University of Akron - Tel Buch Yearbook (Akron, OH)

 - Class of 1979

Page 1 of 300

 

University of Akron - Tel Buch Yearbook (Akron, OH) online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 300 of the 1979 volume:

Q ,ml j 1 978-79 TE L-BUCH STAFF Th U y f Ak Ak Oh Th If h b g y lg? 1, wiv fi'-v .,.. " 115 f-F5 , WW V nftjv -.4:3,.,4 V: . 3 ?ffi'f??1?f'E. " w-'fb 'jypilggf-Q ,,3 JI' Fffg if-4,,'.!f g,. -7 4-1, A ,va ., H, ,U,'1.m.'v-21,-5-ua1 ' . , ,. , ,-I. ...,. .. V '7 '-FH. Ml'-5"'2'5E'rij "" UV-' rd " A' '-' i , ' 'xx W "NM xx ' 1 I ' . .1 V -.-ea." " 'A Y V 1 SCHOOL 'FV' .-'3 I f-rl v,,"fV A --5 l I 5 -'N.,,Ns-i-Q h N- V 'IWW' -mas.. I 1 N ' rx SQ.-.. 1 , ,.., .gg--n-, X www , " iax',,-..J .,,f -K V 'E i rw ,S Z Mr. Charles Pilliod, Jr. Your alma mater is one institution that has made a difference in your life. IVly hope is that each of us who pridefully claim this as an alma mater will continue in years to come to be a part of the university community. lt is my sincere belief that each of us who have been the beneficiaries of this University owe to our alma mater the obligation, as sort of a partial payment, to continue being in- terested in the welfare of the future generations of students who are looking to the university as we did. Each of us must make a contribution, however small or large, to the future success of The Univer- sity of Akron. You will have this opportunity either through the association with the alumni, as a con- tinuing student yourself, through your con- tributions each year to the University, or volunteer- ing for services in some phase of the University ac- tivities in our community. I know that each of you feel as warmly about your alma mater as l do. Its future success will, to a great measure, depend upon our continuing interest. BERNARD I. FROSEN, Chairman The Board of Trustees Mr. Vincent Johnson Mrs. Janet Purnell Robert Kidney Mr. Malcolm Rowan lv1r. Mario DiFederico INSIDE INFO ls there a library expansion in the planning process? Yes. Why is this necessary? The academic heart of any University is its Library and related learning resources. With the growth of the library and the University we are running out of space. Additionally, we need an expanded centralized facility for our related learning resources, including the various electronic media being developed, in order to utilize more effectively the teaching tools our faculty need. When will the expansion take place? It is presently projected for the biennium 1979-81. What additional services will be provided? ilncluded abovel. What will be the future of the Auburn Science Library? ig In A. I 1 1 'Q 5 ,Q V :i 95.34. 5 A O. A. O. A. O.. A. O.. A. O.. A. O.. A. Q. A. This part of our main library will be rearranged an reduced somewhat due to the limitation of spac available in that facility. In all probability, however, it will continue to contain selected highly specializl ed scientific material -l 'I' -I' How many parking decks will be built? lt is expected that possibly two additional decks will be added. When will they be built? It all depends upon the availability of funds. Where will they be built? The next deck is planned for a space south of th new Health, Recreation and Physical Educatio Building east of the present Spicer Hall. Dec number 3 is planned for the area north of Sout Forge Street and west of Lincoln Avenue. How many parking spaces will become available? The size of the two projected decks is still undeter mined. D If N' What is the University's long-range housing goal. Since 1961 it has been the policy of the Universit to attempt to house in residence halls ap proximately 10M of the daytime credit enrollment ln Fall 1979, for example, we expect to house i University owned or leased residence halls ap proximately 2,000 students. Plans for further ex pansion will depend upon enrollment trends an the availability of resources. Will any more dorms be built at the present time. The University does not expect to build additiona residence halls. Will the University purchase any more apartmen buildings? Only if the demand is there AND appropriate facilities are available in the University area. Will there be decreased demands for housing in 1980? It is possible that there will be decreased demands overall for housing in 1980, but it is still uncertain what direction The University of Akron demands for housing will take. In recent years the University's greatest possibility for increasing enrollment has come from the State of Ohio outside of Akron and Summit County. Whether this will continue to be the case remains to be seen. How will the University respond to decreased demands? We'll deal with them forthrightly, continuing to run a fiscally responsible institution and making ad- justments responsive to the needs of our con- stituents. Q Q 'lf - Will Buchtel Avenue be closed from the Fire Station to Guzzetta Hall? lt is hoped that this might be achieved in the not too distant future. However, it is dependent upon con- struction of the Perkins Street Interchange at the north expressway as well as the construction of the Y Bridge which is expected to carry a major part of the traffic from North Hill and the Northern suburbs of the City. If so, why? lt has been the long-range objective, proposed in 1965. that Buchtel Avenue become a pedestrian mall in order that the University might enjoy the ad- vantages of a campus atmosphere. G 'I' -I' Will a fast food service be added to the Student Center? Yes. If so, why? That kind of service has been requested by students and has been successful in the instance of the Dairy Bar and Alteri's. D When will this take place? A. Fall Semester 1979. O.. Where will it be located? A. In the present counter service area of the Chuckery. O.. Who competed for the location? Will it be Hardees? A. Several fast food companies ex- pressed interest and Hardees was selected by a representative committee of students and ad- ministration. If If l O.. Will there be an expansion of the Student Center? A. Yes. Q. Where will this take place? A. It is expected that the Student Center will expand to the West. Cl. What will happen to Simmons Hall and its facilities? A. That subject is still under con- sideration. As other facilities become available on campus, it is expected that the functions now housed in Simmons Hall will be moved elsewhere. O.. When will this take place? A. Within the next five years or possibly sooner. THE ADMINISTRATION ,. K. I ,v - I .g ,xy . 5, , -- 1 TQSL "9 Ir , r l if fl 71. v l have experienced great satisfac- tion through my involvement in the growth and development of this great University. Dean Richard Hansford Vice President Dean of Student Services It has been rewarding to be a part of this fine University over the years. The financial management has changed with growth, but we have been for- tunate in our endeavors to maintain a healthy financial condition. Mr. Wayne Duff Vice President Business and Finance X if. .. 'Yr-:aprt L f . , , I 4 l xi lj 5 l. It has been great to be a part of the expansion of The University of Akron as it became one of the ma- jor universities in the state and probably the most attractive urban campus in the nation. Dr. lan MacGregor Vice President Planning .2-vfllliif My most gratifying experiences have been to watch the ever- increasing quality of our faculty and the development of tools to help faculty and students interact in teaching-learning endeavors. Dr. Noel Leathers Vice President Provost get ll 7- .' " People dominate my great ex- periences at The University of Akron and my greatest privilege has been to be a small part in the success story that is this great University. Mr. George Ball Executive Director University Relations and Corn- munications 52 in: , as .,g,, M i, HCNORS, AWARDS, me sae: 'Wil T352 5 55353225 af? iii ,iii .52 .553 ? i In CynthiafAnasson Merijo Artino George Bandy eg3,3:5iLisa Barbacci Kim Battista Mark Belasic Sherri Qerdanier 5 Janet Elernstein MarthaiBernsteinT? Vanessa Bohaychyk Thomas Borgen , . . -1- - ,553 Heidi geschert t. M52-lfbxiiiiiliifighaneifi Pamela3iBoughtorg Debra Bradford Stephanie Brandes Mgfi obert burns Robert Bu rnside Vyygwygggnafhomasrfi Campbell Cqryalhc E 'Wifi' A ef" Mark Cljzapman 'QE Bev Chuchalovohak Kathy Qliark C3551 Frank Da rr Susan DiCato Dale Dobbins Qtwilliamjilolson l fi Barbaraiflgoyle is Carol Drdek E 'CarolyEDuda M ichael Fawcetff' Christczpher Foote eww David Kitska Debra Klein Kimberly Ksrnentt Lorie Kochenderfer Jane Kuhfeld Jeffrey Lal-iue Jan ,Leighley ,, James Macuga Jeffrey Martin Carl Mazorek Robert Magry-Hannah McCrayx David Mclnally Fraycis Mellott D iajiegme M Ariita Miscevitzh Jonathan Monroe Fred Moseley , A Denise Nendza W Eilisbefh Nagy Scott Numbers Sandra Oliver P9511 Orchoslsyi Mark Pekar - Debbie Polaski John Fieisig is Marilyn Fiegbac Cynthia Fiicei David Roman Patricia Rcrnanik Jefggey Cage Scanlan Kathy Schultz Nancy Shawm M The sysgrn of egucation whichfexists i ourwsocietyzrhas ofiven been criticiied for it failure to fulfill the purposes for which th system was created. Students complain tha a degree does not fully prepare therfi for thei chosen profession, and even more basically that a degree no longer even insures them of position within that profession. While it is true that graduation from a un iversity, by virtue of the large number o gradsuates year, no longer carries thy special distinction of accomplishment it onci signified in years past, the value of a universi ty education has in no way diminished Rather. their aspirations of our graduates i terms of what can be expected from thai education must change. We have entered period in which an education is simply necessity and not a guarantee. We hav entered a period in which the individual, an not degree alone, is the Iggy to his employg menifmand success. The individual must rnaki: and find his own opportunities, for a degr alone is no longer enough. C-i?eater competition, ever increasin technical requirements, and decreasin tolerance of error are all factors which hav indeed made the transition from the universit to the "real-world" much more difficult fo today's graduate. But these factors are no Q glenn Marie Gasser Q I , ttt Richarqigmmore ggi Qqggtig 3 impermeable barriers, for they present n -:-1 2 Euan G?ee,-,horn Douglas Smith obstacle so impossible that determination. Harold Guthrie Lawrence Sobe' desire. and dedication cannot overcom bg? Hannmd g3gi9aSSPerWE them. Hopefully. the time that we have spen 25 "E2iC3rvstaI Vfgrris 'ii - eV were Q fi f - - Q. at Mark Haaw Sherrie Stem at the university has equipped us with th 1 Lori Hayes Wmiam Stewart qualities necessary to successfully mee Q Manha Hicks xy Diane Stinson these obstacles. Herein lies the true value o RosalieQiHiebel Fievmond S3909 education. li 2 SH: Hoskins GEORGE c. sci-ii.ElEn Y, o ert orn . - - - ME Kun Hawk Ama TYOXBHN Co Valedictorian 5 mai UH: if Ni "E Li 25 Patsy Hunley if David TUVUQ an 5' W Julie Hunton GSW Veifh V ifitisarak Namcv Weistjgm W, ""' P55618 Welge 5 Cathy 'Som Cynthia Wirfvel Z 4 'Robert genes David Yoder o. Lewisjlfdd si Tess' be is , 'ff Cfafald S "S Fiuth Kgill Randall Yourchak ' W Diane Kennedy Douglas Zook C as ' In ap 2315?-1 V DEH 5? , tai is s a 'di RECOGNITION . . PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLAFGS Charles Abraham Cynthia Analsson Kim Battista Martha Bernstein Vanessa Bohavchyk usa Burkhart Robert Burnside .Janis Carvalho BQ! Chuckaiovchak Frank Darr fx Clinton Ensworth Lori Faur Richard Gillmore Ellen Greenhorn Harold Guthrie Mark Havir Leslie Hayes Lori Hayes Karen I-Iazlett Patsy Hunley Douglas Keck Fluth Kell Diane Kennedy Karen Kidaloski David Kitska Jeffrey Lal-lue Judith Larko James Maser JoAnn Mays i Robert McClister Mary-Hannah McCray Francis Mellott Anita Misceyich Fred Moseley Mark Pekar Debbie Polaski Timothy Flay , John Fieisig Cynthia Rice Jennifer Rice i David Roman Carla Scanlan Lynn Sedlock Nancy Shaw Curtis Smith Douglas Smith Marlene Tehi' Jon Thompson Anna Troxellei: ' Kathy Walterhouaei Nancy Weisburn Pamela Welge Gerald Young Douglas Zook - "Two roads divergediin a wood. and I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference." meanigggful qggggte by Robert Frost can truly symboigie our past four years as students at The University of Akron. gVVe took the rgad lessgtraveled by. its long andiivvindirfgiipath Qfore us? leading us to a common destination-that of graduation day. To smarty of us graduation marks the begini- ning of new educational routes. to others the starting of new jobs and careers. But for all of us graduation is a roadmark of a goal accomplished along the pathway of life. At times the road became rough and rocky and disxappointrnents and seti backs acted as detours impeding our way. Howevengwith our final destination firmly set and our routeicharted out, we traveled on. Newspapers, books, and magazines served as roadmaps setting our direction. Professors and ministrators were our road signs giving quick and helpful advice to make the journeyga smooth and happy one. The helpful encouragement of family, friends, and fellow classmates served as a boost of energy when our qtginal destinatioiggy. seemed as if it could never be reached? As older student returning after a long period out of school, I found my classes challenging and the competition exciting. ,Maturgty and motivation mores than made up for "rusty" skills. As a black fernale -as well as being older, I ' ."i Y' ,eil . . ' Was Omit 9 7'77l"'0l"'IY'iPfiOUEMQQEE mam classest yet-. found 'acceptance randi friendshi'FISl..ambF!9 my classmates. I We traveled on, andgthat has madetjall the difference. I A Now as graduating seniors of the Class of 1979, we have the hardest road ahead of us-that of materializing our hopes and dreams, Though memories of pastgjaourneys will linger, dreams of the future will pushing us amghead along the pathway iii of life. As co-valedictorian I would like to thank all thosegfwho have helped to make my journey 'iiiii along the educational pathway a happy and fulfilling onemespecially my parents, fiance, and professors who gave me constant sup- port and encouragement. I would also like to thank my parents and all those clubsi and ofganizations who gave me the financial support necessary to reach my goal. leavei3.The Uriiversity of Akroifi. I talie withill me many happy memories of the past and many dreams for thye futureh I would ask that each and everiiione never lose sight of your destination no matter which road or pathway you now choose to follow. It could make all the difference in you your life and in the life of your fellow man. VICKY L. RAYMOND Co-Valedictoryian Nowlithat I have left both the- university and the city of Akron to start another phase of my life in a new state, I would like to say thank you to my good friends both at the university and the city for their support and encouragement. I will always cherish the memories of my time here. Thank you, dear friends. and God Bless You all. y As an outsider from QQ,If1QIl'1Blf country,7Ii,, JOAN L. ANDERSON Qfbundla' VVQICOITEQ EndiiaW16mBil.?ff Akron? EM Co-Valedictorian ' U 'Q I E I ii- I - xiii I :': I New ,9 ,. .:, li I . E 4 E -. Nia as CAMPUS LEADERS RECEIV X Dana L. Bagwell Leslie A. Beasley Deborah A. Bell Rosemary E. Bell Martha L. Bernstein Robert L. Bidinger Douglas A. Bocek Jayne M. Boey Kathleen A. Bommer Donna Bradley Jack A. Bryant, Ill Robert Burnside Christee S. Burridge Michael D. Carr George S. Case Annette L. Cilia Pamela F. Colton Rosanna Castanzo Sheryl A. Dettke James T. Farley Lori A. Faur Neil F. Fogarty Beth A. Harper David F. Heck James F. Helmkamp Mark W. Herbert Brian E. Hoopes A-KEY AVVAR D lUniversity Activities! Patricia L. Hranilovich Nancy L. Hunter Laura A. George Tim H. Johnson Denise A. Kacmar MaryBeth Kase Thomas K. Keehan Christine A. Kolaczewski Ellen D. Kovacevich Karl G. Kramer Glenn D. Krizay JoAnne M. Lancaster Steven R. Lewis Mark l. Maley Carl W. Mazorek Lisa M. McFadden Kevin R. McMahon Deborah B. Merkle Holly L. Messinger Elvin E. Miller Kimberly E. Mitchell Gregory T. Monsanty Michael H. Moore Dan A. Morell, Jr. Carol J. Moots John C. Morton Sandra L. Neely Heather A. Owen Thomas H. Parks Jeffrey T. Pelot Mark H. Pierce John M. Ploenes Frank V. Racco Mark P. Radel Margaret E. Read Richard B. Shaw Kathleen Shisler Kenneth A. Sibert Debra L. Skacal Julia A. Smith Mark A. Smith Leslie K. Spencer Katherine M. Swartz Linda R. Tucci Jeffrey B. Upperman Cary A. Veith Karen L. Verplanck Rosemary Vitavec Gloria M. Vulcanoff Daleen R. Walsh Julie A. Weisbrod Pamela S. Welge Christine S. Williams Patricia M. Yannitti Marla A. Yost RECOGNITION ALSO . . . 'K ic.. . ,L ' . A E i 'ir 'K -it er- l. JN z 1 iliwmiiii AMONG STUDENTS IN WWllllllliil.,..,, AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES V' i X AND COLLEGES Jeffrey G. Bowersox .Jack A..Bryant, Ill Leslie C. Casanova Toni Costa Shirley A. Cool Beth A. Harper David F. Heck Nancy L. Hunter Donna L. Jennings MaryBeth Kase Ellen D. Kovacevich JoAnne M. Lancaster Jeffrey K. Lange Mark I. Malay Thomas H. Parks Margaret E. Reed Mark A. Smith Jeffrey B. Upperman Patricia M. Yannitti "Dare Mighty Things" was the theme of this year's annual "All-Campus Recognition Dinner" sponsored by Mor- tar Board and Omicron Delta Kappa. This event, recognizing students for their involvement in extra-curricular activities. was held on April 21 at the West Hiltop with over 400 attending. The following students were singled out: class officers for 1979-BO were Julie Church, President: Terry Ryan, Vice-president: Elaine Brubaker. Secretary: and Marta Savula. Treasurer. Robert L. Bidinger and Lynne Spagnuolo were named "Outstanding Senior Man 81 Woman." The "Dan Buie Award" was presented to Patricia iP.J.l Russell for her activity in student government. In other activities "Alumni Recogni- tion Awards" were granted to three seniors. Charles W. Walker was recognized for his community group af- filiations: Kaye Kaschak was singled out for her leadership in dorms: and Pamela A. Michalson, the first woman in the U.S. to receive an "Army Air-Assault Badge", was commemorated for her ex- cellence in ROTC. A-Key Awards were presented to 82 students: 19 seniors were named "Who's Who" for their scholastic achievement, leadership. 81 potentiality. 'S r 'K E' -lilnqi ik -7, 5,72 4 ,. K ,- IVIORTAR BOARD I1978-797 The next highlighting event was tapping new members to Mortar Board and Omicron Delta Kappa - the two highest honoraries on this campus. James E. Cox announced Mortar Board tappees as follows: Jerry Frengeu. John P. Gannon. Tracy A. Gordon, Larry P. Hill, John F. Learner, Diane Manson, Deborah B. Markle. MaryAnn Morris, Margaret A. Reymann. P. J. Russell, Keith H. Scheiderer, Barbara J. Simmons, Debbie Skacal, Sharon Thon- nings, Karen Verplanck, Lauren Wentz, and Christine S. Williams. Newly tapped members of Omicron Delta Kappa were an- nounced by Roberti Bidinger. They ware: Martin A. Bezbatchenko, James D. Campbell, George S. Case, Michael J. Dudich. Larry P. Hill, Kaye Kaschak, Thomas K. Keehan, Diane Klug, Lisa M. McFadden, Mr. Richard Neal - a faculty member, Jane T. Paolano, Myrna L. Patton, Guy D. Spiers, Cynthia L. Stonebraker. and Ronnie Tum- burrine. OIVIICRON DELTA KAPPA 41978-79l SENIOR SCHOLARSHIP STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND LEADERSHIP SERVICE Cindy Anasson Martha Bernstein James E. Cox, Jr. Ellen Greenhorn Leslie Hayes Denise Kacmar Frank Klink Ellen Kovacevich Jean Lestingi David Meade Mindy Morse Terri Mugrage Jane Paolano Mark Pierce Kathy Shisler Lynne Spagnuolo Cary Veith Charles Walker Patti Yannitti Edith Bausher Weisend Andy Zeldin AND IVIORE HONORS. Cindy Anasson Robert Bidinger Jayne Boey Dale Dobbins Frank Darr Steve Dubravcic Carol Gannon Karen Hill Deborah Hutchings Frank Klink Ellen Kovacevich Karl Kraber JoAnne Lancaster Sandra Parks Tom Parks John Ploenes Mark Pierce Rebecca Slayman Anna Stofer Jeffrey Upperrnan Charles Walker Marla Yost BRUNCH AT THE Another highlighting event was Brunch at President Guzzetta's residence. Twice a year President and Mrs. Guzzetta invite Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, and other ac- tive students from campus or- ganizations to share a delightful afternoon vvith the Guzzetta's at their spaciously attractive home. After lunch President Guzzetta discusses current university issues such as the implementation of the semester system, the proposed expansion of the student center, and other con- troversial issues. Approximately 'IOO students attend brunch. The Community and Technical College offers a broad range of oc- cupational education programs to prepare people for professional and technical careers in business, and in health and public service fields. These programs, which require two years of full-time study and lead to an associate degree, are offered in 23 fields. In addi- tion to preparing recent high school graduates for entry employment, the programs provide part-time, in-service training for persons seeking growth and advancement within a career field. Dean Weyrick Community and Technical College The College of Business Administration provides a balanced education with at least 40M liberal arts courses required for all undergraduate business degrees.,This im- proves the national image of graduating students well- qualified for job entry employment and development into top executives. This year the college enrolled the highest percentage on campus of University Honors students and SAT high scorers. This indicates a better prepared student body preparing for top executive positions available in diverse careers in the 21st century. Recent years have been banner ones for the colIege's ten student organizations. They provide many oppor- tunities for students to participate with the coIlege's facul- ty and business practitioners in professional associations. This fall 1320 men and 450 women enrolled as un- dergraduates. In addition, 275 men and 63 women were in the evening graduate programs which include the MBA and Masters of Science in Accounting and Management. The college will continue to explore new courses and schedules to service the increasing demand for collegiate business education in one of the nation's most respected business colleges. Dean Dunlap College of Business 'l.-54 K. +L waits N' Nu.-ag' ff it la Q... 'li --ul ACADEMIC DEANS To provide educational opportunities for those who must earn their livelihood during the day, The University of Akron offers Evening College credit courses servicing about 7500 students. Students may earn associate. baccalaureate, masters, and doctorate degrees through evening programs. Practical experience, plus evening classes, presents a completely challenging program for diverse students who contribute significantly to the quality of their education. Dean Carrino Evening College and Summer Sessions The College of Fine and Applied Arts serves the un- iversity's urban mission through teaching, research, and service for students and the community through local, state, regional and national arenas. Dedicated to the highest quality of education, the faculty assist in the transmission of the cultural heritage and in the develop- ment of individual potential through participation in the arts and professions. Students may select programs with a wide range of diversity such as ballet, theatre, art, home economics and family ecology, music, speech pathology and audiology, mass-media communication, and social work. The college provides a variety of dis- tincrtive professional opportunities through its speech and audiology clinics, agency and hospital field work. child care programs, experimental dance ensemble, gallery exhibitions, rhetoric and writing programs, broadcasting opportunities, theatre productions, and performance ensembles. Dean Knieter College of Fine and Applied Arts The College of Nursing believes that the primary goal of the professional nurse is to assist individuals, families, groups and communities to attain, maintain, andlor regain an optimal level of health and to be supportive when op- timal levels of health can no longer be achieved. Professional nursing practice is germane to any setting where health maintenance or support is a goal. To accomplish the stated goals, the College of Nursing offers an educational experience through baccalaureate, masters and continuing education programs. Dean DeYoung College of Nursing In conformity with the goals and purposes of the university, the functions of the General College are as follows: the general Studies Program, which is an integral part of the General College, aids the student in developing as a human being and as a worthy citizen. This program supplements the specialized education the student will receive in the degree granting college of his or her choice. The General College, through the Division of Counseling and Ad- vising, also provides the student with assistance in adjusting to collegiate life and direction in program and course selection in concert with his or her individual and professional goals. , Dean Fluebel W A General College ' d The Mission of the College of Education is to prepare teachers for positions in both regular and special classrooms in elementary and secondary schools. In addi- tion, administrators, supervisors, counselors, and school psychologists receive their preparation in the college. Emphasis is placed on developing knowledge of a ma- jor field and instructional techniques and materials, actual experiences in the areas of preparation, understanding the learner and the learning process and the acquisition of in- quiry techniques and human relations skills necessary in dealing with a broad spectrum of individuals. Dean Barker College of Education f gf' N., Q-' . lqdfi if - kg . Enrollments in the College of Engineering have con- tinued to rise during the last six consecutive years. A total of about 1,500 undergraduate engineering students enrolled during the current year represented a ninety-two per cent increase over a six-year period, or eleven per cent per year compounded annually. Bachelor's degrees granted by the College have also increased dramatically, hitting an all-time high of 162 degrees awarded during the past year. What is even more important, all engineering graduates found high-paying jobs. Dean Major College of Engineering The Buchtel College of Arts and Sciences is. in many ways, the heart of the university. It offers a solid core of basic courses in the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Almost every student at the university takes some work in Arts and Sciences: many go on to specialize in one of the programs offered in the College. Students may earn baccalaureate, masters, or doctorate degrees, or they may work for interdisciplinary cer- tificates that range from Environmental Studies or Com- puter Science to Afro-American or Soviet Area Studies. The college offers a great variety of academic majors. many including a combination of theoretical and prac- tical knowledge. For example, Medical Technology and Political Science offer internships: English may include Business Writing as well as literature and criticism, modern languages provides opportunity to study abroad and use the language of the major. The College of Arts and Sciences offers a varied program based on the best knowledge of the past and practical experience in the present to prepare students for the opportunities of the future. Dean Griffin College of Arts and Sciences I K COIVIIVIUNITY. . . N H ir-. , li ni. Intro. to Fire Science and Lettering . . . Advertising Photography ....... . . . . . Real Principles . . . ....... Cobol . Data Processing . . Quantity Food Service . . . . . Elements of Distribution . . Basic Chemistry ....... . Circuits Lab . . . Lab ....... Application1 . . ....... Business Medical Terminology . . .Commercial Air . Business Machines .... Technical Draw- . . Construction ..... Advanced AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE da' THE GENERAL COLLEGE ft-2 x, X, X Eastern Civ . . . English Comp . . .Institutions. . .Western Cult . . Intro to Public Speaking ....PhysEd. . . . . . .Effec- tive Oral Communication .... Natural Science ..... flfl 1iQ,, A-J Principles of Biology . . . Consumer Economics . . . Intro. to Linguistics . . .The Eastern Roman Empire. . . Analytic Geometry-Calculus . . . Descriptive Statistics . . . Intro to French Literature . . . German Conversation 81 Composition . . . American Philosophy . . . Concepts of Physics . . . Government Si Politics . . Developmental Psychology . . . Social Problems . . . Polymer Science . . . Astrophysics . . . Physical 81 En- vironmental Geography . . . English Literature . . . Classical Archaeology . . . Organic Chemistry 81 Biochemistry. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES G 9 0 U ,Exif ra ,.. , , K A , 7 -. ,,,3, -5 -1.25E5 ET X Q -' ,gx ---- Q t f -x jj Y, ,,,, ---H E --- 'W h V i iff? 3 Engineering Fundamentals. . . Material 81 Energy Balances . . . Plant Design . . . Statics . . . ln- troduction to Mechanics of Solids . . . Theory of Structures . . . Steel Design . . . Circuits . . . Electromagnetic Fields . . Physics of Electronic Devices. . . Control Systems . . . FORTRAN . . . Engineering Graphics . . . Thermodynamics. . .Engineering Analysis. . .Construction Quality Control . . . Construction Formwork. r ff ul E5 1 ,,-.-.Q F. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING L... -7 4' Vx I 'x il-X. M l ,F '.-.x'g4.,,,G, - ian. .R- ' -1 v 'fa E -f - -e-L-me A X5 .X , 1 W' --Y-,Y mYi?Ai W ,G E QE i 3 .- -1, " 1' J' ..1 ,H , , , .. E .L -l ig "' if? ' ' L -W .- , ..,, i -Y EL -. '- - 15 T J: Y i: , , : i ,, 1 + i-,L ,j . . 1 7 ?1if- E ? , L f fi. - f Y V ' , , " Y Y ' ,l : F 1 Y ' : Y Y ' gL i g f Q 5 i V h . - 'i 1 'fs -9 V , V - ,E lm "" -ig Y- "KE:-I 2 hr- A 3 + A ,i ,- W Q - -.af . -, 4 1 ' 2 -i , - lk- 3 ' - G - g 11 4 : fn 3.4 L COLLEGE Human Development 81 Learning . . . Educational Measurement 81 Evaluation . . . Children's Literature . . . Student Participa- tion . . . Early American Education . . . Principles of Diagnostic Teaching of Reading . . . Developmental Reading in the Content Areas . . . Principles of Secondary Education. . .Instruc- tional Techniques in Secondary Education . . . Field Experience . . . Instructional Techniques in Technical Education . . . Fun- damentals of Track 81 Field . . . Physical Education Activities . . . Theory 81 Techniques of Basketball . . . Resident Outdoor Education . . .CommunityHygiene. . .Per- sonnel Services in Schools . . . Human Relations in Education. . . Developmental Characteristics of Behaviorally Disordered ln- dividuals. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS Accounting l . . . OBA . . . . . . Marketing Principles . . . . . . Business Policy .......TaxationI.. Auditing ........... Commercial Bank Management . . . . Business Lavv . . . Advertising ....... . . . Cost Accounting . . . . Organizational Behavior . . . Management Problems . . . Controllership Problems .... Personnel Management . . . . .Business Finance. . . Credits and Collections ..... ig r-rg. E' Us nv' 2' x N-9 ff gg Q33 F I aj 'ew-Qeflgfftx P' I . ' .wif 'xi- .f-X.X Ethical Persuasion ..... . . . . .Phonetics. . . . Music Theory .... Intro to Jour- nalism . . . Textiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sight Sing- ing l . . Photography . . . In- tro. to Fladio and TV .... Poverty in the U.S ...... Audiology . . . . News Writing . . . . . Publications Production .... Elem. Class Piano .... . . Social Work Practice I ..... Tuba . . . . Drawing I . . . . . Family Housing . . Speech in America . . . .Design. . . .Lettering and Typography. . . . M. ff J FINE AND APPLIED ARTS fh fm W: Q5 1 Af, COLLEGE OF NURSING A WWWWW! iff X4 'ww A, - fi.. Introduction to Nursing ....... Microbiology ..... Adult Nursing Theory . . . . . . . .Nursing ofChiIdTheory. . . . .Psychology. . . . .Seminarin Nursing . ........ ...Nursing Pathophysiology. . . . . Chemistry I . . . . . . .. ' Issues in Nursing ...... Special Topics in Nursing .... Independent Study 0 Apu Jmng ...... Seminar in Nursing Lab ......... -gals. f-'hw J-A'f'1 ' 5?'g?525..'f 'fi A F 51 fr: gi' rf,-4. Q '-, ' A W Q ,. " - -':4', ., M '- , Ar.. .-.. .WV " F'14 v. , I. .-11 :1 L.: -. Z N Q-. ,, WA 'x-jg, -- X H N +J'l:.NQfL!f1 13.3 Q .-- ,. H? ,3fJ'LA:,T-.lkru WG? Yfflgw V, .1 'fggfvjil A- ' ' , '-sua, I V , , L y i- ,gy 'V A mf? - ga f" .if N , ' . " 'f' 4 ' I S'- 532. 5 sf , gi sf iw:-A JDS: aff 'Z R L , V ,f .- W 1 1 . 1, -,, i ,, ,-.. V .. 4. , Hg, C,k4, , J l Q U H i ,.... ,,...- .fc V '- A ' v . .55 " 7, l ,xx 5' L-'43 'K . - 'T ,l., 1 1 1 X I r A,, - I . V. . tr' Ln-b Emi., 1 5, Q 3 , , f , ' fag L ' :,. , . . ,, ,, ..- . - lj ' - Q r 'V 5 ... I wi-5. ---f I "' ' . - . my ' ., N - x 5 . is-gs X Fi lf 5 ,: , f - '.Ff'?Q3gr , K. 5535: ' ' H I -45215 ' - i, V ff- u,f"" Q ' f 'Nfl - : 1 'fr' , ' E -5 A G ' ' . 5 fb A - f 'N?. ' 'H . " V .9 war: EVENING COLLEGE Qsskfgsf Non traditional students . . . dedication . . . sunsets . . . returning to school . , . continuing education . . . working during the day . . . second career . . . going home in the dark . . . perseverence . . . 'A - uxi ere is ia .N i,fQ'V 1 - ,. Me...- ,Q .1 fi. 1.1-i ' I4 . -Z, x A, linff Ykifii ilqy .w 5, v, V-v lx-WF? 1. xl - ,Vl,1'1m. '15, K. '13 ff' ,,f.g.' X '..,fff,,- :JL ki lf'r' 4 QEEEES :EYE W' . Pm , ,, in V I .f J CHAPIN AND LETTERIVIEN ATTRAC The performance of Harry Chapin left his fans quietly contented and the rest of the audience genuinely impressed. The quality and creativi- ty of Chapin's talent matched his finesse and style of bringing the crowd together in participation. The casual atmosphere and informality left for an enjoyable evening. IVIELLOW CROW G! 1 Q Wa .Bl- 1 if l ' Once again the Lettermen won the hearts of old and young alike. The blending of voices from the trio renewed nostalgic memories of oldies but goodies. The recent released hits added a dif-ferent light and as always the performance shone on. Pls W N, Q2 5 ' jg .4 4 x. AKRON RETURNS TO TRADITIONAL HOIVIECONIING "Q-f"Wy V l 1 Associated Student Government decided to return to the traditional Homecoming activities at Akron this year. Homecoming week, held October 22-28, started it's ac- tivities on Thursday with music by Bob Beals and Bill Bauer spon- sored by SCP. That night the cam- pus came alive with the torchlight Parade from the Ballet Center to Jackson Field. Many good floats were entered with the winning float being a Volkswagon decorated as Zlppy's head spon- sored by Spanton Dorm Govern- ment. A pep rally on Jackson Field and a party in the Chuckery follow- ed the parade. The highlight of this year's festivities was the Homecoming Semi-Formal held at the Tangier's Banquet Boom on Friday, October 27. Organized by Maria Yost, the dance featured music by the Lou Ciriano Combo. About 336 couples enjoyed hors d'oeurves and dan- cing. The Zips triumphed over Northern Michigan 27-7 before 10,017 fans. Alison Hach and Mark Williams were crowned queen and king. Their court was as follows: Betty Scott and John Learner. Sybil McCoy and Glenn Krizay, Debra and William Young, and Tina Alvino with Scott Dressler. DEPARTMENTS COMBINE TO PRODUCE TWO OPERAS "ve 1 ' V' X A :mud K A? f . -'Y ' .. ff' f- .' ' .ti . N ,. X, aWiLj?4..i' . ' , 1.1 .'-J uf! 'xfj A 1 x X253 'i 5311 .V' X' .f'f43mHyr :-Q. bw f f T' f I X yu- V , A Vx wry-11 bn-nv .,,.u r- ,, , ' :1 -' -J ' J: 1 1 ' L, j,nri1J 1L1fIi15f:1.w+Q.'zxwQmi in wr:-qzgnq-Uv !.f:'?g'K,x. Il., 5 I., ' 4' ri '. 3 .-a,.:l'l' irwl Q' .' 1, fa E f x l Q93 1 i ..:::.:+ f 1 5 ilxntxxg' ' ' 'en x W4 V ! 'fvf , .- gt :fig Avi ,LA I as f 'Q -, if X951 D by E 1. -- K ..g , ,..- , '55 Lf i X r'-.LJ 4E""'- J" """".. " --X 14. 'U Mas 3 palsy '1 3 nn, 15 x. 7,-. V-4. V ' 4""m . L. Gy 1 Mn, kills A 1.,,-'R er 0 0 ?,r-f-A .gg- 6 if X ,gn V4 4 'Q V A ' W in .Q iff 1 f ' ".'i-139. X 52' Fantastic, Super, Magnificent, Ex- cellent, Stupendous, Colossal. Great, Dynarnite, Superb, Terrific, Povverful, Captivating, Motivating, Spell Binding. What more can be said about the Michael Stanley Band?! BLACKSTONE AND NIAPES Excitement and surprise were ap parent by the performance of Blackstone Jr The children were held spellbound as they anticipated what happened next The act was enjoyed by all On Oct 14 James Mapes had eager subjects to help demonstrate hypnotism. The key factor is relaxa- tion and it is "nothing to fear." The moving rhythm of Chuck Mangione had the crowd swaying with the beat. One will never forget the super sounds coming from his trumpet. It was this style of playing that made it a night to remember. IVIANGIONE AND FERGU SON HIGHLIGHT "YEAR OF THE JAZZ " Maynard Ferguson and his orchestra proved that the "year of the jazz" was long overdue. The re- cent concert brought a surge of energy to the enthusiastic crowd. The blending of the sounds ofjazz, latin, and rock music, gave way to the versitality, talent, and charismatic qualities he and his orchestra displayed with utmost ease. MEMORIES COME ALIV "Grease" and "The Wiz" were two of this year's reenactments of nostalgic moments. These musicals brought reality and fan- tasy together so one viewed the best of both worlds. F"'9'7El filing HAMUQ' " A VOICE FROM THE GHETTO " The last play of the fall semester, "The Me Nobody Knows," brought the end of 1978 to a memorable close. Based on the book, the play was a collection of goals, fantasies, and enduring hardships which fac- ed many of New York's ghetto children. The cast was able to bring vitality, enthusiasm, and reality together into focus. The play was evidence of hard work among the members and directors. Their ex- citement and energy was projected onto the audience. Truly a job well donel CAMPUS LIFE .f Ei R L :A-,- ,--. ,Ml - V. tl W Lk . "XXV Y- Y , -. - 1 Em' - ,-,, 12 W -, V 3 . r i f ' Y-Y .ffli gf ft '. LQ' il .,,,Q?v:l -.,,L.,. ,- v,,. . Ji gr- '11 :zzrf ., '. j:,,',1f ' - 1 ,--V.. Y ,::. - -T:-1 7- -Tv I -QTY!-P. 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BUCHTE LITE C' Ewa ff ,bf I INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 1 1 ' V Wxfif- ' rf. Q . fi-1 -.IIff:?g'i53ff:Yi!7E?5f52"" 'Q 12? 2'-' 11 1' WE L Wg ilu I A ' ' f aff' W 5-r ' I A N X 'I I W "- :C ll! , V I ?'517i X Fe' ,.4 ag I V: -'11 ,4 Q Q is Q I in " S. llfllfqii '- 1 ,f .Y -1 if' L53 V Eg: F Y yu lk!! , 1- I - Lg I I' ,V L 4 ' L Rn 3.1. V Y ,Q- 66 BLACK UNITED STUDENTS N ' 1 '-iw . 42'-'NITEUB J Al I 1 - 4 WTAE' I -1. :l I "GL: ,A : w ' if ON CA:-APU-S OFF CAMPLA 5 HINU T5 .. ,gs ' 'fbi it 1 5 M 5 3 T 3 1 H J 45 .f , gn rd . 7 ' ,-H . -3415 442-1" ' --T .W A :asm s'r',v'm-p,' 4 . New 2 , 52 67 -Twp I ..:...'1gf,w:.f.' ' ' ' ., A T 'EI f Ms-a--A.. ' UQ Q M 'H 11- T, V . . OFFICE EDUCATION ASSOCIATIO , p A N ,N hYbr , 1: .. l I P '1 E I x L 1 12 ,525 u X? , h 1 ,4 ' ? ,I 5- 1 -L -Y gm... - 1 1 1 ,. A . 4, 1 " 1 f ' .. wfiL4 " 'A -1A 1.1 I -1 -QV -3, T ' ' . 1.fL!.- 1" ""-g- -1 g . 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"' z . 1 Y L - l 'N N245 L Qvixxiw 1 I K 'x 3 A I X X K Md x ,Wm " Wewlayxif xxx!! 5 Q 6 4..? ,Ep NURSING STUDENTS CLUB NSTITUTE OF ELECTRONIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS M.. WAUP - 5--41 .44 TOASTMASTERS ,, ,f , we it Nf' . 4 'NI x . mi . it r' " nf 761' , z bp 1 .3 4- qi. fmt' FORENSIC UNION AROUND CAMPUS " 'T' 4 if-51:'3'gfj2.fw rp-"YHF?S?3i-f,1wqf'T ff-f'!"'T'T'f? lu H fagiizr H H1 gi ' 4, f .rg - i , u , - N 5 Nik-,Ai .--1 . N, ,JK :!' ' . ,. 4. A -SJ 'l LL .,, 1 --1 'T.,g,- .41 i , L -5152" - - . ' fy 1 Ul f - Q , I, 1-,,.Lg.m:g-,. f if m m wwwmwwSwy:ywJ1L 'F-'. - ' n ifijv x 1'jf: zi'f E I , 2 A M" ,'b.Q7:f3if+,- ' ' ,S-252 Ll,--' -4g,.V.:f?EA, , . Q K-X 11 1, L It gr,fi4.?'i 3 gf. Q I, All 7jz'.3.-.- Elvi yr,-If - . f ' - 1 X ,.v1 x!4f i li , .4 uf V .- r' ' Sw-.DJ -Q5 ,3.g-w,,:Iz.grn.-13. F" 'Pg' ' ' , . Aww- , ,-- 1--'Stix' -Tu .,i-EEA ..3"f Fr. , ' g , , - '- , , - . 4 1 - - M ' - 1' ,Q J. :wa-fwL--1rf'--- fi -. '. E'-uwzff, A - va-.gf .A .4 J. 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'Q5 ff-,fb ,. , ' '- N ' P 1- f - .xg 1 ...S.,-gry .N gun' ....,. 2--' -- -'g. .,,, -'-twat . vi'-J' , -' Ugg- 4 Qt '1. ' V-. f-fe-.rg - 'f 'ff j -- N ' ' L' f --' . ---va?-QF-wap., ,--sg! 1 . .' 61 . 1' My px li k W , f? I N. - .,,,w iwgf,-, N. --Q' as Y f 9 ' .. s. .J A f " 'L THOSE WINTER MDNTHS FASHION SHOW B.U.S 1979 gf! U Mei '?K9 - I AN D STYLES ,fi ff X x N .awe se' -P2 i ,, f-.-F . 'f' ' if-W V " " tl- H' .....ww, P mx - ' 'AX li, .QM 5 Q 1 ' C -,V t -. Q-, w ,fb ff nw 242 1-,Q . " ' ' Y M V g. be 7 " ij., , V - - s 1... .w ll 5'1" ' ,: J nm V3 il 31 X WN V hw? "' ff 'W I Qiiav 1 f . 1-,kin M? kg' 1 , A V1 Af' I I ' , RQ Q Q .11 Q gi TTISE' gg, 3. xx + lift .cf A ' ig, I 1 X ,pr win . f i ff' lquzn. ' sw X - 1 ' , L T ' - '- L+ sf., 7? f' 2 f vu xi? ,L 1 Q 'J , f ,. V A ' ' 2 1' 'Z f .1 35 J N 1 ' - 'J' 1 1 N5 xy K ' 1 ' 'Q g"f.al XX? 1 asm ..' I 5 s v 4 I V. 'l""v:'fv-vm'-lv.. : A - u-:QQ--u .151 ' , A ' ' , 'Lg -' 4.5" lv:-.X , A ' Q A .3 ,P g ' Ei I " . .- ,. .f 4.97 Y 1 2 'Q . n . 1' ' ' ' ' 'iff . , 5' i' . 5, I .X ' 1 F ' 1' A 2 1 ' 'Tai r 1 - 1 -, ! .! 4, 14... .1 . :V.:Lk,,vv?5- -S, ,. ' - "If 5 A x A 'JP FT mfg- f 'vfv,fsQ' '4-P f . 1 ' ' A I- ff .Q 1 iff- - I , ' 1 ,QT W V igmfkfh-R-1 !? 0 'Te!?59g'M lf' I I' A -i 1 fa, I f G If-,1 I .ru "s . -n,.,,4 S440 'ft " I 1 A fan u- i. 4.-7 f gf' ' , - ' - + r2,Q'P- Q-4 f '1 fi V: T' Lg. f I I 'Y' . , , NJ-v ' -41 -91, If af. , f ,I -V Q 1 Xp ,U FI K I .415 ' 'x '-' X gr. 'f 1 . lf? n - - ' 1 ' 1 X . I , I ug fxx ' QUQ Q . f il 1 L . JN' 'Y K Y In 4 - 14 N ' ' x , . . 3 ' 1 3,5 .- ffzig - V? u, E . ff , figx , fl f 's X It I r 45" I P M n 0 OT RIFR ENEA SD PTS' LHIT AED' Y N0 s AN L FTW 5 ,gn , SX 'Ur srfx uk Z0 f "" x W0 J ai 3 rs N X 40" asf.-,QJL IVIUSIC IVIAKE H JU KJ THE WORLD G0 RCUND , . L . , .Af + 51 '191, ,,Wf 'fi we f M 9 ,, ESQ? f ,jn',31," 'v AT- 2 -X,-'.. ..'-.11 15 5' -" f' Qu If - 1.' -.QVLQL , ' .gn ., "r,' "", ,1f ,.,. nn: ln 4 7 .gi , e , 1' r -l N Q 1 1 -F . V- .,fg:.-fffi. " NN f., - A: Z V, "f:+, f '.-'-g-1.4 195,50 . 4: 'I V "r ' ," .. ?-,,-A--.-.LL -A. HS MQ? ,4aa:1pfy' A . , 5g5 HQ:-'Jalan 3 uv" 85 IVIAYWE E K '79 1 J.. 3. .4"a' 1 5 :IQ Z1 jj- Il- Q ' i lx- . ,e, U 1 4 5 I ll Z Qlj -I C -II IZ I ll I May Week Calendar Health Day - Nursing Club Blood Drive - Greeks Food Special - Chuckery Intramural Play - offs begin Evening Bowling, Specials lall weekl Dance Troupe 8r All Gospel Choir - B.U.S. Tues., May 8th Blood Drive Icont.l Intramurals Icont.l - tennis, volleyball, tug-6-War Food Special - Chuckery ROTC Display, Demonstrations outside, etc. Big Apple Night - Jr. IFC Idance contests, beer specials, etc. Idayl - Bertha Raye Iart display!lect.l f B. U. S. Weds., May 91h Intramurals lcont.l V evening tennis International Day IArabs, Greeks, African - style shovvsl Black Culture Day Art Display ' Evening 50's Dance - in Robertson IRHPBI Thurs., May 10th Intramurals Icont.l Game Room Special Icontests between organi- zations, groupsl Chuckery Special Townhouse Night Ispecials, etc.l Outdoor movie IPsychol - after Townhouse l10:OOl Rock Band in Chuckery during afternoon Fri., May 1 1th Classes cancelled from 12:00 noon Great Lakes Band Concert' l12-4:00l RHPD, Beer!Hotdogs, etc. - IASGI IIVIay Day Picnicl' Superstars IJackson Fieldl Teachers v. Student Intramurals games May week'OueenlKing Carnival Ibooths, etc.ldunking machine, tricycle Evening Parking Lot Party Jazz Concert Illllemorial Hall gyml B.U.S. IVIAY DAY . . . ,l gill' f Ill I El .Fl IT' ' F ig I, E - E H f-Q. L nun -1- THE GRAND FINALE OF MAYWEEK ' ?'- Q.. 1 , fy i 1 g A ,1 I F . Z K 19' , 5 f Q U E f :Q 'R 1' .px ,, W w A x ""! Y "Time waits for no man," and the University is not one to wait when it comes to expansion. With the completion this year of the new ultra modern Knight Chemistry labs and Mary Gladwin Hall. the Univer- sity continues to grow. New ad- ditions to the University scene in- clude: construction of a new park- ing deck and also a new dormitory. The city of Akron also continues to grow with the University. rebuilding many of its bridges which connect Downtown with the University proper. A look towards the future includes the building of a new Physical Educa- tion facility. Farther down the road to the Ultimate University include expansions in the Student Center facility. and Library expansions. From that point on, who knows? Only time will tell. gm- QNMS4 I Mgufii 1 i "" it L 1 H., e.,-Ha, .3- -.iisfi gun 2139-QE Em E' n T-TU! gm e EI. T,-. u 21 Dill e ll ii is .ig 1 -1 ii E , , i, UE H51 5' -T, CONSTRUCTION F, -V 4.4 4.2. Q ' "'3"", 1-3- ni'-' FOR TODAY AND TOIVICRRDW Quai ,,,,,. ,Edina W 3 ak 7' Tin. CONTINUING WITH TOMORROW . ,,,l,15i' .V -' ' , , Q55 Ia ibaiyh u if-helm V, . ---Vi. el O T 5 f ' I fe- In cfm f- ' .. f-gQ"'i-Vff sr' Q ' - -w, ' .4 ph 'QL Ia pf" O-I I " 'L ggrpfief-f 1 , g i Z- ,L-V T 'Wx aff, in-il l nu I Illl Ill In "" 'IH um un my lqllll Illl llll Illl un ml Z' T VT v 1 Tffiii' 15,f,If EFT' , s.,1,:- ' .'QF-TQ sb. -, 4- 2'5" L . - ,Q-rpm .fg,ggg,,,- v '7.-ee4'?f'1!"'1 fif' '74 ?"i" "1 ",',ZTi'f'gg.,5-5:2-iv I""'f -+f,,.,.,-.3-5' .gy '1ffw?'fI":Wf. 3,11-""'k"fiZf,-uv""'f57"2'.4ff'f-S-' 53222. L.":",,5f"?9 'U'-. vi' fr2fj1F1',-rgrlf'-'---:f,+-1'-. 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' 1, .C 2 -.r PAR KS-S HAW 8 1 2 On Voting Day 1673 voters came out and let their "voices be heard". At the finish it was Tom Parks with 812 votes and oppo- nent Dan IVlorell with 783 votes. Due to the fact that there were 78 write in votes Parks did not get 50- plus-1 percent of the vote, the amount he needed to win. Technically, the vote could have been invalidated, or called a run off and a new election scheduled. The Superior Court of A.S.G. was called in to make a ruling on the case. At the first meeting of new senators, Chief Justice Thomas Gearhart gave the court's decision. The court voted unanimously to uphold the election as valid and make Tom Parks the new president of A.S.G. Parks ran on a platform that was basically founded on representation of the student body. Some key issues that Parks said he would like to work on include a student bank and better programming at E.J. Thomas. NIQRELL-HDFFIVIAN 783 -any '10- ,Z 'Iii is it '-f' .fu-ff 'P' in 5 -' "' .i 3.2524 l. iii? 3- .-- .-- --.-: -N EL---is-H-' -- W Y 1--Q -:Jiwv -i A lkf- E'l'..' ' 1 H H.. '...l4 4 gf-M g-f'-. i-.-5 FOR fl-q 1' - IH B is 6.9 63+ .W QSM V it sc Q tot-:NT . 5:55 w . IDENT ge.. t .i ,, i d for lllifll' ' PR ESlDENT'drid SET' vice PRESIDENT ,. ..-B... -.i.,i....... . Every year we seem to get a presi- dent who wants to do everything but ends up doing very little. Proof of this is in the amount of students who go out and vote. This lack of interest on the part of students for voting in A.S.G. elections is probably due to the fact that a lot of promises are made PRR . SHAQS but very few are carried out. A lot of talk and very little action. Hopefully Tom Parks will change this trend -around and get A.S.G. back onto the road towards a respectable student government. Whether or not any of these hopes and dreams ever become reality, only time will tell. Fred Andersky -'51 Associated Student Govern- ment, the representative body of the day undergraduate student, serves as a communication link between The University of Akron administration and the students. Mark Maley A.S.G. President 1978-1979 X., OVERNIVIENT FOR STUDENTS Y STUDENTS T 's W, 'I .i .L 'Ili' fa 1- -... lil, I, b b 1 FUQ ?T'fl'f , QQQTEQEZQ P., A Q - 1-f-4----:ff 7.Z,'L.gQ' ,. :f.:,fvif-'Q gg P 'l 1 Q , ,z fa Q6-fzfs L F - f Ei ' , Q - 1' ,J--'S f 5 Lyn, 2, ' T 4 ,I - K, . J - L . f '12-f i 51: ,3wr"'-'L- 1 ,L L M P .Ln , ,,,:,7f -- giggle ,. b 1 ,.. ,J w ,. ' ' '-F" " ' 4i' '-f - Lifii -am., 'S'-'N-.,g,g' 5 SJ., . , , - .Y . bg bb A , . 1 ,-. 'A 4. 1 ..f--' T' 1: Q J ,:: I P15 sl nil, 5 -gf f 'Ui f -f Lg. N A L , V ., Q F, 'Q X ,Z g.l - :s-1' 1. .' My J' flu 'lr The Warm sun . . . fresh cut grass . . . cutting classes . . . watching the girls go by . . watching the guys go by . . . spring break . . . looking for a summer job . . . 'UI was qv . G.-u. ' it -'Q ,f KN -L. . gi ff' F F wif' V, Lo RUSH GREEKS New Q2 AND PARTY . . . AND RUSH " ' NSY '12 Pa: - - - 1- fi-nf H2-N-f,, Q -. . .g,, ' , , ' fl Q1 Hiya sf-rg ig. - L . 3, , Z V 1 'Q 1 . b ,M gl , N M Q gm if , .4 -Mu., v Q..-I , , 1 3-.La V I . x -- 4- gif, www! .ML , fl. E Q I", ' " if . se- ff, . , J ,?.- e. fs, ,e"' 19 be f: 'YW 5 x l If L -, - if M ,amia- Q- H Sin 3 1524125-Q' n Q 9 u v 4 s Q l BUT lT'S NOT ALL FUN . . . ARE TOO MN ff-',,' ' -Is ff 1 Y ,, .15 iff? H. ,1 .- gg ' 1 n . J 4. L E5 , -155- fulii' 7 5512911 3 x.L '5f2i:. 1 2 f ' ffgi ' ' ' ef . 5:-s 'T j ": r: Lz:-.f y ff W 'J 'S ' rw , . K3 -. . me 1 :'? , :I , x J' . lr:- Tar ,... I FTW a X 'nfl Q , 41 I . Q fi 'Wi' ffl . - ,A I NJ r ,x ,SQ Q f 1 Lila' gi' lf ' '- I .3 1 , 93, 1 1. -z ', J Q il. L-.. 'W six 8 A 5 . 'jk 4,5 W. gvlifi 'gf V 35 123: as rl V- ' r V' 5 5 9? I , 5' - , - Q-ei , Q f-. . 9- -5 vi, ,N f , -V , 3 -ff 5? ,P Q , iw" ' 'W f' 1. x ., -, Q, wfqkav' -..-' 5 . ' Ik. 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A X 'R H'-m QQ.. 4.3.41 .. 1 .4 , i N H ,M , ,ygy N2 GREEKS SHOW STYLE AND TALENT 's I T Y I - - ii li, ' S 5 - 1, : 4 A if E 5 ' 4- -fgfff 'ihfwf '15 " ,, XX Q., 1,4 w. .1,,,,1fl-- "f 1 ,LJ-f I 1 L4---E 2.'::.,A1f-ff . W' ff If 'gi .- L5 fs 4 5, gin" Z' - 14" '41 a ,L ,+. zur. .4 -'Inky K ' TE, Y ' N. . -3 ' :Q y ' A V 1 . L , :-2 It .I ,L ' I F V Y L H I Jfgrff, .g,1-vJL:4V-Jigga! lf-ini-V -1- 1 Y I 4 --0 1 ..- , 9 p In as M. +P,- ' Y-'TfTZg,Q::f3gA,, ', .. --ir-.gg-f..i -rfg,L:ff::.f- l V J-3-4 ffifrgygis.. ' , ', ,ein N fl, M25 1 , L' -4 4 .SJ L ,,.. xg, 1 mil 3 we -, i g' sm 'fx fVS-Q Q? -, I I I PHI SIGMA KAPPA TY. ',N' .3 xwik V ,H , 'f we ALPHA PHI ALPHA LF F .,,:,',"q"'v"1j"'r. f Ng 1 7,1 - , X- ,V t ' i I: X 5 , bs? I - ,, - W F' , , 9iff"5 T.4fi5,E' :'lf4i-was '. b , . - -I , rf, ' It . ' 'L .,,.' Qf:":m .bw-,i. -, ,hz av 2 C. ' 3 Y , ' -' ' gg ' i.A'L,A,' -,.f 'E' 5. M ig F 1 ' ' a ah '--X L flwsff- ' 'I ug !'Z.x'i ' ffif a. if " ' f M .1 ik ' - I -I 5 A iffy? hi- t," p g f ' ,Q A ' V gp ' ya! 15' . I Q'-if A' ll ' 'K "yQ,, E N lf. L B . .. I ., . 'hr C-7 f"' C! L., V 171 v-1 x ELTA TAU DELTA ALPHA DELTA PI Q 6: v wal ,V ,... Q Q37 n bl, Q Z V 15' r-A ALPHA GAIVI NIA DE LTA I 1. -Q 5 I 1 . -4 , . 1 J 1 ' xl!! 1 LAMBDA CHI ALPH .wr-'-V llll '11 ..- I HI DELTA THETA ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA ..f' HI OMEGA S7 C7 up 14:9 N' . C"1' 'N-,,k,1f 5 37 ,f J vivq- .,"' .nge 4- 'Y if K? PHI KAPPA PS 2 F! - if tk-r HI KAPPA TAU .f-0 Cv? 443 7 wi Eh, N4 DE LTA GAIVI IVIA ,vu -Q-1 an RJ -.p E? Ei xi' 3 k fi -.1 Q. Y 5 ' .. A fif 41,32 1 f Ill 1' .C ..- " vs an-'A X ? . v .QQ I xxx, Fw. P fy' 'fi fx'Fx-1-SF 5+ 3TH4 DELTA ZEm Q 1 .,,-1 .I 'J ,..- , ..,'-' .aww-1 XX Vg ,B 5 - 5.7. x I v 4 4 CJ r. J F "7 Y . - Vv,M51ThL,?Lf C- ., w --1 -Y V, , 5 T :-T-2,1 1 131 :T if r rt' 4 r--eg ll J +. TAU KAPPA EPSILO " r 1. ml -, . w zu, f Yi I ,Cx m 'W PI KAPPA EPSILON K- 0 me 'F-A ,g11l'If 6 , 353311-la 'TYFWNM ' k :X 1 5 1 S ,arf ,B . 32 gg, 'wif , I ,H - rf' - , Q if---' .i 11. ,A 'A ew' ,-js S.: 'J r - t Qi T.,-X' ' 5 1 J, , I' J I as "" 4 gill'-A . .A f-1 '- an A K' Q 1 QA, ,gf .. . k CK f TJ if , id 5 'L Eff-.L-, Q 4 ' , X N., 'si ' L E' 1 " , L fy' sw .. 3 -1.11 ,, 2 .ef IJ ' 1 ff' an TH ETA PHI ALPHA C? uv- an ,J up F7 KV'-H N. - v fn' Eiga 5 T N L :F f'5gC.:v1 as V.- 92. -14 'f-,. J 4.25: -3. - V fr., rfjl I 'iii an ,,-.1 .-.Y "FEi.f': '3 lf:-Sissf 1- 4. g. 1? H-QLOI 'i"':T5f4J su-555 ,551 ,T Qi 'iw .,,f+-i.:':,. 3' SIGMA P HUL 104 I' T, ii' of Y-UFS' Q A PPA KAPPA GAIVI IVIA THETA CHI :ggi ,, N' , ' 'C '-A-L 4,1 , ' "mil A. .. 11 OMEGA PSI PHI . . 'DWI 5" '.54'.?,' fb . 3 -Q"." ' ' :-fp?-" 2. L 'li' "f" rw: ' 5 1 I' t FN: ,Lrg iv ,iz "FQ 5 'il 5 1 40 ZETA PHI BET HI BETA SIGMA ' iris ff . ' -gr, Yi-A sa EP Kiwi.: 0 ' ' 5 r A' IJ ' X -wk. 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'T' The University of Akron riflery team has once again succeeded. Although the season looked less than promising at first, the team managed to attain a 33-4 overall record. During his first year as head coach, Newt Engle produced champions of the Lake Erie Inter- collegiate Fiiflery Conference. SHARP SHOOTERS SHINE + DESIRE? i+ w wx: ., ,f KARATE ,L. w- w ' ' " VXA X -105' Y , 1 -- ' E ' XR g jE1 f 1 fl tikliii-W l5P"'4'U'M A xi 'iff-'AQ X P 1 ' Q 'U SWIFT SLOPE RS 147 48 ref ' ' ' S-'I' 151 , 'f?9', A V' -.C The Soccer team this year was plagued by inexperience. Coach Robert Dovvdy recognized the signs of inexperience and tried to cure this by giving the Zips a tough pre-season schedule. But it was not enough as was evident when by the end of the season the Zips had not reached their high expec- tations. Hovvever the Zips did earn an 8-5 record making this their 13th winning season and again proving their unsurpressible desire to vvin. 13 VICTORIOUS SEASONS 2 - if 4 2 - - v, -1--2 - ' ev, I -- 'V-'ll I: --1 fy' 1-4-f ' -Y-5, " ---' '- Qu, .Q 'Tg-fPB'l!lf"X 'q,17UQf lrfiiigffrrv--irf'z11.22rg- 'Yr YH 1 fn- 'r-."TT":,!J+:7"r.Q75-' -E it q . 'gg .hw lf-, --fff'wafs"Q:1qway +1 f I-.T ? JH, ighfff."31:1":."':'.f'i-.:T4'.' , .JT--. .1 4' , .P ay TY., J. P--f -1-' .- 'ia' fr.,'.Y:.'-:.'f 'I Nfl- 'wir-Y' iv HIT? if 7-' 114.36 ,34:'f1i:.4if2:lT' - "2'T5'4'- 'J' '11 ':at?:.7f:.x" ' w v-mir rv .U V. -qua ,-, 5 H N A. -Y .. .,,'-LEFHYJ' I H U :gm 1 ' ' fl! 'T Q I. X: A' I ij- I . , . , X Q, .L .- W - 1 A Q is , I' 1 Ju 'xx f. " ' 4 A ' "'f , ' 1 'N N :M Sims - .N ---' Y 5 W, H. cr" - . 1 4 -1 , ,Ll f -b "T2, ' ' ' V --H ' "" :gm J v "gn ' Y' - ,QU - :lg Rf A, .. ' , f , A V ..'55TT:f93.H ,, . uw: . 'Nm L: . - v,,g.2,.nl. wif52'jQ?r.'i-2ji3.',1t::fJ'!:l: I -- , fy. 3 fx- Kytiwziii:-Lai Af- . " ' , A - .Sn P.-411' .iigqiggii-iii-J1EgL,g5,az:,f1f H1 Y - wif " Fix' 1 "7 F .fmjfr ' ' N LQ, ' 4 ' ' E,- YY .xnf--Li-., ' f' 'Y' -1"-""'.9"1' -5- 251-.' 45? k V473 7. 2.1-.1 -712' .Q f:LE:.- V-n ' NL, 1- :1Nff'ZX- ':',2,,mt'-'gir:?4..- --1. -f , .,, .4 , .- Q ....,-,P mt 'if A ' ' ' '- 54.91 :"1gfa'EE' '-T-F1fP-3534215 W , mfg? Rf W - ' J , f ., -'-wtf 1" H-'--5-EP -',1g712- .gg-. T1'f-1"fijge,1-gg:j-A.5fE"2-f Y' i . A lr- ----u:f g4gif.m:4Q s1'i'141f2'af2i'i? 44' Foo'rBAl.l. li 4 - -M , -1- ff 1,2 I K M gs sw ' o A 10 '71 'N W i v I will I . ,, f:..e.fie?5is:wsm'v" . .. .-,.1-PM .I-are " ' I M51 ,:..i,:'1'?Qi?G:-"'3"f' K ' '-'rar' A :-33-effy 29:5 ,-,L , .-.tt FOOTBALL RESULTS WON 6 LOST 5 at Western Illinois at Northeast Missouri WAYN E STATE EASTERN ILLINOIS at Western Kentucky at Eastern Michigan at Youngstown State NORTHERN MICHIGAN Temple at Eastern Kentucky NORTHERN IOWA OPP 3 14 O 16 21 25 27 7 56 35 28 I, 2 FIRST IN 13 YEARS UVI C C In their 1978 season, the gridders held a 4-1 record after the first five games and were ranked fourth in the NCAA Division II national rankings. Unfortunately they reversed their winning streak to finish with a 6-'5 record. The team was not pleased with the 1978 season. "Although it is a winning season we like to win more than than that," said head coach Jim Dennison. Special awards went to Herb Kohler, Most Valuable Lineman and Executioner Club: Fiedell Windley, Most Valuable Back, Outstanding Offensive Performance, Most Outstanding Senior, and the Executioner's Club: Paul Winters, Most Outstanding Junior: Juan Pope, Most Outstanding Sophomore, Terry Cameron, Most Outstan- ding Freshman: Mike Holian, Outstanding Defensive Per- formance, Captain's Award, and the Executioner's Club, Marty Bezbatchenko, Captain's Award: Scott Miller, Ex- ecutioner's Club: Dan Simon, Executioner's Club. lv I 'I 'I 1 AKRON LQ 'WIKI 29, Q Ivo UF mimi ,J of . Hg Q V ,ga S , 'il L- --- 11'f'KHun AKRON A L1 J C' To be AGGHESSIVE, to be alert, to involve teamwork, was to have a 20 win-8 loss season for the women's volleyball squad. This record stands as the best record for this sport in Akron University's history. The season proved effective to a young team. Although there were nine returnees, there were eight new freshman. With dedication these girls went on to prove their teamwork. Speciafawards went to Pam Gaug, Most Valuable Player: Leslee Simon, Most Valuable Offensive Player: Terri Tidwell, Most Valuable Freshman: Chris Smith, Most lm- proved: and Debbie Reich, Coach's Award. The Volleyball team completed their record setting season by being aggressive and showing teamwork. VOLLEYBALL RESULTS VVON 20 LOST 8 WALSH: 15-4, 15-1, 15-11 at Mount Vernon: 15-4, 12-15, 15-3 Otterbein: 15-5, 15-7 at John Carroll: 15-2, 15-10 Mount Union: 8-1 5, 15-14, 15-5 at Hiram: 15-4, 15-6 Theil: 15-4, 15-5 at Wright State: 15-13, 15-13, 15-12 Louisville: 7-15, 7-15, 4-15 NOTFIE DAME COLLEGE: 15-4, 15-O at Baldwin Wallace: 15-9, 15-2 Toledo: 13-1 5, 7-15 at Ashland: 10-1 5, 15-4, 15-1O Ursline: 15-3, 15-2 WALSH: 15-4, 15-4 at Cleveland State: O-15, 8-15, 12-15 at Wooster: 11-15, 15-10, 11-15 Kent State: 6-15, 13-15 at Ursline: 15-O, 15-2 CCC West: 15-1. 15-10 Case Western Fleserve: 15-1 1, 15-13 KENT STATE: 3-15, 13-15, 7-15 at Ohio U: 1O-15, 11-15 Miami: 3-15, 4-15 Youngstown State: 15-10, 15-4 at Malone: 15-4. 15-8 wyr fr' , .. L, YS OFF 1lAllg1LT +! I0 SIDKIIIG v , I n 1 f f . , ' n I I I 1 V ,l I I Iwi., J,,,,,,,.l.,.l,H --.lk -11, . 1 l. I .1 m- ,W M , Y S,,,,,.: '-an 5-4. -.L r ,gp ' 1 , ' -s 1, 41-' X F' X ' x 1 N1 4, In V , fg?9:E1,'l1.v V111 L' fa , .1113 1. 3- - . . 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' J lf" A .i 1 Nt 11+ It - f - ' fs k A , 1 x' ' ' V, . 5156" vf V f f F- ' if 3 ' J Q I 4 ff l' Q W f iv 1 fm, -. Aw ,q,. -2 in . -. ,. f 'fn 5 p A. Y, .V 5 r , ' 1 gg , X i 'iii , WS-4? 5 X 4 A 2 X V -my - Wi F' " ' iv ,qg,.,.,.,--Y -,Q ,S 'n-'agw 1- ,Y .NC A '. - Sri Q' TL' fuf -W W ' , ,G I i A, N .il xv L , ' 'K rx n 16 Q I' ufi ff? alum.. I N-Y--v :gi safe 'K Lf n..-owl Q--"' -,- 1: 2 Q, 4 rr s 1 5 if .,J, ,MW .452 M Wa.: ' - 3 tg, A ,, ,. ....,. , W 4 ? r1' sms ' , as XE n 'Q Q Kaz? Q 51511 E V ik Su " Ei B 7 ' ,Q U 555 C: X375 5 ' 11 2 PZ W1 :Ref , H 'W V THE AGONY CF DEFEAT ' .G7Lfv:': ', - ,. f--1 'www H4 1,-4 . 215.0 41 .:'f"'f:-'- YQ. A., ,. ,,N. ,. U, . ,b :nwwwmGHFwfWwL' 3 'tm . 1 i nf, ,, SJ' WOMEN CAGERS 3 1 Af x I 6 f ,N if fagopgll L? gi rl' of' Hg W' I 'T W4 .1-15' I AU YZ fx 4. I 1 I A , - 'f ffl- 3. e X fy wwe A ffg' I"-flil! , A 4 1 - ' y Il .-sf""- 1 M7 S , lx 1 l Aan' lQ5h'17i74Q This year's women's basketball team was a young one. Dominated by underclassmen this was a year for building. Although Coach Mary Ann Tripodi was disappointed this year, her team next year will possess more skill, experience, and hopefully more victories. fl' 'ly as by as IL t rl? 'in N0 SMUKING "r , A :Less '41--cv ,f'2'V!sg -dh, WOMEN'S BASKETBALL RESULTS WON 6 LOST 20 OPP at John Carroll 94 at Cincinnati 68 GANNON 70 at Defiance 67 TOLEDO 32 KENT HOLIDAY CLASSIC Youngstown State 96 Cleveland State 57 WRIGHT STATE 65 ASHLAND 56 at Dayton 1 10 at Mt. St. Joseph 74 at Rio Grande 82 OHIO NORTHERN 74 at Cleveland State 83 MOUNT UNION 35 at Malone 62 WOOSTER 50 CEDARVILLE 61 KENT STATE 88 BOWLING GREEN 57 YOUNGSTOWN STATE 71 OHIO U 59 at Edinboro State 78 at Capital 39 OAISWTOURNEY YOUNGSTOWN STATE 67 CINCINNATI 67 r ' X ZIPS HAVE ROUGH SEASON L! , .nas-Q pil. -'fwvnr , ,. ., 0.3 Q w rfgar-" 'J-Jaffa!-ff-P?4fJ'v'31! 1' ' "2. - .HQ-Z.-3855.6--+1' X 4 ' ' ., H51 "-.f.,gfg5f512.z4-5-si.-, - -Q24-,3Neg,' 1 wg .f ' FLZ'?6':5"fY'3i-f'i"l7!mE4TfYR2f+.'1 T1k1"'-P'-Q.'f"29 "1 'H " V'j'f,Q-T,-r.:lS1fi2L2ggEJQ'13'' QM I x A A , 4.4, :'5.kEi,. lv K l JET. - .,,,m,. -Q-MA f "m,Q,.ag1--4. , E U,-f' fig .4 Ns S. ' meg ' V 'STSS -, ' "Ii:?5:i: A! 'pk ? 'F .- R' fi A, Q 'f' 1-.k LIAAY1 Q 11 N fi 2 1 , I . i-I 1? L. -""!-ff . 3' ff!-aux I 4 , f If -ILO x--1 Mlm, 31 554 ar! 51 if QQ! M 4 Ken Cunningham's cagers this year had a disappointing 1017 season. Highlights of the season however, include defeating previously unbeaten Gannon College 95-75. Also, John Brit ton's offensive effort which led him to break seven all-time UA records BASK ETBALL FI ESU LTS WON 10 LOST 17 Wooster at Oakland at Buffalo BALDWIN-WALLACE GAN NON WALSH at Kent State at Indiana-Purdue WRIGHT STATE at Youngstown State WESTERN ILLINOIS EASTERN ILLINOIS NORTH KENTUCKY CH EYN EY STATE at Cleveland State Northern Iowa Northern Michigan CLEVELAND STATE at Gannon YOU NGSTOWN STATE at Eastern Illinois at Western Illinois Ashland at North Kentucky at Wright State at Northern Michigan at Northern Iowa OPP 61 90 51 69 75 64 68 B4 71 53 84 95 63 76 93 70 72 83 71 47 GO 86 76 B4 91 85 B8 spew AKRON DEFEATS GANNCN sim af. 3 7C 6 IVIATIVIEN IVIAKE PCINTS Although the team doeSn't have much depth, it does have a powerful punch, as is evident by their 9-5 record. Midway through this year's season, Coach Greg Gilmore accurately predicted the team's success. Perhaps he can accurately predict a greater success for next year's team. With the exception of Senior Eric Porosky, everyone vvill return next year to con- tribute to the team's success. 5 Q B .l Ill. i 7 2, n, , gs 44- ,Ae . .eq ' 1 R we 1 om .HA 1 Q' 6' ,-7 VVR ESTLI NG FI ESU LTS WON 9 LOST 5 CALIFORNIA STATE CLEVELAND STATE INDIANA U at Ashland at West Liberty at John Carroll PITTSBURGH IVIALONE WEST LIBERTY at Youngstown State Kent State HIRAIVI at Slippery Rock OHIO NORTHERN t.t I t Pg JM.. Y X , muy H Liv' 1-, S , ...,A ,, , -'Z-: 1 zfiffhziv 'Z' M-594: -1, ' A 1:9 vii ', f h' f"U3,,- ,' 2' Wifi! "" 1r ' 5 ,m l ew 1g'sa,-,- , -.,, . - ff -if V: .?"-fLuJ+-LL-- 'Yu-if5- K ' 55,2 . -,U "" , '-':.-His, - 'K S" - .aa1:'i'g5,-'f -' my 41 'N tit b A 5,-f ',i'5 Y, ig.-If' - :gf-,Q . , Tr, 1u'.:"3+gQ-'FSE -r-4 F5 U. ,e , ' - :i,,-L I4 -- - f 'Fi'-3-HI'-..," g,'5L'i'2f'2"'7:7?-'fL7.i1"' 'Ur-sz ' 1-- 5 , . "L up - ' M' xt wgggay ci. . , 'E' ..-Y-. L '7' his E.' ""f-f-f- "'N,I',:- ' -. -fr.: - . A. " f .' -g ifilwq-. '. iogigi J - 4',.-ff ,y x Eff? 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' 4 k -,-f'.,, E22-IA A"'f111'f5L.,'fsig,:JE:'if'7f,f'3':: ' , 1 , , , , -P,-Exif' V m- -1gw,..3,f.,f45' V , W- H- , , ,, f L xi, , , , ,W--5 k ' ,:p,g-v-g- ,. H.' . ,my F ui-N4 y J., .1 fr. , , , ,sA,,-...Mx Q , f.. .-. . 11 1- .:.. M , wav.. 1..- -. ,j ,M-' .pjg1"-,ff:'Ll'-1" 1 1' :f.,,1'fn 'Yf":.f',L'f!' 1 -si'-',,.,.,? f-,,1y,yg,' l, 44 '- W ' wk. ,jniw D,-H...-b1.',, ,IU 1 73,-if ..+1f,i?- 1 ' .v ,1 -,'f'Lf,j3,," If 'N 2145" if - ., ' 1 54.4 5-'1 . QV- . A 'J' 'l " Y"' 'f 'J-l5 A:,.....1 1- "'1f-92M1f?.f3S4ezHf' -' f :L '-17' '-,P '5'.' H ' - '-'MA ' ' ,M x-'nw ,,.-, :11?':?f5i: "3E5T - r: "1,-3fP1i':fll:i'- ,g'1'1'f2'f ' , 1 5 2 , ., ' pigs, - , ., . ,, 5. , - . Y- -. - - . I 5 ,,-,-.. -K 54 Y M ff. Vwf ., -v "-,'. H , L X, -,nf 25-55: 'f-'g.,f-Qi 477- fail-J , Av YJ. 'T-"fL'l7"1f37n LQ "fi", + "'-'L' in .- ' E.- f' sn-,. 1:-' - ' S 'f' 1.44 ,. - 1 - :mf -1' . 4-1 -Jf. if , -.. - - , .nf , f - .. - ' -. 4 , Q ?,,q:i?-...J .I .5-,v X 1: 'L gg?-:'ve,fv ,f , - --zgiilgli j,.L?k,:f 4 '4,,3li..',,.a 44' 4 I' '1'..' . ., ' 1' r - ' 1. VF -wzef. " . I-." Bef' ', -I n K ,jf - , ' K 'ffA,Q5 -3.52. , V, ' f A ' fp-'Q-2... ,. T-MK'-' 'ij ff. ,J ., 5 gg 6 J . .,: gfiqrf 4 l'igj2ifM.!2v -qufpxfr -1 ,gf A ' an- , ' ' v'-K' 1 A' -'1 '-, A P' ,aa S Q. iz, ,- A, f S -S Q, S N , 1 xiii? -M, sf "f'l .' - -MJ 5 -. -1 H 4 "-v ,A 1 I I V ' ' ,f,.'-' Xw'fu.., -.-5-A ff . S ' '13 4 f -A 'S -MH-f v f ff: . S . F52 xi S I tb:-f'n41'fM SWIIVIIVIERS SNATCH SUCCESS Although the team consisted of only 14 swimmers. the Zip mermen managed to defeat six of ten op- posing teams. They then continued their success at the Penn-Ohio Championship, where they es- tablished nine new school marks. Sophomore Mike O'Leary set four individual records and was a member of a record breaking relay team. Other members contributing to the success of the team in set- ting five other records were sophomores Rick Szittai and Matt Bezbatchenko. senior Mark Gian- carli, and freshman Ritchie West. UA 60 at Wright State 54 at John Carroll 90 at Walsh College 54 CHARLESTON 54 at Westminster 13 MUSKlNGUMlForfeitl O SWIMMING RESULTS WON 6 LOST 4 OPP 51 59 19 40 59 58 FREDONIA STATE 51 45 TOLEDO 68 66 at Duquesne 43 39 at Cleveland State 72 1 U.,-A W.. ...Q--f' l .i i V37 ". -. ' I n 5- :J P xii.. I s , ' v, " X .3 ' , ' X' ."' 3- 1 - Vf' 1 Yu ', " .A f 'a Lv, K. Ulf, A2 , ' -. f 4 I ni?" '-' , . 17" t N 1, .YW " -MAJ' , . .xii . . frffikfi LQ . , .,g.v.,.-., ir, -,, 4. .1 ,: . fx ii K-'sa . Y . 'I 'V:f"1, .gf . .A - ,sg f ,. ' Xp , . 's '-W' .V I -1, 1 A .Q 'f V - vp L ,,.f,, .-1 -H H . 1 ' ,- , K '- . , .l W m.,,j, .WT 'Q V L ' D I, ' , ' ff- . V . , ,. 1 . -5 l - a, ' eh ' . 5 S ' . .1414 ' .- 'F 1 -. 2 iff? ' ,V i ' lgffflbffny T ' AF""'a'G""'7 Q5 NL 1 S 1 . , f - 9. 1 4 XL 1529, . 'agxzfk h K . ' . 1 fwrmgsii g .M , .,.. X .3-Ya, .ff 1 'J 4' H1 . . w xx-1,- fn 1 ffggr ' ' - wsggig.. ,- , . A 1 WNNN.. . YN 1 - . S., . 5 , 'N 4 J ,iv '4 W., . H X- 45 I 8. nf ' f ,, fag v Q,-.' , - 713- K - fx io' ' wr-- .g.,g, ink V- , V 'fx f., an , ' A ' 'W QM, 1 ' gf? AQ ., ,V .r ,A ' mf 1. -N-, -M-.., Ja-- f Yr , rd. x QM1 ' x -5 , . 1. '-.fu ,. ' ' . x u-- fi - ....,,.. it -J ,Lg M4 f ' -:ik . ., iii f , 'M DZ ' Tim , 'fl' and A. 1. 'Q-is-Tea-ft ,...--if-"":T r-'--- , UA's golf team had a different season than most previous seasons. Not one match was played on their home course. Nevertheless, they compiled an ex- cellent 50-25-1 record for the season. At the end of the season, the Zips hosted the first annual lVlid-Continent Conference Golf Championship on their own course. However, since they had not played on the course all year, they did not have an edge on the other teams. This took its toll when they came up three strokes shy of winning the tournament. Coach Jim Hackett, however, was happy with the season and said he looked forward to com- peting in the sophisticated Ohio Valley Conference next year. GOLF RESULTS WON 50 LOST 25 TIED 1 at Wooster Open 5th of 1 1 at Dale Beckler Invitational 3rd of 20 at Ashland Invitational Tied for 3rd of 7 at Indiana U. IPAI Invitational 7th of 18 at Kent State Invitational 5th of 9 at Bowling Green Invitational ,Sth of 12 at Youngstown State 3rd of 6 Ti ,. 'S' W R '. ,ik X 'SQ KQENIG DOUBLE PARTICI PATIO jf ,4" ...f SN N fxx I '4 A A ,V students. "The whole point of Intramurals. as far as l'm concerned, is to get as many people involved as possible." Koenig will be working with a 317,961 budget next year, NJ Aa if NI E N, S T E N N I S Tough competition was the downfall of the men's tennis team this year. They finished with an overall 13-12 record against some of the best collegiate teams. The highlight of the season was UA's victory in the Greater Cleveland Tournament, a title previously claimed by the host, Case Western Reserve. Although coach Dave Bard classifies this season as a dis- appointment, he hopes to improve next year by adding depth and im- proving overall quality. -as E, W L- 'S- IX, N. R 32 iflzh ff.H" lVlEN'S TENNIS RESULTS WON 13 LOST 12 OPP at Case Western Reserve 2 at Kentucky State O at Morehead State 9 at Eastern Kentucky 9 at Eastern Tennessee 9 at Western Kentucky 7 at Pittsburgh 6 ASH LAN D 1 at Walsh O at West Liberty 1 YOU NGSTOWN STATE 7 at Cleveland State 1 EDINBORO STATE 7 Eastern Kentucky 6 at Ohio State 9 Indiana 9 at Otterbein 1 at Greater Cleveland Tourn. Case Western Reserve 1 2 Cleveland State 2 M Ashland 2 WOOSTER 3 at Baldwin-Wallace O Central Michigan 7 at Kent State 8 IVIALON E O WRIG HT STATE O 175 TENNIS ' I K naix xml! In Ill S 'W X r W'.Y' KX4 Vw K 0 k A xr n ' W X X UH? l X t A 5" . -v-2 EQ sw if kv PM 1 1:71-F Y. , - : ,.. x?wAw, , ' ' '- "ff: . . :S nf ,1 25153 Egfi,-5,.ru tv A 2 w, ' 24. -35 lb 'GS' ,fn is-M-v I5 Z.. . -"' gl. . all This year's women's tennis team completed their season by earning a 9-3 record with the assistance of their new coach Joanne Dinie. "In the beginning, we were a little disorganized," said Dinie, who was unfamiliar with competition on the college level. So, "we took one match at a time" to beat last year's 5-9 record. "However the highlight of the season," said Dinie, "was com- peting in the Ohio Women's Collegiate Tennis Tournament." WOlVlEN'S TENNIS VVON 9 LOST 3 UA OPP 5 at Wright State 4 2 atToIedo 7 9 MOUNT VERNON O 9 CEDARVILLE O 5 at Ohio Northern 4 9 IVIALONE O 9 MOUNT UNION O 4 - CASE WESTERN 5 8 at John Carroll 1 9 A at Hiram O 9 BALDWIN-WALLACE O 1 KENT STATE 8 seg reap- iii W Yfiif "-+L,-Q ga- ap- in A ,Y , ,, ,. Y.. " ' . . . ,-5 ...- .:.'1i.L-.Avis-u.'J-N' . V. w - 1 . 1' 1.. -, .N SIM. .fl -ff,-,.-iff2.i':,4::::-,lzrh --- Y. :xiii-' A f--A-' 'Z li 'ii' ' f-1-531,11 Wi W 1 . ,ga-X Y -- N-+-5, -b. f.Q,'.1w3,..-.. V 1 . - .. . 12, ,E ,ff-,ff 191 " ' 'way 9 1. 'LM fwi-Jr'- A-TQ ! -".L. - 38:1-... , f K, ?'?iiS+.fx . "1 N " , " TL T' :" .2 4 i-af...--' ff.. g , xr- . ,ZH-... " 4-S, . wlgy, Lf.. 'QA-'thier ...-L -.6--x-35.,g".3.m.,-,Vai. :wl,1L,jI-.q,,E?,:,E5:szs.V-L MW-in F .'-1,-g Q5-.'e:'-T. u-fnf,...,.A fue., -13. ,- .' . A Ni- ,v-yr.-. -1 it3iy.:7f5'l,l.gg:.5Emj5,,51.fiS6321 ' ,S MPff't-x21- 1 r:,"iugg2I'ikx1.,:M?:g fd ' 'MMS-1 'Wk' 'x w": "ix539L VV J6msF3i5a5fA.,,1-+ g .4 "M ..,,. - -., -05. V " 1' "' 1 , . 'E fi. . N ' N W .VP?I5i?.f5fT FfQ5?Pgb:fgwp "-.-. J . Q'-Wm". VL'-3.gq:5, , HL-.-f, " Y. ,,'5?4g,wAfa:.:,14 .E,x. .,,.. -'-025mg-,,wmL,?f X? , W Y wx. U vvu..ui '2 E L.-5 ' if ...3"1..l'. v- 1.10 , all ,uf-0""" HINCLADS STRIVE FOR SUCCESS Zip thinclads finish with a 3-2 season, having no trouble with the local competition. Next year though, Coach Al Campbell and his team enter the Ohio Valley Conference. Here the Zips will compete with many top notch teams. However, there is some en- couragement in that 22 of CampbelI's 40-man roster were either freshmen or sophomores this year. Next year will be a year of building. TRACK RESULTS VVON 3 LOST 2 UA OPP 29 2X3 at Middle Tenn 78113 Austin Peay 65 82 1!2 MALONE 62 1!2 83 MOUNT UNION 53 84 KENT STATE 61 . Nl 1. - rr NR' rf V Yrqr -g Y, il 0 -iv X QM, -v fi if Gif 'D 9-I 1 w 3, ' A , 9 Q ' Y 4- , - r 1 . 411 N .1 SL V. ' WJ! E , .. ' J 'a' Ai". x l ' V f - vw - -n. ELIJEEERE f I EIZZLE 181 ' X Zips make history as the first ball club ever to compete in the NCAA Division ll Great Lakes Regional, held in Louisville. Kentucky. Although baseball, the oldest sport on campus, has been around for over 100 years, it took this year's team with a 26-18 season, to qualify for the regional. The Zips did not do as well as they had hoped in the play-offs, but it was quite a comeback after three straight losses following two weeks of bad weather which caused the postponement of nine games. ,Suv ra u. VVOIVlEN'S SOFTBALL WON 17 LOST 11 UA OPP O WRIGHT STATE 4 2 WRIGHT STATE 3 4 LAKELAND COMMUNITY O 1 LAKELAND COMMUNITY O O at Flio Grande 6 3 at Rio Grande 4 4 at Mount Union 3 17 HIRAM 1 14 HIFIAM 1 10 atToIedo O 1 atToledo 6 3 at Bluffton 2 17 at Bluffton 5 1 YOUNGSTOWN STATE 4 3 YOUNGSTOWN STATE 4 5 WOOSTER O 9 WOOSTER 8 5 BALDWIN-WALLACE 4 1 YOUNGSTOWN STATE 2 7 BALDWIN-WALLACE 6 3 at Miami O 5 at Miami 2 1 1 CLEVELAND STATE 4 6 CLEVELAND STATE 3 7 atAshland 8 25 at Youngstown State 5 6 at Youngstown State 8 1 at State OAISW Tour- nament in Dayton 13 VAX This year brought another winning season for the women's softball team with a record of 'l 7-1 1. Although coach Jo Arrietta was not pleased with the team record, she thought they had an excellent attitude and played well together. Next year the team will switch to fast pitch and will play in the AIAW Division II. Nearly everyone is expected to return next year. QAMDEQTBZSS u - THE RESIDENCE HALL ALTERNATIVE f . 12, SK A x RESIDENCE HALL PROGRAMMING BOAR JLEL ESIDENCE HALL CDUNCIL 90 ORIENTATION FOR A NEW GENERATION -9 ':J..-L? " -,nur .. .. .. -- ,V "S-ar ,Y-iff-'-q,,A ,. - X4 Q -..1.r 545 , S A A . ..r I is L, - W- xg, 4' - N522-f"i41f .2-A Wg?-?"' 5 ' I F, ii "' 3:-f'1grfTT:fg.L.L I -.. -, ,....f,, ,- ,, ... 49. ,ng I fx 4 -1 v I . ,JA mi--Nz. A IYr ,A-f -.., 'Y gui fi - '-fl YY" , .'-'GZ' 'x AT AKRDN U Y v M, A LE I . ww H ,jgy J .fr H xg, '-ww C QA 1 'ar '1- 'v"!'1' TSM, 'hz' Lg We :- 'wi f, ,. ,W I. ,ig 4, J '-24315, 'ff w Ibn X 'W 1' Q iii'- w . 1 AN ,' .kk P J X 1 1 9 L . V - , Q- V, .ffm Q 3 " 'Q - ,l 7 x a :N -1 Y 11 1 :,,S,-vw ',.QjfE'f 4 ' gf' , fl ', 'L .VL , '11 H. v, V g I l ' V 5 'J ' "' , " M9 'gh W TS- :V L, s 'Q A ' "5 R 1 4 , Q ALM ' ' N . -1- ,V N 0 ,X if 1 flx XXTQ, M 2 X ? ,L 5 'FC -. 2 Xi-,lg5:,f2:lj,1:. f H 'QM H 1 'f '34 I N xxx ' '39 - ?:.-AVE li. KW 'f . 1- , 1 1 I 5 - f 1- .3254 X 'R M: .fn Y' 164 -r I . w A- ' X . iff'-g""n,Qf flgifgg av . gage-if 'vlvsq . We ' pf? A Ag X, 4 COURTYARD CAPERS I r Y 73' "1 Y...- ,iff The Courtyard, that concrete square between Spanton, Bulger, Orr, and Robertson, is more than just awalkway. Many a frisbee has been tossed, a baseball thrown, and a concert heard on its surface. It is an entity which brings people together, and to- getherness is a main factor in enjoying Dorm life. A! Q14 l-Q 'xt is - r , I ' 2? H". If Q' N ' ,s 511, , '-,,. H- a s 5 B3 feffu -M -Af ' , 'E?1p'3 1X!,f ' ' ' , s 'M W --- Y- -f-- -JF - , M., .., , 4. g I ..,- M..- ..-. ,-,, JK 'un,,., i 1 Pa 5 4 , , i W N 11 Q' Q WIWIQ ' , -A: fx- Y, H' 5 I B -L 1 p J 5' 5' nib ' 4 , Q' 3' if N 3 l f gf . ' - 'L -. ' -1, 3 1 1 1, 1' 1 K E W f is .A 3 gf ? H 1 - '. ' "-LA uf " . 1' , .. , . 71, , '-2 L -1 - Y 2 - --"2 ' wt -. ' A' '-. A- 2. fi .Y v , L AM!" wwwlw ' 2. 1 wtf' X HJ fu T?f- 'EHR V -N533-Pi faglgy H2-F55 Hg w u - 135.-, H Hu -ff? :gi 1 -- 44 ,,,,E-:Burg-53 EA -wa ,V ,,,,, W,,,27N'Q.,.. R, N, , ISM rm, -- -H xv ,swf ,.v ,, M., 'cff wz H ' H wLImw"U. , :gi 1. H "lu ' -if ,ii .1359-Q ' ' G: 2K-QW-4:5 M w .L,.,,.W m WT? X I , I gd, r w -.ff it H E ..- 1 f HSN ff Q ,i:,. , F H si -- 3 L 1.1. h fry -1 si H N 1 -M 5 ' m U it-1. 'TY' " dei! .,.,-5 - if ' 95, , "fy ,ir L, T: uv inwlqfg w V m Ei ..g ri" 55? W gg? . r Ziff! si., Q vw V-Z X A up . fs in ,ri ,- L EET -Ygugi. . , HH, -fu t , Q, , A wb I j ' ' 1. J r .tif 0 A A I w if f ' . V i I 1 jf y V ,gl I- ,.-" :J , !2i .. ,- c ,fm-. f" ' 9 n , , 'I A ff" P -4 . rf' Ulf" -Q WELL WCRTH THE WAITC?D PEPSNH 'W -I --si M ' 3 in FU A ff' '5-Q 11.44.-,Q - Wm! , . ww, fs, f?s:i'!'v :,"'T,'.- ,:1 E". V w' jx 1 ,-'M V 32 ,sg js ii We Q SURVIVING THE FALL W?" Q wi X r- A Fx ' A .,.,. L 1: -K ,""5 irq .M 4 V AF' 5 'Q ,M 4 ,gm 1' 1 , 1 ., , I 'E ,.. My I , Wnw. 1 -V , 1 C q - f ,Q - .bk ,. ,nf LIQJ. '.n ,, . , w, A It 8 l if at I, if ,Xu S h P54 1 Wg Af 1 I fi "4 p I -' 895' NAA' 'i f L J Ml! ' ' Q .NLF S 9,5 . .5512 , ,ai 7 ,,..,V 1 A -sz 17. , fi xi ' V X 2251 I 5 W 3' 55'-63' E C 1 -...,.,,m 5 a i , - N Q96 W.. .,,. X Thaw. r W-- NW lv .w ? . ii',A4A5?lf 200 SPIRITS HAUNT RQBERTSON are L M 4. 5, A ' ffxxs 'rg .V Nr' ,I X' X M11 1 -QNY I Iii ' N nj r Qi ' B in i ga A favorite annual event of UA dormies is the Halloween dance. This year's bash, sponsored by FIHPB, surpassed the expectations of most freshmen. Along with the music of Gabriel Oak, RHPB sponsored a show of illusions including lasers, creeping fog, and a light show. This set the stage for a spookyevening. Other events includ- ed a kissing booth, and a costume judging. M'-.NN x I X , fvrttrln 4 "77u'nLll'l 9 'B f , , . if 1 A Z ffgmlngz . , "4 .- 41, 2 1 ,A -,:,v u J 1: ' Q li 5 u E W Q 1x AT 3 4 w 2 il . IIN lm 'U 1, P4 A I 1 F 7: 4 1 , I FV, 1 ,Q x -3-'. I . 'AJ 1 w 4 1 , 1 N A . N i V71 ff" , , '1 '. , W . A. ' 1 . ,1. 15: ., V. 1 N, - f ," xii? L+' A L V -E' Ji KU. wg! 124 f I . x x ,F . w s v , s .L ., jg as emi aiifiig f 5:1 ' 11" if waffle" 3 -'PK " - n v f if' vw 2 Qu 7 xi, f r k. f ,, ww: ,. ' J-. . ,-.-Lf p J :V H,:H.,rn . fag- gif NQHI .E-gg IH! 111 ff-Liz, ' fafzf' 2 Lirglfll 'ch 4' 'ff w??a3mFaf,f 1:3211 ' 'f1iY',i.flbf?mg 2-g625'f,":.eYW,,, elllil VL, s- 'WH-'?.fff'faa'1 ?f-F1211P I 'T leigh '-fbljx 'A Q . 5131 '65 , - X 1 A e .1 u- , V .fun 'A 7- l-:f.,""Qf Q 1 . '24 Q: Qzj:-53311 . , ,V , l' x ' . lf," if N 5-1.-z '-a' J ,TH H Q 1' 'fx x F QZFT ' 133' . i r1" ga '- 11: A 'i nga ' L 1 Q!-' ' Hx" as KM 3'-2 M as ,Q :vw .-4.1 X.,-gg 4 , N3 1 P1 ,fy V , iw? H , "W -ffm . .Rf 1 .U L, ,f K 1 L , 'E-'fn l - Qzffglr, L, , . 1. ' 1. I , N X i 1 ,r ' , H '- f-1 Ji M Q i M W ,nf J 4- in ' M bmw A , n w ii . SQ Qf 'Q' 'T' ' I ' 1' " Sv' ,Wg 13 , 'sw-P L. 'x U 35" ,Q3QP'f1 DON'T SAY GOODNIGHT, TONIGHT H , 06 SPRINGING BAC 'EW 'FT Z4 -+4 " A ii- E5 1 Mfg m JL '- :..L. ,L .193-ag DORIVI TIMES 209 1 . , El00,E f Jisfirr v . . ,1 ' li-1'i".""5ii'2L.11 - ' ref .-11357 155 vw- Q-.' :psf -5 lf? 1 fix? ' "W, uf: Wm. 41. .i , W-. -vw as B, '19 1 .51 ,gr if -, .vw . 1 illilf ! gl' Dorm Week this year was something else. There was much more to do than in years gone by. Events ranged from the traditional tug-of-war, with a flair added by the Miller Company, to some untraditional events including Little Joe's Cafe, and a courtyard Toga party. Dorm Week made liv- ing in the Dorms, with all its faults, well worth it. 2 BLACK OUT "7E Students reacted to the Black: mature and responsible rr Shown here is one matu responsible individual setting c d alarm at two a.m. on a We night. The University of Akron is selected to test Aluminum cable. To the right we see the results of this test. The Blackout caught the photographer and these showering Spanton dormies by surprise. Shown here is the Housing Direc- tor assuring irate students that the power situation is well under con- trol. O SQWZQWQQES 1 6 SUSAN ADAMS Physical Education RONALD ADKINS Electrical Engineering MARTY AFFINEEFI CONNIE ALBFIECHT Accounting KIRK ALBFIECHT Sociology RICHARD ALEXSONSHK Finance NANCY ABBOTT Accounting .JAMAL ABDALLAH Textiles B1 Clothing JEANNE ACKEFISON Accounting JAMES ADAMS Technical Education NANCY ALLEY Elementary Education CYNTHIA ANASSON History BEVERLY ANDRISKY Legal Secretary DAVID AFICHUAL Management x l 'Wx Mil .rfflvi I E' CHARLES AFRDING TIMOTHY ARISON Business Management Technology MARY ARMSTRONG Spanish MAR! JO ARTINO Cnernistry PAUL ASKEY Elementary Education CINDY AUTH DANIEL AYERS JEFFR EY BAAB Mass Media JEROME BABICH Marketing DAVID BAEFI Marketing DANA BAGWELL Elementary Education DEEIOFIA BAILEY Communications 109 1' his 5 "Yl'1' nn' ELIZABETH BAILEY Music THAD BAIFID Electrical Technology TO BY BAJ EC ELIZAB ETH BAJOFI EK Management , 'wax ql' "N-I UN W MQ X fax Q- I DARLA BAKER Elementary Education GARY BAKER Accounting MICHAEL BAKER Data Processing REBECCA BAKER Psychology JUDITH BAM BAUER Marketing MAFIGUERITE BAFIBACCI Nursing FRANK BARBER Elementary Education PAMELA BARBER D IAN E BARLEY English DOROTHY BARRESI English KEVIN BARRICK Commercial Art CHRISTINE BAUER Nursing 9 ARTH U R BEALL Chemical Engineering SHARON BEARD Nursing FRANCES BEAVERS Business Management Technology YCZJL? DEBORAH BEISWENGER Executive Secretary KATHERINE BELANY Elementary Education DEBORAH BELL Nursing ROSEIVIARY BELL Graphic Design FRANCES BENFORD Nursing KENNETH BENNER Management CANDACE BENNETI' Home Economics DEBORAH BENT Primary Education ROGER BERGH Marketing MARTHA BERNSTEIN English RHONALD BERTOLDI DENISE BESKITI' Elementary Education TIMOTHY BETZ Data Processing MARY BEVACQUA Nursing MARTIN BEZBATCH EN KO Marketing 'faux - , 'sw--. .M HELEN BIALDRUCKI Medical Secretary JOHNNY BICKEFISTAFFF Political Science ROBIN BICKSLEFZ Nursing -A ROBERT BIDINGEFI Finance JAMES BILBREY Accounting D IAN E B I LEK Nursing FROBEFITA BIRCH Nursing DOUGLAS BLANCHARD Management DOFREEN BLISCHAK Speech Pathology 81 Audiology DOUGLAS BOCEK Mechanical Engineering DONALD BOCK Civil Engineering KENDALL BODDEN Accounting TIMOTHY BOEBEL Accounting l M cr ,. '-Rf, 5 f ws., , A342-Q ii' 90 'FTW'- 1 in Vi - V' ,E N ff xr- T F 9 BBQ: at M Kirk .i -' SHARON BOWERS Elementary Education JEFFEREY BOWERSOX Accounting MARY BOWLES Nursing KAREN BOYD Accounting KATHRYN BOYD Accounting FRANK BRACKETI' Accounting JAYNE BOEY Elementary Education TRUDY BOGARD Mass Media KENNETH BOLDT Management HAROLD BOOKER Elementary Education 224 ANTHONY BRANCAZIO Primary Education THOMAS BRAY Geology CAROL BRECHBILL Data Processing DAVID BROWN RICHARD BROWN Management ROBIN BROZ Family 81 Child Development JACK BRYANT Marketing SUSAN BRYENTON Communications JAMES BUCHS JAMES BUCY LINDA BURKHART Executive Secretary ROSALIND BURKLEY Accounting JOAN BURLINGAME Elementary Education ROBERT BURNSIDE Sociology ROY BURNSTAD Geophysics CHRISTEE BURRIDGE Political Science MICHAEL BUTLER Psychology CH ERYL BUZA Nursing PAMELA BYRD Data Processing RONALD CAIN Mechanical Engineering SCHERYL CAIN Community Service FELICITAS CALDERON Social Work ip 'Nw f. af- ,Alix 4: ROGER CHAPLIN Electrical Engineering CYNTHIA CHAPMAN Nursing DELBERT CHAPMAN Technical Education Si Criminal Justice LAURA CHESLOCK Data Processing VINCENT CICCARELLO Marketing LINDA CLARKE Accounting DEBRA CALHOUN Political Science JAMES CANNON Chemical Engineering JUDE CANTZ Nursing ANTHONY CARDINALI Retailing CHARLES CARPENTER Chemical Engineering PATRICIA CARPENTER Executive Secretary TIM CARRACHER RONALD CARSON Mechanical Engineering PAULA CARTER Nursing SUSAN CARTER Business Management Technology DENISE CARUSO Nursing TERRI CARWELL Executive Secretary JOHN CASEY Graphic Design SHARON CASH Executive Secretary DENISE CERNY Marketing JEFF CHANDLER 6 DAVID CLEVENGEFI Mechanical Engineering MARY COBURN History GEARY COCHRAN Accounting GERRY COLEMAN Community Service Technology RICHARD COLIAN English DOROTHY CONKLIN Music LYN DA CO N LEY Accounting SHIRLEY CONTI RO B I N COOLEY Commercial Aviation DIANE CORBETI' Nursing TONI COSTA Social Work ROSANNA COSTANZO Accounting YW' ...- K fit arg If g -1 , Iilil TZ?" ANDREW CRAFTON Accounting JACOUELINE CRAWLEY Elementary Education JOHN CRONE Mechanical Engineering JEFFREY CROSS CYNTHIA CULBEFITSON Elementary Education ROBERT CUNNINGHAIVI Technical Education IVIINH DANG DENNIS DANGEL Accounting JANET DANKO Nursing RICHARD DANNEIVIILLER Technical Education DEANNA DANNER Legal Secretary DAVE DANNIBALLI 7 B EVER LY DARWAY Nursing SALLY DASH Nursing ANITA DAVIS English CAR O L DAVIS Nursing EVELYN DAVIS Accounting .JANICE DAVIS Home Economics JAYN E DAVIS Nursing MARIETTA DAVIS Elementary Education VICTOR DAVIS Technical Education MICHELE DELAUGI-ITER Mass Media STEVEN DENISH Management WILLIAM DENNIS Biology SHERYL DETTKE Nursing ANN-MARIE DEUCHER Graphic Design LINDA DICKINSON Nursing CATHERINE DICKS Nursing CYNTHIA DI DOMENICO Fashion GREGORY DIERINGER Natural Science DARLENE DIERKES Nursing JAMES DOERR Marketing :ff .E A -if 'gui i if -9' -el --- MICHAEL DORSEY Mechanical Engineering KATHLEEN DOUGHERTY Graphic Design PEGGY DRAINE MABLE DRAKE Community Service Technology KAREN DRECHSLER Elementary Education JOHN DREW Civil Engineering STEPHEN DUBETZ Civil Engineering PAULA DUBINSKY Data Processing STEPHEN DUBRAVCIC Political Science DENNIS DUBS Civil Engineering MICHAEL DUDICH Management MARYELLEN DUGAN Fashion ROBERT DYE Geography DIANA DYKE Community Service Technology BARBARA EARHART Business Education HERBERT EAST Chemical Engineering TAMARA EDMISON Nursing GODWIN EKECHUKU Geography SUSAN ELEFRITZ Nursing TIMOTHY ELMORE Applied Math JEAN ENSWORTH Dietetics FREDERICK ERBE Transportation STAFFAN ERICKSON Electronic Technology HELEN ESMONT Nursing SUE ESTEAD Elementary Education EVERETI' ESTOCK Commercial Art LINDA EVANS Business Management Technology NELIA FAJARDO Technical Education PJ! ,. l' IVIARCIA FALOR Family 84 Child Development SANDRA FAFRKAS Visual Arts DIAN E FARRELL Medical Secretary MARY FAZIO Speech 8: Hearing Therapy MICHAEL FETTERS Technical Education THOMAS FINK Nursing ROGER FISCHER Electrical Engineering ROBERT FITZ Management GEORGE FLEMING Mechanical Engineering CAMILLE FLETCHER Special Education DAVID FLINT Finance RAYMOND FLORES Mechanical Engineering JAMES FELTER Accounting WI LMA FENN ER Business Education 554.4 H P l . 'ix YA " , ff 6 Q...-9, fa-PY :jf :H-J I 5911, 'lnzvf 6 'Qs we NEIL FOGARTY Political Science ROBERT FOLK History ELLEN FORD Nursing DEBRA FOSTER Physical Education PAMELA FOTI Business Education LISA FRANJESEVIC Finance GARY GASSER Geology JULIA GASSER Dietetics TAMMY GEARHART Executive Secretary MARY GEORGE Mass Media RICHARD GEORGE Accounting BONITA GETZ Legal Secretary DIANE GALES Technical Education FRANK GAIVIBOSI Accounting CAROL GANNON Special Education RONALD GARIVIAN Elementary Education ROBYN GETZ Elementary Education KENNETH GIFFORD Mass Media ANITA GILD Political Science GARY GIORGIO Natural Science LINDA GLENN ANGELA GLIATTA Business Education PENELOPE GOLDEN Ballet PATRICIA GOIVIOLA Data Processing RICHARD GORRELL Accounting ev' -E qt.:- Mvl 1897 EDWARD GRAVES Chemical Engineering CHARLES GRISPIN Chemistry CYNTHIA GROSS Elementary Education KAREN GRUSZEWSKI Elementary Education PATRICK GSELLIVIAN Civil Engineering TIMOTHY HABECK Accounting THERESA HADDAD Technical Secretary HARRY HAKENSON Alcoholism DEBORAH HALL Executive Secretary 2 I I if I eff. 2 DENNIS HALL Marketing JOHN HAMPTON Mass Media PATRICIA HARALAMBO Spanish SHERRY HARPER Business Management Technology Executive Secretary THOMAS HARRIS Finance RO B E RT HART Construction Technology 3. A A ii, .- .- -r.. 5--rs .ff . . .,--1 , ' '-Tw ' 'ffild-"H ffJ'i.J "'.. "'v,.'I.W n r . hi' ' Ln--"f..'i K, --' 4.11515 ' ' " - ..i.fx ,.. - -. L' , u ' -' Hi Jim, ' v :yin 'gn Y,,Y.,,'f ,.i .l, ,, , .,. 'JA , 17,1 l .., ,, ,I I MV. ,F - at -4 ,'- '4'1,l,, fjfiwxt im-Nan.,,,n1. sf A I fl, . , f K ., , . f,V , .I v , ,I . . -f.,, 5 ' .M , S-1 'A -.-E, 4g'g-2- A A ? PATRICIA HARTENSTEIN Elementary Education G EO RG E HAFFIZ Electrical Technology SHERRYL HAWK Executive Secretary LESLIE HAYES Business Education Executive Secretary JUDY HAYN ES Elementary Education HENRY HEFFNER Technical Education JAMES HELMKAMP Biology ELIZABETH HENLEY Legal Secretary MITCHAEL HENNESSEY Psychology JULIE HERMAN Textiles 81 Clothing NANCY HESTON Nursing STACEY HEYWOOD Marketing SUSAN HOFFMAN Nursing MICHAEL HOLIAN TINA HO LLEY Executive Secretary MICHEL HOLZBACH Elementary Education HOLLY HOSTETLER Nursing PAUL HUCHOK Accounting T PATRICIA HICKOX Dietetics AGNES HIFIKO Medical Secretary JANICE HIRKO Geography EFIIC HIFIT Mechanical Engineering Sf J., :Pi 45'-Eff L ,1 CAROLYN HUDSON ROBIN HUDSON Marketing ANNE HUMMEL Elementary Education BRENDA HUNSICKER Medical Secretary ROBERT HUNT Mass Media NANCY HUNTER Executive Secretary Industrial Distribution 41?- -np fi l , tn Vg fe-FQ lu QQ. . JW CHAD JENNICH JANICE JOHNSON Nursing MARNETIA JOHNSON Executive Secretary Retailing WARREN JONES Transportation DENISE KACMAR Nursing SAMI KAKISH Biology DEBORAH HUTCHINGS Civil Engineering MICHAEL HVASTA Marketing GARY IHASZ Psychology JACOUELINE JACK Commercial Art MICHELE JACKSON Home Economics ZENIA JACKSON Community Service Technology LUNETTE JANEZIC Legal Secretary TERI JARES Geography 7 KAFI EN KAPUT Nursing RON KARA WADE KAR HAN Biology ANNAMARIE KARIKAS Textiles 81 Clothing KAYE KASCHAK MARY KASE Accounting MONICA KEIL Nursing CYNTHIA KEITH Business Management Technology REBECCA KELLEY Physical Education REGINA KELLY CRYSTAL KEN DALL MICHELLE KERN Nursing ELIZABETH KERR Home Economics MARK KINDER Psychology EARL KING Mass Media MADALANE KIRKMAN Nursing JAMES KISH Criminal Justice Technology JOSEPH KLAMUT Management DEBRA KLEIN Nursing LAWRENCE KLE'ITLINGER Electronic Technology MJ' 1 N ,329 . NT 'Qi' 2 .3 fe I L ix - WN XX Z ' ii, ,V-. S- ww. .,, hater-- JGIN MWA .- ,nf ROB ERT K Ll M M Marketing DAVID KLI NECT Electronic Technology JUDITH KLINGLER Physical Education ALAN KNAPP Geography DAVID KNIGHT Accounting BRUCE KNIPPENBERG Electronic Technology ELIZABETH KOCHMAROS Surgical Assistant KAREN KOHART Legal Secretary CHRISTINE KOLACZEWSKI Math RAYMOND KOLLAR Electrical Engineering ALEXANDER KOLOSIWSKY Management ELLEN KOVACEVICH Management WILLIAM KOVACS Business Management Technology LYNN KOVALCHIK English KARL KRABER Psychology PATRICIA KRAEMER Nursing LYDIA KRIBS Marketing GLENN KRIZAY Political Science- Criminal Justice NANCY KROEGER Nursing CYNTHIA KRUTY Nursing 239 240 AN N LASK I N Dietetics JAMES LAWRENCE Marketing SHARON LAWSON Office Service Technology S U SAN LAYKO Civil Engineering LALIT KUMAR Electrical Engineering LORE'ITA KUPAR Nursing DOUG LAP -1 --c n3L5"' ' 4 .mozer-I F005 , , CHERRIE LEBARRE Nursing LARRY LEDMAN Accounting JUDY LEITER Accounting T .5-'V .. Legg ,..1 g?V. 'A BY A ,V Q-kwgznfwf, . ,yr kzzzv' I ,, DAVID LENART Marketing STEPHEN LEN EHAN Chemistry SUSAN LESKOVYANSKY Nursing I T7 I -nh ' Vugqkln- , fx if if is LINDA LINCICOME Music DIANE LINDSEY Data Processing LINDA LOEFFLER Data Processing PATRICIA LESLIE Accounting CATHY LEWIS MICHAEL LEWIS Nursing REN EE LEWIS Nursing MICHAEL LOEFFLER Electrical Engineering SUSAN LONG Nursing VICKI LONGSTRETH Foods Bl Nutrition MARIWI N LONGVI LLE Nursing MARGARET LOPATOWICZ Dietetics MARTHA LORADITCH Elementary Education LORRAINE LUCAS Nursing GAYLE LUIZZI Mass Media MARY LUKACIK Ballet BRIAN LUNDY Accounting GLENN LUTTNER Elementary Education MARK MACE Applied Math -idk DAVID MACH LES Nursing MARY MACU RA MICHAEL MADONIO Civil Engineering COLLEEN MAHAN Respiratory Therapy ROBERT MALLOY Electrical Engineering ANTHONY MALONE THERESA MANIJAK Data Processing SANDRA MANIS Geography DANIEL MARCHETTA Accounting THOMAS MARIMON Mechanical Engineering JAMES MARKER Civil Engineering ANN MARKINO Medical Secretary JOHN MARKUS Accounting CINDY MARQUARDT Nursing DONALD MARSH Elementary Education NEVA MARSH Accounting RICHARD MARTIN JOAN MASCIO Mass Media 24 44 KAREN MASTROIANNI Nursing BARBARA MATTHEWS Family Si Child Development Social Work LAU RA MATTH EWS Psychology DIANE MATTY Accounting RUTH MATTY Accounting PAULA MATY Home Economics BETTY MAYS Business Education MARY NIC ARTHUR Dietetics LEE MC BEE Elementary Education CHRIS MC BURNEY Elementary Education JAMES MC CANS Civil Engineering CARRIE MC COY Music TINA MASIELLE Accounting MAR K MASS! E Biology SYBIL MC COY Criminal J ustice Technology :fi e-,gf 'ae' ta? PHILIP MC DANIEL G-uv' Management is-I A "3 . vii " N AUDREY MELTON Social Work BARBARA MENTIS MARIA MESKO Marketing lifu 5 CAROL METZ Nursing ROBERT METZ Nursing MARA MICHAILOVS Biology THOMAS MC GINLEY Management KEVIN MC MAHON Psychology MARK MC OUAIN Accounting GAYLE MECKLER Nursing CATHERINE MICHEL Nursing DIANE MILKOVICH BARBARA MILLER Management BARBARA MILLER Executive Secretary 24 46 HAROLD MILLER Management MARK MILLER Construction DAVID MILTER Sociology NlCOLE'lTE MININNI Nursing ELIZABETH MINSON Nursing THOMAS MITAN Civil Engineering GREGORY MONSANTY Civil Engineering KATHY MOORE Respiratory Therapy MICHAEL MOORE Chemical Engineering T. ,L., i' SHARON MORGAN Mass Media gl F f 4 FRED MOSELEY Accounting DALE MOSER Mechanical Engineer CONNIE MOSS Textiles 81 Clothing MARK MOTTICE Biology DONALD MURRAY industrial Accounting IRVIN MUSSON Accounting PATRICIA NELSON Nursing FEREYDOUN NEMANI Management GARTH NEWBERRY CLARENCE NEWMAN Psychology 247 48 NANCY NEWPORT Criminal Justice Technology DINH NGUYEN Mechanical Engineering WILLIAM NICE Management JAMES NICHOLAS Mass Media DENISE NICOLINO Executive Secretary Business Education THOMAS NOE Real Estate Technical Education SHARON NO'I"l' Sales 84 Merchandising MARK OELTJEN Elementary Education 'iivv' Yrs' CHARLOTTE OKEY Nursing MICHAEL OLAH Political Science KATHLEEN O'NEILL Q MARK ORAVECZ Accounting LORI OSBORNE Graphic Design H EATH ER OWEN Biology JANE PAOLANO Marketing CHARLES PARNELL Special Education MARIA PATITUCCI Executive Secretary DALE PATTERSON Visual Arts .mp- DONNA PATTERSON Management JAMIE PATTERSON Social Work RENEE PERREN Executive Secretary MARY PERSKY PAULA PERZ Dietetics SUZANNE PETERS History JOHN PIERKO Civil Engineering JOHN PITIVIAN JOHN PLOENES Biological Science PAMELA PLOGGER Nursing , Y f xkxhxlq' X .r 41' v , xxx .S V. , N - I I -4 af? I l VICKY POE Elementary Education JANEEN POHL Theatre Arts TONYA POINDEXTER Statistics JOHN POKORNY Accounting DEBRA POLEN Home Economics ELIZABETH POPIEL Nursing ANN POPPLESTONE Biology DENISE POST 24 50 IVIAUREEN POWERS Legal Secretary DIANE PRETZER GERALDINE PRICE Criminal Justice Technology SHELBY PROPST Community Service Technology GEORGE PROSUCH Mass Media VOJTECH PUPIK Management CHRISTINE RADDEN Child Development ALIREZA RAHROOH Electrical Engineering RICHARD RAMSEY Management VICKY RAYMOND Textiles 81 Clothing is ll, If I-le .gpg,L:.'l 4 , , 1,,,,,-., . I - If , .Tryp ,. ., sf-f. .rf 4.. 4 .Q E111 "F H "F: --Lf f 1-, 'f' - lil " ' - A lfii, 935 .ff I ' W "1" 4.-J' XXI l in ....-.-- - J fs... JOSEPH FIECKTENVVALD Civil Engineering MARGARET REED Communications SUE REIHELD Elementary Education KATHLEEN REILLY Theatre Arts 'A aw. FIOBEFIT FIEINHART RITA REX Mechanical Engineering BEVERLY RICE Family SI Child Development DANIEL RICHARDS Electrical Engineering ROBERTA RICHARDS Nursing SANDRA RICHARDS Nursing 52 GRANE'l'l'A RICHARDSON English DAVID RICKEY Mechanical Technology DORA RIDDLE Sociology PATRICIA RIGGINS Business Management Technology Executive Secretary LISA RITCHIE Foods Bi Nutrition PATRICIA ROBERTS Nursing RAYMOND ROBINSON Elementary Education REGINA ROGERS Family Si Child Development KATHY ROMAN Dietetics ROBERT ROOT Electrical Engineering SUZANNE ROSS Business Management Technology DEBRA ROWLEY Mass Media KAREN HOYER Family 81 Child Development ANN RUBAL Nursing DEBORA RUSSELL Elementary Education DARRELL RUTHRAUFF Marketing JAN E'I'I'E RYAN Nursing LISA RYD ER Elementary Education JOHN SABO Math JOSEPH SALEM Psychology LISA SALMONS Industrial Distribution WAYNE SANDERS Social Studies ELISA SANFORD Criminal Justice Technology GAN NY SANNI Biology MARK SANZON E Management JOSEPH SARDONE Physical Education MOHSEN SARFEHJOO Electrical Engineering MARK SASKA LAWRENCE SAVOY JUDINE SAWAYA Foods B1 Nutrition ELLEN SAWCZYN Management 1 1 , . f--gn ' .-' A . , A, K- . A r f 'I - ,Lv ' 1 I - k 'qv A ' If 7 s IT m., rf 7x Nha. ""' v ' g-1 , c 4. . , . I 122- QQ . f f .1- XJ- -f Wf- X. 'Er' I t ' CHRISTOPHER SCALA Management DIAN SCARPELLINI Spanish DAFILENE SCI-IADLE Mass Media TERFIENCE SCHAFEFI Electrical Engineer FIEBECCAH SCHAUB Nursing JANET SCHLACHT Elementary Education WILLIAM SCHNEE Technical Education DUANE SCHFIEIBEFI Civil Engineering DIANE SCHUNIAKER Elementary Education ELAINE SCIARINI Nursing DOMINIC SCIRIA Management DANIEL SCO'I'I' Management KATHLEEN SCOTT Medical Secretary CHARLES SEARS History KENNETH SEBERT Mechanical Engineering .JACOB SEIBEL Psychology Biology PAUL SEVOUGIAN Finance STEPHEN SFERRA Chemical Engineering LAWRENCE SHADLE Chemistry SAMUEL SHAHEEN Political Science DEBORAH SHARPLEY Psychology STEVEN SHEPPARD History KATHLEEN SHISLER Home Economics DENNIS SHUTWAY Accounting SUSAN SHUTNNAY Nursing THERESA SIMON Office Service Technology EVA SIMPSON Business Management Technology BEVERLY SIMS Legal Secretary MARK susico """' Biology MARY SISLER Mass Media rn ,..fv -Zi JEANNE SMILEY JOHN SLAGA Accounting RICHARD SLANCZKA Drawing RAYMOND SLA'I'I'ERY Electrical Engineering DALE SLIVKA Marketing Family Si Child Development DAVID SMITH Sales 84 Merchandising KATHIE SMITH Legal Secretary VALERIE SMITH Graphic Design VIVIEN SNOW Nursing MARGARET SNYDER Home Economics JENNIE SOUERS Nursing ROBERT SOVACOOL Electrical Engineering LYNNE SPAGNUOLO English MARK SMITH Biology RICHARD SMITH Electrical Engineering ROBIN SMITH Psychology SUSANNE SMITH Special Education ROGER SNYDER Biology KATHERINE SOLOMON Nursing FRANCINE SOIVIIVIEFIVILLE French KAREN SOM PPI Primary Education CHARLOTTE SPARKS LESLIE SPENCER Accounting SUZANNE SPENOSO Nursing JOHN SPINELLI History SAMUEL SPINO Chemistry BETH SPRINGSTON Biology RICHARD SPRUNGLE Management BEATRICE SOUIRES Management MONICA ST CLAIR Ballet PA'I'I'l STANCIN Child Development KAREN STARR Technical Education JOAN STEIDL Mass Media THOMAS STEIDL Mechanical Engineering DAVID STEPHENS Nursing SHERRELL STI NGEL Painting LOR E'I'l'A STON E Psychology CYNTHIA STONEBFIAKEFI Nursing DIANE STONEMAN Psychology STEPHANIE STORCH Accounting DENA SUND Data Processing CHRISTINE SUFHCK Nursing RHONDA SWAIN Business Management Technology JUDY SWORD Office Service Technology KATHRYN TALALAS Elementary Education JAMES TAMMARO Electrical Engineering DOROTHY THAFRP Business Management Technology KATHLEEN THOMAS Medical Secretary SALLY THOMAS English NANCY THOMPSON Respiratory Therapy KENNETH THOFINSBEFIFRY Accounting WAYN E TH FIASH Nursing MARK Tl ERN EY Accounting NANCY Tl LLITSKI Visual Arts HOBERTA TOMPKINS ROBERT TOTH REBEKA TRACHSEL Social Work 60 JEFF TUCKER GREGORY TURLIK Accounting PAMELA UNDERWOOD Real Estate FRANK VACCARO Arts Retailing JEFFREY VALENTINE Biology SHARON VALENTINE Special Education GREGORY VAN BUSKIRK ELISSA VANDER Sales 84 Merchandising EDNA TROYER Nursing REBECCA TSOUFIOU Respiratory Therapy LINDA TUCCI Q!! 48 4-. 3 'lx E41-W fg"i!?li.uQ: ' ' E iiu:"f for 'W M ,-. LI. SUSAN VARGO Chemical Engineering ROSEMARY VEGA Nursing RAJIV VERMA Management TERRI VERMIE Marketing EVA VIGLUICCI Speech Pathology Si Audiology .7 RICHARD VIOLA Chemical Engineering MARY VOLCHKO Executive Secretary BARBARA WALKER Dietetics 16- CHARLES WALKER DIANA WALKER MINNIE WALKER Criminal Justice Technology STEVEN WALKER Accounting CH ERYL WALSH Marketing DALEEN WALSH Nursing 2 JENNIE WALTER Management CHERYL WARNER Family Bl Child Development VlNCENT WARNER Mechanical Engineering KAREN WASHABAUGH Nursing Community Service Technology BE'l'l'Y WASHINGTON REBECCA WASSEM Mass Media LINDA WATHEN Nursing ELIZABETH WEAVER Medical Secretary KIMBERLY WEDDINGTON Business Management Technology ir! ,.. Q i Xi g . ffl' MARY WENGER Nursing WESLEY WENGRYNIUK Electronic Technology KAREN WESSEL Home Economics DEBRA WEST Business Education KENNETH WHITE Electrical Engineering KAREN WIGHT Marketing WAYNE WILHELM Food Service Management 264 WILLIE WILLIAMS Management MARK WISNEFI Psychology PAMELA WOODFIUFF Community Service Technology DEBRA WILLIAMS Elementary Education MAUFIEEN WILLIAMS Nursing JAMES WYLES Science JANICE WYLIE Executive Secretary ELLEN WI LLEFOFID French STAN LEY YABLONSKI 'THX .ff Y",.'ffP' Civil Engineering 'SLI' FRANK YURCZAK Electrical Engineering PETER ZEITZ Mechanical Engineering DENNIS ZIMMERMAN Electronic Technology KENNETH Zl MMEFRIVIAN Office Service Technology 66 The Senior Board was very active during the 1978- 1979 school year. In addition to assisting with the plan- ning of commencement, we held several events for the members of the class of '79. We continued the "Senior Night at the Rubber Bowl" program which was begun in 1977. We were able to award 45 prizes to participating seniors. We sponsored a Senior Happy Hour at the University Club that was well attended by graduating seniors. We also acquired the theme-"The Class with Class Seniors of '79" and promoted class identity with this theme. The Alumni Of- fice sponsored individual college receptions to honor the graduating class which helped promote college identity in addition to class identity. Our main event of the year was the Senior Challenge program which has replaced the traditional senior class gift. Teams, captained by senior board members, con- tacted each member of the graduating class and asked for a monetary contribution to the university in the name of the class of '79. We raised more than 332,000 dur- ing this campaign which sported the theme, LIVE . . . from the UNIVERSITY OF AKRON. . .lT'S SENIOR CHALLENGE '79. To encourage the teams to raise money, there was a kickoff where skits were given and instructions were given to all team members. There was also a wrap-up banquet at which prizes were awarded to the winning team and to the top money raisers. The '79 campaign was the most successful so far and we challenge future classes to beat our total. ELLEN D. KOVACEVI CH. President fYsf"'Q 1 1 . K ill' "X Avv 050141 1 I For the graduating seniors of The University Akron, lVlay 1 979 designates the culmination of a for mal education. We were young spending many of most invaluable years at this university. Though diverse interests will separate most of us from another, the classroom instruction, culture, and univer ty life we have experienced will undoubtedly enhan our future pursuits. But, perhaps a more imports aspect of our education was not learning theories frc textbooks: rather, it came from our coexistence w others and learning to harmoniously live together Although conflicting beliefs, morals, and purpos sometimes resulted in dissension and misunderste ding, our basic sense of responsibility, dignity, and l tegrity were never abolished. Since education is a continuous process, we ha not reached a terminal point in our lives. Thus, we sh resolve to move forward, making our graduation more beginning than an end. Our attitudes we ha developed will be reflected in the future in how we api our education and experiences for upward mobility our increasingly complex world of tomorrow. JUDY K. LElTl I 5 K . T i 1 . T .E VJ, D, fA , V 1 1 f 5 1 1 iff J' s, 5. ,I gl Q' H- if '-Q 5 QATU-V uf ' 1 I iff, ' in, ,- 1.-A 'L , . I 1 ' ai . 'nl4,. ,f X fi-M g - Y ,ff A fu.. 1,4 IH W in ., . , M x at Mx..-1 1. If lx sie' .' f .xx x ' . , V ' . ff wg,-:'j N. ' 1 '-,' 1 , ,' W' 1 ' F A F4 'A ,-v.yy31'f- A Ss x S Q 2 Dr. D. J. Guzzetta, President of The University of Akron, presided at commencement ceremonies and conferred 3267 degrees of which 777 were associates, 1834 bac- calaureates, 469 masters, 42 doc- torates, and 145 Juris Doctorates. Two honorary degrees were conferred one of which Dr. Corbally received for recognition of his ex- emplary scholarship in education. An honorary degree was also awarded to Dr. Stanley W. Olson. founding provost of the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine and Professor of Medicine in recognition of his contributions to medical education. Dr. .John Corbally, President of the University of Illinois was featured speaker for The University of Akron's 'lO7th annual spring commencement exercises at the Coliseum. Graduating seniors, faculty, and guests heard Dr. Cor- bally state that a higher education is not for everyone. "Many people are pushed into college and feel like failures if they do not graduate." He stressed that college should prepare students for jobs, but it is essential for colleges "to find ways to help people understand what is going on." After congratulating graduates, Corbally asked if they understand the motivation, com- mitments, and assistance which they encountered while obtaining their goals of graduation. ,gQJ5iTY 1870 I . From Natick, Massachusettes top ranked Joan L. Anderson, a non-traditional student whose hus- band was on faculty, completed the requirements for a BA in Sociology from Arts 81 Sciences after transferring from The University of Hartford. .Joan is married and has three children, is a member of Alpha Kappa Delta - Sociology Honorary, and Sociology Club, and is an involved citizen in the com- munity. Joan is tutoring at Framingham State College in Massachusetts. Many students were singled out for their outstan- ding scholastic achievements, including 59 Summa Cum Laudes, 148 Magna Cum Laudes, 225 Cum Laudes, and 128 With Distinction. Three members of The University of Akron's Class of 1979 shared top academic honors. Joan L. Anderson, Vicky L. Bay- mond, and George C. Schleier-each of whom main- tained perfect 4.0 averages-were class valedic- torians. Vicky L. Raymond was the first from Fine 81 Applied Arts with a BA in Textiles 81 Clothing to graduate as valedictorian. She was a member of Kap- pa Omicron Phi-Home Economics Honorary, the University's Marching Band, and in 1978 named "Who's Who Among Students in American Univer- sities," and was tapped to Mortar Board-Senior Scholarship Honorary. She is employed by the M. O'NeiI Company as an assistant buyer, Vicky is from Avon Lake. Ohio. Also heading the class, George C. Schleier-in- volved in Beta Gamma Sigma, Beta Alpha Psi-Business Honoraries, Pi Delta Phi-French Honorary, Phi Eta Sigma, and in Junior Achievement as an advisor-was the first from Business Ad- ministration to graduate with a BS in Accounting with a 4.0. ln addition, he earned 25 advanced place- ment credits and worked while attending school. George is employed by Ernst 81 Ernst Certified Public Accountants and anticipates earning a CPA cer- tificate. George is a native of Akron where he also graduated valedictorian from Akron Garfield High School in 1974. ml ?' --has X ig X is ww N 1l . 4. .- E7 fkh, q ' , Q X C.. ' if "1 ? dis- 5 ,gg ix ' ...' E N' X ' .X Y I ' :Q P B' ,135 5, F , 1- ' fgyfft . A50 2, iQ .z 'Q' A If H776 . 3,- P5 V 2 n -ri. Q-t Q21 Q . ,M I saw-2S"'i'f WX - H. 5. .g. ..1!' I I '-sr? f' vas. 4 iq ' -. JN 'J 1 if lam E ."i"h,Y 11,1 xy n P' X x 1 JL X. 'Ya f ' ffl , .ti .., :-. v, f Q if Z 5 . : I in ye: -1 I .V . 1 9 .L -O 5 'e1"'l?' 'r . x . X fl :A f x, y Q. HIE I K., X -T lx 'Z K L ' ' ' fa' . , I , ,f , 1 -n ' W 'NX , M A YQ 'E'-g,-'FX .A W 2. fx 1 f' - P fh Q2 , 5' - 'Q qi X , .q X , N N 1 L. - 2 1 V 3 X-1 E lg: QM f, f .Jin ' , fm if if W ff' ,1- X We , ii, ' ' r"l5fQGf"Q5 Charlie McCarthy is packed away for the very last time . . . Golda Meir expires at 80 . . . Norman Rockwell paints no more A. . . Guyanna Massacre claims 900 . , . Yankees dump Dodgers in six i r' .W i iw-v-f' i , i l ., , an vi ii , 4 , . Q1 A- A- V it 31 55.3 .gg J V .X--f'fr4iF,'i - - x Mid: A A f I A 154 -wif 3532?-.B , 'M' ' KV . . . By stinging like a bee AI regains his crown Hayes "clipped" . . . Steelers steal away third Super Bowl, . M I C K E Y . . . M-O-U-S-E . .1-w . N Q X - ,N 9 : WN A t 5' '- v -l . we i ti ': IT WAS A DAY LIKE ALL DAYS . . . America's main mouse turns 50 courtesy of. . . Life. . . Newsweek . . ...John Belushi "Branches out" . .. . Sports Iilustrated . . . Us . . . and Nlork and Mindy are out of this the Akron Beacon Journal . . . world . . . Photos and drawings Research done by...DanieI Cox... 1 . . . AND YOU WERE THERE 276 Dry and die as cancer causing asbestos is found in hair dryers .... . . . . . . . . . . Fuzzy Zoeller wins Masters green ............. "Rocky,' dies at 71 . . Baseball Umpires strike out ........ . . . Rodgers runs to win Boston Marathon . . AGAINI ....... . Michelle fights pal Lee Marvin in court ........ The sun will shine on .- fix li M"xll'!Wlll'il'li'li"l'!ll'lx'lilxlill.'ll'illl'lllMl! li ll'l'lllll"'' Ml l l l l l ' iiii " HW l " 'cs W mei 2-P1:1'1w2:2:s,l:i?-:ww-1.fi - 1 'A SEX , ,f,1' H., ' "'f" , XXX owes ,xxvsi x ex NY Q ' A - Y Y ii Q M Xxx A A 4' :rhsi A yrs rer :A ' 'N "WN x N' -cf 'XE i Mxi ' wg xg -A ' W' - " f ""' N, A "" 'I "" """ - ' 3, L N iii. H., ill 'iii 1 iiii i,ii i ii ., " .A, ' Fl- iiii ---- PT iiiiiiiii we iiii W' A X i,-'-h 'r--r, X N X Y Sk KN u..,' X A N X x X XX Ny xx x c ,..,i .. X XX X V 'a , ' z2fl"' :il: ii, 7' 'f1, V N i'ii'i l i l i'ii l i ' -- xg 'N N 2 A X, i fpffs. Er: A W li il i l Nw ll' if"V"il in i EHQTXHXii X X ll X X x X T' 3 ilwxi "' 555-. Tl 'xx' lilim'Wlllilllullxlll'ii'w'l!iiwiillW"?wlN1illillllU'l xixx YWW NN " !! H lllwiiilllixN'liuiJli'ill'l'Wi3' 'i-1. p'i'i'l'l"'qi, iii, illlillmMM'Mi,,wiJiiW ""' iwlj Nillmmiilllllllxll' iq V Q i' ,nl "-., ii,,,i- 'i'!' ilWllxifli'il'il,,l,qi-i1,,ill,,i,l,i'J i,ii1 i ll' 'i" xm. '4 x'- "iXgSN? Y iiliilllll' l"!"' ilii "" Wi ii' ii" i"iii' l li fi 1 " XYZ' 'i X N X mwx x -. Y - NX X X N X .tro- llE?'ll SQ' XOYC F9111 huh' as Americans view the last eclips till 2024 ............... Midea Peace at last . . . But will it? . . . . .. IT WAS A DAY LIKE ANY DAY . . . . . . . . Three Mile Island becomes a China Syndrome ............ Deco,-m-ol Sends gas prices out of nadoes twist Texas ..... . . Akron Beacon Journal. Village People incite Disco . . . control ................. Bird flies high but Michigan State "Magic" ...... Photos courtesy of . clips his wings .......... . . Tor- Newsweek ,.,,, Life ,,,,,,,,, The liilllllll l l ii ii ul-wi. llglj' ,, A V A 'l-'QVW , .' .A , -Q M '1 Qing ,Z .'I1:Afvf!'13'iL I' '1ii2'X-'...cf mfiiijrffql . 1 2-iw-f:c:u.5 ' ,A '- H ll.-..':1'E.' 1 W W U . . . IN WHICH HISTORY IS MADE tfrzl' 1- if-1 Y, Y if ,Q in 4.-l11,l'?7-fff - - , "'v.1 g'f,,5tvmg.,qWg'p :,4-ehrvii35,2.xg-11:.g,-gp',-QSM.,1:.:',:u7.-:.,gW:'fi Q :, r:'..f JW "33'i"1f3'fKJ4 :V,i'9iT1U5'C4C ' ?i""W:l:"f.'.'lP f,l,3-'fiv--W .., ' 4" "f"5' 215-+" ie-fi Y is 'QE-"-fgix.-. 43231 'iff' -f f Y nf .V ., .4-ff U- V if :rn - iqT-.f,l',.1:f. psf-P? 'f -P - . 1 c ' Y.. '--+32-1' ,512 ..'1+'-A Q -" ,-,T J L' T' . m" -j r- .. ,. , ,.. 4 N .U . -1 3 F' , . ' , v, 1' , a 7 EDITORIAL COMMENT . . . If man does not try new ideas he will be forever stuck in a quagmire of tradition. Innovation is the way man avoids this fate. Innovation, trying those ideas which others of weaker character would never dare try. It is with these thoughts in mind that we have put together and present to you the 1978-1979 University of Akron Tel-Buch.. There are those in society who believe that new ideas should not be tried. As Editor I believe differently. l directed my staff to the end of being non-traditional, and as creative as possible. This book is the essence of innovation. We attempted new ideas. Sure, not all the ideas we tried will be accepted, but the main thing to be remembered is that we tried them. We dared to break tradition. We dared to be different. We dared to be innovative. The major innovation for this year is the inclusion of group shots. Group shots had been discontinued in the book, due to the increase in the size of the University. There just wasn't enough room for them. This year we felt that groups were the core of student activities, and that more students could be included in the book. But one of the major problems with group shots in a yearbook is that the student who is not involved in any campus organizations has to sit and read through an odd number of pages that have nothing to do with him. So for that student I excluded group identifying copy, and in its place included pictures from around campus. This way more students could be included in the book, and students wouldn't be bored with a block of nothing but group shots with copy. For the people who sit back and say: "What of the future? How are we going to know who's who?" To those people I answer: the people in the group that are im- portant and mean something to you, you will remember their names, whether they are included or not. Also lack of money did not allow us to include all the groups on campus, so we sent letters out to various organizations and asked them to answer a couple of questions, and return the form. Those groups that showed the con- cern to take the time to fill out the form, for the most part, were in- cluded in the book. Another new idea I had was less use of copy. This year I felt that a good descriptive headline would be better to stir memories than a lot of boring copy. I also felt that since "a picture is worth a thousand words" that by using pic- tures to describe events they would speak better for themselves than excess copy. Also, I did not use copy in the opening or closing sec- tions, but used sunny photos for the Open and winter photos for the Closing and left the words up to your imagination. Other innovations I tried in- clude: the use of the graphic sym- bol. Isee drawing A.i By using this symbol I escaped from the con- straints of a stated theme Ii.e. memories? and thus give the book many more directions to follow than a stated theme would allow. Also the use of unusually shaped pictures add to the overall style of the book, making it a little bit different than previous books. The use of color is also down to a minimum in this book, mainly due to rising costs. But with the color on the division pages I tried to create an effect of day to night, by varying the shading of the color along with the spring to winter effect of the opening and closing sections. And that's about it. What I have tried to do here is to explain the reasons for what you have just viewed in the book. This book is different, whether you like it or not is your option. But what I would like you to remember is that we tried these ideas. In a time when conservatism and tradition seem to be the trend, trying new ideas is a breath of fresh air. So enjoy the book because it is different, and above all because it is untraditional. It is innovative. IL VVU5 UIIU YIBCK of a learning experience." E 0 Drawing 7941, The Logo. NDERS F. L. Andersky Editor-in-Chief University of Akron 1978-1979 Tel-Buch The 1979 edition, Volume 66, of the University of Akron TEL- BUCH was produced by Inter- Collegiate Press, Inc. 6015 Travis Lane. Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201. Volume 66 contains 288 pages, and 5000 copies were printed. The printing surface is 9" x 12" and the paper stock used throughout the book is Kingston 1, 80 iii Double Gloss Enamel. The Endsheet liners are Gold Snow Velum. The heading style and all body This picture brings back a ton of memories. Well. actually about thirteen tons of memories: apiece. Keith and I spent a hell of a Tuesday unloading Qfel-Buchs from the delivery truck and taking them into the student center. When we asked for some help from the Director's office we received a dolly. and were told to expect some help shortly. It never showed up. copy incorportated in the book is Newton Medium Italic and Newton Medium respectively, with point size ranging from 8 pt. to 36 pt. The cover is embossed 4368 Forest Green on a 541317 Shoegrain material, with Gold Em- bossed aif991 Top Stamp 701. All books are Smyth sewn, rounded and backed with silk headbands on 160 pt. binders board and were manufactured by Inter-Collegiate Press in lola Kansas. 1 978-79 TE L-BUCH STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF Frederick L. Andersky MANAGING EDITOR Richard J. Bohn ASSOCIATE EDITOR Keith Scheiderer COPY EDITOR Ken Poast SECTION EDITORS Academics- Judy Leiter Campus Life- Angie Lillo Greeks- Fred Andersky Sports- Chris Osmar Dorms- Keith Scheiderer Ken Poast Seniors- Rich Bohn World Report- Dan Cox ARTIST Ann Osrnar PHOTOGRAPHERS Fred Andersky Lloyd Dull Jeff Lytle Erik Skarl Bob Wilkey STAFF Carole Bertele Melanie Clifford Rita Greco Paul Sekerak Andersky Bohn Poast Scheiderer Lillo Wilkey Sf .1 QL -MQCH eg... Leiter Clifford Cox Bertele 3 rj!! 5 6' 'I Osmar Greco Sekerak Skarl 7f 5Ng '91-sy-1 JA ,T ,lase"'-'F-Q 1 ' .Ji 7.44 .r., 5- - .- :rf 1 ,. ' . -'f 1 Ax I f ,.. 5 W X in X , 4-sf! 5' fm "K, V , A .3 " 'J-'J , g Ai ,Qs ECO? N0 PARKING no wxmgeme NCD PARKING no panklmg NO PARKING no nnnmnc , no par-kung if , NA xMLm"i5ww!AQv- M f ll 445 fi .T ',: ' LN' N, ' . ,. , N df, .645- 'f , I V I if Xi,- , X QQ Lmqmgmngg NO pimms G no wvsgmxxe N0 PIHRIZI NG no panking NO PARKLNG no Pnnnlna no par-km 9 NCD PARKING no Pnl!!-IIIIG 4 - J 'B Wwmwmm mm -.J "-s . ,1- LJ- iw- A-'of' ff me: -' 7' :.,, '. :Z "N 25 L --mc 'wa-'fav Mind" T-., ' X X 285 6 1 Q +- i 1 '1 Q- I , 4 nj 5 M N Y uwwgg Q If If v up 44:1 This yearbook may not mean much to you novv, but wait about 10 years or so. You'll be home reading the even- ing paper and your son or daughter, who had been rummaging through the attic, comes up to you and presents you vvith a dust covered book and a questioning look in his eye. You look at the book, it looks familiar, but you just can't place it. You blow off the dust and realize it's your college yearbook. Suddenly your mind is filled with memories: the parties, studying for that final final, the trips to Florida over spring break, and all the other events that meant something to you. And that's what a yearbook is for. To remind you of the events that were impor- tant to you. and only you. All these pages mean different things to different people, and each page helps people remember the things that were important to them. For a yearbook is for tomorrow, so each of us may remember our own special todays. 4 1 Y w us W W 1 Y


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