University of Akron - Tel Buch Yearbook (Akron, OH)

 - Class of 1975

Page 1 of 296

 

University of Akron - Tel Buch Yearbook (Akron, OH) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 296 of the 1975 volume:

EEN HllMl!!H llWI W GC 977 102 AK7UNl 1975 1975 Tel Buch The University of Akron Akron, Ohio 44325 Volume LXII 7' Pu ,an FU , 15 1MsewZ1?f2 W- 'mvigw ,, , QL ,,,W'.mfw- xy u " ,, gm-L 7. .49 L, H 11 , 'Ziff 71,4 A' -1, if-iw X iff? Academics Page 14 Actlvltles Campus Lrfe 58 Dorms Greeks 180 A th Ie tres Wm ter 2 Sp ring 230 Seniors Page 248 Fall .. .... 202 ' . . . 16 We of the University mu ,f ,rx . x ' dignity of the individual ith . A W., . A-11 :Mu wi... vvlnufi """"""""""""""""""""',,,.r I C."::.QA 2 .4 4, 1-11 - H773 li W meaningful employment h'-2-'ff protect the integrity of his personality I ! I I , P , ,f X ,. I X F v' t W., W -eh t Q9 s x ,. 1:3 ,V N. tiff T3 . , t Jw' V J-' , --'Kiki' I even in the midst of mass instruction ll 11 XY 1 show him the fulfillment that comes ,F FM 3 from working with others V'ff, 31 ,734 XXA 4 HQ iii! 549 1 9' us--V 4-. .M If 'L 5 , ""rksf X: ,: an 'E' ww M55 J M 5 fm. , W. V. wif A vi Y M UN 1 45 U- 1 a ' G 1... U 'u ,M :egr- Q- H. ,- , 4f.,w:u5. 5 Y M B swf . . qw' ,H f mx .WW V , N A mmwAWww wMmwfwww V-m,wm v Jhm:wf w W W y ' ,fra :W N ' nb 4' 2' 'w" P 'WwMm+wywfm, ..,, , . A f Q5 ' 'gf-W, vw1'L'wL. ., . , ,MHLX f '- .:L"Q., 5. n'a.:,r'i'- M, fm,,L,,: ..,.,.V Y v1f?+!2EL1es4,' , f ,fg,351A:,vaw t. ' 1,54-Q1 Q ri, fhww. MW 5-E ' Q 41 ,,,:g,,k Mi, X , ,, wzivegww , up H ., , , QM' T 25" , , 5 f gi' mf " 4 H ,fx I WF. , H , I ..: u' HEY! Www , ' X 12', :QQ1'.'LHf2figaa4g- Ml' ' " N W A .N Q . we ,, fgqilf M - fa 1' mmf f ' A w'gwf'1,j- , ,S N, ' I 11 :"f'fk5 M , '..w..,i: .m. H Qs, 3 .651 A .. ,.mf,A ,:'eE'3-Lf' ..3iQ'12',ff,1f' nw? , J xv ,A we qw. ., 'lt X ff , ,w 1 , ,i sy" V , 'uaiw 4 K ' H5 ' . 4 , 1- if "" u Tf5V'Z?5,fZi,' N21 '- 'W ' ww li, Nw. " E ww , , 1: Y' - sf In "7 -W3 sf "?"-F?'fwr'5ff:w' 3RWmHwNwfQAg '3 , --1- Wxif A W- M3173 f.f9'i5'L ff5Wi'f'?2 7 1W7f:?,Q YZWW' N ' 1 Af, Sw w,,Q'5i' ' 'jf-' 1- " ' W" 1" Q. , f .V A 'f ,Q wWfw 'wM:1M HHyew - .55-.,319f' .1,kv3vy"1:fe: 41. Qr ,, "wily: , Y X w , , Y .ww Aw .:.- X -:4 1 ' ww? fll ,Ig gs 'rw 'va wk M N' ff : W his own destiny. I mA-. 'vvvpx J ' Q 5' 'Wi Em. H , - 'sf , , 5,4 ,wise d4',,,-rw, , Mya-1: . ., fr 4 N 1' f4'gaih--- ', . -qsee311,54', 1vf , f , :'.g1:'v',1,a, 4- H, 1 ' 'V 1::,.wzwr1af:,,g, w, , M,,,Y 4:4 . ,M .JL . - L J. 33? , r I Af E L Z' ,www Aql dviwx I H f iff. 5-,Im 1- Q33 ff ,g w .-2,1 A .4 A, , , , - Y - 1,-,pf,, -rg W ' "" Wl7f91flTw'v g- ---.N ,J 55133.:1?W7??iiE'??'f'T'fW ,". , H :r3'.Z 'fL , ?n ' iM?- lil35T1'f'W fi -12:4 ' 1-.31-E11 ' ?45f4if1Q'fXif3ffQkLlf?A'Vlilf-TiffN ' '- . , f , A " - fm A7 L J W Q , f M 6 ' , I V ,gf , ' 1 il fp, ,nv 'Him 1 I f J' 1 rg LH 2 Q., '54 uf iff f L ff 41 14 W, "I am on a voyage of discovery. I search for those ot you who will go on a great adventure. I am looking for you, one of the audacious few, who will face life courage- ously, ready to strike straight at the heart of anything that is keeping you from your best, you intrepid ones behind whom the world moves forward. To you, I am go- ing to unfold a secret power that but few know how to use-the secret power of daring and sharing which carries with it tremendous responsibilities. Once you have it, you can never be the same again." William H. Danforth General Basics-that is what you attain from General College. From Physical Education to Effective Speaking, General College provides the background for further college courses. "Teaching the student to be a well-rounded person is the prime purpose of education and it starts right here," states Dean Thomas Sumner. The General Studies program is aimed at developing a person 's ability to understand and express ideas effectively, and to think accurately. The exposure to the many facets of General College enable students to better understand themselves and their own individual abilities. 18 Academics!General College 3 fun! Awww. AI' -Q K 3 4 ' 'X IE. Q. " 45 SQ, , Q42 X.. Sq! 1. 'Y is 'Q ittfg 5 -'s gg if 5- 'A 5 Sxtitgxikx 'ix 'KX 'fx 'X ix W I' X qx ' .K is 'Rx N .A ,l W xxxx 41. 6 xx '15 K- 1 A. 'fn ,.x'l.,hxX,f,! X 'R 'lf' X x n"t Academics!General College 19 P w ,...M, N . f.a ,sg 57' " Lita A '7' H' N' WX' wk .s,w. L, yn., all Q5 P1 ....-in f'r- ,X ...Q-5.7 it 1 Sy ws ,, 345, A ffgiiw gil 4"4Q??l95?El Q, Q 4pQZSfb3'xS,'bQY, 'S Wa Kxfxebs- Q sfmiirif jfbi-,Xfg y. G N5 An Kwai' yr- 20 Academics!General College f. l l A, -If . 'S X Individual Abilities Are Learned Through General Courses AcademicsfGe "JL s Q C 81 T College Boasts 2-Year Program Para-professional and technical careers in business, industry, and science are made available to students who take a broad range of occupational education programs in the Community and Technical College. Graduates are prepared for almost immediate employment in their fields and are provided with the potential to adapt to future technological change. A student can choose from a two year degree program in Business and Office Technology, Engineering and Science Technology, Public Service Technology and Allied Health Technology, or may continue his or her education through a four year Bachelor of Technology Degree program. lt has been estimated that by 1980, more than 25 percent of the Ohio work force will be engaged in semi-professional, technical and highly-skilled job classifications requiring at least two years of post high school education, therefore, the C 8. T College is a very important aspect ot the University . of Akron. Editors note: Robert C. Weyrick was named Dean of C 8. T College this year. 22 Academics!C 81 T W Vx I 1,55 ,, E V I X Qs PK ft , HM" Q'-,lem ' 4 ' ' "lf, 17? A!"T " YY! ' 5'1'l?"' F" PT' - M - 1 . r H ar N ir, A .Q I' iw -- I' 3 Q if 5.- ww 1151 f x,,,,.1wMww. .nw ,, 4' Q, ' - ' 1 , H .ah . x' JF5 v f 5 Q. 1' 4 , ,I tl pf QQ ?',.9,Jg, ,, ' 5 " -W ,Gu '- .JN 9.5 ' 149 - . ,- .A,,4,.m,,.: ,A V-M22 X, Ji-'Q' 'Z -w, 1 yr , , ,HQ ' -,554-dl", 4,4 ' Q 'Img 1 QQ fl. Q?-if-f"r 1-ez. , .,j'..,fq .' Q wif r , is 5,-. 1. WA if3,,,wL QQ, ly . ,X wirfa -hxvvzkf ,.. , 1 'iw A 4 A-' f' A Q V 'Q 'ar F , Y m mx' ' , ' 'Sf' Q O ' . 'ffgpli "A..m..if'9"V -H V, 's,ffwg?? Academics!C 8. T 23 .mfsvw-an Au ,Ariz 1 4- ffflgfgi' f vm 'E0' v 1 24 AcademicsfC 8. T Students Prepare For Immediate Employment - ' Wt.-.,, ' - V H.. V' I ,.' , 2 te. , -Hg. X .6 2 , 1.14 .:J,. 1: .53 f i2"?.Zis-M ' it f" - f' ,, 4 il- 5x91 4 F '1 ,g-N K -'mt' me S X, 'Lia .IN .l Academics!C 8. T 25 Arts Nurture Man's Heritage Undergraduate and graduate education in the artistic, technological, clinical and studio aspects of speech, the dramatic arts, music, the visual arts and the family life arts are provided by programs in the Fine and Applied Arts College. Through the congregation of the arts, the college attempts to nurture and expand not only a knowledge of man's creative and cultural heritage, but also a perceptual awareness of direct sensory experience through creation and performance. "We prepare students for professional iobs while teaching them to enioy aesthetic and cultural experiences," , expresses Dean Ray Sandefur. Q 95,45 fI I'3:?,f 26 Academics!Fine 8. Applied Arts Cf' CQSU 'W' SAW If 6, S if Z mx V sm XXXX XXXX mm MX' N WX U at in XX' X xx I I, All 2111 T. 1- ', '. li yy, 1' Inj. Ap s -v n"s"u H s l 5 x I 'hull s' 4 , I ' " 'sas N xxx QX g .... my -xx, ','5 x:e""h' uw, xx s XX X X MAB. '- ve1:m 'ivvmM tm .',, 1 X. " Q 3 RQQ"3c'6.,5R H 1 ' 'X - I x - ,. 'dtiilm A Sixty, Q! .5 x A . Cad9mlCSfFine 8' Ap I P fed Arts 27 .-if 1,7-.f f'1. i xf..-f 4' f-. -r-4.5 fmat:.fi?541 ' f it tv- Q,-.v,..,,,' fe ., ,u..,N, ,mf- .-My 26' f,,i.,, ,u J, .Mr Mg my.-1. .M 14- vw f, J , 11,59 v W - im ' Q-,zu . ., 41 ,N ,-,. Fine 81 A ppliedA rts Stress Creativity, Performance st , , 'xtsvgw-V., Q1 fb si. 'lldgs K I -4 in e w J ,wr .lf , 'V' ?' i fy, i ti 1, . ,rt w r 5 , ,lfsfg 1- ' b F .N . " :" -mg I , I 1 g, A i t Q99 H4226 ' n I ii' , 4 . 1' f et,, l'fVE?-51m 28 Academics!Fine 8. Applied Arts r f, fi- v Ili- ws Q'-'J wg' ffm ' . , "' '12 15'-:ref 1 QA' f if 'Tm 'YT v -1? .gm - M., ,,,.,.: , ,nw n F. .flgggg A535 J VP ' :PQI qglifilji A fa, y ,. n -,mf Y ' 'wi an -7" F5 J 5 VW-'X Jin' .1 I' x Academics!F1ne 8. Applied Arts 29 Aw Co-op ls "Heart" of Engineering Since 1913, the College of Engineering has been providing sound instruction in engineering principles. Whether it be in Chemical, Civil, Electrical or Mechanical Engineering, a student is expected to become well versed in the arts as well as in his own particular field. The "heart" of the undergraduate program in Engineering is in it's five year cooperative program, commonly known as Co-op. This is an optional plan of alternating work with study and begins in a student's third year when he is formally admitted into the college. Annually, the College of Engineering holds an "Open House" where the students display experiments and projects. This year the displays included a twenty- four toot tall distillation column from the Chemical Engineering department, an acoustics lab from the Mechanical Engineering department, a concrete canoe 1 from the Civil Engineering department and- an Electromyrogram from the Electrical Engineering department. M ,L- TNJ 'N x 30 Academics!Engineering QQ 5 Q Z!! 25295:-::"' . 1 1 f .- :Gnu "' III R . .. . an , x y x v' Ill lllllll' llllllll llnlilll llllllll' lllllll' :l:lll' I I I 'HE :if .4.. f Wx .gs 61 l .,.. I .... I ,,.. Im!! . 4 xx L, --..,- I fl uf A 1 'L v ,' E U' ' 6 5 1 vi, r My i 4 U1 ,, aj Dean Coleman Major ,fx G f ,g ig 1: ww-aw-1-uf' -f-uvwvv ' 1 f' xxx' "'!v"X ,1 H, " I easy.-MM-..-. .. MM, , 1 M ' ' in 4 u ," F X X 'gh' wwvmnvim-.-,.,.,,.. views -v-seems. . E ' au., , ve flw-,.,,..,,,,m, nw M AcademicsfEngineering 31 Projects at "Open House" " ' 'ililliltlil Students Display E61 -nv ni rn, ,,,,.,,,- A , . ' N1 E14 ,fig W we Div ' 4 ,Q 'if SN xx? tff, vw., f Z 'R+-xV',,, 7 Cf? t L in... af fx fs inf.,- ..- 1 Qi- 'f--.., ,...,-..-u.- if-ff fl- l l 2 UPVR A ,Ulf PUNSUI .L .1-sv fl 4 ' fn' ' W- ii, " ' 'A p-1:-7.1.01 E +4 ' "fTni ,Hn -' ' 'Wig ij," spw-ff . W JM, ' nlwiq rj' 1 ... '. VM' i J balk, WF' I .Y - N '31, rw as., g - Ln-. , - ' S--.. - fm Pau if I it . 'gl'eWWV 1. r 1 ' Q H - S il 2 I-... we Fi, A --Y v YM ' -v., ' V fx 3 pn' fvr . 5 4 mln ' , L -MLM -' 3 ' - Y Y' r ,.3..,., ,,W,T V 5 Y FX lm 1 sfykg-,,'fv,,agi iz' 6 'Z' 4 an S: M , zo A SW. - 4 , thug ,S f ' if 1' f ' L' -V lv - - 1 ' ff i'7"Qf'H J sa I Kp y ,Hx -3 .,,,, -, Ml -M ,,. - Q ' 4' 'iii-f I lunar- . ' 'gr-2 ,iw WN V .UQVAG 1 -.. - " Academics!Engineering 33 S Nl VIP? F if me My 'SH ,ww 34 Academics!Business Administration -3-3-if' 'WMQZQY is 'NM Tiff' 'kai ,xv 2 s R, Business College's Future Looks Bright Enrollment is continually increasing in the College of Business Administration. The total number of students has increased from 1,794 in 1972 to 2,038 at the present. The number of women enrolled is also up from 60 to 222 in five years. With this rise, the college's future looks bright. "I am confident our current student body will accomplish a record of achievements in the years ahead which will surpass the present alumni's impressive achievements. The college is committed to being respected at home while attaining a national reputation. Ultimately, we are judged by our students performance on a job either as an employee or as an employer. l am proud to assert future alumni will be even better competitors than in the past," boasted Dean James Dunlap. An interesting aspect of the college's program is a curricula which must present management concepts, principles and techniques in forms adaptable to a wide range of public and private sectors of society. "Our college is in the vanguard of three recent trends characterizing education for tomorrow's business managers: learning by doing, individualized learning and life long learning," states Dean Dunlap. - , ,M " "'S..3 x x' N, 2 X fn f Dean James Dunlap Academics!Business Administration 35 Women Enrollment Increasing in Business College il...-wi: l , FS 'Za - lv V gnu' as V' ' Q 'tire Nag I was "B-' A W' 1, . 'G , if 1 ,.,:?""' Q! sg A-will W ' I y i'- 'lil' I wg! .g n i i at ' 'ff'-s... .l,s V "- k :::1.,,. , . vwbix X ,,,v--f ., .:., ,IZ ' '.,1'f bk , ,Q 1 X U- ? J ,fx A ff ' Wm' N' sw? ,M .1 in 1- ,gm fi v fre' 2 yn Xl . .. ,:,3.::-.1-gl' I . . 14" Q JW ' A-fd M-MN' -ff Y MM ew 03" Q-w,,,-4 ,Neff x, R Q9 ., x - .av 'K 1 f sf. . ix 36 Academios!Business Administration 3 in - M Qs., E' i x Q I xX Academics!Business Administration 37 I vii 1 v 54555 - A J':'+',- ,4 'Uni ,. , , ' ' vt-QQIU "mer" 5, Q 'LL J, O QOVIX , 1' P . 1Q,f.'Q,,Q, " YJ, . 1 . A xl ,. I ff.. w 1, . N J' A fgjur , 1 74 'f . 1" xi'E'T?f:f7?5fi'9Sbr YH.- 'lgirk ? 'gwif . . -" thai 5 -hir: - M 'M '. .f-rr-X 1 ' 1 - ,, 5: N -1' - 1 1 ' V' ,ww- ' 4 6 1- ,Q za. 1952 kv-ff' ,sw 'Um NGA X A...--""' .f 411 38 Academics!Educa tion Qi Ji, "g..N5 3 - -. ,115 Ei.. 'L x X Yu' Q I X.. .,. , ...WMV , . ,ts . .1 Q... ZA.. ,, V., 1 Hg, ,951 - rt H- 5 if L -j eff' ' ,' ' . if rf x X s 5 X QQ 4. 1 .keg , ,r -, Education Strips ,i l A way Teaching Mythology ixgfw AA p.,Mm,,,,,s..,,, .. ,wt .vt,,, . M ts, .fsfw as N ,M ,4,:.x.N,Q, s , . 1.,n,w gf, ygwvfv ,gs ' - ,-fs,Ltf,-,wx r 'f f-Alfie?-w 'fwsm Q sgzjlfsffxg xt fix-ag,3 f m1 , - uvkvsx3s4.f. AEQZSQ 'f' Kgs-'A12'az kg'-few, 44, wx sy ' Q1-,f,f'ya 1 fi ' fx ff' rfw:'.,1 ', f.. ., Qa tdgii M3,v,,b.2q af -511,2 i ,,', v., A- eff' wr , - fs-. 5 .- Q.. f aQ3.:,,vY5 rv -.ar '- ., 1: ' 1-'f ,A - y, . - -.Q " as ' f fi aw? fi , '- x ',, ftvgiy' i Rasa, Wa kg 'Wet ,QQ .O .ii ,fl vm, f 8 ,iq 4 lb 'xv-3 "if ,fi , - -..X '- 2:9 XY " 5 1 . 'r 4 ' 'ixkx .j QQ. -' , .t NX Obsolete methods ot teaching how to teach have Q been removed from the College of Education's Xlf, ,L ,, .. QE Qgyxi r.. '-xytuwd X,-.QQXX xi L XXXXM curricula. The mythology of the little old lady school teacher has been stripped away and replaced Y xxxgi xml! .,l1'QV5: '-Y' 1--N. - si tba X52--X35-zgi, W xi ff-.ic is .-X R . .NN 4-Tx .-QX ex Qxixzrei X N -, s-51N W Xxxgxltxk 4 ., it E ,A . . - . N , ,V zyxmw, ,W . . 11,7 , .lb at .,,4,, , x with a sound method of teaching students how to teach. This is accomplished through a balanced foundation in general education, study in teaching andfor administration, professional courses and other learning experiences which attempt to combine theory and practice. Dean Kenneth Barker 'Via Academics!Educa tion 39 ' fi -108' at 3 bv N Q K. Q wk ., , , .im 1 4- lm V ' WMV eg 9 , ,.7'f,x - A 3 5 . ii . V1 F5 ws Q , V I 'Q '5 M5 Xi. , , 'K 57' A . a .-ff-f H 2' 5' fwwif- 5 X M W 33 ug. v N- K ' f , fs 'S . fffff ' .gif g 5 X xiii?-Q ' if 5 , xg R 40 Academics!Education i W' Q Obsolete Methods of Teaching Removed from Curriculum rx ' , x' ' ., -Q.-s'5'm V , . Y 4 'E' pm Xw P 'K wwwwwmm ,jaiiiii ygisgig qw W ,xxx 'V' Ava.-1 H-...nil-5. S--N" AcadenHcs!EducaHon 41 Arts 8. Sciences Provide Enrichment Component Whether taken as electives or as requirements for a degree, the coursesoffered by the College of Arts and Sciences prepare students for a richer life when they leave the University. Forty-eight percent of the courses taught at the University of Akron are in the College of Arts and Sciences, consequently almost every student comes in contact with it in some way. The college is -composed of three administrative divisions. The Humanities Division, which is concerned with the intellectual traditions that have formed man, such as the classics, language, literature and philosophy: the Natural Science Division pertains to man's physical environment through studies in such areas of biology, chemistry, geology, math or physics: and the Social Science Division which stresses intelligent participation in community affairs through education in such fields as history, economics, geography, political science, psychology and sociology. The College of Arts and Science does not train people for a professional iob, but it does provide an enrichment component for students. "We help to help you change in a changing world," emphasizes Dean Oetien. 42 A,cademics!Arts 8. Sciences u . ,,.--' if I N..- X 2' , , , x W f If! Q ' r ff- -a .1,,, . .4455 e. . Y ,, NJ 1 Dean Robert Oatien Academics!Art 8. Sciences 43 Aff' 44 Academics!Art 8. Sciences 4' ' il J, : J 'ij-,e af O' ff. nfl .4 , A I It ll "' " 1 , fs gf' 4:-. Lf' I V ' 3 ' ,g"'F'?'f Ai, 6 ' '- 5 x aj 95 5- - -P A P-I can ,.f, , , I ,,i.1v,.4,,iffv, - 1 X ff 'J M A 1 YS A ad, 4310? as A --. N W , Qs? , g X fx , t N g in Ku- wg., iff,-Q . Forty-eight Percent of Course Load Taught In Arts 8. Sciences Academics!Arts 8. Sciences 45 1 I W ff 3 ' Wu '."-, '43 ' 11.11, if' tr 1 kk-fi' f t. 'fi , I, W? A , 93 ,Q 1'-w. ,lvl V IPM wht, ' , 4 at h ,ir fvmgf 'gs 1 cf N- Nj, s Nursing Care Learned A, Through Variety of Courses i t 4 . im l i2,w,,A Q . Objectives of the College of Nursing are A ' 1 to develop a person who is able to X fl sufficiently command the many facets of knowledge basic to having a rational approach to human life and living. lt is important that students acquire a functional knowledge necessary to assess, to plan, to give, and to evaluate professional nursing care in a variety of situations including the hospital, the home, and the community. "We are concerned with the total development of each student," states Dean Estelle Naes. "We not only want our students to be well educated in nursing," Dean Naes continues "but to be socially and emotionally rounded as well." Editors note: Dr. Estelle Naes, Dean of Nursing, is retiring this year. D Est Ile Naes 46 Academics!Nursing 4 l 5 5 5 f 3 5 I N , f, Hy," ,w,,,m.1j ,f 'Ar fn -,,,-47' 11 Academics!Nursing 47 1 '. 2 4. i r " ,., -Th ' ' E E ff I , X ix s 5 Z if t E 1 V. 4 ik' LQ g V7 1 i 5 Q li' Q . Q2 , g gyej: fl V U ' Ylb. ,n V ,,Y--' 5 'H zfffwfgg ffl "3 1 1 W 3 , E 5 'f ' "ff 4. . :",',I. wut X ' ,' f . - I ,. . , , 56 r w X ? 4 s' gs- nit - M .A . , .hi N K 2 -umm -. 2 4 '-1-5 V 5 Q 1 'M' ff L f ' as ' 'E' " t . A a N ' -'gf : ' l,.-9-1-' " 'V- M vD"41- . "' -fl .V 5 , '.-'f-1-N... gf 13 1' I 'V . . f ,A . Q ' I- -iw. 4 Q ,r A N , . x l , I .ix X . 0 in 'K' f T"L',1 ' K xt M- f J x ' f 17 wx 4514'- ' l, f v I X, .W 1 . ,w9'x04 iv 9 v , N V X - X , 1 1 D Caesar Carrino Evening College Supplies Education for Working Adults Devoting special attention to the development of courses for the education and interest of busy part time students through evening classes has been a rich tradition of the Evening College since 1909. This form of continuing education for adults has become a significant pattern for urban universities. Evening College is a continuation of the regular day college life on campus. Credit courses have the same academic value whether taken in day or evening, moreover, many of the full-time faculty members also teach Evening College courses, insuring a high caliber of instruction. Evening College has finally been recognized as an integral part of the University, and part-time evening students are receiving some extra-curricular benefits that they are entitled to. They can now attend football and basketball games and functions at the Performing Arts Hall without paying additional fees. Academics!Evening College 49 'dvi' ' M :Ne . 5 M iwff' f , Q ,f , . .Wh Q' .44-zz K U ' f XR. Mr. George Ball, Executive Director ol University Relations G Dev. . . -A h , NH M A' - ,, - ' .ahJ""' W V .P ff .J if, f' V. ., V f ,. W- t' f ,iv N EW my w , ff f -H. 1 . ,, K 2 Dr. lan MacGregor, Vice President lor Planning xvf"'sv Mr. Wayne Duff, Vice President for Business 8. 50 Academics!Administration Finance Dr. Noel Leathers, Vice President for Academic Affairs Mr. Richard Hensford, Vice Pres. G Dean ol Student Services ...-nu, 1 j 5 , S- V 3 Q T E2 f f 'V 'CJ' f , 1 G ' I in 1 t 5 E 2 'L nfl is V -E. 5 Q 2 ' 5 I ,, I , w L ' Q e - 1 V Q , 1 5. a f ' , g f 3, 9 i E ig f , 2-if 8, 5 A f X 1 5 Q1 Q 4 , 53" x f, f 2 - 5 5 . ,' " 5' , 'L 'Lis Q 2 5 .Q .....-ff 'N-...,g' 4 Q ' ., x Za ,- E .A....w..-w..... 1 2 g s asm 7 PM The Administration y, if if -mph ek . "'.f ff, J g C' '49 'C 4 l 4 ,few 2 x. R5 . N av ' 'I' 'A 'I ' 1 , CN V001 ' fl ' 'im " 'J-. 3 'Q "'fSf, " ,' I N X f A V' 'I , X C 'L A' 'X K I If , , N 1 l , 4 ' --r-f' V t Q ' , R R - Y NN A M , n l 6:14 -' ,ywx 'I -I - V. ' " x f . ., A 4 X , .1 515115 ,f U t, iq t-ag ,M ..rr,..l , .2 Q Q ' ,Week A ap, , A 1 , ,f J V., , fl ,. . f A ' l ffgyie fl ' - I V LW, .iw , X XX K ., lf, F 1 , , ' , , I ,W li a QU' yf'C""w ",f s WX fl-fl l J -we W7 'LACK 1, .XT -'Lx ,ff X0 A yn 4. S x 1 ' gm pn!-5 .ifiwax "Ry" 'iff V K iw-,."" 1-Q. ff X "WZ "At J " ik 'X " " 'f e 5 i I K L' A K,-, ,wig B. Y -IX agfafl LQZAH 'lu'-vga i X"u tl in 5 ftf fx if :A V S.. .me A 1 i ,B I 1 s r 5 xl' 5:-ff h' X ,Q . Y "Fl X ,f'lr ,IWW , V X l X ' ,Dfw , ,X . , g , , . X . A be . 'Pr ' Y I I -NN I . 1 , 'rx - ,u - 5 i . 4 wxgxu h i wi fp' Dr. D. J. Guzzetta, Prosldont Af' 1 ffwfx-4'f ff ,J I, f . , -P9 . UI 7, f ,-uw 'wt JJ pd A three week visit te the Peoples our own," stated Dr. Guzzetta. "Certainly no one Republic of China was the highlight can claim expertise about the world's oldest of the 1974-75 academic year for Dr. Dominic Guzzetta. Dr. Quzzetta living culture after a short three week visit. However," he continued, ff J' A C J' ' 4 Q a X A 4, m Il X S -cunt! 'gk 1 -r -Q ?1 V , 3 . swag: ' 2 .3495 ' V37 ,..,q- r .. f-.fr - 2. , , -1. 'A 1, '1 gf5!,ggj,Qg 3, . - K fi 53,3 , fb 2-191sfa.4l1! 1 ' , "1" was chosen to be part of a 22-member "the itinerary was thorough and comprehensive. delegation from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities to visit China 's educational, cultural, industrial and agricultural facilities in five cities. "Touring the People's Republic of China provided me with a rare opportunity to compare viable but different educational, cultural, economic and political systems with As a result, we formed some useful, on-the-spot bases for judgements as to what the 'New China' seems to be all about from a limited point of view." During the year, Dr. Guzzetta was also appointed Chairman of Northeastern Medical Education Development Center of Ohio and helped establish a "Presidential Scholars Program" to augment the existing financial aid opportunities. Academics!A dministra tion 51 The education l propose includes all that is proper for a man, and is one in which all men who are born into this world should share .... Our first wish is that all men should be educated fully to full humanity, not only one individual, nor a few, nor even many, but all men together and single, young and old, rich and poor, of high and lowly birth, men and women-in a word, all whose fate it is to be born human beings, so that at last the whole of the human race may become educated, men of all ages, all conditions, both sexes and all nations. Our second wish is that every man should be wholly educated, rightly formed not only in one single matter or in a few or even in many, but in all things which perfect human nature .... -John Amos Comenius, 1632 it .ul 52 Academics ,..- s 4 f .r -.4 1 Q 1 I xx The Board of Trustees ' 1 W. Howard Fort Edwin J. Thomas Joseph LOYUOII .1 'lewd ""Z"' Vincent Johnson Frances McGovern Malcolm Rowan 54 Academics!Board of Trustees Z,- 'Ui R, x Berne rd Rosen Ben Maidenburg x gf' ni. H f 'vt 1-Z-N 5 1 I' fu. Robert Kidney im! 97 5y 3if" Wf7i' 4 ,,ufff,,5 meg: 4 '.3Zf s4 3VIi1fV0? I5' V ' ' lp ' J 5' I 11945 ' ff: ,,,1gf32' 1.3835 f Q ,,,.,'f.Xfg ffm. llvbd, v,'.1,, , 5 ,Fff'5dth r, iiffifia ' f Q ' -58' . fill "f ,W .-,f'a-3944 . pg' gf ...1n?' ' w-:, ,, " ' fy - 32,1 u 'f-if ww: 'f lfffwfn A 'I' 5531.9 'Q 1 . ' . . -:ggi-2: . , 'Q-,f - W: M: 1' M, ' M ' 1 - ,fn ,-'xglig-.gr:, ff , '- f,- 15-, Univ. 0 -'. , , V Effsvfif . fl 'f' 'Af fgff ,525 ,V , , ,- , . Bfigj Z", Academics!Board of Trustees 55 Q .ay '-.ff L4 fi 'D ixC1'lVIff1f9S X 5. 1 , 'ff ,G 4 K .5 PS A ,P - k .Y,.,. ng --'fam-. ca-J .wiv 43- N "':'x ' 4 ' " - . 1 5 A v pw-4' l -N Q' 4 ,Shel .,v, WW an-A -fm gf. u W6 -qs- llxjfmm .J f-vw--1-M .,,. . .......VH ,... 'ixfivavwheqvf -'- , W x l -MM W uv., , n .mf ,,, 'H -,L "w, wx PORTRAIT OF A SISTER Her straight, brown hair, bluntly cut lust below her shoulders and parted down the middle, is cleverly caught on each side in two barrettes. Three layers of Sweet Honesty foundation gives her a flawless complexion. A circle of pink blush on each cheek gives her a healthy glow. Two dabs of baby-blue eyeshadow and sixty strokes of mascara accent her innocent eyes, and a slick of frosted pink glosser surrounds her naturally glowing smile. Her 325.00 soft pink sweater coordinates perfectly with her soft pink, baby-blue, and white plaid skirt. Her legs are semi-covered by soft pink knee socks tucked into lust-polished A saddles with blue shoelaces. She sits at her table in the Chuckery with slx or seven others who look lust like her, totally oblivious to the fact that her cloud of pink and blue is in complete contrast to the dark, smokey, noisy world around her. She knows when to smile, and how to giggle. She's conquered the art of tact, and can flatter any mele's ego. When need be she can make a friend of an enemy. And she's llvlng up her college days and keeping an eye out for a husband. Maybe she doesn't know it's 1975. Maybe she's never heard of women's liberation. Maybe she'll never flnd her real self. But she'll probably marry a man with potential and be a wealthy, society wife. PORTRAIT OF AN INTELLECTUAL His!Her colorless hair hangs in no specific style. The top thlrd of hisfher non-descrlpt face is hidden by bottle bottom glasses. Hls!Her shoulders are permanently hunched over the full set of the Encyclopedia Brittanica lwith complete index and unabridged dlctlonaryl hefshe carries. He!She leaves a trail of papers, pencils, pens, and erasers everywhere hefshe goes lyou see, organization isn't a required course at this universityj. Clad in creations by Robert Hall, hefshe sits ln hlsfher cubicle at the llbrary living ln a world of the printed word. He!She doesn't even see the others iust like himfher sitting ln their own cubicles. He!She understands big long words, and lnlects them into hisfhers conversation when ever possible. Hls!Her mind reaches great heights, het he's!she's naive when it comes to life and human nature. And he's!she's living up hisfher college days because learning is hisfher life. Maybe 1975 will bring himfher more wisdom, or maybe he'll!she'll find happiness ln research. He'll! She'll probably become a university professor and " speak of all the things he's!she's learned: lecturing for hours and relating nothing because no one else can understand hislher big words. PORTRAIT OF AN INDEPENDENT Her dark brown hair with light blonde streaks here and there, goes any way it wants. Her face is accented by two large black over-painted eyes and deep red lips tmatching her finger and toe nailsj. She wears a black leotard with her liberation bouncing beneath it, and her indispensible hankerchief is tied around her neck. Her hips and long legs have been poured into a pair of straight leg ieans. She waddles on her platform shoes with an eternal cigarette in her hand. Her fingers and wrists are weighted down with silver and turquoise Indian bracelets and rings. nveloped in a heavy cloud of musk she leaves a scented trail everywhere she goes. She sits around the edges of G.S.C. or on any patch of grass she can find lweather permittingj with six or seven others who look just like her. And she puts down social values and people with money as she pulls another cigarette from her 336.00 leather purse. And she's living up her college days, praying they'll never end, lest she'll have to ioin the real world. Maybe it's irrelevant that it's 1975. Maybe she can live her whole life without getting involved in any petty human commitments. But she'll probably become a professional student and live here forever. PORTRAIT OF A JESUS FREAK Her waist length, blonde hair meticulously parted straight down the middle hangs the rest of the way in strings. Her pale, blue eyes are lost behind her round wire rimmed glasses, and the rest of her face is au naturale. She has on her favorite red and navy plaid flannel shirt and Osh Kosh by Gosh overalls: after all, Jesus cares not about appearance. She strums on her guitar and sings her holy songs. She roams the campus with six or seven others who look iust like her, spreading the Lord's word and showing the world how humble and holy she is. And she's living up her college days and praying there's a heaven after 1 college. Well, maybe it doesn 't matter if it's 1975. Maybe she'll make it to heaven, but hopefully she'll read the Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 6, verses 1-13 and practice what it preaches. PORTRAIT OF A DORK His bushy brown mop sits on top of his head almost Unattached. His bespectacled beady eyes go unnoticed ioverpowered by his huge banana nosej. His mouth is permanently frozen in a sheepish grin. He sports a short sleeve blue shirt which is only half tucked into narrow-belted pants. His blue-gray pants end abruptly two inches above his ankles lhe's always prepared to walk through the waters of Lake Auburnj. White socks and black oxtords house his unbelievably large, boat-like feet. He hangs around anywhere where no one wants him. He's mastered the art of being obnoxious and a total bore simultaneously. He's always alone, even though there are hundreds of others who look iust like him. And he's living up his college days looking for companionship. 1975 is another lonely year. Maybe he'll find someone to be his friend, but he'll probably wander through the streets of Akron forever. PORTRAIT OF A BROTHER His tightly braided corn-rowed hair lines his head beneath the thick rolled edge of his knit cap. His face is semi-covered with hair. His dull green army iacket, bearing some philosophical patch, hangs over his well-kept jeans and worn hiking boots. A huge canvas bag is slung over his shoulder, bulging with the weight of its contents. He sits in the corner ol G.S.C. or in the alcove of the Chuckery with thirty or forty others who look just like him, and he com- plains about discrimination and segregation and civil rights. He knows how to walk and talk real smooth. And he's living up his college days and hoping he won't get caught. Maybe he knows better than anyone that it's 1975. Maybe he doesn't want equality but supremacy. But someday he'll probably live in middle-class suburbia holding down a respectable white-collar iob. PORTRAIT OF A DUDE His natural lwith a little help from Afro-Sheenj crowns his head beneath his white hat with black hat band. The wide brim of the hat dips down on one side at just the right angle. He's "lookin' fly" in his white double knit suit with black stitching, a black and white checked vest, black shirt with tiny white dots, and white tie. Atop this is a black leather coat with a slit up the back, always worn unbottoned lpreferably pushed back on one side and held in place by a hand on the hipj. His shoes of black and white leather in a patchwork design, have very high heels and platforms lthey're a little worn, but maybe no one will noticej. He struts around G.S. C. just a rappin' and a jivin' with all- the other dudes who look just like him. He's conquered the art of being cool,' he's got real style. He strives for the attention of the nearest woman. And he's living up his college days majoring in student relations. 1975 or '76 it really doesn't matter to him, it'll be a long time before he gets out of here. But someday he'Il probably have his own Cadillac with gangster whitewalls, a diamond in the back, and baby shoes on the rear view mirror. PORTRAIT OF A JOCK His layered cut always looks good, even when he's dirty and sweaty. His moustache, just covering his top lip, certainly shows his masculinity. His tight, knit shirt strains with the bulge of every muscle beneath it. He and his basketball are inseparable jlike a child and his security blanketj. He's found on any basketball court on campus with ten or twenty others who look just like him. And he's living up his college days drinking gallons of beer. 1975 is just another year of scholarships, pulled muscles, and free rides. Maybe some day his life's dream will come true, maybe he'll make the pros. But the reality of life may wear down his ego, and he'll probably end up selling golf balls. Q? dr. ',P v ' -.. M 5 Q , I ! Ronnie Schell ,Ja 142. 1 Q 'Eff 5 - ' , fl' 2 K M gf VJ!! . Q , , " 1. in ' , Y .. Li if -Y f I- Q 1 . tg' xf J C lf. I 1 A n and . ' as D Entertainers Help Audiences Laugh, Unwind McKendrie Spring, Robert Goulet, Arts Hall Auditorium-however, you and the Ambassadors marked the may smoke in the lobby and the beginning of fall quarter entertain- bathrooms." 'nent giving everyone a chance to un- fvind, to leave the stress and strain S'C'P'B' Wepomed back about, 2000 jf back-to-School days behind, to students to listenlto the melodious sit down and to be entertained. rock of MCKendr'e Sprmg' If you came stoned, you left stoned, if you came straight, you left mellow- 'May I have your attention, please! ed. Either way you were relieved Jon't smoke dope in the Performing of worries for a little while. For Moms and Dads still suffering from the shock of book fees and tuition payment, there was Robert Goulet and Ronnie Schell. They gave two sell-out concerts in E. J. Thomas on September 27th. Comedian Ronnie Schell prepared the audience for beautiful Bob and his flashing blue eyes who warmed the audience's hearts with his songs. Moms and Dads weren 't the only ones there,- young as well as old enjoyed the shows. -5. layn Houck, Janice Bluhm. Presentations given by the College and Community Ambassadors gave everyone who attended an opportunity to enhance their knowledge of foreign countries. The College Ambassador to Kenya, Jayn Houck, and the Community Ambassador to Turkey, Janice Bluhm, dressed in the native costumes of the countries they visited, showed slides, souvenirs, and told of their travels, enlightening those who came to hear as they had been enlightened by their experiences. 76. is 'nl' Homecoming 1974 a Traditional Chan e " ""P-"""Ht-s-..rwvf-i.-n- ., F ' V W N V 'av-uv v -fl Q24 I C W, A 4 A Q iii' 'Zig' 1 Q The Greek community upheld the tradition of Homecoming this year, but an alternative was also offered through SCPB's programs. On October 7, the Greeks sponsored the annual torchlight parade and chose the homecoming King and Queen. SCPB voted against the traditional Queen and conducted a contest for Home- coming Person. Jill Rueble, SCPB Chairperson explained, "lt has become the growing trend in America to speak in non-gendered terms. For this reason, the Homecoming Committee of SCPB has decided that the title of Homecoming Person will best suit the purpose. We want the student body to choose a person, whether male or female, who they feel represents our campus for Homecoming of 1974." Delta Gamma's Marilyn LaCroix was crowned Homecoming Queen, and Mike Cox of Lambda Chi Alpha received the title of Homecoming King. The honor of Homecoming Person was bestowed upon Connie Bowman, who was sponsored by B.U.S. Other activities during Homecoming week included a speech by convicted Watergate figure James W. McCord, two feature movies "What's Up Doc?" and "A Touch of Class", a dance with music by "Rainbow Canyon", a bonfire rally, fireworks, and a visit from "The Ghoul". To top the Homecoming festivities, the Zips crunched Northern Michigan in the annual homecoming game held at the Rubber Bowl. 64 Campus Life!Fall James WI Mccord Q f'T R vu J My 5 K? ' W AQ h S f' 92177 3,-nf CJ' xo, I ,B af -w ff' ikrxxx fff- ' U '.wf"x'gx:.g "Wg A ' 34 ,- 66 Campus Life!Fall ,fix ,Xf Wm fl 'I Bonfire, Torchlight Parade Highlight Homecoming w i l I W6 f!,5- old on E ro co G5 E DJ 'O Q cu rdboard C8 In fo rm kes -S ru as T9 Q T the ground is broken, and reality rises in 0 own 0 Q C p Lf!FlI concrete and steel. 'L 3 A I 11. Dfw! , ,........ Q...-f ry., L, ,.. ' 5 Q I X V V l,,,, ,wr 2, . ,, .4 1 ,115 gl", N- pc' 1. -,-JV! W I Q4 ,W , hw, x.,, V, ff, ci nv: uf" ,5,g?Q,gZ'gg?Z','.v"ii'f'A M..mu4,g-QW, ,M 1,1-Mfqff 1' 1? fy, f, ef' 3, 4. Q iiJf5'i5i'9Zvh5 N SQZQJ5 ' ...,,,gf-44vA4xvaf22a63,.5g,g,4g5, :Z,Z,f M LS . Q , 5,5 In jyfgfzswwf I ,Y 4, '1 we-1 ,, xi' ' -' je' ,mi 'gf 7.1 ,K ' ,534-af' 4 F J ,x. '-,L X - 4 3: ,Q X -Q Campus Life!Fall 69 70 Fall!Campus Life "1"'h3.f.g.Q 4wf..t., ' -dau-if-lx sihgf f '14 s Y University Theatre Opens lt's 46th Season Presented first in the summer, "Rosencrantz and Guilder- stern Are Dead" was resurrected September 26 through 29. The play was directed by Dr. Wallace Sterling. Kali Marshall Brandon and Lawrence Marks starred in the title roles They played the two scapegoats from Shakespeare's "Hamlet" searching "to find out what it is all about." The University of Akron Theatre's 1974-75 season opened with the dramatical performance, "Diary of Anne Frank," and ran October 25-27 and November 1-3. It was directed by Alex Davis as part of his masters thesis, and featured the following cast members: Bruce Probst as Mr. Frank, Thom Gradisher as Mr. Van Daan, Mindy Tanner as Mrs. Van Daan, Valerie Spencer as Miep, Mark Marple as Peter Van Daan, Judy Breit as Margot Frank, Joe Weishampel as Mr. Kraler, Mark McHenry as Mr. Dussel, Tati Albrecht as Anne and Theresa Frazier as Mrs. Frank. Based on the original diary, the play depicts the plight of the Jews in Nazi-occupied Netherlands. lt's success was largely dependent upon the strong performances by Bruce Probst, Theresa Frazier, and Mark McHenry, and the realistic set and lighting done by Lawrence Sexton and Noreen McGucken, respectively. 1? M . ,, 541 , 7 , it ,Af .W it 2 X , 5 ' ' f . 5 X Fall!Campus Life 71 Y qs eww, Mm: - ,E Mnax. . .W . ,aqui HJ 5 an-i l I ISS i Qfjbx 454 """1 'WJ' Ml, n fd, if .. ,E ,F E E . X .5 H Q ,X qu, .36 -E V21 .X , ft, T" Ns N VK 1 W Vw! ' 1 , 4 4 - if 5 ,wx A ' , , 'f ' 1 W 55, ,ZW " ' r in D Bm ' 2 it "1 A iff. fx, 1 1 D 1 ' Y ,A I 'fy' ,. R 5 1 L if it ti 3, Akron 's Center for Peace Studies Joins Kent State To Discuss "Population-Resources-Development" United Nations Week was sponsored jointly by The University of Akron Center for Peace Studies and the Kent State Center for International and Comparative Programs. The theme for the week was Population-Resources-Development. Included in the week of activities on the two campuses were photo exhibits, films, international student activities, a mock U.N., and related programs focusing on the United Nations. 1- 'Y-'-lSIl1iQl"' " ul?-' 4 " 1 :fi g tk, ,W U - A 'A if, NI J' , "W gf' ..wv" gf it S " Wi' ,A .' r- , 1, :V rv' 665.6 3 Qlget. MUCH In do n o 5 f o 74 Campus Life!Fall ,"'-up-.o'...... M, -v . Y . Q' NS XX Qlz- AQ ,J x',. , b K 4 3.1 ?9:'f'1 , g 'frigg sf ' 4' wiyepilgli -4 - , Q of 7 , 'I ' 5 as QL ' -' 'i , 1, ?vg , - fl db- -. - X 5 Q I pn! , D is 4 5 3 s Ll .. I ., , KN' ., , f . QM? Us ,Q 6 ' V 5 na uf ' fi -- .Q Q 4 U V+ . G. 4 0 is we ' Q ' s M , . w,4u- Q Q O . .iam Q it fa' . ' O - 'Q' i 2 i 3 5,,?" ,, , , JB ," 1 1 iififif " " ff 5' ill, A V, F3591 .fmuni Black Students"Come Together" for Edul A Dah Week Edul-A-Dah is a Swalhilian festival which epitomizes the "coming together" of a people. During the week of November 11- 16, Black United Students observed the festival of coming together. lt is presented "to increase the sense of unity and harmony among black students and to increase the knowledge of blacks by the campus in general," said Calvin Glaze, president of BUS. Events included a "Black Coffee House" with poetry and a hairbraiding clinic, a movie presentation, a panel discussion on "The Role of the Black Woman" and a roller skating party. Other events included an African Naming Ceremony and an "Ebony Expose." The week of festivities ended with a concert in Memorial Hall featuring Blue Magic and Mother Braintree. , Stokely Carmichael, the black militant of the 1960's, has changed his message from "Black Power" to a pan-Africanism revolutionary aim of uniting black people all over the world in the creation ofa socialist state. Further, he advocates that capitalism is the enemy which will be destroyed with black people playing a maior role in its destruction. Stokely Carmichael, who spoke to about 150 students in J.S.K. Auditorium, was sponsored by Black United Students. F9 78 Campus Life!Fall Y i , . If-9-,V-V 7, SQ IZ 5 '- if I. iff PQ-f 94' L. 9: Sfokloy Carmichael ' - ' - .1 , ,,,,- .-.... x. .Q-Q-1-1.4 Campus Life!Fall 79 Q Q f - 5 Qs 0 Cf e C9 We for Ohio Chamber Ballet Company The Ohio Chamber Ballet Company, the resident ballet of the University of Akron, opened its seventh season as a professional company in the Edwin J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall on October 25 and 26, 7974. lf consistency is the name of the game, then the Ohio Chamber Ballet Company has consistently mesmerized and enthralled those vvho have attended. Audiences for the ballet performances are grovving larger and larger and the number of performances are increasing accordingly. lt is difficult for one to imagine that the Chamber Ballet gave its first performances in K olbe Theatre to sparse audiences. Today, it has evolved to national prestige and high acuity. Commenting on the maturity and growth of The Ohio Chamber Ballet to let the dancers take on more demanding roles." Progression, grovvth, C 4-Q. 4 l 1, 1' 1, 5 - 1 M, ? ,, -- , , ff . A if , . maturity, class . . . call it what you vvill - The Ohio Chamber Ballet has it all. Company, Norman lsreal, general manager said, "There vvill be some cast changes in the ballet, because it is important to the maturity of the company .. w 1 S .. '. 1 v ia'- 1. . , .. we 5 A C I ' '- 2 ? T" E 5? 11 v -- Campus Life!Fall Art Gallery Provides a Showcase for Talent After years of being taped, hooked, and tied to the walls in the art department, the works of University artists finally have a place where they can be properly displayed. November 2nd marked the grand opening of the Emily H. Davis Art Gallery. Dr. Davis, professor emeritus of art, was head of the art department at Akron University for twenty-seven years. She was very influential in the growth of the art department so it is fitting that the gallery was named in her honour. Besides being a showcase for the works of students and faculty, the gallery provides professional artists' exhibitions for the enrichment and visual education of students. The gallery also provides cultural programs in the visual arts for the enjoyment of both the University and greater Akron communities. Among the exhibits displayed at the opening were paintings, drawings, sculpture, ceramics, weaving, metals, photography and graphic design by University faculty members. . w . , 1' , .ax lpn, x X-f f "f - AJ ' 82 Campus Life!Fall I Ili "---n xr ki L . '-..,,' X fi l ' 443 Sims 5'Gi.S g alffcfizwnvf' ,,.,,..5i.wq 4 ',,,.,.-v-- di x wi gr 4-.4734 -1 .ark 'V 'x Y- 2:15, g,.ml-fj - Vw -'rbi ' 'Q ' " sw Yv ,S .bm AMHY -7 Q-rx xg.. . X, Q ,. ' . I 'ii :Mg ' if-an mn? My 1--Q M -'NT---. Q , :Q '., 1 I' , . : ,'ef ' 41 .. ' ' 1 x , wi -1 - ' L A - 4 , v 1 , xy' Af y 2 1' ' , yr' HV 5 I - sf . n nl . 4. . . J - , A Y , I . gg, A ,Aw P ,-,, I , 1 J , -fe - 1 . i V -,fe 'f 5 :S L 5 ,' V Q T- 4 . I M , .r L4 1 . I 1 Q: A ff- 4. Vg 21, ' . '4 - 7' kj . 2' V1-,K , " 4 f, L., .V-1" I Law, fi Jag, f..-L K l .W ' . - . + 'z Y' ffl- as W Q ' 5 za Qgl 1 , CW.-Q an - I f V 'V 1 1 H. ,f ' N ' -ff iff!-'f?'tg'Y 1 - ., ,-' . , '. n jffgyk 'ig ' P4 . 'ite 4? . f 'imwk ' ' . . ,, V ...N . . 4, - - , Nr u- '- " , " ' "Mx fi-ni v I . fl, K , , .-,gi ' .- N. . ,-wif Nu. . A Q1 lxx, F, ,AJ J: V M 'uf vs ' ' V4 4. I - , I ,. af.. Yu, -. i , 4.31. xA ,4-. y 4, f in :V ffl 51-,Q N , ., . 2. 'A f " "xxx 3 Campus Life!Fall 83 w 1 I l l A l 1 1 I I '1 Bandorama Marks End of 5 Beginning of W j Marching Band Season Symphony Season Bella Abzug John Glenn 86 Campus Life!Fall Speakers Focus On Political Issues Congresswoman Bella Abzug was the first speaker in the 1974-75 Town and Gown Lecture Series at the University of Akron. Ms. Abzug spoke at the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall on November 7th. Abzug ian out-spoken member of Congress! discussed women and their role in politics, the nuclear arms race and the confirmation of Nelson Rockefeller to the Vice-Presidency. Rep. Abzug suggested that the confirmation be held over until January when the 94th Congress takes office. "We don't want a non-elected Vice- President," claimed Abzug, "confirmed by a lame-duck Congress." Fall quarter was also a time of local elections. On October 17th, students had a chance to listen to Ralph Perk and John Glenn, candidates for Ohio's U.S. Senate seat, debate in J.S.K. auditorium. Dr. Carl Lieberman, associate professor of political science at The University of Akron, spoke at the University's Current Issues Forum Wednesday, October 30. Dr. Lieberman spoke on "The President Before and After Watergate" in the Beech Room of the University's Gardner Student Center. The forum is free to the public. Current Issues Forums are held each Wednesday during the school year and are sponsored by the Akron U Institute for Civic Education. Campus Life!Fall 87 ""'uL .nh as "" iv .07 'Q NJ' '25 wang, - X 31.4 , Z-. ,inf . ' Vs I i g: S 'Q . lf. Sy, 3? . Q" N, ? N' W gi. - ,Q an P O J I' 1 . ' 0 , I ,. Q 'C' .4 I US ck! "" 4 ' - s :A ' 4 I -0'C 9" 5 f V I I 9 Y ,fr , s I 5 gnihlvs. 'PA4'ts,, I wflwiw-?k: 'Q Sw ,' f 4 'x s 'S 'L Q fs, '-Ex!-.K - v fgpzw-, 3 L I .Hifi 'f-if ' l A .Fha . . , , I W1 1 ll . - . . G f I 4 i rf Q Li , sus" ell. 6 -nf' VA .1 al ' 'E 2'-HQNK., Nm xiii., wg. fe A65 ff, -Q .fn 1 4 ' rf' . 'V N 5 ' f,,3',f'Q"f . .Z,- - -3 V. , lg.. ' Lf . J, . ,:, MW, , S- Wi? .W --0 ,wmwmw-" 5 . 1 ,x 3X5M?f K, ,wi ,, '11 1 L ,. Q ,p ,-.44 N. s . he 1 ' - j.H3".' Ky, A W .ww- R r: ' Qhfbfflav ,Q ' f'2j ' f M- ' 'W' ' A 1. .-'49, 2 ' V? V' 'f':Q?A 5 ,Q -, ,K ff' if .a 'Q . . f Q Q 15 ,. . ,K . ' P' " I g , ' 1 . i f 1 90 Fall! Campus Life 'I ,J : . Y" . -44- 2 J 4 1 , 5-Sgr., ' fir fm' 9, ,gf.'.xgf ,, " ' '5 5+-' Y, 34, W .4 Q ix?g1'? . 'ffirv ' S671 . ' 3' Y 'W i ,. M zf,,Y,Zg,,.5f . . Lfniffv i 1' X x x fp, vffii., egg f6:?tQ3. 4 . ,M ,Pg ,....,.1f-'F' 5-fix ' -Sag 92 Campus LifefFall n December 1st Snow Postpones Fall Quarter Finals Winter Speakers Present Diversified Topics After one full quarter of class lectures some students are still eager to listen to speeches from individuals other than their professors, and inevitably, where there are listeners, there are speakers. Columnist Jack Anderson, the second speaker of the Town and Gown lecture series, spoke in the J.S. Knight Auditorium on January 13th. Pulitzer Prize winner Anderson gave his opinions on the economy, the CIA investigations, the energy crisis, and reform in Congress to a crowd of 500 people. On January 19th, 20th, and 21st theologic questions were the topics of discussion. Dr. William Halladay, Lowry Professor of the Old Testament of Andover Newton Theological School, led the three days of discussion. Session titles included "God Enters History", "God Declares War On His People", and "The Prophet Like Moses". lt was a soul-searching and enlightening experience for all who attended. For those who wanted to forget about the stress of politics and religion, a poetry reading was held. Selections of original poetry were read by Robert Wallace in the Beech Room January 30th. William Hallada y Robert Wallace 94 Campus Llfe!W1nter Jack Anderson Campus Life!Winter 95 V, 1 'G' ,M Q ,s W we X A -ez u 4 'v .ff ""'w.. y ,f v., ,lu-wax 1 if lm-t .Q-.. f V , s 'E In ,uf ,Q Y ff! 96 Campus LifefWin ter Hifi' 1 1 X ' v' , . -V X, Campus LffefVVinter 97 I CAN Day, Founders Day Reminiscent of Old and New 'I 'I 'vk . . ,Ae ,, hmumuu NY yn,,"",,' " U wmv 'W Pllaeauf gf Wvmlwhs nglheermgiff "" "Gwinn 'M ""Yk 5' Traditional Founders Day ceremonies were held January 15th 1975. Included in the series of annual events were the wreath ceremony paying tribute to the early benefactors of the University, the 19th annual luncheon for the AU Associates, the "state of the University" briefing by President Guzzetta, the Founders Day luncheon for the faculty, and the annual Faculty Educational Conference. Afternoon classes were cancelled, and for most students that was the true beauty of Founders Day. When Mr. and Mrs. Buchtel founded Buchtel College, which later grew into the University of Akron, they obviously showed their interest in the value of education. Mrs Buchtel undoubtedly had high hopes for the women who attended the school. lf she were here today to see the activities and contributions of the University's women students, her dreams would be surpassed. Not more than ten years ago, most women did not enter college: some women never finished high school. However, women decided to make use of their abilities, and they began to enroll in colleges. Many became teachers, nurses, and secretaries. The metamorphosis continues, and women are branching out into new and heretofore male professions. January 22nd was l-CAN day. I-CAN stands for Investigate Career Alternatives Now. Summit lounge was filled with displays and representatives from many fields, including faculty and professional women to answer questions and to distribute literature. The purpose of I-CAN day was to acquaint women students with many different career opportunities, because women make excellent teachers, and nurses, and secretaries, and doctors, and lawyers, and chemists, and engineers .... Associated Women Students IA WS1 held their annual awards desert on February 11. Awards were presented to 30 outstanding women on campus. Campus Life! Winter 99 "Get the Show on the Road" For music lovers SCPB presented Michael Stanley and Alex Bevan in concert at E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall on January 19th. Many students came to revel in Bevan's melodies and witness Stanley's folly. Alex Bevan sang ballads and folk music, putting the audience in an enthusiastic mood with a little hand-clappin' and foot stompin'. Bevan did more than sit on stage singing songs, he put on a show. Contrary to the billing, Bevan proved to be the hit of the evening. Then came Michael Stanley. Well, not right away. ln fact he was approximately an hour late. The impatient crowd resorted to chanting "Get the Show on the Road" which ironically is the title of Stanley's latest hit song. When he finally got on stage, it took him ages to get set up. By this time, the audience had lost their enthusiasm. To top it all off, Stanley had technical problems throughout his performance. Sunday, February 2nd SCPB presented Dave Mason. The famous recording artist filled Memorial Hall with wonderfully warm vibrations and all his fans seemed satisfied. Despite a late start and a few periods of excessive jamming the crowd left "Feeling Alright". Michael Stanley Campus Life! Winter 100 DEVO Mason Campus Life!Winter 101 if: Q", , fiend' if Game Room, Dances Offer Entertainment During Winter Quarter 102 Campus Life!Winter g .K x ' 2-3 -' M f Xl 611'-Q W '. ' f Q,-45 - ',,:w-45 X: x , - - '. ,. , , "' V .- g,,::f-in ,df 1' v', -VJ Campus Life!Winter 103 xxx Us iii N . L vga-g,f 1 -S. 6, 556- Y.,- 4' 9 fy ,A 5.454 .pf-f N , -We: A' cat" 1 iw . 315 ,A w-li 4 M H . gi ,fu Mfg : M555 'N 'v ' in w Q 4 L F A 'S I LI . 'fiffw 4' . in .:' , A. F .1 V ' ' Nm. sg. ' 'Q' "' H' x' X-Ev Ev. W .wsu-L X 3 " 'HH H , , 'Hug j. , ' r A ku x ASV I 1 1 '1 .1 1 1 1 1 I A M75 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 4 0' ' J 5.1 5 , n " , g ,ML A. .1 , ' Lge vi M V , i wi! 1 'Q . J T P"'l"' I' , ' I V A' ' ' -,.if11i':l! 'uw 'V- ir 1. A- A E. ,K gi 'E " !. 5,1 X4i!,.f. ' - f' X 1 1 l N w l l l fx V fr ,. as , Arthur Fiedler Conducts University Symphony Band 1 l 106 Campus Life!Winter i 4 Y Zn Edwin J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall was filled with beautiful music on February 5th. The University of Akron 's Symphony Band was making the music but under different direction. Arthur Fiedler, famed conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra since 1930, appeared as guest conductor. Highlighting the "evening with Fiedler" was George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue", with Gary Rusnak as the piano soloist. L "'l"' Z f Campus Life! Winter 107 1 r J i I Z E J I ! I 1 I n 1 'U 1 Q. V , IQQ5 4 QQ N "' if .,., ! y, r iam, av " U J' if '75 -.,, 4 lf' I I ,,. "vi . - .1 l l 'Z " f 4' S Q ff .D 1 5" w , W Q ,N BNQQJA Qw- .w, x V EMI! AS JS.. 1 a 'Q Y U' if-7 x T-2 r iii F Y' 'A if J'u F5 'ii ' w 110 Campus Life!Winter sw v-u-W5 Na if na, ui fl , , 'B . ill xii... t Black Cultural Center Coordinates Black History Week Campus Life I lllllllllllllll 1 if . X X K .tri - , .4 J on . 42- fd,-.,. . A Av. 5 , 1 Q . R Y, . f M. , 3 s' , A , 'TQ--y wx , 5. f' , 'Wi ,v x R ,. K N 'E I U Q ,w N A X f , 6 ,www 'V'-ww - , , .x A vt .5 P ' ff wg fL:f,"fi-3':'9y tiff. Q ,Q ,"f,, ,gs N4 Q . , .1-ff? W, ,qgfsgfw f-8? V .ia -+- J' K t ' Y. . -V I ig I li 1 , A if M fi ."""'. ,s 1 in . , - . 4' -,.. 2 ' Of ' Q a 1, Q . ,. , Nh, 1 , avhl -an I 23 .,x if 1 .3 ,G .515 W ivw...,6 IN we ' x v I 5 Nh W . "4 'W 'Q' m W U, , " Nl ,V rg xanga? Q' Q .Mi V ig' be if v -V. , 1 5 J 172 Campus Life!Winter Black History Week Provides Films, Speakers, Entertainment The University's Black Cultural Center, directed by John Wilson, coordinated the Black History Week celebration with help from Black United Students and Afro-America Studies. An entire week, February 9-15, of activities proved to be an enlightening and enjoyable experience Along with the speakers which accompany every event of this sort, Black History Week was filled with special events such as an open house at the Black Cultural Center, an art display by Willie Portis, a Festival of Choirs featuring local and national choirs who presented "A History through Songs" with soloist Mrs. Grace Lee Mims and an African Awareness Day. Other events included bus trips to basketball games, a Film Festival, a coffeehouse, a style show entitled "Variety in Blackness and Beauty", poetry by Haki Madhubuti, a variety show called "Ebony Expose Part ll", an Art Festival and Show featuring displays by members of The Ohio State Reformatory Black Cultural Club, a Soul Food Theme Meal, a performance by the Black Experimental Theatre, and a Jazz and Rock Music Festival. Black History Week provided mind probing productions, discussions and films, as well as festive entertainment and visual enjoyment resulting in a giant step forward in making the public, both black and white, aware of the role of blacks in history. Campus Lifefwinter 113 Black History Week Speakers Spread the Word 114 Campus LifefWinter Bill Miller A series ot speakers voiced their views on current issues facing black students and citizens. Among the guest speakers were Mr. Bill Miller director of Equal Employment Opportunities for Goodyear, Ed Boston who spoke on the "Role ot the Black College Student", Dr. Art Thomas director of Afro- America Studies of Wright State University, and Mr. McDaniel of the University's Black Cultural Center. Haki Madhubuti added culture to the week through his poetry readings. On January 24th Afro-A merica Studies presented the distinguished lecturer Dr. Elliott P. Skinner, Franz-Boas Professor and Chairman, Department of Onthropology of Columbia University. The subject of his speech was "The Double Consciousness of Afro-Americans". ..-'f""' D Aff Th H188 Albert McDaniel 'd Boston ff , j 1 11' Pr. Elliot Skinner 42 Hakl M8dh8bUfl Campus LifefWinter 115 Their Money As- ROTC Gives 'Em a Run for A parachute fell from the sky, a runner delivered a torch from Akron General Hospital, and the annual "Run for a Life" was underway once again. Members of Arnold Air Society, Angel Flight, ROTC officers, and University administrators ran nonstop for 48 hours, circling the track on Jackson Field to raise money for the purchase of hemodialysis equipment for Akron General Medical Center. Money was raised through pledges for each lap run. When it was all over, a check for 82,022 was turned over to the Medical Center. When Gov. James A. Rhodes proclaimed Army ROTC Week, The University of Akron was obliged to participate. Among the events of the week were an Army lecture exchange with Air Force ROTC, a Pershing Rifles Banquet, an openhouse-exhibit featuring Army and Air Force weapon displays, and a dinner dance in honor of ROTC. 116 Campus L1fe!Winter '4 'u fs 555-7- gif' r -0- uf, Q, 5 . 71 .2 I' "v, 127 'rm ip' x -.4 J e . I 4 r ll I Y 1 . W- . , , "i':.u.. ' ' 1- Q , P:"i,iv A541 ' A A 2, . 'YQQJL - f N -ff -1:97 rum .f 2" " A' X Q-'S jg: Jf,!,l,rA I - ,' It v t' ,pry -I Campus Life!Winter 777 Audience Turns on Klan Speaker Heckler By H. Howard Hollingsworth Buchtelite News Editor Despite attacks on Blacks and Jews, the real issue when Knights of the Ku Klux Klan National information Director David Ernest Duke spoke Wed- nesday night was freedom of speech as several hecklers tried to shout him down. One young Black woman in the front rows was particularly loud, standing and shouting at Duke during the entire speech but also made a ready target for blasts from Duke that had the crowd of seventeen hundred roaring in approval of his right to speak. His claims of excessive Jewish influence in America and the pampering of minorities were greeted generally with indifference and even laughter, but he scored heavily with the crowd in claiming a right to present his viewpoint and the audience left generally in sympathy with him personally, if not with his opinions. The Klan speaker ripped into the hecklers, accusing them of demonstrating Marxist tactics. He pointed out that neither he nor any other Klan member had interrupted left-wing speakers Jane Fonda and Stokely Carmichael when they spoke at the University and claimed that he had never disrupted any other speech. "What are they afraid of?" he asked. "They can't argue with facts. All they can do is abuse you and cut you down to keep you from speaking. The American people should hear both sides. They're not getting the truth now." Duke blasted the "Jewish-controlled" media for pushing the United States into another Vietnam-type war in the Mideast. He pointed out that the leaders of the three major networks are all Jewish, a fact he viewed as unfair in presenting news coverage. "What if Klansmen were heads of all three networks?" he asked. After attacking the Jews, he moved on to hit the Blacks. "White people are the ones being discriminated against in this country. If you're black, you could qualify for special scholarships and the white ones besides." The Klan speaker rapped busing, also claiming it meant sending young children into black ghettos where the crime rate was much higher in proportion to the total population than the white rate. "I challenge any of you to walk through the black section of Akron tonight. lf you come out at all, you'll come out a Klansman," he said. Duke left the stage and was whisked out of the building through a rear exit. 118 Campus Life!Win ter 'I David E 98 pd , ""' f' Campus Life!Winter 119 - ff"XZfg,i4 -If' 51? .31 :Egan ..... , A ax' . . l nf. .Wi 6 cg, .ni . H-- . . 1, vm , 1"Qf 'rj K. ff. +.. , . .' . '--' ,gi u 1, 1 ' I 7' 'N va." 'nz -, 1 2 sw I ! 0 1 A Q vgfr fax X wb? I I .'. va.. I., i" ,v-,.'mr-'aff 5, , f ,. , ' iu5'f'w M nf v-A A. ,jf , .,Q.,dj'f"f.f.'k ,1 W ' X 'W,.t""4l,"" J. ,sg 1'-f .,, V - f,f ' "Z-fSQ','f' e5'?fl'f.i ' A . Q- 'H wfjfijf., 4-7 :A .lan Q ' D, v .4 Q W. sis, ,W wwf hm , . A 41 fg,p2,f . L ,jaws f ,J 451 5. ,-1543 .giggfw L - f-Znlf., fc.. 4, lf., ' 2 , J ,, if if , rr gy' 1Hfi'f,'5.Q. V I m., L 1, x ft' K, W -. ' " x I A 1' U1 l I 'X' 9 fix If I' 1' Wixizel I X ' 1' VL 'f . ' li , F Ak 'B ' ! K' 6 Qs at 'A .2 . 2 f l ', f . f ' J 1 I 'I I ,431 if WP Lf s ' ' - ' ffffff ' ' 'ff ff' f v,' 45 'gif 34 1 I if ts xiii' gy I y fl 1' 5 5, 1 f IK' 1' 1 , iff fin" il l' E F ei iff f 'Q "4 2 ' z if' 4, . l. fl ',- E ' i ,I fr 5, 2 'r ""' fy.iV, 1 5 Ili , 2'1vFg55HM ' ' f'ifi12i3 EQ . .251 :I S KW lil.: 'Af ,,.g'g f? 5 xx- i 222- ', 2 .f-gt' Q ,,.- I. EH, i.i2:,f .- ' 'fl 1 5 4 21 I 'fir rg is.: VM' iz I 'X 1 . International Students Sponsor Soccer Tourney, Parties, Dances International Students sponsored indoor soccer tournaments during the months of January and February. The finals were held on Sunday, February 9 in Memorial Hall. A party held at the International Student House, 200 Spicer Street, followed the play-offs. Dances and parties were planned throughout Winter Quarter by the International Students Club. Campus Life!Winter 121 ....,Nkt mx --....., M 122 Campus Life!Winter 5 W' W2 Wh., dm vm Campus Life! Winter European Tour Echoes in Symphony Thursday, March 20th, the University of Akron Symphony Band spread their wings and flew. The band left from Cleveland Hopkins Airport, arrived at New York's Kennedy Airport and took the 7M hour flight in a Boeing 747 across the Atlantic Ocean. Upon landing in Brussels, the band members began their concert tour through five European countries. They toured such cities as Paris, Heidelberg, Cologne, Hilversun, and Katwiik lNetherlandsl. Between concerts, the members of the band became acquainted with European life styles and did some traditional site- seeing. One of the surprises of the trip was a concert the band presented at the Cathedral in Chartres, France. Their bus was late,' therefore, the band members had to set up quickly and begin playing without the usual warm-up period. When the first notes came from the instruments, the band members could not believe what they heard. Every note resounded and reverberated off each arch and wall of the huge gothic cathedral. lt was as if there were five musicians for every member of the band, all playing each note a split second after the musician before him. The echos still ring in each band member's ears. April 12, the Symphony Band gave their "Sesquicentenial-Welcome Home Concert". Richard Jackoboice conducted the band in an excellent performance, featuring the 'Akron Sesquicentennial March" which was composed by Jackoboice. lt was good to be home, but somehow the echoes of the E. J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall were not as thrilling as those of the Chartres Cathedral. 724 Campus Life!Spring . 1 TEL 7? mf ' V 1 may .4 -ix f I M 'I . I lf 43' '9,9l'v: 'Le .-gg'GL'- ' l Z' I 'I' ,qi AQ' 5 vp ' fJ X ' .L A .nnlfwjy . It ,' 42 ' jfffffijQ 'D" f 1.2 "3 ' , I M I' fttiiiilxghgn 4 X 'it4i?1 A" A gf? --v 'Q 1- . , . ir V , ,M ,, ,Q 5-f . f, . 31 55'-if f- -Q X 4.1, , xg, lf" 'if ' 1 '21 mfrr, ' 7 'Q 2 Wife!! ' ...: -0 Q I, '5g5f f L' W .ff ,-wwf-i"'i5"',g' , E- X X X ts XP .cl X 'fr' X A " 'H " 14 ' f 'Wi Q' - It 3' ? ,' - a :A ,p . 1- . ... f 1 J V f- w . i A , ' 4' . . lan' ' 5-'f A. 'XI if AI fa in f. ,, , ,A ...- I Q I , if U ,,. Q ff-va., ,, , ,, . ' Q ' Q 8.77 3 s 1 l 4 V ,I If I in JA, ,N .ffl . , 1 --u, , ,' ' x 4- 4. , 1 nf ' " ' -Q4 Q , , ' -x .ft 'ak , ' 1? . ,..,. . . 1 f ,4nf-f 5 'Z 1' sw 5 I v An Impressive audlence of more than 500 students crammed rnto Summit Lounge on Wednesday Aprll 9th to listen to a talk on rape The speaker Mr Frederic Storaska kept the attentron of his audience for almost two hours He used humor as well as factual information to talk about a very sensitive sublect Mr Storaska author of How to Say No to a Raplst and Survrve outlined the dos and don ts of dealing with a raplst He stated that the key to preventing rape IS communication but he also stressed the usefulness of karate Mayor Charles Evers spoke In the Performing Arts Hall on Aprll 10th Evers was the final speaker of this years Town and Gown Lecture series The flrst black Mayor of a Brraclal Mlssrsslppl town Evers has the unique ability to take many different kinds of people wanting many drtferent things and then get something out of all of them so they can work toward the same goal ln the srx years that he has been mayor of Fayette seat of the fourth poorest county In the nation Evers has raised the social and economic status of the town the county and surrounding counties by organizing a team of specialists to attract lndustry and to help Improve health services Evers spoke on his economic policies and his involvement In clvll rights J.-ag. f F99CSf Campus Life!Spring Storaska, Evers Present Serious Topics Charles Evers 'Q 5- Qfofg I ,. Fi ,,v,- ii P Nl ,.:LQ - . ---ff-A3E Z,' ' - ' -'ll - f W , 1,-,ie Ta- -- ai -1: - , V ,V 1 :Qt ' 'E ?'3:1'1i.i'fz' 1 5 '- E t 5 :sa-"' , 1 K1 SEM-N 128 Campus Life!Spring SCPB Stages Demonstrations SCPB was threatened by an administrative takeover this spring. In the past, the Student Center Program Board has been run by students. The members of the organization took to the sidewalks in protest armed with signs and petitions. However, their attempts proved futile. Mr. Don Sabatino, Student Center Director, is now director of SCPB with a staff of two student assistants working beneath him. One of the activities SCPB brought to the campus this spring was a free hair styling clinic. Wednesday, April 16th, Summit Lounge was filled with men and women waiting to have their tresses tossled. The hair stylists were from Tony's Headquarters Along with the usual cutting and curling, they did tinting, frosting, and permanents. But curiously enough, there were more men than women having their hair frosted and their locks curled. Y-'utgg-agua-if TGWS "'Ulo11n, Campus Life!Spring 129 Evening Students, Faculty Administrators Receive Recognition Evening Student Council held their Annual Student Recognition Dinner on May 17, 1975 at Tangier's Restaurant. Recognition was given to evening students, faculty, and administrators who have worked to improve the evening educational experience for the past year. Gamma Beta, Evening College Sorority, celebrated their Fortieth Anniversary at their Annual Founder's Day Activities, May 4. Incoming pledges, actives, inactives, and alumna enjoyed a luncheon at the Holiday Inn. The highpoint of the day's program was a fashion show of Jennique Fashions with local nutritionist Ruth Jarrett narrating. Chi Sigma Nu, Evening College Fraternity, held their 43rd Annual Founder's Day Banquet at Young's Restaurant. WK YC-TV's staff meteorologist Wally Kinnan was the guest speaker. -f--xg! - ff- 'z Tl.7""" 'H Ne? we .iff x Qs ms s, Q?" M W 1 i x if J Campus Life!Spring 131 X r r , ex D if X Spring ls a Time of n S.A. Scmcd ""-'ik - ,, ,.,g ' 132 Campus Life!Spring if Enlightenment and Acknowledgements ln conjunction with Law Day U.S.A., Akron University's School of Law began Law Week activities on April 24th. Retired associate justice ot the U.S. Supreme Court, Tom C. Clark was the honored speaker at the opening. Following his speech, a banquet and an honors and award program i N was held. A seminar on "Black Youth and the Law" was sponsored by the American Law Student Association. Other events, sponsored by the Student Bar Association, included a meditating seminar, trial advocacy seminar, Akron Legal Secretaries' Association seminar, voluntary moot court competition, law faculty seminar, and panel discussions. University Theatre and the Experimental Theatre Company held their annual awards program on Friday, May 23rd in Kolbe Hall. ln addition to the presentation of awards, entertainment was provided by students of the Department of Speech and Theatre Arts. Following the program a reception was held for the winners at the home of Dr. Paul A. Daum, assistant q professor of speech at the University. CN, Af Q t " N. ' A I .. W, "v E QC W- t X . ta , r ' 5 V . F 1 , Campus Life!Spring A N .,.,. , . xH 51, fc' 734 Campus LifefSpring lliip Campus Life!Spring V 135 136 Campus Life!Spring 'Students Contribute to Those Less Fortunate Y Q if '11 .. X'-SR ,Q .4- . Q f Q Qs W ... , N .a af ., l. ..... af . " 7 yt. ' 3... , v 1 ' X z . .. . . ff ry If g' l A 1 'sg .,, xnxx I Mi H 1' M. ?a3!l..,...,. April 23rd, "The Hello People" and "Atlantis Philharmonic" filled the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall with music. "The Hello People" put on a fantastic show with their unique combination of rock music it and pantomime. Later that month, April 30th, a free benefit concert was presented in J.S. Knight Auditorium. The main feature was the blues music of "Blind Joe" Hill. Joe and his seeing eye dog, Chum, live in a three room shack behind a house on Fern Street here in Akron, buying the necessities with disability checks and food stamps. Joe certainly meets the qualifications of a blues singer. Up until his guitar and amplifier were stolen, Joe used his concert profits to feed Chum. Although the concert he gave at the University was free, donations were taken at the door and given directly to "Blind Joe" Hill. Throughout the year information tables and displays were set up in the lobby of the Gardner Student Center. These displays provided students with additional insight into careers, problems, religions, and people in general. On May 14th, as part of World Hunger Day, a Rice 8. Tea Meal table was set up. Its purpose was to bring the world hunger problem into sharper focus for students by inviting them to share in the kind of meal which is standard for many of the starving people of the world. For a -. dollar donation, each student received N-"" a heaping plate of unadorned rice Rice 8. -I-ea and a small cup of tea. Meal for HUNGER RELIEF Wed' Moy 14,1975 ll.l0. lv.. il n R Campus Life!Spring 137 '97 U lillltap un ueuxnon .-.-.. Y.-- l!hn..4- . Tragedies Strike K olbe Hall Clare Boothe Luce's "The Women" was presented April 4-6 and 11-13 by The Experimental Theatre Company. The cast, directed by Gini Black, included Martha Brdar, Jennifer Auth, Mindy Tanner, Carol Hageman, and Liz Zaharopoulos. "Oedipus the King", a Greek classic, was the final production for University of Akron Theatre's 1974575 season. The play, written by Sophocles in 430 B.C. opened May 2nd and ran May 3rd-4th and May 9th-11th. The main plot was based on the inevitable fate of Oedipus who would murder his father and marry his mother. The leading roles were played by Thom Gradisher fOedipusj and Bunny Navar tJocasta, Oedipus's mother and wifej. Other members of the cast were Bruce Probst fthe Priestj, Ric Goodwin fCreon1, Rick Groetzinger tTieresias1, Mike Border lSecond Messengerj, Ben Price tFirst Messengerj, George Keros fHerdsmanl and John Fiafery and Ali Jamal fChorus Leadersj. The tragedy was directed by Dr. Wallace Sterling. 138 Campus Life!Spring QS. ...nv-,.. ...A- 4514-ing. fx , if A .,,,,,.,ggas090'J: ,f , , K I, lf., f 'f , A 1-22.-it -I ,, -. 12' ?t9 Campus Life!Spring 739 Expan sion ls Key Word For 1974 75 BUCHTELITE the 1974-75 edition of the Akron Buchtelite. More pages were added to the twice- weekly student publication to compensate for increases in coverage of campus news, arts and sports. The effort paid off as the paper and its writers received a handful of awards including the All-Bonaventure Award "in recognition of exemplary performance in college journalism" from St. Bonaventure University, New York. Among its credits, the Buchtelite researched student grade distributions i"59'Mi of the grades earned on the undergraduate level are "B" or better. "1 and tenure percentages l"the university as a whole is on the threshhold of becoming tenured-in".1. ln addition to its regular features over 40 guest columns from faculty, administrators deans, students and public officials - were printed in 67 issues of the Buchtelite. y , BUCHTELITE STAFF Jim Macak Buchtelite Editor H. Hollingsworth Anne Forster News Editor Arts Editor Dave Allen Frank Smrdel Sports Editor Photo Editor Theresa Forster Joy Goble Back Page Editor Business Mgr. Assistant Editors-P.A. Schwalbach, Marilyn Jackson, Marge Barbacci, Bill Sarris Staff Writers-Robert Bryant, Gary Buckles, William Coulter, Mike Horvath, George Hummel, Joe Kovach, Karen Krugh, Fred Lee, Scott Love, Alice May, Leslie Musser, Diane Paparone, Ellen Quinn, Mary Beth Santelle Tom Foote Production Manager Production-Dave Braden, Gina Get- zinger, Kathleen Linton, Mary Anthony Miller, Rick Nelson, Bob Witschey, Ernie Spannhake Joy Goble Advertising Manager Advertising Production-Gail Paugh, Robin Whitan Jim Nabors Circulation Manager Circulation Staff-Cynthia Gulyas, Kathleen Pandall, Dave Sanders 140 Campus Life!Spring Q2 1 '07 A-. 5 J! 4 Q Jmfx . , I rm N gg: Y I .V 'H , -. rg U M , L, , . '- S Q . ff' 5 Vi! H 4 AM! tx ,K - T. I 4 5 5 QM IWW '5 R 8 I ge a ig JK. A lg f ,E A a :r 5, Ar 1 1 I 1 N A i n A pxigvwwffg fi 142 Campus LIfe!Sprlng ff! Nr ff!! . fx iff SIL. YA WP TO THE MOON RISING IN SOUTH AKRON l stand here near the window and reach over to turn the lamp out The light of the moon appears on the tops of the rosemary plants growing in a large yellow pot Theres no trace of yellow in the moonlight It must be up somewhere over Summit Lake Just look at the way it stays in the sky like a balloon over a carnival that is now apartments Beyond of course the night tugs but it can t forget as if there were eyes in those craters. My lashes brush the glass too soon. I 1erk awake Moon your light is like dust on these leaves like flakes of dry skin trapped in my eyes by John M. Schott Editors note: Robert Wallace, editor of Bits, a magazine of small poems, acted as judge for the Spring, 1975 issue of YA WP. Robert Wallace selected John M. Schott winner for best poetry and Rick Urdials winner for best prose. A twenty- five dollar prize was awarded to each winner. Furnishes News, Music for Campus , +1 f :l -f ar I . X ' 1 . fl ,A QQ. rn, d ii. I . . ft Campus Life!Spring 143 Students Receive Recognition at Mortar Board-ODK Dinner Mortar Board and Omicron Delta Kappa IODKQ held their annual Student Recognition Dinner on May 9 in the Hilltop. Women's honorary Mortar Board tapped Beacon Journal education writer Helen Carringer and Board of Trustees member Frances McGovern to be honorary members. ln addition, 34 students were inducted. Men's honorary ODK tapped UA Executive Director of University Relations and Development, George Ball, as an honorary inductee. New student inductees were also named. In other activities Tom Hackim and Sandy Pianalto received S250 Alumni Recognition Awards. Kathy Kalaman and Tim Miller were named Outstanding Senior Woman and Man. The results of Senior Class elections, which were held on May 7, were announced. New officers included Sandy Pianalto, President, Cindy Earich, Vice President: Nancy Sikora, Secretary: and Dana Sims, Treasurer. Selected to the Senior Board were Debbie Brooks, Kathy Considine, Dave Conte, and Len Krause. rr 1-ggi. -2' '-453714 'K Qin? J " -r""'5 qs- ,N A -44 . '-:iffy 4:::,'eFE' X, , - , 1.4 'S Ml. 1, g,,5.,f " '11 ik J fn' ,ov I SY ,Q f 5 -1 I 4.5 . 1 'jwq :,z " ' 3 E, , f gk ' 1 Io qi 2 - - x 73,1 ' ! Y - E 5 I -1 lf,-M' -r?'.v , . , I ,zz ZWZS 'Y : lik' ,mf 2 1 .M I' ,,,,..--fn.. , . V L, 1 f mira 'Vw 'Q . Q .auf Q 'V - x .ky f., J sf xv 5 1 X U X fx' v'XJ Campus Life!Spring 145 SCPB's May Weekend Helps Relieve Spring "Hornies" 42' SCPB's May Weekend provided a T" variety of activities for students. Included in the week's events were a Happy Hour in the Chuckery featuring "King Colbra" and refreshments, a chest contest giving a money prize to the best male and female chest, a Bicycle Race, and Karate demonstration. gg i Y ,W i f A I shk i ? Sis 1 gg? ? ,Q W gg , Q 'X N gg ,Q , 5 A95 x .ne -eff, 1 is , v r A-cr we Q in P 7 Q4 15 'EES gr? -21. If or-as 146 Campus Life!Spring E. I. f ,Q I x 3 f. i" TS -H 1 .vsxgtvg ,iv ,I , Q xv 'ff x An- I V, s Q ih 1 . iff' - . ' s . gg, M' ,ef . fl . b v 5 1- 4 v D , Q . xg 5 ' L. 'r .SJ ' gg M3 f A f ' ' I.. SR E. Q. Y ' I K, s ,axgfikgf 5 I A ,4 , Q x , 'si' , of . f Q 'V s is H 8 xi 4 ' vi 5?'sML1'l-cf'?J-A -Ji", , 143 imffff 3 X . 'W " Ni' ,g " at I I f, xx!- i- ,r A+.. .F I My-A Twenty-five Member Experimental Dance Ensemble Premieres On May 22nd and 23rd, the University's Opera Theatre Workshop staged two one-act operas, Stravinsky's comic opera "Mavra" and Puccini's "Suor Angelica Both productions were presented in English with full staging, costumes and orchestra. Opera performances, directed by Dr. David Flohrbaugh, were held in E. J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall. Experimental Dance Ensemble made their debut May 20 and 21. The premiere performance was showcase of the 25-member Ensemble in various types ot dance including modern, ballet, and iazz with featured music ranging from Chopin to Billy Preston. Entirely student run, managed, and produced, the Experimental Dance Ensemble marks the first time that dance maiors at the U of A will have the opportunity to perform in fully staged productions. After performing on campus, the Ensemble toured to Kent State University and the Coshocton Community Center. " "" Wal 44 N, ,f"""""' X 'Q' ! .415 . 1.4 id -Y X x 1 f f f f 5 I f K no- +4 -f -,hu--Q my ' ,-an-M' ,Aw .npr f --M wx ,4- Q 7 A AM bw' R11 , ,w'm,,wqg.rg sg - A- - ' 'le-Ni 1 ,. . , ' ' If Q-:X . ., f w -" wwf, ' yf 'f.4 'xf.f , w' fP"'-a+ 'm-"Q ' , ff f"v1l':.'+f v. . ' ' V. -qs!-3 ,. , , ,Inv L, , -A - 1, 5 I w I Mu- Navi" V V 1.'ggv'1s: 2 , "." ,Z-Affff J .Q fx ' I ., 1.1 Wk. ,--V V nswwf. VM, A 1 - , .nv ,pw fy-wa. V wx ...j . -,. r . -V , , . A' 1 I :j1??yg"V'.' ' , . ,,, x ' . V . -xr w f ' - ' , ' ' 1, aww ,,.,.,s, . , , A ,..,., W ,.,. fu., .WL A, . U I, H Q It -k,,- , J., 4, f Mgfb. 7 A 1. V-M. ff x wa " A . I. -w.g"'A 3 ,...- . . 7" y 4-. nw., .,, ,K-,,,Wag N 1 NQF In 'T M, 'lr x-'?'N QHJQH I I , .....,.....-A 5 ...A-" X x fr 5 O N YY---.f ' S4-iii X. S A fig ' 1-H14-A K- x WAI' QVX. X , wzlqggz. . K 5 '15 I .fury Demonstrates Practical Skills Four scholarship winners were announced and awards for academic and military excellence were presented during Army ROTC spring awards ceremony Thursday, May 29th. A helicopter landed on Jackson Field beginning a day of ROTC activities. Included in the activities was a static display, where ROTC members demonstrated their rescue skills. Every year, as soon as the weather becomes warmer, ROTC cadets and officers take to the woods. This year in addition to the usual campouts, adventure and mountaineering training, ROTC did extensive work with the Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops ot Akron. Campus Life!Spring 153 154 Campus Life!Spring I I I I I f .iii-'If xii., LJ .Ll Candidates Vie For ASG Offices ASG Presidential elections attracted candidates. The election held on May 6 and 7 was so close that only 200 votes separated the first and last place finishers. A run-off election was held between the two top vote-getters Corlett and Ungar on May 12 and 13. Bob Corlett and his running mate, Pat Dougherty emerged victorious by a decisive margin Voting was extremely heavy in all elections. Steve Cordova and Matt Pugliese won University Council Seats, and all the Senate seats were filled. pw-vc, ... . T. .1 ,K 5 s lv Campus Life!Spring 155 xi' :Q In ' """ll- , ffffff' ffffxiii f NR , Qivvx I XXL '- .A'5f"ff-". - x ',- - .A A i "-v-nov-vm-away-,--.,.. Dr, Vladmir Simunek :,,.. ,4-v-'fi , -4? jjffr ,.,.-e- ,,l.- M-fr : ' -Li . i,, W I IQ K -I--S-A T 1553 3.31 P1 I2E1i1 1 , -fp 1f 3l if AV l1 fL H- 3i.r,.lL QT Qi1i3i1F 1 L 4 3 J' li 1 ff--" "TA -Y..-f .A-v-'J' ,f-'Q-T' 156 Campus Life!Spring M-A-7 L, iT74-fl R 1v ' L, lr 5- Ll ' if L TA ij, - ,,,, LT fx fKfJTJfFJ?lL5 'i l lg nfs ,svn Q.: -Q, Econ Day Gives Students Appreciation for Econom cs Talks, a panel discussion and films were among the presentations planned by The University of Akron's Department of Economics for its second annual "Economics Day" Friday, May 9. "Economics Day" is intended to give students an appreciation for the study of economics and help them learn about activities of the University's Economics Department. Speakers from area businesses talked about job opportunities in the field of economics when the program began. Dr. Vladmir Simunek, professor of economics at Kent State presented the model he designed to predict economic activity later that afternoon. Activities were capped by the annual Omicron Delta Epsilon-Akron Economic Association Dinner held at the Mark ll Restaurant. A brief "unveiling" ceremony was also held on May 9 when Leigh Hall was formally dedicated in ceremonies held in front of the building. W. Howard Fort and President Guzzetta unveiled the name plate. Leigh Hall was named for Dr. Warren W. Leigh, the first dean of the College of Business Administration. si ' 9 if-Q inf QYFQ. Campus Life!Spring 157 7525354 IW! M f 2 5 If ,fi ,H Qi S ,ia g 1, gf if I 7' " ' 1 f, , 1 o x f 'ws QMTAT.-nr I . ik , ., iv V i I fha-:sf f L I I 1 ll Il 'll .,,,.,.-..- 'Q 3, 1 1 W . , M 9, ,425 ' - ..h,,g,'F-V" X"41,g-jfftfj-rycvf ww., pq-" Gr- fem, if ,Tx C l , ! ! N.. 1 3 A Campus Life!Spring 759 Y I 1 I The Rains Came, and Came 2 gif gklilig i 'fL"f:131 .295 gli Algal mix, QQ' ,f H' Wuglglufifff? Efwtmihzgrk. t ?,:1'2f2W12 E., Hlizlff' , XX .,u.g.1-'Ilia-sw 1 '1 'ww EPR'-k'2v5.'w, 5QSqgiQ'x,n, gmeihakg' QL ' t :ky g'2Q,f'2,3fm '?f gi wwEPwf ii2g,Ef WEE? 122:32 , Mmm kwa? 4,5 S'-wisq , Y,--,,....,....q 9 MN, M... 160 Campus Lile!Spring X -z Q 4 , F his mfg' ---s!s"! l we-:rem iieafwu hu- Uywkmi "Hla5i'he? m.'Hi:,3.. H twirl 514 N .lim Qirqi 227535 illwfzf my Nw af an as FQSSUM Q i and Came, and Came . Q-as 7 uns 1- X4-MAX hwqv xx.- A 1 X V 1'-4, t ' SAX f -vu... Campus LifefSprir1g 767 Y z 5' 1, 3 'sh 1 N 4' 1 ix Q .e 41 wL!""l' Q.-we ,- i , x 1 Q. if N' - ,, -HW gmw... Y ..,, . A 1 . NS. H 5 'Mx X - x W - 'H - Cl- f A, - A g,,-,kxi-I-Zfjgg'-. 'V .vi-Q. .. .. . bw: - ' .qs x ., x. .yn M-:,4s'z.M:-, ,,, .- MSM rw ,,, MP 4- . 5 1. - -A H f u 'M' . . . "Qi ,if , -if 'gy ww K " ,. Q- , W, QA ' -Y ' . My my .als ' . .gw jsgwggxf K 3 ,,:. s.,-.za ' -Az ,A -- we 0 , a . -A5-,,"!' v-A 1-.g-wavy CX- . - . ff' ',.. ' www-v . 9' 'NG' ' wklixlfi' ' w 'f ' "' H ' ' , N N- W Q' -413195, ' ' -.. -w ww ,A ,J ig" if , 11. j f K ."' , , 2 Q" " bm x - U ' -..'-,M H Riga A-:au x " is -fig - - w"'ff1 A Qwg-.Q fifi ' ff"'ffw .X " ' T. ,, '::. ,arf 4 . ,ww " 'W " . ' -- 41: 2-' 1 Q .M.Q '?QX x 48' Y' ., ,.. . . , , , . W A - .. 1: SH W J". A '- wg . ' '- - H ,5'M.3.g,W ,Q f ' t ,aj QW 1 , , ,S 4- - Mt..i,.K ' " " X " :Vx -.,1.,,.., ' x , Eff Q ig ' Q N: , L., k -3 ' .' Q-F, .3-4, , Y H' , 1.3 f , - W 51 : -4 V -M V V, " EP: 53? " I W N - Am, 2 1 ,Q T 11'-A 5. ' W "-I--9 -, Nw N- ' . X ' x ., 'QS'--X. 4514- :5 2 'V war-fisqzsf. gli- 1 "ff 'iff A Q vw 1 35. X " 'fsf1.-,.Ix Y 7, ' :l '5 ., 1 g ,Mig . - S if xl . L+, . Q ' g,3,,,W ,J . V 't x wks? -Q, E , x if S Ne- V , I , NW, K Q X -- -XQQCQNS ' 'X 15 3 , N - ' -3 - , ' ' ' L21 .Af.x,.Q. 4 5,5 . . ms -N I ., . ., f. ., -9' ' 4' ' s ' - 'Ml .- 'fx if -, ' .1 ,, x, 455 , ,1 ' ,.. w -x an - W l 6455f f ,ui . , N1 .x , 1. me 75 31? 525: ' im. f is 'P 4, A ff 'NJN arm' M ' A .2 . ,,., , 5 .kV. A, ,A , A AB, IW. .. , .iw Q R 1 ig iv , i x .-E,-:i ii -I ,,. ,. ,U 5 . x .v ,X 1 if , , Z Wren- lv' 3,--an A V' 1 . ' V W -,, .5 -E gi' sity., ,Q A , , X .4 "fn, Campus Life!Spring 163 iw fi ' wx iff , .. N1 sf x u :sf ff v 4-I ff .,, ff j 4, , ff if 1 14,1 ,V-1.4 6 f '24 e if igfiqt' Z' by MQ wi? Q. ,, , ,H-fu ' 5 .1 4, ,, 1 1 Orientation Week Helps Freshmen Break the lce "Welcome back" was the theme for the Freshman Orientation Program. The new residence hall students met with their resident assistants, the orientation assistants and other administrative personnel. From these people the students received information regarding university rules, policies, procedures and the physical campus To help the freshmen break the ice various social activities, including free movies, parties, a Monte Carlo mixer, a picnic and dance at Clay's Park, The Uncle Vinty Show, an activities fair in E.J. Thomas, and the 6th Annual Freshman Orientation Banquet in GSC Hilltop, were planned. Parties, Fun Add to Dorm Life 'Y K7 166 Fall!Dorms F 4,4 2.5 fydgq 4 lf - '23 am , -.Z ,f .va 145011911 smnmw5Qi Q mv lil' SGDVWWL fame "5 .- 73" T , , U -uh v ff' 4 ll I xx Q? x, ,NN 41, - ,nv -5 ,if xi 1' 'f"17,v-X M ,' F' 3 Ei' . Nfffp' - ,. ' 9 14.1 kftilr' "'l'-Q17-YA. Il . Alf n . .frfhli - x , 4-JA . a f' . -' ,fy Lv-lzifgzsf' 1 x 'Q , - , -v-T ni -Mr mmmresl Man., X ff- .V - . -..-...wr MJ.,-4 Vim, NML.M,.,..,.r,. 7 I . ww ' Swan-iai 1- -wf 4 ff' 'Q u ,., , "Q-Ja 1,7 . 1, 1 -, -'S' -my '- ':L'f:-1:16-.:r' "' b 'Q 'H "W, 4fA"'-M-A 'c . xA--.Lhflagj i in ' U s. V '. V . ,b ,-....- m 4 -I .113-4 -,, QNX- f V. Variety of Programs 'ls the Spice of Dorm Life' 3 fig. 'X ,S Variety was the programming goal for the Residence Hall Program Board for fall quarter. This goal was accomplished through dances, coffee houses in the Top of the Tower, bingo, speakers, concerts, an open game room, movies, a hay- Q ride and hoedown, craft programs, I "How to" help sessions, a slave T auction and bar hopping. A John Bassette was a hit in the first nightclubfcoffeehouse. Lat- er, the coffeehouse's atmosphere and performers were moved to the Top of Bulger Hall. ln the Top of the Tower, Hank lffland started the new series with his simple easy folk music. 768 FallfDorms 6 f ff sf 5 f . p jli xx 3 l ,Q . I ' -rags? + 1 5- S 1 -if 1? , W NN i 5 1 Q Af I . -,S 9 I Y. -f5" , . 9 3 -.-, 'I 'f ' 17 ' u n -E' il. x ' ' A, x T R I W Q, -- N 'I " W W- , 'L' ,I ,' " ggyjf, g'f5.3,j,i'f"l9 ' , ,wk Q' ' x,5 'ff .ffnfxi ""5- if ' Q' . , HQ- . 4 . Q ' I ga, xr Dorm Residents Celebrate RHPB's Third Birthday Y! , GL . Q11 tyin- "" ',,.f'- . x 9 Q ii fl-f,,,f"? Q 4,-, 'a I-'Aff-5 -,J-. 5,4 - LL?-Q 1 - . 'X bl J -. e -5 lx ' e 'X V111 'Q-la ' . 'Zig' A 1 e Q ' is-2222? ' k ,j'iEi3E2,' . ,- 9 N ,' C Q Dorms!Winter 171 1 I , , tl A Mg Game Show and Parties Warm Winter Quarter Popular RHPB activities in the winter were a birthday party and a game show. Dorm residents celebrated the third year of RHPB's existence with a birthday party complete with cake, ice cream, games, contests, and prizes. RHPB's version of TV's "Beat the Clock" had a few dorm students going in circles to do stunts for prizes. Other winter dorm events were Bulger's All-Dorm Party and Spanton's Ice Cream Social and Little Sis Weekend. 172 Dorms!Winter we .5 , .53 l XXXN H1 X X S xg, sau X xt, x g? S R -52 uf 1 Q 5 J5- ffff at fm I-HSM Q- 4.- Xx 'I . I Q cfm S ff Q ff x L? Z C S g ,1.... ...- -t- tx Ji,-' ' , .N 2-'51 4 nfl MW Q 3 Dorms! Winter 1 73 Paint Policy Splashes Dorms With Color New paint policies have added a splash of color to the dorms. Spanton and Bulger residents now have the opportunity to paint the walls in their rooms. Three of the walls must be painted in a pastel color, but the fourth wall creatively with murals or abstract 'desi5nsLf'iriSupplies such as paint, t ladders, and tape were provided by the housing office. Dorm stggenjtsfsypplrede the brushes, and glabvr. s 0. :- af'1 "K, qigfra 3 1 L UN' .111 5X S ,X Q1 xx Avg., 3 4 A 'QRS , , 0139: f 59 ,E gg 'ww ml . W, M' A XR 2 - fig,-. x QA it K K- Yr 'i'Fa- it V' if 'fm 14- A+ Jr v-mam 3, if 5: e-- .1 ww L 1 -4 M 'ltr iv N . fl 2:1 53 M I A i 1 76 Dorms!Spring .1 , , fi? V, ,-f' 'N Dorm Students "Get Involved" in Dorm Week Many dorm students were given a chance to "Get lnvolved" in dorm life during Dorm Week '75. Dorm Week programs ran the gamut ot variety-there was something for everyone. There was a Playboy Happy Hour, a Roman slave auction, a canoe trip, a road rally and a bike trip. Other events included an open games room, a cotteehouse with Alex Bevin in the courtyard, a Penney's fashion show, an ice cream social, a tug-of-war, volleyball tournaments, a picnic theme meal, a movie orgy, and the grande finale-a 50's dance complete with costumed participants. Publicity for Dorm Week '75 was unique,' a balloon was released to publicize the coming week of events. The balloon was returned to the dorms by mail and was accompanied by a letter which indicated that the balloon had landed approximately seven miles from Lake Champlain in the Adirondack Mountains of New York. Dorms!Spring 1 77 I 0 N 1 i Memories of Spring Quarter Linger for Dorm Residents As They Prepare to Leave , .'+-L. Ks -w 1 . .M HQ , ,1ff'a1,.vssW1m ' V 'l ul f 'iivlfx .W-5.34 si X xx f" My A, XY 1' IA, I A ' 'A J, ' iii 'f- 5: g 1 ' V h an , ' 235' Z A1 - 114 p f , 'rv ii 519: f'ii,53' 51" ew' -3 New 1 "U 'PI 2 X "N 'gi X? mb Qi ft xv pe A V! Y- .ir na' N'-'V XYDRQQQ1 N-LR f V KYNQ-tswfgg l 'N ,i 'K . ,,,,, ,-,QM V ti nk.-,1 43 ,.-5.5, ,. ff? Q31 f 23- I 2 , ' We f 'VFR 1? 0 "ELM . Q -, V-in ,Alf 1,,..M- U ni 178 Dorms!Spring X0 AP S2 H M1510 4 3 N. pf' M' fl' Q I D R H52 X' I: A A- Y' A, , ' r 4 fc id 4 P l E .: 4, ,V 1, il M- I fl rf, If V . I M A , fy., , L. . ,.,. ..,gA ,Qld F I 2. Ap- 4' -3 .V 5 6 .Y ' . 1 4.4 ix. I-e 4 1 4 1 I I 1? i Greek Rush: Beginning of the H iw s 54' . ,. FEA:- Sisterhood and Brotherhood Bonds , f r ' .4 Q My .. . ,: x- 4 4 ',,,,,..4f Wm, -. x, wil , v ll N f xlll 1 Greeks are always ready to share, to care, to work, to study, to get involved, to laugh, to cry, and to have fun. . To highlight Homecoming, Greeks sponsored a King and Queen. The fraternity men chose Marilyn LaCroix lDelta Gammaj as the Queen and the sorority women chose Mike Cox lLambda Chi Alphaj as the King. Election results were announced at the Homecoming Game. i I I Delta Zeta held their annual Halloween Open House. Highlight of the day was a Donut-eating contest between the fraternities. The object of the contest was to eat six donuts in the least amount of time. Phi Kappa Tau's candidate stuffed his mouth to victory. i Sigma Pi and Alpha Delta Pi also celebrated Halloween by inviting l 50 children from East Akron Commun- 7 ity House to their party. l 1 5 Q ' Alpha Phi Alpha held their annual formal at the Holiday Inn Cascade on December 14. Jerri Edge was crowned Queen. During the Christmas Season, Kappa Kappa Gammas donned elf costumes and spread Christmas cheer through the campus. .41 xx i RK fr' 182 Fall!Greeks Parties, Formals, Fun Are Part of Greek Life 9' 42, ,kfgnnz .rid ev.-,711 ,I da Y gy V83 Neale iN. ,, , I 1 fr M K -S3 ZZ.. 5 ,',. . 1 4 ' whnladvm 1 'Ci wvfgy 'H' 15 'Me war" -1 e F . -' in ri f Fall!Greeks 183 nd P N 4 I 1 'v ar? ,yi ,, IA.. yr 41 ' , Fi sf? ' ,Q -' U F 'Kr Y' 3' 4: L 1 'iv X, A V lf , .4 ' . - a 4.0 .l , - + , , H., 4. , ,, , 4:- 4 g.,,,,w, , gf f N, ff G ' CQ' X 07- ' Vg ' ' ' ..f....'--- - ,ff Z'-in ,, . , ,,,,l,' , I I 3 .1 ' v ,, , A- , ' -,aff .454 ' WW A lf! " iw? ' r, .YQQ3 , 2 . z 'v :VU , 1- m .' x w f 2 , 1 :WM ,,f' fm i 1 -1 1 h,,wf2af'5j 41, ' fi ff 1 fi- VM. ' ' ' f'f'.,f'l-V1 . " X ul ,ff ' - Ag. M ,, , 9- 1, C, f.,wXai'f"g V ,, "1-V,-w f ,5.W',3vf M . ' cr, jgy f 2: .,fv If' - ,u',W., v f U , f 9 fpvw w-,,'ff,, 154 4 .,f,.m 4. 1 'igyf 'CA , . iff R 1 'Z 143-3:,x'ii.gg5,..Q,z5?9': ' ,-3 'V , 7 :if ' "f,,:'.11ffffw lv' Q. . - 'wx-Inf 4 v---fff'6:H5' "' u, ' ". gi If Y 1 W- P . . ' 4, wif: ', "Lf-f5,,,.,5,fM i- g:.y4,W-gi., L ,. ,'-f:Qjs,' 1.-fs, Q41 , , :Wgx 3 ,,- '- , . " 'iff' - -. ' 9345? 'C .N H-31193, W 1 "'l9"4-5' ,AQ R4-1 A' f' ff 4 f fl, Fifa MZ 1 ' ' 1: ., V ,,1tb.V,, ,,. , 6 ,, t.. ,',U3:,. ,i 2. ,Q at ,,,,A,f , f ,Q 3 Y 2 'Kim' 1:1 fi! "' 5521--544 ziaff' "W Rf 2 'Tiff 'fi W 1 I1 it VZ-, M if I ,L .A . J: ,V 3 I-V ZW. ' L" lin A I tfwvt-'Ha ,A 20,1 V4 x V .Xi f : . Q P - N25 1- jg:-gif" M wr, .A ,, 'll' f ,gif A, A ' f .A 41 53- ,, f ., I f 5 'f Q . -,vzfmf-i, ' " .- ' . 1 : 4 .9 fu. ,M-'. f wfr' A if .ff ' ' A1iHf,Q"GP:5'N'Z . ff -' 11- 4- ,.. ju ' ' . '- ' aff' . 2 . ... , 3 fb ' Q -R-'e'f?:'?" ?v ea? d ' ' fi . - ' 5 I-T5 Vg, ' .' A 'f1"'l'k f'1'l ::'f"'., '- : '.':': P? ' T , KK , if -4- 3 . A 'Vf2 .,fr f" f'- Q1 1. - ,:.. 1gC'.! f-'i"'f"+ il Mqg, ', TF?" fx Q2 1 gf- t Zig. ya .i,:f:f,,., 4-'. ,Aw Y xg-1,23 , 1-,h 4- 'V I, f-.xiii in F., fri.. - - aaa s 4, -" --fs , 1 - '. , -,Z-,,-'K vga" . -,, , - L ,gl U va'-'W ,ff-,VL f' Qaffw V - u f f-A-4 '?'.2Tl'w f'4 ,bs-Zvawfv -V F? " 5 , 4 , f J -. 'Y' 4' '. "" jars " L+ V h VK" Lkvf ' ff ' 3-L '- , -JM w 3' lf '. A ' x 'i": , . 'ffl -ffn '- . 1 , 1 I 1 f I i i 184 Fall!Greeks ' . . -1 "-'ff"al':'..' 7' , vi s inns: "mm Ssalv fx ' -.S-V 4 MH V -v ,, 1 .2 an J!! N nf vw. 1' i up 'an-'Q' fqgjk 3... "YZ" I F . ,Iz- N Www.-' f -4 Greek Life: A Time For Sharing Through philanthr0PY, Greeks demonstrated their concern for those less fortunate. Lambda Chi started the cycle by sponsoring their annual sorority mud tug. Each sorority paid an entry fee which was donated to the United Fund. The women of Theta Phi Alpha were the winners. Theta Phi Alpha and Phi Kappa Tau followed with "Dribbling for Dollars." ln two days tin the cold and snowj, a dribbling basketball raised over 860000. 1 'tm-r T ulll nlrlll NLDEL, . . and Caring Donations from the University were overwhelming in this quarter's Greek-sponsored Red Cross Blood Drive. There were 387 pints of blood collected. Delta Zeta's, Theta Chi's and Phi Mu's created a "Santa's sleigh" by decorating a U-Haul and hitching it to a car. The girls and guys spent two days walking through neighborhoods Collecting toys for the Marine Corps' "Toys for Tots" Drive. Phi Mu's re-instituted the Phi Mu King and Queen of Hearts. Debbie Brooks lDelta Zetaj and John Smilek lDelta Tau Deltal were elected Queen and King. The penny votes which were collected during the week were donated to Project Hope. Greek projects include mud tugs, slave sales, Christmas parties for the old folks' homes and the children's homes, and volunteer work with various agencies. lt's all part of the Greek spirit: caring and sharing. 786 FallfG reeks Qfllmfs Q ,yn- 'fe ax'-f:'J'Jr Cal 'X QA 1 Q 1 V la. 'V 'l i f 1 Q lf' 1:7 Mg if 1 Fall!G reeks 18 7 188 Greeks! Winter it il 3, 'H Xt, Winter quarter saw many successful Greek proiects. Greeks recognized dedicated members and alums, participated in philanthropy work, and built new houses. Kappa Kappa Gamma celebrated the ground-breaking of their new chapter lodge being built next to the present chapter house on Spicer Street. The lodge is expected to be finished in September. Phi Mu's honored the dedication of their regional advisor, Miss Nancy Whitmer, by holding a tea in her honor. Among the guests were Dr. and Mrs. Guzzetta. The men of Phi Kappa Tau honored their pledges with a winter banquet. Guest speaker was Mr. Don Stevens, Summit County Commissioner. Kappas teamed with the Lone Stars and children from the Summit County Children's Home to display their bowling talents. Delta Tau Delta Fraternity also took a group of children to the basement of GSC to try their luck on the lanes. Following the sharing spirit, the women of Delta Gamma prepared dinner at their sorority house for residents ot the Blind Home. To climax the events of winter quarter, Panhellenic Council re- established the inter-sorority talent show, "Casbash", Many talents, ranging from singing and dancing to skits and comedy routines, were displayed. Money made from Casbash was donated to the ChiIdren's Home. Winter Quarter Proves Successful for Greek Projects Formals, Parties Highlight Greek Greeks were never too busy to take time for partying. Good times and fun were abundant in theme parties, open parties, and formal dances. The women of Theta Phi Alpha held a Christmas party for the sisters at the chapter house. ln the spirit of the season, "Santa Claus" made an appearance. Formals are very popular with all the sororities and fraternities. Phi Sigma Kappa held their Moonlight Girl Formal again this year. Delta Zeta, Delta Gamma, and Kappa Kappa Gamma sororities also held winter formals for the sisters and their dates. . J as 190 Greeksfwinter fr Winter Social Scene nx- , e 1 ' if 5 " 5,1 v 1 1 1 e -, .X Q, ' YV. vgertb. so- ' KA 'A I :' V a 'f' ' I 4 ' -V - 'Q gv fl.. ' ti mt ' If -A4- 1 52 . it - .fi f,. 05, ' ' 2 1 fA "' I " ', E - 1 - If e f .4 '. J I if K, W --in h AV is , ,I t ,llv A 1 . 4. , I- a vr, C A , - , . gljbl X N, '. ,,,f ,MQ J" 7 ' n f r I e "-' ' """ ' ,-A K ' M SX We P' S z ' J' A - ' 1,-L -. 611 -Y R"' :'1e - lie Ai'- Greeks! Winter 191 Greeks' Spring Fever Helps Others Through Spring was the quarter for Greek philanthropies and fun. Members of Alpha Delta Pi and Lambda Chi Alpha pulled a bathtub from the Lambda Chi house to the Summit Mall collecting money enroute. Delta Gamma spread sunshine and cheer to the folks at the blind home and the women of Alpha Gamma Delta arose early one Saturday morning to cook a tower of pancakes. All the people who came to the Alpha Gam house hungry left well fed. Alpha Phi Alpha celebrated their chapter's Fiftieth anniversary on May 9. Celebration activities included a dance for dorm students, Greek Alpha Phi Alpha Review, and a Wine Feast. 1 ! ' NT J l 192 Greeks!Spring .,,.g.. 4. 1 li? we A I - 5 ,3 . 1 N . -' C+- g 5 Q Y , ' 0 if if ef fe Vg-""J'4 A . l P Q X K Ah, Y' L 2 , A X X if duff' y, EY 5.3 4 2 9 ki, fb 4' www ms. M ,XA fb., , . , JWFQRQALH-1 Greek Spirit Manifested in Greek Week Acfivmes NM X. ' rf ul v' . L ,A . .Q 5? ' 'L f i " Li - V .ff f 45 wav My I 5 , 'img In x Q 1-r' .. gli Q N Y ' wc:-.'. ,f ' -Q 2, N . M,-4 614 J . is .. . ' V D, f' ,-- S'gf,,f,.,.. -S ' iff ,, ' 1 .. 5 .W 442,44 'T U ., , X, ' k , . if GCLQ, , Liwfxn' 'fffi :W PU W T, ,1,,QM'.i0:' 1 3953 f- wr' ' 4 A, lr 4, , ' ery A V fwn ' ,Vwgf 'f'fw:i .,. Agf,,.ii ,wig '--....-Q Fw mf "Q, -,+ M we Wwe 4325212 'P' A 'f'Y'9nT'z'?4 .x 4,.,,,i, wr., 5" "'h-bil 1-1. ,mf .AH K six.: il'iti?Q',f,TGlv-CiT.l?' ,ANN CLE! 5336 75 K D EV' sf , -tw? J .1 0 QL - ff! 1,-A44 . .. ,Y '35 N 4 wh UH: 3 mu X A A. ' Q Gr' .Q . ' 5 'FN , 1, gre: 1 ,,, Vi 'Ka x , .gg-,., .- . .-'19 Ma-f '. lg, X, gflj .df Greeks!Spring 195 Greek Week: 1975-Year of The Greeks Greek Week kicked off Friday, May 9, with the Lone Star Pizza Party. Pizza, beer and fun highlighted the evening. On Saturday, Greeks combined efforts to plant trees for the Parks and Recreation Commission. Bowling, pool and euchre offered enjoyment during the week and various races and contests proved to add excitement as well as fun. The Kappa Chariot race saw Greek contestants don Roman attire and race homemade chariots. Lambda Chi's and TKE's sponsored the annual'Chug Off and TKEquacade respectively. A week of frivolity came to a semi-climax with the Greek Feast. An odd assortment of games were planned to entertain the masses, while hot dogs, chips and all the trimmings were served to feed them. One of the high points of the feast was the Delta Tau Delta balloon ride. The traditional alley party provided a happy ending to the feast. "Those were the Good Old Days- A Night of Nostalgia" was the theme for Songfest 1975 which ended Greek Week. Phi Mu, Phi Sigma Kappa and Delta Tau Delta combined efforts to take first place with their version of a "Gay 90's Medley." No strangers to winning, the men of Phi Sigma Kappa placed first in individual fraternity competition with their "Fantasia of Sea Songs". Theta Phi Alpha placed first in individual sorority competition with their medley of "Mammy!Rock-a-bye Your Baby." Delta Tau Delta and Chi Omega were voted most improved chapters. Phi Sigma Kappa, for the third year in a row, was named Outstanding House. Kathy Kalaman and Sue Hamilton were named Outstanding Greek Women and Tim Miller was named Outstanding Greek Man. 196 Greeks!Spring ? nhl w t - in + :Q , xJ"h V b nw Mil, H Vai 4 47 . S. ' N yr" K ,L ' ai ' f '- .vf L 2' "JH 1 ' 4 'ng ' - ., - 'sa H - - L .fi 1 bg 47 4 ' In sig - rl - " ' V 9-.' . , ,.3 1 5 -- ' V -0 H Aj, 'Z' ' is I a. '. " I . . N , , . Lg- W ,I 1 " 5 - 9 'l x '!,,gnH.q':- .,,"j I , 1 U , R" V , - A-3, ...ilk-.E 1 ' qua- e inf i Vr . I . -all' ' V V- iizggjktrlz I x '. I ' sz-. .5559 1 . 4 , 1' Q10 F' E I - ,nl 4 .- ' . " - V-5 1 ' a Eh' f , ,PV . Ili V vq 1 '-- 'S , :Eff-V ,ma- ,X N' 4 A u 1' 3 V. W 155' 2 XA A1 ' xg 5. V -fn :V ' VL -Q ' V ' fa Wg f 49" Rig' .1 , ,. K V , ,-e , .rw ,ifc V is ' A P" 'fl ' ' 1 4 v V n- - H" . .qw ' ' r- V. Q K , ., ,, .15 , -1? , Q.. I Tj if , ', h.:1'1L':jf N . X'- 4 V 'V - ,' X.. . 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N I s 5 515' E' 4' 'I , u L- Nb FM, pn 'v n n '62 1 1 , 4 1 , jx, . r ' .aw U, J ' 3, 'Z . 0 arf' 0' H, h 141 is W-f'-rr , ' , v , K ? ,,,.. - M., x, v Q M . ixw-QY"" ' s ' Q i V S , ' - 5 mf' "' ,, bl- ' 'Nw My . -.L"""In.... vm A ...M , 5, 5. in I' !, flu' , N7 31 I fi a un,-3 1. ..,1'.3-Q Always: - - I K ,Y Q AWAY, , ,p ....- -.L1L.:,: .Y.. nmQ , . ,W az1z:-Q.::un-f---v-f+-- '-'----- - SQ all 200 Athletics .q 5, V1 -QW ,ml aww . M X we lu, 4 I rf'-fr W.- ' agsfzkif . W ... 14.1" ' " . Wfffiif " nwfi' 'I L 'VAT' .ww- if 'xv .M-'j7Mvw+ lf . .W 1 ,ff .,.. uf.--1 wwf W ' " N . I , uv, W ' ' J7ff95'5'f- -R " ., 55' ' ...,,,'L,,, f 'f ,mpg W f A, , -1 av y.5',,fm1',, 3 "S'xf,:'- ,Tim 7 zu' Li: , '74 usb? -- una--mr W' ima, -,1 -1 5 ni lf rl, .. 1 F w Q I A i i I E X ,xl Qi W1 I -n'kn 1.4 202 Fall!Athletics Record "lt was a season of peaks-both up and down," said Head Coach Jim Dennison in retrospect of the 1974 football campaign. No one could have stated it better. A fired up Zip team opened its season on a high note by defeating Central State, 31-20, before 32,874 Acme-Zip fans. However, in the next game, two TD's scored with 1:10 left in the first half robbed the gridders of the vic- tory which their super effort war- ranted: the result was a painful 14-0 loss to Delaware. Somewhat demoralized and with help from four fumbles and an intercepted pass, the Zips blew what should have been an easy victory by drop- ping a 17-7 decision to Marshall in the third game of the season. However, the letdown was only momentary as the Zips came up with three fine performances in a row. The first was an exciting, 26-21 come-from-behind victory over Ball State, followed by a hard fought game against Tampa that left Akron on the short end of a 16-7 score. Undaunted the Zips came charging right back to crush Northern Michigan in a 23-0 shutout. The next game was disasterousg it not only brought defeat to the Zips but also brought them embar- rassment as Kent State waltzed to a 51-14 victory. Fall!Athletics 203 3 Youth Deciding ' Factor of Season v . vu xvf' 1l il ' X -0 ? gb., ,Z,.,,,.-vAr',',.Q5? v , A ,ww H KM! Ili! '-4 , X ,Wei A-.M . ., J f "Wi fi " o 1 , V .1 -f ,M .m.:mf, ' X - V 4 -,,, M, 1 4. 'Q7' .,, A f . E . . ,.. V A 57, 5... 5 S 1 fir F' mfr , 1 S 'wgfgwe' Q., lx i 1 yi if Q l I A 204 Fall!A thlefics mn yn 1 11 1 Ili ' X...- iavik Zips by a score of 30-0. "It makes a coach scratch his head to try to figure the emotional peaks of football players," lamen- ted Dennison. "We worked hard to get where we are and I watched this team defeat two good football teams. We're down right now-but, one loss doesn't ruin a season. This team is capable of playing good football. We started 17 un- derclassmen and l'll be very disap- pointed if we aren't much improv- ed after spring ball and then put it altogether in 1975." 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W9-V - f' -iw 206 Fall!Athl9ticS 63553 ' AKRON Akron Akron AKRON Akron AKRON Akron AKRON AKRON Akron 19 s'4j4f'jf'7 ,, ij gaf5'5'9?' 33 1 ,L acyl!-3f"4NL5i 433"f+fT1i1mwfn' M N wt a' ,I Q ,An , ..: avi-' : V - -lm "': Y 114, , . t, 'Li' I J A . d 7 ' ww ' v-ina-uugnwc rf M ,N 1 , 1 -Munn ':t..q1,' - W, ,V Wawgf, Ng 3,3 ,:,:Zqm,,a:i'aww A ' V A 3' 1 -vw Football Coach: Jim Dennison 31 Central State 0 DELAWARE 7 MARSHALL 26 Ball State 7 TA MPA 23 Northern Michigan 14 KEN T S TA TE 22 indiana State 32 Western Illinois 0 YOUNGSTOWN STA TE Season Standing: 5-5 F ...mm ' 1 I 1 1 ,,,,,.,.,.,.M....4.M,M..,............ 1951" M 92.xf'5' 3 i A Eff 1' A v.::fi1:E2f" N , -""'r" '- ,I I, of f5Qgg.5jf,J f, . W- A - tl. K 16 V . N14 a-.1 ,- ,Ku - 5 1-,gg 1g wfy at-, A-w,:'fv' i, 1,1 g.,',Q-hfa-iyyiw' " J' .PW , 1- A34 I "A Jig" - pwfwi, -I -' gcUg'b.,3j,, , f.w515.e,.,..g-yi,w1-gf-71 1.4 3. B ' V 'F K"-' 5'H '7T'i?'Z' rw ',ff3"'. ' 3 , in W we.. ,W l l. 2gz f ,f ..k,ff5Erwx.,,qEtLy23y,v qu 5 : 3 ,Q-. 1: ,,,' A 'qC1'.gu, 1. ' , x'1.'r41 4131 J , - A we Y O , V ,T - I f H:- 1, W . 1 w ' 'ffl Mr ' r ' , X V' " -l,ggfa:15g34g:g?-we Fall!A thlefics 207 Do wd y Has Winning First Season Some formidable obstacles were presented to Akron 's soccer team by the 1974 schedule, but despite these obstacles, Coach Robert Dowdy's booters were able to com- pile a winning record of 6-5-1 and just missed being invited to par- ticipate in NCAA postseason play. Preseason training was hindered by the fact that Dowdy, a rookie as head coach, did not take over un- til August 1. This late start left him only a short time to get to know his team and to prepare for the '74 season-and what a season it was! Four of AU's opponents were ranked in the top 20 nationally. The Zips were shut out by Southern Illinois, 5-0, and Howard, 2-0, who were ranked one and two re- spectively. Booters came back and completely outplayed Youngstown State in a 14-1 slaughter and up- set undefeated Bowling Green, the OSCA defending champs and number one ranked team in Ohio, by a decisive 4-1 score. ln the Youngstown State game, George Nanchoff made five goals and four assists to break the AU record of most points scored in a game, and went on to be Akron's high scorer for the second straight year. "l rate the 1974 campaign, despite being mediocre, as highly success- ful," says the positive-minded Dowdy. "The outstanding play and leadership by our seniors has set a good example for our younger players. Several of our freshmen have gained an early baptism un- der fire. In talking to those players coming back next year I sense a strong competitive spirit and enthusiasm which says to me, 'l can hardly wait for next year.' lt echoes my sentiments exactly." 208 Fall!A thletics - ' 4 H-nv--,V 5 - , . . .. " 1 :jf . 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V .- ,,g1,ff F5352 mQ.:a.Vq:W,,,,.j,5,yi,,, MWA N MM .,,,.y., A ' ' in Mk.. ,,, 5 -,Mg -wud ggsrcy -191,:f--:'fwf"1.11.-ttf-5i?nflii."f f 5' wwf? er- -'M M '- ,. vw. Q Lf 1 ' . f.. 'f'-'lm' ' ,,,":":-"g f, ft 'fig 33-1' f T.,5f?y5dv"?-i?33'5'?3iQ5.?w ' Q5 rg 492595-325 ' -,3'5f'3' Qitwii' 1.4, , ifxbwfxtfmw' , Titania? .ei ff 1 1.1: I aw' 'f ff In 3 I l W, ,f 'x 'lf X I and 'Hmmm M Qeygrkfygygkvn wmv'-'H ,Y A' ,1,,,.,XN. S www 1 Ziff -ts '-a mi-.22-' f , ' . an . - - - Soccer Coach: Robert Dowdy Akron 3 Lewis U. llll.j 3 AKRON 6 Buffalo State 1 Akron 0 S. ILL.-EDWARDSVILLE 5 AKRON Federal City Akron CLEVELAND STA TE Akron ONEO TA STA TE AKRON Kent State Ak. on HOWARD AKRON Youngstown State AKRON Bowling Green Akron ALDERSON BROADDUS 3 ' 0 1 2 0 1 8 0 ' 0 2 14 1 4 ' 1 0 - 3 AKRON 6 Wooster 1 Season Standing: 6-5-1 Harriers 5-1 Record-Best ln Seven Years From a dual meet standpoint AU's 1974 season was highly successful. The 5-1 record was the best in Head Coach Al Campbell's six years at the helm and the best since the 1967 campaign. For the most part, freshman Nate Ritchie was AU's leading runner, but it was veteran Dan McCallion who garnered the big honors. The senior captain ended his career as an All-American, placing 20th in the NCAA Division ll Championships. Prior to the NCAA meet, Akron's individual highlight was Nate Ritchie's winning the All-Ohio Col- lege Division crown. The slender freshman bested many a talented veteran in the All-Ohio and gave Akron its second straight champ- ion. Last year Cletus Griffin, considered the best long distance runner ever at AU, captured the race. Nate is way ahead of Griffin's pace and has assured that he will have to be contended with for collegiate cross country honors in Ohio for the next three years. "Our youth caused us to be erratic in our invitational meets," said Coach Campbell. "We didn't have the veterans, the experienced run- ners to give us the consistency a ' 4 u . li. I' J wir'- , V I' :Rx qt? 5 C 5 I '4' I is thigh I . . ,, 1 so ff, was good team needs in big meets. ,,,,,fL,53ff1E, i at nuff' gwk . . Q1 gem- ., T.: 'gf '- f+'.rrggfa.avgsm',1T'f,y ,ef 1+ an But, despite this lack of exper- fr-ft ji ' gpm if W: ,gh 33' QW ' - ,iv , .wi Y! 1iwWLf.wA gi., A I W 11,511 A fence, AU was very successful in ff, Vffgf-f, YW 5,255 awww ' it . f"w54"A ,, . "'f'?fg wfff any N, 'ffl ay ,I 1974 and the way things look for me glj vggg, , ae WA ..,f- M ,, W zfgjfls' the future, with five lettermen . ,' , Q ,wh ft tr Q5 ,, v f it 2 If "', ii.jI'f' T- 16 1'1' ' i 1 A expected back next year, Akron 4,9 ,.,.,1 M 63.3 Afmfefiqng-q?3,,2y,iv,3,Q r is a team of the future, Q ,ff 5 A QQ hi f . 'f - vt , Q 'Hg -'fi 'wink ff 1 V549 L' fe""' 135.9-' ,. f 55. 1 ""' N-J' 'Q 7' if iff E231 W 'ff' , ,M ,..A,,,w,f V 72,7 , ,H f QS. F, W it it 52 w ... 1' A 3' 'f as tl Mr 'X K 'xf' 'bei'-?f'7-4 , S' ,J,," " 4 N ir I 3 'N aw MQ "wines-f"X ? ff? +4 1' ' GS t 1 7- 4 ' I zifighf -ff., ,-1, Q"'x'll?.i f 1, . . wif iz-55" f Q ,ff Q id Laude X . N i:'W.1'?A .ff ',4uv.t"l'775'yrS7i,M,' IQ 1 ,"..,,w f'1.f'3Qf,j5,.'1 .Qff .,, Q A A 9 ut. 1.1 , 1 .f 1 f. 4 My ,ff tasty .- f M ef- emtff ' ff 'S cv. + K df Gt .f"V5 253. HV 1' . I fl, 5.715 "L-V, 1' ..' .-J, 1,10 -, 'is 'iff : . .-. U r "" 272 Fall!A thletics AKRON AKRON Akron AKRON AKRON AKRON Volleyball Coach: Mary Ann Tripodi KAU Score Firstl Case Western Reserve: 15-1 15-5 Baldwin Wallace: 8-15 15-3 10-15 Oberlin: 13-15 15-6 15-6 Hiram 15 7 15 5 Wooster 15 11 8 15 915 Bowling Green 15 7 15 11 Wrrght State 15 11 15 9 Notre Dame College 15 3 15 12 John Carroll 15 12 15 7 Ashland 1510 615 515 Ohro Northern 15 13 15 13 Mount Unron 15 4 15 12 Kent State 9 15 15 11 715 Cleveland State 6 15 2 15 Toledo 151 15 9 Youngstown State 15 7 15 1 State Tournament at Dayton Toledo 1512 11 15 1614 Mramr 1513 815 815 Dayton 12 75 6 15 Season Standing 12 7 -'-34" tv ' f " f-QAM' JP ti, 3 QW . va wa -N gg- t 1b,q af I:-S5 f f. .gi H ,fm , ' H. N, ,WW 1, , ., 1 . ,,f. . 1 'rg f. .- x t -'S' H A 1 ff 2 2' af x ss t 6 ,,-x . gg.. FN 7? Q 54 . lv, , ,-1,-gl X , V, 1,3 ' -811' ."'4,, ink is Volleyball Team Plays 1st Season as Varsity Sport Intercollegiate athletics at The University of Akron can no longer be called sexist. After three years as a club sport, womens volleyball was admitted as a varsity sport this past fall. Mary Ann Tripodi, who has handled the coaching duties in volleyball and basketball the last three years, made her Zip volleyball coaching debut a success. Tripodi guided her Zip volleyball unit to a fine 12-7 record. Led by senior co-captains Donna Vanchoff and Karen Kennedy, the Zips vaulted out to a 7-2 mark, but then closed with a 5-5 mark, including two losses in three matches at the state tournament in Dayton. Vanchoff was by far the leading point getter, compiling 162 points and had a season individual high of 19 points in the two set victory over Youngstown State. Kennedy, a four year veteran on the team, followed with 98 points. Rounding out the varsity were senior Dot Meola, junior Sue Davis, sophomores Anne Riede, Debbie Havlik and Sue Richardson and freshman Melanie Brackley. V, 1. if at .Ty as fs ' I rw-.-M10 , I' i a ,. 1 1 I . 5 I -, 3 .V f' --.Q--' , M ,. X D,f,',7f ""- 'VY A We 711 2,1 U , 2:70 ' of ' " ff -2 E X 4 A 'a f -3 m ' 0, 1-' W 'Q " - '-W ' I Q ..-A , a: , .1 .. ,. .., ,Q P L H ""4.. ". 'f A 4 y u- 'M Q, 1 9 ' -V-4 ff' ,QW Q fc , 3' gig' ,M 1 1 I .Q . .. 3. f , mf 1' AA' -' I A av is w. F Si Q6 5531 IL ,4 , 4 I N i w ff-W Q 4 4,,,,,,...,....- 1 il 5 . I Ka- :f-ff F1 rf' .mx ' hflkx . .fi m,,,.,,v.,.,' 1 Iwgee ta . 1, ' . 1 FQ .,-gi -'fo YA. f"""' 554 sf P f-w-prewmwu' File J " YQ ul I " X -fast " nil Al. V 3 41 ' 3 , A v all "'2i'.4 A ff' f- f W 5 lx 1 . is 'fnfg 72- I a I A a Q! I ' 2 '. al' if new 1'-, i , u 4 bl if wg 4. M iwfg, a W " nf'- V ff ,,KRO,, SIX Q X ,gfll77RN 7 35 WCHIGA N V 1 y,KROf Qu' Roundballers' Defense Sparks Late Season Turn Around VG-, ..--Q-'WM M? -lg ' fs. The 1974- 75 basketball season was to be a season for rebuilding at The University of Akron. Indeed it was a rebuilding campaign and a most successful one as the Zip cagers 120-91 earned their ninth invitation to participate in NCAA post-season tournament play and went on to capture the Great Lakes Regional Championship. AU's season ended in the quarterfinals at Evansville, Indiana with a hard fought 72-69 loss to Tennessee State. Earlier Akron had journeyed to Charleston, Illinois for the Great Lakes Regional. The Zips disposed of host Eastern Illinois and its 19 game home winning streak, 76-62, in the first round and then came from behind to beat number one seeded St. Joseph's College, 58-52, in the championship. For the second straight year Head Coach Wyatt Webb had the problem of having but two returning starters and only three lettermen as the nucleus to mold another winning campaign. This meant that Webb, in his seventh campaign had a 13-man squad, 10 of which had no varsity basketball playing experience in an Akron U uniform. The two returning starters were 6-3 senior guard Nate Barnett and a 6-9 senior center Greg Parham. With the experience of both Barnett, a two-year starter, and Parham, Webb had 40 percent of his starter five. However, Webb's salvation was six college transfers, three of which filled in the empty spots in the lineup. From Bacone Junior College iOklahoma1 came 6-4 junior Dave Joyner. From Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio came 6-3 iunior Casimier Moss and from the University of Louisville came 6-4 sophomore Jim Abrams. "l do think we have great individual talent," said Webb, prior to the season's start, "but we will have to sublimate that talent to the team's success." Through the first 14 games Akron struggled, showed inconsistency in its overall play while compiling an 8-6 mark. At times the Zips looked like "world beaters" and almost in the next instance-completely incompetent. ln the beginning AU showed signs of greatness and poise. On the two-game trip to Montana, the hero of the hour was Akron's big guy- Parham. Trailing 67-65 with one second remaining, Parham sent the contest with Montana State into overtime by taking a full-length-of-the-court pass from Barnett and then sank a 22 foot lefthanded hook shot. The Zips outscored the Bobcats 7-2 in the overtime for a 74-68 victory. ll. Vi, a 1 4 I 4, 1. 6' 0' , . I . Basketball Coach: Wyatt Webb AKRON 84 S. California College Akron 56 MOREHEAD STA TE AKRON 84 Western Illinois Akron 66 BROCKPORT STA TE AKRON 88 New Hampshire College AKRON 88 Hayward State, Calif, AKRON 74 Montana State lOTi AKRON 63 Eastern Montana Akron 72 DA YTON Akron 64 EASTERN MICHIGAN AKRON 92 Roanoke Akron 67 GANNON AKRON 80 Kentucky Wesleyan Akron 59 CLEVELAND STA TE AKRON 69 Central Connecticut AKRON 63 Wright State AKRON 65 Youngstown State Akron 66 CLEVELAND STA TE AKRON 82 Bellarmine AKRON 57 KentState AKRON 70 Youngstown State Akron 56 BUFFALO U AKRON 97 Buffalo State AKRON 82 Ashland AKRON 79 Western Illinois AKRON 87 Marshall Grest Lakes Regional at Charleston, lll. AKRON 76 Eastern Illinois AKRON 58 St. Joseph's NCAA ll National Finals at Evansville Akron 69 TENNESSEE STA TE Season Standing: 20-9 A thletics! Winter 219 W e Zips Fall at Evansville Quarterfinals 5 - Asw-.. 1' v x X , X 6' 4 'G XS ' ,436-'QM 'T 220 A thleticsf Win ter .fill . X, X1 ---..- , "Q 2 Q ,ff-3 :al 1 1 ' .1 44 "' A , W , 5' fi' ' , 3 -4. .af-'J' :- pn. ...W " , .. Us y A if f f., 42 J ff ? 2 . AL 1 . w w .- Z Y , D S . V 2 - Aff: Q in S E A Q J 5 Y' -V fl-1 4 , Q A 1 N -f 1 . .. ' if f" ,Y W.. . , sv, 5 Q ,mg ' A Q 'HK -23222:-1 , .Nw--N.-f .wrap as r' 'Q-sh M..-....,,... 'x .-.W ....,..., ,V VM my A A X a M.,- s. . ,, ,. ,...,. . X affix. '- iv' ntwlniqnwvvyq yy ' ,, , Tf ' . . ' - .., X We 'ir Two nights later at Eastern Montana, Parham did it again. The 6-9 cager picked up a deflected Barnett pass and netted a 20 foot jump shot from the left corner at the buzzer to edge the Yellowiackets 63-62. By contrast AU went icy cold in the shooting department T24 for 721 in the 64-56 loss at Morehead State, played a poor floor game in the 69-66 loss at Brockport State, who went on to finish fourth in the NCAA lll National Tourney, and were sluggish on offense in the 66-64 defeat by Eastern Michigan. On the season, the only game that Akron was not in during the later stages was against nationally-ranked Gannon. AU dropped that contest 75-67. For all its inconsistency, the Zips did not taste a humiliating defeat in 1974-75. AU's worst loss was by eight points and five of its losses were by three points or less. The last 12 games of the regular season showed a marked change in AU's play. "l think it's a sign we are maturing," Webb said, adding, "I hope so." During this stretch the Zip cagers won 10 of the 12 games, including several important games crucial for the NCAA tournament bid. "When they realize it's a must game they get fired up," Webb exclaimed. Much of the credit for AU's late season turn around was its defense. "Defense was the best phase of our game all year," Webb says. "We threw in everything but the kitchen sink for defense." Using a variety of fast moving zone defenses the Zips allowed only 59.9 points per game in the last 12 games. As a result, AU's defensive average dropped to 63.4 for the season, good enough to rank fourth among NCAA ll teams. Eight of Akron's last 12 opponents were held to 61 points or less. ln the 82-47 victory over Bellarmine, the Knights didn't have one player score in doubles figures-a rarity in this day of high scoring basketball. This 1974-75 team played "D" for defense and it had scoring balance. All five starters ended the season with double figure scoring averages-a tribute to each individual's sacrifice for team success. This team, one of the most talented but at the same time least appreciated had the will to succeed. "You can't tell about teams," Webb said. "Each has its own character and each takes a different amount of time to mature. Everyone counted us out when we were 8-6. But we hung in there. This team deserves a lot of credit. They could have quit, but they didn't." A thletics!Winter 221 Injuries Hamper For the second consecutive year Coach Pete Guthrie produced a .500 season and a Little All-American in wrestling. After the Zips had finished with a 7-7 season, Greg Kesselring, 118 pound iunior, finished sixth in the NCAA ll Championships at East Stroudsburg State to earn the coveted honor for the second year. ln 1974, Kesselring finished third in the national tourney, and also for the second year in a row Kesselring lost to the eventual champion, Tennessee- Chattanoga's Mark Batten. Kesselring, who was number one seeded, undoubtedly would have finished much higher but suffered an ankle injury in defeating Northern Michigan's Neal Seagram, 7-6, in the quarterfinals. A less than 100 percent Kesselring then lost to Batten, and twice more in the consolation bracket to wind up sixth. Guthrie also 'took six other Zip wrestlers, Doug Hradek 11261, Joe Morris 11501, Bruce Ryan 11581, Steve Cain 11671, Bob Wolf 11771, and Ken Nettling 11901, to the championships but Wolf was the only wrestler, other than Kesselring, to win one match. Akron University finished 22nd out of 55 teams entered in the competition. Kesselring paced all wrestlers during the regular season too, winning his first 11 matches before tasting defeat. He lost twice in 14 regular season matches and compiled an overall 19-5 record. Ryan, 12-4-2, and Nettling, 12-6, followed with the next best season marks. lniuries turned out to be the biggest culprit to a better season for the Zips. ln pre-season practice Guthrie lost the service of highly touted freshman John Hite 11421 with knee surgery. Veteran 126 pounder Doug Hradek fractured his hand at mid-season and never did get back in his best shape. The Zips were most vulnerable at the 134, 142, and 150 pound classes. However, by the season's end, Guthrie found two promising freshmen at 150, Morris and Mike Bitting. Ryan, a transfer from Cuyahoga Community-West, proved an excellent addition as a wrestler and enthusiastic team leader. Another surprise was 167 pound Cain who has great potential according to Guthrie. 222 A thleticsf Win ter G K x. -ads? ii' AKRON AKRON AKRON if A kron ,--" .ZZ X AKRON Akron Akron Akron Akron Akron Akron AKRON AKRON ,DX A ""---- A Akron J I" AKRON iii """s.. ff' x ,An-.nv-v if Wrestling Coach: Pete Guthrie 36 Youngstown State 5 17 Hiram 14 23 Wa ynesburg 20 6 WEST LIBERTY 25 21 Pittsburgh- Johnstown 18 2nd Ashland Tournament 8 CLEVELAND STA TE 31 7 KENT STA TE 29 77 EDINBORO STA TE 21 14 FAIRMONT STA TE 31 3 ASHLAND 39 40 Youngstown State 3 28 Wayne State 9 14 NOTRE DAME 21 30 Wright State 18 Season Standing: 7- 7 F "fa," ,J oz? X 9. ' AthletiCS!Winter 223 E 6 f X. . X Q K he at X 4 Coach Clark Morgan Swimming Coach: Clark Morgan YOUNGSTOWN STA TE WOOS TER INDIANA U lPA.1 SLIPPERY ROCK Muskingum GROVE CITY Morris Harvey 46 67 51 62 41 70 45 67 60 53 46 65 63 46 29 CLEVELAND STA TE 84 6th in the Penn-Ohio Championships A kron A kron A kron A kron A K RON A kron AKRON A kron Season Standing: 2-6 B, . ,." meg? "I only wish our swimmers were as X if 2 E ft ,,......,,..B wnanunm -M,,.,.w-wwwvmt ,, , sv -.,.4a W ' W' uw f vw ag., z 3 V. ft ' 1 5. Q, nnv""""' 'H.,,.,,g .X . , P , ',...-1-ew xgwm .151 vs WN te if ii 'TY dedicated through the regular season , 1, 1 " .4 as they are to the Penn-Ohio .,fF"" Championships," said Head Coach aw 'J' . W .A 'B Clark Morgan. The Zips mermen had we ,,, ,Q .N 2, g,,,,,tw we .. g ,, ,, M vgf,,.,iif a disappointing 2-6 regular season, "" ' . , - I but rallied to break 10 school ' W? , -A records at the Penn-Ohio Championships tti.. ..1:q if- i f at Indiana U. of Pennsylvania on the y to a better-than-expected sixth place M M' ' finish. Over the past two seasons, under Morgan's leadership, the Zips have broken 17 school marks. 224 A thletics! Win ter , , I I 1 .1 Q I1 Y l 4 L . Regular Season a Disappointment to Mermen Freshman Bill Parry and Tom Buder led the Zips during the regular season as well as at the Penn-Ohio. Parry, a backstroker, was the best overall point producer with 82. Buder, a freestyler, edged out veteran freestyler Mark Bezbatchenko, 66 to 64-M for second spot. However, Buder won the battle of breaking records. The Sandusky Perkins swimmer turned in record-breaking performances in the 200 11:52.13l, 500 15.08.081 and 1650 118:45.6l yard freestyle races and teamed with Bezbatchenko and seniors John Hall and Brian Wilson to better the 400 yard freestyle relay mark 13:23.11 Parry established new standards in the 100 158.941 and 200 12:08.51 yard backstroke. Other record setters were Hall in the 100 yard freestyle 150.2l. Bezbatchenko in the 100 yard butterfly 156.42 and freshman Mike Ziruolo in the one meter 1353.051 and three meter 1359.051 diving events. "Our program got behind in the latter part of the 1960's and early 70's," said Morgan, who just finished his third season at the helm, "and we're l ,.... 1 Y just now catching up a little. Still 1---- our competition is much more talented and have better facilities. Over the next couple of years we will continue to lose unless we improve our facilities and begin to offer scholarships to grab some of the excellent talent in the Akron area." Next year Morgan should be left with a pretty good nucleus. Besides Hall and Wilson, the Zips lose the services of Steve Ingles and diver Bob Kerek. Also departing will be Don McCans. "We sorely missed McCans this year," said Morgan. "He would have definitely broken two more records in his specialties, the 100 and 200 yard breast stroke, and helped win a couple more dual meets. And also we missed his leadership," added Morgan. The senior swimmer was seriously in- iured and lost for the season in a freak accident to his right eye in- flicted by his swimming goggles. McCans will be receiving his fourth year award. 1 Q A . I! --ixq 4, u- , 94 .T 'a .i r. .I . I A thletics! Winter 225 1 RI 11 'hu Coach Mary Ann Tripodi Women's Basketball Coach: Mary Ann Tripodi AKRON 59 Kent State- Tuscarawas 24 AKRON 79 Baldwin Wallace 26 AKRON 54 Malone 38 AKRON 51 Case Western Reserve 16 AKRON 5 7 Lorain Community College 40 AKRON 62 Mount Union 32 AKRON 52 Wooster 41 Akron 65 YOUNGSTO WN STA TE 68 AKRON 85 Kent State 67 Akron 59 ASHLAND 72 Akron 45 TOLEDO 50 State Tournament at Ohio Northern AKRON 55 Findlay 28 AKRON 44 Mt. St. Joseph 43 Akron 40 ASHLAND 82 Season Standing: 10-4 226 Athletics!Winter x, ' 1519122 Ng -S247 . ,, ..-.154-.2-' -U1 l 'QV '11 aj V72 N, 5" . Lf' -,-'N 4 ers ' Women Ftoundballers Finish 5th in the State In its first season on a varsity level The University of Akron women's X basketball team under the guidance of Mary Ann Tripodi, compiled an """""""""""""' enviable 10-4 record and finished in a tie for fifth in the Ohio Women's Intercollegiate Basketball Tournament at Ohio Northern. Despite the winning mark Coach Tripodi was somewhat disappointed in the 1975 season. "l expected a great year because we had all five starters back from the 1974 season when we finished 11-1," said the slightly defected Tripodi. "We got hurt the most by our turnovers and it was our undoing in the close games." Akron got the season started on a winning note by demolishing Kent State- Tuscarawas Branch, 59-24. The wins became infectious as the Zip cagers added Baldwin Wallace, Malone, Case Western Reserve, Lorain Community College, Mount Union and Wooster to its list of victims. The gal cagers were 7-0 and Tripodi felt that they 3 Q if were rvmg up o err expeca ions I' ' I th ' t t' . However, at this juncture AU lost its momentum. Perhaps it was overconfidence . or perhaps they were looking ahead it to their big game with Ashland, one of the top three teams in the state, but the Zips women were upset at Youngstown State, 68-65. Dreams of an undefeated season vanished, and although it rebounded by smashing Kent , State, 85-67, AU was cut down by .. Ashland, 72-59, and Toledo, 50-45, in the final two regular season games. 4 A . . .'t",7.P1,, fy, ' 'fy' 4, 1Y:,f...".-xy, ', 'Il' ,-fm? Z - UAS, A ,I In the state tourney AU rededicated itself to make amends and battled to the quarterfinals before being sidelined by nemesis Ashland by a rather convincing 82-40 score. The Zips were led all season by 6-0 ' senior center Chris Miller. Playing ' in only her second season at AU, Miller broke 12 individual school records enroute to scoring 232 points and grabbing 199 rebounds. She was "52"Q held under 10 points only once during the season and scored a record- breaking 28 points in the Kent State win and hauled down 23 rebounds for another record in the Ashland contest. Sue Davis, a 5-10 junior, backed up Miller averaging 10.9 points and 9.7 rebounds. Other starters were seniors Sandy Hunsicker 16.11 and Karen Kennedy 13.91 and sophomore Sharon Richardson f3.41. A thletics! Win ter 22 7 A 'HQ -,xv-W 'Q 228 A thleticsf Win ter H X TaIent,q 1" -rf 4 I ...--P 1 Z' 4. 'uf 51" IMS 1 Consistency Help Skiers Compile Respectable Record He, -Z Skiers compiled a very respectable record on the slopes with some solid consistency and refined talent. Out of seven races in Michigan and Ohio, the men's team finished on top three times and the women's team twice. The men 's team closed their season in victory by capturing first place in the Eastern Regional Midwest Championship at Crystal Mountain, Michigan. The women placed fifth out of seven teams. Team members included captain Howard Bellowe, John Darago, Phil Erlanger, John Knapp, John Brandenstein, Greg Ballou, Rod Gawer, Tom Sibila, Bob Cook, Bob Valentine, John Slaga. Women team members were Denise Schauer, Mindy Broadstone, Patti Brown, Joani Desimone, Judy Zawacki, and Cathy Redmond. Akron. may not have been able to ski at all this year if it wasn't for the help of Dr. Mravetz who first organized the team four years ago. A plus for the team next year could be the attainment of varsity status. Skiing is not recognized as a varsity sport,' this goal would strengthen the Zips' competition. Dr. Mravetz also served as advisor to the Ski Club. The club met on Friday evenings at Boston Mills. Fun, adventure, and parties added to the enjoyment of skiing. AthletiCS!Winter 229 Diamondmen Break Record Number of Records I T .T A H., 5 AKRON AKRON Akron Akron Akron Akron Akron AKRON Akron AKRON AKRON Akron AKRON AKRON AKRON Akron Akron AKRON Akron Akron Akron AKRON AKRON Akron Akron AKRON Akron AKRON AKRON AKRON Akron AKRON AKRON Akron Baseball Coach: Dave Fross John Carroll John Carroll ASHLAND CLEVELAND STA TE CLEVELAND STA TE SLIPPERY ROCK SLIPPERY ROCK Kent State MARSHALL Case Western Reserve Wright State WRIGHT STA TE Malone Malone Allegheny ALLEGHENY ASHLAND Ashland KENT STA TE CENTRAL STA TE CENTRAL STA TE Central State Central State CLEVELAND STA TE CLEVELAND STA TE Kent State YOUNGSTOWN STA TE Youngstown State Wayne State Wayne State llorfeltj BALDWIN WALLACE Youngstown State Wooster WOOSTER 5 4 9 1 5 3 9 4 5 7 Season Standing 17 17 230 A thletics!Spring ,-K 3 E, 13 gin: sf A A R X Baseball was The University of Akron's first sport on campus. lt had its beginnings in 1873, exactly 102 years ago. Since that time, although it must be pointed out that accurate records were not kept in many of those 102 years, probably no team has broken as many records as the 1975 squad. ln all, 16 new records 110 team and 6 individuall were established and two records tied. Dave Fross, in his second season at the helm, guided the Zip nine to a 17-17 record. The 17 wins and 34 games played were two of the records set in 1975. To break even the AU diamondmen had to win five of their last seven games. Senior Doug Crist, workhorse of the Zip pitching staff, and freshman hitting star John Barnett combined to insure AU's .500 record in the season's finale-a doubleheader at Wooster. Crist pitched a two- hit shutout and Barnett's triple scored the lone run in a 1-0 opening game victory over the Scots. Crist, who earlier in the season pitched back to back no-hitters against Case Western Reserve and Malone, ended his career with a 5-4 record-best on the staff that Coach Fross called "the weak link in the AU baseball program." Fross added, "All you have to do is look at our overall earned run average of 6.06 to see that pitching was our biggest problem." Barnett not only proved his worth in the Wooster victory, but all season as well. The freshman outfielder broke three school records while batting .4075 included were 44 hits, 14 doubles and 71 total bases. Other standouts were senior designated hitter fDHl and second baseman Brian Horning I.376l, freshman first baseman Jack Jones f.338l and pitching newcomer Kevin Angotti 12-21. Fross also gave special praise to four other ball- players, junior shortstop Carl Neroni, "who was exceptional defensively, especially in the second half," freshmen third base- man Dick Brown and catcher-DH Mike Lebarre and sophomore left fielder Joe Rafalowski. Although the pitching was subject to suspect, AU's hitting record improved tremendously over last year. Led by Barnett, AU's team batting average was .273 up from 1974's .242 average. The Zips cracked out 253 hits for a total of 321 total bases and scored 179 runs-all new school marks. Highlights of the season were doubleheader victories over Malone, the NAIA District Champions, and always tough Wayne State and capturing two of the three games with arch rival Kent State. Athletics!Spring 231 As far as Coach Al Campbell was concerned the 1975 season wasn't long enough. "lt took our young men a long time to round into shape," explained Campbell. "Our best showing didn't come until the season's final meet." That meet Campbell referred to was the first Ohio Independent Schools Conference Championships 1OlSCCj, which was held at Jackson Field. Although the Zip thinclads finished behind champion Ashland and runnerup Cincinnati, they scored in all but one event and had three champions-Ken Frank in the 440 inter- mediate hurdles, Ed Tillman in the long jump and Dan McCallion in the steeplechase. The results, prior to the OISCC, Campbell would just as soon forget. AU took its lumps, defeating only one of eight opponents. Frank, Tillman, McCallion and pole vaulter , Jeff Johnson qualified, participated, but did not place in the NCAA ll national championship in Sacramento, California. For the season Frank led in scoring 167-M pointsj and recordbreaking. Prior to this season Frank, a senior had been primarily a sprinter. However, he elected to participate in the hurdles as well during his senior campaign. Competing for the first time in the event, Frank found the 440 yard intermediate hurdles to his liking. So much so that he broke the school mark with a 52.9 clocking at Kent State and ran a 53.4 race to establish the best standard on Jackson Field. Frank didn't stop there but went on to break the oldest record on the board when he ran a 9.6 time in the 100 yard dash to better Gary Finn's 1955 mark of 9.65. Four other school marks fell in 1975. McCallion turned in a 9:09.4 time in the 3000 meter steeplechase, Johnson vaulted 15'2", Jeff Smith tossed the hammer 118'4" and freshman John Dobrzeniecki set the decathlon standard with 5834 points. McCallion, Johnson and Smith are all seniors and were co-captains along with Frank and middle distanceman Scott Brown. Despite being weak in the weight events, sprints and distances, Campbell had special praise for freshman sprinter Tim Sisler and junior distance runner Pat Richie. "We're going to be hearing a lot from Sisler before he's through and Pat started to come into his own during his junior season," said Campbell. "We'll have a good nucleus to start with next season but we are going to have to do a heckuva lot of recruiting for next season." 232 A thletics!Spring at OISCC AKRON Akron Akron Akron Akron Akron Akron Akron Superb Coaching Gives Netters Winning Season At the start of the 1975 season neophyte head coach Bob Dowdy was hedging about his team's chances. Little wonder, he had a tough schedule and his two top players had graduated. Dowdy did have six returning lettermen, but five of those had only one year's exper- ience. Yet, as Dowdy would tell it later, "superb coaching pre- vailed,"' and the Zip netters went on to compile a 7-6 record al- though they had to capture three of their last four matches to gain the winning mark. Besides coaching, the primary reason for AU's successful campaign was due to sophomore newcomer Bob Horning. Horning inherited the number one position vacated by Jim Grafmeyer and responded by winning 10 of 13 singles matches-best on the squad. Two other newcomers, freshman Ed Jones, Jr., who played at the number five and six positions, captured nine of 12 matches and senior Bohdan Woloschyn defeated six of eight opponents in the number three and four slots. Of the seven players who competed in sin- gles matches, compiling 48 wins and 30 losses, only two suffered losing records. On the other hand Dowdy encount- ered trouble all season while trying to come up with winning doubles combinations. By the season's end Dowdy had experimented with 14 different combinations that managed only 20 victories in 39 matches. Teaming with three different players, Woloschyn compiled the best doubles mark, winning six of nine matches. Horning and fellow sopho- more Don Lawson were together the most, splitting 10 matches at the number one and two positions. "Our winning this season will establish a precedent for the future," says Dowdy. That statement doesn't seem overly optimistic when you consider Dowdy loses only senior captain John Scharon and Woloschyn off this year's tennis squad. 234 Athletics!Spring gf rg Y' fx N,,,.- , M 4l!!.'J.- XA, R . A ,A 1 1 ' Y' 'r 1' 'v x x 1 K .l I K --Aw, .., Nf- x'.4.r,,e7'Y.,e..f,f.x, x yf4111fNx 3 l!xzgk,,,,AV,, HfYy' 'A "'- "A X ' E I, f , xr X xy l, 1' xr" y ,xx-I xj.'l'kflg,: , fix -1 my X ,A I A ,T A A , A 9 4, rj 'A K- ..4. l VI, 1 1 1 4 I H f 1 In 'J ft,-. .f 1 -. wfx- , 'f"Y',i1A1J'1"oA -":r"'xJ,",i?lfXe'5vff iff' 'il' 'if r .1..-kr-'M' 141, , A .- .4 4 A YSI'x1?'x!'jfifK1'R-jbikji Jixxfjx y fdgh' fin I 1" '4,f',,1F.1l-Xlizxi 11 ,,A Q , f ",', . ', owl, , , , IA' Z13'f?YrAjYf3fiXf7kg A , Ai' Lili,-lxtsf. ,- 121176 ,' 4 if If x - , ,r .V , x I f I , f flifffflff-5" '."xA.' 'TAX 'riff A ,f ,r',r',f'f'c'7f,'i ' A -1 A Lf 511795 -- f r' , . , , A 1 . , ' r' r " ' bf ' , ' if f jf: ixfffy ldrl ff' 1452444-y ,X . ' ' x A.. x 1 X if 1 X -fl ' . 4 4 5 1 4 Fi , , lllll A 5 s g I 8 -nr 'Hur-I , P1 " , Q" Ks!! ,V4, jf, " ' , 5 MM, A-I Tennis J, ,1 ij xy 1 E , 'Y 3'5" 'Alr :Ju 4 F 4 way, DMN! gl., !,,A,,Q, Coach: Bob Dowdy . .',4,Kld,fl ff' ' 1 r fxirzn, J . f ' AKRON 8 Youngstown State 1 f 'I . ,iyjfjtgigiyg A AKRON 5 Cleveland sraro 4 4, ' Y ' gj,4Ij,g,ij,1j4. Akron 4 PITTSBURGH 5 524'.f-.rilff-,jjigjifgig ' ink 5.5 jiy' H 'f AKRON 9 Gannon 0 . qz.54:-ifoor I Akron 1 EDINBORO STATE 8 ' ' AKRON 8 Ashland 1 J 'f Akron 3 OBERLIN 6 f Akron 4 WRIGHT STA TE 5 ' f A Akron 3 WOOSTEH 6 ' AKRON 8 Hiram 1 AKRON 6 Baldwin Wallace 3 Akron 0 KENT STA TE 9 X AKRON 9 Youngstown State 0 ,f Season Standing: 7-6 'J 1 Athletics!Spring 235 52 rf , - f Linksters Earn NCAA ll National Championship Bid Head Coach Jim Hackett, Jr. was disappointed with the way his golfers performed in 1975. "l don't feel we played up to our potential in key situations," said the second year coach. One would think that Hackett was making excuses about a losing season. However, to the contrary, The University of Akron golf team compiled more victories than any previous team, extended to 20 years over which AU golf teams have not suffered losing seasons and earned its second straight bid to play in the NCAA ll National Championships. Despite compiling an excellent 35-16-1 record, which doesn't include wins over three Canadian teams, Hackett was disturbed with the way the Zips performed at Wooster's Dale , Beckler Invitational, the Ashland Invitational and the Youngstown State Invitational. AU finished second, fourth, and fifth, respectively, in those tournaments and Hackett expected better. "We're a better team than what we showed in those outings," Hackett said. Yet, when it came to dual or triangular competition the AU linksmen were only beaten once-getting nipped 406-403 by Cleveland State. A couple weeks later Akron got revenge by handing the Vikings a 451-459 set-back. And the Zips also gained revenge over three nemeses, Wooster, Ashland and Youngstown State, with a season-ending victory at Good Park. Another highlight was a victory over nine schools in the Wooster Open which kicked off the 1975 season. Throughout the season, unexpectedly, sophomore Bob Heffelman was consistently the best player. Heffelman, who averaged 79.8 as a freshman, improved 4.5 strokes for a 75.3 average in 1975. His low round of 69 came in the big win over Kent State 1497-5041. Improvement was the key word among the Zips. Of the five returnees off last year's unit, only senior Ric Haury 179.01 regressed, and he only by .8 ofa stroke. Senior Bob Cain improved 2.6 strokes to a 75.4 average, a shade behind Heffelman. Then came sophomores Dave Barnes' 76.9 and Terry O'Rourkes' 77.3 averages, down 1.7 and 2.6 strokes, respectively, from last season. The only newcomers to crack the veteran team were iunior Denny Schreiner and sophomore John Croley. Schreiner, who averaged 78.5 in 15 rounds, drew Hackett's praise for his steady improvement during the season. Croley only participated in two matches but scored well. 236 Athletics!Spring Women 's Tennis Team Hampered Women s Tennis Coach Roxanne Schaffhausen A kron A kron AKRON AKRON Akron Akron AKRON AKRON OBERLIN WOOSTE L C C C Ashland CASE WESTERN RESERVE KENT STA TE Baldwin Wallace Mount Union Season Standing: 4-4 By Bad Weather Intramurals Attract More Than 10,000 Students at:-. V - , A dj,,4-Q . X Q A K., 0 fI'lQ'Jf-Qf , ,,.. tl My T img w 238 Athleticsflntramurals Q , M, W 2:- f- --f fwywyg dp. rf-.Q Q- .nf ZW, 'Wm pair, f New Events Add Variety To Intramural Program iam., K' 4 N 5 4 1 ,O .. ,N ,ML xi Athletlcsflntramurals 241 W gm . sv Kg H V x if -QW- MQ ,v""""m ,, . J ..-. 3' 'Q' ' 'E N wx 1 5 1 W " XT! ,fr Yi. f J 3 . 7 :Ti , w ii- 1 y . . , l - -si Bi I fi' 5' gf, ' 93' .I vi, L, W V , ' f '- "" " f , , . , , ,, ,,., ,A I H' ' qi?-1 TIE : -ga ,nln K H ', I 1.7. , . , QF W V ,- s er N, , 4' 4, A f RN -,,f, A 34 ' 'X' ' A 1- L . K n ,N ,. 1, ' x H" ' -x .1 , R . ' ' 1 F 4 , ' 3 ,X X . . 5. H 4 V I. A . 5 I , if . - N 4' 7 ,. 1 .TI xx xi. :L- ' Z 1.7 -I' H ' if . - f "- M I' -,.-fn ' gr '. 1- gf: agp W ,wp 5 1 ' - 5 ' F-f-. I ,r:,A,g-f,L7-WH 2,4 1, , x-Q, I .ff A 4 2 , qi? : 3 H ff Kwai' U f P - .' '-' fr' -:I A XRS,-. .-A. .f, -as ,,J?.,m - ,- T 1 -.1 Q.: . 4 -,- if ,fwaW:fHL.1v I-1-,ua 3, x 'f:i- 1 -fi' ' V, Q 43 - - ' H 1.3-3, if-1 , - -.. f ' -1 -,yvfgi mi 6 17 A -Q 1'-,--Qi... 'pg "1-Mimi-'-K w-oiwifs 1 K' R' L 3'-jg.. jig: 4 ,f 6 - 1 RQ- . , --. " .. , rf wf 'f?flfs?f?f Jil , .4 ff . ' pi f M., 'lf' W rvXA.Q.E-NJ Z J D-1w- '.. . .. r. .-- I hear omnesfy IS no longer ' cz dirty word back m fhe U.S." 242 World Report!Fall R . . I, Gerald R. Ford, President of the United States ,... grant a full, free and absolute pardon unto Richard Nixon for all offenses. . . . U.S. Ambassador Davies slain in fighting on Cyprus . . . The CIA comes under attack . . . Whip Inflation Now! . . . Frank Robinson named the Major League's first black manager . . . Nixon unable to testify in Watergate trial because of phlebitis surgery . . . President Ford appears on Capitol Hill to submit himself formally to questions of the Congressional Committee concerning his pardoning of Richard Nixon . . . Former Astro naut John Glenn elected U.S. Senator from Ohio . . . James Rhodes defeats John Gilligan in race for Ohio Governorship . . . Ella Grasso elected Governor of Connecticut. . . Kent State defendents acquitted . . . Muhammad Ali regains Heavyweight Boxing Title. . . Conditional amnesty rejected by Vietnam Draft Evaders . . . Rockefeller ioins Ford's team as the new Vice President. . . Oakland A's win World Series in five games . . . Ford and Breshnev met to discuss Detente . . . Lieut. Calley freed on parole . . . Yasser Arafat addresses the General Assembly of the United Nations . . . TV's Rhoda takes subway to her wedding while millions of Americans watch . . . Lisbon demonstrators celebrate Portugal's shift to the left after the resignation of provisional President Spinola . . . World Report!Fall 243 244 World Report! Winter Photos taken from Tlmo FL- -.!1 """"' LJ Q If i 7 W 0000 AQ, ooo o oo2 A' 'J -I bi: 'A4lH.Ql: f- ea ,Q qw " , Wffrv QMQ' -1' .-. I lt: 1 1 ,IL-,' E lm, , l! -L, I ' Q ' Hi ll l ,Il t i .,,,,..,...,.. . E: ,, 0? 9 sg- 'EE ' ,Q X: .LHLWX ei ,g l J! X6 E' ". - ' I K Kin, Q 1 rffg a '4'h,4"' A ss f' 1, .1 3 C2 .ilk me g . is X 1' I 4 . sag 1? j o 1' 7 L if 1 M 4 , X X 1 , M f , ' u. Jmffiv 'V 'Q I 4 4 9 u 1 . "l've called Hue family fogefher fo announce ihaf, because of inflaiion, l'm going fo have fo lei fwo of you go." '17 ,H . F' M' W ,ww ' l I 44 . MII E tv P M ' if GA I0 WH' oMMfS5 n VVAQ M... . . . United Nations declares 2 T Q 1975 as Women's Year. . . y 3 3 Drought and overpopulation , , , - . 2 cause World Food Crisis . . . Pittsburgh Steelers defeat Minnesota Vikings in the Super Bowl Game . . . Cashback rebates offered by car manufacturers on 1975 models . Unemployment soars to QM . . . Pope Paul opens the Holy i iiiii iiiiiii i Year 1975 with its theme of "Renewal and Reconcil- iation". . . Mitchell, Haldeman, Erlichman, and Mardian convicted for Watergate offenses . . . Henry Martin lScoop1 Jackson announces his candidacy for the Democratic Presidential Nomination . . . Mrs. Thatcher, who toppled former British Prime Minister Edward Heath from his ten-year reign as Conservative Party Chief, soundly defeated four male challengers to become Tory leader. . . Cher gets her own T. V. show,' ratings ff' f look good . . . Israel and Egypt, their only common 1 L ' A ., V X . ground is "no compromise". . . .C g f Qatsta OPEC summit does not bring Q, ' down oil prices . . . Barbara Streisand sta rs in n C5 g Q, P' Funny Lady continuing :gf ' liS QQ her role as Fanny Brice . . rf , W ' 3 4f . . fy ' iff! i 1" 4, .f1'i' g Sify' H ' B. .A-ff P. 1,131,535 M. P. , '-- "' Q g Q. World Reportfwinter 245 . .Q-wifqwa g, migod! Here if comes again!" l 'l45 'f 4 l l 1' ls E 19516 SETHQAERD TIME, MARCH 24, 1975 in Wp iffllfl JA . 1 2 3 1 4 0 4 f ff Z 4 . , XKMWM ' fn! f 1 I nl ll 1 l N, 4 oF THE 7 7 Nu clmeovnm elf l L s, fjj ii:f,!feW,l?4JT7-.,.' . .JV-gzyh'-5 O ,'. ' ai K f1"--'pQ- 'I-,2E:I57?2f'fiZ52if5:. 4 3 273214 ", '72 I ,, xaxk wc -f"?5?i5ElF:f:5?fEf??5is:1, '222?Ef5E1 ' A '4 2 , If I P '-Af J , ,.f.,, 4 be at W Q Vxxxgr ' w'ffW UE Z I f , ' 5' .- z 4 i .5 n-, -' ', 34 'QV , ' if ff! ' 1 --' "'- " 6' 2, ,.,24,,? f- ' 'P-- .. Q -nMmfWxx!QQ7?-Wyl7fl'W- , A ., ,75,,,.T b5W'5Z"7,Q,-'1 ' fl: ' J 'Q ' fo" 4 'VG ':,-' 4 '-Tl L ' Lg ' W -ff f A S , - 1 - ,., , 'eg . 44 , 755 W ' A' ' , . J 'WW V f 'f f ' Q' 'Please leave . . . we con'f afford your help." P VICTURY5 . , P, .X is-BVI, If -ki' X l r .., ,-9-165 WWW NGfQzf f ' M'jN1, W mini, d w ' fl' 'l 'VW eg A 'K I 1 ' e ef A I N v- Photos taken from Time 246 World Report! Spring A A if Q Pie V1 3 N i'-Qfl Q " vw' .Q .l . . . Khmer Rouge insurgents take control of Cambodia . . . Vietnam: the last retreat, the end of a thirty year war. . . New Communist government in Cambodia captures U.S. Mayagiiez . . . Graduated income tax rebate passed by Congress . . . King Faisal assassinated by his nephew. . . U.S. and Russia shake hands in Apollo- Soyez space program . . . The Godfather ll, sequel to The Godfather, wins the Academy Award for Best Film . . . Increased malpractice insurance rates raise all health service costs . . . Movie goers devastated by disaster films: Jaws, The Towering Inferno, Earth- quake. . . Golden State Warriors win NBA title in a 4-0 sweep over the Washington Bullets . . . Aristotle Onassis passes away leaving his fortune to daughter Christina and wife Jacqueline . . . Philadelphia Flyers win Stanley Cup for the second year straight . . . Thieu flees Vietnam with 3-M tons of gold . . . Thousands of Vietnamese flee their homes to escape communist attacks on their cities . . . C-5A transport carrying 243 Vietnamese orphans and 62 adults crashes near Saigon haulting Project Airlift temporarily . . . Vietnamese refugees rush to the United States . . Rockefeller commission investigates the CIA . . . Saigon renamed Ho Chi Minh City. . . Ford announces his candidacy for the 1976 Presidential elections while Ted Kennedy announces that he will not run . . . World Report!Spring 247 7 5 , " - :- i ,..-1 5- 311:-r ! , i 1 lt- il H 19-N. .,.-.3 is asus A l 'iw' mm T323 M 'ww V W W. gf- f' , LX, ,M 314 Nm Wm -'W .IW 'A wg :W W, 'T 'Wnuw-W wif' vw wwf we W-V 1 R . , Q " wa . M 1, HL K ., 'r , ,J ' sw... 4' "" T 4 Y W . 5 4 '95 ' 5"""" """"""'?? ' K - - X "W 'V MNA' A "ww .fn -"" , 4 M Mm UQ ,, -,W-A m. AMW 115, ,. 1 -. ,, u gi v H W .W V ' 'lm 'if' mgf' 0 , i Z .J A Y wa an ,. -, - R a. ,,, . , ' " , , X ' - Uv' F -' U , f M , ?,,m,-,E .M .- --H-. 51 1-.5 ' x ' gg 1,,g ,isakmp N N , ' ' - .f, . - 'Jail' N ' ' Y W M '- 1 1"r'1--' , -M - Y - -F , QI ' , W, , E - f - A , 'K . ' ' - .4 JM- -1' 3 I ' 1' 3 W f 'X fa "-fi. ms .Hg ' , mf ,Pl 5' 5 '. , fn. nf 6 .A .- , ' H ' ' A E Y '01 ,M v " -W , '- f "" 'W' U M M ' , F -an 4 wi ' ' . 'f ' .H M Mx J D' ' 'Aw 'A ,., w mf. 14 P 'fm S, Wqwmvyx W ..., "P-'gk A ' 1 s. 'Li J J' 4..- I i i - is 4... 0 .O s D 12521 r. f Q 'O' ,. -:Q ,Q 1. -a.!,x,. og .,.,V l - F - "' '4. -' 'U 1 ' 5 . 3 '.14,"1m"i75 bf 'T--u . , ,r 'B ,mf 1 Q ' 0 -:XD W W I 1 W Z ' Q vm! Q fu. ...- mf- -fo 69-- It .,' V . 2 . V .J 1 b H .JR V. . ,, ' , - - f xv ' f E' '15 - -L 5 v in N '55 'sf ' " ' 1.-.f A ,A , V PW.: N.. Wm, ,dit 5 J,.N 9, . 9 id 1 .1 . ' l' dj ,Q-1 gr ...4 gf -Qw- 1 1 lg Margaret M. Abood Education Amy B. Albert C 8. T Sue E. Alderson Business Administration David L. Allen Arts 8. Sciences Glenn Ft. Allen Business Administration Ray Badertscher Business Administration Nancy A. Baines C 8. T Gretchen M. Banks Arts 8. Sciences Sylvia J. Baxter Education Kenneth A. Bender Arts 8. Sciences Diana M. Berry Arts 8. Sciences Kathleen M. Bever Arts 81 Sciences William W. Bickett C 8. T Robert L. Bier Education Mary E. Borrell Education Kenneth W. Brant Business Administration Chado Brcic Engineering Kathryn A. Bright Fine 8- Applied Arts Jack W. Buchanan Business Administration Beth A. Buker Education Scott K. Burnett Engineering Douglas E. Burnham C 8. T Ann L. Cochrun Fine 8. Applied Arts Enrique J. Collazo Business Administration Gary D. Collier Education Brenda S. Cox Arts 81 Sciences Paula S. Crabtree Fine 8' Applied Arts Kathy D. Crocker Education Sandra J. Culver Education Stuart J. Davidson Arts 8. Sciences Thomas Decker, Jr. Arts 81 Sciences Carolyn M. DiFrangia Education Robert G. Dittmer C 81 T Clarice S. Donnelly Education Dianne E. Drapp Education Elaine Duvall Education Holly A. Dysart Fine 8. Applied Arts Verner M. Edmonds Education Thomas W. Eisenzimmer Business Administration Charlotte A. Erbe Education Male Home Economics Major ls Class Valedictorian Sir Peter Ftamsbotham ,... - p, n vs - GH - jg, fn. 11- " Y . .. 1 l Q iam--. My -ww-. ..'M.,w. .,, ww A A ,h M, .,. . .. . x f, Z iw. a , :zz .2 1 During the annual midyear commencement ceremonies held on December 15 in Memorial Hall, the University of Akron conferred 1,230 degrees. Present in person were 639 of the graduates, who received degrees ranging from doctor of philosophy to two-year associate degrees. President D.J. Guzzetta conferred the degrees and presided over the ceremonies. The principal speaker and recipient of an honorary Doctor of Laws degree was the Hon. Sir Peter Ramsbotham, British ambassador to the United States. Terry Meese was named valedictorian of the December, 1974, senior class, and has become the first male in 24 years to receive a degree in home economics at the University. Meese earned a 3.881 grade point average in his four full years and one quarter at the University and was recognized during Commencement exercises :uk ,P Q President P.J. Guzzetta, Terry Meese Stephen H. Falor Fine 8. Applied Arts Floyd L. Fisher Business Administration J Jo A. Fisher Education Phyllis Jean Fontilla Education Thomas G. Fritsch Arts 8- Sciences Peter J. Frost Business Administration Charles P. Fry Arts 8. Sciences John A. Gabelman Business Administration Thomas L. Garrett Business Administration James W. Gartner Business Administration ill 2 Liliana J. Garzia Arts 8. Sciences Peter F. Gentile C 8. T Adrienne A. George Education Diane L. George Education Christine R. Gerbig Education Michal J. Gingo Arts 8- Sciences Matilda T. Goerlich Education Mark A. Goldfarb Business Administration Sheila L. Gonzales Education Terry R. Gorbach Business Administration Marilyn J. Grieves Education Ann L. Grimm Education Brenda C. Gurganious Education Marcia D. Hanes C 81 T Barbara J. Hecker Education John W. Hedgepeth Arts 8. Sciences John C. Herberich Arts 8. Sciences Greg D. Hotacre C 8, T John T. Hoffman Education James R. Holsapple C 8. T Hosia C. Huggins Fine 8. Applied Arts Alice M. Hupp C 8. T Robert F. Jaketic C 8. T Mary A. Jednak Education Murielene L. Jennings Education David C. Johnson Business Administration Debbi A. Jones C 8. T Sterlie L. Jones Business Administration Jerry L. Justiss Business Administration Melanie E. Kahaner Education Frank M. Kaluza Business Administration Robert L. Karam Business Administration Siavash A. Kassemi Arts 81 Sciences Nicholas Kazacoff Education Rebecca E. Kessell Education Mildred L. Keyser Education Bruce D. Kilby Arts 8. Sciences Jacqueline D. King Fine 8' Applied Rebecca J. Kite C 8. T Paul D. Klim C 8. T Rebecca S. Kodish Education Karen L. Koneck Fine 8. Applied Arts Barbara M. Kordel Education Mark J. Kordon C 8. T Robert J. Kubilus Arts 8. Sciences Scott A. Kurzinger Education Berth K yler Arts 8. Sciences Paul D. Leidal Business Administration Walter Lesniak Arts 8. Sciences Mark S. Lindahl Business Administration Charles M. Lowrey Business Administration Charles V. Lynn Business Administration Cecelia M. Madden Education Craig R. Maefs Arts 8. Sciences Charles M. Matfei Business Administration Evelyn Mahone Education Mark E. Mallett Fine 8. Applied Arts Sharron E. Marbury Education John J. Markulis Arts 8. Sciences Robert G. Marmaduke ll Arts 81 Sciences Eric L. Martin Engineering Thomas M. McDuftee C 8, T Gary D. McEnteer Education Terry L. McVey Arts 8. Sciences Maria F. Mesko C 8. T Robert K. Meyer Engineering Marsha L. Moldea C 8. T Latrecia S. Moore Education Joseph J. Morriello Arts 8. Sciences Pamela J. Moyer Education Donald C. Mullen Education Rhonda L. Mundy Arts 8. Sciences Robert L. Murray Arts 8' Sciences Thomas E. Ondecker Business Administration Ramon L. Pagan Education Daniel R. Parsons C 81 T Giannina Pianalto Arts 81 Sciences Cathy A. Pirogowicz C 8. T Gary J. Promey Engineering Richard M. Protich Education Richalyn B. Puente Arts 8. Sciences Paolo Ranaldi Arts 81 Sciences Naomi Reed Education Rose D. Reed C 8. T Michael J. Reidy Arts 8. Sciences John F. Rexroad Business Administration Susan L. Rottmayer Education Rosalind A. Rowe Arts 8. Sciences Lynda J. Scharnott Arts 8. Sciences Stephen J. Schreiber Engineering Janet A. Schwarz Arts 8. Sciences Nancy C. Serazin Business Administration Larie L. Shaw Arts 81 Sciences Sherry Sherard Education Johnny J. Sherron Education David D. Shuman Education Mary Anne Simmons Education Kathleen B. Siniawski C 8. T Sharon R. Sitko C 8. T Harold E. Sliger Business Administration Georgene Smith C 8. T Jacque L. Smith Arts 8. Sciences Michael R. Smith Arts 8. Sciences Karen A. Snyder Education Pamela J. Snyder Education Lois A. Steese Education Bobbie L. Stephens Education Nonita A. Stiggers Education Kay L. Stoddard Education Alyce L. Stoops Education Joseph M. Stubbs Arts 8. Sciences Mark F. Sullivan Business Administration Anthony B. Sutphin Education Marnie Sweet Arts 8. Sciences Alicia E. Thomas Arts 8. Sciences Jeanette Thomas Education Sandra L. Thomas Education Ronald W. Thomson Engineering Fred W. Tobin C 81 T Gary Traveny Education Christine L. Treml Education William R. Triesel Education Louis Twitty C 8. T Frederic L. Uhl C 8. T Dennis W. Urban Business Administration K' .fi ,' ' JTITZQ ...KI :ff . if 3 imgvyfk 5: 2 4,15 ,JJ of'-n J J 2 759' . . 7 FW C ll 1qa,:t!'-N-ff Q- I I2 3:15 T' f M A 5 ' ASTM? 524: ..-:. V. A sr, , Richard L. Watring Business Administration Dolores M. Wayne Arts 8. Sciences Edgar J. Whitley Education Lance Ft. Wilkinson C 8. T Gus Yogmour, Jr. Engineering Joyce K. Yonfrieda C 8 T Paula J. Yurko Arts 8. Sciences Deborah A. Zelei C 8. T Richard A. Zisk Business Administration Gary P. Zolton C 81 T 1 n 'iii Seniors!December 255 Secretary of Labor Addresses June Graduating Class The 103rd annual June Commencement of The University of Akron was held Sunday, June 15, at Blossom Music Center. Featured speaker was the Hon. John T. Dunlop, Secretary of Labor. Secretary Dunlop's talk was titled "A Degree in Listening." Degrees were conferred upon approximately 2,250 graduates, 1,350 in person. Another 900 received degrees in absentia. . Secretary Dunlop received an honorary doctor of laws degree "in recognition ot notable national leadership in labor relations in the marketplace and in academe." He was nominated for his present post by President Ford on February 18, 1975. Presiding at the ceremonies was UA President D.J. Guzzetta. Marching music for the graduates was provided by the University Symphony Orchestra and the Rev. Barrie Bodden, UA Protestant chaplain, gave the invocation. The Rev. Thomas Dunphy, UA Newman Center director, pronounced the benediction. Richard A. Adam C 8. T Lynn M. Adams C 8. T Celeste A. Alexander Education Rickey Alexander Business Administration Richard W. Alford Education Lynn M. Allchin Nursing Karen L. Alley Education Viiai Amaralikit Engineering Donald E. Anderson Business Administration Linda J. Anderson C 8. T Maryalice G. Anderson Nursing Renee D. Angel Education Jane A. Arnold Business Administration Dennis J. Ashley C 8. T John S. Bader Business Administration Rose Marie Badia Arts 81 Sciences Connie Bailey Arts 8. Sciences Robert F. Baltzer C 8. T Anton Banweg Engineering Thomas M. Barb C 8. T Jann r Dunlop . .nl 41 ,N . is 5 -. x-2,9 , , ,,. . 'f ,' T -rf- k ex If 'xmffvz F . , s F". 9 1 SLT if-'f""f 'T jg- ff. ' 1 . i f , .I - X T 3 f ff- ' , 3 6: 5.1 Q! X . - E K' gf' ' 25 A 'LW 55" TZ E2 Y. V xx ' A XFX is LW' .pw . ,'.3iHi , X Q , ' , i - 1. - J 5.-',,g.,1'1. xlqzqi' wi. ' V H , .. 'akin . ,nr '21 ' X. . . 1 ' ' .:...'.,' 'si 1 ii ,QX X . J YA' ' E .. .S wi . X ,. is ' A .uk l . " x Z" 5' 'f .f - K .E -M Mnwwmz W F ' rw V .1 - A. 6 'au 1 ' ' Vx 1 ,. .l -5 'r A s . A3M2'ffwf" gi, v K, - ' fi af , P' .- 77' "lil gl! .1 L? QP r. , ' J 1-. . ' :ef-' ,V fr- -.1 ,fe f'i?.'55f.5S5A A A 4' ' mi Mfr 3, Q.. 4 f L- M3?lip:x, uri- " 2 o I ' - -"1 JZ- Awww. 1.M,.. r7'.e2' J n. fc.. ss. .41 y1......,mLi4i:.w1.'1::L wife. -. ...ft A Ww- . 44 5 .ii , -P' X . ,Ks 5 .... .AJ .,,,-if .af ,9 Z f ' I 4 if fi J 111 Karen J. Barckert Education Daniel R. Barcus C 8 T Theodore J. Barna C 8. T Michael H. Barnhouse Engineering Michael Barrett Arts 8. Sciences Mitchell Barry Engineering Phyllis Bartlett Fine 8. Applied Arts William R. Bartsch Engineering Patricia J. Baswell C 8. T James M. Batman Arts 8. Sciences Jerry A. Bauman Business Administration Joyce E. Beahn C 8. T Kenneth M. Beatty Business Administration Larry P. Begue Education David L. Belden Business Administration Christine G. Bellman Fine 8. Applied Arts Howard L. Bellowe Arts 8. Sciences Joseph P. Belsito Business Administration Eric J. Beltz Engineering Mary K. Bender Fine 8. Applied Arts Donald J. Bennett Arts 8. Sciences Thomas J. Bent Education Joyce M. Bernas Education Michael J. Berthelot Business Administration Jane S. Bethel Business Administration Alma L. Beverly Education Michael A. Bilinovich C 8. T William R. Bingle Education Mary Beth Blazewicz Arts 8. Sciences Kay L. Blocher C 8. T Warren A. Blower, Jr. Business Administration Joanne Bobulsky EUUCEUOD Michael O. BOleS C 8. T Eugene L. Bonos Business Administration Phillip D. Booth Education Matthew J. Borkowski Arts 8. Sciences Harold F. Bowers, Jr. Arts 8. Sciences Donn E. Boyd Business Administration Allen M. Boyer Ill Business Administration lrene M. Boyle Arts 8. Sciences David F. Braden C 8. T Joan E. Brasaemle Arts 8. Sciences Philip W. Brasse Business Administration Russell W. Brasse C 8 T Christine L. Breedlove Education Robert S. Breitbarth Education Dennis A. Brett Business Administration Bruce A. Brown Business Administration Randy J. Brown Engineering William J. Brown Fine 8. Applied Arts Elizabeth A. Brownfield Nursing Linda D. Browning C 8. T Susan M. Brozina Nursing Jack W. Brummert Business Administration Donald G. Buckman Engineering Lawrence M. Bukovey Business Administration Bruce Bukovi C 8. T Michelle Burg Education Carla M. Burgess Arts 8. Sciences Pamela S. Burwell C 8. T Glen F. Buttacavoli Arts 8. Sciences Nancy A. Byndas Fine 8. Applied Arts Alice M. Cable Nursing Janice L. Calhoun C 8. T Tim M. Callaghan Arts 8. Sciences Gust Callas Business Administration Terrie L. Campailla Education Paul E. Carney Arts 8. Sciences Dale E. Carter Engineering Michele J. Cartmel Education Ruth A. Carver Education Kirt L. Case Engineering Leslie A. Casterline Engineering Patricia A. Catanese C 8. T Rebecca A. Caudill Fine 8. Applied Arts Milotka Cerovski Arts 8. Sciences Anthony J. Cespedes Business Administration Cinda Chima Arts 8. Sciences Nancy L. Chima Arts 8. Sciences Mary J. Chizmadia Nursing .4-g',"',. 33 K E .Q f .2 'A M its , 1+ a 4.- Zv i 1 .f -.G ,'fffiiS. K1-1 "' fr 'F ,f xv 1 ' nf tl X ' ' TZQ ,' -45'-X64 X' 1' A ...Y as L 'Pie-. . M . X . . X 4. l.. . W Q: 3 Frei, f .is 1. KN k-JA ' b nlasx 'Q O q 5 '.'L 45"9 Nha' gt 1 . w 1 w V W: -1 .7-, A YF: 1' '14, i "V W 2? I i Sq? ??if5i ji L 35938 .5 . ttf, 4 -"' ' 4' if w ,i , s 'Q' I it 4 'E' I Q W! ,JM XR. if .. . if . "' A X f 4 17 'vga' W X X in he xx 'V X 'Q 2 4 . .fZ...K 1. new 'Q Q yu .. ,n f ., X fx X" 59 J QV? QQ, i V X, 'Iv Jw A Q' w.,,,.m2 y X s ' -.1 .. .. , , ,.. 'f,w'?v.: M13 Y W72? ff'-Av x Y' 3 I4 Y at R' W3 T .ff G ' . N. 'vi 'M' IEE 'n"""' if 11" 'EZ Nm..- 'Sb 5 52. lim Wk. 'DK- 'QFW sk A ...uf-an :' 1 ,41 39,1 JT! HV wrt!" Pi'-A zg "-QE.-A 'il 1 ,' xi ...... ., - -- -,: -.sv if fu .L I ,3 . 'fif' . .. Y'-em, . :S , ' 4' , ' -fnztbfv ff '? ..-.NV 1 1. ,f A QVJQQ- lffi 747.gif .ef . . . ,.. 54. , 45 ' V fflkqmgqg 554.53 Dale G. Christodoulou Engineering Emily Christott Fine 8. Applied Arts Brenda J. Ciccozzi C 8. T Joseph M. Cindric Business Administration James C. Clatlin Education Harold L. Clark C 8. T Margaret M. Clark C 8. T Thomas L. Clark Business Administration Todd J. Clickner C 8. T John J. Cochran Education Nancy A. Coey Arts 8. Sciences John F. Congrove Education Richard E. Connolly Arts 8. Sciences Patricia L. Connor Arts 8. Sciences Carol A. Conrad Arts 8. Sciences John W. Cook Engineering Marlene R. Cook Education Lawrence J. Corall, Jr. C 8. T Ken W. Cornelius Business Administration Susan A. Costello C 8. T Douglas R. Cox Business Administration Joanne R. Crabtree Arts 8. Sciences Maureen T. Craig Arts 8. Sciences Janette L. Crawford Education Margaret A. Cullen Nursing David J. Cullison Business Administration David Culp Arts 8. Sciences Don W. Cunningham Business Administration Jeffrey T. Cunningham Business Administration Judith B. Currey Arts 8. Sciences Franklin O. Curry Education Cheryl A. Custer Arts 8. Sciences Shirley J. Custer Education Nancy L. Cutright C 8' T Beverly J. Dalessandro Education Steve W. Damsa Education Leah J. Darkow C 8. T John H. Daubney Arts 81 Sciences Mildred E. Davis C 81 T Ronald E. Davis C 8. T Timothy W. Davis Education Edmundo M. Delgado Business Administration Richard E. Delong C 8. T Dominic DeMatteis C 8- T Robert P. Demko C 8. T Phillip R. Denney Arts 8. Sciences Ralph J. DeSantis Education Denise DeVries C 81 T Robert S. Dewey C 8. T Diana Dickerhotf Business Administration Gloria L. DiLullo Education Richardt F. Dipold Business Administration Janice M. Dobbins Fine 8. Applied Arts Robert C. Doerr Engineering Patti L. Dover Education Johnnie Fi. Downs C 8. T Rebecca L. Downs Education Marjorie K. Duffey C 8. T Karen L. Dukerich Education Grant J. Duncan Arts 8. Sciences Julie A. Dunn Education James E. Duplaga Education Joseph A. Duve C 8. T Ludmila S. East Education Karen S. Edwards Nursing Jean Efland Education James P. Egert Engineering Dana Ehasz Education Eric N. Eisenhart Business Administration Michael L. Eleo Education Barbara J. Elias Education Kathleen R. Elliott Education Elvina Ellis Education Ruth R. Elsass Education Jeffery M. Enright Engineering Thidaratana Ft. Epley Arts 8. Sciences Mark E. Esmile C 8. T Lee E. Evans Fine 8' Applied Arts Michael L. Evans Arts 8. Sciences Ron E. Evans C 8. T Ruth J. Evans C 8. T Sue E. Fannin C 8. T Siavash M. Farahmand Engineering Mark D. Farmer Business Administration Patricia M. Farr C 8, T Debra L. Farrell Nursing Dennis A. Farrell Education Michael G. Fatica Arts 8. Sciences Michael A. Fatigati Arts 8t Sciences Lawrence C. Fergus Education :" .- A3 3 v- 15 K .5 -..V ' g . ' . A - Qjggiis: 1 if -.. Q ., fkm, ! .. ..f,v- wsf f T3 . -y ,. 'f -1-E 1 i. It X .fr W QS ,X Z!" in 5 ' , fx 4-.-.-Y' 'REE ,gd , V J-9 J R I , as Y sw Wx X. . W 4, fy 9 Q A A X ,fx 'K Q 554215 4 ' :I ! W X " y r t i ,kiwi sim 6 ., Hr" xr 15 3' . ,rt A 'Q 'nn ,fy ,,, fi -. - il if '. . 4 .pai ,J1 A i 'mf .- V i 'air' 3 K . Dfw f . x . ' Q.. . T3- .. . ' s Wax- f ' Ji. ff w, . IH K 42' ' r,..p..,6s-3 1' Jw ,gp g . We 'W , ' ig , . W . 51:73. J i", "gf 11- .5111 gif M ,3 'n if v -ffl? in . C 9 . 1 f I K Marilynn M. Ferrell Education Karen S. Fike C 8. T Ronald P. Finklestein C 8. T Arthur B. Finn Business Administration Lucy S. Fiocca Education Marvin Firestone Business Administration Jeffery A. Fisher Engineering Patricia J. Fister Fine 8. Applied Arts Larry D. Fitting Business Administration Sharon L. Fitting Education Robert Flower Engineering Cheryl l. Flowers C 8. T Warren C. Foley Arts 8. Sciences Anthony S. Fontana Education Cheryl A. Fontana Education Michael R. Foore Business Administration David R. Foote Engineering Elaine F. Forsch Education Cynthia A. Fox Education George S. Frankovich Business Administration Denise M. Franks Fine 8. Applied Arts Pamela S. Frashure C 8. T Randall B. Fratianne C 8. T Aleta D. Freeland Nursing Gary H. Frevold Business Administration James E. Frisby Engineering Richard H. Froman lll Business Administration Kathryn A. Fulton Education Mark A. Fusco C 8. T Janis T. Gaffney Education Howard Gager Engineering Donald H. Gallimore Engineering Kathy J. Gallo Fine 8. Applied Arts Linda L. Galloway Fine 8. Applied Arts Ronna C. Gander C 8. T Kathleen E. Gardner C 8. T Mark E. Gardner C 81 T Allene D. Garrett C 8. T Mario R. Garzia Arts 8. Sciences Silvia C. Garzia Arts 8. Sciences Katherine J. Gaug C 8. T Paul A. Gaug Arts 8. Sciences Dennis N. Gearhart Arts 81 Sciences Janet L. Gearhart Education Christine L. Gentry Education Christine E. Gerig Education Regina J. Getzinger Arts 8. Sciences Elias J. Ghandour Arts 8. Sciences Joseph R. Giacomoni Business Administration Linda M. Gibb C 81 T Danny L. Gibbons Arts 8- Sciences Charles T, Gies if-ak ff' .nl 645. "" ' . rv- Q, " ' rf x A .af .tif 4 X. yi: fn'-af 1' as-5. Dv Qff C 81 T 4 Q X David A. Gilbert fm "' Arts 8. Sciences Jennifer A. Gilbo Q-ff' Nursing , 'xv 3: Gail L. Gilmore ,I 1, ztgggi Education 'rf-A 'xx ,f"' 4- ---1: 131. , ::m..i X Vicki M. einos Education ff' James G. Giovinazzi, Jr. ' . . . . 5. 5 Business Administration , . 'K 6 Beth A. Giron Arts 8. Sciences Karen S. Givens C 8. T Mark G. Gnadt Engineering 1" J - . 2 ,,X I . if 1 Q 4 . Qi- kt , .2 - ' -A N - - 9 f5' f 264 Seniors!June ,ya ,bi S x L NV S i fs. ...l 'X M. Cadets Are Sworn in as Second Lieutenants Gen. Russell E. Dougherty, commander in chief of the U.S. Strategic Air Command, was the speaker Saturday, June 14, for the 22nd annual Joint Army and Air Force Commissioning Exercises at The University of Akron. Gen. Dougherty also is director of the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. He received an honorary doctor of laws degree from the University for his "outstanding contributions to his country in times of war and peace." Thirteen Air Force and seven Army Ft.O.T.C. cadets were sworn in as second lieutenants at the 11 a.m. ceremony in John S. Knight auditorium William F. Gorey Business Administration Mary J. Goymes Q C iq ,Q .ak Business Administration gi James H. Grafmeyer 42 "' Engineering George H. Graham Business Administration Vincent L. Graham C 8. T Susan E. Grande C 8. T Patrick S. Grealis Fine 8. Applied Arts Albert H. Greenbaum Arts 81 Sciences Karen L. Griffin Nursing William J. Griffith Business Administration Kenneth L. Grisby Engineering . Martin J. Grindle Business Administration 0 ii '7' "' Judy A. Groner - . C 8. T Alan S. Grotenrath Business Administration Michelle E. Guzzetta Education Thomas G. Hackim Business Administration Victoria L. Hackim Education Nancy Hader Education Laurie A. Hadlock Education Carol A. Hageman Fine 8. Applied Arts Jack M. Hall C 8. T Patricia M. Hall Business Administration Russell G. Hall Business Administration Beulah M. Hamilton Education Susan M. Hamilton Business Administration James M. Hansen Business Administration Susan K. Hansen Education Betsy G. Hanson C 8. T Kenneth A. Haren Arts 8. Sciences David E. Harhay C 8. T Gregory L. Harig Arts 8. Sciences Kenneth R. Harper Education Danny C. Harrison C 8. T Susan J. Harrison C 8. T Richard H. Harshbarger Business Administration Gail W. Hausch Engineering Martin P. Hauser Arts 81 Sciences Don Hawke Business Administration John A. Heese Engineering Julius P. Heil Education Scott T. Heinzerling Fine 8. Applied Arts Mark A. Heisler C 8 T Susan M. Henley C 8. T Judith A. Hennessey Education Sharon Hensley Arts 8. Sciences Richard F. Henterly, Jr. Business Administration Charles H. Henthorn Education Gail F. Herbert Education Ronald Herink Business Administration John H. Hillard Business Administration Mark E. Hollo Engineering Ruth A. Holzer C 8. T Linda M. Horning Fine 8. Applied Arts Vivian l. Huber Business Administration Gary J. Hufstetler Business Administration l ,,f l N., ,,5? mi -nu! as 4 A .Q 'F . . .bg .... V., ,. fa f' 1 .1 1 f + 2-is 3 T'-.,g. f:'W Q. . -af ' ' S 1 ' - K 'W' i R . . .aW'7' 'V Wir ' 'I ' . . Q mg fl f Q 5 X rf--. .-ff 'sw -Q E '14 v ' J -ff- 'L ' it 'Si' ' t it., 3 ' GXMQW . -... .- mi ti . 'rw at G5 f T A T as '. ' u VN: ' ': fr Q r "-fn-IFWK . nt A . . .i t .. . ,.f .v iw- :j 1 3 .c Q: af. f . Wg, , yizm ' 4, .- f 3' ' "Q", x-' XX 6 X x b1.'fZ.'.f' 1. ifisif. if Mn! A ! fx? - -x ' 1 W' 3 -Fi K """' L ,f f' M' as I .infill J-A -A :???:'f ' iff :Ii u '.41f:' LA ' .J ' ' . ips' are 3, I .. ...H - , Y L , N A g .A am, A I T Y .. 3, ,Q 5 1' . P -.-4:52. ,K :""'l.sjAsfE. at m , 4, Y - . N- r.'::-glgjw . ,1 ,.-,.,+,,-4 'sz Xw is "J Ben' it l 1'?i5'1'i?EfiE M 'W gy, Q ' f I M 1111?-4'? v.:T'55.f -f'w"i-r . ,et 1 V 1 s , af .RI , " we Q gq:2t2fff5Z,,4 ". 7-.,-7g.:,:.Q1m - ' X ,, -aj, fr " L ' , ff9i'f.5'Sf:'fI--' flf-ft:-.f'I"'4':'5f5 ' ' 5959.5 'Q 'Jil .3'ffs'f:'1:.'QEzzzzfE't , J' X A 811 Lam f.. M4 Qzz2'?f2a1?:f2f urls:-ffffi.-fu.. .' M. A 1 af if X fi ...I f figiw V77 V7 ,I FW . QM: 1 Q' . rl if .M x 9 . 1' 2 ps fifigxj ' 57" M '64 Q 6 A '15, V' if ... ig. ' zu. -+ -5 rfg'J'ff 'E L 1.15 R 5- QQFV fe: ef . f ""' ,fin -Q. 1'-'lv ' .M F A Y. 5 'F . f 'f'2:f'f!T"' .. Q- E... A .. . .. . Q , Lim , ,.::- ,... gy 'wif pc" . W' -'ulfu -is 1 -:gif :R f. . 1 M .f , L,,.zlm fs ' 'QF 4' ,ff 4. 'ax asv R' . f . .54 -we A Q . , . 5: Q 1' ' Q 4 N r -',v , , Q ,YS ,f -u A ' A KX ., .1 ' 1, i Q ' w. Ml F 't . ii "" ei' if 'Wi' .. t ,ff A .12 I as t E n S Mil . ' A V . a,,"' threw- . A i ' 421 .' . Q - . if x 13 3 i f 'WI , ..- 41.8 iv N 'sm rn, 1 ts mr' K A . .Q A7 ' 7 - CK' W 8. . is V ,X -,J is xr ' , 1 5 ,l A L fl f., A1 - :.g:f., A .af J Terrence D. Hughes C 8 T Julia K. Hummel C 8. T Richard A. Hunsicker Engineering James A. Hunt Engineering Monica R. Husser Arts 8. Sciences Bobbi J. Huston Education Janis D. Hutchings C 8. T James W. Hymes Education Robert R. lglewski Engineering William P. Irvin Business Administration Harvey Jackson lll Arts 8. Sciences Daniel R. Jacobs Arts 8. Sciences Fredrick L. Janusz C 8. T Teresa A. Jaroszewski Education Martha J. Jarvela Education Mayo Jefferson Education Laura L. Jenkins Education Terry R. Jennrich Arts 8. Sciences Casimira E. Joga C 8. T Susan D. Johnson C 8. T Thomas A. Johnson Business Administration Willie E. Johnson Education Denise A. Jones Arts 8. Sciences James M. Jones Education Jerry A. Jones Business Administration Jerry Jones Education Kathleen M. Jordon Education Michael A. Jordon Arts 8. Sciences Donald A. Joseph Arts 8. Sciences John Jundzilo C 8. T Anne Kachurchak Business Administration Raymond L. Kaczur Arts 8. Sciences Robert Kaderle Business Administration Ellen C. Kaforey Nursing Kathleen M. Kalaman Education Lyle D. Kalina Education Sylvia A. Kallas C 8. T Robert A. Kanauer, Jr. C 8. T Karin T. Kaufman Arts 8. Sciences Mary V. Kee Education Nursing Students Receive Caps at Intercollegiate Nurses' Banquet, June 13 -"j"Ji' ,Lf i if!! Z Gary L. Keefer Business Administration Holly E. Keel Education Bose A. Kellers Education Debbie S. Kepple C 8. T Kris A. Keslar Education Charlene S. Kibby Education Thomas M. Kieffaber Engineering Rebecca J. Kinzel Education Penny L. Kistler Nursing Julie A. Klaserner Nursing Ruth L. Klika C 8. T Jane L. Klim Arts 8. Sciences John K. Klinger C 8. T Susan E. Koba Fine 81 Applied James A. Kobb Education Keith A. Kohart Business Administration Kathleen M. Kolaczewski Arts 8- Sciences Camille A. Kolanski C 8. T Larry V. Kollert Business Administration William J. Kondik Business Administration 'Ev' 1.3.1 L., ff1A0 '56 Q88 W I R. - J I' -,f2T'4z:::,t A nf' A naiiiies C5552 ag -ia.: ,Z-ef q.,'12i5Qi4Q3 :His-122 5-:fir 7 -1,4-gf. Qt,-hfaxs js: , ' ff 'Est ffieaxix 419 B9 . Michael J, Konet Education Louis Korom Ili Business Administration Kenneth E. Kray Education Mark A. Kray Engineering Elizabeth J. Kraynak Education George D. Kresovich C 8. T Karen L. Krugh Education Christopher J. Kubik Engineering Kathryn A. Kuntz Education Cynthia E. Kuthan C 8. T David F. LaBate Business Administration Greg Lacki Arts 8 Sciences Laura S. Lamb Fine 8 Applied Arts William G. Lamb Business Administration Richard P. Lampasone Fine 8 Applied Arts Joseph E. Lance Education Carolyn Land Education Carol J. Lang Education Susan M. Lang C 8 T Ruth Langlais C 8 T Deborah A. Lansinger Education Patrick J. Laprocina Education Bonnie S. Lawley Nursing Mary Ann Lawson Education Jay D. Lax Education Climon Lee lll Education Patricia A. Lee Education Nina L. LeGette Arts 8 Sciences Martin E. Leshin Engineering Elizabeth M. Letvin Education Janis E. Levine Business Administration Hope Levitt C 8 T Jeffrey R. Lewis Arts 8 Sciences Michele M. Lewis Education Norman B. Lewis Engineering William J. Lewis Education Stephen R. Lindsey Arts 8 Sciences Valerie S. Loccisano Fine 8 Applied Arts Michele A. Lombardi Fine 8 Applied Arts Rosalie Lopez Arts 8 Sciences Bruce A. Lorincz Education Nadine l. Lorman Education Wesley V. Lowczynski Business Administration Reggie A. Lucas Education Chrysa M. Lukacik Education Mary Anne Lukacik C 8 T Janine L. Lundgren Nursing Daryl P. Lupsor Business Administration Zenon Lysak Engineering Isabelle Maglione C 8 T .uggx ,W ak W LX " .' V? X U 5 f - iii" 1 'xg ,gp .., l 1" 1 NM' i-5322222 . Psi:-NI: . 1 . n Q . 1 v - - ::::f--:'- W .. . ukwfrl, . r . . -. .. .. ,, . - -.- .-...7,-3,v.'f'..':, . M . .....,.',',',. . . . . .M 1 . "' - f -:af " ,d.',', . v 4 u if .A . . . 1 v - ',.v'x ff U .1 '12 -.v'2T.- .' .U J .' . .. 4 .5 'V . 'S , Q .111-L.-Z! E s E" 5,55 .K ,QW Wt JMX WY .s 1, ' Wg. 'xl 1 " A ' bitt ih QV. 9 A ., 1 es' il. -Q J X- s 1- ' ,pq , rirli 5 Barbara L. Mansdorf Education Elizabeth J. Marano Arts 8. Sciences Michael J. Mardo Business Administration Deborah A. Markley Nursing Louise J. Markovich Education Marian B. Marrone C 81 T Karen S. Martin Nursing Michelle M. Martin Education Patricia A. Martin Education Robert W. Martin Education Martin J. Marz Arts 8. Sciences Leslie Mashburn C 8. T Barbara J. Masters Education Mark E. Mathes Business Administration Laura J. Matthews C 8. T Karen L. Mayes Education Janet A. McAlister Fine 81 Applied Arts Kathy A. McCaffrey Arts 8. Sciences Daniel T. McCallion Education Nancy M. McCauliff Arts 8. Sciences Andrea K. McClain Education Elizabeth A. McClarnon Education Judith L. McCloskey C 8. T John H, McDonough Engineering Lorraine F. McFarren C 6 T Craig B. McGilvray Education Edward G. McKenney ll Education Ronald P. McKenzie C 8. T Darlene D. McKisson C 8. T Cora M. McMillan Arts 8' Sciences Darlene Y. McMillan Fine 8. Applied Arts Pamela A. McNutt C 8. T Karin l. Melton Education Charles F. Mendat Arts 8. Sciences Dorthy F. Meola Business Administration John W. Michalec C 8. T Peter Mier Education David A. Mikita Education Robert M. Milanovich Business Administration Nancy J. Milbrodt Nursing Mrs Guzzetta Hosts Brunch for Senior Women 3.,.J' 1, ,A . gf I 5 ,,. 'Cf Q 'T E Connie L. Miller Education Daniel R. Miller Arts 8' Sciences Deborah L. Miller C 8. T Dennis J. Miller C 8. T Emil E. Miller Education Kathy Miller Education Kelly A. Miller Engineering Marcy J. Miller Arts 8 Sciences Stephanie C. Miller Education Thomas A. Miller Arts 8. Sciences Tim W. Miller Arts 8. Sciences William E. Minamyer Arts 8. Sciences Ruth A. Minkhouse Education Beverly J. Mitchell C 8. T Laureen G. Mobley Nursing 0 "9 fav MQ x . 'Sai 2- S 1-1- -fb if N 1 2 Candice R. Molnar C 8. T Daniel J. Monaco Education Mary D. Moneypenny Education Frederick R. Moore Education George R. Moore C 8. T Janet S. Moore Education Peggy Moore C 8. T Teresa Moran Business Administration Cynthia D. Moreland Business Administration Linda E. Morley Fine 8. Applied Arts Ann L. Morris C 8, T Raymond P. Motz C 81 T Susan D. Mullett C 8. T Kitty Munka Business Administration Ed A. Murphy Engineering Paul R. Murrow Business Administration Linda C. Muschkat Education Robert J. Mussro Engineering William E. Myers C 8. T Richard A. Needing C 8. T Thomas R. Nell Arts 8. Sciences Patricia Y. Nelson Arts 8. Sciences Richard W. Nemeth Business Administration Linda S. Nessler Nursing William K. Newhams Business Administration Thomas M. Nichols Education Lucien J. Norman Business Administration Anita R. Norris Education Gregory G. Oblisk Arts 81 Sciences Joyce A. O'Brien C 8, T Margaret M. O'Connor C 8. T Peter J. O'Connor Education Renee L. Oldfield Education Helen A. Olexia Education Romaine B. Oliver Nursing Christine A. Olszonowicz Business Administration Rita K. Opter Fine 8. Applied Arts David L. Oreolt Engineering Gary L. Orr Education Victoria L. Osolin Education Judith M. Oswald C 8. T Denise A. Oyster Fine 8. Applied Arts Christine S. Palmer Education Albert Pandl Business Administration Mikan Pantic Engineering Esta T. Pappas Fine 8. Applied Arts Lynn M. Parker Education Timothy Paskert Education Michael T. Patrick Business Administration Fred W. Pell Fine 8. Applied Arts Garlene L. Penn Education Lori M. Perry Education James E. Peters Engineering Michele M. Petric Arts 8. Sciences Jeanette C. Phillips Arts 8. Sciences Rosanna S. Pianalto Fine 8. Applied Arts Rodney C. Pifer C 8. T Francis A. Pinto Education Clayton M. Pitchure Engineering John Plasky lll Business Administration ,iw Q A ' jg i 2 tg N i . 'S . 5 " gllg N .... . N It . Qaal , ,, f - 03216 iw jf? T f F aff' ,.. 4. sl S X-Q11 tiystsitiifslthissfs S - ' T A X Wlivf , J 1 t ' i 1 . 4 i. .1 . . . 3-fuzz, It -. 1 X x .2 ' .55ffi1wVft5' Q' W f f .R- f ' ff . .Q H 4' hh ' ff' ,N---rv' f. 'rl 1 ix W I 1 ' .ifsrff ' N.. 'sl ,ss G in ji has-I ag we 2 U fi iii if 5.2 nf X f' .V A . , . ff L 'J Nfl . x Q X s 't ifflfffx A S X. RAS . Sr 'Q ' W ' ' T' I-ik.. Q.. I Ax? U L ps J! . N Mun! X ti M. 1 X . . Diane M. Plona Education Christine A. Pofahl C 8. T Michael Polack Arts 8. Sciences Richard H. Pollard Business Administration Zdravko Popovic Education Svetomir S. Popovich Education Steven M. Porter C 8. T Joseph A. Powell Business Administration Nellie Prica Education Michele J. Pringle Arts 8- Sciences William T. Protheroe Arts 8. Sciences Jennifer L. Proudfoot Arts 8. Sciences William P. Prueter Engineering Michael R. Purkhiser C 8. T Cynthia A. Putnam C 8. T Rose M. Quattrocci C 8. T Kathy S. Quinn Education Robert L. Rabell C 8. T Patricia Racco C 8. T Donald F. Radcliff C 8. T Ghobad Rahrooh Engineering Rex T. Raper Arts 8. Sciences Aileen G. Rasberry Arts 8. Sciences Rene Rask Arts 8. Sciences Khalil R. Rasul Arts 8. Sciences Thomas K. Rauber Education Gary C. Ray Business Administration Patricia A. Ream Education Dennis E. Reed Education Larry C. Reed Arts 8- Sciences Thomas A. Reed Engineering Nicole S. Reep Education Elaine F. Reid C 8. T Lauren J. Reid Education Susan K. Reigle C 8. T David P. Reiter Engineering Thomas A. Reiter C 8. T Cynthia Reitz C 8. T Eric A. Reitzel Engineering Robin D. Resh C 8. T President Guzzetta Holds Reception for Seniors, Parents in Performing Arts Hall Lucretia V. Retzer Education David A. Reusser Business Administration Richard T. Rexroad Business Administration Timothy T. Rich Education Leslie J. Riddle Education Kirk D. Rieger Business Administration Richard J. Riegner Engineering Darlene A. Riggs Nursing Diana M. Rish C 8. T Pamela L. Roberts Education Laura G. Robertson C 8. T Darryl D. Robinson Arts 81 Sciences David J. Robinson Education Denise Y. Roe C 8. T Sandra Roebuck Education Rita M. Rogers Education Mary Jo Rohrer Arts 8. Sciences Richard Roman Business Administration Linda Root Nursing David J. Ropar Arts 8. Sciences 2'-I Abraham Rosenblat Engineering Bonnie L. Rosler Education Markus J. Ftostedt C 81 T Rebecca S. Rowland Education Jill A. Rueble Fine 8. Applied Arts Isabel E. Rush Education Mary L. Rush Nursing William E. Russel Education Douglas C. Ruth Business Administration Albert J. Sabo Fine 8. Applied Arts Rick A. Sahli Business Administration Jane Saker Arts 8. Sciences Carolyn H. Sales Education Joseph P. Salvo Business Administration Robert G. Sammartino Business Administration Everett R. Santee Arts 8. Sciences Deborah K. Saraceno Education Sunil B. Sarkar Arts 81 Sciences Deborah A. Saroglia Arts 8. Sciences William G. Sarris Arts 81 Sciences Robert A. Sauer Business Administration Ross P. Sauner Arts 8. Sciences Roseann M. Savoca C 81 T Tom Sayers C 8. T Steven L. Schafer Engineering Thomas Schafer C 8. T Vicki E. Schafer C 8. T Betsy A. Schapp Fine 8. Applied Arts Michael J. Scharra Business Administration Laura D. Schecter Arts 8. Sciences 5 ,psig at f if 4. at T . ,A . Q, '91 Q I X 123- .',y"! w ffm 'N' Q' ..- X 'fi f :ss-9' ff-'M Senior Challenge Affords Graduating Seniors Opportunity to Contribute to the University X, I WZ 'Y 5, 1 4? , V 0,9'f.,e . L . ,TY 5 -gn 'Q 8' Over 100 students met on Sunday, April 12, at the Mark ll Restaurant to launch the Senior Challenge fund-raising drive. The project, sponsored by the Senior Class and the Alumni Office, affords grad- uating seniors the opportunity to pledge between S50 and 3150 over a five-year period to the University. Alumni Director Allen Boyer asked students to work to beat last year's 822,000 in pledged contributions. Ken Mackovic, founder and president of Old World Products and a 1969 grad uate of UA, gave the keynote speech for the program. Jerome J. Schiffer Engineering Daniel H. Schlayer C 8. T Mark J. Schlosser Education Richard A. Schmidt C 8. T David L. Schneider Arts 81 Sciences Linda A. Schnell Nursing Susan M. Schoenstein Business Administration Harold N. Scholz Arts 8. Sciences Gary L. Schrade Arts 81 Sciences Joan M. Schumacher Education John C. Schumacher Arts 8- Sciences Cynthia J. Scovell Nursing Anne E. Scoville Education Lynn M. Sehika Education Forrest R. Seitz ll Engineering Cheryl L. Shadrach C 8. T Mary A. Shatter Education Dilipkumar A. Shah C 8. T Laura J. Sherer C 8. T Katherine M. Shields Education Walter J. Shimp Fine 81 Applied Arts Maiorie A. Shotts Fine 8. Applied Arts Jayne M. Siedlecki C 8. T Adam R. Siemienski Arts 8. Sciences Rebecca Simmons Nursing Laura J. Sinacore Education James M. Singer Engineering Thomas J. Sirna Education Gerald R. Sisil C 8. T William K. Sizemore Education Leslie A. Smiljanich Nursing Alan D. Smith Arts 8. Sciences Beverly J. Smith Education Christine F. Smith C 8. T Dennis W. Smith C 8. T Jerome Smith C 8. T Lionel S. Smith Engineering Margaret A. Smith Education Patrick E. Smylie Education Diane E. Snider Arts 8. Sciences Karen P. Snider Arts 81 Sciences Robert L. Sniff C 8. T Dana E. Snyder Engineering Robert E. Snyder C 8. T Suwan Songpaibool Fine 8- Applied Arts Antoinette M. Sospirato Education Suzette A. Spinelli Education Joan M. Spirnak Education William R. Stager Engineering Connie J. Stahl Education Mary Stallings Education Loise A. Stanek Business Administration Deborah L. Stanley Arts 8. Sciences Sonoko S. Starosta Fine 8. Applied Arts Walter S. Stashkin C 8. T Craig A. Steele Business Administration John L. Steele Engineering Ward F. Stein Arts 8. Sciences Frank D. Stemple C 8. T James A. Stender Engineering CF' 'oi Q fa 4 sf :lf 4 4V 1-QQ x X 'QI 'E 1 'T' , J. 225 V , H, ff A I 5 M.. S sa v-in kk A if 2 if gf?"-in ' ,gg 4 ,F is ,Qt 'NH' "" my-J-' ' Q Q 1 1 25' Q' My K ,df x X ff "' .K r ff l, , gf UG Kalaman, Miller Selected Outstanding Seniors nf" 23: Ill Kathy Kalaman 1. N3 I '1- 4' .D Nh 'UW X f J A35 '21 ,, 1. , fi MA. . Dig' z, , Nfff .rr 4 JW m 4 vi .. 54 '22 .J ".., ' 8.6, 4. f'Z'.'1v A-swf. f L - 1 lf 1 . .f 6' if -4 A fx X 1 . is :QS ' .!:f'fr tix .Q ifivizg. 5,125 ' 1' 'Tin' , , XSRYI l -1, tv 1 3 4 321- elf ., ef T nl" null' K lv I INN ll. xmas: Tim Miller xi? 2 'f A0 , 'Q"X, t , , . ' .- .. A , . .0 " -. ' . ' 9' . S-tg, -.-fr I-t . , ? ' x .5 mf" v- 'Y xt-' . ' ' ".n2'0' qw-a8+ Q Q..-3 ?ggua'1,gQ',g!j, ' ' ' J" LK-tl Holy' n'. W -4- IQQ. ....,.,t 1K,4!.,, D X . , 1O'0Q,.J,.oq- M -, M Q A x . A . .. I A. ' f77f'1s"':--'V ft- 5' I, 1,81 ,f . Q ... I.-1' I jjfxxj O' A ff ' R tv' xyg ,F ef x i, I .eqlq so .ii 1' 14C"."i' - 1 inf' ,QP 'Q-f ry' ' . f 39 hw" if 1 X Us . i Q-3,-V' CO' Frank H. Stephenson Arts 8. Sciences Karen J. Stevenhagen Fine 8. Applied Arts Dortha J, Stevens Business Administration Robert E. Stevens Arts 8. Sciences David C. Stevenson Engineering William R. Stirgwolt Engineering Bruce E. Stiver C 8. T Darlene G. Stokes C 8. T David A. Stone Business Administration Fredick L. Storck Business Administration Benjamin P. Stupi Business Administration Nancy Sulick Nursing Steven J. Swedler Business Administration Sandra K. Sweeney C 8. T Penelope J. Swingle Education Stephen Swope Business Administration Dianne S. Szabo Nursing Kathryn L. Takatch C 81 T Timothy A. Talley Arts 8. Sciences Timothy C. Tanner Education Christopher P. Tavolier Arts 8. Sciences Susan L. Taylor Nursing Carolyn M. Teare Education Richard L. Terney Engineering Ollie M. Terry C 81 T Earl C. Terwilliger Arts 8. Sciences Linda R. Thomas Arts 8. Sciences Peggy A. Thomas C 8. T David P. Thompson Education Sally A. Thompson y Education Zipporah A. Thompson C 8. T Kenneth L. Tisdale Business Administration Kari F. Tittl "A 1' Education Anne L. Todaro Q., We Education Leslie S. Todd C 8. T Doris M. Tolbert Education Vernon Tolbert Education Dennis W. Tompkins Business Administration Frank G. Tompkins C 8. T Frank A. Torcasio Education Jenifer B. Toth Education David P. Tschantz Engineering Janet R. Tschantz Education Mary K. Tunstall Education Jeftrey M. Turley Education Timothy E. Twardowski Business Administration Christina T. Ulatowski Fine 81 Applied Arts Richard D. Untch C 81 T Palma Urdiales Business Administration Deborah J. Valentine Education Neil A. Van Arsdale Business Administration David B. Vanchoff C 8. T Barbara J. Vanke Nursing Stephanie M. Vargo Education Kris J. Vasilo C 8. T Michael L. Veres Arts 8. Sciences Gary M. Vestal Business Administration Robert J. Vidd Business Administration Mary E. Vielhaber Fine 8- Applied Arts Barbara A. Vigh Nursing 'UN 'vrmi 419 'tv' ,Hn 1 'H A 'fd X l Sf ...ef 1-L14 .-Q Q .aim - ,A . if sg MM, .FUN . .fx ' -. 1 f 1 I ,J,d: f f ws? I N.,-1' fu x F-1z."""' ' 4 3""V' u KK ik , A - 5 2 2:51241-.zszsf f. bi X ff' Pt .l 1 CN ...,5:f"2Zi92' ' ' G efflfzi 'T 1? ' x , 111 L or is 'Vu' .- x ,..-. . ,se k 1 4 H.. Atv' 'bv' , an Sandra K. Vogel Education Deborah J. Volker C 8. T Diana J. W. Volz Arts 8. Sciences Cristine S. Voorhees Fine 8. Applied Arts Patricia J. Wade Education Marian L. Wahl C 8. T Susan L. Walborn Education William J. Waldecker Education John S. Wallace Education William L. Wallace Arts 8. Sciences Mary M. Wallar C 8. T Sibylle E. Walter Arts 8. Sciences Pamela J. Walterhouse Arts 81 Sciences Andrew W. Ward Education Joanne M. Warmus Arts 81 Sciences Anthony Wasik Engineering Phylliss L. Wasmund C 8. T Diane M. Watson Fine 8. Applied Arts Victoria L. Watts Nusing Tanya T. Webb Education Richard H. Weber Arts 8. Sciences Phyllis J. Webster Arts 8. Sciences Janet W. Wedge Fine 8. Applied Arts Cheryl A. Weisbarth Education Dan Weiss Education Mark W. Weissfeld Arts 8. Sciences Richard E. Welch Fine 81 Applied Arts Lisa D. Welsh Education James E. Wertz Education Laurie A. Westbrook Arts 8. Sciences David G. Whitaker Education Mack L. White Education David G. Whitmire Education Deborah A. Wilde Fine 8. Applied Arts Patricia A. Wilkins Nursing Donald A Williams Engineering Shelley Williams C 81 T Nancy E Willis Arts 81 Sciences Patricia L Wilson C 8. T William E Wilson K 3 . ' . Qs' V! . . ' . ' i 9 Business Administration f 'VK' John J. Winkler Business Administration Mark J. Wisberger Education Kathryn A. Witner Education Robert G. Witschey C 8. T Bev A. Wolf Education Kent A. Wolf Business Administration Scott Wolf C 8. T Cynthia L. Wood Education Jeanne M. Wood Education Janice H. Worrell Arts 8. Sciences James Ft. Wray Education John R. Wray Business Administration Cathy D. Wright C 8. T Leslee S. Wright Fine 8. Applied Arts Mark V. Yanko Education Jim H. Yee Business Administration Edward Yost Business Administration Valerie L. Yost Education Dale A. Youngblood Business Administration Renee L. Yourchak C 8. T Karen L. Yunker Nursing Doreen A. Zacharias C 8. T Gary J. Zaiac Business Administration Thomas J. Zalar Education Jo A. Zeno Arts 8. Sciences Donald A. Zocchi Engineering Diane Zupke Education Cheryl A. Zupon Nursing Mary A. Zurek r . ff fs- 52 Q as 1 . ' 1. 155111. .MN K ' , -f ,fwfr -Y M25 f f-H' 1 M- 1., '- :QA ti 4- ,an wQ,y'N Arts 8. Sciences Doreen A. Zver Fine 8. Applied Arts i I u i 4., . M' 6- o I 'J 1 ."" wi 'Q v, V uf. 5 l Ivy 1 . ,,,- 4 ,,i4.1"x1.,XYx IA A M 4 I , V fl v,xrQv-I. .Yk2,,s'lrl ev! V" J ur 1 I 1 1. my 7f,4!K"t71 ,i,:,,3,f, , A K .Y K Y' if 1'L"' Q, , 1i.,+w.f' 'vw - L' ' '14 4 ' 9'- '7'-X' -- 91 4 'L '. " ' J'-'df Y?"--41.35531-1af'1'?f!7' -.','- V" ' X V M u'j'lff1l1y f .',"f'hAf"fi',A-"-lzxfrk . f' 5 I 4, ,,ftffA,-ww, D agfn ,Q , I j X 41 'if "V"-W" 17.1.-5' Ae"'11'ff" , riff 1 A ' I' ' f ' M 1 If-nfl? fr. ff-'.+-'mgzz .z'fs.'f:A-WM 14:4 ,144 lf , , L, f y , , 1. "X 175' I 'i3"V,i "',ff'f'f,Zl""i7,1"Vf1'f'-df" "'!9f'-i'Aff?Q5"" '+xZf-J 1 'N' "E X-'ff' w"' N -'fvlgf ,J 1,1 f . 452-0 .XJ ,Au Vg' f "1f3,'fx-'-', 1 511--X.,"5,1,q'I--ff "., , ' ,f i, ,R Y 1,5 -.f-Lwfflf ." W., , ' 49544 ', Q , ,Wy .. "" fx" ,' , H :L gil ' f . fu' fi , -.-hvf1 'f5'fm'f"fw wb' .f. Q1.4',K2'WM1, -fm lf- .. ,xfw X ffff .-, f N 'iid f,1 iP'2fi !'.Sff - fi ff as 35595 X A -. , ff, if . Y ,' 1 V- ,,.,1,1, .!.-g"ff'g'N,.,1..1 ,gp '42 Jv,4l,.. ,f,,fA.-Q .JP 4 I , 'X A v , ,P .f'Ai-!.",',,1"j'A' gfaw bf J ' ,Q-,K ji ,gf24'-32' 5k:."'1X' fy' N- if f f 4 ,,'v",f 1 1' 'A' . , ,. Z: 9 lg ',f.q'l ff, k' ,Qi ' I-:A fl if ,-.X 1 P, V .gf 1-f 'f-.ffm-x.',A 'J-'qi f .1 Mfhfww 'Q f .2 AAC V,-a f. 1 -. 4, K f' fVxL,l,'fJQ5s'73f'ii,j-ik,-?",f tflffl.-i'neQ5,ff, QQ? 'Ars .Fixx "N ' ' --H ff J.--u-,Qu f.Af.f..:Lff n,1:","2 ?'?13i. '.yf"5,1S7fffQ5v,-g. V' ,Ri ,I I .fy fn! ,, P' Co-Editors ........ .. Sandy Pianalto Linda Miller Campus Life Editor .. ........ Daryl Telfer Sports Editor ....... .... S hirley Williams Academics Editor .. . ...... John Bollas Greek Editor ..... . . .Debbie Brooks Dorm Editor ..... ...Susan Strouse Research Editor .. .... Ed Macika Photographer .... ...Bob Wilkey Staff Vanessa Brown Chris Keenan Peggy Moore Tom Hackim Sandy Lovelace Tim POIIGS Cover by Teresa Matuska Advisor, George F. Cella, Jr. Acknowledgements Sports information and copy written by Ken MacDonald, Sports lnfo. Director The Buchtelite The University of Akron News Service Contributors Myrna Chavez Jean Dages Mark Deaton Ann Frabotta John Fongheiser, Photographer Dianne Garrett Howard Hollingsworth Linda Hunchak Dudley Johnson Jim Macak Bob Malloy Patricia Mravetz Linda Newman John Oravetcz, Photographer Antonella Pianalto Rosanna Pianalto Frank Smrdel, Photographer Lou Tobias, Photographer Deborah Torok Nancy Wilkey Kim Wilson, Photographer Printed by Bert Coburn and John Fowley at Inter-Collegiate Press, lnc. Senior Portraits by Root Photographers Colophon Volume 62 of the University of Akron Tel-Buch contains 288 pages. Printing area is 9 x 12, and there were 6,500 copies printed. Paper stock is 80 pound Saxony, and the endsheets are 65 pound cover stock printed in 50'Z, PMS 378. Heading style incorporated in the book is New- ton Medium Italic in sizes ranging from 36 point to 18 point. Body copyis from the Newton Medium Italic type family ranging in sizes from 8 point to 12 oint The cover is silk screened on a dark reen vin I. Covers are P - 9 Y Qmyth sewn, rounded and backed. ' J Shirley Williams Linda Miller 41,-an Q, ,,-...X r In 3 , ,- -f. 71 5 Av X 1, ' Q ,Q 0 a 6x ,mf 1122317 Daryl E E 5 2 3 s 5 5 5 Bob Wilkey ,. lu V if - R A f 2 timing 5 F3 AN! ,' in f ,w H 'A 1 N, V 3 ...,.y,-.- . 1 V , , gy, f.-,1.w.,. ..'.-.X-.. , ,x , ,Q . Ed Macfka Susan Strouse zfqm,-' 'Q' TM'- f f .1 K0 ' I .5 f' . wg' r ff 2 . is K5 H . M.. M. ... .. s K., is It we as an institution can express a humane and generous concern for each individual and his fulfillment, it will do more to soothe and humanize our savage hearts than any power that man can devise. - 1 4 Q Q. a - 4 . ' a 1 1 'N ll-I I. WF 'Y 'H l, ws F 1- - . Fi ' 1 I I Ju' . 4" 4 'K 'I J N .- 1. -. x-.,,,- p- ,ef - r , 4 . .1 ur Agff. 1 j n 5. I I Y lkff ,ff , if .f'H '1 ' 'IW-K1 vllq VV ll .L ' 1 h. ' if! .l41.xQ mg , in .rid 'o ff A - 7 'v' ZW' 7 ' ' J x-r'R".A'W his fl , Hr . - r I fl is ' v All ' T ' n I .'3' , - , 4,11 -I A - .-' W Q! .JE gpm .W ,'. l' f'd.f"if ,L... - 1 4 Q Q. a - 4 . ' a 1 1 'N ll-I I. WF 'Y 'H l, ws F 1- - . Fi ' 1 I I Ju' . 4" 4 'K 'I J N .- 1. -. x-.,,,- p- ,ef - r , 4 . .1 ur Agff. 1 j n 5. I I Y lkff ,ff , if .f'H '1 ' 'IW-K1 vllq VV ll .L ' 1 h. ' if! .l41.xQ mg , in .rid 'o ff A - 7 'v' ZW' 7 ' ' J x-r'R".A'W his fl , Hr . - r I fl is ' v All ' T ' n I .'3' , - , 4,11 -I A - .-' W Q! .JE gpm .W ,'. l' f'd.f"if ,L...


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