United States Military Academy Camp Buckner - Mortar Yearbook (West Point, NY)

 - Class of 1957

Page 1 of 38

 

United States Military Academy Camp Buckner - Mortar Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 38 of the 1957 volume:

the -i1AifYQfQ3i1 and , wg ard so t to Vw. C BRIGADIER GENERAL JOHN H. MICHAELIS Commondont of Cadets MAJOR GENERAL FREDERICK A. IRVING Superintendent C MP BUCKNER OFFICER STAFF This is Buckner, its reveille runs, PRI, Ranges, Lectures, Demonstrations, Cleaning Details, Water- tront, and Hops. This is two months ot time. Two months during which the Class ot 1957 learn- ed the school of a soldier in the field. This is two months ot weather, rain, winds and every once in the while, sunshine. This is a lot of things, but however you may choose to look at it, these are the men who made it whatever it was-The Tacs. FIRST PLATOON SECOND PLATOON THIRD PLATOON First Company First with First Company was the byword for "Reed's Rang- ers." lt could not be said that this crew wasted any time trying to prove it. We moved into the field the first day under Skip MacDon- ald, and the ensuing week went with no let up, and yearling dead- beot seemed to be the figment of someone's imagination. After the third week things let up and we began to enjoy Buckner. After a good start, fate dealt us some bitter blows, and a few compan- ies slipped past us in company competition, but no one ever ap- proached us in spirit or in our ability to make the three second bell at reveille. We tore the Buckner stakes apart with half of the people at the top seemingly coming from our company with Dick Caldwell leading them all, but somehow got edged out. Once we got the drill streamer we held on to it. As Captain Reed said, we had fun, learned a lot, and it was "A job well done by all." Second Company We were the best, and we knew it all the time, even if some of the others didn't get the word 'til late. "Patton's Pan- thers" set a lot of records in the field, but it wasn't all work. Who can forget the long free hours for swimming, boating, dragging, cleaning details, and cleaning details. With the influence of those two great Italians Scholtes and Miklinski, aided by Des there was a Little ltaly movement which was finally stamped out by those of us who couldn't un- derstand what was happening, only to have a movement to the rear of the barracks where we blitzed everything in sight ex- cept what we painted. With Moon and Jack teaming up to produce the Color Line show what more could you ask except Buddy Bullotta, and we had him too. Ted Jasper found a new popularity in the yearling class thanks to the first platoon who spread the good word, and thanks to our mysterious ways in the field "Mr, Karam" became the most used cry at Buckner. We had a great company and a swell bunch of guys. FIRST PLATOON "L- SECOND PLATOON THIRD PLATOON FIRST PLATOON SECOND PLATOON THIRD PLATOON Third Company "Every man a putty tate!" was the battle cry of E-Z 3 the silent company, and every man was. We didn't bone muck, we didn't bone files, and we didn't bone spirit, but it was there. It was a quiet kind of spirit, more of a silent bond of confidence that we were all working together, and it was enough. Had the Buckner Stakes in- cluded tenths for dragging pro, we had an easy first. We ac- cumulated more sack time than the rest of the Buckner Battalion, but that didn't count either. If there had been free ice cream waiting at the end ot the PA test we would have been the fustest with the mostest of the bestest. Only there wasn't. Life did have its trying times, like Captain Dingeman's "BIG BUCK-UP" but we managed to get through as easy-going as ever, even though we were a bit insulted at the thought of being Gung-ho. We shook the OC at the Bazooka range when he shouted out, "what company is this?" and a few voices replied quietly, "Silent Three, sir." And he was more shook when we shot first place. The Corps has. Fourth Company As the cry of "Simba" echoed forth from the hills, 4th Com- pany issued in a new era. Al- though frustration was our theme song in training, as we set rec- ord after record only to have them broken, it wasn't dull with such characters as "Bwana", and the "Sentator" to enliven the proceedings. Our Color Line showed we had more than a little talent, for who will ever forget that stirring epic "Song of the Sewer?" We had other talents too, as with a tac- tical skill seldom seen by the TD we revived the customs of our an- cestors and "Got that Buglerf' "Blitch's Bad Boys" turned into Chick's Lions as August roll- ed around and the PE schedule took on a new look. Did anyone mention push-ups? All in all, through the eyes of the "Simbas" the summer was quite an affair. lt was a great company with a great bunch of guys as we left our mark in the Annals of Buckner. FIRST PLATOON SECOND PLATOON THIRD PLATOON FIRST PLATOON SECOND PLATOON THIRD PLATOON ,-15133 Fifth Company lf, as the old soldier said, there are two kinds of troops, "Paradin' ones and shootin' ones," then 5th Co. was com- posed of the latter. Any slight imperfections on the review field were more than adequately com- pensated for by performance on the rifle ranges. Typical Buck- ner spirit was reflected in the title, "Marty's Brewers," and it was this spirit which character- ized all 5th Co. operations dur- ing the summer. The lake was conveniently located for the cooling of certain individuals who insisted on quiet after taps. Noc- turnal raids by stray patrols in- variably resulted in effective retaliation by our own com- mandos upon the unfortunate trespassers. Reveille was always associated with frantic cries of "No near lates!" and the clomp- ing of combat boots at the double-time down to the Engineer site. Evenings, one could hear the inspirational music of "Big John" Sankey and the Sentry Box Six or the fabulous tales of old Vienna by Herr Bob Drudik. With memories of these and oth- er such characters and deeds, it will be some time before 5th Co. and the fateful summer of '54 are forgotten, Sixth Company From the hills of Range 6, to the shores of Lake Poop-a-loop we fought the Battle of Buckner. lt was a good fight, too, with spirit the keynote and every man a jumper. With the cry of "Hook Up," Sixth Airborne took, se- cured and dissipated the ob- jective. Accomplishments were numerous and records fell by the way. The Color Line show was fabulous and it took us twelve minutes to reach the top of Bare Rock. All dragged pro task Tom Keeley about airline hostesses sometimel and our after taps re- vivals made the heavens them- selves take notice. PRI was a pain, but it produced 32 experts land a couple of bolos just to keep the curve adjustedl. We packed our packs on weekdays and our blankets Pl on weekends, shined boots, mop- ped floors, walked guard and chased coons. Runts dominated us. Auger and Fikaris, both A-2 files were our company com- manders. They worked hard CAII the timel and we worked hard lSometimesl to find our- selves leading the company com- petition almost all summer. Sick Call and Room Orderly must have claimed their toll dur- ing the Buckner stakes for we finally finished second. We tried to drown our sorrows in drink, but found the firsties all too will- ing to go in-they went. lt was a gay, carefree sum- mer from the first soiree to the last. Some of us boned Armor, a few Artillery, a very, very few hardy souls stuck with the Infan- try, while the rest of us Air Force files just nursed our ailing feet and backs and thought about Christmas leave. Adeste Fidelis. FIRST PLATOON SECOND PLATOON THIRD PLATOON X I!! J If X ,W 'I , J , ' Q ,fy -,fl Wg M ff A T K' '1?1 f.5f.'I 3 - fi , zifkfsifb' ' f X .f f , A,.nun , 1fr , f f f f hi if X If X! fi! J V' fa img ff X M : f -, . Q ii'1i f9 - 'X x 55 W - -cf -7- , .mf "ig x ,lpn Y x,.5 ,. '+:f' Rf ff ' ffl iff' .4, ,., , -,..,,,v,,, ,,:-, . - '- ' r km'-rr, .Y Wxii K I 'Q , Y i,fTAwL3v'bf 1 N ANTRY What math was to plebe year, the Infantry was to Buckner. It easily claimed first place in the time spent department, and when it was all over there were few who would argue that it was not the "Queen of Battle". After returning from the field problem everyone agreed that you had to have a lot of respect for the men in the front who stand and take it. July was almost entirely devoted to training in the basic weapons of the squad and the platoon. Almost as soon as we got here we were bent like pretzels and told to "squeeze those rounds off". Bolos to the contrary it wasn't too long before it was over, and we got off the thousand inch ranges and into the field. We fired what seemed like impossible shots on the transition range and managed to come up with a few hits, dragged ourselves up mountains that seemed miles high and came back down again, and defended ourselves against an aggressor who seemed to know every move we made before we had thought of making it. After learning the art of silence on night patrols, we were ready for the three day field problem which was to climax the summer's training. We waded in swamps up to our necks, froze at night and walked all day, but when we got home from this prob- lem everybody had learned something, and even the air force files knew that it was time well spent. Transportation ln an age of highly mobile warfare, the movement of troops, supplies, and equipment is of paramount import- ance in any branch ofthe service. The l5lst Light Truck Company from Fort Eustis, Virginia showed us how TC solves such problems. With ex- cellent instruction and demonstration in the functioning and organization of a truck company we learned how to get there "fustest with the mostest." Grinding gears and double clutch- ing, we participated as drivers and convoy commanders in moving a truck convoy from Camp Natural Bridge to the Cavalry Plain with even a few moments off the reservation. A "jeep sinking" contest at Stilwell Lake climaxed the day as '57 rumbled and roared through TC training. c f xl I ,s '52 if' L1 'lf f ' WW' ll 114 3 A' 'f llll vl i as r we if ssvs sf: Y ff ' u ,. r,. Z Wy , l Nall 0 llgllwrwi I-f. f K I I Q 'Q 4 .i i tx l f ,lf 5 lylfzfk gn l i -fe f? "VVrr l A ff if i ' 12 lg if 'gh X 5' -- +3 53 U L?5X ff Q r 5 X ' , Y, Y, ff Q f f i?? e X - jf - T 'f' up 2 if 'E 5 was if r, 7 2 4 so J - W- - fpi' i 7 - if X ll I ilitary Police This is the page we had planned to set aside for the M.P.'s. Unfortunately, their demonstration came too late for us to get the pictures we wanted, and we express our regrets that we can't give them the coverage they deserve. When we first heard of MP. instruction no one knew just what they could do to occupy four hours. After all they didn't seem to do much more than control traffic and ride around in little brown cars. ln four hours, through the best presented, best or- ganized training presented all year, they showed us ex- actly what they could do. The jobs that have to be done in peacetime and in combat by the Military Police are seemingly numberless. We sat, in the field house, thanks to a mild hurricane, and with a crack platoon from Camp Gordon, the M.P.s showed us as many of these jobs as they could fit in during the time allotted. We sat, and we laughed, and we learned, and when it was all over we applauded loudly. These people also seemed to be able to march pretty well, and their riot formations made such an impression that the Camp Gordon shuffle became a part of what little time there was left at Buckner. We're sorry there are no pictures, but there are 600 yearlings who remember. Ask them. l X e we eeffe-he fx 6 'QQ ,N ,i gi e2 59 if ' f ,f 1 Y , " " 2 Xi' 7 ff'-'i ff At i, X 1 .J an I ,fr ff K ff ff R5 ke? fb' T I f X ff X W Vi if TT f fl , -. - . .1 as f T, I y ' Z, ,1 , "1 ' w-.,, , ' ,QL r e e "' A ify r ffe, e . f ,f ' T T t 5 if if . v T ' ,,f i ,tiif f wc 'Zi X waz? 1 X LMK , X Xl X 'li l' x 1 l iv K gg The trip to New Jersey was the highlight of our AntiAircraft Artillery Train- ing. From the time we dis- embussed until time to go, we were amazed by the complex mechanism used at the Teterboro and Teaneck AA installations. We track- ed planes with the quad fif- ties, watched bugs on the radar screens and actually manned the 90mm guns, but the big thing of the day was Nike. The facts we were told about her were just enough to capture our in- terest and thrill our imag- inations with vivid pictures of ourselves as Artillery officers directing one of those big babies on target. rtillery is New pl! if ff i , c X -Y, XX L" he -1 ,, i f' . As A c N, ma it 'tiff i ' X X , X "On the way-Wait!" and every eye turned to the impact area awaiting the bright flash and the puff of smoke that would bring the "Fire for effect!" Dummies flew to pieces and Base Points disappeared before our eyes as we watched. At the guns, we shoved the rounds home with a vengeance and split hairs with the sights to put those rounds where they belonged. And if a few strays did go over the hill, it only added to the excitement. ln FDC we were slipping our air- cooled sticks around like pistons trying to corre- late the FOs with the Gunners. But patience had its reward and the words "End of Mission" were more than welcome. ,s g c as H 1 ic. e lf sewer s as acaccs 5 K ill' W L2 is gbfvf f Milf. W Field Artillery S. ,Eg 7 Q' fi i,, 77 . . I Qu fi ' fl i' 9.55,-. ,X ' X417 4,,,, . ' i at to fr , f ii v . 1 J if JW ' . J ff ff A l e xit-'t o 71 4 'i f ii c 'l PV . f'j'f, ff , Jl,ii,yf I. I. ,f Aff ' fgr l My ff W LH A Wriglgfi " Y I . mf? ' '- will 6:5 -"h'7 L ' 4 ef- f f S- xi f rf we--f rf 27 X ,,..gi l131't61' II121StG1' Quartermaster training lasted only half a day this summer, but it was one of the most interesting morn- ings of the entire summer. For over a month we had been climbing up the hill to get our shoes repaired, and the free ice cream available, so it was with good will in our hearts that we went to training. After a welcoming lecture giving us the "big pic- ture" of all the jobs the QM is called upon to do in the army we were broken down into small groups and rotated through the various phases of training. All of them were interesting, as we saw where the daily bread came from, how oils and fuels were handled, and how the troops were kept in clothes. The most reassuring part of the training to the air- borne files was the demonstration on parachutes and packing. With all the precautions taken we learned that it's just like stepping off a log, The breaks were good too, with ice cream and lemonade on all sides, and a free lunch, not a field lunch provided to end the day. We'd like to thank all the people who came up from Fort Lee for all they did to make Buck- 1.----f ner more pleasant all summer, and for making their training interesting. We'll appreciate what they can do for us. Engineers The final note of Taps echoed back from the hillside and we replaced our hats. The Engineer Mining Crew had claimed another victim from the ever diminishing ranks of the Class of l957. But we had a chance to more than make up for this when we went through Demolition Training, and the noise was louder. Then came bridges, Timber Trestle, foot bridges, Airborne bridges, and the M-4. Then we found out how the other half lives when we "sailed" across Popo in the assault cross- ing. After Engineers there are a few more of us boning first man. 'f' A, Y - ' qi, r - X,A,, ff , , . , g ,,. ,, ,lqgvti jx 'xx - H e e rrrr ' QL, fi i 5.5-mir f V Lis fr EU , ' pn s .V ,ff 1 ' TQ:-A ff ,, ci f kv 4. 3 -,fx arf' 7 gf, I, thi L ,ju in Ki it r im T, T Q i ' if tl l ,Q ' ,gel , fl N , 1 tgapg jfwiw N N ,N -I fi ' i s W' Meir M s rea N ij 1 fbwi lf .F l Ji tgi rl , ,7'X gf, X lxl . lf'fl Signal You can't control your troops unless you can communicate with them, and Signal Corps, in two days of instruction showed us how you do it. From basic orientation in the Able Baker Charlie alpha- bet we progressed to the mystery of the year, the ANPRC radios and the air was soon heavy with yearlings trying to find somebody to talk to. Wire communication was the order for the afternoon and all soon became expert splicers, tyers and switchboard operators, not to mention our more agile classmates whose motto was "Every man a monkey" as they swarmed to the tops of simulated telephone poles. The second day of instruction was devoted to a field exercise testing what we had learned. Most of us learned a lot, as was evi- denced by the fact that a whole battalion wire net and radio system went in during the course of the morning, but some of the recorded conversa- tions were enough to make us respect the Signal Corps the rest of our careers. f QW Wx A f' "HX 'ii Y ,l' 'f -- Vw-, Z FA! " 5 1,-,g . ' "f- K , f., 4 f 7 ,f ff xii- ,QE ,Sas A Gfxfj T- Y f ' .ff F9341 if 351 A 7, ' , 447 .,., mfs,-T f' -' ' -N pg f,, 6j jg K K , X 'T T if - ' F.-71e..::s ' xo 1 f 5 , i "rf, Y ' ltfxlliii ,Nw Nw M. lim.. -fwfr I'II101T With a rumble, a wheeze, and a roar we tore up half the county with those big M-48s. The trails were rough, but the tanks were rougher and by the time we finished even the Air Force files were convinced that Armor, with its Firepower, Mobility, and Shock Action had what it takes to win battles, and win them decisively. We had a chance to play with the radios and fire on Range l. And for those few who didn't see them, I assure you, the geese were there, all eight of them. The tactical problem really showed us what Armor can do. And as we started the attack on our objective we found that riding beats walking in more ways than one, sixty per cent grade or not. And when Lieutenant Glassmeyer told us about driving a tank through Napalm, a few more of our fears about the tin coffins were dispelled. They just don't make can openers that big. We ate Armor chow, talked Armor talk, and breathed Armored air, and when we finished, we were tankers to a man. THE BUCKNER STAKES 'fjmv ' "2 . k Q Nag ww :M x X The Buckner Stakes was the pay off of all the training we had all summer. A 2,500 yard course complete with woods, roads, streams, mud, and bushes, packed with twelve stations measuring each individual's ability to solve a problem having to do with basic weapons and skills is run one day every sum- mer and this year for some reason was no ex- ception. Heats started running right after break- fast while most of us returned to barracks, ancl began to wonder just what was happen- ing out there when our classmates started coming back covered with sweat and mud, When we finally got going though it wasn't bad at all. The hour it took most of us to run it went more like ten minutes, as we tied knots in our hands with barbed wire, forgot to put aerials on radios and found leveling a mortar for speed an almost impossible task. Thanks to some unbreakable balloons on the carbine range the committee came out a little ahead on that one, but our M-l's were still accurate and few dropped any points at that station. With the two hundred yard sprint for the finish line the summer for all practical purposes was over and we were ready to go back to the Point and tell the other classes what a tough summer we had and awe them with our tales of how well we did. lt was the feeling of accomplishment we had after posting a gocd score on the stakes that made everything seem worthwhile. All the times we heard "Good morning gentle- men welcome to your first hour of instruction in .... " All the meals in the field. Mother dIdn't cook like that, she didn't like stew. All the other instructions and field training, all of it paid off here, and it will later. We learned a lot this summer, from everybody. lt was two months well spent. ? CAMP BUCK ER GETS ILL MINATED When time for Camp lllumination came, we illuminated everything, in- cluding the reveille cannon. The show itself did a great deal to add to gayety. And the carnival that fol- lowed was just another step toward the Camp Illumination l-lop. Cos- tumes were the orders for the evening and as you can see, they were the mostest to say the least with a few exceptions which could well be called the leastest to say the mostest. swim np .- s TIME TO TAKE IT EASY . 3, , 1 1b f was 1 W? Q 'ix 'Max A F 4 ,T 1 fx, 5 351 Y . " 5- -::f:'if , ,':6 MM.. ,Q H Yi ,, ,K M 'X ' ".. ' kg . -- GP ,S .sk 2, ' Q Q if c , N. 'A ,,. Y L5 , ,gy ' ' " 5 fa? w i 1 I I I I i 1 l m.l I fi 'f llllixzllmf ITE' ii--' i S 1 l'l'lill'l'LLl C F' C, so Q W ww T Herff Jones knows that your appointment to the United States Military Academy must fill you with pride: it is a high honor that reflects the fine quality of your character, intelligence and pa- triotism. Herff Jones feels proud too, because you have invited us to submit samples of your l957 Class Rings. The honor carries with it the responsibility to justify your choice-through a class ring that ex- cells in beauty and workmanship . . . that becomes the treasured symbol of ideals, traditions' and pleasant memories. Everything that can be done will be done by Herff Jones to fulfill this responsibility in the ring it proudly fashions for you. Eleven of the past fourteen classes have chosen Herff Jones Rings. ---- HERFF JONES COMPANY World's Largest Manufacturer of Class Rings EASTERN DIVISION: 57l Broad Street, Newark 2, New Jersey .QQy.ZivdalAm,fKcmbcf .2 -5 lx ' Run- ' J -.Q ii- fx t url- r-on wwf f - 1 a ft-ff - -WL-fs 'A eg l qg , hwmi X C531-IE QERSQNAL ERVICE . . . . . which We render is absolutely necessary for the proper execution of Ene publications. 0 gbublishers of. . . . . . The Pointer, The Mortar, Ducrot Pepys, Association of G1'ac1uates Assembly, Pointer Calen Jar, WECIS-Bild Pointer, Htnlxflrerltlx Night Pro- SFHIHS, ZIIICI West POiI1t Class Year Boolxs. Cphone 1200 50 'Z5'hir0 Qstreet :-: ,9VewlJurgh, .QV CY M" II W0 up I 1 ST in fl: 1' ' 1 '- e 5,0 lu """ f igb iff? ' WHL! ight, A , I -- II N EQ.-Q if W XX if 1- -N 1 Q eg:?5! 5.3 N S :WL mXwwl X la ur--.Et X x X5 N t ttfc 1nirsgoiuisxinininioi WEST POINT MOTEL COMPLETELY MODERN Five Miles North of Bear Mountain Bridge Telephone-Highland Falls 6-8 I 26 Mr. 81 Mrs. Mellis, Proprietors 361 SOUTH MAIN STREET HIGHLAND FALLS, N. Y. BEST WISHES FROM THE MllNUFlIOTURER'S OUTLET W0 Supplier of civilian clothing to the Corps for many years. A background of sincere service to Cadets assures you of satisfaction. Visit our conven- iently located salesroom in Newburgh. The Manufacturer's Outlet, Inc. CORNER BROADWAY AND ROUTE 9-W One Flight Up Over Packard Agency :fig s Q 5 5 Q i g Q, 'V si-:wb WEST POINT TQXI SCFVICC BOSCH'S GARAGE A. Boscri s. soN, mc. BUICK SERVICE GENERAL REPAIRING AND SUPPLIES 8 Main Street, Highland Falls, N. Y. Telephones: Highland Falls 4520 and 4588 FIRST NATIONAL BANK HIGHLAND FALLS, N. Y. czghe 'Bazrzk f7Veares1f CIQUQSL Quint ir DIRECTORS Earl l-l. Dlaik Brig. General Harry VV. Crandall Brig. General C. L. Fenton, Retd Abraham Kopald Theodore Michel George S. Nichols Hayden W. Wagner Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporatio GC CHEVROLET FORT MONTGOMERY, N. Y. TELEPHONES: HIGHLAND FALLS 6-2980 and 6-2981 CADET MOTOR COURT CORNWALL, N. Y. HIGHWAY 9-W 8 MILES FROM WEST PoiN1' MODERN HEATED ROOMS PRIVATE SHOWERS OWNERS MR. 8. MRS. DON SABIA Telephone 3-4595 U. S. HOTEL THIIYER OPEN TO THE PUBLIC O ls conveniently located on the U.S.M.A. reservation and easily accessible to all the points of historical interest in the vicinity. The Hotel Thayer offers the finest in hotel, restaurant and banquet facilities. JOHN H. PETTIT, Manager


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United States Military Academy Camp Buckner - Mortar Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 23

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United States Military Academy Camp Buckner - Mortar Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 15

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1957, pg 38

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