United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY)

 - Class of 1965

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United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 620 of the 1965 volume:

THE SOLDIER J I WE are the heirs of a noble tradition, extending through all the ages of man . . . the tradition of THE SOLDIER Ever since man first stood in battle, tasting the triumph of victory or the bitterness of defeat, great military leaders have demonstrated their ENDURANCE COURAGE and INITIATIVE 1 Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.)-Heir to the throne of Macedon at the age of twenty, he inherited an arnny superior to any the world had ever seen. Acknowl- to a science, he dedicated himself to carrying on the ambitions of his father, Philip, in the conquest of Persia and the Hellenizing of all of Asia. The dominant figure in the world of his time, he is depicted here in the remaif The Battle of Alexander, The sculpture is by Lysippus Museum Capitolino, Rome, Italy. They have conquered worlds, Gaius Julius Caesar (100-44 B.C.)-Of patrician birth and training. Julius Caesar was piimarily a statesman but became one of tine outstanding military figures of ancient times through his decisive victories in the Gallic campaigns, wherein his loyal Roman legions scored a continuous triumph against overwhelming obstacles He is shown in a painting, Caesar Crossing the Rubicon, His bust is at the National Museum, Naples. Italy. created empires and amassed treasures. They have shown FLEXIBILITY in their strategy, DECISIVENESS in their thinking and the qualities of V ISDOM and STATESMANSHIP in their actions. They have fought for many causes, some glorious, others mercenary. Those who fought fired by PATRIOTISM inspired eternal values for their country and the world. George Washington (1732. 1799)- Born in Virg nia, this great American named Com Tiander in Chief of th e Continenta Army by Cong ess in 17 the ragged evoluti nary forces f rom his forti led stronghold at West F the central figure e victory ar d first Preside nt of the States of A Tierica. He IS depict ed in a pair ting by Alonzo Chappel Rallymg His Trooos , Battle of P inceton. The bust is a plas er cast o study in 1785 by J ean Antoine Houdon, Was hington, D.C. They have brought their personal TALENT their INTELLECT their individual VISION and wrought new destinies in their time and for all time to come. Napoleon Bonaparte (17691821)— This brilliant, enigmatic, Corsican-born French general, was crowned Emperor of the French and ruled as Napoleon I from 1804-1815. Though he died in lonely exile from the land he once ruled, his per- sonal dreams of glory were crystallized in the creation of the vast and powerful organization which remain in France today. He is shown here in a painting. Napoleon During The Battle of Wagrom, 1809, Defeating the Austrians, painted by Horace Vernet. The bronze bust is at the French Institute in New York City. The great captains of history the regrettable legacy of Pledged to more important they shared a common have handed down violent death, inseparable from war. values than life, DEVOTION to that which is greater than self. The past laid our FOUND AT: as ancient as man. On it rose these walls, grey and stern, somber stone boundaries of the new united states mili v- ARY ACADEMY ■PMP . ' ■M s m 1 : .- iMwBKmPm unBl ' ' ' wBmJBki ■■ MI1I.III MJJHK|[ H9Htak|| ,,iw- ' ' k 1 ' : . flfM The stones were rugged, harsh and cruel in contour: their strength lent STRENGT " Their ageless patterns, sharply etched by time, underscored the excitement of the present with the dignity and wisdom of a timeless past. Inheritors of the role of leadership, WE.l share VALUES and IDEALS w zr to generation, so that together in 04 J £ POINT ' s graduates, the famed and the unknown, ave provided a link from generation history, they have acted as one . . . Today we are their heirs, building within these walls a continuance of two traditions: the AGELESS HERITAGE of the military profession and the CHERISHED PRINCIIPLES of the Long Grey Line which has preceded us here. ) ' t ' 1 1 ' liss. ■ 1 ii I mil 7 1 k 1 r 1 1 T ifi n Hli Hu 11 Ik. ' H I l H " l H ' |MgHMMfl| 1 ■HMij J Nc IHnK ' ' V " S T iBbE ' V , S| - ■ " . ' P ' tj Creating within ourselves the knowledge, self discipline, high purpose and moral strength that will guide us and future generations, we come into our inheritance, capable of serving those words chiselled for us in history and carved into the familiar walls which have surrounded us: DUTY HONOR COUNTRY f- ' i dsmkM Smts® L The class oj a 965 presents THE ANNUAI V J -l -liv.. v -. m nm Veil E.J r 1 Ji II 3F THE CORPS OIF CADETS UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADE WEST POINT, NEW YORK MY LYNDON B. JOHNSON PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 1f 4 1 " ! HONORABLE ROBERT S. McNAMARA SECRETARY OF DEFENSE HONORABLE STEPHEN AILES SECRETARY OF THE ARMY M GENERAL EARLE G. WHEELER CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF GENERAL HAROLD K. JOHNSON CHIEF OF STAFF OF THE ARMY IN MEMORIAM THE CORPS OF CADETS SALUTES THE REVEREND THEODORE CUYLER SPEERS, D.D. CHAPLAIN, UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY 1959-1964 " It was noised abroad that Mr. Valiant-for-Truth was taken with a summons . . . Then said he, 7 am going to my Father s; and though with great diffi- culty I am got hither, yet now do I not repent me of the trouble I have been at to arrive where I am. My sword I give to him that shall succeed me in my pilgrimage, and my courage and skill to him that can get it. My marks and scars I carry with me to be a witness for me that I have fought His battles Who now shall be my rewarder . . . So he passed over, and all the trumpets sounded for him on the other side. " Pilgrim ' s Progress — John Bunyan :| 1965 HOWITZER STAFF CHARLES M. ARON Editor-in-Chief RICHARD A. HENNIG Assistant Editor FREDERICK J. CHARLES Associate Editor LEE EDWARD KLEINMAIER, JR. Associate Editor JOHN M. HOWELL Business Manager JOHN K. SWENSSON Advertising Manager WILLIAM J. BRADBURN Asst. Advertising Manager CHARLES R. ECKART STEVEN CLARK HARMAN, JR. Circulation Managers WILLIAM T. HELLER Photography Editor HOWITZER Staff Members: Jon C. Shuler, James D. Horton, Thomas J. Waraksa, L. Jerry Hansen, Dave Car- raway, William Flowers, Herbert Smith, Doctor R. Crants, Fred Laughlin, Robert F. Berdan, Thomas Jackson, Mel Liss, Douglas Lawson, Peyton Ligon, Frank Robinson, Buz Altshuler, Thomas McLaughlin, Rich Scaglione, Jack Norris, John Hoskin. CONTENTS ACADEMICS AND ADMINISTRATION 33 FIRST CLASS 65 CLASS HISTORY 273 THE CORPS 337 SPORTS 391 ACTIVITIES 457 ADVERTISEMENTS 497 ■mf If jt ■■ M . ■S: JiM ? - i ' AV «v. x cvr %h y 1 . K1 s l . ' i i iom ' - ' i ! ' R ! X- I. kX " :. ' fcW.. NE GRIGSBY ( c ?: ' J 7¥ ' 77 7 «: O M o On 28 June 1963, Major General James Benjamin Lampert. U.S.A.. became the 46th Superintendent of the United States Military Academy, in a line that has in- cluded such men as Sylvanus Thayer, Robert E. Lee, Douglas MacArthur and Maxwell D. Taylor. Born on 16 April 1914 in Washi ngton, D.C., General Lampert spent his boyhood in Wisconsin where he moved with his mother following the death of his father, Lt. Col. James G. B. Lampert, USMA 1910, in January 1919 while serving with the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe. Upon graduation from public high school. General Lampert entered the United States Military Academy, where he was on the Board of Governors of the 1st Class Club, a fencer, a POINTER editor and a member of the Choir, graduating 36th out of 276 with the Class of 1936. Commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Field Artillery, he transferred that same year to his father ' s old branch, the Corps of Engineers. Following ini- tial assignments and duties, one of which was to marry Margery Mitchell in June of 1937, Lieutenant Lampert entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, re- ceiving a M.S. degree in Civil Engineering in 1939. Now as a First Lieutenant, he was assigned to Fort Belvoir, Virginia, where he graduated from Engineer School, Regu- lar Course, in 1940. With the advent of World War II, General Lampert, now a Major, was sent in June 1942 to the South Pacific as Battalion Commander of an Engineer aviation battalion in the Fiji Islands. After being transferred to Bougainville. Solomon Islands, in January of 1944 he was switched to the XIV Corps and it was as Corps Engineer that he partici- pated in the invasion of Luzon, Philippine Islands and the subsequent liberation of Manila in March 1945. Following the war. General Lampert served in both the Philippines and Japan before returning to the United States in March of 1946 to assume the post of Executive Officer to Lieutenant General Leslie R. Groves, Chief of the Manhattan Project (the atomic bomb project) and then to assist in the formation of the Armed Forces Spe- cial Weapons Project in 1947 which co-ordinated the military applications of atomic energy. From 1949 until 1962 General Lampert served in various posts to include a study of the water resources of the Southwestern United States, a study which later became the basis for large scale development of these resources in that area. THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY Returning to the field of atomic energy in September of 1952, General Lampert functioned as Officer-in-Charge of the joint Army-A.E.C. Nuclear Power Program which studied the application of nuclear power plants to military needs. It was in this capacity that General Lampert di- rected the establishment of the first atomic power plant for military use at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Leaving Fort Belvoir in 1957, General Lampert at- tended the National War College, and was subsequently assigned to Saigon, Republic of Vietnam, where, upon his promotion to Brigadier General, he became Deputy C hief for Logistics for the military advisory group. In December I960, General Lampert returned to Washing- ton. D.C. to become Director of Military Construction of the Office of the Chief of Engineers, a post he held until his present assignment to the Military Academy. Among the General ' s citations and decorations are the Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, Legion of Merit. Bronze Star, and the Army Commendation Medal. MAJOR GENERAL JAMES BENJAMIN LAMPERT General Davison graduated from the USMA with the class of 1939. He took his commission in the cavalary. By 1942, he was a Major, serving as G-2 for the 90th Motorized Division. General Davison was next assigned to the Operations Division, War Department General Staff, in the Pentagon. In April 1943, he joined the 45th Infantry Division as Assistant G-2 and was sent to North Africa. He was with the 45th Division in the Sicilian campaign, the land- ings at Salerno and Anzio, and the later fighting in Italy. In March 1944, while at Anzio, General Davison was named Commander of the 1st Battalion, 179th Infantry. With his battalion, he later took part in the successful Allied invasion of Southern France in August, 1944, by which time he had attained the rank of Lt. Colonel. In November 1944, he joined Headquarters VI Corps and served as acting G-3, as G-2, and finally as G-3 of the Corps. Shortly after the war, he was promoted to Colonel. After World War II, General Davison attended the Command and General Staff College, and was then as- signed to Army Ground Forces Headquarters at Ft. Mon- roe, Va. In January 1948, he was named Senior Instructor of the Army Reserve in Puerto Rico. After this, he was given command of the 18th Mechanized Cavalary Recon- naissance Squadron from July 1948 to May 1950. At this point, he became a graduate student at Harvard University, and received his Masters Degree in June 1951. He then was assigned as Assistant Chief, Plans and Policy Office, in the Office of Chief of Legislative Liason, and subsequently, as a staff officer in the Office of the Army Chief of Staff. General Davison returned to West Point in June 1954 as Commander of the 1st Regiment, USCC, until June 1957. After a year at the National War College, he was again assigned to the Pentagon as Chief, Combat Material Division in the Office of Chief of Research and Development. After a year as Senior US Representative, US Army Standardization Group in London, General Davison assumed command of the 3rd Armored Division ' s Combat Command A. He was named V Corps Chief of Staff in June 1962, following promotion to Brigadier General, and remained in that capacity until called to West Point as Commandant in March 1963. THE COMMANDANT OF CADETS Among his many awards are the Silver Star, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star with V and Oak Leaf Cluster, the Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, and the French Croix de Guerre with two gold stars. As Commandant, General Davison will long be remembered as the embodiment of a fighting man. No cadet present at his stirring messages in the fall of 1964, could forget the " Spirit of Philadelphia " which climaxed in the long sought victory over Navy. It was only fitting that a man of " Big Mike ' s " stature should remind the Corps what it meant to be " Regular. " When the name of General Davison is mentioned, he will always be paid the supreme accolade, " He is a Regular, by God. " In January 1965, General Davison reached another milestone in his career when he was nominated for pro- motion to Major General. BRIGADIER GENERAL MICHAEL S. DAVISON Richard P. Scott was born in Buffalo. New York, 27 September 1917. He was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1941 and commissioned in the Cavalry. Prior to World War II he served in the Second Cavalry Regiment at Fort Riley, Kansas, and attended the Cavalry School. In July 1942, he was assigned to the 90th Cavalry Recon- naissance Squadron, 1 0th Armored Division. Serving as a Troop Commander, S-3, and then as Squadron Commander, he participated in the 10th Armored Division ' s three cam- paigns in Europe. Upon redeployment of the Division to the United States in September 1945, he remained in Europe and was assigned to the G3 Section, Third Army. From February 1947 to November 1947 he served as Engineer Real Estate Officer, Vienna Area Command. Returning to the United States in December 1947, he was assigned to the Logistics Division, Department of the Army. In June 1949 he was ordered to the United States Military Academy where he served consecutively as instructor. Executive Officer, and Assistant Professor in the Department of English. During this period, he completed his MA degree at Columbia University. In September 1952 he returned to Europe and until December 195.3 was assigned to the G4 Section, Headquarters USAREUR. In December 1953, he assumed command of the Second Battalion. 6th Armored Cavalry, at Landshut, Germany. In December 1955 he returned to the United States and attended the Armed Forces Staff College. Upon completion of the course in July 1956, he became Chief, Personnel Actions and Education, Armor Branch, Career Management Division. In August 1957 he was reassigned to the Office of the Chief of Staff, where until July 1959 he served as an Assist- ant Secretary of the General Staff and Executive to the Vice Chief of Staff. This tour was followed by attendance at the National War College, until June I960. His next assignment was Deputy Chief of Staff, Opera- tions, MAAG Vietnam. Upon completion of this tour in September 1961, he was assigned to Headquarters USARPAC as Chief, Plans and Operations Division, G4. Promoted to Brigadier General in April 1963, he was ordered to Korea where he served as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4, Eighth U.S. Army until reassigned to West Point in April 1965, as Commandant of Cadets. General Scott has been awarded the Silver Star, the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Army Commenda- tion Medal and the Purple Heart, THE COMMANDANT OF CADETS BRIGADIER GENERAL RICHARD P. SCOTT j»-afSSfi At the same time that we of the Class of 1965 gradu- ate from the Military Academy, the Dean, General Willliam Weston Bessell, will also " graduate " for the sec- ond time. His 45 years of commissioned service to his country will come to a close on 31 May 1965. His USMA class, the Class of 1920, will be celebrating its 45th Re- union during the graduation June Week of the Class of 1965. This, then, is our salute to General Bessell. General Bessell has been the Dean for the past 6 years. He was largely responsible for the " Modified Cur- riculum " which ' 64 and we of ' 65 have been privileged to follow. It is hard for us to realize that prior classes had no Advanced Studies Program nor Electives from which to choose. Prior to being appointed the Dean, General Bessell served for 1 2 years as Professor and Head of the Depart- ment of Mathematics. ]t was in the latter part of this period that the " new Mathematics " came into being and changes to USMA courses began to be initiated to profit from these modernizations. General Bessell came to the Academy in 1947 from his position as Commanding General of the Antilles De- partment, with headquarters at his birthplace, San Juan, Puerto Rico. The outbreak of World War II found Gen- eral Bessell, then a Major, at the Pentagon as the Military Personnel Officer for the Corps of Engineers. He was awarded the Army Commendation Ribbon for his crash program which, among other things, raised the strength of the Corps of Engineers from 800 officers to 22,000 and enlisted men from 10,000 to 311,000. General Bessell later served at the Military Command Post of World War II, the Operations Division, where he assisted in the establishment of the Joint War Plans Committee of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and became its wartime Army Director. In this capacity he attended the Allied Staff Conferences in Washington, Quebec, Cairo, Malta and Yalta. For his various wartime services. Gen- eral Bessell was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, and an Oak Leaf Cluster to his Army Commendation Ribbon. In addition, he was awarded DEAN OF THE ACADEMIC BOARD the Order of the British Army for his planning work with the British staff. Prior to the war. General Bessell served an interest- ing, many faceted career as an Engineer officer, encom- passing both military and civil engineering projects. For his services under General Pershing with the American Battle Monuments Commission in Paris in 1936-39, he was awarded the French Legion d ' Honneur by Marshal Petain. General Bessell stood 6 in the Class of 1920 at the Military Academy. In 1922 he was graduated from Rensselaer PoUtechnic Institute with the degree of Civil Engineer, standing first in his class there. In 1960, Rens- selaer Polytechnic Institute honored General Bessell for his long and distinguished career in engineering and education by awarding him the degree of Doctor of Engineering. During the past 45 years General Bessell has served his country faithfully and unselfishly, living up to the rich traditions of the graduates of the United States Military Academy. We of the Class of 1965 are proud to have Gen- eral Bessell graduate with us and to offer him this salute. BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM WESTON BESSELL Seated. L to R: Colonel Charles P. Nicholas. Professor and Head of Department of Mathematics; Brigadier General William W. Bessell, Jr., Dean of the Academic Board; Major General James B. Lampert, Superintendent; Brigadier General Michael S. Davi- son. Commandant of Cadets; Colonel Elvin R. Heiberg, Professor and Head of Department of Mechanics. Second Row. L to R. Colonel Charles R. Broshous, Professor and Head of Department of Earth, Space Graphic Sciences; Colonel Amos A. Jordan. Professor and Acting Head of Depart- ment of Social Sciences; Colonel John R. Jannarone. Professor and Head of Department of Physics Chemistry; Colonel Russell K. Alspach, Professor and Head of Department of English; Colo- nel Walter J. Renfroe, Professor and Head of Department of Foreign Languages; Colonel Charles H. Schilling, Professor and Head of Department of Military Art Engineering. Third Ron-. L to R: Colonel John D. Billingsley, Professor and Head of Department of Ordnance; Colonel Frederick C. Lough. Professor and Head of Department of Law; Colonel John H. Voegtly. Surgeon; Colonel Elliott C. Cutler. Jr.. Professor and Head of Department of Electricity; Lt. Colonel George A. Gar- man. Jr., Acting Director of Admissions and Registrar. THE ACADEMIC BOARD THE SUPERINTENDENT ' S STAFF ' «€4 n J Front Row. L to R: Col. R. S. Crandall. Col. R. P. Murphy, Col. C. R. Broshous, Col. J. H. Robinson. Col. E. P. Lasche, Maj. Gen. J. B. Lampert, Col. K. T. Sawyer, Col. J. C. Cross. Col. J. H. Voegtly, Col. T. M. Metz, Col. P. W. Holter. Right Rev. Msgr. J. P. Moore. Second Row: Lt. Col. J. F. Rocan. Lt. Col. W. H. Schempf. Lt. Col. W C. Malkemes. Lt. Col. J .W. Losch. Col. D. L. Geer. Col. R. C. Borman. Col. D. E. Wilbourn. Lt. Col. A. G. Vitacco, Lt. Col. J. H. Le Page. Lt. Col. W. N. Todd. Mr. E. A. Weiss. Lt. Col. W. H. Webb. Third Row. Maj. E. A. Raynis, Rev. Father R. F. McCormick. Lt. Col. J. E. Mclntire, Lt. Col. W. J. Hodges. Lt. Col. R. E. Kren. Mr. F. P. Todd, Lt. Col. J. Mittlestadt. Lt. Col. G. A. Garman. Maj .H .H. Madi- son, Jr.. Maj. C. J. Heyer, Maj. P. H. Brooks. Fourth Row. Mr. E. W. Amick, Capt. G. E. Galloway. Capt. O. C. Schlinke. Maj. R. A. Carlone, Maj. E. B. Covington III, Maj. M. J. Del Santo, Capt. F. W. Matthews, Capt. A. G. Burbank. SEC F. J. Haase. _4 - f )UTY HONOR COUNTRY : . r THE COMMANDANT ' S STAFF Sealed, L to R: Maj. Maxwell R. Thurman; Maj. Richard L. Hunt; Colonel Robert M. Tar- box; Brigadier General Michael S. Davison; Lt. Col. A. M. Foote; Maj. Thomas U. Harrold. Standiiii;: CWO Roman A. Smith; Capt. R. L. Hargrove; Capt. R. P. Hoy; Maj. Richard C. Breakiron; Maj. L. J. Flanagan; Lt. Glen A. Blumhardt. THE DEAN ' S STAFF Sealed, L to R: Lt. Colonel Dallas L. Knoll. Jr., Associate Dean; Brigadier General William W. Bessel. Jr., Dean of the Academic Board; Lt. Colonel John W. Mastin, Permanent Assoc- ciate Professor. Assistant to the Dean. Second Row. L to R. Captain Frederick J. McConville, Assistant Professor, Assistant to the Dean; Major Arthur H. Blair, Associate Professor, Assistant to the Dean; Major Charles M. Adams, Associate Professor, Assistant to the Dean; Captain Charles H. Cooper, Assis- tant Professor, Assistant to the Dean. FIRST REGIMENT COLONEL G. K. MAERTENS COMMANDING OFFICER STAFF, HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT L !o R: Lt. Colonel Dale J. Crittenberger (XO), Colonel Georce K. Maertens (CO). Major Charles S. Stodter (S-l). TACTICAL OFFICERS, HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT From Raw. L to R. Major Fletcher K. Ware (I-l), Captain Thomas G. Weaver. (M-l), Major Flovd C. Adams. Jr. (D-1), Captain Michael S. Sirk ' is (C-1), Major Wilbur A. Ross (A-1), Cap- tain William H.Wilcox (B-l). Back Row: Major Hal B. Rhyne (G-1), Captain Billv J. Chance (E-1). Major Robert E. Glasgow (K- ' l), Captain Wendell H. Gilbert (F-l), Major Robert G. Yerks. (H-1), Captain Irving A. Beau- champ, Jr. (L-I ). SECOND REGIMENT COLONEL A. L. HAMBLEN, Jr. COMMANDING OFFICER STAFF HEADQUARTERS SECOND REGIMENT Lett lo riahv. Lt. Colonel H. S. Long. Jr. (XO), Colonel A. L. Hamblen. Jr. (CO), Major R. C. Turner, SI. TACTICAL OFFICERS HEADQUARTERS SECOND REGIMENT From Row. left lo risiht: Major W. H. Ritter (C-2), Major C. S. Meek (G-2), Major R. A. Cheney (K-2). Back Row: Captain P. W. Lash (E-2), Major E. E. Fuller (A-2), Captain W. L, Weihl (F-2), Captain G. D. Waters (L-2), Cap- tain T. L. Mullan, Jr. (D-2), Major J. G. Whitted (H-2), Major D. S. Rickard (M-2), Captain C. F. Bliss 111 (1-2), Lieutenant F. H. Ingram, USN. (B-2). i ia H ra o sefiSSr Ma a r i i ■ ' ' ' 1 i Office of MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY and LEADERSHIP We first encountered this Department long ago — our climb over the long grey wall. Most of the Class of ' 65 have very few memories of Yearling Psych. The course itself wasn ' t as much to blame as was the schedule. The first class after dinner is usually a total loss, and Psychology was no excep- tion. However, since part of the course was about subliminal perception and teaching the subconscious, perhaps we retained more than it seems. We at least got some practical applica- tion in the art of sleep teaching. Our second encounter with MP L was under much more favorable circumstances. We had just returned to bear the brunt of the Academic Year and had discovered that the Tactical Department really gave us credit for some maturity. Our new First Class Privileges were almost as comprehensive as those of a Second classman at the Air Force Academy. Of course, with these new Privileges went the duty to perform even more diligently, so we really applied ourselves in Leader- ship. Some of us were confused and fell back to the tried and true methods of Yearling Year. Others felt bound by tradi- tion to uphold the age-old nickname for the course — Leader- sleep. As for the remainder, not a one of them was found. Z ' First Row, L to R: Captain Richard C. Baughman, Major Dandridge M. Malone. Major William J. Livsey. Jr.. Lt. Col. Harry A. Buckley. Colonel Aiiburon P. Hauser, Lt. Colonel Roger W. Little. Major John R. Jennings. Major William N. Thomas. Captain Robert F. Anthis. Second Row. Captain Jerome H. Anderson. Major William C. Maus, Captain Ernest B. Wilson. Captain Irvin G. Katenbrink. Captain James P. Bergen. Captain Charles R. Russell, Captain Shapleigh M. DrisKo. Fir.ll Row, L to R: Major J. J. Coghlan. Jr.. Lt. Col. M. J. Hanna, Lt. Col. W. J. Schuder, Col. W. J. Ray, Lt. Col. C. K. Nulsen, Jr., Major F. J. Sheriff. Major J. G. Donahue. Second Row: Major W. C. Stinson, Jr., Capt. R. L. Salvador, Capt. P. N. Walker, Capt. H. F. Stone, Capt. J. W. Foss, Major C. J. Fiala. Third Row: Major F. Zimolzak, Major C. Alderman. Jr., Capt. J. W. Nicholson, Major J. T. Griffin, Jr., Capt. E. E. Cross. The change from carefree civilian to responsible officer is difficult indeed, and our success in the transition is pri- marily due to that hardy band of professionals in the Office of Military Instruction. The mysteries of strategy and tactics unfolded before the not-always-too-wide-open eyes of ' 65 as OMI introduced us to the Combined Arms Team, Battallion in The Attack, Mod- ern Warfare Techniques, and myriad other concepts. Under OMI direction we successfully completed such memorable classroom maneuvers as the " Bode River Crossing, " and the " Attack of Hill 503. " We soon learned that the approved solution to military problems is not always, " Hit. ' em with a nuc! " OMI also gave us practical training in the Combat Arms. We enjoyed instruction in Infantry ( " Growl when you say that. Mister! " ); Armor ( " Driver right, dammit! " ); Artillery ( " Now pull the string Mr. Furd, and it will go ' BANG ' " ); and Signal ( " I authenticate Erudite Elephant, over. " ). For our military skills we are indebted to OMI. Office of MILITARY INSTRUCTION COLONEL FRANK J. KOBES Professor and Director of Physical Education Office of PHYSICAL EDUCATION Front Row, L to R: Mr. Joseph M. Palone, Lt. Ronald V. Pifer, Captain Andrew F. Underwood, Mr. Thomas E. Maloney, Cap- tain Edward L. Trohaugh, Mr. Herbert J. Kroeten, Captain Richard G. Cardillo. Captain Gerald E. Van Valkenburg, Mr. John B. Kress, Mr. Ray S. Baggett, Dr. Lloyd O. Appleton. Back Row. Captain Fred S. Lindsev, Mr. George W. Linck, Mr. LeRoy A. Alitz, Major Earl L. Keesling, Dr. Alfred C. Wer- ner, Col. F. J. Kohes, Jr., Major Joseph P. Perlow, Mr. Robert E. Sorge, Mr. William F. Lewis, Lt. Col. Tliomas A. Ware, Jr. Captain Jarold L. Hutchison. In an environment saturated with meaningful initials, none generate such instant response in a cadet as those of OPE. In miraculous fashion OPE takes an input of 98 lb. weaklings and in a mere four years produces muscular, sand-kicking athletes. The instruction offered by OPE ranges from the Manly Art to the subtler skills of ballroom dancing. The joys of contact sports are denied to no one. Intramurals and the semi-annual testing program produce grim testimony to our continuing physical prowess. As junior officers we will be well versed in wrestling, boxing, gymnastics, swimming, golf, tennis, squash, hand, basket, and volley ball: as well as the Fox Trot. All this because of the training of the Office of Physical Education. What can we say? ACADEMIC COMPUTER CENTER The tenure of ' 65 at the Military Academy saw the introduction of the electrographic pencil as a companion to the slide rule and Hudson ' s Manual. Deep in the bowels of Thayer Hall, in what appears to be a showroom for GE and IBM products, looms a light blinking, paper- devouring, oversized adding machine, which the academic depart- ments call the Academic Computer Center. Amid the flashing lights of the Center a Cadet could peacefully (?) solve a math problem, which the Department of Mathematics was happy to provide, or com- pute the odds for the next weekend ' s football games. With the introduction of the Computer Center, we bridged the gap between everyday math and science and entered a super-sophisti- cated world, in which we will be living. The officer-instructors of the Academic Computer Center soon made us realize that we could and would control the giant General Electric Computer System. Some of us became expert in the use of this important analysis tool, and all of us learned its importance to military science and technology. MAJOR WILLIAM F. LUEBBERT Director of Computer Center ' right: Captain Frank E. O ' Brien, Major Harry W. Lombard, Major William F. Luebbert, Top Right: Major Harold C. Hannaway, Far Right: Major Herbert C. Hollander. EARTH, SPACE AND GRAPHIC SCIENCE :OLONEL CHARLES R. BROSHOUS Professor and Head of Department ' ,V High atop the Mess Hall, nestled among the clouds and sprinkled with the seat of a six story climb, lies the happy world of Colonel Broshous and those who sought to make Plebe life more enjoyable. How can we forget the frantic panic caused by a broken pencil on the 60 minute bout with advancing eyelids. Mornings we spent daily drawing by numbers, con- tented by the fact that we would never stagger desks. Here as a side light we learned to play engineer as well as draw our own maps. In the afternoons we endeavored to follow explanations of why stars twinkle, how the earth was made, and who lives where. Although the 37 pound books, the 6 flights of the world ' s steepest stairs, and the 5 minute dash after dinner made the E.S. G.S. course sometimes a physical effort, it remains the most unique and one of the most enjoyable departments of our first year. COLONEL WILLIAM W. WATKINS, Jr. Professor Firsl Row, L to R: Lt. Col. R. H. Hammond. Lt. Col. W. B. Rogers, Lt. Col. W. C. Smith, Col. C. R. Broshous. Col. W. W. Watkin, Jr., Lt. Col. R. E. Clark. Maj. A. L. Erickson. Second Row: Maj. I. G. Kinne, Jr., Maj. A. C. Biggerstaff, Maj. W. M. Jewell, Jr.. Capt. C. M. Minich. Capt. J. L. Abel. Capt. D. F. Svendsen, Capt. E. M. Moses. Maj. R. J. Miller. Third Ron: Capt. E. G. Stauch. Capt. J. C. Shirey, Capt. E. S. Diez. Capt. W. B. Streett, Capt. J. G. McCormack, Capt. J. E. Drummond, Capt. R. B. Chapman. Fourih Row: Capt. N. E. Vinson, Maj. E. J. OBrien, Capt. R. H. Julian, Maj. G. A. McClellan, Capt. R. V. Perkins, Capt. H. J. Hatch. Fifth Row: Capt. P. D. Booras. Capt. M. G. Swindler, Capt. F. B. Phillips, Capt. J. R. Jenkins, Capt. J. L. Ballantyne, 111, Capt. D. A. Andrews, Capt. R. W. : V J?rt, ! - 9 VMir:»ViSS wm i WP First Ron, L lo R: Maj. H. C. FiU, Jr., Maj. E. E. Emerson, Jr.. Lt. Col. W. T. Lincoln. Lt. Col. E. A. Saunders, Col. E. C. Cutler, Lt. Col. W. W. Chandler, Maj. W. F. Reilly, Maj. E. D. Frankhouser, Maj. R. L. Alexander. Second Row: Capt. R. L. LaFrenz, Capt. R. G. Caldwell, Capt. D. P. Whalen, Capt. A. B. Salisbury, Capt. B. C. Giallourakis, Capt. J. E. Rudzki, Capt. D. 1. Newnham, Capt. . 1. 1. Kovel. Tlunl Ron: Capt. J. F. Passafiume, Capt. F. L. Day, Capt. R. T. Goodwyn, III, Capt. R. W. Cell. Capt. E. M. Mayson, Capt. T. G. Adcock, Capt. D. L. Smith. Fourth Row: Capt. G. L. Breeding, Maj. L. S. Zim- ELECTRICITY And then came the light, but the problem was how. The Department of Electricty knows the secret and they were willing to share it with us and we were willing to learn, yet somewhere in this teacher-student circuit a huge capacitor stored the flow of knowledge. We sat believing what we saw, but we were never sure that the man in green wasn ' t the Wizard of Oz. When we weren ' t playing with bulbs and plugs. Col. Cutler had us playing with neutrons and pions and other funny little things that nobody has ever seen — still we believed. Eventually the fog began to lift, clearing up certain things and some of the words began to sink in. How many of the First Class wouldn ' t have had television, if it weren ' t for Col. Cutler? So we left the land Electricity assured that the bush had bloomed. COLONEL ELLIOTT C. CUTLER Professor and Head of Department LT. COLONEL EDWARD A. SAUNDERS Professor I I I , ! i First Rou L to R: Maj. W. A. Holt, Maj. J. A. Hettinger, Jr., Maj. J. R. Galvin, Lt. Col. W. C. Burton, Col. R. K. Alspach, Col. E. V. Sutherland, Lt. Col. G. W. Tracy, Lt. Col. J. L. Capps, Maj. W. C. Cousland. Second Row: Maj. A. A. Arduna, Capt. J. T. Munsey, Capt. S. W. Focer, Jr., Capt. E. J. Cutler, Maj. J. H. Cooper, Capt. M. D. Mahler. Capt. P. W. Child, Jr., Maj. R. R. Sullivan. Third Row: Capt. W. C. Haponski, Capt. D. Martin. Jr., Capt. E. W. Martin, Capt. J. H. Ryan, Capt. N. Terzopoulos, Capt. C. J. Piolunek; Capt. W. Willett. Fourth Row: 1st. Lt. J. L. Tribble, Capt. A. C. Sterling, Jr., Capt. K. A. Barlow. Capt. A. T. Zukowski, Maj. D. H. Rumbough, Maj. J. W. Wensyel. Absent when picture was taken: Maj. J. F. Bart, and Capt. L. S. Sorley, IIL ENGLISH COLONEL RUSSELL K. ALSPACH Professor and Head of Department Until March 1965 " But Sir, I have a 2.8 average, you can ' t turn me out! " Etched somewhere on the walls of the Department of Eng- lish is the sad. but true statement. " You ' re never safe! " When we came to West Point we all knew how to speak English, but we soon learned, " it ain ' t necessarily so. " Within a year we were thoroughly convinced that here at West Point words were spelled differently than back home. Year- ling year the thought of only one semester of English made us read a little more and perhaps enjoy what we had read. Then came the good-bye kiss, last semester First Class year, and English followed us out the door, as a matter of fact most of us will probably be using English a lot every day — maybe it was a pretty good course. COLONEL EDWIN V. SUTHERLAND Professor and Head of Department Since March 1965 FOREIGN LANGUAGES In the beginning was the word and no one understood it. After two years we had learned so many words that no one could speak English anymore. The Department of Foreign Languages sought to make us pass as a native of France. Germany, Spain, Brazil. Portugal and Russia. So we went to Europe confident that we could pass as a native. How often was our perfect German answered by. " What kind of beer do you want? " We studied long and hard and eventually we could re- member some of the many words and idioms. Yet there are still those of us who will ask, " Why, after two years of Span- ish, did I get stationed in France? " COLONEL WALTER J. RENFROE, Jr. Professor and Head of Department LT. COLONEL SUMNER WILLARD Professor Front Row, L to R: Lt. Col. J. J. Portera, Lt. Col. J. C. Martin. Lt. Col. R. E. Lenzner, Lt. Col. S. Moraes-Rego, Maj. H. E. Cartland, Lt. Col. S. Willard. Col. W. J. Renfroe, Jr.. Lt. Col. D. T. Dunne, Maj. H. W. Halterman, Jr., Lt. Col. H. Reiner, Lt. Col. W. C. Thoma, Maj. R. Orlikoff, Maj V. Herrera. Second Ron: Lt. Col. T. J. Stacy, Capt. W. R. Frederick, Maj. E. L. Smith, Maj. J. R. Ross, Capt. R. L. Wheaton, Maj. F. G. Agather, Maj. K. A. Frith, Mr. C. Viollet, Maj. R. D. Vanderslice. Third Row: Mr. F. C. H. Garcia, Capt. J. W. Crancer, Maj. J. E. Moore. Jr., Capt. C. D. Beaumont. Maj. T. A. Austin, IIL Mr. N. Maltzoff, Maj. J. E. O ' Brien, Capt. P. V. DiMauro. Fourth Row: Capt. T. J. Livesay. Maj. C. A. Olsen, Capt. J. R. Henry, Capt. G. A. Richardson, Capt. M. C. Schepps, Jr., Maj. H. J. Vetort, Dr. F. Tiller. Last Row: Capt. H. Heinsoo, Capt. R. Rinker, Capt. P. F. Parks, Capt. J. E. Porter, Capt. C. E. Poole, Jr. vr I 11,11 I II J I i I i_ ■ • • i J ' n First Ron L !o R: Maj. W. A. Holt, Maj. J. A. Hettinger, Jr., Maj. J. R. Galvin, Lt. Col. W. C. Burton, Col. R. K. Alspach, Col. E. V, Sutherland. Lt. Col. G. W. Tracy, Lt. Col. J. L. Capps, Maj. W. C. Cousland. Second Row. Maj. A. A. Arduna, Capt. J. T. Munsey, Capt. S. W. Focer. Jr., Capt. E. J. Cutler, Maj. J. H. Cooper. Capt. M, D. Mahler, Capt. P. W. Child, Jr., Maj. R. R. Sullivan. Third Row: Capt. W. C. Haponski, Capt. D. Martin. Jr.. Capt. E. W. Martin. Capt. J. H. Ryan, Capt. N. Terzopoulos, Capt. C. J. Piolunek; Capt. W. Willett. Foiirlli Row: 1st. Lt. J. L. Tribble. Capt. A. C. Sterling. Jr.. Capt. K. A. Barlow, Capt. A. T. Zukowski, Maj. D. H. Rumbough, Maj. J. W. Wensyel. Absent wlien picture was tal en: Maj. J. F. Bart, and Capt. L. S. Sorley, IIL ENGLISH COLONEL RUSSELL K. ALSPACH Professor and Head of Department Until March 1965 " But Sir. I have a 2.8 average, you can ' t turn me out! " Etched somewhere on the walls of the Department of Eng- lish is the sad. but true statement. " You " re never safe! " When we came to West Point we all knew how to speak English, but we soon learned, " it ain ' t necessarily so. " Within a year we were thoroughly convinced that here at West Point words were spelled differently than back home. Year- ling year the thought of only one semester of English made us read a little more and perhaps enjoy what we had read. Then came the good-bye kiss, last semester First Class year, and English followed us out the door, as a matter of fact most of us will probably be using English a lot every day — maybe it was a pretty good course. COLONEL EDWIN V. SUTHERLAND Professor and Head of Department Since March 1965 FOREIGN LANGUAGES In the beginning was the word and no one understood it. After two years we had learned so many words that no one could speak English anymore. The Department of Foreign Languages sought to make us pass as a native of France, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Portugal and Russia. So we went to Europe confident that we could pass as a native. How often was our perfect German answered by, " What kind of beer do you want? " We studied long and hard and eventually we could re- member some of the many words and idioms. Yet there are still those of us who will ask, " Why, after two years of Span- ish, did I get stationed in France? " COLONEL WALTER J. RENFROE, J Professor and Head of Department LT. COLONEL SUMNER WILLARD Professor From Row, L to R: Lt. Col. J. J. Portera, Lt. Col. J. C. Martin, Lt. Col. R. E. Lenzner, Lt. Col. S. Moraes-Rego, Maj. H. E. Cartland, Lt. Col. S. Willard, Col. W. J. Renfroe, Jr., Lt. Col. D. T. Dunne, Maj. H. W. Halterman, Jr.. Lt. Col. H. Reiner. Lt. Col. W. C. Thoma, Maj. R. Orlikoff, Maj V. Herrera. Second Row: Lt. Col. T. J. Stacy, Capl. W. R. Frederick, Maj. E. L. Smith, Maj. J. R. Ross, Capt. R. L. Wheaton, Maj. F. G. Asather, Maj. K. A. Frith, Mr. C. Viollet, Maj. R. D. Vanderslice. Third Row: Mr. F. C. H. Garcia, Capt. J. W. Crancer, Maj. J. E. Moore, Jr., Capt. C. D. Beaumont, Maj. T. A. Austin, IIL Mr. N. Maltzoff, Maj. J. E. O ' Brien, Capt. P. V. DiMauro. Fourth Row: Capt. T. J. Livesay, Maj. C. A. Olsen, Capt. J. R. Henry, Capt. G. A. Richardson, Capt. M. C. Schepps, Jr., Maj. H. J. Vetort. Dr. F. Tiller. Last Row: Capt. H. Heinsoo, Capt. R. Rinker, Capt. P. F. Parks, Capt. J. E. Porter, Capt. C. E. Poole, Jr. mi If A 1 Weaver, r ),,ncl Rotiert - • ' 1 ' ' I ' .jKh. Pro- f ,l.,nel ' iptajn Mcnry ■ ,.,» r. u!, Oor.iJJ J Uanilek. LAW iiiliy or mil guilty thai was the question, yet for some tciiion wc were not giiilly and still lost. Wi- i| cnl a very profitable year with the Law Depart- iiu-nl, li-atiiinK all about conslilulional, criminal and military l.iw Wc liillowcd with a summer of daring anyone to bring us III ciuMl, but no one would lest what we had learned. I iiw i.iunhi us about problems in life " outside. " and gave us I ' uiilidence in our ability to venture into the world, know- iiiB the law was on our side. ( ()| «iNlil I Id I l Kit Is I OtUill I ' ltllwHlldl .llhl lll.nl ol I), n.ullll. ' lll 1 Mill M ll( s The miMhw oJ ihc M«ih l rpartm«nl t% lo in lrmi laikit in i »« ■ AI !•■ HI 1 111(1114 . I .iij; . tiMi. iiiiiiii ,111.1 !.■ ,l villi ' ilii |.|.., hmk ipihtiUiiH " K ) Hiifkr M i I I.. 1 " I I iM I ( M VKI I S I ' Ml ll )l S SIM I • I IMli ii t«nii A ' kl m . ..| . Mre Will r«hihii 1111.1. Ahrah ' ii. k. ■- ' »pc .l mornii hiiil. rcHuirril 111 prove In fi II. «|i«ci itMnigh. il rc«ll» n . " ; ■ upon .» hill »i f;i( ' l MUlir ... .l n l.i i .. il ' H ..ill i. rMliiral toil enable in lo dci well fuml H., . I I,. H Mai I S ( J I Marlin I I ( ••( H I Kar»lr ll ( ol « f S f.-T « ' Muh Mji f «pi I u Un.l tr M., M |..«rr, M M M ( .-ii.r... . ' I M Hell M ' ■ « OIONI I I fi It l |t k I ' tiilv !)! ' W f llllllMIIII. ( DIM H I II Vwi ' ll l , MnI » .il ( I Hii-dn MECRWICS COLONEL H_ 5. E Professcr Deep ia the Brown Boy-covered heart of even ' First Classnan tisere exists a hope. Someday the summatioa of mocnaits at A wiH equal a mtnuie. Until that time, it is bet- ter to wslk. to the Ordnance Compound by cutting across the Plain than to expose j-oux faci-fiDed mind to the tenth- attrscting foroes of Bardett Hall. The keen-minded engineer- ing disciples scoff at this superstition, but only one who has tasted tiie ftaiity of assuming thai steam is an ideal gas can appreciate the value of cautiosi. The greatest -alue of a diversified education is that it proves to you that you wiQ never be successful at anything. Mechanics of Solids showed us that nobody »tI1 e -er drK-e i tank over one of our bridges except under jjain of an - rtjde XTS " . Mechanics of Fluids showed us that the driver was right. Tanks just can " t fk ai. WelL if the Navy can do it. why . . . ? In actuality though, the Department of Mechanics has managed to underscore and comdare the principles of ph -sics and cfaemisiry with phenomena from the realm of every day existance. The structures and processes of both man and Nature ha% mors meaning for us now that we have been exposed to a deep and detailed study of the mechanics realitv. rent Rov. L a? St: M . E. A. GSbsx. IIL Maj, J. D. n a-rrf. CoL H- 5L Frasar. (Prat). CoL E. R. Heibers. (Head of D .). Mil. T W NelsoE. Usi. " W. W NatL S c. r Ro , ■ Cape R. -A. La:n »on±r . Capt. C. M. Radlia-. Mai. . G BrouEias- Cant. A. JofatsciXL in. Mai. E. C- kes«-. Ca t. C. D ooc. CapL S. 8. Haiarer. J.-. Cijr, R . C-o es. J- VU F B Boii .-£. CapL J. L. Dazier, Cape R. E. Baker. CspL G. H. G. Krafft. Tkird Raw: C L. K. E. Giiaer. Cape. R_ E. Hadson. CapL W. R. Elis, CaiJC W. J. Eddms, Cape H. N. Schwarzkopf. Cape M. S. Jones, Capt. G. R. Robertson. Capt. G. U. Loffen. CapL J. K. Scrarier. C S. R. Sydenham. n m mmm Itvf ; f r|: t if f Cip- F M . r lLlani. Maj. G. E- Jester. ' li. ? •-. . ' _:■::;;. Coi. J R. Elunz. Col. C. H. Schilling. U. Coi. W. F. Rooi. " lj- Col. .A- P. NVade. Maj. L. G. MicfaaeL Lt. Col. R. W. ReisacUer. MUitiU Ro : .Maj. J. R. McDonald. Cape R. E. Baker. Maj. C. W. Guth. Maj. .A. F. Gram. Mai- J. M. -Miller, Maj. W H. Ellion. Maj. R. H- Snath. Lt. CoL R. W Areo. Mi T R .t r ± D. D. Lod»T£. Mi;. J. D Tr:-. ?a : Maj. J: L Pisg. Li- Co-l. C. ?. i. Braim. LCDR D. F. DaDv. LSN- Ma V- E- Whan. Maj- A. F. Trompeter. LSA.- .Vof SAo»7i: Lt. CoL T. E. Giiess. MILITARY ART and ENGINEERING Commonly referred to as Total Recall 401 and censored), tbese two caanes have been responsible for separating the men bom the bo aixl the bo 3 from their First Class Privileges. The biggest loss of revenue to the Mohawk Bus Company for the Fiscal Year 1964-1965 has been Civfl Engineering. Long weekends are ooh for the privQeged fev when C.E. falls on a Saturday. The immutaMe tiieoran oi the 2.3 is enough to drive men to mayhem. Untfl the change in schedule afta the Anny- Navv Game, the Second Regiment Firsties had to conduct the battle ol the 23. whDe the First Regiment only bad to shoot fm a 2.0. Cdosklenng that a 2.0 pras you in the upper half of the class, this battle too, is far from easy. Perhaps with the passage of time and the mellowing of memories of fmstratioQS, we will be able to take the same phflosophical anitude toward thb dq»rtment as we now have for math or electricity, but just now .we are stiE too aware of the thin string by which the Sword of Deficiencv ' hangs. This department even has the moti- vation to keep people deficient after Mobilization Day. It has even been said thai they were responsible for priming the " All-over Bush " last year. Oh welL yon can ' t wear gold stars on your Olive Greens anv-way. COLONEL ::-: Profess- - bcHILLTSu LT. COLONEL THO. LAS E. GRIESS Professor • Sabbatical Leave I 55 COLONEL JOHN H. VOEGTLY Professor and Head of Department MILITARY HYGIENE There is something distinctive about a cadet; everyone knows that. It has been said the mission of the Military Hygiene Depart- ment is to make sure that the distinctive ■ " something " is not the result of poor personal sanitation. Through a comprehensive pro- gram of lectures, training films, and quasi-religious propaganda (■ ' Cleanliness is ne.xt to Godliness " ), the department is supplying Ranger School with a surprisingly healthy Class of " 65. From the leadership standpoint, we are now aware of the importance of adequate field sanitation among troops and our future responsibilities in this area. The popular pre-leave lecture program, although discontinued last year, added much to our fund of practical knowledge in personal hygiene. In future germ- free years we will remember with gratitude the Military Hygiene Department. Colonel J. H. Voegtly, Capt. W. H. Johnson, MSC. e c. LELtL ,mM M » ' - Srurcd. L In R Maj. M. J. Herhert, Lt. Col. D. F. Burton. Col. J. D. Billingslev, Maj. G. M. Montgomery, Maj. E. J. Boyle. Sramlim;: Capl. J. H. Huff, Capt. J. L. Palmer, Capt. J. S. Cheshro, Capt. C. B. Donovan, Capt. R. F. Trabert, Capt. D. S. Oberg, Capt. R. H. Sugc. Capt. R. M. Gomez, Capt. C. F. Buck, Maj. J. R. Aker, Capt. D. R. Reinhard. ORDNANCE Oh my Lord — Smorgasbord. What else can you say about a department that takes everything you should have learned in Physics, Math, Chemistry. Mechanics, Electricity and Voodoo 301 and applies it to practical problems. To wet your appetite for this varied farce, you ' ve even got a conditioning march before every class. If it weren ' t for the fact that the tests are all open-book, it would take on the aspect of the last mile. The fresh air and crisp breeze across the Plain in February are enough to chase away the after- effects of the last hour spent in Brown Boy defilade. Cob- webs shatter very easily after they crystallize. Perhaps the perfect question for this department was once posed by a former member of the Class of 1965. " Sir, if you apply an RLC circuit equation to the Brayton Cycle gas turbine engine, assuming that steam is an ideal gas, then by taking the summation of moments about the " p " sub shell, and assuming that matter and energy are conserved, how can you prove that a Plebe mail-carrier approaches the speed of light as " t " approaches 1210? " COLONEL JOHN D. BILLINGSLEY Professor and Head of Department Bottom Row. L to R: Maj. W. S. O ' Sullivan. Ll. Col. P. J. Kenny. Maj. W. J. Hoff. Jr.. Lt. Col. R. E. Thayer, Col. J. R. Jannarone, Lt. Col. L O. Elsaesser. Lt. Col. R. A. Shade. Capt. H. W. Butler. Capt. A. V. Richard. Second Roh: Capt. F. S. Holmes. Jr.. Maj. R. M. Ellon. Capt. C. H. Stevens. III. Capt. J. P. Huntington, Capt. J. B. Hall, Capt. R. B. Henry. Capt. C. H. Drcxler. Capt. W V. Murry. Third Row: Capt. J A. Lupi, Capt. P. Miller, Jr., bpl. G.W. B. Glen. Capt. T. J. CoondL Capt. J. A Gibhs, IL Cpi. W. R. Licht. Capt. G. E- ttlen. Top Row: Capt R. M. Islore. Capt. E. A. WOhdm. Cipt. C. H. Jones. Jr.. Capt, R ' . H. Schmidt, Capt. H. E. Sov er Capt. W. M. Hooker PHYSICS and CHEMISTR •ll ONEI JOHN R JANNARONE i ' ic fcsv r and Head of Department We came back from Buckner with desire an motivation burning in our NeaiSS. and soon were left with only the flaking ashes of fim deiermination. Only a pn ili e 3 few can become enthusiastic over frequencies oreleciroKsis. and to most ot us ths Reference Data Pamphlet assumed biblical impaance Studying wis redukXvi to i simple process of finding out where the right fnnula was hidden. Of o.Turse thae were days when the Cookbook failed us, but « were willing to be phtiosociiKaS .A favorite phrase became, " Win some, lose soie, some get rained ottt. " The atmosphere was more relaxed in this doartment than in our Plei« ;. " r though, and we could usually rely on a questioi and answer period NetOfe - was given. Syl anus ma not have approved, bl at least w got i S tdci . -; to practice a dela ing action so that we couldniget graded. The instructor- •- " ; pretty reasonable lot. and they knew the burdes we had to bear frwa cta; ' ; ' depanments. However, as alumni of our instittion the also knew the :- . " of the Brown Boy, and resented the ease ith hich we succumbed to its - embrace. ' ou get the bear, and some days the ber gets you. Now we come to realize that we were just orrow ing time Fcr r-r-f - we spent meditating or corresponding, we spent iv studying F .After 160 years things begin to hang together n the curric we had our conscientious objectors, most of us ook the hin; because even though preoccupied with visions t Musungs an J or J - ? are still taking FCPs. Strange now we owe al this to the DeoanaieBt « and Chemistrv. I ( NALD G. MacWIl LIAMS Professor ic..i.K,.i:..,.i I _.... SOCIA. SCIENCES ihcrc a little (au t. ' - ' , Major J B Our 1 1 ( ol.mcl K I Major A S AH M J ( ollinx. ( icnani k VS Si Perkins. 1 I icu •in. Mjior S ( l cp.inment of S .x:ial Sciences has rting insiinci instilled in cadets b ■ ' ic cnrrojlar) lo " Read, not study. ' • c wid. " Quid, ne vexare? " It • find out that the members n if we aren ' t. Maybe there Jacobins, even though they Maybe if they put some of .1 r ' i int of inflection about ' • . don ' t really have to h our knowledge. All up our cocktail party M 1! ' . ' iL lovial. LCcnumiu jnd political aspects of ■Ikia and mumbling references would make you a •ment did for as. They gave the knowledge that we will .1. .iil.iblc. and in view of the ij ed to give us a fair ■icory Only lime will nicnt of Sixrial Sciences. COLONEL A A JORDAN Professor .n W M Wu. hilziimmons. Captain L. D. Givey. Captain W, D, McClellan. A A Jordan. Captain J M Rolls. Captain J. F. Sloan. Fourth Ro»: Captain ) VV cif :- H f Ihompv n. Captaia F. J. Schober. Lt. Colonel E. Denton. plain Z B. Bradford. Major .A. .Mansinne. Captain H. Twichell. ■ - r I) A. Vesser. Isl Liculcnani S. R. Williamson. Fifth Ron: r ' Hin ( R Parker. Captain F. I. Brown. Captain J. R. Murphy. „ , . ' . M W Johnson. V(t; i « ' m : .Major J. W. Mann. Major H tiinh " 59 ' ' ' Sf» I r y. Bollom Ro»-. L lo R: Maj. W. S. O ' Sullivan, Lt. Col. P. J Kenny, Maj. W. J. Hoff, Jr.. Lt. Col. R. E. Thayer, Col. J. R Jannarone, Lt. Col. L O. Elsaesser, Lt. Col. R. A. Shade, Capt H. W. Butler, Capt. A. V. Richard. Second Row: Capt. F. S Holmes. Jr.. Maj. R. M. Elton, Capt. C. H. Stevens, III, Capt J. P. Huntington. Cap ' . J. B. Hall. Capt. R. B. Henrv, Capt C. H. Drexler, Capt. W. V. Murry. Third Row: Capt. J. A. Lupi, Capt. P. Miller. Jr., Capt. G.W. B. Glen, Capt. T. J. Connell, Capt. J. A. Gibbs, H, Capt. W. R. Licht, Capt. G. E. Wien. Top Row: Capt. R. M. Pastore, Capt. E. A. Wilhelm, Capt. C. H. Jones. Jr., Capt. R. C. H. Schmidt. Capt. H. E. Soyster, Capt. W. M. Hooker. PHYSICS and CHEMISTRY COLONEL JOHN R. JANNARONE Professor and Head of Department We came back from Buckner with desire and motivation burning in our breasts, and soon were left with only the flaking ashes of grim determination. Only a privileged few can become enthusiastic over frequencies or electrolysis, and to most of us the Reference Data Pamphlet assumed biblical importance. Studying was reduced to a simple process of finding out where the right formula was hidden. Of course there were days when the Cookbook failed us, but we were willing to be philosophical. A favorite phrase became, " Win some, lose some, some get rained out. " The atmosphere was more relaxed in this department than in our Plebe courses, though, and we could usually rely on a question and answer period before the test was given. Sylvanus may not have approved, but at least we got a fighting chance to practice a delaying action so that we couldn ' t get graded. The instructors were a pretty reasonable lot, and they knew the burdens we had to bear from the other departments. However, as alumni of our institution they also knew the attraction of the Brown Boy, and resented the ease with which we succumbed to its soothing embrace. You get the bear, and some days the bear gets you. Now we come to realize that we were just borrowing time. For every hour that we spent meditating or corresponding, we spent two studying Fluids, Solids, and Juice. After 160 years things begin to hang together in the curriculum, and even though we had our conscientious objectors, most of us took the hint. It must have worked, because even though preoccupied with visions of Mustangs and GTOs, some of us are still taking FCP ' s. Strange now we owe all this to the Department of Physics and Chemistry. LT. COLONEL DONALD G. MacWILLlAMS Professor (Sabbatical Leave) r SOCIAL SCIENCES Squeezed into a basic science course, the Department of Social Sciences has been adversely affected by the adventurous sporting instinct instilled in cadets by the morning courses. Perhaps it all stems from the corrollary to " Read, not study. " made famous by Alfred E. Neuman. 3rd Class when he said, " Quid, ne vexare? " It takes being deficient for two months in your elective to find out that the members of this department are serious about their courses, even if we aren ' t. Maybe there really was a difference between the Girondius and the Jacobins, even though they were on the same river. Ifs just a nice thing to know. Maybe if they put some of these facts into a Reference Data Pamphlet and give us a point of inflection about which to sum moments we could have a fighting chance. We don ' t really have to understand politics or economics in order to impress people with our knowledge. All we need are little mnemonics like METT or COCOA to spice up our cocktail party conversations. How about SEPAL for the social, economic and political aspects of life? From there a little fast talking and mumbling references would make you a Rhodes Scholar. Basically though, that is exactly what the department did for us. They gave us some rudimentary frameworks upon which to base the knowledge that we will garner from other sources. In the limited amount of time available, and in view of the limited expenditure of precious energy on our part, they managed to give us a fair grounding in history, economics, government, and political theory. Only time will manifest the thought and effort that came to us from the Department of Social Sciences. First Row. left to rif ht: Captain A. A. .Sardo, Captain W. M. Wix, Major J. B. Durst. Lt. Colonel R. E. Lynch, Colonel A. A. Jordan, Lt. Colonel R. H. Nye, Major G. K. Osborn, Major J. W. Seigle, Major A. S. Albro. Second Row: Captain G. R. Phillips, Captain M. J. Collins, Captain R. L. Hunt, Major D. D. Horner, 1st Lieu- tenant K. W. Smith, Major D. H. Martin, 1st Lieutenant W. C. Perkins, 1st Lieutenant L. Parkus. Tliinl Row: Major R. E. Carig- nan. Major S. C. Sarkesian, Captain O. B. Combs. Major E. L COLONEL A. A. JORDAN Professor Fitzsimmons. Captain L. D. Olvey, Captain W. D. McClellan, Captain J. M. Rolls, Captain J. F. Sloan, Fourth Row: Captain B. T. Thompson, Captaia F. J. Schober. Lt. Colonel E. Denton, Captain Z. B. Bradford. Major A. Mansinne, Captain H. Twichell. Major D. A. Vesser. 1st Lieutenant S. R. Williamson, Fifth Row: Captain C. R. Parker, Captain F. J. Brown, Captain J. R. Murphy, Captain H. W. Johnson, Sixth Row: Major J. W. Mann, Major D P Shaw. Bollom Ron-. L lo R: Maj. W. S. O ' Sullivan. Lt. Col. P. J. Kenny, Maj. W. J. Hoff, Jr., Lt. Col. R. E. Thayer, Col. J. R. Jannarone, Lt. Col. L O. Elsaesser, Lt. Col. R. A. Shade, Capt. H. W. Butler. Capt. A. V. Richard. Second Ron-: Capt. F. S. Holmes, Jr., Maj. R. M. Elton. Capt. C. H. Stevens, IIL Capt. J. P. Huntinaton. Capt. J. B. Hall, Capt. R. B. Henrv, Capt. C. H. Drexler, Capt. W. V. Murry. Third Ron-. Capt. J. A. Lupi, Capt. P. Miller. Jr., Capt. G.W. B. Glen, Capt. T. J. Connell, Capt. J. A. Gibbs, IL Capt. W. R. Licht, Capt. G. E. Wien. Top RoH-. Capt. R. M. Pastore, Capt. E. A. Wilhelm, Capt. C. H. Jones. Jr., Capt. R. C. H. Schmidt. Capt. H. E. Soyster, Capt. W. M. Hooker. PHYSICS and CHEMISTRY COLONEL JOHN R. JANNARONE Professor and Head of Department We came back from Buckner with desire and motivation burning in our breasts, and soon were left with only the flaking ashes of grim determination. Only a privileged few can become enthusiastic over frequencies or electrolysis, and to most of us the Reference Data Pamphlet assumed biblical importance. Studying was reduced to a simple process of finding out where the right formula was hidden. Of course there were days when the Cookbook failed us, but we were willing to be philosophical. A favorite phrase became. " Win some, lose some, some get rained out. " The atmosphere was more relaxed in this department than in our Plebe courses, chough, and we could usually rely on a question and answer period before the test was given, Sylvanus may not have approved, but at least we got a fighting chance to practice a delaying action so that we couldn ' t get graded. The instructors were a pretty reasonable lot, and they knew the burdens we had to bear from the other departments. However, as alumni of our institution they also knew the attraction of the Brown Bo ' , and resented the ease with which we succumbed to its soothing embrace. You get the bear, and some days the bear gets you. Now we come to realize that we were just borrowing time. For every hour that we spent meditating or corresponding, we spent two studying Fluids, Solids, and Juice. After 160 years things begin to hang together in the curriculum, and even though we had our conscientious objectors, most of us took the hint. It must have worked, because even though preoccupied with visions of Mustangs and GTOs, some of us are still taking FCP ' s. Strange now we owe all this to the Department of Physics and Chemistry. LT. COLONEL DONALD G. MacWILLIAMS Professor (Sabbatical Leave) SOCIAL SCIENCES Squeezed into a basic science course, the Department of Social Sciences has been adversely affected by the adventurous sporting instinct instilled in cadets by the morning courses. Perhaps it all stems from the corrollary to " Read, not study. " made famous by Alfred E. Neuman, 3rd Class when he said, " Quid, ne vexare? " It takes being deficient for two months in your elective to find out that the members of this department are serious about their courses, even if we aren ' t. Maybe there really was a difference between the Girondius and the Jacobins, even though they were on the same river. Ifs just a nice thing to know. Maybe if they put some of these facts into a Reference Data Pamphlet and give us a point of inflection about which to sum moments we could have a fighting chance. We don ' t really have to understand politics or economics in order to impress people with our knowledge. All we need are little mnemonics like METT or COCOA to spice up our cocktail party conversations. How about SEPAL for the social, economic and political aspects of life? From there a little fast talking and mumbling references would make you a Rhodes Scholar. Basically though, that is exactly what the department did for us. They gave us some rudimentary frameworks upon which to base the knowledge that we will garner from other sources. In the limited amount of time available, and in view of the limited expenditure of precious energy on our part, they managed to give us a fair grounding in history, economics, government, and political theory. Only time will manifest the thought and effort that came to us from the Department of Social Sciences. ,«-,.». J, COLONEL GEORGE A. LINCOLN Professor and Head of Department COLONEL A. A. JORDAN Professor First Row. left lo right: Captain A. A. Sardo. Captain W. M. Wix Major J. B. Durst, Lt. Colonel R. E. Lynch, Colonel A. A. Jordan, Lt. Colonel R. H. Nye, Major G. K. Osborn. Major J. W. Seigle Major A. S. Albto, Second Row. Captain G. R. Phillips. Captain M. J. Collins, Captain R. L. Hunt, Major D. D. Horner. 1st Lieu tenant K. W. Smith, Major D. H. Martin, 1st Lieutenant W. C Perkins, 1st Lieutenant L. Parkus, Third Row: Major R. E. Carig nan. Major S. C. Sarkesian. Captain O. B, Combs. Major E. L Fitzsimmons, Captain L. D. Olvey, Captain W. D. McClellan, Captain J. M. Rolls, Captain J. F. Sloan, Fourth Row: Captain B. T. Thompson, Captaia F. J. Schober, Lt. Colonel E. Denton, Captain Z. B. Bradford. Major A. Mansinne, Captain H. Twichell, Major D. A. Vesser. 1st Lieutenant S. R. Williamson. Fifth Row: Captain C. R. Parker, Captain F. J. Brown, Captain J. R. Murphy, Captain H. W. Johnson. Si.xlh Row: Major J. W. Mann, Major D. P Shaw. II x UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY BAND WW LT COLONEL W. H. SCHEMPF Commanding Officer and Bandmaster FIRST BATTALION, FIRST INFANTRY From the Plebe Hike to AOT preparation the men of the First Battalion. First Infantry have supported us in our struggles with, for. and against the Military Profession. They provided us with lifeguards when we camped at Lake Freder- ick. They supplied us with heavily accented " Aggressors ' " dur- ing Buckner training, ( " Banzai, Yankee Peeg " ). The lent us armor support for pre-Navy rallies both officially, in the march to Thayer Gate, and unofficially, as during last year ' s Central Area Maneuvers. The men of the " First " have been our link with the " real army " of which we will soon be a part. A unit is only as effective as its support, and without the ser ' ices of the First Battalion. First Infantry our training program would have suffered greatly. Li. Lolonc) J. Ml Wentwonh. Second C.ipL.in I) M Hiichu.ild. M.,n.i k J. KrMiilich. Jt. bergeanl Major k, L. Slick. Captain P, D. CWO B. A. Yankolonis. Captain G. C. Williams. m 1 1 iC S m n mi ' i Jii " .v.,.i; •j;ii ' jiiiwi ' ii.«ff.T;i ' A 5L ;. .x« i3f«« ' ib 1 1 li ' 11! li isiSivKfe ' I? m Vs PM »«s%« -ja0 [, _ There is a certain segment of the Long Grey Line which delights in pointing out with alarm that the " Corps has Gone to Hell. " It seems to me that, according to some criteria, we have been en route since the Spring of 1802. Still, there may be some truth in these familiar cries of alarm, especially as they pertain to the Class of 1965. Certainly, the main theme of our four year sojourn on the Hu dson has been " transition, " a word which is hardly appreciated in traditionalist circles. Most of our transitions have been small, but indicative of greater under- lying changes. We were the last class to have napkin rings and doolie buttons, to wear Dress Grey in Beast, to stroll to P. E. and E. S. G. S. and, despite rumors to the contrary, to have a good old fashioned Plebe Year. Conversely, we were the first class to have a Yearling Light and Yearling weekends, to drive on post, to reestablish the tradition of getting our cars in time for Spring Leave, to escort to the Officers ' Club, to be full-fledged squad leaders as Cows and, to the con- sternation of many, to wear Drill " S. " As if these changes weren ' t sufficiently revolutionary, our stay here has witnessed the passing of the M-1, the chrome bayonet. Cadet Drill, Plebe Christmas and turnbacks; the renaissance of Plebe Class formations, and the temporary chain of command, as well as the advent of the Company change, checking accounts, unlimited late lights and Second Class Privileges. And, so, we live in a rather freer atmosphere than did the Class of 1955, who lived in a somewhat freer atmosphere than the Class of 1945, and so forth. But, what does it really matter? We are separated from our civilian counter- parts by the same margin of discipline that separated the Class of 1865 from its college contemporaries and we gave up the same relative degree of freedom upon entering the Academy that the Class of 1915 did. No group of Cadets or officers, including the Class of 1965, has sent the Corps to " Hell. " The times change, and this flux dictates that we, too, change, if we are not to lose touch with the very society for whose ideals we may someday lay down our lives. If a greater calibre of graduate could be achieved by having Sunday parades or by forfeiting weekend leaves or by wearing Dress Gray to classes, then these things would be done. Fortunately, the effect of such regression on efficiency is usually negligible, while the impact on morale is devastatingly negative. As long as the outside world continues to change, West Point will have to change along with it. Here we stand, ready to take on the world and everyone in it, each of us convinced that he will wear stars before his military career is ended. We are not unmindful of the occasional accusations levelled against us, nor are we disdainful, for we respect our accusers. At the same time, we recognize that a goodly portion of such criticism is nothing more than good-natured kidding. We recognize that we are a " transition class. " We realize that we were a Class blessed with a few more freedoms than the classes which preceded us. We believe that we earned these freedoms. And we know that we are the best damned class ever to toss a white hat into the air on its graduation morning. ' -p 3 ..A Mark R. Walsh President, Class of 1965 MICHAEL MOLLIS ABBOTT EDGARDO QUERIJERO ABESAMIS THOMAS SAMIEL ABRAHAM. JR. MICHAEL MOLLIS ABBOTT G-1 Rabbit Rabbit ' s quiet Buckeye manner hides his fun- loving attitude and an unheralded all-around ability. As West Point ' s answer to Harry James, he became famous for his flighty solos in the mess hall during gloom period and for echoing the bugler in Central Area at taps. His drive and ability to do a job right will take him far in the Army; and he can always supplement his pay by moonlighting at the O-club. Gymnastics 4; Astronomy Club 3; French Language Cliih 2; Sk Diving 2, I : Ski Team 4; Dance Orches- tra 4. 3.2. 1. EDGARDO OUERIJERO ABESAMIS F-2 Ed English as spoken in the Philippines stresses a dif- ferent accent; thus, for a while the company enjoyed some amusing pronunciations. But Ed adjusted quickly — he took most of the advanced courses and always finished high in the class. He was a thoughtful person — philosophic — always moralizing while picking love bal- lads on a guitar. Although we must bid Ed " paalam, " he will always remain a colorful memory. Spanish Language Cluli 1; Sailing Club 2.1; Cardinal Newman Club 3. L THOMAS SAMUEL ABRAHAM, JR. D-I Abe Tom came out of Greensburg. Pa., with a fine list of achievements to his credit. He found things not so difi ' erent at West Point as he became Abraham of Army. " Abo, the Arabian Fabian " has given Army fans many fine performances on the gridiron and the wrest- ling mats, although it cost him a few Stars on his B- robe. Abe will be a credit to the Army and will be long remembered by his many friends. Football 4. 3.2.1: Wrestling 4.3.2.1. LEROY ARTHUR ADAM F-I Ace Ace, a native of Idaho, came to West Point with a design for the future. His canny attitude soon won him many friends, and his dependability soon gained him much respect. Never to be denied a chance, he took advantage of every opportunity to better himself, both academically and in the fundamentals of life. A great friend, always willing to lend a helping hand, he should enjoy much success in the future. Golj 4; Public Information Detail 2 : Russian Language Club 4. 3. 2, 1; Sky Diving 4. 3: Chess Club 4; Bowl- ing 2,1: Catholic Chapel Choir 4: Glee Club 4; Flying Club 1: Ski Club 4, 3, 2,1. I F R() R[Hl K M)AM CURTIS H. ADAMS. JR. F-1 Curt Curt, an Army brat, entered West Point with high goals and ambitions. B.P. has faced nearly every pos- sible obstacle in a cadet ' s life, with special emphasis on the math department and the T.D. But through his great determination, he has surmounted all these obsta- cles and is headed toward a long and bright career in the Army. Curt was one of the charter, and most devoted, members of the F-1 pinochle club. Debate Council and Forum 4. 2: Rocket Club 1 ; Judo 4,2, 1; KDET 4. RALPH WYATT ADAMS, JR. A-2 Rafe Rafe did many things in his four years at West Point but he did them all in his own inimitable way. We will not soon forget his outward traits; his jokes, his art work, his successes at the Eisenhower monument, his lack of callouses from book opening. But we will remember even longer his quieter side, his devotion to ideals and his friendship with us. Some day, perhaps, he will reveal the secret of his Purple Hooch. RM I ' M K M 1 M) MS JR MES FRt;Dl-RIC AIR ' i ' FREDERICK JAMES FREDERIC AIRY Airs H-1 Always an active atlilcte, Jim has found his physi- cal interests somewhat thwarted at the Point due to numerous bouts with the WPAH. Undaunted by these and other minor setbacks, he has never lost his sense of humor or winning personality. The future spells nothing short of success for this great emiss ary from the Southwest. Lacrosse 4, 2: Russian Language Club 4, 3, 2; Ski Club 4,3,2,L LORIN CRAIG ALBRIGHT E-1 Craig Hailing from western New York. Craig came to West Point with an indomitable spirit that neither the T.D. nor the system could alter. Both a good athlete and a good student. Craig was able to maintain a good academic standing without grinding. He has an ability to accomplish whatever he sets out to do. This, coupled with his self-confidence, will serve him well in the years to come. Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2.1: Pistol Club 4, 3. ERROL DEAN ALEXANDER rcpnf N L ammo: ERROL DEAN ALEXANDER A-1 Alex To those of us who lack Alcx " s inner drive, there is something almost frightening about this man ' s seem- ingly limitless energy. A host of cliches come to mind to describe his intellect, dedication and athletic prowess, but his actions speak far more eloquently than could any adjectives. A man totally capable, wholly selfless and completely without malice, of whom it may be said " this vale of tears was much the better for his having come, " — this is Alex. Stars 3; Track 4; Swimming 4. 3, 2. I ; Numerals 4; Major ' A " 3. 2. 1; Navy Star 3. 2. 1 : 1st Class Com- mittee: 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1; Handball Club 3; Cailet Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2. 1; Glee Club 4. 3, 2, 1; Goat-Engineer Committee 2. JOHN IRVIN ALGER M-2 Alji " Big John " came to the Class of Strength and Drive via Aliquippa, Pennsylvania and Duke Univer- sity. Whether we knew him as a Star man, as Army ' s best high-jumper or as one of the men who made us proud of the way our class was run, we are all glad we knew him. John did himself proud at West Point and West Point can be proud of him. A good sport, a good leader and a great friend. Track; 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee: Public Information Detail 2; Public Relations Council 2.1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2,1; Glee Club 4,3.2.1; Cadet Band 4. FREDERICK W. AMMERMAN D-1 Alpha Perhaps the greatest mark Fred will leave on West Point will be on his friends. A friendly, infectious smile and an intelligent thought were and will be his pass- words to success. Whether in an intellectual bull session, or a moment of crisis with the Academic Department, we, his classmates, found him a rugged individualist but devoted to the guiding principles of the Academy. Rifle Team 4; French Language Club 4,3,2. 1 ; Ger- man Language Club 2.1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3; Rifle Club 4: .Ski Club 2,1: Instructor. STEPHEN L. AMMON M-2 Steve An Army brat frnm Vicksburg, Mississippi, Steve finished his high school in Atlanta, Georgia, after which he served in Europe with the 7th Artillery for 10 months. After a year in the USMA prep school, he came to West Point. Excellent skiier, skillful debater and fluent in German, Steve has made innumerable friends through his eternal good nature and ever-readi- ness to help anybody who needs it. Ski Club, Instructor; 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ; German Language Club 1; Catholic Chapel A colytes 1 . f»p9 JOHN T. ANDERSON K-2 For John success was measured by the thermom- eter, rising, with the exception of Beast Barra cks in the summer, and falling in the darkness of gloom period. The world of science and engineering have always been esoteric to him. not so with the humanities. Someday, a long time after graduation, John will surrender the bachelorhood to which he is so dedicated, but until that happy hour he remains — Airborne, Ranger, Infantry. Wrestling 4, 3, 2; French Language Club 3. 2, 1; POINTER 4. 3, 1: Sailing Club 2, 1: SCUSA 2, 1; Sailing Team 2.1. JOSEPH B. ANDERSON. JR. C-1 Joe Joe never spent a dull weekend at West Point. He was never there. Joe always seemed to have a trip somewhere, and between weekends, Joe worked hard at his studies, gaining ground with the Academic Depart- ment each year. Joe could always be counted on to help a friend, and his cheerful good humor and efficient manner insure him a successful future. Hop and Activities Commit tee 4. 3, 2,; Frencli Lan- guage Club 4, 3. 2; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3. 2; Rifle Club 4, 3; Sheet and Trap Club 4. 3. 2: Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2; Glee Club 4, 3, 2. ROBERT M S .ANDERSON MARIIN WAYNf ANDRESEN DONALD H APPLFR FRANK MICHAEL APPI ROBERT M. S. ANDERSON H-1 Bob Emerging unscathed from Plebe year in old I-l, Bob was singularly successful in not allowing any of his previous college training to influence his running battle with the Academic Department. We will always remember his big heart, dead-pan humor and the fact that he was the only man ever to come to " order bayonets " while carrying a rifle at parade. His sincerity and good spirits will brighten the lives of those fortu- nate enough to know him. Astronomy Club 4; French Language Club 4. 3. 2, ; Mathematics Forum 1: Art Club 4; Camera Chih 3: Pistol Club I: RadioCU(b4. MARTIN WAYNE ANDRESEN E-1 Marty Iowa ' s loss was West Point ' s gain when Marty Andresen brought his smiling countenance a thousand miles east. From beast barracks through graduation he kept up a steady stream of intelligent humor. His quick wit and gung-ho artillery attitude will long be remem- bered by his classmates and will insure a long and successful career. Public Information Detail 3; Debate Council and Forum 4. 3: HOWITZER 2: Bowling 3, 2. DONALD E. APPLER G-1 Curly Curly, as Don was so ineptly monikered, is the epitome of the Southern gentleman. A reserved yet omnipresent abundance of energy, complemented by an honest desire to excel in all he attempts, will stand him in good stead in the noble profession he has chosen. Alas — shall we ever disremember his debates with his roommates? Huntsville ' s ambassador will undoubtedly merit a statue besides the one which stands in front of Salerno barracks at venerable Ft. Benning. Track 4; Portuguese Language Forum 4. 3,2. I; Rocket Club 3. 2. 1 ; C iess Club 4: Scoutmasters ' Council 4, 3. 2. I; Skeet ami Trap Club: Ski Club 3. 2. 1. FRANK MICHAEL APPLIN G-2 Mike Apps. G-2 " s Beatle, gained fame as a souvenir collector from Rio to Penn State. Thanks to his dedica- tion to the finer things in life, the milk run flourished, to the delight of the contented cows in G-2. Although juice and the T.D. tried to put our Chariie Brown back in the comic strips, he successfully turned the tables. The humor and friendship of the " guiding light " has been an inspiration in our greyest hours. Portuguese Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1; Cadet Chapel Chimers 4. JOHN T. ANDERSON K-2 For John success was measured by the thermom- eter, rising, with the exception of Beast Barracks in the summer, and falling in the darkness of gloom period. The world of science and engineering have always been esoteric to him, not so with the humanities. Someday, a long time after graduation, John will surrender the bachelorhood to which he is so dedicated, but until that happy hour he remains — Airborne, Ranger, Infantry. Wrestling 4, 3, 2; French Language Club 3, 2, 1; POINTER 4, 3. 1: Sailing Club 2. I: SCUSA 2, 1; Sailing Team 2.1. JOSEPH B. ANDERSON, JR. Joe C-1 Joe never spent a dull weekend at West Point. He was never there. Joe always seemed to have a trip somewhere, and between weekends, Joe worked hard at his studies, gaining ground with the Academic Depart- ment each year. Joe could always be counted on to help a friend, and his cheerful good humor and efficient manner insure him a successful future. Hop and Activities Committee 4. 3. 2,: French Lan- guage Club 4, 3. 2: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3. 2; Rifle Club 4, 3: Sheet and Trap Club 4, 3. 2; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2; Glee Club 4, 3, 2. « r- ' I ANDtKSUN JOSFiPH B AND! RSON JR ROBERT M S ANDERSON r MARTIN WAVNi; ANDRtSEN DONALD E APPLEF FRANK MICHAEL APPLIN ROBERT M. S. ANDERSON H-1 Bob Emerging unscathed from Plebe year in old I- 1, Bob was singularly successful in not allowing any of his previous college training to influence his running battle with the Academic Department. We will always remember his big heart, dead-pan humor and the fact that he was the only man ever to come to " order bayonets " while carrying a rifle at parade. His sincerity and good spirits will brighten the lives of those fortu- nate enough to know him. Astronomy Club 4: French Language Club 4. 3, 2, 1 ; Mathematics Forum I: Art Club 4: Camera Chtb 3; Pistol Club I : Radio Club 4. MARTIN WAYNE ANDRESEN E-1 Marty Iowa ' s loss was West Point ' s gain when Marty Andresen brought his smiling countenance a thousand miles east. From beast barracks through graduation he kept up a steady stream of intelligent humor. His quick wit and gung-ho artillery attitude will long be remem- bered by his classmates and will insure a long and successful career. Public Information Detail 3; Debate Council and Forum 4. 3; HOWITZER 2: Bowling 3. 2. DONALD E, APPLER G-1 Curly Curly, as Don was so ineptly monikered, is the epitome of the Southern gentleman. A reserved yet omnipresent abundance of energy, complemented by an honest desire to excel in all he attempts, will stand him in good stead in the noble profession he has chosen. Alas — shall we ever disremember his debates with his roommates? Huntsvillc ' s ambassador will undoubtedly merit a statue besides the one which stands in front of Salerno barracks at venerable Ft. Benning. Track 4: Portuguese Language Forum 4. 3. 2, 1; Rocket Club 3, 2, 1; Chess Club 4; Scoutmasters ' Council 4. 3, 2.1: Skeet and Trap Club; Ski Club 3, 2, 1. FRANK MICHAEL APPLIN G-2 Mike Apps. G-2 " s Beatle, gained fame as a souvenir collector from Rio to Penn State. Thanks to his. dedica- tion to the finer things in life, the milk run flourished, to the delight of the contented cows in G-2. Although juice and the T.D. tried to put our Charlie Brown back in the comic strips, he successfully turned the tables. The humor and friendship of the " guiding light " has been an inspiration in our greyest hours. Portuguese Language Club 4. 3, 2. 1; Cadet Chapel Chimers 4. CA,RV1H ITO ARK NdLL JR CARMELITO ARK ANGEL. JR. D-1 Sonny Blown to the Point by trade winds of the South Pacific, this " pineapple " managed to survive the win- ters and frustrate the hives with his lack of studying, yet having excellent luck in academics. His spring afternoons were spent giving instruction in Karate. This Airborne-Ranger-Infantry file will be a great asset to our Army. Hop and Activities Committee 4, 3, 2. 1: Spanisli Language Club 3 ,2, 1 ; Fencing Club 2,1; Ski Team 4; Karate 4, 3, 2, 1; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2, 1: Scoutmasters ' Council 2: Skin Diving Club 4, 3, 2, 1 : Cardinal Newman Club 3. EDWIN LEE ARMSTRONG B-2 Ed Is it a bird? No. Is it a plane? No. Ifs Edwin L. Armstrong! Born and raised in the Ozarks, Ed came to us from the metropolis of West Plains, Mo. " Never a dull moment " is the best way to describe Ed ' s affable personality. Active in all phases of extra-curricular activities, Ed plays 150 lb. football, sings in the Cadet Chapel Choir and is the director of the 100th Nigh Show of 1965. In the immediate future is marriage to his home town sweetheart and a Lieutenancy in the Army. 750 lb. Football; Rabble Rousers 1; Audio Club 2, 1; Portuguese Language Club 4, 3; Rocket Club I; Sail- ing Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Bridge Club 1; Models Club 2, 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, 1 ; Skeet and Trap Club 1; Skin Diving Club 1 ; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3; Diatectic Society 3, 2,1; Sky Diving 1 . FRANK MARION ARNALL. Ill M-1 Frank Hailing from the sunny state of Florida, Frank has pursued the more pleasant aspects of cadet life with remarkable ability, vigor and success. An able student, he has directed his natural poise and talent toward such activities as Sunday School Teaching, Debate, SCUSA, trips and weekends. Dragging proved to be one of Frank ' s finest skills. The U.S. Army stands to gain an outstanding oflicer with a fabulous perspec- tive on life. Public Relations Council 3; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1; French Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; HOWIT- ZER 4; Chess Club 2,1; Pistol Club 4; Skeet and Trap Club 4, 3; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3,2, 1 ; Protestant Discussion Group 4, 3; Dailectic Society 2. CHARLES M. ARON B-1 Steve Steve, being a wanderer at heart, was not content with the Ridgewood way and came the short distance to " the Rock. " With many talents and an appreciation of the finer things. Steve made his mark at everything from Stars and Stripes to the written word and Rugby. He never ignored his law of averages and his wanderlust took him both east and west. His blue eyes look skyward to the future with anticipation. Stars 3; Track 4. Numerals; Rocket Club 1: Spanish Language Club 2, I; HOWITZER 3, 2, 1; Rugby Club 3, 2, 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2. 1; Chess Club 3. , zy ' - ' J - ' CHARLES M ARON EDWIN l.EF ARMSTRONG CARL ROBERT ARVIN Bob FRANK MARION ARNALL, 1-2 Hailing from Ypsilanti, Michigan, Bob came to West Point with high goals and the capability to achieve them. It wasn ' t long before everyone realized that he was a leader, whether he was at West Point or furi- ously bargaining his way through Europe. Never having any difficulties with academics. Bob devoted his spare time to many extra-curricular activities, wrestling, and the fairer sex — excelling in all tields. Bob will surely continue his successes in all his future endeavors. Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Captain I ; Footlnill 4; Hop and Activities Committee 4, .?, 2, ; Public Information Detail 3; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Russian Club 4,3, 2. I; HOWITZER 2,1; Triathlon 4; Cadet Chapel Acolvtes 3, 2, J: Catholic Chapel Choir 3; SCUSA 2,1. ' RALPH E. ASPLUND B-1 Super-Goat Fresh from the mining and lumbering region of upper Michigan, Ralph entered the new world of West Point. Although academics were not as easy for him as Judo, one could not help but admire his strong determination to make the academic grade. The rigors of cadet life did not stop him from helping anyone at anytime. Ralph ' s great personality and desire to succeed will surely make him a stand-out in his military pro- fession. Judo 3. 2. 1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 1; Mountain- eering Club 1 . i.J fTV - ' l CARL ROBERT ARVIN RALPH E ASPLUND OSCAR LEE ATCHLEY LEIGHTON C ATTEBERRY ROBERT JACK AXLEY OSCAR LEE ATCHLEY, III H-1 Atch Easily recognized by his loose-jointed gait and his slow, friendly Tennessee drawl, Atch could usually be found participating in or talking about sky diving. Lee ' s friendly ways and genuine interest in those around have made him one of the most well-liked and respected fellows in H-1. The Army will be gaining an important asset when this Southern gentleman graduates. Sky Diving 2. 1: Sailing Club 4, 3; Pistol Club 4. LEIGHTON C. ATTEBERRY F-2 Lee Lee, who arrived here four years ago from the regular Army, likes to think of himself as a " citizen of the world. " While at the Academy he did well in all aspects of cadet life, especially in sports, where he was a valuable member of any team on which he played. We wish Lee the best of luck in his career. French Language Club 4, 3. 2.1; POINTER 4. 3, 2, 1. ROBERT JACK AXLEY 1-2 Bob Men are remembered for many reason. You can remember a person for his leadership, his physical ability, his e.xcellent personality or his good friendship. But it is rare when a man is remembered by so many of his classmates for having all of these attributes: Bob Axley is such a man. Probably Bob ' s greatest asset is the fact that he is a man of great sincerity. This man is destined to have a bright future. Football 4; Lacrosse 4,3, Rocket Club 2, L 1 ; Class Committee 3, 2, 1; G-2 BRYANT BACHMAN Bryant G-2 ' s old soldier came to us from the Virgin Islands and why he left, we will never know. This wise old owl, having spent six years in college and two in the Army, has much to teach about life and love in the outside world. Our representative in the Century Club is bound to go far in the military, if he ever crawls out of the rack. Swimming 4; Tennis 4; Poitugue 3,2, 1; Water Polo Club 3, . Language Club 4. VANT BAtH )NAL1) BRDCE BAILEY RONALD BRUCE BAILEY M-1 Ron Ron arrived at West Point well prepared for his new home by seventeen years experience as a brat. This experience stood him in good stead as he quickly rose to the top of the class in academics, aptitude and physical education. His intelligence, leadership and physical ability should insure a long and successful career. Honor Committee 3, 2, 1; Hop and Activities Com- mittee 4, 3, 2, 1; French Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Mathematics Forum J ; Rocket Club I ; Handball Club 3, 1; Water Polo Club 2.1: Chess Club 2. 3: Models Club 2. 1; Pistol Club 3; Skee! and Trap Club 3, 2, 1. ROBERT W. BALDINGER, JR. G-2 Bob " Baldy, ' " as he is affectionately known, is aptly described as a little man with a big, big heart. Whether achieving success with his academic ability and athletic prowess, or unselfishly helping his classmates, he will long be remembered by those who know him. With the qualities he possesses, plus his tremendous desire to succeed, the future will show him many opportunities for greatness. Gymnastics 4, 3, 2; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Club 4; Public Information Detail 1; Ski Club I; POINTER 3. ROBIRT W BM DINCI R IR ,K i m X - ,_ 9. . v- £m 1 ' % M DWIL ' ellARLlS UWGERT JOSEPH RICHARD BARKLEY THOMAS CLARK BARRON PAUL FREDRICK BARBER DAVID CHARLES BANGFRT I-l Dave A native of the " Windy City, " Dave came to the Academy and took his place among the top men in academics. A diligent and persistent worker, he battled the French Department for two years and willingly coached all comers in the sciences in his spare time. Always smiling and carefree, he enlivens any group. His cooperation and drive will long be remembered and will serve him well in the years ahead. Squash 4; Debate Council ami Forum 4. 3; Mathemat- ics Forum 2, 1; BUGLE NOTES 2, 1, Associate Editor; HOWITZER 1; Camera Chib 3. 2. L Presi- dent; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2, 1; Sheet and Trap Club 3.2, 1. PAUL FREDRICK BARBER G-2 Paul A harder worker than Paul is difficult to find, and many of us among all classes in G-2 owed him many thanks for his cheerful assistance. It must be said that he is tremendously proud of his native Wis- consin and from there come his sharp humor and competitive spirit. He and his rockets will be a great asset to any man ' s Army. A more constant friend there will never be. Basketball Manager 4; Rocket Club 3, 2. 1 ; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2. 1; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3,2,1; Glee Club 4. BALLARD MICHAEL BARKER BALLARD MICHAEL BARKER L-1 Mike Ballard M., more commonly called Mike, is an individual who doesn ' t let anyone or anything get him down. In the Academic Department he does not pro- fess to be " all over " the sciences, but he can match the best in English, Law and the Social Sciences. With the heart and soul of a soldier, his goals arc Airborne, Ranger and Pilot. Cadet Sunday School Teacliers 3, 2, I; Rijle Team 4, 3, 2; Sky Diving Club 4, 3. JOSEPH RICHARD BARKLEY E-2 Joe Whenever mention of " words for posterity " is brought forth, Joe is in there with the best of them. Whenever hard work is the central theme of the day, Joe can be found doing more than his share — and most effectively, too. What with his " moody music for distressed cadets " and his wonderful outlook on life, this young man will find his way to the top. Blue envelopes, Joe? Debate Council and Forum; Cardinal Newman Club; KDET. THOMAS CLARK BARRON A-2 Tom Coming directly from the beaches of California, Tom quickly adjusted to the rigors of West Point and met its every challenge unswerving and undismayed. His ever present good cheer and unselfishness made him an indispensable part of A-2. As an officer he will now be able to carry his personal motto of " getting the mission done " even further by going Airborne- Ranger-Infantry with Korea as his first choice. Best of luck to him. Public Information Detail 4. 3, 2. 1 : Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1: French Language Club 2, 1; HOWITZER 4; Rugby Club 3. 2 1 ; Scoutmasters Coimcil 3; Dialectic Society 4; SCUSA 4, 3.2. I. BARTHOLOMEW DENNIS BARRY, JR. H-1 Bart Bart will long be remembered for his determina- tion and drive from Thayer Hall to Smith Rink. His down-to-earth attitude combined with an ever-ready sense of humor constitute a congenial personality that will not be forgotten by his many friends and acquaint- ances. His many athletic achievements are topped by his record breaking scoring ability on the Army hockey teams. Success in all his endeavors awaits him. Hockey 3. 2. 1 ; Baseball 2.1: Spanish Language Club 3; HOWITZER 2, 1. JOHN WILLIAM BARWIS r -7 Wis ' Wis leaves West Point with a warm smile, a friendly ' hello. " and a generous heart. The smile stands for the ring on Candy ' s finger, the " hello- is Yankee for ' " hi, y-all, " and the heart — thafs just Jack We wish you all the luck — if you ever need it. Football 4; Spanish Lan,,ua,,e Cluh 4: Scoutmasters- Council 4. PETER KOLINSKI BECKER n 1 Pete ' Pete ' s fighting spirit has come throush more than once on the " fields of friendly strife, " and he has proven his endurance time and again in the final stretch He knows how to get along well with those around him and his good humor and friendliness add to his stature " He is a genumc competitor and a good friend. Cross Country 4; Track 4: Spanish Language Club -. ,• Sky Dnins 2. 1; Triathlon Club 3, 2 1; Art Club 4: Camera Club 2. 1. JUH WIIIIWI B k ROBERT L BEDEL WILLIAM AUGUST BEINLK H FRED M BELANGHR GEORGE TIMOTHY BELL ROBERT L. BEDELL I-l Bob The Texan will always be remembered for his well-balanced sense of values and his impeccable judg- ment. From academics to athletics his enthusiasm never lagged. He always maintained a sense of humor, coupled with a deep sense of respect for his fellow man. Foothull 4. 3. 2. 1: Track 4: WILLI. ' MVl AUGLIST BHINLICH L-1 Bill Bill can best be described in one word: versatile. He has conducted himself well in every facet of cadet endeavor; athletics, academics, extra-curricular activ- ities and matters military have all felt the impact of this unassuming son of the Old West. Yet, despite his dedication and desire to excel, he has remained a true individual and a loyal comrade at arms. The trans- ition is complete; the cadet ' s cadet will become, we feel sure, the soldier ' s soldier. Honor Convnitlee; Mathematics Foriiin 2, 1 ; Spanish Langiuiiic Chih I : POINTER 4, 3.2,1: Sky Diving 1; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, I; Car Committee 1; Goat-i ' .ngincer Came Committee, Chairman: Class Committee, Officer: Brigade Boxing, Rimner-iip. FRED M. BELANGER I-l Fred Fred, a tall New Hampshire Yankee, found the Hudson Valley a warm change of pace. Being a hive, he found time to help the goats and still spend time with his brown boy. Fred ' s ability to adapt to any situation will assure his success in a bright future. French Language Chih 3,2. 1 : Mathematics Forum 1: BUGLE NOTES 2, I: Chess Club 4. 3: Scoutmasters ' Council 4. GEORGE TIMOTHY BELL M-1 Tim To those of us fortunate enough to know him, Tim ' s friendship has always been something to cherish. Despite an overwhelming affinity for his brown boy, George is always willing to lend a helping hand or just sit down and solve the problems of the world. Regardless of a belief that one should never let books interfere with one ' s education, Tim always managed to make the Dean ' s List, strong evidence that you just can ' t keep a good man down. Astronomy Club 2, 1; Mathematics Forum 2, J; Span- ish Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Camera Club 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3, 2, 1; SCUSA 1; Ski Club 4. 3. 2, 1. JOHN WILLIAM BARWIS Wis G-2 Wis leaves West Point with a warm smile, a friendly " hello. " and a generous heart. The smile stands for the ring on Candy " s finger, the " hello " is Yankee for " hi. y ' all. " and the ' heart — that ' s just Jack. We wish you all the luck — if you ever need it. Football 4: Spanish Laiiiniage Club 4: Scoiumasters ' Council 4. PETER KOLINSKI BECKER D-1 Pete Pete " s fighting spirit has come through more than once on the " fields of friendly strife. " and he has proven his endurance time and again in the final stretch. He knows how to get along well with those around him, and his good humor and friendliness add to his stature. He is a genuine competitor and a good friend. Cross Country 4: Track 4: Spanish Language Club 2. 1; Sky Diving 2. 1; Triathlon Club 3, 2, I ; Art Club 4: Camera Club 2. I. r JOHN 1LLI.- . I BARWIS «b»i- Ji PETER KOLINSKI BECKER ROBERT L BEDEL o ' ■ F £ r JL .. w l k ' " i H 1 !3H | H iii H WILLIAM AUGUST BEINLICH FRED M BELANGEF GEORGE TIMOTHY BELL ROBERT L. BEDELL I-l Bob The Texan will always be remembered for his well-balanced sense of values and his impeccable judg- ment. From academics to athletics his enthusiasm never lagged. He always maintained a sense of humor, coupled with a deep sense of respect for his fellow man. Football 4. 3. 2. 1: Track 4: WILLIAM AUGUST BEINLICH LI Bill Bill can best be described in one word; versatile. He has conducted himself well in every facet of cadet endeavor; athletics, academics, extra-curricular activ- ities and matters military have all felt the impact of this unassuming son of the Old West. Yet, despite his dedication and desire to excel, he has remained a tnie individual and a loyal comrade at arms. The trans- ition is complete; the cadet ' s cadet will become, we feel sure, the soldier ' s soldier. Honor Committee; Mathematics Forum 2. 7; Spanish Language Club 1; POINTER 4, 3.2. 1: Sky Diving 1; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, I: Car Committee 1; Goat-Engineer Game Committee. Cliairmun; Class Committee, Officer: Brigade Boxing. Runner-up. FRED M. BELANGER I-l Fred Fred, a tall New Hampshire Yankee, found the Hudson Valley a warm change of pace. Being a hive, he found time to help the goats and still spend time with his brown boy. Fred ' s ability to adapt to any situation will assure his success in a bright future. French Language Chib 3. 2.1; Mathematics Forum 1; BUGLE NOTES 2. I; Cliess Club 4, 3; Scoutmasters- Council 4. GEORGE TIMOTHY BELL M-1 Tim To those of us fortunate enough to know him, Tim ' s friendship has always been something to cherish. Despite an overwhelming affinity for his brown boy, George is always willing to lend a helping hand or just sit down and solve the problems of the world. Regardless of a belief that one should never let books interfere with one ' s education. Tim always managed to make the Dean ' s List, strong evidence that you just can ' t keep a good man down. Astronomy Club 2, 1; Mathematics Forum 2, 1; Span- ish Language Club 4, 3, 2, J; Camera Club 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3, 2, 1; SCUSA 1; Ski Club 4. 3, 2, 1. JOHN AUSTIN BELL JOHN AUSTIN BELL G-1 John John has had his problems, but his bouyant spirit his helped him survive. He has shown success with girls and a love for Shakespeare, an odd combination unless one knows the secret. Behind his quiet, unassum- ing manner lurks the spirit of a true fun-lover and friend to many, who will travel far along the road to success. Lacrosse 4: Public Relations Council; French Language Club 2: German Language Club 3, 2, I: Dialectic Society 3.2.1; Ski Club 3.2. L LAWRENCE GEORGE BENNETT D-1 Larry Coming to West Point from Indiana, via a year in the Army, Larry ' s one claim to fame lay in his academic achievements, never missing a Dean ' s List. He was always willing to help his less fortunate class- mates, especially with his nightly juice sessions. Though his social life, including many basketball trips, was somewhat obscure. Larry always managed to have a good time. Basketball Manager 4. 3. 2. 1; Public Information Detail 4, 3; Astronomy Club 4. DAVID LEE BENTON. Ill A-1 Dan The son of an Armor file, Dan, too, set his sights on the Combat Arm of Decision. A secondary goal of post-graduate bachelor life went down in flames Cow Year as a post-grad wedding gained probability. Dan with his French proficiency always on his side, still had his greatest triumphs in surviving Yearling math WGR ' s. He made many friends at the Point and was in turn " un bon ami. " French Language Club 3. 2. 1; POINTER 4; Sailing Club 2, 1; Dialectic Society 4. 3. 2. 1 ; Baptist Student Union 4.3. ROBERT F. BERDAN A-2 Bob Bob has had a rough four years. Hard work has kept this boy busy all the time. Not what you would call a hive, Bob usually had to rest before beginning any difficult assignment. He never liked to be second best — not in football scrimmages Plebe and Yearling years — in handball or in grade averages with his roommate. No crises too big — no problem too small — life will take good care of Bob. Track 4; Football 4. 3; Debate Council and Forum 1 ; Spanish Language Club 4. 3, ] : Camera Club . ROBERT F BFRDAN LAWRENCE GEORGE BLNNL MICHAEL EDWARD BERDY Mike DAVID LEE BENTON. I-l In Mike ' s life, football was first and foremost. The cry of " Igor " could be heard in most any game as number 65 rambled on to the field, for Mike was truly one of the best known and most popular members of our class. His success in all fields was due to an ever- present burning desire to be on top. The proof of this is that we never found Mike on the bottom of anything. Football 4, 3, 2. 1: Russian Lani uai e Club 2, I; BUGLE NOTES: Ski Club 2.1. PAUL LEWIS BERGMANN L-2 Paul Hailing from the cold climate of Maine, Paul had little difficulty adjusting to the drafty halls of West Point. Undaunted by the Academic Department and the T. D., he has maintained a gay, carefree attitude towards the system. The Artillery will have another happy son of the Academy within its fold. Cactet Chapel Choir 4. 3,2. 1 : Bowling 3. MICHAEL EDWARD BERDV tto PAl I 1 hVMS Bl RCM-WN OHN AL STIN BELL JOHN AUSTIN BELL G-1 John John has had his problems, but his bouyant spirit his helped him survive. He has shown success with girls and a love for Shakespeare, an odd combination unless one knows the secret. Behind his quiet, unassum- ing manner lurks the spirit of a true fun-lover and friend to many, who will travel far along the road to success. Lacrosse 4: Public Relations Council: French Language Club 2: German Language Club 3. 2. 1: Dialectic Society 3. 2. 1 ; Ski Club 3.2. 1. LAWRENCE GEORGE BENNETT D-1 Larr ' Coming to West Point from Indiana, via a year in the Army, Larry ' s one claim to fame lay in his academic achievements, never missing a Dean ' s List. He was always willing to help his less fortunate class- mates, especially with his nightly juice sessions. Though his social life, including many basketball trips, was somewhat obscure. Larry always managed to have a good time. Basketball Manager 4. 3. 2. 1 : Public Information Detail 4, 3; Astronomy Club 4. DAVID LEE BENTON. Ill A-1 Dan The son of an Armor file. Dan, too, set his sights on the Combat Arm of Decision. A secondary goal of post-graduate bachelor life went down in flames Cow Year as a post-grad wedding gained probability. Dan with his French proficiency always on his side, still had his greatest triumphs in surviving Yearling math WGR ' s. He made many friends at the Point and was in turn " un bon ami. " " French Language Club 3. 2. 1 : POINFER 4: Sailing Club 2. 1 ; Dialectic Society 4, 3. 2, I : Baptist Student Union 4.3. ROBERT F. BERDAN A-2 Bob Bob has had a rough four years. Hard work has kept this boy busy all the time. Not what you would call a hive. Bob usually had to rest before beginning any diflRcult assignment. He never liked to be second best — not in football scrimmages Plebe and Yearling years — in handball or in grade averages with his roommate. No crises too big — no problem too small — life will take good care of Bob. Track 4; Football 4, 3: Debate Council and Forum I : Spanish Language Club 4. 3, 1: Camera Club L ROBERT F BERDAN LAWRENCE GEORGE BENNETT MICHAEL EDWARD BERDY Mike DAVID LEE BENTON, In Mike ' s life, football was tirst and foremost. The cry of " Igor " could be heard in most any game as number 65 rambled on to the field, for Mike was truly one of the best known and most popular members of our class. His success in all fields was due to an ever- present burning desire to be on top. The proof of this is that we never found Mike on the bottom of anything. Football 4, 3, 2. I; Russian Lant iiage Club 2, I; BUGLE NOTES; Ski Club 2.1. PAUL LEWIS BERGMANN L-2 Paul Hailing from the cold climate of Maine, Paul had little difficulty adjusting to the drafty halls of West Point. Undaunted by the Academic Department and the T. D., he has maintained a gay, carefree attitude towards the system. The Artillery will have another happy son of the Academy within its fold. Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2.1; Bowling 3. MICHAEL EDWARD BERD PAUL LEWIS BERGMANN BARRE S BERMER JAMES L BERRI WILLIAM SHERWOOD BIRDSEYE BARRE S. BERNIER C-1 Barre Here is the man who will be missed when he is gone. Quiet, friendly, diligent in his ever ' job; these attributes have helped him lighten shadows and lessen loads for himself and for others. He has learned that perseverance will bring him far more than that which another is content to find at his feet, making himself one on whom you can always depend. Lacrosse, Manager 4. 3; Debate Council and Forum 2, I: Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4. 3. 2, 1 : Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2, 1; Dialectic Society 2. JAMES L. BERRY G-2 Jim Underneath the carefree, easy-going mantle there always appeared the mark of true greatness. Jim ' s ability to get along well in any situation, his intense desire to win and his vast grasp of knowledge — un- tapped by the Academic Department — will un- doubtedly gain for him any goal for which he strives. He will always be remembered by the men in G-2 as the cribbage king from the West Coast. 150 lb. Football 4, Numerals 4; Portuguese Language Club 2,1; Rocket Club 1; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 1: Cadet Sunday School Teachers; Ski Club 2,1; Hooligan Club 2,1. WILLIAM SHERWOOD BIRDSEYE C-I Quiet and sincere. Bill won his place in the Corps through hard work. Plehe year slowed him down aca- demically, but in the following years he frequented the top sections. His sense of humor and eagerness to assist others claimed for him many friends and will contribute to his success in years to come. We feel cer- tain that he will continue his family ' s tradition of service as a fine officer in his future career. Handball Club 2 ;SCUSA 4. GLADE McKAY BISHOP K-2 Joe From the start. Joe made himself heard, being the only cadet ordered to call minutes for the 29th Divi- sion from the Clock Tower. Upperclassmen who crossed Bulldog ' s path won ' t forget him. The T.D. so admired Joe ' s S.I. ' s that " Archie " tried to match shoe sizes. For the Academic Departments Joe, in his best French, hands apart, says " ppht. " Throughout his four years, Joe always came through for his friends without too much thought for himself. Ski Club 2.1; Ski Patrol 1. (,1AI)I VItK% ' l lilSIIOI ' JACK LAWRENCE BLAU M-2 Jackson Jack came to West Point fresh from high school and immediately began his battle to reach that golden day in June of 196 5. Always with a smile and a good word for everyone. Jack won himself many friends and made his presence known among the ranks. The long battle has finally ended and Jack now sets out upon another battle. This one he will surely win, with all the grace and humility he displayed while here. Baseball 4. 3: 150 lb. Football 4; Public Information Detail 2.1: Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3.2,1. STEPHEN MICHAEL BLISS G-1 Whale Steve brought a long list of accomplishments to West Point with him. A three time Ail-American swimmer in high school, he did not rest on his laurels. He became one of the few freshmen to ever earn a varsity letter. He worked hard and went on to win college All-American honors in his three upperclass years. Steve, a true friend, will always be fondly remem- bered, especially by those goats above him and above the cutoff. Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Letter 4. 3, 2, 1 ; Track 4, 3, 2, 1. Numerals 4, Letters, 2, 1: Skin Diving Club 1. STRPHEN MICHAEL BLISS RKHARDALLtN BOFRCKEL DAVID L. BODDE Dave Dave ' s dauntless sense of humor and lightening fast wit have a way of winning friends and debate tournaments. He has those inherent magnetic qualities of leadership which cannot be attained by practice. Never too busy to help a friend, Dave is well known throughout the Corps, as well as by the Tactical Depart- ment and the Commandent of Midshipmen. Academics come naturally but his one love is for law. His talents indicate a career in JAG, but the Army will benefit from his troop leading abilities for at least a few years. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3, 2. 1; Spanish Lan- guage Cluli 2. 1: POINTER 4. 3: Pistol Club 3; SCUSA 2.1. RICHARD ALLEN BOERCKEL K-2 Dick Through the years Dick has managed to sub- stitute rack for study and still end up around 200 in the class. Other than the rack, he loved to go on gym- nastics trips, write letters, play the banjo and complain about juice labs. His love of a good argument has caused many of the P ' s to be in awe of him. but his generally good disposition has earned him the respect of all his classmates. Gymnastics 4, 3, 2; French Language Club 2: Rocket Club 1 ; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4,3,2,1; Glee Club 4. JOHN R.- HNER BOHANNON JMAS F BORROW SKI JOHN RAHNER BOHANNON E-1 Bo Although Bo didn ' t spend much time hiboring over his books, he was always a reliable source of poop for his classmates. When he wasn ' t catching up on sleep, he enjoyed winning milkshakes from his tennis and handball opponents. His one encounter with the Marine Corps quickly turned him against their service. Tennis 4; Squash 4; Debate Council and Forum 4: French Language Club 4, 3; Chess Club 4. 3. CHARLES W. BOOHAR. JR. K-2 Chuck From the wilds of Quarryvillc, Pennslyvania by way of the wilder wilds of Navy ROTC at R.P.I. , Chuck came to us, emerging from the relative obscurity of Beast Barracks wrapped in a brown boy and fully prepared to meet the rigors of West Point life. He was not exactly a model cadet, but he was a model friend. Portuguese Language Club 4. 3. 2. I: HOWITZER 2, ; Camera Club 2,1. MITCHELL E. BONNETT JR. 1-2 Mitch Good old Mitch, man of action, knows what he wants and is out to get it. With hard work at the gym and little work at studies, Mitch was able to breeze through four years of academy life. With his physical and mental ability, we are sure the Infantry will be gaining an outstanding leader of men. Debate Council and Forum 1 ; French Language Club 3, 2, 1: Rocket Club 2. I: Sky Diving I: Judo 4. 3. 2, 7 ; Scoutmasters ' Council 3.2.1 : Skin Diving Club 3. THOMAS F. BORKOWSKI 3 2 Boris Boris could illuminate an approved solution room or light a grey gloom period with his smile alone, not to mention his personality. From Pittsburgh and proud of it, he has never placed in a Pig Pool and do any dance " so fine. " The guy with the magic pen always had exciting inside sports scoops for the POINTER. Always ready with a helping hand and a kind word, Boris will be an asset to any man ' s Army. Football Manager 3, 2, 1 ; Golf 4: Portuguese Language Club 4, 3; POINTER 4. 3. 2. 1. Sports Editor L DA ID I RODDh F BONNETT JR CHARLES W. BOOHAR, JR. (K HARD ALLEN BOERCKEL DAVID L. BODDE L-2 Dave Dave ' s dauntless sense of humor and lightening fast wit have a way of winning friends and debate tournaments. He has those inherent magnetic qualities of leadership which cannot be attained by practice. Never too busy to help a friend, Dave is well known throughout the Corps, as well as by the Tactical Depart- ment and the Commandent of Midshipmen. Academics come naturally but his one love is for law. His talents indicate a career in JAG, but the Army will benefit from his troop leading abilities for at least a few years. Debate Council and Forum 4, 3. 2, I; Spanish Lan- guage Clul ' 2. 1; POINTER 4. 3: Pistol Club 3; SCUSA 2.1. RICHARD ALLEN BOERCKEL K-2 Dick Through the years Dick has managed to sub- stitute rack for study and still end up around 200 in the class. Other than the rack, he loved to go on gym- nastics trips, write letters, play the banjo and complain about juice labs. His love of a good argument has caused many of the P " s to be in awe of him, but his generally good disposition has earned him the respect of all his classmates. Gymnastics 4, 3. 2; French Language Club 2: Rocket Club 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Glee Club 4. JOHN RAHNER BOHANNON HOMASF BORKOWSKl JOHN RAHNER BOHANNON E-1 Bo Although Bo didn ' t spend much time laboring over his books, he was always a reliable source of poop for his classmates. When he wasn ' t catching up on sleep, he enjoyed winning milkshakes from his tennis and handball opponents. His one encounter with the Marine Corps quickly turned him against their service. Tennis 4; Squash 4; Debate Council and Forum 4: French Language Club 4, 3; Chess Chib 4, J. CHARLES W. BOOHAR. JR. K-2 Chuck From the wilds of Quarryville, Pennslyvania by way of the wilder wilds of Navy ROTC at R.P.I. , Chuck came to us, emerging from the relative obscurity of Beast Barracks wrapped in a brown boy and fully prepared to meet the rigors of West Point life. He was not exactly a model cadet, but he was a model friend. Portuguese Language Club 4. 3. 2. I : HOWITZER 2. I ; Camera Club 2,1, MITCHELL E. BONNETT JR. 1-2 Mitch Good old Mitch, man of action, knows what he wants and is out to get it. With hard work at the gym and little work at studies, Mitch was able to breeze through four years of academy life. With his physical and mental ability, we are sure the Infantry will be gaining an outstanding leader of men. Debate Council and Forum 1; French Language Club 3, 2, 1; Rocket Club 2. 1: Sky Diving I: Judo 4. 3. 2, 1 ; Scoutmasters ' Council 3. 2. 1 : Skin Diving Club 3. THOMAS F. BORKOWSKl Bt2 Boris Boris could illuminate an approved solution room or light a grey gloom period with his smile alone, not to mention his personality. From Pittsburgh and proud of it, he has never placed in a Pig Pool and do any dance " so fine. " The guy with the magic pen always had exciting inside sports scoops for the POINTER. Always ready with a helping hand and a kind word, Boris will be an asset to any man ' s Army. Football Manager 3, 2, 1 ; Golf 4; Portuguese Language Club 4, 3; POINTER 4, 3, 2, I. Sports Editor L ANTHONY JOSEPH BORREGO L-1 Tony Tony ' s effervescent personality and indefatigable sense of humor have made him the most well-loved runt in the Corps. If ever a day needed to be brightened, this inexhaustible bundle of energy was the one to do the job. Tony ' s kind words, on a serious occasion or in a fleeting moment of fantasy, will not be easily forgotten. Judo 4. 2. 1 ; Outdoor Sponsinen Club 2,1; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2. I; Dicdectic Society 4, 3, 1; Glee Club 4, 3, 2. I. NORMAN CALE BOVTER. JR. E-1 Norm Arriving at West Point with a year at N.C. State behind him. Norm found academics fairly easy. He had time to excel in throwing the hammer, playing on intermurder teams, and helping his goat classmates make it through. Social life here on the " Rock " was much different than that found in the North Carolina hills, but Norm had no trouble generating his own. With his leadership, ability and personality. Norm will have little trouble achieving whatever he desires. Track, Indoor ami Outdoor 4, 3: Numerals 4; Dialec- tic Society 4, 3, 2; Ski Club 2. 1; Sky Diving Club 1. NORMAN CALE BOYTER. JR MLLIAM J BRADBURN ROBERT STEVEN BRADLEY W ILLIAM CRAIG BRADLEY, Jf WILLIAM J. BRADBURN G-2 Bill B will always be remembered as one who main- tained the individuality he brought with iiim from St. Louis. During his four years at the Aeademy, never letting academics bother him. Bill enjoyed many extra- curricular activities, especially dragging, but his finest efforts were in the field of rifle marksmanship, where he brought many honors to the Academy and to himself. His keen wit and fine sense of humor will carry him far in the service and in life. Rifle Team 4. 3. 2. I, Cuptain: Rocket Club 2. 1; Spanish Language Club 3.2. 1; HOWITZER 3,2. 1, Exec. Advertising Manager: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. 2, I: Rifle Club 4, 3. 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4, 3: Dialectic Society 3.2. I . ROBERT STEVEN BRADLEY D-2 Bob Bob ' s friendship will long be valued by his class- mates. He is always willing to give assistance and encouragement. His competitive spirit has been mani- fested in all of his activities, including his battle with the T.D. Not one to waste time sleeping. Bob could be found participating in athletics almost every after- noon. Bob ' s desire for competition, his friendly and helpful personality and his many abilities will certainly lead him to success in his chosen profession. Lacrosse 4; Cross Country 4; German Language Club 2, 1 ; Handball Club 2, I ; Ski Club 2. WILLIAM CRAIG BRADLEY. JR. C-2 Bill The pride of Marin County came to Happy Valley with an effection for books, love of food and fondness for good music. This five-year man, a devoted Catholic, is well-known for his devastating humor, directness, hard work and outspokenness. Each man leaving West Point leaves some small part of himself behind. Brad leaves the skin of his teeth with the Academic Depart- ments, and the flesh of his knee with the gay blades in Orthopedics. Track 4; Chess Club 4; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3, 2,1; Dialectic Society 2,1. DENNIS WAYNE BREWER K-1 Denny Hailing from the big land of Texas, Denny brought the warmth of Southern hospitality to our grey existence. His casual air of smoothness and unruffled calm con- ceals an inexhaustible supply of energy and determina- tion to succeed. Undaunted by four years of futile eflforts by the powers-that-be to do otherwise, he re- mains the independent spirit. With his sincerity and unselfishness, Denny is an invaluable comrade to all. Pistol; Debate Council and Forum 4; Handball Club 1; Judo 2, I ; Pistol Club 4. 3. 2, 1 ; Scoutsmasters ' Coun- cil 2.1; Skin Diving Club 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2, 1; Dialectic Society 2. 1; Glee Club 4. 3, 2. 1. ' , t«.r ' " f ' - LLOYD CLARK BRIGGS L-2 L.C. Determination, a strong will and plenty of hard work have characterized Lloyd ' s four years at West Point. As a cadet he set his goals high and as the stars on his collar and the stripes on his sleeve attest, he uually achieved his objectives. As a graduate the goals will be higher and the work harder, but with his strong desire, his ease with people and his great ability, Lloyd should be equal to any challenge. Hop and Activities Committee 4, 3, 2.1; Debate Coun- cil and Forum 2,1; Russian Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; HOWITZER 2. 1; Rugby Club 4; Cadet Chapel A colytes 2.1. GEORGE R. BROCK B-1 George George, the man who is always there. A quick wit and a heart that lies in the Rhineland are big things in the life of an outwardly quiet individual. Behind this, one finds a person full of fun and ready to do anything or argue about anything. Stubborn in a gentle way, George is a friend to all and an enemy to none. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3; French Language Club 2, I ; Handball Club 1 ; KDET 2,1. WILLIAM RUSSELL BROWDER I-l Bill Though missing the warm climate of his native Arkansas, Bill worked hard to adapt to the wintry blasts of the Hudson and the other aspects of cadet life. Judo being his main interest, he also learned and enjoyed many other sports during his four years. His desire to get the job done will assure his success as a soldier. Judo 4. 3. 2. 1 . .Secretary-Treasurer 2. President 1. CHARLES EDWARD BROWN, JR. F-1 Charlie A likeable, carefree fellow who decided to transfer from Yale after his freshman year. Charlie will long be remembered as a classmate who placed others before himself. His natural sense of humor was evident in all fields from academics to athletics. His drive showed he was capable of attaining any goal he desired. This fact, coupled with his unselfishness, assures him of suc- cess and happiness in the future. Football 4; Baseball 4; Debate Council and Forum 4; HOWITZER 3. 2, 1 ; Dialectic Society 2. 1. CHARLES EDWARD BRCWN. JR DAVID ROBERT BROWN A-2 Dave Dave ' s humor and intelligence have made him a valuable asset to every organization with which he has been associated. A Star man and permanent member of the Dean ' s List, his talents are by no means limited to academics, having earned his class Numerals Plebe year and a Major A Yearling year in track. An Army brat, his fondest memories are of Hawaii; yet he is continually looking to his future career in the Army, hopefully flying. With his talents he should have little trouble in achieving his goals. Cross Country 4; Track 4.3: HOWITZER 2.1; Pistol Club 4; Cardinal Newimin Cluh 4, 3, 2. 1; Flying Club I. DAVID ROBERr BROWr LLOYD KENT BROWN L-1 Brownie Working under the theory that every hour spent studying must be compensated for by two under his brown boy, and never hesitant about shrugging aside text books for a good bull session, Kent has still man- aged to become a permanent fixture on the Dean ' s List. The " spud from Idaho ' s " warmth combined with his zealous energy and contagious love for fun have helped to make the lives of all who know him just a little bit better. Debate Council and Forum 4, Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3, 2 3,2, 1. 3. 2, I. President; 1; Debate Team 4, LLOYD KENT BROWN WILLIAM HOWARD BRL SH NEIL EDWARD BROWN A-2 Neil Young Neil began his pursuit of the Goddess of Learning at North Carolina State but decided, in view of the many collegiate distractions, that he required a more spartan existence. His ready wit and ever present good humor have managed to carry him undaunted through all soirees, great or small. They will certainly carry him equally well through a long and distinguished career. Pistol 4. 3, 2; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, J; Spanish Language Club 1; Pistol Club 4, 3, 2: Prot- estant Discussion Group: SCUSA 4, 3, 2. ROBERT D. BROWN. Ill K-l Dune An Arm_ brat. Dime entered the Military .Academy with an enthusiasm destined to make his a successful career. Never satisfied with less than a great challenge or less than 100 effort. Dune applied himself suc- cessfully in such activities as sky diving and cross coun- try. Possessing a sincere desire to help others. Dune was never lacking a ready smile and a quick hand, consequently, his list of friends was lengthy. His fine record here is but a preview of future accomplishments. Sk Diving 2,1: Ski Patrol 3: Radio Club 4. 3. WILLIAM EDWARD BRUSH D-1 Bill Bill changed family tradition by coming to West Point, since his father is in the Navy and his brother is a Middle. ■ " Fuller ' " entered with a casual attitude, which he has maintained, while searching for a higln grade, a good b-ache and the right girl. His friendly personalitv will be remembered and his friendship cherished. ' Frencli Language Club 4. 3. 2. I: Rocket Club 4. 3. 2. J: Camera Club 4. 3. 2. I: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3. 2, I: ScnutinuMcrs ' Council 4, 3: Cadet Cluipet Acolytes 4. 3. 2. 1 : KDET 4. 3, 2. J. JAMES EDWARD BRYAN A-1 Jamie .A traxeling boyhood, which included one tour of West Point, a father and brother who graduated before him, Jamie came to us from what might be termed a slightly military family. Not quite making it in after graduating from high school, he is one of the old men of the class. He ' s not bald yet and his age hasn ' t affected his making friends with the younger set. Jamie has had trouble with athletics because of his bad knee, but is now banging around with the lacrosse stick. Lacrosse 4,2, I , Numerals 4, Monogram 2, Major A 1: Hockey 4, Numerals 4: Honor Committee 2, 1; Rocket Club 2, 1; Skin Diving Club 2, 1; lAMES EDWARD BR AN RICHARD 1 ARR-l l)R AM RICHARD LARR BRYANT B-1 Larry Those wlm doubt the existence of the Arkansas Traveler need Unik no further: Larry is the genuine article. Complete even to the guitar, he is the image of Southern gentility and good humor; nevertheless, when the fists start flying, he is a good man to have on one ' s side. Larry was an old citizen of these parts when we arrived and we found his experience and guidance invaluable. May they be available in the future. Hop and Activities Coinmiiicc 4. . . 2. I : Pistol Cluh 4: Sheet and Trap Chili 4. 3. PALL W ILLIAM BIC ' HA F-2 Bud Gifted with both athletic and academic prowess. Bud has made his mark as one of .Army ' s finest swimmers and as a Starman. His desire and determina- tion to excel, his willingness to accept any challenge and his sincerely, have won him the respect and friendship of many. Success, happiness and hopefully, that " perfect girl, " will find their way into his future years. Swimming 4, 3. 2. 1 , Captain 1 : 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee: 3d Class Committee: Hop and Activities Committee 4. 3. 2. I: Public Information Detail, Chairman I: Public Relations Council 4. 3: Water Polo Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Ski Club 4: Class Sec- retary 3.2.1. J? - " " i jIKALD a Bl CKOSkV iRKE OWEN BLINTZ C HARLES H BL ROARDT THOMAS MERRII 1 Bl MPASS, JR GERALD A. BUCKOSKY K-2 Boo Boo is probably one of the most popular and most humorous guys around the Corps. His quick wit and rolicking actions constantly keep others in stitches. However, his talents don ' t end with clown-like gim- micks, for he also has the knack for the sciences and that includes how to attract those good-looking blondes. Jer should do well in whatever he attempts, for his personality and perscrvcrance seem to point him toward a bright future. Football 4: Portuguese Language Club 4, 3. 2, 1; Rocket Club .?, 2. I . Vice President; Ski Club 3. 2. 1. THOMAS MERRITT BUMPASS, JR. A-2 Merritt Merritt ' s arrival on the scene was marked with his genial personality and easy-going disposition. Always a conscientious student, his grades reflected his deep pride and perseverance. Much of his time was spent participating in various athletic activities which had been nurtured during his high school days in Roxboro, N.C. His journey through life should be marked with a success that is indicative of his unbending character and adherence to his ideals. Golj 4; Debat e Council and Furum I: Frencli Lan- guage Club ] : Debate 4. RICHARD D BDNN STFPHE-N CLARK RICHARD D. BUNN K-l Rick Always one up on tho T.D., academics and girls. Rick brought to West Point a sunny California dis- position that never failed to win him the friendship and respect of his classmates. His determination and will to win will stand him in good stead in the years to come. Skv Diving 4, 3, 2; Audio Clul) l; Centurv Club 4, 3, 2, 1. BURKE OWEN BUNTZ K-2 Burke The pride and joy of the Buckeye state, Burke had little difficulty making the transition from Napoleon to the rack. Although the French department tried to cut his military career short, Burke had a reputation as a great lover of books. In fact he could never stand to crack one. His imagination and devotion to the task at hand made him a valuable friend to all those around him. Audio Club 2. 1: Rockc! Club I: HOWITZER 4. 2, I; Camera Club 1 ; Dance Orchestra 3 : Dialectic Society 1 ; Radio Club 3,2. CHARLES H. BURGARDT 1-2 Chuck For four years Chuck has displayed to us an exuberant personality, unlimited energy and ability, a deep desire to give assistance wherever possible and an unassuming warmth for his fcllowman. We could not have asked for a more loyal friend or closer comrade. The only way we can repay Chuck for all he has done us is to wish him nothing but the best in the future; a future already made bright by his natural ability and ambition. 150 lb. Football 4. 3. Coach 2, J; Wrestling 4; Rocket Club; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; Ski Club. STEPHEN CLARK BURRELL C-1 Nikita Nikita is probably the only member of the " avant- garde " to attend West Point since Edgar Allen Poe. With his dry and satirical wit, the skiing flash from Wyoming has helped all of us laugh at ourselves. Steve is a fine friend whom we all think will some day rule the world, or at least a part there of. Hudson Hideaway will never realize the lull measure of experiments that have straightened his mind into the correct way of thought. 750 lb. Football 4; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; Rocket Club 1 ; Russian Language Club 3.2.1; Rugby Club 4. 3. 2; Ski Team 4, 3, 2. 1; Dialectic Society 4,3. ROBERT RONALD BLTTERFIELD C-2 Ron Whether in the barracks, where he infused our lives with a constant warmth and subtle humor, or as a member of the hockey and football varsities, where his indomitable figure was an anchorage for the " ' twelfth man ' s " ' spirit. Ron ' s rugged outdoorsman mein, social grace and quiet intelligence distinguished him as a rare combination of gentleman and athlete. He was and always will be a valuable friend and natural leader. Football 4, 3. 2, ; Hockey 4. 3. 2. I: Public Injorma- tion Detail 3; Skin Diving Club 4. 3: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4.3. WILLIAM EDMLND BYRNE. Ill E-1 Bill Bill came to L ' SMA from a year at RPI. His keen mind and ability to use it to help others enabled him to quickly acquire Stars while gaining the respect and admiration of his classmates. Although seldom at odds with the T.D., Bill managed to keep a mind of his own, a characteristic which will serve him in good stead in his chosen career. A loyal friend. Bill should succeed in all his endeavors. 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Committee: 3d Class Committee; Russian Language Club 4. 3: Water Polo Club 2, 1; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2.1: Skeet and Trap Club 3, 2. ROBt RF R( LD BLTTFRFIELD WILLIAM LDMLND B ' l RNK. PETHR JOHN CAHI THOMAS HA1 hS CARLl, PETER JOHN CAHILL A-I Pete When at a loss lor sdmcthiiig to say about liis home city of Toledo, Pete was constantly ready to discuss his part in " the last of the I- 1 Plebe years, " but he always packed a large grain of salt, brightening parades Yearling year with a Halloween mask. A quick wit and a quicker mind, but what uill always make lifelong friends for Pete is the shin on his back — he gives it up for any friend. Debute Council and Forum 2. I: Frcndi Lcinguuiie Club 4. 3. 2. I; HOWITZER 3: An Club 4; Camera Club 3, 2; PisiolClub 4; SCUSA 2.1. RUSSELL ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, JR E-1 Russ Russ came to us from the heart of " ode Island. He soon won the respect and admiration of all those around him. His subtle wit, shiny bright smile and athletic prowess became his fame. " The Dean will little note nor long remember what we say here, but he can never forget what Russ did here. " His warm personality and desire to succeed will make him a real asset to Uncle Sam ' s Army. .Swimming 4; Track 4: Public Injur motion Detail 2.1: Astronomy Club 3, 2. 1, President 1 : French Lan- guage Club 3. 2. 1; German Language Club 3. 2. 1; HOWITZER 3: Camera Club 2. I : Ski Club 4. 3. 2. 1 : ROBERT MICHAEL CARINI H-2 Bob Bob came here with big ideas for the future and is leaving with bigger ones, as he shifts his Corvette into second gear. While here he was known by all for his willingness to participate and his ability in the classroom. As he leaves he takes with him the keys to open doors on the path to future success. He is a man marked as a sure bet in this game of life. Baseball 4: German Language Club 3. 2. I: Rocket Club 3.2.1: Catholic C Impel A colyies 2.1. THOMAS HAYES CARLL I-l Tommy Tommy ' s Texas walk and soft personality are well known to all of us. In everything, we found Tommy to be a hard-nosed competitor. He excelled on the base- ball and football fields, as well as in all the many other facets of cadet life. In whatever he does in the future he is sure to do it with the same sense of pride and desire that enabled him to be one of the most out- standing members of our class. 150 lb. Football 4.3. Numerals 4. Monogram 3: Foot- ball 2. 1, Monogram: Baseball 4, 3. 2, 1, Major A 3, 2: 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Cotnmittee: 3d Class Committee; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Art Club 3. 2, 1; .Skin Diving Club 2. 1: SCUSA 4.3.2.1; TERRY AXEL CARLSON TERRY AXEL CARLSON H-2 Zeke Arriving at West Point after a year of Big Ten College life, Terry quickly picked up the name of " the stonefaced one " because as a Plebe he would ne ' er crack a smile. Terry always managed to stay on Dean ' s list, even with all his tennis and squash. Through his four years, Terry has made many lifelong friendships and will be remem bered by all as a great guy who was always willing to help everyone. Tennis 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Squash 4, 3. 2. 1: Debate Council and Forum 4; Bridge Cluh 3, 2: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. 2 J: Cardinal Newman Club 1 : Dialectic Society 4. ROBERT BRUCE CATO I-l Bob In a few words. Bob is the greatest. His outstand- ing athletic ability, coupled with his scholastic achieve- ments, have been the basis of four extremely successful years. With a kind word for everyone, a marvelous sense of humor and a willingness to do more than is required of him, he has endeared himself to his class- mates. Bob ' s pride in his work and sense of responsi- bility will assure him of success in any undertaking, and his superb personality will serve him well in future years. 150 lb. Football 4, 3; Mathematics Forum 2.1: Span- ish Language Club 2.1: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1; Dialectic Society 2,1. JOHN RICHARD CHAFFER A-2 Dick Dick is known for his straightforward and frank opinions. He consistently shows the ability to complete a difficult job in the best possible manner by always applying his wholehearted effort to the task. Dick is a great music lover as evidenced by his owning one of the finest FM stereo systems. When commissioned, he will be a credit to the Academy and to the Army. Audio Club 2, 1: Sailing Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Models Club 2, 1; Glee Cluh 4: Amateur Radio Cluh 2, 1; Sailing Team 4.3.2,1. RICHARD WARREN CHAPMAN G-1 Rick Many of his classmates think of Rick as blonde, B.J. and brainy. Others know him to be friendly, fun- loving and faithful. But 1 will always remember him as no kings, no suit, no trump. Often doubt ed but seldom doubled. Rick plays life " like he plays bridge, with bold assurance and a lot of finesse. His Stars will put him in the Engineer Corps, and his fairness and fidelity will put him on top. Soccer 4; Astronomy Cluh 3. 2. 1. I ice-President; Mathematics Forum 2. I: Spanish Language Club 3, 2, 1: Bridge Cluh 3. 2. 1 . Secretary 1: Chess Club 2, 1:KDET4.3,2. ROHIRF BRl ( h C, FREDERICK JOSEPH ( HARl.ES, III Rick Rick ' s cflorts during CiR ' s It. keep the ckiss from shrinking in size will long be remembered by the goats of I- 1 and K-l. Those long sessions, which frequently stretched into the small hours of the morning, were interspersed with forays to the roof of the New South Barracks to test-fly revolutionarily designed paper airplanes, which somehow never could quite make it across the Hudson. Pistol 4, 3, 2. I; Gennun Language Club 3, 2, 1; HOWITZER 3. 2. I, Associate Editor: Pistol Club 4, 3, Secretary 2, President J: Dance Orchestra 4. EMERY JOHN CHASE. JR. C-1 Ems There are many of Emery ' s friends who might not be here today if it were not for his helping hand in academics. He is always ready to help as long as it is needed. His unselfishness is equaled only by his sense of humor and fun-loving disposition. He will always have our admiration and friendship. Honor Committee 3, 2. 1 ; Audio Club 2. ] : Debate Council and Forum 4: Spanisli Language Club 3, 2. 1 ; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3. 2, Secretary 1 . FRFDFRICK JOShPH C HARl t EMERY JOHN CHASE. JR. KENNETH JEFFERSON CHERRY DENNIS L CHUDOBA KENNETH JEFFERSON CHERRY D-1 Ken Ken left the Tennessee hills to come to West Point and his first challenge was to adapt himself to wearing shoes. He overcame that obstacle and has since done well in sports and academics. One of his many athletic achievements was being named outstanding rider at the Spring Hunt. Ken is known for his accent and his Southern humor, and because of tests put to his ability his second ear here, he is able to accomplish anything. DENNIS L. CHUDOBA B-2 Denny Denny is a guy always ready with a laugh or a helping hand. No matter how tough the going, he is in there punching — be it in the ring or at the boards. A goat, he spent his free time in the rack or learning more about his favorite woman, the " queen of battle. " Being the true scrapper he is, the Infantry can be proud of gaining another top-notch officer. Gvmnasrics 4, Numerals: Debate Council am! Forum 4. 3. 2. 1: POINTER I: Rowling 3; Pistol Club 4. DANIEL WILLIAM CHRISTMAN L-2 The " D " Throughout his four years at West Point, Dan has continued to display the personal qualities which first became evident during his prep school days at Hudson. Through his great desire, determination and self- discipline, he has attained a physical and scholastic level of ability which many of us would only dare to dream about. Success in Dan ' s future life is unquestion- able, for it will only be a matter of time before his achievements truly become an indication of his superior abilities. Track 3. 2 .1 : 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Com- mittee: 3d Class Cotnmittee: Ring and Crest Com- mittee 4, 3, 2. 1; Debate Council and Forum 2, 1; Mathematics Forum I: Rocket Club I: HOWITZER 4, 3; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4. 3. 2. I: Cardinal Newman Club 4,3.2,1. CURTIS D. CHURCHWELL H-2 Curt Curt was the guiding and stabilizing influence in our division of complete indiflference. He has the steady type of strength and drive that will put him through any situation which may arise. Besides his steadiness, he has the rare quality of being a natural athlete. No man was better on the Lacrosse field or handball court. These qualities are the ones that make Curt a fine man. Bridge Club 1: Outdoor .Sportsmen Club 4: Goat- Engineer Football: Ski Club 4. 3. THOMAS ANTH(1N - ( INDRIC THOMAS ANTHONY CINDRIC H-1 TOM Intelligence, ambitinn and a tine sense of humor have combined to make Tom the type of person that everyone wants for a friend. Noted for his English themes and impeccable grade charts. Tom has demon- strated a great capacity to succeed at those things he considers important. He looks forward eagerly to a career in the Artillery or Corps of Engineers. Football 4: Baseball 4: Catholic Chapel Choir 2.1. ALEXANDER J. CLARK. JR. C-2 Al Al Clark, known afTectionately as the oldest living cadet in C-2, came to West Point from somewhere in the Southwest, a small place known as Texas. Since coming here, Al has become a sailor-on-the-Hudson, and is one of the Glee Clubbers who is always on a trip. His ability to hide his tracks in artfully worded verbal camouflage knows no bounds. We expect great things from Al. Soccer 4: Sailing Club 4.3.2.1: Cadet C Impel Choir 4.3,2. 1. LAWRENCE C CLE LE JERRY F. CLARK A-1 Jerry Coming from a farm in upstate New York, Jerry ' s good nature and sincere friendliness carried him through the many obstacles of cadet life with flying colors. If you can ' t find Jerry under the brown boy or out drag- ging, you can bet he is somewhere trying to evade the Tactical Department. Quite the tactician on the plain. Jerry ' s " drag-nets " succeeded when others failed. The resourcefulness he learned as a cadet will be a real asset in his career. Public Information Detail 4. 3: Astronomy Club 3.2, 1 Audio Club 3: Rocket Club 3, 2. I; Ski Team 4 Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2. I: Pistol Club 3. 2. 1 Skin Diving Club 2. 1 . BRUCE BENNETT GORHAM CLARKE M-2 Bruce Bruce will long be remembered by his classmates in M-2 as the man who pulled the majority of them through Solids and Fluids. Every night Bruce faithfully did the problems, even though science was not his true love. He was a hive in Social Science and as such, a constant pain for the Social Science professors with all of his world shaking theories. With his drive, Bruce should go far. Debate Council and Forum 3, 2. !; Rocket Club ]; Russian Lani uai, ' e Club I: Bridge Club 4, 3, 2, 1; PistolClub4,3, ' 2. 1. ANTHONY H. CLAY mtikmim mi ANTHONY H. CLAY 1-1 Tony Tony has a short move when he came to West Point, and he soon showed that his transition from high sehool to college competition was just as easy. Because of his desire and competitive spirit Tony soon became national known, as he made All-American all four years at West Point. He was quick to show that all his talents weren ' t in the pool and he took interest in many activities and along the way gained many lasting friendships. Tlic Infantry is lucky to have him; he should go far. Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1. Major A 4. 3. 2, I . A II- Ameri- can 3, 2. I; BUGLE NOTES 2, I, Editor-in-Chief 1. Assistant Editor 2; Water Polo Clidy 4,3.2.1; Pistol Club 4. STEPHEN DAVID CLEMENT L-2 Frog Steve Clement covered many, many miles in many, many respects during his sorjourn at L ' SMA. From the ski slopes of the Upper Peninsula, through days of " the praying mantis poop " , to the raceways of West Point ' s track and cross-country courses, it was a long haul, but Steve became the master of all. The cry " C ' mon Frog " became familiar. We ' ll never forget this malapropism — forgive us — but then neither will we for- get this great fellow and greater friend. Cross Country 4. 3, 2. I; Indoor Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4. Major A 3. 2. I : Outdoor track 4. 3. 2, 1 , Numerals 4, Major A 2. I : Debate Council and Forum 1; French Lani;ucii e Cliih 4. 3. 1: Catholic Cliapel Acohtes 4. 3. 2. l ' : Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3, 2, 1; Ski Patrol 4. 3. 2.1: Ski Club 4. 3, 2. L LAWRENCE C. CLEWLEY 1-2 Larry Larry, alias Clew, is as straight as they come. Give him a soap box and he ' ll preach fire and brimstone or lecture on the merits of being a Boy Scout. " Faithful to ONE, ever true, and can ' t wait to don the Army Blue. Bound for greatness, just wait and see; his reverie is the Artillery. " Debate Council and Forum 4: HOWITZER 2. I; Scoutmasters ' Council 4. 3. 2.1: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4. 3.2.1. ROBERT LEIGH CLOVER A-1 Bob As A-l ' s representative from Iowa and the farm country. Bob brought with him a fine sense of humor and a well-used brown boy. Never having to worry about academics, he found plenty of time to satisfy his curiosity about the female sex and make a major con- tribution toward the company ' s intramural efforts. It has been a real pleasure being associated with Bob, and his success in the Army will never be in doubt. Lacrosse 4: French Language Club 3. 2. 1 : POINTER I; Sky Diving I : Cadet Chapel Choir 4: Goat-Engineer Football 2. RICHARD E. COLEMAN G-2 Dick With a smile on his lips and a song in his heart, Dick came trooping out of the back woods of Arkansas bound for glory. Never letting anyone forget the origin of his accent, he won many lasting friends throughout the Corps. Blessed with quality in his voice, a great competitive spirit and any easy-going personality, this man will go far in his life after graduation. When Dick left Arkansas, the South lost a good man, but the Army is better for it. Wrestling 4: POISTER 4. 3: Rugby Club 2. 1 : Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. I; Dialectic Society 4. 3; Glee Club 3. 2, I: Ski Club 4. 3. 2. I: Hooligan Club 2. 1. H1URD fc COLfcM N DHNNIS R COl DENNIS R. COLL F-2 Denny Denny came to West Point and went right to work making friends and showing his outstanding qualities to everyone. He had many interests here and he put forth his best effort at all times, but he still found time to rest on occasion. Denny found a home with the Corps and with the attitudes developed here, he will never be daunted in his endeavors on life ' s road beyond West Point. Football 4, 3: Ring and Crest Committee 3, 2, 1; Rabble Roiisers 1 ; German Language Club 2; Spanish Language Club 4. 3; Rugby Club 3; Sailing Club 3. 2, 1 ; Camera Club 2. ].: Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3, 2,1; Glee Club 4. RIIH. RDGLEN C JOHN FRANCIS (ONC XNNON RICHARD GLEN COLLINS M-1 Dick The fun-loving philosopher from Los Angeles never lost his ability to smile in spite of a frontal at- tack by the T.D. that lasted all of Cow year. A fierce competitor anywhere, never intimidated by the Aca- demics Department, Dick could attain anything he desired, using what we realized was a truly gifted intellect. Numerous friends will testify that drive and aggressiveness will be his mark wherever he goes. Track 4, 3. J; Pistol Club 4, 3; Rugby Club I. JOHN FRANCIS CONCANNON, 111 K-2 Jack Jack was the prize package plebe, delivered in a mattress cover. With Sean, his leprechaun, he adjusted quickly to cadet life, shown by newspaper deliveries in his B-robc. With beard, derby and brown boy he fought academics to a standstill, never opening a book in four years. This gave him time to find and win a certain young lady. Above all. Jack is a good man to have on our side; it ' s safer that way. Hockey 4; Soccer 4, 3. 2, 1 ; Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1; French Language Club 2.1; Russian Lan- guage Club 2. I; HOWITZER 4. 3; Scoutmasters ' Council 3; Catholic Chapel Clioir 4.3.2.1; Dialectic Society 2. 1 : 1964 100th Niglit Sliow. MILBLRN KENNETH CONCANNON, JR. G-1 Mike After more than two cars in the Air Force, Mike came to West Point, a determined man. This determina- tion has won him respect from all. Never has he left a job undone or badly done. It was not all work and no play with Mike, for many a weekend he could be found on Flirtation Walk. " ' Shut the door, please " is an expression that will he remembered by those who knew him well. Audio Club 1 ; Art Club 3; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2.1; Skcet and Trap Club 2.1; Ski Club 2.1. JAMES S. CONLFY, JR. M-1 Shamus A quick wit. a face full of smiles and a genuine sincerity to help other people, characterizes M-l ' s emigrant from the University of Washington. Jim is famous in everything from a Rabble Rouser to a dancer; including his popularity with the Academic Department, which has let him take the final exams three times. A natural athlete, Jim has dabbled in 150 lb. football, intramural lacrosse and the 123 lb. spot on the wrestling team. He will always be remembered as just a great guy. Best of luck, Jim. 150 lb. Football 4; Wrestling 4. 3. 2. I; Rabble Rousers 2.1; German Language Club 3.2.1; POINT- ER 1 . Managing Editor; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2. 1. W ILLIAM J CONNOLLY WILLIAM J. CONNOLLY H-1 Bill Bill came to us as one of the favorite sons of Boston. His good nature has made him well-liked by all who know him and his ability to gain friendship was always closely paralleled by his athletic qualities. The future should shine brightly upon Bill, for his per- sonality and ability lend themselves to complete success in any endeavor. Hockey 4; Astronomy Cliih 3. 2. I : Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; German Language Club 3, 2. 1; Rocket Club 1: POINTER 2; Rugby Club 3. 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Choir 3, 2. 1: Dialectic Society 3. MICHAEL JAMES CONNOR K-1 Mike Mike, after living here for three years, was no stranger to West Point when he entered the Corps. He immediately accepted the challenge of Plebe year and could always be counted on when the chips were down. This Army brat will always be remembered as a very good friend as well as an excellent leader. Mike is bound for even greater heights as an Infantry officer. Lacrosse 4, Numerals; Soccer 4; Debate Council and Forum 1 ; French Language Club I ; Catluilic Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2. 1 : Glee Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Ski Club 4,3,2,1. JOHN E. CONNOR. HI John John came to West Point with high hopes and higher goals. Plebe year saw him excel in many activi- ties; he was by far the best soccer player lucky G-1 ever saw. His leadership ability did not go unnoticed for long either. Through the years. John has disap- pointed no one; he has left his mark at West Point with the Academic Depart, the T.D. and most of all with his many friends. The Army is gaining an outstanding officer and a fine man. Public Information Detail 2. 1: Debate Council and Forum 4. 3. 2. I: HOWITZER 2. 1 : Catholic Chapel Choir 2,1. CHARLES M. COOK D-1 Chuck Chuck came to us from West Virginia. His com- petitive spirit has made him a tough nut to crack in some tight situations and it has gained him the respect of those around him. His friendly smile and equally friendly attitude has gone a long way toward making him a well-liked friend. He is insured success in what- ever field of endeavor he chooses. Swimming 4; Debate Council and Forum 3; Models Club I; Skin Diving Club 2, I: Protestant Discussion Group 1. CHARLES M COOK MICMAI I. JAMhS CONNOR JACK WAYNE COOLEY E-2 Spade Jack is not the type to " take things by storm, " tor such would be out of character. Through his mild manner and his ability not to jump the gun, which are perfect keeping with his ways, he has achieved a posi- tion that very few cadets are able to obtain throughout the years of " cadetship " — and that is respect. The " Padre, " his smile, his manners and his abilities will always be a credit to our class. Honor Committee 2,1; Catholic Chapel 4. 3: Dance Orchestra 4, 3; Dialectic Society 4, 3; Glee Club 3.2,1. PHIIJP ROBERT COOPER K-1 Phil Although his main interest at West Point was the Mountaineering Club, of which he was President, Phil ' s true love was a certain Northwestern New York girl. He will always be remembered for his great contribu- tions to the intramural teams, for his unselfish help in academics and for his quiet and sincere manner. With this personality, as well as perseverance, high intellect and a devotion to duty, we know that Phil will be a fine officer. JACK WAYNE COOLEY Public Infornuition Detail 3; 4. 3, 2. 1; Rifle Club 4. 3. 2 Club 3,2. 1. President 1. Outdoor Sportsmen Club 1 : Cadet Mountaineering PHILIP ROBERT COOPER ■MM I T[ Mm ik JAMES MICHAEL COUGHLIN THOMAS L CROAK LOUIS S CSOKA JAMES MICHAEL COUGHLIN C-1 Jim. Flynn Being an Irish-CathoIic-democrat from Boston, Jim is seen by most of his classmates as " ' your friendly politician about campus. " Quick-witted and smiling, he. like all Irishmen, has ingrained in him an impish spirit which often runs to mischief. However, beneath all this lies a man of strong character, possessing a will to succeed in all he undertakes. We know that Jim. through his wonderful personality and sense of humor, will make the best of anything he does. Rocket Club I; Russian Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Handball Club 1; Sk Diving 1: Catholic Chapel Clwir4. 3, 2, 1. THOMAS L. CROAK E-2 Tom It isn ' t often that a guy comes along who thinks as much about doing things for other people as the May- wood, Illinois flash. You seldom see Tom without a smile on his face and a kind word of greeting and, he will always greet you by name. Anyone this friendly just can ' t go anywhere but to the top. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2.1; Pistol Club 4, 3. LOUIS S. CSOKA K-1 Louis Louis was truly the example of a West Pointer. Overcoming difficulties as a refugee from Hungary, he brought his high ideals and hard work to West Point and became a legend and the leader of our class during Plebe year. He never failed to appear on the Dean ' s List. With his sense of humor he enlightened many dull hours and his love for the .Army can only bring great success in the future. Track: Soccer; Hop and Activities Committee 4, 3, 2, 1: French Language Club 3, 1; German Language Club 1; Fencing Club 3: Sailing Club 3: Skin Diving Club 1 ; Cadet C Impel Choir 4.3: Dance Orchestra 4.3; Glee Club 4, 3, 2. L JOHN NOLAN CULLEN. Ill C-2 Runt From the Confederate flag displayed in his locker, to his deep drawl, Johnny seemed to bring part of Mississippi with him in his successful four year assault on the North. The rigors of cadet life were no problem for our hero and he won many battles in the classrooms, on the lacrosse field and on the streets of New York. Those fortunate enough to know this ex " loose-deucer " well are confident that the world is gaining a man of talent and worth. 150 lb. Football 4. 3. 2. 1; Lacross 4. 3. 2. 1: Spanish Language Club 4. 3: HOWITZER 4, 3; Ski Club 4. ' ' 3mii JOHN NOLAN CULLEN. -- «i i.. GILBFRT UARRtN ( L R[ . JR GILBERT WARREN CURL, JR. C-1 Gil Words are barely adequate to describe Gil, a true friend of all who knew him. While not dragging Ginny, Gil occupied himself with a good movie, bridge game or losing another tussle with his brown boy. Academics never bothered him, especially when he could do some- thing else, yet he always did well. His convivial spirit and sincerity made him popular from the start and coupled with his enthusiasm and ability, earmark him for success in all his future endeavors. Swimming Manager 3; Audio Club : French Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Rocket Club 2. I : Water Polo Club 4; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. STEPHEN CLARK DARRAH A-1 Steve Steve has proven himself to be a big man from a small state. He brought with him from Rhode Island a big sense of humor and one of the biggest squash racquets in the nation. Steve is a hard worker in every- thing he does. When he works he is serious, but he manages to keep smiling. He will undoubtedly be suc- cessful in whatever he does. Squasl 4. 3. 2. 1: Tennis 4. 3, 2. I: Public Informa- tion Detail 1; HOWITZER 4: Judo 4: Skin Diving Club 4,3, I. STEPHEN CLARK DARRAH GARRETT MARK DA IS JOSEPH E DEFRANCISCO ERICT deJONCKHEERE. JOHN STEPHEN DA 1S GARRETT MARK DAVIS E-2 Gam- Garry has never known the word " " quit " — and this has proven to be a most valuable asset in his develop- ment. His determination and will to succeed will con- tinue to place him at the top. No one could be more valued as a friend, for never was there an instance when Garry would hesitate to help when help was needed. There is no doubt in his future success, for such quali- ties do not harvest failure. His sacrifices will be more than rewarded tomorrow. Rifle 4; Spanish Language Club 3. 1: Bowling 1: Rifle Club 4. JOHN STEPHEN DAVIS C-2 Steve PUnk. plank, plunk! Anybody want to buy a used guitar, almost fixed? Steve is a brat — hails from all over. He " s a fast man on anybody ' s athletic team, but even faster to pick up his guitar and lead a group in song. He is easy going, a really fine guy, just as willing to sit and give serious counsel as he is to have a good time. He has made the most of life at West Point. Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2. 1: Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club Quartet 3,2. 1. LEONARD D DAVIS pp F ' Rj- - ■ HPHRI LEONARD D. DAVIS H-1 Doug Emerging from the thriving metropohs of Bisbee, Arizona, where he was very active in football and track, Doug has vaulted himself right up into the top ranks as a cadet. Excelling in both academics and on the track team as a cadet and with his ability to make friends, Doug will surely reach the top in life. And, as Airborne-Ranger qualified, he will always be seen wearing his two crossed rifles on the lapel of his olive drab suit. Track 4. .?. 2, 1 : Public hifdrnniiion Detail 3: Moiitain- eering Club 3: Cardinal Newman Club 3,2, 1 . ERIC T. de JONCKHEERE, JR. F-2 Tom While placing books in their proper place — on the shelves — Tom always managed to find time for the finer things in life — golf, basketball, tennis and the movies. Never allowing the fairer sex to seriously affect his life, he managed to record laudable success on the fields of friendly strife. Tom ' s rare blend of common sense, humor and academic ability, plus his loyalty to his friends and principles will insure his future success. Baseball Manager 4: French Language Club 2; 1; HOWITZER 4 3. JOSEPH E. DEFRANCISCO A-1 Joe Albany ' s claim to fame and notoriety is a con- scientious, well-mannered fellow wc have come to respect. " True blue " and " straight arrow " are terms which cannot be applied derogatorily to this likeable friend. Though he never talks about the summer venture into the Caribbean, we are sure he has made many friends there as well. Great things will always be heard of him and wc owe him our highest compliments. Football 4; Debate Council and Forum 2, 1; Portu- guese Language Club 3. 2. I: Judo 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3.2, 1 ; Cardinal Newman Club 3.2, 1. ROBERT ANTHONY DE LAAR F-1 Lucky Lucky ' s stay at West Point has been characterized by both athletic and academic achievement. Whether it be on the rugby field, the wrestling mats or in the class- room. Lucky has always put forth his best effort. Always willing to help others, a great personality and a sincere friend, Lucky will always carry the best wishes of his classmates. Wrestling 4, 3, 2. 1; Rugby Club 3,2,1. 4 -4 ' ' ' fe-..,„ DAVID SARGENT Dh MOLLPltD DAVID SARGENT DE MOULPIED H-1 Mopes Dave ' s catcalls, barks and " cousin Brucie ' s " will keep South area vibrating for years to come. His room- mates will never forgive him for winning on the horses seven days in a row just like he never let them forget it. His biggest thrill in life came when he won a tennis trophy, which he always maintained was just like win- ning a pennant for marching; even though it was utterly worthless, it proved he had done something of no benefit to anyone-more capably than anyone else. Cross Country 4, 2; Track 3, 2; Ring and Crest Com- mittee: Handball Club 1; Skv Diving 1; Sailino Club 1; Models Club 1. DOMINIC H. DeSANTlS. JR DOMINIC H. DeSANTlS. JR. G-2 Bo Bo emerged from the fields of friendly strife in academics and football without a dent in his good- natured character. Tnie to the hallmark of venerable Kappa Dos, he " nosed " his way through the hardships of cadet life. Always true to himself, what he did, he did well. Football 4. 3. 2, 1: Track 4. 1 : Rocket Club I: Span- ish Language Club 1 ; Rugby 1 . JULIO Of SANTIS A SPOTSWOOD DE WITT JULIO Dc SANTIS F-2 Baby Bear Cosa Nostra ' s contribution to the Corps arrived here suffering from a severe " ping " complex. TTiis inalaily soon gave way to the familiar " what me worry? " atliludc lor which the Baby Bear is now famous. After four Inurowing years, he has emerged imperious to and insoluble in the rigors of Cadet life. Lacrosse 4. 3: POINTER 4; Ski Club 2. I; Karate Club J. JOHN C. DEVITTO A-1 Weeto A Statcn Island boy coming to us by way of Villan- ova, John has to be different from the crowd he runs around with. Maureen is going to tie this free lancer down for good in June. The weekends that she isn ' t here he can be seen strolling around the Plain. During the fall and spring you can always find him on the diamond, if he is not spending his annual rest break in the hospital. Baseball 4. 3, 2, I; POINTER 4. 3; Bowling 3; Catliolic Chapel Acolytes 4. 3: KDET 4. 3, 2. SPOTSWOOD DE WITT I-l Spot Spot, from the fine Southern community of Rich- mond, Virginia, is one of the most popular men in the class. In academics, though he says he prefers social sciences, his love for them all was exemplified by his extra effort in fluids during Cow Year. Spot was a hard man to find on a weekend, spending as few as possible on the campus. A fair tennis player, he was better known for his luck with the fair sex. With his soft- spoken, easy manner, Spot can expect a lot of success in the future. Tennis 4; Squash 4: Portuguese Language Club 1; Skeel and Trap Club 3: Cadet Chapel Choir 2, 1: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4.3: Glee Club 4. JOHN MICHAEL DEEMS F-1 Minski The people who don ' t respect and admire Mike as a true friend are those who haven ' t met him yet. His stellar performance on the soccer field as well as in the classroom have put him on the top. But you would never know it, for his biggest attribute is modesty. An outstanding friend and classmate, Mike ' s future is a cloudless sky. Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1. Captain 1 : Honor Committee 2, 1; German Language Club 4. 3; Band 4, 3. M DERMODY HENRY M. DERMODY K-2 Uncle Harr ' Uncle Harry from Manchester, Mass., has over the years come to be known as the " old man " of the class of ' 65. Entering with the class of " 64, Harry initiated his cadet career by participating in a variety of activities and showing his varied interests and abili- ties. With his love for the sciences, Harry probably has more time on the slide rule than any two cadets. With such drive, a successful career is a certainty. 150 lb. Football 4; Golf 4: Lacrosse 4, 3: Rabble Roiisers 2,1: Spanish Language Club 4. 3. 2, 1; Ski Team 3; Ski Club 4, 3, 2. 1. Secretary-Treasurer 3; Ski Instructor 3. 2. 1 : Ski Patrol 4. 3. 2. 1. Patrol Leader 1 . JERRY DERNAR L-1 Jerry Cleveland ' s gift to West Point. Jerry soon became one of the well-known little men of the Corps. Jerry made no attempts to fight his brown boy after exhaust- ing wrestling practices. Early to bed was a must, but daytime hours saw Jerry alive to soak in a few minutes of study. His distinguished popcorn provided many an O.C. with a late evening snack. Calm and easy-going, Jerry will go far in the world he sees ahead. Wrestling 4, 3, 2, ; Soccer 2; Spanish Language Club 2, 1; HOWITZER 4. 2; POINTER 3; Camera Club 3, 2, I; Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. 1. CHARLES C. DICKEY, JR. K-1 Chuck To his friends. Chuck was the man for all seasons. Everything he did and everyone who knew him profited by his enthusiasm, humor and high sense of values. A competitive spirit tempered by noble ideals and con- strained by calmness, made Chuck the friend of all and a classmate whose career we will follow with pride. Football 4; Spanish Language Club 2.1; Rugby Club 1 ; Bridge Club 1 ; Chess Club 4; Bowling 3, 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3; Pistol Club 3. 1; Scoutmasters ' Council 3; Skin Diving Club 2: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3, 2,1. WALTER A. DIVERS, JR. K-1 Walt Walt came from everywhere in general and no- where in particular and took command, in his mild mannered way, of his own sector of West Point. Although military life was nothing new, Walt found the Academy a drastic change from the " simple life " of Johns Hopkins. Never noted for his own academic exuberance, he was responsible for many pro turnouts on the part of his classmates. His interests and inherent abilities will surely take him far in the Infantry. Soccer 4: Honor Committee 2. 1; Portuguese Lan- guage Club 2,1. ;RRN DfcR D. NIEL JOSEPH DONAGH F-2 Dan For the past four years this true Irishman has maintained his easy-going philosophy of a tenth earned being a tenth wasted and. when receiving his turn-out Stars, he came through in grand style. Ne er a man to sweat academics. Dan was one of the veterans of the weekday flick. The Army will pro ide a natural home for Dan and he will have no trouble having a very successful career. Ring and Crest Committee 4: HOWITZER I; POINTER 3. I: Cardinal Sewman Club 4: Goat Football Squad. DANIEL JOSEPH DONAGH ' RICHARD JAMES DONAHUE L-2 Dick It is seemingly impossible to erase the Irish twinkle in Dicks eyes. Everyone who knows him knows that he is one of the easiest going guys in the world. He is usually pretty quiet, but when these Irish go — look out. Never slowed by academics. Rich always had time for a game. Good luck and success. 150 lb. Football 4; Rocket Club 1; Cardinal ewman Club 4; B " Squad Football 2: Ski Club 4. PATRICK JOSEPH DONOVAN CHRISTOPHER JOHN DORNEY RUSSELL LION I I PATRICK JOSEPH DONOVAN D-2 Paddy Although attending college here, Paddy never really left Boston. Posting with his share of battle scars, mostly Star shaped, he leaves an indelible mark in cadet history. If records were kept of weekend drags, hours spent under his brown boy, T.D. — thwarting schemes and phrases murdered by a Boston accent, our boy would rank high. As this half of Mutt and JefT goes his merry Irish way. we wish him luck, happiness and a jug of punch. Soccer Manager 4,3,2,1. CHRISTOPHER JOHN DORNEY I-l Chris This easy-going, good-natured giiy from Brooklyn has made a lasting impression on all of us. " The old man " was a terror in the handball and squash courts and outstanding in everything he attempted, for his competitive spirit and deep sense of pride has kept him on top in all of his endeavors. We are all proud to call Chri a friend, and friends are something that he will always have many of. Mathematics Forum 1 ; Spanish Language Club 2.1; BUGLE NOTES 2, 1: Associate Editor 1 : Handball Club 2; Rugbv Club 3: Pistol Club 4. 3: Cardinal Newman Club 1: Ski Club 4. 3.2. 1: Gout Football 2. RUSSELL LIONEL DORNIER M-2 D Ever since Russ put on a pair of shoes and came North, there has been commotion. Those Northern girls just can " t seem to catch " D ' s " eye, but oh, those Southern belles. Whether in a pair of jeans or dressed in a pin stripe suit with spats and sporting a bowler and an umbrella, " D " is the coolest. If it is almost, just about nearly but not quite exactly, it won ' t pass. There is no such word as failure in your future, Russ. Basketball 4, 3; Portuguese Language Club 1; Rocket Club 3, 2, 1: Bridge Club 1; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 1 ; Skeet and Trap Club 4. GLENN ROY DOUGHTY, JR. D-2 Dotes The pride of Corpus, Dotes isn ' t agressively boast- ful about being a Te.xan. but then again he isn ' t at all shy to admit it. Although high in academics, he has never hesitated to drop his books for a hand of bridge. Glenn has always been ready to speak out his opinions, and is quite serious about his christian life. The service will get an able officer in this outspoken Texan. Spanish Language Club 1: Bowling 4. 3. 2.1: Scout- masters ' Council 3, 2. 1: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 2. I: Protestant Discussion Group 2, 1. GLENN ROY DOUGHTY, JR ROBERT ALLAN DOUGHTY- ROBERT ALLAN DOUGHTY G-1 Bob Bob came out of the Bayou country to survive his first big hurdle — tying a tie. He got past this one and went on to bigger and better things, tackling them with the same energy and vitaHty he constantly displays (even after reveille.) Bob is an organization man, a charismatic leader and a fellow anyone can depend on. Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2, 1. PAUL RICHARD DRASS G-2 Dick Dick, the incomparable, Dick the unpredictable, always full of impossible suggestions and corny jokes. He used his time jovially rationalizing his tomorrows, to plan diversions and to save his roommate from some dread chore. This was typical of Dick. He was optimistic about troubles, full of fun and a good friend. Wrestlinii4. 3. 2. I ; 150 lb. Football 4: Debate Council and Forum 3, 1 : Rocket 1 ; Russian Language Club 2, 1 ; Cadet Chapel Acolvtes 3, 2, I; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 4, 3. 2. I; KDET 4; Ski Club 3, 2. 1; NDT2, 1; Hooligan Club 2, 1. PAUL RICHARD DRASS 4gf ' M% i HAEL DRINKWATER REG WILLIAM DR ZGA DAVID MICHAEL DRINKWATER M-1 Mike Mike is one of the men who spend almost as much time on the water as on land. His ability in sailing is complimented by great ability in other sports. How- ever, Mike ' s greatest attribute was his easy-going, don ' t- let-anything-bother-you attitude. Graduation will be the beginning of what Mike has planned so hard for. Debate Council and Forum 2. 1: French Language Club 2; Sailing 4. 3. 2, 1: Catliolic C Impel Clioir 4, 3.2.1. REG WILLIAM DRYZGA I-l Driz Reg came to West Point from the Marine Corps and with him he brought a sense of humor and ideas on life that have not failed him in his cadet career. Reg never had any real trouble with academics and seemed to master everything he tried. This easy-going attitude and desire to get ahead can lead him no place but up. Debate Council and Forum 3. 2. 1 : Russian Language Club 4. 3. 2. I: POINTER 1: Handball Club 4. 3; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4. 3: Roman Smith Society. —• JEROME PIERRE DlFOl R CHARLES R ICKARI JEROME PIERRE DUFOIJR H-2 Jerry Jerry was one of the few cadets with the distinc- tion of dragging every weekend since Plebe Year. Though he excelled in academics, with the exception of Russian, it was a rare sight to see him at his dcslc. He could always be found at one of his favorite escapes — repairing radios, catching live movies a week, curl ing up in his brown boy or winning gymnastics meets. Quite the individualist, his determination and abilities will carry him far. Gymnastics 4. 3, 2. I : Dehaie Council and Forum 2. 1 ; Mathemalics Forum I: Rocket Cluh I: Skin Diving Club 2. 1; JAMES LEE DYER B-1 Jim Jim came to us from Missouri — a clean livin " kid who will go as far as he wants to in the Army. His devotion to a pretty girl from the Island made his stay here a lot brighter, and gave him an infectious cheerful- ness which he transferred to everyone near him. He will be remembered as a good guy and a capable athlete. Pistol 4, 3; Audio Club 2. 1: Frencli Lanttuage Club 3,2,l;KDET3;SkiClub4,3. JAMES E. ECHOLS. Ill F-2 Jim Jim was definitely one of the most outstanding members of the class of 1965. Never a harsh word, always a smile — might well have been his motto. His sense of responsibility, sincerety and genuine interest in others always won him the highest respect. There were few of us who didn ' t consider Jim a true friend. His contributions were numerous, but most outstanding was his loyalty. Name any compliment and Jim deserved it. Soccer 4, 2, 1: Hop and Activities Conunittee 2.. 1; German Language Club I: Sailing Club 4. 3, 1. CHARLES R. ECKART A-2 Charlie Charlie, a transfer student from Phi Delta Theta of Hanover College, came to West Point armed with an arsenal of books and the brains to use them. Unfortu- nately none of these books contained any math or physics. He always was willing to help his classmates, especially with their girls. Multi-linguist Charles will always be remembered as one of the few real members of the intelligentia of our class. Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2. 1; HOWITZER 3, 2, 1; Judo 3: Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2, 1; SCUSA 1. JERALD P. EICHELBERGER F-1 Ike Ike, a product of New Cumberland, Pa., found few tasks too difficult at his home on the Hudson. While challenging the top of his class academically, he always found ample time for many extra curricular activities, as well as time for helping others. Ambition, coupled with an extraordinary sense of humor, will most cer- tainly lead Ike to the top of any endeavor. Wrestling 4, 3; Public Information Detail 4, 3; Public Relations 2; French Language Club 3,2, 1 .Secretary 2; Bowling 2. 1; Rifle Club 4; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4. 3, 2. J; Dance Orchestra 4. 2. I; Cadet Band 2. 1: Ski Club 4.2, 1. JERALD P EICHELBERGER FREDERIC NELSON RICHORN. JR FREDERIC NELSON EICHORN, JR. C-1 Fred Fred will be long remembered by his many friends for his constant smile and a liking for a bit of friendly mischief. Equally adept on the field of friendly strife or the whirl of social life, he was at home in any situa- tion. His greatest quality, and the one that will take him far in life, is his ability to make sincere and lasting friendships with all his associates. Astronomy Club 1; Fretich Language Club I; Rocket Club 2. I; Spanish Language Club 2. 1: Water Polo Club 1; Camera Club 2,1; Models Club 2. I: Out- door Sportsmen Club I ; Cadet Chapel Choir 4,3.2,1; Goat Football Team2. STEVEN WILLIAM ELLENBOC.E STEVEN WILLIAM ELLENBOGEN M-2 Steve Steve left an indelible impression on those of us who knew him. His ready smile and willingness to help linger in our memories as we leave West Point. Conli- dent of his future, we remember his extraordinary feel for a " good deal " and the life Steve brought to our bull sessions. To use an old phrase for an old friend, " we are all better off for having known him. " ' Debate Council and Forum .?. 2. I : French Laiii, ' iiai, ' e Club 2.1; n,nrlini; 4. 3: Jewsli Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2,1. RICHARD L. HNDICOTT B-2 Dick Hailing from the wilds of Wyoming, Dick joined the Long Gray Line with an intense desire to become a Regular Army officer. " On guard " will be the words which remind us of the excellence he achieved in four years of fencing for Army. His agressivencss and demonstrated will to win will provide a sound basis for future success. Debate Council and Forum 4: Spanish Language Club 2, ; Fencing Club 4. 3. 2. I: Judo 2. I. DONALD CLAY ERBES K-I Don Leader, athlete and loyal friend are words that come easily in describing Don. Through hard work, this good-natured Army brat was a consistent member of the Dean ' s list, but Don ' s studies were only a part of his varied activities. As chairman of the National Debate Tournament, class committee representative or dragging his OAO, Don excelled in every aspect of cadet life. We are sure this will not be the last of a truly deserved — " well done. " Cross Country, Numerals: Track: 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Committee: 3d Class Committee: Debate Council and Forum 2, ,■ Mathematics Forum 2, J: Rocket Club 2, 1: Spanish Language Club 3, 2. 1: Chairman, National Debate Tournament. EDWARD R. EVANS Ed M-1 With home but a 45 minute drive away, Ed has waged a pitched battle with virtually every Academic Department for four years, but hard work and lack of sleep have pulled him through. While not in the throes of academics, Ed also found time for his favorite study, a certain lovely blonde. He also mastered the art of making that hard-earned trip or weekend a roar- ing success. Graduation marks the beginning of a happy and successful career for a capable new officer. Astronomy Club 3,1; French Language Club 1 ; Portu- guese Language Club 2,1: Spanish Language Club 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 2; Math Forum 2. DONALD C EXEL DONALD C. EXELBY G-1 X X quietly moved in from Michigan and soon mas- tered the complexities of cadet life. He didn ' t have to worry about academics, so he helped out the B-squad football line. He concentrated on the pistol team, win- tinuing. He then concentrated on the pistol team, win- ning his A and gaining Ail-American honors while a sophomore. His conscientiousness and desire to carry a job through will be remembered and admired. Football 4. 3: Pistol 4. 3, 2. 1: Pistol Club 4, 3. 2. 1 : Cadet Chapel Clwir 4.3,2.1. GENE R. FARMELO 1-2 Farmer Calm, cool, collected and, due to his clandestine eco- nomic enterprises, often a collector. Gene had an easy way with Academics. This left him plenty of time for the pursuit of the creature comforts; fine food, fine drink, fine women. He followed a brother out of the pristine reaches of primeval Elkland to win fame as an Army Soccer player. But his crowning attribute is his way with people — Geno has a lot of friends. Wrestling 3,2: Soccer 4. 3. 2, 1; Numerals 4, Major A 2, 1; Rocket Club 3, 2. 1; Spani.sh Club 4, 3, 2. 1; Catholic Chapel Choir 4,3,2,1. JAMES EDWARD FERGL;S0N H-2 Jim Jim came to us from Illinois corn fields, but it didn ' t take him long to find the true values of life. He parlayed a winning smile and a fine voice into the hearts of many chicks and the presidency-in-being of the ' est Point trip club. More important, he has earned the admiration and respect of all who have known him. Wherever he goes from here, this son of the Illini is sure to find success. Public Information Detail 2. I: .Spanish Language Club 4; Cadet Cluipel Cliuir 4. 3. 2. 1 ; Glee Club 4, 3. 2, 1: Ski Club 4. 3. 2. J: 100th Mglu Show 3,2.1. THOMAS CALLOW AY FERGLSSON D-2 Fergy Having unbounded determination, spirit and abil- ity, Tom has excelled in all acti ities he has undertaken. His fiercely competitive outlook on life in general is an attribute in itself, and it will continue to be Tom ' s hallmark, the foundation upon which his future success will be built. Tom has given in excess of himself to help others and, as a friend, few could have given more. His sacrifices will be more than amply rewarded. Soccer 4, 2, 1; Honor Committee 3, 2, 1; Debate Council and Forum 4. 1 : Spanish Language Club 3, 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, I : Cadet C iapel Choir 4, 3,2,1. WILLIAM JOSEPH FIFLDS Bill With a winning personality and a ck ' tcrmination to excel. Bill left Maryland and descended upon the grey walls of West Point. Bill ' s friendly manner and willing- ness to help others have made him many friends. H ability and will to succeed should assure his future success. Track 3; French Laiii ' tuific Cluh 4. .1 J: HOWITZER 4; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3. GROSVENOR WARDWELL FISH, JR. Bud Bud joined ' 65 as one of the last of the brown- slipper Corps and five year men, and soon proved himself one of our most talented classmates in every- thing from engineering design, to triathlon, to enraptur- ing women. Only one redhead seemed to influence him, however. His winning smile, willingness to help others and pure " muck " in spite of the T.D. ' s obstacles, makes this man-about-the-plain one member of the ' 65 who is headed for a sparkling career. Swimming 4, 3, Numerals 4: Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 7, Battalion Representative; Audio Club 2 German Language Cluh 4; Triathlon Cluh 4, 3. 2, 1 Water Polo Cluh 4; Bridge Cluh 3: Camera Cluh 4 Cadet Chapel Acolytes 4. 3. 2. 1 . VVH.LIAM JOSKPH FIFLDS GROSVtNOR W VRDWELI FISH JR CLAUDE MAHANY FLIGG. JR RONALD JOHN FLOTO EDWARD A FOEHL CLAUDE MAHANY FLIGG. JR. K-1 Mike Mike brought his deep sense of propriety with him when he joined the Corps, and try as it could, the Corps could not take it from him. Yet Claude Mahany never took himself too seriously. During Plebe year, which he spent on the Dean ' s List and on the area, he kept his chin up — quite a feat if you consider the promin- ence of this feature. Mike " s indomitable spirit, inimi- table smile, his wit and his quick mind helped him to win the admiration of his classmates. French Language Club ■ 2,1; Skin Diving Club 2, 1. 3, 2, I : Matheinalics Forum 1 : Cadet Chapel Choir 4,3, RONALD JOHN FLOTO C-I Ron Hailing from North Carolina. Ron ' s friendly smile and ever-ready philosophy on life have become his trademarks. A keen eye for the lighter side has given him an unequalled ability to enjoy life. A real dreamer. Ron will certainly prove himself a success. 150 lb. Football 2, 1 ; Public Inforniution Detail 4. 3; Astronomy Club 2, 1; Portuguese Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Scoutmasters ' Council 3, 2, 1; Skin Diving Club 2, 1 ; Cardinal Newman Club I. EDWARD A. FOEHL A-2 Ed Coming from Philadelphia. Ed developed an early love for basketball which endured throughout his stay at West Point. He demonstrated the qualities of a fine all-around athlete and never let academic worries stand in the way of his activities. Although there was no love lost for the Academic Department on his part, Ed ' s bright and inquisitive mind constantly sought to acquire more knowledge. Ed ' s personality and steadfast convictions will insure his success. Basketball 4.3: Baseball 4.3. ERNEST GRAHAM FORREST. Ill H-1 Bo Nicknamed by an instructor in the Spanish Depart- ment. " Bosque " was to be found every afternoon of the year on either the tennis or squash courts. He will be most remembered by those who knew him for his slow North Carolina drawl, his excellent taste in females, his all-around athletic ability, his ever-present sense of humor and his uncanny knack of cheering a person up by showing a genuine interest in others ' problems. Tennis 4. 3. 2. I : Squash 4. 3. 2. 1 : Public Relations Council I: Astronomy Club 4. 3. I: Rocket Club 1 ; Spanish Language Club 2. L «%,. ■ ' ERNEST GRAHAM FORREST ROBERT THOMAS FRANK ROBERT THOMAS FRANK B-1 Bob Not having inherited the congenial nature of his parents. Bob has inherent qualities of " rcd-headcdness " combined with a willingness to help his classmates. He has run a four year home for wayward cadets, mastered the flamenco dance, carried on an infinite number of colorful philosophical discussions, and thwarted the best efforts of the academic departments to take away his treasured tenths. Those of us who have known Bob will always remember and respect him. German Language Club 3. 2. I: I ' uhlic Injormation Detail:. I; SCUSA 1. GRANT LOUIS FREDRICKS F-1 Grant It was not long before we realized that Grant was to be one of the outstanding members of the class. Be it academics athletics or activities, Grant is a leader. His level-headed, common sense approach to every problem, his constant cheerfulness and above all, his patience, are the things we shall remember most. As a cadet. Grant was a fine example, and as an officer he promises to be an even finer example. Swimming 4, Numerals 4; 1st Class Committee; 2nd Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Automobile Committee 1 , Chairman 1. GRANT LOL ' IS FREDRICKS HARLAN FRFDERICK FRICKh The littlest and only Irishman to come from Italy came to us after one year at Penn State. He soon was a stellar performer on both the ski and triathlon teams. Quick-witted and smiling, Bob could always be counted on to put forth his best efforts in all his endeavors. Academically or socially, with his great personality and ample ability, he has a great future in front of him. Rifle 4; Rocket Club 1; Ski Team 3, 2, 1; Triathlon Club 4. 3. 2. I; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, 1; Pistol Club 4. 3. 2. 1; Rifle Club 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3,2. 1; Glee Club 4. 3, 2, 1. HARLAN FREDERICK FRICKE. II B-1 Frick Every night, the last light to go out inevitably was Prick ' s. Nobody studies or worked harder than our contribution from " the biggest little city on the world. " He was sort of quiet, but if you ever had a problem, he would help you in any way that he could. A friend to all, Frick will go a long way Pistol Club 4; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3, 1 ; Dialectic Society 2; Goat-Engineer Game 2. ROBERT FRANCIS FRITZ. JR DAVID A GAHEL ROBERT FRANCIS FRITZ, JR. C-1 Bob Having forsaken the idea of being an ideal cadet. Bob has concentrated on being an ideal friend, and his friendship has been a reward to all who have known him. An easy-going disposition and ready laugh are his hallmark and will stand him in good stead in the years to come. 750 lb. Football 4, 3, 2. I; Aslromuny Club 2. 1; French Language Club 2. I; Rocket Club 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 1: Skin Diving Club 2. I: Cardinal Newman Club 1 . ROGER W. FRYDRYCHOWSKI A-1 Fry dry Hailing from the Windy City, Roger will always be remembered for his talented abilities in the field of social activities. As co-chairman of the Hop Commit- tee, ' 65 will forever be in his dept for many enjoyable weekends. His academic standing is demonstrated by his prized position on the Goat football team, and he can thank the T. D. for building all that character. Helpful and sincere, Roger has been a close friend, and his winning ways assure him of a bright future. Track 4; Lacrosse 3; Hop and Activities Committee 4, 3. 2, 1; Co-Cluiirman; Astronomy Club 3, 2, 1; Russian Language Club 4. 3, 2. 1: HOWITZER 2. 1; POINTER 2.1; Cardinal Newman Club 3.2, 1; Goat Football 2. JOHN ERIC FUNK C-2 Jug Born in God ' s Country, John came to West Point and lived in " indifferent deuce " through Yearling year. The next two years on the shores of the Hudson were spent in C-2, where he concentrated on juice, military art and those tri-weekly visits to the Army theater. His biggest day came when he crossed the stage and joined the ranks of GRADS. Goat Football: Public Information Detail 2,1. DAVID A. GABEL H-2 Dave We ' ll all remember Dave ' s winning smile and cheerful comments, which kept us in high spirits con- stantly. He came to West Point from Catholic Univer- sity like a thunderbolt, tilled with desire and ability which he applied to keep himself in the first section. Dave was in everything while at the same time he was pulling others through academic woes. He sky rockets away from us with the same desires and abilities which guarantee him a successful future. Basketball Manager; Judo 2. 1; Scoutmasters ' Coun- cil 4. 3. 2. 1: Cadet Chapel Choir 3; Cardinal New- man Club 2.1. ROBERT OMER GAGNE D-2 Bob One of the last of the five year men, the Chicopee Flash spent his time at West Point in search of Aca- demic excellence. Unfortunately, this search was often interrupted by a bridge game or anything else that seemed like fun at the time. Bob will long be remem- bered by his friends and classmates for his outgoing personality, his readiness to laugh and his sincere friendship. Humlhall Cliih 4. 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Cliih 3, 2, 1. JOHN BRUCE GAILEY M-1 Bruce This son of the Army passed his brief sojourn with us conscientiously — always trying for better- ment of self, development of lasting friendships and honest contribution to his school and his profession. He moved freely and was welcomed throughout all circles of cadet life; always popular, never sacrificing his true ideals. The Army has reared a man of whom it may be proud. Stars 4; Soccer 4; Squash 4; Tennis 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4; German Language Club 2; Ski Club 3; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3; Glee Club 4, 3, 2. 1; Scuba Club 1. ROBLRl lMLR OAGNt JOHN BRUCE GAILEY ANTHONY H GAMBOA g» - ROBERT tMERSON GATES. JR ANTHONY H. GAMBOA M-2 Tony Tony came to V ' cst Point t ' rcun the sunny West Coast. He has fought losing battles with West Point winters, — but they haven ' t been able to dim his warm smile or his friendly personality. Tony has made many friends here and with his perseverance and high spirits, he should find success in life after graduation. Lacrosse 4.3; Debate Council am! Forum 2.1; Spanish Language Club 3, 2. J; Catholic Chapel .Acolytes 3, 2. 1; Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2. 1; SCUSA 4. 3. ROYAL RUSSEL GARMS F-2 Roy Roy ' s steady approach to life has marked him with the respect he deserves. Never far from those elusive Stars, Roy is always ready to lend a helping hand. His dedication will carry him far in his chosen vocation, but never far from the hearts of those who have known him. Audio Club 2, 1; Rocket Club I: Russian Language Club 4, 3. 2. 1; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4. 3, 2, 1 ; Dance Orchestra 4. I ; Band 4. 3, 2, L STEVEN C. GANSHERT F-2 Steve Stexe came to West Point endowed with a sense of humor and a love for the great outdoors. To those who did not know him well. Steve appeared somewhat shy, but his friends will not easily forget his practical jokes or the double-take talk which became known as " Gansherts. " Though he was a goat at heart, Steve was often able and always willing to help a classmate in need. We will long remember him as a real and honest friend. ROBERT EMERSON G.ATES, JR. F-2 Bob Bob and his ever-present humor descended upon West Point from Seattle, Washington. It was his natural love for a joke or a few more hours in the bag that have forever endeared him to both the Academic and Tactical Departments. But even though our century man has made the T. D. ' s honor roll, his casual air has allowed him to miss Stars — both kinds — although he admits to still owing the English Department two tenths. Golf 4. 3; Debate Council and Forum 4. 3; Spanish Language Club 4; POINTER 2, 1 ; Sky Diving 4. 3. 2: Bowling 4, 3. 2; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2.1; Skeet and Trap Club 2. 1 ; Radio Club 4. 3.2,1. GEORGE S GEHRINGER GEORGE S. GEHRINGER 1-2 Orky Through four long years, George battled the Academic Departments with hard work and determina- tion. His easy-going smile and cheerful readiness to help those in need won him much silent applause from his classmates. With these qualities there can be no doubt that the Artillery has gained a fine officer. French Language Club 1; BUGLE NOTES 4. 3. 2, 1; HOWITZER 4. 3: Ski Team 4; Catholic Chap el Acolytes 4, 3, 2. 1 : Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3. 2. 1. STANLEY GEORGE GENEGA E-1 Stash Raised on " kielbasy " and blessed with a substantial quantity of grey cranial matter. Stash has undeniably established himself as one of the outstanding members of our class. The by-product of a proud Polish heri- tage. Stash has exhibited all those qualities that we admire in an individual. Accordingly, he was selected as chairman of the Honor Committee. A quick wit, a ready smile, an endless source of words and a perpetual willingness to lend a helping hand have and probably always will be his trade-mark. Honor Committee, Chairman: Astronomy Club 2, 1; Mathematics Forum 2. 1: Camera Club 3. 2, 1, Custodian. THOMAS REGIS GENETTI L-1 Tom Tom must have taken exceptional care of his books during his tenure as a cadet. At the end of four years, the books appeared literally untouched. A letter to Judy constituted his nightly study periods. A genial person, Tom was quite popular on the cam- pus and off. His devotion to the military guarantees him success as an Army officer. Football Manager 4. 3; Russian Language Club 4, 3; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3, 2 ; Roman Smith Society. THOMAS C. GENONI H-2 Butch Never one to be shown, Tom has played the " follow me " role well. Always among the top four of his class, he has found the time to become a top player on the squash team. For his ability and com- petitive spirit, he was elected Captain. Always willing to pass out the poop, Tom has helped more than one classmate reach graduation. Forever popular, always ready to help, Tom will undoubtedly lead the way for many years to come. Squash 3, 2.1; Mathematics Forum 2: Spanish Lan- guage Club 3; Dialectic Society 3. CARL WILLIAM GENTINE Carl Carl, our Caliiornia Croldcii Bear, came bravely forth unto us to leave a lasting impression. To say that his influence was inspirational would be far from wrong, for Carl was always there with his carefree academic attitude and great sense of humor. Not one to become a slave to the Tactical Department, he lived from day to day, managing to come out on top of any work or duty without a scratch. Football 4; Handhall Cliih I : Ski Club 4.3.1. DOUGLAS K. GENTZKOW K-2 Doug Hailing from Salem, Oregon. Doug brought with him the unshakable pride of being from the Far West. Always ready to lend a helping hand, he nevertheless was also ever ready to join in the ever present " battle royals " that existed in the lost fifties. Continuously active in extra-curricular activities, he set an Academy record for signing up on trip sections and somehow managed to take many of them. With such persistence, success is bound to follow. Football 4, 3, 2, ; Public Information Detail 2; Por- tuguese Language Club 2. I: Rocket Club 3. 2, 1; Spanish Language Club 2. I: Soiling Club 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3; Glee Club 4. 3. IK •»r— CARL AILLIA M GENTINE DOUGLAS K GENTZKOW DOI (,l AS 1 RENTE GIBSON AMERiCLS MACK GILL. JR DOUGLAS LAWRENCE GIBSON L-2 Doug After a year at Penn State. Doug ' s contacts there placed him in good stead, especially with the upper-classmen. His leadership abilities soon became apparent and he could always be counted on to do his best. Doug also became an expert on how to get out of here on weekends or on trips. But his many friends will remember him for his friendly smile and his greeting of " Hello there, cadet. " Hockey Manager 4. 3. 2, J : Lacrosse 3: Dehaie Coun- cil and Forum 2, 1: Cadet Clutpel Choir 4. 3. 2. I: Dialectic Society 4, 3. MALCOLM ST.ANTON GILCHRIST E-2 Gil Not too many people know Malcolm or even Stan- ton Gilchrist, but " Gil " they do know. The midnight oil usually burned late in his room, but Gil reaped the rewards that he deserved for his hard work, as well as the tenths from the Academic Departments. We are sure that he will continue to reap the rewards for his unceasingly hard work throughout his career. Lacrosse 3, 1 ; Ring and Crest Conunitiee: Portuguese Language Club; Sailing Club 4. AMERICUS MACK GILL. JR. D-2 Mack Coming from a small town in Mississippi, Mack was initially quite awed with the North, even West Point. Although he lost his drawl he was still able to maintain his reputation as a true Southern gentleman. Once he settled down in his new environment, he dedi- cated himself to accomplishing his goals which were always to enjoy life and never get an ulcer. Portuguese Language Club 2, 1: BUGLE NOTES 4. 3; Judo 4; Pistol Club 4; Cadet Sundav School Teachers 4, 3, 2. 1. CLAIR F. GILL C-1 Clair " They ' ll never get me on the area. ' m too smart. " Anwvay, everyone is entitled to one mistake. But justice caught up with him in some 400 football practices and an equal number of circle drills. Never one to worry about little things, he still managed to make the Dean ' s List regularly and get more than his share of sleep. With this record of success, the future definitely looks bright for this large Pennsylvanian. Football 4. 3. 2. I : Carliolic Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Cardinal Sewman Clidi 2. L CLAIR F Gil L MICHAEL THOMAS GLYNNE E-2 Mike Attending and graduating from West Point has completed one of Mike ' s many goals. Rather than having three sources of hazing, (which is typical), he had only one — the T. D. The Academic Department especially presented no problems to Mike, (as many well coached goats will testify). As for P. E., not many other cadets would climb out of the rack before reveille and lap the Plain. The sky is the limit for this man ' s capabilities. Track 3; Cross Coiiniry J : Dchare Council and Forum 4; Russian Unii uui c Cliiii 4: Catlei C Impel Choir 4.3.2. I; Glee Club 4. 3.2. 1. DA ID PARDEE GNAU F-1 Gnu Dave ' s four years at West Point have been charac- terized by his intensive desire to study, his love of music, and his fear of the Infantry. An ever-present friend, he has never failed to offer a helping hand to those around him. His ability to attend reveille while still asleep will remain a source of amazement. Dave ' s self-assurance and enjoyment of life have been con- tagious and will always be remembered by his class- mates and friends. Baseball 4, 3, 2. I. Numerals 4: Bowling 3, 2. 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3.2,1; Cadet Band 4.3.2.1, Vice-President; Dance Orchestra 4. 3. 2, 1; Glee Club 2,1. DAVID PARDEH GNAli J AMI S R[[ DCOLDFN FREDERICK R AN GRAT AMES PETER GREENE JOSE RAFAEL GONZALEZ JAMES REED GOLDEN F-2 Jim Jim insists on constantly seeking and meeting new challenges — academic, athletic or personal. He will never accept less than a maximum performance from himself. His associates in the future will appreciate his unselfishness and his sincere interest in others. Jim is never too busy to have fun and one can always antici- pate enjoying his refreshing approach to life. Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1; Debate Council ami Forum 4. 3. I ; German Language Club 3. 2. 1; HOWITZER 2, 1; Bowling 4, 3. 2. 1; Cadet Sundax School Teachers 4, 3,2,1. JOSE RAFAEL GONZALEZ M-2 Jose Many people wonder why Jose left the climate of the University of Costa Rica to come to West Point. Some say it was so he could laugh at his roommates who asked him how to spell words in English. Regard- less of why, those who know him are as glad as Coach Palone that he did, for knowing Speedy was a pleasure in itself. Thus a great tribute to a great guy — " All American. " Soccer 4,3,2. 1 : Public Relations Council 2.1: Span- ish Language Club 2.1: .SAv Diving 2. 1 ; Art Club 4; Pistol Club 4: Cat iolic Ciiapel Ciwir 4. 3. 2. 1: Dia- lectic Society 4. 3; Glee Club 4. 3. 2. 1. ' Jn TERRY BRLSSVSKK GRANDSTAFF ROGER Al AN GRIFFIN TERRY BRLlNSW ICK GRANDSTAFF L-2 Terry Friendliness and an ever present sense of humor well describe the impression Terry has made on those around him in his four years at West Point. Music and skiing are the prime interests of this well-liked member of the graduating class. The Air Force and a pretty coed from Vassar are sure to profit when the final " class dismissed " is given. Pistol Cliih 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3.2: Glee Club 4.3.2. I; Ski Club. FREDERICK RYAN GRATES L-1 Little Bear As one of the " biggest " little men in the class, Fred will long be remembered as the subject of many witticisms concerning those of short stature. He spent many happy hours dueling with the Academic Depart- ment, losing weight for wrestling, charming petite young ladies and discussing the finer things in life with the " Big Bear. " His indomitable will and intense de- termination will take him far. Wrestling 4, 3, 2. I. Numerals 4, Major 3; Hop and Activities Committee 2.1; Rugby Club 3, 2, I; Cath- olic Chapel Acolytes 4. 3; Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. JAMES PETER GREENE G-2 J. P. For four years J. P. has fought the battle of the brown boy. with the Academic Departments in hot pursuit. But undaunted, he persisted in the theory that a tenth gained was tenth wasted. J. P. ' s ambition is Bobbye, and his Cheshire smile and diabolical laugh are his legacy to the halls of West Point, as he nudges his way into the long grey line. Debate Council and Forum 4; Portu(;uese Language Club 2. 1, Vice-President; Rocket Club 1; Ski Club 4, 3.2. 1; Hooligan Club 2.1. ROGER AL.4N GRIFFIN I-l Rog Rarely a person ' s name is synonomous with suc- cess, but such is the case with Rog. His natural ability, quick wit and superb personality make everything he does a success. One couldn ' t find a finer friend than Roger, and the Army couldn ' t find a better qualified officer. Indoor and Outdoor Track 4. 3. 2; French Language Club 4. 3. 2; Skeet and Trap Club 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3. " ' WILLIAM RALPH GRIFFIN M-2 Bill An Army brat calling the South his home. Bill always managed to retain a high spirit and a devotion to the finer things in life. Academics never presented a problem so he was able to devote a great deal of time to his favorite pastimes — girls, handball and his brown boy. His reliability and acti e nature speak ery well for a successful future. Soccer 4; Public Informaiion Detail 2, 1: French Language Club 4. 3, 2, 1 ; German Language Club 2, 1 ; Handball Club 2, 1; Sailing Club 4: Bridge Club 4; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3.2. I : Scoutmasters ' Council 3; Skin Diving Club 3,2,1. -r- — k " jm WILLIAM RALPH GRIFFIN LANDOLPH K GLKMHFR RANDOLPH K. GL ' ENTHER A-1 Rand Sunny California can be justly proud of Randy. As a scholar or friend. Randy is tops. With his person- ality, initiative and love for the Irish, a successful career is assured. Watch out for those Frogs. Randy! Rijle Team 4. 3. 2. 1: .Automobile Committee 1; POISTER 4. 3. ROBERT ARTHLRGL1 LESLIE EDW IN HERSHALL DON HALL ROBERT ARTHUR GUY C-1 Bob Years ago, Georgia sent lier son north to lace the Yankees. He came a true Southern gentleman and lie remained one; quiet, unhurried, friendly and loyal. The only loss he sustained in four years was a little of his drawl. He believed in the better side of every man, and he usually found it. Be his road rough or smooth, count on him to alua s do his best. Baseball 4. Numeral 4: Club 4.2. 1; Ski Club 4. Handball Club 2. I: Pistol LESLIE EDWIN HAGIE L-2 Les Hailing from Colorado, Les has made a reputation among his classmates for his high standing in both academics and physical education, as well as for his friendliness, his infectious sense of humor and his serendipity. Due to his frequent debate trips he always seems to have three or more girls clamoring for his attentions and he claims the happy life of a bachelor is his immediate future. He will always carry our best wishes for success and happiness. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3. 2 . I : French Language Club 3, 2, 1; Chess Club 3. 2. 1; Cadet Band 4. HARRY CAUM HAINES, III 1-2 Harry Harry, a goat turned hive, demonstrated repeatedly what hard work can do. Never satisfied with only the answer to a problem, he always searched deeper to find out why. An advocate of afternoon strolls, he wore the distinctive brown stripes with pride. His ready smile and willingness to help others enabled him to make a lot of friends, both male and female, very easily. The Signal Corps will gain a fine and dedicated officer in June of 1965. Swimming Manager 2: Spanish Language Club 4, 3, 2. 1; Rugby Club 4: Scoutmasters ' Council 4. 3; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 4.3.2.1. HERSHALL DON HALL B-2 Don or H. D. Don, as a product of old " loose deuce, " maintained an unchallenged membership in the elite goat sections and upheld to the best of his ability the traditions of the ranks of the Second Regiment. The Southern accent was faded and less distinct after four years, but his love and loyalty to the South was undying. The climax of four years and the attainment of two gold bars will be his greatest moment. Lacrosse Manager 4, 3. 2: 150 lb. Football Manager 2, 1; German Language Club 3. 2. 1; Spanish Club 2.1; Scoutmasters ' Council 1 . . T ' JAMES H HALL JAMES H. HALL M-1 Jim Although a member of the college ranks before entering West Point, it did not take Jim long to adjust to the military. Before coming to West Point, his favor- ite past times included a variety of athletics and out- door activities in the north-centra! region of Pennsyl- vania. Continuing along these lines, Jim ' s quick wit and pleasant personality will lead him to success in any endeavor of life. 750 Ih. Football 4: Baseball 4: Mathematics Forum 2,1: Camera Club 3. RICHARD MICHAEL HALL L-2 Rich While professing academic indifference and still remaining high on the Dean ' s list, this brown-haired Irishman with the sunny smile has still managed to live by the motto " Never Deviate " in pursuit of the goals he has set for himself. After gaining the respect of everyone through his willingness to help. Rich has our best wishes as he leaves the shouts of graduation in response to wedding bells and the end of his un- happy bachelorhood. Handball Club 2,1. RALPH ALEXANDER HALLENBECK. Ill 1-2 Sandy R. A. — all the way — up the hills, down the hills and around the hills, this Airborne-Ranger- Infantry file puffed and panted for four long years, not to mention his African safari. A philosopher, phi- lanthropist, opinionist and friend par excellence, his firm stands on everything from the color of the sky to Andorra ' s economic st atus, will carry through to the great outside world and the .Army will get one top- notch officer. Cross Country 4, 3. 2. 1 ; Track 4. 2. 1 : Debate Coun- cil and Forum 3. 2. 1 : Sky Diving 3, 2, 1: KDET 3. 2; SCUSA 3.2. I ; Crossroads Africa 1 . COLIN O. HALVORSON M-2 Toby Toby never seemed to have enough hours in the day, but he always managed to come out ahead in academics and sports. He was always ready to extend a helping hand to all those in need, and coupled with his initiative desire for success, friendliness and strong character, Toby ' s success is guaranteed. German Language Club 4.3.2.1: Sailing Club 3, 2, 1 ; Bridge Club 3, 1: Chess Club 3, 2, I; Outdoor Sports- men Club 3, 2. I: Scoutmasters ' Council 4, 3, 2. 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2. 1: Order of the Anon- 4.3,2,1. RICHARD MICHAEL HALl JAMES CHARLES HARDIN Jim The Academy got itself another tigiiting rebel when Jim Hardin entered its hallowed halls fresh from the hills of North Carolina. Jim ' s friendliness, athletic and intellectual ability and eool attitude marked his performance in the classroom and on the fields of friendly strife. West Point and the Army will have found themselves richer as a result of his presence. Gernuin L(ingii(ii;r Club 2. I: Rocket Club 2: Sky Diving Club 3: Oiinloor Spoilsmen Club 3. 2. J. STEVEN CLARK HARM.AN. JR Steve Inside that small body lies a big man with a kind word for everyone and a willingness to fight for his principles. He came here to learn to be an officer; his endeavors have been both academic and professional. When he leaves West Point with his lovely wife, the Army will gain a man worthy to be called a soldier. We have been proud to know him: wo will be proud to follow him. Baseball 4, 2, 1 ; 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Com- mittee; 3d Class Committee; Mathematics Forum 2, 1 ; HOWITZER 2. 1: BUGLE NOTES 3. 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3. 2. I : Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3, 2. 1; KDET4,3.2. 1. AMES CHARLES HARDI STEVEN CLARK HARMAN, JR. JAMES D. HARMf JOHN BERARD HARRINGTON JAMES D. HARMON I-l Jim Whether it was 150 lb. football or B squad la- crosse, Jim could be found actively participating in athletics around the campus. His free time was often taken up fighting off the brown boy or the admirers from down the road. When Jim made a friend it was a friendship sincere and true, resulting in his many friends in the Corps. Whatever his futine holds, suc- cess and happiness are surely included. Lacrosse J. 2: !?( Ih. Football 4, 3. 2. I: French Language Club 4: Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3: Cath- olic Chapel Clioir 3. 2. I : Cardinal Neivman Club 4: Dialectic Society 4. 3: KDFT 4: Ski Club 3. 2. I. PHILIP V. HARPER. JR. E-2 Phil When Phil came to West Point from his Southern homeland, he brought all its sunshine and good humor with him. His charm, quick wit, friendly smile and slow, easy-going ways quickly won him many friends among the class of ' 65 and among the girls. Phil fought a continuous battle with the Academic Department, winning after a long, hard four years struggle. Which- ever branch Phil finally chooses will receive a dedicated, hard-fighting leader. French Language Club I : Rocket Club I. JOHN BERARD HARRINGTON H-1 John It was pretty hard keeping John out of bed after Plebe year. He did arise occasionally to play lacrosse and soccer, however. But you could always count on him when a true friend was needed. Although he would not admit it, it was probably because he was from Boston that he was such a good guy. Soccer 4. 3. 2. 1; POINTER 4. 3; Models Club 4. 3; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 4. 3; KDET 2, L ROBERT LESLIE HARTER L-2 Bob Bob Harter is known for his quick, friendly smile and optimistic outlook. An active ski enthusiast. Bob has contributed to a Brigade Championship for L-2 in this sport. Graduation will find Bob once again wander- ing through a world of wine, women and song. Well- liked by all. Bob will be a true asset to his future Infan- try platoon. Ski Teatn : Catliolic Chapel Acolytes. ROBERT LESLIK HARTl R JAMES R. HARVEY M-1 Jim It was always easy to rind Jim — simply look on the cross country course. Always out in front, this quick Texan combined his running ability with just as quick a grasp of the books. Eager to try something new, Jim took up many other activities available at the Point — all of which he will put to good use in making a success of his career as an officer. Cross-C oil liny 4. 3. 2. 1 , Numerals 4, Major A 2, 1; Track 4, 2. I: Portuguese Language Club 3, 2, 1; Handball Club 3; Triathlon Club 3,2.1; Bridge Club 3, 2, 1; Scoutmasters ' Council 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1. DENNIS E. HAWKER 1-2 Hawk Hawk will be remembered by all of us for many reasons. Upmost in our minds will be his athletic ability in diving. Also, the O.P.E. found it hard to inflict a subject he couldn ' t validate. A very sincere person. Hawk has the ability of not speaking uselessly. Above all he remains calm throughout everything. What better qualities could there be for a highly successful and happy career. Swimming Team 4.3.2, I . Major A 3,2, 1 . DENNIS F: HAWKI R JAMES A. HELBERG RAYMOND J. HAWKINS K-2 Punky The first thing that strikes you when you meet Punky is that there is not one insincere bone in his body. Always ready for a good time and making certain he enjoys fife to its fullest extent marks him as a suc- cess in any endeavor. He will always be remembered as the cadet with the most amazing " hat. " Football 4, 3.2. 1 ; Track 4: 2,1; Handball Club 2. 1. Lacrosse 4; Rocket Club L-1 JOHN HULSEY HAYS JOHN HULSEY HAYS Johnny A true Floridian at heart. Johnny somehow man- aged to reserve a small portion of his mind for aca- demics. Although he was always more at home on water skis than with a slide rule, he still enjoyed a certain amount of success with the Academic Departments. The Army could not gain a more willing or more qualified officer. Rocket Club 3. I : SpanLsti Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1 ; POINTER 3. 2. 1: Pistol Club 4; Skin Diving Club 3.2,1. WILl lAM FRHDERICK HECKER, JR. WILLIAM THOMAS Hi WILLIAM FREDERICK HECKFR. JR. K-2 Bill An easy going and friendly son of Missouri, Bill never let academics or the system bother him. During his four years at the Academy, his steady hand and keen eye brought many rifle trophies to himself and to the Academy. His attitude and personality will carry him through many good years in Army blue. Rifle 4, 3, 2, I: HOWITZER 4. 3: Sky Diving 2, I; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2.1; Pistol Club 4. 3; Rifle Club 4, 3.2, 1 : Dance Orcliestra 4. CHARLES RAOHL HEINDRICHS D-2 Chuck Hailing from the Great Lakes Country. Chuck brought his shining head and electric guitar to West Point with one year of college already behind him. Underneath his easy-going mannerisms lurks a highly competitive spirit, which is most evident on the rolling fairways and greens of the golf course. Looking to the future, one can see for him the gleam of a new Mustang, a long-awaited commission and continuous success. Golf 4, 3. 2. I: Cadet Sunday Scliool Teachers 4. 3, 2, 1 , Kindergarten Siiperimendent I . JAMES A. HELBERG D-1 Berg Berg, the Argyle flash from Minnesota, spent his cadet days doing what he loved most, playing basket- ball in the Army gym. After a Plebe season in both 150 lb. football and track. Berg decided to find out what engineering was all about and traded his spikes for a slide rule. But Berg is still known by all as one of the best athletes on the intramural fields, be it cross- country, basketball or lacrosse. Berg is a fine com- petitor with lots of determination. The Army and Berg have big things to look forward to. 150 lb. Football 4: Track 4: Spanish Language Club I; Rugby Club 1 : Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. 1. WILLIAM THOMAS HELLER F-2 Bill Johann, sleep and the demon of photography oc- cupy almost equal portions of the mind and soul. With this combination to hold his attention, it is amazing that he has also had the small, not the large. Stars fall to him. But then who can beat the combination of luck, sleep and intelligence. Football Manager 4. 3. 2: Debate Council and Forum 3; HOWITZER 3.2. Plwiography Editor 1; Cardinal Newman Club I. CHARLES L. HEMMINGWAY C-1 Chuck Chuck a product of modern day Dodge City, was often seen with his Sunday school story books and art pad under his arm. Not to be entirely dominated by his friendly smile and warm charm, he has been said to be the most ferocious man to climb into a boxing ring. Chuck ' s prowess in athletics, his homespun brand of humor and his sincerity made him popular with all. He is assured of every success in the future. Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3. 2. 1 : Portuguese Lan- guage Cluly 4. 3. 2. I: Rugby Clul 2. I: Art Club 4, 2, I : Cadet Sunday Scliool Teaclwrs 4. 3. 2. I . THOMAS R. HENNEBERRY M Tom Tom has been known for his good nature and easy-going manner since he first " parked his car in the West Point yard. " Always faithful in carrying out the little tasks assigned to him. Tom can be depended upon to meet big tasks in the same manner. Tom will always meet future tasks with that same dependability. Cardinal Newman Club 4. CH RLFS I Ml MMlNfA " . 5, HOM.AS R NhNNhBtRR " ! J.AMES M HI NNf-N JAMES M. HF.NNEN B-2 Jim When Jim left TenncssC L-. he brought to West Point a personality imparaileled. Despite an unfortunate accident and the math department, Jim ' s first year set the pattern of his happy-go-lucky existence. Though serious in many aspects, Jim never allowed authority to dampen his joyous life. His athletic ability made him an asset in sports. His charm and pleasing appearance insured more than adequate female companionship. Life is good and Jim will live it. Fool ball 4. 3. 2. I; Wrestlini; 4. 3. 2. I: Baseball I: Rocket Club 2. I : Russian Laiii uage Club 4: Handball Club 3. 2. I: Catbolic C Impel Choir I: Dialectic Society 4,3, 1 . JAMES FRANKLIN HENNESSEE C-1 Frank Arriving from A-1 with Stars, Frank became one of those who could play bridge til taps on ofT-movie nights and then stay up til the wee hours coaching the goats. His intellect. Tennessee twang and wicked wiggle marked him, but his effortless effort distinguished him. He is one of luir good guys. Public Inionnation Detail 4; Fiencli Language Club 3. 2. I: R,Kket Club 1; Water Polo Club 3, 2, I; Bridge Club I: Skin Diving Club 4, 3: Dialectic Society 4, 3; Class Historian. GUENTER HENNIG E-2 Gunner After two years at the LJ. of Cincinnati, Gunner stepped into cadet life with sureness and determination that could not be altered by the hardships ahead of him. He was well known for his friendliness and bearing, and he found no task in cadet life that he could not accomplish with his ability to get the job done — and well. To have him as a friend was like having an additional right arm. Soccer 3. 2. 1 : 1st Class Conunittee: 2d Class Com- mittee: 3d Class Conmiitiee: Clerman Language Club 2.1: Spanis i Language Club 2.1. RICHARD ARDEN HENNIG L-1 Calientc Rich was never the type to be content in one place and when things began to get hot in Calientc, he de- parted for the Far East and West Point. It meant giving up his California sun and various other things, but not his restless soul. Rich proved that he could be an out- standing cadet, but like an errant knight, he yearned for the new and intriguing. He ' ll always be on top with his good eye on the open road ahead. German Language Club 2, 1; HOWITZER 1, Assist- ant Editor-in-Chief; Skeet Club 2. 1, Vice-President; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2, 1; Ski Club 4. ARTHLIR CLEVELAND HESTER K-2 Art Gathering strength from the civilian world of West Chicago, Art has finished his four years in an unusually painless style. Always conscientious in any endeavor, whether hustling someone across that green baize or resting his mind for the iicM day ' s classes, he has that capability to succeed which is found in few people. His ability to work hard, yet always taking life easy, will be remembered by his many friends. Wrestling 3; Honor Committee 2. 1: Deluite Council and Forum 2, I: French Language Cluh 3. 2. 1: POINTER 4,3.2. I; Bowling 2 J. LANSING T. HEWITT C-2 Lance Hailing from an obscure little dorf in North Central Arkansas, Lance came to us to light through the last tough Plebe Year. Finding his footing in C-2 after the famous little Captain left for Navy, this old L-2 ' er now finds that a new car and Lieutenant ' s bars hold the place of glory in his eyes. He is also looking forward to a career in Armor or the Engineers, whichever finds room for this cadet of the class of " Strength and Drive. " Football 4: Wrestling 4; Goat-Engineer dame: Ger- man Language Cluh; HOWITZER; National Debate Tournament. LELAND H. HEWITT K-2 Lee The Chapel Choir, the opposite sex and thoughts of sunny Southern California have occupied Lee ' s cadet days. Somewhat hivey and not prone to worry about anything, Lee will best be remembered as a classmate who griped about very little and was always willing to do a favor for anyone. Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3.2, ]; KDET 4,3. ROBERT WALTER HIGGINS L-1 Higgy After the experience of a healthy stint in the Army and both the USMA and USNA prep schools, Higgs was in good shape to take charge of the cadet situation. Plebe year, not being too much of a challenge, let him devote much of his time to adding a little humor to the scene. When academics got rougher and responsibility got heavier, he still had time to incite smi les. Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3. 2; Rifle 4; Debate Council and Forum 4; HOWITZER 2, 1; Rijle Club 4; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3. JOHN WARREN HIGLEY M-2 John Running, shooting, swimming, riding ;ind fencing — you never i nevv wliere you would lind John or what he would be doing. One thing was certain — he was always hard at work doing something. His gym locker resembled a pawn shop with all the implements of Modern Pentathlon bulging from within. John ' s com- petitiveness did not stop in sports, for it was often a battle to the wire with the Academic Departments. However, John always came through successfully. Cross Country 3. 2. I : Swinmiiiig 4: Indoor Track 3, 2, 1; French Liingiia e Club 4. .?, 2. I: Triathlon Chih4,3,2,l. ROBERT JOHN HILL. Ill H-1 Bob Coming to us from the Army. Small Mountain demonstrated early in his cadet career that he was going to compile a good record for himself. His maximum efTorts both in academics and on the athletic field have won him a high position in the eyes of his friends. Upon his graduation, the Artillery will be gaining a fine person as well as an excellent officer. Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, Monogram 3. 2. Coach 1: Rocket Club 2; Spanish Language Club 2.1: Bridge Club 4; Chess Club 4. ROBERT JOHN HILL. JOSEPH DA ID HINDSLEV KENNETH EUGENE HJELM JAMES W. HOLMES JOSEPH DA ID HINDSLEY L-2 Joe From the metropolis of Beckley. Joe travelled to the Hudson ' s shores. A top athlete in high school, he soon had to forego visions of fame to engage in the famihar battle with the Academic Department. When he wa sn ' t busy defending his home state, he devoted his time to a Queens (N.C. ) college sweetheart and settling down to the single goal of graduation. His sincerity won him the respect and admiration of all those who knew him. 750 lb. Fooiball 4: Ski Team 4. 3: Dialectic Societv 3. 2. JAMES V. HOLMES G-2 Jim Jim left the country of North Dakota and set his sights on the great world. Since Jim had little trouble with academics, athletics or the T.D., he spent much time discussing the world ' s problems and solving them for anyone who would listen. A hard-working pillar of strength even on his many trips. Jim should have no trouble taking on the Army or anything else he may pursue. Rijle 4: Pistol Club 4; Riile Club 4. 3: Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3.2.1; Glee Club 3.2. J. KENNETH EUGENE HJELM K-1 Hiemy Although hampered by a variety of roommates. Ken managed to remain high enough in the class to wear the Air Force blue. During off hours Ken was able to successfully complete three hockey seasons with a minimum of scars and three letters. Many knew him as affable and versatile, but for those of us who knew him best, we settled for just friend. Hockey 4. 3. 2. J: Baseball 4; HOWITZER 2, 1; Bridge Club 4. JAMES DAVID HOPKINS G-2 Dave Several things characterize this southern cadet: a love of life, a passion for tennis, an affinity for New Orleans sunshine, willingness to listen to the other man ' s views, and a quiet, but firm conviction in his own ideals. POINTER 2.1: Sailing Club 2. 1; Catlwlic C Impel Choir 4. 3; Dialectic Society 3. 2. 1. Publicity Agent, Vice-President: lOOth Mght Show 3.2.1. JAMES DAVID HDPl RICHARD GLKNN HORs RICHARD GLENN HORST H-2 Ric For Ric it might ha c tai cn five years, but the English and History Departments lost out — as Ric had the desire and a certain young lady behind him all the way since high school. Ric wasn ' t one to waste a tenth and certainly wouldn ' t accept an offer for a blind date. Football was his passion and after those rough spring practices, you could find him nursing his wounds beneath his brown boy. Football 4, 3 . 2 . I : Lacrosse 4. PETER MASON HOWARD L-2 Pete .After a year of college. Pete nexer fully recovered from the shock of a plcbe year in the old G-2. He will probably still be complaining about West Point after thirty years in the Infantry. While here, he seldom passed up the chance to make a wise remark and his friends will never forget all the laughs he has given them with his dry sense of humor. Wrestling 4; Debate Council and Forum 4. 3. 2. 1; Spanish Language Club 3, 2, 1; Pistol Club 4: Scout- masters ' Council 4; Ski Club 4, 3,2, 1. PETER MASON HOWARI JOHN MICHAEL HOWELL ROBERT WELCH HUFFHINES. JR. LVTTLE PRESTON HLCHES CLAUDE KEYES HUDSON JOHN MICHAEL HOWELL C-2 Wheeler Dealer Mr. U.C.L.A. came to our rock bound home from sunny California. Never late — just almost. He wheels and deals as head of the Ring and Crest Committee and Business Manager of this publication. This boy is always busy with some enterprise — he is a rower of sorts and tried to get us a crew but the river is too rough and no officials were interested. We will never forget the card section against Navy in ' 62. John will always be a helper, wherever his future takes him. Ring ami Crcsr Convnittee 4, 3. 2, 1; Portuguese Lan- guage Club 3. 2. I; Spanish Language Club 2, 1; HOWITZER 2.1. Business Manager I: Bowling 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3: Ski Club 3. 2. 7. CLAUDE KEYES HUDSON C-1 Keyes A ready smile marked Keyes to all his friends. He was always prepared for fun or work, whichever offered itself — but he always seemed more anxious for fun. The drawl he brought from Mississippi brightened many nights in our grey cells. His good humor will always stand him in good stead. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3. 2. I: German Lan- guage Club 3. 2, I; Cadet Chapel Clioir 4, 3, 2, 1: Glee Club 4; SCUSA 4.3.2. L MICHAEL HUDSON MICHAEL HUDSON G-2 Humpty Huds, our lovable card from Texas, ran the Weapons Room branch of the G-2 milk run. In spite of many pressures and close calls, he remained our greatest spokesman for the liberal movement. When he was not hitting the books, he could be found hustling the pool hall, on the links or in his Queens hideaway. With all his talents our boy is a natural to succeed whether in green or grey tlannel. Golf 4. 3, 2,1; Honor Committee: Hop and Activities Committee: Spanish Language 3. 2, I: POINTER, Photo Editor: Dialectic Society, Stage Manager. ROBERT WELCH HUFFHINES, JR. K-2 Huff Huff came to West Point just to give it a try. He made his mark in many fields, especially in academics. If he was not over at the gym or joking around with his friends, he was ready to discuss politics or any other subject. His ardent integrity and individualism will represent him well in or out of the Army. We will all miss his friendly and easy-going manner. Debate Council and Forum 2,1: Rocket Club 2, 1: Spanish Language Club 3. 2, 1: BUGLE NOTES 4, 3, 2, 1; HOWITZER 4, 3: POINTER 2, 1: Sky Diving 2; Jewish Chapel Choir 2, 1; Cadet Band 4, 3: Stars 2. LYTTLE PRESTON HUGHES H-2 Buster Buster came to West Point a Southern gentleman — he left an officer and a Southern gentleman. The transition was not easy, as Buster, like most of us, had his troubles Plebe year. He proved that he could " take it " and do a good job too. Buster complained only about two things — the Plebe system was becoming too easy — and being awakened by bugles blowing, instead of southern bacon frying. Honor Committee: German Language Club 3. 1 ; Cadet Chapel Choir 4: Cadet Siuiday School Teachers 3, 2,1. BRUCE DANIEL HULIN K-1 Red Bruce came here knowing very little about the Army, and he left in the same state. Athletics and girls are uppermost in Bruce ' s activities and he has not let his studies interfere with them. However, Bruce did enjoy the opportunities afforded him here, so much so that he took the extended course, which meant four years for " flirty. " Baseball 4, 3,2,1 : Sailing Club 4. JOHN MICHAEL HOWELL , ELCH HLFFHINES. JR L ' lTTLE PRESTON HLGHES CLAUDE KEYES HUDSON JOHN MICHAEL HOWELL C-2 Wheeler Dealer Mr. U.C.L.A. came to our rock bound home from sunny California. Never late — just almost. He wheels and deals as head of the R ing and Crest Committee and Business Manager of this publication. This boy is always busy with some enterprise — he is a rower of sorts and tried to get us a crew but the river is too rough and no officials were interested. We will never forget the card section against Navy in ' 62. John will always be a helper, wherever his future takes him. Ring and Crest Committee 4. 3. 2, 1 ; Portuguese Lan- guage Club 3. 2. 1: Spanish Language Club 2. I; HOWITZER 2.1. Business Manager I: Bo ■ling 3 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3: Ski Club 3. 2. L CLAUDE KEYES HUDSON C-1 Keyes A ready smile marked Keyes to all his friends. He was always prepared for fun or work, whichever offered itself — but he always seemed more anxious for fun. The drawl he brought from Mississippi brightened many nights in our grey cells. His good humor will always stand him in good stead. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3. 2. 1: German Lan- guage Club 3. 2. 1: Cadet Cliapel Clioir 4, 3, 2, 1: GleeClub4;SCUSA 4.3.2. L MICHAEL HUDSON MICHAEL HLIDSON G-2 Humpty Huds, our lovable card from Texas, ran the Weapons Room branch of the G-2 milk run. In spite of many pressures and close calls, he remained our greatest spokesman for the liberal movement. When he was not hitting the books, he could be found hustling the pool hall, on the links or in his Queens hideaway. With all his talents our boy is a natural to succeed whether in green or grey llannel. Golf 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Honor Commiiice: Hop and Activities Committee: Spanish Language 3. 2. I; POINTER. Photo Editor; Dialectic Society. Stage Manager. ROBERT WELCH HUFFHINES, JR. K-2 Huff Huff came to West Point just to give it a try. He made his mark in many fields, especially in academies. If he was not over at the gym or joking around with his friends, he was ready to discuss politics or any other subject. His ardent integrity and individualism will represent him well in or out of the Army. We will all miss his friendly and easy-going manner. Debate Council and Forum 2. I; Rocket Club 2, 1; Spanish Language Club 3. 2. I: BUGLE NOTES 4, 3, 2, I; HOWITZER 4. 3; POINTER 2. I: Sky Diving 2; Jewish Chapel Choir 2.1: Cadet Band 4. 3: Stars 2. LYTTLE PRESTON HL GHES H-2 Buster Buster came to West Point a Southern gentleman — he left an officer and a Southern gentleman. The transition was not easy, as Buster, like most of us, had his troubles Plebe year. He proved that he could " take it " and do a good job too. Buster complained only about two things — the Plebe system was becoming too easy — and being awakened by bugles blowing, instead of southern bacon frying. Honor Committee: German Language Club 3. 1 : Cadet Chapel Choir 4: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3,2. 1 . BRUCE DANIEL HULIN K-1 Red Bruce came here knowing very little about the Army, and he left in the same state. Athletics and girls are uppermost in Bruce " s activities and he has not let his studies interfere with them. However, Bruce did enjoy the opportunities afforded him here, so much so that he took the extended course, which meant four years for " flirty. " Baseball 4. 3. 2. I : Sailing Club 4. JAMES S. HUME L-2 Jim Lord Jim— athlete, scholar, gentleman, philoso- pher — has all the traits of either Thomas Jefferson or Thomas Jones, (we know not which. ) Whether shiver- ing in Shea Stadium, contemplating in the Weapons Rooms, listening to records in the library or just relax- ing in class, Jim is a natural. Only Jim knows where his interests may lead, but for the present he must remain the highest paid Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. Track 4.3. 2. 1. DAVID EVAN HURLEY G-1 Dave The biggest thing Dave got from West Point was his first haircut. A product of the blackboard jungles of New York City and three years at Massanutten Military School, Dave gained the reputation of being one of West Point ' s great untapped natural resources. The only thing he ever sweated was making three no trump with a week ' s experience at bridge. Dave ' s natural talent and demand for perfection in fields of interest will bring him success in whatever he cares to undertake. Astronomy Club 1: Debate Council and Forum 4, 3. 2. 1: Russian Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Bridge Club 2.1; Cardinal Newman Club 2.1. AMLS S HL.ML DAVID FA AN HI RLHY MICHAEL J HI JOHN KHNDRK K III TTON. IR AKR HAROLD ISAKSON LABAN PHEl PS JACKSON. JR. MICHAEL J. HUSTON F-1 Mike Hailing from the Midwest metropolis of Logans- port, Indiana, " Farmer Huston " spent an unusual four years at the Academy, to wit, he managed to evade the snares of the Academic Departments and had no serious clashes with the T.D. A charter member of the F-1 pinochle club. Mike was well known for his deft- ness with cards or just about anything else. The future looks bright for this B- 1 . F- 1 stalwart. Debate Council ami Funiiii 3. 2. I: Rockci Club I : Spanish Language Club J, 2. I; liawling J. 2. J. JOHN KENDRICK HL ' TTON. JR. I-l Jack Jack is well known for his dry sense of humor. His easy-going Southern manner has made him a pop- ular member of our class, and his ease with academics left him a lot of time for sky diving and his beloved brown boy. The people of Suffolk should take great pride in his past, present and future achievements. Astronomy Club jt . 2. 1 : French Language Chib 2, 1; Rocket Club 3. 2. I: Sky Divinu 3. 2. I. LARRY HAROLD ISAKSON D-2 Larry Ruffled occasionally only by typical Tactical De- partment policies, Larry has nonetheless done an excel- lent job in everything he has encountered, while still being able to maintain his reserved manner. Strong convictions and dependable, efficient work will also characterize Larry ' s later life. He is a tine person and a true friend. Public Relations Council 2; German Language Club 4. 3. 2. I: Scouinuisters ' Council 3. 2: Ski Club 4. 3, 2. 1. LABAN PHELPS JACKSON. JR. A-2 Labe Labe, the tall lad from old Kentucky, brought with him to West Point the true marks of a Southern gentleman; a booming Southern drawl and an ever present sense of humor. His love for laughter and easy- going manner have made him the immediate friend of all who have met him, with the possible exception of the Academic Department. His natural ability to under- stand people will undoubtedly be an asset to Labe and Labe will definitely be an asset to the branch of his choice. Mathematics Forum 2: Rocket Club 2. I: Spanish Language Club 4, 3. 2. L JACK M. JANNARONE JACK M. JANNARONE D-2 Jack Being a local product. Jack came to West Point with the inside story. He was always one step ahead of the Tactical Department except for one time during Cow year. He had the amazing ability to never study — yet he still wore Stars while playing lacrosse, skiing or simply enjoying the high life. Jack will always be remembered for his easy-going attitude, coupled with his ability to always get things done. Upon graduation the Air Force will gain a successful bachelor. A-2 Hockey: Lacrosse 3. 2. 1 .: Racket Club 4. 3. CaihoUc Chapel Acolyies 3. 2. I: Ski Club 4. 3. Ski Instritclor 2. MARVIN ALVIS JEFFCOAT. JR. Jeff Jeff made it through his four years in spite of the Academic Department. Nevertheless, he always seemed to be on the weekday movi e squad. An aggressive and sincere competitor in athletics, he was a valuable asset to any team he was on. A true " Mr. Sunshine, " he never had anything bad to say about anyone and he was always willing to pitch in anything but Yearling math. Riigln ' Chib 2. 1; Rifle Club 4: Glee Club 4; KDET 4,3,2. 1. HAROLD AUGUSTUS JENKINS, JR. E-2 Hal Jinks will always be remembered as one of the most fun-loving guys around. From the midnight visit to Athena to the races against time on the oval track, life was never dull for this boy. Though the Academic Departments were never able to win him over to their side, he nevertheless dexeloped intellectually. A friend to all, the Infantry will receive a tine and dedicated gentleman. Track 4.3.2.1. Captain I: Debate Council and Forum 4; Hriclf e Club 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2, 1; Glee Club 4. JOHN TILSON JOHNSON. JR. E-1 Tilson Hailing from the tine state of South Carolina, John revealed a quick smile and an all-out sincerity, which brought him many friends. Add to this a formidable athletic prowess and you end up with an incomparable fellow. Football 4. 3. 2. I : Cadet Chapel Chimers 4: SCUSA 2. I: Ski Club 4. JOHN TILSON JOHNSON. JR. HAROLD ALGLSTl S JJ SKINS. JR MARTIN LEROY JOHNSON. JR. A-2 Marty Marty, the strong, silent t pc Irom the snow-cov- ered mountains of Montana, hroiight with him to West Point a love of the outdoors and athletics. A natural hive, academics provided no problem, and Marty soon found that his love of skiing presented a new face, for he was often seen teaching " sweet, young things " the finer points of the sport. It can be assured that his chosen branch. Artillery, is getting a fine officer. POINTER 4; Ski Team 3, 2, I; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. 2. I: Dance Orchesira 4. 3. 2. I. ROBERT B. JOHN.SON, JR. A-1 Bob Bob might best be described b those who know him well as a lanky lacrosse player who has a magnetic attraction for little momentos from the Tactical Depart- ment. Hailing from the " land of pleasant living " down in Maryland, Bob radiates a likeable personality and a sincere interest in those around him. Robert always is the easy-going friend and classmate. Lacrosse 4, 3. 2. I; 150 lb. Football 4. MARTIN LF.ROY JOHNSON. JR- ROBERT B JOHNSON. THOMAS HAWKINS JOHNSON. DAVID T. JONES ROBERT CAMPBELL JONES THOMAS HAWKINS JOHNSON. II A-1 Tom Tom, an Army brat who thrived on the demands of the Hudson Highland can only be called exceptional. Academically he never had a strain and probably coached more goats through turnouts in more subjects than any man in Academy history. Of all Tom ' s varied interests and abilities his poetry is undoubtedly most outstanding, taking second place only to his interest in a certain jeune fille from Wyoming. With Tom ' s convictions and abilities, nothing can possibly come between him and sure success. Astronomy Club 4, 3: Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2,1; Mathematics Forum 1: Rocket Club 3. 2. 1; POINTER 4. 3. 2. 1: Bridi e Club 4, 3. 2. I.: Chess Club 4. 3. 2. }. Cadet Sunday School Teachers 2. 1; KDET 3, 2. DAVID T. JONES B-1 Dave A free spirit when he has time to himself, Dave also has the desire and capability to buckle down and produce when he has a job to do. His presence can never be ignored, but it will never be resented, for he lends vitality to any group. Debate Council and Forum 3: French Lan(;iuii e Club 3, 2 ,1; Rocket Club 2, 1 : Skin Divini Club 2. 1 ; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4,3, 1 . ROBERT CAMPBELL JONES A-2 Bob Bob came to West Point as an outstanding high school athlete and wasted no time in proving he was going to be just as great in college. He was known for his friendly and cheery attitude towards everyone and his willingness to help anyone in need. Bob will be a tremendous asset to his branch choice and the Armv. Football 4.3: Baseball 4, 3. HARRY NOLAN JOYNER. Ill B-2 Harry Few individuals have more ability than Harry to accomplish any desired goal life has to ofTer. But, of more significance, to supplement and enhance these superior talents. Harry has demonstrated a fierce desire to succeed in all phases of life. This combination of spirit and ability has not failed him in the past, and it will continue to make whatever life he chooses a success. Texas will undoubtedly be " as proud of Harry as he is of Texas. Golf 4. 3, 2. I: Honor Committee 2, 1: POINTER 4, 3: Handball Club 2, I. HARRY NOLAN JOYNhR. W 11.1 JAM C. JLICHAU H-2 Bill Bill brought with him to West Point the experi- ence of two _ ears of prior iiiilitar_ service and a strong confidence in his ability. Although he had a rough Plebc year, his desire and ability brought him through. A dedicated worker on the athletic field and in the class- nwni — though not one to pass up a litle mischief- making now and then — Bill will be a conscientious leader and a credit to any unit . . . hopefully Artillery. Track 4; Riiii; timl C ' ic.u CdDiuiiriee 2. 1: Debate Council and Fariaii 2. I : Spanish Lani aai c Cluh 2. 1 : Sailing Cluh 2. I: Skin Divini Cluh I: B wling 3; Ski Cluh -4. 3. 2. 1: SCUSA 2, 1. GARY STEVEN KADETZ B-1 Gar One of the biggest of the denizens of B-1, Gary was also one of the most amiable. Since he was from Queens, there was no dearth of lovely young things breaking a path to his door on weekends. Between dragging and playing football, Gary astounded us all by still having time for a little study without jeopardiz- ing his title as " most rested man in the Corps. " Tran- quil and sincere. Gar ' s success is insured. Football 4. 3. 2. 1 , Monogram .?; Track 4; Astronomy Club 1 : Audio Cluh 2. 1 : Debate Council and Forum ,?; Rocket Club 1 : Russian Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Rugby Cluh 3: Camera Cluh 2. 1: Jewish Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. 1: Ski Club 2. I. vIHAN KANTOR CALVIN GEORGE KAHARA B-1 Cal From the day we entered the Point. Cal never set his goals short of success. His personality and perseverance won him the honor of pistol team captain and placed him in the upper portion of the class aca- demically. No matter how busy Cal was he always found time to help others with their problems. Cal is truly a credit to his state of Michigan. Pistol: Debate Council and Forum 2.1: German Lan- guage Club 3, 1: Judo 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. 1 ; Pistol Club 2.1: Ski Club 3. NATHAN KANTOR M-1 Nat Hailing from the heart of Brooklyn, this person- able guy came to West Point fresh from a year at college. Nat set out to make his mark in the Academic Department and was soon to make the Dean ' s List Nat " s familar face is seen everywhere during the week, but on the weekends, you will find Nat ever-close to his fiancee. Nat " s qualities and personality will inevit- ably make him an asset to the branch of his choice. Astronomy Club 2. I: French Language Club 2, 1; German Language Club 2,1: Mathematics Forum 2,1; Spanish Language Club 2. 1: HOWITZER 3, 2, 1, Editor 1; POI.XTHR 2: Camera Club 3: Jewish Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2.1. PALL Jl LES KANTROWICH HFNR " ! ' LOl ' IS KELLEY PAUL JULES KANTROW ICH L-1 Kantro The man with the golden tan and the sky-hlue contact lenses — " the Florida flash " has vowed that he would not let the pressure of regimentation affect his carefree life. Having achieved this goal with minor exceptions, he devoted his charm and talent to becom- ing the Academy ' s finest and most popular tennis- squash player combination. His tremendous popularity with both sexes will readily assure that success, in any field he chooses, will be Paul ' s future. Tennis 4, 3, 2, I, Numerals 4; Major A 3. 2, 1; Sqiiasli 4, 3, 2. J. Numerals 4, Major A 2. J: Jewish Chapel Choir 4.3.2. I . ROBERT GEORGE KEATS E-2 Bob Bob was an outstanding student. He devoted much of his spare time and talent to extra-curricular activities, all of which he did with great success. From him we learned of the men of the Corps long dead, in his column called " Historical Notes, " seen so often in the POINTER. Bob has the distinction of initiating a new club at West Point designed to keep its members abreast of current trends in the Army. Bob ' s devotion will lead him to a rewarding career in the Infantry. Track 4; Debate Council ami Forum 3, 2, 1 : Rocket Club 2, 1; HOWITZER 2, I; POINTER 4. 3, 2. 1: Scoutmasters ' Council 4,3,2,1; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4,3,2, 1 ; Dialectic Society 2, 1 . JOHN FRANCIS KEITH G-1 Jack Jack came to West Point directly from high school. Plebe year brought him opportunities to display his leadership when the upper classes were away. He saw both sides of the Corps, from the inquisitions of I-l to the fraternity-like atmosphere of G-L His happy- go-lucky attitude helped him gain the respect of all he came in contact with. The .Armor will gain a valu- able file after graduation. Ru. sian Language Club 2. I: Sailing Club: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2. 1 ; Ski Club. HENRY LOUIS KELLEY I-l Hank The gentlemen from Boston — the man with the guitar — will always be remembered for his well-bal- anced sense of values and his impeccable judgment. From academics to athletics, his interests never lagged. He always maintained a sense of humor, a ready wit and a deep sense of respect for his fellow man. 150 lb. Football 4. 3; Russian Language Club 4, 3. 2, 1, Administrative Vice-President 2: Ski Team 4. 3; Judo 3; Camera Club 2.1: Models Club 2.1: Roman Smith Society 3,2, 1. HUGH ALLAN KELLEY, JR. L-2 Surly The nickname Surly belies Hugh ' s true nature as we knew him. Quick to laugh, he remained a crusader against the injustices of the Tactical Department. There is no limit to the future of a man who is willing o grasp life and live it to the fullest measure. His die is cast and with aggressiveness he makes his way from the grey walls of West Point to the unkown of tomor- row. 150 lb. Fooihall 4. 3: Indcor Truck 4: Outdoor Track 4; German Language Club 4.3.2, L JAMES MICHAEL KELLY M-1 Kell Although a quiet individual. Jim made himself known through his ability to make friends and get along with others. Jim spent a lot of time on academics, but also found plenty of time to play basketball and participate in other activities, especially at the Catholic Chapel. We will always remember Jim as " smiling Jack " because he always had a smile, whether things were bright or black. Public Information Detail 3, 1: Spanish Language Club 4, 3, 2, ; HOWITZER 2. 1; Catliolic Cluipel Acolytes 4. 3. 2. I; Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2. L HL ' GH. ' XLLAN KtLLEY. JAMES MICHAEL KELL JEROME E KELLY STLPHtN JAMI S Kl MPF LtO RAYMOND KhNNhDY JEROME E. KELLY A-1 Jerry Being ;in Army brat, Jerry grew up in a variety of places before lie settled with us at the Point in the summer of ' 6L His OAO, beaming smile and affinity to the rack when not doing battle with the Tactical and Academic Departments, will always remind us of him. An outstanding friend and classmate, plus his dedication arc symbolic of his future success as an officer. Pisfi l Team 4, 3, 2, J: German Language Club 4. .?, 2, I; Pistol Club 4. 3. 2. I: Cadet Chapel Acolytes 2. 1 ; Cardinal Newman Chdi 4. 3, 2. 1 . THOMAS J. KE LLY H-2 T.J. T. J. took one step out of the Air Force, tripped, fell in a glorious heap surrounded by his brown boy, and stayed that way for four years. It might have been five, but the English Department proved no match for the old man from East Troy. After seven years full of blind dates, it ' s back to the Air Force for the next four. We say goodbye to a fine product of Wisconsin and a faithful friend. Football 4: Russian Language Club 1; Ski Club 1 ; Catholic Chapel Acolytes ] . Diving STEPHEN JAMES KEMPF C-2 Steve Steve is regular .Army from way back. A Corporal before he came here and proud of it. Steve met " Me " back during first of Plebe year and has seen her every weekend since, almost. He also plans to occupy all her time after graduation. Steve is a POINTER artist, a Brigade track speedster, likes to pick his Rccondo buddies big and is a member of the 1 6th Division Hoot- enanny ' s. Among Steve ' s other attributes is that he is fast-talking, always on the go — and — if you need a date, he knows how to pick them. Ask his roommate. Rocket Club 4. 3; Russian Language Club 3. 2, 1; POINTER 2. 1; Pistol Club 4: Catholic Chapel Aco- lytes 3. 2, L LEO RAYMOND KENNEDY F-1 Leo Leo (the Lion) came to West Point from Cleve- land, Ohio, although he claims that Ireland is his home. Because of his conscientiousness, Leo soon showed us that he could be counted on and became known as the man to get the job done. Leo made many friends because of his friendliness and willingness to help out. After getting a taste of Infantry mud on A.O.T., Leo decided he liked it so we can expect to see him soon as a member of the " Queen of Battle. " French Language Club 1 : Rugby Club 3: Chess Club 4; Models Club 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2; Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2: Grenade. 7 i f ss . ja. 3.Z VIV iIJOT ». Bcmic friendship and respect and piarantce him cx-en fumrt success. I: HOWITZER. Sp s EJtn ' ' v auh 4. J: CatthUkr Ch4 t 4. 3: SpivTs Ctimcra Crew 4. 3 4. J». ?. r ..rc LFFFDWAROKIUNMMIR 1R Ted Ted has pvvscd quite a ptx k-m at Woi JXMni His interests ani.1 enthusiasm arc s ' lansc that his ixxmw- male can newr figunr oui « ,• xv ..., this smiling son i ' »t ' the Si ui ' a-sults of a ji h wx-ll d«. nc au hich standards and sinccnt h. , --.vs ' " pcrsv n to know and will nwke him a aluaNe asset to the Army. risu 4; Dehatf Ct- ncil mA Forum 4. 3; Hi ' 4 . . :. 1. r ' .-.;;-::, •: Huh 3. 2. . 5r.- ' r..- . .,• ■ - -■?.:. ;i c wcr i ' -..- - .:?. . .- ' . DT 2. I: Sk» c w 4. 3,2,1 DOUGLAS COLEM HAROLD HENRI KLINC.LER. JR EDWIN HOWARD KLINK DOUGLAS COLEMAN KLINE B-1 Doug Douglas was the Academic Department ' s problem child and a regular at area formation. He was the only man in the Corps with no shadow, having sweat same to the wall of Room 1524 at Ranger Dan ' s bid- ding. Subsisting for long interludes on coffee. Pall Mall ' s and much bag, Douglas suffered as few of us have ever done, yet he seemed to soap up the troubles of others like some cosmological sponge. Whatever should we have done without him? POINTER 4. 3: Ski Club 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 2, I: Cadet Band 4. 3: SCUSA 4. 3, 2. 1. HAROLD HENRI KLINGLER. JR. A-1 Henri A rebel with a cause, Henri comes to us from the University of Alabama, with two years of college life behind him. Henri was always willing to spread Southern culture to his Yankee friends. Though his favorite sub- ject was Tactics, he could hardly be called a favorite subject of the Tactical Department. His love for guitar and freedom suggests that we keep marriage out of this confirmed bachelor ' s vocabulary. French Language Club 3. 2. 1 : Racket Club 3, 2. I. EDWIN HOWARD KLINK E-1 Big Ed, The Klinker Sharp-witted, always trying to make the best of things, but working hard when he had to — like around Portuguese G. R. time — that ' s Big Ed. Lots of guts and determination won him a spot on the starting Plebe football team among some tough com- petitors. A guy with a heart of gold who never lets his buddies down — that ' s Big Ed. He will always be one of the all time greats in our book. Football 4. 3; Astronomy Club; Judo; Cadet Sunday School Transportation; Ski Club. ALBERT EDWARD KNAUF, JR. K-1 Ed Ed fit into the Company C-1 crowd without any trouble. His warm friendship and personality enlight- ened many a dreary day during Plebe year. Moving into Company K-I 2nd Class year, he took with him that friendliness (and the T.V. set) and came out as a hive first class year. It was told that he rewrote the 1st class Math course. Ed will always be remem bered as the friendly " Knoffer. " Astronomy Club 4; Debate Council and Forum 1; French Language Club 4; Mathematics Forum 2, I; Bridge Clubl; Chess Club ]. JATHAN HALL KMKl NATHAN HALL KNIKER L-1 Nate Nate, a tall and amiable fellow, held things under control and disposed of each task with a minimum of worry. Not to be messed with and quite the athlete, he was always a good man to have around. Having an inherent determination, Nate will carve out a success- ful future of his choosing. Track 4; Debute Council and Forum 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3,2, I. ERNEST J. KNOCHE. JR. M-1 Ern Ernie is a Navy brat who will be remembered by all of us. With the end very near, he is looking forward to his departure for his first station. The brown boy and Ern were the best of friends, but he still had time for everyone else, too. Ernie graduates with a bright future and a promise of a successful and reward- ing career. Lacrosse 3. 2. Monogram: Spanish Language Chib 3, 2, 1; POINTER 2. I: Rifle Club 4: Ski Club 4. 3, 2,1; Sky Diving Club 3. I RNI ST J KNOC Hh JR JOHN WILLIAM KOLETTY RONALD K KOLZING RICHARD ALLEN KNUDSON JOHN DANIEL KNOWLES D-2 John John took everything in stride during his stay. Academics proved to be almost no challenge, especially since they were ranked behind movies, weekends and handball in importance. A good friend and a tough competitor, John will take his later work in stride and excel! in it, just as he has done here. Gymnastics 4; German Language Cliih 1 : HOWITZER 3, 1; Handball Club 3, 2 l: Models Club 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 4: Dialectic Society 2, I, Custodian 2; KDET3.2.]. RICHARD ALLEN KNUDSON 1-2 Dick Wisconsin has been the source of many fine cadets and Dick Knudson is no exception. That he loves his home state is proven by a well-expounded love for Wisconsin cheese, Wisconsin beer and the Green Bay Packers. That he has been a fine cadet is proven by his record of conscientious application of self to every task. Indeed, conscientious is a very fitting word for Dick ; no one could ask for a better classmate or friend. Debate Council and Forum 4; Russian Language Club 3; POINTER 4; Scoutmasters ' Council 4.3: Dialectic Society 4,3. FRANK WILLIAM KOLESZAR LEO LAWRENCE KONERMANN. JR FRANK WILLIAM KOLESZAR L-I Frank Many a fortunate member of the class of ' 65 has found a solid and true friend in Frank. His sincer- ity is genuine; his loyalty does not falter. May he ever be the man of principle and devotion to duty that he has been during his four years at the Academy. Debate Council ami Forum 4, 3: German Language Club 2,1. JOHN WILLIAM KOLETTY H-2 Jack West Point ' s Bob Hope came to us after three years in the Air Force, for what reason he didn ' t know — but he was a welcome addition, especially to the Spanish Department. A natural comedian. Jack kept us all laughing, but when it came to work he was the first one there with book in hand. One of Jack ' s plethora of girls decided she had him " pegged " and shared his book, along with his guaranteed future success. Hop and Activities Committee 4, 3, 2, J : Fencing Club 3, 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3, 2. I; Cardinal Newman Club 1 : Dialectic Society 4.3, 1 . RONALD K. KOLZING H-1 Kolz Ron must be the friendliest, most down-to-earth man who ever graduated from West Point. His value to his friends and his quiet character were best realized by those who knew him well. He was always willing to help anyone where he could and brightened up many moments with his home-grown Herb Shriner wit. LEO LAWRENCE KONERMANN. JR. F-1 Larry .Arriving at West Point, Larry found the climate so delightful that he decided to stay. After a few early skirmishes with the Academic Departments, he fought his way to the middle of the class. Now his gaze is focused on those gold bars to be received at gradua- tion. French Language Club Goat Football. Sailing Club 3: Judo 4; OLEH BORYS KOROPEY G-2 Ol A guitar and a book of folk songs, a set of still rings in the gym. a stinging wit and an unfailing good nature, topped off by a singleness of purpose that bested the T.D.. O.P.E., and Academics — Oleh is all this and more. A good friend, an outstanding leader and a credit to the Academy, this mild-mannered Ukrainian is sure to be a success in whatever he tries. Gymnastics 4, 3, 2. 1; Rus Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3. JOSEPH PETER KOSCIUSKO Joe Language Club 1, L-1 Joe Kosciusko finally decided to stay at West Point after his second trip through Beast, and at the same time was determined to let everyone know it. Few people worked as hard at academics and sports as did Joe, and even fewer became the captain of the basket- ball team. Hard work, determination and success will certainly be his lifelong companions. Baseball; Basketball; Astronomy Club 3; Debate Council and Forum 3; Russian Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Bridge Club 2. 1; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3,2,1. OLEH BOR ' IS kOROPL JOSEPH PETER KOSCILSKO THOM.AS J KOV. CH .RPAD DE KOVACSY RICHARD tARL KRAMER DAVID B KL HN, JF THOMAS J. KOVACH A-1 Ernie For tour years Tom has spread his influence at the Academy. Tom has always displayed an intense desire to do well in academics, duties, sports and dragging. He has never failed to come to the aid of a classmate. He improves his culture constantly by attending the Army theater when he is not inciting rallies. His determination and stamina will certainly make him a fine officer. Ri(ghy Club J; Catholic Cluipcl Acolyus 2 Chapel Choir 4; Cardinal Sewman Club Glee Club 4. Caiholii -•;, 2, I; B-1 ARPAD DE KOVACSY Arp Arpad entered the Academy with a smile, a win- ning personality and a terrible memory. Coming from the Hungarian aristocracy, it was quite a letdown to become a member of the lowest caste, but with grim determination he overcame this and all other obstacles. His goals are to graduate, fight for the United States and free Hungary. If the rest of his life is character- ized by his four years at West Point, there can be no doubt he will succeed. Debate Council and Forum 4. 1 ; Spanish Language Club 3. 1 ; Fencing Club 1 : Art Club 4: Camera Club 3, 2, 1; Chess Club 4. 3. 1: Pistol Club 4; Cadet CImpel Chimers 4, 3; Sl i Club 4. 3. 2, 1 : Goat-Engi- neer Comimttee 2. RICHARD EARL KRAMER 1-2 Flash Slow of pace, slower of speech, quick to the brown boy, quicker to make friends, Flash drawled his way through 4 years of West Point with the eyes of a Florida hurricane and the perseverance of Ponce de Leon. As a Cow. the amazing Florida Flash delivered a blow to his goat reputation by appearing an entire semester on the Dean ' s List. His potential still under wraps. Flash will make the Air Force glad they have him. Rocket Club 2, 1 : Rugby Club 3. 2. J; Bowling 3. D.WID B. KUHN. JR. G-I Rick Dave is a California boy and proud of it, ready to tell you that L.A. has everything, especially girls. Keeping his Stars and earning a few to wear with his letter in track keeps him pretty busy, but hasn ' t stopped him from taking the finer of our Eastern girls by storm. Quick-witted and friendly, he is well-liked by all who know him, and he has a lot of people talkin " about him. Track Teatn 4, 3. 2. 1 . Numerals 4. Letterman 3, 2, 1 ; 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee: Debate Council and Forum 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 3.2, 1 . JOSEPH KALA KUKEA, JR. JOSEPH KALA KUKEA. JR. G-2 Kuk Kala is the rare individual who can be immediately likeable to all who he encounters, earn the respect of all who know him well, be the most valuable of friends, yet remain true unto himself. Whether riding a 25 foot wave, turning some sweet young thing into a pin cush- ion of joyous nerves, plunking his uke or driving the top section in regular solids, Kala is a man in whom excellence is natural and naturalness is expected. Rabble Rousers 1; Water Polo Club 3. 2. 1; Skin Diving Club 4. 3: Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 2. 1. WALTER STANLEY KULBACKl C-1 Wally He breezed into Beast and he ' ll breeze out in June, but everyone will know he has been here. This volatile, laughing baseball player from " Bean Town " never failed to generate enthusiasm and sincerity in everything he did. Academics came easy to him. With a wide grin and a pleasing way he made many friends. He was always willing to lend a helping hand. Success cannot fail to follow him in whatever he does in the future. Baseball 4, 3, 2, I. Numerals 4, Major A 3; Audio Club 1; French Language Club 2, 1; Rocket Club 3, 2, 1; Russian Language Club 1 ; HOWITZER 2, 1; Camera Club 1 : Skin Diving Club 1 ; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3.2,1: Ski Club 4,3,2. ]. DONALD GENE KURTZ A-1 Robin Friendly and easy-going, Don quickly adapted himself to the challenge of West Point. With a marked determination, he always stayed way ahead of the Academic Department, but sometimes fell behind the T.D., especially in his after taps activities. His quick smile and helpful attitude made him a friend to all. A successful four years assures Don of a bright and eventful future in any area of endeavor. Chess Club 2, 1 : Jewish Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2, L RICHARD JOHN KUZMAN E-1 Kuz Rick was always ready to stand on his convictions. A man of strong principles and admirable industry, Rick was never phased by academics after Plebe Eng- lish. Always in the rack by 10 P.M. he consistently did well in track and football, which kept him busy during the weekdays. His weekends were always re- served for fun and frolic. Football 4; Track 4,3, and Trap Club 3. ' ; Ski Team 3, 2, 1; Skeet I s. R SI NLEY KULBACKI DAVID FOSTER LA ROCHELLE Dave Through these four years of hard and continuous study, Dave has impressed us all with his stout heart and proven worth. He excelled in Army football and track while being a constant inspiration to both his teammates and his classmates. With the rare quality of genuine devotion and the trademark of being true to his ideals, Dave will continue to excel and prosper as he has done here at West Point. Track 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Football 4, 3, 2, I : Canliiud Newman Club; Ski Club 4; Cardinal Newman Forum 4. 3, 1. JAMES ELLIS LANE M-2 Bronco Jim came to us from Florida and although a Rebel at heart, he quickly adapted himself to West Point and Yankee weather. Jim will always be remembered for his spirit and determination and the fact that he never let the Academic Departments dampen his spirits. His easy-going manner has won him many friends. Jim, a staunch admirer of those who wear the crossed sabres, is looking forward to a career in Armor. Public Information Detail 3; Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1; Scoutmasters ' Council 2, 1. DONALD GENE KURTZ E-2 DAVID FOSTER LA ROCHELLE JAMES ELLIS LANE GORDON ALAN LARSON KERMIT DONALD LARSON MICHAEL P. LAPOLLA I-l Mike Mike ' s story is that of the local boy " making good " ' at West Point. From nearby Peekskill, N. Y., Mike makes immediate friends wherever he goes. Having found academics no problem, Mike spends his free time reading sports articles and counting the days until spring brings baseball. The future will find Mike meeting big responsibilities with enthusiasm and success. Baseball; Bowling; Models Club: Ski Club. GORDON ALAN LARSON G-1 Gordy Gordy will be remembered as an outspoken indi- vidualist, who never let a lack of knowledge prevent a bold stand on any issue. A master of deception and the purple phrase, he was always ready to dazzle you with his footwork, whether it be at the boards or the bridge table. As a gatherer of good deals, he managed to meet many girls on glee club trips and was the only Gentile to ever direct the Jewish choir. Astronomy Club 1; Bridge Club 2, 1; Pistol Club 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 4; Jewish Chapel Choir 3, 2. 1 , Director; Glee Club 3, 2. I ; KDET 4.3,2. KERMIT DONALD LARSON D-2 Don Don came to us from Salt Lake City and brought with him the intelligence and sense of humor that en- abled him to tackle with ease all that the Academic and Tactical Departments could dish out. His sincerity and willingness to help others made him a good friend to all who knew him and will insure him a promising future. Audio Club 2.1; German Language Club 2.1; Rocket Club 3.2. 1; Ski Club 4. 3. 2,1. FREDRIC LEWIS LAUGHLIN 1-2 Fred Michigan boasts of many graduates, but none to compare with the Port Huron flash. A high school star and versatile athlete, Fred displayed prowess in all fields, including academics and activities. But what makes him shine among the others, (besides his rubi- cund cranium), is his sincerity. This, tempered by a genuine wit, keeps his friends in robust spirits. For Fred the future holds marriage to his high school sweet- heart (a rare feat) and then undeniable success in each endeavor. 150 lb. Football 4; Squash 4. 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4. Monogram 2, Major A 1 ; Debate Council and Forum 2.1; German Language Club 3,2,1; Rugby Club 2, 1; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4,3,2,1. LOWELL B LAWSON LOWELL B. LAWSON E-1 LB. L. B. will probably be remembered most vividly as the sparkplug of the athletic field and the piston in the Academic Department, because of his intense desire to win and his relentless drive to achieve the maximum from his education. His quiet, yet confident air cannot fail to impress itself on those around him and will always be remembered by those of us who have come to know him these past four years. Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3,2,1. RONALD F. LAYER H-1 Ron Ron will be remembered by all who knew him as one of the friendliest, most conscientious and continu- ally happy members of the class of " 65. He contributed much to serving his class as a member of the Class Committee. A bundle of energy and vitality, he bright- ened up many a day with his Hoosier sense of humor. 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; French Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1. Custo- dian 3; Cadet Cliapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Car Com- mittee 1. 1 )NALD F. LAYER STEVEN R. LEACH Steve Having trouble staying off tiie area, Steve decided that the only solution would be to get more rest and this he did, for he never seemed to worry too much about academics. His abil ity to do a good job with a minimum of efTort will always speak well for him, no matter what he chooses to do. Astronomy Club 1, Ski Club 3,2, 1. Rugby Club 1; Century Club 2; RICHARD ANDERSON LEARY B-2 Rich Rich entered West Point in July, 1961, a carefree, honor ' s graduate from Grand Junction High School, Colorado. During his four years. Rich has managed to remain the same jovial fellow; while his academic en- deavors have stood him high within the class. During the late fall and entire winter, you can find Rich sharp- ening and waxing his skiis. No matter what season, you could always find him with either an electronics book or a Playboy. Audio Club 2,1; Debate Council and Forum 4. 3, 2, 1 ; Rocket Club 1 ; Ski Team 2, 1 ; Models Club J; Pistol Club 4, 3; Scoutmasters ' Council 4,3,2, 1. JEROME M. LEDZINSKI A-2 Jerry When Jerry left Benwood for West Point, he was determined to make good. He came with a purpose and, a rough person to please when it came to efficiency, details, P.E, and pro girls, he accomplished it. Jerry ' s pastimes were physical conditioning and wrestling. If you didn ' t fmd him studying, you knew he would be in the gym. We wish a faithful friend good luck and we congratulate the Army, for it will always be able to rely on Jer. iVrestling 4, 3, 2, I ; Lst Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; Hop and Activities Committee 3, 2, 1 ; Public Information Detail 1 ; Public Relations Council 1; Astronomy Club 2, 1; Audio Club 2, ; Debate Council and Forum 4; Portuguese Language Club 2,1; Rocket Club 2,1; Outdoor Sports- men Club 4; Rifle Club 4; Skin Diving Club 3, 2, 1, Vice-President; Catholic Chapel Choir 4; Cardinal Newman Club 2, 1; Automobile Committee 2, 1; Buckner " Mortar, " Business Manager 3; Flying Club 1. ROBERT LIST LEE M-1 Bob Bob came ready to work with his high school rivals, who formed the greatest Army swim team in history. He set several records Plebe year and worked hard to cut seconds off each year. Deterred from Stars only by the French Department, he proved his juice prowess by building a ham radio station into his desk. His relentless pursuit of high standards he sets guar- antees his success in the Army. Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1 , Numerals 4, Mafor A 3, 2. 1 , Navy Stars 3; Sky Diving Club 2, 1; Water Polo 4; Radio Club 4, 3, 2. 1; Cadet Band 4, 3. WILLIAM J. LEHMAN D-I Bill Coming to us from the wind-swept plains of Kansas, Bill managed to take West Point in stride. He didn ' t let the O.P.E., Tactical Department or academics get him down, and always had a smile and a friendly word for everyone. Eastern girls failed to faze him through- out his four years as a cadet. Bill ' s nonchalant attitude should carry him far in the Army. Bridge Club 4, 3; Rifle Club 4. 3; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3, 2, I; Cadet Band 4. 3. 2. I. Librarian 2; Secretary L MICHAEL LEIBOWITZ D-2 Leibo Leibo made the long trip to West Point from an outstanding high school career in central New Jersey. In his athletic activities, he excelled at track and wres- tling, devoting his time and efforts to the Army teams. Plebe year he won a hard battle with the Math Depart- ment and went on to show that academics would no longer be a problem. Mike can always be depended upon as a friend and leader. Football 4; Wrestling 4, 3, 2; Track 4, 3,2,1, Mono- gram 3,2; Spanish Language Club 2,1; HOWITZER 3, 2. 1: Handball Club 1; Jewish Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1; Ski Club 4, 1. V KENDALL McRAE LEMLEY M-2 Ken Initially inclined to take academics a trifle too seriously, Ken soon abandoned that course for more leisurely pursuits and developed a large capacity for relaxation and good books. Beneath the easy-going attitude he was a confirmed thirty year man. and his love of the Army was shaken only rarely. Normally unrufflled and soft-spoken. Ken neverthless possessed strong convictions, which he defended with relish. French Language Club I : Bowling 2. 1 ; KDET 3. 2. 1. LARRY LOUIS LESKOVJAN G-2 Larry Out of the Lone St ar state there emerges a man endowed with academic ability, athletic prowess, a tremendous courage to surmount all obstacles in his path — and an unpronounceable last name. L ' nder a militarj- e. terior lies his unselfishness, a great sense of humor and a warm heart. Larry has left a trail marked by continued accomplishments, an unlimited number of friends and a tremendous desire to succeed in the future — and he will. Russian Language Club 3. 2, I; Cadet C Impel Choir 4. 3, 2, 1; Dialectic Society 4, J, 2, ; 100th Night Show 4,3.2, I; Ski Club 2,1. t KENDALL NLRAK LEMLEY LARRY LOUIS LESKOVJAN CARL A LETTERIE o |B % " " - « ' ; H j i| GORY LETTERMAN SARRY WARREN LEVINE CARL A. LETTERIE C-1 Slats Had Slats turned his interests to thie civilian world instead of the military, he would undoubtedly have been a tremendous success. His good business head was never turned towards his classes, where he fre- quented the last sections. Carl embodies the class motto, " Strength and Drive. " He does everything from cheering for an Army team to just enjoying himself with the same energy. He is a true friend. Century Club; Camera Club 4. 3; Pistol Club 4. G. GREGORY LETTERMAN F-2 Greg Greg brought that good-natured country charm and personality to West Point all the way from Rolla, Mo. Not even the grinding system of the Academy could make this representative from the Ozarks worry. Greg should be able to find happiness and success wherever he goes. Lacrosse 4, 3; Debate Council ami Forinn 4. 2. I.- German Language Club 2, L HUBBERT LEE LEVERETT H-1 Cooky The midwest ' s loss was West Point ' s gain when Hubbert L. joined the class of ' 65. An honor student and excellent athlete. Cooky has spent four years developing a taste for cherry cokes and Saturday matinees with minimum effort and maximum rack time. Honesty, loyalty and a brilliant mind make Cooky ' s friendship an asset to any man lucky enough to have it. We are sure that Cooky will find success and satisfaction in all his endeavors. Hop and Activities Committee 4, 3. 2, I ; French Latj- guage Club 3, 2, J; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2. 1; Mortar, Associate Editor. BARRY WARREN LEVINE B-1 Barry From Denver the class gained one of its more colorful members. Always a keen competitor, Barry has found time to excel in every field of endeavor from being on the KDET airwaves to being an outstanding intra- mural athlete. Everyone who has come in contact with Barry has come to value highly his friendship. Barry has been a truly outstanding individual. Honor Committee 3,2,1 : KDET 3, 2, J. DENNIS BLAIR LEWIS DENNIS BLAIR LEWIS C-1 Denny This lad from Youngstown brought with him to the Academy a flair for the " good Hfc " and an indomi- table spirit. Denny trudged through his tenure at the Academy seemingly impervious to the regimentation and unaffected by the demands of the Academic Department. He was, however, never above presenting his " estimate of the situation. " As broad as his shoulders was his willingness to lend a helping hand and his ability to win friends. Football 4, 3. 2. 1; Track 4: Astronomy Club 2.1: Handball Club 1; Camera Club 4, 3. PETER CHRISTIAN LINN B-I Pete Pete is an Army brat from Kansas. He came to West Point with qualities about him that the rigors of the system could not change. Stars on his bathrobe and a stint on the area tell the story of his determination. Often outspoken, always sincere, Pete has a cheerful disposition and genuine interest in others, which make him the finest of friends and an asset wherever he goes. Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Scoutmasters ' Council 4, 3,2,1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, I: Glee Club 4. 3,2; I. GERALD EUGENE LIPSIT B-2 Jerry Coming from the Army to West Point, Jerry dove into everything with vigor and determination. Always improving and moving forward, he will long be remem- bered as a very funny guy. A real terror on the soccer tield, Jerry even found academics fun and interesting at times. As Jerry said one spring over an electronics test, " I love it here, " and indeed he did. Pistol 4; Debate Council and Forum 4; Rifle Club 4; Cardinal Newman Club 1 . ANTHONY G. LIVIC H-1 Tony Tony is able to blend rugged physical abilities with a personality and character into a combination that packs a mighty punch. If you know him, luck favors you. His wit and sincerity dominate you in a feeling of respect and a desire to become his friend. To call him a friend is to have made an achievement — to call him a man is an understatement. Football 4, 3; Lacrosse 3, 2; Models Club 2,1. RISTIAN LINN RALPH VITO LOCURICO Loco Coming from the big city atmosphere of New Jersey, Ralph brought with him a sense of humor, a desire to succeed and the ability to apply himself. Despite occasional bouts with the T.D. aiid those four grey walls, he still managed to keep his smile. His inter est in photography made him well-known for his shutter-snapping ability. With his bright personality, he ' ll go a long way. French Language Club 3. 2. I : Mathematics Forum 2, 1; HOWITZER 2.1: Camera Chih 3.2. 1; Football Photographer 4,3.2, 1 . DEAN RICHARD LOFTIN C-2 Falcon Falcon came to us from the University of Michigan. A.R. Infantry, no less. " Are you hurt down there? " " Yes sir. " Six months isn ' t long. Just ask him. Cuts a mean saber. Karate anyone? Picks on roommates locker — " Kia. " Scrappy little fella, with or without his guitar. Wrestles for hours against larger roommates or with him again all comers. A true buddy. Another of the 16th ' s songsters. Career man — (you sure this parachute will open?) Fencing 4, 3. 2, 1; Sky Diving 3, 2, 1: Pistol Club 3; Karate 3,2,1. RALPH VITO LOCL ' RICO DEAN RICHARD LOFTIN GORDON ALFRED LONG PETER JAMES LONG, JR JOHN EDWARD LONGHOLSER GORDON ALFRED LONG G-2 Gordy Although Gordy was that rare member of the upper five per cent, he was never too busy to help a classmate with his studies. When not studying, sleeping or reading Science Fiction, Gordon could usually be found con- tributing sitzmarks to the ski slope or bailing out an overturned canoe on Lake Popolopen, depending on the season. G-2 will long remember this jovial nimrod from the wilds of California. Stars 3. 2, I . Public Information Detail 2.1: Fencing Club 3: Ski Club 3. 2. 1; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. 2: Ski Patrol 2. 1: NDT 2. I: Christian Science Chapel Squad 4. 3. 2. 1: HOWITZER 2, 1. PETER JAMES LONG. JR. A-2 Jim From the land of the mint julep came this wander- ing troubadour ready to make his way within our grey walls. Every year there was a new interest from KDET to sky diving, but always there was the same perserver- ance that took him through the forest of obstacles con- fronting him. This doggedness and self-confidence will make Jim " s career enviable and rewarding. POINTER 4, 3: Sky Diving 2. 1: Cadet Cliapel Aco- lytes 4, 3,2, 1 ; KDET 4,3. JOHN EDWARD LONGHOUSER G-2 House Love is a girl named Karen, sport is an event called " tramp, " and fun is a movie or a leave in the Chicago suburbs. House is_ a light-hearted guy with a full measure of personality. When work is to be done, it is well done, and when help is needed, it is freely offered. John has well represented the Academy, and will continue to be a credit to the service. Gymnastics 4. 3. 2, 1: German Language Club 4, 3, 2.1: Cadet Chapel Choir 4; Dialectic Society 2,1. PETER BRL ' ERE LOUNSBURY D-1 Pete Pete came to West Point from nearby Brewster, New York with all the zing and vigor of living on a farm. He found it much different here, but made the adjustment in his cool collected way. He played Plebe football and track, but realized after a good freshman season that the weight and hammer were his claim to fame, so he went on to make good in these events. He had little trouble academically, being on the Dean ' s List for two years and having a fine overall standing. He is a true friend and will always be remembered. Track 4, 3, 2, I; Football 4; 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; French Lan- guage Club 2, 1; Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1. PETER BRLIERE LOLINSBI ' RY HENRY JACKSON LOWE HENRY JACKSON LOWE B-1 " Call me anything but late to dinner " Jack, like many of us, was an Army brat, and knew a little of what to expect before he came. But he applied himself to the grind with the theory that the harder he worked, the more he would get out of it. In every field of endeavor he gave his best, and the kind of drive and intense ambition is sure to grant him an even more successful career upon graduatoin. Soccer 4, 3, 2; Lacrosse 4. 3; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. 2, 1, President: Pistol Cliil- 4. 3; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3,2, I . RAYMOND JOHN LUDWIG L-1 Ray Ray joined us in Beast already an old trooper. During his sojourn he was a continual source of inspira- tion. Never one to sweat much but always ahead of the game, the T.D. never got the best of him. Whether he was searching for a good political argument or a bright spot in old Germantown, Ray always enjoyed life. His carefree attitude tempered with his natural grasp of any situation will carry him far. French Language Club 3, 2, 1; German Language Club 2, 1. UN LUDWIG WILLIAM EARL LYONS JERRY A. MADDEN JOHN K. LYONS G-1 Jack Jack is one of those rare individuals that we can call a real friend. He was always ready to lend anyone a friendly ear or a helping hand. Jack did an outstanding job as Company G-Ts Honor Representative, Often found on the fields of friendly strife, Jaok is known for his prowess as a handball player. Look for success to follow him wherever he goes and in whatever he does. Honor Commiltee 2,1; Public Information Detail (Regi- ment Representative); Public Relations Council (Bat- talion Representative) ; HOWITZER 4; Handball Club 2, ] , Custodian; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 2,1; Cardi- nal Newman Club 3. 2, 1 ; Dialectic Society 4; SCUSA 4. 3. 2. 1. TACRO Chairman 1: NOT 4, 3, 2, 1, TADRO. WILLIAM EARL LYONS D-2 Bil Bil, spelled with one " 1 " because of his Hoosier drawl, quickly lost himself in extra-curricular activities Plebe year. He sold his soul to the DC and F and in turn lost the privilege of remaining at West Point on the weekends. But he adapted himself to this unusual punishment with great stamina. Relying upon his pre- vious college experience at Purdue, he has also man- aged to keep from being found. Track 4; Audio Club 3, 2. I, President: Debate Council and Forum 3, 2,1; POINTER 4. 3; Chess Club 4; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2, 1; Pistol Club 4; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2; KDET 4, 3, 2; SCUSA 3,2,1. THOMAS DUNCAN MAC VICAR JOHN A MADIA THOMAS DUNCAN MAC VICAR L-1 Mac Mac ' s enthusiastic devotion to a task — whether it be a pretty female or solving an academic problem- consistently results in the approved solution. His ability to accomplish easily what others find difficult, combined with a constant striving for perfection, have gained for Duncan the admiration and respect of all. Wrestling 4, 3; 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Com- mittee; 3d Class Committee; Public Relations Council 2, 1; Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. I; Glee Club 3. 2. I. JERRY A. MADDEN E-1 Jcr Hailing from the state of Iowa, Jerry made his mark the minute he set foot at West Point. Excelling in track and the ability to make friends, Jerry soon had a room full of trophies and classmates who thought very highly of him. With his wonderful personality and desire to make the best of his opportunities, Jerry will undoubtedly achieve the highest goals this world has to offer and will continue to make success of his life. Cross Country 3. 2. 1; Track 4, 3. 2. 1; Chess Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Pistol Club 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3,2, 1. ROBERT W. MACE B-1 Bob For two years B- 1 has had a dedicated young man in its midst. During the week Bob never lets an oppor- tunity for advancement pass. He thinks nothing of sacri- ficing his vital study time for his cultural betterment at the Army Theater. Nearly every afternoon after cl ass he pauses in his room to reflect on the days accomplish- ments. Even on weekends he supplements his training with extra studies in chemistry. Such diligence will cer- tainly make a fine officer. Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2,1; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN A. MADIA B-1 Big John After a brief interlude at the University of Cin- cinnati, this loyal West Virginian begrudgingly settled down to the unfamiliar regimentation of Army life. Keeping his academics foremost in his mind, he always managed to find time for more enjoyable diversions. His booming voice and generous smile made Big John well-known and well liked. This blend of good humor and good sense cannot fail to produce success in the future. Football 4, 3. Monogram 3; French Language Club 4, 3, 2; Mathematics Forum 1; Rocket Club 3, 1; Camera Club 2, 1; Outdoor Spor tsmen Club 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 1 ; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4, 3; Car- dinal Newman 2,1; Goat-Engineer Game. lik ' " EMANUEL PAUL MAIMONE B-2 Manny Years from now when the accomplishments of this fellow classmate are being honored by a grateful nation, our thoughts will return to his cadet days and the Manny we knew — kind, considerate, a true friend. Amid the accolades our proudest utterance will be — " Yes, we knew him well. " 150 lb. Football 4; Debaic Council ami Forum 4 HOWITZER 4. 3. 2. I : I ' OINTFR J, 2, 1: Judo 4 Pistol Club 4. Jt; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 Cardinal Newman Club 4. 2. I : Dialectic Society 2, 1. JOHN RICHARD MALPASS M-1 Mole Faster than a speeding Jaguar, a better dancer than Fred Astaire, able to lift heavy weights in a single gnmt — it ' s Super-Mole. This mild mannered captain of Varsity cross country fights relentlessly for pro- ficiency, better movies and female companionship. The Yonkers flash thrives on wheat germ and dreams of the perfect girl, an Army career and a Caribbean re- tirement. As an all-the-way Airborne Ranger, the Mole in Army blue will be an officer unsurpassed. Cross Country 4. 3. 2. I . Numerals 4. Letter; Indoor Track 4. 3. 2. 1: Outdoor Track 4. 3. 2. 1: Sky Div- ing 3.2: Catliolic C Impel Acolytes 3,2. 7. EMANUEL PAUL MAIMONE JOHN RICHARD MALPASS LLVMSl DWARDMANLSS JR GENE KARL MANOHI AYNE WATSON MARSH LEWIS EDWARD MANESS, JR. D-1 Eddie Eddie came to us with eighteen years as an Army brat, a fine athletic record and a previous military edu- cation as his main accomplishments. Since he ' s been here our foes have felt his physical prowess on the 150 lb. football field: and both the Tactical and Aca- demic Departments have felt his mental prowess along the military lines. Eddie ' s warm personality and inde- pendent ideas are sure to guarantee his success. 150 Ih. Fooihall .?, 2. I: Foothull 4: Wrestling 4; National Debate Tournament. GENE KARL MANGHI L-1 Gene Came in from what he claims is ski country, U.S.A. . . . spent a lot of time at cross country skiing, but turned out to be a pretty -good skier anyway . . . good thing there was snow here; he would have been bored without it . . . never had to study-seldom did . . spent CQ in the most smoke filled room in New South . . . smart enough to get ahead ... he probably will. German Language C lub 3.2. I ; Mathematics Forum 1 : Rocket Cliih I; Ski Team 3.2. I; Art Club 4; Catholic Chapel Acolvtes 4. 3. 2, I: Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2. I. ARTHUR B. MARK. JR. B-2 Shadow, Art Never one to sit back and watch the world go by. Art has spent the larger part of his cadet career master- ing the academic system and adorning his room with athletic trophies. His ability as a doer should, in years to come, bear out the saying, " success breeds success. " Track 4. 3. 2. 1 : Cross Country 4, 3; Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2, 1: Dance Orchestra 3. I; Cadet Band 3. 2. 1. WAYNE WATSON MARSH K-2 Wayne Whether in the classroom or on the athletic field, Wayne has continued to excel. A willing worker, an efficient leader and a likeable guy, Wayne will be re- membered by his classmates. All of us who have known this little Missourian agree that with such personal qualities, nothing but success can lie ahead. Hop and Activities Committee 2.1: French Language Club 2,1; Rocket Club 2. 1; Skx Diving 2. 1 ; Skin Diving4,3; KDET2.1. BRLCE ROLAND MARSHALL BRUCE ROLAND MARSHALL M-1 Bruce Bruce was a great guy of many talents. Among these, he worked hard for the swim team until he dis- covered a much more challenging sport — triathlon. He often climbed higher mountain peaks than he ever did in academics, but he never failed to make the grades for a trip. His greatest asset is his determination that aims at a goal and stops only when it is there. Swimming Team 4, 3: Debate Council and Forum 2.1; TriatlilonCluh 3.2. 1: Chess Club 2.1. DAVID VINCENT MASTRAN K-2 Dave Being a brat, Dave had no doubts about West Point until he got here. The first year was a rough one, but he quickly adapted. A hive with a flair for science, Dave soon sported stars. Shelley, his high school sweetheart, remained faithful throughout the four years, as well as brightening up the weekends and making the future bright too. The stock market got his fortune, but he ' ll make good, we ' re sure. Stars 4, 3. 2: Debate Council and Forum 2.1: Rocket Club 1; Spanish Lamiuaae Club 3: KDET 4: Radio Club 4, 3, 2. THOMAS JOSEPH M.ATKOVCIK. Jr. K-2 Tom Tommy had little trouble when it came to playing cadet after one year in the bush leagues at VML Neither academics or athletics gave him any particular trouble as he cooled his way through the four years. He spent as much time on things of his own interest as he did on studies. Everyone knows the great contribu- tion Tom will make to the Army. 150 lb. Football 4, 3. Numerals 4. Monogram 3: Debate Council and Forum 2, 1 ; German Language Club 3; Sky Diving 2; Rugby Club 3,2.1. MICHAEL M.ATTESON F-2 Mike Mike always managed to keep his sense of humor during the long four years and took everything coming his way standing up. .A dedicated infantr man. you ' ll no doubt find him several years from now in the mud and swamps — still smiling! Wrestling 1 : Ski Club 4. 3 , 1. DAVID VINCHNT MASTRAN KENNETH DICKSON MC ARTHL R Pete Pete, a high school " stud " from the Blue Ridge Mountains, made his greatest contribution to the Corps by being " leader of the goats " and producing notebooks that attracted classmates from all over the Regiment. The only thing that disrupted his elaborate " poop " ses- sions was an occasional " why? " from the audience. As for his athletic prowess, give him a racket and he was at home. Always popular, Pete never lacked friends — male or female. French Language Cliih ; Cadet Band 4. Cadet Chapel Choir KENNETH DICKSON MC ARTHLR G-1 JOSEPH ALEXANDER MC CHRISTIAN, JR. Tanker Joe was an Army brat and mighty proud of it. Wearing Stars kept him busy studying, yet between time for playing soccer, speaking French or working with SCUSA, he still found time to play bridge, drag pro and go on trips. His pleasant air and friendly smile made him well-liked by all who knew him and his high ideals, tact and determination will surely help him succeed in the years ahead. Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1 , Monogram 3. 2: Debate Council atid Forum 3, 2, 1; French Language Club 4. 3, 2, 1, President 2; HOWITZER 1; Bridge Club 2, 1; Chess Club 2,1; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3, 2, 1; Dialectic Society 4; Glee Club 4; SCUSA, Chairman L JOSEPH ALE.XANDER MC CHRISTIAN, JR. o. CHARLES CARROLL MC CLOSKEY. CAMDEN WHITE MC CONNELL WILLIAM T MC CREARY CHARLES CARROLL MC CLOSKEY. Ill E-2 Chuck Chuck is a solid guy — sohd all the way around. He is a guy you could always count on never to let you down in a pinch. He was usually serious, but he had that fine sense of humor and wit that kept everything going. Beast, Buckner, Firstie Trip — Chuck was there and left his mark. Now he is on his way to bigger and better things. Public Information Detail 2,1; Bowling 2.1: Catholic Cluipel Choir 4. 3. 2. I: Glee Club 4, 3. 2. 1. CAMDEN WHITE MC CONNELL G-2 Cam Cammy is G-2 ' s representative on the Corps rack team. He had a tough time with academics, not his own, but the rest of the company ' s, and he earned the undy- ing gratitude of us goats. He spent most of his free time sailing, but he makes it back in time for the weekly milk run. His wit and determination will take him far in life. WILLIAM T. MC CREARY H-1 Mac A combination of bad luck and injuries right from the beginning made things somewhat less than enjoyable for Bill ' s cadet days. There is nothing, though, that could detract froni his as a friend or as a man. When Mac spoke people listened. Football 4; Wrestling 4; Rugby. JOHN HAROLD MC CULLOUGH F-1 Mack Mack, hails from Tennessee, came to West Point with an education in mind. He soon realized that he had both time for this and time to aid his classmates in their quest for knowledge, or more likely a " 2.0. " His classmates will remember him for his generosity and dependability. His loyalty and strong hand leading us straight will always endear him in our hearts. Russian Language Club 4. 3, 2. 1; Cutlet Sunday School Teacliers 4.3.2.1; Glee Club 3.2,1; Baptist Student Union 4.3.2.1. Portuguese Language Club 4. 3. 1 President I; Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, JOHN HAROLD MC CLLLOUGH PALIL THOMAS MC DONALD PAUL THOMAS MC DONALD L-1 Tom Hailing from the great state of Texas, Tom is living testimony that he who has a noble heart is never alone. Regardless of the problem, whether it involved academics, cadet life or just a desire to discuss some- thing, P.T. was the man to see. Tom was probably responsible for more people being on the Dean ' s List and off the " D " List than any other man in the Corps. We all owe a debt of gratitude to this serious minded Westerner. Public Relations Council 2. 1; Astronomy Club 4, 3, 2,1; Spanisli Language Club 4,1; Cliess Club 4. JAMES HENRY MC ELIECE, JR. C-2 Mac Through his great desire, determination and self- discipline. Jim has attained at West Point a physical and scholastic level of ability which the majority of us can only sit and dream about. Although completely dedicated to a 52 " blond female, he has managed throughout his four years to participate in and partake of the sweeter and more enjoyable things in life. And what about Jim ' s future? Evidence of his personal suc- cess and accomplishments will only be a matter of time. 750 lb. Football; Debate Council and Forum 1 ; French Language Club 3; Rugby Club 4, 3, 2, I; Sl eet and Trap Club 4. JAMES HENRY MC ELIECE. JR ILLIAM JOHN MC kiiMh ' l . JR. FRANK LANGDON MEIER JOHN ROCCO MC GURK E-1 Rocco Sports fans, the " mayor of Cambridge " will surely go down in the Corps ' history as an all-time " " all-timer. " " Whether generating spirit at a rally, leading the Corps of Cadets at a football game or otherwise displaying his Thespian skills. Rocco was always the center of attention. With his dynamic personality, articulate man- ner and many proven abilities, this Bostonian is destined for great success in all future endeavors. Track 4, 3. ' iimenils: Hop and Activities Committee 3. 2. 1; Rabble Roiisers 2, 1. Head Rabble Rouser; Spanish Language Club 3. 2, 1 ; HOWITZER 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Club; Dialectic Society 3, 2: KDET 3.2. 1; Ski Club 3. 2. 1. WILLIAM JOHN MC KEMEY. JR. D-2 Bill Bill emerged from the suburbs of Philadelphia to pursue a military career and. in the process, put in many hours aiding others with his gifts for the finer forms of the engineering sciences. He left an admirable mark on the intramural fields of lacrosse and football while managing to take his share of trips. He will be re- membered by all of us for his pleasant perseverance and sincere friendship. He cannot help but find success wherever he may go. Public Information Detail 4. 3. 2; Spanish Language Club 3. 2, 1; HOWITZER 2,1. JERRY REED MC MILL GEORGE EDWARD MENNINGER JERRY REED MC MILLAN E-1 Mac When Mac came to West Point, he terminated a dream which had begun many years back. Once here, Mac reflected his Southern heritage with his ready smile and good humor, which have won him many friends. Texas would award Mac a hero ' s medal, if his many close victories over the Academic Department were known. Always a strong competitor in athletics, his determination to do a good job will carry him far in his Army career. French Language Club 2; Camera Club 2; Pistol Club 4; BSU 4,3,2, I. JOHN EDWARD MC MILLAN A-2 Ed An unreconstructed citizen of the United States of Georgia, Ed claims to be Senator RusselFs greatest single contribution to the nation ' s defense. Be that as it may, our butternut hero has given undoubted proof of his durability under fire by the ingenuity and g usto with which he has successfully managed to with- stand the assaults of the T.D. and the Academic Depart- ment for four long years. We have no doubts that the service will find important use for Ed ' s many talents. Pisrol: Pistol Club: Dialectic Society 2: Debate Council and Forum 4,3. FRANK LANGDON MEIER F-2 Chipmunk A living example of the old adage, " the little people will gain control, " Frank has won the friendship and respect of his classmates. While wading through West Point ' s academics and providing a fighting spirit to intermurder, Frank was always willing to aid a friend and used his energy and ability to help, regard- less of cost. With his coupling of desire and abihty, Frank will make the Army an outstanding officer. Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Rocket Club 1 ; HOWITZER 4; Sports Publicity 4, 3, 2, 1. GEORGE EDWARD MENNINGER 1-2 Ed From West Point I send you one single thought and one sole idea; the magnificent G.E.M. is upon you. It walks, it talks, it is full of pride and the enthusiasm emitted from this Black-Grey-Gold species is highly contagious. If the exterior of this Airborne Ranger is cleaned and divested of all slide rules, grey uniforms and other extraneous matter and is emersed in Army blue, you will find one hell of a fine officer. Public Information Detail 1; Debate Council and Forum 2, 1: Russian Language Club 4, 3; Sky Div- ing I: Cadet Chapel Acolytes 4. 3, 2, I; SCUSA 2, J; B Squad Chapel Choir. GEORGE JERRY MERGES H-1 Big Jer Big Jer ... a natural atliletc . . . sure missed a lot of swimming practice . . . still made Ail-American . . . man aged to run KDET in his spare time . . . Steuben ' s . . . wurst . . . dark brew . . . sleep . . . came back from his first Christmas leave with a sun tan . . . the rest of the year it was a Westinghouse tan . . . originally wanted Arty . . . settled down . . . decided on Honeywell. Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Ail-American .?, 2: Major A, 4, 3, 2. J, Navy Star 3, 2. J: Track 2. I: POINTER 5; Water Polo Clidi 4; Dialectic Society 2, 1; KDET 4,3,2, I , Station Manager. NICHOLAS HARVEY MERRIAM D- Nic A Southern boy and Army brat, Nic made a home in the Corps. The good-natured and well-liked Starman lead his class as a devout Christian and class representa- tive. He is fond of the aesthetic values of literature, music and art. Famous for sailing, good judgment and hell reports, he is destined to be an able military leader and an asset to the Officer Corps. 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3(1 Class Committee; Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1; Astronomy Club 4; French Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Spanish Language Club 4, 3, 2.1; Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1; Sailing Team 4. 2, 1. Captain 1; Pistol Club 3: Scoutmasters ' Council 4,3,2,1; Skin Diving Club 4. 3; Cadet Chapel Choir 2, 1; 100th Night Show 3; Order of the Arrow 4, 3, 2, 1. GEORGE JERRY MERGES HARVEY MERRIAM 190 JAMES HOWARD MIMS LADD HAYDEN METZNER M-2 Ladd Ladd came to us from Phoenix, Arizona, where he says it gets so hot you have to carry a canteen to go two blocks. He has proven himself to be a vary hard and efficient worker and never one to shirk responsibility. Whenever someone needed help he was right there with a helping hand and a ready smile. We can all be certain that in the future he will prove himself a valuable asset to the Army and a credit to the Academy. Rifle Squad; Judo; Rifle Club; Cadet Chapel Choir; Glee Club. JAMES EDWARD MiMS Jim Jim " s first venture north was when he came to West Point. . ' n amiable Southerner, he quickly adjusted to the fast cadet life. Academics never gave him any excessive problems, but the T.D. managed to run into him a few times. He had a special knack for staying away from entangling alliances with the opposite sex, though he seldom let a chance to drag pass by. Jim ' s personality and determination will bring him great success in the Army career. Astronomy Club; French Language Club. HENRY G. MICKELLS, JR. C-1 Hen Hen will always be remembered by his classmates as being one of the Army team ' s most avid rooters. We can always be sure of seeing him at any contest in which Army is engaged. Hen has devoted much of his time managing the gym team and even a lot more time dating his fiancee. Throughout his years at the Academy Hen has worked very hard and has made an excellent account of himself. He certainly is a credit to himself, his par- ents and the Corps, Gymnastics 4. 3, 2. 1. Manager; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3,2, 1 ; Cardinal Newman Club 3. JAMES A. MIRANDO F-1 Jim Jim, a native of Long Island, came to West Point with bright aspirations and an eye for the future. When he was not striking out opposing batters, he was striking laughter into the lives of his classmates. Quick of mind as well as quick of wit, he masters most tasks with ease. With a natural talent for success, he should achieve much in the future. 150 lb. Football 4: Baseball 4, 3. 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1; Pistol Club 4, 3; Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. WILLIAM BROWN MITCHELL WILLIAM BROWN MITCHELL L-1 Mitch Mitch came to us from the hills of Tennessee and though the Academy has had some influence in speeding up his speech, he will always remain " the ridge runner " to us. Unlike his namesake, we will always remember Bill for his tremendous desire to do well in any en- deavor, whether it was academics, athletics or just having a good time. A true believer in the saying " any- thing worth doing is worth doing well. " Audio Club 4, 3; Portuguese Language Club 3, 2, 1; Rocket Club 4, 3, 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3.2, 1 ; Rifle Club 4; Sheet and Trap Club 3. 2, 1 , Secretary 2, President 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2, J; Boxing Champion Camp Buckner 3; Sky Diving Club 1 ; Ring and Crest Committee 1 . JAMES T. MIYASHIRO L-2 Jimmy Jimmy left the sunshine of Hawaii and entered the university with a pineapple in one hand and a brown boy in the other. Though little in size, he is very big among the guys. He will give you his right arm if you need it. One of the best around. Jimmy will do a great job in whatever he undertakes. Track 4; Public Information Detail 3.2: HOWITZER 4: Judo 4, 2, 1. BERNARD JOHN MOGAN F-1 B.J. John is a proud product of Nashville, Tennessee; as a scholar, Rebel and Southern gentlemen in the best traditions of the Old South, he has done well in spread- ing the charm which the Land of Lee is so noted. A warm smile and engaging personality coupled with a natural athletic ability has characterized his stay at West Point. As an officer, John will be a credit to his state. Alma Mater and country. Football 4; Soccer 1; Spanish Language Club 3. 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Choir 2, 1; Dialectic Society 4, 3; Ski Club 4.3. RICHARD DE VERE MOHLERE F-1 Dick Dick brought his magic slide rule along from Carlisle, with a desire to make the Army a career. As time passed though, we all realized that it wasn ' t the slide rule at all ; and the long nights he spent keeping his classmates proficient will not soon be forgotten. His celestial collar, his calm assuredness and a strange yen for the boxing gloves are all indicative of this man whom we are proud to have known. Gymnastics 4; Audio Club 2,1, Custodian 1 : German Language Club 3, 2, 1; POINTER 4, 3; Skv Diving 2, 1; Chess Club 2. I; Catholic Chapel C ioir 2, 1. JAMES T MIYASHIRO ROBERT JOHN MOLEPSKE Bob A native of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, Bob is a graduate of Assumption High School in his own home town. He attended Marquette University, where he studied for a year before transferring to West Point. Excellent swimmer, German hive and showing excellent grades for his dedicated work. Bob has made many friends with his eternal willingness to help whenever he is needed. Swimming, Head Manager: Ptihiic Injarniation Detail 2; Water Polo Club 4: Dance Orchestra 4. 3. 2. I; Cardinal Newman Club 2,1. MICHAEL MOMCILOVICH, JR C-2 Mike This Army brat will carry on the Army way that his father showed him. The future will hold many new experiences and fond memories as Mike returns to posts he saw when he was younger. Strength and drive will bring an exciting career to this man. Mike ' s winning smile will serve him in good stead through the years. Public Information Detail 1: Frencli Language Club 2, 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. ROBERT JOHN MOLEPSKE MICHAEL MOMCILOVICH. JR HARLEY LESTER MOORF KENNETH PRICE MOOREFIELU STEPHEN REAGEN MORRISSEY HARLEY LESTER MOORE, 111 A-2 Harley A ready smile and an easy sense of humor made Harley one of the most enjoyable individuals that his classmates ever came across. He has a sincere sense of duty and responsibility and this, together with a healthy ambition and a quick mind, should make him a constant asset to the Army. He is continually on the Dean ' s List and his athletic abilities have made him a stalwart on A-2 " s intramural activities. Always within the top fifty in the class, he ranks as a solid performer. Rifle 4; French Language Club 4, 3, 2. 1; POINTER 4, 3; Chess Club 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 2, 1; Engi- neer Football 2. KENNETH PRICE MOOREFIELD D-1 Ken Scholar, athlete, friend and inspiration are words that have been and will be said of Ken before his bright star runs its course thru the heavens. This tall hearted man from the plains of Texas has given the halls of West Point new light, which will insure his success in whatever phase of Army life he chooses. Only a place at the top will be his just reward, with his firm ideals as the light. Wrestling 4. 3; Rocket Club 2: Spanish Language Club 1; POINTER 3. 2. I: Dialectic Society 3. 2; National Debate Tournament 2. 1; Debate Council ami Forum 2.1. STEPHEN REAGEN MORRISSEY F-1 Pico From the University of Alaska, Steve brought with him a ready smile and a long remembered sense of humor. His achievements in athletics and academics were only surpassed by his ability to make friends. His mature personality concealed an often wild and untamed heart which more than one young lass found impossible to tame. Steve leaves West Point with the greatest respect and admiration from all of us. Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3. 2, 1: Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; French Language Club 2. 1: Skin Diving Club 4: Ski Club 4.3.2. }. CHARLES HENRY MOSELEY. JR. D-2 Chuck Chuck arrived at West Point as an adopted son of Texas. His Texas background served him well, as he thought big and accomplished many things during his four year tenure. Chuck ' s intelligence and hard work brought him very close to Stars for three years, but his many female acquaintances, complicated dating arrange- ments, (spanning two continents,) and weekly trip sections managed to keep him from the top five per cent in academics. Big things are in store for Chuck Moseley. 750 lb. Football 4. Numerals: Baseball 4: Track 3; Public Information Detail 2, 1. Battalion Representa- tive; Debate Council and Forum 2.1, Banquet Chair- man: Rocket Club 2,1: Spanish Language Club 3,2, 1 , Treasurer 1: HOWITZER 2, 1, Advertising Staff: POINTER 3, 2, 1: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3, 2, I; Dialectic Society 2, 1, Advertising Manager; Ski Club 4, 3. 2, 1. BEVERLY WAYNE MOTAL B-2 Indian One his 84th birthday. Gcncrul MacArthur con- veyed to the Corps those attributes which should be the hallmarks of every graduate of the Military Academy. The attributes were tolerance, balance, intelligence and courage. These words create a picture in the minds of those who hear them and the picture is not difficult to recognize — Wayne. PRESTON M. MOTES, JR. D-2 Pres After many years with the Army as a brat. West Point was only a natural for Preston. From the start, he demonstrated his sincere drive and motivation, especi- ally as he gallantly stood off the attacks from the Math Department. During frge time, Pres could usually be found either in the rack or brushing up for the coming golf season. With his winning smile and personality, he is sure to meet with success in whatever he does. Camera Club J; Bowling Club I . PRESTON M. MOTES, JR CHESTER A MYERS, JR . Wi H| ' -- " iSa- " " " " " " ' . -r m _,fli MERTON E MLNSON JR ORLIN LEE MULLEN B-2 Odin Orlin had a rather unique Plebe year. Apparently he and the upper classes didn ' t quite see eye to eye in many instances. Things became brighter Yearling year and he started on the upward trail. His care factor for studying science left much to be desired; but this could be attributed to his active participation on the POINT- ER and an interest in France. An Army career holds much in store for his ambition and desire. Debate Council and Forum 3, 1; French Language Club 3, 2, 1; Rocket Club 1; POINTER 4. 3, 2, 1; Bridge Club 4; Pistol Club 4: Area Squad 4, 3. MERTON E. MUNSON, JR. K-1 Mert Public Information Detail 3, 2, I; Frenclj Language Club 2, 1; German Language Club 3, 2, I; Sailing Club 4; Skin Diving Club 2. JAMES WILLIAM MLRPHV LARRY T. NEAL JAMES WILLIAM MURPHY 1-2 Murph Murph is red-hcadcd. freckle-faced, hardworking and outspoken. He is sometimes quiet but always ready with a wry comment from an honest yet charitable wit. A rare guy who has the courage of his convictions, he also has the ability to change those convictions when he realizes they are wrong. Murph is the kind of friend chosen by those who value friendship as their greatest possession. Soccer 3.2. 1 : Honor Commirtee 2.1. CHESTER A. MYERS. JR. G-1 Chet Chet was an experienced college man when he first joined us as an A-1 " flanker. " Throughout his four years with us he has continued to display the courage, determination and will to win that will always serve him and our country well. His desire to learn and capacity for work have kept him busy in many fields, but Chet has always found time to help a friend in need. Cross Coiinrrv 3. 1: Judo 2,1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4,2,1; Glee Cliih 2.1. THOMAS JAMES ML ' SHOVIC E-1 Tom Tom came to West Point from nearby Massachu- settes, determined to take full advantage of everything the Academy ofl ' ered. A lover of all sports, he found time for football and lacrosse. After besting the Math department, Tom went on in academics, and by Cow year he was taking tenths from all the hives in the first section. A fun lover, but a person with true devotion, Tom is certain to achieve success in all endeavors. Lacrosse 4,3, Numerals 4, Monogram 3; Football 4: Ski Team 1; Pistol Club 4. 3. 1; Ski Club 4. 3. 2, 1; Company Representative 3. LARRY T. NEAL I-l Lar Larry ' s four years were characterized by a smile for everyone, all of the time. His most prominent trait was that he remained a good friend whether the going was easy or difficult. He was always willing to do his share of the work and then a little more. Natural ability combined with a superb personality will gain for him the goals he seeks. Rijle 3: Rocket Club 3; Spanish Language Club 4, 3, 2.1; Bowling 1 . CHRISTOPHER J. NEEDELS I-l Chris Chris made his mark immediately by winning " Best Plebe " in Beast. Over the years, he has exploited his interests in everything from scuba diving and karate to electronics, in addition to carrying his share of the responsibility. He once shaved it a little close with the English Department to the rocking sounds of the Beach Boys. No matter what the Army might develop, Chris will always remain the " ultimate weapon. " Debate Council and Forum: Karare Club: Skin Diving Club. JR. G-2 WALTER ELLIOT NELSON, Scotty Scotty came to West Point from the shores of Con- necticut determined to survive his four year stay. Never having trouble with academics, Scotty devoted his time to three loves; soccer, brown boy and improving the Academy. Always eager to enter into a conversation, he could frequently be heard discussing his favorite subject, his " Rockbound Highland Home. " His friendly personality and devotion to duty will take him far in his chosen career. Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1; Spanish Club 1. CHRISTOPHER J NEEDELS WALTER ELLIOT NELSON, JR GLENNON E NENNINGER, JR ; SPENCHR NICHOLS DONALD i; NOWLAND FRANCIS WILLIAM OBRIEN, JR GLENNON E. NENNINGER, JR. Glenn Gienn never will regret making from St. Louis, tor it was here that Mrs. The thought of graduation and soccer and karate have occupied leisure time here; and, though never were no problem with him. Come will learn as we have that Glenn wi when there ' s a job to be done. Soccer 4. 3, 2: Rifle 4: Karate 2, CHARLES SPENCER NICHOLS Chuck Chuck was part of sunny California ' s contribution to the " Strength and Drive of ' 65. " Despite the fact that he was a southpaw, he managed to manipulate the G. L right-handed slide rule with enough dexterity to put him so close, to, yet so far away from Stars. His extreme industriousness kept him well ahead of the pack in his favorite pastimes, electronics (E = IR) and girls (1 plus 1=3). Audio Club I; German Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Rocker Club 2. 1; Art Club 4; Pistol Club 4; Skin Diving Club 2,1. D-2 the trip eastward he met his future a keen interest in most of Glenn ' s a hive, academics June, the Army 11 always be near ; Rijle Club 4. E-2 DONALD E. NOWLAND 1-2 Don The Army will be gaining a fine officer when it adds Don to its roster. His constant smile and cheer- ful attitude will always be his trademark. Always active in all sports and his battle with the academic depart- ment gave him a busy four years. With all of Don ' s ability and character he is certainly bound for a suc- cessful career. Cadet Band 4. 3. 2, I; BUGLE NOTES 2. J; HOW- ITZER 2; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 2. 1. FRANCIS WILLIAM O ' BRIEN. JR. I-l Obie An Army brat coming to the Academy from Boston College, Obie will always be admired and remembered for his great wit, friendly personality and Irish music. Never one to hit the books too excessively or worry too much about the T.D., he seems to have a special talent for making a hit with his many female friends. His determination, personality and interest in the Army should carry him far in the years ahead. Hop and Activities Committee 4. 3. 2, 1 ; Pistol Club 4; Catholic Chapel Acolxtes 3, 2. 1; Dialectic Society 4.3,2,1. JOSEPH P. O ' CONNOR, JOSEPH P. OCONNOR. Ill H-1 Pat Noted for his many valient attempts to conquor the ski slopes, and his endless collection of trolls, Pat ' s only enemy at West Point was the Academic Depart- ment. Pat will always be remembered for his unflicker- ing study light that faithfully burnt deep into each night. Honest reflection on our part will show that Pat was the cadet we all wanted to be before entering and the cadet we will believe we were after we leave. Honor Committee 2,1; Triathlon Club 4; Pistol Club 4; Catholic Chapel Acolvtes 2.1; Cardinal Newman Club 2.1: Ski Club 2. 1. CHARLES F. ODONNELL. Ill M-2 Skip Skip is always available for advice and laughs, even when he doesn ' t feel particularly happy himself. It seems that nothing bothers him, but we suspect he just keeps it all within himself. Skip does well in all the sports in which he participates, is a good person and a great friend to have around. All these things added up assure his success in years to come. Hop and Activities Committee 4. 3. 2. 1: Portuguese Language Club 1 . MICHAEL J. OGRADY E-2 Mike Mike came from Chattanooga with his good be- havior, good intentions, brains and football ability. Like Mike, we all have our ups and down, and like Mike, we can be out on our feet but still fighting. A guy with rare abilities and many friends, Mike will go nowhere but up from here on. Football 4. 3,2, 1, Major A 1; 1st Class Committee: 2nd Class Committee: 3rd Class Committee: Debate Council and Forum. TIMOTHY S. OHARA E-2 Tim Tim is a typical Irish " quiet man. " Sincere, devout and unassuming, he nevertheless showed fiery Irish spirit by out-swimming the opponents, as well as many records. He inclined more toward the brown boy than academics at times, but showed brilliance when he applied himself in any subject. The . rmy will gain a fine officer. Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1; Hater Polo Club 4: Pistol Club 4; Catholic Chapel Choir 4; Cardinal Sewman Club 4; Glee Club 2,1. 0mm o- ' -X TIMOTHY S OHAR GERALD DAVID OLEARY Gerry Gerry was never one to sweat the small stuff. His bottomless barrel of wisecracks and wit will stand him well in any crowd. Dividing his free time between girls and barbells, he allows the Academic Department to interfere with neither. An uncontrollable smile and quick mind are his greatest assets. The Army will not be getting a " yes " man. Only the Plebes will be happy to see him leave. Audio Club 2, 1 : Rocket Club 3: Judo 3: Camera Club 2, 1. EUGENE D. O ' NEILL H-1 Gene After successfully negotiating the perils of Plebe year. Gene continued to display the drive and desire that has marked his cadet career. His intense will to succeed extended from the wrestling mat to the class- room, but his studious attitude never stopped him from willingly helping others with academic problems. Gene ' s congenial personality, coupled with his capacity for hard work, will stand him in good stead as a mem- ber of the Army blue. Spanish Language Club 3. 2. 1; Bowling 3. 1; Skeet and Trap Club 4. Ml( HAIL J OGRADY F-1 GERALD DAVID OLEAF EUGENE D ONEILL PATRICK OTOOLE WALTER HENR ' i OEHRLEIN MES ANTHONY OLI O PATRICK OTOOLE A-2 Pat He comes from the Land of 10.000 Lakes with a certain disdain for the Academic Departments and a cosmopoHtan savoir faire. The virility of Paul Bun- yan is characterized in this good-natured Irishman who seems to draw people to him. Pat is known for his in- dividuality and his dislike of a job half done. As a sportsman, a friend or an officer, he will be hard to top. Cross Country 4, Numerals 4; Track. Indoor and Outdoor 4; Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3. WALTER HENRY OEHRLEIN E-1 Whoop Union ' s gift to the Academy was indeed West Point ' s gain. Walt compiled an enviable record on the athletic field and in the classroom. His ability to make things look easy was coupled with a contagious enthusiasm and determination. These same qualities, which he brought to every friendship, will always keep Walt on top. Squash 4, 3, 2. 1: Tennis 4, 3. 2. 1; German Lan- guage Ctuh 4, 3; Catholic C Impel Choir 4. LAMES ANTHONY OLIVO K-2 Olive Jim entered the Corps with an outstanding record of athletic accomplishments, including selection to the Pennsylvania .All-WPIAL " A " football and basketball teams. His quarterbacking in the Goat-Engineer game will be remembered as a high spot for the class of 1965. Jim obtained the title " goat " only with effort. When he forgot not to study, academics were no diffi- culty. He was high in the class in the all important intangibles; the numerous friendships he made will last long after graduation. Football 4, 3: POINTER 2; Catholic Chapel Choir 1; Dialectic Societx 4; Cadet Combo 3, 2; S i Club 4. KIM HARMON OLMSTEAD F-2 Kim Kim has always been one of the outstanding mem- bers of the class of 1965. He possessed a rare blend of athletic ability, common sense and a tremendous sense of humor. Kim refused to be distracted by any feminine creatures. He stuck to his goals and devoted his time to sports, books and the enjoyment of life. Always willing to lend a helping hand to others, Kim never let his own ambitions effect his sincere interest in others. For this and his many other fine qualities, he possessed the respect and friendship of his classmates. Football 4, 2; Debate Council and Forum: Pistol Club 4, l.SCUSA. KIM HARMON OLMSThAD PHILIP ROBERT OLMSTED G-1 The Marquis The bleak, grey walls of West Point never seemed to fit in with the personality of California ' s favorite son. Combining good grades and lack of worry, Phil always found time to stay in contact with his many female admirers. His warm sincerity and outstanding leadership mark him for success in any line of en- deavor. Pistol; Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3. 2, 1 : Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; French Language Club 3, 2, 1; Pistol Club 4. 3. 2. I; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3,2.1; Ski Club. ' ' U -« JOHN VINCENT OLSON F-1 John John ' s four year stay has been marked by a run- ning battle with the Academic Department and success in every other field. His quiet sense of subtle humor, terrific personality and determination to do every job well, have made life in barracks a lot more bear- able. There can be nothing but success in John ' s future. JOHN VINCENT OLSON SrtFHhN ALAN ULSON STEPHEN J PAEK. JR JAMES MARSHALL PALEY TADAHIKO ONO STEPHEN ALAN OLSON G-2 Steve Frequently driven into the deptlis of the night to privately combat the Academic Departments, Steve singled out the solids and javelin targets upon which to unload both barrels. Plebe math almost got his Pennsylvanian ' s goat, but a little studying and a lot of sweat pulled him through the battle. His hearty laugh, which shattered many a silent night, and his unyielding desire to win will bring him endless success in the world. Football 4; Track 4. 3, 2. 1; Rocket Club 2, I; Pistol Club 4. TADAHIKO ONO L-1 Tad The biggest little man the Corps has ever known; five feet five inches of heart and mind. As a student, he would always prepare himself — during mid-period, As a lover, he will always be known for his little woman from Japan. As an athlete, he was unsurpassable in his agility and devotion to Army gymnastics. No mat- ter where he goes or what he does, this little giant can never miss. One of the Corps ' true flankers. Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Captain 1; Mathematics Forum 2; Spanish Language Club I: Camera Club 1. IICHARD MAGEE OSGOOD, JR DONALD C PARCELLS RICHARD MAGEE OSGOOD, JR. A-1 Oz After surviving the last of Inquisition One ' s pat- ented Plebe years. Rick went on to gain Stars his Yearling year and a big " A " his Cow year. Then during Firstie year he tacked a Star on the " A " . Rick ' s quick, loud laugh brightened many section rooms, coming as it did a few minutes after a joke was told. Few who knew him will forget his deep friendship and the glow of warmth that followed him about. Track 3, 2, 1; Cross Country 2.1: Aslronomy Club 4; German Language Club 3.2. 1 . STEPHEN J. PAEK, JR. K-1 Pack Rat To those of us who have known him, Steve has always been an inspiration. An example of a really swell guy who always strived to do the best job pos- sible. Though often times pressed by the Academic Departments, Steve was always willing to stop and help a friend or do a task that needed doing. He has made all of our lives here at West Point just a little brighter. Truly he can look back on four hard years and say " well done. " Audio Club 2. J; Debate Council and Forum 4: Rocket Club 2.1; Sailing Club 3: Camera Club 1; Cardinal Newman Club 2. I: .Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JAMES MARSHALL PALEY H-2 Jim Washington will proudly claim her own — James Marshall Palcy — and rightly so. When Jim departs from West Point the Academy will realize that she lost a great deal — notable among which will be extra- curricular leave blanks by the score, sunflower seeds by the ton and ammeters by the dozen. To those who knew him best, Jim will be remembered as that great- est of fellows who always came through with a smile — and always on top. Wrestling 3,2, 1, Manager 1: 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1; Debate Council and Forum 3, 2, 1, Chairman I; Russian Language Club 4, 3.2. 1 . Secretary 2. President 1; Dialectic Society 2. DONALD C. PARCELLS D-1 Don On the football field, Don was a rock; in tactics class he was a Napoleon; and when he sang he re- sembled a perfectly amplified sine wave. A hard worker and a not-so-hard relaxer, Don could be found either in a weight room, studying mechanics, or catching a few rays at Delafield Pond. When Don came to West Point, New Jersey lost a big fullback and a bigger man. Football 4, 3,2. 1. EUGENE JAMES PARKER. JR. A-1 Gene Gene is one of the hardest working cadets at West Point. If he is not busy with the honor committee or the band, he is sure to be found studying. He is respected for his hard work and well-liked because of his easy-going nature. Success is sure to follow Gene throughout life. Football 4; Honor Committee 3. 2, 1 . V ice-Chairman 1; Russian Language Club 4. 3. 2: Scoutmasters ' Council 3; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4. 3, 2, 1; Cadet Band 4, 3.2, I. DONALD JAMES PARRISH. JR. E-2 Don Don ' s easy smile has made our years here at the Academy more pleasant. He has found time to par- ticipate in many sponsored extra-curricular activities besides his own " drag-of-the-week-club. " " Don has never been known to neglect his responsibilities, and his de- votion to duty will be an asset in his long service career. Cross Country 4; Track 4; Rocket Club 2,1; Spanish Language Club 3.2.1; Handball Club 3; Ski Team 4; Triathlon Club 3; Bowling 2.1: Skin Diving Club 2.1. tUGtNt JAMbS PARKER, JR. Miir-i " Hf ' i1fr ' lMf DONALD JAMES PARRISH, JR RAYMOND JOSEPH PASKE CARL AUGUST PETERSON. JR CHARLES FRANK PFEIFER RAYMOND JOSEPH PASKE L-2 Ray Ray arrived at West Point from Buffalo, New York. Quick notice was taken of Ray upon the fields of friendly strife, where he excelled in football. He was the main " battering ram " at fullback for the Black Knights for three years. Athletics alone did not occupy his whole time, as he participated in many extra-curricular activities. As he had a smile for every- one and was always willing to help, he will always be remembered and admired by his classmates. Football 4. 3. 2, I; Lacrosse 4, 3: Track 4: French Language Club 4,3,2. CARL AUGUST PETERSON. JR. H-1 Pete A regular wherever the girls were pretty and the jazz was cool. Pete still found time to adequately fend off the attacks of the Academic and Tactical Depart- ments. Wherever he went, and wherever he goes from here, his perfect mixture of care factor with casual living will brighten the surroundings of all who know him. Rifle 4; Public Informatiun Detail 2,1; Debate Coun- cil and Forum 2.1: Spanisli Language Club 1; Cam- era Club 1: Bowling 3: Models Club 2.1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2.1: Pistol Club 1: Rifle Club 4. JAMES MARTIN PETERS 1-2 Jim Jim is an Army brat from Texas. He has spent a year longer at West Point than most of his class- mates which shows his devotion to the school plus his tremendous perseverance. A diligent worker, he is not satisfied until a thing is done right. As a room- mate you have to beat him to the broom in the morn- ing. His cheerfulness, thoughtfulness and understand- ing of other people ' s problems make him an outstanding member of any group. Ring and Crest Committee 2: Spanish Language Club 1: HOWITZER 4: Pistol Club 4. 3: National Debate Tournament 2. CHARLES FRANK PFEIFER K-1 Chuck Chuck ' s love for fast cars, fast women and college life have given the Academy one of the most color- ful figures of the decade. Who of his classmates will ever forget his immortal sayings concerning the M.P. ' s and the airborne troops? May he forever be blessed with his mild-mannered but outspoken personality. Football 4, 3, 2: Lacrosse 2: French Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1: Rugby Club 1: Dialectic Society 4, 3. u PHILLPOTTS DONALD A. PHILLPOTTS M-1 Don Don came to West Point with an Army back- ground, which was an asset to him throughout his cadet career. He was never troubled by the academic system and always seemed to come out ahead of the professors. He will be remembered for the crossed rifles in the picture frame on his desk and that light blue scarf that was frequently seen around his neck. Ri le 4: Debate Council ami Forum 4: French Lan- guage Club 3. 2, 1: Mathematics Forum 2. 1: Rifle Club 4. STEVEN EDWARD PHILO H-2 Steve Everyone knew where Steve came from, for his first love was always the South and especially North Carolina. Never one to let academics bother him, he accepted his math courses and excelled in Social Sci- ences. After his luck ran out Plebe year, he left his mark on the area as a true member of the Century Club. He never quit smiling though, and his good humor and personality made him many friends. Cross Country 4; Track 4; Debate Council and Forum 1 ; Spanish Language Club I : Century Club 3. JOHN MORRIS PICKLER D-2 Pick Pick came to West Point aboard the Chattanooga Choo-choo with a fighting spirit naturally associated with red hair. With a flare for being continually busy, John devoted many free hours to extra curricular ac- tivities and clubs. A first captain from Baylor High School, he possessed natural leadership ability, but will be remembered for his personality and desire to help his classmates anyway he could. Soccer 3, 2, 1 , Monogram 2: Public Information De- tail 2, J, PIO Representative-2nd Regiment; Debate Council and Forum 2, 1, Secretariat 1; French Lan- guage Club 3, 2, 1; POINTER 4, 3; Outdoor Sports- men Club 4, 3. I: Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2.1; Glee Club 4. 3. 2, 1, Librarian 2. ' ice-President-Cus- todian 1. BEDFORD M. PICKUP H-2 Bub Bub came to West Point with an unequaled dis- position. His ability to take the good with the bad and make the most of either was his outstanding char- acteristic. Academics never posed a problem to this cadet. Whenever someone needed a helping hand with anything. Bub was always the first to offer his services. He can leave confident that whatever the future brings, he has the ability to cope with it. Rocket Club I; HOWITZER 4: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, I. JON R. PLAAS Jon Grand Forks, Nortli Dakota ' s contribution to the Corps of cadets was a big one. Although fresh out of high school. Big Jon quickly adjusted to cadet life and made many lasting friendships. His size and jovial manner earned him the title of " the jolly green giant. " Size and personality are not Jon ' s only assets, for his success in academics and genuine enthusiasm predict a bright future for one of the Corps ' biggest and finest. POINTER 4. 3, 2. : Handhall Cliih 4. 3: Cadet Siiiulay School Teachers 2. I : (lice CItih 3. 2. 1. KARL J. PLOTKIN L-2 Karl Karl, one of the old men of our class, came to West Point after two years of college in the big city of New York and two years in the Army. With all of this worldly experience to help him, he always managed to stay on the Dean ' s List. Karl will always be remem- bered by his many friends as the guy who was always having a runnint; war with the O.P.E. and their OC and PFT. Russian Language Club 3.2; Dialectic Society 4. Teachers 2. Je s h Chapel Choir 4, Jewish Sumla School KARL J. PLOTKIN RAYMOND GEORGE POLLARD. HI A-2 Ray West Virginia ' s loss, and evenone agrees, was West Point ' s gain. Although a certain vested interest in Huntington did not take to this loss overly well, this was readily remedied upon graduation. Ray spent his first two years battling the Russian Department and flashing his well-known smile, a smile even broader when the last Russian book was burned. Between 150 lb. Football, studies and lesser known activities. Ray always managed ready companionship for all. 750 lb. Football 3, 2, 1; Russian Language Club 4. 3, 2. 1: Pistol Club 4; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 3: Cadet Chapel Choir 1; Glee Club 1; Dialectic Society 3: SCUSA2:SkiClub4.3.2.1. THOMAS P.4TRICK POWERS. JR. E-1 Bernie When not laboring til all hours over his POINTER books, Tom was putting into practice his theory that five minutes of quick speck is worth two hours con- centrated study. Apparently the theory worked, for it gave him time to join the Glee Club and Choir, sources of many enjoyable weekends away from West Point. POINTER 4, 3, 2,1: Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2, l;GleeCluh 3,2,1. NICHOLAS JOHN PRINCIPE C-2 The Prince Born and raised in the heart of Vermont ' s Green Mountains. Nick never lost his love for the outdoors and sports. Always ready with his silly grin and impish chuckle, he was never challenged by the rigors of cadet life and never at a loss for friendship. Academics? No problem at all. After four swift years, the Prince will find a worthwhile adventure as he steps off into his military career towards success. Soccer 4. 3. 2. 1 : Honor Committee 2,1; Portuguese Language Club 2. I: Rocket Club 2, 1; Spanish Lan- guage Club 2.1; HOWITZER 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3. 2. 1: Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2. 1. FRANCIS JOSEPH PROBST. JR. A-2 Frank Frank will go a long way on the tremendous determination which he has shown in all his under- takings. His concern for the welfare of his classmates has won him many friends and he has gained the respect of his associates. He will be remembered by his classmates for his sincere interest in the military and his personal drive for achievement in every task. Bridge Club 4; Bowling 4. 3; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, 1; Pistol Club 4; Skeet and Trap Club 2.1; Cardinal Newman Club 3. FRANCIS JOSEPH PROBST. JR. IRANK JOHN PROKOP FRANK JOHN PROKOP C-1 Cosmo Dark and distinguished, our noble comrade has a post-graduate date with celestial wanderings. This vicious soccer player has slight inclination to keep both feet on the ground — a fact easily discernable from his rabid rocketry and systematic skin diving. May our fair, blue skies never be empty as long as the Cosmo endeavors to fulfill his destiny with the stars. Soccer; Rocket Cliih 4, 3. 2. I, President; HOW- ITZER 4. 3; POINTER 4, 3; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4, 3; Skin Divini Club 4, 3. 2, 1. President; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2, I. Director: Dialectic Society 4; Glee Club 4.3.2. 1. RICHARD EDWARD PULLEN F-2 Rusty Coming to us from Brooklyn, after spending a year at B.P.I., this mild mannered and modest fellow proceeded to rip right through West Point ' s academic curriculum, although English slowed him down con- siderably, as it did other cadets. It seems he was always worried about footnoting those English themes. Rusty ' s favorite sport was swimming and he played defense in the Water-polo Club. French Language Club 3. 2. 1; Handball Club 2, 1; Water Polo Club 3.2. 1 ; Bowling 3, 2; Outdoor Sports- men Club 2. 1: Ski Club 4. HARD FDWARD PULLEN f - ■ Tf % — ;Lj_ ,- ' I B w = r- — —■ " " ' .. H ■ ir- 5f ' j H JULIAN EMORY PVLANT PALL DOLGLAS RAL LL01 D C R ' THONY P P ' iRZ JULIAN EMORY PYLANT E-1 Ponch Ponch, an Army brat who calls the state of Mis- sissippi home, came to West Point straight from high school. From the start he was a dedicated individual and distinguished himself both in sports and in the classroom. Noted for his love of the outdoors, he never let adverse conditions interfere with his numerous activities. The Army has a great need for men such as he; Ponch will readily find his place in the service. Honor Committee 2, 1; Triathlon Club 3. 2. 1; Out- door Sportsmen Club 2, 1, Vice-President; Rifle Club 4: SCUSA 2. 1. Committee Chairman; Parachute Club 1. a , S. J ANTHONY P. PYRZ H-1 Sparky Sparky will long remain in the memories of his friends after his departure from the Academy. His contributions to West Point in the fields of academics and athletics have been consistently on the highest of levels. His attitude towards life will definitely insure him complete success in all his endeavors. Football 4. 3, 2. I; Baseball 2. 1: POINTER 4, 3; Handball Club 2, J; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3; Glee Club 3. ROBERT FIELDING RADCLIFFE ROBERT FIELDING RADCLIFFE B-1 Tree An elongated individual often seen brandishing his lacrosse stick as he charged from last section " applied knowledge " to Clinton field; Bob RadclifTe is characterized by his love of sports, women and good adventure, plus his complete disregard for academics and the Tactical Department. Surely none can com- pare with our institutional cohort of four long years, who was always there when a friend was needed. Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, I: Football 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3. I. LLOYD C. RAY, JR. A-1 Sonny Red Bay, Alabama ' s most lovable ray of sunshine, spent four hard years trying to brighten the Corps. Who can deny his success? An old 1-1 man and steeped in the proper tradition, S. Ray can look over his shoulder at his many forced retreats across Tenth Avenue with a Bronx cheer for the defeated Academic Departments, then forward to a bright, stirring career in the fighting Infantry, where they ' ve certainly got no time for glory. Switnmmg 4; Water Polo Chib 4. 3. 2,1. PAUL DOUGLAS RAU F-2 Paul Straight from " Rau Drive. " Michigan came the imperturbable Rau-Rau with his rod. reet. bow, arrows, axe and love of the great outdoors. Since then he has done well in many areas, most notably in combat on the cribbage board. With his solid outlook on life, he is sure to win himself good standing in his future career. Water Polo Club 4; Bowling 3. 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4, 3. 2. 1; Skin Diving Club 3: Dialectic Society 2. BRUCE A. RAYBECK C-1 Bruce From the start, Bruce rapidly adjusted to life as it was meant to be in our college. His easy-going per- sonality and good nature have won him many friends here who will always remember him as one who never let the trivialities of cadet life stand in the way of a good movie or bridge game. Bruce " s many abilities will lead him far in the future and his sincerity will make him a lifetime friend. Public Information Detail 2: Audio Club I; French Language Club 4, 3. 2. 1 : Rocket Club 2. 1; Sky Diving 4, 3: Bridge Club 1 : Bowling 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3: Skeet and Trap Club 4. 3: Skin Diving Club 1 . JULIAN EMORY PYLANT PAUL DOUGLAS RAL ANTHONY P PYRZ JULIAN EMORY PYLANT E-1 Ponch Ponch. an Army brat who calls the state of Mis- sissippi home, came to West Point straight from high school. From the start he was a dedicated individual and distinguished himself both in sports and in the classroom. Noted for his love of the outdoors, he never let adverse conditions interfere with his numerous activities. The Army has a great need for men such as he; Ponch will readily find his place in the service. Honor Committee 2, 1; Triathlon Club 3, 2, 1; Out- door Sportsmen Club 2, 1, Vice-President: Rifle Club 4; SCUSA 2, 1. Committee Cliairman; Parachute C lub 1. O ANTHONY P. PYRZ H-1 Sparky Sparky will long remain in the memories of his friends after his departure from the Academy. His contributions to West Point in the fields of academics and athletics have been consistently on the highest of levels. His attitude towards life will definitely insure him complete success in all his endeavors. Football 4. 3. 2. 1; Baseball 2. 1: POINTER 4. 3; Handball Club 2, 1; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3; Glee Club 3. ROBERT FIELDING RADCLIFFE HRLCf A RAYBECK ROBERT FIELDING RADCLIFFE B-I Tree An elongated individual often seen brandishing his lacrosse stick as he charged from last section " applied knowledge " to Clinton field; Bob RadciifTe is characterized by his love of sports, women and good adventure, plus his complete disregard for academics and the Tactical Depart ment. Surely none can com- pare with our institutional cohort of four long years, who was always there when a friend was needed. Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1: Foolball 4; Cadci Chapel Choir 4,3,1. PAUL DOUGLAS RAU F-2 Paul Straight from " Rau Drive, " Michigan came the imperturbable Rau-Rau with his rod, reet, bow, arrows, axe and love of the great outdoors. Since then he has done well in many areas, most notably in combat on the cribbage board. With his solid outlook on life, he is sure to win himself good standing in his future career. Water Polo Club 4; Bowling 3, 1 ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3. 2. I; Skin Diving Club 3: Dialectic Society 2. LLOYD C. RAY. JR. A-1 Sonny Red Bay, Alabama ' s most lovable ray of sunshine, spent four hard years trying to brighten the Corps. Who can deny his success? An old I-l man and steeped in the proper tradition, S. Ray can look over his shoulder at his many forced retreats across Tenth Avenue with a Bronx cheer for the defeated Academic Departments, then forward to a bright, stirring career in the fighting Infantry, where they ' ve certainly got no time for glory. Swimming 4; Water Polo Club 4.3,2,1. BRUCE A. RAYBECK C-1 Bruce From the start, Bruce rapidly adjusted to life as it was meant to be in our college. His easy-going per- sonality and good nature have won him many friends here who will always remember him as one who never let the trivialities of cadet life stand in the way of a good movie or bridge game. Bruce ' s many abilities will lead him far in the future and his sincerity will make him a lifetime friend. Public Information Detail 2; Audio Club I; French Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Rocket Club 2, 1; Sky Diving 4. 3: Bridge Club 1 : Bowling 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3: Skeet and Trap Club 4. 3: Skin Diving Club 1 . HOWARD HAMMEL REED K-2 Howie Absecon, New Jersey used to be noted for its clams, but now it is noted for Howie Reed. He was near the top in academics all four years: his intra- mural participation was always most-valuable-player caliber. Howie was an asset to all those who associated with him. He offered academic aid to both the highest and lowest in the class of 1965. Howie accomplished an enviable record at the Academy. His success is assured. Debate Council and Forum 2, 1; French Language Club 4. 3: Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. 1: SCUSA; Stars 2. WILLIAM EDWARD REISNER D-1 Bill Bill came to West Point from Michigan Tech. determined not to let the life at West Point change his ways. When he wasn ' t battling the English Depart- ment, he always proposed that a minimum amount of studying was sufficient. Most of his time was spent outdoors and you could find him hunting, skiing, or soaking up the sun at Delafield. He enjoyed the many extra-curricular trips he managed to make, and the girls he entertained on the weekends. Debate Council and Forum 4, 3. 2: Rocket Club 3. 2. I ; Spanish Language Club 2. 1: Ski Team 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3,2. 1 : Carbolic Chapel Acolytes 2.1; Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2. 1; Ski Club 4. 3, 2. 1. HOWARD HAMMEL REED WULIAM EDWARD REISNER FRANK A II R REl LI R DOUGLAS J RICHARDSON FRANK XAVIER RELLFR, III M-1 F(x) A St ar man whd avoided books with as much enthusiasm as he pursued dragging, has added much to West Point. His room was the scene of many a chess game and many an after taps social gathering. On weekends, his friends anxiously awaited his return from the week ' s choir or glee club trip, for there was always a fantastic story. There is no doubt that Frank ' s ambition and ability will produce a fine officer. Portuguese Language Club 3, 2. I: Chess Club 4; Pistol Club 4; Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2, 1 ; Glee Club 4. 3. 2. 1. PAUL STEPHEN RENSCHEN L-1 Paul Paul, who is not one to let the trivial pressures of cadet life get him down, centers his existence about two desires. His first love is skiing. Because of his out- standing ability as a skier, his charm and very like- able, although at times stubborn nature, he was a natural choice for President of the ski club. When he is not skiing his mind is on sportscar racing. Success will be his future as it has been his past. German Language Club 2: Ski Team 4: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2; Pistol Club 4; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3. 2, 1; KDET 2: Ski Club 4. 3, 2, 1, Presi- dent: Ski Patrol 4. 3 ,2,L MARTIN J. RESICK K-2 Marty Marty came to West Point determined to blaze a trail of glory. Earning stars was the first of Marty ' s accomplishments. His natural running ability aided the cross-country team in intramurals, and he " hard- nosed, " playing football and boxing. Friendly and out- going, Marty never was lacking drags. Infantry has captured Marty ' s heart and his flame can only burn brighter. Stars 4. 3. 2: Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Club 3.2. J . DOUGLAS J. RICHARDSON H-2 Doug West Point ' s Duane Eddy came to " the rock " from Kansas City, Mo., and twanged out sine waves with his guitar for three years. During the spring intra- murals, Duane traded his guitar for a paddle and came out a brigade champion in boat racing. Always racing through other things, especially parties, femmes and academics, Doug never varied and cruised through four successful years. Basketball 4, 3, Manager: Public Relations Council 2.1; Debate Council and Forum 1 : Spanish Language Club 2. 1: Ski Team 4. 3. 2. 1: Ski Club 4. 3.2, 1; Cadet Combo 1 : Goat-Engineer Football 2 . HOWARD HAMMEL REED K-2 Howie Absecon, New Jersey used to be noted for its clams, but now it is noted for Howie Reed. He was near the top in academics all four years: his intra- mural participation was always most-valuable-player caliber. Howie was an asset to all those who associated with him. He offered academic aid to both the highest and lowest in the class of 1965. Howie accomplished an enviable record at the Academy. His success is assured. Debate Council ami Forum 2. I: Frencli Language Club 4, 3; Cadet Cliapel Clwir 4. 3, 2.1; SCUSA; Stars 2. HOWARD HAMMEL REED LI AM EDWARD REISNER WILLIAM EDWARD REISNER D-1 Bill Bill came to West Point from Michigan Tech. determined not to let the life at West Point change his ways. When he wasn ' t battling the English Depart- ment, he always proposed that a minimum amount of studying was sufficient. Most of his time was spent outdoors and you could find him hunting, skiing, or soaking up the sun at Delaficld. He enjoyed the many extra-curricular trips he managed to make, and the girls he entertained on the weekends. Debate Council and Forum 4.3,2: Rocl et Club 3.2. 1 ; Spanish Language Club 2. J: Ski Team 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3.2. I : Catholic C Impel Acolytes 2.1; Cardinal Newman Club 4. 3. 2. 1; Ski Club 4. 3, 2. 1. FRANK XAVIER RELLE DOLGLAS J RICHARDSON FRANK XAVIER RELLER, 111 M-1 F(x) A Star man who avoided books with as much enthusiasm as he pursued dragging, has added much to West Point. His room was the scene of many a chess game and many an after taps social gathering. On weekends, his friends anxiously awaited his return from the week ' s choir or glee club trip, for there was always a fantastic story. There is no doubt that Frank ' s ambition and ability will produce a fine officer. Portuguese Language Club 3. 2. I: Chess Club 4: Pistol Club 4; Catholic CImpel Choir 4. 3, 2. I : Glee Club 4, 3,2, 1. PAUL STEPHEN RENSCHEN L-1 Paul Paul, who is not one to let the trivial pressures of cadet life get him down, centers his existence about two desires. His first love is skiing. Because of his out- standing ability as a skier, his charm and very like- able, although at times stubborn nature, he was a natural choice for President of the ski club. When he is not skiing his mind is on sportscar racing. Success will be his future as it has been his past. German Language Club 2: Ski Team 4: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2; Pistol Club 4; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3,2, 1; KDET 2: Ski Club 4. 3,2, 1, Presi- dent; Ski Patrol 4, 3 ,2,1. MARTIN J. RESICK K-2 Marty Marty came to West Point determined to blaze a trail of glory. Earning stars was the first of Marty ' s accomplishments. His natural running ability aided the cross-country team in intramurals, and he " hard- nosed, " playing football and boxing. Friendly and out- going, Marty never was lacking drags. Infantry has captured Marty ' s heart and his flame can only bum brighter. Stars 4, 3. 2; Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1: Cardinal Newman Club 3.2, . DOUGLAS J. RICHARDSON H-2 Doug West Point ' s Duane Eddy came to " the rock " from Kansas City, Mo., and twanged out sine waves with his guitar for three years. During the spring intra- murals, Duane traded his guitar for a paddle and came out a brigade champion in boat racing. Always racing through other things, especially parties, femmes and academics, Doug never varied and cruised through four successful years. Basketball 4, 3, Manager; Public Relations Council 2,1; Debute Council and Forum 1 ; Spanish Language Club 2, 1; Ski Team 4. 3, 2, 1; Ski Club 4. 3, 2, 1; Cadet Combo 1 ; Goat-Engineer Football 2. THOMAS A RIDENOLR THOMAS A. RIDENOUR E-2 Reindeer When Tom came to West Point it was the Buck- eye State ' s loss and Company E-2 ' s gain. At Camp Buckner Tom gained fame by being one of the last two men in the " pits " for his company. In athletics, Tom was not only a star on the Rugby team, but the most outstanding intramural player in Company E-2. Endowed with the attributes of ability, determination and a competitive spirit. Tom will indeed ha e a suc- cessful future. French Language Club 4. 3. 1: Rugby Club 3, 2, 1; Bowling 2.1; Pistol Club 4.1. FRANCIS GUY RILEY G-1 The Sheik From the casinos of the west, comes this free- wheeling, two-fisted individualist who overcomes ob- stacles as smoothly as he shuffles cards. He deals his personality and character into hands that win respect, admiration and awe. Being a sophisticated operator, he plays his cards recklessly in the pursuit of the finer things in life. To meet him is an e.xperience. to know him a privilege, to call him a friend, a fulfillment. Fame and fortune will surely fall prey to him in the future. Baseball 4: Hop and A divines Conunittee: Spanisli Language Club 4: Camera Club 4: Pistol Club 4; Cardinal Newman Club. RONALD JAMES RILEV E-1 Ron The " friendly giant " from the coal fields of Penn- sylvania will always be remembered for his ability to laugh at the most trying circumstances. Big Ron was a good all-around athlete and could have been an all time Black Knight if the kni es hadn ' t been so active on his knees. Football 4. 3. 2; Track 4; Public Information Detail 2, 1 : Spanish Language Club 3. 2: Cardinal Newman Club 2, 1; Astronomx Club 1 . JOHN BUNDY RITCH. Ill D-1 Bundy Coming from a Navy family by way of R.P.I.. Bundy joined us with enough personality, ambition, talent and sheer genius to quickly sweep him to the top of our ranks. A superior athlete, his aggressive spirit could easily be detected whether on the basket- ball court, in the classroom or on a weekend in the city. To know Bundy is to like and admire him. All of us who knew him well are anticipating big things for Big Bundy. Stars 4. 3, 2. 1: Basl eiball 4. 3. 2. 1. Major A; Debate Council and Forum 2.1; Mathematics Forum 2, 1 ; Portuguese Language Club 3; Rocket Club 2. 1 ; Spanish Language Club 2, 1. FRANCIS GUY RILl Y - IWJ WILLIAM N. RITCH. JR. A-1 Bill Bill is a lively man who never seems to get tired, whether it ' s swinging a lacrosse stick with an arm in a cast or causing mayhem on the dance floor. He is famous for his good nature and devotion to his friends. His perseverance has identified him as a cadet and should continue to identify him as a man who can get the job done in spite of the odds. Lacrosse 4. 3, 2, 1: Caiholic Chapel Acolytes 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Cliih 2,1. ZIGMLIND J. ROEBUCK F-2 Zig Hailing from Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Zig came to West Point with no previous military experience. However, the lack of experience did not daunt his enthusiasm, spirit and desire to excel!. His congenial attitude and willingness to work will long be remembered by his contemporaries. He will always strive to do the Corps and his country honor, and we, in turn, are proud to call him one of us. Football 4: Audio Club I: German Laiii;iiage Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 1 ; Rocket Club 1; Ski Club 4,3,2. AM N RITCH. JR ' IGMUNDJ ROEBUCK ROBERTO ROJAS OMAR E ROOD. JR ROBERT D ROOD ROBERTO ROJAS L-2 Bob Although spending a great deal of time on the soccer field. Bob has managed to find sufficient time for academics, listening to music and the brown boy. A strong will to succeed in the task at hand, coupled with the ability to make friends everywhere, will prove to be his most valuable assets in the years ahead. Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major A 2, 1; Portuguese Language Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Span- ish Language Club 4.3.2. 7. OMAR E. ROOD, JR. B-1 Ohms Ohms is the type of boy one just can ' t know without liking. His mild manner, friendly disposition, reserved confidence and an academic genius command the re- spect and admiration of all who know him. A former son of Easy One, Ohms was never one to succumb to the cadet rat race or the T.D. Not one to overstress academics, he did most of his studying in the horizon- tal position but was always ready to crawl out to help a classmate in need. Ohms is assured great success in anything he pursues. Astronomy Club 3: French Language Club 4. 3. 2; Mathematics Forum 2,1; Rocket Club 2.1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 7. ROBERT D. ROOD 1-2 Roodus Bob came to West Point from an Air Force family. Short in stature but not short on anything else. Bob has made a real contribution as a cadet. Thorough, hard-working and a terror to the fourth class. Bob devotes himself completely to any task placed before him. Although he is often kidded about his size. Bob takes it all in his stride. His good nature and loyalty make him a fine friend and will carry him far in the service. Pistol Team 4; German Language Club 3. 2, 1 : Rocket Club 3, 2, 1; Pistol Club 3. 2; Mountaineering Club 3.2. ]. LEO PETER ROSE F-2 Lee Leo was one of the more permanent residents of the class of ' 65, much to our good fortune. A smile and a friendly word were his trademarks. He worked hard at everything and was never satisfied with an average job. A good athlete, an industrious student and an active socializer, Leo has always been one of the outst anding members of our class. Track 3; Rocket Club 4, 3, 1: Spanish Club 4. 3, 1; Handball Club I: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. 3, 1; KDLT 4. LbO FLILR ROSE JOHN BERTH ROSEBERG JOHN BERTIL ROSEBERG C-2 J.B. Those of us who were fortunate enough to have known John as a cadet cannot fail to feel confidence in him as an officer. Whether boning up in Art or dis- charging company duties, to watch him was to take a lesson in true scholarship and dedication. His bouyant optimism and determination assure him professional success. Truly worthy of his size, the " big bear " has left all who have known him here a little bigger. Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. 1: Dialectic Society J; Glee C hi h I. ARTHUR ROTH. JR. A-2 Art Conscient ious — that ' s .Art in a word. Rarely doing anything half-way, he puts out to the full extent whether it be in sports, academics, company duties or letter writing. His enthusiasm is contagious and his good humor infectious — two qualities that will be valuable assets as an officer and a leader. Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; Russian Language Club 4, 3. 1; HOWITZER 2.1: Camera Club 4; Skin Diving Club 1; Dialectic Society 4. 3; Ski Patrol 2,1: Ski Club 4, 3,2, 1. ARTHl R ROTH, TERRANCE C R1 AS JOHN LOL IS SALOMONE IX)S | D S ROUF RANCH HENDRIX ROUNTREE A-1 Peach Being the true Southerner that he is. Ranee has seldom been one to get over-excited about the demands made upon him. He will be remembered as a man who preferred to choose his own reading rather than that prescribed by the Academic Departments, and one who would challenge all comers vshen it came to taking advantage of leisure time. Those who know him best are certain that he will prove a credit both to himself and to his Alma Mater. French Language Club 4, 3. 2. 1: German Language Club 1; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 1. DONALD S. ROWE B-1 Don From a small town in Massachusetts. Don came to West Point to fulfill a life long ambition. Although fresh out of high school, Don soon felt right at home within the grey walls and soon made many lasting friendships. Academics proved to be no big obstacle and early in his cadet career he cultivated a strong desire for Airborne-Infantry all the way. The Army is getting one of the Corps " finest in Don. Astronomy Club 4. 3: Debate Council and Forum 4. 3, 2. 1 ; French Language Club 3, 2. 1: Cadet Chapel Acolytes 4: Ski Club 3: Sky Diving 4. GEORGE W RIGGLES VALENTINO THOMAS SAMMARCO GEORGE W RUGGLES D-2 Teeth George came to the Point after poop school and a year in the M.P. ' s and in his four year stay has proved more than a match for his brown boy, academics, taps and the T.D. After changing Janie ' s name, a tour in the Artillery comes next, but the combat arms may soon lose a fine worker, retain a good friend as this half of Mutt and Jeflf returns to either the M.P. ' s or the world, vowing never again to play touch football. TERRANCE C. RYAN 1-2 Terry (T.C.) Terry came to us from the wilds of Nebraska and was a real mainstay right from the start. Despite his well- p ublicized battle with a baking winner from back home, he was always his cheerful self. Ever working and ever on the move, he still found time to add his voice to the Choir and Glee Club in addition to propagandizing the cortege of Midshipmen. As he changes his Cadet Grey for Army or Air Force Blue we know he cannot help but find success in any field. Swimming 4; Debate Council and Forum 4; Frencfi Language Club 4, 1; Rocket Club 1: HOWITZER 1; POINTER 4. 3; Water Polo Club 4: Pistol Club 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN LOUIS SALOMONE D-1 Sal Sal ' s warm smile is known to everyone, even those who entered the ring with him, only to realize quickly that he had the intramural bo.xing championship in mind. Running at full speed, whether in intramurals or academics, he was always kept busy, yet still found time to be one of the faithfuls in his chosen extra- curricular activities. This dedication, in addition to his aggressiveness and initiative, will carry him far; Sal ' s future will certainly be filled with success. Swimming Manager 3; Russian Language Club 4. 3; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3: Catljolic Chapel Clioir 4, 3, 2,1; Cardinal Newman Club 2.1: Dance Orchestra 4.3. VALENTINO THOMAS SAMMARCO G-1 Val Although Val takes the brunt of the G-1 onslaught in the Italian campaign, he submits an impressive de- fense by being able to counter smiling. Being one of the best-natured guys around is only one of the several Roman-like qualities abiding in this partaker of the fine arts. His prowess on the soccer field is only super- ceded by his devotion to a certain New Paltz coed. Constantly positioning himself on the field of friendly strife leaves Val with one final aspiration — " 4, 3, 2, 1, Fire! " Soccer 4. 3, 2, 1 ; FrencJi Language Club 3. 2, I : Hand- ball Club 4; Chess Club 4. 3; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2,1; Ski Club 3,2, L JQBE OZK Sr Vi r . -! IDE jrxnm rn-Tirimrnr n : siors- n: lETT VTTTV ■ ' miinHn TOE TTITTrrfmilfrtKC 1 m TTP ' trrftM ■ 3E ji ' Mil ih- rrnnfrm-r rmi a nn ur-JSniinS wjIll Clair - ' See innriE ai ic ac ?3C nxnii 3WiI T i- ' M ' x TT SE: llE -;wr an BDE- " HtTF itin-; iii " tfx E: farm thtt IKE ' °grT pr in ■ " rHHtlMk- ' -.. ?£- anc iiiai l — ■;. — ; — ■;! . r u ' .Trr 3 f ;- )j i in - Willi HIDE of hlE i i i itc iBnti : H " j m IT JTr - rr . 2EIE- " »1 nUt rH f iu IE :ZI[UC ai5B27?5 !E frnTrrr JE " SE wtaTTTTg ni2I OT HI a ia iii »»;n -rrrrr ' g ' - iiinu inE niHnr I ' rttllli.S UL wm 2l HJE i ' ,- fr j: . Sc Ciar YT % AnB WAYNE JOHN SCHOLL WAYNE JOHN SCHOLL F-2 Wayne Wayne, a product of Wisconsin, has done much in his years at West Point to show us how, by just being oneself, a person can truly be outstanding. His warm personality and wonderful sense of humor made him well-liked by all who knew him. Although he did not take academics too seriously, he kept his name on the Dean ' s List. With these traits, Wayne cannot help but have a bright future. Honor Committee 2,1: Debate Council and Forum 4, 3: German Language Club 4, 3.2, 1: POINTER 4, 3. PAUL F. SCHULTZ. JR. F-2 Paul An easy smile, a quick wit and a ' Bama drawl from Mobile Bay — these are the marks of the Southern gentleman whose scholarly genius is hidden by the mischievous twinkle in his eye. A versatility that makes him seem as at home in a uniform as he is on water skis will serve him well in life. Track 4; Corps Squad Track Manager 3, 2, 1 ; Debate Council and Forum 4; German Language Club 4, 3; Rocket Club 2, 1: Sailing Club 2, 1; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4. 3, 2, I; Dialectic Society 2, 1, Advertising Editor 1 . MARSHALL WAYNE SCHWARTZ L-1 Marsh Regardless of the endeavor, it was bound to turn out better if Marsh was involved. We will always re- member him as being the life of the party and the in- domitable spirit. Despite a membership in the century club and his well-earned label of being a goat. Marsh always managed to come up with a big smile and a readiness for more. He is truly a believer in L- 1 ' s motto, ' Tlligitimus Non Carborundum. " POINTER 4, 3: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 2, 1; Jewisli Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2, 1; Century Club 2, 1. JON DOUGLAS SCOBIE C-2 Scobes Jon ' s friends will remember his quick wit which brightened any situation. His wholehearted efforts on behalf of any activity with which he has been associated have marked his interest and enthusiasm for performing every task well. Jon can always be depended upon to stand by his friends in any situation. These strong traits will be great assets to a long military career. A iidio Club 1 ; Debate Council and Fortmi 2,1; Ger- man Language Club 3, 2, 1; Sky Diving 1; Models Club 3, 2, 1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, 1; Pistol Club 3, 2,1. HUGH FREDERICK SCRUGGS Fred Fred came to us from Hisplint, Ky., where the government gave him a choice — his still or West Point! And we are glad he chose the latter. Coming from E-1 to D-1, Fred brought with him a personality which was instrumental in keeping things bearable around our neck of the woods. Being an honor representative, warrior and good guy all rolled up into one is hard to find nowadays, but we all feel Fred fits the bill. Honor Committee 2, 1; Astronomy Club 4. 3, 2. 1; Mathematics Forum 3; Rocket Cluh 3.2. 1. ROBERT EMMETT SCULLY M-2 Bob Bob is the type of person that once knowing him you cannot help liking and respecting him. Whenever a problem arose and you asked Bob for advice on what to do, the reply was always, " Do what is right — whether you like it or not. " New Jersey ' s finest never let the Academic Department win if he could help it, and many a classmate can remember Bob ' s helping hand when it was needed. Swimming 4; Russian Language Cluh 3. 1; Scout- masters Council 3, 2. 1 . HUGH FREDERICK SCRUGGS ROBERT EMMETT SCULLY JAMES T. SEABLEOJ GEORGE H. SEAWORTH ROBERT F SELKIS JAMES T. SEABURN B-2 Jim Jim rolled into West Point from that sprawling metropolis of Beaver Falls, Pa. With his glorious high school career behind him, he accepted the challenge of West Point. His first attempts were not looked upon with much favor by the beast detail because he was a regular at the special shower formations. However, that was the last time that West Point ever troubled him. Jim is easy-going, even-tempered and a good athlete. With these and his many other attributes. Jim will make a wonderful success of the Army. Football 4, 3; Lacrosse 3: 1st Class Cuinmiltee: 2d Class Committee: 3d Class Committee; Portuguese Language Club 4, 3, 2. GEORGE H. SEAWORTH D-1 G.H. Coming to us fresh from the great North Dakota Indian uprising of 1956, G.H. immediately took West Point in his stride. Undaunted by academics and un- impressed by the Tactical Department, he took charge of his brown boy and all government property in view. A true " socio-philosophe, " George was never noted for his dependence on others. His keen determination is certain to carry him far in the Infantry. Debate Council and Forum 3. 2. 1 ; Russian Language Club 3. 1; Catholic Chapel Acolvtes 3. 2. 1: Karate Club 3. ROBERT F. SELKIS M-1 Bob Bob had a philosophy — " the important thing is not to live, but to live well. " He lived by this philos- ophy during his four years as a cadet, being deterred only by the Academic Departments. Bob ' s interests centered around lacrosse, but he always found time to be with his many friends, especially the " little bear. " Lacrosse 4, 5, 2, 1 ; Spanish Language Club 2. I : Cardi- nal Newman Club 2,1; Goat Football. DENNIS JAMES SELLERS M-2 Dennie Never caring for regimentation, Dennie developed his own style of military life, which consisted of sports — especially football — privileges, trips, weekends and academics, in that order. He excelled in all of them but still found time, pipe in hand, to lead a nightly post taps story session. In or out of the Army, Dennie ' s abilities and personality add up to a formula for success. Football 4, 3; French Language Club 2, I; Handball Club 4. 3; Rugby Club 2. 1; Dialectic Society L ' ' JOHN B. SEYMOUR ' 1 ;■ JOHN B. SEYMOUR H-2 J. B. John has not been one to let the rigors of West Point life alter the natural personality which has brought him enduring popularity. Outwardly cheerful and casual, he has inwardly maintained a keen aware- ness of his surroundings and his future. On the foot- ball field, John displayed a strong competitive spirit which helped to make him a standout for his three varsity years. His confidence and overall ability can point to nothing but a successful and rewarding f uture. Footballs, 2, 1; Rocket Club; Ski Club. DENNIS ANDREW SHANTZ A- 1 Denny Best known as the little guy on the Army basket- ball team. Denny has proved himself eight feet tall in many a close game. With academics posing no threat, this soft spoken Pennsylvania export could only have done his homework in transit from the movies to his brown boy. A certain lass back home claimed most of his leave time, and it seems as if this arrangement will be put on a full time basis come this June week. Baseball 4; Basketball 4. 3, 2. J; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; Spanish Language Club 4: HOWITZER 4. 3, 2. DENNIS ANDREW SHANTZ JAMES T SEABURN GEORGE H. SEAWORTH ■iii Kl F, SELKIS JAMES T. SEABURN B-2 Jim Jim rolled into West Point from that sprawling metropolis of Beaver Falls, Pa. With his glorious high school career behind him, he accepted the challenge of West Point. His first attempts were not looked upon with much favor by the beast detail because he was a regular at the special shower formations. However, that was the last time that West Point ever troubled him. Jim is easy-going, even-tempered and a good athlete. With these and his many other attributes. Jim will make a wonderful success of the Army. Football 4, 3; Lacrosse 3; 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; Poitugiiese Language Club 4, 3, 2. GEORGE H. SEAWORTH D-1 G.H. Coming to us fresh from the great North Dakota Indian uprising of 1956, G.H. immediately took West Point in his stride. Undaunted by academics and un- impressed by the Tactical Department, he took charge of his brown boy and all government property in view. A true " socio-philosophe, " " George was never noted for his dependence on others. His keen determination is certain to carry him far in the Infantry. Debate Council and Forum 3. 2. I ; Russian Language Club 3. I; Catholic Chapel Acolvtes 3. 2, 1; Karate Club 3. ROBERT F. SELKIS M-1 Bob Bob had a philosophy — " the important thing is not to live, but to live well. " He lived by this philos- ophy during his four years as a cadet, being deterred only by the Academic Departments. Bob ' s interests centered around lacrosse, but he always found time to be with his many friends, especially the " little bear. " Lacrosse 4, 3, 2. 1 ; Spanish Language Club 2, 1 ; Cardi- nal Newman Club 2, 1; Goat Football. DENNIS JAMES SELLERS M-2 Dennie Never caring for regimentation, Dennie developed his own style of military life, which consisted of sports — especially football — privileges, trips, weekends and academics, in that order. He excelled in all of them but still found time, pipe in hand, to lead a nightly post taps story session. In or out of the Army, Dennle ' s abilities and personality add up to a formula for success. Football 4, 3; French Language Club 2.1; Handball Club 4, 3; Rugby Club 2. 1; Dialectic Society I. DENNIS JAMES SELLERS JOHN B. SEYMOUR JOHN B. SEYMOUR J John has not been one to let the rigors of West Point life alter the natural personality which has brought him enduring popularity. Outwardly cheerful and casual, he has inwardly maintained a keen aware- ness of his surroundings and his future. On the foot- ball field. John displayed a strong competitive spirit which helped to make him a standout for his three varsity years. His confidence and overall ability can point to nothing but a successful and rewarding future. Football 3,2.1; Rocket Club; Ski Club. DENNIS ANDREW SHANTZ A-1 Denny Best known as the little guy on the Army basket- ball team. Denny has proved himself eight feet tall in many a close game. With academics posing no threat, this soft spoken Pennsylvania export could only have done his homework in transit from the movies to his brown boy. A certain lass back home claimed most of his leave time, and it seems as if this arrangement will be put on a full time basis come this June week. Baseball 4; Basketball 4. 3. 2. 1 ; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3; Spanisli Language Club 4; HOWITZER DENNIS ANDREW SHANTZ RALPH THOMAS SHAW FREDERICK JAY SHAPIRO K-1 Shap Fred stormed into West Point like the winds of Hurricane Hazel, and the Plain hasn ' t been the same since. With a maximum effort to foil the Tactical Department and a fierce competitive spirit, Fred found his way into the hearts of all who knew him. His future is a cloudless sky, filled with Cathi, his Corvette and a .300 batting average. Honored was the man who called Fred Shapiro friend. Baseball i, 2, I : Spanish Language Club 4. 3; Hand- ball Club 2: Pistol Club 4. 3: Jewish Chapel Choir 4.3.2.1. EDWARD J. SHARKNESS F-1 Shark The ' " champ, " one of Army ' s hardest working wrestlers, hails from Kingston, Pa. With a very amiable personality, Ed was never seen " bouncing around " the company. Active in the mountaineering and German clubs, Ed is a hard worker. Being quick of mind, wit and quick of hands — cards, qualified him easily as a member of the Pinochle Four, which met " whenever they found time! " The Army will gain a very versatile officer. Wrestling 4. 3, 2. J: Track 4: French Language Club 1; German Language Club 4.3.2.1: HOWITZER 2; POINTER 1; Chess Club 2.1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4: Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4. 3: Cardinal New- man Club 4,3.2. MICHAEL P SHAVER MICHAEL P. SHAVER C-2 Mike Although a veteran of many hours of after-taps study, Mike never let the Academic Department get him down. Known well for his athletic ability and entertaining humor, Mike has proven himself " the man to get the job done. " We are sure that his career in the Army will be long and successful. Wrestling 4; Spanish Language Club 4: Rugby Club 3; Bridge Club 1; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4, 3, 1; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4, 3. CHARLES FRANK SHAW, JR. M-2 Chuck Buddy Young, Buddy Werner, Buddy Holly . . . next came " Buddy " Shaw, three in one and still active. Shaw, football, skiing, guitar, in that order — so goes the protocol of Chuck ' s life and so went West Point, four years uninterrupted by that which is West Point. An officer, an executive or an international playboy without a key — only time can reveal what will become of Chuck. However, he will always be an individual, and there is no higher compliment. 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, 1; HOWITZER 2. 1: Sky Diving 4; Bridge Club 4; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3; Dance Orchestra I : Dialectic Society 3.2,1; Mortar Staff 3; Ski Instructor 2.1. RALPH THOMAS SHAW A-1 Tommy Hailing from Georgia, Tommy ' s sweet Southern accent could often be picked out in a crowd. He ex- celled in athletics and was an asset to every team he played on. He was always one to stick up for what he believed in. A champion in the demerits depart- ment, the confinements or hours were the only things that would make him spend a spring weekend at the Hudson resort paradise. Wrestling 4; Debate Council and Forum 4. 3: French Language Club 4. 3. 2. I: Rocket Club 3, 2, I.- Rugby Club 3. 2. 1. THOMAS ROBERT SHECKELLS G-2 Tex As Tom leaves West Point, he takes with him fond memories of four years spent with the boys, working and playing Lacrosse. He walks with a wide gait and is an easy-going fellow who puts everything he has into whatever he is doing. He will surely make good in any field he enters, be it military or civilian. Lacrosse 4,3,2,1; Soccer 4. V " ' 5 " - I MARK 1 SHhRIDAN MARK E. SHERIDAN K-1 Mark After coming to West Point via the prep school at Ft. Belvoir, Mark was always noted for his maturity. Attacking all problems with characteristic perserver- ance, vigor and administrative genius, he was soon marked as a leader. Equipped with these traits, as well as a high standard of duty and honor and a sin- cere spirit of professionalism, we know that Mark will be among the finest of Army officers. Track 4; German Language Club 4, 3. 2. 1: HOW- ITZER 2.1: Triathlon Club 3: Karate 4; Cadet Sun- day School Teachers, Superintendent 1 . WILLIAM W. SHERRELL A-2 Bill " Big Bill " came to West Point to be a soldier. A tiger on the football field. Bill was known to be gentle and modest off the fields of friendly strife. Bill ' s friendly manner and determined approach to life will make him an asset to any man ' s Army. Football. WILLIAM W. SHERRELL ERIC- KEN SHINSEKI JOHN Mol ' l; SHLKJRD -IK ' HAhL THOMAS SHLLICK DOUGLAS J SIKORSKI ERIC KEN SHINSEKI A-1 Ric Though coming to us from the Far Islands, this favorite son of Hawaii had no difficulty in adjusting to cadet life. Surviving several knee operations and other well-known enemies, he ranged from Mexico to Europe, representing West Point ably on numerous occasions. Ric also managed to excel in social as well as military activities, and he will long be remembered for his cheerfulness and his willingness to lend a helping hand. Soccer 4, 3; Debate Council and Forum 4, 1 ; Spanish Language Club I; POINTER 4. 3; Judo 4, 3. 1; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1. MICHAEL THOMAS SHULICK H-2 Mike Mike came to West Point from Blairsville, Pa. via the University of Pittsburgh with a winning smile, a gleam on his lips and an easy-going manner. Though usually quiet and reserved, he never missed a chance to tell one of his war stories, nor did he leave a stone unturned in his search for the perfect girl. His con- scientiousness and warm personality have won him many friends throughout the Corps. Debate Council and Forum 4, 3: Russian Language Club 3. 2. 1: 100th Night Show 3. 2; Ski Club 4; Fencing Club I.SCUSA L JOHN HOPE SHUFORD 1-2 Shuf This true southern gentleman made the transi- tion from The Citadel to plebe year without the slightest hesitation and without any qualms about invading " Yankee-land. " Often accused of having a pulse rate of about 10, John was quick to prove tha t " haste makes waste. " It will be a long time before any of us in the class of " 65 find a more likeable comrade or a more loyal friend than Shuf. Tennis 4, 3, 2, I ; Squash 4, 2; Squash Manager J . DOUGLAS J. SIKORSKI C-2 Doug Doug, a State Department brat, came to us a product of many environments. He made West Point his new home and adapted well to the " Strength and Drive " motto of his class. On afternoons and weekends he could be found on the golf course, in the gym or just strumming country music. He was well-known to us for having the most " D " blind drags, avoiding P- rades and generally being a real " good guy. " Swimming 4; Soccer 3, 2, Monogrm 2; Water Polo Club 4. 3. 2.1: Glee Club 4, 3. 2, 1. TIMOTHY JAMES SIMMONS TIMOTHY JAMES SIMMONS H-1 Slim The memory of Tim ' s ready smile and pleasant character will be one of the greatest gifts that his many friends will take with them at gradution. Tim was both easy-going and active in his four years. His voice enriched the Chapel Choir nearly as much as his loyal friendship enriched the lives of his many friends. We figure that when he grows his beard, he will look much like his neighbor, Abe. Portuguese Language Club 3, 2, 1 ; Chess Club 4: Sheet and Trap Club 4. 3: Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1: KDET 1. EDWARD SIMPSON. JR. B-2 Ed If Ed ' s cadet days are any indication of the quality of life which will characterize his Army career, he will always reflect great credit upon his class and to the Academy. Surely our class motto, " Strength and Drive, " could not delineat e his finest qualities any better. We will always remember Ed for his aggressive- ness, dedication and unselfishness, in the classroom as well as on the athletic field. Stars 3, 2, 1 ; Soccer 4,3,2,1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2. I. PAUL J. SINGELYN G-1 Singe Known for his love of football, distaste for Russian, extremely wide and ever-present grin and his uncanny knack at making out laundry slips. Singe has proved to be one of Michigan ' s most useful war- time products. He has earned much respect for his many hours spent helping classmates with any of the science courses, as well as his coolness under extreme pressure on a certain mountain climbing experience. Track 3; Debate Council and Forum 3; Cardinal New- man Club 4.3.2,1. RICHARD HART SINNREICH A-2 Rick The past four ears have been busy ones for Rick. So much of his time was taken up with playing his guitar, reading, and going on trips that it often seemed that there just wasn ' t going to be any time left for some of the lesser things, such as studying and classes. He is a hard worker with many interests, but always manages to find time for a little fun. The Artillery is getting a fine officer. Rifle 4: Debate Council and Forum 4. 3; Fencing Club 3, 2. 1: Bridge Club 4; Rifle Club 4; Cadet Chapel Choir 3. 2. 1: Glee Club 4, 3,2,1. RICHARD HART SINNREICH FRANCIS R, SKIDMORE A-2 Frank Four years ago Frank, true to the Skidmore tra- dition, arrived at West Point from Virginia. Easy-going and amiable, he was well liked by his classmates. Many still owe a debt of gratitude for the tutoring he liberally gave. Being a hive, Frank could afford to indulge in such activities as the Honor Committee and his favorite " domestic " sport, bowling. We wish Frank the best of luck in his career as an officer. Honor Committee 3, 2, 1 ; Bowling 4, 3, 2, J : Catliolic ChapelClwir4,3,2. 1. KENNETH BRUCE SLUTZKY E-2 Ken Ken came from Massapequa, Long Island, where he and his brothers had dominated the local sports scene. Ken continued his athletic prowess as one of the top performers on the gym team. Silent waters run deep — " quiet Ken " just wasn ' t the same fellow at a party in the city. Average in academics. Ken will be remembered for his achievements on the highbar, p-bar and rings achievements. C ' FRANC IS R SKIDMORE Gvmnastics 4, Ski Club 4. I ; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, 1; KENNETH BRUCE SLUTZKY FREDERICK J SMITH HERBERT J SMITH JAMES LENHART SMITF FREDERICK J. SMITH M-2 Fred Originally from the great Midwest. Fred achieved high goals in athletics and academics in his cadet career. Since his folks lived on post, Saturday night TV sessions and Sunday dinners were not uncommon for many of his less fortunate friends. His easy-going manner and friendly personality won him many friends throughout the Corps. Fred " s competitive spirit and willingness to help others point toward a bright future in the years to come. Track 4; Rocket Club 2.1: duholic Chapel Acolytes 2.1; Cardinal Xewman Club 2.1: Dialectic Society 4; Ski Club 3. 2.1. HERBERT J. SMITH. Ill M-1 Duck With two years of college under his belt, Herb arrived at West Point a proud representative of the great state of Michigan. The feeling of significance, not uncommon among Plebes in Beast Barracks, was of course felt in this " college junior. " Throughout his years at West Point, Herb has given unselfishly to help his classmates, as many of them can surely attest. Con- scientious, considerate, enthusiastic and capable — Herb will make a fine officer and leader. 150 lb. Football 4; French Language Club 2. 1 : HOW- ITZER 4, 3, I; POINTER 2, 1; Cadet Band 3. 2. 1; Dialectic Society 4. 3. 2, 1; KDET 4: Ski Club 4. 3. 2,1: 100th Night Show 4. 3, 2. 1; Math Forum 1. JAMES LENHART SMITH C-2 Jim Sting Ray Jim, the boy from Bethesda. performed every job well and always supplied plenty of every- thing, but with no sweat. When not planning trips to Europe or shaving the hair off soccer balls, Jim was always to be found fle.xing for his fans in the weight room. Gentleman Jim asks for very little before he joins the Armor; a hairbrush, a barbell and a full-length mirror. Soccer 4. 3. 2. 1 : Tennis 4: Public Information Detail; Debate Council and Forum 4. 3. 1 : Spanish Language Club 4. 3. 2, 1: Scoutmasters ' Council 3, 2: Cadet C Impel Choir 4. 3. 2. 1 ; Dialectic Society 4. 3; 100th Night Show 4.3. JOHN RICHARD SMOAK, JR. K-1 Smoky Disappointed by the absence of equestrian facili- ties at West Point, Smoky resolved to retain his Southern personality and independent spirit throughout his cadet career. After four years he is still the inde- pendent Southern gentleman, accepting the hectic life at the Academy with a smile. There can be no doubt that Smoky will be an officer who has a great deal of ability and who will remain calm, composed and even friendly in any situation. German Language Club 2: Skin Diving Club 2: Sky- Divim; Club 2. 1. JOHN RICHARD SMOAK, JR DANIEL tDGAR SPhlLMAN, JR DANIEL EDGAR SPEILMAN, JR. E-2 Dan Dan came in with as much character as most men leave with, and through his travels and experiences here, he built on this foundation. Wherever he applied his determination and talent, he succeeded, and his well- rounded personality will go on winning him a place in the world. No one who knows Dan will e.xpect any- thing but first place to be in store for him. Public Relations Council 2, I; Portuguese Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1; Rocket Club 3. 2. I: Cadet Sunday- School Teacliers 4. 3: SCUSA 2.1; Debate Council and Forum 2, 1 . STEVEN M. SPERRY E-2 Spuds A century from now, a Plebe guard will see a ghostly figure in the area and hear those famous words — " You camel-driving junior Tactical Officer! " Then the Plebe will know that ifs the spirit of Steve back on one of his favorite haunts. Steve ' s accomplishments were in all fields — academics, athletics and " flirty. " He packed his four years with friendship, studies and good times, and he will pack the future years with success. 750 lb. Football 4: Public Relations Conned 2, 1: As- tronomy Club 4, 1; Audio Club 1 : Roc et Club 2,1; Spanisli Language Club 2. 1; Skv Diving I; Bowling 2, 1; Skin Diving Club 2. I; Cadet Band 2. 1; Ski Club 4,2,1. STEVEN M SPERRY - : , H - ..A STEPHEN JACK SPOERRY DORIN E. STEELE CHRISTOPHER LOWELL SPIRE F-2 Chris A fine athlete and a sociaUte extraordinary, Chris has contributed much to the class of 1965. Involved in everything and anything which is found at the Academy, there wasn ' t a thing unfamiliar to Chris. His active participation in Academy life and sports, won him a place among his classmates. A hit with the women, Chris will always be remembered as a true friend. 150 lb. Football 4; Wrestling 4; Lacrosse 4; 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; German Language Club 3, 2, 1; Glee Club 4; Debate Council and Forum 2,1. STEPHEN JACK SPOERRY L-2 Steve The name Spoerry is synonomous with sky diving. " Stable Steve, the falling feather, " is a Recondo, rigger, sports parachutist — or more plainly, an apprentice Airborne Ranger. Though very far from Stars, Steve has fingertip information on almost any subject you can think of and a gift of logical expression that is un- surpassed. Steve ' s amiable enthusiasm should keep the 101st and 82nd STRAC for years to come. Sky Diving 4. 3, 2, I , Property Officer 2, President 1 ; Scoutmasters ' Council 4, 3: Glee Club 4. MICHAEL ROBERT STANKO I GREGORY CHARLES STEELE MICHAEL ROBERT STANKO B-2 Mike Beginning with those toilsome hours in spring practice, then resumed in fail, lasting until the climac- tic battle with the Middies. Mike has worked long and hard during his four years at Hudson high. Always of a cheerful nature and generous heart, he has made friends that will endure a lifetime. And through it all, he has left a permanent record in countless letters written with a wary eye to the vengeance of the academic dean. Foohall: Rocket Club Club I ; Area Squad 2. I: POINTER 1; Skin Diving K-2 GROVER C. STARLING Terry Like tho Greeks, Terry managed to develop him- self both physically and intellectually without sacrific- ing his avid interest in the fair sex. Backed by his win- ning smile and sense of humor, Terry was at home in any group. As for the future, the sky is the limit for this Air Force bound Texan. Football 4, 3; Track 4. Numerals; Debate Council and Forum 2,1; Rocket Club J; Russian Language Club 4,3,2,1; SCUSA 2, 1. DORIN E. STEELE B-2 D Here is living proof that the Rocky Mountains produce something besides snow. Dorin has spent most of his time helping classmates less gifted in aca- demics and making trips to spread the good cheer of his college. He also has a knack for starting argu- ments he knows he can win, thwarting the Tactical Department and charming the opposite sex with his innocent, bewildered expression. Our nominee for chief- of-staff — Dorin E. Ring and Crest Committee 2. I; Debate Council and Forum 3. 2. I ; Russian Language Club 4. 3; HOW- ITZER 4, 3: Ski Club 4, 3 . I: GREGORY CHARLES STEELE A-2 Gregg Gregg Steele, as an athlete, made his way into the Academy on a track scholarship. He excelled with his natural ability as both an Army trackman and an Army football player. As a student, he made an even stronger mark at West Point by showing the Academic Department his courage and determination to stay. As a man, he will continue to be inspirational to those near him with his courage, determination, understand- ing and natural leadership ability. 750 lb. Football ; Football 2. 1: Indoor Track 4, 3, 2.1; Outdoor Track 4, 3, 2. 1 ; Ski Club 3. . r SSi;: . DANIEL FREDERICK STEINWALD. JR. C-2 Steinnie The " big fella from Buffalo " ambled through a rough Plebe year. Worked pulling smaller buddies up wet cliffs in the dark during Recondo. Held regular Dean ' s List slot since Yearling year. Nominated for Ail-American for his work plugging up the goal in water polo. Brigade football lineman. Has held the " rat ' s nest " secure against all comers despite occasional losses to the T. D. No lucky girl — yet! A big man — in every way. Hop and A ctivities Committee 2.1: Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1. President I: Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3,2, 1; Ski Club 4, 3. 2, 1: Catholic Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2: Automobile Committee 1 . DANIEL FREDERICK STEINWALD. JAMES PRICE STEPHENSON JAMES PRICE STEPHENSON M-2 Hyme Bred near one of the 10,00U lakes, Hyme has let no hardship cause him undue duress. Having mastered the art of self-expression, he could transform any idle conversation into a heated argument. Although exer- cising his intellect was his main pastime, Jim ' s sense of responsibility and conscientiousness enabled him to become a leader in a diversity of activities. Whatever his calling. Jim ' s individuality and valued opinions will be at his disposal to provide him with a boundless future. Wrestling 4. 3, Numerals 4, l 4onogram 3: Debate Council and Forum 4. 2. I: POINTER 4: Handball Club 1: Cadet Chapel Choir 4.3.2. I: Dialectic Society 3, 2, 1; Ski Patrol 1 ; Ski Club 2.1. ROBERT HENRY STE HhNRY UlllJAM STHRBhN . JR ROBERT HENRY STERBA H-l Bob By far the most oLilstanding product of Three Oaks, Michigan, Bob came to West Point after a year ' s apprenticeship at VMI. His abihty and winning ways soon won over his classmates, and have given him many lasting friends. Although never as interested in academics as in pistol. Bob has skillfully avoided any head-on clash with the Academic Department. However, he never shirks any other battle and he will be a credit to himself and West Point. 150 lb. Football 4; Pistol 4. 3. 2. I : Sixiiiish Language Club 1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4. J. 2. I: Pistol Club 4. 3.2. 1; Ski Club 4. HENRY WILLIAM STERBENZ. JR. D-1 Hank Hank ' s constant drive and excellence in all ac- tivities, both athletic and academic, destine him for success; the Infantry should consider itself lucky to be getting him. His athletic ability and competitive spirit have been the deciding factor in many a contest. As an academic coach. Hank will always be remembered by many as the " man who got me through. " Truly, he fulfills the qualities of the D-l warrior. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3, 2. 1 : Chess Club 4: Catholic Chapel Acolxtes 3. 2. 1: Cardinal Newman Club 3. 2. J: Ski Club 4. JAY FRANCIS STEVISON C-1 Jay " The Duke " brought unending optimism and a tremendous sense of humor with him to West Point; and in his time here he shared them both with every- one he knew. Never one to overwork, he could always be counted on to join any clandestine activities, and on occasion, has masterminded a few himself. The future looks bright for this Kansan. Golf 4: Public Injormation Detail 3. 2, 1 ; Astronomy Club 2, 1; Debate Council and Forum 3: French Language Club 3. 2. 1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 1 ; Skin Diving Club 1 : Cadet Chapel Chimers 4. JAMES VAUGHAN STEWART. Ill F-2 Jay Intelligent, but not exceedingly " gimg-ho, " Jay will always be remembered by ' 65 for his ever present and original sense of humor. He did well in his scien- tific studies despite minimum study and maximum " bag. " His outstanding athletic ability and aggressive- ness made him an intramural athlete long to be remem- bered by those who played against him. No doubt the future holds much success for Jay. Track 4. JAMES WILSON TALBOT FRANCIS PAUL TANTALO JOHN KARL SWENSSON D-2 John Since coming to West Point four years ago, this likeable Kansan has compiled a record that few can surpass. He was always present whenever work was to be done and his versatility was something to be envied. A fierce competitor, John was never content with mediocrity and constantly strove for excellence. As he departs West Point, the admiration of his many friends will follow him throughout his career, along with their supreme confidence in his future. Cross Country 3; Track 4. 3. 2, Monogram 3: Hop and Activities Committee 4,3,2, 1 , Secretary; Debate Council and Forum 2 1; HOWITZER 3, 2, 1, Adver- tising Editor 1; Rugby Club 4; Pistol Club 4, 3; Scout- masters ' Council 4, 3; Cadet Chapel Choir 4,3,2.1. Cadet in Charge 1; Glee Club 3. 2. I. Budget Officer: MORTAR. Editor 3. JAMES WILSON TALBOT K-1 Jim An Air Force brat who calls Maine home but doesn ' t denouce Florida, Alabama, or Idaho for any reason other than their apparent lack of appointments. Jim joined the Army and nailed down a reserve com- ponent appointment. Beginning with a rough (?) Plebe year in E-1, Jim amiably pursued his cadet career, skiing constantly and doing as little as possible to remain on the Dean ' s List. Con siderate, capable and duty-conscious, Jim is a credit to the service. Soccer 4; Astronomy Club 4, 3. 2, I : French Language Club 3, 2, 1; Models Club 2, I; Ski Club 4. 3. 2. 1, Vice-President. FRANCIS PAl ' L TANTALO F-1 Frank Frank, who hails from Rochester, New York, did not find West Point hard to master. Always willing to lend a helping hand and never willing to miss the fun, he enjoyed much popularity. His straight forward attitude toward life gained him much respect among his classmates. With the same attitude applied to later life, he should enjoy continued success in the future. Hop and Activities Committee 4. 3. 2. 1 : Public Infor- mation Detail 1 : Audio Club 2: French Language Club 4, 3. 2. 1: An Club 4: Camera Club 3. 1; Cardinal Nen-man Club 4. 3. 2. I . WESLEY BAYARD TAYLOR, JR. A-1 Wes After four years of fighting a running battle with the Academic Department, Wes should be well pre- pared to fight battles of a military nature. Coupled with a friendly disposition, dedication to dragging, and an undaunted Southern spirit he will be a success in what- ever he does. Goat Football. w } WESLEY BAYARD TAYLOR. JR MICHAEL B TEETERS MICHAEL B. TEETERS L-2 Mike. Mighty Mike ' s marks have always been high and the reasons are obvious. Throughout his sojourn here, he has always maintained that the shortest distance between two points lies on the line of least sweat. Mike ' s cheerful attitude and " flex for us " bearing will carry him happily into the arms of the queen of battle, where he ' ll have still another chance to demonstrate his proven capabilities. Cathol ic Chapel Choir 4: Glee Club 4. 3, 2, 1; SCUSA 1. JOHN KINGSL.AND TERRY M-1 Jack Jack, the M-1 muscle man from Ailentown. Pa., during his four years fought a brilliant campaign against the out-classed Tactical and Academic Departments, turned into quite a budding sociologist, and still found time to demonstrate his athletic aggressiveness and abiliy. Always intensely interested in the Army, this master of the calculated risk is certain to do well with his unquenchable enthusiasm and good nature. Football 4. 3. Numerals 4: French Language Club 3; Rugby Club 2.1: Pistol Club I : Cadet Sunday School Teachers 2,1; Brigade Hvwt. Boxing Champ. JOHN KINGSLAND TERRY JOHN TIMOTHY THOMASSON MICHAEL H. THOMPSON JOHN WARE THAMES, JR. C-1 Tim Known intimately by both the Academic and Tactical Departments, Tim established a legend while at West Point. His outspoken manner and unique philosophy was a cause for much concern by the First Class. Tim ' s constant yearning for a taste of " real college life " " never dampened his witty sense of humor or his enjoyment of what West Point had to offer. He is a true friend, and we all wish him best of luck in the Army. French Language Club 2. 1: Rocket Club 2.1; HOW- ITZER 4, 1; Sky Diving I; Sailing Club 4. 3. 2, 1; Camera Club 4; Outdoor Sportsmen Club 4; Skin Diving Club 1 ; 100th Night Show 3, 1. JOHN TIMOTHY THOMASSON K-1 Jack Jack, being from Baltimore, Maryland, was natur- ally one of the stalwarts on the lacrosse team — and he was known for his calm personality, and he would not settle for one varsity sport. Jack played on the 150 lb. football team as well, and was selected as All-East in Yearling year. Because of his winning ways both on and off the athletic field. Jack will succeed in any endeavor of life. 1501b. Football 4.3.2.1: Lacrosse 4.3.2.1. JOHN CHARLES THOMPSON D THOMPSON JOHN CHARLES THOMPSON B-1 Thomps Thomps came to us from the heart of Dixie with a rollicking sense of humor, an enviable liking for people and an ability with words that kept him on top in all situations. Whether instructing the elephant squad, getting on trip sections, defending states rights or meditating with his brown boy, Johnny was never too busy to be a friend in need. With his winning personality and high sense of duty, he shall be a great success and serve our country well. Debate Council and Forum 2. 1 : French Language Club 2, 1; Mathematics Fonim 2, I; Rocket Club 3, 2, 1, Secret ar 1 ; Spanish Language Club 3, 2, 1; HOWITZER 2. I; MORTAR 3; Sky Diving 1; Judo 4. 3. 1: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, 1; Skeet and Trap Club 2,1: Dialectic Society 3, 1 . JON K. THOMPSON F-2 Jon Leaving God ' s country in the Colorado Rockies, Jon brought with him the experience, personality and ambition that were to peg him as a true leader in our class. An organizing specialist, " the old man " was al- ways coming up with new ideas. Four years have failed to dim the ever present smile and easy-going manner that have been his trademarks. Jon can ' t help but be a huge success wherever the future takes him. 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Committee: 3d Class Committee; Public Injormation Detail 3, 2, 1: Public Relations Council 1; Debate CouncU and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1; Rocket Club 2, I; Spanish Language Club 3, 2, 1; Sky Diving 1 : Outdoor Sportsmen Club 2, 1 ; Mormon Chapel Squad 4, 3. 2. 1: Class Treasurer 3, 2.1; Ski Club 3, 2. MICHAEL H. THOMPSON B-1 Tiny Back in Two Harbors, Mike never learned to march, but he learned to play hockey as no one at Army had played before. He did more than just march or skate though, and made an indelible mark here, in Europe, and everywhere he went. His accomplishments and honors were equaled only by the number of his nicknames, but Mike sacrificed more than his share too. As he always will, Mike made sure everything worked out for the best. Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1, Captain: Soccer 4. 3. 2; 1st Class Committee; Public Relations Council 2. 1: HOW- ITZER 2.1. ROBERT D. THOMPSON G-1 Tomper Tomper came to West Point straight from high school, but was obviously smarter than the average bear, for he always kept the T.D., the Dean and everyone on his side. Although West Point deprives. Bob lost less than most since he kept his girl, his smile, and his roomate from getting turned out. He will no doubt be a success and was one of the two best men I ever knew. A true friend and great guy. French Language Club 3. 2: HOWITZER 4. 3; Sail- ing Club 4. m c m M m HL 1 — ' " ' ?, « W. r v ' H| B ■ . m ' - IP THOMAS DAVID THOMPSON 1-2 Bips One of the most effervescent and gregarious in- dividuals in our class is the " Shamokin Flash, " Tommy Thompson. Best known both by the T.D. and his classmates for his carefree, devil-may-care spirit, Tom wended his way through four successful years of hard work intermingled with loads of fun. To those of us who have been fortunate enough to know him, Tom is a most outstanding example of a cadet and a friend. Wrestling 4, 3, 2. 1: 150 lb. Football 4; Catholic Chapel Acolvtes 2,1; Catholic Chapel Choir 4: German Club 4. TERRIL MARQUETTE THROCKMORTON D-1 Terry Knowing Terry has been both a privilege and an experience for all of us. His quick smile, natural wit and sincere personality have brightened many an other- wise hopeless problem. Throck was never too busy to help someone else, and many of his classmates will re- call for years to come his after-taps social and aca- demic " approved solutions. " Iowa ' s loss has been the Army ' s gain. Whichever road Terry takes, it is sure to lead to success. Track; 150 lb. Football 4, 3. 2; Ring and Crest Com- mittee 4, 3, 2; Debate Council and Forum 3; Rocket Club 2; Spanish Language Club 2; Skin Diving Club 4. 3; Cadet Cliapel Choir 4, 3. 2; Glee Club 4. 3. 2; Ski Club 4. 3, 2. THOMAS DAVID THOMPSON TERRIL MARQUETTE THROCKMORTON JAMES LEE TILLMAN Ri. ' Ul Kl DUL CLAS TIMBROOK JAMES LEE TILLMAN H-2 Jim Without a doubt, it would he difficult to find a more considerate and kind person than Jim. Even though he, like the majority of us, failed to see benefit in some of our training, he nevertheless put his mind to it and kept on plugging. To talk about lacrosse and a girl named Lou would be to consider the desires that kept Jim going through this institution. Lacrosse 4. 3, 2.1: Soccer 4: CatlwUc Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2. I. ROBERT DOUGLAS TIMBROOK D-2 Tim The test of a man comes with adversity, and Bob was one who could be counted on when the chips were down. We can still remember the crisp fall afternoon football games when Bob sparked us to a regimental championship. The Army holds great promise for Bob, as his fellow officers will soon learn what we remember — " it was a pleasure to serve with him. " Track 4. Numerals 4: German Language Club 4: Out- door Sportsmen Club 4; SCUSA . FREDERICK WHITING TIMMERMAN, JR. D-1 Tim If desire, friendliness, devotion to friends and duty and demonstrated ability can insure one " s success in the military, Tim will surely see " stars. " This gung-ho lad from the heart of Pennsylvania impressed all who came in contact with him by his earnest, outspoken approach to life — whether in the barracks, the class- room, or on the athletic field. The Army has found itself a mighty good man. Debate Council and Forum 4. 3: Spanish Language Club 4. 3. 2. I: POINTER 2. I: Bowling I; KDET 2. JAMES ROBERT TOMASWICK D-1 Swick Swick came to West Point from the hills of West- ern Pennsylvania with high hopes to play Army foot- ball. Broken bones and injured knees dimmed his hopes of playing A-squad. Undaunted, he switched his efforts to the intramural field and left an enviable record of bruised shins, not his own, and many victories. Swick was never one to sweat academics, and when not over in the gym shooting baskets, he could be found peace- fully enjoying the comforts of his brown boy. A true friend and hard worker, he will be a credit to the Army. Football 4; Track 4: Debate Council and Forum 3; HOWITZER 2: Bowling 3. 2, I. r m d KEVIN PALL TOOMEY KEVIN PAUL TOOMEY G-1 Kev Kev came to West Point from Connecticut, where he had already made a name for himself as one of New England ' s top high school pitchers. His drive and am- bition earned him a place on the A squad as a sopho- more. G-1 will remember his tennis ability as a great asset to the company; his many friends will remember his unselfish companionship and his well-rounded per- sonality. Baseball 4. 3: Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. 1: Glee Chib 1. WILLIAM HUDSON TREDENNICK M-2 Following a year at Penn State. Bill and his friendly disposition tackled West Point where, sacrific- ing tenths in favor of his brown boy, he still found time for dragging pro. Although not the tallest man in the Corps, " Tred " stands as tall as anyone in the goals he has set. Having perfected the art of making lasting friendships and being continually happy. Bill steps forth as an excellent representative of Uncle Sam. Soccer 4, 3, 2. 1: HOWITZER 2, 1; Cadet Chapel Acolytes 3: Protestant Discussion Group 4, 3. RICHARD W . TRAGEMANN C-1 Dick From La Salle College to West Point: from Big Man on Campus to Plebe, Dick quickly adjusted and immediately set his sights on graudation. A firm be- liever in working hard and playing hard, especially at his beloved baseball, he makes the most of his oppor- tunities both at West Point and away. He has accom- plished his goals at West Point, and all others he may set will become realities. Baseball; 1st Class Committee; 2J Class Committee; 3d Class Committee: Astronomy Club; Spanish Lan- guage Club. WILLIAM ALBERT TRUCK F-1 Bill Bill, a native of Middietown. Ohio, came to West Point four years ago, and liking the warm weather, decided to stay. Although the weather wasn ' t always warm. Bill decided to stay and has left an impression long to be remembered. His devotion and ability to put others before himself have made Bill many friends. In keeping with with Bill ' s friendly manner and unselfish- ness. I know that he has a great deal to look forward to in future years. Football 4. 3; Baseball 2.1; Audio Club 2.1; Spanish Language Club 3, 2, 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 2, 1; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 3. WILLIAM ALBKRT TRIICI RICHARD W IRAGL JACK COCKE TURNER J.C. WILLIAM HLDSON TRLDLNMCK M-2 Jack will always sacrifice his own comfort to help another person. His quiet demeanor hides one of the most clever intellects ever to edit a company news- paper. Jack ' s ready smile and cheerful disposition made every acquaintance a close friend. His loyalty to his friends and his high personal standards earned him the respect of everyone who ever associated with him. Honor Committee 2, 1 ; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1; German Language Clui) 4. 3. 2. I ; Cadet Sun- day School Teacliers 4, 3. 2. TERRENCE RICHARD TUTCHINGS E-2 Tutch Tutch, the pride of Norwalk. came to West Point with a reputation for excellence both in scholarship and athletics. Here he added to that reputation by excel- ling not only in these, but in every field of endeavor which caught his fancy. Tutch, the composer of lyrics, singer of ballads and champion of the joke tellers, will probably be remembered most by his friends for his maturity of actions and thought. The future — only success! Stars 2; Foot all 4. 3. 2. I: Track 3. 1; Wrestling 2; Russian Language Club 4. 3; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3, 2,1; Glee Club 4,3,2, L JACK COCKE TURNER TERRENCE RICHARD TUTCHINGS ST. ELMO P. TYNER, THOMAS WILLIAM VAN DY W ID BENTON VANN ST. ELMO P. TYNER. Ill B-1 Step Step is a person of whom one speaks in terms of superlatives. He is a genius in the use of words, although somewhat less than a genius when it comes to numbers. He is a soldier who makes one wonder if the word was designed with him in mind. He has quick, piercing wit, which occasionally turns to bitter acrimony. And fore- most in the minds of those who know him well, he is a friend, the like of whom there are unfortunately ery few. Pislol 4; Public Relations Council 2. 1 : Debate Council and Forum 4: POINTER 4. 3: Pistol Club 4: Cadet Chapel Choir 2: Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1; Goat-Engineer Committee 2: THE GRENADE 3. Editor. THOM.AS WILLI.AM VAN DYK 1-2 Tom Tom is an " Air Force brat " transplanted into the Army from Wisconsin. Always puffing on a pipe, his mature attitude and even disposition make him seem older than his 20 years. He believes in hard work dur- ing the week and dragging every weekend. It seems he always has women dangling from his earlobes; they just can ' t resist his wide, innocent grin and natural, friendly personality. Ambitious, thorough and hard- working, he will be a fine officer. Debate Council and Fori Acolytes 3, 2, 1. Chatholic Chapel DAVID BENTON VANN H-2 Dave The T.D. and the classroom never gave Dave any serious trouble, and he always managed to stay cheerful through the blackest days. Although he never let any- thing interfere with his many pro drags, we ' ll all re- member Dave for trying to set the example, no matter what the job was. With his enthusiasm and happy grin, Dave is bound to be a success in the career he has always wanted. Golf 4, 3: French Language Club 3. 2: HOWITZER 2.1: Bridge Club 2,1; Chess Club 4: Bowling 3.2.1; Ski Club 4, 3; Goat-Engineer Football. JOHN MACRAE VANN M-1 John After quiet Plebe years both here and at The Citadel, John enthusiastically accepted the challenges of the T.D., academics and West Point social life. An athlete of many talents — golf, engineer football, tennis and others — he mucked it with the best of of them. Tactful with women, unselfish among class- mates, military in appearance and hardworking, John is destined for a brilliant Army career. Golj 4. 3; Debate Council and Forum 2. 1: French Language Clidi 4. 3. 2. I: POINTER; Bridge Club 2,1; Chess Club 4. 3; Bowling 2; Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1; Dialectic .Societv 1: Engineer Football; SCUSA 2,1. JOHN MACRAF VANN [ LDON VAL ' GHN JAY ELDON VAUGHN H-1 " Old Man " The " old man " rode out of the Oregon canyons to spend his first two years in Epsilon-Uno. A real great guy to know. Jay kept us all supplied with yaks. Whether swimming Lake Georgina in winter, climbing Mt. Hood, jumping out of airplanes or winning the Brigade wrestling championship, Vogen was always equal to the task. When Jay departs from H-1 in June, the Artillery will have the pleasure of his company. Debate Council and Forum 2, 1; Spanish Language Club 2,1: Sky Diving 2: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, I ; Dialectic Society 2.1. MICHAEL LAWRENCE VI AN I E-2 Mike Mike comes to us from Boise, Idaho. His inter- ests at the Academy were mainly academic, and he al- most won the honor of wearing Stars. Mike was very interested in foreign languages and studied German, Italian and Tagalog. Music played an important part in Mike ' s life, and he especially enjoyed playing the guitar. He will be remembered by his classmates as industrious and friendly. Public Relations Council 1 : Debate Council and Forum 2,1; German Language Club 2.1; Judo 4; Catholic Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, 1; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3,2.1. MICIIAFL LAWRENCE VIANI JAMES MICHAEL WATSON JOHN M. WATTENDORF MARK R WALSH TIMOTHY JAMES VOGEL K-1 Tim Tim, in his four years here, managed to stay one step ahead of the Academic Department and T.D. most of the time. His exploits on the lacrosse field livened up many a spring day, particularly when he unleashed his famous shot; and no one took greater pleasure in beating Navy than this Annapolis boy. As a friend, thfre was never any better than Tim, and with his friendly nature, he can ' t help but do well in life. Lacrosse 4. 3. 2. 1 : Fooiball 4: Wrestling 4. MARK R. WALSH M-1 Snalsh No more energetic individual ever entered these hallowed grounds, be it in athletics, soldiering, extra- curricular activities or even academics. — (Who can ever forget his memorable encounter with the solids department?) As president of his class, he worked as hard for our benefit as he did in promoting the Air- borne. A product of the USMA prep school at Ft. Belvoir, Mark entered and left the Military Academy an affable, earnest young man, intent on being a credit to the Army and always anxious and willing to aid his friends, the number of which increased with each new acquaintance. Football 4: Track 4. 3; 1st Class Committee: 2d Class Committee: 3d Class Committee: Catholic Chapel Choir 4.3: Glee Club 4, 3. RONALD L WALTER i ' i I %s4i. RONALD L. WALTER K-1 R.L. R.L. came to us from sunny California. His humor and friendliness made our four years bearable, and the best efforts of the Academic. Tactical and P.E. Depart- ments were no match for the shortest member of ' 65. He was a good man to have along, no matter what the occasion, from a wild weekend in the city to a philo- sophical discussion on any subject. His spirit and drive will take him far in the Infantry. Wrestling 4; Debate Council and Forum 4; Spanish Language Club 2,1; Sheet and Trap Club 4: Karate Club 3. 2, 1; Color Line Show 3; 100th Night Show 1. Dialectic Society 2. JAMES MICHAEL WATSON H-2 Bug Always active, ever eager, never study — that was Bug. A man with tremendous talent for anything ath- letic, Bug lived for sports. Occasionally, however, he bent to the will of academics or the T.D., and stayed out of the gym — but those times were rare. Never one to sweat the minor problems of life, Bug breezed through the rigors of many love affairs with a carefree heart and closed eyes. Life around here would indeed be dull without Bug to cheer us on. Lacrosse 4, 3, 2: French Language Club 4. 3, 2; Art Club 3: Ski Club 4: 100th Night Show 2. JOHN M. WATTENDORF G-1 Watts Quick to smile, but never to study. Watts became notorious for his easy-going, extremely likeable person- ality. He overflowed with intelligence and relished new ideas — originality was his byword. The key to his success — enthusiasm, combined with a level-headed, fresh approach to life. Armed with these attributes, and his natural ability as a leader. Watts will take giant strides in any and all his endeavors. Soccer 3, 2; Public Information Detail, Battalion PIO Representative 3; German Language Club 2: Pistol Club 4; Catholic Chapel Clunr 4. 3, 2, 1. Cadet-in- charge 1 ; Cardinal Newman Club 4, 3. 2, . JOE ALBERT WEATHERALL. JR. M-2 Joe A tall, easy-going Texan who long ago lost his drawl, Joe slipped easily into M-2 " s flanker tradition. Afternoons found Joe playing any one of a number of sports, of which tennis was his forte. Not bothered by the O.P.E., T.D. or academics, Joe was in most ad- vanced sections, but he had that touch of goat indif- ference that made him everyone ' s friend Portuguese Language Club 4. 3: Handball Club 1; Chess Club 4, 3, 2: Pistol Club 4, 3: Dialectic Society 3, 2. JAMES R. WEBB, 111 M-1 Jim There is little to be desired in Jim ' s effort to con- tribute the maximum of his talents, and to receive the maximum benefits during his four years at the Military Academy. Accepted in all circles, his sharp wit could bring you from the depths of gloom, or when needed he possessed the ability of providing encouragement when tasks got diflficult. Whether securing advertise- ments for KDET or running the cross-country course, Jim would settle for nothing but success. He should be proud of his cadetship, since his performance here has destined him for honors. Riiii and Crest Committee 4. 3. 2,1: Debate Council and Forum 4. 3. 2, I; Catliolic Chapel Acolvtes 4. 3, 2. I: Catholic Chapel Choir 4. 3: KDET 4. 3. 2. I. JAMES R. WEBB, lU RONALD M WELLS RONALD M. WELLS C-2 Ron Ron, a backwoodsman, was originally an Oregon lumberjack. He traded his axe for a slide rule and became a hive and an all-around good guy, still striv- ing for satisfaction. His high standing in fluids can be attributed to weekly seminars, devoted to all aspects of the subject. His duty consciousness to keep his class- mates pro should stand him in good stead after grad- uation. Public Information Detail 4, 3: Debate Council and Forum 4. 3; Spanish Language Club 4. 3. 2. I ; Rocket Club I: Ski Club 4, 3: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 3, 2, 1. Oisf WALTER JOHNSON WELLS, JR. [ THFRII.L. JR WALTER JOHNSON WELLS, JR. K-1 Johnny Johnny, a West Pointer from birth, was responsible for many a chuci ;lc throughout the Corps. He enjoyed his four years at the Academy, even when it seemed impossible, and did his best to make things more bearable for those around him. He will always be re- membered for his dramatic portrayals in 100th Night Shows and his equally dramatic battles with academics. His quick smile and conscientious attitudes will always be an asset to him. Hop and Activities Coininillee 3: Audio Club I ; De- hate Council and Forum 3: Frencli Language Club 2, I: Bowling 3; Dialectic Society 4. 3. 2. I: KDET 4. 3; lOUih Mglit Show 4, 3. 2, 1; Color Line Sliow 3: Ski Club 4, 3. 2, 1 ; Automobile Committee 1. LOWRY ARTHUR WEST C-2 Low Low came to the " windy rock " from the sunny shores of California. Slide nile in hand, he found his way through four years of academics with comparative ease, and always found time to help his less brilliant classmates. With an easy grin he faced all the trials of the T.D., surviving a few minor defeats. C-2 ' s loss will be the Army ' s gain in June of ' 65. 1st Class Committee; 2d Class Committee: 3d Class Committee: Rocket Club 3: Russian Lam utige Club 4. 3; Bridge Club 4. ERNEST DAVID WESTPHELING B-2 Ernie After a year at prep school, Ernie came to West Point well prepared to meet the rigors of Academy life. His ability to plan and organize, his cheerful outlook and ever-present smile, helped him to become well-liked by all. Upon graduation his ambitions are to follow in the family tradition by becoming Airborne-Ranger, with the Infantry as his home. Best of luck to him. Lacrosse: Hop and Activities Committee: Public Rela- tions Council; Ring and Crest Committee: French Lan- guage Club; Rocket Club: Sky Diving: Skin Diving Club ; Dialectic Society. RODERICK WETHERILL. JR. F-2 Rick Rick will always be remembered for his original talents as a Plebe. His continued attacks on the Plebe system were usually victorious and always humorous. After Plebe year he turned to the Academic Depart- ments where his brilliant maneuvers again were victor- ious. Whether it was on the lacrosse field or on a weekend, he always gave it everything he had. Lacrosse 4. 3. Assistant Coach 2.1: Spanish Language Club 4. 3. LOUIS L WHEELER LOUIS L. WHEELER E-2 Duke Coming to West Point from an Army Family, Duke was not easily befuddled by the newness of Army life that confused so many of us. His mild manners and quick wit won him many friends. His war with the Academic Departments had its unsure moments, but he met them with a strong spirit and determination that always pulled him through, and gained him a Star for his B-robe. Duke will always be a credit to the Army. Lacrosse 4; Rifle 4: Rocket Club 2.1; Camera Club 2,1: SkiClub 3.2.1. ROBERT CRAWFORD WHITE G-2 Boom-Boom Boom-Boom. G-2 ' s bull from Bucyrus. as a faith- ful middleman, made his mark as our perennial prank- ster. Our chief coast watcher could often be seen trudging towards the Hudson, with duffle bag under one arm, preparing to spend another lonely weekend guard- ing our coast. Our lovable Boom-Boom will undoubtedly go far in the Army, if he ever realizes that he is a part of a military organization. Indoor and Outdoor Track 4; Ring and Crest Com- mittee 3, 2, 1 : German Language Club 2.1: Order of Arrow 3. THOMAS ROSS WHITE H-2 Whitey The classic " dumb " footballer didn ' t lit Whitey, who was always one of the Dean ' s men ; yet by spend- ing as little time as possible on studies and concentrat- ing on football, he easily overcame the stigma of being a book type. Always ready to lend a hand or stamp an envelope, he was as indispensable as the c-store; yet Whitey was prized most for his enduring friendship. Football 4. 3. 2. 1: Debate Council and Forum 4.3: French Language Club 1; Rocket Club I: Outdoor Sportsmen Club 1: Scoutmasters ' Council 3: Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4. 3. 2: Dialectic Society 4,3,2.1: NDT4. 3. 2.1. BENJAMIN WHITEHOUSE, IV A-1 Ben Ben crossed the great, grey threshold after two and one-half years at V.P.I. With his ever-present smile and determination, he managed to survive a quite event- ful E-1 Plebe year. Never threatened by the Academic Departments, Ben was always there to assist others. A man of quick wit, dedication and a warm friend, Ben is destined (after a long-awaited trip to the altar) to a proud and successful future in the Army. Astronomy Club 3. 2. 1 : French Language Club 3, 2; POINTER 4.3: Dialectic Society 2.1. ROBF RT CRAWFORD WHITE JESSE MILLARD WRITTEN Jess C-2 Jess came stomping out of the delta of Mississippi to make good at the government school up North. He succeeded and left his mark, along with his rebel flag. He left a scorched trail in his march through the North. Somehow Jess managed to be a man without a company, until he found a home in C-2. Even though he was a goat, he managed to make the most of his weekends and spare time. Football Manager 4,3,2.1. LAWRENCE PARKER WIEST I-l Larry Larry will always be remembered for his high ideals and his down-to-earth sense of values. From aca- demics to athletics, his enthusiasm never lagged; while always maintaining a sense of humor, together with a deep sense of respect for his fellow man. Larry will go far in his chosen profession. Century Club; Roman Smith Society 4. 3, 2, 1; Honor Committee. JESSE MILLARD WHITTEN LAWRENCE PARKER WIEST EARL THOMAS WILEY. RONALD NEIL WILLIAMS EARL THOMAS WILEY. Ill C-2 Tom Wiles brought to West Point an educated back- ground from Belvoir ' s school of mental giants, and even more important, some high school years in Germany. He was given a second chance when Plebe year he ran into academic difficulty, but he elected to return and has been ahead of academics ever since. Thankfully, he can usually be counted on to come up with those all-important HSP ' s. Tom ' s perserverance will undoubt- edly carry him far. Lacrosse 5, 4. 3, 2. I, Manager: Portuguese Language Cluh 5. 4, 3, 2. I : Cardina l Newman Club 4, 3. 1. RICHARD CHARLES WILLIAMS E-1 Dick From the hills of Virginia, Dick came to join the " long grey line. " Having had two years at V.P.I., he became known as the " old man " who never worries. A lover of all sports, he soon found his place in track and cross country, earning his Major A Yearling year. With his interests torn between hot rods and sky diving, he still found time for a certain girl and his friends. A great guy and a real credit to our class. Cross Country 4, 3, 2. Numerals 4. Major A 3; Track 4, 3.2. Numerals 4: Debate Council and Forum 4: POINTER 4, 3. 2, 1: Sky Diving 2, 1, Custodian L RONALD NEIL WILLIAMS L-1 Ron Believing that life is a total experience, this " cow- boy " from Gene Autry, Oklahoma, set out to insure that he left no experience u ntried. For him there will always be a bigger mountain to climb, a new frontier to challenge. Whether it involves pulling a ripcord or helping out a classmate, any endeavor is done with the same reckless abandon and spirit of adventure. Just knowing him has been an experience we will always remember. Pistol; Debate Council and Forum 4, 3. 2, 1: Russian Language Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Sky Diving 4, 3. 2, 1; Outdoor Sportsmen Cluh 1 : Pistol Club 4, 3. 2. 1; Scoutmasters ' Council 4. 3. EDWARD DEWITT WINSTEAD M-1 Ed The South has been the birthplace of many of the greats of this land. Coming from North Carolina, Ed personifies all those virtues we so admire. He is a man with a big heart and the capacity for leadership that will insure his success. The Army is fortunate to gain this man. Spanish Language Club 4,3.2, 1 : Camera Club 4.3, 2; Skeet and Trap Club 3; Cadet Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1 ; Debate Team 3. RDW ARD ni AMrr winstfad MCHARDC; MR RICHARD G.W I RTH M-1 Dick Dick ' s easy-going and likeable attitude has won him many friends during his past four years. His ability to outfox the Academic and Tactical Departments and to be on an uncountable number of trips, has amazed us all. After graduation, a commission in the Air Force and marriage signify the beginning of a bright career for this capable new officer. Swimming 4; French Language Club 3. 2. I : German Language Club 3, 2. 1; Mathemetics Forum 2, 1; Spanish Language Club 3, 2. 1 : Dialectic Society 2. ROGER W. WOLF L-2 Rog From the swamps of Louisiana. Rog brings a sunny smile and quick wit to the old. grey walls of West Point. It is said that leaders are born, not made — Roger is both. He was elected L-2 ' s Honor Representa- tive for his honesty and sincerity, though not for the shine of his shoes. In the middle of Cow Year he dis- covered the guitar and some latent musical talent, although he did manage to conceal more than he dis- covered. Nevertheless, if past success is any indication of future success, that future is bright indeed for Rog. Cross Country 4; Indoor Track 4, 3; Outdoor Track 4; Honor Committee 2, 1; Debate Council and Forum 2, 1; Rocket Club I: Spanish Language Club 3, 2, 1; Art Club 3; Skin Diving Club 1 ; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. ROGER W WOLF JAMES ARTHLR WOODARD ARME WOODRUFF ALLAN ROSS WOLLEN ROBERT DAVID WOLFF L-1 Bobby Bob joined the Corps full of determination to work hard and to do his best. He never let up, whether he was studying, working out on the rings or coaching others. Between solving math problems or studying French, Bob always found time to drag pro. read and listen to music. With his good sense of humor, high ideals and desire to excel. Bob is bound to succeed in whatever he pursues. Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, 1 , Numerals 4, Major A: Debate Council and Forum 1 ; French Language Club 4. 3. 2, 1 : Jewish Chapel Choir 4,3,2, 1. ALL.AN ROSS ' OLLEN A-1 A.R. Ross, a Jerseyite never to be found idle, spent most of his time earning his seat in the Blue Room and running down features for the POINTER. A member of the Catholic Acolytes, many of our Sunday mornings began with his often original renditions of the Scrip- tures. With a sting ray in hand and several years of playful bachelorhood in mind. Ross should meet with success in whatever endeavor he attempts. Squash 4, 3,2, I , Numerals 4; Major A 1; Tennis 4, 3, 2, 1; Numerals 4, Major A 2, I; POINTER 2. Fea- ture Editor 1; Chess Club 2,1: Catholic Chapel Aco- lytes 2, I; Cardinal Newman Club 2,1. JAMES HAYWARD WOOD H RLhS I M fRIf NBl JAMES HAYWARD WOOD L-1 Jimmy Insert a heart of gold inside the hody of a rugged middleweight, add some wit. eharm and dependability and you ' ve got Jimmy Wood. Determination is what pulled him through Plebe math and also made him an outstanding lacrosse player. When Woodic turned to skiing, his personality and pleasantness made him a perfect choice for veep of the Ski Club. Militarily, Jim ' s leadership will provide him with Stars someday; that ' s Gentleman Jim ' s life ' s goal. Lacrosse 4, 3. Mono nini .?.• Spani.sli l.ani;iicii;i ' Club 4, 3, 2. 1; Sailing Club 2. I: Cadcl Sunday School Teachers 2. 1: Ski Patrol 2. I. Imtrnctor; Ski Club 4. 3,2. 1. Vice-President. JAMES ARTHL ' R WOODARD, JR. E-1 Jim A Southerner in the truest sense of the word. Woody attended the University of Florida before com- ing to the Academy. His interests have continually ex- panded since his arrival here and mostly center around a certain Alpha Gam in Lakeland, Florida. We will never forget his sunny disposition, especially after reveille, or his willingness to tackle any problem. Those who know him have faith and confidence in him and his future. Handball Club 4. 3. 2. 1: Camera Club 2. I: Model Club 2, 1; Cadet Chapel Choir 4. 3. 2. I: Cadet Band 4; Goat Football Team 2. RAY GARNIE WOODRUFF K-2 Woody Woody, as he is known when not called other " affectionate " names, hazed plebes. his roommate and his brown boy in that order. After duping his old com- pany, G-2, out of a nice radio by pretending that he was dying of pneumonia during Yearling Year, Woody recovered to bring his boodle and wit to K-2 for the last two years. In spite of his off-center nose. Woody should go far with his humor, personality and drive. Squasli 4; Tennis 4: Debate Council and Forum 4; Rocket Club I: Spanish Language Club 3. 2. I; Sky Diving 4. CHARLES E. WUERTENBERGER H-2 Chuck With a year of college life behind him. Chuck embarked upon his cadet career with an apparent indif- ference that did not always endear him to those who did not truly know him. Once acquainted with him, however, one realized that the apparent indifference was actually an expression of his strong convictions, which served him in good stead throughout his four years. Chuck was one of those who produced when the pressure was applied. Wrestling 4. 3. 2; Lacrosse 4. 2: German Language Club J, 2. ; Handball Club 4. 3: Bridge Club 4, 3; Pistol Club 4: Skin Diving Club 4. KEN YOSHITANI B-2 Ken Knowing Ken is an honor and his friendship is a proud possession. Helping others with their studies and at WGR time, spending many hours with anyone need- ing help, he is completely selfless. Due to his natural ability and self-discipline, he is also able to participate actively in extra-curricular activities and athletics while maintaining his academic Stars. He is blessed with a wonderful sense of humor and an ability to make friends, and seems headed for success. Wrestling 4, 3; Debate Council ami Forum 2.1: Ger- man Language Club 4. .?; Mathemuiivs Forum I : Pistol Club 4.3. ADOLF HERMANN ZABk ADOLF HERMANN ZABKA A-2 Ed A collegian for two years before entering these hallowed halls, Ed won the academic battles with ease. His desire to get things done right won many victories against the T.D. too, and for his entire career the area remained a place unknown. Always ready to help out, he was the mainstay of many of A-2 ' s erstwhile scientists. His good humor and friendliness have won much for him and cannot fail to do the same for future years. German Language Club 4. 3; Pistol Club 4; KDET 4, 3: Ski Club 4. C WILLIAM ZADEL BARRIE EMFRT ZAIS BERNARD LEE ZIEGLEt C. WILLIAM ZADEL K-l Bill In 196L the Windy City traded Bill to the class of " 65 for two guidons and a promise to keep him. West Point has not regretted the trade — yet. Bill is never without a broken nose, the new PLAYBOY and an El Producto. His outstanding size, personality, ability, and blonde make Zade the center of attraction on the ath- letic field, in the classroom or on a slippery dance floor. Football 4. 3, 2, ]; Basketball 4. 3, 2: Wrestling 1: J St Class Committee; 2d Class Committee; 3d Class Committee; Vice-President, Class of ' 65. BARRIE EMERT ZAIS F-1 Z Famous for a few sincere romances, Barrie ' s easy- going manner and sense of humor has provided us all with many pleasant hours of conversation and hilarity. Straight from Duke, his love for the sun, girls and s ports are well-known.- Easy to know and like, his varied abilities and interests assure him of great success in any field of endeavor. To have known him was a thor- oughly enjoyable, sometimes enlightening, always un- forgettable experience. French Language Club; Chess Club; Bowling; Outdoor Sportsmen Club. ANDREW ALOYSIUS ZALESKI K-2 Andy Andy has put Wheeling, West Virginia on the map and why not? He represents everything in its history. His life is definitely one of " wine, women and song, " — and basketball too. We have shared many great times together that will never be forgotten. There is also the other side too. His ability to confide in people and his tact has won him many friends, and when he puts his mind to something he is second to none. Everyone will agree that he is the real Don Juan of our class. A truly great " bud " you have been — good luck to you, Andy. Basketball 4. 3; Portuguese Language Club 4. 3. 2, 1 ; Rocket Clidi 2. 1. Treasurer: Catholic Chapel Choir 2.1; KDET 4. 3. BERNARD LEE ZIEGLER E-2 Bernie Bernie started his career in 1st Company and became a member of the Corps in Loose Deuce. He is best known for his efforts at first string center — (he was the only one left), on the Plebe football team. From there he moved up to be manager, a position he held until graduation. Winthrop, Minnesota, can be justly proud of this dynamic little fireball, who has carved a place for himself in the hearts of his classmates. Football 4. Football Manager 3. 2. 1; German Lan- guage Club 4, 3, 2, 7. ROBERT JOHN ZONNE, JR. G-1 Z He " d left his mark on West Texas, so Z came to West Point to show the Army his many traits. In work or fun. Bob could always be counted on to get the job done. This tall Te.xan will always be remembered by his friends as a person who could always meet any situation full speed ahead. With his Texas technique, his future shines brightly in all endeavors. Football 4. 3: Golf 4: Spanish Language Club 4. 3. 2.1: Cadet Chapel A col v res 3.2.1. JOSEPH ANTHONY ZL RLO H-1 Z A fast man with a judo chop, Buffalo Bill, fan without equal and after-taps discusser par excellence, Joe always managed to leave the impression that the trials of Hudson High weren ' t really that tough. His grade chart full of Dean ' s List, non-existent demerits and Corps rackout records seem to support that belief pretty well. No matter where ue go from here, the Z will be remembered fondly by all who knew him. Debate Council and Forum 2,1; POINTER 2: Judo 3, 2, ; Bowling 3, 2. 1: Pistol Club 4. 3. 2. 1 : Catholic Chapel Choir 4, 3. 2. 1. JOSEPH ANTHONY ZL RLO THE CLASS OF 1965 Page Name 66 ABBOTT.MH Artillery Lieutenant 66 ABESAMIS, E Foreign Cadet Sergeant 66 ABRAHAM, TS Infantry Sergeant 67 ADAM, LA Signal Corps Sergeant 67 ADAMS, CH Infantry Sergeant 67 ADAMS, RW Jr Air Force Sergeant 68 AIRY JF Artillery Lieutenant 68 ALBRIGHT, LC Armor Sergeant 68 ALEXANDER, E Armor I Captain, Isl Detail Lieutenant 68 ALGER, JI Infantry Captain 68 AMMERMAN, FW Artillery Sergeant 69 AMMON, SL Artillery Lieutenant 70 ANDERSON, JT Infantry Sergeant 70 ANDERSON, J Infantry Sergeant 70 ANDERSON, RM Signal Corps Sergeant 71 ANDRESEN, M Artillery Sergeant 71 APPLER, DE Armor Captain 71 APPLIN, EM Artillery Sergeant 72 ARKANGEL, C Jr Infantry Lieutenant 73 ARMSTRONG. E Air Force Lieutenant 73 ARNALL, FM Infantry Sergeant 73 ARON,CM Armor Lieutenant 73 ARVIN, CR Infantry Captain 73 ASPLUND, RE Artillery Sergeant 74 ATCHLEY, OL Artillery Lieutenant 74 ATTEBERRY, L Artillery Sergeant 74 AXELY, RJ Signal Corps Captain BACHMAN,W Artillery Lieutenant BAILEY, RB Infantry Lieutenant BALDINGER, RW Corps of Engineers Sergeant 75 75 75 ' age Name 76 BANGERT, DC Corps of Engineers Lieutenant 76 BARBER, PF Corps of Engineers Sergeant 76 BARKER, BM Infantry Sergeant 76 BARKLY, JR Infantry Sergeant 76 BARRON, TC Infantry Captain 77 BARRY, BD Jr Artillery Sergeant 78 BARWIS, J Artillery (Captain. 1st Detail) Lieutenant 78 BECKER, PK Armor Sergeant 78 BEDELL, RL Air Force Lieutenant 79 BEINLICH,WA Infantry Lieutenant 79 BELANGER. FM Artillery Lieutenant 79 BELL. GT Corps of Engineers Lieutenant 80 BELL. JA Air Force Sergeant 81 BENNETT, L Signal Corps Sergeant 81 BENTON, DL Artillery Lieutenant 81 BERDAN, RF Signal Corps Lieutenant 81 BERDY, ME Infantry Lieutenant 81 BERGMANN, PL Artillery Sergeant 82 BFRNIER, BS Artillery Sergeant 82 BERRY, JL Artillery Sergeant 82 BIRDSEYE, WS Artillery Sergeant 83 BISHOP. GM Infantry Sergeant 83 BLAU. JL Artillery Sergeant 83 BLISS. S Quartermaster Corps Sergeant 84 BODDE. DL Corps of Engineers Sergeant 84 BOERCKEL, R Lieutenant 84 BOHANNON. JR Infantry Sergeant 84 BONN Err. M Infantry Sergeant 84 BOOHAR, CW Artillery Sergeant 85 BORKOWSKI, TF Quartermaster Corps Sergeant Page Name 95 CARINI, RM Air Force Name Lieutenant BORREGO. A 95 CARLL, TH Infantry Infantry Sergeant Captain BOYTER, NC 96 CARLSON, TA Infantry Artillery Lieutenant Lieutenant BRADBURN, WJ 97 CATO, RB Air Force Artillery Sergeant Lieutenant BRADLEY, RS 97 CHAFFER, JR Infantry Artillery Lieutenant Sergeant BRADLEY. WC Jr 97 CHAPMAN, R Signal Corps Corps of Engineers Sergeant Sergeant BREWER. DC Jr 97 CHARLES. FJ III Infantry Corps of Engineers Sergeant Sergeant BRIGGS. LC 97 CHASE. EJ Jr .Artillery Corps of Engineers (Captain. 1st Deta il) Lieutenant Lieutenant 98 CHERRY, KJ BROCK. GR Sergeant Army Intelligence Service 98 CHRISTMAN, D Corps of Engineers (Captain. 1st Detail) Captain Lieutenant 98 CHUDOBA, D BROWDER. WR Infantry . Artillery Lieutenant Sergeant 99 CHURCHWELL, C BROWN. CE Artillery Sergeant 99 Artillery Lieutenant CINDRIC, TA BROWN. DR Artillery Corps of Engineers (Captain. 1st Detail) 99 Sergeant CLARK. A Armor Lieutenant BROWN. LK Sergeant Corps of Engineers Lieutenant 100 CLARK. JF Infantry BROWN. NE Sergeant Artillery Sergeant 100 CLARKE. BBG Armor BROWN. RD III Sergeant Infantry 100 CLAY, AH Lieutenant Infantry BRUSH WE (Captain. 1st Detai Navy Lieutenant Sergeant 100 CLEMENT. S BRYAN. JE Artillery Infantry Lieutenant Captain 101 CLEWLEY. L BRYANT. RL Artillery Artillery Sergeant Sergeant 101 CLOVER. RL BUCHA. PW Armor Infantry Lieutenant Captain 102 COLEMAN. R BUCKOSKY. G Infantry Air Force Sergeant Sergeant 102 COLL, DR BUM PASS. TM Armor Air Force Lieutenant Sergeant 102 COLLINS, R BUNN, RD Infantry Artillery Sergeant Sergeant 103 CONCANNON, MJF BUNTZ. BO Army Intelligence Signal Corps Sergeant BURGARDT. CH Service Sergeant 103 CONCANNON, MK Artillery Lieutenant Air Force Sergeant BURRELL, S 103 CONLEY, JS Sergeant Artillery BUTTERFIELD, RR Sergeant Marine Corps 104 CONNOLLY, WJ (Captain, 2nd Detail Infantry Lieutenant Sergeant BYRNE, WE III 105 CONNOR, JE Armor Infantry Sergeant Captain CAHILL, PJ 105 CONNOR, MJ Corps of Engineers Infantry Sergeant Sergeant CAMPBELL, R 105 COOK, CM Artillery Armor Sergeant Sergeant Page Name 105 COOLEY, JW Artillery (Captain, 2nd Detail) Lieutenant 105 Cooper, PR Armor Sergeant 106 COUGHLIN, JM Artillery Sergeant 106 CROAK. TL Infantry Sergeant 106 CSOKA, LS Infantry (Captain, 1st Detail) Lieutenant 107 CULLEN, JM Signal Corps Sergeant 107 CURL, GW Artillery Sergeant 107 DARRAH, SC Infantry Sergeant 108 DAVIS. CM Armor Sergeant 108 DAVIS, JS Armor Lieutenant 108 DAVIS. LD Infantry Captain 108 DeFRANCISCO. JE Artillery Lieutenant 108 De JONCKHEERE. E Air Force Sergeant 109 DeLAAR, RA Corps of Engineers Sergeant 110 De MOULPIED DS Artillery Sergeant 110 De SANTIS. DA Jr Air Force Sergeant 110 De SANTIS, J Sergeant 111 De VITTO, JC Sergeant III De WITT, S Artillery Sergeant 1 1 1 DEEMS, JM Infantry Captain 112 DERMODY, HM Signal Corps Captain 113 DERNAR, J Signal Corps Sergeant 113 DICKEY, CC Infantry Sergeant 113 DIVERS, WA Jr Infantry Lieutenant 113 DONAGHY, DJ Infantry Sergeant 113 DONAHUE, R Artillery Lieutenant 1 14 DONOVAN, PJ Artillery Sergeant 114 DORNEY, C Infantry Captain 114 DORNIER, R Signal Corps Sergeant 115 DOUGHTY, G Air Force Sergeant Page Name 115 DOUGHTY, RA Armor Lieutenant 115 DRASS. PR Infantry Sergeant 116 DRINKWATER, DM Sergeant Artillery 116 DRYZGA. R Marine Corps Sergeant 116 DUFOUR, JP Jr Air Force Sergeant 116 DYER, JL Signal Corps Sergeant 116 ECHOLS, JE Artillery Lieutenant 117 ECKART, CR Signal Corps Lieutenant 118 EICHELBERGER, J Armor Sergeant 118 EICHORN, F Artillery Lieutenant 118 ELLENBOGEN, SW Corps of Engineers Sergeant 119 ENDICOTT, R Infantry Sergeant 119 ERBES, DC Infantry (Captain, 2nd Detail: Lieutenant 119 EVANS, ER Artillery Lieutenant 120 EXELBY, DC Air Force Sergeant 121 FARMELO, GR Signal Corps Sergeant 121 FERGUSON, JE Artillery Sergeant !:i FERGUSSON, T Armor Lieutenant 21 FIELDS, WJ Air Force Sergeant 21 FISH, GW Jr Artillery Sergeant 22 FLIGG, CM Signal Corps Sergeant 22 FLOTO, RJ Infantry Lieutenant 22 FOEHL. EA Artillery Sergeant 23 FORREST, EG Air Force Lieutenant FRANK, RT 123 Infantry Sergeant 123 FREDERICKS. G Corps of Engineers Captain 124 FREY. RM Artillery Sergeant 124 FRICKE. HE Infantry Lieutenant 124 FRITZ. RE Jr Air Force Sergeant 124 FRYDRYCHOWSKI. R Infantry Sergeant Page Name 124 FUNK. JE Armor Sergeant 125 GABEL. DA Infantry Sergeant 126 GAGNE, RO Artillery 126 GAILEY, JB Corps of Engineers Sergeant 126 GAMBOA, AH Armor Sergeant 127 GANSHERT. SC Artillery Lieutenant 127 GARMS, RR Corps of Engineers Sergeant 127 GATES, RE Jr Infantry Sergeant 128 GEHRINGER, G Artillery Sergeant 129 GENEGA. SG Corps of Engineers Captain 129 GENNETTI. T Infantry Sergeant 129 GENONI. TC Air Force Lieutenant 129 GENTINE, CW Signal Corps Sergeant 129 GENTZKOW, D Air Force Sergeant 130 GIBSON, D Infantry (Captain, 1st Detail) Lieutenant 130 GILCHRIST, MS Armor Lieutenant 130 GILL, AM Infantry- Sergeant 131 GILL. CF Corps of Engineers Sergeant 131 GLYNNE, MT Infantry Sergeant 131 GNAU, DP Artillery Lieutenant 132 GOLDEN, J Artillery Captain 132 GONZALEZ, LJR Foreign Cadet (Captain, 2nd Detail) Lieutenant 132 GRANDSTAFF. T Infantry Sergeant 132 GRATES. F Medical Service Corps Sergeant 132 GREEN. LE Infantry Sergeant 132 GREENE, JP Infantry Sergeant 133 GRIFFIN, RA Artillery Sergeant 134 GRIFFIN. WR Corps of Engineers Lieutenant 134 GUENTHER. RK Corps of Engineers Sergeant 134 GUY. RA Infantry Lieutenant Page Name 135 HAGIE, LE Army Intelligence Service Lieutenant 135 HAINES, HC Artillery Sergeant 135 HALL, HD Air Force Sergeant 136 HALL, JH Air Force Sergeant 137 HALL, RM Corps of Engineers Sergeant 137 HALLENBECK. RA Infantry 137 HALVORSON,C Armor Lieutenant 137 HARDIN, JC Infantry Lieutenant 137 HARMAN, SCJr Signal Corps (Captain. 1st detail) Lieutenant 138 HARMON, JD Infantry Sergeant 138 HARPER, PV Infantry Sergeant 138 HARRINGTON, JB Armor Sergeant 139 HARTER, RL Infantry 139 HARVEY, JR Corps of Engineers Sergeant 139 HAWKER, DE Armor Lieutenant 140 H. WKINS, R Signal Corps Sergeant 140 HAYS. JH Armor Sergeant 140 HECKER, WF Jr Artillery Sergeant 140 HEINDRICHS, C Artillery- Sergeant 140 HELBERG, JA Infantry Sergeant 141 HELLER. WT .Air Force Sergeant 142 HEMMINGWAY. C Infantry Sergeant 142 HENNEBERRY. T Infantry Sergeant 142 HENNEN. J Artillery Sergeant 143 HENNESSEE, J Artillery Captain 143 HENNIG. G Armor Lieutenant 14. HENNIG, RA Armor Lieutenant 144 HESTER, AC Armor Captain 145 HEWITT, LT Infantry (Captain, 1st Detail ) Lieutenant 145 HEWITT, LH Signal Corps Sergeant 266 Page Name Page Name Page Name Page Name 145 HIGGINS. RW 155 JOYNER, HM 164 KOLETTY, JW 174 LETTERIE. C Infantry Signal Corps Air Force Artillery Captain Captain Sergeant Sergeant 145 HIGLEY. JW Jr. 155 JUCHAU, WC 164 KOLZING, RK 175 LETTERMAN, G Artillery Artillery Artillery Artillery Sergeant Sergeant Sergeam Sergeant 145 HILL, RJ III 155 KADETZ, GS 165 KONORMANN, LL 175 LEVERETT, H Artillery Artillery Infantry Corps of Engineers Sergeant Sergeant Infantry Sergeant 146 HINDSLEY, J 156 KAHARA. CG Sergeant 175 LEVINE. BW Infantry Artillery 166 KOROPEY, OB Corps of Engineers Sergeant Lieutenant Armor Lieutenant 146 HJELM, KE 156 KANTOR, N Lieutenant 176 LEWIS. D Air Force Air Force 166 KOSCIUSKO, JP Signal Corps Sergeant Sergeant Lieutenant 146 HOLMES, JW 156 KANTROWICH. P (Captain, 2nd Detail) 177 LINN. PC Artillery Artillery Lieutenant Infantry Captain Sergeant 166 KOVACH, TJ Sergeant 147 HOPKINS, JD 156 KEATS. RG Infantry Sergeant KOVACSY. A 177 LIPSIT. GE Artillery Infantry Artillery Sergeant Sergeant 167 Sergeant 147 HORST, RG Artillery 156 KEITH. JF Artillery Army intelligence Sergeant KRAMER. RE Air Force Lieutenant KUHN. DB Air Force Captain 177 LIVIC, A Air Force Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 147 HOWARD, PM 157 KELLEY. HL 167 177 LOCURCIO. R Infantry Signal Corps Corps of Engineers Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 148 HOWELL. JM Artillery Lieutenant 158 KELLEY, HA Ji Infantry Lieutenant 167 177 LOFTIN. DR Irifantry Lieutenant 148 HUDSON. CK 158 KELLY, J 178 LONG, GA Armor Artillery 168 KUKEA. JK Air Force Sergeant Sergeant Infantry Sergeant 148 HUDSON. ME 1 58 KELLY, IE Lieutenant 178 LONG, PJ, Jr Infantry Armor 169 KULBACKI. W Infantry (Captain. 2nd Detail) Sergeant Signal Corps Lieutenant Lieutenant 159 KELLY. TJ Lieutenant 178 LONGHOUSER, J 148 HUFFHINES. RW Air Force 169 KURTZ. DG Armor Air Force (Captain. 1st Detail) Lieutenant Artillery Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 179 LOUNSBURY, P 148 HUGHES. LP 159 KEMPF. SJ 169 KUZMAN. RJ Infantry 149 150 150 Artillery Sergeant HULIN, BD Artillery Sergeant HUME. JS Infantry Lieutenant HURLEY, DE Artillery Sergeant HUSTON. MJ 159 160 161 Arti ' llery Sergeant KENNEDY. LR JR. Artillery Sergeant KENNEDY. WM Lieutenant KENNY. PD Corps of Engineers Lieutenant 169 169 170 Signal Corps Sergeant LA ROCHELLE, DF Artillery Sergeant LANE, JE Artillery Sergeant LAPOLLA, M Infantry 179 179 180 (Captain, 2nd Detail) Lieutenant LOWE. HJ Armor Captain LUDWIG. RJ Armor Sergeant LYONS. JK Armor Sergeant Lieutenant 150 161 KINARD, RC 170 LARSON. GA 180 LYONS, WE Artillery Lieutenant 161 Sergeant KING, IE Armor Sergeant Corps of Engineers Sergeant 151 HUTTON. JK Jr Artillery 170 LARSON, KD 180 MacVICAR, T Infantry Sergeant 161 Sergeant KISTLER, B Artillery Sergeant Corps of Engineers Captain 151 ISAKSON, LH Infantry 171 LAUGHLIN. F 180 MACE. RW Artillery (Captain, 1st Detail) Infantry Signal Corps Sergeant Lieutenant (Captain. 1st Detail) Sergeant 151 JACKSON, LP 161 KLEINMAIER, LE Lieutenant 180 MADDEN. JA Air Force Artillery 171 LAWSON. LB Artillery Sergeant Lieutenant Artillery Sergeant 152 JANNARONE, JM 162 KLEIN, DC Lieutenant 181 MADIA, JA Air Force Artillery 171 LAYER. RF Air Force Sergeant Sergeant Artillery Sergeant 153 JEFFCOAT. M 162 KLINGER. H Sergeant 182 MAIMONE. E Infantry Artillery 172 LEACH. SR Adjutant Generals Lieutenant Sergeant Marine Corps Corps 153 JENKINS. HA 162 KLINK. EH Sergeant Lieutenant Infantry Infantry 172 LEARY. RA 182 MALPASS. JR Lieutenant Sergeant Air Force Infantry 153 JOHNSON. JT 163 KNAUF. AE Sergeant Sergeant Infantry Air Force 172 LEDZINSKI, JM 182 MANESS. LE (Captain. 2nd Detail) Lieutenant Infantry Artillery Lieutenant 163 KNIKER. NH Captain Lieutenant 153 JOHNSON. ML Infantry 172 LEE. RL 183 MANGHI. GK Infantry Sergeant Signal Corps Armor Sergeant 163 KNOCHE. EJ Sergeant Sergeant 153 JOHNSON, RB Artillery 17? LEHMAN. WJ 183 MARK. AB Jr. Infantry Sergeant Artillery Infantry Sergeant 164 KNOWLES. JD Sergeant Sergeant 154 JOHNSON, TH Corps of Engineers 1 73 LEIBOWITZ. M 183 MARSH, WW Air Force Sergeant Finance Corps Signal Corps Sergeant 164 KNUDSON, R Sergeant Sergeant 154 JONES. DT Armor 174 LEMLEY, KM 184 MARSHALL, BR Infantry (Captain, 2nd Detail) Armor Infantry Sergeant Lieutenant Sergeant Sergeant 154 JONES, RG 164 KOLESZAR, FW 174 LESKOVJAN. L 185 MASTRAN. DD Air Force Armor Corps of Engineers Air Force Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Lieutenant Name MATKOVCIK. T Signal Corps Sergeant MATTESON, M Infantry Sergeant McARTHUR. KD Artillery Sergeant McCHRISTIAN. JA Armor Captain McCLOSKEY, C Corps of Engineers Captain McCONNELL. CW Corps of Engineers Sergeant McCREARY, WT Signal Corps Sergeant McCULLOUGH. J Corps of Engineers Lieutenant McDonald, pt Corps of Engineers Lieutenant McELlECE. J Armor Captain McGURK. JR Artillery Sergeant McKEMEY. WJ JR. .Artillery Sergeant McMillan, j Artillery Sergeant McMillan, je Artillery Sergeant MEIER, FL Artillery Lieutenant MENNINGER. G Infantry Lieutenant MERGES, J Infantry Lieutenant MERRIAM, N Corps of Engineers Sergeant METZNER, LH Artillery Sergeant MICKELLS, HG Signal Corps Sergeant MIMS. JE Artillery Sergeant MIRANDO. J Signal Corps Sergeant MITCHELL, WB Infantry Lieutenant MIYASHIRO, J Artillery Lieutenant MOGAN, BJ Artillery (Captain 2nd Detail) Lieutenant MOHLERE, R Signal Corps Sergeant MOLEPSKE. RJ Artillery Seraeant MOMCILOVICH, M Jr. Armor Sergeant MOORE, HL Corps of Engineers Sergeant MOOREFIELD, KP Infantry Sergeant MORRISSEY. SR .Artillery Lieutenant Page Name Page Name Page Name 195 MOSELEY, C 204 PAEK, SJ 215 RESICK, MI Corps of Engineers Artillery Signal Corps (Captain 2nd Detail) Sergeant Lieutenant Lieutenant 204 PALEY, JM 215 RICHARDSON, DJ 195 MOTAL, BW Corps of Engineers Armor Artillery- Captain Lieutenant Lieutenant 205 PARCELLS, D 216 RIDENOUR, T 195 MOTES, PM Artillery Air Force Artillery Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 206 PARKER. EJ 217 RILEY, FG 196 MULLEN, OL Artillery Artillery Armor Captain Sergeant Sergeant 206 PARRISH, DJ 217 RILEY, RI 196 M UN SON, ME Artillery Infantry .• rmor Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 206 PASKE. RJ 217 RITCH, JB III 196 MURPHY, JW Artillery Infantry Marine Corps Captain Sergeant Lieutenant 207 PETERS, JM 217 RITCH, WIM 196 MUSHOVIC, TJ Signal Corps Infantry Infantry Sergeant Sergeai t Sergeant 207 PETERSON, CA 217 ROEBUCK, Z 196 MYERS, CA Armor Artillery Infantry Sergeant Lieutenant Lieutenant 207 PFEIFER. C 218 ROJAS, R 197 NEAL, LT Infantry Sergeant Artillery Sergeant 218 ROOD, OF Lieutenant 208 PHILLPOTTS, DA Corps of Engineers 198 NEEDELS. CJ . rmor Sergeant Infantry Lieutenant 218 ROOD, RD (Captain 1st Detail) 209 PHILO, SE Signal Corps Lieutenant Artillery Sergeant 198 NELSON, WE Sergeant 219 ROSE, LP . rtillery 209 PICKLER, JM Artillery Sergeant Artillery Sergeant 198 NENNINGER, GE JR Captain 219 ROSEBERG, JB Artillery 209 PICKUP, BM Armor Sergeant Artillery Lieutenant Sergeant 199 NICHOLS, CS 219 ROTH, A JR Corps of Engineers 209 PLA. ' iS, JR Infantry Sergeant Sergeant PLOTKIN, KJ Air Force Sergeant 199 NOWLAND, DE Infantry 209 220 ROUNTREE, RH Signal Corps 199 Sergeant OBRIEN, F . rmor Sereeant 210 Sergeant POLLARD, R Infantry Sergeant POWERS, TP Armor Sergeant PRINCIPE, NJ JR 220 Sergeant ROWE, DS Infantry Sergeant 200 201 O ' CONNOR, I Artillery Captain ODONNELL. CF III Artillery 210 210 220 220 RUGGLES, GW Artillery Lieutenant RYAN, TC Corps of Engineers Lieutenant Artillery Sergeant 201 OGRADY, M Arullery Sergeant 211 Sergeant PROBST, FJ 220 SALOMONE, JL Artillery Infantry (Captain 2nd Detail! 201 O ' HARA TS Sergeant Lieutenant Infantry 211 PROKOP, FJ 221 SAMMARCO. VT Air Force Signal Corps 201 oleary " gd Sergeant Se geant Infantry Sergeant O ' NEILL, ED 211 PULLEN, RE 222 SANCHEZ. JL Air Force .Artillery 201 Sereeant Sergeant Signal Corps 212 PYLANT, JE 222 SATORIE, TR Sergeant Corps of Engineers Corps of Engineers 202 OTOOLE, GP Lieutenant Lieutenant Infantry 212 PYRZ, A 222 SAVATIEL, KR (Captain 1st Detail) AW Force Artillery Lieutenant Lieutenant Lieutenant 202 OEHRLEIN, ' W 2 12 RADCLIFFE, RF 22.1 SAXON, WL Air Force Infantry Artillery Lieutenant Sergeant Sereeant 202 OLIVO, JA 212 RAU, PD 223 SCHALTENBRAND, R Signal Corps Artillery Infantry Sergeant Sergeant (Captain 1st Detail) 20- OLMSTEAD, kh 2 12 RAY, LC Jr Lieutenant Armor Infantry 223 SCHEINER, JI Lieutenant Sergeant Corps of Engineers 20.1 OLMSTEAD, PR 213 RAYBECK, BA (Captain 1st Detail) Artillery Artillery Lieutenant Sergeant Sergeant 224 SCHOLL, WJ 20.1 OLSON? JV 214 REED, H Corps of Engineers Infantry Corps of Engineers (Captain 1st Detail) Sergeant Lieutenant Lieutenant 204 OLSON, SA 214 REISNER, WE 225 SCHULTZ, PF Infantry Signal Corps Signal Corps Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 204 ONO, T 214 RELLER, FX 225 SCHWARTZ, MW Corps of Engineers Corps of Engineers Infantry Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 204 OSGOOD, RM 215 RENSCHEN, PS 225 SCOBIE, ID Air Force Armor Artillery Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Page Name Page Name Page Name Page Name 225 SCRUGGS, HF 235 SMOAK, JR Ji 244 THOMPSON, JK 255 WEST. LA Infantry Infantry Artillery Infantry Sergeant Lieutenant Captain Captain 225 SCULLY, RE 235 SPEILMAN, D 244 THOMPSON, M 255 WESTPHELING, ED Artillery Armor Artillery Infantry Sergeant Lieutenant Sergeant Lieutenant 226 SEABURN, JT 235 SPERRY, SM 245 THOMPSON. RD 255 WETHERILL. R Jr Artillery Artillery Armor Infantry Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 226 SEAWORTH, G 236 SPIRE, CL 246 THOMPSON, T 256 WHEELER. LL Infantry Artillery Air Force Artillery Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant THROCKMORTON. TM Sergeant 226 SELKIS. R 236 SPOERRY, S 246 257 WHITE. RC 227 227 Infantry Sergeant SELLERS, D Air Force Sergeant SEYMOUR, JB 236 236 Infantry Sergeant STANKO, MR Artillery Sergeant STARLING. GC 246 Infantry Sergeant TILLMAN, JL Signal Corps Sergeant 257 Artillery Sergeant WHITE, TR Artillery Sergeant Artillery Air Force 247 TIMBROOK, RD 257 WHITEHOUSE. B IV Sergeant Sergeant Artillery Lieutenant Signal Corps 227 SHANTZ. DA 236 STEELE, DE Lieutenant Air Force Army Intelligence 247 TIMMERMAN, FW Jr Armor 257 WHITTEN. JM (Captain 1st Detail) Service Artillery Lieutenant Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant WIEST. LP 228 SHAPIRO, F 237 STEELE, GC 247 TOMASWICK, J 257 Artillery Marine Corps Artillery Lieutenant TOOMEY, KP Artillery Sergeant 228 Sergeant SHARKNESS, EI Corps of Engineers Sergeant 238 Sergeant STEINWALD, D Artillery Lieutenant 248 258 Sergeant WILEY. ET III Artillery Sergeant 228 SHAVER, MP 238 STEPHENSON, JP 249 TRAGEMANN, RW Infantry Corps of Engineers Artillery 258 WILLIAMS, R Infantry Lieutenant Sergeant Sergeant 228 SHAW, CF 238 STERBA. RJ 249 TREDENNICK, WH Sergeant Air Force Infantry Artillery 258 WILLIAMS. RN (Captain 2nd Detail) Lieutenant Sergeant Corps of Engineers Lieutenant 239 STFRBENZ, H 249 TRUCK, WA (Captain 2d Detail) 228 SHAW, RT Infantry Armor Lieutenant Infantry Lieutenant Lieutenant 259 WINSTEAD, E Sergeant 239 STEVISON, IF 249 TURNER, JC Signal Corps 229 SHECKELLS, T Artillery Armor Sergeant Air Force Sergeant Lieutenant 259 WIRTH, RG (Captain 2nd Detail) 239 STEWART, JV 249 TUTCHINGS, TR Air Force Lieutenant Armor Air Force Sergeant 230 SHERIDAN, ME Sergeant Sergeant 259 WOLF, RW Infantry 240 STEWART, LR 250 TYNER, SEP Artillery (Captain 1st Detail) Infantry Iiifantry Sergeant Lieutenant Captain Lieutenant 260 WOLFF, RD 230 SHERRELL, WW Infantry 241 STICHWEH, CR Artillery 250 VANDYK, TW Infantry Corps of Engineers 230 Sergeant SHINSEKI, EK 241 Lieutenant STOCKTON, IR 250 Sergeant VANN, DB 260 WOLLEN, AR Artillery Sergeant Artillery Lieutenant Air Force Sergeant Infantry Sergeant 231 SHUFORD. IH 241 STOWELL. RD 251 VANN, JM 260 WOOD, JH Artillery Infantry Infantry Infantry Sergeant Captain Sergeant Sergeant 231 SHULICK. M 241 STRASSNER, LM 251 VAUGHN, JE 260 WOODARD, JA Air Force Artillery Infantry Signal Corps Sergeant Captain (Captain 2nd Detail) Sergeant 231 SIKORSKI, D 241 SULLIVAN, R Lieutenant 260 WOODRUFF, RG Artillery Corps of Engineers 251 VIANI. ML Signal Corps Sergeant Sergeant Corps of Engineers Lieutenant 232 SIMMONS, T 242 SWENSSON. IK Sergeant 261 WUERTENBERGER, C Infantry Infantry 252 VOGEL. TJ Infantry Lieutenant Captain Navy Sergeant 233 SIMPSON, E 242 TALBOT, JW Sergeant 262 YOSHITANI, K Corps of Engineers Artillery 252 WALSH. MR Corps of Engineers (Captain 2nd Detail) Lieutenan: Captain Captain Lieutenant 242 TANTALO. F 252 WALTER. RL 262 ZABKA, AH 233 SINGEEYN, PI Air Force Infantry Corps of Engineers Sergeant Sergeant c . Lieutenant 243 TAYLOR, WB 252 WATSON. JM 262 ZADEL CW Jr Marine Corps Captain ZAIS, BE Infantry Sergeant 233 SINNREICH, RH Artillery Infantry Sergeant Signal Corps Sergeant Sergeant 243 TEETERS, M 252 WATTENDORF. J 263 233 SKIDMORE, F Infantry Corps of Engineers Corps of Engineers Sergeant (Captain 2nd Detail) Liet ' enant 243 TERRY, IK Lieutenant 233 SLUTZKY, KB Infantry 253 WEATHERALL, JA 263 ZALESKI, AA Corps of Engineers (Captain 2nd Detail) Infantrv Air Force Lieutenant Lieutenant Lieutenant Sergeant 234 SMITH, F 244 THAMES, IW Ir 254 WEBB. JR III 263 ZIEGLER, B Corps of Engineers Artillery Air Force Signal Corps Captain Sergeant Captain Sergeant 234 SMITH, HI 244 THOMASSON, JT 254 WELLS. RM 264 ZONNE, RJ JR Artillery Infantry Corps of Engineers Infantry Captain Sergeant Sergeant Lieutenant 234 SMITH. JL 244 THOMPSON, JC 254 WELLS. WJ 264 ZURLO, JA Armor Armor Armor Artillery Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant Sergeant 1 Exchanging six stripes . . s« M for one! The squad with the longevity record Beast From Ron. L to R. Don Parcells, Hank Sterbenz. Don Appier, Ed Armstrong. Joe Sanchez, Second Ron: Bruce Marshall. Phil Olmsted. Ed Menninger. Bob Bedell, Lenny Tutchings. ' to Graduation. A ' ' ■ ' l ]f) ' lfi ' l ' : r ' [ ' : 4 ' m MARK E. SHERIDAN ARTHUR ROTH, Jr. |m».«: h i. ' - ;M fel m M ' s% . .5S,iwX!ai«t .. r-. ' " ' " " ' ' jjfe ' ' ' ' ' 2% i r l -- i«iiMb(m «« •;» « , . E! Young, strong and idealistic, we came to West Point for many reasons. We came to learn to be leaders, to march to the sound of the guns, to share the great and noble heritage of the American soldier, or in some cases, to discover what this military was all about. Whatever our reasons, we soon learned that we were to be uncompromisingly tested. Not all passed the tests, but we who remained began to grow. We embarked on those four years of two-fold growth: the development of mind and the development of body. It was a hard year, but it had some light moments, and we found time to smile. Always behind the smiles, though, there was something else deep and silent — a new awareness, a quiet pride, a " strength and drive. " PLEBE EAR ; Little does he know. My hat was too small anyway I ' ll take a pair of white bucks please We came to West Point from all walks of life and all parts of the country, filled with different concepts and visions, varying hopes and aspirations. Some of us were confident, others afraid, many more uncertain about this new world. One thing we all shared was our warm reception . . . it was July! i i • u ST BARRACK5 ■1 I This must be to cover up the mistake the barber made. If it doesn ' t straighten out by tomorrow, go on Sick Call. 1 .jjH B In a surprisingly short lime . . . one day, in fact . . . we had achieved certain similarities of dress, demeanor and haircut, as well as a uniform fatigue. From our newly bared heads and tucked-in chins to our spotless white gloves, we were ready . . . And I ahvays thought you just cut off the tie to look like that. ' m well prepared in body and spirit to pledge ourselves in a solemn oath. to swear as they did of yore . (« . ' The formalities and ceremonies of reception were soon behind us . . . and now we began to find out how Beast Barracks achieved its poetic name. In the sun-glazed heat of the Plain, we endured the frosty glares of super-human upper classmen, as well as the sub-human tortures they inflicted on us, as we exercised and marched, exercised and drilled, and exercised some more. 9R W-- " tJi --.-i ) vvanr to do is shoot with it. Sir, do you have another queslion? If you think this is tricky, you should have seen the last , I .» ' ' M V. vS«..jAiitr - Most of the obstacles soon became surmountable and we were ready for a major test of our newly conditioned selves. I know I brought that tent rope. I ' m sure they won ' t make me shine my boots after this. Our preparation for the Plebe Hike was diligent and thorough . . . A Huh ' to the h ' ft. plec You ' ve got dripping chocolate ba and our bodies were willing and able even if we didn ' t think so. We followed him before — we ' ll ft How him again. ..am TBI m :.di. » i r «H;fr W9f- 91 .■ 1 m P , lil 5 This time we ' re the Indians. There was more to this hike than marching or playing soldier: this was a vital challenge to our solidarity as a class, a chance to win tiew friendships and share problems . . . ' Dear Joe. I ' ll be starting college next month . Our leaders were always hard at work. We were hard at work too. and a time when the homes we had left behind seemed very far away. You skate your way and III skate mine After Beast, the academic year offered its own terrors and some of us were too soon gone. There were bright spots in the long, dreary winter and dark moments, but we shared them all. spurred on by the coming of our Recognition as a Class . . . 1965! THIRD CLASS YEAR Yearling year we grew, professionally and. in spite of ourselves, scholastically. The tribulations of plebe year were forgotten and we began to prepare ourselves for the future. The summer training went quickly as we tested our capabilities in all areas. We gained our first practical insights into the positions that we were expected to fill as piofessional soldiers. The challenges were many, mental and physical, but we welcomed tests of this sort. It was with fond memories that we returned to West Point. The Academic year was long and many a time the discouragements tested our motivation, but gradually we wore our way towards June and the half-way mark. The country club was nice, but the limousine service w hi ' I ' ll ' .: Hiilk home. We learned hand to hand fighting and confidence, in that order, discovering that the former will surely erase all traces of the latter. s group had 20% fewer cavities. R n After our experiences with life, Recondo-style, we welcomed the civilities and displays of Quartermaster orientation where we learned the simple intricacies of keeping armies supplied and ready to fight. It beats getting shot at. The modern arnn If it doesn ' t work bring it back. M. ntM » A I the rate of 42 dollars a round. Our days were filled with a terrifying variety of activity, ranging from the live firing of mortars to the welcome hours of swimming and boating on Lake Popolopen . . . Would someone check that map again. . where we proudly displayed our hard-earned class spirit! Wfithcr rum. nor sicct. nor heat of sun! " ll ' s mine and xou can! ha Sv «OM ' , parades and inspections were an integral part of a familiar way of life and those at Camp Biickner were in the truest West Point tradition. At least they all have them. There were moments of leisure and pleasure which we would remember with longing during the bitter classes and cold of Yearling Year. But as all years do, this one, too, soon passed into our history. Amphibious maneuvers? Waterborne Recondo. And for our remaining leisure time we had the world ' s least efjicient Air Raid drills SECOND CLASS YEAR After a summer of holding down leadership positions in Europe or Beast Barracks, we returned to West Point for our third year of Academics. As Cows, we faced an awesome burden of Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Electrical Engineering. and Nuclear Physics, to say nothing of our " Liberal Arts " subjects. But the year ran its expected Second Class course. We were squad leaders, we had our 500th Night Party, we ordered our rings, and we started thinking seriously of how we would run the Corps. This was the year which saw us stopped on the two yard line, but it was also the year when we really felt we were a part of the Academy, when we were making memories, and when we discovered that we could be leaders. It was another tough year and a good one. We met it squarely. Like sheep to the slaiii.htci Now fly. Stimulating conversation at di, As squad leaders on Beast Detail it was our turn to provide a reception committee for the newest crop of plebes, and to guide them through the activities of the first busy days No, you can ' t have your yo-yo back. We remained totally unimpressed by even the best of them, forgetting we had once shared their dismal appearance. We inspected them, conducted classes . . . ' " ' ' ill! L-luJ Somebody ' s got to be in the right iinifc And then I sneaked up on it like Indoctrination. . . . and rehearsed them in the finer points of dismounted drill, old and new type, of course. We soon had them practicing for a parade and beginning to show some hope. Now grab your partners hand and do-si-do. Chain gang. P ' i- Mf M - - M mmMmm Harbinger of things to come. It was nice To be on the other end of all the various introductions: to gas masks and rifle firing, to Brasso and tactical training and endless conditioning. Don ' t sit there . . . he went thataway. SI .iiW8i|||ll An afternoon stroll looking over the campus. And now we can readily see that he is completely confused. Oh. I am a) raid to look. fr We found Cow Year academics a struggle, as always, and we envied the bright, light-twinkling computer its calm and speedy approach to intricate calculation. Storm cloud moving in for the Falcons. We exchanged visits with our friends at Annapolis All I said was drive for five and he grabbed my and joined many others in a solemn, final salute to Douglas MacArthur. n — n I ' ! We sons of today, we salute you mS m r m r ' li. :: m Now where did he go? And only 500 more to go. m -- i Whar. no scotch? But we never ruled out fun for long and there were parties and drags and weekends that made all the rest bearable. And, although it wasn ' t June soon enough, soon enough . . . it was June. Finally we had reached First Class Year. With it came the realization that the end was not far away. We spent the summer filling various roles across the country and in Europe in preparation for running the Corps of Cadets during the coming year. As we moved higher in the chain of command, we began to appreciate the multitude of responsibilities that we had before us and glimpsed an insight into the value of the training we had received in previous years. The Army ' s submarine se FIRST CLASS YEAR The year wound its way to June and, finally, as Graduation approaches, it seems as if the last four years have passed too quickly. The trials of previous years are behind us, and we have new challenges before us. We leave with many memories. We must admit that it has all been worthwhile, though we have probably received more from our stay here than we have given. We, like all the classes before us, leave with the realization that West Point has served us well and that our debt to her can only be paid in the years of service we will share. " don ' t know. Henry, it ' s i;ot i;ets three miles to the gallon. " lines hut I hear it only LOOK! IIS SUPERMAN 7% What ' s that red stuff in the water? After our first stop of First Class summer, Fort Knox, Kentucky, and an introduction to Armor, we proceeded to Fort Benning, Georgia for a tantalizing introduction to airborne training and a vigorous course in leadership. That ' s not what they said at Fort Knox. J p We managed to achieve a busy social life with the local belles despite classes and weapons displays: after all, what ' s the summer for? You look so cute in your white uniform. Fort Bliss, Texas presented us with a bewildering variety of Army missiles at the New Mexico firing range, each smooth, sophisticated and pointed reassuringly skyward. Say, isn ' t that Mexican town near this post Gil ' s thinking about taking a ndc 326 m We never worried about hein j attacked from the air while we were at Bliss an wa . An Indian Dance show was a highlight of our visit to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, also memorable for our first, and undoubtedly, last, buffalo-burger barbecue. io, V( ' ;( If Udm! It ' ll never reach the far bank, though. I thought I was a supervisor. was a steel driving man The Engineers at Fort Belvoir, Virginia were eager to display their bag of tricks, testing some of the theories of our mystifying engineering courses. What with running the Beast and Buckner details and a contingent off in the German forests, we were a busy class our . . . last . . . summer. " On behalf of the Class of 1965 1a. . ' Firsties, at last, we assumed the role of leadership of the Corps and began to look to the future. The year began with the Ring Hop and the first. . . and loveliest . . . of our committments. A night to remember. The other Washington Hall. A midwinter stroll down Pennsylvania Avenue. Events followed rapidly on one another: the triumph of Philadelphia, the Inaugural parade . . . i ' f . . . service selections, cars, June Week. j . " Jmi.. ' jki . O ' c li ' ' es are before us; jour years have passed. We have grown, the world has spun and changed T C . . . and together, we have made history! -rx K — " w B sl- 1 AND moMk ' -UCHHEAD; " fl K era! of Army, 84. A!so 1 the Korean Conllict z V. o DO H ite Ui M A r T m y B[ W ■- . The men of the Corps today stand at a crossroads in time. The Corps of yesteryear graduated into roles as soldiers and statesmen of our young and growing nation. Our graduates faced and conquered the greatest assemblages of arms ever massed as a threat to freedom-loving nations. Today the challenge that faces our country- is not clearly defined. We see it in the jungles of Viet Nam, in the struggling new nations of Africa, on the floor of the United Nations and General Assembly, in our laboratories and on our college campuses. The challenges that face the Corps today reflect the increasing world pressures facing our country. Strict discipline, through physical conditioning, along with a strong sense of duty and an inbred sense of honor are as much a part of the Military Academy today as at any time in our history. However, the cadet of today must be prepared to serve his country not only as a soldier but also in such diverse roles as advisors, ambassadors and technicians. He must have an understanding of the complex social, economic and political problems that face our world community as well as a thorough knowledge of the profession of arms. He must be a linguist, an administrator and a diplomat, as well as a soldier. Changes taking place within the Corps today reflect the new challenges that face the officer of tomorrow. Activities are geared to acquaint us with the physical, cultural and moral problems of our environment. Class privileges are designed to bring us into a closer and more realistic relationship with the civilian community with which we will be closely associated in many of our future assignments. Our education and training remain, as always, the cornerstone and strength of the Military Academy. However, above all of the routine events of Academy life, our Honor system remains as a shining light that permeates every aspect of our lives. The Corps of today is prepared to meet the challenges of tomorrow. (? u. fC iiM ::, Carl Robert Arvin First Captain Class of 1965 r • ' v? . - . . . ; " BRIGADE STAFF BRIGADE STAFF Left to right: C Captain T. D. MacVicar. Activities Officer C Captain J. A. McChristian. Operations Officer C Captain C. R. Arvin, Brigade Commander C Captain D. B. Kuhn, Executive Officer C Captain J. I. Alger, Supply Officer C Captain D. W. Chrislman, Adjutant FIRST REGIMENT Al STAFF FIRST REGIMENT STAFF Left to right: C Captain T. H. Carll. Supply Officer e, Captain J. E. Connor, IIJ, Operations Officer e Capta n G. L. Fredricks. Executive Officer C Captain R. D. Stowell, Adjmam „ _ F- Kistler, Adjutant C Captam E. J. Parker, Battalion Commander O Lieutenant E. D. Alexander. Operations Officer C Lieutenant G. R. Brock, Supph Officer SECOND BATTALION, FIRST REGIMENT Lett to right: C Lieutenant J. E. Vaughn, Adjutant C Captain J. P. O ' Connor, III. Battalion Commartd. C ' Lieutenant J. M. Wattendorf. Operations OffZr C Lieutenant J. T. Johnson. Supph Officer m ' ' ' • 52? -«« MU, THIRD BATTALION, FIRST REGIMENT Left to right: C Lieutenant C. J. Needels, Adjutant C Captain J. R. Webb, III, Battalion Commander C Lieutenant P. T. McDonald, Operations Officer C Lieutenant R. N. Williams, Supply Officer Fate and the four year scholarship brought us across the " grey threshold " we have come to call home. After two years of forlornly wandering. " Big Brother " brought us together in Suite A in the Hotel on the Hudson. Our own distillery, weekend clothing-calls and horned toads and hamsters, gave us few weekends in which to meditate on the finer qualities of WAR. while Bob meditated on the finer qualities of the Marine Corps. The nightly meetings of the Theatre and Athletic Clubs managed to withstand the onslaught of the Academic Departments. " Johnny Cotton. " Wes. Jerry, " Sun- shine. " Ross and Fry found academics to contain the essence of Mica, i.e., the unreal. While " The Poet. " " Pete. " " Ozzie. " Gene. Denny " the Gunner. " and Tom, found it to be inconsequential in our cadet life. Bill, Don, " the Mole, " Alex, Ranee, Dan, Jamie and Tommy made their presence known, and felt, in much more subtle ways. June will find us starting new careers. Those who will try to prove that old adage that " two can live as cheaply as one, " — Vitto and Moe, Steve and Phyl, Jerr ' and Lee. Bob and Nancy. Gene and Marg, Rick and Patty. Ben and Gladys. Denny and Dodie. and Tom and Marylin, leave with our best wishes. For the rest of us — look out world! Four years in the " Party Class " and two years together in Alpha Uno left us with many memories and friendships that will strengthen with the years. FIRST CLASS — First Row, L to R: Alexander. E.; Wollen. R.; Kovach, J.; Benton, D.; Ritch, W.; Ray, L., Second Row: Frydrychowski, R.; Rountree. R.; Shin- seki, E.: De Francisco, J.; Kelly, J.; Cahill, P., Third Row. Klingler. H.: Whitehouse, B.: Johnson, T.: Osgood, R.; Shaw, R., Fourth Row: Clark, J.; Parker, E.; John- son. R.; Shantz. D.: Kunz. D.: Bryan. J.; Taylor. W.; De Vitto, J.; Clover. R.: Darrah, S. U I ' UO SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Culpepper, A.: Waylonis, K.; Benham, P.; Hargett, C; Moll, J.; Williams. R.: Ashbaugh. B., Second Row: Musiol, J.; Senoak, T.; Cole, B.? Judd, D.; Leach, L.; Salt, T.; Britton. J., Third Row: Borek, T.; Morgan, K. ' , Son- stelie. R.: Riley, P.; McNaughton, T.; Lewandowski, W., Fourth Row: Behan, W.; Cox, R.; Foster, H.; Kirtley, W.; Ruderman, G. THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Fowler. J. Emerson, T.; Robinson, G.: Condon, T.; Hughes, E. Dewey. E., Second Row: Bailey. M.; Groover. D. Burkett. P.: Norton, M.; Cox, M.; Rothmann, H.;Obley W.. Third Row: Greene, E.; Mikula, J.; Andrews. M. Angeli. R.; Enners, R.; Maron, A.. Fourth Row: Palmer N.; Timm, P.; Held, W.; Jones, J.; Byrum, J.; Kelly, M FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Holdemess. J.; Rhodes, L.: Piraneo, C: Carson, C; Moore, T.; Grogan. W.: Cowperthwaite, N.; Crist, P., Second Row: Olmstead. D.; Adams. R.; Rorie, W.; Kurkjian, T.; Stefan. J.; Mawby, R., Third Row: Dyer. W.; Barnes, T.; Mangino, J.: Neyses, D.; Hensler, R.; Calabro, J.; Heiner. P.. Fourth Row: Georoff, A.; Dienes, N.; Coff- man, E.; Kelly, J.; Shaw. C; Vickers. W.; Street, J., Fifth Row: Hedley, J.; Frankel. R.; Danihy, G.; Crup- per. G.; Warncke, R.; Colglazier, D.; Koren, H. _.| ftsBSiffill i,- a •ri I ' SCfiP " ' FJRSr CLASS — F « i ou. L to R: Tyner. St. E. P.; Kahara, C: Levine, B.; Rowe. D.: Dyer. J.; de Kovacsy. A.: Brock. G.. Second Row. Thompson, J.: Thompson. M.: Aspliind. R.; Stockton. J.; Savatiel, K.; Aron, C; Jones. D., Third Row. Madia. J.; RadcUffe, R.: Sanchez, J.: Fricke. H.: Kline, D., Fourth Row. Lowe, H.: Rood, O.; Linn, P.; Frank, R.; Kadetz, G.; Mace, R.; Bryant. R. Two years ago, twenty-six members of the Class of ' 65 joined together for the first time in B-1. We have stood together and fought the good fight against the Academic Department, the T.D., and the many-headed monster of O.P.E., and we have always come out on top. Many nights were spent in fun and frolic as we pre- pared for various writs, while others were spent in exquisite agony trying to squeeze the last hundred words for a term paper that was due later that morning. Ood, Jerry, and Hurting added local color to the scene, while from several dark comers, the voice of " Duty " could be heard. Pie and his puck, Cal and his pistol, and Tree and his stick represented us on the athletic field. We had our book readers, cardplayers, and more than our share of ath- letes who daily performed that well-known exercise — the brown boy pullover. Yes. we had good and bad times, and now all that we have are wonderful memories. Godspeed! SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Culhane, F.; Grigsby, L.; Johnson. E.; Donahey, I.: Coonan, D.; Grant. R.. Second Row: Brown. S.; Oshel, M.; Niskan- en. M.; Utter. G.; Backlin. C: Canavan. G.. Third Row: Silliman. M.: Rinehart. S.: Hannaberry. J.; Sale. L.; Bailey, M., Moore. C. Fourth Row: Bueh. K.; Unruh, E.; Rosato. J.: Blades. J.; Stowers, C; Blumenfeld, G. M%% % hirst Row. L to R Moonev !; Segraves. M Cusack. B Ciinis • IHIRD CLASS Streit. C; Libutti T.. Second Row: Swett, T.; Wilson, G.. Lobelle, G. Hartman. P.: Weakley. B.; Kinnard, R.: Hoskins, H.. Third Row: Lau. A.; Baker, J.; Dials, G.; Commons, C: Kinnev, P.; Combs, J.; Fourth Row: Larson, C; Windeler, J.: Hale, D.; Terry, J.; Nickerson, B.; Frink, J.: Pejakovich, G. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Morris, J. Olvis, C; McClary, M.; Brown, W.; Weitzenhoffer, R. Allgood, C; Trauner. T., Second Row: Post, F.; Wilcox J.; Rader, S.; Scaglione, R.; Cunningham, D.; Donahue. D.; Walsh, J., Third Row: Harrelson, K.: Green. J.: Aldrige. M.; Hargis, J.: Dalke, R.; Gaetano, R.: Reid J., Fourth Row: Young, T.; Baerman, V.; Gonzalez, A. Wooten. M.; Hauck, K.; Carraway. D., Fifth Row Jones, D.: Gora, R.; Kunz, E.; Noonan, M.; Stevenson L.; Urlaub, W.: Linn, W.; Puckett, F.. Sometime during eternity — June, 1 963 to be exact, the usual unreliable sources stated that some twenty-seven fearless young stalwarts would cast their lots together for the final two years of a four year stand in the Catskill Catacombs. This, in itself, is a record for an ott ' -Broadway production. Almost instantaneously, the change became apparent — Charging Charlie Company was transformed into Clandestine One, or, preferably. Cosmopolitan Company. Our infamous crew, beset upon from all sides with the plentitude of perils that characterize this beleaguered bastion of back- wardness, nonetheless discovered that co-existence with Pow- er-Complex No. 720 was plausible, if not altogether pleasant. With the assistance of that ageless medium, rose-colored glasses, all of us, many years hence, shall recall with fervor the wonderful times we shared — and the moss of age shall blot out our heartfelt hours of remorse. And thus, as C-1, Class of 1965. a truly memorable group, lifts its glazed eyes to the sky on a bright June day, you will hear us say: What ho! — the world! FIRST CLASS — First Row, L to R: Stevison, J.; Letterie, C: Chase, E.; Frey, R.; Eichom, F.; Mickells, H., Second Row. Saxon, W.; Thames, J.: Curl, G.; Hennessee, J.; Bernier, B.; Kistler, B.. Third Row. Kulbacki, W.; Tragemann, R. W.; Hudson, C; Lewis. D.; Burrell, S., Fourth Row. Floto, R.; Fritz, R.; Hem- mingway, C; Guy, R.; Birdseye, W.; Gill, C; Anderson, J.; Prokop, F.; Coughlin, J. SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Kelley, D.; Harnden, G.; Manlove, R.; Daly, T.; Almojuela, T.: Penning, M., Second Row: Rhymers, K.; McGuire, J.; Meurer. F.; Whilihan, W.; Hock, F.; Gillenwater, P., Third Row: Wilson, L.: Kopecky, K.; Buczacki, J.; Eckert, J.; White, G.; Sherborne, W., Fourth Row: Drouby. G.: Kimbrell, G.; Doty, R.; Keating, P.; Harri- son, M.; Cresci, R. THIRD CLASS — Inst Ron. L to R: Madsen, J. Davis. J.; Daniclls, M.; Bianey, T.; Davie, R.; Altshuler H.; Swanson, C, Second Row: Uberecken, H.; Huyck D.; Nesterak, N.: Evans, R.; Yambor, S.; Jackson, J. Wolfe, D., Third Row: Ramsey, K.; Philips. M.; Wil- liams, F.: Phalan, R., Fourth Row: Griffin, R.; Cort- cse. A.; McMillan, L.; Brierly, J.; Smith. F.; Burnette, B.; Peterson, M. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Hawley, R. Cochran. J.; Brennan, M.; Yasukawa, R.; Bruce, M. Robinson, W.; Miller. C. Second Row: Pritchard, D. McKenna. B.; Darmody. D.; Walsh. J.; Pynter, H. Thomas. E.. Third Row: McConnell, T.; Fellows., M. Yager, H.; Tijerina, G.; Feher, R.; Meeker, M.; Hall S.: Oberbeck, D.; Dallen. J.; Reid, M., Fifth Row: Lam- S.; Oberbeck. D.; Dallen. J.; Reid. M. .Fifth Row: Lam- bert, v.; Canella. C; McClain. J.; Outlaw, L.; Bennett, E.; Kitzman. P.; Mishoe, J. 347 iviiivt: Into the Valley of Death strode the D-1 Spartans of the Class of " 65, embarking on their last campaign together. The ground trembled under their pounding feet, brave men grew weak in the knees and fair maidens fainted at the spectre of it all. Firmly commanded by such Great Captains as John Connor. John Salamone. Pete Lounsbury and Larry Strassner, nothing could withstand the onslaught. From their ranks, athletes of reknowned fame like Don Pascells. Tom Abraham. Ed Maness and John Ritch went forth to carry the banner. Around the camp fires there was never want of entertainment with the humor and fables of Swick, Throck and Hugh and the sage advice of Chuck. Larry and Hank to pass the time. Which army could possibly have stood up against that unyielding impenetrable front line of Jim FIRST CLASS — First Rcnv. L to R. Arkangel, C: Reisner. VV.; Seaworth. G.: Maness, L.: Throckmorton, T.: Becker. P., Second Row. Salomone, J.; Bennett, L.; Connor. J.; Brush, VV.; Timmerman., F.; Abraham, T.. Third Row: Tomaswick, J.; Helberg, J.; Ritch, J.; Scruggs, H.: Lehman, W., Missing: Ammerman, F, ; Cherrv, K.: Parcells, D. Hardin, Tim Timmerman, Ken Moorefield and Fred Ammer- man, with the likes of Jim Helberg, Bill Reisner, Sonny Arkangel, Pete Becker, Bill Lehman, George Seaworth and Ken Cherry ready to fill the gap? Some might say that the D-1 warriors were brought home on their shields but the future battles cannot erase the lessons learned or the comradeship formed in their Firstie year. We said we were deadly, dynamic, and determined. And. of course, we were — down to the last man. but we modestly kept it a secret. There are no illusions before our eyes or feelings of grandeur in our hearts. Only a sense of pride and accomplishment plus confidence in ourselves will be our blade as we depart from the ranks. ffi SECOND CLASS — First Row, L to R: Nason, A.; Higgins. M.; Steen, R.: Aiidibert, R.; Hood, R.; Hunt. L., Second Row: Hustead. M.; Hoyman, W.; Nesmith, v.; Bronn, D.; Hunter, M., Third Row. Lutze, R.; Timms, T.; Grant, A.: Brinker, W.; Megnin, D.; Gar- rett, T., Fourth Row. Striegle, R.; Keravuori, J.; Eck- lund, R.; Ray, J.;Champi, S. THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Sears, S.; Ma- honev, B.; Tucker. H.: Ruthven, A.; Root. J.; Weitz, R.. Second Row. MacDonald. V.; Anastasi. R.; Locke, E. Kellenbenz, G.; Hyde, G.; Begin, R., Third Row. Albers D.; Costanza, C; Frazer, R.; Vallee, C; Thornton, T. Brvla, E., Fourth Row. Hardin, J.; Behrens, J.; Spincic, W. ' : Socher, G.: Kasper, L., Fifth Row. Winton, G. Hamilton, M.; Rivers, D.: Corley, J. 1 OURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Purr, J.; Bur- nette, T.; Allen, A.,- Cliff, R.; Mathews, T.; Shaw, R.: Stead, W., Second Row. Peplinski, W.; Swedock, R.; Hergenrether, D.; Kruger, J.; Bartholemew, S., Third Row. Fravel, G.; Dauth, M.; Wilhite, H.; Simonich, M., Fourth Row. Madora, A.; Grant, G.: Giasson, C; Brooks, S.; Wright, J., Fifth Row. Johnson, C: Strong, M.: Alexander, D.; Crowe, M., Sixth Row. Brown, T.; Gregorczyk, H.; Soice, M.; Nerdahl, J.; Sands, A., Seventh Row. Slowek, M.: Rhodes, R.; Caldwell, S.; Nahorniak, N. Out of the mass confusion of a typically disorganized Reorgy week in " 63 we found ourselves conglomerated to- gether from the far off reaches of the First Regiment. Destiny had it that we should be brought here together; to be nur- tured under the tutelage of BJ. for the day when we would take over the reign of Easy One. Ugly Ed was whipped into shape on calls to our mighty Tac. Such a threat got the Rock " s and Rile ' s disreps ' into the thrash can before the Tac did. Not really of course, for we believe the 2-1 had it the other way around. Stash was elected Chairman ot the Honor Committee, and Big Walt captain of the Tennis Team. Our academic edeavors crowned us with the Dean ' s Trophy. Credit here must be given to our somewhat dubious academic wizards, Mac and Russ, who made it in spite of all obstacles — true fighting spirit and valor beyond reproach. Our real ' hives " were led by Bill with staunch support from Craig, Marty and Jerry. First class year arrived and command of this hallowed crew went to two of our " A " " men, Schaltz and Johnny. There were other stalwarts of our mighty group: Norm was the epitome of the Southern gentleman: Rick was our Casanova; LB. well, he was just plain lovable; and then there was Mush, the man with the lonely heart. Bernie was always trying while Ponch was hunting. Old Sterbs kept us straight, and Dick entertained us with his sky-diving tales. That leaves only .lim, who was last alphabetically, too. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Bohannon, J.; Albright, L.: Campbell. R.; Sterba, R.; Andresen, M.: Byrne, W.; Genega. S., Second Row: Woodard. .1.; M Millan, J.; Lawson. L.; Powers, B.: Madden. J., Third Row. Boyter, N.; Pylant, J.; Schaltenbrand, R.; Klink. E.: Johnson. J., Fourth Row: Kuzman, R.; Wil- liams. R.; Rielv. R.: Mushovic, T.; Oehrlein. W. •..C , SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Vivian, J. Laipple. D.: James, D.; Hlista, R.: Swift. R.: Williams M.; Auer, B., Second Row. Norton, G.: Cox, G. Schroeder. K.: White, J.: Woodward. R.. Fourth Row Cecil, G.: Sirutis, A.; Wight. W.; Farrell, H., Fifth Row: Kriebel, J.; Walsh, M. THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Ehrenreich, R.; Pennington, W.; Fischer, M.; Hausman, W.; Thomas, F.; Miller, R., Second Row: Economos, P.: Newton, J.: Caldwell, J.; Threadgill, G., Third Row: Heyne, M.; Jansen, A.; Ervin, W.; Loftin, D., Fourth Row: Rice, R.: Risseeuw, D.; Alford, K.: Hale, G.: Bush, K. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Skipper, H.: Merritt, K.; Hoblit, F.; Kelley, Jr.: Zophy, G.; Rosen- berry. D.; Miller, B.: Schappaugh, G.; Prosnik, G., Sec- ond Row: Ambrose, A.; Eustaco, A.; Becker, D.; Sween- ey, R., Third Row: Olsen, R,; White, D.: Brown. T.; Smith. A.; Hart. M.. Fourth Row: Manning. L.: McLean. N.; Sharpies. S.; Baker. L.. Fifth Row: Laing, M.; Petcu, L.; Garcia, V.: Sorensen, P.; Hawkins, C, Sixth Row: Crawford, J.: Norris, J.; Shaeffer, L.; ToflFler, P., Seventh Row: Black. L; Gi ' huly, M.; Bevans, J.; Allen, R.; McCauley, W. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Eichelberger. J.; McCullough, J.: Mirando, J.; Adam. A.; DeLaar, R.: Triick. W . Gnau, D., Second Row: Deems. J.: Tantalo. F.; Sharkness, E.: Konermann. L.; O ' Leary. G., Third Row. Kennedy. L.: Morrissey, S.: Adams. C: Huston, M.; Stowell. R... Fourth Row. Zais, B.; Mohlere. R.: Olson, J.: Fredricks, G.; Brown. C; Mogan, J. When hither we go forth to greater things Hesitating not to look back. We ' ll find a solace in our minglings. With classmates, friends and Tac Of our pride . . . F-1 Proud we are! A little crazy at times, filling the void that so naturally exists; a little humble at times, recognizing our deficiencies; a little mean at times, fighting to make ourselves more worthy, but always proud! Togetherness is our byword, a togetherness that has solidified the sad, hard and happy times that will forever bind us; a togetherness that will serve to motivate us to the service of one another in the future; a to- getherness that will make us look to each reunion with antici- pation of renewed friendships that have been too long dor- mant. From this institution we will take knowledge, skill, a sense of duty, and an impeccable honor, but most important will be our friendships. Yes, we shall go forth, but we will always be proud to look back at F-1, for it has become a part of us and a part we will always revere. SECOND CLASS — First Rovi-. L to R: Faber. M. O ' Connor, W.; Fry. M.; Proctor, J.; Williams, S.: Kane E.; Grandison, W., Second Row: Noble, W,; Darby, R. Keith, C; Kronberg, P.; Brvan, L., Third Row: Frazier B.; Hoffman, J.: Haneke, W.; Turbish, J., Fourth Row: McGoogan, F.; Swain, R.; Anderson, E.; Burger, J. Fifth Row: Strokin, V.; Engelman, F. »t 9 mmm THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Schwartz, F.; Harris, K.: Kunselman, R.; Dionne, R.; Butcher, R.: Mase, R.: Butler, C, Second Row: Loyola, M.; Murrell, J.: Alich, J.; Hegglin, T.; Lenz, R.. Third Row: Strom- berg, R.: Parr, T.; Ruhl, J.; LaBouliere, R., Fourth Row: Bea n. D.: Merlin, L.; Foley, W.; Trevathan, L„ Fifth Row: Palomar, A.; MacPherson, D.; Colson, R.; Mur- rill. R.: Keithly, R.; Grube, R.; Mather, W. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Larson, E,; Rider, F.; O ' Meara, N.: Coco, R., Second Row: John- son, F.; Millson. E.; Tillery, G.: Mackall, C: Farrugia, ' .; Smith, D.: Steveson, D.; laconis, C, Third Row: Robinson, B.; Bunnell, D.; Shahid, F.; Witwer, R., Fourth Row: Raines, W.; Buckley, J.: Adams, D.: Os- born, S., Fifth Row: Saari, C: Reynolds, F.; Kennedy, T.; Powers, T., Sixth Row: Morand, l.: McCaffrey, J.; DeCoursey, P.; Dearth, J., Seventh Row: O ' Neil, M.; McLane, D.; Jack, H.; Robinson, W.; Little, W., Eighth Row: Benson, J.; Hanson, P.; Francis, J.; Finney, J. Two years ago we entered the " Gopher Hole " as true Sons of Slum Gravy, at least where academics were concerned. We had the starmen, " Tanker, " Dave and Ric as well as " Fetch " and " Whale, " who ended yearling year holding up the rest of the class. Both " Fetch " and " Whale " weathered the rigors of cow academics, but we lost our friendly body guard to the OPE in a big surprise to everyone who knew him. Now as we leave G-1. we carry with us many memories. Remember riding up to the Tac ' s house in a deuce-and-a- half for some Christmas cheer and " Ding Dong ' s " " closed " party at PhiUy? Who can forget the purge of " the Hot Cor- ner " by Hal B., or " Operation Blue Sheet, " which saved Guy when he was the " D " est cow in the Corps in conduct, academ- ics, and regular account? Then there were Ric and " Pseudo Jew " playing bridge and rapelling off the walls of South Area on the painter ' s rope; " Flexible Mike " trying to break off his cast, and " Alabama Fats " calling " Batts to " in his Santa Claus suit. " Watts " lost his membership in the " C " club, leaving " Honest Jack, " " Singe, " and Chet to carry the white banner alone. On the firsty trip, " Phil " made top billing at the Fort Sill Officers Club with his rendition of Bye Bye Blackbird, and " Greaser " became the victim of his own fam- ous laugh. Some people will be remembered in special ways. " Rabbit " will be remembe.ed for his trumpet solos. Bob Doughty for his dedication to SCUSA, " Z-man " and " Windy " for their arguments on how the game was won. " Toomer " for going to parade without a pompom or sending a plebe after his grey jacket when he already had it on; Jack Keith, Bob Thompson, and Dave Hurley with their future wives; and " X " and Phil with their Sting Rays. Yes, as we leave the company with our " sheepskins " in one hand and our car keys in the other, we remember all this and more. We travel our sepa- rate ways knowing that things will continue on without us. but hoping that we have left our mark on G-1 and the Corps. FIRST CLASS — First Row, L to R: Hurley, D.; Lyons, J.: Sammarco, V.; Abbott. M.; Toomey, K.; Keith, J.: Wattendorf, J., Second Row. Chapman, R.: Myers, C: Singelyn, P.: Olmsted. P.-; Doughty, R., Third Row: Concannon, M.; Bell, J.; Larson, G.; Zonne, R.; Exelby, D.. Fourth Row: Bliss, S.; Riley, P.; Thomp- son, R.; Appier, D. i Mr00 j r b SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Bubriski, J.; Ohotnicky, S.; Moore, D.; Durbin. T.; Isenhour, J.; Lincoln, A.; Fix, D., Second Row: Sparling, F.; Lang- endorf, H.; Cavolick, J.; Traubel, W.: Lindseth, A., Third Row: Hart. L.: Sherrard. R.; Eason, T.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, R., Fourth Row: Gorski, R.: Kozak, J.; Wheeler, L.; Crabtree. J. THIRD CLASS — First Row, L to R: McCoy, B.; Cales, B.; Young, L.; Gizzi, P.; Nathe, M.; Moyer, G.; Mekkelsen, N., Second Row: Seaman, J.; Paidakovich, M.; Bowen, C; Atkinson, T.; Pryor, J., Third Row: Wenkel, R.; Kreger, F.; LaRaia, R.; Wells, W.; Mc- Dowell,, Fourth Row: Fowler, G.; Smith, K., Fifth Row: Herzfeldt, D.; Findley, J.; Hartley, R.; Severson, J. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Ptasnik, P.; Ludwikoski, J.; Lorentzen. E.; Allen, G.; Hansen, M.; Ingham, G.; Adams, R.; Martin, T., Second Row: Carman, J.; Brown, R.; Minks, D.; Galak, R., Third Row: Westerlund, J.; Vinton, R.; Stewart, D.; Mac- Donald, R.; Clark, J., Fourth Row: Adam, G.; Morris, D.; Seibel, G.; Kendall, R., Fifth Row: Clark, D.; Pat- row, M.; Steel, C; Oventile, J.; Reilly, G., Sixth Row: McLellan, B.; Audrain, E.; Schweitzer, G.; Beckley, S., Seventh Row: DeBlaquiere, J.; Tangen, M.; Mente, A.; Henningsen, K.; Moran, K. FIRST CLASS — First Row, L to R: Livic, A.; Barry B.; Connolly, W.; Pyrz, A.; Kolzing, R.; Anderson, R. Harrington, J., Second Row: McCreary, W.; Airy, J. Simmons, T.; Zurlo, J.; Peterson, C, Third Row: De- Moulpied, D.; O ' Neill, E.; Cindric, T.; O ' Connor, P. Leverett, H., Fourth Row: Atchley, O.; Vaughn, J. Hill, R.: Layer, R.; Forrest, E., Fifth Row: Davis, L. Plaas, J.; Merges, J. Ahoo-hoo, gawahh, and a little green cheese, bitte — the trademarks of H-1, and none of us who lived through it all and came out " ready " can ever forget them. Nor can we forget the Plant. Mopes. S.O. KnowlerT S.O. Cinder. S.O. Jim- mer, Zingo, Sparky. Dynamo. Baht. Genghis, the ol ' Bugger, Bosque. Atch, Timmer. Gino. Mountain, Whale, Harringbone, Eel, Andy. Pete. " Z. " Pat. Cookie, or Big John— all 25 cultural midgets dredged up from somewhere and majestically molded by Dusty. Charlie, and Yoiks into company clowns, battalion buffoons, etc. . . . Well we didn ' t want to leave a good im- pression anyway — we just wanted to leave. And as we leave, as we bid goodbye to the joyous days and fun-filled nights, to the pleasant Tahitian climate, to the wonderful hours of learning, to the rewarding hours of friendly competition on the playing field, to the magnificent laundry, and most of all to Vincent Talaratko and his ever helpful, courteous, cheerful Army-Navy store, we ' d like to say to one and all — gabork, gadugz, gabye. THE PHANTOM L flwp- 1 i: i:,ct. « SECOND CLASS — First Row, L to R: Grabow, T Grice, K.; Persson, J.; Ramsay, R.; Donnithorne, L Dickens, J.; Cunningham, J., Second Row: Harvey, W Arrants, W.; Delp, L.; Kelley, K.: Fuller, M., Third Row: McKay, M.; Baslianl, R.; Mentell, R.: Bonifas, A.; Kinane. T., Fourth Row: Harder, R.; Figgins, C; Waldo, D.; Turner. R.; Carlson, K. THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Lascher, M.: Mills. C; Kempf, M.; Matthews. M.; Freccia, W. Lancaster, M.; Kern, P., Second Row: Tankovich, J.: Komblevitz, A.; Jorgenson, J.; Keenan, R.; Sullivan, E., Third Row: Kuspa, J.; Nusbaum, A.; Pringle, D. Shelton, M.; McClelland, R., Fourth Row: Mikale, D.: Nelson, D.; Miegs. M.; Delaplain, C, Fifth Row: Sum mers. P.; Yankus, J.: Haas, J.; Matulys, J.; Jackson T., Missing: Herman, C; Whaley, B. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Fourqurean, J.; Pence, T.; Beahm, R.; Llewellyn, J.; Torres, A.; Murphy. M.; Stolph, J.; Murphy, S.; Coulter, P., Sec- ond Row: Altemose. J.; Gardner. J.; Markley. M.; Hunt. R.. Third Row: Bue, D.; Anderson, J.; Adams, G.; Tackett, S.; McGuigan, D.. Fourth Row: Robertson. L.; Lee. A.; Cerne, A.; Mann, M., Fifth Row: Hittner, B.: Vikesland. ).: Ogles. J.; Klein. F.; Sepsas, N., Si.xth Row: Higgins, W,; Peters, M.; Childers, S.; Balliett, T„ Seventh Row: DeMattio, D.; Erion. B.; Speer, L.; Wil- liams, G.; Lorbeer, R. Joining together two years ago for the first time in I-l. ■65 " s best has shown it could stand up to the Academic Department, O.P.E. and the Tactical Department with hard work. Remember study for WGR ' s until early morning . . . and the confidence that came from working together. How- ever, we found that somewhere in the shadow of war with these departments, we had lost the famous ability to be continualh ' in the rank as we remembered the Firsties of our Plebe Year. Our company was reknowned for its Cadet Captains, Golden Elephant, Purple Cow, Goats, Hives. Igor and the grand old times. For those of I-l going to the female sex shortly, we wish all the happiness a family can bring and to our " confirmed " bachelors, we wish the very best in all endeavors. Our memo- ries will .always be with the past two years in I-l, with the underclasses who worked hard and did an outstanding job for us. The friends we have made here may be far away , . . but never in spirit. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Neal, L.; Kelley, H.; Lapolla, M.; Harmon, J.; Browder, W.: O ' Brien, F., Second Row: Wiest, L.; DeWitt, S.; Bedell, R.; Berdy, M.; Griffin, R.; Leach, S., Third Row. Needles, C; Clay, A.; Carll, T.; Cato, R.: Henneberr ' , T.; Guenther, R., Fourth Row: Mims, J.; Bangert, D.; Dorney, C; Belanger, F.; Hutton, Jr.; Dryzga, R. P|- W ' iV W 1a ' CiriLl d SECOND CLASS — First Rom, L to R: Van Prooyen, J.; Hunt, W.; Scott, T.; Perey, L.; Loftheim, J.; Glass- ford. J.. Second Row: Dixon, G.; Mines, C: Gang. W.; Hinkle, L.; Dutkiewicz, H.; Bludau, C, Third Row. Andrews, E.; Thompson. R.; Wilson. B.; Jeffrey, T.; Zierdt, J,; Lee, J., Missing: Andrise, B.; Britain, D.; Chittv. C; Donnell, P.; Hackett, J.; Jenkins. J.; Luecke. R.; Redmond, J. i Mltt ' ii t THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Dean, W.; Leonardi, K..; Yuguchi, T.: Heath. R.: Brown. J.; Snyder. D., Second Row: Ouellette, J.; Kujawski, S.; McAdoo. D.; Petrie. T.: Lynn, W.; Ellis, D.. Third Row: Canevet, J.; Hadly, D.; Younkin, D.: Dwiggins, D.; Frankiewicz, S.; Yap. M., Fourth Row: Blanchard. D.; Misurek, G.; Refsland, E.; Rollow, J.; Powers, D.. Fifth Row: Rankin, G.; Hickey, M.; Carlson, G., Missing: Hubert, G.: Wood. J. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: McKibban M.; Magathan, W.; Johnson. C; Kent. R.; Pierce, L. Toole, M.: Day, K., Secor d Row: Limbaugh, D. Crecelius, A.; Hayes, R.; Gonzales, J.; DiBenedetto, M.; Weaver, L., Third Row: Cima, J.; Bowling, M. Hobbs, E.: Adams, M.; Nash, W., Fourth Row: Rolfes J.; Heiman, D.; D ' Amore, M.: Foster, T.; Stratton. A. O ' Connor. C, Fifth Row: Casey, R.; Fulton. L.; Har- meling, J.; Staffa, D.; Williams. G.. Si.xth Row: Mc- Donald, R.: Kyzer, W.; Orahood, J.; Dodson, J.; Ham- mond, E.; Farquhar, B. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Zadel. C: Wells. W,; Walter, R.: Thomasson. J.; Hjelm, K.: Paek, S.: Divers. W.: Shapiro, F., Second Row: Talbot, J.: Knauf, A.; Erbes, D.: Connor. M.: Sheridan, M.; Charles. F.. Third Row: Cooper, P.: Fish. G.: Dickey. C; Smoak. J.; Fligg, C: Brewer, D.. Fourth Row: Muncon, M.; Hulin, B.; Pfeifer, C; Bunn, R.; Brown, R.; Vogel, T. On that fateful day in the Spring of 1963 when assorted yearling eyes beheld their recently reshuffled ranks there was (as legend has it) undue commotion in the vicinity of one drill roll in particular. Those passers-by who were attentive enough to have overheard the belated cries rising from that part of the sallyport can well recall . . . " ' Pfeifer, Vogel, Shapiro, Thomas- son, Hjelm, Hulin . . . Yeah, yeah — and that ' s not all either! No. please I don ' t want to hear anymore . . . you mean they are all in the same company ' ? That ' s right, K-1 really struck it rich this time " . . . or so the legend has it. There was no doubt that ' 65 was going to do its level best to uphold the already established tradition of K-1, exempli- fied so beautifully by its motto, " Not Obnoxiously Eager. " Yet, K-l ' s new cows did prove eager in their own irritating ways: The Fat Falcon meeting and defeating innumerable academic departments simultaneously; Zades striving for his slot on the All-American team: Smokey fighting to achieve his ultimate philosphy, " Obscurity is S ecurity, " and even a few rising to notoriety through rank as K-1 successfully staffed the Battalion and Regiment, leaving the Brigade to the more obnoxiously eager. In our efforts to live up to our beloved motto, we all tried desperately to master the words of the K-1 song, continue the tradition of the Party Company, and procure something of our own — the Commandant ' s Poker Trophy of 1964. Each of us contributed our own inert personality traits: Denny was ever willing to analyze the problems of one and all: Eddie. Wally, Rick (Charles) and .Tim contributed their academic adeptness: Mert and Mike (Fligg) donated Lou: Mark and Dunk, their idealism; Pack Rat, Don and Mike (Connor) brought B-l ' s best; Rick (Bun) brought us our own Century Clubber; Bud won the first NTT Award : and Phil brought his ropes and pletons. Ron and Johnny decided they deserved a whole sentence to themselves but their minds went blank in an attempt to think of anything immodest to say. Under the conservative influence of Rapid Robert, ' 65 departed K-1 with seven Corvettes, 1 X-KE, numerous TR-4 ' s and 21.2 percent of the reception time at the Protes- tant. Catholic and lewish Chapels, respectively. ' Nursing Timmy Through SECOND CLASS — First Row, L to R: Bartholomew, S.; Stone, W.; Tumas, M.; Fullerton, L.; Forhan, J.: Moffett, D.; Dubia, J., Second Row: Dunavan, R.; Phillips, J.; Swain. T.; Schroeder, T.; McLaughlin, T.; Case. R., Third Row: Dock, W.; Drewes, C; Dusel, T.; Welch. J.; Fazen, R.; Brown, M., Fourth Row: Ham- mond, R.; Braun, P.; Dunn, C; Campbell, M.; Pickens, W.; Groves, G. T i V ii THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Lucas, E.; Call, J.; Taylor, H.; Baker, C; Parr, M.; Avard, J., Second Row: Stark, J.; Neubeurger, D.; Petruzel, VV.; Herb, R.; Jacobs, K.: Frank, R., Third Row: Balkcom, J.; Knapp, R.; Jones, N.: Kurtyka, S.; Miller, M.; Pills- bury, H., Fourth Row: Purcell, R.: Mullane, R.; Davis, D.; Mills, K..: Murfee, W., Fifth Row: Graham, J.; Pangle. V.; Jones, R. 1 OURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Sprinkles. R.; I huss. M.; Spelman. M.; Flowers. E.; Bussa, J.; Babitz, Ci.; Worthen. J.. Second Row: Creeden, J.; Selvitelle M.; Henry, J.; Irvin, W.; Heisel, J.; Weiss, T., Third Row: Sackett, D.; Riek, J.; Jones, C; MacVittie, D.; C raven, W., Fourth Row: Nicholson, K.; Barnett, M.; I atron. A.; Armstrong, J., Fifth Row: Mance, J.; VoU- rath, T.; Stroud, B.; Guignon, J.; Munson, J., Sixth Row: Hatcher, D.; Clarke, T.: Broyhill, T., Seventh Row: Alward. H.; Parry, B.; Newsome, E.; Gatlin, J.; Eighth Row: Coatney. L.; Kremser, K.; Wantuck, D. The cannons are silent and only a faint echo of the " Hum- mers " mischievous sound lingers on the battlefield where our L-1 colors wave defiantly. At first, there were some minor " tactical setbacks. " P.T. and Ron ' s turning movement down to LadyclilT met strong resistance and they were forced to retire to Central Area where they joined Paul and Marsh, already involved in " tactical " marching. As the Cow Year campaign progressed it became clear that we were fighting a two front battle. Solids and juice almost outflanked Mike, Uncle Freddy and Woody, but the decisive employment of their reserve kept our ranks intact. By this time snow had covered the terrain, and we lost Gene and Paul who were on TDY to the ski slope. Finally the snow melted away, John ' s Florida blood thawed. Bill moved up to the sun deck on the roof and Tom became the first man in the Corps to stack arms. (Loco was a very close second.) Tad and Pay woke up to find that they had never unstacked them from Yearling Year. With our interior lines and Bob ' s coaching. we again withstood the frontal attacks of GR ' s, called for a truce during the summer, and then flew off on a Firstie Trip under Joe ' s paternal guidance. Weighted down with a variety of clandestine electrical gadgets and trophies from our summer experiences, we re- turned for our last Reorgy Week to find that Max had gone and taken Dune along. " Beauch " was now running the opera- tion. Ken had also left us to become the Batt meal ticket and telephone scion. Being flexible, the strategy was altered to fit the new atmosphere. .Terry and Nate favored economy of force and allocated a minimum amount of energy to secondary effarts while concentrating on their brown boys. Meanw hile in the rear area, w hen the bomb w ent off in Rich and Higgy ' s room, it produced a close shave for Mitch. And so, as we file out ... in precise step, thanks to Tony and Frank ' s diligent efforts . . . and take our places in the ranks, we pass by our L-1 guidon still waving defiantly and full of memories for ail to see. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Ludwig, R.; Brown, K.; Wolff R.: Genetti, T.; Dernar, J.; Grates, F., Second Row. Renschen, P. Borrego, A.; Schwartz, M.; Kantrowich, P.; Locurio, R.; Higgins, R. Third Row. Koleszar, F.; Kosciusko, J.; Mitchell, W.; McDonald, P. Wood, J.; Hays, J.; Ono, T., Fourth Row: Williams, R.; Hennig, R. Manghi, G.; Kamer, K.; Beinlich, W. : -4 € . i i ii-i i ■ VLrnhXld SECOND CLASS — First Row, L to R: Brunnhoeffer, G.: Jenkins. J.: Potter, M.; Cooney, N.; Gardner, J. Wilson, T., Second Row: Johnson, C; Kimel, M. Atkinson, G.: Ga nor, K.; Pontuck, H.; Barry, W. Third Row: Wallace, H.: Ligon, P.; Schrenip, . B. Brodka, S.; DeJonckheere, T.: Brown, F., Fourth Row: Foret. K.: Schofield, D.; Tews, W.; Ogle, J.; Harris, B ti i kVi THIRD CLASS — First Row, L to R: Kunihird, D.; Hood, M.; Brigadier, W.; O ' Hara, K.; Adams, R.: Wach- holz, D., Second Row: Estes, R.; Casey, J.; Peixotto, D.; Smith, G.; Thompson, T.; Adams, J., Third Row Rice, K.: Kolesar. G.: Adamson, J.; Rodriguez, G Pittenger, W.; Williams, R., Fourth Row: Vissers, C: McManus, T.: Keck, C; Carter, K.; Sutton, R., Fifth Row: Askman, J.; Kessler, R.; Fulkerson, R. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Adkins, C; LInangst, G.; Hathaway, J.; Jacobs, G.; Bowman, M.; Wright, L.; Jewell, T., Second Row: Mulvey, W.; Cowan, S.; Kecki, T.; Schramm, B.; Cobb, J.; Ohle, D.. Third Row: Perez, J.: Workman, D.; Riser, H.; Robin- son, F,: Paulson, P., Fourth Row: Carleton, S.; Flak, J.; Fenema, L.; OConnell, D.; Tallman, J., Fifth Row: Kremenak, K.; Guinn, J.; Crenshaw, J.; MacLaren, M., Sixth Row: Jetland, R.; Kerns, J.; Wong, T.; Graves, K.. Seventh Row: Erikson, R.; Garrison, J.; Fetterman, R.; Lieb, C. i ii t m FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Evans. E.; Harvey, J.; Smith, H.; Harman, S.; Kantor, N.; Winstead, E., Second Row: Lee, R.; Gailey, J.; Malpass, J.: Phillpotts, D.; Arnall. P.; Bell. G.; Hall. J., Third Row. Knoche, E.: Webb. J.; Marshall. B.: Collins, R.; Kelly, J.: Selkis. R.. Fourth Row. Wirth. R.; Drinkwater. D.: Vann, J.; Bailey. R.; Terry. J.: Conley, J. As the years separate us, let us look back at some of the things that were so much a part of us in our two years in M-1. First and foremost is our short but rewarding half year with Captain Glidden whom we all admired but who lost his life under such tragic circumstances. The Air Force stay- ed with us as Captain Weaver became the Tac of M-1 and guided us through a successful senior, year. There was the littlest company commander, Steve Harman, who led M-1 to the drill streamer for the Fall of 1964. Our proudest export. Mark Walsh, became First Regimental Commander. We had the brigade heavyweight boxing champ in the person of Jack Terry. There was Jim Conley in his rabble rouser uniform and Jim Hall riding the Army Mule at all our Football games. There were the four " great Engineers " Mark Walsh. Jack Terry. Bob Selkis and Jim Conley, giving each other EI in their specialty . . . SOLIDS. Frank Rellen and Ed Winstead invented the first three dimensional chess set. There was the electronics lab that Bob Lee set up in his room. Everyone will remember at least one trip that Nat Kantor got for him. Everyone will remember, too, " Duck " and Ernie. M-1 also had their trackmen, John Malpass, Captain of the Cross Country Team and Jim Harvey, always a steady performer. John Vann and Frank Arnall always seemed to have a way with the girls. Don ' s clipboard was always with him at fall parades. " Beetle " and Frank were our star men. Jim (New Mexico) Webb was our able Battalion Commander. Dick al- ways managed to sleep while Eddie hit the books. We had two Bruces. too. Dick Collins was always " engaged " to vari- ous sports. Drinks had a tough go with C.E. but he ma de it. Kel will always be remembered as the quiet man from PA. These are but a few memories and it is hoped that they will stimulate us to remember many more of the times that we shared together. MMli- f-vt-v tv ■ ,.. . i SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Harris. C: Piskun. W.; Booth, W.: Connell. J.; Rogers. G.: Simon, G.. Second Row: Miakar, P.: Wright. A.; Fairchild, F.; Detrick. J.; Doogan, J.; Bniegger, R., Third Row: Smith G.; Bowen, R.; Bertolino, P.; Clark, R.; Thomp- son, R.; Helkie, W., Fourth Row: Murray, R.; Rice, J. Aii»j¥¥M- THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Moore, E.; Ketter. T.; Rowley, D.; Stafford, D.; Calocci, T.; Jor- dan, E., Second Row: Ellzey, M.; McEldowney, R.; Lima, P.; Watts, G.; Wentzel, S.; Mosser, D., Third Row: DeSantis, J.: Brawn. R.; Hubshman. E.; Schremp, P.; Nahas. A.: Harmless, H.. Fourth Row: Segal. R.; Piatt. W.; Izzo. L.; Dyer. T.; Cenci. R., Fifth Row: Visconti, J.; Smith, L. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Manske, D.; Kunzman, W.; Easton, W.; Rapisarda, L.; Cutting, E.; Creighton, P.: Spencer, J„ Second Row: O ' Keefe, P.: Hewitt, G.: Throckmorton, J.; Joseph, P.; Williams, C; Fay. M., Third Row: Russell, R.: Carroll. D.; Heckman, tl ; Laughlin. P.; Kimball, J., Fourth Row: Stewart, n : Darling, J.: Dooley, J.; Gardepe. W.; Shaw. M., ifth Row: Bressler, M.; Fragin, G.; Yohsitani, T., Sixth Row: Hammerquist, R.: Glinton, W.; Cruden, J., Seventh Row: Johnson. R.; Margrave, T.; OToole, L., Eighth Row: Croft, H.; Krieger. P.; Krohnfeldt, L. SECOND REGIMENTAL STAFF SECOND REGIMENT STAFF Left to right : C Captain L. R. Stewart. Operations Officer C Captain J. K. Swensson, Adjutant C Captain P. W. Bucha. Regimental Commande C Captain H. N. Joyner, Executive Officer C Captain J. H. McEIiece. Jr., Supply Officer Ml Wb s ' e «,S«islife: " FIRST BATTALION, SECOND REGIMENT Left to right : C Lieutenant R. R. Butterfield. Adjutant C Captain J. M. Ledzinski. Battalion Commandei C Lieutenant E. Simpson, Jr., Operations Officer C Lieutenant G, P. O ' Toole, Supply Officer SECOND BATTALION, SECOND REGIMENT Left to right: C Lieutenant T. .T. Kelly. Adjutant C Captain J. K. Thompson. Battalion Commander C Lieutenant M. E. Hudson. Operations Officer C Lieutenant T. R. Sheckells, Supply Officer THIRD BATTALION, SECOND REGIMENT Left to right: C Lieutenant C. F. Shaw, Adjutant C Captain H, M. Dermody, Battalion Commander C Lieutenant F. L. Laughlin. Operations Officer C Lieutenant L. C. Briggs, Supply Officer Company A-2, the leader of the second regiment, showed during the year ' 64- ' 65 the inspiration and dedication essent- ial to the effective operation ol a leading company. Com- manded by the able leaders David Brown and lorn Barron, A-2 excelled in both intraniurals and parades. To combat the effects of last years Navy Tactical Officer, Company A-2 was honored by the guidance of Maj. E. E. Fuller and was motivated by his high spirited qualities and high standards which A-2 maintained throughout the year. To complete the well rounded troops of Company A-2, two new classes joined the ranks of the old A-2 files, the first and third class. These two new classes were composed of a spirited and competent second class whose main function was that of controlling the new and eager-to-learn fourth class. Due to the unity and cohesion of the men of company A-2, this year will be remembered as " the year that was. " FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Brown, N : Steele. G.: Pollard, R., Second Row: Zabka. A.; John- son, M.: Chaffer, J.; Adams, R.; Sherrell, W.; Long, P: Jeffcoat, M., Third Row: Probst, F.: OToole, G.: Moore. H.. Fourth Row: Skidmore, F.; Ledzinski, J.; Berdan, R.. Fifth Row: Eckart, C: Brown, D.; Barron, T.: Roth, A ; Foehl, E.; Bumpass, T.: Sinnreich, R.; McMillan, ].; Jones, R.; Jackson, L. SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Basham, W.; Snell, M.; Barnes, F., Second Row. Newell, W.; Mar- vin, R.; Stevens, B.; Davis, T.; Petersberger, J.; Hos- kins, J.; Carrow, J., Third Row: Poole, W.; Smith. J.; Whicher, J., Fourth Row: Backlin, J.; Berkman, D.; Carlson, K., Fifth Row: Anderson, D.; McCullough, T.; Norris, J.; Sandell. G.; Wiser, G.; Dean, A.; Ren- neker, D.; Woltz, K.; Hill, T., Missing: Smith, T. THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Minnick, C; Gale, J.; Roe, R., Second Row: Shotwell, R.; Toelle, S.; Dunn, M.; Altieri, R.; Gilbert, T.; Milliken, J.; Eggering, W., Third Row: Horn, W.; Cain, M.; Nelsen, M., Fourth Row: Mengert, R.; Nowels, T.; Lowry, K., Fifth Row: Jinks, D.; Groman, W.; Howes, R.; Bring- ham, R.; Stancil, C; Norton. W.; Francisco, T.; Siket, J. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Tucker. F. Karvonen, D.; Alexander, R.; Gorecki, M.; Brooks, C. Ohlinger, C; Lamansky, R.; Lopes, P., Second Row Samuel, P.; Cummings, D.; Mears, H., Third Row Shaw, S.: Roberson, G.; Wright. R., Fourth Row: Bod- enhamer, J.; Heller, E.; Case, G.. Fifth Row: Wallace, P.: Woessner. C; Shipley, R., Sixth Row: Drummond, D.; Oneal, J.; Hart, L., Seventh Row: Gerard, D. Claris, M.; Blancett, J., Eighth Row: Johnston, J Apicella, P.; Hiatt, V.; Hostler, D.; Witherspoon. R Simmons, T.; Shaffer, H.; Winsor, S.; Fowler, J Lower, R. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Motal, W.; Maimone, M.; Stanko, M.; Mark. A.; Endicott. R.; Armstrong, E.; Chudoba. D., Second Row: Westpheling, E.; Simpson, E.; Yoshitani, K.. Third Row: Borkowski, T.; Joyner, H.; Hall, D.. Fourth Row: Sullivan, R.; Kennedy, M.; Hennen, J.; Steele, D.; Stichweh, R.; Lipsit, J.; Leary, R.; Mullen, O. Blessed with a multitude of leaders, B-2 was bound to excel. After a year of insulation under " brown boys, " and a summer of solidification under glasses, the Boys stepped forward. In the Fall, Ken took us to watch " Stich, " with his bodyguard Jimmy, lead in TD ' s on the gridiron and to see " Big Ed " kick the " roundball " for " 85. " At the same time. Rich, the " Top, " led m length of hair, and the B M Lounge was the leading spot for " cool-ness. " At night Denny took the reins and imbued Don with his superior knowledge of strategy. The S-3 section was headed by " Fats, " and " Skinny Ern " set the example in territorial " chickies. " " Big Ed " ascended for the winter and he marched us over to watch " Swashbuckling " Dick in the gymnasium. Harry was shining his clubs in preparation for leading the assault on the golt links in Spring. The snows hurt Art ' s time in the 50 kilometer, but he kept practicing. The " Oklahoma Road Apple " led the best singing platoon in the Corps with its First Tenors, " Sully, " " Seebs. " " Dee, " and Jerry. Ed came back to lead the pack in the auto races. " Injun " finally got " E.P. " to go to reveille even though his interests lay in A.T. T. and Carol. SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Smith, D.; Wolak. R.: Shepherd, A.; Rizzo, S.; Huston, R.; Beasley, T.; Hayes. J.; O ' Connell, P., Second Row. Youngquist, D.; Gimian. A.; Cullem, J., Third Row: Hartley, S.; Hill, E.; Stull, T.; Mazzarella, A., Fourth Row: Eichen- berger, D.; Crants, D.; Nichols, R.: Canning, R.; Ken- ner, R.; Casillo, V.; Lawson, D.; Zurla, T.; Ford, J.; DeBolt, B.; Martin, D. wrn THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Cole, D.; Mc Mahan, T.; Colella, L.; Sayes, T.: Steere, M.; Born mann. A.; Donohue, W.; Brantner, J., Second Row. White, E.: Fischer, G.; Marshall, J., Third Row Richardson, B.; Dietzel, J.; Bucchieri, D., Fourth Row Heimann, R.; Rice. G.; Bishop, B., Fifth Row: Spinello. M.: Moore, W.; Hall, G.; Pettit, C; Releford, R Howard, C; Farr, R. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Lane, R House, J.; Harper, S.; Chapuran, F.; Johnson, D.; Curtis R.; Durkan, J.; Yoshizumi, G., Second Row: Stallings J.; Camp, G.; Halstead, G.; Herman, S., Third Row: Jordon, L.; Wuerker. J.: Banks, F., Fourth Row: Perry F.: Donohue, S.; Speidel, L., Fifth Row: Schlipper, L. Besanceney, C; Robinson, D., Sixth Row: Parsons, T. Miller, J.; Ford, D.. Seventh Row: Romero, B.; Knitt K.; Flynn, R.; Lovett, P.; DesJardien, R.: Hansen, D.: Popov, D.; Benefield, M.; Sheaffer, M.: Einbinder, M. Vitters, A.; Capella, J.; Swaney. J.; Frinak, J. The fall of ' 63 witnessed the formation of a group which may never be recorded in the annals of history. However, in the C-2 tradition of never reading anything, including D.B. ' s, poop sheets, and lessons, it is doubtful that many of us would bother about the annals of history either. Flexi- bility was the by-word of the C-2 crowd in all that we did and the records of our accomplishments have been dutifully entered in the hearts and minds of each of us. Somewhere between our welcoming party and our farewell to the class of ' 64 we formed that permanent bond of loyalty that will unite us for the rest of our lives. Perhaps it was at the Penn State Party, where we officially christened the new gang, or on the fields of friendly strife where we excelled to the tune of two Brigade Championships. More likely though, it was in the life that we shared with each other from day to day, the good times and the bad. Firstie year brought the Firstie Trip, Rings, Fun and Games with " Ma, " Gus ' s and Snuffy ' s, and cars, all of which we weathered without strain. Our own competent leadership guided us through the hazards of academics, F.C.P. ' s, and numerous buck-ups. And as we watch C-2 pass for the last time at the graduation parade we bid good-by to a company that we are proud of and a tradition that will survive after us, the C-2 tradition. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Cullen, J McEliece, .1.: Momcilovich, M.; Whitten, J.; Principe, N ; Shaver, M., Second Row: Clark, A.; Wiley, E. Scobie, J.; Funk, J.; Hewitt, L., Third Row: Davis, J. Loftin, D.; Kempf, S., Fourth Row: Sikorski, D. Steinwald. D.; McArthur. K.: Wells, R.: Butterfield R.: Smith. ,1.: West. L.; Roseberg, J.; Howell, J. SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Kline, R.: Biamon. N.; Johnson, W.; Bartek, R.; Wagner, T.; Ekstrom, P.; Guerriero, R., Second Row: Rybicki, F.; Linder, D.; Fellenz, M., Third Row: Liss, M.; Michener, R.: Carpenter, R.. Fourth Row: Chatfield, R.; Wood, P.; Kobes, P., Fifth Row: Carber, J.; Schap, F,; Fan- telli. P.; Gagnon, R.; W ilson, W.; Clark, J.; Skowronski, W.; Coates, C. THIRD CLASS — First Row, L to R: Taylor, H.; Bigelman, P.; Stave, C; Roberts, J.; Curtis, R.; Griffith, R.; Burns. R.. Second Row: Berger, J.; Mohler, R.; DuBois, J., Third Row: Feeney, J.; Morrell, W.; Hill, F., Fourth Row: Shaffer, H.; Walker, J.; Clapper, R.; Alvarez, M., Fifth Row: Haeffner, R.: Schrage, D.; Crowley, J.: Smith, R.; Hoagland, B.; Doheny, R.: McCoy, T.; Reder, R.; Sargeant, J.: Brown, W.; Rod- riguez, B. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Greenberg, J.; Kaufman, D.: Wooley. C; Diamante, M.; Font, L.; Jeffries. W.: Nelson, E.: Clarke, R.; Leatham, K., Second Row: McLaren, T.; Miller, R.: Sowa. P., Third Row: Baldenweck, T.; Carl, D.; Reed, J., Fourth Row: Fischer, T.; Niemi. J.: Fraley. R., Fifth Row: Reynolds, J.; O ' Reilly. L.: Cullen, J., Sixth Row: Steiner. R.; Hatch. W.: Schulte. D.. Seventh Row: Burdette, F.; Houck, R.; Hill, C, Eighth Row: McNaugher, T.; Exton. H.; Utermahlen. C; Orr. D.: Blevins, J.; Hanna, P.; Burns. R.; Meinshausen. W.; Rogers, J.; Decker, J.; Balog, R. FIRST CLASS — First Ron; L to R: Doughty, G.; Merriam. N.; Satorie, T.; Swensson, J.; Donovan. P.; Gagne. R.; Pickler, J., Second Row: Larson. D.; Mose- ley. C; Nenninger. G.. Third Row. Motes, P.; Isakson. L.. Bradley. R.; Fergusson. T., Fourth Row. Gill, A.; Gentine. C: Jannarone. J.: Heindrichs, C; Lyons, W.; Timbrook. R., Ruggles, G.; Leibowitz, M.; Knowles, J.; McKemey. W. Here we are. ladies and gentlemen — the D-2 gang. Quite a bit was accomplished by this crew — really — and. hope- fully, we ' ll be remembered for our endeavors. Can ' t help reminiscing about less official things, though, such as the joyous hours at Snuffy ' s. the 20th Century edition of Benny Havens: the drill and trainer won through constant effort and skillful deception: the fine work of the public relations council (Hi ' ya. kids): the amazing intramural effort, as chronicled in " Sweat Sock: " the hard-fought 90 most — Z ' s — in — lecture contest: the Tac and his powerhouse Chevy rumored to be his graduation present, despite ve- hement denials and mudslinging charges. We learned a lot in D-2. though, like don ' t have snowball fights on the stoops roof: don ' t refer to a high-ranking government official as " what ' s-his-face: " don ' t schedule more than one drag for a given time. But more than anything else, we D-2 files learned about each other, and whether it ' s called group solidarity or plain old friendship, what remains at graduation most of all is the feeling of belonging to a fine organization of great comrades. SECOND CLASS — First Row, L to R: Gartenberg J.: Ely, C; Denney, R.; Hoffman, C: Tillson, J.; Cook. S.: Collmeyer, M.. Second Row: Blackwell, S.; Israel son, G.; Kushkowski, J.; Smith, J., Third Row: Smith, A.; LeCuyer, J.; St. John, R., Fourth Row: Arnone, R. Sahan. B., Fifth Row: Scales, R.; Pleasant, J.; Wise, N.; Scoggin, D.; Fox, J.: Galligan, F.; Wall, J.; Ama tulli, R.; Cattron, E. THIRD CLASS First Row. L to R: Metzger, R.; Sherer, M.: Marino, E.; Barney, M.: Hedrick, B.; Pena, J.; Arango, R.; Kraus, K., Second Row: Eme, E.; Stewart, J.; Hall. J.. Third Row: Kilhoffer, J.; Rowland, J.; Moon, R., Fourth Row: Still, T.; Sellars, R.; Molnar, G., Fifth Row: Hernandez, C; Lowrey, W.; Stevens, R.; Harmon. G.; Stann, W.; Hart, J.; Millard, V., Sixth Row: Lupton, G.; Stewart, J. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Marriott, W.; Kusmierski, T.; McClelland, R.; Gertsch, G.; Owens, H.; Netteshiem, D.; Wildrick. J.; Taylor, D., Second Row: Siegal, R.; Witschonke, C; Delia, F.; Lowry, S., Third Row: Bowers, R.: Brown, B.; Jenkins, G.. Fourth Row: Jenkins, R.; Cooch, F.; Stettler, J., Fifth Row Wing, J.; Pigot, J.; Stroble, C, Six ' h Row: Campany. R.; Barton, W.; Kelly, M., Seventh Row: Gustafson, K.: Florance, J.; Thygerson, W., Eighth Row: Bowman, S.: Sleder, A.; Nolan, J.; Connor, P.; Olson. R.; Keller. R.; Miller, J.; Korda, B.; Christensen, G. It has been a long haul, but finally the long awaited goal has arrived. It is mostly with a great deal of relief that we ■65ers of E-2 bid the academic pursuits adieu, but we take with us many happy memories as well as some sad tales of woe. We found ourselves thrown together after yearling year, and made the best we could of the situation. We banded to- gether to fight our foes, and held our own against all comers. Then we were in command, and again we jumped to fill the breach, organizing the company and helping to get a new TAC off the ground. Now we do a " to the winds, march. " leaving behind us the 23 count halts and the " double to the rear with a double hesitation, march. " Although our com- pany is sometimes called Easy Deuce, we leave with this chal- lenge to those left behind. " We made it, and it wasn ' t easy. " FIRST CLASS — First Row, L to R: Barkley, J.; Viani, M.; Fink, R.; Nichols, C; Wheeler, L., Second Row: Jenkins. H.; Keats, R.; Cooley, J.; Stewart, L.; McCloskey. C. Ridenour. T.; O ' Hara. T.: Davis. G.. Third Row: Ziegler. B.; Speilman. D.: Harper. P.. Fourth Row: Hennig. G.; Sperry. S.; Glenn, M.; Croak. T.; Gilchrist. M.: Parrish, D.; LaRochelle, D.; Tutchings. T.; Slutzky. K.; O ' Grady. M. i-j SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Jenna, R. Schulcz. A.; James, L.: Meszar. F.; Otto. W.; Behnke D.: Jones. R.. Second Row. Mosley, A.: Wheeler, J. McKinney, W.. Third Row. Cosentino. F.: Carhart. T. Dyer. G.; Gibson, E., Fourth Row. Stewart. G.; Ford J.; Hayes. J.: Lowr ' . R.; Hicks. R.; Satter. R.; Nibbel ink, J.; Dodd. D.; Thomas, W., Missing: Boyd, J. Root, P. THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Gentry, G. Compagnone, P.: Osborne. D.; Gray, D.; Starr, D. Hadom. J.; Strong. K., Second Row. Newell. R. Walker. R.: Foelsch. R.. Third Row. Wikert. G.; Tie- man, M.; Sands. M.. Fourth Row. Shumate, B.; Heim- berg, E.: Obert, J., Fifth Row. Berthelot, H.; Boretti J.: Buffa, M.; Beer. J.; Horton. R.; Trainor, C; Jaco- bus, T.; Murphy, T.: Macfarlane, S. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Champion, P.; Ratcliffe. L.; Timboe. H.: Flanigan. R.. Second Row. Doyle. E.: Wantuck. T.: Uhler. R.; Wells. M.; Wohlers. E.; Cinquino. J.; Ruiz. M.: Broderick, C; Trexler, K., Third Row. Petruska, C; Jones, J.; Pinzuti, R., Fourth Row. Rodgers, S.; Foster, J.: Nickols. J.. Fifth Row: Sweeny, B.; Harper. H.; Hadden. H.. Sixth Row: Vassa, D.; Merriam. J.: Williams. J.. Seventh Row: Greeby, G.: Pimie, L.: Winter, D., Eighth Row: Bottrell, R.; Nelson, D.; Mayer, J.; Ba ' :hman, W.; Howard, J.; Ben- nett, H.; Griffin. L.: Lawton. J.: Kimball, A. -- FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Scholl, W.; Coll, D.; Abesamis, E.; Heller, W.; Meier, F.; Rose, L.; Roe- buck. Z.; Donaghy, D., Second Row: Ganshert. S.; Garms, R.: Ran. P.: Echols, J., Third Row: Golden, J.; Schultz, P.: Pullen, R.; Wetherill, R.; OToole, P.; Atteberry, L., Fourth Row: Matteson, M.; Letterman, G.: Bucha, P.; Stewart, J., Fifth Row: Spire, C; Gates, R.; Thompson. J.; Olmstead, K.; DeJonckheere, T. We ' ll remember F-2 for its best company awards and its Banker ' s Trophies, the Tacs who were human, the class parties, and even the waterfalls in the 43rd. But more than that we ' ll remember the individuals who made our class a group of friends that really enjoyed each other. We had our stand-outs of course — Bud got the regiment and the swirn- ming team, Dan designed our rings. Lew finally made it through Solids, and Pin Boy managed to keep his car on the road. Denny made sure the rum got in the swizzles. Steve punned his way through four years and three barbells, and Julio made us all cartoon stars. Jim got his quota on the soccer field and in class. Grape got all of his announce- ments read. Paul and Jim made William Tell look like an amateur, and the other Paul kept the track team going. Ed is a better squash player now, Lee can handle the lacrosse stick, Tom is an expert in basketball and Rusty grew gills in water-polo. Wayne, Jay and Jon added dignity to what might have been a vulgar brawl, while Rick tried to make sure it was. Frank kept us all straight. Zig kept us all smiling. Greg kept us all drunk and Bill put it all on film. Chris limped around the tennis court and still beat us. and Roy showed us where we should have taken those moments. It was quite a group but it made being miserable so much more en- joyable. SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Stenstrom. R. Kelsey, J.: Gurock, D.; Peery, S.; Horst. K.: Eisenberg, S.: Bohuslar. J., Second Row: McFarren, F.: Strick land, M.; Hathaway, E.; Fish, K.; Faust, L.; Swanson F.; Crowell. D.. Third Row: Steelage, R.; Rose, D. Kievit, D.: Crocker, G.; Hixon, W.; Cniikshank, R. Fourth Row: Hanau, S.; Harper, W.; Sciireman, M.: Kakel. W. THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Brown, H. Nolan, R.; Cline, P.: Pollitt, W.; Barbee, S.; Nii, M. Dello, M.; Jones, D.. Second Row: Cassity, M.; Olson A.; Kush, M.; Lanyi, T., Third Row: Downs, G. Aiello, M.: Crawford, G.; Zimmerman, J.; Cowart, J. Naples, R.. Fourth Row: Ducharme, G.: Thomas, C. Garay, J.; Crowley, D.; Anderson, B. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Lee, D.; Klein, M.: Belasco, M.; Veidt, R.; Curran, P.; Kelly, R.; Sperber, H., Second Row: Powell, R.; Buckley, J.; Beierschmitt, T.; Holland, T., Third Row: Piatt, E.; MacFarlane, D.; Merrit, R., Fourth Row: Nader, F.; Ader. S.; Burwell, S.; Beckwith, C, Fifth Row: Mc- Carty, T.; Scottow, A.; Borsik, J., Si.-cth Row: Mendoza, E.; Jennings, ].; Palone, M.; Clemm, D., Seventh Row: Lowry, G.; Roberts, D.; Mahan, C; Edleman, M.; Swinney, J.. Eighth Row: Van Schriltz, R.; Fuhrman, R.; Garrison, J.; Neswiacheny, B. We of the " liberal " wing of the corps like to think of ourselves as an autonomonous group, which has been pretty close to true on the whole. Periodically, of course, unpleas- ant little sessions with the various official departments served to shake our faith in our policy of self-determination a bit. By and large, however. G-2 has been able to absorb setbacks with a calm, unperturbed attitude that, interestingly enough, seems to disturb Tacs greatly, but never to the point of doing anything too drastic. All things considered, our com- pany as a whole has managed to slip quietly between the gears of the West Point " mechanism " without causing any ■jamming or malfunctioning which suits us just fine. In future years, we proud alumni of Gamma Dos will look back on our cadet careers and think fond thoughts of our very own company, a tower of harmony in the midst of chaos. FIRST CLASS — First Row, L to R: DeSantis, D.; Kleinmaier, L.; Baldinger, R.; Brass. P.; Greene, J.; Leskovjan, L.; McConnell. C; Barber, P., Second Row: Coleman, R.; Applin, F.; Olson, S.: Koropey, O.. Third Row: Holmes. J,: Bachman. W.; White. R.; Long. G.; Kukea. J.; Kenny. P., Fourth Row: Hopkins, J.; Nelson, W.; Barwis, J.: Bradbum, W., Fifth Row: Hudson, M.; LQnghouser, J.; Berry, J.; Sheckells, T. 1 , ri m . SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R. Fisher, H.; Calek, J.: Pier, VV.; Wright, E.; Farewell, T.; Selsor, J.; Seigie, R.; Dobise, J., Second Row. Larson, R.; Sullivan, W.; Van Sickle, J.: Morton, B., Third Row: Williams, C; Siepp. J.; Classen, R.; Pelletier, D.; Wilson, D.; Agnew, E., Fourth Row: Crawford, D.; Unger, J.; Fields, T., Fifth Row: Dearborn, R.; Lindler, C: Al- brecht, W.; Thomas, P. r i 1 ' m 1 ■I i I i THIRD CLASS — First Row. L to R: Waraksa, T. McCrodden, B.; Biltoft, C; Allen, J.; Tipton, E.; Pais R.; Harris, R.; Grove, S., Second Row: Warner, J. Zurawik, C; Hines, J.; Warren, M., Third Row: Bol- yard, M.; Waltz, R.; Ragsdale, D.; Williams, K.; Bon durant, J.; Spillman, L., Fourth Row: Guignon, T. Viney, S.; Etheridge, H., Fifth Row: Kline, R. Brown, G.; Kelley, D.; Hewett, D.; Schwartz, T. Schaefer, G.; Shuler, J. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Lynch, W.; Heil, B.; Shields, B.; Pedrotti, P.; Ackerman, A.; Romah, M.; Lyons, S.; Horton, J.; Hansen, L.; Maty- gar, G., Second Row: Swearingen, M.; Westcott, G.; Peduto, J., Third Row: Bayer, J.; McAdams, W.; Sor- row, J.; Behl, R., Fourth Row: Baker, R.; Saska, J.; Cerrone, M.; Sweet, R., Fifth Row: Puffer, R.; Mc- Crone, W.: Hotchkin, R., Sixth Row: Carlson, R.; Bowland, W.; Milinski, E.; Martin, D., Seventh Row: Durham. O.; Kelton, J.; Curl, W.; Stacy, T., Eighth Row: Spengler, J.; Reid, k.; Szigethy, R.; Nippell, G.; Myers, C.; Carroll, K.. Missing: Thome, J. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L ot R: Carlson, T Dufour. J.; Kelly. T.; Gabel, D.; Horst. R.: Pickup, B Churchwell, C: Richardson, D.. Second Row: White T.: Ferguson, J.: Koletty. J.; Paley, J., Third Row Hughes. L.: Vann, D.: Sliulick, M.; Carini, R.; Juchau W.; Genoni, T., Fourth Row: Tillman, J., Philo. S. Wuertenberger, C; Seymour, J.; Watson, M. From the beginning of Cow year as ' 65 began converging piecemeal on the Happy Deuce Company area, we knew we had it. but we didn ' t know what. From A-2 to M-2, from Dean ' s List to ' " d " list, from athlete to scholar, we represented all walks of cadet life. Our activities were many and varied from John. Plug. Terr ' . Tom and Jerry as our big-time athletes (and big-time sleepers), to Gerbs, Bob and Dave, who distinguished themselves with slipsticks and chalk. Who can forget those crisp fall afternoons when Chitlin ' s fl ain ' t believin ' yoo) boys, spearheaded by Curt, Chuck, Doug and Fergy, steamrolled over all opposition? On the domestic scene. Rickee. Cotton. Bub and TJ (Papa Bear) did their best to slay the never-draggin Dragon with their slashing witticisms, but were usually singed themselves. We stood in awe of Dave and Jack ( " Sir. here comes 220 of the very best " ), who were devastatingly professional in juice labs. Coach Tom. socialite Mike, and super-skier Bill rounded out our fine group of professional file closers. From the blackboards to the brown-boys, from Thayer Road to Pennsylvania Avenue, we knew we had it. and by the end of the year, we had proved it. SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Wright, C; Crocker. D.; Deponai, J.; Gunderson, N.; Clark, W.; Berry. S.; Gray, P.: Robbins. R.. Second Row: Albright, R.; Parker. A.; Anderson. D.; Lawrence, G., Third Row: Wynne. M.; McKnight. J.; Thornbloom, D.; Alexander. G.: Meccia. R.. Fourth Row: Sevilla. G.; Fretwell. N.; Murphy. D.; Tarpley. R., Fifth Row: Hart. N.: Kirk. H.; Kone. W.; Lingle, T., Missing: Mull- igan, A. THIRD CLASS -- First Row. L to R: Coker, T.; Coates, D.; Piatt. R.; McColgin, S.; Partridge, D.; Horwath. C: Hayes. B.; Dietz, D.. Second Row: Hor- ton, D.; DuRocher. J.: Seyfer, A.; Theis, J., Third Row: Kishiyama, M.; Ramsey. A.; Wald. T.; Davis, H.; Mahle, C; Kelly, J., Fourth Row: Hulse, R.; Atkins, G.; Shadburn. R.: Mackerer, J.. Fifth Row: Gladstone, R.; Russell. W.: Calhoun. P.; Savory, C; Webb, D., Missing: Gonser, W. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Swan, P.; Anderson, A.; Locher, J.; Dickerson, W.; Bonasso, R.; Krueger, P.; Marotta, J.; D ' Alessandro, R.; Mills, R., Second Row: Burke. G.; Coogler. A.; Miller, C; Wirth, T.. Tlurd Row: Johnson. J.: Clark. W.; Nagy. R.. Fourth Row: Havey, M.; Carroll, S.; Goodell, R.; Spengler, H.. Fifth Row: V olk, K.- Mason, R.; Baker. R.. Sixth Row: Sayre. G.; Chavasse. C; Byrne, C; Trollinger. M.. Seventh Row: Wiedenbeck. R.; Cor- coran. A.; Strand. J.; Horton. A.; Nelson, R., Eighth Row: Vehlow, C; Thai, E.; Rebovich, W.; Reichert, W. It didn ' t take the 1-2 members of the class of ' 64 long to realize the quality of their understudies in the Fall of ' 63. Destined to supply a brigade commander, a battalion com- mander, and a regimental officer, the newly integrated cows lost no time in forging the unity that was to last for most of two years. Copping the title for most movies attended dur- ing 2nd class year. Hungry I ' s ' 65 ' ers went on to post a new high in F.C.P. ' s rentention. It wasn ' t all bliss with the T. D. but he sure helped. Without losing our fused stride we took on all comers. Undaunted by changes of command, the group was never threatened. Only graduation will succeed in breaking us up and then only physically. The world will be sprayed with the inhabitants of the lost fifties, but the world cannot create a place remote enough to be impervious to the spirit of our togetherness. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: VanDyk, T.; Shuford. J.; Clewley, L.; Nowland, D.; Rood, R.; Peters, J.: Burgardt, C, Second Row. Arvin; Bonnett, M.; Gheringer: Laughlin, F.; Haines, H.; Knudson, R.; Thompson, T., Third Row. Hallenbeck, R.; Ryan, T.; Menninger, G.: Axley, R.; Hawker, D., Fourth Row. Molepske, R.: Murphy, J.; Farmelo, G.: Kramer. SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Meier, R. Poage, W.: DiFiore, M.; Loving. D.; Seibel. D.; Buetti A.: Sims. D.. Second Row: Sims. B.; Roberson, G.: Wilson. D.; Ulrich. F.; Winger, J.; Roggenkamp. P. Laroche. J.; Baker. R.. Third Row: Prem. D.; Adams T.; Hayes. T.; Brown, M.; Loysen. G., Fourth Row Eberle, J.; Higgins. M.; Salander, J.; Lantz. P.; Camp bell, D. B iWi. THIRD CLASS — First Row, L to R: James, J.; Thiltgen, J.; Adkins, R.; May, S.; Perkins, G.; Shark- ness, W.; Love, R., Second Row: Boyt, J.; Goodnow, J.; Douglas, .1.; Hill, R.; Donneli, A.; Reilly, J.; Alver- son, M., Third Row: Hankard, T.; Vance, J.; Moush- egian. S.; Smith. C; Weller. J.: Condos. W., Fourth Row: Rettig. R.; Winton. M.; Waterman, R.; Russell, T.; McBride. M. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Anderson, J.; Hayes. H.; Shimp. R.; Sherman, R.; Flowers, E.; Curran. W.; Holmes, W., Second Row: Davis, L.; Keller, R.; Kohler, J.; Younts, L; Burrell, D.; Soeder. A., Third Row: Potter, M.; Craig. J.; Brace. R.; Rynes- ka, J.; Parker, F.; Kympton, H.; Olivier, R., Fourth Row: Nonon, L.: Langston, D.; Laswell, G.; Neill. G.; Harter. J.; Cohn. D.. Fifth Row: Tildon, R.; Rem- mel. C; Billingsley. M.; Marcuccilli. S.; Schutsky. W.. Sixth Row: Phillips, D.; Stevens, G.; Lynch. F.; Powell. D.; Seebart, D. I « ipr FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Woodruff, R.; Kovac, F.: Bishop, G.; Buntz, B.; Hecker. W.; Marsh, W.; Hester, A., Second Row: Huffhines, R.; Scheiner, J.; Concannon, J.; Mastran, D.; Resick, M.; Matkovcik, T.; Hawkins, R., Third Row: Anderson, J.; Starling, G.; Oiivo, J.; Boohar, C; Dermody, H., Fourth Row: Boerckel, R.; Hewitt, L.; Reed, H.; Zaleski, A.; Gentz- kow, D.; Buckosky, G. Once upon a time, a group of boys lived together for two years in a remote place and tried very hard to learn how to be good soldiers. At the end of the two years, they had learned all about the stock market and how purple pic- tures weren ' t all that popular and what the oldest man in the world was like and how to make popcorn. When they found that they had not learned quite as much about soldier- ing as thev had wanted too. they were very sad but they said, " Oh well, maybe we ' ll learn that next year. " And then they all went out to the TP and had a beer. They were Kappa Dos, the original Fraternity. lUegitimus Nan Carborundum. And it was Fun. J , SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Brown, D.; Sands, J.; Pappas, J.; Singer, S.; Kesmodel, R.; Glea- son, J.; Haniine, F., Second Row: Miller, T.; Clainos, D.; McKibbin, H.; Wysocki, R.; Mewhinney, M.; Ma- gee, D., Third Row: Stalker, W.; Zehren, J.; Ernst, F.; Geiger, J.; Driscoll, E.; Hall, G., Fourth Row: Hiller, C; Rees, F.; Coats, R.; Haines, D. THIRD CLASS — First Row, L to R: Jones, W Natalini, E.; Honzo, S.; Baccei, B.; Spring, S.; Sakas, K.; Saxon, V., Second Row: Dempsey, W.; Penny, P. Tye, D.; Cullen, T.; Richards, W.; Coe, A.; Hanelt P., Third Row: Kiper, R.; Kimmel, R.; Doty, S.; Her ring, W.; Fabish, F., Fourth Row: Cage, L.; Hikes, D.; Hardy, M.; Keck, R.; Graziano, J.; Ziemke, J. FOURTH CLASS — First Row. L to R: Shaffer, W. Gilliard, R.; Keane, J.; Van Cook, D.; Fisher, M. Fuchino, P.; Williams, W.; Wheeless, D., Second Row Anderson, J.; McKenna, C; Wallin, L.; Reffett, W. Everett, S.; Fike, S.; Ericson, W., Third Row: Ingwer sen, D.; Moe, P.; Lynes, C; Lewter, M.; Haven, K. Quinney, G., Fourth Row: O ' Connor, J.: Dunphy, J. Nyquist, S.; Hughes, N.; Graboski, W., Fifth Row Ryan, D.; Jones, D.; Chomko, R.; Burrell, C; An drews, D., Sixth Row: Messel, R.; VanHom, L.; Lak amp, S.; Brown, J.; Dull, A. L-2 became the first fully incorporated fraternity at Woo Poo with the start of re-orgy week 1964. The sporadic appearance of a company newspaper which exposed lovers, fileboners and malingerers of the Loose Deuce kept even the company stripers from getting smug. Pete ' s newspaper was a credit to his initiative and also the cause of numerous attacks and beatings. On the field of friendly strife, the big Red showed its mettle by playing hard down to the wire with only an oc- casional pause to kick the opponents in the teeth or any other handy location. Losing all its firstie starmen, we neverthe- less maintained high standards in Tactics, ES and BS and various and sundry academic trivia. The friendly fraternity spirit failed to reach some individuals at times, however, and during Lloyd ' s reign of terror, the previous record of the number of men having Regimental Boards in any one company was shattered. The world has turned over many times since we became Plebes and we face it with a bit of trepidation, saying good- byes to Wally, Steve and the good old Tac. FIRST CLASS — First Row. L to R: Hindsley, J.; Hagie, L.; Briggs, L.: Mivashiro. J., Second Row: Teeters, M.; Wolf, R.: Hall, R.; Plotkin, K.; Clement, S.; Donahue, R.; Rojas, R., Third Row: Grandstaff, T.; Harter, R.; Bergmann, P.; Kinard, C, Fourth Row: Fields, W.: Hume, J.; Howard, P.; Kelley, H., Fifth Row: Gibson, D.; Christman, D.; Paske, R.; Bodde, D. JU-il -I c SECOND CLASS — First Row. L to R: Olkoski, J.; Bishop, W.; Ferguson, W.; Morrison, J.; Markey, K., Second Row: Loftin, J.; Thoden, R.; Pratt, F.: Gates, J.; Parker, J.; Parker, E., Third Row: Seith, W.; Seger, R.; Peake, J.; Hayes, T., Fourth Row: Grugle, R.; Arthur, D.; Marshall, J.; Perkins, D., Fifth Row: Payne, W.: Jackson, G.; Roseborough, M.; Morrow, B., Sixth Row: Drury, D.; Reilly, B.; McDonnald, J. ca V THIRD CLASS — First Row, L to R: Sutten, C: Charters, J.: Landgraf, J.; Darden, J.; Stone, V.; Koch, W„ Secot d Row: Schaltenbrand, W.; Heisler, C; Saine, J.; Langlois. W., Third Row: Rothrauff, T.; Bishop, D.; Johnson, J.; Browder, L., Fourth Row: Fox, G.; Birk, J.; Cano, A.: Moore, R., Fifth Row: Baird, J.; Frazier, G.: Haseman, P., Sixth Row: Clark, A.; Koko- nowski. P.; Neuman, M.; Barofsky, F.; Hagen, P. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Stanley, J.; Kulikowski, M.; Parker, A.; Johnson, D.; Ziots, G.; Miller, N.; Weeks, G., Second Row: Laughton, N.; McElroy, H.; Wallin, J.; Buchanan, A.; Davis, D.; Phelan, S., Third Row: Muir, J.; Tuccillo, R.; Aker, A.: Robinson, F.; Toczylowski, H., Fourth Row: Hen- derson, R.; Gerke, J.; Grygiel. M.; Stites, T., Fifth Row: Johnson, O.: Kurilko, N.; Finley, J., Sixth Row: Andrade, N.; Dodson, J.; Klapnik, C; Murry, M., Seventh Row: Jonas, P.; Matlach, W.; Frushour, S., Eighth Row: Winter, L.; Brooke, R., Ninth Row: Gardes, G.; Nolan, T.; Guter, S.; Howe, J. FIRST CLASS — lust Row. L lo R: Gonzj Gamboa, A.; King, J.; Scully, R.; Blau, J.; Metzner, L.; Lane, J.. Second Row. Turner, J.; Ellenbogen, S.; Tredennick, W.; Smith, F.; Higley, J., Third Row: Clarke, B.; Halvorson, C; Amnion, S.; O ' Donnell, C, Fourth Row: Dornier, R.; Griffin, W.; Stephenson, J.; Shaw, C, Fifth Row: Sellers, D.; Weatherall, J.; Al ger, J. As the sun slowly rose in the East and sprinkled its rays upon Hudson High, so did the able first class of Mother Two rise each morning to lead the Corps ever onward. The glow of the sun became more intense with those fortunate enough to stand near The Scull. As P. A. Clarke calls in the report to Central Guard Room (orally) and Finger Metzner wins the foot race back to the barracks, our day begins. While Higley ' s doing push-ups in his alcove in preparation for the day " s activities. Mutt Weatherall and Jeff Blau are busy wrinkl- ing their sheets. Meanwhile O. D. is going through a pack of Gillettes trying to finish shaving before the two minute bell and Cocke Turner, at 0620 hr., is checking the width of bed collars for possible minute variations. As M-2 falls in for breakfast, the Televive Commando King is in the phone booth, Whale Sellers is still buttoning his fly, and Ammon and Lemley are still in their rooms practicing air- borne sit-ups for the make up P.F.T. Griffin, Anger, Gamboa, and Ellenbogen are off to class subtly trying to break each other ' s slide rules. After class we find Bronco Lane shining his FD hat for the P-rade while PE Smith is practicing the O.C. The Corps Squaders head off for their respective fields of endeavor, Shaw carrying his guitar, Gonzalez combing his hair, and Tredennick grabbing a snack at the boodlers for halftime. Meanwhile, Beatle Stephenson, Chief, and Major Rickard, our devoted disciplinarian, are going ' round and ' round in the barber shop. As the day draws to a close, everyone sleeps peacefully knowing that D. Dornier is on guard for Toby Halvorson who hasn ' t yet returned from Chicago. Good ole ' M-2, where the smile outshines the shoe. l :az SECOND CLASS — First Row, L to R: Caldwell, R. •- . m Baily, C; Barksdale. R.; Coggins, G.: Grisafe, M. S ' Miller, H., Second Row: Rantala, J.; Ewart, T.; Per ( nandez, R.: Campbell, E.; Guerreo, W., Third Row Nelson, P " Row Pearce. D.; Crooks, D.; Gibson, J., Fourth Cecere, P.; Sustersic, L.; Callahan, F. FOURTH CLASS — First Row, L to R: Johnson, G.; Cummings, K.: McDonald, J.; Onasch, T.; Gaiser, J.; Reynaud, D.; Cobey, E., Second Row: Williams, J.: Firehock, R.; Main, L.; Javorski, J.; Taylor, D., Third Row: Thomassy, J.; Clappier, D.; Maddux, D.; Flani- gan, M., Fourth Row: Gooding D.; Fryer, G.; Medici, An.: Horn, J., Fifth Row: Austin, G.; Martin, J.; Kuonen, F.; Knecht, D., Sixth Row: Price, W.; Car- penter. T.; Toraason, J.; Tanski. M., Seventh Row: Searles. G.: Echols, R.; Gaddis, W., Eighth Row: Freas, S.; Thrun, R.; Mortensen, C. THIRD CLASS — First Row, L to R: Cunningham, J.; Toneatto, G.; Helnistadter, D.; Hand, T.; Fracker, P.: Carpenter, R.. Second Row: Lighthill, M.; Smith, E.; Sienkiewicz, S.; Monroe, W., Third Row: Marion, E.; Ankener, R.; Walker, W.; Hohman, L., Fourth Row: Baggett, D.: James; C; Radez, R.; White, T., Fifth Row: Cmil, P.; Gooding, R.; Parrish, M.; Chambers, G., Sixth Row: Preston, L.; Nida, A.; Kraft, C; New- man, G.; Casey, E.; Hutchinson, M.; Perry, M. Another year has now passed by Another Corps has gone. Its deeds are not of blood and death But of tradition strong. Though years shall pass and old I ' ll grow And my Life about to soar. May I yet say with humble Pride I was a member of That Corps. N J .J ' % i f« ? ' ' :t- - V : TEAM CAPTAINS Joe Kosciusko Basketball Chuck Shaw 150 Football John Malpass Cross Country Mike Thompson Hockey Paul Bucha Swimming Bob Arvin Wrestling Tad Ono Gymnastics Tom Genoni Squash Bill Bradburn Rifle SPRING r. V,, -ii 5 ' -J Calvin Kahara Pistol Tony Pyrz Baseball Tom Sheckells Lacrosse Walt Oehrlein Tennis Harry Joyner Golf " re »4 ' 76 -.-sb; ?, ' 73 ' 86, 43 -3, From Ron-, L to R: Rollie Stichwch. John Johnson, Tom Schwartz, Bill Zadel, Pete Braun, Ron Biitterfield, Sonny Stowers, John Carher, Sam Champi, John Seymour, Don Parcells, Coach Paul Dietzel, Second Row. Fred Barofsky, Ray Hawkins, Ed Unruh, Mike Neuman, Billy Sims, Mike O ' Grady, Tom Dusel, John Montanaro, Barry Nickerson. Mark Hamilton, Curt Lindler, Third Row: Frank Cosentino. Tony Pyrz, Sam Bartholomew, Vince Casillo, Jim Hennen, Townsend Clarke, Mike Berdy, Dave LaRochelle, Dave Rivers, Don Dietz, Ed Noble. Fourth Row. Coach George Terry, Tom Abraham, Stan Brodka, Curt Cook, Pete Krause, Jack Wood, Warren Albrecht, Greg Steele, Jim Siket, Ahsent: Bill Sherrell, Dave Ray. Bill McKinney, Claude Herman, Dick Black, Dave Baggett. FOOTBALL Rollic on a long m Our 75th season of football opened with a STORMING OF THE CITADEL by a score of 34-0. In retrospect it can be said that our first game served as an indicator of much of what was to he expected the remainder of the season. The opening play saw Car! (Roliie) Stichweh returning a punt 78 yards for a T.D.. only to have it called back on a clipping penalty. This was, however, only a temporary misfortune as Fred Barofsky ran the second play for a 71 yard T.D. which put Army on the scoreboard after 53 seconds of play. Roliie crossed the goal line three more times against Citadel to earn " Sports Illustrated " title — BACK OF THE WEEK. BOSTON COLLEGE faced us fresh from their spectacu- lar upset over the East ' s pre-season 1 team — Syracuse. Army ' s offense aagin proved too strong as we handed B .C. a 19-13 defeat. Most spectacular was Fred Barofsky ' s 94 yard T.D. punt return in the third period. A cause for much fourth period alarm came as Ed Foley, B.C. ' s second team quarterback, entered the game to connect for 11 of 20 passes and pilot B.C. to their two touchdowns of the game. The final gun found B.C. stopped by our strong line on their 40. For his fine running, to include pushing over our second TD from the 10 yard line, Don Parcells was named to the All East TEAM OF THE WEEK. Don Parcelh u. ik Fred Barofsky at the start of his 94 yd. run against Boston. Our third game of the season found us in the South- west facing a strong, nationally ranked 1 TEXAS team. The Longhorns " fans sat shocked for 3 quarters as Mark Hamilton ' s T.D. from the 9 yd. line gave us an early 6-0 lead. The remainder of the game was plagued with disap- pointments, starting with a 71 yd. T.D. by Rollie called back for clipping. Our penalties for the game totalled 140 yards. The fourth period with the score Army 6. Texas 3 saw Ernie Koy. the strong Texas fullback, become the deciding factor in what was to this point an all Army game. A fumble by Army initiated the Texas drive culminated by Koy going over from the 5 yd. line. Later in the period Koy ' s surprise 71 yard QUICK KICK put our back to the goal and set up another Texas T.D. for a final score of Texas 17, Army 6. In light of our previous three consecutive underdog victories over PENN STATE, this year ' s 6-2 loss proved to be a great disappointment, both to the team and the Corps. Spirit ran high prior to the game in hopes of climbing once again onto the vict ory wagon after our 17-6 loss to Texas. The first half of the game proved rather uneventful as the two big. strong lines clashed in undecisive battle largely confined to midfield. Following its reception of the opening second half kickoff, Penn State drove and passed to the Army 2, from which substitute halfback Bob Riggle plowed in for the six point. It appeared that Penn State was headed for another TD after an interception of a Stichweh pass. They drove to the Army 9 where big Bill Zadel and Tom Schwartz teamed up to drop quarterback Wydman for a 10-yard loss. On the next play, tackle John Carber recovered a Penn State fumble on the 19. Amid the roar of the jammed stadium, Rollie Stichweh led a last ditch, inspired drive in which he either passed or ran for 6 consecutive first downs. This drive was highlighted by a clutch third down run and a pass to Sam Champi. The final first down found Army on the Penn State 7 and knocking at the door. Fullback Don Par- cells bulled his way to the 2, followed by a one-yard loss by Mark Hamilton. The excitement quickly fizzled as Rollie ' s next two passes fell incomplete and Penn State took over control of the ball. In a never-say-die effort, our resolute team held for three downs whereupon Penn State elected to take a safety. wm John Seymour beats a charf;i For those who travelled to Charlottesville, their reflec- itons on the game will probably remain as dismal as the day itself was. Sitting in drizzling rain we wached Rollie Stichweh pick up a loose ball and nm for a 74 yd. T.D. in the first 34 seconds of the game. Minutes later a 63 yd. T.D. pass play to Mark Hamilton was called back on a clipping penalty. From that point a series of mistakes to include interceptions, fumbles, and bad punts put VIRGINIA in favorable position on eight separate occasions, resulting in four Cavalier scores. This 35-14 defeat was to bring about the end of our three platoon system the following week. As a strong, undefeated band of Bluedevils from DUKE invaded the North, the Army team, riddled by injuries, abandoned its three-unit system for two-platoon football. Army, seeking to recoup two consecutive losses, was up in arms for the Duke game. A combination of penalty markers and Duke " s driving fullback Mike Curtis thwarted Army ' s plans for victory. After a hard fought, scoreless first quarter Duke drew first blood with a field goal in the early minutes of the second quarter, followed by Caldwell ' s second field goal of the day in the closing minutes of the first half. An inspired Army team, sparked by changes in offensive strategy, opened the second half by taking the pigskin and driving to the Duke three, only to see a touchdown pass nullified by a penalty marker. Despite a tremendous team effort Army was unable to register in the scoring column. The result: Duke 6 — Army 0. The IOWA STATE game served to put us back in the win column after the previous four games had seen us out- scored if not necessarily out-played. You could almost say the reverse concerning this game. After a hard played first three quarters Iowa State pulled ahead 7-3 in the last quarter. Following a series of 10 plays, which put us in scor- ing position. Stich completed a TD pass to Sam Champi. All seemed lost when the TD was ruled " no good " — having been caught behind the end zone. There was, however, pass interference ruled on the play which placed the ball on the one yard line and allowed Mark Hamilton to drive over for the score on the next play. With seconds remaining, an unsuccessful field goal attempt by Iowa State gave us our 9-7 victory. Hamilton ' s loose. Football — never without its agony. Excuse me, again. m W m. £.. Meeting SYRACUSE, the top team in the East, proved to be one of our hardest played ball games of the year. Syracuse ' s strong backfield of Little. Mahle. and Nance provided a running and passing attack that made the spectators in Yankee Stadium think they might be watching a trio of pro ' s. But Army made the Orange Men play one of their best games of the season to claim the victory. Tied at 7-7, Syracuse scored in the closing second of the first half to go ahead 14-7. Opening the third period, a strong drive by Rollie ended with Don Parcells going over from the 2 yd. line — his second T.D. of the day. Syracuse was overcome with disbelief when Rollie picked up the 2 point conversion by running from the shotgun formation. Although leading 15-14 we were unable to contain the explosive Syracuse back- field who were good for two more T.D.s that afternoon. Speaking of this 17-15 victory Coach Ben Schwartzwalder claimed Army to be a very fine team and accurately pre- dicted that we would beat Navy. The last home game of the 64 season, and our last con- test before Navy, brought PITTSBURGH to Michie Stadium for the first time in seven years. Army was ready, but the 24-8 Pittsburgh victory was decided by a line with an average weight of 218 pounds plus the passing of quarterback Fred Mazurek assisted by halfback Eric Crabtree and fullback Barry McKnight. It wasn ' t until the last minute and 14 seconds of the fourth quarter that we really came alive. Rollie hit Greg Steele from the Pittsburgh 49 for 27 yards, then ran for 16. Then, on the option play, finding he couldn ' t turn the corner, Rollie passed to Steele again with a two- handed basketball pass for the T.D. Rollie passed to Sam Champi for the 2 points and the game ended Pittsburgh 24, Army 8. Bill Zadel displays the skills which earned him national recognition. Ed Noble makes a well timed tackle as Tony moves in for seconds. ivs oUV - ' ' ' ' ' " „ , cadets M ' 1964 Uidd ' ® ARMYMANPOfl ' IS AT I,nW PI ARMY MANPOWER IS AT LOW POINT « I Die tzel Says Five Will Play " . _„ Both Ways Against Navy ft , " Rush " " ' ' • « The Statistics W - " " 7 ' Army Navy IE I First Downs 14 13 tkt a " ' H, First Downs 14 13 Rushing yardage 215 31 Passing yardage 53 110 Passes 3-8 12-21 Passes intercepted by 1 Punts 6-37 7-39 Fumbles lost Yards penalized 75 20 Army 2 6 3-11 Navy 8 0-8 Army-Safety Staubach taclcled in end zone; Army-Champi 5 pass from Stichweh (kick failed); Navy-Leiser 1 run (Norton pass from Staubach); Army-FG Nick- erson 20. Attendance 102,000 Bali: " ifsr " " 1S ' ' ° ' «. It Conn biggest ctotr John Seymour off on one of his fine tound s;aimn runs foUowms; Pete Braun Rollie discusses pre-game strategy with coach Dietzel THE GAME The high point of the 1964-65 football season for the Cadets, graduates, and all Army fans the world over, took place in Kennedy Memorial stadium in Philadelphia. Spirits ran high as Army met Navy. Underlying our outward antici- pation was the firm conviction that this was the year to stop Navy ' s control of the Army-Navy classic. Suffering defeats from Navy in the last 5 of the series we were especially mindful of the 1963 Army-Navy game which ended with Army 2 yds. from a winning touchdown but unable to use the remaining time to make a conclusive victory. The cadets did not have to wait long to glimpse what was to be the predominate aspect of the day — total domina- tion of Navy. Less than one minute into the game Army was on the scoreboard for 2 points after dumping the 1963 Heisman Trophy winner Roger Staubach for a safety. Army ' s furiously charging defense was to create disappointment after disappointment for Navy. But defense alone will not win a ballgame. The offense was equally as effective under the control of Rollie Stichweh. Rollie, Army ' s valuable asset during the entire season, while effectively running and passing, found much assistance in the fine ground gaining runs by Donny Parcells and John Seymour. Our first touchdown, making the score 8-0, came on a pass from Rollie to Sam Champi. In the last seconds of the first half Leiser of Navy plunged in from the I yd. line to give Navy their first score. A pass from Staubach to Norton for the extra points tied the score at halftime 8-8. The second half completely belonged to Army. Army ' s line held Roger Staubach. always a threat to the opposing defense, to minus 22 yds. rushing. Barry Nickerson ' s 20 yd. field goal midway through fourth period gave Army its 11-8 win. The determination of this fine Army team was such that Rollie Stichweh. Bill Zadel, Johnny Johnson, Sonny Stowers, and Pete Braun all played in excess of 55 minutes of the game. Army wanted this win badly and got it, but it can- not be overlooked that the 1964 Army-Navy game was played in the highest sense of tradition that the annual event repre- sents and was a tribute to both teams. The defensive line that meant so much to Army ' s win Don Parcells finding an opening on one of his many carries of the day Rollie about to take off Sam Champi takes Rollie ' s pass in the sec- Wi ond period to make the score 8-0 ff For the season finale, we sent Coach Dietzel. Bill Zadel. and the Army backfield to Miami to team up with many of the nations finest players in the North-South Shrine Game. Rollie Stitchweh. who moved out to the flanker slot for this game, was honored by being elected team captain for the North. Before the game ended on a last second, game winning touchdown pass by Heisman Trophy winner John Huarte of Notre Dame. Stitch caueht a touchdown pass. Johnny John- son caught a conversion pass and stood out on defense. Zade was a standout on th; star-studded line. Don Parcells re- covered a decisive onside kick, and Don shared with John Seymour the task of defending against Bob Hayes, the world ' s fastest human. It was a fitting end to five outstanding careers, and to the 75th season of Army Football. Rollie Stichweh set the only record of the year, an Academy Record for single season offensive play. Stichweh is credited with 1471 yards rushing and passing. Army Coaches picked for Outstanding Offensive Back Outstanding Defensive Back Outstanding Offensive Lineman Outstanding Defensive Lineman As picked for tlie Season by Press Outstanding Back Outstanding Lineman Outstanding Sophomore the Season: Carl Stichweh John Johnson Bill Zadel Sonny Stowers Box Sports Writers Carl Stichweh Sonny Stowers Townsend Clarke 1964 Individual Season Statistics RUSHING Tries Gains Avg. Long Run Player ' Carl Stichweh 129 655 5.1 93 ■Don Parcells 66 237 3.6 16 Mark Hamilton 52 183 3.5 25 Fred Barofsky 34 163 4.8 71 John Seymour 41 127 2.9 32 Bill McKinney 25 81 3.2 5 Frank Cosentino 26 80 3.3 18 ' John Johnson 25 76 2.8 11 Curt Lindler 15 49 3.3 7 Claude Herman 5 43 8.6 32 Don Dietz 1 6 6.0 6 Curt Cook 3 5 1.7 3 ' ' Tom Abraham 3 0.0 2 TOTALS 429 1690 3.7 PASSING Player Player Att. Pet. Yds. TDs ' Carl Stichweh 119 .555 816 3 Curt Cook 10 .400 32 Frank Consentino 7 .429 26 Fred Barofsky 8 .125 14 TOTALS 144 .514 888 3 PASS RECEIVING Player i Caught Yds. TDs Player Caught Yds. TDs Sam Champi 25 347 1 Mark Hamilton 4 7 Don Parcells 7 115 David Rivers 3 34 John Seymour 7 81 Greg Steele 2 32 1 John Johnson 6 73 Sam Bartholomew- 2 9 David Ray 6 49 Warren Albrecht 1 9 Fred Barofsky 6 47 Bill McKinne 1 4 Tom Schwartz 4 81 1 SCORING Player TDs FG 1 Ex. Pts. Kicks Totals Carl Stichweh 4 1 26 Don Parcells 3 18 Mark Hamilton 3 18 Fred Barofsky 2 12 Barry Nickerson 2-4 6-8 12 Sam Champi 1 1 8 Curt Cook 1 6 Tom Schwartz 1 6 Greg Steele 1 6 Ray Hawkins 0-1 2-4 2 iSk Team (Safeties against Penn State and Navy) Weekly Ratings by Army Coaches Game Defensive Back Offensive Back Offensive Lineman Defensiv Citadel Bartholomew Stichweh Zadel Clarke Boston Noble Consentino Butterfield Braun Texas Dietz Stichweh Zadel Clarke Penn St. Johnson Parcells Zadel Casillo Virginia None Hamilton Ray Clarke Duke Dietz Stichweh Zadel Stowers Iowa St. Dietz Johnson Champi Stowers Syracuse Noble Parcells Zadel None Pitt. Noble Stichweh Champi Zadel Navy Johnson Stichweh Zadel Stowers Rollie ' s T.D. puss to Champi SOCCER Under the able coaching staff of Joe Palone, Maj. A. Broumas and Capt. W. Wix, the Varsity Soccer Team knew that this was to be a great year. Surging back after a near miss at the National Championship last year, we utilized new talent in the form of sophomores Joe Corey and Tilo Wald who joined with (3 time All American) Jose Gonzales, Cap- tain Mike Deems and Hugo Elvir to provide something that teams in the past had lacked a real offensive punch. As our season progressed, the opponents toppled one by one. Our record was slightly marred by a spirited Westchester team. The sudden loss of Hugo, due to a knee injury, was a real detriment to us as his unique style was truly an asset to the team. The Navy classic exhibited an Army team continually on the offensive but falling just short of our desired win. But a team does not die, and so, accepting a bid to the NCAA, we continued to show soccer fans what a real team Army was. In the semi-finals we completely dominated the opposing Michigan State team, until a goal in overtime put us out of contention. Our season was a success though the ultimate goal was not reached. But we can claim that the sport of soccer was played to the best characterization of Army and will prove to be a power for years to Come. fro 1 Ron-. L to R: Simpson, Henning, Prok op, Sammarco, Deems. Captain. Golden, Gonzalez, Harrington, Conncannon, Second Row. Mogan, Fafrmelo, Principe, Kriebel, Kobes, Smith, Nelson. Casey, Spinello, Third Row. Sullivan, Smith, Macktrer, Alvarez, Haas, Wald. Ellis, Heimberg, Echols, Fourth Row. Williams, Larson, Groman, Jacobs, Meccia, Kinane, Nelson, Bor- etti. Fifth Ron-. Capt. Wix, Coach Palone, Major Broumas. Saved bv a shade. Mike makes a steal. ' ' .j jtm K Perfect form. . mebody ' s faking. CROSS COUNTRY Army ' s Iron Men started off the season with hope that the strong yearling harriers out for their first varsity competition would be able to augment a nucleus of letter- men weakened by the graduation of Bill Straub and the injurj ' of team captain John Malpass. With Jim Warner leading the way. this group of yearlings did a very fine job. Fred Barnes and Steve Berry teamed with lettermen Dick Osgood and Jim Harvey to round out the team. Providence and Syracuse were the high points of the season with each member of the team breaking his own personal record. The finest team ever to come from the Naval Academy made the last note of the season an unhappy one but next year ' s captain, Fred Barnes, claims the score will be evened the next time around. Kneeling;. L lo R: Malpass, Captain. Harvey, Petrie, Pittenger, Mahoney, Linder, Roe. Seaman. Barnes, Standing: Coach Crowell, Pailes, Prey, Clement, Baccei, Berry, Murphy, Osgood, Sharrard, Rowen. Warner. Schultz. Maj. Snyder. As it should be. M ■ W ffftt! ' Hti.| f " ' i O ' r ! - 1 1 ' Next year ' s ca ptain leads the way. Just one short lap lef Front Row, L to R: Floto, Thomasson, Harmon, McGuire, Olko- ski, Shaw, Captain. Tarrant, Pollard, Atkins, Carlson, Frank, Second Row. ,Maness, Fritz, Dyer, Mahle, Gleason, Hayes Crocker. Hixon, Beasley. Mather, T iint Row: Obley, Izzo, Gooding, Stevens, Frankiewicz. Markey, Caldwell, Moon, Penn- ing, Fourth Row: Hogue, Knapp, Ramsey, Dials, Emerson, Threadgill, Wacholtz, Sands, Fifth Row: Murrell, Richards, Kraft, Rinehart, Koch, Shotwell. Weitz, Sullivan, Sixth Row: Major Boyle, As.sistant Coach. Capt. Sardo, A.ssi. ' itani Coach. Major Jennings, Coach Tipton, Mgr. Hall. 150 Lb. FOOTBALL Despite forlorn preseason predictions the 150 pound football team unveiled a combination of potent offense and granite wall defense that scored 170 points while allowing the opposition a scant 14, and gave Army an undefeated season. The year was highlighted by a 6-0 victory over Navy and a 46-0 finale at the expense of second-place Rutgers which brought the Eastern Intercollegiate Championship back to West Point for the fifth time in eight years. An unexpected wealth of material up from the Plebe team and the seasoned nucleus of last year ' s team gave Head Coach Tipton enough depth to successfully use two platoon football for the first time at Army. Under the able guidance of Coach Eric Tipton, Major Ed Boyle, and Capt. A. A. Sardo the team improved with each game, hitting its high point on the last day of the season when it shocked pre- viously undefeated Rutgers University by scoring three touchdowns in the first quarter and winning with demon- strated ease. The undefeated team was spearheaded by Captain Chuck Shaw, All League offensive guard and linebacker; and All League selections Jack Thomasson, Ed Manness, Jim Gleason, Bill Hixon. and Gary Atkins. ' i Boh Fritz finds a hole. Protection at its best. Chuck — resolute as i BASKETBALL With Coach Taylor Locke at the helm, the Army basketball team went through a fine season. The team started well but dropped a couple of its early games by small mar- gins. When everyone went home for Christmas vacation, the Army team went on a trip that took them to Dayton, Salt Lake City, and ended up at the Far West Classic in Portland. Oregon. After playing one of its finest games of the season, the team lost to Oregon State by 1 point in over- time. (Oregon State went on to win the Classic). The team came fighting back and won its last two games to take a 4th in the tourney. The spirit, desire, and hustle continued for the rest of the season; and with big victories over St. Johns and NYU, the team received the reward it had fought so hard for, an invitation to the N.I.T. Capt. Joe Koscuisko, Denny Shantz, and John Ritch. in their last season, came through with fine efforts in the late season splurge. But it was a team effort all the way, and that ' s the only way the guys would want to have it. Standing, L to R: Bob Seigle, Dennis Shantz, John Mikula, Walt Piskun, Bill Helkie, Mike Silliman. John Ritch. Dick Murray, Ed Jordan, Dan Schrage, Jack Isenhour, Bill Piatt. Kneeling: Coach Taylor Locke, and Captain Joe Kosciusko. This man could be great. A jumping game. VARSITY BASKETBALL Army Opp Lehigh 60 54 Princeton 60 64 Amherst 83 48 Cornell 61 65 Canisius 93 65 DePauw 74 54 Manhattan 81 62 Dayton 33 41 Univ of Utah 65 87 Far West Classic Oregon State 64 65 Far West Classic Washington State 59 54 Far West Classic Portland 68 67 Seton Hall 73 71 Pittsburgh 88 63 Hofstra 59 57 Fordham 53 60 Albright 70 63 Rutgers 76 68 St. John ' s 58 56 Colgate 89 51 Bucknell 64 49 Penn State 44 59 Massachusetts 82 67 New York Univ 70 62 Navy 62 52 Mike has it. The Season Finale: Third Place in the N. I. T. HOCKEY Despite losses from graduation, this year ' s hockey team remained one of the most colorful and talented Corps Squad at West Point. With the four firsties leading the way, Riley ' s boys were a success in their many adventures both on and off the ice. The firstie line of Mike Thompson. Bart Barry and Ken Hjelm again proved to be one of the leading trios in the East with both Mike and Bart leading the scor- ing column figures. Mike managed to break the all-time scoring record set a number of years ago here. Kenny proved to be one of the best play-makers the Army pucksters have seen in a long time and Ronnie always seemed to be there at defense to provide that key play when needed. The two most pleasant surprises were to be found in Dick Newell and Jim Cowart, the two cage men we could always rely on to come through with a top notch job. Coach Riely ' s boys got off to a real bang whipping their first nine opponents with impressive scores. Then came GR ' s and with them trouble at Smith Rink. As a few of the boys did not comply with the Academic Departments we were without their services for a few key games. Once every- one got back the boys began rolling again. Winning most of the rest with the exception of a couple of overtime losses which were heartbreakers the team wound up with a 17-6 record. The climax of the season came with our decisive vic- tory over our visitors from north of the border — RMC. Out to avenge last year ' s game the team not only showed Army fans its capabilities but all the ECAC followers just what high caliber hockey we play down here. With the team strong in Yearlings and Cows and with a good bunch of Plebes coming up. next year ' s Army hockey team should be one of the finest. Kneeling, L to R: Newell. Kobes. Hjelm, Barry, Thompson, Captain. Butterfield. Hansen, Kelley, Cowart, Standing: Mgr. Gibson. Assistant Coach Fullerton, Riley, Eklund, Miley, Ander- son, Boretti, Avard, Olsen, Lowry, Smith Trainer Bender, Coach Loose puck. e . ' E ' -- ' This is how it ends. p m -- ' " ' S A f ruellini: sport. VARSITY HOCKEY Army Opp Princeton 6 3 Hamilton 12 Middlebury 5 Harvard 5 2 American Int College 8 4 Ohio Univ 10 3 Hamilton 7 St. Nick ' s 2 1 Univ of Mass. 8 1 Brown 3 7 Univ of Penn 13 Dartmouth 3 4 Providence College 1 3 Yale 3 4 Boston Univ 4 5 New Hampshire 6 1 Colgate 7 3 Boston College 2 6 Williams 5 2 Bowdoin 4 2 Colby 6 Merrimack 2 1 Northeastern 3 4 Royal Military College 6 again, boss, I ' ll tell yoi,. - . All MliSM j s j . Too many sticks. So near, yet so far. A temporary situation. SWIMMING A returning nucleus of varsity lettermen coupled with strong additions from the Class of " 67 made the Army swim team even more formidable than it was last year. The season began with a squeaker over Harvard and ended with two very satisfying victories over strong teams from Navy and Princeton. The only loss of the season was a close decision to Yale, ranked third in the nation, as the Army squad compiled a 10-1 dual meet record. Academy and pool records were broken continually throughout the season as the team improved. Notable were Frank Pratt as he slipped below the 2-minute mark in the 200-yd. butterfly. Kerry O ' Hara who broke and rebroke his own record in the backstroke event and Dick Kline the new individual medly record holder. The first two also teamed up with John Landgraf and Warren Trainor to set a new mark in the medly relay. The freestyle events were led by Tony Clay, Steve Bliss, and Jerry Merges who always managed to deliver a fine performance where needed. Captain Buddy Bucha and Lyn Hunt helped the team to success with their versatility, swimming a myriad of events throughout the season. The responsibility of the diving event was borne capably b ' Al Alexander with help from Denny Hawker and Wayne Shaltenbrand. A comment often heard at pool-side from followers of Army swimming was that this year ' s team was the finest ever to compete for Army. From Row. L to R: Charters, O ' Hara. Shaltenbrand. Alexander, Hawker, Gonser. Gatesy, Landgraf, Second Row: Larson, Hunt, O ' Hara, Pratt, Bucha. Captain. Clay, Shaltenbrand, Cresci, Coach Lovestead, Third Row. Coach Ryan, Kline, McCallum, Trainer, Bliss, Merges, Wynne, Guignon, Mgr. Molepske. Lt. Col. Thayer. Tony off the blocks. The officials are thorough. Alex — in perfect form. VARSITY SWIMMING Harvard 49 46 Columbia 68 27 Pittsburgh 63 31 Yale 41 54 Colgate 55 40 Cornell 66 29 Univ of Penn. 76 18 Villanova 63 32 Dartmouth 54 41 Navy 62 33 Princeton 68 27 They all start togeth • " - ' •itf; Front Row, L to R: Lester, Spring, Pontuck. Ono. Captain Rantala, Wolffe, Assistant Coach Ambrein. t oach Malone Back Ron-: Assistant Coach Munn, Assistant Coach Warner Ouellette, Groover, Brantner, Koropey, Chatfield, Steele. Crocker Slutzky, Roggenkampf, Lingle, Longhouser, Mgr. Calek, Capt Ludwig. GYMNASTICS This year ' s gymnastics team turned in a fine record of 7 wins and 2 losses. Led by captain and all-around parti- cipant Tad Ono, the team worked hard and improved each week. Hurt by injuries of key men like Ken Slutzky and Howie Pontuck during the season, each man worked that much harder to keep Army in the win column. Finally at full strength for the big one. Coach Maloney ' s boys soundly trounced Navy by a score of 75 to 43. With the big one under their belts, the team traveled to Philadelphia for the EIGL competition where John Longhouser took first place in the trampoline. Thus ended another very successful Army gymnastics season. VARSiry GYMNASTICS Army Opp US Merchant Mar Acad 69 42 Univ of Mass 78 34 Springfield College 46.5 71.5 Southern Conn. 69.5 43.5 Pittsburgh 72.5 44.5 Penn State 36 85 Temple 74.5 45.5 Syracuse 62.5 57.5 Navy 75 43 Our able captain. A d ifficult event. EhH p -ffcj— ■ ■■• •■■ ■■■CTi S5! w 1 Din 01 i J ■ m jj l 1 gm -, ■fe »v 1 1 1 1 ElPa 1 ) m B I Many marvel, few excel. A demand for s!ren,i, ih. Now, if you ' ll please untape my wrist from the rr Kneeling L lo R: Baily, Scurman. Sharkness, Abraham, Huyck. Arvm, Captain. Sepeta, Steenlage, Fowler. Standing: Mgr. Paley, Mase, Carlson. Tucker, Monroe. Keithly. Wilson. Hanau. Schroe- der. Fisher. Doogan, Assistant Coach Powell. Coach Alitz, Miss- ing: Robbins. WRESTLING Army completed one of its most successful wrestling seasons in recent years. The 9-2-1 record was compiled by much sacrifice on the part of the entire team. Aggressiveness and conditioning were the qualities stressed most. Coach Leroy Alitz and his assistant. Fred Powell, guided their charges in the acquisition of a wide variety of offensive moves and special counters for individual opponents. The lighter weights of Fowler (123), Steenlage (130), Robbins (137) and Scureman (147) formed the nucleus of this year ' s strong attack. First Classmen Ed Sharkness (157). Bob Arvin (167) and Tom Abraham (191) added the major strength in the heavier weights. Septa (177) and Huyck (HW) completed the lineup. Team Captain Bob Arvin ably led the matmen through their rough schedule. Outstanding performances in the EIWA Tournament were turned in by Champion Bob Steenlage (130) and runners-up Mark Scureman (147) and Tom Abraham (191). VARSITY WRESTLING Army Opp Rochester Tech 33 2 Maryland 19 9 Columbia 18 9 Yale 27 6 Springfield 23 3 Pen State 15 14 Syracuse 18 15 Lehigh 10 21 Minnesota 13 14 Navy 16 16 A two point reversal. SQUASH Coach Bill Cullen ' s 1964-1965 squash team finished the season with a 9-4 record. Four returning lettermen from last year, Walt Oehrlein, Steve Darrah, Captain Tom Genoni, and Paul " Kantrowich filled out the top positions on the team, and Terry Carlson, Fred Laughlin, Hank Langendorf, Randy Loftin, and Rex Nickols completed the lineup. Inexperience played a part in two 4-5 losses to the University of Pennsyl- vania and Yale, but a fine team effort on the part of each individual against Navy resulted in a 9-0 victory for Army. Navy was favored to win this match as they possessed a bet- ter season ' s record and due to the fact that the match was played on their home courts. The . rmy victory was the first shut out to be registered by either team in Army-Navy squash competition. At the National Intercollegiate Tournament, Army was represented by Walt Oehrlein, Steve Darrah, Tom Genoni, and Paul Kantrowich. Army placed second in the team standings, while Walt Oehrlein played fine squash to win the tournament and Steve Darrah won the Consolation Tourna- ment. Coach Cullen will lose seven of his first nine players this year, but a nucleus of promising Second and Third Classmen and a surprisingly good Plebe team will provide another good season for the Army squash team. Kneeling, L to R: Oehrlein, Nichols, Preston, Commons, Carlson, Genoni, Captain, Darrah, Mentell, Langendorf, Thoden, Coats, Standing: Assistant Coach Harrison, Mgr. Shuford, Brown, Paida- kovich, " Cage, Hutchinson, Schap, Kantrowich, Allen, Wellen, Hinkle, Chitty, Leftin. Capt. Mayson, Coach Cullen. Nichols poised. M l ifrkpi W. A0 VARSITY SQUASH Army Opp Wesleyan 9 Trinty 9 Amherst 5 4 Harvard 1 8 Princeton 9 Cornell 9 Univ of Penn 4 5 Dartmouth 9 Williams 9 Yale 4 5 Fordham 9 MIT 9 Navy 9 Leftin on a serve. fiv. The able Squash Captain. ARMY-NAVY SPORTS WEEKEND FEBRUARY 27. 1965 Often overshadowed by the large public appeal of the Army-Navy Football Classic, the Army-Navy Sports Weekend is. nevertheless, an important annual winter event. The fervor of excitement and spirit of competition generated by the two academies meeting in a contest of eight ditTerent sports recalls the degree of emphasis placed on physical activities b - the ancient Greek citv states. Of the eight sports in the competition. Army achieved victories in seven and yielded only a tie to Navy in one event. The Corps of Cadets is happy and proud to dedicate the following pages as a tribute to all those who participated in their respecti e sports, culminating our winter sports season with such an overwhelming success. John Ritch making two of the twelve points he con- tributed. Dennis Shantz and Mike Silliman hit also into the double figures for Army with 16 and 14 points respectively. Joe Kosciusko. Captain of the .4rr. be counted on for a maximum effc .am. can atwi Army Opp Basketball 62 52 Gymnastics 75 43 Pistol 1397 1380 Rifle 1459 1434 Swimming 62 38 Squash 9 Track 60 49 Wrestling 16 16 Tad Ono. Captain of the Gymnastics Team, captured the all-around title while competing in six of seven events. Boh Wolfe. Jerry Dufour and John Longhouser all made sizeable contributions to Army ' s win. Ken Slutzky displayin;. the form which won a first place in the parallel bars. Ken also captured second place on Cat Kahara. Captain of th Army to a 1459 to 1434 tiired after their win over Nav Rifle Team. Tom Genoni. with the full support of his Sqiuish I won an overwhelming 9-0 victory from Navy. Steve Darrah was among on Army ' s Squash team. if the winners ARMY-NAVY SPORTS WEEKEND Captain of the Army Wrestlers, Boh Arvin points for a takedown. Boh went on to rei ister a Ed Sharkness, pictured, won his match as did Gary Fowler and Bob Steenlage. Front Row. I. to r: White. Mgr.. Harmon, Hazes, Nelson, K.ier- stead, Michela, Haydash, Pyrz, Captain, Mirando. Carll, Second Row. Coach Tipton. Meccia, Lapolla. Debolt. Triick. Kosciusko, Tragemann, Kulbacki, Kulin, Peterson, Wright, Rogers, Col. Reader, Maj. Marder, Third Row. Silliman, Atkinson, Fazen, Rusnak. Hammond, Kelner, Gnau, Garrett, Shapiro, Jones. Coach Tipton — Diamond E.xpert BASEBALL Coach Eric " The Red " Tipton is looking forward to a very successful season this year. Having lost only two regulars from last year ' s team. Coach Tipton has an excellent nucleus around which to build an ECAC Champion- ship team. This year, the team is captained by Anthony " Tony " Pyrz, who is the mainstay of the infield, being a well seasoned shortstop. The pitching staff this year, led by letter-holders Barry Debolt, Jimmy Mirando, and Phil Nelson, appears to be one of the best, if not the best on the East Coast. The infield will again be very experienced, with Mike Silliman at 1st, Bob Fazen at 2nd, Pyrz at shortstop, and either Walt Kulbacki or Tom Carl at 3rd. There are some fine sophomores coming up from last year ' s plebe team. Kenny Smith, John Birch, and " Mac " Casey could all break into the line-up if they continue to hit as well in the regular season as they have been doing in pre-season practice. Assisting Coach Tipton is Colonel " Red " Reeder and two fine officers, Lt. Col. Nichols and Maj. Livsey. With an experienced coaching staff and team, Army should have no trouble wrapping up the ECAC pennant as well as beating Navy for the third straight year. This should be one of the finest teams in the history of baseball here at West Point. Give me an inch and I ' ll take 90 feet. Pill one right by the bag 4 M- tML VARSITY BASEBALL Army 1 Long Island U. — Colgate (rain) Villanova Pennsylvania Columbia Fordham Yale Penn State (ram) Cornell N. Y. Yankees CCNY Rider (rain) Brown Harvard Rutgers St. John ' s Ithaca Lafayette (ram) Manhattan Dartmouth Syracuse Princeton Seton Hall Navy 0pp. 2 or maybe over that nearby fence. really is a ,i, ' « " f of inches. Routine unprediclability. LACROSSE 1 964 was a year for revenge in the annals of Army Lacrosse history. And revenge, indeed, was gained as Army went undefeated in intercollegiate competition until the National Championship game with the Naval Academy. After a hard fought loss to the Mount Washington Lacrosse Club, Army built a string of victories highlighted by tri- umphs over Maryland and Johns Hopkins. Against Hopkins, Army rallied to a 13-11 victory after trailing 6-1. The loss of the National Championship to a fine Navy team left this year ' s team one ultimate goal — to beat Navy! As a testimonial to a fine team, four Army players were named to the All-America First Team. Norm Webb, Mike Buckley, Roy Buckner and Tom Sheckells each re- ceived this honor, while Bill Ritch was named to the Third Team and Tim Vogel and Bill Annan received Honorable Mention. 1965 finds another Army team dedicated to revenge against Navy. The scoring punch is supplied by experienced attack men Sheckells and Ritch, plus a promising sophomore, Roy Ennis. Depth of attack is assured by the presence of Larry Strassner, Warren Dempsey and Jack Jannarone. At midfield. Army finds perhaps its greatest strength. Here, seniors Tim Vogel, Jack Thomasson, Bob Johnson and Jim Tillman are joined by Frank Kobes and foot- ball star, Rollie Stichweh, as well as two fine sophomores, Chris Pettit and Gordon Rankin. On defense, senior goalie John Cullen is joined by last year ' s starting pair of Ray Paske and Bob RadclifFe plus Jamie Bryan and Bob Selkis. Former member of ' 65, Matt Di Fiore, will also see considerable action. The Lacrosse team spent many long hours preparing for the season as this year- book was being printed. ' 65 will find its team, too, dedicated to victory over Navy and unwilling to rest until the National Championship is once again returned to Army. This one isn ' t oing anywhere without Paske. " ..,. .. !feS«, , „ k ' !»Mfi»:« rA»%H -ca aAMAMH Front Row, I. lo r: Chescavage, Buckley, Annan, Webb, Roberts, Buckner, Captain, Case. Stapleton, Bennett. Lang, Flint, Second Row. Lt. Col. March, Kesmodel, Cullen, Selkis, Paske, Strass- ner, Tillman, Ritch, Mgr., Togashi, Coach Adams, Third Row: Jannarone, Bryan. Kobes. Johnson, Radcliffe. Sheckells, Cap- tain Vogel, Thomasson. Sage words, strong emotions, and a hard-fought game. ' % mn mmmm mi 5?! - ;•.-:-■;-. V- - - Vv» ' - ' T Iff} Vji jibL i ' ■•t • ■ ■it A- VARSITY LACROSSE Army 8 Mt. Washington 8 Hofstra 10 Rutgers 10 Yale 13 Johns Hopkins 14 Maryland 11 Virginia 14 Syracuse 11 Princeton 4 Navy 0pp. 11 1 3 3 10 6 4 8 4 9 OH mav have dropped it Middle, but dotu try pickini; TENNIS Coach Cullen. VARSITY TENNIS Army Opp 3 Harvard 6 6 Pennsylvania 3 9 Swarthmore 9 Dartmouth 8 Penn State 1 8 Wesleyan 1 — Yale (rain) — 8 Columbia 1 8 Williams 1 9 Brown 9 Amherst 7 Cornell 2 9 Colgate 9 St. John ' s 1 Princeton 8 6 Navy 3 The West Point tennis team, under the able direction of Coach Bill Cullen, had another successful season last year. The overall record of the team was 13 wins against 2 losses, which made it the third-best team in the East, behind Princeton and Harvard. The final match against Navy was especially joyous in that the Cadets whipped the Middies for the third straight year by a score of 6-3. The number one position on the team was held by Walter Oehrlein, who went on in June to take second in the Eastern Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament at Colgate. Walter was followed by Rich Oehrlein, Paul Kan- trowich, John Leyerzaph, Graham Forrest, and Dan Hombarger in that order. Other cadets who played a key part during the season were John Shuford, Ross WoUen, Steve Darrah, and Terry Carlson. The winning combination of Cullen and Oehrlein should prove to be even stronger this spring. Kneeling, I. to r: Carlson, Shuford, Rezek, Lampkin, Leyerzaph, Captain. Hom- barger, Wollen, Forrest, Kantrowich, Standing: Lt. Col. Buckley, Coach Cullen, Loftin, Scheiner, Langendorf, Darrah, Oehrlein, Oehrlein, W., Horsman, Nichols, Mentell, Coach Harrison. Klunk, Mgr. ' i ' " - • ?; " " ' - •:»?? " !;. %iMK— KX ---- Army ' s brother a , Captain i alt Oiliil. GOLF Last spring the Army golfers shot their way to an impressive 11-1 won-lost record, the third highest winning percentage of the year for Army sports. Under the tutelage of Coach Brown, the golfers swept through ten straight matches only to be stopped short of a perfect season by Navy. Army finished third in the highly competitive Eastern Intercollegiates. Captain-Elect Harry Joyner suffered only one loss during the season, and he tied for second in the grueling Fall Easterns. This spring the team should be as impressive as last year, and Harry and Coach Brown have tricks up their sleeves for the spoiler of last year ' s Record. Lejt to right: Captain G. Van Valkenburg. Fred McFarren. Chip Romano, Mike Hudson, Steve Pembrook, Jim Grisham, Harry Joyner, Chuck Heindricks. Sure be easier to hit the big rm VARSITY GOLF 0pp. 4 Pennsylvania 6 Rutgers 9 Manhattan 6 Colgate 6 Columbia 5 Princeton 6 Lehigh 4 Dartmouth 3rd E. 1. G. A. 3rd 6 Syracuse 6 Cornell 7 Seton Hall 1 Navy 6 A 40 fool putt counts the same as a 300 yard drive. TRACK OUTDOORS 1964 VARSITY TRACK Army 0pp. 96 Harvard 73 89 Yale 60 _ Penn Relays — 991 2 Notre Dame 5IV2 73 Manhattan 76 2nd Heptagonals (Harvard, Army, Navy) 2nd 91 Penn State 58 80 Navy 69 First Ron I to r: Ryan, Von Freyman, Tetu, Schillo, Straub, Richard, Wass de Czege. Di Neno. Otjen, Miller, Mgr.. Second Row. Coach Crowell {standing), Oshel, Griffin, Jenkins, La Rochelle. Norris, Lounsberry, Bliss. Berry. Ramsay. Alger, Clement, Hume, Champi, Maj. Bard, Third Ron-; Jenkins, Swan- son, Hallenbeck, Gimian, Farrell, Casillo, Smith, Linder, Sher- rard, Phillips, Olson, Kuhn. Fourth Row: Keating. Davis, Osgood, Sandell. Lawrence. Jeffrey. Chrisman. Pearce, Kievit, Stichweh. Army ' s 1964 Outdoor Track team finished a great season by winning an inspiring victory over a highly favored Middle team. This win typified the team ' s spirit during an 8-1 season featuring favored opponents such as Harvard, Yale, and Navy. Team Captain Billy Straub highlighted great individual performances of a strong squad and retained his reputation as Army ' s finest distance man by registering his third con- secutive win in the Heptagonal two mile run and second win of the one mile event, the only performer to ever accomplish this feat. He followed this with Academy Rec- ords in the mile and two mile and the tying of the NCAA record in the 5000 meter run. Dick Plymale and Wayne Richard finished their last year by becoming the first two cadets to break fifteen feet in the pole vault and Ed Schillo led the way for a strong weight man showing at all meets. Leading the way in planning to retain this momentum in the 1965 season is the Academy Record holding mile relay team of Captain Hal Jenkins. Ranee Farrell. John Phillips, and Bob Ramsey. Dave Kuhn. Rog Griffin. Greg Steele, and Rollie Stichweh intend to insure the Hop Step and Broad Jumps are two events kept in the Army win column. " Ozzie " . Steve Clement, and a host of year- lings paced by Jimmy Warner will fill the tremendous shoes left by Billy in the distance events with Pete Louns- bury. Steve Olson, and Steve Bliss taking over in the weight, javelin, and discus events respectively. All in all, the 1964 season was a monument to a great team effort and the 1965 season will hardly be counted as less. This is a team that knows what it means to always want to win. Griffin going for five points in llic broail iiimp I hive in ilic hop, step and grimaci Mrulc tor Stride. The most recent development in Infantry weapons. TRACK INDOORS 1965 Army Opp Harvard 42 67 Rutgers 83 26 Manhattan 50 59 St. John ' s 81 53.5 lona 81 2.5 Cornell 58 51 Dartmouth 96 13 Pittsburgh 57% 43H Penn State 62 47 Navy 60 49 Doug Davis, by a foot. INTRAMURALS An indisputable fact of cadet life is that there ' s more to sports at West Point than just varsity athletics. While the Army banners are carried forth by the various Black Knights of the Hudson, so also are the company banners carried by a multitude of intramural teams, and so also is the individual banner of every cadet carried forth — by himself. In intramurals covering almost every sport played inter- collegiately, plus a few additions (Military Watermanship?), everyone has a chance to demonstrate the same spirit — even if not the same skills — as his varsity counterpart. And if he misses any athletic opportunities in company contests, the Office of Physical Education is more than willing to afford him a chance to compete with the ever-present Obstacle Course and fitness tests. West Point without PE would be as the Army without OD. The sport where the word " inter-murder " originated ' : -. - - Varsity tomorrow! The object is to be one of the first 90 finishers. 3 H ' P 0- - 1 1 t:- ' - Jf ft , i WL JlBflWPOT £ l!SK P J:-- " =i-l4i t m J Ti -f I ' ■ . 1.12 ki Mi fli flHr " ir l? " - ' ' ■ «r .. ■ ' ■■■, ll Jb - ■ ' ■ ■ " " i " ' ' ' ilMB K y ' !g " ' ffv.i3g . -- ' w ' M ' , —-■» ' " .-..•; • " ■ - ■- ■ f " - B. ; ■ 0 0m -- M ' — _ They can ' I be serious. J The one-arm. five-finger handstand. This first stcf sure is a h)ni; one f I ' d rather walk. Effectively confused. Sec, I i, ' UI ya I had it! THE ATHLETIC BOARD Left to right: Colonel R. P. Murphy. Director of Athletics, Brigadier General M. S. Davison. Commandant of Cadets, Colonel E. R. Heiberg. Head of Department of Mechanics. Colonel J. R. Jannarone. Head of Department of Physics and Chemistry, Col- onel F. J. Kobes, Jr., Director of Physical Education. ' .ii ' Ki ■■X- )J .4. ■•■ i4VI, ' ■tim ' M: ' m ' ' MA ' m H M O m i. a ' ff T ihouiiht the moon looked like t hat! This year the Astronomy Club got off to one of its best starts in many years. A great deal of credit for this success must be given to Capt. Minich. our OIC. His tireless efforts on behalf of the club were undoubtably responsible for its activities. On our first trip four cadets enjoyed a high level program on Nuclear Propulsion in the Astronautic area. Russ Campbell, the club ' s president, conducted several observation periods on the roof of Washington Hall. Some cadets started from scratch, as evidenced by John Oi ' s mistaking the lights on an airplane for a shooting star. John, incidently, was the club photographer. It has been a very successful year for all concerned. Thanks must also be given to Dean Risseeuw, who handled all the papers as club custodian, and to Rick Chapman, the club vice-president. ASTRONOMY CLUB The West Point Audio Club provided the Corps of Cadets with answers and equipment concerning essentially every phase of stereophonic high fidelity. To acquaint more cadets (and officers) with the types, prices, advantages, and histon, ' of hi-fi equipment, the Audio Club presented its Audio Show under the direction of Jan Van Prooyen. The club had available at its disposal a wide variety of electronic equipment, including a high quality stereo system, all types of testing equipment, and a vast assort- ment of kit-building tools. Bill Lyons, club president, and Dick Mohlere, custodian, acted as a storehouse of information concerning building and repairing audio equip- ment. Jerry Ledzinski, the vice-president, acted as advisor for selecting components and getting discounts. Any problems on tape recording were aptly handled by the secretary, Roy Garms. The club OIC, Capt. Caldwell of the Electricity Department, tackled any and all problems which the cadets couldn ' t handle. To see the material results of the Audio Club ' s activities, one has only to walk through a few divisions of barracks and look at some of the professional systems assembled by various cadets. AUDIO CLUB The . ophonic. ultra-high frequency Audio Club! wish she would check my stripes out. DEBATE COUNCIL AND FORUM The Debate Council and Forum, involving more cadets than any other extra curricular activity, is actually four clubs in one, the Debate Council, the National Debate Tournament, the Forum, and the Student Conference in United States Affairs. THE DEBATE COUNCIL The Debate Council has the longest actual season of any of our activities. Starting in September and lasting through May, cadet teams participate in intercollegiate tournaments at the Academy and campuses all over the States. The council also provides the two man team to represent West Point in the National Tournament here on home ground. NDT Annually since 1947, the Debate Council and Forum has sponsored the National Debate Tournament which marks the culmination of national intercollegiate forensic activities for the academic year. This year forty colleges and universities representing all sections of the United States competed for the first place trophy. All aspects of the tournament were organized and run by hundred members. cadet staff of approximately one THE FORUM The purpose of the Forum is that of broadening the intellectual horizons and stimulating specific intellectual inter- ests of cadets. The method used is to bring cadets into contact with leaders in the fields of government, education, business, the military, and students of diverse interests from other colleges and universities. In addition, through the Forum, a cadet is able to pursue personal intellectual interests to almost any depth he desires. SCUSA The Sixteenth Annual Student Conference on United St ates Affairs was held at West Point from two to five Decem- ber. After a year of preparation, the cadet staff was ready for some 210 round-table participants from nearly 95 colleges and universities from all parts of the United States and Canada to discuss the Problems of the Developing Nations. All agreed that the year ' s preparation for SCUSA XVI was well worth it. No, it is not Joan of Arc! GERMAN CLUB FRENCH CLUB Once again the French Club was able to boast of a very successful year. The cultural and social activ- ities were numerous and varied. Among the highlights of the year were a trip to Vassar College early in December, a Christmas party previous to our departure on leave, a special trip to the Naval Academy at Annap- olis for the celebration of their " French Weekend " in March, a trip to the World ' s Fair Pavilion dc Paris in April, and the annual picnic at Round Pond during the spring. The radio program in French continued to be heard on KDET once every week. Several French movies, starring Fernandel. Yves Montand. Mylene Demongeot. Brigitte Bardot. and others, were shown during the academic year. Interesting lectures were presented by distinguished visitors. The persons respons- ible for the success of the French Club activities during the academic year 1964-1965 were Captain Bowes, Of!icer-in-Charge: Cadet Hugo E. Elvir. President: Cadet Peyton Ligon, Vice-President: Cadet William T. Harvey, Secretars ' : Cadet Thomas Eason, Custodian. met the sweetest little German girl The German Club has always held the interest of those on either side of the tangent line, as well as those who had not the least connection with the German side of the Dept. of Langs. The reminiscences, the rumors, the war stories from AOT pointed to the desirability of some familiarity with German language and with the more popular traditions. The meetings. the ocre of club activities, provided just this familiarity. Movies and dis- cussions brought on lively discussions and appraisals of the land and its produce, as well as the opportunity for everyone to see the new Germany through the lenses of German news-cameramen and of cadets on the German Exchange trips. The program, scrupulously designed with some cultural purpose in mind, also taught some of the intangibles of surviving and thriving in Germany, magic phrases, and the fact that a little ' Gemutlichkeif goes a long way. ) PORTUGUESE CLUB ( this is Ihc I ' orlui csc Cliih Like an old Caravela setting out to find a route to India, the Portuguese Club began its year with a small gathering of die-hard members. Our strength grew, however, after our meeting with seven guest speakers, including our new Brazilian Army officer, Lt. Col. Moraes-Rego and his charming wife, Marina. Under the direction of our club officers, we settled down to a program of enlightening talks by guest lecturers. " Gloom period " was somewhat shortened by our trip to New York City, where we met representatives of the Portuguese and Brazilian governments. We were delighted that our old friend, Capt. Americo A. Sardo, USMC, was able to speak to us in this, his last year at West Point. A native of Portugal, Capt. Sardo showed us unique charac- teristics of the Portuguese language and people. The Spanish Chih . . . in action! This year the Spanish Club started with a campaign for only Spanish to be spoken in its activities. Several guest speakers from different academic departments were scheduled during the year. They told of their experiences serving in Spanish speaking countries. Among them were Lt. Col. Chandler, Maj. Galvin, Lt. Col. Portera, and Col. Sutherland. The highlight of the year will come in the spring when the club will take trips to the Organization of American States, and the Spanish Pavilion in the New York World ' s Fair. SPANISH CLUB RUSSIAN CLUB The Russian Club concentrated on fun this year, coupled, of course, with many educational endeavors. We had movies, lectures, a slide show by cadets who have toured Russia, and even a trip to Vassar for a joint meeting with the Vassar Russian Club. The Cluh proved to be a painless way to gain some slight degree of proficiency in the Russian Language. The officer-in-charge of the cluh was Major H. J. Vetort, and the officers included Jim Paley. President; Lloyd Briggs, Vice-President; Steve Kempf, Custodian; and Ken Schroeder, Secretary. During the course of the past year, the Mathematics Forum met each month to attend lectures. These lectures ranged from the application of the hyper-circle in the solu- tion of mechanics problems to the mathematical analysis of reaction rates in chemistry. However, lectures were not the only activities of the Fonim. The Computer Section was organized to teach members various computer languages and their application in solving practical problems of this modern era. In addition to these activities, several trips were taken during the year to lectures at nearby colleges, and to the IBM Center at White Plains, thus rounding out the events of the year. MATHEMATICS FORUM Are ihey confused? l£fr Tourini; Cape Kennedy, under the hot Florida sun ROCKET SOCIETY The Rocket Society has existed to foster cadet interest in the missile and space exploration realm and to provide the laboratory testing facilities for projects which are cadets ' own designs. Coordination with the Mechanics. Chemistry, and Ordnance Departments has helped several rocket enthusiasts to further genuine research into solid propellent design and the live firing of cadet-made models. Specifically, the Ordnance Department has static test cells equiped with such electronic back-up gear as closed-circuit television, fully instrumented test beds to afford amateur rocketeers facilities comparable. on a smaller scale, to the major missile companies in the country toda ' . Everyone likes to take trips and our Rocket Society is not to be outdone, with annual guided tours to Redstone Arsenal at Huntsville. Alabama and Cape Kennedy, Florida. The cadets have always found these trips quite inter- esting because the scientific detail takes on a more meaning- ful and lasting impression when you actually observe the A tlas and Polaris firings and the missilemen at work that make these " birds " fiv. 1965 has been a building year for the Fencing Club. After a banner (9 wins, losses) season in 1964. graduation saw the much regretted departure of six members of " 64 who had made up much of the backbone of the starting lineup. Despite these losses, however. Coach Dow and his team looked to 1 965 for still greater achievement. Five first classmen-Foilman and team captain Dick Endicott, Sabre-men Rick Sinureich and Dean Lof- tin, and epee-men Jack Koletty and Mike Shulick provided the solid framework upon which to build for the 1965 season, which included such formidable opponents as Princeton, St. John ' s and Norwich Uni- versities. In addition to the firsties, a number of experienced second and third classmen were avail- able to round out the starting team, while the pres- ence of an especially promising group of plebe? assured future depth. The prospects looked good for another outstanding season, to culminate finally at the National Intercollegiate Championships in Detroit. After one year of Army saber manual. FENCING CLUB ■pilHK!1. i - ' HANDBALL CLUB The Cadet Handball Club finished its most successful season to date, providing the very experienced athletic clubs and Y.M.C.A. ' s from New York City much stiflfer competition than in previous years. The club hosted five teams at West Point including an exhibition match by the New York Athletic Club, one of the strongest teams in the country. We also played the Post Team weekly, enabling us to get even with the instructors who gave us one-side beatings in the classroom. Captain Lupi and Captain Glen, the oflicer representatives, helped make our successful season possible against noteworthy opponents during our trips to New York City. Bob Bradley (Presi- dent). Chris Kinard (Vice-President), Jack Lyons (Custodian), Tony Mazzarella (Sec- retary), Reg Dryzga, Bill Griffin, Dick Hall. Harry Joyner. Mike Hudson, John Knowles, Jim Seabum, Bill Tredennick, and Bob Arnone composed the handball team. u - A See if you can i;ct this one! The Judo Club is a relatively new organization at West Point. The club was organized to provide instruction for inter- ested cadets while at the same time provid- ing a team to represent the Academy in intercollegiate competition. The club ' s membership was increased by over one hundred per cent in the past year partly because of the inclusion of Judo as an event in the Tokyo Olympics which made more cadets aware of the sport. Also interest was boosted by the undying eft ' orts of the new OR, Capt. Wilcox, tactical officer of B-1. who gained experience while sta- tioned in Korea. A demonstration in judo was given for the Corps to promote further interest, while instruction was offered to cadets interested in judo but not in formal competition. The club had competition with several of our football rival schools and also had a match with the Ishikawa Judo Club of Philadelphia, which ofl ' ers a promising future for the club. JUDO CLUB Oops! PISTOL CLUB This year the Pistol Club did not attend the National Matches at Camp Perry, Ohio, due to increased Summer Training for the Corps of Cadets. This did not prevent the Club from carrying on its Corps-wide shooting program. The Club conducted several events to provide funds for the Club ' s future activities. These activities included the All Service Matches at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, The First Army National Trophy Match, and the National In- door Sectionals. As in the past the club fared well with two cadets gaining " Legs " toward their Distinguished Pistol Badges. The Club is coached by Master Sergeant Herbert Roberts who has put much time into instructing and advising mem- bers of the Club. During the spring and fall, Sgt. Roberts, along with members of the Club, has held many periods ot instruction for the Corps of Cadets in the basic fundamentals of pistol shooting. The Atafia RIFLE CLUB The USMA Rifle Club has once again had a highly successful year. In April, the Rifle Club traveled to Fort Dix, New .Jersey to compete in the First Army Rifle Matches as defending champion and also as the First Army Matches record holder. In this stiff competition the Club has again represented West Point in a fine manner. The Rifle Club officers were Randy Guenther, President: Bill Hecker, Vice President and Cus- todian; and Bill Haneke, Secretary. Capt. Hargr ove and Capt. Slensko were extremely helpful in planning and administration, while the fine coaching of Sgt. O ' Neill helped lead the Club on to a winning season. That is what you call " real shooting. ' Ui. iliis IS the hi SAILING CLUB This year was another good one for the Sailing Club under the leadership of our great OIC, Maj. Denton, and marked the second year at the new dock facilities across the railroad tracks from Target Field. The 30 men on the team started sailing the 15 Flying Dutchmen Jrs. as soon as the ice cleared from the mighty Hudson, and that river is mighty cold when one tips over. As a result of the Middle Atlantic Intercollegiate Sailing Association convention here in February, we sailed against such colleges as MIT, Yale, Cornell. Princeton, and Harvard. At Annapolis we competed with the other service academies — Navy, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine — for the Bryant E. Moore Trophy, a presentation originally given by General Moore when he was Superintendent here. Sailing made Spring an enjoyable season, but especially when we beat Navy several times at their own game. RUGBY CLUB The Rugby Club completed a very successful season under the capable coaching of Tom Baron, and the leader- ship of President. Jim McEliece. Having made one trip to Cornell, and two to New York, the Rugby men demonstrated the two qualities which are almost inherent in the Rugby world: 1) a desire to play and win in the atmosphere of a rough contact sport, and 2) a keen interest in having fun after the game. Besides three trips, the " ruggers " had five home games and many offers, both in the fall and the spring, for games in various parts of the country. This fact, along with the interest and enthusiasm demonstrated here at West Point for the sport, indicative of the growing popularity of " English football. " e mmi SKY DIVING CLUB The Cadet Sky Diving Club, first organized in 1958 when two airborne qualified cadets, along with other military parachutists on post, formed the West Point Sport Parachute Club, has expanded rapidly. During this academic year, over 75 new members, who were trained by qualified Cadet Military Sport Parachute instructors, made their first jumps. In addition, under the direction of OIC Lt. Col. Paul F. Braim and NCOIC and team coach SFC Arvin Briscoe, the experienced mem- bers of the club have continued to advance their skills in free-fall maneuvers and target accuracy. Headed by Club President Steve Spoerry and Vice President Ron Williams, this group has done very well this spring, competing against both niililars sport parachute clubs and college sky diving teams. Training and practice in maneuvers with other jumpers has allowed a number of cadets to reperform the maneuver of Cadets Hal Kaufman and Steve Spoerry, who made the first Cadet to Cadet mid-air baton pass in the spring of ' 64. The Cadet Sky Diving Club was one of the first college clubs to be organized. It is now one of the best equipped sky diving clubs in the country. hope it doesn ' t rip any more. i % m WATER POLO CLUB The Water Polo Club, a member of the Eastern Colle- giate Water Polo Conference, is one of Army ' s winningest teams having lost only six contests in the last fifteen years. This year, with a strong nucleus of Seniors, the team is better than ever. Outstanding Juniors and Sophomores round out the starting lineup with several promising Freshman also on the team. This year the team will participate in the Junior and Senior AAU Championships. With more schools and athletic clubs fielding teams, stiffer competition and increased interest are foreseen this season. bathing trunks! TRIATHALON CLUB The Triathlon Club is one of the newest additions to West Point ' s extracurricular activities. Organized in 1960, it has increasingly drawn interest among the Corps of Cadets. The sport, as " tri- " implies, con- sists of swimming, cross country, and pistol shooting, three of the five events in the Olympic pentathlon. The club not only provides a chance for intercollegiate competition, but it also gives the interested cadet a foundation for the Army ' s pentathlon team at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Competition this past spring included meets with Nav -. Cornell, LaSalle, and the Army Pentathlon Team. There are no walls out there. - ' ■ ' IC ' M]: ' :: ; ' ■kj ' . ;■■ • ■■ ' - ' Yy ' ' - ' ' ' : ' -::- -.V- ' - •.. ■■■;. .-.■.,■■• ' ' •? M ' - L . , ' ' - ' ' II HBi- I3 ' ' V ' V •-. - ' -f ■S Pl • ' - Mi PC -i f f- I .S. hhl. uUi CADET BAND The Cadet Band is a relatively new club. Although the Cadet Dance Band has been a mainstay at the Academy for many years, it was only three years ago that the Cadet Band came into formal existence. Prior to that time a few cadets who had a musical ten- dency would get together once a week to play purely for their own enjoyment. However, since that time the Band has taken tremen- dous steps forward. As a result of the last three presidents and the Band ' s director, Captain E. W. Allen, the Band has grown to a size today of sixty-five instruments and has become a vtial function of the Corps. The Band performs concerts in the Dining Hall, plays for after-taps rallies, and supports the 150 lb football team, basketball, and baseball teams at their games. This does not mean that the Dance Band has been neglected. It continues to play for many of the Cadet Hops and in the Dining Hall during Gloom Period. The Cadet Band is still in its growing stages. Within the next few years a near-professional sound and strong organization will no doubt mark the Cadet Band. KDET This is not Murray the K., but Jerry the M. The staff of Radio Station KDET concerns itself primarily with the Corps, its main audience. The carefully selected programs provide an appreciable and enjoyable variety, blending soft study sounds with the current hit programs to meet its listeners " requests. Supplementing this, KDET provides the best in news and ARMY sports, along with timely editorials and special news broadcasts. The sports coverage is especially extensive, providing ARMY sports fans both home and away games of ARMY football, soccer, basketball, hockey, lacrosse, and baseball. In post-season compe- tition of the Army team, KDET brings all the action back to the Corps. A systematic training program aids staflf turnover and the addition of Fourth Classmen. Circulated questionnaires help the station maintain the Corps ' interests. KDET considers all- around and in-depth coverage in its presentation. 469 DIALECTIC SOCIETY West Point ' s only true cultural organization, the Dialec- tic Society, provided the Greatest Entertainment Year Ever for the Corps of Cadets, bringing them rest and relaxation from their daily grind. Under the watchful eyes of Major Roberge and Captain Wilcox, the Society presented such extravaganzas as Peter. Paul Mary. The Four Saints, and The Bitter End Singers — the best in show business from the outside world. President Chuck Shaw and Special Pro- grams Director Jim Stephenson working in conjunction with Vice President Dave Hopkins, Treasurer John Knowles, and Secretary ' Rich Tarpley must be given credit for bringing the Corps some of the best weekends of the decade. One such was the Dec. 12 Sweater Hop in the theater, presented as the Dialectic Society ' s contribution to the Ski Weekend. Through their efforts the Astronauts appeared in person to provide the music for the all-civilian-clothes hop. As the Corps eyed the end of the academic year the Society turned its efforts to the 100th Nite Show, which was staged in a quite extraordinary manner under the directing of Ed Arm- strong and his assistant Sam Rizzo. With this type of culture, the Long Grev Line can rest in complete assurance that the Dialectic Society has provided the Corps with an excellent background for ' their venture into the cold, cruel world. The Dialectic Society presents Peter, Paul and Mary The people responsible he chorus line My own true lov CADET GLEE CLUB Cadet Officers: Head OIC Capt. G. D. Waters President. Duncan MacVicar Vice-President, John Pickler Information Officer. Jim Ferguson Secretary. Tom Hays Librarian. Frank Rybicki Stage Mgr. Morris Faber Assistant QIC ' s IVIaj. K. J. Krstulick Maj. F. J. Sheriff Capt. D. F. Svendson Maj. H. B. Rhyne Capt. T. L. Muilan Capt. A. B. Salisbury Maj. J. A. Eiibanks The Cadet Glee Club, first organized in 1908 with the presentation of two concerts at West Point, did not gain full momentum until 1919. Then, it continued to increase its prestige and singing ability throLighout this year. It is privileged to list among recent presentations those at Carnegie Hall, at Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.. for the President of the United States, and for the late General MacArthur. Thus, the Club has traveled widely throughout the United States. The Glee Club lists on its credits numerous television appearances, among them the Bell Telephone Hour, the Perr ' Como Show, and the Ed Sullivan Show. There are future appearances planned. The Glee Club consists of 120 members of the upper three classes, chosen on the basis of semi-annual try-outs. The members represent some 40 of the nation ' s 50 states. Trips this year included Boston. New York, television in Philadelphia. Washington. D.C.. Miami. Tampa. St. Louis, and Denver. The Glee Club also recorded for Decca Records. They also sing. H :« i. !ri BOWLING CLUB Some people think that the Bowling Club is endorsed by the (shudder) OPE on the theory that some benefit is derived from slinging 16 lb. cannon balls toward ten inoffensive wooden sticks. Actually, the Bowling Club is an organization promoted by the Psychology Department to en- able small groups of lunatic fringe cadets to vent their frustrations on the pins during the week. On weekends, those members who are more adept at venting their frustrations compete against simi- lar fringe groups from other colleges. n beat Vassar. CAMERA CLUB The West Point Camera Club is a unique club here. Its organization and atmosphere is in- formal which provides the members with a pleas- ing departure from the rigors of the system. The four officers are Dave Bangert (Pres. ), Ralph Locurcio ( Vice-Pres. ), George Bell (Sec), and Stan Genega (Custodian). This year the club went to New York City where we visited the Time and Life Building and the World ' s Fair to give everyone a chance to try what they learned at the Time Photo Laboratory. Foremost, the Camera Club enables any cadet to learn how to take and develop their own photos in our modern darkroom in the catacombs of Old South Barracks. To give the members an equal opportunity to display their acquired skills, we ran a photo contest during the spring and displayed the products in the new library. The entries were judged by Captain Jack Williams of Penn State fame, our OIC, a connoisseur of fine photography. The winner received a prize. Under the able direction of President Tom Johnson, Vice President Warren John- son, Secretary Bill Ervin, Treasurer Kush- kowski, the 1964-65 Chess Club reached a new zenith of overall chess competence. The highlight of the year was the trip to Colorado to participate in tournaments against both Colorado University and the Air Force Academy. In addition to this trip, the club en- countered several local teams in New York City and was host to many strong opponents. The club ended its activities with the Annual Corps Chess Tournament. CHESS CLUB I ' m done ahead MODEL BUILDERS ' CLUB The Model Builders ' Club provides all cadets with facilities and equipment for construction of models of many kinds. In- terest usually centers around model airplane construction and flying, both manual and radio-controlled, and on the large model railroad, still under construction. For the small amount of financial backing it re- ceives, the club receives a large degree of interest from the Corps. ' ' l- ' " ' hat other type models ihey have? MOUNTAINEERING CLUB The Mountaineering Club has contin- ued to grow and expand its activities. Trips to New Paltz and to Colorado highlighted the year, while additional training and climb- ing experience was gained at Camp Buck- ner. The Mountain Rescue Unit provided protection for club members and gave the club ' s more proficient climbers experience in rescue techniques. The club also partici- pated in activities with the American Alpine Society and the Appalachian Mountaineer- ing Club. Extensive training was conducted indoors during the winter to meet a demand for increased proficiency among club mem- bers and to aid interested cadets in their climbing development. Leadership was pro- vided by Captain Huff, the Officer in Charge; Sgt. Maj. Brosseau, Assistant Officer in Charge; and the cadet club officers: Phil Cooper, Jerry Cecil, John Buczacki, and Bill Sherborne. I ' . i a ' Kr OUTDOOR SPORTSMAN S CLUB The Outdoor Sportsman ' s Club is subdivided into four associated clubs: the Archery Club, the Fishing Club, the Hunting Club, and the Woodsman ' s Club. Although Jack Lowe was the president of the Outdoor Sportsman ' s Club, he directed the overall program for all associate clubs. The presidents of the clubs v ere; Emory Pylant of the Hunting Club, Jack Keith of the Archery Club, John Madia of the Woodsman ' s Club and Joe Anderson of the Fishing Club. This year the club had all of its activities hampered by the drought which caused the prolonged clos- ing of the woods. Hon ' come we always ha The West Point Scoutmasters Council provides a con- tinuation of scouting activities for members of tfie Corps. It offers the opportunity for service, both to personnel on post and civilians in the surrounding area. These activities include visiting troop meetings, giving classes to Scouts, assisting paper drives, serving as advancement counsellors, conducting hikes and camping trips, and running an In- vitational Camporee in the spring. The Council also took its annual trip to National Boy Scout Headquarters in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Previous scouting experience is not a necessity for active membership and all cadets who indicate their interest will be given the opportunity to work in the program. The officers this year were Robert G. Keats, (Pres. ). Robert Scully ( Vice-Pres. ), Dennis Brewer (Sec.) and James Harvey, Order of the Arrow Chapter Chief. RADIO CLUB The Amateur Radio Club boasts fourteen licensed " hams, " in more than one sense of the word. These mem- bers use the club ' s fine facilities to confirm contacts with all fifty states and over one hundred foreign countries. In fact, the club might be described as the Corp ' s own means to a good neighbor policy. Representatives have been sent to national conventions held throughout the year, as well as to local meetings in the New York area to confirm relations with many of the over 250,000 licensed amateurs in the United States. SCOUTMASTERS COUNCIL Radio Moscow. SCUBA CLUB The West Point Scuba Club has increased in popularity since its beginning only five years ago. and promises to climb to greater heights each year, as there are a greater number of activities making up the schedule every year. Many " Mike Nelsons " have gotten the " bug " for this sport and find it quite a thrilling adventure. Interesting trips to excellent div- ing spots as Key West and Bermuda were the highlights of this year ' s activities. Besides diving in the lakes on or near the reservation, there are special winter events as ice dives in Delafield and Round Pond. Courses of instruction in three categories were offered: basic. YMCA, and Instructor. An expansion program was in need, thus making it a well diver- sified organization. The adventures of diving are unlimited, and for many cadets who have received instruction here, the " silent world " is theirs to conquer. L ' V S4r ' M ifr -.:... tm Keep digging, it ' s not too cold. SKEET AND TRAP CLUB The Cadet Skeet and Trap Club, a spring sport, has as this year ' s officers: President. William B. Mitchell: Vice-President, Frank Probst; Secretary. Bill Frazier. The club is fortunate to have an expert skeet shooter as OIC and team coach. Maj. Robert Davis. The team took several trips, shooting against such clubs as the Win- chester team and Remington team. This particular activity has a large membership in the Corps, but to make trips one must continue to show skill and interest in shooting. Competition for team berths is keen, but those who survive the test have found it very rewarding. In the past season, three team members had an overall average of over 23.5 (with 25 being perfect). What goes up must come down. The form is good, except for his right hand. SKI CLUB The biggest improvement in skiing facilities at West Point include the new 2200 ft. " T " bar and the snow making facilities. Through the Supe ' s fund and the hard work of the officers who support our club, the third major improvement was made with the addition of a 1500 ft. Polma-lift servicing a newly developed slope. And along with this improvement came con- tinual increase in use of the slope as many cadets found that a winter of skiing was a winter without a gloom period. Sun, snow, and flashing skies were the magic that lifted many to another world for a few hours of each winter day. You ' re nuts if you think I ' m going up the The 1965 HOWITZER staff would like lo express sin- cere thanks to the people who pla ed a part in the publica- tion of this yearbook. Capt. Shapleigh M. Drisko, Officer Representative for the HOWITZER: Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wohl. representatives of the publisher; the Post Signal Corps Photography Laboratory, who contributed many excellent pictures: and many members of the Corps who aided in the advertising for and production of the book all have been most helpful. A yearbook is intended to be a record of four years, a tribute to an entire class, and a memento for each graduate. Those of us who did a little something lo help produce the 1965 HOWITZER hope that it is adequate. SfSu Oj ar t H K1 is M. . v Editor THE HOWITZER 1965 Aron. S,, Ediit -Chief: Capt. Drisko, Officer-iii-Ch,ii ;. Hennig, R , Pr,,d„ Editors, Standing, LtoR: Grigs- hy. L., Kantor, N., Roth, A.. Kistler. B. Silting: Sheridan, M., Thompson, J., Arvin, B. THE HOWITZER 1965 Mill Heller and his Photography Stall Standing. L to R: Swensson, J.. Howell, J. Sitting: Charles, F., Harmon. S.. Eckart. C. THE EDITORIAL STAFF: (L to R) Huffhines, Borkowski, Kinard (editor), Frydrychowski, Rogers, Conley, Wollen. (not present, Johnson, Hudson) POINTER The monthly publication, the POINTER, serves a dual purpose. On the surface, it is a product of the creativity of the editorial personnel designed to reach the varied in- terests of its readers, from fiction, humor, and features to art and photography. But underneath the surface it is a full- fledged business, developing the managerial and business talents of those involved in the sales, circulation, and adver- tising necessary to promote not only the magazine itself. but also its associated products (calendars, stationary, Christ- mas cards, Ducrot Pepys, Weekend Pointers). cs are developed the ideas which le itself. THE BUSINESS STAFF: (L ' to R) Hayes. Drury, Mullen, Stanko. (not present. Powers, Tumas) BUGLE NOTES Faced with the problems of an expand- ing West Point and plebe class, the editorial statt of the BUGLE NOTES have met and over- come the man conflicts. The job of bringing out the BUGLE NOTES is not an easy one. The fluid attitudes, changing athletic records and the many sided fourth class system have challenged the staff. All the work has not stopped the hard driving hierarchy of the chin, the old man, gore, the general and fred from having a good time first class year. Even though not much was heard from the hard working Business Staff we know they too enjoyed the best year of their lives since ours is not a great profit making organization. We again helped the Corps keep up with their poop. PROTESTANT DISCUSSION FELLOWSHIP The Cadet Protestant Discussion Fellowship has lived up to its name. Its weekly meetings have been held in the 19th Division Office of the Cadet Chaplain, James D. Ford. Though formerly a weak organization, the group found a rebirth in September of last year with an infliLX of cadets from the Class of " 67. Presently the fellovNship is meeting as two separate units: a plebe group from the Class of " 68 and an upperclass fellowship built around the nucleus from " 67. The purpose of the organization is two-fold. Fellowship sup- plements a discussion founded on the principles observed through Bible study. An annual visit is also made to the prominent Protestant churches of New York City. H ' hat could possibly be so funny CADET CHAPEL CHOIR Providing music for the Cadet Chapel and representing West Point at various churches in the East, the Cadet Chapel Choir has done a commendable job in fulfilling its obligations. Under the expert direction of Mr. John A. Davis, organist and Choirmaster, the Cadet Choir has earned a fine reputa- tion with both the churches and the young ladies of the communities it has visited. This year the choir ' s travels have extended to Washington, D.C. and Ridgewood. New Jersey, as well as churches in the New York area. The burden of the Chapel Choir in its efforts to make the services at West Point a memorable part of Cadet life been increased this year with the passing of that stalwart cornerstone of the very foundation of the Cadet Chapel, Dr. Speers. We thank him for the memory he has left us. The Cadet Chapel Choir. A§BR 4 % fi ( ' : i.f , CADET CHAPEL ACOLYTES and CHIMERS Along with the Cadet Choir, come the Protestant Chapel Acolytes, who provide acolytes lor all Protestant Chapel services at the Cadet Chapel. This limited organization has a membership of appro.ximately 30 cadets, and they, too, enjoy the benefits of a trip with the Chapel Choir. Every evening before supper and at the late services at the Chapel, the Chapel Chimers are busily at work playing their chimes, giving us delightful music for getting us up after our afternoon naps. (Impel Ac. ' h The Cadet Chapel Chimers. CADET SUNDAY SCHOOL 1 In bringing the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the Protestant children of the Post on an interdenominational basis, the Cadet Sunday School teachers, in close cooperation with the Chaplain. USMA. fulfill an essential function. Over five hundred students were instructed each Sunday by one hun- dred cadets who gave their free time to teach them the Word of God. Major Foote and Chaplain Ford worked hard advising and helping, but the brunt of the work was left to the initiative of the Cadet teachers. Jim Golden, who served as overall Superintendent, was closely aided by Fred Laugh- lin. Preston Hughes. Jon Plaas, Gene Parker, Chuck Hein- drichs, and Mark Sheridan. Trips to nearby churches ex- posed the teachers to new teaching techniques. A banquet in mid-winter brightened up gloom period and reminded us of our tremendous opportunity and responsibility. The Sunday School drew us out of our little grey world and brought us all a better perspective of life. The Cadet Sunday School teachers. iIJIJli U CATHOLIC CHAPEL CHOIR The Catholic Chapel Choir this past year was con- fronted with the task of learning many new pieces of music as the result of the sweeping changes in the Sacred Liturgy. But under the able leadership of John Wattendorf, CIC. Anthony Borrego, and valuable assistance from Captain Richard Hargrove, the required changes were easily made. The Choir, first organized as a parish function to assist in the worship of God, particularly the Sacrifice of the Mass. sang at High Mass on most Sundays of the year. The Fourth Class Choir, which joined us in December, sang at Low Mass. Our first trip was to Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. where we sang with the Mercy College Chonis. We then travelled to New York City and sang in Blessed Sacra- ment Church. On 4 March the Choir sang with the Mount St. Vincent Glee Club at the College of Mount St. Vincent. On the first Sunday after Easter, the Choir sang the tra- ditional High Mass in St. Patrick ' s Cathedral in New York City. Throughout the year, whether at West Point or away. the Choir realized that our purpose in the parish was to be active participants in the worship of God. This knowledge, shared by the members of the Choir, was responsible for the success of our endeavours this year. The Catholic Chapel. JEWISH CHAPEL SUNDAY SCHOOL Ever ' Sunday morning the Jewish children here on post, and a few from Highland Fails, attend the Jewish Chapel Sunday School in Thayer Hall. There are twelve teachers from all classes who teach on a rotational basis and about twice as many students. This is only the second year of the program, but it is growing fast and attracting active interest from many corners. The Jewish Chapel Choir last year was a small group with generally more courage than singing ability. The mem- bers practiced diligently every Wednesday night in order to get ready for the three trips that are alloted to the Choir each year. Traditionally, the cadets have gone to the New York City area for the majority of engagements. Last year, a trip was scheduled to Boston in addition. A large share of the credit for the Jewish Chapel Choir ' s success was due to West Point ' s rabbi. Avraham Soltes. He used his exceptional musical ability to advise and encourage the Choir to a high level of performance. The officer in charge. Captain Kovel, offered both guidance and friendship to the members of the Choir. Last year ' s Choir was ably directed by Gordon Larson, who also sang in the Glee Club. The cadet in charge of the Jewish Chapel Choir was Jim Scheiner. The Jewish Chapel. JEWISH CHAPEL CHOIR The Jewish Chapel Cho CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION The Christian Science Organizati on at West Point is one of the most active religious organizations on campus. The organization holds services each Sunday in Cullum Hall, as well as a weekly Monday evening Testimony Meeting in Nininger Hall. Also an early morning study period is held in Nininger Hall Monday through Saturday. These meetings are open to all interested cadets. The organization members are grateful for the opportunity to hold their religious serv- ices in addition to attendance at Protestant Chapel. Through these meetings, the cadet gains a firmer foundation in his own denomination ' s beliefs. The members enjoy the privilege of meeting occasion- ally with members of other Christian Science College Organi- zations in the area and participating in the Biennial Meet- ing in Boston of college organization members from all over the world. CARDINAL NEWMAN FORUM The Forum had a busy schedule for 1964-65. Weekly meetings covered topics ranging widely from cadet-oriented subjects to discussion of the tremendous changes taking place in the Catholic Church today. The Forum was privileged to have several distinguished guests at our meeting, rang- ing from Seminarians to missionaries. Sever- al informative films v ere included in the schedule. Among the most popular of the Forum sponsored activities were the Sunday dis- cussion groups with groups of girls from nearby colleges. A new plan for return trips to these schools was initiated this year, and, needless to say, met with enthusiasm. Prob- ably the single most important Forum-spon- sored activity was the Retreat to Mary- knoll Seminary. Anyone who has made this Retreat will testify to its worth. Our two Priests, Monsignor Moore and Father McCormack, Maj. Moore, our OIC. and this year ' s staff can truly say that a lot was accomplished this year. THE 1965 CLASS COMMITTEE 1965 is a proud class. It is also a spirited class. Evi- dence of this can be seen in the work of its representatives, the Class Committee. Through the efforts of this group ' 65 brought social progress and efficient leadership to all activi- ties within its sphere of influence. The Class of 1965 will long remember the activities organized by the Class Committee from the Yearling June Week Picnic to First Class Privileges. It can take pride in the Plebe System. Academy Exchange Program. Automobile Show, and numerous other functions. The Class Committee ' s reward is the record of performance of its class — a class that because of the changes and progress it has made, is credited with the creation of the " Corps going to hell. ' " The 1965 Class Committee. FIRST CLASS CLUB BOARD OF GOVERNORS The Class of " 65 initiated a new concept for the opera- tion of the First Class Compound. For the first time in his- tory the club operation was handled by an active Board of Governors. The Chairman was Steve Harman and he had seven members of the Board to assist him. These members were Clair Gill, Rick Chapman, Mark Sheridan, Ron Butter- field, Joe Hindsley, Tom Croak, and John Howell. Special credit must be given John for his sincere interest in the Club. The operation of our Firstie Club was certainly a class effort, an effort of which we should be proud. Look how proud they are. AUTOMOBILE COMMITTEE The Automobile Committee is com- posed of First Class members of each company and selected members of the First Class Committee. It serves the mem- bers of the First Class in facilitating the purchase, financing, insuring, licens- ing, and delivery of their new cars. High- lights of this year ' s activities included the Automobile Show, demonstration driving. Bankers " Weekend, and most important, MOBILIZATION DAY. The Automobile Committee. HONOR COMMITTEE The Corps, collectively and individually, is the guardian of the Cadet Honor Code. The Honor Committee represents the Corps of Cadets in matters of Honor. It has primary responsibility for the instruction of the entering classes in the precepts of the Honor Code and the workings of the Hon- or System. The Committee represents the Corps in guarding against violations of, and the appearance of practices in- consistent with the Cadet Honor Code. The Honor Code has never outgrown its original and simple meaning — " A cadet does not lie. cheat, or steal. " It has been and will remain the most treasured possession of " The Long Grey Line. " Front Ron. L u, R: Bailey. R.; Geneg a. S.; Stowell. R.; Wolf. R. Second R nv: L ons. J.; O ' Connor. J.; Levine. B.; Murphy. J.; Scholl, V.; Scruggs. H.; Hudson. M,; Hester. A.; Deems. M.; Turner. J.; Divers. W.; Pylant. J.; Chase, E.; Skidmore, F.; Cooley, J., Joyner. H. Buck Row: Fergusson. T.; Beinlich, W.; Wiest, L.; Principe. N.; Bryan. J. From the activities of Piebe Christmas to the social whirl of June Week 1965, the Hop Committee has broadened Its horizons far beyond its customary " hop " functions. The introductions at Camp Buckner and the decorations at the Ben Franklin did their share, of course, to bolster the spirits of the hustling hop-managers. The Class picnics at Lake Frederick and at Camp Buckner, the 500th Night Celebration, the Ring Hops and various other campaigns (the brave volunteers on the First Class Trip) all made for a busy and pretty swinging four year tour of duty. HOP COMMITTEE PUBLIC INFORMATION DETAIL The Public Information Detail in its two catagories, the information detail, and the sports information detail has disseminated information about the Corps of Cadets, its activities, and its functions. This was accomplished through the use of newspaper releases, photographs, and inter- views. The sports information detail provided the spotters, statisticians and public announcers that were used at the sporting events this year. The detail is headed by Frank Meier, with Jack Lyons and Richard Coleman as the regi- mental representatives. Gordon Long was assist- ant head and Ray Woodruff the administration officer. Two trips were taken this year, one to Fort Slocum to see and take part in how the Army gathers and disseminates information. The other trip was to Washington, D. C. to visit the information agencies there and to be the guests of the Association of the United States Army. PUBLIC RELATIONS COUNCIL The Madison Ave. men. This year many selected cadets have been sent throughout the United States to keep the public, especially potential cadets, informed of the life and activities of cadets. The task of selection and preparation of these representatives of the Corps has been the responsibility of the Cadet Public Relations Council. To insure the most unbiased selection possible from the many candidates, tryouts for the trips over Spring Leave and for Boy " s State in the early summer, were initiated in mid-November. The Council for this year was headed by President Duncan Mac- Vicker, Vice-President John Alger, Secretary Dan Speilman, and Operations OtTicer Doug Richard- Hi _ A4 j n.. ■•1 :; X, F i l l , ?. .,, i m vm I he I ' lihlu Rcluii. ' tis L iH THE RABBLE ROUSERS " The Spirit of tine Corps. " a phenomenon known only to those who have participated in Army victories, reached its peak in " The Victory " — the 1964 football season finale. Yet multitudes are meaningless unless formed into a cohesive contingent mass. Undertaking this task were the twelve Rabble Rousers who erased all vestiges of collegiate cheerleading by reviving the vengeance of " The Spirit of Max. " Involved in such diverse activities as mule riding, bon-fires. and after- taps rallies, this select twelve massed " The 12th Man " into an unbeatable deafening roar. Incomparable Rocco McGurk. Grandad Harry Dermody, Playboy Sam Rizzo, Prince of Beauty Ed Klink, Handsome Jim Conley, Mule-men Jimbo Hall and B-Kesmodle, Labo Transpo Jackson, Singing Ge- nones Genoni, E=IR Coll, Ole Dad Thompson, and Goat Gordy Wiser comprised the group which converted the Corps into a defiant human megaphone heard around the world. A three million dollar library, up in flames. For our next speaker . %m » lt i ' .T- - The 1965 Riiw and Crcsl Coniimltee THE 1965 RING and CREST COMMITTEE Nuw, isn ' t that sweet? To say that the Class of 1965 did a few things different is an understate- ment. Successful new ventures were our aim. Adding to the class accomplishments the Ring and Crest Committee contributed a new and very enjoyable full weekend to the West Point social calendar. Where Ring Weekend had always been large, it was improved upon by activities on Friday night and Sunday. The Ring Presen- tation was given more significance with the creation of the Stag Banquet replete with military toasts and a final toast to the class. The Rings presented that evening, 11 September 1964, had been long in coming and proved well worth the wait. They were the culmination of the efforts of the Ring and Crest Committee begun plebe year with the selection of the class crest. The design met the criteria of the class. It was bold and readily showed the aggressive spirit and the initiative of our class. The crest was also placed upon other items, sometimes in the form of a charm which sufficed for the often used, crest accented " A " ' pin. Always welcomed as the ultimate to a courtship was the miniature ... at least by most. Our rings will always be a link between our four years at the Academy and the bright prospects of the future. Thank you. Sir. it ' s been a pleasure. j K THE CENTURY CLUB Not to be out-done by any class, the class of 1965 is proud to have as its members, the Century Club. This is a small group of elite Cadets that have had the honor to " walk the area " for 100 hours or more. Come rain, sleet, snow, or hail, these men have become more regular than the U.S. Mail. We are especially proud to have a " Double Centurion. " in Guy Riley. " The King. " who holds the record for " 65 with more than 200 hours walking the turf. We are all proud of the fine job these men have done, and the class of ' 65 regards them with deep esteem. The King If they got a dollar for every hour! CADET ACTIVITIES OFFICE Under the direction of Major Thurman, the Cadet Activities Office has been responsible for the extra-curricular activities of the Corps. To coordinate social and recreational functions of such a large group is not an easy job. and we express a word of thanks for everything that was done for the Corps. CADET HOSTESS A tribute is due to Mrs. Holland and her staff, who have worked continuously for " 65 from plebe year right on through graduation. We would like to take this opportunity to thank Mrs. Holland for ever thing she has done to make our four years at West Point as happy as could be. and extend our appreciation to the " Sweetheart of the Corps. " Front Rom-. L to R: Miss E. Ross; Mrs. T. Maloney; Back Ron-. Maj. M. R. Thurman; Mr. T. R. Trainer: Mr. D. Bucci. R : Mrs. Ware, Mrs. Holland, Mrs. Schandler. Xt txv s " ;- .Vj ? V3ll : : 11 ii ,fl r r m ' n. ■S .■ 0. !,.. 1 ,: a s 1 bMV: • ' V «it, I 1 k M M pq .r f As different from other cars as they are from each other Come join us now. Catch the whole new look, the whole new feel of the Chevrolet line for ' 65. Look them all over. You ' ll discover the difference- fast! 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Fifth Avenue Office: 546 Fifth Ave., New York 36, N. Y. Bowling Green Office: Beaver St. at New St., New York 4, N.Y. CABLE ADDRESS: SEASAVE NEW YORK Member Federal Deposit Insvrance Corporation T VIN -TURBINE CHINOOK is new Boeing Vertol tactical transport iielicopter now operational with U. S. Army llth Air Assault Division. Capable of carrying 33 fully equipped troops plus troop commander, or 24 litter patients and attendants, Chinooks have cruise speed of 150 mph. Cabin is 30 feet long. has rear-loading ramp which can be left open in flight for carry- ing longer loads, or air-dropping troops or supplies. Maximum paylo ' ad is more than seven tons. Sealed fuselage makes water landings possible. Chinooks can also serve as " flying cranes " . With an external sling, loads of lOVa tons have been carried. Capability has many faces at Boeing SPACE RENDEZVOUS. Pilot sights orbit- ing vehicle and begins docking run for simulated | rendezvous in space, one of many advanced jQ Boeing research programs. SATURN V, -tfrawing, right, will stand tall as 30-story building and hurl 100 tons into earth orbit. Boeing is developing, building and testing for NASA the S-IC first-stage booster with thrust of approximately 160,000,000 horsepower. LUNAR LABORATORY and living quarters for four research men on moon, based on Boeing study. Also, under NASA study contracts and its own research programs, Boeing is studying manned orbiting research stations, ferry vehi- cles, lunar explorations and deep space probes. Space Technology • Missiles • Miltlary Aircraft Systems • 707, 720 and 727 Jetliners • Systems Management • Helicopters • Marine Vehicles • Gas Turbine Engines • Also. Boeing Scientijic Research Laboratories RIGHT DRESS FLORSHEIM 5riOc5 when the occasion demands the very finest! Shown: The Kenmook, 93(M2; Im- perial brogue in brown hand-stained calf; in black calf. 92601. THE FLORSHEIM SHOE COMPANY Makers of line shoes lor men and women AMERICA ' S LEADING A RESORT HOTEL i . SALUTES THE FUTURE LEADERS OF AMERICA i HOTEL t 1_AS VEGAS • NEVADA W i H Mfi m. In the heart of TIMES SQUARE 1400 air-conditioned rooms— each with pri ate hath, free radio and television. And so reasonahle! ■ Ideal location in the heart of the theater district... close to all transportation and smart shop- ping centers. ■ Special group rates availahle upon request. ■ Ftxcellent fa- cilities for Sales Meetings, Conventions Banquets. ■ I lospita lity desk 1 lohhy. ■ Home of the Playbill Restaurant. Special Cadet Rates $7.00 single $5.00 per person, 2 or more to the room ! President General Manager the crossroads of the world Gaicly and excitement — find them at the Aslor! Ideally located next door to lead- ing Broadway theatres . . . steps from New York ' s famed department stores, shops and business districts . . . close to all ter- minals and transportation facilities. 750 delightful air-conditioned rooms with free TV . . . and a courteous multi-lingual MafT 111 serve you — more reasons why the Astor IS the tirsi choice of knowledgeable Special Cadet Rates: $7.00 single $5.00 per person, 2 or more to the room the famous loday, as wc face great technological challenges, the Cur tiss-VVright Corporation is proud of its traditional identification with the U.S. Army as part of the team dedicated to strengthening die nation ' s defenses. In this spirit of dedication, Ciirtiss-Wright research and de elopment programs are constantly- seeking new advances for a better equipped U.S. Army. CURTISS -WRIGHT CORPORATION Wood-Ridge • New Jersey .em mmw. QUALITY Counts with the Army Regulation Military Academy Cuff Lnks with the name krementz are a symbol of correct style and fine quality. Year after year this quality becomes more and more apparent . . . krementz Jewelry wears well, does not tarnish be- cause it is made with an enduring overlay of ACTUAL 14 KT. COLD. lAKT GOLD OVERLAY Evening Jewelry - Cuff Links ■ Tie Holders - Belt Buckles From $3.00 to $25.00 plus fax Available wherever fine jewe ry is soM. Krementz Co. • Newark 5, New Jersey Tiu. UUUi l€V ASL VIa oJaK ' . o .k cMxX-iSyy JiAJi 50fyiAn - 4 Al LXlJlJtAYVUyXA o ArtMyU T,U (JyjJ X VYVULAA oJmt A( r A , TU (jj X y mj:i A)- - O jaA 1 - U a.)JjT vm oiAA) ' Miu; ri jAOl r.dx i xdt rmi l ) oJl {j ; rouaJOt TU CAX tJMjA :) JLur : J ii Ul - JYV W i ly yw) V fM CMJikjT ASLM J2 AJtUy r ( f ' HI ■ 7 -|vv Jt 1 ] i ' J " -• " - . . . . --•- - .- 6 68 minds with but a single thought. You. Right this minute there are 6,168 Plymouth, Dodge, Chrysler and Imperial dealers figuring out ways to deserve your business. They offer Certified Car Care, to stop car trouble before it starts. They don ' t just sell cars— they sell great engineering. There ' s a fine distinction which deserves your consideration. And today, any high school with an accredited driver training course can get a car without cost— from one of said dealers. But don ' t get nervous about so many people thinking of you. They just want to keep you happy. And in the family. It ' s good business. To a Chrysler Motors Corporation dealer, " Customer Care " is many things. Thinking about you, as well as your car, is one of them. CHRYSLER CORPORATION PLYMOUTH. DODGE. CHRYSLER. IMPERIAL IVATIOIVAL BAIVK OF FORT SAM HOUSTOIN AT SAN ANTONIO 1422 E. Grayson St., San Antonio 8, Texas Special Services for Members of the Armed Forces Since 1920 One of the first banks to inaugurate special " Career " services for military personnel — regardless of where stationed in the World. During the past 43 years many thousands of military personnel have made it their per- manent banking home. Liberal personal signature loans at reasonable rates. Write, wire or phone for further information. Inquiries receive prompt attention. DIRECTORS Maj. Gen. M. E. Tillery U.S.A.F., Retired Col. H. E. Fuller U.S.A., Retiree Maj. Gen. W. E. Prosser U.S.A., Retired Mr. W. Evans Fit General Insur; Brig. Gen. E. W. Napier U.S.A.F., Retired Mr. W. L. Bailey President Col. D. B. White U.S.A. F,, Retired Mr. R. L. Mason Executive Vice Mr. Je Chairman ss J. Laas of the Board Member — Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation READINESS Pershing missile is raised swiftly and surely into the vertical firing position by its erector-launcher, as a multiple-exposure photograph records the action. The rugged, highly mobile erector-launcher — a vital part of the Pershing weapon system — is among the products for the nation ' s defense made by . . . UNIDYNAMICS DIVISION UNIVERSAL MATCH CORPORATION ST LOUIS, MISSOURI OUR SYSTEM IS BUILT ON TEAMWORK AtGT E, research, man ufacturing and operations work closely together in serving the public interest. Research develops new ideas. Manufacturing translates them into products. Our operating companies put them to work for the community. It is this common aim and unity of purpose that assures the public of new and better communications services in the quickest, most economical way. By operating as a fully integrated system, GT E not only benefits the total community but furthers its own growth as a major communications company serving areas in 33 states. GEE GENERAL TELEPHONE ELECTRONICS W ?30 THIRD AVE. N.V. 10017 • GTSE SUflSIDIAfllES Gcneial Telephone Operalino Cos. in 33 stales • GTSE Labotaioncs • GTSE Inicmalional • General Telephone Oireclotv Co. • Aulomalic Elecinc • lenkun Elecliic - Sylvania Elecinc CAREER OFFICERS If you have mail service you can nave the FULL BANK SERVICE of Riggs National Bank Whether you are in Washington, D. C, or some remote corner of the world, you can have the comfort of knowmg that your finan- cial affairs are being handled by one of the largest banks in the world. Savings accounts, checking accounts, bank- by-mail, trust services, and money for prac- tically any good purpose are part of the full bank service available to you through Riggs National Bank. Serving Washington and the Armed Forces since 1836, we are proud to have served such distinguished people as Admiral David Farra- gut. General Winfield Scott and Dr. Samuel P. Langley . . . we ' d be proud to serve you, also. r » RIGGS NATIONAL BANK OF WASHINGTON, D.C. • FOUNDED 1836 LARGEST BANK IN THE NATION ' S CAPITAL Memte,-— Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Memter— FeJeral Reserve System Wherever You Move in the U.S.A., Sears Service Follows You . . . When you buy an appliance from Sears, Roebuck and Co., you get an extra nobody else can give . . . Sears Nationwide Service Today ' s career executive is a man on the move . . .moving about the country as he changes jobs, gets new assign- ments, moves further on his way up. Take a tip from miHtary men who ' ve really been around. Buy your appli- ances at Sears. Suppose you live in Chicago and you ' re moving to Denver. As soon as you and the moving van arrive, call your Denver Sears store and they ' ll send a man over to hook up your Sears appliances — on the same day you call. Regardless of where you pur- chase a Sears appliance, Sears service is available at more than 780 retail stores and 1,100 catalog sales offices. " I have faith that Americans, armed with the great strength of our heritage, will show the courage, the energy, the determination and the patient wisdom to surmount the grave challenges which confront us. We can— and so we must— march in the front rank of the century ' s search for human dignity in a world of peace and freedom. " These words were written by John F. Kennedy as a challenge to all Americans in the struggle we face in the world today. We reprint them here be- cause we feel they have special meaning to the 1965 graduating class of the U.S. Military Academy. The jITABLE Life Assurance Society of the United States " " Home OlUro 1285 Avenue of the Americas, New York, N. Y. 10019 At West Point, fast General Electric com- L puters do a very special job. The Cadets use them the way you use a slide rule, helping them squeeze more problems and experiments into a curriculum that is already crowded. Special use takes a special system. To be effective, the system must allow many cadets, with different problems, to use the machines at the same time. And the com- puter language has to be easy to work with. Togetherwiththe U.S. Military Academy, (icneral Electric developed the computer s stem SAD-SAC and a special basic pro- eraming language that West Point wanted. ' w Cadets are able to do five experiments the time it took to do one. In delivering what West Point needed, G-E people showed they put first emphasis on the customer ... on what he wants rather than what we offer. College-educated men and women at General Electric find that studying customers " special problems helps them grow . . . keeps them from getting into a rut where they always do the same thing the same way. And they ' re assured that they ' re putting their education and training to the best pos- sible use — meeting people ' s needs, today ' s and tomorrow ' s. Progress Is Our Moif Imporfanf T roducf GENERAL ELECTRIC " Our best to you " from your local Sinclair Dealer ifjS? ' " ' Drive with care and buy Sinclair See Sinclair Dinoland at the New York World ' s Fair SINCLAIR REFINING COMPANY 600 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y, 10020 Around the world... with 6000 kinds of lamps, Sylvania lights the way in military, commercial and residential applications. SYLVANIA GENERAL TELEPHONE ELECTRONICS GT E iting Division, Sylvania Electric Piodiict!. Inc.. 60 Boston St., Salem, Mass MUNARit after ' ski boots original KtU»P sweaters original Bavarian SWedterS jASTKiEiR 8, jackets CARRERA goggles ICELAND PARKAS TEAM SWEATERS VELOURS TURTLENECKS STRETCH PANTS REFLEX BINDINGS FUTURA POLES ACCESSORIES P M DISTRIBUTORS INC. 40 New York Ave , Westbuty. L,l , NY. 1 1590 P M WEST 2S5 West South Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 There ' s a Keds that ' s right for every tennis court (grass, clay or asphalt) GRASS? Get into Mainsail with the zigzag sole that won ' t skid, even in early morning dew. ASPHALT? You ' ll keep your bounce on black-top in Triumph , with its shock-absorber crepe sole. Keds are kings of the courts. All three of the pro-Keds® shown here are made with pull-proof eyelets, shock-proof arch cushions — and they [ll iirif) stand up through countless washings. Rocefalle, Center, New Vo,., N.V. 10020 U.S. RUBBER EVEN OLD SOLDIERS APPRECIATE THE DIFFERENCE IN FLAVOR! vme An officer with bright insignia sets the proper example for his men. Brasso, the world- famous metal polish, gives a quicker, brighter,longer-lasting shine to insignia, but- tons, and buckles. You will find it most dependable in keeping a good appearance. THE R. T. FRENCH COMPANY Rochester 9, New York Moira LaTour Can you tell who owns the 1965 Falcon? Here ' s a test we think you ' ll have some fun with. Pair the people on the left with the Ford Motor Company cars pictured below. But remember, people ' s tastes in cars are wide and varied. That ' s why we at Ford Motor Company make 72 models available in our eight great car lines. From Mustang to Lincoln Continental there ' s a car to suit everyone. See what we mean by visiting your Ford or Lincoln-Mercury dealer. He ' s got a car just right for you, too. Mustang Mercury Comet ANSWERS: Granny Garntz — this durable grand old lady made Comet — the World ' s Durability Champ — her personal choice. Calloway Gribbs— nothing but the private world of a Thunderbird would do — pop art sales have never been better. Jeremiah Van Allen III — what else but a Ford Galaxie 500 LTD for a scion of the times. Moira LaTour— " Make mine Mercury, " says Moira, " now that it ' s in the Lincoln Continental YOUR CHOICE ' 65 CARS ARE FROM. Continental tradition. " Tex Kincaid— he ' s really from Hoboken and doesn ' t drive but likes to stand near a Continental. Farley Fastback — he ' s no hot rodder, likes gas savings instead, up to 15% greater fuel economy in the ' 65 Falcon. Harriet Harassed — a mother of .six needs plenty of room and a Fairlane 500 wagon fills the bill. Mervin Milton — Merv found the Mustang hardtop hard to top. MUSTANG . FALCON . FAIRLANE • FORD COMET. MERCURY THUNDERBIRD • LINCOLN CONTINENTAL Mervin Milton MOTOR COMPANY A C CHEVROLET, INC. Serving U.S.C.C. Since 1930 Extends Thanks and Congratulations To the Class of 1965 Adams Porter ASSOCIATES MARINE INSURANCE Established - - 1907 Cotton Exchange BIdg. Houston, Texas Maracalbo Caracas Sao Paulo Rio de Janeiro Buenos Aires Bogota C]|||||IIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIII[3IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIIIE]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]|||||||||||IC]|||||||||||IC] Compliments of AMERICAN CORRUGATED CONTAINER COMPANY THE HERALDRY OF MERIT The above trademark has earned the right to be considered as such. It signifies a dependable STANDARD of QUALITY that has always been distinctive and recognized. We are proud of this, as you men are of your career. ART CAP COMPAIVY, INC. 729 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 3, N. Y. E]||||IIIIIIII»IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIIIE]IIIIIIIIIIII[]IIIIIIIIIIIIC]IIIIIIIIIIIIC] What is the big advantage Garrett-AiResearch gas turbine generator sets have over diesel and gasoline engines? Mobility. J ightweight generator sets made by Garrett-AiResearch can be moved fast. Heavy diesel and gasoline engines can ' t. And that is one big reason why Garrett gas turbine generator sets are being specified more and more frequently in place of reciprocat- ing engines. Today, any modern weapons system — ground radar, missile support, or communications unit — must have the ability to move on a minute ' s notice. That means it must be equipped with a lightweight, portable power source. The power output must be precise and of high quality. It must be reliable. ■.I ' ' Garrett gas turbine generator sets fill the bill on all counts. For example, four men can easily carry a 20 kw or 30 kw generator set made by Garrett, or it can be airlifted by helicopter or light aircraft, or transported in a ' Jeep! Garrett generator sets can produce 50, 60 or 400-cycle electrical power or combination outputs ranging from 20 to 250 kilowatts. Garrett .sets are built tough — to withstand shock and rough han- dling in field operations. Our sets operate reliably in any weather — with immediate starts from minus 65 " to a plus 125°. Starting, electrical loading, and shutdown functions are automatic. Sound attenuation is an integral part of the enclosure and exhaust system. Noise is reduced to a comfortable level. The multi-fuel m ' capability of Garrett sets permits them to run on jet fuel, AV gas, diesel fuel, natural gas or com- mercial gasoline. Because Garrett has built over 10,000 small gas turbines, proved dependability comes as standard equipment with every set we deliver. Garrett-AiResearch generator sets are currently at work with many military units: The U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, NASA, as well as with foreign military groups. For further information, write to J. A. Connell, AiResearch Manufacturing Division, 180 N. Aviation Boulevard, El Segundo, California. Garrett is experience AiResearch Manufacturing Divisions Los Angeles • Phoenix The best of everything to the FIRSTIES of COMPANY F-1 from deLaars Airport Rest CONGRATULATIONS and BEST WISHES rOOYEARS Your Guide to the Best in Mens Slippe L. B. EVANS ' SON CO. WAKEFIELD, MASS. To the Class of ' 65 Ou.Lart ehconc ralJationsanJ beit iviikei on uour araaualion . . . ana tnrouqli tne iteari to come. Oke 10 Wejf point e.i on tlie federal S ierincej ita iaiute ijou on ttiii nappti Geo. M. Badger Ward W. Dworshak Clyde D. Eddleman David G. Erskine Thomas H. Harvey Robt. W. Hasbrouck W. A. Holbrook Jr. Frederic H. Smith Jr. James F. Torrence Jr John M. Weikerf Nov. ' 18 ' 45 ' 24 ' 24 ' 32 Aug. ' 17 Nov. ' 18 ' 29 ' 23 ' 23 1701 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE • WASHINGTON, D. C. Income Foundation Fund JCORPORATED An OPEN-END Diversified Management Investment Company ESTABLISHED 1934 FEDERATED GROWTH FUND An OPEN-END Diversified Management Investment Company ESTABLISHED 1955 P Prospectus available from FEDERATED INVESTORS, INC. Special Distributor for INCOME FOUNDATION FUND, INC. and FEDERATED GROWTH FUND Federated Investors Building Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 281-3093 Where your driving takes a turn for the best... at the Sign of the Orange Disc Gulf Oil Corporation Caribe shares a precious moment One man, one woman, the glow of twilight turning the world to a lovers ' wonderland .. .and magic words that change your life forever. This is a precious moment... a Caribe moment. Caribe creates fine jewelry— (irom rough stone to finished piece) -in its own factories, guaranteeing you highest CARIBE standards of workmanship in every phase of manu- facture- Afl Caribe diamonds have a world-wide 100% trade-in policy. Insist on pearls, precious and semi-precious jewelry and diamonds that are " Created With Care " by CARIBE Caribe diamond works, Santurce, Puerto Rico, U.S. A. lied WuUu Serving the Army, Navy, and Air Force with ... IFF Systems Equipment Avionics Test Equipment Meteorological Systems Padcat-d Bell Cars International representing the U.S. Armed Forces in 27 countries worldwide Salutes the members of the Military Academy. ESQUIRE SPORTSWEAR MFG. CO. Makers of America ' s Most Modern Slacks thecrackerIarrelCQ. Cutters of Traditional Trousers Fine Imported Weatherwear 1291) Avenue of the Americas New Yorkl9.N.Y. CARS INTERNATIONAL 485 Lexington Avenue New York. NY. 10017 THE AIRLIFTERS FROM LOCKHEED-GEORGIA How MATS unloads its new airlif% six minutes Last October nineteenth, when the first of Lockheed ' s big C-141 StarLifters was delivered to the 1707th Air Transport Wing, at Tinker AFB, an efficient Mili- tary Air Transport Service ground crew discharged a full load from the giant fan- jet freighter— and rolled the cargo into two waiting C-130s. Using their new 463L mechanized freight shifters, total elapsed time was 14 minutes: six minutes to unload the StarLifter, eight minutes to reload the two Hercules. The 15 StarLifters already delivered have been flown hundreds of test hours by Air Force, FAA, and company pilots on anti-icing, all-weather, crew-training, and systems-checkout missions. Ahead of schedule, more StarLifters are rolling off the p roduction lines toward the objective of doubling the nation ' s military airlift. Now the Air Force has a truly compatible airfreight system — the C-141S for long-haul at jet speeds, the C-130s for medium-range, short field operations. AND the 463L mechanized equipment which speeds loading opera- tions through the big rear doors of both Lockheed aircraft. Lockheed-Georgia Company, Mari- etta, Georgia: A Division of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation. IN THE FIELD OF HYDRAULIC DREDGING CAHACAN A LEADER Established 1898 Gahagan Dredging Corporation 90 Broad Street, New York 4, N.Y. 2907 Bay-to-Bay Blvd., Tampa 9, Florida The FULLER BRUSH Co. HARTFORD 2, CONNECTICUT H R H CONSTRUCTION CORP. 579 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK 17, N.Y. San Juan New York Washington GRADUATING CLASS Let us finance your automobile. Special low loan rates and terms. Free checking and personalized checks fortwo and one half years after graduation. UNDERGRADUATES Join the many others who use our per- sonalized service. FORT SILL NATIONAL BANK of Fort Sill, Oklahoma Member F.D.I.C. A Fast Convenient Banking Service for the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard WRITE FOR DETAILS ' BANKING FOR SERVICE PEOPLE IS OUR SPECIALTY ' OUR MANY SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR BEST ADVERTISEMENT At home and overseas. ..this sign stands for... dealers you can depend on. ..for good advice and ■ncBTissr. prM obil Premium 1 ■fB 1 — — ii I ■— — » good products hke -Mobil ' s High Energy Gasoline! Your nearest Mobil dealer can prove it to you MOBIL OIL COMPANY, A Division of Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc. L o npumenid of West Publishing Company Law Book Publishers jar the Nations Lawyers ST. PAUL 2, MINNESOTA OMAN CONSTRUCTION CO, INC. OMAN-FARNSWORTH- WRIGHT A JOINT VENTURE 625 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK We Believe fhat Peaceful co-existence is best maintained by being Too Tough to Tackle MASON HANGER-SILAS MASON CO, INC. ENGINEERS and CONTRACTORS Designers of Explosives Processing Plants and Biplosion Resistant Structures Builders and Operators of Ordnance Facilities 500 Fifth Avenue Lexington New York Kentucky cJhe liluttary ' s JLast QJringe Jjenefit HARRY ' S LIQUOR STORE The Original Liquor Locker Since 1934 4th M STREETS, S.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. THE EVOLUTION REVOLUTION At Douglas, we aren ' t waiting for new scientific knowledge to evolve into benefits for this generation. We ' re speeding the process. Like extending fast jet transportation all over the world via DC-8s, DC-8Fs and DC-9s... And orbiting satellites that improve weather prediction, Ijring us world-wide live TV and cut overseas telephone rates with Douglas Delias, Improved Deltas, TADs and new boosters... And furthering exploration of the solar system witli Douglas Saturu S-1 ' B and other moon, Mars and orbiting laboratory programs . . . And developing better defense systems like the world ' s biggest jet transport, the C-5A, advanced close-support aircraft and new missile systems. So if you want to turn the clock ahead a matter of years, DOUGLAS 527 Kaiser Jeep oorporation TOLEDO 1, OHIO World ' s Largest and Most Experienced Manufacturer of 4-WHEEL DRIVE VEHICLES for families and friends o f cadets . . . banquets, reunions, recep- tions, group conferences, sales meetings. Fine food and beverages served in four different settings P 3E iC CORDIALLY INVITED HOTEL THAYER Just inside the south gate of the Academy JOHN J. SCHAFER, Manager CHARTERED BY CONGRESS 1867 We invite your use of our complete Banking and Trust Facilities National Savings Trust Company FOUR LOCATIONS: Main Office: 15lh STREET and NEW YORK AVENUE, N.W. Capitol Plaza Office: ONE INDIANA AVENUE, N.W. Cathedral Office: WISCONSIN and IDAHO AVENUES, N.W. 20th and K Streets Office: MERCURY BUILDING COMPLIMENTS of THE IRVIN H. HAHN CO. MANLFACTURERS of FINE INSIGNIA since 1898 fit! 326 S. HANOVER STREET Baltimore I, Md. Monguamnfm hsfingpetform nee This magnificent stage made from Alger-Deck serves the theater in Mobile ' s new twelve- million-doiiar auditorium complex. The edge-grain, laminated planks of long leaf pine are good for the life of the building because they ' ve been treated by the new CELLON process at Alger-Sullivan. Developed by Koppers Company, Inc., the remarkable CELLON pi-essure treatment saturates every cell of the wood with penta, the proven preservative. For Mobile this means the best possible guarantee for a healthy = tage floor, always free from dry-rot, decay and insect attack. Superior strength . . . golden beauty ... and the armor of CELLON ... all play a role in Alger-Deck ' s continuing performance. See the other side of this page for additional technical data and the man to call for more information. Right: Aerial view of new auditorium complex in Mobile, Ala. L© I?o©(li7 i i [i£3 @(o)R [p U TECHNICAL INFORMATION ON CELLON TREATMENT AND ALGER-SULLIVAN PRODUCTS CELLON TREATMENT: Developed by Koppers Company, Inc., of Pittsburgh, Pa., this process is considered the first real breakthrough in wood-preserving techniques in nearly 100 years. Eight-hour pressure treatment utilizes the proven preservative, pentachlorophenol, with liquid petroleum gas as the carrier for 100% pene- tration. The treatment results in wood that is dry, odor- less, paintable, and without variations in dimension or weight. After treatment, the product is free from raised grain, can be made water repellent and may be lami- nated. Dry penta crystals, deposited by the CELLON process, are water insoluble and non-volatile and thus give permanent protection against decay and insect attack. Alger-Sullivan tests all treated materials for retention of .3-!- pounds of penta per cubic foot, which is recommended under Federal Specification TT-W-57 Ig. LONGLEAF YELLOW PINE: All Alger-Sullivan decking and flooring products are produced from the very finest dense, old-growth, long leaf yellow pine. This means a minimum average count of six annual growth rings per inch and not less than one-third summerwood. Although FHA accepts a 1200 " f rating minimum in the 2 grade yellow pine, Alger consistently supplies its distributors with stock graded at a minimum of 1750 " f " rating or above, by SPIB standards. Acceptable moisture content after kiln drying 48 hours at 155° ranges 9% to 14%. depending on end use of product. Alger-Sullivan con- tinues to harvest from the world ' s largest remaining stands of old-growth longleaf . . . almost unbelievable forests in the Alger lands of south Alabama. ALGER-DECK: Edge grain, longleaf yellow pine, electro- nically laminated from one to two inch finger-jointed strips, can be formed to most any width for bleacher seats, truck and boxcar decking, loading ramps and flooring planks for auditoriums and stages. Available with or without CELLON treatment. The treatment locks the penta crystals in the wood and thus cannot con- taminate merchandise transported in boxcars without separate containers. BOWLING ALLEY FLOORING: Special bowling alley pattern flooring strips 1-1 4 " x 3 " in random lengths. Only the finest longleaf yellow pine selected and cut to expose the dense edge grain as a wearing surface. Alger is the world ' s largest producer of dense, longleaf pine bowling alley flooring — as used in Brunswick and other bowling lanes the world over. For more information write or pick up the phone and ask for Mabry Dozier, (305) 256-3456 in Century, Florida. ALGER -SULLI AN COMPANY Pioneering for the U.S. Army and the Nation The supersonic Redhead Roadrunner target missile, shown in action above, is now being produced by North American Aviation for the U.S. Army. The Redhead Roadrunner is one of many achieve- ments by North American Aviation— a company at work through seven divisions to expand America ' s defense power and advance the frontiers of science. NAA Autonetics Division builds advanced electronic equipment for the Minuteman ICBM and Polaris sub- marines. NAA Rocketdyne built the rocket engines to launchallU.S. Mercury astronaut flights. NAA Atomics North American Aviation 4 International pioneers in nuclear technology; built the Hallam, Nebraska, Nuclear Power Facility. NAA Space Information Systems Division is building the Apollo spacecraft. NAA Los Angeles built the X-15 rocket plane. NAA Science Center performs fundamental research to stimulate scientific progress and further North American ' s extraordinary diversification. And the NAA Columbus Division is producing the versatile Redhead Roadrunner for supersonic missions at altitudes from 300 to 60,000 feet. It is an official train- ing target for the U.S. Army Hawk air defense missile. Atomics International, Autonetlcs, Columbus, Los Angeles, Rocketdyne, Science Center, Space Information Systems 529 INSIGNIA SPECIALISTS Our 97th Year of Service to the Armed Forces N. S. MEYER, INC. FOUNDED 1868 NEW YORK, N. Y. NOR-EAST America ' s Favorite UNIFORM TIE Crush It ' $ M Twist It Not a Wrinkle NEWARK NEW ORLEANS LOS ANGELES Sales Offices NEW YORK and CHICAGO Spence Engineering Company, Inc. Owners of Rider-Ericsson Engine Co., Founded by Capt. John Ericsson 1842 PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE REGULATORS Desuperheaters - Strainers WALDEN, NEW YORK Ukank uou Jacob Reed ' s Sons meet the challenge of tomorrow. Fracliunalor roncr where he- lium is separated from natural gas soars 165 feel over Kansas plains. Utilizing a tempera- lure of minus 275 F., the re- covery process operates at 99.6% efficiency. Metals used in Titan II fuel tank are joined directly by helium shielded-arc weldings eliminating the metal buffer required before. This results in weight reduction — vital to space vehicles. The world ' s superconducting magnet produces a magnetic field of nnn!;ou : Helium, cryo- 1 1 nu s jnd man ' s ingenuity II! I It ihi pound scientific iinn.l pnsihle U I I I r liquid helium is ' I lo a glass double ! I huh is at a tenip- I minus 300 degrees I I for liquid helium. I hi hJium Hill boil vigor- ously until the Dewar is cooled further. Helium— the miraculous element— has a unique importance in space ex- ploration, nuclear technology and basic research. To assure the nation of a helium supply geared to the fast pace of today ' s science, the United States adopted a national helium conservation program in 1960 and called upon private industry to design, construct, finance and operate new helium re- covery plants. To help meet this challenge, Panhandle Eastern and National Distillers and Chemical Corporation jointly formed the National Helium Corpora- tion which constructed the world ' s largest helium recovery plant. Repre- senting a breakthrough in industrial technology, this plant processes about 850 million cubic feet of natiual gas daily, from which more than one billion cubic feet of helium will be extracted annually. National Helium ' s space age facility, located near Liberal, Kansas, is also the largest application of cryogenics — the new science of super-cold. There are countless examples of helium ' s part in the drama of tomor- row ' s world. A bath of liquid heliiun reduces electronic noise in complex circuitry . . . and may also play a vital role in the production of vest-pocket size cyclotrons and other nuclear accelerators. Cryotons, used in computer circuits, can provide one million memory elements in a space smaller than a shoe box. Helium is also used in the manufacture and pre-launch servicing of mis- siles ... it purges rocket engines of impurities ... it detects minuscule leaks in space craft. In medicine, it brings dramatic relief to asthma patients . . . prevents explosions in anesthetics. Helium helps prevent the dreaded " bends " in deep-sea diving operations. The National Helium Corporation is another of the many ways in which Panhandle Eastern serves the community ... the nation ... the world. Long a leader and pioneer in producing and transporting natural gas, Pan- handle Eastern — through this diversification — assures a reliable and con- tinuous supply of helium, vitally needed element for the world of tomorrow. " PEL " is the New York Slock Exchange trading symbol for Panhandle Eastern; " He " is the atomic symbol for helium. Panhandle Eastern Pipe Line Company One Chase Manhattan Plaza, New York, N.Y. 3444 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. Serving MIDWEST U.S.A. NEW YORK MILITARY ACADEMY Established 1889 Philip B. Toon, USMA ' 44 B.S., M.B.A. Lieut. Colonel, USA, Ret. Superintendent ALL-AMERICA CAMP Clair Bee, B.S., M.A. Director 77 ACADEMY AVENUE CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON, N.Y. Discerning If est Point officers for many gen- erations have had Uniforms made to measure by A. Jacobs Sons, Inc. for Outstanding Quality, super tailoring and fit, correct Styling and dependable delivery in the jAadiiwn BALTIMORE, MD. Fine Custom Toilored Uniforms since 1891 No glove in the world as comfortable as CONGRATULATIONS DAN LUXENBERG NEW YORK LIFE HAVS 6l.OViltSVH.LE, N.Y. v v U.S. Military Academy cadet, 15 years after graduation. After a West Point cadet spends four years studying to keep abreast of advancing technologies in a world that become an officer, what comes next? A lifetime of study. is going to get more and more complicated. A good oflfi- As one of the leaders of his country, he must constantly cer will remain a student throughout his career. NORTHROP Builder of the F-5 tactical fighter Militex, Inc. 112 MADISON AVE., NEW YORK 10016 Manufacturers of Cotton Thermal Underwear Fabrics Mosquito and all purpose Nylon Nets Mills: St. Johnsville, N.Y. Dolgeville, N.Y. Working in close association with the mili- tary for 40 years, Morry has introduced and developed many items now accepted as regulation equipment. This has earned him the rightful reputation of " Tailor to the Services. " Morry Luxenberg, foremost manufacturer of tailored uniforms and accessories, con- tinues his tradition of personalized service at his new and ONLY address. MORRY LUXENBERG GO. Military Outfitters 45 EAST 30th STREET NEW YORK 16, N.Y. USMA and Class Blazer Crests ' The Finest Caps in the Services ' COMPLIMENTS OF THE RETIRED OFFICERS ASSOCIATION 1625 EYE STREET. N.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006 CONGRATULATIONS ARMY 1 1 NAVY 8 Phyllis Baby Wear TINY STAR DRESS INC. Manufacturers of FINE QUALITY CHRISTENING SETS 691 1 NEW UTRECHT AVENUE BROOKLYN 28, N.Y. There ' s a live one under the hood (Have you priced a tiger lately?) Purrs if you ' re nice. Snarls when you prod it. Trophy V-8, standard in Pontiac GTO. 389 cubic inches. 335 horsepower. 431 Ib-ft of torque. Also standard ; bucket seats, heavy-duty suspension, real walnut dash, Hurst floor shifter, dual exhausts, even special tires— redlines! (You don ' t build a GTO with options, you personalize It.) Want something wilder? Got it: 3-2bbl, 360 hp. Want something tamer? Got that, too— Pontiac Le Mans. ' Take our 140-hp six or order up the V-8 you like: 250 hp, 285 hp. Try some- thing. Drive a " sporty " car. Then prowl around in a Wide-Track a while. You ' ll know who ' s a tiger. Quick Wide -Track Tigers Pontiac Le IMans GTO C ompliments to TO THE CLASS OF ' 65 PELLIE ' S PONTIAC ROUTE 9W HIGHLAND FALLS, N.Y. HI 6-4034 J jflftffftl dtSiii 3 GENERATIONS OF EXPERIENCE IN MILITARY TAILORING THE NATION ' S OLDEST SPECIALISTS IN HAND-TAILORED UNIFORMS jjiSii dBui SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS ARLINGTON, VA. Taking another ho-hum vacation because you think traveling is expensive? Cut_it_out- COLLEGE RELATIONS DIRECTOR Sheraton-Park Hotel Washington, D.C. 20008 Dear Sheraton: Please rush me an application for a free Sheraton Student ID Card. I understand it will get me discounts on room rates at Sheraton Hotels Motor Inns. Good Deal! Name 95 Slieraton Hotels Motor Inns ROYTEX, INC. Thanks the Class of 1965 for their Continuing Acceptance of the " B " Robes ROYTEX ROBES 390 5th AVENUE New York 18, N. Y. MAMMA Mamma Leone ' s Ristorante ' Where strong appetites are met and conquered. " 239 West 48th Street, JU 6-5151 fast turnover Talk about turnover! Sunshine cookies and crackers are made to move fast. Because Sunshine offers your customers more than just a top-quality line — it offers them fine cookies for every taste. And Sunshine gives you a big plus by promoting related item sales year ' round. For Dig sales that will mean bigger-than-ever profits for you, stock and feature Sunshine products ,. .and watch how they move! BENNETT ' S BLUE BOOK OF QUALITY MERCHANDISE On Display at the Cadet Store or P.X. Also available for use in military installations and governmental agencies in more than 100 foreign countries SHOW ROOMS 485 Fifth Avenue, New York 175 Broadway, New York 30 East Adams St., Chicago BENNETT BROTHERSriNcl 435 Hudson Street, New York, N.Y. 10014 SINCE 1922 POLICIES CARRYING THIS SYMBOL HAVE SAVED MILLIONS FOR U. S. ARMED FORCES OFFICERS Write today for details on any of these policies. Compare the savings offered with standard rates S Automobile Insurance S Household Goods Personal Effects floater Personal Articles Floater S Comprehensive Personal Liability S Homeowners Package Policy Boat Owners Insurance S Farmers Comprehensive Personal liability UNITED Services Automobile Association Dept. H-65 USAA Building — 41 19 Broadway San Antonio, Texas 78215 STETSON IS THE ARMY ' S FAVORITE FOOTWEAR . , . as it has been for more than 70 years If your Army Post Exchange can ' t supply you — Stetson will ship shoes to any officer, anywhere, on an open ac- count basis. Ask for them by number, as indicated below. The Stetson Shoe Co., South Weymouth 90, Mass. 402 — Premium quality Black caltski 403 — Premium quality Tan calfskin. Especially For You. A life insurance service exclusively for offi- cers, future officers and their families; Larger than 92% of the life companies in the United States; Premiums payable by allotment at one- twelfth annual rate, also available later in civilian life; Policy loans available immediately without note or policy endorsement; Up to $1,500 available by wire in event of death on active duty; Aviation coverage to fit your individual flying needs with extra premium refunded if grounded 90 days or more; The best policies available to you anywhere including the CONTINGENCY PROTEC- TOR " Option Five " ; Almost S900,000,000 of Life Insurance in Force. UNITED SERVICES LIFE 1 INSURANCE COMPANY N. W., Washington, D. C. THEY WALK WITH A MILITARY STRIDE CORCORAN. INC. STOUGHTON, MASS. L ompiimenU of nend Boston ' s famous I ixxktx mtse the hotel where gracious service is a century-old tradition Andrew A. Sherrard, Vice President General Manager . . Firing rockets; missiles, machine guns, armed UH-IB Iroquois powerfully support riflemen on the ground. With ARMY AVIATION Ben meets the requirements of the Air Assault Mission Long a member of the U. S. Army Aviation team. Bell is proud to be a part of the Army ' s expanding air mobility program. We pledge full support with Iroquois and Sioux helicopters capable of matching performance to the requirements of the Air Assault Mission. (» BELL HELICOF XER co vh-aimy FORT WORTH. TEXAS • A DIVISION OF BELL AEROSPACE CORPORATION • A feXtrOnl COMPANY ANYWHERE, ANYTIME YOU SAY, SIR... BY AIR! Supplemental Airlines of the National Air Carrier Association support the U.S. Armed Services around the world around the clock with charter airlift of personnel andcargo A versatile fleet of over 150 aircraft— fromDC-3 ' sto DC-8 ' s — is at your service in air logistics from factory to front line . . . from staging center to forward command post. Best wishes, Class of ' 65. We ' ll see you around . . . and very possibly take you — safely, reliably and economically. NACA MEMBER AIRLINES Aaxjco Airlines, inc. Capitol Airways, Inc. Modern Air Transport, Inc. Saturn Airways, Inc. Southern Air Transport, Inc. Trans International Airlines, Inc. World Airways, Inc. ROLL CALL OF MARINE MIDLAND BANKING SERVICES • instant interest Savings Accounts • Automatic Savings Plan • Checking Accounts • Loans of all types (including a special plan for West Point Cadets) • Safe Deposit Boxes • Christmas and Vacation Clubs • Complete Trust Services • Investment Management • All Banking Transactions handled by mail FREE CHECKING ACCOUNT SERVICES TO ALL V EST POINT CADETS " We have specialized in managing the Accounts of Service Officers for over fifty years. We offer complete banking facilities backed by the state wide Marine Mid- land group of 200 offices, including London, England. " IVIARIISIE IVIIDI.AIMC3 NATIOIMAL BAIMK HIGHLAND FALLS OFFICE Highland Falls, New York Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Opened April 9, I960 o }: 2VV Member Federal Reserve System Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation FULL SERVICE BANK IN SERVICE SINCE 1892 ORDNANCE AND MARINE GEARING SPEED REDUCERS LIMITORQUE VALVE CONTROLS FLEXIBLE COUPLINGS FLUID MIXERS World Standard of Excellence Philadelphia Gear Corporation " phllllg gean " Ei3 ■ I l l est Pointers on the move. UouARDjounson ' S RESTAURANTS AND MOTOR LODGES IN 34 STATES Our Rapid Reservation Service is convenient, personal and speedy . . . you talk directly with the host of the motor lodge of your choice. Available at all motor lodges and many of our restaurants. ' FOR EVERYTHING YOU NEED A BANK FOR " THE PHILADELPHIA NATIONAL BANK Philadelphia, Pa. 19101 Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation MOTOR HOTEL Wastiington, D.C. . Dallas, Texas . Philadelphia, Pa. Atlanta, Georgia • Saddle Brook, N.J. Hughes is: Syncom satellites, computers, Polaris guidance systems, microelectronics, command control, Surveyor moon-lander, antennas, sensors, lasers, missiles, communications... and many more. SERVING THOSE WHO SERVE When you get your permanent assignment, you will find a Uni ted of Omaha Military Specialist nearby who is authorized by the Department of Defense to serve your life insurance needs. Over $335,000,000 of Military life insurance in force. United ranks among the top 3% of all life insurance companies. Offices in principal cities throughout the United States, Canada, Canal Zone, Puerto Rico, Panama, Europe, Japan and Pacific Islands. MILITARY DIVISION United Benefit Life Insurance Company Home Office: Omaha, Nebraska Essential Construction Co., Inc. Himount Constructors Ltd. A Joint Venture 1325 INWOOD TERRACE FORT LEE, NEW JERSEY 201 943-2660 212 564-4577 REHABILITATION OF BARTLETT HALL 546 Space-Age Defense I needs Down-to-Earth MOBILITY! From engine to wheel, Rockwell-Standard carries the power that moves military might at ground level. Multi-wheeled, rubber-tired v ehicles are equally at home on or off the highway . . . transport everything from men to missiles. Maneuverability helps make our country ' s security certain . . . Rockwell-Standard makes performance dependable. Today, complete power transmission assemblies . . . produced to quality standards that have made Rockwell-Standard axles and transfer cases famous for half a century . . . are solving power transmission problems for the Department of Defense and its prime contractors. the men o Class v e shq o 1965. their goal t ROCK WELL-STANDARD C O R PO RATION ffi HSBEBBlBS LARGEST MANUFACTURI OF AXLES FOR TRUCKS, BUSES AND TRAILERS Every second saved can save a life True close support: it ' s the Army Mohawk ' s ability to be " one of the troops " ... to land and take off from frontline fields that are little more than cow pastures... to fly at treetop level as slow or as fast as needed. ..in any kind of weather. All this adds up to trigger-fast respon- siveness—intelligence now, not hours from now. " That ' s the Mohawk, the " elevated eyes " of the Army that watch out for the guys on the ground. GRUMMAN Aircraft Engineering Corporation Bethpage, New York CELEBRATING OUR 20tti YEAR in SPACE and DEFEINSE MELPARtinc A SUBSIDIARY OF WESTINGHOUSE AIR BRAKE COMPANY FALLS CHURCH, VIRGINIA SAIGON - BERLIN - FORMOSA - HAWAII Your Next Duty Station A Nation ' s Armed Might is only as strong as YOU make it. MILITARY BENEFIT ASSOCIATION A non-profit organization serving those who serve, officer and enlisted, v ants to help strengthen that might. JOIN NOW $40,000 GROUP LIFE INSURANCE JOIN NOW HOWITZER salutes the class of ' 65. MBA salutes the class of ' 65. MBA beckons the class of ' 65. ACTION You must act now. Your loved ones depend on you. You are faced with a major decision. You must act. HONOR Don ' t let them down. Your security and their well-being come first. You must act. INITIATIVE More and more you ' re called on to make decis- ions. Your judgment, leadership and your in- itiative are the Free World ' s hope. YOU need MBA. MBA needs YOU. As membership Increases, so do benefits. MBA is rounding out a decade of dedicated service to our fighting forces in all uniforms. A history of unequalled benefits through the lowest cost possible has been achieved. Basic $9.00 per month cost was lowered to $3.25 per month last year after dividend. Facts are facts. You ' ve been trained to deal in facts. Find out for yourself Free descriptive booklet. Act now. MILITARY BENEFIT ASSOCIATION WARNER BUILDING WASHINGTON, D.C. 20004 Of course, there is no obligation and no salesmen will call. Thank you. A-7 A Jlji Mtmai:k.ai -k- i ' 7 ojWM , r yC-l42A V STOLtifl iip(Vit X M-se f ct?. What ' s new in Defense? Take a look, i p ' l-ING-TEr CO-S OUGI-IT. INC What do millstones and moon rockets have in common? The answer is Allis-Chalmers. In fact, they stand at opposite ends of 117 years of AUis- Chalmers service to almost every industry. A period that begins with a small Milwaukee plant making milling supplies in 1847 and extends to the development of the revolu- tionary fuel cell now playing such an im- portant role in space exploration. Originally employing just 20 men, Allis- Chalmers has expanded to today ' s vast com- plex of A-C research, engineering and man- ufacturing operations employing over 33,000 persons in 26 plants all over the world. We are owned by some 60,000 stockholders. And from that beginning line of millstones, our product list has grown to include everything from tractors, bulldozers, and lift-trucks to motors, transformers, nuclear reactors and hydraulic turbines — in fact, more products for more industries than any other company produces. So, we ' re rather proud at Allis-Chalmers. Proud of this record, of course, and of the people who helped make it. But, every bit as proud of our stake in the future. A-1933 ALUS- CHALMERS Congratulations to The Class of 1965 J From Your negatives will be kept on file for your convenience in reordering ZJ 26 West 58th St., New York 19, N. Y. Est. 1875 Why do more people watch The Huntley-Brinkley Report than any other television news program? On the surface, there ' s no ready answer. True, Chet Huntley is a care- ful, articulate reporter. He ' s un- usually well-informed, a sound analyst of issues and events, and he brings a depth of experience to his job. But other networks have qualified newsmen, too. True, David Brinkley has a per- ceptive eye and a searching mind. He also has an engaging writing style and delivery that bring each day ' s happenings into sharp fo- cus. But other newsmen have some of these characteristics. Huntley and Brinkley are only a partial answer. Nor is the whole answer in the scope and re- sources of NBC News, the largest of all broadcast news organizations. After all, the other network companies have competent staffs, well-placed bu- reaus and reliable sources, too. Yet, one fact is clear. By every available yardstick of national audience measurement, more people do watch the five-night-a-week Huntley-Brinkley Re- port than any other network news program. What, then, is the reason for its consistent leadership? We believe it to be a singular determination to re- port the news and its significance fully and fairly— not merely so that it be understood, but so that it cannot be ;?!Kunderstood. It begins with broadcasting ' s most news-minded administration. It flows through all levels of the NBC Television Network and NBC News. It characterizes the enterpris- ing teams that support the on-the- air efforts of Huntley and Brinkley and such frequently contributing NBC correspondents as John Chancellor at the White House, y M Frank Bourgholtzer in Moscow, jB ' ' Dean Brelis reporting from y the Middle East. And this determination is re- flected in performance on the Huntley-Brinkley Report, per- formance which conveys to the viewer more information, a greater depth of analy- sis, and a keener sense of the world around him. As one viewer put it, " I just feel that when I watch Huntley and Brinkley, I ' ve got a better idea of what ' s going on. " Resolution and resources, purpose and people create a news program that uniquely serves the needs and interests of television viewers across the nation. THE HUNTLEY-BRINKLEY REPORT Executive Producer— Reuven Frank. Supported regularly by news reports from national NBC News bureaus in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Washington; foreign bureaus in Berlin, Hong Kong, Jerusalem. London. Moscow, Nairobi. New Delhi, Paris, Rio De Janeiro. Rome. Saigon, Tokyo; and. when the occasion de- mands, by a staff of 800 around the world. .■he 1965 HOWITZER was designed and manufactured by Hallii.air vaic a division of Hallmark Lithographers, Inc., Westbui ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Official portrait of President Lyndon B. Johnson by Arnold Newman. Portrait of General Michael S. Davison by Pach Bros, of New York. Portrait of General Earle G. Wheeler by Oscar Porter, U.S. Army Photo Agency. Paintings of Alexander, Julius Cae- sar, Napoleon Bonaparte and Gen- eral Washington (pps. 2, 4, 6, 9) were obtained from The Bettmann Archive, Inc., New York. The Bett- mann Archive also provided the statues of Alexander. Caesar and Washington (pps. 2, 5, 6), as well as the detail from a painting of the last meeting of General R. E. Lee and Thomas Jackson by Turn- bull, 1877 and the photograph of General Pershing. (Both on page 16) Other historical photographs, all appearing on pages 16 and 17, in- cluding World War I wounded be- ing loaded into Red Cross ambu- lances; the landings at Normandy (U.S. Coast Guard photos); Am- erican soldiers at Buon Mo Prong, South Vietnam; U.S. rifle squad searching a Korean village, were provided by the facilities of As- sociated Press, Wide World Pho- tos, Inc. Photograph of bronze bust of Na- poleon (page 8) was obtained from Columbia Records, Inc., with the permission of the French In- stitute, New York, for its use in this publication. Poem on page 492 written by Cadet Louis Csoka.. ADVERTISER ' S INDEX A and C Chevrolet, Inc 518 Aero-jet General Corporation 500 Adams and Porter, Inc 518 Alger-Sullivan Company 528A Allis-Chalmers 551 American Corrugated Container Company ..518 Armed Forces Cooperative Insurance Association 497 A Army Mutual Aid Association 499 Army National Bank. Ft. Leavenworth 498 Art Cap Company, Inc 518 Avco Corporation 501 L. G. Balfour Company 497 Bell Helicopter Company 541 Benjamin Franklin Hotel 498 Bennett Brothers, Inc ..538 Boeing Company 503 Caribe Diamond 522 Cars International of America. Inc 522 Cayuga Rock Salt Company 500 Chevrolet Division, General Motors Corporation 496A Chrysler Corporation 509 Corcoran, Inc 540 Curtiss-Wright Corporation 507 Daniel Hays Company 532 de Laar ' s Airport Rest 520 Douglas Aircraft Company 527 Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States 512 Esquire Sportswear Manufacturing Co 522 Essential Construction Co-, Inc. Himount Constructors Ltd 546 L. B. Evans ' Son Company 520 Exchange National Bank 497A Federal Services Finance Corporation 520 Federated Investors, Inc 520 Florsheim Shoe Company 504 Ford Motor Company 517 Fort Knox National Bank 542 Fort Sill National Bank 524 R. T. French Company 516 Fuller Brush Company 524 Gahagan Dredging Corporation 524 Garrett Corporation — AiResearch Mfg. Division 519 General Electric Company 513A General Telephone and Electronic Corp 511 Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation 546-47 Gulf Oil Corporation 521 H R H Construction Corporation 524 Hallmark Graphics, Inc 554-55 Harry ' s Liquor Store 526 Hotels Astor and Manhattan 506 Hotel Sahara 506 Hotel Thayer 528 Howard Johnson ' s 543 Hughes Aircraft Company 544 The Irvin H. Hahn Company 528 Jacob Reed ' s Sons 530 A. Jacobs and Son. Inc 532 Kaiser Jeep Corporation 528 Krementz and Co 508 Lauterstein ' s 536 Ling-Temco-Vought 550 Lockheed Aircraft Corporation 523 Marine Midland National Bank 542 Marriott Motor Hotels 544 Mason and Hangar-Silas Mason Co., Inc 526 Melpar, Inc 548 N. S. Meyer. Inc 530 Military Benefit Association 549 Militex, Inc 534 Mobil Oil Company 525 Morry Luxenberg Company 534 National Air Carrier Association 542 National Bank of Fort Sam Houston 510 National Broadcasting Company 553 National Savings and Trust Company 528 New York Life Insurance Company 532 New York Military Academy 532 North American Aviation 529 Northrop Corporation 533 Olivetti-Underwood 505 Oman-Farnsworth-Wright 526 P and M Distributors, Inc 514 Packard-Bell Electronics, Space and Systems Division 522 Panhandle Eastern Pipeline Company 531 Parker House 546 Pellie ' s Pontiac 536 Philadelphia Gear Company 542 Philadelphia National Bank 544 Phillips-Van Heusen Corp 508 Phyllis Babywear, Inc 534 Pontiac Motor Division, General Motors Corporation 535 Restaurant Associates — Mamma Leone ' s ....537 Retired Officers Association 534 Riggs National Bank 512 Rockwell-Standard Corp 547 Rogers-Peet Company 504 Roytex, Inc 536 The Seaman ' s Bank for Savings 502 Sears, Roebuck and Company 512 Sheraton Corporation of America 536 Sinclair Refining Corporation 513 Spence Engineering Inc 530 Stetson Shoe Company, Inc 539 Sunshine Biscuits, Inc .538 Sylvania Electric Products, Inc 514 Unidynamics Division, Universal Match Corporation 510 United Benefit Life Insurance Company 545 United Services Automobile Association 538 United Services Life Insurance Company ....540 United States Rubber Company 515 Wembly, Inc 530 West Publishing Company 526 White Studio, Inc 552 Wise Potato Chip Company 516 Zodiac Watch Company 538 4i w» x.i


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United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

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United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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