United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY)

 - Class of 1962

Page 1 of 612

 

United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 612 of the 1962 volume:

N THE OCCASION OF THE PRESIDENTIAL PROCLAMATION OF THE CENTENNIAL OF THE WAR BETWEEN THE STATES f ff af Q M-' ww- ,. -- W mg, -wf w ., , 14:1-5 I gi' H - I I I I Q I OF . ,., ' ,. . THE CLAS ' 'M' I I Q 3' YK " 4' F " ' .',, . ,lf I 2 ' I ' ' I I .-v,, M J T I , .A . ,. 4 I fx r Im f I f I I THE UNITE fi ,K x .,".'f.. ' 4 .'.. 3,2 5 . Ig I , ' x -I 2 - Q . x N . A , , N ' 5' :flak Q LX A if .T , .ff X ,xi xA x L W q I l X X .71 ri .l ,.. in.: 1- 4: PN ,A:,'f,g'Z 5, 'ii-'lid ",,,'.Yga."j, HQ! 'X s , '- 4 ., QS, AN ly-,335 V5 , , 93.7 ,, . f ,v A 4 A lu N if -0 ,gg 'Q 'LS -idliwfiiildaiifii 11?-iq 5' f. , i .3 a .2 Y ff. ? 1 I .t y 1 q t o the members of the Lorig Grey Lirle iuhose selfless cleyotiorl to their itleals aricl whose yaliaiit serfoiee to both North arlcl Soilth olitrirlg the Civil Warseoiitribitteol a irl sileh great measitre to the heritage of West Poirit, the Class of 1962 oleclieates this oooh iri the sirleere hope that ive may serye as well aricl as rlohly as they. ,mfg- . ..-....,X r' ,, X .r ,, ,MW .,,..., ' ww , U m MV..bW- q I iQ R l'5Qff'!' , Lf ' -Q' I 9' f VY.'.' t 1 ,,2f!, ,Q N , fq K, . .A :MX fhgf k g , M Q, R' SEM I - , , x A : k ,,1'V f wr -' ,X 4,v Fra' 'Q f Q ' ' ':Ei": 2 Q -I M. Fw 4, f ggEiE'w m b X 'X 'NE 'E ww-.qu N M LX 2 Mg 'K Q, rimfwwmhg A V fx KY? K 1 Qisgl ii : 1 'DEQQL' ,QM W-,Zgg"""!"f .pf Jn Ag. HM W-w Q is W 'mlm 2 2 Ms 3, ,igwww W mwwf U fm mf mx P W , N 4? TS' K J 1 xi X if 'Q 3 Ti, f " 2 M...-Q-ul!l , rx Q Y 'A , Q ,- ,Z Q 5' ' X, ,, J VK , f'.1., q,g ' fe- ff, ,.,, V K 1, 1 -ig : K .. -X ---- ' ' -- K QW 2.3 si ,X L - f A ff 1 ..Q"" ' X ' f xfff fs K 1 Wff-fig, ,,7u,gffL"'f.f 'J Y : K A if K R351 - 78 'EW531 , in Qi. Nifsrkxj, " fn --L 1-X - A g., .M hgh.. -2 :: sg, 1, ,Q ' -gg qw W 'f 5 H Si af:-Q3 ,,,L ::J.ifif-.:L,,i: 'L1f wfyh, Min.. .. -- .. ,.,,, ' . f.. , uw'-M Qin ., I Wg ,V df . X5 M .ei . kgggii Lf Emi n 2 W ' ? L H V . xkiziff, dgn,, N ' mx k ' , v 'Q y Q fe ff ' .ff f - 5 K-'1':f.7"IE',Eff'F-"....': elf? f . Q f ,W f , , 5-565 - A ' 19' ' .L-si . - V f .- Azz- "" Y 5 , 'V ,,' . - 3325512 ' - w w , if . A 'ff M . jq f fifff.-2 ,w mfg? Wm ., iq 4- lil 5 gs 'Y 3 :L " "" Q ' f E 1 k 5 A fiiliw ' z ' W ' - vw 3 If iff S3 af 1 QZV X Xb X xx RN oar fathers broilght forth orl this eorltirlerit a rteio riatiorl eorieeiyed irt liberty arid dedicated to the propositiori that all piert are ereated eqital. Now we are erlgaged irl a great eifoil ioar, testirig iohether that iiatiori or arty rlatiorl so oorieeioed avid so dedicated, eaii lorig eiidilref' mnrtrvrv The oisiori of oar early leaders, riiirtitred by the faith, eoilrage, ahd irhagiriatioii of the Apieriearl people, had its fniost depiarldihg test ori the battlefields of the North avid Soilth. W ,lll..' X In the eornfielols, ancl in the peaoh oreharcls, in the cities a flaine with olespair ancl alight with challenge, the test was inet, brother against brother. Neyer was the nation so cleeply cliyiclecl, nefoer clicl it strive harcler to be nnitecl. And when the battles were oyer, the nation hacl enclitrecl. Coneeifoecl in liberty, baptizecl in agony, reareol in strnggle, it haol enclnrecl- anol it grew. ul The rlatiorl greio, but the tests of its strerigth arlcl its icleals coritirlue. It is to learu to irieet such tests with urisioeryirlg olefootiorl to "Duty, Horior, aricl Courltryf that we are trairiecl through our acacleiriic stuclies, irioral guiclarlce, physical activities, aricl military eocercises to follow the irispiratiori ofthe great leaclers ofthe past who have brought coutirluirig glory, to the riairie- West Poirit E K sk 7' ac , Y. af15'hnK -" ' Y? 7 'fzil Jfiifa Za: , , 41:11, K x :mf-1 s W Vu C , . , A393 :QQ -,z ' W ' fl -. , ,L1:1.j. ff. 1 -,Q 2' M R3 ' vw, ' fr- f V , 471 "gi V -12 1, Cle- . . er, ':,3fg:v:,gf ,f. any k:gE-Q -Q13 yi-I14 794: ,-5, X '1 211' V - 2, w?2':fQ.1f 5 -1, :gp ,-J: rw , , .Qw':i4" Y' S . gf , vii? A ,5,aL.14a . 4, ,RWM 131,21 1.1: .v 1 1-1:w:1f-ik" - v: 2511" 'L L X 1, . X ,.5,.5-fy 1' -X .-Q. K , , -Q:-yr, 9 'Fw ., ., 1 , 4 A As' A va X J W W' 3, 1 f Q 2? 'S 1 ? , ,,, , if , M 155 N' ,fvb A I Q , ,Z W 'A 'ik y ln 1' ff. Ze: . S , c .M 4, fx- ,QJH .,,,,, A , As clflcl the Cflofll Wolr, our trollrlflrlg tollces four years. . . our problems are jooseol, clrlol solvecl. . .A lmrlclrecl years before, it begclrl at Bull Rom. . . ? ! i 4 . . . fonvf gears ago we called it Beast Banraeles. . . it is Plebe Yean. the beginning of a new tfione. .XX X -NN X X .. XX rv Xxi N X . N'.Rx .xzxg X RX N N X jfs ff' ff ' , sffiif The wave eontftnneot. . .Snttoly Anttetaan, Fneotenieltsonnax Q, tthe battles grew stennea' and nftany felt by the way... we, too, onasteofea taottoal training. . .went deepen into tntvnoate stnoltes. . . began ony tests as teaaefrs. Yeanlftng Year, onof' seeonol, took tts toll ana tent its gtoonles. The third gedr. . .Seoorld Cldss. . . Chdrieellorsoille, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, Chiehdirldu . . .their rldiries dre irlseribed irl Airleriodrl History.. ioe struggled with iueredsirlglg dijic responsibilities thdt soorl would be or drld soriehoio got through. ubjects cmd vlstoofy. . . First Class Year. . . Cola Harbor, Atlarlta, Nashville, Petersburg. . . t war erlclecl. It ehcleel simply at Apporhattoa, with staeheel rifles arlal folclecl flags arlcl sileriee. .. at West Poirlt, it eralecl ilproarioilsly, iii the eleaferiirig roar of high flilrlg hats oh Gracliiatiori. . . fareiuells arlcl triilriphs, fear years behirlel as. Aff? , K ir: f . Y-Sis: , . 1- 5:25 Y -- if-H-ffis.: A2 if-T+ -..:.Q+i iff, 1 113',1.... . '41 6 4' QKA' f 1 N' fI'Q,gi" Y? , I if ,Q -X 5 '-is I-gg. W is ig ff ww f is lvmx 'TYQTQV-1 ' x lf? 35 Four years oehiuot us. . . omot before thott, iu meotsured time, the muted echo of couuttess steps otcross the Plctiu, the murmur of ct thousctud fooices uoio goue, uoio ct iohisgoer. . . ct ctistctut cult to grecttuess. . . iu this momeut of Commeucemeut, ct pctuorotmot o f the future cts foctriect cmd ots chottleugiug cts our heritotge. . . For the Class of 1962- Commeucemeut is truly ot begiuuirig. . . fl" . :Q .JM . WI T a o Q lf!! CIC! ill! a 1 'f 5' 1 1 '03 , 4 'c 3 5 . , f M ' ' F M33 ill IUC li! I -v R . ar V vs. www 2-rumen'-4' W e 4 mf Uu- :Fa , av 'K' M.. v has W A -1 J H A ' 1' X2 I . 'N :vw JA' Y 1 .1 , Q. vw, N ' 'Q-WM, x x-pg ,L ml. ' ,f 1,559,335 X 4- , , is n Q , NM , , W, N X X Q S c 'F X M xx if Q xx YA EK x x W 1 KN ' n X .14 511, Q, :PU 5 mfg ,A l S92 3 if .1 X W . . . the beginning of the life to iohich ive hoive pledged oivr vevg selves. halt is fov ns to be heve dedicdted to the gvedt tdsh venidining befove iisg thdt fvoin these honoved dedd ive tdhe incvedsed devotion to thdt cdnse fov iohich they gdve the ldst fnlt niedsvive of devotion. " Abraham Lincoln ". . . the somie reyoliltioriclry beliefs for iohieh oilr forebectrs foilght are still olt issite clroilrlcl the globe. . . the belief that the rights of pictii oopie riot from the gerlerosity of the stolte bitt from the holricl of Goal. We claire riot forget toclcly thott ioe olre the heirs of that first reyoliltioii. . . . . . We sholll poly otriy price, beotr ctiiy bilrolerl, irleet olrly hctrclship, silpport olriy friericl, oppose ctrly foe, to ctssilre the silryiyttl clrlol sileoess of liberty. This irlitoh ioe pleclge. . . ctrltl piore. JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY President of the United State S Nw X MR. ROBERT Secretayy 1gSjlNAMARA 97139 i THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE t WAS:-HNG-TON To the Ciass of 1962: N For 160 years the United States Niiiitary Acad- X emy has been educating ieaders oi men who have iq exempiiiied the ioitiest standards of character, ca- X pabiiity, and devotion to the nationai interest, not oniy in the miiitary service but in virtuaiiy every Q. i y sphere oi American iiie. it vviii be your particuiar Q 1 i priviiege and responsihiiity to heip provide a con- i l N tinuity of distinguished ieadership during years i Q which promise to he the most dangerous, diiiicuit, x ll and demanding in our Nation's history. X have ev- ery confidence that you vviii meet the chaiienge in N y a manner which 'iuiiy refiects the great traditions i of West Point. f c M i HONORABLE ELVIS J. STAHR, JR. Secretary of the Army GENERAL LYMAN L. LEMNITZER, U.S.A The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff GENERAL GEORGE H. DECKER, U.S.A. The Chief of Staff ofthe Army If ws c . . I JV 4151:-x fa, N X Q 1 . pf V ,'aj3fgg3,f N I , , ,fvvi K v 1 ' W9 J ZW f VW ll 'J qkfx? F W :wa 'Fw b .1W E ., U H V? 1 W- J P EM! w- 'Nl gvx111'5ib,i hQ" 'yy Yxukxt Wm W ' if jg MWlmmf-2i 1 ,U EW + PM X yy' ' ,Ki V jf? ' 'aight NN, 'P :', W li , 1 A A4A" W QV Ijfu ill y,4'1'my M1 1.' Q 5 5" V "Q E , Q YV W U 1 , 2 Vw 'X if "! ' '.G'm-fv'I'r ' 1 J W I r -f' ' I I 'X QNJ4 'rf XB X it J Wi, I H 1 'w im :'?'f".ti,f 1 I: , XR M MqQNkxk Tb Mi' 12 M TW M 'X f1' 2w GKW . k ,' -Hy - M4Q X , wtf, ,M w'1 ill1 '!f'J' F71: fflj ff .f,1--yi. ' 5W' f9M W N Y fm 4f"XW W z M f f f ff N W ' qv www vw vw xi f X f s' '- V Q If Qksmlwu IV MIIKWM YM 11 SLK kxxkcroufkkv Km AMWQXMX WMM ,ff fx Wm 'N -I Mk L XM v , 05. ' x AIDMXIINIISTRMVIIUN Y1 1 W1-if . .- . I ..1' ., ,.. 5, , 5 h-,v -g N" Q5 4 -4' ffxx 4 i' w Q 3 Q af Jig. C' M Q 15 ' - V , ig: l Q if ' 'iff if X, 1' - I, . . v -4. - -ZS it fi 1? N' . an 3 . . ,A 4-auf' ' r- . 15- swmazmxwmaweew:s,a.:,:mwssx:xgaavs,fwQ ysfam:z-wfsxsezmxmswsmrxaeswdmasw :ff Us My Y K v L v 1 X ww: xmwwwaww, mf: fx W. M A M Q V V , w . M H . , . ,Q U, Wwwpxifpnwqrgfww ww EDITOR Bob Ricks . .V v , .-.-. . -1, ', -,X '-rf' '-, V. ,.,, , ,,. v , ,., , 13,1 A..-T, . ,,f..,. H 'ixgzf azygf "J-ff.-'--"'gNqi5Sg-1 V' " ' 'E I," 3 1' 4, . ,,,'1.g1k,!Y,I u- mi 'S 47 11.1 ' ,r , r F., .. in .Km -v. " U' ' ,v.Wi,7,,' -.-. ,.g, f.. 4' -ww'-v4r1"taf ,.-.fri , , -. - - - . . v, -I - , V V, ppp-Mg f ,Ink-.5,.1.q-Egg -13-an-,cf gpm I.: 1,..:313, ,aut !.,p-vim, p ,. .,,'f1f g ,..,,.v,:-A pl 7:11. 1- 5,31 ,V ,J -.--., -I - .I ,f.,.g'gg,5.,g?-.- Y- . I 1 -17:g-- -- 5 , ., , .- ff, 4 " ""l t fx3l "wW 1: "5 fS F . 72 93: Wf fifi agiii r r ivffglf sasfggagizf'-fp-isctpgggv 'fy -aff!-1,iW wA'f ?" i i 5"1' tr 2 'vefm i ' ' 2 11 . 1':. - - . .4 -if 1:12 -fam ' 2 . mai 2 'V I ,- ' .-1- .1 . u - +14 ' ' ns ' ' if-' , ,P ' +- I . ' 1.1 . .M ZS'-. -.-...f . L '5'?'f'a,. . 53 l.,5',i-1gnJ.45....fH 1" -zhlfihqhi-all 1: in- 3 'Sf hm k' Li' again Q s hir. Jn-.1 -inane . JQJEQZE- :,gC:"i':-.K-lgzfgfgkik' COMPANY i T UNITED STATES CORPS OF CADETS WEST POINT, NEW YO H, 1ST REGIMEW RK 4 November 1961 SUBJECT: Explanation of Report TO: Tactical Officer Company H, 1st Regiment United States Corps of Cadets West Point, New York 1. The report, HLate, English class, 0755 hrs 1 Nov, N is correct. 2. Although I knew my class was being resectioned in English, and I had inspected the resectioning list, I did not look up my room number and instructor because I was assigned to the same section that I was in previously. Therefore, I assumed that my instructor and section room would remain the same. Upon reporting to the room which I believed to be the proper section room, I noticed than the instructor was not the same. I then left the section room to look for my proper section. After inspecting all of the other section rooms, and not seeing any of them to be my assigned section, I reported back to the first room where I found that I had been right the first time. I was ten minutes late. 3. The offense Wa s unintentional. it ,59 - .gs 5 ffm ' 1 "' 1'1" nxt ,jgrf viigzi' 1525 11 ' 'iv 1 .,. fr . 3:3 Wfm ' ft JOEY? HAL' . 'Y '11, 59: 91? . .iam eu V?- fg , . 4 97 1. 12,3 . E 71Ef2l-fit V rg ., vga? I Q.-9' ff'-23 ' If mbsf f 51... aygqfs. , .f f ?,ai3fi , .X . ,Uv- ELBMFV its , V. zu- - gl' 4, 'YJ'-iyii ' ff I .if-we I. Swv' ggi. Q yah. 55314-fi. ' fl-v. '- Ii .1 . 1 555. :- 'WS ff , 1 .M z 1 -' 1, .xr I 4 I ii- X IIHHE SUIIFIERIINIIENDIENIV OF THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY MAJ. GEN. WILLIAM C. WESTMORELAND The United States Military Academy is proud to have as its forty-fifth Superin- tendent Major General William C. Westmoreland, following in the tradition of such men as Taylor, MacArthur, and Lee. In tracing his colorful career in the service we find that he was First Captain of the Class of 1936, and, upon graduation, selected the branch of Artillery. Serving first at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, he was then transferred to North Africa at the outbreak of the Second World War where he commanded the 34th Field Artil- lery Battalion. He then was made Chief of Staff of the Ninth Infantry Division dur- ing the campaign through France, Belgium and Germany. In subsequent years he was made Chief of Staff of the 82nd Airborne Division and commanded the 187th Airborne during the Korean Police Action, spending the intervening years in teaching assignments and at the Harvard School of Business. Following several years of top-level work at the Pentagon, the General became commander of the famed 101st Airborne Division stationed at Fort Campbell, Ken- tucky. But regardless if it is an airborne attack in actual combat or merely a rally pre- ceding an important game, General Westmoreland is always present giving his units the spirit and drive that have characterized his rise to the rank of major general in but twenty years. However, aside from his long and distinguished military career, General West- moreland serves us as a guiding example of the epitome of an Army otlicer as re- Hected in his integrity of character, devotion to duty, and dedication of service to the United States. BRIG. GEN. RICHARD G: STILWELL It is Htting that the favorite expression of Brigadier General Richard G. Stilwell should also be his guiding principle through 27 years of Army service: Mission! In every assignment it has been this typifying phrase which enabled him to rise to the position of Cadet to Commandant of Cadets in only 21 years. Upon graduation with the class of 1938, the then Lieutenant Stilwell elected the Corps of Engineers and served with the Third Engineer Regiment in Hawaii. The Second World War found him in Europe where he first commanded the 315th Combat Engineer Battalion and was subsequently G-3 of the 90th Infantry and of the XXII Corps. Following the war he served in various capacitiesg ranging from CIA work in capitals all over the world to Military Advisor to the United States Ambassador to Italy. During the Korean conflict the General was commanding officer of the 15th Infantry Regiment of the Third Division from 1952 to 1953 and became Senior Advisor to the First Republic of Korea Corps. After instructing at the Army War College he served as Chief of Strategic Forces at Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers Europe from 1956 to 1958, at which time he was appointed commander of the VVestern Area Command, United States Forces Europe. As if the foregoing were not suflicient, another indication of the paramount importance of mission throughout General Stilwell's long career can be seen in his many decorations: among which are the Silver Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Legion of Merit with two Clusters, and the Bronze Star with two Clusters. TIHHE CUMlMlANIDAlXllV or CADETS ff----4 "' Q4 1 455 1 , ' i -M--a...,,,.--uh 1' ll-II-IHE I IEAN or ACADEMICS BRIG. GEN. WILLIAM W. BESSELL, JR. On 15 June 1920, 271 First Classmen sat listening to the graduation address given by General John J. Pershing. The sixth ranking Cadet among them, William Weston Bessell, Jr., probably had little idea that years later he would return to West Point to serve first as a professor and then as Dean of the Academic Board. General Bessell was commissioned in the Corps of Engi- neers and served with the Second Engineers of the Second Division and then with the Third Engineers of the Ha- waiian Division. He received the Commendation Ribbon for services as Chief of Military Personnel in the Office of the Chief of Engineers. His outstanding work in the Operation Division of the War Department General Staff and as Army Director of the Joint Chiefs of Staff won him the Legion of Merit and the Distinguished Service Medal re- 34 spectively. After holding the position of Commanding Gen- eral of the Antilles Command from 1946 to 1947, he was assigned to West Point as Professor of Mathematics. Following twelve years as Head of the Department, he was appointed Dean of the Academic Board in 1959. Aside from being a graduate of the United States Mili- tary Academy, the Army Engineer School, and the Com- mand and General Staff College, the General holds the degree of Civil Engineer and the honorary degree of Doc- torate of Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti- tute. Obviously only a man of 'General Bessell's caliber is qualified to head the demanding and challenging academic program presented at the Military Academy. Til-HIE IRROIFIESSCDRS OF THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY COL. CHARLES W. WEST COL. CHARLES J. BARRETT I'. COL. GEORGE A. LINCOLN COL. CHARLES P. NICHOLAS 35 TH-HIE IPDRQDIFIESSURS One of the reasons that our Academy offers the best military education in the country can be attributed to the quality of our Professors. These men, who act as supreme heads of each of our academic departments, undoubtedly have the finest background of any college professors. This is true because they not only have fine aca- demic backgrounds, consisting of various graduate degrees, but they are able to impart the knowledge of leadership gained only through the experience of serving as command- ing oflicers in the Regular Army. Several of these men have had the opportunity of being general officers but have passed up this opportu- nity in order to come here and develop the aca- demic prowess of each Cadet. It is to these men, with their incomparable experience and pro- found knowledge, that we owe what we have learned here at the Academy. COL. ELVIN R. HEIBERG COL VINCENT J. ESPOSITO COL. EDWARD C. GILLETTE, JR. COL. JOHN D. BILLINGSLEY COL. PHILLIP MALLORY COL. CHARLES R. BROSHOUS COL. RUSSEL K. ALSPACH COL. FRANK J. KOBES COL. ELLIOTT C. CUTLER 37 Front row: Col. Barrett, Brig Gen. Bessell, Maj. Gen. Westmore- land. Brig. Gen. Stilwell, Col. Lincoln. Second row: Col. Al- spach, Col. Esposito, Col. Brosh- ous, Col. Mallory, Col. Nicholas Rear row: Col. Heiberg. Col. Bil- lingsley, Lt. Col. Day, Col. Gil- lette, Col. Cutler. Front row: Col. Capers, Col. Pidgeon, Col. Woolwine, Col. Lux, Col. Ashworth, Maj. Gen. West- moreland, Col. Scott, Col. Mallory, Col. Sheets, Col. Adams, Col. Gregory. Second row: Lt. Col. Day, Lt. Col. Wheelis, Lt. Col. Stephens, Lt. Col. Durham, Dr. Spears, Col. Gaskins, Lt. Col. Kerr, Lt. Col. Welles, Col. Ivy, Lt. Col. Watson, Lt. Col. Buchanan. Third row: Lt. Col. Kasserman, Maj. Burns, Lt. Col. Jones, Lt. Col. Hutchins, Lt. Col. Benson, Lt. Col. Calhoun, Lt. Col. Flynn, Lt. Col. Sebesta, Lt. Col. Paulus, Maj. Everett, Capt. Peats. Rear row: Capt. Hoenstine, Maj. Mi- nor, Capt. Hazen, Mr. Stapleton, Capt. Wetzel, Dr. Forman, Maj. Hervey. TIHHE SUIPIERIINWVIEND ENTS STAIFIF THHE ACPXI IlEMlIlQ IBUARD 1 . , L. , ig, 5 , k M '- l 5 ,Elf-X., ' . E I 5 '. .f"" HIIIS . TVHHE AIIVVHIILIETIIC IBUARI TIHHE STAIFIF AND ll-IHHE COACIHHES OF THE ARMY ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Left to Right: Col. John R. Janna- rone, Br1. Gen. Richard G. Stil- well, Col. Charles J. Barrett, Col. Elvin R. Heiberg, Col. E. S. Ad- Front Row: Mr. Hunter, Mr. Ryan, Mr. Adams, Col. Adams, Mr. Nordlie, Mr. Riley: Second Row: Mr. Alitz, Mr. Hall, Col. Amick Cret.j, Mr. Browne, Mr. Palone, Mr. Maloneyg Back Raw: MfSgt. Benner, Mr. Crowell, Mr. Tipton, MfSgt. Gallmang Not Shown: Col. Reeder Cret.D 39d aw bum: not '04 Lt. YB' Front row: Maj. Heilbronner, Maj. Walker. Col. Collins. Brig. Gen. Stil- well, Lt. Col. Blazey, Maj. Duquemin. Second row: Maj. Lillibridge, Lt. Brinson, Maj. Flannagan, Maj. Kingston, CWO Sims, Maj. Miller. CUMlMlANl ANlVS SHIVXXIFVF FIRST REGIMENTAL STAFF Col. Ott, Col. Chamberlain, Maj. Lindahl. ff ' AT l M ' ' fi ffl 'T N A u I L '. 1 SECOND REGIMENTAL STAFF Lt. Col. King, Col. Gleszer, Maj. Hoge -1-gg Front row: Maj. Gosling, Maj. Gudgel, Maj. Henderson, Maj. Daugh erty, Maj. Schultz. Rear row: Maj. Betts, Maj. Partain, Maj. Ochs, Maj Norman, Maj. Lee, Capt. Forman, Capt. Gibson. Tl-II-HIE TAQTIICAIL CPIFIFIIQIERS Front row: Maj. Hallahan, Maj. Dorney, Maj. Thurman, Maj. Tailrnan, Capt. Knoff. Second row: Maj. Trefry, Capt. Weinert, Capt. Lucas, Maj. March. Rear row: Capt. McCormick, Maj. Kinney, Maj. Parmly. 41 'IVII-HIE UINIITIED Sl-All-lES MHILIVIVARY AQADEMY BAN! The fine and versatile music of the United States Military Academy Band has embraced our cadet careers from start to finish. From the familiar strains of reveille and taps, to the football rallies in the Fall, to the concerts in the Winter, the Band has presented us with music, both military and other- Wise, which has made us proud that they are "our band." Equally adept at Sousa, Beethoven, or Dixieland, they have led the Corps down the streets of such cities as New York and Washington, and have brought on themselves and the Corps only the highest regard. It is for these and many other reasons that We pay tribute to the "Band of Bands" the United States Military Acad- emy Band. The finest marching band in the World For the colors 43 Bopping at Buckner Q" 7' cgewrriivi Instructors of the Onfice of Military Instruction Front row: Lt. Col. Spragins, Col Seaton Col Cameron Lt Col Snow Maj. McAlister. Second row: Maj Bowen Maj Hooker Maj Leiser Maj. Hobson, Maj. Wier. ll-XXCTIICQS llNSlVRUlQll-IIUN Each summer in our tactical training, and during the year in our tactics instruction, we encounter a collection of soldiers of high caliber such as is not likely to be found anywhere else. Imparting to us the skill and knowledge they have acquired over the years is the primary mission of the First Battle Group, and is one which is creditably fulfilled. The men who comprise this group have come from all over the United States Army, and are specialists in their fields. Represented are men of every combat arm from the Infantry to the Signal Corps, and from many of the tech- nical services also. It is to these men that we look for the basic military knowledge that is eventually to shape us into leaders of men tomorrow. Bob takes boards to make his Approved So lution maneuver. 44 fi f U "Social tactics too? says Mike! 4 ,,.. 4, P 1 , 4., 5, W L, Q., 1 up i W J' wfhsw A L fi ' Home on the range 45 1 1 , 'AI ,N A 'w 4 WW, ff 1- ax 7 If fb " A QW, 5 'ZQ' YfY"v7NfXY X' M,-' U 'V , mv J w vm , V 1' Wil. , v i 1 3 V X f Ef f' H 4115 , WU'vgll'w5 5,F 1 M' '- M ' Qigwf h ,?u'1f,LgfiK Q: ' ff '-+ J Mf,g : M,:j WM W j 2 " XXI Aw 1 M QW!-.?'1. yi A '1-.fa ,Lf l!', I I HW M ,Q I 7445.58 nwy- -410l,y'1- Y 1, i. ifgl 2,-' ' UW 3 I' f f'fu SJ ' +9 3. ' Y' v Ng F',j ,4 , "QH,'y,3'2W J K. 9 ,V .I ,A H,'f,f . xx 9 , W M sz, 7,"'w'!hr:?Jy"N MJ flhf Q1 fx lE W'fL KQfAKXxvf4L - - wv Af W + , u3fg,gq wx, 'f W "' f , ' lf' ?XyN kxX.Mk X Q15 . if, LN l 'X 15150 KWWL ,,, . X It If gk, K 1 N x M YM f ff x z X Q1 f R W Am Ivuyklrrf WWNM lg.KtA,ff wk , Q1 gk Nix I b , ... S M, Q k in MM A bl Zf7Ktu!1Xb vm ' XKQKX fffylkkkkv if EQ 3 f Km AXQQKNX Xllxx W Ck Wm 'lx ' WL U JM mu CJ Q , . by ' xx GLASS IHHISTURY S S af E 5 E E 3 2 2 Q Q .. A 'K 5 E E 55 ,I W fl E . f 1 i 4 g :- E 1 fi 5 S I 5 , , gy.Wmwmwwuwvnm-WWWQ,-wwmmuwHM..MW v ,. 'f..m.v,-,M - 1 -- 1 ' V -' -' -' 'WW X ' nuns ' . -1- i GLASS HIISTQRY EDITOR Brian McKinley E 'U' 'Gu ,U JC J?351'?!bA..,Q '?9E"15: kl'l."-GMWMS- 'Q 1 , .' -v 0 ' sa ' 45,99 -gr N V ,,. Lf 5 a 1 'Y a:Q':'f K ' ' :F ' 17 6 ?4ii5QZk,,vNwE5QA fii5W HE w if qqQ e y+Q?QQHgEf:f Q f ,, W W J' ,W It allbegan with 5 J!? 1 g 5!4fM iQQ ' H !? iF wfwz WMwff ,g9!1a , IBMSWV IMRMQKS 321-f '::W'-"' ' , 424, ,Q fl-dig ' ' K P A C -f , - ' fl V ' A A' ,1f1x.f h5?ffaifNQ, , M ff : -'?f--W: Q, 5 F , . :nf . fi , Lf ' f??I1fL N, .,. ff' . on-'G - .N 1' S ' f- i bf ,,, K 6 DQESFQG' ,Ywdg ' ' Y.. .Y 'A ' Q P . , v K 4,4 1 . 'Q ff, -9 . 1' 55143, ff' M W R un, J 4 'igf ax4'5i,, ,. ,. , , 5 if , V l M ,3.. m" ,, ,,,y,Q. " 1 he -'Q 3, Q l V, I L'J.'i,'Mi.Z l:aAui Ak? 'n .g rf' 'AQ ,i . A il 4. Q X J lbs NEW LADHS 5-..., A ,Nw ' " On the first Tuesday in July, . . . . . . Young men from all parts of the United States re- port to the United States Military Academy. 48 They are collected . . and we'lZ never forget 1 Jnly 1958. . given a tag . . . Sometimes it seems as if it were a million years ago, and other times it seems like only yesterday. In either case, 1 July 1958 Will always be remembered as one of the biggest days of our lives . . . the day We entered West Point. Tension mounted as We Went through the initial processing in the West Academic Building. . .but it Was over all toosoon. We were graciously escorted to North Area, halted and rapidly imil- trated by a mass of gray-and-white clad supermen. We staggered up endless Hights of stairs with an infinite number of leaden barracks bags. We sweltered and sweated on the area as We were introduced to the mysteries of dismounted drill. We could do no right . . . every shortcoming was countered by a hail of abuse and mental anguish. Somehow, it vvasn't quite as collegiate as it had all seemed on The West Point Story. . . . and their processing begins. wwwmrassmweemeleswzstse-:iwfs:-M1 f.-'- ur-QM-Qme-i.rW,ima:-.mmM,,eesm,,em,,,,wfQ W m em.. ,, .... vii- a, .. .. V- , V. . . . . . when, stontng with totgs, sweating and swnnlng, we were tntveootneeot to the Point. It f els nice but I can't say much for the color." "It's on gooda fit, Mt you take it home " 5 9 Q f S hdt L 50 ,NX , 'mv When do plebes eat around here? "Sir, New Cadet Brown prepares to report for the first of many times . . . sir, New Cadet . . ." 51 Bare backs artol white gloves alterrtateot as amform ofthe day.. It may have been the most memorable moment of his life to General MacArthur when he was sworn in at Battle Monument, but to most of us it was just another hectic Hurry of activity in the midst of a world that seemed slightly unreal. Much clearer now are the impressions we retain of the many hours of sweat and toil on the Plain, which were disguised under the harmless sounding titles of MA, DD, and CE. Anyone who has not had a layer of dried grass imbedded in his back over a thick coating of sweat does not truly know the meaning of the word uag.0ny.n S0 well remembered. Our first formation We learned about drill . . . . , K K H L... 1. . Mani The next exercise is always the Pushup. . . . and physical fitness. Whatls everybody looking at? I 4 5 E A cadet does not lie, cheat, or steal. Are all cadets like this orie? So this is why we practiced so much! 'fThe most fart we had in Beast Barracks We inoireheol and polished.. and onaroheol again.. As Beast Barracks 1958 got underway, we found ourselves getting adjusted to life in a cadet factory. Some of us managed to excel . . . although all of us tried. Our first parade was a milestone. Luckily, we wouldn't realize until a year or so later how uncoordinated we must have been. The Plebe Hike marked the end of our glorified Hell Week, and for a while we were able to commune with nature, and re-discover that the whole world isn't cov- ered with grey stone walls and lawns with water sprinklers. As we tromped out into the boondocks for the last time that summer, we all wondered what life would be like in the regular companies, after we returned from our little jaunt of picnicking and hiking. It couldn't be as bad as the last few weeks had been . . . or could it? ri Deosi enweti. There were new things which got old pretty fast, too . . l And how! Academies cmd exercises kept us 7:71 shape A pentomic day of twenty-five hours seemed to be the only way to beat the prob- lem posed by academic demands in the fall. Not only did classroom work keep us on our mental toes, but to paraphrase the travel posters, "getting there was half the fun." Marching to class was a remarkable institution. Not only did it instill pride, develop character and maintain discipline, but it gave a plebe section marcher a Wonderful chance to develop his physical agility as he tried to keep under control his slope board, slide rule, text book, note book, drill roll, section marcher slip and pencil, all in the face of a fifty knot gale. The weekends and their football games were the best of all possible times. Al- though none of us were out there on the field with St. Pete, the spirit of the Class of '62 was undoubtedly a major factor in the success of the team that year. All this and reveille too. if 5 4 The fifth set . . ." "One point six! ! ! "Has anybody got a section-marchefs slip?" arid Plebe Christmas prooiolect a piiieh-rieeoted lift iii spirit. . .t "No, it's not exactly a patio . . ." Th guys do1i't lcriozo leadership when they see it. t And spectating W :A 1. my Y HQ- ' ,gt L M .9- 5659 'NA fm. 4 5 wk wx Q wk Good rockin' tonight! Why do you think the pilloufs there? 59 . . . with hops, afhd mistletoe arid Christmas Trees ctrwl. . . girls I "We dori't understand it either." Where's the opener, she says. 60 Would you owe fm some fresh air? When Plebe Christmas rolled around, we finally had a chance to find out how much we'd learned. Maybe we still didn't know it all, but we'd be the last to admit it. Showing the people from back home what it was like gave us all a thrill. Even the days spent in the pad were relished. The return to the standards of normal living was almost unbelievable, but just as we started to get used to walking around "like we owned the place," it was all over, and we found out that as before, we definitely didnt Even though it was hard to readjust after leave was over, WGR's, gloom period, 100th Night and Spring Leave came in rapid suc- cession. Finally, the year seemed about to end, and We be- gan to think about what it would be like to be Yearlings. 1959-so what? W And then ecmne Glooffn Pefrfiocl. . . bnt not few' behind was Spring. . . and the end of Plebe Yecw Topo can be fun? "I can move that tree! J" my s nm H ti if 3 4 YIEARILIIN uri is i 'fs xg ? .5 E4 .fc N 'n W, Q A' Q. ,x .K mb Q' Y .3. R,- 5,45 N At Buckner, we found d dzjjferent lflfe It wasn't all fun and games at Buckner . . . at least it wasn't all fun. The OPE seemed to have a knack for playing games at the weirdest hours. Most of us developed the ability to put on our boots and run two miles without waking up, but nobody ever de- vised a means of staying asleep while stumbling around the Ob- stacle Course at the crack of dawn. Conditioning exercises at the break of day did wonders for insuring a wide-awake feeling that lasted for minutes on end as we returned to our dormitory-style log cabins for a few more precious moments in the pad. The daily training, in the way of all Army training, was in- formative and entertaining. Most of us had our first close look at the tools of the trade, and got quite a thrill out of tearing up the countryside, one way or another. I'm glad I worked out during leave. Azh bolm Azh bolm all de way' t , M4343 What does Coaxially rnean Qu Uggg W 9 03.7. .M J A After breakfast, unstoppable ARMOR! ,V A l7,t. V ,,,, ' ' 4 ' H" 1 21 Af L. 21" f ff ,, Panzer Leader! A short respite . . . ENGINEERS stop unstoppable tanks. WF! uf! , df' S" W , if pa' 'W 1 Shock action from the engineers. Wx h-,if ff' A 'Q a-. . . . then back at night. x . Q , . sq ar-1. - . , fibw -'inf L, .',,AV9,fm Q-tai.-EK 33" V qv' ,, Q,,N,L' V ,,?,f'A1:9'k, J-iq, ' " , Q .f ,A 7 x fi-5 ww fx' iff, ffyljj-fk, :s,.ig-,f 3"' 'I ., piwff 'J I ' vi 1 . . .the training was fvcwiecl No good... ...nogoocl... . . . teaching ns all aspects of betng a good solafter Just because We were living in the field didn't mean We should stop being good garrison soldiers, so every Satur- day our honorary classmate arranged a little "help keep the Third Class clean" party in barracks and ranks. We did our best to play it cool, but little things like "moss on butt plate" just didn't seem to go over too Well. As always, the OPE kept finding more and more ways to make life worth living. At Buckner, we were exposed to the thrill of our first Physical Fitness Test . . . something that most of us Would have been happy to never encounter, then or since. Unfortunately, it seemed to catch on. 68 "Do we have inspection this morning? SO GOOD! "Is that laundry bundle pregnant, Mister?" "Here, let me help yon." 0 in yi QA if J ... Civilians in the Mess Hall? Soaking up those good rays. f 3 if X. 4, 'N fr 'xx 5, 1, s M2 , N f ,lg - iv s ,Q .. .gl .... ,mg by , Al, K X 5, if 6 X 'X E- Y . VVVVA .. A, ,-5M5: "5. . 'en GTF'-1' if F' Q Q S C E . it I N ,. VSWR "V, :S W, She wants to know what. h Some things theytdtdwt have to teach ws "Come on, baby, let's do the . . ." Q e--fi---L-M---f-w me 'Dear Mom, Camp is fine . . ." More memofrable than Step up, please. ....,-'af' fgji-.ff-f4,f.4 'M",.t4.,'-Y" .. A ,L Depth charge, Army style. ,Q 1 "7"-4, L ' V "5-in ,-,, 'Q 'figs 't'...j'fflh2"""-. M .ww ., 'wr' Q 1 ' 'V , fs L- -'eq ,A - f ,M --uv ,,.aa,,,, .vt 5""'-Qs.. the oarrnloal or the talerlt show. . .the water tortfare. "The Inkspots-a little blotted." Sold to the mart with the blue ears! All work and no play makes for a very dull yearling sum- mer was the motto on the beaches and at the hops where we made sure everyone knew that '62 can do, and would, at every opportunity we got. Some of our drags became a lit- tle upset about our non-dragging classmates leering at them across the mess hall, but the food was enough to keep them on their toes anyway. We found the hops to be great for relaxing after a tough week of training, and that in- evitable stroll along the wooded shore gave us a fine opportunity to get better acquainted with the young ladies who made that place look better on the weekends. But after the weekends and the girls had gone, it was back to work for the Class of 62. Some of us never could figure out what a compass was good for. And the Buckner slide-well, nobody will ever forget that thing! As if hit- ting the water at numerous miles-per-hour wasn't enough, some nut had thought up the idea of walking across a wet log and then climbing out on a rope where we could jump in the drink again. Soon, however, our time at Camp Buckner drew to a close with Camp Illumination Week, its carnival and close- ly-censored show where we could show everyone just what talent we did, or did not, possess. All in all, it wasn't too bad, but we were certainly glad when it was over. SGH? WLKF 31 away iiiiniw 'QV 4 'ff V5f't'.!p f 2 Q M -'W Q , 1 - ,- 1 ,ifug I F 5 qi Ji. y wik i! HN 1 ,A f, g-Y ,l5g'?fs'Q :3':Q 2'1" vifiifim' gif iff 4 ' fS'f'? , " ?g3'-fi ?ll,' 'iH?'2-ff wh ' ri l w51f . 1' w x' , W 2 x,v 3'3f? f41Qwf H in A '-142, f 'I' Wig , ..Q':"'Q?,x11 .- ,.x. A . - ' if f 4 A f jQ,?,55.- ,: 453, faks ff Q3',fsg' .eJ 2 i wg ,, Q H S , ,A Zq: , Q "SK Q23 in t!f1l , ,kW, A ,W . EIB 4 5 ,gqfjg L3 :Sr If -we ffazfi md' 4 mimgf " "We swim out, how else?" The integral of X is-ZZZZZZ! M.. ..---"""""? 1 'IE wmwmg team. . . ct losing battle with the slftde rule For some strange reason, that so-called Yearling Deadbeat never showed up. The academic departments were more than glad to get their clutches on us once again, and a lot of good friends, buddies, and roommates turned in their grey uniforms at the end of that first semester. The hives, however, were in their usual good form demonstrating the use of the Brown Boy while the goats spent many a night trying to decide what to do with all of those epsilons and deltas the Math Department threw at us. Football season is always a good deal. Our class took its first football trip to New York City, and amazingly enough we all made it back-most of us on time too. Michie Stadium looked pretty good that fall with the Army team beating all comers. Christmas leave-our first-was great, to say the least, but when we got back we found that the place hadn't changed a bit . . . 160 years of existence, unhampered by progress, or something like that. "Sir, I lost my seat, and I wonder if . . ." n so-1 mul - mmwr f1J"'i. -izl Only when I walk to class on it." 54W-ha' , iii? .'T'b'-- A study in gray and white. , k K 5 '-'X' . . xg, 'S .X W- e to the x, dyfdx 77 Artd saotaertty another year was over ,255 fb? 3546 , . H Please direct your attention to the center ring. We'll teach the Astor to ratse zts rates. Where are the elephants?" CIUW YIEFXR Pre-twist days. "Sitting on my ya-ya." Belfoovlr cmd Morwrtouth had their good porhts When Yearling year was over we counted noses and sure enough, our ranks had depleted a little more. None the less, we started the Cow Trip with a grim determination to work hard, and have as much fun as possible, with emphasis on the un part. Ft. Monmouth was our first stop, with its antennas, static displays of communi- cations equipment, and the inevitable hops. It was here that our class got its first taste of being away from West Point as a group, and make the most of it we did. From the home of the Signal Corps we moved on to Ft. Belvoir where we re- ceived an orientation on the type of work the hives would be doing when they got their gold bars. Even the truest goat got a big charge out of driving that earth mov- ing equipment, and pushing his classmates into the lake in the wild frenzy to build those floating rafts. Our biggest feat however, was that we didn't dump the Bailey Bridge into the ravine . . . no matter how hard some of us tried. Of course there was a hop, and to top that off we had a weekend in Washington, D.C. to keep up occu- pied and provide a well-deserved break. We'd better put it back before they find out it's gone. N - fiwizw F5-i5'5w X 5 l . if 1 ,, It Q - ,Af 5 5 s L 54 fm .ix M if L, 5- 3 We wouldwt think of trying to snow you! At least it's a convertible." Efecfof Set' one each . . audi so did Rucker. . . Would you hold these, please, sir? + What a milk shake we could make with this baby! Y fv J! ' No that flushes it! Pool entries sign in here. .p::f'9'y ' ,X and Eglin liad planes and Norfolk. . . well, it had boats assi S 1- After 'visiting the static display of fighters, cadets will please move to the static display of bombers. Somehow we managed to get our hat box, clothing bag, B-4 bags, Blue bags, and all that other junk into those airplanes and down to Ft. Rucker for our first look at Army Aviation with the exception of the L-19 which seemed to be organic to every Army unit we saw. We did, however, get our first look at the helicopters and amazingly enough they let us steer a few of them through the Ala- bama skies. One day, though, We actually got into an L-19 ourselves, with a minimum number of classmates suiering acute cases of air-sickness. Naturally, there was a hop, need we say more? It doesn't take much to remind us of that hot Florida sun and those static displays at Eglin A.F.B., and the good look we got of the Bomb Bays of the SAC Bombers . . . after all, it was the coolest place around. Our next stop was a visit with the Navy who provided us with a demonstration of a beach invasion, with able assistance by a few of our own number. The highlight of that trip was definitely not our stay on the USS ROCKBRIDGE but it did provide an interesting diversion for those of us who had never viewed the ocean from the rail of a ship, and from the rail is where a lot of us saw it that night. In the ROCKBRIDGE's sleeping quarters we learned the true meaning of togetherness, and gained a great appreciation for fresh air. The harbor of New,York really looked great as we neared the end of our trip, but for some reason West Point hadn't changed one bit when we finally got back-it never does, it seems. X T- as QL Will we get d weekend in the city? This little wheel does all the work It smelled so much nicer on deck. 5 Q 5 Ana Dewlns and Carson were ACT and 56.00 a day The Class 0 f '62 advances on Fort Campbell. ,SQ H "What'll I do with these?" After the trip some of us stayed around to greet the new plebe class while others ventured out here and there to give A.O.T. a try. Ft. Devins and the boy scouts at Ft. Carson claimed a few of us while others gave the 101st and 82nd Airborne Divisions a try. A.O.T. taught us many things and one of them was that West Point isn't the only place where men keep ridiculous hours. But since the Army was our chosen career We took to it with a slight degree of enthusiasm. Can one ever for- get his iirst look at the ground from a 34 foot tower, or driving around the countryside with a map in your hand while an entire platoon follows you with confidence? Oh well, it's nice to know what will be going on for the next twenty or thirty years. He's all over PLF"s too. N'Q-.....,,,,hGR.- 88 With Fall, high spirits, a new stains. . . Cow Year 8fQ'r PRN! KX O L ' fl' 9g ii vl , ,,i J E, X2 KZ 6 3 i X M : .,vg,.Adw ' ' 'fhifegr Q KN , hhhb , ai On again, off again-the spirit button. t :C . t i' t Q.',L'?fQ ' X I-' X W X lfxlk " X dl N ' f fi A A fe W ! Ei-,ist yi i iii If 58' 531241, MF' ' 'V f g Qt s 1- -g.- M. .ff M . ---- Ont standing . . .Spirit? I dreamed I went to the Home- coming Hop-in FD over white. In 160 glorious years, the only lec- ture at which no one slept! wig 53 "Wh,at's your mission?" . . . "Beat Ncwy-Sir!" :bl ti' 1. ef' I 0 2 v . Section tenths get you nowhere here. 'Q 4'-s V1 Ns. With Jackie firt the stctrtds, the lortg grey lfirtes were very strcmght Cow Year came on fast and so did the Mechanics and Juice depart- ments. Football season provided its usual, and welcome, diversion that year with the bringing back of the spontaneous rally. Our own class- mates provided a demonstration of brawn over brains in the annual Goat-Engineer classic, but when we got back to Bartlett Hall they still put all the goats back in the last section. A new and thrilling experience came forth in the form of a parade in Washington, D.C. Train trips are all the same, the weather was too cold for words, but we were rewarded at the pass-in-review, where we caught a glimpse of Mrs. Kennedy and her husband. Another change of pace came our way with those trips down to Crab- town to learn how the other half lives . . . if you can call that living. Now we know why the exchange weekends are referred to as West Point ap- preciation weeks. The ROCKBRIDGE wasn't anchored at Annapolis, but a boat cruise was provided anyway . . . it seems that we just couldn't get away from water that year! L0070-l TIZGTG S729 58-' Splzsh splash I zr as talcm a bath .wmesl4sl mmn nm, -vunm u-nn iun Sill ,iji Practical exercise in probabilities. "We did NOT go Large Richard on the box lunches!" "NO, it cloesrft have overdrive Fluids can be furi. In the Spring, our thoughts turneol nuturctllg to. . . Lightly turns to thoughts of-monographs? L ,xzx IFIIRST GLASS a WEAR Same place, same game-next year! it Some stewardi haveg some stewardi have not! 1, Ji 93 Ft Bliss and Ft. Siu y l f, - Q. 3' 7 , 'S , 5" fi . . K 1 5" is - ta 4 A nslf ff -. ,, 5 ' 2 9, mfg . Q-:li ' ., 1 , 5 I- K 4 'X -9 .M 73,1 Q-'M z - A ' ' . ' . ' fs me 5 s i ' 3: '- , 5 ' L f as .307 M ,,, ,. ,-1 M siifisig ll . 5 K ,,., Q V kV,,l, , 1 LLL. . is L,,: fi C ' ' ,rg-. sz, ,., t I dare you to stick your finger in here!" "Ou behalf of the Class of 1962, it's my pleasure to present you with this plaque, which says . . ." "Ori behalf of the Class of 1962, it's my pleasure to present you with this plaque, which says . . ." "Dammit, I forgot mustard! !" 'l if ai K s 52 fi S if x if as 1 11 "Ou behalf of the Class of 1962, it's my pleasure to present you with this plaque, which says . . ." . M, 1 ers giiided missiles, biljalo bilrgers arid girls As Cow Year snapped to a halt, we found ourselves thrust upon the outer world again, through the courtesy of the Overseas National Airline and Storm Door Com- pany. Maybe the stewardii weren't too pro, but at least the food was lousy, what there was of it. Everywhere we went, we took away memories and left behind plaques. After the wonderful reception we received at the hands of the "Lawton-Ft. Sill Community" we were all pretty anxious to see what the "Juarez-Ft. Bliss" people had in store for us. It turned out to be entertaining and informative. The Armor- philes had the best time of all at Knox, but nobody seemed to object very strenu- ously to the free beer the CG laid on for us at the "informal" barbecue. Somehow, all white with hop gloves and name tags didn't seem very informal at the time, but then again, there was all that beer. We finally had to head back to Happy Valley at the end of the month, and we went our separate ways during the rest of the summer. Followirlg the static displays, there will be free beer in my back yard. . X Symbols of Bliss. DON'T TOUCH THAT BUTTON! ! .V ,Ms f , L , a s if And seconds on free beer too. SS10??? x WHERE do you see, "Infantry in the open"? and barbecues at Font Knox, The answer to "Why Me?', """""f aaaa s yy .. , ,g-,A,HzgL,g ,L K , ,,,hl,l15-ikfm -. V X, av' -s ' at Q tx. V B E Xi' if ' X. .Kb wi X G Q53 . LLV' 15, 1 X v , " , ' nk y'4ts,g ae.. .I E l ,' .f. 'Q XE 4 Y I " x ' I5 Q. A ' Q by X ria l X' 3 K ,x - - A . Waiting forthe "young gentlemen of '65" Q.. in f 5 3 .Q HYU NE: Sie vevlnmnjuzv WEST'BERllN Deutschland Uber Alles fur AOT. a ' ' W we lv H ,YJ ,gan K F 512' E' 4. " 5 K , ,yn Ay' ll gr ' W. e W fm B 6 . - s Eff M g ,Q . A .N A. 4.-A .J , ,5,,.,e,1fs l ' ag M 'S 91:52 A l"Bfl 'f . f.l'?'l . 'S li' A I '- Nl W K-.' any x ,fl 3 1 B ,l ,'l' -H J at 'wr I V Ji 1 , l f 'N"'W k .7 ' ' T :'. ,, J, gk fl -V K v 1 My In K K ,W . 'N ': W,,,y xp-1 ,V I Z- 5.951 Gee, it's good to be back! . . " ?!g 1 74,4 , gif, as well as Beast Bawaeks Ufofoon a e new point of oflewj and Berlin. The last Reorgle natty. The Ririg, The Girl arid tougher trctirtirtg. . this was First Class Year Being a Firsty turned out to be a good deal after all. Ring Weekend marked the start of another new way of life. The Superintendent said a few words of encourage- ment to us in Cullum Hall, Ring Reps casually picked up the boxes, and the next thing we knew, the crass masses of glass and brass were ours. For some of us, it was the first time in our cadet careers that we left an encounter with the Tac with smiles on our faces. The O.A.O. couldn't be forgotten in this moment of pride, so many of us finally got around to taking the first of many big steps and buying miniatures. Life seemed pretty fine-things were looking up. The OPE made a valiant try at stemming this outrageous How of enthusiasm by running us through their "unarmed combat" course, but something was miss- ing. . .in spite of all that thrashing and yelling, nobody even breathed hard and life was still fun. Bigtirhe rirtgknockers. He did. DON'T!!! Cars in the area and women in the Mess Hallg it must be Ring Hop! A liberal education: Dirty Fighting I i 9 9 We took a looh at oioiliaii olothiiig, foilght Wai IV with tho MPS ahol oiijoyocl fiwi, if hot siloooss, oh the football 1 turtleneck on this sportcoat! What's this rally poop? YY RRY 'Q A uple of cadet drags are on the way down to th h t l field me ,iii 5. is ' ' e,,Ax:f,A , me eg .. , ,.. Us ,,k Aw, , L, S, ,, is, si vkL:,,. ww f-ww f-,. 5:-may '- Li f - .. Q isa Q1 1- U- 1. ,, .Ui Are we as one, big squad?" 1. I ' 5 e LF ' in Jumpin, Jim sez... 'un ,IQ ' J f' Y ' ii gif-'X 'kiwi "Y, Q4'it:A t VL .gijfakzf f -n ' ,f I Q' it 3 iw: ' fi ui" Ly ,. S, . f W, 51: s, . 'W' f"" ' lp-9 A " ' v , .L , 'rf . Y 1 4 0 I 'E 1, , if? 'Q 1 fm: Ogg Cf, J A A 'W g?v!, "ad 4 'Q i ll wwf Pliil likes to park on ci mule . . . "WV Pass him up! IOI BEATNAVY A man who smokes White Owls. Q I 102 Remembmhces of things past. Rally, hell! Let's have a riot!! Night exercise-mission accomplished! 'Tuff 5' iz" Oucthe road . . . and in the rack. The football season was a memorable one. By the last week, the spirit of the Corps had gathered some real momentum. Colonel Es- posito told us to try hard, and we did. Some of the stunts pulled off far surpassed Mac's escapade with the clock tower in terms of tactics. Recon patrols, radio nets, F.O.'s, and sentinels, all coordinated in moving the field pieces from Trophy Point to their tempo- rary location in front of Washington Hall. Statues were decorated and guidons dis- appeared, while O.C.'s with C.I.B's and bat- tle stars quaked in their boots. Prelucle to the Philadelphia Disaster. . . the euthusiasiu was rhueh higher tharl the score ....,.?q Q jf' We ID I ,J ci"- See you in Juue, John. lO3 The beginning ofthe end Where's "PZayboy"? e rw r AD Let's see, I'll NEED the competition block, full race cam . . .,' got to beat those Impala !,09's! we biiya cap... The walking talking digital computer from USAA 3118,000! , E 5 1 WM-' t, E dnnppnnv 'B I' ' V he :ef, 1 - i ...we 5 -iii. 'C' 'fmt O6 For the rowdies, the "Twist" in the Weapons Room And quiet entertainment for those so inclined. The end of the beginning. . . we Say goodbye. . After Christmas leave and the automobile show, there wasn't far to go. From then on, it was all uphill, every step of the way. The TD tried hard to keep us on our toes by bringing back that all time fa- vorite, the Band-Box Review. In spite of that, the weekends were still fun and everyone found something pleasant to do on Sunday after- noons. We were kept pretty busy, planning personal finances, debating the car andfor wife questions and trying to stay pro, but still, we could feel it all coming to a close. Finally, the lines of the song that we all knew so well, began to take on meaning: "We'ye not much longer here to stay, For in a month or two, We'll bid farewell to Kaydet Gray, And don the Army Blue." Oar first band box review wasn't so hot after all we had heard about thenz An end, a beginning. . . fonof nnfmfgettable years. . . ahead, an nnforeseeable fntnfre. frwswve as-,Q mf'-Q 1 ?j A. j fl"'!9Cg33 VN e e e .ea K ,K ' f'1 eff fi lift. n ' , , may ef-new iegwm M .5 3?e5gf5f?wgf44fQ4I4 Mmm 4 e I -V: - L L 'fe pf 1 w- fr, H it ll i " A very rare instance of a beast squad remaining intact through four years . . .congratulatlorlsl "vHJ-,-hwy I er gf W ,. 1 'fCf'fI'W m fs 'I ' .' 1 f 1 ' ' ' , , X an o 5: k l 1 ' f, 4 f it - if - f 4 V . . if 5 I t V 1, I , f f l .. ' X -rr g.'?f'3,'i5,J"h-5-EJ .1 lr gi ff li 3 A gift ' ii' ' 51 - B fe! f ? 1' ' lg 3 :K .gl ll? 3 I3 ix' ig i esemafl--Sgt!- 5 , 1 , 'H !!.,e41 At last it ended. We could look back on the most unforget- table years of our lives. Time might dim, but would never destroy our memories. We knew we could never forget any of it . . . the joys or the sorrows, the good times or the bad. A part of West Point would always be with us, and part of us would always be with West Point. On 6 June 1962, it was all true: "Now, fellows, we must say good-bye, We've stuck our four years through. Our future is a cloudless sky, We'll dorm the Army Blue." 109 WM Mm X u .x ., ,X --4 , A 4 if ' -'-: Wg NSQ .I X J MN! Eu ,,-XY Jfr, Q AE1 lx. X A x M WW21,r' h Qf .Tf1 km ' xgwf i fl M' "wl"Hf' WN K f W ,F 4 W M lw 2 NH 4 f 1 Lx ff' N 4 ' if fi' A 'I Q X fu ff X K - W ' iN f'A gj M W 1 A fimp' W-.X f ax 45-YW, MN3L1 u gg ff"'f" 'f V Hr , f 4 N X fm' W , f- if U X 'f f f W 4 ff, Kqyk?l1Nfxl48l'g'1!'Q ' M I L X f 5 K L 7 X X K JI! HH Aka, I jx i I .CG-ge Q k ' ' fix x C xx Xiffmw Mk Q X K x SIEIQIIQRS 1 3 . " "" """""' 'W"'M'D"'A" 'M' ' " " ' ' ' 1 RS O SIENH EDITOR Ted Stroup I 4' ff ,QS . fr' . . . , 'A' ' -' u'l?'s.N" .ig fs' ' . Hg bb A - :Q ' f-"Q: CHUCK ABBOTT ' .4" l' JIM ACKLIN T, 5 T 12- " f .i'Z. ,.x. S to .' :.,,f an s .. 1-.,-rr -, ZI4 7' nag-'LW f f , tl " Ks A ,s . VX 7 X THOMAS CHARLES ABBOTT F-1 Chuck Dallas, Texas Chuck is one of the better-known members of '62. His physical prowess and carefree ways made him a legend at the Academy. By not allowing the academic departments to interfere with his time, Chuck has had time for an occasional brush with the "T.D." and has always won. The future offers no limits to his capabilities. Sergeant 1, Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Monogram 2, 1, Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Nu- merals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Track 4, Numerals 4, Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, Triathlon Club 3, Camera Club 2, 1, HI-FI Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 4, 2, 1. JAMES MONTGOMERY ACKLIN, III B-2 Jim East Lansing, Michigan "Live-I am coming"--Oliver Wendell Holmes Jim's personality is as radiant as his bright red hair, and his cheefulness is at least as evident. This insomnious native of the Midwest brought new life, and an air of warmth to any gathering he joined, be it with his coffee pots and peanut butter, by a subtle joke, or merely his presence. Sergeant 1, Public Relations Council 2, 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Spanish Club 4, 3, 1, Pointer 4, KDET 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 3, Scoutmasters Council 4, 3, 2, 1 , Handball Club 3, 2, 1, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 2,1,' CCA 1. KEITH EDWARD ADAMS D-2 Keith Kenmore, New York Army lost a promising swimmerwhen an injury forced Keith to leave the team. He still has a keen interest in swimming as well as skin diving, ice skating, and skiing. One of the few to remain attached to the same young lady for four years, Keith is a born optimist who never fails to find a "good deal" in everything. Lieutenant 1, Swimming 4, Public Relations Council 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Art Club 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Shin Diving Club 1. KEITH ADAMS Ill 4 E, W-gm M1955 AL AILINGER ROY ALCALA JEFF AI T -v ' ...A-, ,. ,,,. , . 1 ., A , ..- .A , ,I 4. "VM " , k -'fr'-1'5" law,-...V ',f.'?' ,aux ' Tip 'T L' fW1?gji:'T???ffisf?w,aiwifgisv-pibef "'M,,: wifiwn ' 'V' " 'A -ff -. K- fm :fum A- 5f,jwf'1-'wi-KS,-,A 2, .1 , YI, hi . K K ,, .55 K,K,.,fK,K xgyw f .Sw-f.Azs,35KK.?,5A,, gh 1 1 7 K. zfxggz g'3Q51u-4' Y X, f , , Km , KK . , f . 2 .f":,fn'?f:w Y, 'iw if ff " f2f,1'3'f4"-'f'if2W 'A , .Ji .xi " V- , . 4 g , 'Q 1 H9 f M f H I f".-S'fJ"r.7.v ..,s5Q,fi.'T'f'wgg w5f'lZ3v'.!WvQ'2'aa "Mail -5 "'1gxf'5S?,.fLfff'4'5e+nw35:,'K'i:9gf'3f?',,Q'Tf: . M. J.i"f"guPf4'wf-'vz'? ""i2.,"-w!"fT A ' f X , , K KK K5 K? K .K KK M 1 :Ki K K-gvwrkyg ..u,,b,,i?Kig?. KQQKE ,Kun-y?,.32v .V K fy KK K. gLfaw:KK.f7Kf,5KK-AK, LK. KK KK--Q My KKK, K , L ' 'fQ1wwyqi.:fdQugg-M. A , A - - A - K ' if-if ' , . fi ' . ' v' - RX A 17: flwb, Q 'ff 'XF 'iflag .5551 .-5.4 ,,4:Mi3ig,fg,.w-Mgr . - ff , .N .W 1 -f vm WM - -f 1 f . g Q, ,..f., ,V .9 mv ng X , , f . Lg, 3,4.-max y - -, W' ,., -7 f I i 1, QV. . H . -f 1 fx K KW 2 f ,,.. 7 M4 . ,,,.a,1f,M, I .2 K ,Mm V Lf K,,fw1..5?:5g, ,Sa Y3,.m.Wffg4,q3-v3g..5U,K3gFQ,3.mr ,L -f. , rhdk . K .f ..,,fM?'7,fJfm5 4fp,.,,i1 ,VM ,Q ,Eff S, ,W 4 .-us . A 1 , 7, .j,,.KfKK,,KiK K E. . Q .WH .. ,Q .N . KxK,.K,p5K,.., nm., Asa., 65, ,QJIKK Sew. 51,552,621 Q ,X , ff i?,M,,c. pw . K. Q 1Q,d5mK .,, 5, K .KKMNL ,K ,Q . i Ka, .WA14 ,,n,.,,, 4. K I Q K, KQ K. , K ,,, +V, hwy. .ug .,'5,.4.Rf.1g , ,, X GK ,M KN K.. A ,ns K .Au ,A ,M A k KA .,,QJ3,,q,K,K . Ks f Y ,. A y, . , K K rg ,,,.pniaw,..a,-, wifi' .,.- -, V. say -I, Le,-.ff f S45-.b,.p. ff. ,gF'.,,. 4 2 'K'-i-K fi fan 2-:49'4'V'Wfx,, . 1 X21-'iffFh!.?2 if v't51F'i'E3'-ffi' 75m-QQCYE,55-k.:wf:.u'i.,, 2 ,,1-im. ww' - . si.-5"?mi+5u.w+ .mi A - N-A LARRY AMON CHUCK ANDERSON AT , .. ,.. 255 1- S g'5" . 4' - ill j X. tsaaff.. 1 .lv 1 fx 9 '-mi?-gs ' v'.,fl! lk, 19, wgx Z Q 2' r-X fn xl, J LAWRENCE G. AILINGER F-1 Al Middletown, New York Al came our way by compliments of the "Screaming Eagles." When he passed out the "poop", there was a crowd in his room as big as the Satur- day night Weapons Room mob. His ability, desire, and experience, all aided by a friendly brunette, have carried him through West Point in the highest-flying style. Lieutenant 1,' Stars 1,' Pistol 2, Monogram 2, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Li- brarian 4, 3, 2, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1 , Camera Club 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 2, 1 ,' HI-FI Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rifle Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 4, 1. RAUOL HENRI ALCALA M-1 Roy San Antonio, Texas Although busy with his many activities, Roy always found time to help others. As an active member of the Debate Council, Roy brought several trophies back to West Point. His was a familiar face in the "sinks" where he coached students in Russian and Spanish throughout his four years. His unselfishness and great energy are sure to make his future a success. Lieutenant 1, Gymnastics 4, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, Debate Council 62: Forum 4, 3, 2, Spanish Club 2, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, Camera Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, 3. JEFFREY CORNELIUS ALT G-2 Jejj' Des Moines, Iowa "3.0 or no" seemed to characteristically define Iowa's own cornhusker. Whether the subject was athletics, academics or models, the Swedish- Mexican made quality a requirement as well as a habit. His combination of sincerity and unexpected wry humor broke the sourness of many days. Sergeant 1, Debate Council cf: Forum 4, 2, 1, Spanish Club 4, 3, Pointer 4, Glee Club 3, Outdoor Sports Club 2, Golf Club 2, Skeet Club 2. LAWRENCE ROY AMON I-2 Larry Monrovia, California Hailing from the rays of warm California sunshine, Larry was an active member of the "What me worry?" Club. Although he wasn't the greatest academic Wonder he was a wonder child of the T.D. His determination for a job well done, coupled with his ability will carry Larry high up the ladder of success. Lieutenant 1 , Indoor Track 4, 3, Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 , Dance Orchestra 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. CHARLES CALDER ANDERSON, JR. G-1 Chuck Spokane, Washington It didn't take long for everyone to realize that Chuck was a man of rare talent. His imagination and quick mind, although never fully appreciated by the academic departments, enabled him to rise above the "T.D.'s" de- mands. He will never be forgotten by those who knew him, and there will never be a dull moment when Chuck is on the scene. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 3, 2, 1, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council 42 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' German Club 3, 2, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1,' KDET 4, 3, 2, 1 , Pistol Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 100th Nite Show. JAMES GILLIS ANDRESS B-1 Jim Los Angeles, California Andresselli-"Head Honch" in "The Bunch"-is known for his carefree and warm personalityand has promised many reforms when he is "Supe." Refreshment stands and hour-long breaks are sought-after ideals by this "Century Man." His claims to fame are many, but just between you and me, he has met his Waterloo in many friendly jousts. Sergeant 1,' Indoor Track 4, Ring and Crest Committee 3, 2, 1, Debate Council 62: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Astronomy Club 4, Fencing Club 4, 3. JIM ANDRESS H3 WA. 'ma Y'5Tl'fZ'3g W 'mv .JAQXQZ3-Il I if if "' lei fc z 5 llllllwl ROBERT P. ANDREWS M-1 Andy Chica o Illinois S y Hailing from the Windy City, Andy came to West Point straight from the University of Illinois. As a cadet, he developed a great affection for his beloved "Brown Boy", yet Andy was an asset to his class and to all who knew him. Through it all, Andy's drive and determination have insured for him a successful career. Captain 1,' Ring dt Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Newman Forum 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council cb Forum 4, 3, 2, Russian Club 3. ROGER A. ANDREWS D-2 Roy Brooklyn, New York Rog gave up the casual life of New York City Creluctantlyj to do battle on the Hudson. It will always be remembered how he consistently nodded in approval at lectures. Rog has developed the qualities and desires neces- sary for the pursuit of a successful career in the profession of arms. Upon graduation he plans to fulfill his one other desire--to marry the girl who saw his four years through. Sergeant 1,' Public Information Detail 3,' Spanish Club 3,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2, Pistol Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3. CHALMERS HILLIARD ARMSTRONG, III M-1 Chan ' Spartanburg, South Carolina Devoted to the Armor's concept of "Firepower, shock action, and mobility," Chan took the long trip from "Colonel's Row" to the ranks of the Corps of Cadets. Sweeping by the Academic Departments easily, he met his defeat at the hands of the "TD" "yearling" year. With his wide range of abilities, Chan will be a great asset to the Armor. Lieutenant 1,' Golf 4g Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 3g Debate Council ff: Forum 1,' Spanish Club 3, 1,' HI-FI Club 1,' Skin Diving Club 2g Rocket Society 3. DAVID ARMSTRONG G-1 Dave Santa Rosa, California Dave came to West Point from the sunny vales of California, but changing his environment couldn't alter his genial nature. His enthusiasm for a rather unique form of lacrosse was boundless, but h-is friends will remem- ber him as a literate and self-reliant scholarg assured of success in the future and a good man to have on one's side in an argument. Sergeant 1,' English Literature Seminar 2, 1,' Russian Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 3, 2. STEVEN LLOYD ARNOLD I-1 Arn Decatur, Illinois Arn was the "biggest', little man in the Corps. He was always the leader, whether on the athletic field or waging a winning battle with the UTD". Entering West Point with a love for farming and women, he kept both- but added the "Brown Boy" to his list. He is assured of success in the Army just as he has been successful in everything else he has tried. Captain 1 ,' Baseball 4, 3,' Squash 4,' Debate Council JZ Forum 3, 2, 15 Span- ish Club 3g Bugle Notes 3, 2, 1, Associate Editor 1,' Howitzer 1, Activities Editor 1, Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Chess Club 3, 2, Golf Club 3,' Sheet Club 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 3. DONALD NEIL BABB C-2 Don Independence, Missouri Donny came to the Point from high school, and he quickly proved without a doubt that he could stand with the best. High standards for himself and those around him characterized his performance. He gave academics all he had and then some. With a ready smile, an intense devotion to duty, and an indomitable will to win, Don will go to the top in whatever he does. Lieutenant 15 Track 4,' Debate Council cb Forum 4, 3, 2,1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. H4 ANDY ANDREWS ROG ANDREWS CHAN ARMSTRONG 1735 DAVE ARMSTRONG STEVE ARNOLD DON BABB I 15 .........-.,...,..,...-m- ,.N152, J vm MJ 'zu we sl-G! 491 35 , L L LARRY BACHELOR ED BAILEY PAUL BALTES I I6 1,-g..-M--1-rw DICK BARRY l. V MIKE BARTELME HOWARD BATT 5 hex C552 Y Xb J S- I s .". ,fir-'-' . X' ' Q . 1 "1-ff 3 --fs, .Q 'av -' K fx R Qfrgggi? reg "QV Ev 7 N . 3 v - 4, fx ,G 'af-.X ' ii LARRY DOUGLAS BACHELOR E 2 Bach Bluffton, Indiana Larry came to VVest Point from Bluffton with his eyes set on a career in the sky. After he fought his way past the Spanish Department, with a val- iant etfort on their part, Bach settled down to obtain his goal. He was always there with a helping hand and advice when it was needed most. Sergeant 1,' Baseball 4, Manager 4,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,- Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 3, Rocket Society 3, 2, 1. ELLIS MILLER BAILEY B-2 Ed Itasca, Texas Loyalty, integrity, and perseverance to all facets of life, are only a few of the words needed to describe this native of the Lone Star State, Ellis M. Bailey. A man whose true friendship never dies but leaves an intangible feeling of warmth in one's heart. Ellis M. Bailey, the personification of today's outstanding othcers. Sergeant 1,' Track 45 Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, 1,' Ordnance Club 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Model Airplane Club 2,' Scout- masters Council 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4. PAUL ANTHONY BALTES, JR. L-2 Scranton, Pennsylvania Paul came to West Point from Arlington, Virginia. The son of an army officer, he had wanted to be a cadet ever since he could remember. Although never in the starman category, he learned as much as he could toward making himself a good officer. Lieutenant 1,' Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1, Triathalon Club 3,' Skin Diving Club 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 1. RICHARD ALBERT BARRY G-1 Dick Omaha, Nebraska Plebe Year found Dick well on the way to adjusting himself to the rigors of cadet life. That year brought complete mastering of the tradition of the Brown Boy. His adjustment was completed Yearling Year when he adapted a policy of extensive "dragging". An easy-going attitude towards both aca- demics and P.E. always seemed to attain the ultimate goal-the 2.0 mark. Sergeant 1 ,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2,' Astronomy Club 4, 3, HI-FI Club 2, Ski Club 4, 3. MICHAEL JAMES BARTELME H-2 Mike Duluth, Minnesota Mike, "The Minnesota Midgetn, always ready for a scrap after C.Q., made life in H-2 happy and unpredictable. His three loves, his Brown Boy, sports and the fair sex, left little time for the pursuit of knowledge. Mike's aggressiveness and leadership will stand him in good stead after earning his Ranger patch and Airborne wings. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 2,' Hockey 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 35 Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' HI-FI Club 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Law Club 1. HOWARD CLIFFORD BATT B-1 Howard Clearwater, Florida Quiet, reserved-these adjectives don't apply. With a friendly smile, How- ard was always ready to enter any verbal fray on any side, holding in re- serve some violently prejudicial support for any argument. He came to West Point saying he would be the best of Panzer Leaders, and as he leaves, he'll be mumbling something about being a lover, not a fighter. Sergeant 1,' French Club 4, Handball Club 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 1,' Parachute Club 3, 2, 1. 117 xi fn EQ 5'N'bf'N4L"-.'D ' 0 Lili? E 4. l sslillllflllll HAROLD DALTON BAUGHMAN A-1 Bud Seattle, Washington In spite of intense persecution by the "T.D.", Bud was one of those rare specimens who never surrendered to the Area. As a matter of fact, he rarely gave in to anything, except, perhaps, where the enticing folds of his "Brown Boy" were involved. Whether coaching classmates or terrorizing plebes, whether basking under a sunlamp or doing pullups in the sinks, this son of Seattle has shown qualities of determination, generosity and love of living which will stand him in good stead the rest of his career. Sergeant 1, Spanish Club 3, 2, 1g Astronomy Club 2, 1g Scoutmasters Coun- cil 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Rifle Club 4, Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2.' Rocket Society 4, 3, 1. ROBERT DAVID BAUMAN D-1 Bob Appleton, Wisconsin Although during his Yearling Year Bob became B-1's loss and D-1's gain, his affability and sincerity quickly won him respect and new friends. Bob's proven ability on the golf course is recognized by the Corps and opponents alike. Bob's talents, sound judgment and personality will be felt everywhere he goes in his future army career. , Sergeant 1 ,' Golf 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Debate Council Ke Forum 2, 1, Span- ish Club 4, 35 Pointer 4,' Handball Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 3, Rocket Society, 4, 3. GENE EDWARD BAXTER A-1 Geno Decatur, Indiana After cadet soirees are long forgotten, those of us who have known Geno will never forget him. Athletics were his first love, the casual kid from In- diana always had a sharp chick on the hook and his address book was a horn of plenty for those in need. Geno was a "bud" and a fun-loving bacchant. Sergeant 1,' Basketball 4, 2,' Football 3, 2, 1,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 15 Debate Council dt Forum 2, 1, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Golf Club 2, 1g Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Skeet Club 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. DENNIS LYNN BENCHOFF H-2 Bench Miquon, Pennsylvania The Pennsylvania Flash brought with him to West Point his three great loves: his girl, his wresting, and his pad habit. Endowed with this arma- ment, Bench was truly prepared for Cadet life. Those of us who knew Denny will always remember his wit, sincere humor and desire to help others. He will be successful in whatever he attempts. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Minor A 3, Major A 2, 1,' Sunday School Teacher 3, 2g Debate Council di: Forum 45 Russian Club 4, 3. CHARLES ORON BENNETT, JR. M-2 C.O. Long Beach, California C.O. came to us from the Golden West with his own ideas on how a military academy should be run. Although he didn't succeed in bringing about any drastic changes in the system, he certainly didn't let the system change him. Throughout his four years on the banks of the Hudson, C.O. main- tained the same quick Wit and likeable personality he had brought with him from Sunny California. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, Monogram 25 Debate Council di Forum 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 4, 3,- Pointer 4,' Rocket Society 3, 2, 1. DENNIS RAY BENNETT M-1 Benny Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio Benny's presence enlivened many a gathering, and his laughter was often heard throughout South Area. But, in true Cadet style, Benny was happiest when he was closest to his "Brown Boy". Benny's waking moments were spent wisely, and his philosophy of making others happy will carry him far in his career. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Wrestling 4g Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Dialectic Society 3, 2, 1,' Special Program Committee 3, 2, 1, Shi Club 3, 2, 1. GENE BAXTER ll8 BUD BAUGHMAN BOB BAUMAN Q . 5 7 'K "Zim A 2350, ff""'T'9' qw ' DENNIS BENCHOFF CHARLES BENNETT BENNY BENNETT 119 DON BERGERON TODD BERGMAN 120 W-mv CHARLIE BERNI AL BIDDISON MARTY BILAFER X elseif T' ,sigh fs. El m ,- 7 1 - AT ef f 'X 'gfiigi r ' :L Wa' . lu ,.f is f " lx . ' 5-1 f X., ,fi DONALD N. BERGERON L 1 Don South Portland, Maine Don came to the Point with a year of college and the Army to his credit. Although he won a "gold-star" for his "B-Robe" in Math, his interest in languages and a fluency in French, made German his devoted interest. He will surely make his Army career a success. Sergeant 15 Debate Council JZ Forum 4, 25 German Club 4, 35 Dialectic Society 25 Pistol Club 25 Sailing Club 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2. TODD LAWRENCE BERGMAN E-2 Bergs Westbury, New York A quick hearty smile and twinkling "puppy dog" eyes admitted Bergs to the warm companionship of everyone. A "hive" from the word "go" Todd has managed to mould a firm set of close friends, in spite of many hours logged under the "brown blanket". Todd's ability to solve a problem quickly, coupled with a keen sense of humor, will enable him to be a quick military success. Sergeant 15 Lacrosse 25 Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3, 25 Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Pointer 4, 35 KDET 45 Handball Club 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Bridge Club 2. CHARLES FREDERICK BERNITT G-2 Charlie Whitestone, New York In four years, Charlie has never let the Academy get the better of him. His smile, sense of humor and long hair never disappeared. He transferred his street fights into the Boxing ring. His parties, candid camera and loyal friendships will always be a source of memories. Charlie will always get the job done-don't rush him. Sergeant 1 5 Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 5 Newman Forum 45 Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Photography Editor 15 Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 15 Ski Club 2, 1. ALAN McCAULEY BIDDISON L-2 Horse Baltimore, Maryland Some people may have been born with silver spoons in their mouths, but Al was born with a licrosse stick in his hand. He brought his Lacrosse abili- ties to West Point with him and excelled on Clinton Field for four years. On Sundays, Horse put away his stick and devoted his time to teaching Sun- day school. Al's friendly attitude won him many friends throughout the Corps. Sergeant 15 Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 15 Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2, 15 Superintendent 15 Radio Club 2, 15 Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Spanish Club 4, 25 Outdoor Sports Club 25 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Bridge Club 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1. MARTIN FRANCIS BILAFER ' E-2 Marty Arlington, Massachusetts Arriving here with little background for things military, Marty quickly mastered his new environment. Whereas academic pursuits rarely diverted his interest away from the fairer sex, when Hockey season rolled around it was time out from his blue-eyed gal and into the net for the puck. Then, after the cold months, it was out to the links for a tan for Marty. Sergeant 15 Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 15 Catholic Aco- lytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Newman Forum 2, 1 5 French Club 4, 3,' Camera Club 3, 2, 1 5 Golf Club 2, 1. GLEN ALGER BLUMHARDT E-1 Glen Mondovi, Wisconsin As one of the "old men" of the Class of '62, Glen arrived at USMA after two years of college and a two-year hitch in the Army. Dividing his time between the classroom and the football fieldgthere were ups and downs to be shared in both. A "Yankee" with a weakness for North Carolinian south- ern hospitality, he will be a credit to the Academy and his class. Captain 15 Stars 35 Football 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 25 Wrestling 45 Class Committee 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 1 5 Spanish Club 35 Parachute Club 45 Automobile Committee, Chairman. GLEN BLUMHARDT l2l it 'W KAP Z1-ei felllllllllnmll JAMES DONALD BLUNDELL D-2 Jim San Diego, California Jim came to us from sunny California flashing a broad smile and a sense of humor, neither of the two were lost throughout his four year stay. Jim's presence and "spoony" appearance have remained an inspiration to all who have come in contact with him. His spirit and dedication will give the ranks of the Infantry a mighty fine asset. Sergeant 1, Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, 1,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 3, 2, 1 ,' Dialec- tic Society 3, 2, 1. DAVID MONROE BLYNN I-1 Ace Palmerville, Pennsylvania D. Monroe managed for four years to live by the famous old maxim "A tenth gained is a tenth Wasted". Never one to put too much emphasis on academics, he wisely spent his time hazing the "TD", "dragging pro", and increasing his pocket library. Dave is sure to find graduation a welcome change in the cadets' daily routine. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 2, 1,' Art Club 1, Golf Club 2, 1, Handball Club 2, 1, Skeet Club 3, 2, Ski Club 3. JOHN T. BODE M-2 Body Raleigh, North Carolina Coming out of the sunny southland, this converted Yankee constantly had a smile and a joke for his friends. Putting out in the gym or studying under his "Brown Boy", Body was willing and ready for any kind of action. His willingness to work and cheerful attitude will certainly be the Army's gain. Sergeant 1, Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 3, 1: French Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Bridge Club 3, 2, 1. ARTHUR FRANK BONDSHU G-2 Art Fort Leavenworth, Kansas From the wind-blown plains of Kansas came a young man whose enthusiasm to excel in track, extra-curricular activities and the number of parades and inspections he could miss, could hardly be missed. Art's determination, ability and good-nature added up to make him a true "file". His drive and personality will carry him a long way in the Army. Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Indoor Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 , Outdoor Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 3, 2, 1, Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 , Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, Astronomy Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Chess Club 4, 3, Ski Club 3, 2, 1. WILBURN LAYNE BOOZER K-2 Bill Springhill, Louisiana Bill found his way out of the Louisiana swamps with a strong determination that has characterized his actions ever since. With his personality and tem- perament, Bill was just made to order for ol' Kappa Dos, and it was from there that he waged his four year campaign against the Academic Depart- ment, for they were constantly testing his determination. Lieutenant 1 ,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council JZ Forum 1,' German Club 4, 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, KDET 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, Rocket Society 4, 3. RONALD ANTHONY BORRELLO D-2 Ron Monongahela, Pennsylvania After two years of playing a hot trumpet at the University of Pittsburgh, Ron came here and cooled off for a year. Monongahela, his hometown, caused no small grief to Ron's plebe year. As souvenirs of "intermurder" football, Ron has two stainless steel bolts from a broken leg. Ron has a saddle in his dress cap, and has wings in his eyes for the future. Sergeant 1, Baseball Manager 4, 3, 2, 1, Cross Country 4, Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council di Forum 3, 1, French Club 3, Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Advertising Manager 1 ,' Ski Club 3. 122 JIM BLUNDELL DAVID BLYNN ""r3'f"' . I K I JOHN BODE X '-F' W N-if mr-wwf' ART BONDSHU BILL BOOZER RON BORRILI LO ' q..gw ' FRED BOTHWELL HAP BOYD JIM BOYLI' 124 TOM BREWER BOB BROGI PETE BROOM 5 if .X 5,-ff' g - ,. , xi' 5 "-Q 1' . ,,.f x: Q sulfii A - hifi 9-Ssiigf .V . .jqxx . -. L1 FREDERICK CHARLES BOTHVVELL III G 1 Fred Pittsfield, Massachusetts Boatwheel was a true individualist who gave his all to getting what he wanted. The fact that the authorities often frowned on some of his masterful plans never dulled his spirits-he still kept smiling and scheming. His rare talents, socially and professionally, are sure to continue to be an asset to his friends and to the Army. Sergeant 15 Catholic Choir 4, 3, 1, Director 45 English Literature Seminar 4, 3, 2, 15 Debate Council QQ Forum 2, 1,' Spanish Club 4, 35 Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 15 Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 15 KDET 4, 3, 2, 1, Program Director 2, Chief Announcer 1 5 Pistol Club 45 Extemporaneous Speech Contest, Winner 4. HARRY RAYMOND BOYD, JR. D-2 Hap West Point, New York Hap, a "brat", was born at West Point, was assigned with the first Regi- mental Combat team here in 1956, then came back in 1958, and will prob- ably return as a "P" since he has very successfully eluded the grasps of the math, mechanics, and graphics departments. Hap has room in his heart for two queens, Suzy and the Infantry. Sergeant 15 Mathematics Forum 2, 15 Dialectic Society 25 Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1 5 KDET 4. JAMES F. BOYLE K-1 Jim Boston, Massachusetts From the UDT course at Norfolk to the Halls of Ladycliffe, Bogle has exhib- ited the true qualities of a Kappa Uno man. This aspiring young critic from Boston has demonstrated his talents as circulation manager for the Pointer and "culture rep" of K-1. The combined efforts of the Social Science De- partment and the Army Hospital failed to dampen Jim's desire for "pad" and "moving at the Forrest." The Army has gained a valuable asset. Sergeant 15 Gymnastics 4, 3, Numerals 45 Catholic Acolytes 4, 35 Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Spanish Club 45 Gymnastics Club 4, 35 Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Circulation Manager 2, 1 5 Outdoor Sports Club 4, 35 HI-FI Club 2. THOMAS CLARENCE BREWER L-1 Bear Yankton, South Dakota A bruising football star from South Dakota, the Bear found additional interests. Tearing up the academic department, he passed every "turn out" but one. He is historically noted, however, for his amazing organizational ability. Besides excelling in athletics and academics, he kept his little black book full. The Bear will certainly find success in the years ahead. Sergeant 1 5 Football 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monograph 3, 25 Track 45 Wres- tling 3, 25 Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 35 German Club 4, 35 Portugese Club 35 Pistol Club 4, 3, 25 Sailing Club 4, 3, 2. ROBERT PAUL BROGI H-1 Bob Highland Falls, New York Brog makes daily life in H-1 a pleasure for all who associate with him. The old proverb that hard work and study will produce stars came true for this man, but he wears them on his "b-robe" and not his collar. Between skin- diving, lacrosse and dating local secretaries, his time is more than accounted for. Being a localite from nearby Highland Falls, "Beast Barracks" was no shock to him and he merely took it in stride. We would deem it an honor to someday serve with this devoted man. Sergeant 15 Lacrosse 4, 35 Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1, Manager 4, 3, 2, 15 Class Com- mittee 3, 2, 15 Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 15 Debate Council :Q Forum 3, 2, 15 Howitzer 45 Dialectic Society 2, 15 Camera Club 4, 35 Outdoor Sports Club 45 Camera Club 25 HI-FI Club 1 5 Fencing Club 25 Ski Club 4. THAD A. BROOM, JR. D-2 Pete Spartanburg, South Carolina Pete, one of the few who always had a pro girl, will always be remembered for his electrical circuits and his collections for Kim Key Wol. One of the best cross country men ever to come to the Academy, Pete will always be running among the top. Sergeant 1 5 Public Information Detail 3, 2, 15 Portuguese Club 1 5 Pointer 45 Camera Club 25 HI-FI Club 1 5 Fencing Club 25 Ski Club 4. l25 ' 1 I was 7R' ignite ,.lT:Q?i '5' z . .iiw -. 5 F Y ll ll ll! 5lIV 'llilllllllll CHARLES RUSSELL BROSHOUS, JR. E-1 Rusty West Point, New York This native of the Ugrayest place on earth" CGuess wherej was known throughout the Corps for his "hops home!" The only thing wrong is that absolutely nobody wanted to go "home" with him. Outstanding as a student, he was also a high-calibre Corps Squadder with his little gray "AAA T- shirtsu. What will this pal be remembered for? We don't really know. . . oh, yes, his exotic footwear! Lieutenant 1, Hockey 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major A 2,1,' Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, English Literature Seminar 3,' Debate Council ei Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 3. ARTHUR STANLEY BROWN C-1 Art Teaneck, New Jersey Art was the only day student in the Corps. If he wasn't on the soccer field, he was on a trip. Everyone will remember Brownie for his quick smile and helpful handg he was an inspiration to all. His first "love" was Teaneck. Art's ability to excel will certainly carry him a long way in the future. Lieutenant 1 ,' Stars 3, 2,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major A 2, 1, Captain 1,' Track 4, 3, Numerals 4, Moongram 3,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Historian 3, Secretary 2, CIC 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 2, Rocket Society 4. CHARLES EDWARD BROWN H-1 Charlie Cleburne, Texas Charlie, a man whose manners and actions are as slow and friendly as his Texas drawl, was one of the best-liked men in Company H-1. Not even the most devious actions of the Academic or Tactical Departments could make Charlie shed a drop of sweat. He was one of those remarkable creatures that could sustain a happy-go-lucky attitude for four years of Cadet life, without once breaking, and he always had a cheerful word for everybody. May our paths often cross that of Charlie Brown in our later careers. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, Numerals 45 Dialectic Society 2, 1, Golf Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4,' Ski Club 4,' Bridge Club 3, 2. GARY LEE BROWN L-2 Tulare, California Gary will always be remembered for his enthusiasm and for those special days when he competed against the Navy. A dedicated worker and leader in many areas, Gary should find the problems of the future easy to overcome. The men of '62, especially those old L-2 "files", will expect great things of Gary in the years ahead. Captain 1,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major A 3, 2, 1, Navy Star 3, 2,' Cross Country 3, 2, 1,' Class Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Chairman 4, 3, 2, 1,' Public Relations Committee 3, 2, 1, President 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Business Manager 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Skeet Club 4, 3. HAROLD LEWIS BROWN A-1 Lew Pine Grove, Pennsylvania Lew was a rare cadet, indeed-he lettered four years in trip sections! Whether he was watching the "Hall-Ball" tournaments in the "Hilton" or burning up Central Area Cvery rarelyj, our ambassador to New York City will always be remembered for his sincere friendship and his ability to get to a small Pennsylvania town, Lieutenant 1,' Track 4,' Public Information Detail 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3,' Newman Forum 4, 3,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Coordinator 2, President 1, German Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Scusa 2,1. MORRIS EDGAR BROWN C-2 Ed Fairmont, West Virginia Ed has contributed much to the academy, both in athletics and academics, and we hope that he will go on to bigger and better things in his career. His interest in electronics and HI-FI caused much grief to the Tactical Department, but Ed and his electronic monsters won out in the end. Sergeant 1 ,' Rifle 4, 3, 2 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2,' Debate Council di: Forum 2,' Rifle Club 4, 3, 25 Ski Club 4. CHARLIE BROWN 126 RU STY BROSHOUS ART BROWN PQ! 4 ed, fa N-vnmvm P X 1 6' . ff! rg' ' 4 ev-1 N, u-.5 """"-,R .,,,3g:saP GARRY BROWN HAROLD BROWN ED BROWN Q 1 A '-gyms, Q X 1 Q. 1 1 1 l mf W fi K W i 1 1 1 127 XR QQ 'A - N--.-ff ROG BROWN WALTER BROWN PHIL BROWNING Q ' Q5 1.'g,f 1' 128 WALT BRYDE TOM BUCK lr' X! f?-as 2 X RSM 1 3, K '.Q,: 'fri "ggi-.. '-' .1 if lv .ff F 17, lllrix "pl XX - A A Q4 ROGER ALLEN BROWN C 2 Rog St. Joseph, Missouri A little ball of fire with unending energy and a smile for all was typical of Roger while at West Point. His mental alertness and unbounded ambition lent themselves well to success in academics and propelled him into the hierarchy of many extra-curricular activities. Well liked and much respect- ed, Rogeris future success seems assured. Captain 1 , Soccer 3, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1, Pointer 4, 3, 2, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, House Manager 1, Special Program Committee 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, Bridge Club 3. WALTER RONALD BROWN K-1 Brownie Rossville, Georgia If these were the times of the civil war, Brownie would be the commander of the Confederate Armies. A true southerner, he refought all of the Civil War battles, in the "pad". "Wake me up at taps so I can go to bed", Ron was never one to "sweat" academics. Unselfish in body, mind, and spirit, Ron is truly a credit to the Corps and the Army. Captain 1, 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Captain 1 ,' Baseball 4, Class Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1 ,De- bate Council JZ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Pointer 4, 3, 2, Protestant Discussion Group 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3. PHILIP Y. BROWNING, JR. L-1 P. Y. Alexandria, Virginia Phil, as an army "brat", saw much of the world before entering West Point. However, no trip was more important to him than the one he made up the Hudson in July 1958. Successfully fulfilling his youthful desire to be a cadet, he now aspires to be a career oiiicer in the Infantry and, too, a bachelor-"for a short while". P.Y.'s good natured personality and his ever-ready helping hand have won him many friends. Sergeant 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 1, Portuguese Club 3, Camera Club 3,' Handball Club 3. WALTER JOSEPH BRYDE, JR. C-2 Walt Newburgh, New York Cadet "Birdie", as Walt was known by his friends and near-sighted in- structors, has always been the type of person who will do any job, anytime. His unrelenting sense of humor is surpassed by none. Yet contained in this proud "runt" is a sense of determination and a dedication to Uncle Sam. Sergeant 1, Debate Council JZ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Golf Club 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 3, 2, 1. THOMAS EMERSON BUCK C-1 Tom Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio The Buckeye from Ohio tackles all his tasks with that old mid-western drive, whether it be academics or 'fdraggingli To him there was only one branch, Armor, he talked about it like a student of Rommel. This Ranger playboy's weaknesses were ivy league clothes, parties and his "Brown Boy". Sergeant 1, Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Home Debate Manager 1, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, Sailing Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 1. PAUL WESLEY BURKE A-2 Manitou Manitou Springs, Colorado Paul came to West Point from the shadow of Pikes Peak. The fact that he could never get the right answer in "plebe" math proved nothing as he went on to become one of the elite few representing A-2 on the Dean's List. With his ability and his desire to solve any problem set before him, Paul will be very successful in his chosen career. Sergeant 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 1, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Astronomy Club 3, 2, 1, Pointer 4, 3, 2, KDET 4, Camera Club 2,1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. PAUL BURKE l29 X IPR 2? .. QQ if s Im Hi, -lb. Ulllllllll DONALD ANDREW BURNS B-2 Don Maplewood, Maine Although an Army "brat", Don is by choice a true New England Yankee. A big asset to B-2, he was a real "hive" and self-made "mukkoid". Although inexperienced, he began debating and became one of the Academy's finest debaters. Sincere, humble, thoughtful, and congenial while still being ag- gressive and determined, Don will always be a man we're lucky to have on our side. Lieutenant 1,1 Class Committee 2, 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, Newman Forum 2, 1 ,' Debate Council di Forum 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2,' Glee Club 4, 3, Handball Club 2,' Parachute Club 1. PHILIP J. BURNS L-1 Phil Rochester, New York Never a dull moment was to be found with.'Phil, but never a finer man or friend. Between battling the academic departments and opponents on the wrestling mat, he gained the deep respect and admiration of all those who came to know him. The Infantry will gain a man and a leader second to none. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 2, Honor Committee 2, 1,' Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' French Club 3, 2, Outdoor Sports- man Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4. WILLIAM CHARLES BURNS, JR. F-1 Bill . Coeur d'Alene, Idaho W. C.'s uncanny ability to excel in academics and skiing are to be remem- bered. In fact, Bill spent most of his winter Weekends in the cozy ski lodges of Vermont. But "Hive" Burns had his serious moments too, in almost single handedly saving his "turned out" roommates from the clutches of the aca- demic departments. Bill will be remembered for his numerous unrewarded diets, and as an aggressive "engineer" lineman. His enthusiasm and easy going personality will take him a long way in his future endeavors. Sergeant 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2,' Pistol Club 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1 ,' Ski Patrol 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Team 3, 2, 1. RALPH REGIS BURR, JR. H-2 Burr-Head Washington, D. C. On any given night of the academic year one could find Ralph mumbling magic words over his textbooks, hoping that some microcosm of knowledge might impart itself to him. With a talent for humor that would rival Groucho and a host of true friends, nothing but the finest is in store for this lad. Sergeant 1,' Swimming 4,' Soccer 3,' Hop Committee 4. 3, 2, 1,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, Newman Forum 3g Spanish Club 3,' Glee Club 2, 1,' Fencing Club 3,' Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Parachute Club 1. LEONARD ANTHONY BUTLER K-2 Butts Towson, Maryland Len's casual manner and genial nature has brightened many a classmate's day. But on the Held of friendly strife, Butts was not so genial, for he darkened the days of many an Army foe. A true member of old Kappa Dos, Len has contributed much and has justly earned the respect and friendship of all. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2. 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1,' Radio Club 3, Russian Club 4, 3, Bugle Notes 4, 3, 2, 1, Business Manager 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3: Handball Club 4, 3, Ski Patrol 4, 3, 2, 1,' Skin Diving Club 3,' Weightlifting Club 4, 3. DAN DALE BUTTOLPH L-2 Kansas City, Missouri Dan came to us from Prep School and well prepared he was. He lost no time in making a name for himself and never shed a drop of sweat in doing so. For excitement Dan turned to the clear blue and sky diving, and he still says he's going to make the world's longest delay, and we're sure he will. A tough competitor and a natural leader, Dan is sure to go far with Uncle Sam. Captain 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3,' Class Committee 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Shi Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 3, 2, 1, Secretary 1. 130 DON BURNS PHIL BURNS BILL BURNS I , K 1 2-1,2 , I 3 f - 1 2 ' e 1 5 K 5 i 3 ' 3 2 5, ii ff RM ,L 9 1 Y f 5 ix.. 4 5 ,. 'F " 3 U A KL 77 'ia A wh , Mi ZA5 gv M gn ,KA E! K 5 ,FXR QfN?.,,fw?W q'1'5K R RR H-phil? RALPH BURR LEN BUTLER DAN BUTTOLPH 131 CHARLES BUTZER JOHN BYERS BILL BYRD 132 RICHIE CACIOPPE BERT CADWELL ROG CALDWELL 5 3'1- 1 I lx .. . f-, s nw ??3i-1 rr rx Q "-2,55 if SX if X . vb K V ' .-sag? CHARLES BARRY BUTZER B 1 Butz Lancaster, Pennsylvania As he is always cheerful and smiling. you can't help but like Barry. He's been a stalwart in the Army line for three years and never lacks the Army spirit. Barry excels in all fields of endeavor and is never at a loss when it comes to wine, women, and song. Butz will never be forgotten by West Point nor the countless friends he has made. Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2 1, Numerals 4, Major A 2. 1 ,' Track 4,' Public Information Detail 2,' French Club 4, 3, 2,' Astronomy Club 4, 3, 2,' Camera Club 3,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 2. JOHN WINCHESTER BYERS A-1 Baby Huey Elkton. Maryland Legend has it that the big man from Duke University named Jack Byers never said a word unless it was worth listening to. He gave no man cause for anything less than admiration, and, as a result, he was looked up to by all. The Marine Corps will gain a true leader in "Maryland's gift to the Confederacy". Sergeant 1,' Baseball 4,' Pistol 4, 3, 2, 1,' Class Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Por- tuguese Club 2g Astronomy Club 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3. WILLIAM A. BYRD D-1 Bill Reno, Nevada Luckily, Bill was the easy-going type, and knew how to best spend his four years. He got out of bed to go to meals, "to drag", and to go on leave. All those who knew Bill well will remember him as a cheerful, friendly Nevadan who was always the first under the covers at Taps, and the last one out at Reveille, and they will consider themselves luckier for the experience. Sergeant 1, Debate Council fb Forum 4,' Russian Club 3, Pistol Club 3,' Skeet Club 4, 3. RICHARD CHARLES CACIOPPE G- 1 Richie West Orange, New Jersey Even during Beast, Richie was our company good humor man. His un- failing cheerfulness and friendliness have made cadet gray life less gloomy for G Company. Yet he can be serious, and does the best job possible, even when unasked. Like the good leader he is, he always keeps spirits high. His name may be unpronounceable, but it's high on everybody's list. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Acolytes 2,' Catholic Choir 45 HI-FI Club 2. HERBERT DANIEL CADWELL B-1 Bert Mamaroneck, New York Money honey! John Pierpont Clodwell, Maker of Deals, and Appreciator of the Finer Things. And to boot, a mean man with squirt-guns in second floor showdowns, and with refreshments at the ski-lodge. But lest he be thought shallow, his philosophy-"Candy's dandy, but liquor's quicker!" Sergeant 1, Lacrosse 4. 3, Numerals 4,' Hockey 4, Numerals 45 Football 3, 2, 15 Ski Team 3, 2, 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' French Club 3, 2, 1g HI-FI Club 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 3, 2, 1, Secretary-Treasurer 2, Ski Patrol 3, 2, 1. LAPSLEY ROGER CALDWELL L-2 Rog Tampa, Florida Rog was one of the more unique members of our class. He spent his time either attending advanced, enriched, "super" courses or helping others. Although Rog was from Florida, he took special delight in going camping when the snow was deepest. However, Rog met his downfall when he tried to transfer his knowledge of water skiing to the slopes of the golf course. Sergeant 1 ,' B-Squad Lacrosse 3,' Spanish Club 3, 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Handball Club 2,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. l33 H iill T I 'asv 'ZZ , eisixh Crew Y l is i 6 sl! X , lr ui .iggll iflmwl WILLIAM ROBERTS CALHOUN, JR. D-2 Crash Florence, Alabama Why do they call him Crash? He drove a truck at Buckner and had an ac- cident. Crash was also regimental boxing champion, a social science "hive", a good man at any job, and a real hero of the soldiers paradise. Lieutenant 1g Astronomy Club 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, If Skeet Club 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN HENRY CAMPBELL F-1 Skip Davenport, Iowa Skipper spent most of his time writing to Iowa. Of course, there were many hours in the wrestling room which contributed to the "P.F.T.'s" Skip's determination which showed itself in the "bone, bone, bone" attack he gave West Point, will raise him to honorable heights in the Army. Captain 1,' 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1,' Wres- tling 4, 3, 2, 1, Class Committee 4, 3, 2, 1. PATRICK L. CANARY K-2 Pat Johnstown, Pennsylvania Pat, although he had his struggles with the academic department, invari- ably managed to stay one step ahead of them. His sincerity has made Pat a good man to go to with a problem, and we always will remember his con- tinuously smiling ways. In the days to come, he no doubt will advance far in his military career. Lieutenant 1,' Gymnastics 4, 3, Numerals 4g Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Chairman 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1g Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Spanish Club 4, 3,' Glee Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. WILLIAM PHIPPS CANNON A-1 Sweet Pea Abilene, Texas A true Texan with ability enough -to match the size of his state, Will ex- celled with ease in all endeavors at the Point. No matter what the sport, he could out-do others without practice, proving himself to be a natural ath- lete. In academics, his quick mind and fantastic writing ability kept him well out of trouble. Will's classmates will never forget his great sense of humor and sharp wit. The Air Force gains a man admired by everyone who knew him. Sergeant 1, Rifle 4, Mathematics Forum 2, 1 ,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3,' Spanish Club 4, 3,' Portuguese Club 25 Astronomy Club 2, 1 ,' Pointer 2, 1,' KDET 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 3, 2, 1,' Scoutmasters Council 3,' Rifle Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Parachute Club 3. 2. VITO! MICHAEL CAPUTO M-1 Vit East Meadow, New York One prominent characteristic of Vito is his diversification of interests. Known by a few as the Walter Mitty of the Corps, the lyrics "Doctor, Law- yer, Indian Chief . . ." all apply. He has wanted to be all of them. His pres- ence has provided his classmates not only with fun, but an education in itself. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 15 Newman Forum 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' KDET 4, 3, Camera Club 3, 2, 1 ,' HI-FI Club 1. RICHARD I. CARLSON B-2 Rich San Jose, California Rich is from sunny California and matches California's climate with his sunny disposition. Academics was never a problem for Rich, and between tennis, squash, and the "brown boy" he always found a pleasant way to spend his afternoons. Rich's friendly smile and hard working attitude will insure his success in the future. Lieutenant 1,' Squash 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 1,' Tennis 4, 3, 2, 1,' Honor Committee 2, 1 ,' Radio Club 4,' Debate Council di: Forum 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2,1. PAT CANARY l34 BILL CALHOUN SKIP CAMPBELL ' f BT I CANNOIN VITO CAPUTO RTCH CARLSON A wg, ,f g gfsz su y I . ,.,, , A ---' .i if-qvfliwf' GEORGE CARNES SAM CARR BOB CARROLL , K 4 'YQ y. A ff+g,?7l W ff gm-r Q, Q Q f, . . 1 ,- ax 'Mv'6Xf V9 'S Q Q riffs I an 5' 1503 5 5 5 Rexx' P' Y? x -. sf 136 BEN CARTER MARSH CARTER X X lf 3 s Q F ' ing 1, 'fx ' itgflk 45,0 r ,iw I vl in E T" vt f X 3? N 4 all X, 11- GEORGE P. CARNES F-1 Washington, D. C. George, the quiet man from D.C., is a good, reliable friend, who is always willing to lend a helping hand to those in need. His favorite pastime was glee Clubbing his way around the country. His unassuming nature can be counted upon to bring him an enviable future. Sergeant 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2,15 Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Fencing Club 3,' Golf Club 2, 1, Ski Club 3, Skin Diving Club 2, 1. SAMMY TIPTON CARR B-1 Sam Roswell, New Mexico Although battered by various academic departments, by Mr. Sims Cwho was never satisfied with the jumping recordsb, and by the other blows that West Point concocts, Sam never once lowered his head or quit raving about the "Brown Shoe Army? Nor did he ever take his eyes from that horizon or falter in his convictions of what duty really is. Lieutenant 1, Debate Council di Forum 3, 2, French Club 3, Astronomy Club 3,' Fencing Club 3,' Parachute Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 2, Vice President 1. ROBERT COOPER CARROLL A-2 Bob Arlington, Virginia Bob grew up with the Army and still retains his liking for traveling. He doesn't claim to remember too much about "Beast Barracks", but he is re- membered by others. He spent the fall seasons playing 150 football. Bob had a manner that made him well-liked by all who knew him. We have the great- est confidence that he will have a successful career with the Army. Lieutenant 1, 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 1, Minor A 2,' Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1g Newman Forum 3, 2, Secretary 2,' French Club 3, 2,' Pointer 4, 35 Pistol Club 2, Ski Club 4, 3. BENJAMIN FREDERICK CARTER, JR. A-1 Ben Shreveport, Louisiana Not many Louisiana Rebels even like snow, but Ben is so wild about it, he even spends his free time on the ski slope. His active extra-curricular life, however, did not bar him from excelling in academic interest, where he became master of the educated guess. We will always expect to find Ben where there is fun to be had. Sergeant 1,' Mathematics Forum 2,' Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Howitzer 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3,' KDET 3, 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 3, 2, 1, Model Airplane Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Patrol 1, Skin Diving Club 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3. MARSHALL NICHOLS CARTER A-1 Marsh Colorado Springs, Colorado Although calling Colorado home, Marsh has hailed from many places, rang- ing from Alaska to Texas. His "good deals" have nearly as wide a range, from two summers of "AOT" to Hong Kong, to Korea. As President of the Skeet Club, he instills fear in the hearts of many a Hudson River boatman. Whether it be Smith Rink, North Dock, or the halls of the "Hilton" after "C.Q.", Marsh will always be remembered for his excellent humor and win- ning personality. Sergeant 1 ,' Lacrosse 4,' Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, Hand- ball Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, President 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. MICHAEL ALLEN CASP H-1 Casper Beaver, Pennsylvania Casper was known most for his aggressiveness and grim determination to win on the gridiron. Eyeball maintenance and cultural trips to the city were his favorite off-the-field pastimes, and academics never gave him any trouble. If things weren't swinging, Mike made them swing, and he never let the routine of cadet life or women get the best of him. His abundance of self-confidence along with his humility will carry him a long way after graduation. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Captain 1, De- bate Council ffe Forum 4, 3, 2, l,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 2, 1. MIKE CASP 137 QRS M140 55' QQ 'UWA J 4519 ii i , T lim V I flillllll FRANK JOSEPH CAUFIELD F-1 Frank Newark, New Jersey The Irish Genius joined the fold with the same preconceived ideas about West Point that anyone has. It took little time for his biting wit to reduce the local conventions to objects of amusement to all who knew him. A sense of humor and a willingness to work, combined with natural ability, insure him the top seat in whatever field he chooses. Sergeant 1, Swimming 4,' Track 4,' English Literature Seminar 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council rl? Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' KDET 3, 2, 1,' HI-FI Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3. WILLIAM ANDERSON CAUTHEN, JR. H-2 Bill Washington, Georgia As a transplant from the Citadel, Bill enjoyed two plebe years. Although an Army brat, Georgia and a certain Georgia peach were his main loves. Being a lacrosse manager seemed to keep him forever busy, but he always found time for another trip. Always a hard and dedicated worker, Bill will be a real credit to the Artillery. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Manager 3, 2, 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' English Literature Seminar 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 3,' Glee Club 4,' Outdoor Sports Club 2,' Handball Club 2,' Skeet Club 4, 3, Law Club 1. RICARDO CESPED F-1 Rick Oticina Maria Elena, Chile Rick came to West Point a stranger to all of us, but we will remember him as a great friend and a wonderful person. Rick loves athletics and compe- tition and was consequently a tremendous asset to the Soccer team. Both on and oi the field, he always worked hard and did well. His will most cer- tainly be a successful career when he returns home to Chile. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4,' Swimming 4,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 2, President 1g Astronomy Club 4,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3,' Fencing Club 4, 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Skin Diving Club 2, 1,' Rugby Club 2. GLENN ARTHUR CHADBOURNE B-2 Chad Palmetto, Florida Coming to the Academy with a year of military school and several years of Florida sunshine under his belt, this likable guy confronted most things with a Winning smirk. Whether excelling on the ski slope or easily out- maneuvering the Academic Department, his ability was never doubted. Chad's spirit and big heart which won him many close friends will also in- sure his success in the future. Sergeant 1, Debate Council dk Forum 2, 1, Pointer 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Patrol 4, 3. DONALD ALLEN CHAFETZ C-2 Buffalo, New York Don made the transition from stars on his "B-robe" to Dean's List. He will be gratefully remembered for saving so many from the Mathematics De- partment. To the officers, he was the source of Pointer Christmas cards. To his classmates, he was an able bridge partner and a good friend. Sergeant 1 ,' Cross Country 4, Track 4, Debate Council QQ Forum 3, French Club 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 3, 2, 1. CHARLES RODNEY CHANDLER E-1 Chuck Arcadia, Louisiana This romancing Rebel entered our hallowed walls from the "cajun" bayous of Louisiana and has impressed us all with his good nature and academic talents, rising to meet every challenge. His natural ability coupled with a desire to do well in all his endeavors has stood him in good stead and should be the key to his success in the future. Lieutenant 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1 ,' Cross Country 4, Track 4,' Public Information Detail 4, 3,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Prot Discussion Group 4,' Sailing Club 3, 2,' Para- chute Club 2, 1 ,' Engineer Team. 138 FRANK CAUFIELD BILL CAUTHEN RICK CESPED PU! GLENN CHADBOURNE DON CHAFETZ CHUCK CHANDLER 139 'Nw jfrii, ,., , . . L.. DICK CHEGAR RON CHISHOLM DICK CHLADEK 140 -xxx BILL CHRISTOPHER WALT CHROBAK DAN CLARK .xx f"'N HS rfl s-,,, - Q 5 :QE . ,Q -if I ix ' 3:23 l A lx fx, fr V9 S1154 RICHARD DANIEL CHEGAR B-1 Dick Kokomo, Indiana Dick-the backbone of the tennis team for two years! This was typical be- cause his enthusiasm was unequalled whether he was verbally defeating a debate opponent or physically on the fields of strife. Well known and liked by his classmates-the Kokomo Flash. Captain 1, Track 4, Public Relations Council 2, 1 ,' English Literature Sem- inar 2, Debate Council CQ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 3, Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, Bridge Club 3, Rocket Society 3, 1. RONALD JAMES CHISHOLM K-1 Ron Natick, Massachusetts Though his idea of paradise is being marooned in the Boston Garden with the Bruins, '62's most famous puck-stopper will probably have to content himself with charming the fair sex in his '62 Corvette. A "hive",whenever he wanted to be, Ron could always be counted on for help in academics, al- though it was pretty hard to understand his "Bostonese." The sun will set many times before Army Hockey sees the same caliber goal-tender, and K-1 gets as fine a guy as Ron Chisholm, Natick's finest. Lieutenant 1, Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Lacrosse 4, 3, Numerals 4, Monogram 3 , Debate Council di: Forum 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4, Rocket Society 1. RICHARD MARK CHLADEK K-1 Dick Milwaukee, Wisconsin Sincerity and friendliness are two characteristics which held Dick in good stead throughout his cadet life. Always at odds with the "TD", Dick always managed to come out on top-of their list. Determination and ability to do any task well will take him far. Sergeant 1, Debate Council CQ Forum 4, 3, 1, French Club 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 2, 1, Golf Club 1, Ski Club lf, 3. VVILLIAM GARTH CHRISTOPHER B-1 Bill Liberty, Texas To paraphrase Will Rogers, "I never knew a man who didn't like Bill Chris- topherf' Constantly peeved that he hadn't been able to fight at the Alamo, Bill still always found something to laugh at and you found yourself join- ing this amiable Texan, despite yourself. The Lone Star State can be proud of this giant, as all of us in B-1 were. Sergeant 1, English Literature Seminar 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, HI-FI Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, 3, Ski Club 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. WALTER JOHN CHROBAK I-1 Vegetable Temperance, Michigan Walt, busy fighting the "TD," the "Brown Boys," and the dining hall policy of serving meat, found time to get on the Dean's List, Honor Committee, and to spend memorable weekends in scenic New York City. He will be a valuable contribution to the Army, as age was to the old grey walls. Sergeant 1, Pistol 4, Honor Committee 2, 1, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, Russian Club 4, 3, 1, Camera Club 2, 1, Secretary-Treasurer 1, Art Club 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Sailing Club 3, Skeet Club 3. DANIEL DAVID CLARK F-2 Dan Toledo, Ohio Combining to an extraordinary degree, those qualities which mark a per- son's ability to get along with others, Dan distinguished himself for his "on the spot" ironical humor and his cheerful disposition. His willingness to cooperate with those above him and at the same time gaining the respect and admiration of those below him, will augment his already promising career. Sergeant 1, 150 lb. Football 3, 2, 1, Monogram 2, 1, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 1, French Club 4, 3, 1,' Ski Club 3,1,' Parachute Club 1. 141 Xu x '4f 19... we -r I .L fees. . Ill "ll llllii l 'll l lllllll WINSTON BLANTON CLARK, JR. H-1 Fish Waco, Texas Fish came to West Point after three years at Texas A 8x M where he re- ceived the name Fish, as do all freshmen. Besides being a member of the "microbs" at the Academy, he was "military" all the Way. Although his heart was in Texas with a certain young lady Cone letter per dayl he was everyone's friend with a kind word and smile all the time. Fish will be a success in anything he embarks on, with his outstanding ability, person- ality and leadership. Lieutenant 1 ,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Public Relations Council 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Hoioitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4,' Rifle Club 4,' Ski Club 3,' Scusa 3, 2, 1. TYRUS RAYMOND COBB, JR. E-1 Ty Claremore, Oklahoma Tyrus Raymond Cobb came to the Academy from the "Sooner State". A fine student, Ty was always ready to do his best in everything. Ty's quick smile and a legend about a certain antique rocking chair will long be re- membered by the E-1 "files". Sergeant 1,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council dt Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' French Club 4, 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 4,' Pistol Club 3, Ski Club 4,' Rocket Society 3. ROY WHEATON COLE III I-2 Roy Little Compton, Rhode Island Roy was always active in something whether it was playing soccer, keep- ing central area packed down, academics or writing to that certain some- one. We all know that his consideration for others and his will to work, coupled with a fine sense of humor, can only spell success in the years to come. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3,' Debate Council di Forum 4,' Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Rocket Society 2, 1. JEROME JOSEPH COMELLO C-1 Zero Cincinnati, Ohio "You guys got the wrong idea! !" Though the academic department did a poor job of reflecting his intellect, old Napoli would be proud of his noc- turnal discussions. We all cheered as Zero rode his few "tenths" down to the wire and never came out second best. He never had an enemy-we all owed him too many favors. Using his slide rule only to draw straight lines, he conquered these worlds and moves on to the army with the gleam of eagles in his eye. Sergeant 1 ,' Newman Forum 2,' Spanish Club 3. FREDERICK EUGENE COMER K-2 Fred Norfolk, Virginia Fred came to West Point right out of high school. With his strong desire to graduate and make a good ofiicer, Fred was able to excel in many things. Besides being tops in academics, he chose the most grueling sports in inter- murals. In these he excelled, also, as evidenced by his many triathlon achievements. We know that Fred will succeed in his chosen career. Sergeant 1,' Debate Council fi Forum 4,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Triathlon Club 1 ,' Dialectic Society 2, 1,' Pistol Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3. ROBERT STAFFORD COOPER K-2 Coop Fayetteville, Arkansas Coop's tall frame was a friendly and familiar sight in the halls of Kappa Dos. We knew him as one who loved to call the hogs, finesse his opponents in bridge, and take an occasional swim to Constitution Island. His deftness with a slide rule, accompanied by a scientific mind, will bring success to every endeavor. Sergeant 1,' Mathematics Forum 3, 1,' Debate Council cb Forum 3, 2, 1,- French Club 3, 2,' Sailing Club 35 Skeet Club 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ROY COLE l42 WINSTON CLARK TY COBB JERRY COMELLO ' FRED COMER qw BOB COOPER 143 R A ,Q V 9-ai -me ,,-' A 'M 'H ' an 1 A . ' ,5"'f"' fi' QQ WALT COOPER JIM CORR PHIL COSTAHN Y X lumix, 'A f 3-my ' -fa -W' A + NS. x H X , ,,, Ek I x is -' - A Xi """" "V V' xx . I Hfw, v y. W K M1, YN kg V .,, KA-H fc Z, U ,WS , ,, . MW +.1.K,,-an-ex MM I , ,, UL , , " ,M-V ' f K ' - ,Q " 5 ' ,-AW' "f'f'3'.2."-swam-,Tw " ' f x " . " ' ,Wir ' Rf 5 . JM Ava on I - r ..aNWW.IXXAhr . hwfffh- N N- . A W J 2 ' X. 'QI' 1, " Q A 'D' 7 -' an 4. I 'wwf-V W wwf:-rfffhffi - L 'mf' V H-"" : . 11" :N ' " X K W J' , 4 V' A L.. ip, -. Wi. W- A K ...L 'W ww. , ,ff . X, 'g ff ,Q '?3i2'wf'5"L v.fk'u,-1f"'-' Y, xi - V is . .,-it '51 N, Y r 1. A N r.::4E,,l 'gay' Q 5 K Jrqgh-W' V' YI. A Nj: W .A 1 t 3 ' j V , m f Q -A ,yt-:W -. L -14. -..Q1ffi+.km..-.., NF, nzggfg K K ' ' 5 4 .N V A 1, fg,,,x- Q W Lf A A ,g wg L. wg- "W-"HH ,g 1 L Q 'uf' 'V 2 . Pnjiv- gt f 1 -Rs' I at '-urs 4 X . - - Ig 4 f , in .- ., 'Yr-W 5 4-' if M Q' . ,,. Q fy ' W , - f . 7 '-. Aw- 1 V - , .Y-ig A- 1, ' .ah - V ,. f . - 4 A- 'MA ' . "f V - A N, -A 3 , W, ,N , Q'-W1 M.. ,Awww N- .R - 1: wx M - J wi, " A-f..+gig1? -f . - M gf' x X , S r- 'f e ,-, t i f X4 - -W' '31, ,VA 7: A .L M . ,Q VMLWQ 1: A A .ff 4- Q . N ,, i rg ' Mi- ve Aff wh fn, f .N-'i 'M' 5.'.:'f1--- Y' - U W - .Q f' -1-3 ,EM '53-rn I' - K Q J ' A 4 -fs. Q QW' JIM COWLES BOB COYNE Qi 41" ugrfn x-, .. ,- 'Q 21 1 333525 2 ?' -fix 9 1 Via? va -5' I ,ff N ,' he m ,fi U , , 1 xv' :J :SEB WALTER ALAN COOPER G 2 Walt Eau Gallie, Florida Walt came to the Point following a brief but glorious career in the Army, his greatest ambition to build the biggest stereo set in the Corps. Always willing to help others, whether it be repairing a TV set, or "pooping" some- one in juice, Walt will long be remembered when he leaves the Rock, to join Cnaturally enoughl the Signal Corps. Sergeant 1,' Rifle 4,' KDET 4,' Camera Club 3, 2, 1,' HI-FI Club 3, 2, 1,' Sail- ing Club 4, 3, 2,1 ,' Ski Club 4,' Skin Diving Club 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 1. JAMES FRANCIS CORR G-2 Jim Maitland, Florida Late hours and showers were J im's claim to fame in G-2 Company while he staged weekly skirmishes with the Academic Department. Jim, the dashing figure astride Hannibal, roared from the sidelines each week into his never- ending weekday pursuit of "The Anchor". We all hope Jim will fly high and fast in Army Aviation after graduation. Sergeant 1 ,' Mule Rider 1 ,' Debate Council and Forum 2,' Portuguese Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Sailing Club 3. PHILLIP ATKINSON COSTAIN G-2 Phil Minot, North Dakota Phil discovered plebe year that gymnastics would be his sport. With hard work, Phil developed into a top-national contender on the high bar and be- came captain of the gym team. Phil's sincerity and poise earned the respect and admiration of all. Natural ability added to his personality makes Phil a great man, leader and friend. Lieutenant 1,' Gym 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, Captain 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Portuguese Club 4, 35 Gymnastics Club 3, 2, 1, Cus- todian of Funds 2,' Protestant Discussion Group 3. JAMES H. COWLES G-2 Jim Salt Lake City, Utah The guy who could do anything well, except matching out, will long be re- membered by General Bessel's boys as the one who got away. Between making sure everyone pronounced his name right and cultivating poison ivy, he made life in the lost 50's seem more interesting and enjoyable. Sergeant 1,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 1g Outdoor Sports Club 2, 1 ,' Golf Club 2, If Pistol Club 4, 3,' Rifle Club 4,' Sailing Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2g Weight- lifting Club 3. ROBERT CHARLES COYNE H-1 Bob Cambridge, Massachusetts If wealth were measured in friends, Bob would indeed be a rich man. His pleasant, sincere manner, in addition to a winning personality and the abil- ity to remain cool under pressure, promise success in the future. Sergeant 1,' Newman Forum 3, 2,' French Club 3,' Dialectic Society 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' Rocket Society 4. MICHAEL ANDREW CRABTREE B-1 Crabs Portland, Oregon Got an ear you Want caulifiowered? See Mike Crabtrick and his after taps Mafia. Got adjustment problems with the Board? See Mike and his portable lending Social Problem Library. Conspiracy afoot? Put the finger on the Portland Puppy. All of these he was, and more-but above all-he was a member of "The Bunch." Sergeant 1,' Football 4, Numerals 4,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' HI-FI Club 4, 3,' Parachute Club 3, 2, 1,' Weight Lifting Club 4, 3, 2, 1. MIKE CRABTREE l45 N 1,f Q-'fb 1, !ii '?A '5K.iQ :I V .iggmll , li' l 'llllllllll - l LAWRENCE ROBERT CRANE D-2 Larry Westmont, Illinois One of the big athletes around the scene. This quiet man from Illinois cracked a loud bat on the diamond. Larry, a big spender, always gave wait- ers big tips. Larry will always be remembered for his winning smile and determination in his endeavors. Sergeant 1,- Basketball 4, 3, 2, 1, Numeral 4, Major A 3. 2, 1,' Baseball 4, 3, 2, Numeral 4, Major A 3, English Literature Seminar 2,' French Club 3. WILLIAM M. CROSS C-1 Lucas Loudonville, New York Big Bill has been dubbed with the name Lucas, taken from a character in "Peyton Place." However, the Lucas Cross of C-1 is quite different from the gruesome character in this notorious novel. He is an easy going guy, whose quick humor is the source of much enjoyment for his classmates. Among the greater achievements of this hard worker are the consumption of a record number of pieces of french toast, and the announcement at "P.O." in the Mess Hall, "A book has been found belonging to a friend of Ann Suderly. Owner claim same." Albany's loss is surely the Army's gain. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, 1,- Basketball 4,' Caclet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ordnance Club 1,' German Club 3, 1, Glee Club 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. RUFUS CLAUDE CROW, JR. G-2 Ruf Elaine, Arkansas West Point did more for Ruf than for most. He traded his mule for a Cor- vette and even crossed the language barrier to discover Yankee women. Few class mates have forgotten his belle of the Yearling Picnic. Rufus recog- nized his obligation to U. S. diplomacy and in two summers made Elaine, Arkansas a household word throughout the Continent. His good humor will long be remembered by all who knew him! Sergeant 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1,- Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ARTHUR NORRIS CROWELL A-2 Art Forestville, New York Art came to us from Forestville, a small community in upstate New York. His keen interest in soccer and love for the mat saw him soccer manager and a B-squad wrestler. Academics were no problem to Art, though social sci- ence gave him quite a tussle. A driving ambition to get ahead will serve him well in his goal to put Forestville on the map. Sergeant 1,' Soccer Manager 3, 2, 1,' Wrestling 3, 2, 1, Monogram 2, 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, Camera Club 3,' Pistol Club 3,' Skeet Club 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2,1. ROBERT SEWELL CULP, JR. L-1 Bob Millington, Texas For a fellow whose father spent thirty years in the Navy, Bob took this place in stride. The only trouble was from the academic departments. He is endowed, however, with two things that cannot be learned from books: common sense and those intangible qualities needed to be a friend. Sergeant 1,- Football 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2,' Track 4, Nu- merals 4,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2,' Chess Club 4,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3. THOMAS DALE CULP A-2 T. D. Canal Eultonk, Ohio After coming to the Academy from the Buckeye state in 1958, things were never quite the same here or there. The home town lost half its population and USMA obtained a new member of "last section" everything. Despite his never ending battle with the Solids Department, T.D. managed to find time to develop the qualities which will make him a standout in the Army. Sergeant 1,' 150 lb. Football 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 1,' Pistol Club 2, 1,' Wrestling 2,' Newman Forum 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3,' Outcloor Sports Club 1. l46 LARRY CRANE BILL CROSS RUF' CROW Qiwem. - , . , , ' , , - -- wifi Mm, ,.,A., ,, A.., , .. l L , W I X,.,,.5,. ,- i .,k. xy,-,,Nk . ,,""'w . ,. if 'EN-Q .XSPX-""5'1 s ,.-A. 4 .V I .x I ,V . 1 . eA,k..,....Ai f-.5 2.1315 , Ura-nu -. " F4 1 '- .J-Jig-x.i.X-L-,,,,,3?.,zLizx. - V 2 ,G -bv.lL.fW1 1 Nmlfxnk-t ull, fsimzler LQ' ' xydff aw R id V , mx il' -if 'M s-P-... 'Hs ,, , NNN!! ll!! 1... 1. M4Q!gwq3Jp 2 W, 4 A MWF ,gunman ART CROWELL BOB CULP TOM CULP 147 TOM CULVER GRINDLEY CURREN MIKE CURRIN 148 JOHN DARGLE JOHNNY DARRAH CHARLES DARRELL 41 stsrf P S... ,..- 1 , .G cr fx -wiisjgs-.11 ig . l-,N --L ,. . fl ,rig X I .3 . 'X ,fi ug Xvlfki THOMAS R. CULVER C 2 Tom Indianapolis, Indiana Tom has been blessed with a magnetic personality that makes him one of the best-liked members of the class. His aggressive performance in ath- letics is well known to all Army fans. His ready wit and sincere interest in people have gained him many friends here at West Point, and doubtless, will make him a popular success in the future. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Basketball 3, 2, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1g Pointer 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. GRINDLEY CECIL CURREN F-2 Knuckles Atlanta, Georgia Suspected of ghost writing for Better Homes and Gardens Knuckles is probably the only cadet ever to have a private golf course in his room! Good for a million laughs and just as many friends, Knuckles will surely be a legend when we leave these cold gray walls. The Tactical Department may sigh with relief, but we can only say "Thanks" Knuckles, for filling our four years with a little humor. Sergeant 1,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3,' French Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 3,' Parachute Club 3, 2. JAMES MICHAEL CURRIN H-1 Mike New Braunfels, Texas Mike hails from the Lone Star State as an Air Force brat with a lifetime desire to enter West Point. Save a few scrapes with the "T.D." he breezed through adding his high spirits to every activity. Always good for a friend- ly argument, Mike's lively intellect and ready smile will surely carry him a long way in his chosen profession. Sergeant 1,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 35 Debate Council and Forum 4, 3,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN WALTER DARGLE F-2 Darg Cazenovia, New York After a Plebe Year of chuckles, John accepted upper class life with a re- served but meaningful attitude. It may always be said that he took his tasks in stride. His pleasant personality and conservative humor won for him the friendship of many. But foremost in John's eyes was always a gold bar and a wedding band. We wish him success. Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Monogram 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council and 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1. JOHN WALTER DARRAH II C-1 Johnny Brownsville, Texas The Question: "Hey, Johnny, what do you think of tomorrow's assign- ment?" The Answer: "We got class tomorrow?" Although it was hard to catch him at it, he did study and his grades remained comfortably "pro." "Drag line", the "Brown Boy" and club trips insured that all was not work. This Army brat should do well in his chosen career that he already knows rather well. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4,' Rifle 4, Hop Committee 45 Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3g Dialectic Society 3, 2, KDET 4, 3, 2,' Camera Club 3, Outdoor Sports Club 2: Model Airplane Club 3, Fencing Club 3, 2, 1, Armorer 2, Treasurer 1,' Pistol Club 3, 2,' Rifle Club 4, 3,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2g Ski Club 4, 3, 2. CHARLES CAVENDISH DARRELL G-1 Butch Baltimore, Maryland Butch arrived at West Point with two assets-the ability to make anyone his friend and the desire and ability to play an outstanding game of la- crosse for Army. Since a plebe year marked by a winning battle with the academics and the shortest pair of white trousers in G-1 history, Butch's star has risen toward the success which he deserves. Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Captain 1, Numerals 4, Major A 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3. 149 f 14, gh was 2 -9 .sg e'fQV :'- - il!iIl":x ,".-53 Hg N R ffm 'XT-4-sisalf. ,l -QL Grqrp :Ng Q .. M 9 -ErQ 12 U ' gre' E , g LP I ll! ll- Ll sl.: lf: I illalzl ll I WILLIAM FRANK DAUGHERTY B-2 Bill. El Paso, Texas Happy, friendly, God-fearing, and hard-working describes Bill. Whether he was dragging, studying, or taking the PFT, Bill always enjoyed himself and endeavored to make others happier. Religious, he was a source of strength to those who would accept it. His philosophy, "If God shall stand with me, who can stand against me"? Carry on Bill Daugherty. Sergeant 1,' Rifle 4, 3, 2, 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Sunday School Teachers 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, Camera Club 4,' Scoutmasters Council 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2,' Rifle Club 4, 3, 25 Ski Club 4. JAMES ALEXANDER DAVIDSON, JR. K-1 Clarence New York, New York As a latter day legal adviser, Clarence, so dubbed by his contemporaries, pursued a course of legal supremacy. In advising his classmates on de- fenses against the ubiquitous regulations, Clarence has left behind a set of precedents which should be of help to any in future predicaments. With a feeling of relief, we are thankful that he was on our side for these four years. Sergeant 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4,' KDET 4, 3, 2, 1,' Golf Club 2, 1,' Ski ub 4, 3, 2, 1. THOMAS RICHARD DAVIS F-2 T.R. Holly Springs, Mississippi The "Ridge Runner" from Holly Springs was a master in the art of horizon- tal engineering. He made up in personality and ability to get along with everyone, what he lacked in size. A person as dedicated as T.R. cannot help but achieve success in the Army. We are all expecting great things from him. Sergeant 1,' Football 3, 2, 1, Manager 3, 2, Head Manager 1 ,' Fencing Club 3, 2, 1 , Vice President 1. ANTHONY RONALD DE AMICO F-1 Tony Baltimore, Maryland A member in good standing of the "A-K-Q-J-10 society", Tony was also known as "the big gambler from the East." He would do anything for a buddy but drop. Lucky in cards and love as one look at his favorite blonde will attest, he's a swinging Sinatra fan who will wow them wherever he goes with the crossed rifles on his lapels. Sergeant 1 ,- Swimming 4, Numerals 4,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 4,' Camera Club 3, 2, 1,' HI-FI Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ALAN ROBERT De.IARDIN E-1 Al Forest Hills, New York Always an "Army Asset" on the fields of friendly strife Cfollowing Brother Don, Army's 1958 Basketball Captainb, Al earned a "turnout star," "drug pro" and enjoyed life. The little red-head, his infectious grin and his talent for making friends, will always be an "Army Asset" on those other fields, and we will always be proud of him. Lieutenant 1 ,' Basketball 4, 3, 2,' Baseball 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 1, Captain 1,' French Club 4, 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 4,' Ski Club 4. DONALD ALBERT DE SAPRI C-2 Don Cleveland, Ohio Don came to West Point with little knowledge of the Army. But in four years, the only battle he lost was the "brown boy". He never put off until tomorrow what he could do today, even if it meant dodging the OC after Taps. With his competitive spirit and sense of humor, he will be sure to be remembered by all of us. Lieutenant 1,' Public Relations Council 2, 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Newman Forum 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, Vice President 2, Pointer 4, 3, 2, Skeet Club 4. TOM DAVIS 150 BILL DAUGHERTY CLARENCE DAVIDSON fm 400185 TONY DE AMICO AL DQJARDIN DON DE SAPRI I-4-2 . M, M I , wi, M W 'X ww, x,,,,, wh, .,, Pk 79 'V-'V M92 -,457 'QR , V It L W' if K 1 A AW M " " 21,4 -, mc, gay", ., -W ' 753.4 Y 5 W ,, A. , . A W 1' 'rdf' X " Y v N Y 9 N A m' ' Q' .1 'm.. PQ A v Q 1 I L. " ff . -MV , - fu , ' 'ff ms tigni f' ,,-'iv ' xi MI, I , ,, gf . X ' f-'- , 1 ,A V, Wil if -- uf -3 .:?""' 5 h v Q" ' M 2' ---- w i- , W' ' ' ,M - ,. sfxgl-3,7-ga-1f3", - 5? V - sv'-iw-,515 ,WV . w ""'7' ' W.: . - If 2 A-.' "' W iki' A 1 3, I ' A F 1 2 . f , - . .a- -If Fw Q WZN. . - -f 3231: -V .. .. , ,L i , , gijq Q yy W: f ,,. M .,,., E,:.-:,,.5 ,,f-Lf: A ,, ' - .,f V- ,Q :WF ,uf 1. Zz QA-A: .. N , V ywsw - wfffi ff 'VV -115-.,,, w A , 2 Q' 5 ' .R L v: m, ., , , . , ,A D97 V W , V , i my , W "WN ' ,ff -'35 ' -.- . WWWWXW P V ' .af ,.A-N' ", V L K X '33 ' 4. if I N ' A V 6, le , I 4 l- 151 bak H, 415' JOHN DEVORE BOB DQVRIES RUSS DeVRIES I 25152 5 ' KEN DEAN ROY DEGENHARDT DAN T yi QA is l HQKPQQEEESY 'gif' Ve?-iiilggaz if Q N: -' , is . lb JOHN EDWIN DEVORE F 2 John Winter Haven, Florida Neat, likeable and helpful, this is John as we knew him. This blond-haired boy from Ohio was built like an ox and those who played opposite him on the athletic field knew him to be tough, daring and a good sportsman. There is no doubt in our minds that John will find an extremely successful career in the service. Lieutenant 1, Football 4,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2,' Chess Club 2,' Golf Club 4, 3, 2, Ski Club 3, 2. ROBERT KENNETH DeVRIES K-2 Bob Carlton Hills, New Jersey Bob came to West Point right out of high school with his modest expression of "Gee Whiz !" and good natured personality. Bob soon won many friends. Being always very aggressive in sports, Bob received his thrill when accepted to the first string All-East team, during his first year with the "Little Rabblef' Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 3, Numerals 4, Indoor Track 4, Numerals 4,' Baseball 4,' 150 pound Football 2, 1, Major A 2, Bugle Notes 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 3, 2. RUSSELL DeVRIES I-1 Russ East Rutherford, New Jersey Unlike most cadets, Russ has never been known to spend an afternoon in the "pad". His boundless energy and love for sports caused him to devote most of his time to beating Navy, which was his greatest goal. His ability to get along with all types of people and his steady dependability will give him a good start in the Army. Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 3, Numerals 4, Monogram 3,' 150 Lb Football 2, 1, Major A 1,' Track 4, Baseball 4,' Spanish Club 1, Bugle Notes 3, 2, 1,' Dialectic Society 3, 2, Outdoor Sports Club 3, Handball Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. KENNETH LEE DEAN, JR. B-1 Deaners Cleveland, Ohio Deaners was B-1's first cadet to make a success and a lifetime career out of trooping around the plain on Sunday afternoons, dangling under the "silk", or making "z's" under his "Brown Boy." He always gave his best. His best will be highly satisfactory to those "C.O.'s" who await him. g Sergeant 1,' Football 3, 2, Parachute Team 3,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, French Club 25 Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' Parachute Club 4, 3, 2. JACOB ROY DEGENHARDT C-2 Roy Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Blessed with an abundance of natural and mental attributes, Roy was con- sistently above the norm during his four years. He made and kept friends with the ease which typified his performance in all fields. When he runs on open throttle, there are few goals which he cannot attain. The future for Roy is a bright one. Sergeant 1,' Track 4,' Mathematics Forum 3,' Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3: Howitzer 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2,' Golf Club 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. DAN LEYLAND DENISON K-2 Dan Dallas, Texas Dan, better known in the company as Merv, could always be found defend- ing his Texas or his New York Yankees. A true hive, he was always ready to help those on the Dean's other list, so that they too, could enjoy a warm association with their Brown Boy. Dan's friendly smile and personality will carry him well through the ranks ahead. Lieutenant 1,' Stars 3, 2, Class Committee 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 2. DENISON l53 X 5: QQ P Wi' .. A 'ii :sv 1, , '-in llrllfyllml DONALD ALLAN DEN TON C-2 Don Syracuse, New York Don is one of the more socially minded men of '62. His personality arid humor have made these four years go quickly and yet supplied those memorable experiences, cherished years after graduation. He has shown his versatility and ability in all facets of cadet life from athletics to extracurricular activities. There is no doubt that he shall achieve his place in the sun. Sergeant 1,' Stars 35 Debate Council 49: Forum 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 ,- Pointer 3, 2, 1, Dialectic Society 3, 2,' Skeet Club 3. ROBERT CHARLES DICKINSON M-1 Bob Detroit, Michigan Although the academic department had "words" with this Michigan "Muck" some three times, Bob truly demonstrated to us that life was more than a bowl of integral signs. In his cheerleading endeavors, we will always remember the football games with the tireless tumbler in white drawers. Bob's indomitable spirit makes him, in our eyes, synonymous with our motto "Can Do". Sergeant 1,' 150 Lb Football 4, Numerals 4,' Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2,' Debate Council A2 Forum 4, 3,' French Club 4, 3, 25 Pointer 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Rocket Society 4, 3. WILLIAM JOSEPH DIEAL, JR. M-2 Bill Bedford Hills, New York Being from a "small town about twenty miles from here" and looking for the finer things in life, be she blonde or brunette, Bill has successfully continued his search through his numerous trips through the world around us. With such determination, strong spirit, and winning disposition, he briskly moves out to take his place in the Long Grey Line. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2: Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1,' Glee Club 4, KDET 4, 3, 2, 1,' Scoutmasters Council 4, 3, 2, 1, President 15 Fencing Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Captain 1,' Rifie Club 4g Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Skeet Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 2, 1. JOHN HENRY DILLEY, JR. F-2 Dilley Ft. Benning, Georgia An Army Brat in general, but a Southerner at heart, John came to the Trade School with the idea of following in his father's footsteps. He always has a smile for everyone and was able to make many friends. The Army is getting a fine officer as well as a Southern Gentleman. Sergeant 1,' Rifte Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3: German Club 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4,' Rifle Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1. PAUL JAMES DOBBINS G-2 Dobber Melrose, Massachusetts The Dobber, as he is affectionately known throughout the Corps, came to West Point from Boston with a hockey stick in one hand and a sick slip in the other. He will always be remembered to his classmates as "one of the guys", a great hockey player and a good man to have along. Paul and suc- cess will go hand in hand. Sergeant 1 ,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 25 Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Captain 1 ,' Golf 4, 3, 1, Public Information Detail 1, French hClub 4, 3, 2, lg Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Handball Club 4, 3,' Sailing Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Weight Lifting Club 4, 3. JAMES WALDEMAR DODD L-2 Jim Terre Haute, Indiana The past four years have proven themselves both educational and stimulat- ing thanks to Jim's tremendous vision. Each night our room could sleep in peace with the knowledge that if any danger lurked, it could not escape the all consuming eyes of Jim, for truly he has the vision for three. Sergeant 1, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1: German Club 4. 3: As- tronomy Club 3,' Pistol Club 2,' Ski Club 2. l54 W .fs-'Fi '1"""f'79' DON DENTON BOB DICKINSON BILL DIEAL L. 'r W' 1251 . 42 A., 6, 5 V xx.,-f' kqnvmfn Qi V k47.,,,?j,.,x ,,,QE2 2 FEQ, fu? Ay .5 Q55 my fi ,Km .45-ffm, ildg JOHN DILLEY m PAUL DOBBINS JIM DODD 155 S? M A A If is " f e 2fWg ,f W 'M 2 W, A A W H, df 9- A-31" KEN DOLSON CHUCK DOMINY STAN DOTEN 156 BOB DOUGLAS WAYNE DOWNING DICK DUNCAN X rf-5? S-,r - -- 2 , - F . X: 8,51-a2.1f15.4 1, i I . ' MTF .C 1 , , W. 1 ,g JE 'KT 1. 1 KENNETH ROBERT DOLSON E-1 Dolc Griffith, Indiana West Point academics came easy to Ken, allowing him to keep his standing high with plenty of time left for the "pad." Ken's "claim to fame" is being acclaimed the most "bowlegged" man in the Corps by his company-mates. Ken's congenial nature and his ability to take every situation in stride will go far in making a successful career in the service. Sergeant 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, Camera Club 2, Bridge Club 3. CHARLES ELGIN DOMINY K-2 Chuck Oakton, Virginia The "Flying Virginian" brought to the Point an easy smile, a subtle humor and all the savoir faire of a true southern gentleman. Always ready to lend a helping hand, Chuck prepared many goats for combat against the Aca- demic Department. Chuck will be remembered by his Kappa Dos brothers as never idle, always a discriminating draggoid, and destined for a bright career. Captain 1, Debate Council ci Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Dialectic Society 1, Pistol Club 2, 1, Skeet Club 1. FREDERICK S. DOTEN E-1 Stan Woodland, Maine Stan was born in Woodland, Maine. Upon graduating he enlisted in the Army and stayed in until he entered the Academy in July of 1958. Between jumps with the parachute club, Stan managed to read more novels in less time than any man at the Academy. He was a fine asset to E-1. Sergeant 1, Lacrosse 4, 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, Russian Club 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4, Pistol Club 4, 3, Rifle Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, Parachute Club 3, 2, Skin Diving Club 3, Rocket Club 3. ROBERT EDWIN DOUGLAS D-1 Bob El Paso, Texas Most of this easy-going Texan's time at the Point was spent in the sack. When he wasn't in the sack, you could hear that old Western music drifting through the barracks. Approaching academics as a completely unchalleng- ing test and alloting his time accordingly, he still managed to corral excel- lent grades. Sergeant Z, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, Public Relations Council 4, English Literatyre Seminar 3, Debate Council di Forum 4, Spanish Club 3, 2, Protestant Discussion Group 4, 3, Pointer 2, KDET 3, 2, Outdoor Sports Club 3, Scoutmasters Council 2, Fencing Club 4, Engineer Football Team. WAYNE ALLAN DOWNING H-2 Wanger Peoria, Illinois The "Wanger" came to the clan from Peoria, which he reminds us is the home of the Bradley Braves. Nothing was too risky to be attempted, from climbing mountains with Hagerty to the regular trip sections leaving the 54th for the cultural benefits of the surrounding communities. All who knew him well, counted him as a true friend and Wish him much success. Lieutenant 1, Wrestling 4, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pointer 4, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rifle Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 3, 2. GEORGE RICHARD DUNCAN I-1 Dick Sutton, West Virginia Sutton's roving ambassador to West Point soon became a popular academic crutch to many a "goat" in "Inquisition-One". Not one to suffer from strained muscles, Dick tackled all problems with an unequalled amount of West Virginian "horse sense" and always found an easier solution. With his easy approach, Dick will be able to carve his Army career with the same finesse. Lieutenant 1, Debate Council dt Forum 3, 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, Bugle Notes 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 3, 1. 157 1 5139 me WP 31-9 -S515 q 'E F, - Z," ffftgi' .-.iiiwf . ' S' r ms., 6 ff vnlmmfl JAMES WILLIAM DUNMEYER C-1 Jim Wilmington, Delaware Though born in the Philippines, Jim came to West Point a native son of the state of Delaware. His ambition, drive and conscientiousness made him quite well known and quite well liked by his classmates and many others in the Corps. He was best known by most, however, for being able to boast one of the most attractive company sweethearts of the members of the Class of '62, A gentleman, a scholar, Jim wore the Gray proudly and respectfully. It cannot but be expected that his consideration for the Blue will be very much the same. Lieutenant 1,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1,' Hoioitzer 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4,' Golf Club 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, Vice-President 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3. TREVOR N. DUPUY, JR. D-1 Dupe Bronxville, New York Dupe Dupuy, always quick to make a friend, easy-going, taking the ups and downs in stride. Brown's loss was West Point's gain when the Big boy from Bronxville, New York decided to join the Long Grey Line. His only fear while at the Academy was that his twin brother, CA Colgate fraternity manb was having more fun than he. He fought the Academic Department for every tenth they gave him, but he was never one to complain. His future looks bright as he embarks on an Army career. Sergeant 1,' Tennis 4,' Squash 4,' English Literature Seminar 3,' Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 1,' French Club 3, 1,' HI-FI Club 1, Handball Club 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 2, 1,' Sailing Club 1,' Ski Club 1. WILLIAM FRANCIS DWORSAK D-1 Bill Rosedale, New York Bill was Well on his way to achieving his life long amibition of "dragging" every weekend, when he got into a dispute with the "T.D." Needless to say who won. As it was he still managed to fight the books for five days and the snows of Flirty for two, without ever losing his cheerfulness and good humor. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3,' Catholic Acolytes 4, 3,' Catholic Choir 3, 2, Ger- man Club 4, 3,' Glee Club 4,' KDET 3, Camera Club 4, 3, 2. EDWARD JAMES DWYER C-1 Diesel St. James, New York "A bookcase, made of railroad ties?!!!" Fresh from the wheat fields of Long Island, it took Diesel about two weeks to conclude that perhaps academics were not the most important element of cadet life. After master- ing the two-count pull and roll, he moved on to Handball and Triathlon. A diamond in the rough, we're looking for the Infantry to polish his facets. Swimming 4, Numerals 4,' Track 4,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1,' Newman Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Triathlon Club 2, 1 ,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN EDMUND EASTERBROOK I-2 John Fort Rucker, Alabama Entrance day, for John, was the completion of a wide circuit of Army posts, returning to his birthplace. He was an example of a person after the Academic Department's heart, acquiring the appellation of "the rook" during Yearling math. He was always ready with a good word for Army Air, and when each winter rolled around, basketball occupied the sole center of his life. Sergeant 1 ,' Basketball 4, 3, 2, 1, Manager 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 1 ,' Mathematics Forum 1, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 3,' Hi-Fi Club 4,' Skeet Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. THOMAS FREDERICK ECCLESTON K-1 Rock Wareham, Massachusetts Rock entered West Point from Massachusetts with visions of baseballs dancing in his head. His diamond endeavors were hampered by an attempt to prove himself another Shakespeare, to the Tactical Department's dismay. He emerged H88 hrs" worse for wear but with his characteristic unfailing good humor. Although accused of thinking in concentrics during "plebe year", Rock, with his athletic and literary prowess, will leave an unfor- gettable mark on Kappa Uno. Sergeant 1,' Football 4,' Baseball 4, 2, 1,' Debate Council Kc Forum 4, 3, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 1. BILL DWORSAK l58 JIM DUNMEYER TREVOR DUPUY , :. mamwvbik ED DWYER JOHN EASTERBROOK ROCK ECCLESTON 159 qu, , ask ' .. .Q I , fi ' wA'4v'fi,g-fig--v.. 3 f : S, ' J a...f...wil1lns- JIM ELLIS BOB ELLIS STEVE ELLIS 160 we? -nv-wi!" JOHN EVANS BILL EVANS -Tv ff if r' T7 S xg SQ-f1'i'-H"A'5 . f , 'G-S ' v V- fr X lug- .Exif f V ,: MJ LW' H f 'f L AX .1 xr A7 ,Q ig JAMES RAIFORD ELLIS K-2 Jim Birmingham, Alabama Since his arrival at West Point from the University of Alabama and the Army, Jim was destined for success. His sincerity, intelligence and ambition blended with his subtle wit and personable smile and made him a man who was respected and admired by all. We know that his many attributes will make him a success in the Army as well. Captain 1 , Stars 3, 2, 1, Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2, Honor Committee 1 , Class Committee 3, 2, 1, Class Historian, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 3, KDET 4, 3, Rocket Society 4, 3. ROBERT LLEWELLYN ELLIS M-2 Doc Canton, Pennsylvania Doc, as he is known by his close friends, is a man behind the scenes. Although he has never been in the spotlight, his hard work and under- standing, along with his pleasant mannerisms, have won him many close friends. West Point has meant a lot to Doc and he has served it faithfully. When Doc leaves West Point, the Academy will be losing a great guy, but the Army will be gaining a great leader. Sergeant 1, Chapel Acolytes 4, Debate Council di Forum 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pointer 2, 1, Camera Club 3, HI-FI Club 4, 3, Handball Club 4, Pistol Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Bridge Club 4, 3, 2,' Rugby Club 2, 1. STEPHEN HORACE ELLIS H-2 Buckwheat Maryville, Tennessee Out of the smoky Smoky Mountains of Tennessee came this lad with a built-in grin and a fishing rod in hand. Buckwheat, he became known as, and a better friend one could not ask for. H-2 Classmates will always remember him for his elfervescence in everything he undertook. Here is a man for whom success was made. Sergeant 1, Pistol 2, Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2,' Debate Council :Q Forum 4, Russian Club 3, Pointer 4, Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2,' Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, 2, Bridge Club 4. JOHN GRADWELL EVANS F-2 Jack Arlington, Virginia After spending two thoroughly enjoyable years in the Army, Jack came to West Point where he subsequently devoted a few highly successful years in the pursuit of learning. He may not have learned much, but this was only due to many much more important activities. His favorite sport, besides snowing all the femmes, is shooting the breeze, especially after Taps. Lieutenant 1, Lacrosse 4, Numerals 4, Hockey 4, Football 3, 2,' Hop Com- mittee 4, 3, Public Information Detail 3, 2, 1, Debate Council JZ Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Chess Club 2, 1, Handball Club 3, 2, Parachute Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Bridge Club 3. . WILLIAM ALLEN EVANS A-2 Bill Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Bill came all the way from Ft. Lauderdale to these majestic walls but his thoughts were always a little farther North with a wonderful blonde at Syracuse University. Although happiest when with her he gave West Point his best throughout the four years. Upon graduation, his warm personality and conscientious attitude mark him for success in the future. Sergeant 1, 150 Lb Football 4, Golf 4, Numerals 4, Cheerleader 1 , Pointer 3,' Glee Club 3, 2,' Golf Club 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rugby 2, 1, Weight- lifting Club 4. JOHN HERBERT FAGAN A-2 Herb Northampton, Massachusetts Jack is an individual who devotes his fullest attention and ability to every task he undertakes. He has spent many willing hours helping his classmates in need of academic coaching. His favorite choice for a relaxing afternoon is swinging his irons on the golf course. He has a driving determination for perfection which already has and will continue to lead him on to greater achievements. Lieutenant 1, Stars 3, 2, 1, Ring Ke Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 1, Debate Council 84 Forum 3, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, Pointer 3, 2, 1, Golf Club 3, 2, 1, President 1,' Ski Club 3. JOHN FAGAN l6l ,.g,,, I lb Qt 'X F-ig ,fy 511, 4 llllllllll THOMAS E. FALEY K-2 TOWL Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Tom came to West Point from Dickinson College with a ready smile and Joke. Plebe Year didn't dim his spirits at all, and we found him to be particularly adept with the Femmes. A hard worker who could smile through the worst days in Bartlett Hall, Tom is assured of winning many friends and attaining high goals as an Army Infantryman. Sergeant 15 Cross Country 4,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2. JOHN E. FEE D-2 Feeje Chelsea, Massachusetts Johnis capacity for hard work is surprising and it often made us wonder about "all work and no play . . . " until we realized that he makes play of all work, keeping his friendly smile when others would be gloomy. The ease with which he makes friends, combined with his perseverance and determination to accomplish whatever he sets out to do, will carry him far. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 3,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2,' Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' English Literature Seminar 2,' Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. DAVID ARNOLD FELDMAN F-2 Dave DeKalb, Illinois With a carefree outlook on life and no academic burdens, Dave very success- fully devoted his energies to the pursuit of a good time. By interspersing the four years at West Point with jaunts to Bermuda and Europe, he was able to maintain that casual, happy-go-lucky attitude intact. Being lucky in love as well, "his future is a cloudless sky." Sergeant 1 ,' Stars 15 Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council aft Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3,' Camera Club 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4,' Chess Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 3, 2, Shi Club 4, 3,' Weight Lifting Club 4. RICHARD W. FELLOWS A-1 Dick Arlington, Virginia Dick will be remembered as the man who could streamline his academic schedule to cause no disturbance in the flow of his extra-curricular activi- ties. Weekends with the Glee Club, afternoons with the "Brown Boy", evenings with high fidelity, and academics Cnobody was sure Whenj never seemed to tax his varied talents. His boundless potential promises a brilliant future. Sergeant 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 2, 1,' Debate Council :ft Forum 45 Pointer 45 Glee Club 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1g Model Airplane Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Custodian 2, President 1,' HI-FI Club 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 2,' Rifle Club 4,' Sailing Club 4, 3,' Sheet Club 3. JOHN PALMER FERGUSON, JR. D-2 Fergie New Castle, Delaware Fergie hails from New Castle, Delaware, where he played basketball and baseball in high school and was salutatorian of his graduating class. Fergie continued his academic success here by winning stars "plebe" year. Besides his academic endeavors, John found time to give questionable advice to buddies, to be a member of the Glee Club and Class Committee, and to help D-2 win intermural championships. Lieutenant 1,' Stars 3,' Class Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Howitzer 4, 3, 2,' Glee Club 2, 1. RALPH JOSEPH FINELLI A-2 Finool Rahway, New Jersey Four hectic years never dimmed Ralph's characteristic happy attitude. Since Academics were no problem, he managed to devote the bulk of his time to his prime interests, his "CAO" and his Hi-Fi equipment-in that order. He probably holds the record for most consecutive weeks "dragging", With such persistence and dependability, Ralph cannot fail to be a fine oflicer. Sergeant 1 ,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 15 Debate Council :fc Forum 4,' German 4, 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 3, 2, 1,' HI-FI Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 35 Ski 7.4 4. l62' F ,-Mug, TOM FALEY JOHN FEE l l l l l l l l l DAVE FELDMAN f X ? . Y was '-. ., W k Wt-.E, Q XA X J ,f w, 1 ' 5 ' . E js w A V ' i 'Q H, . M fx. K -5 Uk L xv" AM""',. x -L K 5 Aviv -Q N- It E . 5 I N LA. K -, K . A ,, j ' , 3 , . .. 4- 0 .W Q I ,. ' . j , I . ml.. R X V l TE 5 'N if :A . Vw k 4 m ' 3 K ' : 1 " 5 t ,L 1."'4 7? 1-5 7 I .- . 2 'W V ' --Q' HV KLM M. w, i..-,,w.,....w.x . .. . "1 . , -f -, . ,wx - A E ' 1 N r I b M A X i "f"."L fL- - V23 W , H . g eg L V ,Q 1 r 5 .- I Q x, gm . 5 N, . gl vK, H yi. i t E ' K . K 2 : . ' 1 . E 'I U.. 3 S 4 - in f I k 5 rugm' i w, , x X MM ES? .. i 7 . J.-A Q W ' ,.. ,Q , , J f L , . , NJ- pm r , , - 4, M. A W Q A 5 A X X - f SW 4 , .. . ' " -sa f 1, 3 t A 3 . I ' K 5 I xxx-. , ' ' K K wa- 5' 5 . , ,, 5 1 - K. A . - . i . K . i l Mm V MQ K 5 , , ,V , A A, L, W H , . - s sf. 5 7 , .., ' I I I - f 3 j Y 8 - A ,,,.. .k,. f . , 1 -- S , ,, : ,,,. V: g A I Q s ,. . . A, W w LT K, 4 - . . f 1 ..w -T' E Y K K A . .i f io ff K K. ' 'Mp-.X v L -.A .eff A l' ,W " M my -, Q K K I . AA -a,.,Aw- , M . Wx. -- 4 V f I 1 .f f Q vu 1 ', y wb, i A I 'VA k Q fi? A 552- Q 4,,if'5f DICK FELLOWS JOHN FERGUSON RALPH FINELLI 163 if Y'-f ' :QA 5 X ,Qg?5'?f-,Q 5 Q iw.: iffjgy-..is, JOHNNY FINLAYSON BERT FINN ARTHUR FINTEL 164 TONY FIORE GUS FISHBURNE - all . . CHUCK FISHER .g il , -Q-25 .K 41, I Q3 . K -.x E -:f f -4 QQ XZi1if513"-fi -Q .w 4 31 -L, 1 Qfiflp-2 5' rfW:', :R ,Q 2 H ,I X fb p JOHN DAVID FINLAYSON M-2 JOIWWW Omaha, Nebraska Johnny came in from Omaha to fight a continuous battle with the English Department and the O.P.E., but somehow he managed to salve his wounds on weekends with the choir and glee club. His drive and determination will assure him of success in the future. Sergeant 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4,' Pointer 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 2, 1,' Ski Club 3. BERTRAM PAUL FINN B-2 Bert Teaneck, New Jersey Hard work, devotion to his job and a desire to always do better in all he undertakes-this is Bert. A New Jerseyite of outstanding character, his devotion to any task, big or small, cannot be matched. Bert is, without a doubt, an outstanding example of today's soldier, gentleman, and scholar. Sergeant 1, Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major "A" 2, 1,' Newman Forum 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Sheet Club 4, 3,' Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ARTHUR THOMAS FINTEL K-1 Veal Oakland, California Tom, better known as Veal to those who remember the "Cow Trip," was usually found squatting atop his "pad," Indian style, either perusing the papers and weeklies or trying to best Poe and Irving in literary output. With his keen desire to do a good job, he will see many fruitful years along whatever path he may take. Sergeant 1g Newman Forum 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council dk Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rocket Society FRANCIS ANTHONY NEIL FIORE C-1 Tony Red Bank, New Jersey Tony came to us from Pottstown, Pennsylvania, with a long military back- ground. He was born in Ft. Riley, Kansas on December 6, 1940, into an Army family. His pre-high school days were spent in Spain Where he became Huent in Spanish. His high school days were distinguished by his receiving letters in several sports with his favorite being his varsity letter in wrestling. Tony entered West Point directly from the Hill School. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Company and Battalion Representative, Ordnance Club 3,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Company Representative, Editor of Forecast, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Astronomy Club 4, 3,' Sailing Club 4, 3,' Sheet Club 2,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Rocket Society 4, 3, Company and Battalion Representative. ELLIOTT GUTHRIE FISHBURNE, III F-2 Gus Waynesboro, Virginia What an unveiling-to substitute for the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, the rugged, dank Hudson Highlands-to set aside gracious Southern living for ascetic Yankee discipline. All illusions soon passedg the gruelling challenge of the martinets was ever present. Yet always there remained the companionship, the smile, the lust for freedom-these the South's traditions and his hallmarks. , Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Class Committee 3, 2, 15 Mathe- matics Forum 35 Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 2, 1. CHARLES LESTER FISHER, JR. M-2 Chuck Mt. Auburn, Illinois In the summer of 1958 Chuck came from an Illinois farm to the Academy and made the transition to cadet life without much trouble. During his stay here, he has proved that academics and bridge mix well, as he has excelled at both. An intramural enthusiast, Chuck will be missed by those who remain behind in M-2 and welcomed by the Army, Sergeant 1,' German Club 4, 3, 1,' Pistol Club 3, Skeet Club 4, 3, 1,' Bridge Club 2, 1, Vice-President 1,' Rocket Society 1. l65 ? 5 g:'. fx ' 'WMD 4519 Nr . 'TIT fr' ff' ."f"'?2iEQ.'2g?l-'l A n f gm 3 f,.,l,mIMy1ln DENNIS DON FLINT L-1 Denny Grand Rapids, Michigan Denny came to West Point with one ambition, to get into the infantry. No one will agree more than himself, however, that it was a tough fight, especially where academics were concerned. He will always claim that a "plebe" math "Turnout" was never worth a "gold star". Although not an excellent scholar, he was a good athlete spending many hours with his favorite activities, swimming or skiing. Den's friendliness will not be forgotten by his classmates nor his charm by the "femmes". Sergeant 1 ,' Debate Council Kg Forum 4, Spanish Club 3, KDET 4, Camera Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2. JOHN PHILIP FLORENCE G-2 Phil South Charleston, Ohio Phil brought to West Point a cheerful smile that four years behind the gray walls failed to dim. The small-town Ohio boy came with an eager desire to learn and lead. His diligence and determination sped him to success in these fields and will insure him a successful career. Lieutenant 1, Track 4, Numerals 4, Mule Riding 2, 1, Honor Committee 2, 1, Public Relations Council 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, Russian Club 4, 3, Glee Club 3, KDET 3, Sailing Club 4, 3, Skeet Club 2, Ski Club 4,.3, 2. ARDEEN RICHARD FOSS I-2 Rich Sioux Falls, South Dakota Never did a gloom period descend on this Dakotan, whose love of the ski trails kept him quite busy during the long winter months. Relatively undisturbed by the tradition of 150 years unhampered by progress, Rich has maintained a willing smile and implacable calm, which has served as an inspiration to us all. These, coupled with a high concept of duty guarantee his success in the years to come. Sergeant 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Patrol 4, 3, 2, 1, Assistant Patrol Leader 2, Patrol Leader 1. ROBERT M. FOX B-2 Foxey Hamilton, Ohio Foxey, a preacher's son, came to us from Ohio and he's mighty proud of it. This jovial redhead is quick of wit and never at a loss for words. Never a star man Ceither wayj, his biggest battles have been with the "brown boy". However, his spring afternoons were always spent in the "bullpen" at Doubleday. Sergeant 1, Football 4, Baseball 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Radio Club 3, 2, Debate Council JZ Forum 3, German Club 4, 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, Camera Club 4, 3, Handball Club 3, 2, Pistol Club 4, Rifle Club 4, Sailing Club 3, Skeet Club 4, Baptist Student Union 2. DAVID PAUL FRANCIS F-1 Big Dave Ware, Massachusetts A member in good standing of the "A-K-Q-J-10 Society" and one of F Co's stalwarts, Big Dave is popular and well known to all. Although he was seemingly unrattled by academics, he always did well and finished "yearling" year 16th in English-something he won't let anyone from Baltimore forget. With his winning smile and agreeable nature, Dave is sure to "Hy" to the top. Lieutenant 1 , Football 4, 2, 1, Monogram 2, Track 4, 3, Numerals 4, Cross Country 3, Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 2, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Hi-Fi Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN LEROY FRANCK B-2 Jack Fort Wayne, Indiana Self-disciplined, steadfast, and straightforward, John L. Franck. Demand- ing high standards of discipline, bearing, and purpose for himself, he was never content with less than the best. Loyal as a friend, trustworthy with any task, Jack cannot help but be a successful oflicer. Sergeant 1 ,' Squash 4, 3, Numerals 4, Public Relations Council 2, 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 3, 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pointer 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 3, Scoutmasters Council 3, 2, 1, Handball Club 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 2, 1 ,' Skeet Club 4. RICH FOSS 166 'Tr DENNY FLINT PHIL FLORENCE ,via ROBERT FOX DAVID FRANCIS JACK FRANCK 167 WW' ' .y-nun' """""""p ROG FRANKE REID FRANKS HARRY FRASER F"-s 3 in 5 168 My-N EVN JOEL FROESCI-ILE BOB FUELLHART PHIL 5 Chg., A? Q, sub , - S - - T Y, .4 P3 2' :E 1 - 5,1 : 'lkffa-3121 ' f' EC?- KY ." W -CWB . Q yu wx., Z9 X .wa I 'el X-I K' if TX, , X " 1' Vox, ,f"l A .' , ROGER WAYNE FRANKE D 2 Rog Manitowoc, Wisconsin Above and beyond all else, Rog, as he is known by his company-mates, is a "ham". His voice filled the air waves for several years prior to coming to the Academy. His academic adeptness has given him considerable time in which to further pursue this avocation. His knowledge of "juice" is exceeded only by his pride in Wisconsin and his ability to make life interesting for his classmates. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Choir 4,' Radio Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 3, Vice- President 2, President 1, French Club 3: KDET 4, Camera Club 2. CLIFTON REID FRANKS I-1 Reid Charlotte, North Carolina Although faced with two formidable roommates, Reid ran a tight room, usually directing operations from his headquarters-the "pad". Naturally talkative, he divides his time equally between being clever and having his foot in his mouth. He makes friends easily, in spite of the fact that he never lets them forget two things: he is a southerner and an Infantry "file", first and last. Sergeant 1,' Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Ring di Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4,' German Club 4, 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Production Manager 1 ,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. HARRY LEON FRASER L-2 Baywood Park, California Throughout our short stay, Harry's reflections have been a constant source of enlightenment in our room. Though he isn't an Einstein, each year he has managed to gather enough tenths from the Academic Departments so that when the General Reviews roll around he can sit back and worry! Lieutenant 1,' Debate Council di Forum 2, German Club 4, 3,' Pistol Club 3,' Parachute Club 4, 3. JOEL DOUGLAS FROESCHLE A-1 Joel Lisbon, North Dakota When Joel burst upon the scene four years ago, he brought a vibrant per- sonality and perpetual good humor that cheered many an unhappy day. He took time out from his many endeavors to spend every afternoon with his "brown boy" and every weekend with a different girl. Having set out to enjoy his brief stay here, he will depart with mission accomplished. Sergeant 1 ,' Debate Council 62: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 1, KDET 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Handball Club 3,' Pistol Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, Bridge Club 3. ROBERT HOWARD FUELLHART M-2 Bob Tionesta, Pennsylvania Bob came to West Point from Tionesta, Pennsylvania with a football in each hand, determination to make a dent in Army's letter supply-which he did. Although he became famous as Army's "Lonesome End," the gridiron was not the only field on which he excelled. We will always remember his ready laugh and good humor. Bob will undoubtedly Wear stars someday. Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 1,' Track 4, Lacrosse 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' Skin Diving Club 2, 1. PHILIP BALL FULLER H-2 Phil Baltimore, Maryland The boy who never slept, "Files" lived up to his name because if he wasn't seen studying, he was shining his shoes. He found her his yearling year, and since then, hasn't stopped writing. Versatile at many sports, he finally settled on Triathlon his cow year. Though we hate to give him away the "flyboys" will get a good man. Captain 1,' Cross Country 4,' Indoor Track 4,' Lacrosse 4, 3,' Pistol 2,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Newman Forum 4, 3, French Club 4, 3, 2,' Triathlon Club 2, 1 ,' Chess Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 3, 2, 1,' Skeet Club 3, 2, 1, Bridge Club 3, 2, 1. FULLER 169 kb rf 'X' 1 eg-Qc'-.0 lilly' 7 nllillllllil PHILIP JOSEPH GALANTI K-2 Phil . Fort Belvoir, Virginia Although he arrived late for Beast Barracks, Phil didn't let this loss of valuable training slow him down. From the very first, Phil's dedication to detail enabled him to excel in everything he tried. He gained his stars by hard work, but was always ready to spend his time coaching anyone who needed help. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1,' Mathematics Forum 3,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1,' Hoioitzer 4, 3, 2, 1g Dialetic Society 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4. JACK DAVID GARRETT H-2 Jack Plainview, Texas Having spent two years in college before arriving from the Lone Star State, Jack found a new and diferent way of life, sometimes to his liking, some- times not. He lost a few hairs during the yearling year struggle, but still required a haircut for Saturday Inspections. Although Jack was well in the middle of his class, he and the Academic Department had their battles, but he almost always managed to come out on top. Success was made for this individual. Sergeant 1, Diving 4, Numerals 4,' Radio Club 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 3, 1 ,' Hi-Fi Club 2, 1 ,' Skin Diving Club 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 3,2, 1. ROBERT PAUL GARRETT M-1 Bobby Del Rio, Texas Straight from the Lone Star State, leaving one "plebe" year at Texas ASLM only to find himself deep in another, this short Texan has fought both the Academic and Tactical Depts., winning a victory over the Spanish and Eng- lish Departments, only to lose to the "TD", This Airborne, Ranger, In- fantry "file" will be a great asset to our Army. Lieutenant 1, 150 lb. Fotball 4,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 1,' Hi-Fi Club 2, 1,' Rocket Society 3, 1. BARRY LUCIUS GARTRELL B-2 Squats Reistertown, Maryland Barry will be remmebered by those of us who sat in the last section with him for his ability to pass impossible turn-out exams and for his easy going manner. Despite his battles with the books, Barry found time to play three years of A squad lacrosse. His industriousness and congenial nature will assure him of a successful future. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Spanish Club 3, 1,' Dialectic Society 4, 3,' KDET 4,' Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Pistol Club 3,' Sailing Club 3,' Skeet Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 1. RICHARD EDWARD GARVEY, JR. K-2 Gary Milford, Ohio Garv was a true son of the fraternity. When he wasn't shooting skeet, or haunting the bowling alley, he could be found unveiling to others the mys- teries of the ol' Academic Department. His subtle sense of humor, along with his cool, calm and collected outlook on life, make Garv a good man to know and insure him every success wherever he may go. Sergeant 1,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1, Battalion Representative 2, Astronomy Club 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 3, 2, 1. DAVID BENTON GARVIN C-2 Dave Cranston, Rhode Island Dave, the smallest man in the company from the smallest state in the Union, constantly defeated the academic department in the battle for tenths and rested on his laurels by frequently diving into the pad. Small in stature, but big in effort, Dave could always be found pushing the gym- nastics squad on to victory. With "brown boy" in hand, and bars on his shoulders, Dave Garvin will be a fine contribution to the Ohicer Corps. Sergeant 1 ,' Gymnastics Manager 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Class Committee 3, 2, 1, Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1. l7O PHIL GALANTI JACK GARRETT BOBBY GARRETT ,JP 4 E A ' ' ' J . rm 4 A ,X .XMMP f , uv-'fy ,M M-v..,m ,. ,.,, ffqyf X X N Hi! T BARRY GARTRELL DICK GARVEY 171 DAVE GARVIN U- L , aim! W, V, A 7, 'Qi ' " +2 JERRY GARWICK BILL GAVAN GORDI GEISS GUS GERTSCH gf.-ii? MIKE GIBSON DICK GULLIGAN ,.X? if 55931 .Ni 3 S-, C -- 1- ,A iiiggnsf ' ' -5151. '-,rf jQOQQgf kr 5,4 X- N. ' 2? fX, A X xXsV,ff xr GERALD G. GARWICK I 2 Jerry Hopkins, Minnesota An Army brat, Gar loved the Point, but hated to admit it. Between aca- demics and anchoring Army's mile relay team, he found plenty of time for extra-curricular activities and lending a sympathetic ear to his friends' troubles. Here's hoping that after graduation, he has plenty of luck in his career. Lieutenant 1 , Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1, Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Class Committee 3, 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, Pointer 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 3, 2, Skeet Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. WILLIAM H. GAVAN I-2 Bill Fort Sill, Oklahoma Bill was always the life of the party and a sure remedy for depression. Despite the hazing that he took from the Academic Departments, Bill re- mained a trustworthy and cheerful friend to all who knew him. Being Hgung-ho" Bill should give the Army a valuable source of leadership. Lieutenant 1, Cross Country 4, Numerals 4, Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 1 , Outdoor Sports Club 1 , Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 2, 1. CHARLES GORDON GEISS I-1 Gordi Louisville, Kentucky A first section man from the start, Gordi attacked academics and athletics with equal fervor. He probably holds the record for coaching the most "goats" and "hives" at one time. "Ask Geiss", was almost a "BH hour watch word. His Saturday afternoon oboe playing has given many eventful hours to South Area and will serve to make Gordi long remembered. Sergeant 1, Stars 3, Cross Country 4, Mathematics Forum 2, Russian Club 4, 3, Triathlon Club 3, 2, 1 , Pointer 4, 3, Art Club 3, Pistol Club 3, 2, 1, Sail- ing Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. WILLIAM DARRELL GERTSCH L-2 Gus Pocatello, Idaho Gus came from Pocatello, Idaho, in the beautiful northwest, to run track and get an education. As one of Army's best half-milers, he received varsity letters for three years. He was little seen, for when he wasn't running, he was seeing Chris, who followed him from Pocatello after plebe year. En- gineering and electronics promise a bright future for him in the Army's ranks. Sergeant 1, Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 3, 2, 1, Radio Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Astronomy 3, Outdoor Sports Club 1, Hi-Fi Club 3, 2, 1, Rocket Society 4, 3. MICHAEL KENNETH GIBSON M-2 Hoofves Riverside, California As an Air Force Brat, "Hooves" came to West Point well indoctrinated in military life. While having a little difficulty with academics, Mike found time to play both soccer and Rugby. Never having too much trouble with the female sex, he could surely be found in the Weapons Room on week- ends. Upon graduation, the military service will receive a fine leader. Sergeant 1, Soccer 3, 2, Debate Council 42: Forum 3, 2, 1, Spanish Club 3, Pointer 4, 3, KDET 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Parachute Club 2, 1, Rugby Club 2, 1. RICHARD MICHAEL GILLIGAN L-2 Dick Shrewsbury, Massachusetts Dick spent his years at the Academy dividing his time between reading, sleeping and working out at the gym, with the first two receiving the emphasis. Always frustrating the hives with his lack of studying, Dick was able to excel at any science course. The possession of a ready smile and a cheerful outlook enabled Dick to practice one of his most remembered characteristics, his willingness to help out a classmate. Sergeant 1, Catholic Acolyte 4, 3, 1, German Club 4, 3, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 1, Ski Club 3, 2, 1. l73 Umwickn ll' .. T -' ff '1 "fL ,' .1 O O . 'llllllllll DENNIS WILLIAM GILSTAD L-2 Gil l 7 East Troy, Wisconsin With cries of distress ringing through L-2 hallways-occasioned with a broken slide rule or a recitation with the Department of Mechanics-Gil could be heard repeating quietly to himself, "Oh! That's simple. Falls right out!" Although classmates expect much from Gil's unusual talent in sci- ence, and remember him for his savoir faire in engineering endeavors, those who have worked most closely with him emulate Gil for his patience and true concern for their well-being. Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4,' Track 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2,' Newman Forum 2,' Ordnance Club 25 Radio Club 3,' Howitzer 4,' Handball Club 3. ALFRED FRANK GIRARDI F-2 Al New York, New York About the only affiliation Al had with the Army before Beast Barracks was the "We Want You" poster at the Post Office. Nevertheless, in his four years at the Monastery, he has compiled a fine record of academics and ath- letics. He will be a great asset to any unit he serves with. Sergeant 1, Lacrosse 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 3, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President. JAMES MICHAEL GLEASON I-I-1 Gleep Boone, Iowa Jim's sincerity and Willingness to give a task his all are bound to bring success in his every endeavor. The friendships he has gained here will pass the test of time because his enthusiasm and pleasant manner make him some one you are proud to call a friend. Lieutenant 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4,' Portuguese Club 2,' Howitzer 3, Dialectic Society 3, 2, Camera Club 3, 2,' Scoutmasters Council 3, 2, Sec- retary 2,' Pistol Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 2,' Rocket Society 4, 3,' Weight Lifting Club 3. EDWARD ALBERT GLEICHMAN D-2 Ed Reigelsville, Pennsylvania Big Ed, better known as "Hercules Unchained", will always be remembered for his subtle humor and his clean living. Ed, one of our more "gung ho" classmates was held in high respect by everyone. Ed cannot help but to suc- ceed in his future career. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2. MICHAEL LAWRENCE GODSHALL M-2 Mike Sunbury, Pennsylvania Mike is a brat from the start, claiming the Fort Belvoir, D.C. area as home. Having excellent luck in academics, he has found time for many peaceful afternoons of slumber between bridge games. Other games with the "T.D." have added to his loss of hair, but Mike needs no top-knot to be a top knotch oiiicer. Sergeant 1,' French Club 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 2, 1,' Fencing Club 4,' Golf Club 2, 1,' Bridge Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, President 1,' Weight Lifting Club 3, 2, 1g Rocket Society 4, 1. JOHN TURNER GODWIN E-1 Johnny Charlotte, North Carolina A Carolinian with a quick smile and a sincere greeting for all, Johnny came to West Point determined to do well, which he did. A fine competitor in ath- letics, he fought a successful battle against the Academic Departments, but was never to busy with himself to share a classmate's problem or a laugh with us all. Captain 1 ,' 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, Public Information Detail 4, 3, Howitzer 2g Pointer 3, 2,' Golf Club 25 Handball Club 4. JIM GLEASON l74 GIL GILSTAD AL GIRARDI ED GLEICHMAN MIKE GODSHALL JOHNNY GODWIN mH'W"'A I- 175 Mmmk 3 , 'Qu BERT GOLDBERG BOB GOODE FRED GORDEN 176 JIM GORMAN "WF NORM GRAHN 5 'ff"""" X 5, z fx 7 "1NQ'Z5g.u ra X' if -'K rx ' X? i W -ner W 52,55 BERTRAM GOLDBERG F-1 Goldie Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Small Cprobably due to too much unnecessary "sweating" over academicsj but mighty-over 300-a real triple threat: stu dying, singing, and sleepingg and red hair to boot! Well known and well liked by the Corps, Bert's ability to see the funny side helped keep us all in spirit. His capacity for friendship is infinite and will follow him wherever he goes. Sergeant lg Rifle 4, 3, 2, Manager 3, 2,' Jewish Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Director 1, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Spanish Club 3,' Pointer 4, Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 2,' Pistol Club 4,' Skeet Club 4. ROBERT HARDING GOODE, JR. K-2 Goodie Nashville, Tennessee Football player, Sunday School teacher, Track Man, and Skydiver-just a few of the titles Goodie has managed to accumulate during his four years at West Point. In these various capacities Bob has learned to do more than just tolerate the Systemg he created a new one. Between squelching Navy beachheads, and taking an occasional swim across the Hudson, Bob man- aged to squeeze in just enough time for academics. Sergeant 1g Track 4, 3, 2, 1,' Cross-Country 3, Football 2, 1, Monogram 2, Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2, 15 German Club 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Photography Editor 3, 2, 1, KDET 4, 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 3, 2, 1,' Skin Diving Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 3, 1. FRED AUGUSTUS GORDEN C-1 Gordy Battle Creek, Michigan Constant determination mingled with his desire for perfection brought Gordy to the Dean's List and lifted him over the high bar. Slow to praise, yet never too busy to help, he has grasped the hearts of us all. We view his past with pride, his future with expectation . . . the Army shall indeed pros- per. There was no finer among us. Lieutenant 1g Basketball 4, Track 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4,' Cross Country 3, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council and Forum 4. JAMES GORMAN C-1 Slotz Swampscott, Massachusetts Slotz was renowned for his long touchdown sprints in the halls of East Bar- racks. He was a pretty good singing waiter, too, with a style reminiscent of Louie Armstrong' Determined to be collegiate regardless of the cir- cumstances, he was, at times, thwarted by the powers from above. News- paperman, athlete, waiter-the Champagne of Bottled Beer signs out for good. Sergeant 1 ,' Golf 4, Catholic Choir 2, 1,' English Literature Seminar 2,' De- bate Council and Forum 4, 3, Dialectic Society 3,' Golf Club 2,' Ski Club 4, 3. NORMAN DONALD GRAHN F-1 NOWVL Dawson, Minnesota Norm, a true Minnesota Swede and the son of a minister, is undoubtedly one of the sincerest members of '62, His smile and quiet, hard working ways will lead him far as an ofiicerg they will guarantee him our friendship in the years to come. He is truly an asset to our class. Captain 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council fb Forum 4,' Out- door Sports Club 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. RICHARD HAVEN GRAMZOW F-2 DiClC Detroit, Michigan Everyone who has come into contact with Dick since he joined the Long Gray Line could not help but be impressed by his warm and magnetic per- sonality. He has made the motto of the Academy his hallmarks and he cannot help but be a success in his career as an oflicer. He will be remembered by all of us as a man of loyalty and honor. Sergeant 1,' Swimming 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' New- man Forum 4, 3g English Literature Seminar 3, 2, Secretary 2, Ordnance Club 1 ,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2," German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 3, Pointer 4,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Parachute Club 1 ,' Bridge Club 1. DICK GRAMZOW l77 xr' xg, Gm P ' -4?-' 'dm Ri' MICHAEL WILLIAM GREBE C-2 Mike Farmington, Illinois An alert, conscientious mind, tempered by warm friendship, has made Mike a popular leader in every field of endeavor. Always an academic standout, anxious to help classmates, Mike still found time to successfully direct the activities of some of West Point's largest extracurricular institutions. His sure, intelligent manner assures him of success and an abundance of good friends. Captain 1 , Stars 3, 2, 1 , Basketball 4, 2, Public Relations Council 2, 1, Vice President 1, English Lnterature Seminar 3, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Editor-in-Chief 1, Handball Club 2, 1, Ski Club 2, 1. ROGER WILLIAM GREEN, JR. E-1 R09 East Smethport, Pennsylvania Rog was well known in the Corps Cand at Navy Landb and by this renown Joined the "Century Club" early in his first class year. Winning several close decisions against the Academic Departments, Rog was always easy going and likable, and kind of man we are proud to claim in ,62. Sergeant 1, Lacrosse 4, Spanish Club 4, 3, Astronomy Club 3, KDET 4, Art Club 4, 3, 2, Fencing Club 2, Handball Club 3, 2, Pistol Club 4, Sailing Club 4, 3, Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, Skin Diving Club 3, 2. ROBERT DEAN GREENWALT B-2 Berg Shelton, Nebraska Perseverance, self-control, confidence, and a pleasing disposition, admir- able qualities, and all incorporated into the disposition of Bob Greenwalt. This man obtained our confidence, our trust, and our respect. Because of him our life here was more livable. For those of us who knew him well it can be said, "I am better for having known you". Sergeant 1 , Debate Council di Forum 4, French Club 2, Pointer 2, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, KDET 4, Outdoor Sports Club 1, Pistol Club 3, 2, Skeet Club 3, 2, Ski Club 3, 2, Bridge Club 3. THURSTON ALGEE GRIFFITH, JR. I-2 Turk Albuquerque, New Mexico Turk, with his invisible camera, was the life and leader of the Idiot Dos Coalition. He was the only tackle on the 150's to wear low-cuts and turn them in for "twistin' " shoes during the winter and spring months. His experience gained from combat patrols should prove invaluable later in his service career. Whatever branch Turk chooses, he will be a success, and will long be remembered by his classmates. Sergeant 1, 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Numerals 4, Major A 2,1, Track 4, 3, Numerals 4, Public Information Detail 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 4, 3, Para- chute Club 2. JOHN M. GRIMSHAW A-1 Grimmy Paterson, New Jersey An avid Yankee fan, with nicknames running from Grimmy to Snooper de- scribes John. His greatest pleasure, next to some normal cadet activities, is baseball and this interest was more rewarding when Mickey Mantle ate in the Mess Hall, as a guest of Grimmy. We're sure that John still has not washed his hand. Sergeant 1, Basketball 4, 3, 2, Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, 1. JOSEPH EDWARD GROSS, III I-2 J0e Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania In his own inimitable way, Joe always did the job well. Possessing a good sense of humor, and a serious side, too, Joe got along well with everyone. Coming from the bustling city of Scranton, he never sweated the Academic and Tactical Departments, and always helped those of us who were less handy with numbers. Joe will be a credit to our class and to the Army. Lieutenant 1,' 150 lb. Football 4, Numerals 4 ,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Ger- man Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Skin Diving Club 3, 2. 178 Q Y. MIKE GREBE ROG GREEN mug, BERG GREENWALT K , , ii . A 52,1 .nl-' THURSTON GRIFFITH JOHN GRIMSHAW JOE GROSS 179 -K Mx :Rf JOE GUARINO TONY GUENTHER LARRY GUNDERMAN 180 1 STEVE HABBLETT HARRY HAGERTY HERBERT HAMEISTER he fkne-s Q15 Wim X, 'G s m 2 ' ? 'q:Q'a: e f ff'--.2-ig-L .fl P UQ . Ll ,f .S f N. f' J PQ, X llrs-.,,f f JOSEPH LAWRENCE GUARINO A-2 Joe Merrick, Long Island, New York For the past four years Joe has been A-2's leading entertainer. Regardless of the time or place, Joe could always be counted upon to soothe the nerves of his companions with a song. As a member of the Glee Club and Catholic Choir, he took more trips than John Foster Dulles. West Point will long remember A-2's answer to Enrico Caruso. Lieutenant 1,' Soccer 4, Lacrosse 4, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,Librarian 3, 2, Camera Club 2, Shi Club 4, 3, 2, 1. MICHAEL ANTHONY GUENTHER F-2 Tony Falls Church, Virginia Tony came to West Point from the Southland, and never let anyone forget it. He was immediately tagged with the name, Grunt, for his deep Southern drawl. Most of Grunt's extra-curricular time was spent "dragging" his "brown boy". He waged a five year war with the Academic Department for tenths. His ability to complete a task efficiently shall prove him to be a suc- cess in all of his endeavors. Sergeant 1, Hop Committee 2, 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, Hoioitzer 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3. GEORGE LAWRENCE GUNDERMAN A-1 Larry Coxsackie, New York Larry holds the distinction of being the first contribution to these grey walls from the buzzing metropolis of Coxsackie, New York, in one hundred twenty five years. This, coupled with his winning personality, his perpetual presence at every after-taps gathering in the "hilton" and his fame as a hard-driving softball coach, will cause Gundy to be long remembered by anyone who has been fortunate enough to know him. Lieutenant 1, Baseball 4, 2, Basketball 4, Hop Committee 3, 2, 1, Mathe- matics Forum 2, 1, Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,Pointer 2, 1 , KDET 4, 3, 2, Camera Club 3, 2, Golf Club 2, 1 , Rocket So- ciety 4, 3. JOHN STEVENSON HABBLETT M-1 Steve Tamaqua, Pennsylvania Steve came straight from the coal regions of Pennsylvania to West Point. He managed to keep his time with the "TD" down to a minimum in order to spend a maximum amount of time on the handball courts. Steve's ex- cellence in academics and athletics along with his winning personality will take him a long way in the Army. , Sergeant 1 ,' Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, Pointer 3, 2, 1 , Fenc- ing Club 3, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Manager 2, President 1. HARRY E. HAGERTY, JR. I-2 Hags Arlington, Virginia The "Hag" survived numerous embarrassing situations throughout his stay at the Academy to become one of the more renowned 1-2 personalities. A formidable foe of the "T.D.", his outstanding exploits went undiscovered. Nevertheless, his presence was felt by all, and his many cohorts wish him well in the future. Sergeant 1, Football 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3, Weight Lift- ing Club 4, 3. HERBERT HOMER HAMEISTER G-1 Pete Kent, Ohio Pete's most outstanding attribute is his intense desire to do whatls right. He admits to no barriers in anything he tries. Pete is good at everything, because he is willing to work. A good student and excellent athlete, Pete exceeded these successes as a leader. He won the respect and admiration of all for his firm tact and positive leadership. Sergeant 1, Football 4, 3, Numerals 4, Basketball 4, Golf 4, 3, Numerals 4, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club , 3, 2, 1, Bridge Club 4. l8l A 15' way ff'fgE'a'f1iSfe1:- .v 1 0 . typ if W , , ,mr EDWARD ALBERT HAMILTON I-2 Ed Charleston, South Carolina Two years of the Air Force and four at West Point haven't daunted Ed's Southern charm and ready smile which have endeared him to the girls and Kaydets alike. Afternoons usually found him down at the track "stepping" over the hurdles. Whatever Ed did, he did it well and seemingly eiortless- a trait which will no doubt carry him far. Sergeant 1 ,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Cross Country 2, Z ,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir li, 3, 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, Shi Club 4, 3. GEORGE WALTER HANDY M-2 Duxbury, Massachusetts George will always be remembered by us as a hard worker who never fails to get a job done. His friendly personality and easy-going manner won him many friends throughout the Corps. George's versatility proved itself on the athletic Held as well as in the classroom. His boundless energy and personal drive will serve him well wherever he goes. Captain 1, Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Monogram 3, 2, 1 ,' Honor Committee 2, 1, Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, French Club 4. 3. 2: Glee Club 1,5 Ski Club 3, 2. PIERCE .IUDE HANLEY A-1 PJ, Roslyn Estates, New York Good-natured and "hivey", Pierce was never too busy to help anyone whether it be in Plebe French or Second Class Solids, though it may have cost him "stars", One of the most versatile athletes in the company, it was not unusual for him to play rugby one day, tennis the next or boxing one day, basketball the next. Excellent in all he did, Pierce is assured of a Very successful career. Lieutenant 1, Baseball 4, 3, Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1, Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Howitzer 1, Bridge Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rugby Club 2. 1. KRAIG ULLMAN HANSEN L-2 K.U. Manhattan, Kansas Having completed a year at Kansas University, learning in that time to recite the Greek Alphabet in three seconds Hat, Kraig was more than ready for most of the erudite aspects of cadet life. His keen grasp of his scholarly pursuits and his outgoing, friendly personality made Kraig a welcome mem- ber of the L-2 fraternity. Lieutenant 1,' Swimming lf, 3, Manager 4, 3,' Track 4, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2,1 ,' Handball Club 3, Pistol Club 3. DONALD WILLIAM HARD F-1 Donnie Bill Plainfield, New Jersey Don's many accomplishments speak for themselves. What other man could cram so much activity into so few waking hours? Aside from his renown as a lover of the "pad", he has gained fame as a wrestler, chess player, and a knowledgeable man of the world. We all agree that when all has been said and done, it will be diliicult to remember a finer friend than Donnie Bill. Sergeant 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, KDET 4,1 ,' HI-FI Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Chess Club Ji, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 3, 2, President 1, Shi Club 3, 2, Bridge Club 4, 3, 2, 1. DAVID VINCENT HARKINS G-2 Dare Winchester, Massachusetts Harky, Boston's version of Rip Van Winkle, never let academics deprive him of the nine hours of nightly sleep he always seemed to need for Lacrosse and Hockey. Dave's quick sense of humor and fierce competitive spirit make him well liked and respected by all who know him. West Point could have been very dull to Dave had it not been for "occasional" hospital appoint- ments to break the monotony of classes. Sergeant 1, Hockey If, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Maple Leaf 3, 2, 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 2, 1, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Catholic Choir 1,5 Newman Forum 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council and Forum 25 French Club 3, 2,' Camera Club 3, Shi Club 3, 2, 1. PIERCE HANLEY 182 ED HAMILTON GEORGE HANDY 'JW 57' M v'-wr, KRAIG HANSEN DONALD HARD DAVE HARRHNS ,I I --P---' ,, ,VLV JIM HARRINGTON HAROLD HARRIS HARRY HARRISON eg, WFMMM-' DICK HARTMAN ROGER HAVERCROFT W in xx 9 X X-. .-. . -. f -+1-sing- A, V iw mf ,xg If -7 lxf I ff F x7 ll' ,lt JAMES STEPHEN HARRINGTON E 2 Jim Sioux City, Iowa For the four years he was a cadet, Jim fooled many classmates and tactical oiiicers. This supposedly quiet cadet never worried about formations or meetings if they interfered with personal plans and he more than oc- casionally strayed from the straight and narrow path. He will long be re- membered for the many hours he spent writing his girl, or eating the "boodle" she sent him. Lieutenant 1g Track 4, Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Newman Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, Pointer 4, 3,' Golf Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3. HAROLD EUGENE HARRIS A-2 El Gallinero Tempe, Arizona From the deserts of Arizona came this friendly fellow whose amiable per- sonality made an immediate good impression which got better with time. Famous for reading a page a day from the Spanish dictionary, he's probably best remembered for his ability to put electronics instructors into orbit. Harry is a man who always kept his sense of humor and no matter how dark the day, was able to bring sunshine into the lives of his friends. Sergeant 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2,' Camera Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, HI-FI Club 3. WILLARD EUGENE HARRISON E-2 Harry Fort Benning, Georgia Harry's quiet and friendly smile has enabled him to surmount all obstacles and be liked by everyone. The "Old Man" always had time to listen and give advice to a friend in need. A true "Buddy", this "Screaming Eagle" with his warm sense of humor and aggressiveness, will be an ofiicer we will always be glad to have on our side. Captain 1,' Pistol 4, Golf 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, President 1 ,' Dialectic Society 3, 2, 1 ,' Golf Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 3, 2,' Parachute Club 4. ALLISON RICHARD HARTMAN M-1 Dick Danville, California Dick's life at West Point was marked by his avid enthusiasm for athletics and his less avid enthusiasm for academics. The "Flash of the Obstacle Course" divided his spare time equally between the Ski and Sailing Clubs, with an occasional moment for the belles of Ladycliffe. His mild manner and congenial personality are sure to win him friendship and respect throughout his career. Sergeant 1 ,' French Club 4, 3, 2,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 25 Ski Club 3. 2. ROGER VENTON HAVERCROFT A-2 Ranger Spokane, Washington Soldier, statesman, and poet, Ranger Roger is a man of high ambition and high morals. He came to us from the 77th Special Forces and served as an inspiration for us all. Roger is a quiet man, yet his presence is always felt. His pride in the Army and his country will make him a definite asset to the service. Sergeant 1,' Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Rifle Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 25 Para- chute Club 4, 3. JAMES JOHN HEIGL, JR. B-2 JJ Buffalo, New York "Mind is the great lever of all things".-Daniel Webster. Although a true intellectual who coached both star men and "goats", JJ 's talents were not reserved solely for the academic departments. Instead, he is remembered as an excellent debater, a fine harrier, a natural "muckoid" and a main cog in nearly every activity on "campus", All this and a "dragoid" too! Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4, 3, 2, Track 4, 3,' Public Relations Council 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1 ,' Catholic Acolyte 2,' 1, Catholic Choir 4, 35 Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Mathematics Forum 3, 15 Debate Council cb Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 15 Special Program 2, 1 ,' KDET 4, 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 2, 1 ,' Scout- masters Council 4, 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JIM HEIGL 185' .-5 A f .31 ' 'i"1mil'l7 3 f. , . fy1v w r ,i I H JAMES RONALD HELDMAN H-Z Crow Eugene, Oregon An easy-going and friendly Oregonian, Jim never let academics or the Sys- tem bother him. His great interest in skiing and the lure of it, led him to the distant slopes of South America and Europe. With his sense of sportsman- ship and fair play, Jim will do well in whatever he attempts. Sergeant 1 ,' Wrestling 4, Track 4, German Club 4, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Sailing Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Patrol 2, 1, Skin Diving Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Team 3, 2, 1, Captain 1. RICHARD ELI HELMUTH, JR. H-2 Dick Carmel, Indiana Dick came to us as the unsung hero of Carmel, Indiana. His time was di- vided between a fight for stars and a nightly letter to his O.A.O., although he always managed to find time for a refreshing battle with his "brown boy". His capacity for detail and his exceptional leadership qualities will be a great asset to the Army. Lieutenant 1 ,' Basketball 4, Assistant Manager 4, Mathematics Forum 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3, Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Hi-Fi Club 2, Handball Club 2, Roc- ket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. LEONARD CHARLES HENDERSON E-2 Len Newburgh, New York Len, a foreign exchange student from Newburgh, New York, is the pride and joy of Orange County. His four years were typified by hard work, both academic and keeping his classmates in "drags" Although quite active and adept in sports, Mr. H usually prefers to work at perfecting his pet project: his snow machine. Success and Len will go hand in hand. Sergeant 1 ,' Baseball 4, Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, 1 , Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1,' Golf Club 1. RONALD ROYCE HENDERSON E-1 Ron St. Clairsville, Ohio Ron was one of the few men in '62 who were able to be referred to as one of the biggest and one of the smartest. Stars adorned the size 17 collar of Ron's dress coat for three years. On the football field, his competitive spirit and good natured attitude made him one of the best liked men in '62. Sergeant 1 ,' Stars 3, 2, Football 4, 3, 2, Monogram 2, Track 4, Mathematics Forum 2, 1, Vice-President 1, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. ED WALTER HENDREN C-1 Corky Arlington, Virginia Gar had more angles than a poolshark. He was the best dressed sprinter we had. In spite of athletics and trips, he still found time to get "sheriif's badges" on his collar. A famed proponent of the Umidperiod theme", he cut the deadline pretty close at times. He also had a compelling desire for grassy spaces late at night. Ed bows out . . . with calluses on his hands, of course. Captain 1, Stars 3, 2, 1, Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, Class Committee, Extra-curricular and Athletic Representative, Chapel Chimer 4, 3, 2, 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Gymnastics Club 3, 2, 1, President 1, Prot. Discussion Group 4, 3, 2, Glee Club 3, 2, 1, Public Rela- tions Representative, Handball Club 3, German Club 3. KARL MARTIN HENN C-1 Karl Washington, D. C. Karl came to West Point already familiar with the life of a Lieutenant, for he had received his commission at O.C.S. in 1956. The call of West Point beckoned, however, and he resigned his commission and faced the challenge of Plebe Year. His love of soccer, pool, and bourbon will be remembered sec- ond only to his leadership qualities. Lieutenant 1,' Pistol 4, Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 1, Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, Russian Club 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 4, 3. 186 JIM HELDMAN DICK HE LMUTH fi 42136-1, ff 3. ., ,. 31144 f ' J f 1 ies 3, . M., gt 4 fffqsfe I.EN HENDERSON '79 1S Aw A-iam , jf, ,wgu 5' I J N.. "' 'HW Q- , ,, N-Qhmw Afi fi- 1 I ','. -.W v M , M ,, ik ' una., N'-.... fa,-A ,M 'NYY' S Mi'7' " MA, ,W -kh' , 5 fffhv, W""N-mm , V,LLu. A M u, .M an ' W xx .qu-099' . adv muff RON HENDERSON ED HENDREN KARL HENN 187 "ir x 5. LP , 2 ,ak TOM HERRE KEN HERRING CHARLIE HERTEL 188 JOHN HICKEY LEWIS HIGINBOTHAM FRED HILLYARD 56 ,E-NI, l XJ '4 X, T .. , ig 2 .gm ' wc: Xi 'aw-g.i'f'.9. H -'wizvi-Y 'f- -, w-Egg., vc I i ,-ff' Jil ,"' N , if FX ,'? ' ll ' . 33's f A Jw, - ' THOMAS ARTHUR HERRE H 1 Tom Fond du Lac, Wisconsin Tom, "The Hair," came to us from the shores of sparkling Lake Winnebago in Wisconsin. Eternally cheerful and friendly, Tom was a man whom people were forced to admire. Although at times close to deficiency, Tom was never bothered by trifles and expended his creative talents composing letters to a certain girl back in Fond du Lac. May our paths cross often. Captain 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1g Newman Forum 1,' Pointer 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 2, 1,' KDET 2, 15 Golf Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2,1. KENNETH DALE HERRING K-2 Ken Meridian, Texas His is a personality few individuals will forget. Ken's sharp mind and com- petitive spirit have earned him the respect of all. He left a pretty Texan back home, but never in spirit, and soon those many miles will be no more. Ken's friendship will be treasured by us all. This man's future is bright and is sure to have in store-success. Sergeant 1, Football 4, Numerals 45 Track 2, 1 ,' Chapel Acolytes 3,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Weight Lifting Club 4, 3, 2, 1. CHARLES HERTEL H-1 Charlie Bryan, Texas Char1ie's desire to give one hundred per cent of himself to anything he at- tempts has made his four years at the Academy most profitable. Never one to be satisfied with anything but his best, Charlie has risen to the top of H-1 society circles and has served well as company "culture" rep during our four years. If desire means success, Charlie's cup will overdow. Sergeant 1 ,' Track 4,' Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 15 Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 2, 1,' Howitzer 4, 2, 1, Associate Editor 1,' Dance Orchestra 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 3, 2. JOHN JAMES HICKEY, JR. H-1 John New Hyde Park, New York West Point was the school John picked from the amazing number of scholar- ships he won. While here he proved that he could excel in many fields of en- deavor. Weekends spent away from the grey walls were the principal endeavors resulting from his prowess in the Glee Club. John did well with "P.D.A." while here-never caught once. Without doubt John's life will be filled with success. Sergeant 1 ,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1g Radio Club 45 German Club 2,' Pointer 4,' Dialectic Society 4,' Glee Club 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 35 Sailing Club 3,' Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. LEWIS HIGINBOTHAM E-1 Lewis Amarillo, Texas We have never been certain whether Leroy is an American citizen or a foregn cadet from Venezuela. Lewis spends much of his time thinking of his second home south of the border, and speaks better Spanish than Eng- lish. Despite this affinity to our South American neighbors, he will always be a dedicated American and will serve his country well as an officer. No task will ever be too great for this soldier. Sergeant 1,' Gymnastics 4, Numerals 4g Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Sun- day School Teacher 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Parachute Club 2, 1 ,' Skin Diving Club 1. FREDERICK JAMES HILLYARD Y G-1 Fred Falls City, Nebraska Fred was never one to worry about the small stuff, academics and demerits included. He proved to be a real tiger on the athletic field and a regular on the Area. With his un-bounded spirit and ever present smile, he Will always be remembered as a friend. Following in his father's footsteps, the Infantry Will do well to open ranks in welcome to Fred. Sergeant 1 ,' Rifle 4, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2,' Pointer 4, 3, Dialectic Society 3, 2',' Camera Club 4, 3, 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, Sailing Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2. l89 QQ N-mi ssrig. l"1,..aQ., fa-"3-fi ' i lllllllwll ROGER THOMAS HILTON I-1 R09 Marion, Iowa Rog will probably be remembered for his uniquely organized disorganiza- tion and his taking more than four person's share of Hboondogglin' " trips. His main interests include music and politics, which explains his high stand- ing in Social Sciences. It wasn't until "cow" year that Rog made up his mind to be a 30 year man, but with his likable ,personality and good spirits, he should go a long way. Sergeant 1,' Howitzer 1,' Pointer 2, 1, Associate Editor 1 ,' Dance Orchestra 4, 1, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Glee Club 3, 2, 1, Chess Club 3, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1,' Skeet Club 3, 1,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 3,' Bridge Club 2, 1. CORNELIUS COLE HOLCOMB, JR. A-2 Skip Seattle, Washington Skip came to the Point from an Army family after serving a year as a Pri- vate in the 3rd Infantry Diviscion and USMA Prep. .After "Beast" he hit a stone wall-the German Department, but finally managed to get his second stripe. He says he has only one ambition and that is to be half as good an oflicer as his "Old-Man". Sergeant 1, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3,' Rifle Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Parachute Club 3. STEPHEN WALSH HOLDERNESS, JR. I-1 Steve Tucson, Arizona Steve came to West Point with an educational background covering two schools-University of Maryland and Braden's. He established a reputation for individualism as evidenced by his frequent unique solutions Within the academic departments. His numerous fiexible philosophies, his sly humor, and his constant academic endeavors all contributed to a successful and re- warding four years at the Academy. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4,' Debate Council di Forum 4,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Howitzer 4, 3, Pointer 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, Sailing Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ROBERT EARL HOLEMAN L-2 Earl Paducah, Kentucky The Earl of Paducah came to West Point ready to become another Kentucky Colonel. Much of the strategy employed in this operation was mapped out by him on the chess board and card table. Enough time was saved for the books to keep him high in his class. Always game for most anything, Bob helped many an evening study period slip by more pleasantly for his class- mates. Sergeant 1,' Mathematics Forum 1,' Spanish Club 3, Chess Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Golf Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 1. WILLIAM ARTHUR HOOS G-1 Bill East Chicago, Indiana Daddy took Plebe Year seriously. We saw him smile three times. We dis- covered after Buckner that he wasn't really grouchy, he was just more mature than the rest of us. But maturity wasn't Bill's only leadership trait, he was capable and hard-working. He never gave up until he had Won. Our nasty old man will do well when he is back in the Army. Captain 1,' Ordnance Club 4,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2,' German Club 4, 3, 2,' Pointer 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. PETER PAUL HOROSCHAK L-2 P.P. Denver, Colorado Coming from the West and descending in a direct line from the Great Rus- sian Cossacks, Pete divided his years at West Point between praising the cavalry and making disparaging remarks concerning the academic depart- ments. Pete's motto-always leave 'em laughing. Sergeant 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. STEVE HOLDERNESS l9O nu' EARL HOLEMAN BILL HOOS ---..f" Sq X, u' , ik PETE HOROSCHAK .,.--v'- ' -Af 5-in yr' ai Wm W., V-iiln""mv , 53 Vx ,"' ""E?E' gL'7'mQ 191 , 7 :V 'Vi' Mi , k "7 5 if-575531 44 41,4 FRANK HORTON MACK HOWARD SETH HUDAK PAT HUEMAN BOB HUFSCHMID 5 C74 fxf 5-LQ U f , . Q K9Efi,i.,we-2 Q1 s frrfx f .vip-gs 1, al . la' xii u ..- wi .5 , V, rr if A FRANK BARRETT HORTON, III G-2 H005 Owl Houston, Texas Barry Hoot Owl Horton came to West Point with high goals for himself and achieved them. Academic stars were a breeze for Barry but few will forget this remarkable young man's drive for physical fitness and intellectual ac- complishment. Barry will make a prominent mark in the world with his rare combination of a keen mind and a Winsome manner. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1,' Pistol 3,' Gymnastics 2,' Mathematics Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1,' Handball Club 3, 2,' Pistol Club 3, 2, 1,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Engineer Football Team 2, Manager 2. MALCOLM JONES HOWARD M-2 Mack Deep Run, North Carolina "A tenth pro is a tenth wasted". This about sums up Mack's academic career at the Rock. Although the German and Social Science Departments threat- ened, Mack somehow came out on the long end. When not enjoying the caresses of the ever faithful "Brown Boy", Mack could inevitably be found excelling in the true deep run fashion on the business end of a midfield stick. Mack's personality coupled with his unquestioned dependability when a classmate needed a helping hand, mean nothing but a bright future and colorful career for one who well-deserves it. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Monogram 2, Public Information Detail 3,' Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3, 2, German Club 4, 3,' Camera Club 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 25 Sailing Club 4, 35 Ski Club 3, 2. SETH JOHN HUDAK B-1 Cathy's Clown Coventry, Connecticut From the "prayer meetings" to frequent "hill climbing", from studies to that all important nightly writing of a letter to Cath, Seth was always quick with a greeting and a smile. The "TD" won some encounters with him as his worn-out shoes proved 3 but the "whoders" won some battles about which few will ever learn. The graduation "Peace Treaty" shows that he won the war. Sergeant 1,' Cheerleader 1, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1,' Chapel Acolytes 2, 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Protes- tant Discussion Group 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Exchange Editor 1 ,' Dialectic Society 4, Glee Club 4, Model Airplane Club 3,' Model Railroad Club 3, Golf Club 2, 1g Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. THOMAS PATRICK HUEMAN I-1 Pat Nehalem, Oregon Pat, whose personal "tangency" was 2.7, proved that the academic depart- ments can be beaten. This oresotian found time to challenge every activity including, but not limited to, wine, women, and "weekends", With ready wit, he pushed many through by coaching and humor. This wolf shed his "wool" for "castles", which is symbolic. Many may go down, but T.P. should reach the top. Lieutenant 15 Stars 3, 2,' Class Committee 3, 2, 1 ,' Catholic Acolytes 35 De- bate Council fi: Forum 4, 3,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 2, 1, Property Officer 15 Art Club 2, 1, Secretary 1, Pistol Club 3,' Ski Club 2, 1,' Rocket Society 1. ROBERT GEORGE HUFSCHMID D-1 Huff Hewlett, New York Bob came, saw and conquered, breezing through academics with the mini- mum input for the maximum output: in fact, the stars showered down on him. His two loves are the "pad" and "dragging", in that order. From his past record, the future looks bright, but as Bob might say, "It's all relative l" Lieutenant 1 ,' Stars 3, 2, 1 g Newman Forum 3,' English Literature Seminar 2,' Debate Council QQ Forum 3, 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, Handball Club 3, 2,' Engineer Football Team. WILLIAM MCCAW HUGHES, JR. K-1 Bill Georgiana, Alabama Bill had an insatiable curiosity about cadet life. This curiosity was recog- nized by the proper authorities. The Academic departments placed him in many accelerated coursesg while the Tactical Department gave him special recognition for his after taps endeavors. When he was not debating or speaking German, Bill would be found next to his chess board. He should discover a success wherever he turns. Sergeant 1 ,- Chapel Acolytes 4,' English Literature Seminar 1 ,' Radio Club 4,' Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 German Club 4, 3,' Chess Club 1. BILL HUGHES l93 A I X x-1 'a Ps -,.' if I X115 lnlllwi I NICHOLAS RICHARD HURST D-1 - Nick Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Nick arrived from M.I.T. to battle the uniform flag and the French Depart- ment. His abilities in the sciences made his room the "Ultimate Source of All Knowledge", and never have so few tenths been surrendered so grudgingly. Many laughs and a well worn "brown boy" will be left to West Point when Nick moves on to begin his successful Army career. Sergeant 1,' Squash 4, Numerals 4,' Tennis 4,' Honor Committee 2, 1 ,' Mathematics Forum 3,' Ordnance Club 35 Debate Council 62 Forum 4, Rocket Society 3, 2, 1, President 1. CLINTON O'NEIL HYDE E-1 Neil Evergreen, Alabama Neil came to us by way of the Airborne Infantry. Slow to excite about ordinary things, he is a friend and soldier, on whom we will be proud to depend, when the chips are down. CProvided he isn't fighting one certain blonde or any "brown boyb A good man for any job, Neil will be a fine officer. Lieutenant 1,' French Club 4 3, 2, Howitzer 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Adver- tising Managerg Pistol Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, Parachute Club 4, 3. RICHARD WILLIAM IRWIN L-1 DiClG , Lutherville, Maryland Maryland's contribution to the "Long Grey Line" came to West Point after one year at Georgia Tech. A lover of all sports, Dick lost no time in dis- tinguishing himself by Winning his numerals and Major A in soccer. His winning personality made it easier for him to make many close friends. Lieutenant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 2,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 2, 1,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1,' KDET 4,' Handball Club 3, 2, 15 Pistol Club 3,' Skeet Club 2, 1, Ski Club 4, Rocket Society 1. KENNETH V. ISHOY D-1 Ish San Francisco, California This Army Brat, born in San Francisco, attended nine schools in complet- ing his primary and secondary education from coast to coast, and around the world. Ken has always been mathematically inclined and hopes to return to his "dear old alma mater" to be an instructor in the solid half of the mechanic's department. Sergeant 1g Lacrosse 4,' German Club 4, 3,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, Hi-Fi Club 35 Handball Club 3,' Pistol Club 4,' Skeet Club 4,' Ski Club 3, 2. CHARLES HENRY IVY L-1 Chuck Clarksdale, Mississippi Straight from the Mississippi cotton land, Chuck came to our Urockbound highland home" with a deep southern drawl and a sharp eye for both Yankee and rebel women. With his quick wit and desire to help anyone who needed his assistance, he has made many friendships that all who know him will never forget. Lieutenant 1,' Debate Council db Forum 4, 3, 2,' Portugese Club 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 1,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 1,' Rocket Society 1. RICHARD ALLEN JAMES A-2 Dick Fort Dodge, Iowa To Jaime life is "interesting" From sailing on the Hudson to getting ready for the Saturday Inspections, there is something of interest. Never one to be worried by academics, nor awed by "hives", he took each days classes with a smile and a shrug. When Dick walks off the platform with his diploma, we will know that sometimes the good guys do win. Sergeant 1, Squash 4g Debate Council db Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Golf Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 3,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Sailing Team 3, 2, 1. l94 NICK HURST NEIL HYDE DICK IRWIN 1 x""w 's"f""'i. LL ,.. N EE EE 'VB QL I gawk -4 4. ,, 5 2 Q 1, xx fk Ek , . ,, 4 Ax W with Q, .lf A -'V' 3 Z' iv' if ' rf m J' - 1. fr, i .E ' xi.,- N 'iid -4-4l""" KEN ISHOY CHARLES IVY DICK JAMES ,Mr .wax V' QQMM J WMM ff' Q., " K P' "WW JERRY JANICKE CAL JOHNSON JOE JOHNSON 196 idk? MARSHALL JOHNSON .l as i. f' "1 ERIK JOHNSSON DAVE JONES S F- Z? f x X1 1 1 3352's -we , er :rr fx -INST-Es' u D e 4 at ffS1vi,.f JEROME THOMAS JANICKE K 2 Jerry Minneapolis, Minnesota Jerry is from Minneapolis, and the midwest is the greatest to hear him tell it. Blessed with an unending store of sports knowledge, and a little spec in French, his pleasing personality helped four years pass quickly. His hard work and deep devotion have impressed us all, and the men of K-2 will long remember him. Sergeant 1,' Hockey 4,' Catholic Acolytes 1 ,' Newman Forum 3, 1 ,' Dialectic Society 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rugby Club 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4. CAL DUANE JOHNSON L-2 Ingemar Barksdale, Wisconsin Always high on the Dean's List, Cal was never too busy to lay aside his pocket novel to help some poor "goat" foil the academic demon. Whether Shell Scott, Marx, or the Mechanics of Solids, there was no plot to baffle him. A true no-sweat member of L-2, he just lay back and enjoyed every good deal that came his way. Sergeant 1,' Mathematics Forum 2, 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, lg Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. JOE SLADE JOHNSON, JR. M-2 Cracker Talbotton, Georgia Slade came to West Point with great tales of his native state of Georgia. His deep voice and Southern drawl made him the best "rebel" in M-2. His sense of humor and carefree attitude made him popular with those around. Slade will be welcomed by the Army. Sergeant 1, Cross Country 4,' French Club 3, 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rifle Club 4, 3,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rugby Club 2, 1. MARSHALL BUHL JOHNSON D-2 Bear Coeur d'Alene, Idaho A center of attraction at all D-2 parties was the Bear who led the company in ambition, but not always in capacity. A confirmed airborne-ranger Infantry file, he threw away his "brown boy" after Hyearling year" and made the gym his second home. His sincere interest in his career and his high personal standards mark him as a future leader in the Queen of Battle. Sergeant 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Astronomy Club 3,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Dialectic Society 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 2, 1. ERIK GEORGE JOHNSSON G-1 Erik Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania Erik had one ideal: to do the best job possible. He tackled everything with the same determination that put him in many first sections. Erik worked just as hard at athletics, with the same success. He led by example, not by word. Busy as he was, Erik made many friends, because he was always cheerful. Lieutenant 1,' Soccer 4, Numerals 4,' Baseball 4, Numerals 4, Football 2,' German Club 4, 3,' Pointer 3,' Glee Club 3, 2,' Chess Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' Bridge Club 4. DAVID MERLE JONES I-1 Dave Ravenna, Ohio Dave has been like the proverbial "dynamite wrapped in a small package." He has always been ready to accomplish any task presented to him. With this ability, he has fared well with academics and the UTD". With his abilities far from being spent here, his future career will be filled with much success. Sergeant 1, Debate Council di Forum'4, 3, 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,- Dialectic Society 4, 3, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 1. 197 arty 'G5fb.f"N1L"-.'l E.51g ,.5 A 1,' 'T 912-1 fl!! .v gE.1- ' QL-E . wlllg, ig: i WI: A . llil ' JOHN WADE JONES, JR. H-2 Sonny Waynesboro, Virginia When Grasshopper wasn't bouncing gaily around the campus, he was bouncing for records in Track or Cross Country. Though the Roadrunner went from "hive" to 'igoat" after Plebe Year, he never permitted even his class shoes to lapse below a flawless base. His capacity for work and his realistic front-line sound effects should be an asset to any Artillery unit. Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1, Nurnerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1,' Public Relations Council 2, 1, Secretary 1. PAUL M. JONES F-2 Mike Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Mike fell right into the Long Gray Line after five long years of "tin school." His smiling face and agreeable personality were always present to boost the morale of his classmates. Whether it was on the wrestling mats or just listening to our problems, Mike always did his best. The Army is, indeed, gaining a fine man and friend in Paul M. Jones. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Nuinerals 4, Monograrn 3,' Howitzer 3,' Glee Club 3, 2. ROBERT WRAY JORDAN I-2 Bob Point Pleasant, West Virginia The West Virginia hills generously donated Bob to the world. His four years of apprenticeship have been marked by several pitched battles with various academic departments, but he has always emerged triumphant, though slightly the worse for wear. All of his classmates expect great things of this budding young administrator. Sergeant 1,' Pointer 4,' Model Airplane Club 2. MATHEW RONALD KAMBROD A-2 Matt Belleview, Florida From the Regular Army, Matt came to us with the natural qualifications of an excellent soldier. Many nights at extra instruction and his constant battle with the academic departments put a damper on his soccer and track abilities. Matt will always be remembered for his perseverance and easy- to-like personality. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2,' Debate Council Je Forurn 3, 2,' Russian Club 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 3, 2,' Skeet Club 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ERVIN FRANK KAMM, JR. A-2 Erv Ashland, Wisconsin A friend to all and well liked by everyone, Erv came to us from the shores of Lake Superior and spent his time doing almost everything worthwhile and doing his best of everything he did. Always admired for his friendly smile and his high morals and ideals, Erv made his influence felt by every- one with whom he came in contact. His future will be a great contribution to the service of his God and his Country. Captain 1,' 150 Lb Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Nuinerals 4, Monogram 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2,' Class Conirnittee 3, 2,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2,' Debate Council 0? Forurn 2,' Camera Club 2,' Ski Club 3, 2. DONALD KARRER D-1 D071 St. Petersburg, Florida The hectic existence of a cadet never seemed to have bothered this Army Brat. He easily kept ahead of both the Tactical and the Academic Depart- ments during his four years here. His quiet manner and conscientious Ways have made him enjoyable company and will stand him in good stead in any future endeavor. Sergeant 1 ,' English Literature Seminar 3,' French Club 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. BOB JORDAN 198 JOHN JONES PAUL JONES h1' mffe Jil' .null MATT KAMBROD ERV KAMM DON KARRER A-1 ,w,d.,,,,p.-nv- 5 ,,.,"'mv-""' A- ,,M,..,wlwd!fQm ff QL , Q sw, 'L 5-'fwv' N 1. fe. ., . . gm.-4,-'W"" ui , . K " L 199 ,aludlllv DON KAUER JIM KAYS JOHN KELLY ZOO ' '- N252 sw S is-K, -Q4 A '-,-r:'.- it f 14341:-gifs 5 V--'44 ' A fr l 1 DONALD FRED KAUER H-2 Don Corry, Pennsylvania Don came to the Point from the land of coal fields and football players. There was never a dull moment around him, and his genuinely friendly attitude made him many friends throughout the Corps. Although never a "hive", The Animal had time for dismantling opponents on the football field, and, even on occasion, a stalk of bananas. We are sure he will find success and many friends on the road ahead. Sergeant 15 Football 4, 3, 2, Monogram 25 Radio Club 35 Hi-Fi Club 25 Sailing Club 45 Rocket Society 4. JAMES LEE KAYS L-1 Jim Rogers, Arkansas Jim, a good rebel, hails from Arkansas. He has always been tops in every- thing he has done and he has been more than willing to help others with their problems. He has been a pillar upon which we have been able to lean. Indeed, we are all expecting great things of Jim. Captain 15 Stars 3, 25 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 25 De- bate Council :Q Forum 45 French Club 3, 25 Outdoor Sports Club 25 Handball Club 3, 25 Skeet Club 2. JOHN JOSEPH KELLY E-2 J.J. Rockaway, New Jersey The Rockaway Rock, J.J., is our idea of what the West Point cadet should be: Academics were never a bother, the Tactical Department never slowed him down, the girls always flocked at his feet. Voted Most Wanted Room- mate, he was a real leader of '62 in Old E-2. The grey walls will long echo with the applause given in recognition of what he accomplished during his four short years. Sergeant 1 5 Wrestling 45 Football 3, 2, 15 Class Committee 3, 2, 15 Catholic Acolgtes 2, 15 Newman Forum 3, 2, 15 Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 35 Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 15 Golf Club 2, 15 Pistol Club 4, 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Bridge Club 2, 1. PATRICK OSETH KELLY F-2 Rick Bismarck, North Dakota Arriving from sunny Hawaii, Rick brought to West Point a genial smile, a ready wit and his beloved ukulele. His jousts with the Academic Depart- ment were many and although he -lost some minor skirmishes, he never suffered a major defeat. When not wrapped in his "brown boy", he could always be found in a jam session somewhere. No doubt the Infantry is going to get a good man and fine soldier. Sergeant 15 Swimming 45 Gymnastics 4, 35 Soccer 25 English Literature Seminar 35 Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 German Club 4, 35 Howiizer 45 Golf Club 2, 15 Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Pistol Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN FREDERICK KENDALL C-1 John Nappanee, Indiana J.F.K.'s aggressive, driving and inquisitive spirit, coupled with his ever-present sense of humor will surely lead him to success in his infantry career, and throughout life. Everyone in the company has benefitted from this Hoosier's friendship. C-1's intermural teams will wait a long time for another Cold Steel Cobra, and East Barracks will echo, "Got a cigarette, John?" for years. Sergeant 1. RICHARD STEVEN KENT C-1 Sleez Brooklyn, New York The operator of "Radio Free Sleez", constantly aspired to remain that one golden step ahead of the Tactical Department. Each semester's end found him utilizing his unfathomable reserves of mental and physical stamina for an extension of his scholarship. Forever loyal to his homeland, he will be remembered for his eloquent words, "There are so farms in Brooklyn". Sergeant 15 Jewish Choir 4, 3, 2, 15 Radio Club 4, 3, 2, 15 German Club 4, 3, 1 5 KDET 45 Pistol Club 2,1. RICHARD KENT 201 'QQ mf UXWWQWGB-9 , a 5 - CHRISTOPHER HENDRIK KEUKER G-2 Chris Buffalo, New York Keuky was always a few steps from stars and a few less from the "brown boy". Chrislhad two loves as a cadet: coffee and school teachers. His week- ends, 'especially early Sunday mornings, were spent indulging in both. He will never be forgotten for his ,big feet, bigger smile and excellent coffee. No stars, no car. Sergeant 1, Rifle.4, Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Cadet in Charge, Sports 1, Mathematics Forum 2, 1, Debate Council di: Forum 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, Camera Club 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 3, 1, Hi-Fi Club 3, 1, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOSEPH SPANGLER KIEFFER, III B-1 J- Hagerstown, Maryland J. has the distinction of coming from the nation's number one depressed area, Hagerstown, Maryland. This is not his only claim to fame. He is well known for his wrestling ability, after taps, and otherwise. This favorite pastime has won him many friends, and equal number of bruises. There's a great future ahead for the Maryland Mauler. Sergeant 1, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, Handball Club 3, 2, Sailing Club 3, Skeet Club 3, Ski Club 3, 2, 1. THOMAS J. KILMARTIN, III D-1 Tom Graterford, Pennsylvania Sincerity and friendliness were two characteristics which held Tom in firm stead. Throughout his cadet years, his sports car enthusiasm, longing for weekends and avoiding comments about his eyes, kept him smiling. At times, when the going gets rough, Tom could always be counted on to get the job done with spirit and enthusiasm. Tom will set a high ideal for all to follow. Sergeant 1, Debate Council di: Forum 4, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pointer 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1, Hi-Fi Club 4, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary and Supply O-HTLCGT 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. JAMES VERLIN KIMSEY M-2 Jim Arlington, Virginia "Lightbulb", as Jim is affectionately known by his friends, was never without interests. Although the fairer sex was J im's main accomplishment, during weekends he could be found participating with either of two extracurricular activities: the Weapons Room, or the "Brown Boy" squad. Jim was always the one to bring a bit of humor into the dreariest of days. His easy and friendly manner will asuure him of a successful career in the Army. Sergeant 1 ,' 150 Lb Football 4, B-Squad Football 3, Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, English Literature Seminar 3, 2, Debate Council JZ Forum 4, 3, 2, Spanish Club 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, Fencing Club 3, Recorder 3. WILLIAM HENRY KINARD I-1 Bill Arlington, Virginia As an Army Brat Bill has dedicated himself to the Service, even West Point. In all his endeavors he has Worked hard, like studying after taps in order to save "CQ" for music and talk. But his real interests were his many extracurricular activities, especially the social ones. He always managed to have a "drag", but he has also managed to maintain identity and his original box of letter paper. He enjoys the Army, and the Army will enjoy him. Sergeant 1, Debate Council di Forum 4, French Club 3, 2, 1, Bugle Notes 4, 3, 2, 1, Editor 1,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 3, 2, 1,' Art Club 2, 1, Sheet Club 4, Parachute Club 2, 1. JOHN HENRY KING C-2 John Millburn, New Jersey During his four years, John shot himself to fame as one of the top men on the rifle team. His quiet manner would deceive most people, but he expressed himself on the team, winning numerous awards in the process. He will be remembered as the quiet, somewhat reserved, individual whose sincerity complemented his personality. Sergeant 1, Rifle 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Golf Club 2, 1,' Rifte Club 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1. 202 CHRIS KEUKER JOE KIEFFER TOM KILMARTIN .-"EI 4 xr. afiwiif INN JIM KIMSEY BILL KINARD JOHN KING 203 ,f-f-"'-- 1 - ,.... , ,Eg-,::5.,,.::-,peek-:-,al-H, , ,Mb ., A , ,, , . ' esffv'-::5', . , F 5 ' .'5?Zf'f:f":E'S1:k ' ,J .:' ' -,135 . ' 'P 1. , K 4 ' M 52 1-252'-,' -33 3,3519 in , V,-J Q fa,,. H . ' , .Qs f i H ' gvims'-:mfs'ikwwmvfmgsfggggk an 5. ' Mi ,lf ,Q ' , 555 ,A ' -' J X yu I ,. Ml, .ff I f .f"! LX., ..-sw-N0-"""V W f"":':v , V ' X- -K 1.1 I kg s . ' -ff! .-.Av 4 bk I .. ., ,A .1 A," , m ,arf . fn PETE KING JOHN KIRBY PAUL KIRKEGAARD 204 41 'Q A.W,A, , GEORGE KIRSCHENBAUER TOM KLING ROY KOBAYASHI ff 5 iff, fs? A 1 X J B- f f s 5" A A k X- 95.,l.Nff5 E A, ,.,i.f, , .w Vkir 4: I A V'-nz-me-Q 1 r, Y ' '- If ,ax ' J E P F ,Q PETER GUILD KING A-2 P6156 f I' Plainfield, New Jersey Although' known best for his accomplishments in football and track, Pete set it as his goal to prove that 2nd Class academics are not really too hard. There was always time for a little action around the card table or that extra 15 minutes of sleep. This combined with a touch of Western music made for a comfortable four years. Sergeant 1 ,' Football 4, 3, 2,1,Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2, Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2, Spanish Club 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 1, Hi-Fi Club 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 1. JOHN JOSEPH KIRBY I-1 J .J . Norwich, New York J. J. has one of the most radiant personalities in the Corps. A man of action, he could almost always be found participating in some worthwhile activity. His woodworking ability was surpassed by few. John's uncanny supply of practical knowledge will carry him as far in the service as he wants to go. Sergeant 1, Lacrosse 4, Catholic Acolytes 2, 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Newman Forum 1, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, KDET 4, Camera Club 1, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Hi-Fi Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 3, Skeet Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 2, 1 ,' SCUSA XII, XIII. PAUL JAMES KIRKEGAARD F-2 Kirk Graettinger, Iowa An all-around athlete in his pre-Academy days in Iowa, Kirk has been a mainstay on the Army Soccer Team. His talents at trumpet, singing and writing have not gone unnoticed either. A fiery competitor and a level- headed leader, Paul has made his mark as one of the outstanding members of his class. Infantry, here he comes! Captain 1 , Soccer 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, Spanish Club 4, 3, Handball Club 4, 3. GEORGE W. KIRSCHENBAUER D-2 Kirsch Allendale, New Jersey Kirsch, good natured and always ready to lend a hand. One of the big men on the campus. Always dragged pro-even down at Navy. George will always be remembered for his reserved manner, especially in those numerous water fights. Held in high respect by everyone, Kirsch, with his drive and competitive spirit, will always be on top. Captain 1, Football 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Baseball 4, Class Committee 3, 2, 1. THOMAS ROBERT KLING G-2 Tom Erie, Pennsylvania Transferring from Penn State, the boy from the "Big E" started at the top by inviting the OC to an after-taps party Plebe Christmas and a few days later, he visited the Commandant. Remaining "alooft" he viewed Copenhagen and London from a window pane while passing out "A" pins. His ability to organize "moose trips" obtained him the presidency of the Outdoor Sports Club. A good man who is going far. Captain 1, Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 2, President 1, Sailing Club 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ROY SHIGERU KOBAYASHI D-1 Pineapple Honolulu, Hawaii Roy may not have been able as a plebe to celebrate the proud day that Hawaii became a state, but certainly Hawaii can be proud of Roy the day he graduates. His many extra-curricular activities were outstanding. For these and other reasons as well, weekends would find Roy in New York City. His sincerity and devotion will win him great respect from all in the Army, too. Sergeant 1, English Literature Seminar 3, 2, Mathematics Forum 2, Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 4, 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, Dialectic Society 4, 3, Glee Club 4. 205 f VZ'-f5Ii'2' QT C50 'Drew 4-"3-9 'avg uv 'T' gziilfiiilnnlllii RUDOLPH WILHELM KOHLER E-1 Rudi! . Bronxville, New York Rudy, finding himself in the Army's care after some distant association with naval training, has met the Academy's challenge with his typical, prone to conquer, prussian approach. He has done well at the Academy in all respects and will be a valuable asset in the service of his country. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 2,' Track 4, 3, 2,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 35 German Club 4, 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 3,' Sailing Club 3,' Ski Club 3, 2. WILLIAM G. KOSCO G-2 Wild Bill St. Mary's, Pennsylvania With his smile and easy way undimmed by the grey walls, Bill is just beginning a successful career. Even with many of his talents untapped, hidden beneath the "brown boy", Bill still managed to burn up the academic departments, not to mention the "fields of friendly strife". His ingredients assure him an inevitable success. Sergeant 1 ,' Cross Country 4, 3, Numerals 4, Track 4, Numerals 4,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1,' Newman Forum 3, 2,' Triathlon Club 3, 2, Camera Club 3, 2,' Pistol Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. STEPHEN JAY KOTT K-2 Twink Greenville, South Carolina In 1958, a hard-punching South Carolinian came to West Point from Staun- ton Military Academy in Virginia. Steve, better known as Twinkle Toes, has had a iine record here as a cadet. He excelled in most phases of cadet life, being brigade boxing champion for his weight, a good student and a well-liked personality. He was also well known on the 150 lb. Football Team. Such traits as friendliness and willingness to work hard will carry him far in the service. Sergeant 1, 150 Lb. Football 3, 2, Major A 3, 2,' Russian Club 4, 3, 25 Pointer 4. JAMES EDSON KRAUSE G-1 Cactus Phoenix, Arizona Arizona's gift to West Point seldom got off the D list or quit smiling. Although it took him three years to make his first tour of the Area, his spirits and faith in regulations were never dampened. We are all sure that he will, as he always has. "give it his best", and as an Infantry ofiicer from the first day, be a fine addition to the Army. Sergeant 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3. ROBERT GUSTAV KRAUSE A-1 Gus Pasadena, California Pasadena's pride came to West Point after a year of college, and took the change to cadet life in stride. Being constantly on the Dean's List did not hamper Bob from devoting two years to the Army baseball team. His win- ning ways and outstanding ability to work with others insure his success no matter what the future has in store. Captain 1,' Lacrosse 4,' Baseball 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 35 French Club 4, 3,' Camera Club 4, 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 4,' Golf Club 2, 1,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4. MELVIN ERNEST KRIESEL F-1 Buzz Stillwater, Minnesota With a loud laugh and some Minnesota cordiality for all, Buzz was known throughout the Corps for his humor and his wrestling. He educated him- self, in spite of the clutching Academic Department, while reading the classics and resting up for "turnouts". His easy going manner and vigor- ous personality guarantee him acclaim for his every act. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4 ,3, 2, 1,' Newman Forum 2, 1,' English Literature Seminar 2, 1,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 1,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Chess Club 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Bridge Club 1. STEVE KOTT 206 RUDY KOHLER .v Q X BILL KOSCO JU! i I 3 " 35? gi ' 'JN--. Qual JAMES KRAUSE GUS KRAUSE MELVIN KRIESEL 207 "' ED KRUKOWSKI FRANK KRZYZKOWSKI DALE KUHNS 208 FRED LaROQUE DON LAIR if iss rep ci ,, zu x xG'? - . C-712 CQ :L l "six" li 1 lug xr, 4? Q ,5 fx "l iliac X -K .10 EDWARD EUGENE KRUKOWSKI M 2 Kruk Syracuse, New York Kruk-always a smile for anyone at any time. Nothing ever seemed to get Kruk down, although the Academic Departments tried. His spirit was exemplified by his determination and effort on the "intermurder" fields. The military service will benefit by his winning personality and eagerness to help others. Lieutenant 1,' Chapel Aeolytes 1,' Catholic Choir 45 Newman Forum 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 1. FRANK MARTIN KRZYZKOWSKI F-1 Kris South Amboy, New Jersey Kris arrived at West Point from New Jersey with a ready smile and the ability to get along with everyone. When he couldn't be found on the soccer field, "dragging," or in his "brown boy," he could be found studying and Kris excelled in all four endeavors. We all know that nothing but success can come to a man with Frank's hard working devotion. Sergeant 1, Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 2,' Swimming 4,- Catholic Acolgtes 4, 3, 2, 1,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Newman Forum 2, 1 ,' English Literature Seminar 3,' Spanish Club 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 1,' Hi-Fi Club 3, 2,' Chess Club 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary-Treasurer 1,' Ski Patrol 2, 1. DALE H. KUHNS H-2 Ox Clearfield, Pennsylvania Popular among the cadets and oflicers of West Point, Ox was most noted for his athletic prowess. Although constantly hard at work, Dale always found time to relax and offer a helping hand to others. The possessor of unbounded energy, his aggressive and undaunted attitude will carry Dale far as he moves out and joines the Long Grey Line. Sergeant 1g Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Wrestling 3, 2, 1, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2,' Radio Club 4, 3, 2,' Glee Club 4, Skin Diving Club 3, 2. FRED R. LaROQUE I-2 Fred Kalispell, Montana Fred came from the mountains of Montana to run for the track team of West Point. A hard worker and diligent sportsman, Fred was always doing his best. Although the winning of the West had a special meaning for Fred, he took it with a smile and retreated to the "brown boy." His amiable manner will always win him friends wherever he goes. Sergeant 1 ,' Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 1,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 1,' Catholic Choir 4,' French Club 4, 3,' Fencing Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3. 2. DON LEE LAIR F-1 Buck Plano, Texas Buck, the conservative of F-1, has never been known to concede a point to anyone. Famous for his Texas "Aggie" outlook on life, he has been a success at the Academy. With no academic problems, he was able to help many of his classmates through difficult times. His personality and quick wit will assure him a successful future. Sergeant 1 ,' Ring 62 Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' English Literature Seminar 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, Glee Club 4,' Camera Club KXQ 2, 1 ,' HI-FI Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN RYAN LANDRY .G-2 John Miami, Florida John came to West Point as a "hive" and he leaves as a "hive". Since he has been here, he has acquired an admiration for members of the Salvation Army. His good nature and friendliness helped him to become one of West Point's representatives to the Peace Corps. His stories and actions will always be a source of good memories for '62. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2g 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 1,' Track 4,' Catholic Choir 4,' Newman Forum 3, 2,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2,' Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 4, 3, 2,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2,' Pointer 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. JOHN LANDRY 209 ii? may I. lllllll, ....,.1g1111 lllI1llllllIll RONALD LEWIS LANE I-1 Ronnie Memphis, Tennessee With a guitar and a paint brush, came Ronnie from Tennessee to enrich our stay here. His easy going manner and good nature are indications of his friendly personality. Ronnie's destined for success wherever he may go. Sergeant 1, Rifle 4, Wrestling 3, 2, 1 , Chapel Acolytes 2, 1 , Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1, Primary Superintendent 1 , French Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2,' KDET 4, 3, Camera Club 2, 1, Art Club 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1, Skeet Club 4, 3, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. JERRY VERNON LAPE D-1 The Lump ' Monroeville, Pennsylvania During his four years at West Point, The Lump found time for letter writing, picture taking, his interests in hunting and fishing and even a little study. One of the two per cent, he will leave his "brown boy" behind, and return to the proverbial girl back home. Years will pass, but memories of the fat man will never die. Sergeant 1, Rifle 4, Numerals 4, Camera Club 4, 3, Rifle Club 4, Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1 , Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 , Rocket Society 2, 1. ARNOLD LEO LARSEN, JR. D-1 Larry Peconic, New York When Larry was not roaming around the country on a debate trip he could be found in one of two places-on Flirtation Walk, catching up on his nature studies, or in the "pad" recuperating from hard weekends. Larry's outstanding quality, his ability to get along well with others, will stand him in good stead throughout his career as an infantry officer. Sergeant 1, Soccer 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, English Literature Seminar 3, 2, Debate Council cf: Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 4, 3, 2, Pistol Club 3, Skeet Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, Rocket Society 4, 3. JAMES LAU B-2 Jim Kearny, New Jersey Jim came to West Point via Rutgers University and immediately proved his worth in the classroom and on the fields of friendly strife. Although a "star man", he could never be accused of studying anything other than the underside of his "brown boy". But on the track he came to life, as evidenced by the Big "A" and Navy stars that decorate his grey jacket. Sergeant 1, Stars 3, Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 , Public Information Detail 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3,' Portuguese Club 1 ,' Pointer 1. ANTHONY BORDEN LAWSON E-1 Tony New Britain, Connecticut Tony's love for tanks and weapons can only be surpassed by his love of a good argument and his desire to cheat the "T.D." out of hours on the Area. We will always remember him and his stands on politics and military strategy. His ideas and individuality will take him far in his Army career. Sergeant 1, Cross Country 4, Manager 4, Track 4, 3, Manager 4, 3, Ord- nance Club 4, 3, 2, Vice-President 2, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 4, 3, 2, Fencing Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, Assistant to Curator, West Point Museum. DEAN LEE LEARISH L-2 Clearfield, Pennsylvania Straight from the heart of the Keystone State, Dean came to West Point and immediately became one of the outstanding cadets among the can- doers. A dedicated Infantry "file", he proved his merit by consistently outmanuevering the aggressive enemy in the Academic Departments. His good nature and easy going manner have made him many eternal friends among his classmates, and will prove the impetus of future success in the Army. Lieutenant 1, Football 4, 3, Numerals 4, B-Squad 3, Spanish Club 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 2, 1. 210 glib! RONNIE LANE JERRY LAPE LARRY LARSEN ,M JIM LAU TONY LAWSON DEAN LEARISH 21 1 91,515 ,K'. . if ,. 5 ffwgfm E JS sk as! 9' XX X-i'3QfZ?fL, 192 ffsbwm- , gmmwib :.,w:f...: -fl,MMi'3ff: A J, ?sQ",Q:gIE sg,uS3,,s' ' 1 l gf' ' ' , I 12, gzgqgfiaiggf f'2g1:,: - , , Mf-111f'if "1 xi?7lSf':E L-L75--1 I 1 'TY 37231 :.',:'?iE.I5-A : T 2 14 gf? my xx 'i:i'WY.:'-1 '. 1 MM ,w-22' W wif?-'. :, , : ,Q , iw 5 f,, Wggasf. . ffffgaggiiss sag f eww cw 3 X fi '- www ax W K -v ,gw-'w,,, ,1 Q M4151 , xy W Q 5 fx ,, 1, -1105 mph, TONY LEATHAM ROG LEE DICK LEMBO 212 W BOB LILLEY JIM LINDSEY RAY LOPRESTO X5 2: rX6 'fs f mx X1 I lx ik: E . I 5? ANTHONY LYNN LEATHAM H 2 Tony Logan, Utah Few men in H-2 gave more of their time and energy to keeping us all proficient as did Tony. When the men in green closed in his golden voice could be ever heard leading us in the "Oh-Oh" chorus. A pleasant person- ality and stiff determination point clearly to much success in the future. Lieutenant 1 ,' Stars 3, Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, Monogram 3, 2,' Chapel Chimers 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 2, 1 ,' Bugle Notes 4, 3, 2, 1, Advertising Man- ager 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Patrol 1. ROGER C. LEE H-1 Rog Omaha, Nebraska After spending a year at Omaha University and another at Bradens Pre- paratory School, Rog made his home on the Hudson. He never "sweated" academics, and always found plenty of time for "dragging" and going out with "the boys". He liked our social atmosphere so well he elected the "five year plan" with a little help from the Solids Department. Rog will always be remembered for his amiable personality and ability to get along well with everyone. Sergeant 15 Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 35 English Literature Seminar 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Business Manager 1,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 1 ,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. RICHARD ALBERT LEMBO A-2 Dick Providence, Rhode Island Dick has had the most sleep, most girl friends, and most hair of his class- mates. His personality and vocabulary will be remembered at West Point long after graduation. He has always led the way, in his Chrysler, in his French, and his efforts in research papers. Sergeant 15 Catholic Acolytes 3, 2,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ROBERT J. LILLEY D-1 Lil Framingham, Massachusetts A true Bostonian through and through, Bob never let four years of cadet life change his twenty-five letter alphabet by the addition of an "r", Nor did the Point change him in any other way, except perhaps the worn-down soles of his shoes and a slightly discolored dress coat. Sergeant 15 Baseball 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3,' Class Committee 3, 2, 1. JAMES LEE LINDSEY F-1 Jim Jackson, Mississippi After one year of college, Jim came to the Point with slide rule in hand and German dictionary under his arm. His enthusiasm for German and Tactics won him recognition, but only one "gold star" from the math de- partment. He was always found doing his best in intramurals, no matter if it was football, tennis, or track. His ranking as middle man during "cow" year and his eagerness to go to Philadelphia on weekends are certain to be remembered. But one fact is outstanding in "Rommel's" future: Regard- less of what branch he chooses, Jim's aggressiveness and easy grin will label him a ready friend and leader. Sergeant 1 ,' Ordnance Club 3,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1g Camera Club 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. RAYMOND J. LOPRESTO I-2 Ray Keyport, New Jersey From the barbers of North Area to the "P's" of Thayer Hall, "LoPres" was known as the jovial paisan. He was lesser known for his other abilities only, of course, because he insisted that his friends become starmen and all-Americans, instead of himself. Whether Ray is working on engineering projects or hunting ground hogs, may he always greet us with his friendly "Gazink!" Sergeant 1,' Football 45 Baseball 4, 3, 2, 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1g Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 213 Yarn -. est . V -Q gs' D lllliw sg, DAVID WILLIAM LOGAN H-1 Dave Haddonfield, New Jersey Dave fought a continuous battle with the Academic Department during his stay at West Point, but he proved them wrong when he won stars . . . for his "b-robe". Despite his battles, he could always be counted on for a laugh or a helping hand. His unselfishness, loyalty and sincerity are the attributes by which he will win the successes in life as well as in the Army. Sergeant 1, Cross Country 4, Manager 4, Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Manager 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1, Newman Forum 3, 2, 1, Debate Council Je Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 4, 3, Howitzer 3, 2, 1, Dialectic Society 3, 2, Outdoor Sports Club 3, Pistol Club 3, Ski Club 3, 2. SYLVAIN MAC ROBERT LOUPE M-2 Lump Head of Island, Louisiana Lump came to West Point via the sunny Southland, Europe, and USMA Prep. With only minor exceptions, the Academic Department caused him little trouble. As a result he had time for many extracurricular activities. He was particularly talented behind the KDET mike at a sporting event or quarterbacking the "Mighty Deuce" intermural eleven. With his winning personality, the Lumper gained many friends who will never forget him. Lieutenant 1, Soccer 4, Basketball 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2, 1 ,Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2,1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 3, 1 ,' Howitzer 3, 2, 1 , KDET 4, 3, 2, 1, Sports Director 1. ARTHUR ALBERT LOVGREN H-1 Grin Chicago, Illinois A ready smile-and a willingness to help are only a few of the good qualities that Art brought with him from the Windy City. Almost always "true blue" to the one at home, he nevertheless sparked many an excursion with the troops whether in the City or D.C. The future is undoubtedly bright for the Grin. Sergeant 1, German Club 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 4, 3, Golf Club 1, Handball Club 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 3, National Debate Tournament 2. ROGELIO L. LUIS K-1 Rog Laoag, Ilocos Norte, Philippine Islands After the rigors of the Philippine Military Academy, Rog enjoyed the pleas- ant life of a "plebe". We were surprised on Recognition Day to find that he spoke more English than we had thought he could, quietness was merely his nature. When he was not selling tickets for the Dialectic Society shows, you could find him next to a chessboard, outmaneuvering some opponent. Rog will surely be an outstanding member of '62 in years to come. Sergeant 1 ,' Catholic Choir 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Dialectic Society 3, 2, Camera Club 1, Chess Club 3, 2, 1, Fencing Club 1, Pistol Club 2, 1, Rifle Club 1, Ski Club 4, Judo Club 1. RALPH LEE LURKER I-2 Lurk Leavenworth, Kansas Having come to us from Kansas via the Regular Army, Lurk set about es- tablishing a place for himself. A very aiable and helpful guy, he was an in- spiration to all who knew him. We will miss him after gradution, for his accomplishments and friends were many. The Infantry will soon benefit from his services. gerzgeant 1, Track 4, Rifle 4, Honor Committee 2, 1, Skeet Club 4, 3, Ski u 4. KENNETH ORVILLE LUTES G-1 K.O. Malden, Illinois K.O. came to West Point from Illinois and managed to take the demands of life on the Hudson well in stride. He worked hard and ably at the tasks he set out to accomplish, and won the respect of his classmates for both his academic ability and his skill as an administrator of KDET. Because of this, he is well prepared to meet the demands of his future career. Sergeant 1, Rifle 4, Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, KDET 4, 3, 2, 1 , Administration Director 1 ,' Camera Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, Rifle Club 4. ARTHUR LOVGREN 2l4 DAVE LOGAN SYLVAIN LOUPE XSIW 'IW' 'Mfg ROG LUIS RALPH LURKER KENNETH LUTES ""x Args- 215 AL LYNCH JON LYNN DICK MADDEN , f - x """"'s,.M.. x , VLA, 1 . Q .1 f -" N 1 VQX , V, ' , J A Zwff ix' A . N ' MQW www 1 if W ,A 1 Y "" mf 1' 1 kiwi N M A V I N A Q . y Z , Af m.,ga,,'., nz. hm ., W N N 1.4f"' N LLVN '- A fm , 4 , . - , K " A A ':-ww. 6, ' ' ' L A. K- Lf'1,L,,,4 if Mu, 1 fukmw M -"- V' - , - Wigwam - Aw My A QU M., ,gsm - -+-v.w-wfzfu 1- ew, ' JM, K ' A Y -ya, , .. wqtg W of L, 1, Ld, ,N L,,,w.g any V ,M wgfkhv -qv , my ,ma K . , N awww 'P ,S ' -' ., UGA- . 91: w Lv- M X A gum f 216 BUD MAIDT TOM MAILEY , w 5 Y? zrgfx 7 ' Eg X V nb SRS ALBERT FRANCIS LYNCH, JR. I 2 Al Natick, Massachusetts One of I-2's many "star" men, Al never let academics interfere with his edu- cation. What might have been a good career in football was cut short when Al was injured plebe year. This Irishman from Boston will long be remem- bered as the one who made it without integrating. Sergeant 1 ,' Football 4, 3,' Hockey 4,' Chapel Acolytes 15 Newman Forum 1 ,' Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 25 Shi Club 4, 3, 2, lg Parachute Club 1. JON VISART LYNN M-1 Jon Little Rock, Arkansas Jon never made much noise around the company, but he made up for it on the 150 Pound Football field or on the baseball field. Central Area claimed much of J on's time on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons when he wasn't on the athletic fields. His spirit and determination will take him far. Sergeant 1,' Baseball 4, 3, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 1,' 150 Lb Football 3, 2, 1, Major A 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 1. RICHARD G. MADDEN H-1 Dick Mount Vernon, New York Dick's warm enthusiasm and interest in all activities will make his friend- ship forever remembered by all those with whom he comes in contact. His sincerity and willingness to assist all will always be appreciated by us. His pleasant personality should make him always successful. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2,' Newman Forum 3, 2, Debate Council di: Forum 4,' Russian Club 4, 3, 25 Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2,' Handball Club 4, 3,' Rocket Society 3. HONALD NOEL MAIDT, JR. B-1 Bud Camp Leroy Johnson, New Orleans, Louisiana Ever heard of the spine-chilling, hair-raising, nerve-racking sport known as the Maidtathon? Hondo is the only person in the world known to have developed this sport to such an unprecedented degree of precision and com- plexity. For this diversion, one needs the prime requisite of the "no-sweat" attitude. We'll always remember Bud as the supreme champion. Sergeant 1,- Catholic Choir 4, 3,' French Club 4, 3, 2, Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Handball Club 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2,' Sheet Club 4, 3, 2. GEORGE THOMAS MAILEY A-1 Tom Latrobe, Pennsylvania Latrobe, Pennsylvania, offers Tom Mailey and pro-football as its claim to fame. Tom wasted little time in displaying his versatility as an athlete Cfootballer and golferj and a conscientious student. Tom learned early to utilize his "Brown Boy" as an escape from cadet routine. His friends will best remember him as one who "stuck to his guns", never hesitating to say what he believed. Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 3,' Golf 4, 3, Numerals 4g Mathematics Forum 2, 1,' Debate Council at Forum 4, 3, 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Astronomy Club 3, 2,' Golf Club 2, lg Shi Club 4, 3. JAMES H. M. MALLEY H-2 Moose Providence, Rhode Island Moose Malley, the man who came to sleep. Moose, for four years, never left the "pad," never opened a book and was never off the dean's list. His guns and drags were equallynproficient with the addition of the Mailey factor. All kidding aside . . . H-2 will be sorry to lose such an outstanding man and friend as Big Moose. Sergeant 1,' Rifle 45 Cross Country 4, English Literature Seminar 3,' Mathematics Forum 2 g Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Triathlon Club 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, Ski Club 4,' Parachute Club 2. JIM MALLEY 2l7 x N CIu!Ngv,9 aw H: llfllmlil BERNARD M. MARTIN D-2 Bernie Homestead, Pennsylvania Bernie came to the Academy from the area of the Smoky City. He brought with him his love for both academics and athletics, for both of which he was well known in high school, and both of which helped D-2, Brigade Cham- pionships in soccer, lacrosse, and wrestling-in this last he was 155 Brigade Champion. Bernie did well enough to wear stars during his stay. In his free moments, well, he did so much that these were few. Captain 1, Stars 3, 2, 1 , Public Relations Council 4, 3, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Catholic Choir 4, Newman Forum 3, 2, 1 , Debate Council 62: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 , Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, President 1 ,' Astronomy Club 3, Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Business Manager 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 1. JAMES ROBERT MARTIN B-1 Marty Chattanooga, Tennessee With multiplication facts and trips, Marty mastered academics and week- ends. Sue, sleeping, singing, Yankee weather, and the joke of the day were his gifts to his classmates. Many will not forget his unselfish giving of time and talent that they might succeed. The Army gains a fine officer as West Point loses an even finer cadet. Sergeant 1, Stars 1, Rifle 4, 3, 2, 1, Manager 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, Pointer 4, 3, Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, KDET 4, Rifle Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1. RICHARD EUANDER MAYO A-2 Dick South Berwick, Maine Dicks hails from a little town in Southern Maine where the word "law" is incorrectly pronounced. His free time here on the Hudson was divided be- tween debating, skiing, and "dragging", all of which he did well. Dick will have no trouble in the Army with his ability to tell as well as listen to a good story. Sergeant 1, Rifle 4, Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, Russian Club 3, 2, Camera Club 2, Pistol Club 2, Rifle Club 3, Shi Club 4, 3, 2. JEFFERSON BRIAN MCCARTHY A-1 Charlie Brown Larchmont, New York Academics and the Tactical Department never posed any serious problem to Charlie, so he was always ready to lend a helping hand to those of us who were less endowed. Whenever a ruckus shook the North End of the "Hilton" Charlie was there. As devoted to ye olde "Brown Boy" as he was to the pur- suit of his academics, Jeff will long be remembered for his perpetual smile and winning personality. Sergeant 1, Ring and Crest Committee 2, 1, Mathematics Forum 2, 1, Debate Council di: Forum 4, French Club 2, 1, Astronomy Club 2, 1 , KDET 2, 1, Camera Club 3, 2, 1, Golf Club 2, 1, Pistol Club 3, Shi Club 4, 3, Rocket Society 4, 3. TERRANCE C. MCCARTHY E-2 Terry Seattle, Washington Terry's smiling face and Irish eyes have been a source of pleasure to his cohorts in '62, A singer from the beginning, he spent more weekends with the Glee Club than weekends with the Drag Club, although in the latter re- spect he was never lacking. A sincere friend, Terry's happy smile and jok- ing conversation will be missed in his successful years which follow. Lieutenant 1, Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 4, Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Sailing Club 4, 3. JAMES R. MCCROREY E-2 Mac ' Chicago, Illinois Big K is the type of person that comes to West Point to get that gold bar. Anything that comes between him and that final goal, such as academics, is just something to put up with. Hard work is as much a part of him as his friendliness. His alma mater can rest assured that it is giving the Army a man that will do the job. Lieutenant 1, 150 lb. Football 4, 3, Spanish Club 3, 2, 1, Handball Club 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 3, 2, 1. 218 BERNIE MARTIN MARTY MARTIN 'fda-ul' DICK MAYO 5 . , : ' ff ,S:V:::,,7i5'if M , if .iz gvwffmswgff, , -SK 1. fzf I: , 1 JEFF MCCARTHY TERRY MCCARTHY JIM MCCROREY 219 ,f LJ? fm K ' , , X n-iunlununas-vw ,.-,N-.........w 1' i . MIKE MCDONNELL JIM MCDONOUGH RAY MCDOWALL 220 AL McELHOSE l BRIAN MCENANY THOMAS MCGARRY 5 Wag ZS? A X X., S, I 7 ,, ... I ff X ' S3- 4: . it 4' .X . ,g Tx -'i ll ' ROGER NEAL MCDONNELL E 1 Mike Orchard Lake, Michigan This frowning Irishman came to us from sunny North Michigan and thus has had no problems with the West Point weather. His generous post-gradu- ate contributions to his high school Alma Mater, Culver Military Academy, has shown how much he appreciated what he learned there. As a cadet, Mike has been quite active in all types of athletics, that is, when he is above the surface of the water, including weekend wind sprints-to 'tFlirty". Sergeant 1, Swimming 4, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 2, Soccer 2, Lacrosse 2, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Prot. Discussion Group 4, 3, Pointer 4, 3, Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Handball Club 3, 2, 1, Shi Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Parachute Club 1, Skin Diving Club 2, 1, Safety Ojficer 1. JAMES MICHAEL MCDONOUGH B-1 Jim Portland, Maine After having one year at the University of Maine and having "seen the light", McDoo came to us with his blonde hair, rosy cheeks and a friendly Southern "Maine-ish" hospitality. His winning personality made him liked by all, his gift of gab was a credit to the debaters, his athletic prowess a boon to Company B-1 and his social graces were an asset to the Hop Com- mittee. Lieutenant 1 , Track 4, Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, Handball Club 4, 3, 2. 1, Ski Club 4, 3. RAYMOND GRAHAM MCDOWALL, JR. L-2 For Boston, Massachusetts The Fox was delivered, under protest, to Hudson High from Ft. Bliss, Texas. He earned his nickname by eluding the Tactical Department. Since aca- demics presented no problem, the "Brown Boy" became a lasting friend and he separated himself from it only on occasions of a good argument, "pro dragu, or a classmate with an academic problem. Upon graduation Ray will build bridges for the Engineers. Sergeant 1, Catholic Acolytes 4, Catholic Choir 3, 2, Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 3. ALAN FLEMING MCELHOSE D-1 Mac Waterloo, Iowa Mac had a lot of trouble with stars in his first two years as evidenced by his clash with one in the swimming pool Plebe Christmas, and another awarded him by the math department Yearling Year. He did, however, manage to shake this plague, learn from his experiences and serve out his "term" in peace. Sergeant 1, Wrestling 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, Model Airplane Club 3, 2, Model Railroad Club 3, Skin Diving Club 2, Rocket Society 4, 2. BRIAN RAYMOND MCENANY H-2 Mac Dunedin, Florida Mac soon mastered the art of staying ahead of academics and spent much of his time earning points for the swimming team and butchering popular tunes on his beloved guitar. A confirmed optimist, his quick humor and cheerful personality have gained him many friends in four years, and will certainly gain him many more. For Mac and his catalog bride, the future is indeed a cloudless sky. Sergeant 1, Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2, Public In- formation Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Radio Club 3, Debate Council di: Forum 3, French Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, Treas- urer 1. THOMAS WILLIAM MCGARRY G-1 M cGoo Malverne, New York Although an exchange student from E-1 and an obtrusive believer in "Dis- neyland", "McGoo" was quickly accepted within the hallowed hall of G Company. After spending three years at Notre Dame, Tom did not sweat academics-after three years at West Point, Tom did not sweat anything. His constant alertness and ability to adjust to all circumstances point out a brilliant future for Tom. Lieutenant 1, Class Committee 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 3, Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 4, Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, 2, Rocket Society 4, 3, 2. 22l 'H Qliuifl P -rm win 'Q nr 0 Its- - f' Y' '1 3225, at F5 is gl 1 4 will 1, -itil A .ls lr,l,Hll1f1IIlll ROBERT MCGURK F-2 Scotty Fayetteville, New York With twisting and yodelling as his trademarks, Scotty, wine, women and skis all go together. He was one of the best known men in the class. Depend- able and conscientious, he will go far as an officer. Sergeant 1 ,Lacrosse 4, Hockey 4, Ski Team 3,2, 1 ,Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pointer 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1 , HI-FI Club 4, 3, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 , Ski Patrol 3, 2, 1, Judo Club 3. 2. 1. JAMES F. MCKAY, JR. M-2 Milyon, Massachusetts Jim will never be forgotten by his classmates for his unselfishness and de- sire to win. Whether it was trouncing some company in intramurals or studying for a writ, his presence always made the job easier. Always willing to lend a helping hand, no task was too large for' him. His integrity and sincerity were admired by more people than he'l1 ever know. We all rest assured that the attributes Jim displayed as a cadet will carry him far in a successful career in the service of his country. Sergeant 1 ,' French Club 3, Newman Forum 3, 2, 1. CLIFFORD MOORE MCKEITHAN E-1 Cliff Charleston, South Carolina Cliff was born in Charleston, South Carolina. By the time he finished high school, he was convinced that his future lay in the Army. While awaiting appointment to USMA, he took second best, and attended the Citadel for two years. Now this Son of the South is eagerly awaiting the end of his cadet days. Sergeant 1, Swimming 4, Ordnance Club 3, German, Club 2, 1, Astronomy Club 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1, Pointer 3, 2, 1, Exchange Editor 1, Camera Club 2, 1, Vice President 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Sailing Club 3, 2, Ski Club 3, 2, 1,' Skin Diving Club 2, 1. BRIAN VINCENT MCKINLEY G-1 Mack Lowell, Massachusetts Throughout his four years at the Academy, Brian has combined an excel- lence in Academics with an unseliish desire to help us who were less fortu- nate. Wherever help was needed in anything, we could rest assured that he would be there to give more than his share. Brian is one of the few who deserves the title of true friend. Sergeant 1, Stars 3, 2, 1,' Rifle 4, Newman Forum 4, English Literature Seminar 2, Debate Council and Forum 3, Howitzer 2, Pistol Club 4, 3. DAVID R. MCLAUGHLIN K-2 Dave Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Coming from the sunny shores of Ft. Lauderdale, it is no surprise that Dave has spent many hours of his life in the water. As a cadet he continued his career as a swimmer and added water polo to his list. With a good natured personality and a ready smile, Dave has won many friends. This, coupled with his determination to do a good job, has placed him in high regard among his classmates. Sergeant 1, Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rocket Society 4, Judo Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1. THOMAS EDWARD MCMAHAN, JR. D-2 Mac Greeneville, South Carolina Mac's problems at West Point seemed to get bigger every year. His rapid and repeated transition from the "Dachau-look" to the "Balloon-look" and back again put a strain on his southern disposition-and his love for South- ern cooking. The attempts to sell him-bound securely, naturally-to some unfortunate "plebes" was almost too much. He snapped back from this re- buff and is headed for the days when he will be in charge of affairs. Sergeant 1, Wrestling 3, 2, 1, Monogram 2, 1, Debate Council di: Forum 3, 2, German Club 3, 2, Astronomy Club 4, 3, 2, Vice President 2, Howitzer 4, 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, 2, Canzera Club 3, Chess Club 2, Skeet Club 4. CLIFF MCKEITHAN 222 ROBERT MCGURK JAMES McKAY , i V gy .H I I J K , 4? , . Z h . . E, N I fx 4 w .S BRIAN MCKINLEY DAVID MCLAUGHLIN TOM MCMAHAN s"'ff If .v" -lr mf" ',. L 1 7 ' '- mi 'fi' Q., - -'11 W 9 xl, , Nb s' u K K , Jail, ,1- A., . .. 4? in pkg O ,8 QA 'J- . , J ffm PAUL MCNAMARA BOB MCNAMARA JAMES McQUILLEN W MAC MCRAE WILLIE MEADE js 5151: .jg 6 5 q -x4 E-Q! ,f 1 A ,fc aa' if 1 1 l. f wg ,L ,xx jf st ,. X 5 X I in fx f f UL? XML, XXX sz! I lb PAUL DAVID MCNAMARA C-1 Dee Brooklyn, New York Paul came here with quite an impressive record from the wilds of the Big city. He has maintained this quality of cheerful, witty cooperation, with all who have known him. Paul can always be counted on for some Brooklynese- Irish wit, along with his serious side. Dividing his time between hockey games and the hometown girl, Paul is remembered best as just a thorough- ly good person and friend. Sergeant 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 , Handball Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,Rugby Club 2, 1 ,Bowling League 2, 1. ROBERT T. MCNAMARA D-2 Mac Arlington, Virginia During his four years at West Point, Mac, the true Irishman of company D-2, has made many friends with his ready smile and his helping hand. Al- ways a conscientious worker, Mac has already many accomplishments to his credit. Not the least of his accomplishments came when he was unoiiicially crowned company sleeping king. With his good humor and common sense, Mac will continue to be a success. Sergeant 1, Hoioitzer 3, Camera Club 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3. JAMES F. MCQUILLEN L-2 Bethesda, Maryland Breathes there a plebe who doesn't dread the name McQuillen, a terror both on and off the squash courts? But strong willed as he was, he was never too stubborn to help a buddy or say a good word. There is no doubt that Jim will be a winner always. Sergeant 1 , Tennis 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Squash 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Ma- jor A 2, 1, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, Ski Club 1. WILTON DAVID MCRAE K-1 Mac Marianna, Florida Always on the go, Wilt never relaxed during his four year tenure. He at- tacked everything, be it athletics or academics, with enthusiasm and de- termination, and the outcome was always superlative. Wilt was always ready to help a friend in need. He will be long remembered as the guy who enter- tained the company with hot servings of popcorn and coffee. Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 150 lb. Football 3, 2, 1, Major A 3, 2, 1, Baseball 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 1,' Debate Council JZ: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Golf Club 1, Skeet Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, Rocket Society 1. WILLIAM CROZIER MEADE, III I-2 Willie Lansdowne, Pennsylvania Coming from the City of Brotherly Love, "friendly Will" was known by plebes everywhere. He was never challenged by any phase of cadet life and always found time to assist the goats. Will was always in high spirits and had a friendly word for everyone, although his affairs were sometimes questioned by certain parts of the Tactical Department. As an oflicer, he'll be one of the best. Squash 4, 3, Numerals 4, Tennis 4, Numerals 4, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pointer 3, 2, 1 ,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1 , Glee Club 4, Camera Club 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 3, 2, 1. JOHN ROBERT MECEDA M-2 Duke Bronx, New York Hailing from the Bronx, the Duke brought with him a barrelful of wise- cracks and an extensive repertoire of wisecracks and adlibs. Even after his victories over the Academic Department, he found time to make those sports and newscasts over KDET. Whether he engages in a proverbial "bull session" or controlling that soccer goal, Duke always had a ready smile and pleasant word. Sergeant 1 ,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council :Q Forum 3, 2, 1, KDET 4, 3, 2, 1, Station Manager 1 ,' Rocket Society 3, 2, Ski Club 4. DUKE MECEDA 225 be tems N QL"-9 lllllll' 1 1 ! 1' Ill fliillllllm lu JOHN F. MEEHAN G-1 Frank Frederick, Maryland Frank came to West Point from Maryland but he overcame this initial draw- back in his own fine style. He was well-liked by all who met him, not only for his humor and friendliness, but because he was a good leader. A success at everything from Athletics to Academics, Frank is a valuable asset to the Army and his many friends. Sergeant 1 ,' Track 4, 3, 2, Russian Club 4, 3, 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1g Chezss Club 4, 3,' Handball Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Skeet Club 4, 3, Ski Clu 4, 3. HARRY MEETH, III M-2 Harry Baltimore, Maryland Harry can be described with two words: grim determination. A friend to all, he was never too busy to give the "goats" that all important "poop". FRANK MEEHAN , His ability to throw those great parties will long be remembered by the men of M-2. We are ah certain that his fighting spirit cannot fail to insure him success in the future. Captain 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 15 Mathematics Forum 2, Debate Council dt Forum 3, 2,' French Club 4, 3g Pointer 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, Mortar 3, Circu- lation Manager 3. LARRY L. MENGEL A-1 Nazareth, Pennsylvania Hailing from the center of the steel-producing area, Larry has exhibited the determination characteristic of a perfect ingot of the same. His Achilles heel was certainly the metallic weakness of his "brown boy" but he still found time to be Superintendent of the Sunday Schools, demonstrate his ath- letic prowess as an outstanding track man, and keep well ahead of the Academic Department. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, Numerals 4, 3,' Track 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 2,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2, Superintendent 2,' Prot. Discussion Group 4, 3,' Handball Club 3,' Sailing Club 3. THOMAS LEROY MENNIE C-2 Tom Omaha, Nebraska Bedecked in a "B-Robe", Tom was constantly on the prowl during the sup- posedly studious evenings in his room. No Hi-Fi or radio could combat his good natured laugh. Hailing from Omaha, this cosmopolite journeyed far and near before finally coming to rest on the peaceful shores of the Hudson. Fun loving, yet sincere in his efforts, Tom Mennie will always be ready when duty calls. Sergeant 1, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1, Secre- tary 1 ,' Astronomy Club 4, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1. HARRY MEETH WALTER RICHARD MENNING C-2 Walt La Salle, Illinois Walt distinguished himself "plebe" year as one of the best students in the classg he lived up to that reputation throughout his four years. Yet he did not permit his books to take more than a fair share of his time. Throughout the Corps, he was known for pushing his own work aside to help someone with an academic problem. With his diligence and perseverance, he cannot fail to succeed in his chosen profession. Lieutenant 1 ,' Stars 3, 2, 1, Cross Country 4,' Track 4,' Honor Committee 2, 1,- Mathematics Forum 2, 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, Bridge Club 3, 2. THOMAS HENRY MERRELL, JR. M-1 Tom La Marque, Texas A true Texan to the end, Tom came to the Point with a gun on his hip. During his stay, he managed to climb out from under his "Brown Boy" long enough to bother the "TD" and the faculty at Ladycliffe. The southern gentleman's warm sense of humor will enable him to do an excellent job in the Armor. Sergeant 1,' Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 25 Debate Council JZ Forum 4,' Portuguese Club 25 Fencing Club 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3. LARRY MENGEL 226 7 - i, , .W Y 4 rv-A 495:-W' TOM MENNIE WALT MENNING TOM MERRELL 227 BUD MERRIAM ,q F E 51 E SAM MEYER TOM MIDDAUGH 228 HE -S :IE 1 Ii, E AL MILLER ART MILLER FRANK MILLER 5 Axe f'N 3 S 1+ !.5,. Q Ci., .,.,, ,- EC ?52-fn? Y .i1g, ., 'z 2' 'IQZEQQQ if 5 97' mga x ,Ns ,f 7 tx ' ,TN ,fi its-" CHARLES STEUART MERRIAM, III C-2 Bud Panama City, Florida Happy Charlie was one of those few worldly types to grace our class. He helped us through the receiving line at "hops" and tried to steer us clear of social blunders. However, Buddy's playboy personality and nature have not detracted from his athletic and academic prowess. Charlie's well round- ed ability and pleasant personality shall continue to win him many friend- ships and ensure his success in the profession of arms. Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1, Monogram 2, 1,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Nu- merals 4, Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 15 Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. SAMUEL SANDEFORD MEYER, III D-2 Sam Rocky Mountain, North Carolina Sam's fine southern background has been evident through his cadet career. Although not entirely adapted to the northern winters or the accompanying gloom, his smile has never faded. One could not hope to find a person more friendly or eager to help. Sam's friendliness and fine attitude has most cer- tainly enriched the lives of many of his classmates. Sergeant 1,' Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4,' Honor Committee 2, 1,' Ord- nance Club 3, Portuguese Club 3. THOMAS R. MIDDAUGH E-2 Tom Towson, Maryland Tom, a great athlete, hails from Baltimore, Maryland. He was always one of the best on "the fields of friendly strife" and in the battles with the Academic Departments. Tom's great sense of humor, his ready smile, his will to win and his strong personality were a great asset to West Point. His country will now be the one to benefit. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2, 1,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2,' Pub- lic Relations Council 2,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2,' Pointer 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' Bridge Club 4, 3, 2,' Scusa 2,' Rocket Society 4, 3. ALLEN ZEHNER MILLER L-1 AZ Waukegan, Illinois The Redhead from Illinois found many friends and many activities in the Corps. Academics being no problem, he was always eager to work in an- other activity and secure that trip to anywhere. His energy and spirit will stand the redheaded tiger in good stead in the years to come. Sergeant 1,' Swimming 4,' Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Chairman 1 ,' French Club 4, 2, 1, Treasurer 1,' Protestant Discussion Group 4,' Out- door Sports Club 4, Golf Club 4, 35 SCUSA 2. ARTHUR RAY MILLER B-2 Art , Nazareth, Pennsylvania Self-sacrifice, loyalty, and a cheerful word for everyone. These were the traits that Art came to be known for during his career as a cadet. He Was always able to add cheer to our lives as a Cadet. One of those who will be nflarrled soon, Art graduates knowing he has made many life-long friend- s ips. Sergeant 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 3, 2, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Dialectic Society 4, HI-FI Club 3,' Pistol Club 3, 2. FRANK DICKSON MILLER, .I R. F-2 Frank Frank came to Company F-2 from Panama after spending an entire week in the Army. Capable of wearing stars, he studied hard for the first two and a half years but preferred to coast from then on. Frank was always easy going as far as "The System" was concerned, and little worried him, save the problem of finding an "O.A.O". Upon graduation, Frank plans to take his ready smile and join the Corps of Engineers. Sergeant 1,' Track 4, 3, Manager 4, 3g English Literature Seminar 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Howitzer 2, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4, 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 1 ,' Bridge Club 3, 2, 1. 229 I lk 'H-Teil G!'fb..'J,4"N4L"-an I I .f 4 6 . 'limi' llllil WILLIAM LYLE MILLER, JR. C-2 Bill Sapulpa, Oklahoma Billy came to us from the open spaces of Oklahoma and college life. He soon found his work cut out for him by the French Departmentg his triumph over that "ogre" is a credit to his fierce determination to succeed. Quick to lend a hand and blessed with an unquenchable sense of humor, Billy is well armed for the challenges of the Army. Sergeant 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 45 Debate Council QQ: Forum 35 Skeet Club 35 Bridge Club 3. ' WILLIAM MICHAEL MILLERLILE E-1 Bill Jackson, Michigan Coming from an Army background, Bill came to'West Point from the wilds of Southern Michigan. His energy and enthusiasm have weathered the bleak four years and Willie remains unchanged and "gung ho." His pride remains rooted in his physical abilities and his success with the opposite sex. Certainly with his attributes, Bill is destined for greatness. Sergeant 15 Track 4, 2, Numerals 45 Spanish Club 4, 25 Prot. Discussion Group 35 Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Fencing Club 25 Pistol Club 4, 25 Skeet Club 45 Ski Club 2. WILLIAM WALTON MOGAN M-2 Mog Minneapolis, Minnesota With Bill there is always fun and excitement. Having little trouble with academics, he is always scheming for new sources of merriment for both himself and his classmates. His weekends consist of "dragging" and the "brown boy". Still he finds time to lead the rifle team. Whatever Bill did he did it well and that will carry him far. Sergeant 15 Rifle 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 2, 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 35 Hi-Fi Club 45 Rifle Club 45 Skeet Club 45 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. .IAN T. MOLVAR A-1 Jan Portland, Oregon Jan is the memory cell of Co A-1's UNIVACQ the very tall memory cell. He has had a bit of trouble with the "Department of Physical Tortures", but has recouped any lost ground by winning his stars. Jan will always be knoyvn for the amount of time he spends in bed and for his stacks of fan mai . Sergeant 1,' Stars 25 Basketball 4, 3, 25 Debate Council dt Forum 4, 2, 1,' French Club 25 Glee Club 45 KDET 4, 3, 25 Camera Club 25 Handball Club 35 Pistol Club 4. DAVID WILLIAM MOORE M-1 Dave Los Gatos, California From the "Area'i to the presidency of the "D.C.8zF.i', from "Stars" to the "D-list", Dave had a very "Cadet-ish" career. Always sincere, his opinions were respected and he could always be counted on for sound advice and intelligent discussion. Sergeant 1 5 Stars 35 Squash 4, Numerals 45 Tennis 4, Numerals 45 Newman Forum 3, 2, 1, President 15 Debate Council rf: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1 ,' French Club 3, 2, 1, President 25 German Club 3, 25 Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 45 Chess Club 4. MICHAEL MOORE H-1 Mike Liberal, Kansas Mike is endowed with a quick mind and a love of good living which enabled him to get the most out of West Point life. His great confidence in his own solution to problems sometimes rocked the status quo, but the job was always well done. Always ready to relax as hard as he works, Mike has the capa- bility for success in any field. Sergeant 15 Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Monogram 35 Newman Forum 1,' French Club 3, 2, 1,' Howitzer 3, 2, 1, Editor 1,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 3, 25 Hi-Fi Club 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. BILL MOGAN 230 BILL MILLER BILL MILLERLILE JAN MOLVAR DAVE MOORE MIKE MOORE TOM MOORE LARRY MOORING DOUG MORGAN ARL MORIN M MOUNT 5 'F'- fs? Q N Qvq - , 4 A "1 C ... B 5 fi 31? axis? , ' f., ..f5'QL- , r i .X y -Swgistf ,rl w 6 V Q Lk' Nd ' x' 7' THOMAS JOSEPH MOORE C-1 Tom Ft. Bliss, Texas "I've got a college credit in Chemistry!" Yes, and many more followed, but not without hours of sweat and determination. A "goat?" A dis- tinction he proudly claimed. The Army sent him to us and we proudly return him to same, five years older Cpossibly wiserj assuredly prepared. We have laughed, complained and worked together. It has been our pleasure, Tom. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4,' Ring :Q Crest Committee 4, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council C92 Forum 3, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. LAURENCE GREY MOORING F-2 Monk San Mateo, California Coming from sunny California, Monk brought with him a big smile and a likeable personality. When he wasn't wrapped up with academics or his "brown boy" Monk spent most of his time swinging from the high bar or the still rings as an integral part of the gymnastics team, or from the alcove rail as a preliminary to going to bed. With his boundless energy and enthusiasm, Larry is destined to have a very promising career. Sergeant 1, Football 4, Numerals 4,' Gymnastics 3, 2, 1, Monogram 3, Debate Council di: Forum 4,' Gymnastics Club 2, 1,' Handball Club 3, Ski Club lf. DOUGLAS W. MORGAN L-2 Doug Rockville, Maryland Doug is well-known for his athletic ability and personality and for the parties held at his home in Rockville. Although he spends much of the time in the "bag" he does find time to "drag" certain young ladies, who shall remain nameless. Doug's ability to get along with people will aid him in the future, no matter what career he chooses. Captain 1 ,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major A 2, 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3,' Newman Forum 25 Glee Club 3. CARL ROLLAND MORIN, JR. L-1 Carl Eaugallie, Florida From Florida came Carl to halfback for us. He just had to be good because he whipped Bob Anderson's civilian gang in the old days. He didn't, though, confine his many talents to the gridiron, having shot, skied, and "Russky-ed" his time away. Never a half-way man, he'll be a profit to Uncle. Lieutenant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 25. Class Com- mittee 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Patrol 3, 2. JIMMY DALE MOUNT I-2 Jimbo Merced, California The "California Care Package" divided his time unequally between listen- ing to hill-billy music and sleeping. Subscribing to the maxim of burning bridges when they pop up, Jimbo calmly took everything in his quiet and loping stride. His conservatism and agreeable manner made him many friends. Uncle Sam should have more like him. Sergeant 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4,' Portuguese Club 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. JOHN B. MUMFORD I-2 John Louisville, Kentucky Endowed with above average ability and an enviable personality, John came to us from Louisville. A person always to be counted on for a "job well done", or some excellent camaraderie, he has helped us pass our four years easily. As he joins the Long Grey Line, we wish him the best of luck and success in every endeavor. Captain 1,' Swimming 4, 3, Manager 4, 3, Golf 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Chairman 1,' Chapel Acolytes 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Bridge Club 2. JOHN MUMFORD 233 X, 'ft if W 11? can I DAVID LORELL MUNDT B-2 Dave Anchorage, Alaska Dave is always around to add his self confidence and assuredness to any situation. Although his love life has given him many frustrations, he always managed to excell in academics and sports. His brigade boxing and wrestling have been a great asset to Company B-2. Always willing to help others, Dave will be a success wherever he goes. Sergeant 1,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, KDET 4, Golf Club 2, 1, Handball Club 2, 1,' Sailing Club 4, 3, Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, 2, 1 , Rugby Club 2, 1, Rocket Society 3. ROBERT CHARLES MUNSCH ' D-1 Boom-Boom Lodi, California Whether he be expounding on the virtues of not going to bed after reveille or getting a haircut before first hour class, Monday morning, our Boomer always managed to make himself heard. But, classmates will always remember him as Lodi's roving ambassador of good will who always had time to give a helping hand and asked nothing in return. Sergeant 1, Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, 1, Mathematics Forum 2, Debate Council :Q Forum 3, 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, Prot. Discussion Group 4, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. PAUL TERRY MURPHY L-1 P.T. Cincinnati, Ohio Since coming to West Point from Cincinnati, P.T. has been busy on L-1's "field of friendly strife", in the Debate Council 8z Forum, and writing letters to a certain blond in Cincinnati. In his spare time he is well known for being the terror of the L-1 bridge players. P. T. will be certain to gain his goals. Sergeant 1, Cross Country 3, 2, 1, Manager 3, 2, 1, Ring and Crest Com- mittee 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1 ,' Dialectic Society 4, 3,,' Golf Club 1, Handball Club 4, 3, Skeet Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, Bridge Club 4, 3, 1. VINCENT EDWARD MURPHY L-1 Vin Winchester, Massachusetts Leaving high school with the intent of joining the Mids, Vin soon found himself a cadet instead. He managed to become a real Navy hater. In the lulls between his battle with the Academic Departments, Murph had made many friends in the corps. His conscientiousness and personality will carry him far in life. Sergeant 1, Football 4, Lacrosse 4, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 3, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. CHARLES ALEX MURRAY H-2 Charlie Glen Burnie, Maryland In four years at the Point, Charlie established himself as a true goat. Even in the midst of the great semi-annual battles, however, he never lost his sense of humor or his ability to laugh oif his problems. These qualities, along with his friendly and straightforward manner, earned Charlie the respect and friendship of all who knew him well. Good luck, C. A. Sergeant 1 ,' Lacrosse 4, 3, Monogram 3, Catholic Choir 4, Newman Forum 2, French Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3. THOMAS EDWARD MURRAY H-2 Too Oklahoma City, Oklahoma This cheerful, aggressive personality from Oklahoma soon found himself surrounded by friends here at the Academy, since anyone he went near could not help being his friend. He quickly found his "home in the Army", and for that we're all thankful. He'll be a tremendous asset in everything he does, and we're glad he's with us: H-2 and Army-All the Way! Lieutenant 1, 150 lb. Football 4, Track 4, Debate Council 62 Forum 2, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, Handball Club 3, 2, Rifle Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Weightlifting Club 4, 3. 234 . ies? r-si? f DAVE MUNDT BOB MUNSCH PAUL MURPHY VIN MURPHY CHARLIE MURRAY TOM MURRAY 235 .-4,-,A qmfrtmbfi-',Y KQQTQ. 1 ' "Ss, - A -I 1 I V . N. -- twig 3' - 1 4 1 A- f m L Q, -V., ....,,.,., y, MW, M55 -a,, if -ef, Q, -YQ , -......,g. -., 1, ., . L W M l--2-.W3Q.,,, if. W-KN 5.31. X K . fha' X , g ,NM N , is A 'W R ,K , K si, 5 3 men 1 N. 4' NATE NAHLEN JOHNNIE NAU LARRY NEEDS 236 PHIL NELSON DAVE NEUMANN HARRY NIEUWBOER ge' ff-N 2 m x N .4 x - , -. FQ-flxsia ini? I 'QfZL?',2i2:," 3, I r ' " Qikxk-2 . r :rf L' 'fh- iFN X,-. l. Y CHARLES LARRY NAHLEN H 1 Nate Little Rock, Arkansas Through thick and thin, Nate has always managed to be on hand with a good word for everyone. Though his good nature has made him the victim of many practical jokes, Nate has always been ready with a comeback and has shown a virtue displayed by few-the ability to laugh at one's own mistakes. Arkansas and H-1 are proud of their contribution to the Army. Sergeant 1 ,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 1g Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, 2g German Club 4, 3, 1,' Camera Club 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Sheet Club 4, 3, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN FREDERICK NAU, JR. K-1 Johnnie Hattiesburg, Mississippi Johnnie found West Point quite different from LSU. In spite of the frater- nity life here, he still found time to study. Being a natural scholar, Johnnie could often be found carrying his typewriter case in the direction of Battle Monument. He will surely be a success in all his endeavors. Sergeant 1,' Baseball 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4,' Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3,' French Club 4, 3,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1. LARRY ROBERT NEEDS K-1 Laroo Midland, Pennsylvania Here was a man with unbounded supplies of energy-which were naturally expended at the expense of much U.S.C.C. Bond and many pounds of shoe rubber. Between his sprees, he made many good friends. Now, as he leaves "The Long Grey Line", we wish him the success due a true friend. Sergeant 1 ,' Football 4,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Shi Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Weight Lifting Club 3, 2, 15 Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. PHILLIP EARL NELSON F-1 Phil Sioux City, Iowa Phil brought with him the ability to see a long range goal and to work hard for itg though the many obstacles would have barred the course to a lesser man. "Plebe" year he even took a Regimental Wrestling Championship. Though many have smiled at his quest for efficiency, all knew that in him they had a true friend. Sergeant 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,- Camera Club 2,' HI-FI Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Chess Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Sailing Club 3, 2,' Judo Club 2, 1. DAVID CURTIS NEUMANN E-2 Dave Willard, Ohio Dave, synonymous with a ready smile, a hand to help and a sense of humor to lighten the darkest moment, was E-2 all the way. Gum, and a very pretty lass who adorned the shores of Erie, were among his most important inter- ests besides his continual and aggressive encounters in sports and aca- demics. Success is and will continue to be his. Sergeant 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Protestant Discussion Group 4,' Howitzer 2, 1,' KDET 3, Golf Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 4, 3,' Shi Club 3, 2, 1,' Cadet Bowling League 2, 1. HARRY W. NIEUWBOER L-2 Portland, Oregon From the land of the Oregon Grape, Harry came to us, with seemingly more knowledge of history, art, music, and the Navy than any other man living. It is little wonder that his cogent thoughts and excellent conversa- tion were sought and respected by us who knew him, nor will it surprise us to see his extroardinary mind carry him much further in successive endeavors. Sergeant 1,' Honor Committee 2, 1,' Public Information Detail 2,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 3,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. 237 1 4 View m v-'A Q H GWWN l 421- illlllwlll DAVID ALTON NOAKE H-1 Dave Williamsburg, Virginia A truck driver from deep in Virginia, Dave came to West Point with high standards and fine ideals and he kept them for all four years. Antagonistic towards the Tactical Department at times, Groake was always cheerful and ready to laugh. Capable of seriousness when necessary, Dave will not stop short of stars on his Army blue. Sergeant 1 ,' Pistol 4, 3,' Football 4,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 2, 1, Associate Editor 1, Pointer 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Stage Manager, Pistol Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. MARVIN P. NORWOOD C-1 Marv I Austin, Texas Marve came to us with an already full and successful background. Born in the Lone Star State December 7, 1936, Marve graduated from Wm. B. Travis High School in 1955. He was, among other things, Vice President of his class, President of the Student Council, and President of the Student body. From there on he went on to serve two years with the Texas State Police, and then a year and a half with the Army. Marve was a "poop scholarlfrom Ft. Belvoir. Sergeant 1 ,' Lacrosse 4, 3, Numerals 4, Monogram 3,' Class Committee 3, 2, 1,' Public Information Detail 4,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, Spanish Club 3, Portuguese Club 3,' Sailing Club 3, 2,' Skeet Club 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2. JOHN LEE NOVOTNY D-2 Novo Westerville, Ohio D-2's Sammy Snead glided in from "Dear Westerville High School" with a bag of Woods in one hand and a bag of irons in the other. Novo was a firm believer in the "no sweat" doctrine and fought his battles with the academic departments and the "TD" in a cool, collected manner. His likeable per- sonality and ready wit will make him a success wherever he goes. Sergeant 1,' Golf 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Ring 62 Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council di Forum 3, 2, 1, Golf Club 1,' Bridge Club 1. JOSEPH DALE NUNNELEE, II B-2 Joe San Antonio, Texas Words are inadequate to describe certain individuals. Honorable, dedicated, loyal, faithful, self-assured, and sensible only begin to reveal the truth about this pensive yet light-hearted Texan. A man's fortune is measured by his friendsg Joe is fantastically wealthy. We who have known Joe shall not forget him as he ascends the ladder of success, two steps at a time. Sergeant 15 Cross Country 4, 3,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, 150 Lb. Football 2, 1 ,' Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Public Relations Council 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Projects Manager 1 ,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 15 Ski Club 4, 3,' Skin Diving Club 2, 1. NEIL K. NYDEGGER I-2 Neil West Point will never be the same again without Neil to Wake us from our afternoon naps with his chiming of the chapel bells. A good word and a smile for everybody made him popular throughout the corps. Neil stood at the top of the class in everything and perhaps the only reason that he didn't wear stars was that he was always taking time out from his own studies to help a less gifted classmate. Lieutenant 1 ,' Chapel Chimers 4, 3, 2, 1, Head Chapel Chimer, Spanish Club 4, 3, 1,' Dance Orchestra 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3. MICHAEL THOMAS O'BRIEN I-1 O.B. El Paso, Texas Michael arrived upon the scene from that West Texas town of El Paso. Yearling and Cow Years found him on the better side of the Dean's List most of the time. Mike's line athletic abilities and leadership have been a constant asset to Company I-1. A good friend, and a good guy, Mike will surely be welcomed by the Artillery come June. Sergeant 1 ,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, Bridge Club 3, 2, 1. JOHN NOVOTNY 238 DAVE N OAKE MARVIN NORWOOD 'Wh 'TN eu-afw-wa""a" JOE NUNNELEE NEIL NYDEGGER MIKE O'BRIEN 239 JOHN O'NEAL PETER OLDFIELD X M '?",,,',. plfjyf ff Q' 'diff' f "1 ff 'Q 'W 4 . 240 BOB ORD TOM OSTENBERG ie YS? Q x bm,-5 , - . 2 L -G c -1 'A EQ?-gays. 'A 4, z V ' '-mi?-2 o r 1 Eff s 'C w 'G 15 , ,. f 3 - ff fx ,"T JOHN WILLIAM O'NEAL' M-2 Rosebud Chattanooga, Tennessee Being a former enlisted man, John came to West Point well-indoctrinated in the Army life. The eagles of the Academic Department always hovered close, but John was far too elusive for them. His hail-fellow-well-met atti- tude will be sorely missed, and the absence of his sunny countenance deeply felt. But the Army is gaining an exceptional leader. Sergeant 1 ,' Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 , Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 , Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. PETER JOSEPH OLDFIELD D-1 Ajax Cohasset, Massachusetts Pete was West Point's own Mort Sahl. His work on company signs will always be remembered by the men of D Company. His motto: "Spooniness is next to impossible", was probably arrived at through his undying eiorts to keep a good appearance and to maintain a sharp room. The radio he built in our electricity lab was his most outstanding accomplishment. Good luck to a swell guy and a most promising career man. Sergeant 1,' English Literature Seminar 3,' Mathematics Forum 2, 1,' Ordnance Club 4, Radio Club 4, 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 2, Russian Club 4, 3, Astronomy Club 4, Pistol Club 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. ROBERT LAIRD ORD, III H-2 Bob Medford Lakes, New Jersey From the backwoods of New Jersey, West Point acquired a tremendous guy and a hard worker in Bob Ord. He has always been an individual, whether on the Football field or diligently practicing his guitar. He is well known throughout the Corps for his dynamic personality and inner-aggressiveness which will carry him to success in all endeavors. Captain 1 ,' Football 4, 3, 2, Monogram 3, Track 4, 3, Wrestling 3, 2, Honor Committee 2, 1, Investigating Ojicer 1, Radio Club 3, French Club 4, 3,' Handball Club 3, 2, Skin Diving Club 3, 2. THOMAS FRANK OSTENBERG C-1 Tom Alexandria, Virginia A quick wit, an ability to make others happy and a genuine sincerity characterize this very likeable guy. Tom's ability to do well in anything he undertook, in athletics, academics or extracurricular activities, was a source of inspiration to his classmates. His willingness to lend a helping hand and his ever-smiling friendly face will not soon be forgotten by the men on the Hudson. Lieutenant 1, Lacrosse 4, 3, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, Newman Forum 3, 2, German Club 2, Sailing Club 3, Shi Club 4, 3, 2, Shin Diving Club 2. EDWARD JOSEPH PABICH H-2 Ed Hartford, Connecticut Having spent some time at college before entering West Point, Ed was a bit surprised with the situation at West Point. It was a long and high climb from the academic battles in plebe math to the Dean's List but Ed made it. His personal interests covered everything from electronics to the function- ing of the stock market. I am sure many a tac's ear has been tuned by the stereo staccato which permeated his ceiling into Regimental Headquarters. Lieutenant 1, Catholic Choir 4, Radio Club 2, 1, Portuguese Club 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 3, HI-FI Club 1 .' Pistol Club 3, Rifle Club 3. ED PABICH 241 x X4 fa 'QQ mmf' ii'2IA'2,4'Nt'!-9 4 0' , ifllg, llllllW KENNETH RICHARD PAKULA M-2 Ken Worcester, Massachusetts Ken's four years at West Point have presented him with the challenge to live up to the motto, "I came, I saw, I conquered". This he has done with obviously favorable results. His easy-going personality and determined attitude Will continue to insure his success as he embarks upon his service career. Lieutenant 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. LIUIO FREDRICO PARDI B-2 Lee Gainesville, Florida "Il Duce" is a true artist and a true Roman. He also is a true friend to all of us who know him, even though we weren't fortunate enough to be born in Rome. Lee added a lot to help make four years pass by quickly. With his sense of humor and home-grown philosophy, he should have a long, successful, and happy career. Sergeant 1,' Pistol 4, 2, 1, Major A 1,' Mathematics Forum 1,' French Club 2, Pointer 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Camera Club 4, 3, Fencing Club 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Sailing Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Skeet Club 4, 3, Parachute Club 2, 1. WAYNE BRANDT PARKER E-2 Woops Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Although Wayne's home was displaced after coming to West Point, he still feels a strong tie with Massachusetts for a reason well known to all his friends and to a certain little girl. Wayne's conscientiousness and firmness of purpose carried over in all his cadet activity as is known especially well by his opponents on the athletic field. Strange noises and "Roombal1" are synonymous with Wayner. We wish him continued success in his career. Sergeant 1 ,' Honor Committee 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2,' Ski Club 3, 2,' Rugby Club 2. LARRY WAYNE PARMENTER B-1 Parameter Murphysboro, Illinois Larry always found the trip to the hall closet shorter and more convenient than the trek to the basement, when stashing away unauthorized articles, unfolded laundry, tennis shoes, ukuleles and so forth. Weill never forget the time the inspecting oflicer was there to point the way. One can never underestimate the value of camouflage and concealment! Sergeant 1,' Radio Club 4, 3, 2, Debate Council QQ Forum 45 French Club 3, 2,' HI-FI Club 4, 3, 2, Handball Club 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2. BRUCE B. PARSONS K-2 Bruce Sparrowbush, New York While always upholding the Kappa Dos ironclad discipline, Bruce has established a reputation for being a true hive. Being a native New Yorker from the metropolis of Sparrowbush, Bruce has proven himself to be a great leader in athletics and "Beat Navy" campaigns. We, his classmates, expect great achievements from Bruce wherever his career takes him. Sergeant 1,' Cheerleader 2, 1,' Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, Mathematics Forum 3,' Astronomy Club 3, 2, Pointer 3, Ski Club 3, 2. ANTHONY ARTHUR PATTAROZZI B-2 Art Oglesby, Illinois Coming from a small town near Chicago, Art immediately impressed us with his open friendliness and a desire to please. His love of sports and competition gained him much accomplishment and respect. Hard work and intense study gave Art the upper-hand with the academic department. These attributes make us proud to call him our classmate. Sergeant 1 ,' 150 Lb Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major "A" 2, 1 ,' Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 25 Newman Forum 4, 35 Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3: French Club 4, 3, 2g Handball Club 4, 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. 242 QQ'-A KEN PAKU LA Awami like LEE PARDI WAYNE PARKER ,A , V" -I I'-A X .A P . 4 w-aw., fb' x ' V' f "1 ax-.. ' ,f ,' Q- . Q vu . .-wg, A .,'+,'76'N.:'f"V1J 3-f,.,. -., 1- A ,, ,..R Q-,. 3- - j 'as ,,...' ,WL ,-.. 'B ' N .v ,. .- ' - M 1 effiff ' .41 3 -5 Q . N -Q - , Q--u fig. . , w . bi ln Q A3 w N , ,N A L' xp. J' x.. ,N - , 'K 'A QNX A I fu 1 .. . yy' ' xwuf - and .2 Ne Jw,-sf-.. . N 5" - .f . iwlggi' 9 h xxx X z ' W., xx ll , !S . .,. . A 1' ..-......, E Y .fi IQQG 'ur-M'1vy. -milf' LARRY PARMENTER BRUCE PARSONS ART PATTAROZZI 243 ffdi-Z GARY PAXTON ALBIE PEARSON 244 DONALD PEDERSON RUDY PENCZER JOE PENDERGRAFT RAY PENDLETON S fl WSP ff--f S -S K -A g'g"+. 1 " xt V T-E:fflT"i'?, 1 sg-. Q52'fQQ. ,pw 5 1 X -any-45 1, I ' 1" ,4 X, 131 Vg "' 7 M fx fo u e l Q X F J GARY LEE PAXTON D-2 Pax Sitka, Alaska Pax. driven from home by 95 lbs of Boxer, Duke, comes from our largest state. He was the major spark for D-2's intramural power. Capping the intramural cross country record, he went on to lead D-2 to the Banker's Trophy during his third class year. He is a confirmed bachelor for weeks at a time. Pax is a fighter all the way and never gives up. Sergeant 1, Basketball 4, Spanish Club 3, Howitzer 4, 3. THOMAS DAWSON PEARSON, JR. C-1 Albie Fort Sill, Oklahoma Thomas Dawson Pearson Jr. is known to his classmates as Albie, an epithet they appropriately borrowed from the spirited baseball player of the old Washington Senators. He will be remembered by all for his ability to do a job quickly and efficiently, and for his dry English sense of humor which has caused many smiles. His fine professional attitude will carry him far in his future Army career. Sergeant 1 ,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2, Ordnance Club 3, 2, 1, Radio Club 4, KDET 4, Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Law Club 1. DONALD F. PEDERSON F-2 Czar Duluth, Minnesota Like the dinner gong of a North Woods lumber camp, the name Czar will always ring a friendly note with us. And if you can't 1'ind him in "the rack" high upon his rockbound alcove rail, he might well be ringing, as one of the Chapel Chimers. The name Czar stems from his ability with the Russian language, and added to his other capabilities, you find a mighty worthy member of 62. ' Sergeant 1,' Chapel Chimers 4, 3, 2, Mathematics Forum 2, Radio Club 4, 3, French Club 4, 3, 2, Pistol Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 2. RUDOLF E. PENCZER F-2 Rudy Fairfield, Connecticut Fairfield will be mighty proud of Rudy's achievement while at the Academy. He is known as the science whiz of his class. For four years, he has been the leader in this field. In his pastime, the "penz" can be seen on the courts, battling out his matches of tennis and squash. In the future, Rudy will probably be responsible for the first Moon rocket. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3, 1,' German Club 2,1213 1,' Chess Club 3, 2, 1, Vice President 2, Handball Club 3, 1, Bridge u 3, 1. JOE EDWARD PENDERGRAFT H-1 HUM Joe Joplin, Missouri High spirited enthusiasm and a perpetually jovial manner have distin- guished Joe among his comrades in gray. His ability, fine sense of humor and regard for details are sure to make him successful in any endeavor. Lieutenant 1 ,' Soccer 4, Hop Committee 3, 2, 1 ,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. RAYMOND ALDEN PENDLETON E-2 Ray New Orleans, Louisiana Known by his drags for keeping the South well represented at West Point, especially during football season, Ray's fraternization with the Northern lot has also been a subject of enviable comment. Although never finding that happy medium in academics while soaring up and down "The Tubes" from advanced at last sections, this Pistoleer is well liked for his steadfast and sincere personality. Sergeant 1 ,' Pistol 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Minor A 3, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Public Information Detail 2, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, President, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Skin Diving Club 3, 2, 1. 245 .sqft QW was rf A' 5:-I dp xx, W v 5 skew! Q K, W kr,?' 3 6 lil ,Q l , ELDON LEE PERDEW F-2 Don and Clod Hastings, Nebraska The Clod seems somewhat a misnomer for this very able member of the Class of 1962, a paradox personified. A fine athlete, Don also was chosen as an Honor Representative by his classmates. Behind that easy going com- posure, we found a friend, a laugh, a leader. Captain 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 2,' Honor Committee 2, 1, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, Handball Club 3,' Ski Club 4, 3. JAMES CRAWFORD PETERSON K-2 Pete Palm Beach, Florida Pete came to West Point from the Bolles School and the Warm Palm Beach climate. Changing from Navy blue into Kaydet grey and from tropical to frigid climes did not at all upset Pete's good humor. However, the Math Department at times caused him a twitch of concern. Nonetheless, after the Hmurk of it all" Pete came out way on top by a few "tenths" and a top player on Coach Nordlie's Squash and Tennis team, as well. We believe Pete's drive and friendliness will take him far in any pursuit. Sergeant 1 ,' Tennis 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Captain 1 ,' Squash 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Astronomy Club 3,' Shi Club 4. JOSEPH ANTHONY PETROLINO, JR. K-1 Pietro West New York, New Jersey Pietro fitted in perfectly with K-1's tradition. It took a little over a year, but finally he was taking his twice-a-week stroll across Central Area. A thirty year man at heart, Pietro has done an excellent job in all his under- takings at "Woo Poo" as evidenced by being on the Dean's List most of the time and being selected for the Honor Committee. Pietro will be the Army's gain and K-1's loss. Sergeant 1, Honor Committee 2, 1,' Ring dt Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council LQ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. WILLIAM DOOLEY PETTY I-1 Bill Guthrie, Oklahoma Bill was one of the most scientific minded men around the Corps. His coaching ability saved many from the wrath of the academic boards. A typical westerner, Dooley is a man of few words and strong convictions. His persistence and tenacity, coupled with his sunny smile, will stand him in good stead in his career. Sergeant 1,' Newman Forum 4, 3, Mathematics Forum 1, Debate Council di Forum 45 Russian Club 4,' Pointer 4, 3, 25 Dialectic Society 4, 3,' Camera Club 2, 1,' Art Club 3, 2, 1, Vice President 2, Treasurer 1,' Ski Club 2, 1. BILL P. PFEIFER K-1 Pete Maryville, Missouri Missouri gave Gen. Pershing and Gen. Taylor to the Academy and Pfeif to the Class of '62, Although he did not establish any academic records, Pete never experienced any difiiculties in his academics and never allowed a study assignment to keep him from a good book or his beloved "Brown Boy". However, his zeal and ardor for a party anytime was unmatched in the Corps. All those who know Pfeif realize that he will always be a success in any endeavor to which he sets his red-head. Captain 1, Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1,' Catholic Choir 45 Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3,' Portuguese Club 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rifle Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3. DAVID JOHN PHILLIPS B-1 DJ- West Point, New York At 10:00 every morning, the room would be filled, everyone waiting for the "poop" from our company "hive", Always willing to help with a happy-go- lucky smile, D.J. was well liked by everyone. When it wasn't studies, it would be sports or movie starlets. We're sure Dave will have success with everything he does. Best of luck to a great guy. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2,' Class Committee 3, 2, 1g Public Relations Council 2, 1 ,' French Club 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 2, 1. PIETRO PETROLINO 246 DON PERDEW PETE PETERSON BILL PETTY PETE PFEIFER DAVE PHILLIPS 247 Z 44 K N.-.5,.6, ,A im: i BOB PHILLIPS DWAYNE PIEPENBURG STEVE PIERCE mmwmmewf PHIL PONS Q., JOHN PORTER ROBERT LESLIE PHILLIPS K-1 Bob Phoenix, Arizona Bob is a man who likes to succeed-and does. This is the one characteristic which has been most noticeable about him throughout his four years at West Point. His success as a master rifieman and as a debater are but two prime examples of his success. Lieutenant 1,' Rifle 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council Kc Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, Rifle Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1,' Shi Club 2, 1. DWAYNE DONALD PIEPENBURG K-1 Pieps Litchfield, Minnesota From central Minnesota came our Kappa Uno farmboy. With Pieps came his unceasing desire to excel as a cadet. When not busy studying or admiring his accomplishments in the class, sallyport or getting out of a possible slug, Dwayne was always helping others. Success is sure to follow him after graduation. Sergeant 15 Wrestling 4,' Mathematics Forum 2, 1,' Debate Council JZ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 45 Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3. STEVEN DURWARD PIERCE F-1 Rabbit Clarksburg, California When Rabbit left the land of smog and broken hearts, little did he know what West Point and the East had in store from him. Here, he found his heart's desires: pretzels, a "brown boy" and the Jersey Shore. Since he had no trouble with academics, he found plenty of time for all. His ability, sincerity and unlimited energy will see him through to greater things in later years. Captain 1 ,' Stars 3, 2,' Squash 4, 3, Lacrosse 4, 3, Manager 4, 3,' Honor Com- mittee 2, 1 ,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council dt Forum 4,' German Club 4, 3,' Camera Club 2, 15 HI-FI Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 1,' Shi Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 4, 3. PHILIP E. PONS, JR. F-2 Phil Ft. Eustis, Virginia With a background as an "Army Brat", and a few years prior service to assist him, Phil took cadet life in stride. Numerous bouts with the Academic Department failed to dampen his spirits. When Phil wasn't talking about the Army, he was generally sailing. His warm personality and devotion to the military will always be a valuable asset. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 15 Newman Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice-President, Ski Club 4, 3,' Sailing Team 3, 2, 1. JOHN D. PORTER, JR. E-1 John Reno, Nevada An Army brat, he has served us well, both winter and spring on the riiie team. A true "goat", he survived his clashes with academics with relative ease. Quiet, but friendly, he will certainly find success in the Army. Sergeant 1,' Rijie 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 2, German Club 4, KDET 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Rifle Club 4, 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. JOSEPH G. PORTER, JR. A-1 Joe San Antonio, Texas Joe is one of Texas' many fine contributions to the Corps. Joe seemed to always be doing some work for some extracurricular activity throughout the Corps, but in spite of this, he always found time to give a classmate help. With this fine beginning, we all know that Joe will have a brilliant career in the Army. Sergeant 1g Honor Committee 2, 1,' Sunday School Teacher 2, 15 Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 2, 1, Spanish Club 3,' Dialectic Society 3, 2, 1g KDET 4, 3, 2, 1,' Golf Club 2, 1, Custodian 1g ,Handball Club 3,' Sailing Club 4,' Shi Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Advertising Chairman 2. JOE PORTER 249 5 ci ,.,. h rx! ns .. X 2 ,fa K -. f T 4' 4" . xg si :3 1: agi.--5 ' xv 'lil32:e..Jl"7'i":' , , , ,Agfa f- , 4-, ,zjqwu-a 3 . f e,,,Q.gv., .f ' 6 . ,, , C, 'Q ,ff "7 by fe .4 Lv , ' .Q X , . 1 FX If wh . , 'H Q-its swf 02554542-'li will yy i giljllmmllll PHILIP WALDEMAR POULSEN E-1 Phil Littleton, New Hampshire Ph1l's four years at the Academy have been one continuous fight. He fought the "T.D.", The Hospital and the Academic Department. CPhil is the only man 1n the class to be "turned in" rather than "out" in Fluidsj. But his perseverance and desire to do well have helped him to win his fight and point him in the right direction for a successful career. Sergeant 1,' Sunday School Teacher 2,' Ordnance Club 3,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2,' Camera Club 3, 2,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 3,' Shi Club 4, 3, 2. DONALD A. PRICE I-1 DOH Lebanon, Tennessee A punky Lilliputian with a quick smile and a slow drawl, Dave came from Tennessee to fight Euclid and Russian. When the going got rough, Dave could always be counted on to get a job done. With spirit and enthusiasm, Dave will make a mark for all to follow. Sergeant 1 ,' Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4,' Pistol Club 3, Sailing Club 3. HOWARD TAFT PRINCE, II B-2 Howie Belton, Texas "Hitch your wagon to a star," symbolizes Howie's attitude toward any field of endeavor. Determination, diligence, perseverance, and just plain hard work, and an instinctive drive to gain the top, motivate Howie to rise above the ordinary. Never content to be only an above average cadet, he will not be satisfied until the gold stars he wears turn to silver. Lieutenant 1 ,' Baseball 4, 3,' Stars 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Protestant Discussion Group 1,' Pointer 4,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 1,' KDET Handball Club 1,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. RALPH WHITTAKER PRYOR B-1 Ralph San Francisco, California His nicknames were as many and as well known as were his quick retorts and uncontrollable smile. Probably no other cadet gained immunity from the heat of the Plain for so many years. Wars have followed him as have their triumphsg his future contributions to victories will but enhance a fine career. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1,' Astronomy Club 4, 3, 1,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 1. EUGENE RAMELLA K-2 Ram Ellwood City, Pennsylvania After a year of fraternizing in college, Gene was indeed meant to be in Kappa Dos. His easy going manner, along with his earnest attitude led to his becoming company Honor Representative. Upon escaping Plebe Eng- lish, he later proved his scholarship by joining the Dean's List. Ram's friends know that with his winning personality, he is bound to succeed, no matter what his field of endeavor. Sergeant 1,' 150 lb Football 4, 3, 2, 1,' Honor Committee 2, 1, Catholic Choir 45 Astronomy Club 3,' Camera Club 3,' Skeet Club 4. RICHARD .I. RANDAZZO F-2 Randy Arlington, Virginia Randy is one of the "granddads" of the Corps, having witnessed the military in Navy blue for a year prior to entering the Military Academy. The trans- fer was no problem, the academics came easily, the Dean's List was a cinch. Forever taking arms against the Tactical Department seems to be his pastime, while anxiously he awaits his graduation day and a promising future. Sergeant 1, Debate Council cb Forum 4, 3,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Howitzer 3, 25 Handball Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3. 250 PHIL POULSEN DON PRICE HOWIE PRINCE RALPH PRYOR GENE RAMELLA RANDY RANDAZZO 251 2.69-,If ,, as ,BJ TO'VI RFACH FRANKIE REASONER JACK REAVILL JIM REDMOND BOB REDMOND ual. MAAF" BUD REEVES We if ,yi ,P WP .V 6 Y ---' - g's'-G 'g Req ?'-3,5'S5TlQ.f ' V., . ' wi- kz 9 'QQRE-E, U 1.91 ! -E f' .LX ,ff 5- I I ei f fr xxx- X ,J . .X ,. YA, WILLIAM THOMAS REACH B 2 Tom Decatur, Georgia Although Tom is a native Rebel, his four years with Yankee roommates have corrupted his accent. When he wasn't "dragging", playing tennis, or re- organizing the CCA, he was busy making lifetime friends. "Hivey", athletic, and active, Tom was always a big asset to his class. With his perpetual grin and desire, he will always be a credit to himself and his service. Lieutenant 1,' Squash 4, Numerals 4,' Mathematics Forum 3, 2,' Debate Council 62 Forum 3,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 15 Handball Club 3, 2,' Shi Club 4, 3, Parachute Club 2, 15 Skin Diving Club 2, 1. FRANK STANLEY REASONER C-2 Frankie Kellogg, Idaho From Idaho came one of the best boxers West Point has ever seen. He accomplished an unprecedented feat by winning four Brigade Boxing Championships in four different weight classes. Frank also had his fights with the academic departments, but as usual he won, occasionally by a split decision. A Marine when he entered, four years have not changed his mind. The Marine Corps is getting the best we have to oifer. Lieutenant 1, 150 Lb Football 4, 3, Numerals 45 Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4,' Baseball 45 Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Cadet in Charge 1,' Spanish Club 1g Triathlon Club 3, Pointer 4, 35 Golf Club 2, 1,' Handball Club 15 Skeet Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 1 ,' Weight Lifting Club 4, 3. JACKSON CUSTER REAVILL L-2 Jack Flat Rock. Ilinois Jack is known throughout the Corps for his ready smile and friendliness. Competing in both corps squad football and lacrosse, he has proven himself a fine all-around athlete. He plans to marry Susie upon graduation, or short- ly thereafter. Sergeant 1,' Basketball 4,' Football 3, 2, 1, Monogram 3, 2, 1 ,' Lacrosse 3, 2, 1, Monogram 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Ac- counts Manager. JAMES LEONARD REDMOND K-2 Reds New Orleans, Louisiana With a booming rebel yell, Reds tromped out of the swamps of Louisiana determined to leave his mark. Little did he know his mark would be earned from the "old" Academic Department in the form ofa single star. The fields of friendly strife found Reds a vigorous competitor and his love of a prank made him a mainstay with the men of Kappa Dos. His easy smile and quick wit insure him success in any endeavor. Sergeant 1,' Newman Forum 4, 3, 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 3, 2, 1g Pistol Club 2, 1. ROBERT ALBERT REDMOND E-2 Rojo Barneveld, New York During his four years at West Point, Rojo came to be Well known and well liked by everyone he encountered. He was famous in Company E-2 for being the cadet who was most able to consistently defeat the Tactical Department and this he did on many occasions. Rojo will long be remembered by his classmates as the happiest cadet in the Class of '62. Sergeant 15 Hockey 4, Numerals 4,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, lg Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Golf Club 2, 1, Handball Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, 3,' Sailing Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. STACY EDWARD REEVES D-1 Bud Camas, Washington Washingtonls own triple threat has left a devastating trail on the fields of friendly strife. His soft-spoken manner has made him a real favorite with the "femmes". Cblondes in particularb His conscientious efforts as a cadet indicate a fruitful future and a successful Army career. Lieutenant 1 ,' Pistol 4, Numerals 45 Baseball 4, Numerals 4g Debate Council cQ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 2, 1 ,' Triathlon Club 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. 253 r fl, 'rf X " f la' I 'wb L5 2 597714 rx' :Z 0 lililll I , .i ,,. ,pr JOHN SOMERS REGAN D-1 Ranger Regan Nashua, New Hampshire John's wit, sense of humor and Irish temper will never allow him to be forgotten by the men of D Co. Although academics gave him a little trouble, he never failed to come through when the chips were down. One might say that his only weakness is a noisy breakfast table. His most outstanding chalracteristic is persistency, so keep plugging, John, you'll get that week- en yet. Sergeant 1, Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. RUSSELL OSBORNE REICH, JR. K-2 Mike Sunnyvale, California Russ, known to his West Coast friends as Mike, hailed from San Jose State and was always ready to relate tales of former college life. Never troubled with academics, Mike was able to develop his talent on several instruments. He excelled in water polo, but was never one to rest on his laurels and constantly strove to do better, K-2 will long remember its famous wandering minstrel. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, Swimming 4, 2, 1, Manager 2, 1,' Debate Council JZ Forum 4, 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 4, Ski Club 4, 2, Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1 ,' Bridge Club 3, 2, Judo Club 1. ROBERT LEO REID C-2 Bob Colorado Springs, Colorado Bob came to the Academy after serving three years in the Army. Somewhat older than most of his classmates, he had an initial advantage in the way of the Army. Activities took must of his time as did "dragging", He will be remembered as one who oifered his help and advice to anyone who needed it. Sergeant 1, Pistol 4,' Cross Country 3, 2, 1, Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 4, Pointer lf, 3, 2, 1, Associate Editor 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3. DENNIS J. REIMER . A-1 Denny Medford, Oklahoma Denny was always the guy down the hall that you could count on for help. Through his quiet manner and his eiiiciency, he won the respect of all his classmates and even though the Yankees didn't win, he always greeted you with a smile. With all this, we're sure Denny will make it to the top. Captain 1, Mathematics Forum 2, 1, Debate Council fi Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, KDET 4, 3,' Golf Club 2, 1, Handball Club 3, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rugby Club 2, 1. LAWRENCE JAMES REMENER L-1 Larry Millville, Pennsylvania Hailing from a small community in Pennsylvania, Larry could speak the language of the farmer and laborer as fiuently as that of the politician or soldier. Although never exceptionally fond of academics, Larry always appreciated being a West Pointer. Always striving for more difficult goals, never stopping short or taking the easier road, yet seldom failing, he is sure to succeed. Sergeant 1, Portuguese Club 3, KDET 4, Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1, Golf Club 2, Handball Club 3, Pistol Club 4, Skeet Club 4, 3, 1,' Ski Club 2, Bridge Club 3. WILL MAYRON REMINGTON IVI-2 Files Ukiah, California Files came to us from distant California. This left him as unfamiliar with the system as anyone. As a true hive he rapidy adjusted to all phases of life here. Files has eased through his four years with little trouble from either tactical or academic departments. He will make an officer in whom the Academy will be able to take pride. Sergeant 1, Stars 2, 1, Cross Country 4, Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2, 1, Deputy Superintendent 2, Protestant Discussion Group 4, 3, 2. BOB REID 254 JOHN REGANV T .E MIKE REICH tgv""s4f 'W ffqxt 'Ln' YQ, 1, 4' 2,35 1 x K' " ," X Q lvl --""'F"""" DENNY REIMER LARRY REMENER WILL REMINGTON ,M ff 4'-nn" . ,Q , 255 KEV RENAGHAN LARRY RICHARDSON my .1 rw- ' ig' f BOB RICKS W I M., SW , , r 'if R ' ? y M Swan . 256 'Q f-H13 JOE RI GBY AVF R IGGS 5 ff-5? ff sp 5191 S -T ,,,-, . P37 Jr 6 :C1,?l2::l':?, 1- .Z--5: 1 fx -may-iso f N My . . 15, . it ye N I '- " 1' KEVIN GEORGE RENAGHAN E 2 Kev Hingham, Massachusetts Kev will be remembered by all as the man with the wide toothsome grin who forgot his "r's" every now and then. Kev was a true friend and if he couldn't solve your problems, he had problems of his own for you to solve. We will remember him as a cheering inspiration whose sincerity and in- terest in people will make him an asset anywhere and a friend to all who meet him. Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4,' Hockey 4, Numerals 4,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Mathematics Forum 3, Debate Council di: Forum 4, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Astronomy Club 4,' Howitzer 4,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, Handball Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rugby Club 2, 1. LAWRENCE CRAIG RICHARDSON E-2 Berkeley, California Craig benefited from his experience with a dart board Plebe year because many of his escapades in later years were never noticed by The Department. Even though his lifelong ambition of remaining a bachelor after gradua- tion was quickly terminated, he could not devote every hour to escorting on weekends, since he became rather attached to the cement of central area. Sergeant 1 ,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, German Club 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, 2. ROBERT E. RICKS, JR. H-1 Snoopy Georgetown, South Carolina Bob arrived at West Point wearing a smile that has outlasted the frown of the Tactical Department and the scowl of the Academic Department. His amiability and willingness to help have earned Bob many close friends and contributed to his reputation as being both devoted and capable. A success- ful career is guaranteed Bob by his cheerful attitude and ability to work. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4,' Track 2, 1, Major A 1, Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Prot. Discussion Group 4, 3, Howitzer 2, 1, Dialectic Society 2, 1, Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, Scoutmasters Council 3, 2, 1, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOE W. RIGBY K-1 Riggs Lockney, Texas A favorite son from Texas, Riggs has proven his worth to Kappa Uno: athlete, intramural type, ladies' man, New Jersey variety, and all Army, airborne ranger type. Dividing his time between DCXLF, reading and a sprinkling of "pad", Joe has developed into an institutional ideal. There is no doubt that success is in store for the future leader of Rigby's Raiders. Lieutenant 1, Radio Club 4, 3, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Triathlon Club 2, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Skin Diving Club 2, 1. DAVID KERR RIGGS E-2 Dave Washington, D.C. An Army brat, Dave will find himself in familiar surroundings after grad- uation. He has distinguished himself here at West Point as a "hive", and many an evening has found him coaching various subjects for those of us who are less endowed. Always friendly and likeable, Dave will have no trouble gaining the respect of his fellow officers in the Army. Sergeant 1, Stars 3, 2, 1,' Mathematics Forum 2, 1, Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 3, Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Associate Editor 1,' Dialectic Society 3, 2, 1, KDET 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4,' Hundredth Night Show 3, 2, 1, College Bowl 2. ROBERT E. RINTZ F-1 Bob Philadelphia, Pennsylvania A member in good standing of the UAKQJ 10 society", Bob has carried F-Co through the years with his pudgy smile and good humor. "Mr, Prez" of the Audio Club also helped carry many an F-Co "file" to N.Y.C. and some swinging weekends. If you were looking for Bob you usually found him behind the Armor book or digging the latest sounds. Sergeant 1, Mathematics Forum 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, German Club 4,' Dialectic Society 3, 2, Ticket Representative 2, Hi-Fi Club 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1, Fencing Club 4, Pistol Club 3, Ski Club 4. BOB RINTZ 257 fir? JE' if DTT' ,-- ' 97 l lui WAIDE MEILAND RISHEL, JR. M-2 Rish Sharon, Pennsylvania After a year of coed campus life, Rish came to the Rock to find evening C.Q.'s and Saturday classes a "mild" shock. He distinguished himself as a member of the Century Club and Pointer photo-staff. He showed he possessed the spirit and sense of humor to come out on top in any situation. Sergeant 1, Rifle 45 Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Radio Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council JZ Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3,' Astron- omy Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Dance Orchestra 4, 3, Camera Club 4, 3,' HI-FI Club 4, 3, 1,' Chess Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rifle Club 4, 3g Parachute Club 2, 1,' Rugby Club 2. ALLAN DODGE ROBB A-1 Al . Lawrence, Kansas A short whirl with the service after high school was incentive enough for a successful attempt to enter the Academy with the "Can Do" Class of '62. The harrassed passage into North area was made straight from a Kansas farm and has now blended in with memories of "super thermo", advanced math and guard duty in the fog at Camp Buckner. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1,- Track 3, 2, Mathematics Forum 3, 2g Russian Club 4,' Camera Club 3, 2,' Pistol Club 2, Ski Club 4, 3, Rocket Society. CHRISTOPHER RUTHERFORD ROBBINS E-1 Chris Washington, D.C. Breezing into "Beast Barracks" at the one minute bell for assembly, this ex-terrapin from Maryland was somewhat surprised at the lack of wine, women and song here at The Rock. Undaunted, however, and with guitar in hand, Robbie continued to raise the devil with the female population for his four years at the Happy Valley. His combination of a winning smile and a helping hand will insure his success for the years to come. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 3, 2, Monogram 3, 2,' Class Committee 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council JZ- Forum 4, 3, Company Representative 3,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Portuguese Club 2, Astronomy Club 3,' Golf Club 1,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1,' Sailing Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Water Polo Club 2g Parachute Club 1. RICHARD ROHRBACHER I-I-1 Dick Saugus, Massachusetts Roby will be remembered in H-1 for his quick wit, ability to get along with anyone and his Aryan traits. Dividing his time between athletics and the "brown boy" left him little time for the books. Being a man of enormous stores of knowledge, his association with the academics was only a slight momentary interlude. He spent most of his weekends down on Flirty with his typewriter, dreaming about his future. With his leadership ability and personality, all his friends will agree that Dick will have little trouble achieving whatever he desires. Lieutenant 1,' Football 45 Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council :Q Forum 4,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 2, President 1 ,' Triathlon Club 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1,' KDET 3,' Golf Club 2,' Sailing Club 3g Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JERRY DEAN ROSE I-1 Jerry South Bend, Indiana Jerry joined the Corps with the same enthusiasm and drive that We all had in the beginning, but he never let anything dampen his outlook on life. He has always been willing to put his best into everything, be it managing behind the scenes work for the One Hundredth Night Show or the tra- ditional company "orphan's party." Academic and Tactical departments have been unable to get the best of this determined "runt." It is certain that he will overcome future obstacles with equal ease. Sergeant 15 Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 3, 1,' Pointer 4,' Dialectic Society lf, 3, 2, 1,' Camera Club 1,' Ski Club 2g Rocket Society 1. MICHAEL JEFFREY ROSENBERG M-1 Mick Glendale, California Cocky, cheerful, and full of life, Rosie was sure that "plebe" year and life in general were a game. Yet he played it well. Always happy, even if his roommates weren't, and singing at reveille, he made our stay a little more pleasant. He will be a fine addition to the ranks of the Army. Sergeant 15 Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, Jewish Choir 4, 3, 2,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 2,' French Club 2,' Pistol Club 4. 258 W ' s ' I K , H, WAIDE RISHEL AL ROBB , r..L. f CHRIS ROBBINS 'Hu DICK ROHRBACHER JERRY ROSE MICK ROSENBERG 259 BILL ROSS DORSEY ROWE MAX RUCKER 260 BOB RUMPH AL RU SHATZ HARRY RYAN T if as iff J 5-T-. I ' .ff '+Z55EQQ'7.,"- s'olY y'mS??LT i 1 ' Q, ff, A W -. 7 2? FN ,ff X-fel WILLIAM L. ROSS, JR. L 2 Bill Allen Park, Michigan A big city boy, Bill wasted no time in becoming one of the most popular members of L-2. A sharp wit and a ready smile are his greatest assets. He never knew failure at any thing he tried at the Academy. Whatever branch of the Army Bill selects, he will do well with these traits. Sergeant 1 ,' Rifle 4,' Pointer 3, 2,' Pistol Club 3,' Rifle Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 4, 1, Parachute Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 3. DORSEY EDWARD ROWE D-2 Wedge Kansas City, Missouri Arriving at West Point with a year of college behind him, Wedge rapidly developed a fond aiiinity for the ever present "brown boy". He spent his periodic waking moments engaged in a varied number of extracurricular activities, "dragging" being a prominent one, and arguing the seemingly endless advantages of Armor. His sense of humor and knack for organizing should take him far in the years to come. Lieutenant 1g Debate Council 49: Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Astronomy Club 2g Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Circulation Manager 1,' Dialectic Society 2, 1,' Glee Club 3, 2, 1, Business Manager 3, 2, 15 Scoutmasters Council 3, Pistol Club 3,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Skin Diving Club 2, 1. JACK LEON RUCKER B-2 Max Burlington, Iowa A native Hawkeye, Jack quickly adopted the ways of West Point. Employing his vocal talent whenever possible, Jack enjoyed the loose atmosphere of the lower academic sections. Playing games with the "TD" was a favorite pastime, especially concerning TV. Having conquered the plebe system, "cow" academics, and FCA's, Jack will continue forward as a true credit to the service. Sergeant 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1g French Club 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 2, 1 ,' Handball Club 2,' Pistol Club 3, 1 ,' Skeet Club 4, 3g Parachute Club 2, 1 ,' Weight Lifting Club 4, 3. ROBERT RAYMOND RUMPH M-7 Bob Bellmore, New York Having spent several years at West Point as an Army brat, Bob was forced to face several former neighbors across the academic battleground.-Yet his four years at the Academy were profitable ones. He follows in his devotion to complete a task well done. Sergeant 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir B Squad 4, 3, 2,1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 1 ,' Spanish Club 3, 1,' Hi-Fi Club 1,' Rocket Society 1. ALFRED S. RUSHATZ L-1 Al KShatzj Allentown, Pennsylvania At Allentown High School it was determined that as an athlete Al Rushatz would be a man to be reckoned with. Since coming to West Point he has proved this by being a leading ground gainer on the football team, Eastern Wrestling Champion, and Captain of the Wrestling team. His drive and diligence will surely help him attain whatever goalshe desires. Lieutenant 1, Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1g Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3g German Club 4, 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 1, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4. JAMES CHARLES RYAN C-1 Harry Bronx, New York A great hotel lobby baseball player, Harry turned to football at times, and rose to new heights in the classic "Snow Bowl". The "T.D." thought ill of his prowess, however, and brought a tragic end to his playing days. With a new fare, meter running, number 12 moves out, never to be forgotten. Sergeant 1 g Catholic Choir 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3 g Handball Club 1,' Ski Club 4, 3. 261 4 'X -is-ith 'J' K. .L.' -51' 4 in I RICHARD THOMAS RYER E-1 Dick Malverne, New York Dick went from high school to Braden's Prep for three months and then entered the Academy. Finally he gained a star Cturnout, that isb in January of second class year. He started playing Lacrosse third class year and followed it through second and first class years. We wish him good luck in his future, which is sure to be bright. Sergeant 1 ,' Track 4, Lacrosse 3, 2, 1, Monogram 3, Major A 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 3,' Pointer 2,' Handball Club 3. MARCIAL DAVID SAMANIEGO G-1 Sam Concepcion, Paraguay Sam left the warmth of the South American sun to become a member of the cold grey line. His aggressiveness on the soccer field was carried over to his endeavors in every-day cadet life. His presence at "W.P." did more for Paraguay-U.S. relations than a host of diplomats could have done. Everyone who knew him will not soon forget G Co.'s representative from "faraway Paraguay". Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major A 2,' German Club 3,' Portuguese Club 4, Glee Club 4,' Pistol Club 3. LAWRENCE THOMAS SANDERS B-2 Larry Being an Air Force "brat", Larry has resided in several states, but he takes pride in referring to Montgomery, Alabama as his home. A deeply sincere person and an extraordinarily hard worker, he distinguished himself on the athletic field and in academics during his four years at West Point. Larry always has a smile for everyone, and well liked by all who know him. Captain 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1,' 150 Lb Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Major A 2, 15 Track 4, 3, 2, 1,' Sunday School Teachers 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 2, 1, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1,' Special Programs Committee 3, 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Skeet Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. GEORGE CLAUDE SARRAN H-1 El Texano San Antonio, Texas The constant death struggle with the academic department and the calling of the "brown boy" were the major conflicts in George's life. When this wasn't the case, he would be conniving for a weekend "drag", addressing himself as "El Texanon. We're sure by now El Texano has found his per- manent Weekend partner. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, Dialectic Society 4,' Sailing Club 3,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2. RONNY JOE SAYERS H-2 Joe Clearfield, Pennsylvania Joe came from the mountains of Pennsylvania with a casual attitude that not even West Point was to shake. The combination of his easy-going attitude and a desire to do a good job have made him well known around the Corps and in the handball courts. With the addition of wheels, in the form of a dashing sports car, and his fine personality, Joe is sure to go far in the future. Sergeant 1 ,' Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Manager 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3,' HI-FI 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Skin Diving u 3, 2, 1. FRANCIS JOSEPH SAZAMA A-1 Saz Schererville, Indiana Although Saz has had his differences of opinion with the Academic Depart- ments, he's always had the time to make new friends. He will always be remembered for his sympathetic and understanding nature, and is sure to make one of the finest oflicers in the Army. We all look forward to seeing him again. Sergeant 1, Football 4, Numerals 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 1 ,' Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Skin Diving Club 3, 2, 1, President 1. LARRY SANDERS 262 DICK RYER SAM SAMANIEGO Ji -3.5. N175 , e 'WRHPW' GEORGE SARRAN JOE SAYERS FRANCIS SAZAVIA Z --.M has A L SCARSELLA FRANCIS SCHARPF LAWRENCE SCHEEWE , au- J K c I Q . I , gas 'K k aw .. , ,K .N . t O .R 0 A GEORGE SCHEIN BILL SCHERR X 4 ,J ,lv iii-G 411 L - 3 Agia:-Digg 3 'E- f 'x 'WNQLQL1' xii ,f 15' is " ,T fx .ff nb l. xv, ,. 1 ALAN NARSETE SCARSELLA M 1 Scarse Rochester, New York Crou.ched over his desk with his nose three inches from a sketch pad, Scarse refused to allow academics to interfere with his first and greatest love-art. If he had a temper, he never lost itg few who met him will forget his shy grin and good deeds. Quiet and friendly, he will go a long way. Lieutenant 1g Honor Committee 1 ,' Catholic Choir 4,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 1, Art Editor 1,' Pointer 2,' Dialectic Society 2, 1,' KDET 4,' Art Club 4, 3, 1, Ski Club 4, 3,' Mortar Art Editor 3. FRANCIS ROBERT SCHARPF E-2 Snarfer, Frank Brooklyn, New York Snarfer, the proudest of the P.R.'s who carried his own light bulb, we say to bring light on the subject, was rarely without a good story, hearty laughter or the patience to listen to a friend's problems. Frank has amazed all of us who have seen him dancing with a certain blonde at West Point. We are sure he will amaze everyone else with his success in the Army. Sergeant 15 Track 4,' Hop Committee 3, 2, 15 Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 15 Newman Forum 4, 3,' Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Program Director 2, Vice-President 1,' Pointer 4, 2,' KDET 4,' Handball Club 1,' Ski Club 4, 3. LAWRENCE R. SCHEEWE C-1 Rusty Arlington, Virginia Rusty is athletic, scholarly, and lazy. Athletic enough to play football and box, scholarly enough to sneak on the Dean's List, still he always finds enough time to spend half of his day with his "brown boy". He attacks every thing like a freight train, and usually emerges victorious, just in time to look for "boodle" or go to bed. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 2,' Track 4, Numerals 4,' Lacrosse 4, 2,' Boating 35 Basketball 2,' Boxing 2, Brigade Champion 2,' Catholic Choir 4, 3,' Slfi Club 4. GEORGE SCHEIN D-1 Daddy Rabbit Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Old Doc Schein, or the Daddy Rabbit, as he is now frequently known, is Mr. 440 of D-1. "Making quality a habit" has been his motto throughout his four years at the Point. Soldier Schein has left his mark as an alfable chap, and a vibrator in the keenest sense of the word. Blond hair, blue eyes-his free days are numbered. Captain 1 ,' Football 4, 3,' Track 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 2,' Honor Com- mittee 2, 1, Chairman 1 ,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2. WILLIAM ANTHONY SCHERR E-2 Bill Valley Stream, New York Bill, the cadet with that New York smile that swooned all the girls, was always able to pull through when the chips were down. He will always be remembered as the man with a million problems-all Women! He took an active part in cadet life and was always interested in sports. When anyone heard that familiar accent, they knew that it was that friendly chap from Valley Stream, Long Island. Sergeant 1 ,' Track 4,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Newman Forum 3,' Debate Council :Q Forum 4, 35 Spanish Club 3, 2, 1g Pointer 4, 3, 2, 15 Outdoor Sports Club 3, Ski Club 3, 2, 1,' Rugby Club. JAMES KOONIGER SCHMIDT L-2 Jim Muskegan, Michigan The P.E. Department has caused Schmitty to Work and Worry, but this L-2 "file" will be remembered as keeping one jump ahead. Conscientious, yet with a sense of humor, this good friend to all has served the chapel acolytes in his spare time with an extra minute to add to that never-ending stream of letters. He has earned success in the years ahead. Sergeant 1,' Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3g Pistol Club 4, 3. JIM SCHMIDT 265 '-few: We New fl ffflyflflmmi JOHN LOUIS SCHMIDT M-2 Smitty Hamburg, New York John wasted little time in establishing himself as one of the standout play- ers on the plebe soccer and baseball teams. He continued to burn up the athletic fields throughout his cadet career, finding time between seasons to ward off the academic departments. His sense of humor and willingness to help others made him one of the best liked men in the company. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, 2, 1, Monogram 3, Major A 2, 1 ,' Baseball 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 3, Skeet Club 3, 2. MARLIN EDWARD SCHMIDT C-2 Mar St. Paul, Minnesota Wherever Mar goes, he will make friends with his Winning smile and pleas- ant personality. He is usually very carefree, but when a job needs doing his seriousness, will power and perseverance break forth to get it done right. Although he isn't gifted in either academics or athletics, he is a steady plugger who will always come out on top. Sergeant 1,' Radio Club 4,' Debate Council di: Forum 4, 2,' Russian Club 4, 3,' Pointer 2,' Skeet Club 4,' Ski Club 4,' Skin Diving Club 4. RODNEY JACK SCHMIDT K-1 Roddo Cleburne, Texas Rodney set up his "Brown Boy" as headquarters on the first of July. Since then he has used his textbooks as calendars-taking down each unopened set as a new season rolled around. But Roddo was also active. When not reading unauthorized literature, he was engaged in debating. No company party was complete without him. Sergeant 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 2, 1. PAUL DALE SCHOTT G-2 Schottzie Lafayette, Colorado The integral sign proved more of a stumbling block to Paul than the ski slope or the cross country course. Neither the fairer sex nor the gloom of WGR's could keep Paul from the lure of the woods. Neither the gloom of WGR's nor the loss of his pipe could dampen his wit nor prevent a smile. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 4g Class Committee 4, 3, 2, 1,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3,' Camera Club 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 1,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. MICHAEL G. SCHREDL A-1 S0h7'6d'rLik San Francisco, California A quiet and almost shy cadet, Schrednik had few "drags" and as an avid amateur radio operator, could always be found repairing someone's hi-fi or in the "radio shack." He proved himself an aggressive tiger on the playing fields of football, volleyball and rugby, and will always be remembered for his countless battles against the "T.D." and his dogmatic refusal to ever study . . . although usually on the Dean's list. When Michael graduates, the Army will be receiving West Point's finest. Sergeant 1 ,' Pistol 4,- Ordnance Club 4,' Radio Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Coun- cil and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' KDET 4,' Camera Club 2, 1 ,' Model Railroad Club 4,' HI-FI Club 4,' Chess Club 4,' Handball Club 3, 2,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Rugby Club 2, 1 ,' Audio Club 3, 2. STEPHEN ROBERT SCHWAM I-2 Steve Oak Park, Michigan A man never to turn down a good deal was our Steve. Since we have known him, he has been an enrichment to our fellowship. Always handy with the academic poop to help those who were not blessed with it, Steve was a great friend to have when in need of tenths. Coupled with this brain power, his determination and ability will carry him far whatever path he chooses. Sergeant 1 ,' Jewish Choir 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 3, 2, 1. 266 JOHN SCHMIDT MARLIN SCHMIDT RODNEY SCHMIDT U K Ll J W X u f ?' In ' 1, W, H. ,510 ww ' ' 5 ' 7 5 ,M F a ' k.',' jf? QW A F V nl-on-nllllf' PAUL SCHOTT MIKE SCHREDL STEVE SCHWAM 267 .-"" 1 Inf Q Q b N 'Y xxx? hH'1.Qi:, R Y W 14-1 ....-A GARY SEASHOLTZ JERRY SEAY JOHN SELBY 268 GARY SHARP ,.LW,, ,ll CHARLIE SHAW FRED SHEAFFER 5 kg F - -- A aa,"-4 ., ff X "is, ' :J , Nd If f rx 1' xfx X' Y GARY LEE SEASHOLTZ B 2 Wedge Pottstown, Pennsylvania While a cadet, Gary's biggest passions were "dragging" and squash. Still, Wedge saved time to be one of the most well-liked cadets in B-2. He always was able to take everything in his stride, academics and the TD included. We hope the chains of married life won't inhibit him too much, but we know Gary has a successful career ahead of him. Sergeant 1 5 Radio Club 4, 3, 25 French Club 4, 3, 25 Pistol Club 4, 35 Sailing Club 4, 35 Ski Club 4, 3. JERRY J. SEAY G-1 J. J. DeKalb, Texas He'd left his mark on Texas, so J. J. came to West Point to show the Army his talents. Sure of himself and his ability, he'll be remembered for both his outstanding performance as an athlete, and his fantastic ability to talk circles around anyone, about anything. A justiiiably confident man, Jerry can face the future with a certainty of success. Sergeant 1 5 Football 4, 35 Track 4, 3, 2, Major A 25 Cross Country 25 Public Relations Council 25 Radio Club 35 Debate Council and Forum 45 Spanish Club 4, 35 Camera Club 4, 35 Outdoor Sports Club 35 Model Airplane Club 35 HI-FI Club 3, 25 Pistol Club 4. .IUHN ROBERT SELBY L-1 Selbs Martins Ferry, Ohio Selbs never ceased to amaze everyone with his ambition and sense of humor, and he quickly gained a reputation for being unbeatable at the more serious aspects of cadet life, such as bridge. Although not too fond of aca- demics himself, Selbs never refused to help a classmate in need, and will be remembered by all as a true friend. Lieutenant 15 Wrestling 45 Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 25 Debate Council di Forum 4, 3, 25 Spanish Club 4, 35 Pointer 35 Golf Club 25 Handball Club 4, 3. GARY LINN SHARP L-2 Tweek Kansas City, Missouri Gary came to West Point from Kansas City, Mo., by way of Beloit College. Tweek always found time for his extra-curricular activities, which included sailing on the Hudson, gliding down the ski slope, diving on the bottom of Round Pond, or climbing the steepest cliffs at Buckner. When Tweek wasn't actively engaged he could be found with a good book. Sergeant 15 Track 45 Radio Club 3, 1 5 Debate Council 49: Forum 45 Spanish Club 15 Astronomy Club 35 Pointer 45 Dialectic Society 4, 35 Handball Club 35 Sailing Club 3, 2, 15 Ski Patrol 4, 3, 2, 15 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Skin Diving Club 3, 2, 1 5 Secretary 25 Cadet-in-Charge of Rock Climbing 2, 1. CHARLES LEO SHAW H-2 Charlie Bellerose, New York No situation was ever so dark that Charlie didn't have one of his classic comments ready. It would have been a much bleaker four years without the Shore's good humor to make us laugh. Whether it was leaping legally into the blue for Skydivers, or illegally into a cab for Highland Falls, he never gave us a dull moment. He will be an attribute to any organization and our best wishes follow him. Sergeant 15 Radio Club 4, 35 Debate Council dz Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Ski Club 3, 2, 15 Parachute Club 3, 2, 1. FREDERICK E. SHEAFFER M-2 Fred Dixon, Illinois Although Fred came to us from the farm lands of Illinois, he was quick to learn from his "city" classmates. Always active in a variety of activities, he was always willing and able to lend a hand with academics. Because of his many attributes, Fred's future will truly be a 'tcloudless sky." Sergeant 15 Cross Country 45 Debate Council di: Forum 3, 15 French Club 4, 35 Golf Club 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 35 Skeet Club 4, 3. 269 'M QED 1 ll!illllllljq1lllli1i 35152, . 'S fi 4' 5" 'tsffsz-Eg 1,13 'iw o ,ir 3 o H ui ll! ! 4 ll STEWART SHERARD C-2 Stew . Marshall, Missouri Stew came to West Point as the original "All American Boy"g it wasn't the guitar which he handled with finesse, but the basketball. His second class year he made the Little All American Team and led the nation in foul shooting. He captained the "Big Rabble" first class year and became one of the finest players in the history of the Academy. Lieutenant 1,' Basketball 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, Captain 1,' Public Information Detail 1, Spanish Club 15 Ski Club 4. DAVID JAMES SHOLLY M-1 Dave Kulpmont, Pennsylvania Fresh from the Valley Forge Military Academy, Dave came to West Point with his horn tucked underneath his arm. Pipe in mouth and pencil in hand, he fought the Academic Departments in a room filled with the strains of Stan Kenton. But Dave emerged from his cadet career hardly scarred by his activities on the Lacrosse "B" squad and the Math Department's "D" Squad. Sergeant 1,' Lacrosse 4, 2, Monogram 2,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' De- bate Council 62 Forum 4,' French Club 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 4,' Pistol Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 3, 2,1. WALTER ROGER SHOPE I-2 Rog Winter Park, Florida From the sunshine state of Florida to the wastes of the Upper Hudson Highlands came our own Roger. His cadetship may aptly be described in three words, "Veni, vidi, vici". From the hallowed halls of learning to the gory fields of athletic endeavorg from the stoic spires of Gothic barracks to the stately domes of pleasure, his accomplishments are as a torch to light the way of those who would follow. He will become an Engineer. Sergeant 1,' Rifle 4,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Skin Diving Club 3, 2. ROBERT DALE SHUEY C-1 Bob Bob was basically a quiet, withdrawn, serious individual when he first entered "The Rock". Gradually, thpugh, he developed a casual, "no sweat" attitude in addition to his old self, accompanied by a respectable number of outbursts of enthusiasm for sports cars. python pistols and Joe King's. He will be remembered, though, for his evil and yet warm smile and witty comments, which always made him a great guy to know and to call a friend. Sergeant 1 ,' Pistol 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 2, Ordnance Club 3,' German Club 2, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Vice President, Skeet Club 4,' Ski Club 4,' Skin Diving Club 2. STANFORD WOODRUFF SHUTES B-1 Skates San Mateo, California The "first corporal", famous for his Masters Tournament in which he "bogeyed" the nineteenth hole at Rucker, for the ability of his stomach to function entirely separately from its owner, and for his dog-like devotion to lst LT Evetts, he was also known, in some circles, as "the back-seat circus". Sergeant 1g Portuguese Club 3,' Pointer 4,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4,' Rifle Club 4,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Patrol 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 3, 2, 1. PETER STEPHEN SIEDZICK A-1 Pete Cranston, Rhode Island After serving one year at Brown University, Pete decided to re-enlist for a four year stretch at West Point. He attacked the Academic Departments mercilessly. After putting them at his mercy, he moved on to bigger and better things, thus excelling in the glee club and the Catholic Chapel choir. Pete will be an attribute to any branch of the service he chooses. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Executive Oyficer 1g Glee Club 3, 2, 1,' KDET 4, 3,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. ROG SHOPE 270 STEW SH ERARD DAVE SHOLLY E., -an-anvil" an BOB SHUEY STAN SHUTES PETE SIEDZICK :fn .M fi- , 271 BOB SIKORSKI TOM SIMCOX JOE SIMONEAUX f- --" w ' fl' VR F X, N Y 272 ' x i' ,g " L RONALD SKARUPA DICK SKLAR 674, fs P Xu X -1 N sr - i"' . iq f 322 'A --,fra-.,'::. . 2 1, qngixx 4 - ,X Q:3iasfjgg? . l IF 4 '9-1 1 IVF' ci ,f -f x: f . 5 YN. X ' K-fi fx ,fl lb ,s In ROBERT JOHN SIKORSKI C-2 Bob Lansing, Michigan Bob's home has moved from Michigan to Iran to Panama, but wherever it was, it must have been a lively one, for few people enjoy life as Bob does. A guy with a ready smile and an appropriate joke, Bob snowed more than one "femme" here on the banks of the Hudson. On the more serious side, how- ever, Bob's natural capability will take him a long way in this Army. Sergeant 1,' Pistol 4, 3, Debate Council :Q Forum 2, Pointer 4, Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Golf Club 2, Pistol Club 4, 3, Skeet Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 2. THOMAS ANTHONY SIMCOX A-2 Tom Knoxville, Tennessee Big Tom spent all kinds of time doing all kinds of things from making yell for the "rabble,' to sporting for the Pointer. He kept a pretty calm outlook on everything, except for occasional worrying about not knowing every girl between seventeen and twenty-two. Yet his only real ideal is to be as good an oHicer as his father. Sergeant 1, Cheerleader 1, Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1, Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 , Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Sports Editor 1, Dialectic Society 4, Glee Club 4, Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 1, Homecoming Committee, Chairman 2, 1959 Grenade, Editor, Sailing Team 4, 3, 2, 1. JOSEPH ALFRED SIMDNEAUX H-1 Joe New Orleans, Louisiana Joe came from the bayou country of Louisiana with a quiet and strong de- termination to conquer the Yankee school of West Point. Joe, however, has found it is easier to become one of the long grey line, through the coercion of "plebe year" and the "T.D." He is well liked by everybody and is a hard worker in "intermurder" and academics. Joe's cheerful smile is always an inspiration to anyone, even during the darkest of times, "gloom period." Sergeant 1 ,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2, Pointer 4, 3, Dialectic Society 4. RONALD ANDREW SKARUPA B-1 Scar Torrington, Connecticut Scar was a whiz in the three most important areas of cadet life, Flirtation Walk, the "Pad", and academics. The silent towhead was always quick to help anyone, even if it meant cutting down the Hi-Fi or putting away his guitar. He was living argument that Slavs are the master race and will al- ways be recalled as such. Sergeant 1, Public Relations Council 2, 1 ,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1, Model Railroad Club 3, 2, Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Skeet Club 2,1. RICHARD ROBERT SKLAR II G-2 Dick Sedalia, Missouri Never one to lose any sleep over academics, Dick was always able to find time to keep his address book up to date. The "Mizzoura" Flash of the "goat" football team was no less sensational on the golf links. Sklar was known to have magnitude but no sense of direction-unless it was towards Flirty or the golf course. Lieutenant 1, Track 4, 3, Golf 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Public Information Detail 2, 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Glee Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. BERNARD SKOWN G-1 Bernie Detroit, Michigan Bernie left his mark on everyone who knew him as a hard-working scholar, an enthusiastic athlete and one of those rare people who always seem to demonstrate a zest for living. His many friends will always remember his ability to keep his spirits high. Bernie can look forward to a very rewarding future. Sergeant 1, Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1,' SCUSA 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,- Dialectic Society 4, 3, Sailing Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, Bridge Club 4. BERNIE SKOWN 273 X xf-' fn rg-sf . W .w w fr in 1 'ipxve 5 gftfgf f q 5 lil ' -1 7 5 mlm! THOMAS J. SLAGGIE D-2 Hoover Winona, Minnesota A golden gopher from Winona, Hoover took one look at our rock-bound high- land home and chose the iive year plan. This was a boom for '62, Camp Buck- ner, Cow Trip, Firstie Trip-what a cry for help! We laughed so loudly at his numerous quips that the time passed as money in the hands of a spend- thrift. A true hero. Sergeant Ig Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1,' Radio Club 3, 1 ,' Astronomy Club 1 ,' Pointer 4, 3,' KDET 4,' Camera Club 2,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 1. DUANE L. SLATER K-2 Slate Ionia, Michigan Making the transition from two years of Michigan College life to the grind of cadet life might have caused apprehension in the mind of any college student, but Slate refused to be influenced by the world of the status seekers. His good nature and easygoing manner have been unhampered by four years of West Point. When not residing under the "brown boy" he could be found gleefully throwing the hammer. Slate will always be a tribute to the Kappa Dos spirit. Sergeant 1,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4,' Astronomy Club 4, 3, 2, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2,' Skeet Club 4. JOHN NORMAN SLOAN D-1 Sonny Harper, West Virginia From the hills of West-by-God Virginia came a fellow who, if size were determined by generosity and likeability, would be "six-six." A curly head of hair, a broad smile, a fine athlete, and the best friend a man could have- all describe that little Irish-Italian, Sonny. Lieutenant 1,' 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Minor A 3, Major A 2, 1, Lacrosse 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 2. DALE FRANKLIN SMITH I-2 Smitty Scottsburg, Indiana Smitty came to us from the Hoosier state and proved to be one of the more alfable members of the company. He was always ready to help anyone at anytime. His singing and sailing accomplishments were rewarded with many trips, which eased the pains of academics, somewhat. Good luck, Smitty, from us all. Sergeant 1 ,' Cross Country 4,' Sailing Team 3, 25 Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2,' Russian Club 4, 3,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' Bridge Club 2. LARRY DENNIS SMITH K-1 Los Angeles, California Larry always maintained that the greatest mistake Congress ever made was not putting West Point out westg specifically in California. His four years at the Academy were musical, to say the least. Whenever there was a K-1 party, and there Were many, there was Smitty with a song. Larry will always find success in any endeavor. Sergeant 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Glee Club 3, 2,' Model Railroad Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 3, Vice President 2. WILLIAM FLOYD SMITH M-1 Smitty Salem, Illinois Salem's answer to Will Rogers found "plebe" year not quite the game he had expected, but his Mess Hall skits almost convinced everyone else that it was. All who knew him will always remember his experiences with the "TD" and the academic departments and-the girls. Smitty's pleasantness and personality will carry him far in life. Sergeant 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 ,- English Literature Seminar 1 ,- Debate Council dt Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Glee Club 3, 2, 1 ,' KDET 4,' Pistol Club 4, 3. 274 "' TOM SLAGGIE DUANE SLATER I 'A f-,. My JOHN SLOAN 1 1 , me 'aa VKV4 I DALE SMITH LARRY SMITH BILL SMITH 275 ' I 1,04 DON SNIDER RAIFE SNOVER WAYNE SNOW 276 iw DAVE SPANGLER JIM SPENCER STEVE SPERMAN IW i xx x Ifx ' -fs rlf P DON MELVILLE SNIDER M 1 Duke Blanchester, Ohio ". . . that was undoubtedly the best . . . I have ever . . ." Don could say this of anything, whether he had tasted it, seen it, or done it on one of his many Glee Club trips, or related it to one of his exciting War Stories. On the serious side, too, "best ever" was what he usually accomplished. Lieutenant 1, Cadet Chapel Choir 1, Mathematics Forum 3, Debate Coun- cil 62 Forum 4, 3, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' HI-FI Club 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2. RAIFE EDGAR SNOVER C-1 Raife Chenango Forks, New York S.S.S.-sure-shot-Snover. Raife was always one of two places: "the rack" or the rifle range. He seemed like a quiet one-and then you would discover your "rearranged" room. Always game for anything that looked like fun. No evidence-but someone must have painted the clock pink. But, in spite of his many distractions, he was usually in the upper sections. Sergeant 1, Rifle 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3, Monogram 2, Dialectic Society 2, Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, Handball Club 2, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, Rifle Club 3, Sailing Club 4, 3. WAYNE ALLEN SNOW C-2 Wayne Lynne, Massachusetts Hailing from the land of Puritans, it was only natural for Wayne to find the life of a cadet to his liking. After a year at Dartmouth, academics proved to be no strain. In between Rifle matches, Wayne compiled many friends, who wish him now the best in life. Sergeant 1, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rifle Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4. DAVID ROBERT SPANGLER K-2 Dave Talent, Oregon Dave came to West Point from the green hills of Oregon, bringing with him an undying dedication to the West Coast. K-2 will long remember him for his ability to write the proper equations in solids in his attempts to keep up all above 2.0. His love for his "brown boy" was unequalled, and his desire to excel was an inspiration to everyone. Sergeant 1, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 3, 2, Bridge Club 3, Rocket Society 4, 3, 2. JAMES JOSEPH SPENCER F-2 Jim In the midst of all the turmoil stands one calm, reserved. Those who met the wrong end of his jabs and hooks in the ring would surely disagree, but Jim is not easily excited. A flair for Judo, a zest for song, a very critical eye for females-all add up to an interesting personality, an integral part of '62. Sergeant 1 , Rifle 4, Track 4, Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1, English Literature Seminar 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, HI-FI Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Judo Club 2, 1. STEVEN D. SPERMAN F-1 Steve New York, New York The same determination that carried Steve to West Point from the "big city" and through a harrowing "Beast Barracks", led him through four years of academics and made him a social science "hive" Cow Year. His deep concern about the changing world situation often got him into many friendly, yet sometimes heated, discussions, most of which he emerged from as victor. Steve's conscientiousness and aggressiveness are due to serve him well in his future career. Sergeant 1, Jewish Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Debate Council :Q Forum 4, Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 2, 1,1 Scoutmasters Council 3, Pistol Club 4, Rifle Club 4, Ski Club 4, 3, 1. 277 Qtr digg-.0 n' ig 'O 1,5 ,Fi "flu lllllimlmliin CHRISTOPHER BENNETT SPIVEY E-1 Chris Wilmington, North Carolina Chris came to West Point from the Carolinas, after a stopover at North Carolina State. "Turned back" from '61, he joined the "can do" class with a big smile and a quick helping hand for any classmate in need. Sharing his study time with sailing and "dragging", he was and will be welcome in our midst. Sergeant 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2,- Astronomy Club 3, 2,- KDET 4, Camera Club 2,' Sailing Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2. ELDON HOWARD SPRADLING A-2 Sprad Charleston, West Virginia Sprad descended on the Military Academy from the "Switzerland of the United States". His cheerful manner and ability to do a good job whether in academics, intramurals, or any other field of endeavor will always stand Sprad in good stead. However, work never kept Sprad from his afternoon bouts with the "brown-boy" and his ability to hang loose as evidenced by his favorite saying, "No Big Thing". Lieutenant 1 ,' Honor Committee 2, 1, Catholic Acolytes 2, 1 ,' Debate Council di Forum 4. 3,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1g Pistol Club 4, 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 2, 1. HAROLD EDWIN SPRAGUE II H-1 Ed Arlington, Virginia Some people win their chevrons through social ability, others through ag- gression at the expense of their classmates, but this speedster from New England asked no favors and took advantage of none. He won his place on the "make list" by his efficiency, tact and dependability. Though the pages of his textbooks see little use in the evenings, he more than makes up for it on the cinder track every afternoon, for there are few people who can catch him. Wherever life takes him, he should have no trouble adjusting. Sergeant 1 ,' Track 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3,' Cross Country 3, 2,' Sun- day School Teacher 4, 3,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, Portuguese Club 2,' Distol Club 4,' Skeet Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3. DEREK GORDON SPROUSE F-1 Derek Williamson, West Virginia Derek brought to West Point a never-say-die ability and a tremendous de- sire to succeed. In numerous pitched battles with the Academic Department he always emerged triumphant. Both on the "fields of friendly strife" and in the Orchestra, he was always at the center of things. A true friend, and well liked by all who came to know him, he will be an asset to his unit and the men who serve under him. Sergeant 1,' Debate Council and Forum 2, 1 ,' French Club 1 ,' Dance Orches- tra 3, 2, 1, Vice President 1 ,' Camera Club 3, 2, 1, Outdoor Sports Club 2, 1g Hi-Fi Club 1, Golf Club 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JAMES EDWARD SPURLOCK L-2 Jamie Midkiif, West Virginia After successfully waging a noble war with the basic sciences, Jim began to attain the true height of his outstanding intellect in the demanding field of human engineering. His piercing insight and knowledge of human nature were evident to all of us who, as his fortunate classmates, benefitted greatly from them. We may safely say that, considering this great talent, others will also benefit in the years to come. Sergeant 1 ,' Track 3,' Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Chapel Acolytes 2, 15 Debate gouncil :Q Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Protestant Discussion roup 4. CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM JEROME STANAT B-2 Chris Washington, D. C. Stolid Stanat, the Brown Beat, the Phlegmatic Finn, Snoopy--epithets for this lover of Polish dance music and other such hit parade material. Flirty knew him not, because he was a clean-living, hard-nosed ball playerg yet, his power over women and his capacity for strong drink were rivalled only by his roommate, Andress. Lieutenant 1 ,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1 , Numerals 4, Monogram 3, 2,' Honor Com- mittee 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Bridge Club 3, Weight Lifting Club 3. ED SPRAGUE 278 CHRIS SPIVEY ELDON SPRADLING 1 l 1 l DEREK SPROUSE JAMIE SPURLO CK CHRIS STANAT 279 WARNER STANLEY ED STARBIRD SAMMY STEELE iw b ?,, Q ,,SL. N W S uuv g K A A H g, 280 A RICHARD STEINKE , "' DAN STEPHEN SON 54 .SMH Z B- ,,. 1, ...-. Q 19?.,f:is-as 2' 2 f .sr-11-3 '17 W.. C-2i,.-if Ii J 'G "VX XP - is X ,. wtf. ,ff ' Sw X" WARNER D. STANLEY III D 1 Stanislaski Deale, Maryland Dean will always be remembered for conscientious performance of duty while a cadet. For example, taking a meal count for our stop at Fort Rucker CSecond Class Tripb during OUR Plebe Christmas can be termed no less than ingenious foresight. His episode with a certain New York model, and the knowledge and experience gained from this, put Dean in a class by him- self. Here's Wishing him good luck in a career that is bound to be long and fruitful. Lieutenant 1 5 Stars 35 Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Catholic Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 1 5 English Literature Seminar 4, 3, 2, 15 Mathematics Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Pointer 35 Model Airplane Club 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 25 Rocket Society 2. EDWARD ALFRED STARBIRD B-1 Ed Portland, Oregon The Bird will long be remembered as the only man to start a fire drill with a pullup. But he will be more often remembered as a "hive" in academics, a tough competitor on the athletic field, and especially a great person to have for a classmate. Sergeant 15 Handball Club 35 Ski Club 3, 2, 15 Ski Patrol 2, 15 Parachute Club 3, 2. , SAMUEL L. STEELE C-2 Sammy Knoxville, Tennessee Sam, or maybe we should say Sammy, came to the chilly highlands of the Hudson from the warmth of his Tennessee homeland. Bitter winter winds and the inevitable gloom periods were unable to detract from the charm of this truly Southern gentleman. Somehow he always found time for those beloved excursions around the Plain. His mild manner, his subtle smile, and his casual dignity will ensure him of many close friendships wherever the hand of fate guides him. Sergeant 15 150 lb. Football 4, Numerals 45 Ring Je Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 15 Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1, Superintendent 15 Spanish Club 2, 1 5 Glee Club 4. RICHARD RAYMOND STEINKE E-2 Stinky Milwaukee, Wisconsin Stinky came to the Military Academy from the shores of Lake Michigan and Milwaukee, via the United States Military Academy Prep School. Studying posed no challenge to the little guy during his four years and he could always be found with his habitual companion, the "brown boy". When- ever help was needed, from a friend or a coach, he was the one to see. Captain 1 ,' Lacrosse 4, 3, Manager 4, 35 Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 5 German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 25 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. DAN TALBOTT STEPHENSON G-2 Dan Ashland, Kentucky Dan is Kentucky's gift to West Point. He always had a story that could top the one told before. Plebe academics were tough on Dan but he showed his true hivey nature after Plebe Year. He had everyone convinced that he wore no shoes and made corn "likker" prior to coming North, but everyone knows he is wiser than he acted. Graduation springs Dan on the outside world where he'll set it afire. Sergeant 15 Basketball 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 35 Debate Coun- cil and Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Spanish Club 4, 35 Glee Club 45 Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 15 Pistol Club 3, 2, 15 Skeet Club 35 Bridge Club 35 Skin Diving Club 3. RICHARD COLLINS STEPHENSON H-2 Dick Dry Ridge, Kentucky Dick brought to the Point a slow drawl and a strong determination to suc- ceed. His ready wit and friendly personality earned him many friends, and his habit of saying what he thought, regardless of the consequences showed that the Army will not be getting a "yes" man. We expect great things from the lanky gentleman from Kentucky. Sergeant 1 5 Class Committee 3, 2, 15 Radio Club 35 Debate Council and Forum 3, 2, 15 French Club 4, 3, 1 5 Pistol Club 3. DICK STEPHENSON 281 X ,J fb: :YJ it .s 1 QL"-9 - nf ' 7 l'- ,fi?2ii'3 . iv : MQ ic? Ni ig5g!zl.1i my ,P . lamina DONALD EUGENE STEWART D-1 Stew Washington, D. C. Looking back over Stew's Cadet career, we can see moments of sorrow, joy and desire. But we must not look back, 'tis true, but forward, and train our eyes up into that bright blue cloudless sky, wherein our future lies. Sergeant 1 ,' Gymnastics 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Ski Team 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Cheerleaders 1 ,' Gymnastics Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Property Ojficerg Ski Patrol 4, 3, 2, 1. PHILLIP RAY STEWART M-2 Skipper Lake Charles, Louisiana An ex-enlisted man, Phil came to West Point Well indoctrinated to Army life. Even While having a little trouble with academics, he found time to be- come a valuable aid to the soccer team. It seemed that when not broadcast- ing on KDET, he was taking a Glee Club trip. M-2's loss of a true friend will be the Army's gain of an exceptional leader. Sergeant 1,' Ring and Crest Committee 3, 2, 1,' Catholic Choir 3,' Newman Forum 1 ,' Debate Council cb Forum 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Secretary 4,' KDET 3, 2, 1 ,' SCUSA 2, 1, Rocket Society 3, 2, 1. RONALD PAUL STOCK M-1 Ron Batesville, Indiana There's a lot of man concentrated in Ron's short stature, as his opponents in intercollegiate Debate, or on the wrestling mat can testify. After a year on the party circut at Purdue, and a tour with the 82nd Airborne, Ron came to battle the mathematics and Russian departments. He's a sure bet to go "All The Way" in the Army. Sergeant 1,' 150 lb. Football 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Newman Forum 2, 1,' English Literature Seminar 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council LQ Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Fencing Club 1,' Pistol Club 2, 1, Parachute Club 4, 3, 1. TODD DARRAH STONG M-1 Todd Downingtown, Pennsylvania From barbells to booklearning, Todd believed in giving it all you've got, and as a result got all it could give. At the hops he graduated from "Boodle" to blondes, getting along well with both. The Army will find Todd's persever- ance and likeable personality an asset and a pleasure. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 3, 2,' Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2,' Debate Coun- cil 62 Forum 4,' French Club 4,' Astronomy 4,' Pistol Club 4, 35 Skeet Club 4. RICHARD ERNEST STORAT M-1 Dick Friedensville, Pennsylvania Even though Dick's arrival on that memorable July morning reduced his hometown population to 158, he soon established his position near the academic top of his class, and through his earnest and conscientious efforts maintained that position. Undoubtedly Dick will always remember his one disagreement with the "TD", as well as the "turnouts" he saved in South Area. Captain 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1 ,' Soccer 4,' 150 lb. Football Manager 3, 2, 1, Major A 1, Class Committee 3, 2, 1,' Mathematics Forum 3,' German Club 4, 3,5 Pointer 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, Scoutmaster Council 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 3,' Automobile Finance Committee Chairman 1. DONALD RICHARD STREET F-2 Tweety E1 Paso, Texas "Twinkle, twinkle, little starg How we wonder where our tenths are. The Department has taken them away, to give to Tweet another day." Voted the "most intellectual" by his high school graduating class, the stars on Don's collar speak for themselves. As a friend he is true, and always eager to assist. Take heed, Army! This man will make a mark. Lieutenant 1 g Stars 2,' Mathematics Forum 2, Debate Council and Forum 4, 25 Spanish Club 4, 3,' KDET 4,' Ski Club 4, 3,' Rocket Society 3. 282 A as DONALD STEWART PHILLIP STEWART RAN STOCK p......vvlI" W? HMV? 4-m:aii"""" ,ik TODD STONG DICK STORAT DONALD STREET YW :M N an Qdi JIM STROHMEYER TED STROUP BILL SWARTZ 284 R5 3 I QI DEN SWEENEY GEORGE SWEET .M MGR DAVE SWICK if ,Qs j rf Y- .' - v 'Q V. -' - :Q 2 g1Q'ri?, 1 4. ' .5 Q f 9-has-4 1 r ,ar S-VJ Q - f' f A . ,J -. gf X , 1 ll -' JAMES ARTHUR STROHMEYER A 2 Stro Lancaster, Pennsylvania On Stro's arrival at the grey walls on the Hudson, came a dedicated soldier with the military as his prime objective. While here, he put to good use his quick wit and personality to gain many friends and cause his four years to pass effortlessly and successfully. The Army, destined to be J im's home, is very fortunate to gain one such as he. Sergeant 1,' Cheerleader 1,' Public Information Detail 4, 3,' Catholic Aco- lytes 3, 2, 1,' Golf Club 2, 1,' Rifle Club 3, 1,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 15 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1: Ski Patrol 1. THEODORE G. STROUP I-2 Ted St. Petersburg, Florida It is a credit to any man to have it said of him that he has done nothing unless it was his best. None deserve this tribute more than Ted. He brought us his sunny smile and takes with him our loyalty and friendship. Sergeant 1,' Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Assistant Coach 1,' Debate Council db Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1, Senior Editor 1,' Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2. WILLIAM JOHN SWARTZ M-1 Bill Moscow, Pennsylvania A little guy with a lot of scrap, Bill tackled everything with real enthusiasm. With this determination he won a boxing championship and finally broke the 135 pound weight barrier. With this trait too, Bill should do well in the years ahead. Sergeant 1g Pistol 4,' French Club 2, 15 Pointer 4, 3,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 11 Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1. DENNE ARONSON SWEENEY C-1 Den Dallas, Texas Den came to the Military Monastery with his amplifier and loudspeaker un- der one arm and his histories of the Glorious Southern Revolution under the other. You could always tell how far away his room was merely by the rela- tive pain upon your eardrums from his homemade Radio City. An indomi- table Southerner and the staunchest Texan of them all, Den will go on to write and tell of his homeland in ever-increasing verbosity and fervor. Sergeant 1,' Rifle 4, 3,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Managing Editor 15 Hi-Fi Club 4, 3, 2, 1g Fencing Club 3, 2, 1,' Rifle Club 4, 3. GEORGE BURWELL SWEET D-1 George Richmond, Virginia George has always managed to find time for an extensive extra-curricular program in addition to maintaining a high academic standing. His all-too- infrequent weekend interludes with his faithful "OAC" have given this cadet the needed inspiration to make his hard work gratifying to all who come in contact with him. Lieutenant 1,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1g Debate Council and Forum 4,' Spanish Club 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4,' KDET 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3,' Pistol Club 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 3, 2. CHARLES DAVID SWICK E-2 Dave Newark, Ohio During his four years, Dave's Ohio spirit has never been suppressed by the Tactical Department or the Academic Department. He was always ready to give an encouraging word to those of us who were. With ever-present cour- age, he brought many intercollegiate honors to West Point and will do the same for our country in years to come. Sergeant 1 ,' 150 lb. Football 4, 3, Numerals 4, Pistol 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2 1, Captain 1,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Handball Club 2, 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 2, 1. 285 ,ls 'Qu sf... ... ., 3 Juan Q-s l3ll' !lIl J' I " lfllflslmlilll DAVID EDMUND SYMANSKI G-2 Dave Saddle River, New Jersey Dave was always "just under an hour" away from home, and many of us spent weekends in Saddle River. Once a year, Dave took his annual trip up to the hospital for another operation, but back in the Company he was all books. The Social Science Department almost got him Cow Year, but he proved that nice guys do not always finish last. Lieutenant 1 ,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Camera Club 2, 1 ,' HI-FI Club 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ALBERT RICHARD SYMES M-1 Albie Stoneham, Massachusetts Born and raised in Puritan New England, Albie broke tradition and didn't go to Harvard. An asset to the Hockey Team with his will to win, Albie en- riched the company of all who knew him. We know Albie will be the Army's gain to its ranks. Sergeant 1 ,' Hockey 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1 ,' Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, Monogram 3,' 150 lb. Football 3, 2, Major A 2,' Newman Forum 4, 3,' Radio Club 25 Camera Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Hi-Fi Club 4, 35 Rifle Club 3, Rocket Society 4, 3- J. DUANE SZWARCKOP A-1 Joe Utica, New York For the last four years, Duane has had one goal in mind-to become an armored commander. One look at his bookshelf will show that he will be one of the best read ohicers on armored warfare. All is not war with Duane. although he may profess this, for we know him as a very sincere friend. Lieutenant 1,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1. ROBERT M. SZYMCZAK L-2 Bob Chicago, Illinois Bob, a native son of Chicago, has always been ready with a tale of the Windy City and its gangland claim to fame. Easy going, but a real "boon" to his "goat'l roommates, he will long be remembered as the end of "FRODAK." We all wish Bob the best of everything. Sergeant 1, Debate Council dt Forum 2,' German Club 4, 3,' Chess Club L. 3,- Pistol Club 3, 2,' Rifle Club 3. ROBERT MORGAN TARBET L-1 Bob Dallas, Texas Tarb's, another one of the Big Texans, has been an important part of our life here on "the Rock." His constant smile and easy ways have brightened our every day. Bob was always ready to lend a helping hand in academics or whatever our problems might be. To those who knew him not, they truly missed somethingg but to those who did, he will always be a friend. Sergeant 1 ,' Rifle 4,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, KDET 45 Rifle Club 45 Ski Club 4, 3. JOHN LESLIE TAYLOR I-2 Jack Tyler Burgaw, North Carolina From the land of corn bread and black-eyed peas came the organizer of Army's first Rugby Team. We will all remember his secret to the French Department . . . when in doubt, say "plowhorse." Quiet natured and con- scientious, John always got the job done and this is certain to mark his success in years to come. Sergeant 1,' Debate Council 45 Forum 4, 3,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' How- itzer 4, 3,' Rugby Club, CIC and Organizer 2, 1. JOE SZWARCKOP 286 DAVE SYMANSKI ALBIE SYMES BOB SZYMCZAK BOB TARBET JOHN TAYLOR sr?" i EE A Mamma 287 , W Q if Q . MW LEE TAYLOR LENNIE TAYLOR DUD TAYLOR AV ,hh I . iv' V 5: .44,ijmL,.'w5?J?-Y ' jig A. "L f .- h. f '.- ', 4 Wg!" " f h X Mm W Vx ,mn 412551-vfzvgq I f ' magqgcgifiy 4 faq' ,Hal '15, ,gp W -ew 1' ,,.,.,,:.w , :Q My, V, 15,1 - X 'Hvwy -. , f Q- A j1.'v,mn'u1w, fa" '.'f4'L:f,f. ' A f A LN'-4 fu A ' "' ' "" 9' A ' , ff"'W"1S. DAN TEED GEORGE TALENKO TOM T 'fif 5.5 if 1 5. sm i - - E ., T " A 111- nj , ,Q ,f ,f if . ' ff fx ,ei YQ OX-fpj R 545 LEE TAYLOR K 2 Lee Falls Church, Virginia One of the original old men of Kappa Dos, Lee came to us from the blue skies of Denver, Colorado and three years in the Air Force. An Army brat, this serious minded cadet got right to work and was soon standing high in the class, both physically and academically. He will always be remembered for his drive and determination in the tasks which he undertook, particularly that of introducing the sport of Judo into a cadet extra-curricular activity life. Lieutenant 15 Gymnastics 4, 35 Track 35 Spanish Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Glee Club 45 Outdoor Sports Club 35 Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, President 1 ,' Ski Patrol 1 5 Parachute 2, 1,' Rocket Society 45 Judo Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Presi- dent 1. LEONARD CRAIG TAYLOR A F-1 Lennie Windham, Maine Lennie entered West Point with a sigh of relief at leaving the rigors of civilian life behind. After the University of Maine, the life here for four years was a welcome gain. He got most from hours of reading, music, and "dragging," With a smile and a will to work, he'll have no trouble fitting into the future. Lieutenant 1 ,' Track 45 Cross Country 35 English Literature Seminar 2, 1 5 French Club 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Triathlon Club 3, 2, 1 5 Pointer 4, 35 Dance Orchestra 3, 2, 15 Camera Club 35 Chess Club 3, 2, 15 Pistol Club 3, 25 Ski Club 4. WALTER DUDLEY TAYLOR, JR. G-2 Dud . Yuma, Arizona Dud Taylor, the nimble-footed gymnast from the Great Southwest, was quick to achieve fame in his first year at the Academy. Who will forget the man who leaped over the wall to reveille as a plebe, or went down the Buck- ner slide backwards as a yearling? After some difficulty with the Solids Department, Dud joined the Class of '62, and a new fame has come his way, for all who know him will remember him for his sincerity of purpose and warilm, straightforward friendship, extended to any man who crossed his pat . Sergeant 15 Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Minor A 3 5 Judo Club 25 Sunday School Teacher 4, 35 Russian Club 3g Prot. Discussion Group 4, 3,' Chess Club 45 Sailing Club 4, 35 Officers' Christian Union, Goat Football Team, Class of 61. DAN GRAHAM TEED E-2 Dan Pampa, Texas "Authorized lights, sir?"-Familiar words to an easy-going Texan whose after-taps studying was usually the result of Glee Club or Choir practice, or a letter to his latest girl. Texas equals "God's Country" and Southern women are the finest in the world-Dan's philosophy of life in a nutshell. Whatever happens, his cheerful nature insures his future success. Sergeant 1 ,' Lacrosse 4, 3, Manager 4, 35 Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Di- rector 2, 15 Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 35 French Club 4, 35 Glee Club 3, 2, 1,' Golf Club 1. GEORGE J. TELENKO I-1 Tank Cleveland, Ohio Perhaps the only man ever to wear a dress coat to reveille for four years, Tank also found time to kick extra points in the "Goat Football" game, win the Brigade Wrestling Championship during "plebe" year, and play Rugby. After having been "Room Orderly" for two month stretches and head "Ele- phant Driver" of I-prime, his Army career should prove quite interesting. Sergeant 15 Football 45 Wrestling 3, 2, 15 Spanish Club 3, 2, 15 Art Club 2, 1, Vice President 1 5 Pistol Club 3, 2, 1 5 Sailing Club 1,' Rugby Club 2, 1. THOMAS JOHN TEUTEN K-2 Teuts Rockville Centre, New York Kappa Dos is justly proud of a true son in Tom. Those who knew Tom best appreciate him for his wholesome attitude towards life. His forceful char- acter and personality have affected us all. One cannot help but be impressed by his knowledge and ideas in almost every facet of world affairs. A man of Tom's ability is well prepared to meet life's challenge. Sergeant 1,' Soccer 4, 3, Numerals 45 Debate Council :E Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. TEUTEN 289 W5' '0'fWb'J,'?'?t'!3-ll 27 "A Imfllllllll BILLIE NEAL THOMAS D-1 Tom Albuquerque, New Mexico Freddy Kilowatt, alias B.N. Tom Thomas, rode "Old Paint" through four years at the Point, even though it was against regulations. Ranger Thomas had a mission type order--get through the place. However, his troubles with "spic" and "chem" were a major source of irritation. Just give him his twanging guitar and saddle "Old Paint" and he will be ready to go on a thirty year tour. Lieutenant 1,' Baseball 4,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1, Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Radio Club 2, 1,' Debate Council 49: Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, KFZILET 4, 3, 2, 1, Chief Engineer 1, Pistol Club 2, 1, Skeet Club 2, 1,' Ski C u 3, 2, 1. ROBERT BARRY THOMAS A-2 R.B. Caldwell, New Jersey Coming from the so called "swamps" of New Jersey, Barry spent four years in the pool where he was captain of the 62 Swim team. When not fighting the academic department, this successful and likeable character was think- ing of a cute girl at Douglass College. Barry, a Sunday School teacher and an active member of many clubs, has "Wedding bells" and Airborne, Ranger, Infantry to look forward to. Lieutenant 1 ,' Swimming 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Minor A 3, Major A for two academy records 2, Captain 1 ,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Sunday School Teachers 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1g Water Polo Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 4, 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 3, 2, 1,' Debates Council di: Forum 4, 3,' Sailing Club 3, 25 Golf Club 2, 1. STANLEY EDWARD THOMPSON I-1 Stan Deerfield, Massachusetts Stan, the man, who spent more time trying to get out of work than he would have spent otherwise, was I-1's mascot Plebe Year. We know that his con- geniality and ready wit will serve him and his country both well. Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4, 3, 2, 1,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1g Debate Council di: Forum 4,' Portuguese Club 3,' Bugle Notes 2, 1 ,' Pointer 4,' Camera Club 3, 2, 1,' Art Club 3, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Skeet Club 3. FREDRICK ELMORE TILTON A-2 Fred Falls Church, Virginia An Army "brat," Fred is no stranger to Army life. A few close scrapes with academics haven't changed his outlook or his sense of humor. With his natural ability to get along and his determination, he will go a long way in li e. Sergeant 1 ,' Cadet Chapel Choir 3, 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Astronomy Club 1,' Glee Club'4, 3, 2, 1 ,' HI-FI Club 1 ,' Pistol Club 4,' Rifle Club 1, Skeet Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 1. ALAN CHARLES TINDALE F-1 Al Rochester, New York A little "dragging", a little time on the "area", a little time in the "pad", and the rest fighting the "D" list-that was Al's cadet career. He was a "star man" of the H500 club", who enjoyed running cross country, taking trips to Rio, and collecting his four "LP's". Tinner will be remembered for his good nature and his friendliness. Sergeant 1 ,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 25 Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Golf Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4,3,2, 1. CHARLES W. TINNEMEYER L-1 Bud Oklahoma City, Oklahoma All the "goats" could always depend on Bud for help wherever he could offer it. His great drive and team spirit has been the spark of many com- pany activities. This enthusiasm and cooperation will be remembered by his classmates for many years to come. Sergeant 1, Hockey Manager 4, 3, 2, 1g Debate Council 62 Forum 3, 2, 15 Rus- sian Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 2g Handball Club 4, 3, 2. 290 , . 'audi TOM THOMAS ROBERT THOMAS STAN THOMPSON f,-Fm Q 1. ,. L. .,......-nal MQ,-W -shui jnii AL-lilly. WVFMR FRED TILTON AL TINDALE BUD TINNEMEYER 291 'lb GENE TOMLINSON DAVE TREADWELL DAVE TUMELSON 292 'X- RON TUMLIN JIM TUMPANE JERRY TYSVER rx! J xx X4 f 4 f S - .. Y - it '? tl.. .TU is -sail? GENE BRUCE TOMLINSON F 1 Williamsport, Pennsylvania The "World Traveler" arrived at West Point smiling and has never stopped. Whether at academics or lacrosse, Gene gives 100 percent effort and has not gone unrewarded. He can be credited with four successful years at the Academy and many friends, including a certain young lady in Ebensburg, Pa. Gene's personality and determination will carry him far. Sergeant 1, Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Spanish Club 3, 1, Camera Club 3, 2, 1 ,' HI-FI Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 3, Sailing Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Skin Diving Club 1. DAVID O'N EAL TREADWELL E-1 Dave Macon, Georgia Dave came to West Point from Georgia. His winning smile and good-natured manner quickly made him one of the best-liked men in the company. A good student, Dave was never too busy to help out a classmate or underclassman. These traits will make Dave a success in everything he does. Sergeant 1, Football 4, Track 4, Pointer 3, Pistol Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rocket Society. RONALD A. TUMELSON L-1 Ron Red Bluff, California Ron came to the point with a military background. For three summers in high school he was with California Cadet Corps, and at ROTC at University of Utah for one year. Ron's big interests here have included coming around on the squash courts, waiting to spend summer leave in Idaho with a cer- tain Fraulien, and re-hashing the 2nd World War over his usual two Pep- sies. Never, but never say Geo--- in his presence. Ron's a wavering armor "file" who may go infantry. Sergeant 1 , Baseball 4, Debate Council 52 Forum 3, 2, Chess Club 4, Fenc- ing Club 2, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3. RONALD WAYNE TUMLIN G-1 Ron Marietta, Georgia Ron is a study in contrasts. Proud of his southern heritage, he's not a pro- fessional rebel. Although usually soft-spoken and conscientious, he has great enthusiasm for both hardwork and horseplay. The "T.D." kept life from being a bowl of cherries, but he kept a cool head. He's a good man to have as a friend, and an asset to the service. Sergeant 1, Gymnastics 4, Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, Ordnance Club 3, Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, French Club 3, 2, HI-FI Club 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 2, Skin Diving Club 2. JAMES R. TUMPANE M-1 Jim Atlanta, Georgia Throughout history, the citizens of Georgia have rallied in the face of grave obstacles. Jim did Marietta proud by butting persistently against the bar- rier of "plebe" year Coccasionally with his headj . With the advent of "year- ling year", however, all became smooth sailing and Jim finished in fine style to become a valuable addition to the ranks in Army Blue. Sergeant 1, Debate Council QQ Forum 4, 3, 2, Russian Club 2, Pistol Club 4, 2. GERALD A. TYSVER D-2 Jerry Bremerton, Washington After two years ofgplaying hop-scotch with the Mathematics Department, Jerry heard the call of higher learning and off he went in pursuit. Despite his preoccupation with academics, he never failed to pay homage to that Corps-wide institution, the "brown boy." We look for many great things from Jerry in the future. Sergeant 1, Debate Council cf: Forum 4, Howitzer 4, 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3. 293 :wild il: in -in 'P' .. - get vw, 'r www, ' i s . - 'r " My if ...I ll! till H HH nl, 1 ,ey .1 iiizlrsillmlllll JOHN MAXWELL ULMER I-2 Johnny New Orleans, Louisiana Johnny was Louisiana's gift to I-2. Throughout his days at West Point he was able to combine an outer calmness with an inward fire, reminiscent of a Mardi Gras, that won him many friends. Despite the fact that the Academic Departments were frequently chasing Johnny, he was always able to live up to a policy of "Cool Head Maintained." Sergeant 1,' Spanish Club 3g Skeet Club 4,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 15 Skin Diving Club 3, 2. HENRY DOMENICK URNA M-2 Hank Newark, New Jersey Hank often could be seen selling tickets for Dialectic Society attractions. His cheerful personality made him a super-salesman. Hank never had a difii- cult time with the academic system and was a real leader in M-2. With a cheerful Word for everyone, Hank was easy to work with and always got any job done well. With this trait he shall be the Army's gain. Lieutenant 1 ,' Class Committee 3, 2, 1 g Debate Council :Q Forum 35 French Club 3, 2,' Dialectic Society 3, 25 Special Program Committee 3, 2,' Sailing Club 3, 2, Ski Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. DONALD JOHANNES VOSS F-1 Don Hattiesburg, Mississippi Don's main interests are tennis, squash and electronics. Tennis and squash he can play year 'round, and usually these take up his afternoons, including Sundays. The free time remaining he usually spends with a soldering gun in his hand or listening to records on the hi-ii- set he built. Once in a while, he enjoys a good hand of bridge. Sergeant 1,' Tennis 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3,' Squash 4, 3, 2, 1, Nu- merals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1, All-American 2,' Radio Club 4,' HI-FI Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 4, 3. JOHN MICHAEL VRANISH L-1 Mike Crosby, Minnesota Cadets enter West Point for various reasons but Mike, unable to get a sum- mer job, came to spend a summer vacation. Being "the most indifferent plebe" he soon became infamous. With weights and after taps push-ups, Mike soon changed his name from canvass-back to iieet-foot. His biggest fame was his innocent smile in the "Weapons Room." Mike's Warmth and friendliness will be long valued by his classmates. Sergeant 1,' Wrestling 3, 2, 1, Hop Committee 3, 2, 1,' Mathematics Forum 3,' German Club 4,' Pointer 4. IVAN LEROY WAGGONER I-I-1 Ivan Council, Idaho Ivan-an easy-going, quiet at times, friendly, dependable guy-transferred to H-1 from F-1 after "plebe" year, he soon took his position at the top of the heap. Always ready to help a "goat" participate in horseplay or act in his position as Honor Rep. Ivan of Idaho will not be forgotten by anyone in H-1. Lieutenant 1 ,' Honor Committee 2, 15 Cadet Chapel Choir 2, Triathlon 2, 15 Howitzer 3,' Dance Orchestra 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Glee Club 4,' Camera Club 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' HI-FI Club 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN HOBART WAGNER II L-1 Wags Vivian, Louisiana Wags will always be remembered by his friends as a true Southern Gentle- man. He was a leader, as well as a true friend, while excelling in the class- room and on the "fields of friendly strife" throughout his four years. With a winning smile and a desire to be tops he left an impression not soon to be forgotten by his many friends. Captain 1, Stars 3,' Hockey Manager 4,' Public Relations Council 3, Asst. Batt. Rep. 2,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2,' Sunday School teacher 3, 2,' Mathe- matics Forum 2,' Debate Council JZ Forum 4,' Spanish 3,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2. DON 294 VOSS JOHNNY ULMER HANK URNA ,Hi ,,fl? I I :gf Q?'f"'1l" T23 au...Q.M,-"V, N-Wed .rd--H-'Qv "Qi" MIKE VRANISH IVAN WAGGONER JOHN WAGNER RHP ,U-an-qi" Nz'-'-'sw' STEVE WAGNER JOHNNY WALKER TOM WALKER xx-e!,, ,W : ., in -F699 W - fag K ff, Q- ., in :J f--n-q-,hi -Qld WALLY WALLACE ROY WALLACE Nksgxii 3 2' 6 '5.."' 2 2X?,4Z2'-9 L' cr ix 7 '-IKE lil f X rx f X f E' S P STEVENTON WAGNER G-1 Steve Ft. Thomas, Kentucky When Steve came to West Point, his suitcase was full of Yoku,-berry tonic, which not only made him strong and blond, but made him outstanding at everything he tried. He never worried about anything, particularly the sys- tem, but still excelled. Everyone who met him, from "OC's', after taps to deer in the boondocks liked him. He was the last of the frontiersmen. Lieutenant 1,' Track 4, 3, 2,' German Club 4,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 3, 25 Sailing Club 3. JOHN BAGGETT WALKER G-1 Johnny Birmingham, Alabama From the beginning of Plebe Year, Johnny fought the Academic Depart- ment, and when the smoke cleared, he had won. The battle was fought, how- ever, with plenty of good humor and high spirits. Being a Hop Manager, gave him ample opportunity to polish his already suave dancing. His con- genial disposition and willingness to work, are an unbeatable combination. Sergeant 1 ,' 150 lb. Football 4, 3,' Track 45 Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1g Public Information Detail 3, Sunday School Teacher 4, 3,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, Spanish Club 3,' Glee Club 3,' HI-FI Club 4,' Sailing Club 4, 3, 25 Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' English Drama Seminar. THOMAS EDWARD WALKER II L-1 Tom Wauwatosa, Wisconsin Tom came into these grey walls with a year of college behind and a relaxed college attitude to go with it. Except for the Mathematics Department, Chow he hated Calculusb he never really had to worry about where the next good grade would come from. His conscientiousness and personality will stand him in good stead with his chosen career. ' Sergeant 1 ,' Swimming 4,' Catholic Choir 45 Newman Forum 4, 3, 2, 1, Eng- lish Literature Seminar 3, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, 2, lg Portuguese Club 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1 ,' Scoutmasters Council 3, 2, 1, Vice-President 1. KENNETH MICHAEL WALLACE E-1 Wally Modesto, California Although Wally's home was not on the range, he felt more comfortable on a "horse" than anywhere else while here at West Point. He is responsible for rolling up many of the points the Gym Team scored during his four years here. Church work and hard studying left little time for the frivolities of cadet life. Lieutenant 1 ,' Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Major A 2, 1 ,' Honor Committee 2, 1 ,' Public information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Gymnastics Club 3, 2, lg Camera Club 1 ,' Pistol Club 4, 2, 1. ROY VERN WALLACE, JR. B-1 The Wallers Martinsburg, West Virginia Girls, run and hide! Brave men shiver! Don't let that calm exterior fool you. Underneath lurks a friend. Ask anyone Who's been near the rock behind the Chaplain's house, or who saw him blossom forth with the "Chicaderos" on the "Cow" Trip. Here's to The Wallers, every inch a lover. Sergeant 1 ,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3, KDET 4, 3, 2, 1, Handball Club 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 4, 3, 2, 1. WINDSOR EARL WARD Wins Windsor is one of the few men who can call themselves "ex-goats." "Plebe" year he was at the bottom, but through hard work he worked his way up to the Dean's List. However, he never forgot from whence he came, and was always willing to help a "goat" in need. With his willingness to help others, he should do well when he trades Kaydet grey for Army Blue. Sergeant 1,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, Spanish Club 4, 3, Camera Club 2,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1. WINS WARD .297 . Nr., I U X .SLT Ev 'x F-is, ,fgf ana? X, RQQA i il V Biff' LSWQQ are F i Ps 'fl ' limi STEPHEN DWIGHT WARNER D-2 Steve San Diego, California Steve came to West Point from the iles of the Army brats confident that his sense of humor would carry him through his four years. He never lost the sense of humor, despite many trials with the Academic Department. Steve's friendliness and determination will benefit him greatly in his career in the Army. Sergeant 1 ,' Soccer 3, 2, 1 ,' Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Handball Club 4,' Parachute Club 2, 1. SAMUEL K. WASAFF K-1 Arab El Paso, Texas The Arab entered West Point with a smile and kept it for four years despite gloom, academics, and Yankee weather. Sam devoted his time to academics, the Catholic Choir, and helping others, with a few parties thrown in. There are a lot of Kappa Uno boys who can thank Sam for keeping them at West Point with his poop sessions. Sergeant 1,' Class Committee 3, 2, 1,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Director 1,' Debate Council 49 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 4, 3, 2,' Glee Club 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 4, 3,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1. LAWRENCE ELLIOT WATERS F-2 Horn Brighton, Massacrusetts This stalwart man from "Bean Town" started his active cadet life as an athlete in Gymnastics and golf. However, Horn found it necessary to devote five grueling years combatting the Academic and Tactical Departments. He still found time to "drag" "pro" lassies from Boston, learn the art of judo and gain new friendships which will last through a lifetime. Larry's eiforts, zeal and affable personality will assure him of a secure and promising pro- fession in the Army. Sergeant 1 ,' Gymnastics 4,' Golf 4,' Jewish Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Radio Club 4, 3,' German Club 4, 3,' Camera Club 4, 35 Chess Club 2,' Pistol Club 3,' Judo Club 2, 1 ,' Weight Lifting Club 4, 3. DOUGLAS WAUCHOPE D-2 Doug Lloyd Harbor, New York Doug came to the party company of the second regiment via VMI and the Marines. A soldier through and through, he taught us most of the virtues of our chosen profession. His terrific sense of humor also enriched many of our otherwise barren hours here at the "Rock," Upon graduation he will be going back into his beloved Marines, much to the chagrin of those of us go- ing into the army. Sergeant 1 ,' Astronomy Club 4, 3, 2,' Pointer 4,' Pistol Club 3, Sailing Club 3, Ski Club 4. ARTHUR MILTON WEBB E-1 Art Goodlettsville, Tennessee "Ah tol' y'all," expressed in a deep Southern drawl was Art's favorite ex- pression. He reported in from the hills of Tennessee showing his enthusiasm by being the first man in the class to take the fatal step that hot day in July. He was and always will be West Point's answer to "L'il Abner." Sergeantllg Sunday School Teacher 3, 2, 1,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Prot. Discussion Group 4, 3, Ski Club 4. ERNEST LEROY WEBB A-2 Uncle Ernie Los Angeles, California Ern has the distinction of being the most well known member of '62, Begin- ning with "plebe" year, Ernie's achievements spoke for his ability and popu- larity. He spent the rest of his cadet career a leader, either as a class ofiicer or as section marcher of the "goat" sections. The name he has made for him- self while here is certainly a good indication of what lies ahead in his chosen career. Sergeant 1, 150 lb. Football 4, 3, 1, Numerals 4, Minor A 3, Major A 1 ,' Class Committee 3, 2, 15 Class Treasurerg Hop Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Coun- cil 62 Forum 2, 1 ,' German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 4, Pointer 3, 2, Camera Club 1, Sailing Club 3, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 3. 298 STEVE WARNER SAM WASAFF LARRY WATERS + fs' 5 Q www: Mp Wm 'Nui ov'-4'5" MIT' W DOUG WAUCHOPE ART WEBB ERNIE WEBB 299 1 1 BOB WEINFURTER JIM WEISS BOB WELLS X 300 FRANCIS WELPER PAUL WERTZ 'MWSL STEVE WEST g SK xx X -, ..- . 1-as 'v55i'g' 5: 1 f 7--.qsisby 1, ff?-4.-,ff ev f I 'xl - A Cy? fx, -7 NMR fp. "NsM.1d iz--N .f ROBERT JOSEPH WEINFURTER I 1 A Fearless South Gate, California Hailing, and still choking, from L.A., Bob arrived at our Hrockbound high- land home" with a fighting pride in his native state. Although walking con- tinually for the "TD", Graphics Dept., and others, his abundant sense of humor and steadfast philosophy have brought Fee to graduation with nary a scar. His intriguing personality and famous word of greeting will long be remembered by the "Can Do" gang from I-1. Sergeant 1 ,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 , Howitzer 4, 3, 2, 1 , Pointer 4, 3, Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, Camera Club 2, 1, President 1 , Art Club 2, 1 ,' Bridge Club 3, 2, Rocket Society 4, 3, 1. JAMES WILLIAM WEISS H-1 Jim Pennsylvania Sports and athletics were second nature for Jim and his talents contributed to Army's swimming team, the Cadet Bowling League and the Handball Club. Academically, Jim found success and plenty of "tenths" after each day's recitations, but he won his star from the English Department, too. Then, too, there were always plenty of time and many pleasant weekends with a pretty Philadelphia lass. Certainly, Jim is well prepared to meet the challenges of an Army career, and to fulfill his ambition of becoming a lawyer someday. Sergeant 1, Swimming 4, 3, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Newman Forum 1 , Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 1, Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, German Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Howitzer 2, 1, Dialectic Society 2, 1, Camera Club 3, 2, Handball Club 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Skeet Club 4, Ski Club lf, 3, 2, 1. ROBERT FERRELL WELLS E-2 Bob Anchorage, Alaska Bob believed that books were made to be a pretty adornment and cadet life was made to be enjoyed. An advocate of "Free Life," Bob retained his individuality but lost his heart during his four year stay at West Point. He was probably the only Alaskan to freeze when the mercury fell below 60 de- grees and will be remembered as a true and sincere friend. Sergeant 1, Hockey 4, 3, Debate Council and Forum 3, French Club 3, Howitzer 1, Pointer 4, 3, Dialectic Society 2, 1, Art Club 4, 3, Pistol Club 4, Sailing Club 4, 3, 2, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rugby Club 2, 1. FRANCIS EUGENE WELPER, JR. G-2 Gene Ypsilanti, Michigan Gene, quiet and easy-going, always kept his life here in perfect perspective. With a few odds and ends, he could fix anything. His athletic talents led him to a Brigade Championship in wrestling and a strong game in handball for all challenges. His friendship will be carried for a lifetime by all who knew him well. Lieutenant 1 , Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 4, 3, Howit- zer 4, Dialectic Society 2, 1 , Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, Rocket Society 3. PAUL F. WERTZ G-1 Flux Arlington, Virginia Wabbit's friendly manners and casualness won him many close friends throughout the Corps. Never in a hurry-especially to study-he could al- ways be found chatting, reading a book, or, more likely, in the "pad." His outstanding abilities, however fully used, assure him success in all en- deavors. Lieutenant 1 ,' Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Sunday School Teacher 3, Ordnance Club 3, French Club 4, 3, 2, 1, HI-FI Club 2, 1. STEVEN GEORGE WEST L-2 Steve Brooklyn, New York Steve came to us from the innermost regions of Brooklyn full of enthusi- asm and bald as a billiard ball. And throughout our four years he never sprouted a hair nor lost an ounce of his drive. In a world where few people know how to set themselves to a difficult task, Steve will contribute much. He has already contributed to his friends a real respect for the accom- plishments of initiative and enthusiasm. Sergeant 1, Football Manager 4, Jewish Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Cadet-in-Charge 1, Debate Council dt Forum 4, 3. 2. 1: French Club 3. 2. 301 QQ- lggii, E143 '!!"?-619 lllmrlwui FRANCIS DUGAN WESTFALL, JR. I-1 Frank Louisville, Kentucky Not always appreciative of the academic side of cadet life, Hound concen- trated his efforts in the field of athletics. His superb ability was a tre- mendous asset to us. Few will ever forget Frank's numerous sessions in his brown office, his facility in manipulating moments about Thayer Hall, and, most of all, his genial personality. The Army is truly fortunate in receiving this "Blue Grasserf' Lieutenant 1,' Soccer 4,' Tennis 4, 3, Numerals 4,' Squash 3,' German Club 4, 3, 1,' Handball Club 2, 1. MATTHEW BARTHOLOMEW WHELTON, JR. B-1 Matt Galveston, Texas If you were to attempt to find the most untypical Texan in the Corps, Matt Whelton would be him. Proud of his home, yet leaving the banner-waving to other stalwart sons of the Lone Star State, Matt could always be found with a smile on his face and a helpful Word for his classmates. The halls of West Point will miss the sound of Bartholomew's slippered feet. Sergeant 1,' Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1,' Newman Forum 1,' Debate Council and Forum 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 3, 1. WILLIAM DONALD WHITE, JR. J K-2 Whitey Des Moines, Iowa Never a man to be beset by adversity, Whitey will always be remembered for his pleasant personality, his athletic ability, and his knack for bringing back "War" stories. With his ability to find humor in almost every situation, Whitey was a true fraternity man, be it the Phi Delts or Kappa Dos. Sergeant 1 ,' Swimming 4, 3, Numerals 4, Monogram 3, Pointer 4, 3, 2,' Sail- ing Club 4, 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Water Polo Club 4,' B Squad Choir 4, 3, 2, 1. WILLIAM CHARLES WHITEHEAD, JR. L-2 Whitey Lansford, Pennsylvania Bill was a true L-2 "file". He was a good athlete and a great guy. Whitey came from Lansford, Pa. to play football. When he wasn't winning respect for his athletic prowess on the football field, he was winning friends. "Lov- able Bill Whitehead" didn't make any enemies during his entire cadet career. Whatever Bill does, he will be a success and credit to those who knew him. Sergeant 1,' Football 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, 1,' B-Squad La- crosse 3,' Radio Club 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council 62 Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Hi-Fi Club 3,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4,' Weight Lifting Club 4, 3,' Rocket Society 4, 3. EVANS KELLOGG WHITING I-2 E'q.K. Camden, South Carolina Never one to let academics stand in the way of his education, E.K. divided his time among such activities as parachuting, steam tunnelling, skin diving and dreaming up ideas, one of which resulted in a rather notable exception to an otherwise enviable record of outguessing the "T.D." His quick smile, Southern charm and effortless manner of getting things accomplished will carry him far. Sergeant 1,' Rifle Club 4, 3,' Public Relations Council 2, 1,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3,' Debate Council and Forum 4,' Glee Club 4,' Rifle Club 4, 3,' Sail- ing Club 3, 2,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Parachute Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Skin Diving Club 3,2, 1. STANLEY EDWIN WHITMORE I-1 Stan Washington, D. C. Stan was one of the first to learn "Sir, I do not understand," in Russiang subsequently it was his most prompt reply. His copious criticism, love for an argument, and competitive spirit have made competition with him an ex- perience both on and off the track. Sergeant 1 ,' Public Information Detail 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Triathlon Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Pis- tol Club 3, 2, 1,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Patrol 4, 3. BILL WHITE 302 FRANK WESTFALL MATT WHELTON '30 BILL WHITEHEAD EVANS WHITING STAN WHITMORE Q if x -gnm 'wr :fda :T ,, .WW at DAN WICK GREG WILCOX AL WILHELM riff? haf! mari' 1 HJMWMW ggi M AQ, f ,ff 1 'f'??xi 'i Q 1- - 3 3,59-A. wg Q +' .f,+'E?vag. 304 19+ . -. RUSTY WILKERSON WILLIE WILLIAMS :psf ff .x xx g- 1 -1 20952.16 2 'Lf sets za - Q'-Siu?-2 I :rr xr- ' l , 'P' il. ie' 3X " 5 'G P DANIEL WINSTON WICK , F-2 Dan Fresno, California What an unveiling to substitute for the beautiful San Joaquin Valley of Cali- fornia, the rugged, dank Hudson Highlands, to set aside an exhilarating Western freedom for an ascetic Eastern confinement. All illusions passed soon, the grueling challenge of the martinets was ever present. Yet always there remained the interest in others, the deep, personal sincerity, the glow of success. Lieutenant 1 ,' Squash 4, 3, 2,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1,' Glee Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOHN GREGOR WILCOX E-2 Greg Denver, Colorado Greg hails from the Wastelands of Denver, Colorado and brings with him a sharp Wit and a good sense of humor, typical of the friendly spirit of the West. He is much interested in sports, such as football and wrestling. His hobbies range from girls to guns, with girls taking preference. During his four years as a cadet, Greg was real straight with the Tactical Department, until it came to one thing, public display of affection. Lieutenant 1g Rifle Club 4, 3,' Debate Council dt Forum 4, 2, 1 ,' Portuguese Club 4, 2, 1,' KDET 4, 3,' Outdoor Sports Club 4, 35 Pistol Club 3,' Ski Club 4, 3, 1. ALFRED DONOVAN WILHELM, JR. D-2 Al Little Rock, Arkansas Even though Al is from the Warm climate of the deep South, he is one of the few people who really appreciates "Yankee" weather, especially the cold winters. Al is always ready to help out and for this reason has made many friends. His conscientiousness and determination ensure that he will con- tinue to be a success wherever he may be. Sergeant 1,' Squash 4,' English Literature Seminar 2,' Spanish Club 3, 2,' Camera Club 2. BENJAMIN R. WILKERSON, JR. E-2 Rusty Franklin, Tennessee Rusty's rebel tongue and receding hairline are well known around the Corps. His friendly smile when not hidden by the "magic brown blanket" is fa- miliar in the Solids Department where he bolo'd the first time and made upper sections the second time. An infantry "file" since the days of "Drop that bag, Mr.!" Ol' B.R. will make a spirited Paratrooper and a military asset. Sergeant 1,' Rifle 4, 3,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2,' Portuguese Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Howitzer 4, 3, 2,' KDET 4,' Golf Club 2, 1,' Rifle Club 4, 3, 2,' Skeet Club 4, 3, Ski Club 4, 3. MERLE ROBBINS WILLIAMS I-1 Willie San Antonio, Texas All Texans are giantsg this one in spirit if not stature. Merle's accomplish- ments on the high bar were matched only by his fight with his native lan- guage. He enlivened every bull session with his high spirits. A sense of hu- mor was his trademarkg it will stand him high in his career. Sergeant 1g Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4, Minor A 3, 2, 1 ,' Gymnastics Club 2, 1,' Camera Club 3. 2, 1 ,' Art Club 1. DONALD LEE WILLIAMSON -K-2 Don Williamsport, Pennsylvania Don brought to West Point his desire to win, his conscientious nature and the personality to fit perfectly in Kappa Dos. For four years, he has ably given his talents to the track team. His interests in extra-curricular activi- ties and young ladies never caused him to lose his place high on the Dean's ist. Sergeant 1,' Track 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4,' Cross Countryg Debate Council and Forum 2, 1,' Russian Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Astronomy Club 3, 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 15 KDET 4, 3, 2,' Ski Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Rocket Society 4, 3, 2, 1. DON WILLIAMSON 305 XJ 'f QQ Z-.7-g WAYNE D. WILLIS G-1 Willie Windsor, Virginia. When he first looked over the "campus", our peanut farmer knew hef shouldn't have left Virginia. Nevertheless, he became a familiar sight ini the upper sections, and "Honest Wayne" was selected as G-1's Honor Rep- resentative and Intramural Athlete of the Year. He accomplished these and' much more without losing sight of his "brown boy." Virginia's loss will un-A doubtedly be the Army's gain. Lieutenant 1,' Honor Committee 2, 1, Ordnance Club 4, 3, Spanish Club 3, 2, 1,' Hi-Fi Club 2, 1, Treasurer 1. DAVID LOREN WINDOM L-2 Dave Columbus, Ohio DaVe's year at Ohio State and 16 months in the Ohio National Guard gave him an easy transition in academics and military-life. Although never fail- ing to keep the books Warm. Dave was always willing to beat an opponent in ,handball or to parachute to the ground after sky diving. Never losing his ability to laugh or make friends, Dave has a successful thirty year career in front, of him. Sergeant 1, Radio Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Pointer 3,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Rifle Club 4, 3,' Sailing Club 4, 3,' Skeet Club 4, 3,' Parachute Club 2, 1. JOHN CHARLES WINKLER L-1 J -C' - Caney, Kansas Born and raised on the midwestern plains of Kansas, J .C. came to West Point. Since coming to West Point he has proved to be a valuable asset to L-1's intramural team, and on any given free afternoon you can find him playing bridge, on the tennis courts, or in the "pad," J.C. is truly a credit to the Corps and the Army. Sergeant 1,' German Club 4, 3, Golf Club 2, 1,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Bridge Club 2, 1. GEOFFREY DISMUKES WITHERS I-2 Jejj' Atlanta, Georgia Raised a son of the Army, JeE brought to West Point a determination and light-hearted spirit which made his four years an example for those around him. Jeff plans, with strong support from the Academic Department to go Infantry-Airborne-Ranger, of course. His ability for a fine performance, coupled with his outstanding athletic prowess will stand him high in the years to come. Sergeant 1,' Swimming 4, 3, Chapel Acolytes 3, 2, 1, Spanish Club 4, 3, Sailing Club 3, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Parachute Club 2,' Skin Diving Club 3. JAY HERNDON WITT F-2 Jay Alexandria, Virginia Jay is a man of many talents and much ability. Coming to West Point from Princeton University, Jay easily adapted to the academic rigors of a cadet. Besides overall outstanding athletic ability, Jay's easy-going personality made him a friend of many. His inherent combination of ability, affability and respect for others is a fine example for all to follow. Sergeant 1, Lacrosse 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Monogram 3,' Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1, Mathematics Forum 3,' Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' French Club 4, 3, 2, 1,' Outdoor Sports Club 3,' Chess Club 2,' Handball Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Sailing Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Parachute Club 4, 3, 2, 1. RONALD WOODRUM WITZEL F-1 Witz Huntington, West Virginia When long, lanky Witz strolled out of the back hills of his homeland, he brought with him an easy-going manner, a ready smile and a big West Vir- ginia "howdy" that were to characterize him throughout his career at "The Rock." Although never one to take work more seriously than play, his many friends will remember him for his sincerity and willingness to lend a helping hand. Sergeant 1 ,' Public Relations Council 2, 1 ,' Chapel Acolytes 4, 3, 2, 15 Mathe- matics Forum 2, 1, Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 1,' Russian Club 3 2, 1,' Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Hi-Fi Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Scusa 2, 1. 306 , WAYNE WILLIS DAVE WINDOM Bw JOHN WINKLER TN xx V-, ' - ' x ,A . - , x ,-S,-N x . .7 ,L W T ,fff,Q!f"L' Vyff. 53 gg ,.., A 1 ,, . X X, , , -. . w ith-- -Mk X . ,N .K W jf 5 K ,Ag , 7 A an-df", , if JEFF WITHERS JAY WITT RON WITZEL ,.......Q.., DON WOEBER JOE WOJCIK BOB WONG 308 DON WOODMAN WILL WORTHINGTON JIM WORTHINGTON 5 74- fi? Q x X4 xg: .. - . "QE, gag ' ' .s7"+t'5E!?',,'-f A24 Vliikrsjigi' N .. ' .3 .FB X , DONALD HAROLD WOEBER I 1 Woden Fort Collins, Colorado The "Great White Warrior" came to West Point with high hopes. Don's. suc- cesses materialized these hopes while his sharp wit kept us all in high spirits. Undaunted by the Academic and Tactical departments, Don was always in- volved in a new project or a crash program. Colorado can surely be proud of their "Rain God." Sergeant 15 Gymnastics 4, Numerals 45 Track 25 Newman Forum 3, 2, 15 Ordnance Club 3, 15 German Club 4, 3, 2, 1 ,' Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 15 Pis- tol Club 3, 25 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1. JOSEPH JOHN WOJCIK C-1 Gump Chicago, Illinois Joe came to West Point from Chicago where he was known as a football star and a member of the National Honor Society. After 1 July 1958 he built an even more impressive record. He has been known as "spoony" plebe, regi- mental champion boxer, Casanova, "Gump Worseley" of Soccer, "hive" and Company Honor Rep. Stars in store for Joe in the service. Captain 1 ,' Baseball 4, Numerals 45 Honor Committee 1, Vice-Chairman 1 5 Catholic Choir'4, 3, 2, 15 Mathematics Forum 3, 2, 1, President 15 Russian Club 3, 2, 15 Handball Club 1 5 Sailing Club 25 Ski Club 4, 3, 2, 1.. ROBERT YEN WONG K-1 Bob New York, New York Bob's four years here were guided by the philosophy of never letting aca- demics interfere with his social life. He exhibited a great capacity for get- ting a job doneg a quality which will be a great asset to him in years to come. ' Sergeant 15 Gymnastics Manager 4, 35 Hop Committee 45 Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 15 Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Spanish Club 15 Glee Club 3, 2, 1 5 Pistol Club 45 Ski Club 45 Rocket Society 1. DONALD KING WOODMAN C-1 Woody Washington, D. C. "This looks like a job for . . .". Though famed for no-arm handstands, Jack was at his best as our informal choral leader. The Jack Armstrong, Clark Kent, Mickey Mouse and Lone Ranger of our class, he was renowned for his impersonations. With cat-like grace the old wagon painter vanishes into a phone booth . . . Sergeant 15 Rifle 45 Track 35 Ring and Crest Committee 4, 3, 2, 15 Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Mathematics Forum 35 Debate Council and Forum 4, 3, 2, 15 Howitzer 1 5 Pointer 4, 3, 2, 1, Art Editor 1 5 Glee Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Ca- det J2 Director5 KDET 4, 35 100th Night Show 2, 1. HENRY WILSON WORTHINGTON C-2 Will Brownsville, Texas Will has more than met the standard of a true son of Texas, silent when problems are crowding him and strong in their solution of them. His easy smile and good humor never let him down. Coupled with his natural abil- ity, these will carry him far in the Army. Sergeant 1 5 Gymnastics 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 45 Cadet Chapel Choir 4, 3, 2, 1 5 Spanish Club 25 Gymnastics Club 3, 2, 1, Secretary 15 Pointer 4, 35 Glee Club 45 Outdoor Sports Club 3, 2, 1 5 Skeet Club 45 Ski Club 4. JAMES MARTIN WORTHINGTON, JR. H-2 Jim Bradley Beach, New Jersey Jim is a Brat who has had an enviable academic record and has been a very skillful athlete, particularly in tennis and golf. As a red-head and non-be- liever in the 3rd Class and 2nd Class Systems, The Cheerios incident and several more were sure to follow. But Jim just smoked his pipe and weath- ered the storm. He has the ability and confidence to bring success his way and his many friends wish him the best of luck. Sergeant 15 Stars 35 English Literature Seminar 25 Debate Council and Forum 3, 2, 15 Spanish Club 3, 2, 15 Golf Club 3, 1. 309 'M ee ,fi we .ii i 'fel 2' e lillllli' .All " fasilllllllll CHARLES LAWRENCE WUERPEL B-1 Peter , Chicago, Illinois "This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man." Shakespeare Captain 1 ,' Public Relations Council 3, 2, 15 Catholic Acolytes 3, 2, 1 ,' Debate Council and Forum 3, 2, 1 ,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1 ,' Handball Club 3, 2, 1. RICHARD WILLIAM WYLIE L-1 Dick Pincknet, Michigan Dick, fresh from a small Michigan town, took West Point in his stride. Although the French Department was not his favorite it created a lasting impression on him. His willingness to lend a helping hand and his undying spirit have earned him many lasting friends at the Academy. Sergeant 1 ,' Sunday School Teacher 4, 3, 2,' Debate Council di: Forum 4, 3, 2, French Club 4, 3,' Protestant Discussion Group 45 KDET 4,' Skeet Club 4, 3, 2. ROBERT DALE ZABIK B-2 Bob Detroit, Michigan After a year at the Detroit Institute of Technology, Bob did not find it hard to compile three sets of stars. His natural talent for academics gave him time to help his less fortunate classmates and catch a little pad too. Bob's fine record and many friends at West Point forecast success for him in any field of endeavor. Sergeant 1,' Pistol 2,' Stars 3, 2, 1g Mathematics Forum 2, 15 Ordnance Club 3,' Debate Council and Forum 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 2, 1, Properties Committee Chairman 2,' Chess Club 4,- Handball Club 2, 15 Pistol Club 4, 3, 2, 1, Treasurer 1g Ski Club 4. ERNEST GUSTAVE ZENKER E-2 Gus Saratoga, California From the far-off coast of sunny California, Gus came to the Point ready to tackle anything it could offer with enthusiasm, intelligence and a smile for all. And this he did. As a starman, he always managed to stay way ahead of the Academic Department, and eluding the "T.D." was easier yet. Ern's activities and interests ranged from calculus to canoeing. What is E-2's loss is the Army's gain. Sergeant 1,' Stars 3, 2, 1,' Wrestling 4, 3, 2, 1, Numerals 4,' Catholic Choir 4, 3, 2, 15 Newman Forum 3, 2, 1g Debate Council 4, 3,' Spanish Club 3, 2, 1,' Debate Council 4, 35 Spanish Club 3, 2, 1, Pistol Club 35 Ski Club 4, 3, 2,' College Bowl 2, 1. RONALD LLOYD ZINN A-1 Ron Peoria, Illinois Zinn was born and bred in Peoria, "the gateway to the West." After running up an impressive record at Cornell, the "wonder Walker" migrated to the Hudson Valley Militia School, where his record grew more impressive. Ron's best remembered moment in the limelight was his participation in the 1960 Olympics as a distance walker, the first cadet to be selected for an Olympic Team. There may be some note in the fact that the only cadet to be so honored, was a walker. Sergeant 1,' Cross Country 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4, Major A 3, 2, Wrestling 4, Numerals 45 Track 4, 3, 2, Major A 25 Debate Council and Forum 4,' Ski Club 4, 2. PAUL THEODORE ZMUIDA B-12 Z Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania He may have been last man in the Corps alphabetically, but he was tops in nearly everything else. He left his mark on many cadet activities, but was best known for his conquests from the lonely end spot on the gridiron. He was in control of most any situation except for his fondness of cookies and bouts with the "brown boy." To know Paul was to know a great friend. Lieutenant Ig Football 4, 3, 2, Numerals 4,' Ring 62 Crest Committee 4, 3, 25 Ozrgiance Club 3, 2,' Spanish Club 4, 3,' Dialectic Society 4, 3, 25 Handball C u 3, 2. BOB ZABIK 3lO PETER WUERPEL DICK WYLIE , , GUS ZENKER RON ZINN PAUL ZMUIDA 2 STEVEN D. PIERCE CHALLENGE Footsteps pass by outside, No more but a passing on to where In the dusk of evening a sentry calls The eternal question-Who is there? Silence was in the air. There were only the words he said: Only the wind across the snow And the words-Steve Pierce is dead. We tiled back in the door. No one spoke but the wind blew ong No word but a quiet sound inside, No word but a whisper-Steve is gone. We all had been his friends. Four Words: in that moment a part Of each man changed-each man became A little of Steve Pierce in his heart. The sorrow dies away. Is there a man who can lose a friend And come away the same? The sentry passes quietly. We who remain answer for him: We must be his fame. Tom Johnson '65 .E aw hx'-"ye 3' M55 my 52' iw lag s 55 lr ,Qff fw 1 K 5 . gh il El ii? i . . . Q .,,,, ,,:., .,... 5 What remains is a memory with no name: 1.142 , . ..,..,. .:,,:: nili ,,,,, . . , 5- if it x, fi G f ..l1e if 5, s l S E 2 l i E A ,fx "U N ww Q fl? X21 E. .fffmfzzx X1 "SS -, 'X f , V . H 15 -1,, L Wi W lx YW! +- X V if wax If U Uwtms lk ILM' N l!"'W M154- U W VE N5 ' 1 ,Ag W' L " A' i , EF, 'w5W'3',,',-Q ',.A ffk WJ M Y f m ,: 1,1a 1s5f 4z pw U fm.f54f'if J 'ef , ' x e1 ' 'fm' 'if-' W H1 W 5 W -1 'M Wy ' mfr .. wjsww " i L W ffm X 1' 1?' e wfff W5 iv +1"f ' f -A "4 -J' 5 'qq.. 1,1 W 9 ' , J N 5 W H QT 'ff yu W ?!l7l yl'HN f. f J x Lxi6LQQQN.l f yx lffl'-Q y ff V' J 4 1 ll 1?Q "'f Kkfgkwff ' - ,WQ 1aV X W 5' I M . MQ-,ij ' ' Q YE Q ' i3M ,QffT2'f'4. Q 4 QXNU' WK4., ,2l5f11Cf1xl ' VX" X ,Mk ff W MM uf f M W CY xwf I 1 X KXXML xx-flxumxx Scsge X , XNG5 ' XXX YK k TIHHE QQRIPDS 314 'W Y ' Y H- U 9'-'Qkfv-1' , Evgen , . 'X -if-'fkiff :dw 'Ln' '11 , .',ff:QCf5f'f,, ' gilk'-6.1 aiff 4, . Qgfigiiillwy-,sg xfw' '+xwWw:ff,1gh wgWWAi2G2a2f1z:: ' S JQQM 51353225 WEE 4 ' I L 1 mf , K in Q , f .W- ,ggquuv ju 44 .- i W- i 'IZ -....5"'. Q- Q 1 42 7 ": ' if es 'Q ,Q Q is Q t . ' 9 -Q1 'ar 'Q .A fvgi 'R ,J " .ff ' Q '53 Q Q I Q 4, 13 1 F C73- S RP CU IE TH-I EDITOR Joel Froeschle . ,Ji -- W . K. My A K A My-W . . 5 "k 'Calf ' ' M., - A 1 l, 4 " L. My W I M M , , W A M Q ' ' ' " R... F K . Q Q A ,m i , QE -V . Z . I 'fr' my fi: . 1 , 7 Al . lq, ' 1 Q J I ! Q U W 4 r Q 1' ,ff I ? Y i 3 'L y Q ad . i ,,.f a - 1 it ist" ,, A I 4 'fig 1 5 .Vi. Q fp 1 3 ,S M3 THE CLASS OF '62: nd we Aid. Xt hai been atong road rannation '62, and our eir teh. Unr ut T0 U0 . . . a '58 to G t00k th sorry,b A '62 Can east Barracks A as the bnrnns A none ei ns are been engrave Xace ironl B winnte end an that haS ' t hhs a n a nnrnber A tour years are at an we can nev er erase the math in our nfrnns and on our hearts. W estYoxn in the history oi our hr es, and we hhewtse ocenny X part oi its heritage. We ptaced a trust in West e us tor the hte that hes aheang and een cornntetect, West Yoint Xt aiks that we, in- ' h a way swat ' to prenar Xi has b t in us. nt rn sue . am, 6 Yoxnt new that its tas ptaces an ev en gr eater trns Atvidnahy and as a dass, aw ays nerior that when members oi the Long Grey Lxnef A intnr ef5neah oi the Ctass oi ' 62 they ' s done, is doing, and Can Dot" sent, an " '62 ha I pre prondty say, c 316 W Y Wrb 63 K V Q JJ ,jk jay. A.,V , A. im X , A , Q:-,.v::-.f.x, ,4 V " - A' , af W P 9 ' + GH, I fI.' ! vw! 'lx Hg , WL g if K fi XM , Hwfff'-:' y, fg,1, ,g',,, yy3QgiQAl , 114, 2 'wa ni"f!ffi'E':- 'f ' 1kw 'RK x, Wm - we " , ' ,,g,s,. .Ar fi' , im -. 1? F-'f+M ' fl I NU' ,wif J ' 5 i- :ami R A. ,f A T 5 K Q5 Z f Q i xw w f, X .N Q , -Q !"f1,- "' ,, . ,l ' .x N 1-, W :N NN '. ' X 'X m f 1 w , XM , X'5f'f" WbNX N P I 4':' x 3-.frjjf ' "', A xi 'i,tVdN,g. v V, ffxbiglif ,XX -sz-.X W Q ,,'. lf N 'X 2? , M ffl-. 6 .1411-r ,1,a.-- --:,'fm,..f,f244 'XA . fr fa-7:5 -gg A I NI . ,V ,f xx BRIGADE' STAFF 317 X ,xv I 1, V . R - N N , R fr K ig , ,N WR,-1m1sg,Hf,l WWF! XV.. X EO R J+ R ' J , , , " Wi. X ' N3mml'la f IFHRST RIEGIIMIENTAIL STAIFIF VHIRST IBATTAILIION SZWAROKOP SWEET GORDON BROWN 318 SIECUNV IBPUVTAILIIUN WERTZ CLARK BROSHOUS PIERCE A CRABTREE KRA AT TIHHIRID lBATTA1LIlUN RUSHATZ ALCALA HUEMAN KAYS Z FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Dennis Reimer, Dick Fellows, Ben Carter, Will Cannon, Jack Byers, Jeff McCarthy. SECOND ROW: Larry Gunder- man, Bud Baughman, Duane Szwarckop, Pete Siedzick, Al Robb, Pierce Hanley. THIRD ROW: Joe Porter, John Grimshaw, Jan Molvar, Tom Mailey, Joel Froeschle. FOURTH ROW: Francis Sazarna, Mike Schredl, Larry Mengel, Marsh Carter, Gene Baxter, Lew Brown. not pictured: Bob Krause. ?? rf '--:--:- .:-.- F . ..,:..,. 5 if lg . l is l b g f 5 . l . . f ,. 1 gl F ., Q35 J R23 K gilt f to 5 5 1 2' ll eil 2 5 3 : Q 'H 4 it ag? .,,. 5 . 1, te v ltl V, , img! Y sill SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Glad- felter, D., Bowers, M., Higgins, R., Stanley, P., Roesler, D., Lodoen, G. SECOND ROW: Venes, R., Beatty, N., LaVoy, A., Jackson, D., Pappas, G., Wilson, J. THIRD ROW: Bagby, D., Whitehead, W., Tyler, T., Spear, L. FOURTH ROW: White, M., Arbogast, G., Coulson, R., O'Donnell, J., O'Connor, J. Captain Forman and Cadet Reimer We of '62 entered A-1 some four years ago with the idea that A-1 was the company that always leads the Corps. Now, after two Supe's awards, a drill streamer and several other distinctions we still believe it. We outlived "Rosie," "Daddy," "The Major," and "Skip," even though times were tough every now and then. Who among us will ever forget "Argon," "Gundy," "Grime Ball," "Hac," "Fuf," "Maashbar," "Harry and Charlie Brownf, "Smorgy," "Spud," "Swee' Pea," "Baby Huey," "Shreds," "Big T,', "Padre," "The Marymount Kid," "Molweed," "The Shadow," "Gus-Gus," "Tanker," "Bayou Ben," "The In- verter," "Candid Camera," and "Tricky Dick"? Through these four years we have endured our constant battle with the academic department, tactical department, laundry, and the mess hall. Now, as we prepare to leave our alma-mater and take our places in the world, though we would not go through it again, we know that we are proud of West Point and the country which it serves so well. THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Elson, P., Doolittle, R., Bearce, A., Knight, F., Stablein, G., Hin- shaw, F., Spannaus, O. SECOND ROW: Major, W., Ger- ken, J., Mack, A., Bramlette, L., Boyd, H., Thomas, T., -Grunstad, N. THIRD ROW: Meyer, P., West, A., Woodle, C., Yourtee, L., Fraser, H., Thurston, C. FOURTH ROW: Kofalt, J., Randall, M., Schou, D., Kullman, T., Williams, R., Kufeke, R., Davison, M. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Mims J., Myers, C., Koleszar, F., Arnall, F., Divers, W., Win- stead, E., Lapolla, M., Johnson, J. SECOND ROW: Web- er, M., Wattendorf, J., Strassner, L., Eller, R., Thomp- son, J., Hennessee, J., Brown, G., Kantrowich, P., Collins R. THIRD ROW: O'Neill, E., Timmerman, F., Smoak J., Smith, J., Gnecco, J., Hemmingway, C., Isham, A FOURTH. ROW: Johnson, E., Burrell, S., Gill, C., Rad- cliffe, R., Kriebel, G., Ritch, J., Fredericks, G., Brown C., Airy, J. " X .... f L fl Hg, QE 5 ---- mm- gf Q if -21 A Q .-as QE Eli E: illgg g y r igs ef +1 1 13 52555 -:E 5 l i 'i H 1 '1: L1 : 1555525 3 lfglf 1,5 1 l. l l , it A Fi 5 x vi ia 1 fl 2 2 f l,lgillg2i,liif I K E " E 335255 gl . f - lil :ez aging Q5 it 3 J 1 Ei is ll E521 5 Q may fl, I If E we 2 il if R 5 in sf 3 13 w w 5 31 FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Herbert Cadwell, Charles Butzer, David Phillips, James Me- Donough, Edward Starbird, Joseph Kieffer. SECOND ROW: Michael Crabtree, James Martin, Chris Stanat, Honald Maidt, Richard Chegar, Ronald Skarupa. THIRD ROW: Seth Hudak, Matthew Whelton, Howard Batt, James Andress, Larry Parmenter, William Chris- topher. FOURTH ROW: Stanford Shutes, Ralph Pryor, Kenneth Dean, Sammie Carr, Roy Wallace. ,Q W ns 1. 'P' ,og ,, .s l fit . uw av Q we Je. , 've 5 -N pm, ,wg it '13 K X 7 gif Z .,.-, is ' 1 eu its QA1 J rf, - LH - . -' f f s. ,:. .. ss - x 'K .1 - h ,ff:.g. 5... -14.1 Q use - , ff ' , 1.5, 4,5 r .. THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Schoon- over, J., Piekarski, R., Rhoades, G., Clark, J., Moran, M. Amrine, R., Schmeelk, P. SECOND ROW: Wells, J., Nahas, N., Roberts, T., Thomas, H., Ramsay, D., Wink- ler, J., Magnell, C., Legan, T. THIRD ROW: Smith, W., Erb, J., Fracker, S., Speedy, J., Lang, J., Woolsey, G., Badger, T. FOURTH ROW: Dykes, A., Baldwin, R., Jimearson, J., Von Freymann, R., Palko, J., Shoemaker, R. .Q : ,-::. . .... . A "'..:-' . -:'i V 1 K J I :':' T . ., . . J. iff: i.. i" , is 1 ... V' , .Q A . I. it ... ....fv4,.. Q... .., FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Letterie, C., Locurcio, R., Jewett, S., Ono, T., Bell, G., Gailey, B., Helberg, J. SECOND ROW: Lee, R., Huston, M., Shin- seki, R., Konnerman, L., Prokop, F., Cato, R., Norkin, L., Ammerman, F. THIRD ROW: Connor, M., Erbes, D., Plate, C., Rountree, R., Klink, E., Genega, S., Berdy, M. FOURTH ROW: Jump, M. Zurlo, J., Throckmorton, T., Zonne, R., McCreary, W., Exelby, D., Leverett, H. not pictured: Bangert, D. We came, we saw, we . . .-well anyway we passed. From Beast Barracks came our motto, H62 Can Do." We did, and how! From the slums of Central Area, we moved to the Hilton, but somebody upstairs did not like hall ball so we were sent .back to the slums for our last year. In both places we fought our battles with the T.D., the O.P.E., and the academic departments with equal fervor, according to campaign plans well made beneath our brown boys. The system fought us, gave up, and awarded us the Supe's Award. The academic departments followed suit with the Dean's Award. Intramurals and Corps squad saw us always in the fray, as it were. Still we managed to subordinate all of this trivia to the real stuif of life: the Bunch, dragging, and above all, an amazing synergy that set us above most and which we would not trade for anything under the sun. With apologies to Honest Abe, we must say as we leave that we may forget what has been said here, but we will never forget what we did here. Major Betts and Cadet Chegar FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Karl Henn, Dan Woodman, Tom Pearson, Tom Buck, Denne Swee- ney, Dick Kent. SECOND ROW: John Kendall, Bob Shuey, Frank Fiore, Paul McNamara, Tom Ostenberg, Tom Moore. THIRD ROW.' John Darrah, Jim Gorman, Jim Ryan, Bill Cross, Joe Wojcik, Jim Dunmyer, Jerry Comello. FOURTH ROW.' Raife Snover, Ron Zinn, Ed Dwyer, Art Brown, Marv Norwood, Rusty Scheewe. not pictured: Ed Hendren, Fred Gorden ,AQ Q. .um A me ae. 1- " : 4 SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Witt W., Davenport, G., Miller, M., Heim, B., James, R. Burke, J. SECOND ROW: Wilson, T., Roberts, R., Orn- dorf, H., Robbins, J., Stennis, W., Guilhaus, H., Seiwert A. THIRD ROW: Trucksa, R., Nelander, J., Dalia, J. Byrns, J., Cornfoot, J., Smith, G. not pictu1'ed: Buse, F I 44f'f at in iv. Cadet Hendren and Major Henderson With the first gathering of our class in comfortable, casual C-1, many friendships were made and many "yuks" were had. Everyone certainly remembers the gradu- ation parade at the glorious end of our first year. Yearling Year found us breaking in the new barracks with the introduction of "socky," the midnight raids, and indoor football. As second classmen, new responsibilities had to be met, this however, didn't dampen our fun-loving spirit, for we continued and strengthened the reputa- tion which we had acquired the year before. We threw many successful parties in "the big city." When First Class Year finally arrived, we were ready to stack arms. The academic department quickly straightened us out..Over the four years C-1 has done its share in the fields from athletics to academics to dragging. As graduation approaches and ends, may the friendships which have grown from year to year con- tine to grow. Good-by, C-1! Hello, world! THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Reynolds, W., Mulvaney, J., Morton, H., Beasley, C., Graves, P., Blair, R., Ames, R. SECOND ROW: Morgan, T., Hene- man, H., Lake, J., Corley, B., Graw, L., Arnold, J., Green, L., Bramlett, D. THIRD ROW: Stapleton, J., Brennan, M., Muratti, J., Ullman, D. Stepek, D., Craig- Hill, R., Efird, C. FOURTH ROW: Boster, J., Hulin, B., Treado, A., Rhodes, R., Kresefski, L., Puckett, R. 2 FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Wag- goner, J., Clay, A., Bliss, S., Blades, J., Plaas, J., Murray R., Saski, S., Bryan, J. SECOND ROW: Lawson, L. Hardin, J., Luttenberger, E., Malpass, J., Terrel, D. Neal, L., Ludwig, R., Phillpotts, D. THIRD ROW: Bai- ley, E., Csoka, L., Salz, L., Stockton, J., Knauf, E. Lehman, W., De Vitto, J., McGee, H. FOURTH ROW: Shutters, D., Kuhn, D., Poor, W., Triick, W., Fricke, H., Besson, R., Pessini, A. not pictured: Holmes, D. QSM" .,,,- ' 1:5 .,.. e - A D EM . -1 FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Ken Ishoy, Jerry Lape, Billie Thomas, Bob Lilley, Roy Kobayashi, Bill Dworsak, Bob Hufschmid. SECOND ROW: Bob Bauman, Pete Oldfield, Tom Kilmartin, Don Karrer, George Sweet, George Schein, Bob Munsch. THIRD ROW.' Don Stewart, Larry Larson, Al McElh0se, Nick Hurst, Bill Byrd, Deane Stanley. FOURTH ROW: Bob Douglas, John Fee, Trevor Dupuy, John Regan, Sonny Sloan. not piCtu1'ed: Bud Reeves. A C' SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: West- brook, J., Thomson, A .,Morgan, J., Smith, P., Lutz, W. Cook, L. SECOND ROW: Tate, C., Bollinger, E., Young R., Owen, W., Waller, J., Prutow, D. THIRD ROW. Robert, E., Ahern, J., Nicholas, W., Wangsgard, C. O'Toole, R., Steinig, R. FOURTH ROW: Caywood, J. Lawn, M., Embree, H., Green, J., Getella, A. f MX F, . , f, , Jsnanneulutafillu THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Topor, E., Stephenson, F., Miller, W., Quann, B., Pietsch, K., Michela, R. SECOND ROW: Pope, F., Schuley, R., Rear- don, D., Rennie, P., Roberts, T., Darrow, J., Scott, G. THIRD ROW: Perryman, S., Oberhill, J., Yankoupe, R., Shanabrough, K., Lozeau, A., Wilderman, G. FOURTH ROW: Overton, S., Harris, R., Lingle, R., Solomon, S., McKinley, M., Sandman, R., Blair, J. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: John son, R., Hudson, K., Kline, D., Lewis, P., Mirando, J. Abbott, M., Munson, M., Campbell, R. SECOND ROW Tyner, St. E., Manlove, R., Conway, J., Alexander, E. Bryant, L., McMillan, J., Van Zant, R. THIRD ROW Holder, J., Doughty, R., Powers, T., Connolly, W., Ren schen, P., Haneke, W., Harvey, J. FOURTH ROW Kehr, T., Birdseye, W., Merges, J., Davisson, T., Lar son, G., Wirth, R. not pictured: Walsh, M., Brewer, D. Zadel, C. Any table of organization will tell you that Company D is the last company of the first battalion of a regiment. However, no such table can tell you of the men who make up that company, or of the spirit that moves it. But what is Delta One composed of? Hives and goats, "A" squad athletes, drag- oids and padoids, areabirds, snakes, extracurricular whizzes, and many others- all drawn from varied backgrounds, geographically and socially. Every man is an individual, but every individual wears the indelible mark of having "served time" in D Co. That mark is the sole product of being the last "brown shoe" company in a "black shoe" Corps. These are the men and the spirit of D-1. In June 1962, the "peaceful confines" of Delta One will belch forth 26 "hot bods" into the Army. The comradeship, four years in the making, will not be dissolved by a casual "Au revoir !" In the years ahead we will go our separate ways, but the thought of having served together at "the Rock" can hardly fail to bring a lump into our throats when hearing, "Should old acquaintance be forgot . . . " 2 Cadet Schein and Major Norman FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Kenny Dolsen, Al De Jardin, Ty Cobb, Chuck Chandler, Rusty Broshous, John Godwin. SECOND ROW.' Phil Poulsen, Kenny Wallace, Bill Millerlile, John Porter, Roger Green, Fred Doten, Chris Robbins. THIRD ROW: Neil Hyde, Lewis Higinbotham, Art Webb, Cliff McKeithan, Dave Treadwell, Chris Spivey. FOURTH ROW: Mike McDonnell, Dick Ryer, Tony Lawson, Rudy Kohler, Ron Henderson. not pictured: Glen Blumhardt. A -dm Qt -H sg -fam ...-. ff 28 SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: St. Am- ant, P., Creasy, J., Rizio, L., Merritt, Wm., Mitchell, R., Ellerson, J., Bentson, P. SECOND ROW: Means, D., Boehlke, R., Odland, R., Sill, L., Shepard, J. THIRD ROW: Stahl, S., Mock, P., Keaveney, M., Doherty, J., Stryker, J., Dean, R. not pictured: Bianco, A., MacAl- lister, R. l Major Gosling and Cadet Godwin Life along the Hudson for the past four years has been a mixture of ups and downs, work and play, anxieties and anticipations. All of us have had our good times as well as the bad. Yet, none of us can deny that West Point has been made a bit brighter by the company life in old E-1. Intramurals, parades, academics-they were all part of our day to day routine, and as we all went through it together, we molded into the daily company life. Each of us had his own special bugaboo with the West Point system, but E-1 and our fellow companymates were release from it all. After all is said and done, old E-1 files agree that our company was a wonderful experience-one well worth remembering. We can now look back at the institution that was for four years our home and realize that, after the Academy itself, Com- pany E-1 held-and rightly so-our strongest aifections. THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Ward, J., Pembrook, S., Caudill, W., Wright, T., Biank, S., Mc- Cutchan, J., Daly, J. SECOND ROW: Sornson, R., Reed, P., Miller, M., Otto, S., Normyle, J., Chartrand, M., Lechner, E. THIRD ROW: Bolen, W., Carr, R., Ficker, R., McCormack, J., Andersen, N., DiNeno, W. FOURTH ROW: Seely, W., Bain, S., Crowder, R., McCormack, H., Bloomfield, K., Aker, T. not pictured: Tripler, D. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW left to Mght Eichel berger, J., Hoffman, C. J., Rowe, D., McCullough, J., Wollen, R., Taylor, H., Leach, S., Talbot, J. SECOND ROW: Chapman, R., Thompson, J., Singelyn, P., Webb, J., McDonald, P., Forrest, E., Brown, R., Russell, W. THIRD ROW: Williams, R., Connell, J., Kimbrell, G., Hutton, J., Kelly, B., Tragemann, R., Thomasson, J., Whitehouse, B., Vaughn, J. FOURTH ROW: Rood, O., Smith, J., Evans, E., Scruggs, H., Frydrychowski, R., Clark, M., Kistler, B. not pictured: Krystof, R. FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Al Tindale, Frank Krzyzkowski, Bert Goldberg, Buzz Kriesel, Phil Nelson, Al Alinger. SECOND ROW: Don Hard, Jim Lindsey, Gene Tomlinson, Bill Burns, Dave Francis, Lennie Taylor, Chuck Abbott. THIRD ROW: Derek Sprouse, Don Voss, Buck Lair, Frank Caufield, Skip Campbell, Rick Cesped, Norm Grahn. FOURTH ROW: Steve Pierce, Bob Rintz, Ron Witzel, George Carnes, Tony DeAmico, Steve Sperman. W we E Vyhz J ww 'em-wav wr , . 1 I A-fi' THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Vineyard, W., Winborn, E., Prothero, M., Chandler, W., Gesner, R. Roberts, N., Wilcox C. SECOND ROW: Hess, F., Cur: rant, T., Lamback, S., Hartley, G., Zengerle, J., Gill, N THIRD ROW: Gaylor, A., Beirschmitt, J., Chilcoat, R. Mceurk, J., crissman, K., Wilson, K. FOURTH ROW? Nichols, H., Galton, M., Lonsberry, G., Webb, A., Moz- den, J. not pictured: Degon, K. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Shaw R., Cushnier, A., Matthews, V., Stevison, J., Donahey T., Arrants, W., Borrego, A., Hill, R. SECOND ROW: Parker, E., Reller, F., Frey, R., Kovacsy, A., Sheridan M., Terry, J., Kulbachi, W., Mason, F. THIRD ROW: Reisner, W., Rinehart, D., Jones, D., Wood, J., Johnson T., Dickey, C., Abraham, T., Hays, J. FOURTH ROW. Bohannon, J., Blalock, J., Madden, J., Dorney, C., Pet- chkorski, J., Livic, A., Love, T., Riley, F., Macvicar, T We did not know it at the time, but Plebe Year was the best of the four. Under Captain Harry's benign guidance it was "Fun One" and few demerits. Only in Yearling Year did we pick up our dust rags and learn the score. But we persevered and, at the expense of some shoe leather, survived. Bidding farewell to "The Toad" we blasted into Cow Year. The Academic Department added to our woes but our mo- mentum carried us through. Everyone got corporal's stripes which made us and the C-store happy. Changes were in store for First Class Year. By promising not to play hall hockey we were allowed to live in the Hilton. Stripes were passed out in abun- dance to a few, not the multitude, and the Order of the Arrow opened an F-1 chapter. But the old Fun One spirit was there even if it could not always be manifested. Graduation will have different meanings for each of us but we will all remember "F Co" where the good times out-numbered the bad. 3 . x l Cadet Campbell and Major Gudgel FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Ken Lutes, Chuck Anderson, Dick Cacioppe, Sammy Samaniego, Jim Krause, Brian McKinley. SECOND ROW: Frank Meehan, Dick Barry, Bill Hoos, Pete Hameister, Erik Johnsson, Jerry Seay. THIRD ROW: Butch Darrell, Bernie Skown, Paul Wertz, Tom McGarry, John Walk- er, Steve Wagner. FOURTH ROW: Fred Bothwell, Ron Tumlin, Dick Barry, Dave Armstrong, Fred Hill- yard. N 1 hu, vqr 2 SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: McDon- ald, W., Sloane, R., Grifm, D., Brown, W., Armogida J., Myers, D., Cunningham, A. SECOND ROW: Nelson H., Hustead, S., Blackwell, J., Reaves, P., Kingry, R. Hanson, R., Harrington, J. THIRD ROW: Adams, J. McIntyre, M., Henning, P., Henderson, F., Hable, P. Shaughnessey, P. FOURTH ROW: Reh, P., Goth, S. Marchand, G., McCord, B., Virant, L., Vaughn, T. Cadet Hoos and Major Partain From the opening cry of "Drop that bag, mister V' to the final command of "Gradu- ating class dismissed !", the ofiicial voice of West Point rang loud and clear in the ears of G-1's "Can do" class. For the first two years, the all-seeing Black Jack kept us on our toes. We left our Tac's conferences bathed in sweat and wishing we'd boned up a little more comparative philosophy before we went in. With the onslaught of Cow academics, Maj. Partain arrived in a knee-deep flurry of 2-l's and Basement Locker Day suddenly assumed the magnitude of a major sociological phenomenon. By the end of that year we learned how to keep our noses clean, and by moving into the Thayer Hilton with its wondrous wardrobes, we solved our only remaining problem-what to do with the weekly bundle of clean laundry upon delivery. We had our ups and downs, but even in future years, in distant lands, no one can ever say that they played harder, marched better, or dragged pro,er than we did-'62 of G-1. A - THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, Left to right: Tetu, R., FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Bernier, Henry, W., Raymond, J., Williams, A., McKittrick, C., B., Davis, L., Hoffman, G., Harman, S., Clark, J., Smith, Lough, M. SECOND ROW: Nischwitz, J., Jinks, J., H., Wells, W. SECOND ROW: Saxon, W., Asplund, R., Cecchine, G., D'Alessandro, P., Crain, T., Faulds, T. Salomone, J., De Larr, R., Sharkness, E., O'Connor, J., THIRD ROW: Baseheart, G., Nanstad, R., Crisler, R., Cook, C. THIRD ROW: Ringl, A., Connor, J., Bunn, R., Read, R., Cornell, J., Bowers, M. FOURTH ROW: Madia, J., Harmon, J., Kelly, J., Browder, W. FOURTH Sheckells, G., Case, M., Brinkman, E., Luckie, W., Fisch- ROW: Kadetz, G., Knoche, E., O'Leary, G., Clover, R., bach, M. not pictured: Conway, M., Pittman, J. Boyter, N., Schaltenbrand, R., Kosciusko, J. ' 333 I"':. . ,...,.....,, ..., . ' ' 2 ---- WR .Eel ::.:' 1-E2 Q SM. . Q . '-:H iliiriiifii K 't -5:5-.:f i.. K . ..... " , ..,. -!...5 ..?f.:.:,n5-.g i- ...:...:.-...k-'.- Q-IB nf, ix M . 'ig H? ,gif Y 3 MN. was i gg H .,.. if NE, X Egg xwvyhg: get E 3 xl .ggliglig segaag 2, s . . P 3,33 ?' rS.0FW " hitgfgw 5 Q' Q Rf wr 9 Q 5 11,5 . X rx , 5 X S 2 file? iii it 'Y' me ,Q , 1 .ass Q 1 53 is :mag f X1 . ' ef... s as l gi 2-it Ezilf iiiql ,lil s 5 i 1 fl . ix T32 5 15, .M lg A' fi 1 5 ig l E Eg E555 ""' e .2332 Wig 5 I 555 . ge., it it 5 E Z' i . f mi E! gg? FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Charles Brown, Mike Casp, Ivan Waggoner, Tom Herre, Dick Rohrbacher, Joe Pendergraft, Jim Gleason. SECOND ROW: Mike Moore, Jim Weiss, Larry Nahlen, Art Lov- gren, Charles Hertel, Joe Simoneaux. THIRD ROW: Bob Ricks, Dave Logan, Mike Currin, John Hickey, Bob Coyne, Bob Brogi, Roger Lee. FOURTH ROW: Dick Madden, Winston Clark, Dave Noake, Ed Sprague, George Sarran, Winston Ward. -wEE?ee.:.' SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Little, W., Natvig, C., Scott, A., Pierson, R., Chickedantz, C., McCrary, W. SECOND ROW: Little, D., Lewsen, R., Graham, K., Seidel, A., Childers, S., Betaque, N., Good- now, W. THIRD ROW: Rienholtz, R., Hall, G., Kelly, P., Wilson, N., Russell, T., Eitel, J., Holland, H. not pictured: Hall, F., Shirley, J., Knowlton, D., Hotman, C. i l ... :ui , THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Colburn N., Tracy, G., Olson, G., Gilson, D., Jackson, C., Palma G., Chapman, T. SECOND ROW: Weisel, S., Lind, R. Graham, J., Hardy, L., Fitzgibbon, D., Induni, S., Smith, G. THIRD ROW.' Marcocci, F., Carlson, R., Braid, R. Peterson, R., McMillan, H., Seiler, D., Collins, F FOURTH ROW: Baratto, D., Maclsaac, D., Ryan, M. O'Donnell, J., Markowski, E. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Thames J., Curl, G., Guy, R., Darrah, S., Atchley, O., Punsalan B., Dryzga, R., O'Brien, F. SECOND ROW: Hennig, R. Aron, C., Maness, L., Genetti, T., Conley, J., Thompson M., Kennedy, L., Bohn, M. THIRD ROW.' DeWitt, P. Drinkwater, D., Sterba, R., Mushovic, T., Haines, D. Colmar, J., Shapiro, F. FOURTH ROW: Lyons, J. Needels, C., Mooretield, K., Cooper, P., Beinlich, W. Morrissey, S., Eynon, B., Backlin, C., Benton, D. From the old south area days when the campaign first began to the luxurious living of the east barracks where the campaign drew to a close, the men of H-1 have excelled in many ways. We were the first totally integrated class H-1 had ever seen covering the range of sizes from the "crobos" to the Hflankersf' During the "year- lingi' and "cow" years however, with the addition of three transferees from another company and one turnback from a previous class, our own class became an entity. We had all kinds: athletes, married men, coniirmed bachelors, hell raisers, quiet types, Northerners, Southerners, and goats. The only category in which our company was sadly lacking was- - - "hives !" CWe always had 5002, more men on the "D" list than on the Dean's List. Although none of us would want to repeat our four years in H-1, there are none of us who would say that these four years were not spent in a good company and who will not carry with them in their future years a fond remembrance of the other men of "Hell-One? .. if Mr. M..- - ..- QQ?" ' I ' 4 .4 'M , . 1 .' M , -N35 , . - X " ,.,' A B - 5?-ei iimlf 5,3 , W:-. M.-Q , fe?-, , ff unease: ff , T Hifi' , E52 .7,, ,g.g.ZJiV , A W, . W 'Q . VVV VIu'vVj,f w - Xi si, . rv w 5 is ' ... A "' ' . V, A , 4 f.. , ,, , ,.,, . ,, , "semi uetilg .1szi.w.w f, .. , i ' Q .. ,QMQLIQ5 ,f - 3 I ...W , f- , , ,aff V gr , ,,.. gi, , ya M Major Daugherty and Cadet Herre FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Don Price, Bill Petty, Dick Duncan, Dave Jones, J. J. Kirby, Merle Williams. SECOND ROW: Dave Blynn, Walt Chrobak, Gordie Geiss, Frank Westfall, Steve Holderness, Jerry Rose. THIRD ROW: Pat Hueman, Steve Arnold, Don Woeber, Bill Kinard, Stan Thompson, George Telenko, Ronnie Lane. FOURTH ROW: Mike O'Brien, Reid Franks, Rog Hilton, Russ DeVries, Stan Whitmore, Bob Weinfurter. MM f ,zr . at-1 1,, Qt ., E mf, X ..... ,,,, D3 me i f - ,,,, . .,.,. . .ff"j. ...,.,.,.,......,,, narn ,, ,, ga El i f 3 if ..:1.:b:b.. E ii ,, 336 vi SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Chap- man, S., Herd, J., Roberts, J., Kosevich, R., Rice, L., Earnest, O. SECOND ROW: Gallagher, R., McCormack, M., Keteltas, G., Mallison, T., Collmeyer, A. THIRD ROW: Godsey, J., Bivens, R., Mosier, D., Cowgill, P., Dolighan, T., Bruce, R. FOURTH ROW: Wall, K., Halgus, J., Sarn, J., Karoly, F., Dickson, H., Brennen, T., Smith, R. . . ,SM Z , .bit '1 , ,,. s.-,t . E Cadet Arnold and Captain Gibson i 7 J . ,L , 4. ,fr i We of '62 made our mark on I-1 by changing that company from Inquisition-one to Indifferent- one. This was a gradual change, starting with lights and sweet music for all upperclassmen on the night before Christmas leave plebe year. Later that same year Bill Kinard made his unusual check on Mr. Larry Minich. Yearling year saw Rog Hilton and team swimming to Constitution Island, and walking on the Sup's roof in the wee hours of the morning. That year Bill Petty and crew demon- strated spontaneous pep by displaying football signs in the strangest places through- out the area. Our attitude showed itself on the Cow Trip as we serenaded our bat- talion tactical oflficer down and up the Eastern Seaboard.WaltChrobak became a sym- bol of change as he was elected the first nonconformist honor rep in the Corps. Then came the big year. "Care" Arnold was "elected" company commander and he immediately launched a "haze the Marine Corps" campaign which consisted of green poop sheets, linspeeded pancakes, etc. To top it all off, 1961-62 was the year of the indifferent intermurder teams. All in all, we are proud to say, "I-1 has I" THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Farns- worth, J., Crowther, G., Carver, G., Harlan, M., Winton H., Welker, F. SECOND ROW: Greiner, B., Macchiaroli, C., Corbett, D., Heydt, R., Neale, J., Leyerzaph, J., Erd- mann, T. THIRD ROW: Sleet, P., Davis, W., Evans, D. Miller, C., Brown, G., Butler, G. FOURTH ROW: Bro- kaw, M., Dexter, R., Carter, R., Lambert, F., Fulco, A not pictured: Rodosovich, T. 337 FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Michells H., Levine, B., Peterson, C., Anderson, R., Gnau, D. Toomey, K., DeMoupied, D., Cahill, P. SECOND ROW. Lowe, H., Pylant, J., Wallace, W., Lounsbury, P., Simp- son, J., Weeter, B., Binkoski, V., Lewis, D., Core, C THIRD ROW: Tantalo, F., Albright, L., Charles, F. Meyer, A., Manghi, G., Concannon, M., Brush, W., Vogel T. FOURTH ROW: Kantor, N., Keith, J., Osgood, R. Linn, P., Ray, L., Becker, P., Hall, J., Dernar, J. Elzl zll Q .. .. Q . ,, ,, . . Z. ViiA .V '- Eiiaifli .,., ' M Wi 7- sg f K' -risii., W . EW ' ".'2:f'2Ei1?i. tail , F Eats ..:,: 'F Wi iF1255g3l?.5??f2Tiifl ggv. :.V z,,.,: . .,:.,..::':,.,..:.:. ....:,,.,: , . fl A . . . ..,. 2 Q5 J . F , FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Jim Boyle, Bob Wong, Joe Petrolino, Rog Luis, Wilt McRae, Ron Chisholm. SECOND ROW: Larry Needs, Tom Fintel, Dwayne Piepenburg, Ron Brown, Pete Pfiefer, Larry Smith. THIRD ROW: Bill Hughes, Tom Eccleston. Sam Wasaif, Alex Davidson, Joe Rigby. FOURTH ROW: John Nau, Dick Chladek, Rodney Schmidt, Bob Phillips. SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Capps, L. R., Janof, L. S., Sturbois, L. J., Oxley, A. R., Fisher, C. A., Galle, J. F. SECOND ROW: Bunze, V. F., La Fond, C. O., Simonetta, R. S., Lang, J. D., Grolemunde, W. J., Entlich, R. E. THIRD ROW: Lengyel, J. W., Goldsmith, R. H., Griffin, T. H., Anderson, L. V., Nickla, R. H., Ford, J. N. FOURTH ROW: Palmer, R. C., Hayes, J. W., Van Zandt, J. F., Dorland, J. H., Eckert, R. E., Emerick, M. not pictured: Downey, W. D. ,aaa ,W ,W THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Johnson, G. R., Bergman, D. M., Carter, I. B., Walters, R. J., To- gashi, T., Bernard, L. P. SECOND ROW: Claewplod- took, P., Ballagh, R., Black, B. R., White D. A. Dan l 1 r y ' chuk, P., Barone, N. THIRD ROW: Gearon, D., Barr, D. H., Harnisch, J. M., Miller, W. J. Watson, F. C. Buckley, M., Knutzen, J. A. FOURTH,ROW: Richardi son, J., Kiley, M. J., Taylor, F., Andrews, A. E., York, R. W. not pictured: Wright, R. E. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Bennett, L., Hurley, D. E., Landom, D. L., Kurtz, D. G., Adam, L. A., Kolzing, R. K., Fritz, R. F., Shantz, D. A. SECOND ROW: Kelly, J., Carrozza, A. R., Marshall, B. R., Martin, L. J., Tomaswick, J., Adams, C. H., Higgins, R. W., An- dreson, M. THIRD ROW: Ritch, W. N., Selkis, R., Schwartz, M. W., Carll, T. H., Knicker, N. H., Henne- berry, T., Olsson, H. A., Chase, E. J. FOURTH ROW: Brock, G. R., Bell, J. A., Kildahl, D. D., Mace, R. W., Riley, R. J., Williams, R., Anderson, J. not pictured: Harrington, J. B., Zais, B. E. ' They came in like a group of lambs, but they soon learned that in reality they were all tigers and were destined to spend four wonderful, trying, and sometimes sad years as a group of comrades in K-1. Who among them does not have his own spe- cial collection of memories of the friendship that signified that they were in K-1, the closest company in the Corps? Many of them fell by the wayside, but those who survived were a group with much to remember. It was their class that started the true K-1 party spirit fiying. The twist and the Hotel Forrest soon became part of every Week-end. Yet, all of their fun was not found outside of West Point. There were four years spent in barracks, trying to quiet someonels hi-Ii so that the goats, the greater percentage of the company, could try to get their privileges back. It was a fight all the way, but somehow they managed to stay a jump ahead of the academic departments. K-1 will be sorry to see them go, but those leaving know that the friends they met here are friends for a lifetime. Their spirit will long be re- membered. Major Ochs and Cadet Pfeifer FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: John Selby, Don Bergeron, Denny Flint, Bob Tarbet, Vince Murphy, Carl Morin. SECOND ROW: Tom Brewer, Tom Walker, Dick Wylie, Phil Browning, Bud Tinnemeyer, Larry Remener. THIRD ROW: John Wagner, Ron Tumelson, Bob Culp, Al Rushatz, John Winkler, Terry Murphy. FOURTH ROW: Phil Burns, Jim Kays, Dick Irwin, Chuck Ivy, Al Miller. not pictured: Mike Vranish. Q . f N W? beef - :-f- Refe ree 192 :I , .-,- . 1 gs- W .- gr f' -:lf-.-' - 4 1 - ...,,.1. ' 4 " if ' 34' M. I n ,p m ,JZZHZ rj 'A it W' me 511' nh, It I N.. ,,.,., K, V. ., Wg? fp 'We 5' l 1 s ll? Q A 2 l ix Ml I . l Q, .. .,.. I .-,. .,. 'A' Z . . . ..,..,,,,. ,,.,,. 'M 2' 'sl if 1 ue.: i fi, . , 5 ,zz ye-' I 1 2 I. , 3 s ' eg! .15 5 E ,Q .V l 4 s Qi: , I . ' E K9 3? 40 SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Hart- man, C., Dwyer, J., Adams, P., Whitaker, A., Scherrer, G., Sorensen, J. SECOND ROW: Drewfs, R., Alma- guer, J., Hogg, C., Armstrong, D., Benjamin, B., Sage, T. THIRD ROW: Wilson, R., Brendle, T., Sartor, W., Schmidt, C., Rasmussen, R., Britten, L. FOURTH ROW: Gideon, W., Conrad, D., Caldwell, H., Walker, J., Schei- dig, R., Brightman, A. Major Schultz and Cadet Wagner The "Lions" of '62 entered the company during their Plebe year in the face of extremely adverse conditions. The adverse condition was due to an exchange "Tac" from the Navy. For a time, reports such as "Gear adrift," "Dirty bulkheads," etc., were commonplace. Yearling year, however, found a change in command. This new opponent from the T.D. was an airborne, ranger, infantry major. Back in the army once again, the "Lions" fought their way through Yearling and Cow academics and into First Class Year. They soon learned that the "Firstie Deadbeat" was similar to the "Yearling Deadbeat"-it didn't exist. F. C. A.'s didn't exist either. June finally came, however, and the gang made it through with flying colors. There were plenty of honors for everyone, but the biggest honor of all was having been Sf one of this great bunch of guys. 'x 'S - I 'Q 1. A , ' Yi' 1.1. - " ......Y. ..i. 'fs F L j i 1 . it -"' A ' f K M - J ' --ii . , 1 ,....., Q V gf, is " F . A 1 Ani .V ,M :,. , . tw 7.-- nf. , V f-:- 5 NIV- . fe et. - X I at rr s 1 A R T 5 ' -ef f A if ' T P f x , ,,,. i ef - f- , A -f Q, ' g h Q X Q fy Q fem T fx - " , ', 'ly , ... 1 1 f , .V . THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Faddis, R., Kongsuvan, V., Brown, C., Bridgers, R., Vondruska, G., Lindou, J. SECOND ROW: Johnson, M., Hayward, G., Rezek, R., Warner, J., McCoy, B., Russell, W. THIRD ROW: Larson, J., Horstman, M., Lynskey, J., Davis, R., McLemore, E., Anderson, R., Golomb, W. FOURTH ROW: Shive, D., Kowalchik, M., Schwartz, D., Otjen, J., Cook, M., Wheeler, W. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Sea- worth, G., Sendak, T., Walter R., Floto, R., Sammarco, V., Kahara, C., Simmons, T., Sterbenz, H. SECOND ROW: Pyrz, A., Bedell, R., Frank, R., Dewitt, S., Ap- pler, D., DeFrancisco, J., Tennison, J. THIRD ROW: Attanasio, R., Vann, J., Olson, J., Hjelm, K., Kovach, T., Hill, E., Raybeck, B., Ohotnicky, S. FOURTH ROW: Belanger, F., Fish, G., Oehrlein, W., Hughes, R., Bailey, R., Cherry, K., Cecil, G. not pictured: Byrne, E., Emery, L., Huessy, W. 3 F Wm FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Steve Hab- blett, Tom Merrell, Dick Hartman, Dave Sholly. STANDING: Don Snider, Bob Andrews. SECOND ROW: Dick Storat, Bob Dickinson, Todd Stong, Al Scar- sella, Roy Alcala, Denny Bennett. THIRD ROW: Chan Armstrong, Bill Swartz, Jim Tumpane, Bob Rumph, Bill Smith, Jon Lynn. FOURTH ROW: Vito Caputo, Bobby Garrett, Albie Symes, Dave Moore, Mick Rosenberg, Ron Stock. SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Clark A., Chapman, A., DeGraiT, G., Hartnett, T., Dunn, J. Best, S. SECOND ROW: Walsh, R., Kelly, P., Candon D., Baucum, W., Wood, R., Ingram, L. THIRD ROW. Kilroy, M., Almy, D., Conlon, A., Greybeck, E., Brown N., Dickey, J. FOURTH ROW: Nahlik, C., Dahlke, J. Wheeler, J., Coomer, W., O'Sullivan, K. THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Kirk- patrick, D., Winters, D., Bachman, H., Balderson, R. Lew, J., Brewer, L. SECOND ROW: Gregson, R., O'Con- nell, L., Shoemaker, P., Mason, L., Campbell, R., O'B1ock, D. THIRD ROW: Stone, E., Hornbarger, D., Robbins R., Gray, R., Ugland, D., McKinley, B. FOURTH ROW: Nestlerode, H., Winter, C., Spinosa, R., Mashburn, F. Gleszer, P. not pictured: Coleman, F., Murphy, K. Stone, D. . M' -Us "' ' my FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Dyer, J., Griffin, R., Grates, F., Wolff, R., Fligg, C., Keeler R., Woodard, J., Klingler, H. SECOND ROW: Mitchell W., Johnson, C., Arkangel, C., Kamps, J., Wiest, L., La- Bach, J., Deems, J. THIRD ROW: Taylor, W., Cindric T., Savatiel, K., Mogan, B., Kelley, H., Coughlin, J. Thompson, R., Olmsted, P. FOURTH ROW: Mohlere R., McChristian, J., Pfeifer, C., Parcells, D., Sanchez J., Kuzman, R., Barry, B. not pictured: Eichorn, F. Layer, R. '62 Can Do, and from the Presidential reviewing stand to Irma's '62 did. Whatever the class accomplished, M-1 had her runty hands in it, in spite of the fact that we were the first ones to break the "Tradition of South Area" by successfully introduc- ing flankers into the ranks of "Mighty Mouse." Plebe Year faded into memory with the sound of the 13th foot scrape, but it had revealed the fact that we had our share of star men, hives, and more than our share of goats. We even had a few Brown Boy lovers. Yearling Year saw an increase in class cohesion and a chance to know the few people left in the company who had not been your roommate. CowYear gave anyone who had not walked an opportunity to spend a Saturday afternoon or two in Central Area, and also the first of many hilarious song fests on trips. We as- sumed the leadership of the company enthusiastically at the advent of First Class Year, and not much later we attended the Tac's mid-season intramural rally in the best repaired class shirts in the Corps. Inspired by this rally, we bounced way out of last place in the athletic standing. Throughout our four years, unity has been our motto and cooperation our trademark. We have been proud to serve M-1, and we know she will continue to lead the Corps. OUT Cadet Andrews and Major Lee 343 fffff v Rf SVECUNI RIEGIIMIENTAIL STAIFIF IFNRST IBATTAILIION SECOND IBPUVTAILIION FAGAN REACH SHERARD FLORENCE LEATHAM EVANS KIRSCHENBAUER ORD 344 0 VERCROFT HARRISON PERDEW7 GREBE TIHHIRD IBATTAILIIUN FUELLHART GROSS BOOZER BUTTOLPH FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Art Cro- well, Ralph Finelli, Eldon Spradling, Tom Culp, Jack Fagan, Dick James. SECOND ROW: Jim Strohmeyer, Bill Evans, Matt Kambrod, Paul Burke, Rog Havercroft, Tom Simcox. THIRD ROW: Skip Holcomb, Joe Guarino, Leroy Webb, Dick Lembo, Pete King, Barry Thomas. FOURTH ROW: Bob Carroll, Fred Tilton, Harry Har- ris, Erv Kamm, Dick Mayo. A Qs Q fi 6 SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Varnell ra, L. SECOND ROW: Beach K., Morris, H., Turpin, W. Dwyer, J., Schaum, F. THIRD ROW: Mercer, C., Otis M., Folsom, S., Lang, S., Silvasy, S. FOURTH ROW. Mitchell, K., Davis, R., Counts, J., Reilly, I. not pictured. Chittenden, R. A., Steele, R., Taillie, D., Carnes, E., Andersen, J., Dap- Cadet Kamm and Major Hallahan From the land of Hamm's Csky blue waterD to the prairie dog mounds of Arizona, from the hills of West Virginia and Tennessee to the Little Italy of the East coast our A-2 Apostles came from the four corners of the U.S. to make their mark on Hudson High's ivy walls. In four years our ranks have dropped from 34 to 23, weive led the Dean's other list consistently, waded through 8 Tacs, fraternized Runt Land, and stacked the Area squad. Herbie gave us the number one man in our class, while T. D. anchored the goat sections. Barry captained our great swimming team while Pete romped on the football field. Our twisting team was second to none with Leroy, Bob, and Tom all lirst stringers. Joe's Brooklyn blasts are now history, Dick was the Admiral Hoolihan of '62, and Sprad made famous his "Slingapore Sling." Time may erase the C. E., the juice, and the Econ, but it will never be able to re- move the friendships we've shared in Alpha Dos. For a long time to come in the far corners of the world A-2's '62 will gather to toast the memories of Woo Poo and the future. '14, - '33 THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Caporaso A., Gray, M., Bischoff, E., Spinelli, L., Brown, J., Max- well, W., Dews, D. SECOND ROW: Giordano, F., Boutz, G., Jones, R., Grisham, J., Dunmar, J., Kobayashi, T., Koterwas, D. THIRD ROW: Schue, E., Hickson, R., Guthrie, W., Roth, A., Miller, B. FOURTH ROW: Dra- per, S., Joseph, I., Chescavage, W., Cunningham, T., Scotnicki, J. not pictured: Kelton, E., Kvarn, K. 347 FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Smith, J., Stewart, J., Kleinmaier, L., Gardner, J., Wright, R., Williams, J., Echols, J., Richardson, D. SECOND ROW: Lipsit, G., Farmelo, G., Blair, R., Merriam, N., Bradley, W., Armstrong, E., Hudson, M., Fisher, C. THIRD ROW: Leibowitz, M., Sikorski, D., Donahue, R., Clew- ley, L., Matkovcik, T., Larson, K., Koropey, O. FOURTH ROW: Emmons, H., Juchau, W., Borkowski, T., Bodde, D., Tutchings, T., O'Grady, M., Sevilla, G., Buckosky, G., Tredennick, W. FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Tom Reach, Gary Seasholtz, J. J. Heigl, Bob Zabik, Joe Nun- nelee, Bert Finn. SECOND ROW.' Larry Sanders, Howie Prince, Paul Zmuida, Ralph Fox, Jack Franck, Barry Gartrell. THIRD ROW: Ed Bailey, Don Burns, Bob Greenwalt, Jack Rucker, Dave Mundt, Bill Daugh- erty. FOURTH ROW: Art Miller, Jim Acklin, Rich Carlson, Lee Pardi, Glenn Chadbourne, Art Pattarozzi. SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: McGar- ity, R., Johnson, D., Manning, R., Eberts, M., Dawson J., Barry, M. SECOND ROW.' Brown, R., Boyle, M. Hewette, J., Crumpler, W., Cole, R. THIRD ROW: Brownback, P., Soth, M., Wilson, W., Vopatek, M., Littlefield. not pictured: Ryan, A. , , rn. 'V' .mn- JF ,sn slr -Q4 4 B DQ in THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Perkins, D., Straub, W., Gantsoudes, J., Grubbs, J., Sutherland, J., Pedersen, J., Price, J. SECOND ROW: Buckner, R., Bertelli, P., Latimer, D., Fly, L., Roby, E., Culp, D., Gray, F. THIRD ROW: Bennett, J., Bergen, J., Bailey, W., Knell, R., Harvey, J., Bodner, W. FOURTH ROW: Randall, R., Oehrlein, R., Kerns, T., Cary, R., Quist, F., Seeber, J. not pictured: Adams, J. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Holmes J. Rafuse, P., Steadman, K., Burgardt, C., Hewitt, L. Koletty, J., King, J. SECOND ROW: Schultz, P., Cooley J., Hopkins, J., Plotkin, K., Coll, D., Butterfield, R. Epperson, W., Hagie, L. THIRD ROW: Greene, J., Ax- ley, R., Clark, A., Jannarone, J., Birdsong, F., Heind- richs, C., Drass, P. FOURTH ROW: O'Toole, G., Her mann, R., Estes, W., Foehl, E., Smith, F., Wheeler, L. MacLeod, J., Martin, T. not pictured: Rainville, T. 25 August 1958 dawned bright and clear as we began our four year sojourn in B-2. Our misgivings were soon resolved, and we settled down to the usual Plebe duties, academics, and visits in ranks from the "Terrible Three" of room 2143. Plebe Christmas brought us parents, pretty girls, shaving cream battles, and Christmas dinner in the Mess Hall. Gloom Period sailed by, and we popped our chests up as B-2 received the Superintendent's Award at Graduation Parade. Leave went by too rapidly, and we returned to Buckner with its work, play, and poison ivy. September moved us to Central Area, and heated debates about the mer- its of our old and new homes. June Week saw the Superintendent give us his award again. Our class trip was full of static displays and hops. Then we split July and August between details and leave. Cow Year dawned early and ended late everyday. "Spec" became our best friend. We broiled during Reorganization Week, drowned our sorrows in Philadelphia, and froze in Washington, D. C. Our last dry run was over, and we donned the long awaited Black Shields. September brought a new "Tac," Capt. Lucas. With memories of Buffalo Burgers, Leave, and Europe, we assumed our new role. We had reached the highest level of our cadet careers. F. C. A.'s, weekends, and cars made life more bearable, but the T.D., academics, and new problems kept our feet on the ground. The sojourn was nearly over though, and we drove slowly but surely toward 6 June 1962, and gradu- ation l Cadet Sanders and Captain Lucas 349 r FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Marlin Schmidt, Frank Reasoner, Tom Culver, Mike Grebe, Will Worthington, Dave Garvin. SECOND ROW: Wayne Snow, Bob Sikorski, Tom Mennie, Stu Sherard, John King, Ed Brown. THIRD ROW: Jim Lau, Don Chafetz, Sam Steele, Don Denton, Bill Miller, Walt Bryde. FOURTH ROW: Chuck Merriam, Roy Degen- hardt, Don Babb, Walt Menning, Roger Brown. not pic- tured: Donald DeSapri, Bob Reid. al fi ,,,, its eerer M ,.,. 5- --gaze: 125: -v5---:L,:-- I 1 QR ls? ilu ,l ggfwweeaf S .g 'lf E 2,1 R. . it A655 'tl .,., l . SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Quinlan, M., Hawkins, W., Weber, R., Hudgins, S., Drewry, A., Stonehouse, G. SECOND ROW: Wildrick, E., Donovan, R., Alexander, W., Desmet, D., Clinton, R., Riceman, J. THIRD ROW: Yanagihara, G., Empson, H., Loren, K., Johnston, R. not pictured: Sutton, P. Major Thurman and Cadet Brown Here stand the stalwarts who were cast four years ago into K. J.'s crucible. Some have fallen by the wayside, but the great majority battled the "gray monster" to the end. We've run through three "Taos" and innumerable other hurdles set up by Thayer and Bartlett Halls. Isn't it amazing when we look back over the long, twisting road and find that only one fell before the relentless pressure of the aca- demic department? Not so difficult to envision is "Sky" whipping into the 24th aboard the "Songbird" Then of course we were beset with the "great connoisseur" of fine wines and foods. Equally intermingled with the sorrows and hardships were the laughs and good times. The Yankee Stadium spectaculars, Navy games, and our class trips all helped to provide us with a spirit of oneness. We "Tigers" had many individuals who were standouts during our four years, and on June 6th, we took our final step together. .,.. LQ, THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Arrington J., Murdy, W., Janairo, A., Getzendaner, M., Hillard, G. Sanderson, M., Russo, A., Harman, T. SECOND ROW: Young, R., McMakin, W., Finno, R., O'Brien, J., McCaf- frey, B., Carson, J., Grimes, E., Reh, D., Ponzoli, G THIRD ROW: Duffy, J., Butler, T., Kempinski, C., Pach- ler, F., Hughes, J., Giacomazzi, J., Sternberg, B., Shore, C. FOURTH ROW: Heywood, P., Hurley, D., Stallings J., Lucyk, E., Plymale, R. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Long P., Carlson, T., Rojas, R., Gibson, D., Doughty, G., Lane J., Scully, W., Scholl, W. SECOND ROW: Olivo, J. Parker, J., Richard, A., Kelly, M., Poling, M., Spire, C. Keats, R., Knudson, R. THIRD ROW: Forbes, R., Les- kovjan, L., O'Connell, C., Haines, H., Endicott, R., Pel- ham, C., Marsh, W. FOURTH ROW: Barkley, J., Thomp- son, J., Jones, R., Mohrman, L., Motes, P., Dorsey, R. Burns, M., Bonnett, M. not pictured: Wherry, P., White T ! Y 7 , ..... . Q. :,,..,. . -'-,' ling? litzsiigilfi . - ----' ,,., 1 'I , rl., N , 'lgg i .,... 1 X sliieasag roi Q, 5 hifi L .. 3,555 355 3 32 55 fill ets" li lgriri . erfli ali gg f si ' iq eggs? . 2 S -'II'-:,f5:2'jf:,ffP' 1 2 lla i il i l all it FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Pete Broom, Bernie Martin, Tom McMahan, Marshall John- son, Sam Meyer, Ed Rowe. SECOND ROW: John No- votny, Bill Calhoun, John Ferguson, Hap Boyd, Steve Warner, George Kirschenbauer, Roger McNamara, Tom Slaggie. THIRD ROW: Ron Borrello, Larry Crane, Ed Gleichman, Roger Andrews, Keith Adams, Doug VVau- chope. FOURTH ROW: Jim Blundell, Al Wilhelm, Roger Franke, Gerald Tysver, Gary Paxton. it ,Om ,QQ Q1 , K ,. ga. My !.sA SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Cardile F., Mayer, H., Goorley, J., McCarver, J., Speed, J., Klop- otek, R., Alger, T. SECOND ROW: Davis, J., Warder H., Clark, W., DeMaret, W., Stidham, R., Ehrenberg R., Christensen, A. THIRD ROW: Farris, I., Reid, D. McCullough, P., Bosma, P., Ballard, C., Ruth, J., Spohn, L. ,KI-xr 4. s 'KB .X DG! 'ihbulf vt-1 smiq 1'- sk. L THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Mackey, E., Odom, R., Miller, J., Kotro, J., Little, J., Shelton, J., Mastriani, J. SECOND ROW: Fields, W., Millacci, T., Kelly, A., Rogers, J., Kunkel, R., Paske, R. THIRD ROW: Howard, J., Moss, R., Weiner, S., Monson, R., Jacunski, G., Feagley, J., Hemberger, W. FOURTH ROW: Erwin, G., Brucker, W., Sage, M., Merrill, J., Howard, B., Manton, T. not pictured: Orr, R., Cobbs, J. One score and five ventured forth from the land, To be linked forever by a common strand. From the golden city of a million lights, To the frozen land of raw nature's heights, They cast their lot with the fabled Black Knights. Sir Keith rode forth from the thundering falls. Friar Sam from the land of the mockingbird's calls, Pisano from the place where two rivers meet, Bear from the craggy mountain's feetg Were passed on the way by a mystic named Pete. United in purpose, but individuals all, Sir Kirch arrived with an ellipsoidal ball. Duke Al appeared, paddle in hand. The Sheriff rode at the head of his band, Followed closely by Pax from the frozen land. Rog with his wire, Harry in brown shoes, Were trailed at length by RC Andrews. Sir Doug broke from a different Corps, Jp deserted the Delaware shore, When they heard from Tysver of the four years war. Blunder and Warner drew near from afar. Tiny Tom was guided by a northern star. Larry and Wedge flew like deer, V Racing to be first to appear. But, alas, the Gremlin beat both by a year. King Beernard showed at the stroke of the bell. Attended, in his splendor, by big John L. Propping their spears in a stack, Reclining 'each one on his back, They turned their attention to a speech by Sir Mac. Let us work together in our common task. Yet not let this meeting be our last. Some will wear stars, some will not Such is the course of life's plot But, let not our union be ever forgot. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to -right: Robert- son, J., Meier, F., Barron, T., Putnam, J., Mullen, O. Stephenson, J., Wilson, R. SECOND ROW: Mastran D., Dallas, B., Dowse, R., Griflin, J., Hindsley, J., Stew- art, L., Buntz, B. THIRD ROW: Bradburn, W., Christ- man, D., Steele, D., DeJonckheere, E., Brown, W., Ammon, S., Pickup, B. FOURTH ROW: Weatherall, J. Sperry, S., Roseberg, J., Libby, J., Sustersic, L., Pol lard, R. not pictured: Brown, D., Hennen, J., Miyashiro J., McClain, J., Peters, J., Tillman, J. T W e ,s f p i X s it 353 i it ffm . A 1..f.,,a . Captain Weinert and Cadet Martin 7 FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Bob Red- mond, Lennie Henderson, Tom Middaugh, Dick Steinke, Kevin Renaghan. SECOND ROW: Larry Bachelor, Dave Swick, Wayne Parker, Jim Harrington, Terry Mc- Carthy, Bill Scherr. THIRD ROW: Craig Richardson, Tod Bergman, Bob Wells, John Kelly, Ray Pendleton, Greg Wilcox. FOURTH ROW: Dave Neumann, Rusty Wilkerson, Dave Riggs, Dan Teed, Harry Harrison, Fran Scharpf, Ernie Zenker. Q... 54 SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Moses G., Gantzler, F., Meier, A., Metzger, R., Grogan, T., Kel- ly, T. SECOND ROW: Forsythe, T., Popielarski, S. Hamilton, G., Schwake, R., Haines, P. THIRD ROW: Ong, R., Allen, J., Simmons, R., Seward, D., Haskins J. FOURTH ROW: Grabner, W., Heiden, H., Holland- er, K., Robinson, W. not pictured: Buckley, P., Ellerson G. Major Dorney and Cadet Steinke J. J.'s Mother-in-Law, Larry the answer man . . . Berger's beak . . . Harry made "Honcho" . . . Hairbone's FCA soiree . . . Lenny's spaghetti a la Newburgh . . . Dodo's athletics and Dave N's support . . . Big Kis military mind . . . Senor Mc- Carthy Sirl . . . Mat Swick and Chester Pendleton, E-2's gunslingers . . . Roho-twist or beer barrell Cpolka?D . . . Kevin-Boston's Rip Van Winkle . . . Riggs, head coach with goggles and stars . . . Willy, E-2's James Dean . . . Yul Wilcox, the tree climber . . . Rusty's 5 years at the chuckwagon's reins . . . Canvasback Wells, E-2's Eskimo . . . Ernie Gus, musclebozmd intelligentsia . . . Steinke, 'The little people will rule the worldli' . . . Woops, E-2's quiet tiger . . . Snarfer's coffee house . . . Craig, I care? . . . Dan, King of the Pampas. Outlasting 3 Tacs, the lst Class had 4005 married men, and a large Rat Pack due to untimely "Dear Johns." Our fond memories of rat fights, Tilson Lake, champagne parties, the 202, chicks left behind at Pitt, Michigan and Penn State, will remain. The last of ,... the big spenders on AOT, Buckners without recondo, cow trips, G. R. bridge tournaments, and those classmates we left behind. And so, E-2 company, best in the corps, passes on . . . Cor outj Indiiference or efficiency, call it what you will, we always did things the Easy 2 way. By June '62 there, "weren't no knotheads in E-2 Company !" Q X . 2 1 'L . . ,L I . ft: i A A e il: J ' 'P " 2 52 .F . .2 -vi.. ,1 A '- 1: . -2 1:12 2 2 ,ifefr .. I h ' as 'T' I, if ' we . . an ,Q . L , . . -3 5. ,K i A 6 .ju A fl? l l 3 , itra . ..Q J 2, 'fi . . if . 1- ' - 22 T . 153 i TQ r itei ldl is 'arl . if 2 ' A ' 5. . ' 2 in t l , , l . 5 ,fi Ea - J f S A . ' 2 ffl J 2.5 2 2. is i ' 'A I E' V , ' X 2 -,W 'fn ' " , V' I " .2 li i s iii 5725 A ,092 I - Q' A V ' ' 5' ' 25 S 2- 2 , ' I' ' ' "' ' J' ' Qxifif . f fi, ,2. 2 , .Q " '45 V3 7 1 - H ' ' A l We -A ...Q v t : rs 2 ' ' 1 :r A at f 1 4 Q 'X ' f ir I I Vg - . 1' , . , A 2, H . .L rg -VL V Nb X V 4- 5. Q . , . 5 .tl : X ,. gi, - A J i, I ' .2 F 4 22 . ' 4 " W 3 5--. g2e2.i,gi5x22l l f 2' -25, Q --,,,r 'K fiifszfm' ' '- a -22 :fzfw ' '.-k,, - 2' I , ezigezigff, 2 1:22 21 g, fif , 1554251 " 2' as I .V ,fl , j .ai ,,.,:, xx H . 5, 27. K 1, 4 ,E 2 HQ 3 , Q , W '13 3 . -5 144, ! . "gf Q A 3 V- 2 gil 4 xt V- ,S sm. V N. ' K " 'ki .5 Qu V ,A - ,I -ik. , l , m ,,,1a,., .It '24 , ,- -I I kr gp . i a ,F 2 VV K 3-l In gl ,QA QM , -u " -, 2- . .W - .. .Mg . ,, - . ,I , 2 ,yt-,, . a A N X. Q , . L222 ,gg E ,Z .,, - ., I , k h -, , A A my K , 'ij is - I M e. .Q -5 f. A ' 2 I .. .. A 1 1 f -als I I f A 1 wmv G: 'BEN Q ,- A. I 2 .E 7, i ,gi . f - 1 x ' gk " ' . .sl ' 2 - 'l 1 .F '2 'N ' 154 if , J., . -1 -. , 1 . A . - M' dpi '- ' W 55352 " . . . J' 'Fi . ., 'c 1' ' - " . 1- . if.: . 'Hi is 2.. .,,'.,, 3.5. 2, , , .H 5 . . ., , ...if-, . 2.,,.x-wM2,.,, .EJ , .- HW.- L A gf, sang. .1,43?32e,.f aio.. ., . , Q, .,, .. jg, 2 . N1 2 ,, ,,,,,.'-aw X . .5 , if 1. .Ac ,.. ga- H , S-2. 2 K, - 1 . .- . 1'-F2 42 . vrkfrinf We "f',':v..'2w'ff:59'i ' 2. W7492-e' J a-KZZT' . --. ' ' W u i i ? . .ss l is.: ff., og fi-2,.fi,1frfK, THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Trifiletti, A., Hatfield, H., Hottell, J., Weiss, A., Bryan, L., Free- man, W. SECOND ROW: Lampkin, F., Jones, A., Szeke- ly, A., Almassy, R., Raymond, H., Szudy, L. THIRD ROW: McWatters, J., Delgado, C., Smith, H., Biglow, J., North, R., Kleb, G. FOURTH ROW: Dooley, T. Mich- lik, M., Weber, J., Koster, J., Kite-Powell, C. notpic- tured: Covington, T. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right. Donaghy, D., Heller, W., Ellenbogen, S., Pickler, J. Briggs, L., Hawker, D., Anderson, J., Matteson, M. 7 r Johnson, M. SECOND ROW: Tucker, R., Shaver, M., Mc- Kemey, W., Nowland, D., Philo, S., Brown, N., Mark, A., Guerriero, R., McMillan, J. THIRD ROW: Kenny, P., Sellers, D., Timbrook, R., Bachman, W., Boohar, C. Pullen, R., Wiley, E. FOURTH ROW: Lieberman, P. Roeder, D., Mormon, J., Difiore, M., Howell, J.-, Hughes L., Harter, R., Cash, R. ' v ! r nfl : :: i , .: :i : FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Jim Spen- cer, T. R. Davis, Paul Kirkegaard, Mike Jones, Larry Waters, Tony Guenther. SECOND ROW: Larry Moor- ing, Dick Gramzow, John Dilley, Dick Randazzo, Phil Pons, Knuckles Curren. THIRD ROW: Don Pederson, Don Street, John DeVore, Dave Feldman, Dan Wick, Gus Fishburne. FOURTH ROW: Marty Bilafer, Dan Clark, John Dargle, Frank Miller, Rick Kelly. not pic- tured: Al Girardi, Scott McGurk, Rudy Penczer, Jay Witt. SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Fuller, G., Robertson, J., Chrisman, R., Ivy, W., Maxwell, P., Casey, T. SECOND ROW: Lutz, W., Gothreau, A., Es- posito, C., Jones, A., Blackgrove, J., Harman, T. THIRD ROW: Lujan, A., Patten, L., McClatchey, J., Moore- head, W., Voss, D. FOURTH ROW: Hannigan, J., Car- ney, T., Hughes, J., lschinger, M. not pictured: Allen, M. THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Scott, K., Domas, G., Smith, R., Deter, D., Vaughan, H., Kyle, J. SECOND ROW: Sam, J., Burney, S., Revie, D., Mur- phy, J., Rogers, W., Popp, J. THIRD ROW: Grasfoeder, L., Green, M., Van Buskirk, W., Hartman, C., Traylor, J., Gagne, R. FOURTH ROW: Wass DeCzege, H., Hole- man, J., Wade, D., Gillem, D., Starling, G., Roller, J. not pictured: Parker, A., Serio, R. F. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Reed H., Hawkins, R., Motal, B., Metzner, L., Woltz, K., Scheil ner, J., Ridenour, T. SECOND ROW: Sheckells, T. Whitten, J., Moore, H., Slutzky, K., O'Leary, F., Satorie T., Nelson, W. THIRD ROW: McClintock, C., O'Don- nell, C., Kramer, R., Dornier, R., Genoni, T., McEliece J., Kelley, J. FOURTH ROW: Shulick, M., Menninger G., Woodbury, K., Dye, M., Morton, L., Berry, J., Sulli- van, R., Principe, N. not pictured: Jackson, L., Lemons D., Tully, J. "GZ can do" was certainly exemplified by the members of this illustrious class in the "Big F" company. From that eventful day of acceptance in September, 1958, we managed to contribute our share to the glories and not so glorious history of F-2. We were always on the "dean's other list," but our accomplishments in P.E. and on the Uintermurder field" overruled the former. We were always well represented on the Area Squad, but still we managed to become the bearers of several drill stream- ers. The "call of the brownboy" was always heeded but a more vigorous class could not be found at football games, rallies, or weekend parties. From our "splendid iso- lation" in the lost fifties we emerged as an integral member of the Corps. Under the guidance of the "Duke,' during plebe and yearling years, and Major Tallman during cow and firstie years, we performed our duties faithfully and thoughtfully. And as we prepare to adorn the "army blue," we will continue to prove that U62 can do." Major Tallman and Cadet Kirkegaard 357 FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Jim Corr, Chris Keuker, Dave Symanski, Dan Stephenson, Charlie Bernitt, Dave Harkins. SECOND ROW: Paul Schott, Dick Skiar, Tom Kling, Dud Taylor, Walt Cooper, John Landry. THIRD ROW: Phil Costain, Rufus Crow, Jim Cowles, Paul Dobbins, Gene Welper. FOURTH ROW: Phil Florence, Art Bondshu, Jeff Alt, Bill Kosco, Barry Horton. lim W S W' M.. A Vw' 'swf W Y rl ,ig lgl ii ,5 l V- 'ff za 5 55 .A 15 iz .E ' 2 . 2:3-'5 li 1 . f ' 5 Z. 1 V 5 -:gi ll if 55, 25 lem ? 2235.352 Q. 35. 1 , 1 Hz! EM.: '- lxll ll 'Nfl-52 ' ,525 rl, lg, , 5,5 H ri. gist I 12.251 ll li" ME? T151 3- Yugi? li 1 3 .2 I bla? F 225,253,522 N SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Parker J. R., McQuary, R., Hudson, R. B., Cobb, P. C., Black- well, E. B., Roth, J. C. SECOND ROW: Cunningham M., Shine, A. P., Sipos, W., Silberstein, K., George, W. Jones, B. K., Murif, J. THIRD ROW: Jaworowski, J. Fairbank, L., Kunzig, L., Merrill, R. K., Walker, R., Rob bins, W. FOURTH ROW: Daniels, J., McNeill, R., Vogel R. A., Nakashima, G. not pictured: Lundin, J. THIRD CLASS FRONT ROW, left to right: Lent, M. Cope J Binney D., Kaufman, H., Kemp, N., Payne, W SECOND ROW Burnham, J., Eklund, K., Muir, J., Mc- Nulty J Lavoy, G., Kierstead, A., Ordway, K., Wil- Gates, R., Wolf, R., French R Jeffcoat M Clavadet liamson R THIRD ROW: Ryan, J., Corey, J., Jackman, W Hutchison C., Magruder, R., Armstrong, J., Hillyer, Cadet Kling and Major Parmely From the beaches of Copenhagen to the jungles of Ghana, the 62'ers of Gamma Dos left their mark. Though we traveled far and wide, our friendship never waned, and June 1962 was constantly in our minds. Introduced to fuzzy trousers, linseed, "eckademics," and the wrath of the Special Forces, we expanded our horizon from the "days" to the years that lie ahead. , We can look back at the four long years and see intermingled with the rigor of academics and the T.D. that we have many a fond memory-the drinking parties of Plebe Christmas, "Rufe's tons of fun," "Thoity-Toid street parties at Cholly's, the growing ranks of the P. W. platoon, big game hunts to Watertown, after taps pool games, Sy's twist parties, the persecution of Jeif, G-2's grill room, and many other memories. . Now, after four years of living and working together, with all its joys and sor- rows, we depart our separate ways, but wherever we go we 'will always remember the friendship we shared in ole Gamma Dos. -.Q R not pzctured Nawrowsky, M.,Mieras,C., Tiplady, R. Golden, J., Johnstone, R., Concannon J FOURTH ROW: Knowles, J., Bassett, S Leary R Molepske R 359 Probst, F., Maimone, E., Clarke B not pictured Bishop, G., Woodruff, R. , FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW left to Mght Scobie . J., Radford, E., Chudoba, D McCoy J Stanko M Hoxmeier, R., Conroy, R., Paley J SECOND ROW scher, C., Howard, P., Sinnreich R Jenkins H THIRD ROW: Turner, J., Croak, T Gonzalez J Wheeler J FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Charley Shaw, Mike Bartelme, Wayne Downing, Ralph Burr, Steve Ellis, Tony Leatham. SECOND ROW: Dennis Benchoif, Charley Murray, Jim Malley, Brian McEnany, Dale Kuhns, Ed Pabich. THIRD ROW: Don Kauer, Jim Heldman, Jack Garrett, Tom Murray, Dick Stephenson, Jim Worthington. FOURTH ROW: Phil Fuller, Dick Helmuth, Bill Cauthen, John Jones, Joe Sayers. not pictured: Bob Ord. fi SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Matte son, R. J., Ellis, B. H., Schwartz, K. O., Porper, H. H. Curtis, C. C., Stribling, R. W. SECOND ROW: Jenison R., Perry, G. E., Miller, B. F., Kelly, F. J., Olsen, A K., Hall, P. M., THIRD ROW: Mabardy, D. M., Bowes R. S., Young, T. R., Asbury, L. T., Fletter, W. A., Dusen bury, D. S., Boice, W. M. FOURTH ROW: Clay, M. A. Bentz, G., Kinsey, C. H., Scharf, R. D., Lennon, F. L. 1- fsn, A,-N 'D THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Tanner, W., Temple, A., Stancavage, P., Goff, C., Robertson, W., Sinclair, R. SECOND ROW: Tratensek, M., Kuhl- man, K., Powers, J., Connor, W., Alitz, D., Sanders, W., Landgraf, W. THIRD ROW.' Simonis, J., Wynn, R., Pells, R., Fishback, D., Klein, R., Vitale, R. FOURTH ROW: Williams, C., Strickland, H., Cesarski, W., Reich, R., Wilson, H., Sullivan, E., Smith, N. -an FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Higley, J., Alger, J., Huifhines, R. Jr., Hester, A., Kinard, R., Mistler, J., Olmstead, K., Arvin, C. SECOND ROW: Williams, R., Rennagel, W., Nenninger, G. Jr., McCon- nell, C., Wetherill, R. Jr., Clement, S., Dice, J., Barber, P. THIRD ROW: Momcilovich, M. Jr., Moseley, C., Ber- dan, R., Robb, W., Wanless, B., Eckart, C., Marshall, H. FOURTH ROW: Isakson, L., Parrish, D., Davis, J., Neil- sen, R., Kennedy, W., Laughlin, F., Stoecklin, P. not pictured: McCloskey, C. When we entered our first home here in the "Lost 50's," none would have guessed that by Plebe Christmas our courageous fourth class wouldhave H-2's name on every tongue in the Corps though our eiforts were unexpectedly thwarted by the T.D. We almost lived it down, but then came Camp Buckner where we proved con- clusively that the best laid plans of mice and "Tacs" often do go awry. The Cow trip allowed us to see each other from a new angle and showed us the function of the major support branches and services. We also saw some of the most interesting static displays in the world. Not all of us made it to the Firstie trip, but who will ever forget the terrified expressions on the faces of the 10th section juice lab? 220 D.C., across 230A. C ?? Firstie trip saw H-2 vigorously partake of Irminian culture in an effort to better Latin-American relations. "Your first, Charlie I" Firstie Year we finally found the formulae for fruitful living here. The great migration no doubt had a good deal to do with it. Probably no other company has been so close and yet so diiferent in so many ways. Major Trefry and Cadet Fuller l36l Aik 'UQ kia? fi Y fa. 'il' 'flee rnuuwwwmwf W-1 ,S . -,Syn M,,5,,,. an ,.g.,' we , h P ,ill ' A .K i. - A 'W' xl "WS FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Bob Jor- dan, Steve Schwam, Turk Grif'Hth, John Mumford, Ted Stroup, Bill Gavan. SECOND ROW: Harry Hagerty, Ray Lopresto, Neil Nydegger, Ed Hamilton, Evans Whiting, Will Meade, Dale Smith. THIRD ROW: John Taylor, Al Lynch, Larry Amon, Rich Foss, John Ulmer, Fred Laroque. FOURTH ROW: Roger Shope, Ralph Lurker, John Easterbrook, Gerry Garwick, Roy Cole, Jim Mount, Jeff Withers. 2 nw, V SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Guthrie R., Leach, D., Lewis, C., Robey, L., Brooks, J., Rowan, SECOND ROW: Moose, R., Yamashita, T., Solenberg- er, T., Shotwell, H., Handcox, R., Sausser, G. THIRD ROW: Chase, J., Coleman, D., Foight, T., Griffith, D., Nolan, J. not pictured: Clements, R., Garvey, D., Lee, E., Orlicki, G., Thompson, L. ibn.. 'T Captain McCormick and Cadet Mumford As our period of conditional servitude here draws to a close, we look back with mixed feelings of pride and sorrow. We lost six of our original number to other fields of endeavor and two to other companies. We received Bill from '61, Our fourth class year was marked by many changes in all phases of training and academics. The foot- ball team that year occupies a special place in all of our hearts for its numerous fall- outs. We lost our first Tactical Ofiicer to Command and Staff College and gained Capt, McCormick. Yearling year was uneventful except for a Regimental Championship in Intramural football. As second classmen, we were too busy with academics to ac- complish much at all. We began first class year with one first class private CLurkD as per usual I-2 TOE. Monk succumbed to three years of concerted effort on the part of TD and became our only century-man. We were definitely not the class the stars fell on, however Neil deserves honorable mention for coming close. With Joe on the Battalion Staff and Steve managing the finances, we joined to guide the company for the last year. We leave behind a job "well done" and gain that "future with a cloudless sky." THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Palmer, A., McLaughlin, S., Ferry, B., Bennett, D., Bedell, L., Macia, H., Merritt, R. SECOND ROW: Adair, W. Holdsworth, D., Walk, G., Zimmerman, H., Kelley, K., Sprague, K., Murphy, W., Higbee, R. THIRD ROW: Donovan, J., Hughey, P., MacAteer, P., Johnson, R., Al len, K., Orndorff, C., Sims, E. FOURTH ROW: Page, G., Waldrop, K., Stanko, R., Levin, D. not pictured: Pow- ers, J., Matsumoto, R., Rusnak, T. 7 363 FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Gam- boa, A., Larochelle, D., Kovac, F., Viani, M., Hall, R. Bucha, P., Norris, S., Muellar, A. SECOND ROW: Bradley, R., Black, R., Gentine, C., Hilton, R., Watson J., Kempf, S. Bumpass, T., Letterman, G. THIRD ROW. Blau, J., Harper, R., Callen, D., Abesamis, E., Hoffman J., Gable, D., White, R., Funk, J. FOURTH ROW: Simp- son, E., Barnaba, R., Kelly, J., Larson, R., Sadar, E. Zaleski, A., Seaburn, J. FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Russ Reich, Jim Redmond, Bob Goode, Len Butler, Lee Taylor, Duane Slater, Ken Herring. SECOND ROW: Pat Can- ary, Jim Ellis, Steve Kott, Bill White, Jim Peterson, Bob Devries, Bruce Parsons, Bob Cooper. THIRD ROW: Dick Garvey, Dave Spangler, Tom Teuten, Gene Ra- mella, Tom Faley, Dave McLaughlin, Bill Boozer, Don Williamson. FOURTH ROW: Chuck Dominy, Dan Denison, Fred Comer, Jerry Janicke, Phil Galanti. SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: McGann A., Marrs, G., Medlin, L., Marrow, A., Parker, J., Hall A., Smith, W. SECOND ROW: Kuzemkua, N., Coe, G. Alakulppi, V., Murphy, D., Pope, D., Workman, C., Bell J., Waugh, R. THIRD ROW: Dopslaff, G., Summers, M. Douglas, F., Dowling, D., Kelly, C., Holterman, G. v .. .Cf t r F ff. W ... , ps If 5- K 3 it 5. F' f.. Q.. THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Kindle- berger, H., Goodman, G., Aguirre, V., Downey, J., Tate, J., Anthony, T., Bast, C. SECOND ROW: Renfro, D., Herdegen, L., Dailey, D., Richard, M. Cromartie, G., Beck, W., Fisher, G. THIRD ROW: Jerge, L., Richards, J., Ziegler, W., Galloway, D., Drahn, P., Foster, R., Boone, H., Mills, L. FOURTH ROW: Chmielak, J., Wi- kan, M., Leonard, M., Davis, C., Cotter, D., Charron, L., Hegglund, J. The first of July--1958 '62 walked through the non-pearly gate And entered a life of privation and trial But Kappa Dos faced it all with a smile. Recognized by October-other companies would say, But Kappa Dos never played it that way. We knew in our hearts that was just so much stuff, And December was really quite soon enough. "Illegitimus non carborundumn-we quote, And at times, we got the TD's goat. This is really not surprising, you see, For Kappa Dos was the home of Otis T. Lee. The Academic Department never quite got us down, For whenever the whole world gave us a frown, We hitched up our belts, knocked the world on its back, And when we were through, it was back to the rack. We laughed through parades, intermurder, and class, And we'll keep right on laughing as onward we pass For when we look back from our posts in eternity, Kappa Dos will still be our only fraternity. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Behnke, D., Rau, P., Gin, A., Whiston, D. SECOND ROW! D., Atteberry, L., McArthur, K., Hennig, G., Speilman Gehringer, G., Steinwald, D., Skidmore, F., Seymour J., Zabka, D., Westpheling, E., Lemley, K., Van Dyk, T THIRD ROW: Bergmann, P., Longhouser, J., DeSantis D., Carini, R., Lyons, W., Ely, W., Kukea, K., Kelley, H FOURTH ROW: Farr, R., Grandstaff, T., Steele, G., Ap- plin, F., Thompson, T., Shaw, C., Tidwell, T., Rose, W not pictured: Wuertenberger, C. 6 Major Kinney and Cadet Dominy fwx FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Bill White- head, William Gertsch, Jim Dodd, Steve West, Roger Caldwell, Harry Fraser, Dennis Gilstad. SECOND ROW: Gary Sharp, Bob Szymczak, Jack Reavill, Bill Ross, Dave Windom, Bob Holeman, Jim Spurlock, Gary Brown. THIRD ROW: Jim Schmidt, Jim McQuillen, Pete Horoschak, Cal Johnson, Harry Nieuwboer, Paul Baltes. FOURTH ROW.' Dean Learish, Kraig Hansen, Al Biddison, Doug Morgan, Ray McDowall. tured: Dan Buttolph. not pic- DQ .3 'Fl' 'Ol' 'Ev' 'X 366 SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Matar- anglo, F., Swisher, A., Hingston, W., Thompson, T. Sallee, D., Brown, R., Hill, E. SECOND ROW: Stewart W., Zelley, R., DeWire, J., Buchheim, S., Byrne, D. Struble, D., Cole, D. THIRD ROW: Simmons, M., Dem- chuk, D., Heath, G., White, C., Jones, J., Williams, D. Cadet Morgan and Captain Knoff In the teeming July of 1958, Company L-2 of 1961-1962 began to take shape. Active in this process were such influences as "The Ape," "Al," "Larry," and "Andy." Sounds that still echo in '62 are t'A1l here, suh I", "Hey, Fitz, where are your socks?" and f'You foath classmen lift yo left heels l" The next year saw the Yearlings turn to slighter endeavors and members of the company began to see one another as something more than rushing, hurrying masses of confusion. Friendships began to develop and the Yearlings began to get "yuks" from the antics of "Roy," "Yerlay," "John," "The Giants," and "Rus . . . "I'll quill ya l" Cow year saw the L-2ers hard at developing more serious aspects of character- battling Bartlett Hall and earning final niches in company organization. With the advent of Summer, the "Firsties" rocked through the Southwest and then off to Europe, or Buckner, or Beast. "Pressure's off!" the goats chimed. With the company reorganized at the end of Summer, L-2 displayed the dis- tinguishing aspect of its 1962 character in finishing high in regimental standings while maintaining a high spirit of friendship and appreciation for frolic. With this combination of hard work and humor, '62 directed the company to the standard of a unit ready to "Go like L l" THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Hromyak, Kiunk, D., Missai, J., schoen, J. SECOND ROW: Moo: G., Robinson, K., Nunn, J., Hartle, A., Liverpool, H. maw, R., Hubbard, M., Knight, R., Stafford, R., Mayhew W., Hoover, W., Smith, D. THIRD ROW: Marino, B. Hughes, F., Annan, W., Huneycutt, T., Louis, G., Reese, T. FOURTH ROW: McClure, J., Weathers, R., Mel- chiori, R., Nowak, R., Rosenbalm, J. O'Neal, D. not pic- tured: Jones, R. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to rzght. Eck stein, N., Sowada, R., Ledzinski, J., Joyner, H., Dono- van, P., Ziegler, B., Adams, R., Boerckel, R. SECOND ROW: Baldinger, R., Wells, R., Halvorson, C., Dermody, H., Hall, H., Clift, J., Nichols, C., Cullen, J., Frickey, R. THIRD ROW: Ferguson, J., Shuford, J., Barwis, J., DeSantis, J., Hewitt, L., Kelly, T., Stichweh, C., Davis, G. FOURTH ROW: Fergusson, T., Churchwell, C., Roe- buck, Z., Glynne, M., Ruggles, G., Tice, C., Gilchirst, M., Griffin, W. not pictured: Long, G. E 2 . :,s 1255-5:1Q, J Q.1,,,, ig' E 'Tv E'E 1 .af .fLTmfi? ir' we f Sf M '3:f,im:i IX S 3 Y k' 3 ...., St ? ii "" 5 E ,.,.: E, g X N .--... .-.. ,.:.. W gi, ,v,- Eu. Ll W, 1 ' :J --':":' 'Fa f-E ",.- ." FIRST CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Waide Rishel, Mike Godshall, George Handy, John O'Neal, John Bode, John Finlayson. SECOND ROW: Ed Kru- kowski, Jim Kimsey, Hank Urna, Chuck Bennett, Slade Johnson, Mac Howard. THIRD ROW: Mike Gibson, Ken Pakula, Joe Gross, Chuck Fisher, Bill Dieal, Jim Mc- Kay. FOURTH ROW: Harry Meeth, Bob Loupe, John Schmidt, Bill Mogan, Myron Remington. not pictured: Doc Ellis, Bob Fuellhart, John Meceda, Fred Sheaffer, Phil Stewart. SECOND CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Galla gher, T., Oliver, J., Rolfe, C., Cargile, E., Hamel, J. Walsh, M. SECOND ROW: Klauminzer, G., Banks, E. Gilbert, M., Kuhns, W., Harrison, J., Gibbs, F., San chez, L. THIRD ROW: Siebenaler, D., Spock, S., Will son, D., Wyrwas, J., Sawin, P. not pictured: Battis, W. Schott, C. THIRD CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Durfee, T., DesJardins, G., Dye, C., Flint, C., McAdams, R., Culosi, S., Hall, D. SECOND ROW: Schillo, E., Lee, D., Harding, J., Richards, C., Bujalski, D., Roller, B., Werner, G. THIRD ROW: Bettner, S., Treweek, G., Moakley, J., Madsen, P., Bush, T., Brooks, M. FOURTH ROW: Murray, J., Christensen, A., Banovic, D., Hay- dash, E., Cross, R. not pictured: Cate, P., Grifiith, M. FOURTH CLASS, FRONT ROW, left to right: Ryan T., Spoerry, S., Stevens, G., O'Hara, T., Rood, R., Tee- ters, M., Hallenbeck, R., Brown, G. SECOND ROW. Hume, J., Kurlak, R., Sherrell, W., Meade, D., Hecker W., Whicher, J., Yoshitani, K. THIRD ROW: Chaifer J., Harper, P., Hughes, C., Horst, R., Coleman, R., Lof- tin, D. FOURTH ROW: Swensson, J., Gentzkow, D. Ganshert, S., Olson, S., Gillespie, G. not pictured: Boehm, R., Dufour, J., Garms, R., Hart, T., Powell, R. Resick, M., Thomas, G., West, L. The hallowed halls of North Area have not had a moment of silence since the ar- rival of M-2's Class of 1962. We started off with the famous "Plebe Christmasl' where we came out with an undeserved, but spotless slate, while our less tactful classmates paid "through the nose." We have not ceased "playing it by ear" since! If any company could be said to have a colorful and diverse class, it's M-2. Our ranks have seen stars Cof both types, but a predominance of the B-robe typej. The nicknames of "C.O.,,' "Weasel,,' "Fubee," "Elmer Gantryf' "Rosebud,', "Piggy," "Duke,,' "Meece," and countless others helped mold our troops into one. Despite our seemingly carefree style of living, we could always get the job done where lesser giants would have fallen. We came in with a blast, as verified in the area formations, and we leave with ever greater energy and vigor than that which we had when we first entered. We leave M-2 with a feeling of sadness and regret, but it will soon pass, for M-2 has endowed us with that spirit that can only lead to success. cf, Major March and Cadet Meeth 369 .h- 1 , ,QT 'ef Xyxx if 'e .-'-Wigh ' ,"i1X I if A xxx 1 Af . : wygx, 113 U, j ' auf W, , i aA Q W NW ' W I ' W"'l fVw' +2 MLW V M qi' - "u" '1I4fw 'vifu' wi ll fu 'I-l k UM Y' . wh 'I 'll 1 H UA' A- , Y ' wt' !"l!:,'.11if 1, 4 bf' N . WA TF? ' M y EHR i1l 21lF 51fA1E,1?.2i'A ji. VW i W f .M 1: if Aff - - ?11 5? W , A5191 i,'?yyfJ:- I 1, UQ E M JQW V M: +.MQw?xQ flL1w1. w,H1w 1: 'sei " ,.qf1-1.r w- ,1 , 1 .A. , M 1 W Wffvfkx x f I Mm Fm ak Y ! 122 f 1 M Wffwfi X U -' " .X 13'HffQL u' 1 I , w11."iLQjf.. A JHXEKXMKXQM XNMM RXN.l!wZf?!ll4 xx! my ty VN lc 4f. Qxlfkclukqi . 0 , Y fdsx XII f X aww k, X ' Mxlfh mywf X My QW ' Q fflwxkxgxxbxxs ggf Dyk .. . ,LL WXIUQ WNW M W NW? Wki XQQKXW CMAQ!! EVN 'Jigga X W ANWMX W k Qffhxxx K A' XR 1, tm xl K PXCADIEMXIICS r 95 ai , nm? 2, PW? mf. J 'F' K an Wimu., M vw V QW AM M1-4. -mir 'M if 1.121 Q wif, JW Wh' -'Cuff -RM is ,K M ,1- was uf R4 .RH a x EDITOR Dave Logan O Q i-Q,,,.......f '-QQ """v 'hs-33 n...,,,,,, AQ ...J xl Qbpisffmaff' Rig? The Department of MATIH IEMATHICS From our very first "Sir, I am required . . ." to our final " . . . Q.E.D.', we tried to absorb the principles of mathematics which were to be useful in most of our other courses later in our cadetships. In our endeavor, we de- veloped skills in such fields as arranging chalk trays, using various colors of chalk, and stalling in vain for staybacks. At the same time, however, most of us were able to main- tain a sufficient degree of proficiency so as to be able to tackle some of those more difficult courses cow year. After a while we were able to understand the reason for all the proofs, question boards, humiliation boards, etc., as we noticed an improvement in our powers of logic and reason, and the dependence in later years on our math background to solve various problems. Our courses in calculus, algebra, geometry, and slide rule, as well as the notorious STM'S, represent one of the finest math courses in the country. Mike questions the "point" in Plebe Math. 372 'K' Front row: Maj. Downey, Maj. Fife, Maj. Stukhart, Lt. Col Smith, Lt. Col. Cabaniss, Col. Nicholas, Col. Dick, Col. Bixby, Lt. Col. Caffey, Maj. Emerson, Maj. Olson. Second row: Capt Filaseta, Maj. Spettel, Capt. Ewan, Capt. Darling, Capt. Otis, Capt. Reed, Capt. Blahuta, Capt. Krupinsky, Lt. Col. Rogers Maj. Wagner. Third row: Capt. Genebach, Capt. Bamford: l . ,Il ffl 1 FTF" 'Ill 6, ,. J fa ,ri Capt. Ganahl, Maj. Patterson, Capt. Davis, Maj. Beasley, Capt. Dean, Maj. Barber, Capt. Cameron. Fourth row: Capt. Meyer, Capt. Cannon, Capt. Eubanks, Capt. Sibley, Capt. Eberhart, Capt. Duke, Maj. Croonquist. Fifth row: Maj. Baish, Capt. Baldwin, Capt. Horn, Capt. Campbell, Capt. French. Rear row: Capt. Cousins, Capt. McGarry, Capt. Daggit, Maj. Culin. l..J ' ,,o'f'T'--- ' 9,14 3 cr -514 X X . ef j, lf j Front Board -- 1862 373 l X . S.. Front row: Lt. Col. Sanelli, Maj. Tracy, Maj. Reynolds, Lt. Col. Burton, Col. Alspach, Col. Sutherland, Lt. Col. Wallis Maj. Capps, Maj. Doyle. Second row: Capt. Samouce, Maj Wilhide, Maj. Rasmussen, Capt. Burkhard, Maj. Hurst, Maj. Lind, Capt. Stout, Capt. Wood. Third row: Capt. Young, wage,-re.vz 'S Q 1 D g 211051 All'-f f Capt. Kintz, Capt. Royals, Maj. Holcomb, Maj. Fallon, Maj. Tague, Capt. Sterling, Maj. Fant. Fourth row: Capt. Buck- ley, Maj. Smith, Capt. Hilty, Capt. Petree, Capt. Shemwell. Rear row: Capt. O'Connor, Capt. Holt, Capt. Matthews. The Department of lENGlLllSlHl From the logic lessons of Plebe Year to the ethical problems of 0173 First Class Year, the English Department constantly confused us while attempting to give us a better understanding of our own native tongue. But these minor bewilderments, along with the basic laws of grammar and composition can only now be appreciated. If it were not for them, many of our other subjects would have suffered since Eng- lish, both in the Written and spoken word, was such an integral part of our curriculum. And now that the speeches of Plebe Year, that turned six minutes into eternity, are over, and the mysteries of Yearling poetry have been solved, we will forever be in debt to our instructors and the foresight of the English Department for giving us an understanding of our language that will remain with us throughout our varied careers. 374 W iw-A.- -Ie-f'fef4 hf: ., al l l l if 1 Q W Capt, Kmtz tells all. We learned to tell all too. In preparation . . . The Library was always all-important. Y N we-few LET 155 HAVQ rim-H THAT RXCHT MAKZS HIE!-i 1v"' '4 fn: f'gf'7 701: V725 Um IW ro rn 01' "'o EZ E270 Q41 'fi' 'fm I ANS in THAT ami LET Us DARZ TQ HG OUR mfgry AS wg Q mmm Nniksmzo xr LINCOLN W P! W S 22 ? ?E ,571 CW 902 F"-4 O.. 25 92 Fi W2 7m 5 'Q ARE JLSTX1 CO5-SKDERED AS DEEPLJS- PERHAPS AS FINALLY STAMQD CW THE EXPERIWENT UNTRL STED TO THE HANDS OF THE IKPSERELAKN PEOPLE WASHINGTON l mt.c.wsiM1Kw 4 re l a ' l mom 5H0f VA 2 4 f 'lfwoslssfgerrs LOS? me Raosnms LOSTA l . , FMNFP' x n ' 1 .fr 5 Us ? 5 7 X The Department of IFUVFMIGN lLANCGtllAGlES spa, e Before coming to West Point most of us hardly knew one lan- guage Very well and now, thanks to the Department of Foreign Languages, each of us has added an additional language to our list of useful knowledge. We acquired the skill of not only speaking, but also think- ing in a foreign language by means of numerous lectures, labora- tory periods, and classroom discussions monitored by an instructor who spoke the foreign tongue with the excellence of a native. But aside from just learning vocabulary words and rules of grammar we also acquired a greater insight into the people of foreign countries by studying their customs and cultures. And when the last writ of Yearling year was finished we thought about the hundreds of words and rules we had learned and realized how valuable this training would be to us as oiiicers learn- ing the tongue and customs of any foreign country. Cadet Kurtz "excels" in Portuguese. . ,..,. , H.. .. ,.., I 'WW W W YM ::5--- FAQ Front row: Maj. Ramos, Lt. Col. Moffet, Lt. Col. Willard, Col Renfroe, Col. Barrett, Lt. Col. Wentzel, Lt. Col. Germann, Maj Tuck, Maj. Leavitt. Second row: Capt. Lowder, Capt. Cart- land, Dr. Tiller, Capt. Holden, Capt. Healy, Capt. Bethea Capt. Lindholm, Capt. Halterrnan, Maj. Portera, Mr. Mar- tinez, Capt. Bonner. Third row: Mr. Viollet, Mr. Garcia, Capt. in-4' The lab periods improved our ability even more. 45? Asensio, Maj. Maladowitz, Capt. Larkin, Capt. Hayes, Capt. Pawlowski, Capt. Corbridge, Capt. Creighton, Capt. Malouche. Rear row: Capt. Hansard, Maj. Wildrick, Capt. Henning, Maj. Burnell, Mr. Maltzoff, Maj. Stapleton, Capt. Dinges, Capt. Wubbena, Maj. Book. Capt. Healy befnddles a Geronan class. 377 The Department of IEARTIHI. SIPDACCIE ANI GRAIPIHIIICAIL SCIHENCCIES QED QV' U TQ the class of '62, the Department of Earth, Space, and Graphic Sciences will always be called Military Topography and Graphics. In our first encounter with this department we studied Earth Measurement, or as it is commonly called, "Squat and Plot." Here we learned the fine art of leveling bubbles, measuring azimuths, and reading maps. The background in maps studied here was to help us in our later instruction and at Buckner, where we endeavored to keep the number of lost year- lings to a minimum. Although few of us realized the importance of this course at the time, we later realized that this was one of the most practical courses we would receive at the Academy. As yearlings we moved up to the graphics course, or "Squint and Print." Here we learned the proper way to print, use pencils, manipulate T-squares and draw garbage racks. Although we did not leave the department as expert draftsmen, we had acquired a good enough background to help us as junior oflicers after graduation. After our departure, the department expanded to include the subjects of phys- ical geography, astronomy, and world geography, in order to improve the cadet's general knowledge of the World around him. Front row: Lt. Col. Hammond, Maj. Rogers, Maj. McDaniel Maj. Salisbury, Col. Broshous, Col. Watkin, Maj. Smith, Maj Boylan. Second row: Capt. Erickson, Capt. Peloquin, Capt. Kinnie, Capt. Birdseye, Capt. McCormack, Capt. Biggerstaff. Third row: Capt. Schick, Capt. Lykke, Capt. Davisson, Capt Grugin, Capt. Ulmer, Capt. Poteat, Capt. Renfro. Fourth row: Capt. Phillips, Capt. Dawson, Capt. Streett, Capt. Scovel, Capt. Fralen, Maj. Brinkerhoff. Rear row: Capt. Kimmel, Capt. Smythe, Maj. Rising, Maj. Slominski, Maj. Leach. 378 "So if you are planning a trip to the moon We saw them in class . . . then we used them in the field. Mr. Lewis and his "Happy Hour." The Office of PI!-IIYSIICAIL IEI UICATIION All the way from the "sit out and turn in !" in Plebe Wrestling and the "bite 05 that breath of air!" in Plebe swimming to the "Extend to the left. . .!" in First Class instructor training, we were always aware of the objective of OPE - that being to instill in the Cadet a strong desire for physical fitness and clean sportsmanship, and a knowl- edge of competitive sports. Fourth Class year proved to be a year during which the class "muckoids" excelled, as we learned the basic skills of swimming, boxing, wrestling, and gymnastics. With the end of the rigors of Plebe year near the OPE also relaxed a bit and we were introduced to tennis and golf in the spring. During Third and Second Class years, we all enjoyed participating in such sports as squash, volleyball, basket- 380 ball, badminton, and handball. Finally, the long-awaited First Class year gave us an opportunity to put to use all that we had learned during the first three years. Most of us, at one time or the other, acted as instructors for the underclassmen. Throughout these four years, OPE managed to add that well-known "West Point flavor" to the course as we intermittently were required to excel on a PFT, PAT, or the obstacle course. With the conclusion of our OPE instruction, we shall always be grateful to them for instilling in us the ideals of sportsmanship and leadership in the fields of Physical activity - a trait which will certainly prove invaluable to us as officers. eb 4 Hand to hand action. No...N0...56...No... Front row: Spec. Tonry, Mr. Alitz, Maj. Richardson, Capt. Appleton, Mr. Bruce, Mr. Werner, Col. Kobes, Maj. Nutting Touchstone, Mr. Kroeton, Mr. Maloney, Mr. Kress, Maj. Mr. Lewis, Capt. Harrison, Mr. Linck, Capt. Thompson. Dallman, Mr. Sorge. Rear row: Mr. Palone, Lt. Col. Call, Dr. ,...... 195. ,Am .....a..M....s.Ma.a... M ... -W """"""-'1-vw .. The Office of lVlllllLIllVPlRY IPSYQHIUILOGY AND ILIEAV IERSIHIIIP When the good Captain says, "Lieutenant, here's your platoonj' he is going to expect more than a uniformed college graduate to take charge. He is going to want a leader who can influence the platoon to accomplish even the most diflicult of tasks. He will expect a man who can understand other men, teach them, and eventually A - C lead the men to success in combat. This is the role that the Office of Military Psy- .5 L Q chology and Leadership has prepared us to fulfill. Through the skills of teaching, the S xt techniques of leadership, and the general understanding of our fellow humans we N Q5 can make ourselves successful officers. Xl Through the efforts of this Ofiice our Army Crientation Training program has K 4, been expanded to the capability of providing each of us with the invaluable experi- ence of having Hlled the shoes of a junior officer in a combat ready unit. We owe 2 a great deal to these oflicers who so zealously prepare us for our future. Front row: Maj. Watters, Maj. Petersen, Maj. Dexter, Maj. Maj. Buckley, Maj. Stephenson, Maj. Bowen, Capt. Hayes, Napier, Col. Tuttle, Lt. Col. Geaney, Maj. Wieringa, Maj. Maj. Spence, Maj. Wyatt. Warner, Capt. Drisko. Rear row: Maj. Marder, Maj. Wichlep, M... ..., .. - ..,...-- . . . mn-vm--nw..-..........,,.,,.,.,,, Www! .W--K-fit-f ff -- .ew M-HMTAAMWWNM in p.-................. 'W " MRMWMNMFMWM x We even practiced leadership. V On AOT, Lee and Gen. Stilwell concur on the value of MOI and Leadership. 383 Fish adjusts a fudge factor. ' . is T.A.'s staff tackles ct Fluids Lab. The Department of MIECII-IIPXNIICS Second Class year brought along the courses we had all been Waiting for- Mechanics of Fluids and Solids. Certainly our predecessors of the Civil War era couldn't have looked upon these courses with more enthusiasm than we did. In Solids, many painstaking hours were spent with free-body diagrams, trying to hive out if the force of gravity worked up, down, or sideways??? Fluids brought on the question-"Just what is entropy Y" Although many definitions were floating through the classes most of the time, the spec definition was "Sir, it Walks, it talks, it's full of chalk . . ." We soon found out that stresses and strains weren,t exclusively reserved for Plebe year as WGR's rolled around. Although the course began with a minute bit of understanding and ended in complete disbelief, the time spent with the Department of Mechanics will certainly f CED prove to be worthwhile. ix ,ling S91 ff ft A fx 384 "Four micro-mils to the right please, Tom." Front row: Maj. Moore, Maj. Greer, Maj. Boerger, Col. Hei- Capt. Misch, Capt. Moore. Rear row: Maj. Stevens, Capt. berg, Col. Fraser, Maj. Tormey, Maj. Hendry. Second row: Meador, Capt. Munson, Capt. Wagner, Capt. Miles, Capt Maj. Read, Capt. Donald, Capt. Goodwin, Capt. Watkins, Maj. Bard, Capt. Barnes, Maj. Coyle. Wilson, Capt. Daigh, Maj. Drury, Maj. Suttle, Capt. Andrews, 385 The Department of IEILIECTVNICIITY With our introduction to the infamous 'fjuicei' course during Second Class year, little did We realize that it had been around these gray buildings since 1858 - just prior to the War Between the States. Electricity at that time, however, was under the guidance of the Department of Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Geology. It didn't acquire the status of a real department until the late date of 1946. How- ever, whether a real department or not during the Civil War, the cadets then must have spent the same frustrating, mystifying hours that we spent, every time that a juice class rolled around. As we scrambled through the first semester of Circuits and Power, Communications and Nuclear Physics, we were all looking forward to an easier time which undoubtedly the second semester would bring. However, contrary to popular opinion, the traditional juice adage remained true: before Christmas, only the upper sections understand the Juice course, after Christmas, only the instructors understand the course, and after Spring Leave, nobody knows what is going on. Although many of us are still in a quandary about this Ujuicel' that Hows in a wire, the majority of us thank Col. Cutler and our instructors for giving us our basic understanding of electricity. Front row: Capt. Noah, Maj. Mitchell, Maj. Luebbert, Lt. Mentillo, Capt. Miller, Capt. Ellman. Third row: Capt. Cor- Col Saunders, Col. Cutler, Maj. Lincoln, Maj. Feir, Maj. Wa- dell, Capt. Davis, Capt. Koch, Capt. Epling, Capt. Thorsen, lak, Capt. Leggett. Second row: Capt. Lasher, Capt. Car- Burkhardt, Capt. Lewis. Rear row: Capt. Galloway, Capt. penter, Capt. Roderich, Capt. Fischer, Capt. Arnold, Capt. Cline. --.. Y Qx Al and Dave approach it a little appreherisively "They carft be serious!" Terry explains Ecd R W -2 i .us l l .5 M we . K-7 My Igfljijfif The Department of SClQl!-lllt SCIIIENCIES With the advent of Social Sciences during our First and Second Class years, our insight into the complexities which man faces was greatly increased. Nevertheless there were many moments when we believed that one of man's greatest complex- ities was that of passing the Social Science course. During Second Class year we received a background in geography, history, and government. By the end of the year most of us were able to successfully counter any question with an answer that would make any instructor's head swim. Also, we became acquainted with the WFR, a new secret weapon developed by the department for the express purpose of taking away all the tenths accumulated by the cadet in one semester. First Class year we continued building on our background with economics and national security problems. These courses also provided many exciting moments as many a Firsty was beginning to wonder if he could be "e'conned right out of this place." Looking back on these two years, we are grateful to the Social Science Depart- ment for providing us with a wide and varying background in politics and diplomacy. 71 Z l The root of all evil - Economics. 388 . Qt , 132. Front row: Maj. Leary, Maj. Williams, Capt. Thompson, Maj Nye, Col. Jordan, Col. Lincoln, Lt. Col. Jones, Maj. Simmons Maj. Jennings, Capt. Dinkins, Maj. Remson. Second row.: Lt. McClellan, Capt. Olvey, Maj. Mangas, Capt. Shaw, Maj Tilson, Capt. Bell, Capt. B. Thompson, Capt. Cates, Captl Saalberg, Capt. Ralph. Third row: Capt. Albro, Capt. Wix, ,Q ..,' at ' Capt. Sullivan, Capt. Suplizio, Capt. Gibney, Capt. Adams Capt. Davis, Capt. Vesser, Capt. Karns. Fourth row: Captl Osborn, Maj. Morrison, Capt. Martin, Capt. Hooker, Capt. Garn, Capt. Wallis. Rear row: Capt. Seigle, Maj. Denton, Maj. Lynch, Maj. Boatner, Maj. Sulenski. K wif mfg 1 Q tl , x. ., on E , . 5, ,K J ' ,E .2 A ' Z F A M s ...s j j f sci' W 1 ' "fill, T 2. nfl IAV .l-.,Vmfj-1m- . 1' s .... ssvr 1 f .fy r ,ax f. . x . xyy, , rf ,A. ft ,, .1 . g f . 5 . . .,., z ., hm Q., f , .gym hw I ' :gn , li -'fix we y Q . mx, fzgg. , f Y -E f as . .gh , , . Janis geography bones him a few files in History class. 389 iii. i-All Q. 5, 1, E. gk -g ' I , Zffiiiailiill 2. 1 z H5 TTI 4 ,Q Front row: Maj. Nichols, Col. Lough, Col. West, Lt. Col. lin, Maj. Hollander, Maj. Peckham, lst Lt. Williams, Maj Schmidt, Maj. Weaver. Rear row: Maj. Heisser, Maj. Mack- Newman, Maj. Robinson. f: Q is Nag? Q71 0I..'7 mf N X The Department of LAW Having been around nearly as long as the academy itself, some 140 years, the subject of law gained status as a separate department in 1879, after having been headed by the chaplain dur- ing the Civil War. When it gained ofiicial status, a member of the J. A. G. C. became head of the department and continued to impart the knowledge of law to the cadets. As we encountered this subject during Cow Year, many of us searched for some of this knowledge as we often unsuccessfully attempted to solve the legal complications of Cadet Spoony, Phil O'Sophica1 and Barry Battery. By the end of the first term, most of us had an idea of what was meant by "intent," "negligence," and "contract" Although we weren't on the verge of becoming full- fledged lawyers, we did have a working knowledge of the Uniform Code of Military Justice and the United States Constitution. With this basic knowledge concerning the fundamentals of law, we have become more able to logically analyze a situation, an ability which will be invaluable to us in the future. la at A it Beiense Cmmsek may xr kkkr WX The notorious Capt. Zane E. Finkelstein gives Torn some E.I Moot Court was our great proving grounds. Manners The Department of hflllitllll-ARY NUT AND IENGIINIEIERIING From the dirt through the No. 200 sieve to the dirt on which Napoleon found his fame, the Department of Military Art and Engineering kept us on our toes trying to keep up with them in understanding and memorizing the assignments. Military Art, which is the basis of our future vocation, gave us a chance to analyze and apply the principles of war through the successes and failures of great leaders. We learned that the same basic concepts were applied all the way from Marathon to Pork Chop Hill, and that these same concepts will be applied by us if it is necessary to overcome a future enemy. On alternate days, the Civil Engineering side endeavored to make us apply all we didn't learn in Solids. Trusses and influence lines became second nature to us as we slowly but surely learned the value of Mili- tary Engineering. The Department presented both of their subjects to us in an interesting, informative and challenging manner. For this, we are grateful to the Department of Military Art and Engineering. -2 Front row: Maj. Parr, Lt. Col. Pitts, Lt. Col. Heltzel, Lt. Col. Capt. Wilson, Maj. Griebling, Maj. Neil, Maj. Kelly, Maj. Elting, Col. Esposito, Col. Schilling, Lt. Col. Fisken, Maj. Vandenberg.Rearrow: Maj. Mayer, Maj. Johnson, Maj. Day, Hartline, Maj. Lohn. Second row: Capt. Esker, Capt. Willis Maj. Bashore, Maj. Brennan, Lt. Col. Forsythe, Maj. Lan- Lt. Col. Roos, Lt. Col. Romanek, Maj. Aton, Maj. Perkinsj sing, Maj. Brown, Maj. Jones, Maj. Schulz. MNNMs""'1'fg ..4 Q - ' s-5 'MW' " ' " ' ' ' ' A ' H D it WL ' W" i'D'?DDm'iL 'L ' D Vi uttNi'mW'W'tW Zeus Northy'-the engineering feat Kfatej ofthe class of '62. Russ bores into the "great source of knowledge. 1 A xy YA Y i .W , -.X L tif,-'Y - -, 'W ji ,, A il" ' The engineering hives of 1862. 39 The Department of ORV NANCE All the science courses that were taken and forgotten in our first three years were all of a sudden combined and brought to light in Ordnance. Principles and theory every- one thought to be gone forever gradually were rediscov- ered in practical application and vvrits. The writs came on a guess and get basis: either you guessed all or got nothing. When things became desperate, as they always did, we had at least one recourse, as one instructor saidg "When in doubt, differentiate!" During Propulsion, We were taught everything about cars, except how to pay for them. In Ballistics We learned how to make computers solve impos- sible problems. Looking into the future, the Ordnance Department offered us a comprehensive course in the most modern weapons. We profited immensely by the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for every officer. Walt is hiving it out . . . can K Rog is already computing oc E76 ci- at ll iii KW f.- Front row: Capt. King, Maj. Sherman, Col. Tansey, Col. Bil- Brain, Capt. O'Hara, Capt. Philipp, Lt. Westerfeldt, Lt. Little, lingsley, Maj. Mathias, Maj. Ickler, Capt. Thomas. Rear row: Capt. Scholz. Capt. Haumersen, Capt. Lacquement, Capt. Williams, Capt. 395 77? ,Nl ii 396 The Department of IPIHIYSJICS AND CIHIIEMIISTRY It was Yearling year when we encountered the Department of Physics and Chemistry, along with its "magic shows," "solv.able" problems, and impossible writs. This was the proving ground for Plebe Math, and the preview of what was to come Cow year: The Physics labs provided us with many challenging problems, some of which are still unsolved. The Chem labs seemed to deal in 'fblack magic" of long ago. We were, however, definitely left with a basic knowledge of the Uwhys ?" and "hows?" of the world around us, which will give us the basic foundation for the later courses in Mechanics and Electricity. Even after our near escape in the race for tenths we look back fondly on our hours spent in utter confusion and amaze- ment of our present world and its many facets. ii . . . and Seagrawfs gets 86.75 a quart for 'making thzs Front row: Maj. Kenny, Maj. Robertson, Jr., Maj. Carnes Col. Jannarone, Col. Gillette, Jr., Col. Wood, Maj. McNeil Maj. Kingdom, Maj. Thayer. Second row: Capt. Chancellor Maj. Fox, Capt. Bazilwich, Jr., Capt. Stubblebine, III, Capt Coffman, Capt. Pearson, Capt. O'Sullivan, Capt. Hoff, Jr. Home Ee or Chemistry? The Department of MIIILIITARY IHIYGIIIENIE It was through the Department of Military Hygiene that We learned the complexities and functions of the Medical Corps and its importance to the officer, regardless of branch. Through lectures by several medical officers, we learned of the advances of medicine to prepare for the atomic age and its consequences. In addition to this, we learned how an officer can best keep the physical and psychological effectiveness of his unit at a maximum. We were also shown the facilities available at various levels in a combat area, and the equipment that can be used to restore the combat effectiveness and condition of wounded personnel. L 0083 in x, ? Col. Mallory and Maj. Rogers. 398 lx L 1 1 11 '1 ,. 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 ' 11 ' 1 1 1 1 W' 1' 11112 1 .1 M111 1 R11 Hn'1ll1'111111 ,1' 1,'1141'1 111 1 1111, X 11.111111 N 111f1,I":11'I': ,, , ,ff 11M 111111111 1'Q1'1 - 511 11511 W'?1 l1i.1-11'11 1 1 N 151 '11 1 .1 11 111111 1 1'1 11111111111111 1 W1 " ffm: "',1j,1',' 'lg v 1Q3i5w Rf: x,1'iN11f1 , 121 'M'1,'1- 1 1 ff m' 1441 Mi ff , "-1 '," , X, T- ' WX" -5 J ?f' ' ' 1' 'EV l 11 Y111T1W 1 11fi1' 'WJ ff W111111 V V MW 1' 1 1 1 -1. 1111! ' 2-ix 11111 -- 1'e1i'2111:-1G1,f.11w'1 " 1' 11' 1,1 11 ' 11 U1 ' 1 1 , 15' 1 I 11111 71 WY' 1111 ff? 1 3 '1 -1 11V V U- ,WGQ1 1 ' X131 '1 X111 N V211 1 KT' f 11 111 1 1111 Va Q1 1 I X ' NN' MV' f 151 N " f' 1 ii,11","' Vw ' M 1'y, ,1f'J1 f 1" ', , '- 111' fiffg' 1 , K fi 111 1111 11 41 111 1111 11 11-1 1 y RENDK fkx, Vtwkl UL' 16 1 1 : 4271 YH, X 311 6? I' 'vy '.1,f. 1QJ 1 4 f 1 xr' O 111 1111 11111111 1 11f 1 1 11, 1111111 111 11 1M 1 L 11 1111 ff ff 1 K X 11 111 11 idk ,H qw X 311111115 11111, xxx wqfgmx 1 K 191111 '11 X XM '1111141111 1 S1626 1 Xxx ' xx ' SPORTS Xi.i--.-,:.J- fe 35 Q Z 2 2 if ? 5 if ,E Q 2 2 5 2 5 5 3 3 E 2 i 2 3 3 2 3 2 Q 1 s E E E 4 TS R IPO S EDITOR Dave Knowlton N. ,L , KM. 5' A ,KK at, F 1 if ,, ,K I , 4 as K M , 'W-.1-ful"'A ,- YK V rg, V H ' ' , 'ifgsgv , K I A fl 'Q' ' Q K K , , A KE f . - , :- x ' Vkk. , . 'i , ' , N e aww , - Q12 f ff? , . ,Q M1 if dl " , , "' N- , " 5 , ' .. 1 ,. KA A WL, Q 1' 'Cf ' . , K , Q' :MJ K M f K A . Qi, .V,, ff + H f V .V ' yy , , M A ' - , A f V V 7 JM' , A - ' 'H 1' Q' 1, L W , h-" f , ' ' - 4 ,. G + f km, I ' I 3 , ' "" 1 ',,-L ,Liu ,g m , K W , sa . ' 5 . J ii? , fx '---' 1-ff ., Ms KK, . " 15 Zi V in W A Q, ' f 7 '11 'WE an f ' V MM K' r ' Vi' 'Sig vm f Q , H ,A f V W " M Q V 4 ' if - ' ' . - qu X, K4 , ,,,, 3 ,K A 'K KK K K. ,, KKK KK K i 'UML W N' ,pf ' , K 'V ,W ' ff A , 4. , I "'1?5f 1 N if I1 .. 5 f 'ff' , K my ' 1 72 QW W, , ' " V Q f Q Q 5, 4 'Y A y S 4 , "-" ,v y i HI' N ,, K ' ' ' Y KK V Qmmwh , ,K . A A ., M,,, - V f , MW fig ' , fe A. V A f - . , A N ',', ' ,. V , , iw., 1 -Q if ' ,f ,KM ,K Q1 ' :nfgw 54, J, A ff Q Mg? ,K W K f,,-, I f 5 . , ,K.?ffKKiKKK4M gg, K .-,' f gf 1' P i f I W f Q--.f',,,?,SA f K fn, Q A' 'ffff'?l?3m H x I Butch Darrell, captain and star of Army lacrosse Gary Brown, pole-vaulting captain of the track team Jim Peterson, a top performer in squash and on the tennis team, which he cap- tained 402 IHIQPWIITZYER Jirstvle i AILIL STARS 1 l ' f -mfsvs11.1e1eafz , -f - , ,, ..,lf'fYflff'.2Il7Ll5"fAfYfY.. '-:e ':.' , . ,, ., ,Wai-,,n5.,,L, L, . a1L2,'1e2rfe?1sa4Qisz,.sz 'N - .1 fi 1: fs- f l sisszgwv, "g-j iri 1 1 l 4 1 Art Brown, leader of the soccer team 1 Bob DeVies, ground gainter for the 1 Little Rabble 5 l I Mike Casp, captain of the Rabble am leader of defense John Jones, captain of the cross country team and fastest of the distance runners w l Stu Sherard, captain of the basket- ball team and the to scorer in P Army's basketball history Ron Chisholm, set Academy records n puck-stopping Morris Brown, leader of the Army rifle squad Al DeJardin, star and Army baseball Phil Costain, captain of the gym- nastics squad and national champion on the high bar captain of CT- ' .' ,Q II, W. X sfbgl Al Rushatz, captain of the Wres- tling team and big ground-gainer in football 5115, -,KK S Dave Swick, captain and top per- former of the pistol team Don Voss, star of both squash and tennis Barry Thomas, captain of the rec ord-breaking swimming team 403 Ed Sprague, the fastest of the fast osdor on ARMY AWARDS FOOTBALL BASKETBALL SWIMMING Bntzer, C.,B.. ,'h'A'.A' I I Beierschmitt, J. J. King, P. G. Kirsehenbauer, G.W. Kahne. D- . Rnfshatz, A. J Whitehead, W. C. Zmuida, P. T. Blaokgrove, . F. Eolcert, R. Era Efllerson, J. C. Hawkins, W. C. Helm, B. K. Brown, W. R. Campbell, J. N. Carroll,'R. Ci. A Delfries, RQK. . DeVries, R. Grifiith, T. A. Kamm, E. KMLSJ! . 1 Landry, J. R. J Lynn, J. V. Pattarozzi, A. A. Sanders, L. T. Miller, M. D. Seott, A. H. A Culver, T. R5 Heydt, R. M. Kempinski, C. F Kerns, T. C., i. ., . Mr5Millan, HIAA. Nowak, R. A. Paske, R. J. lfterson, R. E. Seliillo, E. .J Vaughan, Waldrop, K. H. FQGWBALLJWWJA Sloan, J. N. S Blackwell, E.B. Conlon, A. Fr Godsey, J. D21 Jones, B. K. LaFond, C. O. Littlefield, J. C. Rizio, L. D. ,,.. A DiNeno, W. T. Flint, C. K. Harlan, M. E. GROSS COUNTRY Jones, J. W. LaRoque, F, R. Thompson, S. E. Zinn, R. L. f Chickedantz, C. E. Cunningham, M. J. Lippemeir, C. M Senecal, J. L. Butler, T. Lingle, R. A. Straub, W. J. All J7S0CCRRJ GJ Brown, AA. S. Cesped, D. R. lrwin. R.,Wo.Q , Kirkegaard, P. J. Morgan, D. W. Samaniego, M. D. Schmidt, J. L. I Candon, J .I D. Entlich, R. W. Kelly, C. P. Kelly, F. Nakashima,fG. N. Stonehouse, G. F. Banovic, D. M. Roberts, T. M. ,Wheeleig W. .JJJ R . WRE STLING Benchoff, D-.,L. Burns, P. J .A Kriesel, M. E. Kuhns, D. H. MeElhose. A. F. Rushatz, A.S. Natvig, Nickle., R. Vanneman, R. G. Vaughan, H.. G. Welker, F. R. Winborn, G. Crane, L. R. , Delardin, A. R. Sherard, S. A Foley, R. F. Loupe, S. M. Rolfe, C. O. ' . Hutchison, C. T. Treado, A. D. . ,.,,,. , GXMNASTICS Costain, P. A. Hendren, E. W. Mooring, L. G. Wallace. K- 1 Williams, M. Rf. Worthington, H. W. Best, S. J. A Brown, W. m Isehinger, M. M. Johnson, D. V. Lengyel, J. W. Mitgehell, R..M,, Balderson, R. Gray, M. J. Lindon, J. R. Thomas. T- N-. XGA JHOCKEYWJ A J' Bilafer, M. F. ' Broshous, C.rR. Chisholm, R. JL. Dobbins, P. J. Harkins, D. V. Symes, A. R. Higgins, R. G.. Hingston, W. E. Stonehouse, G. F. Bnokley, M. J. ' Dooley, T. F. Johnson, G. R. Peterson, R. E. Wheeler, W. R. PISTOL Pendleton, R. A. Shney, R. D. Swick, C. D. Eherts, M. M. Hatfield, H. M. Moakley, G. S. feeirnn Brown, M. E. Dilley, J. H. King, J. H. Porter, J. D. r I ffsQUAsH McQuillen, J. F. Peterson, J. C. Voss, D. J. Hudson, R. B. McQuary, R. J. Silvasy, S. Voss, D. A. Leyerzaph, J. W. Oehrlein, RQV. Finn, B. P. I Thomas, R. B. Childers, S. A. I Kilroy, M. W. Murff, J. D. Herdegan, L. M. Landgraf, W. H. Magruder, R. B. Shanabrough, K. J Shive, D. W. O'Sullivan, K. E. Bliss, S. Riceman, J. P. Bucha, P. W. Stennis, W. H. Clay, A. H. Wildrick, E. W. Merges, G. J. Danylchuk, P. R. Schaltenbrand, R. TRACK Brown, G. L. Garwick, G. G. Gerlseh. W. Gordon, F. A. Jones, J. W. King, P. G. LaRoque, F. R. Mengel, L. L. Seay, J. J. Sprague, H. E. Thompson, S. E. Almaguer, J. A. Ballard, C. T. Banks, E. Dowling, D. E. Lippemeier, G. H. Sarn, J. K. Senecal, J. L. Allen, K. R. -, Career, G. A. s ..e.e . Fiolier, R. K. Lingle, R. A. Plymale, R. E. Schillo, E. C. Straub, W. J. ' WassDeCzege, H. Wright, T. L. Bondshu, A. F. Lau, J. Ahern, J. R. Bentz, G. H. McAniff, F. E. Scharf, R. D. Wilson, W. L. BASE BALL DeJardin, A. R. Eccleston, T. F. McRae, W. D. Schmidt, J. L. Boise, W. M. Boyce, M. J. Dopslaif, G. A. A GOLF m Conlon, A. F. Dwyer, J. R. Woods, J. M. LACROSSE , Broshous, C. R. Biddison, A. M. Butler, L. A. Fuellhart, R. H. Harkins, D. V. . Middaugh, T. R. Mitchell, K. D. TENNIS Culver, T. J Darrell, C. C. Peterson, J. C. Voss, D. J. Cunningham, A. Voss, D. A. Carlson, R. I. TIHIIE ATIHIILIETVIC BOARl The Athletic Board at West Point deserves our deepest admira- tion and gratitude. Appointed by the Superintendent and led by Col. Charles J. Barrett, the board estab- lished all policies concerning sports and controlled all financial transac- tions. We are greatly indebted to the Athletic Board, for Without its in- spiring leadership our intercollegi- ate sports program-so important to each of us - could not have brought the satisfaction and pride it did in the 1961-62 season. Left to rightg Col. John A. Jannarone, Brig. Gen. Richard G. Stilwell, Col. Charles J. Barrett, Col. Elvin R. Heiberg. 405 Col. E. M. Adams. nga' 553, 1 t v9-4 Q, - .1 J it X' W si 4 sfanfgggr Captain Mike Casp and Coach Dale Hall 406 IFUUTIBAILIL Football seasons at West Point are marked by spirit and excitement. In Washington Hall, on the way to class, at football practice -- it is there, and everyone feels it. This spirit has come to be known as the "12th Man." Outside factors may turn against Army, but the "12th Man" is always there, unseen but felt. No one will ever forget the week before the Navy game. We had beaten mighty Penn State, but we had lost to Michigan and, quite unexpectedly, to West Virginia. Furthermore, we had lost to Oklahoma just a week before. Few persons expected to see much of the "12th Man" again, but there he was. He filled the hearts of everyone in gray with a growing awareness of the magnitude and importance of the task ahead. He rocked the walls of the dining hall with cries of "Beat Navy !" and he floated in the crisp night air. He was a living conviction, apparent in the eyes of every one of us. We did not beat Navy - such is often the way of football- and the Corps suiered the greatest of disappointments. Yet that intangible "12th Man" was still there, not so apparent, but still present, watching and wait- ing for his chance to rise again. Well, Coach, what'll it be? Jk3X. f1ii pgs.,-y-A-.M-1-.-pwwl,-,f., Front row: TR Davis CManagerD, Bob Goode, Chris Stanat, Pete Hameister, Jack Reavill, Tom Culver, Bill Whitehead, Mike Casp CCaptainD, Barry Butzer, Bob Fuellhart, George Kirschenbauer, Dale Kuhns, Pete King, Paul Zmuida, Al Rushatz, Bob Coyne CManagerj. Second row: Al Scott, Pete Buckley, Mike Miller, George Pappas, John Dwyer, Joe Black- grove, Curry Vaughn, Cammy Lewis. Ray Paske, Jim Beier- Tliird row: Lee Grasfeder, Bob Reich, Ed Schillo, Dick Heydt, Joe Doolittle, Dick Peterson, Bill Hawkins, Chet Kempinski, Tom Cunningham, Len Kresefski, Bob Metzger, John Eller- son, Rich Stanko. Fourth row: Ted Rodosovich, Dick Nowak, Dick Eckert, Marty Ryan, Ed Lucyk, Dave Ramsay, Pete Meyer, Willie Clark, Jim Kofalt, Tom Kerns, Dick Rhodes, Ken Waldrop, Jim McClure, Denny Seiler. schmitt, Harry McMillan, Paul Stanley, Bill Chescavage. gsm A 'A K, : , 1 ,--f , , 1'r Ia, . 1'-' d"ddi Q :Fi 'A , '- , -- JS i E441 'A' , 2 ' m,,?5' ff':M,,, fi J S 5 W :vf'H- . A A f at if ffl. f K f- , ' - fe 'ft A ?'mfrf9?" 'gi ii if 'A ,g,zf,,1f9 'el-m'.'5 'file fe 5f'2'f P , . Q if J me fiffsarf 11' Y ,ny N-,sx4'V .1 V? Z 'pb f,., K A ,bjf 1 fx, F p 'YA 2, .Tvs-4, bfi' y q w- if-,Q,f,. '41 LI' 1 Y. 'L "ra , na, - GQTN' fix! ,. X , , V , . l J . ' ' ' A NJA? ,- ' . . - ' A ,, . , K We 1? k ,Q , l ' ' V 4- ' ' 5 U ' Q ' M . f 1 ' 'X " 1. Q v ' 'f 1 W5 2, ilu, i lg ' l I wi. i . X K S ,qw J 3 . f .s . V ' x W W . W M H ' , N Wk, Win, K , ,.9.,,,pmq11b-:Of no mwah 1 g,v.,g,, L, . 1 Q . ' V ., a f- , VWWWWW Army on the march, Dick Heydt, "Mr. Automatic," rarely missed 407 ARMY Q4 RIIGI-IIMCDNID 6 fn W .t -. , 1 if - " s 1- - "" 5 f - :Lf -.,. T' ... . . f-H Z.. e V1-'- 1 -A- - H -, nj, the . i . -31.7. v c, Y V .wb vi' . --as .vfetff ryyi , fig M. 5' 1- U Q: gf. Q U , ,y r s- . 'Y Y F6 K ' - . , K, , J ki, ,I 4 . . C, 5 , 5 C g 66:-. r I 5 iixrgl V .7 ' , i' ff . , I .wqkggs , , t.qk,,,,' 3 Hey, where'd he come from? Missile meets target Army opened its 1961 football season at Michie Stadium by meeting the University of Richmond gridiron men. Those of us who had been around Rabble football for a while were gratified by both the fine new team and the strong, enthusiastic spirit displayed by the Corps. During the first quarter of the game, the two teams ap- peared to be sizing each other up, trying to find a weak point to exploit. Army was able to keep the Spiders on the defensive, and the big Rabble was never really hard-pressed. Once when we were forced to kick, Dick Peterson's boot placed the ball on the Richmond two yard line-but they managed to hold off the Army attack this time. Then Al Rushatz got moving behind some superb blocking support, and the offense began to spark. With the combination of Al's runs and Dick Eckert's passes. Army was able to assume full command of the situation, a quick drive set the stage for a field goal by Dick Heydt. Richmond fumbled on the kickoff and once again found itself in trouble. Just a few plays later the Black Knights scored their first TD of the season on a pass by Eckert to Tom Culver. The Spider offense crumbled after the kick and Army was soon deep in Richmond territory again. A pass to John Eller- son brought twenty-four yards and set up another field goal attempt. Although the kick was unsuccessful, Army regained possession of the ball on a Richmond fumble. Dick Peterson, who had done such fine kicking throughout the game, caught a pass and drove the ball to the one yard line. Big George Pappas smashed over the goal line for the six points, and Heydt made good the kick for one more. Jim Beierschmitt began tossing passes to his able receiv- ers, and Pappas was soon back into the end zone for his second TD. But Richmond was not through yet, and in the last few minutes of play, a series of short passes and a run brought the Spiders their only score of the game. Army was in the process of making another drive toward the Richmond goal as the clock ran out. The scoreboard read 24 to 6 as the appreciative Cadets shouted the season's first Long Corps Yell. M onster attack if . is -- ,i gh A, , . X .,p , , , df- wigp at we sg, ax... e..,,.ys M, , , ,K .,, This game was a tribute to the top conditioning of a fine team. The Bostonians were much bigger than the Rabble, but time showed that only Army was able to withstand the hard hitting seen on the field that day. Army never let up its fierce attack which was sparked by expertly executed plays by Dick Eckert, Al Rushatz, and Tom Culver. After a lateral pass and run to BU's twelve yard line, Al began a drive which ended only with our first touchdown. When the Bulldogs put the ball on our two yard line, George Pappas relieved the immediate threat by hammering through the line for ten yards. Two plays later Dick Eckert called an option play, and broke away for another sixty. BU took over but Pappas intercepted a pass and set up the second Army TD. Just before the half ended, the Bull- dogs moved out on a passing spree which paid off in seven points for them. At the beginning of the second half, Pete King and Bob Fuellhart, supported by topnotch blocking, started off another Army offensive. Pappas and Eckert teamed up again, with alternate runs and passes, and placed the ball on the opponent's three yard line. Tom Culver car- ried it across to make the score 20 to 7. After the kick, Boston was unable to move the ball, and Joe Blackgrove took over to demonstrate the Rabble's depth, Together with Paul Stanley and Pappas, he brought in another six points. Dick Heydt's kicks were all good, the line was tough, and the backfield was fast and crafty. Time ran out with Jim Beierschmitt, Tom Cunningham, and Chris Stanat penetrating BU territory. Boston had put up a commendable iight, but the superior spirit and conditioning of the Black Knights gave us a victory of 31 to 7. Here lies a quarterback who failed to get rid of the ball in time 'Scuse me. Oops! So sorry, but Fm going through Ni. -.. BU pass receivers learned to dislike Tom ARMY ill IBQSTON UI 7 409 ARMY 8 MIIGHHIGAN 38 Pete King breaks away M cRea picks up a headache Bat he picks up little yardage Our first real competition came in the shape, size, and reputation of Michigan. With their massive line and surprising speed, the Wolverines were out to get a victory against Army, one of the only two teams which has an overall winning record against them. The Rabble ran into a solid wall as they tried to run plays through the middle and tackle positions. After Army's punt, Michigan showed their strength in tackle slants and power plays by driving deep into Cadet territory. An incompleted pass gave the offense back to Army, but Dick Eckert ran into difficulties with the heavy Wolverine line and fumbled. Michigan fecovered the ball and Raimey scored for them four plays ater. After the kick Tom Cunningham slammed into a rapidly closing hole in the line and was separated from the pigskin, which ended up under several hundred pounds of Michigan line. Their backs carried the ball to our three yard line where they were stopped by Bob Fuellhart, and Michigan had to set- tle for an eleven yard field goal. 410 Soon after the opening of the second half, vicious shoulder blocks set up Michigan's McRae for a 47 yard TD. The score: 17-0. Then Eckert's swing and fiat passes to Tom Culver and Dick Peterson began to work. Ground gains were negligible, but aerials ate up 80 yards and accounted for Army's TD, an eight yard pass to Peterson. Eckert tossed one to John Eller- son, who managed a diving catch worth two more points. Michigan regained the initiative and rolled over for an- other six points. Army relied almost entirely on passes now, but the previous success was not to be repeated. Upon reaching the Wolverine 42 yard line, Eckert passed one too manyg an interception and run left the ball on the Army sixteen. A few plays later the scoreboard read 31-8. Injuries left the Rabble with little threatening force left in the last quarter, and a 36 yard pass, one of the few thrown by Michigan, brought in another seven for the home team. Army's passes had been effective, but the Black Knights had only gained fifteen yards on the ground, due to the tremendous size of the Michigan line. And so, Army took home the season's first defeat. ARMY H0 IPDIENN STATUE 6 The fact that Ar1ny's spirit remained high after the de- feat by Michigan was apparent from the Rabble's performance against Penn State, then rated number one in the East. All of the Black Knights showed poise and coolness in the hot spots of the game, but one person in particular deserves special praise. Joe Blackgrove, whom Coach Dale Hall had shifted to the halfback position, displayed the speed and quick thinking of an All American. In both offense and defense, Army far excelled the Nittany Lions from the start. Dick Eckert completed five passes for five tosses, while superb blocking by the line and the trio of Pete King, Al Rushatz, and Joe Blackgrove brought in 118 yards on the ground. After penalties called the ball back on two TD-achieving plays, Eckert passed to Dick Peterson to bring the ball to the Penn State two yard line. Then Peterson swung out to the left and crossed the goal line for a hard fought six points. Upon regaining possession of the ball, Penn State got rolling-in fact, all the way to our seven yard line. Then George Pappas intercepted a pass in the end zone. Army was forced to kick, but the Lions fumbled and Bill Hawkins recovered for Army on our 45. Tom Culver started the Rabble drive with a 24 yard gain. Behind efficient blocking the Cadet backfield pound- ed to the four. Penn State contained us there, so Dick Heydt kicked a field goal from an almost impossible angle. The score was ten to zero in the fourth quarter and Penn State was in trouble. The Lions hammered through a fierce defense and got a break when Barry Butzer's pass interception was nullified by penalties on both sides. Several plays later the Lions got their only score of the game. The game ended and Coach Hall was soon on the shoulders of his jubilant team. Here was a game to remember, one which was predicted as the turning point in our season. The shift of Blackgrove to halfback had proved to be an inspiration, as he picked up forty yards for Army, and was second only to Pete King in rushing. Other standouts were Tom Culver and Dick Eckert, each with 37 yards. In the de- fense and in the great performance of the line, it would be most difficult to pick out stars-everyone played, in the words of Coach Hall, "an outstanding game." A good play good blocking, and Paske's in the When the going gets tough, count on Pete move-out pliase Blaclcgrofve and McMillan kept Penn State on the ground V The Idaho game brought into being a new concept for Army . . . the "Suicide Squad." This string was to play only on kick offs and punts, areas in which they had been carefully trained. The name came from the fact that most serious in- juries come in kick returns, when players are moving at high speeds. Hence, the Suicide Squad, it was hoped, would cut down on the injuries to first string players. The Iirst quarter started off slower than expected with only nominal gains against the Vandals. Then Al Rushatz car- ried the ball into enemy territory and Dick Eckert passed to John Ellerson to take it to the 31. On a keeper play, Eckert made another 16 yards. Idaho recovered a fumble on their one yard line, but soon had to kick. Eckert then rolled out as if to pass, but decided to keep the ball again, a demonstration of his quick thinking-he ran 30 yards for the TD. In a once-in-a-decade play, the Suicide Squad missed their mark, and Idaho ran the kickoff all the way for a touchdown. With the score now 7-7, the Vandals were fired up enough to hold Army back. However, Army soon crushed a kick attempt and got a safety. After the kick, Al Rushatz got good blocking support and took the ball back to the Idaho 12. After several runs by King and Blackgrove, an Eckert-to-Peterson pass put the ball on the goal line. Rushatz charged through the middle for the score. The Suicide Squad made amends for their earlier mistake by stopping Idaho deep in their own territory. Army took over but was stopped on the 18. With the scoreboard reading 16-7, the half ended. So far the Idaho offense lookedpgood, but the performance of their defense gave signs of what was to come in the next thirty minutes of play. Shortly after Idaho's kick, Eckert passed to Blackgrove, who ran for another TD. From then on, it was Army all the way. On a pitch-out from Eckert, Blackgrove scored again. Then Tom Culver intercepted a Vandal pass and went deep into the Idaho zone. The second string took over and Ray Paske went to work. Between Paske and Culver, Army was soon on the 9. Then, on a fine block by Al Scott, Paske crashed through the center for the TD. The Vandals moved the ball to Army's 26, but there Marty Ryan intercepted a pass and ran 70 yards for still another six points. Another Vandal drive was stopped by Culver, who intercepted a pass and ran into Idaho territory. Chris Stanat, Cunningham, and Stanley moved the ball to the one yard line, and Stanat went over to bring the score to 51-7. Idaho fought back desperately from their "shotgun" line- up, but there was little in their favor. As the game ended, the Rabble were pushing them back toward their goalposts. ARMY Sli HDAIHICO 7 Stanat drives over for another six No gain Dick gets another first down with his keeper play Captain Mike nails one for minus three yards Come back little Sheba! October 28th was a day for upsets throughout the country, and West Point was not an exception to the rule. West Virginia had beaten Pittsburgh, but they had been defeated by two teams which had given us little trouble, Richmond and Boston Uni- versity. Therefore, there was quite an optimistic outlook throughout the Corps. As the game began, however, the Mountaineers showed that they were far from poor, both in their offense and de- fense. Although the first quarter was a stalemate, Army lost more ground than it gained. As the second quarter opened, the Rabble were able to penetrate into West Virginia territory, but Dick Eckert's aerials were not hitting their marks as well as usual, and the backs were running into difficulty with the Mountaineer line. Joe Blackgrove swept the left end for 38 yards, and the picture brightened momentarily. Another pass misfired and West Virginia took over to fight back into Army land. Tom Kerns broke through to stop the Mountaineers on our 37. Time ran out in the first half just as an Army pass was intercepted as it headed toward the West Virginia end zone. Harry McMillan jumped on a kick-off return fumble and set up runs by Al Rushatz and Pete King to the enemy 18 yard line. There the Black Knights were stopped, and Dick Heydt C"Mister Dependablenj was called upon to kick a field goal. The kick was well over thirty yards, yet it sailed through the goalposts with room to spare, and Army led 3-0. West Virginia moved down to the Army 24. Then several of their pass attempts were crushed by fine rushing, and the Rabble took control once more. After a few unsuccessful plays, Dick Peterson went in to kick the ball out of danger. He never had a chance-the snap from center was low, and Dick was forced to fall on the ball on our 13. Here was the one chance the Mountaineers needed. The West Virginia line opened up a hole in Army's right side and sent their high-stepping fullback through for a TD. The pressure of the fourth quarter and a foot injury greatly impeded Dick Eckert's passing, and two possible touch- down passes overshot their marks. The Mountaineer defense gained strength as time ran out, and long gains by fullback Holton impaired Army's chances of a last minute touchdown. Passes continued to miss their targets and the Rabble ended up deep in their own end of the field when time ran out, leaving the score at 7 to 3. ARMY 3 WEST VIIRGINIIA 7 413 ARMY 34 I IETVRUIIT 7 When the University of Detroit Titans came to the gridiron at Michie Stadium, no one had any doubts that this would be a tough game for the Black Knights to win. Detroit's quarterback, Jerry Gross, was the nation's leading passer, with 1,163 yards already to his credit. Army was missing seven regu- lars due to injuries, and first string quarterback Dick Eckert left the game in its early stages when he hurt his ankle. None the less, the big Rabble, led by Jim Beierschmitt, Tom Culver, and Al Rushatz, compensated for their missing teammates by superior drive and spirit. It was Army's game all the way, with Detroit never posing any great threat. Army's first score came the second time that the Rabble got a hold of the ball. After having moved the ball from the Titans' 45 yard line to their one in six plays, five of which were runs by Rushatz, Jim Beierschmitt handed big Al the ball once more for the touchdown. Early in the second period Detroit got a first down on the Cadets' one yard line. When Army took over on the two yard line four running plays later, the Corps went wild, and the Titans looked a bit discouraged. Just before the end of the half, Detroit's Gross crumbled under two Army tacklers, and sustained a broken ankle which sidelined him for the season. It is unlikely, however, that his presence would have greatly altered the out- come of the game, for during the first half he completed only three of sixteen pass attempts. Starting off the second half with a bang, Joe Blackgrove returned the Titans' kickoff 27 yards, A couple plays later, Rushatz picked up 16 more to put the ball on Detroit's 43. Paul Zmuida caught Jim Beierschmitt's pass on the three yard line and dove over the goal carrying a Titan with him. Dick Heydt scored the first of four conversion kicks bringing the score to 13-0. Five minutes later Tom Culver scored on a pitch out from Beierschmitt, The same play by Culver and Beierschmitt brought another six points after Detroit was unable to achieve a first down and had to punt. The Titans did better this time, scoring their only TD on a pass to a fast moving left end who ran 45 yards to the goal. In the final quarter the Black Knights marched 65 yards in 7 plays, cul- minating when Pete King went over the goal line and brought the score to 34-7. As time was running out, it looked as if the Titans might score again. They drove 68 yards to the Army 1, but the Black Knights held again as in the second quarter, and took possession four plays later on the one. The Rabble had beaten the Titans, and shown the Corps how tough they can be when the Army spirit is up. AVS set to mow down two WLOTC Passes don't work against Paul Stanley 3335 Mi' No, AMny's left side is no weaker than its right The William and Mary game was one in which the Army backfield proved that it really had depth and destructive power. Fullbacks Al Rushatz and Ray Paske accounted for most of the Rabble's scoring and ground gains, with Rushatz driving over the goal line three times, and Paske scoring twice. Chris Stanat, another fullback, also carried the ball over the Indians' goal for a big six points. Art fCammyb Lewis got his first big opportunity in this game to show of his Hashy quarterbacking style. In three pass attempts, all of which were completed, he picked up a total of 125 yards and 12 points. The Black Knights started out a little slowly, but gained momentum as time went on. Rushatz broke through the middle of the William and Mary line for Army's first score, and Dick Heydt kicked successfully for the extra point-he completed six out of seven conversion attempts during the course of the afternoon. The Indians, however, tied the score at 7-7 in the first period with a short pass from Army's one yard line into the end zone. During the second quarter Army was temporarily slowed down by the loss of Dick Eckert, first string quarterback, who re-injured his right ankle. Consequently, the Rabble led only by a score of 21 to 7 at the end of the third period. With only ten seconds gone in the last quarter, the Indians' fullback plunged across the Army goal, and William and Mary trailed by only one touchdown. This angered the Cadets, how- ever, and with Cammy Lewis and Jim Beierschmitt alternately in at the quarterback position, the big Rabble picked up four more touchdowns for 27 points. Ken Waldrop, halfback, turned in an outstanding performance on his first appearance of the season during this last period. He carried the ball twenty yards on a punt return, set up a touchdown, and intercepted two Indian passes, both of which eventually led to Army TD's. With only a few minutes remaining in the game, and the ball on our own 45 yard line, Lewis tossed a screen pass to Ray Paske, who ran all the way for his second touchdown of the game. Just to show that halfbacks as well as fullbacks can score, Paul Stanley caught a Lewis pass for a final TD just before the clock ran out, leaving the scoreboard reading 48 to 13. ARMY 4.18 WHILILIIAM AND MARY H3 5 ppa 5 Stanley did his share of catching too Ken Waldrop intercepting a would-be touchdown pass N4 Q -.', pm. John Ellersorl . . . the favorite target of Eckert's bullets Joe and the Rabble ramble toward pay dzrt Oklahoma had made a rather poor showing in each of its games leading up to the Army game in Yankee Stadium. The Black Knights, on the other hand, had won all five of their games in that stadium since 1951. We expected to make this game our sixth straight victory in New York, but Oklahoma's strong defense and running at- tack from a split-T formation stopped the Rabble's attack early in the clash. After Dick Peterson kicked to the Sooners' 13-yard line, Army yielded a first down to a driving Sooner attack. From their 26-yard line, Oklahoma found an opening and with a sneak play McClellan sped '74 yards for a TD. The Rabble were continually thwarted by Oklahoma's fine defense, and in the third quarter the Sooner's took control once more. Helped by a penalty and five first downs, they ad- vanced to Army's one-foot line. After several attempts the Sooners got their second touchdown. With seven minutes remaining in the game, Lewis went in to lead Army to its only score. With passes to Tom Culver, Joe Blackgrove, and Ray Paske, Cammy moved the ball 51 yards to the Sooners' 5-yard line, Blackgrove threw a pass to Paul Zmuida for the TD. Finding Paul in the open again, Lewis duplicated the pass for two more points. Army's last-minute drive was halted by a pass intercep- tion and run to their 17. With the final seconds fiashing away, the Black Knights were forced into a defensive position. ARMY 8 UKILAIHIUMA H4 416 Clutching the ball or the microphone, Tom's got talent 755 'X 'E hw: K? FAME Q 5, S --we bringing with it signs on every- thing that dicZn't move or object to the addition . . . and the rallies in the mess hall . IBIEAT NAWW THE BIG GAME APPROACHED Yes, we were disappointed at the Oklahoma game, but by Monday no one could think of any- thing except HBEAT NAVY!" It was in the air, that volatile entity called spirit, and it was felt. It errupted into continual rallies, in shouts and yells, in the classrooms-no one knew where it had come from, but this spirit was different than before. It came from the hearts of each of us and filtered through the air, reaching others, driving the team on through long hours of practice and growing, ever growing. AND THEN M V Q. was . Q 5 . H, 1 4 Army homes on the naval blockade George was back rolling for Army again nu n A 4 v 4 -.A-., . 4 ' I n oee my ql , 1 q if 1- he tfsgfg f'f5.1iff .5 . f 1 e-we il? -Wfeial, fm! e o,qL - p y .al 'fe , , e , I ,. if, U Q , f,og-fgifllxft, 2 IZ!!! .r v if I 'lzgg-l?h!m,'jiI 1 ,Ji M Uaiy: V W il., QB V VW gg jf 5 M ,3 9 :7?3'5g4 .L :fli' fi55'i X , Qaf' as 3 'E' in is . 'i Q Sig .a. N .. 4, Y' fi' , se' me C' K' Tom snares and strolls for 55 yards Jimmy Squirms for that extra f00t ARMY 7 NAVY na Before a crowd of 101,000, Army moved out to meet Navy for the sixty-second time. The pre-game antics seemed about the same as before and so did the level of spirit-to the spec- tators this was merely another Army-Navy clash, the same as the others. But the crowd did not know what went into this game-the two weeks of rallies, the brigade's march to the practice Held, the constant cry "Beat 'em!", and the spirit . . . above all, the spirit. Navy came out in their new uniforms Cbright orange hel- mets for pass receivers and jerseys with "Beat Army" sten- cilled on the shoulders-novel, but not very effectivej, but they were not new for long. Vicious blocking and frequent power plays soon had both teams looking fourth quarter-worn. Navy kicked to our one yard line and we had our first worrisome moments. Dick Peterson kicked to safety and Harry McMillan 419 stopped a Middie drive with an interception, but the deter- mined Mids hammered back to set up a field goal. After the kickoi the Black Knights lost the ball on an in- terception and Navy took to the air. At our 19 yard line their power ran out and Cammy Lewis replaced Dick Eckert. Navy set up a defense on their 23, just inches too far for Dick Heydt's Held goal attempt. In the third quarter, a big Eckert-to-Culver pass brought 55 yards and set up Rushatz for a gratifying TD. The Middies came back with a frenzied, but successful sortie ending in Army's end zone. In the final quarter, after hard-fought gains on plays led by all three Army quarterbacks, the Rabble lost the ofensive in time for another Middie field goal-with that the game ended and Navy took home its third straight victory, 13 to 7. H50 IPOIJIND IFOUIIBAILIL Coach Eric Tipton and Captain Ronnie Brown Pennsylvania Princeton Rutgers Columbia Navy Cornell In spite of the loss of the first three signal callers from last year's Eastern Championship team, this year's Little Rab- ble gained another successful and satisfying season. The only real disappointment was the unexpected loss to Navy. The leadership of team captain Ron Brown and the out- standing supervision of Coach Eric Tipton combined to mold another winning team. Pennsylvania, Princeton, Rutgers and Columbia all fell before the 150-pounders. Navy came through with a lucky touchdown, but Army came back to win a close one from Cornell, 7 to 6. Their five-win season earned them a second place rating in the East. Army dominated the 1961 All-Eastern Intercollegiate Team by placing three men on the squad, halfback Bob De- Vries, center Skip Campbell and tackle Turk Grifiith. Bob DeVries and Campbell were on last year's All-East team. Five other members of the Little Rabble rounded out this season's All-East squad by making the honorable mention list: end Rus- sell DeVries, tackle John Sloan, quarterback Art Conlon, half- back Jon Lynn, and fullback-captain Ronnie Brown. ARMY OPPOSITION 14 8 48 0 20 6 45 0 7 15 7 6 Skip Campbell, Bob DeVries, and Turk Gritiith starred on the Eastern Intercollegiate All-League 150 Pound Football Team. 1 4, 5, .,,,,,' 1. .-f.. we-iff-A-nal-4n"2?4"'f"""" ' 'fit w..W,,Mw'ifff'ff - . l 4 . fs N f ' K -- uf In gh. . Ronnie gets that extra yard Hey, What happened to my blockers? 420 First row: John Lynn, Art Conlon, Russ DeVries, Turk Griflith, Bill DiNeno, Ron Brown CCaptainD, John Camp- bell, Steve Kott, John Sloan, Bob DeVries, Dewey LaFond. Second row: Bob Carroll, John Landry, Gene Blackwell, Leo Rizio, John Littlefield, Brad Jones, Larry Sanders, Erv Kamm, Mike Harlan, Pat Pattarozzi. Third row: Wil McRae, Rob Vanneman, George Stablein, Dave Latimer, Noel Brown, Leroy Webb. Fourth row: Ben Benjamin, George Fisher, Waldo Freeman, Jack Darrow, Bob McCoy, Bob Tetu, Bob Sloane, Charles Flint, Bill Murdy, Joe God- sey, Don Cotter. Fifth row : Bob Robbins CAsst. Managerj, Dick Storat CManagerD, Parker Cowgill, Mark Galton, Ray Moose, Steve Perryman, Jim Kays CAsst. Managerb, Jim Dickey CAsst. Managerj. Sixth row: Jim Wallace CHead Trainerj, Tom Simmons CAsst. Trainerb, Sgt. Meredith CLine Coachb, Capt. Epling CLine Coachj, Lt. Col. Geaney COICD, Maj. Watters CAsst. OICD, Coach Eric Tipton. 'ii .viii .gwfjj A. g J , e .5e .g , ,13g.4i , . A 'H ' A' .1 if 1' , .wa-Q:v,f't q'W5iff1 1-4.i.g":'q"-91 g 3 C F L , J - " J 3 W, , , ,J tt . t ' -, ,. i i iff xi f . N ,, f A f 7 s f fzH',. f ...Q A , I f,, ,,M I A H: " V"M"' 'fi' f . i ., i ini 'I' M I ,. . . . , 33,2-V I p?7g'3g2ififm"liflT'liilff7', V. 'M l f if ff fvv' ' J A' ' Y . ' 'J' N W w'-jffgwdy 5 X ff. A . - ,, w5,q.,,,.b...2- M an-ft' ' ,I x ' , , I . by r 0 it ,Q-3' 1 - F 1 f J 1 I K V. .,. Q 1 I . h Ah . 1 f . . ,.,,,.., " ,Mg ' .. 7 gf ,g.g,, Nyavi-ff.'. 1.4.14 . - . . .H lug,--' f f. H , . , 7 ,, A ,IW M K VW ,Wo kv , ,, 1 . ,WN V tw ,M,,.5M .,, . . 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A A FW ?f'Wfh"ff'm' 'ga 'hw 'Yaoi' mm milf. i?f..gw..:m,. - Tn.w...'l?i4b',, ' Art, finding no receivers, skirts around right end 42l mow? ,ww J .U ,,.. I gh! .Q. wmwnm., 5 'QYOH I , iw .a f,:, Q. , - ' nr x. .. .. . X, 1. to ,k,, fn .. ,K xwmw. It .. : 2:--,Q-, : 1- ,gg K Q, f wgvbqpg -f.. wi "ATS 'Q m M me X " , 9 g f W-my M ff- ' '-' "P K . . t gg , o W- jf H 1 V5 gn, A fa., W ,, , v ga V 'f fm w, ,, 6 4 Y at in 2' X 4 af V . 1 N' I he 5? 1 Min -- Q . ,, , Q ff .g5 41,w,l,.3g,: H gg-L A :ff W Q .qw-rwg' Q Q1g:4f'5ss1-- W 'I f Ig1wI.s fe.-sf it f' 1' - ' . V AS-gk1,,efmsS2'im":h3csf. .- f5'5f2ff?7Q , P V , - " ,I A A 1-W . t h, , ., . A t Sggigsfiii'-2 - tg-5- , X ,. ' Q ' if -A 5 po 'f f t L- -' A A I -K 4 A A. 'iwstii-lgf"' ' E "" x- S W T E:-gg 'f i"jfl1',sQfS'gvgiV'!"MWl t ff- It takes more than one to stop Jon Szt on htm, Ronnie Through the mzddle for another fzrst down wa KN, , Another pass play doomed to failure ?s Four hands are better than two " f ?,',,yn-Q1Ffj't"""M . -Y v' Q-fc-9-W,-f-" Arrny blasts Navy from the air 42 C si fi' X, is 'A 1 .f A Z T 4 3 X r Vg r,,,Jq,f'i I fi We 3 5 N J g I V A .... f""'x 4. 1. . -I 1 1" A ,-f""M First row: Jerry Stonehouse, Steve Warner, Dick Entlich, Randy Harris, Skip Roberts, Ed Lee. Second row: John Robbins, Frank Kelly, Sam Samaniego, Tom Middaugh, Art Brown CCaptainj, Paul Kirkegaard, Jack Davis, Wayne Wheeler, Fred Coleman. Third row: Art Crowell CManagerD, Coach Joe Palone, Mike Kowalchik, Ron Stei- nig, Bill Kuhns, Ken Eklund, Dirk Schou, Doug'Morgan, Dick Irwin, John Schmidt, John Candon, Mike Moorman CAsst. Managerb, Asst. Coach Cary Cissoudes. Fourth row: Trainer Joe Gieck, Roy Cole, Jim Doherty, Dick Chil- coat, Dan Banovik, George Handy, John Dorland, Colin Kelly, Milt Tratensek, Gerry Nakashima. SOCCER In Coach Palone's opinion the soccer team was stronger than their record indicates. They looked good early in the sea- son, defeating the Coast Guard Academy and Yale. Troubles developed and they lost two overtime games. Navy proved to be the biggest setback by grabbing two goals early in the game, holding the Army offense to a minimum in the second half, and winning the game 3 to 0. Prospects for next year are excellent. Returning Second Classmen Colin Kelly, Dyne Candon, and Gerry Nakashima will provide the strong oifensive unit. The half-back line looks promising with several experienced returnees, including Year- ling Wayne Wheeler, Defensively, Army is depending on the ability of Doug Morgan and Jerry Stonehouse. Other experi- enced men we can count on next year are Dick Shilkou, Dan Banevic, Fred Coleman, Skip Roberts and, of course, high- scoring Frank Kelly. Also, Coach Palone expects a great deal from two promising goalies, Dirk Schou and Ken Eklund. ARMY OPPOSITION Coast Guard Academy 3 0 Yale 2 0 Maryland 3 4 NYS Maritime College 8 0 Brockport 1 2 Rider 3 1 M.I.T. 2 3 Westchester 0 1 Penn State 4 2 Navy O 3 424 Coach Joe Palone and Captain Art Brown 4 "Ace "WF" ,A .3 M Y' iam wwf ggf , , . -w,M,ww,5 W ,,..,k5,, - s 1 a r elly . . . the bane of goalies Rabble defense prepares to stomp wdfwvc I 1 nw NX."- ww M ' , 'in' "x""i " w-on-w-mm www, 425 426 Bill Kuhns out-ncwigates a dry-docked Middle Penetration and exploitation A typical Army pincer movement an-n-M-. 1 V- -H Q-n we-f-M11 -n-MM -1.1.3 f-ff ..-, 1 if Q- J--r H-uv ff- H--f1 --A-uL.ma-rw vw- - aw- w Army fakes one past a faltering defense Up and over, Gerry! 427 Sammy hooks one out CRUSS QUUINTRY Coach Carl Crowell and Captain John Jones 428 Captain John Jones and Bill Straub take a decisive first and second place against N any Armys cross country team, led-both as captain and top runner-by John Jones, began a rough season by winning two triangular meetsg one was with Lemoyne and Providence, the other with St. John's and Manhattan. The next three opponents proved to be faster, but they too were second best to West Point's top collection of lungs, legs and guts. Robin Lingle and Bill Straub were outstanding each time- special credit goes to John Jones, who placed no lower than second in the Hrst seven meets. After a close but disappointing meet with Cornell, the cross country team went to the Heptagonals in New York, where their predecessors had been the champions eleven times since 1944. This year Army placed second, and ten days later they returned to the big city to take a fifth place in the IC4A meet, conducted in a heavy snowstorm. Our runners had had a successful season. When they went to "Crabtown," the Middies turned out in mass. However their cheering section failed to overcome our advantages of high spirit and fine conditioning. The first Army asset was provided by the Corps in its support of the team, the second developed through self-determina- tion, practice, and a push now and then from Coach Carl Crowell. November 25 was a rather dark day for the floundering sailors, who lost by fifteen points. ARMY OPPONENT Providence 17 46 ,Lemoyne 17 83 V.P.I. 15 50 St. John's 15 68 Manhattan 20 49 Syracuse 25 32 N .Y.U. 21 40 Cornell 29 27 Heptagonals 2nd Place IC4A 5th Place Navy 22 37 1' 4, 3 a , s f it if fi' 'E nfiwi, 7: 1 if X uf A mass of legs and lungs Front row: Tom Wright, Ron Zinn, Stan Thompson, Fred LaRoque, John Jones CCaptainj, Gus Gertsch, Bill Straub, Erik Chickedantz, George Lippemeier. Back row: Terry Murphy CManagerj, Mike Soth, Huba Wass De Czege, Bill Connor, Tom Butler, George Hamilton, Mike Cunningham, Robin Lingle, Bob Mayer, Akos Szekely, Jan Senecal, Coach Carl Crowell. l x 1 N , H-1.-nu-uv--an-w -ie- Tom and Bob m the backstretch First row, l to r: Bob Foley fnew Captainl, Chuck Hutchison, Charles Rolfe, Gordon Arbo- gast, Alvin Treado, Frank Lambert, Dick Chilcoat. Second row: Mr. George Hunter fCoachJ, Mr. Ed Pillings 1TrainerJ, Larry Crane, Sylvain Loupe, Dick Eckert, Stu Sher- ard fCaptainJ, Ivan Farris, Al DeJardin, John Easterbrook CManagerl, Lt. Col. W. T. can fOICJ. lllASllilElVBAILIL Coach George Hunter and Captain Stu Sherard Although Army's basketball fortunes did not fare too well this year, the team still provided followers with some real thrills over the course of the season. Naturally, the biggest cause for joy was the heroic comeback victory over Navy, 47-46, with the unheralded Bob Loupe emerging as man of the hour with his winning basket in the last 12 seconds of the game. Another great one was the overtime trimming of Boston College, which came into the Field House sporting a 90 points per game average. However, Captain Stu Sherard and Al DeJardin led a determined attack which brought the 89-83 victory. A 58-56 edging of a strong Fordham team and a 70-63 win over Col- gate stand out as other seasonal high points. The Rabble also came close to de- feating a highly touted St. John's quintet, had they not fallen behind by 20 points in the first half, they probably would have toppled powerful N.Y.U. As for individual stars, one must single out Captain Stu Sherard. When the season was over, he stood alone as the all-time high scorer in Army basketball, with a career total of 1299 points. During his First Class year he scored 476 points for a 22.1 game average. His hustle and ability to take charge on the court were always evident. Also, Al DeJardin played a fine season, working well with Sherard. This guard combination was one of the finest in the East. Also, Yearlings "Hutch" Hutchison and Al Treado came through with several top performances. They helped fill the gap caused by the loss of Bob Richards, and will definitely be mainstays on next year's squad. First Classman Larry Crane constantly hustled, and Second Classman Bob Foley really came into his own in the latter part of the season. And though Stu Sherard's absence will be sorely felt next year, high scoring Plebe Joe Koscuisko gives indica- tions that he may fill Stu's big shoes. 430 and we got it Hofstra had a tall, observant defense We needed this one Army Opponent Princeton 68 72 Lebanon Valley College 79 61 Vanderbilt 52 67 Boston University 57 54 Los Angeles Basketball Classic UCLA 72 86 Washington 52 68 West Virginia 58 73 Rider 73 67 Fordham 58 56 Lehigh 64 59 Boston College 89 83 Williams 72 58 Hofstra 45 57 Manhattan 54 68 Albright 60 55 St. J ohn's 51 57 Colgate 70 63 N. Y. U. 61 69 Amherst 58 75 Penn State 36 49 Navy 47 46 Army zworlfed from the Then Army drove in close Scoring leads were am- ply protected by a fine defense distance, scoring a high percentage and disrupting opponents, defense ss... xv ff- i dd"f' 432 . . . and always there was teamwork f 2' First row, l to T: Neil Mieras, Rusty Broshous, Paul Dobbins CCaptainJ, Albie Symes, Dave Harkins, Ron Chisolm. Second row: Lt. T. H. Harvey CAsst. Coachj, Mike Buckley, Dick Peterson, Warren Battis, Dick Higgins, Jerry Stonehouse, Mr. Jack Riley CCoachJ. Third row: Greg Olson, Wayne Wheeler, Hunter Shotwell, Norm Anderson, Bill Hingston, Gary Johnson. ,, gt, -p , .il:,,,,.i? A W Coach Jaclc Riley and Captain Paul Dobbins N-IIQQIKIEY The 1961-62 Army hockey team brought the most rewarding season ever for Coach Jack Riley since his arrival at West Point in 1950. The hustling sextet set an all-time Army record for the most wins in a single season with 18, including the 3-2 victory over RMC. And at the time of this writing, the team was on the way to the Eastern Playoffs with seven other Eastern teams. Highlights of this fine season were the RMC victory, an amazing 5-2 victory over powerful Boston College, a 4-0 shutout for the first Army vic- tory over Boston University, after 28 previous unsuccessful efforts against the Terriers, a 5-4 win over the Swiss National Hockey Team, a 6-5 victory over Dartmouth, Coach Riley's alma mater, and a 4-1 win over a talented Providence team, avenging a loss to the Friars in the Boston Christmas Tourney a year ago. Though the team had no exceptionally high scorers, it featured balance and a depth of four lines. Coach Riley changed his lineup quite frequently to arrive at this balance, and the success of experiment was obvious. High scorers were Gerry Stonehouse, with 41 points, despite missing over a month of the season with a broken wrist, Tom Dooley, a Yearling with a bright future, 32 points, Bill Hingston, a hustling Second Classman, 26 points, Gary Johnson, a Yearling who scored 2 of Army's 3 goals at RMC, also 26 points, Rusty Broshous, 25 points, and Dick Peterson, also of foot- ball fame, 24 points. Goalie Ron Chisholm was always great fand sometimes fantasticj in the nets, he set an Army record for number of shutouts over three seasons. And Captain Paul Dobbins, along with.Dick Higgins and Wayne Wheeler, handled the defense expertly. With the addition of two Plebes who scored over 80 points apiece this year, Army hockey fortunes should be equally' bright next year. 434 Princeton A. I. C. Norwich Harvard Ohio University Merrimack Boston University Massachusetts St. Nicholas Club Williams Pennsylvania Dartmouth Western Michigan Yale Colgate Providence Hamilton Middlebury Boston College Northeastern New Hampshire Switzerland National Team Brown Royal Military College Army 41141 more than 7,138 Share of puck Stealing Massachusetts defense and goalie found the game was played excluswely in their zone V xg sttss me af-ff In ojjfense or defense, Peterson was always there f-""""-K, -1- Sowy, buddy, this road is closed 4 36 Keeping alert, Army regains control of the puck after an unsuccessful goal-attempt Army takes over Many attacks on Ar1ny's goalie were stopped at the line of contact-the defense 'iw 'Y af ifttl ' K V Vkyyh 1 e c or '-t' t Q V .f',- ,L',,t V rm wtf ' -at Vt ,- 5 sw X M 'UE 1 f, f we My 14' ., ,JYMQ .W ,F 'K W my 'W Q52 at we ee " af X, 3 WRIESTIUING C t x v ii ESS Coach Leroy Alitz and Captain AZ Rushatz ---.-.....-.Q Army wrestling looked good from the start of the 1961-62 season. The Cadets returned from the annual Coast Guard In- vitational tournament bearing the team trophy. Captain Al Rushatz was named the outstanding wrestler, while Denny Benchoff, Mike Natvig, and Buzz Kriesel took the individual titles in their weight classes. Columbia's matmen fell 26 to 3 and after Christmas leave, Army startled Maryland, the Atlantic Coast Conference Champs, with a decisive victory. Yale, too, succumbed to the Cadet onslaught. An always powerful Pitt team handed Army its first defeat, but revenge came the following week when Penn State, a perennial powerhouse, was stopped 21 to 6. Injuries to Rushatz, Kriesel, and Benchoff led to three more defeats at the hands of Lehigh, Syracuse, and Ohio State. Navy, however, felt Army's wrath when she was dumped 20 to 8 in the field house. Al Rushatz and Dale Kuhns Iinished the season undefeated, and Mike Natvig suffered only one loss. With the great depth provided by Floyd Welker, Rob Vanneman, Al McElhose, Gwynn Vaughan, Ray Nickla, and Ed Winborn, Army will definitely be a force to reckon with at the Eastern Champion- ships. Big Al makes it five instead of three wmwmm mmmwmm-meg' 2-aes lm,-A --ft-few,-sW.M-X-V -- f- , :Y ffm- -7w'vrr.,amummnmmmow me-':e,f.s mf- ... ff-t' K M' Y Y. , You ccm't pin him if you can't keep him on the mat Army Opponents Coast Guard Invitational Meet 1st Place 26 Columbia 3 Maryland 17 9 Yale 25 6 Pittsburgh 11 20 Penn State 21 6 Springfield 15 9 Syracuse 12 22 Lehigh , 14 18 Ohio State 11 15 Navy 20 8 Attended EIWA Championships 439 West Point's version of "the Twist Perfect timing + perfect balance Z Mike Natvig 440 First row, Z to r: Dennis Benchoff, Gwynn Vaughan, Alan McElhose, Al Rushatz CCaptainl, Mike Natvig. Second row: Floyd Welker, Ed Winborn, Pete D'Alessan- dro, Rob Vanneman, Glen Wilderman. Third row: Mr. Leroy Alitz CCoachl, Buzz Kriesel, Don Schwartz, Ray Nickla, Dale Kuhns, Doug Alitz, Clint Seward. All right, what am I bid for a slightly used wrestler? df I '.., JH!! Say, you d0n't plan to go dancing tonight do you? Rob Vannevnan stops an attempted take-down Captain Barry Thomas and Coach Jack Ryan Another first and second place for Army butterfliers First row, l to r: Mike Hartley, Dave Little, Jack Dwyer, Alex Hottell, Pete Dannyl- chuk, TedWildrick, Greg Hayward. Second row: Mike Kilroy, Don Shive, Bill Land- graf, Bert Finn, Barry Thomas CCaptainD, Brian McEnany, Dave McLaughlin, Jack Riceman, Ken O'Sullivan. Third row: Mr. Jack Ryan CCoachD, Ted Stroup CPlebe Coachj, Steve Childers, Bolo Magruder, Bill Chandler, Mike Jenks, Gordon Treweek, Don Murff, Larry Herdegen, Dick Carr, Joe Shanabrough, Steve Chap- man, Bob Weber CDiving Coachb. Not Pictured: Bill Stennis. 15 SWIIMMIING West Point set the pace in the backstroke too Lehigh MIT Harvard Williams Columbia Villanova Yale Cornell Dartmouth Springfield Pennsylvania Princeton VMI Navy Colgate Army Opponent 64 30 56 34 28 67 61 34 58 37 57 38 41 54 54 41 56 39 61 34 61 33 42 53 69 26 43 52 53 42 Look at the records - we've never had a finer swimming team than in the 1961-62 season. Every Academy record except one was broken and several swimmers, such as Steve Childers, spent the season breaking and rebreaking their own records. It is difficult to pick out one member of the squad as the most outstanding swimmer, but perhaps the honor should go to Bill Landgraf, who was out in a class by himself in the 100 and 220 yard free-style events. Bill was also on the 400 yard free-style relay teamg he was our top scorer, and he now holds a pool record at Annapolis. Captain Barry Thomas, also a member of the 400 yard free-style relay team, was our top man in the 50 yard free-style event. Larry Herdigen was tops among the backstrokers, and Steve Childers set the pace in the Army's breaststroke competitions. Steve and Bob Magruder were point-gainers in the 200 yard individual medley. An all-around speedster was Joe Shana- brough, top man in the 200 yard butterfly event and frequently seen on relay squads. For distance events fthe 440 yard free- style racel, no one could surpass Bert Finn. Mike Kilroy and Ken O'Sullivan completed the four-member 400 yard free- style relay team and starred at various times in other events, such as the 400 yard medley relay. Army diving brought in valuable points through the performances of Pete Danylchuk and Bill Stennis. 44 Form like this helped bring in an extra eight points 444 ClYMlNASl'llCS Captain Phil Costain and Coach Tom Maloney 1962 marked another victorious season for Army gym- nasts. The season terminated with West Point once again boasting the Eastern Intercollegiate Championship team. Army gymnasts were led by Phil Costain, selected as the Na- tional Champion on the high bar. Close behind Phil in this event was Steve Best, next year's team captain. The long horse, still rings, and free exercise events were brought into the competition this year to replace the rope climb, flying rings, and tumbling. This change seemed to present no particular problem to Army, whose performers soon excelled in all three new events. The top stars in these events were Wilson Worthington, Larry Mooring, Marty Ischinger, Mike Gray, Larry Lindou, Mitch Miller, and Bill Brown. Doug Johnson, Ken Wallace, and Gary Thomas excelled on the side horse and the trio of Ed Hendren, Joe Lengyel, and Bob Balderson brought in numerous points on the parallel bars. Coach Tom Maloney places credit for the victorious season on the shoulders of his team - they, in turn, claim the honors should go to their brilliant coach, who has coached three Olympic squads during his career. As for the Corps, no one will argue with either claim - we are proud of both team and coach. The parallel bars-point-getters for Army this year sn... Massachusetts New York Ath Syracuse Pittsburgh Springfield Penn State Temple Navy E.I.G.L. Phil 'makes it look easy ' Q K I Q it f t5 letic Club Army 65 67 48 57 625 52 57 60 lst Place Opponent 31 29 48 39 332, 44 39 36 ., 1, E? M . v f f ,I 1 45,5 - fy' 5 5 Q X fl W i 5 W fe l it se if ll l l 5 5 5 2 l '7 l K il"'7 l x V iv l l M r K, I no ssr First row, Z to r: Don Tonry CAsst. Coachj, Larry Mooring, Merle Williams, Phil Costain CCaptainD, Willie Worthington, Ken Wallace. Second row: Dave Garvin CManagerD, Joe Lengyel, Marty Ischinger, Doug Johnson, Mike Gray, Steve Stahl, Ralph Mitchell, Jim Lindou, Bill Brown, Mr. Tom Maloney CCoachj. Third row: Bob Balderson, Steve Best Cnew Captainj, Tom Thomas, Art Oxley, Jeff Souther- land, Dave Kirkpatrick, Ed Hendren. 44 First row, l to r: Joe Lake, Al Cunningham, Dick Oehrlein, Ray McQuary, Sam Lam- back, Fletcher Lamkin, Mike Horstman, Ralph Brown, Dave Windom CManagerD. Second row: Capt. O'Sullivan, Lief Nordlie CCoachj, Jim Peterson, Dan Hornbarger, John Leyerzaph, Don Voss, Jim McQuillen CCaptainD, Steve Silvasy, Roland Hud- son, Tom Badger, Rich Carlson, Sgt. Millikan, Capt. Horn. SQUIASIHI Any team member and most sports fans are always prepared for the unexpected. One outstanding example of the unexpect- ed came on March 3, 1962, when the Army squash team romped Navy 6-3 after having been given no chance against them. Navy had accumulated a rather impressive record, while Army r was rated low because of several defeats - perhaps the Mid- i dies were too overconfident, or perhaps Army was especially fired up for this match. Whatever the cause, however, the vic- tory is there to be received with enthusiasm and gratitude from the Corps. In this match our players with the least probable chance proved to be the winners of the deciding matches. Before Navy knew what was happening, the Cadets had run up a 3-0 lead. It was then too late-Navy managed to take three of the remain- ing six matches, but Army grabbed the others. Special credit for the success goes to Don Voss, Jim Peterson, and Banks Hudson. :rw Coach Lief Nordlie and Captain Jim McQuillen Harvard Princeton MIT Williams Pittsburgh Wesleyan Cornell Dartmouth Yale Pennsylvania Trinity Amherst Navy Army Opponent 1 8 1 8 9 0 3 6 6 3 9 0 9 0 4 5 1 8 7 2 8 1 5 4 6 3 446 Coach Gallman and Captain Ed Brown Army Opponent Yale 1422 Providence 1435 Canisius 1435 Penn State 1432 Villanova 1432 Citadel 1427 U.S. Coast Guard Academy 1442 MIT 1439 St. John's 1439 Buffalo 1439 West Virginia 1435 CCNY 1435 Coast Guard Invitational Meet Navy 1428 7th Place 1435 1388 1415 1424 1399 1432 1442 1408 1423 1398 1423 1417 1439 RIHFILIE The high points in the riHe team's season came in the form of revenge against St. John's, CCNY, and the Coast Guard Academy -- the three teams which had ended our 37 game winning streak the year before. These victories made up for several losses this year and brought special satisfaction to the team, which was hampered by the losses of graduating First Classmen last year. Particularly notable was the 1442 high score against the Coast Guard. The top scorers were John King, Morris CEdJ Brown, and J. D. Porter, all First Classmen. Although they will soon graduate, prospects are high for a great season next year. In addition to several high-scoring Second Classmen, a number of Third Class- men and one Plebe will perform for the A-squad. If their scores are comparable to those they turned in this year, Army can be confident of a highly successful season in 1963. First row, Z to rr John Ward, Jim Hannigan, Larry Bramlette, Al Chapman, John King, Al Christensen. Second row: M!Sgt Gallman CCoachD, Mike Wikan, Dick Matteson, Bob Palmer, Steve Soloman, Joe Porter, Frank Mashburn, Morris Brown CCaptainD, Lou Sturbois, John Dilley, Gary Coe, Jim Martin CManagerD, Major Hervey COICD. 447 , . , ' A 3 ll 1 s A .ff g ,- , 1' A ' 41 x . i as - an fa First row, Z to r: Major W. B. Rogers COICD, Lee Pardi CManagerj, Dave Swick CCaptainD, SgtfMaj Joe Benner CCoachD. Second row: Miles Eberts, Warren Normyle, Dick Cole, Harry Harris, Ray Pendleton, Dan Demchuck, Bob Shuey, John Harnisch. Third row: Everett Grimes, Jack Wilson, Kearney Crissrnan, Geif Moak- ley, Art West, Charlie Macchiaroli, Hal Hatfield, Roger Higbee. PIISTUIL Captain Dave Swick and Coach Benner 448 Led by First Classman Dave Swick, the 1961-62 pistol team turned in another outstanding record, losing only one match. Dave Swick, Miles Eberts, Jeff Moakley, and Ray Pendleton were Army's top scorers and prime causes for the victory over Navy and the breaking of the USRA intercollegiate record this year. Several factors indicate to Army's expert pistol coach, Sgt. Maj. Benner, and to us that next year will bring great suc- cesses to the Army pistol squad. Eberts and Moakley will re- turn and the positions left by graduating Swick and Pendleton will be ably filled by members of this season's fine Plebe squad and by top scorers from the Yearling class. Army Opponent U.S. Merchant Marine Academy 1398 1266' Michigan State 1387 1325 Massachusetts 1387 1341 U.S. Coast Guard Academy 1387 1386 MIT 1412 1301 NRA Sectional 1st Place Air Force 1370 1375 Navy 1377 1354 Royal Military Academy 1398 1309 l . 7 I 5 . tif' . 1,5 .im 'V' if - 4- nz. - . I ,kg ye, f ws. , - A gg if s is "'mn......,,,Wmmq fum. ,'!f,-ig? qygbw, Q vgif if"-K Q55 gg as EQ ""'9s..,,7 2 is I, 45 xg 51 Elf? A if ix nw? Special credit goes to Ron Zinn, pictured here Con the rightb at Rome, Italy. Ron was a member of the United States Olympic track and field team as Well as top performer on the Academy track team. Joe Almaguer takes another first in the 100-yard dash 450 N The 1961-62 track team proved to be one of the most powerful in the East. An initial loss to Manhattan by one point served only to drive the team on through a rough season. Cornell, Pittsburgh, and Harvard fell, followed by St. John's and Dartmouth. Then the greatest of vic- tories came when Army's distance men ran circles around the Navy squad and won the meet 55112 to 53M. In the Heptagonals Army surrendered top honors by only 3f10 of a point. In this event, Robin Lingle and Joe Almaguer culminated many hours of practice and many, many miles by taking individual Championships. Army as a team took the one and two mile relay championships. Many records were set during the year by the runners and pole vaulters. Dick Plymale and distance man Billy Straub gained fame through their series of victories. Billy never surrendered first place to anyone except a teammate in dual competition. Joe Almaguer tied the 60-yard dash record in the Heptagonals. In the Weight events combination, Army held the second strongest squad in the East. In short, Army had a great season in indoor track, due both to its depth and to the spirit and determination of its members. Army Opponent Manhattan 54 55 Cornell 71 38 Pittsburgh 82241 261A Harvard 60M 4016 St. J ohn's 82 27 Dartmouth 81 28 Navy 555 535 Heptagonals 2nd Place Up, up, and over for a new Academy record Army wins by a hand 4 51 452 Missouri Harvard Yale Notre Dame Heptagonals Manhattan Quantico Marines Navy TRACIIQ Ul,lllVlDOOR ARMY 54M 6316 51 67 W 4th Place 9615 83 49 OPPONENT 76243 76W 89 72Vz 43Ve 57 91 The competition placed against last spring's track team proved to be tougher than expected. Army had several costly weak spots which brought defeats by such teams as Missouri, Yale and Navy. In spite of outstanding performances-such as team captain Ted Benz's 4110.4 Academy record for the mile, achieved in the Navy meet-the Cadets were forced to finish the season with two wins, a 4th place in the Heptagonals, and five losses. There should be a great deal of, improvement this year, though miler Ted Benz and speedster Fred McAniif will be sorely missed. Coach Carl Crowell discovered Stan Thompson, whom we count on to fill Benz's shoes. Joe Almaguer and Ed Sprague, co-holders of the Academy 100 yard record of 0:09.7, will be standouts this season. Also John Ahern, Heptagonal title-holder, will be back to throw the javelin. John Jones will contribute his valuable share in the grueling two mile run, as will Gerry Garwick, Academy record-holder in the 440 yard event. Yearlings Bill Straub and Ralph Lingle are expected to give Army additional strength in the mile and two mile runs. Most important of all is Gary Brown, the new team cap- tain. Both as pole vault record-holder and as spirit-inspirer, Gary will lead the stronger 1961-62 team to its goal: VIC- TORY, with emphasis on the Navy meet. Alexander the Great sank his naval op- Starl and Ted lead the pack porlents with spears. Now we use jare- lins. 'Wx we-"' Give it up, flying for the birds "'Nav..f X mm' F i G Y. . .apparently Newton was wrong Joe takes a first place in the Heptagonals Front row: Freddy LaRoque, Gene LaBorne, Bob Mc- Carthy, Stacy Bragg, Howie Roberts, Ted Benz, Jim Mc- Ginnis, Gerry Clements, Conwell Leinback. Second row: Mr. Crowell CCoachD, Mr. Trahan CAsst. Coachj, Larry Mengel, George Schein, Clark Ballard, Fred McAnif'f, Gerry Garwick, Ed Hamilton, George Hamilton, Fred Gor- don, Dean Dowling, Pete Buckley, Gus Gertsch, Jim Lau, Tom Gordon CManagerD. Third row: Joe Almaguer, Stan Thompson, Bert McCord, Will Wilson, Jerry Seay, Duane Slater, Bill Hawkins, Denny Leach, Ward Lutz, George Bentz, Art Bondshu. Fourth row: Gary Sausser, Ed Banks, John Jones, Ken Herring, John Ahern, Dick Scharf, Bob Mayer, George Lippemeier, Jan Senecal. Not pictured: Gary Brown CCaptainD, Ed Sprague, Al Shine. he-, Q M1 --... .N 'S "f 'fu-at my , , 1 v Muff' '.X f , 'K X ,Q Coach. Carl Crowell and Captain Al DeJardin Manhattan Swarthmore City College Ithaca N. Y. Yankees St. John Yale Delaware Syracuse Columbia Villanova Brown Princeton Lafayette Cornell Penn Fordham Dartmouth Colgate Rider Navy IBASVEIBNLIL The baseball season started off well with four wins for Army. Coach Tipton's team was looking good-the long, steady practices were obviously paying off. The squad came back from Spring Leave looking even better than before. They had been in Florida playing four games, two with Georgia Tech and two with Miami. Several of the stronger opponents gave us trouble, but team captain Wayne Williams rallied the team. The seven games preceding Navy weekend gave Army six victories and one tie. As the big final game approached, excitement grew throughout the Corps. Then Fate gave Navy a lucky break, and the Middies walked away with a 3-0 win. No team ever put more effort into winning its contests than the 1961 squad. In spite of the disappointing loss to Navy, the Pointers won the third place title in the Eastern League. Roger Zailskas, who had been outstanding throughout his four years at the Academy, played outfield in the All-East game. Optimism is prevalent in this season's team. Tom Ec- cleston, who pitched a superb game against the Middies, is back. Returning also are Bill Boice at third base, John Schmidt at second, and Al Dejarin fthe new team's captain, at short- stop. Several promising Yearlings have moved up to give added strength to the A Squad: Terry Rusnak, Dave Perkins, John Rodgers and Bruce Hulin. Another Spalding ball gets the "bounce test" ARMY vs NAVY I cafrft bear to look Roger Zailslcas and Roger Maris--they have a lot in common The Navy game meant more than usual to Army, In addition to the spirit of Academy rivalry, this game showed the ability of the Cadets to fight on despite any handicaps placed upon them. Winning this game meant a tie for the Eastern Championshipg winning this game meant everything to the team and to the Corps. We were out to show the sports World that even with the loss of our star pitcher, we could still beat the Middies, Bob Kewley, who had been injured in the Colgate game, was replaced by Tom Eccleston. Tom came through brilliantly, holding Navy to three hits, and nobody looked to pitching as the cause for the 3-0 loss suffered that day. Coach Tipton sent the finest-looking team in the league against the Middies, who were led by their southpaw pitcher Davis. Unfortunately, Army's four hits never reached the outfield and were easy marks for Navy fly-shaggers. Army fielding, on the other hand, was marked by errors. Under the strain of the importance of an Army victory, the Cadets couldn't seem to hold on to the ball. Everyone put forth a maxi- mum effort, but the final score read Navy 3, Army 0, and the Midship- men kept us down to a third place position in the Eastern League. W" ' Q, f L, F 5449K fl ' A .Zips ' sf 2 Y You can't hit what you c0m't see, Middie 455 ., . W1 W John looks for weaknesses? in the Yankee pitching N. Y. YANKEES AT WEST POINT On April 14th the New York Yankees came up to West Point for a sortie against the A Squad. The game, 14 to O in favor of the Yankees, provided both enjoyment and relax- ation for the teams. As expected, the game also provided many thrilling moments for the numerous fans present that day. In between Yankee home runs, for instance, Bob Kewley struck out two of the greatest sluggers of them all, Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle! Front row: Bill Siposg Bob Kewleyg John Schmidtg Dan DiCarlog Frank Gibsong Willie Williamsg Manny Scivil- lettog Marty Zaldog Roger Zailskasg Bob Gilliang Dale Shipley CManagerj. Second row: Col. Reederg Mr. Tipton CCoachDg Bill Boiceg Ray LoPrestog Bob Parkerg John Grimshawg Ralph Foxg Larry Craneg Mike Boyleg George l I I is I YUI? X Mickey and admirers Kirchenbauerg Ed Downing CManagerjg Ron Borrello CManagerD 3 Major Ochs and Maj. Wieringa COflicer Rep- resentativesj. Third row: Al DeJardin CCaptainlg Wilt MacRaeg Tom Ecclestong Jim Kaywoodg Jack Shepardg Dick Eckertg Gordon Dopslaifg Terry Hartnett. 'PL l l i This is one rurt they did riot get Against Kewley, most of them just disturbed air molecules And few of them ever got to first base 457 Al with Buddy under control. Coach "Ace" Adams and Captain "Butch" Darrell Q 9'-i A tt . ttt,rf M, ,W 4' fy 4' W M Q 'iz W :Qu 1 RW? L, .,- .., -.,:,fwg,.,,.,,, in A gy :L 51 fr - v,gwt.w- I I , W sg. es, " Sim 'i..: .K 3.1 Wx. A ,.kk . . .Q . 2.35 llnrl fjf 5, My - WL .. ,- 3 -Y .S . 1 -1 if . , ., A . ML, , ,Al K I , if 1 '.:f-wx. X f.: ii? 1, atlt . LA.A ,, ,V,,r. if ,EQ-. N, I K I 7 71, in Q ,1.,,, Wagga. f. f, + M A 3 H ' QQ A . gg m , 7 1 ' , 1 . . we f:.w.wM,,. -K" 9 . , ,- Q, , A K ,.,-,lg , 1, 3, . Z L- ..f:- , iw - ' wa, , ng ' .' ,-ight: V 7- f. :, - my K N5 , ':s.1uizS.v'Usggv - ,. m 1. iw, 5,1l.fa,,gL L, ..f.:,,,,gg.wfxS ' X ,RQ Xiu -MM 1-7' 'gf 2 4' 15-fa I ' ,f"ff2fL..1l.e2i A1 . f nw 5 - x .ft -5 .fl ,,.. .. .JQKQ gg 5-1 1 f f ., 5 ,f 5..,,1 ,.,, 5- S.. 3 Q W ,, 'E f - s "VI . Q94-f lwlafsli 'f A 'ik A - ,S 42.512, J L? ,W 4, 5 1. 3 x.,. x ,, Egg! .,VA L- - 'AVh,, S 4 4 V . A fywl ,5 Smith scooping through 458 ILACROSSIE A first-game loss to Mount Washington did not dampen the prospects of a great lacrosse season. With Corps spirit behind it, the Army team fought its way through a rough schedule, suffered only one more loss, and terminated the fine season with a heartwarming 10-8 victory over the confident Navy squad. This win was embellished by several facts: Navy had been undefeated in 18 games, the Cadets had to cope with the disadvantage of playing on Middie home ground, and Navy was obliged to share her "victory in the bag," the National Collegiate Championship, with the jubilant Cadets. The power of several football veterans made our defense especially formidable. Dick Buckner and Bob Fuellhart caused many an opponent's attack to crumble. Ken Mitchell did a brilliant job as goalie, adding to the strong defensive setup. Army's often-underrated attack team proved to be the rounding-out factor so necessary for victory. Pat Hillier and Rusty Broshous could be counted upon to gain that extra point needed when the going was rough. Then to give added depth to the already strong team, Lady Luck provided us with Sam Wilder and the big scrapper, Ron Hannon. Mt. Washington Club Oxford-Cambridge Yale Rutgers Princeton Hofstra Maryland Syracuse Virginia Baltimore Navy After the Navy game victory several members of the team went on to All-American fame. Dick Buckner and Sam Wilder made the first teamg Pat Hillier and Glen Adams starred on the second. We have well-grounded reasons for high hopes this year. Defense should equal last season's in strength, with the return of Bob Fuellhart and Dick Ryer. Ken Mitchell will be back filling the difiicult position of goalie. Other prospective stars are Al Biddison, Dave Harkins, and two Yearlings, Freddie Sheckells and Bill Annan, who led last year's Plebe team to an admirably successful season. A hard rain created a soggy mess out of the lacrosse field and Army had to play its first game in the Field House. The long hours of practice showed through as Army exchanged first blows with their opponent, the strong Mount Washington team. Pat Hillier displayed the skill which was later to help smash Navy. The tide turned in favor of Mount Washington, but those Who watched the game that day saw the promise of great things to come. ARMY OPPONENT 7 11 12 4 10 5 11 10 7 4 10 2 15 9 9 4 9 10 11 7 10 8 Armgfs typically good defense in action S fl 7 -is-R 1 s mf' 1 Q Mac H owarcl lets loose Scoop through, Rusty f Whois got the ball? 4 ARMY H0 NAVY 8 Army's 10 to 8 upset came as a severe blow to the Middies, for it ended their 18 game winning streak. Also, Navy was gmrced to share the National Collegiate Championship with rmy. The Cadets deserved the victory-they had never looked better. At least that was the consensus of the sports fans who watched the game at Annapolis or on a coast-to-coast television broadcast or who read the coverage in newspapers and maga- zines. Rusty Broshous and Pat Hillier smashed through the Mid- die defense, scoring two goals apiece. A fierce attack was maintained and Navy never fully recovered. But in some minds it was the impenetrable defense of Dick Buckner, Glen Adams and Bob Fuellhart that really won the game. Better body block- ing was never witnessed by Army-Navy fans-Middie attacks faltered and fell apart. Army held the high hand, but the game was not decided until the fourth quarter. At half-time the scoreboard read 2 to'2. Then Navy scored three goals in the unbelievably short time of 51 seconds. The Cadet squad seemed out of the picture until a fiery rally occurred, bringing the score to 8-5 with Army in command once more. A hard-fought fourth quarter ended With the Middies taking a humiliating 8 to 10 defeat. The victory set off an explosive display of the spirit and will to win that makes an Army team great. This feeling throughout the Corps of Cadets, coupled with the expert coach- ing of Jim Adams, had created another much-needed win for an underdog Army team. ,Q rY lk 1' k Q Izfiiiiiiv :Zi he fx, 3 f js, f' .gif s -4, Q i api, ' E951 12: :yr f 1 394 1' ,aa vaif' .f mg? - :Vt fv ggagffbnf gm-, .Ur 'if 9' K 5 ,QSM Y 2 Ji H if f 14 QW ,Ja - 'v:fff5fz,,f, 'fwfjf' Q fp L 4 ,S J S ,aw ,, Y Qin' :Aff ., ig, ,sfgyrvf ff ffff ,ff X655 ,r ..-1321 fa vu" . - Ili .I 1 'I ff ffffikf ffnff' fitffyw' 5 fi? 'fi ' if f,, 15515, ,ff 'fi wi 51?:?fTgf ja? ,, Good Check, Rusty ! Moving in for the kill Front row: Ross Parham CAsst. Coachj g Kim Foxg Dick Bucknerg Andy Bennettg Bruce Cowang Sam Wilderg Ron Hannong Pat Hillierg John Eilsong Glen Adamsg Gene Ben- ner CTrainerD. Second row: Captain Costanzog Dick Ryerg Jack Reavillg Bob Fuelhartg Butch Darrell CCaptainj 3 Al Biddisong Len Butlerg John Ellersong Pete Cobbg Don 462 Smithg Kenny Mitchell. Third row: John Oliver CMan- agerjg Barry Gartrellg Mike Mooreg Tom Culverg Paul Stanleyg Mac Howardg Dave Harkinsg Rusty Broshousg Tom Middaughg Bill Cauthen CManagerJg Mr. Adams CCoachD. wa? A104 6 , 1' W 0 U if , i A ,H 4' gg" A 3' ur Q A . 34 K '27 ,gg 1 3' . -lr I Q. , , Q A all an 1. if AQ, I V 4, M 'Ag in R A an A W My ,K . , as Q? .M 'as , ff ff- Ja, ff 5' 1' -- sd 'M' ' , ' " A " "' 'L A M V ,A Q ' , , H A ay' 1 ' ,-K .ni I WA 3 fi' ,V We ,f,' av 4 1 V , 3, jf ,V A , , W , 'W " - .A , , 3 4 , 0 H M 4 , A, m ,' if ,,.' , A, ,A ' V ,C , A D g24j,, M, 9 f 1 WA, L? K I , V391 I ' Q , V 5, w Q ' as QA M if 5 af 1, ff ' 4' ,A wk' Ijmf 7 ,W ff , , Vg. W, gg, Q, Y L ff , A , ,A " J A 4' My ' fig' ,.. ,,, dy K A 4' 5 ' W' ,Wg ' ,J H , 0 , -I " A' , ' A ,I - 3.- A V , V A -1 " H f ,A 'V 'lf ,, H' 'L 4 5 M A ,Y 'fy Lf 'A h'A, Y AW: Q vf f , A fn, iff 1 0, WNW' ' H' ff 49 ,,, "',, si? 'ff- fu ' .,. i f M L, , A n ' P' 4, , ' Q YA: W 73" fi' f , if A Q f ' , A A ,, 'D , 52k 5 gn f W ' A"", I , ' A: " K ,,,, A .2 A ,, W ' MM. ,lg SL gg H . 7, Q I A ,i M L9 V' I li 7 , f if. f"' 7 'ui LW k V A, I Q W V , .. IAA, ' L, 'Y' I , '.,,, if , , , A 5 A, ... , V H 7 M , , My I , A 7 Q ' , , A " 'L -'45 ' 'M A , Z M 'h-' , -yi5'q 5:,:" "3f " 1 :iv fl: 'H" A' fm 2' an, .,,, wi' fl Q Q! 555 'rw Y M L midi? "SAW, --97' 'gif iy' H M M 2 ' ' f R A. ,A ,,, ':'k. ' y ,-,' A- 4'-f, ' TIENNIIS SEMA X. Coach Lief Nnrdie and Captain Jim Peterson ARMY OPPONENTS Swarthmore 6 3 Wesleyan 8 1 Columbia 8 1 Princeton 0 9 Rider 9 0 Harvard 0 9 Penn 4 5 Yale 1 8 Williams 3 6 Dartmouth 3 6 Seton Hall 9 0 Penn State 9 0 Colgate 2 7 Cornell 2 7 Navy 1 8 Our tennis team ran into some bad luck-small corrections came too late, and the season left Army with 6 victories in 21 games played. There was no serious weakness in the teamg just a few slight improvements could have made all the dif- ference. Team captain Bobby Cain kept morale high, while Don Voss and Jim Peterson kept up Army scores with con- sistent wins over most of the opponents. A 6-for-21 season should demoralize any squad, but among Army netmen the saying is, "work harder!" Last year's de- feats, especially the one to Navy, have had a profound effect on Army-new hope, more work on the small points, and DE- TERMINATION. Four top players-Don Voss, Bobby Cain, Sandy Stewart and Lee Sager-have left the squad, but Jim Peterson fthe new captainj and Didi Voss are back. They will be joined by Dick Oehrleim and John Layerzaph, who were outstanding members of the old Plebe team, Judging by Coach Lief Nordlie's enthusiasm and by the determination of the netmen, 1962 should be a good year for the Army tennis team. Bobby Cain, captain of the 1961 tennis team, instilled a driving spirit in the ranks of Army tennis. The team was forged by tough competition into a team of steel, always play- ing as a group. At practice or in the heat of a rough match with Yale, Harvard or Navy, the Corps could count on one thing: each member of the Army tennis team played at maxi- mum effort at all times. Y s .AN 1 s 464 ae... Ar1ny's best in action Baclchand is half of tennis L 1533152 ' Wit ' is az, su 17 A, W 1 ' 1 f . 5 was ff , I .A AFQQ. 'Ni""iW sum.--we-""""" ik . - :w,gr3' f N.. if -up M fig' -' " V, L, 3 , , 4 , wifeffm-Saweis-537:2415-3f.i-ng,, we f A ,i.y,3?13w -J ..-:wissifesawafa--f:v:r'75:m-: ,1--,sem-q:mw,,.::ee -' e i f fl Whoa, he sure pulled that one ou iw H . ' R e 1,il L,,.1,, N- ,,L,,wi , L ,,,, V - bf I . 1 , kgW,m,W,, A:Wx,, , W.,Q. A E - Q N W e ' A. H7 . " ,. , D f i"--: :'. ""f ZI,'2f1iw ii... , e A K A , ii 4 ' ' ' Sian ' Lf - , eel ,m,v,45- - ' .fi . . iw. .,,. f1lf'4v2iLa:i ' .V fe, I ' ,HW ,,:.f-ii-fi'il'ff": g K 1ass:,,,,k,. L., ,. ,ifgafff.s:f2' ' V ., psi" ' j7f.97'ie' "i , i-,.,-V y . ,mg 1' .Ugg rgggfglzif 7 J W' i 1. :Q-':,.1f1,-,Q 7 ' ,C ek, bi ky Same Oh, to be a flzmlcer! Mr. Nordlie CCoachDg Rich Carlsong Jim McQui11eng Mike Cunninghamg Lou Sillg Jim Peterson CCaptainj g Ray McQuarryg Don Vossg Lee Sagerg Didi Vossg Sandy Stewartg Bob Chelbergg Pete Gleichenhaus CManagerD. 465 Captain John takes a practice swing 466 Coach Walter Browne and Captain John Woods 13 ARMY OPPONENT Swarthmore 6 1 Rutgers 7 0 Manhattan 6 1 Columbia 7 0 Princeton 2 5 Brown 6 1 Dartmouth 5 2 Eastern Collegiates 7th Place Colgate 1 6 Navy 3 4 The 1961 golf team started of with the advantage of four First Classmen, each with vast experience, in the top positions in the squad. When the golfers won their first four games of the season, they boosted the winning streak of the year before to 13 straight games, an Academy record. Princeton snapped the winning series and Navy came through with revenge for the year before, but the season was marked by success and satisfaction. Through thick and thin, the team had been led by team captain Jim Jenz, Dave Teal, Billy Parks, Manly Parks and John Woods Qthis year's captainl. We have lost the first four of these stars to graduation last June. They will be effectively replaced by members of last season's squad and by Yearlings. Of the latter, Lannie Scott and Steve Pembrook stand out in both skill and experience. A rough schedule awaits the team this year, but with the tremendous potential possessed by it and with constant prac- ice, its members should bring in a victory comparable to or even greater than those of its two predecessors. One secret to golf zs a good follow through ox fffi' HWQK '4- 4 Looks like you should be wearing glasses too lINlVRAMlUlRfXILS FALL After a typical summer leave, few of us looked forward to intramurals. Nevertheless some of us got on football or soccer teams and were soon back in shapeg others ended up on golf or tennis teams and . . . well, we enjoyed ourselves anyway. Com- pany F-1 took football more seriously than the rest of us and ended up beating K-2'for the Brigade Championship. In tennis M-1 took top honors after defeating I-I-2, the best the Second Regiment could muster. In apparent continuation of a tradition, the Second Regi- ment came back in the other four events to take the cham- pionships. Company G-2 had the legs and lungs to topple I-1's fast track team, and A-2 outputted H-1 on the golf greens. In a close, exciting soccer game, D-2 edged F-1 out of the cham- pionship. H-2 found a winning combination of runner-swimmer pistol shooters and was able to stop G-1's climb to the top in triathlon. In ending another season of fall intramurals, most of could say one thingfwe were prepared for the PFT and Obstacle Course, two horrors that loomed in the too-near future. Drop something? Here, let me pick it up for you XVINTER Some people claim that the purpose of winter intra- murals is to force hibernating Firsties away from their beloved Brown Boys. Others say their purpose is to keep us all in shape. Then there are those who get gung-ho about it all and practice so much that they get picked up on the Corps Squad list. But whatever the reasons and degrees of motivation were, this year brought a rather strange concept into winter intra- murder-genuine competitive spirit. The teams were all well-trained, skillful, and deter- mined-few remained undefeated in the close compe- titions, but those who ended up with the highest aver- ages in each sport were: BRIGADE CHAMP RUNNER-UP Basketball F-2 B-1 Boxing A-2 I-1 Handball G-1 F-2 Squash B-2 M-1 Volleyball G-1 H-2 Water Polo K-2 L-1 Wrestling H-1 L-2 ..- 7 V- . , 'tug up . i , ,-1,.' V, "hf I V is e , .g,,.' . 1, , ,. f . , ,, 3 . I ,, V Q ,. f - ,i g,5,r,H.'Qqw,4 w, - , "ei A Mi My . U nz Jw ., Q -.flrfw-J, I . Strictly fo? flcmlcers Good blocking! Now if he catches it . . . www fe- W Another relaxing afternoon on the soft mat . ,M A novel but successful intramural lay-up shot Get a goal? I can t even swim! SPRING As the first buds of Spring began to appear, the Corps awakened from Winter hibernation and sought ways to alleviate the pressure caused by seven months of academics. Spring intra- murals were one method used to burn up the newly-found energy, seemingly inherent in the melting of the snows and the ending of Gloom Period. Contests became closer with every game, as each company mustered the best of its men for each event. Extra, unscheduled practices were held by most of the teams. D-1 and A-2 proved to be all-powerful in canoe racing, with A-2 winning the Brigade Championship. Company A-2 was also tops on the lacrosse field, where her team brought in a second Brigade Championship in a rough game with Company C-1. G-1 and K-2 smashed to the top in softballg in the deciding game, G-1 crept ahead to take the championship. I-2 was too much for E-1 to handle in the game for the tennis championship, while K-2's team became the cham- pions of the grueling cross country course after beating I-1's fast squad. The season ended in another victory for the Second Regi- ment, which took championships in four out of five events. Scores were checked and company standings within each regiment were computed. The process was especially diiiicult, since talent seemed well-dispersed among the teams. However, two companies had been in or near the top in all five events. These companies, G-1 and D-2, were presented with the Banker's Trophy. A perfect setup Lessons in the manly art of self-defense that is what O.P.E. calls it 133:25 we W .mp x' M l1'W:ieiii-hd-My-'ve xiYi2?vs-1,3.,3,,, T -Y't'+r'v ff i Yvif ylfwf 9? T Y A KN V W V K WM, M L. .,,. 5. We X Q A Ha ,ww-M335 ,TWH Q .. ,A an s Ass. M06 ' 4 'wmv' M ., M ' , ,M l , "Let's go, men, the winner gets to run it again!" We'll match out for the-next goal, all right? ffimfilafl ' R ""'f f' if .. ff .-ew-iff' ' if 'tg ff , it H ,,,,,, lik,-fg-l. , ' Impulse and momentum . . . just like a physics lesson 1 V 1 Q ,VH ,N ww' M Mag 1 1 ,ff ,.,. f Y 'L - 1 n n 'N '-, YL 0 r' W fb.-X ' f f N N V1 M MY, X E i, ','. I Q!-W M IEW W , wig' -W CS? WM mf Wu fw1w fw fm wmv I W 5 12511: ,, it d w' NN" I 4 eg MA q,f.:j,3',vQ! ' I--, H V, 3 , ,g UAL N, X W Hui PM ' -' A 9 ,T -nm lkiwly-IL ww FA 'J W " i Qmm 'ij4i:1W , W e-L- H '1 1pI5,i3Q5 f ij, ff .aw f x WMI .V ,M l f, fm, f "H ' x ' "tw vi' "i'5:H W ,. u?"f6g:J Tien ,,, MBV:-' 'N AEN V, WMS x f'1f'5f'W'11 NV ? g i fi' X' 'g , QE' 'ffl' V Ymwgl W N W W' 1 Zgjww W I K I Y 1' W 5' I Nf xx. N' cXX 13L, ff' A lwigk JW, v c6wM,W , mm ,+ A my w + 6 A M Wwe X , V , Rx XXXLL My M ' XWQXXXOS xxx J AXA Rm K X f K, 4-fuk N W K Mckwfi f f . Y MW? fx QV f I WMM? "A " MIM N' Mg X K K C J K QAXWQQ Us jx ACTIIWTIIIES N 5 ww .,', ww, ACTIWVITIIIES EDITOR Steve Arnold I ii ,I . I any I I I I I I I I I ll-IIUNUR CUMlMlITlVIElE Col. Collins, Honor Committee advisor, and George Schein, clz.a'L1'man. Honor is a personal thing. The cadet Honor Code requires complete integrity in both Word and deed of all members of the Corps of Cadets and permits no deviation from those standards. This character development is accomplished through the means of the Honor Code and Sys- tem. Since its organization after World War I, the purpose of the Honor Committee has been to perpetuate this high sense of honor Within the Corps. The main responsibility of the Com- mittee lies in instructing the new cadets in the Honor Code and Honor System. Secondly, it guards against the appearance of practices which are inconsistent with the Honor Code and investigates violations of the Code. This honor is one of the most prized possessions of a mem- ber of "The Long Gray Line." Seated, Z to T: Ord, Investigating ofiicerg Schein, chairmang Col. Collins, advisorg Wojcik, vice chairmang Handy, secretary. Standing, Z to r: Menning, Florence, Wallace, Lurker, Spradling, Waggoner, Willis, Hurst, Perdew, Nieuwboer, Ellis, Porter, Stanat, Chrobak, Ramella, Pierce, Meyer, Carlson, Scarsella, Petrolino. igf'W w-,i.'5 553. W' ' 7.1.01 b 4, i ., s--s- ,. ,+gsie.,,f,- f me - -ff" V 1st'r'0w, l to r: Webb, Kirschenbauer, Colonel Gleaszer, Blumhardt, Brown. 2nd row: Fishburn, Ferguson, Hueman, Garvin, Morin, Schott, Kamm, McGarry, Kelly, Storat, Wasaif, Urna, Ellis, Buttolph, Phillips, Hendren, Norwood, Burns, Robbins, Garwick, Byers, Campbell, Brogi, Dennison, Shuey. Joint meeting of the chairmen of the auto- mobile committee. GLASS COMlMlIliVTIElE ll9oQ The 1962 Class Committee has devoted its iinest efforts to the betterment of its class and the Academy. The com- mittee, under the able guidance of Col. R. M. Gleazser, has displayed the spirit of the Class of 1962. At the end of sec- ond class year, the committee obtained expanded First Class Authorizations. The picnic V third class year at Howze field is another example of their energy. First class year brought the enjoyable responsibilities of Automobiles and the First Class Club. The Committee also guided the redecoration of the First Class Club. In every way the 1962 Class Committee demonstrated the right to proudly bear the class motto: '62-can do. 475 The Debate Council and Forum is a con- federation of two major extracurricular ac- tivities and has a membership of more than eight hundred cadets. To communicate proficiently and ef- fectively is the ultimate mission of the coun- cil. The council sends many different cadets to various places to compete. It also sponsors intramural and novice tournaments within the Corps. The ultimate of its activities is the National Debate Tournament which is held annually at West Point. And if elected, I promise . . . DIEIBATIE COUNQIIL AND IFURUIM The Council is designed to widen the cadet's academic and cultural background. Many forums are held, both at West Point and other schools, at which important na- tional problems are discussed. Also various speakers visit the Academy during the year in order to assist in the discussion of the above topics. Special activities are provided for by the Council which enables the mem- bers to visit New York City's operas and Broadway plays. ...S is l - E5 ii President Dean Stanley exponnds on World Relations while partner Ron- stock critiques. Next week yon go against Rentlier and Meany. Pearls of wisdom from a most distinguished group C-2's answer to the snow machine Did you hear the one about . . . SCUISA XIHIII Once again, SCUSA participants gathered at West Point in order to discuss our National Policy and fields of prob- lem areas. Students from all over the United States and Canada met for the thirteenth Student Conference on United States Adairs. The conference consisted of a key- note address, various discussion groups, and a banquet. Mr. James McCloy gave the keynote speech which got the con- ference under way. Hard work and cooperation between the oiiicers and cadets made the conference a smooth running affair. Every- one who attended gained in many respects-new friends, new ideas, a diferent view of problems, and a deep appre- ciation of the diiiiculties in solving policy problems on a national level. TIH TVWWVIEIRS Tom Culy DANQE URQHIIESTRA Rally! Rally ! Rally J Seated, Z to r: Capt. Wubbena, Major Thurman KOjj'icer- in-chargej, Brown fCadet-in-ckargej, Major Schempf KDi'rectorj, Woodman KCadet Directorj, Major Wright, Capt. Weinert. Standing, 1st row, Z to r: Goldberg, Jones Hickey, McCarthy, Daugherty, Sikorski, Snider, Leatham, Burr, Noake, LoPresto, Johnsson fTreasurerj, Teed, Carnes, Finlayson, Harrison, Hilton, Martin, Rucker, Guarino, Ishoy, Ferguson, Ailinger. 2nd row: Dickey, Fel- lows, Brewer, Gideon, Basset fLibrarianj, Boehlke, Dan- iels, Graham, Melanson, Kuzemka fBudget Ojfieerj, Read, Normyle, Moss, Page, Dews, Green, Blair, Little, Roberts, Lang. 3rd row: Thompson, Varnell, Cornell, McNeill, Lough, Thomas, Sanchez, Kelly KSecretaryj, Rogers, Vine- yard, Dexter, Wolz, Bruce KStage Managerj, Davis, Sie- benaler, Nahlik, Overton, Hunneycutt, Basehart, Colburn, Gray, Mackey, Org. .ith row: Wells, Williamson, Oberhill, Baldwin, Allen, Allen, Lundin, Morehead, Lonsberry, Kleb, Kvam, Hubbard, Quist, Schwartz, Workman, Empson, Sil- Vey, Chittenden, Melchiori, Chapman, Swisher, Woods, Spear, Seiwert. Absent Knot shownj: Capt. Bowen, Rowe fAdministratii1e Assistant! Hendren fPublic Information Ojficerj, Wasaff, Smith, Wong, Bothwell, Burke, Myers, Goodnow, Little. DeMaret, Stidham, Hall, Roesler, Kelton, Galloway, Ramsay. Mayors Schempf and Thurman discuss Glee Club Activities with Art Brown. QADIET GILIEIE CLUB This year, the Cadet Glee Club completed its thirty-fourth year of "No fun with- out music . . . no music without fun." Those rehearsals three nights a week in Ken- drick Hall paid off with our finest year ever. Some of our more notable appearances last year included the Perry Como Show, a joint performance of "The Messiah" with Hunter College, and the annual June Week Concert here at West Point. This year's highlights were the Agalea Festival in Norfolk, Va., the National Hall of Fame Banquet, and a joint concert with Hunter College. Our success is largely due to the untiring efforts of our director, Major William H. Shempf of the USMA Band. A note of thanks also goes to our five hard-working ofiicers-in-charge for making this year a success. 479 IPOIINTIER 1961-62 was another busy year for the Pointer, bi-weekly publication of the Corps of Cadets. The staff, composed of over 120 cadets of all classes, somehow managed to meet seventeen deadlines during the year. Mike Grebe served as editor-in-chief. The editorial staff, headed by Denne Swee- ney, was responsible for the editorial content of the mag- azine, and performed all sorts of tasks from writing to photography. The business staif, led by Gary Brown, struggled to keep the magazine out of debt and distributed Pointer calendars, Christmas cards, and other products to the Corps. This year was marked by several changesg the most important were the reorganization of the business staff and the change in supervisory assistance from the De- partment of English to the Tactical Department. Lending invaluable advice throughout the year were Lt. Col. Luther Wallis and Captain Glenn Stout of the Department of English, and Lt. Col. C. E. Spragins and Major Luis Flana- gan of the Department of Tactics. ,ef Mike Grebe and Lt. Col. Spragins discuss ideas for the next issue 1 Rog Hilton--writer-turning out another masterpiece! ?! POINTER STAFF Front row, l to r: Reid, Sweeney, Grebe, Brown, Nuneile. Back row: Wood- man, Hilton, Simcox, Riggs Goode, Kilmartin, Reavil Hroshak, Hyde, Godwin. ff' I 4'--. imlxfivfi- The finished product in the hands of a satisfied customer. Photo stajj' industrionsly printing the "Pointer Pic" 481 'Y X Seated-E. Rowe, C. Hertel, M. Moore, D. Noake, R. Borrello. Standing-A. Scar- sella, D. Logan, D. Knowlton, C. Bennitt, R. Ricks, S. Arnold, B. Martin. IHIUWIHVZIER The 1962 HOWITZER staff endeavored to produce the most outstanding HOWITZER ever published. Our first step was to contact the best printer in the United States. Having done this our problems multiplied. Advertisement cancellations, circulation problems, and editorial deadlines plagued us, but the way finally showed itself clear. Hard work, not too many boondoggles, and strong determination made this HOWITZER staff tick. With Charlie Bernitt taking the pictures, Bernie Martin signing the checks, Ron Borrello selling the ads, Ed Rowe selling the books, and the editorial staffs headed by Dave Noake and Charlie Hertel writing the copy, how could we lose? Dissipation with Mr. Wohl and the after-trip-section-activities con- tributed immensely to the morale, too. The combination makes the 1962 HOWITZER the best ever-in our minds, anyway. 4 Mr. Wohl, printer, and Mike Moore, Edi- tor-in-chief, clear up problem areas with the assistance of Mrs. Wohl, Charlie Her- tel, and Joe Froeschle. Photo .staff Ed Rowels' Czfrculatiort staff at work Another picture argument 45 vfffmwwdl. ' ws,,,,.f" Good music eases the pain-deadline! 3 DIIAIUECIVIIC SOQIHETVY One hundred has long been a magic number for the members of the Long Gray Line. Who can forget the eager anticipation of 100th Nite and the promise that Graduation Day is only three and a butt months ahead! The Dialectic Society has long marked the celebration of 100th Nite Weekend with its yearly production of the satirical and humorous 100th Nite Show. The production has grown far beyond the imagination of those cadets who first put on the mess hall skits near the turn ofthe century. This year's show, "Once A Knight . . . , " was one of the best in the memories of both cadets and oflicers who saw it and shared the pleasure of this organization which takes two long months of building sets, learning lines, and rehears- ing to make the show possible. The Dialectic Society brought some of America's most popular entertainers to West Point in the personages of the Brothers Four, Johnny Mathis, Count Basie, and others. Where else in America could collegians get such variety and quality of entertainment at the low cost that Howie Prince, President of Dialectic Society. the Dialectic Society made possible? It was indeed a good year for the Dialectic Society as it reached production qual- ity never before attained. xiii is Playwright Anderson making preparations for the music. Seated - Heigl, Vice Presidentg Prince, Pres.g Hewette, Sec. Standing - Sanders, Special Programsg Franks, Production man- agerg Galanti, Custodiang Lee, Advertising. SPIECIIAIL IP5RUGRAlVllS Qtlhflllvllllllllltlt Count Basie Brothers Four Major Sebesta watches a couple of his D.J.'s at 15' This is Radio Free West Point. work. lil ltl Progress, refinement, and expansion have been the keynotes of the operation of Radio Station KDET this past year. Under the able leadership of this year's staff KDET has in- creased its listening audience by almost 10005 over the previous year, primarily because of greater emphasis upon quality in regular programming, and significant steps forward in provid- ing "the best in music, news, and sports" to the Corps. Musicwise, KDET has not only provided all-day programming through its new FM tuner and subsequent affiliation with Dan Arnold at WPAH, but has also initiated a true "USMA Top Ten" by seeking out, and tabulating the musical tastes of the Corps. News, fresh from UPA and AP, has been brought to the Corps through WPAH, and through tuner by such stations as WLNA, WQXR, WPAT, and WCBS, thus giving the smallest transistor the range of our powerful receiver. As for sports, we feel that no college radio station in the coun- try can claim a remote sports coverage surpassing KDET's coverage of Army sports. KDET has been privileged to bring you all home football and basketball games, highlighted by such broadcasts as the Army-Navy soccer game from Annapolis. With this fine past year as a stepping-stone, KDET intends to expand even further next year, and to prove itself as a service, as well as an entertainment organization. Stay tuned for the Best in Music, News, and Sports. 485 IFRIENCIH ILANGUIAGIE CILUIIB The function of the French Club is to further the knowledge of interested cadets in the "language of the diplomats." The club sponsors many and varied activities to keep things interesting in the club. These activities include such things as trips to New York City, debates, movies and other interesting meetings during the year. OIC Captain Malonclie and club members Jenks, DeGrafj', anal Kelly parlay Francais. 'N'-Q X 'Im' +15 SIPANIISIHI ILANGUIAGE CILUIIB The Spanish Club's activities included a picnic in the fall, films on Spain and an interesting trip to New York City. All these things helped to make the entire year a success for the club. Los H amos GlERMlAN VLANGUIAGIE GLUIB The primary function of the German Club is to help interested cadets keep proficient in the German language. Different activities are sponsored by the club and these include an educational trip to New York City, a meeting with a similar club from a girl's school and guest speakers who give an insight into the problems and culture of the German society. The German Club is an excellent opportunity to advance one's knowledge in the language. German club officers having an informal "Gesprach" with OIC Major Wildrick. WWW Mffmr K , W. L RUISSIIAN ILPXNGUIAGIE Cllillltl The Russian language is a very diilicult one to learn and the Club is the best opportunity an interested Cadet has in advancing his knowledge in it and to learn about the Russian society and way of life. The Club sponsors trips to Russian performances, guest speakers, movies and other activities to further the Cadets' interest and knowledge in the Russian language. "How's the plot ?" MlAll'IHllEMlPllVllCS IFURUM The Mathematics Forum was created to provide in- terested Cadets an opportunity to further themselves in learning more about the subject of Mathematics. A number of lectures are given by both instructors and Cadets covering subjects not covered in the class- room. The Forum also takes an educational trip to see the practical applications of mathematics in in- dustry and science. Extracurricular black magic VPORTUGUIIESIE ILANCGUIAQIE CILUIB The main purpose of the Portuguese Language Club is to keep interested Cadets informed in the so- ciety and way of life in Portuguese speaking coun- tries. Lectures are presented by oilicers and Cadets who have visited some of these countries concerning the people and their personal experiences in these countries. Also movies are shown, trips are made and a picnic is enjoyed by all during the course of the year. President Rohrbacher esta lendado publicacao do Brasil. AUH HU CLUB The main function of the Audio Club at present is to help interested Cadets in building their own Hi- Fi sets, supplying tool kits and giving instruction through classes and discussions. The big push toward Hi-Fidelity equipment has made the Audio Club a very important one in the hearts of many Cadets be- cause of the help which it has given them. Advice and instruction are always given by the Audio Club so as to create a greater interest in its field. Study light-soft music RADIIO QILUIIB The Cadet Radio Club offers facilities for amateur radio communication as well as for construction and experimentation in the field of electronics. All types of modern equipment are used by the club which is capable of covering all amateur bands from 80 through 10 meters. The Club, in conjunction with Civil Defense and other individual contacts around the world, sends out its own radio call. By the way . . .H01v's your "juice" grade? 488 ASTRONCCDMY CILUIB The Astronomy Club presented the Cadets with an opportunity to go exploring into the "New Frontier" which man seems to be plunging into deeply. The Club sponsored activities to help maintain this goal. Such activities were lectures, a trip to a Planetarium, telescope building and other interesting things. The Astronomy Club also presented us with a Hne 5-1f4" reflecting telescope for observations. Theu, she said, "Jusf zclzazf were you Zookiug at through. that telescope?" RUCNET CILUIB1 The field of rocketry is a very interesting and the Rocket Society's function is to sponsor any inter- ested cadet who desires increased knowledge in this field. Mathematics, physics, chemistry, mechanics and ordnance are required prerequisites for the study of rocketry. Aid from the academic depart- ments, an 'annual trip to Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, and the actual building of rockets have increased the interest in the field of rocketry by cadets who Wish to pursue this field during their careers in the service. Major Sherman, OIC, and his assistant, Captain Vanston, with Club Officers Wasajf and Rishel. W gy V O 'VY XT f -57 t ' 'FWWWWSL' 'FW' it Q ART CLUB The Cadet Art Club exists to provide artistically- inclined members of the Corps with an opportunity to exercise their skills. It provides facilities for paint- ing, sculpture, and many other types of art to en- courage the budding Van Gogh, or the already blooming Rembrandt. Members of the club are given an opportunity to see and discuss the Works of other artists through a series of trips to art institutions. To let the rest of the Corps see its creations, the club holds exhibits from time to time during the academic year. Under the supervision of Major Nutting and Club-President Ronald Lane, the Cadet Art Club has undertaken an interesting and rewarding program this year. President Ron Lane and George Telenko admire their artistic works. IBRIIDCGIE CLUB When a young ofiicer embarks on an Army career, he always finds a large circle of bridge players among his fellow ofiicers. The Bridge Club of the Corps offers a fine opportunity for cadets to learn the game before getting their bars. The Club spon- sors duplicate sessions as Well as participation in in- tercollegiate and regional competition such as the Na- tional Tournaments. At a nickel a point, we can't afford to go set. 489 CAMERA CLUB All shutterbugs which are interested in developing their picture-taking techniques as well as learning how to develop their own photographs, may well find a place in the Camera Club. Providing individual in- struction for novices, the Club sponsors the Pho- tography Contest each year and takes an educational trip to New York City. X-ray machine? Drill press? Bob claims it's a photo enlarger. 'Q-..., 3 l Tb X X I S l. 5 els: 4 Saw' i it 4 I I i lsslsls 3 4 1 CH-NESS CILUHB Chess is a game of concentration and helps to de- velop a cadet's ability to think. For this reason it has always maintained a strong membership. While being an intricate game it is an enjoyable way to spend leisure time. The more proficient players find oppor- tunities for competition with excellent chess players both at home and away matches. Concentrate half this hard on academics and you'll wear stars. MOI IEIL RAIIILRUAD CLUB The Model Railroad Club this year has enjoyed a much larger membership than it has in the past. In anticipation of a spacious new location in Building 720, they purchased several hundred dollars worth of new equipment and are planning an immense new layout. For those interested in railroading, the club provides facilities for building new equipment, wir- ing circuits, and designinga layouts. Included in the schedule for the academic year is a club trip to the New York Central Railroad facility, Where cadets see full-scale the objects of their work. The club is di- rected by Club President Jim Cornfoot and OIC Major Flanagan. Engineers at work.'?! if is 'Qgfng,L- X ii fif' RHIFIUE CILUIB This year the Cadet Rifle Club, under the leader- ship of Club President John King and coached by Master Sergeant Gallman, has undertaken a schedule more active than ever. Last year the 30-caliber team won the First Army Rifle Championship, and they plan to do it again this year for the third consecutive time. Their schedule also includes competitions with the Hudson-Delaware Riiie League, and, as a high- light of the season, a try at the National Champion- ship to be held at Camp Perry. Bearing in mind their performance in the past, we can certainly expect an excellent showing. Bob Phillips, Vice President, points out the differences between the M-14 and the M-1. SKIEIETI' CILUIIB Here is a club designed to sharpen your shooting eye and build an interest in competition. It averaged three away and seven home matches this year. The trips took the members to various gun clubs through- out New England. Anyone who goes to the skeet range when people are firing can be assured of seeing some fast shooting. Three easy lessons on how to spend an enjoyable afternoon. ' in-nuts...-quad'-Ili V -V 42113 . 1 MUIDIEIL AIIRIPILANIE GLUHB In its new location in Building 720, the Cadet Model Airplane Club provides the facilities and materials for the construction of both model airplanes and boats. Cadets are given the opportunity to design, build, and fly their models. They work with both control-line and free flight models, and for those whose abilities make it possible, they build radio-con- trolled models. This year they are trying to promote competition with other clubs. Dick Fellows, President, looks over the production of a new model. ,..,. awry -,,.. IPIISTCDIL CCILUHB Owing to the large number of members, the Pistol Club is able to maintain over 110 weapons in its arsenal, these including cal. 22, cal. 38, and cal. 45 pistols. Shooting indoors in the winter and moving outdoors for spring and fall, its members have been able to fire against the most skillful opponents and win. Many of the members have qualified with the 45 automatic. Activities during the academic year in- clude competitions against the New York City Police, the F.B.I., and several teams from New Haven, Con- necticut, and a highlight of the year is the Invita- tional Tournament, ofticiated by Master Sergeant Brenner, in which over one hundred of the finest shooters in the East participate. Captain Manjeot fOICj, Ray Pendelton, Club President, and Coach MfSgt Benner with other rneinbers ofthe club. ll-IIANI IBAILIL Cllkllli The Handball club sponsors a wide range of activi- ties designed to bolster interest in handball. Matches, both at home and in New York, provide top competi- tion for skilled members. Other activities include the Eastern Intercollegiate Invitational Handball Tour- nament, an inter-Corps tournament, and exhibitions by National championship players. This vigorous program is a definite factor in the increasing popu- larity of handball at West Point. Big Barry playing one off the back wall. 492 CDUITI OCDR SIPCIRIVSMWN GLUE Anyone who has a yen to get next to nature should belong to the Outdoor Sportsmen Club. The Club operates in four types of activity: hunting, fishing, archery and woodsmanship. The main event of the year is the Eastern Collegiate Woodsman's contest held in the spring. From grouse hunting to cabin building, there is plenty of activity for all members. Club President, Toon Kling, inspecting the club's fishing gear. sig' 'fi ,ai 141452, , . l V.., .K i ,. ' Q .4 1 M. 12' ,, , it 5 c, i o ft... : Q. I f" '-H-'W'----f Ski K , .. --, M is af 5 cp WATIERIRCDILU CILUIIRQ One of the most popular non-corps squad athletic teams is the Water Polo Team. This year, its goal is to gain back the title of Eastern Collegiate Cham- pion which was lost last year. Competing against the varsity teams of other colleges and athletic clubs, it intends to start a new winning streak. This should be possible with the list of promising players for the 1962 season. Come an inch closer and ZOT- right in the kisser! IFIENCIINC QLUIIR The fencing club promotes interest in the graceful, exacting art of fencing. In addition to providing a team for intercollegiate competition in fencing, the club provides competent fencing instruction for its members. Hard zvork pays off in the competition. RUIGIBQY CILUIB The Rugby Club is openly enthusiastic over the merits of the growing sport of Rugby. Cadets inter- ested in developing their ability as Rugby players have excellent opportunity to do so as members of the Rugby Club. The club sponsors not only a spirited team but also instruction in the rudiments of this colorful, vigorous game. Upon the fields of friendly strife . . . 493 IPARACIHIUITIE GLUE The Parachute Club takes its place as one of the most progressive and expanding activities of the Corps of Cadets. This year marked expansion in both facilities and membership are indicative of the club's claim to being a force of the future. Activities include outside competition in this infant sport with particular emphasis on captur- ing Gavin's Gavel, symbolic of- the nation's outstanding collegiate team. Under the direction of Captain Bell, officer-in-charge, the club hopes to continue to develop the proficiency of all its members in this new sport. All The Way For those cadets bearing an interest IH skiing, the Ski Club pro- vides a Welcome antidote tc the poisons of "Gloom Period." From De- cember to March, as the benevolent gods of winter spread layer after layer of snow over the slopes of West Point, members of the Ski Club can be seen plowing over the slaloms with unbelievable speed. One particularly important faction is the Ski Patrol, a group of club- members who patrol the slopes during the winter season, responsible for the safety and Welfare of skiers. Without the capable leadership of Lt. Col. Moffett and Club President Lee Taylor, this most successful Winter season could not have been possible. West Point-N ew Englamfs winter playground XRQHZ Yi JJLUH O Cltltllltl One of the most successful of the newer organiza- tions in the Corps is the Cadet Judo Club. It was organized under Captain Dean to stimulate student interest in the art of Judo and to give Cadets an op- portunity to learn and practice the art. There are about thirty members, including two who hold the black belt in Judo. Captain Dean holds the black belt in both Judo and Karate. The club holds a club competition each week, and this year held one promo- tional contest and a demonstration of Judo and Kar- ate for the Corps. There are tentative meets scheduled with MIT, the Air Force Academy and other New York schools. One, Two, and then Rock . . . 49 SAIIILIING CLUB The Sailing Club offers cadets a pleasant Way to spend some free time. This sport can be enjoyed throughout the entire year and the club furnishes and maintains twelve Tech dinghies for cadets. These are used not only at West Point, but at Camp Buck- ner also. If a cadet has never sailed before, he can get excellent instruction from qualified instructors. As a member of the Middle Atlantic Intercollegiate Sail- ing Association, the Club competes in regattas against other service academies, Ivy League schools and assorted Long Island Sound and Hudson River yacht clubs. Getting ready for an afternoon of pleasure SUNDAY SCIHIUUIL TIEACHIIERS The responsibility of the one hundred and forty Cadets connected with the West Point Sunday School was to provide religious training for the Protestant children on Post. Approximately five hundred chil- dren between the ages of three and seventeen at- tended the school, In order to adequately instruct such a large age group the Sunday School was broken into six departments. The departments and their sup- erintendents Were: Nursery-Robert Tarbet, L-I, Kindergarten-Samuel Steele, C-2. Primary-John Selby, L-I, Intermediate-John Wagner, L-I, Junior ' v A, I QQ NT , sin' M' uve: V- . Q -Arthur Webb, E-I, Senior-William Daugherty B-2. The general superintendent, Alan Biddison, L-2, was assisted by Curry Vaughn, B-1, Roger Stribling, H-2, and Larry Bramlette, A-1. Dr. Theodore C. Speers and Chaplain James D. Ford played an in- tegral part in the guidance of the Sunday School Program. Further assistance was provided by the Oiicer Representative, Major P. T. Boerger and his assistants, Lt. Col. R. H. Hammond, Major E. O. Post, and Major J. L. Fant, III. Sunday school teachers-Cadet Chapel. 'QP' V L -an- 'F 1.8 UI-lilElERILlE!ll lERS The Army cheerleaders accept the responsibility of directing the fighting spirit of the Corps of Cadets. Through their diligent efforts, the Rabble receives the add- ed drive Which has characterized Army athletics. The hours of preparation spent by the cheerleaders is reiiected in the spirit and enthusiasm shown by the Corps at both games and rallies. The Spirit of the Corps is the force which binds the Corps together and gives a memorable worthiness to our years here. The Rabble can ex- pect ever increasing support through the service of the cheerleaders. The Army mules, mascots of the stubborn Army team, are a colorful part of the pageantry of Army football. The lively antics and skillful riding of the mule riders are very much a factor in the overall effect of a football weekend. Whether fraterniz- ing with enemy cheerleaders or outshining the mangy goats of Navy, the mules and their riders can be counted upon to present a good show. GO ARMY Z' AND MUILIE RIIDERS THE BLACK KNIGHT 497 CVENTURY CILUIIB To indulge in any activity in excess has both physical and psychological ramifications which are undesirable. Never the less, this group of hard- core veterans demonstrated their marching talents Cufarmsb with such regularity that recognition of this achievement seemed appropriate. The 100 hour men will long be remembered for their tenacious courage against the T.D. Spizzerinctum! Q., i Ill " Q i eq I Captain O'Hair KOICQ giving a few pointers. the First Army Track and Triathlon Championship. 498 Triathlon is a combination of three sports, running, swimming, and pistol shooting. The Triathlon Club pro- motes the development of proficiency in this sport requir- ing wide skills. In addition to intercollegiate competition, the Triathlon Club hopes to continue as the best team in Assistant Editor Steve Arnold and Editor-in-chie f Bill K inard planning next year's Bugle Notes F57-Q ads-H IBUGILIE NOTES The BUGLE NOTES, for 54 years a Corps publication, is undergoing a major revision this year. Also called the "Plebe Bible," because it is one of his iirst ex- posures to the Military Academy, it presents to the entering Fourth Classman a composite picture of the various traditions and customs of West Point. Revising, under the editorial staiii, is to be in keeping with the changes in the Academic and Tactical training programs-to provide a current, handy pocket reference for both cadet and graduate. Circulation manager looking over last year's publication Tony Leatharn fadoertisernentj and Bob DeVries Kcirculationj Len Butler and his business staff with their staffs 499 QOMMIllVlVlEIES IPUIBILIIC llNlFCODRMATllON DIETAHIL The Public Relations Council attempts to give to the general public a broader knowledge of the Military Acad- emy through a Wide series of speaking engagements. Cadet speakers, upon request, appear before many groups, in- cluding high school assemblies, American Legion Boy,s States, Alumni groups, Rotaries and other service groups. Cadets are selected for various engagements on a basis of speaking ability as well as military and academic per- formance. The purpose of this program is to arouse a de- sire among young men to enter the Military Academy as a result of an increased understanding of the meaning of West Point. IPUBILIIC RIEILATHIONS QOUINGIIL The Public Information Detail has the task of assisting the Information Officer in the widespread dissemination of information concerning the Corps of Cadets. This is a complex task considering the wide range of athletic and academic activities and events here at West Point. One reward for the work which the PIO staf does is a trip to Washington, D. C. for first class members. This trip dem- onstrates the parallel activities of the Public Information Oflice Within the Army. Throughout the range of cadet activities of the Academy, the PIO detail publicizes the achievements of note of the Corps of Cadets. IHICCDIP QOMMIIWVTIEIE The activities of the Hop Committees produce many of the brighter moments of life at West Point. The social activities and the hops in particular, sponsored by the Hop Committees are remembered as being an integral part of a cadet's experience. Through the class Hop Committees, social events are distributed throughout the entire year. Graduation, Ring weekend, class trips, Camp Buckner, Plebe Christmas, football Weekends, and academic Week- ends are marked by the activities of the Hop Committees. The training in social poise received as a member of the Hop Committee serves the cadet well throughout his sub- sequent career. RING AND CCRIEST CUMMIHI-TIEIE The reputation and tradition maintained by each class are symbolized by the class crest and rings. Throughout its four years, the Ring and Crest Committee of the Class of 1962 worked earnestly to achieve this end. It began during Plebe Year when the committee created the design for the class crest. Everyone saw the first product in the form of "A" pins which arrived at the end of that year. During Yearling Year We voted on our ring. Second Class Year saw the class being fitted for and ordering the rings. Returning to the Corps at the beginning of First Class Year, the committee was busy Working on the ring pres- entation ceremony and banquet. Finally, the day arrived. On 9 September 1961 We received our rings, the distinctive marks of West Pointers. 19 QAI IET CIHVWIEIL The Cadet Chapel program divides naturally into two parts- the Sunday programs at the Chapel and the week-day program "down the hill" in the barracks area. There are two main services each Sunday morning for the Cadets. The first is at 0850 and the second at 1100. At the latter the Cadet Choir of approximately 150 voices sings under the direction of Mr. John Davis, Organist and Choirmaster. Twice a month Holy Communion is administered at the 0850 service. Denominational groups hold voluntary services of Holy Com- munion monthly in St. Martin's Chapel in the crypt of the main Chapel. Guest preachers are invited on the average of once a month. During the week, morning devotions are held in Mahan Hall at 0630 daily. The congregation of Cadets numbers about 150. Holy Communion is celebrated each Thursday morning. OHTCGFS from the Post speak Wednesday mornings. The Chaplains con- duct the services Tuesdays and Thursdays. Dr. Theodore C. Speers Mr. Davis and Major Lee Interior of the Cadet Chapel Msgr. Moore Father McCormick 4 IX. -Qi. M, :-cf' i www.- f,f l T 4 . f.s ', ,. l,i,, JA 1 'X ,. Af in ,A ,,, .-fi M. ',."7'iT?WT75wa ff 1:3 . H M ,yu "' ,I ,W -.. - .5 .. f , - ff' The newly remodeled Catholic Chapel KAW!-IHlCllLllC ClHlAllllEIL The Catholic Chapel of the Most Holy Trinity, designed by Heins and La Forge, was consecrated in 1900. It is a copy of the St. Ethelreda Car- thusian Abbey in County Essex, England. In 1959, after plans prepared by Alfred Reinhart, a new annex was added and Cardinal Spellman re- dedicated the Chapel. Subscriptions from the cadets and graduates fi- nanced this new addition. The Chapel now has a seating capacity of 550 and is attended by post personnel as well as cadets. The Chapel and the "padres" exert a guiding influence on our lives from the time we entered as plebes through and beyond graduation. Msgr. Moore and Fr. McCormick have worked ceaselessly to help us de- velop ourselves into sound, mature, Catholic adults. We have had oppor- tunities to practice our Faith through the Choir, the Acolytes and the Cardinal Newman Forum. The Catholic Chapel squad is growing larger every year, and it is putting the enlarged chapel to good use. Cadets will long remember the trips to St. Patrick's Cathedral, choir practice, aco- lyte rehearsals, retreats at Maryknoll, Holy Week and Lenten services, and Baccalaureate Sunday, not to mention Daily Mass and Sunday Mass. Holy Trinity Chapel will always hold a special place in our lives, wher- ever we go and whatever we do. We will always remember the keen wit of Msgr. Moore and the ready smile of Fr. McCormick as symbols of the warm and lasting friendship that was born at the Chapel, a friendship whose bonds cannot be weak- ened by the passing years. The Catholic Chapel has truly been successful in giving us the tools to defend and practice our Faith effectively. 503 Jewish Choir with Rabbi Steinberg Interior Jewish Chapel Old Cadet Chapel lIEWllSIt-H Gt-IlAIllIEIl. From 1836 until 1911, for 75 years, the Old Cadet Chapel served the Corps of Cadets. When construction of new academic buildings necessitated removal of the Chapel, such was the sentiment attached to it that it was dismantled stone by stone and rebuilt in the cemetery where it stands now. Black marble shields bearing the names of' generals adorn the walls and above the altar is Professor Weir's painting "Peace and War." Every Sunday the Jewish cadets march the long road to their services at the Old Cadet Chapel. Under Rabbi Steinbeing, who is here for his first year, the Jewish Chapel Squad has had a very beneficial year. The Choir, under the direction of Sp. Robert Guralnik, is made up of cadets selected from the Chapel Squad and sings at services every week. In addition, the Choir made three trips to nearby communities to participate in religious services, and activities. The religious training received at the Old Cadet Chapel has truly been successful in giving us the tools to defend and practice our faith effectively. QAIWDHINAIL NIEWMAN FORUIM The Cardinal Newman Forum is an organization which fosters and supports the religious development of the Catholic members of the Corps. This past year, under the able guidance of Father McCormick, the Forum has sponsored numerous activities ranging from active discussion of topics of interest to Cath- olic men to talks by guest retreats at Maryknoll Seminary. As varied as these activities are, all are aimed at strengthening the cadet's intellectual and spiritual background in light of his future career. SQOUITVMASTVIERYS CCUUlNClIlL 3 'N 67 cl bt is Q - . 9 A A i l Cadet Lambert issues the last instructions. The able leadership for the Cardinal Newman Forum joyable. ,W-ar. ,.,, The Scoutmaster's Council provides interested cadets with an opportunity to gain experience in leadership by working with the Boy Scouts of Amei ica. Under the able leadership of Captain Wubbena and the President, Cadet Tom Walker, the Council takes an active part in scouting activities. It provides counselors and assistant scoutmasters for West Point's own Troop 23, escorts for visiting units and representatives for other scout activities. These in clude camping with the local troop, and occasionally attending camporees and jamborees. Included in the Council's program is an annual trip to New Bruns wick, New Jersey, which, with its other activities combines to make this work both interesting and en f T ! 'x 3 f the if MEN CF THE CLASS OE' T962 My connection with your ciass may weii be unparaiieied in the annais o Academy. T commanded you aii at Buckner and, in another capacity, do so now. For two years i was your ciass advisor. Your motto is that of the regi- ment T had the honor to iead on the Kor ean battiefieid. This unique association prompts me to bid you, as cadets, a speciai fareweii . and, as officers, an equaiiy speciai weicome to the profession of Arms. X Your iong years ago f for severai, five f you began your cadetship in the great expectation that this haiiow ed institution wouid do wonders for your l mentai, physicai and spirituai deveiopment. And so it hasi dl The extent of your transformation is most evident to one who has watched you grow, month by month, since the outset of Third Ciass year. You arrived as youthsg you depart as men. You came here individuaiiy and aione, you N ieave as part of a cohesive, spirited unit and buttressed by warm, persona N associations forged in the crucibie of common experience and triai. You have been tested, retested and tested again f and not found wanting. in the process, your ranks have thinned considerabiy. Some iosses have been un- importantg others have torn at your hearts. But after each, you have drawn cioser together and stood taiier. As a ciass, you have confronted more har probiems than are the norm, somehow you have soiv ed them. in this your fina . year, you have shown yourseives equai to the chaiienge of Corps ieader- Q ship, you have pointed the way for successor ciasses within your companies, S on the athietic fieids, and in aii other aspects of cadet iife. At this iuncture, your basic miiitary foundation is compiete, soiidiy buiit by the coiiective efforts of instructor and instructed. You have cieared the finai hurdie and have a straight shot at the tape stretched in the morning of 6 Sune i962.You have earned your spurs. My undeniabie pride in aii CAN DOEYJS reiiects iess your cadet accom- piishments than your future promise. For i am confident that you under- stand what West Yoint expects of those it nurtures and trains for the service of this nation, grasp the fuii meaning of the vows to which you have subscribed. Those vows are not for ordinary men. There is no question of duty when the guns roar, West Yointers then stand shouider to shouider with the bravest of the brave. But this Country demands much more of those chosen to guard her sacred rights and honor. The greatest chaiienges wiii be encountered when the guns are siient but the dangers are no iess. The threats an impiacabie enemy can and wiii pose are iegion, they wiii inciude new Beriins and Viet Nams, wiii span the seas and f extend into outer space, as our Country remains embattied throughout your W iives. Then you must waik a ioneiy sentinei's path, eternaiiy vigiiant and ofttimes misunderstood. ' therefore fitting that this Nation and this Academy f one and in- ouid expect of you an aiiegiance as fierce and steadfast as rgy with our God, shouid expect you to stand up and h the going or great the sacrifice, shoui ry task, however strange, whatever P untry couid hardiy demand ' hat you perpetuate those who it is separabie f sh that which unites our cie be counted no matter how roug expect a maximum of performance in eve the circumstance. Stern requirements, yes, but Co She asks oniy that you be true to the Academy motto , t of the Long Gray Line, drawing sustenance from urance from those yet to come, that you prove your- nse iess. the tradition have preceded and ass seives Soidiers in the fuiiest se . Godspeed W. STTLYNELL Comniandant -f -5- f kj 1 V X 'Vi .r ,w g i f My f u .. if fe S' KP K , 1 ff ' J' 9 ik K , w ' ' ' wi W f W"'v ml' ' 'V , ,,, f , ' Q.. s ' t v rg w mf- S X ff , Ars. . F A A . 'A H h Y ' ffm gm . ki ' Y X, - 15 up fn ri W - .jk - J A 'nvi- 4' 'K Q ..-4' Q .3 we-Aff" ff 5552 ' ,QQ ' " Z. ,, .V 15 . Vv.. 1... I ff 2 " 91. ff, H Mmm W I maxgmakfxxi RWM xyjlxkx X L Rum Kxk K XXDVIEIPUVIISIING if i i i i i i GOES AROUND PRETENDING IT HAS POWER STEERING. We'd like to see the look of pleased surprise on your face the first time you park a '62 Corvair. It's hard to pinpoint the reason, but there's a feeling of fun connected with the simple act of steering a Corvair. Who'd guess that you could get this effortless ease without power steering? You also get the crisp control and superb response of a real road car, due to all the sports car ideas that Went into the Corvair. Four-Wheel independent suspension and the air-cooled rear engine make this one of the nicest cars anybody ever transported a family in. And, What's more, you get all this pleasure and practicality at a remarkably low price. It's a real sugar-coated Way to A N ew World 0f W07th save money Without giving up even a nickel's worth of luxury. Chevrolet- Chevy II -Corvair' Corvette '62 CORVETTE . . . MAKES GOING BETTER THAN GETTING THERE. The Corvette has proved that you can have a full measure of sports car driving pleasure without the slightest discomfort or inconvenience. 1962 should be your year to try this approach to fung get your dealer to give you a test drive in one .... Chevrolet Division of General Motors, Detroit 2, Michigan. but-W , ' ' ,, QQKWO 4 5, . . 3 I ga ..,. 4, AV A ' ii QAV: .,,-g -.fV.i -,'--- I 'AQ Q ,.:,.,, if ' - wow nlvl is ' X -- "" 'ws 'ii a naan 1 I l ,- . ff If :' f i N ,,,. R ' 42 2: - ' K I LE fn - l .23 W 3.4 I my M or :-:f .--:f-- is --,-. ..-:: ' ,, or Q D, . .,.,. N., ,,,,,,,,. 4 4, ,.,...,,. a ,.,..,.. Wwwl, ,t,qffh,,.W,,ssa ..,... if ...., , "'-1.,.. 55-'X I ' "IN I J! , 5 Q? Z u x at , p I ,. mm QA. I ' L1 ,i.,f'..?"V , 1 2 f g if?" lb ' f, , 55 A Q 2' .ff . 6? . 52 X A J. TI-IEEE SET YOU AFDAFVI' Small symbols, but with all the meaning imparted by imperishable memories and traditions. Your Balfour ring links you always to this proud class. Superb Balfour A pins, minia- tures, and matching wedding bands complete the treasured symbolism that perpetuates your Academy years. BILL PFORR MQW a JEWELRY'S FINEST CRAFTSMEN HOTEL THAYER AND 521 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 509 MAKERS UF CHIGUG' AND SLEEXQ AMEHlUA'S MOST MUUEHN SLABKS ES GG CUTTERS GF TRADITIONAL TRUUSERS an affiliate of ESUUIRE SPDRTSWEAR MFG. C0. 200 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. '62 ESUUIHE SPURTSWEAH MFG. UU. A ., X i- THE CRACKERBARREL CU. No glove an the work! ' A . Hucwsyimf, , f iongarfxiion pdign as comfortable as . y in fiixlfigfiiifihbi-A 1' A f refuxedv pusuinno ff ff X M rf, ll I" Ill' I I I: f I ,J I I 11' ll ,lr i x 5 f - Xi - i gf ,f' ' y A XX Wx 2 I . 0 e :ominuous , Xxsxx xx X12 If ship from 'here Seamieis A ' 'W -- 1 N hem 4 3 imemion , 1' I I: mg I' I um seam Seamless pol i 'x' F , , fd f A, finger :ips Q bind' i Y 1 b A ' 7- ' A A' A BANIELHAYS' r ' Gt0VERSVlLlE,'N.'Yf A CHANGE TO . . FOR QUALITY UNDERWEAR, SPQRTSWEAR AND PAJAMAS Discerning West Point officers for many gen- erations liave had Uniforms made to measure by A. facobs Kc Sons, Inc. for Outstanding Quality, super tailoring and fit, correct Styling and dependable delivery in the Q yamlm 6 5011.4 jfzadifzbn BALTIMORE, MD. Fine Custom Tailored Uniforms since 1891 IIRMY'S PERSHING MISSILE USES BENDIX INERTIIIL GUIDANCE SYSTEM The U.S. Army's Pershing missile- sometimes called the "shoot-and scoot" missile-plays a major part in our national preparedness program This all-weather, ground-to-ground weapon has been thoroughly tested proved highly accurate in its course BendixC9 inertial guidance system gives the Pershing missile its remark able accuracy. The missile requires no fixed launching site. It can be rushed to an unprepared site either by highly mobile ground launching equipment or by aircraft, and fired in minutes The installation then "scoots" out of range before the enemy can zero-in on the launching site. Bendixwaschosenforthisimportant project on the basis of its previous experience in space, missiles, and automation. For, from launching to target, every major U.S. missile depends upon systems, sub systems, or components developed by Bendix skills. TARGET SEEKER TELEMETERING POWER SUPPLIES LAUNCHERS The general locations of various Bendix-made systems and their components are S-howln here. No particular rm-ssile or satellite IS represented in thrs drawing. WHERE IDEAS ,yy uIILocK CORPORATION FISHER BUILDING, DETROIT 2, MICHIGAN CREATIVE ENGINEERING FOR: SPACE III MISSILES EI AVIATION EI AUTOMOTIVE EI OCEANICS III AUTOMATION 5II M EATON MANUFACTURING COMPANY 1911-1961 CLEVELAND, OHIO 50 YEAR 5 3 A ,A'w"'rT-'wva-vi ZW 4 d1'5fK'.- A r - ff?- y - 7 "0ifuAg,7to11f, M jf 7 A l fx SL -T f 1' .,,-flex-f"f"f'mx N ea' sr M Umm ' 'M V A W ' A x JC' 1 A A 3 A 3031ff,-Asif . op' f If 4 Q Qalfpwfrg 1 Q Z A, , I 6 . Z ' ,r ' V .. ir" - ix 'V' 5 "'A' l ' Ns' '. , of General WINFIELD SCfJTT Inacle payable to his own fff 1 X J A P I A initials and mlatecl 1852-time year lie ran for time presidency against 2 R L ,lv -1? I Q , 4 Franklin Pierce. ' 9" 1 'A X kj? ' I' I ' or more than a century the RIGGS Lanlzing tradition has proudly ii T' A ff: A Q QE! -'jf N, . -- "J , , ' -Af A TN -ig. - U RN, T ?' " ff- 1' f ASX an M lv ,fffff 7-- -.Z X mx , V-lyxyivl p w xx, f XX W yi X X Q 1,4 u l .why X' ?. ' A A - I f xy A V Imlxll f i. N. NNW Q E 4 v A 1 in xx " vk V' Z :ff 11: Six I NFS KLM ip' L -1' fffffffff'f' ' X 3 4 n i O . - W? A Q J f i 1 1 'X F 1Y V U QW K ' served 'tile Army' from Washington. 3 X w .. NN if 'viii Y ' X in 9 itfffv A 11 A .L A, 1,1-A -11f-.1- ' .1 A ?f Wm, jj My AlaicijOITEAZZZJZEBeJSZZ?'F1,Z'1i,,fI11L1Z1i15TS3'1E5E 212355 2 Q A 1 f fax. A The RIGUS NATIONAL BANK My uh W : of WASHINGTON, D. C. - FOUNDED 1836 Efgg A A N ' LARGEST BANK IN THE NATION'S CAPITAL , , x A v I , f , gl, I .Q 3 N MHINXIIAZ 7 Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ' Iviember Federal Reserve System I2 OO OoOoooooO T f" 1 l JQJN say W? 'EV at many at knight was spent in trusty armor ln days of yore, men feared not only their mortal enemies, but the elements too. It was the medieval armorer's task to protect his chief against toemen, but weather-protection was a more difhcult matter. Thus many a knight was spent in rusty armor. Engineers and scientists at Ford Motor Company, engaged in both pure and applied research, are coping even today with the problem ot body protection Ccar bodies, that ish. Through greater understanding ot the chemistry of surfaces, they have developed new paint primers and undercoatings, new rustproottng methods, and special sealers that guard entire car bodies against nature's corrosive forces-all of which add armor-like protection to Ford-built cars. From other scientihc inquiries will undoubt- edly come new materials with protective properties vastly superior to those of today. This is another example of Ford's leadership through scr'entif7c research and engineering. MOTOR COMPANY The American Road, Dearborn, Michigan PRODUCTS FOR THE AMERICAN ROAD 0 THE FARM 0 INDUSTRY ' AND THE AGE OF SPACI 49.mzaliiillifmmiilzt ifgffffff!iffilltiiurfg, ? "a ARMY TIMES PUBLISHING COMPANY 2020 M STREET N.W., WASHINGTON 6, D.C. PUBLISHERS OF Army Times Army-Navy-Air Force Register NAVY TIMES AIR FORCE TIMES THE MILITARY MARKET THE AMERICAN WEEKEND '-Qlsmnzfg 2. X I il ED 8 if E A on 1 ' .... . O OFAM alf- Best Wisbes.' NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA IOOO Rhode Island Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. . . the objects of this Association are to increase the knowledge of small arms and promote efficiency in the use of such arms on the part of members of the armed forces." Excerpt from NRA Bylaws "Objectives" O. -. ,O V . I O .. . A Ewa ,v,r ..,, ' . jg'--'-' . . .- Qjjgcn 1 zqq f"ef 2.4 I,"ix 'ftc r'1"1 ,,sI - nnEnelNa TOE - ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION N U E L 'SAND vGRAVEL 'STONE OOOOOOOOOO - BLAST-FURNACE sum E..1 ...M 'PRE-MIXED CONCRETE mlim THE ARUNDEL BURPURATIUN BALTIMORE 2, MD. BROOKLYN I, N. Y. MIAMI 1, FLA. 4 NEXT TIME TRY SHERATON-ATLANTIC'S SPECIAL STUDENT-FACULTY PLAN Students, Faculty and All Full Time School Person- nel are welcome at all times to avail themselves of Sheraton-Atlanticis Special Student-Faculty Plan Rates are: 37.50 55.25 854.25 53.50 single 2 to a room 3 to a room 4 to a room per person per person per person When planning any special seminars, banquets or dances, contact our Banquet Manager. We have ac- commodations for groups from 25 to 500. Brochure on complete function facilities available upon request. SH ERATO N-ATLANTIC HOTEL BROADWAY AT 34th STREET NEW YORK 1, N. Y. PEnnsylvania 6-5700 'LI U mil? USA ,,,,. DIVE RSIFICATION-into missiles, satellites, aircraft, electronics, shipbuilding, nuclear energy, aircraft maintenance, heavy con- struction, rocket fuels, and steel fabrication-is helping Lockheed to promote the security, science, and prosperity of the free World. LOCICI-I E E D Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, Burbank, California Simi Olganra Academy customers have played an important role in our successful 88 years of designing and tailoring of quality clothing. We, for our part, have endeavored to repay their loyalty by consistently offering the finest in fab- rics, meticulous styling and Workman- ship. . .plus Service. . .factors which reflect the West Pointeris own dedication to perfection. dvtalwus afmiatvtwfumrwg Zim Glwffwa gm9m!4mwmsmw1a74 Sita: NEW YORK BOSTON WASHINGTON COMPLIMENTS TO we Cfaafs o 1962 JOHNSON SERVICE GUMPANY NEW YORK - MILWAUKEE Manufacturers . . . Engineers . . Contractors 69273 AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE AND AIR CONDITIONING CONTROL SYSTEMS Offices in Principal Cities CONGRATULATIONS and BEST WISHES to fthe CLASS of '62 li' QVANS STA N D A99 tiaswreitf SINCE 1841 Your Guide to the Best in Menis Slippers L. B. EVANS' SON CO. WAKEFIELD, MASS. 00 ev-on ch STETSON IS THE ARMY'S FAVORITE FOOTWEAR . :fit . . . as if has been for more than 70 years gi if your Army Post Exchange can't supply you - Stetson .- will ship shoes to any officer, anywhere, on an open ac- N count basis. Ask for them by number, as indicated below. X J THE STETSON SHOE CO., South Weymouth 90, Mass. - K SHOE Sw Z ,Z ff0r1y,IEN si- 5fi'4'02- Premium quality Black calfskin. Q 42 -175403 - Premium quality Tan calfskin. Z 1 8 8 5 517 0 ani' by Louisville The finest military headwear that skilled hands can produce. Available in ap- proved Army Creen . . . Army Blue. E I Zjp, The field fatigue cap that never shows fatigue . . . wonit wrinkle . . won't crush . . . won't sag. The uSpring Up" is the only fatigue cap manufac- tured under a U. S. Patent number. Sold in Post Exchanges 7Round the World. ,OKMJZIKH CAP CORPORATION 301 South 30th Street 0 Louisville 12, Kentucky Spence Engineering Company, lnc. Owners of Rider-Ericsson Engine Co., Founded by Capt. John Ericsson 1842 PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE RECULATORS Desuperheaters - Strainers WALDEN, NEW YORK VVALDEN PRescott 2-7501 Grant St. Sz N. Y. C. R. R. Cable Address DELAMATER, New York OMAN CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. R. P. FARNSWORTH 81 CO., INC. WRIGHT CONTRACTING CO., INC Nashville, Tenn. New Orleons, La. Columbus, Ga. ,gg1ggg,gmf, o M A N - FA R N s W o RT H - W RIG H T Pgggpg-gqg, A JOINT VENTURE 625 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK We Believe that Peaceful co-existence is best maintained by being Too Tough to Tackle MASON 81 HANGER-SILAS MASON CO., INC. ENGINEERS ond CONTRACTORS Designers of Explosives Processing Plants and Explosion Resistant Structures Builders and Operators ot Ordnance Facilities 500 Fitth Avenue New York Lexington Kentucky Army's Pershing-a major accomplishment in the Army's program to use the modern missile to extend mobile field artillery effectiveness. Pershing moves over the roughest terrain on its own mobile launcher, is ready to fire within minutes. PERSHING-in test at Cape Canaveral lVl!ll?TllV IMA RIETTA THE NATIONAL BANK OF FORT BENNING Fort Benning, Georgia "The lnfantryman's Bank" This Bank has a thorough understanding of and is experienced in the needs of Army oilicers and is organized and stalled to serve the Army man. We have many thousands of satisfied customers throughout the World. Be you either at Benning, Beruit, or Bombay, the staff of the National Bank of Fort Benning will efficiently and without delay act as your representative in financial aifairs. The National Bank of Fort Benning fulfills the requirements of every Army man and should appeal to cadets who have selected Infantry as their branch, as the path of each lnfantryman leads to Fort Benning. "Bank by mail with the National Bank of Fort Benning" Travelers Checks Nloney Orders Checking Accounts Cashier's Checks Savings Accounts Safety Deposit Boxes iMember of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporationl C0l'Yl,,9Al'n2h!5 of ,S FAMOUS A uni? BOSTON zxrlwf , New Yonk MILITARY ACADEMY and 9- dl SERV M ,,-..--V .X p, E GRACKOUSTIO V A ' . L w-AER D TRW' A . 1142 HOTECEN1-uRV'o" A .fab ,H 5 A S-is P-HER .wa :T A A. f 3- THE ALL-AMERICA CAMP Cornwall-on-Hudson, N Y BitiJLlWHli1 or Ammon Hill C01. Marvin J. Coyle USA Retired ANSXOCR A99 HOTTLT i 5 T A USMA, '31 SUPERINTENDENT Mwffffwyfy E leetronle and eleetrorneehanlcal systems, equlpment and Inaterlals for natlonal defense and lndustry ELECTRONICS CORPORATION SUBSIDIARIES DIVISIONS REGIONAL OFFICES NEW YORK 72 NEW YORK Alpha Wire Corporation American Beryllium Company Inc Arco Electronics Inc Wnllor Manufacturing Corporat1on Ant: Submarine Warfare Countermeasures Nhssnle Technology Navigational Computer Passlve Detection Reconnaissance Underwater Technology gl Oceanography Washington D C Dayton Ohio Los Angeles Callforma Hillburn ElectronIcs Corporation Five exciting ways to follow the sun The live new '62 convertibles from Chrysler Corporation. "Live" means live weight. Every ounce is dedicated to strength and performance alone. You'll get as much as IOZ better ac- celeration and use less gas. A new low-friction steering gear is the closest thing yet to power steering without the extra cost. And an improved Torsion-Aire suspension system gives a road-hugging ride that makes bumps and unwieldy curves a thing of the past. Even maintenance is easier. You'll drive 32,000 miles between major lube jobs, 4,000 miles between oil changes. Like a common-sense car with a kick to it? Sample one of these. Dodge Polara 500 . ,,,. .,, . . ,gif ii,,f f :ii tlz tt'iL Ztll 9 Chrysler 300 V Plymouth Fury , . . ,,.,.,.,. .,,.... Y " ' ' Q' y y , '. 3 ,,vv,.,.. . .,.... ,, ,. V- ,.... 4 , K U t H X U 080440 ii M i "" """ Imperial Crown Chrysler Corporation Where engineering puts something extra, into every car PLYMOUTH ' VALIAN7' ' DODGE ' DART ' LANCER ' CHRYSLER ' IMPERIAL 522 The stockholders of Chance Vought and Ling-Temco on June 30, 1961, approved plans for bining these two companies into a v company - Ling-Temco-Vought, Inc., effec- tive August 31, 1961. Combination of these dynamic, experienced organizations links depth of capabilities with, depth of management to meet the advanced challenges of eiectronics, space, communi- cations, aircraft, and missiles. , Ling-Temco-Vought employs more than 20,000 people in the development and production of: AEROSPACE SYSTEMS ELECTRONICS. . . COMMU . . .SOUND SYSTEMS. . .AERO SYSTEMS ...INFORMATION HANDLING This is . . . Ling-Temco-Vought, Inc.. new S- industrial leader to serve America's future through science. Cnmlogmenlfo of West Publishing Company Law Book Publishers for the Nationjs Lawyers C ST PAUL 2, MINNESOTA Serving Indzzytry. . . Serving Afmeriwl Continental Can Company G3 w A Cadillao is so soundly designed and so soundly built that it approaolnes the absolute in dependability. VISIT YOUR LOCAL AUTHORIZED CADILLAC DEALER CONSTRUCTION CORP ALAN NEW YORK BUENOS AIRES CHICAGO SANTIAGO WASHINGTON SAO PAOLO COMPLIMENTS LEEDS TRAVELWEAR PRODUCTS, INC. New York 16, New York 'The WorId's Largest Manufacturer of Zippered Luggage' NATIONAL BANK OF FORT SAM HOUSTON at San Antonio, Texas - 1422 East Grayson Street- CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES We invite you to open an account with us and avail yourself of our special services for regular officers of the armed forces. We have been serving military personnel for over 40 years and numbered among our many thousands of customers are many West Point Graduates who have made this bank their perma- nent banking home for many years-even after retirement. Service by mail is our specialty-regardless of where you may be stationed, we can serve you. ONCE A CUSTOMER-AL WAYS A CUSTOMER. Write us for further information. Your inquiry will receive our prompt attention. - LOANS - Our loan policy is very liberal. We make loans to regular ofli- cers on their own signature and do not require co-signers. Monthly payment installment loans are available on easy terms and at low rates. We do not require mortgages on automobiles, furnitures, etc. If in need of funds for any purpose, We can serve you. Loans can be arranged for by mail without loss of time. Write us for further details. Members of Federal Reserve System and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. 526 FASHIONS for YOUNG AMERICA Model SO-260 Settle yourself nearby and listen. Suddenly you're engulfed in a sweep of sound so resonant, so vividly life-like, it's as if you're at the original performance, ready to applaud! Push a button for your choice of listening excitement: Stereo FM, AM, Short Wave or 4-speed stereo phono. Even thrilling reverberation effects. Now look at the classic Black Forest walnut cabinetry-hand-rubbed to a lustre finish unmatched in the fine furniture field. Old World craftsmanship . . . for modern American taste and tempo. "Roadmaster" FM- AM-SW-Marine Band TK-1 "Attache" Tape Recorder Tapes any sound anywhere! All-transistor and fully battery- operated for true portability. 8 pounds of compact C11 M x 7 x 4M"J ingenuity: recording level indicator, record and playback at 354 ips dual-track, fast rewind, temporary stop, safety button. Powerful speaker delivers the famous Grundig sound. Complete with mike, tape and reel. V "gn 232:11 .K Portable f Car Radio Enjoy FM sound wherever you travel, by car or on foot! Func- tions as an under-dash car radio in its own easy-to-install bracket or-quickly detaches for use as a handsome battery-operated portable! Powerful all-transistor performance. Separate tone con- trols. Telescopic antenna. Only 3M lbs., 8 x 7 X 3240. With car- mounting kit and carrying strap. Write for free color brochure and name of nrfarvsi dealer, I I INTERNATIONAL SALES division of THE WILCOX-GAY CORPORATION 743 N. LaSalle St. - Chicago 10, Illinois 528 Q NX ll' ...,.s'ffQ ' nsaowi QIZJQ-k, THE HER LDRY 0F ERIT The above trademark has earned the right to be considered as such. lt signifies a dependable STANDARD of QUALITY that has always been distinctive and recognized. We are proud of this, as you men are of your career. ART CAP COMPANY, INC. 729 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 3, N. Y. llfblnlvleig NOR- EAST America? Favorite UNIFORM TIE Crush lt Knot It Twist It Not a Wrinkle NEWARK NEW ORLEANS LOS ANGELES Sales Offices NEW YORK cmd CHICAGO ARMY MUTUAL AID ASSOCIATION When 1. 2 3 4 While 1 2. 3. FORT MYER ARLINGTON 11, VIRGINIA Serving Army Families since 1879 a member dies, the Association: Pays 31,500 by wire upon request. Prepares for signature and files claims for Government benefits and life insurance. Keeps the widow informed of all changes in laws affecting her, even years after the member's death. . Automatically increases the amount of the benefit by one-sixth with no change in premium after three years of membership. In addition, a terminal dividend may be paid. a member lives, the Association: Provides unbiased advice and assistance with Estate Planning and life insurance matters. Maintains a central file for all important family records. Offers reliable information on Survivor Benefits. BOARD OF DIRECTORS General Wade H. Haislip President Maj. General Glen E. Edgerton Maj. General Edwin P. Parker First Vice-President Second Vice-President Maj. General Carl A. Hardigg Maj. General Ernest M. Brannon Maj. General Silas B. Hays Maj. General Robert V. Lee Major Kenneth F. Hanst, Jr. Executive Vice-President Captain William G. Thomas, Jr. Lt. Colonel J. B. Harvey Treasurer Secretary insurance in Force Members Reserves fB140,000,000 27,000 530,000,000 ongrafufafiond .fgncl X525 wdked .70 jim CVM O! 1962 from THE ARMED FORCES CO-OPERATIVE INSURING ASSOCIATION Formerly CFor 75 Years? ARMY CO-OPERATIVE FIRE ASSOCIATION Fort Leavenworth, Kansas YOUR NON-PROFIT ISSUER OF PERSONAL PROPERTY FLOATER COVERAGE' COMPREHENSIVE PERSONAL LIABI LITY' kWorId-Wide-Lowest Rates RU BATEX afocedceil TUBING AND PIPE INSULATION . . . the easy to install, flexible insulation that prevents condensation on lines downto zero and saves heat on lines up to 2200 F. Available in 5ft. or random lengths. Five wallthicknessesg 3!l6", lf4", 3!8", lf2" 8. 3f4". Also available are Rubatex closed cell sheets for insulating large pipes, tanks and miscella- neous equipment. For additional information or samples write: dus!ries,Inc. Bedford , nia 530 'IM 3 GENERATIONS OF EXPERIENCE IN MILITARY TAILORING THE NATION'S OLDEST SPECIALISTS IN HAND-TAILORED UNIFORMS W SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS ARLINGTON, VA. Congrafufafiolw 'i' ff t d d t , on :,.,.:,':.?.:" 'H' fo the Automobile Insurance! Class of 1962 USAA offers increased savings on automobile insurance available to active and retired officers. USAA organized in i922 is a non-profit insurance association managed and directed by active and retired officers of the U. S. Armed Services. Over 350,000 members now enioy liberal savings on automobile, comprehensive personal liability, and household and personal effects insurance. To save costs, selling is by mail. Write today for details. RS, UNITED Manufacturer of 'Jeep' Vehicles CD AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION Dept. H-2 USAA Building, 4119 Broadway, San Antonic 9, Texas lnncsrmsuffwf sr A "VZ - PEPPY - a s Q wrsg, WM 021' me ce W , i e ili'tt:rcr:'-1a rac: fereers .,r,.r,,,,,,, TH A N ,,,,: , ,...l:-'- e ja w if 532 , 162, . ,gl EQ-Sim ff - W SS, Ev .7 if? NW fs . M, x v, 'Huggy J S1 xv, 'W Wu A ,4f'w if Q Q uv 2 ,. 'XX' X Yi .E I ' x Y QQ? Y Ek L Q' 4 TW' ,V ffff qx lx N5 1 Www this i z ' Q ' 1 . VA fwfr? 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FOR FAST-SAFE- ECONOMICAL MOTORING FROM THE SOUTH OR WEST travel via DELAWARE MEMORIAL BRIDGE Use Our Information Center Facilities En Route For Literature Write Box 71, New Castle, Delaware O Carries US Route 13 from Norfolk Dedicated to the heroic dead of US Route 40 from Baltimore, Md. World War ll and Korea from the Route 301 from Chesapeake Bay States of Delaware and New Jersey I Q , , 7 5212170 ,J U. S. ARMY f + + ARMY NATIONAL For Fifty-Three years the business of this Bank has been almost entirely with Army Personnel, stationed in all parts ofthe World. Our Facilities are especially designed to handle your Checking, or Saving Accounts and your Loan needs, all by mail. Perhaps this Service would be helpful to you. Bank with the Bank Your Father Does THE ARMY NATIONAL BANK FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS 81 A.U.S.A. "Our Best To LGU!! Best Car Care-5llll.'llIll' ZSQMPANY SYMBOL OF LEADERSHIP IN FOODS This new Heinz Research Center stands as a promise of the growing world leadership of H. J. Heinz Company in the field of food processing. Located in Pittsburgh, on the north bank of the Allegheny, it is the hub of the Heinz international operation. In its ultra-modern laboratories, test kitchens and pilot plant, new products are born, new packaging ideas con- ceived, new methods of factory processing formulated. Here research in the field of nutrition is carried on-to be translated into more healthful, as well as more flavorful, foods for infants and adults. Here, with scientific exactness, the high standards of the 57 Varieties are rigidly guarded. With the facilities of this most modern Research Center and with its staff of talented, well-trained personnel pointing the way toward effective production of quality foods, Heinz looks with confidence to the future. For you who will be leaders in the service of our nation, H. Heinz Company wishes a future filled with a sense of accomplishment and just reward H. J. HEINZ COMPANY' R01 . AENERZE GRPORATION 1 Elhiiayy ofThe Genera! Tire and Rubber Company 537 Working in close association with the military for 30 years, Morry has introduced and developed many items now accepted as regulation equipment. This has earned him the rightful reputation of "tailor to the services." Morry Luxenberg, foremost manufacturer of tailored uniforms and accessories, continues, with his son, Dan, his tradition of personalized service at his new and ONLY address. MORRY LUXENBERG CO. MILITARY OUTFITTERS 45 EAST 30th STREET New York I6, N. Y. ft? Zodiac SeaAWoIf . s now een es e to an amaz undersea depth of 660 ft ..IN OR OUT OF THE WATER 0 17-jewel precision movement b b e radium blacks and hands H. R. H. CONSTRUCTION WE SALUTE CORP. 579 FIFTH AVENUE THE f New York I7, N. Y. 1962 UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY OXSTRUC77 GRADUATING , 0 04' CLASS irv 1'-J .C O R ?. IIUMBLE OIL 8: REFINING CUMPIINY , ESSO REGION San Juan New York Paris PELHAIVI, N. Y. 0 P feet for skin divers. . .perf for you, the newest Sea W If h 1 b t t d 1 It's waterproofii, self-Windl THE ADVENTURER'S WATCH mova le ezelwith minute calibrations kb: g u I db b k a soooo d dd ZOCIIOOM omg h s a R y EXPRESS you CAN T0 1055 AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVELERS CHEQUES Spendable anywhere, good until used. Prompt refund if lost or stolen. Buy them at your BANK, at Railway Ex- press and Western Union Offices. Charges, only a pen- ny a dollar. Travel Service The experienced staff of American Express provides transportation, tickets, hotel reservations, rent-a-car res- ervations, interpretersg plans independenttripsorescorted tours. Money Orders Pay bills, send funds with convenientAmerican Express Money Orders - throughout U.S. at stores, Railway Ex- press, Western Union Offices. CREDIT CARDS The comprehensive credit card that offers more charge services-around the world. OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES American Express financial services include: foreign re- ,I N, ., M 4 :Sie me Ii 1 ft Iwi, 3 x., :WG f J, ,. at gp: Wi 'f r i Y V if tf nzkggl ".r'fF5Ef.JSQQ E-ft 2 , ir gxflfa 'Pl , with Lge t, 214' 54.41455 ' ' I i gi n . ,A d ,EZ .- 5' . e Vi! 44 . W . f f E jf tw, 'Z? 'fg ,iillxifeil ,guy ,Y 4 i r ' if-J E tie l fe 5 fd-4 r 2 ,ff r V, U! 'W"'f9zew ,am M vpzaf of" We it mittances, mail and cable transfer of funds, purchase and sale of foreign currency. SHIPPING SERVICES Complete facilities for over- seas shipping of personal and household effects, import and export forwarding, customs clearance, marine insurance, air-freight forwarding. I. .. I . 4545164 ,,,, .,,e. , c tiki". K" if ,,,. Wherever' you go . . . AMERICAN EXPRESS coMPANv Headquarters: 65 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. o Offices in principal cities throughout the world TRAVELERS CHEQUES o MONEY ORDERS - CREDIT cARns - TRAVEL SERVICE - FIELD WAREHOUSING - OVERSEAS BANKING - FOREIGN REMITTANCES - FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDING BAKED BETTER... T0 TASTE BETTER Ill HI 0 mmf! Q,,.. MHDNMU 'Wah QRASZSERS " ft. i .Q suf'S't5".?c-f-H 4 3 I wi!!! V... 'dlp' ll x tx S by Sulzskzrze zIs'czzz?s 0 cozzrsef HIGHLAND FALLS OFFICE Marine Midland National Bank of Southeastern New York Formerly: First National Bank in Highland Falls Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. i4We have been specializing in the handling of ac- counts of Service Oliicers for over fifty years and offer complete banking facilities including checking and savings accounts, loans, safe deposit boxes, trust services, advice concerning investments and finan- cial problems. All banking transactions may be handled through the mail and we shall welcome your inquiries concerning our servicesf' Associate Directors: Brig. Cen. C. L. Fenton, Chairnian, USA Retired Col J. R. Jannarone, US Mil. Acad., West Point Edward F. Kilian, Assistant Vice President Abraham Kopald, Attorney Theodore Michel, Florist George S. Nichols, Vice President 4 THEY WALK WITH A MILITARY STRIDE Genuine Corcoran Parafroop Boots CORCORAN, INC. srouer-non, MASS. COMPLIMENTS - of - THE IRVIN H. HAHN CO. NIANUFACTURERS of FINE INSIGNIA since 1898 326 HANUVEH STREET Baltimore I, Md. OLD GOLD SPIN FILTERS -The filter cigarette with the good, robust taste- OLD GOLD STRAIGI-ITS -Big, bold taste that gives you D G a carload of flavor with the satis- in ' fying mildness that nature in- SPRING--Coallthewaytolight- , , 'ended- ness with Spring . . , extra long filter, extra light tobaccos. ,ms r ,, -N M f X 0166 9-Q QKSIZE orillard eearch Make the ifference! Every cigarette, in every pack, of every Lorillard brand goes through 15 separate processes backed by Lorillard research to assure you the finest taste, highest gualitypossible! KENT-The cigarette that made the filter famous! NEWPORT-Refreshes while with the taste of Kent-because you the soothing coolness of men- Kent with the "Micronite" filter lhol plus a refreshing hint of mint refines away harsh flavor refines in a hlend of the world's finest away hot taste . . . makes the t b can depend 3,25 Lorillard to be First with the finest cigarettes- ,,,6, ,, M., C, C through Lorillard Research! Q U A L I T Y Counts with the Army U , r,,Qi..iQg4rf Qu: . 'ISI 'Ma r 4 .wsfmgrm-:f - v W ., ,a mssS'fxWWMs-.if . ' '-.mm e r5Tfm,,agg,gM 'rx Eiiifisarzw "-- - ,,1,ww5 r b' sf"ebn'1 V1 i r ...,,Ef5i-:.f-1::,a,:1.- :W rf.. .. . ,.f::r:5im,.,. , , A 1 we ,, V ..f' -'rv.'g,g' u QQ... -t.'5E',, 'I,"i, ,,-,r , fgxt .sf r so --- Q3 ' Q lac 3 ' 9 . 'i P 'elf 351' 'fz:s1i,l. .MZ fy' 4 ste aa :i .ef , 4., . A - Regulation Military Academy Cuff Links with the name KREMENTZ are a symbol of correct style and fine quality. Year after year this quality be- comes more and more apparent, Kre- mentz jewelry wears well . . . does not tarnish BECAUSE it is made with an enduring overlay of ACTUAL 14 KARAT GOLD. ifmw I4 KT GOLD OVERLAY Evening Jewelry 0 Cuff Links ' Tie Holders 0 Belt Buckles From 53.00 to 525.00 plus tax Available wherever fine jewelry is sold. Krementz 8g Co. Newark 5, New Jersey Why Nobody at Can verrule the Laborator To help give you more for your money, Sears, Roebuck and Co. maintains the world's largest private laboratory for testing, checking, developing merchan- dise. It is here that Sears values begin. Is such and such a fabric really fadeproof and shrinkproof? How long will this new record changer run without being serviced? ls dishwasher "A" or dishwasher "Bw the more efficient and economical? Will this new armchair design be comfortable-as well as easy on the eye? To thousands of such questions every year, Sears laboratory gives accurate answers. Its reports present the impartial facts-the results of scientific testing. More than two-thirds of the laboratory staff in 1962 are graduate chemists, physicists or engineers. Their precision instruments and other testing equipment are the most mod- ern and complete that money can buy. The exact product information these scien- tists provide is one reason why Sears can keep on offering better and better value for your money. By giving the testing laboratory absolute veto power over any product that does not measure up to its standards, Sears makes it next to impossible for shoddy items to find their way onto the shelves of Sears stores or into the Sears catalog. And-by constantly comparing its own mer- chandise with similar goods sold elsewhere- Sears is always ready to meet any challenge in quality or price. Over the years, this laboratory has cost Sears some 3l350,000,000. 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A' lf?-fQ'HfN'f""'0 - A-" , ' gg- ,see we .-.,-rv' ::.5'.::5:':..ff .-:aa-fl 'iii-5" '15-: TwillY""9?i'533i1ExC '."' lxtsali H1271 I," zflfkl ,QQ Q23 gf I j -1 -Q 5 igI?.g2fIII 2IIIfII ,QI QN .- 4 'ff 433 X 1 :K - f lff I 3gjr.,mS'g,I ,Egfr ff ,I, 5 , K XPICXI .N N, 8 4 .- . -:V' r':' X , ,ra .I -fl 1 , a t !1f'if'hk"i zz' - if NM- f tx gray -::- - X A .. -X 4 f - I f X - 4 ' Q H- -4 4 0 .mf A -19 4- . fr v f f 1 f X -:"Tm- if-S1 ff w - f - -Q, 0 eff 4 Q a - 4 V W2 'ffr1fai'f4fW, Q ,' ' 4 4 F xx is Q-if ff arm - gin -42,4 - ,l , , 4,2 I I X - I, -I ...ob , ffjjy I 2J,x.I32 ,gg 4 I4 fr ' fgfr 0 4 if r - The Budd Company's fin-stabilized ammunition can drop a squirrel at 1,000 yards. Now, of course, this ammo is not for squirrel hunters-but it does illustrate the success Budd has had in developing accuracy. The Budd Company has complete facilities-and experienced engineers-for the design, development, prototype-manufacture, and testing of ammunition and explosives for the Ordnance Corps, including a test-firing range at Indiantown Gap Military Reserva- tion near Harrisburg, Penna. With over a decade of experience in this highly specialized art, We are prepared to solve your ammunition or other explosive ordnance problems. Product Development Department, The Budd Company, Philadelphia 32, Pa. How would yy . drop a squirrel at 1,000 yards? Ewa!! .....4 D DEVEZOPMENT 44 ANNOUNCING COLUMBIA RECORD CLUB'S IAENIQR BONu..' E-BSTMLL wt 1 - sf: aruu H t imrnrnr it r it 5,1 :gi D-NEW gg: ammo-NEW SELEC-TS: ESE OFFER 7 TodaY's best-selling albums Y anies The most ex ' ' ' .5 'ea's leading l'e9"'d'n5 comp 27.1 KE values "IMS ii Amen -exclusively from , Savin - me gfedtest J the Columbia record club- ' ' ITE 5 9' - ever offered ""'.- ., ., WN..-f 33' 722 record club! if .,af.sf.:g5':9gg3S':S':9'276i.5:.-ww 1 1 N QQ QQ 5.4 X r 1 rF7m'mnr'it A 1 ' -.SiFEFSESESLJLS5g?2'EJc,ic.i :I it 11-ctw, ,, THE PLATTERS GRAND CANYON Lf""i' ' 'fm ' ' I5"'i3i."NG HEAVENLY Russo wluullls Encore oloolden Nuts Came UI' MUCH Hallo, 1-loin lim: " " nicnnrhlmunron Q Q "::::0:'f :','Q"'l. , I .M . - 'Ez ninnrws -g "2 f 5 or-villa B'RD ,',:,,:' -j if .-'W' ' .Qi 1:4 onlin: if 'I:.. -f , ru mm 4,- ,, lil Q M v - QQ . rea nyy iron-1. , 1.1, . x - " muofmlu oncmornwiov Em MA JUHNNY MATIIIS ' - I. Also: Great Pre- tender, Enchanted, Magic Touch, etc. IUIINNY Illll1TUN'S GREATEST HITS 'X Bzllleof , ' rowollins SWE . some Bismarck , Nnllh lu Alaska gmgnmplusgmove 61. Also: Comanche, Iohnny Reb. The Man- sion You Stole, etc. MESSIAH omni runourm orrnrslu rut nomo uurucu :noir llrtol 'U f cxrlilnlsnal - -- vrurruo SS. This brilliant musical painting is an American classic me nsiiious pg mount crisis is Ullll'l1IllE Illll EUIIS Ill IIIWN lllll SUI1ll,lllll IIVII YIIIS lll 0llltllS 59. Also: UTI! MUTE Ride. I Still Miss Someone, etc. mum . ' ' .51 ,QR egg. in ssmznm ' 93-94. Two-Record Set lCounts as Two 5GllCtllll1S.lTl'l9 MUHIIUII TIDEYIIICIE Choir: Drmandy, Th Ella in .5 mt Ill ...lm or P' s vi' Berl' f 'VW' In 1. ze: 53. "Most lavish and beautilul musical, a triumph"-ltilgallen :SHQW.T!NlE: vous ',,. , W 28. Dhio, They Say lt's Wonderful, The Sound ol Music, etc. 7. California, Ava- lon, Moonlight Bay, 16 lavcrites in all 3. Also: Moonlight Becomes You, More Than You Know, etc. ll. Gigi, An Allair to Remember, Green- sleeves, I2 in all In PM . .iahxslo NFVERON MILES QQ,-Q Qsone Q. SUNDAY... 3 DAVIS, ' rsiwiiln gag ' 'F tg K JFRIDAV' ' .ll'.i.lflliI. 3. fsl Co lin.n.,....:o QA 70. Bye Bye Black- hird, Walkill', All ol Yuu,etc. 100. "SkillIully per- formed, beautifully recorded"-lligh Fld. LORD'S PRAYER ggnng Of mg TIME 1' rAoeauigT:Tg'i:nann L ox? W W5 Wmgllglln ii 5 . ,153 .1 ,- .. - 'A' Q ziioexgw r,-'lip-.. ig-.,-1 gi, Q ,M f fffff-'51 ' . :mol is . "" ' www-gmyg., gc., Mmnmnrauernacle Choir " immiztm 91. Also: Londonder- ry Air, Blessed Are 92. The Bonnie Blue Flag, Battle Cry ol 71. Take Five, Three to Get Ready, Every- 5I. All the delight- lul music from the year'sgayestcomedy ,wrt gypsy passion Z' I anon nosvcuucrz ..ai...o,.. 41. Dark Eyes, Two Guitars, llora Stac- . . . and with membership you also receive 3 RECORD BRUSH and CLEANING CLOTH Specially treated cloth picks up surface dust. Brush keeps grit out of grooves and clips onto any record player or turntable tone arm. ASI.I9 VALUE Portrait Dl My Love I ' I sreve LAWRENCE ag. " A- lox. . . r - h lm' WST' Ik' Hrailowsty i x . QQ Ah ,K ll. lJon't Blame Me. More Than You Know. e Philadelphia orch. TheyThatMourn,etc. Freedom, Dixie, etc. body's lumpin', etc. cato, 14 in all For You. 12 in all lllIEI1lli'll'l-'l1llEllIS jsflgiggfgxs TIIE Null ROY HAMILTITK 5'il VW42 mv FAIR ulov . "-' , rf SI'IEI.I1EY EXODUS XQ, rnnv:run:QQii:rLrm:r:in mn , You V BERMAN Q usvzo on suuorv .......... ,- E 1 I ' ca. THE APARTMENT ,ugggm '-19.1153 , H Have ..5l.!1.!:HS.'dIft.. g, , 1 xg , av., ., norman nurmcir :nom Plus 13 more ,r-:sf . 5,1 Q 1 . - He' ,...-......,..... 5 Q., ,f- Q-is .i:f::a111r:11'. 30. Misty, Gone Witll the Wind, Now Nigh the Moon, 6 more AHMAD JAMAL Haw? moons IZ. l'lI Never Stop Loving You, For All we llnovr, B more Rhapsody in Blue An American in Paris Leonard lorrstnin - fr rlm 1' ,i Scfsiwih GEIDIB 95. "Fierce impact and momentum" - N.Y. World-Telegram 62. Also: Some Lille lt Not, Magnificent Seven, Smile, etc. FLAMENCO SPECTACULAR 08 , Qi .... RECORDED Ill SPAIN 89. Fandangos, Se- villanas, A egrias, SA. The best-selling Driginal Cast record- ing ol all time L one wlm ' . ': THE EVERLY ' : BROTHERS 55' "Qi 1 .1 ,... , 73. Cathy's Clown, A Change ol lleart,Love 19. "lighthearted, winning inlormaIity" -lliFi Stereo Review N45 aseofamg NIGHT TRAIN suoov raormow 47. one Mint lulep, ltib loint, Mangos, 27. Never Let Me Go, lungle Fever, Down By the Riverside, etc. RACHMANINOFF Plano Concerto No. 1 ENT NTXB RIISTEIN .. N. . Dnumnloltt 102. "Electrilying perlormance...over- Vlllelmillgn-Ilifi Rev. BOUQUET rsncv FAH V smnvcs mam, -' , Loon ' ' n . ex Q' Sm: in 59. "Hilarious . . ." -L. A. Examiner. Not available in stereo SDNBS lad from 9ER1AAttY MKINGSIIIIGS V SB. Hlltraoldinarily beautiful ...ltrilIiant, silvery"-N.Y. Times . - ....,, i I v il Peg o' My Hao Doon Purple Tenderly -to More G. Also: Malaguena, Sabre Dance, Perli- dia, Mam'seIle, etc. . rumour LAIIIE -' L' nm lm , L for LSATNEI logo rm vom sm. . un. rum s more cow 26. Also: l've Got You Under My Skin, Too Young, etc. 97. Mr. Brailowslty is "a poet of the piano"-N.Y. Times TCHAIKOVSKY Ii AYYA 1812 Overture The Fzbulofsl Cnpncclo Italien Z 50m sms MQ Q Q 7 - sm MAKIA Q 1 -r .. 1 . 1: . no-1 ml. . 1,99 ANTAL oonon " A'i':5 mn o-mimi: no-nov mu l0l."1hemost elcit- ing reading l've ever heard"-Nigll Fidel. 44. Xing Kamehame- ha, Blue llawaii, AcrosstheSea,Smorc Norman Lulnrll Choir IAIIMENTS ro mornin in nm: smile Again ' M Unforgettable DINAH WASHINGTON . Pmfnoo f....,....... plusimorc 99. "A performance ul manly eloquence" 21. Also: Song from Moulin Rouge, Ebb 90. lighthearted singing, lusty and 24. Also: Rawhide, Wanted Man, The 35. Taking A Chance on Love, South ol 15. Wllen I Fall in Love, I Understand, Tanguillos, 8 more llurts, Lucille, etc. Pink Lady, 7 more -New Yorli Times Tide, etc. utterly delightlul 3:10 to vuma, etc. the Border, I0 more Song is Ended, etc. PA-rn .Q Q Q QV ' I ' HITS wa I.. ms MAGIC of G H t hum ANDRE PREVIN f no wonowoi worm or PAGE W: . rnom . , snow vAucHAN .1'2..2'.5I,......' H-OWERDRU L . 32.332 JONATHAN Sinn QQ-,VH QE, THE MOVIES , Imslgunm M LIKE Q L Q: GOLDEN hmm "i I ruin rncrrnrn .ln " . norm 'L , ' Lmm gglgnm vi ' j - -' HITS ' V. ,I gfffg, ,- 'Theme rnciriu "j,,',Q" I W "'.""' -. :,fff'u' snniowiv K 3 as es. if . mum . -goslngmfi Kofi- V ,N-MQ' '- coaivmu . ,n:uQvQ: soy : Quits lliorllo-lheSao1e0ne WTS 3 ""' . .,..J.l..' ' JA - -, Q """ 5 'tif-.isigirfi nunnrosininmrnsrrm Emilcssly-9More Qffl f 1' 23. lust Because, I Z9.Dnward Christian 63. Also: Tony Ben- 33. Also: Love is a 71. Also: Billy the 39. Also: When I Fall 55. "A hitol gargan- 13. Also: So Close, 5a,"Cgmipggnigg,,, Walk the line, lea- lous lleart, 9 more swam, :mx ol Ages,1zinan nett - Smile: Vic Damone - Gigi: etc. Random Thing, Are You Certain, etc. Kid, Running Gun, In the Valley, etc. in Love, Like Some- one in Love. etc. tuan proportions!" -N.Y. Daily Mirror llurtin' Inside. So continually hilari- MIIIY WIYS. etc. ous"-lllFi Review A a ll c y M... . .-..,,. Y llEllE'S THE MUST EXCITING OFFER EVER MADE BY ANY RECDRD CLUB! As a new member, you may have ANY SIX records of your choice - a retail value of up to 336.88 - for only 51.89. Never before has the Club offered so many records for so little money. What's more, you'II also receive a handy record brush and cleaning cloth - an additional value of 51.19 - absolutely FREE! To RECEIVE G RECDRDS FDR 51.89-mail the coupon today. Be sure to indicate whether you want your 6 records land all future selectionsl in regular high-fidelity or stereo. Also indicate which Club Di- vision best suits your musical taste: Classical: Listening and Dancing: Broad- way, Movies, Television and Musical Comedies: Jazz. NOW TNE CLUB DPERATES: Each month the Club's staff of music experts selects outstanding records from every field of music. These selections are described in the Club Magazine, which you receive free each month. You may accept the monthly selection for your Division . . . or take any of the wide variety of other records offered in the Magazine, from all Divisions . . . or take N0 record in any particular month. Your only membership obligation is to purchase six records from the more than 400 to be offered in the coming 12 months. Thereafter, you have no further obligation to buy any additional records . . . and you may discontinue your mem- bership at any time. FREE BDNUS RECORDS GIVEN RECULARLY. lf you wish to continue as a member after purchasing six records, you will re- ceive - FREE - a Bonus record of your choice for every two additional selec- tions you buy. The records you want are mailed and billed to you at the regular list price of 33.98 lClassical 54.981 occasional Orig- inal Cast recordings somewhat higherl, plus a small mailing and handling charge. Stereo r..:ords are 51.00 more. SEND N0 MONEY - mail coupon now! NOTE: Stereo records must be played only on a stereo record player. ll you do not own one. by all moans continue to acquire regular high-fidelity records. They will play with true-to-lite fidelity on your present phonograph and will sound oven more brilliant on a stereo phonograph it you purchase one in thu tuturo. SEND NO MONEY - .IUST MAIL THIS COUPON COLUMBIA RECORD CLUB, Dept. 208-7 Terre Haute, Indiana I accept your offer and have circled at the right the numbers of the six records I wlsh to receive for 81.89 - plus a small mailing and handling charge. i1fr'I.'le"Lli'2.i'i3'l.2"?lf'l'5'l.3ll. one? lil REG'-'I-AR U STEREO . and enroll me in the following Division of the Club: lcherk one Division onlyl lj Classical lj Listening 8. Dancing lj .lau I understand that I may select records from any Division. I agree to purchase six selections from the more than 400 records to be offered during the coming 12 months, at usual list price plus small mailing and handling charge, There- after, li I decide to continue my membership, I am to receive a Bonus record of my choice FREE for every two additional selections I accept. Nome ....... . . . . . fPlease Prlntj Address. ..... ..... ...... .. APO FPO addressees write for speczal o17er CANADA 'Prices slightly higher ' 1111 Leslie St Don Mills Ont. I I I I I I I CI Broadway, Movies, Television Rt Musical Comedies I I I I I I R City ........................... Zone .... Stole ............... 39 l Columbia Record Club, Terre llaute, Ind. I- 1- - -i u- - - - - 4 - 1- 1- -3- -i .- ' ""' '1 CIRCLE 6 NUMBERS: 91 92 95 96 97 1 23 41 44 47 53 54 I I I I I I 13 29 55 77 sal I I I I I I I 63 67 69 71 73 3 6 7 11 24 26 27 28 30 33 36 39 15 18 19 21 58 59 61 62 78 82 99 100 89 101 90 1 02 938.941 ' coum' As 2 Rzconos QE l will also recoivea brush and cloth FREE I Brown SL Williamson Tobacco Corporation Salutes the Corps of Cadets ,,.,-.Mr,Qnm.1w::E...,.,.,.:,-.,::.,:,::::.::::::,,::::.::::::,::::9,:::fp:-:-f-:f-:- ff ----- ,, '- -f' ---- Hg:-5:g:g,5:5:53 ---- -'fgzg-1.g:5fgggs:g,-5.3-11515-5-5,:,.,.,,,.. .. " A--- -V S gg- ---- . f m, , """ ' """"' """ ' :: 45: f. .-W" :wb ,:5 -- ,ggsiiiiii an ,.,. SEQ maxaman gdaaw QMQMM A',,.. as - Q '-1--21 2 H " ':':' ' . 412 -.-v-- f-:: -'-1:f -1-gf ,,.. " :' - vrr' l , A 5 1 li- ' . I W V .. ,,., A, 3, E : SY-,lg : C ,A 1 a 1 on . I , .,.. . .,., : E 2, Fx V M , l A ' oi! A , A K' " , Mfefmp , Wlmfzo Cv C'GA'iE"rsS V I Q Cie.-uw E11-ES Q sw--res Also Sir Walter Raleigh Smoking Tobacco and other Famous Tobacco Products 0 ln New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware... When You Seek Finest Quality Food at Lowest Possible Prices Come to V H 0 ll H R ll A B T 1 ff Automat-Cafeterias 8. Waitress-Service Restaurants if Retail Shops if Food Service and Management Division Serving nearly 1,000,000 patrons daily at convenient locations which include New York, Philadelphia Brooklyn, Yonkers, Mt. Vernon, White Plains, Flushing, Garden City, Fresh Meadows, Jersey City, Paramus Camden, Trenton, Valley Forge, Ardmore, Willow Grove, Lansdowne, Bala-Cynwyd, Cheltenham, Wilmington Qualizfy Diamonds FOR YOUR MINIATURE OR CLASS RING Easily Selected, Moderate in Price A Diamond Guarantee with Every GIFTS Solitaire WEDDING BANDS JEWELRY SILVERWARE WATCHES LEATHER GOODS PIPES TELEVISION ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES LADIES FURS OF ALL KINDS The Blue Book on display at the Cadet Store or PX Cadets are cordially invited to visit our Show Rooms. When in New York or Chicago, Come in to see as. Pine Brook, New Jersey BENNETT BROTHERS, INC. 485 Fifth Ave., New York ao E. Adams sr., chicago, ul. Diamonds, Jewelers and Siloersmiths Over Fifty Years Compliments of Kay Electric Company Maple Avenue Gentlemen: Congratulations are certainly due to each of you upon completion of your four years at the Academy. We wish you many years of continued success as an officer of the United States military service. As you pursue your career in the service of our country throughout the world, those of you who become electronics and communications officers, will have many opportunities to work with and depend upon the equipments manufactured by TMC. Many TMC engineers are on active duty throughout the world in both military and commercial service. They too, went through many years of schooling to qualify for their job. We are sure you will find them good members of your team. If, in the future, we may be of help to you, we offer the assistance of our engineering and management group in the furtherance of the state of the art in our chosen field. Sincerely yours, TECHNI CAL MATERIEL CORP . Oeot ie hffga Ray H. dePasquale OS I - President t , 5 2, . THE TECHNICAL MATERIEI. CORPORATION 'io Q ,,,-, Ivpl, MAMARONECK, New voRK to .- - by :nd5ub1idiarier COMMUMCPV OTTAWA, CANADA U ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA ' GARLAND, TEXAS v LA MESA, CALIFORNIA v POMPANO BEACH, FLORIDA Television - Radio Sales and Service FEITH SALES CCRP. 200 lVlaln Street Highland Falls New York Telephone 4654 l avii? f i Ah 1 ,? Auf X lil A r l i A 5 ' ""'- . Z 1 3 .53 2 i 'M .4l, .b,s . 2s6'q.f1ill ll An officer with bright insignia sets the proper example for his men. Brasso, the world- famous metal polish, gives a quicker, brighter,longer-lasting shine to insignia, but- tons, and buckles. You will find it most dependable in keeping a good appearance. 5. V1 hee THE R. T. FRENCH COMPANY Rochester 9, New York gong:-afufafiona fo Class of 1962 48 C0l'YI.f7Aln2Il.fJ fo UL.. CEM of 1962 PEl.l.lE'S PUNTIAC Route 9W Highland Falls, N. Y. H l 6-4034 long for a Pontiac no longer ! Go Wide-Tracking in a budget-wise Catalina. So many things no other car can touch-right within your reach. Precision control and roadworthiness from Pontiacls famous Wide-Track design. Trophy V8 power supply f2l5 to 348 hpj. Longer, 120" road-leveling wheelbase. A turning circle three feet shorter for easier parking. New fineness ff appointments. All contained in the Catalina for '62. f See the new Ventura Custom interior you want added luxury.j Why be just a Pontiac-watcher when Catalina makes it so easy to own one! See your Pontiac dealer at your first opportunity. ii l ' 7' 0 fhdossr STANCE ON we RCICSX CA TALIN.-1 o R CHIEF OXNEI ll. IND PRIX I x PONTIAC MOTOR DIVISION - GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION PQIEKBUQE Wfltilfil GASOLINE AND DIESEL ENGINES 2 TO LIIIII HORSEPOWER AIR-COOLED AND LIQUID COOLED MODELS FOR AN ENDLESS LIST OF APPLICATIONS WHEREVER POWER IS REQUIRED. U 0 I A l COFYLIHAIIIQFL fa NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT INC. 209 West 48th St., New York 36, N. Y. MOTION PICTURE AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT Sales - Service - Rentals To the Class of '62 Our heartfelt congratulations and best wishes on your graduation . . .and through the years to come. The 8 West Pointers on the Federal Services staff salute you on this happy occasion: Geo. M. Badger .....,..,..,..,. Nov. '18 ' ' 28 Edwin A. Cummings ..........r..... ' David G. Erskine ..........r..r........ '24 Robt. W. Hasbrouck ,..,.... Aug. '17 W. A. Holbrook, .Ir .....,.,.., Nov. '18 ' '21 MOITIS H. Marcus ........ .........,... James F. Torrence, Jr. .......,....., ,23 John M. Weikert .......,.. ,........ , 23 EEEEEBEOEEELIEPP 839 17th STREET N.W. Washington 6, D.C. f Supply its everything , egg. IJIIII mr 1 snow From skis To swea1ers...from boots To bindingsmfrorn poles to paste..,there's a PSM labeled product to bring extra foy into every skier's wide,whi1e world. It adds a new note of quality assurance To an unrivaled range of imported ski equipment and apparel. Blizzard Skis-Munari Boots - Eckel Poles 8. Bindings- Toko Waxes-Original Iceland Sweaters-.Iiiger .Iuckeis 8 famous na 5 from P Sr M Distributors, Inc.-40 New York Ave.-Westbury, L.l., N,Y, NAA is at Work in the fieIds of the future KVM 1 ,. , We N" ' 1- .r , . .,.. -mf ROCKET ENGINES. Originally built by North American Aviation for the U.S. Army. the famed Redstone recli- et engine was the engine responsible for launching Arnerica's first satellite and also the first Aineriean into space. ELEIITRONIII COMPUTERS. North American huilcls inanv computers for Arrnv use. Among these are Reconip tone of which is in use at West Pointl, and EADAtl,the coinputei' that directs artillery Iire with uncanny accuracy. NUCLEAR REACTORS. To provide electricity in manned and unmanned space vehicles for long periods oftiine, NAA is developing a series oi' cornpact, lin'l1tweigl1tSNAl'iSvsternsf0r Nucle- ar Auxiliary Powerl nuclear reactors. 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Judah Life Insurance Protection Exclusively for the Service Officer, His Wife and Children TI'Ie FULLER BRUSH CO. HARTFORD 2, CONNECTICUT 552 5'ongratulationA To af mmf Honored lcademq from 'Ure Mod Honored bealelopern CORAL RIDGE DEVELOPMENTS ARE NOT INHABITED SOLELY BY WEST POINT GRADUATES - THERE ARE A FEW NAVY MEN! BUT SOMEHOW ONLY THE FINEST PEOPLE SEEIVI TO LIVE HERE! 716 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY .R ,, .. ron sum Plcmcs I. M ' " Ann maicuss .f TS-2, 51 ref' IU ,ua '- . -51' , ' ex res E ' A SMESTRIN POTATOS X Q I 060152 I-I vrcmata an XX I I ,..,,.,W.,0Y.,.,,., gl it -I ,, 1 uf ff -i , 1, .. A A I QQ, 1- Y fi SHUISIRINGPIIIATIIES i5:a:g 'v W , QW-""k ae- .I 43? we -:Qian . ,2-:, 'Mia Q ' Zivmsinxu Y-l'.xX i4WK , Y-J l im iw 'Huw Atv, Jig - 4Q,,.. I ' n wilwiuuu 4 JUST HEAT Ano urs. 'mfP"ne:W - PIK-NIK CO. FORT LAUDERDALE FL0R'DA 625 MARKET STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 4 KOHIIOAIYLQILE5 TO THE CORPS OF CADETS FROM COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS MFG. CO., INC. Hartford, Connecticut 4 Iii In every field ef endeaiver, there are these who earn the right te lead. BACHE 8: CO. Members New York Stock Exchange and other leading stock and commodity exchanges HOME OFFICE: 36 WALL STREET, NEW YORK 5 Offices throughout the United States, in Canada, Latin America, Europe and the Far East ,Ill ii- WHEN lr's U ff i .X ,Jud ry iff A N Aniviv- NAVY if a M GAME TIME XX fand throughout the year! A Q 43 REMEMBER lbltddm just 10 minutes from Philadelphia near Haddonfield, N. J. PS1 Fabulous foodg 216 air-conditioned rooms, decorated by Dorothy Draper. adjacent to rden 91 Par Home of the JERSEY DERBY and other great stakes A .,,, . . ,'.f,ageg.'.- ,If Qu:-eta g., 2--,Q ., 'f,,,.g,w .img rg, 1,fye5s1 -wr:-.5 Ayy.gmf.,Q,Q.,g,3gg3g , Es?Qmses4.,w.,,Q,.fa. ' 0 ' Microlab's 45,000 sq. ft. plant Microlab is the world's leader specializing in the production of microwave components serv- ing over 800 customers in the United States and foreign countries. Microlab contributes heavily to space, national defense and civilian programs. Atlas, Nike-Zeus, Minuteman, B-57, Project Mercury, Polaris, Dew Line, BMEWS, 707, telephone communication and telegraph communication. Looking for progress? MICROLAB MAKES IT! M I C R O LA B 570 W. Mt. Pleasant Ave. Livingston, N. J. I I ROC I 1 n u I I I I -.N iff V ' " YS ' I A' Q1 55:6 I ' 'A I I w:gLg.ve:,Sjg ' Mm'-5 wr ' 5 I I X I ' W 1 ' S ,Q - - ----- - - -7 - - ----- I - - - - - - - - 5 I I l l n , 4 . 0 I Q I 0 MISSILES AND ROCKETS IN WHOSE DEVELOPMENT DOUGLAS HAS PLAYED A MAJOR ROLE, STARTING AS EARLY AS 1941 'HOW TO TRAIN Civilian Food Service Personnel" H get Whoever's responsible for the care and feeding of this coffee urn has been trained to perform his job properly, and with pride. This is the attitude you'd like to develop in your civilian food service people. Ask your Standard t t is Brandsman for his program on "How to Train Civilian Food Service Personnel." It helps to guarantee that everyone in your military food Axlbby . ,,,y il ..,..V operation will know howto do his job well-and want to. .,..... ,,-,,,. , is one of many services available only from the l X roasters of America's 21 Institutional Coffee. KNUWN FUR QUALITY AND SERVICE FUR ALM05' TA CENTURY , qv 5: Q.. J 1915 Mun ..... ,., , ' v 8 if EQQM 1917 Tzu Wjx ' by Q 3536 1918 . x 'fy L I "" I Q, 41 1919 - 1 'Q' Q 1920 fbwigiwae Yxwjd QI!!! 1921 1916 'MS , 4 ' je , J X... xx 1922 .,r,, '99'QQ' 1923 ilij J Q1--N45 1926 "..'I.T3T.1N Q ' Qp 1 ' 3 if 1927 1928 S iva 1929 1 HIQI, QM A WMMM iwadk X - f 'K ff 1924 1925 awww. gym? 9 9 Q 4 , V K r '-- 2299 are Q ff -Y 1930 1931 3 -xii . i 1932 ,x ,wx A x 9 ,W F 15 1933 ,.W..'wQgk1 1934 , QF if-6 W9' 1935 5xQ2 5 Q um S 1936 1937 1938 145 ,.if? 1939 MgQir.iMENA .,,, 1940 ,. ..,.,, iw xv Mi ,,., E 1941 .....-.Ap Q 1942 M. zu. W- ..... .3 1,1 ...,. 1 ,.., - b 1943 fwef f wM.,eg3xe 99199 iw: ,wmmT3,.L?h 33 ' gi 1 , 9 ...,, ,MIQWQE fii4i5Lq, ,ix3,Ai' CDL, Q9 fe, Q1,dH . 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 ,W ...9.1 11.41-.1,, 4 ,, ,- . .,,. 1, ,,,V. 1- 17 H 5-A:h We .,.-,:,.:, :I ..:.,, ---.,,, 4 M .iii ,.,,,,.,. ..... ....., I A:-:::-- i '--- ,V K W y 5iQ',fE5,,.Tl ly 9 9. - q ui! EL 44 we 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 Lf 9- -a-A "-' Q .IW ,,,: 1 1 , A we V 1956 y ,.' 1 im yy ,E ,M 1 "9 3 K M ' 1957 1958 1959 1960 a. llfwfgffj 5 1961 2...as in every single year for 47 consecutive years Again in 196 ll10RE PEUPLE RIDE 0lI GUUDYEHR TIRES THHII 0ll HIIY 0THER KIIID GO0D EA TRADITIONAL HEADQUARTERS FOR ARMY in PHILADELPHIA IDEALLY LOCATED-CENTER CITY Most convenient to Department Stores - Shops - Theatres and Many Historic Shrines in Independence Mall We Offer the Best Accommodations at Sensible Prices 3 PGPULAR DINING ROOMS Garden Terrace - For leisure dining Coffee Shop - Quick service - Popular prices Kite 84 Key Room - Cocktail Lounge Completely Air Conditioned THE BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HOTEL 9th and Chestnut Streets William G. Chadwick, General Manager 4: ITT I 41 In additiomshould you wish money for 'X l tk the purchase of an automobile, there is qk For fun d9t3Il5, .gg CUITIIJIEIE no encumbrance involved! You retain 't lf Z - - title-even take car overseas if you wish! -K grraeirlxv Had e 'Y banking sglivlces F . ' 3 ' for the Military OI' all UIIKIBFCIBSSMBII: Free bank-by- -K Asst, Vice President- TK . mail checking account service while at Ak care Scranton 1, Pa. K SINCE 1940 the Academy and for a full year after graduation! 41 if -lr THE NUMBER ONE BANK IN NURTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA N 9 oififices ,I Y P BANK AND rnusr coMP4N . Memhe' Fedem Deposit "'5""anc C p t' Formeriy First National of Scranton amma oaoneg 239 TMJ 48tl1 Simi, WM MWA Gi, SID gine cuifnine and wal? Hnfaged BRUNO BERNABO, Direttore JU 6-5151-2-3 SINCE 1906 NOW OPEN SUNDAYS GRADUATES CLASS OF '62 Let us finance your automobile. Special loan rates and terms. Free checking and personalized checks for two years after graduation. I THE FORT SILL NATIONAL BANK OF FORT SILL, OKLAHOMA X MEMBER F.D.i.c. Y A FAST CONVENIENT BANKING UNDERGRADUATES Free checking service and personalized x SERVICE FOR THE Checks' ARMY, NAVY, AIR FORCE, MARINE WRITE FOR DETAILS I coRPs AND COAST GUARD "BANKING FOR SERVICE PEOPLE IS OUR SPECIALTY" OUR MANY SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE OUR BEST ADVERTISEMENT The man who helps us choose Mutual Funds is The Man from IPC! I-s I The IPC Man krwws Mutual Fundsmask him to give you the facts on the Funds which he believes are best for y0u...and why! Investors Planning Corporation Q6 is f AN- 'W' Y' ' HOME OFFICE 60 EAST 42ND STREET ' NEW YORK 17, N V xfw.i.irimmir'.,,.f1f imagination has no beginning... no end... Today's astonishing progress in electronics is no accident-for the field has attracted the kind of imaginative people who have always set the bench marks tor mans progress. Hughes was built by people like these. They are prepared to cutaway old restraintsg to plunge ahead to new discoveryg to build and prove the "impossible," ln just ten years they have made Hughes one ot Americas leading producers of advanced electronics. Creating a new world with ELECTRONICS , ---------- ------- - - - , I , I , 1 ' H H E S ' , i I I - - .. - ...-.--- ------- - J nucwzs Amcmn couniw Hughes, Aircrait Company, Culver City. EISegur1d0,FuIleYlQr1,0Cear1Sid Newpbrtlifnach, Maiih L S Angeles, Califor Y SO Arilona LONGACRE 44575t1u "" New YURK omcf 276 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK -lnlllnngw YORK 'dzlllllllv ...mall milllll IIIl'lI""WH TNEY 37200 SOVERHG tmllvlllllllllblltt '?"'Qugmmynmymd!vlllw""itEfititffsssi1lA'H CONSTRUCTION tlllllqwh COMPANY LM 1, 1 ,,. We take pride in our association with the United States Military Academy - in the past as general contractors for the conversion of the cadet barracks, and in the present as we begin the building of its new cadet library. 2 ROYTEX,INC. s Th k th 1 fl962 s f th G. YQXS C0yK?bS19"" :dev nf' C r g A pt Sqpgxiioevsmx ,as :LE"'f'wo'g 1 w""Z fth B R 1, v113.k.1"'9 'L WY' 5 ROYTEX ROBES 390 5th AVENUE N Y k 18 N Y VVhat is aWinchester? It wasn't too long ago when the word Winchester meant rifle. The old model 1866 was as much a part of our Western history as the Conestoga wagon and the buckskin shirt. Time was when a man felt naked without his Winchester - unless he was a preacher and it was on a Sunday. Oliver Winchester's lirst rifle was the Henry repeater. The Confederate Army saw it from the wrong end. They called it "T hat damned Yankee rifle that you loaded on Sunday and fired all week." Later Buiialo Bill Cody told people, "For general hunting or Indian fighting I consider my Winchester Cmodel 18731 the boss." To Teddy Roosevelt, his Winchester Qmodel 1895j was his 'KBig Medicine." Now, a new rifle has joined the all-time Winchester greats: the model 100, chambered for the 243 and the 308 Winchester cartridges. This is the fastest shooting live-shot hunting rifle ever made. It is the proud result , of over 100 years of traditional Winchester craftsmanship. Wherever duty takes you, you and your Winchester are in pretty good company. WlNCHifTfRf, . WINCHESTER-WESTERN DxvrsxoN f ' M llUH'jHEIIl11fyl ' 1 W Xa fnwf6wize, ffligffglf f'Hl'rlE6f FLOR HEI HOE My XZIZ. meaw gn! s JJZZJQQ 012115201 KIQMJ THE FLURSHEUVIC SHOE COMPANY ' CHICAGO Makers ldiifllll? shoes fzr men, and 1,l'0IIIClI A IHVWMON OF lN'FF-'NAHHNA' U COMPANV 564 In The field of HYDRAULIC DREDGING GAHAGAN a leading name 'for over 50 years Wrile, wire or 'relephone Gahagan Dredging Corpora+ion, 90 Broad Sfree-+, New York 4, N. Y. Telephone Whifehall 3-2558. Cable address: "Walgal'1agan". U-HA UI. . . .for smori movers fl Across town or across the U.S.A., you'll save when you llkfgaf lx take household goods Wizlx you X X Y W in anhornngc and white D lg Xi - T U-HaulTrni1cr. Rent it here, , ' 'X f V V Q leave it there, wherever A you go, and enjoy U-Haul's A Jsb f i. ,f fx QV, kg? ? XB 0 Hikh , 'lb X low, low rntcsl I X ' .Ei 1 Fur 'shed , fgf . nl X 5 Cargo . ZIZCZITZM U-HAUL U'HAUL Tires 5 0 Free Bookler -ff ' .-3-11"-1. :wbmuhau hueirl-125 E ,...- 1 QV: L 1 -: 4 .,-1 ,- : , ...E 1 - iii-i V.- .- Qs v All kinds of lroilers for all kinds o moves WHEN you want information or photo- graphs on the Mach 2 all-weather F-105D Thunderchief, or on space and advanced aircraft research, or anything else at Republic, call Public Relations at CHapel 9-1100. Ken Ellington John Budd John Camden Herb Doherty Jim Gaylord Leon Shloss ...or Carl Byoir in New York. BLIG AVIATION CORPORATION FARMINGDALE. LONG ISLAND. N.Y. Congratulations to The Class of 1962 From W CXD 26 West 58th ST., New York 19, N. Y. EST. 1875 Teamed for Strength Many years of close teamwork between the U.S. Army and Curtiss-Wright have contributed toward maintaining our Ar- my's proud image as a symbol of strength. Among the many Curtiss-Wright products used by the U.S. Army today are missile cases, exhaust nozzles and other space age components. Other Curtiss-Wright pro- ducts for Army use include Turbolectric propellers to equip military cargo and per- sonnel carrying fleets of prop-jet aircraft. Research and development programs at Curtiss-Wright are constantly seeking new technological advances to keep the U. S. Army's defenses strong. Symbol of gualzly product: hr deyfiffzfe and zhdustry CuI'tiSS fi Corporation Wood-Ridge, Nevv Jersey RALPH WALDO EMERSON UCCCSS With what seems a rather surprising touch of materialism, Emerson said, "One thing is forever goodg that one thing is success." Perhaps it was not material suc- cess The Great Transcendentalist referred to . . . but his dictum is cer- tainly true with regard to investing. The one investment that is forever good is the successful one. However, it is seldom indeed that any one in- vestment, however good, can be for- ever successful. That's why even the most knowl- edgeable of investors needs help, if he is to achieve continuing success with his investments. That's why so many investors come to us for that help. Our long experience in every phase of financial service-as under- writers, brokers, dealers, and invest- ment advisors-is assurance that our advice, if not "forever good," is of very real value. We'd like to give you more details about our firm, its background and activities-to show you how our serv- ices could be of value to you. If you'll just drop us a note, we'll be happy to send you a free booklet telling you about Smith, Barney 8cCo. Smith, Barney 8: Co. Memberr New York Siotla Exchange and olber leading exchanger 20 Broad Street, New York 5, N. Y. 529 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. PHILADELPHIA - CHICAGO BOSTON ' SAN FRANCISCO Albany - Allentown v Cleveland - Dallas Hartford - Milwaukee - Minneapolis Congratulations l 4. ROSSE 8. LACKWE LL Famous foods for the American family. Suppliers to the military since 1706. The Crosse 8. Blackwell Co. Baltimore 24, Md. 1-1-15 tltlllll BE""'u In the heart of TIMES SQUARE BEFORE AND AFTER THE GAME 44 rl no -asm TREE T EIGHTH ENU 20:1 I X w York, -:moy Ih: If lcl Mmihallan- W ' vw fdcally loulcnl In me ' alrlcl All I400 roomy -' n In II AI mum, uelctmnn. and II I I ' alkwg dlslance ol v II I B I zl :ml Madison II C- d K A mmm: I , M rwm C I I II nm x I l C n I S I I F - meusPl b Id H D T E L I X I 'I' fl QM. X S TS Vf A Av E JU E O 5 l I V P G l M g rwln . xcie, i TONIGHT AND EVERY mem TALENT SHOWCASE Ieaturing TOMORRDWS HEADLINERS TODAY 2 Shows Nightly cnnziulwuv rlarxcmu lo lln' muuc of DICK HARDING UNE PRICE DRINK It FOOD POLICY TI-IB! 1EllMEEIR..A.L..ID ROOINI of mu ffmnm HOTEF'V' TE W on Tunes Square Fur Reservations Call lUdsnn 6-3800 ...ll- -1 Communications equipment for combat areas. Newest compact, FlVl communications equipment for the U. S. Army Signal Supply Equipment Agency is Avco's VRC-12, designed and produced by Avco's Electronics and Ordnance Division. lt uses narrow-band FlVl, covers 30-70 megacycles, has 920 channels, either manual or automatic tuning. lt is one-seventh the size, two-thirds the weight of former equipment. And it is completely compatible with manpack or airborne FM radio now being developed by the Army. AVCO CORPORATION, 750 THIRD AVENUE, NEW YORK 17, NEW YORK 9 X K W! if ll ll l f if! AJXWVNL Y, . lil' Q .ii-I frxmvl' I - ff' if lf? r if wli ' WHY WAIT TILL YOU'RE STATIONED FAR AWAY? Discover Our Banking Services for Army Personnel TODAY BANK BY MAIL-You deposit or withdraw with simple forms and use convenient, free postage- paid envelopes. ALLOTMENT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS-Simply allot part of your pay to a savings account at The Seamen's. Don't take chances on spending or losing the money. You specify the amount and each month the allotment is mailed direct to your savings account here. FOREIGN REMITTANCES-Promptly and easily arranged by Seamen's depositors who wish to send money abroad. Now's the time to make your arrangements with us. A call, a card or a visit will do the trick! Put Your Money To Work Now! DIVIDENDS FROM DAY OF DEPOSIT THE SEAMEN'S BANK for SAVINGS Chartered 1829 Main Office: 30 Wall Street, New York 5, N. Y. Fifth Avenue Office: 546 Fifth Ave., New York 36, N. Y. Bowling Green Office: Beaver St. at New St., New York 4, N.Y. CABLE ADDRESS: SEASAVE NEW YORK Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Space-Age Defense needs Down-to-Earth MOBILITY! From engine to wheel, Rockwell-Standard carries the power that moves military might at ground level. Multi-wheeled, rubber-tired vehicles are equally at home on or off the highway . . . transport everything from men to missiles. Maneuverability helps make our country's security certain 4 . . Rockwell-Standard makes performance dependable. Today, complete power transmission assemblies . . . produced to quality standards that have made Rockwell-Standard axles and transfer eases famous for half a century . . . are solving power transmission problems for the Department of Defense 41 and its prime contractors. of West Polni Wlqo We Qafukglou The lt is WITIW prlde , Cl SS O I arch OU Wlih the Cl for Pxfflelqco' That we share Well' goo S ROCKWELL-STANDARD I CORPORATION ion and Axle Division WORLDS LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF AXLES FOR TRUCKS, BUSES AND TRAILERS X INSIGNIA SPECIALISTS OUR 94th YEAR OF SERVICE TO THE g ARMED FORCES ADMID EQAHP FOICES MEN' -.... Il II 1 Y N s M1:Y1:n,lNc I I Fouwneoiesa Q NEW YORK, N. Y. HOUSE OF FINE JEWELRY Age nt for -Tiffany 81 Co. Silverware - Towle, Stieff, Sterling -Tiffany, Omega, Rolex, Hamilton, and other leading Brand of Watches -Royal Worcester, Rosenthal, Raymond Loewy Conti- nental China. -Perfect Diamonds Exclusively -Custom Designed Engagement Rings Our special Miniature engagement ring with .50ct perfect flawless diamond surrounded by 6 smaller dia- monds at 5330.00 T.l. has been so tar unexcelled by any firm. OUR MOTTO - QUALITY, SERVICE at the lowest Possible Prices Our thanks to all the cadets and officers of the "Point" for the confidence and trust given us in the past years, thus giving us the privilege to be one of the U.S.lVl.A. West Point Jewelers. 169 Westwood Avenue Westwood, N. J. For Inquiry lreverse chargesl N0 4-0616 N0 4-0671 whenever llrmy men meet you'll find . . . Americas No. 7 cigar 3? S, in-an everyone's hotel qt West Pomi lon the AcademY Qfoundsj for families and friends of cadets . . . banquets, reunions, recep- tions, group conferences, sales meetings. Fine food and beverages served in four different settings il Ama Just inside the south gate of the Academy JOHN J. SCHAFER, Manager The well-kept appearance of U. S. lVI. A. floors at West ' gift ' Point reflect the efhciency of ,f if PONSELL machines which have contributed in a large I measure to their general maintenance for over thirty-five years. Z If .5 1, " ,f ,li ',' "in ' . K' ' I --r' , If ' - i 1 I-es:.N.-..., .,. ix im J "fl" .S ,l -'I Q fm , M.AA A .. PUNSELL FLUOR MACHINE 00., INC. 220 West 19th Street NEW YORK ll, N. Y. 'k BRANCHES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES Pqnsell Products are backed by over 45 years electrical and manufacturing experience l7A6LlfLL V014 JACOB REED'S SCNS The 1962 HCWITZER STAFF 572 SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINC TIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLI CATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF OISTINC TIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLI CATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINC TIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLI CATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF OISTINC TIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLI CATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF OISTINC TIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLI CATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION DF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS SPECIALISTS IN THE CREATION OF DISTINCTIVE PUBLICATIONS INCLUDING THE 1962 HOWITZER OF THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY, WEST POINT, N. Y. HOWARD WOHL ASSOCIATES 192 STAAB LANE WESTBURY NEW YORK X ED 3-7200 X PRINTED THROUGH THE FACILITIES OF H. C ROEBUCK AND SON INC AlDXflElRTll8lER98 lllXllDlEX Aero-Jet General Corp. 537 AAKA Stamping Co., Inc. M562 American Express Co. AA A AA r.., AA A539 American Machine and Foundry Co. A A AA A533 Armed Forces Cooperative lnsuring Ass'n A A 530 Army Mutual Aid Ass'n Ft. Meyer A A A A 529 Army National Bank, Ft. Leavenworth A A AA534 Army Times Publishing Co. A AAA AA AA AAAA574 Art Cap Co. A A Arundel Corp. A A Avco Corp. AA Bache gl Co. A Balfour Co., L. G. A Bendix Corp. A Benjamin Franklin Hotel A Bennett Bros., Inc. A A Breyer lce Cream AAA Brown and Williamson Tobacco Corp. Budd Company, The A Cadillac Motor Division Cherry Hill Inn A Chevrolet Division A A A Chrysler Corporation AA Colt Patent Firearms AA Columbia Record Club AA Continental Can Co. A A A Continental Motors Corp. Coral Ridge Properties, Inc. AA Corcoran, lnc. A A AA Crosse and Blackwell Co. A Curtiss-Wright Corp. AAAAAA A A A 574 528 514 A 569 554 509 511 A 558 546 A A532 545 543 525 A 554 508A AA522 553 A 544 524 A A AA550 552 AA 540 A A 568 AAAA567 Class of Sixty Two AA Daniel Hayes Co., Inc. A DeHavilland Aircraft of Canad Delaware Memorial Bridge A Douglas Aircraft Co., lnc. A A Eaton Manufacturing Co. AAAA A Esquire Sportswear Co. A Evans and Sons Co., L. B. AA Federal Services Finance Cor Feith Sales A AA Florsheim Shoe Co. Ford Motor Co. Fort Sill National Bank AAAA A French, R. T. A Fuller Brush Co. A A Gahagen Dredging Corp. El D Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. Grumman Aircraft A A Hahn Co., lrvin H. H. J. Heinz Co. A Horn and Hardart AA AA AAA Hotels Astor and Manhattan AA H.R.H. Construction Co. A Hughes Aircraft Co. A Humble Oil and Refining Co. Investors Planning Corp. of America Jacobs and Son, Inc., A. AAA Johnson Service Co. M Jonathan Logan Kay Electric Co. Krementz and Co. Lauterstein's , Leone's Restaurant ,. Laviano, M. J. A , Leeds Travelvvear Corp. . , Ling-Temco-Vought, Inc. . Lockheed Aircraft , , , Loral Electronics Corp. Lorillard Co., P. , .,,. Louisville Cap Corp. A , Luxemberg, Morry . . Majestic International Sales Malan Construction . Marine Midland Bank ., Martin Marietta Mason and Hangar, Silas Mason Co., Inc. . Meyer, N. S. ,.. .. ,.,.,....,,..,., ,,,..., . .. . 1 Microlab . National Bank of Fort Benning ,.,. .,.., National Bank of Fort Sam Houston . National Cine Equipment , .,. . M 1 National Rifle Ass'n .,.,. ..,. . . New York Military Academy ., North American Aviation . . .,,...., 1 ,,,.,., Northeastern Penn. National Bank and Trust.. Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. H.. . Oman-Farnsworth-Wright .. M M Parker House Pellie's Pontiac ,. 1 Phillies Cigars CBayukl M. Pik-Nik Sales Corp. P 84 M Distributors , Ponsell Floor Machine Co., Inc Pontiac Motor Division . Republic Aviation Corp. Riggs National Bank . Robert Reis St Co. Rockwell-Standard Corp. Roytex Robes , . Rogers Peet Company Rubatex , Seaman's Bank , . Sears, Roebuck 8 Co. . . ,. Sheraton-Atlantic Hotel . .,.,, . Sinclair Refining Co. ,..... . Smith, Barney 84 Co. . ,...... Spence Engineering Co., lnc. Standard Brands Sales Corp. Sovereign Construction Co. , Stetson Shoe Co. , Sunshine Biscuit lnc. , Technical Material Corp. Thayer Hotel . , U-Haul Co. , United Services Auto Ass'n .. United Services Life lns. Co. Wembley Inc. . M West Publishing Co. White Studio Willys Motor Inc. . M . Winchester-Western ,, Wise Potato Chip Co. .. . Wohl Associates, Howard Zodiac Watch Co. . 552 558 572 549 565 512 510 570 562 516 530 570 542 514 535 568 518 556 562 517 540 547 571 564 532 552 528 524 566 532 563 532 573 538 575 AGKlXlQ5WlLlEI GlEAflllENTl'S The staff of the 1962 HOWITZER sincerely thanks the following individuals and organi- zations for their important contributions to the production of this book: Lt. Col. J. J. Cobb Howard Wohl Associates lVlr. Jacques Caldwell Army Information Digest Cadet Tom Johnson, '65 The New York Times lVlr. Frederick Todd White Studios Lt. Col. D. H. Henderson Cadet Activities Office lVlr. J. J. Dougherty M -A - by ffff -A AN me W. . , fi sry, :V V "V A 'sit f iff -I' . , .' E"v'1.' -' ., . '-Jf? ..T- H-El."... 13 '-:ff P ::Zk !'HfQ,"-rg' . L K'-1? ' ft -kiwi-F'-I. asa-'14, J fat af wget . . .Witt , ' ,551-six-K rt--1 fzhsffeswiw iw g,fe,.,'g:--7 .Q L x--, ,. .ii T P . 1 f f , wk A "1 T. i f ' 4FPfJ!5?r 2 Lv-'PQ ' H' V 4' 533.1 H iN gk u -- A . ' mg? wh las. .r m xwgijgef. ?..,ykm.t., w:g eagglf .gm ,nu ff Lgs If 5,51 , S s Q a 'hilt'-fY'Li4vi5j"!r,,A X", 6-if T-L. ?-' . - ,es -V 1 4' A 'Q f-I ' i Saga' '12 7 42. J " as . ., i 'V Sgq V-'. ' '- " 3 Q -- , ft, ..ff-, , 1 f . . L A- Z ,I if -. 32 : :": -,I , ,- , 1" . g c j fgtf fri- ti. ' -'--:HL ,w ar 5,, ' :: 5,'. f :t 5,.. wif f . - . - , . , 1 K 1 " J- ,. V ! .. . -1 Q " ' f.. i "' ' 9 - , -. pf 3, is K . . H .Q t . uw .... K K Tax? ,- It 4, k.,,5V K N T. ii ,-- F H 5-Ml . L fly. ,-. . .. . t, ,. ' ft Af! "" Wa! .i fl 1' 2- as . In AW 4- .eww Fi ,tg . .. E. Q . 'pts .QE me Q.. rl 53-R 45, - ,, r - ' , " ,V ..-M.


Suggestions in the United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) collection:

United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

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United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

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United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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United States Military Academy West Point - Howitzer Yearbook (West Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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