United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY)

 - Class of 1959

Page 1 of 354

 

United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 354 of the 1959 volume:

1 ws i ' • . ' PASQUALE YOUNG Editor-in-Chief THOMAS E. VETTER Managing Editor FRANK H. HUE Business Manager ANTHONY J. SCOTTI Advertising Manager ROBERT J. RUSSELL Art Editor RICHARD D. RONZITTI Photo Editor LCDR. VICTOR E. TYSON, USMS Officer Adviser LCDR. THOMAS H. GIDDINGS, USMS Editorial Adviser Not Printed at Government Expense ni i temi " 0? KBHS m MIS . ■ The LOGBOOK of the GRADUATINSl TABLE OF CONTENTS ADMINISTRATION Page 14 REGIMENT Page 30 j ACADEMICS Page 62 " ' ACTIVITIES Page 9B c G ; ATHLETICS Page 142 ' SUmS CADET LIFE Page 190 . ' J W . GRADUATES Page 222 7-%- i TO THE UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE MEMORIAL CHAPEL The ground was broken for the United States Merchant Marine Memorial Chapel on October 4th, 1958 by officials of the Federal Maritime Administration and the Acadeni ' . DEDICATION Feats of the men of the American Mercliant Marine are seldom known or publicized. Yet upon these dedicated men who repeatedly absent themselves from home and family, rests, in part, the security and continued prosperity of our beloved country. They often must sacrifice even their lives so that we can continue to enjoy the freedoms and pleasures to which we have become accustomed. That they are ready and willing to do this was proven by more than six thousand mariners who died during our nation ' s recent wars. Among those killed were two-hundrcd- eleven cadets from the United States Merchant Marine Academy. Those of us here now remember these men and the sacrifice they had to make. In memory of these and all lost mariners, the United States Merchant Marine Memorial Chapel is now being erected at Kings Point. We wish to express our appreciation to all those who spent their time and contributed their money to make our chapel possible. The chapel itself is a simple structure wliich will serve as a house of worship for men of all faiths. The 1959 Midships is dedicated with this hope ... as its beacon serves as a mark for mariners to steer by, so may the inspiration found in the chapel prove to be a guide bv wliicli all future mariners may shape their lives. TO THE UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE MEMORIAL CHAPEL " No natural phenomenon has inspired so much fine writing as the sea. It has gripped man ' s creative imagination, has aroused in him wonder and curiosity, fear, awe, exaltation; and has called forth profound and beautiful prose and poetry in response to the feelings and emotions it engendered. Of all things on earth, it is the restless and changing sea alone which man has been unable to accept or reject. Adventurers and explorers have challenged the deserts and the mountains, the tropical forests and the polar ice. Ordinary men have wondered at them, and some have lived among them. But the sea has ' engaged ' man, has teased him and seduced him, has fed him, tormented him, cradled him. If Earth is Mother, then perhaps the Sea is Wife. However we think of the sea, the fact emerges that she stirs the wellsprings of creativity which gave birth to artistic offspring sired by man ' s imagination and damned by the sea. " THE LITERATURE OF THE SEA The foregoing quotation from A. C. Spectorsky ' s The Book of the Sea defines the inspiration which has motivated man to author that huge, wonderful collection of writings which we have termed the Literature of the Sea. What a great treasure the many authors who wrote about the sea and ships and the men who called both home have left us. Every man has at some time in his life been exposed to the wondrous world of the sea through some sea story, be it a childhood classic like Treasure Island and Twenty- Thousand Leagues Under the Sea or a deep philosophical novel like Moby Dick. Through the medium of literature, the sea with all its countless wonders, its forbidden mysteries, its relentless fury, and its majestic beauty has become a part of even, ' man ' s experience. IHUS, the Literature of the Sea has enabled the mariner to share his wonderful stories and proud tradition with the entire world. These many writings have themselves become an integral part of the tradition of the sea. Many a seafarer has been enticed into his ancient profession by the siren call of the sea ' s literature. Many a cadet chose his future career as a ship ' s officer when he was but a lad completely captivated by one of those many alluring and adventur- ous novels of the sea. Having had a taste of the tradition of the sea, the young cadet enters his new life with a desire to become a living, vital part of that tradition. However, only by sailing, living, and struggling over the sea time and time again does man develop the techniques of her mastery. In recognition of this reality, the United States Merchant Marine Academy introduces cadets to the sea — to her glories, her habits, and her perils. Through intensive study in his classrooms and aboard ship during his third class year, the cadet learns the necessary talents to cope with the sea ' s every peculiarity and gains that practical knowledge so vital to his profession. Yet, the Academy is more than a vehicle for the education of the finest ships ' offi- cers in the world. It is the symbol and spirit of young America. It is the manifestation of adventure and the love of far away places. It is the teacher of the loyalty and honor and pride that has made the United States the greatest sea power in the world. It has become part of the graduate. No matter where the fortunes of fate lead him, in his heart he will carry forever pride in the Academy and its teachings. THE MISSION OF THE UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY ALMA MATER Oh, stately, strifeborn Ahna Mater, The Sound flows softly at thy feet; And sunset strikes across its waters As silver notes invoke Retreat. Now dim the patlis and trees in darkness. The stars above our ways appoint. We ' ll sleep secure aboard ' till morning; God steer thee well Kings Point. To attract a high t ' pe of young American with a definite aml)ition to become an officer in the United States Merchant Marine; To impart to him the necessary academic background and the fundamentals of a practical nautical education essential to a successful career at sea; To develop in him a high sense of honor, uprightness, and loyalty; To instill in him a pride in his profession, and a determination to uphold the traditions of the Merchant Marine; and By effective teaching, training, and guidance, to send him forth to his calling with a deep respect and affection for the United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps and its Academv. 9 ■it ■ i, . • . • A 4A.- «t? ' iil The iMission of the United States Merchant Marine Acad- emy is C[uitc a challenging one. It is the formula for the making of the best merchant marine officers in the world. The ful- fillment of the Mission requires a highh ' skilled organization which is proficient in the train- ing of young men. It is a weighty assignment indeed. This all- important task is guided by the Academy ' s capable Adminis- tration. In tlie hands of the Administration lies the future of the Academy. It is to this body of men that we must look for leadership, for it is they more than any others, who con- trol the life of each and every Cadet. It is the burden of the Administration to run the Acad- emy so that it will continue to fulfill its Mission by producing compet(Mit officers to man tlie ships of tlie American Merchant Marine. ' ADMINISTRATION Herman Melville As is the case with many authors, Herman Melville ' s writ- ings are closely allied with his actual life. The more mundane portions of Moby Dick are based on his experiences aboard American whaling vessels in the early 1800 ' s. Because of econom- ic reasons, Melville was forced into die role of provider before he had completed liis schooling. During his years of peak pro- ductivity his lack of education handicapped him se ' crely and he was forced to rel ' heavily on a dictionary in order to make his works readable. By the time he wrote Moby Dick his eyesight was so bad that tlie manuscript had to be redor e by his rela- tives. In tlie original form, his writings were flowery and deeply moving but became so changed after the corrections tliat many of the passages were unrecognizable to him. In Moby Dick he allows his characters to peruse the nature of good and evil by asking spiritual questions and permitting the reader to reason the answers for himself. This style combined with the ex- citing and colorful plots make all of Melville ' s works enjoyable reading for young and old alike. The Mission of the United States Merchant Marine Acad- emy is quite a challenging one. It is the formula for the making of the best merchant marine officers in the world. The ful- fillment of the Mission requires a highh- skilled organization which is proficient in the train- ing of young men. It is a weighty assignment indeed. This all- important task is guided by the Academy ' s capable Adminis- tration. In the hands of the Administration Ues the future of the Academy. It is to this body of men that we must look for leadership, for it is they more than any others, who con- trol the life of each and every Cadet. It is the burden of the Administration to run tlie Acad- emy so that it will continue to fulfill its Mission by producing competent officers to man tlic ships of the American Merchant Marine. As is the case with many authors, Herman Melville ' s writ- ings are closely allied with his actual life. The more mundane portions of Moby Dick are based on his experiences aboard American whaling vessels in tlie early 1800 ' s. Because of econom- ic reasons, Melville was forced into the role of provider before he had completed his schooling. During his years of peak pro- ductivity his lack of education handicapped him severely and he was forced to rely heavily on a dictionary in order to make his works readable. By the time he wrote Moby Dick his eyesight was so bad that tlie manuscript had to be redone by his rela- tives. In die original form, his writings were flowery and deeply moving but became so changed after the coiTections that many of the passages were unrecognizable to him. In Moby Dick he allows his characters to peruse the nature of good and e ' il by asking spiritual questions and permitting the reader to reason the answers for himself. This style combined witli the ex- citing and colorful plots make all of Melville ' s works enjoyable reading for young and old alike. DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER FUESIDEXT OF Till-, I MTEl) STATES HONORABLE JOHN J. ALLEN, JR THE HONORABLE CLARENCE G. MORSE MARITIME ADMIMSTHATOR, MAUITIME ADMIMSTRATIOX AND CHAIRMAN, FEDERAL MARITIME BOARD UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE The Honorable Ben H. Guill, VICE CHAIRMAN The Honorable Clarence G. Mo CHAIRMAN Tlio Honorable Thomas E. Sfakem, Jr., MEMBER DERAL MARITIME BOARD MARITIME ADMINISTRATION • UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REAR ADMIRAL WALTERC. FORD, U.S. NAVYfRETJ DEPUTY MARPPIME ADMINISTRATOR REAR ADMIRAL GORDON McLINTOCK, USMS SUPERINTENDENT UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY CAPTAIN HAROLD V. NERNEY, USMS EXECUTINE OFFICER GUY W. TRUMP, B.B.A., M.B.A., Ph.D. DEAN COMMANDER L. F. DIEDRICKS, USMS HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS LIEUTENANT COMMANDER JOHN T. McKENNA USMS CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN LIEUTENANT COMMANDER JOHN M. DANIELSEN USN PROTESTANT CHAPLAIN LIEUTENANT COMMANDER K. A. GEARY, USMS REGISTRAR AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES OFFICER LIEUTENANT COMMANDER A. B. VAN BUREN USMS ASSISTANT HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS LIEUTENANT H. J. I.EICHT, USMS PUBLISHING OFFICER LIEUTENANT G. F. McGUIRE, USMS SHIP ' S SERVICE OFFICER MT L. F. URSCHEL, USMS tANT TO THE DEAN LIEUTENANT (jg) E. W. MacCRISKEN, USMS PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND HYGIENE OFFICER LIEUTENANT (jg) D. L. SCASSERRA, USMS ASSISTANT HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND SUPPLY LIEUTENANT (jg) E. W. FALK, USMS ASSISTANT REGISTRAR AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICES OFFICER WARRENT OFFICER H. G. LASHER, USMS ASSISTANT TO THE REGISTRAR ENSIGN J. KISZENIK, USMS ASSISTANT TO THE SUPERINTENDENT The cadets at the United States Merchant Marine Acade- my are organized into a Regi- ment. The Regiment is divided into three Battahons consisting of two Companies each. Each Company is berthed in its own hall or dormitory, all of which are named after famous men in the American Merchant Marine. The Administration of the Regi- ment and its various components is handled by cadet officers un- der the guidance of the Regi- mental Office. A Kings Point cadet living in one of the six Companies is a member of a proud, high-spirited organization. Company spirit is bolstered b ' competition in mili- tary drill and intramural sports. The competitive spirit and sense of teamwork received by the cadets from intra-Company com- petition is an important asset in their training as futme leaders. In addition to liis Company membership, every cadet is also a member of the Regiment. The Regiment is an organization of men bound together for a com- mon purpose — to become Mer- chant Marine Officers second to none. The training that they receive living and working in the Regiment is no less impor- tant to their goal dian their academic development. In ad- dition, being a member of the Regiment of cadets for four years gives each man a won- derful sense of pride in his Academy, his industry, and in himself. James Norman Hall Truly one of the best romance novels of the sea, Mutiny on the Bou7ity has been one of the most popular fictional works since its original pubhcation in 1932. It was written by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall. Writ- ing in collaboration, these two gentlemen have turned out some of the finest " salty " literature in the English language. They joined forces soon after their release from service in World War I. Searching about for a topic with a South Sea flavor, they hit upon the strange history of His Majesty ' s ship Bounty. Fascinated by the account of the ill-fated Bounty in a long-for- gotten chronicle, Nordhoff and Hall decided diat their South Sea novel would be based on the true story of the Bounty. After a lengthy research period in which they delved into the an- cient archives of the British Navy, the two authors sailed for the South Sea Island of Tahiti, where much of the actual event took place, to begin their now famous book. Mutiny on the Bounty. The story which came from the pens of Nordhoff and Hall on Tahiti has turned out to be one of the most widely read of all sea rrovels. It is an account of a British vessel, the H.M.S. Bounty, which set sail for the island of Tahiti in the winter of 1787. The cadets at the United States Merchant Marine Acade- my are organized into a Regi- ment. The Regiment is divided into three Battahons consisting of two Companies each. Each Compan - is berthed in its o ' n hall or dormitory, all of which are named after famous men in the American Merchant Marine. The Administration of the Regi- ment and its various components is handled by cadet ofiBcers un- der the guidance of the Regi- mental Office. A Kings Point cadet living in one of the six Companies is a member of a proud, high-spirited organization. Company spirit is bolstered b - competition in miU- tary drill and intramural sports. The competitive spirit and sense of teamwork received by the cadets from intra-Company com- petition is an important asset in their training as future leaders. In addition to his Company member.ship, every cadet is also a member of the Regiment. The Regiment is an organization of men bound together for a com- mon purpose — to become Mer- chant Marine Officers second to none. The training tliat they receive li ing and working in the Regiment is no less impor- tant to their goal than their academic development. In ad- dition, being a member of the Regiment of cadets for four years gives each man a won- derful sense of pride in his Academy, liis industry, and in himself. •• Truly one of the best romance novels of the sea, Mutiny on the Bounty has been one of the most popular fictional works since its original publication in 1932. It was written by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall. Writ- ing in collaboration, these two gentlemen have turned out some of the finest " salty " literatvure in the English language. They joined forces soon after their release from service in World War I. Searching about for a topic with a South Sea flavor, they hit upon the strange history of His Majesty ' s ship Bounty. Fascinated by the account of the ill-fated Bounty in a long-for- gotten chronicle, Nordhoff and Hall decided that their South Sea novel would be based on the true story of tlie Bounty. After a lengthy research period in which they delved into the an- cient archives of the British Navy, the two authors sailed for the South Sea Island of Tahiti, where much of the actual event took place, to begin their now famous book, Mutiny on the Bounty. The story which came from the pens of Nordhoff and Hall on Tahiti has turned out to be one of the most widely read of all sea novels. It is an account of a British vessel, the H.M.S. Bounty, which set sail for the island of Tahiti in the winter of 1787. FALL C. O ' Hara, Regimental Drillniaster; D. McCoy, ReKiniental Aide; W. Holyoak. Regimental Commissary; P. Quintus, Regimental Adjutant; D. Dean, Regimental Commander; G. Hauer, Regimental Welfare and Recreation; C. Belous, Regimental Communications; V. Sosin, Regimental Security. WINTER p. Fellman, Regimental Drillmaster; R. Cleveland, Reciniental Security; R. Hopfe, Regimental Welfare and Recreation; B. Whiteside, Regimental Adjutant; R. Mugavin, Regimental Commander; F. Hite, Regmiental Commissary; D. Ekstrom, Regimental Aide; R. Buscher, Regimental Security; C. Davis, Regimental Bandmaster. I REGIMENTAL STAFFS CDR. RICHARD H. O ' CONNELL, USMS Regimental Officer SUMMER J. Ogle, Regimental Bandmaster; V. Holyoak, Regimental Welfare and Recreation; F. Hite, Regimental Commissary-; D. Dean, Regimental Adjutant; R. Mugavin, Regimental Commander; D. Ekstrom, Regimental Aide; C. Belous, Regimental Communications; V. Sosin, Regimental Security; C. O ' Hara, Regimental Drillmaster. FALL J. Moran, Battalion Commissan ' and BerthinR; D. Greaves, Battalion Adjutant; E. Fabber, Battalion Commander; E. Br an, Battalion Security; A. Bleakley, Battalion Aide and Communications. WINTER D. Dobler, Battalion Security; J. Davis, Battalion Adjutant; J. Leeper, Battalion Commander; L. Price, Battalion Commissary and Berthing; W. Lovaas, Battalion Aide and Communications. FIRST BATTALION STAFFS LCDR. FRANCIS A. LITCHFIELD USMS First Battalion Officer i Q TT M M P P ' B ' I ' sy ' Battalion Aide and Communications; J. Leeper, Battalion Adjutant; E. Fabber, U U I ' l I ' l L n Battalion Commander; D. Dobler, Battalion Security; L. Price, Battalion Commissary and Berthing. FAIL J. Turner, First Platoon Commander; R. Cosentino, Sub-Company Commander; L. Bowles, Company Commander; L. Price, Guidon Petty Officer; R. Smith, Second Platoon Comman der. WINTER T. Sloan, First Platoon Commander; J. Doming, Sub-Company Commander; N. Gasaway, Com- pany Commander; L. Bowles, Guidon Petty Officer; M. Stone, Second Platoon Commander, SUMMER L. Bowles, First Platoon Commander; J. Davis, Sub-Company Commander; N. Gasaway, Company Commander; T. Sloan, Guidon Petty Officer; J. Doming, Second Platoon Commander. FIRST COMPANY FIRST CLASSMEN Front Row: G. Romeo, R. Gomes, R. Rich- ard, U. Dohler, C, Weiser, J. Davis. Second Row: M. Stone, R. Smith, G. Boston, W. Barron, R. Cosentino, F. Haggerty, G. Rosenthal. Third Row: L. Bowles, J. Haas. Fourth Row: D. Dean, W. Lovaas, P. Fell- man, W. Phelps. Back Row: N. Gasaway, R. Million, H. Cannon, L. Price, L. Hernandez, T. Clark, W. Hollon, W. Szeezil. SECOND CLASSMEN Front Row: W. Gregory, L. Drago, D. Eichin, J. Baier, R. Csernalabics, J. DeSantis, R. Bernard, A. Shelko, E. Bowennan. Second Row: J. Fitzsimmons, J. Rozwat, E. Jane, C. Fears, F. Amason, R. 0 " igg. W. Haldeman, C. Bland, D. Sentilles, G. Leffler. Back Row: J. Warren, J. Cano, T. Carroll, L. Mavretish, E. Namahoe, D. Erlandson, D. Kirby, F. Verona, J. Reneau. FOURTH CLASSMEN Front Row: W. Bowes, J. Hoffman, J. Jones, J. Joseph, J. Bionda, T. Hand. Second Row W. Horner, P. Choisnard, J. Johnson, E Cook, T. Murnane. Third Row: B. Jackson, C. Cook, E. Monroe, C. Haynes, D. Mc Manus, R. McNamara. Fourth Row: J McLoughlin, M. Ring, F. Dunlap, M. Elen- iewski, J. Caron. Fifth Row: T. Wilkinson R. Aruta, E. Harsche, H. Allen, L. Migliore R. McKinney. Back Row: R. Halsted, W Dierks, G. Young, G. Faber. r A T T W. Wiley, First Platoon Commander; J. Polsenski, r 11 L L Sub-Company Commander; A. Theriault, Company Commander; W. Lovaas, Guidon Petty Officer; R. Young, Second Platoon Commander. TAT T XT T r D J- Gossner, Second Platoon Commander; W. See- ¥V 1 W 1 L 11 nev, Sub-Commander; D. McMaster, Company Commander; W. Wiley, Guidon Petty Officer; R. Fairfield, First Platoon Commander. SUMMER VV. Wiley. Second Platoon Commander; D. Greaves. Sub-Company Commander; D. McMaster, Company Commander; J. Moran, Guidon Petty Officer; E. Brvan, First Platoon Commander. SECOND COMPANY FIRST CLASSMEN Front Row: J. Ogle, P. Kelly, G. Ursitti, N. Skarvelis, V. LaFranchi, N. Jensen. Second Row. R. Hamilton, D. Baldick, J. Moran, R. Tschida, H. Gilmore, J. Ekstrom, J. Polsenski. Third Row: E. Swanson, J. Barron, D. Greaves, C. Davis, E. Fabber, R. Fairfield. Back Row: S. Banyacski, W. Siegal, R. Mugavin, W. Wiley, B. Woessner, E. Bryan, J. Leeper, J. Gossner. SECOND CLASSMEN Front Row: L. Bellaff, E. Fields, M. Tschida, E. Quinn, R. Lacher, R. Jones, D. Moyer, «. Tetrault, J. Sexton, R. Troike, A. Fleming. Second Row: J. Scinta, F. Wolke, D. Foster, K. Lehn, P. .Martin, J. Walsh, G. Voege, G. Parker, P. Domas, j. Bannister. Back Row: A. Linden, J. .Morrissey, J. Way, J. Lawless, J. Fahrendorf, T- Robinson, G. Nicholson, G. Schieber, R. Phillips, U. Leyendecker. T ' V FOURTH CLASSMEN Front Row: D. Kovaleski, V. Gostom.ski, J. Riley, . Sodher, D. Koons, T. Little. Second Row: J. Allen, D. Adams, B. Carl- ston, D. Goodale, R. Lane, L. Spindler, R. Hendricks. Third Row: T. Rees, H. Baker, D. Denny, C. Smith, R. Baumgartner, D. Marshall. Fourth Row: L. Ruggiero, P. Clicquennoi, L. Johnson, J. Ruck, J. Jakiib- owski, D. Meireck, J. Mullaly. Fifth Row: G. Lcc, F. Schnarr, D. Wander. W. Wieder- recht, D. Olscn, J. Silva. Back Row: T. Toner, R. Sparra, J. Bazler, F. Arness, C. Hawkins, R. Shinners, B. Santini. immm i FALL J. Fettke, Battalion Aide and Conimunications; J. Sanborn, Battalion Adjutant; J. Rinard, Battalion Commander; R. Ottone, Battalion Commissary and Berthing; R- Zakzrwski, Battalion Security. WINTER L. Zaleski, Battalion Commissary and Berthing; H. Weeks, Battalion Adjutant; W. Smith, Battalion C(immand -r; R. Parker. Battalion Security; H. Jenson, Battalion Aide and Communications. SECOND BATTALION STAFFS SUMMER H. Jenson, Battalion Aide and Communications; J. Sanborn. Battalion Adjutant: J. Rinard. Battalion Commander; R. Parker, Battalion .Sctiirit : D. McCoy, Battalion Commissary and Berthing. FALL D. Wine, Second Platoon Commander; W. Sniitli, CPO; J. Landrie, Sub Company Commander; R. Kline, Guidon Petty Officer; C. Scharar, First Platoon Commander. WINTER R. Kline, First Platoon Commander; J. Fettke, Sub Company Commander; R. Madden, Company Commandrr; ]. McDonou!, ' li, Guidon Pett - Officer; H. Si,nn,.ms. Second Plat.u.n Cunnnandcr. P TT liT 1 r Tl JJ-, ® ' ' ' ' ' First Platoon Commander; R, Madden, J U M M L A " " Company Commander; P. Quintus, Company Commander; R. Kline, Guidon Petty Officer; W Smith, Second Platoon Commander. THIRD COMPANY ©)© J 12 .n fp if .f .t FIRST CLASSMEN Front Row: C. Woodrick, C. Elias, R. Hale, VV. Galbraith, L. Zaleski, C. Plott. Second Row: R. Kline, R. George, R. Mad- den, J. McDonough, D. Wine, S. Phin, M. Lyon. Back Row: F. Castaneda, P. Kauf- man, C. Norz, W . Smith, G. Johnson, P. Quintus, L. Jacobs, C. Scharar, O. Karr, F. McQuillen. SECOND CLASSMEN Front Row: P. Suleski, F. Hinchy, E. Am- brose, M. Snyder, P. Parr, A. Foelster, E. Richardson, J. Cunniff, T. Grossman, R. Foster. Back Row: A. D ' Ambra, M. Schiebel, T. McElligott, M. Ford, W. Sweeney, W. Jernberg, J. McAbee, J. Os- borne, D. Harris, E. Knutscn, T. Kaiser, E. Tomlinson, P. Mahncn, D. Schroeder, W. White, J. Farrell, E. Sutter,- E. Fitzgerald. FOURTH CLASSMEN FroMf Row: M. Forster, R. Jacobs, L. Eulner, G. Cawthon, D. Emerson. Second Row: J. Holt. W. Dargin, M. Jones, W. Wood. Third Row: P. Keenc, A. Cullen, R. Caffrey, D. Nazarro, W. Koubck, J. Reilley, R. Hen- riques, C. Hutton. Fourth Row: P. Peter- .son, A. Huebner, J. Weekes, J. Bohn, N. Peckham, F. O ' Toole, D. Larive. Back Row: B. Phillips, R. Lemmert, P. Schaeffcr, D. Larson, L. Prividy, L. Cyr, J. Zablan, A. Averette, M. Hayes, D. Schweter, D. Hagan, E. Skipp. iJh r WINTER E. Silvt ' stri, Second Platoon Commander; F. Kester man, Sub Company Commander; T. Vetter, Com- pany Commander; J. Basset. Guidon Petty Officer W. Lewis, First Platoon Cnniniaiulcr. SUMMER E. Silvestri, Second Platoon Commander; H. Prime, Sub Company Commander; T. Vetter, Company Commander; W. Lewis, Guidon Petty Officer; J. Ring, First Platoon Commander. FOURTH COMPANY FIRST CLASSMEN Front Row. R. Quegan, R. Knight, R. Parker, P. Young, H. Prime, D. Garbiras, D. Combs. Second Row: K. Stevens, R. Pierce, E. Silvestri, J. Rocchio, L. Paine, J. Grubiak, H. Jenson, W. Lewis, F. Kesterman, C. Hodek. Back Row: T. Vetter, H. Jepson, J. Ring, J. Bassett, R. Homan, R. Cleveland, R. Zakrzwski, R. Ottone, L. Richardson, M. Carroll, A. Rausch. SECOND CLASSMEN Front Row: J. Toner, R. Nelson, K. Reiter, D. Hassi, R. Hayden, D. Nurenburg, E Kolchamo, J. Yankanich. Second Row: W. Henderson, W. Tender, T. Cahill, E. Dennis, R. Solinski, R. Muller, A. Amador Back Row: F. Schick, R. Rudnick, R Thomal, R. Thomas, J. Holden, J. Zuritis, A Widberg, J. Duffy. FOURTH CLASSMEN Front Row: M. Dina, W. Fry, K. Fixman, F. Klausner, D. Leventhal, D. Lawrence, R. Frey, E. Egan, J. Kennedy, R. Quick, P. Seifert. Second Row: T. Carr, G. Lonkart, R. McMichael, J. Tanski, W. Schauweker, A. Gates, F. Kramer, S. Losey, D. Knarr. Third Row: D. Campbell, P. Miskimin, R. Griffin, R. Kulmus. R. Coles, J. Collins, W. Duross, G. Faircloth. Back Row: M. Ronzak, K. Rohr, G. Crosby, D. Hansen, J. Kinsder, , J. Holnian, J. Forman. FALL H. Rogers, Battalion Commissary and Welfare; D. Price, Battalion Adjutant; W. McKinney, Bat- talion Commander; R. Cook, Battalion Aide and Communications; R. Klemetz, Battalion Security. WINTER A. Jones, Battalion Commissary and Welfare; C. Quarles, Battalion Adjutant; R. Rothman, Battalion Commander; J. Doran, Battalion Security; R. Leiz; Battalion Aide and Communications. THIRD BATTALION STAFFS LCDR. DONALD E. BOYLE USMS Third Battalion Officer SUMMER G. Rohloff, Battalion Commissary and Berthing; B. Whiteside, Battalion Adjutant; W. McKinney, Battalion Commander; R. Leiz, Battalion Aide and Communications; R. Uhlin, Battalion Security. FALL WINTER M. Brooks, First Platoon Commander; G. Rohloff, Sub Company Commander; R. Stine, Company Commander; R. Magna, Guidon Petty Officer; W. Gunn, Second Platoon Commander. T. McLaughlin, First Platoon Commander; R. Twilde, Sub Company Commander; J. Roethke, Company Co mmander; C. Belous, Guidon Petty Officer; J. Lowe, Second Platoon Commander. SUMMER J. Roedikc, First Platoon Commander; R. Rothman, Sub Company Commander; D. Price, Company Commander; R. Campbell, Guidon Petty Officer; W. Gunn, Second Platoon Commander. FIFTH COMPANY FIRST CLASSMEN Front Row: J. Shannon, J. Maushart, W. Holland, W. Gunn, R. Ronzitti. Second Row: D. Mikkelsen, H. McKinley, R. Bernier, R. Campbell, C. Quarles, D. Price. Third Row: B. Whiteside, R. Andraka, R. Russell, C. Boese. Back Row: H. Leiz, R. Rothman, G. Clancy, W. McKinney, R. Emerick, J. Kay, R. Magna, G. Hauer, H. McLaughlin. SECOND CLASSMEN Front Reno: J. Oyafuso, G. Mason, A. Lipoid, C. Janiile, D. Davis, J ' . Mokuam, H. Sofield, C. Smith. Second Row: R. Moffitt, D. Gaber, D. Cullen, E. McGuire, M. Lindsay, M. Rakosky, D. Morton, T. O ' Brien, R. Safarik. Back Roiv: J. Nussbaum, R. McNeill, H. Seeley, R. Schulz, F. Tuennecke, G. Mortons, A. McDonald, W. Koehler, G. Myers, C. Heller. FOURTH CLASSMEN Front Row: A. Valenti, J. Field, T. Smith, G. Carroll, R. Rhein, A. Seignoli, R. Wil- liams, T. Bulccr, P. Oliver. Second Row: C. Collins, F. Greenwald, E. Walz, A. Baum- gart, J. O ' Brien, S. James, R. Burchell, R. Bodnar. Third Row: J. Striker, J. Corso, W. Rodgcrs, S. Weaker, T. Kosty, A. Finlev, E. Bonacci, R. Biirpillat. Fourth Row: E. Mattioni, C. Williamsen, J. Vanzant, J. Cocker, J. St. Clair, J. Posner, J. Ferguson, J. O ' Felt. Fifth Row: T. Dunn, J. Scroggins, R. Leyh, T. Villa, R. Steiner, R. Wilson, E. Shimler. Back Roiv: M. Ellis, D. Spencer, J. Buxton, C. Morley, D. Partridge, J. Alanko. FALL J. Putnam, First Platoon Commander; R. Browii, Sub Company Commander; J. Spence, Compan - Commander; I. Salenjus, Guidon Petty Officer; j. Lowe, Second Platoon Commander. W T N T F R - Salenjus, First Platoon Commander; R. Klementz, II 1 ll 1 Ij n Sub Company Commander; K. Christiansen, Com- SUMMER R. Twilde, Second Platoon Commander; R. Klem- entz, Sub Company Commander; J. Spence, Company Commander; R. Cook, Guidon Petty Officer; J. Lowe, First Platoon Commander. SIXTH COMPANY FIRST CLASSMEN Frnnt Row: A. Pelletrau, H. Schreier, J. Salenjiis, K. Kinstlcr, R. Branncn. Second Roic: J. FcrriKno, C. Eustace, M. Brooks, R. Twikle, R. Persons, A. Scotti, V. Atkinson. Third Roti:: K. Christensen, R. Daniels, J. Lowe. Standing: C. Galiszcwski, R. Gross, R. Brown, J. Seelinger, D. Mc- Bridc, R. Brown, D. James, R. Kron, R. Stine, D. Cowliig, C. O ' Hara, T. Pross, D. Kane, J. Manning, J. Putnam, G. Collier, R. Cook. SECOND CLASSMEN Front Roic: P. Minch, G. Wanlong. P. Rackett, P. Degregorio, H. Ceely, T. Tollef- son, R. Pearl, K. Morse. Second Row: J. O ' Xeil, J. Ward, M. Schneider, J. Bovlston, N. Talbot, J. Pourto, W. Geist, B. Zelenka. Back Row: S. Griffin, F. Piuko, J. Muldner, J. Warner, J. Conroy, J. Kaufman, J. Schubert. FOURTH CLASSMEN Front Row: D. Liu, S. Parks, T. Kirsther, W. Mostler, R. Jacobi, R. Fcdorczak, D. Hard, R. Merino, E. Terry. Second Row: R. Stewart, K. Webb. D. Hoerle, D. Mathie- son. O. McNecley, D. Koran, J. Giglio, D. Goforth. Third Row: J. Norrod, P. Hancock, J. Mateyko, D, Rohe, D. Miller, J. Strasser, H. Fieldman, A. Honza. Back Row: C. Krebs, D. Higgins, H. Zimmemiann, P. Retzko, U. Vandergriten, J. Packard, J. Mackey, R. Jones, E. Hickman. bJ i |i£ Ma 1 ipi ' P ' s ' ' l Ji jk t.=.7l uM w 41 U£: w f}f- l •aJ ■ v J P 5 . Y V f J. ' ' ri ' ' -.t ' i ' Cr ' .■■ ' DRILL TEAM Year after year, the Kings Point Drill Team continues to be one of the Academy ' s biggest attractions. The Team is in constant demand at the many ceremonies held in the industry during the course of a ' ear. Their performance can al a s be expected to be of the highest caliber. The Team is made up entirely of volunteers and is headed by the Regimental Drillmaster. The Team is coached by LT. Horton Spurr. USMS. ReRimental Drillma.vtcr. Charles O ' Hara ' tk ■Mm- r rl9 - , The Regimental Band leading a review. REGIMENTAL The Regimental Band, under the direction of LT. F. . McCammon, provides the musical accompaniment for all regimental functions. 1ietlu ' r it be morning colors, a Saturday morning re iew, a Fifth Avenue parade, or a regimental pep rally in the mess hall, the Band can always be counted on for the finest of performances. The Band also traxels idel - each ear appearing at e er important function of the maritime industr -, such as ship launchings and pier dedications. Charles Davis, Band Leader; LT. F. V. McCammon, Band Officer; Joe Ogle, Regimental Bandmaster. Morning colors. BAND HONOR BOARD OFFICERS Hitting: R. Million, W. Sociu-y, R. Clonics, J. Davis. Standing: T. Rantke, E. Fitz.yerakl, E. Weiss, J. Yankanich. Sonic of tlic oHicors clistussing the Code ' s interpretation. HONOR BOARD Two years ago, the Regiment voted an lienor system into existence at the Acadcni)-. Tlie ad- ministration of the honor system is in tlie hands of the Honor Board. The Board consists of representati e jurors from eacli class and com- pam ' . The activities of the Board are under the control of the judge who is assisted b - an assistant judge and a secretar -. Other incnilx rs of the Board include the defense and the prosecuting attorneys. The function of the Board is twofold. The primary purpose of the Board is to enforce Hie regulations of the Honor Code, to hear exidencc and to try cases of cadets accused of ' iolating the Code. In addition, the Honor Board also acts as a liason between the Regiment and the facultv. m Honor Board Judge, Bill Sc The Defense Attorney has order for the Judge. point of HONOR BOARD JURORS Sitting: A. Tiliakcs. D. Hard, F. Rodgcrs, ki. Stdiiclinu: V. Jornberg, H. Magan, D, Wflcli. D. Kirhy, L. Paine, J. Holman, D. Adams. The Regimental Office is the admin- istrative heart of the Regiment. All regimental policy decisions, which include such items as cadet morale and discipline, uniform changes, team mo ements, selection of cadet officers, and scheduling of military drill, are made by this office. The Regimental Officer, Commander Richard H. O ' Connell, USMS, is the officer charged by the Superintendent with the administration of the Regiment of cadets. Commander O ' Connell is ably assisted in his duties by his three Battalion Officers and by his assistants. Chief Warrant Officer XlcCaffrey and Chief Still. The Re.ciiiiental Officer, CDR. R. H. O ' Connell, explainiii special liberty polic ' to an attentive cadet. REGIMENTAL OFFICE W.O. W. K. McCaffrey Assistant to tiic Regimental Officer SKC C.- V. Still Re iniental Office .Assistant R. B. George, Director, Regimental Broadcast Unit; T. T. Pierce, Etlitc C. E. Weiser, Editor-in-Chief, Hear This; R. P. Mullon, Chief, Rcgini. -Chief, Pol 1 InfoniKiti Edit .r-in-Cl,ief, Midsli INTELLIGENCE STAFF The Intelligence Staff is comprised of the Editors of the three cadet publications and the Chiefs of the Regimental Broadcast Unit and the Regimental Information Service. With the assistance and guidance of their officer-advisers, these cadets head up their activity ' s staff and are directly responsible for carrying out the mission of their respective organizations. COLOR GUARD The Color Guard is one of the Academy ' s best known representatives. Wherever a signi- ficant event takes place in the maritime industry, the Kings Point Color Guard is sure to be present. The cadets of the Color Guard travel throughout the nation attending such functions as ship launchings, movie premieres, memorial services and various other activities. The Color Guard is also responsible for tending the colors at the Academy. J. Karrell, T. Pross, Color Guard Capta F. Verona, J. Gallagher. S ' 3BS2L7« nt-?5! S«fI; To adecjuately fulfill that part of the mission pertaining to the development of a Cadet ' s mind, the Academy is staffed with in- structors who are among the finest in the country in their re- spective fields. The teachin techniques they employ include modem lecture courses and en- able the student to become entirely familiar with his subject through the medium of labora- tory classes where lie is physi- cally exposed to the practical side of his vocation. The de elopment of tlie cur- riculum in both of the two major fields offered is a devious task if all of the latest developments in all fields are to be offered to the students. Many of the instruc- tors keep their courses up-to- date by taking leaves of absence to be spent in civilian establish- ments wliere new ideas can be gained. Tliese ideas are then transferred to the students so that upon ' .graduation they may assume responsible positions upon ships of the merchant fleet or in other associated industries ashore. CA DEMIC Joseph Conrad Joseph Conrad was born in the middle of the nineteenth century in what was then Rus- sian Poland. More by chance than design he made liis way in- to Britain ' s merchant navy and laboriously mastered the lang- uage from newspapers. He ac- complished this latter task so well that within a few years he had written his first novel, Al- maijer ' s Folhj, and followed with the Nigger of the Narcissus, Lord Jim, Youth and Nostromo which were well received by literary elite of both England ■ and America. Although he wasn ' t as yet making a livable wage from the proceeds of his writings, he resigned from the sea after twenty-three years of service in order to devote him- self entirely to writing. In his later years, his genius and style were recognized and he pros- pered until his death in 1924. Conrad was haunted by " the awful sense of the inevitable " and his tale, Typhoon, points this out quite vividly. It is more than a sea story; it is the con- flict of personalities between a dull ship ' s captain, plying the trade routes of China, and the fickle sea. In Typhoon, Joseph Conrad achieves the very touch of reality with his remarkably vivid description of the work- ings of a violent tv ' phoon and the reactions of the men pitted against it. To adetjuately fulfill that part of the mission pertaining to the development of a Cadet ' s mind, the Academy is staffed with in- structors who are among tlie finest in the country in their re- spective fields. The teaching techniques they employ include modern lecture courses and en- able the student to become entirely familiar with his subject through tli torv clas all of the all fields students. medium of labora- where lie is physi- cally exposed to the practical side of his vocation. The de elopment of the cur- riculum in both of tlie two major fields offered is a devious task if ■ latest developments in are to be offered to the Many of the instruc- tors keep their courses up-to- date by taking leaves of absence to be spent in civilian establish- ments where new ideas can be gained. These ideas are then transferred to the students so that upon graduation they may assume responsible positions upon ships of the merchant fleet or in other associated industries ashore. Joseph Conrad Joseph Conrad was born in the middle of the nineteenth century in what was then Rus- sian Poland. More by chance than design he made his way in- to Britain ' s merchant navy and laboriously mastered the lang- uage from newspapers. He ac- complished this latter task so well that within a few years he had written his first novel, Al- maijer ' a Folly, and followed with the Nigger of the Narcissus, Lord ]im, Youth and Nostromo which were well received by literary elite of botli England • and America. Although he wasn ' t as yet making a livable wage from the proceeds of his writings, he resigned from the sea after twenty-three years of service in order to devote him- self entirely to writing. In his later years, his genuis and style were recognized and he pros- pered until his death in 1924. Conrad was haunted by " the awful sense of the inevitable " and his tale, Typhoon, points this out quite vividly. It is more than a sea story; it is the con- flict of personalities between a dull ship ' s captain, plying the trade routes of China, and the fickle sea. In Typhoon, Joseph Conrad achieves the very touch of reality with his remarkably vivid description of the work- ings of a violent typhoon and the reactions of the men pitted against it. CAPTAIN P. GALD, USMS Head of Department The mission of the Department of Nautical Science is the development of an efficient Merchant Nhirine Deck Officer. To accomplish this mission, the Department of Nautical Science must impart to each and every cadet the knowledge and professional skill necessary for a successful performance of a deck officer ' s duties aboard today ' s highly complex merchant vessels. The Department ' s faculty consists of instructors with both practical sea-going experience and wide theoretical knowledge. The instructors regularly receive leaves so that they may spend some time in the maritime industry, both ashore and afloat. Such a program insures the department of a faculty well-acquainted with the problems of our modern merchant marine. The course of study offered b ' the Department includes such subjects as Astronomy, Na ' al Architecture, Cargo, Meteorology, Seamanship, Rules of the Road, Electronics and Gyroscopic-Navigation. The curriculum is devised to gi e the deck cadet a command of both the practical and the theoretical. Tlie Department has a number of well-equipped labor- atories in which the deck cadet can accjuire knowledge through actual observation and performance. Such laboratory features as the planetarium, the time-facsimile machine, the cargocaire entilation installation, and the million-dollar electronics laboratory ' make the Department of Nautical Science one of the best training centers of merchant marine deck officers in the entire world. LT. V. A. Wichert, USMS; LCDR. F. D. Dwyer, USMS NAVIGATION From the time that men first ventured to sail beyond the horizon, it was of the utmost importance to be able to direct themselves from place to place. Even though electronic means of navigation have now been adopted, many large areas of the world ' s oceans can only be traversed if positions can be ascer- tained from the stars. To enable Cadets to perform this feat, numerous courses in all the various facets of navigation are studied in detail. Determining speed and slip with logarithms 67 LCDR. A. Fiore, USMS LT. L. Pearson, USMS METEOROLOGY-ASTRONOMY The application of meteorology in the daily life of a ship ' s officer is easily seen. The plying of all trade routes is governed largely by weather and the mate ' s ability to correctly predict it. The Cadet is instructed in the many conditions wh ich affect the weather so that he will be able to guide his vessel safely over the water. The stars and their movements through the heavens are also of importance to the navigator. With the sextant and computations based on the never changing positions of the stars, the navigator is able to find his position as easily as reading road signs. The Cadet is also able to learn more about his own earth through this comprehensive study of the skies. ' Any questions concerning the precession of tlie equinoxes: CARGO- NAVAL ARCHITECTURE In the isolation of the vast oceans, the mariner learns 3 depend greatly on his vessel to help him to survive the torms and predicaments which he encounters. For this eason he should know all that he can about the construc- ion and characteristics of his vessel. These characteristics epend upon the manner in which he loads cargo into his essel. The cargo and the naval architecture courses at the Lcademy are aimed at teaching the graduate how to make he vessel and the goods it carries react in a desirable lanner. LT. G. Steiner, USMS; LCDR. J. LaDagc, USMS A visual aid lecture in Naval Architecture. An inclining experiment with the famous Miss Calculation. Just as the master of a household must be able to perform the many and varied tasks necessary to keep his home running efficiently, so also must the mariner he thoroughly familiar with the everyday tasks which he has to perform. Such things as how to handle the forms and officials encountered in all the different countries are no more important than the choice of the proper knot, or strength of a piece of wire rope needed to handle a certain size load. He must also be able to maneuver his ship not only as he would like to, but also in accordance with international rules governing the meetings and crossings of all ships. These rules and all of the feats that he will be called upon daily to perform are drilled repeatedly into a cadet so that whenever the need arises, he will be unerring and pro- ficient in their performance. CWO. C. Williamson, USMS, LT. E. Mangodt, USMS LT. W. OUara, USMS GYRO-ELECTRONICS Modern technological advances have made possible the use of many electronic devices aboard today ' s merchant ship. The study of the principles and maintenance of the gyro compass, which is used to steer the vessel, is necessary to a ship ' s officer. Radar and Loran machines, which are used to find the vessel ' s position, must also be studied to enable the mate, through proper interpretation, to obtain all the benefits of this work-saving equipment. 13 CAPT. L. S. McCREADY, USMS Head of Department ENGINEERING The Department of Engineering has for its mission the de elopment of " marine engineers second to none " . With this ambitious goal, and with its highh- capable faculty, the Department lias achie ed world-wide prominence as a trainer of marine engineers. The Department has some of the finest engineering laboratories in exist- ence. The steam, diesel and refrigeration labora- tories are unique in themsehes and have often been used for instructing classes of practicing marine engineers. The Department of Engineering also imparts to the engine cadets a sound technical engineer- ing background, a background which has en- abled Kings Point ' s graduates to rise to the top of their profession within a relatively short span of time. By skillfully combining the theoretical training with the practical, the Department of Engineering has fulfilled its mission in producing " marine engineers second to none " . CDR. C. W. SANDBERG, USMS Assistant Head of Department The majority of American merchant ships are powered by steam. It is, therefore, the aim of the Department of Engineering to impart to each engine cadet the complete practical and theoretical aspects of tlie steam-powered propulsion plant. Combining the proven practical experiences of instruc- tors, who have spent many years at sea, with a program that keeps pace with the dynamic changes that are taking place in the marine power plant, enables the Kings Point gradu- ate to enter any room with the knowledge and confidence that he is fully capable of operating it. Man, tliis is the course! " tliink this is tlie suction, l)ut tlien again ... " The modern merchant ship depends a great deal on electrical power for its opera- tion. Electricity is used in the propulsion unit, on the navigation bridge, to power the many new electronic aids to naviga- tion, and on deck to run the many cargo winches found on a modern freighter. The electricity,- course imparts to the engine ca- dets a thorough background in the theory and operation of mechanical equipment. Electricity is being used more and more every day on our modern ships and the Kings Point engineer is trained to cope with every new problem. Left to Right: Prof. Lutomirski, LCDR. C. I. Hubert, LT. R. C. Panuska, CWO R. C. Maloney. ELECTRICITY The marine machinery repair course is designed to acquaint the engine cadet with the more practical aspects of marine en- gineering. In the well-equipped laboratories of Fulton Hall, the engine cadet learns the finer points of casting, metallurgy, weld- ing, and various other fundamentals necessary to complete his professional education. Armed with the knowledge and experi- ence gained in this course, the Kings Point graduate can tackle any repair job aboard his ship. vn house with gas welds MECHANICAL ENGINEERING In his incchanical eiiginccring course, the cadet becomes acquainted with the physical laws which govern all matter and energy. With the knowledge gained in such subjects as thermodynamics, sta- tics, mechanics and strength of materials, the engine cadet will be more suited for the complete understanding of the ma- chinery with which he will later work with. As the modern merchant ship be- comes more and more refined, the ship ' s engineer will find an ever increasing use for his mechanicail engineering back- ground. DIESEL Although the use of diesels for main pro- pulsion units is rare aboard American mer- chant vessels, a good working knowledge of this type of engine is required of well- trained ship ' s engineers because of its use as a source of emergency power. The diesel laborator) ' is equipped with a variety of engines which provide the cadet with a fine practical and theoretical knowledge of the internal combustion engine. Left to Right: CWO J. Anlell, LT. G. D. Kingsley, Jr., LT. J. Wells. Getting to know a diesel engine. REFRIGERATION The Kings Point engine cadet is given a course in refrigeration because of the wide use of refrigeration equipment aboard modern merchant vessels. Some merchant vessels have large refrigerated spaces designed for the carriage of consumable commodities, while others have just small compartments for the carriage and storage of the ship ' s provisions. In any case, it is essential for the ship ' s engineer to know how to maintain refrigeration equipment and the refrigeration course enables them to do so. Soc ' s homemade bearing. Charging the refrigeration system with frt MACHINE SHOP It is impossible to cany all the parts that may have to be replaced aboard a ship between ports so it is essential that a ship ' s engineer be trained to fashion the necessary replacements in the machine shop. At the Fulton Hall machine shop, engine cadets receive practical experience with the machine tools that are found aboard merchant ships. LCDR. W. J. Armstrong, LT. J. F. Beatty, CWO J. A. Giaquinto, LT. G. H. Barnes. BASIC MARINE ENGINEERING Basic Marine Engineering is a course in the funda- mental aspects of marine engineering. It is the first course to which the engine cadets are introduced and it serves to acquaint them with the basic problems of a modern ship ' s engineer. It is in his B.M.E. course in his plebe year that the engine cadet first learns the basic steam cycle and about such items as condensers, evaporators and superheated steam. The deck cadets also received a B.M.E. course which is designed to familiarize them with the problems of their shipmates in the black gang. DR. H. M. Kirby, LT. F. . Schuler, CWO L. A. Malinoski, MMC W. F. Harris. Developing the skills of a precision machinist CDR. L. C. KENDALL, USMS Head of Department Since the fabulous era of the Yankee clipper ships, the American ship operator has had a world-wide reputation as an astute trader and a highly efficient business man. In the vastly complicated economics of today ' s world, the necessity of a keen business sense is more important than ever to th e shipowner. The Kings Pointer is introduced to the intricacies of this complex commercial world by the Department of Ship Management. The mission of the Department of Ship Manage- ment is to prepare the Academy graduate to assume a position of executi e responsibility both ashore and afloat. The Department offers courses in Marine Transportation, Economics, Personnel Relations, Maritime and International Law and Marine Insurance. In addition to this well-rounded curriculum in business administration, the deck cadets receive a two-week period of valuable practical experience during their first class year in the offices of operating steamship companies. This first hand experience, coupled with a theoretical background gained in the classrooms of the Department of Ship Management, enables the Kings Pointer to enter his chosen profes-- sion secure in the knowledge that he is adequately trained and informed to encounter an - problem that may confront him in future years. SHIP MANAGEMENT LCDR. W. ON GRONAU, USMS Assistant Head of Department A lecture on the differences between liner and tramp ser ic LT. S. Kirschen, USMS LT. W. W. Moore, USMS Learning the effects of deficit spcndin;:. il 1 LCDR. J. D. Mahoney " The franchise claiisf does not apply to strantlings. ' -r«SHrf«; ' 0 ' . CDR. J. M. DITTHIC.K, USMS Head of Department The Department of Mathematics and Science introduces the cadet to the eso- teric world of liigher mathematics, a world inhabited by algebra, analytical geometry, spherical trigonometry and calculus, to mention a few. This Department is also responsible for imparting a sound scien- tific background to the prospective mar- iners. A sound understanding of both mathematics and science is essential for the mastery of the many technical subjects which every cadet must conquer before he graduates. The Department of Mathema- tics and Science has undertaken the chal- lenge of preparing Kings Pointers for meeting the demands of an industry which is now beginning to feel the effects of the rapid ad ancement of science in our modern world. MATHEMATICS Left to RiKht: LT. . F. Nickl, LCDR. G. A. Keyes, LT. P.M. Crum, LCDK. C. J. Obcrist. Left to Right: LT. W. J. Bay, LT. E. Wesolowski, LT. A. Stweitka, LT. S. Lowell. UND SCIENCE Expl — 1 1 L. II 1 B ' l i !9 MIIU 1 r..jr. Hefcr ;.ll (|ucsti()ns to tliu Little Old Lady from Pa- fl « i ]Ll F!I2 k ii L 1m M B w ' .K H P LT. Ve.solo vski expounding on electr cal circuits. W l IH hM Bb ' ' ■ ' • ' ■ ' ■; " ' ■ " • ' • ' KM Tliis intccration is just like arithniclic. DcsiKninK the niacliincs of tomorrow. CDR. C. W. FERRIS, USMS Head of Department The Department of History and Languages offers to cadets practical subjects, such as history, English, and languages, and also encourages the logical use of the mind. The ideas behind and the effects of all the great moxements in history are studied. Carefully planned reading lists are presented to the incoming plebe so that he may fall into the habit of reading worthwhile books. The language courses offered in the second and first class years include Russian, French, and Spanish. These are aimed at giving the student a workable knowledge of the language rather than a great reading skill. This is of benefit to the man, who, in the capac- ity of ship ' s officer, will someday isit countries in which the language is spoken. With so many technical courses being offered to both deck and engineering students, the courses pro- ided in this department are a pleasant change of pace. The capable instructors arouse interest in litera- ture and the arts. Because of this training cadets will not only be the finest merchant marine officers, but gentlemen as well. HISTORY AND LANGUAGES LT. V. J. Lugowski, LT. R. Brady, Left to right: LCDR. W. A. Flint, LT. F. W. Poos, LCDR. T. H. Giddings. LT. Poos and his memory CDR. E. S. FRIEDRICK, USN. Head of Department NAVAL SCIENCE An integral part of the training of a Ca- det is to prepare him to assume a place in the United States Navy should that service ever find it advantageous to call him. This task is ably assumed by a branch of tlu- regular Navy situated right at the Acad- emy. The officers and men of this branch are collectively skilled in every phase of na al procedure. Not only do they teach all the skills necessary to make a Kings Pointer a fine officer upon graduation, but they are also able to prepare the Cadets for some of the many differences between th(- unfamiliar navy life and the more casual life aboard merchant ships. The work of these instructors is reflected in all of the graduates now serving in the Navy; some as Officers of the Line and many more as Naval Aviators. The gradu- ate ' s success proves that Kings Pointers, if such is their desire, can also find a reward- ing and satisfying career in the United States Navy. Front Ron-: LT. R. J. Zimmennan, LT, W. R. Kellv, LT. (jg) H. A. Pok-tti. Middle Row: LT. (jr) R. T. MaicRae, LT. (jg) W. H. Steffen. Back Row: LT. (jg) W. F. Ryan, LT. (jg) G. Payne. Preventive maintenance on a three inch twin mount. Left to Right: E. Nelson, GMl; I). D. Drun, CMC; G. Harrison, FTC; R. L. Wilcoxen, p-Tl. Learning about Nelson at Trafalgar. LCDR. L. E. BEJARANO, US.MS Librarian LIBRARY The Academy ' s library, which occupies the entire first deck of Bowditch Hall, contains about forty thousand books, some six thousand pamphlets, and subscribes to more than four hundred popular and technical periodicals of both American and foreign publication. Among this huge collection of literature is one of the finest marine reference libraries in existence. Other facilities include a microfilm record of the New York Times since 19.36, and a well-equipped music room, com- plete with a modern high fidelity phonograph unit and a large record album collection. The library is one of the most popular spots on the Kings Point campus. Its ample reference material has given many a cadet inesti- mable aid throughout his academic career, and its recreational facili- ties are also put to a great deal of use. If for no other reason, many cadets will remember the librar ' for its serene atmosphere which at times proved to be a welcome refuge from their hectic lives. LT. E. H. NORTHROP, USMS Assistant Librarian L1BR.ARY ST.AFF .Miss A. Black, Mrs. J. Sch wartz, Miss L. Haviland, Miss M. Gregorio. Leisure hours in Uie periodica Searching for information on turhine dc The object of the training given by the Department of Physical Training is to teach the cadet tlie need of regular exercise as a means of maintaining health. The Department also instills in each cadet a sense of military bearing. The Department instructs cadets in almost every game played in .America. The instruction is given with the object of enabling each man to lead a group. The Department of Pliysical Training is housed in the .Academ)- gym, O ' Hara Hall. O ' Hara Hall is completeh- equipped for all tvjics of sports and it is one of the most popular spots on the grounds. CDR. JAMES LIBERTZ Head of Department PHYSICAL Iw»r ss !. ' ■ ;;iv -i jJ mm = 1 iiii! 1, ' H-MC D. Kennedy, LT. (jg) R. VVliite, LCDR. T. Cannodv, W .O. A. Zielinski, LT. C. Stralka W.O. R. Scalcione, LT. (jg) R. Patterson, SPIC R. London. TRAINING In tlic belief tliat -All xxork and no play makes Jack a dull boy, " the U.S. Merchant Marine Academ - has set up an exten- sive extra-curricular acti it - pro- gram. Ther( are enough different activities at the Academy for every cadet to participate. The three Aeadeniv publications. Michlnps. Polaris and Hear This are publislied by the cadets themselves. This concept of cadet participation is true with all the other activities. Each activity or club has an officer adviser ho is a volunteer from the facultv. With the officer advisers and the cadet officers elected b the club members, the activities set up long range programs which will hold the interest of the members all year long. The . cademy has a Glee Club, Chess Club, Ski Club, Skin Diving Club, Radio Club, Scientific Society, Astronomical Society, an information service, and a Cainc ra Club. This list is but a portion of the entire roster of activities. In addition to the organized activities and clubs, the Acade- my also li.is numerous Regimen- tal and (:l,,ss dances. All tliese lu ' lp the ,adet to relieve the monotonv of work and study. Every graduate will surelv look back at his cadet davs and will most certainly recall the wonder- ful times he had participating in his favorite activitv. i ACTIVITIES tsydi William McFee The changing conditions of the sea-going Hfe are lamented no more vehemently than by William McFee. His descriptions of the pre-modern era ships and seamen indicate his feeling that though conditions ' ere not as they are now,. the more import- ant camaraderies were closer and more lasting. Few writers of the maritime scene have had the background and experience upon which to base their writ- ings as has McFee. Since the day he was born, he lias been in close contact with the sea. Son of a ship ' s captain, he was born on an English trading essel en route to Great Britain from India. He always showed a great interest in the sea but after his father died his motlier placed him in an apprentice ship as a mechanical engineer. This life did not quite suit him and when he was offered an opportunity- to ship out, he accepted without hesitation and, with a few ex- ceptions, he continued to be a mariner for forty ears. Critics are divided as to the value of McFee ' s books. Some claim his hterary charm is de- ri ed entireh ' from the unusual incidents and the tall tales which he relates. Others, however, attribute his magnetism to his colorful characters and his keen sense of psychology. No matter what their values may be, how- ever, they all agree that McFee ' s books make an enjoyable and memorable reading experience. The illustration is from McFee ' s Watch Below. In tlic belief that ' All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, " the U.S. Merchant Marine Academ - has set up an exten- sive e.xtra-ciuricular acti it pro- gram. Ther( are enough different activities at the Academy for every cadet to participate. The three Academy publications. Midships. Polaris and Hear This are published by the cadets themsebcs. This concept of cadet participation is true with all the otiier activities. Each activity or club has an officer adviser lio is a volunteer from the facnltx. With the officer advisers .md the cadet officers elected b the club members, the acti iti( ' S set up long range programs which will hold the interest of the members all year long. Tlie . cademv has a Glee Club, Clicss Cluli, Ski Club. Skin Diving Club, Radio Club. Scientific Societ -, .Astronomical Societ} ' , an information service, and a Camera Club. This list is but a portion of the entire roster of activities. In addition to the organized activities and clubs, the Acade- my also lias numerous Regimen- tal and C:lass dances. All these help the (adet to relie e the monoton of work and stud . Every graduate will sureh ' look back at his cadet days a nd will most certainly recall the wonder- ful times he had participating in his fa orite acti it -. ■m S- - v, u y l n 5« William McFee The chiinging conditions of the sea-going life are lamented no more vehemently than by William McFee. His descriptions of the pre-modern era ships and seamen indicate his feeling that though conditions were not as they are now, the more import- ant camaraderies were closer and more lasting. Few writers of the maritime scene liave had the background and experience upon which to base tlieir writ- ings as has McFee. Since the day he was born, he lias been in close contact with tlie sea. Son of a ship ' s captain, lie was born on an English trading ' essel en route to Great Britain from India. He always showed a great interest in the sea but after his father died his motlier placed him in an apprentice ship as a mechanical engineer. This life did not quite suit him and when he was offered an opportunity to ship out, he accepted without hesitation and, with a few ex- ceptions, he continued to be a mariner for forty ears. Critics are divided as to the value of McFee ' s books. Some claim his literary charm is de- ri -ed cntirel - from tlie unusual incidents and the tall tales which he relates. Others. howe er, attribute his magnetism to his colorful characters and his keen sense of psychology. No matter what their values may be, how- ever, they all agree that McFee ' s books make an enjoyable and memorable reading experience. The illustration is from McFee ' s Watch Below. PAT YOUNG, Editor-in-Chief, 1959 MIDSHIPS A mariner ' s logbook is as important to him as a bible is to a clergyman. At the start of a voyage, a ship ' s log is just an ordinary looking book, devoid of life and character. But by the time the vessel completes her journey and arrives safely back at her home port, the logbook has assumed a much different status. It is no longer a mere journal for it is now a complete and accurate record of the ship, her voyage, and her crew. Every event occurring to the vessel dur- ing her voyage, be it an event of great magnitude or just a routine occurrence, was faithfully recorded in the logbook. The logbook is now capable of telling a story, a story of a ship, her ' oyage, and the men who sailed with her. Midships is also a logbook but instead of telling of a ship and her crew, it recreates the history of a class and its members. It attempts to remind the graduate of his cadet years, from the first day he walked through Vickery Gate right up until graduation. Nothing is left untold; the plebe year with its many distasteful aspects, the fascinating ad- entures of the sea year, the imhappy return to the " lieach " in the second class year, and the dignity and responsibility ' of the first class year are all included. All this will be found betw ' een the covers of the 1959 Midships. The Mid- ships staff sincerely hopes that it has successfully lived up to the Midships tradition by providing the casual reader with an insight to the United States Mer- chant Marine Academy and by giving the graduate an accurate logbook of his cadet life. LCDR. V. E. TYSON. Officer Adviser tiimiUlUlilm TOM PROSS, Asihtant to tlic Edito JOHN SHANNON, Assistant to the Editor SPORTS EDITOR Bob Hamilton with his assistants John Ginna and Dale Welch. BILL GREGORY, Assistant Business Managi Our Business Manager instructing the young. DAVE WINE, Office Manage JOHN De SANTIS, Associate Editor THE OFFICE STAFF: Cliarlie Williamson. Boh Stc Jim Alanko. Frank and Pat engaged in their weekly argument over travel expenses. THEARTSTAFF: KenSteven.s, Dave Lawrence, . w LCDR. V. E. TYSON Officer Adviser 4RIS Polaris is an alumni magazine published quarterly by the Regiment of Cadets. Although primarily an alumni magazine, Polaris contains numerous articles and columns of interest to all. The articles are devoted mostly to maritime affairs and Academy activities. This past year saw a few innovations in the magazine ' s content. Short fictional stories were reintroduced to Polaris after a long absence and these proved to be quite popular with the Regiment. A series of articles on the histories of various American steamship com- panies turned out to be quite informative and interest- ing. One article, a report on the MSTS. phase III emergency shipboard drill, was received with much acclaim and merited a commendation from the MSTS commanding officer. Polaris also publishes alumni news, each class being represented by a representative who contributes articles of interest to the particular class involved. Polaris is a great favorite both to the cadets and the alumni alike. GLENN BOSTON Managing Editor NICK GASAWAY Associate Editor DICK COOK Circulation Manager BILL BARRON, Feature Editor, instructs Jerry ' Joseph on typing of the next feature artie ' SPORTS STAFF Art Shelko, George Parker, Dick Gomes, Gene Fields Members of the Editorial Staff makinji a critical appraisal: Louis Hernandez, Rip Jane, Roger Quigg, Mel Stone. FRED SERGIO Photo Editor HEAR THIS " Published by and for the Regiment of Cadets. " This aptly describes the Kings Point newspaper. Hear This. Published bi-monthly. Hear This is greatly welcomed by all hands. It contains num- erous articles concerning current events here at the Academy and in the maritime industry at large. In addition to the current affairs, Hear This also carries a number or regular columns that are great favorites with the regiment. The " Unquote " column is a genuine source of cadet humor, as are the many cartoons of Academy life. Ever) ' cadet has aspirations of appearing in the " Who ' s Who " column when he is a first classman and even the plebes like to see their favorite girl featured in the " Sweethearts " section. Hear This provides welcome entertainment and timely information on all matters maritime. CH.AKLES WEISER Editor-in-Chief LCDR. T. H. GIDDINGS Officer Adviser VINCE LAFRANCIII Business Manager ROLAND SMITH Minun iiifi Editor NEWS STAFF J. DeMaria, J. Sexton, R. Adams, E. Cook, J. Roc tlik ' Twas tliL- night before printing ■ ' Extra . . . HEAR THIS. " BUSINESS STAFF R. Williams, G. Terry, V. Lafranchi, R. Bannister. COLUMNISTS Sitting: A. Averette, D. Dobler. Standing; J. Way, A. Shelko, J. Spence, M. Hayes, L. Hernandez. RON MULLOX, Chiel REGIMENTAL INFORMATION SERVICE Regimental Information Senice, founded in 1948 for the purpose of public information, has augmented its usual production this year and set forth an efficient s stem for handling news releases. The goal of the Information Service is to promote the Academy through press releases on individual cadets. During the four year course, a minimum of fi e releases are sent out to hometown news- papers concerning each phase of ever) ' cadet ' s achievements. In addition, a special staff handles the releases on Third Classmen at sea and the Graduating Class address booklet. The name and fame of Kings Point are spreading rapidly, greath ' accelerated by the efforts of the cadets on the staff of the Regimental Information Ser dce. COIL H. II. O ' COXXELL, Officer Adviser BOB Fl. CCO, Business Manager THE TYPING STAFF Dick Avery, Dennis Leventhal, Sheldon Wccker, John Posner, Ron Coles, Jerry Holrnan, Steve Losey. REGIMENTAL BROADCAST UNIT STAFF Front Row: Roy Moffett, Bob McNeil, RBU Georfie, Mike Snyder, Bob Muller. Back Row: Joe Hemphill, Jerry Holt, Keith Reiter. REGIMENTAL BROADCAST UNIT Tlie Regimental Broadcast Unit is composed of a group of " beatniks " charged with the weighty responsibihties of recording special occasions, providing music for meals and dances, maintaining the p. a. system in Delano Hall, the Conelrad warning system, and some cadets ' radios. The activities of the Broadcast Unit are better known than most other Academy organizations as it is responsible for providing the regiment with mealtime music. Although all ca- dets may not al a s agree with the staffs selections, it is generallv agreed that RBU makes the long Academic day somewhat easier to bear. RBU GEORGE Director Delano Hall disc jockey. Rewiring the drop mike controls DEBATE COUNCIL front Run:: Kolcliarno, Tighe, Barron, Boston, McQuade, Phillips, Kennedy, Lt. Lugowski. Back Row: Nelson, Dowler, Smith, Tinckcn, Ring, McKinley, Ehas. DEBATE COUNCIL The Kings Point Debate Council is one of the l est represcntati cs tlic Academy has ever had. Year after year the Kings Point Debaters have competed against some of the nation ' s top colleges and have always emerged with an enviable record. This year saw an e en better record than that usualh- achieved. ' eek after the week, the Mariner debaters downed highly respected teams from every college in the East. The season ' s high mark was reached when Kings Point defeated the best colleges in the nation (Yale, Harvard, MIT. etc.) at the annual Brown University- Tournament. The Council also earned a chance at representing tlie Northeastern colleges in the nationals held at West Point. Probably the only dark spot of the entire season was the team ' s failure to recapture the Golden Gavel trophy at the annual inter-ser ice academy debates held here at Kings Point. In spite of this, the Kings Point Debate Coun- cil can hold its head high for a season of continuous excellence in competition. The Debate Council is fortunate indeed to be coached by the ' ery capable Lt. ' ictor Lugowski of the History and Languages Department. Graduation will see the loss of President Bill McKinley, Glenn Boston, Jack Ring, Bill Barron and Cyril Elias, all experienced and highlv-skilled debaters. Glenn Boston, Coach LT. Victor Lugowski, and President William McKinley looking over the Brown Tournament trophy. The Brown University Tournament Trophy, symbolic of collegiate debating superiority. LT. Lugowski and some of his prize winners. Representatives of the service acad- emies participating in the 1959 Golden Gavel Debate. ' ikl J , 44?ttf-f.ttf. f1-1 ■ ' •- m f ' PROPELLER CLUB Front Row: B. Wliiteside, T. Sloan, P. Kc W, H. Kaminski. R. Russell, G. Jolinson. ScroutI Roic: H. Sclircicr, R. Mason, F. rschucren, R. Simmons, R. Foster, C. Bland, W. Holvoak, C. Elias, J. Ginna, N. SkarM-lis, G. Wan on-. D. Espes . H. Twikk-., Third Rote: C. O ' Hara, R. Campbell, J. Leeper, J. ' Warren, A. Prascii.nas M. Linclsav, T. Roetlike. I " . C.uioU. D. W ine. L. Mavretish, F. Duquemin, B. Metz, R. Muller, C. Woodrick, K. Stevens. Back Row: R. Adams, R. Pliillipv J. M.umini;. D. MeMaster, E. Swanson, D. James, J. Gallagher, E. Fabber, R. Klementz, J. Davis, R. Ronzitti, E. Knutseu. PROPELLER CLUB The Propeller Club is a national organization dedicated to the advance- ment of the American Merchant Marine. It maintains branches in over one hinidred American cities and in nineteen foreign countries. Cadets at Kings Point who hold junior memberships are or- ganized into a chapter which holds regularly scheduled meetings. The club also stages dinners to which prominent persons in the maritime industry are in ited. Members are able to increase their knowledge of the merchant service and tlius better plan their future in the industr -. 1 A i BLOCK " M " CLUB Fronf Row: R. Brown, R. Madden, Vice President; R. Hamilton, Seeretan- R. Brown, R. Twilde, J, Barron, F, Verscluieren, D. McMaster. Second Row: R. Nelson, J. Sanborn, N. Skarvelis, T. Tollefsen, S. McCane, J. Rozwat, F. Castaneda, P. Kelly, E. Weis M. Morrow, A. Gonzalez, F. Hite, R. Cosentino. Third Row: C. Woodrick, T. Stout, T. Rawlins, C.King, J_Rn ;l G. Johnson, J. Lawless, R. Hallett, F. lUuzzi, F. Duquemin, R. Peat, F. : Verona, M. Murphy, J. Davis. ike, R. Bornholdt, Back Row: J. Fettke, ' T. Flynn, H. Weeks, F. The Block M Club is an association made up of cadets who have won a varsity letter in one of the Academy ' s intercollegiate sports. The mission of the club is to promote the interests of the various teams and to work towards the general improvement in the caliber of Kings Point ' s athletic representatives. The club works as a liason between the individual athletic teams and the Acad- emy ' s administration. It is in this manner that the - are able to obtain such morale-boosting features as the training tables and the reduced watch schedule for members of teams which are com- peting in varsitv sports. This past year has seen the advent of a new type of athletic jacket for members of the Block M Club. The club also sponsors oc- casional " Kings Point Sports Nights " which are held in Bowditch Hall auditorium and feature such items as football game movies and guest speakers. BLOCK " M " ADVISORY COUNCIL Sitting: R. Brown, R. Hamilton, R. Mupavin, R. Madden, R. Uhlin. Standing: N. Skan. ' elis. P. Gattini, A. Gonzales, D. Greaves, D. Cowhig. R. Brown, F. Verona, M. Murphy, J. Barren. :t_ t::f WINDJAMMERS Front Row: R. Quegan, L. Bowles, D. Mikktlsen, G. Sullivan. R. Smith. Back Row: H. Haga C. Elias, M. Carroll. R. Adams, T. Vetter, H. McKinley, " nyiM WINDJAMMERS Tlie acti ities of the mcmbcr.s of the ' indjammcrs are about eqiialh ' di ided between sailing the Academy ' s sail boats and maintaining them. These men for tlie most part, are experienced sailors wlio sailed on private craft, before coming to tlie Academy. While here, tliey ha e tlie use of the " S " class boats which they race weekly at Larchmont, New York, and the yachts. The crews for tlie Academy ' s entries in national yachting races are chosen from the club members. In the past few years Kings Toint boats ha e made a ver - good showing among top competition. When the team and the .skippers arc alile to get a little more experience sailing tlie liig boats, we can expect to have some of the finest racing boats and crews in the counti ' v. The yawl ICE FIRE. The MINOTS LIGHT moored in Hague MORALE BOARD Sittini:: D. McMastcr, J. Davis, P. (,)iiiiitiis, H. Prime, R. Madden, W. Holyoak. Stuiulinp: R. Rothman, J. Spcncc, R. Klenientz, D. C;reavcs, T. Vetter, D. Price, N. Gasaway. " f-f-f-l t-f 4 z ' " MORALE BOARD The Cadet Morale Board works in conjunction with the chaphiins and the Regimental Officer to keep the morale of the cadets high. Individual complaints about Academy conditions arc brought before the board through the company commanders and with discussions and suggestions the members try to alleviate the situation. The board also arranges for recreational facilities and all regimental dances. This year ' s morale board has been largely responsible for the reactivation and renovation of the cadet activities house, which opened in May, 1959, after being closed for five years. r Lieutenant Patterson and his advisory board are charged with the responsibility of the Academy ' s intramural sports program. The board consists of one representative from each company and the regimental adjutant. Twice yearlv the board reviews all the rules and regulations governing the games, to keep them up to date and best suited to conditions at the Academy. The board members must also keep the company commanders informed as to the dates and rules of all events so that this word may be passed to all cadets. INTRAMURAL ATHLETIC BOARD INTRAMURAL ATHLETIC BOARD Sitting: J. Lowe, LT. (jr) R. Pat- terson, C. Woodrick. Stanclinp: a. Parker, R. Havden, D. Dean, T. Scanlan, G. Leffler. f r - •«? TRIDENT CLUB Front Row: B. Metz, Secretary; R. Wirin, Vice President; LCDR. W. Von Gronau, USMS, Officer Adviser; N. Skarveli: T. Stout. Second Row: J. Riley, W. Claire, R. McMichael, D. Moyer, J. Walsh, L. Johnson, W. Dargin, R. Hamilton. H. Baker, H. Hagen, L. Kurtz, J. Bazler, D. Wander. , President; Back Row: TRIDENT CLUB The Academy ' s Trident Club was formed a number of years ago to give the skin diving enthusiasts in the regiment an opportunit} ' to follow their favorite sport. The Trident Club is a very active organization and all prospective members must pass a rigid swimming test before they can qualify for admittance. In addition to diving right off the Academy ' s shore, the Trident Club often travels to other localities in their craft, the SEA OWL. One of the highlights of the club ' s activit) ' schedule this past year has been their participation in the search for the SAVANNAH, the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean which sank in Long Island Sound many years ago. Whether or not the SAVANNAH Project is ever a success, the Trident Club members who took part in the operation will always look back upon it as one of the most adventurous and challenging feats of their cadet lives. Il Exploring Long Island Sound for a prize catch. The SEA OWL. r R. Simmons, L. Paine, J. Barron, J. Sanbo RING COMMITTEE R. Cook, R. Mugavin, L. Price, R. Kron, T. Pross, E. Silvestri, J. Manning. RING COMMITTEE Part of the personality of every class is its class ring. The design of this ring is entrusted to a Ring Committee elected by the members of the class. The Committee handles all the ar- rangements for the class ring, from its design to the contract with the jewelry company. Before a final design and manufacturer are chosen, many hours of thinking, discussing and even arguing must be expended, but in the final analysis, a handsome ring which is acceptable to all is finalK ' produced. Ring Committee Chairman Ron Mugavin and Tom Press discuss the unique features of the 1959 Class Ring design. l! MICHELSON SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY Front Row: R. Klementz, B. Whiteside, President; CDR. J. Dittrick, USMS, R. Campbell, J. Manning. Second Row: L. Zaleski, H. Schreier, J. Ginna, M. Carroll, C. W ' oodrick, B. Metz, R. Foster, C. Bland, J. Warren, C. O ' Hara, C. Elias, R. Fedorczak, R. Levine. Back Row: R. Simmons, H. Hagan, L. Mavreti ' sh, D. Larson, R. Ronsitti, J. Montgomery, E. Swanson. V. Lafranchi, A. Prasciunas, T. Carroll, R. Adams. - . « . » ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY Front Row: R. Hamilton, Secretary; L. Price, Vice President; C. Weiser, President; T. Sloan, Treasurer; R. Richard, Planitarium Manager. Second Roiv: R. Twilde, R. Brannen, N. Skarvelis, P. Kelly, R. Quegan, D. Davis, G. Wanzong, J. Ginna, B. Whiteside. Back Row: R. Rothman, F. Duquemin, T. Roethke, D. Wine, D. McMaster, R. Adams, E. Swanson, J. Gallagher, R. Phillips, G. Johnson, C. Bland, C. Ehas. MICHELSON SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY The Michelson Scientific Societ}- has the objective of stimulating those cadets whose interest in the world of science has only been whetted by class- room study. A fine lecture series is scheduled each year vith prominent speakers from the fields of physics, mathematics and astronomy participating. Cadets are encouraged to do original research and report on various past and current scientific enigmas. I ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY The study of the heavens and all of its residents is becoming of more general interest in these beginning days of space travel. Both engineering and deck cadets may join the Academy ' s Astronomical Society to further their knowledge in this field. Technical papers are prepared by cadets and presented at the society ' s regular meetings. Celestial observations are made during evenings with the t vo Academy telescopes. Field trips are also taken by the club to the Havden Planetarium where star identification sessions are attended. From lectures given weekly by prominent as- tronomers, cadets are able to keep abreast of the entire fields of astro-physics and astronomy. .RKT RT.TTR A weekend snow storm usually means a poor weekend for the majority of the regiment. Trans- portation becomes extremely difficult and most of the cadets end up by spending their liberty hours in their rooms. However, the Academy ' s Ski Club is one group that welcomes the winter storms. As soon as liberty commences, the club members, if they have been successful in securing a vehicle, head straight for the up-state New York and New England ski resorts. Al- though their equipment may not always be of the latest model, the Kings Point skiers manage to keep themselves entertained throughout the long winter months. 1 « SKI CLUB Front Row: W. Galbraith, Vice President; R. Twilde, Secretary; R. Brannen, President; J. Marsh, Treasurer. Second Row: N. Peckham, B. Whiteside, W. Geist, R. Kron, C. EUas, B. Metz, L. Zaleski. Buck Row: M. Messick, J, Ofelt, J. Kay, J. Reneau, R. Klenientz. A club outing at Mount Stowe. WATER SKI CLUB The ' ater Ski Club hasn ' t been around very long but it has already become one of the Academy ' s most popular acti ities. During the warmer months, when the ice floes on the Soimd have given way to the yachting set. Kings Pointers dart about on their skis looking for new thrills. When frost comes back to the Sound, they pack up their skis and although they wish they could head south, they content themselves with their club room on the zero deck of Jones Hall where they repair the club ' s boat and motor while planning the next series of escapades on water. WATER SKI CLUB Front Row: J. Kay, R. Kron, W. Galbraith. Second Roic; R. Twilde, N. Peckham, T. Pross, M. Carroll, C. Quarles. ■■:.;:.!; ' ,! M SNAME Vront Tiow. R. Quegan, M. Carroll, J. Sanborn, R. Parker, R. Smith, M. Murphy. Second Row: R. Mason, D. Hassi, F. Larson, R. Peat, R. Lacher, J. Ginna, X. Skar ' elis, F. Verschuren, R. Nelson , E. Weiss, D. Davis. Back Row: C. Elias, C. W ' anzong, K. Stevens, L. Price, J. Walsh, B. Metz, T. Stout, W. Holyoak, T. Sloan, F. Constructing a modem supertanker. SOCIETY OF NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers is the professional society of the maritime industiy. This organization provides an excellent opportimity for cadets to become better acquainted with their chosen profession. Members are urged to do research work on various aspects of marine activity. They also attend the regularly scheduled meetings of the society in New York as well as various special symposiums on some topical aspect of the industry. Membership in the Society entitles the cadet to receive the many fine publications sponsored by the organization. Interest in the Society ' s activities is further stimulated by informal discussions with prominent representatives of the maritime industry. 4 A f 1H ' A SNAME Front Row: C. Wciser, G. Johnson, J. Leeper, P. Kelly, J. Davis. Second Row: W. Gregory, M. Snyder, R. Foster, W. Jemberg, F. Duquemin, R. Adams, C. Bland, T. Rawlins, J. Mc. bee, T. Tollefsen, L. Zale.ski, L. Drago. Back Row: R. Russell, J. Roethke, R. MuUer, R. Rothman, G. Nicholson, J. Gallagher, E. Swanson, D. James, H. Kaminski, R. PluUips, E. Knutsen, D. McMaster, D. Wine. DRAMA CLUB Front Row: J. Way, R. Mullon, F. Dunlap, LT. J. Cooper, N. Peckham. Secotid Roic: P. Qiiintus, R. George, D. Le Holt, D. Nazzaro, D. Lawrence, J. Marquis, J. Ward, L. Zaleski, K. Kinstler. Back Row: G. Romeo, S. Losey, Ford, W. Cidlev, P. Mannen, B. Leiz. dial, T. R. Coles, M. DRAMA CLUB This year, as in even ' year since its formation in 1956, tlie Drama Club presented two fine plays. Its first, The Front Page was received ' ery well at all performances. Since last year the club has turned to outside talent for female leads. Much success has been attained with this practice and it will probably be continued in the future. Few of the cadets in the club have had any professional theatrical training, but a combina- tion of their hard work and their adaptability liave enabled them to put on professional performances. Past performances of the group ha c ranged from farce and comedy to traged -. Their second performance of this year. Darkness at Noon, contains many long and laborious passages by numerous characters and also a completely original stage setting. The praise and applause freely given after the performance, clearly indicates the pride of the regiment and the approval of outsiders in one of the Academy ' s foremost organizations, tlie Drama Club. The Officer Adviser, LT. Cooper, gives some last minute instnictions to the cast of The Caine Mutiny. lU I? 1 i A y - r r ' r i« f ' - ' ,5 p i c , ' - ■:■ i - 1 " 1 . GLEE CLUB Front Row: N. Sodher, R. Ullrich, D. Libretta, R. Poarl, T. Cobb. E. Cawthorn, D. Koops. Second Row: D. Hard, E. Kokharno, R. Smidi. T. Tollefscn, R. Mirino, D. Hassi, R. Jones, R. Knifilit, P. Klausner, K. Webb, W. Siefert, R, CJiglio. I. Eiilncr, J. Kt-nn«lv. T nrc Row: J. Bartlett, D. Cocker, R. Dunn, J. Dunn, J. Adams, R. Solinsld, T. Kyrakaksis, T. Rees, R. Stevens, S. Losey, R. Johnson, J. Johnson, J. Warren, Z. Eckel, T. Little, S. Parks. Back Row: D. Brozenik, C. Murley, D. Partridge, L. Bardsley, A. Hoskin, H. Radtke, R, Muller, W. Gunn, W. Cartwright, G. Scheiber, W. Ruedel, F. O ' Toole, M. Bonzak, D. Hansen. GLEE CLUB The Academy Glee Club since its reorganization last year under the direction of Mr. George Rose has become the most acti e activity at the Academy. Performances of the group have been in great de- mand, both at the Academy and on the outside. The chorus has tra eled to give concerts at other colleges and at numerous social functions all over New York. From the large organization Mr. Rose has chosen a smaller group who perform in a quartet or octet. With the use of several soloists, the quartet and the chorus, the Glee Club can put on an impressive and aried concert at every attempt. With the fine performances already given and bookings in the near future, the Glee Club is building up an excellent reputation for itself, and is bringing much fine publicity to the Academv. The Glee Club Director, Mr. George Rose, hard at work during The Glee Club entertains at thi Chapel Fund card party. The Kings Pointers were royally fed on tour. HAWAIIAN CLUB The Hawaiian Club was formed just last year when a group of cadets from the Islands decided to form an organization which would publicize their homeland ' s culture. Now that Hawaii has become our fiftieth state, interest in the club has markedly increased. Membership is open to all cadets interested in learning more about romantic Hawaii. HAWAIIAN CLUB Front Row. D. Dean, C. Jamile, W. Von Gronau, E. Mokuau. Second Row: R. Bodnar, B. Metz, J. Buxton, R. Kuntz, J. Reneau, J. Banister, A, Pauole. Back Row: A. Ramos, J. Zablan, F. Pivko, R. Lee, F. Wood. " m 1 «i f- CHESS CLUB If you ever happen to see a cadet matching wits with an expert chess player down on Washington Square some Sunday afternoon, chances are that he is a member of the Kings Point Chess Club. Although still in its infancy, the Chess Club has produced some excellent players. Under the guidance of LT. Nickl, the Chess Club members hold weekly meetings where they delve into the fine points of tournament chess. The club plans to enter into intercollegiate competition within the next year or so. CHESS CLUB Front Row: N. Skarvelis, C. Weiser, LT. A. Nickl, M. Carroll. Second Row: F. Castaneda, D. Hassi, C. Elias, C. Scharar, A. Bleakley, M. Proios, A. Brown. Back Row: P. Martin, T. Vetter, C. Deaton, W. Seeney. J RADIO CLUB Front Row: C. Elias, L. Hernandez, Vice President; R. Emerick, President; R. Ronzitti. Second Rotv: A. Huebner, J. St. Clair, J. Van Zandt, D. Larson, R. Kulmus, G. Miller, D. Knarr, R. Bodnar. Back Row: J. Buxton, D. Higgins, J. Montgomery, D. Partridge, J. Ofelt. RADIO CLUB From its quarters on the zero deck of Palmer Hall, the Kings Point Radio Club contacts radio hams throughout the world. The members of the club are all experienced radio hams with FCC licenses. The club has a complete radio installation and its members are adept at both voice and code transmission and reception. This hobby is especially valuable to future merchant mariners who will often have to rely on radio communication for the safe operation of their ship. Becoming adept at morse code transmission. Contacting a fellow ham in North Carolina. ' ,m» GREGORIAN CHOIR The Gregorian Choir, under the able direction of LT. Victor Lugowski, supplies the traditional singing for the religious ceremonies in the Star of the Sea Chapel. The Choir leads the cadet congregation during Friday night Benediction services and at high Masses. Although a small group, the quality- of its performance is e.xceptional. ' mmf 1f J ' • GREGORIAN CHOIR Front Row: J. Ferrigno, J. Corso, E. Quinn, C. Bland, J. DeMaria, J. O ' Brien. Second Row: D. Price, R. Wirin, J. Rocchio, C. Norz, L. Hernandez, D. Rohe. Back Row: F. Searie, J. Giglio, D. Emerson, J. Kirscher, LT. V. Lugowski, Director. E -N B STELLA MARIS GUILD k Front Row: J. Ogle, R. Mugavin, J. M; STELLA MARIS GUILD Ushart. Back Row: A. Lipoid, C. The cry important function of assisting the Catholic Chap- lain in the religious ceremonies for the Catholic cadets rests on the shoulders of the Stella Maris Guild. The Guild fulfills the ancient and important duty of representing the congregation during the Mass and other services. The Stella Maris Guild also aids the Chaplain in main- taining and beautifying the Catholic Chapel. Bland, R. Csernclabics, L. Muno. 9k ' hI H h CHRISTIAN COUNCIL CHRISTIAN COUNCIL Front Row: A. Fleming, R. Twilde, LCDR. J. Danielsen, L. Jacobs, R. Foster. Second Row: R. Hamilton, P. Seifert, T. Tollefsen, VV. Fry, D. Davis, R. KniRht, A. Bleakley, R. McMichael, O. Johnson, R. Frey, R. Levine, L. Mayo. Back Row: R. Pearl, T. Kaiser, McKinley, M. Lindsay, D. Larson, G. Nicholson, A. Averette, Hansen, W. Johnsen, R. Cook, J. Bazler, D. Forster, J. Scroggins. The spiritual welfare of each cadet at the Academy must be attended to regularly. The Christian Council acts as a link between the Protestant Chapel and the daily routine of the cadets. Activities, such as company church days and co-ed conferences, are the results of their planning. Two members are elected to the Council from each section. These men have been especially helpful in acquainting the new Chaplain, Lieutenant Commander Danielsen, with the schedule of services. From the Candlelight service for the incoming plebes to the Baccalaureate service at graduation, a high spiritual tone is carefully maintained. PROTESTANT CHOIR The Sunday morning and evening ser iccs in Wiley Hall Chapel are enriched b ' the singing of the Protestant Choir. These cadets and their able director Mr. W. F. Searle are noted for the quality of their programs. PROTESTANT CHOIR Front Row: R. Twilde, Chief V. Searle, LCDR. J. Danielsen, R. Knight, D. Hansen. Back Row: P. Seifert, R. .McMichael, W. Sweeney, C. Murley, J. Scroggins, R. Pearl, E. Cawthon, L. Mayo. DANCE COMMITTEE Sitting: H. Ceelv, J. DeSantis, V. Holvoak. W. Jemberg. Standing: D. Hassi, F. Amson, G. Parker, J. Bannister, M. Rokowsk- -, A. Lipoid. DANC The SupcriaUndcnt and M . McLintock greet the Regiment and their dates at the Christmas Dance. The Regimental Commander and Adjutant do their duty in the receiving ' . Learning to dance the Delano Lounge way. MMITTEE I jfhe job of organizing the many regi- I mental dances falls upon the Dance j Committee. The Dance Committee is I headed up by the cadet regimental morale i oflFicer and consists of one representative i from each of the si. companies. Every task connected with a dance from selecting the ' • date and theme to hiring the band and decorating the dance hall is accomplished very efficiently by the Committee. It is i largely through the efforts of this small ■ group of cadets that the regimental dances have attained such widespread popularity. I Another accomplishment of the Dance ! Committee this past year has been the ' establishment of group dancing lessons. ' " The lessons are held in the afternoons dur- i ing the week in Delano Lounge. Every I Kings Pointer will look back with fond recollection on the many dances held i during his cadet years. They could have danced all night . . . and did. n is An officer and gentle socially graceful. ,y CHEERLEADERS A ery necessary ingredient to the espirit de corps of the regiment is the Cheerleaders. This spirited group will be seen at every Academy athletic con- test performing their job of leading the Regiment in lending moral support to their comrades on the playing field. They are quite of. en the unsung heroes of many a victory. CHEERLEADERS Front Row: W. Tansld, P. Seifert, J. Holt. Second Row: D. Hassi, D. Hard, L. Mayo. Back Row: R. Adams. EAGLE SCOUT SOCIETY Many cadets wish to continue membership in the Boy Scouts of America while at Kings Point. To enable them to do so, the Academy has an Eagle Scout Society. This Society is open to any scout in the regiment. The Society is responsible for con- ducting tours of the Academy grounds for weekend visitors. Their work has long been a source of great pride to the Academy. EAGLE SCOUT SOCIETY Front Row: LT. F. McCamnion, USMS; R. Mullon, President; C. Elias. R. Ullrich, Secretary. Back Row: J. Johnson, V. Johnsen, A. Averette, H. Zimmemiann. A. Widberg, A. Brown. 1959 CLASS COMMITTEE Front Row: Larry- Bowles, Ron MuRavin, President; Bob Mndden, Vice President: Al Amador. Back Row: Bob George, Ed Faber, Ron Brown, Jon Rotbke, Jack Doming, Bud Prime. CLASS COMMITTEE When the Class of 1959 returned from sea, it found itself much in the need of a sense of unity. In answer to this need, a Class Committee was formed consisting of the Class President and Vice President, representatives from each of three battalions, and one representative from each of the six companies. The function of this committee is to assist the president and vice president in the discharging of their class duties. The Class Committee was largely responsible for the excellent quality of the numerous class dances. It was they who organized and established the precedent-making second class year Ring Dance. The Class Committee also started the publication of a class paper. The Fifty-Niner, which enabled every member of the class to keep abreast of class activity. The Fifty-Niner soon became a very popular source of class gossip and humor. The Committee, under the capable direction of the class officers and adviser, spent a great deal of time in planning the activities of Graduation Week. Much credit must be given to this committee for the wonderful sense of class unity which the Class of 1959 has enjoyed since its return from sea. The ability and knowledge needed to maintain one ' s body is not a lesser skill than the maintenance of a good piece of machinerx . Both the Academy ' s administrative leaders and the cadets themselves have long since realized this fact. To facilitate this training. Kings Point has a complete and vmsur- passed schedule of athletic events lined up for its cadets. All of the arsity sports pictured with this section ha e not only the usual effects of college sports upon the men. but also have that of conditioning them for the occupation which they will em- brace upon graduation. To assure that not only those of great abilit - are able to receixe this training, a schedule of intramural events has been set up in which all men may take part. These events are in the form of intra-company rivalry which lends a keen sense of competition to the games which are so dixcrsified as to include some sport for every interest. Though tlie games are phncd fast and hard, sportsmanship and a feeling of fairplay are dominant in all sports events at the Academy, be they intramural or varsity. 1 Jack London The colorful works of Jack London are a ' ery accurate reflection of the a,uthor ' s own life. His vivid imagination coupled with his tra elings as a merchant seaman laid the groundwork from which he was able to catapult himself in tradi- tional American fashion from his squalid upbringings on the San Francisco waterfront to an exalted position among twentieth century authors and social reformers. Though his formal education extended little further than grammar school, his keen mind was aroused by his oracious consumption of all the travel and adventure stories that the public libraries contained. At 17, he signed aboard his first merchant vessel as an A.B. The ideas and experiences which he gained on this trip served as material for his initial attempts as an author. The book Sea Wolf tells the brutal story of his first voyage. It describes the sealing trade around the turn of the century, its lonely and desolate existence and the devastating effects of this life upon the men who lived it. Social reforms are an under- lying principle in all of London ' s works. Many of the characters in his stories are pictured in a struggle against the forces of oppression and inequalities which London pictured as dominant in our society. This preoccupation, however, detracts not at all from the ' iolent and primitive sea epics which he so vividly related. I The ahility and knowlcd ' e needed to maintain one ' s h()d - is not a Ifsser skill than the maintenance of a good piece of machineiN . Both the Acadeni ' s administrative leaders and the cadets themselves have long since realized this fact. To facUitate this training. Kings Point has a complete and imsur- passed schedule of athletic events lined up for its cadets. All of the arsity sports pictured with this section ha e not only the usual cfrects of college sports upon the men, but also have that of conditioning them for the occupation which they will em- brace upon graduation. To assure that not only those of great abilit ' are able to receive this training, a schedule of intramural events has been set up in which all men may fake part. These events are in the form of intra-company ri a]r which lends a keen sense of competition to the games which are so chMrsified as to include some sport for every interest. Though the games are played fast and hartl, sportsmanship and a feeling of fairplay are dominant in all sports events at the Academy, be the - intramural or varsity. M: i m. ■-■ ' gi a ' Sgii..- e1 .-- L Jack London The colorful works of Jack London are a very accurate reflection of the author ' s own life. His vivid imagination coupled with his tra elings as a merchant seaman laid the groundwork from which he was able to catapult himself in tradi- tional American fashion from his squalid upbringings on the San Francisco waterfront to an exalted position among twentieth century authors and social reformers. Though his formal education extended little further than grammar school, his keen mind was aroused by his voracious consum ption of all the travel and adventure stories that the public libraries contained. At 17, he signed aboard his first merchant vessel as an A.B. The ideas and experiences which he gained on this trip served as material for his initial attempts as an author. The book Sea Wolf tells the brutal story of his first voyage. It describes the sealing trade around the turn of tlie century, its lonely and desolate existence and the devastating effects of this life upon the men who lived it. Social reforms are an under- lying principle in all of London ' s works. Many of the characters in his stories are pictured in a struggle against the forces of oppression and inequalities which London pictured as dominant in our society. This preoccupation, however, detracts not at all from the olent and primitive sea epics which he so vividlv related. F O O T B A L L The year 1958 will always be remembered by Kings Pointers as the birth of a " new era " of sports here at the Academy. ' ith the Alumni Association providing the impetus, the sports program was re amped in an attempt to field athletic teams which would represent the Academy in the true tradition of the Merchant Nhirine. A new head coach was obtained in the person of Harry " The Horse " Wright, the former all-American from Notre Dame. Coach ' right has proved himself a very able man indeed. He has not only taught the team the secrets of winning football but he has also succeeded in instilling confidence and a will to win in every man in the Regiment. After ha ing dropped every game for the past three years, the Mariner eleven emerged this year with a very respectable record of .5 wins and 4 losses. The Regiment ' s morale has also recei ed a tremendous and much-needed boost in the arm. After this remarkable start we can be assured of continued success and a growing stature in inter- collegiate sports circles. With such things as a split sea ear and good training meals added to hard work and tremendous spirit, the Regiment and its followers can look forward to many more winning seasons in the future as well as a much tougher schedule. From this season ' s squad only fi e men will graduate: co-captain Robby Madden, Jim Rarron, Rob Hamilton, Nick Skar elis and Jack Doming. With ne.xt season ' s team led by this year ' s co-captain Tom Scanlan and the gridder ' s Most Valuable Player Rob Rogaski, how can the team possibly do anything but better during the second vear of the " new era " ? iA Front Hoit: Rod Sail, Dick Sclnve King, Jim Frew, Boh Hogaski, .St( Tonv Lipoid. John Diiffv, Ed Tlu .Silva, T.).n W illiams. Bruce C.rKt. Allen, Dennis Denny, Klaus Hohr Frank Fleischniann,. Buzz Santini. Steve Stumpf (mgr. ). er, Ste ' MeCa IS, H„v CMiarli 1958 FOOTBALL SQUAD ■ enietli, . " iek Scarvelis, Bob Hamilton, Boh Made i-. Sccmd Ron-: jack Caron, Ed . ml.rose, Arnie ird .Seelrv, Bed Scliroeder, lim Beneau. Third Rou Smith, lack Lawless, Ed Xamalioe, Jan jakubowski en (co-captain), Tom Scanlon (co-captain), Chris Linden. Joe Rvan, Dave Espev, Dennis Smith, . Bill Setek. Bill Wiederrecht, Tonv Walker, John John Kropke, lohn Reillv. Fourth Row: J. Hunter Mike MeKimmy, Wilk Wilkinson, Mike Ring, Dan McManus, Frank Dunlap, Frank Arness, Dave Gi odale, Back Roiv: Ray Bemier (mgr.), Clarence Cook (mgr.), Ken Christensen (mgr.), Dan Kennedy (trainer). KINGS POINT 6 Hamilton 25 i a - v Di inH oviT for two yards. For thirty minutes in the mud and rain of upstate New York, the Kings Point gridders put ' up a battle that showed they really wanted to play football and could do it. At halftime, the Mariners were tied with the highly-rated Hamilton eleven, 6-6. Coming out after the midpoint rest, the Mariners went back to the old type football, and the Continentals were quick to take advan- tage. Under a de astating pass attack, the Hamiltonians scored twice in the second half to make the final score 25 to 6 in their fa or. KINGS POINT 27 - C.W. Post O After dropping the opening game, the " New Era " was laimched as the cadets rolled up their first victory in twenty-four contests. After a slow first half, the hosting Mariners cut loose to take the vengeance of three years of losing ball out on tlieir fellow Long Islanders, C. W. Post. Co-captain Bobbie Madden had the pleasure of starting the ball rolling as he skirted the left end of the Post line for eight yards and the first Kings Point lead in many a moon. From this point on it was Kings Point all the way. Dick Schwender and Frank Fleischman accounted for the other tallies along with the passing com- bination of Ed Namahoe and Chris King. The game was graced with the presence of Miss June Kilian, who reigned o ' er the Mariner ' s first win in three years. The final score was a very encouraging 27 to 0. The y KINGS POINT 32 RPI :. 7 Although a short one, the Mariners pulled another first-one-in-a-long-time as they started their first winning streak in 30 starts by dri ing RPI into tile ground 32-7 on tlie loser ' s home field. This time the Cadets didn ' t give their oppo- nents a chance as they ran the first half, scorin 20 points to die Engineers ' 0. In his first role as starter, Don McManus, plebe fullback, led the Mariners to their first TD, when after a series of line ijlunges he dro e four yards for the tally. Namahoe added the conversion. Another sustained dri e led to the second Kings Point score with Schwender taking the honors. Walker led the Cadets to their final score in the half with only a few minutes remaining. Midway through the third quarter RPI ruined the pending shutout with a quarterback sneak. Additional Kings Point touchdowns were tallied on two Namahoe-to-King passes in the third stanza which finished off the scoring for the afternoon. vf Another i ioint for the Mariners. Ed Namahoe Chris King Not a second too soon, Tony. KINGS POINT 22 Wagner Down 16 points after tlie first quarter, the Cadet gridiron men pulled one of the greatest comebacks in their history to roar past ' agner 22-16 in the Staten Islander ' s own back ard. Late in the final period the Troops got up a full head of steam, which as climaxed b - Ed Xamahoe grabbing a Seahawk pass and dash- ing 25 yards into the end zone. This spectacular pla - came shortly after Xamahoe had hit Chris King on a se en ard aerial for the six-pointer and Frank Fleisciimann for tlie game knotting extra points. . fter what looked like a run-awa ' in the first 15 minutes of play, with ' agner scoring on two passes to their big end Don Trentalange, the Mariners drew their first blooil when Xamalioe iiit Bill Harriot with a 5()- ard pass midway through the second period. This come- back showed that Kings Point really had it when the chips were down, and was thought by the playeis to be the toughest game of the season. Jack Caron p the Homecoming. KINGS POINT O Rochester 20 With Tomb Field covered with ankle-deep mud and water, King ' s Point ' s fortune went with the M ' eather, which was terrible. Using fullback Walt Campbell as a battering ram, the unbeaten, imtied, and unscored upon Yellowjackets from Rochester forced o ' er three tallies to end their host ' s three game winning streak by a score of 20-0. Although the Cadets had several cracks at their opponent ' s end zone, a slippery ball and slipper ' ground kept them from capitalizing on these opportunities. The Gra ' and Blue equalled the isitors in first downs and gained about the same amount of yardage over the ground. The wide scoring gap can be attributed to their four fimibles and t o intercepted passes and their failure to complete anv of their own passes. Bobbie Madden, Co-capt.i Trouble ahead. When trouble comes it usually comes m bunches and this was proven to the Academy eleven as the - took a sound drubbing from Upsala 31-12 on Tomb Field. The visitors didn ' t give the Cadets a chance as they drove to their first tallv before the battle was three minutes old. A pass interception ga e the Vikings the needed break for their second score which left the Mariners 12 points down at halftime. Going into the last half the Upsala defense, which held the hosts to a measely two first downs during the first 30 minutes of play, jumped on an opening kickoff fumble and nine plays later found them- selves 18 points in front. A blocked punt gave the ' ew Jerseyites one of their two last period scores. On their longest dri e of the afternoon, the Mariners broke into the scoring column on a 23 yard Dunlap-to-King pass. Fighting to the last second, Kings Point finished the afternoon ' s scoring as Tony ' alker hit J. Hunter Allen in the end zone with onl ' IS seconds left on tlie clock. Jump for your life. , KINGS POINT 18 Union O Getting ahead again in the win and loss columns was the Mariners ' prime consideration as they hit the road again. They did just that by trampling Union 18-0. With no points yet scored, Union gave the Long Islanders a much-needed break in the opening minutes of the third period by hobbling the pigskin on their own 14 yard line. A nine yard pitch to veteran receiver Chris King by Frank Dunlap opened the way for the Cadets. Setting up the second Dunlap -to King six-pointer was a tremendous 90 yard punt return by Frank Fleischman who used his blockers perfectly but ran out of steam on the three yard stripe. Climaxing the scoring was plebe Tom Williams who on the first play of his college career as a halfback loped 58 yards for the final touchdown. Tlie Mariner forward well prepared to niarcli. Stopping him dead. M " J. Hunter Allen KINGS POINT 28 New Jersey State Teachers 22 Jim Kronzer f y " In a spine-tingling final quarter, the Cadets took their last home contest for their final victory of the 1958 season. Although jumping off to a quick 22-0 lead, the Grey and Blue almost lost their ship as the vitaminized Lions from the Garden State staged a tremendous comeback, knotting the score at 22-22 with five minutes remaining to be played in the game. This snapped the Merchies out of their hypnotic trance, and from then on they ga e it all they liad and fought for an opening which came with liut three minutes to play. This was a Lion fumble wliich was pounced upon by Rod Sail. Now running with the tide the Mariners cut in the remaining burners and plowed ahead for the w inning tally with Jack Caron bulling o er from the one foot line. King, Caron and Williams accoimted for the first half scores and Schwender and King made the points after touchdown. ' m ' h4(: 1 1 ' ' Sweeping around our end. lith their baeks to tlie wall. KINGS POINT O Hofstra 22 Already assured of a winning season, the Mariners journe ed to Hempstead to engage the Dutclimen from Hofstra on the hitter ' s home gridiron. Tlie Fhing Dutchmen kept things flying all da - b unleashing a stinging aerial attack on the ground-minded Cadets. After the sky had cleared the Mariners found themselves on the short end of a 22-0 score. Scores are sometimes misleading and this one surely was, for the Gray and Blue outrushed their oppo- nents on the ground and etjuallcd them in first downs. The Hofstraites took their toll on the airways by completing a total of 12 passes out of 19 attempts for a staggering total of 156 yards. Kings Point made up for their lack of pass defense — in everything but the score — b - their fabulous line pla - which clearly surpassed the Hofstra ' s front line efforts. ank Fkischinan Tliis .season ' s winners of tin- Player of the Week Award, tlu eovetcti purple scepter: Cliris Kinu; Ed N ' aniahoe; Ron Sail: Clerrv Leonard, pep rallv master; Boh Rofiaski; Jack Caron; John .Siha. Front Row: Bill RodjiiTS, Bob McXamara, Ted ludd, Roger Xclson, Bill Skinner, Frank Luciano. Back Row: Arvis A -erette, Hon Ulilin, Dick Muller, Roy Mahr, Al Klein, Mike Murphy. CROSS Co-caplain. ' ! Ron Despite a misleading 3-5 final record, the Kings Point harriers faired well against a rough schedule last fall. Victories were scored o er City College of New York by a score of 27-28 in the season ' s best effort. o er Wagner 16-43 in the lone home meet, and over Adelphi 25-34. The hill-and-dalers also made an eighth place finish in the Collegiate Track- Conference meet on the fine performances of Bob McNamara and Roger Nelson. Co-captains of the scjuad were Frank Luciano and Ron Uhlin. Luciano scored 19 points during the season despite an early injury which sidelined him in several meets. Uhlin was another Mariner stalwart compiling 21 points. Other lettermen were Roger Nelson, the squad ' s high point man ith 31 tallies, Ray Mahr, and Bob McNamara. Other runners included Dick Midler, Ted Judd, Bill Skinner, Al Klein, Bill Rogers and Ar is A erette. Coach Lt. (is) Onieltdienk. 156 COUNTRY rlK ' rr ofF at ' anCordand Park. 1958 RECORD KINGS POINT OPPONENT 30 Hunter . . . 26 25 Adelphi . . . 34 16 Wagner . . . 43 44 N. Y. State Maritime College 17 31 Queens College . 26 27 C.CN.Y. . . . 28 34 Long Island Aggies 22 | 30 Montclair. 25 Coming through the rye. Front Row: A. Gonzak-z, R. Smith, F. Verscheurcn, J. Toner, M. Proios, R. Twildc, F. Ferguson. Second Row: ]. Hoklen, ]. Fettke, W. Henderson, W. Siegel, B. Woessner, D. Finholm. Back Row: F. Castaneda, M. Morrow, J. Hoff- man, T. Stout, M. Elseniewski, C. Williamsen, M. Schiebel. SfO o The story of the 1958 soccer team can lie summed up in the few words that tell of its failure to come up with a consistently strong front line attack. Although bulwarked by a talented group of returning lettermen and the three " Jacks " back from sea duty, the Mariner booters could not whip up a potent offense to stop the caliber of competition they met during the season. A fine job was turned in by Chief Harrison of the Naval Science Department, who undertook the coaching position for the first year. The two best efforts during the season were a 7-1 win oyer C. W. Post College and a 2-1 loss to Hofstra. In the Post game, John Toner booted home four goals, while the Hofstra contest was highlighted by a great team effort as they continuously pres sured the defense in the second half and almost pulled it out of the hole. Pla ' ing their last season of soccer for Kings Point were co-captains Dick Twilde and Al Gonzalez, Fred Verscheuren, Fabio Castaneda, John Fettke, Bernie Woesner, John Ginna, Dave McMaster, and Bill Siegel. Chief G. Harrison, USN 1958 RECORD KINGS POINT OPPONENT 1 West Point 9 C.C.N.Y. . . 6 1 Brooklyn College 3 1 Adelphi . . . 2 7 C. W. Post . . 1 4 Queens College N. Y. State 8 Maritime . 2 2 Hunter . . . 2 2 Pratt Institute . 5 6 Long Island University . 2 ] Hofstra . . . 2 3 Long Island Aggie 4 lil |iMi4 lMr»(iiwiw« «Mi«UMi i«»ur Ktw«(it i Head that ball. Dribbling goalward. m The Mariners pressing a Putting his shoulder to the task. Front Row: J. Rozw; BASKETBALL TEAM J. Clancy, J. Leonard, E. Namahoe. Back Row: Mr. J. Laub, Coach; F. Verona, R. S. Brown, R. C. Brown, C. Keith, L. Carr. 1958-59 RECORD K.P. Opp. 69 Wagner College 65 66 Brooklyn College 86 38 U.S. Militar. ' Academy 79 50 Trinity College 48 64 Bridgeport University 69 56 R.P.I 60 67 Queens College 68 68 Alfred University 53 56 Fairfield College 82 67 Adelphi College 92 55 Union College 67 54 U.S. Coast Guard Academy ... 61 74 Williams College 84 73 Catholic University 84 65 Lake Forest College (111.) .... 67 52 Chicago University 64 87 Hunter College 71 50 Yeshiva University 65 63 Fairleigh Dickinson 94 48 Rider College 58 Cuacli Jack Laub and Captain Jerry Lcoiiai BASKETBALL Though the Kings Point cagers had a poor season, their record of four wins in twenty starts sliows an improvement over the last few years. Under the direction of their new coach, Jack Laub, the Mariners never lacked spirit, but due to their Tack of height, found it hard to put together four hot quarters in one game. Failure to sink free throws cost the cadets at least si.K close contests. With the loss of only four men through graduation, the Mariners have hopes of a much better showing ne.xt year. Graduating will be starters Russ and Ron Brown, Norman Jensen, and Ed Fabber. Next year will see the return of eight lettermen and several stars from this year ' s fine junior varsity team. yWm JUNIOR VARSITY TEAM: J. Corso, Manager; G. Young, W. DicrLs, D. clcli, C. Hawkins, J. Macki, T. Carr, R. Steiner, D. Adams, T. M Rohe, T. Kosty, Mr. R. Domini, Coach. One way to get a center jump. SWIMMING TEAM Front Row: E. Fields, G. Greenwald. M. Ti ;Iie. 1, Phillips, D. Eichin. D. Ochinero, C. Krebs, C. Haines, I. Mullallv, R. QuicR. Back Row: J. Sexton, Manager; R. Phillips, Manager; E. Monroe, H. Powell, H. Moulder, J. Robinson, D. O ' Boyle, R. Muga in, Lt. (jg) R. White, Coach; T. Marshall, Manager. f Captain Ron Miiga Dennv Dean SWIMMING The combination of a well balanced squad and some outstanding individual performances sufficed to give the Mariners the finest swimming season (nine wins and three losses) in more than a decade. The highlights of the season came with the defeat of Fordham and the first win over Union College since the two teams first became rivals. A record-breaking medley relay team composed of Captain Ron Mugavin, Dick O ' Boyle, Gene Fields, and Rodger Quigg was the mermen ' s top point winner. This excellent team will be changed . little through graduation, losing only Mugavin and diver Dennis Dean. With almost the entire team returning, Coach White and the Cadets are assured of another outstanding swimming season next year. 4 J J!i fe Executing a beautiful halfgaincr. WRESTLING TEAM Front Row: W. Skinner, J. Yankanich, J. Doming, R. Hamilton, R. Cosentino, T. Oyafuso. Second Row: Verity, B. Carlson, J. Brown, Manager. Back Row: J. Rocchio, Manager; P. Gattini, W. Siegel, C. Vn( Scinta, Manager; W. Ingoglia, D. Price, D. ■irV- r. T.effler. LT. Clem Stralka, Coach. 1958-59 RECORD K.P. 0pp. K.P. 21 Union College ... 11 28 22 R.P.I 7 23 3 U.S. Naval Academy . 25 26 29 U.S. Coast Guard 22 Academy 3 18 Hofstra College ... 12 5 R.I.T 20 34 231 Fairleigh Dickinson C. W. Post College C.C.N.Y Long Island Aggies Brooklyn Poly. . . Total Points Opp. 5 7 5 Captain Paul Gattini Cosentino breaking free. WRESTLING The year 1959 found tlic Kings Point wrestling team engaging much finer competition than in preceding years. The cadets, however, were still able to demonstrate their mat supremacy by smothering all but two of their opponents and by also walking away with the championsliip of the first Metropolitan Intercollegiate Tournament. The final round of this tournament found fi ' e Kings Pointers still contenc Iing. Of these, Captain Paul Gattini and Bruce Carlston pinned their men, while Jeff Oyafuso, Dan Price, and Bill Seigel placed second in their respective weight classes. Graduation takes away the nucleus of a truly great team which in the past four years has piled up a record of 36 wins, 5 losses and 1 tie, by far the finest in the school ' s history. Graduates include Gattini and Bob Hamilton, botli top men in their weights since their first match in the fourth class year. Bill Seigel, who saw action as a plebe and carries an almost unblemished record, Dan Price, Dick Cosentino, Cliff Woodrick, who have been regulars throughout this season. Jack Doming and Roger Persons. Lettermen Oyafuso, Carlsten. George Leffler, Will Ingoglia, and John Yankanich will return for another fine season next way. Trying to break an Aggie tight waist. Mother told me there would be times like this. ShowiiiR him the lights. A head scissors effectively applied - ta ' W.O, H.i Acli, Civuli, J. Barron, K. Rcitc I F L E TEAM The Mariner Rifle Team turned in another fine record to add to its long list of victorious seasons. Under the fine coaching of W.O. Ray Acli, the Rifle Team has never had a losing season. This past year pro ed to be no exception as the Mariner Riflemen wound up on the credit end of a tough schedule. Both the team and individual members placed juite high in the sectional matches of the national rifle tournament. The team will feel a great loss with the graduation of co-captains Dan Cowhig and Jim Barron. Co-Captains Dan Cowliig and Jim Barron with Coach W.O. Ray Ach. Sitting: J. Lccper, D. Greaves, Co-C;ipti in; W.O. R. Ac Barron, K. Wood, A. ' idberg. PISTOL TEAM Coaeh; R. Beloiis, Co-Capta D. Combs. Stamlin ' : D. Cook, R, Solinski, J. Coach -.0. Ra: certificates to Jim Bcloiis. Ach Barron ards All-Amcrican d Co-Captain Boh PISTOL T E A M After winning twelve of tlie season ' s fifteen inatclies, the AcadciTi - Pistol Team grabbed a hard-earned third place in the National Rifle Associations Intercollegiate Pistol Championships. In the NRA Championships, the cadets beat out fourth ]ilaee Navv, avenging an early season defeat, by shooting a 1400, the year ' s highest mark. Three team members were placed on the U.S. Revolver Association ' s All American Team. The - were Bob Belous. Joe Hemphill and Jim Barron. Co-captains Dan Greaves and Bob Belous along with Barron, Dave Combs, and Jim Leeper will graduate this ear. With onl - one man retmning. Coach Ray Ach will liave quite a gap to fill next season. 173 KSV- -. ' i V e lT t. V;, ' •• V - ' -: • : ■ - - f . .- L (..;| 4i " - ■ . . X ■■■-■■ BASEBALL TEAM Fronf fidic; C. Smith, A. Gonzalez, R. Madden, K. Cliristianscn, J. Seelinger. Srriiiu Roic; R. Little, T- Rozuat. T- Kaufman, R. Cullcn, J. Piiorto. ' . Tanski. Third Row: F. ' erona, E. Bonacci, J. Horner, T. Kohler, L. Prividy, W. Seeley. Back Row: B. Axery, F. ' ersclulren, E. Scliinder, S. Kraemcr, S. Stunipf. 1959 RECORD K.P. Opp. 4 Queens 6 6 C. " . Post 14 St. Francis 3 3 Manhattan 7 5 Wau ' ner 7 18 F " ort Schuyler 6 Hunter 10 11 L.I. Aggies 2 3 lona 11 9 Lone Island U 2 10 Adephi 1 6 Hofstra 14 15 Pace 1 St. John ' s 4 1 Na y 9 A S E ALL The Mariner Baseball Team concluded a highly successful season by copping second place in the Knickerbocker Conference. The team had onl - four first classmen starters and relied heavily on underclassmen for much of their strength. Team Captain, Bob Madden held down the ccnterfield spot and slammed in five runs during the season. Two other first classmen rounded out the outfield. They were Joe " Eggs " Seelinger and Ken Christiansen. Al Gonzalez was the only other first classman and he held down the second base position all year. George Parker was the leading hitter, cracking in twent ' fi -c RBI ' s and hitting 374. Len Prividy was the best pitcher and lie was honored with a spot on the All-Conference team along with George Parker and Smith. With these three men returning along with Kraemer, Rozwatt, Jones and Kaufman, next year ' s team should do at least as well as this year ' s. Tisht play at second. I lb 1 ' Lcn Pri icl ' winding up. ■ V Captain Bob Madde -1 w ' Senior Members Fred " crschuren, Bob Madden, Joe Seelinser, Ken Christiansen, Al Gonzalez. . - i v TRACK Man - records fell as the Academy Track Team again went on to take all their dual meets and to finish high in several big conference meets. This was one of their best seasons to date. Among the top trials for the cadets were the Marine Corps Relays, Penn Relays, Queens Relays, CTC Meet, and the Junior and Senior Meets. In these meetings with some of the best trackmen in the country, the best efforts were put out by the great mile relay team composed of Flynn. Uhlin, Luciano, and McNamara. They broke the school record when they took first place in their division at the Penn Relays. This relay team also took a fourth in the medley and ninth in the two mile open at the Marine Relays which saw some of the nation ' s best teams competing. The team is going to suffer a great loss as it loses the major components of this relay team and three seasoned veterans through graduation. Graduating will be Tom Flynn, Ron Uhlin, Frank Luciano, Frank Illuzzi, John Fettke, Tom Mess, Dick Cosentino, and Managers Mike Murphv and Steve Liggett. Coaches CDH. J. Libtrtz and LT. (jg) S. Omeltchenko. TRACK TEAM Front Row: LT. (jr) S. Oimltilu-nk.i. Ci.aclu Miirpliy, McNamara. Carlsten, Goodalc, Yeafier, Xclson. Lewis, Mason, CDR. J. Lilurt . Coach. Sccniul Ron: RiNnolds. Jolnison. llhi zi, Dcnnv, Fettke, McBride, Leonard, Hartenstcin. Back Row: Liggett, Flynn, Uhlin, McTigne, Giles. Halpin. Wood, JSrooks, Fornian. e c ' ' •M ' ' ■ ' V ' ft M M TIk- winners of the Big 50 Series, Collese Mile Relav at the Pcnn Relays. Tom Fhnn, Ron Uhlin, Bob McNamara, and Frank Luciano. « .,1,7. " - t I ' J. Tom Flyiin Coach Omclfclienko clocks them in. i m ' f ' , M i ' Senior Members Mike Murphy, Frank Iluzzi, Tom Flynn, John Fettke, Ron Uhlin, Dick Cosentino, Steve Liggett. Tlie mile relay team warming up. Manager Mike Murphy and Coach Onieltchenko time meet. X f t TEXMS TEAM CDR. Ridiard H. O ' Connell, Coach: John Salcniiis, Manaucr; J. Roaers, D. Grca es, F. Duqi G. Oster, J. Barron, S. Fiacco, D. Nurcnbers, Manager; LT, (jg) R. Poletti, Assistant Coach, D. Smitli, F. La TENNIS Tn tlieir first ear of competition in the Mctropol ' tan Collegiate Conference, the Kings Point Tennis Team finislied second with ten wins and two losses. This year ' s fine squad was coached by Commander Richard H. O ' Connell, USMS. who was ably assisted by LT. (jg) Robert Polletti. of the Naval Science Department. Van Jones, a first classman from Florida, was captain of the team and turned in a very commendable season ' s record of ten singles and three doubles wins while dropping only one single and three doubles. Other mainstays were Jim Barron and Dan Greaves, both first classmen who had fine winning records. John Salenjus was the team ' s playing manager. Along with keeping up with his managerial duties, John turned in four doubles wins for the team. Returning ne.xt year to form the nucleus of another strong squad will be Steve Fiacco, Dan Smith, Fred Larson, George Oster, Duke Duquemin, Ted Rogers, and Manager Dave Nurenberg. With tliis roster. Commander O ' Connell is sure to come up with anotiier winning season. RfiCORD K.P. Opp. Long Island U 9 Manliattan College 7 Pratt University 2 4 Hofstra 5 lona College Pace College Adelplii Brooklyn Poly 7 Queens College 1 7 Brooklyn 2 n-y -- S A I L I N G Captain Jack Wenners at the heir ■ S ' - ' - Helm ' s a weather. e. v - - ' Manager Frank Hite. TEAM ' The Kings Point Sailing Team again proved them- selves the best sailing team in the New York area as they took the F ' aciilt ' Achisers Trophy in the fall competition. The team competed in the MAISA Fall Regatta, the America Cup Championships, and the Service Academy Regatta. The team had the ser ices of three coaches this year, LCDR. Litchfield. LT. Krinsky and LT. Wheatly. The outstanding members of this year ' s team were Captain Jack Wenners, and second classmen Monro and Brinkerhoff. The team will feel the loss of seniors Jack Wenners, Herb Weeks, Jim Sanborn, Paul Siebeking and Manager Frank Hite. P ' 9 | y ' 3 Tlie Coach tending the buoys. 1 - -t - On the starboard tack. Making a mark. nsik Coming about. " J ' " ' . ' - . ' . SiM.W i I " The end of a tiglit rowing race. I ' N T R A M U A L S J An all-out effort for tlic company. i?l© - The intramural Softball champs from the Sixth Conip M 3 ■ ' Ik i i- ' .... IT M I I 1 N 1..1 1.,,,. ,T,, s. .:i ir m ai A Mc ' l Tul)lin presents Honor Conipan ' pla tlu ' winning company. The Academy has an excellent intramural program which is so designed that just about every cadet has a chance to participate in some sport throughout the year. Competition is among all six companies and it is divided into two parts. The first part begins in September and the second in February. The winners of the intramural competitions are granted a long weekend. For this reward, the cadets compete furious- ly all year long. The intrammal program is run by LT. (jg) Patterson and the Cadet Intramural Athletic Board. The intrammal program is an important part of the cadet training. One sided action in the lioxin;; chanipionsliips. Get ready for a " spike ' No matter where or in what field a Kings Point graduate may find himself, he will always remember his Alma Mater for it is as much a part of his make up as his physical being. Those four long, sometimes sad, some- times ga -, and always challeng- ing years will influence his character and personahty for the rest of his days. In the following pages, these four cadet years are depicted as they actually ap- peared to the Class of 1959. That long, bitter campaign often re- ferred to as the plebe year is portrayed with all of its unpleas- an tries including plebe beats, serving mess, cleaning stations and the endless inspections. The sea year is showni with all of its pleasantries, the ships, the far- away lands, the exotic people, and the world-famous landmarks. The transition stage of a cadet ' s career is shown during the second class year. In this year, he is secure in tlie knowledge that he has conquered the plebe year and has actually sailed the seven seas but must still put in another hard twelve months before taking the " conn " of the Cadet Corps. Finally, the first class year with all of its priv- ileges, responsibilities, authority and anticipation. It is siiicrrel)- hoped that this section will be able to help the Kings Point graduate recall some of the more pleasant memories of his cadet vears. In the middle of the eighteenth century a young man named Jules Verne, who had prepared for a career in law, began writing light, quasi-scientific romances for the people of France. He immediately achieved immense popularity, especially among young people. Before he died in 1905, he had completed forty novels and had seen many of his stories translated and be- come successes in England and the United States. For the most part his works were concerned with geographical and scientific problems of his time which he solved with almost prophetic facility. Verne ' s formula for successful storytelling is exemplified in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. Captain Nemo has become fed up with his fellow man and decides to in- habit the ocean. His invention, the Nautilus, carries him across the vast continents ' hich are the ocean ' s floors and into a series of high adventures. Occasion- ally Nemo leaves his essel and pads about the ocean floor to collect scientific data or to explore someplace whose beauty has commanded his interest. The story has a pace that is unflagging in excitement and has the unique quality ' of being almost as futuristic to the people who read it today as it was to the people who enjoyed it nearly a century ago. No matter where or in what field a Kings Point graduate may find himself, he will always remember his Alma Mater for it is as mucli a part of his make up as his physical being. Those four long, sometimes sad, some- times ga ' , and always challeng- ing years will influence his character and personality for the rest of his days. In the following pages, these four cadet years are depicted as they actually ap- peared to the Class of 1959. That long, bitter campaign often re- ferred to as the plebe year is portrayed with all of its unpleas- antries including plebe beats, serving mess, cleaning stations and the endless inspections. The sea year is showni with all of its pleasantries, the ships, the far- away lands, the exotic people, and the world-famous landmarks. The transition stage of a cadet ' s career is shown during the second class year. In this year, he is secure in the knowledge that he has conquered the plebe year and has actually sailed the seven seas but must still put in another hard twelve months before taking the " conn " of the Cadet Corps. Finally, the first class year with all of its priv- ileges, responsibilities, authority and anticipation. It is sincere-l - hoped that this section will be able to help the Kings Point graduate recall some of the more pleasant memories of his cadet years. Jules Verne In the middle of the eighteenth century a young man named Jules Verne, who had prepared for a career in law, began writing light, quasi-scientific romances for the people of France. He immediately achieved immense popularity, especially among young people. Before he died in 1905, he had completed forty novels and had seen many of his stories translated and be- come successes in England and the United States. For the most part his works were concerned with geographical and scientific problems of his time which he solved with almost prophetic facility. Verne ' s formula for successful storytelling is exemplified in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. Captain Nemo has become fed up with his fellow man and decides to in- habit the ocean. His invention, the Nautilus, carries him across the vast continents whicli are the ocean ' s floors and into a series of high adventures. Occasion- ally Nemo leaves his essel and pads about the ocean floor to collect scientific data or to explore someplace whose beauty has commanded his interest. The story has a pace that is unflagging in excitement and has the unique quality of being almost as futuristic to the people who read it today as it was to the people who enjoyed it nearly a century ago. FOURTH CLASS YEAR It ' s really very obvious and perhaps a bit shopworn to say, " It seems like only yesterday. " The last four years have passed by, however, in rapid procession leaving each and every moment firmly imprinted on our minds to be carefully saxored and pondered in tlie years to come. Entering the Academy, as we did, in our most impressionable years, our first acquaintances and experiences will always stand out in our minds. The transition from high school senior to college freshman is always difficult, and infinitely more so when one enters into the obli ion of a plebe class. Being relatively ignorant of what was expected from us, tlie best course seemed to imitate those who appeared to know what was proper and keep ourseKcs in the background for awhile. Few of us knew any of the men with whom we Iiad been thrown together and the first worth- wliile thing that most did was enjoy the pleasures of cultivating new friendships. Not a few of these friendships were to grow strong and endure long after our school days were completed. When having passed through and o ercome the first nostalgia, our first year became our A flowery Emery Rice cops first place on Homecoming Day. Sanitary engineers second to none. A day off to restore the old Rice. l( - - Remember when, Mr. Cosentino. Lower away easy! happiest and certainly our most contented year at the Academy. Not having any hberty, we put our minds to devising devilish amusements to take our minds off our problems, both academic and administrative. During the long weekends that followed, this training proved exceedingly valuable. When we finally accustomed ourselves to Academy life we began to get down to the busi- ness at hand: education. This education took the form of both scholastics and the preparation in practical subjects for our forthcoming sea year. The e.xcitement for this experience was built up gradually by things that we would learn in class and also by the upperclassmen who told us so many tales. As the time grew short we had a warm glow cre ep over us signifying our sense of accom- plishment at having completed the first year. With this feeling of really belonging to the Academy, we embarked upon an entirely dif- ferent phase of our training, learning to live the life of a seaman, our chosen vocation. Over the bounding Like sleeping on a cloud. Recognition or not The cutest co.xswain. ' RLUHNr CHflNPS 1 i COMMANDER S. W. REED, USMS District Training Representative . (C tuS , THIRD CLASS YEAR 11 i .U£ " dr. M- The ordeal of the plebe year was over now and our thoughts turned to the sea. The antici- pation of salt air and steel ships was now becoming a reality and whether or not we realized it, a new chapter in our lives was unfolding before us. August leave passed quickly and before we knew it we were packing our bags and saying goodbye to those at home. We set out for the year ahead with great expectations. At 45 Broadway we met Captain Reed, our district supervisor, and our good friend Johnny. With words of friendly advice in our minds and orders in our hands, we made our way to the first berth of our sea year. Loaded down with seabags and " civvies " , we climbed the gangplank of our first ship with mixed feelings of awe and anxiety. Once on board we found our way to the rooms of the " mate " or " first " , where we timidly introduced ourselves to these men of whom we had heard so much. They proved to be quite human, however, and after welcoming us aboard, showed us to our quarters. In short order our " trops " were off and we changed into working clothes. Out on deck or douTi in the engine room, we became engrossed in learning as much as possible and soon became part of the teeming activity aboard a ship in port. It wasn ' t, however, until we slipped the last line and saw our wake trailing astern that we realized we were waterborne. The easygoing routine of life at sea gave us a chance to square ourselves away and enjoy some good chow. We were able to meet the men we sailed with now, as they really were, and we shall never forget them or what they did for us. They taught us to become seamen and soon we knew all about " lighting off " and " slushing down " , and ternis such as floorplates, scuppers and bulkheads became part of our everyday language. In our spare time we managed to work on our sea-projects, have coffee, and oftimes just gaze at the sea around us and the stars over our head. We saw the sea in its full fury, and in its calm majestic splendor; we came to respect it for what it was and to love it. We became part of the crew and without realizing it found ourselves pouring out our life stories to our ship- mates who listened and cared. Before some of us had gotten over our first case of seasickness we were nosing our bow into our first foreign port of call. As soon as we were able, we donned our " native sportswear " and grabbed our cameras. One should experience himself the charm and delight that a distant land holds when it is seen for the first time. Venice, London, Yokohama, and all the ports we had dreamed of now became a reality and provided a wealth of experience and knowledge that en- riched us and made us better men. The year passed and during it we visited many lands, heard strange languages and saw places of inspiring wonder. We thoroughly enjoyed ourselves and collected a vast store of sea stories that we would tell over and over again. Only too soon, with sadness and regret we signed off our last ship for the year. To all of us it was a year in our lives well spent. The salt of the seven seas had seeped into our blood and we belonged to that cult of men who are beckoned, and must go down to the sea in ships. -ll— A future bucko mate. Her Majesty ' s finest ... on the right, that is. AMERICAN CAFE The city that needs no sewers. The Wild Ones in Genoa. J I An inhabitant of the fabulous Riviera. She ' s still leaning. An American in Paris. % ' « ' A couple of ancient ruins. J- " Cap ' n Fred surveys the situation. Twenty minutes until the inspector gets here. Ta.xi drivers are trit ndls- tlic world over. Van Dyck and his boy Friday. The engineer in his ' . c Which way to the bridle path? Sea year dancing lessons. Something different about these foreign She is not much to look at, but what a personality- Touring the Caribbean. 1 r )F MEXICO AND CARIBE INCLUDING THE WEST INDIES Shooting the sun. Up from the bilges. Their first sliip. SECOND CLASS YEAR Somewhat unwilling!) ' , we returned from sea to begin our second class year. Most of us had become accustomed to heretofore unaccustomed luxmies during our year of travel. Many of us were overweight and just about all of us were a little lazy when it came to academics. But, being rational men, we soon became resolved to our fate and settled down to the task at hand. Our first job was that of molding the young minds and shaping the young bodies of the new plebes. This we proceeded to do with gay abandon. With overnight liberty hinging on the results of our teaching efforts with the fourth class, we became expert disciplinarians and instructors. We were rewarded for our efforts that October with the much desired o ernight liberty privilege. With o ' ernights granted, our outlook on life brightened; we were now able to become a part of the local social whirl. We attended numerous dances, parties, and various other social get-togethers. Some of the duller and less imaginative among us could be found making their way homeward each weekend. Of course we de ' oted some of our time to academic pursuits and many of us found the going much tougher than in our plebe year. But, fortunately, most of us managed to conquer the scholastic challenge. The time for arranging for the design and purchase of our own class ring soon came about and we promptly elected a ring committee. Sample drawings of ring designs were displayed and the discussions about stones, colors, and prices went far into the iiW iii jiUiM ijfk- ' i fr • 1 ' ■ 1 ' r f mi % -1 The Yul Bnnner fans from Hofstra come to call. k-y - fMfS i V f ' Lovely entertainers from Centenary College action above anH U The colobsii 111 King A meeting of tlie M.B.A. executi e council. How high is the flagpole now, mister? r m - - m s This is a future Regime ntal Comnwno Even seco.KU.,a.n..„pUch on tl. dance p.,ee.. night. A company was finally granted tlie contract and our orders were placed. Again we settled down to our studies, and tried patiently to wait for spring, which would bring the Ring Dance and the end of the year that much closer. During the interim our class developed a literary publication called the " Fifty-niner. " This periodical contained all manner of valuable information and malicious gossip. We also elected new class officers, formed a class committee and generally became organized. Another first for our class was the formation of an officer- candidate school. Likely candidates for cadet officers were chosen from our class during the latter part of the year and were enrolled in a training program designed to make us efficient cadet officers. At the termination of the course, we were assigned petty officerships for the last quarter of our second class year. By now the plans for the ring dance were in full swing. Through the efforts of the ring committee and our class officers, we were granted permission to hold it in June of our second class car. This was the start of a new tradition at Kings Point. The dance itself pro ed to be the most successful one of our class history. More than one " fifty-niner " became engaged at this one. After this, the second class year drew to a rapid close. Before we knew it, we were reporting back in September to begin our final vear at Kings Point. WILBUR CRess FKWy fHiTCHHiKwa reanoHHY HARTFORD 5 5PRINQPIELD 3o B05T0N 69 Look who ' s doing the beating novvl Paradise lost. A propt rly officered and manned vessel. Hmttl « «« „tl,ant «m.9.»«« ,,„( .■• iniMP " ' " ' „„( »a!f i CcllBt " " ' - . ,hi. Commls» ' »n , " " ' A-T- CaBti - " a.e.«0® ' ' - FIRST CLASS YEAR After three long years, the Class of 1959 finally entered their first class year. After such a long wait, we did not hesitate in taking over the leadership of the Regiment. Those among us who were chosen to be cadet officers turned to our task with delight and great enthusiasm. Although we were a bit uncertain at first, we soon began to think that the Regiment had never been in better hands. The athletic teams also show- ed a great improvement in 1959. We had our first winning seaso n in football and all the other teams improved also. Our class activities did not slack off in the least. We had bigger and better dances than ever before. But before we knew it, the graduation committee began to ask us for suggestions for graduation week activities. This caused us to realize that the great day was ap- proaching. After offering our graduation week suggestions, we settled down to license preparation. This was done care- lessly at first, then seriously and finally, furiously. In spite of the fact that no one thought he would make it, most of us man- aged to pass and we were finished. Four years had passed and we prepared to leave Kings Point, some of us with delight, others with trepidation, but all with a touch of sadness. The 1959 Football Ouci-n contest. fc„ _.:,-. ENTRY A pep rally bonfire. ■■1 (lali.-t know taps IkuI blown, s r Tiie KboM of J,„„.s 11;,! DELANO - - Refurbishing the Activities House. Willie spruces up for breakfast. =1 Travelling ia tlic rapid transit s sUni. J. Complete with room service and a pretty maid. s.- ' sm- j Iiiip.irting a necessary academic backgnmiul. A non-scheduled trip. 1 Q MARV GERD . . . v»t» W t 9 1 Ci -»i ' M ' nP A W Ji w i BARBARA GINNV JUDV DOLLY BARBARA SHIRLEY JO ANN cve fct wovM vi CAROL STEWART And then that day arrived, graduation. After four long years, ears filled with study, work, hardships, joys and sor- rows, e finally reached the pinnacle of success. The week- long license e. aminations, which we lonii dreaded, were finally encountered and conquered. We were now Merchant Marine officers stcond to none. It was with mixed emotions that we mounted the stairs to the graduation rostrum to re- ceive our long sought after licenses and bachelor of science degrees. There was that joy and sense of accomplishment that comes with the successful com- pletion of every worthwhile task. And yet, there was also a bit of sorrow, a touch of regret caused ! the realization that we were nou about to leave Kings Point. . s we tossed our caps into the air with a triumphant flourish, every one of us knew that our Academy, our Kings Point, would forever hold a very special place in our nunds anil hearts. Richard Henry Dana, Jr, Among the most popular and most dynamic sea stories of all time is Richard Henry Dana ' s Two Years Before the Mast. It was written when, after two years at Harvard, its author shipped as a common seaman for a voyage round the Horn to California in the brig Pilgrim. During his voyage, Dana kept a diary in which he put down eacli day an account of everything that happened. Two Years Be- fore the Mast is the liook that he wrote from the notes in his diary, and published in 1840. This great work is now consider- ed an American classic of the sea, and of the heyda - of Ameri- can sailing ships. It as written to give the real story of a sailor ' s life and to show the Tiiany in- justices that he suffered. In this respect the book was a tremen- dous success and became the motivating force behind the movement aimed at improving the seaman ' s plight. Yet today its humanitarian aims liave been achie cd and passed, and it is for its portrait of the life on a great sailing ship that tlie volume is treasured. in py- And tlien that day arrived, graduation. After four long years, years filled with study, work, hardships, joys and sor- rows, we finally reached the pinnacle of success. The week- long license examinations, which we long dreaded, were finally encountered and conquered, ' e were now Merchant Marine officers second to none. It was with mixed emotions that we mounted the stairs to the graduation rostrum to re- ceive our long sought after licenses and bachelor of science degrees. There was that joy and sense of accomplishment that comes witli the successful com- pletion of every worthwhile task. And yet, there was also a bit of sorrow, a touch of regret caused b the realization that we were now about to leave Kings Point. As we tossed our caps into the air with a triumphant flourish, every one of us knew that our Academy, our Kings Point, w ould forever hold a very special place in our minds and hearts. Richard Henry Dana, Jr P mong the most popular and most dynamic sea stories of all time is Richard Henry Dana ' s Two Years Before the Mast. It was written when, after two years at Harvard, its author shipped as a common seaman for a voyage round the Horn to California in the brig Pilgrim. During his voyage, Dana kept a diary in which he put down each day an account of everything that happened. Tivo Years Be- fore the Mast is tlic liook that he wrote from the notes in his diary, and published in 1840. This great work is now consider- ed an American classic of the sea, and of the heyday of Ameri- can sailing ships. It as written to give the real story of a sailor ' s life and to show the many in- justices that he suffered. In this respect the book was a tremen- dous success and became the motivating force behind the movement aimed at improving the seaman ' s plight. Yet today its humanitarian aims have been achie ed and passed, and it is for its portrait of the life on a great sailing ship that the volume is treasured. P3 cn en I— ■ LCDR. WALTER VON GRONAU, USMS lass Officers RONALD T. MUGAVIN, Class President ROBERT MADDEN, Class Vice President IN MEMORIAM 1 CADET NORMAN EDWARD SLUSHER SWOYERSVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA JANUARY 1938 - NOVEMBER 1956 The Class of 1959 sets aside this page in memory of a classmate who passed away while we were third classmen. Throughout an active plebe year, in which he participated in many activities, Norman waited anxiously for his sea dut) ' , which he was never to enjoy. Stricken on his first voyage, aboard the S.S. African Dawn, Norman was rushed to Victoria, Africa where he died of complications following an operation. Though no longer with us, Norman will be remembered always in our hearts. For tho ' from out our bourne of Time and Place The flood may bear me far, J hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have crost the bar. Alfred, Lord Tennyson )r t 1 ALBERT ANTHONY AMADOR, JR. San Francisco, California SEA DUTY: S.S. President Monroe, American President Lines; S.S. American Gunner, United States Lines; S.S. Heredia, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Belgium, Ceylon, Costa Rica, Cuba, Egypt, France, Holland, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Malaya, Pakistan, Panama, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Honor Board, Hear This. Dance Committee, Michelsen Society, Cross Country, Track, Intramurals. MICHAEL LOUIS ALBINO Northport, New York VOYAGES: Casablanca, Chile, Cyprus, Denmark, Ecuador, Israel, Newfoundland, Norway, Panama, Peru, Spain, Sweden, Triest, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD; Glee Club. Dance Band, Intramurals. SEA DUTY: S.S. American Chief, United Stales Lines; S.S. Exanthia, American Export Lines; S.S. Robin Kettering, Robin Lines. VOYAGES: British West Indies, England, France, Ireland, Italy, Libya, Madagascar, Morocco, Portuguese East Africa. Portu- gal, Spain, Tanganyika, Tangiers, Tunisia, Union of South ACADEMY RECORD: Intramural Athletic Board, Basketball, ROMUALD KAZIMLERZ ANDRAKA Pennsauken, New Jersey VOYAGES: Panama, ACADEMY RECORD: i[.f- WILLIAM PAUL ATKINSON Wenonah, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. Santa Sofia, Gra Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. States Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Denmark. Dutch West Ind Germany. Iceland, Newfoundland, Norway, Poland. Swec Uruguay, Venezuela. Interest Club. Chris JT DAVID KENNETH BALDICK Canandaigua, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. African Dawn. Farrell Lines; S.S. Santa Monica, Grace Lines; S.S. Pioneer Mart, S.S. American Gunner, United States Lines» VOYAGES: Angola. Aruba, Belgium, England, Formosa, French West Africa, Gold Coast. Holland, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Liberia, Nigeria, Philippines, Venezuela. STEPHEN ALBERT BANYACSKI Newburgh, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. America, United States Lines; S.S. President Arthur, American President Lines; S.S. Examiner, American Export Lines; S.S. Fort Fetterman, Keystone Steamship Company. JAMES WILLIAM BARRON Owensboro, Kentucky VOYAGES: Angola, Australia, Azores, Belgium Congo, Canada, Canal Zone, Germany, Liberia, French Equatorial Africa, Mexico, Nigeria, Trinidad. ACADEMY RECORD; Block " M " Club, Camera Club, Christian Council, Glee Club, Propeller Club, Protestant Choir. Regimental Broadcast Unit, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Water Ski Club, Football, Pistol, Rifle, Tennis, Intrarrturals. SEA DUTi ' : S.S. S.S. Santa Ines. G Cliffs Iron Company ACADEMY RECORDS; Polaris, Band. Chess Club, Debate Council, Glee Club, Michelsen Society. Ring Committee, Intramurals. f JAMES ANTHONY BASSETT Reading, Massachusetts SEA DUTY; S.S. Exchester, American Export Lines; S.S. President Buchanan, American President Lines; S.S. American Shipper, United States Lines. VOYAGES; England, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Italy, Malaya, Philippines, Spain, Sumatra, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club, Intri»murals. ROBERT CHARLES BELOUS SEA DUTY " : S.S. President Fillmore. American President Lines; S.S. Exbrook, American Export Lines; S.S. Keystoner, Keystone Shipping Company; American Har ' ester, United States Lines. VOYAGES: England, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Italy. Japan. Java. Malaya, Panama, Philippines. Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD; Pistol. RAYMOND GERARD BERNIER Danielson, Connecticut United States Lines; „,„ -„, w - .mpany; S.S. President Buchanan, S.S. President Arthur. American President Lines. . NDREVV BLE. KLEY, JR. Margarita, Canal Zone VOYAGES: Colombia, Caba. Fonnosa, Indonesia, Ireland Philippines. Scotland, Spain, Venezu . Aa DEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Band, Chess Qub. Christian Council, Intraznurals. DA ID PETER BLOONLFIELD SEA DUTY: S . Santa IsabeL Grace Lines; S.S. Pioneer M th, United States Lines. S.S. African Gro -e, Fairell Lines; S.S. Robin Gray, Robin Lines. VOT. GES; Belgian C mgo, Canar - Islands, Chile. Colombia. Denmark, Ecuador, Formosa, French West . frica, French Equatorial Africa, Ghana, Iceland, Indo China, Japan, Korea, Nigeria, Norway. Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portuguese . ngola, Sweden. . C. DEMY RECORD: Antomotii. Interest Qub. Block " M " Oub. Drama Qub, Michelsen Society, Society of Naval .Architects and Marine Engineers, G -mnastics Club, C. RL . RE. D BOESE CleiuUle, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. EiceUer. .■ Sun, Farrell Lines; S.S ACADEMY RECORD: IntramuraU. f GLENN ROBERT BOSTON CVTdaiid,Ohio SEA DUTY: S.S. Eicambion. . merican Eiport Lii»s; S.S. Socony-Vacuum, Socony Vactmm Company; S.S. Edward B. Green, Oeveland Cliffs Iron Ore Company. VOY. GES: Eg -pt, France, Greece. Italy. Lebanon, Spain, S -ria, . C DEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Honor Board, Polaris, Christian Council, Debate Council. Michelsen Society, Soccer, LAWRENCE JAMES BOWLES Jersey Reporter, S.S. Clifton, Ne SEA DUTY: S.S. American Reporter, S.S. Pioneer Mist, United States Lines; S.S. African Lightning, Farrell Lines; S.S. Santa Margarita, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: British South West Africa, Chile, China. Colombia, Ecuador, Formosa, France, Germany, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Panama, Peru, Philippine Islands, Portugese East Africa, Spain, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Honor Board, Dance Committee, Gymnastics Club, Windjammers, Intramurals. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Dutch West Indies, Formosa. Germany, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea. Philippines. Panama, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris, Regimental Information Service, Block " M " Club, Camera Club, Christian Council, Glee Club, Michelsen Society. Naval Club, Propeller Club, Protestant Choir, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Ski Club, Windjammers, Pistol, Intramurals. V ' OYAGES: Colombia, Dominican Repuhlii . Dut. England, Mozambique, Scotland, S iiitli s t of South Africa, Tanganyika, Vencziul.i. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, Wrcstlii RONALD SANTIN BROWN Mystic, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. Comavagua, United Fruit Company; S.S, African Endeavor, Farrell Lines; S.S. Mormacmoon, Moore-McCor- mack Lines; S.S. Santa Elisa, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Canada, Canal Zone, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Denmark, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Ireland, New- foundland, Xorway, Mozambique, Peru, Sweden, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, BaskctbaU, Intr.imurals. RUSSELL CLIFFORD BROWN Mystic, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. Extavia, American Export Lines; S.S. American Planter, United States Lines; S.S. African Moon, Farrell Lines. VOYAGES: Algeria, England, France, Italy, Libya, Morocco, Portugal, Portugese East Africa, Spain, Tunisis, Union of South Africa, West Africa. J EUGENE FRANCIS BRYAN Belle Harbor, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Examiner, S.S. Independence, American Export Lines; S.S. America, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Maria, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Colombia, Chile, England, Ecuador, France. Ger- many, Greece, Italy, Ireland, Libya, Panama, Peru, Spain, Turkey. Michelsen Society, Naval ■ ROBERT THOMAS BUSCHER P Comwallville, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Brazil, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. American Forwarder. S.S. Pioneer Wave, United Slates Lines; S.S. Robin Sherwood, Robin Lines. Brazil, British West Indies, ACADEMY RECORD; Polaris. Glee Club, Protestant Choir, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. RAY ARTHUR CAMPBELL, JR. MiUinocket, Maine SEA DUTY; S.S. Ame Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon, Colombia, England, France, Honduras, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Malaya, Okinawa, Pakistan, Panama, Singapore, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD; Michelsen Society, Intramurals. HARRY DANIEL CANNON North Arlington, New Jersey ACADEMY RECORD: Eagle Scout Society, Windjammers. MICHAEL DALE CARROLL Los Angeles, California SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer Minx. S.S. American Trapper. United States Lines; S.S. African Endeavor. Farrell Lines; S.S. President Adams. American President Lines. VOYAGES: Belgium. Formosa, Hawaii, Hong Kong. St. Helena, Japan, Korea. Netherlands. Panama, Philippines, Portuguese East Africa. Union of South Africa. Trinidad. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Astronomical Society, Band. Chess Club.. Dance Committee. Drama Club, Michelsen Society, Naval Qub, Ring Committee, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Windjammers, Intramurals. Bogota, ColombI ' iSV ' ' d- - United States. S.S. American Manufacturer, United States Lines; S.S. Exporter, American Export Lines; KENNETH ARTHUR CHRISTENSEN Mormacteal, Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil. England, Germany, Spain, Uruguay, Yugoslavi; ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Chess Club, Society Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Soccer, Intramura France, Holland, Italy, Huntington Station. SEA DUTi ' : S.S. Exchester, A Buchanan, American President Lines; United States Lines. VOYAGES: England. France, Germanv, Guam, Hong Kong Italy, Indonesia, Malaya, Philippines, Spain, Yugoslavia. ACADEinr RECORD: Christian Council. Baseball. Football Manager, Intramurals WILLIAM ANDREW CLAIRE New York, New York VOYAGES: Egypt, Formosa, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hawaii, Holland, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Okinawa, Panama, Philippines, Spain, Syria. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Catholic Choir, Michelsen Society, Naval Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club. GEORGE JOSEPH CLANCY Jackson Heights, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. African Lightning, Farrell Lines; S.S. Mormac- mail, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. American Reporter, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Denmark, England, France, Germany, Iceland, Norway, Poland, Portuguese East Africa, Sweden, Union of South Africa. THOMAS EDWARD CLARK West Hempstead, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. African Pilgrim, Farrell Lines; S.S. Mormacrio, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Robin Sherwood, Robin Lines; S.S. Santa Isabel, Grace Lines; S.S. American Merchant, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Angola, Belgian Congo, Cape Verde Island, Chile, Colombia. Denmark. Ecuador, Finland. French Cameroons. French Equatorial Africa. French West Africa. Germany. Ghana. Liberia. Mozambique. Newfoundland. Nigeria. Norway, Panama, Peru, Poland, Sweden, Trinidad, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Band, Eagle Scout Society, Propeller Club. Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Baseball, Swimming. Intramurals. WILLIAM CLARK Sunnyside, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. General WiUiam O. Darby. M.S.T.S.; S.S. In- dependence. America!) Export Lines; S.S. American Manufacturer. S.S. American Ranger, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Belgium, England, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Italy, France, Scotland, Portugal, Spain. 1 -68 RICHARD KENNETH CLEVELAND SEA DUTY: S.S. African Planet, Farrell Lines; S.S. Cherr ' Valley, Keystone Shipping Company; S.S. General Maurice Rose, M.S.t.S.; S.S. American Veteran, United States Lines. VOYAGES: England, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Libya. Morocco, Portuguese East Africa, Scotland, Turkey, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information, Christian Council, Naval Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. SEA DUTl ' : S.S. African Planet, Farrell Lines; S.S. American Veteran, United States Lines; S.S. Cherry Valley, Keystone Tanker; S.S. General M. Rose, M.S.T.S. ACADEMY RECORD: Catholic Choir, Michclsen Society. DAVID WALLACE COMBS Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Keytanker, Keystone Shiptank Company; S.S. President Tyler, American President Lines; S.S. Golden Eagle, M.S.T.S.; S.S. Cadallac, Cleveland Cliffs Lines. Indonesia, Malaya, T RICHARD ALLEN COOK ? Ambler, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacmoon, S.S. Brazil, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. America, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, British West Indies, Cuba, Denmark, England. Finland, France, Germany, Haiti, Ireland, Norway, Poland, Puerto Rico, Sweden, Virgin Islands, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris, Astronomical Society, Christian Council, Ring Committee, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Intramurals. f .1 f 1 v % a h. ? RICHARD NICHOLAS COSENTINO Auburn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. America, S.S. American Planter, United States Lines; S.S. Excambion, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Elisa, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Chili, Colombia, Ecuador, ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Band, Dance Band, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Track, Wrestling, Intramurals. JU DANIEL JEROME COWHIG Tacoma, Washington SEA DUTY: S.S. Argentina, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Presi- dent Monroe, American President Lines; S.S. American Gunner, United States Lines; S.S. Heredia, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Argentina, Barbados, Belgium, Brazil, Canal Zone, Costa Rica, Ceylon, Cuba, France. Hong Kong, India, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Malayan Federation, Netherlands, Pakistan, Panama, Singapore, Trinidad, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, Glee Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Rifle, Intramurals. Lisbon New Hampshii SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacsaga. Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Exchequer. American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Rita, Grace Lines; S.S. American Hunter, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Aden, Ceylon, Chile. Colombia. Denmark, Ecuador. England. Finland. France. Germany. Holland, India. Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sweden. CHARLES EDWARD DAVIS Thomwood, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer Myth, United States Lines; S.S. African Moon, Fanell Lines; S.S. Exeter, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Eg pt, Formosa, France, Greece, Hawaii. Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Mozambique, Okinawa, Panama, Philippines, Spain, .Syria, Union of South Africa. DENNIS VALE DEAN Levittown, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. President Garfield, American President Lines; S.S. Santa Cecilia, Grace Lines; S.S. American Trapper, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Belgium. Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Holland, Indonesia, Malaya, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, South Viet Nam, Thailand. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Hear This, Block M Club. Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Soccer, Intramurals. Chile, Colombia, East Africa. Encland, Ecuador. Germany, Ireland, Panama, Peru, Portuguese East Union of South Africa. i ROBERT GRANT DENNINGER BayviUe, New York Moore-McContiack Lines. VOYAGES: ArEcntina. Brazil, Colombia, Greece, Honduras, Libya Portuguese East Africa, Turkey, Union of South Africa Uniguay, Venezuela. DANIEL SMITH DOBLER LaCrange, Illinois SEA DUTY: S.S. American Importer, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Ines, Grace Lines; S.S. Frontenac, Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company. VOYAGES: Canada, Canal Zone, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Germany, Peru. ACADEMY RECORD: Hear Thh, Automotive Interest Club, Propeller Club, Protestant Choir, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. JOHN JOSEPH DORNING Flushing, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Pn-sident Fillmore, American President Lines; S.S, Express, American Export Lines; S.S. Mormachawk, Monre-McCormack Lines; S.S. American Ranger, United VOY ' AGES; Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Burma, Ceylon, Dutch West Indies, French Somaliland, Holland, India, Lebanon, Pakistan, Panama, Saudi Arabia, Spanish Morocco, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. SEA DUTY; S.S. M,i vl. S.S. Mormacport, Moore-McCor- mack l.iiM s S.S, S.nil.i Sofia, Grace Lines; S.S. United States, United st.itis Lint ; S.S. Exceller, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Amniiiii,,. lii,, il, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germain. It.iK. l.ilu.i, Morocco, Netherlands, Indies, New- foundlanii, Nuiw.iv, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Uruguay, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Polaris, Hear This, Camera Club, Catholic Choir. Debate Council, Glee Club, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Ski Club. Baseball, Football, Wrestling, President Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon, England, Formosa, France, Hong Kong, India, Ireland Italy, Japan, Malaya, Pakistan, Penang Islands, Scotland, Southeast Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Glee Club. Propeller Club. Protestant Choir, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Water Ski Club, Intramurals. CYRIL JAMES ELIAS Campbell, Ohio SEA DUTY: S.S. Exbrook. S.S. Constitution. American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Sofia, Grace Lines; S.S. Mormacport, Moore- McCormack Lines; S.S. American Angler, S.S. America, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Belgium, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Netherlands West Indies, Newfoundland, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Venezuela, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Polaris, Regimental Information Service, Astronomical Society, Band, Camera Club, Chess Club, Debate Club, Eagle Scout Society, Glee Club, Marlinspike Club, Michelsen Society, Naval Club, Propeller Club, Radio Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Stella Maris Guild, Windjammers, Track, Intramurals. ROBERT HARDEIK EMERICK North Charleston, South Carolina Lines; S.S. VOYAGES: Belgium, Canada. Denmark, Formosa. Finland. France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Iceland, Japan, Morocco. Norway, Panama. Philippines, Sweden, Turkey, Yugoslavia. GERARD FRANCIS EUSTACE New York, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. American Packer. United States Lines; S.S. Independence, American Export Lines; S.S. African Planet, FarrcU Lines. EDGAR CHARLES FABBER Bayside, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. American Planter, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Elisa, Grace Lines; S.S. Excambion, American Export Lines. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, PropeUer Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Basketball, Intramurals. ROBERT LEON FAIRFIELD Sandusky, Ohio SEA DUTY: S.S. American Trapper, United States Lines; S.S. Expediter, American Export Lines; S.S. Cliffs Victory, Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company. VOYAGES: Belgium, Canada, Greece, Holland, Libya, Spain, Turkey. ACADEMY RECORD: Propellor Club, Society of Naval Archi- tects and Marine Engineers, Basketball, Intramurals. PAUL R. FELLMAN Emerson, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. American Miller, United States Lines; S.S. Ex- tavia, American Export Lines; S.S. Mormacrio, Moore-Mc- Cormack Lines. d, Italy. VOYAGES: Denmark, England. France, Germany, Iceli North Africa, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Regimental Informatit Color Guard, Drill Team, Propeller Club, Intram JOHN CHARLES FERRIGNO Rocky Point, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormactide. Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Pioneer Minx. S.S. American Harvester, United States Lines; S.S. African Endeavor, Farrell Lines, VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, England, Formosa, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Philippines, Portuguese East Africa, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. JOHN MICHAEL FETTKE Albertson, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. United Stales, S.S. Pioneer Mill, United States Lines; S.S. Mormacrey, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Co- mayagua. Union Fruit Company; S.S. Santa Rita. Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil. Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dutch East Indies, England, France, Germany, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Korea, Panama, Peru. Philippines, Uruguay. ACADEXfY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Block M Club, Christian Council, Michelsen Society, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Soccer, Track, Intramurals. ROBERT JOSEPH FIACCO Massena, New York SEA DUT -: S.S. Robii S.S. Executor, Am Grace Lines. Africa, Yugoslavia, Zanzibar. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information Service, Catholic Choir, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Achitects and Marine Engineers, Track, Wrestling. THOMAS LAWRENCE FLYNN Ithaca, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. United States. United States Lines; S.S. Extavia, American Export Lines; S.S. President Adams, American President Lines; S.S. Santa Clara, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon, England, France, French Morocco, Formosa, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Malaya, Okinawa, Panama, Philippines, Pakistan, Portugal, Spain, Spanish Morocco, Tunisia, Venezuela. n 5 k. ' ' ■ ) m A : ' , ' ■■y f, JOHN FRANCHEK YnnkiTS. New York Yonkers, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. President Polk. Anu-riciin President Lines; S.S. Excalibur, American Export Lines; S.S. American Scout, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon, China, Cuba, Egypt, France. Germany, Greece, India, Italy, japan, Lebanon, Malaya, Pakistan, Panama, Spain, Syria, Union of South Africa. .« X, WILLIAM RAY GALBRAITH Prairie City, Oregon SEA DUTY: S.S. Heredia, United Fruit Company; S.S. Robin Trent, Robin Lines; S.S. Constitution, American Export Lines; S.S. American Leader, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Rosa, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Colombia, Dutch West Indies, England, France, Ireland, Italy, Kenya, Mozambique, Panama, Scotland, Spain, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa, Venezuela. f CHARLES ROBERT GALISZEWSKI Garwood, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. American Angler, United States Lines; S.S. Exermont, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: BclEium, Cyprus, England, France, Germany, Gibralter. Holland, Israel, Italy, Morocco, Spain, Turkey, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris. Intramurals. Color Guard, Intramurals. V " ! DAVID RALPH GARBIRAS New York, New York NICHOLAS GORDON GASAWAY, JR. San Antonio, Texas SEA DUTY: S.S. t S.S. Santa Paula Export Lines. ACADEMY RECORD: Swimming Team, Intramurals SEA DUTY: S.S. President Fillmore, American President Lines; S.S. Exminster, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Cecilia, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Aden, Ceylon, Chile, Colombia, Eg -pt, Ecuador, Guam, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Malaya, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Saudi Arabia. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Polaris, Propeller Club, Ring Committee, Water Ski Club, Intramurals. ■■ ¥ S 1 P 19 -. ' ' f PAUL ANTHONY GATTINI Massapequa, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Exchorda, American Export Lines; S.S. Momiiic- saga, Moore McCormack Lines; S.S. Tullahoma, Keystone Tankers. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, Egypt. Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Lebanon. Norway, Spain, Sweden, Syria, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Block M Club, Wrestling, Intramurals. ROBERT BRUCE GEORGE MeadviUe, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY ' : S.S, Robin Doncaster, Seas Shipping Company; S.S. Pioneer Wave, United States Lines; S.S. Exbrook, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: England, France, Germany, HolKind, Italy, South Africa, Y ' ugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Polaris, Hear This, Christian Council. Dance Committee, Drama Club, Michelsen Society, Regimental Broadcast Unit, Intramurals. L di T WILLIAM JOSEPH GIDLEY W LoweU, Arizona SEA DUTl ' : S.S. President Harding. American President Lines; S.S. Limon, S.S. Esparta, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Belgium. Costa Rica, Cuba, France, Korea, Italy, Japan, Panama. ACADEMY RECORD; Scholastic Star, Polaris. Chess Club, Drama Club, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. 4. HUBERT JOHN GILMORE Waltham, Massachusetts SEA DUTY; S.S. Extor, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Elisa. S.S. Santa Ines, Grace Lines; S.S. Br.izil, Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Greece, Israel, Italy, Morocco, Panama Canal Zone, Peru, Trinidad, Turkey, Uruguay, Yugoslavia. M I. JOHN WILLIAM GINNA Sunbury, Pennsylvania RICHARD DAVID GOMES DUT ' ; S.S. Exeter, American Export Lines; S.S. Morniac- dove, Moore-McCormack Lines: S.S. General Maurice Rose M.S.T.S. ACADEMY RECORD; Automotive Interest Club, Propellor Club, Society of Naval Achitects and Marine Engineers, Football, Intramurals. Kearny, New Jersey SEA DUTY; S.S. United States, United States Lines; S.S Presi VOYAGES: Ceylon, England, Formosa, France, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Malaya, Morocco, Pakistan, Philippines, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Tunisia, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Honor Board, Polaris, Hear This, Block M Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Football, Soccer, Intramurals. ALFRED JOSEPH GONZALEZ Brooklyn, New York Queens, New York VOYAGES: Ceylon, England, Eg ' pt, Formosa, France, Holland. Hong Kong, India. Italy, Japan. Malaya, Pakistan, Philippines, Spain, Spanish Morocco, Tunisia. " M " Club, Baseball, Soccer, South Africa. i " DANIEL JOSEPH GREAVES Stony Point, New York SEA DUTY; S.S. American Angler. S.S. American Gunner, United States Lines; S.S. Constitution, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Qara, Grace Lines; S.S. Fra Berlanga, United Fruit Company. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Block " M " Club, Michel- sen Society, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Pistol, Tennis, Intramurals. RONALD CARL GROSS Mount Vernon, New York ACADEMY RECORD: Hear This, Band, Dance Band, Intramurals. JAMES FRANK GRUBIAK Yonkers, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Brazil, Moorc-McConiiack Lines; S.S. President Monroe, American President Lines; S.S. Excellency, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, British West Indies, Cuba, Esypt, France, Greece, Italy, Hong Kong, Japan, India, Malaya, ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, Wrestling, Intramurals. SEA DUTY: S.S. Am States Lines; S S.S. Exanthia, A ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Sta McCormack Lines; Club, Intramurals J JONATHAN LOUIS HAAS San Benito, Texas SEA DUTY: S.S. President Garfield. American President Lines; S.S. Santa Cecilia, Grace Lines; S.S. Constitution. American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Chile. Colombia, Ecuador. France, Indonesia, Italy. Malaya. Panama, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Viet Nam. ACADEMY RECORD: Hear This, Regimental Infonnalion Sen ' ice, Camera Club, Michelsen Societ -, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Massachusetts SEA DUTY: S.S. United States, S.S. Pioneer Mill. United States Lines; Mormacrey, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Comayagua, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Argentina. Brazil. Costa Rica, Cuba, England, Formosa, France, Germany, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Japan, Panama, Philippines, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club, Intramurals. RICHARD HALE Phillipsburg, New Jersey VOYAGES: Bu India, Ja_ Philippines. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club. Pakistan, Peru, ROBERT BRUCE HAMILTON Detour, Michigan SEA DUTi ' : S.S. American Har ■cster. United States Lines; S.S. Exchange, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Rosa, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Arabia, Cuba, Ceylon, Colombia, Curacao, Eg pt, England, France, India, Lebanon, Pakistan, Venezuela, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Hear This, Midships, Astro- nomical Society, Block " M " Club. Christian Council, Michelsen Society, Ski Club, Trident Club, Football, Wrestling, Intramurals. % r . 4 f fl k . GEORGE IRWIN HAUER Ligonier, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. American Clipper, United States Lines; S.S. Exchester, American Export Lines; S.S. President Hayes, American President Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon, China, Egypt. Formosa, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Malaya, Okinawa, Pakistan, Philippines, Spain, Yugoslavia. Dance Committee, ROBERT DAVID HAUN Baltic, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. African American Export Lines; VOYAGES: Aden, Ceylon, Eg pt, England, Kenya. India, Pakistan, Portuguese East Africa, Saudi Arabia, Union of South Africa. SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacdove. .Moorc-McCormack Lines; S.S. Exeter. American Export Lines; S.S. General Maurice Rose, M.S.T.S. VOYAGES: Argentina, Algeria. Brazil, French Morocco, France, Greece. Germany. Italy, Spain. Turkey, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Polaris. Hear This. Catholic JAMES PATRICK HIGGINS Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Santa Rita, Importer, United States Line Export Lines. VOYAGES: Canal Zone, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, France, Germany, Italy, Peru, Spain, Choir. Dance Committee, Naval Club, of Naval Architects Intramurals. , Naval Club. Propell and Marine Enc 4- Jt FRANK BERNARD HITE Chattanooga, Tennessee . DUTY: S.S. AmtTic;lii Packer. S. States Lines; S.S. Independeiici S.S. African Planet, Farrell Lines Holland. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Midships, Business Manager; Class Treasurer, Astronomical Society. Block " M " Club. Michelscn Society, Naval Club. Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Windjammers, Sailing Team, Intramurals. CHARLES JOSEPH HODEK Hartford, Connecticut VOYAGES: Ejopt. England. France. Germany. Greece. Italy, Lebanon, Mocambique, Syria, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Naval Club, PropeUer Club. r fe ROBERT LORD HOLDEN Swansea, Massachusetts VOYAGES: Argentina, Barbatos, Brazil, Egypt, East Africa, France, Greece, Italy, Lebanon, South Africa, Spain, Syria, Trinidad, Uruguay, West Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris, Chess Club, Christian Council. Naval Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. j! WILLIAM JAMES HOLLAND Plainville, Connecticut sneer Mist, United States ■r, S.S. Mor .r, A SEA DUTY: S.S. Pi macstar, Moore- Export Lines: S VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Formosa, Greece, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Spanish Morocco, Turkey, Uruguay. rhis. Polur: WILLIAM RAY HOLLON Brownsville, Texas SEA DUTY: S.S. General Harry Taylor, MSTS; S.S. WILLIAM HARDING HOLYOAK Lynbrook, New York VOYAGES; Argentina. Brazil, British West Indies, China, Eng- land, France. Hong Kong, Hawaii, Japan, Korea, Panama, Philippines, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD. Hear This. Dance Committee, Propeller Club, Society of Nava! Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. L »fe 4- RICHARD MARTIN HOMAN North Providence, Rhode Island SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer M 1h, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Isabel, Grace Lines; S.S. American Scout, United States Lines; S.S. African Grove, Farrell Lines. VOYAGES: Angola, Belgium Congo, Canary Islands, Chile, Co- lombia, Ecuador, Formosa, French Equatorial Africa, French West Africa, Germany, Ghana, Hong Kong, Indo China. Japan, Korea, Liberia, Nigeria, Peru, Philippines, Senegal. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris, Astronomical Society, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Windjammers, Intramurals. P .X MANFRED WALTER HOPFE Riverhead, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. American Forwarder, United States Lines; S.S. Mormacsurf. Moore- ' C " rn " -l Lines; S.S. Expeditor, S.S. Exanthia, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Dutch West Indies, French Mor- occo, Greece, Italy, Libya, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris. Cheerleaders, Chess Club, Christian Council, Dance Committee, Eagle Scout Society, Propeller Club, Intramurals. JAMES THOMAS HOPKINS, JR. Covington, Tennessee SEA DUTY: S.S. American Ranger, United Stales Lines; S.S. Mormacsea, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Margaret Lykes, Lykes Brothers Company. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Dutch West Indies, Great Bri- tain, Formosa, France, Japan, Korea, Panama, Philippines, Spain, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic St.ir, Band, Water Ski Club. SEA DUTY: S.S. Silver Mariner, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Robin Goodfellow, Robin Lines; S.S. Santa Luisa, Grace LEE MURRAY JACOBS Brockton. Massachusetts VOYAGES: Chile, Colombia, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, Le- banon, Madagascar, Peru, Spain, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Christian Council, Band, Glee Club, Intramurals. SEA DUTY: S.S. Linion, United Fruit Company; S.S. Exochorda, American Export Lines; S.S. American Hunter, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Belgium, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Egypt, Eng- land, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Holland, Hon- duras, Italy, Lebanon, Panama, Spain. J NORMAN CHRISTIAN JENSEN New York, New Y ' ork SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacrio, S.S. Mormacpenn, .Moore-McCor- mack Lines; S.S. Exiria, American Export Lines; S.S. Mar- garita, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Chile, Colombia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, Ice- land, Italy, North Africa, Norway, Panama, Peru, Portugal, Poland. Spain, Sweden. HARRIS MALLITZ JENSON New Orleans, Louisiana SEA DUTY: S.S. Exilona, American Export Lines; Aimee Lykes, Charles Lykes, Doctor Lykes, Lykes Brothers Steamship Company. VOYAGES: Belgium, Cvprus, Formosa. France, Germany, Great Britain. Indonesia, Israel. Italy. Japan. Libya. Malaya, Mor- occo. Netherlands, Philippines, Singapore, Turkey, Yugo- ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Midships. Polaris, Hear This, Chess Club. Drama Club. Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Ski Club. :e , HARRY RICHARD JEPSON North Attleboro, Massachusetts SEA DUTY: S.S. Independenct-. American Export Lines; S.S. President Hayes, American President Lines; S.S. Monnacowl, Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Ballearic Islands. Brazil, Canada, Canal Zone, France, French Morocco, India, Italy, Indo China, Japan, Malaya, Okinawa, Pakistan, Philippines, Portugal, Spain, Thailand, Uruguay. GERALD ALFRED JOHNSON Lake Worth, Florida VOYAGES: Colombia, Cuba, Denmark, England, Finland, For- mosa, Iceland, Japan, Newfoundland, Norway, Panama, Philippines, Sweden, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD; Astronomical Society, Block " M " Club, Color Guard, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Windjammers, Swim- ming, Intramurals. J ALLISON VanLOPIK JONES SEA DUTY: S.S. Exford, American Export Lines; S.S. President Garfield, American President Lines; S.S. General Patch, MSTS; S.S. Solon Turman, Lykes Lines, VOYAGES: Cuba, Dominican Republic, England, Germany, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaya, Panama, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Viet Nam, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information Ser%ice. Block " M " Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Tennis, Intramurals. I. HENRY STANISLAUS KAMINSKI Harrison, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. Santa Clara, Grace Lines; S.S. American Shipper, S.S. Mormacstar, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Exermont, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Cypress, French Mor- rocco, Germany, Italy, Spain, Uraguay, Venezuela, Yugo- slavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club. u DANIEL KANE Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. African Pilot, Farrell Lines; S.S. Exceller, American Export Lines; M.V. John Sergeant, United States Lines; S.S. Momiacmoon, Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES: Algeria, Argentina, Belgium Congo, Brazil, British West Africa, France, Germanv, Norway, Italy, Liberia, Montevideo, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, Tunisia. Japan, Morocco, Spain, ACADEMY RECORD: Intramurals. PAUL MORTON KAUFMAN Philadelphia, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S, Momiacmail, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Afritan Glade, Farrell Lines; S.S. Exilona, American Export ACADEMY RECORD: Propelle r JL JOHN PILKINGTON KAY Kearny, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. President Coolidge. American President Lines; S.S. African Dawn, Farrell Lines; S.S. American Clipper, United States Lines; S.S. Brazil, Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Barbados, Belgian Congo, Brazil, Canar ' Islands, Ceylon, Formosa, France, French West Africa, Germany, Ghana, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Liberia, Malaya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Portuguese Angola, Trinidad, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Christian Council, Trident Club, Tennis, Intramurals. SEA DUTY: S.S. President Buchanan, American President Lines; S.S. Constitution. American Export Lines; S.S. American Ranger, United States Lines; S.S. Cherry Valley, Keystone Tankers. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Debate Council. Naval Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Propeller Club, Windjammers, Intramurals. PAUL WILLIAM KELLY Riverside, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. Robin Kettering. Robin Lines; S.S. Santa Mar- garita. Grace Lines; S.S. American Traveler, United States VOYAGES: Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, England, Germany, Mada- gascar, Peru, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Michelson Society, Propeller Club, Foot- i H 1 u«4 1 L ' ' 0 it S L 4 1 id FRANCIS RAYMOND KESTERMAN Malveme, New York President Tylei President Lines; United States Line ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Clu Club, Society of Naval Archite Baseball, Intramurals. J KEVIN JOSEPH KINSTLER ' .S. American VOYAGES: Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Formosa, Holland, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Panama, He- public of the Philippines, Tahiti, Trinidad. ACADEMY RECORD: Honor Board, Automotive Interest Club, Catholic Choir, Drama Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Gymnastics Club, Tennis, Intramurals. JOHN EDWARD KIRZL Bronx, New York SEA DUTY; S.S. Independence, American Export Lines; S.i Pioneer Muse, S.S. American Farmer, United States Line: S.S. Santa Teresa, Grace Lines. IL .J Philippines, Portugal, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club, ning, Intramurals. J ROBERT WILLIAM KLEMENTZ Orange, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. Exminster, American Export Lines; S.S. Presi- dent Jackson, American President Lines; S.S. American Forwarder, United Slates Lines. VOYAGES: Aden. Ceylon, Eg Tt, Formosa, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, Malaya, Okinawa, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South .Africa. SEA DUTY: S.S. America, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Maria. S.S. Mormacwren, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. African Planet, Farrell Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia. Ecuador, Eng- land, France, Germany, Ireland. Kenya. Netherlands. West Indies. Panama. Parafiuay. Peni, PortuE iese East Africa. Southwest Africa. Tanganyika. Union of South Africa. Zan- X, ROBERT PAUL KNIGHT Montour Falls, New York SEA DUTi ' : S.S. American Guide. United States Lines; S.S. Mormacowl. Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Robin Doncaster. Robin Lines. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Hear This, Block " M " Club. Christian Council. Glee Club, . aval Club. Protestant Choir. Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. Ski Club. Soccer. Intramurals. SEA DUTY: S.S, African Pilgrim, Farrell Lines; S.S. Constitutior American Export Lines; S.S. Scientist, United Slates Line: M.V. William G. Mather, Cleveland Cliffs Iron Companj VOYAGES: Angola, Belgian Congo, France, Gauna, Great Bril ain, Ireland, Liberia, Morocco, Nigeria, Portugal, Spair Spanish Morocco. VINCENT EDWARD LaFRANCHI Washington, D.C. SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacisle, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Robin Mowbray, Robin Lines; S.S. American Inventor, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Ice- land, Madagascar, Newfoundland, Norway, Poland, Portu- guese East Africa, Spain, Union of South Africa. JOSEPH HUBERT LANDRIE Pinebeach, New Jersey ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Windjammers, Football, Intra- J JAMES REED LEEPER North East, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. Explorer. American Export Lines; S.S. Ameri- can Producer, S.S. Pioneer Ming. United States Lines. VOYAGES: Burma, Ceylon, England, Formosa, France, French Somaliland, Hong Kong. India, Japan, Korea, Pakistan Panama, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Block " .M " Club. Dance Committee, Propeller Club, Setter, Tennis, Inlramurals. SEA DUTY: S.S. Santa RUa, United Sta Importer, United States Lines; Wentley, Robin WHITNEY PHELPS LEWIS Nyack, New York United States Lines. Export Lines; S.S. VOYAGES: Chile, Columbia, Cyprus, Ecuador, Germ: ter, Greece, Israel. Italy, Malta, Panama, P Turkey, Venezuela, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD; Automotive Interest Club, Club, Radio Club, Water Ski Club, IntramuraU. STEPHAN WILLIAM LIGGETT Norwalk, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer Mist, United States Lines; S.S. African Lightning, Farrcll Lines; S.S. Argentina, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Santa Margarita, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, British West Indies, Chile, Colum- bia, Ecuador, Formosa, Hong Kong, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Mozambique, Panama, Peru, Philippines. Southwest Africa, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Intramurals. f WESLEY LEROY LOVAAS Spanaway, Washington SEA DUTY ' : S.S. Americm Press, S.S. Pioneer Muse, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Mercedes, Grace Lines; S.S. Fra Berlanga, S.S. Junior, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Colombia, Costa Rica. Cuba, England, Formosa, Hong Kong, Hawaii, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Scotland. : - JL JAMES THOMAS LOWE Grand Forks, North Dakota SEA DUTY: S.S. Exton. American Export Lines; S.S. Robin Kirk, Robin Lines; S.S. San Jose, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Africa, Canal Zone, Costa Rica, Greece, Israel, Italy, Panama, Spain, Turkey, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Astronomical Society. Christian Council, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intra- murals. JL JOHN FREDERICK LOWE Grand Forks, North Dakota SEA DUTY: S.S. President Arthur, S.S. President Wil can President Lines; S.S. Constitution, Amen Lines; S.S. Santa Sofia, Grace Lines. ,i - ' :y X m JL FRANK LEE LUCIANO Jacksonville, Florida SEA DUTY: S.S. Americ.in Ranger. United States Lines; S.S. Helen Lykes, S.S. Margaret Lykes, Lykes Brothers Lines. MURTON WATERMAN LYON, JR. Naugatuck, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. American Angler, United Stales Lines; S.S Excellency, American Export Lines; S.S. African Glen, Farrell Lines. ACADEMY RECORD: Christian Council, Propeller Club. w t ROBERT THOMAS MADDEN New York, New York pin„ ,- , , . American Export VOYAGES: Canal Zone, Italy, Yugoslavia, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: BasebaU, Football, Intramurals. BORIS MAIDANSKY, JR. Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormachawk, Mooro-McComiack Lines; S.S. African Enterprise, Farrell Lines; S.S. Exford, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: ArKentina, Brazil, British West Indies, Dutch West Indies, Italy, Portuguese East Africa, St. Helena, Union of South Africa, Uruguay, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Chess Club, Soccer, Intramurals. J RUSSELL FARLEY MAGNA Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. American Banker, United States Lines; S.S. Heredia, United Fruit Company; S.S. Exilona, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: British Honduras, Costa Rica, Cuba, Cyprus, England, France, French Morocco, Germany, Honduras, Israel, Panama, Spain, Turkey, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Automotive Interest Club, Michdsen Society, Propeller Club, Intramurals. f JOHN EDWARD MANNING Flushing, New York SEA DUTY ' : S.S. African Star, Farrell Lines; S.S. Santa Paula, Grace Lines; S.S. President Adams, American President Lines; S.S. American Flyer, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon. Colombia, Dutch West Indies, England, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Malaya, Okinawa, Pakistan. Portuguese East Africa, Singapore, Union of South Africa, Venezuela. 4. JOHN EDWARD MARQUIS Great Works, Maine VOYAGES: Bolivia. Burma, Ceylon, Chile, Ecuador, Egypt. Formosa, French Somaliland, Hawaii, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Union of South Africa, Saudi Arabia. ACADEMY RECORD: Astronomical Society, Band. Chess Club. Dance Committee, Michelsen Society, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Windjammers. iK i f JOHN ALBERT MAUSHART Scranton, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacteal. Moore-McComiack Lines; S.S. General W. O. Darby, Military Sea Transport Service; S.S. President Monroe, American President Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Ceylon, Dutch West Indies, Eng- land, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, Hawaii, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Libya, Malaya, Morocco, Pakistan, Panama, Turkey, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club, Intramurals. f DONALD JOSEPH McBRroE r- Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTi- Ertauia, Lines. S.S. Amer American Hunter, ican Export Lines; United States Lines; S.S. S.S. Santa Paula, Grace VOYAGES: Belgiu HoUand, Italy Venezuela. m, Colombia. Dutch West Indies, Morocco, Portugal, Spain, Tangiers, «lf: i PAUL JUSTIN McCarthy Peabody, Massachusetts VOYAGES: British West Indies. England, Ecuador. Chile, Colombia, Madagascar, Panama, Peru, Portuguese East Africa, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information Service. JOHN JOSEPH Mcdonough, jr ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Brookline, Massachusetts SEA DUTY: S.S. United St,ites, S.S. American Manufacturer, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Luisa, Grace Lines; S.S. President Polk, American President Lines. VOYAGES: Africa, Chile, Colombia, England, Equador. France, Germany, Hawaiian Islands, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Malaya, Pakistan, Peru, Scotland. ACADE nf RECORD: Midships, CathoUc Choir, Glee Club. HAROLD HAMMOND McKINLEY, JR. Winchester, Massachusetts SEA DUTi ' : S.S. President Coolidge, American President Lines; S.S. African DaM-n, Farrell Lines; S.S. Brazil, Moore- McCormack Lines; S.S. American Clipper, United States VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Ceylon. Formosa, France, Germany, Ghana, Hong Kong, Italy, India, Japan. Maylaya, Nigeria, Philippines, Pakistan, Uruguay. s WILLIAM ELLSWORTH McKINNEY Bayside, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. President Hayes, American President Lines; S.S. Golden Eagle, M.S.T.S.; S.S. African Rainbow, Farrell " " ■ Producer, United States Lines. ACADEMY: Scholastic Star, Polaris, Propeller Club, Intramurals. J HAROLD RYRNES McLAUGHLIN Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Independe President Hayes, America Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES; Argentina, Brazil, Canada. France, Indo China, India, Italy, Japan, Netherlands. West Indies, P akistan. Panama, Philippines. Portugal, Spain, Thailand. Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information Service, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Ski Club, Trident Club, Intramurals. n 4. DAVID SAMUEL McMASTER Marshfield Hills, MassachusetU SEA DUTY: S.S. African Moon. FarreU Lines; S.S. Ejchange, American Export Lines; S.S. American Chief, United States VOYAGES: Ceylon, East Pakistan, Egypt, England, French Somaliland, India, Kenya, PortJigucsc East Africa. Saudi Arabia. Tanganyika, Union of South Africa, West Pakistan. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships. Block " M " Club, Christian Council. Glee Club. Protestant Choir, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Ski Club, Soccer, Intramurals. FRANCIS ROLAND McQUILLEN Manhasset, New York Band, Chess Club. Dance Banrf THOMAS RAYMOND MESS Maplewoocl, New Jersey " bS? M- fe -,-- -jes ..es. Peru, Puerto R,eo, ul!u ' ay! v£gli Psfa dT " ' " " ' " • " ' ' ■ " ' ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club, Track. Jackson Height SEA DUTY: S.S. Exiria, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Margarita, Grace Lines; S.S. Mormacrio, S.S. Mormacpenn, Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES: Chile, Colombia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, Iceland, Italy, Lybia, Morocco, Norway, Panama, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Tangier, Tunisia. ACADEMY RECORD: Windjammers, Sailing, Intramurals. EDWARD JOSEPH MORAN, JR. New York, New York VOYAGES: Canal Zone, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Libya, Morocco, Peru, J JOHN JOSEPH MORAN Elmhurst, New York SEA DUTY; S.S. American Flyer. United States Lines; S.S. Mormactide, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Santa Olivia. Grace Lines; S.S. Parismina. United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica. Curacao. Colombia. Ecuador. France. Germany. Great Britain. Panama. Peru, Uruguay. and Marine RONALD TERRENCE MUGAVIN Flushing, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Exhibitor, American Export Lines; S.S. American Clipper, United States Lines; S.S. African Rainbow, Farrell VOYAGES: Burma, Ceylon, Germany, India, North East Africa, Portugese East Africa, Saudi Arabia, West Africa, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Qub, Propeller Club, Ring Committee, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, StcUa Maris Guild, Trident Club, Swimming, Intramurals. RONALD PHILLIP MULLON Port Washington, New York lean Leader, United Export Lines. VOYAGES: Eg England, Formosa, France, Ge Okinawa, Panama, Philippines, Scotland, Spain, MICHAEL JOHN MURPHY Wyalusing, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. African Enterprise, Farrell Lines: S.S. Santa Olivia, Grace Lines; S.S. Pioneer M ' th, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Formosa, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mozambique, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD; Honor Board, Regimental Infonnation Service, Drama Club, Eagle Scout Society, Glee Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. " m GEORGE GERARD NEUNER Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S, Excalibur, American Export Lines; S.S. President Polk, American President Lines; S.S. United States, S.S. American Scout, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon, Cuba, Egypt, England, France. Germany, Greece, India. Italy, Japan, Lebanon, Malay, Pakistan, Panama, Spain, Union of South Africa. 4- CHARLES HENRY NORZ SEA DUTY: S.S. President Hayes, . meric: S.S. Golden Eagle, M.S.T.S.; S.S. Afric: Lines; S.S. Robin Locksley, Robin Lines. VOYAGES: British West Indi. France, Germany, Hong Kong, Iceland. , . Malay States, Norway, Okinawa, Pakistan, Philippine Poland, Portuguese East Africa, Sweden, Tanganyika. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Block " M " Club, Catholic Choir, Dance Committee, Debate Council, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Soccer, Intramurals. 4- JOSEPH LINCOLN OGLE, JR. SEA DUTY: S.S. American Leader, United States Lines; S.S. Mormacstak, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. African Sun, Farrell Lines; S.S. President Arthur, American President Lines. VOYAGES; Argentina. Brazil, Curacao, England, France, Ger- many, Guam, Hong Kong, Java, Kenya, Malaya. Mozambique, Newfoundland, Panama, Philippines, Scotland, Sumatra, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Band, Dance Band, Regimental Broadcast Unit, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Stella Maris Guild, Trident Club, Water Ski Club, Intramurals. CHARLES WORTH O ' HARA Baltimore, Mar ' Iand SEA DUTY: S.S. Brazil. Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. American Forwarder, United States Lines; S.S. African Endeavor, Farrell Lines. i RICHARD MICHAEL OTTONE Garden City Park, New York VOYAGES: Formosa, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Morocco, Panama. Philippines. Portugal, South Korea. Spain. Spanish Morocco. Tunisia. ACADEMY RECORD: MicheUen Socie ty. Naval Qub, Propeller Club. Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. LARRY WILLIAM PAINE BamesviUe. Ohio SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer Wave, United St.ites Lines; S.S. Santa Rita, Grace Lines; S.S. William G. Mather. Cleveland Cliffs Iron Ore Company. VOYAGES: Canada. Chile. Colombia, Ecuador, England, France. Holland, Peru. Panama. ACADEMY RECORD: Honor Board. Regimental Information Service. Propeller Club, Ring Committee. Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. VOYAGES: Argentina, Barbados, Brazil, Canal Zone, England, Formosa, France, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Philippines, Trinidad, Uruguay. Pioneer Wave, United States Lines. England, Holland, Italy, Panama, f ROGER MACMILLAN PERSONS Southbury, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. Cherry Valley, Keystone Shipping Company; S.S. Mormacyork. Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Santa Catalina, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Denmark, Dutch West Indi es, Germany, Honduras, Iceland, Norway, Panama, Poland, Sweden, Uruguay, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Automotive Interest Club. Christian Council, Michclsen Society, Ski Club, Trident Club, Wrestling, Intramurals. WALTER RICKEY PHELPS SEA DUT ' : S.S. Excalibur, American Export Lines; S.S, Santa Margarita, Grace Lines; S.S. Mormacmail, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. African Dawn, Farrell Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Curacao, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Greece. Italy, Lebanon, Panama, Peru, Spain, Syria, Turkey, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Naval Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Color Guard, Intramurals. I SYDNEY NEILL PHIN West Nyack, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Santa Margarita, Grace Lines; S.S. American Traveler, United States Lines; S.S. Robin Kettering, Robin ROBERT LEE PIERCE street, Maryland SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer MN-th, S.S. United St.ltes, United States Lines; S.S. African Enterprise, Farrcll Lines; S.S. Santa Isabel, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Chile, Ecuador. England, Formosa, France, Germany, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Japan, Okinawa, Panama, Peru, Philip- pines, Portuguese East Africa, St. Helena, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Intramurals. TERRY THEODORE PIERCE Rockport, Washington ACADEMY RECORD:. Scholastic Star, Polaris, Automotive Inter- est Qub, Chess Club, Glee Club, Protestant Choir, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intraniurals. CARROLL DEAN PLOTT ACADEMY RECORD: Christian Council, Intramurals. i !lt jL JAMES JOSEPH POLSENSKI ' Yonkcrs, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer Moor. United St.ntes Lines; S.S. Mormacport, Moorc-McComiack Lines; S.S. Exton, S.S. Constitution, American Export Lines. AUGUSTINE PRASCIUNAS Calliooon, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Junior, United Fruit Company; S.S. Mormacdalc. Moorc-McCormack Lines; S.S. American Hanester, United States Lines; S.S. Excellency, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Sofia, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, England, France, Germany. Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Libya, Panama, Turkey, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Ski Club. Water Ski Club, Intramurals. DANIEL JAMES PRICE Bayside, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Argentina, Moore-McCormack Junior, United Fruit Company; S.S. America, 1 Lines. ACADEMY RECORD; Block " M " Club, Catholic Choir, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Trident Club, Wrestling. Intramurals. LORNE HERBERT PRICE Rochester, New York SEA DUTY; S.S. Silver Mariner, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Junior, United Fruit Company; S.S. General W. O. Darby, M.S.T.S. VOYAGES: Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, England, France, French Morocco, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Honduras, Italy, Libya, Panama, Turkey. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Astronomical Society, Dance Committee, Ring Committee, Society of Naval Archi- tects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Windjammers, 1 HENRY STEPHEN PRIME WanUgh, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. American Press, S.S. American Guide, United States Lines; S.S. Executer, American Export Lines; S.S. Junior, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Belgium, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, England, France, Greece, Holland, Honduras, Ireland, Jamaica, Panama, Scotland, Spain, Turkey. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, Wrestling. Intramurals. Ji THOMAS WILLUM PROSS, JR. Bloomfield, New Jersey SEA DUTY; S.S. American Reporter, S.S. America. United States Lines; S.S. Prseident Harding, American President Lines; S.S. Limon, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Costa Rica, Cuba. England, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Panama, Scotland, Spain. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Midihips, Regimental In- formation Service, Camera Club, Christian Council, Eagle Scout Society, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Ring Committee, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Track, Intramurals. Ai Im -« JOHN FARNUM PUTNAM Westhampton, Massachusetts VOYAGES: Colombia. Dutch West Indies. England. France, Greece. Ireland. Spain. Turkey. Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Michelsen Society. PropeUer Club, IntramULTals. Jr CLIFFORD ELLIS QUARLES ' Boise, Idaho SEA DUTi ' : S.S. Pioneer Ming, S.S. American ' eteran. United States Lines; S.S. Heredia. United Fruit Company; S.b. Robin Trent, Robin Lines. VOYAGES: Costa Rica, England, France, Hong Kong. Japan. Korea. Madagascar. Panama. Philippines, Portuguese Last Africa. Scotland. Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: ScholasUc Star. Naval Club. Propeller Club. Society of Naval Architects and Marme Engineers. Intramurals. «t% t Ir RICHARD JOSEPH QUEGAN, JR. Stamford, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S, Mormacislc, Moore-McCormack L Robin Mowbray, Seas Shipping Company; S.S. Veteran, United States Lines; S.S. Excellency, Export Lines; S.S. Santa Sofia, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Denmark, England Finland, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Libya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Newfoundland, Norway, Poland, Scotland, Turkey, Union of South Africa, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information Service, Catholic Choir, Glee Club, Marlinspike Club, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Windjammers, Intramurals. i PAUL JOSEPH QUINTUS Arlington, Virginia SEA Duty: S.S. American Merchant. United Stales Lines; S.S. President Harding, American President Lines; S.S. Argentina, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Eclipse, Socony Vacuum Lines. ANDREW HEATH RAUSCH Ridgewood, New Jersey RENE ALPHONSE RICHARD, ffl Houston, Texas SEA DUTY: S.S. Keystoner. Keystone Steamship Company; S.S. American Har%estcr. United Saltcs Lines; S.S. President Fillmore, American President Lines; S.S. Exbrook, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Borneo, England, France. Germany, Guam, Hong Kong, Italy, Indonesia, Panama, Philippines, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD; Scholastic Star, Hear This. Astronomical Society, Dance Committee, Drama Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. yS ' 48? ' LARRY WALLACE RICHARDSON Santa Monica, California SEA DUTY: S.S. President Buchanan. American President Lines; S.S. African Pilgrim, Farrell Lines; S.S. American Scientist, United States Lines; S.S. Comayagua, United Fruit Company. VOYAGES: Angola, Belgium Congo, Costa Rica, Cuba, England, French Equatorial Africa, Ghana, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Ireland, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Malaya, Marianas, Nigeria, Panama, Philippines, Scotland. ACADEMY RECORD; Eagle Scout Society. Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Water Ski Club, Intramurals. 4. JACK COLEMAN RINARD W Saint Petersburg, Florida ' E JI S.S. Ame Brothers L rica. United States Lines; S.S. Docto Lykes, VOYAGES: Belgium, Germany. Greece Canal Zone, England, Formosa, Holland, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy France, Japan, Morocco. Philippines. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Astronomical Society. Chess Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Color Guard, Intramurals. JOHN FRANCIS RING, JR. Storrs, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer Mist, United States Lines; S.S. Mormacstar, Moore-McCorm,ack Lines; S.S. Executor, Ameri- can Export Lines; S.S. Santa Olivia. Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Aniba, Brazil. Canada. Colombia, Chile. Ecuador, Formosa, Greece. Hawaii. Hong Kong. Japan, Korea. Okinawa. Panama, Peru, Philippines, Spanish Morocco, Turkey, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Honor Board. Astronomical Society, Catholic Choir, Debate Council, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Football, Intramurals, JOHN PHILIP ROCCHIO, JR Bronx, New York SEA DUTi ' : S.S. Pioneer Muse. S.S. American F.irmer. United States Lines; S.S. Independence, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Teresa. Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Colombia. Dutch West Indies. England. Formosa, France, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Korea, Panama, Philippines, Portugal, Venezuela. ACADENfY RECORD: Midships, Michelsen Societ -, Naval Qub, Wrestling, Intramurals. HARVEY ROETHKE Brooklyn, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacwren, African Lightning, Farrell Export Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Aruba, Brazal, French Morocco, Libya, Mozambique, Portugal, Southwest Africa, Spain, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Hear This, Block " M " Club, Catholic Choir, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Ski Club, Trident Club, Football, Swimming, Intramurals. HENRY FRED ROGERS Northport, New York . Unit Excelsior, SEA DUTY: S.S. Amei Santa Ana, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Aden, Beligum, Burm French Somaliland, Holland, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Chess Club, Michclsen Society, Sailii «S, ' GEORGE JOSEPH ROHLOFF Bayside, New York United States Lir SEA DUTY: S.S. Ame Exanthia, Robin Lines Expo Hobi. VOYAGES: Belgium, England, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Kenya, Libya, Morocco, .Mozambique, Portugal, Spain, Tanganyika, Trinidad, Tunisia, Union of South Africa. a.! J GARET MARTIN ROMEO East Meadow, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Exiria, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Luisa, Grace Lines; S.S. American Builder, S.S. United States, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Chile, Colombia. Ecuodor, England, France, Italy. Ireland, Morocco, Panama. Peru, Portugal. Scotland, Spain. RICHARD DONATO RONZITTI Jackson Heights, New York Export Lines; S.J Wa Unit ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Polaris, Hear This, Camera Club, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Radio Club, Regimental Broadcast Unit, Intramurals. GERALD BERTRAM ROSENTHAL Brooklyn, New York SEA DU ' n ' : S.S. Exiria, Am Louisa, Grace Lines; S.S. VOYAGES: Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Erie, England, French Morocco, Italy, Panama, Peru, Portugal, Scotland, Spanish Morocco, Spain. ACADEMY RECORD: Dance Committee, Baseball, Football, Intramurals. W 5 4r ROBERT RAYMOND ROTHMANN Closter, New Jersey Mart, S.S. An SEA DUTY ' ; S.S. Pione States Lines; S.S. M S.S. Excambion. . im ' h VOYAGES: ArEentin,, ! Egypt, Fomios.i. I . Kong, Italy, Jap.ni, h Syria, Spain, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Dance Committee, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Football, Rifle, Intramurals. Zone, Dutch West Indies, n . Greece, Hawaii, Hong .iiKin, Philippines, Panama, I 4. -im ROBERT JAMES RUSSELL Jersey City, New Jersey SEA DUTY ' : S.S. Santa Margarita, Grace Lines; S.S. Excalibur, American Export Lines; S.S. Mormacmail, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. America, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Canal Zone, ChUe, Colombia, Curacao, Ecuador, Egypt, England, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Lebanon, Panama, Peru, Spain, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships, Art Editor, Astronomical Society, Glee Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. MM. 4- JOHN RICHARD SALENJUS Seattle, Washington SEA DUTY: S.; States Lines; S.S. Fra Berlanga, S.S. Junior, United Fruit Company; S.S. Santa Mercedes, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Colombia, Costa " Rica, Cuba, England, Formosa, Hong Kong, Ireland, Hawaii, Japan, Korea, Panama, Peru, Scotland. JAMES HAR Y SANBORN Boylston, Massachusetts SEA DUT ' : S.S. Momiacsea. Moorr-McCormack Lines: S.S. Robin Doncaster, Seas ShippinR Company; S.S. Exochorda, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina. Brazil, Curacao, Ecypt, France, Greece. Italy. Lebanon, Mozambique, Spain, Syria, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, RinR Committee, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Sailing. CHRISTUN HENRY SCHARAR Neptune Beach, Florida SEA DUTY: S.S. Cliffs Victory, Cleveland Cliffs Iron Compan - S.S. Exchange, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Monica ACADEMY RECORD: Band, Glee Club, HAROLD SCHREIER Little Neck, New York SEA DUTY " : S.S. Mormacmoon. S.S. Brazil, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Robin Goodfellow, Robin Lines; S.S. Constitution, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, British West Indies, Denmark, Finland, France, Italy, Mozambique, Madagascar, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information Service, Propeller Club. I 1 ANTHONY JOSEPH SCOTTI West Babylon, Ne JOSEPH HAROLD SEELINGER «estbury. New York VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, British West Indies, Chile, Colom- bia, Dutch West Indies, Ecuador, Mozambique, Panama Canal Zone, Peru, Saint Helena, Union of South Africa, Uruguay. ACADE.MY RECORD: Honor Board, Baseball, Basketball, Foot- ball, Intramurals. J WILLIAM LEROY SEENEY Woodbury, New Jersey iii SEA DUTY: S.S. United States S.S. Santa Rita rican Export Lin VOYAGES: Belgium, Burma, Ceylon, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, England, France, French Somaliland, Holland, India, Panama, Peru, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Union of South Africa, West Pakiitan. r JOHN PATRICK SHANNON New York, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. American Builder, S.S. Pioneer Ming, United States Lines; S.S. African Star, Farrcll Lines. VOYAGES: Canal Zone, England, Formosa, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Mozambique. Netherlands, Panama, Philippines, Scotland, Southwest Africa, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa, Zanzibar. ACADEMY RECORD: Honor Board, Midships. Hear This. Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Archi- tects and Marine Engineers. Clifton, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. Morm.icsurf, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. American Flyer, United States Lines; S.S. African Pilgrim, Farrell Lines; S.S. Santa Maria. Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina. Belgian Congo. Brazil, Canada, Canal Zone, Chile. Colombia. Curacao. England. Ecuador, France, French Equatorial Africa, Liberia, Peru, Portuguese West Africa, Spain, Uruguay. WILLUM HERBERT SIEGEL Lynbrook, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacsurf, NJoore-McCormack Lines. S.S. American Flyer, United States Lines; S.S. African Pilgrim, Farrell Lines. VOYAGES: Angola, Argentina, Belgian Congo, Brazil, France. Ghana, Great Britain, Liberia, Nigeria. Portuguese West Indies. Spain, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Regimental Information Service, Block " M " Club, Christian Council, Soccer, Track, Wrestling, Intramurals. a rf : JT ERROL THOMAS SILVESTRI New London, Connecticut SEA DUTY: S.S. American Scientist, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Cecilia, Grace Lines; S.S. Exiria, American Export VOYAGES: Canal Zone, Chile, Colombia. Ecuador, England, Italy, Libya, Morocco, Portugal, Spain, Tunisia. ACADEMY RECORD: Midships. Band. Astronomical Society, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Stella Maris Guild, Sailing Team. Jd ROBERT JOHN SIMMONS Valley Stream. New York SEA DVTY: S.S. Americ.m Shipper, United States Lines; S.S. Constitution, American Export Lines; S.S. Mormacwren. Moore-McCormack Lines. VOYAGES: Amba, Brazil, England, France, French Morocco, Germany, Italy, Monaco, Spain, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Catholic Choir, Dance Committee, Pro- peller Club, Ring Committee, Intraraurals. I- NICHOLAS THEODORE SKARVELIS Pittsburg, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. Exminster, American Export Lines; S.S. Presi- dent Jackson, American President Lines; S.S. American Forwarder, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Aden, Ceylon, Egypt, France, Germany, HonR Kong, India, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, Malaya, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, Chess Club, Intramural Athletic Board, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Trident Club, Football, Track, Intra- Morristown, New Jersey DUTY: S.S. American Banker, United States Lines; S.S. Brazil, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. Santa Inez, Grace VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, British West Indies. Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, England, France, Germany, Haiti, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico, Spain, Uruguay, Virgin Islands. ACADEMY RECORD: Dance Committee, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Windjammers, Intramurals. ROLAND LEACH SMITH, JR. Birmingham, Alabama SEA DUTY: S.S. American Farmer, United States Lines; S.S. Comayagiia, United Fruit Company; S.S. President Buchanan, S.S. President Arthur, American President Lines. VOYAGES: Costa Rica, Cuba, England. France. Germany. Guam, Guatemala, Honduras, Japan, Panama, Wales. ACADEMY RECORD: Hear This, Glee Qub, Protestant Choir, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engioeccs, Intra- murals. f WARD FRANCIS SMITH Locust VaUey, New York SEA DUTY ' : S.S. Constitution, American Export Lines; S.S. Af- rican Pilot. Farrell Lines; S.S. American Banker, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Angola. Belgian Congo. England. France. French West Africa, Germany. Ghana, Italy, Kenya. Liberia, Mo- zambique. Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Spain, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Honor Board, Pojarif, Band, Christian Council, Dance Committee, Propeller Club, Intramurals. SEA DUTY: S.S. Robi United States Lin Iron Company. VOYAGES: British East Africa, Canada. England, France, Ger- many, Portuguese East Africa, Trinidad, Union of South Africa, Zanzibar. ACADEMY RECORD: Propeller Club, Intramurals. f JAMES ANTHONY SPENCE Philadelphia, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. Ke -lanker, Keystone Shipping Company; S.S, Golden Eagle, M.S.T.S.; S.S. President Tyler, American Presi- dent Lines. KENNETH NIILO STEVENS Newton, Massachusetts SEA DUTY: S.S. President Jackson, American President Lines; S.S. American Producer, United States Lines; S.S. Santa Ana, Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Ceylon, Colombia, England, France, Honduras, Hong Kong. India, Italy, Japan, Malaya, Okinawa, Pakistan, Panama. Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris, Band, Christian Council, Glee Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Windjammers. I QIp SEA DUTY RICHARD ARNOLD STINE Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania S.S. Santa Catalina. Grace Lines; S.S. American S.S. Exiria, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Colombia, England, Honduras, Italy, Libya, Morocco, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, Tunisia, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Christian Council, Michelsen Society, In- tramurals. 1 MALCOLM JOHN STONE Balboa, Canal Zone SEA DUTY: S.S. Exceller, American Export Lines; S.S. Aimee Lykes, S.S. Tillie Lykes, S.S. Doctor Lykes, S.S. Brinton Lykes, S.S. Fred Morris, Lykes Brothers Lines. VOYAGES: Colombia. Cuba, Dominican Republic, Formosa, Greece, Haiti, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaya, North Africa, Philippine Islands, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Spain, GEORGE EDWARD SULLIVAN, HI Fall River, Massachusetts Arcentina, Barbados, BelRium, Brazil. England, Germany, Spain, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club. Windjammers, SaUing, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Polar Swimming. Intramurals. Debate Council, Intramurals. I. A ' ERNEST KENNETH SWANSON Chicago, Illinois SEA DUn ' : S.S. Comayagua. United Fruit Company; S.S. African Endeavor. Farrell Lines; S.S. Mormacmoon, Moorc- McCormack Lines; S.S. Santa Monica. Grace Lines. VOYAGES: Canada. Costa Rica. Cuba. Denmark. Guatemala. Honduras. Iceland. Mozambique. Newfoundland. Norway, Panama. Sweden. Union of South Africa, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Automotive Interest Club, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intra- WALTER SZEEZIL Plainfield, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. President Tyler, American President Lines; ALBERT JOSEPH THERIAULT Roclnvood, Maine VOYAGES: Canal Zone, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Germany, Greece, Italy, Morocco, Peru, Turkey, Yugoslavia. ACADEMY RECORD: Polaris, Ski Club, Intramurals. polis, Minnesota Dutch West Indies, England, Ire- Christian Council, Dance Band, -idi - JOSEPH LIDDELL TURNER, JR. Richmond, Virginia SEA DUTY: S.S. Kiniisport Vi American Export Lines; S.S ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Egypt, Germany, Propeller Club, Wind- SEA DUTY: S.S. African Sun, Farrell Lines; S.S. Mormacpenn, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. President Adams, S.S. Presi- dent Harding, American President Lines. VOYAGES: Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Mozambique, Panama, Poland, Sweden, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Astronomical Society-, Band. Block " M " Club. Christian Council. Glee Club. Michelsen Societj ' , Naval Club, Propeller Club, Protestant Choir, Ski Club, Water Ski Club, Soccer, Intramurals. RONALD CARLTON UHLIN Natick, Massachusetts VOYAGES: Canal Zone, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Formosa, Hawaii. Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mozambique, Peru, Philippines, Saint Helena, Union of South Africa. GERALD FRANCIS URSITTI Washinglon, D.C. SEA DUTY: S.S. American Fonvardcr, United Stales Lines; S.S. Mormacsurf, Moore-McComiaek Lines; S.S. Expcditor, American Export Lines; S.S. Metapan, United Fruit Corn- Cross Country, Track, Intramurals. s MELVIN WILLIAM VAN LOAN CatskiU, New York FERDINAND HENDRICK VERSCHUEREN Franklin Square, New York Grace Lines. ACADEMY RECORD; Polaris, PropeUer Club, Intramurals. VOYAGES: Belgium, Egypt, France, Greece, Holland, Italy. Lebanon Mozambique, Spain, South West Africa, Union of South Africa. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, Dance Committee, THOMAS EARL VETTER Chicago Illinois VOYAGES: Formosa, France, Germany. Great Britain, Hawaii, Hong Kong. Japan, Korea, Philippines, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa, Zanzibar. ACADEMY RECORD: Afidjhipj-Managing Editor, Astronomical Society, Chess Club, Drama Club. Glee Club, Michelsen Society, Protestant Choir, Ram Keepers, Intramurals. HERBERT ELDRIDGE WEEKS, JR. Falmouth, Massachusetts SEA DUTY: S.S. African Star, FarreU Lines; S.S. Exporter, American Export Lines; S.S. Pioneer Moor, United States VOYAGES: Canal Zone, East Africa, Formosa, France, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Italy. Japan, Korea, Philippines, Union of Nahm, Yugoslavia. Club, Windjammers, Sailing, South Africa, JJ, CHARLES HANS WEISER Reading, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. Mormacmail, Moore-McCormack Lines; S.S. African Rainbow, S.S. African Glade, Farrell Lines; Ameri- can Producer, United States Lines. Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. JL, JOHN DOREY WENNERS Halifax, Massachusetts SEA DUTY: S.S. Momiactcal, Modri-McComiack Lines; S.S. General W. O. Darby, M.S.T.S.; S.S. President Monroe, American President Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Canal Zone, Ceylon, Dutch West Indies, England, Egypt, France, French Morocco, Germany, Greece, Hawaii, Hong Kong. India, Japan, Libya, Malay States, Pakistan, Turkey, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD: Block " M " Club, Windjammers, Sailing. 4 BOBBIE EDWIN WHITESIDE Lexington, Virginia VOYAGES: Aruba, Belgium, Colombia, Curacao, England, French Morocco, Holland, Italy, Portugal, Spanish Morocco, Spain, Tunisia, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Astronomical Society. Glee Club, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Ski Club, Cross Country, Intramurals. JOHN ROBERT WILLIAMS Noblesville, Indiana SEA DUTY: S.S. America, United Slates Lines; S.S. President Coolidge, American President Lines; S.S. Santa Teresa, Grace Lines; S.S. General Alexander M. Patch, M.S.T.S. VOYAGES: Belgium, Canal Zone, Ceylon, Colombia, England, Formosa, France, Germany, Honduras, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxemburg, Malaya, Morocco, Okinawa, Pakistan, Panama, Philippiocs, Singapore, Spain, Venezuela. ACADEMY RECORD: Midahips, Regimental Information Service. DAVID FRANK WINE Chicago, Illinois ' lis S ?— ' " ■ " " ' KS ' KS.„tT.S uard, Swimming Team. Intra- RICHARD ALEXANDER WIRIN Hollis, New York ° r?™Jnv J " ' Eps ' - ' d French Viet Nam, France, Formosa, pSrppi es " rp!in ,°s " rii: ' = " " ' - " ' " ' ' ' ' ' °- " = ' ' J ' ' ' - ' ' " - ' ' furin SS-al?; " " " " " ' ° ' - ' " -P " " Club, Triden. 4 v J? BERNARD WOESSNER Teaneck, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. Exermont, American Export Lines; S.S. Santa Catalina. Grace Lines; S.S. American Planter, United States Lines. VOYAGES: Belgium, Colombia, England, Fran ce, Greece, Hon- duras, Israel, Italy, Morocco, Netherlands, Panama, Spain, Turkey, Venezuela, Yugoslavia. Club, Glee Club, CLIFFORD PATRICK WOODRICK Chicago, Illinois VOYAGES; Epypt, Formosa, France. Germany, Great Britain. Greece, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Labanon, Panama, Philippines, Spain, Syria, Viet Nam. w 1 41 WARREN WILLIAM WYLIE Weslbury, New York SEA DUTY: S.S. President Polk, S.S. Socony Vacuum, Socony Va States, United States Lines. ROY ALLEN YOUNG Sallisaw, Oklahoma Canal Zone, Germany. Hawaii, Hong Kong, India, ACADEMY RECORD: Tolaris, Glee Club. Naval Club. Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Windjammers, Intramurals. 4- f PASQUALE YOUNG ROBERT JOHN ZAKRZ WSKI Lilly, Pennsylvania SEA DUTY: S.S. American Builder, S.S. Pioneer Ming, United States Lines; S.S. African Star, Farrell Lines. VOYAGES: Canal Zone England, Formosa, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Mozambique, Netherlands, Panama, Philippines, Scotland, Southwest Africa, Tanganyika, Union of South Africa, Zanzibar. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star, Honor Board, Midships, Editor-in-Chief, Polaris, Hear This, Astronomical Society, Chess Club, Michelsen Society, Propeller Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. P ' Jt LESTER JOHN ZALESKI Newark, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. Pioneer Moor. United States Lines; S.S. Mormacport, Moorc-McCormack Lines; S.S. Exton, American Export Lines. VOYAGES: Argentina, Brazil, Canal Zone, Denmark, Formosa, France, Germany, Hawaii, Holland, Hone KonR, Italy, Japan, Korea, Norway, Philippines. Spain, Sweden, Uruguay. ACADEMY RECORD R.mni. nl.il Information Ser%ice, Drama Club, Michels.n S, ci.lv. N.s.il CU,!.. rrnp.ller Club, Society of Naval Archil, cts ,uui Mum, Em;iiu, rs. Ski Club. Football, Tennis, Intranuir.ils. FREDERICK WILLIAM ZIEGLER WoodcIiH Lake, New Jersey SEA DUTY: S.S. American Harvester, United States Lines; Exford, American Export Lines; S.S. General Patch, M.S. S.S. President Garfield, American President Lines. ACADEMY RECORD: Scholastic Star. Michelsen Society, Propel- ler Club, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Intramurals. IN MEMORIAM Lieutenant Commander Adrian Cecil Thieman, U.S. M.S. 18 JANUARY 1909 — 7 JANUARY 1959 All hands at the Academy were deeply distressed on 7 January 1959 by the news of the passing of Adrian Cecil Thieman, Lieutenant Commander, USMS, member of the faculty of the Department of Engineering. Truly a Southern gentleman of the finest kind, Lt. Commander Thieman was bom in Louisville, Kentucky, on 18 January 1909. After graduation from high school he went to sea in 1930 in an unlicensed capacity and came up through the hawsepipe to First Assistant Engi- neer. He enrolled in the Maritime Service in December 1940 for a period of training at New London and went on active dutv in 1942 as Lieutenant (jg). He was assigned to training •essels, first the BERKSHmE, then the AMERICAN ENGINEER, as Engineering Watch Officer and Instructor. In June 1943 he was assigned to the Cadet School at Pass Christian, Mississippi, and served there in the District Office at New Orleans until 3 March 1950 when he began his last assignment at the Academy. He will long remain in the affectionate memories of those members of the Maritime Service with whom he served and of those trainees and Cadets whom he taught. His familiar greeting, " Hya, bub! " laconically drawled, would begin a conversation sprinkled with many a courteous " Sir " or " Ma ' am " . His careful and faithful attention to his duties and to the interests of others, manifest even when he might have been thinking only of himself and his health, set a fine example of courage and unselfish devotion for all. The many contributions which he made to his Service, to the institutions where he taught, to the colleagues with whom he associated, and to the great number of Cadets to whom he imparted his practical knowledge of marine engineering, will long be a fitting memorial to a fine officer and comrade. Class of 1960 60-101 Adams, Richard William Baker, Patrick James Bernard, Robert Downing Bland, Charles Peter Bowerman, Emil Frederick Cano, Joseph Anthony Csernelabics, Richard Charles Deaton, Coy Brantley De Santis, John Francis Drago, Louis Gregory, William Herbert Hallett Richard Hill Jane, Edmond Joseph, III Kirby, Daniel Patrick Klinedinst, Gary Martin Lacher, Ralph Albert Martin, Patrick Vincent Morrissey, Joseph Aloysius Moyer, Dwight Lester, Jr. Muller, Richard Jerome Nicholson, Gordon Calvin Phillips, Robert Allan Proios, Michael George Rener, Richard Harry Robinson, James Joseph Troike, Robert Lance Walsh, John Patrick Way, Jonathan Linden Fitzgerald, Edmond Joseph, Jr Harris, David Albert Hassi, David George Hayden, Reginald Mason, Jr. Jernberg, William Ralph Jiidd, Theodore Phillip Kaiser, Theodore Joseph, III Knutsen, Edward ' illiam Larson, Frederick Robert Libretta, Donald Francis Mc Abee, John Tolbert Mc Elligott, Thomas James Muller, Robert Joseph, Jr. Nelson, Roger Ernest Osborne, James William Rawlins, Philip Joseph Thomas, Jr. Reiter, Keith Cyrus Richardson, Ernest Edward Schick, Frederick Henry Schiebel, Matthew Joseph, Jr. Snyder, Michael Alan Soiinski, Robert ' a ' ne Tender, William John Thomas, Redding Wilson Thornal, Richard Allen Toner, John Thomas Weiss, Edwin Kent 60-305 Ceely, Henry George Da is, Douglas Lee Dutjuemin, Francis David Gaber, David Francis Gallagher, Joseph Patrick Geist, " Walter Roland Griffin, Sydney Steven Koehler, William Rowe Lipoid, Anthony Luke Mc Donald, Alexander Anthony Mc Neill, Robert Myers, George Kemerer, Jr. Oyafuso, Jeffrey Tetsuo Peat, Ralph Alan Rakosky, Michael Alvin Ranck, Thomas Evan Rodgers, Frederick Thomas Seeley, Howard George Schulz, Roy Sever Talbot, Nicholas Lewis Thomas, Charles Robert, III Tighe, Mark Arthur Tollefsen, Thomas Severt Wanzong, Gary Francis Warner, Donald Joseph Williams, Hugh Keller . Wolke, Frederick Ronald Paul 60-102 Amason, Francis Wesley Baier, John Mathias Bendorf. Charles Joseph Brooks, John Gordon Carroll, Thomas Gleason, Jr. Connors, James Daniel, Jr. Davis, John Thomas Eichin, Donald Paul Fears, Charles Clayton, Jr. Fitzsimmons, John Henry Haldeman, Willard Woodhouse, Jr. Leffler, George Geary Ma retish, Lawrence Paul Quigg, Roger James Reibcr, George Raymond, Jr. Rozwat, John Joseph Sentilles, Daniel Joseph Shelko, Arthur Ullrich, Robert Albert Verona, Francis Michael Warren, John Glen Namahoe, Edwin Charles Reneau, James Allan 60-104 Banister, John Elton Bellaff, Leslie Michael Domas, Peter Lawrence Fields, Eugene Edward Fleming, Arthur Albee Forster, Donald Wallace Jones, Robert Wyman Krinsky, Joel Lawrence Lawless, John Joseph, Jr. Le Blanc, Robert John Lehn, Keith James Leyendecker, Herbert Paul Linden, Arnold Ernest Clarence Mac Rae, John Heron Mahr, Raymond, Jr. Marsh, John Walter Parker, George Lawrence Piscitello, Robert Anthony Quinn, Eugene Allen Scheiber, Glen David, Jr. Scinta, Joseph Lawrence Sexton, James Timothy Tetrault, Roger Louis Tschida, Martin Rudolph Voege, Gerard Lester Woodward, James Robert Fahrendorf, Joseph Bernard 60-206 Anderson, James Charles Baroni, Anthony Edward Bourdon, William Henry Cahill, John Alfred Carlin. Peter Patrick Cunniff. John Michael Dennis, Edward John Dowler, Allan Masamer Engels, Dennis William Foelster, Alfred Frederick Grossman, Thomas Hedley, Peter Eraser Henderson, William Duncan Holden, John Joseph Ingoglia, Ignatius William Johnson, Glen Hjalmer Mahnen, Paul Luke Mavo, Lewis Daniel Monro, Robert William, Jr. Suleski, Peter Francis Zeile, Henriks Phillips. John Francis Zuritis, John Stanley Farrell, John Joseph Sergio, Frederick Angelo 60-208 Brinckerhoff, James Stewart D ' Ambra, Alfred Duffy, John James Ford, Michael Edgar Foster, Robert LuVerne Hinchy, Frank Thomas Kolcharno, Edward James Kyriakakis, Thomas Mc Arthur, Donald Robert Nurenberg, David Parr, Paul Edward Rudnick, Richard Charles Rustia, John Andrew Schrocder, Donald Joseph Shaffner, Phillip ' alter Suter, Edward Matthew Sweeney, William John Tomlinson, Edward Bruce White, Willard Comfort Widberg, Arthur Alfred Ambrose, Edward Vincent Yankanich, John 60-310 Dunn, Robert George Ficken, David Anthony Halka, Joseph Robert Heller, Charles Henry Harvey, Jr. Jamile, Clifford Sonny Lindsay, Maurice Philip Mason, Gordon Conran Mason, Ronald Sherman Mc Quaid, Peter John Mehrtens, George Henry Metz, Bruce Edmund Robert Moffett, Roy Ralph Mokuau, Ernest Maulukikepa Morse, Carl Samuel Morton, . rthur Francis Mulder, Hindrik Johannes O ' Brien, Thomas Francis Pearl, Raymond Joseph Pivko, Frederick Edward Walker, Da id Brett, Jr. Ward. James Connell, Jr. Zelenka, Bernard Thomas, Jr. Kurtz, Lewis Albert Leonard, Gerald Dennis Scanlan, Thomas Moore, Jr. Moffitt, Thomas Andrew, Jr. Class of 1961 61-123 BapHste, Alfred J., Jr. Bess, Henry D. Brooks, Vincent S. Conn, Raymond C, III Davies, Clarence T. Fitzgerald, James R. Herrick, Peter S. Hughes, George C, HI Kosty, Thomas M. Lacey, Virgil K. McGourthy, Jerome F. O ' Brien, William C. Olsen, George L., HI Pafias, James E. Poling, Howard E., Jr. Powell, James M. Reagan, Daniel A. Sloan, William B. Spanier, James Sweeney, David J., HI Ullrich, John G. Welch, Stuart H. 61-225 Beuschel, Jack E. Bornholdt, Robert A. Braun, Bernhard A. Byers, Larry J. Callan, Thomas P. Coyle, Philip C, Jr. Cronin, William G. Every, William F., Jr. Fleischmann, Frank J. Goodman, George P., II Grosfils, Eric F. Hillyard, William F. Kaufman, James R. Kronz, James C. Leddy, James G. Lewis, Julian W. Maliska, Wayne Z. O ' Connor, Joseph O., Jr. Savage, John E. Screen, Harold W., Jr. Underhill, Bruce E. Varga, George Zanger, Hugh O. 61-227 Anzalone, Jerome J. Boylston, John W., Ill Clair, Randall T. Colburn, Newton S. Conroy, John T. Cunningham, Albert R. DeGregorio, Paul V. Dreibelbis, Allan H. Fennell, John Flynn, David E., Ill Gaiennic, Frank W. Keith, Charles P. Lafferty, William M. Lawlor, James J. Lenney, Wayne B. McCane. Steven E. Minch, Paul L. Odell, Marshall S. Palm, Peter J. Rackett, Peter J. Safarik, Robert L. Schneider, Michael J. Smith, Jan P. Williams, John S., Jr. Williams, Kenneth H. 61-226 Atkinson, Thomas C. Bartle, Larry LeRoy Bulow, Harland C. Dammann, Charles N. Earls, Edward J. Frew, John A. Giles, John B., Jr. Gorman, Brian M. Hemphill, Joe W. Johnson, Jerome S. Little, Raymond Q. Massi, Saverio J. Mertian, Charles J. Monroe, Charles McCantlas, Jr. Parsons, David E. Puorto, John W. Rogaski, Robert E. Schiefer, Edward A., Jr. Skinner, William J. Spock, Richard P. Walton, John F. Winslow, Richard G. 61-224 Bay, Norman H. Brady, Edward J. Coyne, Robert A. Cullen, Dermott E. Foster, Ellwood R., Jr. Gillece, William F. Hibbard, George A. Innecken, Ronald Koch, Wayne W. Krippene, Brett C. Kurisky, John J. Lefkowitz, Richard A. Loose, James A. Nemeth, Stephan J., Ill O ' Neil, David A. Owen, Lee C. Reilly, John B. Richmond, Thomas R. Schmeck, Paul R. Spellman, James P. Tompkins, Robert G. Turner, Steven L., Jr. Wahl, Otto A. White, Arlyn R. 61-328 Donahue, John L., Jr. Espey, David L. Fiacco, Stephan F. Francis, Jerc L. Gengler, Gabriel J., Jr. Griffith, Da id G. Heen, Clifford A. Hennctiuin, Richard B. Hoyt, Larry R. Kramer, Herbert J. Lues, John Manges, John B. Markev, Edward J., Jr. Matisoff, Tack D. McGuire, Edward D. Meade, William P. Myers, Harry M., Jr. Otten, Raymond E. Pratt, Richard L. Re aiheer, William C. Yearwood, Donald R. 61-330 Brown, Billy J. Rrowni, Kenneth A. Carroll. James E. Clancy, Daniel E. Dichlmann, William C. Durfee, Gerald A. Farrenkopf, Charles L. lakubowicz. Raymond S. Mack, Judson C. Mancheno, Carlos E. McHale. Patrick M. Miller. David S. Purdy. Eben P.. Jr. Robeson, James Rowe. Garv L. Scluvender. Richard K. Smith. Larr ' Sofield. Harold W. Walker, David A. Wilson, Arthur B., Jr. -ood, Flvnn H. Younu, Ilarrv J. Shurilla. Ronald P. Kistler, William L. 61-329 Be erage. Albion P. Bloom, Johnwilliam L. Brooks. Richard E. Cappell. Mark D. Carr, Louis J., Jr. Coher, Dean R. Donovan, Arthur P. Fitzsimmons, Richard J. Gorman, Jeremiah D. Graham, JEdmund C, Jr. Grubbe. Richard E. Imrich, Michael J., Jr. King, Charles A., Jr. King, Chris W. Kronzer, James E. Kropke, John F. Martin. George S. Monile. Albert J. O ' Neil. James J. Sail. Rodney E. Schaeffer. Anthony Schubert. John E. Smith, Dennis H. Touli, Charles R. 61-331 Rarw ick, Allen J. Brecn, Robert P. Caxalier, John ., Jr. Da idson, Richard J. Deliz-Alvarez, Ramon Dion, Richard G. Felton. Emmett W. Friedl. George R. Haselman, Eugene A. Hoffmann. Donald L. Jones. Gene H. Kuehl. Chester L., Jr. Kvriazis, John P. Mavberrv. Darrvl L. McBride ' James, III McClure. James A. Michalchuck. David P. Morrow. Michael W. Phancenek. Paul L. Rvan. Joseph W. Teatzner, .Arthur M. Price, Jere G. 61-120 Bishop. Boyd W. Blackburn, Douglas G. Burr, Lawrence R. D er, Colby R, George, William D., Jr. Kramer, Stephan Lahey. Richard T., Jr. Luehning, Klaus V. Mauter, David J. McLoughlin, Brendan A. McTigue, Paul F. Nussbaum, Joel H. OBoyle. Richard F. Ochinero, Da id A. O ' Connor, Michael F. Oster, George F. Paul, John D. Petchel, Charles T., Jr. Rico, Frank, Jr. Sleavin, Frank R., Jr. Traut. Jules E. Webber, ■illiam P. Withers, Daniel D. W lie, Joseph E. 61-122 Anderson, Robert G. Burchill, Thomas J. Campo, John M. Clapsadl, Paul C. Crowley. John J., Jr. Danni, Frank R. Dudes, Anthony L., Jr. Earl, Eugene O. Egbert, John C. Frew, James E. Gill, Lawrence E. Green. Daniel L. Hallock. John L. Harriot, ' illiam E. Hawkins, Da id M. Johnert, Ro ' W. Keider, John T. Landau, Michael Masi, Richard J. Rogers, John SkowTonski, Thomas P. Smith, Clifton L. Tesoriero, Albert Welch, Declan F. Zadnik, Thomas J. 61-121 Bonner, James M., Jr. Brush, Michael K. Cookro, James A. Denham, Merlin O. Donaldson, John R. Hermenau, ' aldemar, Jr. Ingersoll, Albert, III Jensen, Charles D. Juris, Harry L. Kelly, Vincent H. Key. ' Barrett L. Kirtland, Theodore R. Lane. Joseph F. Lockwood, Robert N. McCue, David D. McCuen. ' illiam T. Oughton, Thomas ' . Pollock, Ross E. Renick, Myron R. Rogers, Paul D. Shannon, William J. Smith. Alden W. Stout, Thomas M. Tuennecke, Frederick Carl He directs a million dollar show This officer sails the Caribbean with Alcoa. Whether his job is supervising the handling of millions of dollars worth of cargo, or directing the operations of the ship ' s huge power plant, he finds it interesting, challenging work. The job of an Alcoa officer is not only interest- ing from day to day— it has bright prospects as well. With Alcoa he has opportunities to ad- vance, commensurate with his ability and effort. In time, he will become eligible for more respon- sible positions on ship and ashore. With the warm Caribbean beneath him, and a promising future with a good company in store, this man ' s course is set for smooth sailing. ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY 17 BATTERY PLACE, NEW YORK 4, N.Y. INC. Class of 1962 «n 62-141 Adams, Darryl illiam Allen, James Edmund Arness, Frank Forrest Baker, Herbert Newell, Jr. Bazler, John Albrecht Carlsten, Earle Bruce Cartwright, Wilber Fredrick Clicquennoi, Peter George Denny, Dennis Goodale, David Leo Hawkins, Charles Da id Hendricks, Robert Laurel Hoskin, Andrew W., Jr. Jakubowski, Jan Edmund Lane. Robert Walton Manha, William David Meirick, Donald Edward Mullallv. Jo.seph Charles. U Necld, Thomas Ralph Olscn. Dieter Heinz Rees, Terrance . llen Santini, Basil Alfred Shinners, James Rodney Silva. John Sodher, Herbert Noel Toner, Thomas Joseph Wlederreght, ' illiam Martin Williams, Thomas Har ey Smith, Charles Henry 62-143 Beach, Herbert Houston Bowes, William Pitkin Brown, Alfred Albert Choisnard, Pierre Bruno Dierks. William Herman Everv, William Franklin. Jr. Halsted, Richard Lent Hand, Thomas Edward, Jr. Harsche, Edward John Haynes, Carey ' illiam Horner, ' illiam Benjamin. IV Johnson, John AWcn, HI Jones. Charles Ray Joseph, Jerome Elias Kirscher. John Vincent Mate ko, John Robert Mattioni. Eugene Norrod, Johnnv Dwight Parks, Ste an Robert Scroggins. Joe. Jr. Wclib, Kernan Ho% ard Wood, Jerr - Michael Yeager, Williani James Zimmcrmann. Harold Karl Ellis. Michael John Rosier. Michael Ofelt, Jack C, Jr. Strasser, James A. 62-245 Bardsley, Leonard Joseph Blenner. Edward Joseph Brozenick, Norman John Cawthon. Edward Grcner Cullen, Andrew Francis. Jr. Cyr, Larry Stanley Dargin. William Francis Eulner. T awrence Ed ' ard Forstcr. Michael Edward Hagan. Hubert Deal Haves. Michael ' oodrow Higdon. lames Richard Holt. John Jared Huebner. . llen Louis Jensen. Charles Daniel Larive, David George Lentz, Austin Ned Lonkart, George Albert Munu. Louis Anthouv O ' Dell, Richard Walter Pa one, John Broderick Quick, Robert (. " linton Rioux. Bernard Ronald Rohr, Klaus Cluistian Schauwcker. William |.)seph Seifert.lMiilip Martin. Ir. Tanski. J.)hn William, jr. 62-347 . verette, Ar is Vandorph Blades, Jon Wilard Coles, Ronald Richard Emerson, Daniel Herbert Halbwachs, Da% id Peter Jennings, Duane Joseph Jones, Nhuirice Jesse Kennedy, James Edward Klausner, Robert Frederick Kraemer, Friedrich Charles Kulmus, Rudolph Carl Lawrence, Da id Michael Leventhal, Dennis Arthur Losey, Stephan McMichael, Robert Edward, Merrill, Darrcll Keith Murlev, Curtis Paul Oliver ' , Alfred Partridge, Da id Bruce Posner, John Jerome Rodgers, William .Arnold St. Clair, James ' illiam Steiner, Fiobert Newton Str ker. Jeffrey Henry Stumpf. Stephan Francis, Jr. ' au Zandt, Joseph Harry ' illa, Theodore Francis .Montgomers ' , Ja ' L. 62-349 Bauer. Harold Christopher. J Baumgart, Alfons Alfred. Ill Collins, Curtis Allan Dunn, Theodore Osborne Ferguson, John Da id Fieldman, Henry Joseph Hard, Douglas . nton Johnson, Robert William Kelley, Michael David Koran, Duane Meredith Krebs, Curtis James Leyh, John Robert Lindsay, Gerald Stanley Liu, Donald McNeeley, Owen Thomas Merino, Reed Kenneth Messick, Michael Norton, David Lee Patterson, Daniel Mahan Rhein. Robert Eugene Spencer. Donald ' a ne Talbert. Alfred Milton. Jr. Tiliakos. Alexander fohn an Der Grinten. Helu ig Fr urpillat. Ren William Walz. Edgar George Stewart, Richard S. Reynolds, Zachary M. 62-140 Bionda, Joseph Caron. lohn Williani Cook, Clarence . . Clo ok. Edward B. Dimlap, Francis Joseph Eleniewski. Mark Alexander Faber, Gerald Robert Ganley. John Joseph Hoffman. John l obert Jackson, Bovd Rav McKimmev, ' Michael Lane McKinnev. Robert Salter McLoughlin, John Patrick McManus. Daniel Eugene NlcXamara. Robert Emmett Migliore. Lawrence Thomas Monroe. Edward Francis Murnane, Timothv Joseph Ring. Michael Patrick Setek, Williani Mitchell, Jr. Xeritv, Donald Joseph Welcii. Dale Thomas, Jr. Wilkinson, Thurland Thompson, Jr. Young, Gary LaMar . llen, Joseph Hunter . ruta, Ronald 62-142 A er . Dick Theodore Baunigartner, Richard William Ely, Boyd Lee Gostoinski, Victor George, Jr. Horrocks, Richard Wendell Jr. Johnsen, William Alfred lohnson, Dennis Philip Johnson, Lee Robert koops. Dwight Henry Ko aleski, Donald John Kuntz, Richard Edward Lee, Gordon, Jr. Little, Tracey Eugene Marshall. Dennis Gordon Pauole, Allan Ramos. Anthonv Jonathan Rilex-, Jack Henry Ruck. John Frederick, Jr. Ruggiero, Louis Joseph Schmidt, Ravmond George Schnarr. Fred Christian " ' • Sparra. Richard Christian Spindler. William Larry Wander. Da id Llo d Wood, FKiin Halley 62-244 Amundsen, Ole Martin. Jr. Carr, Timothy John Crosby, Gary Arthur Egan, Edward John Forman, Jerome Gates, .Allen Graham Griffin, Robert Joseph Halpin, John Richard Hansen, Daniel George Hartenstein. Lee John Holman, Jerry Joseph Kinstler. Joseph Nicholas Knarr. Donald Norman Larson. Ernest David Miskimin, Paul .Anthonv OToole. Franklin Delane - Phillips. Bert Thomas ink p,,,,.,.]] Michael Harrv Reillv, lames Edward. Ir. Ruedel. Da id Robert Schaefer, Patrick Louis Schweter. Donald Ivan Skipi-). Edward John Wallin. Gar - Phillip ' eekes, lames Ernest X ' ood, Kenneth Ottiwell Kulmus, Rudolph Carl Caffre -. Robert J. 62-246 .Adams. James Lawrence Bohii. James Noonan. Jr. Bonzak. Michael John Campbell, Daniel Robert Collins, Joseph Robert Dina, Michael Louis Du Ross, X " illiam John, Jr. Faircloth, George Eugene Finholm, Dale Harvey Fixman, Ken t L. Frew Ra mond David Fr ' William E erett Henrifjues, Robert Edwin Hutton, George Marion Jacobs, Robert Lacy Keene, William Patrick Klein. Albert Anthony, Jr. Koubek, William August Lemmert, Robert William Miller, Stephan Aloysius Nazzaro. Da -id Alfred Peckham, Nicholas Hughes Peterson, Philip Carl Prix ' idy, Leonard Joseph Tarr, Timothy Lloyd Walsh, Gerald Francis Zablan, James Iwalani 62-348 Alanko, James Marvin Bonaccl, Eugene Charles Bulger, Thomas Alden Carroll, Gerald Richard Fedorczak, Ronald Peter Field, John Burke Finley, .Arthur Richard Greenwald, Frederick William Hancock, Philip Harold Hemphill, Joe ' . Higgins, Daniel Charles Hoerle, Douglas Ravmond Honza, Alfred Harold Jacobi, Robert Glass Le ine, Richard Edwin Lewis, Gary Middleton Miller, George Carter O ' Brien, John .Adam Packard, Jack Carson Soignoli, Anthony Tonneson, Charles Wood Trainor. James Joseph, Jr. X ' aleiiti, Alfred Eugene Wecker. Sheldon Paul Williamsen, CHiarles Thomas 62-350 Bodnar, Roy Frederick, Jr. Bovasso, Robert Michael Burchell. Richard Carroll Buxton. James Robert Cocker, John Roland. Jr. Corso, lames Francis De Nhiria, John Edward Giglio, Joseph Michael Goforth, Dennis Ray Hickman, Ernest Bertram j.nnes. Stephan Lombard, III Jones. Roger Craig Mackey. James Martelle, Charles Waite Mathiesen, Donald Thomas Miller, Da id Stealev Mostler. X ' illiani Jo.seph Retzko, Peter Quincv Rohe. Donald William Schimler. Edwin Be erly, Jr. Smith. Thomas Frederick Terry, Eugene Michael Williams, Robert Britton ' ilson, Ra mond Donald Eckel, Donald R. Leading tlieAVay to a Nuclear -Powered Mercliant Fleet Scheduled to be ready for sailing by 1960, the first nuclear-powered mer- chant vessel will help to assess the economic feasibility of nuclear power as a means of propelling merchant ships . . . another big step toward put- ting the power of the atom to work constructively and economically. De- signed to steam for 350,000 miles — about 3 ' i years — on a single loading of nuclear fuel, the single screw ship will have a capacity of 9,000 to 1 0,000 deadweight tons of cargo plus 60 passengers. The Contract To Design, Manufacture and Install the complete pressurized water reactor propulsion system for this new vessel has been awarded to The Babcock Wilcox Company. The advanced reactor, being developed at B Ws Atomic Energy Division at Lynchburg, Va. will utilize fuel ele- ments of low uranium-235 enrich- ment. The complete propulsion sys- tem is being designed to develop a maximum of 22,000 shaft-hp. In Nuclear Power Development, The Babcock Wilcox Company com- prises a single source for power re- actors, propulsion reactors, research reactors, fuel elements, reactor com- ponents and experimental reactor de- velopment. The designing and engi- neering of complete nuclear steam generating plants are supported by B W ' s long experience in related fields, helping to apply the most recent developments in engineering knowl- edge to the solution of your problems. The Babcock Wilcox Company, 161 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. WiLCOX IMLmiJvs: Ofstcx: of aivierica ALL CLASSES OF OCEAN AND INLAND MARINE INSURANCE HOME OFFICE: 123 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK 38, NEW YORK OFFICES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES - CLAIMS AND SETTLING AGENTS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD FOR MODERN PASSENGER SERVICE the INDEPENDENCE and CONSTITUTION sail the balmy Sunlane from New York to Europe and the Mediterranean calling at Algeciras, Cannes, Genoa, Naples, Great Vacation tip: Fall Winter Sunlane Cruises AND EXPRESS FREIGHT SERVICE 24 modern cargo liners servicing U. S. NORTH ATLANTIC PORTS to the Mediterranean, Portugal, Spain, North Africa, Black Sea, and U.S.ATLANTIC PORTS to the Red Sea, India, Pakistan, Ceylon, Burma. AMERICAN EXPORT LINES 39 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 6, N. Y. The only Steamship Company Linking the United States with All Three Ocean Coasts of Africa INCORPORATED 26 Beaver Street New York 4, N. Y. Loading Berth: Pier foot of 33rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. • Regular sailings to South, East and West Africa. Offering you a wide range of sailing schedules and fast transit service between continents. ONE OF THE MAJOR FLEETS UNDER THE AMERICAN FLAG world wide service TODD OIL BURNERS Firing the boilers of tliousands of passenger liners, merchant ships and naval vessels . . . Todd Burners set a world standard for peak efficiency and rugged performance. TODD SHIPYARDS CORPORATION PRODUCTS DIVISION NEW FROM SPERRY... World ' s Smallest True Gyro-Compass Mark 22 for small vessels measures only 10 " by 10 " by 15 " , yet offers precision accuracy Here ' s good news for owners and opera- tors of work boats, fishing boats and pleasure craft. Sperry now makes avail- able for commercial use the Mark 22 Gyro-Compass to provide precision navigation data for smaller vessels. Unaffected by magnetic disturbances, the compact Mark 22 gives the helms- man an accurate indication of the ship ' s heading even in heavy seas. These are some of the features of the Mark 22: SINGLE COMPACT UNIT. Master Compass and Control Panel are packaged as one unit, 10 " X 10 " X 15 " . DIRECT READING. Ship ' s true-North heading is displayed on compass card clearly visible in Master Compass. No repeaters are necessary since Mark 22 can be mounted near the helm. COMPLETELY TRANSISTORIZED. Ampli- fier and power supply are completely transistorized to eliminate maintenance problems due to malfunction of tubes. LOW POWER CONSUMPTION. Requiring only a cable to ship ' s power supply, the Mark 22 draws very little power. Oper- ates on 12 volts dc, 24 volts dc, or 1 15 volts ac, 3-phase, 400 cycles. With •adapter, it works on 32 or 115 volts dc, or 1 15 volts ac, 60 cycles. WEATHERPROOF. Ruggcd Construction features include splashproof housing. RELIABLE. All features designed to give reliable compass performance. Major components are standardized and inter- changeable. Backed by Sperry service available in ports around the world. SPERRY PIEDMONT COMPANY, CHARLOTTESVILLE. VIRGINIA ■ DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION Address all Inquiries: Charlottesville, Virgirjia or Sperry Gyroscope offices in Brooklyn ■ Cleveland ■ New Orleans ■ Los Angeles ■ Seattle ■ San Francisco BATH IRON WORKS Shipbuilders Engineers BATH, MAINE Builders of Guided Missile Destroyers For the United States Navy 1— 1 SEALOL 1 ] flexibox i_i MECHANICAL SEALS with patented spring drive INSTALLED ON MORE SHIP ' S PUMPS THAN ALL OTHER MAKES COMBINED • Cargo • Circulating • Condensate • Boiler Feed ■ =yjv.]H SIGN ON FOR MARINE SEAL NEWS SEALOL CORP. 320 Post Road • Providence 5, R. 1. United States • England • Germany • France Interesting applications and information about mechanical seals . . . and the ships and men that use them. Send your name and address to Com- mander Greiner, Sealol Corp. FINS are now the fashion Denny-Brown Ship Stabilizer in operation . . . two retractable fins, port and starboard, are located above the bilge . . . hydraulically controlled, each fin is raised or lowered, exerting counter pressure to the roll of the ship. BANANA TRANSPORTATION World ' s first banana carrier to be fitted with anti- roll stabilizers is the " Calamares, " one of three new sister ships which will sail with United Fruit Company ' s Great White Fleet. The same organiza- tion that puts modern science and engineering to work increasing Latin American crop production, has pinpointed a problem never previously solved . . . " How best to reduce fruit damage caused by heavy rolling at sea? " The installation of stabilizing fins represents another " First " in banana sea transportation, pio- neered by United Fruit Company. Results are im- pressive. On a recent trip the " Calamares " reduced a free roll of 25° to 28° to a residual roll of 3° or less. Stems stacked or suspended no longer shift or swing violently at the end of a roll, bruising in transit is eliminated. Once again forward thinking pays off ... in the tonnage of finest bananas reach- ing the fruit bowls of the world, every day through- out the year. United Fruit Company U. K. LINE CONTINENT LINE MEDITERRANEAN LINE AFRICA LINE ORIENT LINE CARIBBEAN LINE LYKES UMES Lykes Bros. Steamship Co., Inc. Offices at: NEW ORLEANS. HOUSTON, GALVESTON, NEW YORK, Beaumont. Brownsville, Chicago, Corpus Christi, Dallas, Gulfport, Kansas City, Lake Charles, Memphis. Mobile, Port Arthur, St. Louis, Tampa, Washington, D. C OFFICES AND AGENTS IN PRINCIPAL WORLD PORTS NSURANCE BROKERS FRANK B. HALL CO. INC. 67 WALL STREET NEW YORK 5, N. Y. WHitehall 4-3300 AVERAGE ADJUSTERS LOOK to the fast-growing MISSISSIPPI VALLEY for a solid career... For further information, write: Captain D. L. Steele. 611 E. A1ARCEAU ST. LOU S M, A10. A PRIVATELY OWNED CORPORATION Many hundreds of Kings Point Graduates, over the years, have traded uniform caps to serve aboard our world-wide fleet of luxury liners and modern cargo vessels. Their skills and diligence help to make ours a respected house flag in ports from Boston to Bombay. Our sincere congratulations. AMERICAN PRESIDENT LINES STEVENSON LINES T. J. STEVENSON CO., INC. Broad Street, N. Y. Tel. Whitehall 3-2977 )ga GENOA — NAPLES — VENICE TRIESTE — PIRAEUS — ISTANBUL and WORLDWIDE TRAMP SERVICE Regular sailing from U. S. ports to Mediterranean Levant Service SMITH a; KELLY STEVENSON LINES PALMETTO SHIPPING CO., INC. HINKINS S.S. AGENCY. INC. What do both have in common? The press gave unreserved attention to Newport News Hull Number 506 ... the mighty 1039-foot air- craft carrier Forrestal . . . world ' s greatest fighting ship and forerunner of a new class of fighting ladies for the U. S. Navy. But take a look at Newport News Hull Number One, built in 1890. Originally christened the Dorothy, this hull is now the . Alvah Clark. And, today, 65 years after Newport News built it, Hull Number One is still in Engineers . • • Desirable positions available at Newport News for Designers and Engineers in many categories. Address inquiries to Employment Manager. operation . . . serving regularly in the fleet of the Curtis Bay Towing Co. You could place 145 vessels the size of the . Alvah Clark on the flight deck of the Forrestal. Yet both Hull Number One and Hull Number 506 have one characteristic in common: the quality built into every vessel ever constructed at Newport News. In fulfillment of the pledge of the founder that . . . " we shall build good ships. " Neivport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Newport News, Virginia Mainsail clewed, Training Ship STATSRAAD LEHMKUHL enters New York. This ship is symbolic of all that is traditional in ships and ship handling. DALZELLERA is all that is new — from latest radar to pilot-house controlled reversable-pitch propeller. Tradi- tional or modern, in both vessels the same time-honored, sound principles of seaman- ship are handed down master to man, generation after generation. At Dalzell, for over a century. Towiisro CO. NEW YORK I — S5 United States Lines Ships — , give you the fastest direct service from U. S. Atlantic Coast ports to Europe and the Far East. When you ship by United States Lines, rec- ord breaking ships speed your cargo to its des- tination. The s.s. United States, world ' s fastest ship, sails regularly between New York, Havre, South- ampton. Her popular running mate, the s.s. America, sails between New York and Cobh, Havre, Southampton and Bremerhaven. And new Mariner type cargo vessels operated by United States Lines in its American Pioneer Far East service are breaking the records for running time between New York and Manila. All-in-all there are 55 great ships in the United States Lines fleet ready to serve you with the speed, skill and efficiency born of over a half century of shipping experience. CMkct Qoit LmBA :Lj g-a: O.VE BROADWAY, NEW YORK I, NEW YORK OFFICES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES THROVGHOUT THE WORLD A SALUTE TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1959 America ' s leadership on the high seas depends on men such as our ships ' officers whose skills and achievements are backed by 6000 years of service on company tankers. Ssso; ESSO STANDARD OIL COMPANY Marine Department Compliments of The Interlake Steamship Companij CLEVELAND, OHIO PAUSE FOR COKE! After the big mop-up . . . it ' s bottoms up with Coca-Cola, ice-cold ! Here ' s to that great taste, that welcome lift. Pause for a bottle of Coke . . . often ! SIGN OF GOOD TASTE Regular Weekly Sailings from U.S. Gulf Ports to BRAZIL • URUGUAY • ARGENTINA Direct Service Regular Sailings U. S. Gulf Ports io WEST AFRICA mssissirpi sHirpiNC co., inc., new oiieans For Sailing Information Consult Our Offices NEW ORLEANS Hibernia Building NEW YORK 17 Battery Place ST. LOUIS 41 1 N. Seventh Street CHICAGO 140 So. Clark Street WASHINGTON, D. C. 1625 K Street N. W. WICKWIRE WIRE ROPE WISSCOLAY PREFORMED i All Sizes and Constructions WICKWIRE WIRE ROPE SLINGS ARE ALSO MADE AND ASSEMBLED AT OUR PLANT IN PALMER, MASS. New York District Sales Office 575 Madison Avenue New York 22, N. Y. A PRODUCT Of WICKWIRE SPENCER STEEL DII ISION OF CF I There ' s a FUTURE for You in Freight ...for international trade will he active for years to come. Services between the 3 coasts of the U. S. to THE FAR EAST • INDIA • MEDITERRANEAN • NORTH EUROPE UNITED KINGDOM also Pacific Coast-Havana Service INTERCOASTAL SERVICES Between Gulf and Pacific Ports From Pacific Lumber Ports to Atlantic Ports States , Afar he nes 90 BROAD STREET • NEW YORK 4, N. Y. Agents in principal cities and world ports V O R L D V I D FULL CARGO SERVICES YOUR NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON BOARD IS A GOOD MAN TO KNOW LAWRENCE L LIFSHEY iST SERVING THE REGIMENT, CHARTERED r o ON THE BASE, LIFE UNDERWRITER h SINCE 1945 K } THE CERTtFIED REPRESENTATIVE OF NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY AT THE U.S.M.M.A. ISLSLSLJiJUUULSJLSiSLaJLSLaj THE SQUIRE BOWL Great Neck ' s Most Intimate Bowling Center COMPLIMENTS the CADET CORPS of the U.S.M.M.A. For Reservations Call 17 MAPLE DR. HUnter 2-9638 irinrirsirirsiprirTsirs irirs trinrsT Stringent quality control throughout its manufacture— that ' s Naco Chain. Exacting patterns . . . experienced casting . . . careful inspection ... the entire shot of chain uniformly heat treated— gives uniformity of link in both size and structure. That means Naco Chain pays out faster when anchoring . . . has extra strength for safe anchorages. Always specify the chain with the name— Naco Anchor Chain. CASTINGS COMPANY C eve and 6, 0 i ssfFe a.nohora.s:e with NACO SERVICE YOU AS DIPLOMAS and Commencement Announce- ments. W. G. PFORR Representative £.g. A AN OFFICER and Jleaden. Throughout your life, the many fine products of Balfour are available to you. Shown at the left Is the enlarged modern plant which features new equipment and machinery, highly skilled craftsmen and an experi- enced management. Balfour prod- ucts are available to you as an officer, an educator or as an executive and leader. OFFICERS INSIGNIA of craftsman quality. Write for flyer. AWARDS . . . Medals, Cups, Trophies and plaques. Free catalog. otttr Go- ' P ' Ci f ' 521 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK 17, N. Y. COMPLIMENTS OF The Whaler Bar AT Midston House Madison Ave. at 38th St. New York City, N.Y. COMPLIMENTS OF M J TRACY, INC, PAST PRESIDENTS Jimmy Powers, 1953-54 John W. Scherger, 1954-55, 1955-56 PRESIDENT Henry J. V. Werner, 1956 FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Mrs. Howard R. Driggs SECOND VICE PRESIDENT Harry P. Hart THIRD VICE PRESIDENT James P. Walsh FINANCIAL SECRETARY Guy Bittner CORRESPONDING SECRETARY Mrs. Frank Verona ASSISTANT Michael Linden ASSOCIATION of PARENTS AND FRIENDS of KINGS POINT U. S. MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY KINGS POINT, NEW YORK A 48 state organization founded in 1953 to foster the best interests of the Academy and the Regiment of Cadet-Midshipmen through local public information-ac- tivity throughout the United States and through sponsor- ship of various incentive and welfare programs within the Academy. Membership is open to anyone interested in the American merchant marine and its Academy at Kings Point. Membership meetings are held semi-annually and the Board of Governors meets monthly. Annual dues are three dollars. OIGNODE manufactures ten- sional steel strapping, tools and accessories for securing cargo on deck, in ' tween decks and in lower holds, and for securing centerline bulkheads in grain ships. For complete information and descriptive folder write SIGNODE STEEL STRAPPING COMPANY 2600 N. Western Ave., Dcpt. MS. Chicago 47, Illinois 360 Furnian Street Brooklyn 1, New York 341 Bienville Street New Orleans 16, La. Loveridpe Road Pittsburpli, Calif. COMPLIMENTS OF CHELSEA SHIP REPAIR CORP. 400 WEST 23rd STREET NEW YORK, N. V. World wide cargo services . . . can mean world wide career opportunities for you FROM ALL COASTS OF THE UNITED STATES TO: India • Pakistan • Ceylon • Saudi Arabia • Iran • Iraq • Thailand • Burma • Formosa • Okinawa • Hawaiian Islands Korea • Malaya • Singapore • Philippines • Indonesia • Viet-Nam Near and Middle East OFFICES; Bollimore • Beaumont • Brownsville • Bufiolo • Colexico Chicogo • Cleveland • Dallas • Detroit • Fresno • Golveston Houston • Long Beocti • Los Angeles • Memphis • Mobile New Orleons • New York • Norfolk • Philadelphia • Portland, Ore. San Francisco • Seattle • St. Louis • Tampa • Washington, D. C. lB¥HMiAg»3 I MBl 71 BROADWAY NEW YORK 4. N. Y. Herff-Jones Compan y Official Jewelers U.S.M.M.A. CLASSES OF 1943 - 1944 - 1945 DECEMBER 1946 - 1947 - 1948 - 1949 - 1950 DECEMBER 1951 - 1952 - AUGUST 1953 1954 - 1955 - 1960 { FOR HER . . . An Affectionate Lasting Gift . . . A Beautiful MINIATURE GRADUATION RING Set with any stone you desire, witli or without a surrounding setting of diamonds M Eastern Division 14 PARK PLACE, NEWARK 2, N. J. MArket 3-2295 H ' Available to All Graduates S ' ACADEMY RINGS AND MINIATURES SPECIAL CURVED WEDDING BANDS COMPLIMENTS OF Trinidad Corporation AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MVAL ENGINEERS, INC. SUITE 1004, CONTINENTAL BLDG. 1012 14th STREET NORTHWEST WASHINGTON 5, D. C. FOUNDED IN 1888 Its quarterly Technical Journal can not fail materially to benefit every person interested in Engineering. All regular and reserve, U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard Officers are eligible for Naval Membership. Other memberships are avail- able to civilian engineers. Annual dues $10.00. No initiation fee. No extra charge for Journal. Members of the Class of 1959 of U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, N. Y. are eligible for Junior membership for two years at one-half regular dues. Albert Ullmann Marine Office, ma L 84 WILLIAM STREET NEW YORK 38, N. Y. ■■flr ■ — i ■M lURll NE AT50N A • TO HAWAII m 1 1 SB " B i m « 3 S:-- : ,. mm a MARIPOSA • MONTERE THE SMART WAY TO TRAVEL, THE BEST WAY TO SHIP TO HAWAII AHD THE SOUTH PACIFiC ■ A fleet of glamorous, spacious passenger ships and fast, efficient freighters carry on the 70 -year Matson tradition of outstanding service to Hawaii and the South Pacific. A FLEET OF 24 MODERN FREIGHTERS » ne ss« SERVING the Philippines, Honj Kong, lapan, China, , . Formosa, Korea, Okinavia, TiiallanH, Indo-Chlna, Guam ♦.1 0. ' YOUR PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY You are eligible, together with all other seafaring officers, to become an associate member of the United States ISaval Institute. The Naval Institute was founded in 1873 by a group of naval officers. Since that time it has published the U. S. atal Institute Proceedings, the foremost naval publication in the world, for the benefit of its members, who now exceed 50.000. The Naval Institute also carries on an active book publishing program whicli includes authoritative profes- sional and nautical books and unusual works on naval history. Members may buy Naval Institute books at a substantial discount. Annual dues (S4.00) include at no extra cost a year ' s sul)scription to the monthly Proceedings. For membership, apply to UNITED ST. TES N. V. L INSTITUTE ANN. POLIS, M. RYL. ND INGALLS-BUILT SHIPS help preserve world peace THE INGALLS SHIPBUILDING CORPORATION Executive Offices: Birminghom, Alabama Shipyards: Pascagoulo, Mississippi (2 yards); Decatur, Alabama irr? 8 " 8 ' fi " rB " OVBTrryTnr5Tr6 " B 8 " » " !rB " B " 6 " 6 " » " 0 " 8 8-B " S J. J. HENRY CO., INC. I NAVAL ARCHITECTS AAARINE ENGINEERS MARINE SURVEYORS NEW YORK 21 West Street I New York 6, N. Y. Whitehall 3-2870 PHILADELPHIA 401 North Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. Walnut 5-1755 Cable: Henrycoinc Sg-a-flJULg-g-gJu JUULflJLftJULfiJLSJt. DOCTOR OF SHIPS Rick Bnihn specializes in pre entive " " medicine. " Rick is the Mobil marine engineer in Hong Kong. His counterparts work in every major Free World port— more than 400. As you trust the skill, training and experience of your doctor, so do the men who know marine machinery trust the Rick Bruhns to diagnose their ships " needs and prescribe the right fuels and lubricants. Mobil know-how created the first and most comprehensive service of this kind. It helps make sure that goods you send or receive move without delay— that as a passenger you arrive and depart on schedule— that every voyage is a Bon Voyage. This is the master ' s touch in oil — servicing the world ' s mightiest warship, the world ' s fastest boat, every flagship of every leading ship line, two-fifths of all the world ' s freighters as well as the first atomic-powered submarine. SOCONY MOBIL OIL COMPANY, INC. Mobil COMPLIMENTS OF THofUKc Ttec A4 cR? 26 WATER STREET NEW YORK 4, N. Y. GIBBS COX, INC. NAVAL ARCHITECTS and MARINE ENGINEERS THE HERILDRY OF MERIT Tl.o al.o..- trail. mark l.a .ariu-.l tlic ri-il.t to he considor Ml as such. It signifies a de- pcndahlc STANDARD of QUALITY that has always htvii disfiiirtivo am! reco nizod. We are proud of this, as you men are of your career. AIIT V 0 IPA V. VSV, :-29 HHOADW . M-; YOHK 3. N. V. GENERAL. DYNAMICS Compliments of BOUCHARD TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. r v e ' " ! KEYSTONE SHIPPING CO. Ship Owners, Operators and Agents 1000 WALNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA 7, PENNSYLVANIA WAlnul 3-1300 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT TRAVELERS CARDS CHEQUES The comprehensive credit Spendable anywhere, good ' card that offers more charge until used. Prompt refund if services-around the world. your BANK, at Railway Ex- OTHER press and Western Union FINAXCIAL Offices. Charges, only a pen- ny a dollar. ■ SKRVICKS American Express financial Money Orders services include: foreign re mittances, mail and cable Pay bills, send funds with : . transfer of funds, purchase convenient American Express and sale of foreign currency. Money Orders - throughout U.S. at stores. Railway Ex- Travel Service press. Western Union Offices. The experienced staff of American Express provides SHIPPING SERVICES i transportation, tickets, hotel Complete facilities for per- reservations, rentacar res- sonal and household effects h ervations, interpreters; plans shipments, import and ex- independent trips or escorted port forwarding, customs tours. clearance, marine insurance. 1 Wherever you go .. . American express company Headquarters: 65 Broadway, S ' etv York 6, . Y. • iOO offices in principal cities of the world TRAVELERS CHEQUES • MONEY ORDERS • CREDIT CARDS • TRAVEL SERVICE • FIELD WARCHOUSINC ■ OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL BANKING ■ FOREIGN REMIHANCES ■ FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDING tiiimiiiii e f m Congratulations and the best of luck! We at Lorstan are proud of the part we have had In helping to make your classbook a permanent reminder of your school years, recording with photo- graphs one of the happiest and most exciting times of your life! We hope that, just as you have chosen us as your class photographer, you will continue to think of Lorstan Studios when you want photographs to help you remember other momentous days to come! When you choose Lorstan portraits, you are sure of the finest craftsmanship at the most moderate prices! LORSTAN STUDIOS Foremost School Photographers in the East Laxnry in Everything fant Price SHOES FOR MEN Phi Bates America ' s only shoes Style endorsed by the College Advisory Board ' SUPPER-FREE WHERE YOUR FOOT BENDS " Most Styles S10.95 to S18.95 Webster Massachusetts BATES SHOE COMPANY, A¥atl«bl« Iv«rywh«r« In Hi Unlt«d Stotes and throughout tho World lm«rnalional Dliiribulion coutd only ba butll on a lint of Morint Painlt rtiol afford th« ihlpowntr th« maximum in proltctlon, durobiliry and •cenomy. U ' l a lafa habit to ipvcify Inltrnotionol. International Paint Company. Inc. ' PACIFIC TRADERS ' SHORT ROUTE ' AMERICAN MAIL LINE LTD. GENERAL CARGO TO THE FAR EAST weekly sailings from Pacific Northwest Ports to . . . JAPAN • FORMOSA • OKINAWA • HONG KONG PHILIPPINES • MALAYA • INDONESIA • KOREA fO» Pates— SPACE — FURTHER DETAIIS. PHONE OR WRITE, SealUe (1): 740 Smart BIdg Main 4-4400 San Francisco (4): 233 Sansome St Eibrook 2-1468 Chicago (3): HO So. Dearborn Si Dearborn 2-2257 New York (4): 17 Battery Place Hanover 2-0493 Portland (4): 522 Pacific Bldg Capital 6-2771 Los Angeles (17): 900 WiUhire Blvd Mutual 4321 Detroit, Mich.: 1231 Dime BanV Bldg Woodward 3-9170 Vancouver. B. C: Marine Bldg _. Pacific 2157 Washington. D. C: 227-9 Natl Press Bldg.-Executive 3-5346 ■v jSKj: ! CAILE ADDRESS: " MAILINE " All 0 d« Seatrain Lines, Inc 711 THIRD AVENUE NEW YORK 17, N. Y. WHitehall 4-4060 R. MARTORELLA CO., INC. GENERAL CONTRACTORS Specializing in Sugar Stevedoring Est. 1908 EIGHTY-TWO WALL STREET NEW YORK COMPLIMENTS OF MAURICE ' S CONGRATULATIONS, CADETS! • Slater has been privileged to serve the members of theCI ass of ' 59 • We ' re proud to number the United States Merchant Marine Academy among our 102 college clients. New York Buffalo Detroit — SLATER = • Philadelphia • Danville, Va. M. LORAN has the specialized equipment and experience for every type of tovinji prohleni — harhor, inland water, coastwise or deep sea. Modern diesel-eleclric tugs are availahle to handle assijin- nients anvwhere in the world. MORAN TOWING TRANSPORTATION NEW YORK Mobilgas Special chosen to power the 59 Ford In grueling ' round- the - world test I Over high, cold mountains . . . across scorching deserts . . . through city streets and steaming jungles . . . these were some of the conditions encountered in the ' round-the-world test of the new 59 Ford. And to power and protect it, Ford used Mobil products and service exclusively! Mobilgas Special —the super-special for today ' s high-compression cars— was the fuel chosen. This is the famous Mobilgas Economy Run gasoline that gives your car a big power boost— improved, year- ' round, knock-free performance that means more miles per gallon, too! Mobiloil Special — the amazing all-season motor oil — was chosen for its proved ability to protect engines against wear under all driving conditions ... to keep them running like new— even after a trip around the world! Mobilgrease MP and Mobilube GX gear lubricant were the choice for smooth, quiet, safe driving over some of the world ' s roughest, toughest terrain. What better proof that the wise choice of products and service lor your car is Mobil? See your friendly Mobil dealer for Below are scenes from some of the 17 countries through which the 58 Ford passed on its ' round-the-world trip l J DBZEimX] Mobil I Mobilgas Special • Mobiloil Special ■i " You ' re Miles Ahead with Mobil " Tune in " trackdown " every week, CBS-TV. See ] our local paper for time and station. SOCONY MOBIL OIL COMPANY, INC. A. H. BULL c r. GENERAL AGENTS BmJI Jm. J4i£ I 5 BROAD STREET • NEW YORK 4 • BO 9-2900 A Complet ' e Line Of Modern Marine Auxiliaries LAKE SHORE • Cargo winches • Topping winches • Dock winches • Siporter JOHNSON-TYPE • Mooring winches • Windlasses • Towing machines • Steering gears LAKE SHORE, Inc. ALMON A. JOHNSON DIVISION 7 BATTERY PLACE NEW YORK IRON MOUNTAIN MICHIGAN A URAND CLEANING TOOLS with Clean off accumulations of scale, paint, rust or any foreign matter from any hard surface with Aurand Cleaning Tools. Toothed cutting wheels, loose pinioned on rotating head chip away accumulations at high speed. Positive depth shoe prevents cutting into permanent surface and assures uniform cleaning of entire area. FOR FULL DETAILS, WRITE DEPT. S Address communications to: mm MFG. EQUIP. CO. TOWING-IIGHTERAGE Doing " the unusual " in towing and lighter- age is usual for McAllister — any point — any time. McAllister facilities encompass a wide range of service to keep ships and car- gos moving. McAllister experience covers over eighty years of towing and transporta- tion. Every assignment is expertly handled by splendidly conditioned equipment and eminently-qualified masters and crews. .- m . McAllister brothers I2J0 ELLIS STREET CINCINNATI 23, OHIO 1 m m LIFEBOATS M L V Lifeboats from M ■■■ H 12 feet to 37 feet 1 V ' XT I SES SH RL I manufactured to U.S.C.G. standards. H B V. J t0j ' !iJlBkl f KSj ,% t ' ' H Welin ' s half century of experience H B fe " r i " l fc " ■ [ ' 1 is an added feature in all Welin boats, | H V H which other manufacturer can | B HHIPI i, , . .. -, B furnish. Get the most value for B - - -— " " j l ' ■ L your money when 1 Mfri IM DAVIT 1 Uu r 1 1 lU and yi t H a dhishn of Continen ff LLIIiboatI i .500 Market Street, Perth Amhoy. New Jersey, Valley 6-4800 1 INA is always among the first to brave the hazards of new and untried fields. But our achievements are anchored in experience, for we are one of America ' s oldest insurance organizations. As we insured this nation ' s sailing ships of the past, it is natural tliat we have pone into ■ ' space " to provide protection for tliree major firms building jet-age missiles and planes. Through various types of protection, INA covers Convair, builder of the " Atlas " , Ryan, which developed the X-13 Vertijet, and Boeing, builder of the 707 Boeing Intercontinental Jet Slratoliner, in the development of the marvelous devices they produce to maintain America ' s leadership in defense and space travel. In this way. the past and the present join forces to shape tlic future. There, for graduates, is a landhorne example of seamansliip, slability. and progress. INSURANCE BY NORTH AMERICA Insurance Company of North . merica Companies Tndemnit - Insurance Company of Nortli America Philadelphia Fire and Marine Insurance Company Life Insurance Company of North America . l mhre than 22 miHion miles from 1946 lo 1958 This was the impressive mileage logged by Grace Line ' s dependable " Santa " fleet Between niid-1946 and the end of 1957 Grace Line Santa ships steamed a grand total of 22,330,219 miles in inter-American freight and passenger service. In a concrete and dramatic way, this significant statistic sums up the vast extent of Grace Line ' s year-round service to importers, exporters and travelers of all the Americas. The next eleven years will bring an even more impressive mileage record by the Santas, as our Nation ' s trade with Latin America continues to grow. Backed by more than a century of experience in inter-American trade and shipping, Grace Line now serves Hemi- sphere shipping and travel needs with a fleet of 33 Santa ships. To meet the trade ' s increasing requirements, Grace Line has acquired six modern C-2 type freighters, and the year 1958 will see two of the world ' s most modern express liners, the new Santa Rosa and the new Santa Paula flying the famous house flag of the Santa fleet. More than ever, Grace Line stands ready to provide you with the best in fast, frequent transportation to and from the Caribbean and South . merica. " Serving the Americas for more than a century GRACE LINE 3 Hanover Square, New York 4, N. Y. Agents and Offices in all Principal Cities (f=-(, 0 u ROBIN LINE Krciiilit and Passenger Scrv- AMERICAN AMERICAN PACIFIC REPUBLICS LINE SCANTIC LINE REPUBLICS LINE Freight and Passenger Ser - Freight and Passenger Serv- Freight and Passenger Ser - it ' t«-t M ' en East Coast Ports ice between the East Coast ice between tlie East Coast ice between tlie West Coast of the United States and of the United States and of the United States and of the United States and Ports of South and East the countries of the countries of the countries of Af " " } and the Indian Ocean DENMARK • FINLAND ARGENTINA . BRAZIL Islands ? MOORE-McCORMACK AcH York 4, N. Y. ' ■ : - ' m. £S l j; : _ ._ f y V ipiU OFFICES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES OF THE WORLD Alumnf Association of Kings Point ,, ' =-«--=v OUR ADVERTISERS .nd individuals necessary to give :: 1.. ....... ....... ...■»;7::-;r:.„ .- of this is the support so freely s reflection of this ,,,,,strv Important n-F the maritime industry. v l ecause without their . rratifvirg because througn reach the printers. Gratify , of the faith placed m and had, we are reassured of the t „, ..e «eHcan .ero..n. .a..ne. «e u, to say thanks and to hope smoerely tool, and the graduates wtU Uve up the expectations of our advertiser. Advertising Manager, 1959 ADVERTISING INDEX 1959 Alumni Association _ _.. 341 Alcoa Steamship Company 299 American Export Lines — -.. 303 American Express Co... ._. 330 American Mail Line, Ltd _ _ 332 American President Lines 310 American Society of Naval Engineers _ 324 Art Cap Co., Inc -„ 328 Association of Parents and Friends of Kings Point 353 Aurand Manufacturing Co 336 Babcock and Wilcox Co 301 Balfour Co...._ 320 Bates Shoe Co.... _ 340 Bath Iron Works Corp - 306 Bouchard Transportation Co _ -- 330 Bull and Co., A. H - 336 Carpinter and Baker Cities Service Oil Co..-_. Coca-Cola Co Curtis Bay Towing Co.. Dalzell Towing Co. Esso Shipping Co.... Farrell Lines Inc Federal Barge Lines.. General Dynamics Corp.. Gibbs and Cox, Inc Grace Lines Inc Hall and Co., Frank B... Henry, J. J. Co., Inc Herff-Jones Company Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp. Interlake Steamship Co International Paint Co., Inc. Isthmian Lines Keystone Shipping Co., Inc.. Lake Shore, Inc.. Lawrence L. Lifshey_ 332 302 315 337 312 314 329 328 339 308 326 324 314 332 323 336 318 Lorstan Studios 331 308 Marine News. Marine Office of America..... .._ ....... 328 302 Marsh and McLennan, Inc... 321 333 Matson Navigation Co 325 333 McAllister Towing Co ... . 336 Mississippi Shipping Co... 316 Moore-McCormack Lines , Mobil Socony 340 335 Moran Towing Co 334 National Malleable and Steel Casting Co. 319 Negus Co., T. J. and J. D 328 311 North America Companies 338 Pacific Far East Line, Inc .- 325 321 Sealol Co _ 306 Seatrain Lines, Inc. 333 Signode Steel Co. 322 Slater System Inc. 334 Sperry Gyroscope Company 305 Spooner, Allen N. Son, Inc 312 Squire Bowling Alley 318 Socony-Mobil Oil Co. 327-335 Standard Terminal Stevedoring, Inc _... _... State Laundry- ..._.. 334 ....... 318 States Marine Lines.. Ste ' enson Lines 317 310 Todd Shipyards Corp. 304 Tracy Inc., M. and J _. _.. 320 3?4 Ullmann Marine OfBce, Inc., Albert 32. ' ? 307 313 U. S. Naval Institute 326 33S Whaler Bar 320 Wiokwire. Snencer Steel Division 316 m m Piii coMPAi! UNION CITY. NEW JERSEY UNion 7-2400 New York Phone: LOngjcre 4-9161 [urning the pages of our book of experience reveals a long list of localities we have dutifully and satisfactorily served. The ENGRAVATONE special method of producing better and economical college and school annuals needs no greater recommendation than the honest acclaim of the editors and staff members who have assisted in producing these books, year after year. We take pride in calling these faithful workers our friends and can truthfully say their untiring efforts and cooperation have made their own special annual consistently better each year. agy ' - - s jt;


Suggestions in the United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) collection:

United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

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United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

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United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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