United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY)

 - Class of 1947

Page 1 of 312

 

United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 312 of the 1947 volume:

' ill 1947 life- m fjms ' MMMIj ' mmij- ' .11111 iit " ' ' ■j ' ' LJim -rf 3 ■ ' T 1-. mmpr - yi yyill 111 1 1 liiiillllll PMIUyttlWIIMWMlMll sm ti ssim tfimif mmmmiimy- ' s ' yr I D? mm) ■ -. %Si illllllll)UUIUUV1 S$fV V.I4)lll V4l C " f IN TTED STATE ERCHANT MARINE MARITIME COMMISSION Jm 1 9 " Log Book of the Graduating Classes ACADEMY, KINGS POINT. N IDSHIPS, 1947. is two 1947. And it is the yenrhook of the Cadet m of the years ice have spent preparing for tions available anywhere, as we prepared S .iia !s im Cdtl !k things. It is the log book of the graduating classes of December, 1 J46, and of May, Corps and its Academy. . . . But in both of these it is the same. It is a record, a chronicle a career on and with the sea. . . . We have received one of the finest professional educa- HIU to take our places in our nation ' s maritime industry, once again the finest, largest, and the most modern in the ivorld. This volume is an album of our memories during the period of our training. The MIDSHIPS Staff 94 i U) UUM . . • M D ON V iej ........ . ' .ii.u:.w.i ; t-L-i ; DEDICATION « OUR ACADEMY 13 OUR ADMINISTRATION 41 OUR DEPARTMENTS 57 OUR ACTIVITIES 99 OUR SPORTS 121 OUR GRADUATES 57 OUR ADVERTISERS 238 Dedication With the death of Captain J. Harvey Tomb, the United States Merchant Marine Academy lost not merely its first Superintendent, but its best friend and greatest supporter. All through his long, successful career, Captain Tomb nourished the hope, and fought for the establishment of a National Academy for the education and training of Merchant Officers. Kings Point, with all its buildings, grounds, and facilities, stands as a tribute to his contributions, his guidance and leadership during the early days of our Academy. At his funeral, when the Regiment gathered to do him honor, every Cadet- Midshipman recalled to mind the simple advice given to us by this great man at a well-remembered assembly. His words were, " Gentlemen, keep your eye on the tar- get. " Yes, Captain Tomb, our eyes are on the target, and to your memory we respect- fully and humbly dedicate this year book of your Academy, Midships 1947. • ;S3 MJK, , ;.. , md md ing ies, irly let- It a ;ct- Captii ' i)! J. Harvey Tonih, USN, Retired II II II i I fl ■P B IIIUII kU _ ■y (5, «) Y0 f ' lpii, ' It: V H z: H •R3BCD i Aoade puf. r ' IP K PS •, ili- - - ' - « t iVlii - ' Jj - - ?: UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY Trr TTrniifiTwr: - ■ • W»«nMV»» ' " n " i ' " T " T- " i ' " rT ' — i: !LS25 " a4a5W ' aaWiYyiM gfeaiijifrfti-li " ' " • ' ■ ■ " liiimm.m mr -- ' rf •• ■ " ' — - " - It] VICKERY GATE Portals of Kings Point kJt. fM- O ' HARA HALL Athletics and Naval Science ■S »r »»«r " ' ff« THIRD BATTALION Barry and Jones Halls ' VI i ■. ii . ' •■ ■ -J . 1 ' ' ' - ' ll ' ' ' i- , V - . , - ■■■■ • k ' 1 ■ ' ' V ' y ■■K ' ..v,.v v U% fX ;■ ' ; •:« ' . ' % -iTi ' ' -A v- . I If n jn n i.-JSr ■a § i§ I BOWDITCH HALL Academics I WHikM 1 f OVAL IN SNOW r J WILEY HALL Admlnistra+ion 1 1 FULTON HALL Engineering Jga sm::; . f DELANO HALL " Mess Hall " . 1V r M. — I iiiHii LJi ' -a T tMi, CLEVELAND HALL Quarters Jgl II » Y v w " V V ' v J FIRST BATTALION Murphy and Palmer Halls Hk aaii ■ ■■ ■: -■ I I II mv SAMUELS HALL Nautical Science 1 iJ ' i» ' MWki 1 l» - Kv: I KT ' I ' irgga 1 -NWl h;SJ HARRY S. TRUMAN President of the United States tU i.3-J i il ADMIRAL W. W. SMITH, USN (Ret. Chairman, United States Maritime Commission REAR ADMIRAL TELFAIR KNIGHT. USMS Director, Training Division mamm REAR ADMIRAL R. R. McNULTY. USMS Supervisor United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps and Third Superintendent United States Merchant Marine Acadenny REAR ADMIRAL G. C. STEDMAN, USNR Second Superintendent United States Merchant Marine Academy CAPTAIN J. T. EVERETT, USMS Deputy Supervisor United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps CAPTAIN P. C. MAHADY, USMS Deputy Superintendent United States Merchant Marine Academy 46 I CAPTAIN H. V. NERNEY, USMS Executive Officer United States Merchant Marine Academy CAPTAIN F. S. KIRK, USMS Secretary Academic Board United States Merchant Marine Academy LIEUTENANT R. W. KANA, USMS Assistant Secretary Academic Board for Academy Educational Administration 47 ■ I COMMANDER F. C. ARNOULT, USMS Budget and Control Officer COMMANDER R. S. MECKLEM, USMS Finance and Supply Officer LT. COMDR. J. G. GRUTGEN, USMS Commissary Officer COMMANDER F. B. OTTO, USMS Chief Engineering Officer, Training Organization and Head of Department of Public Worlcs 48 w COMMANDER L. W. MADDEN, USMS Senior Chaplain LT. COMDR. R. O. HARPOLE, USMS Associate Chaplain 49 ?. eaiiften Zaj i ZQ t COMMANDER R. H. O ' CONNELL, USM5 Regimental Officer LIEUTENANT H. SPURR, USMS Drill and Activities Officer SUMMER SET Left to right R. Grismer D. Crook C. Duby W. Bell R. French J. Dunworth A. Beauchamp G. Davis R. Johnson WINTER SET Left to right K. Gam W. Bartosek R. Hughes D. Crook W. Klauberg J. Dunworth N. Asltew J. Kramer N. Wylie REGIMENTAL STAFF ■SMHKHWMmiltmitAltVWl liaitallo-it LT. COMDR. R. E. SALMAN, USMS Baftalion Officer LT. (jg) J. M. FARRELL, USMS Assistant Battalion Officer SUMMER SET Left to rignt A. Hiclcs J. Brotherhood I. Brower W. Lovett 8. Anthony R. Owen R. Lake WINTER SET Left to right J. Council D. Levereni J. Stewman D. Jones M. Manderson C. Weege BATTALION STAFF Second LIEUTENANT R. J. CARROLL, USMS Battalion Officer LT. (jg) J. S. HERLICH, USMS Assistant Battalion Officer SUMMER SET Left to right F. Dubois A. Landry A. Knight W. Yaple W. Bishop M. Bulloch M. Matson WINTER SET LefttorJghf C. Tracy A. Landry R. Lowry G. Konen M. Bulloch W. Bl.hop C. Suhre BATTALION STAFF if " LIEUTENANT C. DIAMOND, USMS Battalion Officer LT. (jg) D. B. MORGAN, USMS Assistant Battalion OfFicer SUMMER SET Left to riqhi J. Bergford J. Diebold E. Brown W. Klauberg A. Cristy N. Asltew H. Davidson WINTER SET Left to right C. Pillsbury R. Donghi A. Cristy S. Kowlesici R. Purcell B. Kostecke L. Malinica BATTALION STAFF I ..r " tt. 0H iU J t ' w. :- A. ' ■• ' m: A ' : Uu epxiAtme W MWtflHWWWH J " - 2) etia iUne ii 4 U u 1 JL CAPTAIN B. M. DODSON, USMS Head of Department gp ' ' ■nri 1 I A Radio Marine Loran in operation Locating Pluto TUF importance of ha ing well-trained officers to man today ' s Merchant Marine is becoming more and more e ident. With the ships built during World War II under the Maritime Commission, the United States now has upon its hands the world ' s largest fleet of merchant essels. To operate and maintain them in foreign competition is a tough proposition since our operational and safety standards are the highest in the world. Whether this fact will prove to be detri- mental or beneficial to America ' s foreign trade will depend upon a number of factors, among them effi- cienc7 of operation. Such efficiency demands the most competent per- sonnel, having a well-rounded background and un- derstanding of their responsibilities. The higher the efficiency, the lower will be the expense of operation, and the more practical and profitable will be the organization. Plotting course for arrival It is towards this end, the development of efficient and competent ship ' s officers, that the Department of ' Nautical Science at Kings Point bends its efforts. Graduates not only leave the Academy with a Third Mate ' s license, or a Third Engineer ' s license, but also with a diploma which is becoming widely known in Maritime circles as a mark of distinction and highest achievement. The courses of instruction administered under the Department of Nautical Science are most complete and far-reaching in scope. Each instructor has extensive practical experience behind him, with the result that no subject is taught from a purely theoretical point of view. In addition, practical work and field trips fre- quently augment classroom instruction. Captain B. M. Dodson, USMS, Head of the Depart- ment of Nautical Science, and Commander S. W. Reed, USMS, Assistant Head of the Department, supervise and arrange the various courses of instruction, and set forth the manner and technique to be used in present- ing the subject matter. Under their able direction, the classroom programs are planned and carried out to the best advantage, always keeping in mind the fact that the goal of the Department is to produce Mer- ciiant Marine Officers second to none. To accomplish tins, all aspects of an officer ' s work must be studied in then- entirety, and no detail is too small for consider- ation. Under the Nautical Science Department, perhaps the Terrestial and Celestial Navigation and the Rules of the Nautical Road take the lead in importance. In Terrestial Navigation, Cadet-Midshipmen study the construction and use of the various types of charts published for Mariners. They become familiar with bearing problems, piloting, and other means of deter- mining a ship ' s position by fixed land objects. They learn to use tide tables, current tables and other nubli- Eliminating compass error Demonstration ot Oxygen Breathing Apparatus cations dealing with this type of navigation, and be- come skilled by working practical problems. They are also taught the use of the many aids to navigation such as radio direction finders, sounding machines, fathometers and the taffrail log. The Department of Nautical Science has recently added to its course train- ing in the use of Radar and Loran, the most modern of the navigational aids. The Cadet-Midshipman learns the theories upon which this equipment operates, and actually uses the equipment, which during the War was to be found only on Naval craft. Both Radar and Loran are now being installed on Merchant ves- sels. The Academy training vessels are used to give Cadet-Midshipmen practice in piloting and in the use of these navigational aids, by making frequent cruises on Long Island Sound. Through Celestial Navigation, a ship ' s position is determined by observation of the sun, moon, stars and planets, and our study of navigation includes many means for finding latitude and longitude. The Cadet- Midshipman is taught the newer and more modern methods, and learns to use such instruments and equip- ment as the sextant, azimuth circle, pelorus, compass, and chronometer. In the study and use of navigation, actual shipboard conditions are emphasized, the same holding true for all other marine subjects. The seaman ' s traffic laws, the Rules of the Nautical Road, exist for the purpose of pre enting collisions on the high seas and upon inland waters. As such, they are not as successful as they might be, for a general ignorance or misunderstanding of them exists on the part of many Deck Officers. As a means of rectifying this situation, the Cadet-Midshipmen must memorize the Rules verbatim. This includes both the Inland and International Rules. The Pilot Rules are not memorized, but must be completely understood. Training aids and actual cases are used to bring out the fine points, and to clarify the interpretations of the law regarding the Rules. The necessity of understanding and complying with these Rules of the Nautical Road cannot be over- stressed, for it is only through a thorough knowledge and understanding of them that they will be able to work satisfactorily. It is the Department ' s proud boast that graduates of the Academy have such an under- standing. Seamanship is also a prime requisite of a good Deck Officer, and every Cadet-Mid- shipman, Deck, must become well versed in this subject. The art of seamanship has undergone numerous changes since its early days when first oars and then sails were the only means of propulsion. The larger, faster ocean steamers have brought with them a standing L-R— Lt. (jg) J. M. Faunce. Lt. (ig) R. S. Dietrich, Lt. (jg) J. L. Thompson. Lt. (ig) T. D. Nichol- son, Lt. T. C. Okland, Lt. O. E. Thompson, Lt. (jg) D. S. Hill. Lt. (ig) W. S. OHara, Radio Elect. G. H. Ryder. Seated L-R— Lt. G. V. Lowe, Comdr. S. W. Reed, Capt. B. M. Dodson. Lt. Comdr. F. A. Litchfield, Lt. J. H. LaDage. 61 tricdcies oi ship construction greater demand on the knowledge and ability of the sea- man. Steel and fiber ropes of superior quality are now being used. Every kind of tackle is heavier and strontjer. Anchor cables have reached tremendous sizes, and anchors have reached as great a weight as fifteen tons. The number of small boats has increased, and the larger passenger liners are covered with them, nested in two ' s and three ' s, and handled by mechanical davits with steam or electric hoists for power. The sea does not respect ships nor persons, and is ready, at its first opportunity, to destroy and consume the craft it supports, hicompetence at sea may easily turn into disaster. Thus, the ability of the officers in seamanship must be an unquestionable fact, which can be brought about only by adequate study and training. To be able to handle and maneuver a essel under adverse conditions is no simple task, and each detail in this respect must be studied individually and with great care. The maintenance and general repair of a vessel and its equipment is also taught, so that the offi- cer may ably direct the crew in performing its ship- board duties, and to sec that the work is done properly. Rescues and emergency work at sea under any condi- tions are also situations with which the Deck Officer must be familiar, and, particularly, to be able to Lt. (jg) O ' Hara demonstrating the complicated operation of the gyro-compass handle small boats in carrying out this work. Cadet- Midshipmen frequently participate in abandon-ship drills, and maneuver regular ship ' s lifeboats, both under oars and sail. Stowage of cargo is the art of arranging commodi- ties in a compact and safe manner for transportation by sea. Consequently it is obviously another subject that the Deck Officer must know thoroughlv. Through his knowledge of the numerous cargoes that are shipped, their characteristics, the principles of stowage required for these various goods, and a general work- ing knowledge of ventilation, he can save his company from damage claims, and thus aid in building good will between the carrier and the shipper. Cargoes can be easily damaged through numerous means. Certain commodities give forth odors which are harmful to other commodities. Variiius cargoes are liable to spon- taneous combustion, and still others undergo ripening, fermenting or decaying processes within themsehes, and are apt to damage the goods stowed nearby. A majority of commodities are subject to crushing damage if stowed improperly in the holds. Only recently has die subject of cargo damage been attacked from a scientific basis, and the newest methods and precau- tions are included in the course. Cadet-Midshipmen 62 are also instructed in the priiuiplcs .ukI use of tiic latest developments of artifKial earLjo ventilation, since such systems are now bcini; rapidly installed on hoard merchant vessels as an added means of reducini; cari;o damat;e. Stability and trim are of special importance to the Cadet-Midshipman, Deck. How his essel is goin to react to various conditions at sea, under arying con- ditions of load, will depend on his own comprehension of this important subject; therefore, by irtue of his knowledge, he can make his vessel stable with a mini- mum danger of listing or capsizing, should unforeseen situations arise. By such an understanding and its appli- cation, he not only makes his vessel safe, but makes it easy riding as well, and reduces the stresses and strains which are continually acting upon it. The course includes studies in ship structure, hull equip- ment and systems, steering mechanisms, principles of stability and buoyancy calculations. A ship without means of radio communication could not operate to satisfactory advantage for its owners. A distress message could not be sent or received, storm warnings would remain unheard, and, likewise, special orders or notifications which are so essential and im- portant to the master could not be obtained. To some degree, the Deck Olilicer must be familiar with radio equipment, since some of the aids to navigation use its principles, as in the radio direction finder. Radar and Loran. While vessels today carry radio operators who control and maintain the radio equipment, it is none the less necessary that the Deck Oiftcer ha e some idea of the radio operator ' s job in the event of an emer- gency. Consequently, in the Communications course, Cadet-Midshipmen study electricity and the theory of radio. They are then instructed in the use of marine radio equipment and learn something of its mainte- nance. Closely allied with radio communication is commu- nication by means of visual signaling. By means of the International Code of Signals, vessels of any flag or nation may easily talk with each other, for the need to do so often arises. Since the only observers having knowledge of any activities at sea are mariners, they must report any odd or unusual circumstances to other ships and to the shore. Such reports include infor- mation concerning storms, icebergs, floating wreckage, vessels in distress, and other emergencies or dangers Lights for pilot vessels SOS dit dit dit dah dah dah dlt dit dit SOS The optical principle ■ i5 jy- " yi Dials, did; . , , and more trouble The charfroom navigator Tuning in on the Radio Direction Finder h) na igation. UiiLlcr this subject, the Cadet-Midship- man must becDmc proficient in sending; and receivinq by bhnker htjht, semaphore, and international flag hoists; proficiency being attained when eight words per minute can be transmitted and recei ed. The course is almost entirely practical in scope, actual experience and practice being the best teacher. Along with the numerous developments and perfec- tions of navigating equipment have come the gyro compass and its accessories. This equipment has been installed aboard most ships, and, as a result, the e ' ery- day navigation routine has been greatly simplified for the Deck Officer. By means of the gyro equipment, it is possible to steer a vessel automatically, and thus more accurate steering is obtainable, especially in rough weather. To the master compass repeaters are connected, located about the ship as required. Another accessory, actuated by the master gyro compass, is the course recorder which traces the ship ' s every movement, and indicates how long it has been sailing on any of its courses. While the course recorder is a means of checking on the helmsman, it is even more valuable as indisputable evidence in court cases involving collisions and other accidents. Cadet-Midshipmen learn the natural lav s of the gyroscope and their application to the gyro compass. They learn how to operate and maintain the arious types of equipment in the Gyro Laboratory which are most likely to be their shipmates at sea. They are certified and receive a Sperry Gyro Certificate of pro- ficiency upon satisfactorily completing the course. The importance of the Meteorology course to the well-trained mariner cannot be doubted. Knowing the weather and its expected changes greatly contributes to efficient navigation and seamanship. The mariner who is able to predict the weather correctly will be able to make his run in the shi)rtest possible time, and will know how to avoid destructive storms. The course in meteorology at Kings Point does not intend to make the Cadet-Midshipman an expert weather forecaster, but does attempt to acquaint him ' ith weather changes and their causes. In this connection he is able to make short-time weather predictions in cx)njunction with in- formation received by radio, such information being iiu.ilu.iblc to the na igator. The course in Astronomy gives to the Cadet-Midship- kL _ . man. Deck, a t eiicral uiulfrstanJiiii; o( the- work- ings of the Solar System, .niJ .iccju.iints liiin with tiic princip.il n,i it;atioii.il stars, tiicir (.h.iractcristics and inoNcincnts. It turtlifr su|iplcmcnts his tr.iiiiinL; in Celestial Navigation b ' a stULh- ot the Sun and Moon, .ind ,ittcinpts to explain such phenomen.i .is eclipses, seasons, meteor showers and other celestial activities. To give the Cadet-Midshipman, Deck, some idea of the v ' ork .uid problems ot the laigine Department ,ibo,ird ship, ,md to bring closer unity between the two, he is given a course in M.irine Engineering. Decisions of the Deck Department, if tempered by a knowledge and appreciation of the engineering side of the picture, are more likely to be the best decisions under the cir- cumstances. Though certainly not to the same techni- cal degree as for Cadet-Midshipmen, Engine, the course does point out the functions and operating principles of engine ri)om machinery and equipment. First, a general picture of the entire power plant is presented. Next, the parts oi the equipment immedi- ately concerned with the generation of power are dis- cussed, including boilers and the various types of en- gine. Following this, the means used to transmit the generated power from the ship to the water are studied, along with the efficiency obtainable with present equip- ment. Finally, the operation and management of the equi pment are considered. The foregoing com-ses under the Department of Nautical Science at Kings Point deal specifically sith the tr.iining of a Deck Ofhcer. These do not complete the .ic.klemic picture, however. Today many Kings Point graduates are holding responsible positions as shore officials, in addition to the many serving as ship ' s officers. It will not be long before the competent and expert ability of Kings Point men will be known thrt)ut;hout the maritime held. Cargo stowage Working the Cargocaire Unit Topping a boom Forecasting the weather 4 ONK of the most important qualifications of a good marine engineer is a thorough understanding of the internal tjperation and the constructional details of the machines with which he is working. It is not enough for an engineer to know that when he opens valves, a certain piece of apparatus will be put into operation. A good engineer must know exactly what is happening on the inside of the machine when he is handling One of our many woes . . . electrical lab Practical work in the steam lab the controls on the outside. It is to give Cadet- Midshipmen, Engine, the necessary theoretical and practical training that the Department of Engineering exists. This department is headed at Kings Point by Com- mander L. S. McCready, vvho directs the activities of the divisions composing the Department of Engineer- ing: Chemistry, Physics, Steam Engineering, Diesel Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Engineering Laboratories. Since the study of Steam Engineering in the Fourth Class year consists mainly of an introduction to basic marine engineering, the course in Steam at Kings Point begins after review of basic principles. To aid Cadet-Midshipmen in better understanding the reasons for certain practises in marine steam engi- neering, the first portion of the Steam course at the Academy is de oted to the study of elementary thermo- dynamics. Theoretical classroom study in this subject is augmented by experimental work in the Thermo- dynamics Laboratory. Operating the shaper The second phase of the course in Steam Engineering is the study of boilers. Boiler construction, operation, and repair are considered. The sectional header boiler and the " D " type boiler, which are generally used by both merchant and na ' al vessels, are studied in detail. Main propulsion units are considered, following the study of boilers. During the war, the Liberty ship was fitted with the well-proven reciprocating engine as a source of main propulsion. This is not the most modern type of marine power plant, but since there are many reciprocating powered ships still in operation, arious reciprocating engines are considered at some length. Popular as the reciprocating engine is, the most modern ships, such as those of the " C " and the " Victory " types, operate with steam turbine propulsion plants. This engine is more complicated to build and operate than the reciprocating engine; consequently, more time is devoted to this topic than any other por- tion of the course in Steam. A reciprocating engine will operate when it is not in the best of condition. A turbine will also operate when it is not in the best of condition, but since it is a much more precise and deli- cate machine, the chances are much greater of di)ing serious damage to the engine. As a result, turbines re- quire better and more careful upkeep than reciprocating installations. The theory of the operation of necessary auxiliaries to the main propulsion unit is also studied in detail. The actual operation and repair of these auxiliaries which include generators, pumps, condensers, evapo- rators, coolers, and heaters is practised in the Steam Laboratory under the dnx-ction of the laboratory staff and classroom instructors. Instruction in Diesel Engineering at Kings Point begins, as with other subjects, with basic principles. riierc IS a variety of cycles upon wIirIi mtcrnal com- luistion engines operate, and as an introduction to ' mmmmmmmM Lf. Travis demonstrating the principles of the centrifugal pump Diesel Cadet-Midshipmen, Engine, make a study of a few of these cycles and the engines utilizing them. Differences in engine operating characteristics are stressed, and the fuel values of various types and grades of fuels are compared in connection with different engines. Diesel fuel injection equipment is very expensive and is very accurately constructed. Clearances as small as 0.000039 inch in certain fuel pumps make it necessary that fuel injection equipment be given expert care. The smallest particle of dirt permitted to enter a fuel injec- tion system may produce a scoring of lapped parts, or cause a fuel valve to remain open. Both air and solid fuel injection systems are studied thoroughly. The operation of Diesel engines is stressed in the Diesel Engineering course, since much repair work can be eliminated by correct operating practises. Cadet- Midshipmen gain much practical knowledge in the classrooms regarding both two stroke cycle and four stroke cycle engines. Engine repair and adjustment re- ceive considerable attention in classroom work, but much of the instruction in this connection is carried out in the Diesel Laboratory. - N Summation of forces Courses in Engineering Drawing are also conducted by instructors of the Diesel Engineering Section. The ability to read and understand blue prints is an invaluable asset to an officer aboard ship. Before a machinist can start to work he must have a detailed description of the part required. Cadet-Midshipmen at Kings Point learn both to interpret and to make drawings under the guidance of these instructors. Refrigeration is an important part of a Marine Engi- neer ' s education. Many refrigerator ships are afloat today, and even the most antiquated tramp ships have refrigeration systems aboard. Since much cargo carried IS perishable, the maintenance and proper operation of refrigeration machinery is of the utmost importance in order to avoid claims for damaged cargo and to prevent spoilage of the ship ' s food supplies. Cadet-Midshipmen consider the refrigeration equip- ment in use aboard ships, and study both the old and the more modern refrigerating systems. Ammonia, carbon dioxide, and several of the numerous Freon systems are studied in detail in the class- room and in the laborator)-. Simple principles of direct current cir- cuits compose the initial portion of the Electrical Engineering course given at Kings Point. Cadet-Midshipmen learn how to ap- ply Ohm ' s Law to simple D.C. circuits, and to compute power in direct current circuits. Stanoing L-R— Lt. M. J. Gross, Lt. C. J. Oberist. Lt. H. C. Thomas, Lt. R. Best, Lt. A. E. Utheim, Lt. L. B. Kane. Lt. R. G. Stewart, Lt. R. A. Labdon, Lt. J. J. Devine. Lt. W. J. Ploeser, Lt. (ig) J. L. Kendig, Lt. (jg) V. E. Tyson, Lt. (jg) C. H. Adragna, Lt. H. O. Travis, Lt. W. M. Dove, Lt. W. F. McAloon, Lt. (jg) H. M. Kirby. Seated L-R— Lt. A. E. Lashbrook, Lt. C. I. Hubert, Lt. J. J. Dawson, Lt. Comdr. C. W. Sandberg, Comdr. L. S. McCready, Lt. Comdr. L. J. Guelpa, Lt. S. O. Carlson, Lt. J. M. Dittrick. Lt. J. C. Martin. 69 shorts, grounds and opens After an understanding of direct current circuits has been gained, the future Engineering Officers study the principles underlying direct current motor and gener- ator operation. Since nn)st shipboard electrical systems today use direct current, a great deal of time is devoted to D.C. motor and generator characteristics. The reasons for using a particular type of motor or generator in a given instance are therefore thoroughly explained. Many present day ships, especially those that are turbo-electrically propelled, utilize alternating current in their main propulsit)n or auxiliary equipment. Therefore, following their study of direct current machines, Cadet-Midshipmen learn the solution of simple A.C. circuits by vectorial analysis. Ohm ' s Law is again applied, and the calculation of A.C. power and power factor is explained. Alternating current machines, both alternators and motors, are considered after the study of A.C. circuits. Single phase and polyphase machines are studied, and particular attention is paid to synchronous motors, since most electric-driven ships utilize the synchronous motor, supplied with current from the steam turbo- alternator. Motor controllers and starters, as well as safety devices, such as circuit breakers and fuses, are studied 70 Overhauling a Diesel generator in connection with electrical distribution systems and switchboards. Transformers, although seldom used aboard ships, are often used in shore transmission systems. They are considered in connection with electri- cal distribution systems. Practical application of the theory learned in classes is the purpose of the Division of Engineering Labora- tories. Included in the division are the following: Steam and Thermodynamics Laboratories, Diesel Labor- atories, Engineering processes and Materials Testing Laboratory, Engineering Repair Laboratory, and Ma- chine Shop. The Steam Laboratories actually consist of two laboratories. Besides the regular Steam Laboratory containing turbines, reciprocating engines, reciprocating and centrifugal pumps, recipri)cating and turbo-gener- ators, boilers, condensers, evaporators, and other pieces of equipment, there is a Thermodynamics Laboratory. This is a recent addition to the Steam Laboratory. It consists of two boilers designed for the specific pur- pose of thermodynamics experiments, and smaller boil- ers for use in testing and adjusting pressure gauges and safety valves. Cadet-Midshipmen perform experi- ments in the Thermodynamics Labt)ratory which put into practice the theoretical thermodynamics taught ill classroDiiis. Tin.- (.akuLitioii of the heat aluc of the various fuels and the eoinpLitation of boiler cHi- ciencies under a variety of load conditions are t)nly two oi the numerous experiments performctl in this hdiora- tory. In the Steam Laboratory proper, ( adet-Midslupmen learn proper techniques in operatin i; reciprocating engines and turbines, in addition to ari(His types of pumps and £;enerators. The proper procedure is taus ht in starting;, operating, and shLitting i.lo sii a m,iriiie boiler and all o( the aux- iliaries necessary in the steam cycle. Instruction is also given in the testing of boiler water. Boiler repairs such as retubing and rebricking are demonstrated and ex- plained to Cadet-Midshipmen in addition to such operations as setting a safety al e and preparing a boiler for its annual inspection as rec]uired by law. Physically a part of the Steam Laboratory, but oper- ating under the direct supervision of the Head of the Department of Marine Engineering, is the steam plant. Steam and heat for all of the main buildings of the Academy come from this plant which is manned twenty-four hours a day by Cadet-Midshipmen. The Diesel Laboratory offers most Cadet-Midshipmen a rare opportunity to work on Diesel engines since most of them spent their Third Class time aboard steam vessels. Both the two stroke cycle and the four stroke cycle engines of modern design are located in the Diesel Laboratory, and among them are engines utilizing both solid and air injection of fuel. Fuel injection equipment is ' ery costly, and for this reason, much of the time spent in the Diesel Labora- tory is devoted to the study of maintaining the fuel injection system and purifying the oil used by the engines. Cadet-Midshipmen also learn the correct manner in which to adjust and test fuel injection equipment. Operating practises to be followed in operating various types of Diesel engines are explained, and particular emphasis is placed upon maneuvering, since damage to engines often occurs during maneuvering. In this connection, cooling water, lube oil, and air starting systems are given particular attention. Considerable time is spent by Cadet-Midshipmen on the repair of Diesel engines. More time, however, is spent in learning proper operating practises to pre ent breakdowns. Much of the time spent in Electrical Laboratory is devoted to operating various types of electrical equip- ment that Cadet-Midshipmen are likely to encounter as future officers at sea. In order to follow the same pat- tern as the theoretical classroom work, the experiments Tangents and obliques Diesel demonstration Tracing the refrigeration cycle c :r». r-W " V WW« WJf " Mjyig a KVLiiiMiiiiAiiM a.«i!!SSiAuvuti;itfurii Lt. Ploeser lecturing on moulding pat+erns Correct operation of a Diesel engine Cross section of a burner ill the Electrical Laboratory are divided into direct current and alternating current groups. To familiarize Cadet-Midshipmen with the various pieces of laboratory equipment, experiments are per- ft)rmed which make use of most of the laboratory equipment. Tests are performed on laboratory machines to determine such things as power factor, overall ef- ficiency, and efficiency at different loads and operating speeds. Great attention is paid to operating characteristics of both D.C. and A.C. machines in order that Cadet- Midshipmen understand thoroughly why one machine may be better suited for a given application than another. Trouble-shooting in electrical machines is very im- portant, and much time is devoted to this aspect since much of the work aboard ships is the repairing of just such devices. Closely related to the Steam, Diesel, and Electrical Laboratories is the Engineering Repair Laboratory. This is the name applied to the course in which Cadet- Midshipmen perform repairs of all kinds to equip- ment in the various laboratories. Such projects as the grinding of valves, packing of pumps, and the timing of engines are undertaken Linder the direction of the members of the various laboratory staffs. In addition, repairs are made on electrical equipment. Cadet-Midshipmen also recei e practical experience in welding, pipefitting, sheet- metal and solder work. Machine Shop is the course that gives future Engi- neering Officers experience in machine work, elementary forging, and elementary foundry work. Since many Cadet-Midshipmen ha e ne er before operated some of the more complicated machine tools, machine shop offers a valuable opportunity ti) acquire experience in the operation of lathes, shapers, mills, drill presses, and grinders as well as pro iding practice in hand tool operation. A knowledge of the various properties of materials is extremely valuable in engineering work, for the engineer who knows what kind of metal to select fc r a given use is of greater alue to his company than an engineer who is unacquainted with the properties of engineering materials. Cadet-Midshipmen study the properties of materials by testing specimens in the Ahiterial Testing Labora- tury. The tliet)ry 1k-1iiikI the tests to uliicli the materials are subjected is explained in the tlassrooin. This testing lahDratory, which has i)nly recently been establishe(.l, contains electric furnaces for the heat treating of metals, an impact tester, a compression tester, a tension tester, a fatiL;ue tester for inetals, and se eral hardness testers. Under the newly re-established four-year proi;ram of training, all Cadet-Midshipmen receive a course in basic chemistry comp.uable to that gi cn to hrst year college students. This course is given in the first and second semesters of the Second Class year and serves as a background for further study in other courses. To Cadet-Midshipmen, Engine, a course in chem- istry is of particular alue, since it provides them with a thorough understanding of the chemical reactions which occur in the treatment of boiler water and in lube oils when they come in contact with impurities. For Cadet-Midshipmen, Deck, chemistry is still vital to a knowledge of such things as hull corrosion, fuel oil, dehumidification, paints and protecting coverings. The study of Physics is very closely related to that of Chemistry. Cadet-Midshipmen, both Deck and Engine, receive an elementary course in Pliysics that is spread out over the summer term and first semester of the Fourth Class year, the Third Class year, and the summer term and first semester of the Second Class year. Since Second Classmen now at Kings Point did not have an opportunity to take this course under the wartime program of training, they are now receiving a shortened course in Physics. As in the case with Chemistry, Physics is given pri- marily as a background course. Cadet-Midshipmen, I ' ngine, hnd it of vakie in such applications as com- puting the strength of a riveted joint or calculating the overall efhciency of a marine engineering plant. ( adet-Midshipmen, Deck, make use of physics in in- stances such as the computation of the maximum safe lo.id tlKit can be applieel to a boom, and determining the stresses encountered in a ship ' s hull by different loading conditions. Courses in Ship Construction and Naval Architecture, Analvtical Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Electronics, Refrigeration and Ventilation of Cargo, Electrical Engineering, Ship Design, Applied Mechanics, and Ordnance and Ciunnery all retjuire a good working knowledge of elementary physics. Testing boiler water for efficient operation Replacing a gear Reactions to completions Drilling through L if ' v n DL V I COMMANDER W. L. BULL, USMS Head of Department ' T ' Hn Department of Ship Management, in its series J- of courses throughout the four-year training period, affords the Cadet-Midshipman a thorough knowledge of the business operations and conditions appHcable to the successful operation of a steamship Hne and rehited activities. I ' nder the new four-year program the Fourth Class- men, in their plebe year, receive an introductory sur- vey of the Maritime Industry and its relation to other industries. A course in Ship ' s Business is then pre- sented, which covers the documentation of essels and many other reports that must be prepared or maintained in the operation and management of a vessel. As Third Classmen, Cadet-Midshipmen are required to write a five-thousand-word thesis during their ship- board duty. This thesis describes their personal obser- vations of the pt)rts and terminals isited throughout their year at sea. In later years this information, sup- plemented by a knowledge of Economic Geography, will be extremely aluable if they should find them- selves in a position where the proper choice of a suitable port for discharging their cargo or anchoring their vessel is necessary ' . On their return from sea, Cadet-Midshipmen Sec- ond Class, commence their upperclass Ship Manage- ment course with the study of Economic Geography. This subject deals with the influence of geography upon the development of domestic economy and the growth of foreign trade. Cadet-Midshipmen, Second Class, also receive a course in the principles of Economics, which gives them an idea of fundamental economic concepts and policy. This course includes internatii)nal economic policy, foreign exchange, and principles of taxation. Problems of transportation are also discussed, which is necessary because of the important position these problems hold in the shipping industry today, due to the increase of competition produced by e er-enlarging rail, truck, and air transportation. Marine Insurance is another course given to Cadet- Midshipmen during their first year as Upperclassmen. This subject presents the origin and history of Marine Insurance and an analysis of its standard policies. The Explaining management Lf. (jg) Dulac explaining United States Courts elements of seaworthiness are included in the course, so that the future officer can be assured his essel is not in danger because of incompetent stowage of cargo and fuel, or insecure construction of the ship. A study of implied and agreed warranties and sur eys on loss adjustments rounds out this course which is so ex- tremely important to officers of our Merchant Marine. Second and First Classmen also receive a course in the essentials of Business Law. This subject gives the student a knowledge of the foundation on which all l.iws are based and co ' ers the basic elements of con- tracts, agency, personal property, negotiable instru- ments, and business partnerships. A course in Maritime Law is given to all Upperclass- men during their two years at Kings Point. This ct)urse is very imporfant to the future Merchant Marine officer, for it tht)rou!;hl ' tiners the shipowner ' s liahihties, sea- men ' s chiims and tiieir rii;hts of action, and the rii hts and duties of M.isters .uul ship ' s olfKcrs. A com|ilcle histt)ricai background of maritime hiw is afforded the student, as well as important acts and case decisions on which this type of law is based. Duriiii; then- last year at the Academy, (]adet- Midshipmcn .ire instructed in Ship Oper.itioii, which gives them the practical aspect of most of the other courses which arc gi en by the Department of Ship Management. Preparation of specifications .ind lunikcr schedules is ex- tremely important to the Cadet-Midshipmen, Engine, while Cadet-Midshipmen, Deck, find that instruction for the preparation of sched- ules and -oyage estimates, which is gi cn in this course, is ery necessary for the attainment of their goal. Cost estimating, analysis of dis- bursement accounts, and a study of commissary control round out: the subjects covered in this ' ery interesting course. Human Relations, another course given to First Classmen by the Department of Ship Management, is, at the start, a treatment of psychology, but later in the year this course deals with industrial relations aboard ship. Cadet-Midshipmen are trained in the psychol- ocv of industrial management in relation to personnel with particular reference to the ship- ping industry. The evaluation of employment prac- tices with respect to the selection, indoctrination, super- vision, compensation, promotion, welfare and recre- ation of empk:)yees is covered thoroughly, as are safety procedures and accident prevention. In this course the student is also instructed in the application of manage- ment technic]ue and the attributes of good leadership. Cadet-Midshipmen, Deck, are instructed in Inter- national Law during the final year of training at the Academy. This course is initiated with the study of a general outline of those phases of hiternational Law which are directly related to the shipping industry. The final course gi cn by the Department of Ship ' 0rfLr We learned more than the fundamental principals of Business Law i Linagemcnt to all Cadet-Midshipmen, Deck, is Steam- ship Accounting and Traffic Management. This sub- ject aftords an understanding of revenue and the ele- ments of rate making, traffic development and the rela- tionship between rail and water transportation. The Department of Ship Management j has constructed one of the finest courses of this type available in the country today, thus afi ording the Cadet-Midshipman an excellent and thorough training in maritime business operations and conditions. With the knowledge and experience Cadet-Mid- shipmen receive in this study and the many others given at Kings Point during the four- year course, it is assured that the L ' nited States Merchant Marine Academy will con- tinue to izraduate the finest and best edu- cated Merchant Marine officers in the world. Standing L-R— Lt. (jg) E. E. Heimbach. Lt. (jg) W. W. Wiard, Lf. (ig) L. Jarett. Lt. (jg) L. Holland, Lt. (igl J. D. Mahoney, Lt. (jg) S. R. Barsky, Lt. (ig) E. B. Dulac. Seated L-R— Lt. (jg) S. Kirschen, Lt. F. C. Setaro, Comdr. W. L. Bull, Lt. W. E. Von Gronau, Lt. (jg) L. R. Fiore, Lt. (jg) C. L. Lewis. 77 Itl 1 Sx. ' ,€ -.i: i . ■ M m uiepaAuneHl 4 1 ] COMMANDER C. W. FERRIS, USMS Head of Department »n3 Till- Mcixhant: Marine Act i)f 193 , wliich estab- lished the United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps, had the far-sighted goal of ordaining an Acad- emy second to none in its field. The complete fulfill- ment of this goal was contingent upon the conclusion of World War II. During the war, it became necessary for the United States Merchant Marine Academy to turn out many officers in a short period of time. This short training program meant that thev could be trained only in the technical fields of their professions. Hut now with the newest addition to the Academic depart- ments, the Department of History and Languages, that goal is within reach. Long has there been the necessity for a department to teach the humanities. Much of the fullillment of the mission oi the Cadet Corps lies in this department, which will impart the necessary academic background. Recognized is the necessity for an understanding of the cultural subjects to develop the Cadet-Midshipman ' s personality so that he can stand among foreign neigh- bors as a desired indi idual. As an officer in the Mer- chant Marine, he necessarily meets numerous people of other countries. In Latin America, for example, where the average business man is an intellectual, his friend- ship must be won before we can do business with him. It is with these objects in mind — the de elopment of artistic taste, social courtesy, and the gifts of cultural refinement — that the department ' s subdivisions of History. English, and Languages have been established. The History courses are designed to equip the Cadet- Midshipman with the background he needs to mingle freely with the men of other countries. In order to un- derstand a country, one must know its past, for only through the past can we view the future. Foremost in the scope of the History courses is the work of acquaint- ing Cadet-Midshipmen with the sources of American culture, of showing our part in the evolution of L+. Massa strengthening our good neighbor policy in a Spanish-American Lecture Portuguese, a classic in our nautical studies modern society, and of shin ing how we are inextri- cably bound to the rest of the ' orld by immutable cul- tural ties. Among other things, the courses are designed to make Kings Point graduates functioning members of society, who know their responsibilities, past and future. All of this adds up to the o erall concept of an educated Merchant Marine Officer personnel through which the Lhiited States can once again be strong Lipon the seas. These are the underlying objectives behind the courses; " The United States In World History, " and " The United States In Sea Power. " The course in world history covers the period from the end of the Renaissance to the present, with special stress placed on the C ' ommercial ReNolutioii, Indus- trialism, the determinism of n.itions, the trials of democracy, the ascension of J.ipan in the Orient, new iSL im am forms of statecraft, tlie Second World War. and " Preparini: fitr Tomorrow. " The courses are taught in terms of significant trends and their overall importance to history, as well as their relationship to other happen- ings. Shying awav from the specific facts, the weight is placed on the values and significance of history. Both political history and cultural history, with the developments of art and literature and .scientific progress, are important m this cour.se. At the con- clusion of tliis course a (ladet-Midshipnian shnuic.! lia c a well-founded understanding of the rise of states, the important economic revolutions, past and present at- tempts at a concert of nations, and the origins of con- temporary civiHzation. The course in literature and public speaking has many purposes: to learn to read with intelligence and understanding, to realize and interpret significant issues of thought and action, to increase the scope of ideas, and in general to develop appreciation of the literature of the Western World. The fundamental things derived from the course should be an ability to weigh values objectively and comparatively, and to relate means to ends. The objective is to teach Kings Pointers to ex- press their thoughts and aspirations clearly, imagi- natively and etfecti ' ely. The material covered deals with Realism, Expressionism, Impressionism, Natural- ism, Symbolism, Romanticism, and Classicism. English courses should make Cadet-Midshipmen conversant with some of the world ' s great literature. Foreign languages — Spanish, French, and Portuguese — are taught at Kings Point with a realistic modern attitude. More than just a comprehension of the language is desired. An understanding of colloquial n p Lt. Wilson differentiates between the periods of Classicism, Romanticism and Realism forms, with the ability to speak with, and to under- stand the natives of a particular country, is desirable. In keeping with the realistic philosophy of making the language useful, a background of the politics and the psychology of the people who speak the language is stressed, so that Kings Pointers may meet our friendly neighbors on their own ground. The benefits derived from courses in History, Eng- lish, and languages by the individual graduate, and the United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps as a whole, are numerous. Every graduate will act as an ambassador of good will, conscious of the origins of modern institutions and the culture of the Western World. He will be able to present the United States in its best light to people in all parts of the globe. The new courses in the field of liberal arts will give weight to the Bachelor of Science degree and will more than ever show Kings Point as the finest institution of its kind. The new- program ofters a diversification of ideas, which leads to the development of well- rounded ship ' s officers, skilled in the tech- niques of their profession and possessing the accoutrements of a cultured gentleman, and the art of knowing how to get the most out of their social intercourse with foreigners. The Department of History and Languages opens a new era for the United States Merchant Marine Academy. Standing L-R— Lt. (|g) J. F. Rios. Lt. M. P. Weiss, Lt. Comdr. A. A. Huegel, Lt. T. H. Giddings, Lt. W. A. Flint, Lt. J. P. Walsh, Lt. (jg) M. DeRosa. Seated L-R— Lt. K. Wilson, Lt. (ig) J. D. Hubert, Lt. (jg) M. M. Maya, Comdr. C. W. Ferris, Lt. G. Massa, Lt. (jg) V. Ramos, Lt. O. D ' Esopo. 81 amuMiiiiiiSkWVilHHit attiU:: 2 efia ' iuneiiZ 4 s jl COMMANDER R. E. CUTIS, USN Head of Department Training In the Polaroid Trainer for 20MM anti-oircraft warfare The maneuvering boaro is an unparalleled asset in ship navigation THE Department of Naval Science and Tactics IS concerned primarily with preparing Cadet- Midshipmen for commissioning as Ensigns in the United States Naval Reser e. Under the standard peacetime course, as recently prescribed by the Navy Department, Cadet-Midshipmen are instructed in the solution of the many different kinds of problems and situations that arise in a modern na y. Many of the professional subjects that must be mastered by a Naval officer are given by the Departments of Nautical Sci- ence and Engineering, but those which are peculiar to the Naval Service are taught in the Department of Naval Science and Tactics. They include Naval Admin- istration, Na al Tactics, Naval Communications, Dam- age Control, Ordnance and Gunnery, and the Principles of Aviation, all of which are vitally important to a Naval Officer. Of these, the course in Naval Administration is the basis upon which the other subjects are de eloped. 40MM, an advanced weapon against air-attack This covers a study of Naval customs and traditions. Navy Department organization, ship organization, official correspondence. Naval accounting, Naval law, and, in general, an indoctrination into the ways and methods of the Navy, thus enabling the future officer to better coordinate his command with the unit in which he is serving, should he be called to active duty. While not as basically important as is the course in Administration, the courses in Tactics and Commu- nications are, nevertheless, invaluable to any Deck Officer since all modern fleets and task forces are com- posed of many elements which operate in a highly complicated system. In order to properly handle a ship in the evolutions and maneuvers demanded of Na al units in combat, the Officer of the Deck must ha ' e a complete knowledge of the various formations used, the methods of calculating a ship ' s course and speed in any maneu er, the ways of maintaining posi- tion in a formation, and the methods of transmitting commands to fleet units. In addition to the last subject, which is concerned with pro- cedure in radio telegraph, radio telephone, flag hoist, blinker, and semaphore signaling, commLinications co ' ers codes and written communications as well. These courses are essential not only to Deck Cadet-Midship- men, but to Cadet-Midshipmen Engineers as well, because they too are soon to be Line Officers eligible for general duty. Probably the most interesting, but at the same time the most difficult, Naval Science course is Ordnance and Gunnery. Included in the course is instruction in small arms, ammLiiiition, anti-ain raft m.ichinc t;uns, dual Comdr. Cutts demonstrating the breakdown of a 40MM purpose guns, large calibre guns, torpedoes, mines, rockets, tire control, and the principles of a iation, as well as appropriate drills. The result of this instruction is a well-trained officer, who possesses a thorough knowledge of the basic principles that are needed by a junior officer of a gunnery division. Although not as extensive in scope as is the ord- nance and gunnery course, the course in damage con- trol covers the basic points of ail practical problems encountered aboard a damaced Na al essel. These include flooding, fire lighting, and emergency hull re- pairs such as would enable the ship to return to her base for permanent repair. This course is particular!)- necessary because of the complex structure of modern warships as compared to the average merchant essel with which Cadet-Midshipmen are familiar. hi order to press home the subject matter taught in the classrooms, practical drills have been de ised. These include rifle and pistol practice, shooting prac- tice in the polari)id trainer, and stripping and examin- Mim r 11 " Keep your eye on the target, " the Immortal words of our late Captain Tomb ing small arms and machine guns, in addition to load- ing practice on the gun ramp. The course has been revised so as to include short training cruises aboard the subchaser and patrol craft now at the Academy. In short, this partial utilization of the method of " learn- ing by doing " has caused the subject matter to be more interesting and therefore more easily assimilated, the result being a well-rounded reserve officer, capable of ser ing in many capacities. During the war, the courses enumerated in the foregoing had to be greatly accelerated because of the comparatively short training period given to Cadet- Midshipmen at that time. This accelerated training program meant that much subject matter was covered hurriedly in an effort to teach the required material in the small space of time allotted. However, the Depart- ment emerged under this handicap with flying colors, having so satisfactoriily prepared se eral thousand Cadet-Midshipmen for commissioning in the United States Na al Reserve that the vast majority of those who were placed on active duty in the Navy earned service records comparable with " H ' ' " ' " se of Naval Academy graduates. These outstanding records have been highly in- fluential in the development of the high regard that the Na y Department has for Kings Point and the U. S. Merchant Ma- rine Cadet Corps. On this basis it is felt that the peacetime program, with its in- crease in time allotted to studies, should enable the Department of Naval Science and Tactics to indoctrinate a reserve officer ho can and will be depended upon bv the Navy to a degree second to none. Standing L-R— Lt. (jg) W. F. Brisson, Lt. (ig) J. C. Mclntlre, Ch. Carp. W. J. Gorry, Lt, (jg) H. A. Klinger, Lt. R. W. Gattls. Seated L-R— Lt. F. J. Greatchus, Comdr. R. E. Cutts, Lt. Comdr. R. J. Gilflllan, Lt. R. E. Brown. 85 COMMANDER W. J. REINHART, USMS Head of Department Ti-MiZD to reach the top " is a phrase which is ap- plicable to botti the rope climb and the Physical Traininji Department ' s new program in preparing the Cadet-Midshipmen for life as officers in the United States Merchant Marine. Followini: this idea, the De- partment has based its course upon the accepted principles of physical education and designed it to promote the aims of the Cadet Corps, and to serve as a force in physical, mental and social improvement. Every Cadet-Midshipman is subjected to a rigorous schedule of activities. After a warm-up period of calisthenics and a short mass-instruction lecture, the physical training classes are broken up into small groups to indulge in a sport under the direct super- vision of an instructor. The various forms of athletics are chosen according to the season. The activities are selected to satisfy the Cadet-Midshipman ' s needs and are based upon the Cadet-Midshipman ' s interests. The objectives of the course are numerous but im- portant in preparing the Cadet-Midshipmen for their roles in life and their careers in the Merchant Marine. As a " sea-going man " the ship ' s officer is apt to find himself in many dangerous and trying circumstances. A high aquatic ability, _ physical fitness, and muscular endurance HI are fundamental. Besides being prepared for an emergency, healthier living habits and abilities that encourage regular par- ticipation in physical exercise and the de- velopment of skills for recreation are essential. The fulfillment of these aims is the foundation of the Physical Educa- tion course at KiiiLjs Point. Standing L-R— CSp(A) A. Mercante. CSp(A) A. Zielinsli. CSk W. P. Bollman, CSp(A) R. Patterson, CSp(A) G. Poulos. Sp. I c R. Scalcione. Seated L-R— Lt. J. F. Condon, Lt. R. T. Stoviak, Lt. G. C. Zarnas, Conndr. W. J. Reinhart, Lt. J. W. Liebertz, Lt. (ig) E. L. Jucker. 86 The program itself is e aluated on the basis of three general points: first, to satisfy the instructor ' s desire in thoroughly understanding each Cadet-Midshipman; second, to provide a basis for suitable changes in learn- ing opportunities und methods to meet indi idual differences, and third, to determine the degree to which objectives are realized and accomplished. " VC ith the aid of a prescribed physical fitness test, which includes the hundred-yard dash, rope climb, sit-ups, a mile run, atti- tude and proficiency in specified sports, these demands can be met. At the Academy, under the supervision of Com- mander William Reinhart, can be found a fine group of physical training instructors, all former college ath- letes. Having distinguished themselves in sports, the instructors were selected from colleges and universities throughout the nation. Experienced in developing physical fitness, these men are well suited to teach others. The instruction in sports goes beyond teaching; it continues into supervision of Cadet-Midshipmen ' s sports activities, making for imprinxment while enjoy- ing a game. ■MM Plllllll I ■ p I Upper — Up the rope in 12 socor.ds " Lower — Up out down The Staff is (.oinpriscd of clc en iifiuers and men, all o( whom ha e Na y, C oast Guard or Marine Corps backgrounds. (Commander Reinhart left his position at George Washingtitn University as Direttor of Athletics to enter tiie Na%y, where he was put in charge of tlie Fleet City athletic program. In addition to his role as Department Head, the Commander is also Head Foot- ball Coach. Acting in the capacity of the Assistant Head of the Department and track coach is Lieutenant James Liebertz who pre iously taught at St. Anne ' s Academy, and during the war directed the Navy ' s physical training for the Third and Tenth Naval Dis- tricts. Lieutenants Ray Stoviak, football backfield and baseball coach; Gustave Zarnas, football line and wrestling coach; and Edwin Jucker, basketball coach, together with Chiefs Robert Patterson, Arthur Mer- cante, boxing instructors; Arthur Zeilinski, trainer; George Poulus, swimming coach, and Specialist first class Rocco Scalcione, swimming instructor, form the rest of the staff. Besides coaching, all of the instruc- tors teach physical training classes and give individual instructions in the various sports. To further increase the interest in sports, a series of intra-mural activities are fostered by the Department of Physical Training and Athletics. A spirit of fair play and sportsmanship is instilled in the Cadet-Midshipmen by these events which are supervised by the members of the athletic staff. Every possible means is used to advance the aims of the Department. A strong mind cannot live within a weak body — on this premise the physical training program is founded. A well-coordinated body gives a feeling of self confidence. To follow a Cadet-Midshipman ' s progress, along these lines, he must demonstrate mas- tery of a new sport at the periodic physical fitness examinations. Thus, throutrh the medium of individual initiative and super ' ised activities, the Department ' s goal is attained. The Department of Physical Training and Athletics is rapidly assuming a new role of importance in Acad- emv life. Released from the compulsion of wartime restrictions, when time was essential, it has met the problem of keeping the Cadet-Midshipmen in the best of physical condition with a realistic and practical program. Upper — Off at the gun! Lower — Nothing as invigorating as a pre-game warm-up ... so they tell us I A short period of convalescence proves relaxing on both mind and body Patten Hospilel SURROUNDED by a spacious and refreshing garden, Patten Hospital, equipped with the newest appa- ratus known to medicine, affords the finest care for those who become ill or suffer injuries. Few institutions can boast of ha ing more complete and modern facili- ties to turn to in times of emergency or sickness. Prevention rather than cure is more beneficial both to the Cadet-Midshipmen and the Medical Department. Following this idea, it has been the aim of the hospital personnel to maintain high health standards at Kings Point. With the aid of a course in Preventive Medi- cine sponsored by the department, a knowledge of per- sonal hygiene and first aid is required of all Cadet- Midshipmen. Every time the spear-like hypodermic needle, propelled by a pharmacist ' s mate, is plunged into the arm of a Cadet-Midshipman, disease is more thoroughly checked. Before Third Class sea training, and upon arrival for advanced courses at Kings Point, all Cadet-Midshipmen are given prescribed inoculations. In addition, periodic examinations of the body and teeth are made by the United States Public Health Service doctors, dentists, and nurses who staff Patten Hospital. The atmosphere is brightened by the nurses who cheerfully aid the recovery of their charges. The health of an organization is the logical criterion of the ability and efficiency of its hospital personnel. Consequently, to Lt. Comdr. Daley, Senior Medical Officer, and his staff, we extend our sincere appreci- ation and congratulations for a job well done. They have contributed in no small way to the success of this Academy and to our development as ships ' officers. 88 DR. D. DALEY U. Comdr. USPHS DR. J. S. MILLER Commander USPHS r mCwPl Cadet-Midshipmen receive excellent dental care under a sta ' ff of capable Public Health Service specialists Commander Miller, senior dental officer, supervising treatment i d Aid and Pneo Htioe. Meaicme T main purpose ot the instriKtioii in Prc cnti e Medicine and I ' list AiJ is to teach (iadet- Mulshipmeii the basic principles i)f mecUcal treatment for use in tune of emeri;encies. Tlie xast majority of merchant vessels at sea do not carry a physician as a member i)f the crew; therefore it is expedient to have personnel aboard who possess a thorou qh knowledge of first aid and preventive medicine. No attempt is made to produce graduates who will be able to act in the capacity of a physician, but Cadet-Midshipmen are furnished an understanding of the necessary principles for alleviating pain and maintaining life. Cadet-Midshipmen, First Class, receive thirty-five weeks of training in this course. The L ' nited States Maritime Service Hospital Corps School Manual, which has been used successfully during the past few years, is the principal text book upon which the course is based, while reference books containing information on minor surgery, fundamentals of health and hygiene are referred to throughout the lectures. Disease pre- vention, hygiene, and sanitation aboard ship, along with U.S. Public Health Service functions, constitute an important phase of the course. Instruction in sani- tary requirements and precautions in the handling and storing of food and water supplies affords the student a thorough knowledge of this subject, so that he will be able to preserve the best health conditions possible aboard his ship. A synopsis of the function and struc- ture of the human body terminates this necessary and important course. Applying traction splints W hile emphasis is placed on the prevention of disease, a great deal of time is spent co ering the im- mediate and prolonged treatment of all the many and varied bodily ills that may be encountered by the crew of a Merchant Vessel. Because of the very nature of their employment, it may often be many days before a seaman can be placed under the care of a physician. Consequently, general first aid practices, as taught on shore, are not adequate for a ship ' s officer, who must care for the health of his shipmates. Thus Kings Point men receive a course of study based upon that given to pharmacist ' s mates. In this way the main objectives of a first aider, those of easing pain, sustaining life, and transferring the patient to a doctor, are met. With the knowledge obtained from this study Kings Point graduates will undoubtedly have no trouble in uphold- ing the high health and sanitary stand- ards of the Merchant Marine. Out goes the bad air, in comes the good air " 89 t iriii Gltdfiel Father Madden giving daily Comnnunion to Cadet-Midshipmen VVTHHN your subjects are getting complicated and the whole world seems against you, you will hnd that a visit to the Chaplain can be a consoling thing indeed. Whether you bring a sea bag of com- plaints and woes or a matter of trivial importance, the members of the Chaplain start always have the right answers, and they send you down from the Sec- ond Deck of Wiley Hall feeling like a new man. Commander Leo W. Madden and Lt. (Commander Ralph O. Harpole, Kings Point ' s two Chaplains, have aided many a Cadet-Midshipman, not only in his re- ligious problems, but also in scholastic and social diffi- culties, where the guidance of an older and more experienced mind was needed. Every Sunday morning and on religious holidays, both Catholic and Protestant services are held t )r Cadet-Midshipmen. Since the present chapel, located in Wiley Hall, is quite small, and has an inadequate seating capacity, services attracting large attendances must be held in the auditorium of Bowditch Hall. In this large auditorium, a great part of the religious atmosphere is unavoidably lost. Consetjuently, in Kings Point ' s building plans of the future, layouts and drawings have been submitted for the construction of a new chapel with an adequate seating capacity, com- parable to the chapels at the three other Federal Acad- emies, Navy at Annapolis, Coast Ciuard at New Lon- don, and Army at West Point. In addition to the regular services held on Sundays, Father Madden, the Catholic Chaplain, says daily Mass and directs groups of religious discussion, for all Cadet-Midshipmen who wish to avail themselves of this privilege. Chaplain Harpole, when not administering to the spiritual needs of the Protestant Cadet-Midshipmen, handles the organization of the Serviceman ' s Christian League. Chaplain Harpole founded the League here at the Academy. Thus in this modern institution of learning, both the spiritual and temporal welfare of the Cadet- Midshipman is cared for and nourished for the future. In the years to come, when troubles beset us in the four corners of the world, we shall draw comfort and courage from the remembered words of our Kings Point (Chaplains. Proposed plans of new chapel soon to be erected ) =- . ». " " ' ' 1; ' .1 ' 1 lip in ' ' k ' h m tf Tfrft 90 riMH v JliLn a j-ilNCi: May, l id, wIkmi rlic rcoru.mi .ition aiul cx- Opaiisioii of tlie Libraiy was begun, the reinarkaWe growth in the [lumber of viilumes has been matched only by the extension of the services of the Academy Library program. At present the Library Department occupies the whole of the main deck of Bowditcli ILilI. Additional readmi; room area, greater shelf space, and cataloguing riioms ha e had to be added to keep up with the rate of expansion. I ' he progressive outlook of the young but experienced start of professional librarians has manifested itself in sucli modern methods and de ices as " con eyor belt " cataloguing, a process to record and classify books on .i mass production basis; the use of microfilm and mechanical readers for books and periodicals reproduced on space-saving film; extension of interlibrary loan relations to include the largest libraries in the east. The Library subscribes to -iOO periodicals and its present subscription list now meets accreditation standards. A modern feature of the periodical collec- tion is the possession of the New York Times on microfilm, from 19.t6 to current issues. Recommendations from faculty members and Cadet- Midshipmen recei e as much consideration in book purchasing as do the selections by the Library stati. The book collections, both supplementary instructional reading and extra-curricular recreational literature, have increased in size and have improved in quality. Certainly one of the most popular places in the Academy today is the expanded reading room area of the Library. Here the Regiment has available current newspapers and magazines, in addition to sets of back issues for reference work; an attractively displayed selection of new books; a comprehensive collection of basic reference books; the reserve book reading shelves; and the major part of the general collection. It is a common sight these days to see Cadet-Midshipmen Future home for the ever-growing volumes , . . 3 -1 Library L-R — Miss F. I. Martemucci, Miss C. V. Rodi, Miss M. E. Bitzer, Lt. L. E. Beiarano, Mr. R. F. Lane, Miss M. J. Sprake, Lt. (jg) J. P. Binnington. busily engaged in a mixed pursuit of educational re- search and reading pleasure. Projected for the near future, possibly early in 1948, is the new building, which will be located between Fulton and Bowditch Halls. In outward appearance it will resemble Delano Hall. The erection of this new building will complete the symmetry of buildings sur- rounding the campus quadrangle. Planned as the last word in modern library architecture, the building will also house the Academy Museum on the top deck. The new library, to be named the J. Harvey Tomb Memorial Library in honor of the Academy ' s first Superintendent, will more than meet the requirements for full accreditation of Kings Point as a college. It will exemplify one of Kings Point ' s protagonists, the late Captain J. Harvey Tomb, his principles and ideals through the printed word — the recorded experiences oi all i:reat men from whom we learn. 91 1 ] CAPTAIN B. M. DODSON, USMS Commanding Officer " On the course " A trim ship needs — IN April 1946, the United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps received the newest addition to its ever-expanding training fleet by the transfer of the U.S.S. Derosa, A.K.A. 27, from the Navy. Statistically this fine vessel measures 426 feet from bow to stern, has a cruising radius of 10,000 miles, and can reach a top speed of 17.5 knots when its two turbo-electric propulsion units are running at full capacity. However, history and not statistics decides whether a ship in war is a great vessel or not. In this respect the Derosa was not lacking. Her record in the Navy was as shining as the minor planet for which she was named. The Devosa was commissioned in the Navy in No- vember of 1944 and was immediately dispatched to the Pacific to take up her duties as part of the Fifth Fleet. During her first year of operation she visited every major American base in that area, safely deliver- ing both cargo and troops. She roamed far and wide in the path of duty and visited such widely spread ports as Tientsin, Tulagi, and Honolulu. The invasions of Okinawa and Haguski found the Devosa on the scene. It was here that she topped her brilliant and most unusual war record, that of never having lost a man. It was only at the war ' s conclusion that the Devosa was released from her duties and per- mitted a well-deserved rest. This rest was to be short lived. Immediately folK:iw- ing her decommissioning from the Na%y and subse- quent acquisition by the Cadet Corps, the Devosa was remanned by a crew of Cadet-Midshipmen and Academy officers who began the work of converting her to a training vessel. The work inxohed in this transformation was tre- mendous. Many months were required to reconvert, to put the vessel back into shipshape condition, and to change her battle gray to the peacetime hue that charac- terizes the Academy ' s " white fleet. " Finally on August 1st she was ready for christen- ing. The ceremony was brief but impres- sive. Mrs. Miriam Conway, mother of the first Cadet-Midshipman to lose his life while ser ing at sea in the Cadet Corps, came from her home in Charlotte, North Carolina, as a guest of the Regiment, to do the honors. In a few minutes time the U.S.S. Devosa officially became the T. V. Kh gs Poii Ur. On August 2nd, the day following re- commissit)ning, the Kings Pointer em- harked on her shake-down cruise, her first official ' oyage as an Academy essel. Tlie tr:p, which was of ten days duration. " Operation Christening " aluA A. Firing-up proved a huge success, the Kings Po ' mter performing admirably in the hands of her new crew. After a brief visit in each of the fine ports of Boston, Gloucester, and Provincetown, she returned to the Academy on Aucust 12. While aboard the vessel the Third Classmen re- ceived training in all the various phases of the work in ' olved in being a Deck or Engineering Officer. The emphasis is placed on the practical side, and the Cadet- Midshipmen rotate in the performance of the different jobs that constitute a ship ' s crew. Captain Dodson, Commanding Officer of the K ngs Pointer, appraised the function of the ship as " a floating laboratory. " The Kings Pointer did not remain long at anchor. Shortly after her shake-down cruise ended, plans were made for a training cruise. The ship was fitted out, provided with all the necessary stores, and on Decem- ber 2, 1946 the Kings Po nter. with sixty First Class- men and one hundred and eighty Third Classmen Heading out to sea aboard, set sail for an extended cruise to South Amer- ica. The trip covered a 17, ()(){) mile course, touching at the West Indies, Cuba, Venezuela, Colombia, and such famous ports in South America as Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires; Cristobal in the Canal Zone, Vera Cruz in JVIexico, and Hamilton, Bermuda. Four months later, on the twenty-fifth of March, 1947, the Kings Pni)iter returned to her newly constructed berth in Hague Basin at the Academy. The trip was successful from many standpoints. Be- sides renewing the sea-legs of the First Classmen, it gave them an interesting and educational " on the scene " study of Latin American trade and culture. The importance of this cannot be overestimated, for these future ships ' officers will ha e many dealings with our neighbors to the South, and a better under- standing of them both politically and economically is essential. The Kings Pointer will be a mediLim of training for thousands of Cadet-Mid- j shipmen in the years to come. On her decks will stand the men who will later man the bridges and engine rooms of the greatest Merch.int Marine in the world. She is indeed a ship with a great past and most certainly a ship with a future. The United States Merchant xMarine Cadet Corps will use her well. Dressed ship 95 1 A ' -l " ' I mm mrmm 1 ' PoAcJe, Hedi! " s ( ' i . v Oi4 i AdUaiiie Hctuutle6. Activities House Committee THi; Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Activities House is a building which has recently been delegated for the offices and meeting rooms of the Academy ' s organi- zations, and for the relaxation and recreation of the Cadet-Midshipmen. The Activities House is supervised by a committee headed by the Regimental Morale Officer, and consisting of the three Battalion Morale Officers and a group of First and Second Classmen. Many problems have been solved by the use of this house, for in the past years, Kings Point ' s publication staffs have had their offices spread throughout the Academy grounds. Now these organizations are situ- ated in one building with rooms suitable for their activities. The staffs of AUdships and PoLiris are located on the second deck of the building. Midships, the Academy ' s yearbook, is published semi-annually, while Polaris. Kings Point ' s magazine, is published monthly. Each department of these publicaticMis has its own offices, conveniently located adjacent to each other so as to provide a well-organized and working staff. The Philosopher ' s Club and the Propeller Club meet in their own pri- vate rooms regularly. The Radio Club is also pro- vided quarters in which a complete amateur radio set has been constructed by its members. In addition to housing the many extra-curricular organizations of the Acad- emy, the Activities House contains other features for the relaxation and en- joyment of leisure hours for the Cadet-Midship- men. The house is a large two-story building with a great number of rooms. There are four large rooms located on the main deck and one ' ery spacious glass-en- closed veranda. One of these rooms, contain- ■ ing two billiard tables and t)ther necessary equipment, is set aside for those Cadet-Mid- shipmen who wish to play billiards. There is also a comfortable reading room in which a large selection of books, including many of the latest novels, is afforded for the Cadet- Midshipmen ' s reading enjoyment. The larg- est room in the house was recently redecorated and contains a piano, radio-phonograph, and an assort- ment of magazines and periodicals. The Acti ' ities House is decorated with plaques, ship models, and nu- merous pictures of different types of ships and scenes of sea life. A feeling of friendship and neighborliness presides throughout the Activities House because it is one of the few places that the Cadet-Midshipmen can go for relaxation and pleasure. Regimentation and class rates are completely forgotten once inside. The Cadet- Midshipmen, however, must abide by certain rules and regulations concerning their personal conduct and the use of equipment. The Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Activities House has as- sumed the role of a focal point for all non-athletic extra-curricular organizations, hi the years to come, with the advancement of the present clubs and the addition of new ones, Cadet-Midshipmen will always find a wide assortment of activities in which they can interest and enjoy themselves. Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Activities House 100 Ra id Om; of the most important orr;.mizations at Kings Point is the Cadet-Midshipman BanLJ. hi tiie past, the Academy ' s hand lias been composed entirely of enhsted personnel; however, this year the assignment of con- structing a marching band was given to the Regiment. The Cadet-Midshipman members of the newly organized band proved that they were highly capable of supplying the excellent music to which Kings Point was accustomed. Playing daily for morning color formations is one of the band ' s traditional functions. The excellent marching and playing of the band also add an inter- esting element to the Regimental reviews. In addition to performing at these events, its contribution to the morale of the Regiment at football games is incalcu- lable. The familiar strains of the Mariner ' s Victory March, which is played after the scoring of each Kings Point touchdown, supplies warmth to the game on a cold autumnal Saturday afternoon. The band ' s rendition of ever-popular college pep songs, and its performances during the half, add to the color and enjoyment of the football games. Kings Point ' s Drum Major, ace baton twirler Victor Mavar, and his excel- lent baton drill have become a regular feature at the games, and his performance of twirling two batons simultaneously has thrilled the spectators. Among its other notable accomplishments, the Cadet-Midshipman Band in conjunction with the drill team has put on exhibitions at the Yankee Stadium and New York ' s Rivoli Theater, where they were loudly applauded for their excellent performance. One of the outstanding features of the band is that " Strike up the band " Cadet-Midshipman Band its members, while at Kings Point, can continue their activities in the field of music. The Cadet-Midshipmen of the band gain valuable experience under the ex- cellent tutorship of Bandmaster Frank F. Kutak. Chief Kutak is an authority on marching bands and martial music, and has played under the baton of many notable conductors. This year the members of the Band formed a dance orchestra which has been greatly appreciated by the Regiment. The dance orchestra plays at Sunday after- noon tea dances, at basketball games, and at football pep rallies. The dance orchestra, which might be called the band within a band, has developed into a smooth functioning organization which has done much for the entertainment of the Regiment. The members of the Cadet-Midshipman Band are: Director: Chief Musician F. Kutak; Manager: R. Fitz- gerald; Drum Major: V. Mavar; Trumpets: D. Faul- haber, J. Hardee, W. Shaw, V. Steed, K. Bournazian, W. Jenkins, R. Marino, A. Nylander, G. Rehm, R. Steffan, R. Steuer, R. Young; Trombones: F. Cho, A. Auk, J. Corwin, P. Ford, A. Lefkowitz, F. Munroe; French Horns: M. Drucker, ' W. Ferguson; Baritone Horn: F. Marker; Tubas: G. Farrington, J. Heaton; Clari- nets: R. Dittrick, H. Falken- berry, G. Graff, C. Jones, H. Stone, J. Beall, R. Blume, R. Brustein, O. Clements. J. Conk- ling, H. Dorney, R. Greer, ' W. Mertz, J. Schliaf, C. McGuigan; Saxophones: E. Donath, B. Jackson, A. Pvrcli. B. Toomey; F u cs: L. Wojan, J. Rey- nolds; Piccolo: R. Lahren; Per- cussion: B. Beck, H. Gurland, T. Knee, H. Roller, J. Rus- sell, J. Snyder, T. Schwartz- man, R. (iorvina, C. Swenson, P. Smith. 101 Just plain camera shy CAMi-RA fans are a social group of individuals. They like to get together with others who share their hobby and discuss the latest improvements in equipment, methods, and technique. Small wonder then that one of the oldest and most successful organi- zations at Kings Point is the ever-growing Camera Club. The purpose of the club is two-fold. Besides the aforementioned idea of providing a common meeting place for all Cadet-Midsh ipmen who are interested in the art, the club furnishes the means by which ex- pensive equipment may be bought and shared by its members without the burden of heavy costs to the individual. Thus Cadet-Midshipmen have at their disposal the most modern equipment and supplies. The Academy grounds furnish various types of ex- cellent photographic subjects. This enables the club members to gain valuable experience during their free time. The Camera Club also has a studio at its disposal for those members who wish to do portrait work. The club holds weekly meetings in the Lounge in the Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Activities House. At these meetings, presided over by the president of the organi- zation, Cadet-Midshipman Burghardt, " and attended by Lt. Martin, Officer- Adviser, the plans for the future are conceived and molded. The activities of the club are numerous; besides pro- viding photographers for the various Academy publications, the club is ever busy taking pictures at the Regimental Dances, the reviews, and all tlie sports events. Thus, an interesting and educational hobby is made available by the Camera Club. Few other activities at the Acad- emy offer so much to the Cadet-Mid- shipman. 102 eacUl4ij Socieiif t; hi; purpose of debating is to give the participants an opportunity to meet otiiers and to discuss timely issues with a iew toward improving their ability to think quickly and to speak publicly, and, no less important, to advance their understanding of the topic. The Kings Point Debating Society is doing just that. Originated in 1945, the society now holds regular meetings every Friday evening. Early in the season, the society, at a special meeting, chose those topics which it would prepare for debates with other colleges, and also elected its officers for this year. For the 1946-1947 debate season Cadet-Midship- man Dunworth was elected Manager of the team and Cadet-Midshipman Field, Secretary. The topics debated this year are: " Resolved: That Labor Be Given a Greater Hand in the Man- agement of Industry, " " Resolved: That the Govern- ment of the United States Adopt a Policy Leading toward the Establishment of Free Trade Among the Nations of the World, " and " Resolved: That the Fed- eral Government Should Provide a System of Complete Medical Care Available to All Citizens at Public Ex- pense. " The team is prepared to defend both the Affirm- ative and Negative of these topics. Lt. O. D ' Esopo, USMS, the team ' s Officer-Adviser, attends all meetings and lends his skill and experience to the team ' s preparation for Intercollegiate Debates. On December 12th, 1946, Cadet-Midshipman Dun- worth and Cadet-Midshipman Field debated the subject of Free Trade on Radio Station WNYC with members of the New York Uni ' ersity Debate Team. In January and February of 1947, the Kings Point team met such well-known adversaries as Columbia, Yale, Harvard, Pennsylvania, Army, and Navy. Verba non acta ItlL For mation Anchor WHEN years slip by and we reminisce of inir days at the Academy, of the halftime acti ities at the home football games, and of the re iews, we shall al- ways remember the Rifle Company. As the Regiment passes in review, the precision per- formances of the Drill Team always thrill the onlook- ers. Included in their repertoire of special formations are Queen Anne Salutes, by the ripple marches. To The Winds March, Flare Eights, and other intricate maneu- vers which were originated by the team under the su- pervision and capable leadership of their drillmaster. Lieutenant (jg) Horton Spurr. The Cadet-Midshipmen of the Rifle Company are chosen for their ability to master the difficult drills re- quired of its members. Only those who show proficiency with rifles and in marching are selected. Much of their free time is devoted to further increasing their skill and accuracy. Marching not only during reviews, but also during half-time at the football games, they contribute greatly to the enjoyment of these activities. Thousands cheered them at Yankee Stadium, where they entertained the crowd with their perfectly co-ordinated exhibition. We kicjht shoulder arms! of the Academy know, but few of the spectators realize how much time and effort are expended by the team in perfecting these maneuvers. Using a recipe with the ingredients of hard work, tedious hours, and continuous practice, the Ritle Com- pany has been molded into an exactly developed Drill Team. Through the efforts of its Cadet-Midshipman members, the entire Regiment has received overwhelm- ing praise. The members of the Rifle Company are: Company Commander, J. Norman; C.P.O., R. Wright; G. P. O., J. Dow die; 1st Platoon Commander, R. Kern; 2nd Platoon Commander, C. Jordan; C. Bassett, W. Beck- meir, M. Bell, A. Boerum, B. Bouchard, R. Boulogne, B. Brooks, J. Byrne, T. Cassidy, I. Cigliano, C. Crow, E. Daubert, R. Delozier, W. Dickmson, R. Essler, J. Filby, G. Gilman, W. Glennon, F. Glocke, D. Glower, G. Hazard, R. Hellweg, R. Hertzberg, R. Irving, L. Jones, D. Klonick, H. Knopp, J. LaMay, G. Lemon, A. Lindeman, J. McBrearty, C. Martin, G. Meisner, S. Mrus, J. Murray, F. Niziak, S. Pappas, A. Perkins, W. Rees, P. Robertson, T. Rohrer, L. St.Amand. S. Safer- stem, W. Sahl, F. Schmidt, W. Sigler, N. Skotynsky, H. Starnes, W. Streat, F. Sudholt, A. Taddei, G. Van- Fleet, W. Vaughn, B. White, M. Wilkinson, and F. Zehnder. Queen Anne Salute! Afe ?«AA _ TnTTTnTTtii rf »f 1 1 wn 103 mw PluLoAjOyfdveAX CluA Do, re, me, fa. sol glee eiuA CADHT-MiDSHiPMEN at the Academy who are inter- ested in group singing have an opportunity to engage in this type of activity by participating in the choral renditions of the Cadet-Midshipman Glee Club. This group of approximately thirty men was organ- ized in its present form in the Summer of 1946, and is under the able directorship of Cadet-Midshipman Paul W. Thayer, who is assisted by Cadet-Midshipman J. P. O ' Neil, the Club Manager. Cadet-Midshipman Philip Dieter, who is well known at Kings Point for his musical ability, acts as piano accompanist. Lt. (jg) G. P. Copeland, USMS, formerly acted as Officer- Adviser to the Glee Club, however he was succeeded by Lt- (jg) J- M. Farrell , USMS, in the Fall of 1946. The Cadet-Midshipmen Glee Club specializes in Negro spirituals and sea chanties, but also maintains a repertoire of semi-classical and popular numbers in order to be able to present well-balanced programs. In addition to performing on very short notice at the memorial services for Captain J. Harvey Tomb, USN Ret ' d, first Superintendent of the Academy, the Cadet-Midshipman Glee Club assisted at the December graduation. At Captain Nerney ' s first Smoker in the latter part of November, the club presented two nautical se- lections entitled " Eight Bells " and " Away to Rio, " the latter dedicated to those Cadet-Midshipmen making the trip to South America on the T. V. Kings Po ' niter. The Cadet-Midshipman Cilee Club in the past year has matured into a well- balanced and efficient organizatit)n, and it has received much praise for the excel- lent entertainment which it has presented to the Regiment. Future plans of the Glee Club include possible concerts outside the Academy at various colleges and universities. 104 t: ' hi; Philosopher ' s Club is primarily a rec- reational acti ' ity for the enligiitenment of C adet-Midshipmen in the field of con- structi e thought as applied to modern living. Established during the past academic year under the leadership of Lt. R. J. Carroll, it has since matured into a firmly established activity at the Academy along witii its re- cently organized sub-division, the Current E ents Discussion Group. The meetings of the club are so conducted that they are comparatively informal and are, in fact, merely discussions among the Cadet-Midshipmen relative to the particular topic of philosophy or current events under consideration at the time. In the case of the Philosophy group, these topics are concerned largely with seeking out the truth and beauty of life as discovered by the philosophers of the past and present. In the case of the Current Events Discussion Group, they discuss the political and geographical events occurring in the world today, with an eye to their effects on the course of our lives. Meetings are held weekly and speakers who have had experience throughout the world in various arts and sciences are introduced. These men have interesting tales to tell, and a great deal of knowledge is received by at- tending these informal get-togethers. It is anticipated that in the future, other well-known people in their re- spective fields will participate in the discussions and so give the club members the benefit of their knowledge and experience. In regard to the moderators, four very well qualified officers are serving in this capacity, namely, Lt. K. Wilson and Lt. J. P. Walsh for the Philosophy group, and Lt. W. Von Gronau and Lt. (jg) W. W. Wiard Jr., for the Current Events Discussion Group. With the splendid leadership enjoyed by this activity, and the in- terest which it can be made to hold for club members, the Philosopher ' s Club is certain to remain one of the important recreational clubs at the Academy. Time out for thought THE Kings Point Propeller Club is one unit of a world-wide organization founded in 1923, which is dedicated to the advancement of the Merchant Marine and the men who sail American ships. Kings Point is one of the student " ports " in a network of Propeller Clubs extending throughout the country. This is in line with the club ' s educational and social pro- gram, and its mission of bringing home to American youth the opportunities to be found in the American Merchant Marine. Each club, although part of the larger organization, has a distinctive character of its own. So it is with the Kings Point Unit. From its inception in 1943, the Propeller Club has had as sponsors Captain Mahady, Commander Mc- Time out while we change the reel Propeller Club Cready, and other ranking officers of the Cadet Corps. Its activities have included such varied social functions as dances, picnics, weekly movies which feature re- vivals of well-known pictures, and smokers, where Propeller Club members can get to know each other and discuss current topics of the shipping industry. The club, in its educational function, has aided Cadet- Midshipmen to understand what it means to be part of the Cadet Corps, which, in turn, is part of the greatest Merchant Fleet in the world. Regular open meetings are held bi-weekly in the club room on the upper deck of the Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Acti ities House. This room is furnished with com- fortable chairs and is supplied with magazines pub- lished by the shipping industry. The club room is open to members during free hours, and is in constant use as a study and a recreational room. Refreshments are served 105 m (ladio. CluL REFLECTING the general desire of Kings Point to expand in its accomplishments and to make itself known nationally, the Radio Club is ad- vancing rapidly toward the achievement of its as- pirations. Under the tutelage of Lt. (jg) D. A. Hill, LISMS, a group of Cadet-Midshipmen began last September to form an organization which would func- tion integrally with the needs of the Academy, and which would take a more active part in Academy extra- curricular work. Meetings of the Radio Club are held in their labora- tory in the Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Activity House. During the course of the work done by the members, any inter- esting points in the mechanism of radio sets that happen to come up are discussed and gone over thoroughly un- der the guidance of Lt. Hill. A complete work bench with electrical instruments and tools is available to these radio-minded Cadet- Midshipmen. At present the members are acquiring ex- perience, and aiding their fellow cadets by converting the small desk radios scattered throughout the Regi- ment, to radio-phonograph units. A Constitution for the Radio Club has been drawn up, and officers elected. Cadet-Midshipman Besch has been elected President, Cadet-Midshipman Story, Vice- President and Cadet-Midshipman Cordiner, Secretary- Treasurer. The Constitution of the club has been sub- mitted to the Deputy Superintendent for approval, and application made to the Federal Communications Com- mission for permission to operate an amateur station. This station will make Kings Point a name in the cir- cles of amateur radio, and will be a worthwhile method of sending messages to all points about the nation. 106 Operation breakdown Hlj Clua THE United States Merchant Marine Academy Rifle and Pistol Team was organized in response to the interest shown in firearms by a large group of Cadet- Midshipmen. The Rifle and Pistol Team had a heavy schedule be- fore it. This schedule included matches with the Uni- versity of South Carolina, 71st Infantry Veteran ' s Asso- ciation, 4th Infantry New York Guard, New York Uni- versity, U.S. Naval Academy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S. Coast Guard Academy, U.S. Military Academy, University of Oklahoma, and Rens- selaer Polytechnic Institute. ' Ready, set, Rr litO oott pleic r WlKjoljcuK neA.6. THL Windjammers is an organization for Cadet-Midshipmen in which all the arts and skill of sailing; are taiit ht and mastered. Before the development of the steamship, a thoroiii h knowledge of sailing was the most important and ncccessary subject for men of the Merchant Marine to acquire. Now, with the courses based upon the propulsion and navigation of steam and diesel vessels, the art of sailing is sometimes thought of as an ancient science. The aim of the Windjammers is to instruct the Cadet-Midshipmen in the technical and practical aspects of sailing and to restore some of the tradition of the golden days of the fleet of graceful American Clipper ships, which at one time were the queens of the sea. The Windjammers have their own clubhouse, com- plete with galley, salon, sail loft, and furniture, for the leisure of the club members. The clubhouse is located on the shore of beautiful Long Island Sound, which is reputed to be one of the finest sailing grounds in the country. The club has access to various types of sailing vessels including the T. V . Robert Forbes, a stay- sail schooner, the sloop Pandora, and twenty sailing dinghies, ten of which were purchased this season. The Cadet-Midshipmen utilize their vessels for intercol- legiate competition, leisure sailing, and inter-club meets. All the sailing ships are maintained solely by the mem- bers of the club. Caulking, scraping, painting, and care of canvas are but a few of the numerous tasks exercised by the Cadet-Midshipmen who endeavor to keep their ships in the peak of condition. LInder the super isii)n Info the winds in nei n windjammers of Commander Litchfield, the club ' s Officer-Adviser, informal meetings are held at which time sailing in- structions are offered. The Windjammers participated in numerous races throughout the season. The T. V . Robert Forbes cap- tured third place in actual competition and fifth place t)n corrected time at the Nantucket Sailing Race. In the race from City Island to Stratford Shoals, the T.F. Robert Forbes attained sixth place on corrected time. LJnder an able crew of Cadet-Midshipmen, the schooner Robert Forbes placed fourth on corrected time over the course from Huntington Yacht Club to Stratford Shoals. The achievements of this past year have added much praise to the record of the Windjammers. Through the successful participation in these sailing races, sponsored by many eastern seaboard yacht clubs, it is the earnest endeavor of the members of the Wind- jammers to prove to all that Kings Point has one of the finest sailing teams in the country. T. V. Forbes W. Condon, Lt. R. J. Carroll, USMS, N. Wylie PoIgaH NAVIGATORS since the time of the Phoenicians have depended upon the rehitive stabihty of the North Star, PoLiris, to guide them over the trackless seas. At least to seamen, it is the best known star in the heavens. Hence, the name Polaris for the official publication of the United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps has been accepted. Polaris has traveled a long way on the road to good journalism since August, 1942, when it emerged as an eight-page embryo. First conceived in the minds of a small group of Cadet-Midshipmen in June of 1942, it rolled its initial issue off the press in August of that year. Its circulation of nine-hundred copies was dis- tributed mostly about the Academy, with a few copies going to Cadet Corps officials in Washington. Today over five thousand copies are sent out each month, not only to the Academy and Washington, but also to the Cadet Schools at San Mateo and Pass Christian; to the District Supervisors in New Orleans, New York, and San Francisco; and to thousands of homes through- out the country. The early history of Polaris is one of small begin- nings expanded quickly into a widely read publication of recognized importance, which covers efficiently and exhaustively its particular field. The Cadet-Midshipman founders of the magazine saw the possibilities and laid the groundwork for its production during the Sum- mer of 1942. They contacted leaders in the advertising and pubiisiiing world and soLight adxicc. Long ht)urs were spent in arranging the format, and in accruing pictures, features, columns, and news stories. The first issue consisted of eight pages and contained congratulatory statements, a summary of life at the Academy, and se eral pictures. It was received with enthusiasm by the Regiment, and thus the staff went to work on the second edition with renewed incentive. During 1943 national advertising became increasingly prominent in its pages. Its content began to retiect wider interests, and a more mature outlook. Stories of interest to the entire field of shipping appeared as well as complete news of activities within the Regiment. Within the short span of a year, Polaris had advanced from an idea to a well-established position in the Cadet Corps. Polaris has a definite commitment to the maritime field, but it is devoted primarily to the corps of Cadet- Midshipmen. It is published by Cadet-Midshipmen, for consumption of Cadet-Midshipmen, and describes the activities, serious and hunwrous, of the Regiment. This fundamental precept is the basis of the editorial policy that governs all material used in the magazine. Its objective is to record for public recognition the purposes, growth, and success of the Academy. To do this. It must command the enlivened interest of the Cadet-Midshipmen, graduates of Kings Point, and all readers in other phases of American life who will turn to Polaris as the ofticial publication of the Cadet Corps. Of necessity, a large, complex, and well-organized staft ' is required to carry out these objectives. While the stafi is made up entirely of Cadet-Midshipmen, an enlisted man is retained to assist in the make-up, layout, and final editing of all the copy. Lt. R. J. Carroll, who in November, 1946, sucxeeded Lt. Com- mander Leo B. Guelpa as Oflicer-Adviser, supervises Polaris ' s overall production. General responsibility for publication of each month ' s issue rests with the Editor-in-Chief and the Managing Editor. It is their job to coordinate the activities of the staff editors; to make dispositions for future stories. 108 co ' ers, and pictures; and to act as special cmoys be- tween Poliiris and the Regiment. Polaris was ft)rtunate this year in getting off to a good start with an Editor-in-Ciiief wiio believed that a well-organized staff was essential to publish a maga- zine successfully aiul who was able to fulfill the re- sponsibility placed t)ii his shoulders. Accepting the position of Editor-in-Chief, after being unanimously selected by the Board oi Editors in early May of last year. Cadet-Midshipman Raymond L. Grismcr soon verified their confidence in hini by making a determined and sustained effort to improve PoLivis. In a short time not only were the appearance and content of the publi- cation improved, but staff members gradually realized that many of their tasks were becoming easier to accom- plish. All who have been associated with Ray Grismer will long remember him as a sincere and industrious worker. The magazine ' s competent Managing Editor dur- ing the latter part of this year was Cadet-Midshipman William M. Condon. Starting out on the Circulation Staff while a Second Classman and rising to Circu- lation Manager in May of last year. Bill ' s business- like manner soon had his staff functioning smoothly. He became Managing Editor in October when that position was vacated by Cadet-Midshipman Frank S. Dubois, who retired to prepare for graduation. Directly beneath and responsible to the Editor-in- Chief are the editors and managers of the various departments. News, features, and most of the written material are handled through the News Editor and his staff of reporters. The News Editor delegates assign- ments at the beginning of each nmnrh ' s edition, and revises and edits the articles before submitting them to the Editor-in-( hief for final approval. As News Editor, Cadet-Midshipman Henry Trombka shouldered the responsibility of setting up a completely new organization to gather and write articles and stories for P iLivis. That he did his job well is evidenced by the high c.iliber of the material contained in PoLiiis during the first h.ilf of this acatleniic year. Slated for the position of Editor-in-Chief in midwinter, " Hank " was chosen to go on the South American cruise of the T. V . Kings Pointer, thus depriving him of the oppor- tunity to take the job which all who had worked with him knew he would have fulfilled capably. News of Regimental activity in the intramural and intercollegiate sports field is reported by the Sports Staff, who handle this type of material exclusively. Cadet-Midshipman Elmer Schlein, who was gradu- ated with the December Class of 19i6, headed this staff for most of last year. The Advertising Staff ' endeavors to get as many nationally known products advertised in the maga- zine ' s pages as possible. It is through this paid adver- tising that Polaris is able to keep its budget and pay the extra costs of special editions and full-color covers which add immeasurably to the value of the publication. Cadet-Midshipman Norman Wylie headed the Adver- tising Staff and did a fine job in that department before succeeding to the Editor-in-Chief ' s chair in December of last year. Starting as a Second Classman on the Polaris Staff 109 " ' RAYMOND GRISMER EdIfor-in-Chlef JOHN KRAMER Art Editor WILLIAM CONDON Managing Editor Advertising Staff early in 1946, he soon became Adver- tising Manager and held that position until he became Editor-in-Chief. Due to his efforts, the Advertising Staff functioned smoothly and efficiently while soliciting advertising for the magazine. Responsibility for the distribution of Polaris rests with the Circulation Staff, who each month send hun- dreds of magazines to subscribers in all parts of the world. In conjunction with the Public Relations Staff, under the able guidance of Cadet-Midshipman Russell Baker, spark-plug of the entire organization, they pro- vide magazines for sale in the Canteen, at Academy sports events, and in news stores in Great Neck and surrounding towns. Polaris now has a circulation of approximately five thousand copies, making it one of the largest publications of its type in the country. A large part of this circulation goes to members of the marine industry v ho are greatly interested in the Cadet Corps. Thus Polaris is fulfilling its primary aim by pub- licizing Kings Point and its Regiment of Cadet- Midshipmen in the maritime world, where such pub- licity can most usefully be directed. Taking over where Bill Condon left off, when he became Managing Editor, Cadet-Midshipman Rt)bcrt Knorr contributed in large measure to Polaris ' s success. Hob h.uulled his job of Circulation Manager in fine style and added to the congenial atmosphere of the office. The Art and Photography Staffs are concerned with improving the " eye appeal " of Polaris. They pro ' ide pictures and drawings to accompany each month ' s stories, work out cover ideas and center spreads, and wo rk closely with the News Staff and the Editors. Before leaving to record pictorially the cruise of the T. V. Kings Pointer. Cadet-Midshipman John J. Menig was responsible for many of the covers and attractive center spreads featured in the summer and fall issues of Polaris. Not soon to be forgotten are his many fine pictures of sports events, and excellent shots of visiting personages. John seemed to have that skill required of all photographers, which enabled him to take in- teresting, newsworthy pictures. Not only does Polaris represent the work of First and Second Classmen at the Academy, but it also con- tains two sections de oted to the U.S. Merchant Marine Cadet Corps Basic Schools at Pass Christian and San Mateo. This material is gathered and written by Cadet-Midshipmen, Fourth Class. The Polaris staff at Kings Point consists mainly of the Cadet-Midshipmen who have contributed to the magazine during their Fourth Class training. The Board of Governors of Polaris consists of a group of officers whose duty it is to control the policies and organization of Polaris and to approve any changes made in them. They also check each issue before it goes to press and again before publication. The Board of Gox ' ernors is composed oi the following officers of the Academy; The Deputy Superintendent, The Execu- tive Officer, The Setretarv of the Academic Board, 10 W J JOHN MENIG Photography Editor NORMAN WYLIE Editor-in-Chief ROBERT KNORR Circulation Manager The Regimental Officer, The Officer-Adviser of PfiLins. and the Officer in charge of the print shop. The Edi- tors of Polaris act in an advisory capacity to this Board. In subject matter, Polaris endeavors to cater to a wide range of interest. There is continual striving on the part of the editors to bring to its pages technical articles on all phases of marine engineering, navigation, ship construction, and architecture. Within the Academy Polaris offers complete cover- age of all Kings Pomt and Cadet Corps Basic School functions and acts as an unofficial sounding board of Regimental opinion. Each month short stories, poems and book reviews are included in a balanced, readable ft)rmat. Authors, company executives, maritime officials, and other important personages are interviewed in its pages. Thus, as Polaris enters it fifth year of publication, it is fully aware of the extent of its responsibility. Its Editors firmly believe that the goals it has set are the highest that any such publication can hope to achieve. Hand in hand with the United States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps, PoLiris is moving forward to share in that " era of new glory " presaged for the United States Merchant Marine. JOHN HARDEE Office Manager RUSSELL BAKER, JR. Public Relations HENRY TROMBKA News Editor III t - 5F Gerald Davis, Lt. (jg) V. E. Tyson, USMS 1947 MukUifH, T VA ' ' ,f is the yearbook of Kings Point as well ■L tJL as the logbook of its graduating classes. Pub- lished annually, it provides a permanent record of the Academy, both for underclassmen and officers, as well as for those who graduate. All work on the book is done by Cadet-Midshipmen. The Editor-in-Chief, elected by the staff, supervises both the financial and literary phases of the book. He is assisted by a Managing Editor, a Business Manager, and six Department Heads. An Officer-Adviser, se- lected by the Executive Officer, provides mature judg- ment and assistance. The staff varies in size from forty to sixty members, dependent upon the amount of work to be done. The work is performed during free time and study hours. This, the fourth annual edition of Midships, is the first to be produced under peacetime conditions. Work on the 1947 Midships was begun last August after the dummy of the preceding edition had been finally approved and sent to the printer for publica- tion. The Department Heads spent many a weary hour that month in Editor Davis ' little office on the top deck of the Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Activities House, de- veloping the basic theme and plans for the book. Mean- while, the Photography Department supervised the photographing of the graduates by the White Studios, of New York, so that when a printer was finally se- lected, there would be no delay involved in the prepa- ration of the " Graduates " section of the book. Ed Midships Staff lA M JOHN KAUFMAN, Photography Editor ARMIN RESCHENBERG Layout Editor JOHN DIEBOLD Editorial Manager CECIL JONES Managing Editor Thoma of White Studios photographed the last of the prospective graduates at the end of August. Page as- signments were replanned innumerable times, and when they were finally organized into workable form, the staff set about to select a printer and an engraver. After several weeks of countless interviews, tours of inspection, letters, phone calls and conferences, the Staff selected Mr. W. L. Schilling of the Conway Print- ing Company as the man to solve their printing prob- lems. Mr. Stauch of the Royal-Jones Photo Engraving Corporation was to handle the engravings for the book. Now the book entered the stage of active produc- tion, with all members of the Editorial Stat?, under Managing Editor Cecil Jones, exerting every effort to do in three months a job that had taken nine months on the preceding edition. The present, and relatively experienced staff, were to be graduated almost en masse in December, and it was necessary to complete most of the hook before they retired to sit for their licenses if full advantage was to be taken of their working knowledge. The Photography Department, the first department to turn out finished work for the book, soon had taken most of the pictures for the " Academic " and " Adminis- tration " sections of the book. They were greatly as- sisted in this work by Mrs. White ' s photographers, Mr. Thoma and Mr. Sabik, who spent several days at the Academy taking classroom pictures, in addition to their other work. Armed with the proof prints of these pictures, page assignments and rough plans, as whipped into final shape by Gerald Davis, our Editor-in-Chief, we began LOUIS LITZLER Editor-In-Chlef KENNETH GAM Editor-in-Chief I 13 a round of conferences with Mr. Schilling, from whai our layouts and subsequent word counts emerged John T. Diebold, Head of the Editorial Departmeiii prepared an elaborate and complete form-and-style pamphlet to permit standardization of all copy. Under his general supervision, the arious articles were as- signed and completed. After each article had been as- signed, it was written in rough draft, then proofread and trimmed to the correct length, before being re- typed for Administrative approval. Then each article was submitted to the Academy Department Head con- cerned, and from him, was forwarded to our Executive Officer, Captain Nerney, who granted final approval on the material. It is a point of credit to the staff that ery few corrections indeed were made to copy after the final typing. Jim Ard in particular deserves a com- mendation for the excellent work he performed in rounding up and supervising the detailed preparation of all copy, filling in the blank spaces where needed. and generally assuming much responsibility in the Edi- torial Department. Paul Van Zwaluwenburg wrote the articles about the Department of Engineering, the Rifle and Pistol Club, and the Glee Club; while R. C. Whitten pre- pared the Department of Naval Science and the Phi- losopher ' s Club write-ups. The essay on the Depart- ment of Nautical Science was prepared by Edwin Allen, and Edwin Goldberg prepared the stories about Patten Hospital, the Department of Physical Training and Athletics, and the Drill Company. John Faigle wrote the essays concerning the Preventive Medicine and First Aid course, the Department of Ship Management, And so the trials and tribulations of Midships were passed on Board of Editors the Chapel, the Cadet-Midshipmen Activities House, and the Windjammers Club. Arthur Goldblum pre- pared the articles about the T. V. Kifigs Pohiter. the Department of History and Languages, and the Library, while Arthur Field authored the Propeller Club and Band write-ups. As soon as the layouts were approved by the staff, they were turned over to the Layout Department under the direction of Armin Reschenberg, and later led by Louis B. Litzler. These men and their staff, including Barrington Cronin, Al Boerum, Robert Stromf, James Feltrup, P. S. Rankin, Alfred Brown, William Nicker- son, John J. O ' Rourke, Julian Patrick, Abraham Rapp, Elmer Schwartz, Floyd Weber, and R. A. Weber, tran- scribed all the printer ' s layouts into our own dummy, kept track of all photographs and copy to be used in the book, and cropped and mounted many of the more complicated boards for the engra ' er. The " Graduates " section of the book was prepared under the general supervision of John Murray, Regi- mental Editor. He and his staff, including Webb Mor- rison, Lawrence Zinaman, Kenneth P. Jones and John Russell, spent many long hours organizing, alpha- betizing, checking the graduates ' pictures and write- Lips, and proofreading and typing the list of facts and activities about each graduate that appears ith his picture in the last pages of the book. When John Murray retired from the staff in November tcj board the 7 F ' . K iigs Poniltf. John Prelc succeeded him and completed the excellent job of w ork this section of the book represents. One of the hardest working crews on our staff was the Photography Department, working under Pho- tography Editor John Kauffman. He and his staff, in- cluding Robert Arnstein. Russell Schulke, John Spencer, C. G. Alvey, and William Acosta, not only supervised 114 Uiiil ««a all tlic i r.iduatcs ' photi)i;iaphs uikI otlR-r putiircs taken by the Wliite Studies, but also were responsible for all the activities, sports, .nni iiiFormal pictures in the book. Working long and late in their Wiley-Hall dark- room, they turned out some of the finest pictures in our hies in record time dnd often under (he most diffi- cult of conditions. The cover design (or this edition is an artist ' s elabo- ration on a design worked up by the staff, and includes ,1 modification of a design in bronze relief by Jo David- son for the GiilLiul Ship. The cover is " MoUoy Made, " and was obtained through Mr. Allis of the S. K. Smith Company. By the middle of No ' ember, all the material tor the first hundred pages had been planned in detail, and all copy sent to the printer. When the last of the officer-group photographs had been taken in the middle of the month, the file of engra ' ings was completed, and this section of the book went to press in December. The " Graduates " section also was completed in November, and printed about the same time. Only the " Sports " sectit)n and the advertisements remained in skeleton form when the senior members of the staff were graduated in December. These were completed by the succeding staff and turned in to the printer in early February to permit publication of this edition on schedule. All this time, the Circulation and Advertising Staffs had not been idle. During their tenure of office they succeeded in paying off a debt of $2500 left over from the 19-i5 edition as well as raising the funds for the current book. The Circulation Staff, led by Circulation Manager Thomas Kundinger and later James Tierney, had to worry not only about this edition, but had to handle the distribution of the 1946 edition as well. All through the tall they kept up the records and receipts of the hitter volume, and upon its puhlkatioii on the Novem- ber payday, set to W(;rk to ship out the seemingly in- numerable copies that had been ordered by graduates and friends of the Academy. When the final tally was made, every one of the ! 200 copies printed had been sold or accounted for, an achievement of which the staff may well be proud. The Circulation Staff included Robert Owen, R. W. Tinger, George Olsen, W. D. Wayne, D. L. Crook, R. E. Stillwell, James Tierney, W. E. Anderson, R. I.. Hattaline, and Paul Bruns. Not only did the Circulation Staff handle the subscrip- tions for the 1946 and 1947 editions of Midships, but they sold the 1947 Kings Point Calendar to the Regi- ment as well. I ' our thousand copies of the pad were sold at Christmas time, and the proceeds from their sale were used to help retire the Midships debt. The members of the Advertising Staff also deserve much credit, for they were responsible for more than half of the total revenue of the book. They not only did their office work and direct-mail solicitation at nights, but also gave up classes to go into New York City on the weekdays to make personal contacts, which previous experience had proved the most fruitful. Sell- ing ads was hard and tiring work, and they are to be congratulated for a job well done, as they topped their goal for the second successive edition. The Advertis- ing Staff included Louis Gilson. J. Juliano, Robert Levy, Corbin Fletcher, O. L. Clements, George Mc- Kinny, N. Eisen, R. A. Heinzer, R. C. McNamara, P. R. Miller, J. E. Nell, C. W. Padrick, H. C. Roller, and F. C. Vousden. Last, though certainly not least, came the Business Start, with Edward Gall, Business Manager, and his assistants, Bruce White, Philip Merrit, and Paul Wis- niewski. These men kept the books, made the bank n And so another layout is completed ' t Editorial Staff GEORGE McKINNEY Advertising Manager EDWARD GALL Business Manager THOMAS KUNDINGER Circulation Manager deposits, wrote the checks, supervised the office upkeep and procured supphes for the staff as needed. The Staff expresses its appreciation to the Staff of the 1948 book, led by Editor Kenneth Gam. These Cadet-Midshipmen, having worked with the senior staff until their graduation, then assumed control of the publication to complete it. Without their sincere effort, this j idsb}ps would have been severely curtailed. The following First Classmen comprised the Staff of the 1947yVI ■afJ :);■ 7.f.• Editor-in-Chief, Gerald Davis; Managing Editor, Cecil M. Jones II; Business Manager, Edward E. Gall. Photography Editor, John T. Kauftman. Head of the Editorial Department, John T. Diebold; Departmental Editor, James J. Ard; Graduates Editor, John Murray; Editorial Staff, E. W. Allen, K. P. Jones, R. B. Kimmet, W. N. Morrison, F. S. Smith, J. R. Russell, I. Suder, P. VanZwalenwenburg. Layout Editor, Armin P. Reichenberg; Layout Staff, A. Boerum, R. R. Cronin, J. D. Feltrup, L. B. Litzler, R. H. Stromph. Advertising Manager, George C. McKinney; Ad ' er- tising Staff, L. Gilson, J. Juliano, R. M. Lc ' y, J. Roller. Circulation Manager, Thomas A. Kundinger; Circula- tion Staff, F. W. Finger, C. G. Olsen, R. L. Owen, W. D. Wayne. The following are the members of the Staff of the 1948 Alulslyps. who have worked with the First Class- men until their graduation on Dec. iO, 1946, then assumed control of the publication and completed the work on this edition before starting their own: Editor-in-Chief, Kenneth Gam; Managing Editor, John F. Faigle III, and later Louis B. Litzler. Photography Co-Editors, Robert Ariistcin and Rus- sell Sculke; Photography Staff, T. H. Jones, J. A. Spencer, W. Acosta, J. Alvey. Copy Editor, John H. Adcock; Graduates Editor, John Prelc; Editorial Staff, A. Field, E. Bernstein, E. A. Goldberg, A. Goldblum, S. Goldstein, R. W. Gresham, H. Hurowitz, R. F. Muntzner, G. Silverburgh, L. Zinaman. Layout Editor, Louis B. Litzler; Layout Staff, A. Brown, W. A. Nickerson, J. J. O ' Rourke, J. Patrick, A. Rapp, E. Schwartz, F. L. Weber. Advertising Manager, Corbin Fletcher; Advertising Staff, A. Burkly, K. Dorrwachter, J. Eisen, R. Greer, R. A. Heinzer, R. I. Rich, R. McNamara, F. C. Vousden. Circulation Manager, James Tierney; Circuration Staff, W, E. Anderson, R. L. Battaline, P. E. Bruns, I. L. Cucullu, T. H. Gerard, D. E. Hale, W. Norton, E. H. Rodger, L. E. Stillwell, S. P. Synder, D. E. Wendel, R. Wolford, J. H. Yokum. Art Editor, Joseph E. Teplow; Art Staff, C. B. Silva, R. R. Baldwin, G. Bednar, R. J. Wall. Comptroller, Bruce White; Business Staff, P. Merritt, P. Wisniewski. Reading through the pages of this book evokes many fond memories for those who participated in its pro- duction. We remember well our offices on the top deck of the Cadet-Midshipmen ' s Activities House, and how we always seemed to be mo ing from room to room. W ' e remember Managing Editor Cecil Jones ' office, with adjacent telephones and other facilities. Among Jones ' many duties was that of preparing the weekend liberty list, and he brooked no insubordina- tion from the staff. No one ever saw him using a bull whip, but sometimes we wondered, especially in the 116 Another advertising contract is signed " Did Joe Gish receive his copy? " mess hall. Coffin corner was really starvation when " Cece " ate. We remember also the Circulation Office —filled to the rafters with copies of the latest edition waiting to be mailed — and Tom Kundinger keeping a running check with the aid of his clip board. How Tom managed to keep track of every copy of the hun- dreds that were mailed, is still a mystery to all but his successor, James Tierney. We remember the Business Manager ' s office — they had to take out the sink to make room for his desk! And of course we will not forget Editor Gerry Davis ' small office, always busy. Gerry was about the most energetic member of the staff, and the only one who could listen to twt) separate conversations in his office at the same time and still sound coherent on the phone. What with his lectures on the technique of yearbook production and his daily communiques on work needed from the various de- partments, the staff ne er got a chance to slow down. George McKinney left his mark on the staff with his sharp dry humor — " Stay loose, George, " and may your successor bring in as many ads as you did. At this point we can not fail to mention Lt. (jg) Victor E. Tyson, Jr., USMS, without whose mature guidance and expert advice the publication of this edition would have been impossible. Yes, Midships has been a lot of fun, but it has been a lot of work too. We hope that the class of 1947 will be as proud of this edition as we are. Edward Thoma, our White Studio photographer Photography Staff 117 w ' IJUVIIUl --M ' .THl ►c C)i4A BfJOAid. i pi r VoAUtif. ooiLcdl Lou Viau receiving Jack Dempsey ' s " Outstanding Athlete of the Year " award ' ONFRONTi-D by a Strenuous eleven-game schedule within as many weeks, Kings Point launched its second season of intercollegiate football with only three letter-men remaining from the 19-45 varsity squad and an entirely new coaching staff. Head Coach " Bill " Rinehart, of Fleet City fame, and his aids Lts. Gustave Zarnes, Ray Sto ' iak, and Leon Kane, were faced with the task of moulding a team capable of meeting ViUa- no a in the first contest only four weeks away. The first practice was called in mid-August and the Mari- ners fought inexperience with determination. Long and tedious hours were spent in developing a light, fast team that would bring them up to the caliber of the opponents which they were to face. Though the final tabulations showed only four tri- L-R — 1st row — McCarty, Wenzel, Hodge. Blowers, Webster, Davenport, Viau, McCrane, Kersten, Michaiski. 2nd row — Mauck. McKie, Von Thron. Groover, Maler, Smith, J., Simmen, V illiams. Hester, Robinson. 3rd row — Loesberg, Smyth, Low, Carl, Brazauskas, Hegemen, Allen, Rudd, Smith, W. B. Monahan. 4th row — Zacharkow, Farley, Wolfe, Cremer, Franks, Carter, Lee, W. T., Malone, Borowsky, Olsen. 5th row — Fecteau, Snell, Reynolds, Rydberg, McDuff, Morasso. Lee, D. K., Gallaher, Rebman, Allman. 6th row — Jennings, Wenger. 122 .. WV ' = ' ' ' M Vo ' , eT tvttJiin 1 ■mi Vidu charges through K;I JGS POINT OPPONENTS 6 Vlllanova 40 Lehigh 7 Yale 33 18 George Washington 37 7 Boston College 56 7 Colgate 47 7 Fordham 6 60 Wagner 41 Brooklyn College 7 St. Bonaventure 26 27 Hotstra Williams converts . . . good 123 umphs as against seven defeats, the driving spirit dis- played by the members of the team proved their desire to play real football right up to the final whistle. The Viilanova game proved that the Mariners had lots to learn. A group of fleet backs, operating from the T-formation with devastating results, led the Wild- cats to a 40-6 victory. Kings Point took the opening kick-ofif but, after a first down, was forced to punt. Viilanova then moved down the field on a 73-yard sus- tained march to draw first blood. In the middle of the second period, after taking the ball on their own 46, Viilanova scored again. Only five plays were necessary before Rogers skirted end for the touchdown. The conversion made the scoreboard read 14-0. Bill Kirsten returned the Viilanova kick-ofi to the Kings Point 33-yard line. Lou Viau cut oft tackle for 18 yards. Here came the Regiment ' s first chance to cheer, as Jack McCrane threw a long, arching spiral into Ed Michalski ' s hands on the Viilanova 20. Michal- ski had no trt)uble in outdistancing his opponent for the score. This drive leading to the six points came in lii htning fashion and momentarily stunned the Wild- cats. Two minutes later. Kings Point threatened again, but the end of the half cut short this drive. From then on, it was all Viilanova. Their crossbucks worked beautifully. Time and again, the Wildcats took advantage of the Mariners ' inexperience, and with de- ceptive ball handling were able to mousetrap the Mariner line, thus opening gaping holes for their backs to plunge through. For Kings Point, McCrane played his usual fine game, and his passes, nearly always thrown with a maze of would-be tacklers surrounding him, had deadly accuracy. In this opening contest, ex- perience told the final tale. Returning to the friendly confines of the Academy, the team met Lehigh in a driving rainstorm. This game liktad fliflUiMiUiiK Action In the Yaie Bowl could be called a water extravaganza and also an odyssey of fumbles. Each side committed nine of them. The only break that counted, came in the second period and was in Lehigh ' s favor. Tomasic of the Engineers passed from the Kings Point .vi-yard line. Jack McCrane hit the ball but deflected it into the waiting arms of Bill Hock on the H-yard line, tlie Lehigh back racing to score. The extra point made it 7-0, and this turned out to be the final count. Yale was our third opponent and caused our third defeat, 33-0. The Elis were one of the powerhouses of the nation and boasted the best line in the East. The Mariners went into the game as the hopeless under- dogs, yet ga e an excellent account of themselves. Re- peatedly, the line, led by big Hank Angulo, bioke the vaunted " ' ale defense to smear their backs for losses. After two kick exchanges, Yale ground out the first score, with Tataronowicz carrying across from the 8- yard line, culminating an 82-yard advance. Viau re- turned the ensuing kick-off to the 29, and then skirted Grid Antics " " " — end tor n yards. Kirsten gained 6 and ' iau once more went around end for a first down on the Vale 3-i- On a double lateral from the box formation. ' iau plowed for 10 more. Again the hard-running, shifty half- back took the ball to a first down on the 1-i. A Yale offside moved the ball to the 9. Here, however, the drive stalled. The Mariners were set back 15 yards for holding, and McKie ' s pass was intercepted by Jack- son who returned to the Yale 29. Furse passed to Lynch for 7 and then went off tackle on a quarterback sneak for 6 more yards. Jackson took the ball from Furse and cut to his right; suddenly he was in the clear and sprinted down toward the end zone. Michalski, chasing him, made a diving tackle at the swift halfback Jack- son on the 15, but Jackson made a clever feint and 6 points In the malting neu ers, includintr two kick returns for touchdowns. On the ninth play of the game, Weber of the Colonials took a fourth-down punt on his own 22-vard line and dashed all the way for the score. The con ersion was successful and George Washington led 7-0. Viau re- ceived the kick-off ' t)n the 20 and displayed a beautiful bit of broken field running until he reached the mid- field stripe. There he broke for the sidelines and ran the rest of the way for the touchdown. In the closing minutes of the first quarter, Viau scored again, this time from the 12, to give the Mariners a 12-7 lead. The advantage was short-lived, as the lads from George Washington then applied the power and e entually gained a decisive victory. Stu Webster culminated the Mariner scoring in the fourth period, but it was too late to swing the tide. Journeying up to meet Boston GiUege in a night game, the Mariners ran into a veritable tornado and were smothered by a 56-7 count. The Eagles still bearing memories of last year ' s defeat by the Kings Pointers, made re ' enge both long and sweet. They never stopped trying to score, even after the game took on the aspects of a rout. In the final period, the Mariners gained their only bit of solace in McKie ' s touchdown pass to Davenport at the end of an 85-yard drive. The Colgate game was much cKiser than the 47-7 score would indicate. Succumbing Shaking loose eluded him. This score took the heart out of the Mari- ners and they surrendered another seven points before the half. A blocked kick and a -}3-yard drive brought the final two touchdowns in the last half. Though Levi Jackson and Tex Furse, Yale ' s fresh- men finds, were sensational in their debut. Kings Point ' s Hank Angulo stole the spotlight from them, and gained the nomination as the standout player of the game. Although Lou Viau scored twice in the first period against George Washington University, his efforts proved futile, and the Colonials marched to a 37-18 triumph. This game, marked by the highest scoring outburst to date, produced some colorful running ma- 126 ti) tlie ONcrwlielinini [iviwcr oi the Red Raider team, the Mariners ne er i axe up and earned the plaudits of tlie erowd for tlieir tine efforts tlironuhoiit the L;anie. Additional proof of tliis lanie in a letter from the secretary of Coli;ate University to Admiral McNultv, in whiLh he said that never heftue had he seen a lotitball team, with the odds so hea il ' in their opponent ' s fa or, display sneh an enthusi- astic will to give a good account of them- sel es. As for the game itself, Colgate had a 27-point edge before the M.iriners were able to strike pay dirt. Late in the third period, Webster took McQuade ' s end zone punt back to the Colgate 16, and dashed to the 8 on the next play. A bullet pass from McCrane to Michalski gave Kings Point its well-earned touchdown. Doucette added the extra point. The losing streak had now reached six. Fordham, the next opponent, was a heavy fa orite at pre-game time, and at the end of the half was on the lone end of a 6-0 count. This score came by virtue of Andrejco ' s 11-yard run around end after seven minutes of play. Though the Mariners threatened repeatedly, they could not erase the zero on the scoreboard. Fordham started out the second half as they did the first, but were stiffly checked from making any addition to their total. Late in the third period, the Rams essayed a toss from their own 37. Big Bill Kirsten intercepted, and behind perfect blocking, reached the Fordham 25. In two plays, Lou Viau carried to the 2. On the fourth down, the star halfback plunged across for the score. Paul Williams split the uprights, and Kings Point led 7-6. Fordham returned with a vengeance; and with only three minutes left to play, scored on a 3 ' )-yard pass. However, " lady luck " shone on the Mariners and the touchdown was recalled, the referee declaring the play illegal. In no time at all, Fordham was threatening again. Achieving a first down on the Kings Point 21, the Rams passed three times unsuccessfully. This led to the climax which turned out to be the most thrillmg nn)ments of the ' 46 season. With seconds left to play, 7000 excited fans rose to their feet, as a determined Fordham eleven hned up for the play that would spell the difference between victory and defeat. Skapinec, Ram ' s ace place kicker, standing on the 30, tried for a field goal. The ball went straight down tlic middle, hit the crossbar, teetered for a moment, and bounced back onto the field. The Mariners gained their first victory. Imbued by success. Kings Point ran over a hapless Wagner College ele en, 60-0, to make it two in a row. From the time Lou Viau took the opening kick-ofif and ran 9 " yards to pay dirt, there was no stopping the Ahiriner attack. If Coach Reinhart had not used every man on the bench, with the third and fourth stringers playing the entire second half, the score would have mounted to three figures. Continuing their winning ways, the Blue and Gray took Brooklyn College into camp to a tune of 41-7. Webster led the parade in this encounter with three touchdowns. The Mariners broke the scoring tie with 127 t the McCrane-Michalski combination clicking on a 40- yard pass in the first period. Kersten and Webster scored again in the same half, as did Brooklyn, on the wings of a strong passing offensive. After intermis- sion, Viau and Webster classified the cx)ntest into route proportions by running the Kingsmen into the ground. The three game winning streak came to a halt when St. Bonaventure visited the Academy. Coached by Hugh Devore of Notre Dame fame and composed of quite a few former " Irish " players, the upstaters fielded a strong team and gained a 26-0 win. The Mariner line stood up to the hea ier Bonnie attack and stopped it cold in the first quarter. After a kick into the end zone, the little Notre Darners tot)k the ball on their own 20 and started downfield. Two plays gained 8 yards, and then Marcolini raced around end to the Kings Point 11. On the following play, Colella cut oft tackle for the touchdown. Later, the Mariners marched to the Bonnie 16 before they were stopped. Then sud- denly Kings Point became infected with " Fumblitis. " Twice the Bonnies recovered Mariner fumbles, and twice they capitalized on them. It was difficult to believe that the Mariners were trailing 20-0, after mak- ing such a fine showing. The second half was see-saw throughout, with both squads apparently tiring. A long pass play in the closing minutes gave the Bonnies their final six points. The Mariners closed the schedule on a high note, whipping Hofstra 27-0. After a dull first quarter, Viau took a shovel pass from McCrane and went 32 yards through tackle for six points. Minutes later, McCrane passed to Michalski for another tally. In the second half, Kersten went through the Hofstra team for 85 yards to score. The final touchdown of the year was made by Michalski at the receiving end of a 38-yard pass from McKie. Converting three out of four times, Williams ran his extra-point total to eighteen out of twenty-one for the year. Summing up, the season that began so dismally was completed on a rather cheerful note. The Mariners, making up in fight and determination for what they lacked in weight and experience, proved their mettle by winning four out of their last five games. Facing heavy odds Coach Reinhart and his boys showed the fighting spirit and the will to win which could not help but be admired by their opponents and did much to enhance the name and reputation of the Academy. Considering that this team was composed of mainly Second and Third Classmen, 1947 should see a bright rejuvenation in Kings Point ' s football fortunes. " Getting It away " 128 Plenty of action 12? " VoA diif. lioAJzetLcdl vho? " AS the last echoes of the gridiron season died out, Kings Point quickly converted its eyes and atten- tion to the indoor sports of the winter season. Basket- ball loomed high and paced the held for the rest of the sports. With the return of Lt. Ed Jucker as mentor, great anxiety rose as to the job he could do with the material available. Lt. Jucker, who led the team through the ' 44- ' 45 season with but one defeat, had a ditihcult job molding a grade A team. Only three play- ers had any college experience behind them, and two of these men were assigned to the Ki gs Pointer be- fore the season got under way. This was a serious blow to the hopes of the Academy. One of these two men, Frank Alagia, had played varsity ball at New York University. The other man, Harmon, had played on the Univ ersity of Pennsylvania ' s starting live during the ' 44- ' 45 season. Fifty candidates turned out for the pre-season trials, and within two weeks the roster was trimmed to eighteen men. But the squad had still another reduc- tion to weather and competition for the prize fifteen berths rose immensely. The final selection was made two weeks before the start of the rigorous season. The gridiron placed its mark on the squad through the con- version of Mark McKie from a defensi ' e quarterback to a forward on the court. Another player who shed his football togs for a basketball uniform was James Rudd who likewise made a forward on Lt. Jucker ' s crew. The team had a few bright spots amongst them Front Row, L-R — Ryan. Meyers, V einer, Paris, Sullivan, Melichar, McGary, Jacques, mgr. Second Row, L-R — Coach Jucker, Franklin, Johnson, McKie, Rudd, Chinery, Sparks, Lewis s ■ X % - « jjiidm muMm Going up KINGS POINT OPPONENTS 43 American University 33 37 Catholic University 36 56 Queens 36 34 Columbia 67 59 Adelphi 46 38 Yale 56 50 William Mary 45 47 George Washington 65 38 Georgetown 53 44 Wagner 57 35 Villanova 49 49 M uhlenberg 61 30 Army 60 40 Up Fordham and away 48 Woiting and watching Heading in with the return of Bill Farris, who was on the start- ing live two seasons ago and the second highest scorer on the team. The only other returning veteran was six- foot George Franklin who was a great aid under the boards as well as in the bucket. Another player of kn() n quality was Bob Sullivan, who led the Intra- Mural Basketball Tournament in scoring during the ' 45- ' 46 season. He was also unanimously voted the most ' aluable player that year. Coach Jucker mnv had to get these fifteen players, who had never before played together, to act as a single unit. Teamwork was the first step toward this goal and was stressed on the players day after day. The remaining two weeks before the hoop season officially got under way was spent 111 hard work and rigid training. The boys had to learn to work the ball in and out of all kinds of defenses as well as setting up a satisfactory defense of their own. The team used a man to man defense in most of their games, but occasionally shifted intt) a zone defense when the time called for it. The Mariners inaugurated the season at O Hara Hall with American University and forged out a 43-33 win o er their opponents. Cadet-Midshipman Dan Ryan paced the Mariners with fifteen points through the aid of Cadet-Midshipman Sullivan ' s feeding. The Cadet-Midshipmen ' s next tilt nsus with the Catholic Under the Bodid wm. Tense moTien+ 133 134 Retrieve 2; ne a n a! tO( te; tis: 8 tin to Vi tal ou OU; i: see Ge to Tossing for two Uni ' ersity Cardinals, which found the Mariners on top again by a score of 37-36 with the aid of Cadet- Midshipman Paul Weiner ' s last-second doubledecker With two wins behind them Coach Jucker ' s squad had a field day with Queens College and rolled up a 56-36 victory o er the Knights from Queens. Bill Farris hghted the way with 22 points. A record crowd of 2,200 witnessed the tilt. An away game featured the next event with Columbia University which ended in a rout for Columbia, by a score of 67-34. Our club was completely out-classed in all aspects but put up a fighting battle to the final whistle. Adelphi College took the next spotlight and dropped a decision to our team by a count of 59-46. This tilt featured the ar- tistic work of Cadet-Midshipman Bob Sulli an, who gave a beautiful exhibition of floor work as well as net- ting himself 14 points. Yale came up next and romped to an easy 56-38 win oxer us. The big gun for Yale was Laveli who set his sights on the ring and couldn ' t take them off all night. He scored 32 points against our team and was in command all the way. We took our next game against William Mary College by a score of 50-45 but dropped the next two games b ' scores of 65-47 to George Washington and 53-38 to Georgetown University. Both teams were far superior to our noble squad. VoA diif. W i tli4 TOURING the war years when Kings Point participated ■ " in few inter-collegiate activities, N e were always outstanding in wrestling. Our tirst mat team during the winter of 1944-19-45 was an excellent aggregation, remaining undefeated in 6 matches. Last year we had another ven- successful team. The Mariners were vic- torious in all but one match, losing a close mix-up to Navv. Considering all this, it was no surprise that many muscular stalwarts offered their services to keep up Kings Point ' s splendid mat record this season. The nucleus of this 1947 squad was Cadet-Midship- man Edward Barnes. Cadet-Midshipman Barnes hail- ing from Honolulu, was the lone veteran from last year ' s squad. Tipping the scales at 145 pounds, Barnes had been wrestling for several years and was as agile and adept a mat man as could be found in most col- legiate circles. He was duly elected captain and de- voted much time to assisting Coach Gus Zarnas m teaching the new wrestlers some of the tricks of the game. Lt. Zarnas is well known to all Kings Point men. A champion wrestler and football player with Ohio and the Chicago Bears pro team, he has long been involved in Kings Point ' s body contact sports. This year he found himself with practically a novice crew of wrestlers. The men were strong and willing, but few had experience. The intra-mural wrestling matches were a basis for elimination, and a team was chosen from that competition. The arsity manager was Cadet- Midshipman Fred Cialluchio, a member of last year ' s squad. Front row L-R — Esposlto, Rydberg, Barnes, Smart, Mabe. Second row — Coach Zarnas. Martin, mgr., Stoklosa, Worth, Franks, Helms, Knepper Coach Zarnas ran into obstacles right from the start. Two men, early counted upon, were put out of action by physical deficiencies. Cadet-Midshipman George Randolph, wrestling in the 121-lb. class, was suffering from a sinus condition which impaired his breathing. It appeared at first as though Cadet-Midshipman Ran- dolph would be unable to compete, but as the season progressed, Randolph ' s condition improved and he saw- action in the Na y match. However, the real blow hit when Cadet-Midshipman ' Woodhouse, 136-lb. class, had an attack of appendicitis just before the first match. Woodhouse hailed from Mepham High School, long renowned for the wonderful wrestlers they produced. To replace Woodhouse, Lt. Zarnas alternated Cadet- Midshipmen Richard Stoklosa and John Knepper in competition. The team was chosen and Coach Zarnas went to work smoothing out the rough spots. Comprising the squad were: Cadet-Midshipman Bill Mabe, 121 pounds, who replaced Cadet-Midshipman Randolph in the earlier matches. Mabe lacked experience but was power- ful and showed promise. Cadet-Midshipman Rudolph Esposito, at 128 pounds, was green but his speed and willingness were obvious as the season progressed and he improved considerably. At 155 pounds, Cadet-Mid- shipman Don Smart, was the grappler. Smart showed great promise and improved with e -ery match, li ing up to his promise. Powerful Cadet-Midshipman Clar- ence Rydberg filled in the l65-lb. niche. Another Mepham High School luminary, he gave all of his opponents a rough time. Cadet-Midshipmen John Wirth and John Helms staged their own eliminations regularly to decide who was to handle the n -lb. chore. Thev were fairly equally matched, Wirth having the edge in experience and muscle. Helms ha ing a weight advantage. Carrying the heaxy-weight role was Cadet-Midshipman Stephen Franks, of the dancing shoulder blades. Totally green at the season ' s start, Frank ' s experience came along readily aiid he developed into a top rate grappler. The first intercollegiate match took our mat men to New Haven, Connecticut, to lock " Ugh! " muscles with ' ale ' s grapplers. Past Kint;s Point wrestling teams had twice met Yale men and had beaten them on both occasions in close matches. We were anxious to make it three in a row. Yale put an experienced crew on the mat and that seemed to be the deciding factor. The final score 28-8 in favor of Yale did not tell the full story, as most of the bouts ■were close and full of fire. In the 121-lb. class, Cadet-Midshipman Bill Mabe met George Hastings, of " Eli. " Hastings had the ad- vantage from the start and won by a fall in two minutes and fifty seconds of the first period. Cadet-Midshipman Esposito and Norman Hascall mixed it up at 128 pounds. Hascall took advantage of Esposito ' s inexperi- ence and won by falls in 1 minute a nd twenty seconds of the second period and one minute and twenty-nine seconds of the third period. The 1 36-lb. clash was fast and furious. Yale ' s Pulford threw a headlock on Cadet-Midshipman Stoklosa and pinned him in thirty- one seconds of the first period. At M° pounds, Cadet- Midshipman Barnes had an easy time winning from J. Moore by 8-2. But Cadet-Midshipman Smart was at disadvantage from the start in losing 6-0 to John Chafee of Yale. The best bout was the 16 ' i-lb. clash between Cadet- Midshipman Rydberg and John Stenger. The decision was 11-11 at the conclusion of the regulation match. The contest went tv o extra periods resulting in Rvd- " Yogi exercise " KINGS POINT H 33 3 8 OPPONENTS Yale 28 Adelphi 5 Navy 25 Army 25 berg pinning his man in one minute and fifteen seconds of tfie first extra period and, liis t)pponent failing to repeat in the second period, Rydberg emerged the vic- tor. The next tilt, the n lb, class, resulted in Bob Baldridge of Yd c defeating Cadet-Midshipman Wirth by a fall in two minutes and twenty-one seconds of the third period. In the unlimited class, Thomas of Yale defeated Cadet-Midshipman Franks by a fall in two minutes and fifty seconds of the second period, and one minute and thirty-five seconds of the third period. Despite this defeat, Kings Point showed plenty of spirit and their ability was shown in the second match against Adelphi. Adelphi fell victim to our grapplers by a score of 33-5. All of our men looked outstanding in whipping the Adelphi aggregation, losing only the 121-lb. bout. Cadet-Midshipman Esposito tossed his opponent in the second heat and Cadet-Midshipman Knepper won an easy 6-0 victory over Adelphi ' s Harry Seltzer. Cadet- Midshipman Barnes met terrific competition in Jack Manheim of Adelphi, but pinned his man with a crucifix in two minutes and thirty-eight seconds of the second period, and a top body scissors in the third period. Cadet-Midshipman Smart took the decision by a fall in two minutes and eleven seconds of the first period, and Cadet-Midshipman Rydberg won by a fall in the second and third periods. Cadet-Midshipmen Wirth and Franks won handily by falls. The whole team showed a marked impro ement and appeared to be ready for the Navy encounter at Annapolis the follow- ing week. The result of the match with Navy would make it appear as though it were a rout. Navy won 25-3, but every point Navy got was hard earned. Again lack of experience proved to be our downfall. C adet-Midship- man Randolph in his first match of the season had ic- tory within his grasp, only to lose it on a reverse in the last 15 seconds. The bout between Cadet-Midship- man Barnes and Midshipman Fletcher of Navy was terrific. Both team captains locked horns and sparks flew for nine minutes. First Fletcher got a two point lead advantage, only to have Barnes tie the score. From there on Fletcher would grab the lead, Barnes would tie it up and vice versa right up to the end. The score in points at the finish was 8-8, but Fletcher had a time advantage and gained the victory. Kings Point took the decision in the last bout as Cadet-Midshipman Franks outwrestled Midshipman Schixeek of Navy. " Pinned? " 138 UoAAyltif, iaoyUuf, ' TpHls year, facing some of the best college teams on - the Eastern Coast, Kings Point definitely estab- lished itself in Intercollegiate Boxing. With a nucleus of but one varsity man from last year ' s squad, Coacli Arthur Mercante formed a strong and powerful team. Coach Mercante formerly served in Commander Gene Tunney ' s Navy Training Program, before he succeeded Lt. Matt Twomey as boxing coach here at the Academy. Sixty-five prospective Cadet-Midshipmen candidates turned out for the boxing program in the fall and a rigid training period was established. Twice weekly, competitive boxing took place to iron out the wrinkles and improve techniques. Most of the Regiment witnessed the hitra-Mural Boxing Tournament, where the Cadet-Midshipmen were given the oppt)rtunity to get the feel of the ring, the lights, and the crowd. The ringside atmosphere was most realistic, and both the Regiment and con- testants adapted themselves to it immediately. Chief Specialist Mercante intensified his training of the var- sity squad upon conclusion of the program. The first competitive match was held with Army at West Point. When the last bout was over, Kings Point found itself on the short end of a 5-3 score, but this result told only part of the facts of the match. Boxing for the Mariners in the 125-lb. class was Cadet-Midshipman Colletta. It was a fast fight with CoUetta throwing the most blows, and by the decision his were also the deadliest. Thomasian of Kings Point, in the liO-lb. class, fought a grueling and bloody bat- tle, with both men receiving cuts over the eye. The bout was stopped and awarded to Thomasian, but the officials reversed the decisii)n because of an Intercol- legiate boxing rule and West Point was tiie victor. Last year, when [loxing against Army, Stan Wheatly lost his fight by a very close decision. This year, all eyes were focused on Wheatly. The fight was a hard- punching bout, with Wheatly wielding deadly and well- aimed blows to K.O. his opponent in the second round. The heavier divisions followed, with Cadet-Midshipman Clinton representing Kings Point in the 16 ' )-lb. class. He was matched against the captain of the Army team, who with terrifically hard punches won the bout. The most interesting and best fight from the point of view of the spectators was the 175-lb. match, with Cadet-Midshipman Groover winning by a decision. The event was an inside battle with blows being thrown fast and furiously. The last bout of the match featured Cadet-Midshipman McDonald, the Mariners ' hea y- weight. McDonald was the aggressor, but the West Pointer ' s superior reach enabled Army to score again. Kings Point traveled to Washington, D. C, for its Front row — Caplin, mgr., Even, Loo, Coletta, Wychel. Chief Mercante. Second row — Cohen, Tomaslan, Wheatley, Ahre, Newton, CIsko. Third row — Upchurch, Groover, Favorite, McDonald, Clinton, V alker, Heyer. ir J iv - ' ' " . - KINGS POINT OPPONENTS 3 U. S. Military Academy 5 3 Catholic University 5 5K. Georgetown University 2 ' 2 2 University of Maryland 6 5 ' 2 Catholic University 2 . 8 American University A little closer boys 140 Mixing It up next contest to face Catliolic I ' nixcrsity. The match bewail witli (JiUetta of KinL;s Point l;in int; his opponent a sound heating. This was Colletta ' s second ictorv in succession since he entered Intercollegiate Boxing. Cadet-Midshipman Tln)masian looked in excellent form and fared well by winning his bout by a decision. In the l-l5-lb. di ision, Cadet-Midshipman (A)hen ftiught a close fight all the way. and it was only until the last round, that his opponent by gcU ' nering two extra points gained the decision. Our veteran from last year ' s team was next, in the n -lb. class. This was undoubtedly the best fight of the match, for in the first minute of the first round Gersin, his opponent, handed Wheatly a terrific lacing. Suddenly Wheatly became himself again and took the ofiensi e. He hammered Gersin all over the ring, and at the conclusion of the round Gersin was in poor shape. The referee stopped the fight in the intermission period and it was called a draw. This bout was considered to be one of the best fights ever staged in an intercollegiate Boxing ring. Cadet-Midshipman Clinton fought a close fight through- out his bout, but the final decision went in favor of Catholic University. Kmgs Point was represented by Cadet-Midshipman Groover in the Hi-lb. class and this was another one of those fast, hard punching bouts which was anyone ' s fight right up to the last bell. The final round was the deciding one, and Catholic Uni- versity scored another ictory. The last bout of the hea y-weight dnision featured Cadet-Midshipman McDonald. McDonald recened a gash o er his eye in the first round and the fight was stopped and called a draw. When the last e ' ent was over Kings Point trailed by a score of 5-3. The Mariners met their toughest opponent in Catholic Uni ersity. Although lacking previous experience, the Kings Point squad decidedly showed spirit and determination throughout the ring season, and gained the respect of all their opponents. At the season ' s close, Chief Mer- cante chose three of his boxers, Cadet-Midshipmen Wheatley, Groover, and Thomasian, to represent Kings Point in the National Collegiate Boxing Tournament, at Madison, Wisconsin. Although the three were de- feated, their performances were a credit to themsehes, their coach, and the Academy. They made their op- ponents move every inch of the wav and Wheatley ' s match with C arlson of Idaho was referred to as " the best ever seen in the Wisconsin fieltl house. " 141 oMitif. B4M4n4fUi Wni;N Kings Point ' s varsity swimming squad re- ported to its practice sessions in the early fall. Coach Poulus could not see a bright season for the squad. With the exception of Cadet-Midshipmen Hodge and Hughes, all of last year ' s team had gradu- ated. Ho e er, Chief Poulus worked diligently and tirelessly in molding a team which was to compete against the strongest aggregations on the Eastern sea- board. Among the teams were Manhattan, Colgate, Army, Rutgers, Princeton, Columbia, Brooklyn Poly- technical histitute, and Yale, the mythical champion of the " tank. " This schedule would discourage any coach with a squad studded with inexperienced and untried men. However, Coach Poulus acquired Cadet- Midshipmen R. Gabey and M. Gabey, both of whom had experience in competitive swimming. Dick Gabey was the winner of the Metropolitan A.A.U. 300-meter individual medley and 100-meter free-style crowns dur- ing the summer of 1946. In the first meet of the season. Kings Point downed Manhattan 36-30. hi this contest, the Kings Point team showed a willingness to learn and although there were traces of inexperience, the men exerted them- sehes to their utmost to capture the meet. The first e ent was the 300-yard medley relay which the Manhattan team won after a hard struggle. The Kings Point team kept abreast until the last heat, when Manhattan pulled away to win the race by a few yards. However, in the 220-yard free-style event, Cadet- Midshipman R. Gabey came through for Kings Point and easily outdistanced his rivals. Cadet-Midshipman Stoughton followed with two brilliant victories in the 0- and 100-yard free-style competitions to put Kings Point out in front, hi a hard-fought race Mel Gabey lost the 150-yard backstroke event when his opponent, Hassler of Manhattan, put on a final spurt of power to take the race by a small margin. Radzivilia of Man- hattan nosed out Cadet-Midshipman Needier in the 200-yard breast stroke contest by a 3-yard margin. In the 440-yard free-style event Cadet-Midshipman R. Gabey captured first place, displaying perfect swim- ming form. The Kings Point 440-yard relay team of L-R— J. Reilly, Smith. Allen, R, Gabey, Nichlos, Needier, Schwartz, M. Gabey 142 The turn Off to the races " Set ready .... go! ' Dead heat Cadet-Midshipmen M. Gabey, Hughes, Stoughton, and R. Gabey garnered the honors in the hist race of the day. hi the meets that followed the Mariners lost to Col- gate 31-24, Yale 68-7, Army 53-20, and Rutgers 63-12. Considering a squad of relati ely inexperienced men, these were fine displays in sportsmanship. Although hopelessly outclassed, the Kings Point squad never lost their spirit and showed determination until the end. Their attempts were not in vain, for even though the Mariners won few meets, they gained prestige and the respect of their opponents. Enhanced by the experi- ence tliat the team gained this season, they are sure to fare much better in future competition. 143 ScUllncf. ONE of the youngest varsity aggregations at Kings Point is our Dinghy Team. While this body is still in its embryonic stage, under the guidance of Lt. C. Oberist and Lt. R. Labdon, the team is rapidly mas- tering the nautical arts. Recently our small dinghy fleet was enlarged by the addition of ten new Inter- clubs, which are praised as the finest sailing boats of their class on the East coast. Entering into competition late in the season, the Mariners met Navy, Haverford, and Drexel in a com- bined meet. Kings Point placed third, in this their first attempt, by outclassing Drexel. The Mariners next played host to Cooper Union, and subdued the Engi- neers " by amassing 13.7 points to the 8 ' S points of Cooper Union. Traveling across Long Island Sound to Fort Schuy- ler, the Mariners edged out a 44-40 win in a contest marred by poor sailing weather. In a return engage- ment at Kings Point, Fort Schuyler again proved to be the underdog by losing to Kings Point 45-20. (Considering this success, in the coming years it is not a far-sighted expectation that Kings Point will embody one of the finest Dinghy Teams sailing in Intercollegiate competition. Overhauling 144 Jockeying for position i Regimental sailing meet Va iAitif " nxixJz, 1st. row L-R — Thompson, Crabtree, Boudousequie, Toomey, Slcofynslcy. 2nd. row — Howes, mgr., Dalrymple, MIchalsltl, Farrington, Strandberg, Gannon, Davis, Lehren KINGS POINT OPPONENTS 40 Manhattan 80 46 Fordham 60 48 Brooklyn 106 Bklvn. Polv. Inst. 20 KINGS Point completed its first track season under Coach Lt. J. W. Liebertz with a fine record. Lt. Liebertz, who succeeded Lt. (jg) Greg Rice as track coach at Kings Point in 1945, was formerly attached to the Navy Physical Fitness program under Commander Gene Tunney. The track team at the outbreak of the season gained a commendable record which was augmented by every contest in which the Kings Point Blue and Gray ran. Lhider the fine coaching of Lt. Liebertz the team gained notoriety on the cinder tracks this year, and it is certain that in future seasons Kings Point will carve out an en ious position in the inter-collegiate track league. In its outdoor season last spring, Kings Point met Manhattan Col- lege and Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute in dual meets, and tangled with Fordham and Brooklyn College in a triangular meet. The Mariners took thirtl in the latter event while defeating Brooklyn Polytechnic In- stitute and losing to Manhattan College in the dual meets. At the Penn Relays, a team composed of Cadet-Midshipmen Gannon, Caskey, Benson and Lehren placed fourth in the Mile Relay. In the Distance Medley Championship of America, the Academy Blue and Gray worn by Cadet- Midshipmen Gannon, Farrington, Poag and Caskey took fourth place. In the first indoor meet of the 1947 track season, Cadet-Midshipman Bill Gannon won a medal at the Grover Cleveland games when he placed second in the 600-yard e ent. A promising candidate v x the team was Cadet-Midshipman Ed Michal- ski, well known to the Regiment for his exploits as right half-back on the 1946 football squad. Michalski was National 400-Meter Champion in 1944 and also took the Metropolitan 440 Championship in the same year. 146 Van Ui4f. lioAjeLcuU A LTHOUGH the baseball squad did not quite reach ■ ■ tlie heights of success in the 19-16 campaign, they did show vast improvement o er the spirited but un- lucky nine of the previous season. Under the guidance of a new coach, Lt. (jg) " Jerry " O ' Brien, the Mariners achie ed an o erall record of six v ins, se ' en losses, and one tie. Considering that the opposition included some of tiic leading teams in tlie Hast, the Academy has every reason to feel proud of its diamond heroes. More than one opposing team, expecting a soft touch in Kings Point, was rudely surprised when it walked otf the field at the short end of the score. The season opened with the Mariners taking a quick hut disastrous swintr throui:ii the near South. After two successi e trouncings at the iiands of Maryland and a severe beating by Bainbridge in an exhibition game, the Mariners returned to the Academy in none too cheerful a mood. A period of rejuvenation seemed in the making when the Mariners held a favored St. John ' s nine to a 10-10 draw. However, our first win was yet to come as New York University and Columbia subdued the Blue and Gray. The former contest was a thriller and lasted ten innings before the Metropolitan Champions were able to eke out the 6-5 win. The Mariners finally hit the victory trail on their second trip, this one a jaunt through New England. Gerry Wilda pitched superbly to lead the team to a •1-3 verdict o cr Yale, later the Eastern Intercollegiate Champions. Jim Miller saved the day for the Mariners in the seventh inning with a sensational diving catch of a long drive to deep left-center. Ha ing tasted vic- tory, the Mariners avenged last year ' s loss to Harvard by pounding out a 10-2 decision. Chet Wojicki and Lou Viau each came through with three hits to lielp send pitcher Art Doyle off to a 10-run lead. Bowing to the New London Submarine Base the following day in another exhibition was no disgrace, as the Navy lads presented a line-up sprinkled with men of major league experience. From then on, the Mariners more than held their own, clubbing St. John ' s and Manhattan, di iding two- game series with both Maryland and Hofstra, while losing a close one to Wagner. The Manhattan game was the crowning achievement, for it was an uphill struggle all the way. Twice coming from behind, Kings Point finally won out in the eighth, 10-8, on the wings of Frank Shellenbach ' s three-run homer. Wojicki, batting at a .466 clip, and Viau were the big guns in the Mariners ' resurgent offensive through- out the latter part of the season. Thus, this nine that had started out upon such a bleak note eventually achieved a presentable record. 1st. row L-R — Quinn, Alagia, Miller, Viau, Shellenback, Doane, Robel. 2nd. row — Coach O ' Brien, Nolan, Doyle. Tentas, Gurnick, Balderson, 3rd. row — Huldqulst, Wilde, Woejiclti, Schrott, mgr. l s? . «if %, (,% ,fS k ' af- 147 9 itnja4fU4 iali C " apturi;d by the spirit of the basketball season, the " cagers " of the Regiment turned out en-masse to represent their respecti e companies in the Intra-mural Basketball Tournament. The rules followed were the same as those for inter-collegiate matches with the exception of the time. Two twenty-minute periods were used, with a sudden-death overtime in the event of a tie whereby the first side to score after the final whistle was adjudged the victor. The spirit shown both by the players and the on- lookers was overwhelming. Entire companies were present to support their team ' s efi orts with loud cheer- ing. The contestants themselves were molded into smooth-functioning quintets, each with a firm desire to triumph. The result of each contest was unpredictable, for losing teams would suddenly gain the required inspira- tion to forge ahead and win, as illustrated by the First Company victory over the Second Company 19-16, with the deciding points scored within the last two minutes of the second period. Each man on the court was the keystone of the " five, " for indi idual stars were non-existent, and cooperation was the underlying essential for a winning team. Al- though lacking in experience and practice, the Cadet- Midshipmen proved themselves by playing heads-up ball when the tide was against them. Some of the men who took part in the tournament this year will no doubt secure a berth on the " Big Five " during next season. Team work and spirit, coupled with clean, hard- played basketball, made this past season one of the most thrilling of all the Intra-Mural Basketball Tour- naments. FALL nipped the air and Kings Point ' s gridiron gladi- ators were stung. The Intra-Mural Tournament, under the leadership of Chief Bob Patterson, more than satisfied said warriors and their enthusiastic rooters Because of the short days, most of the games were played under specially erected electric lights. Night games seemed to add zest to the competition and the men showed a conglomeration of athletic skill, spunk, and sportsmanship. Through this maze of mush and mazdas, the Sixth Company ' s " Liberty Hounds " emerged as the champs. Hard earned was their ictory, and a word of praise is due to the valiant Fourth Com- pany team, which gave its all in the play-ofl with the Sixth Company team. Both the Fourth Company and Sixth Company tore down the tournament stretch like the proverbial im- movable object and irresistible force. At the time of their initial encounter both teams were undefeated and untied and meant to remain that way. The result of this first meeting, a grueling, exciting, scoreless tie, lent prestige to their respective reputations. However, the play-off game pro ided different results, for the Sixth Company renewed their winning ways and scuttled the Fourth Company ' s victory ship. The final contest was filled with excitement. After a sustained drive down the field for the first score by the " Sixes, " the " Fours " took over and another tie was in sight, until the Fourth Company machine broke down. A second touchdown by Cadet-Midshipman Nagy of the " Sixes " crushed the last efforts of the Fourth Company team. Thus did the Sixth Company come up with a 12-0 ictory and the Regimental Foot- ball Championship. Up for two Intra-mural grid champs 148 C iaii Qo44 4 jA4f. Good form SuM4n ni ta Bin-ORi; a large crowd of enthusiastic Cadet-Midship- men, the hitra-Mural Swimming Championship races were held in August. The First Battahon, paced by the Gabey brothers, walked oft with honors by scor- ing thirty-eight points. The Third Battalion was second ith twenty-six points, nosing out the Second Battalion by three markers. The meet belonged almost entirely t o the Gabeys. Not only did they lead the two-hundred meter relay team, which included Cadet-Midshipmen E. Smith and J. Mickle, on to ictory, but also gained four individual crowns for themselves. Dick Gabey showed brilliant form in easily winning the one-hundred meter free style race. Cadet-Midshipmen R. Hughes and W. Anderson finished in that order after him. Gabey pulled the same stunt in the two-hundred meter free style aftair, showing his wake to Cadet-Midshipmen D. Stoughton and R. Hughes. The same Dick Gabey then proceeded to outswim Cadet-Midshipman Ray French in the one-hundred fifty meter individual medley. Not to be outdone, Mel Gabey completed the family conquest by capturing the one-hundred meter back- stroke competition. Another First Battalion entry, Cadet-Midshipman C. Schwartz, gained second honors, ahead of Cadet-Midshipman H. Kendall. Sharing the spotlight with the Gabeys were Cadet- Midshipman J. Hodge of the Second Battalion and Cadet-Midshipman R. French of the Third Battalion. Hodge gave a fine performance in the di ing compe- tition to gain first place. His closest competitors were Cadet-Midshipmen D. Stoughton and N. Wyiie. Cadet- Midshipman French emerged as the victor in one of the most exciting races, by coming from behind in the last lap of the one-hundred meter breaststroke to edge out Cadet-Midshipman V. Needier of the First Bat- talion. T . K)ng-distancc stalwarts of Kings Point ' s cinder paths clashed last October for the Intra-Mural Cross Country meet. The course measured some three miles. The race started with two laps around the Roosevelt Field track and extended through Kings Point Park and over two more laps around the Rcjose- clt I ' lcld track. Long striding Cadet-Midshipman John Stranherg of the Second Battalion, led the run- ners across the finish line by a healthy margin. Bunching at the start made it practically indiscerni- ble as to who was in the lead. But as the group be- gan to string out around Roose elt Field, Cadet- Midshipman Bob Kline assumed a comfortable lead. Behind Cadet-Midshipman Kline ran Cadet-Midship- man Bondosquis and in third place ran the easy-going Stranberg. After completing two laps around the track, the course led oft through Kings Point Park. Over the rough terrain trotted the harriers, showing wariness and agility all the way. Having covered about a mile of the course, Cadet- Midshipman Stranberg began to close in on the lead- ers. Passing Cadet-Midshipman Bondosquis at the mile and a quarter mark, Stranberg began to edge up on Kline. After another quarter of a mile, he passed Cadet-Midshipman Kline and was never forced there- after. Cadet-Midshipman Stranberg showed a steady, smart pace, and proceeded to lea e the field behind. He broke the tape with fully twenty-five yards sepa- rating Kline and himself, with Cadet-Midshipman Coday taking third place. Stranberi: ' s brilliant effort, however, was somewhat in ' ain, as the Third Battalion harriers managed to gain sufticient places to win on team points. The winning combination included Cadet-Midship- men Da is, Bondosquis, Kline, Story, and Tryon. Where champions are made ' i 149 The coach looks them over THOSE Cadet-Midshipmen who witnessed the hnal of the hitra-Mural Boxing Tournament were af- forded an interesting and exciting evening. The Ath- letic Staff did their utmost to create an atmosphere closely paralleling that of an actual prize ring arena. The fight card was stacked ith dynamite and it was exploded amid the roar of the crowd. The 125-pound class saw Cadet-Midshipman E. Col. leta gain an easy decision over his opponent, Cadet- Midshipman J. Prelc. Colleta showed good form throughout, and shook Prelc several times with upper- cuts. Cadet-Midshi pman R. Thomasian mixed it up with Cadet-Midshipman J. Sposato in the 135-pound class. Bob ' s vicious left hook kept Sposato mo ing a good part of the time, and was the main reason for Thom- asian ' s gaining an upset decision. Up the weight scale 10 more pounds found an ex- hibition of classy boxing by Cadet-Midshipman M. Cohen. He hammered his foe, Cadet-Midshipman S. Adamson, for two rounds, and though the last heat was fairly even, Cohen won an easy decision. A close match was the Cisko-Newton 15Vpound fracas. Cadet-Midshipman R. Cisko produced a smooth right hook to counteract Cadet-Midshipman Ci. New- ton ' s sharp left jab. The pace was fast and it was only in the last round that Cisko managed the few blows which gained him the nod. Cadet-Midshipmen J. Favorite and A. f linton, 165 pounders, pro ided the e ' ening ' s thriller. Ciood form, stamina and a marked willingness to mix it up, tagged this bout from the initial bell. Clinton managed to jab himself an early point advantage, which he held well into the sccound round. Suddenly the slow-start- ing Favorite came to life and hung a haymaker on his opponent ' s jaw which ended the fight. ■f .- ♦ %m Grid! ron runners-up Another rung on the weight ladder witnessed the 175-pound fray. This also ended in a knockout. Cadet-Midshipmen R. Groover and C. Weege collided in a furious mix-up of leather. Weege ' s superior reach kept the hard charging Groover off for two rounds. Tired, Weege ' s defense slackened in the final heat, just long enough for Groover to sneak in and tag him. Taking the offensive. Groover beat his opponent to the canvas. In the heavy-weight division Cadet-Midshipman R. Walker outpointed Cadet-Midshipman A. MacDonald. Both men showed a healthy respect for his opponent and the result was much dancing and sparring. A flurry of leather in the second frame by Walker ap- peared to be the margin for victory. The night was a complete success and provided sev- eral fine prospects for the varsity boxing squad, and another Third Battalion victory. Wn iili Kf. LAST December saw Kings Point ' s matmen vie for Intra-Mural honors. The matches pro ' ided Coach Zarnas with an abundance of potentialities. The bouts consisted of three one-and-one-half-min- ute rounds. Scoring was in such a manner that to pin an opponent in the first round ended the match auto- matically. Pinning an opponent in either of the two last rounds gave the victor five points. In the event that no decision was reached before time was called, an overtime period was employed. The evening ' s activities began with a fairly even match between Cadet-Midshipman Haines and C adet- Midshipman Upchurch, weighing in at 139 and 1 J3 pounds respectively. Cadet-Midshipman I ' pchurch eked out a 5-4 decision. The middle-weights found a fracas between Cadet- 150 Midihipinan S. Kicras, ' 0 pounds, and Cadet- Midshipman R. Stoklosa, In pounds. Stoklosa piled up a 7-3 ad antai;e. The same weight group included the clash between Cadet-Midshipman C. Lee, support- ing 16 ' i pounds of brawn, and Cadet-Midshipman S. Tompkins, 160 pounds. The bout was a collision be- tween ability and perseverance for better than two heats before the aliant Tompkins succumbed. " Who ' s got who? " Two interesting and exciting bouts were staged by lighter men. They were the Teplow- Wolfe match and the Van Thorn-Guido clash. Cadet-Midshipman J. Teplow and Cadet-Midshipman R. Wolfe mixed it up for three grueling rounds. Wolfe gained a margin for victory by tossing his opponent in the third heat. The bout between Cadet-Midshipmen J. Van Thorn and E. Guido was the highlight of the evening. Both men put everything into the fray, and it was difficult for an untrained eye to determine the winner. It would appear that Cadet-Midshipman Van Thorn was the more active, as an 11-4 decision was rendered in his favor. Coach Gus Zarnas found in his heavyweights plenty of brawn and willingness. Cadet-Midshipman G. Bour- nazian wrestled Cadet-Midshipman W. T. Lee in a hotly contested duel. Although both men were ob i- ously lacking in experience and ability, they gave their all in the match. A draw decision was rendered at the end of three rounds, requirmg additional rounds un- til a winner emerged. Bournazian managed to squeeze out a one-point advantage after two overtime periods. The other heavyweight mat_h, between Cadet- Midshipman S. Franks and Cadet-Midshipman G. Miller, was fast and furious. Franks, with a weight advantage, slipped a quick hold and pinned his oppo- nent in the first frame for the victory, to clinch the tournament for the Third Battalion. (Utu ta ON an ideal Saturday morning last summer the en- tire Regiment assembled on Mallory Pier to wit- ness the biggest rowing event of the season. For a large part of the summer the oarsmen had worked diligently at acquiring stamina and learning new strokes. Two weeks previously, the Battalion Rowing Races had taken place and the winning Companies were now represented. They were the Second, Fourth, and Ninth Companies representing the First, Second, and Third battalions respectively. A major portion of the mile-long course was not isible to the neck-craning Regiment and the score of notables present. During this period the Fourth Com- pany gained a comfortable three-length lead which they maintained well past the half-way mark. At this point the Second Company began closing the gap. As the whale boats hove into view, the Second Com- pany pulled alongside the hard-stroking Fourth. Their specially painted oars sparkling in the sun, the Second Company lent added effort and slid by the Fourth. At three-quarter, the Second was about two lengths in the lead, but the Fourth and Ninth remained as con- stant threats. However, neither could muster the neces- sary power to overhaul the leader, and they crossed the flag-bedecked finish line in that order. The coxswain, Cadet-Midshipman Winslow, was thrown overboard in true tradition. The Second Company thereby won the Superintendent ' s Trophy. Several weeks later, the same Second Company crew- showed their wake to six other Company crews in the Alumni Trophy Race. Despite a strong headwind, the victors set a new record for the e ent, finishing ahead of the First Company by almost three lengths, and the Fourth Company by fi ' e. They pu ' led their way to fame iy„,.iJ-K J 151 ri ENDEAVORING to develop to a hi qh degree in all phases of sports, this year ' s stepped-up program included a Regimental Tennis Tournament. Forty-two men, under the direction of Coach Bill Bollman, pro- vided interesting and exciting matches throughout August and September. Cadet-Midshipman R. Kirsch- ner, who had copped the Eastern hitercoUegiate title for Kings Point in 1945, was top seeded. Favored were Cadet-Midshipmen J. Mumm and M. Sheldon, both members of the tennis team. Only Kirschner, however, came through to the finals, where he met and defeated in three sets, 6-2, 6-1, and 6-2, brilliant Eldon Yeck. Cadet-Midshipman ' eck, at that time a newly arrived Second Classman, was the surprise of the tournament. Though pressed at times, his steady, smooth play pro- duced one victory after another. His smashing fore- hand and tricky backhand drives gave him a slight edge. Yeck met and defeated Malcolm Sheldon in the quarter-finals, 6-4 and 6-3. One of the most thrilling matches of the tournament was the Yeck-Kuenzli semi- final. Cadet-Midshipman Kuenzli, another unheralded, but talented newcomer, made impossible shots con- sistently, carrying the match to three sets, succumbing 2-6, 8-6, and 7-5. It cannot be said that Cadet-Midship- man Kuenzli went down to defeat without playing a superior match. However, the finals, played under extremely wet conditions, were dominated by Kirschner ' s skill and experience. His murderous serve and terrific line place- ments aided him, as he garnered the Intra-Mural Ten- nis laurels. Cadet-Midshipman Kirschner is deser ing of the title bestowed upon him. Based on the form of the players in this tournament, the prospects of another winning intercollegiate tennis team seem bright indeed. Yes, we certainly believe that Kings Point will again place a winning team on the court. A hard drive through ,: - s:?! ' 7 t J The gym or sportsmen ' s rendevous O ' Hara Hall, the focal point of sports activities, is named after the first Cadet-Midshipman to be awarded the Merchant Marine Distinguished Ser ice Medal in World War II. In this hall, Cadet-Midship- men learn the essentials of getting along with their fellow shipmates by playing and working with them in all types of athletics. O ' Hara Hall takes the spotlight as being the most popular place of recreation on the grounds, and can be found well inhabited by Cadet- Midshipmen at all times. If anyone were to look in O ' Hara Hall at any time during the week, he would see a wide assortment of athletic skills being carried on throughout the gym- nasium. He would see basketball, boxing, wrestling, badminton, table tennis, weight lifting, and all types of gymnastics. Many intra-mural tournaments are spon- sored to give all Cadet-Midshipmen an opportunity to enter at least one competitive sport. A complete modern equipment room is available at all times to fulfill the arious needs. Here Cadet-Midshipmen have an opportunity to build themselves up physically and learn the essentials of any sport. Cadet-Midshipmen ha e two periods a week taken out of their class sched- ule for physical training and in addition are required to spend another hour of their own time during the week engaged in some phase of athletics. There is an excellent opportunity for Cadet-Midship- men to make new acquaintances with their shipmates and learn the basic fundamentals of good sportsman- ship and fair play. Thus O ' Hara Hall takes its place, along with the academic studies, in the program to educate the Cadet-Midshipman to be a capable officer and an able servant of his country. 152 Qdl Safe at first SoltLall t r ]:. already popular sport of Softball received an - - even greater boost this past summer at Kings Point. It was the result of the hitra-Mural Softball tourna- ment concluded under the direction of Lt. (jg) Ed Jucker and Chief Bob Patterson. Each Company in the Regiment was represented by two teams in the initial Battalion playoff. These teams played against each other to decide which would repre- sent each Company. Through this channel of elimina- tion, two teams were chosen to represent each Battahon in the final playoif for the Regimental Championship. The result of the competition was interesting as the teams battled to a heated and enthusiastic climax. It was decided that each team should play fi e of the other teams. The team with the best average would then be crowned " Regimental Champ. " The result, however, proved to be a tie between the " 3 ' O ' s " of the Second Company and the " El Toro Cholos " of the Ninth Company. Both teams had won four and lost one. The " Cholos " had lost their only game to the " 3 ' 50 ' s, " a 10-2 rout, while the Second Company team had been upset only by the Fifth Company ' s " Kings- men. " The finale was a thriller, witnessed by a lart;e turnout of Cadet-Midshipmen. Paced by the hitting and pitching of James Miller, the " Cholos " reversed an earlier decision and defeated the " 3 ' " iO ' s " 6-3. With a wide lead, the " Cholos " coasted until the seventh inning, when the newly inspired " 3 ' 5() ' s " sprang to life and forced over three runs. Hut three is three less than six, and the " El Toro Cholos " won the gold baseball denoting Regimental Softball (Champions. ' TpHi; traps and fairways of Cireat Neck ' s Sound View (iolf (bourse experienced the 19 6 debut of Kings Point ' s potential Nelsons and Hogans. The tourna- ment tLirn-oLit was surprisingly large, and the grand re- sults were the returns of Lt. (jg) Ed Jucker ' s labor. As a means of icwing the prospects of a Spring iiolf te.im, and to lend additional enthusiasm to the sports program, a tournament was hrst rLin oft. Sixteen low scorers cjualificd for the Intra-MLiral (Championship. Cadet-Midshipman Aalbersberg was medalist with 78, while Cadet-Midshipmcn Thalhcimer, Ashbec, Jones, Pleas, Dittrich, Thayer, antl Burcu qualified with low eighties. The elimination matches followed which were close and interesting. The first round included a bril- liant duel between Cadet-Midshipmen Thayer and Thalheimer, the latter finally being victorious. By elimi- nation, the semi-final round featured matches between Thalheimer and Ashbee, and Hurcu versus Dittrich. In the former contest Thalheimer took the first hole and spent the next thirteen holes defending his lead against the brilliant putting of Ashbee. Ashbee won the fif- teenth hole to even matters, but Thalheimer ' s long dri es were the margin for xictory. The other semi- final saw Burcu eaininc a win. The final round between Cadet-Midshipmen " i ' hal- heimer and Burcu was a match between Thalheimer ' s terrific distance drives and the slow, deliberate, potent putting of Burcu. Thalheimer gained an early advan- tage and pressed his lead all the way to gain the Regi- mental Golf Championship. Up and . . .? 153 Bfr Ml V rK] » iiinw V ' ' mmmw ' ) ■• ■ ■ ifiH ■MiMriSA i s. •I (5, m •S r. -A «k H iff ' TTrD OuA. Qn idi4 ite4. f y ie li i v ■■■ -i S . 1 " CloM. oi Q iadnai%aH %au: 20 ece fiJte f9 6 THEODORE C. L. AALBERSBERG EDWIN WOODWARD ALLEN LEARY DA WELL ALFORD JAMES JOSEPH ARD HARRY MENGEL ALKER DAVID DUNKEL BAIRD THEODORE C. L. AALBERSBERG Utic.1. Michigan Fourth Class — San Matei); Sea Duty — S.S. Laurel Hill, Union Oil Co.; Service Rib- bon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Offi- cer, Drill Team, Golf. LEARY DAWELL ALFORD Ardmorc, Oklahoma Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cedar Breaks, Pacific Tanker Corp.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific. HARRY MENGEL ALKER Morristown, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Wyoming Valley. American Republic Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediter- ranean, Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Windiammers, Escort Committee. Propeller Club, Camera Club, Intramural Regimental Championship Basketball Team. EDWIN WOODWARD ALLEN Verona, New Jersey Fourth Clas.s — Kings Point ; Sea Duty— S.S. Winchester, Barbar Asphalt Corp.; Service Ribbon.s — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Drill Team, Propeller Club. JAMES JOSEPH ARD Elizabeth, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Panther, American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Midships, Drill Team. DAVID DUNKEL BAIRD Canton, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Clovis Victory, Seas Shipping Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Pro- peller Club, Intramural Regimental Cham- pionship Softball Team. pecentl ' iC) 160 ?r JACK ALBERT BAKER Washington, D. C. I- " oiiitli Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Fairmont Victory. International Frtiglit- in.K Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Fencing Team Captain. JAMES WALDEN BAKER Toledo, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S, Evans Creek, American Republics Corp.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Football. ALFRED JOSEPH BEAUCHAMP Rutland, Vermont Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Bucna Vista, Texas Shipping Co., S.S. Cape Archway, American Hawaiian Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Ofiicei Regimental StafI, Band, Christmas Card Committee, Swimming. JOHN MILTON BECHBERGER Sandusky, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S, George D. Prentice, Coastwise Co., S.S West Cactus, Moore-McCormack Lines S.S. Wallace R. Farrington, Burns Steam ship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philip pine; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Midships, Glee Club. FREDERICK CHRISTIAN BERG, Jii. Georgetown, M,iryl,ind Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Oriental, Seas Shipping Co., Sea Train Texas, Army Transport Service; Service Ribbon — Atlantic ; Academy Record — Sec- retary of Windjammers, Sailing. ARTHUR GEORGE BERNDT Great Neck, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. James Island, Marine Transport Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer- 7th Company Commander, Propeller Club. JACK ALBERT BAKER JOHN MILTON BECHBERGER JAMES WALDEN BAKER FREDERICK CHRISTI.AN BERG, Jh. ALFRED JOSEPH BEAUCHAMP ARTHUR GEORGE BERNDT ARLO MARVIN BIGNALL ALFRED BOERUM ERNEST FARNSWORTH BISBEE ARTHUR EDWARD BOHNER EDWARD LEIGHTON BLAU ' ELT III CARL RICHARD BOLGER ARLO MARVIN BIGNALL Hill City, Minnesota Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Race, Union Sulphur Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. ERNEST FARNSWORTH BISBEE Los Angeles, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Alcoa Pegasus, Alcoa Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Offi- cei . rd Company Commander, Glee Club. EDWARD LEIGHTON BLAUVELT III Cranford, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Talisman, Mississippi Shipping Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic: Academy Rec- ord — Propeller Club, Basketball. ALFRED BOERUM Norwalk, Connecticut Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Rosebud, Marine Transport Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Midships, Propeller Club. ARTHUR EDWARD BOHNER Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Perryvillic, Keystone Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team, Football. CARL RICHARD BOLGER .•Mtoona, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Yaka, Waterman Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Propeller Club. 162 ROBERT SPILMAN BOSTON Chamblee, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Uruguay, Moiire-McCorniack Ci)., S.S. Frostburj; Victory, Alcoa Steamship Co., S.S. Brooktield. Keystone Ship- ping Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic. •ALBERT JOSEPH BRAZAUSKAS Edwardsville, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. South Mountain. Texas Ci . ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Acad- emy Record — Windjammers, Sailing, Foot- ball. LESTER GEORGE BROOKS Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Corwin, A. H. Bull Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Officer-Mascot Staff. JOHN OLIVER BROTHERHOOD. Jii. New Canaan, Connecticut Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Black Jack, Marine Transport Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, P.tcihc. Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer-lst Battalion Staff, ' Wind- jammers, Glee Club. IRVIN JOHN BROWER Detroit, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Fear, United States Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer-lst Battalion Adjutant, Pro- peller Club. ELMUTH MILTON BROWN, Jit. Houston, Texas Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Kumukaki, Pacific Far East Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Oflicer-.Srd Battalion Adjutant, Propeller Club. ROBERT SPILMAN BOSTON JOHN OLIVER BROTHERHOOD, Jii. ALBERT JOSEPH BRAZAUSKAS IRVIN JOHN BROWER LESTER GEORGE BROOKS ELMUTH MILTON BROWN. Jk. THOMAS FRANCIS BROWN MARTIN BYLE TRACY LELAND BRYANT HARRY LEO CAMPBELL. Jii. HAROLD SCALES BUTLER, Jr. CHARLES G. CARLUCCIO. Jr. THOMAS FRANCIS BROWN Rochester, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Catahna, Grace Lines, S.S. Gervais, Pacific Tankers Co., S.S. Missionary Ridge, Esse Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Pro- peller Club, Football Manager. TRACY LELAND BRYANT CarbondaJe, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Ana, Grace Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Track. HAROLD SCALES BUTLER. Jr. Atlanta, Georgia Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. James Swan, South Atlantic Steam- ship Line; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. MARTIN BYLE Grand Rapids, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cedar Breaks, Pacific Tankers Inc.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club. HARRY LEO CAMPBELL. Jr. Beaumont, Texas Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Sturgeon, Waterman Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Propeller Club. Tr.ick. CHARLES G. CARLUCCIO. Jr. North Bergen, New Jersey- Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. J.W. McAndrew, United States Army Transport Service; Service Ribbons — At- lantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. Midships. V( ' ind|ammers, Philosopher ' s Club, Boxing. 164 ' rildi JEAN CALVIN CASSEL Union, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape San Diego, American Presi- dent Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Propeller Club. THOMAS GRAHAM CLARKE Oxford, North Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty - S.S. Oneida Victory, United Fruit Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean. THOMAS MERRIGAN COLLINS Larchtnont, New York Fourth Chiss — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Quail, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet OtTicci-Regimcntal Staff. THORN DUANE COMPTON Larncd, K,insas Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Pilliar, South Atlantic Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific. JAMES LESTER COX Johnston City, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Elk Hills, American Trading and Produce Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Secretary of Debating Team, Midships, Windjam- mers, Propeller Club, Philosopher ' s Club. ROBERT BARRINGTON CRONIN Perryman, Maryland Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. VC ' ahoo Swamp, Cities Service Oil Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Midships, Assistant Trainer Football. JEAN CALVIN CASSEL THORN DUANE COMPTON THOMAS GRAHAM CLARKE THOMAS MERRIGAN COLLINS JAMES LESTER COX ROBERT BARRINGTON CRONIN ROBERT CUMMINGS AMODIO ARTHUR DcSIMONE, Jii. BENJAMIN GIBBONS DAVIN JOHN THEURER DIEBOLD GERALD DAVIS THEODORE DIMITRIOU ROBERT CUMMINGS Pro ' idencc. Rhode Island Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Alava, American Mail Lines; Service Ribbiins — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Vi ' indjammers, Propeller Club, Sailing. BENJAMIN GIBBONS DAVIN Granville, Massachuietts Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Borda, South Atlantic Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Propeller Club. GERALD DAVIS Seattle. Washington Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Albert B. Cummins, Alaska Steamship Co., S.S. Horace H. Lurton. Cosmopolitan Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Otfi- cer-Regimental Staff. Scholastic Star, Edi- tor in Chief of the 1946 Midships and the 194 Midships, Propeller Club, Captain Tomb Trophy Medal. AMODIO ARTHUR DcSIMONE, Jii. Westerly, Rhode Island Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Talisman, Mississippi Shipping Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Intramural Regimental Championship Softball Team, Cross Country. JOHN THEURER DIEBOLD Weehawken, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Shooting Star, United States Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Ofiicer-ird Bat- talion Stafl , Scholastic Star, Editorial Man- ager of Midships, Escort Committee, Pro- peller Club, Philosopher ' s Club, Christmas Card Committee. THEODORE DIMITRIOU Dayton, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Coalinia Hills, Los Angeles Tankers Co.; Service Ribbon.s — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Drill Team, Boxing. J ecembeP ' 166 rxj ERNEST JOHN DONATH Cypress Hills, Lung Island, New ' ork Fuuitli Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Texas, A. H. Bull Steamship Lines; Ser ' ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Band, Propeller Club. JOHN WESLEY DOWDLE, Jii. Columbia, South Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Oriental, South African Steamship Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Drill Team, Propeller Club, Bas- ketball. Track. WILLIAM DREW Brooklyn. New York Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Rutland Victory, United States Lines; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Track, Baseball. FRANK SANDS DU BOIS, Jr. New London, Connecticut Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Robin Locksley. Robin Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer-. rd Battalion StafF, Scholastic Star, Managing Editor of Polaris. CHARLES WARREN DUBY, Jit. Fall River, Massachusetts Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Bass, Matson Navigation Co., S.S. Sea Cardinal, Luckenbach Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Otficer-3rd Battalion Adjutant. ROBERT JOHN EHRLINGER Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — • S.S. Oneida Victory, United Fruit Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Polaris, Propeller Club, Fencing. ERNEST JOHN DONATH FRANK SANDS DU BOIS, Jh. JOHN WESLEY DOWDLE, Jii. CHARLES WARREN DUBY, Jii. WILLIAM DREW ROBERT JOHN EHRLINGER JOHN PAUL ELLISON CARLO BENTON EVANS JAMES THOMAS ENZENSPERGER MELVIN THEODORE EYESTONE ROBERT ERNST HORACE WESLEY FABING JOHN PAUL ELLISON Cleveland. Ohio Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. St. Albans Victory, American West African Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Escort Committee, Pro- peller Club. JAMES THOMAS ENZENSPERGER Sausalito, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Tumacacori, Pacific Tankers Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Commodore of Wind- jammers, Sailing. ROBERT ERNST Grand Rapids, Michigan Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — • S.S. Gainesville Victory, Matson Navi- gation Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Track. CARLO BENTON EVANS Naruna, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Larimie, American Petroleum Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Propeller Club, Baseball. MELVIN THEODORE EYESTONE Wichita, Kansas Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Ducato, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Midships. HORACE WESLEY FABING Gilroy, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Hxiria, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Propeller Club. pexxfttb p ' 168 VICTOR LEONARD FABRY Belhiirc, Ohio Fourth Class — S.in Matc-o; Sea Duty — S.S. Sheldon Jackson, S.S. Cape San Alartin, American President Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club. HAROLD LEE FALKENBERRY Marianna, Florida Fourth Class— Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Fiji; Harbor, Keystone Shipping; Co., S.S. Cjpe John, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons- -Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Midships, Band. JAMES DUNCAN FARLEY Madi son. Wis Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Afoundria, Vi ' aternian Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Ac.idemy Record — Cadet Officer, Propeller Club, Fuutball. JAMES PETER FELTRUP Arlington, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kin,es Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Alcoa Pili;rini, Alcoa Steamship Co. ; Serv- ice Ribbons — P.icihc, Philippine; Academy Record — Midships. JOHN PAUL FENSTERER Bay Shore, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Orpheus, American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — NX ' indjammers, Sailing. EDWARD LAWRENCE FERBER Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Chapel Hill Victory, Marine Trans- port Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terransan; Academy Record — Windjam- mers, Vice President Propeller Club, Base- ball. VICTOR LEONARD FABRY JAMES PETER FELTRUP HAROLD LEE FALKENBERRY JOHN PAUL FENSTERER JAMES DUNCAN FARLEY EDWARD LAWRENCE FERBER FREDERICK WILLIAM FINGER RALPH WILBUR FOSTER, Jk. ARCHIE WALTER HNK RAYMOND FRENCH CLAUDE FORD, Jii. EDWARD EARL GALL FREDERICK WILLIAM HNGER Bethlehem, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — San Mateu; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Kildare, Weyerhaeuser Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean; Acad- emy Record — Midships, Escort Committee, Propeller Club. ARCHIE WALTER RNK Nlinneapolis, Minnesota Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Scamp, Lykes Brothers Steamship Co., S.S. Wild Hunter, Pacific-Atlantic Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Port Cap- tain Windjammers, Propeller Club, Sail- m, . CLAUDE FORD, Jh. Baton Rouge, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Beale, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pa- cific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Drill Team, Glee Club, Propeller Club. RALPH WILBUR FOSTER, Jii. San Mateo, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Smoky Hill, I.os Angeles Tanker Operators; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Radio Club. Track. RAYMOND FRENCH Litchfield, Connecticut Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Kildare. Weyerhaeuser Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Regimental Commander. Scholas- tic Star, Propeller Club, Swimmini;, Track, Intramural Regimental Championship Swim- ming Team. EDWARD EARL GALL Honolulu, Hawaii Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Durham Victory, Agwilines Inc.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. Business Man.iger Midships. Polaris. Propeller Club, Intramural Regimental Championship Basketball Team. 170 ROSARIO GAROFALO New Brit iin, Connecticut Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Lej;ion Victory. Lykts Brothers Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer-2nd Company Com- mander. Intramural Regimental Champion- ship Baseball Team. LOUIS GILSON Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kinjjs Point; Sea Duty-- S.S. White Squall, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Co., S.S. Chorubusco, Texas Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Officer. Midships, Windjam- mers, Propeller Club. DONALD DUANE GLOWER Crestline, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Broad River, Pacific Tankers Co., S.S. Egg Harbor, Keystone Shipping Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Mid- ships, Drill Team. GEORGE OMER GRAFF Indiana, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Pcrryville. Keystone Shipping Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Band, Propeller Club. WALTER JOHN GREGO, Jr. Floral Park, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Turkey Island. Marine Transport Lines Inc. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-lst Company Commander, Former Editor-in-Chief of Midships, Scholastic Star, Track. HARVEY WALTER GURLAND Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Devil, United Fruit Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Vic- tory, American Theatre; Academy Record — Polaris, Drill Team. Band, Camera Club. ROSARIO GAROFALO GEORGE OMER GRAFF LOUIS GILSON WALTER JOHN GREGO. Jn. DONALD DUANE GLOWER HARVEY WALTER GURLAND I THEODORE PHILIP GURNICK DAVID ELUTHER HAMILTON CHARLES WHITE HADLEV LOUIS 3URGHART HANSEN FRANK WILLIAM HALLSTEIN RAY HARDCASTLE THEODORE PHILIP GURNICK Cleveland, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Gauntlet, Norton Lilly Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Baseball, Regimental Table Tennis Cham- pion. CHARLES WHITE HADLEY Pl.iinfield, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. McClellen Creek, Tinkers Inc.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Olficer. FRANK WILLLA M HALLSTEIN North T.irrytown, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. NX ' hite Falcon, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Athintic. Mediterranean; Academy Record — Propeller Club. DAVID ELUTHER HAMILTON RichiTiond, Virginia Fourth Cla,ss — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Mormac Moon, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Drill Team, Football, Track, Captain T mb Trophy and Medal Award. Pexxmbdi ' Vj ' pM. O LOUIS BURGHART HANSEN Cranford, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kin,i;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Glorieta. Marine Transport Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- ranean. RAY H.ARDCASTLE Hcrrin, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mormaclark, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean, Atlantic; Academy Record — Secretary of R.idio Club. 172 mm mM r.s ' V EUGENE ROBERT HARRIS Detroit. Mii-liij .in Fourth Chiss — S.m M.itio; Sea Duty-- S.S. Hxcli.uiyt, Aiiuritan Hxport Lines: StTvici.- Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- tmy Record — Propeller Club. THOMAS J. HA ' iDLN Bayside, New York Fourth Class — ian Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Wyoming Valley. American Republic Corp.: Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific. Mediterranean. Combat Bar; Academy Record — Intramural Softball Champion- ship Team. GERALD HARTLEY HAZARD W.Tshington, D. C. Fourth Class — San Maien; Sea Duty — S.S. Mesa Verde. Deconhil Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Atlantic; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team, Escort Commit- tee. GEARY PRICE HEERMAN Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kini;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. V ' yomint; Valley. American Republic Corp.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific. Combat Bar. Medite-ranean ; Academy Record — Philosopher ' s Club. PAUL FREDERICK HELLER St. Louis, Mi ouri Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Alamo Victory. Weyerhaeuser Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific. Philip- pine; Academy Record — Baseball. RALPH HERBERT HELMS, J.t. O.iklyn, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kinus Point; Sea Dut) — S.S. Wauhatchie, X ' ar Emergency Tank- ers Inc. ; Service Ribbon — Atlantic. EUGENE ROBERT HARRIS GEARY PRICE HEERMAN THOM. S J. HAYDEN PAUL FREDERICK HELLER GERALD HARTLEY HAZARD RALPH HERBERT HEL.MS. Jn. WALTER MARTIN HERBST HARRY LAWRENCE HODGES RODERICK ROBERT HERMAN FREDERICK HAROLD HOLT DUDLEY LE ROY HERNDON, Jh. STANLEY GENE JAMES WALTER MARTIN HERBST Coraopolis, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Sumter, Pacific Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Officer-Seventh Com- pany Commander. RODERICK ROBERT HERMAN Alton, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Ringleader, Moore-McCormack Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Mascot Staff, Mid- ships. DUDLEY LE ROY HERNDON, Jii. Alexandria, Virginia Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Chapultepec. Barbar Asphalt Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. Philip- pine; Academy Record — Cadet Odicer-2nd tiattalion Adjutant, Propeller Club, Glee Club. HARRY LAWRENCE HODGES Los Angeles, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Frank H. Evers, American President Lines, M.V. Cape Friendship, Pacific-Atlantic Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philip- pine, Combat Bar ; Academy Record- - Propeller Club, Chairman of Transporta- tion Committee, Intramural Baseball Cham- pionship Team. FREDERICK HAROLD HOLT Warwick Neck, Rhode Island Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. North Point; X ' ar Emergency Tank- ers Inc.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Acad- emy Record — Windjammers, Sailing. STANLEY GENE JAMES Fullerton, Californi.j Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Mariposa, Matson Navigation Lines, S.S. Sea Owl, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Windjammers. Propeller Club, Escort Committee. Pefie ttbep ' 174 ■ SIDNEY EARL JENNETTE. Jii. Henderson, North C.irolin.i Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape May, United States Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team, Propeller Club, Glee Club. KERMIT CHARLES JENNINGS Green Cove Springs, Morida Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Borda, South Atlantic Steam- ship Co. ; Service Ribbon — Atlantic. HENRY GEORGE JOI I KAY Belleville, Illinois Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Ducato, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Midships, XX ' indjam- mers. Propeller Club, Secretary of Philoso- pher ' s Club. JAMES HAIGHT JOHNS Cleveland, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Runner, Grace Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer — Color Guard Captam, X " mdjammers, Philosopher ' s Club, Commodore of Dinghy Team, Intramural Regimental Champion- ship Basketball Team. JAMES FRANKLIN JOHNSTON, Jii. Asheville, North Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Lake George, Bernuth Lembcke Co., S.S. Smoky Hills, Los Angeles Tankers Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Com- bat Bar; Academy Record — Propeller Club. CECIL MOORE JONES II Gainesville, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Cottonwood Creek. War Emergency Tankers Inc., S.S. Bienville. Waterman Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Managing Editor of Midships, Band, Propeller Club. SIDNEY EARL JENNETTE, Jn. JAMES HAIGHT JOHNS KERMIT CHARLES JENNINGS JAMES FRANKLIN JOHNSTON, Jii, HENRY GEORGE JOFFRAY CECIL MOORE JONES II ERIC MAGNUS JONES JASSI JULIANO KENNETH PERSON JONES JOHN THOMAS KAUFFMAN LEO COMPTON JONES III ROBERT RICHARD KEENAN ERIC MAGNUS JONES Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Turkey Island, Marine Transport Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Wrestling. KENNETH PERSON JONES Selnia, North Carolin,i Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Champions Hill, War Emergency Tankers Co., S.S. Woodbridge Victory, Isbrandsten Co. ; Service Ribbon.s — Atlan- tic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Midships, Vice Chairman of Escort Coin- niittce; Propeller Club. LEO COMPTON JONES III Tampa, Florida Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Oriental, Robin Lines; Service Rib- bon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer, Propeller Club. JASSI JULIANO Salem, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Spencer, United States Lines, S.S. Golden Eagle, United Fruit Co. ; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Midships, Drill Team. Boxing. ppjcember Qg.J6iO JOHN THOMAS KAUFFMAN Palisade, New Jersey Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Czechoslovakia Victory, American-Hawaiian Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Photography Edi- tor of Midships, Camera C luh. ROBERT RICH.ARD KEEN. N Dover, New Hampshire Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Henry, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Chairman of Escort Com- mittee, Propeller Club. 176 ' fl S. JOHN FRANCIS KEMPF Chicago, Illinois Fiiurtli Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Ticonderiij;a, Kej stont- Tankt-rs Corp. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Midships, Camera Club. WALLACE WARING KliPPEL Criinford, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kinjjs Point; Sea Duty-- S.S. Raphael Seemes, Waterman Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Midships. RAYMOND THEODORE KERN Davenport, Iowa Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Inj;lewood Hills, Los Angeles Tanker Operators Inc.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Drill Team, Chairman of Class Ring Committee. RICHARD BERNARD KIMMET Tiffin, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Snipe, American President Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — P,icific, Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Midships, Pro- peller Club, Radio Club. KEITH CHARLES KING Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kinj;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Winchester, Barbar Asphalt Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club. MARTIN JOHN KINNAIRD Springfield, Missouri Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Fairwind, American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Officer-Color Guard. JOHN FRANCIS KEMPF RICHARD BERNARD KIMMET WALLACE WARING KEFPEL KEITH CHARLES KING RAYMOND THEODORE KERN MARTIN JOHN KINNAIRD • K ELLIS ROBERT KLINE LOUIS BARRY KREMER STANLEY KLOSOWSKI WILLIAM HENRY KROMANN HENRY ALAN KOOCHER THOMAS ARTHUR KUNDINGER ELLIS ROBERT KLINE Lancaster, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Mission Carmel. Pacific Tankers Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Track. STANLEY KLOSOWSKI Newark, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kinus Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Glorieta, Marine Transport Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic. Mediterranean, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Intramural Re.t;i- mental Championship Softball Team. HENRY ALAN KOOCHER Reno, Nevada Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Ann, American Mail Lines, S.S. Philippa. Matson Navigation Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific ; Ac.idemy Record — Pro- peller Club, Track. LOUIS BARRY KREMER New York, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Esso Memphis, Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific; Academy Record — Windjammeis. Propeller Club, Manager of Football, Track. WILLIAM HENRY KROMANN Patchogue, New York Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Joes, Grace Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Midships, Pro- peller Club, President of Camera Club. THOMAS ARTHUR KUNDINGER Sebewaing, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Casa Grande, Pacific Tankers Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Circulation Manager of Midships, Escort Committee, Propeller Club, Camera Club. 178 mk I ROBERT GAFtTNE ' i ' LANEY Shelby, North Cirolin.i Fiuirtli Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Raven, United States Lines; Service Ribhcin — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Midships, Escort Committee, Pro- peller CAuh. HERMAN LE ROY EARNER Phil.ndolphia, Pcnnsylv.ini. i Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Great Republic, United Fruit Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — VCindjamniers, Propeller Club, Radio riub. ROBERT EUGENE LA VILLA Bronx, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Wolf Mountain, War Emergency Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club. i GEORGE RAYMOND LE BLANC New Orleans, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Redbank, American Republics Corp.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean. ALTON LEGER, Jii. Handsboro, Missi.ssippi Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Pembroke, Moore-McCormack Lines, S.S. Golden Fleece, Bull Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Windiammers. ISADORE LEVY Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Ocean Mail, American Mail Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic. ROBERT G.AFFNEY LANEY GEORGE RAYMOND LE BLANC HERMAN LE ROY EARNER ALTON LEGER, Jn. ROBERT EUGENE LA VILLA ISADORE LEVY ROBERT MELVIN LEVY JOSEPH HARLAN LION WILLL M STANLEY LEVY ALAN S. LOESBERG RICHARD VERNON LILJA WILLIAM DOW LOVETT ROBERT MELVIN LEVY St. Albans, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Raven, United States Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Mascot Staff. WILLIAM STANLEY LEVY New York. New York Fourth Class — Kini;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Orpheus, American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Track. RICHARD VERNON LILJ.A Chicago, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Nicaragua Victory, Isthmian Lines; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific. JOSEPH HARLAN LION Arlington, Virg ' ni.i Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Mission San Gabriel, Deconhill Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. ALAN S. LOESBERG Washington, D. C. Fourlh Cla s -Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. George Abernalhy. Grace Lines, S.S. Fairwind, American Lxport Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Football. WILLIAM DOW LOVETT Jacksonville, Florida Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Ridgely, American Republics Corp.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-lst Battalion Com- mander, Windjammers, Propeller Club. pecemi ' 180 o riH:S.r[c) FREDERICK GROSS MAC GURN San Francisco, California Fcurth Cl.l — S.m Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Ni-ptuncs Car. American President Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, McJilerranean ; Academy Record — Intramural Re.yinunt.il Championship Softball Team. LELAND GUY MARSHALL Mulino, Oregon Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mormachawk, Moorc-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philip- pine; Academy Record — Propeller Club. MELVIN EARL MATTSON Bronx, New York Fourth Class — Kin js Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Esso Buffalo, Standard Oil Co. of New Jersey; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record -Cadet Officer. JOHN ALBERT MA i Macon, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Robin, Grace Lines; S.S. Marine Panther, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Drill Team, Propeller Club, Baseball. EDW.ARD J.AMES McCLAFFERTY Elizabeth, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Sirocco, American West African Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — X ' ind|ammers, Propel- ler Club. JOHN ALOYSIUS McCRANE Teaneck, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Markay, Keystone Tankers Inc. ; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Propeller Club, Football. FREDERICK GROSS M. ' KC GURN JOHN ALBERT MAY LELAND GUY M,A.RSHALL EDWARD J.AMES McCLAFFERTY MELVIN EARL MATTSON JOHN ALOYSIUS McCRANE CH ' Fill! H.V Co.: Foi S.S a tec 4 " GEORGE CLAGETT McKINNEY WILLIAM LOWELL NEEDLER RICHARD FREDERICK MILLER ROBERT JOSEPH NOLAN WEBB NASH MORRISON JOHN HAMPTON NORMAN GEORGE CLAGETT McKINNEY Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — Kin s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Alexander Ramsey, United States Lines, S.S. Fairwind, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean ; Academy Record — Advertising Manager of Midships, NX ' indjammers, Pro- peller Club. RICHARD FREDERICK MILLER St. Louis, Missouri Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Jean LaFitte, Waterman Steamship Co., S.S. Santa Isabel, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Rec- ord — Boxing, Fencing. WEBB NASH MORRISON S.Tyville, New ' ork Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Thompson Lykes, Lykes Brothers Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Midships, Windjammers, Escort Committee, President of Propeller Club, Sailing. WILLIAM LOWELL NEEDLER Evanston. Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Snipe, American President Lines, S.S. Berkeley Victory, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbon -Pacific; Academy Record — Band, Windjammers, Swimming, Intra- mural Regimental Championship Swimming Team. ROBERT JOSEPH NOLAN South Orange, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Explorer, American Export Lines, S.S. Hubbardton, Texas Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer- th Company Commander. Pecefni ' [i JOHN HAMPTON NORMAN Street, M.iryland Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Aiken Victory, Mississippi Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbon — Atlantic ; Academy Record — Company Commander of Drill Team, Radio Club. 182 rxpoa " CHARLES G. NUSBAUM Norfolk, Virginia Fourth Class — Puss Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Tc-xas. A. H. Bull Steamship Co.: Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Man- ager of Tennis Team, Manager of Boxing Team. DANIEL FRANCIS O ' BRIEN New York, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. James Island, Marine Transport Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record -Midships, Ten- nis. PETER OHIGGINS San Antonio, Texas Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Elmira Victory, Alaska Steamship Co., S.S. Red Canyon, Cities Service Co.; Service Ribbon.s — Atlantic, Pacific, Philip- pine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Windjammers, Propeller Club. THOMAS FRANCIS O ' LEARY Maiden, Massachusetts Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Point Pleasant, War Emergency Tank- ers Inc. ; Service Ribbons — Atlant ic, Medi- terranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Band, X ' i djammers, Propeller Club. SAMUEL THEODORE OLIVER, Jii. Greensboro, North Carolina Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Leonor, Grace Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Scholastic Star, Camera Club. THOMAS BARRETT OLIVER Carnegie, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Bhick Warrior, United Fruit Co.; Service Ribbon — Atkintic; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Officer, Scholastic Star, Band, Propeller Club, Glee Club. CHARLES G. NUSBAUM THOMAS FRANCIS OLEARY DANIEL FRANCIS O ' BRIEN SAMUEL THEODORE OLIVER, Jr. PETER OHIGGINS THOMAS BARRETT OLIVER GEORGE CAPEWELL OLSEN WILLIAM HERBERT PAGE ROBERT LEE OWEN ROBERT EUGENE PAINTER THOMAS McADORY OWEN IV RICHARD ALAN PARAMORE GEORGE CAPEWELL OLSEN Corpus Christi, Texas Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Stephens, Moore-McCormack Lines ; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Midships, Windjam- mers, Propeller Club, Football. ROBERT LEE OWEN GlendaJe, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Matsonia, Matson Navigation Co. ; Serv- ice Ribbon — P.icitic; Academy Record — Midships. THOMAS McADORY OWEN IV Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Mission San Miguel, Pacific Tankers Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Windjammers, Escort Committee, Camera Club, Radio Club, Cadet Officer. WILLIAM HERBERT PAGE Grand R.ipids, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Bass, Matson Navigation Co. ; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Midships, Propeller Club. Camera Club. ROBERT EUGENE PAINTER Los Angeles, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Fdmont, Alcoa Steamship Co., S.S. Mission S ilano, Deconhill Shipping Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Director of Glee Club, Cadet Officer. RICHARD ALAN PARAMORE Wilmette, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Seven Pines, Barber Asphalt Co., S.S. Santa Leonore, Grace Lines, S.S. Kieth Palmer, Merchant Miners Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Pro- peller Club. Pcx:efttter , 184 r ERNEST FRANK PASCOE Dixon, California Fourth Clas — San Matio; Sea Duty — S.S. Bcl ;ium Victory, Sudden and Cliristcnson Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacitit, Phihppine; Academy Record — Glee Club. Track. ROBERT BROOKES PATTERSON East Liverpool, Oho Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Alcoa Polaris, Alcoa Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Basketball, Intramural Rej;imental Championship Softball Team. WELLS HOLMES PLEAS Redwood City, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Ipvak, Marine Transport Lines, S.S. Golden Gate, International Freight Corp.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. FREDERICK RUSSELL POAGE San Antonio, Texas Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape May, United States Lines ; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Track. WILLIS DENSON PORTER Cochran, Georgia Fourth Clas.s — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Valverde, Keystone Shipping Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- ranean. R.AYMOND P.AUL POYNER Richmond, Missouri Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Afoundria, Waterman Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar;.- Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Business! Manager of Polaris, Radio Club. ERNEST FR. NK PASCOE FREDERICK RUSSELL POAGE ROBERT BROOKES PATTERSON WILLIS DENSON PORTER WELLS HOLMES PLEAS RAYMOND PAUL POYNER w9 " V « ' RAY CHASE PRATT THOMAS ROWLAND PRIVETT ANDREW ANTHONY PRAWICKI JAMES McKINLEY PUGH LLOYD WILLIAM PRESCOTT EDWIN HAROLD PUTNAM RAY CHASE PRATT Washington, D. C. Fourth Chiss — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Raphael Stmines, Waterman Lines ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-8th Ccm- pany Commander. ANDREW ANTHONY PRAWICKI San Francisco, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Johet Victory, Alaska Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Combat Bar, Pacific, Philippine, Atlantic; Academy Record — Windjammers, Philosopher ' s Club, Glee Club, Intramural Regimental Champion- ship Basketball Team. LLOYD WILLIAM PRESCOTT Mount Pleasant, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Matsonia, Matson Navigation Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific. THOMAS ROWLAND PRIVETT Portsmoutli, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Texas, A. H. Bull Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Boxing. JAMES McKINLEY PUGH Covington, Virginia Fourtli Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Niagara, Keystone Shipping Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Windjammers, Cadet Officer. EDWIN HAROLD PUTNAM Nantucket, Massachusetts Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Colonel George Baxter, LInited States Army Transport Service, S.S. Mackay, Key- stone Shipping Co.; Service Ribbons — At- lantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Band, Windjammers. 186 E ROBERT GEORGE QUINN Washing ton, D. C. Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sta Duty — S.S. Santa Pauhi, Grace Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Clieer Leader. PERRY STEPHEN RANKIN Sotilh PortLind, M.iine Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Chapel Hill Victory, NLirine Trans- port Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean ; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Midships. JVAN LOREN RAUCH Napa, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Sandy, American President Lines; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean, Pacific, Philippine, Coinbat Bar. I ARMIN PAUL RESCHENBERG Oshkosh, Wisconsin Fourth Clas.s — San NLiteo; Sea Duty — S.S. Panama Victory, NLirnie Transport Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Acad- emy Record — Scholastic Star, Midships, Propeller Club, Camera Club. JAMES PATRICK RICE Bayside, New York Fourth Class — Kinfjs Point; Sea Dut) — S.S. Mission San Diego, Deconhill Steam- ship Co., S.S. Fortwood, Los Angeles Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbon.s — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Tennis, Track. JOSEPH DILLON RIGBY Fall River, Massachusetts Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Cristobal, Army Transport Service, S.S. Robin Locksley, Seas Shipping Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Polaris, Band, Propeller Club, Camera Club, Glee Club, Ski Club. ROBERT GEORGE QUINN ARMIN PAUL RESCHENBERG PERRY STEPHEN RANKIN JAMES PATRICK RICE IVAN LOREN RAUCH JOSEPH DILLON RIGBY ARTHUR RAYMOND RINKE BERTRAND JACOB RONNEBERG 535hi I GABRIEL ANTHONY RISCO VICTOR ACHILLE ROTOLO WILLIAM THEODORE ROBEL JOHN RAYMOND RUSSELL ARTHUR RAYMOND RINKE Old Greenwich, Connecticut Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. African Sun. American South African Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Cadet Ofiicer, Drill Team. GABRIEL ANTHONY RJSCO West New York, New Jersey Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Archer, Luckenbach Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- ranean ; Academy Record — Cadet Officer- 4th Company Commander, Windjammers, Propeller Club. WILLIAM THEODORE ROBEL Baltimore, Marylatid Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Robin, Grace Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic : Academy Record — Mid- ships, Baseball, Fencing. BERTRAND JACOB RONNEBERG San Francisco, California Fourtli Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Celestial, American President Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean, At- lantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Drill Team, Windjammers, Propeller Club, Wrestling, Track, Rowing. pecembcF k VICTOR ACHILLE ROTOLO Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. M.E. Lombardi, Standard Oil Co., S.S. Santa Cecilia, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Fencing. JOHN RAYMOND RUSSELL Wilton, Connecticut Fourth Class — Kings Poiiit; Sea Duty — S.S. Cross Keys, Gulf Oil Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean ; Acad- emy Record — Midships, Drill Team, Band, Propeller Club. 188 j :w JOSE SAEZ Detroit, Michigan Fuuitii Cl.i.s — S.ui M.itcii; Sea Duty — S.S. Owyhee, Los Anpcles Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet OHicer-Coior Guard, Scholastic Star, Glee Club, Boxing. STANLEY IVIELVIN SAGER Washington, D. C. Fourth (;iass — Kin ;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. North Point. Standard Oil Co.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Baseball. ELMER LOUIS SCHLEIN Kansas City, Kansas Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Bald Eagle, United States Lines, S.S. Nep- tune ' s Car, American President Lines; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Sports tditor of Polaris, Propeller Club. HENRY SCHMIDT, Jr. Kenosha, Wisconsin Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Nonpareil, Matson Navigation Co., S.S. Marne, American Trading and Produce Corp.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean, Pacific. WILLIAM SCHMIDT, Jii. EUwood City, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Pipe Spring, Pacific Tankers Inc., S.S. Carolinian, American Hawaiian Steamship Co; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Midships, Intra- mural Regimental Championship Cross Country Team. NORMAN BERNARD SCHROTT Alexandria, Virginia " ourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Eufaula Victory, L ' nited States Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Manager of Basketball Team. JOSE SAEZ HENRY SCHMIDT, Jii. STANLEY MELVIN SAGER WILLIAM SCHMIDT, Jii. ELMER LOUIS SCHLEIN NORMAN BERNARD SCHROTT THEODORE D. SCHWARTZMAN WALTER ROY SILBERSACK JAMES VERNON SCROGGIN. Ju. EARL STRATTON SMITH DAVID E. SHUART JUNIOR STEWART SMITH THEODORE D. SCHWARTZMAN Miami Beach, Florida Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Edge Hill, War Emergency Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Band, Escort Committee. JAMES VERNON SCROGGIN. Jii. Oak Ridge, Louisiana Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. William Dunbar, South Atlantic Shipping Co. ; Service Ribbon.s — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Windjam- mers, Escort Committee, Radio Club, Fenc- ing, Intramural Regimental Championship Softball Team. DAVID E. SHUART Grand Rapids, Michigan Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Lordo Taft. South African Lines, S.S. Albert K. Smiley, International Freighting Co., S.S. Montclair Victory, Agwilines Co., S.S. Brandon Victory, Rothchild Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Combat Bar; Acidemy Record — Propeller Club. WALTER ROY SILBERSACK New York, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Thompson Lykes, Lykes Brothers Steamship Co., Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Combat Bar; Academy Rec- ord — Propeller Club. EARL STRATTON SMITH Honolulu, Hawaii Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Typhoon, Mississippi Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific. Combat Bar; Acad- emy Record — Midships, Propeller Club, Swimming. JUNIOR STEWART SMITH Dallas, Texas Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Egg Harbor, Keystone Tankers Co., S.S. Wide Awake. American Mail Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Boxing. 190 no my . JACK ALEXANDER SOMMERVILLE Oakland. California Fiiurtii Class— S.ui M.itcn; Sui Diity -S.S. Cipc Flattery, American Mail Lints; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean, At- lantic. DONALD RAFAEL SPERIER New Orleans, Louisiana Fiiurtli Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Red Bank. American Republic Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Nlediterranean; Academy Record — Vi ' indiammers, Hscort Committee, Propeller Club. Glee Club. MICHAEL A. SQUILLACE Detroit, Michigan Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Red Canyon, Cities Service Co, ; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Glee Club. ERNST ALBERT STAHMANN, Ju. Cincinnati, Ohio Fourth Cliiss — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Porpoise. Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbun.s — Atlantic, Pacific, Victory. American Theatre; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Boxing, Cadet Officer. WILLIAM JOHN STAMM Mount Vernon, New ' ork Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Raven. L ' nited States Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Propeller Club. Intramural Regimental Championship Softball Team. LOWELL STANLEY STANLEY Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Alden Besse. Grace Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Acad- emy Record — Propeller Club, Cadet Officer- 8th Company Commander. JACK ALEXANDER SOMMERVILLE ERNST ALBERT ST.A.HM.ANN, Ju. DONALD RAFAEL SPERIER WILLIAM JOHN STAMM MICHAEL A. SQUILLACE LOWELL STANLEY STANLEY RICHARD JOSEPH STARK WILLIAM LEE STREAT HARRY CLINTON STONE ROBERT H. STROMPF NELSON STONE ISAAC SUDER RICHARD JOSEPH STARK Riverhead, New York Fourth Class — Kinj;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Midnight. American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Vi ' md- jammc-rs, Propeller Club. HARRY CLINTON STONE St. Augustine. Florida Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Oneida Victory, Lfnited Fruit Lines, S.S. Aiken Victory, Mississippi Shippmg Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Midships, Band. NELSON STONE Chestnut Hill, Mass.ichusett: Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Exhibitor, American Export Lines, S.S. Gaines Mill, Keystone Shipping Co., S.S. River Raisin, American Petroleum Lines; Service Ribbtms — Atlantic, Mediter- ranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Pro- peller Club, Man.iger of Footb.ill Team. WILLIAM LEE STREAT Baltimore, Maryland Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mesa Verde, Deconhill Shipping Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team, Escort Commit- tee, Camera Club. ROBERT H. STROMPF Larchmont, New " York Fourth Class — Kings Point ; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Leonor, Grace Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Lay- out Editor of Midships, Head Man.iger of Football Team. ISAAC SUDER New ork. New York Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Ticonderoga, Keystone Shipping Co.;. Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Midships, Polaris, Camer.i: Club. 192 n, ffl EDWARD C. SUMMERS Greensboro. North Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Paula, Grace Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Meditcrr.incan, Pacific; Academy Record — Wind|,iinmers, Philcisu- phcr ' s Club. CARL HENRY SWADELL Fresno, Californi.! Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Tryon, American President Lines; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer- 1st Bat- talion StalT. LEONARD B. SZATKOWSKI Kcw Gardens Hills, Lonj; Island, N. Y. Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Elk Hills, American Trading; and Produce Corp.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Propelkr Club. NICHOLAS TENT.AS Astoria, New York Fourth Class — Kint;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Talisman, Mississippi Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Officer, Propeller Club, Base- ball. DAN H. R. TEODORSON Manchester, Massachusetts Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. San Juan Hill, Bernuth Lembckc Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean, P.Kific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Intramural Regimental Champion- ship Softball Team. CHARLES G. THALHIMER Richmond, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — United States Army Transport Bra zil, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Offi- cer — Regimental StafT, Scholastic Star, Po- laris, Propeller Club. EDWARD C. SUMMERS NICHOLAS TENTAS CARL HENRY SWADELL DAN H. R. TEODORSON LEONARD B. SZATKOWSKI CHARLES G. THALHIMER THOMAS FRANCIS TRAVERS PAUL R. VAN ZWALUWENBURG IRVING CLARK THAYER LOUIS JOHN VIAU, Jii. GEORGE ALFRED VAN FLEET BILLIE WILSON WALDEN THOMAS FRANCIS TRAVERS East Wiliiston, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Oriental, Seas Shipping Co., S.S. Antinous, Waterman Steamship Co. ; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic; Acaiieiny Record — Track. IRVING CLARK THAYER Camiel, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Pilot Butte, Pacific Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacitic. Philippine; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Tennis. GEORGE ALFRED VAN FLEET Grand Rapids, Michigan Fourth Clas.s — Kings Pomt; Sea Duty — S.S. James Lykes, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Drill Team. PAUL R. VAN ZWALUWENBURG Honolulu, Hawaii Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Manukai, Matson Navigation Co. ; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Midships, Polaris, Pro- peller Club. ppce-irtJ r i LOUIS JOHN VIAU, Ju. Now Orleans, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pa.ss Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Redbank, American Republic Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Football, Basketball, Captain of Baseball Team. BILLIE WILSON WALDEN Hugo, Oklahoma Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Newenham, American Mail Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer — ith C ompany Commander. 194 WILLIAM DEAN WAYNE Peru, Indiana Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fairfax, Marine Transport Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Piiilip- pine; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Midships, Propeller Club, Treasurer of Camera Club, Ski Club. HAROLD FLOYD WENZEL Springdale, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. hik Hills, American Tradini; and Produce Corp.; Service Ribbons — Atl.intic, Pacific; Academy Record — Intramural Regimental Championship Softball Team. CHESTER ROBERT WILMOT Cumberland, Maryland Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Sweepstakes, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Propeller Club. WILLIAM GASTON WINSLOW. Jii. Old Greenwich, Connecticut Fourth Clas.s — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Fear. United States Lines, S.S. Sea Devil, American Hawaiian Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Band. ROBERT WALTER WINTER Manitowoc, Wisconsin Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Porpoise, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Officer, Scholastic Star, Editor of Midships, Camera Club, Glee Club. JAMES FRANCIS WISE. Jri. Norfolk, Virj»inia Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Lightning, United States Lines; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic. WILLIAM DEAN WAYNE WILLIAM GASTON WINSLOW, Jii. HAROLD FLOYD WENZEL ROBERT WALTER WINTER CHESTER ROBERT WILMOT JAMES FRANCIS WISE, Jit. L ALV ' IN ROBERT WITCHER BERNARD PETER WOLFE JOSEPH JOHN WYSOCKI ALVIN ROBERT WITCHER Sandusky, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Flying Mist, VC ' eyerhaeuser Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Radio Club. BERNARD PETER WOLFE New Orleans. Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Delaware, Texas Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Vice President of Propeller Club, Foot- ball. JOSEPH JOHN WYSOCKI Meriden, Connecticut Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape San Diego, American President Lines, S.S. China Victory, Matson Navigation Co. ; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Intramural Regi- mental Championship Softball Team. PetX4rt bep JgJdl O V 196 f M AutacyucupAl Auto j.nxipit6 Qiaduatian c 29 Mcuf f9 7 ■ CONSTATINE AFANASIEF NORMAN LEON ASKEW LELAND GRAHAM ANDERSON WILLIAM J. BAILEY BENJAMIN ALLEN ANTHONY, Jit. RUSSELL SAGE BAKER, Jh. CONSTATINE AFANASIEF San Francisco, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Sea X ' itch, United States Lines, S.S. Man- darin, American Hawaiian Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine. LELAND GRAHAM ANDERSON Santa Cruz, Califomi.i Ft)urth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Henry, Moore-McCormack Lines ; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Acidemy Record — Cadet Officer, Drill Team. Propeller Club BENJAMIN ALLEN ANTHONY. Jic. Mariemont, Ohio Fourth Class — Kings Pomt; Sea Duty — S.S. Mission San Luis Rey. Pacific Tankers Co., S.S. Santa Clara Victory. General Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Regimental Staff, Propeller Club. NORMAN LEON ASKEW Atlanta, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Horn, States Marine Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Regimental Staff, Propeller Club. WILLIAM J. BAILEY Springfield, Massachu ctt.; Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. George Washington. United States Army. S. S. Fdge Hill. Sinclair Oil Co., S.S. Autosse, National Bulk Co.; Service Rib- bons — Atlantic, Pacific. Philippine; Acad- emy Record — VCindjammcrs, E.scort Com- mittee, Baseball. RUSSELL SAGE BAKER, Jit. Cambridge, Maryland Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Kelso Victory. Isthmian Steamship Co., S.S. Marshfield Victory. American Mail Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Exchange Editor and Pub- lications Editor of Polaris. 200 WILLIAM GREGORY HALDRJDGE Kansas City, Missouri Fimitli Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Trycn, American President Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Mediter- ranean; Academy Record — Boxiny. EDWARD HAROLD IJARNES San Francisco, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Ventura Hills, Deconhil Shipping; Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacitic; Academy Record — Wrestling. WALTER RAYMOND BARTOSEK Blaine, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Constance, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Otfi- ccr-Regimental Staflf. ROBERT JONATHAN BATCHELDER Petersburg, Virginia Fourth Class— S.ui Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Dalton Victory, Suddery Christensen Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Scholastic St.ir, Propeller Club, Track. RICHARD LOUIS BATTALINE West Hartford, Coruiecticut Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Lorado Taft, American South African Lines, M.V. Cape Borda, South Atlantic Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic; Academy Record — Midships, X ' indiammers. BARTLETTE ALBERT BECK Portsmouth, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. George C. Childress, Grace Lines, S.S. Hanging Rocks, Texas Lines; Service Rib- bon.s — Philippine. Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Officer, Band, Boxing. WILLIAM GREGORY BALDRIDGE ROBERT JONATHAN BATCHELDER EDWARD HAROLD BARNES RICHARD LOUIS BATTALINE WALTER RAYMOND BARTOSEK BARTLETTE ALBERT BECK w Foi Hi WILLIS EUGENE BELL DAVID STANLEY BERG DAVID MORTON BENENSON JAMES WALKER BERGFORD FRANKLIN SEATON BENNETT MARTIN BURKE BETTS WILLIS EUGENE BELL Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Examiner, American Export Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean, Atlan- tic; Academy Record — Cadet Gflicer-Regi- mental Commander, Scholastic Star, Glee Club. DAVID MORTON BENENSON New York, New York Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Elgin Victory, American Hawaiian Lines, S.S. Marine Dragon, Vl ' aterman Lines, S.S. Brandon Victory. Blidberg Rothchild Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Mediterranean. Pacitic; Academy Record — Manager of X ' restling, M.inager of Tennis. FRANKLIN SE.ATON BENNETT Poland. Ohio Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Panther, American Export Lines. M.S. John Ericson, L ' nitcd States Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic; Academy Record —Glee Club. Basketball. DAVID STANLEY BERG Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mormacsea, Moore-McCormack Lines ; Serv- ice Ribbons — Combat Bar. Pacific, Philip- pine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. P JAMES WALKER BERGFORD Minneapolis, Minnesota Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cody Victor) ' . S.S. Sea Tarpon, Alcoa Lines: Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- ranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. Scholastic Star, V ' indjamniers. MARTIN BURKE BETTS Augusta. Georgia Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Kettle Creek, War Emergency Tankers, Inc. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- rancin; Acadcmv Record — Cadet Officer. 202 HARRY JOSEPH BIHLER San Mateo, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Halaula, Matson Navigation Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. W.AYNE HARVEY BISHOP Ford, Kansas Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Jean La Fitte, Waterman Lines; Service Rilibons — Philippine, Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Ot}icer-2nd Bat- talion Staff, Propeller Club. WARREN GRANT BLUE Columbus, Ohio Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Fetterman, American Republics Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philip- pine; Academy Record — Cadet Officcr-2nd Battalion Staflf. THOMAS TALBOTT BOND Baltimore, Maryland Fourth Class — Kinqs Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Golden Fleece, Bull Line; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean, Pacific, Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Escort Committee. RALPH JAMES BRADFORD Lansdowne, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Brandy Station, ' VC ' ar Emergency Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Offi- cer. Windjammers, Escort Committee, Pro- peller Club. RAYMOND STARLING BRAND Miami Beach. Florida Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Paulus Hook, Marine Transport Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philip- pine; Academy Record — Cadet C)fficer-6th Company Commander, Philosopher ' s Club. HARRY JOSEPH BIHLER THOMAS TALBOTT BOND WAYNE HARVEY BISHOP RALPH JAMES BRADFORD WARREN GRANT BLUE RAYMOND STARLING BRAND ROBERT CLAY BRAND MAC GREGOR BULLOCH RICHARD ANDREW BRAY JACK BURCH JACKSON ANDREW BROWER ROBERT PAUL BURGHARDT ROBERT CLAY BRAND Miami Beach, Florida Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Pan Rhode Island, Pan American Petroleum Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-6th Company Commander, Philoso- pher ' s Club. RICHARD ANDREW BRAY Ogdensburg. New York Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Ray, American Hawaiian Lines; Ser -ice Ribbons — Pacific. Philippine. JACKSON ANDREW BROWER Chicago, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo South African Victory, African Lines; Service Academy Record — Cadet Glee Club, Radio Club. ; Sea Duty — S.S. American South Ribbon — Pacific; Officer, Polaris, M.A.C GREGOR BULLOCH New Orleans, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Perch, United Fruit Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Otficer-2nd Battalion Staff. JACK BURCH Miami, Florida Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Eufaula Victory, United States Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Cadet Otiicer, Glee Club. ROBERT PAUL BURGHARDT New York, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Tule Canyon, Marine Transport Lines, S.S. Sea Cardinal, Luckenbach Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Polaris, Windjammers, President of Camera Club. 204 w m - DONALD JOHN BURLINGHAM Salem, Oregon Fcmrlli Class — S.in M.itto; Sea Duty — S.S. Kudiak Victciry. Alaska Steamship Co.; Service Rihbcin — Pacific; Acailemy Record — Wiiulianinurs, Basketball, Cadet Otficcr. MEDFORD PARR C-XNHY Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Quail, Moore-i lcCorm.ick Lines; S.S. Pachaug Victory, Merchants Miners Co.; M.V. John Ericcson, United States Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Mediterranean; Academy Rcciird — Cadet Officer. Fencing. ROBERT JOSEPH CANNELL Rockton, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Lurlinc, Matson Navigation Lines; S.S. The Dalles, Pacific Tankers Co.; Service Rib- bons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Polaris, Propeller Club. MYRON HARRY CAPLIN Roxbury, Massachusetts Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Scamp, Lykes Brothers Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific. Philip- pine; Academy Record — Polaris, Vi ' indjam- mers. Propeller Club. WILLLAM THOMAS CARL Salina, Kansas Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Rincon Hills, Pacific Tankers Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer — Third Battalion Staff, Propeller Club, Football. ROBERT MARTIN CARLTON Bellevuc, Washington Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Piatt Park, Pacific Tankers Co.; Service Rib- bons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-5th Company Commander, Windjammers, Intramural Basketball Cham- pionship Team. DONALD JOHN BURLINGHAM MYRON HARRY CAPLIN MEDFORD PARR CANBY WILLIAM THOMAS CARL ROBERT JOSEPH CANNELL ROBERT MARTIN CARLTON JOHN CHO ARTHUR CODAY DAVE EMERY CHURCH MARVIN COHEN ALLEN RALPH CLINTON JAMES EDWARD COLLINS JOHN CHO Honolulu, Hawaii Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Henlopen, A. H. Bull Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Rec- ord — Band. Boxing. DAVE EMERY CHURCH Royal Oak, Michigan Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Borda, South African Steamship Co.; Ser ' ice Ribbon — Atlantic. . LLEN RALPH CLINTON Richmond Heights, Missouri Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cody Victory,- Alcoa Steamship Company, S.S. Sea Tarpon, Alcoa Steamship Company; Ser%ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Polaris, Escort Committee. ARTHUR CODAY New York. New York Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Cornell, Union Oil Company of Cali- fornia; S.S. Sedalia Victory, United Fruit Co., S.S. Council Grove, Cities Ser ' ice Company; Service Ribbon — Atliintic; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Otficer, Scholastic Star, Polaris. Windjammers, Boxing. MARVIN COHEN Oakland, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. U.S.S.R. Victory, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Atlantic; Academy Record — Propeller Club. JAMES EDWARD COLLINS San Francisco, California Fourth Class — San Mateo: Sea Duty — S.S. White Sands, Pacific Tankers Company; Service Ribbons — Pacific. Atlantic, Philip- pine; Academy Record — Drill Team. 206 WILLIAM MATHEW CONDON, Jii. Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kings Pdint; Sea Duty — S.S. Jancsville Victory, American West African Linc-s, S.S. Marine Star, AEiierican Hawaiian Line; Service Ribbims — Mediterranean, At- lantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Regimental Staff, Hditor-in-Chief of Polaris. WILLIAM SHAW CORBITT Henderson, North Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Jalapa, Gulf Oil Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Track. ANDERSON BLACKWELL COSBY III Richmond, Virginia Fourth CJjiss — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Yaldosta Victory, Robin Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer — 1st Company Commander. JOSEPH THOMAS COUNCIL Norfolk, Virginia Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Cleare, Matson Navigation Co. ; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Officer, Track. -ALBERT BOWMAN CRISTY Honolulu, T. H. Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Alcoa Patriot, Alcoa Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer — 3rd Battalion Staff, Scholas- tic Award. DELM.A. LOM.A.X CROOK Lumberton, North Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Blackwater, War Emergency Tankers Inc. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Offi- cer — Regimental Adjutant, Propeller Club, Glee Club. WILLIAM MATHEW CONDON, Jn. JOSEPH THOM.AS COUNOL WILLIAM SHAW CORBITT ALBERT BOWMAN CRISTY ANDERSON BLACKWELL COSBY III DELMA LOMAX CROOK CHARLES KENNETH CROW HARLAN WAYLAND DAVIDSON, Jr. IRWIN LOUIS CUCULLU WILLARD FREW DAVIS WARREN RANDOLPH DAVENPORT RICHARD FRANK DITTRICH CHARLES KENNETH CROW Letart, West Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Towanda Victory. Black Diamond Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Propeller Club. IRWIN LOUIS CUCULLU New Orleans, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Pitt, American Petroleum Trans- portation Company; Service Ribbons — At- lantic, Pacific, Philippine. WARREN RANDOLPH DAVENPORT Soddy, Tennessee Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Quemado Lake, War Emergency Tank- ers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific. HARLAN WAYLAND DAVIDSON. Jii. Alameda, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Cruz, Grace Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Acader»iy Record — Cadet Officc ' -3rd Battalion Staff. Scholastic Star. Windjammers. WILLARD FREW DAVIS Denville, New Jersey Fourth Class- Kiiif;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Panther, American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Philosopher ' s Club. Man- ager of Debating Team. RICHARD FRANK DITTRICH Garfield, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Knute Rockne. Grace Lines, S.S. Mission . ' santa Maria. National Bulk S.S. Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic. Pacific; Academy Record — Band. 208 y -A LOUIS ' VICTOR DONGHI Tcx.i! Texas Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Sandy Lake, American Republic Lines; Service Rihbuns — Atlantic. Nlcditerr.intan, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer- Battalion Staff, Football. .ARTHUR HOWARD DOYLE Woodhaven, Long IsLind, New ork Fourtli Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. African Dawn, American South Afri- can Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Base- ball. CHARLES OLIVER DUNNIC.AN, Jii. San Diego, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Claremont Victory, Isthmian S.S. Company; Service Ribbons — Combat Bar, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Drill Team. JOSEPH MICHAEL DUNWORTH New York, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. African Dawn, American South Afri- can Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Regimental Stafl . Drill Team, Po- laris, Glee Club, Debating Team. RUDOLPH ESPOSITO Red Bank, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Montclair Victory, Agwilines, S.S. Archer, Luckenbach Lines, S.S. Andrew Hamilton, International Freight Corpo- ration; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Wrestling. RICHARD BERGMAN ESSLER Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Fetterman, American Republics Corporation; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. Philippine; Academy Record — Drill Team, Propeller Club. LOUIS VICTOR DONGHI JOSEPH MICHAEL DUNWORTH ARTHUR EDWARD DOYLE RUDOLPH ESPOSITO CHARLES OLIVER DUNNIGAN, Jii. RICHARD BERGMAN ESSLER VICTOR ALFRED LEO EVON GERALD ERVIN FARRINGTON ROBERT FRANK EWELS DONALD JOHN FAULHABER WILLIAM DON PARIS ROBERT JOSEPH nTZGER.A.LD VICTOR ALFRED LEO EVON Willimansett, Massachusetts Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Bull Run, Keystone Tankers, S.S. Kencsow Mt., Keystone Tankers, S.S. Sappo Creek, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team. ROBERT FRANK EWELS Pleasantville, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Boyer, Lykes Brothers; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific. WILLIAM DON FARIS Bloomington, Indiana Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Loma Victor ' , American South Afri- can Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Polaris. Basketball. GERALD ERVIN FARRINGTON New Canaan, Connecticut Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Buena Vista Hills, Pacific Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Track. DONALD JOHN FAULHABER Erie, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. San Antonio, Gulf Oil Corporation; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean. Pacific; Academy Record — Band. X ' md- jammers. Sailing. ROBERT JOSEPH HTZGERALD St. Joseph, Missouri Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. McKittrick Hills, Pacific Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. Philip- pine; Academy Record — Band. Football. 210 SMITH RICHARD FLETCHER Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Fourth Class — San Matto; Sea Duty — S.S. Mormacsea, Mnore-McCormack Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacitic, Mediterra- nean. Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Transportation Committee. DONALD GEORGE FLOYD Columbus, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mormacgull. Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. CH. RLES FREDERICK FORD Hagerstown, Maryland Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. LaCrosse, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Track. WILLIAM LEE FOSTER Mauckport, Indiana Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape St. George, ' aterman Steam- ship Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. GEORGE DAVID FRANKLIN Delavan, Wisconsin Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Bon, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific, Combat Bar: Academy Rec- ord — Propeller Club, Football, Baseball, Basketball. FRED GALLICCHIO Chicago, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Halaula Victory, Matson Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Glee Club. SMITH RICHARD FLETCHER WILLIAM LEE FOSTER DONALD GEORGE FLOYD GEORGE DAVID FRANKLIN CHARLES FREDERICK FORD FRED GALLICCHIO JOI Foil Si. WILLIAM PATRICK GANNON HENRY WHITE GOODSON, Jr. WILLIAM SHERIDAN GARVIN OLIVER WATSON GREENE III GEORGE GERALD GOLAN RAYMOND LEONARD GRISMER, Jit. WILLIAM PATRICK GANNON Lakewood, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Nampa Victory, International Freight Corp. ; Service Ribbons —Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Track, Cadet Officer-Ninth Company Commander. WILLIAM SHERIDAN GARVIN Chicago, Illinois Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Walter Ranger, Eastern Steamship Company ; M.V. Cape Flattery, American Mail Line; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Atlan- tic, Mediterranean, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Propeller Club. GEORGE GERALD GOLAN Fall River, Massachusetts Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Stephen B. Mallory, Isbrandsten Steam- ship Company, M.V. Cape Porpois, Moore- McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlan- tic, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Windjammers, Propeller Club, Sailin.i;. HENRY WHITE GOODSON. Jit. Salisbury, North Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Four Lakes, Atl.antic Refining Com- pany; S.S. Kettle Creek. Sun Oil Com- pany; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediterranean. OLIVER WATSON GREENE III Cranston, Rhode Island Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Rosebud, Marine Transport Company; S.S. Australia Victory. Matson Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — ' Wind- jammers, Track. RAYMOND LEONARD GRISMER, Jii. Minneapolis, Minnesota Fourth Class — San Mateo ; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Frederich, Los Angeles Tanker Oper- ators; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Regimental Staff, Scholastic Award, Editor-in-Chief of Po- laris, Band. 212 . ' »-- JOHN HANSEL HARDEE Chiefland, Florid.i Fourth Class — Pass Cl-ristian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Barbara, Grace- Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Po- laris. Band, Windjammers. WALTER LOULS HARLOS Drc. el Hill, Pennsylvania Fiiurtli Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Clarkesville Victory, American Ex- port Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Windjammers. HARRY JOSEPH HEGEMAN Clayton, Missouri Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S,S. Sea Perch, United Fruit Company; Service Ribbons — Pacific. Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Escort Committee, Pro- peller Club, Football. JOHN CHARLES HERMAN Staten Island, New ' ork Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — M.S. John Ericcson. United States Lines; S.S. Frontenac Victory, Agwilines; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic. JOHN FLOY HESTER New Orleans, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Crow Wing, National Bulk Carriers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Ofiicer, Football, Track. ALEXANDER PETER HICKS Taylor, Texas Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Maunawili, Matson Navigation Com- pany; S.S. Morning Light, Matson Navi- gation Company; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer — First Bat- talion Staff. JOHN HANSEL HARDEE JOHN CHARLES HERMAN WALTER LOUIS HARLOS JOHN FLOY HESTER H.ARRY JOSEPH HEGEMAN ALEXANDER PETER HICKS ffl. Four Oca BVl Ion JAMKS ROE HODGE HUBERT HOLDER HOWARD GEORGE EDMUND HOLLAND RICHARD EDWIN HUGHES JOHN NEAL HOLT ELMER GUY HULDTQUIST JAMES ROE HODGE Atlanta, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sta Duty — S.S. Marine Dragon, Waterman Steamship Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Drill Team, Swimming. GEORGE EDMUND HOLLAND Brooklyn, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Chesapeake Capes, War Emergency Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Drill Team, Propeller Club, Glee Club, Cadet Officer. JOHN NE.AL HOLT Birmingham. Alabama Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Mill Spring. Keystone Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Tennis. HUBERT HOLDER HOWARD Ludowice, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. African Dawn, American South Afri- can Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Chair- man of Transportation Committee. A RICHARD EDWIN HUGHES Puunene, Maui. Hawaii Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Silver Peak. Deconhil Shipping Co.. S.S. Blue Island Victory, X ' aterman Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Atlantic; Academy Record — Swimming, Cadet Offi- cer-Regimental Staff. ELMER GUY HULDTQUIST Diablo Heights. Canal Zone Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Catham, Barber Asphalt Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Baseball, Track. 214 .mm WILLIAM JOSEPH HURLEY Wilmette, Illinois Fiiurth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Ocean Telegraph, Isthmian Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Otficcr. DAVID THOMAS HURLOCK Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Fetterman, American Republics Corp.; Academy Record — X ' ind|ammers, Propeller Club, Sailing. SAMUEL SULLIVAN IRVIN, Jh. Corozal, Canal Zone Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Dut) — S.S. Sea Hawk, Grace Lines ; Service Rib- bons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Glee Club. B RON CAREY JACKSON Birmingham, Alabama Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Quemado Lake, Tankers Company Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. ROLAND BURGESS JARVIS Redondo Beach, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Anadarko Victory, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Company; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediterranean. Philippine; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Officer, Camera Club, Philosopher ' s Club. PAUL CORNELIUS JOHNSON Baltimore, Maryland Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Palmas, United States Lines; S.S. David F. Barry. Alaska Transporta- tion Company; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, X ' ind- jammers. Sailing. WILLIAM JOSEPH HURLEY BYRON CAREY JACKSON DAVID THOMAS HURLOCK ROLAND BURGESS JARVIS SAMUEL SULLIVAN IRVIN. Jii. PAUL CORNELIUS JOHNSON ROBERT OWEN JOHNSON ROBERT HENRY KAROW DONALD FORBIS JONES SCUDDER DARRAGH KELVIE FRANCIS HERMAN KARFS FREDERICK REGINALD KERN ROBERT OWEN JOHNSON Seattle, Washington Fourth Class — Kings Piiint; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Blanco, American South Afri- can Lines; S.S. NX ' estward Ho, American President Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Olfi- ccr, Swimming. DONALD FORBIS JONES Lawndale, North Carolina Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Tiger, American Export Lmes; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Otficer-Battalion Staff. Base- ball. FRANOS HERMAN KARFS Belleville, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Longview Victory. Alaska Steamship Com- pany; Service Ribbon — Pacific. ROBERT HENRY K.AROW Chicago, Illinois Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Four Lakes, War Emergency Tank- ers Inc.; S.S. Marine Panther, American Export Lines; S.S. Aedanus Burke, Mis- sissippi Shipping Company, S.S. Muhlen- burg, Luckenbach Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Polaris. SCUDDER DARRAGH KELVIE Canton. Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Salina Victory, Matson Navigation Com- pany; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Windjammers, Pro- peller Club. Debating Team. FREDERICK REGINALD KERN Ridgcfield, New Jersey Fourth Chiss — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. African Dawn, American South Afri- can Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. Philosopher ' s Club, Ten- nis. 216 ■ :imim WILLIAM JOSEPH KLAUBI:RG Brooklyn, New York Fourth C-I.iss — Kint;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Devil, llnited Fruit Company; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Oflicer-Rej;imental Commander, Vi ' indjammers. TED HERMAN KNEE New York, New York Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Maria, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Polari.s, Band, Windjammers, Escort Committee. ALLAN J. KNIGHT Howeil, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mission San Luis Obispo, Pacific Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Second Battalion Adjutant. ROBERT HENRY KNORR Hawley, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Antinous, Waterman Steamship Company; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean. Pacific; Academy Record — Polaris. JOHN WARREN KNOWLTON Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Owl, American Export Lines; Serv- ice Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Glee Club, Football. GERALD JAMES KONEN Detroit, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Hastings Victory, Grace Lines ; S.S. Salina Victory, Matson Navigation Company; Serv- ice Ribbons — Combat Bar, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Cadet Officer-2nd Battalion Commander. WILLIAM JOSEPH KLAUBERG ROBERT HENRY KNORR TED HERMAN KNEE JOHN WARREN KNOWLTON ALLAN J. KNIGHT GERALD JAMES KONEN BORIS WILLIAM KOSTECKE RICHARD ANTON KRAVCHUK STANLEY MARCEL KOWLESKI HARRY KUMOVE JOHN EDMUND KRAMER RICHARD NORMAN LAKE BORIS WILLIAM KOSTECKE Caro, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Whirlwind, Alaska Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar, Philip- pine; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer-.Trd Battalion Staff, Camera Club, Intramural Softball Championship Team, Student Coun- cil Assembly. STANLEY MARCEL KOWLESKI Oakland, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Jericho Victory, South Atlantic Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterra- nean ; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer-3rd Battalion Commander. JOHN EDMUND KRAMER Ridley Park. Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Skull Bar. American Republic Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Regimental Staff, Art Editor of Polaris, Public Relations Committee, Ring Committee, Christmas Card Committee. RICHARD ANTON KRAVCHUK Omaha. Nebraska Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Possession, American Hawaiian Lines; S.S. Examiner, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediter- ranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Philosopher ' s Club. HARRY KUMOVE Detroit, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Flying Cloud, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Drill Team. RICHARD NORMAN LAKE Dover, New Jersey Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Kelso Victory, Isthmian Steamship Co.; S.S. Marshfield Victory, American Mail Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-lst Bat- talion Staff, Windjammers. 218 o ni ' fLo ARTHUR JAMES LAMBRIGHT Tiffin, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sunset, Pacific Tanker Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Ofiicer, Propeller Club, Camera Club. ALFRED SMITH LANDRY New Iberia, Louisi.ina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Fraberlanpa, LInited Fruit Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Intramural Basketball (Ji.impionship Team. DAVID CONKLIN LARKIN Columbus, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Longview Victory, Alaska Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team, Wmdjammers, Cadet Officer. I N ' INCENT A. LAV AN Jackson Heights, Long Island, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Towanda Victory, Black Diamond Steam- ship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Vi ' res- tling. Track, Intramural Softball Champion- ship Team. DONALD T. S. LEE Honolulu, Hawaii Fourth Clas.s — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Texarkana, O.J. Olsen Co.; M.V. John Ericcson, United States Lines; Service Rib- bons — Atlantic. Pacific, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer- th Com- pany Commander, Propeller Club, Radio Club. GEORGE LEE Lookout Mountain, Tennessee Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. White Falcon, American Fxport Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Midships, Propeller Club, Camera Club. ARTHUR JAMES LAMBRIGHT VINCENT A. LAV AN ALFRED SMITH LANDRY DONALD T. S. LEE DAVID CONKLIN LARKIN GEORGE LEE ROBERT JAMES LEHREN ROBERT CHARLES LEONARD GLENN LE ROY LEMON DON WILLIAM LEVERENZ JOSEPH STEVEN LENKAY LOUIS BERNARD LITZLER ROBERT JAMES LEHREN Riverside, Connecticut Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Flying Cloud. McCormack Steamship Co.; S.S. Island Mail, American Mail Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific. Philippine; Acad- emy Record — Band, Track. GLENN LE ROY LEMON Caliente, Nevada Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Ethiopia Victory. Agwilines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific, Combat Bar ; Academy Rec- ord — Drill Team. JOSEPH STEVEN LENKAY Toledo, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Perpetua, American President Lines ; Service Ribbons — Pacific. Philippine; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team. ROBERT CHARLES LEONARD Inglewood, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape San Bias, American South African Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Polaris, Propeller Club, Boxing. DON WILLIAM LEVERENZ Downey. California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Dut) — S.S. Ringleader, Moore-McCormack Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-lst Battalion Ad- jutant. LOUIS BERNARD LITZLER Cleveland, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Loma Victory. American South African Lines, S.S. Petrero Hills, Los Angeles Tankers Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Mer- chant Marine Defense Bar; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Officer-Regimental Staff. Edi- tor-in-Chief of 1947 Midships. 220 RICHARD COHRON LOWRV, Jh. Honolulu, Hawiiii Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Dutj — S.S. Fort Stadwin, Pacific Tankers Co., S.S. Maunawili, Matsoii Navij;ation Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Pliiiippine; Ac.idemy Rec- ord — Cadet Olficer-2nd Battalion Adjutant, Swimming. JOSEPH PETER MAFRONE Bronx, New York Fourth Class— San Mateo; Sea Duty— S.S. Marine Diat;oii, Waterman Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Orticer, Propeller Club. WII.I.IAM JOSEPH MAIER Astoria, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Marine Devil, United Fruit Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Foot- ball, Baseball, Track. Intramural Softball Championship Team. GEORGE HENRY NLAJN Baltimore. Maryland Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. NX ' esterly Victory, State Marine Co., S.S. Samuel Colt, Union Sulfur Co., S.S. Orpheus, American Export Lines, S.S. Felix Grundy, South Atlantic Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Otficer-lst Bat- talion Staff, Propeller Club. JOHN JOSEPH MANEY Los Angeles, California Fourth Class — San NLiteo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Mendocino, American President Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Acad- emy Record — Windjammers, Propeller Club, Track. LAWRENCE WOOD MARBOURG San Mateo, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Luxemburg Victory, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Co., S.S. Santa Rita, Grace Lines, S.S. Thomas Howell. Chamberlin Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Wind- jammers. RICH.ARD COHRON LOWRY, Jk. GEORGE HENRY MAIN JOSEPH PETER MAFFIONE JOHN JOSEPH MANEY WILLIAM JOSEPH MAIER LAWRENCE WOOD MARBOURG 1 MELVIN JAMES MARSHBURN WILLIAM LAWRENCE McDOWELL IRWIN ISIAH MAZO PATRICK FRANCIS McINERNEY WILLIAM BROOKS McCARTY MORRIS LEONARD McPHAIL MELVIN JAMES MARSHBURN Yorba Linda, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Douglas Victory, James Griffiths Sons S.S. Co. ; Service Ribbon — Pacific. IRWIN ISIAH MAZO Savannah, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Poland Victory, Isthmian S.S. Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Drill Team, Escort Committee, Intramural Soft- ball Championship Team, Rejzimental As- sembly. WILLIAM BROOKS McCART ' Columbus, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mandan, Isthmian Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Football. WILLIAM LAWRENCE McDOWELL Camden, South Carolina Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Stony Creek, Sun Oil New Jersey; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Activities House Committee, Tennis. PATRICK FRANCIS McINERNEY Bronx, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Dut) ' — S.S. Lorado Taft, American South African Lines, S.S. Marine Arrow, American Hawaiian Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. MORRIS LEONARD McPHAIL Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. James Lykes. Lykes Brothers S.S. Com- pany, M.S. Cape Flattery, American Mail Lines; Service Ribbon.s — Atlantic, Medi- terranean ; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Midships, Camera Club. 222 .um m fin " H--.?. HENRY WEBB MEALY Baltimore, Maryland Fourth Class— Pass Christian; Sea Duty— S.S. BitriviUe, VC ' atcrman Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord-Philosopher ' s Club, Tennis. JOHN JOSEPH MENIG Syracuse, New ' i ' ork Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Stanwix, Pacific Tankers Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippine, American Theatre, Victory; Academy Rec- ord — Photography Editor. Polaris. OSCAR ALFRED MERIAN Suffern, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Peroty, Keystone Shipping Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- ranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Drill Team, Propeller Club. FRANCIS BRETT MILLER Washington, D. C. Fourth Class — Kings Pomt; Sea Duty — My. American Manufacture, United States Lines; Service Ribbons— Pacific, Philip- pine; Academy Record — Tennis. JAMES NATHANIEL MILLER Los Angeles, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Montebello Hills, Pacific Tankers Co.; S.S. Tufts Victory, American Mail Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- ranean; Academy Record — Baseball, Box- ing, Intramural Championship Softball Team. KENNETH JAMES MONTANYE Balboa, Canal Zone Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Cumberland, Marine Transpor- tation Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Scholastic Star. HENRY WEBB MEALY FRANaS BRETT MILLER JOHN JOSEPH MENIG JAMES NATHANIEL MILLER OSCAR ALFRED MERIAN KENNETH JAMES MONTANYE MICHAEL MOURADIAN FRANK LESLIE NAGY JOHN STEWART MURR,- Y, Jii. THOMAS HOWARD NOLAN ROBERT SANDS MURRAY WILLIAM O ' BRIEN NOONEY MICHAEL MOURADIAN Somerville, Massachusetts Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. High Flyer, Coastwise Lines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Drill Team, Baseball. JOHN STEWART MURRAY, Jii. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Clarksville Victory, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean. Pacific; Academy Record — Regi- mental Editor of Midships, Drill Team, Windjammers, Radio Club. ROBERT SANDS MURRAY Mobile. Alabama Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Blue Island Victory, ' Waterman Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Drill Team. FRANK LESLIE NAGY Detroit, Michigan Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. William Dunbar, South Atlantic Steamship Co.; Ser ' ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Football, Baseball. THOMAS HOWARD NOLAN New Orleans, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Hawk, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons — Atlantic, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Windjammers, Propeller Club, B.iscball. WILLIAM O ' BRIEN NOONEY East Orange, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Santa Rosa, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bon — Atlantic; Academy Record — T rack. I 224 WILLIAM ROBERT O ' BRIEN San Francisco, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Cleare, Matson Lines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific, Philippine. ROBERT MICHAEL O ' CONNOR Parsons, Kansas Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Mcchanicsviile, Pacific Tankers Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Glee Club,. MALCOLM DAVID PENDLETON Birmingham, Alabama Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Groveton, Keystone Steamship Co., S.S. Orefjon Trail, Dcconhil Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Medi- terranean. if JOHN LEWIS PENN Associated, California Fourth Clas.s — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. ' W ' hittier Hills, Los Angeles Tankers Steam- ship Co., S.S. Czechoslovakia Victory, American Hawaiian Lines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific, Philippine. WILLIAM ROBERT PIERCE Vassar, Michigan Fourth Class — S an Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Elgin Victory, American Hawaiian Lines, S.S. Paoli, War Emergency Tankers Co., S.S. Mission San Luis Rey, Pacific Tank- ers Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — At- lantic, Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Windjammers, Track. JOHN PRELC, Jii. Fairmont, West Virginia Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty- -S.S. Brigham Victory, Alcoa Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine, Com- bat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Drill Team, Escort Committee, Propeller Club, Camera Club, Regimental Editor of Midships, Runner-Up-Intramural Regimen- tal Boxing Tournament. WILLIAM ROBERT O ' BRIEN JOHN LEWIS PENN ROBERT MICHAEL O ' CONNOR WILLIAM ROBERT PIERCE MALCOLM DAVID PENDLETON JOHN PRELC, Jr. jgM- Mfk ROBERT FRANOS PURCELL WILLIAM REES ALLAN JOHN PYRCH PALMER CHAMBERLAIN REHM RICHARD DANIEL RAHM FRANCIS XAVIER REYNOLDS ROBERT FRANCIS PURCELL Elmhurst, Long Island, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — Sea Train Texas, United States Army Transport; S.S. Marine Panther, American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Battalion Staff, Wmdjammers, Propeller Club, Track. ALLAN JOHN PYRCH Mentor, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Monarch of the Seas, Waterman Lines; S.S. Solon Turman, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Dance Band. RICHARD DANIEL RAHM Oak Ridge, Tennessee Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. White Bird Canyon, American Petro- leum Transport Corp.; S.S. Hood River, Pacific Tankers Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Mediterranean, Atlantic. WILLIAM REES Browns Valley, Minnesota Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Jean LaFitte, Waterman Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine, Com- bat Bar; Academy Record — Drill Team. PALMER CHAMBERLAIN REHM Beverly Farms, Massachusetts Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Alexander, Agwilines; Service Rib- bons — Pacific. Combat Bar; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Officer, Swimming. FRANCIS XAVIER REYNOLDS Bronx, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Knute Rockne, Grace Lines, S.S. Fort Matanzas, Los Angeles Tanker Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Athintic, Pacific. 226 Mmm WILLIAM DODDS ROBERDS Memphis, Tennessee Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Carp, Agwilines; S.S. Beaver Victory, Norton Lilly Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacilic, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Football. PAUL HOWARD ROBERTSON Arlington, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Blue Ridge Victory, Calmar Steam- ship Co.; S.S. Edge Hill, Sinclair Refinery Co. ; S.S. Autossee, American Refinery Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acad- emy Record — Drill Team. SAMUEL LOUIS ROBINSON New Orleans, Louisiana Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duly — S.S. Mobile Bay, War Fmergency Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, NXindjammers, Philosophers Club, Glee Club, VC ' restling. HARRY CLAIR ROGERS lola, Kansas Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Juby, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bon — Pacific; Acidemy Record — Propeller Club. JOHN GRAYSON ROGERS Nassawadox, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Sturdy Beggar, Mississippi Shipping Co., S.S. Roxbury Hills, Selling and Jarvis Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean. THOMAS ADAM ROHRER Cincinnati, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Canso, Marine Transport Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbon — Pacific ; Academy Record — Scholastic Star, Drill Team, Pro- peller Club. WILLIAM DODDS ROBERDS HARRY CLAIR ROGERS PAUL HOWARD ROBERTSON JOHN GRAYSON ROGERS SAMUEL LOUIS ROBINSON THOMAS ADAM ROHRER HENRY CHARLES ROLLER ROBERT CORDWIN SAYRES THOMAS EDWARD ROST JOSEPH JAMES SCHACK JOSEPH ELWOOD SARTAIN JAMES ROBERT SCOTT HENRY CHARLES ROLLER Nutley, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Knute Rockne, Grace Lines, S.S. Mission Santa Maria, American Petroleum Trans- port Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Midships, Band, Propeller Club. THOMAS EDWARD ROST RiN ' crd.ile, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Anadarko Victory, Lykes Brothers Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pa- cific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Track, Ski Club, Cadet OHicer. JOSEPH ELWOOD S.ARTAIN Baton Rouge, Louisi.ina Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Black Jack, Marine Transportation Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediter- ranean, Pacific, Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Xindjammers, Boxing. I ROBERT CORDWIN S. YRES Honolulu, Hawaii Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Alcoa Patriot, Alcoa Steamship Co. ; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Fifth Company Com- mander, Scholastic Star, Fencing. JOSEPH JAMES SCHACK Balboa, Canal Zone Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Catham, Barber Asphalt Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer-Second Battalion Staff, Scholastic Star. X ' md).immcrs, French Club. JAMES ROBERT SCOTT J.ickson Heights, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fort Matanzas, Los Angeles Tanker Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Baseball. 228 STANLEY JOHN SEYMOUR North Abington, Massachusens Fourtli Class — Kinijs Point ; Sea Duty — S.S. Thompson Lykts. Lykcs Brothers Steamship Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean ; Academy Record — Scholas- tic Star, Student Council Assembly, Soft- hall Team. WILLIAM HAROLD SHAW Providence, Rhode Islimd i ' ourlh Class — Kin,[;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Kcrnstown, Keystone Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacihc, Medi- terranean; Academy Record — Band, Presi- dent of Windjammers Club, Sailinj;. FRANCIS XAVIER SHEEHAN Manchester, Massachusetts Fourth Class — Kin ;s Point; Sea Duty — S.S. NX ' hite Bird Canyon, American Petro- leum Steamship Co., S.S. William Luckcn- bach, Luckenb.ich Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer. JOHN MICHAEL SHERIDAN Detroit, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Maryville Victory, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Otficei— 3rd Company Commander. WILLIAM ANTHONY SHERMAN San Francisco, CaHfornia Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Chanute Victory, American Hawaiian Steamship Co., S.S. Exchange, American Export Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediterranean; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Polaris, Propeller Club. WENDELL PRUGH SIGLER, Jii. Larchmont, New York Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Dut ' — S.S. Alcoa Planter, Alcoa Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbon — Pacific. STANLEY JOHN SEYMOUR JOHN MICHAEL SHERIDAN WILLIAM HAROLD SHAW WILLIAM .ANTHONY SHERMAN FRANCIS XAVIER SHEEHAN WENDELL PRUGH SIGLER, Ju. JOHN SNYDER JOE DAN STEWMAN WILLIAM VANSANT STEED JOHN WESLEY STRANBERG HARRY PAUL STEELE FRANCIS EARL SUITS JOHN SN TJER Jackson Heights, New York Fourth Class — Kings Puint; Sea Duty — S.S. Jalapa, Gulf Oil Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Band. WILLIAM VANSANT STEED Atlanta, Georgia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. North Point, War Emergency Tank- ers Inc.; S.S. Marine Devil, United Fruit Lines, S.S. Opequon and S.S. Wilson ' s Creek, Standard Oil Co. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippme; Academy Record — Band, Propeller Club, Tennis, Sailing. HARRY PAUL STEELE Hansonville, Virginia Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Stony Creek, Pacific Tanker Corp. ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pacific; Academy Record — Wrestling, Box- ing. JOE DAN STEWMAN Columbia, Tennessee Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Hastings, Waterman Steamship Co., United States Army Transport James Park- er, Army Transport Service, S.S. Crown Point, Keystone Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Rec- ord — Cadet Officer- 1st Battalion Com- mander, Propeller Club. JOHN WESLEY STRANBERG Pasadena. California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mormacgull, Moore-McCormack Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Track. FRANCIS EARL SUITS White Plains, New York Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. JaLipa, Gulf Oil Steamship Co.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Mediterranean, Pa- cific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Po- laris. 230 mm ROBERT EUGENE SULLIV AN New Berlin, Illinois Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Douglas, Grace Lines; Service Rib- bons — P.icitic, Combat Bar; Academy Rec- ord — Baseball, Rei;iment.d Basketh.rll Cli.im- pionship Team. NORMAN IINN TAYLOR Augusta, Kentucky Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — M.V. Surprise, United States Lines, S.S. Mobile Bay, War Emergency Tankers Inc.. S.S. Thompson Lykes, Lykes Brothers S.S. Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic. RICHARD LEE TEAL Tucson, Arizona Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. White Swallow, S.S. Sea Quail, Moore- McCorm.ick S.S. Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific. Combat Bar; Academy Record — Photograph Editor of Polaris. Camera Club. VARTKISS TERTZAKIAN Detroit, Michigan Fiiurth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mission Loreto, Los Angeles Tankers Inc. ; Service Ribbons — P.icihc, Philippine, Com- bat Bar. ROBERT THOMASIAN Detroit, Michigan Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Paducah Victory, Pacific Atlantic S.S. Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Philosopher ' s Club. JAMES GLOVER TOMPKINS III Galveston, Texas Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Romano, Lykes Brothers S.S. Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Escort Committee. ROBERT EUGENE SULLIV. N VARTKISS TERTZAKIAN NORMAN LINN T.AYLOR ROBERT THOMASIAN RICH,A.RD LEE TEAL JAMES GLOVER TOMPKINS HI m m CHARLES LEE TRACY MALCOLM LLOYD WARD HENRY TROMBKA CLYDE MORTIMER WATSON. Jii. WILLIAM WALTON VAUGHAN NATHANIEL LEE WEBB CHARLES LEE TRACY San Francisco, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Jericho Victory, South Atlantic Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbons — Mediterranean. Pacific; Academy Record — Managing Edi- tor of Polaris, Wrestling, Secretary of Christian Council, Executive Board of Regimental Assemblv, Activities House Committee, Cadet Otficer-Battalion Staff. HENRY TROMBKA Vassar. Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Saginaw Victory, Pacific Atlantic Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Com- bat Bar; Academy Record — Polaris, Pro- peller Club, Philosopher ' s Club. WILLIAM WALTON VAUGHAN Ashland, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Frederick Victory, United Fruit Co.; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Drill Team. MALCOLM LLOYD WARD Saugus, Massachusetts Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty--S.S. Brigham Victory, Alcoa Steamship Co.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific. Philip- pine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Scholastic Star. CLYDE MORTIMER WATSON, Jii. Atlanta, Georgia Fourth Class — P,iss Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Crow Wing, American Petroleum Transport Corporation ; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Drill Team, Swimming. NATHANIEL LEE WEBB New York, New York Fourt h Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Chanute Victory, American Hawaiian Lines, S.S. Morm.acport, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Mediter- ranean; Academy Record — Polaris, Wind- jammers. P 232 .im a im oa fko roi{i;rt wii.i.iam wkhlr Clifton, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sta Duty — S.S. Cluysler ' s Fitld, Bi-rnuth I.cmbckc Stc.uiisliip Co.; Service Ribhons — Atlantic, Pacific; Acadtmy Record — Scholastic Star, n,;il T,in, TVaiii. ROIU RT AUGUST WESSMAN Pinole, California Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Philippa, S.S. Maunalei, Matson Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Acad- emy Record — X ' indjammers, Camera Club, R.klh. Club. STANLEY DAWSON WHHATLEY B.iyside, New York Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Sea Ray, American Hawaiian Lines; Serv- ice Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Boxing. FRED EUGENE WHIPPLE Cristobal, Canal Zone Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. X■ahoo Swamp, Cities Service Steam- ship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific. JERRY LEE WHITE Sentinel. Oklahoma Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Black Water, War Emergency Tankers Inc.; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Ofli- cer, Vi ' ind|ammcrs, ROBERT CRAIG WHITTEN, Jii. Baltimore, M.irvl.Mid Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Fairwind, American Export Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Midships, Escort Committee. ROBERT WILLIAM WEBER FRED EUGENE WHIPPLE ROBERT AUGUST WESSMAN JERRY LEE WHITE STANLEY DAWSON WHEATLEY ROBERT CRAIG WHITTEN, Jii. ARTHUR ADOLPH WIGREN HARRY WRIGHT WISE GERALD LOUIS WILDA LYMAN PAUL WOJAN PAUL CHESTER WILLIAMS CHESTER RICHARD WOJCICKI ARTHUR ADOLPH WIGREN Glen Ridge, New Jersey Fourth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. DtSoto, Waterman Steamship Lines; Service Ribbon — Atlantic; Academy Rec- ord — Scholastic Star. GERALD LOUIS WILDA Manitowoc, Wisconsin Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Blanco, American South African Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine; Academy Record — Cadet Officer, Baseball. PAUL CHESTER WILLIAMS Colunibus, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Mandan Victory, Isthmian Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Rec- ord — Scholastic Star, Cadet 0(ficer-2nd Company Commander, Windjammers, Pro- peller Club, Football. HARRY WRIGHT WISE Madison, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Robin Doncastcr, Seas Shipping Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Wrestling. LYM. N PAUL WOJAN Antigo, Wisconsin Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — M.V. Cape Juby, Grace Lines; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Philippine, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Band. CHESTER RICHARD WOJCICKI Belleville, Michigan Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Joplin Victory, Moore-McCormack Lines; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record —Baseball, Basketball. 234 JOHN HARTLAND WOODHOUSK Merrick, New York Fnurth Class — Kings Point; Sea Duty — S.S. Sliooting Star. United States Lines; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Combat Rar. RUSSELL COWAN WRIGHT Browns ' ille, Texas Fourth Class — Pass Christian ; Sea Duty — S.S. Chalmette, Pacific Tankers Inc.; Serv- ice Ribbons — Atlantic, Pacific; Academy Record — Drill Team. ARNOLD LOUIS WYCHEL St. Louis, Missouri Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Cape Canso, Marine Transport Company; Academy Record — Propeller Club, Base- ball, Track. NORMAN IRVILL WYLH; Columbus, Ohio Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Loma Victor) ' , American South African Line; Service Ribbons — Pacific, Combat Bar; Academy Record — Cadet Oflicer-Regi- mental Staff, Editor-in-Chief of Polaris. WILLIAM RILEY YAPLE Erie, Pennsylvania Fourth Class — San Mateo; Sea Duty — S.S. Joseph Lykes, Lykes Brothers Steamship Co.; Service Ribbon — Pacific; Academy Record — Cadet Officei— 2nd Battalion Com- mander, Scholastic Star, Radio Club, Dinghy Team. DANIEL JACK YOUNG Roanoke, Virginia Fourth Class — Pass Christian; Sea Duty — S.S. Groveton, Keystone Tankers Company, S.S. Oregon Trail, Dcconhill Shipping Company; Service Ribbons — Atlantic, Medi- terranean, Pacific. JOHN H. RTL- ND WOODHOUSE NORMAN IRVILL WYLIE RUSSELL COWAN WRIGHT WILLIAM RILEY YAPLE ARNOLD LOUIS WYCHEL DANIEL JACK YOUNG -fl A44io yia pLUi r -c v. P rjc « l - ' -5Z_ M Auioq iapiiA. i . i: -7? ' TMJf i l WMa ! VV5 ;. 1 [ III ' , v DD ED MC. THE MIDSHIPS STAFF wishes fo extend fo its advertisers gratitude and appreciation for their kindly interest and support miiir atcs 11 :iiN6 0BVIPTi5lN(; 0!il5 Olin: Ships to be proud of... Grace Line ' s ne v fled (if 2S inoderu " San la " ships lirinjis to our MercliaiiL Marine tlie last word ill iililih. They reflect the ingenuity of Anieri- aiid I he experience and liiiili standards of America ' s operators. Fealnriiii: ' the com|tletely renovated and inndcrni cd Sania Ko a and Sania Paula, lliis new fleet linlvs llie Americas witli swill, edicieni and ecoiioiuical service for a ' s designers, llic sldll of _inierica s Imildcrs Lra eleis and sliiniieis alike GRACE LINE 10 Hanover Scjuaro. IScw Yiirk ApriUs (Uiil off ' tcrs in all irimyial dlirs 240 L= - noiv in regular service to and from IRELAND ' ENGLAND FRANCE Consult our authorized Trai EL ACEyTS for complete information United States Iiives One Broadway, New York 4 Telephone: DIgby 4-5800 ' 3 241 • Established more than 87 years ago Moran has the speciaUzed equipment and experience for every type of towing problem. — harbor, inland water, coast vise or deep sea. Modern Diesel- Electric drive and steam tugs are available to handle assignments anywhere in the world. MORAN Established 1860 TOWING AND TRANSPORTATION NEW YORK NEW ORLEANS SAN FRANCISCO A flag known round the world as a synnbol of time-tested Experience, Integrity, Reliability and Efficiency — indeed the symbol of an ener- getic organization which purposes to meet the challenge of the times. AMERICAN-HAWAIIAN STEAMSHIP COMPANY 90 Broad Street, New York — 215 Market Street, San Francisco 242 umfm J e Two Continents in friendship and commerce Africa with her immense natural resources, America with her unhmited production ca- pacity — is it any wonder that these two great continents should be united in an ever-tight- ening bond of friendship and commerce? For a quarter of a century the American South African Line has served as a connect- ing link between the United States and South and East Africa. Recently Amsaline added six fast new ships of the African Star class to the fleet that makes this run. These vessels complete the New York-Capetown trip in only 16 days. And now Amsaline has inaugurated a direct express service between New York and West Africa . . . sailings every three weeks, utilizing ships of the C-2 class. It is the only direct American flag service to West Africa. By increasing its fleet and ex- panding its services, Amsaline gives practical expression to its faith in the continuation of the warm relations that now exist between America and the peoples of the continent of Africa. UNITED ' v AND t ' AMERICAN SOUTH AFRICAN LINE. INC. (Established 1922) 1249 Washington Blvd., Detroit 26 Beaver St., N. Y. 4 327 South La Salle St., Chica .ago 243 The iVlusket that started mass production take in more than it spent. And out of these earnings, GM was wilhng and able to huilJ big laboratories and proving grounds — and pay for the research which has made cars grow better year by year. IVlany, many years separate Eli Whitney ' s old muskets and modem automobiles. But his principle of mass produc- tion — plus the willingness of prospering companies to put part of their earnings " ' ack into a steady pro- gram of improvement — In school you ' ve learned Whitney and his cotton did you know that quite a maker of muskei Shortly after the Revolu tionary War, Whitney otfered to make muskets for the young government m quantity, and quickly — an un heard of idea at the time. To prove that he could, he made separate piles of the parts from ten mus- kets — asked the officials to pick a part from each pile — and put together a perfect gun from the parts they handed him. It was the idea of interchangeable parts that made the mass production of muskets possible. iVlore than loo years later, General Motors put this principle to work on automobiles. In a test like Whitney ' s, the parts for three automobiles were dumped into one huge pile. GM mechanics then quickly put together three automobiles from the one batch. They demonstrated that the parts were truly interchange- able — and that mass production of automobiles was practical. Mass production helped General Motors prosper — that is, gives us many of the good things we have today. Thus, every modern automobile you see today goes to prove that all the people profit when a business prospers. " Moreand BetterThings For More People " ENERAL OTORS The People Promt WHEN A Business Prospers CMC TRUCK COACH GM DICSEl DEICO CHEi ROlET • UNITED MOTORS On (he Air: HfNRV J. TAYIOR, Monday and Friday evenings, ov-.- more than 300 Mulual lialiom. coasi to caast. Hear him! PQNTIAC • OIDSMOBIIE ■ EUICK • CACIUAC • BODY BY FISHER SER ICE • AC SPARK PIUGS 244 " mm New-world ships • • • for the j : world s oldest trade routes ci i MEDITERRANEAN BLACK SEA RED SEA INDIA CEYLON BURMA FROM Portufial to the Black Sea and Rus ia. from Morocco to India ami Buiina . . . wherever American shippers find markets, or American importers seek supplies . . . there our vessels drop anchor! Eighteen fast, new cargo liners — tangihle evidence of the far-sighted huilding program inauginated in 1938 — consti- tute a fleet wholly comjileted since the war and replacing with more modern vessels the losses sustained in that conflict. It is our j)ride to hclong to a strong American IMcrchant Marine, ready and aide to play an indis])ensahle i)art in re-vitalizing Americas peacetime trade, and in iuiilding the economic foundations of a prosperous and progressive new - world. 1 line ncii Liixtirv l iiicrs I ' XfH ' ilcd tit Ix ' ri ' ady in I ' ) HI. Lartifsl (intl fa.sli ' f ' l in ri ' aiilar (t xTatiim in lilt ' McdiliTninian under llic Anwrimn Fla . American Export Lines 25 Broadway, New York 4, N.Y. 245 ' Refreshment Time " a+ the Ships Service Fountain Success to the Graduating Class! S|S LILY-TULIP GUP CORPORATION 246 p AT ROCKEFELLER CENTER • NEW YORK 22 One of America ' s foremost naval outfitters E r • imm wm eze. ( f ' J, o ' n o j WSTPOK 7%e Tentj jf fnie tccit 4tJuce. -OG . . . ry shaver WARD • VESTPOK is what every man has waited for since he came of shaving age ... a vest pocket sized dry shaver that can be used any time, any place! As small as a match folder, Vestpok is designed to be the trav- eler ' s pal, the office companion, the buddy in the barracks, locker room, airplane or taxicab. Vestpok can ' t cut, scrape, nick or burn . . . its t he safe, com- fortable, efficient answer to the Male Animal ' s most annoying problem — " phonograph-needle " face! • NO ELECTRICITY • NO WATER • NO SOAP • NO MIRROR Here ' s how [ lr()k works Used like an eraser, A iwist of a coin in Vestpok fits into N ' estpok ' s cylinder thcslotand — presto, your smallest vest rolls the whiskers the old blade drops pocket, with plenty away in a hurry! out — it ' s that easy! of room to spare! with 10 of the finest razor steel blades) at leading men ' s furnishers, de- partment stores or jewelers. If you can ' t find Vestpok at your dealer ' s, write di- rect to: Vestpok, Ward Machine Company, Inc., Brockton, Mass. S Jiiio t i- . ■ ude I LSI I Ok 247 ■ " flmERicfln inTCRnflTionflL mflRinc flcencv OF NEW YORK, INC. LESLIE A, WARD President UNITED STATES MARINE MANAGERS FOR NEW HAMPSHIRE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY THE NETHERLANDS INSURANCE COMPANY ■ isiab ie s GRANITE STATE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 111 JOHn STREET, REIU VORK 7, R. V. WORTH 2-2800 ==SK =t Marine Underwriters 99 JOHN STREET NEW YORK 7, N. Y. • Telephone BEekman 3-2470 Staiiiliird Friiil and steamship ronipaiij n REGULAR ESTABLISHED SERVICES FROM NEW ORLEANS TO CUBA - PANAMA - NICARAGUA - HONDURAS MEXICO ALSO FROM NEW YORK TO CUBA - JAMAICA - HAITI NEW ORLEANS OFFICE CHICAGO OFFICE 140 Carondelet St. Ill West Washington St. NEW YORK OFFICE 1 1 Broadway 248 High Resolution Sperry RADAR now in Marine Service ■ The Sperry Gyroscope Company, Inc., is now ready to schedule deliver- ies of its high resolution RADAR.The Speriy RADAR is in lull production and comes to you as a t inroiig th test- ed unit — tested on the Atlantic luider actual seagoing conditions and under inland water conditions on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Ri er. ■ Sperry RADAR offers the ship- owner all the safety, economv, and ini|)roved schfdule reliahilitv |)ro- vidcd by modern radar . . . plus the adtled advantage ol the ■tujuiKir de- sign and construe tion long associated with every Spcrrv liudt produi i in the marine field. ■ Sperry RAD.AR will enable toii7 ' ship to ojiemle on schedule . . . tiuongh fog, rain, smoke, total darkness . . . by its sharper, clearer indications of above- water objects and hazards. Sperry RADAR provides a Gyro-C ' ompass- controlled image and can be operated by bridge personnel without extensive technical background. For further par- ticulars write oin- Marine Department. AMONG THE MANY ADVANTAGES SPERRY RADAR OFFERS: m Clear images on a 12-Inch scope. • Choice of true or relative bearing. ■ Defines distances from object to ship accurately on range counter indicator. ■ Operating range 100 yards to 40 miles. ■ Conforms with U.S. Coast Guard Specifications for a Class A Radar. ■ Backed by world-wide Sperry service. Sperry Gyroscope Company, Inc. EXECUTIVE OFFICES: GREAT NECK. NEW YORK • DIVISION OF THE SPERRY CORPORATION LOS ANGELES ■ SAN FRANCISCO • SEATTLE • NEW ORLEANS • CLEVELAND • HONOLULU Aircraft: Gyropilots • Gyrosyn Compasses • Atlilude Gyros ■ Directional Gyros • Gyro-Horizons • Detonation Indicators " Automatic Radio Direction Finders Instrument Landing Systems •Traffic Control Systems Marine: Gyro- compasses • Gyro-Pilots • Gyro- Magnetic Compasses • Incandescent Searchlights • Steering Systems • Radar • Loran Industrial: Railroad Radio Microwave Relays ' Microline Test Equipment ' Klystron TubeS ' Strobodync Knockometer 249 Cruising will be on these sleek, new ships Although it will be some time yet before the ships are ready, pas- sengers will find many new features to provide for their comfort and safety when we are able to resume the famous Cuba Mail and Porto Rico Line cruises. Ship superstructures will be sleek — streamlined — with flared bow for easier riding. Each ship will have latest radar devices. Staterooms and lounges will be as attractive and luxurious as rooms in a swanky hotel. There will be air conditioning through- out, including crews ' quarters. Modern sash windows will be the rule instead of gloomy portholes. Cruises will run to Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, ATLANTIC GULF and WEST INDIES STEAMSHIP LINES, foot of Wall Street, New York 5, N.Y. . CUBA MAIL LINE • PORTO RICO LINE • CLYDE-MALLORY LINES • SOUTHERN S. S. CO. ' tis Prudential steamship corp. 17 STATE STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 250 ,4 ikwu¥miii U Aijyji Couriers and cargo carriers of the Caribbean TjOR nearly half a century, modern - - vessels of the United Fruit Company ' s Great White Fleet have been serving the Americas. Afloat and ashore, the experienced per- sonnel of the United Fruit Company is eager to bring its collective experience to bear on your inter-American shipping problems. Everything calculated to in- sure prompt and expert handling of cargo aboard ship and ;:t modern piers, here and in the American Tropics, is at your service. New, fully refrigerated vessels are now in operation and more are being launched. In the near future the Com- pany will resume its passenger sailings to Middle American countries, so rich in scenic beauty and historical and archaeological interest. Great White Fleet UNITED FRUIT COMPANY General Offices: 1 Federal Street, Boston 10 Pier 3, North River, New York 6 111 W. VC.ishington St., Chicago 2 321 St. Charks St., New Orleans 4 1001 Fourth St., Sun Francisco 7 COLOMBIA • COSTA RICA • CUBA • DOMINICAN REPUBLIC • ECUADOR • EL SALVADOR GUATEMALA • HONDURAS • JAMAICA, B.W.I. • NICARAGUA • PANAMA • PANAMA CANAL ZONE 251 mL PIER 45- NORTH RIVER NEW YORK I4,N.Y. CABLES- ALCOASMIP . TEL C O » T L A N DT 7 - 64 O O SHIPS ON THE HORIZON The modern neric an Merchcnt Vesze2s suc ' .i os thone recently built on the Pfcific Corst for U5e in this company ' s passeng ' jr service are equipped with every knowri, proved safety device and aid to navigation. f!any of these had their testing ground in rcr theatres. • " hat T.lth niodern radio, ship-to-shore telephones, direction finders, depthmeters, metal r.ikes, gyro ccapasses, rtdar, etc., it light seen we are fast aorroiiohing the time when the ship can be operated entirely by machines. Of course, v,e know of no instruments able to practice the ai t of serxEnship. You nen at the Acadeay are now acquiring the " knoir ho ' .7 " vihioh, together with your sea service, Fill fit you for the skilled seamanship that will enable you to handle your ship in all reathers. With some glaring exceptions, shini?, particularly in thf matter of safety measures and aids to navigation, have clianged out of all recognition in the past dozen years. The improvements have been received with open arms by the seaman, but they are recognized for what they are - " aids, " not substitutes, for seamanship. If ships have changed, the ocean has not. The same storms, hurricanes and fogs prevail as of yore. The North Atlantic, for instance, can buffet the largest liners afloat. It is at such times that sea experience, which is the essence of seamanship, comes into olay. To the Master and his deck officers it is the " feel " of their ship that prompts a Certain course of action. VTiat to do cannot be found in books as all vessels differ in some respect. Moreover, as any seaman knows, the " feel " •••111 be influenced by the nature and method of distribution of her cargo. Too often it is assumed that we of the deck department have a monopoly on seamanship, Tjhereas in fact it must be exercised by all the ratings aboard if their duties are to be performed efficiently. The engineer standing at the throttle while the ship is pitching into a head sea, watch- ing the -performance of the main engines as the stern of the ship lifts out of the water with racing propeller, is practicing seamanship. Oh yes, I ' m aware we now have a device that greatly assists the engineer under such conditions, but nevertheless we on deck • would not be at our ease if the engineer •.-ent to bed and let the device carry on, would re? Kor can we exclude the catering department. Have you ever seen a thoroughly experienced ship ' s waiter manipulate a full tray holding a comolete meal for room service as he negotiates corridors leading to the staterooms, and anticipating the comings and goings of the deck beneath his feet, with uncanny skill? That gentleman is also practicing seamanship. Sincerely, J . FCTheobald;dl Manager Marine Department 252 " V " PILOT Semi - Metallic Packing IMMEDIATE DELIVERY From stock of style No. 20 (tn all sizes) " V " PILOT SEMI-METALLIC PACKING is designed for the piston rods and valve stems of the steam and liquid ends of — Auxiliary Air and Circulating Pump Boiler Feed Pumps Fuel Oil Transfer Pump Fuel Oil Service Pumps Fire and Bilge Pump Ballast and General Service Pump Salt Water Service Pump Dynamo Engine For the liquid end piston rings on these pumps use genuine " WOODITE " RINGS. U. S. NAVY SYMBOL ?!£1400 1894 W e Wave Been Building Packings for Over Fifty Yeats 1947 THE NEW JERSEY ASBESTOS COMPANY PILOT PACKING CO., INC. Executive Offices: 1 Water St., New York 4, N. Y., WHiteholl 3-5580 Factory: Sea Cliff, Nassau County , Long Island, N. Y. Branches oncj Agencies in All Principal Cities v t SAtOTt THt G u ' HttP V4SV) t V)TV3 Of E C • 4 HEAT TRANSFER EQUIPMENT DAVIS ENGINEERING CORPORATION 1064 East Grand Street, Elizabeth 4, New Jersey 253 These great ( (iA fleets of passenger and d by ' S Ocie% f cargo vessels are poweret The Grace Lines New Santa Fleet Santa Barbara Santa Cecelia Santa Isabel Santa Leonor Santa Luisa Santa Maria Santa Margarita Santo Olivia Santo Rita The Lykes Brothers New Cargo Fleet Convasbock Red Gauntlet Chorles Lykes Reuben Tipton " -s Dick Lykes Ruth Lykes Elizabeth Lykes Simoon Eugene Lykes Stella Lykes ► giL Horry Culbreoth Sue Lykes 1 Kendall Fish Tyson Lykes Stt Kenneth McKoy Velmo lykes ' i Louise Lyk es H |g l i HS 1 New United States Lines Cargo Fleet Red Jacket American Former Stag Hound American Ranger Onward American Merchant Courser American Shipper . Resolute American Importer Rattler American Forwarder Rapid American Clipper Whistler American Scout Defender American Banker American T oveler A-990A COMBUSTION ENGINEERING 200 MADISON AVENUE • NEW YORK 16, N. Y. C-E products include all types of steam generating, fuel burning and related equipment for stationary and marine applications 254 ■mm Compliments of American Dock Company Pouch Terminal, Inc. General Free Bonded Storage EXECUTIVE OFFICE 17 STATE ST., N. Y. Tel. BC-9-7950 roiioraliilatioiis c; liradiialioii v . ARTHUIC 3HJ«IIAY 695 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK CITY The Black D i a m » II d Lines Regular Service from United States North Atlantic Ports to Antwerp - Rotterdam - Amsterdam a« UllOAOWAY XKW VOKK « ALL FORMS OF MARINE INSURANCE APPLETO] COX. IjXC. Ill JOHN STREET NE YORK 7, NE YORK See Ytntr l ical iifirnt or hrnkfr 255 CARROLL TDWmG CD, IIVC. 17 BATTERY PLACE NEW YORK 4, N. Y. Cosmopolitan Shipping Co. Inc. Steamship Agents and Managers 42 BROADWAY NEW YORK 4, N. Y. Telephone Dlgby 4-6363 Wni.HJI((lee fo.,lnc. OCEAN AND INLAND MARINE UNDERWRITERS in JOHN STREET NEW YORK 256 ESSO SHIPS ARE " HAPPY SHIPS " STANDARD OIL COMPANY (INCORPC)RATEn IN NEW JERSEY) MARINE DEPARTMENT 257 (f3e5t WJi leA UNIVERSAL TERMINAL and STEVEDORING CO. 24 State Street New York 4, N. Y. 258 Air. O. D. Colvin, president of Cargocaire Engineering Corpo- ration, presenting The Cargocaire Award to Cadet-Midshipman John M. Bechberger for his winning thesis on ' Cargo Damage. Congratulations to the winner of The Cargocaire Award The Cargocaire Engineering Corporation takes this opportunity to extend sincere congratula- tions to Cadet-Midshipman John M. Bechberger, this year ' s winner of The Cargocaire Award. Tliis award is presented annually to the writer of the best thesis on " Cargo Damage. " The subject is of vital interest to the Cargocaire Engineering Corporation, which has spent eleven yem ' s on the development of Cargocaire — the modern system that protects cargoes from the hazards of airborne moisture. To all members of the graduating class Cargocaii ' e expresses its very best wishes, and feels sure that their careers in the nation ' s maritime service will ever reflect credit upon themselves and upon the United States Mer- chant Marine Academy. CARGOCAIRE ENGINEERING CORPORATION New York • Washington • Son Francisco • Seattle Montreal • Vancouver • London • Gothenburg 259 KEYSTONE SHIPPING CO, Operators Of Tankers Trans- porting Liquid Cargoes To And From All Ports Ot The World. w JEFFERSON BUILDING PHILADELPHIA 7, 1015 CHESTNUT STREET PENNSYLVANIA Smith- Johnson Steamship Corp. STEAMSHIP OPERATORS AND BROKERS 60 Bkaver Strep:t New York 4. N. Y. 260 MOORE-McCORMACR Passenger and Freight Serviee between the East Coast of United States and the eonntries of BRAZIL . URUGUAY • ARGENTINA Passenger and Freight Service between the West Coast of United States and the countries of BRAZIL . URUGUAY • ARGENTINA AMERICAN SCANTir LIXE Passenger and Freight Service between the East Coast of United States and the countries of NORWAY POLAND DENMARK FINLAND SWEDEN RUSSIA rom Vt ' arl Ihiibor to } ' -J Day, Moon ' ' hConnack Lines opcralt ' tl more tfuiu ir 0 shifts, lost II ifssels. tnmsportrtl 7. ' ) l 23 f troops ami carried IH.iWJ II tons of nur carfiiK To discharge such rrsponsihilities in linir of crisis, tnicrica ' s Merchant Moitttf must be kept strong in peace — as in icar. For complvte information apply through your Travel Agent or MOORE-MeCORMACK LINES Offices in Prind[)ul Cities of the 1 urld 261 Compliments of PFOFF KENDALL 84 FOUNDRY STREET NEWARK, NEW JERSEY Far East Service MAERSK LINE Fortnightly Sailings from Atlantic Pacific Ports to SHANGHAI • HONGKONG • MANILA CEBU • ILOILO MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC. 30 Broad Street, New York, N. Y. BO 9-8870 General Agents PHILADELPHIA: B. H. Sobelman Co. CHICAGO: Phelps Agency ' BALTIMORE: R. C. Herd Co , Inc. DETROIT: F. C MocFarlane SAVANNAH: Smith Kelly Co. HAMPTON ROADS: Dichmann, Wright Pugh, Inc. Qtilm Onills ' S SAIL-MAKERS 73 Pearl Street, New York, N. Y. TARPAULINS — AWNINGS — BOAT COVERS WIND SAILS — COTTON DUCK CARGO SLINGS — HATCH TENTS — FLAGS Day Telephone: WHitehall 4-7280 Cable Address: Sailduck BERNUTH, LEMBCKE CO., INC. Graybar Building 420 LEXINGTON AVENUE Best Wishes and Cotioratidiitions to the Graduittin Classes of the United States Merchant Marine Academy LONDON OmCE: Cory buildings Fenchurch St. London, E. C. 3. Mohawfc 4-9414-5-6 Cable Address " Limbo " Liebers Code A. B. C. 6th Edition Western Union 262 nlUU om .ments OF THE N.y. j5 A. H. BULL ) CO., Inc., Agents ll5 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 263 B Serving the Ships that serve the nation Water-Tube Marine Boilers • Superheaters • Refrac- tories • Airheaters • Economizers • Oil Burners Seamless Welded Tubes. 4, pi Single-Pass, Header-Type Boiler o o Three-Drum Boiler l ' ■■. @ - ; 2 -4-4 ' S iUiUv Two-Drum Boiler T-r ;st Three-Pass, Sectional-Header Boiler ' tA,v , ' i 1.1 Single-Uptake, Controlled- Superheat Boiler [M-310) Water-Tube Boilers, for Stationary Power Plants, for Marine Service . . . Water-Cooled Furnaces . . . Super- heaters . . . Economizers . . . Air Heaters . . . Pulverized- Coal Equipment . . . Chain-Grate Stokers . . Oil, Gas and Multifuel Burners . . , Seamless and Welded Tubes and Pipe . . . Refractories . . . Process Equipment. BABCOCK Cfnee, ■ " ■ Office BCOCK ■ AHo tiBefijY Hr i cox - «Sf«royv, ntw CO. 264 mmmim lowing tip to its ame ince 1829 THE SEAMEN ' S BANK FOR SAVINGS f IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK Allotments Accepted • Banking By Mail United States Savings Bonds • Foreign Remittances Travelers Cheques Main Office 74 WALL STREET New York 5, N.Y. Midtown Office 20 EAST 45th STREET bet. Madison Fifth Aves. NewYorkl7, N.Y. Member Federal Deposit tnsuranre Corporation COMPLIMENTS OF THE ARNOLD BERNSTEIN STEAMSHIP CORPORATION !7 BATTERY PLACE NEW YORK, N. Y. 11, ulls, cargoes and all types of marine insurance — CIIIBB A OX ( Inaerti ' rttei ' i 90 JOHN STREET. NEW YORK 1 . N. Y. Ocean and Inland Marine TransfKirtatiiin • Fire and Automobile Aviation Insurance through Associated Aviation Underwriters 26S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION of the U. S. MERCHANT MARINE CADET CORPS, Inc. B National Headquarters 147 Fulton Street New York City Regional Office 130 Bush Street San Francisco, California Local Chapters Washington, D. C. Baltimore, Md. Philadelphia, Pa. Chicago, III. Seattle, Wash. AIMS AND PURPOSES To foster a Maritime Industry equal to the conuiiereial and defensive needs of the United States of America through a non-proiit Association of the firaduates of the UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE CADET CORPS, and hy the advancement of the sciences and professions of the industry. To recognize officers (deck and engine) of the Merchant Marine as following a distinguished profession. To disseminate to the puhlic. as well as to the memhers and the maritime industry, information that is for the advancement of the INITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE CADET CORPS, its Academy and Cadet Schools. To contrihute to the well-being of members and to further their best interests in the pursuit of their profession. To establish, for the use of members and their guests, clubs and offices in the principal ports and cities fif the United States. PROFESSIONAL ADVANCEMENT The Association will foster a large and healthy Merchant Marine and will specifically promote the more efficient operation of our iiicrchant ships in competition with foreign vessels. The Association will proinolc and support vigorously the present training program for merchant marine officers and especial K llial id " the L nited States Merchant Marine Cadet Corps. The Associalion will crMdiiragc and foster nuitual understanding between licensed mariners and their employers. Through ZENITH. ade(piate news coverage of technological ad an(ements and other develop- ments in the profession will be furnished to all Tiiembers. 266 No.1 SHOE for America ' s No.1 SPORT ¥ ou ' re In the best of com- pany when you wear " All Star " basketball shoes. More players flash across the nation ' s courts on " All Stars " than on any other basketball shoe made. If you ' re looking for extra speed, greater comfort and amazingly long wear, you ' ll want America ' s }tl basketball shoes — Converse " All Stars. " CONVERSE RUBBER COMPANY MALDEN 48. MASS. Ml snun BASKETBALL SHOES Alfiiki) (oniia(;hn, inC. MARINE SlIMMIFS SALES — S IK NICE 129 W est 17lli Sire.-t New York 1 1. N. V, Chelsea 2-1676 % 00 AS " «% ' YEARS ht, Marine, Fire, rsonal property insurance. Non assessable, fit participating, through brokers or agents. •... y.iG= ATLANTIC c INSURANCE y, yi FORTT-MNE WALL STREET • NEW YORK S. N. Y, Albany • li.illitnorc • Iti.)stoti • Chicago • Clevclaiui Uetroii ■ Houston • Los Angeles • Newark • New Haven Philadelphia • Pittsburgh • Rochester • San Francisco 267 HERFF-JDMS COMPANY Official Jnrelers U.S.M.M. A. Class of 1947 New Features Design and Construction AVAILABLE TO GRADUATES Cadet Corps Graduates Rings — All Classes Academy Rings — Miniatures — Wedding Bands Many Graduate rings in stock for prompt Delivery . Circular with all details on request Eastern Division 14 Park Place — Newark 2, New Jersey MArket 3-2295 ALin ifact ners for United Staths Mf.rchant Marinh, Coast Guard, MlLITAR ' i- AND NaVAL ACADEMIES 268 ■ mii J Milimv Albert Ullmann Marine Office, ma 84 W ILLIAM STREET NEW YORK 7, N. Y. Murray Hill 3-6256 Best Wishes JOSEPH WEIL. INC. 105 EAST 29 STREET • NEW YORK, N. Y. BERNARD J. GILSON GIBBS COX, INC. NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS • ONE BROADWAY— 21 WEST STREET NEW YORK CITY NEW YORK Merritt-Chapman Scott Corporation Founded I860 Marine Salvage — Industrial Construction — Heavy Hoisting 17 BATTERY PLACE, NEW YORK, N. Y. New London, Conn. Cleveland, Ohio Norfolk, Va. Key West, Florida Kingston, Ja., B. W. I. 269 ■■i 1871 1947 Over Seventy-Five Years of Manufacturing Experience CROSBY - ASHTON Safe+y and Relief Valves Pressure Gages Approved and Used by U.S. Navy and U. S. Merchant Marine Crosby Steam Gage Valve Co. The Ashton Valve Co. Cambridge, Massachusetts New York — Chicago — Dallas — Los Angeles London — Paris 270 STATES MARINE CORPORATION Own rs ami OpviUiU i s OFFICES NEW YORK, N. 90 BROAD STREET Y H ( U S T O N , TEXAS COTTON EXCHA fGE BUILDING GALVESTON, texas 305 COMMERCE BUILDING NEW ORLEANS, la. HIBERNIA BANK BUIIDING NORFOLK, VIRGINIA CITIZENS BANK BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO, calie. MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BUILDING imn nmmi LUGS. IM. n BROADWAY NEW YORK 4, N. Y. 510 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 11, CAL. M Ship Operators Tankers Dry Cargo Vessels K 271 1 JEFFERSON-TRAVIS MARINE RADIO Model 252. 25 Watts Radiotelephone Subsidiary of EMERSON RADIO AND PHONOGRAPH CORPORATION .il.l famous R ADIOTFXEPHONE equipment by ,|KI KKKS(fiN-TR AVIS measures up to the lii ' liest stand- ards and the most critical requirements of two-way radio conimunicalion. I ' or pri ate yachts, connuercial vessels — liiiats of all sizes — there are outstanding J-T models. MARINE PORTABLE Model MR-3 New TWO-BAND M;irinc Poi- ialil — plays on A( ' .-I)(l liousp rur- rcnl and balteries. Short and Ion;; «ii " . Wealher resistinj; construc- tion. Powerful — niajinificent lone. The ideal recei ei for sea and lan l. .S.i ' J.O. ' S less batteries. Senil for l.itrratitre JEFFERSON-TRAVIS Incorporated. 380 Second Avenue, NEW YORK 10. N. Y. ( onqi ' ctfulal o iJ and { j e.it ix ' hlieS o l p Class of 1947 H. W. ST. JOHN k COMPANY • JI W YORK NEW YORK 272 tiiUUMi Idlewood SYRUP Made from Maltose, Dextrose, and Maple Sugar Syrups Packed by VERMONT MAPLE SYRUP CO St. Johnsbury, Vermont 273 IP • •• • • ••••••••• • • • ••• 170 2 WHAT YOU COPMIGMT 193J br mi. CO. OF NORTH AMEdCA INSURANCE COMPANY OF ' ORTII iHIEIIlCl COMPANIES, Philadelphia Insurance Company of North America, founded 1792, oldest stock fire and marine insurance company in the country, heads the group of North America Companies which write practi- cally all types of Fire, Marine and Casualty insurance Insurance Company of Norfh America Indemnify Insurance Company of North America Philadelphia Fire and Marine Insurance Company The Alliance Insurance Company of Philadelphia ♦ All Bilt Uniforms Inc. U. S. NAVY COAST GUARD MARITIME SERVICE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE OFFICER ' S UNIFORMS CIVILIAN CLOTHES A roiTlpIrIf line ol lUllf. While, Slate (rray ami Khaki uit , eaps, devices, !eeve lripi ' , ami iii if;nias are a ailahh ' at all times for iinin«- halr )leli erv. Alterations completed in 3 hours when necessary 147 FULTON STREET I . t ir HmadtLay i NEW YORK CITY CORTLANDT 7-3323 •••••• •••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••• W. J. Roberts Co. Inc. Five, Ahir ne and TriiHSparliilioii Uiulerwriteyi .Sy JOHN STREET NEW YORK 274 iiS».v ' i CILIM ' S SONS ICH., Inc. LIGHTERAGE 15 MOORE STREET NEW YORK The SEA IS RICH IN TRADITION TIDES— STORMS SAII— CHANTinS CALMS — HAIL WHALES and a host of other words that conjure up talcs of the past. OFFICERS AND MODERN SEAMEN are educated to a most efficient handling of ships. OFFICERS from the U. S. MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY wear their class ring proudly as a mark of their associa- tion. Bill Pforr NEW YORK MANAGER L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 535 FIFTH AVENUE AT 44th STREET P AL f Marine Paints and Compositions High Quality Products for Every Marine Purpose Any Color — Any Quantity — In Any Port 7 FEDER t MARINE PAINTS The Federal Paint Company, Inc. 33 RECTOR ST.. NEW YORK — Phone: WHitehall 4-0655 Agents in All Principal Ports 275 WEEMS SYSTEM OF NAVIGATION 227 Prince George Street Annapolis, Maryland All kinds of navigation instruments and text books — Second-setting navigation watches — Navigator ' s note books — Agent for charts and publications of the U. S. Coast and Geo- detic Survey and the hiydrographic Office — Navigation Consultants — Bring us your navi- gation problems. Send for free catalogue ISTHMIAIV STEAMSHIP LIIVES SHIP ISTHMIAN ' ROUND THE WORLD ISTHMIAIV STEAMSHIP CDMPAIVY 71 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. BOwUng Green 9-6800 TIERNAN TIERNAN MARINE INSURANCE I I I Fulton Street New York 7, New York REctor 2-4995 ATLANTIC METAL PRODUCTS. INC. COMBINATION STEEL DOOR FRAMES METAL COVERED PRODUCTS HOLLOW METAL DOORS ELEVATOR FRONTS 5-15 48th Avenue, Long Island City I, N. Y. STillwell 4-3534 276 1 p 1 Steamship Terminal Operators AND Ger]eral Stevedores 15 WHITEHALL STREET NEW YORK 4, N. Y. PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. BALTIMORE, MD. BOSTON, MASS. NORFOLK, VA. NEWPORT NEWS, VA. OFFICES ALBANY, N. Y. PORTLAND, ME. NEWARK, N. J. SEARSPORT, ME. CAMDEN, N. J. TRENTON, N. J. WILMINGTON, DEL. BUFFALO, N. Y. 1 5 FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, MARINE and Allied Lines of Insurance The HOME INSURANCE COMPANY 59 MAIDEN LANE NEW YORK 8. N. Y. 277 ( oliinibia Welcliii! C ' o Certified Boiler Repairs and Welding 186 Joralemon Street Brooklyn, N. Y. TH. TICian l4 ' 5-12l i STRAUSS ' MARINE SCHOOL Preparatory Courses for Licenses All Grades Steam or Diesel U. S. Steainhoat Inspection Service Licensed bv the State of New York Owned and Operated by A. A. STRAUSS JOHN MITCHELL 61 Whitehall St. New York 4 Tel.: V.Hilehall 4-0742 ATLANTA WASHINGTON THE GUARANTEED WATERPROOFING COMPANY ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS ROOFING — SHEET METAL WORK — ACOUSTICAL TREATMENTS — ROCK WOOL INSULATION — STEAM CLEANING OF BUILDINGS — INDUSTRIA L MASTIC FLOORING WATERPROOFING — DAMPPROOFING — CAULKING — REINTEGRATION OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES — SAND BLASTING — GUNITE — TILE AND TERRAZZO P. O. BOX 1828 PHONE 3-3491 GREENSBORO, N. C. enci FOR THE REVISED EDITION " The Painting of Ships " discusses the prepara- tion and painting of e ery part of a ship. It shows how to maintain speeds with minimum fuel consumption and how to lower mainte- nance cost. It tells how to get a uniform joh of painting in every port of the world. International Paint Company. Inc. 21 West St. New York t " . N. Y. ni!mauiins 001 Minnesota St. Sau Francisco 7 Cal. AGENTS IN EVERY IMPORTANT PORT 278 luuviiLnMWiiai Marine Insurance liritn ' srittatn rs Thrnli htHit tltr l orltl Union Marine Gen. Ins. Co. Ltd. I ' lioenix Assnrance Co. Ltd. ' liinihia Ins. ( ' o. of N. . y nil« ' d Fireniens Ins. Co. Imperial Assurancj- Co. Norwich I ' nion Fire Ins. Soe. Lttl. Kasrle Fire Co. of N. . .1. . IATIIKII. Marine . laiiaKer 2 PLATT STREET NEW YORK 7, NEW YORK FOR High Efficiency in Dust Recovery u se BUELL van Tongeran Dust Recovery Systems Write For Buell ' s Book " The van Tongeran System of Industrial Dust Recovery " BUELL ENGINEERING CO., INC. 70 PINE STREET, NEW YORK 5, N. Y. Athletic Association Uni ted States Merchant Marine Aca Kings Point, New York demy Gradua tes of the Academy are eligible for mem ber- ship in the Athletic Association. Associate membership of $2.00 pe r year entitles members to two (2) persona use tickets at a discount to all home games. 279 pBm ' i Best Wishes FROM OFFICERS CLUB UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY KINGS POINT, N. Y. MiiniiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiHiiiiii Nautgattnn I (Enmpany, ilnr. | I 1 I I 39 BROADWAY I I NEW YORK 6, N. Y. | niiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiitiMMiiiiiiiMniiiiiiMin COMPLETE MARINE FACILITIES Ocean and Inland Hull and Cargo Including War Risk Anywhere in the World M. M. PEASE United States Marine Manager NORTH BRITISH GROUP ATLAS ASSURANCE CO., LTV, 90 JOHN STREET NEW YORK 1. N. Y. 280 (■■Htin u wimvMiHnmtWMWgastKMmBmm K -onipiiincnis oj E. F. DREW CO.. INC. 15 East 26tli Street New York 10, N. Y. AMEROID T ic Compli ' tt ' lioiliT W nttT Treatment Tugs, Barges and all types of hull insurance TALBOT, BIRD CO., INC. 111 JOHN STREET . NEW YORK r.N.Y. it. L. Bui ' bank k Co., Ltd. Steamship and Berth Agents Ship and Thartering Broilers WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 BATTERY PLACE NEW YORK 4, N. Y. Tel. WHitehall 4-5980 X ontnlitnenti of The Union Sulphur Company, Inc. STEAMSHIP DEPARTMENT 33 RECTOR STREET NEW YORK 6, N. Y. 281 .amu Compliments of BERTSCHMANN MAIOY 56 Beaver Street New York 4, N. Y. MARINE INSURANCE Krpresi ' nlirifi " SWITZERLAND " GENERAL INSURANCE CO. WORLD FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE CO. AETNA INSURANCE COMPANY RUBIES LINGERIE CO., INC. 171 Madison Ave. New York City New York Complinients of ZUKOR ' S 450 -7th Avenue New York City New York 282 MIKE LEVINE COMPANY 1385 Broadway New York City New York ( onijfttmcnt. of DANAX CORPORATION • 1328 Broadway N ew York City New Yorlc PARKWAY DISTRIBUTORS. INC. AUTHORIZED DEALERS OF SLOP CHESTS SHIP SERVICE STORES CANTEENS P. X ' s COMMISSARIES 279 Church Street New York. N. Y. WAIker 5-5387 JAMES C. MURPHY President 283 LITTLE COTTAGE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 26 MIDDLE NECK ROAD GREAT NECK. N. Y. Telephone: Great Neck 1971 DAYTON FROCKS 2477 Grand Concourse Bronx, New York Compliments of HARRY WAXMAN CO. 152 MADISON AVENUE New York Cilv, N. Y. MUrrav Hill 3-5730 PEDIGREE FABRICS. INC. SPUN AND RAYON FABRICS 461 FOURTH AVENUE at 31st Street NEW YORK CITY 284 i Af nif iU UV W.lM«fftf ««■ The Propeller Club OF THE UNITED STATES Extends hearty corifiratiilalions to the 1947 urndiiates of the I nited States Merchant Marine Academy, Kiniis Point. ' Sen- 1 ork. " Organized in 1927, the Propeller Club now has more than one hundred Ports located throu ih- out the United States including: eleven foreign coun- tries. Our primary objecti e is to promote, further, and support a strong American Merchant Marine for our domestic needs, and to carry a substantial portion of our exports and imports; also to serve as a naval auxiliarv. NATIONAL OFFICERS Honorary President LT COMDR ARTHUR M. TODE, USNR, RETIRED President MR. LEWIS D PARMELEE Graduates of the United States Merchant Marine Academy. Kings Point, are invited to take up membershi|) in the Propeller Club. For full in- formation write to — The Propeller Club of the United States. 17 Batterv Place. New York 4. N. Y. Secretary COMDR. HAROLD J. HARDING, USNR Treasurer MR. JOSEPH H. GODWIN PORT OF NEW YORK OFFICERS President MR HARMON LEWIS Secretary -Treasurer MR. JOHN G. THOMPSON SUPPORT THE AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE — IT SAVED US IN WAR — LET IT SERVE US IN PEACE 285 Complunents oj JAMCE STORES CORPORATION 30 East 14 Street New York, New York Congratulations to the graduates of the U. S. Merchant Marine Academy from: JULRAY SHOPS, inc. 242-252 West 36th St. New York City New York Uniforms for the Cadet-Midshipmen of the United States Merchant Marine Academy " Congratulations on the splendid record made bv the graduates of this Academy on every part of the globe. " • ••• • •••• WENDER GOLDSTEIN INCORPORATKD 387 FOURTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 16, N. Y. ACADEMY LOCATION— PALMER HALL 286 ■I k n» t)UAijr JitfiJH m Have a Coke Coke = Coca-Cola " Coca-Cola " and its abbreviation " Coke " are the registered trade- marks which distinguish the prod- uct of The Coca-Cola Company. 1946 The C-C Cal 287 Compliments of DuBenay Undergarment, Ine. 102 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK CITY. N. Y. Complimenfs of INDUSTRIAL OVENS. INC. 13825 Treskitt Road Cleveland, Ohio ff en I rcj-er NOONANS HAIR PETROLE R ecauie It Gives Them A " Head Start ' In Appearance SOLD AT DRUG COUNTERS AND BARBER SHOPS EVERYWHERE T. NOONAN SONS CO., BOSTON, MASS. Best V ' Ushes to tJie Graduating Class MANGEL STORES, Inc. 1 10 Broadway New York, New York 288 . juwfin BS v Compliments oj L ZEJSDMAIS, Inc. 135 Madison Avenue New York. N. Y. Be Sean ' s FKExNCIl IJKSTAUKANT Exchisivc Bill Inexpensive 20 STATION PLAZA GREAT NECK, N. Y. Telephone Great Neck 1689 NUtlev 2-13S2 ORange 3-384:{ Roller Machine Works In diistria I Engin cering Air — Gas — Oil — Steam — Water East Orange, New Jersey Best Wishes o our Graduates POLARIS STAFF CompUmeuts of MARTIN SIG. SHAPIRO 165 SMITH STREET PERTH AMBOY, N. J. 289 FLEUR DE LIS FLOWER SHOP FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS GREAT NECK 632 BONDED TELEGRAPH FLORIST Menil)er of National, Long Island and Great Neck, Real Estate Boards NAOMA MOODY REALTOR 43 SOUTH MinnLE NECK ROM) GREAT NECK, N. Y. Tel. Great Neck 4226 " THE FRENCH MART.INC.- 1605 Kings Highway Brooklyn, New York Compliments of Lt. (jg) V. E. Tyson, Jr., USMS Great Neck Diiier Formerly MARTIN S DINER Excellent Food Air Conditioned Free Parking Space for Diners Only CUTTER !MILL and MIDDLE NECK RD. GREAT NECK, L. I. Tel. Great Neck 2069 Open 21 Ilonrs a Day Including Sunday BAYARD C. CASS REAL ESTATE 6 MIDDLE NECK ROAD GREAT NECK, N. Y. TEL GREAT NECK I Great Neck and North Shore Properties 290 Mim 520 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK 18, N. Y. OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER to the 1947 MIDSHIPS Congratulations to the 1947 Class and thanks for your cordial patronage BON VOYAGE! 291 c _ r 1 mat y llci irS Makiiiir iiiiuals for America ' s leadiui: colleiies and Americas leadinti industries is our jol». In less than 24 months over 400.000 texthooks. cover- ing 157 ul)jects. were produced in our plant for collcire consumption, not includinir colleiie annuals or industrial year books. Midships is a record of achievement for the United States Merchant Marine Academy, another jtroduct of Conway. May we extend our greetings to the fine staff of Midships and wish them well wherever the service may take them. THE CONWAY PRINTING COMPANY, Inc. 416 WEST 33r(l STREET NEW YORK 1, N. Y. This book is a Conivay product 292 mimmf miw r mmm !! mimmii!. ( onipiinicii j of WINDJAMMERS CLUB L oinnliincnls of GLEE CLUB Besf Wishes from CAMERA CLUB Besi Wishes from RADIO CLUB 293 i Success to Our Graduafes RIFLE AND PISTOL TEAM Good Luck PHILOSOPHER ' S CLUB Good Luck DRILL TEAM Success to Our Graduates DEBATING SOCIETY 294 ' mmimmi mjm Besf ly s jes SAILING CLUB Best Wishes CADET-MIDSHIPMAN BAND i oninlinicnts oP LATIN-AMERICAN CLUB FRENCH CLUB 295 S nioolli S ailinq yo Lynr L raaiialc. PROPELLER CLUB Port of Kings Point UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY KINGS POINT, N. Y. L onip lini cuts of U.S.M.M.A. CALENDER STAFF l oinnilnicnlS oj- " HEAR THIS " STAFF 296 mmi 9m if rmmwfiv»ri Mmmvr.,! K onqratuiatioiiA MIDSHIPS STAFF Logbook of the Graduating Class of 1947 297 !)4 lle x. ta Adae Ulie 6. ran, ' Vloci Sleiiiii liip ( " o.. Inr — - All-Bilt Lnif( rnl lii - 274 Alumni AsMH-ialioii of the L ' SMMCC. Inc- 266 Anifriraii Oock Co -• ' • ' Aiiu ' ricaii F.xport Lines -+• ' Aiiieriiaii Koreisn Steanisliip (!orp 272 AiiHTiran Hawaiian Steani liip ' o 241 AnuTlcaii InU ' rnalional Marine Agency 248 Anu-riran Soulli African lanc . Inc 243 AppU-lon iK Cox. Inc - • ' Arlliur Mnrra Slntlios — • " » Alliletic Assoriution of the LSMMA 279 Atlantic (;nlf and est Indies Sleanisliip Kine.s 250 Atlantii ' Mt ' lal l»r Mlncts. Inc 276 Vtlanlic Mnlual Insuranc e ( ' o 267 Habcorlv and W ilcox Co 264 Italfour Co., L. C 275 ltcrn lcin Shipping Co.. Inc.. Arnold 265 ItiTiiiilh l.cinhckc Co.. Inc 262 Itcrl i liinaiiii iV Malov. Attorneys 282 Ulaik Diainoiid Stcanr-hip ( orp 255 Kiicll Kii;:inccrinK Co.. Iiu- 279 Mull A C.I.. A. H 263 Itnrbank Co.. Ltd., A. L 281 (!arj;ocaire Knyineerins: (orp 259 Carpinlcr i Uaker 276 Carroll Towing Co., Inc 256 Cass. Bayard C 290 Chubb Son 265 Coca-Cola flo 287 Columbia Welding Co 278 Combustion Engineering ( o.. Inc 2a4 Conhagcn. Alfred 267 Converse Kubber Co 267 Conwav Printing Co 292 !osin ip ilitan Shipping Co 256 txosby Steam Gage alve Co 270 Danax ( orp 283 Davis Kngineering Corp 253 Dayton Frocks 284 De Jean ' s French Restaurant 289 Drew Co., E. F 281 DuHenay Lndergarment. Inc 288 Federal Paint Co 275 Fleur .le Lis 290 French Mart. The 290 General Motors Corp 244 (;ibbs Cox. Inc 269 (rillen ' s Sons Lighterage, Henry 278 Grace Lines. Inc 240 Great Neck Diner 290 Guaranteed Waterproofing to 278 Herir-Jones Co 268 Ililborn Hamburger, Inc 259 Home liiHtirance (!o 277 Industrial Ovens, Inc 288 Insurance ( ' ompany of IVortli America 274 International Paint ( o., Inc 278 Isthmian Steamship ( o 2 18 298 n«e Janice Stores Corp 286 Jarka (!orp 277 JelT ' ersoii i Travis. Inc 270 Julray Shops. In - 286 Ke sl« ne Shipping Co 260 Levine. Mike 283 Lily-Tulip Cup Corp 246 Little Cottage 284 McGee Co.. Wni. H 256 Mangel ' s 288 Marine Transport Lines Inc 271 Mather, J.. Marine Mgr 279 Merritt-Chapnian Scott Corp 269 Mocxly, Naomi 290 Moore-McCormack Lines 261 Moller .Steamship Clo 262 Moran Towing Transportation Co 242 New Jersey Asbestos Co 253 Mlsen Mills 262 Noonan ' s Hair Petrole 288 North Atlantic ;ulf Steamship Co 263 North Itritlsli S: Mercantile Insurance Co 280 Officers :iub of LSMMA 280 Parry Navigation 280 Parkway Distributors, Inc 283 Pedigree Fabrics, Inc 284 Pfoir Kendall 262 Propeller t:iub of the U.S 285 Prudential .Steamship Co 250 Roberts Co., Inc.. W. J 274 Roller. Fred M 289 Rubies Lingerie Co.. Inc 282 St. John Co.. H. W 272 .Saks, Fifth Avenue 246 Seaman ' s Bank for Savings 265 .Shapiro, Martin SIg 289 .Smith Johnson Steamship Corp 260 .Sperry Gyroscope Co.. Inc 249 Standard Fruit .Steamship Co 248 Standard Oil ( ). of New Jersey 257 States Marine Corp 271 .Strauss ' Marine School 278 Talbot Bird Co.. Inc 281 TIeman TIernan Insurance 276 Ullmann Marine Olli.e. Albert 269 Union Sulphur Co., Inc 281 Lulled Fruit Co 251 United Stales Lines 241 Universal Terminal .Stevedoring Co 258 Vermont Maple Syrup Co., Inc 273 Ward Machine Co., Inc 247 Waxnian (! ., Harry 284 Vl ' eems .Sv |em of Navigation 276 W ell. In... Joseph 269 ender (Foldslein, Inc 286 W bite Studio 291 Zendman, ln - 289 Ziik«»r ' s 282 i i ilv SSSSSi»!!|«J|lW,(IWI vV, i|, ' V -? ' 94 jde ia QnaducUe ecemMe-fi ' 46 AulbersbtTf;. T. ( " Allonl. I.. I). . . Alk.r. H. M. . . . All.li. K. W . . . . Aril. J. J 160 160 160 160 160 ISair.l. 1). 1 lf 0 IJak.r. J. A 161 Hak.r. .1. W Iftl IScaiirhallip. A. J 161 K.M lilur -er, J. M 161 nvv-i. I. (. lf l Horii.ll. A. G 161 Hisiiall, A. M 162 Bisbi-e. E. F 162 l{laii ell. E. 1 162 H.KTuni. A 162 Koliner. A. E 162 Bolger. :. R 162 BosK.n. R. S 163 l?razaii ka , A. J 163 Brooks. 1,. (; 163 Brollierhood. J. 163 BroMcr. I. J 163 Brown. E. M 163 Brown. T. F 164 Brvanl. T. L 164 Buller. H. S 164 Bvle. M 164 Campbell. H. E. Carliu ' rio. i ' .. G. Cassel. J. G. . . . Clarke. T. G. . . Collins. T. M. . Coniplon. T. D. Cox. J. L Cronin. R. B. . . Cuniniinss. R. . 164 164 165 165 165 165 165 165 166 Davin. B. G 166 Davis. G 166 DeSinione. A. A 166 Diebold. J. T 166 Diniitriou. T 166 Donath. E. J 167 Dowdle, J. W 167 Drew. W 167 DnBois. F. .S 167 Diibv, C. W 167 Ehrlinger. R. J. . . . Ellison. J. P Enzensperger. J. T. Ernst. R Evans, C. B Evestone. M. T. . . . 167 168 168 168 168 168 Faving. H. W 168 Fabrv. V. 1 169 Falkenberrv. H. L 169 Farlev. J. D 169 Fellrup. J. P 169 Fenslerer. J. P 169 Ferber. E. L 169 Finger, F. W 170 Fink, A. W 170 Ford. C 170 Foster. R. W 170 French. R 170 Gall. E. E 170 Garofalo. R 171 Cilson. L 171 Glower. D. D 171 Graff. G. 171 Grego, W. J 171 Gurland, H. W 171 Gurnick, T. P 172 Hadle . C. V. . llallsiiin. F. W. Ilainillon. I). E. Hansen. I.. B. . . Hardiaslle. R. . Harris, E. R. . . Havden, T. J. . Ha ard. G. II. . Heernian. i ' r. P. Heller. P. V. . . Helms. B. H. . . Herbsi. W. l. , H.rmaii. B. K. . Ilernd4 n. D. E. Hodges. H. L. . Holi. F. H 172 172 172 172 172 173 173 173 173 173 173 174 174 174 174 174 James, S. G 174 Jennelle. S. E 175 Jennings, K. C 175 Joffrav. H. G 175 Johns. J. H 17.5 Johnston. J. F 17,5 Jones. (.. M 175 Jones. E. M 176 Jones. K. P 176 Jones, L. C 176 Juliano. J 176 Kaufl man. J. T 176 Keenan. B. R 176 Kempf, J. F 177 Keppel. W. W 177 Kern. R. T 177 Kimniel. R. B 177 King. K. C 177 Kinnaird. M. J 177 Kline. E. R 178 Kh.sowski. S 178 Koorher. H. A 178 Kremer. L. B 178 Kronian. . H 178 Kundinger. T. A 178 I.anev, R. G 179 Earner, H. L 179 EaVilhi, R. E 179 EeBlanr. R. G 179 Leger. A 179 I vv. 1 179 Lew. R. M 180 Lew, Vi ' . S 180 Eilja. R. V 180 Eion. J. H 180 Eoesberg. A. S 180 Eovett. . D 180 Ma.(;urn. F. G. . Marshall. E. G. . Maltson. M. E. . Mav. J. A McClalTertv. E. J. MeCrane. J. A. . . MeKinnev. G. (S.. Miller. R. F. ... Morrison. ' . !N. 181 181 181 181 181 181 182 182 182 IVeedler. W . T 182 Nolan. R. J 182 Norman. J. H 182 Nusbanm. C. G 183 OBrien. D. F. OHiggins. P. O ' Eearv, T. F. Oliver. ' S. T. . Oliver. T. B. Olsen. G. C. . Owen. R. L. . Owen, T. M. 183 183 183 183 183 184 184 184 Page, W . H Palmer. B. E. . . . Paramori ' . i{. A. . Pase.H-. E. F Patterson. K. B. . Pleas. W . H Poage. F. R Porter. W . D. . . . Poiner. K. P Pratt. U. ; Prawirki. A. A. . . Presrotl. E. W. . . Privelt. r. R. . . . Piigh. J. M Piilmen. E. H. . . . (.hiinn. R. (; 184 184 184 185 185 185 185 185 185 186 186 186 186 186 186 187 Rankin. P. S 187 Raneh. I. 1 187 Resrhenberg. A. P 187 Ri.e. J. P 187 Rigbv. J. D 187 Rinke. A. R 188 Riio, G. A 188 Robel. W . T 188 Ronneberg. B. J 188 Rotolo. V. A 188 Russell. J. R 188 Saez, J Sager. S. M. ... Sehlein. E. L. . Schmidt. H. . . . Schmidt. . ... .S«hrolt. N. B. . . Schwartzman. T. D Scroggin. J. V. Shnart. D. E. . . Silbersack, W . R. Smith. E. S. ... Smith. J. S. ... .Sommerville. J. A Sperier, D. R. . Squillace, M. A. , Slahmann. E. A. Stanim. ' . J. . , Stanlev. L. S. . . Stark. ' R. J Stone. H. C Stone, N Streat, W. L. . . StrompI ' . R. H. .Slider. 1 Summers, E. ( " . .Swadell, C. H. .Szalkowski. E. B. Tenlas. N Teodi rson. D. H. Thallieimer. ( ' . G. Travers. T. F. . . Thaver. EC 189 189 189 189 189 189 190 190 190 190 190 190 191 191 191 191 191 191 192 192 192 192 192 192 193 193 193 193 193 193 194 194 Van Fleet. G. A 194 Van Zwaliiwenbiirg, P. R 194 Viau. L. J 194 Walden. B. W 194 W avne, . D 193 enzel, H. F 195 W ilmoi. C. R 195 W iiish.w. W. G 195 W inter. R. W 193 W ise. J. F 193 W ilrher. A. R 196 V olfe. B. P 196 Wvsoeki. J. J 196 299 9nde x. ta QnxiJUuUeA. Matf, ' 47 m Afaiia ief. ( ' . . Ande oll. L, G. Aniliony. B. A. Askew. N. L. . .v e . W. J. . . Hak.r. K. S. . . . Halclri.l;;f. W. G. Hariie? ' . I ' .. H. . |{arlo ok. W . K. Hal.lu-l.l.T. K. J. Italtaliiio. K. I-. |{,M k. 15. B. ... B.ll. N . K. ... BeiieiiMiii. D. M. Beiiiiplt. F. S. . Berp. D. .S Btr;;r .r l. .1. V. B.II-. M. B. ... Balil.r. H. J. . . Bl-li.-p. W. H. . Biiii ' . w . ;. . . Bond. 1 . T. . . Bia.Hord. K. J. Braii.l. K. S. . . Brand. B. C. . . Bra?. K. A. Br «»T. J. .4. . . BiiII.kIi. M. (;. . Bur. h. J Bur liardl. B. P. Biirliii;:liaiii. I . I)a% ciiporl. W DavHUoil. H. U -. W. F. . Dillrirli. H. I DiHiylii. I.. V l) . lc. A. E. . l)iiiiiiiu;iii, ( . I)iiii»i rlli, J. Espf»il i. H. . Esslcr. K. B. Ev. n, V. L. . Ewels, F. K. K. W. O. M. Paris, W. D. . . . Farrinjiltiii. G. E. Faiilliabcr. I). J. Filzforald. K. J. Fhtclur. S. R. Flovd. 1). G. . . . For.l, C. F Foster, W. L. . . . Franklin, G. D. . 200 200 200 200 200 200 201 201 201 201 2(»1 201 202 202 202 202 202 202 20;i 203 203 20.} 20.{ 20.i 20 1 20 1 20 1 201 204 204 205 Canbv. M. P 20.5 raiin ' .M. R. J 20.i (aniill. M. H 20. Carl. W. T 20.-. Carlton. R. M 20.1 C.l.o, J 20(. Church, 1). E 200 Clinton. A. B 200 Codav, A 206 Coheii. l 206 Collin . J. E 206 Condon. W. M 207 Corhitt. W . .S 207 Cosbv, A. B 207 Coun.il. J. T 207 Cristv. A. B 207 Crook. I). L 207 Crow, C. K 208 Cueullu. I. 1 208 Galliirhi Gannon, W. Ired 208 208 208 208 20 ) 20 ) 2() ' 209 209 209 210 210 210 210 210 210 211 21 I 21 I 21 I 21 1 211 212 (iarxin. W. .S 212 (folen. ir. G 212 (.oodM.n. 11. W 212 (.re.no. « ». W 212 (irisMi.r. K. 1 212 Hard.-.-. .1. H 21.} Marl.... I . W 2l:5 ll.;;.inan. 11. J 21.{ H.-rnian. J. C 213 Hol.r. J. I 213 Mi.k-. A. I 213 llo ly.-. .1. B 211 Holland. G. E 2U Moll. .1. . 211 Howard. H. H 214 1Iii;:1h«. B. E 214 Huldi.|ni-t. E. G 214 llurlo. W. J 21.j llnrlork. 1). T 215 Irxins. .S. .S 215 Ja.kson. B. C. Jai-xis. K. B. . . . ,|oliii..on. 1 ' . C. johiiM.n. R. O. Jone . U. K. . . Karfs, F. H. . . Karow. R. H. . Kelvie. S. 1). . . Kern. F. R. . . . Klanbera. W. J. Knee. T. H. . . Kni;:lil. A. J. . . Knorr. R. II. . . Knowlton. J. V . Konen. ( . C . . Kosleeke. B. W. Kowleski. .S. M. Kriinier. J. E. . KraM-hnk. R. A. Knnune. H. . . Lake. R. N Eanihri;:lit. .V. J. l.andrx. A. .S. . . Earkin. D. C. ... Lavan, V. . ... l.ee, D. T. .S. ... Lee, George . . . Lehren, R. J. ... Lemon, (t. L. ... Lenkav. J. S. ... Lecniard. R. C. . . Le erenz. I). . Lit ler. L. B. ... I owr.i. R. C. ... Madlone. .1. I ' . . . Vlai.r, W . .1 Main. ;. H Mane . J. J MarhoiM-K. L. V. . . Marshhurn. !V1. J. Ma o. 1. 1 M.Carli. W. B. . M.iJowell. W. L. M.lneriiev, V. V. M.l ' liail. M. L. Meal . 11. W. . MeiliK. J. .1. . . ■Merian. (). A. . Miller. V. B. . . Miller. J. . . MonlalM . K. ,( MiMiradian. M. Mnrra . J. S. . . .Murra . R. S. . 215 215 215 216 216 216 216 216 216 217 217 217 217 217 217 218 218 218 218 218 218 219 219 219 219 219 219 220 220 220 220 220 220 • -7l 221 221 221 221 221 222 222 222 222 222 222 223 223 223 223 223 223 224 224 224 Nasv , F. L 224 Nolan. T. H 224 Noonej . W . 224 Oilrien. W. R 225 O ' Connor. R. M 225 IVndlelon. M. 1 I ' enn. J. I Pi.r. e. W . R. . I ' rel. . J I ' ursell. R. F. ISr.li. A. J. . Rahni. R. 1). . Rees. W Rehni. 1 ' . C. ... Re nolds. F. . . Rober ls. W. 1) Roherlson. P. H. Robinson. .S. L. G Roaers. 11. G. Rogers. J. G. . Rohrer, T. . Roller. H. C. Rost. T. E. . . Sarlain, J. E. . . .Savres. R. ;. . . Seiiaek. .1. J. . . Seott. J. R. ... Sevniour. .S. J. Shaw. W . H. . . Sheehan. F. X. Sheri.lan. J. M. .Sheriiian. V. . Si«ler. W . P. . . .Snvder. .1 Stee l, W . V. . . .Steele. H. P. . . .Slew man. J. 1). Siranber;;. J. . Suits. F. E. ... Sullivan. R. E. . Tavlor. . L. . . Teal. R. 1 Terlzakian. , . . Tlimu;isi;in. R, Tompkins. J. (i. Traev, (;. L Tronibka. H. . . . Van h w . v. War.l. M. L. . . Walson. C. M. W ebb. I Weber. R. W. . Wessman. R. A. healle . S. 1). Whipple. F. E. While. .1. 1 Whillen. B. C. Wi;:ien. A. A. . W ihla. G. L. . . Williams. P. C. W ise. 11. W. . . Wojan. L. P. . . Woi.i ki. C. B. W 4 odhouse. J. 11 Wri;;hl. B. C. . . W rliel. A. L. . . W vlie. N. 1 Yaplc. W. R. Yoiinji. D. J. 225 225 225 225 226 226 226 226 226 226 227 227 227 227 227 227 228 228 228 228 228 228 229 229 229 229 229 229 230 230 230 230 2.30 230 231 231 231 231 231 231 232 232 232 232 232 232 233 233 233 233 233 233 234 234 234 234 234 234 235 235 235 235 235 235 300 GlaU o ' S Kl ' .SCII. (;..ril. M Olio Carl lt(t Kl M N. Iltrlurl K.IiiuiikU lt(»K( (M)V. Joseph IMU I.«M.M:. Kohcrl UKVAN. Jiinio- K.ii(l:ill. Jr. ((tISDIM l«. rii..Mi;i i.tor DOKKW ( Mil l{. karl i:ii;:riif I ' KIM, F ' orm ' S( nuuir IIOIKAI.A. WillUiiii AU-xiiiiiler JACKIK. Willinin lli.rl LKWIS, IMiilip l{. » LUCENTK. Anthony Kavnioncl MAM)F.KSO . Marion :iiesliire MI.HKI.I.I.. TlioiMa Wilbur KinKK. Donal.l Slanl. SWI.NSON. (all William THOMPSON. l,lo .l .loliii WKEGI.. Cliail.- M. WOOD. Mlurl O.iinis ZIKN KKS, Janu ' Irancis BRONK. Janus Hughes Jt)SEPH. Ralph George KIMRAI.I,. Clarence Fosler KISCH. William Fie.lerirk. Jr. MaiDONAEl). Angus Ridiard MaeLAREN. Donald Rov MANCINO. Joseph MVRTIN. Remer Doiiahl MEEICIUR, (.eorge Irving MP VER. Robert Henry MGRRl.S. James Haines NEWTON. George ORSBORN. James Talmage i{ D ;l E . Elmer Donald ( I.ARK. Eee Harmon C0E(;ATE. I ' aiil Alexander V W . W illiam IW ' niamin HOIH ' ER. Carl Jame 0»eus JENklNS. Wa iie Mason J(»IINSON. Basil Demosthenes Jl N(,l.i;S. James Eramis kENDAIE. Marr Hinsdale KEN(;, Theoilore KNEIM ' ER, John Thomas EEEK(»W IT . Alvin Martin EOWRV. Charles Hamilton. Jr. EVTI.E. Charles Albert MAI ' I ' l S. Edward Riissel MARIIN. John Eran.is MeCARDEEE. Charles Rex PETERSON. Erancis Seward ROBERTS. John Ronald SCHEIRF. John William SPOSATO. John James W AEDEN. Clarke WAEKER. Douglas Brook W OEFORD. Raymond vol N ;. Robert Owen ARNOED, Albert Blakely CIGEEVNO. Irving Eiiigi CONNEEE, (;ilbert Fred CUPO. Joseph ineent DELOZIER, Riehard (;eorge FERGUSON. W illiam Thomas GLIE.ST. Howard Ereas, Jr. NELSON. Donald SCHROEDER. Charles Clinton BENINt.OSO. Henry Daniel ItOl RN iAN, Kavark DM BI.IM ' . Elmer Jaeob FECHNEB. Erviu leo FEINBEBG. Joseph lewis HANSSON. Herberl Erik KEEEE . Boger Joseph. Jr. LOO. Frank Wing Choiig Ml BRA . James PIAINEB. James B li sen W ARIZ. Elmer ;eorge. Jr. STIMSON. Arthur Hummer I RBAN, Charles Thomas IE V. Jesus Jose klEBAS. Stephen Albert BRl ' CE, George E.lwin. Jr. CAMPBEIE. Franeis Emiis FEECk. Howard Chandler. Jr. LA MAY. James Henry MUNROE. Frederick Eugene PATTERSON. Thomas Jerome REiNEHAN, John Lewis STILLWELL, Lester Ennnet TEARNEY. James Eram-is TEARNE . Ralph Edward TIERNEY. James Donald TORRACA. Nicholas Ri. hard VEENTA. Richard W ALSH. John Joseph W ISNIEW Ski. Paul. Jr. W ONG, I mard Lock VANEY. Richard CALTHERS. Richard Albin ADCOCk. John Hammond AEVEY. Charles Oorge ANDERSON, Willis Edward ARNSIEIN. Robert Jerome BMI.E . Henry Milcliell BVkER. Joseph Martin. Jr. lUI.DEBSON. Lester Vllcii :VBLE. Leian B.acli. Jr. (ASHMAN. Mi. had Ri. hard. Jr. CORE . William Charles CORWIN. James Addis m DONNELLY. Charles Orard Dl BN L. Don E ()BHE. J. .1,11 rllMir FE HEN . William Matthew FINNEV J.i-cpl, J.smI FIOBE. Thomas William FOSTER. R.,berl Wa|s.,n (.AITHIER. IL.war.l Eugene (.II.BERT. Hugh Bri.e ;R0BMEIER. Alvin Henry HAWkEN. John Ross HEATON. James Edgar HEILSHORN. J..l,n W illiam kLONICk. Da i.l Emanuel MURPHY. Benson Bru.e NIC! HITT . Angelo ;abriel MVLINkA. Louis Mariiii. H BARTLETT, W illaid William. Jr. DULANEY, Aey Carl MANDIN. Edniond Leon McGLNNIS. W illiam Joseph MYERS. Walter Richard CISKO, Robert Keith COOKE. Earl W adsworth IGOE. Robert JOHNSON. Andrew R.diert. Jr. McKIE. Mark I iiderliay RYAN, Daniel James RYDBERG. Clarence Robert S. NDER. James Courtney SMITH, Woodie Bruce TOOMEY, Bernard Carver W ENDI.ER. W illiam Frank ZACHARKOW . (;eorge Stephen ZEHNDER. Frederick John ZUM BRUNNEN. Ernest (;eonry ASHBEE. James Cleveland BEEBE. Richar.l Leslie DACY. George Harold. Jr. DURVEA. Robert Dana KERLEY. Arthur Richanl MAJOR. Calvin Flood MANDELL. Kay MATTOON. Stanley W illiam McGUIGAN. Charles Oover. Jr. MULLIS. Charles Howell. Jr. NOLAN. Ezra. Jr. PARKER. Richard Stanley REID, (Charles (iarrison, Jr. RENICK, Charles Mathew SAMSON, Edward Lionel. Jr. STEINMAN. Harry WALL. Robert Joseph WARNER. R.mald JoM-ph WEBER. Russell Ad.dph VECK, Elden Bryant AUK, Anthony Charles BEDNAR, (,erald Thomas BERNSTEIN, Eugene Har.d.l BLUTE, Liiwrem-e Joseph BROW N, Alfred BRUNS. Paul Edward, Jr. BYRNES. Bernard illiam, Jr. CHARLTON. Perry DE METZ. Donald John EMERICH. Richard Lee ERLEY. Richard Arthur HAMMON. Alfred HENDERSON. Ulysses Virgil. Jr. MacDONALD. Ian Alan NICHIPORl K. Paul PRICE. Eugene LeRoy. Jr. RI H. Robert John R0D(;ER. Edwin Harold. Jr. ROSENSWEIG. Leonard SHERRY. George Vincent. Jr. TAYLOR. William Francis W ELBORN. John Henry WHEATLEY. John Clevelan.l YOCUM. James Howard FLEINER. Fred John DORMAN. Richard Maben NOBLE, John Frith i..f, Jr. OLLINGER. William Henderson PARKER, William Marvin PILLSBURY, Charles Peterson STEIGER, R. bcrt W illiam SULLIVAN. J..lin Movsius TODD. Tr., Mil. h.ll ZIMMERMAN, Arnold Stanley AKRE, Cecil W illard BELL. Ronald W illiam BAYl ' K. Ford Meyer. Jr. BIISSIN(;. Thomas Leo BYRNE. James Charles GLENNON. W illiam Henry LINDEMAN, Adrian John MARTIN. Clarence Duncan McBREARTY. James Clabby RIBIN. Edwin Harold RUSSELL. Donald Weeks SAFERSTEIN. Samuel David .ST. AMAND. Leonard Marsh STARNES. Herman (.eral.l STUART. John Kilgoiir SUDHOLT. Francis August SUGARMAN. Samuel Louis SUHRE. Carl Homer TROTTER. John David OUSDEN. Edwin Chesley W AGNER. Gordon J. liii (iERKEN. Ogboiiriie Bruce GONZALES. Paul GORDEY. George S. HATHAW AY. Lyle James HAYNIE. Robert Nelson HORTON. Ja k Ri. har.l HUEBNER. LeRoy Frank MAGUIRE. Arthur Joseph MOLLER. (;erald MOI.I.ER. Donald SE(,UR . iil.uii.i EUHRER. Robert ADAMSON. Stuart Sandell ALEXANDER. R.d.ert Joshua BEHMLANDER. Harold BRAUNSDORF. W illiam John CORVINO. Ralph Anthoin ER.ANKS. Stephen R..berl Gl IDO. Frank R. bert HELMS. John Douglas HEYER. W illiam George LEE. Do Kyung LEE. W illiam Tlia.l MARTIN. John William MA AR. ictor a.hiaii McDUFF. Charles H.uu.r. Jr. MICHALSKI. Edward MILLER. Charles Edward SMART. Don Merrill STOKLOSA, Richanl (ieorge STOUGHTON, Donald Bernard TRYON. Jewell William UNGER. Paul Richard. Jr. UPCHURCH. E.lwar.l Franklin WHITE. Donald E.lwar.l ACOSTA. W illiam Anth.my STORY. Eugene D. .ielas WARING. Joseph Ferris. Jr. ELSEN. Jerome ENGLEHARDT. Julian I lieo.L.re. Jr HANSEN. Waller Paul JONIS. L..rcu Chester LYONS. Thomas MORRIS. D.mahl I.anienee ROLSTON. Claren.e Henry ROSS. William D..r. " el SCHl RM N. ( harles E.lwin 30 ' Glcui o ' 48 Eb COLI.KITA. F.ilnioiid Eden GUDMINDSKN. horre I.. HA A . Kninull I)a i l. Jr. HAKTMAN. Itriijainin (.liri li:in HI HHAHI). Ymw Iiificne ISAACSON. Heiirv Carl JACQl KS. Rit-hard Lewis K .H. Kd«in v.. Jr. MVHUN. (:liarlc Arlliiir. Jr. MAIMIN. Koborl Idward NA Z K ». I ' a-.iualf I ' K.KIO. Allr.d l.xaiider I ' KTKKSKN. Donald Kric SCHKNCK. Jaiiu- Norman SKINNKK. William Allan .STKON(. ATIK. Murray SIJNOK. Slanlf.i Irwin VEAZIK. I ' anl Cran.li UASSKTl. :iiarl ( lu lor. Ill UOWKF.H. Hi-rl erl Humi ton (;l,( Ki;. Iri-.lcri.U U»rnf HKCIMON l 11. Jolin kdward HKI.IAX K(;. Hobtrl Harrj H )(;I.F.. Ma. Ka.- MOOKK. I ranU Kniylil NIK. Juc! ' rniman KOIMI.. illiani llin kle Kl rHI{ l I K. h.nni- Karl S IM(»N. Monlamio. Jr. SIIKI ' IIKKI . John Kdward SIIIKI.DS. Mtr il Darr.l WILBIKN, hrian I ' ill 1515 VMS. Ja.ob KI KM, . Alfred Jo epli (AUI- . lloMK-r Kranklin. Jr. KM « ZKW SKI. Kran.iv Hol. l: l) l in MI ' I.K, Sianl M.Kiii l»l. I .l ». (.a-parr An;: lo DIKII K. I ' liilip l »()l) . l oii;;la ( liarles KMCII. Kalpli i-l. (,IKSKI.M N. Donald I.eon (,11.1. KS. William (..raid (.OI.DItKKC. Kdwin MIf-n .(( N. Kran ■i Aniliony (,l KN. IIarl(or l Nelx.n, Jr. KKKN. William l ell KHKIM ' S. (raia M.M.re Ml NKOK. Harr . Jr. MIJXO. Jo e Manuel. Jr. PATRINA. JoM-pli nllionr PATTISDN. Allen Towles SCHII.KK. Russell Kvan SIMCOX. J. din Joseph. Jr. W AI.KKK. Leonard WOLI ' OW, Milton I ' liilip ANTKDWIVK. K lward Thomas H. ' DE, Tiniollij LaKollelle SI ' ENCKK. John Addison I.V RM ( . Kirardo Raphael LORD, i ' aiil Theodore M KTiN. Howard Rerlram. Jr. MOLIIOR. Rudolph (.usiav MILLER. Charles I.eRoy .S(:AM. »N. J.din l o STEWART. Donald Webb. Jr. W ELSH, James Ri. hard BONHAM. Max Loyal FIEINER, IJurton 302 KI Kl R . Kilwaid Hopkins HOW KS. Kimball We liiev IR INC. Robert KIRSCHNKR. Ki. hanl William KNOI ' I " . Il.uiier l:;;Uii. Jr. I I III I roN. i.liis iipi.m MKISNKR. C.-or;:e Kae MRl S. Stanle Thomas OKSIKKLD. Kre.lri. iir..n O ' Neil. Jeri-miah I ' alri.k PERKINS. Mbert K.lwar.l SAHI . William l. -onar.l THA KR. Paul William VI (ICII. Mi.hael (.eorye HOI SK MP. J.il.n Drukker MKKIDOSUN. Saha;: Charles OKKIKN. John J.i ph KI NNIii. Kxr.ui Dean KIRD. Jame ' . Whitfield KORRK. Karl Vnth.my Kl KSKINC. Har.d.l Oil.. CVKSON. Jani.s ,illiml.r EKKRHARDI " . D.mald Wawie ESKRIIX.E. Kaeler Carlisle GRKNKKLL. John Klliot Hl ,HKS. J. din ii liii JORD N. ( laii.le W hilne . Jr. MeMl RR . J. din William .SAWAKR. J. din Chandler .STEINER. William Kranris THARR1N(,T( N. Crady Tyler W ACNKR. Harr Marlin BECKMEIER. W aldemar W illian BELL. Mas.ni. Jr. CAMPKKKK. Kufeue Rex ( ARTKR. J. din K.lwar.l. Jr. CASSID . rii.uiia I ran.is D SHIKSK . Daniel Paul DICKMEVKR. Frank Kdwin DIKTKR. James (,e..r«e KILRKV. James Ju.U.ul COLDRLl M. Arlhiir GREER. Russell Allen. Jr. HAVES. W illiani Herbert. Jr. HERTZBER ;. Reinh.d.l Krederi. 1 JONES. Thomas Henry. Jr. MOORE. I)..ncall Rewiolds NIZIAK. Fran.is J.iseph NOVACEK, Arthur (harles PATTERSON. Jame Millon PLATON. Julian. Jr. R0KER ;E. Kerlran.l Benediel SCHWOEREL. William Oldham I.ITn.KKIEI.D. H.ira.e Jaekson PAPPAS. Stephen RADER. R.dnrl Sireell CONKKIN(,. John Allen ;0 . Thomas Trevor (.KSSNER. W alter August (;OODMAN. Joel ALLEN, Frank Eugene VNDKRSON. Warren Lawrence RELLEVILLE. Waller KRAWNER. ;e..rKe Henry. Jr. KRENNAN. Leo James BRYAN. Th.uiias Cliarl.s CAMPMAN. Herbert W illi-t.ui. Ji CLEMENTS. Owen Lowell. Jr. CRIBKINS. Paul Da GODDARD. l. -onar.l Hiins.lon MALONE. Franklin JelTers.m. Jr. MOKVSSO. lir.-.l. Jr. RVNDOI I ' ll, (..-..rce Howard RKII lA. J. dill lleur . Jr. Rin. William K.lwar.l SIMMEN. Henrv W illar.l VALENTINO. Fran.is Viitli.my VON THRON. JoM-ph CanKiiey W VIZ. Clelu- JoM-ph KOI (HVRD. K.rnar.l Ro% CLARK. Le.ui Klli DICKINSON. Warren Henrj GILMAN. (ie.ir e Clailin KlENZLl. Davi.l Kdwar.l MeNAMARV. Ri.har.l Charles LEWIS. Gilbert MASTRANDONAS. Vasilius MeDANIEL. C..v F.. Jr. NEILL. Julian iort NYLANDKR. Arthur Glenn ORTON. II..berl (iraxes. Jr. PELGRIM. D.uiald Ilenr PICKAR. Arn.d.l David POTTS. James Me. kle REANEY. David Warlor.l SCOGGINS. Paul Keith SHULTZ. W illiam Burton SIEGERT. ,e..rye EIwo.mI STEUER. Rii.l.dph R.iberi TADDEI, Arlhnr Clenienl TEPLOW . Josef Elibu TREVEILER. Anioine Robert TREVEILER. Paul J.din W ILLIAMSON. Robert Glass ■SIERF RT, Tlioinas Finueane TURENNE. Joseph Resinald HALE, Donald Everett HEWETT, William Frederick. Jr. NICKERSON, W illiam Aniius NORTON. alter W esley PATRICK. Julian Ellis OROIRKE. J.din Joseph RONALD. Walter Rau.l.dph. Jr. SILVA, Clark Rurrist.m SNYDER, Sidney Peekwell, Jr. TIMM. Ernes! TOLLEY, Charles Glenn W EBER, Fh.yd Lee W ENDEL. Donald Eufiene WILSON. Charles Richard ABEL. John Bonzano BALDWIN. Bry.e Roberts BEALL. John itoyer BLACKW ELL. Wallace Norman CECIL. M.irt.m Stewart I)e MELMAN. Walter Weill, Jr. FLETi HER, Corbiu Drummon.l FRICKE. Walter Harold (iAM. Kemieth Louis JOHNSON. R..bert Earl ME ERS. Th.. mas Joseph POPOVICH. William John REHM. Geral.l Stetson SCHMIDT. Frank John SMITH. I ' liilip (..-..rce WILKINSON. Marcus Aureliii-. I WALKER. Robert i ' aiil ENGLERT. John Carlin (;AT0F. Arn.d.l -lier COLEE, Cecil Stewart FRITZKE, Herman Ernest. Jr. KAl KMAN. Norman l. wis RINKE. Har.dd McNAMARA. Thomas W illiam MAHONEY. Stephen Barker SEAVER. D.mald Brown SHOREY, Leifih Temple (II.O.SE, Louis Bart.m COSTANTINO. V.lelino CI RTIN. Tli..nia Hazelton DIXON, W illiam J.din ELLIS. W illiam IIar..ld F. DDEN, Le.) Dominic FINZER. J.din Oswald, Jr. FRENCH. Russell C.dlis.ui GABOW ITZ. Earl GENNINGER. Gilbert Edward GINSBURG. Bernard Stanley H.AINE.S, Frank Doncasler HOPKINS. Fre.leri. k J.ilin JOHNSON. R.d eri L mis JORDAN. Joseph Chester KELLEY. James Deiivir I VNDEFELD. Kmil Krnest MARE. W illiam Bent.m MEYERS. Richard Edwin MLRPHY. Joseph NANCE. William Ralph PATTON. Ri. har.l Kniiis RH0DENBAL(;H. Dean Hissins ROW AN. Robert Desmond UBERTI. George W IRTH. J.din Rogers YOUNG. Walter Charles. Jr. KLINE. Ravm.md Henrv GRESHAM. Ravmond W illiam MERTZ. William Richard MUNTZNER. Robert Francis RAPP. Abraham BECKER. Jack Richard BOROW SKY, Charles Haskell KOI DOi;S(. l IE, James Royston CHINERY, Wilbur Franklin CRAMER, Thomas Spencer GABEV, Melvin GABEY, Richard Henry ;R00 ER. Robert Joseph HEINZER, Robert Alexan.ler McMACKIN. Robert Francis MERRITT, Philip Edward NIEMI. Edwin Matt POZZO. R. bert Michael REYNOLDS. Ja. k Mason RI DD. James W illiam. Jr. SCHNKIDER. Nathan Morris SCHUBERT. Harry Kurt SKOTYNSKY, Nicii.das. Jr. SPARKS, Th.mias Marvin STAUB. Herbert Warren SW EFT, John Forest THOMPSON. William Murry TROTTER. Ralph (;e..rse W FINER, Paul Leonard WOLFE, Robert Lawrence Mc(;AREY ' . Francis Denver. Jr. DAVIS. Gorge Harold ,1 :CIARDI. Anthony Steven ZAN ;. Allen DAVLS. W illiani Saiiiu.d. Jr. SPENCER. J.din K -rr, Jr. SWIKRCZ NSKI. Bernar.l Karl W IGi.INS. Harry Bernard iL 1 I 9n AcJ24 ' UUAdedc 4fve4 The Staff of Midships wishes to express its appreciation to tlie following indi idtials and groups whose assistance have greatly aided them in the production of this book; to the Regiment of Cadet-Midshipmen, and to those graduates whose names appear in this book without whose cooperation and assistance this book could ne er have been published; to Captain Mahady, Captain Nerney, and the Academy administrative officers; to Commander O ' Connell; to the White Studios of New York for the scenic views and many of the pictures appearing in the " Departments " section; to Mr. W. L. Schilling of the Conway Printing Company; to Lt. (jg) V. E. Tyson, Jr., USMS, our Officer-Adviser for his invaluable advice and assistance; to Edward Thoma of White Studios; to Mr. McDonald of the Wendel P. Colton Advertising Agency of New York; to Mr. N. W. AUis of the S. K. Smith Company; to Polaris for assistance, cooperation, and when needed, material; to Comdr. Richardson of Training Aids and Photo Educational Unit; ro William Olff, Phm IC, USMS, and to all the Craftsmen of the Conway Printing Company of New York City. ■ f mmmmmam m m ii N I vS- ...JH — .k •-c-?? k • ' ■ WM '


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United States Merchant Marine Academy - Midships Yearbook (Kings Point, NY) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

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