United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT)

 - Class of 1927

Page 1 of 236

 

United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1927 Edition, United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1927 Edition, United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1927 Edition, United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1927 Edition, United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 236 of the 1927 volume:

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Il M l u 19 i f E iw Q fa u ii L I ly: lllgl alll J 1 V, ,.- 1 .-, ' , . r ., ,I 4. - ' Y : ff- Z'-2 7'-G "QQ-I - x L H ' - f' 'f f ,... - "" ' wiv- 1 ff'-E-zzz- rigs 313 Fin- Tl Q Whimsy:-:Sd ,1- E , Y 'ffgt-:xxx 133.421, - ' 4-:. , f ' fgg? iilgi-ief"f'r f-' ' . Y .... - " hr? - - W' -l m ig' Q - ?'Q i E-Tfgll 9- N ,f 51:21 . . .1 6 '."- g?i'9" , 5 'iff-' .i 5 'figiqifi l 'l if X1 ,,i?-,i ,g 5-15:-223. 5 , ml' are-1: Zag- fl l is ' l i ' i 1. - N l -F-Eill - - f r ? X l 4' el iv' LD J. ' '15 .ag " ff f ,,3Z.,,. ,. 2212? 52 A K f Q .f x E92 Hlll Efipffe 'E 'WI -2 4 1 C-A , u ' 1790 ? i Actuated by sincere admiration and respect for the man Who, throughout our association With him, has ever proved an able commander, a consummate gentleman, and a considerate friend, We, the members of the Class of 1927, dedicate this book to him, Commander Harold Dale Hinckley, '99, 4 f Z iw-'Q ,... l Z' , ? . au K 1 ,7 4, if ,A ,L 67: 7 .Cn in "' 9. 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X LQ ji ' -' 11 Q5 .i ai Q3 it ' gt QI Q 'Kg 1-ii l g Gsm, 5 at ' I l T0 the Gmcluatfing Class of the Um'tecl States Coast Guard Academy: Al I congratulate the members of the Graduating Class on completing their ' Q course and becoming officers of the United States Coast Guard. The Treasury l is proud of the Coast Guard. It has participated with distinction in all the wars in which the country has been engaged. Its duties in time of peace are 4: eu no less dangerous than in time of war, and each year they are growing more HPD? ,:4'i,? numerous and more difficult to perform. QQHY5 "9 4 Q It would be impossible to overestimate the value of such a Service, not only iv. Y ' as regards lives saved and property rescued, but in -its humanitarian aspects. mm W I In its traditions and in its record of achievement it is typical of the nation which K E it serves. The Coast Guard has shovvn that it will fight hard and effectively it when an enemy threatens and will destroy life where necessary in time of war. IA' ' But it will tight even harder against the greater odds of wind and sea in order to save life and to protect the nation against those who defy her laws and X threaten her existence in time of peace. I know that you can be counted on to M K uphold the best traditions of this splendid Service of which you have now l I become a part. ' A. W. MELLON, I Secretary of the Treasurfy. X wx 6 f Q an P ia U lx, 'RWM ,IW 'lim' lit! ?i2-iii? g if , .-,.., I gash at 2-5 f ' ' ,L 53 cg i I c.-.:,-.I-...,l.,-ei g g hfg thi tif iilf fs" :f i iigiglf I - A -e G+ if gli -- xg fe efi::1L-i- Lf ' ' ft-2 If -1 kne- ,,- lz., Lgjfgu-. - - :emm fngwh N w , - . -, . Q f Q4 'Tv fi" WB' .,.. 1'0" " 7 4 ??T 'L L' .- ufsiv, Q 115595, w ,NN - ,fir V Q if : f xl, ' :yy x c 'Q ' " " ? N W ak- , 1-ig. H f'l' ' VW. , ' . iii? sf ? Q f M.,--V,w,g...,,,,,, -,,.--.-. ....., , .,x.,h...., :mga ,,,,,,,, W K x is 3' V v, W 'Q ,ir N I' ll 5 Q 1 2 Mc! 2: 1 v 1 ' 3 i Eiga ei 1 ! T 1-52 QI an A' il ' 3' ' 5 Z E H P M il: ,Eli gg 4. 1-3 ' CJ 'W L13 up n'- vu H iw i ii? x 1 1 ,u I w n lx IE 2 NI JW . N fx' 'iiiil -miie 'iglfi-E Mx-la: V. MM wi-'sis uf we I! A ez vi' Ms Bw 'il liliii FE 'QU iid H 1 4 i Hfsi gg! 23 I Y fr. 2 1 :lg , Wi' 5 I 1 Wi 5' H ,S ,L , , if A EL 1 ! ' il , 11 M' as fam s il www EWH, 3 gf wi grf '5 A.... M.... .,.,.. 2 V. ,,,, , ,,.,..,..,.,...,....-.,-....... , w, 1 -f, . , it ""' fwxfzsa' 'WW' 'i". N ""M"' 54"'TA""" E 1 -M---"-""fL----- '-' , fizfin, , W, . , . . .,,,,,,,, J THE IIONORABLE ANDREW W. MELLON SCU7'GtIL'I'y of the T7'6LZS'lL'7'-'U ,J 27 ZW? f ' ,qs E A 5 X if vu W 5 -V . -, E 5 'J' f - -- -' . A '.- .l-- -..L Y "Ei ' f" " " + - - - Y ' 2-' Y vi ' ,g -1 f Yi ,If fi i E S: 5 -4 L7 1 - , "1"""'f j-Y' I 'T' - '...:f.. ff ,f5Qj GH- J ,5.'.j , f d: ' -if i7kT119f in '25, 4: YY! T, -2, ir 'fig 1 - it Q51 f 5 ferr 513'-iggs--QL-Y " ff T- ,Eg ' ---'A' f' 7' N ' 5'1" '- "if -2' aff ' - 7-f' ,g ',:,' il! Ar.. ?l 74' L1-f 'ref-Q QV- --Q -4 7--mli g ain V e ' se- fd. ' Q 57 1-f Zigi h .1 A 2:1774-'ff' 1 Wi- J -fig' g,' 1: gr Q? 33f:. K I - fgjqg-Lip, . ,l f l R f l f x T vi vs, QA. T' . il - Wanda . Q' -g, l Y-:- 'al :w u z f -e if -. E95 W K L 'E ll To the Class of '27: wi You have made good. Your chosen profession welcomes you. Your careers I will be what you individually make them. That is life-it should be happy. i And happiness lies in accomplishment, the gratification that comes from wanting to do something and actually doing it. There may be any amount of fun on the side, but to get anything worth while out of life there must be a real purpose 3 . , underneath, and a real exercise of the faculties for its accomplishment. Then 5 If? -'- Y the hours and days of life take on value, and life is worth living. 437 1 L. W fi kj' i. ,J v 'D ni X3 ' H .1 W Y From now on you are going to command men. It is a serious responsibility. Your method of dealing with them will do much to make or mar their characters, and may definitely affect their lives as men, as citizens, and as fellow members of the race. Give this some thought. It is likely to be vital to your success as officers. Develop your qualities for leadership of men, and enjoy the gratifica- tion that comes from their successful use. It is good to have the approbation of your superiors, it is '-even better to have the approbation of your subordinates Y 5 ' H i n ga ? ,ya I Il -at vm li . 1 and of those who know you most intimately. "Hard-boiled" is a term of dl , reproach when applied to an officer commanding his fellow citizens-the true fi ideal for an American officer is the "he-mann of whom his subordinates say, . "he is a real human being." LINCOLN C. TIXNIDREXVS, l zlssisfcmzt SOC7'CffI9'2j of the Trcasmy. f' Q X , , , 1, Z 5 E 2 U I ,1 ,. W l TRW WH' ml' ' ' ' WX W 1 '5-- 2 4.-- . g . 1. . . -. - , . ' A- 77 f 2 .ff f A e ke--l-e Q f .j eg .-gi 'i'f?'i?fgfL?ai. ff eifigpi-21a " Y L ' laik? ,-fs-45'-E-:alla - if fffiE " 'Y' - 1 ' ' 'm:"ff-f-' V 'f ga 1+'3' f 71 hlffrilfl fggg' 15 f 'L,, W-'til-pf ZQQ2 Q Aw R .5 FEE ,K i i 1 I 3 3 n :wa 'H Til- Mfg? 2 1 :ffl 9 diff-mfg fm 'E --. -5 . KNIX :N -u u --vx w Al 1-5 ,- f- 1 Z., 4 N . . 4 .4 'N fijg f A31 -' ,1J?:ii '19 1 . . . 511-Y 5 - , .Ju '-u V - 4 Y -j,..agt4.7 ' .g., ""- ,. 'K " Mill - 'Z-S 'Zin ' 'Qrgf--:f-f-f-a:T.i.5.2g:- . -. fb- S f 1 V . fa' J ,fi X 43 Q Kg f ' ififig 4 N n' A 'Q .. .-A .W mr. M 71 E5 Q I - W-. -f-,-"- .,., - -- I ,,,,, V--f-- .. .:L1-- .,,,,., , 5 , I 52' mf, v ip IA 1. l , ' ii' i I Q S xx X .Tl X f! !I N E w Q 2 f, :E J. , I! 1: - . ag, -7 17 'jf-1 S 31 N5 5111? I 1 2 ' G , Bl' N, I if F Y . I K , 1 H j I5 ' ff, . vw fi wg 1 2 Z A is EE Ei 1 - "' Q Z V 1 i1i,.,--.M. , .,,.. ...1.. T ,.,.A -, ! A -....W V , R - ' ,Q Al X THE :HONORABLE LINCOLN C. ANDREYVS Q Assistant SPC7'Cffl7'Qj of the T1'eas1m'y ' 5 N N 1 9 f NP' 5 NE Q Q11 U IN. I Lf!! W' Wffrf' R1 M IJ 1 '41 WI t , f??ii7'Y1: f fgifa iQ Q -1 sf if 2?1f N-' 1 , '91 -1, '-f'4f1 - 5255, 5 1- fjj:i7'iP-1 " - --ff? f 'f,,i3?3?2"iEggg: , ' 4 fl J , . ff . lzilgm IP I - Q3 fic. i s f X -sl .- ns- -ters 2:1 ff, Q e5Qn:: are 31544 t rait -1: an '1-if I ll K -4?-Qgf 3555-w ill fb- -"'x- alia, - J , , X I .l l. -5 N Q 5 ' ,Q l 1. ,. f L,7 .flaw Ajjxwx I X I ll , . n f 9? c T0 the Grcecluczting Class, U. S. Coast Giztcrcl Academy: GENTLEMEN : The Commandant and all other officers of the Service are distinctly proud of the Coast Guard Academy-proud, not only of its curriculum and discipline, but, in a very special sense, of the high standards of honor and conduct which have always animated the cadet body. You are entering the Coast Guard as commissioned officers at a time when a degree of responsibility and corresponding opportunity quite unusual for young officers will be placed upon you. You will, of course, welcome your responsi- bilities and opportunities and you will best succeed if you keep always before you the high ideals of loyalty, devotion to duty, and exemplary conduct that have been so firinlypgestablislied by the long line of officers who have preceded you during the 186 years of the history of the Service. gi cz 5 1' E' f T L 17 44 are 6.2 7 Cn it Y f All nv f1l" ll,, - -- 4 Based on my associations with many officers during my Service career, may Al f I advise you that your most satisfying happiness will be found in an unswerving ,tl devotion to duty and to the best interests of the Coast Guard. . e 1 I welcome you into the fellowship of commissioned officers and wish you all 5 ' success and happiness. i' Cordially yours, A l . JR 'i F F. C. BILLARD, Rem' Admiral, gli' E' U. S. Coast Guard, Commcmclaozt. q M U ii' I1 1 . 3 lui I' lf' N. lj V . Nuiiiw . A ln ll l I 4 i 6-if 2- -sz-ff ii T- 4? 1'-.fi , W ,ip-ian: K lillifsgf 7.31 '-2121215-al .- ..,. f ff ,ug -. I 1 V -wtifiag ,,f. E5-:L ii..-7:3 gif' Q f J Q '1?"i . -,-' 'TL --:SQ-' ' if am , '11 7 65 3 E- 'v 51111111 ' -' 12 .3 U -' Ms, ' tw' Q: f :ff - Q ' " ' f- 'L wwi- -L -5 jpQL fjififf :Af f"f'f2? f ' Q 1 5 ? --i i- :'-1,1 - 7 - 1' 2' 1 f 1 1 ' Elf? 1 1 E' 1 1 E A ggg1g:Q?":'ff M271 N i , . -- - '--- ,N 1 1 3 l 1 I i 9 - 1 1 , 1 111 HY . t ?1 Q! -1 7 Q V12 2117 . 1. - 1 1 I f 1 4 '11-5 1 111 27? 11 - ' 2 XJ 1 -f 1 '11 2 1 ima h 0 oo ,, 1 . 1 4 r 1 11" 1155 5' -, 1- .5113 1 , L F ' Li , 1, ,,,1 W... E-.. . 1 1 1 I 1, W 15115 P M,1y,I- REAR ADMIRAL FREDERICK C. BILLARD ' Coomuamlrint E 5 fi W f21?'5fw E-, L3 1 xg f Q E- -'Ei A - EE 4 ' Imibl xl 7 Y 2' 'Y ' 1 ,- Y 1 77- -,Q 7'V -Y Y ""n'T""" 'Y 1 52:1 f: fly. W ,Y T- ,T w-Qi I Er- '1-aafmyf 12 -E 5'-1, fm- eg 5. L fgiia. F E E: 1 fELfe.s'E ' ' ' 2595, ' , f ' '-Y ' Zfizklg ' Y' i1QQi75 ,ALL "1 Qflfafl lf' 'in' 1' -7-'L' , , , .1 f' Q, Pg 4- xx 'V 4--A ' Q f f41 1 ' Zffmv ,PNN P' W , f f ' 21 - Lf' 2 ' Q"-l+-254' Eff' Pau:-"' if 'i Eilwlqs 4 'rgcf hy " - A L-.--1f ff' gay'-g g? f f N -- f -Afg- Lusuw. Comm. QEQ MITJTON R Chief Enginecv' . DANIELS L11cU1'. Comme. Wlwlzlcn N. Dlslusv A Executive OMacr LUQUT. COMDR. RAYMOND T. NICELLIGOTT Acting Comvncmdavzt of Cadets ' f "L, +42 ,G 1123! I -I 7 fy G? Q3 4 C' i. Y ,U I M M' , : .. 4 dt! X iahgfw iw ulfx .. i H-A :-'-f" -x Y, ff- 1 v H Y - Z-. BB , N 5,L,5?, N N, EEN V -ff N 14 ff ?M - aff X11 : 1- Y- s- L - , - L, ,--L4 f :L 4 iff? r f ffm ffm. H p f , -: . -, -' New , ,ill J-fi, L- 1 " 'H Z3i'! ' :LSL L ffl ff M N 'x ,lyk - . f'f Os Q Q , N 15223, ' 4, L Wig l E5 W Sk N N X FLOYD J. SEXTON GUSTAVUS R. O7CONNOR LIEUT. COMDR. LIEUT. Comm- CED 2 sq fs np, .. 'N I L CHESTER E. DIMICK PROFESSOR ' I 1 .1" - " ' K 7 ,7 fin ? E9 7 R I -li! w Q42 X 5 m Q z, f ' ll' W "I yu' Wm WILLIAM J. Kossmm EDWARD S. MOALE ' X LIEUT. LIEUT. QJ.G.j QTD. 5 L I ? E' I , , ' , . . 1 ff' ?fLii'1?e4if5'Hi li 1-Eai fg i? SY GYl4' 4 ' J f'- A k f .:7' -' , if 5 i f-L. 5 52-Q' 7 - A . - -- .. ., . ---. f , rw . 122' - fl-.- .f -Q ,SEE - W - r ,,': ' X- S, -wr.-' 'I ' 155-T' I 'H Il. fl- . ffffm film 'H-H H-G' f ' 1 ' - hh- "' "WX ' :'?f g 1la 411- "DJJ X .ff -'W "4 14-1ii." -fgfligggrffl E? ' , ' I ., 'ax-9: 44 ' --.:- i -.,f -'- '31 ,4-, X gr eg 1. ' A I 5 L, 1. A 'A w 5 kfy . A 5 f R 8 ENSIGN A. CARROLL RICHMOND ENSIGN WALTER R. RICHARDS 6. L-J LJ t 27 n' O 4i1"f 7 1. F' 1 15 ' Q ' l'. XJ Jain Y , - fl' M 5' .fp , a ff ,MA W w f , X I W 1 AX f , ENE P R, B. GILLESPIE, U. S.P. H. S. FRANK C. CADY, U. S.P.H. S. U NIM SURGEON Assw. SURGEON CD3 I in fw ww WM X Wu I 1 L A lf? t . 174 -" ' ' W- g Y,-, K A - . ff , ..--Q--..---:gj:' e ,,'1 E 1 f,gf.f,- fgggjjiiig -iL2fg l A'A if 5 itil QYTEQELZQD f 1 - 1 21 -A 1 Lf 15, wgfggiaff L 5 ,fifiifs-lid ,,-.ii V: A xy, gg' 'IL L .- 'IJ T'i l,AVf I' , qi: C1 xf-mix M ' 'F' Q " WB' 2 IVE Q f 44- 'f i' i Q j x f il f' f3gQ,'Qfl,?f?f 3XQ'- V J 5, ' N n f N M , E A X 1 L fi f J g ff Q 4 5 I Q5 gig? l N , gi' ? f 7 F 7 Il., ', ,,f Q rx X Xxxxxxg Qxxix XX gif',!'. Y E - 1 'X y E fi!-V f f s - if xx r S ' . 7 I L7 l kb ILX .. 7'! X ll ii S ff?-'25 w f ff . f x M W ffl: DJ I fzly' ,x - -. 2115 6? " x 4 EH 5 K 1 , X 5 l 1 K an I ,,--+-' .,, 'I ,-.. .V ,Y 1,7 - Y Y nz-K -Sf! .zjj T 7 ' " df? li-:f7f?i?ifQ' - - ,W - - -. -Y ---------"""5Y1.:1- Y 'MW , ,- fi- - 'V flex , '?l1g ig' flag - f 3 19739: fu - E 111 i , i 5 g - ,,.z.j: - mf - f ff Q Y 77- ' i i V:. -?. fflt :'W .I f -.:-5 42-659 fm LT y N4 x . "ff-Q: I Wu- -L - .. --Ai ' , -4'-. -, , xf ' I , - ,A ' 'Tw ' :fx ' Q"4j :f,2f,., LL. ' -X ,4 - ,f , 'X My ' .1 I N 3 mb -5, E -af 1 A1-Q-A G , I ,. J- I I I I 5'ifI I II ? I ' . 4314 -in fsf ji! 2g4 x x 3' I I ,Z 'rw 1, A - 1 -1 1 1 21 :: lf f1-E-A f I I I ? 3 I I I I I I f Q gg , I XII I 19 I EIU P D I .I, M,- I H .9 1 - mf .qt in f gi' . 'fi A 1 f' EEE? f'fgf3???1 iHi 3 wfv5iD T-f 1"f ' QSiZE3. .Tx ', . if X- "5 ' ' fr --. - -,.1- .. 43 2 Wnxiix 'EEF' - 9? ,, ' -4 Nb' E5-3 .f J WW 121 4 2,5-iaii -, . f f A -45' 2 - 1 1 fg12 .,T ,14'il , , ' f Q - ge. , 1',1i.2 !4? . ,,-ffi1,, ,-,...'f'T."-- , QWELX? K 'gif' A, - -QE' X Q? ,T A sg? ig? Afaax K-V ' .N ' 533' - ' Nw - g ' lg + f '-af! I SR X X N - , A J ,7 Q45 54 U F Y in 7: I 6, LI ' Q ., :wer ' x' -f I, R - Sv gf Y . 1. mix 4 X A A f .E X l wg 3 i if + Qiln! I-IW? N f l X 'E.rf2-zififfsf w I ,, ' my een ! f f x f n N X . S 1' W 'Q f in 'tb : L -5: 'N . ,ff 5: W u 'Q E-1' ? Fi! H J M V U U W N N .H I Q' ' i 2 Q gi ? 'D 4 D' X 6 in 'Q' . . N H JI' A Yp - v",qb'-7 , fff - E A A A 1 N w pl , , in Q 4 lm If 5 J, ' I W 'W V n , f'T g -A -Q ----l-ff-:--513:14 .,. T?1,ffi-:gi f " 'ii ' 'ig A- A - 1 4 ff -ff:igF mTLLf"g2?, gfA L, , i -- .zisfv .wg-:1,,S.k-,iz q5':-ft - L': - . -igff-'rs-T ,-if .-kifr-' 1-'45 1 f 1? -",-, -..cQ ,f-. , -f - , v -,, "' fb. -, WZZU fiqgx X gf - TN if 1' A . -. "L ?E2' f' was-Q1 , f 7 - f ,- .. :' ,fx 5 2 A gs? xl - ng- En. , 'wa S E1 if , L ig- N W Q ' E223 35? L Eff ' l ' x ,,i-.reg- f. 'il-ZZ1Y,fi:LfEg-LHH Vf f!U'B .f' I . 'L ' T If X .. , K ' l ' N '- -024' 'X Wh -4. 1-gr .4 1. :a-- ':-f - -r -- ' f -1 ,ily :H . f. -L2-N.. uzrd' 'Q ,gf 1, ,wit 'fffi ,sf :E 4 "'. 'G f-"lbw .M-1-T-icsx A .-5 M ng, ' I ii! :Rig ' !f '0 .G ' 332' - .-,Q al S , ,A ,. ,f -- a- -'-.u-1.1.5. N: L. ., M ,F 1-- , 0,-M ' '-fx I f' - ' 1 fl ' '19 6 ' hl : 3 ' ev ' JK ?' T N. Quia! SEN-XL 4 N bg ' JY 5" - Q' ig? I ' at P :.'5"'.S ' 1 4 kg' .,-7 I, 'X 7 57 "' 2 X' . JJ' ' gig s " X Q fX. ,X , x EEE 44 " Www .ff 'fix I ,l 'T Mk fa XT' f m H H1 J' IQ! V N Sef ' f 'ly ' T I' Ap- ffl- 7 f, " Y T if 'ggf K 1 .ffvifisrig -ix, f 1 - . 4?f22,4f., fwqm, ' u.f.c e.5, ' ,J 7 A A -5A I-, R, "Eg-2 'ffl Y" ' l gi - , L . -' -j -I gi, . . ' :::: -I ' I' ' 'rf-. A lglllgh , fl-i ff , -2 V, :, , LA' V fi 1712: tif X , - 4- 3 5. j X ALUMNI ASSCDCIATIUN fe Qi gf? iii, 1879 1886 1896 A A ! lt Davis, John L. Ainsworth, Daniel J. Billard, Frederick C. - l Lockwood, John A. Brown, James H. Camden, Bernard H. gf Myrick, Orin D. Culon, Willizmiii NV. Chiswell, Benjamin M. Ross, VVorth G. Fengar, Cyrus B. Cutter, Leonard T, York, George A. Harris, J. Charles Goodrich, Moses 1880 Hamlet, Harry G. Hooker James C. 1888 ' Doty, George H, 1 G lf' L Jenkins, Tl10HlaS L. Dunwoody, Francis M. CQTC en' Oc my ' Ridgely, Randolph, Jr. Emery, Howard Dmloclff Fmnkllg' Stnrdevant, Richard M. 4' S Reynoias, lrVillia.m E. ge1f,de3S?n'gmeWJ' 1898 U. ,7 31, u , our . WW? dp 'Hi 1881 Jacobs, William V. E. Barker, Eben G1 . J Landrey, Staley M. Blake Eugene J, Q " ' Fl D-,'lP. , 1 D 1' ,- Lite,y'J0i11eE Mffow, James M- Blasaei, wnnam e. lil ff Thoxl ,Son Pell, W Re1HbH1'e, J01111 E- Balmer, Albert H. sl. igrrfg I ' Y ' SH111511, Frank L' I Cairnes, Charles W. l,.lI, lu' "' v Ub6I1'O'Cl1, P1'6S'COJl I , Fisher Iienl. G yg ' 1882 1 Y ' B db t H I M Gowdy, Frank B. 1-03 en' mmm I' Haines Oscar H. Cantwell, John C. 1889 H tt 1, J F , Hall, William E. W. Bel-niolf, Eliswor-th 12. M0 6' Gaufs E, , ' Iignned f C1 -1 D Brereton Pere H mm' embe ' A ' 5' lm GS ' ' y ' Mead Ernest E f Kimball, Eflwgwcl P. Crisp, Richard C. Me, Bohn ' ,E ooie, Join C. o inson, eonic es . Sattedeey Charles V Starkweather, George A. Scott Phillip H West, Horace B. . ' ' 1890 Snnth, Frank W, , X 1383 Carmine, George C. Ulkef Hemlyf 1 ', 5 H1 Williqnl H O Wheeler, William J. X N5 , Ewing, Albert H. CY' " ' ' Wild John V lg Q15 P J T . D .1 H White, Chester M. 1 ' ' X' vis, avic . Wiley, Walter A. ll ull SIU' James L' Wolf, Herman H. ILM! lilly 1891 . Ml 1885 Daniels Georve M 1899 M 7 C ' Barnes, Charles A. de Otte, Detlef F. A. Brockway, Benjamin L. Perry, Kirtland WV. Haake, Frederick J. Hinckley, Harold D. Quinan, Johnstone H. Scott, James H. Molloy, Thomas M. Reed, Byron L. Van Boskerck, Francis S. Pope, Henry W. l 'i-4,3 f ' D- W, . ,,, 1... gg '4' E2.. 1 --I7s::z-?i- 2- - 2- A L ,"f ' if - - if -ri-f'f'Y ---h -T fZ: f -'iii 2 'ye i'1 r LSL A- , reef 4 A '?-la-ifi.. -ee B5 Z- ff:- +21-fl if --W f f T--Y T' 'Kilim '-'-L.e.M -'ii 1?-fr - f J 5: .ff ,if , 4-5 ' A fy., :--4-:.-EQQ .f . ff ei .. X. A fx Ai. 4 . 'Z ll, f'?'?W" 41:!1l1!ix v-LM E-1 ' Sf? We gf .5551 i ei .A -f" T .5L ff A- ' ,x Ai? 1 1 L X 4 K-U ir! O 1. 'fri 2 vi ' ni X3 f 4 Il or 1900 Boedeker, John 1901 Harwood, Franklin B. Howell, Charles F. Maher, John L. Mnnter, Wfilliain H. Shoemaker, Francis R. 1902 Addison, Edward S. Covell, Leon C. Gabbett, Cecil M. Lauriat, Phillip VV. Scarles, Hiram H. Shea, W'illian1 H. VVhittier, lhlilliani A. 1904 Alexander, George C. Crapster, Thaddeus G. Hay, Miller S. 1907 Benham, Vifales A. Cairncs, G. W. Hahn, John F. Jack, Raymond L. Prall, YV. M. Roach, Philip F. Shanley, Thomas A. 1908 Bagger, F. E. Besse, Joseph R. Bixby, Alvan H. Donohue, Edward J. Doyle, Martin A. Eaton, Philip B. Hall, Norman B. Hutson, John J. Johnson, Harvey F. Jones, Chester H. McGourty, John F. Nichols, Fred A. Orine, S. B. Pine, James Robinson, H. B. Munro, Roy P, Odend 'ha.l, Charles J. Roach, Henry C. Sugden, Charles E. Williams, William YVisha.ar, William P. 1910 Baylis, John S. Coffin, Eugene A. Cook, F. A. Keester, William J . Oberly, R. S. Perham, Herbert N. Roemcr, Charles G. 1911 Allen, F. C. Anstctt, Charles E. Bothwell, Roy A. Daniels, Milton R. Dench, Clarence H. Dc1'by, lrVilfred N. Eberly, lVillia1n H. Hemingway, Henry G. I X 1745 X Z! 994' I 12: nr' '7 f-: f r 9, Strornberg, William T. R M, 1 1 J Klinger, Thomas S. . Wfilcox, George E. Xml' mme ' Kniskerin, Charles F. Seiter, Charles F. Lum? Russel, L 1905 Thompson, hVa.rner K. Mueller Leo C. Towle W1llia1'n F ' 7 Alger, James A' Yerwezi T H ' Scannnell, William K. AL Austin, Frank L. Lb ' ' ' Starr, J eremiah A. . Dempwolf, Ralph XV, 1909 Stlkaf Joseph E' ,im Reinburg, LeRoy . Thorn, Benjamin C. ' i . Rideout, Howard E. Jgjilfgit' gissf? Trilk' John M" Jr' , Ward, Willialn O. D 1 :W H - Ycandle, Stephen S. N b W-eightman, Roger C. Els? C -A - Zeusler, Iirederick A. 1 Q Finlay, Gordon T. 1912 NX, f 1906 Fitch F. E. Abel can H. , UUE E Ahern James L Gray, John 1? B' kett F l ' k J ' A X 7 1 - , . ir , recerie . D Chalker, Lloyd T. Harrison, Paul H. Earp, J ames M, K? M lhlgfyf Drake, Joseph T, Johnson, C. H. Farley, Joseph F., Jr Jones, Edward D. Kendall, Clinton P. Kain, William P. i 'A Kleinburg, George W. Kerr, H. G. Marvin, David P. Parker, Stanley V. Krafft, K. W. ReedeHill, Ellis Scally, A1'ClllbZ1.lCl H. Lukeus, A, E, Sexton, Flgyd J, WfleS0lle, R-USSG1 R- McFadden, B. C. Stewart Gustavus U. 3 i n . I ' 1141-f 'fd' E ig:2e 1 -QL ggfffe he Q.- . H111 .f-iff 1 if?-f'4-:Q-'v:1..,1L ' ' ---G f - 2 -ff K' a. 13.1141 ,gig ii-,5f'iLle:,,gffA., A-A, 1----:QT ' 2 e"7ff'f'f'?W1 - - 45 ' A- to - H i' ' - ' W W HJ" ' Todd, Clement J. Heimer, Roger C. Mu,.,.ay7 JT., John P. Torbett, Mzlyson VV. Kaufholz, Robert M, Olsen Sevel-15 A , XVebster, Eawm-fr M. Kosslm. W J S ', ' L 1 - - arratt, Robert G, . 1913 giullzf H- G- Sl1fUl1l01l, Willia111 S. " 1 + '- 1 fr Bl'OXl'll,iFlCtCllCl' W. O1GEH1gi?tt',Rg5mOm1 1' 9- Cm-ll' Henry M' Peifklhs oE2i1is'NV 1924 W 5955, Coyle, Henry Se mougl J H ' Dyer, Nathzrniel B. , j l Donahue, Robert Singer 'I Sudan B'l21l'l'Ol1, :Ri1yl1lO11d V. 1,521 "-E Frost, James A., Jr. we H Il 15 GOl'1l13ll,FT2lllk J. G S' estcl D' 1925 Hall, Rue B. 1919 Awillt, Thomas Y. Kcmloflly Lloyd V- Bloom, WlVfllf1'Cd G. Berdinof Harold S' McL:1ne, Gorclon NV. Dean, C1131-les XV' Byrd, John H. 3601130131 R- Patch, Roderick S. gmlstedt' George C' ose, 4511- . ollins, Paul W. Smith, Eclwarcl H. 1920 Conway, Joseph D. Stone, Elmer F. B1'2LClbu1'y, Hurolcl G. Gelly, George B. +. Troll, wvanel- M. Buckalew, I1'vi11e W- H11-S11f1e1a, James A. 414, Von Paulsen, Carl O. Hall, A1'fhl11' G. J01-dan, Beqkwith U. ,7 A211 .D Vvhitbeek, John E. Perry, Paul K. Kenner, Frank T' 4, Af? P? , . T l 7l Q ' Xp 1014 R11CkGtt,S, Loble G. Kenner, Wrlllaun W. gf , I x ' I -1 gli.. Beckley, C. A. 1921 iZ'flV1f1if1'1Sm1,leZW' Alllll - Y ' . . I - 1 '21T1 . g g iw Muglels' A' E?i161,11N.i?n.?.H H' Perkins, Henry C. fn W' ef . 5 Slllltll, P, R. A 91 1 1 91 U1 A , I , ,yu r W fe-L2-h I J Smith Clmetou T Pete1son, 0111161166 H. -. b Yan Iiillllllllml, . . Stiles, Norman R. Reneyy Roy L' 1915 Zoom, Ephraim R'1Cl1Hl'dS, Walter S. Henley, Charles T., JI. Rlelnnond, Alfred C. Palmer, Edward F. 1922 Rountleef John A 1 Baker Lee S1V1C6g0OC-l, Stepllell P., J-1', 1916 Curry: Her111:111 H. Thomas, Ch211'19S W- Cmsbyr George R' Fritzsehe, Edward H. Wood, Russell E- Heiner, John N, Gmgmlj I.Im,1ey E- NVGHSJ F- C- Jewell, Robert C. Y 1926 7 1917 Marrtinson, Albert M. Cowffll' Kenneth IX' Cu1.1.e,1, J' A, BI21l161'll1Zl,l1, Rdylllfillll J. EZk11FgI?icE3dEM I Q Mz1eCollo111, Donald H MCCLUOC, George E. 111371 rf Mileg H ' 1 gm E, Mandeville, Andrew C. 1923 Toni, Morris C' H3 - . , . Wa, Mcgmn' Gelflge W' Bfrny, Freael-ack R. M001-e, Inu-01d C. fl? u . rw Snnth, Bf1l1'Vl1l C. B, H S tl E Pouald Emma. C If H. mg, Trebes Jr. John 411011, e 1 , 1 , .. us . y ,I 5 ' ' Belford, Harold G. S'GlIlC11C0111-b, Harry YV. .1,y"f 1918 Fish, Wa,1te1- S, Tyler, Gaines A. Akers, David F. Harwood, Charles W, WVl1it111ore, Howard J. Greenspun, Joseph McNeil, Donald C. Woyeiehowsky, Stanley J. W l I 35 'ilisf'i3,-iii5if.J'Zf9fA?f1-ii I. Q gi: 2--Q' T225-Z 71" 'gli '1 1 rwrffi A 'i?'?-2 L :iff GJf1i'zi-fff'1f2.q.-341:55Q- 33.-Z-. fl. 2:42 . . f W N J -v ff - .' u - ' :i.-li- '-f. :pu , 83355,-,, Qgswh , eg f Q , M ' elif? 'P' gi . 'if lylgf 'gi' . J " . 1 . - , 1 . 1 L.. 1 1 r ASSOCIATES I 4 A - 1861 1892 1901 8 . 'V1ueDoug:1l, James M. B01'1'J', J01111 G- Adams, Robert B. 1 E Edmonds, Samuel P. Newman, Quincy B, I f-fe ,A 1865 Howison, And1'ew J. O'Mz1.lley, Willizniii A. ' 5 I Tczier, Dom- F. -Toyues, Walker W. Usiml, Michael N. 1: gl McAllister, Charles A. -ig I ' 1868 Znstrow, Charles W. 1902 A 1. K , I . . , ' Kilgore, XV11118111 1. 1893 Dmud, George W. Farwell Lorenzo C 18'1 G' C. 'l M. ' ' D tt J 1 JLEEZ' Lim T Gilbert, William J. enne om 1 - , , ,- - , - 7 Mncooun, W'illi:nn E. MCMIHQH' Cahfolma C' 1873 Newcomb, Frank F. 1894 1903 lfVood, Horatio M. Ker, Lucien J. 1874 4- L3 McLellan, Charles H. 1895 1904 U7 ?7 571.3 Wadsworth, Francis G. F. Gamble, A213011 L' Patterson, Albert F. -'Q l N VVhitworth, Horace C. lgalxlveip Wlliilllll L-T Young, Frederick H. gf Y . fl 010611 orn, Aenry 4. xy Q.: 1876 'Walton, John Q. 190, ' - 9 " 3 . 1 - - 1 , ' F' ' .V NV, Munroe, Charles XV. 1896 Maglatmm, ,Webb G. M A31 'ft 1373 Bryan, John 1. 1915 J Clmlker, James H. HFITVCY, U1'b2l11 - Dennett, Alexander Kotsehmar, Hernmn Bowleyf George. W' X Lawton, Theodore G. Chapmfrn, Edwin E. , 1885 Normzin, Albert C. H3'1'diUS'1 S1133 H- ,qi ' Boyd, Harry L. P6411-Mk, Wiuets Jensen, Peter 1 1887 Poreher, Christopher G. Knowles, H91'b91't M- , Turner, John B, Lippincott, Chester A. Bowen' Dems F' X' VVl1eeler, Charles A. L0fbG1'g, GUS B. , - 1883 W1-ight, Robert Elliilipi, -T 511303 F. ' 8 ' l W. Coyle, John B. 1397 SI1ggCS?g7On 0151 1 ' 1, , 1 , 7 ' 1 Q- Ealkenstem' bled R' Davlsa Edwin XV- Tunnell, YVil1iam E. . X X Iiillpill, RObe1't 1 nl Z IW 2 M 1 J l id' Butler' Harry U' Rich QLZIHG1 M. 1920 qw U 11" Maher, George B. ' Crowley, Ralph T- I in ,lll . , .Wy mlm.-f sm ton Hem- L. 1898 Kelley, J 01111 ull' ' y ' y L' 1 F k B l Minor Byron A. mm nf mn ' 1891 , Price, James A. COCIITLLII, Claude S. 1900 Rasmussen, Martin 'W. Dorry, John E. Root, Charles S. Wilcox, Howard 2 ' ' - W ?:fQ5"1 5!lj'i2j- gi L g.giig1? "" V -' r- ' lgrr-f L A Qrzfff i - -1- .ff A egigg -f' fri"-4-U 4 - f J 1 ee- e W . X aff- " -1 S" 7 f f f 1 -4' , f -sh rg , li he if 1 - 1-'iff-4 e I eg if 2 41-sg? e ' 'ijf Z F f f -1' , -fig-11 15xE,:5 Iu.f - ' --- 4-,L- , 4,4354-,ly X A ' X f X 2+-ex 1 gf r n n C E when time whn ziealea nur gears muah MP7 FN X 4,, 'f Shall steal nur pleaaureef Inn 2135 'll X: 57 "' x .1 ' " I' E Ehe memnrg nf The past 111111 ning , H Ahh half nur gags renew. A, S - -Thomas Moore. Y I Z A , 1 Mk P 5 S h X f Q 1 Q mf? th U MIM W N -- W: fi? fflife' 599155 iifQ'? 44 ffiik- 1 e 5 1 i Qlsaigiaif e Lil ' -'Q' fffef 1 1 -:?:f1 1- Je .24 -fr - fx J-lr C"Cl' 411' -XX 9 'Wi .2 6--X -if J X Eff! X VN :Xp ,gi s o o Ll QY'6 t ,015 f . ire-1:-fgxf rbl N. . -- 2-Y - 'fz9s2?'fi3gQ'551-1?Q' gl ' K ' S , 43 , Z 5gv?'7fg,v TT S 2.Q'l.?L1"' MB' !Q75 f Q? Qffff L J a xy V 4:42 g- 4-' , ae?-xgf i-5 - - fl '. Vg-E. 'r' fzeemif N A x f iii ..-:--, gf: - 5 'E' K LW ' KJ ?lmw .1',X, . , f"3e4 , . 212.5 A I' rx J J ig ' ' 5 up . r . ' ' 1 f . 1 Q1 r rf 2 ff A t Q4 f' '-'ESE f ll f Y H 27 1941 J' 6 5 THE FIRST CLASS QQSK5 i' Y M W Ml ' H 1 - EFX f 9 V QM 2 Q Q V I' H ffl I' 'INN 1 r Fi? ElifffifiiSZfTTiS1'fT??' S1 S J S+1 SE 4? S S E S J :ff ' Qif J S S f ' A S "7fL'i.,,,f5f1 3, 10 . , 4 - f Www "MII 1 -' 1-fr ., X V I S - ".- b-' -,7f? E'f "' -ff.. -4-X - - lg -Y- A ? i ..,.-.2-.J -ff. I X.. Ii' I5 if If X Izbg I Igi-EI E? I g I IX , I IN ' STANLEY C. LINHOLM P7'G5'iCZ0l1'L I , 1,3 fr' QD D . II, .-.K fi P I - IP .eme- CLASS ' OFFICERS A FRED P. TVETTERICK I 3 3 I I 5129, .. - 'f , I K ,PA , WM. XVALLACE SCOTT z Vice-President Scfc1'cta1'y-Trcasurev' A 1, IX cg X I EIEI 2 II II I I I I LIIIIJ II I.. LESLIE B. TOLLAKSEN Master-at-Arms I T 1f4f.ei1fifi:i1-Qjjjfff .iff - L 5? Q U 27 Q IIII r I, 1 , , T , f X. eip- . - '1' . f ? P ' Q . 2 f'?fee'v 'fi1Htr TH U G' - tes or r r eil if e A- li if ,, ' RICHARD LEON BURKE 4 ll X ' SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS l I Orolwstra f3j ffjg Baseball f3j Q21 fljg X 11' Class Football f3j K2j,' Football U15 Bas- ' ' ketball KSU f2jg Class Mastea'-at-A-rms f2jg l fj Rifle Mcwlcsmcm. I Knifrhthood will always nourish while Sig! pl ? D c, '. ' 1 :ffg,:.J old Dick is around. Trouthe, Honoure, X ET Fredome, and Courteisye are in the air E- about him. He brought these romantic 7 'N ideals from Texas, and even in Connecticut l he has kept them. A hard thing to do but r by his introductory story of the "prune ,lg juice fast" Tex demonstrated that he is a man of strong will and determination. l VVho could doubt the courage of a man who l would take a cold shower every morning at "Dick" "Tex" 'fCowboy" , Si-Y? 4- .sg To "gripe" on merited occasions in a D, I7 Lffjlff cheerful and whole-hearted manner is an art of Diekls own ,ly lp, creation. It has been a real pleasure to hear him fluently gi, ? ' all 1 express an opinion of some wrong with a few choice words. 5: E Though we have been afraid to mention it, there has of ' ' "T 'iff late been a marked clnimge in Dick 5 a certain increasing stoicism, a self denial of some few common pleasures. Some M ifa unseen power is at workg an element. Could it by any chance "f M ' be love? Dick has been especially stable in this matter in which most of us are markedly unstable, so that we have not the diabolical 5 pleasure of Haunting the-in most cases-rather soiled red A ! 5 flannel of the past before him. We can but hope that in seine time yet to come we ,may 'E again hear his old call of "Hey, guys! " 1 l Y 4 "VVelcome I mount, as welcome down I came l X Into the Bower of this good Tuscan land." l f X X T 5 ' -oezzlm. WE 2 ta U l"w f . ll if ll ,f,1',v It H ,, , Q , ! .1 , I i I ' , ,, EH-522 2 ' - ' s - L as M l - use , l f ' 5?f7jTffil 5.fi,Q2iigiiLf1fpiilAs -Lit,T-iifif s " ff 2 ,N 1 V:-f-'15 - N X- -Q ' 7' ' ? - gif :ph J. e. tra. Q W S' lie- Ei, .J 'l tw i7-'kit xl iwit fffn-.,t,, ti f ' F I:5, +.i "b"V"i'A' Q"'4'i' VERNON EDWIN DAY A i ' TXVIN FALLS, IDAHO ' f if ' Sclzolarshi Star K3j MQ, Expert Rifle- P . ' v mam, Pistol Ercpert, Tide Rips Staff. Ever since Vernon shook off the lure of w V- i the "great open spaces" and the temptings of his mother 's cookies he has been making himself famous in a variety of ways. In V 2 if l l l iw ' 3 addition to belng radioman, chemist, and l electrician he has won the distinction of X being class pliotographer. This last was because as a mere child he bit on an ad to "Kodak as you go." His craving to be- come an engineer was due, no doubt, to the atmosphere of the Pocatello railroad yards. Give our ''jack-of-all-trades" a hammer or a wrench and he is content to be left alone. Vernon is a good sport, he has never 4- ni hesitated to help us out, even at the expense 41 -LJ , , ' of his OXVH time or energy. How often' he has "' V. E. ' ' ' ' I70'7'IlflZ Equinoa: ' ' ' 1 Sarge' ' lf lx responded to the cry of "Say, Day, how do you do this one?" Cheerful at all times, his broad grin has never left him except when he ran up against his one stumbling-block-' f Frog. ' ' Although not an athlete, at no time has V. E. 12:9 Ti? Z l l Ml , l if I 1 7 t7 25555 C7 "' ' J fl .. .. failed to give his rousing support to the team, His reputation as an umpire, however, is secure, and thereon rest his laurels for athletic prowess. "Tr-ipe's only rival" ships letters by freight to i Brooklyn, and from there gets his daily car-load in 'V return. Leave, to him, means a pilgrimage to the E destination of his dulcet notes, and some day- 1. Vernon, 1nay'you Win the Cup! l l l U l fl, as I yu' 1 ,ill " l if i V ' ' - Lx QS t, inggf-1-itz, 416.4 semi n- D f --1-'-'f""""ife D D e if -,fn-1 Y- rim, f2fi??,1jif?fi:'j5,-If-f if-g. f f E e.jif pE.?f 145-fig-iie-Q?D1'f i2 - ff-fe' -Q' lfsm - f fr' f f 1 'fishy f- ::3f1 E+ ,-5-Liz m,,.s1f,,c :YA-M5 7' f A L M " ml? J.- "' l '-If-2 E3 1 iii 'f f' ' g iligil i 2352 .fl g?f4lZQvif5 --.Y - f -A -A figs - , x-.-s -- 3925? CLARENCE FRANCIS EDGE ,i X , JoHNsTowN, NEW YORK x ,v - Scholarslzip Star UU f2jg 07'C7LCSt'I'0. KSU 1- f MQ, Business Mzmagcr, Tide Rigas, Expert y Riflcmang Pistol Mcvrlosman. J , il Give ear to the lurid tale of one Clarence , Francis Edge, e'en as savvy a lad as bold. ' l ' A gay cavalliero, this "Vodka Boat1nan" of . 5? ours, famed in fun and fiction as a fiddler of no small worth. Nero's only modern ' rival, he, who though the barracks oft' has seethed and burned within itself as from his viol he 's drawn a. festive, lilting note, would not succumb or list' to supplications of the masses. For all his frantic music we like , him well, and many 's the time the Class has heard with high good cheer his fiery, deep- X- 7 HDWCOVPH "Slb07'W3,' "Deke" "LCW7'Z'!" impassioned words as in session We have sat ffl, if and sped the dreary, lagging hour. ifjlixig ,Q 'Di As a soldier of fortune he invaded Siberia, garnering story, L4 - song, and legend that have served him well as one of our most in V f e constantl a reciated entertainers. Hb is as the good old say- Hill - " y pp ' .arms-, ing has it, "a bit of a sheik, and a Charlestoneerf' doing his 4' 1 'p l' A stuff with one and sundry or stepping a merry measure as the JA 'L ' tg occasion at hand requires. F' Leader, politician, student, executive,-these may well describe fl some men, but to describe our Deke, all these plus "darned good if eggxn ' ,qi K "That's a small matter! " .- w v f C 2 X HE E' , " i 'Q D 'mill if Ll ,ll l l ' ' A A i f , ,mf W A ff? -- - --2 -.. . YYAV . ,mi . 9. I -hh N -hm 4 Y . , ' 5 ef -if if 2 A E iff -is :file ,leg-1 c if-45552 H 'V A ---' W- - Y - -- f - f - -ig' --- -l-if-lik, ,-3511222-- E' . - .,- - , 'ff-'fr 9 Me- 'ill if f A Q--L. -.f'-"' ,,41.gd e ff, if - i rififie 1 I MIL SE Q ' -SLE? H r. E STEPHEN HADLEY EVANS ' CLARENDON, VIIQGINIA I l Editoi'-'iii'-Chief, Tide Ripsj Class Football 'gi i K2j,' Ewpcrt Riflwiiazzij Pistol llIcu'lJ.S-mang ' 'l l Custodian of the Bear fljj Class Ring Com- 'N if 'mittee fljj C0711-'lll,ClJl,CZC'!', Second Platoon T"-l Ill. T 927 ' ' gli g The smiling countenance looking out at I i ? you from this page, ladies and gentlemen, is , i one Stephen Hadley Evans, the editor of I X 4 this volume of fact and nation, connoisseur if i , of youth and beauty, and gentleman from i x "Clahendon, Va'ginyuh, suh, just across . from XVZl.Sl1,ll,i1Ol1.," l When Hadley deserted the fair damsels of Q Wasliiiigtoii to come to the stern and rock 4 X bound coast of New London, he was, alas, Q unable to withstand the lures of the sirens "Hadley" "Charlie" of Connecticut College. He rolled serenely ' ,7 Q. 9 il? along from wagon to wagon, leaving a trail of heart- U7 X, breaks behind him. "Gentlemen," said Hadley Y ' iii ' after one of his latest experiences, "my only advice V is not to go out in a Hudson! " "T K' Hadley was never known to miss a chance to argue about who won the Civil Wa1', or that Wzisliiligtoii ' V Z girls always have been more attractive than Maine A-G li girls and are still going strong, or on the Eleven i Reasons why the Academy should be moved South. A The Line presented l1in1 at a Swab banquet seems to f' have provided him with plenty of Topics for Sessions, 'ii K and we oft' have heard his joyful voice holding 6-i forth on taxi bills, spots, royalty, fences, the good Z' old days of history when southern gentlemen didn 't have to get their mint juleps from nigger boot- g V lcggers, and above all on girls, Girls, GIRLS. , Then here's to you, Hadley old boy, may your days P be pleasant and your laughter never wane, and when 1 g we all land in the Big Fireroom Down Below, may WW Q we have your southern drawl to help raise the roof IW, X of Hades in the roaring chorus of The Fii-emen's tiilpru I Band. Then the Old Guard will be complete. , i 'HV i "While on the othah llillldu-' A me W' T" "H 'T "rt-"f"'Ei?i:5L1,j' -' K- Qeiisli-f Ll," '15 ii if'.f if'ffE..-1 -5,55 - T S12-isffififlfg-1 T T -T 'I N f-' 1' -f14'7?h7vv lllkir Xu. .C.GfA, ' " . -:i x . , , I ., 'g 'ilk :V lg. I -+-A . 1, , , - -" -' .4-. , fv,C ,Ay ,, 'H--ff -, .- t , l,,!, Q IE 'y - :.Ev,., - -' 'Tie- ?' f. I ' , 1 L ,L F :-ggi. - V figaffifff- ::::f'-1--- ' 1Lf?iY'," A V .... JOHN EDXVIN FAIRBANK BLIILTON, MASSACHUSETTS Tide Rigas Stajfg Stationery Coin-mittee ,T W 'mln ffgi, fe-"' dd. mrgug. Q fbcnmgmx., .-4 i-'md 3529 N 0'Q.O 5 x, QE'-:wb ' 'UWQPAS' QCP-:ig O'-. at-hrq-1,55 n-I P-If-'rl Eff' UQ H-22 F+5r5fJQ O r-emg o 3352194 ,ntfiwz oline:-2 mO4f:.re- f--pgfwg 'Sr-1,-I-'Jn-J aqmggd 5':22E H-SHOE :bd-ggvr' gggbrfig HCP' 550375 35's SidE.""r-as F3-'Q.r+,':'2 l4:"5c1:.' l x Il Z7 Q. R rivers, and of rescuing distressed dainsels ' 1, lil .ffg illli Y not 1, X whose autos have collided with obnoxious it lamp posts. ii When not arguing with his rooinniate as iy to whose turn it is to supply the room with ix Food and Fiction, or Peanuts and Post, he is usually reading or answering the piles of X letters that coine addressed in fair Gout "J. Edwin" "Jef" "Major Hoople" alas! differentj hands. This Mormon doesn't 4- L3 realize that there is no Coast Guard station f-7 17 423' X? in Utah. "P 'f- xl J. Edwin has worked steadily during his stay at the iff " ' " ' Aeadeiny, and without being a out-throat, has stuck to his work, whether studies or class business, with J U Q a tenacity that should be a worthy example to all J M,,,,.,.Q' - - "swabs" for years to come. "Go thou and do y '- likewise. ' ' "Well, that boy Scott! " QA ia 9 A ' 2 2 A NX ' 'ff' Q J I ',f ""'y?? at V Q A X 1 X C , if i , 5 . 1 WE P u qi 5' ,J E5 ' fir I " . , i viii-4 vlwzwf ff F iw ' i 'S ,X 'a.ll5 f - 415, x x. '.. 1 T-N 'J flfbg 1 , l 's i f -- V -A+ , n.-- T , m un. -- - so --- - get , e-if ea.v:L.f:1"'Q"2+ fl nl--QL if f T T it i T- f2'1' 'fl it fiitf n5f1ff,E,fZ1f ML A . ' ' ' Liz? "5?,-5,'1E5:- Y :sf .f " ' -1 '-,WL-2'-' --ii-T 15 -if? 7, ? My ,, - I 1 -. gffgk Hx Y -T-. - -A-J . 1 9 itil' ,,. E I- MB. '-:iff li y' ,'lL - Q 2 . ,IV , , Lei- g gi' if Jiiislp e if + K . - f ,. - f Y V l A ,,f, , ALEXANDER LAWTON FORD -", 'f','- SAVANNAH, GEORGIA L I .1 4 pi' Rifle S7LfL7'17S7lf0Ol6?'j Pistol Ma'r7osman. Z Q? Lawton is a home and nature-lover- , 7 ,2 especially V710-1' home and female nature. He I 1 ' 5 has had his anchor down i11 S011l0 beefsteak Q l dispensary ever since he's been in the T' l 3 Academy and we don't know for how long - l before he got l1C1'e. Although he l1i1SI1,l3 yet gotten warm up here in this "bitter cold i North," at least it must be some comfort to him to k11ow that several northern gi1'ls have 1 done all they could for him to furnish the , missing btu's. In corroboration we cite the fact that he streaks out the gate Groton- bound the instant liberty starts and doesn't get back 'til the last minute of play. J 7 K I ,. ,' P I I K 7 7 5 e, In the academic he has proved himself FOHZLC Lawton QQ? ,-YW L' quite studious and has gained no small QW! Lg ' f- 7 I 'I N A 13 .91 " n xg 4 we Y! V I amount of notoriety through his uncanny faculty of being able to .C Y ,- ' memorize the text word for word. From the hermitage of his room he - -5 comes forth occasionally to borrow something or to spread a cheering ,fr --" ess word among hrs classmates or to argue some philosophical point. ww w - Q jj i Once 011 a working detail Fordie was known to have worn two blisters "' ' A ' we .I,...1sfi., .F . . . ' - on 111s -, well, anyway he was unannnously awarded the Gold Brick - 1 it ,-5' .- 111 26. fr Amono' his multitude of rare characteristics that "Can't be downedu f:,aa.4fg:nw.,.: f, eg. ,. 'fp b lj spirit stands out in bold relief, and we all feel that the honor and A 1 glory of tlus famous Class has been enhanced by having the little Rebel with us. Yes, by Geo 'gial ,E ' ttf ? i staff" -M2132 55?i? "5'i4g we -me . Y 7 X VI ,.,. ,, 14, f d U1 Y ,, M N U , X ' ' V1 'tw l 'J fl , , f' " I 2' V W ' ' 5 1 ' A I 4 u ' , -....-.. If ----- ' , -- " --' -'J-" -'lv' - "" L 5,4 , 4 .' 'vi ' ,g -Si L ' ' In L - 1, x , 'L f f " "i":'f""'1".:s f -A f 7'-Y fiifeii- gi15,,Z?:,c 'iflg7'? f,-A 'irlf in - - gif gn k ff, :rf Q - .strut fgii Q fi if-if: 1 t it -1 1 f! 'ii A fs 1 v i Qc1f 5' 11 11-ik? Mi e.ai'1a?1'-LS.,--rigs" ,- Z "' ' K, 2- ' ' L- J W3 ' f - , f' A X ian' sf?" y -f ,' ' 'W ic-is ' .- F A A- ' 1' 4-, ' . ' Q -' ITE' TEE, 'WI 1 ' 1-7 - ff-l2' 3.l 3 ' Wg-fwLi QB, '.'I.TL' E ':.g:,4Q-J' :li gY5T:E',gi sf T::2d ,g ., Q I : V'g,,.E-qfir, . ,TY-Q:--it-13, . , . y 'elsif l ' .5 x l l l Fl w Rl: NJ 1 , we K - Q l ' ' Frenchie 'F' philanderings cut short and himself inextricably by" to tell HER "I do" as soon as he tells th please. Faets are true as stated, howeveixj We know you're waiting to have us spread a heavy line about his flashy brand of basketball, but what ls the use? The "New London Day" and "Saginaw News-Courier ' ' have stolen our stuff for once and in inch-high headlines have sounded his fame to the sport- ing world. Many of you have seen l1im play the game your- selves and know first-hand that it spells "tail-end score" for REGINALD HICKS FRENCH SAGINAXVJ MICHIGAN Football fljg Class Football MQ M25 Slfzlionevvy Cofimnfitlec KZQ fljg Barscbdll Kljg Art Editor, Tide Ripsg Baslactball M1 KZQ fljg Pin Ommnitlcc f3j3 Expert Rifle- ozcm,' Pistol Jllcwlcsman. Cynical though he would make you be- lieve, by expression and by action, the hero of this page is actually a tender-hearted lad who is forced quite often to take refuge behind a mask of sophisticated boredom in order to call his soul his own. Intriguing men with his personality plus and Women with his insolent auburn curls, Frenchie has gathered friends and playmates all along his tortuous trail from Saginaw to the meridian of 2-20-15 E. Longitude. Once back in New London, however, he found his snared, and to-day you see him "standing e Academy "adieu." QBHIH joke. 'Scuse, I ' - ffg W fe 994' A '1 'Z' 1 - ? , vw illllll Wh , s ig.. L,: '- Al l I X our opponents when Frenchie fb jumps center for the C. Gr. -J gtg g Team. Remember tl1e spectao- tl Q qw' ular tosses he used to make 5 W from half-way down the court? 'NSEJX ll' l1is impregnable defense? his I speedy footwork? What else can we say? His glory ill sports was established in action 5 we cannot add to it with still words. - -Lfrasaiff--ici-t 21'-Th 4 1 ll? s - i ff if-S--Q-f.4:T-agen F '-if 1 A " """fd! L' L' flf'-r, 'T " " f 1125-gg1'2?H 1 YZF' gf f . " 1l-- C2313 - -J ,. .,:f:: 1 , 51 1 1 ,, .gi-f-ijfiigiei if ' 'ta' t - -' ll ' 2' .fa eg..-.Z-' 'f -?1T f. YP 1, A e 4"'x' i 'Q' '-'L ' Ci , S ms- Y- '1 "its ?g, A izv, Q, ' 1 'n TElTs?':"11,. vffgm- -.4-:life -eggij-L 1? .-- f . Y 425-ir. i QEQEF 4 , ,Y,x. ,---1-f -vi- l, - 1, F2 '-iii!! MM" ' 1 A ,I 4 JOHN ARTHUR GLYNN GLOUCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS Class Football f3j K2jg R-ific Marlcsmmzg Pistol Marksmaot. Li-X :Q!r!', X 5 Z6 When Pop forsook the Beam Trawler to ' try his luck at the Academy all the little pf, Janes of Gloucester gathered 'round to wish --- 1 X 'gg 1 him well and tell him what big things they .27 N ? y expeetea of him in his new life. That fickle ' lx , youth, however, seems to have forgotten all X ' his home-town playmrltes, but we can truth- X fully give out the gladdening news that he lb X most certainly has made good their expecta- tions. , , X His first few months at the Academy were characterized by his extreme conscientious- ness and his aversion to women, but since 4- ,S then-rowdy dow! such a life he has been 141902917 ffBu,myn LJJ7? W' ' 'I , L., .RD leading! . , 67, eq J XJ He achieved real eminence during Swab Year ,Ji Y -f i when he was boorned for Company Com- 'Q . -Q ' mander- however this died dex d " U li ,.','7T,l ,, ', iirst C1'l.1lSG, just after sailingvnfrogimgadizi ,.-:- because of the HGOODSH some of his politi- V - A' f cal rivals claimed they had on him. X Q' Pop has other distinctions. He is known as W 1 ff' J A M? , it "The Toughest Man in the Outfit" and also in ,5-Ne. h ftg l f f by another title, "The Get-away Man," which A 5 A K Q he acquired in Philadelphia on the last cruise, 4 Q ffl , ' and the particulars of which only he and lm fx -,k iwi fi Ryssy know the whole truth, 4, vagal 'P ' f ' i - , , , U . Pop, for all his smelly pipe, is a real ship- ' mate, and we are all proud to be his friends. - -"' f N- x 1 --,f- S V 4' - X ', N il Nfffi, f ' . I' "You don 't catch me not neckin'! " X ' ? V , . hxlpl V UUE P K, V, ,N X .e X Q WW 1554 'T ' ' "WJ flu fl N i l jf- ,1,,-i -Q y,:u,i-T f - Z - 1-1?-If i, - t -12,1 -- A e -- - uf- - - - - - f-.-- -- -.bf gif- f - -Ja,-1-f-...2' . G-LLQZL --Q- R ' 4: fag. ,H .fs V-w .Aa , ,,.. ?rJ V , :A ,. .1 -3:55--!vE:T Y -- . ,y..:..- fir Y KSTLH. -, GEORGE FORT HICKS STRONGHURST, ILLINOIS Rifle S7Z0,'1'27-S'7L00f0'l' g Pistol Mar7cs'mcm. Tripe is a human, he-sort of fellow with a perpetual grin and a double chin. He likes his refreshments powerful and his mail from Brooklyn regular. His most sincere regret is that since the Cruise of '25 he can no longer emulate the royalty he admires, for he was forced to discontinue signing his In athletics Tripe and Dan Brady were featured as stellar performers in the Bean- Eating Classic of '24, and to his phenomenal work in that event Tripe owes much of his present fame. George fuels beans not as a mere matter of eating but as an affair of honor, and his technique is admittedly with- nh NN 4.1 . R ' .f - I li f' 'f --ut xlp? ek'g1G-. " ' tv' 'vt iw ' . 'si -' lf? 'lf 'f-BTN .2524 I Y P 1 - --51 I et fl K" Qs E' ' ? name "George V." 49 "Tr-ipeu "T1'ipocZ" "Tabby" "Eg1'oc,' 5' 5"'D ' out fiaw. .9 I . i 'f' rf He writes such a passionate line that they post his letters from time to time up at a well-furnished dorm at Conn. College just to W E show the most approved masculine style and to illustrate "What the , hot young man is writing this season." 2? Without his professional assistance and cheering words TIDE BIPS of '27 could never have been published. Wlio but Tripe could have successfully kept the editorial fountain-pen eternally filled, polished, and rigged out? or who but Tripod could have seen the "office" Q' rf , 41 Q. F I . "L, l ff X ef 1522! ? l 1 J 7 if we 57' 4' 2' ' fe, , U ff ilu Hr 2 , ,, 1 if-., "4 1--2 --Y-fi L L- A1447 4: A., Y Y Z ,FA Y ,Y E i :fi y f W ' ' H V-fil ,""7' 5 waste-basket emptied every 11101'1li1'1g'? Huh? .,,, A Well, we 've almost illed his page now and you haven't heard half the stories we might tell about our Egrec, but possibly it is just fl ' as well we're running out of space because if we printed all the ,, , tales they tell about this flaming youth we'd have to put the book 4 , , on ice to keep it below the "flash" point. Curtain. "ii' , Q, "Eat, drink, and be merry, 2 J , E Q Tomorrow we 'll have pie! " if " Bl ivlxw -Tripod Cayenne. if - 'I Wu iilyiiit it ' Mft l F ai pq-K ,W V' -, , - e I 552 E dig . E' f " E i "Y gi f ,- "f"""""E?f5i--f :QW v .-,- fffif e ---- eegeif 4: is Q- A ---. i . -,Si-5, H i ez, ,fgainnh 5?-"T , L5 H Y , f EMM fisliii I . TE' .-J.- Pl- A 'ffs rfii-Le " 1' 1 Au? 1, i"l72QF i -"7-!.,:K --ni'1i 'ielrf 'il if I 1' f , -5-225:-1 ax fig.: 45 ' 1L.'41-f-i'Tii.:EL"'- iW5'iN'1! v fa N l K gp 52:- L ' JOSEPH ARTHUR KERRINS Evmnnrr, MASSACHUSETTS Export Riflcmang Pistol Slmrpslzfoolorg Class Football KSU f2j,' Football Kljg Base- ball flj. R-r-rajah! the "Last of the Red Mikes," is another foreign potentate who has spent I iid I 2 .,,..: - considerable time in the French capital - , playing the part of "Flame" in the "Moth ' R and Flame" act that is so widely advertised. y He "bobbed" into the Gare St. Lazarre one Q night in 524: and spent every minute of leave X "bobbing" around from the pursuit of one i Parisian pastime to another. That was during the Cruise of '24. In '25-but let your own imagiaiation ru11 wild 3 we haven't space on one small page to print the story Q V e of all he did in Paris that year. "Joe" "RUfjl17l" U1 17 L-ffl? Although, as you can well see from his . r?i ll picture Cprinted herewith by request of his many friends ry 'f ' and admirersj, Joe has quite a serious air about him, yet ..5l,. , he has a Vesuvian wit that breaks forth from beneath his g a "' M" usual calm at times, to Hood us with redehot humor of his ,jig own creation. And that ain't the half of it, dearie-you A - V should hear him quote from H. C. W'itwer and the little blue books when we in session are assembled! ..li' Q ,:-' "p, 17iTff" ,sfig:v. - Joe's favorite outdoor sport is footballg his most ,'i' abhorred, Tac. Lab. True to his customary form he has N , been notable in both-on the gridiron as a capable, flashy 'Y ' end and on the parade ground as a file-closer wot could A i close a mean file! 'A 'i'i ' ' Well, Rajah, here's luck! May your "cup that cheers" f JOE- never turn to dregs, and may the luck o' the Irish follow At the age of indisoretion you forever. l 1 f Q X 9 I X WE 2 5 U wry iii iii if! I ,il ,li W N I l - ---s- ' - i r , .. . --1. . - A , V5 A M as N L- W , f Lg: k Siii ,f s , -'PY "' 1-:Q--1 5 P' , -, 1 K t e . 4 J : XC ,557 ggg.-I m 139 '-X :g l - -5, 3' E,, 1 4 Y i! V F' tl wifgfi g 14,373.4 ffi Q" ""Y J X. - ' - F- 'g"'T?l 4:-- I l l I X 'if E Q I k-W 752 O sil ly ,- qv, XX All , - Q5-345 "Stem" "Lia" "Swede" STANLEY CLARENCE LINHOLM MCPHERSON, IKANSAS S07LOZCL7'S7L7219 Stow' KZL: O7'67lf08i7'0, f3j L21 mg Basrmlmzz my fel fu Captain f2jg Card Committee KZQ g Expert Riflema-ng Pistol Expcrtg Glass President fljg Platoon, Petty Ojficeo' KU. Handsome, isn't lie? Not a trace of re- semblance to Abe Lincoln, who started this thing of coming out of the Hsticksn to be somebody. Stan came from the plains of windy and treeless Kansas to the wide and equally windy, treeless sea, and that without the droop of a long lash. It was the old "Swede" and his "Bas- ketball Bible" that did most to push the Academy into collegiate athletics. Under his leadership we have built up a team that is capable of taking on all comers and of giving them a real fight. Victory has never seemed unattainable, and Defeat has seldom downed the C. G. A. when Stan has been on the floor to lead EA, f,, l an I tl l l Z., Z X ,f x ul '7 7 if ? Ally H ft J ' 1' f the quint. . i n 5 f gi g Speaking of leadership again-Lin leads us. as lid Class President and also in the little matter of variety ' ' and number of femmes. Say, fellows, dldga see I . if ' f f-V the one in the corner? Boy! She was keen., ' Then . N follow special deliveries and night-letters until the U . 4"' .. 1, S X next lucky lady comes along. Seldom 1S there found Ml a man who is esteemed by both sexes to the degree "" ', " l of which Stan may boast. After all this is said, , 2' - ' however we must admit that althou 'h he has "" 'V I , ef' 4: ff: ,,5"4, l ' ' ' , lf 4' .. '4 S3 'Qin engaged in many "affaires des coeurs" since we have known him, he has always been true to ONE- 5' '1 731 1? N at least, in spirit! , X X l fi .. 5 i i f X - .4340 is , Elm E' HA fell lad: In love! LE: e l I .lltt What! No women?" 1 ji. -iii , A IVV' fllll p y ,ill wi ,y :egg , Ugg, H xl ,, ..,, 5 1 -'fjffaf' "i' ',.1-:il-W1-'2"!"',, . 2' :f'F..:rf:'Q Q" i --We '--4 .1.-.1 .. . i ,:,...,, mes- S - .ffl L S " H ff , ee --------Q-A--icq fl is so A, fgzfq '-, to 'A :iii 'iii fig-figs +TgjT all fffg A p iE,f Q ' 'gm Y ' f -A :A 3 A- Y, :ff -- --- - 1 -A --i-fr A ,fr x' W W-gf 7,17 yi A -Ai li,: -l Y- Z- - Y Y 'rn , ,L Y V - ,- r - QZW U' eff,-? as '-H' ,V,,?ff-,flfi at . yi ia f , i g if Y J DONALD EDWARD MCKAY i BRAINERD, MINNESOTA iid Scholarsltip Star f2j,- Rifie Ma1'7csmang v ' Pistol SlLd7'2J87L00lf07'j Tide Rips Staff. i A-sg ' Would you believe, gentle reader, that the 52, pink-cheeked little boy featured in the illus- 4 iii I tration is a hardened baekwoodsman of the i Great North Woods, and a soul-seared vet- h eran of the grim, gory game of lady-killing ,Y i 'to boot? Well, the eat's out of the bag, Q now, as he would say, and at last the wo1'ld A is confronted with the full truth of his , wary ways with women. For two years Mae confined himself to native material, but after a severe setback in one encounter with Cupid's fatal darts in the City proper he decided to transfer the scene of his ravish- ings to the collieh, where, he argued, the victims' iuexperienee should be decidedly to his advantage. ll-Don!! l!A71,gcl!! KKMUICIJ f ,W ai Q 6 --w e ,., N, I 4 lil W. 5 V In view of our Angel 's hot technique we felt justifiable amazement X, 7 xc r 7 P i aa, Ann my 'iii 'in Z 1 Q s. when he sprung tales of sleeping out in snowdrifts in his bee-vee-dees - fa , hqkl Q and breaking the ice to go swimming and other hardy and foolhardy f 34 9 customs of the Land Around the Pole for wherever Minnesota isj, - V f" but possibly the stories were just additional proofs of his undeniable I torridity. Throughout his eadetship Mae has been a howling supporter of every team we've put in the Held, and win or lose, the end of each X f game always finds him with an apparently hopeless Case of sore A ,N throat. In the classroom he's one of the Nation's savviest cadets, E, and at no time has he been known to gripe when asked to "Help I li me with this problem! " f In every way he's been an asset to the Class and friend of all and v sundry. VVhen he grows up we expect to see him flying two stars. .--.,,i , 1 3 " p , 3 xr ae E' ' D ii u iliwiwi I V ' " JW ii- Imjj! yi will .i 3 - ,ii ,, L 5 Z l , H , lim., , H, ,,,,,, ,Q, ,,..,,.. . , w ig s ""' Q ' - ' - e -4 H """"" f1f ' .-. .- .- o1e ee , ol - gf-24: ' g laisi- igzgafwfii f Q f?.ilfe,-fi g ou: Lg-425ge,gl'li g1Z ' of fi -fo?'fff' 4 o 112- of Qi g-tiefeg 1ii:'-it 37 e?2-3 A A i , 'l L l 2? 6 x . 75.2, ' V ' W i' Q 4 L7 441. LD 7 '5 'V lI'- X3 Il ' W 25.5 HAROLD SIDNEY MAUDE FRAMINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS Class Football f31 My Football fljg Baseball K3j KZQ fljg Title Rips Athletic Erlitoog' Assistant Manager Baslzctball KZL: Manager Basketball fljj Seoretai'y-T1'cas- woo' Athletic Association K2j,' Prosiflcnt Athletic Association fljg Pistol Sharp- sliooterg Rifle Marlcsmaa. At last We can scribble a write-up without crediting the subject with being a heart- breaking lady-killer-this boy doesn't kill 'em although he sometimes does put them in the hospital. Our lil' Eva came to us with a mighty fine athletic record preceding him. The only statements he could be in- duced to make about his own prowess was that he was purty good at spearin' fish through the ice and that he enjoyed duck- :z,E,Ua1! hunting on particularly frosty mornings, but he couldn't fool us! We already knew that as a wrestler he was Olympic material and that-three cheers!-at center and behind the plate he would be quite a find for the Academy teams. Eva's graduation leaves two important Academy posts to be filled from the next class-those of president of the A. A. and of manager of basketball. In this latter capacity he has contributed in no small measure to tif? - sf K1 Eli llsll' I 'Q Xl '-il I llflill it . ia N A A i fin A 'rl Mi 1' ."'.'U5 ,lun QM Mm JU- ' fl allll y Ulf ' ffll'l f' i -xx! lx i Z A uv . 4 , i - - v-',f?fT D1 ,7 eff? 57' v fill the 't6Zllll7S many victories. V' Rumors come to us fthat in high F ' ,W as school, prep, and college Eva had the ' S 1 reputation of being as good a sport - A as one is likely to find in a long timeg A I I Z as a parting word and friendly pat on if M' L ' - f his pretty Csee illustration herewithj , 5 ie- ' F , X ' - head We make these rumors fact by 1 Ely? ' :gig Q 4 I I I' vii adding to them our official Voice of Q ' 1 ' 35 E , x j fig 1 sincere approbation. Ji If z Q A i - W X f N f V W P 1' Wlllflyl fill . G lj WW! - 52-sY1?i+h?3gyf if .491 bfi? itlf-niiei' ' if gg:lfiQng..5,,.g1 cf3?:eii "'ffd , , K Y - - L- SEYETA1 A if ifipf A V--5 771,251-j lug El liff, E:YffJ g- deigg lj Ti E- l l LD ? l 15 ll X.-' ntl QW: , . if 5: '2a "' n ,F-Q 5 ' ' ,,.,-T,-.1-9 3.1 - jg-.-f-1' ,:?Lf-'t 'TT- T,f LT7- ., i 42' --1 3 ' A' A22 . ' git'-l?-?-l4A 'f en. y c. f 1f,, . 1 ' E -T J '-i'Y ?is-iii 1- A' GEORGE MILTON PI-IANNEMILLER G PATCHOGUE, NEW YORK Orclteslra 1215 Rifle Slzm'pslmotm',' Pistol , 4 S7m.rpshoote1',' Class Ring Committee fljg 'Al Baseball Kljg Class Football f3j KZQQ Cup Committee fljg Company Petty Ojiiccv' . avg, Ducks, potatoes, oysters! Phz1nny's weak- nesses. And why not? They are the prides of Long Island and we consider him, with his fiery thatch, another pride and joy from our neighboring isle. Generous, friendly, happy-go-lucky- George is everyone's pal. He is given to quietness of speech, dress, and manner, except at Class banquets. On these happy occasions he has often been known to enter into the evening 's merriment with no slight P7lCW711!"' HMT. Millie", "P7Wf7U1U7lliU67"' Phz1.nny's education has certainly not been neglected, but we sin- cerely doubt that his vocabulary contains "labor" or ziny of its remotest synonyms. When we first inet him we were inclined to believe that he would be o11e of those fellows who could turn out the light and be between the sheets before it went out, but it lV2'1S11"t long before we were willing to take it all back. He's quite adept at sliding between the sheets, but he's never been known to go to'the trouble of turning out the light. On committees he has served us diligently and faithfully. In inter-class athletics he has been a solid asset. His line work on the f ' 491 gf ? if l it M fl ll x l' football team has spoiled many 21, play for the other classes, in base- fl ball he could ever be depended on to help pile up the score. 'E K As to Mr. Miller's activities with the fair sex we are more or less ' , in the dark. But just in general we might ask ,l , What jolie femme so pretty and fair fx ' Could ever resist that auburn hair? D, f 5 . 4 A 1 QUE E' Il U fl if ll 'WI in ,Wal M so fi i c - i - - 15:43 2? - eiiefE?f1l31 fitld e -l G 2 ' l - T fi i sf Ee-f:'?Sg55Z1L.E? ee-if Y ...D . , -,Z i f- f ifiif ' f- ',:1-1-e-'f?Q1i6'i, -Vlgf' fl'iT:' , , SfL-self:-sf'-F4-' '-T l"'-f- Lexi? ' " .,.,:Hi3-:E:2'?'! -V . tx 11 4. - rgflal-5-5 5 fi H .3 y ,-up ,jjlg-5 - . QL ' -pi fefffff eil YA G- ' e "F has "" ' KZ' fr, 'Eel' XJ .Y , 1 -S 'i..,1f4 e YJ rfe ,. :rA.e:f it--laa., fi:QQi,.a it if l li E rr-Peycyu rc Quackn JOHN JOSEPH PURCELL l SOUTHOLD, New Yoiuc l Baslcetlvall f3j K2j Ill C'apta'i'n fljg Baseball K3j 122 fljg Football KZQQ Com- mander, Tllflllfbl Platoong Rifle Ma-rlcsmcmg leflff Pistol S71,a1'psho0te-rg Mi1z,iat1m'o R-ing Com- mittee fgjg Humor Editor, Ticle Rips. , ve I O11 June 25, 1924, the S. S. SlLl7L'IL8GOCln7 4 dropped a load of Long Island potatoes and John J. Purcell on the New London doek, thereby furnishing food and fun to the Cadet Corps for years to come. Neither supply has failed us yet. Quaek's comedy is of that intoxicating sort that sparkles like old Burgundy and leaves all hearers with a laughing jag. Say, if M1'. Volstead only 554, I M3 knewi! Percy has been particularly brilliant in QL' the Radio Classes that meet in the recrea- U1 17 Qfvllj tion room, which is not at all surprising when we consider that " ff- xf he has had "Late Lights" nearly every night during the whole nw Y ' " past academic term in order to bone it. His real savviness, 5' 7 1 however, crops out in a different way. Percy has almost usurped 4 Pop 's honors as "Get-Away Mani'-he has gotten away with ffffffgifhjl, more steals than are listed in the Ac. Regs. . . Speaking of steals, you should see Percy s11agg'ing bases on the '-if diamond. His value here rests more, however, on the fact that he " ' can put a right-handed twist on tl1e sphere with his left hand and slug into the far outfield whenever the bases are loaded. :AH , Quack's athletic fame and history are probably more closely A coupled with that of the Basketball Team than almost any other 2 xx 2 i"-i', 1 , player's. His game is fast, ilashy, clean, and sure. The Corps lx A has every reason to boast of him as one of the men who led our 'S ' X f invasion of collegiate athletics. . V -l,- If pictures could talk the one you see above would very prob- I , V ably sound off, "Hey, E-e-eva! " , l 1 9 XT in E' ta U lillll I ll llulllflll 1 llll l l .J Gllj ?+--Qi Y - ll yo : .mix 55. m y -,,-ef, . A' g i ,, , fl QE' rpm 'Zi gi fe' 1 1 1.1, ef -wES,q,,,g5.a:g1-F f g.,fg-axe, JOHN VVALFRID RYSSY I lfVOR.CES'1'E1t, MAss11cHUsE'r'rs A , Rifle Ma1'7s.s111a11g Tide Rips C'i'7'0'll1lCb?f'l:0IL , 1 wig Malliagerg Baseball K3j flj. ,I 1' From the College City 031110 our telephone ' , 11. sl1eik to introduce the art of Terpsichore i11 it :ij this deserted village. Every man of us ' q secretly envies John the grace with which, " H, ? ' even eorseted within a monkey jacket, he is l able to glide ainong the lllilfllllllg throng that crowds the lJ2ll.ll'O01l'l floor, demonstrat- lx ing form plus ill the latest style of rhythmic N leg exercises. R J. XV. entered the Academy as a rank lH11dSll1il11l, yet so Cl1tll1'2l-llC'Ll did he become l witl1 the sea and tlle denizens of tl1e deep, that by the time l1e made his first cruise l1e had joined the Society for the Aid of Home- "John" "J, W." 7 'iw less, Hungry Fish, and niany a meal did l1e fl, f ,'l"'5 contribute to the starving Fins tlxereafter. While in tl1e classroom John if ' 'f' X? always had a great deal of difiieulty with the French language, yet with wi. if " ' 4 4 , I I Spanish nratters seenied reversed, for the story 1S told that he had 110 1 - w e . . . . . , iq Q, trouble lVl12ltGVG1'-111 fact, that l1e really enjoyed-picking up a, httle ,, .F '1,, "Spic" in Cadiz. This, we lllllllltilvlll, accounts for the stardom in aw w' ' f b? Spanish athletics which all of us eoneede l1in1. V J0l1117S academic record is one of sincere endeavor, and 11is work as Circulation Manager in spreading TIDE RLIPS far and wide has been 61101'1110llSly successful. 4 fl ii A .I ' ' 5. 5 ' ,Lt 19 By 4 , ' gf NU E' I ? D Q. will It H iilltll J .101 wi EEE:-Rgil -- f I - Fgajzfz N 43 5 f- -H " , f-f-fe-L irf, V e , , e ..-.:, .:ifg4,1,, , 1 r,,.,,.fis1 it f gist fr-f22if,. se if 1 1 x ,e. ivlllif YB len s -G f e r f H M" -fi :gilt gg ilnifeiigsif if li it 553215 Si 'ff l .1 -. 1 7, -ix f 1 ge 2 iid itil-l V? -4 'alas-Q. WILLIAM THEODORE SGHELLHOUS PORTLAND, OREGON Associate Editor, Tide Ripsg Class Vice- Presicleoit 522, Class President M15 Class Football f3j f2j,' Football flj, Scholarship Star K3j KW, Expert Rifleman, Pistol Sha-rpsltooterg Mirtiature Ring Committee 521g Platoon Petty Ojitoer flj. Schell dropped in on us wearing his characteristic golden smile, and announced himself as a. ,Hwell known figure" in his old home town. As one of the class fztthers he took ei leading part in the sessions whereat the Topics of the day and the well oiled class political machine were l HQ, ' 3553 4 l 'au .1 lf, qv l . discussed. While class president, he kept things mov- ' ' Sehell ' ' ' 'Dugout' ' ' ' Watertight' ' ended in understanding and ae- co1nplishment'? and the class ban- quets at which he presided? . Schell has on unusual record at Few indeed have the Academy. gone overboard Via. the dotted line, as he has, only to be hauled back without aid of the breeehes buoy. record 'rhas been His athletic bright, and his class offices show what we think of him. If he doesn't "know his stuff" he has fooled all of us as well as the instructors. His only failure has been in trying to drag J oe away from the "Lyceum" and the ranks of the .Red Mikes. "How's to get in the argument?" city' - ---v--- ,, A-.1,.. ,,,,, X, W. vi..-. C,-.Qt1..:,t,,.,,,-,-i-1:.:z,.v.,,f- 5.13, . 'slwif:-'f':esZef'f:2y:55 :5:35,,sg5g3::, b ., , .W ,t , ,.i, .. ,. .,. l, ing. Who doesn't remember those stormy sessions in the ree room X . , meetings that x . - ., - ., .,., N :Q-'.:?' - N l l A - is is Q 1' - if ,. at-1-.ff - f . -5' rr-. - 'E '11e-"ia, 5.--M55 , W ,qgx - V Y 1 1 Xi X 7 ,E I, s s rw 2, Q l 5 , 3 i Ng Z5 Q5 4 ,Q me S I il E Q ,Y M, XL 91 K 5 X Q ,Q S 2 -6 3 " 1: ,ii H t 5 , f I in . Y 5 2 N H+, 3 it S ff Q i s .. . si, Y' 4 z we f Q ff Vw v K W V4 Q ,KZ v s- 7 we x W ,Q - if .,,. .5 X .,..,.f.l,l,,.,.., M ,.....,, .. ... ,,,,, . l l. X .'.-se-es.....:-w:.,s.gf-wi.:',,'.,..ls11.:-.ss . - k . is. , .' i U 1 'N ' I ' . 5: Lfflfllj 4 1.1 713' . . .,-.-.-.....am-nf -55.225 , fe- -yi-V '-gffgmigf-A X 7-, eg .gpg gii4gg?'igf3??' 'lg u .. ' -is Q n .ni . , are hi ,v ,7 Z yr? '7li Lg gd I Mill UH I 1 Ll-.-:fi A ,-' 'ii-A? , gif-4'4" 25' '-e -f-:':-'A-'LL-"i, Haha?" fitlliil E- - 'Sd os- t 'il if -- '25,-Jail JE. -' L 1 ' L . ' ff '1'lB J 375 ' .1 ,:f 1.45, Si jbq l o 1-. , , WILLIAM WALLACE SCOTT GORDONSVILLE, VVIRGINIA Class Football Wig Card Comnnitloc 121, Class V-ice-Presiclcnlt UQ, Empcrl Riflcmazlg Pistol .Mfl7'7t7.S77lGll,' Cup Committee KSU L22 flj. Just give him ai chance and Scotty will tell you that "Between the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Piney Woods is ii strip of land called the Styx, where they have the inost beautiful women in the world! " And that means that the men-and boys- have to know their stuff. Undoubtedly this is the reason Scotty always makes suvh a ' 'Scottyu hit with the girls, no nintter the continent or eliine. How often have we heard them whisper shyly, "'Oh, I like Scotty! He is so young and boyish!" "Young and boyish?" Well, yes, but he's old enough to be ex-Honorary President of-the cele- brated V Club. Dealing in the superlatives of his life and chamcter we might go on to tell that the hardest day in his life was when his One And Qwe had hoped, but doubtedj Only sent him a wedding an- nouncement, his greatest weakness, sleep- f'Hey, Fairbank, how much more time have I g'ot?',-5 upperniost on his mind, Gor- donsville fried chicken, Gordonsville girls and the Tactical Officer. Although he is fanned as a gallant and well-known as a gentleman, we can always best picture hini as the freckle-faced, bare- foot boy paddling around in the mud Hdown thar in ole Virginnyf' True southern in style, damning Yankees and New England XVGU.ti1G1', a, hale fellow is our Vice-President, the Baby of '27, ---- Lf- :L W-... 1: '51, ,A , ., . e A M , ,, , 1 -. i-:" 1-fax-- -sv--V W- -- -U . , A 4 fi 4 ,,,2.5:.r. ,, l - sz J--A ' Y ,,-.1.,a.a:.n:s:?L:li.? ,Avg Y Y- :L I 3 asa?-Qrirriefifl ' L 1. ij iie T' if f..' ,-:E-E?f:-L. ff?f.4 ...- ff L - gr- A -it , Liz, ., if 'i T" ?f'1? Y ' "E -1:25 fig" C,-R-: , . i if -i 'We' - H 24 eil ' 'if if 1 '5 3 - i ..: A f i " ST' ' '-- Y X11 Nc Y"Q"'l"" ' JOHN LUTHER STELNMETZ W f BALTIMORE, MIARYLAND X lp, ' Sclzlolarslzip Star KZQJ Ri-jlc Marksmang ' , O? Q Pistol Bf!1f7'7J.S"llLll7L,' Class Football f3j f2jg 3 l Football flj. f K' i jar!! J f-rl We dedicate this page to the undvino' i ."-731 ' b A "" 43 ' ml honor :uid oft' sung glory of John Luther 1 ' i Steininetz, one of that original triulnvirate '55 of hardy souls who, during their first few ix months of Coast G'ruzu'ding, undertook the i job of keeping the Groton Ferry off the Q ll Qfinzincialj rocks. Later Jack shifted the ll location of his by-play and since then he X has been delving into 1ife's mysteries in l Mystic QConn.j. The motto of "the eternal kid" seems to be "A playinate in every port and two if they live on opposite sides I, bg ' 'Jac7.c" f'L'lttlc Rascal" of town. " We rather expect the little dears J 17 nj4I,liJ will get together some day, find out his 55,157 2 " inconstancy and pull his hair for hini, by way of 7' .. N, I , Y K Y . X 4 reparation. ,erik 2 Jack went out for Track in Swzib Year and con- I ' scientiously trained for the high jump on the Lower 'nf ' -L 4 Gate during the rest of his czrdetship. For three il H KM' ba seasons he has played :L fast gridiron gzune and done W big things toward giving the Class Team Z1 forinicl- able offense. 4 Vile named him "Little Rascal" only after listen- ing' to his wild stories of insinuated Wilder tinies in A Norwich, New Bedford and Philly, but it is our 5 honest opinion that these tales are but fancies gar- 'E nered from the little blue books that line his shelves, , i r Hx 1 X Z E' fl lily if lm lt .fl llll " W EN i ,4 -- 92 f , - s . i --1 i .i A- , , A ,L V 5 4 1-,TP-fiifl -17, lifn 17,19-fffgglzi f f fzifg,-fflggig.-if -'-' 1 ' 2' f' ' f J' - , ?j , 17 f- F- fifgjg igfggi?? , p 4 if i' by ' - f"'ffeff0 "-11151 -' 21- .,-. W1 fait A lain, 'HW31 I Af- - -' " 1 ' , E -,ui " J I l EDWARD HODGES THIELE VVASHINGTON, DIs'rR.1cT on COLUMBIA XL' Orclwstra K3j MQ fljg Class Football f3j ' E f2j ,' Expert Riflemang Pistol Eacpertg Base- -5 ball K3jj Basketball f3j 122 fljg Company fi I 5 C0'I7l1'l7ZfCl'I1dC'l' flj. ' pf., ' W 4' 1 5: , . , . . y t N Here s to Eddie rll1lGlC'-d1'1VC1' of tl1e OILC' -si.,-iv Q ? lunged hack! "Anybody wanna ride uptn W Q Collieh? Two bits! " Two such rides and ' W f Room 8 buys Zll10iLl191' tire. lx This old 1neal-l1ound has guzzled 111o1'e i wutHes yll, scup skoff at tl1e Third Congre- ' ffational than an other 1111111 ill tl1e Class. C- Y Whatever may be said' to the eontrary in other sections of this book his favorite I remark is, "Jeeze, get Sl.lllll1101'6 slum!" After Z1 eon1n1a11d like that just try and pry NEW, HEdlH0,, 7 7 - H . ,, , 4,21 'jg him away from the 111ess-l1a.l1! , ff F? vtjltx Lg D' W by He's a 'n1a11ha11dle1' and a woman- inf ' ' ' , IVN- trainer from ,way back-'way back ,- yonder ill the cave-dwelliiig age. Eddie , fa, - , ' I.. h' "fd 14 can take care of anyone that plays next 3,34 s r , -, N to him 011 the basketball eou1't, and 011 , E gifih' .4-if the back seat of a Ford-well! "Han 'Q' W 1 - i t J Q, bor no illusions! " the boy's just l1ot-t0- 1 , if death! Q by To l1i111 we give the praise of leading , V, ...1 j jfij.-'f us as in 'tl'111111pl1 111 tl1e "Big P-rades" "W 'A' f ,. 'fl " gg. -if ,ef ff. I -review"-ft-.sae . . T . A 1 x of Philly and lXOl'XV1Cl'1. For two years K! " -'----. and a. half lEd and Pop Glynn ran a .E kb A close race fox Company Coinniander, and N wk "V" A, only an early graduation kept 11s 'from XX1fllGSS1Hg 0, 1160 anc nee 111s1 o I - After the 'tGZ1111,S t1-1p to Detroit 111 Wi , A '25, Edfs favo1'ite 1llClOdy was "Sweet 1 4 217--' ....3 Arabella. Made 'L Fool Outa Me " but N i ' ' . ' X i 3 Z 5 ,.t.,g3g122 ,, l1e wonwt tell why. Suffice lt to say that ,Q f E P ?1"l7. ever since he's been a sterner el1a1'aete1', 1 UU 1 - ,. - Q m IV R' bowed wlth the guef of O11e Big A 'Ml f yll! 1 'QW WV e expect him to Glld l1is days either .Jil . Wi .il in the Service or feebly driving a Ford f'?-'ff' up and Cl0W11 "F" Street, Washing- '1 ,nfs-1,4 2 . VL! V 1 f ton, D. C., 111 Search of the 'fperfect ' ' WOIHHIL77 1.2:f-m-k:.q.-ff-- - , -. . l f ig, ,Q ge L Q 1 ' 1 -fa: 51: i s ' fla g Ear-if-EQ, i s 'fi F.A3fQegliff1.T?f irlifffif T T f 'ET'475if?T'-Af? il f J ' ' ef--'ff V-,- 7-L--7:-1'-55: - ---.gizlqr -'F-1 AV jg-' ,Vg - 3 - 12: '-1 N-T -1 L f - 'F-:L-Jim if-' 'ir ' - - 1' I Y?" 1 T- s-.. 3-'Q 1 ' - -if A ee --setaewef l I I r - Tl I 2 LESLIE BLISS TOLLAKSEN y SEATTLE, WASHINGTON l. l l- Baseball L32 fljg Class Football f3j f2j,' ' Orchestra LSU f2j fljg Cofmmancler, First Platoon Nj, Yell Leader USU Kej fljg Class Sergecmt-at-Arms fljg Rifle Sharp- i i sltooterg Pistol Expert. l L 7 ' ' 'A' ' l This old reprobate is none other than the 5 i handsome hero of many an affair of heart A and hand, Leslie Bliss Tollaksen. ' N o session is ever complete without Tollie to give the Seattle point of view. No city ever had a more loyal song he's told us so many tales of the West and of how this or something else is done in Seattle or the University of Wasliington that 'we're all just about ready to pack up and go West, 4. L-3 "Cossae7s" "Tollile" 'fLa1'1'y" young man, go NVest. Vile almost regret ,ig f7 -if-l 0 that he didn 't go into the real estate game. igq fix ip As a dashing young Lochinvar he's laid waste to three coiitinents fm, Q, Y . and our own fair coast. If the '1'ranseontinental had stopped long -fm f 7 E g and often Cnough when he came east he'd probably have scorched a multitude of towns and hamlets all the way across, causing great - is devastation and uncounted love triangles in the Middle West. - fe, 2 ... " ' All during his incarceration within the barbed wire fence inelosure li N , i 7 Tollie has been giving his best to cadet activities, Whether bucking "l- qp -"" 1 I lilz.. tl1e line or leading the Corps in cheers. Wliy did We choose him , W Sergeant-at-Arms? Alia! His glorious, great, Western he-manli- i - -1 xl ness marked him out as the only mortal who might prove competent E 4' to quell the rabid mob. That his tenure of this office has been as "i.1 f"' K ga f successful as all others is attested by the fact that upon one occasion ,:,,,, 5 . ' he almost succeeded in piping down the Man from Pocatello. I L ' N Greater success must needs be attributed unto the gods. A 5 . N? 751 i , y , y 1 i y ,XX Elm E' lil U GI -, , 1 - " r Vi' llllll lil i lwl . if 'f T-1' series-ei:'1-iiiieaai'-5"1e42 f as 2 jg:-fe-J Y :LTI f illii ci: ' 'Q 3 Q f 21, ,Q .. f-- V 4 1, 41? 1" f' ftm- A-22 Sim - sf Af,-' ' Q .fr 'lgzr-' ' X' fi "'f5'4:5I 'I -I z-f""' , A ' - , , eeim limit x .ki - s 5 tl ' or 1 - .f ms- ' MN gal 41 f 1 . :ji rf, - 1, '. t ., P, .5 L:-5, 55:35 , I. v-f.,1,Y-.,1iiiQiif'fQt---V. 1 f .. I v lg 5 x is ll 'ix WLM' lg il Q s l i l l FRED PAUL VETTERICK STATEN ISLAND, NEW YORK S6'7l'0lIl'l'S7l'll7 Star Mjg Rifle Marl.:svmdng Pistol Marlcsmczng Football fljg Class Foot- ball K3j f2jg Baseball f3j Ulf Class Score- tav'y-Trcasurer f2j fljg Tide Rlps Stayf. The lure of travel has ailwuys had its hold on Fritz. During his early years Staten Island proved too small for our wanderer so he made numerous excursions to the U. S. via "South Ferry," gaining, thereby, much experience in the ways of the outside world. Even now the Wanderlust crops forth on liberty days and the "Old Mun of the Groton Ferry" gets uuotlrer nickel. Friday, the thirteenth of February Q'25j, marks the golden page in Vett's life-'twzrs then he started the now well-worn route Y 3 Ulm-mf' ffvmff I , 'ug 1 4 ue? from the C. G. A. to Groton. When asked U7 wish? ,. , about that night he replies in his Qinimitablej Dutch accent, pl '- i "Dot was fine' H 5 ll Y N fi. ' ' F ' On the truck squad, Vett was "all there," doubtless because - NLE. 'V,.qi fTl ' of the excellent training he got by trying to get in on time 9 ' ' 'I' ,iff J from liberty. For two seasons he llGlCl.ClOXV11 second base on F' -QL 6' I 2 the diamond, and in football he has done his bit well. During " 'El ,gi , the pust two years he has become n fixture as Class secretary- Jf Emi, ' treasurer. fy' 'i 4 Vett is one of the most unassuming and "regulation" men l' A in the Aeadeniy, well liked by ONE and ull. Just say the A f word, old fellow, and welll be ready to cross swords at the L 1 door! .E E , A X , E 1 I ee 2 ll Q tx H :Q -', . .- - i - tlflwlf E llllll i fflll . Nl ii i I Qua il e , 1, f'Fb2f 'eff e Ai Y-12 i-2--:ag Z' Zi T75 2?-f i 19 flu +gg JfQg'fgeQ,5gfQgfi1gsg 473 ' ' l l l - Y ' gf - , ".-,Hifi ren. 7 Y '- --f"r 7 -F,--ffki, I ,QNX 13 a p i: ' A 'iefiif "Nl 1+ A Q, 9 1 , 7 ij... 'if Q Isle- ll if " l lgfjg? ' ,Vw -f ' 1 l EX , 3 1: RCLL CALL OF L THE CLASS OF 1927 Richard L. Burke Vernon E. Day Donald E. McKay Harold S. Maude I f , 4 . 1 grl 6712 Clarence F. Edge George M. Phannenmiller gn 1? ,fp 1 up , "4 iq f xr S. Hadley Evans John J. Purcell ir Y :ALL J. Edwin Fairloank John NV. Ryssy Y ' f Qu W A. Lawton Ford NVilliam T. Schellhous 3 Reginald H. French Win. Wallace Scott John A. Gllynn John L. Steinmetz z George F. Hicks Edward H. Thiele A 1 I Joseph A. Kerrins Leslie B. Tollaksen EE Stanley C. Linholm Fred P. Vetterick N fif ll N7 jo 2 5 D ilfhiwxf , 'HH fi! " J 3 , , . MM, I ff:il 4 'ix XM.-:1kl'L1':.DJ,. .1 Q V-JJ Y --5 Cz? Y ' .- f -'F 'T - ' 2' i-'gb- - :in i 8?f5?b,ff,, U. .C.G.5J - 51 ' Sli? Ink Vi 153331 1+ ' fx -A ' ' J' -il -3 V 99- " - , 23? f ' fl - A -Q Y lk X l el. 3 ku ' if A kg? W bil... 1- L - I 'T ,Q Q ff ? W x. ml A WW 4 4 nh ' CASUALTIES Robert Alth auser Harry Anderson, Jr. Langford Anderson David Armstrong George Bowerman Daniel Brady Albert Buseher lVhittmore Butts James Carolan William Chase Aubrey Dodson George Ericson XVillia1n Fields George Gahn George Gjoerloff Brendan Greeley Vance Hill Samuel Latta, Jr. James Lee Marshall Locke, Jr. Ashby McGraw Albert Meyer Elbert Molner Clinton Nolan Robert Randolph Charles Smith James Smith Bartus Spicer Joseph Tompkins Alton Velia Herbert XValsh Howard lVise ,921 5 'EZ Al ?,f"f, . z. el '7 525 55 ii "' Ahh 1 X ill LQ?-1' ,QL l Ted Griesenbeek Harold Zahl Marvin Hall , CS' V QE 2 5 U lv I V1 Ill" I 'ld Vlillil ' Jiri, ll ffz iffffffii 2375221 ggiggeif fees Q i-11.gfiT?Liff- ie., fin- , K P 'E VN I fi 4 4,,, XX XMJlf'W g imgmifwixi ff .Q is ,X VFW M5515 nm M' M MM If 59 ' ' 7 5 E! 5: "2 3 V, '-K :EW Q Q Q E in 3 '- 5 M,1Q1Q Q SP up 5' X ua- 5 A S 5 QW no '-N . , G Q-H Ayr!! 1 Q 'T Q' W5 .WAXL I 'O M fl just fr Pu W5?'fj ' M Wlrw HW Hr' ' .Ml rr! K -at ,SNIA . T X V WM 33? ?' M? 'QMIIW M , , ,.,. ,. , .,..,,4 ,1 i ' -, 5, f- Yi Ci Y , -- :ri if YY A , 4g-S Y - Q- . V , ' A - :4-A-Y ' i ' -- 'miseiz f ,,, Y- 3, Ib, ' ,Y - Y- g i -'?Lt':,E7-'i"'?3iJtQ:?:'L:1"l-Tkggjs? W Q1- 1 K gkkiix N y - S 1 ' QQ -5 !,Al 'il' E .gpm I ,, :TQ ' 'F, f , 'gr 'J L -S , f ' .. 4: , " f- FK SU, ' 1 :L-3'ff-nf'-,leLf??',"' - :,, 1 K 44" X' f is-4 f 1-sf' f -fi? g :s f 'S S - ,..u.,,, A 4 14 :-if f an 'J LJ 17 .115 Q gvw g? , 1 I v! R JJ' ,xo ea E f ' '- Q li THE SECOND CLASS I Yfllu A Ja X X v W! C S , XR in IW 'HUM' eq? 7 ff f . -d-,4- F 'ish -W 1 f"f-7- ,f - , -3 -W -----W---Huis, 1,47 -f .'-- I- W- Y 4 '5' . ,J Z I5 ir 7'i -'Ll - - gi, . -5-:T -- ' gig, Wg , F Iflfl ,I'- - --H -, - ?,,,f Y .-1f...fQ- 1: 'S 'ET T QF 21 if fl -L1 A-Aj '75 4 -'T- ' li ,V 7 f Llffzf-Q, 6731" -53599 ?f: ! if? -,A ,145 7, . , -T ha , , 1 1- ff S - ,f 5- ,if"?3f :J 1? ,Fl-I-' .V,V S113:1i5a ff f X Z:-3 Y f-+ ' ' .V LEL5 ' uxziiifkf Y Y 5 Q kinky! li ' U, .c.G. ' -'fig -f l . X X E., '- 11: :fx 1-55:-,z-:X , .4 A . ..-A - 1 A. ,gx A. X 'ff' 5' -J-.- .UW QF- iff' "' f:f.1, ' TJ gf - " " S ' W Z 4? 3543? .5 -Ar .-:fy . - 2 5 4 Ln 176 O 9 X tw xl ' 4 ww.. vt' 4: . fi, mf. , X fb. ,fx 6 E 2 M H. mr A ff 'J 'M .IYX A 5. CLASS OFFICERS XVATSON A. BURTON Vice-President G. FRANCIS CARLETON Treasurer DALE F. CARROLL Prcsiclcnt '95 , ff. Al Y 'f'-ai? S. FRANCIS GRAY Secretary A-7 ' '7 7.x 64' 555 C7 Y im m Lrg' Em I1 -A JOHN S. COLE - M avstev'-at-Arms ,ff : I - .xi-, Wg E 53 fi., ,153 ' f ff. A- 3' L? -Q S , i ' 1-3-A' A F :ff .,,,,.,',. X if i f -54-??5N7 i l , Q ff?-Wav GR it - " 5 1 'if sf il Q ,, in-5 . ' ir f e :e v 4 I E - l lx f l le' lx 2 1 if .n Al 1 .Qs -, l f l o N X X l -'Q x ilu 3 5- ex i i L7 17 in ,ll v ' lt ,531-si A - X Standing-IVIEYER, CHADXVICK, MORINE, SLADE, ROMMEL, HOGAN, Rnoons. 1, J Seated-Conn, WHITE, BURTON, OLSEN, CARROLL, BIALEY, GRAY, CAPRON, GARLETON. P f rf ' FOLLIES OF 1928 , l X ' "Permission to come aboard, sir?" ,N l I ' 1 n v ' ' 5 "Hi there, Jimmy, old man. You sure as hell ean. I'll be off Watch in Just Wm Q a minute. Then we'll drop down to the wardroom for refreshments and a con- fa U fab. It's been a long time between drinks, eh What?" It W iffull' Fifteen minutes later Jimmy Austin and Red Parker, Class of '28, were busily engaged in animated conversation while refreshing themselves with coffee and toast. l l "That reminds me," said Jimmy, interrupting a remark of Red7s, "of our l f S -'I ' ' , ' ' i . 5 , - ., A .,.., A W1 f o e 3253?it-oTi?T5?3E'5ooileeil 2JQfi-... Jff Li Zi eg-I-mfr?-?'fl'4+?'-7 'W ' ff- f - ' r ' ' 5 ,fi , f--T - gf " 'lege - In 1335-3: aid 3 '2'i-L-'ea ' .X 5 l-L-5 - QA- 1. ,lf 446217, "o. .c .5,I' 1 Q A A eff .1 H- is 'I H2 any fr. C 523, 24 :1 l X f"'. f ' L.. --I-L-11' gxfav' . ' ::.,ff-il- ELSQQW - irst sunnner at the Academy when the Line cruised to Europe and the Engi- neers stayed behind. Do you remember the time Fritz Mathesonintended to drag to an informal in his sideear?" - 'L 'Us guys what's done bin brung up right,' " reminisced Red in reply. V , "Yes, I do, and also the occasion when George Hulst pulled the old trick of 5' X- 'looking for Iiusk.' " L21, '4The bunch never was ver f much in love with work. Our shift s fstem ?ff' -' 2: 5 3 . fs - , . if 2 usuall f took care of that, The smoke stack and stone walls called for in 'enuit f ig- 5 8 5 :ff gf in the fine art of 'dead-beating,' all right." I "Stone walls-," mused Jimmy. "They were the cause of much impatience and exasperation, as for instance: 'Don't get red in the face, Mr. Carleton. Q Itls not going to do you a bit of goodf " "O ie also found out that Mac didn 't care to stand in front of a '45.' " P "lVIac's a bear on discipline. Tactics never fazed him, either. Do you remem- ber, Jim, when he said: LVVe are now going to have a competitive drill. Mr. Peachey, fall out?' " T. "He never locked the barracks doors or windows from the outside at night, 2, though," added Red. ,QQ ff "5 "I wonder if Kenny Maley still has a fondness for straw hats?7' ' 53 5' I H' xi . . . . . I in " e i , "I don't know about that," replied J immy, lighting a 'satisfier ' "but I do Fl' ll t ' AIEIX know that Dale Carroll thought that fish had a fondness for green eggs, whereas, . r I . V N iw for awhile, Hans Slade found sleeping in a hammock about as engjoyable as H mie's nightl rest back at the Academ Y." '- Y e Y 5 l A l i C F E IE! af .92 "That Third Class cruise was all new sights and smells. Were you around when Capron sighted a fire on the horizon over a thousand miles from shore which turned out to be the moon?" asked Red. "I was there,7" replied Jimmy. "I was also around when the starboard watch sighted the turkish baths at the Imperial Hotel in London. It was quite refreshing. ' ' - ' "I heard that some 'fine looking young men' tried to get away with salad forks in Simpsons but didn't succeed. Is that right?" "It is, and that same n-ight they had an American ride down the Strand to the Regent Palace. Upon arriving there they had no recourse but to walk back to Russell Square. In the meantime, John Cole was finding 'it' in the amusement park at VVembley." " 'You eawnt miss it,' ' ' laughingly quoted Red, 'abut we missed 'it' most of the time except when Hogan saw the whole darned town from 10,000 feet." "I dare say there was plenty to see at the 43 Club," added Jimmy. "It was there that: Alsop almost obtained his fill of cheese sandwichespand beer-'a ft .4 V its ,xv ,ff .ff 1' , 2 V-...a 4 53:2 'H 1 t ""' Q- -V, " .. ... " H -,. . . , , .1 4 I W A f- ez '?, Yf'-ali--'12 -Q' --f if f- ' jj ' nj: . f E73 jj' 1 - T1 ag -f?11.1F, 'fag I " ' '- :gli .2 ii- ..L,5h",e 1-'jg ,ggi 1. fl 1, gli-rf--,L f..f 'Y 82,2251 I 'Rjj5'f:-it 'ff' 1 :r'-'T' ' "iJ5QY"'fwf-.:Ti.?"7 f T,.e1:"1 ' 'J " K "rf , J' If.--T-iff: ' ' 75iL'L sf - if ,L .... T -H- tsr f it -is np' 'VN 256 ,ff 1.1 gg v, 'aaa .C , ,nine 5 "?:'-izrkfiaf-1 232' repast fit for a kinglg Hogan won a tilt with the 'Royal Flying Corps'5 Harry Proctor mingled with royalty 5 and Sammy Gray proved himself to be a finished "A rare place, Hlld. by the way, have you forgotten Pearl and May?" "No, I have not,', Jimmy answered with emphasis, "and I'll wager that there :25f',,i5 15. ' all 'ull ' f f., ll? . 1: :afraid fQiE,rass ,.,i f-www-9 I , 4 Y 1+ - - . ' E25i2LQigf.g15'1gEEg, i escortf' e ri? x i .xn ' , s l l 'J lt LJ , rw It xii ' W 1 ffpfisnif 1, are four other men in the class who haven 't forgotten them, either." "Paris was the dive, though. It rightly earns its name the ',world's capital of pleasure,' but how tl1e Parisians love to 'work' an American! Fourth of July and the Montmartre was full of them. Not only was it full of Americans but full of skillful little gold-diggers, also. Ask Ted VVhite who played Santa Claus at the Moulin Rouge to the extent of 100 francs-grief and disappoint- ment were his only rewards." "XVasn't it Alsop who found that sleeping with a First Classman was no handicap 'Z " "Yes He overcame handicaps. 'It's just the principle of the thing-,' Hogan and Gray would tell you. You might sum up Paris as: combien this and combien that. H "That also applies to Gibraltar where no quarter was given the native mer- chants. It may have been 'Fleet XVeek' but by a little 'jewing down' here and there we managed to extract a good many trinkets for little more than nothing. Gib offered little of interest except what might be found in the dens of Spanish Town." "Cadiz-cherchez la femme-or 'have they any water in this town?' " quoth Red. "WVasn't it there that Peanuts Morine was temporarily disappointed in himself ?" V '25 , :Z n YE? 1: ,Q- -,,: 5 7 ,, ,7 X4 K 2 'ff C il. Y f at Fifi ll 1' 9. -. A "Yes, and it was there that John Laverty showed a fondness for una ehicita, A l Bohunk Preboske realized a blighted love, and several proposals of marriage were rejected!" ' "Cadiz and Gib ruined us so badly that we had to use socks and cigarettes 5 for legal tender in Madeira. XVe were lucky there wasn't much doing in that portf' ' "Madeira was no bargain, but Bermuda was another story. Pay day and the ,tx Q American House, featuring 'Mr. Thomas Collins and company' as the impulse, in with the VVindsor Pahn Gardens and the Inverurie, scene of the missing hats, sa. W as the aftermath-little resistance in that program was there? Remember how 11,1 W r, we topped it off with the soiree at Point Pleasant and our very hot cutting system at the hop aboard ship? Then-home!" "It was only New London, but what a welcome sight! The first train out was too slow for me." 5 i 'i 2 . ,gf M Aff' I X- P-A -I -' .41 ft' SEE?-tw ' - ' il iw'W"- lF'1- A1:,G- ' I ' 5 nf l F1261 " . 1 ' I Ei r i fii?ig- If 'W .fda Li ' S I ,W .g J- 5 , :rbi .fn vang. fl l 1 I J W Y UI was damn glad to get back to the Academy in a way, Red, and a bit sorry l I too, after a Hing at the :gay and irresponsiblef but what a remarkable contrast i it all was to our Third Class academic year !" - ' HOI1. that year had both its hi0'l1 and low s .mots-besides it went b f faster than ' 1 I C 1 D , Q, any year Ilve ever experienced,l' replied Red. "Just the same, I was glad to - I have it behind me " 4 Aditi '4Bfuq 1 ' f 1 J' Y "a . -1 ' . - Kaffe 5 e nay, in eiiuptec nnmy, o you iecal the time the coral dis- I. gi? 2 TF .ZW rg? 1? E I ef' c, f T fy QD M a in NJ -1 , , QW a., appeared 02 It appears to be quite a mystery yet." I "Mystery, or no mystery, it saved us from enough work. The week ends usually made up for the work, though, whether we were on the grade or notf' '4That reminds me that Slade wasnit on the grade one liberty night but I guess he thought he was on the down grade when he crawled into bed with his clothes on!" ' 'L If he was on the down grade, Tom Roinmel certainly avscewclcd rapidly every Saturday nightf ' 4'Opie rarely missed Tom's speed, either, if I rightly recall some of those hectic evenings in the old barracks. NVhat about the night the inspecting oticer found two in a bed and one underneath it?', "I'll never forget that event," replied Jimmy, in a burst of laughter. "I was in the locker at the same time. That was when Archie Burton and Bill I-Iogan ravenously devoured a cake of soap between them. But say, what time is it? I can 't afford to miss my train to New York." " 'IVhat time do you want it to bel ?-as John Cole would ask,7' queried Red. Tia t p y . is L '7 55. 1' itil, s. 'tBetter stick around, You have two hours yet." 'lOh, all right then. I'll do that but if I miss that train it will be as bad as the night I stayed in the Third Class Hospital ward in Room 21. Iid have the A Y Quack treating me for an incurable case of breach of promise." y I 'LAs bad as that, J immy? I-Iope it will be nothing like the Capron-Slade set-to's of yore." , "No, not as bad as those," answered Jimmy, dragging deep on his old cob pipe, "but I seldom get much leave and I'd hate to take any the way Pete 1 Pierson took his or even as the unlucky I4 who took 'basketball liberty' one y X ' timef' X gym Q "That about finished academic year for me until we sailed through the Light- qi A house Inn episode and left for Parris Island on the 'Alex Ham' in a haze of VV WU 'MQM Joeis brand." "Parris Island-hot as hellfdusty-sardine sandwiches-and marines," i mused Jimmy, "but I regretted leaving there even if We were going to Bermuda. X They certainly treated us right-with the dance and all." ' I 'c tt r -t '. -- e c :+I-:sfo 'figgjlii sin -er 2 aav2?fJ ?ix1i.t N ' -We . .1 'l l 1 .leie ik iiifslif " ri"-" i "IVhat with sleeping on the dock and in the day coach at Port Royal, not to , mention the Beaufort hospitality, especially appreciated by Bill and Sammy, the Al little blue-eyed buck-dancer, it wasn't such a bad stop at that." lg" "They were all married but one. That didn it seem to faze Ted any, how- ' ' Via ever, " added Red rather vaguely. Ill, .- "Bermuda with 'Miz Tom Collins? again entertaining lavishly at the tavern ' of His Highness 'The Roya.l Prince' was the fulfillment of all my dreams on the ' W '-a 2 5: ' r'fle range. Dry 'l-oh my!" moaned Jimmy. 1 23 " 'Rifrhtl Right! That's a hot onel' Bv the way, 'Mint Juleps and lVIoonlight 13 .- Bathing' or 'ItIogan7s Downfall' would be a fitting title for the St. George party." "Bermuda put us in trim for Halifax, it I remember rightly, even though it Ii t rn. It meant nothing to was only for strawberry shortcake at the Green an e John exce t a. missing tooth. This loss didn 't shake his usual in 'enuity ver f D ' . ' " l bv. much because he found a convenient alley when authoiity passec , Remember il ' ' fx KZ' 1 p ,gg "Check! Plenty can happen in Halifax. Jimmy. If you don't think so, fx, ,7 explain why Ham, Sam and Ted left St. Mary 's Canoe Club so fast that night." ga y? flllxkfv "Halifax wasn't so bad. Quite a contrast, in fact, to Rockland, To my, gf Y 'ff M ' mind about all of any interest that ha.ppened there was John sighting the port 'IAM . :,y.iTL.Q., running light of the Samoset IIotel.' ' "You're right about Rockland but Slade and the rest of the quartet claim W - that in Portland a small apartment is just the thing for a big party. Some were M' disappointed. though, if testing Bermuda Special in a hammock is an indication of despair." 4 "I can't say Boston was so hot, either, Red. Everybody broke, you know. Al H Didn't cost Ted NVhite anything, however, when company unexpectedly showed K up alongside on a barge. " ' "Everyone was looking forward to pay day, the Sesqui-Centennial, and the , banquet in Philly about that time, Jimmy, so being broke didn't mean so much. The banquet was plenty compensation even though Tom, with tremendous will l power. kept his pledge." . . ' C "Rhodes didn't have any pledge to keep, and wasn't the least bit backward 1 gym Q that evening," added Jimmy. "I-Ie and Capron later found life in a taxi-cab ig ,L rather rough, I understand, but after the final toast was given the others found IW nj JQ,iilll,.li slumming more than educational. It was then that Dale Carroll lost his mem- bership in a certain well-known Academy organization, wasn't it?7' X "Yes, I think it was. I don"t recall whether he treated New York with the same respect that he accorded Philadelphia or not. Tom, however, found f ::1'?-- to A cafe' ' -G-:faire i i .. ll lf l Greenwich Village far from boring. He and Ted were so interested one night l l X that they made the ship in a '75-footer' next morning, barely in time for i ' yi breakfast." - , fi X "New Bedford came across for all hands in fine style even though Tom, Arch, I Z X- and Hans found realization ratlier less interesting than anticipation. Albeit, R Olsen and his cohorts discovered that a certain phase of sociology was worthy of study if not of experimentation." f x "So I understand. Walter, and the licensed fussers reported investigation ji ? profitable enough in Newport if Chaddy's 'gun deck? reeitals bear any weightf ' "I well remember when Chaddy returned from Second Class Sep leave in body only, you might say. Again, 'cherchez la femmel' " "I guess he wasn't the only one afliicted, Jimmy. Even Al Meyer can be accused of that. -Vile had reason enough to forget Sep leave temporarily, though. Wliat with a few studies, decorating for dances, and wielding the heavy hand of discipline, our time was well cared for. To Ted life proved so arduous that he . took time off to philander a bit among the 'angels of mercy,' while John, over- fi 4 anxious, unintentionally Kjumped ship.' " f 57 ,.i'in,3 7, XX Il ' it fifiiiilfgzi K A I 5 I A ll f Q iii 2 M it ,i lllllll 'fThat's J ohn's usual luck but Dame Fortune was with him when the Vice Squad raided the stockholders' meeting of the P. P. and P. Club. There was much wailing and gnashing of teeth that night but-il fait rien. lt wasnlt long before 727 handed the reins, over to us and then it was all over. I'd like to reminisce a bit over our First Class year but I really must be running along now, Red." ' "'Well, Jimmy, it's mighty good to have seen you and talked over old times. Give my regards to 'any of the gang you run across and-be good!" T "Righto, old man. Same to you. S'Long!" Q' G' C in Y k All - Q Wi, - s 4 l its El fl fl 4 lxllll ll I A G14 W E -1 -2 ,, M. H J , ,g f f ' " 'E' L' L' "'g' J'nt" t " 'Z ' M - --- ' J "ee -.mn .1-51: -6 ' ---' -'-- f -- - -11 Af 1 ' --f ' n ffff -ff' .1- f' 2. rr fn, , .cf 4-3' , , , .- , -f Y QT - 1, - - YY -'f::----""'5f3f-M: W. Y ...-.. 12211 Tr -1 .',',gK if ? ?5 j515:"T'5f'?ZQ.l :lm 1: --,i ff' "1 ?T3'i E il ' hi? .41 - Y rv - -- T - -"ln - il-1 -1- 1 1, '15-tr 4 Y 71- -11,5 Agsff Y -- in r r in T , 7 I if :gnc .r J 'Q' EQ 5, if 'if' 4 Q ,J 77 If YZ 4 1 4 5 fmf? I , I, I I ' I ,IA I I Qu IIII I fp rf f - ? H. if 5 ! , 15 1 dgfhff ffuwh I WNW Q - wif' , ' lg .,.A, -5 ,M f - E' nh- , I Afgn 'gi fl :Q 3,9 ' j I I IEE? CLASS 5 v - ZZ E I I X I 1, 142 I OFFICERS I i' ' ? fri? , , I II I II. QLIVER A. PETERSON I1ARRY A. LOUGHLTN II: I Vice-Presiclfmt SUUTCMTE! ,gf In U' 27 j'! CJ 47 If? M 7' ' 'D 57' ' '11 D' LI. X, L7 Y I Qu .fp III' - , - -- X JAMES G. VVENDLAND Prcsiclmzt is ,A gf IE E "II, IIIII GARRETT VAN A. GRAVES EDWIN J. ROLAND I Treasurer .Master-at-Arfms ,N I 51 5 . ' I . . ' " ' 4' , f A 'E ., g.1..... " "" W ' - --.rch ?q i S S Sff- 12 e if 1, - -Sf "Y ' Q-1? ' , 'igiiw , -' S' ii4 ""L if S 1 1 ' S1 S'SS - 2 Sl - -S 151 A ff' 3 frf l l l ,f '5++2' - . :.:f A -' .it -Q. " 2 Y :f-L' '-LTZ' 'Til' ' M1 4 "-vggeggggzmgmiisggi' J xl ,fi -1:1 f le 1227 E X x'- YF.:- Q? l :EEA .len , , V. .---l 4 4, fl f, t I IQ l f if-55' l 'Q at -Q l l , 7 17 7 nf tri? Cane Y ' J Ill K, gs., . . 25?-3' if ll Top R010-PERROTT, VVINBECK, J ONES, NELSON, TARLETON, TVUENSCH, FRIEDENEUEG, FUERST. J Center R010-BLACK, Tom, GIBSON, MICDIARMID, BORROMEY, ZELLER, Sci-HEEEL., MZOORE. 4 Bottom Row-MERCIEE, Mosslxcuio, LYONS, COLORACCO, HZAXVLEY, DETXTARTINO, ROLAND, " PETERSON. u HISTORY OF THE THIRD CLASS l l 1 . If a story is ever going to begin it simply has to start somewhere, and this X pl EM 2 one might just as well commence with the rainy day that Hfty-three Swabs for Wg U filwf, the first time passed through Fort Trumbull 's gates and huddled together in It will front of the Well-known grey stone walls of the administration building. ' ,pa N XVe had arrived on September second mainly because a paper sent us from Headquarters told us to, and most of us chose one P. M. because We thought that was the safest mean of the twenty-four hours which made that hectic day. p H3523 ' Y' ' 44, Wl 2.6 -'24 lie-Q21 11?'1 Ti' "'?"f- ':"T..iv5?T" ' - , 'gf -T7"Ig.:ii 'M' 'QI i?-iff'-f-2""I'...g-A -3 ' " 2 ff 'T"'?' Y :ji ,....- 2-ifzn ff 7,717 ' L, 2--'if T:"L .. 1737" ii-E? Q, T' 1-A . f, ' 5449: ff ' Left :QA We ll 1 O so 1 tit f fi-evil l - -N E" :ri sky ' " raw" 'qnil ' ' 2 -- H" ' r n. 'sl ms, lt:-x if , ffm? - ' ,iE g wt : ,f zzz! , 195- e. 5529: ff' gn, it : g zffgxi eff li ' ' lf X Al W x- Syd, i 'Ev , gi , 5 3 "3 Q' ' 1,21 , sv ,7 V1.9 ,'7,,rf? ip 'Dv CJ - l - 24 ii, - m e Top Row-BUCHANAIKQ BOXVMAN, MACCLINTON, LOOP, BUTLER, SANDS, SCHNEIDER, Dnuis, RIGHTER. J W Center R010-MILLER, LADD, SEIDEL, CHISXVELL, AVERY, Ross, BEALLIER, PORTER, MASON. I K Bottom Row-WENDLAND, LOUGHLIN, GRAVES, DICK, PIEKOS, MZILLIKEN, LAMBERT, HASTINGS, NILES. I i, f X l Something had to be done about us, so an admiral or yeoman or some such r X f' 5 official gave each man a paper which proved to him nothing more than that he f . - . Ai W WW P was himself, a doubtful honor at that point of a SWab's career. Then His Honor Q, Q U ffHn'wW told us to report to the barracks Cwherever that might bel. Let me state right prim Nil here, that the ecstacy We experienced the moment We set foot inside the last 'Mii mentioned edifice Was at least every bit as great as that Daniel must have known N when he went in for his romp with the lions. To shorten a scene of agony as much as possible, I might recount that the half dozen upperclassmen then present 1 l A , gggg r H r ii elif feng? A i j-iii? gl ' ii-at if 5 jiifigrfggglgg i5i Q Q 1 Q - V gfg- - it: T4-'ei' - J K ljfgs ff g lr, ,Q 1 iff- -,gr-2,1 Ji, ' ", 5 gg ' - -I 5 - 'f'FfIE.'?'-53325:-.f-' -1' , eff- ' . ,fs X15 ' QB ' - 5. N .4 Z, 1 ,r - :I --17 - - - . L71 - -- 4:.-27 il - L ,5 ' N: - ami, jk ,sg fi n- A ii Q HL- It WN , C- .ai rd.. pf Q! f T-' "F z l :gli ' , 1 . 1 ggagg. 5 -:r t I! ziggy l . , . , . l lined us up, frisked us for cigarettes, found how many of us had V's to our , credit for discreditj, asked us myriad embarrassing questions and before we 1 had time to answer any of them, gave us our room numbers and told us to "clean fig' house." W'e swept our iioors, dusted our shelves, and then made our beds with ' ' f such infinite care that the overlords who inspected them hadnit the slightest 'V X difficulty in tearing them apart again. . v - . . 42-lf., Supper came, as suppers will, and we filed into the mess hall. Before being seated we were firmly told to ma.ke ourselves comfortable-but-on only three '- E T inches of chair, one luxury that was to be uniform for us, apparently, ad infinitum. T Our recreation after supper did not last long, for when nine o'clock came we were told to go to bed and not bother to set the alarm as someone would surely , . see that we were called early-what I mean, erzirly, too! The next three weeks tduring which time two of our classmates swallowed the anchorl may be summed into an easy-going schedule of drills, rowing, sea- : L' 1 x.- x. . S A L : manship and signals, with plenty of rest and food thrown in. NVe began to get fat and leisurely, and even to think wc'd run into a good thing. But every, Eden has its apple, and ours was the return of theupper classes. Life now took on a rigid, snappy, and far different aspect. Many of our brethren found it more blessed to "snap ton than "hit the pap," However, there was not one Third Class man whose chest did not swell a little at our first full Corps formation. The erect, military chaps beside us were to be our models and councilors in Academy life and our superior officers in the Service. Some 524' U7 ,7 QTY? cj lrlx " lily 7 M , z . da f the f told us if we were 0'ood Swabs we too might wear two diaffs and N 5 7 3 7 U 7 D D r look dignified. Cheering thought! l .f , September 23 started the academic to operating and us to cursing that foulest , , fiend, Fiziks. Half a dozen stiff subjects set us yearning for the far-off term ' ' end, but our first month's report made us realize that it would probably arrive sooner for some of us than we had thought before. f Q. The first cadet hop brought no end of thrill, since for most of us military X , T ' X X . I a . 4 in Q functions were complete novelties, and, in most cases, our blind drags held no or I small element of mystery themselves. tl nm 1 " . . ' . - . 1"' Vlfhile speaking of exertions various and sundry we must not forget the athletics. Vile are proud to take count of the number of our men in Academy sports and we look forward to a brilliant record for them all. Already several men of '29 have securely grasped enough fame to begin it well. ' S!! -'.. ,: ,,,,,,.,, ',!,..,.,... . .., sara t ff ' " . i - 1 M 1-Esg" rrA - -s t -.ii Q ' Mg-,Bi "":..1- - ra ff- S2 fe ff f 2 -' . 4 PZ" mf f T' 5211 ' .4 I" 'fl "t1'7? e+Q1?.igj: -Z1'1.'? 4 :ipqh . if , ll? 111f5 f-Ei . 'F ?, t- Y Le r -ff i ef- E -e i ff eff :trim--W r- tlf5h.,ige+y ali-A :-I Q 7 Wagyu "Dawg, n c.G.5g - TT Y 'gf f K - - -I -' Inlay 5 li ,ah I lgg :Q-754 ' R V ,I -f -Lriigie 221: 'rfffh-ei,-Nffiler m iigieff it Eff ,l And now half our fledgling term is over. In these few months we have seen our ideas and habits change from those of gangling youths to those of military men. WVe have seen our Classmates make records in soholastiesg we M3 have seen them meet standards in drillg we have seen them set. marks in athletics. ' l lVe are proud of them and of our class and as we look back to what has already lf X - 7 dl a If vel! passed, and ahead to what is held before, we are proud that we are members Bw. pl TE 3' of the Cadet Corps, integral parts of this Service of ours that since 1790 has 5 been noted for its accomplishments and bravery-the United States Coast -2 x ? Guard. ll u ll ll l l l 4- lg Law .1 ' 1 f? 1. 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'lfqthcv I, , XX N fwuijzlh ' J, ' Xxf ff .J A Fme, , "X vf X wwf" 5 Q' A H Q. -' ' X Y f l i ff " EP F , . - fffw -XXX f 'ii if W fff!,!,A K X flf W X l fwf g 'llsllgylrmnl lll lll lllhrlm -'.. I I , X lil , , ff X Q , ll! w1ggff"f' ' ,nf-' 1' 1llV X ,, , X M A A 1 f M49 1 5- I - A X X "-In J" Q f A . .-mag? X t" ff !' '. f N I fl 1. -I 'Z X 1 ' X I A, I7 Z, GX I: I l Z X 'A ll , K 1 -1 J-PY ,lv 1 I4 ' X it -ii'-fn fl . N , 41 15-6 -gg 5 'Q X " ,su S X 1 1 X ff T 1 f f we w. W Y f f Why Mix, U that . , -55 Eg D MP f - gs' . . , ':'1 - ' - --- - -.,-, fm- .. . . , g, 7 ' 1 -ssh A , Q -Y-' - -V ' -- - "-L 1- H wr ,,-.1.- . - .- J. - ' , . ,.f?-'H ' -ff Q- - " if-1'T 'l,,Y E g ' 'gf Y, Ifi, fi - ' I- ' 1,7 i Y ""1--5---f-Zkr'-igggii. 423 --1 , ,Q f-ge fy i Y L i4 41, iw L-Y-ii if-Q - L24 Y- 7 I 7 , i ii' 'V Q -,, -'L-ff ., Y --I '-'-'A-' r 'QQMS-e.-,, api' 3-ik-f: - -. ' 7 ,anis H- QQ? J fi Y ' I -' 05' .f i ff, T fl' -ff lfiif Y, 'f 'f t i f I I ff- i ik V e K X I AE ' '45 In the interests of Service tradition members of the i -6 L? '7' QD W ., HG Class of 1927 take Great pleasure in 0" ' U 757 D C1Vl11b space in their QW? .Q Z1 we fi "Tide Ripsn for the Written story of the Coast Guard. if ' .-A HQ, r .4-11151, 5 .. Z At , i f Q f X is wh li X , 1 K :Lf - , , frzi-Q.4i Agzifhifsfi ,, - ' -- V 1 ' 'J W' - 1 31:1 '1g fQjf V --lg . ,.- ,. , f i f Q' al l fig L' 1' he - 1. ff 5 HISTORY OF THE U. S. COAST GUARD Coast Guardf history divides itself naturally into two phases-records of -fi achievement in times of war and chronicles of service in days of peace. These 1 two phases are equally glorious. For the Coast Guard there is no stagnating M g inaction, her history is written day by day in annals of the nation's glory and in the hearts of seafaring men. In war the Coast Guard shares the fame and perils of her sister maritime service, in peace the "Peace-time Navy" wins victories "no less renowned" than those achieved in war. In our short narration of the Service's story we will treat first that phase which embodies her participation in her country'S conflicts. Since the birth of the Coast Guard, one hundred and thirty-six years ago, no QW national struggle has been waged without her aid upon the sea, no duty thrust QM? j,'J 'DN upon her has been too arduous or so fraught with danger that her men or ships . Ill T have failed in fulfilment of that duty to the ultnnate 'extent' of human possibility. , ' ,Q Back in the days of our nation 's youth, after the dissolution of the Continental ' i Navy, revenue cutters formed the only protection on the sea for American ships ' and seamen. French and English men-o'-war, envious alike, harried the lmer- is chantmen of an infant power. 'LReady" then as Halwaysf' critters chased, caught, and captured eighteen of twenty-two prizes taken, and assisted in cap- turing two of the remaining four. This is the iirst chapter of our history-it is the record set by a fleet of puny 'il f cutters, the largest mounting fourteen guns and carrying a crew of seventy, Ai against ships of war and men long versed in strategic arts of battle. Outstanding among these cutters was the gallant old Pfickermg, which ' during the difficulties with France claimed ten prizes as the foundation for , her everlasting fame. In a day when naval warfare meant broadside to broad- ! V , Q side and gory cutlassing from fo'c'sle to poop, this cutter matched her weakling 'S lg f X strength against that of a super-dreadnought of the age-a frigate, forty-four f 4 'El P guns and two hundred men. Miraculously, the 13'liG7C6T't71-Q won her fight, and S lfllll tml r qu iliI"i' if The Revenue Cutter Service, as the Coast Guard was first known, was organized on ihlllii August 4, 1790, by an Act of the First Congress, approved by President Wasliiiigtoii. The present organization was created on January 28, 1915, when the Revenue Cutter Service and the Life Saving Service were amalgamated under the present name. l . ,. 'Q 'f aff" e if ff. n fgfi - .nAg4.-.--.2-gif-1. v e - S - f fe f ee at ef . e- G L11 -aernfz aan-L,:g7,j:2eff X r f Q gin Q hopes and began our emancipation upon the seas by making the first capture 1. fx E' ,Yi - ' 1 X-5'i4 ':i " Y ,e ' - ' "T-75'.4i ,.-. ft. ' 'T ' , -F-1-Wi Y -T'-if'-.m14lJ:KA f I ' .fa ll -, . - x :I fl- ' 14- 4- 'I' ' . F' if ,ii ff-I' -ef f Tnnaial ' 52 f PYP'-?'f2iv, Anim, i ' U. .C,G, ' , ' ,. - . '- -. 'A 15 ii ir. P- y m. in .. . P -1 A-, 4,5 ' XQQW' -ig! N 55' , 'gf' . ..--.- 131 224' 6 - 'K : iisfri 'ff-KET Ag -Erie' Q?-X C7 mm- 1 2'iY,2q!5 : 'Z , T, 7 - Yipiii SLT E7 ifi I X ' .,i K-r:f:f..as22- r eg srgq--me-Tzmva, -. , ,, .. addedtto Service tradition a tale of patriotism and of valor that may Well inspire Americans as long as Americans sail the seas. Creation of a regular navy during these uncertain times detracted nothing E' from the Coast Guard 's activity in war. Thirteen years after the Piclcerfmg ' 5 X ,,t.y.,rt i .. r.ttt, Al Cf: M ' G t ' 1-ef, k I A I . P tl ' X , Q. : A ' . --' E' A A it . ' A -t-- 4 r is 1: l - V G. E O R G E YV A S H I N G'T O- N, .Px'chdent- of the United States Of-AJHCYICQQQ '5f",.h:,,',.,,1,',, --- ' '-1 . . f,,,. Q, ,A., , ,1,,,,.,,,.,--.-as-----V Q-A ee.: sr,r...,,, X. 2, . : .. ,. 'ro ALL wno smite siiiwrurisfs P'iznszsN'rs, qreiuflivo, H. . K N O W Y E, That rfpoiing ipeciai ffrull :uid'Coofidcriec in the Integrity, and good Cimdoik nf A ii 123254- ' .' 11 .. ' 'fl ' Jyuuyiffmanttsffoiffc N.. A., - ..Q..,, I-um..i-.feng-r qiavqmerinzhe Serviccgofihcvlggiigeii,-graves, QQ i 0 Protvdion of xh: ilcvcriuc 5 and do :xuxhurizc und ciiipowcr-lminikfcieeukc and fulfil the of-dm OPEC: according K0 Lair save ' i, ro new dw Exid uint, with all the Ifights and Emolumcnts lthixeunmlcgallynppcruining, units him dip: faidy is- Qfwirieruf - .wwfbffkV'M'S'f'-fefofifhffigeifeine- .,.y is u . V- ' ,ll, . . ,7 WH ., ' Txsrmony wbclfziff Lau: zqrjhf Leiter: Io be mad: Paimz, andthe Sm! qf :ba B:rsuylc,2j,vrd. gil W 91,145 ' 'N i. 'Given undzrmy l1'anJ, af flu Ciy iyiiladfgabia, 15: .fl 'Daily' eff 1713" TPIIF' i' 'KG , . L w- '2-1' ig, v - 1 ' , , g . . 1.. I .V I yi .-M L, f ,, . ,. .f ,,,,,. Lc,,1,,,,, fbyiglhndfwzn buff-ffiiah-l,:1in:,5v owe , q:1a'.y'.3'biIn4':prr:a'u:n if fb: 1y"1Z7f1cr:ca 11: in Y -ix 'K-'S M ' qv Vw' QQ, ,.. ...e.. - ' 1135 WN... f A Q. ,:.'.i.c.5 ., 4. . p. . i -1 1-. ,cv 'QQ'5:1,- . .- . -f 1 A A , A 1 "" . , . . . ' . ' l s NE ..,, -S i The first commission ever granted to a. U. S. officer afloat, ' CAPTAIN HOPLEY YEATON, RCS. , , X first won the Service acclaim, another cutter, in the War of 1812, bolstered forlorn , iw of the War. Fourteen British vessels fell as prizes to the daring of Coast Guard if , ry, cutters during this short war-fourteen victories for the Flag in a time When national victory seemed often dim and never sure. In defeat, our ships and men were no less heroic, their deeds were no less i glorious, than in triumph. The cutter Siwveyor, lying in York River, Was N will' W' i ,L ..-.-.. ...-- - H ' . . . - Y 5 ,fi E 931 " . i ' A . 1" ' I.. . - .. . 1- - jf ,iii ' f fff E T? diff 2T5QLfi21.i4rL'5i mmf. '.3?S 1-firriiifa .- Jig F -3 JJ l f ' fffm aim 1 f 4 : , ' FE' Hglgiiw fi ' 21L:r,+ " , , Q f Egg at areas '37 ff' + 1 a f r at W ,lyhs my , aa attacked at night by a party from the English Nm'cissuis. Bearded, cutlasses , aflash, decks and scuppers running with intermingled blood of British Tar and If Yankee Gob, overwhelmed by guns and men of thrice greater numbers than NE' her own, the Surveyor finally surrendered. The admiration of the victors, as ' f ii expressed by a note from the English Commander to Captain Travis of the ,., Szwvcyovy best tells the story of the little vessel's heroic action: W 7 gi! ' 7" I K 4 f i'-. , :..,i..:'- .: ,iii ,gifs ,J e ' , . QA I - f I f J ,Q ,gg I 2 V , if ZfcM.,,a6-W 34:5- Ji plump.: iQLJ,L':-'A' Wfialf , ' , -Lff.,,,. flidis.. esfaiff. Q Agn., Unix., ZJ5-X-3, ix-'Al-lf-f vvrr 1 K J:-,QF ,NA 5 I Mei, 'JW iff ,I ' E 3 'Ef- Li ' 1 fig-. .?'-f.aye.a-.TJ I--12-T.M...QH ,4 T we ,if an Lb-.ma fs-wf4fb,k.'i7252 it-ei' U5 efiwe -2 A T 3 f ..l. T A Ml.. limi Iii 3. gf f 'f:"'m1:,fm fmt' 'tf"""z Wg W. re gil 'e: ieearveaaaaaaaa fasa " V ' Z,l.,V. l,A t 5,3355 fi l-.gl,aar- ,,,,, M tt..r W l fb fx ,Cf ,4 ij in 2 in Miiillif N I Order of acceptance for the R.G.S., by Lincoln, of James Gordon Bennett's yacht. " Your gallant and desperate attempt to defend your vessel against more than double your number excited such admiration on the part of your opponents as I have seldom witnessed, and induced me to return you the sword you had so ably used in testimony of mine it f if I am at loss which to admire most, the previous arrangement on board the Surizeyoo' or the determined manner in which her deck was disputed inch by inch." No more dramatic battle in the entire war can be cited than the defense of the cutter Eagle against the combined attack of a British brig and sloop-o'- war. Chased by these two vessels, fighting as she ran, the Eagle faced com- plete destruction. At last, to avert final disaster, the cutter was beached on Long Island and her guns were dragged to the top of a high bluff. For hours a worn crew struggled up and down the hill, lugging unwieldy cannon balls to feed the belching war-machines. Three times the cutter's colors dropped, :Z 1 Al .2 5-1 U7 2 in if ' ilili 4' ?, . fill! ,glit- v-. P541-A' T' 4 if Si ti U fi-2 A . .- - e. .1 I fag . 225 - -f'-- 'Q' Q4 - - , V. . .-.1-1 e . V , - V .e f , - 4 -4: 'jrijlirf i f - -Y. - A Q L YY" f "f'i '- Tal k' n -if T : 'a f-5:1557 f f 'AJ " 4 E 727' to 1 'iff :'i-Jfaiinf? ' 1 : s i an' Ties e 1231-aa-QL i i if - -Y' ' ' Y Qffri, " - 1 H- -- - W YY V 517- in: nfgj -- -,fa 7-f :ni-N54 shot away by enemy shells 5 three times Coast Guard sailors braved the English fire and nailed fast again the Stars and Stripes high at the top of a remaining spar. XVhen the Eaglels large shot was all Bred away the dauntless crew Q' salvaged spent shells that lodged in the hillside, wadded them with leaves torn ' 5 from the log book, and shot them back again. Could they iight, these ships ix and men of the humanitarian Coast Guard? The question has just been answered. f After the NVar of 1812 came halcyon days for the Army and the Navy- 1-C' ? but not for the Coast Guard. From war with a chivalrous nation the cutters entered into war with fighting men most barbaric-the pirates of the Spanish Main. For a quarter of a century coast guardsmen trailed these marauders ' of the sea through Louisiana's slimy bayous and around Florida's verdant keys-striking whenever opportunity permitted, fighting desperados in their tropical strongholds. On open waters action with pirate craft was forced again and again. The doughty cutter Lomfsicma, with no thought of personal danger, attacked and captured three ships, the Bolivia and two prize vessels sailing under the latter 's command, in a bloody battle in South VVest Pass. Again the U, ,7 ,,-Tiff odds were high-but again a cutter scored. Of such tales is tradition born, 49, 17 'J q'- Lv by such tradition is fostered esprit de corps. A Li G V X ' Superior numbers in the ranks of the foes have never crushed the Coast U - WW Guard 's spirit of 'tcutters never fail. " When Jean La Farge, bold ex-lieutenant of the notorious Jean La Fitte, attacked the cutters L0'lL'iS'tCL'llCl and Alabama c i p with his powerful pirate vessel Bravo and tried to force them to accept defeat heufound the truth of this old maxim. Pressing the fight, as always, the cutters' lads boarded the pirate, ca.rried her decks in a whirlwind hand-to-hand struggle f and hauled down the Jolly Roger of her cut-tliroat crew. A WVhen the pirates were finally ousted from their bayous and inlets along the , i southern coast by the Treasury's strong right arm, after the vigilance and 'E adventuresome daring of Coast Guard officers had made the lives of buccaneers ' A on American shores too hazardous, they moved their rendezvous to Bretons Island. The cutters Lozvismvict and Alabcl-ma pushed on against overwhelming 1 numbers of ships, guns, and men, destroyed every habitation on the island and , . f drove the renegades away in their small boats, thus crushing for all time pirate jim 2 realms on American soil. Although driven from our shores, pirates from kwa WW Spanish-America.continued their ravages of mercliantmen for .a number of ,fm W1 years, during which time cutters on the Southern stations were in a continual state of war--ever watchful, always prepared. Finally, about 1825, after years of long-drawn-out hostilities, the last of the buccaneers vanished-the Coast Guard had won through again. ,i,i.fi'gQHIQ-,. 4 sig, .,j!1- -5 ffag c A' Mfli -E232- F f-T? 33fge'T1-:iii iiggg fffifg as W s- , 44 ' A X we ' we ngldftt in fax . ,af ,LL fnllh'UmfW f " QW' 5 mil xx!! U I .f . - 58 or . e ia Cf H S N Q: Ui CD ,lun SETS 'F m 5 Vg, lmwil 5 a :S Q X alll , ,-I X , 4 A , , X I 4: 2. 3 ,S P 5? 1,522.4 'E cg H H O 'wiv Q- 9: ,e U2 .. -r' .-fu ry' Q. an 5 H SE q. 513 lf 5 Q 1+ N H if Kl' ' if O E 'f',kl.l-wy'I" . -,. . 1., " :A or 'l" G if 5' E4 1W 5 UE- A L 1 i rs ra aas ll a '- ' LLL ff ff far -- ,'A -31 ,' S2 5' 5 G e .. ll l f -' l l L 4 i if 2 E U'-' : ' A A -' 22 6 i 5 E' i. 55 .- I X ,,Q. H, tb 0 F gain? a is ss- s 5 Q at H2 rSffh,ll ,. it o V- Q W S , a lf' ' e Skit M gb S 5 as L? 'L' E ul. C Q G +411-4 - ., 23 7 gi 55 ll - .N.. 6.5 S if 5 IM' A .lg fa gg sf 's M':Qk,lrkg,f UQ Q Q U2 lml,lAXhLl 42 O M an E- a 2 Q lust!Ml ,, U ra- 3 H gqlrm - ' WM Q3 CD m-1 O V l X i :. El ed 5 H. all W1 UQ H sw Q4 5 full' F E' U ff 93 Mi-ni W fl-UQ Q O rn' 1' It V . 'fvlfxfxmw C ,f - A ,nm if MTXN , EXX lil! KN? C7-'i'AY7E'NP51 T0 WA'-Ili D021 THF 9.8 il XR F I saw mm as ras sm: 1 , na .aw .3 me :nm f c .. aw. A A' 0.1. sq.: s fm- 4-.V :wha w,gL,,,, , fx, .IL-ws.. we V.-Q mf. .amwsu f vs l. ,,,,,E,K - affnfz Emi ffm 1 4 R, , Qi - wus,-:' aww! :mm g an ,S g '5ww.w.famM, I p jungles of dank swamplandsg sailors who had never heard of ambuscades or EI tortures at the stake hesitated not a moment when called upon to beat the brush '4 of a dark interior. Many fell these Coast Guard heroes fighting blindly a new l U 1 4 v Guard. They traded life for heroic death that Widows and orphans of massacred men might live, that civilization might prevail and savagery perish. So reads another chapter of the Coast Guard s story of glorious deeds Well done. ! I 3 A CS SC fl' 2 1 lg l' f . . ' . . , ' . Ii ml kind of fight, but their deaths Won again Humanity s plaudits for the Coast Ml is ,Yi , . --fees' ' ' , fr- , 1.7 - ,aaa-af -A g il, f 1 l V-,-.,,, A. , , f ,-.- - -.-.,,, ' .. .- -0- - , 2 ggi-53 if -1751 5 K, ' T ,, - ' , 'L t' fi'-3 'LZf" 'iii5liE5i,Q-ff' feTf.5,..nlQ :fig ' 5 ?H1- "fr-F? f - f?r 5 '-i 'f - ' - - - riff" F Z ' K-f':f1 -.752 c- ferfif-an 1 riff' n-i vc- ff Wifrl' , g:ggng,,4a1ga,gif n-. - ,.t j'45 pl ' VA V, '2 : V, X fglx ,., Il , :tl , sg cffrffff Tam i ' ' -- -I T' me r A ng 1 ggi , , 'Y J I . f av 4:-P I l FSH?- :e:-, During the Mexican IVa.r cutters again took part in naval operations, particu- larly in blockade work and in attacks upon Alvarado' and Tabasco. Typical service was rendered by the Woodbury which. under orders from the Com- manding General of the Army of Occupation, covered the Army 's march from Aransas Pass to Brazos St. Iago. Promptly and efficiently, in the Coast Guard's usual style, the order was carried out, and claimed the Army ts admiration as attested in a commendatory note from the Adjutant General to Captain VVinslow Foster of the lV00cZb'zw"y: "I am directed by the Commanding General to say that I he takes this occasion to express his thanks for the handsome manner in which you have extended your assistance and that of your vessel to the operations of the Army." Then came the Civil lVar, shaking the nation's faith and principles, disrupting homes and country, creating enemies of brothers. Embroiled in the Great Struggle, the Coast Guard, as always, did her part. 5 9 'Y,ff J?- I l l I 4 'I A 3 l l l 4- nw Famous battles saw the actions of many famous cutters. , The IIa-rriet Lane U, ,7 -ilk? was in the fleet, intended to relieve Fort Sumter. Later she shared in the 4375 'p i' sr harrowing affair known to history as the 'tcapture of Fort Hatteras." WVhen gf Y i n troops for the recapture of Norfolk by the North landed at Lynn Haven Bay - WW a Coast Guard cutter, the Mfz'a'm'z', attempted-and successfully accomplished- IQ the important duty of covering their landing. More famous, possibly, is the tale Q of the old cutter Nazcgatuele, which, after aiding in the fierce onslaught at All Sewall's Point, led the fleet up the James River and helped in the bombard- ment of Drury's Bluff, June 15, 1862. Equally effective and efficient was the l I aid given to the Army and the Navy by the Nchama, cruising up and down Al A the southern coast, carrying dispatches often through thick Confederate tire, - doing blockade duty, never failing in her tasks. 'What standards of war-time ' service these old cutters set for posterity to uphold! ' ' Hardly was reconstruction complete and the nation firmly welded once again than new battle grounds called American warriors. In the war with Spain ' , X Coast Guard ships and men carried on with traditional heroism and disregard , f 5 of death or danger. Eight cutters served with Sampson on the Havana blockade. Elm if IVith Dewey at Manila sailediold Captain Daniel B. Hodgsdon, veteran of thirty- 11 D seven years of service, In command of the cutter Hugh McCulloch, at H71 fl! 'fll'fi"' the battle of Manila Bay the Captain won such distinction for his dashing exeeu- 'lim tion of hazardous dispatch duty that Congress retired him with full pay and allowances at the end of the war. I At the top of the war 's long list of heroes is indelibly inscribed the name of '---2 I gf, , , . SS? 'N cf if " f M Ti rf ty i-nfl' A--fee, iff-gaa+il , ' A-r P - g i '-:f--f- . 1 " -1 -A is 2 ' H ., 2lf1f2i' ug - i Lieutenant Frank H. Newcomb, who received the only gold medal presented by Congress for gallantry during the war. , In the naval engagement of Cardcnas Bay on May 11, 1898, the Huclscm, ig' under Captain Newcomb, rescued the naval torpedo boat l7l7't'1l.Sl0'LU from under '5 the very guns of the Spaniards. The l'Vfli7'lf.SZO'W had been helplessly crushed W . by broadsides from Spanish gunboats and splintering volleys from the shore E Z. ll batteries. Her ca.ptain, Ensign Bagley, U. S. N., and half her crew were dead or dying, her guns were hushed, her lifeless hulk was drifting with the tide l ? ' down on a rocky shore where the enemy awaited to complete her destruction. I lVhen the Spanish fire became most furious, as though to annihilate the i5 lVzfu.sZ0w, Captain Newcomb piloted his cutter into the thick of the fight and ll alongside the stricken torpedo boat, at the same time opening fire at the Spaniards. l In constant danger of grounding on submerged rocks the cutter maintained hcr fire, made fast a hawser to the Winslow, and towed her out of range.-Again a cutter did not fail, and one more shining page was added to the already brilliant book of Coast Guard tradition. . ' 4,3 'ff QD . 9'1" lj 4 If XJ N .f 1 . e-1: QNX NEI? lr 1 A I 5. -S l Advocates of "Preparedness," just prior to our entry into the VVorld Conflict, must have found great satisfaction in knowing that the Coast Guard is always prepared. Hardly had the United States declared war than, on May G, 1917, the Coast Guard was ordered to operate with the Navy in driving German kultur from the seas. This order gave the Navy the services of two hundred and twenty-three experienced, highly-trained officers, of four thousand five hundred seasoned warrant officers and enlisted men, of forty-seven vessels of many types, and of two hundred and seventy-nine stations, whose patrol areas surrounded the shores of the United States. , Six cutters, the Ossfipec, Seneca, Yamacraw, AZg01zq'ui11, Illfl-7Hl'li7lf7, and Tampa, were ordered to foreign service in the early fall of 1917, and, based at Gibraltar, formed Squadron Two, Division Six, of the Atlantic Flcet's patrol forces. With little armor and but light armament these ships of the "Peace-time Navy" sailed through perilous, menaced waters, protecting hundreds of vessels between Gibral- tar and the British Isles from German U-boats, or patrolling the haunted, war- stirred Mediterranean. Other cutters. left at home, performed duties no less valuable, no less dangerous. Cruising alone up and down the coast these ships were the source of a constant sense of security among seamenq thev were the instruments of many important missions from one corner of the Atlantic to the other. c The record of Coast Guard oflicers alone, during the war. is impressive. Over thirtv-five percent of the line officers of the Service commanded combatant Coast Guard and Navy ships in threatened waters, two commanded important air L' '7 64145 57 Y F ir m v .. ,qi f E q, ,IL 'llll 1- 2 V H ' . fzf.-f ug- gg . ,,i.11.,. L- ,. ,- ,,... sr-5.1 g.f...,-,, -- -7 4 -- Q,-. 7 .4 - ,3? W 4... ,, Hi V f . ? I , '.:"-f"' i , ' - -i f ----1'-ff--Qi ' , """'IiT'., gi 1ii,E1:1:Ql2F-1'-ffT1lzgET.441-4352! 1- TTA 1-' T355-if" 1 'A 'i Lf"-I ':- ' iii' 1 LE?555-?f3E?,..l5 ' ' 1 T?-4 - t -' " I T 'J 'Tiff 'N 'iE'ia - -' " mari -Li? -:ig Qs,-Q ii an A- Y X - 'iii' ' ?f5!'? : '.1T-1:3 I 7, XX eff! In x watfzeg V .. J 7- f - .- j e' " if vi 'WM-Q- A9--+ 510-,G ' f 1132 - a t " f Q? Q at A i f g " X7 5,-ig aff, 1 Q4 w mv - 'Q r f -ffgiggi 'il 1 X Y -my f ll , 2' AA: 1,1-Af, ffiejaygafix- Km ' X Ei .slant gl it I T 'N 155 C 4-3' 'vii QD L. ' QD I: , V .r. X, 5 , Q stations, one in France, five commanded training stations, six performed avia- tion duty, four commanded large transports that brought the doughboys home after the armistice. The Navy Department, always choosing for commanders only oliicers in whom it has full, unstinted confidence thus paid tribute to Coast Guard standards when it assigned fifty percent of our line officers that important dutv. A ug! 7 l I 5 ff 4 x I f 1 , L 17 lit V gp' w ,I - H 4 Among the legends of the sea stands forth that of the cutter Tampa, pride of a proud Service. lVhile on her Gibraltar station, engaged in convoy and I patrol duty, her record was one of continuous achievement and of service ren- dered well. In commendation thereof, Rear Admiral Niblaclc, commanding the , United States Naval forces at Gibraltar, addressed aspecial letter to Captain ,, , Q, Charles Satterlee, her commander, in which he lauded the gallant little vessel's XX 7 f X constant preparedness without requesting repairs and her worthy work in escort- .. USM E ing eighteen convoys, comprising three hundred fifty vessels, with the loss Q through enemy action of but two ships. Admiral Niblack wrote: I IVV? tLUi"i "This excellent record is an evidence of a high state of efficiency and excellent ship 's .hw spirit and an organization capable of keeping the vessel in service with a minimum of shore assistance. The squadron commander takes great pleasure in congratulating the commanding officer, officers, and crew on the record which they have made." H -a ?GG 5 5'-5 ,, Ji ' A-i -TLA -7:--W ' .-9 in -,Q 1 Y ' -Q-"'T"' i: -- Y , ,- age- -- -,1.'4'.g,,x 2 2'-ef 4:g5fgg,Lf,e A-1 e-i F' .ii-if' lfgefzgag- ' we A or ' tr ff: 4 1 if-t can s ,-ef -finaly i:1,"f'-iY,?1j ff gtglgiilew 'f u ?'-in 5911? ' W ' ,Li , ngggrf j,.L.A-1-T... ,TTT N, 'Q V -'- - ,i ' ' ff 'f" ' -f ff ' lp T, my fgffhfhfvf, Zhu eh , ' .5 .f -' Q W I 'li p air' - 13 4. T. " f 'A -I . . 'T . 'V , ' . Ti 'l V ' "H, 'Q P 771' f l Tiff!" 'T L i K Qld ' 115- Y , 4 Then came disaster. Cn the night of September 26, 1918, other ships of a convoy bound from Gibraltar to Great Britain heard a great explosion off the N coast of the British Isles. The Tampa was never seen again. A Hun U-boat , , Q C535 claimed her destruction and the annihilation of her crew, one hundred and ' fifteen American seamen. Vice Admiral C. H. Dare of the British Navy, the 5 commanding officer at Milford Haven, in a telegram to Admiral Sims expressed i 'K - . vigil ln a note of universal sympathy in the loss of the Tampa: i "Myself and staff enjoyed the personal friendship of her commanding officer, Captain E Charles Satterlec, and had great admiration for his intense enthusiasm and high ideals Z ' of duty." ? l l , l 4- an H Q 3 A-w l Il, 9 ' 'x fbfil, S2 fl x K? f 7 27 f in Y llll .ml WW '- f-ff M ,s,,: A Q l w ' 5 K .E The cutter Bear, caught in the ice off Point Barrow, Alaska. X The Coast Guard again had done her bit, Coast Guardsmen again had given x r all protecting the lives of others. This sacrifice of the Coast Guard was pro- , , C S portionately the greatest made by America 's forces in the great war for XX 5,3 Q Democracy. A nation bows, the Tampa is thus commemorated to the World. q N U pm y, And now, for nations, Peace, for the Army, Peace, for the Navy, the Marine if ,N l Corps, Peace, but for the Coa-st Guard there is no peace. Primarily the func- ' tion of revenue cutters was to suppress smuggling along the coast. At the ll beginning of the War they had practically stopped illegal entry of dutiable goods into the United States. XVith the passage of the Volstead Act, smuggling began M I "" "' r .ae A... ' A H - - A- - if-A - an ' i 3 jfs A iff? if '5i'if2-Q,?1?2T f To iff Pffli'- Lf?-ii? H: ' f :fir 1 1 1+'1e . Ju ,- a ffii aegis t-Qiefzfffi H Lip, wmv "-iw. 9- 'Gi - 4- - ff l r: . , -' New A ,itatwl ,ig A f 'f i' ' - Y"mf1fl:iv-l i tQgiQQTD?3 K ,-,-74, i I - ,r 1,212 fu - 'Tig-- ,f1:' Y anew, the Coast Guard went to war ag in. Along thousands of miles of shore- line, battle raged between Coast Guard cutter and the desecrater of our Law. f More vessels were required, Congress gave cast-oif destroyers from the Navy ,iv - and a fleet of now famous seventy-five foot patrol boats. Did Rum Row vanish? - J Overnight it disappeared, starved out. This does not mean, of course, that the ,l 5 X job is done. Doubtless, but for the vigilance of Coast Guard patrols, another , ct sf, . . . . ggefg' i n Row would soon be formed. Foreign ships, from time to time, do appear off ' Q the coast with rum, and patiently await a chance to run the blockade. Constant i picketing of these vessels is responsible for the fact that to-day the amount of liquor imported in the country is dwindling rapidly, cutters, destroyers, patrol boats, ever watchful and always prepared, grant small hope to ambitious U rummies. ' ' Life-saving shore stations patrol the beach to aid stricken ships and luckless mariners, and incidentally to prevent wholesale landing of forbidden liquors that might possibly slip by the sea-drawn cordon. To many, the Coast Guard is but part of the Prohibition Enforcement plan, 1, L3 to the Coast Guard, Prohibition Enforcement is but an added duty, by no means 17 fig O the most important of the diversified list imposed upon her, peace-time duties ,fi K? A , i 'W . . . 27' G' -' in X, all, but thrilling, adventuresome, and often epoch-making. il Y ' No story of the Coast Guard in peace would be complete without some mention 'Q . qw of that most famous of all our cutters, the Bear. For fifty years this veteran 5' . 4 has stood the buffeting of the Arctic 's gales, ca.rrying succor and new life to the J, - id nearly-dead in the Land Around the Pole. Among thepfeats which won the Bear those laurels that will keep our history ever fresh was her rescue of i i Greely's ill-fated expedition from total extinction at the top of the world in 1884. Again, in 1897, the Bean' set out for high a.nd treacherous latitudes to Al bring back the crews of eight whalers caught in Point Barrow 's frigid toils. l K Unable tonproceed farther because of ice-locked seas, the Bear put in to Dutch QE. Harbor, and while gold-crazed men rushed towards the Klondike, the Bea1"s fn lads, under Lieutenant D. H. Jarvis, made their painful way overland to the relief from blue death of ice and hunger of two hundred souls-again a cutter did not fail, again the Coast Guard proved her worth. , f Further enumeration of peace-time activities must include the Interna- V f Elm 2 tional Ice Patrol that is now maintained by the Service. For many.years the A U U Wu, menace to navigation constituted by gigantic bergs drifting about in the sea if 0 lflliliii lanes of Newfoundland's Grand Banks had been the dread of transatlantic -MM vessels, but not until the horrible Tvltcmic disaster was any protection from i the danger offered. Then a thirteen-power, pact was formed to defray the expense of an ice patrol, which duty the United States accepted and handed l E A ., W D V Y W A S-.11 wt- . .,-1 -V-- M. M- . ' - J 'gg .,l e :F1 A at rg , f,m,.l: nfs A 3' "----fe""l-f35e- 'fr'r,. D- A " I i"-Ziflgff 'fi .7 ' i..j-in i-Q - n -,q . ' Y "Dam, Q-:gif-3451-5 ' '1!T?kT+f:EEi ' ,Eff ' 4 'Q - Dwai'-"3 ' Qjfil 4 " in , f gg , .24 ef .2 gli-Za-il over to the Coast Guar'd. Since 1913 cutters have roamed the ice fields from March to July, studying the ice, its physical properties, drift, erosion, and melt- ing. They have located bergs, defined danger limits, charted currents, and broadcast positions of the ice. Incidental to the paramount duty of the patrol ' ' as stated is the giving of assistance to vessels in distress, the lending of medical aid to injured fishermen, the removal of derelicts, and any other usual Coast Guard work in which the vessel on patrol may be called upon to engage. That no accident such as that of the Tfitcl-nic has occurred since the Coast Guard undertook the ice patrol is evidence sufficient to convince all of the efficiency of the ships and men employed in the work. Another of the peace-time duties of the Coast Guard is the protection of seal herds on the Pribilof Islands. Back in 1910 the Treasury had collected more money from the sale of seal-skins taken on the Islands 'than the whole Alaskan Territory, of which they are a part, cost the United States in actual money paid to Russia as purchase price. That these seal herds were not wantonly destroyed years before is due to the active protection given them by the Coast Guard. Old-timers tell of occasional bits of smart fighting between poachers and the cutters. but at last the "seal warn is ended and another of the govern- ment 's revenues is safeguarded by the Treasury 's efficient navy. h To the Coast Guard is charged protection of life and ships upon the sea, to this end the Service bends its every energy, often at the expense of all its other varied duties. "Humanitarian" is the term that has been given to this phase of Coast Guard activity, and hunianitarian the Service is. No night too stormy, no.seas too high, no shoals too forbidding to restrain our cutters from their work of saving life. The same heroic spirit of self-sacrifice and disregard of personal danger that was fostered by our predecessors in the Service's infancy pervades the Service to-day, not only on large, seavvorthy cutters and powerful destroyers but also on the tiny egg-shell craft that patrol nearly every mile of our far-flung coast. At random from among many of the year 's heroic deeds we select a. case, and cite the bravery of the CG-213, a seventy- five foot patrol boat. in saving the imperilled crew of the sea-going tug Tracy, off Atlantic City, N. J., on November 16, 1926. Foundering, amid mountainous waves lashed to white fury by a hellish gale, the Tracy sounded an S. O. S. From Base One the fragile 213 put out, never questioning the advisability of attempting rescue against tremendous odds imposed by .raging elements. Through furious seas she made her way to the disabled Tracy. Every wave threatened to crash the two vessels together 5 every minute seemed the sinking tug's last. Unable to secure a line aboard the helpless hulk, Boatswain Hart, officer-in-charge, ran his boat back and forth, as close to the Tracy as possible, .J 17 1, W5 6' Y ig if ill 4,41 if ,,,. .. . .. . - ,. . -.,..- '- J- f.. ' , " - - . f-- 7.1. . .: ,- .. ,. .. '1-Q - "- - " -Y 1 --Li--L..:r- ,fn Y. . "' .Y ' - ----F-'im - j g,:f.1a-g e 1-F. 2 ee 9 ef if s we e I Q 'iT'5?'AL":, :yi . V ,Y Y- if - Y -D. 1 .- I.. J. .1-.. f.-e 'if-2: --2. Y 7- -2 -1-21 L-fs-?f,ef H ,,.- 7, . gfijilfgg-'St-i',.gfi. tf I3 -F 1- . r gi' L ezigaaisig ,,-tgggfgz ..-,i 3' Q' f' Q T , Cf' -- at " - and the rescued crew jumped to the deck of the patrol boat. At last all were saved but one. The skipper once more ran his boat close aboard the Tracy. A The last man leaped, but as he leaped a heavy swell caught the 213 and tossed Wg- her twenty-five feet from the side of the wrecked tug and down went the luck- ' . ig? less man, struggling in the sea. Lost? Orders were to save Hall handsf' Into 4 X the hungry waters dove the gallant skipper, to hold up the drowning man until 'G 41' ly a line was heaved from the little craft and they were hauled to safety. Again l j, a Coast Guardsman had risked his life for duty, had heedlessly thrown himself i lg to the Coast Guard's humanitarian task of saving life, had proved that the Coast Guard knows no failure. N I In the interest of protecting life afloat the Service sends each year a special is f patrol of her sturdiest cutters to sail- in times of winter 's storms along the eastern ii coast in search of distressed and helpless vessels. Unheeding angry winds and i boisterous seas that combine off Hatteras and other parts of the coast to wreck and destroy all those who go down to the sea in ships, cutters steam through P chaotic waters in brave attempts to save seafaring men and vessels. Wliat relief 1- L3 it must be to the weather-beaten skipper of a sinking coaster to know that his ,7 Lf?-We frantic S. O. S. is heard and that help "that never fails" is making all speed 4511? -P if, to his aid, what blessing to panicky mothers and Whimpering, fear-numbed gQ f' ' children to know that rescue, strong and sure, is at hand! V ?mg Supplementary to this duty is that of removing derelicts and other floating menaces to- navigation. In this work every.Coast Guard vessel is engaged, no " 0 matter what her otherspecial orders may require. Usually destruction of dere- --JT ' licts is not difficult in accomplishment, but in heavy seas, when putting off ' from a cutter to secure treacherous mines to a half-submerged hulk that rolls x and tosses and threatens to crush the pulling boat to bits with every swell, A t difficulties and dangers arise which add a spicy, vivid sense of possible calamity f to the lives of the Treasury ls sailor lads. Yet without this protective work by the Coast Guard our coastal waters would be a veritable graveyard for ships 1 V sunk by floating timbers, hulks, rafts, and spars. Humaritarian work, all this, A and yet to men of the Service engaged in its accomplishment thrills are always l i , certain and safety ever doubtful. Q ge Navigation laws primarily are to insure safety upon the water, their enforce- X Em Q ment falls naturally, therefore, to the Coast Guard. A bit less exciting than 5. y any of the other duties, this policing of regattas and of the sea, but certainly a Am worthy endeavor in the interest of Safety First. That over 53,000 vessels were ip 'i boarded and examined for infractions of safety laws in 1926 shows conclusively M l that even in this task, unadventuresome as it is, the Coast Guard is "on the job," ever alert in the fulfilment of her duty. . lu as as t t at it t L -H tree t T- fart e-aff f' ee Aff 'A re 11 ff iff. at sf--ef .ffigif ' ,Li-.4 -5: "' Q -9 X Kaffsifgf y.vfs?? .i2if?E5EEQ 2 f't'f'tf'N 'altii t y 4 p iSZiQMmgf?3gg,. QQMZ 'liifiiiigggagb ? , nl Northern cruising has been mentioned in the story of the Bear. Several other ' cutters make annual patrols in high latitudes-into the Bering Sea, the North 1, Pacific, and around southeasternAlaska. The purpose of the northern patrols J lr' is to enforce the convention of 1911 between the United States, Great Britain, V g Russia and Japan, and the laws and regulations protecting seals, other fur- M 1, - bearing animals, and fisheries of Alaska. In addition, critters have carried food A 9934? to starving natives, medical aid to those near death, law to lawless men, and E: succor and relief to homeless destitutes in the frigid north, ever since the Bear ' 5 began her service to Humanity, fifty years ago. NVith breaking ice our cutters head to northward, carrying civilization to a land of which Civilization seldom thinks, engaging in noble enterprise, asking no other reward than the satisfac- tion which is born of service, demonstrating always that Hcutters never fail." In the Service's great heart is branded deep by flames of a burning ship a tragic story of heroism in death. Just off the storm-scarred North Carolinian coast plied the Coast Guard's small supply ship Lincoln on the night of Decem- ber 18, 1926. A heavy sea, a freshening gale, a tiny crew worn by battle with ' 4' Q? val Q3 lf" 'N ij ? , " " ni X3 - H W- ails the unrelenting alliance-then Fire! Eating through bulkheads, disabling engines, seeming hell-bent toward final, quick destruction, the Red Killer wreaked his fury. Battling iiames that scorched their bodies and dried their last reserves of strength, seven men strove to obey their skipper's cry of: "Fight it, lads! Fight it! Don't give up the ship I " until at dawn the British Defencler stood towa.rd the flaming schooner, a last, late hope of rescue. But N if? U '7 461 tg gf Y tix Ja lin inf ill iii i 4 ,N ,Jn-. , Fl ' ' for one the Defencler held no false hopes. During the battle of the night a wave, impatient for the end, had reached up and torn one sailorman from the doubtful safety of his dying ship, and taken him to a sailor is honored, unmarked A tomb. 11 , On came the Defcncler, yet high swells prohibited more in the way of rescue gsm than a distant approach to the Lincoln and the heaving of life-buoys toward her. t Aboard the Lincoln exhausted men no longer could combat the stifling heat, , v at last it was "abandon ship"-or perish with her. Now came the action of J one whose name 'fleads all the rest" , Olaf Hansen. Seizing the three life- l jackets yet unburned he forced them on other members of the crew, the Lincoln 1 X 1 , 19 ' listed, waves broke over her, but failed to quench the flames, reluctantly the A an 2 men took to the sea, preferring a seaman's death to one in a flaming hell. 'Elm WF Fatigued and nearly drowned, the lads struck out for a lifeboat lowered by the ' ffl Wi Defencler-all but Hansen, who, hearing his Captainls impassioned, painful fm words of encouragement from the searing deck, turned back, with superhuman strength climbed the Lincoln? side and, risking, giving all, took the burned man in his own sore arms and leaped into the sea. For a few moments he was ifiir M, .,.. . as . M ,,., w ..,, ,r,rh1nn-n.naN.,yg,,g, ,?Z?? M -'f'-"M"--eftg fmrgg api' . -. A-'ff ff--5134? B-r i?5:2fiti 1 e .jp .ef 1? egg: fr' jeff Us Z 1 I ' 1 gif iii , e zfga, I-,Wx :UL .mfg weigh , J i -D - r.. me l H I- C. -f ' agar i r an y e Q-iz ' able to hold the injured one afloat, but, succumbing to strength's exhaustion l and the pound of the merciless sea, they sank-the skipper who wished but to ff go down with his foredoomed ship, Boatswain T. A. Erlingson, and the sailor-boy D jf-T' who gave his life trying to rob Death of hard-won victory. y "Semper Paratusn-to fight our foes, defend our coasts, to protect our lives If lax and interests on the seas 5 f'Always Ready"-to face danger for duty anywhere, i 5343 i pi 3 andy when that duty demands, "Always Ready" to die like men, are these sailors 1 5 ,5 2 E ' of our United States Coast Guard. W ' '77 if' U gi f? L, 7' . Wt, ' 1' 'fi X C lk, "' . X- ' I' ' 'r, 5.5 . ' A A i is N W v l l P C Q Af! are E' Q u lf 1 ,f , il fl all 1 W all I' If ' '- -'- , S -Ti? " .i :S :ge i ' Wg' ph , -, .. -, ,, ,,.3-31 1 .. A t .-,-.,..-.. ,-5, '. - :K -. 1 e -' -- L , -4- - - F , . , . ,T ---.... ,. V ' " - -,L-I A ' -' W "L, -f'- -1 six- fr p sk i!! Y - AIT ' 7 , 'jg , -V--1 Y--5 Y Y' W ' Y- L ,, "JEL-if'trT' -7-1, if 151.11 ft -fe f:f1,if-1' I ' 'Q Q' i -Y gf '-ff - -, - ' - Y" Y' A - 'il-L 'if -Liffff A' ' " -f, W., ,, -- -Y -:T - - Al-i-if ff -771.7 ,rj - i : EVQ- -if 31,311+ Q.. -1 ' f Ee - 1.2:-.if-:.. .Ef- 1 iim' .- - 292115 A 'ff'-T 1 may ia x - Zi 2 QS - ' .A . -' hte' riff" ' fl? i L W e 2124 wg- 2 , rs?-M. -. lv-ee feea'-gs-2' e fe ef ' A i Q 1 ,lg HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF '27 ag, Amid pouring rain on that memorable 12th of May, 1924, we made our initial 1 2-Bri appearance as the Class of 1927. Step 1 in making officers of us was to rush us , l 1-gf into whites and introduce us to the bane of our future lives-the Academy ' 1 Regulations. During daylight hours of the next two weeks we put the cadets' if private yacht into commission and at night were initiated into the mysteries of military servitude: "Letseesumheads!H rang out every time the stencilling ink was located and two more victims would be hustled away to the Chamber of Horrors, instructed in such arts as that of Hcarrying a brace," and formally introduced to the famous "spot book,"' which last has exerted no small amount , of influence on our habits, our peculiarities and the class seniority list. But I all things end. On the first day of June all the Corps except the engineering section of our class sailed on the Alcxalncler Ilamfitton for Euro e. P 6' 1,3 FTE, O lf-Ji mi ., In X: it W 1 - T' Practice Cruise of 1924 V At one olclock the last line was cast off, forcing Armstrong to make himself renowned as a pierhead jumper. As Ocean Beach faded from view, the com- mand rang out '4Topgallant yardmen on the sheer pole!" and twenty third classmen shouted and ran dizzily in circles. For twenty days and twenty ,nights we sailed the broad Atlantic, garnering L1 ,7 . af ' Atty knowledge of the sea and familiarity with scrubber, squilgee and paint brush. On our iirst week out we ran into dirty weather and had every' watch below ruined by the incessant call of 'tAll hands on deck!" For six weary days we bucked head winds and gave the ship "apparent headway by continuous hauling upon , All the braces." Oilskins were uniform for all occasions, especially meals. No one Elm thought of breaking out hammocks, the watch flopped down on deck wherever ' relieved. A . i Lizard Light was a welcome sight to the numerous lookouts who posted them- 5 - selves in the rigging on the third Sunday out. The next day we crawled up the I crowded Thames to an anchorage off Gravesend. The first liberty boat contained ' y the Class off 1927 en masse all eager to set foot on shore and try the hospitality f 5' of England. London wa.s explored and exploited, .the Coast Guard uniform ,A5 mg L beiiiiie a iijainiclilgr sight at Elie British Egnixre lixplositioni H 1 1 Elf' U 13 ter a ou en cays o conques 0 errie +ng anc 's aming youti anc T y im, beauty we betook ourselves to other fields of sport and arrived in Cherbourg ,,g,l,li on the 4th of July. One o'clock the next morning the iirst contingent of the full Paris Expeditionary Forces streamed out through the gates of the Gare St. Lazare. For the next forty-eight hours Paris was exposed to an invasion that may well be remembered yet, from the Quartier Latin to the Montmartre. The Hamilton sailed from Cherbourg on the 13th with Armstrong again among l -22: Z 1 fl? Ti ia? .L1"Ef'5'g?,f.,?..- -1-ik 'X' .4371 ' Lili-. . ., . if ' -W -I 'I' MB' " A i frig-'-2' '-'7 5 gif: - 1545 .ff STE? e l if? T".-? - QF 'ff -if 1' eli f-f'1???:i3'E ' ' 1 ' we-.QA-1 --' ' X: 'N 4' + the missing. lVe stopped in Lisbon long enough to cheer the Bull at the Portu- guese national pastime and then heaved up for Madeira. Here we divided our time between climbing mountains and driving bumboats away from the ship 's side. A few of the far-sighted purchased Madeira merchandise Qmade in New Yorkb to silence the dear ones at home who might inquire too much into the attractions of foreign shores. On the 29th of July we weighed anchor for Bermuda and HOME and sailed 4 f f 1 ff, 1 r w. Qi, pra.ctically all the way under the impetus of the friendly trade winds. Again , Q chipping hammers and paint brushes broke the monotony of 4iWatcl1 on deck! f.- A il E l man the main and mizzen sheets." August 4th will ever remain a typical Coast : if Guard holiday to those of us who spent the day in sujeeing the fireroom fiddley. H X We sighted St. David7s Head on the evening of the 25th and steamed to our ll anchorage in Grassy Bay the next morning. General liberty was granted to ll everyone except poor, unfortunate signals bilgers. Everyone was eager to get l ashore in a place where English is the native tongue and American money the l medium of exchange. The corner drug store was a favorite gathering place for X those who had a failing for ice cream sundaes, although the Palm Gardens came in for more than merely casual notice. The grand climax to our visit in Bermuda was a dance aboard ship at which the femmes of Hamilton and 1 4- es St. George turned out in force. Heartrending partings characterized the night, L 1 ,7 Lfilgf the next day we headed for home. 1 ggj lfi J gp. Q Shovels rang mightily on the fireroom floor-plates during the four-day stretch gf Y ' 4 to New London 5 masts groaned with the press of sail we carried trying to end ' g g the cruise and start on September leave. Long before we crossed the 100 fathom 'W' ,fi demarcation, ambitious Third-Class lookouts reported every low-lying cloud with ' a loud and cheery "Land ho!" ' .. Early on the morning of August 26th the Hcwwiltofn put her first line ashore Tw at the Academy. The next few days were spent in feverishly moving into the barracks and putting our floating hotel out of commission. Cn the 1st of Sep- tember the Class of 1925 graduated, after a brief ceremony, and the long-awaited f three weeks? leave began immediately afterward. NVithin an hour the barracks '15 were deserted by all except a few who felt the urge to return to civil life. The tl class sustained a great loss in Hill, Dodson, Anderson, Locke, Wise, and Smith ' at this time. , Engineers' Summer , 1 X ix' ff 5 Due to lack of space the Alexcmcler H cmtzflton was unable to accommodate the ll T Elm P' entire Cadet Corps on the 1924 cruise and it was necessary to leave the engineers W U Q" 1 of the class at the Academy. At first this was a great disappointment to many If W of them but as the summer passed this disappointment was well compensated. 'wwf ' As the time of the Alex Hcmt's sailing drew near, the engineers went down to 1 ' the dock, let go the lines and cheered lustily asthe ship moved off and then sat down to enjoy life without interference from upperclassmen. It is said that when the cat's away and-so-forth, but it wasn't very much M aazf-if 245: 5-fate? .1 i 5"li'Eci1:jE 1?i?i4.lieiLTL t H v ftffe 'A l iffi . 771 ef T22 leaw-iacykll ie? 15:1 5 if . iii-?? -'15 -A L . ' ' r 1 ' play after all. Having already perforincd much hand-toughcning work on the l ship, the Cl1g'l1lGGl'S were fortunately prepared for what was in store for them. I They easily acquired the art of gold-bricking a11d became so proficient in it that 5 - once two of them were found s1tt111g 111 a locker 'tlooking for Luskfl The engi- A , neers were "there" when it came to slinging paint and whitewash, digging 55. L2 X ditches, laying walks, and setti11g up machinery in the casemates, and in class, xl under the instruction of Mr. Olson Zllld Mr. Bixby, they became acquainted with ' the mysteries of.Physics and learned that after all 'ieverythi11g's-in tl1e text." ,f Q The remaining time was taken up by drills-infantry, boat and signal. Under ' K g the able leaderslnp of Tollaksen and l11s wooden sword, the eng111eers had a well ' drilled company and showed their stuff in the American Legion parade. After gf many long hours on the Thames the bilge drivers even became expert oarsmen. VVhen it came to having large times, they again excelled-if we are to believe their thrilli11g tales. On liberty days tl1e barracks were always deserted and Ocean Beach, Golden Spur, H11Cl Groton Long Poi11t beca1ne known as the rendezvous of the underground savages. On June 20th the engineers spent the day aboard the Scnacc watching the Yale-Harvard rowing classic. Several cadets were assigned to power launches to patrol tl1e course, and how they did patrol it! uh 4 LJ vii O 1.3 115 -' -. X, ll ' June 25th brought us Purcell. Soon afterwards Gahn left to enter NVest Point 5 O. E. Smith, unable to resist tl1e lure of the air, decided to don l1is wings 5 Fields returned to civil life. V Social affairs began with a the dansant in tl1e barracks lobby. Invitations "? f 7 V27 225 7 lily ' 7 e were sent out by "Spenny" inviting the tOlV117S femmes to be guests of tl1e cadets. W A good time was reported by all, but three young hopefuls decided they hadn't 1 ly had enough a.nd continued via the lower gate. As a result tl1e cadets lfC1112:l,llll1lg ... at the Academy were aroused fl'O1ll their peaceful slumbers to Etl2l7C11Cl a "coffee 'AA formation." Mr. Spencer's toast was: "The moral is: you canlt get away with it I" On the 9th of August a dance was held i11 the ballroom. Lawn fetes were additional functions. The remaining engineers all remember the one , at tl1e Lawrence Memorial Hospital. 'li , The engineers became somewhat famous in sports. In tennis, Phannemiller im and Purcell were invincible partners. A baseball team was organized and the A X victims were generally the enlisted personnel on the reservation. VVhen the , other cadets returned from the cruise with tl1e championship of England, Ireland, 4 Scotland and Vllales, the engineers took them on and wrested their title from 1 tl1em. l 1 vi Toward the end of August all were busy preparing for the final examination Jfsx l N "5 in Physics. Study hours were then really observed and savoirs from Peacock fi E W P Alley were constantly kept busy by the wooden from Dumbbell Alley. q Q U xlj.11,,, The time for the return of the Alex H am was approaching and with it came If A AI 314 the end of independence. Shortly before this took place the engineers held a ,W "i A banquet with Mr. Spencer and Mr. Olson as guests of honor. There is hardly lt" any need to say that it was a howling success. 'With the H amiltou again moored at the dock, the engineers returned to their status of lowly third classmen and awaited impatiently for September leave. . 5 jg " P i '77-ef 421112-EQ gf -'Tj 472-itil ggi A ee2f.i? ?9-: -if , aafiflv, Ur . , - E 7 , I " , 'lla ' ' Q 'A Third Class Academic Year The next gathering of the class took place on the evening of the 21st of the B- month, while whiling away the study hour with lurid tales of adventure and ' , Ei, conquest on leave in the old home town. Assignments were posted for the next , X day 7s classes but new books were neglected in the excitement of getting back. gpg After the 8 100 A. M. inspection the next day classes started with a roar and the Effdf, war for tenths of a point was on. For four long and tedious months we battled J gl with academic subjects of which Physics was our most valiant adversary. Day ? after day Professor Duif's Folly almost wrested our commissions from our grasps ' but we still managed to hang on. After we had grappled for three months with textbooks, rifles and oars the day of departure on Christmas leave arrived. Eight o'clock on the morning of the 24th we were all eagerly packing bags and scanning train schedules in an effort to get home in time for Christmas dinner. For ten days the corridors of the Cadet Barracks heard no sound of "Formation7' and "Study Hour." After New Year 's we all returned eager Qoh, my, yeslj for a few days of con- centrated effort before the assault upon our first deluge of examinations. Exam- ination week remains only a horrible nightmare to us, the end of which we 6 V' celebrated with a brilliant mid-year hop that lasted well into the morning of e-' 27 L 73.5 the next day. The results of the examination decimated the ranks of the class 49:1-Z 'Q Xi by sending Spicer, Anderson, Ericson and Gjoerlof out into the cold world again. fi Y Again we fell into the spell of the inevitable textbook and emerged only .,5',,H to trip the light fantastic at the monthly hop. The amount of our ignorance "W nf' revealed by the mid-year examinations drove us to greater efforts in the assimila- tion of information. ln the middle of April the list of new cadets were posted - and the end of our year of bondage was in sight. Many new ideas were con- ceived at this time for the instruction and edification of the incoming class of Swabs. Only those who have spent -a year on the lowest rung of the ladder X can feel the anticipation with which we awaited the arrival of the Class of '28. A l The terror of impending annual examinations was lost in the forecast glamour 1 of one stripe. , Examinations started on the same day that the new class arrived. Fervid prayers of Swabs for our success in examinations failed to keep a few of the ' , class from falling by the wayside. The names of Meyer, Smith, Hall and Buscher swelled the list of casualties. XVe gave a farewell banquet at the l Mohican in honor of these men, whose loss was deeply felt in the depleted ranks , Q of the survivors. After the banquet the cadets assisted in making the opening l X f X of Mago Point Casino a glorious success. .3 E 'E P On the 20th of May we donned our new stripes, the insignia of our first promo- ll Q tif ,R tion in the oldest and most glorious government service. The little eighth inch Ig M xulllgli diagonal of gold braid assumed monstrous proportions in our eyes 5 no admiral ever carried more brass than, viewed in our own mirrors, did we. The next few days were spent in placing the Alexander Hamilton in commis- sion, preparatory to our second annual practice cruise. We were no longer terrified by the thought of dumping ashes and holystoning the deck. NVhat a ? '2 7- flees- ' '4' , ,,. , ,ff g J.-,nn A - at is f ,V W,-if Q QEZ'-: tm A-554W" J i g 1 3.-Ala: i, - 35 lp n! 1 . - u p eff 4 5:13 . F- ,ia q -3, W ' Mit U. C.G,ef -f -ff Ala " "f S .Q-1 iigife. L L - ELXLQQ, r i it X'- . .lg X , 5- 4 X l. li 'gf 5 5 l ll Q. . T 4 x jim? Gia .Hill l l relief it was to 'look forward to a cruise where someone else would man the scrubbers and fall heir to the position of Captain 's Orderly! Under the pains- taking efforts of the new Second Class the Swabs soon became proficient in the arts and sciences incident to stowing holds a.nd rigging masts. Practice Cruise of 1925 The flower of New London's femmes was on hand to tell us "Be good!" as we cast off the lines on June lst for Europe. Oh, that was a cruise! XVe had no responsibility and less strenuous effort. The First Class shouldered duty and the Third Class fought for turns at the ash hoist. If only the spot book had been left behind, our yachting trip would have been complete. lVe feel certain that the First Class was grateful to us for the advice and assistance we rendered in making out the watch lists and ta.king charge of the night watches. Early on the afternoon of our departure Thompson managed to get the Ilcwwilton under sail after many conferences with the Second Glass Line. The ship fairly flew through the water as soon as the sails took the load off the antiquated coffee mill and for seven days we bowled along under all canvas with only an occasional call to man the braces. It was during this cruise that we showed our skill in seamanship by making unerring dashes to lines that needed slacking. From this time on we met head winds and boomed along at the terrific speed of four knots. So efficient were the members of the engineering section of our class that they soon had the bunkers empty and we were forced to change course for the Azores to recoal. Vfe anchored in Horta at the end of the second week and one watch went ashore sightseeing while the other watch prepared the coal- ing gear in readiness for an early turn-to in the morning. General liberty was granted the next day while the natives filled the bunkers and incidentally our lockers with VVale7s finest. Not much can be said for points of interest on the island of Hortag the heat was so intense Qalthough excuses are possibly a bit unnecessaryj that we naturally gravita.ted to those shops where native beverage was dispensed. The Hamilton pulled out for Gravesend early in the afternoon and we worked long into the night removing the remnants of coaling from the ship and our persons. The next six days were spent in standing watches with an occasional sail drill to break the monotony. Sail drill was a unique method of putting so many men on the yard that the sails would no longer draw and therefore must be taken in and furled. As soon as this little job was finished and all hands had lain down from aloft someone would discover that there was sufficient wind to carry sail and aloft we again would clamber to loose the canvas. Eventually a satisfactory harbor furl enabled us to make a landfall and we slipped into the Thames River. On the morning of the 24th we awoke to view once more the familiar sight of Gravesend and the Terrace Tavern. As soon as liberty was granted we hurried ashore to renew our acquaintance with Merrie England and one Johnnie Wallrer, "born 1820 and still going strong." The hamlet was still ,iff ":5 f Qe' I fi dll 5 I, 4 E . z: 1 l A , ji Jn, , ,.. 1 17 ilu. Y hilt Q ,al w X X. HW ful 2 li gif ff , .-.Q g r g R . 'sf aigis' 2 A , " i' LL' -'---- 'f -., L. I E, . . img.: l ' ' " if- . 'fi ff Q f -------'-I-mg if p , .nf --'4-QQ wily .. . , ,. - -f .7 h , - , A f SLT f f - Y , f ,Y , g:- 'T ff ---r A Y-.:E.... ' ' . 4 : -Y lm Rf- ': . 7 ' - - if , , ff .fi,,,,,.+" Y if-4 rg, Y f 4 ggzfnf-'L-y gf: ,gm P fif 'fi 5 K- Ai- .Y f 7 41:',:.'43f -:--QL 'Y J? T 'W' 1'9" - 17315 . ' -E Y -1 7:1 1 'af' Yr' Q IF5'3':L " X fP1"f?f'ffff, Saw' 1o1".c .g Q ' X - 'fa ll '-'-WE." -I lv' - 1 12' s - vs 1 X ' ' i pf. " i ff? ' fini J I W . ,- 31 at 'r L' the same, it looked as if we had left but a day, instead of a year, before-the same way, probably, it looked 300 years ago. There was a mad scramble for the first train to London. The famous Forty- 1 -X three Club was taken' over as a headquarters and rendezvous of the class. 1Ve - , -in spent many festive moments in this club after hard days of visits to the Tower xx .44-1: of London and Buckingham Palace. After a glorious two days back we went to the ship while the other watch relieved us of entertaining Britain 's belles. The Americans marooned in London challenged the cadets to a game of baseball and after a hard battle the Anglo-Americans managed to regain from us the championship of England, Ireland, Scotland and VVales, that we had held since the cruise of 1924. After a pleasant day of coaling ship we shoved off for a trip across Gertrude Ederlefs race track and arrived in Cherbourg in time to fire 21 gtms on the Fourth of July. Pleasant memories of our first visit to Paris made us impatient to get started on the Hgrande tour" of the world 's playground. The starboard watch drew Jirst liberty and the others, with a vague discomfort in their hearts that the city might be burned down before they returned, watched them go. By dint of numerous diplomatic maneuvers the port watch managed to get permis- sion to start for Paris before the starboard reported back. The next two days E i 5'2i' -' I 4 an were a veritable nightmare of whirlwind dashes from the Follies ,to Zelli's. U7 ,7 nf? Upon our return from Paris we returned to our commonplace duties of Hsoojy- 45,17 J i, Q, woogy, sand und canvas." Shortly before leaving for Gibraltar we gave a tea Q71 ii ' 'Pm dance aboard for the ladies of Cherbourg, the cadet orchestra functioning for :sag the first time on foreign shores. Vile spent six days on the trip to the Straits of ww Gibraltar, one day of which we amused ourselves by holding man overboard drills with the ship under way. . H Gullible ones scanned the mountain side for a look at the huge Prudential sign '61 'C on the rock as we dropped anchor in Gibraltar harbor. During the next few days all hands madeshort excursions through the British lines into Spain. On the 18th a large number of the officers and cadets chartered a steamer and , crossed the Straits of Gibraltar to Tangiers, Morocco. The largest part of the dl W day was spent in riding the Moorish variety of Rocky Mountain canary through , narrow streets and up the mountain side with stops at all the points of interest including the Sultan's Palace. Unfortunately, his wives were visiting his 1 mothers-in-law at the time. After a dinner at the only hotel of which the city V can boast we wended our way through the alleys, collecting souvenirs from , markets and shops. On the next day we sent our cheering section to the bull Xl fights at La Linea to root for the horned gladiators. Although handicapped 1 fl 3 from the start, the bulls, ably assisted by the cadets from the sidelines, managed 5,3 Q to do away with five horses before succumbing. . E " U, After a nine-hours' trip the Hamilton arrived in Cadiz, a town that has L, Xu Since become famous as the port in which one of our foremost clubs became sadly W il' 'l'i ' depleted and in which the class practiced making formal calls of short duration. lull' Mention of Eva 's laundry is made elsewhere in the book. The trip from Cadiz to Funchal was made under both sail and steam. The lx H mmlton outdid herself, often logging 13 knots, and making the dash in less . l ' Ig?-f 'fs if fi?-222232 itil? eigyfii-ilffaif K --' W li- T- "Z??"?4'm-,.-5-'3iii'?i-Y, ' -..Z-THAI? 5-"" ' . -' - ' i ' ?-P? .-TL-1'9-' , 1'-LL-:TT 2 an 2' - than two days. After staying only long enough to coal ship and trade all the socks in Small Stores with bare-foot natives we set sail for Bermuda. Owing to y pleasant weather and the unfailing assistance of the trade winds we devoted all our time to preparing for examinations in signals, seamanship and steam. ia' For six days we shut down the engines and coasted alongiwhile we sat on deck T V23 and harassed our minds answering conundrums officers placed before us. Two y 5 days before we sighted St. Davidls Head we holystoned the deck in preparation ' for coaling ship. The awnings were stretched, the sails furled, and the ship given a final touching up before we anchored in Hamilton., Bermuda, on the ' i 13th of August. l The ensuing week was a series of tea Hghts, sailing trips and swimming parties. N i Our visit to Bermuda during the Third Class year made the ladies of the island X seem like old friends. The people living in Hamilton and St. George certainly X made us welcome. One whole day was spent in making a trip in the ship's l launches to the famous sea gardens and coral reefs of which Bermuda boasts. As a pa.rtial repayment for the hospitality of the Bermudian ladies, the officers and cadets gave a dance aboard ship the evening before we sailed for New London. lVeighing a.nchor early on the morning of the 21st, we sailed for New London. In order that we could get away early on September leave we spent our time on this short voyage in taking down all the running gear and sails and by the time 7 7 we anchored in Long Island Sound we had everything ready for immediate QQ ip Q'f'b removal. lVe moored to the Academy wharf at eight bells on the morning of 1 1" Sf the 25th, flying a pink homeward-bound pennant of extraordinary origin, and inf' V if ' immediately moved into the barracks. lVe worked feverishly the next few days - iw putting the H Cl'7'1L'1.Zf07L out of commission and left on leave early on the lst of 2' September. ,J ef-Qiif fif' During leave Althauser, Brady, Griesenbeck, McGraw and Tompkins resigned " from the Academy upon being found deficient by the academic board. Owing to a mistake Schellhous also signed his resignation but was immediately rein- stated. The class did not know of the loss of these men until they returned from leave. V ,gl l I ' Second Class Academic Year ' The academic year started on the 22d of September with the staff of instructors V increased by the addition of three officers. The schedule of the Second Class was unusually heavy with difficult subjects. Calculus was our greatest bugbear. A Owing to increasing vigilance of the First Class very few of us ever stayed on JN f Q first conduct grade and liberty on Saturday afternoon and Sunday was sadly 4 I X curtailed. It was a long, hard grind unbroken save for the Corps' monthly hops. 'Q l UNB E The long-awaited miniature rings arrived late in September a.nd disappeared ii D soon afterward to be seen later on O. A. O's. in all parts of the United'States IMI! Wf and New London, Conn. ' ' illli During the first term UCasey of the Coast Guard" was filmed in New London, and a number of the class made their debut in Hlmdom. It is said that Scott has a future at Hollywood if he ever decides to leave the Coast Guard. On l 'Z-x'4' - 7 4 W., ., nf. I ' If W fff, -,K , ,. ,, "" L - - - - ' ' v f--f T2-v f ffdvgiw 'T' 'iegrgfleerjgi fiY1'mH A l , if at 1 ' -'ffi1g.e.-2Leg'-ev-.flip f-i fljel-i1"3 age- slgiigfrgf -iff :gif-iag-aj -.. - 1 isnt. 'PF A r ' -if -' f-t hey gi.. ,-4, isa., Q1Li?i'i 1 aj, I 1 'L ei if ,- .U , x-V A l is-'ir l L L3 fro Nfl., :J f I fl- ag I'I if H2552 nf Tlianksgiving day the Second Class succeeded in defeating the Third Class in football 19 to 6. Soon after, XValsh felt the urge to return to civil life and resigned, leaving but 23 in the class. Christmas and leave arrived eventually. Second classmen that remained at the Academy started housekeeping to the detriment of Room 3 5 repasts concocted then are still remembered by those who partook. The only disagreeable event of the whole leave was the resignation of Bowerman, president of the class. At the end of leave all hands returned for a couple of weeks of intensive study in preparation for mid-year examinations. For a change these examinations did not take their usual toll and drive second classmen out into the cold world, although a large percentage of the class spent their Saturday afternoons in making a. beaten path in front of the barracks because of their ability in acquiring the little black marks in the conduct book. One of the features of the last term of our Second Class year was the famous Rover Boy party in which ten of us were tendered a surprise party upon return- ing from liberty. Mr. Tyler gave a reading that was unusually successful. From this time on we counted days, hours and minutes until graduation would make us first classmen. Gradually the days rolled away. NVe ordered our rings in preparation for the great event. Examinations decreased to insignificance in comparison with the exit of the Class of '26. No proud mother or devoted sweetheart was more pleased to see them finish than was our class. After graduation, open house was held in the afternoon and the Graduation Brawl in the evening. Wlieii the smoke following the festivities cleared away, the Cadet Corps sped the weary hour by again giving the practice ship her inal overhauling before the cruise de luxe-our First Class cruise. Not much was accomplished until I :fs ' I f 42. l l N .L 17 t I 4 if , ' -v-. 3 two diagonals were made uniform and then the Alex Ham was outfitted in L: short order. ! Practice Cruise of 1926 A if 1Ve shoved off on our 4'See America First" cruise at 1 P. M. on June lst, 6-lm escorted by 'a tug carrying a full capacity of femmes to wish us godspeed. At ' the mouth of the river we parted, the Alexa-ncleo' Hamilton, heading for Parris ' 1 ' Island, South Carolina and the tug returning to the whaling city. Four days of ' piloting brought us to our first destination-the barren desert isla.nd which is inhabited by a strange animal, the girene. For twelve days we crawled 21TOL'l11Cl 1 X 1 in the hot sun on the target range, exerting every effort to make a bullseye and XX 1 T 5 to forget the sardine sandwiches. From early morning until late at night we 1' gm E, tried to master the details of windage and elevation in spite of the oppressive 4 U ,H my heat which would invariably turn our thoughts to ice water and the "ole swim- .ry ming hole." Sunday the 13th we celebrated by playing a baseball game with ly llli-'i' the Naval Prison in the morning and by holding a tea aboard in the afternoon W for the officers and ladies of the post. Outstanding among our South Carolina adventures is that of the ti1ne we placed in commission The Night Club on the Dock at Port Royal. After long-drawn-out festivities in Beaufort even tomato l ll r f'-r f" as --- A .. 5 -... I lin-3-Eflg. . -,.- 1 . . T. 1 1, .5 5 Ji ,.5.,. . f Sl , ,- nf -, ?e."2-'ver Lfaiiffa' T -V , , "' N iZ' f ' W S, 'N ' 1 1 B N- New 'l l' ' eg ef fefi 'fair crates and deserted railroad coaches seemed like Home, Sweet Home to those of us who'd frolicked that evening in the good old Southern fashion. Upon leaving Parris Island we headed for Bermuda, the summer playground l - of the Corps of Cadets. During our stay at this port we witnessed the end of . d Wifi the annual New London-Bermuda yacht race and goined in the incident festivi- ZZ, yi -' ties. Contrary to our usual practice, we spent but a short stay in the land of l coral and onions, ending a delightful-visit with the customary dance aboard ship. Aa . 'il The trip to Halifax was uneventful except for a short delay when we put a 4 3 ,af el launch over the side to take pictures of the Alefrcmzder Hamilton under way with ' l all sail set. VVe arrived in Halifax in a dense fog but managed to crawl up the l T5 stream to the International Ice Patrol dock. The people of Halifax were quite ll hospitable and our six-day stay was a series of parties and da.nces. Our ly departure came too soon for everybody. After a day and a half at sea we N arrived back in Los Estados Unidos at Rockland, Maine. Most of our time 5 here was spent in boat drill notwithstanding the dense fog that enveloped the z harbor., Six first classmen made a trip to Vinal Haven by launch to visit Smith, a former classmate of ours, at his island home. One of the features of our sojourn in Rockland was the return of late liberty parties in whaleboats left all fi' i . "lt ' n. X3 l .fx Erma fihllyf, il rl l l conveniently moored at the landing of the Samoset Hotel. On the 16th of July we sailed to Portland. Owing to the brevity of our stay in this port we did not unearth the hidden possibilities of the city iuitil too late. The occasion of our disillusionment was a lawn party just prior to our departure for Boston. ' The Hub of the Universe was a disappointment to us. ' 'We spent so much time getting lost among the maze of former cowpaths that are misnamed streets that we were unable to find time to take advantage of the liberty that was granted to us. It is said that a few took flving trips to New London from Boston but the reasons therefor are not available for publication. From Boston we continued our journey down the coast, arriving in Philadel- phia on the 29th while the Sesqni-Centennial Exposition was at its height. Drill was held every day in preparation for a parade on Coast Guard Dav, the anni- versary of the founding of the Service, August 4, 1790. Seventeen Coast Guard vessels were present at Philadelphia and constituted the Sesqui-Centennial Squadron. The Superintendent of the Academy commanded the parade. which was participated in by landing forces from every vessel of the scuadron. On the following day the cadets made an inspection tour of the Navy Yard and the naval aircraft factory. On the 7th the officials of the Exposition tendered the officers and cadets a banquet, after which the squadron disbanded, the Alcxcmder Hamilton proceeding to New York early the next morning. Shore leave in Babylon consisted of exploring each man for himself the allur- ing mysteries of Hoboken, Harlem and Hell's Kitcheniand gravitating later. as the witching hour approached, to the stronghold of Bohemia. Many belated liberty parties were ferried aboard early in the morning on unauthorized trips of the running boat manned by the quartermaster and his anchor watch. From New York the ship sailed to New Bedford. Our first liberty was taken up with viewing the possibilities of Fort Rodman as a future site of the Academy. The New Bedford Chamber of Commerce was Pl '7 C' "' ,al NX lib 'll l.ll l l ' -4' of ,fn 153: , . T JM , -as . , ,. -1 .H i!-,.cf E LL .. ,:.- "-'-1, H.. I i J.. .Him Y. -L.. MM mu Q JQA ,. .4 '- , . . -- -a-Qi- ' ,. ' . , 1. mmzgfg, Y 1 -J f - -g ' 1. -,, -- A ' Y- - L ' """""""f"'lE- :L ,.?Z..g:'.-,. f 1."f.:f" i tif- -2 5.'.Jf,-JZ '54, --is fiil' 3 iv- Y A, ' -Trl -' 1fi.YT . 4' .7 YT " ' f gh,..'2,'f2""f LL 'i fel 2 , IT Fifi ij 152,-j 4. -V "??'3l Q-.-7' 1 2- If E62 f. f N' ia f i-efifjiif-gLkQ?-?Li'E-" gfiiiilgig L53-ff fr - 52 I X 1 amz., 51 ,4 ,- 5 1 5 gig: - M! f',u i, j k f ,Q 1.3: fn .. L ge X Tgsgllf 305 i552 ' '1 M- 1 . - 'Slim ff' ---1 T li" ' 'asf fl V - - , - Ah- at that time making a campaign to have our Alma Mater moved to their fair city. In line with this campaign the citizens gave a dance for the officers and cadets at the New Bedford Hotel on the evening of the 17th. This one act went a long way towards gaining the support of the Cadet Corps. At Newport, our 4 next port of call, we visited the naval torpedo station and held the inevitable f. boat drills. The people of Newport added much to the pleasure of our short X- sojourn there by arranging sightseeing tours and banquets, and by their gener- , ' osity in handing out theatre tickets. NVe shoved off for New London on the " morning of August 25th and arrived back at the Academy at 2:30 that after- ' f 4.7 QD , D X, in ' Q s P lil noon, thus bringing to a close our last cruise as cadets on the good ship Alex H am. A week 's hard work in dismantling the practice cutter and in placing her out of commission put us in fine trim to enjoy September leave. The new class of cadets was due to report the day after the beginning of leave but a few unfortu- nates drifted in early, much to their subsequent chagrin. A committee of second classmen under the direction of one of our classmates stayed at the Academy to welcome the benighted innocents who cherished a desire to enter the halls of learning of Uncle Sam's School for Boys, on the Thames. There is much doubt in the minds of the editorial staff as to the methods used to instill discipline and knowledge into the new third classmen but the results obtained seemed most satisfactory. No foreign potentate ever received a more ceremonious ovation than did each individual upperclassman on his return from leave. First Class Academic Year Immediately following our first full corps formation, on the morning of September 22d we started on the last lap of the contest for commissions. The amalgamation of line and engineer branches of the service added additional subjects to the curriculum of our First Class academic year. Concentrated doses of steam were thrustnpon the former line cadets and the navigation department started a reign of terror among the hitherto monkey-wrench gang. A month after the beginning of the term, just as the class was beginning to get both feet firmly braced under the unwieldy load of studies, the executive department announced that in view of the shortage of officers in the service the Class of 1927 would graduate in January. Not even theknowledge that Internal Com- bustion Engines, Service Regulations, Seamanship, and Military Law would be added to an already heavy schedule could dampen our enthusiasm at the welcome news. Every one took a new lea.se on life and determined to do or die. Although the odds were against them, the editorial staff insisted that they publish the TIDE Rirs in spite of the shortage of time. The midnight oil was burned long and late, and in some cases certain firstclassmen were known to leave a warm bed as early as 4:00 A. M. to grapple with the day ls problems. Christmas leave arrived in time to keep twenty-two men from filling padded cells at Brewster 's Neck. life returned from leave on the 2d of January and received word the upperclassmen would make a mid-winter practice cruise on the Mojave. ,i 4 l fi Al T5 7? fl 7 ij' ' it ig.v f.f ,Z s, 4 l ll YD il, aff: , , E ws. , , , A -F - , , . - 5 , . f- 2 71. -. .. .A .g-Zea -- -1 if " - ,. - - - E' 31 .1 if f V - n A ff : - f --f--v-----f"E.-:ie-Y .. n f -.g -,:'2- - of -1 fs 'Cf' Q QT- fi, ' L:1'., -- 27- if ' L' -- 71 I T f , ':-3-14" -'AfqIrf'L ' " : N t'iT K-if 1' Z' Y ,. 1.fW':J n TT Hi , -- 1, 1 if .,, '11-1-?'?-'?f2? Y--.-J J 5422-:.-.he f X :YE - f, w- Y -I f -ltr, f - - -572. 1 -5 ,r wif ll? -gfif fhzes-, -' LT, ,Af I K ., fizrsif-7 A, 2 f - fiig- - ., : A, X. - . , 251 f .,,f 1 - " i' - iff , , ggi . -: 1f21f.i fr2. , ,, f ' My Kang- 'lawn E41 - ! 3 .gg-,kv i Wil" i Bad weather, impending examinations, and the team's defeat combined to take most of the joy out of our trip to Annapolis, but the hospitality and sports- X manship of the Midshipmen went a long way toward oifsetting our sorrows. L' Q After the game and a couple of hops we steamed down the Severn, bound for ' ,ly New London and our last exams. Let us in silence pass over the ten miserable gift, 5 xx days spent in examination rooms, that we may more quickly forget the embarrass- I F" ,ls ing exposure of our ignorance. By grace of the gods and the superhuman assim- r , Q-,gg . 1 ilation of information at the eleventh hour we managed to survive the final ordeal. . lk i On the morning of January 28 came the unheralded dawn, catching two and 3' . twenty graduates all unawares. "To-dayf' they chortled, gleefully heaving i shoes and blacking brushes as they rose for the last time from their lily-white o' ix A bunks, "our eniacipation is complete!" N X Even McKay Calthough he really Clldllit need itb took a careful shave and l neatly brushed his hair: Many of the lads broke out clean white collars in l A wild abandon. Together they struggled into monlzey-Jackets, together marched they- from Bankrupt Hall down ,Show does this soundlj Hthrough marble - corridors into a vast assembly hall. In everyone the holidaylspirit prevailed, not even could it be crushed by the gaunt, spectral view of New London's 'LL1ttl.e Italy" that shone through 6' ,S the windows down upon the graduation scene. Then-it was hnishedl Each L .1 27 4' . . . . y Lying of us walked dazedly back to barracks, clutching tightly the bit of parchment 65,5 V' il X: that had cost us nearly three years of concentrated work and untold liters of 57' V ' ff ' highly compressed hot air. Oh, supreme of all delights, oh most complete of 4' will aullilatlsfacilonlil l l b l tl K l 7 fi me buildinos uid soidid sur , ,- K e can iarc v oo: ac: on ,le ,L'CZlfC1l'lY s 'a 1 gn a . ' .' - If -, " . : . ' . . .. . I .gg N fi :-Q roundings Cto wit: the Ghettoj with any particular degree of pride and affection, f I but-what matter these more material aspects V? During our three years as ,' cadets we learned that the Academy is forever symbolized to the graduate in the friendship, the fellowship, the scholarship, and that subtle, mdetinable Academy spirit that ever characterizes the Academy man, which he acquires Aix 'A there. Of these symbols of our Alma Mater are we proud. X 1 A X l W il Hfi 9 li lj NE E W U Titty, ,cl - ...ol I ll I4 N12 ' li, Wifi ull' tl l ', 1 ,ff imma. -can .. i, p W 'QR ,, - , 44. ,. K. , . , ? q. nigiiir - - ' Q -. i --- V- -1 .. A pl .q . y" " " " we r -E yet iiit21l?Ti.1eei'f4 fiiii'-FE'-,f?e.l:i+'. ifiiiiiii - "--- A 'Y '.- ' f ' 'S' -' : r-2 fr- is' ' - I I fr I II I I " " ff' IIe:S2'1:1E:- -fissm-ff-E-7? ---ff fff- E . ' M It I ,E S 3 R ada, -J y, Q-Ru xi .' I If' I CAMPER FARM I --I E-ffpf' -'Eg ' ix I " X I79O If III ' 5 4 N - . fs: :PV E-,, I I-55510 417112 5" H 4 Zi - -' :gif 32 I if ' I 9 I A, r , I I ,.,. SWE 0 I Q SI 11,7 'il BQMMIIIIG 9, 45 E 3 W I . . - ' 1 . . ,.,- I -. . .-, ,I ,f UW ,I 1:21601 -'-rw M 4. wr- J" "5 I 1' 1 ". , IU, A' L, 1 'L' IZ?-"Wx rffjf " ', 2 I HI- 52? xc f li gf A I f-,ri If L f J I I gh? Q '29 f Q -"' ,, S -,EE 2 X . -3-' 'E-1 ? x X22 U14 :QI . fr 'fs f- x . f I 1.4 ,fl 5 Li,1xx gf .agfhvwm 5 ,541 fly izqcx l.2',oL. 'I,.-IE? QI 1 ,,.'-45.15 '91, ',' 5-Ex "?-' ff, ,pi I X ff QMH1 Ie ' I' ff ' Iflr Q, f- ,Zi 03 l 754 lg X " JA. Z I N7 ' , ' ' I Z I I I I . 1 K I I I I I I , I I I I I I , I I I I ,,, . 131 I 63777 --X :. X N 5 Vw I 'III I I I I 'I I I f 'F vu I . II 147' f. .x 'W' I , U 1 I 3 I v I t g U 3 I 1 I 5 1 y I 1 O 5 U ' Q5 T 5 E E Ci 2 X ,..-W-qw---fn Wg - - S . l Q -- . Q- l . N, 4 X H Q H - I A '- 'W 'khh "'- .439-'i ff'i."2is2r V , I A - COMPANY OFFICERS W A- Left to v-ight: THIELE, PHANNEMILLER, TOLLAKSEN, EVANS, PURCELL. - iz ,,,,: 2 - H 1, AT , Llalf :,',,, 3 f 'A::, K v . WWV az.,-gy J I H wtf? . .y,.a.2,b - ,.,..,.. .,,3.. A . ..,, -,... I A . . .. fv - I ' ..L A' 229' W ' ,Q 32 'ev fa ' f:-' k ' 'W .. ..,- . -"2-f--' '-" f"" ' 5 , H 1 CC O C CC O C O CC OO z F ":A "' 'A-A ,A -: A'1f O ':" C- A 'A.AW . 2 Y ::" .- 5 f A O C'O ' ' '-' " CACC F5 gg O OOOO O O O L 3 fi OO O C O O OO O OCCO : OCOO ii -Z - ,A 1 ig --'- -'-i-' A Q ju Av mfg C f Q Q .. , , C Mi O .- Q S- -. L H PETTY OFFICERS Q 3 C ., fwrvvwwrfvwr-T' vvvvvwm, 0 Iwi-,gqvpg ,1W,0,r,my W,Q,f,'Cq'm,r'v,Q,r,'53T,'5,'rW, Qgwviyyg y,'5f'vaW,Q, ,mvam1W,Q,mrm '1'Q"1T""1 Q-1iv'fjV'f,1V'N'vN'fQuQj1Qj1'QY'jlv-v1LjjV"V1QjV'-VvV!Lj,1 ., , If H ' L g 3 EQ L 5 4 I X if inmMunM1mimHs1nMtgMM imtmm1 mmQ1nHmmm1umm. ,i. .i, .1. . . . 1 . Ai No sooner had the Class of l2'7 hit A the Academy than it began to make i military history. Wlieii the call ,. went out, 18 days after we entered, 2 for all the Qthenj Third Classmen Who Q had had previous experience to volun- Q teer for the Decoration Day Parade, 5 some of us were innocent enough to Ei step forth and say, 'iI'll go, take i me!"-little guessing the foot-Weary- f ing march that lay before them. The 1 thrill, however, that attends one's 5 nrst parade as a member of the - Corps-and it is no uncertain thrill, A f but one that causes Svvabs to stick out 3 I g their chests and step high-repaid us for the g ' long monotonous trek through New London's 3 finest cemeteries. Q Two days later the line branch of the Class A put to sea on the "Hamilton," leaving their gi bilge-diving classmates to the scant joys of l bieaking racks and executing 'ccoripiiniiis left 1' a out" unc er tie summer sun. iiee was , selected to command the platoon until the - cruise's end, but unfortunately for him he ' missed a 'icoffee formationl' one night after a ' hop and Was sentenced to carry a 3 rifle for the remainder of the term. Q Tollaksen succeeded him as platoon - commander, and With his trusty 1 Wooden sword led the Swabs-That ' Were in the July Fourth parade Q Walsli was lucky enough to Win E5 and hold the position of platoon petty E officer and, with his empty holster, '5 constituted the source of much envy i among the riflemen. - After our first Sep leave the Swab v Platoon was broken up and the pieces 4- thoroughly distributed among upper ' classmen to form the Company. Due ' i 3 'S T"'rwWV'r'rf't't"PMW:WaW+WaWwaWaM't"wW W,mmm,vg,'5',xW,Q,sg-,'m,sW,mW,O,:vwWf't'?'Vr"':VfWr'fW , .1. .i. .f. .i. .i. .,. lv-vs,-vwsf to the early graduation tin Septemberj of the Class of '25, Moore C265 was ra.ted Company A Commander, Imlay C261 and Cowart t'26j, e Platoon Commanders, and Stinehcomb C262 -L - Company Sub-Commander. Moore and Imlay later swapped stripes, due to Moore 's suscepti- . Q bility to the lure of the great out-doors-over-the-- fence, and throughout our Third and Second H e . . EQ , Class years, these men drilled us with thorough- gg ' ' going conscientiousness, with the result that at the end of Second Class year we were able to In take the company and make ot it a really military, snappy outfit. L At the Competitive Drill of '25 the Second Platoon, under Cadet Cowart, won lirst place and carried off the cup as trophy. The First Platoon was disappointed with defeat, but soon brightened at the thought that "Second place was not so bad after all!" Bowerman won nrst honors over Eastman Q'26j, ii W in the Manual of Arms Competitive on the same day. ,,.......Q, 3, aWitli the premature "graduations" of some of the Class of '26, Q- in May, several members of our Class were rated petty officers to IQ we shoved off on the "Hamilton," trading all thoughts of matters W military for far more roseate dreams of la vie Parisienne. In our Second Class year we witnessed a repetition of the pre- ceding year's grind--drills and more drills, eternally whipping Z us into some semblance of a military unit. On Graduation Day, '26, the Second Platoon, Cadet Cowart Q commanding, again filched First Place from the eager grasp of the First Platoon and VA again carried off the cup as spoil of war. This year Carroll C'2Sj, took First Place in the Manual of Arms Competitive, with Maude a.nd McKay finishing second and third, respectively. ' At Parris Island, on our First Class Cruise, 3 '27's war-like education took on a new aspect. They would make killers of us, would they? g Send us out to shoot a.t flimsy bits of paper and die of thirst and sardine sandwiches on South Carolinas arid sands, huh? Well., we'd show -- 'em, we would! And actually, we did. Just take a look at the list -of activities that is attached to each man 's personal page and count the dead eyed gunmen vie have among us " " l" T" 1" 'l" i " " 7" 'i i ' "" 1 i . iill the vacancies thus created. Our military careers as Swabs terminated with the inevitable Memorial Day parade and again E F, l I I l l Bring on your duels, murders, battles-we're ff . ' r as all set for gory times! .4 . ' r W'hen we got to Philadelphia in August we i Q'u- -' - ffl found the Sesqui all ready to welcome us with a vast parade-we to act as paraders with Thiele "out frontl'-and on Coast Guard Day, August Fourth, we celebrated the 136th birth- day of the Service by leading the C. G. parade V . A from the Navy Yard through the Sesqui Grounds to the Coast Guard Exhibit Building. Returning from Sep leave the members of the Class acted as company officers in rotation, to give everyone experience in command and to make possible the choice of permanent company officers. The first public showing of the Corps in New England under the leadership of '27 was in the Armistice Day parade in Norwich, Conn., when the cadets, three full platoons strong after the influx of , . . . qw . ,. -1' 1f,f2g.f-Q ,mfg-'Ma 'f,3,,..1.fQ,fj r ' ,-' A r , .. l,l. . ,1.l . . , . ,. . f 1 j ' -..,..4 f .7-...f,. ,J J L ,Q , y 4.1, ,.,,5h.- li, , M, ,gg , q , , , - K .A MW If ,fa ., ,5g1y.v, ,5 ,-4 f , 5 , '.,.ffz 'Z' - . - " K i ' 'f ' ,. 'H - -f i 'A ' 'M gy f f -1-fygqgygw-4-whf.w1o,.4.v",,.'J y ...:W.,',, g,fy ,,,, . ' - - U 1, ' 4, ' l is A., 'Q . av, .N J ' '06-s ' ' 4 f V-ill-f' 'J . 1 'I f , - 4 4".f41w:fi,-'.- , vt 1 W W W5 A 5, V ' X 14 ' as 'f f ii' ' ' 1 'S 71 n K I p VVAI . ar. , -I L 'K J! . , gg, ,rg ,A fra ' the new Swabs, marched at the head of the column reviews, inspections, and such functions, while the whole Class continued in seniority rotation to hold the , ,,,, ,V d ,H with Thiele again in command and Schellhous, Evans, . and Tollaksen as platoon leaders. Tlnele was finally rated permanent Company Com- L1 . 1, . T 11. lv. E . . 1 P H . . Pl. manc ci, o axsen, vans anc ui ce peimanent a- . .X toon Commanders, and Phannemiller permanent Com- pany bub Commandti. Tl iese men commanded at Fi, fr? gflpiff- 7 fe 5 'Ya 5 W N , A A Q R ,wry 5 f n 0 39 gi' A 'IL 9 my I 5 ' F i. ' vs usual drills. Schellhous, Linholm and Maude also received permanent ratings, as Platoon Petty Officers. In our First Class year we succeeded in gaining the cooperation of every member of the Corps, in trying to give our Academy that greatest of all her assets, a well-disciplined, well-taught, well-drilled military unit, and we feel confident that when we have left the Academy the classes that follow will, because of our efforts, have something more in the way of esprit de corps to carry on through the coming years than ever in times before. , , wage fi. fa-mg, , baggy-i.,. S sv rf we W Q if fbi! f3'2'N',4-.w ' ' ,, X - ,-' - , , P-,sf ss., Vsgyzfi-' 4.185 41, ,Q-.-:Q .V ' 4-4-+I-2 -ls" 1 ,N f . 1 7 A , , , we' N 4 fc . f ,ga ei, ,gr M, il , . . ff ' I i ' 1' 1 4 ' f , , W ,QW Z i, if , sa, ,L f . Hr- 'wx lk amy Q f -. 4 ---- ' - i - Nwvfn n w't'i'f'1'uVwVuWvsrA"rvvvWv'vvrN:WivfW1V'1Wn 4Wr"ff'r'1v'1Wr'vaWaWrf'rNwWrfvrf'ff-1Wv'ff'i'-1WWl AAAA vvvvvv ,? . EK " ' ' -? V , ' wg ' u -5 3 na -V. ni,-.w'. 2 , 'if 1 ,Q , 2 ' A 5 1 3 'f W3 1 -, f -ff' ' W I , M ? 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M QQ " f wdgmewx A at ff, jx! b -wi? Q.. -'L-'E 1,2 ,f' f I ,qyfh 'A ' Nna,.L,,. :aa 1,1 -1rMQrbF... ,QA 4x fa W 4 --a 1, 'Q Vi '2 W 1 5 3 'w 4 7: 0 w 4 1, 0 w 4 71 lu 'I' Q W 4 Ai, tu '? r O O U D , . I D . 4 41 Z 41 in 4m 7, P tm 7 4+ U U 9 ,P n i. . a . . Q . v 'T" T" ?" ,QV',Q,r,'5,T,'5,v",Qmiamf,Q,1,Q,:,D,:,Qmgffgg ' agqvfvvv,gm91:51,Q,:,Q,x,mn,Q,m,Q11,'5-,TfmW,D,aW,0,rfv,Q1:WT'A-f' -vfwwrfvvfvz I E 5 1 P 'T 'N 5 5 S 2 7 5 'L r 4 A I 0 4 4 4+ a 'a 4 5 3 W 4 r -4 'r 4 4 3 BASEBALL F ff?-.EE X Nu Q"- MKS' 1 'WAP-va W WF 3 ,la g151llkl l , -vlll 11 'iw' glgfqfaf wuz ,- yf4v.1vqiLK gm. K iii 5 1 is '5"!L.x- I., .Lf 1 -TY, H 1 ' I , I4 .,:f. ferst vgv1v1v1v1. .:- A1 1. ,l. ,1 ? 1 ' ' I ' ' . 1 f X ' x rl 1'- ' 4 41 f . X .51 . . A' I' 19.1 . X X . . f- .t f- X '.'-,:f,'7ff' Aft- ,- 5 .' A x --Sm: if A ' .5-Kam, g1'1-fbfmqgg N f , 'W711' HX rf 5- ' .1 ll' any :I ,liz 44. , , , ., W- . ' N d-,., , 1. I '. , X " 'X I IAM-f fx' ,I I K1 myqxv ,,, ,-S , , KQH5 SS. ? .fi ...J U H , 1 my wm- a' ' L, .1 A ' A G izii'nW""'v"V"V"z13iz0i10i1L3i1A1l1'Zx'uV' A1hL3i1LxuF"V'V"f3U1L31kL11 N?'1A1kx'i'i D7 113n .r. .1 1 s 1 1 , BASEBALL 5 -z.. 1924 W tg X, Late August, 1924, found the Hamilton fini '.,' f ," b1'eez1ng into ldew London harbor with the W ' - f :'v if ll, ,'1: f 1" A., Baseball Champions of England, Scotland, Tre- ., if ,Z ,vlb , ,La w X px, 1 kk. . land, and Wales on-board. Then.. P1-oud title w " V, k,, ,H -f was won by defeating the American Legion nuzi W ,. ,.Y. 3 Y 'V.. , V, 'lu .lzu X Team, crack sluggers of the British Isles, by a I 1mV , :AE .- Awlu score of 8-5, in London. The team deserves M .4-, 1 7 j p more than usual credit for this victory because " , X X, in Lf any sort of practice to put them in real fettle , ,, for such a hal-d G11gag'e1l'1Gl1t was an impossr. .',,,, ,,,'f H -'L, ,,-f 'L Autl bility. After a long, tedious voyage across Q ful V, y " ' if 1' .- 5 5.3 , the Big YVater the boys were able to go ashore " ',-.: if .rf 'i x,r' 7 ..f', r""-,-1 Y -,lr and beat the landsmen on their own battle- THE ENGINEERS ' Tnarr ground. Encouraging support from the Corps, then on leave in London, overcame material handicaps and the game was won by one of those spectacular climaxes that always distinguish the great games of fiction. Until the first of the ninth the Cadets were apparently hopelessly behind, yet retained their spirit until the last, which enabled them to lay down a barrage of hits Y L that finally netted the Academy a comfortable three-run lead. At the termination of the cruise our Champs found the Engineers of 1927 boasting a, rare team that publicly announced itself out for the overseas title. Challenged and challenger clashed, and from the melee emerged the Engineers with the crown, defeating the salty ones 11-2. E' ' 1925 . In London again, in 1925, we staged a contest with the American Legion Team, This time the Hamilton 5 did not return with the championship, the Corps was defeated 5-2 in an excellently played game. Coach Derby showed the Legionnaires a snappy ball club even in defeat. Our lack of practice was not in f evidence and errorless ball resulted. S4 1926 VVith the advent of spring class rivalry in the sport again ran high and was evidenced by the many challenges that started to creep about. The Class of 1927 once more was champion, The latter part of June found our team stacking up against L the "Prisoner-sl' of Parris Island, S. C. This team had quite a record and was out gunning for the Cadets. No previous PTAC' Q tice had been possible for the Academy but we suffered defeat V only after a hard-fought battle in which the "Prisoners" were 1 obviously outplayed. The Cadets led for seven innings by a count .. of 4-3 and seemed to be sailing along to victory, but in the last 1- of the seventh a fine drive by one of our foes brought in two big -- runs that clinched us in defeat, 5-4. 3- We expect soon to see a regular schedule of intercollegiate base- -f ball facing the Academy each spring. To-day, with no big games W at which to shoot, the spirit of baseball is not properly aroused. ' Our schedule would from necessity terminate with the first of June " but there is ample time in April and May for some really worth- ' while games. IN LoNDoN f EH'H?I31'7m1""V"'1Qy1Q1lV"1Q1i""yQ1l""yQj""lQ1F'T'1QlaH1'Q"jT"'1Q1lHX1 VvfggjgQj1'Q"1T!'Q"yT1'Q"3T'T'rQJVF gl""'yQ3t""x'v!QjZg11v"yQ3lV!Q1'7m1WEm?1'vQglvvvfyQy!'Q"1'V"" gj1QnQf!Q3T O U U 'PUC ' U U UU U U UUUUU ' U FOUTBALL RSF X N. v-13 0IVAW4 Y aff f fzvgt ' ,126 9 '5' ' ,151 Q 94 X' Wi" EQF: N ' WUf3'r '4'a,f',9'8 x 'W' Wy Qsifx Nw XX I mill N 'Fi-cnt 2 g 5 g Qg q r l l l l N V 1 . .1. .1- A!- ,:. .:. .1: ,L O 1 ' U C Q , - I Z -. K M 3 . ' K . ..L" , f 'ff U K f 4.5 gig N-47. . 'f - t . " Y A ,f 1, , , - , ,L it 1,5 I A , fgffffgg-2 .- - f,J ,W wi f Q '- 2' " ffl, Q ' A' :ffa 'Eiiiffa ' " ' ,A sl ' fws f ' b 2 ' tiff' E! 14 . Q, ef I "Af 53:9 FQ . 2 FA' T M55 , ' , 1 J 5' D ' . ' v 'N z .. If 27'-' ,M V MQ' K 2 , f .I y I 1 - XX if L A ,' Z ffff 3 qi J 11,1 V. - 177- -- ' 'I - Z UAS? 'Q KJ , , f . it x 7: 41 1 2 2 D . . ,, 9 um W Vzmxmmx 1 Vwfviwx 1 r V f'1 V"V"V"7"'T"V"V'VVvV"V"?WiEiE'iHiS1lW7v7"4W7"VvYx0iQ 4 4' 9 1 41 9 AAAAA6 .A,.,a,aA,,,,, , , , , , 1, , V , .,,,J,..,,,.,.1.,v.s,,,,.,,.-I,.,, I I I I I I I FOOTBALL 1924 1925 'W' Intensive 2.lC2lClC1l1lC courses perlnit little opportunity for the Cadet Corps to play football. In View of this very power- ful drawback the Athletic Association deemed it advisable, in 19241, to refrain ' U I C ' U U U U U U U V U U U U I U U Q U U I f 1 5A A1A A:A A1A AjA A1 ' I C U ' D I D . 4 . I from collegiate activity in this branch of sport. I However, on o11e bleak Novernber morn' , ing of that year the pigskin warriors of A- the Classes of '26 and '27 faced each other 2 for the supremacy of the Academy. The - poundage of '26 offset the advantage of speed in the lighter '27 team and thus the Y crown went to the higher class by a score 1 of 7-0. Some excellent material was shown 1 H' by both classes, and the close score tells 1, '26 vs. '27 but part of the really good playing that 5 evidenced itself. During the game ,."' I A I ,,.A. E 5 many spots were erased from the ,i,, , ,QL 5 books, and bruised battlers of '27 pypp g I l returned to the barracks content with .V,.b 5 if 2 the knowledge that theirs had been a zfpz ll gloriously gory fight. A Ag-21111, 111 1925, the only footbuir at 5 , p,1. . the Academy was an interelass game, - between '27 and '28. Many physical "" 5 periods were observed in p1.epa1-ation .Z ,... - ,W -." , f' V-ff ":f I .'-' 5 i'LI.'FS?----3-f 1. "V-cfEf'1'Y""fW 1 . .Me -'-f 'fr . ' '4,1. "' , .,.., .,f: 2 1 fo' the HWY ed the f isei irff 'r' 'f 1 ' g eeto 7 f 1 5 ciz n ...," ,1 1 1 if I ,. Q 'N' 1 "1V 1 I , 5 '27 VS. '28 1I 5 desire to boast as "champions of the Academy" ran rife in both classes. E Many freak plays were perfected by the two teams as in secrecy they l practiced, one behind the Caseinates and the other on the parade ground. ' W Thanksgiving niorning was the tinie and Morgan Park the site of g the all-important clash. The field was covered with snow but the rivalry more than offset this discouragenrent. As a final outcome the Y Class of 1927 emerged as victors by the count of 12-6. Many stiff S joints were carried to the groaning Thanksgiving board in fond nienrory A '26 VS. '27 of our one game in 1925. ' I I I I ?'7'V"'?'1Q'1Ih"'7'VV1QpQ11i'Q"yfY"!Q1I"gg3S"7'!Q1I1'Q"jF'fgF'vyQgI"fi"'fV""1Qj1'Q"-WYP"T"'T"'lVN'P'NT"'I""?'7'V"T"'EE""I""I"VP"'iV"T""I I I 1M UD11m D!m! d ji started work with a squad of thein and A nearly the same plane as their Varsity squad. After our long absence from the gridiron, this 45-0 score Z 5 Z 5 y e11,g'aQ,'en1e1'1t on the home lot in many years, it seemed but itting, ZMg9?,,,W3,,. ,, 4, f,y,,,,.,4M? 1 1926 .V-v' This year wrote for us a. diierent foot- ball sto1'y than the two preceding ones. A large Swab Class entered in Septem- N-viv-v i 1 ber and Coach Richards immediately A 0 held practice every afternoon while the P reniaincler of the Corps was away. On ' returning from Sep leave we found that U V 5 ' 'l'l 1 1 ' ' I ' ' I ' ' A A ,- .A i A .,. L. . IA -1 , . . J . J . . . 9 9 n v o , 1 . 2 1 . Q for the first time in three years the A Acadeiny would be represented on the .- F2 gridiron. Exponents of the pigskin art E, la among therupper classes joined the squad, .- which continued its schedule of long hours W 3 of intense practice through September - 2 and well into October. S- I Then came the season's first encounter, W - 327 VS- 728 in which HarVard's Second Team demon- ' 3 strated the advantage held in this sport if by larger institutions by whipping us 45-0. Even though defeated, our team played a brand of football " 5 which was a. credit to the Academy. Harvard's Seconds, this past season, was admitted to be on very 4 against such a team as the C1'lI11SO11,S is no discredit to Coach R-icliards' aggregation, About the middle of October the team hopped a bus to Lowell, 3 i Mass., to take on strong Lowell Tex. This affair ended with the Cadets fighting hard to cut down a 12-O score. The experience 'Y gathered and the actual iinproveinent in our teain's technique, A g during this fray, gave added spirit and conidence to the squad jg 7. - . , ,Q . i .A P-' U ISD ' S EO 13 F2 5' o p-5, re- V3 3' Q C1 i... 2 ii F4 'QP C ID v-- m 'ti E' 9 Q ' Z3 ss "' L4 'S ff' 5' 5 SJ ,t is :- E. 3 e -"2 e H . we 5 Z 4 Q O Q Q 2: fi Eb V-I " ' Q 5 Z3 H P-' Q U' H' 25 Heade UK 1' Z O rs. g gg W 'T E 'A 4 Us E' H. 'T fi 2 4 45 2 E.. if S S Eeeee H H 1" H S-1 in m Cf' ,.a. r" EQ Q O TL S i.. -I H: g, V-3 1-I Ph O 2 re- 2 v-1 CD f-1 E4 9 O n-1 rf- CP' H g O UQ 5 .. .- Q: O - nh ...f Z : E bi 3' 2 0 ' D .1 -' m Q 5 at 2 2 is H Es O Q1 Q1 E' 55 Q CI "' 1-: 3' O ... V5 ,:.. 5 Q F :rs L" fa " s- ,.5 "' ri' s. U, M rr- E' 1+ e' O CD .TF fe -x 5.-::Vr3's',,: xx N ff.: l' o. Q K ' Q x N NNN? i X, bbw. 'WX .1 A I A ' v Xx N sex We si s- . V I i I V,-,Vv E25 -Y-.L-.,J,.,J,-.Al . V I V .AAL-,A . V,.,JA.A- I . A,.l,.AVA.NA.,J Q se E 321 ,... 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H R A - Sifegao estate W . .- wmwpjgi 63335609 HSZS: 'fvf L+ - Gmoimfff Ufbsoi-b , o f-I-SCD rw'-1V-2H 4' 511.20252 Q --7 ,' .-1 .. - 'x 93'5s5T+-'rf " Fl A, 'Iii-Tig-+-ygjocb SBOUE'-' CQ 95'S'?"SE 35112: ' . Ejv-Hg U,,:rP'g,w 4. 'f"' Q.. SJ rr- vt M Siilie r-'jrcregg 4 N C,.a-1-423 '-' gb x .mo H gg m -5 :IT rug QQOQQ, - x , . - .... -- 353505 53:1-If H QQ-f-:QCIQ 5w:l1l?UQ C1 X T Qdgocj 3 ,. Gf5i'j'f"' Shaw'-'o U2 :D 'A 'Ch v-102,05 M5-"o""Q'E 5223: 2.591314 QTH'Q . y H13 in T336 S' il om'L"r-vs Q-1-4'-'PEFS' KS, C7',., ,-a .. H 52517113 513055 Vis 'lliilii lil iiiliiiii 5 f ,rye f ,f 7 U f44'A'5'i47g!??2ff4f t aff! 'AW fjfffff f ' 4' 5 .ff we ,. .1 ' .f 4,14 -. -aff' i -' ' 1' 4?.221'n:'4'm if, 'ak Q- "YffQ?f,VZ?a:ff1'f.f: Qt. f.. . Z f., . ,fm wry. Z..,5.iiV5 1 1' HW' 4. .fu wi. '? 1'Lf',. .4 V,,1, I. 2S2g,,, Q.,.,,,Z .Q . 2, ?. .., . ,. . ,.e . .V .. ,. f ' V . . , V - .,.,e-V - . fr' -vf--wv:V:A-a. f . f V 41 fu. I ff V V , , ., . , ..,r,,..y.,. , t.,.,,.,, f .. V ef" f :f- nfiiw " ,- AU' V Wi- '.wshgz:" 'life "F", f ,V.. . .,-,.y.f.-.'-. ,, ,.,,.f My Q., 4- , if 5. ,W 'f 4 .. .. Q .1 I wa:-mzff ,f f 'v 11-,mfffnfcfv -tw.-rf vw: ga .4 5 " " " " " " " " KWLWANMkMlWM' ' V ' , J .m,.. ,,:, M -W - - f - V -.Q V X . ...f " ' . -V A-P 2-. ' 'X ' -, ' N -FCM' ., J' K. - '- -- 7 x J, E ' i -'F - 2 V- -.K 'N -59-H J '. 'W sf -E st, -' H .fl 'E H ', 3- -' ' ', ' .5 , ,W-Nb. 1 I , "x. - f - , .' 3 Y, V 4 MW'-Q gf 3 ' gg, 4' - A ,'?v fZf.7wf ' Ve p - . ., . I -V ' M . , ,,.,.,.,,.,,, 7 ,,,4.,.,,4. , ,, .a,, W N ., ,... ., ,,,. G. G. A. vs. CONN. Aeems Prospects forecast for next season make us feel sure that we'Ve crashed the gate to the gridiron for the last time and are there to stay. The team's losses through graduation will be very few and games are -booked already with Conn. Aggies Varsity and N. Y. Aggies. With the record of the past season behind - in the season of 1927. I it and Coach Richards at the helm, the Aeademy's team should play havoc with any others of its class A V. ,S V E esei . , ., . , , . ,L ' V - 'I-iv.. -- V VV . , 2 ' ' " ' , 1 -' . " V q - D ' - " - , W -A' ,W -'-,::'3Q:,.?!':43,:?5'.-s- K-1-1Z:Pa-.:.1'H .V ' - ., '- ,- ' , 'V 'H'5E"' ,f ' ' .az-Ve.',v,'?.-'ygsg-is.-gg:-'.51.. ,-:.,-.-A-1 , , JY' 'Q - Q., vi -, ' . A- 5 'ya ,--Igggl,-29:22 ,r ...M 'Vg3:,1Vigpsg13-3i5fV?,1.1,'?n-?-2 .+Qu,,gQi'-21-slip ,1.42-Qj:,,.1-:VZVE,-155-1-if'IV-j-fs--2-1f:': A - V- V V ---Q: Ve ,, ,V -C ,V . -f ,f---,,..g-,Vz if-V53-x--:,:a.-11-.9-.-N-V:e - , 9 ' V ' ., - ' V " M p r , V D :dum 1 - --4:." e-4 -M . -rw-5:5 ' 2 -, . Vf'fe.3e"' -V Vw -' ---- ' 2. ' -em' me --V ,V - - gf, ,, , H - ,523 s,Z,,V:.. . ,V . X In V. 1-.9 e ci ,sv .W . - f 7 v :MAA--,5." ,, ,M -:f f f ., 1' :-'1. ,,1:.-egg-3. ., ,V , QI: AIT' Q y . V V-3 - -1--1,454 'swf'-Vw-2 .w.f:f.V. IJ -gif s. ' 1'-we .,.,zf-- .-V41-:ff ' ' 1.1 -- - -- -, - . .rs .l -- .14-..-QW., .3-:Game D 310215712 V V - 2-,Vi-:1::'fv.:: sf .V::xf3?'f1-, gals.-rr' .--4 'Y 351 .rf - . '- - 5-:mast -. f!Er:z5-Qxigtfm ,5-157. v.-ify.. ,.,- 2591" 'AJC-5 .1555-:H-:kliif-1:-: ,V2':57f.-:L-'E 1fi5:fF',-,I,i:f:iLE-' 'J -I: f " V'7 -:Q W 3 ' ' 31-25152-y -. - .'-Hiffjf' ' ' .K 14.27 - .f s'f4?w V-4 -- -1 SV :--QV-1-:asf -,Q-1:-:z-a-rw: -'r V, -' ---::,-is , . ..,:,:::s?f-. ., Vf-:----c-.1 -f .. f -. V QV E- -re-c,.V5:.-:embasy ,, V.: --..:.-:o.V::,Vt , . - - 2. . . --rm-5 --,-:V1-QL,-. ,wr-04:-qw fs.: V H VV ' - -V O - - " f,-. . .. wr ,'E':-5,,q5Vf,::V33s32' gg-yv:3',QEjj: ,:, ,lb 44. , ag -,V V, V. 1' -4 4-Rfk 1' - - -'11,-g .322 '- ig :V- 3 gg , , 1 Q . .... . - H V' :VV .- ', ' V J- -, T59 -' .4-iz? .1 X' w-' V ' 1V-1 - Wiz- , -5:-. '-if, N- -.Q -Q ,ifgll -f1" ,.y:-' ,pq 5 - be-L:-,V '-4.11-TQ f., ' - I . 13- .Z "1xj:'1wwq eg, .- V. tina- ,M 4 24- i s ,Qs ' -'f....-.--145:31-.-',1V, -1 -. .V fi 1 - 4, : gm-:-1.5" ., '-5.V -rw,-Q-.944 ' - . ' f, ' .. -, 125325'Q:?i:':1?'irPF2E2',,?f'i"13-HIEZEI :1.i1S'5E5fEi?1- 'ep , 35" li . i 'f1'i:E.1i-P-'iff " A ' " -l"3fE:15 ' '--.f.:gV.',-21-2.1.,Ze12" V:f'sc:::V- ""s'r:t1:.-'- 1 - -2 V- '- gf-"-' we-1--'-f ' -, .9 .. 5- 3' --2.-:ENUM :Wai ..::Vae::-1 ,'-HJ, ai' V '- Vg:-,--1-.,, .Vf ,351 A ith, seep- mf .. as V. V. ,Q-,gig , J, , , D w er- .. '-'M '- .. -V , V.ff.. - 1. L.. -,fi :jg W , fm:- V -of ,' -1,-f -ge.,g..,s.:...-:,.-.: - .V .- , L O - , 2.-r, ,- -- A Q i '- 1'7'V"ff"f- W'947'i'1 V' ' "ll-14-FJ-'ff'-' '-?"'U5'lvrffiwe-W'a'1:4V-H-1-21V-'Iwi' 'r fr-.1g,515:f5.4:V',f1 "-TG -'i'-',j1- '-Y?' ,E.':,:V " "':b"f':i1. - '-fV:3H2.:'i.fl ,ZW ,"V:'1:-'iizz ai- -' K. ,.., V- A A D D D U O D lx D THE SQUAD-'26 5' 'l" i" T" T" V" " " E" " I" " " i" 4" T" ' l" v A A A i A " " i" " i" " I" " T" T" T" 1" +" :" " " 'l " 1" " I A A A I A Lvvvv v o vvv vvv v v vvuv v vvvo v v o v c v 0 v v BASKETBALL KR kzflwf Nwfvassrcw f rf, W W W " X XZ j'9 K. w? sg' I 1 ' QQ X Ricrsg- 1 I 1 MM e :MM M , ' f , O O U U l O W , X . - -sl 1' . "W 0 ,W ' fffvf , I Nxxil yt . X, ,fffw f w, ' 5551" X if Z X y' '-if ,. A , X fi K f' 9 'PV T' f -- ef f p.- , , , .' . Ja 6- ,, . VU N Qffzif' H 5 X 2- - f - 4, is A 541 , J . ' 9 N 4 ' x f' . ' X F , f W f J ?'?f 'v di? Qi 2'1" J I VN E4 s ' ,X X.. ' - V U 1 9 Z -p ,- , . ' lu, 9 ' I 3 . V .I . D U O u U . . I D U " -" " l" 1" w" r" N" w" 1 V W" " I" w" w" l" w" N" " N W N v u A 0 A A A a n 0 0 A n n A A ,MMMMMMmwMMAAAMMMMMMM mm1mQMmMx 1 Q x X gn in Qi 2 iz 2 22 3 ii 3 MAUDE, Manager RICHMOND, Coach 1926-27 1926-27 P --a w 4 1? 1 1? 73 UiW1mmmumV'A"WWWmni?1u VNV"V'T"'T""VVT1 VvWWVvNwV' 113133176P'vV'VlDUVVvL3!'1D1v-VV!'L3Y'1d1!sE'!JH7 ? Q 1 a 1M IM IM l I l l l l l l i ! 1 l l ' ' V l ,.Al.,.!,.A,vJ,.,J,.,J,.,JA,JA,J,..,JM' l , 4 5 E, I I Q l l K, Q THE SQUAD, 1926-27 C Sitting U. to 1'.j Jones, Linholrn, Purcell, Morine, French: Stmiflmg U. to rj Coach Richmond, Thiele, Burton, Wendland, Roland, Miller, Maude. BASKETBALL 1925-1926 5 Lieutenant Commander Donahue again took the helm in maneuvering the Academy through a success- ' ful season. A veteran teani found added strength in Morine, at guard. The Academy entered the A Y. M. C. A. League in which the year previous it had wrought havoc with other representatives. College games were added to the schedules so that a real start was niade by Manager Moore toward a pernla- nent collegiate schedule. Linholni, our brilliant forward, was elected captain by the letter nien of the -- season preceding, - AGMYS ROUTED, 37-11 3 The first game of the season took place on December 2 at the Y. M. C. A., leaving the Acniy team battling a 37-17 score. More than two full teams were thrown into the game by Coach Donahue to try Q out the new men in a real fray. The cadets were never in dangerg they early obtained the jump and . 2 then remained in the lead for the entire game. Captain Linhohn held high score with seven field goals i to his credit. . l 4 ' 7 C A ' g l i A 1 A l A l " " 'i" " 1 i ? " -T 4 51 I RHODE lSLAND STATE VICTORIOUS f Ti Two days later the Cadets journeyed to Kingston, R, I., to engage in one of the fastest games M W played on the victorfs court. It was bitterly fought with the outcome ever in doubt. The cadets .. would not accept defeat without a nervy struggle and in the final minutes of play uncorked an offense L H which carried Rhode Island State off their feet and very nearly brought the game home to us. It was at game of which the losers could be duly proud, the playing was clean and fast throughout. ,, C. G. ACADEMY R. I. STATE V Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pts. Y, Cowart, R.F. . . . . . 1 2 4 Hill, RF. .... . . . 5 2 12 .1 12 Ll11l1Ollll,.L.F, .. . 4. 1 9 speaker, LF. .. . 2 I 5 ,- -Y Burton, L.F. .. . O 0 0 ' Hasham, C. . 1 0 2 ir French, C. . . . . 5 0 10 Haire, RG. . . . . 3 0 6 Purcell, RG. .. . 1 4 6 Jensen, L.G. .. . 4 2 10 .- Morine, L.G. .. . 0 O 0 1 - 'IQ 'Z H 1, Thiele, Le. .. . . 0 o o Toms 15 0 30 5- 4 T " 'T' .v F Totals .. 11 7 29 H M 1 TRINITY DEFEATED, 32-23 1 it The following night we tasted sweet revenge when we trounced Trinity College to the tune of 32-23 if 011 their own floor. Although this was the third game in four days the Blue and Wllite proved to be Q in excellent condition and never was in danger of defeat. French proved to be high scorer, with four ii field goals and two points from fouls. The cadets' passing was all that could be desired by their 1 supporters. This factor, coupled with a strong five men defense, paved the way to victory. Ev 'I i C. G. ACADEMY TRINITY O Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pts. W 0 Cowart, RHF. . . . . . 1 1 3 Burr, RF. .... . . . 1 4 6 Af . Proctor, RF. .. . '11 I 3 Newshoim, L.F. .. .. 1 2 4 H 9 Linholm, L.F. . . 2 1 5 Riley, C. ...... .. 1 0 2 A French, C. .... , 4 2 10 Thomson, RG. . . . . . 4 2 10 L Purcell, R.G. .. . 1 - 2 4 Kuna, LG. .... . . 0 1 1 W Q Morine, LG. .. . 3 1 7 F' '- '- , - ,- ,.. Totals .. . . . 7 9 23 5 Totals .. .... 12 8 32 ,- j g j -- 5 it 2 SECOND sTItAIeIIT IN HYH LEAGUE W . C - Our next game was with the Submarine Base i11 a Y. M. C. A. League affair. The Sub-Base fought hard but the cadets were always going strong, finishing on the long end of a 39-29 score. Many times -' our opponents rallied to overcome the lead but Purcell 's and Morine's perfect guarding was more than ' ' a deciding factor. Captain Linholm was again high scorer with twenty-one points. 1?urcell's work stood out in the ease with which l1e advanced the ball down the court, many times dribbling through the entire Sub-Base team. Colton, at center, played well for our opponents. - 1 S 0 ' . . , C , F " " T" T" l" 1" 1" l" " " " l l " 1 l 2 MEBS ADDED The next NVednesday found us up against the Mebs in another game. The score closed 33-9 in our favor. Coach Donahue inserted nearly two full teams before the fray ended. The Blue and White played without the service of French at center but even this did not daunt the cadets in their steady drive for league supremacy. Passing and defensive work was unusually clever. li i lf i " TEAM OF STARS SUBMERGED . ' 1 ' '! With the approach of Clrristnras many stars of various colleges returned home for their vacations. These combined into a team of "All Stars" with the idea of giving us our first defeat on a New London iioor in two seasons. Their efforts vanished in victory, 29-12, for the cadets. It was the fastest home game that the Blue and White had been called upon to show, the All Stars refused to accept an urrfa.vor'able verdict without a desperate struggle. The rirst half found the cadetls second team intact on the floor and rolling'up a 16-'Z score on their opponents. Coach Donahue turned the first team loose in the second half, clirrchirrg the game. BLUE AND WHITE RUNS IVILD In the next game the Dorrnats stacked up as our opponents. The contest Ca league gamej proved to be but a picnic for our players and when the rinal whistle blew we had gatlrered fifty-three points to the Dormats ten. Baskets were garnered from all corners of the court and it was apparent before the ganre was rrrany nrirrutes old that the Blue and IrVlrite was on a rampage. Every player had his eye on the basket so nothing that the Dornrats could do as was of any avail in holding down the score. LEATHER PUSHERS SQUEEZED OUT Appearances for the first half were decidedly against the cadets in this league game. The Leather Puslrers led at the end of the first quarter 10-4. In the second quarter the cadets settled down to cut this lead so that the half ended with the Leather Pushers leading 14-11. The third quarter was the period in which we surged ahead, gatlrerirrg twelve points. This lead was not relinquished. The final count favored us by 28-25. The Academy's second team again started off but could not hold its OWII, leaving a big handicap for the first squad when the latter took control. ACMYS TRIUMPH IN CLOSE GAME 21 94 The Acmys pinned first dcfert to a Coast Guard Academy team on 'r New London fioor in two seasons The cfrdet team, whose formations refused to function properly, evidently had chosen an off night for the battle The Corps was without its brrllrfrnt guard, Purcell, whose confinement rn the hospital w 'rs probably 'L deciding factor nr this defeat Fouls played havoc with our team and the Acnry let very feu opportunities slrp through their fingers Lrrrlrolnr and French were our hrghcst scorers urth eight porrrts apiece to their credit The highest personal score of the evening was nrrre, that of Brewer, one of our opponents For the first trnre nr the season highest individual score uent to 'rn adversary. I l il 3 L , ww, , NNAV-vlv-v, I I 4 --, , - ' - 2 V v - , y C C Y ' . Y C . c c ' ' ' ' ' Q- ' , , ' ' .' ' w 1 , v 4 ' ' r . ' K - ' 'Ir ' c ' ' L . c 'Y ' A . , . ' ' ' . V ' . . ' ' - ,v - - ' ' v - Y' ' ' ' ' 1 1 ' ' 1 p . . ' v , ' v , , WW, . ,vw.WW.WWWWv,.vw,-,mawwv-,A.-2-,A.4VWwvwWw.w,VWv-csv-vVV.W,VvM,,-,A.4s,.A..,.vw,-AN. l l" " -" r" 'l r r i i l r r l r f f l r l l i l - l r - r - V -101113101 V V I 1 l - Q .AAA,.A,aA,.A NORYVICI-I "Y" TROUNCED 36-19 The Cadet team met Norwich "Y" in first of the State eliminations for honors as State representa tive in the National Y. M. C. A. Tournament. Our eourtmen found little difficulty in nursing a fat 36-19 score. We still were playing under the handicap of Purcell's absence from the lineup. Linholln ran high score with seventeen points, but French was a close second with thirteen. Leaders in the league, we represented the New London Y. M. C. A. in this game under the name of Coast Guard Cadets. 1 ' fi' :lj SUBMARINE Basis SUBMERGED, as-19 4 ' - If F' ,.n,..4,..A,.A,.,,,i,4,.L,,A3.., ,.c.,At.,a.v.as,a.,.1..,A1. l...t,,JM:,,..rA,a.,..!,,A .,.,.i.a,J ' r ' 2 0 KW!!!-KVJLKU-'L I i 4 J In a game which was much more lively than is indicated by the score, the Cadets topped the Sub- marine Base in their second meeting of the league. Purcell was still missing but even this could not stop the Blue and White. Our team 11ow seemedito rise to any occasion. No one could predict its future possibilities as anything short of brilliant. The Submarine Base started with a rush but .the cadets' fighting- spirit was more than enough to overcome their meagre lead and bring home the bacon. Captain Linholm again led the way to baskets galore with six field goals and one foul to his personal credit. NORWICH Y. M. C. A. ELIMINATED, 29-16 We met and defeated Norwich "Y" on their court, 29-16, in the final elimination game in the State Championship. At first, the layout of Norwich's court threw our representatives from their stride. Coach Donahue tried to save his varsity and used his second team in the entire Hrst half. At the termination of this period the two teams were deadlocked, 9-9. The second half showed a different story. The nrst team, minus Purcell, took the Hoor. Baskets slid in, one after another, until finally Blue and White rooters were able to breathe easily once more. , ANOTHER VICTORY, 52-23 The Mebs, our next adversaries, gave the team a good chance to run up personal basket averages. Cowart, at right forward, was a tower of strength on the offense during the second half. I-Ie caged a total of eight field goals, seven of which he bagged in the second half. French and Captain Linholm were running close seconds for scoring honors. That the Mebs were never dangerous was due to our tight five-man defense. FIRST TEAM RUNS WILD, 48-16 This game was the second meeting between the Dormats and Cadets in the "Y" League, resulting both times in disaster for our LINHOLM, Forward opponents. Coach Donahue let the first team loose for the first half Captain, 1925-26 to roll up a score of 36-8. This was just enough to prime the team " 'l" l " l A fv- : l L for their next game, with Yale Junior Varsity. The second team was then thrown in and more than M held its own for the renrainder of the game. French, at center, was our high scorer for the evening, gathering seven Held goals. OLD ELI TURNED BACK, 31-13 I Yale Junior Varsity, after holding our players to a 6-6 mleacllock in the first half, were literally swamped under a deluge of baskets in the last part of the game. The game was played on Eli's floor and this may have been the reason for our late start. Second half found the Cadets gathering speed. Linhohn, French, and Purcell dropped many shots, from mid-floor, which were the source of high admiration from Yale rooters, especially the femmes among them. A bright feature of the game was Purcell 's return after over a. nionthls absence. Score: G. G. ACADEMY Goals Fouls Pts. Purcell, R.F. . . . . 2 2 6 Linholm, L.F. . . . . . 5 1 11 French, C. .... . . 4 3 11 Thiele, RG. . . . 0 0 0 Cowart, R.G, . . . . . 0 1 1 Murine, L.G. . . . . 1 0 2 Totals ... ... 12 7 31 YALE Jn. VARSITY Goals Fouls Pls Raybeign, RHF. . . . . . 1 0 2 Miller, R.F. . . . . . 1 O 2 Wallace, L.F, . . . . 0 1 1 Campbell, L.F. . . . . 0 0 0 Kennedy, C. . . . 2 1 5 Herzburg, G. . . . . 1 0 . 2 Schiller, RG. .... .. 0 0 0 Rosenman, RG. . . . . 0 1 1 Black, L.Gr. . . . 0 ' 0 0 Moran, L.G'r. . . . 0 0 0 Totals .. .. .. 5 3 13 CADETS LEAD LOWELL TEXTILE, 43-36 Fresh from victory over Yale, the cadets lit into Lowell Textile School of Lowell, Mass., and emerged seven points to the good. The game was played at New London Armory before a big crowd of ardent Academy routers. Purcell, at right guard, was high J ONES, Guard lv-fPfvVvF.-.Tv-f?,-vvfvvyyY-LT.-Zvv-:v-V-vvvvf mve:eq-vfi.T.-:qv-,YTY-:vT,v: Vffxhff mv-:vjvvs mv-,vyvv-V m,,v-v::v-vvvvvvvv-vw w Iv-vpfvefvfr,-vs,-vrfxqsf., l Vv.:,,P,v:V,-v::,::,, y :vvyv ' 12' 1,1 1 4 A "I scorer of the day with thirteen points. Lowell displayed the finest brand of basketball that our court "I warrio1's had been called upon to face during the season. ' The Cadets got the jump at the first when Purcell caged a goal from nearly mid-door in the first ' 'A minute of play. This lead was never overcome. At the end of the first half the count stood 23-18 in ' our favor. This meant nothing to Lowell who brought the score 25-24 in the first few minutes of the ' second half. However, with a 116W spurt by the Blue and Wliitc the Lowell team was left in the rear ' where they remained for the rest of the game. ' f Score: . C. G. ACADEMY LownLL TEXTILE ' Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pts. if Cowart, RF. . .. 4 1 9 Burke, RF. .. .. 5 3 13 ' H Linholm, L.F. . . . . 5 1 11 Logan, L.F. . . . . 3 3 9 French, C. ...., .. 1 1 3 McKay, C. ..... .. 1 0 2 1 A PIITCGH, R-G. - - . . 5 3 13 Kenney, RG. . . . . . 4 2 10 H Morine, L.G. . . . . . 3 1 7 Cgffgyy LG, , , . , 1 0 2 e 3 Totals .. . . . 18 7 43 Totals .. . . . 14 8 36 ' A , COAST GUARD ACADEMY vs. LEATHER PUSHERS, 24-8 . Q The Leather Pushers were next defeated in a low scoring X -5 in the "Y" League. Our opponents found that our defense A - was working in a brilliant manner which is shown by the A " fact that o11ly three field goals trickled through and two . t fouls were caged. Coach Donahue, after the first half, which ended with the score 12-3, sent the first team to the u showers and the second team carried on by scoring the same , number of points in the second half. 4 5 Q . STAMFORD "Y" ELIMINATED, 35-24 Y Stamford Y. M. C. A. was the second team to face us in - the State elimination games for the right to represent ' Connecticut in the International Tournament. The Academy, representing New London "Y," was held nearly even for - ' the first half, 19-15. This close score was merely an incen- - ' tive for us to jump ahead in the second half. Captain Lin- . 5 hohn ran wild during the entire contest by scoring iifteen - of our thirty-five points. Stamford was unable to stop his 5 shots, which were caged from all angles and all parts of the ' court. He was ably aided by the other members of the ' ' team and most of his shots were the result of perfect passes from his guards. o H LAST "Y" TEAM DEFEATED, 37-24 i o V5 March 6 found the cadets, New London "Y" representa- tives, defeating Greenwich "Y" and thus annexing the O , , . . -- MORINE, Guard chanipionship of the State. Tlns game gave us the chance ' 9 0 " vvNv-vv1vvVvVQuvv'vv.vv,vvvv1vv"l v'v1vNl' v'vAv'v'vVxvAv'Nfvvs1xfxrv-vwfw"VVVv?vAv'1vvNrx1vN1rv-vlvvlv-vwrvvvlvvrvwvV ' - . l i l l i l i - , 1 l 1 l 4 + 1 1 I" i" 5 5 515 4 5 5 1 5 4 0 5 n a a a a a a a o a a n o a .u. .l. .L,,g O . Y Y 1 to be entered in the International "Y" tournanient at Toronto. It was Purcell's turn to show the E' Greenwich supporters just how basketball should be played. At right guard he swung into his usual W f stride and scored six goals from floor and four fouls. Many times he dribbled through the entire ' Greenwich team to cage a brilliant goal. So fine was the cadets' teamwork, however, that even this " display of basketball did not stand out over the work of the other nienibers of our squad. Twenty of the E' ' points scored were rung up by our guards, Purcell and Morine. it . .1 1 , GIRENES VANQUISHED, 37-22 1 - Next on our schedule were the Marines who were defeated in a "Y" League game, in which from the 3 - start it was evident that our team was out for blood. Captain Linhohn caged a neat follow-up shot in Af the first nrinute of play. This lead was never cut down by the Devil Dogs. The score at the end of -' the 151-st half stood 16-9 in our favor. French was high scorer with seven goals from the floor. -- .- U NEW HAVEN TURNED BACK FOR SECOND TIME g . Yale Junior Varsity could not match the brilliant brand of basketball displayed by the Cadets, ' witness: a 30-11 score. The entire first half was clear of field goals as far as our opponents were .1 - concerned. Our five-man defense was functioning to perfection and Yale's few shots were of no avail. - Score at the end of first half stood 14-4 in our favor. These , -- - fourteen points were more than enough to win as Yale 's best .L 1 3 ,,V - efforts in the last half netted only three field goals and one goal ? - from fouls. Captain Linholni, in garnering five field goals and -Q' ' K . one foul, acquired enough points alone to tie the Yale team. X o His scores were the result of fine pass-work by his teannnatcs. Score: H C. G. ACADEMY " Y Goals Fouls Pts. W Cowart, R.F, . . . . 2 2 6 f Liuholni, L.F. . . . . 5 1 11 K ' French, C. . . . . . 2 1 5 5 Purcell, RG. . . . . . 1 2 4 I . Morine, L.G. . .. 2 0 4: E- Totals ...... 12 6 D ' YALE E' Goals Fouls Pts I ' Riley, RF. ..... .. 0 1 1 ' ' Rehberger, RF. . . . . 1 0 2 ' -' Campbell, LF. . . . . 0 2 2 -A f Goodwill, L.F. . . . . 0 0 0 . Kennedy, C. ........... 0 0 0 Q . Herzberg, C. ........... 1 1 3 H 0 Schiller, ne. .......... 1 0 2 g i Miller, R.G. ........... 0 0 0 v Back, L.G. ............ 0 ' 1 1 ' Rosman, L.G. .......... 0 O 0 W - Totals . .....,...... 3 5 11 FRENCH, Center' .1 O 1 V . E ' 3 D 1 " l" 'l l " l ' l " I " l " " 1 " " l " 1'lT'T'i"'1T"'iVN7""? "'1 ', S, ACMY DEFEATED, 34-28 will Our last 0'?llllC' in tl1e "Y" Leaffuc was with the ACll1f ?l0'U'1'GU'ilt1O11 the o11l ' JCGIIIII that has defeated b 13 5 bb Z3 1 us on a honie floor. The Acinys were going at their best and the game was a battle from start to .- Hnish. Our opponents started with a rush i11 the first quarter, which ended with the Ca.dets on the short end of an 8-6 sco1'e. Half ended, however, with the count deadloeked at 15-15. XVe finally forged Q- ahead in the third quarter and led 24-23. Our iinest work eaine in the final quarter when the Aeinys 5- were left far in the rear. Captain Linhohn led the field with eight goals, but the work of tl1e entire team throughout the ganie was well up to its usual standard. g K 35 COLCHESTER CUT SHORT, 43-24 In order to stay in p1'oper condition for the International "Y" Tournament a team from Col- chester, Conn., was imported and played as the final gaine of the local season. It proved but an " opportunity for our team to sharpen their eyes for the basket: the result was never in doubt. The ' first half ended 27-12 in C. G.A.'s favor. Coach Donahue left the first team in until the middle of the E' third quarter when he sent in tl1e entire second team. Cowart was unable to play, due to an injury " suffered in practice, but Jones at right forward played a very good T game in his absence. Captain Linhohn again led in points chalked T up for us with seven field goals and one goal from fouls to his - account. A CADETS DEFEATED IN CLOSE GAME, 35-32 The Cadets got away to a poor start by losing the opening game M in tl1e Y.'M. C. A. Tournament at Toronto. A long trip told its ' story on our playing in the first quarter but from then on the team niore than held its own. Personal fouls more than played havocg we lost the services of both Linhohn and Purcell via this Q route. The game was fast throughout and tl1e Cadets seemed to L SQ ii be tl1e nlost popular teain of tl1e tournament due to their highly- PURCELL, Forward Captain, 1926-27 1Qj1Q1'vf1V"f1CV"'v"v"yQy !Qy1Q3lv"1Q1lV"'yQ1t1'Q"j v!f3!VV'vvVlvVx!QjlQJ yQjy'Q"g1V"x1Qjy'QA'jP"'vfQjyQ3y'Q"3TfQjy'Q"jV"'v'vVyQyyQy1Q3lVf QjyQpyQ1yQ U 1 1.. -l,. ,. - Al l ' ' ' I V ' ' I ' l V l,. -1,. 1r. - M 1 No-1 ..,. . A . J... .. developed team work. The result of the game was in doubt right up to the final whistle, the lead shifted continually from one team to the other. French, at center, was a mainstay of the Cadets' play. Score: C. G. ,ACADEMY ToRoN'ro Y. M. C. A. Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pls. Cowart, R-.F. .......... 1 1 3 Fraser, RF. ........... 1. 3 5 Jones, RF. ..,......... 0 1 1 Mickey, R.F. .......... 1 2 4 Linholm, L.F. ......... 1 3 5 Merner, L.F, .......,.. 5 2 12 Mortensen, LF. ....... 0 1 1 Sniallcomb, L.F. ....... 0 0 0 French, C. ........ I .... 3 5 11 Hedges, C. ............ 0 2 2 Purcell, R.G. ...,...... 2 1 5 Watson, C. ............ 0 1 1 Morine, L.G. .......... 2 2 6 Lalonde, R.G. .......... 0 3 3 Thiele, L.G. ........... 0 O 0 Gillespie, R.G. ......... 3 0 6 Totills l fl 'Q Howard, L.G. ......... 1 0 2 ' ' """""" ' " Fraser, L.G. ..,........ 0 0 0 Totals . ............ 11 13 35 H CADETS DEFEAT TIFFLN, OHIO, 31-20 ,,,, Our court warriors retu1'ned to form in the next tournament contest by defeating Tiffin Y. M. C. A. in 1 a game which was all for the Blue and VVhite. After the brilliant performance of the night before .f the Cadets found that they now had a group of rooters to spur them on to victoryf The iirst half Q seemed as if a repetition of the preceding night was in store for us, for the count stood 11-7 against us when the third period got under way. Captain Linholm, after being held scoreless the entire nrst S' half, came back with six goals from floor and three goals after fouls. His work was brilliant and a perfect revelation of good basketball to spectators. Score: C. G. .ACADEMY TIFFIN, OHIO, Y. M. C. A. Goals Fouls Pts Goals Fouls Pls Cowart, RF. .. . 0 0 0 Davis, RF. . 2 2 6 Mortenson, RF. . . 0 0 0 Martz, LF. . 1 2 4 Linholni, L.F, . . 6 3 15 Hess, C. 2 1 5 French, C. . .. . 2 1 5 lVyant, C. . .. 0 0 0 Purcell, R.G. .. . 4 1 9 Adams, R.G. .. 1 3 5 Morine, L.G. .. . 1 0 2 Dare, L.G. .. 0 0 0 '- "' '- Hotz, L.G. . . 0 0 0 Totals 13 A 5 31 .. .. .- Totals .. . 6 8 20 CADETS DEFEAT OAK PARK, 27-21 Our basketeers sprang the surprise of the tournament when they defeated Oak Park Y. M. C. A. of Chicago. This game was the semi-final in the "consolation" series. By our victory we won the right to enter the finals against the Cincinnati lVildeats, champions for the past two years. Oak Park had removed the crown from Cincinnati the previous night by defeating them 30-29. It was a case of a 1 7 l strong comeback in the last half once more as we were trailing at the end of the Iirst half by a ' ', count of 14'12. Wliexi our siege guns started shooting, however, Oak Park fell far to the rear, finishing " It 27-21. ' Score: H . C. G. ACADI-:MY OAK PARK Y. M. C. A. 1 1 Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pts. H 1- 1XfIO1'lZC11SO11, RF. . . . . 0 2 2 Huck, RF. . . . . O 0 0 -- Cowart, RF. .... . . 0 O 0 Popkin, RF. . . . . 1 4 G -- - Jones, RF. . . . . . O 0 0 Fletcher, LF. . . . . 1 1 3 t - Linhohn, L.F. . . . . . 4 1 9 Clarke, LF. . , . . 2 0 4 - French, C. ..., . . 4 O 8 Heidles, C. . . . . 0 2 2 ' A' Purcell, RG, . . . . 3 1 7 Tipping, C. . . . . . 0 0 0 ' W Morine, L.Gr. . . . . 0 1 1 Bills, I-LG. ...... 1 ..... . 0 1 1 ' T I '- '- 5 Deltocher, R.G., L.G, 1 1 3 " 11 Owls 11 5 B11-ks, Le. . .. 1 0 2 A Totals .. . . . 6 9 21 - ' MA! 1 CINCINNATI XVILDCATS ON TOP, 34-14 Cadets lost iI1 the consolation finals of the Tournament to the Cincinnati NVildeats 34-14 in a game 1 that was far closer than the score would indicate. Both 116211118 started at a fast clip, each Vieing in a pace that soon told on the players: The Wildcats had a big edge in the Inatter of substitutions, 1 as they had an imposing 'array of high class men for relief work. The Cadets, although far in the rear, showed real courage in battling the ex-champions wliolelieartedly to the final whistle, - Detroit won the title in the tournament by defeating the Toronto team in the finals. This Toronto 5 team barely defeated the Cadets in their first game 35-32. The Wildcats were defeated by Oak Park who in turn was turned back by the Coast Guard Academy quintet, 27121 1 Score: 5 . C. G. ACADEMY Goals Fouls Pts CINCINNATI Y. M. C. A. Goals Fouls Pts. 'L 3 I -TOMS, R-11 -- -- - 0 0 0 Ixteyrs, Im. .. . .. 4 0 8 - -1 Cowart, RF. . . . . 0 0 0 ROSS, R.F- l D D l 1 0 2 K 5 Thiele, RF. . . . . . 0 1 1 L0111-J L,F, I I I 1' 5 0 12 5 Linholm, L.F. ,... . . 2 0 4 Byrd, LDF' , . , , 0 0 0 5 Mortensen, L.F. . . . . 0 0 O T1-ipple, C. ..,, , , 1 2 4 ' F1'e11C11, C- ---- - - 2 1 5 KIOStG1'111311, C. . . . 0 0 .0 K ' Pu1'Cff11, R-G. .- -0 1 1 3 Schnedl, Re. .. .. 4 0 8 E' ' 110fi11e, LG- -- 0 1 1 sclien-1011, Le. . .. 0 0 0 gi Totals I, . . g 5 4 14 Evans, L.G. .... . . 2 2 -B X g 1- Totals .. . .... 16 2 34 F Q - I 7NWW1 i awzwwa l"s'PN'm'IKIYEIH1f3'1iKI"'Ir3I?IW"V"1z3IlI"LY1lIr3"?"'x01VNIQI'EEE:l"ILx1i"'Lx12W1AIlI"Wv'QfI0dIQnx'Q"1T"WWWxnunHI0nAIHHTd'nE'iHlHE'Il'1'V' mnmxlmmxiif AAAAnAMdm4NeavaAAdcaMAaMuAAamn 1: KmMaA,nm4Wmr.,Jmmwm MA KK OBJEE,77 first and only official mascot of the Academy, came to Fort Trumbull in November, 1926. Although she pretends to be nothing more than a very spoiled little cub, yet the Corps maintains that she is certainly the reincarnation of "Lady Luck" herself, Cbjee is an ardent rooter for our every team and never fails to spread defeat among the C. G. A.'s opponents. A most vain and versatile young lady she is-just .glance at some of her characteristic photos, posed specially for the TIDE Rues photographer. S. :HADLEY EVANS JOHN J. Fuensr, Jn, Custoflicut of the Bear Keeper of the Bear l9Z6fl9Z7 VARSITY GAMES 1 The opening of 1926-27 season gave Ensign Richmond Coach Donohuc's job of coaching a team which StL'll'tCd off with four regular veterans of the preceding season, Linholm, Purcell, French and Morine. A new man, Jones, filled out the team by fitting into right guard. Ensign Richards-took over the work of working up the Junior Varsity team. The Junior Varsity was entered in the local Y. M. C. A. tilts, the Varsity team being saved for our collegiate schedule. The team elected Purcell, stellar forward and guard for two seasons past, as captain in the coming games. Maude was elected manager by the Athletic Association. At last head- way is being made on a permanent college schedule for future SCILSOHS. CADETS VVALLOP MERCURY, 45-9 Objee, our new mascot, made her public debut at this game, and by way of celebration we rolled up an overwhelming score of 45-9. The Academy had difficulty in setting a steady pace so it was any- body's game in the first quarter which found us leading S-6. In the second quarter all danger was removed when our quintet gathered ten points While the Mercuries marked time. In the second half the Cadets began to show their topnotch form. No fault could be found with their firmly knit five-men defense. Only once, in the second half, did the Mercurians move the ball beyond the first line defense. Captain Purcell was easily the most brilliant performer of the game. His accurate shooting accounted for nine field goals, and his work in the high-geared passing system aided materially in retaining the ball in our possession. "'INlNlNfs"v'v' v nvv v'v :vvnVVr'v'v' vvvvv n vvvv I 1 vfv I 4 vfv 1 1 v'v r v'v'fv'v'lNfvNvvr -V-V Vvr v 1 Aa a a a a a a o a a e o o a a a a a a a o : n c a a 1 V i I r FITCHBUHG YVHIPPED IN ROUGH GAME Our court warriors won their first major game of the season by defeating Mass. State Normal School of Fitchburg, 25-16. In speed, endurance and technique our quintet was by far the superior team. Richards, of the visitors, scored the first point of the game when he sank a. free throw from the foul line. French, however, put us in the lead wl1en he made good a long shot from the center of the lloor. Rosh then tied matters up with a foul goal only to ind French retaliating with three rapid goals from floor. These three goals gave the Cadets a. lead that grew larger and larger as the half progressed. In the second period the Cadet defense, built around Morine and Jones, worked to per- fection, with the result that our opponents failed to score once. The second half saw the Normal School courtmen rejuvenated but in their eagerness to check our sweeping advance they neglected all conservative tactics. Their violent rush served to jam up the works rather than start their machine in motion. Nevertheless, the visitors gained productive scoring results, although they failed to cut down our tremendous lead. In the final quarter the two teams went into action with equal aggressiveness. It was a give and take affair, with our quintet holding the advantage by virtue of their early lead. U Between periods Objee entertained the 200 or more Academy rooters with her playful antics, and g easily proved her right to the title "Mascot" when the final count was made. " Score : C. G. ACADEMY Goals l Fouls Pts. MASS. STATE NORMAL Goals Fouls Pts. gp LH11101111, RF- -- -- 2 O 4 R-iCllZ11'fl.S, nr. 0 1 1 BUNCH: RHF- - - - 0 0 0 Fitzgerald, LF, . . . 3 1 7 i PH1'CClL LF- - l - 2 0 4 Carrigan, C. ..... . 1 1 3 French, C. . . . . 7 0 14 Fe1sbaCk7 Q. , I , 0 0 0 H Jones, R.G. .. . . O 0 0 Pgnny, C, H 1 , , 0 0 0 Moline, LG- -- .- 1 1 3 Sullivan, Re. . . 0 0 0 3 Thlelea LG- - - - - 0 0 0 Rosh, RG. . . . . . 1 1 3 -fl - ' ' Felsbaek Le . 0 o 0 1 T tl .. . . . 2 1 V ' ' ' ' ' 9 'ms 1 20 O'Leary, Le-. . . 1 o 2 J WVilkins, Le. . . 0 0 0 1 in Totals .. . 6 4 16 11 f ACADEMY TRIMS N. Y. AGGIES, 37-19 I The Cadets, in splendid form, turned in a wonderful exhibition of basketball against N. Y, Agricul- on the defense, allowing the Cadets to wander about almost at will in the last half. Morine started the scoring by a foul shot, followed by field goals by Purcell and Linholm. Finally both teams settled down to work and the quarter ended with Van Pell making a clever shot from mid-floor. The second quarter was ushered in by Captain Purcell, who bagged a neat run-under shot, followed by a pretty long shot by Linhohn. Stoxvell of the visitors then worked the ball almost the entire length of the court for a field goal, ending activities for the half. Second half opened with Van Orden, who had done little in the first half, making three field goals in rapid succession. French retaliated with four goals before the Aggies' defense could form, followed by a brilliant goal by Linholm. Van Orden then shot two foul goals and with a few minutes left in the third quarter Van,l?ell caged a field goal. Scoring in the Hnal period was started by Captain 1 5 K. it it I I S- ,V-.fy-vlvwvvf-fl vvvvvvw-.fy-vw-jgv-v:::: 53 E K5 Ki 'Kr l Tfwiv-vlvvy-v 'l 3 V"'V"'V"'l 1 l 5 l 't0 11A1" T:DT?zi'1mlvvVVy 1+ S H 2 5-f O 0 IZ' rm UQ Q 'j 5 UQ UQ Fa. vm ,I 'I IS' O TJ' 'D 4. as U' Q Q D 6 T 12' ,:. r-f UQ ET UQ rn '-P' 57 rn +-: H1 O f-1 rv- IF' f-: fo 0 'LA ru L7 H in U! LS' O ,- 4 fu fl' LT' E FT' O Ha ra O LT' cw m ..... o 5 'IBB I l l l l l l l l l V U V U U U U Q I Purcell. Van Orden then made a goal from the foul line, followed by Van Pell with two field goals. Liuholm came back with a goal from mid-floor and French again broke loose with two field goals. " Just before the iinal whistle blew Linholm dropped a pretty goal after taking a pass from Purcell. f The team work of the Cadets stood out more than any individual player 's stardom. Score: C. G. ACADEMY N. Y. Aeerns 'A 4 Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pts. W Linliolni, R.F. . . . . 8 0 16 Stowcll, R.F, . . . . 1 0 2 I Purcell, L.F. . . . . 3 0 6 Richter, L.F. . . . . . 0 0 0 French, C. . . . . . 6 0 12 Van Pell, L.F. . . . . 3 O 6 Jones, R.G. .... . . 0 1 1 Van Orden, O. . . . . 3 3 9 Morine, L.G. . . . . 0 2 2 Gillian, R.G. .... . . 1 0 2 Totals .. . . . . S 3 19 KINGSTONITES TAKE GAME it Rhode Island State grabbed off the high tally in a 38-28 game played on the Kingston court. Speed characterized the entire game, both teams put their best into the melee from beginning to end. In the final five minutes of play the Cadets ran wild, trying to pull the game out of the fire. The final gong stopped them, though, and our opponents breathed a thankful sigh of relief. First half ended with the Blue and VVhite trailing, 15-11. The two bus-loads of Cadets who went to the game formed into a mad cheering unit that helped the team romp over the Kingstonites in a S 'L vain attempt to save the game during the last quarter. Throw after throw found its mark from short I and long ranges until eleven points had been registered in the last few minutes of play. I Rhode Island tate boasts, this season, one of the finest teams in its history and certainly their speed W and defense 41114115661 them as worthy victors. Haire, their captain, was high nran with a total of W seventeen points. His side-kick, Epstein, at left forward, also drew much applause with his brand W of basketing. A Score: G. G. ACADEMY RHODE ISLAND STATE - Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pts, Purcell, R.F. . . . . 5 1 11 Haire, FMF. . . . . . 7 3 17 Linholm, L.F, . . . 3 1 7 Epstein, L.F. . . . . . 4 2 10 '- Freneh, C. . . . . 0 1 1 Trumbull, L.F. . . . . . 0 0 0 - Morine, R.G. .. .. 4 1 9 Asher, C. ....... .. 1 0 2 Jones, L.G. . . . . 0 0 0 MeGoon, C. ..... . . 3 0 6 'N - ' - Hurwitz, R-.G. . . . . 1 0 2 ' Totals "' '-" 12 4 .28 Bai-ber, Le. .... .. ' 0 0 0 -- Flemming, Ii.G. . . . . . 0 1 1 ' Totals ... .. 16 6 38 .- Score by periods: i. cadets ............. 11 17-ze S- Rhode Island State ,. 15 23-38 1 NEW BEDFORD TEXTILE SCHOOL DEFEATED, 31-28 In a game that will stand out for a long time to come as the most remarkable exhibition of basket- ball New London has ever witnessed, the Academy quintet turned back the team from New Bedford, , , iv-v vvvvvv? U: :?f-v:,v-v:,v-v?v-:wiv-:vu v-?: U lw:,v-vv-T :V-v: y-v: N U U F: '- l I E I l i . Q U lXIi1SS'lC1ll1SCttS, by a score of 31 to 28 The speetaculai p'ut of the game was tl1e seco11d five-minute stletcli 111 tl1e seeo11d half, nhen ou1 team, t1 llllllg 18 13, evened the count 'iftei '1 concentrated drive ulnch set a new m'11k fo1 speed and accumcy It seemed that the Blue 'ind White is is due for defeat as the New Bedfoid boys weie iapidly C-I.1'1l'il11g to tl1e fiont, but fippemfmnces had not counted on the iallg which X1 as to folloxx When it finally d1d come the Cadets hid gfuneied eight points in about tluee minutes to le 1d by 26 20 Tll1S lead 11215 1lGVGl given up fo1 the 16l1l"L1I1dS1 of tl1e game. Duung tl1e iiist half and G'l1l5 pait of the second half the Cxdets failed to Get n1'1nV shots, even it close iange Once, hon GVC1, 0111 quintet st1uck its stride In tl1e SGC011d half tl1e Bay State team had all lt could do to fo11n 'L defense 'uound the Blue and White uppei cou1t t11o The shock of the b11ef assault 111 tl1e second half had obviously discoucelted the v1s1to1s They had been taken uiraxvucs and fO1 'Lll piactical puiposes tl1e delth bleu had been dehveied SLO16 C G Aezinnixrv Goals Ifouls 'ts P111 cell R F VE1lle1 R F L1nl1olm L F1 encl1 C VVendland, C J ones L G Tot tls Sfoie by pG11OClS 9 1 1 S Cadets New BLdfO1 d NEW BEDFORD TEXTILE Goals Fouls Pts. Rouecliff RF B1uce, C Tiipp, Fled, RG Levosky, RG Totals NAVAL ACADEMY COPS GAME BUT GETS UNEXPECTED OPPOSITION When ue t1aveled to Annapolis to play the Midshipmen 1t nas simply anotl1e1 case of "when Greek meets G1eek " Navy knew little of hei S1StC1 S81V1CC7S team at tl1e stfut of tl1e game but tl1e first 1166 minutes of play soon pioved that SllG7Cl. struck a 1eal seiap that VlOl1lC-1 mean 'iight like helll' up to the last uhlstle, and that the stage was all set fo1 a tluly gaeat game Tl1e Middies staited off with Team B as the lineup and guabbed a 5 1 lead but ou1 D1'l.Cl1l116 got going then uid soon added up a scoie that put us out in fiont Nwy sent 111 l1e1 Team A at this point, The fnst squad had tiouble stoppmg ou1 attack and in the next foui mmutes ne increased tl1e lead to 10 6 Ntval Academy caught the Stllde 'ts was," until at end of half ue vseie down Ytvy goat Team A kept the H001 against us and of the second half nhen a tl111d team was sent at last, though, and f01 'L while ou1 score remained at 16 10 But tl1e Coast Gu 11d bG"l1 l1 md scared tl1e giadually 11'1C1G!1SGd its lead until tl1e last two minutes ln to finish A.At.,,,.,,, I 1 V 1 I 1 1 I 1 E A' K. ' 4 , KV 1 l C ' L ' - f ' . .. 1 . - A 1 C ' A 'z 1, ' ' 2- I 'c 'l l ' c c 'L b c -I r V . V V' , , ct Y 1-,X Z' .C . . ' . I - ' 2 , ' ' VK V. ' . 1 c' . V " ' L, C 1 ' ' '- 4. Q "' ,Q . A 1 ' . r .V . ' - 1 ' ' . L' ,X K, ' . 6 6 . ' . .. .' ' . V - . . ' 1 1 ' - I . L , c L 4 1 ' 3 1 .. - n D Il . . . - A . . . 1 I 4 +1 ' ' 1 ' 1 ,. V , '-, .. 8 1 7 1 ", .. 3 1 ' lf ', . . .. . O 0 0 " , ' . . .. .. 4 1 ' 'A , . 5 1 11 - . ....... 3 0 ' , . . 1 0 2 f' - . . .. .. 0 1 . . .. . 2 0 4 . . .. 0 0 A Y Morine, RG. .. . 2 3 7 Schofield, L.G. .. .. 1 3 0 , . . . 0 0 0 , '- '- - - .. .. .. ... 11 6 z .. .. ... 13 5 31 - 1 1 ' " Z Q , ........ .. 10 -1-3 . -r 1 ' - .. 14 4-2 P . D 1 - 7 1 4 4 L' . s - . . 4 -, V .. X V y . . - ' . ' . v ' n n . . 1 . L . , tl . ' . . L .v - . , ft c . . 1 c 1 . lc- T with Hamilton in commaiid. - 'N C ' ' ' ' . C 1 ' ' f A K . l 2 . . .' ' I V L V ' V U. 1- ' ' ff Y 6 - . C z' cl' 'z lk . f, ' ' ' ' . ' ' . ' ' 1 . I K ,V 'V V ' ' . . I wi I 1 ' C 1 u 1 ' . , I L L I I 1 1. LA Q' ' H l 'L "l L 4 ' fl - L VVe lost Puicell on fouls when the scoie stood 22 17 against us, tvso plays latei Linholm injured 11is ankle but iefused to leave the 11001 Reseive foiees 111 the Navy's ianks f01111Gd ou1 chief opposition. The game was one that we aie ,justly pioud to have played The Rega1nent's spo1ts1na11ship and ll0bpll3Z1.llty as piesented to us make tl1e Coips i1,lJ.k1OllS that futuie yeais 11111 see the good fellowship that exists between ou1 two Academies calmed on and may we nent yeai Beat Navyl " v U 1 7 Tiipp Flallk, L F 9 6 1 0 5 28 7 . I 1 """"T""f '?'VV'B'F""V"'T"'T"7 lvVV'V?'VP"l"F"lV'V"l"'T'vP"l"'O"IV7'T"T"l"'T"V"l' ' "1"' 'I' '1"l' 'i' 'l' 'I' 'l""P""1 l I l,vJ,.,JAAA l V l V I V V l V I V l V 1 V l V V I V 1. .1.. .. . .!. -l,. ,.!,. ,.! V l V I V 1 V V Score: C. G. ACADEMY NAVAL ACADEMY Goals Fouls Pts. Goals Fouls Pts Purcell, RF. . . . . . . 1 1 3 Hull, RF. . . ,. 1 1 3 Miller, R.F. .... . . . 0 0 0 Schuber, RF. . . 5 5 15 YVendla.nd, RF. . . . 0 0 0 Kern, RF. . . . 0 0 0 Linhohn, L.F. . . . 1 2 4 lX'lille1', L.F. . . . 0 0 0 French, C. .... . . . 4 3 11 Dennett, L.F. . . 7 1 15 Morine, BMG. . . . . . 2 3 7 Johnson, L.F. . . 0 0 0 Jones, L.G. . . . 0 0 0 Lloyd, C. . . . . 0 0 0 - '- T Bennett, C. . . . 0 0 0 Totals " ' ' ' 8 9 20 Smith, C., RG. 0 O 0 Malle, .... 0 0 0 Hamilton, BMG. 0 0 O Shapley, L.G, . 1 0 2 Graf, L.G. . . . 2 0 4 1Valsh, L.G-. . . . 1 0 2 Totals .. ... 17 7 41 Score by periods: Coast Guard Academy 10 154-25 Naval Academy .... 16 25-41 SECOND HALF RALLY SINKS ACMYS, 25-14 Basketball supremacy in New London was settled when the Coast Guard Academy staged a brilliant second half rally to defeat the Acniy ive, then leaders in the Y. M. C. A. League. Both teams played deliberate game, using a five-man defense which introduced scrininiage at close quarters about the end zones. Short, swift passes featured the advance of the ball by both teams until the final period when the Cadets baffled their opponents by switching their offensive froni the center of the floor to the sidelines and corners, In the first quarter the Cadets took the lead, 8-4, due to the concentrated attack of Captain Purcell, French and Linholm. After the one-minute rest, however, the Acniians held the offensive alrnost the entire second quarter to bring the score to a 10-10 deadlock as the half ended. The third quarter was a. hard one, but in the final quarter the Blue and White tossers peppered their opponents' goal continually. Nine points was the total registered and was plenty to prove that superiority in basketball in New London rightfully belongs to us. The effective defense put on by Moi-ine and Jones, our guards, is reflected in the apparent help- lessness of Brewer, Acniy Captain, who failed to collect a single point. Although he is the highest scorer in the local Y. M. C.A. League he was boxed out of every play so that even his infrequent shots were of the hit-and-miss variety. Score: C. G. ACADEMY p ACMY Goals Fouls Pts. Goals 'Fouls Pts. Purcell, RF. . . . . 2 0 4 Brewer, RF. . . 0 0 0 Linholln, 3 0 6 WRtS0l1, . . O 0 0 French, Q' ,,,, 4 0 8 Mortensen, L.F. 3 0 6 Mm-ine, R-G. , 2 2 6 Rappenport, L.F. .. . O 0 0 Jones, L.G. ..... . . 0 1 1 Higgilwf C- - - - 1 2 4 Wendland, L.G. 0 0 0 Kaplan, RG. . . 0 0 0 - - '-' King, LC. . . . 2 0 4 Totals .. . . 11 3 25 - -- - Totals .. 6 2 14 l f" T" " l 'I' 5' i" " T" l" " l' l A l A l A i A l l l l l A i A l" l" l A I A A A Score by quarters : Cadets .......... . 8 2 G 9-25 Acmy . .......... . 4 6 2 2-14 JUNIOR VARSITY 1926-1927 For the first time in the history of the Academy our school had two teams playing two schedules of basketball. Coach Richmond was aided by Ensign Richards in coaching the Junior Varsity. The ,.,J,.JU1,.,FU1,.JUI..:. .tv,1--'..1..!,. 42,1 games played were in the local Y. M. C. A. League, of which our varsity had been the winners for the past two years. i We started off with the Coast Guard Section Base Four 's team and emerged the victor, 34-22. The game I was much faster than the score would indicate with the Cadets' better condition aiding materially in Ii the victory. The next opponent was the Mei-curies whom we defeated. Miller, VVendland and Burton ran wild to amass a score of 47-29. The Submarine Base was our next opponent and had revenge for their many defeats for the past two' seasons at the Varsity's hands by setting us back by 38-6. As a preliminary game to the New York Aggies game, Bacon Academy was taken fin by the Junior Varsity, 29-16. This game was followed by one of the fastest and closest games of the season. The Marine team of the Y. M. QA. turned out to be a fighting bunch and annexed a field goal in the final half-minute to win, 30-28. ' The Juniors were unable to get started until the final period in the next game and thus we had to bear defeat to a tune of 29-13 played by the Acmys. X This tune proved disgruntling to our aggregation and in the following game they walked over the League leaders, 44-27, " i" l" " l" l" 1" 1 i" " l" 1" l" i" 1" " A " " " 1" " i" l" i" l" i A I A i A I A l A i A A V A , be A 5 I - r Y Y 9 2 , 2 , i Q 1 5 1 5 5 Q T 5 EQ SQ Zi Z 1 5 5 4 4x g 3 ? Ei , E2 Eg E Q 'J 5 z 5 . gy'-"vVV"'fTd1Qy1QgV'f123''3T1'Q''gTy'Q"1Ty'Q"j"v"ygy!Q3V"T"T"'T"?'VP'vIVVYVV'VT'Vl""'P"'VVV'V'V'VVVST'A"VVVYVVIV'Vfm7YQ'fV!Q1'71EiYT'?YW"T"'qVVV'Vx , L 3 Q E E? E5 E2 F Q Q SQ 2 E 3 z Ei Ki 5 353 Ei ii Ei iii 5 5 Q I l Ai ! :, 2 on W :N 'wrnxxqwx ai ' -,'. Fx 'nl:v.n!lInI1Illnq.I"h , - ' - fr. I f . ' 1 I I 5 E 2 E ' , : '1'15W'm-L YJ W -X R1 2 -- F 'L' ,:. E 2? g X J- -":..f"'-f"- , ,L-1-3" X 'fi' ,lil 2 ruise , Section I Z 3 E 3 S 3 I 3 I K K5 li Z5 5 S K Z Z I i 3 ii 3 I li l 51 l Ml ' 1 EI E2 El TIDE RIPS' MEMDRY COURSE Q2 This is the System: Twenty years from now dig TIDE BIPS, 727, out of your sea-bag and Eg see how many items of the following compilation mean anything to you, and why. Ei GRAVESEN D Q2 '24-'25 Mother Ca1'ey's ham and eggsg cobbled streetsg squalid wateifrontg Vllhite Horseg smug-faced rustiosg the cricket fieldg the garclensg the "King's Headng Bovrilg A'fWl1:tt time do they open?" LONDON E? '24-'25 " Majestic spiresg the U43 Glub"5 the Royal Guarclsg " 'Ave you bin to We111bley?"g J. Walkerg 'i Piccaclillyg bussesg top-hatsg HPySt1'yS and kike"5 Baseball Champions of England, Ireland, Scotland, 'D and Walesg stiekersg Trafalgarg Hyde Pai-kg "Palais cle Danse"5 Tollie's toothg Wise's tripg "What g time do they close?" 2 CHERBOURG E '24-'25 li XVOOflC1l shoesg tamsg 253 tiny boatsg rouletteg 365 fishermeng "Defense cle fL'llllG1'HQ Hennesseytw, H chemin cle fei-5 "Wha.t's the exchange on the dollar? " PARIS ij '24-'25 Bright lightsg Gare St. Lazareg not-so-bright lightsg taxis at five eentsg Zelli's5 "Oni, m'selle!"5 Ei "Folies Be1'ge1'e"5 "Ha1'1'yls New York Bar"5 The Olympic Gamesg Montinartreg "Casino de Parisng Ei "Where are the Apaches'?"g "Voulez-vous-?"3 Pol Rogerg Latin Quartierg HL211lg6f7SHj more stickersg E2 "I know where they sell real sunclaes! "5 "Gi1'o's," of courseg U Trop CllG1'lHj "Dead Rat"5 "Heaven"3 ' 'Hell' '3 Cafe cle la Paix, and pay and pay and pay! 5 5 Mvwsfvvv . ,-. ,vw-,-v .WWW ,.-vwvwvyw . , VW , ,WWwW. . 1 l l"'l""f"' TA? l w l l l l i l l l l l " " 1" w" l" " " l' l " 1 + w ! + l f l I l I 1 5 Q5 Q5 Q5 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 Q 55 E 5 5 5 5 'I 5 -5 fl 1, 5 5 5 1 3 4+ 5 5 1 P 4 4 4. 45 5 5 5 . 5 J 4, i 1, 5 4 -il A ix ' 42,0 hall K ' A r A 'VNAVNA . 'Nz 1 ' 'TNr'Nff'T' 'T' 'Tf-'vNrf'1Wfv:'f"r'AfzWwk'A'rNr'vWW' 'T'vf'A'T'A'vNr-1''vfvrfvrf-'rf'':,0,,,Q,V,WrNrfvrfvWW AAAA P 7 J O f 4 qu u , W , 1 - , , , , , v ,-,.,.A,-..N,sA,.A,.A. . , .AN . 1 V I 1MIMM2A,JM: . s 1 :..e..z..x , 5 ,,,...--,MMNQ S Q 4 - ig , -X -:-Q'-1+ ' z . A -.-.X-5. Seq ,. Q - 561,19 x g-swwxg ,Z z. ,, .sax Q -' ww, .Mm ' 1 " - -fw-I iv ig ' m ' .1 Zin der ioWerz1x5'.E1HeI , .,,5, x' ' J':.':1" -":'-"' .711 4 E- .V " .':E' ' . " :::1.-- . .g.- A-My W 1 ' I A ,, 'fbndoid Toqgkr N255 5 :Eh , , and f ' , : zf'-1: 1, A S ,.,,., f- R Brmd N ff - A ,, -"A 1 f F A " - mga' ,.,, --Q-'fmgazfim , 9 - ' fZ:f":" , - 7 " s:5'?gg'x '91-' 'f H , ,V I M, , w...A..4.. -V ..,. .-...... A. . aa, , -1, if S fi , ??'S:i3ilfT' Pff 1?0"'e""a' f ,. I . ,Q-3,15 2' 1: ,W - , .i X ' fx AA EUS 'VZ-'ss' Qs, H -mm A firm - .13 ' VYWX .W-" . j"l51"'42'f?H'f???fffPf"f"'w..' , M ..,.r" X- --5. Nr' Nqr' ... K ,Lam ,A ., ,U . , . ,, i f 'A-W? 1' .. .. .fe V... . -3' . , 4 4:1-:K ' k r'-vw - , , V5 I WH X ,ww if .x K , Mg 9 E 2 E f ii? Yf gi GW 5 5 0 4 w, 2.3 4 , f ' 'S -4 ,XS U v K NN 6 x C A. ...'.,'.'g.'."'.' 7 ' '-1.-.., ..., x.. X W A Q'"-.--V:-1-1fz4s..e:2sf1v1 - 35? "" M'-"' a ' ' Qs' A. sw f 4 . ,. vs 6 , ygm z 'SW gn f 1 Wi? 4, ff 1, "" ,Q , M Q M e J, Stnpaul , .,xL ...,., , , . f--f London E A ' '." 5 ' 7 ' "Wi 1 E "'T:"' ' " -" 1" 1 A 1 A I A w A 1 A A I A 1 A A - N A A 1 A "'V'VW"'T"'T"'V'WPm: W Danze .,....i.. Seine E K, -I k fi. 'fa 1 .A70fF"8DdII1f6 5:45112 9jv9?1'f . 4 ffff, ff? YQ I ri I ff f 4' pry.-. 3 01,4411 . , . 1: - . - 2551152 ' . v , - ,f5hg7?ffa-W . ' ...,, H.. ,A,. , , I -9-am .,,-155 V I V , 25, ,. . ,:.A.., I I ,,-. Eiffe owerffzf frozen way IJSIDW Les 11'n7dZide.S 1:2-2-I I I I I I I fvfyvy-f v-.fv-I wvf:vIv-.P mlm-vifpfv: mv? V-E wvfzvqvv: P,-v:I-.f:.Tv-:v-yvv-.f FZIV-v:I-vf:vjiZJv!Ivf:vI-.A:.-Ffv: V-vzy-.f::v-VIV-v . A lUZ ' 1 w w , w ' l : l I 1 1 w A 1 1 w I w w l r v 1 w t w fl f 5 or , il 5 or 5 LISBON ' of '24 E "Maxim Clubng blue-tiled houses on palm-studded hillsg dirty nrchins and yelping dogsg the Portu- - 'S guese Navyg our parade of canesg aguardienteg Cintrag 'fHere are the balconies, but where 'n'ell are if the 'dusky-eyed beauties'?"5 Black Horse Squareg "Avenida Palace." - MADIERA - '24-'25 E' "Fi' cent, oy doive! "5 'fWhat's the exchange on the sock'?"5 Sailor Joeg aniberg "Reid's Palaceng ox-sledsg the Old Fortg the garden-nioviesg Madierag laceg "Golden Gate"3 radiant flowers of the W W Tropicsg the mountain road. H li THE Azolans f I 525 Picog the buniboatsg eoalg the wind-niillsg the beggars3 Portog "Let's get away from this dump! " ee I, om' SOUNDINGS 1 J "Hit the deck! H3 the long hours of turning-tog the drawn-out fo'c'sle 2l1'gl1111Gl1tSj the dead-beat 011 Ev which. you thought you were safeg discoveryg U:DGll1Gl'i'ES fifteen! Reported by -"5 chowg dinner v jackets inade of oil-sking "Yon vant JAM Ven you got PRUNES? TNVO FRUITSEH flow bridge, dodge the cleaversjq the calls to "Lay aloft!"5 the sessions after workg tl1e joys of Lady Nicg the M lmnrnrooks spread on deckg the inevitable raing the dash below 5 the mid-watch that trails off to inlinityg Q ,A relief 5 caulked Off ag-ani, Hint the deck! ff Q ri Z 5 .- A Z, ri l 1 2 i -2 .,-v 1 U U U Qjlvxfzlvirfv:yv:qi3f! -v-i.Tv-ivfvvvvvvu i lwvvv-wiv-i- U Y w 2 U:!vviivv: iPfv:lvv:Vfv: Ffxfm U:1vv:!' 1 l 3 , in M fdeira f X3 l vvwvl L.,,wM A,Q.AMr,.JMwM:,N4 1 L I rg rg 4, 1 fm f . 4x 'w 4 1 J! 1 1 iffmff MH- f':Z 4' kill 4 V A, ' ,,:.,.1,f.1 V A .V -'V Se . Xi a' - ' f-wwf? , FW' Q . . - .1 ..V 4 ,,.- , L . .. J . -X M ' f 33 . J 4"'Q:,f' ,-fvff 4.-" W Q, W , , 'A -I xv: . x ' H fz, df 1"f?.- - - 'K ' 'rf gf 13 Q " -' -- 'Q -'J' E W. A f? -'Q.' if? if ' . g9 aa' ,W ' "V' . . ,. . .yy ,A ,655 X, V r 6 V. -N I . :J 1 w':Q43,,g1', 0,yV g , p Q- 'V -1-QA . ff ' - 5' x , '12 :V 3 ,f ' .- - 14-'Af "wr,-5-.Nw Q! fi M, . . 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E1..Aj,.,.!,..J,.,.1-A1--t,.AJ,.A!,.A',.,.r,.-2 BERMUDA '24-'25-'26 Celestial islands in :L turquoise sczlg Mr. Thomas Colliusg the dalnces znbozuclg the SlVl1l'1111l1lg pzrrtiesg the dances ashoreg the crystal cavesg "When I get home on leave-! "5 the chug-chug boat to Invcrurieg 'fG1'een Sl1utte1's"5 "XNVl1zLt! N0 21lltOSN?Hj Elba Beach and the 1110011llgl1t bathing partyg 2'lft01'XVZl1'dSQ Gl1n,1'lieg the A1l'1G1'lC2l-11 girlsg mokesg Scotticfs swim at llllfllllglltj thc Be1'n'1udzL girlsg' bicycles 3 water- melousg yachtsg In1lay's hzmtg "Point PlGi1SZll1lL.H -Vvvvvv- a a1" T" l 1 !D!lIAi l 1 i l 2 F I l VVlhwl Imlxmmizm A, ,vvvvw-vvv-wvv I4V'V. K .V-v Q 3 S S 3 3 3 3 E, Z K I Q I 3 ., n 54- i 1 X I 1 L., I 1A,,,l ' 1,4.! if Af 7 4' Zin? ,V ,JH . V .X A , fi I I QQQQQEH , Vi I ' H A - us,-?.x"t , .S G A :'Zy: s-l XX 4 Q 2. Af ' N J . iii 5 A Z.. qi J' A 3 2 s 7? 5 ff . ' fi, ,- . ---5:54 5 . If 1 his' -5' fa ff Qc fi' T my 1 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 VV?" he Yqo if v IK! -2 , ,r t ,S rf! KA: fn Gallia 1 J "YW T 4 3 v Coral Reef' 'E Qi X. fa 6 6' PN L ME ,fr A-1 N8 M -. 4 - . - -' ' ,. -.,.rv,54 - . ,, M, g 1 R? 4,A,,....,..-ww-.Mff-V-QR.,.N..W,M H ly 4 ---L-was-F fv 1 X' --,,,,,, ,.,.. . 4 : ,.5.,.-...,-.,:,-.gf W "2f',,.3'4?'?" "Y'W' M M L - .E, s - .,.. ., 4' 'B , 4. Q22-al, ' " 1: S ' 'Hy - I -fl f ' 1 ,X 4 ,,,,,.MA., ..,., ..,....w.,.,..,-...-.,...... Y 4 -J 1. - 1 -. I W I 3 f 6 . . 5+ Q A . I Q22 ,I . . W f 2 .wli fi in e. M -- for 14 5 X. Just beibre ggi . 2 1:'f?ff?+',. -Ani-:iff ,yy 'A - ' f - :ff 2 1 X battle, ,.,. 5 Q ,iA,.Y" ANN , '- 4 Y ! 5.157 Y '-'ak -xiiffiifa '15-"5"'f1E" 5. ' ' 7 - ff P ' X: 2 .G ' 'A 'WLVSW . f A 5 ,ff xv if me ' ' ,Elf-:e.', ' .f -4 X . ffiffgiggj, -- 7 vi ,.., . ,.,,... 4f5,.,...-www, . 1... My ,,. . I .,...... . .. in L 'gm . -- .... - J w wiv- .222 ,- A' 2-1i2:?'bEZf2fz',y1AfgS f"-Q.-:...a3.1i,j. -f 1 A ' ' . 1, x 'A mf ' 1. ' 24111 K -Q AA'A f ' A f 1' A f X 'A ' L 3 lx A H: .ff Q V . 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' Coral IJ ,Y ,WX 1" l" l" 1" l' '1" I" l" T" 1" " I" 1" i 1 1 I" i" T" I" 1" V" T" i' 'i" f" 1" i" i" I" " N" 1 !" f" A I A A A + A A " " 5 Q CADIZ 7 mco pcsetws, seum " 16 Cuthedml, Eva,'slz1u11d1y, WdtGlf1OHJD beggms, lME'L1l1ll07S pzlmtingsg Tl1lJ0,SlOSS, A111011t1llQLlO Ve GIBRALTAR 70 Luney S0ld1G1S, 01.11 H1St T3.,11U'611'l11S, polo L1 L11lG"l, Wllat a l1o111ble l0Ok111U' clefltule jou fu'e. 5 t01641dO1S, flesh igs, ale, wud you gentlemen ale 1GSl211Cl',Cd f01 the Clllhltlbll of ou1 st Ly' ' more mlb, N 1th Gate, XVl161G,S the Pllldelltl 1 S1gH? TANGIERS 7 NT'111ou, tmtuous St1CGtS, 121111316 lulls, the Velled Llches, the hotel dmue1 , the doukcyb, been , ferzesg cl cet atmosphew, 'Pd Class xx 'L1d100111 thfmt qufute1 " , D '1 V1 D , , . 7 I O A A . 25 fic' 6 -" .! S C ,Lx . . . ,U . . ,vi . . 3 '- -. .' , . ' C- . t 0 ' ' . -5 5 ' ' . . . . J . . ' . ll ' , . , yn A, ca " - 1 ' 4' ' :J L ' 9 -. .. . . .nl . . . . . f 2. F L L . , I Sharvi- LTO. Q. Cl, . l . 'al ' '77 2 Z U 4 , 25 the citaclelg floppy trousersg fghe Sulta11's palaceg vendorsg Moroccan lezmtherg the shopsg dogsg the ul ...H ur.. 31:1 L... , iw A li f Q Y ,l N , Q D f WlWl"fW7"l I l vvvvvv 2 2 w w 5 1 4 . ,. ..- ,-r,. k -ff 1 , Q E Q EQ E5 K5 3. L S- S g 5 ' , - C 2 A i ' 5 5 ' 5 ' Z , ' H ' I ' ' " 1 " T" " f" T" " " " " " 'T" 'N " ' Y " '1 ' Ii 1 QI 1 lx 3 I I ww?-v I Vvvv Ivvyv-v v-xwv-v I I I.vAI...I..A.I I.,I.,I IA..I I :MIM I I I 1 I I I I I I fA .,AL, jf E I. I I I Q I 3 I .555 E Z- F f ' 7 VR M d ullnii ,Q ' fi . I, 3 qyhqzl 1'1' EI ,, I 5- 13? ,- A'-' 2 !'., H ,, If "Q'- -'--1 -I Q,Q-A I , ,..,. I ., ,-' -I, ,ff I -": Qf?g?Y.4?iL.,12331,f,I .WW " M ., fa Q, . -I -Qifu--pf' A ., YV 5- ii I I I L L E I Q o . - I ' E- Wwwwww, , W WWWWWML I I I I I I I" I" I" - I I a a na ano a an n a n I" I" I I" I I I ' I I I I I I" " A " I" a n I I " ' ' "I I I I" I I I " I" I" A " I A L L L VWTAWW' WWWW mWWWMW1., .-Q J . J . A . A . . J . f W- 'ff-A 1 Www rAz.,4W2.' W .ywncdlsireet 6 :Q J Waferw carrz er 5 - I I Q 1 'N A 1 :x . . 5 ' 1 9 ' 1 I' '1"'1"I"'N' 'i' ' "'l' 'V '?"F"'V"'T""2"? 3 V" T V l a - A A 1 A I A 1 a i V" T" 'i" ' 3 V' i N ' ' ' -AA,-AAN,-A 1 V AAAA - 1 A , . ' , .Y .- - H - - Q 1 , , 1 unlv' Fm? .--,AY 5 V V, V V . ,- 5 f g 5 3? :" Y 7' f V ' 9 ,H , V K A V ,,,, L . V A ,. , ' ' 4 Q7 . ' " v , ,, Q 5 Q A Q A . I .- 0 , , . ' ' - Q .,, . ' ' , , - . ' f , 1 ,Q I g , VA ., 1 5 K I , . 3 J , 'fi K u U . , A 4 L T , I A , I 0 ' ' f Q ,. 'V 1 1 1' 1 5 lv H3 -E tt EQ 4 it 3 if ti it - L I 3 5 SEVILLE ' ' '25 " -3 Dream-city of an ancient raceg Hotel Simong the Giraldag the night clubsg "Got any pesetas 1eft?"5 - -3 the Roman W21115 shawlsg the Alcazarg 'fW1'1e1-e are the hot-to-death seioritas they advertise'Z"5 eogna.c5 fi the fast express to Gadizg the gardens of the Alcazar, 3 I fi i ti , 2 - 2 tl 2 - ti - Vv:ivvivvVvyv:vvVvyvyvvvYv:vviw-vTvAv1vv 1 V-v 15 ff 7 ir ,2 1 E 5 E5 E ,Z Q .5 .- 1 A terfiar Doorway pflh E E 3 E I of gfnggge 21:17 'la - 5 5 - 1 an wam g Q if 11 e J galfdejf of E 5 1 I in 4. 5 . 5 I Ei 3- K Q Z E , E rig , E2 , I si Q 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 't T ? T5 4 3 5 'PARRIS ISLAND 1 Q '26 1 SAND5 Gyrenesg sunshineg the dancesg Southern beauties and those not so Southerng "Are they all 111zL1'1'ied'!"5 the 1'2L11g6j the moonlight ride in the kickerg Beztufortg the nite-club on the dock at Port Royalg "Goin, home, Fo1'die?"5 more sunshineg "Mark 8! "5 blistersg SZL1'di116 S2L11dW':lC119SQ lemonadeg tennis. 4 41 7 A1 41 1 4 fa '1 11 LWWA 1 1 1' "1"1V'1W:W1""'1"1"1W1W1W1W1W:WV'1' '1' ' 1 " 1" 1" 1" " 1" 1 1 " 1" 1" 1" I" 1" " 1" " 1" 'AALVA ,L. .'. .I. -I. .l,. .! ! N ' ' I 'I vvvvvv v vvv vv vvvvvv vvvo vvv v vvv U I U ra' "Tj 7 A 1 ' A - A. ' f A MS LAVA V A A ' '- Q,g Q 'I ' AA Q-ff -4 3 IW "XY-'?1 A- -' - A ' ' A. A L .JA ' 3- , -Vifqkgj-A. " ' AAAA' JA.- vh-U fm ,A 'Q Q ' f' fn? 2' -V A 'At thepart Royai Nifllzf Club ,ia fi'-?'+.DZfT--rw. - Q.:-41.3 A- J V W k - ,',. 'Wiz frr,A-,1,VA3i':5A,.-V, ,f ,ww 1' ,A A A 4 'gg-'A52-'I-Q,4gA:gqg-,cjef-A 'A ' A V 4, A' - W A- A' A' A- 1 'V KMAM' w an ff? 0 22 QQ: , Wfifjpl . ' f 2'f?'f W - 'LV ,,, ,.., ' -A AVA V W' " b A AA " A 550 A " A V, Qfilyff "AN A A , ',-f"'X AA 4 l?Q ... -I4 fm wwf. ---H "Q'AfA'+ Ah- 0 I -aff 7 ' f ,f c ,J X .X ' ' G ' ' 5 Y x 4 v V 5 1 4 . 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I P x A A AAAAAA A, ,A f haof 'J A- ' A- f M The Marines teach us o s A A X ly 'X xxx N394-1 Wx fx' AX- , 'x A A if-Qf4gQ - 3 - X - A A Q lg AA A x g'?!2Sg -- S fj 'A ' 3 M A A,zA5Q,41A' A - 5 .A VA A' - A wt fx - A I- ,- '1 f T 'V - 5' Z e f -f ?f .M -. A A .A A A A5 A. v VAN A 5- LA- .Q A A WAAAGA- EM - ' ' A .-.w -:Z-f 'iff - ' A- 5 f X A Vh - ,A A ,-In A I-A,-' -K A-asm ' 2 5 K - K 7 5 K lf- -.Ziff 4-, A L f "- -A 'A ,1 ' - A - - .-- 1uy,'y,y-xiahim ' I --I -wef-1 'IA AIIV 1- AA V :ff - A ' -- A-A gsf-4 -? -1 j iE's1g.'w45x 941- 4z...4:: ' -'I -- A ,. 2 A' Ark .3-1 AAA? Q - - '4 1 A- I. :WE V -"V-iff?,AA,NA.,.-A.. "" V W ' ' 'il H' ' E 4 ' 1Y AAA- " 'A 1 . E ' - 1V-.-Ai,',-- A y AV A AAI! ' ai' r- ff Av " As. I A-5 5 'Al I - 'f' A AA Eg Q f F 7iA?'iY ' M' Li. ' '- AA ' ' ' H 2- ' 7' Ag. - A 2 :MA A A 2 - 1 55 1, A -A A A A The Capfam 11-'gr -5 -A-- On fha Buffs ' fp! ' ' ' - 5f'L31,'-A A ,,,. ,A ' A 1 -Mark Tm., '75 Q A A ,A 1 A--12Ti'fAf'-W'-1" Abi M A.AL 'W' g!,f'Z'a,j- ,ZA 'z .,A, f'f -A AAAAA VA ,Af Ivbv -Aa - Af if-AfNftAAV7' gag A - H ' " ' - -A ,..g,..,,,qf-Av A-:-Q,AmAi. A A52 - W- . 'sg-gi A A A . pix? V, A AAAfA A VV, A -A -A ' ek AA ' YA' A. 52: '- ' 'RQ .A A ' ' ' 3 ,AA - V - .- ----' ' 'X A A 'V -A I - V f -ff'-AQ., dz A ' Y' 1 ' A - ll VI - f Q f-AJPPQGI AA A AA A A AAA ax, Q A A fi' A , -fa A- A AAATW A QA-V 125 -15 25.1 EAAA3 LSL , , Iwi Am. A 5 f - ' -W' ' ,Ms EV -tv " A- -' A ' -- E' ' ' A 'A Wil? ' A 1 S v --' 'im AV ywf' if " ,A. - V- A - Q MN34' -V.i .V A4 '-'f ' , A 1 f ' ' - -A --A f f ' A A A - 1, 1524? Af AAA- Q39 ' A 2 "fff-W-ffwff-Sf A - 2, " Xx A A A VA-- 'f - -- ' A Y .1 A' ' 5 A M " " -VV- ' ' 12 - A VAAA AMA . A ,AMAA ,A-,Aw A A: A.sLAA.v , AA, A A Ag. A, AA ,AAA AAA. ,.f, A A A AA V A :A-A - '- .aim-miv - -MAA 'A W" A w-We .'-A - -Aw A v, Av -1 AV ' f ' AA A A- 'fV-- A A -H ,AA A .A A , Jef 114 Ag-f AAA,f4g A.-ff f A V .As--iff? V1-:A L A "'A V A A N ' - A If-IAA-f-MiA.41'f .?T:A-A.:rf:Q-W ,V AP - . A - MA.ji?i7QfAA' V-WW A V. A A V7 f--- VWz.mbe1" lease f ' A A f, E513 1--A-4575 - -L ,Vmzzr-bf' ' - ' .,:AA: f-'- -A-A ,M-M Q -V - W-vfAfA.w?6Zww:z4-f---YA A H, " 5 AA, VV V- .w L"" 5:-2' - W- 'A V - ""N' f --V--- - '4"i5iQ11A...A A A AAQQAAAAAQAAAMAQ-mmA ,, ,A,,.AA A AAA,,A ,YA A A AA AAAA A AA A 'I r 4 Il1iWi l1liim lWiiVWi1ili mL QM1WW1wwWWmmQEEmu!mmmmmmmmwmmwmmwmmmmmmQmmmmmHmmmmmmmmemmmmmmmmmmwwumu El 1 l 6 W W e 5 ,V i I it HALLFAX il 5 i 526 3 'fTolie, cloz1h!',3 Northwest Army canoe elubsg czuioesg tensg teunisg July Fourthg "I 111831111373 Z' colcl!"5 "Let's leave! "5 Hector McGi11nis5 automobile ztecidentsg Demarzrg the mztjorg cocktails. " 'A ROCKLAND ' Y '26 -- "Beams and brown bread, l0gi"'5 yztclitsg boat drillg HSiUl10S6tH5 Ouklzuicl Purkg "lVha,t'll we do if we do go z1shore?"5 the Main Drztgg moviesg H203 Vi1iulHzLven and Smitty 5 the boat-ricleg seztlsg Item: -- -E one stern and rockbouucl coastg Mr. Russell. f Q PORTLAND l Q Q6 s -- Fish Streetg big times in big uutosg Keitl1's5 Schell in u cuuoeg Deke 's swim uboardg Olcl O1'C'11H,1'Q:l3 5 -S aqua pure.. K 3 BOSTON W 'E '26 , -- Scollzry Square, at lustlg the Commong sliowsg Bunker Hillg the HCO11SJEltlltlO117,j t!WllC1'G are we going to a,uchor'Z"5 Tremont Streetg 1050 F5 Revere Beaclig Jiggs, againig "I-Iztp"5 water. 2 , ,Z ,- oi Ee ,, E, V L ti L .2 if 5 ,o -Iv-vi N-vip,-virvxf:y-v:y-vvsfyxff Z mHyviIvv:Vv:Qvv:ivv:mMxv-iT,vvvi:y!5ffIEE!EIDf i RT 1 Z IT Ivvvvwiyvvv?i?f!d!qvv:yv:Vfv:1vv:Ff-V:lv-v:iv-v:ivwf:v-QI . I , l g , g v v v v v v v v v 9 o v v Q W 1 V k 1 KMLA M h fy werf ' v ' ' AAAA ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' V v 5 . o D V1 V. 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I1 - pug-pd ,.,,..,.WW.M WW, , 2: More of i' e Stern ck rockhh , . ,W ff w ' ' ,, ..., , , 5 ., 4. 3 3 igW""'Qyf5pfC11",Q,P"'v'1,Qy,O 1 Xpmf, omg, 1!Qji!QgiyQ3!yQgT'f1V'fQ3IQU'1'QA'fyfQA'1'ZV""1QyjfvvvgjyQ3ivVvvVV1Qj1Qg!Q1V"V1Q1F'N'V'1QMQ-1!ygligggiyggiygjiyggiyQJIIQMQJFIQXIVVIQXEVVIQffQgivvlgffg11'fQ,U1'QY'1'vV1Q1l1Qjqgy w 1 Q L gi s .YVI -A Q in if ,Q gt ef EQ PHILADELPHIA We ,ze 2 Pay-dzmyg the 'tPicc:1diHy"5 all sorts of thingsg "Cahn" the Sesquig the Coast Guard. Fleet 's pztradeg ships and planes :Lt the Navy Yurdg "Sir, I request special liberty to T Soc. Scc."g showsg "VVeH, I'm uf broke again! "5 "Didj:1 see that OIIGIZHQ Broad Streetg banquetg siuellsg "Adelphia, Roof"5 Jersey E Q mosquitoesg the Portuguese 1112111-O,-W2l1'Q the pnintg pink gurters. if NEW YQRK , gd 726 S, V76 regret to sziy we 112IVC117t space To print the dirt about this place. 5 e zu ee L 5 eu ui Q Q Qi Q Ei W 3 i I , l E1iWWzmimh71h7xWN1LmLmz'E3'uWV"'1131V"11311"01"T"W10fr011lWWQr101V"WWWzLxr1LAr10i1AuQ1iWV'v1A151'D'1i101WV1A11L31'A"V"7'NvV !Ll!Ul115!x1'!5IY1vlT'-v!llUDV-v1Y'vQ15VNICl1!u. 1 1 1 uAqM!,AvA.lqQMQq qqMiMplqq l 1 1 1,4 ' 3 I Q, fx M 4 'P f Q 1 .E CA Nfgillffwwpfdpjj M! '-N the A Q23 " '.-min-,, .: , . 'ff' .' ,. ' X ' , 1 4 nf. jf 3 ' 'f f " ?:s ?E352B7f455V' 1 5 5 L - Rx ms mu fi . '1 ""' :X M57 f V ,... , -. , -1: .,.,:,q14.,,. . 1 -' fa.. -w:'1:,., .I , f . Q - - 1 K ' Z . ,A-N - 1 11 f ' ' f Q . - ' 2 ' ' I-'vi X i w? ' ' 252'5stfQ.1z11.y ' 1 3 ' 1, ' ,,-X yr , . ' few R 1 if , , 1 1 , , I- , . V - 1 t:-:-:Jw S 1 :Q-.. -'M J , f , , f . , A L: Q I , 'fig 3 5 down an the whale wqgfips . , ' ' , fi 5-f sy 2 ' .3 , ' K. e . gsm , ,, '. 'ff' x , ,, 1- ' + . Q 1 sr 1 fx -ff? 4 G f Q , 4 'Q f gg, ,, .A x :gf ae - 5 14 3 A . 'Q f , iw. V -97 . ,. n1f?2' .zgL.,,-a, fir, '- 4 5 W f, Q M-nv-J-.ii -V 2 .. 'R 1 L " KL 'Q ""....'1.' -.P K M 5- f W,,,,,,,.,1,e - Wy- -H 5 'N 'ig '12 -6 A 'I' 'Js5:Z:P2-1m2" ', 4, Ng, PN,-w,a-1:49 . ff gf 1 -3 grin, g f H C", 'N-EA, e, M ja -, 4' 3 f ,I 'L ', ,. " '. WWW ,,.. :- ,- 1 4' 2 Q. 5536? -Qu -1 -y"K?f'vf,yVf fi! F ig i - , gms 5 "' wmms-:M - 1 - 5 L V Q if ,-'QL - F -f SEEN? " " -T-W. "" X ay? 5 E3 . M-4 ' K """ - 4 ,i,, fifi I 23 - -, W, f 31, -:,1.-,,., ,,,,, 1, Q Jressec? up for 111 G 13 -- - " Q f . " 1fff4vi P4fx s H ... , ,,..V , M--Q, - i- of the C' '-3:0 'A . 'www' 5 'w:1w.N,,.,,,.w:y,gq.qyv f ' A 4 415 7 'W ---' f wifi ,, l wp: . -2 'lb . - g ' , X ' ' WX 5 uf N5 Q L KA 5 K V-vlvv. K K S- L I I 4 .1 av. 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" NEWPORT D '26 Yzwhtsg the Torpedo Sehoolg bout drillg T1'iP67S worryg another bus rideg GZUICES here and thereg XVi111H1i11g5 our uutosg the banquetg K:BGGH1101l16 again, Fo1'diei1"5 21 bit of old. Bermuda. NEW LONDON '24-'25-'26 "'Let's move the Academy! "3 LEAVE! E ie N-v.vv1vv.v-V .vw Vvw-v 1 V-vw-vw 2 L Z E E Z 5 35 EQ ii? Vfvtv-vivvlvvy-v Ui:V,Nfv-vv-vv-W H Qzvffpffsv-v:Pfv:xvv::vv:Rvv:EYv:rf-v::v!5f!ivv:ivvw:I i 1 I vvvvv-vvw, I 1 3 W 5, -f Ei Q E1 Q 5 E5 E E2 E2 E1 Ei Ei Ei Q E3 E2 Ei 4? 2 , . , N II JU! 7TIY7IIUUW4W A ,A,..,,1AN,vN.,.A-,.A,.ATAA.Q1,QlAAM-A4AA1AAMfAAANAAAA?AA-AAMAAAAAMPMIAAAAMAA!,vx.,.,,.,.,,,VJ,VJ,VJ,g,J,-..fJ,vJ I I,-,J,v,L..,,,.,. - I I. - V f"'-""'-fi, Q, ,ff-. Q-Tim' , yi L ff' 1- , 4 i . fl? . ' Around Mm? Bedford ff'5'Y:t,lW r z 1 1 Ac:':-3.23 , 'Z' 'J f Wh, I k W Tx .M 1 -,vw 1' A., , H712 ., ., ,L V f -,VH .rp gk , , ., V I , f, ,fi I I LMA A x . Q f 'An' '-J., .1 .,"k: , VV t ,, N- . 1. - -fm, , 'Peg lc fro P 0 1, 4 I- I 0 Z! at W fha QI. 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I THE 1927 TIDE-RIPS .ECZ'i7.i0'l'-'i7Z-Ch'7i0f D Business Zllcwmgev' S. EIADLEY EVANS CLARENCE F. EDGE Art Eclivfoi' REGINLKLD H. FRENCH Artists JOHN J. FUERST, JR. MARIUS DE MARTINO GEORGE H. MILLER The Oyjice Dog ALFRED B. LOOP Assoczicmfe Eclfitor XVILLIAM T. SCHELLHOUS Assistant DONALD E. MCKAY A.H'l'Z6f1'C Editor HAROLD S. MAUDE Humor Eclitov' JOHN J. PURCELL Photogmpher VVERNON E. DAY Business Staff Advertising J. EDWIN FAIRBANK FRED P. X7ETTERICK HQERBERT R. SEIDEL PETER V. COLAROOCO Circulzitioii JOHN W. RYSSY V'A"'V'D'5V'IlIiI1I : I I I L Zfvf wvf:v'!vw:P,wiV,-v:r,v:xvv:V,-vzzv-Q-:vTvf:viv-vvf wvA:.flvv:'v-v:V,wAwiv-V: 1vf.vfFfvxwvf:.ivvvvvvm :V-vzwvfrf-vzi I V-.fv-V jf 7 r 5 ju Z lx 5 -1 ja . . t ,. ,. I . . l l . . . . 1 . JQ5A,JAALVJ,.,J,.,J,.,J,vJ,,,L,,J,,,JAAA,JA,J,.A1 f ! 1 l g 1 N 4 Y, , 'w -3 5 o 2 3 3 5 FRENCH PURCBLL VETTERICK SGHELLHOUS DAY AIAUDE FAIRB ANK RYSSY MCKAY j , 11 ' , , U 2 5 lg ' ' 11 , jx if 2 . 1 4 I . , O 5 O - . . U D MA. ,MJAM-AW, ,Wv ,w, v. W.WWWWANv..WWWW .T,vvvN:PfvIvvvvv.fvvV: N T Hzv-ivww: V-v:Ffv:vv:vv:vv1vv!vvyvvv5vvTfvvvV vw vvvl- -Vviv vv qv -I W , l 1 Y N llama! 4 11 51!DlID11C1UDl !m'1m!m!D1Umm1m! m!lm ID! Q i I it THE YEAR BOOK ii Ever since Twenty-Seven crashed the Academy gate back in 1924 one ambition of its mass has been to leave behind a record which in time may add to traditions and fame of Alma Mater, and to leave this record on the pages of Tins Rubs, '27. XVhen two diags beca.me uniform for members of the Class work on the Book was well under way-then came news, in the last days of 1926, of early gradua- tion. Realizing that doubled academic work and doubled editorial effort was demanded by this hastened exit, the'Staff nevertheless persisted in its task, yet . in its extremity welcomed the assistance of many friends of the Cadet Corps It in publishing, under difficulties imposed by the curtailed length ot' time, what is hoped will be a successful TIDE Rnes. ' is The Editor and his Staff wish to express deep appreciation to Mr. P. Leroy Harwood, Vice-President and Treasurer of the Mariner 's Savings Bank, New London, for a painting used as the Frontispiece, to Capt. Q. H. Newman, Capt. Q C. M. Green, Comdr. C. C. McMillan, Comdr. P, H. Scott, Lieut. Comdr. L. C. Mueller, Lieut. Comdr. J. N. Heiner, Lieut. E. M. XVebster, and Lieut. CJ.G.j D. P. Marvin for their valued assistance and advice in preparing the Advertis- Q ing Section of the Book, to Capt. B. M. Chiswell for assistance in preparing the i Alumni Section, to Miss Jean H. Hamlet, Mr. Royce M. Riley, and Mr. C. B. Goodwin, of the L. G. Balfour Company, for sundry illustrations in pen-and-ink: g to Arthur Somers Roche for aipoem, to Lieut. Comdr. NVilfred N. Derby for his . unstinted labor as Faculty Advisor, to Commodore R. O. Crisp and Capt. W. J. g XVllGE3lGlf for their notes on Coast Guard History, to Chief Pharmicist's Mate E. F. Sullivan for assistance in collecting material on Coast Guard History, and to The Tuttle, Morehouse, Sa Taylor Company and the Bickford Engrav- ing and Electrotyping Company for their friendly interest and invaluable L assistance in compiling the TIDE R1Ps of 1927. f Z ' z L S lv-v: :Vv:yv:Vv:y-vzyfyv-VSV-vw:yw-:v-rfvvvvf j nv-:v ZVNYZP,-v::v-vz y-v:ivxf: D ' 1 . C N C ' A QF fs" ' a 0 h L' ,i i o ' L G ' 3 f v a x " 1 7 flxxx S q w 'xg X ,, f fl G f' , . C' f-Fi - E 1 Wig WWK QU, 1 , M Q. f5Rf?j'fT-fx X 'Q fiqv Q 54' f f Fw XX 5? SX K Mm QQ fx if lbxpff ff A- V N' WVN '-' lf 5 lm N2 - 2 , y 1 , 155-Cf --- fl-I " "M xfv Q QS, fAV ' if:--251 fl? I I? lx ,Q X 5 f f f M! A X wg fi! EK' i'5 ! X Nflkf .- ,I x, fy, 1 ffff f f 74 ,g f 2iiWfNf', ,gW N s f ZWWWAN' Q S. Tgilz 1 M. X 5 Z4 fffl x WQWAXK K J , f fi J 1 :ff A w ' fl 'va fs- y 2 , N V ofQCfq3'-1,gL,1-f,x,ffi il --1 3-W' ' ' - ' v gMJbvjM,'u"'-'-JJQ, ' ffl f, f f i g ' "W W U wilfdi w g f FZ ff ff M SW 2 X fm pf 1 ,Q , I v..: ,QSX W fl X X 1 . 4 ai ,1Qjv,,M,z5Q3 flixvjg Ffa" hfffff ,ff 9 f9tQ:?.ff5'5fq'r , X WWMX 71 1 if X , wif5L25QY1:r1U1 2 ? pf M1 iw f f ,411 f 2,-LQ vfvffbsviaffigl k fy Z 2 ff ' X ' I 5955! ' 5 X541-- f F-Q f 1' X Q i , X, A-Sffi. gs V- ffff- -i?1T f:1gg fa'-f L-, fi' g .,,,X. 1 ' 'fix '+L Xxjqj il ' THE HUUSEBOAT ON THE STYX Charon, seated on a bollard of the Styx' East dock, drew his threadbare garment tighter about his withered shoulders and shivered. The hour was late. A chill, gusty wind, like some elusive phantom element, swept silently westward into the Land of the Dead. Broken only by the throaty, triple growl of Cerberus and the ghoulish laughter of the three weird sisters, unearthly silence reigned. Ef,,5cxi,,4A.A,.,,,.,A3cxN.nA,.,,,,,,,MMMMMMMMMMMQMIUFMIUINVMMYWMJA,4,c,Q,.,rL.Q2,.,4,,,a,.4,,,4,,,,ic,,:,,,4,,,4,,,xiMJ nUr "This is a helluva life! 'P muttered the aged coxswain, meditatively, as he fell nimbly oif his bollard I I H and piped all hands to unnioor ship. In sharp command his thin voice quavered, "All-l-l r-r-right!" E E whereupon eight shades of galley slaves with blue piping on their jumpers rushed on deck, thumbed K' E' their noses in shady salute to the Old Man, and fell to, stroking their oars in cadence. 2 Later, when Cap 'n Charon came topside to take a. sight he found that his ferry had not moved a Z' W centimeter. "Psi mu upsilon!" he swore querulously, lasping into native Greek, "some crazy swab 5 M left the mud-hook on the dock! H Now this ,gripped Charon exceedingly, for he had a. date with Cleo- H 1, patra 'board the Houseboat in ten minutes, so forthwith he placed the entire crew " - on report and stumbled over an eye-bolt, which he later kicked viciously, saying ' H 44' , for emphasis, "There now! H E2 f , About this time a hollow step, like this, ''Hap-de-thump-thump-bangl " fell on g' W all ears. Throwing overboard his binoculars Qinarked "l7907'j Charon saw at once 5 Af that the belated visitor was the last survivor of the Class of 1927, come iinally to K i . be ferried to his well-earned reward aboard the Houseboat on the Styx. f i "Sideboys! H yelped Charon, and immediately seven devils leaped to the gang- T 4 Qitfdulll way. The Last Survivor thumped steadily nearer. "Let go the jib halyards!" ' l 4- llllljz carolled Charon, whereupon Gunner Bourne stepped to the side and pulled the cap M i Wifi on a bottle of confiscated 4M plus. "Fop-p-pl " went the report, and a cloud of ' Wu, foam spread over the deck. "Never mind the other twenty-yetli' said Joe as A V I i" 1 J he swung his peg-leg over the side, "lVe'll just break the necks on those! " I 3 HSTAND BY, ,, Thus did Joe Kerrins, our Last Survivor, laden with the gilt of a full adiniral, L step from his iiagship, the Alexhain, to the quarterdeck of Charonls ferry, and L K7 ' was carried to the Islands of the Blest. There a great multitude awaited L Al him, and as he stepped ashore in the Stygian darkness his glowing stripes I l O7G1'Sl10I16 the scene with the brilliance of the noon-day sun. K Q Ten thousand sylph-like maidens, who on earth had danced their ways A if fl to glory at the Casino and the Folies Bergere, lined the dock from the X" E ferry to the Houseboat and strewed roses in the old salt's path. Joe's QQ, W 2 eye lit up as it roamed the throng, seeing here and there a familiar face, Y ds l 'A Q and his head "went bobbing up and down" in cheery greeting to his lL'lR'7M. ,, friends of long ago. "Shylock,,' he shouted, as that old skinilint slid 13'-229.55 ll A L down a backstay on the Houseboat, "YVhat's the exchange on the franc 9 Z L tofda 'V' S 5 l Segreral evenings later the Class, now "all presentl' in Hades, gathered , ,l together at a festive little dinner arranged for them by King Pluto in the Nl it l wal-flrooin of the Houseboat. ' QE 1. Q L "Boyl" gurgled Phannemiller deliciously, "Get some more slum!" Q -. 4' 'Tain't no moahlt' rejoined the moke, laughing at his own bright 'X - crack and spilling prune-juice down Day's patriarchal beard. Vernon ,, didn't seem to mind, years and years on a Pocatello sheep-ranch and three Q l fickle wives had made a stern, silent man of him. Scottie, however, objected. "You always did take all the prune-juice, Day! " he pouted. HFIRE! " L -. S - L i I 5 . 3 - mmrmlm7WmmvHnK1VH1EKr 1 1 At that everyone looked nervously at Vernon, but he had a mouthful of "n1ystery,' and could only mumble. Tension was relieved by the Deacon, who had had experience in embar- rassing cases during his career as a nnancier of no mean parts. Once while running a bucket-shop in Northern Siberia his tactics were questioned by the authorities and he was thrown into a tiny cell, but like the true financier he was he broke his bonds and strode away a free man. In this crisis he was equally cool. "Now when I was a cadet -," he said, at if? EWU .c Ge Xitfv NF 9 v ' Q I, ti l which happy thought everyone brightened visibly. "Gripes!" shrilled j - old Mrs. Noah, who until then had been throwing a quiet necking party 'r with King Solomon and quite naturally was the topic of catty remarks ' , 5 Q among that gentleman 's wives and - Qoh, shut uplj - lady friends, "Get I A away, Sol. - I'll call Noah! - I simply must hear this one! H And she Q 2 settled her bony old self coyly in Deke 's lap. This so mortified the modest , 1 banker that he withdrew immediately to recover his composure. 1 -- "Missuh Es'rish, I wanna recite!" piped Dan Brady, 'fC'mon, you ' A U'lsterite, tell us how dry it is in Texas! " Thus addressed, Dick Burke, ll garbed in conventional black and white, c1'owned A with a three-gallon hat and armed with all the xt 7 lr usual six-guns of a Texas ranger, rose to his feet and blushingly told of his rapid rise to success - in the cattle game after he left the Academy. HMATDENS ---- STREWED H "I attribute my success," he said earnestly, "to ROSES TN THE OLD I 1ny undying energy, to burning the midnight oil SALT'S, PATH-H 3 unceasingly, and to my conscientious search for Z the best line of bull on the stock market. In my spare moments I seriously took 1 up an I. C. S. course in "Beef and Its Substitutes" which I devoured from end A ' to end. You, too, can succeed! Just clip the coupon to-day and -." From ' near the bookcase at the forward end of the ' wardroom came a wild hurrah. "Give me V pen, ink, and a coupon! " shouted Professor , A q Dimick, speaking seven languages and H, , 3 rapidly sliding a. mammoth slip-stick as U,d,165.- " he emerged from under a heap of heavy V ' , jp toines, "I've searched for years for some- T thing new to study. Eureka! Lemme have iffy! Mit , 3 'at pen! H "V, --P' X Vw 'S Now all this talk of study bored Stein- , f , ,N M- 'S metz exceedingly, for he had never been f f, x' X XXX ' 5 famous as a grind, oh dear no! So during 1 4' Q42 .X AZ the commotion Chet was making, he snuk off K X 43 Q to keep a date with a Groton medium, with Q1 M whom on earth he had collaborated in litera- 9 W ture and love, to give her first-hand material y 9 3 on a book, "Can Vile Communicate With X i i 197223 Our Deceased, Loves?", they had often SOLOMON DOES HIS STUFF ' X planned to write. 3 EVENING ATTIRE Having found a pen for Mr. Dimick, who in the meantime had discovered the Pl IN THE LONE STAR Fourth and sundry other missing Dimensions, the gang returned to the table 3 STATE. , ji 5 -P'VWVVVVV'!""!WVVlWVWW!""l Q3VV1QgTVvyQgV'f-QQQ1'Q"1lVf!'Q"j!y'Q"iV""1Q1!"fT'fP"" Q3!Vf1!1'Q"1lV"yQg!y'Q"3T"'V"1QyyQgivf1!""'1Q1!""'yQ1'i'Q'VT""7'I'V"7""7" I . . . . . . . . . .,. .. I - A J M . . A M 1 1 V 2 U i V 2 V V V Q fx E is -f:u.eEfrRPa nor'rsH?y, TRlv-ouomeTRy- 'Cnucunus - FXLer:BilPa -Cnncurus in time for the scallop course, of which none partook, in memory of one disastrous banquet of long ago. "Egrec," ventured the sprightly Queen of Spain, familiarly addressing George Fort Hicks, as well she might, for he had ever had a penchant for becoming acquainted with queens, "Tell us how you earned your 'Annie Oakley' for Elysium's fields and pleasures," Then fell a great hush over the ancient classmates as the old bean-eater' wove a verbal spell about them and snared their imaginations with his enchanting tale. "I was Qapproximatelyj penniless when. I graduated from the C, Gr. A.," he stated, "and found myself in a fair way towards bankruptcy after buying a Stutz, furnishing an apartment, and paying for the other sundries which every ensign is expected to own. However, at last I found a way. I posed for ads for Campbell 's Beans. Success? Well, rather! I was better known than a movie star! From every quarter of the globe came requests for my signed photos. Why, even the Sultan's veiled ladies wanted one! " "Those ladies ain't nothin' to wot we've got on the West Coast! " snorted that weary, wirile Seattle- ite, Tugboat Tollie, the man who Hrst said, "Bring up a child in the way she should go and when she gets old enough to know better she won't." Claiming vairrgloriously to have been "born and raised on a tugboat," Tollie could notrlong resist the wildly romantic call of the scow business. And can we blame him? NO! A thousand times NO! Tugs are, as one of Tollie's Parisian associates once was heard to murmur rn the beautiful brg brute's ear, Jutlr too ducky for wordth"' The harry Westerner 's solrloquy was cut short at this moment by the entry of a Sw ab, who sounded off, with pathos, ' Mr Vetterrck on the 'phone' Frist booth, sri!" Instantly everybody broke into srnrles, for did not such an announcement always precede dessert? How now!" quotlr that Romeo, ' Why 'n ell can t she let me eat9" But he hurried off right blrthely to keep hrs Long Distance tryst, despite a quite evident look of hunger unappeased When he had gone John D leaned across the roulette table and whispered to hrs srdc krck Mr James, 'Jess, old pal, that man rr as bound to suc- ceed! Rerlrzrng the deplorable inefficiency of audio communication between the Academy and Groton, TK iJ,w?v1Q 'TS 32114, 5 we wif! "N ,M Q' z be A PAKISTAN Assocrrrrn he installed fr private lrne ind cleaned up brg on toll charges, by patenting the rdea of h-rvrng the girl call the cadet, which idea he personally guaranteed after several years of successful xperimerrtatron ' All at once fr great "Yo heaveho! ' startled the banqueting Class 'Zounds!" re echoed Frenchie, who'd been a long time Swabs 'ue srphonrng Brcchus aboard' Which reminds me of Gr but I'll tell that one later How did I make good in a big way, you askf' Mr Derby and fellow classmates," here he bowed slightly to right and left, "Not urrtrl I'd passed the octo- gerrfrrran mark drd the world take note of me an old mari then, but vit-rlly alrve Then I began to write for publication the ,. . . ' ' ' . . cc . N, . I ' . 1 . ' , ' . ,cp ,- 1 . .' ' ' . ' . l . ' . ' . X A . . . l If ,- c J , 1 K Q 1' A ' I A 4 V . 1 . . - . , i. L l 7 V 'M I I '.l L . I' ' .2 I - . Y .631 ,- . . - ' . - - .' - GX " ' . ' .jfk fi XV C. '-. L ' - . 7 1 ' at 11 . V 'Q' M 7, L in Hades and "knew the ropes" as the expression has it, "the 1' , - .b ' . ' -. A ' E ' 'C e J ', ' ' 1 f - fff a up at-pf r ' , Y 1- Q ' . 7- M..- iE:f'f iLg1-.-:- Aa- Q- - It Y C I I . Y I 1 4 ' C ' . ,. -' 1 W 3 , www r f-TN -A-'rfvwwg rf""t""WP"r'VYV! "'O"V'V 1 ! V"1V' ! ! I " r" ! c a n .c a n nons c a an iwiwi ! 5 VV ' story of my life and the health secrets that kept me young at eighty Adonis rival with grey hair. I was a success ovcrnight. lou, too, can have health, strength, and a perfcct figure! llat Fleischmann s least! Delicious! R-ef1'eshin0'! Bee1'y!" When the applause had subsided, Don Quixote, to-istniaster of the eveninof rose and smiled at Scott who was Oliarlestoning rlieuniatieally atop the festive board. The noble caballcro spoke: "Gentlemen and all youse other guy s-attend my words I prithee: From Valley Borge to Timbuctoo, But HG761' befo' in all my time - I'xe roamed thru broad expanses, Have I seen the strut Scott dances. .- ' 1' fo' arfs 'i ." coocd illy r 'no' 21. spi -Q c IPSC'lL'El1lg tie red-lead in Purceyjs lap, 'iuh - shoulda scen ine, suh, as 'Funny Billy Scott and His Bcvg of Broadway Bathing Beautics' doxxn on the Grelt NVhite Wayl' But that vias not until after he d become famous in C G annals as the hcro of the Bittle of the Bippihinnock and h rd iotiicd to the peice of L GOICIOIISVIIIG plantation, theic to imbibe altelnttcly llllllt juleps ind flied chicken mud the scenes of his childhood, until the uoild cilled him once 111016 lnto the lime light to iesuuect the Challeston 111 ' some of those places" doun 'long old Bioaduay ty-f i d1OXVl16d out even the clattei of Scott1e's ein can 'I tell you, 1n1111a0 .. should be legislated against' I got hooked thiee times before I found it out, and a New London woman II as the ciuse of my tiouble II ith eveiy one of my uives Man lS too poly g"lll10llS to make of mauiage anything but a l1011lb16 failuie, unless he suppicsscs his natui Ll mstincts and XX xx I the ueighted voids of a man steeped 111 expelience Puicell, houcvei, XR came back at Mac quite peeushly "The tionble xxith you, ' he lispel, ikgx of! f JW' Sounds of gieat contioi eisy iose fiom the fn end of the tible and fh Y 1 Pllxxx Xi d6S116S'H Thus spoke the Moimon woodsman of B1 amei d QM11111 J, xuth M ic s eyes flashed 1'i1e and he fumbled foi his hunting krutc "Nou don t get tight," Puicey nent on, addinfr flame to the Iile "W111t I mean IS that a cozy little place out on Long Isl ind to cill home, to bo back to aftei a haid day's grind, to deeoiate uith sunflouers on the outside and mottoes 'God Bless the K1ds,' f'11nstance on the inside, to hillou as the abiding place of 'L dfuling uife, to make iesound auth the plttei of little feet that, that is true happiness' Amid 1 shout of approx il fiom ll Sconcnin Srnils A MEASURE the Red Mikes Cif thele Weie anyj the lniuential Spud B'11on of Southold, Long Island, subsided ' IIou's to get in the aigyumentqu Schell buist in 'The Univeisal Topic again? That's fine' u I disagiee nith both of you Gentlemen, my ldeas on the whole subject, gatheied fiom a life time of iathei iaie enpeiience and a ceitain amount of pliy iight hme by the side of the Styx dunno m stay in Hides, may be summed up 111 one biief sentence TllG1G,S only one thing bettei than association 111th a good xx om 111, and that 's association with one not so good' " And the latter day Gappy Ricks fpclqkhiq is U I M 'gfliutul , L lxws.,5,-1 , Klux f Xl VENUS AT THB PORT Hom: Sei dog Schell, ounei of '1 hunch ed ships and captain of lns soul, bon ed and vi ould haxe taken his seat hid not Venus poked hei head thiough a poithole at that lnstant and beckoned l11m out to pinch hit for Adonis Schell uinked at the astounded Class, folded his napl 111 and silently stole into the nigh At that glad episode Fanbank s hefut thumped and socked him ug roundly in the 11bS "I-Iell's bells!" he shouted piofanelw, a mannei all out of keeping uith the high position of Past Giand Beaiei of the Royal Hod, to ulnch his b1Otl161b ln A F Sc A M had thiust him " Hell's ellsl' ' the void nas passed by the 1ne11y D6V1l7S Mates uheieupon the quaiteiniastei struck eight a11d tuined in KXIVISSU. da m1tt', John Edu 117 ' inquired Neio, sohcitously The l11'I,11IVll0,d almost gone to Hahn ihd give ansuei 'Dahn neah foigot a date ix th Queen Liz foi the movie ' 1 I 1 5 1 1 1 f 1 , ' K L 4 1 I 7 1 1 1 If 4 L ' 1 7 1 C, ' Q ' 1 1 1 D, 4 L , o 1 1 c c 1 4 1 1 1 e 1. -1 . 7 L L . o A At 1t sale' 1 B , lol U1 lt 111111 l 1 1 " I 1 5 1 3 ' 1 c 1 5 ' . 5 -1 4 . f- . 1 1 1 1 f 11 , , , , C 1 . . 1 1. 1 z 1' 1. ' 1 'f 1 2 - ' . Z 1 . .J . . A I! A Z I y . . A : '. A ' 1 . , 1 , . ,Qs f ' I 1 f vi - 1 1 ,' Af ' A71 . .. 1 1 '1 1. . 1 - ,ft 1. . 1 - 1 'c ' 1' 1 1 QQ., l 1- Q '1 1 2 . ' 'U ' " IX 1 M . . . . 1' 411- ' 1 ,I 1 ' 1! ' 6 C t '-1 1 4 - . . . 1 . . 1li.'QX"s?' , 1. , -V A 1 1 1 'Z 1 .hai 1 . .1 , , .1 . . . 1 .IQ A . 1 - , 1. 1 1 . 1 tif tx. , , ,. mv, 1 - 1 1 Q my 1 1 ,1 I . 'VV ,V . NI X-:pi lx 5 . .' . --.sr Q . p A I . V . V I V. N , . I lil E .QL5R.5Q., H 1 . 1, , . I. xi YES! is that you've never known the love of a. good won1a.n!" "Sul - " 'ei-,f , 1' 1 ' -' 1' '- 1 ' ' dl' V 1 ' " ' ' 1. ' 5 A 1 1 ' ', 1 1. ' ' ' 4 V ' . I 2' . 0. I 1M 1 ' ' - 1. 1 1" 1' ' 1 ' , " 51 - , 1. , , I ' - c ' 1 ' 1 ." ' 2 1 1 ' 72 ' 1 ' ' 1 ' 1 ' 2 ' ' . ' ' ' 1 ' L 1 . B t .L p V. . . K y V . 4 t , A 6 . -. ' ,' " '1' A 1' " -' f 1 '. .' "5 y 1. ' 1 1 ' " 1 : ' ' ' ' ' T' 1 ' 1 2 1 1 . ' ' . 1 1 . ' , z- ' 1 ' 1 ' A 1' ' ' 1 1. f 1 ' ' 1 2 . ' .1 ' ' - 9 4 A N I . L 0 7 V . . ' b . 1 A . D V 7. . 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I , , V I 7 ' V ll 4 chirruped, dashing off with all the spirit and vitality that had characterized his life ashore and aiioat, without which he could never have raced the ' ' Lady May" to victory and wrested the International Cup from old Sir Tommy Lipton, as he did upon one memorable summer's day, out off grand old Bawston Hahbor. - Now Alexander Lawton Ford, Southern planter of the old school, shuddered and felt extremely chilled at all this Northern accent, for it reminded him quite forcibly of the dreary days and cold in New London, far, far from Hades and the sunny South. In all his sojourn in that Land of Ice he'd found only one little ray of sunshine, across on the Groton shore, and, 'scaping to his cotton fields after graduation he 'd taken that one with him, leaving a great scarcity of sunbeams in the Yankee Realm. Since that day he'd lived in feudal splendor under Dixie skies, and in time many little sunbeams came to play around his door. Relegated to the Houseboat, bearded and beefrookcoated as was his wont in later life, he still cherished hate of all things in the frigid zone above the Mason-Dixon Line except one little house-0'-dreams on the icy Groton shore. Not so, however, the case of Glynn and Ryssy. At Fairbank's outburst in the native tongue of Boston they'd fallen into deep reveries, and here it was, time for the mokes to bring in the potato course before they snapped to. "John," reminisced Pop with pathos in his salt-cracked voice, "Remember the days we spent at sea, you and I, out o' Gloucester on the trawler, 'Boston Brownll' When I was skipper and you played hell with drum and traps in the orchestra during dinner and for dancing? When, after a hard da.y's fishing on the Banks, we'd go down in the wardroom, you and I, and have a soothing, restful, game o' ping-pong or o' craps? Remember?" HI-teinemberfl Huh!" wheezed Jolm, shaking sea-dust from his silvered locks, "That's why I hate this place! Too much comfort! No action, no fish, no bounding sea, no soap, no-nothing! Why, on the Hamilton - " But the aged fisherman got no further with his tale, for Swede Linholm broke in with an ancient Scandinavian oath, "Skoal!" he growled, as he emptied his goblet Qmarked, "Zelli's - '25"j, then licked ambrosiannisette from his rose-bud lips, rose, and held all eyes. "Who the dence is mess- treasurer aboard this packet?" he queried, as he looked baleful askance at one Mr. Cudahy, who cringed 'neath the accusing gaze of the Silent Swede. "I was wondering where I'd N ever tastedchow like this before, and when Ryssy mentioned the Hamilton -! su Swabs out! Round in the caterer! Let's impeach the robber! " This last 1 like wa.s addressed imploringly to the Class, some of which took sides one way , QU' and some the other. Now Stan was quite qualified to gripe about the chow, fgr he had tasted beaucoup beeksteaks in sundry homes of New London's IMX 'If A J finest and well he knew the joys of good food. Persuaded, late in life, by Purcey, that "the home's the thing," Stan left the Service and went back f to Kansas to the little girl who 'd waited, oh! so long, for him, and there x 4 he settled down, contentedly, among the cornstalks. But even there he could U-LITTLE GIRL WH0,D not lose his past and his daily mail contained sweet-scented letters from WAITED ' l i AMONG THE every seaport on our far-flung coast, begging him, "Come back, Stan, 1 CORNSTALKS. Come back! H Not so Thiele, however. Ed had ever been a precocious lad, and having once tasted of the sea-lotus and learned the lure of strange ports and the fair mermaids residing by the sea he made up his mind that coast-guarding wasn't so bad after all, gave up all hope of ever becoming the successful politician he might well have been, and continued throughout his earthly existence to go down to the sea in cutters. As he had so often told the J. O.'s in the many ward- rooms he had graced, so now he addressed the assembled Class: " Why, you ask, with all my many chances, did I never marry? Alia! I plead guilty to tl1e charge of philandering and of toying with many a lllHldCl1,S heart. But here you have my defense: Marriage, gentlemen, to 1ne is a beautiful thing. Some one of my philosophical predecessors, however, once said that 'a thing of beauty is a joy forever! That 'forever' part is what stopped me! Two weeks is enough to spend on any woman!" And, over- 9 c U 4 U 1 9 1 ol, NIWWIWWI :WWWWI I I IWWWI I V"'P'r?"'T'I I I I I I I I I I IVVVVVVI I IWVVIWIWWVVIWIWIW WVV I . I . IW IW IW g "" " l L.1ULvJ,vJ 1 ,VJ AAAAI Wz :Lu ed by tl1e t1eu1e11dous OV'lt1011 of applause ll1S 1 o1ds b1ought f1Olll the lmpp ly 11'1ZL1119C.l n1o111be1s of the Class, l1e dwshed 'may qu1te flL1StClCC-l, fxnd d1d not IGCOX G1 l11S CO1'1l1DOSll1G fol fully fifteen nnnutes 1ft1,1 Nou the btnquet nezued 1tS end, 'md '1s the e1g11s want the 1ou11ds Pl1'11111e 11111161 got to l11s feet IS best l1e could 'md ch111uped thusly UI' f11th 11011, 111e111e gLl1t1GlllCIl, know ye '1ll thflt I 'un ,4 NX N Sheuffl Come' 110 dlSSG11SlOl1, plelse I' Q P1OOf9 XR ell, l61G,S Bly badgev' Nou I '1ll tl1e Class linen, of COLUSC, that he 1e1lly Qu QI w1s11't sl1e11fE but tl1f1t he lX'lS just 1ev1v lllg '1 l1ttle gnne tl11t long ago he d plqyed 111 the 1IOl1lCll1 s blnquet h1ll R1gl1t nobly d1d he pl 1y l11S pfut, 1nd the 1CllllltCCl al1ss111f1tes cl1o1tled gleefully lt the lu11d 111611101108 l1e su111111o11ed up 111 con11ect1o11 JCl1LlGVl1l',l1 SGC111g tl1'1t l11s Xl1SQL1'1Ck llld el1ee1ed the slmdes, G1 M modestly blushed 1 deep 1056 tlllt md cuefully 1CS'Llll1Cd l11s t111t tlns k111dly old fellow l11d once been known as Pl oolem' Calus Pl1la1111ng"Q Pl1.11111y, tl1e jegg 11ho'd gmfted 111016 Gold Bucks f1o111 the Royal TlG21S1lI'y than 'llly otl1e1 s111ce the df1zc of f0IJJ111lG TOlllPk1llS 'md yet as he scoffed off 'U.1Otl10l HZLQOII of 11ecte11u111, P1 ghnt stole 1lltO l11s dllll old eye 11l11el1 the gang l1'IC-l seen the1e oft' bGf01G, und seemg lt once I11016 1pplauded All through the f1 '1nt1e eve11111fr L1t tle Evo, l1'1d muneh ed '111 IY 111 s1le11ee, but 'lt list l1e felt 71 ff' 9' LURE 01' MLK MAIDS RESIDING BY 1111: SBA yew YE SHDRIFF lt t1111e to tell h1s , W,,J'MQ A sto1y, and 111 the WJ WA 5 telhng tl1e1eof su1p11sed the Class 111th at Cockney accent, 111 l1eu of l11s own Ollglllal d611C1011S babble HX 'Fellas, I'n1 d.dEL1ll8d. glad to have 'L Cl1'l1'lCG 7 'J tell you of 111ylate1 hfe, yes, I d1d go to England finally, 'mud 1'I'1'1111Sd the httle gul That was my fust leal sta1t 111 hfe Tluough tl1e e11eou1age x ment and advice of that plucky httle Woman I founded :1 luc1a1t1ve Gonespondence School of 'y Lau11de1111g fo1 the POO1, 1n1sgu1ded l.1uud1esses of CHd1Z, Spfun I11st'111ta11eous success W'1s mme' Cou1'1ge and Caubona d1d 1t' " Huzzahs and mo1e hurzfths mug f1on1 eve1y tluoat, as Maud1e shyly added "Tl1:111k you' " and subs1ded Now ove1 at one e01ne1 of the twble was a, flgme ulneh had -1tt1 'teted small atte1.1t1o11 it Ll, ,-.131-4:2 A BEISGUIDED LAUNDRDSS OF CADIZ, SPAIN 4 '1 , 1 4 D 4 1"1" 1" 1""""' 1 """"""""l "1"l"1'1'1 T'VV'v1'l"l" ' 1 17 5 ,vt l 5 ,vJ,v,lA.,J A,J,VJA.,J l S o I U 4 4 1 1 ' 1 ' . ' v ' ' ' ' . i '- ' . V ' 1 , . ' . . , . . ' - ' . 1. . ' . - , 1 jk ,4m.1,1,, 1-- -1 1 1 ,V A ,vUf,7,,.L .- - - , - '1:1.g.111. 7 1 y ' . . -1 . A M I- I I 1, 7' 1 . . V J NX 9 Z' ' ' T , ' ,' 'r 4 5 . . . x 'f I 'I C 'C - ' , . '. , ' - 'lf' -- 'C ' . ' 1, , . . 7 K . 1 . ., . . - X xo! , I , ,N L R, I V., P . . , 1 , . . . . - . .- I ' L L1 1 '1 1 1 4 ' 1 . . 1 - 1 '. 1 -A 4 I 1 seat. Few there were who could beheve 711, . . . Y I , 1 z 1 7 'Z rc ' .. " H- 1 1 , 1 1' , . - A L - . , . . , . ' - ' 1 1 .' 1 f e. ' ' ' ' 1' ' 1 ' l, ' ' . ' . , , V . C , . .. M . . , . 1 . ' 1 V o 'L I I za ' , h 9 f . 1 - ' Q 1 1:11 ' ' I 11-xxx . f ' ll ' ' f 1 'M I . f te ' . . . RU J I G 'QHL2 I . ' ' . . Q41 V' iv I V' V - 4 ' p lv , offl' ' - 1 . 1 - 1- ff 1 ' . . . 1- H. - . " v 1 ' W . , - - 1 L I, to 1 ,Jn W . . X. , . . K A c x-A A 1 - Tj as - L 1. . E, - - !1"' I 1 . - I ......-. .- - , -- 1 . l . . I . . . . 1 . . . 1 . v - . . , I 'L ' . . 1 1. ' ' ' v L I C 4 . . , , C ., , K ,v G, , ,,,, G, , , , , G , , , ,,,,A,,,, , , Wvvwvlvwv-ve., n a aaa a a a n a s 1 I l " " l 1 l l 1 1 I 1 1 P I 2 2 . i my ir 'vp 5 E D AU1if71IU1AU1lUAlUuUlIUUUTTY7l 7 . 7 7 9 1 U U U V O U I U U O U 1 1 5 g j i 1 i g 3A 1 i g g g g g qi""M"""""'M M ' ' M ' ' ' ' ' ' t' M M ' ' U'''"'"""""'"""""""'r"'r"'r"'Vr'r'VV""'A"'X""r"'r"' S 1 Q Q 1 Y O -f tliroughout the dinner. Its stooping shoulders bore at bowed old headg over shaggy brows was pulled a. f pea-green eye-shzxdeg a tray at the elbow contained a. myriad half-smoked butts. The ancient ghost had Y- not once glanced up from a, manuscript, the pages of which he turned with IL feeble, ink-stained hand, -- until about this time when Eddie noticfed him and shouted, "VVell, Hadley! Howsa boy? The old idiotor A' himself! llfhy, I thought you'd gone to Hell!" "This," muttered the tiine-worn scribe, as he red- A pencilled seven p:i1':1g1':1pl1s and helped himself to more rice pudding, "This is Hell! " V is e F125 1 O Q Uscga to Conneol, about to lose a hard-Won uimiature: "Stop crying! Your tears have no effect on me. What are they? A small percentage of phosphoric salts, a little sodium r chloride, all the rest Water. Blahln HIS Day going to drag a Woman to the dance?" A "Yeh, and through it too-she weighs a hundred and eighty." U 5 5 E , WWWWWVwvf.-va.-vwwwwwvvv-vwvvvww,WWNvW,WWVWWWW ,g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g A n o a a a a n a a o a s a a a a a a s a a a n a g n GLOSSARY OF CADET ENGLISH Thrown together from the four corners of the country, bringing with them varying ideas, colloquial bits of speech, and slang terms peculiar to the sections from which they came, the members of the Cadet Corps have, by necessity and circumstance, adopted a jargon which most aptly expresses their common emotions, thoughts, and desires. From sources far and wide, to be bound within our narrow walls, came words which have taxed the brains of many a comely drag, have worried the few remaining hairs from the nearly-bald pates of sundry fathers, and have afforded untold amusement to members of the inner sanctum. Therefore We have compiled this glossary, hoping that it may clarify the meanings of these words that enrich our parlance. ACADEMIC BOARD-The Powers-That-Be, they who pass on our virtues and faults, and in passing render futile the hopes of those found wanting. ALEX HAM-The U. S. S. Alexander Hamilton C. G., barkentine-rigged, auxiliary steam, cutter, our palatial summer yacht. ANCHOR lVLAN-The caboose on the fast freight to Commissiondom, the junior man of his class. ANN S-But one of the means of depleting our ranks 5 inal exams. BATTLE WAGON-A irst-class fighting ship. One of those taboo. BEEFSTEAK-A week-end release from the messhall, pro gratis. BILGE-To fail in anything 5 to flunk. BILGER-One who has bilged. BLIND-An unknown quantity, Hexpectation is better than realization" and vice versa. BLUFF-To follow in the footsteps of the great god Make-Believe. BONE-Conscientious endeavor With one goal in sight, a passing mark. BRACE-Connoting the carriage of a regulation Swab, as opposed to the col- legiate swagger. CSee SWab.j BRINY DEEP-The home of the fish, upon which we spend our three months' vacation. BULL-That for which Mexican athletes are famous. BULRUSH Cverbb-To commune with nature, a deux, in the near vicinity of Connecticut College. 4 1 N "'P"'Vv1 i " ? i A l" T" A" l A i A l " l A 5 A i ' i" T" l A l" l A l l A A A A xg: -,.,.+11v.i,,i-i4,i,.1U14, BUST-A faux pas 5 a grave error committed on the most delicate of occasions 5 Cverbj to bilge. BUTT-The product of Lady Nicotine, the careless use of which causes much sorrow in the Cadet Corps. BUZZARD-The bird upon the arm of a cadet petty officer. CALC-Calculusg a slippery stepping stone to a first class stripe. CANDIDATE-The young innocent who aspires to Swabdom and a chance to gather demerits while he may. CANNED VVILLIE-A very ancient part of a defunct bovine, supposedly edible, relegated to the cruise mess. CASEMATES-The ancient ramparts of Fort Trumbullg the fort in its entirety. CASUALTY-One of those whose permanent absence we mourn. CAULK OFF-To worship at the shrine of Morpheus. CHOVV-Necessary sustenance for the pursuit of our daily grind. CHRISTMAS LEAVE-Surcease from the eternal grindg ten days for indul- gence in Wine, Women, and Song. CIT-One of the crew of the U. S. S."'Outside." Free from the chains of discipline. CIVIES-The uniform of the cit. ' COLD-Descriptive of the superlative to the nth degree5 completeg why the icicles hang from our radiators. COLUMN RIGHT 'AND LEFT ABOUT-An impossible tactical evolution. CUT THROAT-An undesirablej one who betters his own Academic and official standing at the expense of his classmates. ' DEAD-BEAT-A proverbial sleep-houndg one who lives a life of slothful ease. DRAG-To perform a necessary social dutyg recourse to the tactics of our caveman ancestors 5 to escort a femme 5 the young thing in question. DUTY-Upholding the standards of the C. G. A.5 your turn to ca.rry the Coast Guard on your shoulders. EAGLE-The crow who pays us once monthly. FIFTY-FIFTY CLUB-A band of doubtful honorees 5 those who have received fifty or more demerits on two occasions. CSee 4'Spots."j FOO-FOO-Used to enhance the week-end charmsg powder, perfume, tonic, etc. FRUIT-Connoting simplicityg soft pickings. 5 . A A A A " l" l" F" 1" V" ' l" l" l" l" i" 1" I" 1" 1 'I ' " l" i" l" i" l" l" 1" " i" l" l l i i i l A A F ' MMMM.mM:MMmMi r 1 e :MiMt,nA4AnMt..aNiM4,.,iAnMnn l v v GOO-GOO-Those little brown boys Whose knowledge of the English language is confined to 'fDere ,ain't no more775 Filipino mess attendants. '- - GONCK-To smite solidly with -disastrous consequence. ' GOLD-BRICK-A snapg a soft detailg a trophy of the Class of '27 for which there has been much competition. GRADE-Conduct gradeg 'fOn the Grade," restriction of liberty for over- diligent accumulation of demerits. GREASE-Unnecessary oil used in the classroom and in the pursuit of social and official business. GYRENE-A hybrid soldier-sailor discovered by the Cadet Corps in his native confine, Parris Island. HAZING CArchaicj-Formerly an important factor in the education of a Swab. I-IOP-lVhere the devotees of Terpsichore perform their red-hot ritualg "All cadets are invited and will attend." JUICE-Abbreviation for ' ' Electricity. ' ' JUMP SHIP-To take unauthorized libertyg to climb the fence5 A. WI. O. L. LIBERTY-Permission to visit New London and the College5 the chance of a lifetime to spend the remaining dime. ' MAN OVERBOARD-A spoon jumping the traces of Emily Postg spoon in cup at times prohibited. A MATH-A conglomeration of sines, cosines, stresses and decimals that require subjugationg Mathematics. MESS HALL-From which comes the supply to satisfy the cravings of the Inner Mang the C. G, A. dining room. MONKEY DRILL-A heartbreaking form of torture for the good of our muscles 5 morning ealisthenics. MONKEY JACKETS-Why we are likened to bell-hops at the holiday dancesg full-dress uniforms. NAV-Something else the Coast Guard is famous forg a course that teaches us how to steer clear of rocks and shoals 5 Navigationq NECK-The underlying attraction in the C. C. bulrush partiesg the Science of This and That. NON-REG-Non-adherent to the regulations. O: A. O.-The one and only girl in the world. OIL-Product of Lady Nic in compressed form. OIL BURNER-He who creates demand for the above product. A I A A A l n i lw 1" " l" i" i" " 1" 1" " l" l" N" 'l A A 1 A I A 4 A I A I A I A 1" i" i" 'I A A A A a " t" 1" " "" t" " '2 c a n o e i n g A 4 a a a l l" l" l" T" i"V1"l"l""f""l""" ORDNANCE-The science which enables you to skillfully drop a shot across a rum-runner 's bow. PAP SHEET-The daily publicity sheet, a record of those astray from the straight and narrow path. P-RADE-Showing off on national holidays. RATE Cverbb-To be privileged, to be one of the elect. RATES-Privileges 5 the distinction between one stripe and none. RATEY-A disregarder of rates, one who "rushes in where angels -," etc. RED LEAD-Commercial product known to the trade as ketchup. . RED MIKE-A misogynist, one to whom the qualities of Woman, ornamental, mental, or temperamental, mean nothing. i REG-As prescribed in the gay little books which ever adorn our boudoir tables. lt I REQ-A written request for anything from tennis racquets to shoe strings. R. H. I. P.-HRank hath its privileges. " RUN-I-Iazing, in its mild and modern form, to avail oneself of the advantages of one stripe. SAVOIR-One whose mentality allows him to wink at the Academics, one of the intelligentsia. SAVVY-Having brains and knowing how to use them. SCUTTLE BUTT-The fount of agua pura aboard ship. SEAMANSHIP-That branch 0 study which teaches us not to wear our caps on the port tack when coming alongside the docks of discipline. SEMI-ANNS-Mid-year exams, another reason why the graduating classes grow smaller. SEP LEAVE-The annual twenty-one day period of bright lights, theatres, parties, home-cooking, and freedom from the regular routine. SICK BAY-Sea-going physical repair shop in which the mechanic's tools are cc's, iodine, and salts. SLUM-A dish of mysterious origin and marvelous possibilities 3 generally sup- posed to be the remnants, scraps, and cast-away pieces of bigger and better meals. SNAKE-A sheikish person whose natural proclivities render him the bane of the Red Mikes and the delight of Connecticut College. SOCK-Coin of the Realm in Madeira, Qverbj to paste heartily, as upon the pap sheet. :MMr,JMr.,eM:rMn,r,rMu4NiMnaAmnr,arn,.,a,.ar4NrM1 SPUDS-Species of fruit, native to Long Island. SPOTS-Little gloom sparrowsg records of misconductg demerits. STAG-Unaccompanied at a hop 5 the result of lean days and repulsed desires. STAR-The reward of expertly applied intelligence in the academic battle5 a gold star worn on the collar of the full-dress uniform. STATEMENT-"As the drowning man -" etc. and etc. 5 the why arrdlwhere- fore of a reported misconduct. STEAM-Course in Steam Engineering 5 all about btuls, hot air, and latent heat. SUJEE-Soap juice, used for cleaning paintwork aboard ship, the continuous application of which has oft' been known to gripe unfortunate Swabs of many a Working detail. SWAB-He nho is serxing the Hrst 5ear of a life sentence- a third classman. SWABS OUT I-The Call of the XVild CSecond Classmenb. THERMO-The science pertaining to the vivisection and examination of mole- cules of superheated steam. TREE-NVeekl5 report of XVho s Who in the pursuit of the academic. TROU-NVithout which most men are helpless- an important item of dress for nearly any occasion. - V CLUB-A group of those xx ho think that Virtue is its oun ren ard. XVAGON-A steady drag to be relied upon for Week-ends and hops' a jyard of silk a bit of cartilage and a Parisian bob. WALK POST To perform guard duty rn the vrcrnrtv of the barracks the ren ard of the ultra non regulation WIFE The butt of our curses and entreatres alike belox ed despite his faults roommate fd ruff wig' gg 'ff cg W w Wag f X 7 ' 7 7 I , , . 1 . 7 ' f 7 , . 7 . , H l . , aa 1 7 1 J ' 7 7 7 ' 1 1 m - . - - ' 1 1 , .1 ' 7 I 7 fn - - 1 I 1 1 fx . 1 I v 4 7 . . n - . , , . , f 'Eg eb I , E,w.fg..w.-.P -sw W, sw .1 1, Q-,.5'.,'.3fg.,?11af'pr' L9s,,r,, Q'ii .-,Mi-.Jaw f fp'b'.,, 1" m rf 1-Q." , 2? A rfb. 1 ' 4 ' 1 vwvvfvffvv A i . " I" 1" 'l" 'l" "" "l 1 1 1 t" 't" l" P" 'P" " l" I l l l l l t l t i l l l l l i t l f - s c a n s 0 a n I 0 9 O I U 1 I I , 4' 1 , 3 g I O 9 0 U U U V U U U U U U U I O V U I V I U U U O O U I 50-50 CLUB lb I '," A wrt? Y " I-he M MV fi. WI- Ii Ip " X I'igH:I.g,Ig.I 'gi'WI!IlI Iyllzifi L?ItiNI f M Iiffx 'i ii " "" 'I l Jaxx " M i 'I f QNX. . WI if IIIWIIW 1-' ill 'I ff ' I I 4 N . X XXX 5 w,,fmI,xi,JI X W 'IM L ,ff Ie Mdiiigrii Frenchikw Thielewds Edgegw Tollaksenmik Schellhousw Evansw f'Motto: H Over the fence is OUT!" This congloineration of liberty-hounds is made up of those who have received unsought, free publicity via the Pap Sheet upon at least two occasions when choice bits have been handed out. The distinguishing marks of the Brotherhood are holes Csometinies vitalj snagged in the members' service trou by those bothersome barbs that decorate the top of the Lower Gate. The dues of the organization are payable Qand, usually, paidj to Bernstein, the Tailor. I " I " I " I " I " " I " I " I " I " I" I " I " I " I " I " ' " I " I " I " I " I" I " I" I " ' I " I " I " I " I " I " I " I " l l l l 9 I V W Z ' ' A 4 HOVV SWEET THIS LIFE WOULD BE c - If Hamlet would fall in a trance, ' How sweet this life would be, - And Willie Vlfheeler learn to dance, How sweet this life would be. . If Harry Pope had less to say, A And Scott would wake for just one day, ' And Doc not hold so tight his pay, How sweet this life would be. ' If our Fall leave would never end, How sweet this life would be, And we had twice the cash to spend, How sweet this life would be. If on returning we should hear That threats from aft we need not fear, And we could all get drunk on beer, Y How sweet this life would be. ' Q If we were sure of sixty-five, How sweet this life would beg ' And did not have to bone a.nd strive, How sweet this life would be. . If geometry were not so hard, And calculus from the course was barred, And in drill regs we were never starred, How sweet this life would be. --TIDE Rirs, '06, ' W C Well, Old-timers, times haven't changed much, at that. '27 admires your ability to gripe sincerely in lilting measure as above. C , ' 1 I , 1 1 . O ' ' 4 H U. s. s. Chase I Training cutter 1878-1907 . C C C C C A . n . s . ,QQ,gy,mm9,omg,rpm'ggiav",0y,'5',i,'Qt'f"vWN,QmmQ1,Wyy,'5',Tm,yggrg9gir"',m,'Qt'f"vWf,0ym,Qp,'5',i,'5',1'sf,Dp,'5',rnO,:WvvV' Qy,Qy,0y,m,0y,5,1c . . ,. -,,. ,A - ,.,,. ... ...,. ,.... -.- ,.1L ,.4,. . 1 1- Ax. ,.!,. ,.!,. ,.1,. ,.!,. ,.:,. ,.l,. ,.1,. .l,. -i,. ,.!,. -t,. ,.l,. - V 1 7 ! V V ! 9 C .3 I What they wore in the 'fGood Old Days" Glass of '96 and offieers WOULDN'T YOU LIKE TO SEE: Ahern bald-headed? Scott Wake upw Bennett say something? Reynolds smoking a pipe? Waesclie with his hair combed? Jack keep quiet for just two minutes? Hamlet with the smile that won't come off? Hudson do something besides eat, sleep, and study? Cornell willingly put one cent in the collection plate? hQ"Like father, like sou." See page 49.3-TIDE HIPS, '06. 1 Q lW Wr :" 'WW1.l.:W W: :W Ww,0,tv51,D, Wvwwwwwwwa I 1' 1 1 a l"'T""T"'v"v'xl 1 w"'WWWu l a K K AAL-AI ,ve,VJAAIAAAAIAAAA.-i-l,-Y-L-,J,.AL,,,L.,Al-,-l-,Al-i-Lvl,YAJAY-l-Y-LvJ,aALVxLA.L SILLY SYLLABLES DEMERIT-The eleventh part of a quarantine, generally issued at 8 A. M. as compensation for some heroic act performed during the preceding 24 hours. FARTHINGALE-A girl who visits the ship. HELL-Generally a name applied to a lower region, but some contend that it floats on the water. CYSLACKANVAY-A name applied to a junior cadet who always finds the lee braces. SCULL-To haul on the braces continually during a calm and occasional catspaws and apparently give the ship headway by that means.--Ticle Rvlps, '05. SKY-HOOK-A most useful piece of marine hardware, described by its name. 'When you step a mizzenmast in an examination and forget to provide shears, of course you intended to use the "sky-hook." It may be used for almost any purpose where your memory is short. Wheii it is required to get an "infinitely large" weight aboard the sky-hook is an absolute necessity.-Tide Rips, '08, ' U S S Itasca Training cuttel 1907 21 W 3 I S I K S L " ' 'G'jfyK1'T'jQyy'Q"1Ty'Q"jl1'Q"jfQy1'Q"jl!'Q"g?'f1T'vVfmQyy'QA'jT"'fQjyQyy'Q"1l"'l1Q3121Y1'Q"jVQ'Q"j1"fQp!'Q"1lv"V"'vVVV 1Qj!QjyQj!Qj1'Q"jl"'yQ1 1'g"1T'fQj1'Q"jF'f1IVfy'Q"3Tfy!QI1 1V""! L 3. I Q L E v v v v Q v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v u v U U v Mathematics gripe me. The miracles that may be done with numbers And sines and cosines and Other gags associated therewith VVear on my nerves, Depress my spirits- Yeal Crowd me to the utmost edges Of despair. Because Newton, goncked grievously lBy a falling squash And suffering from the shock Said, "The apple fell" In scientific language, I have to learn it. - Why don't rocks grow on apple trees? I Or boulders bloom thereon? -Boulders are heavier, and Death decidedly more certain. Our solar system swings about A fearsome ball of iire. At awesome rates Of speed. Truly, here is romance! My imagination staggers 'neath the picture But no! All these are only things To be measured with More mathematics- Angles and azimuths and right ascensions. The fire that burns so merrily on the grate That crackles, leaps, and dances like an elf Yields British Thermal Units QEquivalent to 778 foot pounds of Honest perspiration eachj. The steam that whistles in the peanut roaster Is full of jumping molecules. Then in turn, molecules, of atoms: Atoms, electrons- And each of these has probably a wife and family. Disgust! A ' ' ' I 3 1 ' O ' ' A A C Stars and planets also fly through space 4 : ' . ' 4 O I A ' , I ' ' ' A ' ' ' lvvx l 5 1" I " 1Hf"1LYf?Q1'Hf1'Q"3lV"V'yQyyQ1i""'1Q1V'ly 1Qj!Qyy'QA'jl' Qj IQMQJ i'5'3Ty'Q",gl"'lx""V""y Q1 yglygglvvvvvvygy 1Qy1Q1 Qj ygj 191 ygy ygj ygy 1Qf!QHQ1!Q3ivfj lQ1llYQYvjTlYQYvj'P'vIQ1lIQ1:, 5 . 1 -fxb, THE COAST GUARD CUTTER ARTHUR SOMERS ROCHE CAPO Oh she 3111 t packed 6101111 111th cannon She s got no tO1p6ClO tube And she p1o1n1ses 110 glO1y To att1aet the count11 1ube 1 Ol he1 C1811 don t b1 ag of 11111111 N01 the 303s of bloody st11fe F01 they 10 llellfllll to tl1e11 busmess Nvllliill 1S sa1 111 human llfe 1Vhen she steams 111120 the ha1bo1 People don t flocl 1ound l1le bees For she 3,111 t no glllll dest1o5 61 No da1k ter1o1 of the seas And the1e am t a load of 10111211106 To the guy that doesn t know In a Shlp that Just saves vessels 'When the 105 no1tl1e1s blo11 But the men that sa1l the ocean In a 11011115 1otte11 elaft 1Vhe11 the sea ahead lS mountalns 1V1th a hell blOX1l'1 gale abaft 1Vhen the n1a1111nast e1acks and topples And sl1e S ll1lClllll 1n the trough llhem s the gujys tl1at g1eets tl1e Cutte1 Wlth the snnles that 11 on t come ofE 1Vhen tl1e old sto11n s1gnal s flylll EN6lY 1essel seeks a lee Cept the Ollftel 11111011 ups anchor And goes plough1n out to sea 1Vhe11 the 111111103119 s a blo111n FlO1l1 the Banks to old Cape Cod Oh the 011111561 11 11.111 l1e1 SG?l.lClll1gl11S Seems tl1e lllCSb6llgGl of God She s a sa1 61 no dest1oyer And tl1e populace don t rave Bout the shlp not bu1lt fO1 11111111 But the N1 1ves of men sl1e s rescued You can tal e lt f1 om me Bo That those 110111611 bless the Cutte1 And tl1e 1101116111 mostly know Nlo she s got no b1g t11elve 1nehe1s And she doesn t svs eep the seas But the 11 llld that SCH1 es the Dreadnought 'lo the Cutte1 1S a b1eeze She goes thump1n and a blllllplll Whe11 tl1e V1 ate1s 1S a hell Sav1n Sl1lpS 11616 s to 5ou CLll1l16l F01 11e l1ke 5 ou Well' . 1 . -Q , E V " D 0 2 4 11 BY 5 0 A r minent Landsmanl . 2 . . . , . , 5 1 . ' ' 1 O 1 I ' 1 3 ' 1 ,V ' .. 7 ' , 1 7 A . , . A . . 1 I A F . 7 . 7, 1 .. . ' ' Y 2, A . .' 1 7- 1 9 ' ' 2 U v 7 1 . 7 . 1 1. 1 1 ' 1 v. ' U I 1 . u 2 7 ' . d ' 1 1 f' 1 1 . . I 7. 7 . . 1 N 7 H I I ' U N , , . ' . . 1 F . , . . A 1 1 O 1 , 1 7 - , l 1 1. 1 . 7 9 . 7 M. i 7 1 7 . . Q . . 7 1, ' 1 1 5 ' ' 1 . XVlllCh 1S snnply bullt to save. . , - 1 , 7- 1 i 1 A ' U 1 T ' 7 ' 1 i . A 1 1 D . . 1 Q V ' ' 11. ' . . n . 7 . i . A 0 l , . 7 ' 1 D ,1 - r 1 1 7 1 - 1 1 1 , . . . Q 1 ,7 U - . K 4 - , - - , I C 1 1 - 1 - 7 1 , NIH 7 . 7 7 . . 7 7 w 7 . 7 l ii 7 D . . O I O 9 O D TN 7-.-:vT.-:viz YV: V.-:v?,5: yy: 7V-V: Pfvjsv-:ev-fNYA:.?,vvvN1 Th? F,-v: P,-vvprvvzvvvvwmv-VZNV-vwsfvv-vyrfvi VV: L - 'A A A A A AUA A A A A A A A A A' A A A A- i lA A 1A A1A AlA AE. .1. .1 V 1 V l V 1 9 KW' W D . O ' REMEMBER THE NIGHT- , The gang hit Paris? Smitty hid in the waste basket? - Fairbank stripped off beaucoup neck in the port gangway, in Bermuda? ' Scott got his birthday present in Halifax? ' Deke swam aboard in Portland? ' Hicks said, "You give me a big swing and I'll get in that l1a1nmock!"? ' The "Dismal Brute" lost his hat? 1, "Spennie" said, "The moral is, you cz1n't get away with it! U? 5 We stepped the light fantastic in Beaufort, S. O., and then attended "opening night" of the ' Night-Club-On-The-Dock at Port Royal? . Day got his shoes wet? o Scott, Fairbank, and Hicks celebrated the Fourth? o Deacon showed his ability? Evans inasqueraded as a chauffeur? - Mike got a sleigh ride? ' We went to Mago Point? ' Ford and Brady short-sheeted the bunks? Steimnetz got fiailed? . Vetterick did not snore? ' The gang left Paris? D D O REMEMBER THE DAY- ' Althauser asked Mac what "Lay aft and splice the main brace" meant? 1' McKay tried to buy those much-advertised sea-stamps at the Post Office? 5 Wise asked J iggs when we 'd pick up a mailfbuoy? 1 Dan Brady recited 'fDan McGrew" from the barracks roof? ' Brown said, "You, Mr.QEvans, being a specialist in Greece, -H? . Day climbed the Eiffel Tower and hardly knew he 'd done it? . Maude had his laundry done in Cadiz? - "Dickie" visited the "Second Class' -W31'd1'OO1117,? a The Cadets analyzed shellac? Jiggs said, "Get up and take a walk, Mr. SCl1Glll101lSlH'? Q 3 Bowerrnan made first conduct? 3 The class ahead graduated? it The episode of the garter occurred in Philadelphia? 3 Hicks kicked Brown in the shins? ' Phanny took a snow bath? , Thiele and4Thon1pkins looked for Lusk? , Tollie made formation with his wooden sword? n Olie refused Evans' invitation? ' Brown said, "Someone wake Mr. Scott up before hc falls over."? 0 Dan dropped his Physics experiment? 1 0 C A " li" " T" T" " l" T" i" l " T" l" " " I l A I I U I U I U I U I U I I Y I I,. Al,. AIA rI,. ,.1. ,J 1 I 'A AIA AI I HONORABLE ORDER OF THE GOLD BRICK X xylllillluflfhd, QI , I 1 s If I 'flnnpkins DSCMIT Yhannemllur or Pur cell mmmmukllk Motto D n't get caughtp' Savvy men and brave, alone, are eligible to membership in this ancient honorary frat They are those Within whose mammoth brains are formulated multitudes of ehaneey schemes to avoid the Grind- within Whose stalwart hearts is courage to follow these flimsy plans through to delightful, though oft? disastrous, materialization X fl! box 'bf 5 If Q. Q 1 4 N , f Q MIM 4 N 1 , I, , c I 1 N N X A, ' 1, Ox 5 4 1 X A Q ', Xt Xe of 'UI QX 00,0 999 X" IIIIII WX fl I O . 7 I I I I I , I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I1Q1 ! I ' I I l I 5 'I U 1 , a. -1. .:. .1. .n : : U V ' V ' 4513 P' are ,fs 3 ,tlgwg I Wir- Efgwm 7 W KJ 9 Xi I f 10 THE LADIES Here s to girls ue ve loved-and lost And here s to those We Ve Won- Here s to those We see in dreams And those ue ve played in fun. Here s to all the frilly Janes Who give us love clandestine? Mercy, J ove, and guard them Well From jealous frausl molestin'! CHM Black Cat Slop Chestb-: Storelleeper "Say, who do you think I am, Omar the Te11tmaker?'I Y MMMMMMMM I I I I IMMMM I +L If ' . 4 I J Q N X: we ' - x Y X N' H , of . f 4, A - I , xxx . Q cj I It 5 I C! 1 m I g I - I th J H679 . t f , XX I I "Give me a jumper, size GO." C C 1 C 1 C C I I C C I S S 5 e fvvvvvvvvvwvefvvv vqfvvvv, -vfvfw-vvvyv vvvv.vv V-v.v-V V-vsfvvvvvvvvv. V-vv-V V-V V-.lv-.f. QQQ Q Q Q Q Q I I - I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I 4 I I I I I I I I I I W5 T UFF7. ' as 'QQQQJ T HKU C'xg.'?,5.g5ibQ J' if-3,70 Ygyffizff U.-In :mg f X, F X WLUSQGK ,A-J 'fjv0S'NvmsR+HlXU0 Sx UN ,GA ogg? - - Q QL A15 to wiv? 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X 0073118 EQ WT n ' EL Q-Q?if 2 fs XJ.fQefqQLz 1 J .L00H9'T'Qu JA1 Jfbxa x Z J"-?S' U OP X Q X 1,610 . Ygfipf'-4-dx Gai!!!-ANU?-IMOH .0HJ.--' co e 017, olj .f xSh7 ' H7 XX ADL-afhmrs' 3fSP uVVVV,VYvVvwVVu'v V v v V-VN-Vvvvvvxlwv -fv VYIVV VWy nYVvVv v . v'v1Nvwl1VQuv-Nl4V'NllNfNlV'VNrNlV'V. I I N u n 1 x , n u 4" !" ." N " 'K' N 4 I 1 1 X v! . I 1 X 1 I wg N F"'P"'f , , . 1 . N 'A ... vi ' ' x 1. - -4 N Q mi nz NZ RN' sf, 1Jd0H.-719-gwzbjqui 5 is kfxu' 6 T ' Ex 'X' 5 u lx nf ' . 6' O Q' o E 'L I ' 5 , 4, Y - Q: Kb - I ' R ' O-9 if Q I ' '9 - H Q' 1 r xv' A ' Q I Y . K W Q 'i N X x X ,B Q L 6 v, N 3 3 s- UM Q m - fb? R A 0 p QQ f 1 Q 'L fs " 'V 4 fb 1 1 f sy J ta 54 N Dc 'S' " C1 Q 'Z' Q 1 I FN Fl , Q I Q Y ' 4,00 NT- B 'V I 6, 4, J 10 1 Q- or 7 1 ' :K OL S V A uf :M-L S Q I : 3 . 1 I . ' X N 1 'EQ QOH .f g . 1' 5 N -fo . L X, f 0, n' ' X 9' fo X Q IV 7k ui Q JF I 1 , I - U 5 OW Z7 fs -ff' LW" y x 4 "f -L Q , Q N M , v 7 V1 ' gi s N Ig Q Ni 9' 4,1 1 6 I LV 9 fx 0 f Miro' W an Q . Pg 0 2 5 ' , 5,3 Q Q y N Q Q X 1 X ? x " f 0' 1. f li 37 Nea b X0 P A vi? , gi K YS. Q, Q wb Q I 0 -7' -x K r: ' Q0 2, f 6' W, gy 5 X X I-1 YJ X .M 3 '23 X X X f 1' . . 1 YJ ' 4, ,ABN i ' b J-54 4- ! 9+ -' 4 1 J. XX, J ' E 7' ANL 4 M 0 19 o HM fa?-752 fm T E Qsfyf 0 ,moms fswwfm 1910. E fl ummmymx1.1mx141mx1.1miwmrmVFW?Igxwfmngmlmllmgmumglygllgln' mn,., ,.,1,., ,.,:,.,1,.,lm-,.,1,.,-,. ,sW,.,V,n,. 1,.,',.,m mw,fmgu4fmVVAxwllxwlgwvwlnyynxwwlmmmf 1, I E 7" R Lf' In 171 Jegfabtixd Z Ct T- A 1 'F-if A. -'T 1 ffl IJ Mr. Moale: H011 would you stop the flow The Brute: Freeze the pip , ir. Mae QTO Swabj : Has the Cadet Oficel Swabz Yes sir. I am to Wake him When Z I see you commg Nlotorist CTO long boyj : A1e you a mechanicnlu A The kid: No si1 l I am a McKay. 1 Ciocker House balbel z Wet or Dry?" Cadet: Comb my hair and cut out the polit' . A f f- ' 1 f uatei 1n a valveless pipe line, M1 Ford?" f the Dag given 5 ou you1 1I1Si11LlCiZ1011SQH Yeh! I advocated the giraffe for an Academy mascot on account of its great neck, b t 3 rybody said it would be better if a little bear! H OXVED TO MR. ROSENTHAL Our friend he is 5 And you can bet I His loss is great On each ka-debt. T Frozen Swab at Armistice Day parade, Norwich: "What a hell uva day to end the War I" Z S 5,1 . .41 .1 . . 1. . . .-2 .AL .HMLA ' 2 ' 1 ' 2 V I R ? C ? C 1 C C ua , H. W Valli, A ff ' Qaffflffl ka Q 7 , . -1'.-- JK 754: nfl re NH12-Z , H . H rg 1 . '21,-1 1' I .1 P MQW!! Au qtg :S af, p,,,,, 1, 7. -nbrlflq A C - ln. - rag 2, P -- If-., .L Hath,-. - Z5 r4"L'Ll1v4,- . 4 v7v1ar .. 9 f I7 a 2 Lulu -' -ill' U, 1 Q I 1 1 ff 1 Y O 11 1' , - - -. - . 1 2 zz 77 K e s V .- K C rc ' . ' . ' - lg ' O 7 7 . Q gg ' 77 7 ' A C Q H 1 . 1 V , , Q ca , 77 J . ..r. Q C 2 : . , , H L C 77 -- H 1CS q 2 I f M in NA 3 1, I if f W- -'P l K 1 X 5 J f 1 f 1. I, lm A 4. I I 5 4 2 1' 1 H '-" ' Q L 4 'W o . . 2 ' 111411 E 4 o x 5 'X C K f I fp' , . . .if ,QP Z I 1 N11 ,fl 133: - A 1 AL lxhwz ff , XX N I Q 1 6 n - . 1 N 7- N 1 J 1 f 4 . 1, , 1 f f 1 4 C cz 5 u ' 1 77 1 a CVC Y-vlwvvvfv-v, .v-vvvivvfvf.. ,V-VN-vvvwvw-ve-f.v-v,v-v.v-VV-V v-vw-v-Y-v-v-vfv-v .v-. .fvfvvvwvvv-vvv-.-vavvwvvv ,V-VV-V ,11T"'7llifvvi,l111.11lT""llfl4lV'xfT"fll1llI11l 1 1 Y" 1 " " 1" Stage director: "Grit up on tha stage. I Wanna see your pa11tyn1ime.'7, EX-Coed: "But sir, I have11't any onl' 7 ig! f If X W f f , ,--. va! fl I f f g f W "The Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginnyn- eross-sectional view. vfvAv-vwvwvvwvv 1 . 1 v-v"v-'rvfv'--vexfvvvwfwfwfwf 1 1 v-xfa -vvvv, vvvvvv. V ,vvvv 1 .v-vxf-ve, . v-v'rv-v'-v-vuvvmfxavsavs l l w l l l v w l W s l w l w w l u l u l u l r w x l j - N N i N 1 1 - N ' K ' 1 ' 1 ' l ' ! V 1 ' ' 3 ' 1 ' l 1 W 1 1 L , I O I U 0 Q Q Just a bood old fElSl11011GCl u11ul CA D l937j HEARD IN EAST WING Cc11lOll lou looked llke 1 wxrecl it 111spec,t1o11 l2lllS 1110111111 M1 Cl1lSNl ell how cornea? Czuletou D011 t you know that the fhst 111st111ct should be 0 get out of the TH11102 S.. 1341 5 Cl1Sl3l16116S Dost care to eXp1ess thyself? 5 Plerrot "Yea, for such I labor I " 1 Fust fella "Huzzah' The ezqmessman awalts below " I - vvvvv xvixfdve-A Qi M1 M Y r ,, X l . 2 12 12 , il Cf O, - , g 1 , 77 I I I 1 U e- 0 P "' Cnr . c 7 fc h 'I I "Ig, '. l 7 ,' :H ' Chiswellz "Sir, I was eauglu: in the rain and got soaked." U , I zz 7 , . ' ' ' 77 . 4 'C . - 162 f A - X - 'lf - 1 0 l U I X 9 f V F jx fr ' I 1 1 1 1 2-f " U -P 1 U , X-wx - - ' 1 , ' l cz , ' an g -fvNfv'v'fnfvNrvnrvnrNlwfN14vNlhrNdvNfwrvNfv-vvNrxfvsAvvvv1vNlvvnvv'-'v'NfvNrwfnrv1vvv-vvvvvhfvv-VV-vw'v'rv'v'hrwfNfs'hfV?v'v'f-'v'4v'vmf-v'v-v-v-v-v-vvvvv 1 1 1 a n o n a a a a a n a n a a a a a c a n a a n s a n n a a a a a a o a a a n s a a a n ,-fvsfvv. I I 1 !1l,vJ,.,JUI11l1llll " """ Pete Dawson sez and neck." Tom: "Mae, Wh Collins: "YVhy'? Cllarliez "Hoot, Father Ccarving Daughter : ' 'Wh Bowerman : ' ' M A11 "wV11y'zf' Bowermanz "Fm lone enouoh now Swabz "Why d KGB 2d Classman : v-vw-rv-vw-,rv-v'-vvwxfw-.f O C L C ! I l l , , ,,,, . , , , , , , A X AAAAAA VM D D l 0 2 I3 o pw ' e V A 2 P2 , S -.f f W11y do labblts have shmy noses? Because the powder puffs ale on the othe1 end. Q 4 Q?-'N -1-'SJ fX..,1 go. ' -X-I QP-""- What an awful wx aste' flUIflUlTUT, 1 1 3 g g q ? He takes a 48 slze amunum 7 V'W"'N"T"'4V'V?U ! I " i " l " V A AA 2 I " . k b x Q f e N f ' f - h z Q , , lg , - I nl 2 Y ful IH lm!! I D e Z . . Q . ' 1 4 o D In S ' ? . A ,, I 1 . 5 N. J -ll - ee r,L.e!.r ef. - x ' 4 x 5 'YL-V , 'Q U , lg-j 1.5 1- ' i" fi, ' X ,UV 1 I ' . ua - f -1 U. .' ' - , 1 ' '. l ' ' 7 .J X f R51 u -ge be F n 1 ji I , A , ' 1 , ,.u W R N:-:rn-J 4- 'I J " I 'im ' ' " ' - A ff- Y I HN Y . Q 5 "filer e - -' Y cc A c 7 ' 77 . . ' Cl 7 7 .7 , D 9 D . D ?,"v'Qy,Q,vN OHgum,gy,Qy,'5','v"W'v'V"r"',Qy,Qy,Dy,Q,,Qy,'Qu',T,'Qu',T"WWW1Qmplm rNV'P"P"-Wr'v"u'?"f'u'T'u'vvVv I H -jig ' ' 1 ' 1 ' I ' I ' 3 4 Q .I 'C' H 7 X . riff-H v ,f ' if f I 1525 .Z . - I I I ' 'I Il' af XE-3 0 ZW fi .. f U 5 2 I f 1 j Q Q 'I I l I 9 I -B...-L Agatha: "Marry you? IVhy you couldn't even keep me in pin money!" Eli: "I thought you Were past that age.' Sing: "Hey, Red, did you vote for the honor syste1n'?" Red: "Sure, kid, four times!" Mr. McElligott: "It is apparent you do your work independently, Mr, Righter. Your ' results are independent of your calculations' 2 Inspecting officei : Mi. Loop what s that piece of paper doing behind the radiator? The under do Ctip toeing ovei quietly so as not to disturb paper and examining it caiefully D It s not doing anything novv sn ! I did not say all lauyers aie ci ooks said the doctoi but you ll adinit your profes- sion doesn t make angels of inen N o ieplied the lav yer you quacks certainly have the advantage over us there!" , cz , 7 1 1 1 0- ' - ' I 1 ' ' D 7 , 7 U cz 1 ' ' , ', 77 ' . , . ca ' I, H, . ,77 ' 1764 7 1 " 7 77 zz 77 , ' , ll , - , 7 1 ' fvvvs,-v.v-YI.-vw-v .vva-v. . Iv-.Iv-vs,-v.v-.FY-v. . Iv-.f-fe-vvvv. v-v. an-vwv-WV-VI.-ve'-v. I I I . , . g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g I I I I ! TAT! I I I I I I I I I I I I I I at , E Q! I 4 0 X 15922 ' xfiiii? I J 1 l . . . A . J . . L A-- A ,. - - A A A A A - I ' 1 ' l ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' Q I . 3 I C ,Ll A I l 1 ffaifgf v ' I ' , 1 ,li Q uf' . .K X JI: I QL, Q , 0 X . X - X . ' Q - 0 i il 1 1 Alpha: "I hear your clog was run over and lost his tail. Did it spoil his carriage?" Bootis: "lt dich1't spoil his carriage but it surely ruined his Wagginfn 5 - I A I y,,v i db UQ' 6eatQ15g Q3 - nufwlfglmgbtk g :R glitz' ' gt lux, in .J g I Y Bean: HI gave the girl a kiss. Thatls what I inetaphoix' ' Q ' ' " " "" l" l" l" !" 1" l 1" " V 'l" l" F" i" ?" I" i" " l" i" " l" Y" i" l" l" i" ?" l" I" i" T" T" l" " 1" L Boston: "Use the Word 'metaphor' in a sei1tenoe.'7 . .. .1. .1M l ,. .1. .l. -t l 1 l l 1 l l l l r : l : 1 l l l l l l l l i l EXTRACT FROM SERVICE REG. PAGE 1201. . . . Never use a niatch to see how much igas there is in the tank unless you are sure it is a safety match. Anyone failing to do this is liable to be reinovecl from the Service iiiimediately.-Pointer. ' .--X' ,fe -, '1- 'ff- Q, li 'Q Ar-'-x , ,V L fl Q Tig ! 4 1' 1' -Q I. XX A, , fx - ei "' f 'Eg 4, ' T' A 'ffl f ,i - X 7 1 X X if 2 lf- ill ' 'x Q 4 ff' l 2 . "!f7'jfcx i I. 1, lxxk "1 rgcig.-Mf, . f?f"f flxx . - M B v f Q .f - ' , ' r j' f' ' ' , T E, -ff ' E-J, " R. - ' 'Vi " jx. Tx Q Wh : I R 12" . ffff fd- f. , ' LIU , v V 1 4 . : , 5 2 T QD ,. ,fl Q 'ff if H MQ A . C 'EK 1 y "As You Like Itl' -Bill Sltakespecvre cmd all the rest of us. 2d Classinana "Swab! what is that bad odor in the chart house?l' Swabz "Sir, I think it's the cleacl reckoning." Coach: "Has anyone taken a shower this after-noon?7' Rajah: "Why, are there any Inissing?'f Teacher: "Abie, decline '1noney.' " Abie: "Teacher, pleez don 't tall: foolish!" F l l i " T" i " l" 1" i" l' 'I' 'l" i" '1" I" l" 'I" I' '1" i" 1 " N A I A V ' .I ,x ' 4--' T xi - , I RS 3 r -5 1 X -. X 3 1. N Q p C' X .1 -f-Z1 " ' X X 6 P E A Z., F X -' - i N X . 'L 9 v 1, X-df, H , i 3 X f 0 mn ff 1 A kxf - 1 'Y S, f2Q.i -. S f DTl'f'!""x V f ' f fy M Yf f ' fgf if fy VH W7 wwf if Aff if W ffffffff ,. f U f f X f . 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' L x xfffk., 'HK X lf NM.: f il fmt ' vfiflix Jax! , QTIMOVQ I MMLAAAAME V D O ' ' V ' U " " ' ' ! 1 f,.A,.A,v.,..,.. uw Q 2 fm? Z gmwu ll Q S 5' X 0 U 1 Maryland Uniform Company 205 WEST LOMBARD STREET BALTIMORE, MARYLAND Uniforms for Every Branch of the S Service A SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST UPON REQUEST vvyvyvyvfxqvvfv-fvvTvAv'wvNvVvxfMvN-vvvV,-vw-vmfvfv-va-Y-fp'-f.vv,vv.vv.vwvvT,vsvv,'v-v'T,vN-v,vvrvww-vvvNvvvv In H11 jj If nu 51 Qu! My Mn jug My 3311 5-H1 nu Mqfnrlf 51113111 MIM jmljufnru 13,1151 MMM 31.11 51.11 MM jimi 11: . 1 , 1 r K 1 v 0 v s v v c v Q v v 9 Q v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v o o v v v v o v v 0 v v v XAAAAAAAAAAA X 1 I Gr .p s HW ' ...A-9 -. . 4 , ,r . '-E ' f' - - '-' ' ""' EE---:T ii i- A -1 ' -f- A - 5 1' ' - --p sl! -' -L1 . .. ' ,A gpg, :g" in r Y :V l l I r ,, al f 2' J, E V I 4 , - . LJ i- L- g4j A-.41 mf 111 grl?+f.-Q L-.Q 1! ,iii-AT '-.JZYSL ...- i-it ,, i 5 -- .-:-. z-Q.. -- 'z Q T .....- ... 'Z ' lf- E ..r - .,..:,. K "All you swabs spike your hats on all three trucks of the Alexander Hamilton before the cruise begins." This was our introduction to practical seamanship. WVe crept slowly up the ratlines, gripping the shrouds with a death grip, then at the top of the to'gallant shrouds the smooth, slender to'gallant mast seemed to reach up to unattainable heights above us. From there on we scrambled up as best We could, and from the fore truck waved our hands to the tiny Hgures on the deck below, while the gentle rolling of the ship at the dock sent the truck swaying back and forth, and vve tightened our convulsive grip on the mast. MATEINE OURNAL " For Profitable Ship Operation " 32 Broadway, New York DAVID P. MARVIN COMPLIMENTS OF The Gardner Storage Company NEW LONDON ATPKZIANT s VARNISHES PIONEER WHITE LEAD W. P. Fuller 8: Co. 301 Mission St., San Francisco The American Rubber , Manufacturing Company . Belting Rubber Hose Cotton Hose Lightning Hose Racks Faciory and Executive Ofice OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA Branches ' SAN FRANCISCO, 215 Marlcetslreel LOS ANGELES, l8l7 lnduskrialstreet PORTLAND, 69 First Street vvPfvwvTfvT,v.v-wvvN-s4vviv-vwvqvv1vvivvT-vjvvTv-.'V,-f R W 1 ' 1 i i . 1 5 " V" i 1 ' l l l" l" 1" l A 1 A A J LANGFORD ANDERSON LIFE UNDERWRITER '2 so, UNION SQUARE X NEW YORK RETIREMENT INCOMES FOR COAST GUARD OFFICERS MMNQAgMMM,' V The New Londen Ship 81 Engine Company Groton, Conn., U. S. A. ' BUILDERS OF S A High Gracie Single and Double Acting Marine and Stationary Diesel Engines H SIZES, i50 BHP UP TO 8000 BHP Oldest Marine Dissel Engine Builders in the United' Staies. ALSO Freight and Passenger Vessels, Ferries, Tugs, Yachts, Etc. 2500 Ton Marine Railway in Operation Excellent Facilities for Repairs to Vessels and Their Machinery H. LIEBES cisco. GRANT AVE AT POST SAN FRANCISCO Operating Fur Trading Schooners and Stations in the Arctic Retail Stores at San Francisco and Portland, Oregon 'PHONE 3 O O O LYCEUM TAXI CO., Inc. Cars for all Occasions CHURCH STREET GARAGE 29 Church Street NEW LONDON, CONN. .v-vanwv A A i A 1 A A 1 WWWW l b l l l l l l l l A A A A A A ,g g vviwfvvvwvv-vfvvvvwvwvvvwvsfwvvvvwv vv S I E- L E i ii Ki Ii Z Pfvlvxjvvyvyvrfvrfv 5 l gg g g gg g l i s i i l v r l i U U ' V ' V V l I !,. ,.,. ,... ,, l V V VLUJLUJJSIJ V V V M IA AA JM IM EM M V V "QUALITY TOOLS'.' of Every Description SHOP SUPPLIES Complete Equipment METALS 4 E BRASS, oorrjfn, SQUZEL, nzzoNz15 MONEL METAL 'ALUJIIINUMQ NICKEL SILVER, ETC. Ill RODS - SHEETS - TUBES A IVIRE C. W. MARWEDEL Established 1872 Supply Dept. 76 First Street Metal Dept. 31 Jessie Street SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA Uhr Garb? Catering Glnmpang RESTAURANT AND GRILLE CATERING - SODA - ICE CREAM THE COLONIAL SHOPPE 305 STATE STREET TELEPHONE, 1644 ,NEW LONDON, CONN. Q COMPLIIVIENTS OF The F. H. 8: A. H. Chappell Co. New London, Conn. ' COAL and LUMBER . l Block House If these solid old granite walls could speak, they would tell a story more interesting than any ever written in books, for they saw the advance of the British troops under Benedict Arnold and the capture and massacre of Fort Griswold, across the river, during the Revolu- tionary NVar. Later they witnessed the rise and decline of the Whaling industry, then the establishment of the Coast Guard Academy. Since then its Walls have echoed back the foot- steps of those cadets who were unlucky enough to get caught jumping ship, and had to Walk post for weary hours in consequence. , Hg, Cvf f ,M 1 , 0 fyQTf',fw,ff ff ' x . .. ,,,': ', ' ,,.,..-. ', f:1.-fm:'1- fw +I E273 f, NK jeg : 5, N! 1, I Officer of the Deck: Mr. Swab, see if the Watch has mustered. Swab: I don 't think it has, sir. 'We used all the mustard for supper. I X .A.T,f.TvA.yw.-qvfvvyv1v!5,fv!5g l 1 i yvVvA.-VvlA,m1vvyqvf.T.fv Vv U U ' U U 9 ' U U ' " , . -AAAAAA i . l l Alaska Commercial Company Unalaska and Dutch Harbor Alaska Coal Fuel Oil and General Supplies New London as . T Leading Theatres Capitol Crown lLyceum Keith Photoplays Legitimate Vaudeville De Luxe Attractions The Walter T. Murphy Amusement Co. lce Cream was made before- VVho improved it? A. J. Maloof HOMEMADE PRODUCTS 3x70 Bank Street 'Phone, 552 NEVV LONDON, CONN. C. I. HENDRY CO. Ship Chandlers Fishing Supplies SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. - 27 Main Street SAN PEDRO, CAL. SAN DIEGO, CAL. 439 Front Street 334 W. Broadway P. ADEL ESL CO. Wholesale Commission Merchants in FRUIT and PRODUCE 4426 Bank Street Telephones: 2222, 2223 NEW LONDON, CONN. Marshall-Newell Supply Co. Engineers' and Machinists' Supplies and General Hardware Spear and Mission SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. l ' 'i" l" 1" l" i' 'l" i" i" " T" i" i" i l" i" i A I s i" l" " V" T" l" l" i i" " l" i" l" I l '4 V V V I V i t V I V I ROEBLI it WIRE ROPE BAEE and INSULATED 1 WIRES WELDING WIRE CLOTH and NETTING 6446 Folsom Street SAN FRANCISCO I I ,I II 7' 'Q TATE Sc NEILAN 4 Hats Furs Furnishings ,N Stetson and Dobbs Hats -l D Mark Cross Gloves 4 Ladies' McCallum Hose Rain Coats Ladies' Sport Hats TATE CE, NEILAN State and Green Streets ' +I ' NEW LONDON -J I COMPLIMENTS OF l YELLOW7CABCKL H ,'PHONE1w0 ,iffy ,ff X X ff xypj A5 J .4 W' S' 'W y Qfpjjdfx jd gf lfwaww whim M. W 6555 -7 '-',IV - ,,.7V, . y I - Q - -LW I , ' - I .f ' 1 1zm117""-'vm-f-r ., ,. -: f"'f" 'I'1z' fri?-, 'WWW sz' '- by-f , 7 2 32132914 QW . -' ,a:y:15:af.-.afz'51fu4qi:5a:5i?2: .fy rw' , f' ' ,E '.-. ,ul M' 11---V -Z -, -my w- ' V' :4 439,3 1 46 ' 'f -" M ya: .f ft ' if 'uf' f' 1-14 f fa., W A -fa f ,WW-a.I4?f , . - --- I ,- pu? I , fff nz - .. , W.. ,Y - 4' .', ,,,g I ,IH z Q , 'I ,V -' Qfiqily f' Fl - ffffzn-,-ww? I, ,Win-,M-.f,,.4-fzaffq ,, ,ya ww 4, E , . - ,f . V , I .IV,::, ?f,,,.,,:A,Q,: 2 .V .5 S 41. 1 . ' 1 In 1, f. f f A, M G - .-:,,,,,YaMf1f7,,..,W.i,,.Af?5.i, 5,5 Q95 .fa -at . rf -'sf'-4 1' . ,If , fr, ' 4-A , " ' ,. IKM' . -- 41 'C' " . ,,.f 1 M, ..,,, . ,. 3, ., ,. ,' , N . :- 3 -, ,Qu-'f' - , new . a ,va ,I ,- ' Jr If LEE? ' . ' W' - 2 , W1 1 I I . ., .K , 23,1 ,. ,,,, l 92,1 Wy ,.,,, fi, ! Q 4 -4 Q Q, H , " , fn f 'f , Av ' ,JL ,V Full and by Give us a strong, steady Wind on the quar- ter, all sail set, and no paint Work to scrub or bright Work to shine, then Who Wouldn't be a cadet? You can stretch out and sleep in the sunshine, or read "La Vie Parisiennef' or, if you feel like cutthroating, Work out that star sight you should have taken, "Given my position and a nautical almanac, how much intercept do I Want on my observedaltitude il ' ' In the years to come, When the sailing ship has nearly disappeared from the seas, We will remember, as the pipe smoke curls upward, the creak and rattle of gear, and the steady, even sWing of the old "AleXham" surging along at a ten-knot clip. Dumb Swabr I feel seasick! -v-v N-vr-vwv 1 NEW LONDON Much Dumber Swabz Well, go up on the topgallant yard Where you Will be alone. ' Z W I 9 1 I M " " " " ' 1 P l v v ' COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND HEVC"AE1vd'!'i'Vi"'l'i'W"V3"Vi"V'i'T'i'l A f A N A I A K A E e 2 Z 5 Q ia 5 i W!L xfz'fJ'14Dm"'1LxxV'v1LA1 1Cxu"'m"'v'vVf if xr xi101Vx'LJ"xTx'L3"1Ws'1L3WSJ'VF:TU!Vffjn :Qi 10,61'Q"1T1'Q"1T1'Q'T'vxQ1V"'xQ1?"'W'1QixQ1P"'xfQi101:LE Complete Banking Service f QP 7' " pgnqv v v o v 0 U v o 0 v v o v v v v 0 0 0 0 o v v v u v v v v g i r l y , v ' s I Q36 Sosa N V' I' IL 1 Ei eff EU to N cp Qi Ei S THE WIN THR OP TR UST COMPJI NY 3 Plant Building S New London Connecticut Q - WARREN 5 MARINE Q PUMPS FOR 'ALL SERVICES Warren Steam Pump Co., Inc. MAIN OFFICE AND WORKS Q . WARREN, MASS. I 3 h 3 Raymond oc Alexander Lumber Co. LIME LUMBER BRICK CEMENT PIPE BUILDING MATERIAL 150 Howard Stieet Telephone, 12416 NEW LONDON CONN. "Fore 'n tops'l yzwdineu lay aloft" You scramble up the ratlines and edge gin- gerly out along the yard, and with feet braced against the swaying foot ropes and bodies leaning well over the yard, tug up fold after fold of heavy canvas. Remember how hard it was to hold when the wind was sweeping it out in a hard, smooth bight, and how you broke your finger nails and skinned your fin- gers trying to get a hand hold? Then when the last bight was up, the skin smoothed on, and the clews evened, you slid down the backstay and from deck inspected your work, only to-discover a couple of sea gaskets swinging gayly from behind the yard. How hard it was to climb back and tuck them in! ,,,. ws., ..., ay, .... ,,., 5 In - ' . - . by Ievalmi-M -1- ,.-:2 2. A - I tx .. ,Q "1-wwvfka 1 - M...mafQ.w iv K fffafwff--1 K wr' 99 16 A f-gr: F sw 1 - . , 2 ' ' ,V Mi- - - M 2"'e J' -. """ vi: ""' "1 f..,.""V' E' -wwf: fa" as , X .,,., we 2 we if . " gi-11. 252' w 1' ' . I f 1 5, 'Q A X 5 I "Lay down from aloft" T e H 1 I . Q , 3 I jrfwrm, Q, y'Q"j11Q1 ,Q,i,'5'f,'5,vN, mvim, ,YV 1Qm'QA':j vvrvv- I I NV: Pfivvf w.N: yfpfvi Tv-fvfw: Lfmvwfvsfw mv-:qvvi Emgmgmv-v: V,-fvlalsavvzrfvzvvz 3? United Sta 4 i n A A 1 ' 1 1 -YA,AAAAA,-LAL-Y-CAYAC--EAA A,A1AA'.-YAEAAMAL 4- . , 1 . , 'ALALCAM - .1. A - A ,. .o. - f. 1w ' 1 9 V I V v. ..- .l. .:. . . .s. . 2 ' FRATERNITY, COLLEGE me CLASS 2 JEWELRY C' COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS A 1171, d INVITATIONS ,Q Jewelers to the Classes of 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929 of the 'Q tes Coast Guard Academy 'I L. C. BALFOUR COMPANY Manufacturing Jewelers and Stationers ATTLEBORO, MASS. ASK ANY COLLEGE GREEK ' THE NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE NEW LONDON C pt1330000O S pl dP ft eeooooo NEW LOIN DON CONNECTICUT SHIP CHANDLERY CORDAGE PAINTS d OILS FLAGS Weeks Howe Emerson Co M k t St SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA California Wiping Materials Co WIPING RAGS CHEESE CLOTH COTTON AND WOOL WASTE SPONGES AND CHAMOIS M k e sr SAN FRANCISCO 1 E 4 - 0 - 1 1 - 1 V 4 1 - u . I - - . 90 ar e reet . A , n ' 4 a i a , , . 0 1 0 U 0 I , ur us an ro i , , . -A A 1 - . A T 5 M 711 ar e reet . P 1 0 2 - ' -nqvvzxwww wyvyvww w: :?,Wvfi.Tfvi !W:,vsqW:1WvvU we-LY,-ewvvwfvvvvvm N H N N Uwzlwzvfvwwz lW:,W1W,WlvdP,eaWF,v,m.i E 9 ' 9 " ' ' ' ' ' V V ' I l l Compliments of KEMP BROTHERS COAL COMPANY Q UALITY COAL -I AN THRACITE and BITUMINO US SAULT STE. MARIE MICHIGAN 'Phone, 860 Closed Cars ' UNION CAB C O M PA NY One or Two Passengers within City Limits 50 cents to Thames Street DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE CARS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 26 State Street A NEW LONDON, CONN. COMPLIMENTS OF SOO OIL COMPANY , DEALERS IN TEXACO PRODUCTS BEST GRADES OF LUBRICANTS SAULT STE. MARIE MICHIGAN 5 . I E a 1 "By the dee-ee-eep six" Raw, chafed fingers, smarting with salt water, arm and shoulder numb from swinging "a seven-pound lead" on a fifteen-foot circle, do not make any difference to a cadet in the lead! stands, coming into port after two weeks at sea. The lead swings with monotonous regularity, and if the port Ieadsman makes it 'fby the mark ive" as the starb'd one gets "by the deep nine," that is a matter for the officer of the deck to worry about. Port is in "sight, and with the last cast of the lead the anchor goes over with a splash, the word is passed, "Liberty for the starb'd watch till eleven 0"clock," then the mad rush to get ready for the irst liberty boat. Lubber: Did your food come up to stand- ard on the cruise? Swab: It came up, all right. L L Q wvwm, E V'VVN'-v'VV'V1v'vvNl1v'v.vxfv-vvxf. ivvvvvvwlxfvvvvhf-vdvvvvwv 1 vv'v'Vw'v'v'vHlNxfNx11vN1iv-V-vvrv-vvvi v r i A o a o a n o a a a a o a o a o A uo i i i izzlrinmll- 1 I I - I i I I I + . vv,A,.LA,.Y.,,,x,,,4,.Y.5 ,,,,g,.,v.L.j,,,, ,ALAN ,A ,,,,g,Y.Q,,AL.Y.L..,J,.Y.OlML.,.jWALAA4AA 3Mlvl 1 THE THAMES TO VV BOAT COMPANY ' I NEW LONDON, CONN. W A l SL i OCEAN, SOUND AND HARBOR TOWING AND TRANSPORTATION Ei RAILXVAY DRY DOCKS AND SHIPYARD Q, Ei Z BUILDERS AND REPAIRERS OF VVOOD AND STEEL VESSELS E A Q YACHT WORK A SPECIALTY Y E, A I E B R A N C H O F F 1 C E i EQ 1214. NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE BUILDING, NORFOLK, VA. d 5 - I A ' A 'ww 'CI1 x 3711. ,f T A S A Q '-" l if ' Not alone in Consolidated-built-boats Za E1 but ln Craft deslgned by leadlng Naval 251 Q MODEL C' H P archltects and ln the product of proml- 5 Q Th' d If d r tl Slot IQ' ll t b t nent boai?-building Compames Speecl- KA Deizglgtijellsltgistulll onlill Sodzls 1'LcIlgjIlU' :oil Way Engines have found enthuslastlc T' D nf 22 to 300 H. P. will be mailed on request. acceptance- T ,O Z CONSOLIDATED2 SI-IIPBUILDING 2 CORPORATION MORRIS HEIGHTS, NEW YORK ' 3, 1 . .rf! I7VvlvV?mTvITvvlVvPAT'Y'T'Y'lvvl101VvV'vI01V'v!D!EEvfU7H7EV'vV-VI11EIl3ll!D1vVlvV1O!lV!51l VVVlD!'YPlE1Wg t X i- -l. . . At.AlA,:mM:A-eM14 MgqM1MqqmmmM:Mp1qMuAMuA I 1 w v AAAAAAAA. it Q 1 I Q s A 1 Z Ol! HERE engineering skill, Q A . . il craftsmanship and a determi- 35 1 nation to make the best are A Q Qi co-orclinated to meet the gg if Coast Guarcl's, Army's and , A A it rt E5 E2 Navy's usual and unusual re- A 'N Ei ll Ulllirements for Gyrofflom- Twfe1gm'SqWGf London lg H Passes' Gywpilofs' Search, Deah old Lunnon! What a queer lot of Q lights, Gun Control and , , 5 5 S . . . memories it brings up! Shades of Wembly, ' E pecial Mechanical Equip, ,, I , 3 ment the 43 Club, Ram, those bobbies, 'arf an' 'arf, M the gorgeous uniforms of the Household Regi- - 3 i ments, Johnny Vlfalker, the British Museum, Q ' The Strand, Piccadilly-a mixture of the A- l MANHAWAN BRIDGE PLAZA . . . , 1 BROOKLYN , , N. Y, ridiculous and the sublime. , And perhaps our 1 5 short visit helped a little toward a better un- K derstanding and friendship between the two Q great English-speaking peoples, who, united . by a common language, should stand together 5 Z Incorporated and by precept and example guide the Whole DRUGGISTS World on to a Golden Age. f e Q l NEW LONDON - - CONN. 5 f ' Q 2 . V ' li 2 Eastman Cameras and Supplies , t Kg Ei B1-ing us your films to E2 develop and pl-int T E if F5 E TM ,E dm d? M Sim 6 in L a f 6' ' V - 5 Easter9f4C0n1icticut i ' 'Arryn NV'y do the blarsted fish 'ave scales, I 5 110 sr i st t ,E1'be1't? 5 a e ree V l 'Erbertz To 'elp the bloomini sylors Weigh l- f hanchor, you blighter. E 3 , l f nswwvrwwrfvrfvnwiwawiwvvawrvvvrvwwww,Oy,Qy,m,Qy,Q,r,'Q"f' "vNr'vYVfWvrvvWvf'rf'VVv'rrfVrf':WvNvvWrf'vvvW'rri'r'rNNnvr . , . . . . ,. . . .l.. . . ,.,,. ,. ,. ,. ,.. ,. ,. ,. ,. ,. ,. ,.!,. ,.',,. ,.I,. ,. ,. ,A,. .1,. ,.2,. ,.1,. ,. I,. .,. LV . MA' ' 1 1,. ,.N,. .l 9 3 V l V . V 9 .-L 'r C The Savings Bank of New London ESTABLISHED 1827 A BIG, S TR ON G, FRI ENDL Y' BA ZVK' Resources Over 321,000,000 Belonging to More Than 31,000 Depositors 1 Accepts Allotments from the Federal Government for Credit to Accounts of Boys in the Service Open for Deposits Saturday Evenings, 6.30 to 8.30 SPEIRS BROTHERS The New London Boller Works m BOIICTS T ks Smoke St cks Etc Steel a d Iron Plate W k Prompt Attent1 n Glven to Rep rs AT YARD OF MARINE IRON WORKS FORT NECK NEW LONDON CONN PERRY 81 STONE Inc JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS Fme Leather Goods Stationery Gnft Articles In Great Variety 138 State Street NEW LONDON The Sun Never Sets WALK OVER SHOES Sold ln l0l Forelgn Countnes 50 Years o Honest Shoema mg Wzns World W :ale Reputation AGENCY BOOKS STATIONERY DRAWING SUPPLIES Edvvln Keeney Co 15 Maln Street l N l l I l ll I N ll llDLYD - 9 -L ' 4 Manufacturers of Stea ' , an , a , . E 0 3-1 . . . . E 5 1 ' 7 'Q I 4 - ' Q on I - and . . f . 'Y' ' ' . 237 sate sneer NEW LONDON, coNN. A New London - - Y 5 mquyilxmiv v v o v v 0 0 U v c v 0 Q u o v o v o v v o v v .I I ,I I I g I I I I I I I I AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA. Golf : Tennis : Baseball Swimming : Skating : Skiing Tobogganing : Football : Boxing Basketball : Volley Ball Everything for the Athlete at the ATHLETIC STORE HENRY ELIONSKY A4 . 4I I I I 6 4! Agent for A ' A. G. SPALDING 8: BROS. 4. Q: Crown Theatre Bldg. 1 tx New London, Conn. 4 1 I :I 'I is 1. We Feature J 1 4I I The Hartmann Trunk For Better Luggage 1' TRY . The Luggage Shop . 99 Bank Street I 3 NEW LONDON CONNECTICUT I 4 I Belein Tower, Lisbon From this ornate old tower, reminiscent of the days of the Moors in Portugal, Vasco da Gama sailed on his voyage around the Cape of Good Hope. And in the magnificent cathe- dral behind it his bones are laid. The crum- bling and forsaken walls conjure up pictures of Haunting banners and flashing armor and all the pomp and glory of medieval chivalry. Now instead of withstanding the attacks of enemy cannon it is the target of tourists cameras Sic ti ansit Two old ladies late for a muslcale fell to quibbling over the name of the selection being played One thought it Was the Soldiers Chorus, While the other was equally sure h it Was the quaitette from Rigoletto To settle the matter one of them hobbled over to look at a sign affixed to the Wall Return ing she reported, We were both Wrong 1t U' 7 . , . . I . , 7 7, . H . , , aa ' C. , t at - I , rc ' 77 . H . . 7 was the 'Refrain from Expectoratingf 'I' wT"'I"'F"'fQj!Qyy'QA'1'IVv1Q,1T"'v"vv1Qn1Q-U1QnVT'x"!Qy1Q1Iy'QA'iV'VVfQjyQjlQ1V'Vv'VyQj1Q3T"v1QgP"'IV"'VvN'fQ1ygjygjygjyggllgngg -vA-'vvvvsfvvv-v-v'vvvvrY-v1vsnvvvv-v-v'vvvvrv-v'vvI vvsfvvvrv I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I C I 1 E Qs ,E I . A,,,c,O.,..MM.,,.QA,AWCA..M,4,.,O-,AO-,.p4...,44.,.O-,.cA.- M l. . . -,. ... - M a. , l I JOHN CURTIS GEORGE CURTIS Y Presizlemf Secretary ii as ngine Sc oat Corporation .5 I Eg ENGINES .' SUPPLIES .' REPAIRS TIVO MARINE RAILWAYS -2 ' 1 Norfolk, Virginia E E HAPPROVED COAST GUARD CONTRACTORS" I 2 - THE BABCOCK 8a WILCOX CO. -. 1, . . , l Elf.. 5 IK '-iT 1, F . ,Z , 5 N Q Ig O, oi 1' ' Y Ei I N qu ' . EZ A 5 ' il 1 I - . I i3WllUJ'1J3 I -P 'P X , ' - l A ,. ,ok -I I -' " fi Q, wk V- 111, . .V . A a.,.,Q.1,.::3 Z W: f".".,,,.,,-M'-.1-1:q.:.g- ' .Lu 1 ' Q, , ., H - -'i- - ,W ' 1' if ,fe 5 U. S. C. G. C. "MODOC" Equipped with Babcock 6: Wilcox Water Tube Boilers, Superlueaters and Mechanical Atomizing Oil Burners -A SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK LONDON, ENG. fi -YY-v: yvivv: Z Pr-v: P-Z'TY-vfivvtvvvvyvavvivvivvvvlvv1V-Vsvvivvxvvlvvvvy-vlvf,-,T,A,-Yivvrvvlvvgvv5,A,-ivvqvvlvvpvvpfvpfvivvfv-fy-vwvvivvwvvrfvlvvl U U' UU' YUUU UUU UUU U UUUU UUU U U U U U UUU U UUO r I1 1 lx 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 L, I I I I L A 'Ph0ne, 888 W, ' Q Spicer Ice and Coal Co. - E 3 QUALITY COAL I 5 5 135 ANTHRACHE AND 131TL11v11NOUs 11 ii A ALL K1NDs OF WOOD FOR SALE Ig 5 5 A 1 g DOCK SERVICE Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris 5 I Wonder if any of us will ever forget cele- 5 brating Fourth of July night in Paris? The E l crowded dance floor at Zelli's, the mad whirl g of the Moulin Rouge, and, that funny little place called the Dead Rat? Days spent in E Q vast nluseulns and beautiful cathedrals, and Q nights on the Montlnartre-nobody tried to 3 For All Occasions sleep in Gay Paree. Funny little taxis rat- 2 tling along, Wide looulevards and narrow, QQ 2 , Local ReP'esfmat"'e U ' twisting streets, parfum Houbigant and Moet 1 Fhmst Telegraph Delivery Assoclatlon et Chandon. A capital where politics gives E Flowers by Wim ,O All me World Way to pleasure. These are our impressions of Paris, and-may We live to see it again. Ei 4 E EZ Z5 ig THEY CALL "IT" GRAVITY 2 Photogyaphey tO the Instructor: 'Would you fall harder in Paris 5 Class O 727 or New London? E 2 K 'f Loop: In Paris, sir. QQ 3 -NIANWARING BUILDING InSt1'uCtO1': Avhy in Paris? S NEW LONDON, CONN. tl Loop: The girls are more attractive over Eg iere. Ei E I li rNrO'1v-o't'r"ff'rfvr"of'r'if't'v'vrvw'mW:WgW1Wvvzvnw,mfrpw,Q,:Wvv,0y,Q,V11W,Q,:W,Q,1mmmmKmm,mm -1111111 H ,I A r NGANK SHIPYARD, INC. NOANK CQNN. g W X Builders of all Wooden Type Vessels X - - 1 STEAMERS BARGES TUGS 3 -Ei AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYAAAAAANAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA 3 x 1 'OJ IJ i 'ikf:: Repairs to Wooden and Steel Vessels -- 31- x'--W --r-- 1 ,TTA --... 7,7 . Y A .... -'il-Lili--333' lei! NOANK RACING SLOOPS - - - - - Four Classes '- - ' ' - Telephone, Mystic 365 WEUNY jieiwvg-.rj,g Wi .6 Wir Q 3 N 0 crefvzces ' 7' LW is 5 . i n ln OUT SETCUICC rle" ' s rm fl Year' afffif YF3-F SOCSPHY follows 93011 tial or tell you the right road. 15 ' 12 . new lm as 1 15 ma 2 And everywhere in Soconyland you On every road all through Soconyland -11 fl df .1. l S h there are Socony Service Stations and X51 .f n gnu ml Gocolgy Pumfs if garages iiaclyhancl W2-lling to helpdyou, S nl Ornili Clcongll aso 1122 and re la e grease t e c aissis o your car, rain 0001157 0 01' 1 may 2 21 - and fill the crank case or the differen- Use both for Best Results, MIJTIJR - STANDARD on. COMPANY -50 h OF NEW YORK , , 26 Broadway m ' f'55i'!ll'5 S Y Gasoline GfMot0r Oil AlAAAQLDAMvvvvVv1UD!1Dlv!f3'!vVvvvVIDiMML0l1vV011vVvv0HDlUEYLY1k!D'14vvlD1l'D'lw-VVVVVVVVVVVVVIQXID1 r13izLxmAi1Ai1Lx1Yd'1EVi'nL3'iVB'iiiHUvB'1HU HV'1f3121Ax'fH E F lg 5 is L is Ei EQ EQ Q il zo 1, as so as is Q ll Q ore as as 5 za is za ze za 52 rs ra Is is Z Si li E I in nl ,C ,, 9 I M -Y X, . V . I - W TAAA A -1., lx ,AX V, iv NA 1 K , 'Avl ., 2 'ee' ' A X' - 31? FY, .A " M ': ..:l:Vi l .,,,.. '- - ' iii? X- "Q 1 3 -. 1 1- I-hv M : . 1 1 F 5 1 f ' -f ' ""' at -- In oi f I Y I ei 'W"'m There is never a lack of volunteers for a gg Ei sailing party, especially when it is a hot day he and there is paintwork to be scrubbed on the if Walter Kidde 86 Company, Inc. old 'Alex I-Iam. Some difference between T E 140 Cedar Street manipulating swab and sugee and clipping New York the tops off the Waves in a handy Whaleboat. Those sailing parties in Cadiz and Bermuda- E can you think of a better Way to deadbeat? ,I And even at New London there was fun in a E ' sailing party-but when the Wind died and ,C ,, W W E U L E left you out in the sound, it took some time to ' 1' . .izi ' ' - -- Y ' - Y euie the blisters 3ou g0t roW1i1g7l?aek. M 'With port sheet-make sail! p h QL, 5 In use by U. 5. Navy E ,. ' t",rt 51 we :., ,'r, iifllsll Manufactured by . ,V in EE ,v" . f - , y ' 5 l Lows Weule Company dtt' 3 3 1 .t A 6 California Street 'i 1 '- " -':, Q San Francisco, Cal. 3 Ei E Ki The largest cmd most up-to-date esZabZis7Lme1zt 5 in New London E Crocker House Barber Shop ee John O. Eno, Prop. 5 182 State Street New London, Conn. g' i . If qu Specialists in Ladies, Ifair Cutting Eg Clzifrlreifs Hcziv' Cutting a Specially Eayvert llfmzicurist l Cadet Mess : Is she the kind of girl to whom you would give your name? Cadet Barracks: Yes, but not your right name! if-wvvy-V1vvFfvTfvT'xfP,-vs,-Viv-VIVVRVVN-VEv-vw-sfvvfv-Avvf.-.fvf.ivvP,-vNvP,vp.wVvisv-.-Pav.vv,vv vvrfvff.-wvl-vf.fvvNx1v-vV-qv-v1vvyvwvIvx C4 ' + 'M'!Ql ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 Z . ,QMMQ4qM:,,.m4A,.lA,Ag4A4A,A. an ARRL P 4 D Y Ili"-li S9 REPAIR Coq 5 NEVV YORK ' i L ' Eg A I E DRY DOCKING TURBINE BALANCING A SHIP REPAIRING CARPENTER AND JOINER WORK L5 H Of FUEL OIL INSTALLATIONS TANK CONSTRUCTION L gg 5, A DIESEL INSTALLATIONS SPECIAL MACHINERYINSTALLATION 2 ff GOOD SH1PS DESER VE- GOOD WORKTIIANSHIP H I 1 SQ if W 5 3 I "DA VIDSON" FIRE PUMPS I -. 3. E A P ,Z ,I E 1 ii ,Z E E2 Zi E2 iii E2 351 i 52 5 A .QE 6 g Q ig M. T, DAVIDSON COMPANY DIAIDT OFFICE 'DIAIN SALES OFFICE I 43-53 Keap Street 154 Nassau Street -A ,. Brooklyn, N. Y. New York City H 3 P vI51EJ7SIXlEV!51v5fWMKIYVVVVYIDILYLBMLHifil'DA'1T!'LY3'1Tl'DY'1'7V-VVVIQEIDIUAIW' '47 f W " lE" I ON LATEST COAST GUARD PATROL BOATS E , Ki i 1 l I 5 5 2 Q Th Conqalzwzwzis Qf e Pequot Laundry INCORPORATED QUALITY ,SER VICE New London DAVIS 6: SAVARD The Leading sfyze Sm of NEW LONDON Hart Schaffner 8: Marx Clothes Stetson Hats Arch Preserver Shoes Quality Furnishings - 134 STATE STREET J. Frank Fooshe SPECIALIST IN SER V I CE INS URA NCE 217 Broadway New York City Colst Guaul Cutter Coast Guai cl cutters are not built primarily as u ai Xessels The arduous natuie of the duties assigned to the cutters has made neces saijy the dex elopment of a type of vessel that can stay at sea in all lmds of Weather The cutters are designed to meet the requn ements of the Noith Atlantic ice patrol the Beimg Sea patiol and especially the saving of life and of shipping in distress along the coast Together wx ith these duties the cutters must enforce the revenue laws and be able to serve as part of the Navy in time of War. ne. f 9 ,T .. ml n' ,,f.y.4.,'.1's. ' ff Red Mike: I see that short skirts and low necks have reduced consumption among Women twenty-five percent. Snake: Hooray! Let's do away with con- sumption altogether. 1 l I E l !,.,JA.A1 It' I 1 I U I ig I " il . ' ,, I ' n 5 F 4 17' T 7 . i. I u Q- f. 7 1' . , I . 7 I 1 4 7 v-5V-Vvvrv-v'v'v'1v-vhzxfyvxfnfxfnr-vwvtv-vrv'v1'v'vGvNl'v-vlv-v'v'v'-'v'v7Nfvfv-v'rv-v' rlrlllrrnrrnly-y-Qy4l,11 vinf'n'rfn1vfmrrinumm l W' A ' 113uLMm 'V"7"'T'S7W'l an rr E: ix 51 QQ .5 xo by 1-6. 5' .HV so f, Sf Z 'bv T4 090 tqqfl' QQ gas ef-shi, G "J S1845 -' With ttzese American Brown Boveri starts the delivery of 33 U. S. Coast Guard Patrol Boats The first six patrol boats ot the U. S. Coast Guard were launched practically complete on November 30th, within one hour The completion of these six boats and six Diesel-electric ferries now operating on the Hudson River, clearly shows the ability of our organization for mass production AMERIC BRO BQ RI ' ELECTRIC CORPORATION 165 Broadway, New York City Camden, New Jersey 842 Summer Street, Boston 922 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia 230 South Clark Street, Chicago The Mariners Savings Bank Founded in 1867 by men identiyierl with the whaling industry State Street next to Post Oflice NEW LONDON T" f l 5 l l l " l l l ' l l l" 1 i i 1 I l i 1 l l i" T" " a JAMES DRUG STORE t , Corner Bank and Pearl Streets ' 5' NEVV LONDON CONNECTICUT E X ::::::::::::::: g w V. PRESORIPTIONSComvounded by l X : Registered Pharm- X acists with assayed drugs and s'Squibbs" Quality - Chemicals W A complete stock of Patent and Proprietary Vx v - ' "K" -'L Remedies which we sell at OLf1'P11,1OEs Mg t ' I 431: I , mil! ' ' 9 Q Q I l . ' wk? C' Physiciangt, Hospital and Sick-Room Supplies Q li-it X? g,Q-?i-Q-,Li , y I dE . CR UTCHES, YW USSE S, ELA S TTC BELTS and SUPPOR IFRS-Fitted and Guamvzlzrvrl I X D f A IIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIII 1 u Y mnw lohllau nmnfl CONN Confectioners and Caterers 'Phone 2016 THE UNION BA NK AND TR UST COM PA N Y of NEW LONDON, CONN. 61 State Street Incorporated 1792 First in the State Fmlz, in the Nation Always at Your Financictl Service Patrol Boat CG-233 Since the beginning of the ruin War, the Coast Guard has been compelled to build a large number of boats for patrol duty. The seventy-five-foot gasoline motored type shown above proved successful, and some two hun- dred of these vessels are now in service. They have shown themselves to be remarkably sea- Worthy for their size, and have been given the task of keeping constant watch on vessels on Rum Row, and of patrolling the inlets and passages along the coast. They have per- formed their unpleasant duties in a manner in keeping with Coast Guard traditions. A somewhat inebriated passenger stood on the deck of a liner gazing intently at the flash- ing light of a far-oft lighthouse. He suddenly burst into guffaws of laughter, and turning to a fellow-passenger whispered conidentially: "Sher-3 'at feller over zhere? 'S tried t' light 'at cigar twenty times now, an' dam' t'ing's gone out again!" vrofrf-ThiWrwvvrfwv-ff'rf'r'n'o'orfv:Ww,0U,Q,l'f5',r,'5-,'vV,Q,rVWfm,m,ZiT,'5'mi,. l'5',T,'53vff,0m'0r',1WWWm,miff1Wrfwvw'-Tf'T'vT'o'Tf'rf'ff'T'vt'-'ro' Coast Guard Academy Canteen and Tailor Shop A complete line of candies, cigarettes, cigars and refreshments. Also stationery, toilet articles and novelties. Cleaning and pressing. Unitorms made to order for oflicers, cadets and enlisted men. M. BERNSTEIN, Proprietor TELEPHONE, 3731 Compliments of The Mohiean Hotel The New Jersey Asbestos Co. "VI, Pilot and Gladiator Packings for All Marine Purposes Woodite Plunger- Rings Pilot Gauge Classes for 400 lbs. Steam Pilot Expanding Tube Cleaners Corrugated Copper Gaskets Kinghorn Valves MAIN OFFICE 1 WVater Street NEW YORK, N. Y BRANCI-IES Boston Philadelphia : Baltimore Norfolk and : S Francisc I It Zi EQ I I3 I I- I Ei E EQ Zi I2 II Ii! B'1EDVxiLx1'x0i1Q1i'F1'1YY1 I ,V-Vlv-vm,-V I I I I I I I I I Igugf vvpfvlv-.qv-v v-vvvxfvw-v vvn,vsfvm7vx?fIvvIvv.vv Iv-.nv-vwsf Iv-Av-vv-v.vv.vv.vv.v-v.v-vIvvvN,v-v.v-vv-vIvs1Iv-vIv-vv-vwfvI I I I I I I I I IQU I . Vvf I I I I I I I I Iv . I I I I I I I I I I PN I I I Q Ei E Ei if Pyrex Insulators for the radio E E 5 E 3 5 2 PYREX IN SULATQRS rrz'zmzph at rf'e Norrfz Pole 5 E2 E ITHOUT exception, on ex- peditions Where life and death depend on radio communication, I Pyrex Insulators have always been A - used. Commander Byrd selected equipment on the ship "Chantier" E and for the plane which he Hew to 5 the Pole. in The message from the Commander from Spitzbergen, announcing his r successful flight, came on equipment A Which used Pyrex Insulators. tPyrex Insulators are always se- r lected on such expeditions because of their dependability in conserv- E ing radio energy. Ei E2 coRNiNG GLASS y Wonxs l I7ZlZIZUf7'Z.6Z! ima' Eguzfmen! Dg'Uz'rz'02z i CORNING NEW YORK 'I l 5 rT.M.aeg.U.s Pros Q l s. l lj .-,fa ."' ,fa 1 1 H ' A t l A X , '- ,.:'f,' i, f L. H: . 1"- Y ly ' i 39 " 1' L - I" . . , .3 - 1 QQ-l 'di ' 'z ,,, -agqff. , : ,fja ' f -' ' 4- 4 s 4 if V, '12 ' ' 1 'Wg . K wif fs I 2 ,f ff -1 . ' aff. Q6 .ng, f.f. U .W N, af 3 -it aa. . - - Q ,- . ass' . 4 V: -I ., fm.-,fa ,I ' 4 1 1 i vs ' 7 ,I . 6 , Vina 'M ,V 'if W, M "W-ff.. I . ,aw . . ' 'is-iriwm-l q...v "fred , 'J . "if 4' Captured Rum Runners Once upon a time there were some bad little rummies, and this is what happened to them: They got tied up at a Coast Guard Wharf and laid there till they rotted or were sold. It makes no difference what our private opinions may be as to the wisdom of any of the nation ls laws. Our duty is to enforce all existing laws, and this silent line of captured rum-runners shows how the Coast Guard per- forms its duty. For the past two years the Coast Guard has waged an intensive campaign against Rum Row, which has resulted in an almost complete cleaning up of the line of rum vessels that once was anchored just out of the twelve-mile limit. Kay: I didn 't know you played football. Det: I don't. NVhy? Kay: I heard you tell that bootlegger you gould tackle anything. E1 rl - , IW:f.f.vT.f:.4,N:,n,fV.,:aw.pvWW nxm,m3,rsNV,v.VW.fvT.f.?,vWwyvpwyvpvyvyfv-.1- vyvvvya V TUV ' ' ' TUUUTTUT 1 V 1 ' QMLAM,4MML4MMMCMmMACMMMMMMLAMMLLUmmMMMmm.MMMMMMMMMMMM HEADQUARTERS EOR SCHOOL AND COLLEGE ENGRAVING Am PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND '3 l " " l A 1 A " 'T" ' " I A " 'T" i A 1 A 1" i A A f" ' l A I A 1 A A " A" f l " 'T" A I A J Ei BOSTON :SAN DIEGO Z PHILADELPHIA ii NEWPORT 1 wksumorois - I I-D D':m' T I CHARGE ACCOUNTS INVITED Z D M O N D S Midi-iilfr I it :4'f : WAT C H E S 1.1 'D I I t .. ,- H . 2, I '11 'A'1 ' ,O.., .,..,, A..,, . ""' ' .- ii' " -A 3' - - fi' v ZZ V 7Yn 1 Y 'ZZWAQV S6 I -4 -. .f -'i -'-' 42" "" "'-" ' - f' J U All UH I 4 1-v'1fgf.ra1!.,f.V f 17 Vbll Q5 - ,-m1,,:j:f-13 fkvf , ,.., M .- " 'ff-'-' 1 if' Q1 SILVERWARE I A ez wr U gg C LO C K S 2 2 2: Ei 4' 51 JEWELERS TO T1-1E E SERVICE SINCE 1853 D1-GSS Parade H. One of the things for which we thanked the g TQ Q T QS Powers That Be was that we seldom had a full- ? 5m..BL.5.ED .ss ENG dress parade. lVe will long remember a cer- Q 208 Granby Sweet, NORFOLK, VA' tain day when, in monkey jackets and im- maculate white trousers, we waded through a A -L- ----f- e ee we ee ee dress parade in a drizzle of rain. It was the 2 thrill that comes once in a lifetime when water began to shed off our cap covers and run down D E the backs of our necks. .E E5 New LOIZfl07If,.S' Most BBKLTLIQCILZ Theatre After due investigation by the Cadet Corps, it has been decided that the difference between Q a monkey jacket and a strait-jacket is that M the monkey jacket is tailored to fit more 3 PRESENTING closely. The necessary gear for getting into E. one is two classmates and a jigger tackle. So now that we have worn them for the last time, E2 I PHOTOPLAYS cmd we chortle with unholy and understanding STAGE REPRESENTATIQNS glee at the pained expressions on the faces of cadets at full-dress functions. 41 I 'fi SELECTED Lf O Comedies - News - Short Subjects J. G.: VVhat are you running for? 5 Swab: To stop a fight, sir. CONTINUOUS DAILY 1 to 11 P. M. J, G, VVh0'S fighting? Swab: Me and that fellow back there. . . I " " T" " T" " T" I" I" l" ' " I" T" " T" l " T" 'T" l" ' . . 1.i.gA,,c.g,,,4,.,4,.,e,,a,.,4 IUUUUUUU1 I 101' "CGf203 left Cape May, 5:00 p.m., February 11, 1926, upon receipt of weather reports forecasting diminishing NW winds, during the night the wind increased to gale force and the temperature dropped to 14 degrees. Heavy seas were encountered by the ship until after passing Scotland Light Vessel. Dur ing the trip the vessel and machinery behaved admir ably and no difEculty ofany kind was experienced The service demanded of these engines requires the reliability and ruggedness of the Sterling Coast Guard engines. Over 450 of these engines are on duty in the U. S. Coast Guard service These ZOO I-I.P. engines are a logical power plant for cruisers from 60 to 90 feet, and are offered at an extremely low price. Other Sterling models range from 12 to 300 H P STERLING ENGINE COMPANY 1270 NIAGARA sr. BUFFALO N.Y Q 1'0"iTWiQ1IWyQg1W1Q3V'N',gffgiT""",Qy,Q5mlig''1Ty'5'1Ty'Q"1T1'Q"1'IVY' " I I A A A I A I A I A A I A A I A I A I A 'tAleXander Hamilton," farewell! Never again will we of the Class of '27 holystone MqMqMMQM 4 your weathered decks or scrub your miles of paintwork, and no more will We stretch out on your decks on sunny holiday afternoons, taking well-earned ease and lulled by your even roll as you rise to each passing wave. Those days are gone, and with thenl has passed a part of our lives, Which, through the haze of years, we will look back upon and smile as We see ourselves in the smoke of pipe dreams, clainbering aloft to take in sail, or stepping over the Well-worn gangway in some foreign port to splice the main brace. Hail and fare- Well! M a 4 'X V V ,. ig X A . K ' .f X ' 3 . . . I' ' X: . 1 . .. A , . 2, .- ----'-' A - Wig-:. 'x's..f "W"-vg,f' ' " -' , y vii: , 4 V " 1 . . .'Tl'1-M-Y'v5,,i ,- - ' ' 'X' . -- .,,. ,, ,. 'GRM .Jw ' A ,. "jaw -B ' ' ' 5 . , , , +'f:'--W 1 .. ',,V:t:. veff-f-. , 1, - 1 '-' ' . V - - 1 f 'ima-' 'ff :':"i3'.- 2-H 2'6zaae.,p, . . I 7w.4Qv4fv'.1,f Mk -A - . Wm, fn., -f.,,:-.Wife ' - HH: , ,-.f4,g,:g.gff , Q ' -V 'f - v-"--: nw ,Wm 1 '2fz12e'fff:2+5?" ' 'ffffarg-.,'1fww--41" -W f- ' T533 --fffeQYe.:?f'.4.g, 1 7 1' ' ' Alexander Hamilton " GCQDMANS UNIEGRM AND EQUIPMENT SHQP CUSTCDM TAILORS TELEPHCNE, 191 123 BANK STREET NEW LQNDDN, CONN. v'7W?WWWxQn :gn101V?xgxlfxVU:1i'0"1T"'xL3rx'E'r'l1WA1YHEfV5i V1ME1fE1f H1 1 1Di 5? ,S ' . is it E ' ri 3 G-E quippe l nl l, Service ,li SS joseph Medillf . Fire Boat. . . K YS SS Graeme Stewart Fire Boat . , . r X W USS Langley lex-jupiterj Airplane Carrier , i ,X N I USS New Mexico . Battleship , 2 I USS California . . Battleship. . A I " C 1 X ' , ' USS Maryland . . Battleship.. , M . K ' 'J J K ' X . V, USS west virginia. . Battleship . gf' AM. . 5 I . X M SS Eclipse Cargo. , ff if Win' - X x I" E, SS Invincible Cargo, ,V -, I SS Archer .. . .. Cargo .. Al, . I SS Independence, . Cargo .. . M i I' ' SS Vicimous " Cargo A f Qs gxW,...ii"'iS!!!Rg3?e'?i 'fiiiie' ' , , A- I SS Cuba , . . , Pass.-Cargo b ',kQ1d?WQma-, I. ., "" k D 4 t , - nl A , MS Mariner . Trawler . . . 1 . . ' -N7 .t.......,....-.. '.!l,EBhQliwuu'i'im'ii 'NAR 5 SS Tampa . . . Coast Guard Cutter , X in . 'Q ss Hama . . . cam Guard cum. i V .4 '.m,-' W gb SS Mojave . Coast Guard Cutter , . 'TY' i Q Lggjm t, 'g SS Moduc . Coast Guard Cutler , I " K Q 5 SS San Benito Pass.-Cargo. ... . N HUMS Kamoi . . .iz - MS Fordcnian.. . E MS Golden Gate E gal MS Golden West f girl' MS Golden State . an SS Hayward . , 1 ss sail Leandro MS Standard Service , ' MS Alaskan Standard - SS W. R. Hearst H SS Rodman Wanamaker 2 SS Geo. W. Lore S MS Twin Ports . A- MS Twin Cities YZ Q l USS Lexington A 2 'iz USS Saratoga . . ix.. MS La Playa -- MS La Marea . M MS Hawaiian Standard Ms van Dyke-No. 1 f MS Van Dyke-No. 2 . MS Van Dyke-No, 3 J , , , MS Brilliant , Ms F. lvl. com il 2 ss T. W. Robinson MS Lake Weir, . iff MS Bear . . , For U. S. Engineer Corps For U. S. Engineer Corps EZ Ei V For U. S. Engineer Corps ff For IMM ....., . For New York Central For New York Central . Fuel Ship . . . . Cargo CGreat Lakesj Ferryboat . . . Ferryboat , . Ferryboat Ferryboat . Ferryboat Tanker Tanker . - Ferryboat, Ferryboat .. . Ferryboat, , . . Cargo fGreat Lalcesl Cargo lGreat Lakes, Airplane Carrier Airplane Carrier. Pass.-Cargo Pass.-Cargo . . Tanker: , . , Tug BL Fire Boat .., Tug Gt Fire Boat ,. Tug Bt Fire Boat Tanker, . . . . Ferry . . . Bulk Freightev . Dredge . Coast Guard Cutter Towboat . Towboat , . Towboat .. . Pass.-Cargo . . Tug , . .Tug , . o service too severe. Nowhere in the marine field is reliability of equipment more vital than in the service of the Coast Guard--ffor saving human lives. No ship imposes more exact- ing operating conditions on its equipment than the coast guard cutter. The G-E Electric Drive installed on four U. S. Coast Guard Cutters has given successful service for four years. Based on this record, G-E Electric Propulsion Machinery was purchased last year for the Coast Guard Cutter Northland, now under construction. Gr-E Electric Drive has proved worthy 5 I in service of such varied character as E1 S E i ' - Y represented in the accompanying list of Q a . ' a half hundred ships-tugs to airplane EZ carriers. Ei GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, S OFFICES IN ALI. PRINCIPAL CITIES vvSwvf:v'yvi Rvv: .vv:.vv:.vv:P,v:ivf:vfmMvvvF :P,?f:vfvv: rvA:v4.vv:1v-v:yvvvvvF T


Suggestions in the United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) collection:

United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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