United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT)

 - Class of 1925

Page 71 of 182

 

United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 71 of 182
Page 71 of 182



United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 70
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Page 71 text:

f A i NATHANIEL BROWN DYER Salem, Mass. Football (3): Manager, foolhall fj) (i); Captain. Track (i). Prophets were not flourishing in 1902 and the Coast Guard failed to oljserve February T3th of that year as a hoHday. The error is not generally appreciated, though it can- not be long before everyone will know that date as " Nat ' s " birthday. As noted above, Salem, Mass., was the place favored. Hav- ing graduated from the local high and gr.im- mar schools " Nat " decided to try engineering and gave Northeastern University the re- sponsibility of his education. After one and a half years there, he gave up engineering and came to the Acadenn-, where throughout his three years ' st.iy Ik- ixirted considerable influence in shaping tin- alLiirs of the cadets. The list above show.s thu e sports in which he was most prominent but it docs not tabu- late all the activities that he supported or was instrumental in organizing. He was a good student at all times, although a mem- ber of Connecticut College considerably im- paired his scholastic technique in his last two years. Much could be written about his gentlemanly characteristics but the whole subject can be summed up by saying that he was liked by all who knew him. RAYMOND VIRGIL MARRON Denver, Colokaho Football (3). Captain. F ' ootball (j) (i); Baseball (2) (1) ; Basketball. Mamiger (i) ; Crew, Manager (i); President, Athletic Assnciation (i) Whether the call of the sea reaches as far as Denver, scientists tell us not, but in any case so anxious was " Gubby " to go " down to the sea in ships " that subsequent to his first year with the Colorado Aggies, he navi- gated all the way down to New Mexico to take the entrance exams. The result was that the aforesaid Raymond Virgil Marron did arrive in New London, shortly after- ward, full of tlie fabled western " wim, wigor, and witality " which condition never altered except that the " wim " changed to " wimmin " with the passage of time and the growth of Connecticut College. Responsibilities and honors were heaped on his shoulders as the tabulated list above gives evidence. He proved himself a congenial acquaintance, a warm and sincere friend and above all a gentleman. While it was with pride and pleasure that we congratulated him on com- pleting his course at the Academy, our felici- tations were tinged with regret at losing such a popular and active mcmlicr of the cadet corps. Sixty-five

Page 70 text:

- r-,. (I ' Ml About the time that the vanguard of the famous class of ' 25 arrived at the Academy, four would-be bilge divers became cadet engineers. They were Dondero, Baily, Harwood, and Olsen and we almost think of them as members of our own class because for the month that elapsed before the " Alex Ham " returned from Cape May, they rowed on the same thwarts as the rest of us and were merely " Fred, " " Jack. " " Charlie, " or " Olie " instead of " Mister. " After the Gardiners Bay cruise of ' 22, Sarratt from North Carolina and Murray from Washington, D. C, swelled the roll of the engineering class to six names. These six cadets wrestled with everythin.g from steam engineering to radio and five of them were successful ; Dondero was the unlucky ( ?) one. They had most of their subjects with the first class and gradually grew away from the lowly third classmen who had been their playmates during the summer. They were not, however, destined to graduate without going on a cadet cruise and they conse- quently made the one in the summer of iy23. During this cruise they stood deck as well as engine room watches and became as proficient in line duty as engineering. At the completion of the cruise they were lined up on the quarterdeck and, after a brief graduation ceremony, were presented with diplomas and commissions. We have heard much of their activities since then and as officers they have shown the same spirit that characterized their career as cadets ; that of active support and cooperation in every phase of service life. Sixty-four



Page 72 text:

! CLASS OF 74 The class of ' 24 began its official career with one cadet ; it ended it with two. In the interim between the beginning and the finis of their history the size of the class rose and fell from time to time and the recording of their checkered cadet life is an arduous task. Dyer was the original member, entering the Academy during the summer of 1921. He was appointed too late to make the cruise of that year, and so, throughout the summer, he loafed around the Academy reservation in company with Bergen and Snyder, two cadet engineers who had been appointed at the same time. These three lived the life of " Reilly " until the " Alexander Hamilton, " then the " Vicksburg, " returned from the west coast. At this time the class was augmented by the addition of Goodman and Marron who had been members of the preceding class but who had found that French is a stumbling bl ock in many a cadet ' s career. In addition, " Rand, who had resigned from the Academy in 1919, was reappointed and thus the roster of the class was boosted to four names. Rand didn ' t last long, however, as a climb to the aerie domain of the foremast convinced him that he had been correct in his previous decision, that dry land was preferable to the bounding main. Goodman was the next casualty, for so diligently did he strive to master the French language that he completely forgot the English and consequently in the fall of ' 22 he resigned. At this time a curious state of affairs existed at the Academy. Just before the mid-year exams in the same year a new class of five had been admitted and the remainder of these, three in number, were not due to become second classmen until the February of 1923. The advent of the class of ' 25 in August, 1922, therefore gave the Academy two sets of third classmen separated by a half year ' s scholastic work and a summer cruise term. To overcome this difficulty the authorities shoved Roimtree, Holberg and Collins ahead a half year, and then made them a part of the class of ' 24. This raised the roll of that class to its maximum strength of five. Unfortunately, however, it was not destined to remain that large for long, as misfortune seemed to dodge the steps of the three that had been advanced. Rountree was the first to be hit with hard luck, as a protracted stay in the hospital during the fall of 22 put him hopelessly behind in his scholastic work and left him with too much of a handicap to overcome at the mid-year exams. Collins seemingly did not realize the necessity of " boning " excessively to make up for the half year skipped, and as a result the mid-years proved to be his Waterloo also and both he and Rountree turned back to become active members of the class of ' 25. Hollberg made the academic grade successfully, but on the following cruise poetry and day dreams abetted by several unfortunate incidents, such as allowing a row boat to become moored under the jib boom during his mid-watch, proved his undoing. He resigned before the beginning of the fall term of ' 23, and the class was then down to two memljcrs. During their first class year at the Academy there is little to record. The two went through the terms without appreciable difficulty, studying the requisite amount to receive commendable marks. The remainder of the time they enhanced their social education and if marks were given for this branch, both members would liave received gold stars. They graduated in May, 1924, as one of the most popular classes that had ever left the Academy. i

Suggestions in the United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) collection:

United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

1927

United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

1929

United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

1930

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1932

United States Coast Guard Academy - Tide Rips Yearbook (New London, CT) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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