Union High School - Aurora Yearbook (Grand Rapids, MI)

 - Class of 1947

Page 1 of 104

 

Union High School - Aurora Yearbook (Grand Rapids, MI) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1947 Edition, Union High School - Aurora Yearbook (Grand Rapids, MI) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1947 Edition, Union High School - Aurora Yearbook (Grand Rapids, MI) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 104 of the 1947 volume:

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W., W iff QUQE V I twat fo DU., gym TTWH M M N 3 x VL, Wxs XMLH WN' tt Bjjmxvx to-N, M: AL ' 5 aw, - W' yw.. p Sclflvs 50 T .J , ' ,mx 2.54 , 404644. if-CW'-4 odafy Kyfuaa' A ,Mfffyf W X ,WZ A20 .Www a4'u44!,f' dw .J,x ,ii fm, TABLE OF CONTENTS ' . ,W rf Q. 1fMykf5Q9L'?! -J. Introduction . 1 2' School Life . . 6 ' Sports ...,. . , 1 16 ' 1 Work-of-the-School . . . . 28 V' . ,M X Organizations . . . . , 44 V f' , N Underclcxssmen . . . . 60 Seniors . . . . 74 Foreword Midst the excitement of the "kick-off" into new and different futures, Senior fans "flash back" to the fun and friends of their memorable social life at Union. Then suddenly the ball is snapped by Captain Learning who quickly passes to Wholesome Living. Darting swiftly, endeavoring to make a touchdown, he is halted at the one-yard line, just short of his goal. Ar the half the Underclassmen cheer loudly when once again the team pours onto the field with Co-operation ' Although quick thinking and fast ste ' an opposing touchdow oth ' its firm res l ppmg follo n. Tense m' ers hands, b o ve. w, the third quarter ends with mutes fly by leaving the victory, mayhaps, in ut the Light of Loyalty remains burning as all unite in singing, We're Loyal to You, Union High . . . " 4 n --....i-,,?W,,. Dedication To the men who fought and died so freedom's radiant beams may shine once more on a troubled world, the Aurora staif of 1947 humbly dedicate this yearbook. Toda in Union I-Ii h stands a memorial, reverent in its s mbolism, breath- Y S Y takin in its s lendor. Presented b the senior classes of the last six ears, this g P Y Y memorial carved in white oak, portrays the raising of the Hag on Iwo Jima and the rising of a new dawn, represented by Norman Rockwell's Four Freedoms. A tribute to gallant men, it is a reminder of a great debt that can never be repaid and of loyal spirits that must ever be emulated. Its simple inscription echos the prayer in all hearts, "God Grant 'Tis Not In Vainf' 5 1 . L ., ' l School Lila Remember the Prom with soft lights, dreamy melodies, and happy couples such as Warren MacKellar, Ioan Lange, Margie Wilder, Bob DeBoer, Charles Cicelski, and Marjorie Schneider - the good times, fun and laughter, and the fellows and gals who proved so true-blue? The many treasured events of the year include lasting impressions of cluttered lockers, crowded halls, the Senior Mixer, "The Frollies," senior play, excursions, and the never- ending fads in fashion. Then those thrilling games, the grand rushes to and from school, and, most of all, those wonderful gifts of health and happiness throughout the year. A hidden nucleous of loyalty, love, and joy 'in their tellowmen will for- ever have its place in a corner of each Unionite's heart as in later days they recall each happy event. LQPBOUQQJ Tillkltz Q M L05 N 01, lk I . kfl. 1 Maur, .1 wx Look again and you will see that these girls are not someone's baby sisters, but the members of the G.U.C. holding their annual Yuletide Kids' Party. Thcsu "kids" urn: lizirbaru Upton, Arlene Ackerman, Dzlrlvm- Beyer, Lurrainc VVoznizik with Ds-na Koem-s playing Santa Claus and Donna Jouslrn, as Merry Christmas, Fun-Filled Moment The bell rings, a mad dash, and the cafeteria is reached at last, Where nutri- tious and tempting food is served to all who buy their lunches at school, Unions cafeteria really has everything from soup to nuts and everything is as tasty as it looks. lt is hard deciding, as can be told by the pondering expressions revealed here. The sun is out, the Weather is grand, and the boys are out sunning on the steps and banks around school. After a morn- ing ot hard, brain-racking studies, it's a relief to get outside to swap jokes and tell fish stories. lt looks here as it some big controversy is going on. Mrs, Bender, Ronald Smeg-mrs, and Mrs. Apple dish out tho delicious. Miss Atwood tcenterr is about to indulge in her favorite dessert, apple pie. These tellers of tall tales are: Gerald Kragt, Wendell Nybvrg, Roger Van Dam, Robert Nelson, and Don Buzalski. Liven Leisure Time A-l-l aboardl And they're otf to an out- oi-town football game. The Student Coune cil is in charge ot chartering these buses and seeing that all reservations and tickets are in order. The buses arrive at the school at 2:30 and wait for the students until the game is over. That's servicel On this particular excursion the seniors com- posed the majority ot the cheering section. High on the bleachers the crowd sits petrified during an important shot in a crucial game just as the tussle draws to a closel Here on the Union Red Hawks' side the student spectators wait breath- less in a tense moment at a game with the Creston Polar Bears. Merrily enjoying their bus ride are-: Helen Meyers, Betty Mollo, Joy Wilson, Harry Havelhorst, Yvonne Wood. Audrey Zeeryp. Shirley Flora, Beverly Fik, Abner Ragins, Ted Jacobs, Dick Meretsky, Don Coates. Marvin Hee-mstra, and Joe Saplis. is Like busy bees the students swarm up and down the steps as the stairways and halls take on new lite when the bell rings to acknowledge the end ot three pe- riods oi study and, one and all, the fellows and girls dash off to their respective lockers to snatch their coats and lunches and either file up to the cafeteria or go to one ot the eat shops in the vicinity. Given the go-signal for the three-act comedy, "Go Ahead" on February 6 and 7, the seniors followed through with two successful performances. The uproar- ous portrayal of lacob Steiglitz by Abner Ragins 'in his encounters with a life-long friend, Maurice Koppler COtto Heisman off stagel, was hilariously received by the audience. In the scene at the Kopplers' home, Steiglitz is inform- Seniors Stage Riots A play is more than just the cast, as ambitious committee members found when confronted with setting the stage, securing properties, publicizing the play, obtaining program ads, and run- ning the backstage smoothly. The members of the stage crew pic- tured are tleft to rightl: Chuck McNulty, Norris Brookens, and Gerald Tomasik, all of whom are watching Bob Trapp give a cur- tain signal. Cast members wait- ing for their cues are Felicia Stas- kiewicz and Donna Wichert. The committee handled lighting prob- lems and set difficulties with the ease and capability of veteran technicians and managers. ing Koppler, his daughter Zorah CLynne Waddelll C David tHarry Havelhorstl, his own son, that an oct sion like Davids graduation from college calls foi speech, While Leo VonFreisheim CVal Smitterl, ' Kopplers' nephew, listens in. The lower left picture shows Mrs. Koppler tPat Dre lerl, heatedly defending a wronged friend, He. Strauss tlqelicia Staskiewiczl. lt's HFrolliesH Time l'One, two, three, shift!" shouted the masculine voices of the own- ers of the muscular legs pictured at the right as the Varsity boys came forth with a slightly detect- able and decidedly laughable im- personation of the girls' Frolliette line at the annual "Frollies" held March 6. The boys kept the audi- ence in spasms of laughter as they precariously pranced and frol- licked in their quaint costumes and demure manner, and with these antics showed their talent for grace in fields other than foot- ball. Poised for a kick are: Cleft to rightj Bill Beynders, 'Bill Clinger, Donald Wiest, Bernard Kisielew- ski, Howard Fletcher, and Ken Baxter. l'The Old and the New" was the theme of this years Frolliesu when the curtain went up on two hours of :narkling entertainment featuring modern stage acts :umpared with those of yesteryear. The girls' chorus ne, "The Frolliettesu was, as usual, the main attrac- on. Seen in action fleft to rightl are: B. Blink, B. Kool- ian, D. Faulkner, P. Nyberg, L. Havinga, N. VerHowe, 'l, L. Wilder, D. Hill, P. Ioustra, M. Wilder, and A. .ckerman A special feature in this year's show was the "Fash- ion Display" by seven male members of the faculty, This act was received with delight by the students, who had never dreamed their teachers possessed so much poise and talent as well as such showmanship. The production was sponsored by Mrs. Margaret Black, girls' physical education teacher, assisted by Miss West, Mr. Stanley Albers, Mr. lohn Whitaker, and Miss Delores Whitaker '45 5 Q. is rg, ,V , at ' l f ,,4135f'iT, A . ug- Jw. ww x i Q if ffm .ww 4 gy 5 Q X S 2 "K, ,J vm. J 5 N. 4ntgf2Li'1v Q ' ' We ' -X 52, E:-ii' A. .4 nm V, .vzwfz ,. . - fi I' sq- 5 32, wi Wi A i s. 1 'V ,E -Q M E H, Lifwf' wif . ' . 5' H Q an 'fix Q if if ' ,Q L ' ' Ak fi K 'V 1 ff! ,1:g,l,,,, 'ff' A Q X , f 7 -A ew 12+ 'ww x x:i4Kg0N4x,'1 U 'fs .vvwwe af Ng. 1 13 Fifi TM' nf .' -fn' iffrbm gjQ:1f,4a9:,3,, N .M ga-gg:-,'ia,9r+ f at Q , if ' ' -W e 45. 611 .X V- .... R , in ' 1' M k 5 ' 5 ' Y Y ' . ' 1923 'ml' fri fw ' rr fkQfrg.Yl fmfgkf gfiv K .. -LF575, Mi ' 3 f- Lf? I9 J If l . Q A nf www... utmoxssi if Twinkle Toes e Gay froliclcers at the 'lAdventurer's Quest" a Elmer Snoap and Dolly Gates as they laughing dance through the unique "lighthouse," clever provided by Don Wiest. Dale Demerests ban plus colorful cardboard sailors and fish, add the fun to make one big, jolly time for all. Cor bined efforts of Reflector members made th hilarious occasion possible. l-learty laughter, scrumptious doughnuts, ar tasty cider will always remind social Unionites 1 that funfpacked dance, Mllhe Cider lug ligf' Spoi sored by the senior class the party was a hug success. lrene Sowinski and Ann Speth flower lef dutifully serve the sweet apple juice while Abnf Ragins and Nancy Bylan soberly enjoy it. l-larr l-lavelhorst reaches for the sky while lohn Bei dokaitis, Lois Russell, and Dolores Koets chee fully trade tall tales. Dreamy waltzes, peppy fox trots, and merr polkas rank high as favorites for Unionites, bi jitterbugging still holds its place in the hearts c Shirley Andress and Maureen Higgins as the gayly perform at the ever-popular noonfhoi dance in the girls' gym. Dut Merry Times Stepping up in the world are Barbara DeYoung and Harold Van l-loft as they prepare for that special spring dance, "The Bunny l-lop." Bob Bloom lends an eager hand as he holds the rickety ladder and Norma Haan helps with the crepe paper. The "Hop" turned out to be a jovial spring success enjoyed by a large crowd. Deco- rating committees are all too often left the unsung heroes of an evening of gaiety, and they certainly deserve the glory and credit due to them. Ora Mae Blok, Carol Veldman, and Kay Bomine flower leftl will have loads of experience if they choose to play the roles of housewives. lt's a great World, according to Elmer Snoap, who glee- fully looks on while the gals fullfill that never-to- be-omitted job of cleaning up after the "Bunny Hop." This gay occasion was the fruit of a great deal of Work done b ythe public speaking class. A beaming smile is typical of cute Iune Schulz, shown here prirnping to make her natural fresh- ness even more attractive, Unionites can fre- quently be seen fulfilling this daily rite of comb- ing hair, patching lips, and erasing shiny noses. lt's a joyful duty and one easily taken care of by lovely lune. 2. - T Sports Take a little pep, sprinkle it with vitality, season well with vim and you have Bob Trapp, Colleen Free- man, Pat Dressler and Iack Rohe, active cheerleaders, Whose shouting, "Come on and yell," has made many an Unionite perk up when the going was tough. Take Cl lot of sportsmanship, plus plenty of co-operation and loyalty and you have the Red Hawks, big, bashful heroes of many thrilling games-football, basketball, track, tennis, their sidekicks, the little hard- Working, unrecognized Water boys and managers, and the heroines of the sports world, the girls who dem- onstrate that they can hold their own in badminton, bowling, and speed- ball. Take a strong school spirit, shown in loud yells, mix it with loyalty to team and you have the Unionites who will truly back their team "to stand against the best in the land." GACKQOM TO -Riffs EQZLND 'GH INST TH UQN 557113, 'S r if WND QU f C73 J Q f 1 J 711- . Qt..-Hifgff 1' fuffzi f J s.- , 2-vfkx wwf If I' f , - , I KA- f, X, A ll, vw .W k gl Q V. 1. L' " K " ' 'ff '47 x "Mx-cf fx"-I my 'vu i I , ,Y ,, - ,, , ,,f1"' ' . D , ,M ' 'j96"""" f 9' g'f7"b"M f' -ff W' . ,f:,'l, ., f'lf. -m 1' ,ff -fwf-'f',4 -fy 1 V, , Vx, , , A ,,,L ,.f,1vf' "V, . ,, I ,MI I - - ,g , ff J ' J -1- f , .,. f' Lg, 4 nf "2 W' ,M - I, ,, . ,, , ,ff ,1 ,N M- U l I x , ef ,ff rllvf- K uf! ,nm W 1---.., 1 ix Mt ,4- 'iia'i-N " 1 ,V itsxnygflig 5 Vox wwe Krause Ganlevoort W ies' Pigskin Pusl1ers With good material from the preceding year and the return of three men from the service, Coach Milo Sukup started the season oft with a 172-pound line and a 160- pound backfield. Victory over Traverse City in the grid-season's opening game showed the Red Hawks 'in good condition. Led by the expert guidance of the coach and team spirit of Co-captains Don Wiest and Ed Shustha, the Hawks played a mean game of foot- ball. With every player in an important role, they bucked their opponents blow for blow. Highlighting the season with various out-of-town games, the well-packed Greyhound bus excursions were good experiences for team and students. Slowly but surely topping city league opponents, allowing only a three and two-thirds point average scored against them, the Red Hawks, after a grueling game, tipped their hats to South on Thanksgiving Day with a final score of 6 to U to take a more-than-earned second place in the city league. Gridiron grads are off to higher fame. Line-up: Coach Sukup, Ganzevoort, Krause, Buzalski, Vander Hyde, Burkholder. Huffman, Wiest, Shustha, Assistant Coach Henryg second row: Rugg, Heald, Haadsma, Kisielewski, Batenburg, Umzrey, Baxter, Re-ynders, Johnson. Talking over Digskin problems are Co-cap- tains Don Wie-st and Eddie Shustha. Strcngtheninf: the team are three war vets, Reynders, Krause, and Unpzrey. 18 We MSW, lm ur HUH'man Heald ShUSfha Show Team Work 1946 FOOTBALL SUMMARY Traverse City .........,...........,...,,. 28 U Ottawa , . .... . 21 7 Central ..,...... . 28 7 Muskegon Heights A. 7 l3 Catholic ..t.,,.. 6 O Grand Haven . . 6 U Creston . , . . 20 U Lincoln 7 U South . 0 6 Va Tl d 01' Hy de 1 . if BOOP Deliioer and Rs-ynders force him cluwn First row: Reynders, Burkholder, Baxter. Shustha, Wicst, Vander Hyde, Buzalski, Heald, Batt-nburgz, Johnson: second row: Miller, Ganzuvuurt, Rumz, Kisielewski, De Boer, Ungrey, Krause, Huffman, Levan- doski, Heeren, Haadsmag third row: Assistant Athletic Manager Houston, Ludwick, Burkhulder, Bierri, Tebeau, Lammers, Assistant Coach Henry, Coach Sukup, Dykpzraff, Werra, Manne, Timmerman, Pottcrack, Virkstis, Athletic Manager Liskoy. 19 Q -FQ 4 1 m bpgfg an S! "'Q?f-M M and ,ml 15159 Ji if-2 82fI'65 -11587 ZQQPSM Q 'ff Q 57:45 W Jig' +559 n ' I V mW.,f...,, W - k Www- QE QE! , A wi. A 3 :M Qi 9 . .K- 5' ri , K ff? A A1 Q f 3 5451 . J 3' af .,,, .Ms In 'Tar 33 gh W W ' txt ? ,K X X q Q ,YR 9 Y 4 ev 1 W -s xl gg Q K NL g ,Q y gg R NS 1 fig if X55 A H K x lx Aiw- ii Tenscly Krause, Van Allsburg. and Levanduski, reach for the ball. Warren Krause Qin above picture-ll was selected as All-City forward. Cheers from the crowd and then the tip-Ulf, with Wlest and Vcrmaire of Christian giving the game zu successful start. Tuweringlto stardom, Captain Bob Dc Brier leads the team to victory. Soaring Redhawks Yield Thrill-Packed Season Although the Red Hawk basketball team ended in a tie for fifth place, they were a constant threat to other teams of the city. Many thrilling games were lost by a few points. Coach "Doc" Ellingsons future pros- pects for a championship team are Van Allsburg, Cudney, Watson, Miller, Le- vanduski, Heeren, and Mac Lennan. Unionites will greatly miss Captain Bob De Boer, Krause, Wiest, and Bu-, zalski, who worked hard to achieve victory. The highlight game of the season, and most exciting, was the Union-South clash, which was a nerve-racking over- time game. In spite of the tough battle put up by the Hawks, they lost by a few points. Another spine-tingling game was the Union-Creston game which ended in a victory for Union. Krause stood in tenth place in total number of city league points with 77. Wiest was Unions second highest point- maker with 61 tallies, "Doc" Ellingson stated that Ganzevoort was sorrily missed during the balance of the season. Bob De Boer was also commended for his outstanding ,defensive work. "Doc" is looking forward to working with the promising group that is coming up from the ranks of the second team. FUN F0-W2 V811 AUSDUFK. Wiest, De Boer fCapt.t, Krausf-, Ganzr-wort, Baxter. liuzalskl. Second row: Coach "Duc" Ellingson, Mai- Lennan, Miller, Ht-Q-ren, Watson, Potterack, Lev:-mduski, Cudney, 21 Speedy Reserves Capture Championship Crown Full of action is Emil Moerlock as he adds excitement t 0 t h e game. With only determina- tion to win, Vermaire of Christiarfs first 12 d W' t f This year Unions second team played its hardest and won its way into the city championship. Both "Doc" Ellingson, the first team coach, and Mr. Henry, the second-team coach, agreed that it was the best second team Union has had in years. The team won 10 city games out ot a possible 12, thus putting it in first place with total points of 436 in the 12 games. The two remaining games were lost by a one-point decision. Much of the team's success is attributed to Bill Slanger, the Reserves' champ, who tossed 133 points in the city games. At the South-Union game he made 20 of the 37 points. Three other assets to the team were Moerlock with 77 points, Tim- merman, 64g and Conklin with his many clever passes. Because ot the second team's great skill and teamwork, "Doc" Ellingson put Slanger, Moer- lock, Timmerman, Conklin, Van- der Laan, and Stevens in the tournament games this season. Iltglgnz nfirst Ieiealjn play their hardest. Catholic ' I U I A - Ottawa .... . . . 26 18 Christian . . . . . . 31 20 Creston . . . . . . 46 24 Central . . . . . . 26 27 South... 25 17 Catholic . . . . 559 17 Ottawa 33 17 Through hard work the second team emerged vicboriously this year with the U I I - 4 4 championship, L Chrlstlcn . , , . . , First row: Vander Laan, Timmerman, Moerlock, Conklin, second row: Boonstra Creston """""'i 34 Draugalxs, Wagcnka, Coach Henry, Dutkiewicz, Stehower, missing: T. Proctor: SOUl1'1 .....,......., Stevens, J. Proctor, Smith, Chicky. irlwhis WGS the largest Score ever made by any reserve team in the city and every one on the team played. The boys behind the boys behind the team are Belke, Mead, Kuk, and Boer, loyal, hard-work- ing team managers. 22 Pitching Strikes, Batting Runs is Their Job L0-captains Bob Doxey and Don "Buzz" Buzalski :mtl 0 ch "Doc" E'lingson startt-d the season right with three straight wins and one loss. Union sluggers had a busy season last year as they swung their way through twelve games, winning six and losing six, to take second place. The boys worked and played hard, always worrying the other teams. The most exciting game of the season was with South when Union won 4 to 3. The outstanding players were Dale Ganzevoort, Bob Miller, Dave Haadsma, Mark Lahr. This year with blue skies and balmy days again comes the familiar call of "play ball." From thirty-eight hope- fuls, Coach "Doc" Ellingson began picking a fast and powerful baseball team, With only six Vets back this year, Coach Ellingson along with co-captains, Don Buzalski and Bob Doxey, moulded a team into good shape and team work. Having started practice in late March indoors, when the springy days of April moved in "Doc" and the Hawks played ball at Valley Street Field. Winning from South, Ottawa, and Christian, the team showed great promise by taking the lead in the city, but when they played Creston, last year's champs, they ended up by losing with a 6 to 5 score in a twelve-inning game. One of the ,most exciting games of the season was the one with Creston, when the Red Hawks and the Polar Bears battled for twelve innings with Creston coming out on top by a thin margin of 5 to 6 score. Reaching the end of an exciting season the Red Hawks are in fourth place in the city standings. Union has won seven games and lost five. 23 First row: Coach Ellingson, Johnson, Kupris, Coats Bu- alskli DOXPY, Ziettcr, Milla-r, Makerg second row: lielka L2jmIP9Y'S, Pick, Levanduski, Mac Lennan, He-cron Virk: SUS. Cuflny, Jams: third row: Duthit-wicz, V'i1'kgtiq Drnugvlts, Wenxenka, Proctor, Janes, Hughes, Boonstrim, Splrtlck, Sunil: fourth row: Rittenhouse, Van Gilgt' Stahhrvx vc C ' S fl B s ' . A ' 1 E T. Hmll1C'I'. UH . 0on'tra, Luclv k, fifth raw: Anderson, Vandvn HOHL Sund, Bolke. uc Teil Proctor batting a single against South, which helped Union win. B'Db KUDl'iS VUYlrliDiZ to home base to clinch Union's first victory. Watching R. Phillips jump the low hurdles are: R. Timmerman, R. Van Dam, R. Pindar, B. Smith, P. Versluis, B. Failing, B. Clinger. Max Curtice and Chuck Cicelski arf ir t' ' c 1 an icing to get themselves in condition for the half-mile in H' :in e ort to retain the city championship. Fleet Hawlcs Win Last year Union beat all schools in dual track meets to take the city championship. They also won from East Grand Rapids in a practice meet. Catholic and South meets were the most exciting because Union Won them both by only a traction ot a point. Some ot the outstanding players were Duane Obermeyer, Bernard "Kish," Max Curtice, Charles Cicelski, Frank Zenk, Ioe Daniels, Chester Kozal, and Bob Nelson. Through the loss of Obermeyer they lost the Re- gional meet. Cinder raisers of this year's track tea : f' This year's cross-country team won the beautilt trophy now displayed in the show case on the fir: floor. The team consisted ot Roger Van Dam, Ph Versluis, Robert Bush, Richard Pindar, and Charle Cicelski. Only six vets are back this year: Max Curtice Charles Cicelski, Bill Clinger, Al Manning, and th two co-captains, Chester Kozal and Bob Nelson, bot unable to run this year. . ' m are lrst row: Rexford, Cicelski, Czhuai, Curtice, Van Dam Gobolew'k' C B ' ' ' " ' ' ' " s i, 'ross ush, Pati korf, Phillips, second row: Ford, Wilkinson, Cullin, Failing, Kragt: y Pindar, Mcbillicuddy Lozicki, Aogummy, G. Smith, B. Smithg third row: Madukas, Rickson Ilglyberg, Vander Laan, Timmerman, Nelson, Kozal, MacKellar, Ludwick, Van Dusen: fourth row ounce, ' Manne: missing: Clinger Shusta, Wiest, and Baxter. Stewiens, Pelak, VanOtten, Kosten, Versluis, Snoap, Pierson, Slanger, Nowicki, Vorelz Co-captains Bob Nelson and Chester Kozal, themselves unable to run be- cause of ill health, have drilled long and hard with an inexperienced team, endeavoring to defend their city championship. Bowling' Hawks are Neyberg, Rexfnrd, Hendricks, and Sperlick. Listening to Coach Sukup are: R. Gessncr, Wilson, Cook, Johnson, D. Gessner, and Stoke. Balls Tell Tale Bowling has made its way into the conversation of many Unionitesg especially is this true of the boys who roll the balls at the Fanatorium once a week. They took many prizes at the all-city bowling ban- quet held at the Morton House, where Mr. Palmer, their adviser, presented the awards. Golf at Union is not at present a major sport but it is making its way, with more and more Red Hawks putting those little balls around the green. Warner is hitting the ball while Samrick waits for his turn. Both arv members of Union's tennis team unslcr Coach Freoman. The team has a schedule ot eight matches and one state match. Coach Sukup said that there were twelve boys out, but only six in the above picture. The twang of the ball against the racket lured many athletic-minded students out for tennis. Last year Sidney Samrick was third in the city. He is on the team again this year. Mr. Freeman, a Navy veteran, took over the coach- ing this year upon the resignation of Mr. Meyering, coach tor many years. Getting: pointers from Coach I-'rue-man are: first row: Meyers, Smvenge, Strain, Seamon, Unprcrg second row: Rc-ynders, Ham- .nond, tvloriock, Samrick, and warner. Puitinir the-ii' host, font furwzirrl to si-nil the Cage hall zooming uvi-r their oppnm-nts' liomls arm- B. Hoist, li. Ansclr, li. MQ-r'c'0i', and H. Mimro. Carre hall was one of ihv many sports 1-njoyvcl uftvi' scliool on Wvilnvsflay. Qin-ons of thi- sports Luiirnmmiiitsl Renting mywl not-lziini art- Janet Hammer, Elainv l'ioi's1m. and liucillv iizlmzv, winners in howling, ping-pong, and lnulminton ruspuc- tively. All won aftm-1' hot competition in zi rminil-robin tmli'n:inn-lit. Always inspii-im: fsms :mil ti-:im with thvit' 1-xei'-pri-suit smilvs uri- thifsz- puppy smiulvziflers. Km-sling: nrt- Clint'- mziinv Vhicluy, Marilyn Zvi-ff, Alicu Van l'oi'tflu't: sland- ing, Marjury Wilrlvr, lic-vi-v-ly Koulmzizi, linrlinrzi Upton, Dolores Sosnowslii. Feminine Live Wires Sports-minded girls happily take part in athletic activities on Wednesday night alter school, rushing down to the gym to get into the various exciting games and earn their awards as well. Bowling, bad- minton, and ping-pong tournaments were played in great suspense as the compet- ing contestants narrowed down to the three final champions. Another one oi the many vigorous games played with great enthusiasm was volley ball. Songleaders deserve high praise tor their big part in building up the spirits of both team and tans. These girls looked charming in their new sweaters and let- ters. 3,94 Thrive on Sports Appeal To create an interest among girls in the sports and activities which add to health and physical efficiency is the double purpose of the Girls' U Club. In G.U.C. there is no place for idlers and loaters. A girl must pull and work together with her teammates in order to chalk up victory for her team. To bring out sportsmanship and build strong bodies are offered badminton and bowling, both in school and out. About 60 girls belong to two bowling leagues that play twice a week at the Fanatorium. These girls are members of the American High School Bowling Congress. "Set 'um up" must have been the thought of Speth, Golubski, Wilson, Hammer, Flora, and Pierson, after-school howling enthusiasts. Standing: Phillips, Upton, Schneider, Havinga, Pierson, Mrs. Blackg second row: Golubski, Hammer, Speth: third row: Wood, Flora, Phelpsg bottom: Ackerman, Bailey. Officer positions for the bowling league were staffed by Donna The birdie could be found whizzing back and forth across the net, Girschel, secretary: Sally White, president: Lois Russell, secre- batted by Schneider, Lange, Havinga, and Phelps on Mondays taryg Marilou Wilder, treasurer, and Pat Dressler, vice-president. after school, Phillips holds the net. 27 ' 4 Faculty Captain of the school is Principal Charles A. Everest, who willingly lets Unionites step into the picture of school service, is always ready to promote cooperative systems which will benefit all, who remains exceed- ingly proud ot his prize-package, the student-supervised study halls. Supporting the captain is the facul- ty team, leading the Redhawk fans with specialized knowledge and wise understanding. Readily, instructors see the advantages in the trends of audio-visual education and in live- lier student participation in class- room doings. Without the student fans' backing the team and the captain, achieve- ment of this scholastic goal would not be attained. Typical classes ra- diate the spirit of interest, coopera- tion, and democratic friendliness in their three-fold support of the prin- ciple, "F or honest labor and for learning we stand." gl OG HON6 FUR MQ if-tm fi xml :Utd Q lg, Y g umRNiN6 U85 D J W J, 9' Q 'HAH i f 2 . x M. f m ' rf ' I xr , ,, ,Aff i,.,.aQ1g ,, W f Af'?L7?v5yi ,, x in av fvfill, ,, fi 1 ,if 7 f , H my A5 ,,Yg.kgfijzf'i'N 1 1 M' if ew--, Y -V f :- ': mf ,H gui? ,, Emu w - V ,Aw , ff XG 1, 112 ,am .x s yn wx! k ww . Q , ,,,, ,, s,5i?ZLfx' f so I , g a lv," if 5 - 1 - ,LA .lggg jg,1:fL,Q, Q 5155 " in .Q , A ii: ' f x ,fi Tw I1wi"-- i 54, 'qw f. f' gi jfkiwm, . 521,93 ff, 1, K- -gf, ., 11 ,,,1 Q' 4, K 7 , X ,xx K- fgfjfx, L- ', 1, ,wif a' ,V A R H, I r a ,Lx f M' WM.-J, , rf? , . A .Q , Amiga A f wa' ' M V Y -,Mi 4: :Wi I 1' V zz, My SAL ,Q 1? ff, f K asm" 45' gl 9 'L Q The Future Will Profit As Youth of Toda MRS. ESTHER KNIESLEY fupper lettl shows two pupils of her geography class, Ioanne Hansen and Richard Demp, material on the Great Lakes water system. Never without a tall tale MR. EDWARD HENRY fcenter lettj goes over economic theories without missing a point. Round and round it goes, where it stops MR. OREN STIEHL flower lettl geography teacher, knows. As he propels the mimeographing machine, out pour bewildering questionnaires for his classes. "Do as Franklin thought and you will be wise," advises MR. MAYNARD "Doc" ELLINGSON flower centerl drawing Dan De- Boer's attention to Franklins views as they applied to an issue way back in l857. The asset of visual education is being demonstrated by MR. RICHARD MAROUSEK flower rightl history teacher, with Bob Trapp's assistance. "Seeing is believing" is the motto ot this picture-minded instructor. "Ht-ru it is," says MISS GERTRUDE YOUNG, charminyl 4-ivics instructor, as shi- points to Grzuul Rapids while IM-nzi, Heeren, Bc-ll, and Paczkowski look ou. 30 ialance Assets and Liabilities of the Past When MR. KEITH HOUSTON fright! gets going on Czechoslovakia or Russia, theres sure to be a lively debatel Taking roll is MR. EDMUND GALANT Ccenter lefti new history teacher. To know his dates and keep them in the minds ol his students is a tremendous task. With a pleasing smile and voice, MISS LUCILLE DUNN tlower leitj is pointing out to her pupils the country which her world history class is discussing. Taking care of both basketball and football money and tickets is one of the tasks with which MR. ELMER LISKY Ccenter letti athletic manager, contends, besides teaching his civics classes. Business mathematics, Civics II, American History VII and VIII f this is a day's work for MR H. I. GLOCKZIN llower rightj. He has charge of a junior high home room and advises the freshmen class. Instructinyz at Junior Follugn- in tht- ziftcrnuun makes :1 sluulrlu slay for MISS ZUR MUEHLPIN leg-nur rightt friunflly ht-lm-r and ton notch history teacher at Union 31 They Stimulal Well-liked MISS VALORA QUINLAIY lupper lettj is marking papers in her usua efficient way. I-Ier specialty is starting ot younger students on the right toot a Union. MISS FLORENCE TROY Cupper rightl charming, quiet, and helpful, is about to read a story to the class. Since coming to Union, Miss Troy has inspired Unionites to great enthusiasm about English classes. The covvrzim- of foreign nl-ws in the Now York Times is pointed out by Virginia Pierce, while MISS MYRTLE HESELTINE lcenter rigrhti. journalism instructor, hvlps to hold the paper up. Tm-nty American wspapers ure analyze-ml by the class. MISS MARY E. EENNELL fabove leitl is shown here correcting papers tor her many English classes. A Latin lover ot cheerful disposition, Miss I-'ennell is constantly helping her seventh and eighth graders. "You must not be afraid to open your mouth and talk with your tongue." This is the helptul advice ot MR. STANLEY ALBERS Cleltl public-speaking teacher, as he articulates for his speech and debating students. .iterary Know Pausing tor a moment as she posts scenes from Shakespearian plays for her English literature classes, MISS OLGA PERSCHBACHER Crightl, chairman of the English Department, converses with a co- English teacher, Mrs. Beulah Kromer. Energy plus describes MRS. BEULAH KROMER Cleft? whose organization al- ways keeps her classes running smoothly. Students keep on their toes helping check classroom work and giving oral recita- tions, Always searching for improved modern teaching methods, MISS MARIAN WRAY is giving a spelling exercise taken from Coronet Magazine to some ninth graders, Block, Bush, and Dalcntt, MR. LEONARD MEYERING Ccenter rightl is seen plac- ing a dramatic recording of the famous classic, "Silas Marner," on the phonograph. "Audiovisual study discs," he says, "furnish a valuable new teaching technique." To prepare his class for a movie they are to attend, MR. EMERY FREEMAN flower rightl reads selections from "David Copperfield" to his English class. Future Atom Smashers Probe Scientific Realms Amid test tubes which rep- resent the activity series of metals MB. CLAYTON BA- ZUIN Crightl calmly checks his papers. Consistently pleasant, Mr. Bazuin is noted for his ability to make chem- istry thrilling. MB. IOHN HESS Clettl who always looks serious even when telling a joke, takes time to answer Sally Yates' question about the cells ot plants and animals, an es- pecially interesting biology topic. Whut happens when sulfur dixoid Q passes through potassium permaganate? bolvrng the mystery is Ludwick, while Mr. Bazuin, Damson, and Lammers look on intcresterlly. Barbara Medd and Harry Fuller inspect an octopus that has been preserved in alcohol during MB. LOWELL PALMEBS Biology ll class Clettl. Barbara and Harry are Mr. Palmer's star pupils. "What is it?" MB. DEXTER SMELKER Crightl with the aid of Hankerson is putting an unidentified animal on display. The next day he will reveal its identity. 34 Numerical Experts Conquer Difficult Figures Ah! The quiet solitude ot study halll Kay Pierson and Elizabeth Young Clettl are busy doing their schoolwork under the new system of stu- dent supervised study halls. lVIiss Elizabeth Dockeray Crightl, math lover, whose day consists of guiding jun- iors and seniors in her home room, and ot asssisting stu- dents like Barbara Zeett in arithmetic. Testing the influence of pressure upon the boiling point of water proves an interesting experiment when conducted by Mr. Fred Voss tabovej. Assisting him are Bricker and Rose. Students agree that learn- ing mathematics, geometry, and algebra 'is not hard when taught by Miss Doro- thy Renzema Cleftl who will soon receive her master's de- gree from the U. of M. Montana hail and snow mingled with the Law of Charles and gravity enliven physics and math classes of Mr. Fred Voss frightl. Mr. Voss also guides the senior class through many storms. 35 Umonltes Unravei Mysteries in Beginning a school day, MISS MABIE MCDERMOTT Clettl is getting bulletins and absence slips from her box. Miss McDermott also acts as treshman class ad- viser and secretary of the Community Council. MISS NELLE ATWOOD trightl, chairman of the mathematics department, is carefully posting the work of her students on the bulletin board for others to appreci- ate. Miss Atwood is also sophomore class adviser. in division are those seventh graders, Lazaski, Scholten and Klingv. Mr. Lair tabovet stands by to help them. Busy as a bee, MB. FLOYD EARLY Clettl still finds time to smile. Besides expertly teaching math, he acts as ad- viser ot the junior class and senior counsellors. MB. FORREST LAIB trightl, with arithmetic book in hand, carefully explains the science ot numbers to clarity the per- plexed minds oi would-be Einsteins in his math class. 36 Mathematics Unionites Jot Shorthand and Tap on the Keys Leaving on trips to the bank to deposit An able commercial bookkeeping teacher is VIR. ARTHUR AVERY rightl who teaches five nf these classes in a day. Business leader of the fac- ilty, Mr. Avery is always riendly to all. "Swing and Sway" Mr. Torrest Barr's way, as you ype to the rhythm of the 'ecord he has just put into :laying order on the pho- tograph. This is one way o learn while your brain elaxes. As each beat :omes along, the fingers nove and touch and go in r hurried pace. school money has been one of the duties of MR. FORREST BARR Cupper leftl as school treasurer, in addition to teaching several typing classes. MRS. BEATRICE MARBLE Cupper rightl teaches at Union for only one period. She is valued by students for her friendly help- fulness in getting jobs for students of this course in down-town stores. "Always there to help" is MISS HAZEI.. WEST Clower leftj office machines teacher. Cecilia Strobejko is mimeographing under her instruction. Miss West helps with oc- cupational training Work at Union. 'll-aching with an upon mind and since-re heart, MISS MARTHA K0- SANKE 1let't5 acuuaints pupil in hor clasaes with problems that will cfm- frunt them latvr. Work, Laugh, Play ls Typical Language Day MlSS DOROTHY BLAKE Cupper leftl points to the Temple ot Iuno, one of the pieces of Roman archi- tecture studied in her Latin classes. The temple also concerns the study of Roman gods. Translating Caesar's capture ol Gaul from Latin into English are these "durus laborans" Cupper rightl, Visser, Silvers, Bouwkamp, and Bower. "We work, we study, we play," sing these Spanisl' students flower leftJ. Placing a record of a Spanisl' song on the phonograph are Smith, Cook, Peterson and Haadsma. MISS RUTH CARPENTER fright? instructor o Spansh, shows her class a mantilla, part of the Span- ish costume. Mary Ann Ratayczak willingly don: the veil to demonstrate how it is Worn. Gay Homemalcers Plan for Modern Tomorrow During a personal regimen class, Kiel, DeRoos and Schulze receive instruction in posture from Mrs. Iennie Marten fupper leftl. MRS. IENNIE MARTIN Cupper rightj home eco- nomics teacher, brings new and interesting ideas to personal regimen. Counting money from cafeteria sales is MISS ROSE SCI-IAUER Clower lettl, also director at Ot- tawa. MISS INA DENNIS tbelow centerl helps Marilyn Spartling as she lays a pattern on her material, MISS MAUDE TRAUT flower rightl proudly dis- plays a girls dress made by a student in child- development class. Humming Machines MR. DEE A. REYNDERS Cupper leftl one of Union's favorite teachers and usually called "Pop" by the students, patiently explains to lohn Kaatz and How- ard Van Gilst a difficult problem in architectural drawing. "Could you print this poster for me?" has been asked with a pleading eye by many a student and teacher of MR. GEORGE GUY Ccenter leftl, printing instructor, who checks proofs here for Bob Virkstis and prints signs, tickets, and papers for all who ask him. Under the skillful supervision of MR. PAUL "Markie" MARCKWARDT fbelowl teacher of Wood shop, the eager wood carvers, Pete Nowicki and Ber- nie Hanson, pause to gaze upon a half-finished min- iature cathedral, two-year project of the department. 40 Sing of Skill MR. ERNEST VREELAND Cupper rightl, known as "Ernie" to the boys in auto shop, is caught in a typical moment as he teaches Lumpkin and Brady how to assemble a carbureter, "This is the way to do it," explains MR. PAUL. MARCKWARDT Ccenterl to Tom Neper. As spon- sor ot the cheerleaders for years, "Markie" is always ready to give a helping hand. MR. ROY CHAMBERLAIN flower lettl gives his usual individual instruction to Dick Ambrose and Iohn Dykgraaf, as he tests a motor which they have re-assembled for a ground circuit. MR. CHARLES RAVERS flower rightl, genial ma- chine shop teacher, points out to Iames Russell the correct method ot fitting the air gauge tightly on the tank of a spray gun. 41 A true friend to students and teachers both is MISS HELEN OLSON otli e l rk . c ce tlcftj who can always lind time to help anyone and is never without a smile. She capably manages Union's of- fice, with the help this last semester of Charmaine Chicky trightj, mid-termer. Special Courses MR. THEODORE ERYEOGLE lupper lettl, called "FRY" by his band and orchestra mem- bers, contributes much to the vigor ot the in- strumental music department. Here he leads the band in a moving number with character- istically humorous flourish. MISS FLORENCE BEST Ccenter lettl is point- ing out to Russell Chistopher a diagram of the motions a director goes through in the course ot one piece ot music. She directed the mixed chorus at the Bach Festival this year. MISS HARRIETT SCHRODER tlower lettl is dictating a Civics outline to Kent Bradtield who is typing it on a large- print typewriter. Miss Schroeder, be- sides helping students in sight saving classes by reading to them, also is ad- visor ot the Senior Y-Teens. The necessity ot individual teaching and ot oral presentation is greater in the sight-saving class than in regular classes. MISS DOROTHY IANE FARR Clettl is reading and explaining the principles of a history lesson to Mary Lou l-lilliker. Spice Learning, MR. MILO SUKUP Cupper leftl, director of boys' physical education and football coach, poses proudly by the pictures of the football eleven. MRS. MARGARET "Macky" BLACK fupper rightl, girls' physical education teacher, is in- specting one of Arlene Ackerman's costumes for "The l:'rollies", a project she has so success- fully directed many years. SGT. ROBERT SANDERS Ccenterl, instructor for the R.O.T.C. at Union for the second year, is grading test papers on a movie about first aid, previously shown to all companies. Through the friendly guidance of MISS ESTI-IER NOBLE Ccenter rightl the library has become a 'capital' of knowledge. Using the Readers Guide, she assists Rose Lucas in lo- cating articles for a vocational report. Helpful MISS EULALIN WILLIAMS flower leftj answers a question for Gwendolyn Ketchen about the scenery in her picture as Pat Hilton works nearby on her drawing. Express yourself! That is the theme of MISS EDITH BARKER'S flower rightj art classes. In the group at cen- ter Van Malsm-n. Smith, Gillowski. Shultz, Aspgren, Kurti, Skuth, Balcor and Mtsler are seeking self ex. pression in oils, water colors stract 1 clay, and various ab- . ions Miss Barker is supervising the class with an appraising eye. UQ. Qrga "Silence is golden" is the motto of the study halls now supervised by Unionites themselves. Checking for the physical condition of the room, individual attitude toward study, and general atmosphere ot the room are Tom Simpson and Sally Wiersma while assistant study hall chairman, Beverly Fik, looks on. This is just one of the new phases of student government that has been developed this past year. Pledging their "heart and hand", Unionites went all out for activities. School service, publication work, sponsoring assemblies, and taking charge of campaigns were all in a day's work. Minds, bodies, and mor- als were strengthened by these ac- tivities. Not only did these eager- beavers do useful things but they had a hilarious time doing them. Meritorious performance of extra- curricular activities received service recognition when the Dillingham Cups, Gold Keys, and numerous other awards were conferred upon outstanding leaders. lit,-v .. lit Tj rig ml fit nizati milf? CQ XMBQERT ni HAND gtlli I OI1 ,, K9 A Sgqny? K 1- , -125,332.5 Q W1 rv. A br I 1 1, 'Sw ir ,www 51? r ,ppm Union received more than its share oi recognition when Pat Dressler, chosen its D.A.R. winner, won the State DAR. award for her superior citizenship. Rich- ard Anderson acquired the national science award given by the Bausch Lomb Company and the University of Michigan Alumni Scholarship. Shirley Weeber, who displayed outstanding ability in language, was given the Marion l... lennings Award, and Marvin l-leemstra, the Albert lennings Scholarship Award. The Marion L. len- nings Fund was started by a group ot citizens as a tribute to Miss Iennings, a former language teacher for torty-two years. The award is a gift of money pre- sented for outstanding work in foreign languages. The Albert lennings Fund was started by a group of taculty and alumni in honor ot Mr. lennings, a former princi- pal at Union for fourteen years. Gold Keys were awarded to twenty- three students this year for their activity work during the past three years. Those eligible must be leaders in different field of endeavor, such as school service, publi- cations, clubs and organizations, music, art, physical education, and special pro- jects, Walking into a bright future are Marvin Hecmstra and Shirley Wceber, Jennings award winners: Pat Dressler, D.A.R. winnerg and Richard Anderson, science genius. Gold Key winners are: first row: Marie Damson, Char- maine Chickey, Shirley Flora, Ann Speth, Mary Phillips: second row: Felicia Staskiewicz, Sally White, Jean Snel- link, Arlene Ackerman, Barbara Upton, Marjorie Schnei- der, Charles Cicclskig third row: Pat Dressler, Marvin Heemstra, Betty Boryce, Richard Anderson, Otto Reis- man, Janet Hammer, Marie Golubski, Yvonne Wood. Missing: Robert Trapp, Richard Mcretsky, Donald Wie-st. Star Seniors Shine The Dillingham Cup was awarded to Ruth Apkarian and Abner Ragins. Ruth, an energetic worker, participated in such activities as school service, publications, senior counselling, the senior play, and the Student Council as its president. Pop- ular 'lAb", science and math genius, lead the senior class as president, acted as Senior Counsellor, and took part in the senior play and debate team battles. Beaming with pride arc- tha- winners oi' the Dillingham cups, Ruth Apkarian and Abner Ragins, as they look admiringly at the shining' symbol of their achievements. , Union Leads the Way 'lPermit, please," UNO running in the halls," are the tirm Warnings of the service staff members. These workers, anxious to share the responsibility of school service, are recommended by the homeroom teacher and one teacher with whom they have a subject. To maintain order in the halls is the main objective of this organi- zation. Energetic chairmen of the service for the huurs of thu day 3.1'6'2 standing: VViersma. Mac Lennan, Snellink, Speth, Huhbelg seated: Lapinski, Haan, Shippyg missing: Colm-- I11 il n. With a firm command for quiet and a rating sheet for a guide, the student- supervised study halls daily swing into action. This study hall project, the first to be successfully carried out in any of the city schools, functions without the assis- tance of teachers. Pupils keep the order necesary for study. Hourly chairmen for the six study halls head this activity as- sisted by the raters and the roll takers. The study halls are rated on four points, individual seats, individual study, quiet for study, and observance of permit regu- lations. A report is submitted to the office each Week by the chairmen. Union had the only local debate team participating in contests this year. Under the skillful guidance of Mr. Stanley Albers, the squad Won a wall plaque. The ques- tion for discussion was the proposal to provide the citizens of the United States with free medical care at public expense, which the squad contended was a needed though drastic change of the future. Among the high schools that they debated were Lansing Eastern, Wyoming Park, Battle Creek, and Holland. Making: it their responsibility to see that everything runs smoothly arc: standing: Trapp, Zoet, Havinga, Van Setters, Van Allsburg, Verschonr: seated: Dressler, Up- ton, Ankarian, Sosnowski. Staskiewicz. Debators Abner Ragins, Pat Dressler, and Otto Riesman are rehearsing' some of the witty points of their argu- ments with Mr, Albers. J' Y -t i- ,tw em? I5 ELHVN? vi sf is Captains Talce Command Providing new white coats for the Boys' Glee, sponsoring the senior banquet, and helping with "The Frollies" were among the major projects this year of the Com- munity Council, composed of representa- tives of businessmen, the P.T.A,, alumni, and classes. Officers lleft to rightl are: Miss Marie McDermott, secretary, Princi- pal Charles Everest, vice-president, Mr. Iohn Whitaker, president, Mr. Carl Schnei- der, treasurer. Ulnformation, please?" will never be de- manded by Unionites as long as Mr. Palmer and his able Athletic Council helpers display posters and charts and sponsor assemblies. Officers Cleft to righti are: Don Buzalski, president, Ralph Lud- wig, secretary, Donn Bouwkamp, assem- bly planner, Mr. Palmer, adviser. "More junior high activities!" cried this year's Senior Counsellors, advised by Mr, Early, as they took charge of the seventh graders. lnforming them of rules and reg- ulations, the counsellors acquainted the newcomers with the school and made them feel at ease in their new surround- ings. First row: Flor:-1. Speth. llptun. lmnison. Chivlty: second row: Rzuxins. Mr. Early. Hammer, Schneider, Dresslvr, Prnt-tor, VVnml, Zoe-rup: third row: Apkariun, Boryce, Snr-llink. C014-niang fourth w: Ann-rson, lirickvr. Alcsz- ro l ku, Vain Ottr-re-n, Iicmiistrzl, Litti-Il. liurkhnlmicr, Wiest. To Build Democracy Gazing at the poster bearing the em! blem ot the l-li-Y are: llett to righti Curtis, Klinger, Burkholder, Weber, Van Ottern, Bauer, Anderson, all members ot the Young Men's Christian Association. With them at the extreme right is their moder- ator, Mr. Dee "Pop" Reynders. The sale of paddle pops and soft drinks at the games, taken over the last semester by the Varsity Club, proved successful, Listening attentively tor instructions are Doxey, secretary, Burkholder, president, Buzalski, treasurer, and lacobs as Wiest, vice-president, who explains the schedule tor the sale at the next game, Sponsoring outsot-town excursions and carrying on studentesupervised study halls are some ot the many accomplish- ments ot this active Student Council. First row: Moore, Webber, Apkarian, Ragins, Cicelski, Haadsma, Breining, Kin- dig, Kurkjian, second row: Mollo, Peter- son, l-lankinson, Girschle, De Witt, Philips, Haan, Brown, Noneman, lones, Wood, third row: Dressler, Trapp, Zoet, Anderson, Staskiewicz, Upton, Zuelke, Amante, Cook, fourth row: Roh, Van Otteren, Heisman, Barszewski, Berry, Boryce, Schneider, Van Setters, Curtice, Dolsey, Wright, Walters. Youthful lnstrumentalists Prove Promising Gay, rolicking woodwinds really shone as their owners set them at a fast pace for the "Flight of the Bumble Bee" which drew interested listeners to "The l:'rollies" and the Spring Concert. The lads behind the licorce sticks are tleft to rightlf Charles Mindel, Thomas Strang, lrving Mindel, and Stuart Noordyk. These boys have proved themselves out- standing in the field of instrumental music by contributing both to the success of the band and orchestra and by doing a little harmonizing on their own. Among their many activi- ties was playing at PTA. meetings, Oalcleigh School, and the Grand Bapids Music Teachers Association. C. Johnson, Nallizindizin. Post, W'cavc-r, Unger. Malmlierg, Bollgraph, Mayo, Carlson, Armlrvy, C, Johnson, Cole, Num-r, Kostvn, Haadsma. Macombor, Maher, Huber, Gillette. Modders, Spratlimz. Hanson, Flan- ders, C. Mimlel, J, Johnson, Ketchum, Strang, Ct-ntilli. Van We-stenburxz. Playing Beethoven's "First Symphony' in the band and orchestra festival held at South High as well as the annual spring concert was one of the highlights for this year's orchestra. Twisting the spotlight over the season's activities, Unionites find many outstanding musicians such as Ed Perschbacher, Bill Barkley, Carl Iohnson, Marian Modders, Tom Strang, and Charles Mindel who participated in the state solc festival at Ann Arbor. The string ensem- ble, a small group of players, entertained at various functions throughout the year. Carl Iohnson won honor by being chosen guest artist of the Grand Rapids Sym- phony Orchestra at the young peoples' concert while Dan Kovats, who recently completed String Quartet OP. l No. l, would, in Mr. l:'ryfogle's opinion, rate an award in any young composers contest. The orchestra has, this season, maintained the Union standard of really fine concert music. Noordyk. Barkley, Rutaj:-Zak, I, Minds-l, Romine, Hammond, Berkov Coykcndell, Kovats, Finstrum, R. Johnson. Pc-rschhackvr, Schoenf Frey, Mullian, Pawloski, Wicst, Van Dyk, Havclhurstg center fr Mr. Fryfogleg missing: Peterson, Sumner. 50 Band Leads Musical Parade of Year's Events "To thee we pledge our heart and hand" might well be the theme of the band as they parade out of an exciting year of parades, football games and excursions, assemblies, concerts, and festivals. The spirits of crowds on the bleachers and of Red Hawks on the field at the football games were raised with their snappy loyalty song. Countless pep meetings and assemblies were staged with the support of the band. They ably accompanied the team on out-of-town jaunts to Detroit and Muskegon Heights. Again making use of their previous idea, an R.O.T.C. band took part 'in the Armistice Day Parade and R.O.T.C. Field Day. The gay, usual bright- ness of the red coats stood out in the Santa Claus, Memorial, and Flag Day parades, while the spring concert benefited by their expert handling of festival and concert numbers. Osbeck, Kindig, Cummings, Unger, Gessner, Strang, Schipper, Cud- ney. I. Mindel, Brown, Leith, Carlson, Hanson, Peterson, Kosten, C. Mmdel, J. Johnson, Noordyk, Cavanaugh, VanWz-stcnburg, D. Belke, Kovats, Maher, Kunst, Macomber, Pcrschbacher, Schoonfeldt, Randal, Representing Union in the Schubert Club Contest were Don MacGregor, Elizabeth Ann Lockhart, and Fred Collins. By means of this contest, held annually at the civic audi- torium, two in first place receive scholarships to MSC and two placing second receive war bonds. The event boasts entries from all parts of Michigan. ''Young-Man-with-the-Violin'' Carl Iohnson has done it again. Bringing more praise and credit to himself with his music, he brilliantly played the First Movement of the Men- delssohn Concerto for the Young Peoples' Concert at the civic auditorium in March. Carl was also a soloist at Ann Arbor. Gillette, Pawloski, Havelhorst, Dantuma, Moddt-rs, Tweddale, Wilkin- son, Wallington, Elzinga, J. Belke, Brown, Beeman, Mayo, Kubiack, Burkhart, Rothloy, Kuhn, Cole, Silver, Samrick, Schaafsma, Barkley, Hammond, R. Johnson. 51 irst rnw: Hznrkt-ns. Flora, Miller, Gt-ssni-r, An4lr-rson, liostwick, Austin, Hilton, McConnell, Edison, Miller. Bauer, Brown, Krause, Christoph: liltol. Williams, liowvn, Sltipitis, Maoshall: second row: .Heart-vn. Hey- Mac Gregor, Spvncvr, liapinski, Hanson, Rigii-rug fourth row: Kr-elf man, Myszka. liulmzin. lialuwurt, Gigowski. lizirst-n, Clit-rnoliy, Curtivr-, Wiest, Spratling, lic-um-r, Haan, Mervinnv, Ms-nningz, Vander Hyf anis:-y, Collins, V4-bolzik. lionvzkowslci, Doolittle-, lllumg third row: Young, Vanrlvr Kopplt-, Simonscn, Rugzgz, lk-nimzton, Kurchcn. Songbircls Sing Blitlmely at tl1e Bacli Festival Singing seems to be the thing this year. The size and quality ot the choir and of the glee clubs have doubled. The junior classes are just a milestone cross before getting into the senior choir, Singing tor the Christmas program, Fountain Street Church, Bach Festival, Schubert Club and the Spring concert has kept thern busy. Special awards have been given to a tew seniors for extra activities. Gay carolers break forth in magnificent praise to thc- Lord during the a nnual Christmas Pageant. The singers are top row: Kalawairt Miller, Harkt-ns, Iionczkow- ski, Blum, Cc-belak: lower row: Fertnuy, Wiest., Vander Hyde, McConnell, Edison. Girl Soloist., Norman Kalawart. Boy Soloist, Roger Baum-r, ' qi 52 Old and familiar Christmas carols art- sung by the Senior Boys' Glee. Standing lleft to right! are: Schmidt., Christopher, Brown, Miller, Ramsey. and Watson. leeiul Singers Deliver Music the "Best" Way The music department, which boasts many talented students, has gone through the year bringing much delight. The boys' and girls' glee clubs and the mixed choir groups have sung and sung again with spirit at many school assemblies. The Girls' lunior Glee Club is progressing rapidly under the strict guidance of Miss Florence Best. The lunior Glee girls can be remembered for their splendid performance in many assemblies. Various styles of songs are boast- ed by this outstanding group. Members are: first row: Wolo- siecky, Lindberry, Brown, Batch- elder, Hansen, Matthews, Wie- land, second row: Holmes, Irwin, Heuer, Upton, McDawee, Burton, Berdan. Singing with body and soul are Cleft to rightl Earl Paige, Martin Burns, Dan Phillips and lohn French, four of the twenty mem- bers ot the lunior Boys' Glee, which meets three noons a week. Preparing themselves to join the Senior Boys' Glee, these members learn the fundamentals of group singing. This group has particie pated in the Christmas and Spring Concert. Deadline Ditl1ers Cvercome by Red Hawlc Staff With a six-page paper as his goal, O Heisman, managing editor, guided 1 one-semester life of this year's Beflec to a flourishing finish. Here he is conf ring with Marjorie Schneider, front-po news editor, on an idea for her page lc out. Marge did an excellent job, putti a great deal of time into turning out well-balanced and attractive front pat Planning for their last Reflector c Yvonne Wood, feature page editor, Chi maine Chicky, assistant news editor, a Lois Hoek, chief editorial writer. The gi are discussing subjects for stories a editorials that will promote modernizati of the school building, one point in t paper's platform. Whether the story explaining the V sity Club's new set of rules should apps on a news page or the sports page is t cause of the debate between Merlin Su ner and Muriel Spoelstra, sports editc and Audry Riddering, page 4 editor. Ec of the editors has justifiable argumer Barbara Proctor, efficient advertisi manager for the Reflector staff, also act as chief typist. Here she is busy typi out feature-page copy while Barbara V Neuren, editor, supervises. Rushl The deadline is todi Copy, headlines, and editi must be completed by tonig Headlines that have oom and sparkle are under creatf by Marie Damson, Virgil Neper, Betty Boryce, Ruth I karian, Donna Wickert, o Ioyce De Roo, reporters o columnists on the staff. Meet the Gang Who Wrote This 47 Yearbook Deciding on art work for the divisional pages can be quite a trying task, as Mar- jorie Schneider, business manager, Iris Bodle, Ruth Apkarian, and Ann Speth cir- culation managers, Lynne Waddell, art editor, and Gareth Renkes, photographer, have discovered. Barbara Upton, manag- ing editor, and Ianet Hammer, associate editor, help make the final decisions. Tedious problems arise and soon per- ish, once Aurora divisional editors are on the job. Here the editors, Mary Phillips, Peggy Crane, Marie Golubski, Delores Koets, Marian Haberman, and Marie Damson, decide where to place a play picture in the yearbook. Pride and joy of the '47 staff are Shirley Tweddale and Gary Renkes, talented ar- tist and photographer. Shirley did the art work and Gary took 300 photographs "To Each His Own" would oe a very good title for this pic- iure when an analyst reviews :he various jobs done in prepa- cation for the yearbook. lnclud- ad in the group are: Cstandingl Baranowski, Nyberg, Ardrey, Strobejkog Cseatecll Boryce, niniature picture chairman, Dierce, Gryczanowski, Mayoi 1nd Post, photo ticket chairman. viissing is Donna Cebelak. Striving to become "helpful l-lannahsf the Future l-lomemakers of America dem- onstrate some of the household duties. Miss Traut, adviser, and Buth Apkarian, vice-president, look on while Betty Boryce, secretary, sews on the electric sewing ma- chine and Marie Golubslci, president, darns a sock. Missing from the picture is Louise Nalbadian, treasurer. Demonstrating how to put the finishing touches on the hand-made dolls is Miss Gertrude Young as she guides Donna Chapel, Felicia Staslciewicz, and Marilyn Phillips in the correct method ol sewing Bed Cross tags. Because of this club, Union is lUU per cent on top in all Bed Cross drives. Eagerly They Serve The Business Club bustles with busy people! Started in connection with occu- pational training program under the supervision of Mrs. Marble, its aim is to help students at their job. Elaine Whally, secretary-treasurer, and Charles McNulty, vice-president, help President Howard Fletcher Cseatedl select a date for a dance they are sponsoring. Operating the projector in Boom l34 during their free periods and sponsoring noon-hour movies to aid visual educa- tion is all in a day's Work for these ambi- tious members of the Movie Club. Offi- cers for the club are: Cleft to rightl SVSgt. Sanders and Mr. Chamberlain, advisers, Del Kubiak, vice-president, Gerald Toma- sik, treasurerg Frank Bocci, a member, and Bob Trapp, president. The old and the new of the Y-Teens! Pat Dressler, Ann Speth, Ruth Apkarian, and Sally White, out-going officers, gaze at a list of events of the past year, while lanet Hammer, Yvonne Wood, Norma Raper, and lvah Gollar, new officers, look on, hoping to gain helpful hints. Below, three members of the Library Club perform one of their many duties- putting away library books. They are, left to right: Mary Phillips, president, Elaine Pierson, vice-president, and Helen Stepan- chuk. A few of their other duties are cata- loguing cards and checking in magazines and books. They Shine in Ambition Earning money towards their own movie projector is the aim this year of the Spanish Club, advised by Miss Carpenter. To aid the students, Spanish speaking movies are shown. Officers for the year were: president, Norma Haan, vice-presi- dent, Norma Raperg secretary, Lorraine Wozniak, treasurer, Gay Van Otteren. Marie Damson, president of the Latin Club, presents the gavel to the new presi- dent, Donna Bowkamp, while other offi- cers, Richard Anderson, Shirley Webber, and Louise Nalbanian, watch. This or- ganization sponsored noon-hour dancing last semester. The Latin Club, advised by Miss Blake, contributes yearly to the len- ning's Scholarship Award for the best lan- guage student. A ' v W ' fry. , - gg . LQ I g Q I . M W 'Y Q ii . V . Q 1 ' 9 ' ' wg l -f ' eg 6 . . l I K . W K! 5, - S .ry 9 A A0 L. . . I - i - F :,k ,A. -Vg . . I my l K In . , A Q I Q- - g f ' -'LH k,-. 1 K ' 3 ' :'-'Y K .L I ', 1 2 f- 4' ' ' . M, 1 2 . . . I ... . . b K . V t , Y . 3.5.6, . 4 5 , . , -a 1 ff Q , . L, A I - 4' 5 H f v o g - ,gg K , , f 'w ' A A , 'ly Q I . ' . k , . Q . I -Q 4 4 n' ' f ' ' I nfgf 0 Q Q O 7 4 1. . , . wi 1 . , , i 1 0 Q xg, fi 'T' I f at Y ,.. .I ' s f Q X' fx QQ Q , 'f 'N', E M 1 - .2- ' Q , ' , , ' , ' - b . Q Z-- Ll Q .U P Q Bl H at hi Raising "Old Glory" to its height each morning is the task of These R.0.T.C. sharp-shooters are examining the target boar these R.O.T.C. boys. They are tleft to rightj: Warner, Roh, Trow- to see if their marksmanship is improving. They are lleft to rightj bridge, Mc Divitt. and Roth. Collins, Roh, Valkema, Yowiash, and Heemstra. R. C. T. C. Strives to Put lts Talents on Parade "Straighten your tie," "Polish your shoes," and "Shine your buttons" were all tamiliar commands heard just before the final regimental inspection-Field Day, May, 1946. Company E took second place tor the best Company in the city. Union's R.O.T.C. also claimed second place tor the best squad, third place for the best pla- toon, tirst and second place tor the best otticer, and second place tor best non- commissioned oiticer. The standards for membership were raised When Col. lohn I. Barker P.M.T. and Capt. Richard A. Rowland, jr. took charge ot the groups trom Grand Rapids. A 'B" average is a "must" tor the otticers and nothing below a "C" for the sergeants. The Bars and Chevrons Club Worked hard this year to bring the otticers and subordinates closer together and get them into the habit ot Working as a group. The "higher ups" of the R.O.T.C.4the Bars and Chevrons Club-are discussing methods to bring the boys closer together. Seated lleft to rightj are: Capt. Krauss: Lt. Collins, Lt. Valkemag Sgt. Christopher' Major Cicelski: Col. Havelhorstg Sgt. Caminerg Sgt. McDivittZ CDI: KHSi0H0WiC'Z3 Silt. Warner: Lt. Peterson: Capt. Heemstra, Sgt. Trow- bridge, Sgt. Porter: Sgt. Jakolatg Sgt. Roth: Sgt. Roh, Sgt, Yowaishg Sgt. Koopmansg Sgt. Zeeffg Sgt. Ramsey: Sgt, Nowickip Sgt. Schuelke. d 59 1, Ul'ldCl'CI6SSlTl2l1 "A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, therefore Drink Ye Deeply," reads little Ioan Rausch as she drinks from the fountain. Waiting for their taste of knowledge are Ianet Haan, Ethel Fish, and Iohn Kurkjian. Gay school spirit, trials and tribula- tions, a friendly but studious atmos- phere tell the story of the six years which beginners will brave. Becom- ing active in their freshman year, peppy ninth graders keep up the mo- rale ot fellow Unionites with weekly sales of doughnuts, eclairs, and jelly buns. Stepping lively, the sophomores put on a dreamy spring dance, perfectly set for the season when "a young man's fancy turns to love." The juniors go all out with a year packed full of activities -the Holadaze, typ- ifying the Christmas spiritg the Prom, honoring the seniorsg after-basket ball-game dances to soothe the ex- cited crowds. Yes, trom all these lively underclassmen Union may well "expect a victory" in the years to come. EXPECT A is Simi mow QOH ll? 9 f ff- m, , if iw ' 2 5 ,ww mi 1 L " fr:-.,.,i , vm. M A , .f . f f i mg, V .fu - M W gw P A, H., X M LLM Q , :msd .531 f iz , 'f fum HKS wwf. , -M - h-A f 1, PM My 517 My 3 - if 123211 gf w ' fm L N 35532 ia ,H . H4 , , Fmt Y -- i H 42 wi M ,AX aim in QM? in sl . X . gig lg bi if xx Q33-Q 'M Q1 First row: Nc-per, Noorthoek, Ogrodzenski, Olson, Olszanecky, Orlow- ski, Paczkowski, Peck, Perchbacker, Peterson Second row: Pierce, Pierson, Pierson, Pierson, Pindar, Pratt, Proper, Ratajczak, Raymer, Remington Third row: Rickson, Rittenhouse, Rode, Roetman, Rose, Rosloniec, Rowe, Rozemag Ruiter, Sacks Fourth row: Samrick, Sanders, Schoenfeldt, Sherman, Sliver, Skipitis Skestons-, Slomski, Smith, Smith Fifth row: Smith, Smith, Smith, Snook, Sparks, Speckin, Sperlick Spinski, Stnnkicwicz, Stimle Sixth row: Stevens. Stoke-ns, Stressman. Strobridge, Sullivan, Toabeau Teunis, Timmcrman, Tompkins, 'I'ownvr "Your Coat, Please" Ambitious and Willing, the lunior Class ot '47 took full re- sponsibility tor the dances alter basketball games. The pro- ceeds Were put into their treas- ury to be reserved until they are seniors, a system devised by Mr. Early, junior adviser. Left to right are Bloom, Chicky, Howland, and Wiersma. -W. "Lovely to Look At" The class rings arrivel Proud- ly showing theirs to one another are Darlene Beyer, Cedric Pier- son, and Arliss Schoenteldt, Class ot '48, The ring is one ot the most exciting events of the year for the juniors. It is proof to the world that they have ap- proached the threshold of sen- iorhood. First row: Troll, Turuta: Unger, Valkema, Van Allsburg, Van Daalen, Fourth row: Wvstniaas, Wie-rley. Wiersma Wiersma, Wiotsma Wildtr Vande Kopple, Vanderlloff, Vander Hyde, VanderWerf Wilder, Williams, Wimmcr, Winkler Second row: Van Dyke, Van Ess, Van Hoff, Van Maldcgan, Van Malsen, Fifth row: Witzvl, Wright, Wondalowski, Wood, Wood. Wizinak Xoung, Van Otteren, Van Portfleet, Van Setters: VanderVeen, Vereecken Young, Yowaisk, Zagummy Third row: Verschoor, Virkstis, Visser. Vrosh, Warner, Watson Web- Sixth row: Ze-eff, Zecff, Zeetl, Zoet. Zoppa, Zutter ber, Webber, We-rm Werkema 4-'f 9 , . Fourth row: Curtice, Czlzdfgzurak, Danielson, Datema, Davidowski Sixth row Duiven Dutkiewicz Dykstra Eldid Falickl Falicki Bull Dean De Baar, De Korno, eLa Porte Fex Flora Fredricks Fifth row De La Porte: Denumie: Do Young: Dickerson: Dlugolemski Seventh row Fouse Furtney Garriock Cigow-ki Cildner Cill Gills Dolcey Donley, Doty, Douma, Draum-tis Gingrich Cla? Cold Sophs Hit Second Base To insure better attendance at their class meetings, the sophomores decided to distribute attendance cards. No one could get into these meetings Without a card. Elected to head the class Were: Ian Wegenka, presidentg Leonard Caminer, committee chairmang Elaine Kutchin, sec- retaryg and Emil Morlock, treasurer. Their adviser is Miss McDermott. Fourth row Jeltema Jewell Johnsen Johnson Johnson Johnson Sixth row: Kuklewski. Kurkjeang Kutchin, Lang, Lang, LeBrenz lohnson Joustra Kalawart Kalenda L9 Pard, LEWIS, Llrldemim, MHC0mb9r Fifth row Kaxsanen Kasnowlcz Katz Kaufman Kirydnoff Klocko Seventh row: Madura, Manne, Markle, Marshall, Maurice, MCDlVlIt lxoenes Koopmans Kovats Kramer Mc Ginely, Mead, Medd Up Go Gay Displays Book-jacket displays are only a sample ot the many which make the halls of Union look more interesting. Here Cleft to rightl Ioan Denomie, Rita Nielson, Barbara Reed, Dorothy Snook, and Mary De La Porte arrange travel book covers. Educa- tional and colorful boards everywhere are found to command Unionites' atten- tion. How the Boys Relish 'Em "These hamburgs sure taste good," report Iohnny Price, Harold Timmer, and Rob Ryprna, as they devour a bun, meat, and "goo" combination rnade so appetizingly by the cooks at Union. First row: Merritt, Meinert, Mendel, Merritt. Meulendyli, Me Miller, Moores, Morlock, Mroz Second row: Mueller, Mulder, Nagtzoom, Neilson, Noordyk Third row: Nylie-rg, Nyman, Obudzenski, Orcutt, Overlxeuk Fourth row: Palecki, Panewocik, Passaralli, Paulsen, Pegg Fifth row: Pelak, Peterson, Phillips, Phillips, Phiscatur Sixth row: Porter, Potyuj, Proctor, Purchase, Ranta Seventh row: Rot-cl, Reordan, Riggs, Ring, Ritz Eighth row: Roh, Roth, Rubin, Rypma, Sagyrn Ninth row: Schaufsma, Schaafsma, Schipper, Schulders, Schuel Tenth row: Schulz, Sezemore, Shattuck, Sienkiuwicz, Simpson Eleventh row: Skutt, Slanger, Slenkcr, Smcenge, Smith, Si Smith, Smith, Smith "Lend a Helping Hand!" "Oh this is so heavy," sighs cle- rnure little Dorothy Witzcak, seventh grader, as she and lohn Kurchjian carry heavy trays ot milk from the cafeteria at noon to their roommates. First row: Smith, Smith, Snook, Spicer, Stabingisg Strangg Stehower, Stewart, Strain, Strobridge Second row: Sumner, Swanson, Taylor, Tcunis, Timmerman, Third row: Tisron, Tolsma, Tuinstra, Unger, Van Dalsen Fourth row: Vanderlaan, Vanderwerf, Van Dusen, Van Gilst Van Malsen Fifth row: Van Mullen, Van Oss, Van Westenberg, Veldman, Velte Sixth row: Vereecken, Ver Haar, Ver Howe, Versluis, Verwys Seventh row: Virstis, Vorel, Vroma, Waldmiller, Walford Eighth row: Waller, Walters, Vifanrooy. Wapner, Warner Ninth row: Weaver, Weeber, Weeber, Wegenka, Wells Tenth row: Werre, Wheeler, Whitney, Wieck, Wilkins, Eleventh row: VVille1', Wirt, VVoltjer, Wright, Wright, Yancharas, Zemites, Zenk, Zuelke W 'S N W' iwi J Lf ,i Q 6 HW, fy Sa Vx., f t I E -x. x YE I3 S. Ryu i 'Ace Freshmen Capture A's in Favorite Fields These bright students are tound in subjects taken by the irosh, namely civics, English, science, and mathematics. Two students from each class have been chosen by the teachers for their "A" average in these subjects. Standing from the top down in the left-hand row are Donald Budd, Ken- neth Champion, Michael l-luer, Otto Husted, Bill Higgins, and Dan DeBoer. ln the right hand row are Donna Hoogerhyde, Evelyn Myers, Mary Fales, Nancy Denomie, and David Cross. With many outside activities already assumed on the side this year, forward goes this little sample of the Quiz Kids of 1950! First row: Stryker, Sweets, Swifink, Summers. Sund Second row: Timmer, Tilzeron, Traviss, Valle-au, Van Daalen Third row: Van Daalen, Vanderberg, Vandermevr, Vnnd VanDyk Fourth row: Vercoe, Verwys, Walker, Walkons, Walkons Fifth row: Wa!sma, Ward, Webber, Wecker, Weidermun Sixth row: Wendt, Whalan, Whitter, Wilkinson, Williams Seventh row: Wilson, Witczak, Yancharas, Zokoc QVUS Diminutive Beginners Make Big Time Showing That they may have a better understanding of their studies, their teachers, and school regula- tions, lean Littel, senior counsellor Ktop rightl, counsels Belke, Runner, Shearer, Seymore, and Cross, on how to solve the problems that come in their tirst year ot high school. The lunior Hi-Y club under the leadership of Mr. Emery Freeman, adviser, and Marvin I-leemstra, chairmen, have as their purpose "to work to- gether tor a finer community and a better World." Overnight hikes and a basketball league are examples of the fun that these boys share. What would a modern school be Without its bike room? These students llower rightl rush to get their bikes for the trip home. Promising themselves that they will be just like their hero someday, little Robert Richards and Charles Swanson Clower rightl beam all the ad- miration their thirteen years possess, While Sports Star Dale Ganzevoort signs their Aurora. They look ahead to the day when they will wear the major "U" of a sports player. XXV ff Se Starting the fall meeting with an exceptionally large number of par- ticipants, the 1947 Senior Class gave their loyal support to their guiding officers and cheered for the world- experienced veterans. Before the race began, they unresitatingly pledged themselves to completing the war memorial, and placed it on display with their addition of the table and guardway. The first lap was passed with a mirth-packed dance, Cider Iug Iig. Rounding the far turn, they brought out their play, "Go Ahead." Then, passing the batton, a new set of run- ners came up, initiating the first all- city Senior Mixer. Driving forth into the long awaited Skip Day, they flew on to the Prom homestretch. With an added dash of speed, the leaders tore over the finish line to receive the Dillingham Cup, Gold Keys, and a top-ten rating as highest honors. But none of the seniors actu- ally lost in the contest, for all re- ceived the greatest award of all, their diplomas. ap t I niors MOU SONS L 0 VF fsfrlunuc HTER5 Laing ge 9' w -ldflgi 54,2135 L, A - " 1x,ks,,. sqqzjiqywi . Y I , 1 K 4 fm ACKERMAN, ARLENE . . . Pert little Frollietts . . . loves dancing and records . . . plan: "lit" course at college . . . Majorette 3 G.U.C. l, 2, 3, 4, Frolliettes l, 2, 3, 4. ALBRECHT. EILEEN . . . "Ike" thrives on rolle' skating . . . frowns upon snobs . . . bub bles with gaiety . . . G.U.C. l, 2,, Y-Teen: 2, School Service 2, 3, Chairman 4. ALESZKA, IOHN . . . Never silent . . . ct be coming smile . . . works in paint store . . Senior Counsellor 4. ANDERSON. IUNE . . . Blonde. blue-eyed . . fond of bowling . . . travel-minded . . beauty operator . . . School Service 4. ANDERSON. RICHARD . . . Intelligence plus . . . anticipates U of M . . . Manager o Senior Play 4, Hi-Y Secretary 3, Latin Clul Treasurer 4, Senior Counsellor 4. ANDREE, ANGELYN . . . "Able Angie" . . bound for business world . . . typing top: her list of favorite subjects. APKARIAN. RUTH . . . Dauntless duredevi . . . winning smile . . . Student Council 3 President 4, Senior Counsellor 4, Y-Teens l 2, 3, 4, Senior Play 4. ARDREY. ARLENE . . . Cheerful, smiling brown ette . . . G.U.C. 2, 3, 4, Aurora Staff 4 Red Cross 4, School Service 3. ASPGREN, KENNETH . . . Artful artist . . . . . aims at commercial art . . . will mis: the girls most . . . R,O.T.C. l, Z. BAILEY, PATRICIA . . . Petite red-head . . happy on skates . . . G.U.C. 2, 3, 4, Dril Corp Z, 4, Y-Teens 2, 4, Latin Club 3. BAKKER, SARALYN . . . Hearty laugh . . keen on typewriter keys . . . one-max girl . . . School Service 2, 3, 4. BARANOWSKI, VIRGINIA . . . Sparkling per sonality . . . whiz with needle . . . want: to sing for her supper . . . School Service l, Z, 3, 4, Library Club 2, 3, 4, Aurora Staff 4 BARNES, KATHLEEN . . . Peppy . . . happy go-lucky . . . "Katie" likes a G.l. loe . . School Service l, 3, Study Hall Chairman 4 BAXTER. KEN . . . Ladies' man . . . keel sense of humor . . . year-round athletz . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball l, 2, 3, 4 Baseball 2, 4, Varsity Club 3, 4. BERGSMA. RUTH . . . Glistening blonde . . sings as hobby . . . economics-favoritm subject . . . has eye on nursing. BERRY. IACK . . . Sparkling brown eyes . . big flashing smile . . . "dream-boy" to tht girls . . . interested in electric . . . hope to become electrician. BLOK, O. IAY . . . Gleuming eyes . . . white teeth . . . neat . . . pleasing per sonality . . . enjoys hunting, math, genera science, and Betty Hutton. BODLE, IRIS . . . Cute, lil' . . . Aurora Staff4 G.U.C. 1, 2, 3, Y-Teens l, Z, 3, School Servict l, 2, 3, 4. BOEHM. HOWARD . . . "Personality kid" . . C.P.A, for him-after relaxing vacation. BOREK. ADAM . . . Einstein at math . . machine-shop minded . . . Track and Bas ketball Manager 2, 3. BORYCE. BETTE . . . Charming personalit' . . . slender . . . attractive . . . Senio Counsellor 4, FHA. 3, Secretary 4, Schoc Service l, 2, 3, 4, Y-Teens l, 2, 3, 4. BOSLEY, DOLORES . . . Head in clouds . . sweet . . . working at Kresge's office . . G.A.A. l, G.U.C. 2, Glee Club l. BOUR CHARLES . . . Spirited genius . . a future radio technician . . . "Chuck" wi' soon tune into U of M . . . Boys' Senic Glee 4, Sports Manager 4. BOUWKAMP. DONNA . . . Busy English majc . . . Y-Teens 2, 3, 4, Latin Club 3, 4, Schoc Service l, Z, 3, 4, G.U.C. 2, 3. BRADY, RONALD . . . Pleasant . . . handy man at a theater . . . inspired to roam the U.S ,.., hopes for ranch in New Mexico. BRICKER. IERRY . . . Happy Swede . . . mathematical minded . . . Dance Decora- tions 45 Senior Play 45 Student Council 2, 45 Senior Counsellor 4. BROOKENS, NORRIS . . . Sportsman with rod and gun . . . likes legal life . . .Student Council 25 Bible Club 25 School Service 3, 45 Camera Club 3, 4. BROWN, DONNA . . . Nice-looking . . . well- liked . . . eyes on foreign correspondence . . . School Service 3. BROWN, LORRAINE . . . "Lorry" to her friends . . . Cornel Wilde her weakness. . . Red Cross l5 Library Club 3. BURKHOLDER. LLOYD . . . "Signal-2-3-4" . . . shy . . . good looking . . .Varsity Club 35 President 45 Senior Counsellor 45 Student Council 4. BUZALSKI, DON . . . Energetic athlete . . . favorites: science and women . . . Baseball l, 2, 3, Captain 45 Football 1, 2, 3, 45 Basket- ball l, 2, 3, 45 Varsity Club 2, 3, Treasurer 4. BYRNE, EVELYN . . . Potential energy . . . tiny but teriffic . . . School Service 2, 35 G.U.C. 2, 35 Y-Teens 3. CAHILL, GLORIA . . . Brunette . . . flourishes on dancing . . . California bound . . , School Service 35 Business Club 4. CEBELAK, DONNA . . . Expressive blue eyes . . . music lover . . . expert on flowers . . . Frollies l, 2, 35 F.I'l.A. l, 2, 35 Aurora 45 School Service 3, 4 CHICKY, CHARMAINE . . . lndustrious clerk . . . Songleader 35 Captain 45 Senior Coun- sellor 45 G.U.C. 2, 35 Reflector 4. CHRISTOPOULOS. FRANCES . . . Girl with the eyelashes . . . charming brunette . . . Senior Mixed Chorus 2, 3. CICELSKE, CHARLES . . . "Forward, March" . . . dream 1 "Margie" . . . will build the future . . . R.O.T.C. l, 2, 3, 45 Track 1, 2, 3, 45 Student Council 2, 3, 45 Senior Play 4. CLARK MARIBEL . . . Fun-loving . . . the the sky is her limit . . . Senior Play Make- up Committee 45 Y-Teens 3. CLIFFORD, BLANCHE . . . Devoted . . . loyal . . . "BoBo" is salesgirl at Herp's . . . School Service 2, 35 G.U.C. 2, 35 Y-Teens 3. CLIFFORD, GERALDINE . . . Tiny with twin- kling eyes . . . faithful to Don . . . Spanish Club 3. COATES, DON . . . Cheerful disposition . . . irresistible blonde . . . keyboard genius . . . Frollies 2, 35 School Service 3, 4. COLEMAN. GERALDINE . . . Gracetully tall . . . loves collecting records . . . G.U.C. l, 2, 35 Senior Counsellor 45 Frolliettes 35 School Service l, 2, 3, Chairman 4, COLLINS. FRED . . . Sparkling eyes . . . jolly personality . . . R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 45 School Service 45 Track 3. CRALL, ELLEN . . . Crazy about science . . . . . . on to Michigan State for medical tech- nology . . . Y-Teens 3, 45 Senior Play 4. CRANE, PEGGY . . . Sketching pencil always in hand . . . devoted to political science . . . Y-Teens l, 2, 3, 45 G.U.C. 2, 35 Aurora 45 Latin Club 2, 4. CUMMINGS, PHYLLIS . . . Good listener . . . rolling feet . . . Drill Corps 45 Y-Teens 2, 3, 45 G.U.C. 25 School Service. DALMAN, EVELYN . . . Easy-going , . . wants happy married life . . . Senior Band 25 Y- Teens 45 Red Cross 45 Drilll Corps 4. DAMSON, MARIE . . . Darling dimples . . . human dynamo . . . rambling Reflector Reporter . . . Senior Counsellor 45 Aurora 45 Latin Club 3, President 45 Y-Teens l, 2, 3, 4. " V ,,,. fitfsii y - Z i itfltsfii Play Problems Solved Seated around the table are the chairmen ot the production committees lor the senior play, "Go Ahead," held Pebruary 6 and 7. Properties, the sale of tickets, publicity, and back-stage re- sponsibilities caused many a headache and gray hair. Conferringz in one of their less harricd moments are fleft to rightilz Goluhski, Phillips, Trapp, Mt-rt-tsky, Anderson, Ridderiny: and Schneider. DAVIS, MARIAN . . . Blue-eyed . . . seriou but cute . . . Grand Rapids School of Bibli next stop . . . Girls' Athletics l. DE BOER, BOB . . . Soars down the basketbal floor . . . eyes twinkle when discussing sports and Margie . . . Basketball 3, Cap tain 4, Varsity Club 4. DERKS. DOROTHY . . . Perfect "yanker" . . wants to be a dentist . . . begins drilling c l.C ,... Spanish Club 3, 4, Y-Teens 3, 4 DE ROOS. LUCILLE . . . Flirty eyes . . . me chanical drawing rates . . . "Torchie . . . R.O.T.C. Sponsor 2, G.U.C. 3, Schoc Service 2, 3, Y-Teens 3, 4. DEWAR. EDWARD . . . Pitching fast curve . . . artist in oils . . . fond skier. DEWEY, VIRGINIA . . . Bright-eyed . . , Pop sodent smile . . l.C. her next stop . . G.U.C. 1, 2, School Service 2, Chairman 3, 4 DOLE, NORMAN . . . Ambitious baker . . . . , pleasing personality . . . alway laughing . . . School Service 3, Chairman4 ROTC. 1, 2, 3, 4. DOWNING. ARLENE . . . Attractive . . pleasing personality . . . a ready friend ti all . . , her man is "George" . . . Clas Secretary 3, G,U.C. l, 2, 3, School Service f DRESSLER, PATRICIA . . . Invigorating . . has pep appeal . . . host ot friends . . Senior Class Secretary4, Y-Teens 3, 4, Senic Counselor 4, School Service 3, 4. DREW LESLIE . . . Outstandingly handsome . . distinguished black hair . , . popular vet eran . . . forestry future at I.C. DUNNETTE. ELIZABETH . . . Farmerette . . Hi-ho "Silver" . . . Y-Teens 2, 3, 4, Iunic Red Cross, Treasurer 4, Costume Committee Senior Play 4. DYER, MARGARET . . . Loyal friend . . . . . blushes readily . . . sweet smili . . . School Service 3, 4. EDSINGA. LOIS . . . Sociable . . . quick witl Crocheting needle . . . ambition: marriagn . . . School Service 4, Bowling Team 4. FERNAMBURG. LOIS . . . Dancing fever . . hopes to become beautician . . . Schoo Service 3, 4, Bowling Team 4. FIK, BEVERLY . . . Carrot-top . . . after gradu ation: l.C .... cure aches and pains ii future , . . G.U.C. 1, 2, 3, Y-Teens 1, 2. 4 Class Ring Committee 3, Spansh Club 2, 3 FINEDORE. ELEANOR . . . Simply adores danc ing . . . aim: old maid . , . just over iron Catholic Central . . . Senior Play 4. L I FLETCHER. HOWARD . . . Smooth dancer . . known only as "Red" . . . Progressive Busi- ness Club President 45 Football l, 2, 35 Bas- ketball 1, 25 Varsity Club 2, 3, 45 Baseball l, 2. FLORA. SHIRLEY . . . Called "Shorty" . . . Books? she loves them . . . Student Council I, 25 G.U.C. l, 2, 3, 45 Senior Counsellor 45 Class Reunion. FORD, DOROTHY . . . Busines gal . . . col- lects snappy snapshots . . . "California here I come." FREY. CAROL . . . Alto-voiced . . .baby blue eyes . . .dimpled cheeks . . . plays ac- cordion . . "Long Distance" , . . Girls Glee Club 1, 2, 35 Mixed Chorus 4. FULLER. HARRY . . . Helpful and cooperative . . . red hair minus temper . . , Senior Boys' Glee Club 2. GANZEVOORT, DALE . . . Swift-moving . . . Basketball l, 2, 3, 45 Football 2, 3, 45 Baseball l, 2, 3, 45 Varsity Club 3, Secretary 4. GARDINER, PEGGY . . . Short and sweet . . . clerking in department store her aim . . . favorite instrument: piano . . . Glee Club I. GESSNER. PAUL . . . Dexterous . . , R.O.T.C. 2, 3, 45 Golf 45 Tennis 35 Senior Play 3. GILLETTE. IOYCE . . . Shy. soft-speaking . . . commercial teacher . . . Drill Corps 4, Y- Teens 45 School Service 45 Bowling Team 4. GLASS, RONALD . . . Flashes sporty apparel . . . possesses fine sense of humor . . . Occupational Training 4. GLOWACKI. WALTER . . . Air enthusiast . . . "Bud" for short . . . iavorite study: electrical engineering . . . ambition: air line pilot . . . Senior Band 2, 3, 4, GOBER, EUGENE . . . "Gabby" . . . broad smile . . . quick-witted . . , anxious to succeed in business . . School Service 3, GOEMAN, DONALD . . . Silent type . . . Herp's stock boy . . . due for Davenport , . . School Service 3, 4. GREINER, IUNE . . . Pleasing manner . . . soft-spoken . . . blue-eyed . . . I.C. en- thusiast . . . tentative trip to Arizona . . . School Service 3, Chairman 3, 45 Latin Club 4. GOLLER. IVA . . . Sweet and lovely "Ivy" . . secretarial target . . . demure but sincere . . . G.U.C. 2, 35 Y-Teens 35 Secretary 4. GOLUBSKI. MARIE . . . Smiling and coopera- tive . . . school store-keeper . . . Latin Club Treasurer 2, President 3, 45 FI-I.A. 3, President 45 Library Club Z, 3, 4. "Oh, How We Dancedu With a new idea, energetic workers, "scads" oi decorations, a date, and a band, the dance, "Senior Serenade," which was limited to seniors ot all schools, went oii with a bang to bring to a climax top-flight senior activities. Planning: the big event are tleft tu rightlz Saplis, Phelps, Barnes, Rairins, Havinga, Meretsky, Havel- horst, Heemstra, Coates, Snellink. l Wh -5 Five Years Whiz By A Kozak dancer, seven song leaders, a girl soloist, and a droopy, draggy interpretation of a song are a few of the things members of homeroom 245 have liked to boast and laugh about since their days in the eighth grade together. Here in the business-like manner most often seen are: secretary, Ackerman: treasurer, Sopkowskig president. Snoap. 80 GRIEP. PAULINE . . . Practical "Pete" . . . loves to read . . . wants happiness out of life . , . plans to marry . . . School Service 3. GRYZANOSKA, THERESA . . . Swishing brown locks . . . travelling shoes . . . small and sweet . . . Aurora Staff 4. HAADSMA. DAVID . . . Dream-boy "Dizzy" . . . engineering outlook . . . banking man . . . Baseball 3, 45 Football 45 Varsity Club 3, 45 Class President l, HAAN. NORMA IEAN . . . Sports-minded . . . "CL," for short . . . Y-Teens 2, 3, 45 Spanish Club 3, President 45 Senior Play Ticket Com- mittee 45 School Service, Chairman 4. HABERMAN. MARIAN . . . Ioyous personality future domestic scientist . . . soft, pleasant voice . . . Y-Teens 2, 3, 45 F.H.A. 45 Aurora Staff 45 Stundent Council 4. HAILFINGER. ANNA . . . Always busy . . . dislikes narrow-minded people . . . School Service 2, 3, 45 Latin Club 2, 3, 4. HAMMER. IANET . . . Winning personality . . . witty . . . hopes to be author . . . Y-Teens l, 2, 3, Vice-President 45 G.U.C. 2, 3, 45 Senior Counsellor 45 Aurora Editor 4. HANCOCK, HOWARD . . . Carefree . . . electronics engineering his aim . . . likes people with a good sense of humor. HANSON, BETTY . . . Always blushing . . . cute blonde . .. hankering to be a house- wife . . . Y-Teens 25 G.U.C. 2, 3. HAVELHORST, HARRY . . . Music-minded . . . base fiddler . . . an accomplished public speaker . . . Band l, 2, 3, 45 Orchestra l, Z, 3, 45 R.O.T.C, 1, Z, 3, 45 Senior Party 4. IHAVINGA. LOIS . . .Shimmering read hair answers only to "Tootie" . . . G.U.C. 2 3, Secretary 45 Student Council 25 Frolliettes 4. HEALD, RICHARD . . . Strong. silent type . . . "He's in the Army now" . . . Varsity 2, 35 Football l, 2, 3, 45 Track 3. HEEMSTRA, MARVIN . . . Physics quiz kid tall . . . Senior Counsellor 45 Frollies 2, 3, 45 R,O.T.C. 2, 3, 45 Bar and Chevrons Club 4. HENDGES, DONALD . . . Aquinas College . . . attends night school . . . likes hunting and fishing . . . tall, blonde, and bashful. HERRMAN. MARY ANN . . . lovial . . . de- tests bleached hair . . . idea of heaven: tall, dark, handsome, and with a pipe. HERRMAN, RUTH . . . Career bound . . . Y-Teens l, 2, Vice-President 3, 45 Spanish Club 3, 45 Senior Play 45 Athletic Council 3. HEYBOER, GEORGIA . . . Shining brunette . . . likes roller-skating . . . office worker for telephone company . . . F.l-lA. l, 2, 3, 4, Y-Teens l, 2, 3, Senior Band l, 2, 3 HEYBOER, WILMA . . . Domestic . . . favorite subject: foods . . . hopes to become tele- phone operator . . . French Club 2. HODYNA. DOROTHY . . . Iolly laugh for every- one . . . ardent music lover . . . Girls' Bowling League 4. HOEK, LOIS . . . Glittering green eyes . . . pleasing personality . . . loves reading and cooking . . . dislikes conceited people . . , Frolliettes l, Reflector Staff 3, 4. HOLLAND, GEORGIA . . . Quietly considerate . . . School Service 2, 3, 4, Y-Teens 2, 3, 4, Red Cross 2, 3, 4. HOMRICH. ROBERTA . . . Lively spirit . . . A-1 sports fan . , , loves to dance . . . Y-Teens 2, Humane Club 2, 3. HOOGERHYDE. ANNA-BELLE . . . Charming blonde . . . irresistible twinkle in eyes . . . accounting interests "Hoogie" . . . Mixed Chorus 2, 3,, Girls Glee Club 2, 3. HUBBLE, ROBERT . . . Good-natured . . . . . . easy-going . . . "Fill-her-up" his present job , . heads toward business world . . . School Service 2, 3, Chairman 4. HUFFMAN, DONALD . . . Atlas physique . . . athletic-minded . . . adores eating and Lois Hoek . . . wants happy home . . . Foot- ball 1, 2, 3, 4, Varsity Club 3, 4, Track 2. IELSMA. GORDON . . . Woman-hater, it says here . . . those blue eyes . . . headed for the army . . , future salesman superb. IOHNSON. DONALD . . . Vigorous bowler . . . his allergy: women . . . slated for l.C, . . . Football 3, 4, Baseball 3, 4, Varsity Club 4, IOHNSON, ROBERT . . . Iolly . . . ambition: to be a bank president or crooner . , . Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 2, 3, Hi-Y 3. IOHNSON, RUTH . . . Top-notch bowler . . . reservd and domestic . . . enjoys typing, sewing, and popular music . . . School Service 4, Prom Committee 3. KATS. BERNIE . . . "Peroxy" is Army-bound after graduation . . . Present job with con- struction company . . . Track 3, Football 4, KAUFMAN, LEE . . . Sincere in his ideas . , , scientific in tendencies . . . Spanish Club 2, President 3, Track 2, 3, 4, R.O.T.C. l, 3, 4. KIEL, PHYLLIS . . . "Smiles" , . , a stich in time means fun for "Phil" . . . shorthand racer . . . Library Club 3, 4. lg . 1. uf w . !'c'1 A 4 Lit With Wit is Fun "Who said English Literature is a dry subject?" inquire these alert academic students in Miss Olga Perschbachers "lit" class the second hour. Keeping Old Man Boredom from the door is no problem for this sparkling instructor as the amused faces of the class will prove. Laughing at the Witty remarks of Miss Pvrschbacher, English literature teacher, are tlc-ft to rightj: Rid- dering, MacGregor. Kaufman, Davis, Morrison, and Miss Perschbacher herself. 81 ' 1 l They're Back Again Back from military service, these hus- ky, handsome vets have returned to school to complete their junior and sen- ior years so that they may enter col- lege. This scene is in their homeroom, counseled by the friendly Mr. Marcu- sek. Gathered for homeroom announcements are Lleft to right? first row: Fuller. Riosloniec, Fletcher, second row: Wheeler, VanderMeuhlen, Overholt, Mikula, third row: Wojtaszek, Smitter, Ambrose, MacGregor, fourth row: Wondolowski, Rexford. Drew, Komar. KNOTTNERUS. IEAN . . . I-'leasing and quii . . . "Babe" adores basketball . . . wan' to be happy always . . . Y-Teens l, 2, Girl Glee l, 2. KOETS, DOLORES . . . Vivacious brownett . . . LC. next year . . . wants her ow photography studio some day . . . Bowlin 4, Library Club 2, 3, Aurora 4, Horizon Clul Treasurer Z, 3. KOMAR, ARNOLD . . . Curly. black hair . . silent humor . . . back from the Navy . . finishing an interrupted education. KOZAL, CHESTER . . . Hard-working . . down to earth . . , interested in forestr . . . Wants to see world . . . Track Cc captain 3, 4, Varsity Club 3, 4. KRAGT. GERALD . . . Amiable . . , wonde ful sense of humor . . . radar engineer . . on to Michigan State and the Navy KRAUSE. WARREN . . . Toweringly husky . . easy going . . . muscular . . . "Brunc to friends . . Football 4, Basketball 4. KRAUSS. GERALD . . . Lean and tall . . I.C. and U of M ahead . . . R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 1 4, Bar and Chevrons Club 2, 3, 4. KUNICHI, ELAINE . . . Constant laughter . . shorthand whiz . . . expert historian , . Wants to Work as stenographer in big bus ness office. KUPRIS. ROBERT . . . Whiz with a paint brus . . . shy . . . "batty" about baseball . . R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, Baseball 3, 4. KURKIIAN, RUTH . . . Sunshine in the tai . . . . sewing for fun . . . ambition: beat tician . . . School Service 3, 4, Y-Teens f KURLENDA, STEPHANY . . . Dazzling smil an ambitious stenographer . . . thrives o roller skating . . . Aurora 4. KURTI. MILDRED . . . Friendly "Millie" . . swishes brush with precision .... lC. he objective . . . G.U.C. 2, 3, Library Club Z, I Y-Teens 3. LAHR, MARK . . . "Rabbit" . . . blond . . appealing . . athletic . . . baseball hi hobby . . . Baseball l, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 1 LAMPER, ALEXANDRA . . . Well-develope brains . . . takes satisfaction in helpin others . . . Senior Play 4, School Service 1 LANGE. IOAN . . . Dashing brunette . . sweet smile . . . adores sketching . . G.U.C. 2, 3, 4, Library Club 2, 3, Bowling I LASTOCZY. DORIS . . . Able hands on th typewriter . . . conscientious printing str dent . . . enveloping good humor . . Bowling 4. LAUER, MARALYN . . . Lovable miss from Mount Mercy . . . pretty . . . dotes on drawing . . . Y-Teens 4. LAZOSKI, DOROTHY . . . "Little One" . . . loves peanuts . . . School Service 3, 45 Senior Girls' Glee l, 25 Bowling Captain 4. LITTELL. IEAN . . . Wave in his hair . . . gleam in his eye . . . engineering on his mind . . . R.O.T.C. l, 2, 3, 45 School Service 45 Senior Counsellor 4. LOCKHART, ANN . . . Ambitious . . . tele- phone operator . . . paints and sings . . . lulliard School of Music in NY .... Class President 25 Y-Teens 35 Spanish Club 3, LOZICKI, EDDIE . . . "Mike's goal: engineering . . . shining in mechanical drawing and geometry . . . a man for home life. LULKA, NANCY . . . Sparkling eyes . . . lively imagination . . . future psychiatrist . . . known to friends as "Miss Schizof' MAC GREGOR, DON . . . "Mac" , . . tforrner Marine and Trojanl . . . future "Saw Bones" . . . Track l, 25 Cheerleader l, 2, 35 Senior Glee 4: Mixed Chorus 4. MAC KELLAR. WARREN . . . Friendly busy- body . . . likes to carve . . . U of M to complete his education . . . Property Com- mittee Senior Play 4. MATZAT. EVELYN . . . Modestly intelligent . . . always efficient . . . piano and short- hand fingers . . . Red Cross l, Vice-Presi- dent 35 School Service 3, 45 C-r.U.C. 3. MAURICE. IULIA . . . Sparkling eyes . . . Y-Teens Z, 3, 45 F.H.A. 45 Home Room Secre- tary 35 School Service 2, 3. MAYO. BETTY . . . Gleaming expression . . . Florida bound . . . Band l, 2, 3, 45 Aurora Staff 45 Frollies l, 2. MC NULTY, CHARLES . . . Bursting with vital- ity , . . expects to own supermarket some day . . . R.O.T.C. l, 2, 3, 45 School Service 3, 4. MENTGEN. GERALDINE . . . Brown-eyed brunette . . . chatterbox . . . Drill Corps 45 Y-Teens 45 School Service 3, 4. MERCER. BETTY . . . Well-liked . , , looking forward to office work . . . bookkeeping rates first. MERETSKY. RICHARD . . . Capable . . . architectural designing his hobby . . . faithful class worker . . . Baseball 3, 45 Chairman Frollies 45 Senior Play 4. MIKULA, THEODORE . . . Easy-going . . . machine shop, modern problems rate first . . . future plans: Aquinas College. ,fs N- Education Lures Vets ' t Accornplishing their daily dozens and blazing the trails of the future are these mellow--fellows, the vets of World War ll and the pride and joy of Union High. Genial and well-liked are these clean-cut patriotic classmates. Waiting for the homeroom bell to ring are standing tlcft to rightj: Wotaszek, MacGregor, Rexford, Voss. Vander Meuhlen, Wbndolowski, Mikula, Wheeler: seated: Smitter, Fuller, Royndors, Fletcher, Komar. 83 , 75 A MILLER, WIILIAM . . . "Big Bill" goes for MODDERS. MARIAN . . . Shy. but sweet musically minded . , . commercial a pet dream . . . Senior Orchestra Senior Band 4. MOLLO, BETTY . . . "Blondie" . . . wa Service 3, 4, Y-Teens 4, Senior Glee l, MOREY. ALICE . . . Smiling brownette quiet . . . cheerful . . . her goal: to MORRISON. HAROLD . . . Great orator sports . . . eyes toward pro baseball . . . Basket- ball l, Baseball 2, 3, 4, Varsity Club 3, 4, ft' liei 2, 3, nts to be a model . . . Student Council 4, School 2. 'be CQ stenographer . . , whiz at bookkeeping. scientific mind . . . camera hawk on the side . . . R.O.T.C. l, 2, 3, Athletic Ma l, 2, Spanish Club 2, Senior Play 4. 4, Y-Teens 1, Z, 3, Student Council 1. skates . . . abug for biology . . . Y 2, Girls' Glee l, School Service 3, 4. line . . . from Tech. R.O,T.C, 1, 2, Rifle Team 4, Bars and Chevrons 3, 4. always helping friends . . . hates unf NYBERG. WENDELL . . . Bashiul boy MULLIAN, HASMIG . . . Subtle sense oi humor . . . long dark hair . . . Orchestral, nager 2, 3, NALBANDIAN, LOUISE . . . Silent and studious . . . objective: nursing . . . Y-Teens l, 2, 3, 4, Senior Orchestra l, 2, 3, 4, Latin Club 3, Vice President 4, Fl-l.A. 3, Treasurer 4. NASSTROM. LAURA . . . Gliding along on -Teens NEDERVELD, ROGER . . . Drawing is down his 3, 4, NEPER. VIRGINIA . . . Diminutive, lawn-eyed . . . plans include stenographic work and Gil . . . Class Vice President l, G.U.C. l, 2, 3, Reflector 3, 4, School Service l, 2, 3, 4. NOWICKI, PETER . . . Carefree and jovial . . . a future sailor , . . nicknamed "Pistol Pete" . . . R.O.T.C. l, 2, Track 4. NYBERG. LOIS . . . Good-natured . . smiling riend- ly people . . . Aurora 4, School Service 2, 3, 4. l ' sports-minded . . . goal: super draftsrnan t . . . Bowling Club, Vice President 4. I OROS, THERESA . . . "Terry" . . . cute , . . full of fun . . . always laughing . . . ac- tive . . . future plans start with long vaca- N 'G 2 tion, Y OVERHOLT, THOMAS . . . Skyscraper. dark with a cute smile . . . plans on Aquinas College . . . "Mac" likes modern problems, physics, and a certain little blonde. htm . OWSINSKI. EDWARD . . . Dark. curly hair . . . ' mg. talented scenical artist . . . bound for art '5f'i - 'it' school next term . . , Art Club 3. They Begin the "Begin" That crucial day of graduation is drawing danger- ously nearer and will doubtlessly be causing these executives of the Commencement Committee who have charge of caps, gowns, announcements, tab- leau and programs plenty oi gray hairs, chewed-off fingernails, and blood shot eyes. Thi-sc ambitious and faithful members of thc Commencement Committee are: lstandinzl Reis- man, Havclhorst., Coates, Saplis: fseatedl Yates, liarnes, Snsnowski, and Haan. PERGIEL. LUCILLE . . . Soft-spoken . . . easy- going . . . college days ahead . . . switchboard operator at the Bell Telephone Company. PETERSON. RAYMOND . . . "Ray"-diant eyes . . . R.O.T.C. 1, 2, 3, 4, Orchestra l, Z, 3, 4, Officers' Club 3, 4, Senior Counsellor 4. PHELPS. ELSIE . . . Fun-loving "L.C." . . . Student Council 2, G.U.C. 2, 3, 4, School Ser- vice 4, Drill Corps 2, 4. PHILLIPS. MARILYN . . . Energetically active . . . strong school spirit . . . G.U.C. 2, 3, 4, Y-Teens Z, 3, 4, Library Club 2, 3, President 4, Student Council l, 2, 4. PIERCE. VIRGINIA . . . Sweetly sincere . . . soft spoken . . .chic little blonde . . . Aurora Staff 4. PIERSON, ELAINE . . . Go-getter . . . short- hand speed demon . . . ping-pong whiz . . . G.U.C. 2, 3, 4, Library Club 3, Vice President 4, Y-Teens 3, 4, School Service 2, 3, 4. PLOCKI. ROBERT . . . Nicknamed "Red" . . . Marine bound . . . hard worker . . . joy- ful and well-liked . . . R.O.T.C. 2. PLOCKI. VIRGINIA . . Twinkling smile . . . vigorous bowler . . . enjoys football games . . . Bowling 4. POST, IACQUIE . . . Sympathetic and sweet . . . Y-Teens 2, 3, 4, Aurora 4, School Service 2, 3, 4, Orchestra l, 4. POST, IAMES . . . Sports spectator . . . eager for engineering . . . abuild-up for l.C. . . . Hi-Y 3, 4, Varisity Club 4, School Service 3, 4. PROCTOR. BARBARA . . . Pixie-eyed . . . competent . . . Senior Counsellor 4, G.U.C. l, 2, 3, 4, Reflector 4, Horizon Club 3. RAGINS. ABNER . . . Popular "Ab" . . . an to-be. . . math fiend . . .Class Presi- dent 4, Senior Counsellor President 4, Debate Team 3, 4, Senior Play 4. RAPER. NORMA . . . Sparkling black eyes . . . services always available . . . Y-Teens 3, Tresaurer 4, Spanish Club 3, President 4. REISMAN. OTTO . . .TalI. blonde debator . . . ever-present briefcase . . . Debating 2, 3, 4, Reflector Managing Editor 4, Student Council 3, 4, Senior Play 4. RENKES. GARETH . . . Camera enthusiast . . . photography his first love .... Reflector and Aurora Photographer 4. REYNDERS. WILLIAM . . . Popular . . . draw- ing talents . . . Football 2, 3, 4, Basketball 2, 3, 4, Student Council 4, Track 2, 3. 5HvltW"' rv' if' it E I Eat, Drink, Be Merry Hungry seniors devour lunches while they excit- edly discuss Commencement night and the'ir plans after graduation. Frequently their conversation turns back to their junior high days and they laugh at the "big" little problems which they faced. Busily eating and talking are Herz-man, Kurti, Littell, Heyboer and Collins. P' ' ' "'f"" "" T" W' RIDDERING, AUDREY . . . Live wire . . They Lead the Way Kicking off with a snappy election, the senior class dashed on to further victory with the Cider lug Iig, the humorous play, "Go Ahead," the Sen- ior Mixerg the unanimous selection of the memorial to Commencement and departure from the Alma Mater. Gayly discussing senior problems are fleft to rightj the class orlicors: president, Abner Raginsg vice-presi- dent, Bob Trapp: Yvonne Wood, treasurer: Pat Dressler, secretary: and their adviser, Mr. Voss. writes cleverly . . . Reflector Staff 3, 4 Senior Play Costume Committee 4. RIETDYK. CHRISTINE . . . Friendly "Chris' . . . telephone operator . . .likes student- supervised study . . . School Service 2, 3, 4 ROCCHI. FRANK . . . "Rocky" . . . likeable chap. . . travel-minded . . . future plans Army . . Movie Club 3. ROGALSKE, HARRY . . . Enthusiastic talker . . . . . Boys' Glee Club . . .Footballg R,O.T.C. Occupational Training in Printing 4. ROMINE, KATHLEEN . . . Smiling "Kay" . . earnest worker . . . collects snapshots . . Club Co-ed Representative 3, 4. ROSE. HM . . . "Know-all" in physics . . college daze ahead at I.C .... Hi-Y 3, 4 Prom Committee 3, Senior Play 4. ROSLONIEC. EVELYN . . . Perk brunette . . former "Tech" student . . . enjoys office practice . . . Girls' Bowling 4. ROSLONIEC. HENRY . . . Flashing brown eye: . . . good natured "Rosco" . . . hates bossy women . . . enjoys fishing, football RUSS, DOROTHY . . . Azure-eyed "Dot" . . hopes for a three-point landing at I.C. . . G.U.C. 1, 25 School Service 3. RUSSELL, LOIS . . . Appealing personality . . . sports attract "Russ" . . G.U.C. 2, 3, 4 Drill Corps 1, 2, 3, 45 School Service 2, 3, 4. RYSKAMP, DONALD . . . Carefree and laugh- ing . . . butchering now and M.S.C. late: . . . School Service 3, 45 Cheerleading 4 Prom Committee 3. SAPLIS. IOSEPH . . . Genius in math anc physics . . . inspired by mining engineer ing . . . intrigued by hunting . . . Frollies 2, 3, 4, R.O.T.C. 2, 3, 4. SCHMEISER. IOANNE . . . Deep. fascinating dimples . . . collects pennies . . . Cath- olic's loss, Union's gain . . . Larry is hei main interest. SCHNEIDER. MARIORIE . . . Dependable as an alarm clock . . . steady with Charlef . . . Reflector News Editor 47 G.U.C. l, 2, 3 45 Student Council 1, 2, 47 Aurora Business Manager 4. SCHRIVER, CAROLINE . . . Always smiling . . . feminine . . . wishes to be happily married . . . G.U.C. 3, 45 Memorial Commit- tee 45 Bowling 4 SCHULTZ, IUNE . . . Cute . . . wants to have fun and be happy . . . loves to sew . . always seen with Phyllis . . . Library Club 3 I 1 SHIPPY, BETTY . . . Softly flashing lashes . . . Drill Corps 45 School Service 45 Student Council 25 Girls' Glee 4. SHUSTHA, EDWARD . . . Popularity plus . . . loves food and women . . . valuable ath' lete . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 45 Basketball 25 Track 3, 45 Student Council 4. SIENKEL, GERALDINE . . . Petite little typist . . . School Service 35 Study Hall Chair- man 45 Girls Glee l, 2. SLUDER. PATRCIA . . . Always present "Dim- ples" . . . forever busy . . . loves to sew . . . Girls' Glee l, 2. SMITH. ALBERT . . . Blonde "Al" . . . hailed from Tech . . . loves bowling . . . Tennis 35 R.O.T.C. 3. SMITH. BRUCE . . . Tall, with blonde wavy hair . . . hopes to own his own business . . . Hi-Y 3, 45 School Service 3, 4. SMITTER. VAL . . . Carefree . . . dauntless . . . goals: health, happiness, success . . . Football l, 25 RO.T.C. 1, Z5 Senior Play 4. SNELLINK, IEAN . . . Delightful sense of humor . . . favorite subjects: shorthand and Don . . . Senior Counsellor 45 Y-Teens 35 School Service 2, 3, Chairman 4. SNOAP, ELMER . . . Slzillful saw filer . . . concert pianist . . . Secretary Home Room 245 15 President Home Room 245 4. SOPKOWSKI, DOROTHY . . . "Chicken" . . . always happy . . . Home Room Treasurer 45 Athletic Council 35 School Service 3, 4. SOSNOWSKI. DELORES . . . Cutie ofthe class . . . travelling bug . . . Army man on her mind . , . Songleader 45 Senior Play 45 School Service 2, 35 Chairman 45 Frolliette 3. SOWINSKI. IRENE . . . Smooth dancer . . . G.U.C. 25 School Store Management 2, 3, 45 Senior Play Prop Committee 4. SPETH, ANN . . . Energetically charming . . . aim: to be a nurse . . . G.U.C. l, 2, 3, Presi' dent 45 Y-Teens 3, Treasurer 45 School Ser- vice 2, 3, 45 Aurora Circulation Manager 4. SPOELSTRA. MARIAN . . . Brown hair . . . blue eyes . . . very attractive . . . loves roller skating and office work . . her man is Bert . . . School Service 3, 4. SPOELSTRA. MURIEL . . . Scooting around . . . flashing blue eyes . . .precise and accurate . . . pleasant smile . . . GU.C. l, 2, 35 Reflector 3, 4. STASKIEWICZ. FELICIA . . . Able actress . . . Iunior Red Cross l, 2, 3, 45 Library Club 2, 35 G.U.C. 2, 35 School Service 3, 4. ff, We Q i :X ,M ' t ti Q sgifgllliib -PQNL gin.. f ,K . , t 87 IFN A .lV. A ' "Geniuses" Malce Song Every spring senior class thoughts turn to the composition of their Com- mencement song. The few musically and poetically inclined seniors try their skill at composing a song that will set forth their feeling of "Gracluatior1." Assembled around the piano deciding, among other things, what key to put the song in are tleft to righty: Johnson, Hammer, Peterson, and Dunnette. 2 N 5 1 13?- l 1 T "Lest We Forget" Provision of an artistic setting for the Iwo lima war Memorial Carving was finally selected as the project for this year's senior class. The committee made trips to the American Seating Company and Herpolsheimers' Deco- rating Department to get helpful sug- gestions. Constructively debating upon the fit-sign and position of memorial are lleft to ripzhtr the enthusiastic Meretsky, Havelhorst, Raizins, Mr. Voss. Speth, Sta- skiewicz. STEPANCHUK, HELEN . . . Gleaming smile . . . full of fun and pep . . . abominates snippy persons . . . Girls' Drill Corps 45 Library Club 2, 3, 45 School Service 4. STOREBOOM. IOAN . . '. Glowing laughter . . . self-sufficient . . , consistently pleas- ant . , . Bowling Team 4, STROBEIKO, CEILA . . . Loves roller skating . . . likes good times . . .Cvirls' Bowling Captain 45 Aurora 4. SZCZEPANSKI, ROSEMARY . . . Gay . . . bowling and dancing rank high . . . wants to become secretary . , . friendly toward all . . . Bowling 4. THOMASMA. H. REIN . . . Cheerful disposi- tion , . . hoof beats on the dusty road . . . Oh! those women drivers . . . business world ahead. TOLSMA. IIM . . . Soothing manner . . . brown shining eyes . . . ambition: forestry . . . girl of his dreams: "Barb," TOMASIK. GERALD . . . Determined draftsman . . . wavy hair . , . mighty hunter , . , Camera Club 4. TRAPP. ROBERT . . . Light, camera. action . . . Class Vice-President 45 Cheerleader 2, Captain 3, 45 School Service l, Z, 3, 45 Movie Club, President 3, 4. TWEDDALE. SHIRLEY . . . Eye-catcher . . . prefers "Shy" . . . artistic . . . to become housewife . , School Service 35 Art Club 1. UPTON, BARBARA . . . Alert . . . progressive . . . capable leader . . . G.U.C, Z, 3, 45 School Service l, 2, 3, Chairman 45 Song- leader 3, 45 Aurora Managing Editor 4. VADEBONCOEUR. GERARD . . . "Verde" came from Tech . . . future in electronics . . . hobby is photography . . . college ahead. VALKEMA. CHARLES . . . Hard worker . . . Rifle marksman . . . Bars and Chevro-ns Club 45 R,O.T.C. 2, 3, Lieutenant 4. VAN DAM. ROGER . . . Magnetic . . . cheer- ful . . , flashing smile . , . "Van" is im- pressed by friendly Unionites . . Track 3, 4. VANDER HYDE, KENNETH . . . Ambitious jew- eler . . . football fanatic . . . Varsity Club 3, 45 Football l, 2, 3, 45 Basketball Z5 Track 2. VANDER MEUHLEN, WARREN . . . Thrives on hunting and fishing . . . hopes to have business career . . . plans to attend Iunior College. VAN DYK. FRANCIS . . . Captivatingly tall . . . fun-loving, but serious . . . musically inclined . . . Red Cross 25 Student Council 15 Orchestra l, 2, 3, 4. VAN NEUREN. BARBARA . . . Sports-minded A' . . . missionarys life for "Puss" . . , Hope I College for her . . . Y-Teens 3, 4, Reflector 4, Senior Play 4, School Service 3, 4, VAN OOSTEN, MIRIAM . . . Happy cutie . . . blonde boys her pride and joy . . . loves dancing and bowling . . . Y-Teens 2, 3, Red Cross 1, Art Club 3, Student Council 4. VERSLUIS. PHILLIP . . . Quiet and fascinating . . . hopes to attend college . . . favors track and government . . , Spanish Club 2, School Service 3, 4, Track 3, 4. VER WYS. DENA . . . Striking red head . . . charming smile . . . easy to look at. VISSER, SHIRLEY . . . Business gal . . . loves typing and office pracitce . , . favorite pastime: roller skating. VOSS, CLAIRE . . . Mammoth . , . curly- headed . . . ROTC. l, Football 2, 3, Bas- ketball 3, WADDELL. LYNNE . . . Vivacious blonde . . . hobby: art . . . future plans, I.C. . , . and retail advertising . . . Senior Play 4, Aurora Staff 4, Y-Teens 2, 3, School Service 2, 3, 4. WALCZAK, EDWARD . . . Talking constantly . . always cracking jokes . . . owns creamecolored convertible . . . wears brush cuts well. WEEBER. SHIRLEY . . . Petite . , . glistening personality . . . school marm of the future . . . Calvin College . . . Y-Teens 4, Latin Club 3, Secretary 4, Senior Play Tickets 4, WELBON, ALMA IEAN . . . Obliging and effi- cient . . . Y-Teens 3, Treasurer l, School Service 2, 3, El-l.A. 2, 3, 4. E WENZEL, ROSEANNE . . . Smile for everyone . . . shooting folks . . . nursing career 3 coming up . . . F.H.A., P.B.C. WHALLEY. ELAINE . . . Angelic . . , GR. Beauty College . . . Business Club Secre- tary and Treasurer 4. WHEELER. ELTON . . . "El" loves them all . . . l Navy life over, back to education . . Basketball l, Track l, 2. WHITE, SALLY . . . Singing sweetheart . . . , wonderful personality . . . Y-Teens Secre- tary 4, Bowling President and Captain 4, Class Reunion Chairman 4. WICHERT, DONNA . . . Sincere . . . cordial , . . hearty . . . Senior Play 4, F.H.A. 2, President 3, 4, Y-Teens 2, 3, 4, Reflector 4. WIEST, DON . . . All-around athelete . . . Football l, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 Varsity Club 2, Treasurer 3, Class President 3. 5 ' JPL. 2 V! ---..f" Top Ten Honored Standing high on the pathway to knowledge are the ten top students of the Class of '47, Nary a one has re- ceived less than an These select ten are active too, for among this group are Senior Counsellors and debators. Just naturally happy over their scholastic achieve- ments are lleft to rightj : front row: Snellinkg second row: Dressler, Upton, Coleman, third row: Matzat, N Downing, Staskiuwicz: fourth row: Anderson, Hcem- stra, Ragins. 89 WILSON, IOY . . . Delicately tall . . . ad- mired for long hair . . . G.U.C. 3, 45 Y- Teens 4, Senior Play 4, Drill Corps 4. WONDOLOWSKI, IOHN . . . Reserved and in- telligent . . . likes math and English . . . main ambition is engineering. WOOD. YVONNE . . . Sweet little Bonnie . . . quietly calm . . . game-ticket saleswoman . . . Senior Counsellor 45 Class Treasurer 47 Y-Teens 3, President 4, G.U.C. l, 2, 3, 4. WYMAN, MARILYN . . . Tall, vivacious blonde . . . quiet . . . twinkling personality . . . School Service 1, 2. YATES, SALLY . . . Anticipates college and - . , dotes on T.C. records . . . G.U.C. l, 2, Y-Teens 25 School Service 1, 2, 3, Chairman 4. ZEERYP, AUDREY . . . Sparkling . . . bub- bling with activities . . . sociable . . . witty personality . . . Senior Counsellor 4, Y-Teens 45 G.U.C. 2, 3, 4, Student Council 4. ZOPPA, ALVIN . . . Happiness hunter . . . favorite subject: woodshop . . . working as upholsterer. ZUKERMAN, DOROTHY . . . Cooking for lun and future . . . platter chatter for spare time . . , budding accountant. ZYZKOWSKI. BERNARD . . . Nicknarned "Zisko" . . . headed tor U of M . . . great sense of hunger . . . Spanish Club 2, Student Coun- ci . Seniors Without Pictures AMBROSE. DICK . . . Unlittingly nicknamed "Fats" PORREY, IOE . . . Future Pharmacist . . . Iunior Col- . . . loads of fun for laughs . . . ex-Navy man. lege and Ferris lnstitute next stops . . . wander lust. BAER, TED . . . Smash-hit smile . . . going into the PULASKI, EDWARD . . . physics fiend , , , electrical ministry . . . oi unquestionable character. engineering-that's for him . . . Football 3, 4. BATTENBURG. BEN . . . Sports-minded . . Ihobbyi RADIMAK, HILDA . . . Baseball advocate . . . Latin sleeping . . . Football l, 2, 3, 4, Track 1, 4, Varsity 3, 4. and "Terry" favorite subjects. BIELECKI. MARION . . . On the beam . , . radio man REKUCKI. IOE . . . "Ticket, please" at Kent Theater ambition . . . to enlist in Army upon graduatlori. . . will miss students . . . Football 35 R.O.T.C. 2. BUNN. DANNY . . . Peppy printer . . . will study pro- RESNER, IOE . . . Pepy . . . frolicsome . . . tuture tessional printing under G.l. Bill. business manager. DOXEY, ROBERT . . . Bashful , . . good-looking . . REXFORD, THOMAS . . . Blonde hair . . . enjoys Baseball l, 2, 3, 4, Varsity Club 2, 3,44. stamp collecting and chemistry, FALKELL. FRED . . . Laquacious red-head . . . enjoys RYSDYK. ARTHUR . . . Restless, quiet type . . . drafts- spinning yarns ot his Navy experiences. man dreams . . . enjoys swimming and diving. FIEDOROWICZ. ROBERT - - - GGY gfeefing for all . . SOLTYSIAK. EUGENE . . . Dark and carefree . . . a ROTC. to U.S.A .... khaki in one year. model builder . . . specializes in machines. FOX. RUSSELL . . . Likes hunting. fishing' cmd dfClWiT19 ST. PIERRE, LEON . . . Debonaire . . . future plans: . . . Varsity 3, Basketball 3. successful marriage and home . . . Football 3, 4. HOWELL, HARRY . . . From Fairview in soph year . . . SZOTKO, EDWIN . I I pqscinuted by machinery I . mid-term vet. known to friends as "Shot Gun." IOHNSON, EDWARD . . . Blonde. tall "Ed" . . . be-Sf WASKO. STANLEY . . . "Saki" plans to become ma- work in sheet metal shop. chinist , . . hobby: model airplanes, KALENDA, NORMAN .. . . Very intellectual' . . . chem- WELLS. BONNIE . . . Flashing personality . . . spark- gs,1gr:yni2LsCg3ilZ.3. . R.O.T.C. 1: Athleiw COUHC11 2: ling eyes . . . wittily pleasant . . . hopeful knitter. ' ' wrss. LAR . . . - ' xoPnowsK1,c1-tssrm . . . mu of fun . . . athlete mQfhi,,eAgfdEe1eCtr1c Shop riifgfddrzriiin' best Gum' . . . ex-"Gob" . . . likes golf. ' A ' ' g ' 1 . I S d ..Ed. ,. 1 h A U 1 WOTASZEK, IOHN.. . . Twinkling eyes . . . red hair, LEAlSE1Jri.1Dhi!vpk.Ie.g:rIili einployeifzon lson nc e freckles, and lriends . . . loves to tinker with cars. LUEDERS,ARLANE . . . Mid-term graduate , , , dreams WYSOCIQI, CI-TESTER . . . Eager machinist . . . every- of becoming professional Skater. things going his way . . . model airplane builder. NARDIN. ROBERT . . . Olive complexion - - - dflrk- ZOKOE. LEONARD . . . Bursting with vitality . . haired . . . manly . . . an extremely talented artist. hearty voice . . . a babbling brook, Do You Remember those first September days when we went around in a wonderful haze of program signing and enroll- ment . . . the kicking shut of lockers . . . the thrill of the first football game . . . the way we enjoyed our bigger and better Reflector . . . how fervently We worked to entertain ourselves as we grieved the loss of the old homestead, the Club Co-ed. . . the excursion to Detroit when the bus driver almost lost his way and Don Coates and Marv Heemstra serenaded us while Betty Shippy almost froze . . . ah yes! physics class and those experi- ments we all tried to perform, especially when Dick "Fireman" Anderson's demonstration of a fire ex- tinguisher back-fired and the school almost burned down . . . how proud we felt when Pat Dressler won the state D.A.R. Award? the 1947 "Frollies" with its unusual style show and beautiful "Powers" models . . . the gleaming new white sweaters worn so proudly by the cheer lead- ers, "thanks" to the Varsity Club . . . the fun of exchanging senior photos with our class-mates . . . the way the hydrogen experiment Bob Trapp was making exploded in chemistry class While Bob stood calmly by tearing his hair out . . . those term papers in pre-college English which Miss Persch- bacher "requested" us to compose . . . choosing Moclc Election Do you recall how the returns of our mock election crowned Pat Dressler most popular girl and Ed Shustha C55 our best- liked and best-looking boy . . . gave Otto Beisman C25 the titles of class Wit and class politician . . . named Val Smitter and lvah Gollar the best-dressed boy and girl and Dee Sosnowski C75 the prettiest girl . . . honored Dick Anderson C35 and Pat Dressler for their prowess in scholar- ship . . . designated Ruth Apkarian and Bette Boryce C45 and Fred Collins and lean Littell C85 class pals . . . pegged Virginia Baranowski and the suave Val Virginia class flirts . . . janet Hammer C65 class chatterbox . . . Marjory Schnei- der and Charles Cicelski class insepar- ables? our class motto, "Knowledge is a treasure but prac- tice is the key to it?" the way the vets "loitered" in the halls during home- room period . . . Louise Nalbandian standing on a chair in order to reach Otto Beisman's head to meas- ure him for his graduation cap . . . how Ruth Ap- karian, beaming and starry-eyed, floated into jour- nalism class after Principal Everest informed her she was winner of the Dillingham Cup . . . and Abner Ragins' blushing face when the same honor was an- nounced for him in a Student Council meeting . . . how that thrill of pride played on our spines when we saw the completed memorial for the first time . . . the gay time we all had at the Senior Sere- nade? how those senior meetings kept us out of our first- hour classes . . . the swishing of formals at the junior-Senior Prom . . . how jubilant We were when we learned we could have an excursion to Detroit for our Skip Day . . . the luscious dinner and entertaining speakers so enjoyed at the Honor Banquet . . . how at long last, turning limp at the sound of our names, we glided across the stage to receive that cherished diploma? On-the-Job Training Creates Future Experts Absent from school in the afternoon-yet they receive five hours credit toward graduation. These students earn their points by on-the-job Work. This year the occupational training program has reached its peak with 68 Unionites under the supervision of Mrs. Marble with the help of Miss West and of Mr. Wood as the all-city supervisor. On-the-job-training was originally promoted by the retail committee of the Association of Commerce under the co-operation of the State Board of Health Control for Vocational Education and the Board of Education. TAG MARKERS X' EVELYN BYRNE and BLANCHE CLIFFORD, Union seniors, work gayly side by side at Herpolsheimer's. These two are taking profitable part in the city's learn-to-work-training program. Here they are mark- ing tags which will go on merchandise. GROCERY WORKER "RED" FLETCHER wants to own a grocery store, and is gaining practical experience by working for the A :S P Company. Details he learns now will be put into use at his future business. TYPIST DOROTHY FORD, blue-eyed senior, spends her afternoons and Saturdays at filing, typing, Nan' stuff" in the office of the maintenance department at Wurzburg's. She hopes to continue after gradua- tion. PRESSMAN HARRY ROGALSKE, apprentice pressman, has been working at the Dependable Printing Company a whole year. He likes it, and wants to make print- ing his life ambition with a shop of his own. STORE CLERK "Femininity plus" describes captivating LUCILLE DE ROOS, Worker in the lingerie department at Wurzburg's. Assisting in the credit office as a care- ful cashier and modeling in style shows are merely part of her day's work. BUTCHER "Meat, meat, meat," reply the customers when CHARLES MCNULTY of the Stanton Store asks them if they may be helped. A super market may some- day be under this manager who learned to carve meat for high school credit. CUSHION MAKER The Grand Rapids Leather Furniture Company is fortunate to have a Workman like HM POST. As o cushion maker, he is one of the links in the produc- tion of a leather chair. BOOKKEEPER The helpful experience gained by ANNABELLE HOOGERHYDE in accounting and bookkeeping at Darling Truck Lines will start her on that winding road to success, 'if she keeps up her excellent work. PHOTOGRAPHER Enlarging photographs is one of the jobs GARETH RENKES performs at West-Dempster's. I-le has proved his ability in taking pictures as the Aurora photographer. Late into the night Gary spends his time developing and enlarging prints. sAw mini ELMER SNOAP spends his afternoons at his fath- er's saw-filing establishment. He has apprenticed with his father for four years and hopes to continue this trade. SERVICE RECORDER lust a "little kitten on the keys" is KAY ROMINE who works at Old Kent Bank as part of her occupa- tional-training program. In addition to typing, Kay posts the service records. ADDRESS MAKER . Zip, zip is the noise that the addressograph makes at the Baxter Laundry where EUGENE GOBER is busy making addresses on thin metal plates for stamping bills and laundry. Eugene also makes out bills and does stock work. CLOTHING SALESMAN "Right this way," directs RONALD GLASS as he sells clothing at Iurgens and Holtvluwer. He now works half-days with the prospect of being em- ployed full-time after graduation. 38 40 E. ina: .,-W "Brady, Ronald, 7-6365 . . Dalman, Evelyn, 7-8325 . . . 916 Myrtle, N.W. -g: . Y., nv 3 1 1 :- Ackerman, Arlene, 9-8327 . . Albrecht, Eileen, 7-9934 . Aleszka, Iohn .... Ambrose, Dick ,... Anderson, Iune, 30F2 . . Anderson, Richard, 8-2372 Andree, Angelyn, 7-7203 . Apkarian, Ruth, 9-7037 . Ardrey, Arlene, 7-0648 . Aspgren, Kenneth . . Baer, Ted, 8-9208 . . . Bailey, Patricia, GL-4-3688 Bakker, Saralyn, 6-9047 . Baranowski, Virginia, 8-9052 Barnes, Kathleen, 6-8319 Batenberg, Ben .... Baxter, Kenneth, 8-5410 . Bergsma, Ruth, 67-3246 . Berry, lack, 6-9833 . . . Bielecki, Marion, 9-8675 . Blok, O. Iay, 8-1845 . . . Bodle, Iris, 9-5450 . . . Boehm, Howard, GL-4-2401 Borek, Adam, 9-5208 . . Bosley, Dolores, 7-9597 . Boryce, Bette ..... Bour, Charles, 7-4616 , . Bouwkamp, Donna, 8-6164 Bricker, 'Ierry ..... .1B!ookens, Norris, 9-3177 . Brown, Donna ..... Brown. Lorraine . . . Bunn, Dan, 8-2827 . . . Burkholder, Lloyd, 8-8475 . Biiialski, Don, 8-0022 . Byrne, Evelyn . . . Cahill, Gloria, 8-0050 . . Cebelak, Donna, 9-8450 . Chicky, Charmaine, 8-2339 Christopoulos, Frances - . Cicelski, Charles, 6-5742 . Clark, Maribel, 7-2377 . Clifford, Blanche . T . . Clifford, Geraldine, 8-6173 Coates, Don, 7-4396 .... Coleman, Geraldine, 8-4126 Collins, Fred, 6-1844 . . Crall, Ellen, 7-7865 . Crane, Peggy, 5-1773 . Cummings, Phyllis . . Damson, Marie, 6-6155 . Davis, Marian, 67-1333 . De Boer, Bob, 9-2687 . Derks, Dorothy, 7-5050 . De Roos, Lucille, 7-5283 . De War, Edward . . . SENIOR DIRECTORY . 1043 Second, N.W. . . 1419 Fremont Ave. . . 807 Douglas, N.W. . . . 924 Park, N.W, . Michigan, RR No. 1 . 942 California, N.W. . . 827 Arianna, N.W. . 857 Tenth, N.W. . 1540 Walker, N.W. . 1026 Turner, N.W. . . 131 Lexington, S.W. . 1124 Widdicomb, N.W. . . . . 1331 Turner . . 856 Michigan, N.W. . . 627 Lane, N.W. . . . . 1213 Euclid . 611 Pettibone, N.W. . . 709 Kinney Ave. . . 309 Myrtle, N.W. . . . . . 619 Pettibone . 1226 Lake Michigan Dr. . . . 827 Bridge, . 1400 Turner, N.W. N.W. . . . 820 Iennette . 1215 Quarry Ave. . . , 1318 Sibley, N.W. . . . 1322 Covell Road 363 Ball Park Blvd., N.W. . . . 2365 Bristol, N.W. , 42 National, N.W. . . . . . 431ndiana . Butterworth Rd., . . 1168 Fourth, RR 5 N.W. . 115 Indiana, S.W. . . 229 Richards, N.W. . . . 846 Fifth, N.W. . 309 Straight, S.W. . . . 106 Valley, S.W. . 714 Blymeir Ct., N.W. . 720 Seventh St., N.W. . 2447 Berwick Rd., S.E. Dewey, Virginia, 6-1289 . Dole, Norman, 887173 . . Downing, Arlene, 6-5286 . Doxey, Robert .... Dressler, Patricia, 7-2351 . Drew, Leslie, 7-7129 . . Dunnette, Elizabeth . Dyer, Margaret, 9-7947 . Edsinga, Lois, 7-7474 . Falkell, Fred, 9-0391 . . . Fernamburg, Lois, 7-9580 . Fiedorowicz, Robert . . Fik, Beverly, 6-7911 . . . Finedore, Eleanor, 8-5270 . Fletcher, Howard, 8-6122 . . Flora, Shirley, 116-793F5 . . Ford, Dorothy, 7-6281 . Fox, Russell, 6-9940 . Frey, Carol, 9-2454 . Fuller, Harry Ganzevoort, Dale, 67-1291 . Gardiner, Peggy, 8-6595 . Gessner, Paul, GL-4-4856 . . Gillette, Ioyce, 6-4185 . Glass, Ronald, 7-5321 . . Glowacki, Walter, 7-9907 . - Gober, Eugene, GL-4-4225 . Goeman, Donald, 7-0796 . Goller, Iva, 8-0185 ..... Golubski, Marie, 9-0545 . . Greiner, Iune, Marne, 116-799F4 Griep, Pauline ...... Gryczanowski, Theresa . Haadsma, David, 8-4585 . Haan, Norma lean, 7-8248 . Haberman, Marian, 7-6262 . Hailfinger, Anna, 7-6413 . Hammer, Ianet ..... . 63 Scribnei . 215 Cummings . . . . 556 Valley , 418 Scribner, N.W. . . 1220 Oakleigh Rd. . 1050 Woodrow, N.W. . . 4391 Fruit Ridge Rd. . . 156 National Ave., N.W. . 926 Courtney St., N.W. . . . 142 Garfield, N.W. . . 1310 McReynoldS, N.W. . 501 Lexington, S.W. . 1556 Sibley, N.W. . . . 915 Muskegon, N.W. . . . . 643 Scribner, N.W. 3064 Knapp Rd., R.R. No. 4 . . . . 908 Harding, N.W. . . 1540 Turner, N.W. . . 1316 Park, S.W. , 633 Sixth, N.W. . 1006 W. Leonard, N.W. . . . . . O'Brien Rd. . 1031 Lincoln, N.W. . 907 Arianna, N.W. . . 931 Crosby, N.W. . 955 Richmond, N.W. . . 540 Milwaukee, N.W. . 1717 Richmond, N.W. . 811 Garfield, N.W. . . . . . 1125 McReyno1ds . . . 3270 Fruit Ridge Rd. . 1045 Iennette, N.W. . . 49 Deloney, S.W. . . 1465 Fourth, N.W. . . 1553 Garfield, N.W. . . 935 Richmond, N.W. . . 1069 Patton, N.W. . 723 Emperor, S.W. . . . 611 Sibley, N.W. . . . 1850 Gratiot, NW. .' 802V2 Butterworth, S.W. . . . . . . 200 Fourth . . . . Crosby, N.W. . . . . 908 Valley . . . 821 Watson, S.W. . . 977 Collinda1e,N.W. . . . 204 W. Burton . 1315 Leonard, N.W. . . 1101 Watson, N.W. . Butterworth Rd. . . 915 Nagold St. . 1061 Edison, N.W. . 1056 Woodrow, N.W. . 126 National, S.W. Hancock, Howard, 9-8852 Hanson, Betty, 7-8042 Havelhorst, Harry, 8-5138 Havinga,..l,,cQ 7-0489 . Heald, Richard . . . Heemstra, Marvin, 7-6834 Hendges, Donald, 6-5214 Herrman, Mary Ann . Herrman, Ruth, 9-4888 Heyboer, Georgia . . Heyboer, Wilma, 9-0539 Hodyna, Dorothy . . . . . 552 Turner, N.W. 1624 Elizabeth, N.W. . 12l7V2 Third, N.W. . . 1050 Patton, N.W. . 358 Hogodone S.W. 1257 Muskegon, N.W. . . 318 Indiana, S.W. . . 111 Gold S.W. . . . 1159 Sixth . . , , , R.R. No. 5 . . 853 Tenth, N.W. 315 Krokow Pl., S.W. Hoek, Lois ...... Holland, Georgia, 2-3009 . . Homrich, Roberta, GL-4-4558 . I-Ioogerhyde, Annabelle, 7-6280 Howell Harold, 7-0619 . . . Hubbell, Robert, 7-5497 . . . . , , 1655 Alpine . . 448 Fifth N.W. . . 261 Olive, S.W. . . . . 1550 Covell Rd. . 840 Harding, N.W. . 1150' Covell N.W. Huffman, Donald, 9-5661 . . . . 11 Fuller. N-W- Jelsmq, Gordon, 7-8834 . . . . 1606 Alpine, N-W- lohnson, Donald .... . 1235 DCIViS, N-W- Iohnson, Edward, GL-4-3071 .... 903 Turner, N.W. Iohnson, Robert, 7-3486 . . . . 2525 Leonard, N.W. lohnson, Ruth, 9-1669 . 418 Lake Michigan Dr., N.W. Kalenda, Norman, 8-5734 . . 110 Val1eY. N-W- Kats, Bernard, 7-0397 . . . . 1343 Val1eYf N-W- Kaufman, Lee .... . 40 National, S.W. Kiel, Phyllis ...... . , 1130 Alpine, N,W. Knotternerus, Iean, 7-5888 . . . 910 Pennell, N.W. Koets, Dolores .... . 931 McReynolds, N.W. Komar, Arnold, 7-6255 . . . 1446 Emerson, Koprowski, Chester, 67-1023 . . 820 Second, N.W. Kozal, Chester, 9-0984 . . . . 1121 Muskegon, N.W. Kragt, Gerald, 8-1618 . . . 345 Stocking, N.W. Krause, Warren . . . . 704 W. Leonard, N.W. Krauss, Gerald, 8-5979 . . . 1159 First, N.W. Kunecki, Elaine . . . . . . 500 Turner, N.W. Kupris, Robert, 7-8252 . . . . 1434 Muskegon, N.W. Kurkjian, Ruth, 9-7924 ..... . . 341 Tenth, N.W. Kurlenda, Stephany, GL-4-1966 . . . . 127 Gold, N.W. Kurti, ,Mildred ....... . . 1816 Fourth, N.W. Lahr, Mark ....... , , , 650 Veto, N.W. Lamper, Alexandra, 7-5601 . . . 1144 Covell Rd. Lange, Ioan ......... 931 McReynolds, N.W. Lastoczy, Doris, 7-8110 ....... 1523 Powers, N.W. Lauer, Marilyn, Marne 116-790Fl3 ...... R.R. No. 1 Lazoski, Dorothy, 9-6348 . . . . 318 Hogodone Pl. S.W. Leopold, William, 9-0681 . .... 1054 Turner, N.W. Littell, lean, 8-2625 . . . 16 Iohn Ball Park Dr., N.W. Lockhart, Ann, 7-4758 . .... 1451 Bristol, N.W. Lozicki, Edward, 6-8818 . . . 842 Davis, N.W. xLueders, Arlane . . . . 19 Indiana, S.W. Lulka, Nancy, 9-7349 . . 932 Valley, N.W. Mac Gregor, Don, 8-7008 . . . 529 Broadway, N.W. Mac Kellar, Warren . . . . . . 246 Gold, N.W. Matzat, Evelyn, GL-4-2536 . . . 854 Douglas, N.W. Maurice, Iulia, 7-1794 . . . 1529 Hamilton, N.W. Mayo, Betty, GL-2-1754 . . . . 129 Stafford, S.W. McNulty, Charles, GL-2-3116 . .... 514 A, S.W. Mentgen, Geraldine, 8-4857 . 1018 Watson, S.W. Mercer, Betty, GL-4-1312 . . Meretsky, Richard, 8-4923 . Mikula, Theodore .... Miller, William, 6-9344 . Modders, Marian . . . Mollo, Betty, GL-4-5613 . Morey, Alice ..... Morrison, Harold, GL-4-4497 Mullian, Hasmig .... Nalbandian, Louise, 6-5710 Nardin, Robert, 892-F15 . . Nasstrom, Laura, 9-0849 . Nedervelt, Roger, 7-7056 Neper, Virginia, 6-6477 . Nowicki, Peter, 6-9158 . Nyberg, Lois, 7-5429 . . Nyberg, Wendell, 6-5617 . . . . 337 Eleventh . . 723 Ottawa, N.W. . 2017 Voorheis, N.W. . . 655 Second, N.W. . 441 W. Leonard, N.W. . . . 418 Eastern, S.E. . 127 National, S.W. . . 824 Lyon, N.E. . 661 Scribner, . . 953 Bridge, N.W. N.W. . . 5854 Verta Dr., N.E. . 529 Garfield, . . 1230 Myrtle, . . 427 Rosell . . 839 Watson, . . 1417 Garfield, N.W. N.W. N.W. S.W. N.W. . . . . 620 Scribner Oros, Theresa ...... Overholt, Thomas, 9-0270 . Owsinski, Edward, 9-4730 . Pergiel, Lucille, 8-3745 . . Peterson, Raymond, 6-8189 . Phelps, Elsie, 9-2391 . . . Phillips, Marilyn, 8-8992 . Pierce, Virginia, GL-2-2521 . Pierson, Elaine, 7-8552 . . . Plocki, Robert, 9-8919 ..... Plocki, Virginia, 9-8919 . 'f Porrey, Ioe, 9-0037 .... Post, Iacquie, 7-5030 . Post, Iames, 9-4954 . . . Proctor, Barbara, 6-5790 . . Pulaski, Edward, GL-2-1305 . Radimak, Hilda, 6-1251 . Ragins, Abner, 9-8770 . Raper, Norma, 8-0997 . Reisman, Otto .... Rekucki, Ioe, 6-8315 . . . Renkes, Gareth, GL-2-2707 . Resner, Ioe ...... Rexford, Thomas .... Reynders, William, 3-5501 Riddering, Audrey, 7-2049 . Rietdyk, Christine, 8-2558 . Roccki, Frank .... Rogalski, Harry, 7-8490 . . Romine, Kathleen, 6-9448 . Rose, lim, 8-0048 Rosleniec, Evelyin, GL-4-4962 Rosloniec, Henry, GL-4-4962 Russ, Dorothy, 7-5889 . . Russell, Lois, 7-8017 . . Rysdyk, Arthur .... Ryskamp, Don, 7-2015 . Saplis, Joseph, 7-0791 . . Schmeiser, Ioanne, 9-2750 . Schneider, Marjorie, 8-7459 Schriver, Caroline, 6-1002 . Schulz, lune, 7-9038 . . . Shippy, Betty, GL-4-2218 . Shustha, Edward, 67-2861 . Sienkel, Geraldine, 8-9944 . Sluder, Patricia, 7-7607 . Smith, Albert, 116-710F3 . Smith, Bruce, 8-2554 . . Smitter, Val, 5-4366 . . Snellink, Iean, 8-7726 . . Snoap, Elmer, 6-5945 . . . Soltysiak, Eugene, 8-9939 . Sopkowski, Dorothy, 8-0714 . Sosnowski, Delores, 8-4482 . Sowinski, Irene ..... Speth, Ann, 8-2510 .... Spoelstra, Marian, 7-8578 . Spoelstra, Muriel, 7-8578 . Staskiewicz, Felicia, 9-5412 . . Stepanchuck, Helen . . . Storteboom, Ioan . . . - . 1700 Iennette, N.W. . . 904 Hovey, S.W. . . 202 Straight, N.W. . YQ 1035 Butterworth . . 1109 Fremont, N.W. . 1046 Broadway, N.W. . . 235 Straight, N.W. . 140-43rd St., S.W. . 1403 Escott, N.W. . 834 Fourth, N.W. . 834 Fourth, N.W. . 144 Valley, N.W. . 1329 Davis, N.W. . 1406 Fourth, N.W. . 856 Dayton, N.W. . 532 Shamrock, S.W. . 950 Front, N.W. . . 937 Ionia, N.W. . . 1534 North, N.E. . 1131 Tamarack, N.W. . . 420 Lexington, N4W. . . . 904 Otillia, S.E. , , 657 Front, N.W. . 626 Scribner, N.W. . 23 Dickinson, S.W. . . 1948 Haines, N.W. . . 1140 Powers, N.W. . 959 Dayton, S.W. . . . 826 Courtney . . . . 112 Gold, . 1007 Chatham, N.W. . . 1022 Pulaski, S.W. . . 1022 Pulaski, S.W. . . 53 Crosby, N.W. . . 1437 Turner, N.W. . . 1256 Alpine, N.W. . 2740 W. Leonard . . . . 728 Myrtle St. 543 Turner Ave., N.W. . . . . 817 Hovey,S.W. . 409 second sf., N.Vlf 1563 Hamilton Ave., N.W. . . . . 609 N. Lafayette . 835 Bridge St., N.W. . . . 1118 Cora, NW. . 939 Eleanor St., N.E. .419 Garfield, N 232 5 Ave. ,fi .W. . 426 'rhom t' 'sf., S.E. 617 Lincoln Ave., N.W. 109 Cummings Ave., N.W. . 111 Atlantic St., N.W. 1053 McReynolds Ave. . . 416 Lane Ave., N.W. . 915 Davis Ave., N.W. . . . . 1501 Cole, N.E. 1323 Crosby St., N.W. . . 1323 Crosby St., N.W. 1105 Muskegon Ave., N.W. . . 416 Third St., N.W. . . 1435 Pine Ave. . - f erre, Leon ...... . , 147 Mt. Yemen, N.W Rein H 9 0017 Gerald 91875 . Shirley, 6-6239 . ten Marian! 7-4455 . . . 2230 Kenney Ave. Phillip 67 3234 RR No 5 Lake Michigan Dr 1 E.-,J .3 lf 3 1, 1 M I , , A . - .1 V --in Q Cie : Iii 5 -,gf " 4 ,. T il - . 7- V1 - - . V . - Celia, 6-5715 . . . . . 1010 Hoiey St., S.W. Rosemary, 6-1902 . . 738 Alpina Ave., N.W. Edwin, 6-1918 . . . . . 658 Lincoln Ave., N.W. r, ., - . . . 516 Livingston, N.E. Iames, 7-9958 . . . . 941 Richmond St. , - . . . 1657 Fourth St. Robert, 8-8623 . . . . . . 350 Glenhaven Ave. . . 433 Lincoln Ave., N.W. Barbara, 8-6169 . '. 824 Garfield Ave., N.W. Gerard, 6-8006 .... 810 Colt Ave., N.W. Charles, 8-3176 ...... 852 Tenth St., N.W. Roger, 8-9363 . . . . 1141 Alpine Ave, N.W. Hyde, Kenneth, 7-3632 . . . 1051 Myrtle St., N.W. Dyk, Francis, 9-5809 .... 1035 Hamilton Ave., N.W. Meuhlen, W 773 . . . 5 Haines, N.W. Neuren, Barbara, .... ick Ave., N.W. Ooe , , , N.W. Wu,-Dem' 9-2134 .' .l . .. '. ass B1gvemh,N.w: Shirley . . . ..... , Gao Iones St. Claire, 6-1863 . . . 347 Madison Ave., S.E. Waddell. Lynne, 7-0378 Kenney into walmk, Edward, 6-6408 ' .' ' .' ., . .71141 1 Wasko, Stanley, 8-9131 .... 1. 1019 Second St. ' Weeber, Shirley, 7-7114 .... 1 . . 1237 Crosby Welbon, Alma lean, 116-8041912 . 178 Cummings Ave., Wells, Bonnie, 7-8310 ..... ' . . . 1410 'Escott Wenzel, Rosanne, 604-62FZ ......... RR No. Whalley, Elaine, 8-3036 Wheeler, Elton .... White, Sally, GL-4-1594 Wichert, Donna, 5-7907 Wiest, Don ..... Wilson, Icy, 7-5811 . . Wise, Clarance, 6-7997 Wojtaszek, Iohn . . . Wondo1owski,Iohn . . Wood, Yvonne, 8-0506 . Wyman, Marilyn, 7-6152 Wysocki, Chester . . . Yates, Sally, 7-9396 . Zeeryp, Audrey .... Zokoe, Leonard, 67-3296 Zoppa, Alvin ..... Zukerrnan, Dorothy, 6-8691 Zyskowski, Bemard, GL-4-4517 l. . l . ,1122 Pine Ave., NLW5 1510 Houseman Ave., N.W.- .L .... aaa' Michiqari '. . 1218 First St.. N.Wf . . . , , 671 Fremont . 1147 Crosby St., N.W. . . . 916 Fulton, S.W.- . . 1154 Park St., . 616 Ottawa Ave., NME . . . 1006 Bridqqf NIWA . 1419 Valley Ave. . . 1105 Dayton Stl, S.W. .N 1326 Quarry Ave., N.W- , -we '11 1005 Scribner Ave.,.N.Wg A ...... an Nb...S' . 1590 Bristol Ave.. NJWQ . 550 Logan sf., . 615 Davis sf., N.W4j a 1 , l . -'45 9 .911 l F . ,.:,,,.,i'f'f 95 , fbi ' 'I ,Q,T.:,j ,. AJ,' -l,.,, 1 . .l ...., . mg ' "ii-ii F of g7gN WM WEE x AMW! 542 ff 'ffm 'wx 40 JE wil MWMHW xiii? 0jm,gwJS'ZfffW ww ' vxwklqg WW YQMWJW wb W ' x ,1. .1 , I I , A'- '-. . -, -1 '-ff .- 3 , , A . I ' vi. X . .xx J . ' 1 .4 ' 5 , ff V5 X, N' f X 1 I we gli? F I fi Y


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