Union College - Garnet Yearbook (Schenectady, NY)

 - Class of 1934

Page 1 of 324

 

Union College - Garnet Yearbook (Schenectady, NY) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 324 of the 1934 volume:

1 'GTE' '5-33:2 Yi Elij-,g,-13' I -1, x A- '-':"'F: Wg.-f. '-1::fa" - 1-.151-V, . :"'Qv'-ji , ,,., ., N ' w IL .. , 115125 1 J,-i9.i'g 5 w .4 ' " 4454- f.. , A 'J-lr? ' 41: ' ' 1 25,3 ..5,. Lb. -- -- if ff -f-:r-,,,:: -.,, -- ,f,, --.. - -:L - f-W ,--A i.T:, Y Y 1121" nal L.-:A -- -r f. 'LJ'--, .5 . v , ., . -.--. r. - . - - -- : f. -.Vw .- .--Y .-, . , .v-,---, 4 :. gr.-.---..-. ,. --.M . ,- 1 . . , Q.. .- -1 1 J ' f' .2-1 .31 'L ,, -4f.::1:" A, -4,r.-.3-fl, 4,,"- .-r.gf..'g.., .-a.1f I -.T','g. wig., -L 1:3 -. 1 -my ', - , 1 , ,V .V 3' . ,, - -, .- 'S-351: -6,1-za '.:n- cr,-,JL-4-. Rv, 21-1.-1: - ' -g5..f:. 1-.3 , .1-4-g-Y sw 1 nw -. -' - r r., ,.',-, -,-5. -.2 -:f 'J-,.'f . 34-g-:--. ' - .L 'v V '- .-..: I . , A -1 . ' ' - , f- - - ., . .zf-. - 4-E... COMPILED BY DANIEL - F- FLINN E D I T O R RoaERT S. oPPENHlEM BUSINESS MANAGER 'Z' 'I' 'I' 'I' 5: 1 'Fl :4 Q. 'M I5 ,il , 1 S. , . fx? xv. gs Hz L1 I :- fs' ,,: Q :C ...-...F V 3 "" anna-eh Barent Qeretnfure gnu haue been the ahnhe nf relrgmus tnlerzxtmn mag gun he sn stmll' Elms far gnu haue been the nnrserg nt tree sprrxts nt ei eumprehensrue ami! large minheh hut reuerent phrlnsnphg thus mag xt almugs he ifiere has paternal hmhuess anh tnrhearanee ever tem pereh the exercise at authm-:tg :mb aumkeful puter nal uxgmlanee been applueh tn the fumnmg nf gnuth ful :harm-ter Be mt wer utherunse! Anil when guns ehxlhren anh gnur ehulhrews ehrlhren euen tu the tttth anti sixth generatmn, shall mme hack tn celebrate gnnr peruse anh write up gum' reeurils, may xt he that this us then the hnme nf hraue zmh true men nf men hrewer, truer :mb halter than we that better zmh unset spirits have rrsen tu Iltreet gum' ruunmls anh that an hmher sehularshxp mth a Deeper semetxtg are senhmg furth from these shrines richer blessings nn the mm-lb From Rev Anowzo Porrna Union 1818 Hf'Q, a,, -N: ' N' 1 1 .' l 'I -I . 1 " ' Q X., ' K . Ad- N 1 " o ' .I ' . K ' V- A 'O 1 "V ', . , 1 1 the term nf tittg gears has again enlleh aumg, mth A ' ' ll l " K ' ' V 'X 'A N : , Y - , I V , Q4 I Y 'Q 1 . . Y N, 1 K . .1 1 , 3. 1 . ,e . , , . f , ' J'i:.i-E if Z- .- ,Ji 4 ., ,V,N, l5?Y.,,1,g4jw,:!I, . I z 'V , N, h U .V I X?Qxwgvgf,fJ,l,,g,,.,.u N I O N . , xxlx . D ll f .'+wf.fg1nmga-,f,.4f4z v, .1-ag c ,N . ' ' 1 - A fin, '-22i'63:A." -'.::2'5l'5."- !,4:f'.'::'u' '11-'f'ff5'.'Q Q ' 5 .- ' - t GE Q P 5? J i! 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TEi5??3?El!1 . ,, fh',? , ?!??P5, Qi A9!1Y,f?IUZ?E?:1-,,- ggnhih agighfe lhezjlrnphien ih lalllx, ihithenlhggw Alh-sfieneelmig-ghllgshjxhh, ehlxehghn emit uiafexrticzfiailgirs, fl'E:FPVi5 hes igtelleeguul lf eesa frm?-Bihfeh she heriues mnre luster than from ,f11'a'21"'W.f:E'E? wu?4?f?E11Qggsifffifersi?wil tins ahh statesmzmship- ihe mahe gnuernnrs, cabinet ifi??1ea?Qsf?L3ia3nE2fffQEgi5!ie?f?5 ?lhf?2? ill?-5534 5?43l2 px-eaihents. Nur was this a mere fnrlnitumze--rezgltjna ---:fra W f f-, f :--V e- -f-1.2--1, ,fi-T-?,,-e..fff:..4.......r --,, ..-,. it It was the natural fruit nf a Deliberate pnlirg anh well F , Y ,.-... ---fr-i--.,.: ,, , -- 6.1,-.-.., Y-fe:-..,,,,,, 7,Y,.. -,,,1,,,,,,,- Wu..- - hefineh methnhsf' i W ...M-M. ----.-ff,i.- .,L.., - ,,,, ,nf We I CHARLES E. SMITH, LLD. 1861 E I..-.. -11 , 's,:1,'.i:,- I i 1h fl I X 3-:'J1v,',l if lf5QfQlz1i 1' 4 12 , ' 'Z'-WF::'Q:":' , figfjff-Qfg 'I J? iff? i E' '-'ijg-izig 1 sfiiei- J, a 1's-weak i l l J-,'L':+:?5 vs 1 : 7,22 W 9 V V fl , 15511 I ', " J-'gf X , lr l " ! 5 - fff he u '. I 1 .:z?i.'-5531 I 1' l E U ig h I TT'-i,J,:' 3 Fifi-5Zvi'9 H A-i3:'i:s5'l i 1 an 5,4 X 1 w.. fe--HM' +1 NV ll Lgyig lj ' -SQ ill?-If I if -,:::f.2fi:" 1 ,5A:l4.HJ.4 1 1 lr E Lyifskl ' 141 I fqlff-FK: ' I ,jiggjju ' I S Mi ll 'lk M ' 1' M l E Q l ff-FS5475 H - A ..,.. ROBliR'l' TOQMBS, horn in Georgia in ISIC, spent some time at Franklin College, and gradu- ated from Union in 1828. In 1830 he entered the ' TA liar, and from that time ou his rise in the politi- A Y X cal field was rapid, attaining senatorship in 1853. E Ile was a Southern Wfhig, and upon the seces- xl 2 sion of Georgia from the 'Union in 1861, he with- ' I- sg, drew from the senate to land the southern cause. wi Qi' ,. l-le was a candidate for president of the Con- .l J M, lederacy, and his bravery won him much dis- l f tinetion in the battles of Bull Run and .-Xntietam. Z ,!419Xm? K? After the Civil XVar, he refused to take al- W6, 5.1 legianee to the 'United States, and lived tl1e rest Q'+,y,..?" 4 i ol his life as a citizen of Georgia, hut not of the J United States. 1 S ll . I! Qf .y If - , f ,1 iiizllllf . UI X Cgxlf , , , ' ' -I -49 i l i WN '77' if 7 X X I in X '- l 'Vg 4'Nm. .i ' X ' I ' lx Wiiiiillli W Z 1 Zi X .M -Q, . ...i Cl-ll2S'l'liR ALAN JXRrl'lrlUR, born in lfairlield, Vermont, Octoher 5, 1830, entered Union as a Sophomore in 1845, and was graduated at the age of eighteen a Phi Beta Kappa man. He ae- eepted the nomination as vice-president in 1880, and ou President Garlields assassination in 1801, he took the oath of olliee as President. His ae- Cession to the presidency created apprehensions, tor he was reputed to be a lactionist and a spoilsman, but in his inaugural address he stated his profound desire to administer his ollice in a spirit sans factional animosity. From this policy he never deviated till his death on Novemlier IS, 1886. Vi-1503 .-.C5REGGfei33 'Ui WQOD ri-- 13824 . 5 .HOFFMAN '462 4? l'l'l . as Q- , ov- Q .tote REV. SHELIJON JACKSON was horn in 1834. After studying at Glens Falls Acadeiny and at Hayesville lnstitute, he entered Union as a sopho- more in the class of 1855. Upon graduation, he entered Princeton 'liheological Seminary and was otdained hy fir. Nott in 1858. At the conclusion ol' many years work among the frontiersmen and Indians in the west, Ilr. ,laclcson lmegan work in Alaska where he was appointed United States General Agent of Education. He performed a great service to all northern people when he in- troduced into Alaska the domesticated reindeer of Siberia. VY-rwbmill ff. ell if Q. E A 23 Q Sw N : S S i R XX ,,,,ffp1u' 'lui -W DR. NOTT was born at Ashford, Connecticut, in 1773. I-le was graduated from Brown Uni- versity in 1795. Before coming' to Union as its president in IHO4, llr. Nott was a clergyinan in :Xlhany. On his arrival at Union, Rev. Nott found the college financially embarrassed, but succeeded in placing it on a sound footing. flur- ing the tirst decade of his presidency, the enroll- ment increased tive-fold. Dr. Nott was a great leader and teacher, being friendly and congenial, yet always keeping strict discipline. llis death in 1866 brought to a close the longest and most successful presidency of Ynion College. J-.. .-.. Q .-,1 , gc ......- M-.w.1,,.........m.-..i.n.,,K .a.m..rw.....f--..u:..mm aim:-tc!-fran.-Q -:.-.Qnwnfwv sa - . . .Q . .11 f.-:,n1.L-f.,1x...uU-1-..:1,1::..u:1.zx-ie-1,-H..-..m.t.:sAf.,m.1.w, F' R 1 -"ff-T"-"f"E"1"-f " -"'-l1-l"-iT::r-,4a-.ua4v-ses.v:- --24.,-,,g,,,:Y--, - , -4- 74,777 "1 a is ,ww it ,cf - -f ' - s- e- Z-'---ml-fe----M-:1-fMf--H-- t it" P if res ' f 1. 0 A 'Q'-pig Ilya -J: 4:43 ' '.1..-1-A-L1 ff seg 'sr - .--aw 1- ...... . , ,. . .. , , . .. . . 121- as il 1 1 f-J-'lr 7. - ,. , .,. ,,., . ...,. 4 -- ez, -nal, , - ..,1., ., :1 gage- , - wig I-t to wif 4 J wwfw sc? :W gi.. if ,. n, ,ffm M., it-'XFX-T?i',TA 55:51 :l?.T79?' 1 "':i"' AWG? ' -. "" - ' SV. i' 35? 2 "5iu'."-LINE' 'G +1 T3 - ' ka 1, - f 6. . . ... , ,ii , i Qt'-4 . QL' sill-.tit 1Fl':A:,1qlft,.,:5.f,-.Egg gba 5gQg?isf4 :.fk,e -lgw iflr ha d Q,I:Z,u aug Hg , nv ,G my 1 . -. - ,if: - '-tt, , .gy . , 1 lil f . f . . Z! Blissful' vrfrn 1.11. 1.-if...-.1 u ,j.u!T,LLL ,:qiw kg. , Ny.. ,A - W , 354 i , an ' Q' 'Q PH-TBUS-swf-wzuaf-1: . . ,,, -: ' 8-E 'll gl 5 Elly " - Hg S, "3 ,P -ll. ,gs-fa. 211 514 ill gl HA ga tl ls F, fig a lf.: lil '- t. ti 111. til? 551,55 El tj 'i .li F3 lt I' ll: 'Sic 17 I . t ai lf E 1 5? if tl E i - 'if' t' my r,wQ1.,.1,:... . .,... , ., ., m,..',.,-mf. .,A,- ,. ,.-f .. , ,- Tc:g'f.','-v :y.vfp,g4':1q1g-.3.-.' 3, , ' . ' ' L 1 .E:'s!iu.f.?iv.i:F2f!.-1':EM'-5 A111 f ' .. NW ....,..,.x, .1..,,,A . , . , 10 1 on ,LS EWR WA ' 919 RIG H'T l W ,585 of OP sw eip ff 'n the Zliivlh uf Svnrial Svruirr, sgnnnnmnus with V' lr smqll matrriaql rm-maths hu t rhiph lguuwnitzxrivgxt rvsults, n1Vg1g1g n 1LIg1fnu G5rz1huatn ,l1a5 hugh Efrzpmng ppt- lmps Lrg sinfcrre rerngnitinn while -still in tlyvr clam ruum, nf: thx' vinlrutirmal, pnlhgrgll Vzxqil rgligiuuslrrau- ings nf nmnkixyh- Nurturph guuih Qiigxinnfs Vncqr- Hfnpiauj surrnuuhings, wang have rztrrigh hvr man uwssaugr ahrnzuhg gri the gight uf heh-1-gtk xfrabliig is nrunlr lnfst. llnfnn Hspirit, unrlmngvh tlgrnugh the genre, lmlzmrns fart aah plgilnsuphg. f hat ' it is the nhinrt nl all ehucatiun tn rear up mmhs nf ex large ani rnmprelyensiue spirit, full nf rzuercnze fur tlplsrlglgt :mb the true, hexlt alikc sn a W x W li self-imprnurment aah the imprnuement nf the wnrlh, 1 in-, -1'-V Z - ---- , ,-1- - -fs.-L-, W, V -. it is a fart neun- tu he furgnttenf Gllprsz mnrhs. quntrh frum 2 Ihr Evurrrxxh Alfunzn Illnrtrr 'IB nn-rr ginrn 21 lining fnrm in the g--"-'f1--- -----H-is -- ff 1 f's'f ff Y H - prrsuns nf surly mm as Srmurh muh Earkrr. Uhrg msrr IIIPII nf I uriginulitg uf thnnglgt zmh inhepruhrnrr nf artiuu rxrrrisiug uluast guinflurnre lmilp in tlpr murlh nf tlyrir hay ami! the fnnllh slmlrur Dag. lr Mag ilyr glam nt' tlgrir arlyirurmrnts fnrrnvr liglt thr iagtlys llfllilrah ? in mth frum 'illninus huns, I 7-I -:- ---- -:im in-ll -+ , I NYIl-l.l:XM HENRY SEXVARIVJ was born in Ol'- ange County, New York, May 16, IHOI. lle was graduated lrcnn Union in 1820 and hegan law practice at .'Xiihurn in 1923, hut soon turned to politics. lle was appointed to the New York senate, and was the Hrst Wlhig Governor ol the state. Ile was elected to the United States sen- ate in 18-10, and was Secretary of State under Ahraliain Lincoln. An attack was made on him the night of the presidenfs assassination but he survived and retired sliortly afterwards, spend- ing the remainder of his life traveling. l-le died in 1872 and was buried at Atilmrn, New York. ARIAS.-X J. PARKER, a j1'1'EUllII'I.lC of 'Union Col- lege in the class of 1825, was distinguished at the har, on the bench, and in the ai'i'airs of the state. ln 1351, with the help of lra l-larris and Amos llean, he foundetl Albany Law Schonl as part ol the University of Albany. lt became part ut' Union University when the latter was infor- porated in 1873. During his jttdieial career, Parker was judge of the Third Circuit and Yiee- fhancellor. ln 1846, he was elected justice of the New York Supreme Court. He was ollerecl appointments as United States llistrict Attorney and as Minister to Russia. l st .g,f.BREEsEQ me at ALLQENQ 419216131 T9 .DtAtNg?QRD '40 Q gg VI Z K as . z as 'O NOTT MEMORIAL LIBRARY v-xy. fl . 4, - " . . , Le 4'-' 'I HY 1 it-. 'si 'fs Y- ' ' L . ' 'ff . ix ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING HALL , . fzv- '- '- I , . 4. ',-' .' . fiiwpf j : 'Fx In 1 -'11-.4 ' I SILLIMAN HALL AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDING .zmlwn-In.' 'r-..I:',:.-.:w:,'n.,..:,.. cu ,l ,-...-..-.'--in--'Lv . if-GJ' 1, " 'wr 1.11:-I' - "4 " ', IV" N" "- . I-'-U "IVV ,. WC.. V ,r--4. MEMORIAL CHAPEL BAILEY HALL 'K"'W"'M 77 T315 J 1' ff ?f' , , ,:.5?jY wif y uf-1 ,., . . ,. b A.. . 4, Q - 39 V is , , ,-- . x I ' . I, Q K, ' 11- " - 9 A , . . 2 Q az-Jw? , .F ,, 'L 4 ' - 1 . " . - .L 1 1 - J L- N- - 4 . , J 1 ' X 'WN - 4 b . - .f 1 4 ' ' - 'Ax - ' ,ar 4' ' 1 - Q . . V f ,a n q Q I 'W' - 'Q -6 ' h , , . X . Vu XA Y arf wg, I1-Q , -.' of I' 1 - ,uf ,I A 1 . ,y sf 9 ' U'- k"n ' .- 3 ' r .A " pl ' ' - gf, ' ,y V' ,Q V l .TQ 0, L ., v , ,J-, 41, 'ff ' N V. 5 'jx-.1 ,.,- ' wa ,F A ,A " . S ,Q ' -ia. U' . -.gg 5-yr f-,gifki Y acgfgfl' M ' ,A - : . r ' ' . , '- .V JY: vu A J kt: A 2-A A Q. mf If 'Z I-'I Q' i I A t . f' - ' 'Pu' A -F, .4 .,- 'I ! . I :liff 'ff' '1 , .. , , .f- QE, .. 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The smoke was still rising from the smoldering ruins of burned habitations on the northern and western borders, and the echo of the Indian warwhoop had not yet died away in the Valley of the Mohawk. The long struggle for liberty had left the people decimated, weary and impoverished, Yet, in these hardy settlers of the northern and western frontiers the spirit of progress found a firm soil in which to spread its I'OOtS. The building of a new nation meant that there was to be a demand for men who could work out and control the destinies of that nation. Men of spirit, courage, ability and ambition were needed who could grow with the nation and the nation with them. Thus it was that the great force of education was set in motion. The people ofthe valleys ofthe Mohawk and Hudson desired a college in which their children and their children's children, for ever after, might find an opportunity to make themselves equal to tl1e tasks before them. Shortly after the battle of Saratoga, in 1779, the frontiersmen petitioned the Revolutionary JOHN B. SM1111 .......... . 1795-1799 JONATHAN Enwmans ...... I7QQ-ISOI JONATHAN MzXXCY ........ 1802-1804 E1.1PHA1.n'r N011 .......... 1504-1866 LAURENS P. HICKOIC ...... 1866-1868 CHARLES A. A11c15N ....... 1869-1871 E1.1PHA1.Er Norr Po'r'rER. .. 1871-1884 HARRISON E. NNE1:s'rER .... 1888-1894 AQNDREW V. V. RAYMQND.. 1894-1909 CHARLES A. RICHMOND .... 1909-1928 FRANK P. DAY ........... . 1928- State Assembly for a college charter. However, since the petition sought to establish a college without the auspices of any single church, it came to naught. In February, 1785, measures were taken for the establishment of a private academy at Schenectady, by mutual agreement among leading citizens, and it was placed in the charge of twelve trustees. An academy building was erected a few years later on the northwest corner oflwhat are now Union and Ferry streets. This academy was the seed of Union College. Next to Dominie Romeyn, to General Philip Schuyler belongs the honor of establishing the college at Schenectady. The city of Albany had offered strong pecuniary inducements for making the capital the site of the college, but the vigorous efforts of General Schuyler so reinforced the Schenectady petition that it secured the young institution for that town. The college was organized on the 19th of October, 1795, by the election of the Rev. John Blair Smith, D. D., of Philadelphia, as president. The first commencement was held in May, 1797, in the old Reform Dutch Church, and the first degrees conferred upon three young men who had finished the course of study then required. . President Smith resigned in 1799, and was succeeded by Rev. Dr. Jonathan Edwards, the younger, who died in oflice in August, 1801. His successor was the Rev. Dr. Jonathan Maxcy, who resigned in 1804. Although the college was still feeble, it was not without enterprise. Under the presidency of Dr. Edwards, in 1798, a new edihce was begun on a scale magnificent for that day. This was afterwards known as "VVest College," located on the corner of Union and College streets, and was finished in 1804. An event occured in 1804 which proved to be of peculiar and lasting advantage to the institution, and from which its success may bejustly dated. This event was the choice of the Rev. Eliphalet Nott as president. He had not yet become known for that talent in the education of young men which this election gave him the opportunity to exercise, and which has never been surpassed in the history of any American college. "En- dowed by nature with a keen perception of character, a discriminatingjudgment in developing latent talent, a dignity ofmanner commanding both love and respect, a facility in governing young men, the secret of which lay in teaching them to govern themselves, and a zealand earnestness in the discharge ofevery duty, he acquired m '7 .. :L T11 C I' 4 he PU C 'A i I JR. Q ., . :K-1,1 is---asa - 1 ' '5' 771 73' ffffgs-,fbi . 3 ' mga' 1 ' 'T z-if Riff . D 1451311-'li 1 "V . ..,. vw. . gn-I. V4 A F . 1""gw af.-6 HICKOK .gi -4 f- wait and held through a long and active life a commanding position as an educator." "A few years' experience showed that the site in the city was not sumciently ample, and the observing eye of Dr. Nott, at an early period in his presidency, had noticed on the suburbs a better one, which combined in a rare degree every advantage desirable. On the eastern border of the city the fields rose by a gentle slope to a plain of moderate elevation and easy access. Near the upper edge of this slope the construction of terrace a few feet high would afford a level campus of ample space, and a site for buildings that would overlook the valley, the river, and the neighboring city, while northward glimpses of moun- tains blue in the distance, and southwestward ranges of hills dividing the waters of the Mohawk and Susquehanna rivers, would present a panorama of peculiar loveliness. A gently murmuring brook, issuing from dense woodlands, fiowed across the grounds just north of the proposed site and into the river. Alternat- ing fields and groves extend several miles eastward to the Hudson." The Union College of today is located on the same, beautiful 100 acres of land overlooking the Valley of the Mohawk. Jacques Ramee, the famous French architect, who was for a time employed by the National government in plan- ning fortifications and public works, drew up a campus and building plan in 1812, which has been followed throughout the years. From the time of the new college on the hill the number of students steadily increased until in 1820 the nuinber in all the classes exceeded 300, and the graduating class alone contained sixty-five. In 1825 Union had passed Harvard and Yale in the number of its students, and, with the exception of a few inter- vening years, held for a quarter of a century the honor of being the largest college in the United States. The fame of Dr. Nott as an educator, the high reputation of the college, the excellence of its system and management, drew students from all parts of the nation to Schenectady, and large numbers came from lower classes of other institutions to see and hear President Nott. It is not too much to say that during the administration of Dr. Nott he alone shaped the policy of the college and "controlled its affairs as absolutely as any monarch who ever ruled an empire." Union was the first college to break away from the standardized and tradi- tional classical course and to place scientific instruction on a plane of equal dignity. At Union also originated the so-called optional system, which it has always exercised to a limited degree but never to the extent of license which it afterward attained in other colleges. The first course of civil engineering oPfered in an American College was established at Union in 1845, by Professor Williaiii M. Gillespie and has ever since been successfully continued. The prosperity of the college grew with the fame of Dr. Nott and his staff of well known educators. Then came the news of the Civil XVar. The classes V 22 Q, f of 1860 and 1861 were among the largest in the history of the college. Through nearly a quarter of a century the south had sent more students to Union college than to any other, and the classes of those years were made up of represent- atives from nearly every southern state. Thus when the break came that divided the union of states the college also was to be divided. When the shells began to fall on Sumter the last band of Southern students left to join the ranks of the Confederate Army. Scores of northern students forsook their books to take up the musket against those who had been not only fellow-members of Philomathean or some campus society but fraternity brothers as well. The Union Campus became a drill ground. The gallant young Professor Piessner, recruited a company on College Hill and led them in person to the front where he fell on the bloody field of Chancellorsville, with a colonel's stars on his shoulders. In 1866 Dr. Nott passed away at the age of ninety-three years. He was succeeded by Dr. Hickok. Two years later, in 1868, Dr. Hickok resigned. Following a brief interregnum, the Rev. Dr. Eliphalet Nott Potter, grand- son of President Nott, was elected to the presidency. Dr. Potter had the distinction of becoming the hrst Chancellor of Union University. The crea- tion of graduate departments at Schenectady was not practical in those early days of 1795. But when the need for such institutions formed expression, schools of law, medicine and astronomy which had already been founded in Albany, only twelve miles distant, were incorporated with Union College to form Union University in 1873. In 1881 the Board of Governors of the Univer- sity founded the Albany College of Pharmacy. When Dr. Potter retired, in 1884, the Hon. Judson S. Landon became president ad interim until the election, in May, 1888 of Harrison E. VVebster, LL.D. In 1894, President VVebster was forced to resign due to ill health and the trustees elected Andrew V. V. Ray- mond. When Dr. Raymond became President of Union, the college was at the lowest ebb in its history. The enthusiasm., oratorical ability, and the remarkable personal influence which Dr. Raymond pdssessed were in no small part factors in again placing the college on the up grade. The number of students doubled, the teaching force was increased, scholarship was elevated and an endowment of about half a million created. Silliman Hall was acquired during his administration and electrical engineering courses introduced. Dr. Raymond resigned in 1908 after the death of his wife. Dr. Charles Alexander Richmond succeeded Dr. Raymond in 1909. His presidency, which lasted for twenty years, coincided with the boom years of the country. A four million dollar endowment was built up and in addition an active building program was successfully completed. During these twenty years the new gymnasium was finished, Buterheld memorial erected as a chemistry lab- Al li EN :gf LSE. v '53, , . 1 H . Y, 1. i7"' itil: ' ' 4 23 A V: ,, Q V .t . 'eff '--Y l i PO'I"l'liR I. ., Q . N, i oratory, and Bailey Hall built for instruction in the languages and history. The college grew to over eight hundred students and the erection of a new Electrical Engineering building was provided for and begunL Courses in Chemistry, Physics, Art and Music were introduced. Dr. Richmond retired in 1928 and has only recently completed a series of world travels. Union College together with its graduate department, Albany Medical Col- lege Ql838j, Albany Law School Ql85lj, the Pharmacy School, and Dudley Observatory are now under the direction of Dr. Frank Parker Day who is president of Union College and chancellor of Union University. An inter- locking board of trustees of the college and governors of the University main- tains unity in the departments. Dr. Day's presidency has been a particularly difiicult one in view of the economic pressure of the times. Dr. Day holds three degrees, M.A., LL.D., and D.Litt, I-Ie is a Rhodes Scholar and graduate of Mount Allison University and Oxford University. In 1914 he recruited and commanded the 185th Cana- dian Infantry, Cape Breton Highlanders. He served in France with the l6lst Royal Scots and commanded the 25th Canadian Infantry. I-Ie was promoted on the held to Lieutenant Colonel and was made President of the Khaki College for the Canadian Forces While in France. f -' 21"3"Ei 1 . lf .P 5 " ' 'Ti fijziis ,-f" '1 "Tis, '15, ' ,g N i W'5:,:giQfgf-:tx aria?-'?'faf'e:s5a?QS1f.wzi I Ai-5543191 2 v-.frfqff ri 12153:-Q1Efqf.4e.ff:g5.71ja.5nff:-iqinxggso 4 ."f?'i"fI'4,z::1Es , fi-'fly' ,',-FLa2:,2.1!5"'e' 'ri -ri- : I f. Kali' 4:1-'lv.S:,.,-5 v'.-:wr Q-ff-gb:-r'.1,3-viip-wf?'1?T?ig":rzew:+e',G.i-'fy-if :!1,:'-1' i iff'-f:'.53f-"fri 1455- Mfi,fg1:.- fn . 'f 'jiiklfif 1 5i5q?:gi55-fffffi if " ' - Q ni- .14-,vpfefvr q5!5,.f..v.-Q5 ..'n.p.f. .-A ww- 1-was ja, ff? ttlff ' ,.,,gff1 ,P-4 4'-Q52 lylLfi3i?f4?Li!:5 Ji if f"2LfL4'QE31-."'4 e,f '-.qi 5- 5: 412:03 ggi "QQ l13'?2'2a EFL .lh':s1f'e"f3 A f'1f. ?55fe'Wt'11fa13"'ff'3-raffiiffi'Puff: -Zr2".f2 'Fil' may :re ye, 5 'mf'fifi'IQg. I fgmie, 1- -i is W -. I ' I - "1-ft i 'E,,:g:13.'cf"lf'-reg-rf -, r , ,w vt i fir . V Q 5 gizig srz. 1 -rffe.i'it2.g mipgiui , i + .mv ,V 35 ., 3 , .Ar "ra: N 'i -- ,: llllllllm ll A , Mm All nhlltrtgattllf-1 gi ,P i" eg-lg ,Q 'P +l-:ii-v--'f 'C'--:fi-wlfiiifig' I LD ta fig-a ffiifin mfs - fsfft'-erii Eff- '23 -rf if-1-F: :L ' f . T535 - I, . . .i- ., d -3 .. ,fx H 1 'Ti-.Q 55151.16-1 ,a.j f?'T?f1 gig 1'-TE OLD BLUE GATE 24 DR. FRANK PARKER DAY. President of Union College and Chancellor of U niou University 25 up X mv aff'T,..-32,7 -5- I WI' v'tIl,I12-4 I is axiomatic that we never fully value anything until we have lost it. So deeply have I been impressed, through their lack, of the value of health in general, and sleep in particular, that one night in a hospital my thoughts began to How in rhyme and rythm: Seven long nights my eyes stared wide. Time was no more a flooding tide, But a pool stagnant black and deep, Then first I knew the worth of sleep. P Curious, isn't it, that every literate man, yes and even the illiterate, strives to put his emotional life into verse. Why? Wotilcl be a good query to put to the professor of psychology, who would doubtless give you some kind of answer. And as I lie on a sandy couch in the Florida sunshine, watching young fellows brown as berries scamper laughing along the beach, to nip in and out of the breakers, I often think that I would give all I am and possess to have similar health and be twenty again. W'ell, if health is such a jewel of great price, I should try to apply that knowledge for the good of Union. And that I intend to do. I have been think- ing a great deal how year by year we might improve our health service, how we might get more adequate knowledge about our bodies, and instructions about their care. Next year I hope we shall have a small intirmary, so that when you are half sick or recuperating, it will not be necessary to lie around dormitories cr fraternity houses, but instead be looked after by a nurse in suitable sur- roundings. Games and sports were invented, I suppose, for two reasons, first, because people enjoyed them and second, because they helped to build up and maintain good health. Since a large part of this volume will consist of pictures of teams and contests perhaps it might not be amiss for me to say something briefly about sports and what we like to do in Union College. Curling, golf and football along with whiskey and Presbyterianism came out of Scotland' which we often think of as a dour country. It is introduced the bag-pipe into Scotland as a joke, the point of have never seen, and it is just possible that the Irish may also the Scotch the five items I have named above, for the Irish Tennis is an ancient sport played by the English and French are many references to it in literature. Lacrosse is an Indian early times, hundreds took part on a side over wide stretches of is a development of cricket and rounders under the American said that the Irish which the Scotch have unloaded on race is inventive. nobility, for there game in which, in country. Baseball genius for organ- ization. Basketball, a modern game, developed, I surmise, when football men .gg ll E2 I If N il lp x Z4 l i s f A 5EiEEE'Et?f'i5":?" "h'ff'- E' 'x:::::5':!f "4" I 5.7-ji-.., , q""" ,,, 26 K f Vg ,, T A - 5--IS:.1 ::'1?35F"-ei iiii' , E2 5 7. who wished to keep fit during the winter tossed a football from one to another and took sides to keep the ball. But. whatever the origin of games, their initial purpose was to let off steam, keep fit, preserve health and to have some fun. It is always distressing to me when I learn that some particular undergraduate hates football, dreads the weari- ness of the practice, and plays only because he feels it a duty to the college and his fellows. For when the element of fun is squeezed out of a game, it becomes indeed a sorry thing. At Union College I hope we shall have every undergraduate taking two hours of each day for some sport that he truly and heartily enjoys. Anyone who has been an athlete knows the joy of feeling fit, the happy co-ordination of brain and muscle, the glory of "The boxer's trim Of brain divinely knit to limb." Let us not forget at Union our slogan, "Athletics for all," for a genuine and participating interest in sports may be carried on with benefit and pleasure through a man's whole life. In closing, let me congratulate the student body council in particular for the sincere efforts you have and improve your own body politic. Your greatest generally and the student made this year to reform problem, of course, is to learn how to deal with your general student body meetings. A hundred years ago old Eliphalet Nott told the professors and undergraduates of Union College that large bodies of legislators or executives were difficult to handle. "Wl1e11 two men are discussing a matterf, he said, "there is some reason. If eight or ten join in the discussion there is less reason, and if a hundred attempt a dis- cussion there is no reason at all." More and more the tendency, in a world that wants to get something done is to put the power in the hands of a few well-selected men and to free them from the continual review of the large number that has selected them. It is possible that some of your difficulties might be minimized by having fewer student body meetings-perhaps only two a semester-and putting more confidence in the representatives you have selected. To all teachers and undergraduates of Union College, I wish good luck, good fortune and good health. FRANK P. DAY, ' President. I0 NI s, ,.,.. .-4.51 I -" 5 ' W-1 I'IC"'.l'::..'ul .ii1f'fi, 157 l " ' , In ,x In l...lI::::.llipIH, if 5: , ilu..g:,::.lc. , --7-' . 7 ' H1 1 .1 alll- 59 l - . f'F'1': . .a .iJl"-U-U-IF f-we T IH-Ll DR. CHARLES ALEXANDER RICHMOND ' President Emeritus Q w f OW! IN MEMORIAM DR. EDWARD EVERETT HALE 29 F.. B 6 AW 1 5 Q ..2,.sl1eEllYllg..f ' Q' H5151 .lllsllil X .-,,, " M,-..1q it 1 . -Vx ll., ,ii , 1 A -X A' ' ' I ,I .' 'I - A in 'll "I . 'yd 4, m ,ti 4 - fn :Cr D1 X ' ' I T fum T. - ln annie., Iv TI-IE l934 Trustees EX OFFICIO l'ION. HERBERT H. LEI-IMAN ..................,................. . ............. ,.... . . Governor or EDWIN W. RICE, JR., Eng.D., Sc.D. ............. . HON. NICHOLAS V. V. FRANCHOT, AM. ....... . EDGAR S. BARNEY, Sc.D. FRANK BAILEY, LL.D. ............................................... . CHARLES B. MCMURRAY, ALM., L.H.D. ........ WILLIS R. WHITNEY, Ph.D., Sc.D. ................ . I'IIRAM C. TODD, Ph.D. ............................ . ROBERT PORTER PATTERSON, A.B. ALBERT M. BANKER, A.B. ............... . WILLIAM J. SMITH, B.S. HON. HAROLD J. HINRIAN, A.M. HARRY B. LAKE, Ph.D. ....................... . JOHN C. VAN VOAST ............ S. G. H. TURNER ................. ALLEN H. JACKSON ,......... NVILLIAM H. VVRIGI-IT .................................. . HERBER'F C. MANDEVILLE, L.H.D. ......... . WALTER C. BAKER, BS. ......................... . New York State Schenectady Olean New York City Brooklyn Troy Schenectady New York City New York City New York City New York City Albany New York City Schenectady Elmira Schenectady Schenectady . ................... ...... .... E l 1T11I'Z1 New York City GARN ET College Officers FRANK PARKER DAY, M.A., D.Litt., LL,D. .......... .......... P resident EDWARD ELLERY, A.M., Ph.D., Sc.D. ........ ........... D can of Faculty CHARLES F. F. GARIS, MS., SCD. ..... ......... D can of Students ERNEST JULIUS BRRG, ME., Sc.D FRANK BAILEY, L.L.D. .... . Dean. of Engineering Treasurer ANTHONY DIEHOTIILEIGII HOAD1,IES', BS. in CE., SM. ............................,............,... Bursar , , Secretary of the College QHARLLN NLWMAN VVALDRON, A.M. .................... ?SCm,da,,y of mc Graduate Council ESTHER G. ELY . ............ . ..... . ................. JAMES BREWSTER, A.B., B.L.S. ....... . MILTON M. ENZER, A.B. ......... . Registrar Librarian Secretary of the N ew.: Bureau WSF' wtyii '3 "4 . I E .- .. i.--s- 1.-17 -l -1 'ln " Fix! l my i v., , gill' J-I-' Jn iarff' I Z ll'llluF'1' iii .' ,r yrlflifst if-:ILP GEORGE D. Kxzmouc james XY. Mfxvou EDWARD ELLIQRY Department of Ancient Classics GEORGE DWIGHT KELLOGG, Ph.D. ................,.......,................................. .......... . Yale, 1895 Professor of the Latin Language and Literature O HARRISON CADNVALLADER COFEIN, Ph.D. ...,................,,... . johns Hopkins, 1916 Professor of Crock Department of Biology .IAMES XVATT MAVOR, P11.D. ................................................................ .. Canibriclge, 1905 Professor of Biology O ERNEST EDWARD DALE, Ph.D. ........................,.........,..................... . 4 University of Nebraska, 1913 Assistant Professor of Biology O LEONARD BERTRAND CLARK, Pl1.D. University of Manitoba, 1925 flssismm' Professor of Biology O DONALD LANGVVORTHY BURDICK, A.M. ......,...... . Alfred University, 1922 Assiszfazzt Professor of Biology ,, O GERRIT BEVELANDER, Ph.D. Hope College, 1926 Instructor in Biology 32 fD13K IDBK - E: Vr- HFM NV1r.i.1AM KN. Bb:NNE'r1' ERNST I. BERG RAYMONIQ M. HERRICIC Department of Chemistry EDXVARD IzLL1LRY, Sc.D. .....................................................,..... ............... 1 3911, CDB-K, E: Colgate, 1890 Professor of C1Z,c'HLl:Sf7'jF O CHARLES BUELL HURD, 1'h.D. ................................................................. ........ 2 E, TEH NV0rcestc1' Polytechnic Institute, 1915 Professor of Clicniiistry O THOMAS ADAM WILSON, Ph.D. ..,.................................................. ........ A 'TH CDBK 1l1i11oiS University, 1921 flssocfiatc Professor of Clw11iisif1'y O EGBERT KING BACON, Pl1.D. .....................,......................................... AXE, EE, FA, fDA 'F University of Michigan, 1922 K1S5iS11'ClILIf Professor of Cl1c111,isz'ry O FREDERIC COXVLES SCHMIDT, P11.D. lustrmfim' in Clicllzistry O VVILLIAM FIEDLER, JR., B.S. in Ch. A-'lSSiSfClIlf in ClLc'11z,istry 1 I ms.: i IE L 'i' ' I aiwqi EDWARD S. C. SMITH JOSEPH D. Do'.rY CHARLES F. F. Genus Department of Economics XX-'ILLIAM NVHIPPLE BENNETT, Ph.D. Doane College, 1919 Professor of Economies O EARL EVERETT CUMMINS, Ph.D. Hiram College, 1917 A Professor of Economics O DANIEL THEODORE SELKO, A.B. Instructor in Economics Department of Engineering ERNST JULIUS BERG, seo. ,..........................................................,............... EKN, TBH, 2 Royal Polytechnicum, Sweden, 1892 Professor of Electrical Engineering , o Vina X, A it 'gizm- 4 fl itil, I 1' Q ,3. ,Af ,' rl F-.12-'f 1+-1, I7 . ' . I gg?,ge5,,j':'43,. 'Ill 1. v vs 1: f . I g .u. iw. 5""' ? ' . ggi!!! i- L.aL issaaigz 31'-I HUGH MILLER, C.E. Princeton, 1901 Professor of Civil Engineering O JOHN NICHOLAS VEDDER, A.M. .............................................................................. KDBK, 2 Union, 1895 Professor of M eehanics and Tliermodyaznics 34 l i i FRANK C. BARNES ELMER A. TIUMARSH HAROLD A. LARRABEE FREDERICK XVARREN GROVER, Ph.D. ............................................................... AXA, 2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1899 Professor of Electrical Engineering O XVARREN CROSBY TAYLOR, SB. ...............................................................,... ......... . Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1902 Associate Professor of Civil Eiigirzccring O MORTIMER FREEMAN SAYRE, E.M. ............................................... . Columbia University, 1907 Associate Professor of Applied lVIecha1Lics O JOHN MACDONALD, 13.5. in C.E. ' New York University, 1906 Tliompson-Starrett Associate Professor of Civil Erlgirieeriwig O RUSSELL ALGER HALL, C.E. University of Michigan, 1916 Associate Professor of Civil Eiigirieeriiig O HENRY ALBERT SCI-IAUFFLER, M.S. in C.E. ...................... ......... Q Princeton, 1912 Assistant Professor of Civil Erigirieeriiig 35 TBI-I, -n v-1 -4 ? 2:-. 2: h-J K2 l sag' 1 A ,ag IU A R fi , . iii' V xi " ...... ii HERE 5 --- - it gfg' ill'-Q-il!- 1' fi in 'Y . JOHN H. Wlmwlziz PETER I. Wow WILSON L. GODSHALL ANTHONY HOADLEY, S.M. ................................................... ........... ....... I Q .AEE Union, 1923 J flssistam I rofcssor of Civil E71-fjilIL'L'7'i1lg O ANTHONY -IAMIZS PALERMO. PED Union, 1922 1l1.S'fI'1LCl'O7' in Electrical Erzgirzccrizig O SYLVESTER JACOB HAEFNER, Ph.D. in EIS. ................ ........ , AUD, EE Union, 1925 I11.s'z'ruc!or in Elccfrical EI'lfji7ZCC7'i1Lg Department of English RAYMOND MORSE HERRICK, A.M. ..................................,.. .......... QI PFA Columbia University Professor of English O JAMES SPROAT GREEN, JR., M.Litt. Princeton, 1916 flssisfalzt Professor of Englislz and Ilia History of Art O BERTRAND MAX XVAINGER. A.M. ....................................................................... ........ 1 DBK Cornell, 1925 ' Assistaiit Professor of English O DXNIG1-IT VAN AVERY, A.M. Union, 1926 flssistcmt Professor of Envglisli IN. ' .bln ru ., 4' -Z I' use ' if ' '- I F555 ' F? if flf -Q 36 'VT I a -n ..l.. ""' L l Q JOHN L. AIARCH H. I-AURr:NcE .ACHILLI-IS JAMES BREXVSTER EDVVARD LINUS CARROLL, A.M. ................................. ........ 1 MMD Union, 1927 Instructor in English O DANIEL RICHARD VVEEKS, A.B. Union, 1928 Instructor in English O PHILIP ALLERTON SMITH, A.M. Bowdoin College, 1929 Instructor in English O JCI-IN ALBERT STANFORD, A.B. ................................. ......... CD EK, fDBK, EE Union, 1931 Instructor in English O CODMAN I-IISLOP, A.B. Union, 1932 Assistant in English Department of Geology EDWARD STAPLES COUSENS SMITH, A.M. .................. KA, AXE, EE, PA Bowdoin, 1918 Professor of Geology 371 S I glqllllf l l li IS I ly' .7'.'Q.1n 11' r I 1 . ill. x .I Mt, If .U ,l , 'Il '2'..ff'4 " . 1.11 fini Q 3 I :Quiet z -- , ' -' Dx 1 E :lx ...fi .n " ' - 5. O' . :q'Q4,' f ' L FREDERICK WILLCOX TOPPAN, M.S. in Geology Instrnctor in Geology Department of History JOSEPH DAVID DOTY, Ph.D. .................................................................................... ZAE, TKA Pembroke College, Oxford, England, 1923 Professor of History O LEONARD CHESTER JONES, D. es L. ...................... ............ I CA, CDBK Princeton, 1907 Professor of History O FREDERICK LIDELL BRONNER, A.M. .......................... . Union, 1923 Assistant Professor of History O GEORGE SUDE RMANN, A.M. ...........,.........................................,..,... . University of Kansas, 1924 Assistant Professor of History Department of Mathematics CHARLES FREDERICK FLEMING GARIS, Sc.D. ....... . Lafayette, 1903 Professor of Jldfatlielnatics O DAVID SHERMAN MORSE, Ph.D. .......................................... . New York University, 1917 Professor of Jldfatlieniatics O ARTHUR DODD SNYDER, A.M. Lafayette, 1911 Associate Professor of Zllatlieniatics O FREDERICK JAMES I-IYLAND BURKETT, Ph.D. New York University, 1917 Assistant Professor of M atliemotics -gms ' ' 1' ,,. '-I ' f ', 122: Y 'iii his 3i3gg.g.:.,n F, 38 155: I .1 ,:..l..-i--1: i - AY fDAK EN, QJBK fDKfD, IDB K, EE' GARNET CHARLES THOMAS MALE, ................................................ ........... 2 E Union, 1913 Assistant Professor of Matltclizatics O ORIN JAMES FARRELL, Ph.D. ..................,............................................ TYQ, EI12, KPIII Lebanon Valley College, 1921 Assistant Professor of Mathematics 0 FLOYD EDVVARD ULRICI-I, A.M. ...............,........................ ............ 2 E Union, 1926 I ustructor in Mathematics O GRIFFITI-I BALEY PRICE, Pl1.D. Instructor in Illatlicmatics O EDVVIN WOODWORTH I-IAMLIN, Ph.D. in E.E.": ........ ......... A X, EE Union, 1926 I ustructor in Mathematics Department of Modern Languages FRANK COE BARNES, Ph.D. ................................,....................................................... ............ 117 BK ' VVilliams, 1887 Profcssor of M odcru Languages O MORTON COLLINS STEVVART, Ph.D. ............................. .......... 9 AX, CIJBK A Brown, 1894 Associate Professor of German O ROBERT VVARNER CROVVELL, A.M. ......,......................................... .......... 9 AX, QDBK Anllierst, 1889 Associate Professor of German and French O FERNAND JAGU, L.S. Rennes University, 1886 Assistant Professor of French and Spanish O EDUARDO GOMEZ-DURAN, B.Ph. University of Bogota, Colombia, 1922 Instructor in Spanish O AUGUSTUS PHILIP ZABUESNIC, Ph.M. 'University of Munich, 1912 Instructor in French 39 gill -1'--ig Ill-ii ' A 5 x xg istu mf' il fi F -' I f M yt wuz ills! J.-2-.isf . if ' ij, P H' 23" 'TVA A.-its IP 1 Xi Ln ..,. 1 lllll.LilII'ffa-1 fig ' If kiwi ll 'fi' 'wrt Evil it :IL " - if Tl-IE l934a KURT VON FORSTMEYER, A.B. Salzburg and Freistaclt, 1923 Instructor in German and Frcnclz Department of Music ELMER ARTHUR TIDMARSH, A.A.G.O. Guilmant Organ School V Director of Hlnsic Department of Philosophy HAROLD ATKINS LARRABEE, Ph.D. .,...................,l.................... ........ QD BK Harvard, 1916 Professor of Pliilosoplzy O PHILIP STANLEY, Ph.D. Penn State, 1923 Assistant Professor of Plzilosoplzy Department of Physical Education and Athletics JOHN HAROLD WITTNER, B.S. ................................................................................................ CDA9 Union, 1920 Associate Professor of Physical Education O GARRETT MARCELLUS CLOXNE, M.D. ........ ............ 1 INT' Union, 1911 College Physician O CHARLES FAYETTE ROURKE, M.D. Union, 1920 Assistant College Physician O GEORGE ELLIOT HATFIELD, A.M. ...................................,................. .......... E AP Ohio State University, 1922 Assistant Professor of Physical Education O NVILFORD HERMAN KETZ, LL.B. ..................................,........................ .......... E AK University of Michigan, 1929 Assistant Professor of Physical Education 40 GARNET NELSON VVALLACE NITCHMAN. .-LB. ....................,....,. .. Union, 1930 l11strurl'm' in Physical Educarioziz. Department of Physics PETER IRVING NVOLD, Ph.D. .................................,..........,..............., ......... P A University of Oregon, 1901 Professor of Physics ren , 23, KDRK O VLADIMIR ROJANSKY, Pl1.D. ........................................................... ........... 4 DBK, EE yVliitman College, 1924 1-lssociafv Professor of Physics O FRANK JOHN STUDER, Ph.D. ...........................,........................................... ........ E E University of British Columbia, 1921 xlssistcmt Professor of Physics O EVERETT W1-IITING THATCHER, Ph.D. ............................ ..........., 4 DBK, EE Oberlin University, 1926 .flssisfam Professor of Phys-ics O EARL MILTON BIGSBEE, MS. in Ph. ................... ......... E E Union, 1928 Instructor in Physics O AUGUSTUS HENRY FOX, A.M. ..................................,.................................. CDPA, IDBK Westerii Reserve University, 1925 Instructor in Physics O GEORGE ARTHUR CAMPBELL, BS. in Ph, i 1-lssistant in Physics Department of Political Science VVILSON LEON GODSHALL, Pl1.D. .............................,..................... AXA, HPM, TKA University of Pennsylvania, 1919 Professor of Polfifical Science 41 UISEUI N' ww' P ,cf JE lil 1? JL, arg 'O fy- ' - --J F . " "' 3:1543 'U lslr' FI lf. .1 2 -: -. B gif 55 .21 N c 3 : J - -1 1. ' 5 E:-1: ' EE EFT: Fi E? E555 ' ' : : gg - : S.. I - T . , 1 W I A fy gay R5 .a',,...--iv, TI-IE I934 ALEXANDER GORDGN DEWEY, Ph.D. McGill University, 1911 Associate Professor of Political Science O HAROLD RQBERT ENSLOW, A.M. ................................................ ....... H EA, IIFM University of Kansas, 1926 Assistant Professor of Political Science O SAMUEL MOODIE HESSON, LL.D. ............................................... ......... CD BK, ONE Union, 1927 Assistant Professor of Political Science Department of Psychology JOHN LEVVIS MARCH, Ph.D. .................,...................................................,.... ........... A KE, fDBK Lafayette, 1883 Professor of Psychology 0 FRANKLIN CHESTER CHILLRUD, A.M. ............................ .........,. A KE, QBK University of Wlisconsin, 1922 Assistant Professor of Psychology O ERNEST MAYFIELD LIGON, Ph.D. Texas Christian University, 1920 Assistant Professor of Psychology Department of Religion HENRY LAURENCE ACHILLES, Ph.B. .............,.................................,... ........... A W Yale, 1911 Director of Religions Tlforle and Bible Study Librarian JAMES BRENVSTER .................................................,........................ ........ 11 "P Trinity, 1908 A 'I' ,ft K iq! D. LT lll: X f Ms-, have 42 -.--,- ,. ,, li 5 :Q-5E4i xiii' I' Eh? 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' 115, "2--js?-lip , ,, -- f' ' ,.,,f -L:-gig-2 LASSES r " " fA 51' 1, ,H 77 gg 'S -5'. . .lf Q in 5 E., :gf ,KL I I Lhlvilfflw' ji!'F'!14 -w' f ly!"-'11, 'al' ' iii' , iisisag- iw-- ' " 1wf"" E GARNET UNION COLLEGE GARNET 1934 Q ONE TWO THREE FOUR O ANOTHER WEEK OR SO AND WE'RE HAS BEENS Q A JOB A JOB MY KINGDOM FOR A JOBQWELL IT'S BEEN A SWELL FOUR YEARS Q DO YOU REMEMBER THE NIGHT AFTER WE DRUBBED RENSSELAER O LET'S SEE JOE AND JACK AND BOB AND WELL WHO WASN'T OVER AT CHARLIE'S 0 IT TAKES DRAG TO KNOCK DOWN A JOB LIKE THAT THESE DAYS Q LEAVE ROOM IN YOUR TRUNK FOR YOUR SHEEPSKIN O A JOB 47 W "r .fi-il -'-1' I lair! ' Senior Class History ROl3lil1'l' E. lXlL'RR,xY .. ..... Prusidcvzt XVILLIA M T. l3LDRlED . . . . .Viva-P1'csidu1zt G. Gmc.-xRD BA1:N12'r'l', JR. . .... .S'ccra!ary hlonx I. A. LvoNs ,... ...Twc1sm'cr Ronald' E. NIURRAY Horn at the very Hood tide of prosperity and national well-being, the Class of 1933 has lived through momentous changes in the world order. Ours has been no cloisterecl life. Slightly removed from the cares of the World, those of us enjoying the shade of Academe have yet been ahle to watch and to learn. We have seen the soaring speculation of greedy materialists plunge great corporations into linancial ruin and impoverish thousands upon thousands of innocent people. ' i, E ll 48 235.5 xi 'h'."2'l 3.517 W" ll If, '. Eglin We have seen the huge industrial plants of ou1' own city of Schenectady still their machines, bank their fires and spew out into the streets hundreds and hundreds of bewildered men who must find food for themselves or starve. We have seen the collapse of European governments, the rise of dictators and the overthrow of dictators. We have heard the ominous rumblings of War in Asia, and of threatened war in Europe. We have lived through a political revolution in our own United States, and twice have we seen the forces of anarchy and unrest march on the seat of our government. ' We have seen tragedy and helplessness in the face of want, in our home. Where are we, who will leave Union College within such a few brief weeks, going to hnd ourselves in this chaotic world? Are we to join the hosts of men who have no work, no hopes, and give way to dissatisfaction and despair? Or are we going to face reality with courage, the apparent crumbling of civilization with the firm belief that maturity and intelligence must hnd a path through the track- less wastes, must develop leaders who will guide the whole world out of the wilderness? Are we educated men or frightened weaklings? Has Union College per- formed her duty to her sons? And have Union's sons performed their duty to themselves ? VVILLIAM P. PALMER, Class H iszforian. 49 A-' u. J 9523145 lx' 103' fnml tit ' 5,17 , wi Zim ag , 2: ' Y 513.4 f u .QUE iii' , 1 tytgulilmwli lil ,,rsQil.i4fr Htl - iiiuiig: it-jul' D , .u--. 72:2 -1.. 1 I ,7',f.f..-..- ig fig..-rg: N ei M W A .ff i E'-1-:4i Tl-IE I934 Senior Class .l'TAROLD J. LACKLEY .......................................................,,.................................. .......,. QD FA House folznstown, N. Y. fDFAg Baseball qi, 2, 3, 45, Basketball 42, 3,41 'Qf NIGEL POULTNEY ALTMAN ..............................,........................ ..,............ .... ......... S . S . S. C. Malden-on-Hudson, N. Y. Member of Mountebanks, President, Glee Clubg Choir, English Club, Fencing. Q, FREDERICK VVILLIAM ARNDS .............................................................. ........... 9 NF. House Sch.e1fz.ectady, N. Y. QNEQ Cheerleader KZ, 3, Lljg French Club C2, 3, 4j, Treasurer Qfij, Chairman Social Committee QS, 4jg Classical Club UU, Physics Exhibition. Q' VVILLIAM LANDRETH BAILEY ............................................................ .......... B GH House Sclzeuecfady, N. Y. Freshman Football, Band Leader, Glee Club. fs ARCHIBALD VVILLIAM BAIRD .......................................................... ........ 1 426 Baker Ave. .S'cl1r1vicctady, N. Y. 9 DONALD BRUCE BANNERMAN ...,..................................,...................,...,.... ..... ........... 1X f I. S. N. C. East' Bridgewater, M ass. German Club, Pyramid Club. Q GUSTAVE GERARD BARNETT, IR. ................................................................................................ KA Lodge Asbury Park, N. J. KAQ O.A.N.g Idol Club, President Q2jg Secretary O.A.N. f2jg Sophomore Discipline Committee QZDQ Freshman Footballg Fresh- man Basketballg Varsity Football Q2, 3, 4jg Varsity Basketball CZ, 35, Track f2jg Secretary Student Council ffljg Secretary Terrace Council C455 Secretary Senior Class Q4jg Philatelic Club. 50 .GARNET PETER JOHN BAVISOTTO .................,..................................................................,...,,..................... ACDA House Corning, N. Y. AfDA5 Football Cl, 2, 3, 4D 5 Light Heavy-weight VV'restling Cham- poinship CZ, 3, 4j5 Punting and Drop Kicking Championships CSD5 Student Council5 Psychology Club5 Baseball C3j 5- Interfrat- ernity Basketball Cl, 2, 3, 41. 'Q' GORDON ROY BELL ......... ..,.................................................................,... ..................... 1 0 59 Park Ave. Rochester, N. Y. IPY5 HAE5 Concordiensis Cl, Z, Sj, Associate Editor C3j5 Y.M.C.A. Cabinet Cl, Z, 3, 455 Candidate-Manager of Tennis CZD 5 French Club Cl, Z, 3j, Secretary C255 Juris Prudentia CSD5 Psy- chology Club C3, 4j5 Philomathean Society C4j. 6 ALLEN BERNSTEIN ......................................................................................................... ....... ll fl. S. N. C. Albany, N. Y. KDBK5 French Club CZ, 3j5 Cosmopolitan Club CZD. Q SHELDON DANIEL BLOOD ............................................................................................................ DAX House Amsterdam, N. Y. QAX5 Band Cl, Z, 355 Glee Club CZ, 355 Golf Team CZD5 Inter- fraternity Council C355 Instrumental Club CZ, 33. fs JOHN VVICK BONNELL ................................................................................ ..............,.................... I CA Lodge Cleffclaud, Ohio KA5 O.A.N.5 Football Cljg Band Cl, Z, 3, 4j5 Sophomore Soiree Committee5 Tiger's Eye5 Candidate-Manager of Swimming C255 Tennis CZD5 Frosh Peerade Committee C355 Glee Club Cl, 41. Q PARKER NORTHRUP BRIDGES .............................,.................,................................................... fDFA House Rochester, N. Y. IDFA5 Freshman Football5 Choir CZJ5 Candidate-Manager of Footballg Assistant Manager of Tennis C3j 5 Tennis Manager C4j 5' Eta Kappa Nu. Q, DAVID SAUNDERS BRONVN ............................,............................................. ................... M . S. N. C. Newburgh, N. Y. Pyramid Club, Vice-President C35 4j 5 145 lb. Boxing CSJ5 Psychol- ogy Club5 Disciplinary Committee CZQ. 51 --SU E DNLULLFE, M lm! ig 2 f .1, U.-l .6 A -,af N'-'FH-TEX ' . 1-.1 , .- . .-. ' ...QS ' - -if F 9 1- 4 gg 2 , li ' gl 'lt -a 11 L- . 1. - L - ' ' 1 ' E 55:25 -- ' 5? il I 'Z' I .. .- E..- l,.- .. 1 V -nug- ,,,i,..-1- EDWARD WATSON BUELL ............. ..,. ................ . .................................... ........ A X A House Schenectady, N. Y. AXA. is VVARD I-IAGEMAN BUMPUS ......................................A,...........,............. ........ A X House N ewark, N. Y. AXQ French Club, Band. cs ROBERT FRANCIS BURNS ...............,......................................................., ......... A XA House Schenectady, N. Y. AXA, TKAQ Philomathean Society fl, 2, SJ, Secretary Q3j 5 Var- sity Debating, Secretary Q3jg Mountebanksg Associate Editor of Garnet, Interfraternity Council, French Club, Idol Boardg Win- ner of Junior Oratorical l932g I-Iale Clubg Sectional Finals of Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest. Q' IEMANUEL ARTHUR CAHEN ................................................,............... ...... l 048 Keyes Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. Qs ERN1sS'r A. CAPELLIQ ....... ................................................................. .......... .......... ......... A Y H o use H ollis, L. I. AYg Cross-Country CZ, 35, Captain MJ, Freshman Cross-Country and Relay Team, Indoor Track Team, Tiger's Eye, Spanish Club, American Society Civil Engineers, President of A.S.C.E., Var- sity Lacrosse Q3, 4j. Q ' GERARD FIONORE CAYE .................................................................................................................. fIPA9 House Brooklyn, N. Y. GND, Spanish Club, American Society of Civil Engineers, Var- sity Swimming QQ, Freshman Football, Freshman Peerade Committee. -is I-IEBER Mn.'roN CIIADDERDON ............................................................,...................................... S. S. N. C. Room .-lcra, N. Y. TKA, Philomathean Society KZ, 3, 4jg Varsity Debate, Sopho- more Qratoricalsg Track QZDQ Wixiner Goodrich-Duane Debate. fs Ick T Ripe CLARKE ...... ...... ................................................................................................... I C 2 I-louse lVatc-rzfeliet, N. Y. KE, HAR, F.ditor-in-Chief of 1933 Garnetg Publication Board f3jg Manager of Freshman Basketball QSQ, Interfraternity Coun- cil, Vice-President ffijg Junior Prom Committee, Y.M.C.A. Cabinet Cfijg Philomathean Society Q2, Sjg Sophomore Discipline Commitee. A .. 'il t x I i Ill: A .. .- 1 'il""""' C5 A R bl E T THOMAS POWERS CLINTON .............................................,........................................................ KIJAC9 House Troy, N. Y. fDA9g Psychology Club Q2jg French Club C15 5 Concordiensis Staff, Columnist. Q, GEORGE WILLIAII CODMAN ...........................................................................,,......................... CDAQ House Hoosick Falls, N. Y. fI3A9g French Club QI, Zjg Lacrosse fljg Assistant Manager of Lacrosse C355 Band C2jg Freshman Footballg Manager of La- crosse C4jg Athletic Board UU. Q' OLIVER CHARLES COLBURN ................................................................... .......................... 1 073 Dean St. Sclzencctady, N. Y. Freshman Cross-Country, German Club QQ, Intermural Wrest- ling. is NELSON PITTS COLLAMER ......................................................................................................... BGH House Sclzmwctady, N. Y. BQHQ Varsity Football Cfijg junior Editor Concordiensis. Q EVERETT VALEN1'INE CONNOR ............................,..........,...............................,.................. 111 River Rd. Sclzenectady, N. Y. Freshman Basketball, Idol Contributor, English Club, Idol Board. 0 DAVID VVILLIAM CORWIN .................................... - ...................,.................................................. IPAQ House Highland, N. Y. 4DA9g French Club Q1, Zjg Manager Freshman Basketballg La- crosse Squad. Q GEORGE FRANCIS CRAIG ....................................................................... ........ 1 007 Union St. Starksboro, Vt. Q LEROY HENRY CRAIG ......... ..............,.................................... ....... 1 O 07 Union St. Starksboro, Vt. 'Qs DUANE WILSON CRICIITON ........................................................................,............................. B01-I House ' Fairport, N. Y. BSU, Assistant Manager Swimming Qfijg Manager Swimming HJ, Golf Squad C31 ,in www 1 1 Q ll'l IM -:Pi 2' 3 X 7x n Nfl .-'-' FP' "IT ' WMWMWW QMMQQQ swiss? Q, XSWEQ .I jf tl EEE 'A l I THE l934-I 'CLARENCE VVILLIAM DAv1Es ..,........................................................... ............ 8 34 Lincoln Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. Spanish Club Q55 A.S.C.E. Q LINDON LEE DAVIS .......................................,................................................................................... CINE House Fort Miller, N. Y. QNEQ Debating, Manager Freshman Hockey C3, 455 Lacrosse Q2, 3, 45, German Club. Q .ROBERT JAMES DAY ......... ......................................................................... ....... S t op ZZ Albany Rd. Schenectady, N. Y. as JoIIN FREDERICK DEARSTYNE .................,..................................................,.............................. XII' Lodge Albany, N. Y. X'Pg Glee Club fl, 35, Psychology Club C2, 3, 45 Manager of Track C355 Winter Track Q2, 355 Lacrosse Ql5g Frosh Peerade Committee Q35g Choir C355 Student Council, Secretary of Ath- letic Board. ' Q' WILLIAM J. DELLES ....................................................................,................................................ 132 Rosa Rd. Schenectady, N. Y. TKAg Instrumental Club f15g Philomathean Club, Van Orden Prizeg Goodrich-Duane Extemporaneous Debateg Idol Boardg Secretary Classical Clubg Radio Debate. 'C JOHN ALLEN DIETZ ........ ........................,..................................... .......... l 6 9 Furman St. Schenectady, N. Y. Q, FREDERICK VVALTER DILL, JR. ................................................................................................ fDA9 House Schenectady, N. Y. iPAQ, Freshman Basketball, Varsity Basketball QZ, 35, Captain f35, Varsity Baseball CZ, 3, 45, Co-Captain Q45, Varsity Football 145g Sophomore Soiree Committee, Idol Club, Frosh Football, Junior Prom Committee, ex-ofhciog President of Junior Class, American Society Civil Engineersg Student Council Q3, 455 Ter- race Council C45. fo LIENRY WITIIINCTON DILL, JR. ........................................................,....................................... AX House Schenectady, N. Y. AXg 255 Freshman Hockey Squadg Varsity Hockey Squad KZ, 35 3 Hockey Team C455 Lacrosse Squad tl, 255 Student Assistant in Department of Geology. 'X ' YV t 1, ' 4 ' ,'dJM'I 'F in 5 17 ' VX- ? I 'Z 4 ' I L' , 9 7 A GARNET NICIIOLAS ELIAS DJIMAS ............................................,..................... ....... 1 40 Jay St. Kastoria, Greece ' President of Liberal Club. Q 'IOSEPH IQENNETH DONO1-lUIi ................................................................................... ........... A HN House Amstcafdam, N. Y. AHNQ Associate Editor 1933 Garnet, Juris Prudentiag Psychology Club 'QB' GEORGE FERDINAND DLTNCAN ....................,......................,........................................ 19 Snowden Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. Glee Club CZ, 3, 415 Spanish Club Cl, 2, 3, 4jg Chess Club, Vice- President f2j, President Q3, 43, Psychology Club C41 'Q' VVILLIAM THOMAS ELDRED ........................,.............................................. .......................... 9 NE House Delarzson, N. Y. 9NEg HAEQ Editor-in-Chief of Concordiensisg President of Pi Delta Epsilon, Publication Board, Secretary of Class C3jg Vice- President of Class f4jg News Bureaug Candidate Business Man- ager of Handbookg President of Juris Prudentia C3jg Graduate Council Representative for Class of 19335 Senior Class Com- mittee, Associate Editor of Garnet. 'fb' ELMER VVILLIAM ELLERHOFE .....................................................,. ........... 2 09 McClellan St. Schcrzcctady, N. Y. Glee Club Q3, 45, Pyramid Club f3j. Q, IULIUS EMSPAK ......... ....................................................................... ............ 8 1 5 Francis Ave. ScIz.cn.cc1'ady, N. Y. fDBK. Qs, jo11N CHESTER ENGLISH ........................................................................ ............................... f DAQ House Albany, N. Y. 4IYA9g HAE5 Business Manager 1933 Garnetg Assistant Manager of Hockey C3jg Assistant Cheerleader CZ, 3j, Idol Clubg Publica- tion Board f3Qg Manager of Hockey f4jg Head Cheerleader f4jg Tennis Squad Q45-. Q, . .'foHN AUGUS'1'INE Esrosliro ............................................................ ......... 2 4 Nott Terrace Jlfeclzaniiwille, N. Y. -Q A I tim , .Fifi -Q T3 ii -g 'K :fl-Ili wks 1 55 Wit I ' 1-ju l 1 , Q . bpd. ,. ,L A , y y ,g'v.,- '5 l 'IF 1... 1: 4, R, ?11!.lvCH1gSiS7.5s:. 5 171 si iaif Ill iv - f Qi L, Nl 1 , ,lil -1713.5 NVQ . ff .QV Aypg . ll F--'..i.'N7-':,-.f 551 lllllrl-f,' .nl figq 4, UQ ' 'lil E, I ff gl f lnrillf- ll Ji, ll' "TCC , 'ill-2,,"i.-V TI-IE IQ34 JAMES PETER FAULIS1 ..............................,................................................................................... AGA House Corning, N. Y. Af-IDA, Freshman Football, Varsity Football CZ, 3, 42, 158 Pound XfVrestling Champion Cl, ZJ, Drop Kicking Champion Clj, Inter- fraternity Track Cl, 21, Junior Prom Committee, Associate Edi- tor 1933 Garnet, Varsity Track C3j, Commencement Banquet Committee, Interfraternity Basketball Cl, 2, 3, 4J. 'Q- THOMAS PATRICK FINEGAN ....,.........,.......................................................................................... AY House Brooklyn, N. Y. AY, O.A.N., Tiger's Eye, Freshman Football, Sophomore Class President, Sophomore Soiree Committee, Chairman of Junior Prom Committee, Varsity Football CZ, 3, 4J, Varsity Lacrosse CZ, 3, 4j, Classical Club: Psychology Club, Associate Editor of 1933 Garnet, Terrace Council, Student Council C3, 45, Vice- Chairman C4'j, Captain Lacrosse C4j. 'Cb' IRICHARD CAGWIN FORBES ......................................................... ........ E GJ Place Elmira, N. Y. 2419, Track Squad CZ, 3, 4j. is BERNARD FREEMAN ......... ....................................................................................... R . D. 1, Pearse Rd. Bwtonsville, N. Y. Q JOHN CRANE GARDINER. JR. ........................................................ ............ A ACD House lV0011socket, R. I. AAKIJ. -Q WILLIABI TINDALL GEORGE ...................................................................................................... BGII House Lake Placid, N. Y. BGII, Literary Editor 1933 Garnet, Spanish Club Cl, 2, 3J, Columnist for Concordiensis C4J. Q CUR'1'EN1Us GILLlE1'TE, JR. .......................................................................... , ......... E415 Place New York, N. Y. 2419, Idol Club, Varsity Football Squad C2, 3J, Varsity Lacrosse Squad -CZJ, Varsity Hockey Squad CZ, 3J, Freshman Football Team, Freshman Hockey Team, Freshman Medley Relay Team, Contributor to Idol, Philatelic Club, I-Iale Club, Varsity Lacrosse 635. 56 GARNE-T RAYMOND JOHN GIRVIN .................................................................................................. ....... 111 FA House Sclwrzicctady, N. Y. IDEA, Varsity Swimming Q2, 35, Chemistry Exhibition, Varsity Baseball C3, 45, Psychology Club, Interfraternity Council C45. Q EDWARD :RAYMOND GRAMM Albany, N. Y. Q STANLEY HOLLAND GRAVES ......................................................................................................... KA Lodge Buffalo, N. Y. KA, EE, EKN, Idol Club, Choir, Freshman Y.M.C.A. Cabinet. 'Q- SEDGIE FORD GRIFFITH .......................................,............................ .............................................. EX House Columbia, Miss. EX, CDBK, University of Mississippi fl, 25, Wolfe Scholarship. cf EUGENE JOSEPH HANNA'fTA ....,.........,........................................... ........... A X House lVate1"zJeliet, N. Y. AX, Manhattan College fl, 25. -as GEORGE FRANCIS LIARRIS ...................................................................................................... 811 Stanley St. .S'cI1,cnectady, N. Y. UAE, HFM, Vice-President Q45, Business Manager of Con- cordiensis Q45, Associate Business Manager Q35, Publication Board, French Club fl, 25, President f3, 45, Varsity Debating Team C3, 45, Philomathean Society fl, 2, 3, 45, Classical Club fl, 2, 3, 45 , Undergraduate Director of N. Y. State Interscholastic Debating League C45, Assistant Manager Q35, Associate Editor of Interscholastic Debater C35, Model League of Nations Delega- tion, Chairman C45, Delegate C35, Dean's List fl, 2, 35, Honors Course in Political Science, Delegate to Middle Atlantic Inter- national Relations Clubs Conference Q45. 'Q' GEORGE THOMAS HEFFERMAN ..... .... .................................................................................. . ....... A X House flmstcrdam, N. Y. AX, Philomathean Society fl, 2, 3, 45, Chess Club C35, Assist- ant Manager New Yorlc State Interscholastic Debating League C35, juris Prudentia C25, Honors in Economics. 57 A-F j ,1 M y " 1.577 . '13 fafi sf H 1 gig:-6.i',:...i ' ll Uu!l l1w'llW!- lu, 1 I blk U 4 . 'E' at va, Tl-IE IQ34 ALLEN VVALTER T'T1'INDERSON .......,.............................................................................................. AY House N orthzfillc, N. Y. AY, HAE, German Club Cl, 25, Psychology Club C2, 35, Can- didate Manager of Football C25, Business Manager of Hand- book C35, Biology Club C35, Publication Board. Q' FRANK SEYMOUR HIGGINS .................................,.................................................................... fDA9 House S chencctady, N. Y. fDA9, Varsity Basketball C2, 3, 45, Tennis C25, Freshman Bas- ketball, Baseball Squad, Spanish Club, Student Council C45, Junior Prom Committee C35 g Captain of Tennis. 'fb' LAWRENCE SQUIER HILL ............................................................................. ............................. 1 PY House Schenectady, N. Y. WY, Glee Club C2, 3, 45, Assistant Cheerleader Cl, 2, 35, Track C35- Q LESLIE GILBERT HOLLERAN ....................................................... ......... A Y House Crestwood, N. Y. AY, Cross-Country Cl, 2, 3, 45, Varsity Track C2, 35, Captain Freshman Medley Relay, A.S.C.F. C2, 3, 45, Secretary C45, Co- Holder 125 Pound Wrestliiig Championship C25, Captain-Elect of Varsity Track, President of Spiked Shoe Society, Holder of Cross-Country Course Record. 'Q' LEWIS TRVING HORWIT2 .......................................................................... ............. ................... fb E A House Schenectady, N. Y. QPEA, HFM, CDBK, Concordiensis Cl5, Spanish Club Cl, 25, Philomathean Society Cl, 2, 35, Debating Team C35, Sophomore Oratorical Contest, Treasurer of Pi Gamma Mu C45, Liberal Club C3, 45, Idol Board C45, Candidate for Honors in Economics. 'Q' TATOMOSE ......... ....................................................................................................... 1 056 Gillespie St. N ewburgh, N. Y. Track Cl, 25, Biology Club, Psychology Club, German Club, Pyramid Club. JOHN Q ARTHUR IVERSEN .................................................................................................................................... AX House Schenectady, N. Y. AX, Varsity Football C2, 3, 45, Varsity Basketball C25, Fresh- man Football, Freshman Basketball, Tennis C35, Psychology Club. 'I' 1 tl ' if 1- - ' "i 'J hi I -1- 1 FQv""a' GARNET SCHUYLER DAVIS JENKINS ..................................................,........... .......... I CA Lodge Schenectady, N. Y. KA5 Classical Clubg Psychology Club. 'fb' WALTEIQ JENNINGS ..... ......................................................... ............................. A Y House Beacon, N. Y. AYg Varsity Lacrosse Squad 12, 3, 4jg German Club, Secretary CZJQ Psychology Clubg O.A.N. 'Q ALTON STORER JOHNSTON ..............................,................................................................................... AY House Binghamton, N. Y. AYQ O.A.N., President Q2j3 Candidate Manager Swimmingg Varsity Baseball Squad fl, 2, 3, 455 Lacrosse Squad ffij. Q PETER TRIFDIX ICAPSALIS ........,..................................................... ......,.. 5 29 Lenox Rd. Kingston, Pa. QTEK. Qs IRVING AARON IKATZ ..................,................,.......,.............,..............................,.,................................ KN House Albany, N. Y. KNg Interfraternity Trackg Freshman Cross-Countryg German Club Cljg Psychology Club QZQQ Biology Club ffijg Dean's List Cl, 2, 35- 45, THoMAs IVIICHAEL ICELLY .....,............................................................ ............ R exford, N. Y. Rexford, N. Y. EXQ American Society of Civil Engineers. Q, WILLIAM ROGER KILLEEN ............................................................... ............,....... ...,..... A Y House Schenectady, N. Y. AYg President Freshman Classy Tiger's Eyeg O.A.N. 9 .EAMES GRANT KING .................................................................................................................,........, AX House Schenectady, N. Y. AXg IDBKQ Freshman Footballg Freshman Basketballg Varsity Football Squadg Classical Clubg Sophomore Discipline Committee. Q TQENNETII KIEITII ICING .................................... ............ ..................,............................................... I C E House ' Bloomhcld, N. f. KEg Freshman Cross-Country Squadg Vice-President Freshman "Y" Cabinetg Track Squad CZ, Sjg Debatingg Mountebanks Q3, 45. 59 ' ef SQ' ff31', -PIEWBIII 1 I ' - ..,. I' le I' mv- I '!2:!:!n'rlliu1nu1, , fha", "'fEEvs" I' ' .J I lll..f:t:l::l.lll if i1uJ...::e:f:lc. ,Hag r i' --.4.-ada . .I -..- fiP11+ "' E CTI-IE I934 WILLIAM BRUCE ZKNODERER ........................................................,...,......,..................,....,,............ X511 Lodge Fairjield, Cohn. XW5 Glee Club C155 French Club C155 Lacrosse Cl, 255 Track C155 Freshman Basketball Squad5 Swimming C255 Interfraternity Council C355 Wiiiter Track C355 Athletic Editor 1933 Garnet5 Vice-President of Junior Class5 Y.M.C.A. Cabinet, Treasurer 63,45- Q DONALD JAMES KNOX ............................................................,......................,..................... 1050 Park Ave. Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Lacrosse Squad C155 German Club5 Psychology Club. 'Q' EUGENE KUTY .......... ......,...............................................................,...... .......... A X A House Schenectady, N. Y. AXA5 Freshman Cross-Countryg Spanish Club5 American Society of Civil Engineersg Fencing C155 Psychology Club Cl5. Q WILLIAM RUSSELL RooTE LAFLUIQE, JR. .,.......................,............................ 1009 Union Street Chestertowh, N. Y. FBYD5 HFM5 Freshman Cross Country5 French Club Cl, 2, 35, Vice-President French Club C255 Juris Prudentia C2, 355 Philo- mathean Society C3, 455 Varsity Debate C455 Honors in Political Science C3, 45 5 International Relations Club. Q J-ABIES FULLER LAXYSING, JR. ......................,.....................................,.................... ................ I QA Lodge Philadelphia, Pa. KA5 KBQ75 Tiger's Eyeg Candidate Assistant Manager of Basket- ball C255 Associate Editor 1933 Garnet5 Interfraternity Council C35. 9 ALBERT JOHN LENDER ....................................................................................... ...... ........... 9 N E House Bloomfield, N. f. QNE5 French Club C155 German Club Cl, 25, President C255 DeMolay Club Cl, 255 Cross-Country Squad C255 Fall Track Squad C2, 35. Qs EDWARD RUDOLPH LENDER ...............,.............,...............,....,................................................... GJNE House Bloomfield, N. f. GJNE5 255 Freshman Football Squacl5 Freshman Basketball Squad5 Lacrosse Squad Cl, 2, 3, 455 French Club C155 American Society Civil Engineers Cl, 2, 3,55 Executive Committee C35. .il l lil- asia? its 5:55, 5 i :asa I :ti ,... .-. 60 J GARNET A. C11ARL1as LEVINE .........................................................4........................... .,..................................., K N House Brooklyn, N. Y. KN, CDBK, Sophomore Assistant Editor of Concordiensis, Junior Board of Concordiensis, Glee Club, Instrumental Club, Band, Varsity Track Squad, Candidate Manager of Baseball, German Club, Biology Club, Psychology Club, Associate Editor of 1933 Garnet. Q PIORTON EUGENE LINDSLEY ...... . .......,....... . .....,...................................... .....,................................ A X House Ufhitc Sulphur Springs, N. Y. AX, Freshman Glee Club, Choir fl, ZJ, Glee Club CZ, 3, 4J, Mountebanks. Q J. EVERETT LONGDYKI5 ....................................,...................................... ........... 1 730 Watt Street Schenectady, N. Y. EKN, Chess Club. Q Joi-IN IQENNEDY LYNCH, JR. ........................................................... ................................... GJ AX House Oswego, N. Y. QAX, Glee Club KZ, 3j, Instrumental Club, fl, 2, 3J, Lacrosse Squad CZ, 3, 4J, Associate Editor 1933 Garnet, Classical Club Q3J, Philomathean Society Q3, 4J, Choir QZJ, Manager of De- bate, Varsity Debating f3, 45. -Q JOHN Josnrn ALovsiUs LYONS .............................................................. .................... ID EK House fllbczlzy, N. Y. CDEK, EE, fDBK, Junior Prom Committee, Swimming Squad f3J , Associate Editor Handbook, Associate Editor 1933 Garnet, House Manager of Mountebanks, Sophomore Soiree Committee, Man- ager of' Freshman Football, Band flj, Lacrosse Squad Qlj, Class Treasurer Cl, 4J. so LIAROLD SWANKER MACGowAN .............................................,....................... 408 Mumford Street Sclicuccfady, N. Y. YDBK, HFM, President, German Club fl, ZJ. -fs .Al.BliR'1' CnAR1.Es Mfxrss ............................................................................................................... EX House Lyons, N. Y. EX, Freshman Football Squad, Varsity Football Squad QZJ, Var- sity Lacrosse QZJ, Track Squad CU, French Club, Psychology Club, Philatelic Club, American Society Civil Engineers, Vice- President Q3J, Adelphic Debating Society, Dean's List. 1-'wi -'lg uv' , IM A i llill fill' ge fix 'Q 4 Jxhf FI '1 I',l"l 'H' 'I ,ll nl I I, ,' , ' Y . lib " ' " , ll E 4, mr- It 61 ,V -. ,rife Kiv ' eg? X S ,aa x E- f Z , A Tl-IE l934 JAMES E. MALONE .............. ........................................................,............... .....,...... l 0 O7 Union Street Gl0've1's'ville, N. Y. German Club Qlj g Psychology Club QZJQ Erosh Peerade Com- mittee f3J3 Cross-Country Squad QBJ. 'Q' VVILLIAM MCCARROLL AJARK ....................................................................,...........,............... AAfD House New York City AAfDg Freshman Swimming Squad, Lacrosse Cl, Zjg Football Squad f2jg Varsity Swimming CZ, 3Jg Mountebanlcs fl, 25. Q, PIARRY GORDON MARICIAE ..............,.,..,.....................................................................,.....................,.. AX House Staatsburg, N. Y. AX, Freshman Cross-Country, Varsity Cross-Country, Associate Editor Of Garnet, Skull and Scapelg Track, Y.M.C.A. Cabinet. 'Q' EDWARD BOOTH MATEs .................................4...,...,................................ ,............................... 9 NE House Schenectady, N. Y. QNEQ Glee Club fl, Z, 3, 4J, Student Leader HJ, Choir Cl, 2, 3, 4j 3 Instrumental Club Cl, 2, 3, 4J 5 Mountebanlcs QS, 4,35 Direc- tor of Freshman Glee Club QZJ, Fencing Squad QISJQ String Quartet, Leader of Instrumental Club 045. 'Q' FRANK C. lWAXON, JR. ............................................................,.,,... .......... ....,....... A 1 IJ House Chatham, N. Y. AfDg HAE, Mountebanlcs QU 5 Circulation Manager of Concor- diensis Q4Jg Varsity Track Team Q2Jg lnterfraternity Council. fs, VVILLIAM JAMES MAY, JR. .............................................................................. 529 Cleveland Avenue Schenectady, N. Y. Q GERALD MELOESKY ........................................................................................... ........... ........ A ll 'IE House Sklienectaziy, N. Y. AME, American Society Civil Engineers, Executive Committee QSJQ Spanish Club. 9 FRIEND JAY MILLER ........................................................................ ............ 412 FA House Elmira, N. Y. CIPFA, German Club QIJ. 62 fl. , Iv' Y 7 1 , 'Mx GARNETA NATIIANIEL ALEXANDER MILI.EIi .......................................,............................................ AME House Sclzcncctady, N. Y. AM25 Varsity Swimming CZ, 3, 455 Varsity Track CZ, 355 Spanish Club CZ55 Interfraternity Track Cl, 255 Interfraternity Swimming CZ55 Interclass Track Cl, Z55 Freshman Medley Relay Teamg Freshman Cross-Country5 Horseshoe Champion of College CZ, 35. fo IAXSHMORE LAwsoN LIVINGSTON M1TCl'IELL ......................................... .......... E iD House Crestwood, N. Y. 21115 Freshman Football5 Freshman Basebal15 Varsity Football CZ, 3, 45, Captain C455 Varsity Baseball CZ, 3, 455 Mountebanks C255 Chairman Sophomore Soiree Committee CZ55 Associate Editor Garnet C355 Student Council C3, 45, Chairman C455 Stu- dent Discipline Committee C3, 45, Secretary C455 President Ter- race Council C455 President Student Body C45. Q' FRANK VVALLACR MOIQIQIS ..........................,..................,........................................,.................. CDEK House Bergcnjield, N. f. QEK5 EKN5 Glee Club C155 Instrumental Club Cl55 Freshman Peerade Committee. Qs, ROBERT EMSLIE MIIRRAY ..... . .................... .......... .............. , ................................................... . ........ A X 7 House Sclzerzcctady, N. Y. AY5 Freshman Football 5 Freshman Basketballg Sophomore Dis- cipline Committeeg Frosh Peerade Committeeg Varsity Football CZ, 3, 455 Varsity Basketball CZ, 3, 45, Captain C455 Lacrosse CZ, 3, 455 Student Council C3, 455 Terrace Council5 President Senior Class. Qs MELVI N BERNHARD TVIYERS ..................................................................... ................ fIJ EA House lVaterl'07wi, N. Y. QJEA5 ITAE5 Concordiensis Cl, Z, 3, 45, Managing Editor C455 Glee Club CZ, 3, 455 Manager Musical Club C3, 455 Assistant Business Manager Handbook CZ55 Associate Editor Garnet C355 Classical Clubg Studio Playersg Choir CZ, 3, 455 Cap and Gown Committee C455 Honors in Economics5 Liberal Club, Secretary C35, Executive Committee C45. fs LIORACI3 LEAVENWORTI-I INENVKIRK ............... , ............................ ........ l 7 Rosa Road Schenectady, N. Y. , ' "' I. g xr '15 17974 1 g 63 -if L F ' WE Ear? E yuan -A qx5 a: 'lu M my -5- v. ,fl ,ei fl Fl NW Ill DONALD EDWARD NITCHMAN ...................................................... .......... ........... B 9 H House Schenectady, N. Y. B91-I5 fIJBK5 EE, Freshman Scrap Leader, Manager of Baseball Q4j5 Y.M.C.A. Cabinet, Q2, 315 Interfraternity Council Q35 5 Var- sity Basketball Squad QZj5 Varsity Football Squad Q2, 3, 4j5 Freshman Footballg Frosh Peerade Committee Q3l5 junior Prom Committee Q3j5 Henry Lewis Morgan Honor Ql, Zjg Student Council Q3, 4j5 Terrace Council. Q' JOSEPH SAMPSON OLISNIDIER ..............,..................................... . ............................,....................... KN House ,f1m.szferdam, N. Y. KN5 Glee Club Ql, 2, 3, 455 Tennis Squad Q2, 355 College Dance Orchestra Q3, 4jg Mountebanks Q4j5 Philomathean Society Q3, 4j5 Classical. Club QU. Q WILLIARI PACKARD PALMER ............................................................. ..............,.................. I MMD House Maplewood, N. I. AACIJ5 fI5BK5 Concordiensis Ql, 255 Spanish Club QU5 Tiger's liyeg Contributor to Idol Q2, 355 Associate Editor of Idol Q4j. sf JOHN WILLIAM PARKER ..........,....,...................,.............,......,............... ..................... ........ 1 I 11" A House Roclzcstcr, N. Y. CIJFA5 Lacrosse Squad Q2, 3, 4j5 Bandg Assistant Manager of Bas- ketball Q3, 455 Freshman Footballg Class Oliicer QZJQ junior Prom Committee Q3j5 Chairman of Frosh Peerade Committee Q3j. 'Q' RALPH CHANDLER PARKER, JR. ....,.......................................................................,...................... EYIJ Place Ilfashifigfolz, D. C. EQIP, Lacrosse Squad5 Psychology Club QZQ5 Cosmopolitan Club QIQ5 Glee Club 9 NV1LL1AM IRVING PARRY ........................................................,..... ..................,...................... E X House Elmira, N. Y. EX5 Interfraternity Council Q3j 5 Freshman Football, Freshman Hockeyg Varsity Football Q2, 3j5 Lacrosse Ql, Zjg Candidate Manager Varsity Basketball5 German Club Ql, Zj. Q, GEORGE LYON PEEKE ......... ...............,.....,.....................................,............................................... A 1-IN House Mcufiavillc, N. Y. AHN5 Psychology Club5 Basketball Squadg Track Squad, Chess Clubg Freshman Cross-Country. L., i' .,.. v 5 N li' ":- i.-r ,f -.E T ' 4 tuleliilriiii 64 ,tai L ..- - . if f GARNET D. DONALD PELLICIARI ...........,,...................................................................................... 1056 Gillespie St. Albany, N. Y. Pyramid Club, Biology Club, Psychology Clubg German Club. 'Q- OTHNIEL IXLSOP PENDLRTON, JR. ............................... , ............................................................. S. S. S. C. lf-l"'aslzi11g1fo1'1, D. C. Choir Q2jg Glee Club CS, 4,Jg Cross-Country Squad Q55 Sopho- more-Iunior Oratorical Contest, Idol Board, President, League of Evangelical Students, Wfolfe Scholarship, Alexander Scholar- ship. is HENRY A. P1A'rKowsK1 .........................,..,....,.................................................................... Old Gym Dorm Yonkers, N. Y. Basketball Squad C2jg Golf QS, 435 Cross-Country CSD, Intra- mural Vtfrestling C3, 4jg Spanish Club CZ, Sj, President C31 Q' . TI-IoMAs DAVID POWELL, III ........................................................ .......... A ACD Buffalo, N. Y. fs House CLARK PRATI 1 ER ............................................................................ ........ ....................,..................,....... ...... E fD P lace Adams Canter, N. Y. ECP, Football CS, 4jg Tiger's Eye, Mountebanksg Freshman Foot- ballg 175 Pound Boxing Championship QZQ. Q- INIARSIFIALL WILLIARI QUANDT ....................................................... ....... A I-IN llfatcrfo rd, N. Y. AIIN. fs JOHN SIIXIPSON REEDER ........................ , ..................................................................... , .................,. 'PY Jlfontclair, N. J. IYYQ O.A.N.g Freshman Cross-Countryg French Club QS, 4jg Track Team KZ, 3, 42, Tiger's Eye, Sophomore Class Historian, Glee Club fl, 2, 3, 41, Assistant Manager f3j. 1 Q PAUL REGNIER ........... ........ . . .,................................................... ............. . .. ......... 1437 Santa Fe Sclzwzcctady, N. Y. German Club QI, 255 Chess Club QZD. Q josisrfn A. IQEITFORT ..............................................................................,....................... ....... A HN Schelzcctady, N. Y. AHNg Track f2jg American Society Civil Engineers. 65 House House Street House V"',i ' lll'--L- . ,. -, vw ,. . 1: li 'iw ,.f't'- 4: 1 5"-- ""' 'Tl i:'sa1,,ff dffllf llll ' 1I.l'iI'.s5".g1fJ1!.' 3154 I ill uuiflu tbl I' I I I .4 Iii"-if' ,ij WWQVQJE DONALD EDWARD IQOXVLANDS ...................... , .........,....................,........., ....................... , CDEK House Poiilriicy, Vt. IDEKQ Band Cljg Assistant Business Manager of Mountebanks C2jg Boxing C355 Swimming Squad C3,lg Psychology Club, La- crosse Squad CZQ. Q JOHN BARRETT RUSSELL ........................................,.......................,,........... ...............,..... X ll' Lodge Des Molrzcs, Iowa XIII, Concordiensis Cl, Zjg Philomathean Society Cljg German Club CID, Swimming Squad CZ, 3jg Lacrosse Clj. fs DANIEL LAzAREw1'rci-1 RUTENBERC: .............................................,.....,.... ............... ......,....,..,. S . S. S. C. Moscow, U. S. S. R. EE, German Club Cljg Cosmopolitan Club Cl, Zjg Charles Stein- metz Honor Cl, 25. Q, ICARL G. RU'l'I'IE ...................................................................................,.......................................... Nott Terrace Berlin, Germany Graduate-Paulsen Realv mnasiuni' Classical Club' German Club. by l J Qs ERBINO REMUs SABATINI ..............................,,,........................................ ........................... A VIDA House Sclzenecfady, N. Y. ACDAQ Band Clj 5 Baseball Cl, 2, 3, 45 g Inter-Class Basketball C4j 3 Interfraternity Baseball, Interfraternity Basketball. Q TIIEODORE RONAl,.lJ SADOCK .........................,.........,................ ........ ........... I iN House Brooklyn, N. Y. KN, Trackg Biology Clubg Psychology Club. 'Q- JOSEPH SAIDEL ...............,............ ' ...................................,........................................... ..........,...,........... I C N House Bolton Landing, N. Y. KN, UAE, Sports Editor of The Concordiensisg Editor-in-Chief The Interscholastic Debaterg Undergraduate Sports Director of College News Bureaug Dean's List C315 Mountebanks C3, 455 Philomathean Debating Society C3jg Juris Prudentia C315 French Club Cl, 215 Candidate Assistant Manager Freshman Basketball Clj. Q, J. RUDOLPII SCUAEFER ...........................................................................................,............. ....... I CE House Arliizgton, N. f. KE, Spanish Club Cljg Band Cl, 2, 3, 4jg Mohawk Society. .L V' 4 I MN, ,gpg-ilgu C 5 ITT' vf' Q! L-a.-.'.-2--'Ezra E :L-.Ti Fizfil itll ?l r'r1'W" GARN ABRAHAM ISAAC SCIINIPELSKY ........... ............ .......... . . .................................... ....... . ..... A 1X 42 House NVELD Brooklyn, N. Y. AMEg EEQ KDBKQ Mountebanksg Candidate Business Manager Concordiensis C253 Contributor to Idolg Prize in Sophomore Oratorical Contestg German Clubg Biology Clubg Prize in Oratory Cfijg Contributor to Concordiensisg Lewis Henry lVlO1'gE1Il Honor Cl, 255 Hurst Scholarship CZQ. Q DAY SCIIOONMAKER ......................................................,. ..... .......... 1 X ND lfarv, Mass. AAfDg HFM, Freshman Football, Freshman Hockeyg Varsity Football CZ, 3j 3 Varsity Hockey CZ, 3, 4D 3 President Tigerls Eye, Y.M.C.A. Cabinet, Vice-President U.C.C.A. C3j, President Cllj. 'Q' - House CHARLES DONALD SCHUMAN .............................................................,.............. ....... ............. A Y House Briarcliff lllcznor, N. Y. AYg KBfDg O.A.N.g Tigerls Eye, Varsity Swimming Squad Cl, 2, 3, 4jg Freshman Football Squadg Baseball Squad Cljg Second Place, Diving-Interclass Swimming CZjg Psychology Club. Q' ICARL FREDERICK SCHW1-:NGER ..........................,.............................................. . ..... ................. A A111 House Springfield, Mass. AAfDg KBCIR Assistant Hockey Manager Clj 5 Baseball Squad Clj. ' 9 CHARLES FREDERICK SCHXNENKISR ............................................................ 1339 Glenwood Blvd. A ii 4 Schenectady, N. Y. . American Society Civil Engineersg Spanish Club. is JOHN CARL SEDDON ....,.... ............................................. L ................ ....... 1 0 1 Mason Street . Sclzcncctady, N. Y. E755 French Club. 0 PETER josERH CAIIILL SUERXVOOD .......................................... .......... ...................... 1 IJ EK House . Nutlcy, N. f. fDEKg HFMg Band Cl, Zjg Cflee Club CZ, 3D 5 Choir Cl, 255 Swim- ming C255 Track C2jg Instrumental Club Cl, 2, SJ, Dance Or- chestra CSQ. Q CHARLES MARTIN SINGLE ......................................................................................................... AHN House Scliwzicctady, N. Y, AHNQ Freshman Football, Freshman Basketballg Varsity Foot- ball C2, 41g Varsity Basketball C2, 3, 4j. 67 01' M lm! I- E 5 . . .11 -qs-1-Q -11:5 Q 1 .:' C EJ! ' 15:54- F 7 .xii W. 55 :.. ,' :Q ii L,. -Q ' 5 ::-f.I ' ? EE ears? ri sf sf-ass rs I - 5 'g : I U '-' E .. z... i 7 nl :fig r is I-IE I9 GEORGE EARL SMITH, IR. ........... . .,.. .. ........................................................................ 4 Snowden Avenue Sclzcncctady, N. Y. HFMQ Instrumental Club Ql, 2, 3jg Glee Club KZ, aj Philatelic Society, Spanish Club Ql, 25. 'Q' HERBERT VVILLIAM SMITH, JR. ............................................................. ....... Z ID Place Zl4fam.ar0ne1:k, N. Y. ECP, Freshman Baseball Squad, Cheer Leader Q2 35 S ng Leader KZ, 32 9 Glee Club fl, 2, 3jg Choir fl, 2, 333 Mountebanks fl, 2, 353 Y.M.C.A., Secretary Q2jg Frosh Peerade Committee Q3j. . Q THOMAS WATSON SMITH ..........................................,............................. . 512 Paige Street Sclzcrwctady, N. Y. German Club. Q REUBEN SORKIN .......,................... ................................................... ...... ........... ID 2 A House Albany, N. Y. KIJEAQ Varsity Debating, Philomathean Society, Psychology Club Biology Club, Oratorical Contestg Goodrich-Duane Debate Dean s List. 'Qf VVILLIAM HENRY SPENCER .............................................................. ................ 9 NE House Rochester, N. Y. DNF, Glee Club fl, 2, 3, 415 Mountebanks fl, 2, 3 41 Choir Cl, 2, 3, 4jg American Society Civil Engineers. Q SIBLEY DRARER SQUIRE ........................................................................................... WY House Hartford, Conn. WY, O.A.N.g Freshman Football, Varsity Football Squad Q2 3j French Club Q1, Zjg Tiger's Eye. Qf ALDEN QLIVER STANTON ....................................................................................... RA Lodge Bro olelyn, N. Y. KA, Glee Club Q2, 455 Dramatic Club fl, 2, 3, 4 Swimming Q2jg Y.M.C.A. Cabinet Qljg Secretary, Chess Club. 'Q' EDWARD ALEXANDER STEPHENSON ......................................... fIPA9 House fIJA9. lfVashirLgton, D. C. .u -4 ya' 5 I A E" T' .? 1 - vi s. i 'Qin 1 i 68 . .i--- lafffi GARNET RUDOLPH WILLIAM STROBEL ...................,......................... .......... A XA House Erie, Pa. AXAg Freshman Cross-Country Squad. EDWARD F. SULLIVAN 'Cb' Tafwytowiz, N. Y. AYQ O.A.N.g Freshman Trackg Varsity Track CZ, 3, 4jg Fresh- man Footballg Varsity Football QZ, 3, 45. Q MARCEL I. SUTER .............................................................................................................................. BSU S olcrmg Switzerland 139115 Freshman Hockey Squadg Candidate Tennis Manager 5 Psychology Clubg Chemistry Club. House House as FREDERICK SPENCER TEBBUTT, JR. ............................................ ........... A X House Cliappaqaa, N. Y. AXg Band. Q DEAN ALVIN TEELE ......................................................................................................... 806 Becker Street Schem'ctaa'y, N. Y. Varsity Track QZ, SJ 5 Varsity Cross-Country CZ, 3j. Q. R1cHARD.CoMsTocK TEEET ................................................................... .................. 5 38 Lenox Road New Berlin, N. Y. Freshman. Football g Varsity Football Q2, SD 5 American Society Civil Engineers. -Q VVALTER .ARTHUR TITURBER ......................................... . ............................. ......... ........ . ........... A Y House East lfV01'ceste1', N. Y. AYg EKN, Secretaryg Glee Club fl, 2, 355 Choir KZ, 3, 45 3 Band ' Cl, 2, 35- . Q EGAN ,JOHN TOMAN .................................................................... L ..................... ........ I QE House - Santiago de Cuba, Cuba Q ADAM TYBURSKI ................................................................................................................................. AXA House Schenectady, N. Y. AXAg Freshman Cheer Leading Squadg American Society Civil Engineers. 9 KENNETH LEVVIS XIANCAMPEN ......................................................... .......... 2 1 Eastern Blvd. Schenectady, N. Y. Psychology Club. lfgf1rl"i"fi5fs1g,1'iq .f xiii f-'KM ii 'fi !elirlQlflL1lUM' M4 EiE?ifiii', .lf T 69 Eu ,92l:y'Q" X I J ' Ei Tl-IE l934 IROMAYNE S. VIGARS ............................................................................. ........... 3 Union Avenue Albany, N. Y. German Club, Phychology Club. 'QB- THOMAS JOSEPH VVADE ...........................................................,............... ............... ............ I C E House Sclzcnectacly, N. Y. KE, CDBK, HAE, TKA, ITEM, Student Council C41, Editor of Idol C41 5 Editor of Handbook C31, Hale Club C41, Concorcliensis Columnist C41, Erench Club Cl1, President C21, Varsity Debat- ing C2, 3, 41, Philomathean Society Cl, 2, 31, President C41, President TKA C41, Classical Club C21, Secretary C31, Vice- President C41, Vice-President Pi Delta Epsilon C41, Mounte- banks C315 Studio Players C31, Goodrich-Duane Extemporaneous Debates C2, 31, Model League of Nations Assembly Delegate C31, News Bureau C31, Undergraduate Director C41, Candidate Manager Tennis C21, Dean's List Cl, 2, 31, Taylor Lewis Honor Cl, 21, Alexander Scholarship Prize C11. -is STEWART CLYDE NVAGONER ...............................,...................................... .......... 1 PY House Sclzcncctarly, N. Y. WY, Tiger's Eye, Hockey Squad Cl, 2, 3, 41. -is BENJAMIN IWACIXAY WALIQER .................................................... ....,..... 1 044 Garner Avenue Sclzcncclady, N. Y. EE, Band, Manager, Fuller Prize in Chemistry, james Henry Turnbull Prize in Physics, Chess Club, Chemistry Club, Secretary and Treasurer. 0 1 . DONALD CHARLES NVALKER ..............................................................................,.............,......... QNE House REGIN .l K 'I EE gum-.i 'x QW1 M gs F E 'lil llf'a1'c1'7Jlic'2', N. Y. QNE, Concordiensis Cl, 2, 3, 41, News Editor C41, Mounte- banlcs C21, Glee Club C2, 3, 41, German Club C21, Psychology Club C2, 31, Junior Prom Committee C31, Interfraternity Council C3, 41, Associate Editor of Garnet, Candidate Manager of Basketball, Q5 ALD JAMES NVALRATII .......,....................................................... .......... ............ I C 2 House Bloomfield, N. J. KE, President Freshman "Y" Cabinet, College Tennis Champion Cl, 41, Runner-Up Tennis C2, 31 , Tennis Squad C2, 3, 41 , Erosh Peerade Connnittee, Associate Editor 1933 Garnet, Treasurer junior Class. 70 GARNERT RICHARD HUTCHINS NVHEPLEY ......................................................................,......................... WY House Rochester, N. Y. WY, O.A.N., Tiger's Eye, Secretary, Sophomore Scrap Leader, Manager of Football. 'Q' ROBERT HOFFMAN VVILEY .................................,...................... ..... ........................ B 9 H House Albany, N. Y. BGH, Associate Editor Handbook, Freshman Football, Freshman Hockey, Manager Freshman Cross-Country f3j, Assistant Man- ager Varsity Cross-Country C3j g Varsity Hockey Squad, Manager Varsity Cross-Country Q41 451 CHARL1zs ERNEST XVILLIAMS, JR. ...................................................................,................... fI1A9 House KDAQ, HAE, Band fl, Zj, Biology Club, Business Manager Idol, Secretary, Publication Board. 'fb' fXRTITUR SOPER VVOODXVARD ...............................................,..,............... ..... ............ .......... A 4 D House ll'7G7'7'ClISb1H'g, N. Y. ACD, Band QI, Zj, Freshman Basketball Squad, Candidate Man- ager Swimming. 'Q jAM13s CQURTNEY YOUNG .......................,.................................. ..............................................,. X 'lf Lodge fllbcuzy, N. Y. XT, Hockey Q2, 3, 4j, Captain Q3, 41, Lacrosse Q2, 3, 45, Associate Editor 1933 Garnet, Mountebanks Q3, 4j. 'Q' EUGENE josnmt ZI1i1,1Nsk1 . ................. ..................... .... ................................................... ..... . . . A IIN House f1mstw'da11z, N. Y. AHN, Chess Club CZ, 3, 43, President QZJ, Secretary and Treas- urer Q3j, Psychology Club CZ, 31, Biology Club f3j. , -j in x , if bv-1 . l 14-.41 'l ? . ,i?3'fn Qfif- ,r 22 ,lr I in. 'fm 71 I 2 A.-YQ? l' his 7!3r71iiTk7f1.-. .. 3 ,MAX f' W f- O Q, E1 V 2?'f,f"f X? -W nm ,f FPC! '-1 'L ,f 'xxx 'E-if-,f'i'fm '-53-if fxfw f ff? 1 3f wi nc: ,Q 'im fi ., 'N 'H L f 11. 1 ,f-ff fi, .4215 X . ' 35:5-'Jn-Ng 'E M.fN"' 0'?fZ??i51 fn 29 12 ri? 'if' 2 - ' 13 f ,:ff1fTif5-3, Wm' ,f Agigg? 0 gg-21: 1 ' 5 -' 1.91 , , 4, F' ' WI .if -991' ffvxi.-P"Q J E' , ,K rf ' 'Z'.3,a,,,3:ga:.':f,. - 1 1' '.f"'Tfg ,ffafi 1415 ' --QEYLHM V. f qi, xiii: ' x I, 0,1 H,..f,f, Agp,-.J 1!-5L1.r-,L-N,1,A7dfg-1 pk.. P31 ' 1 .521 w - vu' gfff-,1 f, -f.f,,v,,ff-14-5-gsfu-'H f 1125254 -,riff A ff-'-f+.,1.,f X: ,P -5 uf gffiahgvfffff, . 215, 1 5?-5' -N 535 1923? ' -'.I?fi. H "21"5ff ?i5i7'i77'5:kXT4lfxQ, ' 6 f , E ,-Wi V3 -5:-' --1--' ax.-f' . J: V921 x-,Jw ,1 ' I fxgfk ' -' - ff ' IM '. ' ' , mf- :ef .-: .af A L' FLAT! - 'J'- fgffvx. J A MQ 5 - bm.: M iq! 2 , fk.,',4Y.:gw 1 1, V - ,M if Y . E. , Aram- 5-' ,. La 41- 2-gi u.-4 1 ,1 . 'W N . is E: mf- .- 'TJ - :'0--Q-Avrwi-5,1 , f --,,'4mf., H z. ' I 1 1 UE'-Q. W '1 fff + E O M fum 1' if :iff H aliglxgfi"':Q5-r'Ii'-...LIL.., -..,....' U' 1 vfq. f ff". 1 'L . .r"fi5fTT V' ' ' -1-lf: -'- ---5---Q.. L 1 ":"" 'lf' .Ti 1: -:....r:1::w"f' 5' ', f.:fFi?"ff f nz-if 'E'-h--,H g -"" "'-- H- "'---"' -C' -4: ig, 44- ,J5ff'1f' ff- " ' "H" --.-X .. A- ,QZL3 w.:.VT:si,f V V Tn--4 E- , , . 7n-f- mnfiz-gui - 2, 755 ' ERE CTED TO THE MEMORY GF JOHN HOWARD PAYNE 1810 J 61 AUTHOR OF HONII2 SWE 72 ICT HOME" GARNET UNION COLLEGE GARNET 1934 QACTIVI- TIES 46 BIG SHOTS Q DATES O GARNET O SOMETHING OUGHT TO BE DONE ABOUT IT O THESE SOPHOMORES THINK THEY HAVE THE WORLD BY THE TAIL 46 NOW WHEN WE WERE UNDERCLASSMEN O PROM Q GARNET O PROM 0 GARNET Q PRETTY SOFT FOR THOSE SENIORS O WHO WAS THAT BLONDE O MAKE IT TWO O PROM Q PROM Q WISH I HAD A RACKET O THE BEST GARNET EVER PUBLISHED O BUY YOUR COPY NOW O THANK GOD WE DON'T GET OUT THIS YEAR 73 tml: MW IIQ' 4 fa 1 yr '?', X., viilvQ.Z5?i1 FW-'i'-'F' .L ll E i 4 lil A fy :tl':l'-'fi , N v' K ' an . -,. - :.' ,- 'Tie-.Q f 1 - - -i 1 1 2 Q 2 T. Junior Class History DANIEL F. FLINN, H . . . ..... President jos1zPH A. NIANEY ,... . . .Vice-Prcsfident PIARRY B. PAIQICER, IR .... .... . Scrrctary DUAL A. MACINTYRE . . . . . .T1'casm'cr DfNNll5l. F. FLINN, II In the years to come, when We have long left the portals of Union College. and we are scattered among life's divergent pathways, may this bool: and section l1-ring back happy ineniories of our college days, with its pleasant associations, and the life long friendships that we have formed. To our reminiscing may it add many pages of a glorious past. The Junior Class has played an exceptional part in the Colleges active life 74 since its inception in the fall of 1930. The students of the class, representing a high scholastic group, were from the start brought into intimate relationships with each other by the 'tinformal scraps" and the social activities of the frater- mties. The members of the class lost little time in taking advantage of the wonderful opportunity which a college like Union offers for making friendships. During the hrst year the President of the Class was Harold Gallant and the Vice-President, Roland Faulkner. Great success was achieved by the Freshman Football team and the inter-class swimming team. As Sophomores the class elected Xlvllllillli Heffernan to be their president. During the year the class became a still greater element in the college life, con- tributing many important men to the varsity teams, to the publications and to the dramatic organizations. The usual Sophomore social function, Soiree, was not held. Witli these two years of exceptional experience the class entered its Junior year. After a spirited political battle the class finally elected excellent officers. The presidency went to Daniel Flinn, and the vice-presidency to Joseph Maney. Harry Parker was elected Secretary and Dual Macintyre, Treasurer. The Junior Class has provided many of the principal players of the athletic teams this year. There are some men who have had the honor of being captains during their Junior year. XfVith these men strong teams can be anticipated next year. The class of 1934 has enjoyed a life of achievement in its three years of college activity and well merits the honor of becoming the Senior Class of Union College. EARLIQ S. Hfuuzls, Class Iflisfariafz. 75 7'a1ff.? ,iA S t in i 1-A--' -'55l'5'. ..... .I 'f ....... ununnuv gg, ,E, IU. '13 l "":g:F i L I df: rl J....lf.fl!llz.. J E ' l 1-:Gills . .I N Q ' 1 H , l ' . , l ,- THOMAS T. ACHESON PAUL ADANTI EARL Rows ARNDS THOMAS TEMPLE ACIIESON ...............................,............ ......... ....... A A fb House Albany, N. Y. AAfDg Freshman Footballg Lacrosse Squad fljg Varsity Football QZ, 355 Vice-President Interfraternity Councilg Chairman of junior Prom Coinmitteeg Psychology Club. PAUL ADANTI ........ ...........,...............................l................. ............ fl! E K House Auburn, N. Y. CDZKQ French Clubg Chief Operator of Radio Clubg Spanish Clubg Psychology Club. EARL ROWE ARNDS .......... ............,..........................,...................... ...... . . Duanesburg Road Schenectady, N. Y. A French Club Cljg Motion Picture Operator CZ, 35. ,K p -.1 ,-All . " T gliii: S A las: :ill C. :::: 76 fas: :r -----.: I. ,- r' .5 :N . - 1 Y HERBERT A. ASPIN H. TENNYSON BALDWIN EDWARD T. BARNA HERBERT ALBER1' ASI'IN ................,...................................................... ........ 3 35 Locust Ave. Amsterdam, N. Y. Baseball. I H. TENNYSON BALDWIN ........................................................................ .......... A fb House Chc'stc1't0wl1., N. Y. N175 French Club fl, 2,5 Secretary CZJQ Mountebanks Q2, 315 Master Carpenter QSM Candidate Assistant-Manager Track CZQ. EDWARD T11EoDoR1s BARNA ......................................... . ....... . ....... ........... YD A9 House Cohocs, N. Y. 4131395 Freshman Basketballg Idol Clubg Junior Prom Committee. I Y I 7 . I 1 "lt " ' Li M S 'i ff e .p fj- ll? 73, !'-'inrlmi V W' 1 .dl ff. .W roll 'mall p., -4- ' 9' ' XXV ' E1 Q NV1L1.I1xM A. Bruins C11,x11L12s VV. BEN-NETT PETER P. B1EL1as1c1 NVILLIAM A. 131512125 ....... ............................................................. ........ 3 3 5 Division St. Arffzsterdalfz, N. Y. I CHARLIQS VVILLIAM BENNETT .....,.......................................... ......... B GH House Hartford, C01111. BQHQ Hockey QI, 2, 3D 5 Manager Freslnnan Footballg Tennis Q15 5 Assistant Manager Tennisg Assistant Business Manager of Iclolg Associate Editor of Garnetg Sophomore Soiree Coininittee. PETER PAUL BIELESKI .......... .....,....................................................... ........ 1 3 l Fourth Ave. Sclzcncczfady, N. Y. German Clubg Varsity Track Squad Q2jg Runner-up in College Wrestling Championship, 130 Pound Class QZJ. - Q tlisjlgs EQ l fl, I 1 78 Mali-5 'N .mb 1 ' 1 FREDERICK l31l.l.1Nos RlC'l'l.Xlil.P BLANC1-1ARu D. Evlaumr Buss FREDERICK NICCOLL BILLINGS ....................................,........... .......... 5 Root Ave. Scotia, N. Y. I RICHARD BLANCIIARD .......... ...................................................... .......... KD F A House Brooklyn, N. Y. CDFAQ Glee Clubg Band. I D. I?,VlERET'l' Buss .......... ..................................................,... .......... fD 1' A House E H erle'ime1', N. Y. CDI"Ag French Clubg Lacrosse Squaclg Basketball Squadg Football Squad. ' ' .. gn Tf A nz!! 1 ' ' teaiwfv--' 11 E 5-'f A 429 ul I'- P1 . ZF' sg' "A n - ' ell. j' of of .. 79 , -lv .L I-gig-E fin?-lik 'lp RTM iv' .2 f I 1 D CHARLES BOERNER RAYLTOND C. BONK SANFORD S. BRAND CHARLES BOISRNER ......... .........................................................,.... .......... 2 4 Nott Terrace Huguenot, N. Y. Freshman Cross-Countryg Varsity Cross-Country, Captaing Treas- urer A.S.C.E.g Secretary-Treasurer Spike Shoe Societyg German Clubg l35 Pound Wrestling Champion CZ, 35. O RAYMOND C. BONK ....... .............................................................. ....,...... Q N E House Schenectady, N. Y. GJNEQ Liberal Clubg Freshman "Y" Cabinetg Freshman Cross- Country Squad. SANFORD SAMUEL BRAND ......,.... ......................................... ............ fl P EA House Troy, N. Y. QEAQ Glee Club Cl, 255 Tennis 121. uf. .... ll"ll:1'l' . ,I ,IM :gig so QL! if-i Lf 1. yi LOREN L. BRANDOW Romair I. C. BREARTON IAcoB A. BREYMAUQR LOREN LULI. BRANDOW ........... ................................................... ........... 9 N E House . Oneonta N. Y. QNE. O ROBERT J. C. BREAR'roN .............,...............,.......................................... .,.......... 2 1D House Sehcncctady, N. Y. 2435 Assistant Manager of Lacrosseg Associate Editor of Garnetg Freshman Footballg Varsity Hockey Squad CZ, Sjg Freshman Hockey Squad. I JACOB BREYMAIER ........... ......................................................................................... 9 02 Maplewood Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. 81 gy' 'iRL".' I r '49 ,,,.,3gF"b ' +eid :fre Y I ul U ig-'-5 ml-anvil FREDERIC K. R. BRIDGE CHARLES S. BRIDGMAN ANGUS M. BROWN FREDERICK R. BRIDGE ......... ............ . ...................................... ........ . A AID House Albany, N. Y: AAfDg Tigers Eyeg German Clubg Psychology Club. CHARLES S. BRIDGMAN .......... ................................,................... ............ I C A Lodge Rochester, N. Y. KAg Swimming Teamg Glee Clubg Psychology Clubg Idol Club. ANGUS M. BROWN ........ .............................................................. .......... M . S. S. C. Amsterdam, N. Y. AKD. L ll' in '- f l KN I ll X y N an "Eff 82 JSI .Via I s , XIVILLIAM S. Bucl-IANAN CHARLES 'E. BUCHWALD Ioslcvu R. Bum: XAIILLIAM SHARPLEY BUCHANAN ............................................. ........... A 1D House Delmar, N. Y. A4175 Idol Clubg O.A.N. Societyg German Clubg Assistant Manager of Varsity Hockey. CHARLES E. BUCI-IWALD . ............................. ....................................... ........... 9 A X House Tribes Hill, N. Y. GJAXQ French Club Qljg Lacrosse Squad QZ, 35. joslzm-I ROBERT BURG ............ ......................................................,......... ........... 1 0 13 State St. Schenectady, N. Y. 83 frill- ' E I ........ullu1mn1, ,JM be- '12 ""'31F" ' A' IfTi1.2t,ff.1l'v'41lpp31Tf ,g 'H u.l...: 'mu - .3 wnmrmmnnmmw - --.--:Hia . J I .ISE .. .z,'- 1 ' - l zvffiii' it ,.-..i..-l---v l ,V E.,-.A v v 'E1,,:::tu. ' area? aaa lgtiig 2 X :ESE :iii I ... ing Q:.. 1 JAMES G. BURKE JOHN T. BURNS NVILLIAM J. BURNS 'JAMES GRAHAM BURKE ............. .....................,............................ ............ A X House Cohocs, N, Y. AXg French Club QZ, Sjg Juris Prudentia Q2, Sjg Historian QZJQ Sophomore Scrap Leaderg Sophomore Discipline Committeeg Phil- omathean Society QZ, 3Jg Track Teamg Interfraternity Track' Interfraternity Council. J C JOHN T. BURNS ........... ................................................................. ....... I C E House Schenectady, N. Y. KEg German Club fl, 215 Psychology Clubg Freshman Footballg Candidate Manager of Lacrosseg Associate Editor of Garnet. C VVILLIAM JOSEPH BURNS ................................................................... ......... 1 910 Euclid Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. 84 l I . VICTOIQ CAlX'lPRIlZ1.LO JOHN H. CHAMBERS J. HAIIRY CHRYSLER VICTOR CAMPRIELLO .......... .........,....,................................................... ......... 1 S 10 Avenue A. Schenectady, N. Y. I JOHN HACKE'l'1' C1-rAM131zRs ............................................................... ......... X W Lodge New Rochelle, N. Y. X111 5 Freshman Footballg Hockey Squad. JAMES HARRY CHRYSLER ...................................................................... ........ A X House Schenectady, N. Y. AXg French Club Q2, SJ 5 Freshman Footballg Freshman Baseballg Varsity Football 12, 315 Varsity Tennis f2Jg Treasurer of French Club QZJ. l If N ln 5 Gu, lk Mig 'Q e?1 xl Q, IJ It ll '1 l"1l'W"l7'lI lf'-lf "Nl 1' lv R 'V 41 .1 5 I J. .r.,:.l , ' 1 -A ru A ull ll . ul 1 P'-.': 5538. S EQ 8 .57 fi ' 5 :ay--lr'---w' " :wwf ? xsvf' Q B7 B JZXNTI-IONY P. CIOFFI AN'I'IIONY P. CIOFFI .......... S. Michae1's College Q1, ELVIN E. CLA1'P131: SETH T. COLE, IR. 43 Qakwood Ave. Troy, N. Y. 21. U ELVIN EUGENE CLAPPER ....................................................................... ........ 1 704 Eastern Parkway Hale Eddy, N. Y. O SETH Tony COLE, JR. ....... ....,...,........................................... ............ 5 6 9 Washington Ave. Albany, N. Y. 86 'Q f ll! , 4 1 RIiIPlfXIi1J COLLINS EARL 11. Coomns JAMES M. CORIIIN RICI-IAIQD COLLINS .......... ......................................... .... ....... S . S . S. C. Glens Falls, N. Y. I EARL HAMILTON COOMBS ........ .......,.......................................... ........ 1 7 39 Union St. Garfield, N. Y. C JAMES MCI'1ENRY CORBIN ................................................................ ...... E QD House Schenectady, N. Y. . Eflfg Freshman Footballg Freshman Hockeyg Varsity Footballg Varsity Hockeyg Varsity Track 3 Mouutebanksg Tiger's Eye. ..-.. 5. i-LIL: yr! D+'-ur,-""A T "' 'F I as f'?5?ili?,mI r ,4 L L .,,J .- , - ,N 'm ' 87 ,A - - rw : I '4 ' ' 'ij E' -f Q .,,ev,7?E'5 Y A P 'fn-'T' 473-. r' " F ,peer -P 52215 f 2. :G ' a- ,fw -,If A x-T121 L it odbrtvlnxizhi' 1' ' 3 iw ix 2 ww , LEW' K ...' li.-fi? r lj. I ' Q,,.4l-'P .ifflfwtfl .Nw , 1"'I-M ' 'ia 1 'l lik' srl lui if? ,V I' ltyrp llljfjt ttik tl' 'A-' k'd Q 2,3-f-.li X i JOSEPH B. CORTESI GEORGE R. Cow, ju. THADDEUS COWELL, IR. JOSEPH B. CORTESI ........... ............................ . ....... , ,........................ ...... f X CDA House Schenectady, N. Y. AfDAg Historian of Sophomore Classg Varsity Basketball Squad QZD g Sophomore Discipline Committeeg Dean's List. I GEORGE R. CORY, JR. ........ .................................................... .......... ll' Y House Oradell, N. f. i lPY5 Assistant Manager Track and Fieldg Associate Editor Con- cordiensis. THADDEUS GILFORD COWELL, JR. ............................................... ............. A fD House Brooklyn, N. Y. ACDQ O.A.N. Societyg Idol Clubg 'Swimming Squad Q21 g Candidate Manager Cross-Country f2jg Glee Club f3j. 88 THOMAS CIQOWLEY, ju, JUSEPH DEBLASE JOHN DIGIOLIO THOMAS J. CROWLEY, JR. ....................................,................................ ......... A X House Sclzcncctady, N. Y. AXg French Clubg Pllilomathian Societyg Varsity Debatingg Juris Prudentia. JOSEPH DEBLASI2 .......... .................................................................. .......... A YD A House SCll67IGL'fl1djl, N. Y. A4PAg Varsity Track Squad C255 German Club QZJ. JOHN D1G1Gr.1o ........ .................................................................. ......... A 411 A House Sclzenectady, N. Y. AfDAg German Club ffajg Psychology Club C3DQ Liberal Club ffij. 89 reg f 1 Sgr nggai ll .. . Q '., " .ef WW l 3 i 6 7' 1 ,ml A g' nqfl will ' I f llllhl fa., -Ami 'l ....--g. -I-ll: .nl ,rv W I mmf. 12-.1 A !l'ilIVll2?i5 VV. ALl3IiI21' DI5KlgN'l'TEO ANToN1o DIGESEIQU LAVERN15 A. D1I.LENn1icK VV. .ALBERT DEMATTEO ........................................................................ ........ A KDA House Schenectady, N. Y. 1' IQ' e'1 AfDAg Treasurei' of Liberal Clubg Ihilomatieau .eocietyg bpamsi Clubg Candidate for Honors Course in Political Science. O ANTONIO I-JIGESERO ......... .................................,....,...............,........ .......... 1 X IDA House Schenectady, N. Y. AGNA. O LAXfERNE ALEXANDER DILLENBACK ....................................... .......... 5 32 Hegeman St. Schenectady, N. Y. ! U 4 If ., y 'xl 1.-'f - 4 Mxzzx. A 'X - If , 1 gs -. .ggi 51125. I' , y E: - l'lERIlERT C. D1xoN I-IERmzR1' CYRIL DIXON Glee Club fl, 35. VVILLIAM DONIQY .......... Psychology Club PURCELL EDWARD Dow XV1l-1.l.-nr D ONEY C2, Sclzcnccfazly, O N. Y. Schcfzlecfady, N. Y. 35. C Gloversville, N. Y. PURCELL :EDXVARD Dow 12 Hampton Ave. 906 Crane St. EX House EXQ Freshman Basketballg Varsity Basketball Q2, 355 Varsity Track QZJ 5 Varsity Cross-Country Q25 3 Spike Shoe Societyg Soph- omore Soiree Committee. 91 UIEWHIIULE 5 'M 3,4 F' j .T-.1 lil f' "f"'3!fi1: -il., Q .- .. aa. ,, ' " 1' ' nl! My 1. JF- Q: '-A V gl . E3 .-:JL ,' "ig "" L1 - 52 Ef...: C- ' 'as aa 5? EA-EE is .... , :: -1 i L , 1 -1. -- L l, A VVILLIAM L. DRAPER ROl3EliT TODD DREW LANVRENCE K. DUGAN, JR. 'WILLIAM LIVINGSTON DRAPER ......................................................... ........... X 'I' Lodge Rocky lwozmt, N. C. Xllfg Business Manager of Mountebanks Q35 5 Business Manager of "Studio Players"g Associate Editor Garnet C355 French Club U55 Psychology Club Q53 Freshman "Y" Cabinet. O ROBERT TODD DREW' ....... .......................,..................................................... ........ 2 l 33 Fairview Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. O LAWRENCE KENNETII DUGAN, JR. ............................................ ............ B 911 House Schenectady, N. Y. BQHQ Amherst College f1,25 3 Glee Club Q35 3 Choir C35. ' " wily. ' ' ' WEEE: 5 N Iii: 'iii .-. 92 .ill III! Isa: ll f A A .. i 1 1.1.1-1- HAROLD E. ELLTTHORN Glzoxemz F. EMERSON ROLAND L, FAULKNER 1'IAROLD EDVVARD ELLITHORN .......................... . ...... .................... ......... l 1 fY House Keizmorc, N. Y. lIfYg Freshman Footballg Freshman Basketballg Varsity Football QZ, 355 Varsity Track CZ, SJ 5 Board Track Q2, 3jg Eta Kappa Nu V Award 1931. U GEORGE FREDERIC EMERSON ..................................................... ........ 3 4 VVashingtou Road Scotia, N. Y. Freshman Cross-Countryg Freshman I-Iockeyg Varsity Football CZ, 35 3 Co-holder of 145 Pound Wfrestling Title QZJ. O ROLAND L. FAULKNER ........ ........................................................ ........ ........... A X H ouse Schenectady, N. Y. AXg Skull and Scalpel 5 German Clubg Chairman Soiree Committeeg Vice-President Freshman Class. r, N11 If , l will f PS F Q Q if ,X m F' will 361 My' lllllil'-illmlllr 'lla E- QW U il 5 'V i B., ff. PAUL FINKELSTEIN DAN11-:L F. FLINN, II :DONALD FELIX FLORA PAUL F1NKELs'1'iz1N ........ ......................................................... ..... . . . .......... AME House Sclmnccfarly, N. Y. AME 3 Associate Editor Garnetg Psychology Club. DANIEL FRANCIS FLINN, II .............,..........,................................... ............ 1D A9 House Schenectady, N. Y. QA93 HAEg Student Council Q2, 355 President of Junior Classg Editor-in-Chief 1934 Garnetg junior Prom Committeeg Interfrat- ernity Council CSD 5 Mountebanks QI, 2, 3D g Vice-President of Idol Clubg Swimming Squadg Spanish Club Cl, Zjg Manager-elect Freshman Basketballg Secretary-Treasurer of Pi Delta Epsilong Publication Board. DONALD FELIX FLORA ............................................,................................ ........... A X House Schenectady, N. Y. AXg Freshman Hockey 3 Freshman Lacrosseg Varsity Lacrosse 5 Varsity Hockeyg Associate Editor of Garnet. eg' mg i.i..i.i vu CHAUNCEY P. Foo'rE W'i1.r.1Aix-1 FRASER ARNOLD J. FRIEDMAN CIIAUNCEY PEASIE FOOTIE, ju. ...,.............. .......... . ........................... ........ 0 N E House Schenectady, N. Y. 9NEg Secretaiy of Class fljg Sophomore Soiree Committee f2jg Sophomore Disciplinary Committee C255 Dean's List f2jg Scrap Leader C2jg Associate Editor of Garnet Qfijg Varsity Lacrosse CZ, 35- 0 WILLIAM FRASER ........ ..................................... . .. ................. ........ ....... 9 N E House Sclzencctady, N. Y. ' GNEQ Freshman Footballg Freshman Basketballg Varsity. Basket- ball QZ, 35 3 Varsity Lacrosse f2, SD. ARNOLD JQSEPH FRIEDMAN ..............................................,............... ........... I CN House A I7ZS1f67'dlZ7'I'L, N. Y. KN5 Concordiensis fl, 2, 315 Associate Editor Concorcliensis C3jg Philomathean Society flj 5 Associate Editor Garnetg Juris Pruden- tia fljg Associate Editor Interscholastic Debater Qfijg Freshman Basketball. 95 ' IIi'tf,5fiZfj5 f HiM9.mM U1 Lillie Ejazs f Z, .-l -- YQ S : . , ,I -,, - - Q, an M 21.4 4 Jeqwaa n fi., ... H , i 1- 1 -i ggi, I... in h . I 'V J 4' '.:fi'.' I' L ' -11 ' img Ns . V 5. Q hr, , lf" ' If, Il l. PIAROLD Z. GALLAN1' CARLTON GARDINIER ELLIS B. GARRISON, IR. HAROLD ZELIG GALLAN1' ...,......................................................A..... ........ I CN House Rochester, N. Y. KNQ President of Freshman Classg Freshman Footbzxllg Varsity Track CZ, 31 g Psychology Club QZQQ Glee Club. ! O CARLTON DEVILLO GARD1N11sR ........,......................................... . .......... AY House Rome, N. Y. AY. O ELLIS BURGESS GARRISON, JR. .................................................. ........... A Y House Delmar, N. Y. 'AYg Varsity Baseballg President Tiger's Eyeg Interfraternity Council 5 Student Council. ,K llliifi' it lf ff-ly L 96 LMI l-fl 'Q FRANCIS GraL5l,E1c11'r12R FRANCIS IDERMOTT GEL5l,l1IIClI'1'Fl' ! FRANK GERSINCIQH JAMES S. GILLESPIE - X ...................................,.......... ......... f DEK House Sclzcncctazly, N. Y. QPSK. C FRANK GERSINCICII ......... ......................,......................................... .......... 9 6 5 Vermont Ave. Sclzcncczfady, N. Y. - Band. ' I JAMES STOKES GILLESPIE ............................................................... ....... X ll' Lodge Lancaster, S. C. KW. 97 V ",, 9: 10, gm v 1 4. gilvfisf Q I H ll Q A V Vg 7?'7T?t' 'Hi ' Iyuuriwq 1111! If f!I!'!5- T up M UL 4 nf ,W FW-"i'v'-W I . l U. JULIUS GOLDERMAN ROBERT B. GorrscHAr,1c Roumzrs W. GREENE JULIUS GOLDETQRIAN .......... ...............,....................,........... . .. .. ........ N. S. N. C. Valatie, N. Y. Glee Club fl, Sjg Candidate Assistant Manager of Trackg Business Manager of Handbook Q3jg Freshman Basketball. ROBERT BRUCE GOTTSCHALK ...................................................... ......... .......... A X A House Hawkins, N. Y. AXAQ Band QI, Zj 5 Interfraternity Track and Cross-Country C215 Board Track QZJ 5 Varsity Track Q22 5 Varsity Cross-Country Q35 5 Sophomore Scrap Leaders 5 Sophomore Discipline Committeeg Spike Shoe Society. ROBERTS WESTERVELT GREENE ......................................................... ....... 1 352 Lowell Rd. Schienecfady, N. Y. A L 'I 51 'T l -- wtf-li X- 7 98 5-ugii F-51:--l l JOHN D. GREGORY RCJIIEIQT GRIFFETH CHARLES B. GmF1f1'r1I JOHN DAVID GREGORY .............................................................................. ........... 7 12 Craig St. Sclzcnecfady, N. Y. Freshman Baseballg Varsity Trackg Psychology Club 5 Spanish Clubg Liberal Club. O ROBERT GRIFFETH ........... ........................................................ ....... l 9 97 Central Parkway D6lG71SlI7L, N. Y. I CHARLES BURT GRIFFITI-I .............,........................................................ .......... ID A0 House VVESfPO7'f, N. Y. CDAQQ Freshman Basketballg German Club fl, Zj. 99 'ss' ll fsfff1L:y I' f12SE2ff2f1I"':4au1:vf iuu gxsaun. Q? umnmmmmnmvw f.g'El - --."i?'W.: I .J MGR 4 .-. . i, ffff' 4 --T 7 WILMO1' D. GRIFFITH I'lENRY P. GULNAC JOHN VV. GURRY W1r,1x1ro'1' DICIKINSON GRIFFITH . .................................................... ....... f DAG House ll-'cztc1't0w1fz, N. Y. fDA9g Freshman "YH Cabinetg Glee Club f35g Choir f35g Band C355 Classical Club fl, 2, 355 Psychology Club C35. HENRY PATTON GULNAC ....................................................................... ...... l AND House Rensselaer, N. Y. AAKIH Football C255 Track f25g Student Councilg Vice-President of Y.M.C.A.g Freshman Football. JOHN W. GURRY ......... ....................................,....,......... filjvlaus, N. Y. A.S.C.E. I" .Q l 'Egfiia"'gl.'l llll las: 1' I E .. .-1... ..-- gn 1 "" "' ROBERT VV. GURRY EARL L. HAIIIQIS :HERBERT F. PIAUSSER ROBERT VVILTON GURRY ................................................................... Alplaus, N. Y. O EARL LEVVIS HARRIS ........... .................................................................. ........ 1 6 O5 Avenue B. Sclzcfzeciady, N. Y. Historian of Junior Class C355 German Club C HERBERT FREDERICK HALTSSER ........................................,.................. ........... 1 714 Wendell Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. Glee Clubg Choirg Assistant Manager of Glee Club. ' 'f 'lp ,aff f feyir 7-L 5: -N1 rg . DJ 'fl llffi I . 71' ,Wall :sl M 1.xu1.111Ll11lrh1l. All-4 I: H.. ik E. 1 101 ?:,e.5g..,'Q'f,-gx-i. -v f- . .5 ' Jol-IN I-I. ITAYMAN VVILLIAM J. I-l1aIfxf1z1:NAN DANIEL T. 1'IILL JOHN HERIQICTQ PIAYMAN ................................................................... .....,... I iey and Blade Club Sclzcncctady, N. Y. Key and Blade Clubg Spanish Club fl, 2, 35 3 Psychology Club f2j 5 Associate Editor of Garnet Q35 5 ll5 Pound Boxing Champion CZD. WILLIAM JAMES HEFFEIQBIAN ........................................................... ........... GJ NE House Scheizcctafiy, N, Y. GNEQ "Y" Cabinet fljg Sophomore Scrap Leaderg President Sophomore Classy Ex-Officio Sophomore Soireeg Junior Prom Committeeg Freshman Footballg Freshman Hockey. :DANIEL Timonomz HIILL .................................................................................. .,......... A X I-Iouse Rotterdam function, N. Y. AX3 Debating Silt. .Qi 1.02 ' ,'h,iA'ii, A , l l . u . HOWARD NIINARD I'IlI.LS NVA1:r1zk BRUNNER I-l'1mEs JM-ues PIORAN :HOVVARD lNlINARD HILLS ................................................... ......... B ox 105, Galway Endiw tt, N. Y. U VVALTER BRUNNER HIRIIES ........ .............................................. ........... A X House fllbarzy, N. Y. AXg Mountebanks fl, Z, Sj 5 Secretzuy of Mountebanks C3j 3 Class- ical Club fl, 2, SD. JAMES HORAN ........ .................................................... . ......... 9 AX House Oswego, N. Y. GAXQ Glee Club Cl, 2, 355 Assistant Manager of Glee Club C353 Choir Cl, 2. Sjg French Club fl, Zjg Vice-President of French Club QZJ Q Quartette. illii? -j f if T WV ' f '-Miha 5 ' 'E Ii' A sfssjg is 3 -Q-335'sN .I -- 103 'Y ll? 7 ' .gi . ul H ff Wlllll 3 ' my P' mga :SY ve:-:e!w 1 lll M "'1 v v. , 3-, . r 1,,":N H- my TT' Q . lfl'll':, 'l 1 .5 P' , lfllll? lug ll Mflf fynabjl ,.. v 1 ' EDWARD G. Hoxesu-MAN JOSEPH Pl0RVATH, JR. Pmur' B. I-IUESTED EDWARD GEORGE HORSTMAN . .................................................. ,... ..... ............ 1 7 4 4 Avenue B. Sclwnectady, N. Y. German Club fljg Psychology 1215 Sec1'etz1ry-Trcasuvcr- of Psy- chology Club CZJ. O josxsru HORVATH, IR. .................................................................................. ............ 1 DEK House Farmingdale, L. I . CIJEK 5 Interfraternity Council. O PHILIP B. I-IUESTED ........ ............................................................. ............ A fD House Glens Falls, N. Y. A4115 Freshman Manager 5 President of Idol Club: Hockey Squad C2, 35- 104 1 5195 ls., ' 5 aff, l . i if Y, DORSEX' F. HUGHES Pmumz M. HULSART, JR. JULIUS H'U1XIMER-,IR. Donsrzy FOLLIN I-Iucznizs ..., ..... . .................................... ,.................. .......... B 9 I I House lVCl.S'1Ll7l-gf07'L, D. C. H9115 Pi Delta Epsilong Photographic Editor of Garnet f3jg As- sistant Manager of Varsity Basketball CSD. I PIERRE MALCOLM HULSART, JR. ................................................... ............ 119 FA House i Harrison, N. Y. fD1"A. O JULIUS I'IUMMER, JR. ........ ..................... ...............,............................. .....,... I C e y and Blade Club Schenectady, N. Y. Key and Blade Clubg Golf Team CZ, 31 g Captain and Manager of Golf Team CSD. I E ,Fl F rf' I 1 - S r ,ab lviy, - Th. In , ,. X1 I ., guna- 1 ETQ1 tif- 'lf---s' ' I 'll .U!UllW'!F'la 105 all mg 5522222 -,limi 72 Q I '?5 1,1 .L H fjl l If 'fe' i fa 57 11W Y - X ' r-W? f f "qt ---1 l l l -. NVILLIAM L. I'lUN'l'liR CHARLES W. fl'lUNTLEY Enwfxun M. lfTUr'roN XVILLIAM L. PIUNTIER ........ ..................................................................... ......... 2 X House New Rochelle, N. Y. EXQ French Club QU. O LHARLES VVILLIAIXI HUNTLEY ........................................................ ........... GJ AX House Schenectady, N. Y. 9AXg junior Board Concordiensisg Associate Editor Garnet C355 Psychology Club. EDWARD RIARTIN HU'r'roN ........, .......................................... ........... A 419 House Troy, N. Y. AID5 Freshman Footballg Freshman Hockeyg Varsity Foolhallg Varsity Hockeyg junior Prom Committee. 106 l SAMLIEI, JACKSON CARL Comms JOHNSON JOHN PETER JUDGE SAMUEL JACKSON ......... ......................... . . ................. ....... I CN House Albavfzly, N. Y. KNg Freshman Basketballg Varsity Basketball C305 Secretary of Sophomore Class QZJ. CARL CoRDEs JoHNsoN ....... I ......................,.......................................... .......... f DFA House Schmzcclady, N. Y. fDI1Ag Manager of Footballg Intc1'fratc1'nity Councilg Freshman Scrap Leaderg Psychology Club. JOHN PETER JUDGE .......... .............................................................. .......... KD L X9 House Plaltsburglz, N. Y. fDA9g Glee Club. ww ' FISVQZI 5. . xg?-'Jill if ,- --1 fm Tl, 'Z E: lf E ?J F- '- ' :Tai r fffviexs I :..,....,.....f1.-1 :Qi ARTHUR I. :KATZBERG XIVILLTAM J. KATZMIEREZAK SAMUEL TCEATS ARTHU1: josnpn KA'rzm:nc: ........................................................ ............ I CN House Brooklyn, N. Y. KNQ Concortliensis fl, Zj 5 Assistant Business Manager Q33 5 Chess Clubg Chess Teamg Biology Clubg Psychology Clubg Liberal Clubg German Club Cl, 215 Winter Trackg Vice-President of Spiked Shoe Societyg German Club Cl, Zjg Winter Track. VVILLIAM JOHN IQAZMIEREZAK ...,...................,................................. .... .... ..... 8 6 4 Eastern Ave. Scllencctady, N. Y. Freshman Cross-Countryg Varsity Cross-Country CZ, 355 Captain- elect of Cross-Countryg Varsity Trackg Spiked Shoe Societyg Vice-President of Spiked Shoe Societyg German Club Cl, 255 Winter Track. SAMUEL KEATS .......... ...................................................................... ....... fD E A House Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ' QEAQ Tennis CZ, Sjg Concordiensis QU. ' f H'-fry. ' gliiia 5 X lar: ' 'ill 1f:Q....3.. .-. 108 L .i.i-1-- :- Z "il" 1 l I l EDWARD E. .KERN ROBERT E. ICENNEDY ALEX.4NDER I-I. KLEIN .EDWARD EUGENE IQERN ...................................................................... ......... I 'yrzunid Club .S'clzeuectady, N. Y. Pyramid Clubg Freshman Cross-Countmyg Varsity Cross-Country. :ROBERT EMORY IKIENNIEDY ......................................... , .................. ......... I QA Lodge Brighlon, N. Y. KAQ Idol Clubg Treasurer of Idol Clubg Student Chapter, Ameri- can Society of Civil Engineers, Vice-President. ALEXANDER HENIIY ICLEIN ................................................... .......... ....... r lk ME House Schenectady, N. Y. AMEQ German Clubg Lacrosse Squadg Psychology Clubg Track Squad. Q I hw' 'll ' glg ll'll X fr ? r K N515 ll ,QL 'JJ '1 r'.'1,'Iw' ' '11 ll--ll ll lf' !.."'fQ ll H xml lf 0' 1 51 , .v K12NNET1,1 VV. IQNAPP IRVING A. ICUSHMAN PHILLIP LANGWORTIIY ICENNISTH VVILLIAM IQNAPP ..............,.......... ,... .............................. ........ A X i fk House S'clzc1'Lectady, N. Y. AXA. O IRVING ALEXANDER KUSHMAN ..............................,.,............... ........... I CN House Brooklyn, N. Y. KNg Varsity Trackg Varsity Footballg Mountebanlfsg juris Pru- dentiag Philomathean Societyg Dean's List QZQ 3 Instrumental Club g Garnet Goblinsg Bandg Liberal Clubg Biology Clubg Psychology Club. ' PHILLIP Boon-I LANGYVORTHY ...........,....,....,.......,..,.................... ......... A ID House Gloversville, N. Y. A1195 Mountebanks Cl, Sj 5 Fresliinan Lacrosse C11 5 Lacrosse Squad C25- . M Hx ix: is if .ri 'fx 110 lynn," -11 -X 21 , .' .KQV Q , 7 1 ' l . l ROBERT B. L.-WE JOHN LAPINSKI PIARRISON P. LINDABURY, JR. ROBERT BURTON LAPE ....... ............................................................... ....... E X I-louse Sclzmcctady, N. Y. 2X5 I+'resl1mzu1 Cross-Countryg Varsity Cross-Country Q3jg V ar- sity Track f2jg Spikecl Shoe Society CZ, 3j. O JOHN LAPINSKI ........... ............................................................... ......... 8 3 6 Maplewood Ave. Sclzencctady, N. Y. Football Squad ffij. O HAIQRISON PHILLIP LINDABURY, JR. .................................... ........ A Y House Gladstone, N. f. AY. 4 -'M ,, 1 1 fb 1351 4 b?w4W"-Z7 U +1 5121.555 1"'11 4 5 . Pi ell.: L 1, ' 'f A - , 111 , .1 1 fi 1 , ' , Y , , I-IILDEGE G. LoIsELL LESLIE R. LONG WALTER J. LYONS HILDEGE GEORGE LOISELLE ....................,........................................... .......... I icy and Blade Club Sche1'Lecz'ady, N. Y. Key and Blade Clubg Mountebauks Q2, 353 Le Cercle Francais 61,27- O LESLIE RANKIN LONG ........ .........................................,.................... ..... ..... C 1 1 arlton Road Sclzenecfady, N. Y. Glee Club. I WALTER JOSEPH LYONS ........,. ...................,...................... ......... 8 O 2 Second Ave. Troy, N. Y. IIYW -"- ' Sw . 4.1 "W -- 11 A f HW .,31y.',,r'.q E 112 21.41 Lf' . :lf 1' Zi DUAL A. RTACINTYIZE DONALD I-I. MACICENZIE JOSLPH A. :MiANEY DUAL ALASTAIR MACINTYIUQ .... . ................................................. ........... A X House Corinth, N. Y. AXQ Treasurer of junior Classg Psychology Club. DONALD I-IERBERT G. MAcK1zNzr12 ....,.......................................... .......... I CA Lodge Greenwick, Conn. KAQ Master of VV2ll'Cl1'OlJC, Mountebanks CZ, 313 Assistant Editor of Handbook CZ, 3D 5 Tigcr's Eye. JOSEPH ARTIAIUR MANEY ....................................................................... ......... I icy and Blade Club Schenectady, N. Y. Key and Blade Clubg Swimming Team Q2, 35 5 Football Squad fl, 255 Track Squad fZj. 113 S V fig 'il Q 'If l!ll l'fflf'l1 ll 1 ...gliiil Ze, A .ll , mem: N :fm L , . GZ 1 Il. NA f. JOHN N. IVIARCELLUS, IR. SIDNEY D. LLARKMAN JAMES LEO LLCGRANI2 -loHN NICIAIOLAS MAIQCELLUS, IR. .............................................. ........... A Y House Schenectady, N. Y. AYg Freshman Scrap Leaderg Candidate Manager of Swimming QZJQ Assistant Manager of Swimming 1355 Associate Editor of Handbook Q2jg Editor of Handbook QSD3 Classical Club Q3jg Publication Board f3jg Chairman of Junior Class jacket Coin- mitteeg Interclass Track fl, Zj. r SIDNEY DAVID MARKMAN ............................................................. ........... L BT House Brooklyn, N. Y. ZBTg Freshman Footballg Assistant Manager of Freshman Basket- ballg Classical Club fl, 2, 35 5 Mountebanks CZ, SD 5 Property Man- ager f3jg Settings, for Studio Players Q2jg Lacrosse Squad Cl, 2, 3jg Candidate Business Manager of Garnet CZDQ Contributor to Idol QZJ. JAMES LEO MCGRANE ...................................................,......,.,.,.................. ........... ...,...... GJ N E House Schenectady, N. Y. 9NEg Lacrosse QI, 255 German Club f3jg Psychology Club f2jg Sophomore Discipline Committee QZJ. Q, ll' E' i. I """l' If a ' viii ' T524 DONALD F. MCKECIINIE IAARULD D. NIERRY LOUIS JOHN BIIILONE DONALD FRANKLIN MCIiECl'INIE ................................................. . ....... .. Key and Blade Club Glowrsville, N. Y. Key and Blade Clubg German Club fl, Zjg Skull and Scalpelg Glee Clubg Choir. O HAROLD DERWOOD IVIERRY ..............................................,.................... ....... l 6 VVilson Ave. .flmsterdaim N. Y. ' Honors in Economics. C LOUIS JOHN MILONE .............................,........................................................ ........... P y1-amid Club ' Rockville Centre, L. I. Pyramid Clubg German Clubg Baseball fl, 255 Wrestling. I. iw M23 , .4 CISWLIIUI' Eli IM"-'ll-I-LE' ...Ig I i. ' - - .1.,, ,, . - .,'5Qfi':r::?:'::Eg ' l 'Pgfbiff 1. .L- 'Q ' J IQ. 'LM QE EI EQ I 'L A,. fl 115 EE 557155 ra SF F! I .. ': Q 2 , ... :.. .,. If un ii 1, Y ' -11- A yr' l J 1' Q asa? isa 'glliig C X :ass l I A 5 W V l JOHN DANIEL MIRATE ANTHONY JOHN lX4ONDA GEORGE A. MOORE JOHN DAN1131. MIRAT13 . ................,.................................... . .......... ,........ ............ 1 X IDA House Sclicnecfafly, N. Y. AfDAg Psychology Club f3jg Spanish Club fl, 2, 315 Treasurer of Spanish Club fZjg Spilced Shoe Society f3jg Glee Club Q3jg Choir CSD. C ANTHONY JOHN NIONDA ................................................,.................... ........ 7 08 Crane St. Schenectady, N. Y. O GEORGE A. MOORE ........ ............................................................. ............ P y ramicl Club Glens Falls, N. Y. Pyramid Clubg Chemistry Club fl, 2, 35 g Radio Club C35 3 Mounte- banks C215 Secretary of Pyramid Club. 116 , , wx- -. , , .... N a I . l I I, l .' l . l . ' l JOHN CHESTER IYIOORE ALuIzR1' I. MORRISON WILLIAM GORDON NEESE JOHN CIIESTIQR MOCDRE ................................................... . ..................... ........... 2 X House H07'5CIl,CGL1S, N. Y. 2X5 Glee Club CZ, 355 Instrumental Club Cl, 2, 353 Choir QZ, 355 Violin Quartet C355 Interfraternity Cross-Country 135. ALBIQRT IvOR MORRISON ............................................................................. ......... ll 1. S. N. C. London, England Mountebanlcs fl, 2, 35 5 Fencing fl, 2, 35 5 Biology Club C25 5 Psy- chology Club Q25g German Club fl, 2, 35g Vice-President of Ger- man Club Q35 5 Sophomore Disciplinary Committeeg Proctor North College Dormitory. VVILLIAM GORDON NEESR: . .................................................................. ........... A Y House Brooklyn, N. Y. AYg Swimming Team C2, 355 Manager Freshman Cross-Countryg Candidate Manager Lacrosseg Junior Prom Committeeg Athletic lloardg Spanish Club Cl, 253 Baseball 115. u ,VT NRM if fl PCS 'E QP if I X ,N If F 'lx' fill ,fl will ,il .lvl EMMETT S. .NEXVMAN VVILLIAM D. NEWMAN PIARBISON T. OATMAN EMMETT SPRAGUE NEXNBIAN ............................................................. ........ 1 225 Christer Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. Band 5 Garnet Goblins. O VVILLIAM IDOCKSTADER NEWMAN ................................................ ........... P y1-amid Club Schenectady, N. Y. Pyramid Club 5 Band. O HARRISON TREMAIN OATMAN .................................................,........ ........... 9 09 Vxfendell Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. Instrumental Clubg Glee Clubg Band Cl, 3, 41. th xxv' eel ' hm-.ig - U E- l 1 2 PRINCE E. OI,i2soN Rouiziar S. OPPENHEIM THOMAS ORDNVAY, JR. PRINCE E. OLESON ...... ......................................... ........ A fb House C hicago, Ill. A4115 Concordiensis fl, Z, 333 Glee Club fl, 2, 35 3 Choir fl, 2, 3D 5 Violin Quartet Q2, Sjg Instrumental Club Qljg Idol Clubg Fresh- man Cross-Countryg Freshman Hockey. ROBERT SAMUEL OPPENHIQIM ........................................................ ........ A Y House Schenectady, N. Y. AYQ Varsity Swinnning' QZ, 3D Captain of Swimming 5 Varsity Football g Varsity Lacrosse Q2, SD 5 Freshman Footballg Major Letter in Swimming f2jg Business Manager of 1934 Garnetg Pub- lication Board Q2, 3jg Pi Delta Epsilong Junior Prom Committeeg Student Assistant in Gymnasium. THOMAS ORDWAY, JR. ....... .............................................. .,..... I C A Lodge KA 5 German Club. Albany, N. Y. 119 ki in - W 93 ' ,, "4 -dl is 2 R s a i fi: Ilzaiii' I". 'r I , A- sly!! ., .,, .I - - .I A. ' 'ua Q xll 'fr ,, f wa, 'f? ,i f , . lr. ' - ' w I' C rw 'afwvjzj xl", 9 15":5gA??1f " li E- 1 ilifig.: Iii! nl F fi" F ra' '51 71154 "PL . to in rv ai-ia-"-I ,tif ll Nq .W A ,, .. li n1f""X7'5'l'T9' li +'i!'i'l1I'Tiii? av: fe tiff ll: l l a .. . ey E-' A I I i ERNEST F. PAINTER EVERETT S. PAINTER DAv1D S. PARKER, JR. ERNEST FRANK PAINTER .................................................................... ........ l l47 Vtfaverly Pl. Schenectady, N. Y. Concordiensisg Assistant Business Manager of Concordiensis. I EVERETT SIDNEY PAINTER ..... 1 ........................................................... ........ 1 147 VVaverly Pl. Schenectady, N. Y. Associate Editor of Garnet. O DAVID SCHWARTZ PARKER, JR. ...................................................... ....... A HN House Rensselaer, N. Y. AHNQ Freshman Basketball 5 Varsity Basketballg Psychology Club 5 Associate Editor of Garnet. 1 20 vi g 'w w. , ,-' HARRY B. PARKER, JR. VVILLIAM M. PREST BORIS RADOYEVICH HARRY BRACKETT PARKER, JR. ........,... , ............................................ ........ fD A9 House Sclzeuectady, N. Y. fDA9g Football fl, 2, 315 Basketball QI, 2, 355 Track Q2jg Asso- ciate Editor of Garnet QSJ. WILLIAM MARCIIAN1' PRIEST ................................................... , ..... ........... A CD House Brooklyn, N. Y. ND, Assistant Manager of Baseball Q3j. BoR1s RADOYEVICH ........ .. ......................................................... ........... B GTI House St. James, L. I. B9IIg Freshman Basketball, Boxing 3 Lacrosseg Football QZ, 35. 121 7 Vbi Q71 ill I 5 G ,JE lilmlil .. rage, 1 ,7 mils 1 ,'i,l,...! ' I i i-lil xii . 'KB' . esagaiifll - - --Q I ll' 7 ,lv l Y l :HAROLD G. Romsms JOHN P. ROBERTS ERWIN K. Rocicwsu. HAROLD GANUNG ROBBINS .............. ' ....... . ....... . .................................. ........... I C 2 House 'lflfest H aven, C mm. - K2g Freshman Footballg Treasurer of Sophomore Class. O JOHN PALIVIER ROBERTS .,........................................................................... .......... 1 67 Rankin Ave. Sclzenectady, N. Y. Track Q25 5 Idol Board. C ,ERWIN KENNE1'I'I ROCKWELL ....................................................... ........... A CD House 1' yr 'E lphg, I ,f.. -w' F-l'r'+"75 Glens Falls, N. Y. Afbj Basketball Cl, 2, 35g Mountebanks fl, 2, 355 Track C255 Choir f25g Lacrosse 1255 Librarian of Mountebanks C2, 35. iff l L g El W 3 lvl' sllr Q' - 1 - I fs? If - 1 FRANK D. ROYLANCE, IR. HARRISON S. SAYRE ELMORE C. SCHUMAN FRANK DEAN ROYLANCE, JR. .............................................................. ............ E CIP Place LaGra1zgevillc, N. Y. 21195 Track CU 5 Candidate Manager Baseball f2jg Mountebanks Productions fl, 235 Interfraternity Council Q31 , O HARRISON SHERMAN SAYRE ............................................................. ........ I CA Lodge Schenectady, N. Y. KAg Mountebanks Qlj g Assistant Manager Freshman Hockey C315 Candidate Manager Hockey C255 Candidate Manager Tennis f2jg Associate Editor of Garnet Q31 O ELMORE CONRAD SCHUMAN ........................................................,........... .......... A Y House Briarclijjf lllanor, N. Y. AYQ Freshman Basketball Squadg Baseballg Glee Clubg Choirg Varsity Swimmingg Varsity Baseball CZ, 31 5 Classical Clubg Vice- President Tigei-'s Eye Society. 123 uurlwvgkl- 'GM 5 63, -r2-'-:FEP .11 I . rl Fl! QE E. 2? sf.. . S : ' 2-27-- E ---,,., NTILTON SCHVVEBEL LARMAN S. Smzmvoon WILLIAM L. SHINLR 7 MIL'fON SCI-IVVEBEL ........... ., ........ , ............................... .......... I xN House Tray, N. Y. KNg German Club flj 5 Philomathean Society CZ, 31 5 Track Squad QZJQ Chess Club Q2jg Candidate Manager of Debateg Inter- fraternity Sportsg Track f2jg Cross-Country fl, 35. I LARMAN SCRIVENER SI-IERXVOOD ............................................. ............ EJ AX House Cohes, N. Y. GJAX. I WILLIAM LUT1-IER SI-IIMER .........,....,................................................... ........... E X House Schenectady, N. Y. 2X3 French Club Qljg Glee Club Q2, 333 Track Squad flj. f Q IHFW W WQEEI 5 I In: :ill ' f .:, 124 aaa: I -------C ' SAMUEL SILBERKRAUS SAMUEL SIMON JULIUS JAY SITNEY SAMUEL S1LB12RKRAUs ..,...... ..... . ..,.... ........ .........,............................... , . . . ........... AME House Schevzectady, N. Y. AME. O SAMUEL SIMON .......... .................................................................. .......... I C N House Poughleeejvsic, N. Y. KNg Vice-President of Chess Club CZ, 35 g Mouutebanksg Psychol- ogy Club. jULIUs JAY SITNEY .......... ....................................................,...,.... ....... 1 2 98 Parkwoocl Blvd. Sclzwzecmdy, N. V Y. Mountebanks fl, 25 g Secretary of Mountebanks C555 Philo- mathean Society. 1: ll' uf'-' f' gf 'FE f:Q I ,nf F WSW S llf' wllll l ll x.lmll,.s.1lUllM. Ml l -55553553-S 21215: Q Sis? EEE NMASL 'cfif' 125 'J' I' i",-" M xv' U , v - W. - ,u if STE uw u was mv li mf' F ,w 'lm ' w :ee . ,Y ' ,Q 5 w ABRAHAM Sivura CLEMENT ARTHUR SMITH DOUGLAS V. SMITH ABRAHAM SMITH ........ ............................. , ................................ ......... . 1 XME House Schenectady, N. Y. AM2g Juris Prudentia Cl, Zjg Philomathean Society QZQQ Trackg Choir QSM Glee Clubg Mountebauks. CLEMENT ARTHUR SMITH .....................,........................................... ............ 113 A9 House Schenectady, N. Y. CDA9g Freshman Basketball Squadg Varsity Football Squad Q2, 3D 5 Varsity Basketball Squad QZ, SJ. I DOUGLASS Vrsscuaiz SMITH .........................................................,.. ........... A ACID House Schenectady, N. Y. AAIIM Freshman Football 5 Freshman Lacrosse 5 Associate Editor of Garnet. 1 H . imply- E 126 T1 , W ig Z I ROliER'f I--I. SMITH FRANK A. SQUIRES, Ju. PAUL G. STAc1uQo1,iz ROBERT I'IALLOCK SMITH ............................. ........ ..............,........ , ..... . ....... . ..... .... . . ................ A Y House Sclzenectady, N. Y. AYg Varsity Debating Team Cl, 2, 3Qg Philomathean Societyg Secretary of Philomathean Society C355 Candidate Manager of Debatingg Candidate Manager Varsity Footballg Candidate Man- ager Varsity Baseballg Concordiensis Cl, 2, 355 Associate Editor of Concordiensis C315 Freshman Scrap Leaderg Mountebanlcsg Tiger's Eyeg Tennis Tournament Cl, 2, 3jg Associate Editor 1934 Garnet. FRANK ADAMS SQCIRES, IR. ................... .............. . . ........................... ......... I iey and Blade N augamck, C amz.. Key and Blade Clubg Vice-President of League of Evangelical Students C3jg Swimming Squad C3D. PAUL GLENFORD STACKPOLE ................................................................... ....,...... GJ NE House Ausable Forks, N. Y. 9NEg Freshman Cross-Countryg Freshman "Y" Cabinetg "Y" Cabinet C2, 3Qg Candidate Manager Cross-Country C2jg Assistant Manager Cross-Country C315 Manager Cross-Country C4jg Psy- chology Club C2, 3, 45. A l :LM .L+ 'i nz... JE V' -' ' iz? ' 127 ii.. 'L as r Milli T? ' E11 I will iv, I l 5591 h fli fl eg .' if quill ln! If "iff gl: J " I - X 1 .... - , ,AY f 5 f . .4 -v V. J: , ... ,if MORTON C. STEWART, In. HAROLD STRICKLAND JOHN K. SULLIVAN MoR'roN COLLINS STEVVART, IR. ......................... .... ....,.. .......... . . .......... G A X House . Sclzwzcciady, N. Y. CIJAXQ Secretary of German Club Q15 5 Reporter Concorclicnsis Q15 5 Secretary-Treasurer of German Club QZ, 35 g Sophomore Editorial Board Concordiensisg Business Manager of Concorcliensis f25g Assistant Business Manager Concordicnsis C353 Psychology Club. O HAROLD S'rR1C1iLAND ........... .................................................. ......... fl P EK House Baldwin. N. Y. fD2Kg Philomathean Q35. C JOHN IQING SULLIVAN ....... .................................................. ......... B 9 H House Pittsfield, Zlffass. B91-Ig 130 Pound Boxing Champion U55 Glee Club C355 Choir C35- 128 v 1 1 J ' JAMES F. SWEIZNEY EDWARD L. TAYLOR, JR. GEORGE TELLALIAN DIAMES FRANCIS SVVEENEY .............................. ................................ ........... I C 2 House Har1'i1'1zan, N. Y. K25 Candidate Business Manager Of Garnetg Candidate Assistant Manager of Baseball. EDWARD LEON TAYLOR, ja. .......................................................... ........ KD FA House lViZliamspo1't, P cfm. CIWFA5 Spanish Club Cl, 215 Psychology Club f2, 355 Freshman Hockeyg Lacrosse fl, 255 Associate Editor of Garnet. GEORGE TELLALIAN ......... ........................................... ........... 2 3 14 Eleventh St. Troy, N. Y. 129 3' v7 ll 4. l'if5:ffL'i ya- 'T' 5'7 , '7 3' 'Y ,gif 1 in gf' 'I " .ilu ii! .llll ' yLbLli.l.P'gl'1ll,. flip fu: libel :::2'2H 'f 1 I 5- 1 if -1 wlvE1!'f2-' FW ""' ADOLF G. VV. T IMM ELXDOLF GEORGE VV. TIMM CHARLES R. TINKER GEORGE VV. TRACY, JR. Scotia, N. Y. 221 Mohawk Ave Band C1,2, 35. O CHARLES ROBERT TINICER ............................................................... .......... f DAG House Hudson, N. Y. IDAGJ. O GEORGE XVENDELL TRACY, JR. ................................................,.......... ......... 1 4 Furman St Radio Club. Schenectady, N. Y. LL 'Y Ei X- X ,- x LOUIS REED TRIP? ELLIS W. TROMRLEY RALPH TRUMRALL, JR. LOUIS REED TRIPP , ........ ................................................................ ......... A cl I I-louse Schenectady, N. Y. Aflig Montebanks C355 Junior Prom Committeeg Glee Club Q2, 31g Candidate Manager Tennisg Associate Board of Garnetg Choir CSD g Instrumental Club QZD. O ELLIS VVARNIEII rlTROMBLEY ..............................,........,........................ ........ l 744 State St. Sclzcncctady, Y. O RALPI-I TRUIVIBITLL, JR. .,................................................................,..... ........ A CD House Schenectady, N. Y. A1193 Freshman Cross-Countryg Choir Cl, Zjg Glee Club. nam!! ig , --1-S ' 'iw igswhz-:, -4- Ils ' "fi 3 . '- I 42 sr' " n " a 1 ' l "' 3 9 J-: L 1 Y I GILBERT W. TUCK HENIQY W. T ULLOCI-1 FREDERICK TURNIIULL GILBERT WALLACE TUCK ........................,................................,............ ..,..,.... 4 DFA House Round Lake, N. Y. fI7I1Ag Spanish Club Cl, 2, 35 5 French Club fl, 2, 3j 5 German Club LZ, 355 Classical Club fl, 235 "Y" Cabinet CZJ. HENRY WILEY TULLOCH .............................................,......................... ....,....... 9 Close St. Sclwncctady, N. Y. Spanish Club Cl, Zjg Liberal Club CZ, Sjg Secretary of Liberal Club C355 Psychology Club f3j. FREDERICK TURNBULL ........... ............... ,..............................,.............. ......... 1 O 5 7 Gillespie St. Floral Park, N. J. Swimming Squaclg League of Evangelical Students. "".- fi. l l 51 W". gli 'swf iss ' in ' is 154: iii H . I 4 . 132 .EEE . 5 Vg, l azz- , I . f 3.-.-a...-'!:,:-L-I a 7 x T W . ,A.LEXANIlER M. TURNER Josxir-I-I G. VACCA, IR. DONALD F. VROOMAN AI.EXANDER MACCALTL TURNER ........................................... .......... 1 PY House Elmira, N. Y. lIfYg Student Councilg Secretary of Student Bodyg Varsity Trackg Freshman Footballg Freshman Basketballg O.A.N.g Tige1"s Eycg French Clubg Inte1'f1'aternity Councilg Spiked Shoe Soeietyg junior Prom, Secretary. O joslzpn G. VACCA, JR. ....... .................................................................. ....... f X CDA House Sclzmzectady, N. Y. AQUA. O DONALD FRENCH V ROOMAN ................................................................ ........ 3 0 XfVestern Parkway Schenectady, N. Y. Spanish Club Y 5 'Q I 4 J Q40 . 1 'We u nik Mei S .rm nw I" " i51R5l5f2..f'lf W1 x'.ULf1g.,'fQ1.i' ,Hvll am 133 iigS5.v,Q,:'?1?'- "' 4- ? xv L1 I f , iii--1 TH01X'I.'XS S. WALSH, JR. JOHN RICHARD VVARD ALTON C. W,xriN1siz THOMAS STEPHEN VVALSH, JR. ............................................ ......... 1 S13 Third Ave. H'atc1"Uliet, N. Y. I JOHN RICHARD VVARD .......... .............................................................. ........ 5 2 5 Harrison Ave. Schenectady, N. Y. Freshman "Y" Cabinetg Spanish Clubg Philomathean. I ALTON CLINTON VVARNER ............................................................. .......... 2 3 Ray St Schenectady, N. Y. Freshman Hockeyg Tennis Teamg Leader of Garnet Goblins. 'X-Ns" 'r X Ma EEL 134 '.Ha-ii i. A, Q PAUL VVASSMANSDORF BELMONT M. 'WI1.1.1AMs :KARL D. WILLIAMS 49 V1 P 1. PAUL VVASSMANSDORF ......... ..,.......................................... ........... L A cy xc Scolia, N. V. Varsity Golfg Idol Contributorg Lightweight Boxing' Championg Glce Clubg German Clubg Associate Editor of Garnet. O BELMONT MLTRRAY XMILLIARIS ......................................................... ......... 7 55 Curry Rd. Sflzfcnectady, N. Y. Basketball QU. O KARL DAMRROW VVILLIAMS .......................................................... ......... X 11' Lodge Lockport, N. Y. Xllf. --. ' iE g' -Egg. rf nf iii -f. Sign fl -ai R" Ravi I +V i7:"'1' 6Q1w,t1"' ' 5 .!- . .' . im. 1 135 '-'ii f ' ' .f',..A?4 UT 1 .4-.g,j::'y?Lzf. L r P55 '1.. I 1 "i ...n . time bxvivx fix ff I, I 2 i ffl' q i QFf?55"' .llHgv1L'.r.-xii -F TNR' limi ,,f Fri ,",,y W- -H! rlr 'ff nl iiil'i,,E,,i' -H' LoUIsH.VV11.1,IAMs WIIIIAM T. XVINNE LEWIS I. Yiavou LOUIS I'IAMILTON WILLIAMS ...........................,.......................... ......... CI? A9 House Brooklyn, N. Y. YDAQQ Lacrosse Team QZQQ Hockey Team Q2, 3jg Idol Clubg Spanish Clubg A.S.C.E.3 Junior Boardg Freshinan Disciplinary Coinmitteeg Freshman Hockeyg Freshman Lacrosse. I XMILLIARI TIIOIIAS VVINNIQ .....,.,.......................................................... ....... 1 417 Union St. Sclzeucctady, N. Y. O LEWIS JOSEPH YEVOLI ................................................................................. ,......... I MDA House A msterdam, N. Y. ACIJAQ French Club fl, 2, 3jg Assistant Cheer Leader f2jg Asso- ciate Editor Garnetg Concordiensis QU. 136 L MI2zKDE I-T. ZIMMER GEORGE J. Zlvvm MEADE I'IUNFERSFORD ZIIIIMEII ........................................................... ............ 2 03 jay St. Cordova, .fl1'gem'i11-e I GEORGE JOSEPH ZIIJPIN ........ ................................................... ......... f X ME House Albany, N. Y. AMEg I11Stl'L1111C11'Eii1 Clubg Biology Club. O VVILLIAM BATES JMXXTELL .....................................................,................... Sclzencctady, N. Y. O CI-IARLES CARR ......... .........,.....................,.............. ....... 1 N iver St. Colzoes, N. Y. C DAVID WILLIS CHILDS .................................................................................. ........... 3 2 Grant Ave. A-mstc1'dam, N. Y. Track Team QZDQ Spiked Shoe Society. 137 A-F ix' J' '-,vfiE?.,., V' ij NY y Lay! Vgggf? '74 'L uw I r 9 54 QI I1 I Iyuuruhv IU! 1 nl, iiaeaas: E Ip"-' 1 I 'Iraqi' 1 Tl-IE IQ34 VVARREN EDVVIN COOK ....... .............................................................. ....,..... A X House Chateangay, N. Y. AX. O ROBERT CLAIR COONILY .........................................,. ............................... .......... A Y House Sclzwzccfczzly, N. Y. AY. O PHILIP H. FRANKIQL ........ ................................................................... ......... A A 42 House Schcnectacly, N. Y. AM2g Fencing. I HAIQRY FRANCIS LAMOREAUX .........,.................,.............................. .......... 9 AX House Ballston Lake, N. Y. SAX. I DAVID JOHN LOCKE ......................................................................................... ........... 1 03 Woocl1a11d Ave. Sclzeneclady, N. Y. I THEODORE RICIIARD BAICILVVAINE ............,................................. ......... E X House Plattsbmfg, N. Y. EX. I, v' Lf: if NYNA Ljlyin X Q 138 -IX' F 1 GAERNCET :RUSSELL BROWN NUIIKECHNIIE . .,................................................. ..... , ..... E X House Glozfcrsville, N. EXg Mountebacks Cl, 35 g Philomathean Cl, Z, 35 5 Skull and Sealpelg German Club Ql, 2,3 5 Sophomore Qratorieals, First Prizeg News Bureau Cl, 25 5 Associate lfditor 1934 Garnetg Glee Club Clj. O FRANK HIEIQBIAN Oil-BRIIQN ,............. ...,............................................. . ..... T NXA House SClzcr1cL'laa'y, N. Y. AXA. 0 ROBERT STEWART OyF.I2li .,...................................,..,............................ ............ A X House H'afw'-z'Iicf, N. Y. AXQ Coneordiensis Reporter flilg German Club Ql, 3J. O MILTON POZEFSKY ......... ......................................................,................ ........... S . S. S. C. Glovcrwillc, N. Y. I JOHN ARTHUR J. VVALSII ............................................,...................... ......,..... l O33 University Place New York, N. Y. Mountebanks Productions. I IVOR PETERSON VVOLD ..................................................................................... ............ f XAKD House Schenectady, N. Y. AAKDQ Swimming Squad fl, 2, 325 Track Squad. V2.1 ' ulswzgzllvgh 1633.1 .Q . -iz.: 1 .111 H LVRLULIF 'T . " 4' .L.-'13 :-- I gn: ' Ji.: ,A 2 gg in ,Q 'E .1 LF. -, 1 9 ' 5 552:25 ' ' I ....... -5 sul EEL , .- T ,i Q :Q if 'Fi 'H LQ- ' 1' 5 W, ., fl R 4 , 'R 'bfigffl-SS'iz,wa 6' 143,54 Q , ', .,,, ,,5 ETH? NWA-M Yah' f-,fiw -v if T.-- - 2 S I . ,gd 4:5 ' Egffggi gy? S 1 6 N .I agua 3585? xg' ' :ix 4 is giggn . in as n :J ,ff ist g bg '-4.3. , 1 ' 2' ' . xii? Q 'F 2 L15 " 1?-Fxiaiffvi Q41 f1a ii4Q?5ffff 12fS5E25559"' ' g.,Kn. . ,,-" 4663 2-'u:'g+?':. 1i"'S'v':'-1 'H 'frw 5 J . sfismi. 329 if 1 wa -f QW, ff - .. V FM., A-f if"'H1-wif 2,3511gwfigwkag-qijflg-g,u?gg4! wg,-l::e1q:,'5iSg kwnei "I 219, gCMyi55':' l?iff55v5,.-,74 : I . , . f, . .5-.A-,,,w,., ...N 5. af. ff, .,-:5i,:,.'.,51? 4gi1Q1g,,-vs1,'4i',5:ie 1e?"'9- 191'-5S!a?:'f'5'EY Qzwih- I5'H2513RfQ?:515,iL2e,ff.5,-:Q-rfb" 4 5, M-'qgeaaagftffm ww' 15' Lg is wliffaib fu '19QQf,k7g. wifi-l1MvFi.fwfae . vm.-fa-.11., f'9':1,-:W Rfk ffcimfxh- Us 'iwfw :i"'w,g' wawfavf' '1M1qfv'gWLf 1 .2Si'LT?21qf'+i'f''.-J92'f'Q3i. S L- '1 ri?-Ifiginulfffrzw82-1514" fi' V-f?AvA""1J1-Qtfgfmdu f 'f :fi'5?35f1"L'-'1.,.j5f.0?f l'I 5,1-,ififfw C . ' ' QM- ' X wf".Effma2- Mina?-u 1 W 9531 val tl fjgfkwfiiz -1 vhvlrgffg'N4Qysf'1,igfgw,gvF'aj,13 'fy "jf ifi ,-LF1'-. 15'ggiL1Wp,. n 'Hgh a5'gf1F5wWw,mKNUN wQ1h4JW1'i2K1 if-:Hum'fNiw:51iaW"1'v'1ahAQ 5-giwzigay MM' -41' +'?fM'W Vu " N-M W H m W vw IW: wn wr. - Hu.: W., w W .Mu D ,nl L I 1 ,L ,gy 5, ,ur ,, ,1 2'-1 -3 MX',',' : 3' :ulg'QIf:1gU.5' L11 X141 kim' pgin-Ll 6, 'ff-U "f,,"1,'fi'f1!?f'H M, ,:.1v7K4ff15,li5'Nli, .1-1.,,.,,If.E?TR4hfi11F'I?ff..M' ...,.. 1 if N, M-Mmi'-l'l L-T.,',QL, iL,,"" "W"-J" If", L," ""1 -w" gr -J I ...':'.1 31114. j'J'f' --4' --1, 1, , 'H "' MMM!1 W- if +V' K iii 'Y - - 5 5 OLD COLLEGE-UNION STREET 140 GARNET UNION COLLEGE GARNET 1934 Q SOIREE Q FIRST CRACK AT VARSITY Q TEN TO ONE AGAINST US SO WE LET THEM WIN THE IDOL FIGHT Q SO YOU CAN'T TAKE IT FRESHMAN 0 NOW WHEN WE WERE STARTING IN Q WHATEVER HAPPENED TO AL 0 NEVER CRACKED A BOOK AND KNOCKED DOWN AN "A" Q THAT GUY THINKS ALL I'VE GOT TO DO IS STUDY HIS COURSE Q LET ME USE YOUR NOTES O WHAT HAPPENED O I WAS SOUND ASLEEP QTHESE FROSH ARE TOO COCKY 141 Q 5 U ill- .l-L1 hh I li XXV ' 5v41L,,v, ,, li History of the Class of 1935 RAYMOND S. NICIDOXVELL ..... President C. RICHARD DAVIS . . . . .Vive-Prcsidarzf I-QALPI-I D. SEMERAD. . . .... Secretary JOHN I. MOFFETT . . . . .Trcasm'e1' RAYMOND S. MCDOWELL Once again the time comes to consider the achievements of each class during the past year, and again the Class of 1935 is showing interest in every activity. By its own example as well as by the tomato-fight, paint-scrap, and hair-cut method, the Class has sought to plant i11 the hearts of the 'llowlyu freshmen some- thing of the spirit of Old Union, and now it remains for time alone to cultivate this spirit into one of undying loyalty. In clramatics, music, and in debating, in all the art and science clubs, the C l lisfls ,X 142 Hi "I x . if Ill Class of 1935 has not failed to give its active support. Scholastically, the Class has held its own with the upper classes While leaving the freshmen far behind. Unusual distinction has already been attained by the Class in the field of sports. VVe began our college career by coming through the twelve contests of the freshman year with only one defeat, at the same time winning the George C. Foote Inter-class trophy for excellence in fencing, boxing, and wrestling. This year the Class marched on to win the sophomore-freshman lacrosse game and the inter-class basketball championship. Even more outstanding is the contribut- ing to varsity fall and winter sports of twenty players, eleven receiving the major athletic award. The Class has also supplied a wealth of varsity material to the spring sports. Wliile taking such an active part in athletics, the sophomores have displayed a certain characteristic. It is a quality not generally apparent, but yet it is a quality present to such an extent as to draw comment from at least one coach, who termed it "mental alertness". This spirit of wide-awake, intelligent interest evidenced not only in sports, but also by the fact that a large portion of the athletes of the class are honor men. The half-way mark has been reachedg the Class of 1935 has already made a record for itself scholastically and athletically by its 'fmental alertness". just how far we will forge ahead in other fields and how much good we are going to add to the glory of our Alma Mater by being mentally alert to our responsibili- ties-that will be told by future historians. DONALD B. MOULTON, Class Historian. 4 1-5 ...Jai 11- I' gg. Zg"J"ii A ' eh! V 42 J lt! I 4 L -, 143 -Q -lg Y Y -i31L.F ti sis ' " S-eh Il A-NW! I l 4' g Z 1 la ,. 'll 'li If I1 l 'lll-F V ila lv TI-I 93 Sophomore Class ERNEST ABDELLA ..............................,........,... XVVARREN ACKERMAN, IDFA ...................... JOSEIII-I VINCENT AGIUS, JR., AXA ....... RICHARD BRAKER ALLEN, GAX ....... LEONARD ANGERAMI, AfDA .................. CLIFFORD QLIVER APGAR, AXA ....... JOHN IRVIN AXRGERSINGER, AY ................ STEVVART GEORGE .ARMI'l'AGE, Xll' .......... PAUL WILLIAII BACIIMAN, WY .......... ROBERT VVILLIAM BAIN ............................... HARRY MANSIPIELD BAKER, X111 ..,...... GEORGE SPENCER BARRET ...,............. . ARTIIUR VVOODFIN BARTLETT ........ PAUL HAIQOLD BEIR, AY .................. MILTON ALTON BERGER, KN ........ JOSEPI-I VVELLS BISHOP, A113 ................ ......., MICIIAEL ANGELO BLASE, AIIJA ......................... ROBERT FRANKLIN BLATCHLEY, IDAG .......... MARTIN BENEDICT BLOOM, GAX .............. EDWARD MONCI'I.OW BRADLEY, XII' ............. VVVILLIAM THOMAS BRAZELL, K2 ........................ VVILLIAM THEODORE BROCKVVELL, B911 .......... ICENNETII DUANE BROMLEY ................................ BENJAMIN ALMON BROVVN, IIJEK ...,....... ERNEST NA1'11AN BROWN ,............,......... ROBERT MERIDA BROWN, EX ......... THOMAS SPENCER BRONVN, KE ..... ALEXANDEIQ BRZOSTOWSKI ................ RAYAIOND BUDNEY ..,................... GEORGE ADAMS BUw, KA ............ CHARLES IRVING BUSH, AIP ....... LEN SAMUEL CARPENTER ......... VVILLIATXI LORIGAN CARTER ............ NORMAN ORCUTT CHADBOURNE ....... FRANK POMEROY CI-IAMR ....................... FRANK VINCENT CHONSKI, AHN ......... WILLIAM PETERSON CHRISTIAN ..... .... . . GEORGE TOMPKINS CLARK, AHN ...... JOHN ROBERT CLARK ............................ 144 Gloversville Schenectady Schenectady Bayside Schenectady Califon, N, VVaban, Mass. Oxford Rochester Schenectady Larchmont Scotia Greene . ..................... Albany Poughkeepsie Sayre, Pa. WellshO1'O, Pa. Yonkers Buffalo Schenectady Lynbrook Schenectady Bergeniield, N. J. Scotia Saranac Lake Herkimer Schenectady Schenectady Jamaica Glens Falls The Glen Cohoes Scotia Scotia Albany Amsterdam Schenectady Schenectady IQENNETII CLIIf1fORD, AACD ............ SIDNEY .ALBERT COLE, AKA ......... DANIEL RUPERT CONLON, JR. ............. . FRANK XAVIER CONNELLY, QPAC9 ........ ANTHONY COPROLA, AGPA ...................... VVILKINSON CORY, WY ........... .......... ..... REYNOLD lWARVIN CRANE, AACIP ................ VVILBUR .ANDREW DAIIL, ACD ......,..............,..... CHARLES LAXVRENCE DAIN, JR., Bt-DTI ...... JOHN NICOL DALY ................................................. RICHARD EDGAR DAvIEs, AY ............ . CHARLES RICHARD DAVIS, fDA9 ...... RUDOLE FREDERICK DUETL, AXA ................. RICHARD lX"IAXlMILL1AN DIAMOND, KDEA JAMES DICICSON ............,................................. ......................... ANTHONY DILORENZO, AKIJA ....... NICHOLAS. :DINIARCO ...................................... BRANT VVALLACEI DITIIORE, CDAQ ....... JOHN LAWRENCE DORAN ......................,. . VINCENT DOYLE .................................................... FRANK ANTHONY DZIDUCI-J', AHN ..... MILO XVILKINSON EAMES ............................ LEONARD EISENBUD ...........................,........... GEORGE LOCIQE ELRIENDORF, fDI'A ...... LHUGI-I Ross ELWYN, CDEK .....,,.............. . EUGENE OLIVER EIIERSON ............. DONALD LYLE ENGESSER, EX ......... ROY FACCI ..............................,...................... JOHN EVANDISR FINCH, EX .......... RUSSEL GROAT FIRTH ................................,..... VVILLIAI-I HENRY FITZGERALD, AY ......,. AUSTIN MCCIQACIQEN Fox, WY ............. EDWARD .JOSEPH FRANK, QAGJ .......... JACK FRIEDMAN, ZBT ................................ OREL FRIEDMAN, KN ...................................... CHARLES RUXTON FROST, JR., EX ........ ENRIQUE IWARQUIEZ GAETE ..................... JOHN FRANCIS GAIN, JR., IDAQ ........ JOHN GALLO, ACDA .................,..........,....... STEPHEN I-IATI-IAWAY Gow, KA ........ CURTIS PIAZELTINIS GREENE ......... 145 Jamaica Ballston Spa Schenectady Rochester Schenectady Oradell, N. J. Plainiielcl, N. J. Brooklyn , .... ......... . . Oswego Schenectady Riclgewoocl, N. J. Albany Scotia Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Albany Schenectady Albany Amsterclaxn Albany Elizabeth, N. J. Plattsburgh VVoOclstOck Detroit, -Mich. xVZll1C1'llOVV11 Schenectady Wlaitellall Schenectady Goshen Buffalo Schenectady Schenectady Schroon Lake Albany Ecuador, S. A. Cohoes Schenectady Glens Falls Schenectady 'J' :JJ fl 'F' 2-23- I ff ' ? UA"'1'IrF' lsnkz? V - aj- 'I I7 49 E1 IT! IES, if if l, I .,,,aisLiE.. , ml - iiiiiii: ,gun I "" If 1 I A mv i X! rfw-"'12?'1'-I MILTON SCHOONMAKER GREGORY, CDAGJ MALCOLM LOCKVVOOD GRIFFING, fIJ1'A ...... New Platz .................... ..... E astport EDGAR JOHN GROENER, WY ..................................... .......... N ew York City CHARLES MCLAUGIILIN GROESBECIQ, EIIJ ........ ........... S chenectady HARVEY PATERSON GROESBECK, JR., AAQD ....... Schenectady JOHN GROET, AY ................................................................. ........ I lochestei' JOHN GUARNIER, ACDA ......................................... .......... S chenectady DANIEL ALEXANDER GUTTMAN, KIJEK .......... ........ B Oonton, N. J. OLIVER HARDIN HALL, KA .....................,........... ........ P ittsburgh, Pa, IRVING HANDLELIAN, AME ............................ ...... S chenectady DONALD WALLACE HANIIORD, EX .....,........ , .,... EDVVARD JOSEPH PIANNAN, JR., AXA ......... Unadilla Troy JOHN REGIS HART ....................................................... ................................. A lbany CLEMENS FREDERICK HATHAWAY, Xllf ....... ........ R iver Edge, N. J. DONALD CARLTON HZANVKIZS, JR., WY .......... ................................., E hnira GEORGE GUNDERSON HAYDEN ......,................ ....... B ronxville CHARLES REILLY HAYNES .................. ...... S chenectady ROBERT HERRIAN HEINEN, JR. ........ ...... S chenectady NORIVIAN LEARNED HESS, EID .................. NEIL HESSON, JR., DNE .................................... RANKINE GALLIEN HINLIAN, AAfD ......... WALTER HENRY HOLDRIDGE, XII' ........ FREDERICK JOHN HONAN, AKD ......... HENRY ADOLPH HOOS, JR., AXE ........ MARCUS I'IORVVITZ, IDEA ............................ SEYMOUR' ARNOLD HORWITZ, CDEA ....... JOHN FREDERICK HULBERT, ECI? ......... EDWIN MERLE HUTCHINS, KA .......... PHILIP IHUTT, DAX ........................................ . WILLIAM FRANCIS JENKINS, AAfD ........ HOMER THOMAS JENNINGS, Xllf ......... LEWIS SOL IQARP, KN ........................... JOHN NICCREA IKEELER, Xll' ............... ROGER DAVID IQENDELIIARDTJ ACD ....... RODGER ALBERT KENDRICK, AXA ........... FREDERICK AUGUSTUS KNAPP, EID ........ LESLIE JOHN IQNEHER, A119 ................. JOSEPH RAYMOND KOCH, AXA .......... HAROLD DAVID KOFFSKY .......................... ALEXANDER AURELIO KOSINSKI ......... GEORGE WILLIAM KRERIZIER ............ A 'I' 51 V F 5?.EtEE'?ff " 'X J Elmira Wate1'vliet Schenectady . ................ CatSkill WOOdlIaven Delhi Gloversville Schenectady Henryville, Pa. Schenectady Schenectady Derby Line, Vt. Fulton Mechanicville Larchmont Queens Village Easthampton, Mass. W'atertOwn Richmond Hill Schenecta'dy Albany Schenectady Schenectady JOHN JOSEPH KUTTLER ...................................... WILLIAM BOLESLAUS KWIATKOWSKI KENNETH GEORGE LARSON ........................ WILLIAM JOSEPH LEAI-IY, JR. .... . IQOBERT MEYERS LEITH ........................ WILLIAM NEWTON LESTER, KZ ........ JACK HALIILTON LINDABURY, KE ........ HZORACE EHRMANN LITTLE, KA ..,.... JAMES LEE LOOMIS, JR., AAfD ......... EDWARD DAVID LUNELBURG ...... VIRGINIO JAAARTIN, AfDA ......... KENNETH NATT NIATHES .................. ELDON FRANKLIN MATTESON ............ . VVILLIAM SPENCER MCCORD, AY .......... RAYMOND SAMUEL MCDONNfIf1LL AX! Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Scotia . Central Bridge Gladstone, N. J. Rochester Granby, Conn. lA1TlStC1'ClE11'l'1 Schenectady Schenectady Unadilla Forks Albany Holyoke, Mass. ', I MILES AMRROSE MCGRANE, JR. ...................... ............................... ' Froy ARCHIE CONOVER MCKEE .............. ...... S chenectady FOSTER MCMILLEN, CIJAGJ ...................... ........ S taten Island DUNCAN SCOTT NICNAB, BQH .......... ....... S chenectady MILTON MERRILL, JPY ............................................ ................ U tica EDWARD FREDERICK BIINCII, JR., ACD . ................. Albany GILDO MIRATE, AfDA ............................................... ....... S chenectady JOHN JOSEPH NIOFFETT, KDAGJ ............... ...... S chenectady FRANKLIN ROBER'1'S BQORRELL, Xllf ........ ......... G loversville DONALD BAILEY MOUL'1'ON, All' ......... ...... S chenectady STANLEY ELDREDGE NIOVVER, BQH ............ ...... S cheneetady VVILLIAM WELLER MEYERS, JR., EX ......... ......... I -Iorseheads LEAHMON NESTLE, ACD .....................,.......... ......... G loversville JERONIMO OSSA .................,...............,.................................. ........ P anama City, Panama FRANK STEPHEN PANTALONE ................................. ............................... A msterdam GEORGE WASHINGTON PAIQEN, 2nd, fDEK ......,... ................ A lbany JAMES GILBERT PARKER, KA ........................,...... ....... S chenectady EUART FREDERICK PARTRIDGE, KA ....... ...... S chenectady LESLIE ALLEN PARTRIDGE, KA ..................... .......... B rooklyn FERDINANDO ANTONIO PASQUARELLA ...... Schenectady GEORGE HUGH PERKINS, AXA ....................... ....... S chenectady BYRON EUGENE PHELPS, GNE .......... ................. E lmira ANDREW POGGENPOI-IL ........................... ...... S chenectady GEORGE POLANSKY, IDEA ................... ................ A lbany .JOHN JACOB POTOCKI ....,................................. ....... S ehenectady ROBERT LEIXIAN PURCHASE, AfD ......... Newark , Y ' ' ,ii- ro ri' I ll-4 IRVING RABINO, AME ....................... VVILLIAM EDVVARD RALL, ZCD .......,,...... GLENN ROBINSON SRAPALEE, EX ....,... HENRY HERNIAN RAUCH, AY .............. ROBERT RANDOLPH REED, AY .................. THOMAS CLEMENTS REMSEN, AACIJ ........,. . Schenectady Troy ,, .... XVz1tkin's Glen Scl'1OhzI1'ie lXl.2l.l'gll1'CtVlllC ll udson Falls CHESTER MALCOLM RHOADES, JR., AY ......... ............ S chenectady JOSEPH JOHN RIGALI, AXA ............................ ....... H Olyoke, Mass. JOHN EDWARD ROBINSON, KE ...... Ballston Spa STANLEY ROCKIEFELLER ............................. Poughkeepsie ADRIAN SPAULDING ROGERS, KA ......... Ausable FOI-ks XVILLIAM STUART ROGERS .................. ..... S chenectady JOHN BURR RORABACK ...,....... ...... I iinderhoolc JEROME SIGMUND ROSEN ...... ........... J amaica LEON ROSEN, AME .............. .... S chenectady JAMES ROTUNDA ......,...........................,.... ,... S chenectady RAYMOND JOHN RUSZROWSRI ....... ........ S chenectady JOHN FRANCIS RYAN, AXA .................. .................... T roy EUGENE ELLSWORTH RYON, BGH ..... ..... S chenectady VIRGIL JACOB SAGER ...................................... ,.. HAROLD CHARLES SCIINEIDERWIND ...... HOWARD 'DAVID SELD, AME ...................... RALPI-I DONALD SEMERAD, AY ........ FRANK XAVIER SI-IIELDS, JR., KA ............ EDWARD BAYARD SMITH SHIRES, JR. .... . ROBERT LOUIS SLOBOD .................... ,... ........ LAUREN EDWARD SMITH, QNE ........ ROBERT GLOCK SMITH ............ . .......... . VVILLIAM BERNARD SMITH, JR. .... . JOSEPH SOTTYSIAK ........................................................ LIERBERT GERHARDT REINLIOLD SPIESKE MAUS WVELLINGTON STEARNS, JR., AY VICTOR ANDREW STEVENS ................... .........., EDMUND FREDERICK SFOLL GEORGE VVILLIAM STROEBEL, Jr. AX .... HAIiRY ROSEWELL SUMMERHAYES, JR., ALAN CARLYLE STEWART, WY ....... NATEIAN STILLMAN, KN ......,..... ........ X: A DONALD GERARD SUTHERLAND, IDFA ........ RAYMOND SZATKOWSKI ..... ..... ........ ......... ......... PETER STEPHEN SZYJKOVVSKI ....... Schenectady Schenectady Herlcimer Schenectady Auburn Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Albany Schenectady Castleton-On-Hudson Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Albany Troy Schenectady AKD f' i T T Q w ' Isa ' " :se E' 1 IAV. f X 148 nu- F . X Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady ,......Scl1eneetady LEYNIS OT1'O TXHEURER, AXA . ,............ CHARLES CRABBE THOMAS, SAX ....... EDWARD BRINK THOMAS ......................... .ROBERT REED THOMPSON, TFA ...... WALDEMAR HENRY TOMAN, K2 ......... Johnstown WVOOdbury, N. QI. Kingston Anlenia Santiago, Cuba LIENRY GRANT TOWNE, fDEK .......................... ...... I Joultney, Vt. PAUL LEWIS TURNER .............,...................................... ................... .P Xlbany ELMER FREDERICK VAN BUREN, AHN ....,.. ......... S cheneetacly LOUIS VAN DYRE ................................. ................. ......... R e nsselaer CONDE VAN EPS ................. .....,.................... .. ..... ......... S chenectady DEFORRES'I' VAN XVADE .................................................. ......... S chenectady WILLIARI IXUGUSTUS EVALDRON, II, AAG! ........ ..... .......... S c henectady DAVID ELBERT NVALLIS, fIJFA .........,...........,............ ................................ X Nfhite Plains ALDEN PICRETT NVALTIIER, IPAQ .......,.................... ...... L lpper Montclair, N. J. FREDERICK JXNTOINNE VVATERMAN, B911 ..................,............... Brooklyn IROBERT GRANT XVEBSTER .............................................. ............. S chenectady ELLWOOD BEYRICH VVENGENROTII, 4192K .... BEN NORMAN VVERTIIRIAN, AME .......... . ALTON CLINTON VVEST, QAX ........................ CHARLES DOUGAL VVE'1'I'll5lRBIE, KA .,............... THORNTON WILSON WI-IIPPLE, JR., Xllf .......... JOHN EDMUND WI'II1'E, JR. .............................. . WILLIARI STAFFORD VVIIITE, AXA .................. RAYMOND LAWRENCE VVILCOVITZ KN ......L. VVILLIAM BARKER VVILSON, K2 ............. jOI-IN MILLS VVITTKE, KDFA .................... GILBERT VINCENT VVOODSIDE, fDEK ........ JOSEPH AARON XMOOLMAN, KN .....,...... . l49 New York City Schenectady North Creek New Rochelle Binghamton Malone . ,..,..... Oriskany Albany Schenectady Suininit, N. Albany Troy u, 1, uw ' A' llllll ll ' 1 Wil me Ng P if N x 'W 7 Q '-'rm H All -L New l.'.x.1 flu: ,ll 'iltlux 'WA ' ll lf' .tw I llll lil . 1' I -rr-, 327, V -132m-1' A K' 7 1'Ef?JT Ai' - 4 1 .1 l 5 'wif , r' f- 57 Ly' '- - 4"w2'f' . gy, ' :Jwi ,f . F' ,Q f -- sex 1. e'17..4-+'gfL:,:-,p ai-Q .f -f' D ,Qi v gg , , , . . m..14.q9i3,, Magi V -Q ,few ...I ,A i-1.,,,,, 3 ,H fe w 1 ve" - - f75Q1.,Qi,"' "-ls . ' - W- 4' 21-' f-' -,Q ,-1 ?2m5Iw 1r?ff - H' ' '1' 44' Q55 ,v , , xfffrw gi' .V K' , ' 5 NTL ,.'1I' " 'A ' ,-f- "1 1- . , L vi-Dv. YW ' nr ' Q-,, . n- I MQ. .y3.1.,gyz-' ,,u:,. 4'ff V- 3f6. ,,?1y1L'1e4f,-f'v'g.- fl f , w-. T' 'X--M 3'.a.-"'- -:Lz-- ..-Vfiu . -it f . . Nh. 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HW, ffm, .,gf.?g , f- ' 150 G A R N 'EIT UNION COLLEGE GARNET 1934 Q BRING ON YOUR SOPHOMORES Q WHERE YA FROM Q IN HIGH SCHOOL I . . . 46 SO WE PAINTED THE IDOL 0 DEAR DAD AND MOTHER Q WHICH IS THE LIBRARY Q OH THAT O HE TOLD ME IT WAS THE CHAPEL Q FRATS O AH-ER FRATERNITIES I MEAN Q PLEASE SEND ME TWENTY-FIVE RIGHT AWAY 0 IN HIGH SCHOOLI . . .Q BOOKS QD BOOKS O I BOUGHT IT BECAUSE HE TOLD US TO Q AFTER THIS I'LL GET THEM SEC- OND-HANDQIN HIGH SCHOOL I . . . lil :,..- ,E 1.1 rt '51 9 Q A 5 , Freshman Class, 1936 I.. . ,..,,, . . VANV1f:CnT1f:N TRU1xrBULL . . . ...... P1'vs1'dcm' 1? REDERIC W. Trnrz, VTR. ........ V.'rc-President l9UANlE FEATTAIERSTONHAUGH . . . . .Sc'c1'cIczry COLLINS MCGOVERN . .. .... Treasurer X-7AN VEC H'r1iN TRU M num, 011 September 19, 1932, the Class of 1936 formally entered the portals of Union College. lt was a great day for Union because this hopeful and deter- mined group of Freshmen immediately resolved to make history. Of the three traditional tights in which the Freshmen and Sophomores engaged, the Freshmen emerged victorious in twog namely, the Salt and Tomato, and the Paint fights. Consequently the Idol now wears a coat of red paint showing the superiority of the lirst year men. The Sophomores, as was expected, won the Cane Rush. lncidentally, this class has the distinction of being the last class to engage in Vlllf- if il ' 152 5,5 Q Z : yyy, llllllhlwi f an 1 1 .' ll' gi! S these traditional contests, for the contests have been abolished in favor of a tug-of-war. The care with which the Freshman Class was chosen soon became evident as they began to make their presence felt in all branches of college activity, athletic, dramatic, musical, social, and scholastic. The cross-country and football teams were undefeated, and the indications are that it will be hard to keep the members of the Class of 1936 from making the varsity athletic teams. Not only have they excelled in athletics, but in dramatics as well. Everyone can rest assured that the high standards which the dramatic organizations of the college have reached are sure to be maintained until l936. Another indication of the versatility of the Freshman Class is shown by the large number of its members represented in the band, choir, and glee club. Many Freshmen heeded the call of the "Mother of Fraternities" and readily pledged themselves to one of the many fraternal organizations of the college. At the time of this writing, after a never to be forgotten "Hell Weelc,', a large percentage of the neophytes have been initiated into their fraternities. ln the field of scholarship, the Freshmen have maintained the high scholastic standards of the college. This was made evident by the fact that the mortality among Freshmen after the first semester was very low. This loss was compen- sated by the new Freshmen who entered in February. It is manifest that the Class of 1936 has already made an auspicious begin- ning and time will undoubtedly prove that all their efforts have not been in vain MICHAIQL E. Frome, Class Hi.v1m'ian. A-"' J: Q a ., -.x SQirliLQ2' .Arm gi mn y " 1-'T' .rf i.fzf'f. si 'Y , git 2 ii flllllM"l'll il 1 153 1 .l Ml Efieiesr Mui, 'I 1 I 3 a,,. 22. 2. I I. "4 I-IE 93 LIVINGSTON ACKERT ....... JOHN ALEXAITIS, JR. .... . DONALD J. AMOROSI ......... JOHN D. ANDERSON ........ RANDLE C. BAILEY ........ EDWARD BASTEDO ................ RALPII L. BEACH, JR. ..... . DAVID C. BEGRER ................ VVILLIAM J. BEEBE ........ CARL H. BERGMAN ............ GILBEIl'l' M. BETTS ............. ARTHUR S. BINLIZY, JR. LWALD BOEIINE .. ...................... NIELVIN T. BORIGIIT ....... GEORGE W. BOYLE ............. H. XVILLIS BRANDOVV .......... GUSTAV A. BRUNNER .......... Freshman Class SAMUEL P. BRUSH, JR. ...... . THOMAS J. BUCCI ................ ARTHUR A. BULLARD .......... JOHN A. BURKE ..................... NOEL B. BURROUGIIS ........... ALFRED H. BURTCII ................... EMERY W. BURTON, JR. DAVID B. CADXVALLADER ...... ANGELO CAIAZZO ......................... EDWARD D. CAM MAROTA VVILLIAM D. CASH MAN ............. GEORGE B. CAVANAGH, J JOSEPH R. CIARANELLO CLARENCE CLARK ................ DAVID H. CO1-TEN ....... JOSEPH T. COHEN ...., EARLE N. COOPER ........ DAVID A. CRAIG, JR. ........ . DEVER J. CRANE .................. GERALD D. G. CROWE ........... BURTON B. DELACK .............. R. ....... . ALBERT B. DIAMANTE ........ .5 ly x L Aluv if . fi 154 Poughkeepsie Ainsterdam Fort Edward Elmira Wfilmington, Dela. Hastings Schenectady Garden City Schenectady New York City Schenectady Glens Falls Ballston Lake Rouses Point Schenectady Athens Richmond Hill Troy Schenectady Stormville Staatsburg Scotia Fonda Albany , .......... Palmyra Schenectady Schenectady Albany Schenectady Schenectady Ballston Spa. Schenectady Albany Nassau I-Ianuden Fonda Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady EDWARD C. DIAMOND ............ PIIILIP F.. H. DIAMOND ...... LOUIS D. DIFIIANCESCO ....... CHESTER A. DILALLO ...... JACK G. DREIIER, JR. ARNOLD E. DUDE ...................... HENRY G. DUCIISCIIERER .... . IIOIIN F.. DUNCAN ................... FREDERICK P. DUNN ....... ALFRED E. DUI'JlElE ..,...... IRVING DXNVOIQSICY ..,..... LEROY DYAL, JR. .... .. HOVVARD G. EARLS ...... JOHN B. EMANS .......... IRWIN B. ESMOND .......... NICHOLAS ESPOSITO ...........,... .... ANTHONY J. FANTAUZZI lld:ARIO'FAVORl'1'I ...... Q .......... . .........,....... .. DUANE FEATIIERSTONIIAUCII CLEMENT A. FINCII .................... ARTHUR VV. A. FINRELL ........ llflICHA1ZL E. FLORE ................. IXRTHUR J. PIIRTII, JR. HUl,lI-I F. FITCH ........................ THOMAS G. FITZGERALD .......... JAMES FLAVIN ........................ VVILLIAM ji. FLYNN ...... STEPIIEN E. FOLEY ...... . NELSON A. FOOT, JR. ...... . ROBERT A. FORTI-1 ......... DOUCALL C. FRASER ............... ICENNETH J. FREDERICK ..... VVILLIAM FREEDIIAN ........ Wate1'vliet Schenectady Albany Schenectady Hudson Schenectady Kenniore Schenectady Schenectady Bayport Schenectady Glen Ridge, N. Schenectady Schenectady Albany Troy Mechanicville Newburgh Schenectady Gloversville Albany Schenectady Schenectady New York City Albany Rotterdam Jct. Albany WateI'sf1iet Pittsfield, Mass. Schenectady Kew Gardens, L. I. Scotia Albany CLAYTON VV. FREER ..... ....... S chenectady LEONARD VV. GANE ........ ................... A uburn FRANK I. GARGANO ...... ........ M echanicville JOIIN O. GAWNE ............. ..................... A Xlbany .ESISIOND VV. GI1fIfoRD ........... ........ S augerties VEDDER M. GILBERT ....................... .................. A nISte1-dam CHARLES A. GILMORE, JR. ..... ........................ S chenectady CHARLES I-1. GODDARD .............. Hackensack, N. I. f -ef 'M HJ llr- ee::l:n'mii1liilii1, ---"'::r "gi 'wht I l'1 ..IafQff.llu"gIylp1'pf In .:::::::1.. 2 nnmnnnmwsxi WSI fat? I 1:5"72-ES 1 mg' ' I l - .II-te' I' 'S-in 'J fig. Y - 'S ,,. fe' f 'Ui un K' ill .,.. L..l .-. assi I ::- J "rf :' : XVILLIAM E. GORE ..... MORTON I. GOLD ...... XVILLIAM D. GRADY .... XVILLIAM J. GREEN ..........,. fXR'l'IIUR R. GREIENBERG JOHN GILIELTO, JR, .......... .. GUY B. GRISWOLD, JR. .............., . GEORGE F. GUTI 1 I NOER, JOHN D. I'lALL .... ,... . , ..... ..... . JOHN L. HALLENIIECR .... CEUSTAV F. l'lAl..LS'l'ROM CARL G. HARDY .... . ......... ,..... . .JNTELVILIJE P. I'lARGRAVl5 EARL XV. ITENRY ................ THOMAS J. HICKEX' .......... CHARLES VV. IEIINCKLEY, ROBERT H. HIRZIZIQORN JAMES T. PIOLLICN BECK ....... EUGENE F. HULL ............. PHILIP G. HIUSSONG ....... VV. STUART IRVINE ...... GEORGE F. JONEs ........ JOHN J. IQARUZAS ....... JOHN F. IQEARNS ....... JAM ES G. IQEEGAN ................ WILLIAM G. IQEENS, JR. CHARLES D. IQENNEDY . TQICHARD J. IQEYES ............. JAINIES E. IQIMBALI., JR. VVILLIAM M. IQLINE ........ Plattsburg Schenectady North Troy Brooklyn Bennington, Vt. Albany Coatesville, Penn. Schenectady North Troy Gloversville Verona, N. J. Albany Fulton Olean Schenectady New York City Albany Rensselaer Berlin Schenectady Hillsdale, N. J. Glens Falls Amsterdam Fonda Troy . .............. Albany Larclnnont Mount Vernon Springfield, Mass. Gloversville LIERMAN D. ISLLUGE ..... Negros Occidental, P. I. MILTON KOIIN ................,....... ............................................. A lbany ARTHUR T. KONIECZKA CHARLES M. IQRULL, JR LIERMAN IXUDON ..................... VVILLIAM D. LAMEETII . ALBERT C. LANE ................. ROBERT S. LANGIEIQ ............. MICHAEL H. LAVORGNA TIFFANY LAXVYER, JR. ......... . CHARLES R. LEAKE, III S ch enectady Lynbroolc Albany Schenectady Hudson, Ohio Troy VVest Haven, Conn. Albany Garden City l'lARRY O. LEE . ..,.. .. ILOBERT LEONE ................ .. PIARVEY M. LIFSET .......... IRVING LIRSET .................. RONALD C. LINDSAY ........... PHILIP LITTLE, III ............... CHARLES S. LOVVENSTEIN BJACKENZIE A. LUNAN .... VVILLIAM C. lklAGUIRli ..... CHARLES T. LQALE, JR. .... . DOUGLAS G. NlARONE .......... JAMES V. MARO'l"1'A ........ . CARL L. MARSQIIALI. ......... RICHARD MASJOAN ,......... VVENDELL T. lXlAY ............... FRANK J. MAZZAliliLI.A ........ BYRNE W'. NIAYER ............... EDWARD F. lWCFlEE ......... GEORGE A. MCGEIi ............... COLLINS E. MCGLDVIEIQN ..... JOHN C. NICGUILZAN ............ JOHN A. MCGUIRE .......... JOHN S. lk'lCliNIGII'l' .......... JAMES F. MCLAUGl'ILIN ......... ROBERT J. MCMANLIS ......... GEORGE N. MELINlC'I'1'I5 .. ROBERT H. MENDE .............. JOSEPH E. MILANO ................... VVILLIAM H. MILNIE, JR. 'WILLIAM H. NIITCIIELL ..... RUSSELL G. MORSE . ............. .. DONALD MUNRO ......................... GEORGE F. MUIiI'I'lY, JAR. ........ . LEON NAGUSZEXVSTQI .......... . .... . LEO T. NEALON ................. GERARD A. NEUR-IANN ...... ROBERT C. NOR'l'I-I ......... ROBERT O. NELSON ........... DALWIN J. NILES ........ CARL E. OLSON ...... JOHN O. PAGE ......... Troy Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Montclair, N. Minneapolis, Minn. Albany Gdeida Albany Schenectady Albany Scotia Troy Schenectady Schenectady Delanson Schenectady Oneonta Peekskill Carthage Amsterdain Schenectady Amsterdam Schenectady Schenectady Brooklyn Hollis Schenectady Schenectady Stuyvesant Falls . .........................,.. Scotia Albany Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Brooklyn Schenectady New Milford, Conn. New York City Schenectady Ili I ale' li 'ug 'N se 5 Q ,N DJ Av q" Ill M' I-' LII Xl 'J "..2."M715LQZI!fe1 in ""i1fZ1l'IH:gfaf' Lis: f"4Ar, galqafszzj C: 'Hey' -5.0 En: if, Ein? - if 5?-er: K 1 'S ffrwl ly :X , -N , , -2.4 - .q.51..,nm,.5.f:-Q I- 'un wrath xl, IMW' Fl l E - Hgh J. if I-IE I93 JAMES L. PALMER .......... ANDREW F. PAPA ............ WALTER PASKOWSKI ........ LAVVRENCE F. PAULUS LOUIS A. PETRILLO ......................... WILLIAM H. PHILLIPPI, ARTHUR S. PLUMMER .................. ..... VV. BRADLEY PLUINHVIER Schenectady Fonda Salem, Mass. Rhinebeck Amsterdam Buffalo Malden, Mass. Toms River, N. J. MAURICE PODBIELSKI ...... ................ S chenectady MICHAEL PRIZNAR ........ GEORGE W. PUTNAM ....... JOHN R. PUTNAM ......... CHARLES H. QUANDT ..... CHARLES R. QUENTIN . EDVVARD QUINLAN ......... DAVID F. RANDALL ......... THOMAS D. RANDALL ........ CHESTER A. RAS ........... CHARLES L. REID, JR. ......... . FORREST NV. REYNOLDS ROBERT P. RICHARD, JR. THOMAS L. RIDER .......... ....... . ........ . BENJAMIN F. ROBERTS ....... Cohoes Albany Rexford VVate1'fO1'd Schenectady Wate1'vliet Ballston Spa Johnstown Schenectady Schenectady Elmira Schenectady Albany Gatun, Canal Zone RAYIXIIOND F. ROBINSON ...... ................... N Orth Troy ARTHUR ROSENBEIKG ....... ...... B rooklyn JOHN ROSS ....................................., ................. A lbany MEREDITI-I N. RUNNER ....... Schenectady NVILLIAM RYNASKO .......... ................. C Ohoes JOHN L. SAIEVVITZ ..... ...... S chenectady JOHN B. SAWICKI ....................... ........ A msterdam ROBERT F. J. SCIIOEFELER ....... ............................. A lbany AR'1'IIUR WV. SCHUYLER ....... ......... Y eadon, Penna. SIDNEY SCHXVABER ................ ................ S chenectady RAY DANIEL SCOFIELD ........ .............................. . Albany CLINTON F. SEKOL ............ ....... S cranton, Penna. CALBERT B. SELMSER ......... ................. G loversville JAMES A. SEYMOUR ,......... ........ S pencer, Mass. ROGER D. SHERMAN ......... ........ B riarcliff Manor CLARK T. SHIELDS ......... .... 1X flontclair, N. J. ROBERT T. SHREVE ....... ........... S ehenectady JACOB SIEGEL ............... 158 ,'-' VXI. If ' N Amsterdam RIC1"IARD A. .SIMON ........ .. AT.BERT H. STEVENSON .... BRUCE H. STEXVART ........... CHARLES D. STINARD ......... DANIEL P. STOCKWELL ........ MANUEL SUGERMAN ........... I'IENRY M. SWAN, IR. ..... . EDWIN V. TATE .......................... C. MAX TAYLOR .............................. FREDERICK VV. TIETZ, JR. ..... . LENVIS E. TRAVIS .............................. GEORGE O. TRUEX, JR. VANVECHTEN TRUMBULL ROBERT E. TURGEON .................. MICHAEL I. TYTKO ................ HOWARD VANEPPS ............... ALVIN VAN VALRENBURG, IR. ....... . 'VANANTXKVERP NVALDRON MYRON J. NVALTER ......................... GEORGE J. WARD .............. DOUGLAS F. VVARNER ........ GEORGE R. VVARNER ............ lQOBlERT J. VVEILER ........ JAMES B. WELLS ......... ROBERT E. VVELLS ..,................ JAMES H. VVESTERVELT ........ BARDEN M. XNHEDON ............. WILLIAM M. VVIIEELER ............ WALTER E. VVILLIAMS ......... TIWEODORE H. WILMOT ....... BENJAMIN J. VVILSON ........ JOSEBII J. XIVOJCIK ........ -... RICI'IARD L. VVOODRUFE ..... JOIIN K. YOUNG .................... MORTON YULMAN ............ SALVATORO ZAMBITO .......... MERTON L. ZUBRES .......... Gloversville Brooklyn Mooers Albany Hartford, Conn. Brookline, Mass. Saratoga Springs Albany Elmira Albany Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Youngstown Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Schenectady Cortland Cohoes Short Hills, N. Ardmore, Penna. Gloversville Albany Schenectady Albany Granville VVeStHeld, N. I. Scot1a Schenectady Schenectady Amsterdam Rome Utica Schenectady Marlboro Albany 4, ah- . V 1254+ i H P11 .Ii : . . .:., , My - . I E15 5 ff- S- 'SEI 1 'J .MVN v- . -U Q- -...wr W f' Q - Q ,, A 1 ,- . il ff --1-n- 2 --auf a f . , Q ,0,Q.f:. 5'f'g-L'fg-gf,15L'-I?b.'f!7g,l:..-.,3 y-+I! . Q ... Qxx 1,-,-ff'f:1g,e-3vQr5fgq.g1.-.wf,r.:s'eg:'i:11.-1 .ifi-1-niv-, ry .qw-3.fq.,g,iy,,l ,X .,- -fp -.,,,1,1 -:,-N-'--454, .meh ,-yi.. K -4:,,f.w,,-1 ," cz.. W-, X .seifififif-1yfrgdilg-5.-'T4f7f:i'75 'S-.-Af.-c-fi-. 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J-..-, -,vs 1. f.,.w,.-, 1, ...- .,1..4,,,..f .fn EZ. .Q , Y- .7 ..1,-mg,-J.. ,H'...,.. am., gf..-,-.L -.-. -xx - ., .1 -,- .,,.. f 1545597-faJ-axfkff'-'f:'fffg-xp'- "-LA. 5 ',-'-3--. F X - , -L-'-inf. M. -. . - , -.- , -.- . '-.5-lsqwi. Laixgaufjgj 1. ,.r2,,a.'-Q X N, 'f - - - my 1-.P-.nw 1-,4.. - '- 41 11-,-.f'--xl-.1.' ,-pr .1 Q. - -- -..-- 1,1--7, T 'ft' ,-M' Z 1, 'fF"K-- 'KIA'-,.r,' ,- "4'fJ"Q. '1'f,'nQ-' X .??n..'l' fqf ' kb-,ffglfi-'f'f?9.25-9-riijfyiryvf-.f'Jr:f"1:Q-1-.-575 Y, - ' -ima if X . -25-,3-g.-:E gt-'iv?2f'3gA'g-'55iigiyaff 5' 3255 X, 1- 'gicfff hr iryrgzf,su.qfgfwqmegr.5g:3f--g,:c,g7gh.-.gg X-.K , " ' - .154-21i.L':'4:iE5:a5i22-i m X, ' -- L--ITC.1'-Qfijjlx-,.fC2"-:laik-':w.-gk..'f-2355515-",j,. 1 3, an .3,bS'Lf.-fci'-.Lf xi '- f - ' "--' , d NX, 'Rig lax.,- iix f 'fx iufilu -g ,Y T- ftfk. .125 V531 L Xia. f .43 !.'Eij,?SiEf ' "L --.,' L-sv ,... JY.-D' LE T Yi.,-E+ jgrbiirgihbqx , . dyiti,5.!!5h ATERNITIES . Q phvqf' v"'::':x-71,-FJ VP? 7 W1 xv 15 ff 14 :lin k45"" fx Pv S1451 avail J 'lllh ' llblHs:1,'-i' ?ve'U f EHIH wif P fp, Lula ll I 11' - up f M Ujg'?' 5-""'5"'xga L 'I in '- I 1 1- 1 frm ,.' v E2 E .1-E Fm! iyi i KAPPA ALPHA Founded at Union College, 1825 Active Chapters-8 Alpha of New York of Kappa Alpha FRATRES IN FACULTATE Anthony de Hothlegh Hoadley Leonard Chester Jones Edward S. C. Smith FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Gustave Gerard Barnett, jr. john W'ick Bonnell Stanley Holland Graves Charles Simmons Bridgeman Robert Emory Kennedy 1933 1934 Schuyler Davis Jenkins james Fuller Lawsing, llr. Alden Gliver Stanton Donald H. G. Mackenzie Thomas Ordway, Ir. Harrison Sherman Sayre . George Adams Burd Stephen Hathaway Mott Gow Oliver Hardin Hall Edwin Merle Hutchins James Gilbert Parker Gilbert Morehouse Betts Albert Cleveland Lane 1935 1936 162 Horace Ehrmann Little Leslie Allen Partridge Adrain Spaulding Rogers Frank Xavier Shields, Ir. Charles Dougal lVetherhi Tiltany Lawyer, Ir. Robert O. Nelson C 1825 7, N 1, i N The Kappa Alpha Society is the oldest secret brother- qp hood of a social and literary character which has had a JI' continuous existence in the American colleges. It was formed at Union in 1825, and at the first formal meeting on November 26, 1825, nine charter members answered to the roll call. Chief among these were John Hart Hunter, Thomas Hun and Isaac W. Jackson, of the 'll class of '26, who conceived the idea of a new secret so- ciety. The new order grew rapidly in size and quality, in spite of the natural opposition which it encountered, largely on account of its secrecy. In 1833 a charter was granted to a society at VVilliams College, and the number of chapters increased steadily, though slowly, until 1913 when the tenth chapter, Beta of Pennsylvania, completed the list. Two chapters have become dormant, Alpha of New jersey at Princeton, in 1856, and Alpha of Virginia at the University of Virginia, in 1861. 163 il I I f5'74.e Y SIGMA -4 ah, ,., of -21 , 'f . X, raw irgzfs, 1411 -.wfeLi'Ef'Q'gff,, - 5 M V ,,.,: h:W.' 7, - 4- 2-s 1 .Q f NA, 4 1 L.-Q -32 .f f ,if ..,T',Y. 5, -:g.,f5f..2' y-,Q .I Q E? ,Hip A-irrhaggg I .. isps' 12-Hia e if A ,f if '4'l '- 9 , 34 X Founded at Union College, 1827 Q Ai -f N. , fi A if : kg, H .Jig me fi if A , ff 'lf W? 'iw "-,-i"'1zA- . -' " .-nu. 'Si ' A v ,M 40 ,lf rf Ki :Q ui gg, .EH I v 4 ag? X .w S 1 Ez 1 ix i11!",Z, f 1 . 4 l "A V Q H -77 1, 5 A Q59 16514 . --41,-i't ,vw vw - ' f i 9 . ' it 5 F ' A 5 ' E ' f " "1 ' IJ fe b A -fa , ,- -1- 5 N: 5' ji 'W p - Q U if l Q, " Q? . 'Q' ' 5 1 ' Y W is Cl? ,l -Q i l ':":l" g, -' ,X 1 ' if A ---iii: ll iixvl t, ,, 1 , .,Yl - 'rw - .X l,,.,. X .1 fl! ...J J., s....s -6, V , asa.:-. V 7f-- Active Chapters-10 ""' , Alpha of New York of Sigma Phi . 1827 FRATRES IN FACULTATF Codman I-Iislop FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Richard Cogwin Forbes Ralph Chandler Parker, Ir. Curtenius Gillette, Jr. Clark Prather Ashmore Lawson Livingston Herbert Vlfilliam Smith, Ir. Mitchell 1934 Robert John Castle Brearton james Mel-lenry Corbin Frank Dean Roylance i 1935 Charles McLaughlin Groesbeck Norman Learned Hess John Hulbert David C. Becker XV. Forrest Reynolds 1936 ,I Q . ,, EN- 'P wil' . . ' . , H-I YP ' ,lxf :515 Nl 1 'in 1 ::: ... .x I :A , li-1 " :- fI.T.' 1 Frederick A. Knapp Arthur Selwyn Plummer Wfilliam Edwai-d Rall Robert Thompson Shreve Douglas Vlfarner lf. , I' .--f?i':5P:' filalfa., ..:. ' H fs.. -v in A. 6?21YL-M igvwm , 4.1.5 L ' A g ,Qu eats la? -5,5 ' ...-,gf 1. juij :jg-'gi lf' Jiwzhe igfgrxgifpi: if . 5 if F . '92 DE, 'I'iI', 2141 52.123 QEZU . ' ""' K P STO Pl-:RP Sigma Phi is next to the oldest of the niodern Greek-letter fraternities, and was first of them to establish a branch chapter in an- other college. It was founded at Union, March 4, 1827, by Thomas F. Bowie, '27, john T. Bowie, '29, Thomas S. Vlfitherspoon, '23, and Charles T. Cromwell, '27. The fraternity has grown very slowly and in tht matter of extension has exhibited 'in intense conservatism. There are at pres- ent tcn active chapters 'ind two inactive ones. iendcicd its charter in 1846 in the belief that a sutttsstul chapter could not be main , 113 will ff Y T i V154 ,X 'L ji. fx, .fr Neil 'lil A '1 A U1 '-' xhm rV.f,fW- C . , , A EIL' ' 4' ' Mk , , , M ., .fm y L C N . -A , v . . l ,, 'lhe chapter at New York University sur- S W -V g . A1 x l . ., . . 1, .E . L . 1 .1 y . .V tained in a city college, where students met only at recitations, and the Prince- ton chapter was killed by anti-fraternity laws. VVhile each fraternity claims for itself that its alumni are more than usually loyal, Sigma Phi is really en- titled to pre-eminence in this respect. 165 gb xx: iii an , DELTA PHI Founded at Union College, 1827 Active Chapters-15 Alpha Chapter of Delta Phi . . 1877 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Philip lrVieting Banker Frank Clay Maxon, Ir. Arthur Soper VVoodward 1934 Harry Tennyson Baldwin Angus McLean Brown Xvilliam Sharpley Buchanan Thaddeus Guilford Cowell, jr. Philip Birch I-Iuested Edward Martin Hutton , Louis Hamilton 1935 Joseph 'Wfells Bi-shop Charles Irving Bush Wlilbur Andrew Dahl Frederick John Honan Philip Booth Langworthy Prince Eric Oleson Wlilliam Marchant Prest Erwin Kenneth Rockwell Louis Reed Tripp Ralph Trumbull, Jr. Wfilliams Roger David Kendelhardt Leslie john Kneher Edward Frederick Minch, I Leahmon Beecher Nestle Robert Leman Purchase 1936 Carl I-Iugo Bergman Arthur Scoville Binley, jr. Richard Jay Keyes Vlfilliam I-Iarrison Mitchell Thomas Dudley Randall Charles Max Taylor Van Vechten Trumbull ,,,. ,, K 'l S l 1.3 f sf 166 iuvilni- "3-Hin It-u XX I' g., Delta Phi, third in order of estab- iu -3- lishment of American college fraternities . L was founded November 17, 1827 at 'A 141: Union. It forms the third of the group hs known as the Union Triad, which is 2 1- 3 composed of Kappa Alpha, Sigma Phi wx E . . . - and Delta Phi. There were nine found- o A IH. ers, all of the class of 128, and tive of I ill them were members of Phi Beta Kappa. X 1 ,xi 'S ln' u-"AL .' ,D - i Q .: - Er- :- . ... . ,.,4 . ', 1 BI . 2, J- , 5. . . QW' , . 1 , 1, .sf 4 -a. .J .sf Q -:, og ,f 1 ,A 2 ... ,f H. 4, . : -' 1- .. : 1 -113-. ' ig 5- . 55 -1 v5 -,L-E :.: -31 P - 1 '- ra - : - v i.. f ,X -3 0 :A "' l "'vU ' A, I 1. l,. 4. . . u A -' A.. ,5 . 4' 44: 4 5- . L g 9 I r ' .T--Y A L7 -1: I-"U r 7 - . .. . 1- . 4- T.- I : n1"u' ll, :" U' y . The objects and purposes of the founders were "to consolidate their interests and at the same time mutually benefit each other, to maintain high standing as students and gentlemen and to foster coz'- dial and fraternal relations." During the drive against secret orders by the faculty at Union, the defense of fraternities was taken up by Delta Phi, and john jay Hyde '34 as spokes- man convinced the faculty that the continuance of fraternities such as Delta Phi would actually be beneficial to the college. There are hfteen active and live inactive chapters. 167 ,l'llJ5FTiT1f'fi: - 1' ' -, 4231 1 ' L 25 s il' lg l 1 'T-r"'Pzi4,::,.1l ' ty haf- qa,,l " 'T " ' li '3fii3rFt"l' 1 l' X 'I at V Ltr' I i r l l ' l 1 if 11- ii .t V, Lkll il H: 1 . " ' PF? iif' 1 2 a3vTf?f?L-'f?P1f,, TTD I ','g:hY3525LzQQQ 3-5?-LQ I C X-,13,ffbVb? frjjigigw I I x L, is ,A-' ' gg.. ,,.y'Z,- .- l .' f- -r i.,, -4 ,Pri ,, .f,. X 1I,Ll'l' 1 lc? g,i1Q-IHLNZQQZQH I S 1 Ill' l l . 1, N, if L, f,fJ,,f-x-18-I -- ' Ujiflfffgfgllj-jlfliiiifli-1: 1+ 1 Tin.-wi i "17"' ll iaiiiiq M A-su' , 1 'm ,L--f'.T'f:'T?' Ilp,if',f,fllfj nr: 1f . Z Z, ' . PSI UPSILGN Founded at Union College, 1833 Active Cl1Zl.DtCI'S-IO Theta of Psi Upsilon . Q 0 0 FRATRES IN FACULTATE james Brewster Garrett Marcellus Clowe FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Lawrence Squires Hill John Simpson Reeder 1933 Sibley Draper Squire Stewart Clyde Wfagoner Rieliard l-luteliins Wlhelpley George Reid Cory, Ir. Harold Edward Ellithorn Paul Wfilliam Bachnian Wfilkinson Cory Edgar John Groener, HI 1934 Austin McCracken Fox Alexander MacCaul Turner 1935 Donald Carlton Hawkes, Ir. Milton Melllahon Merrill Allan Stewart Herbert E. Wfalker John Douglas Anderson David Breener Cadwallader Henry George Duchseherer Dougall Charles Fraser Leonard Wlilliam Gane Myron 1936 Vedder Morris Gilbert Charles H. Goddard Vlfilliam Stuart Irvine Ronald Cameron Lindsay Albert Henry Stevenson ames Wfalker 168 1 1833 Psi Upsilon was founded in November, 1833, at Union by Samuel Goodale, '36g Ed- G ward Martindale, '36g George W. Tuttle, '36g 0 Robert Barnard, '375 Charles VV. Harvey, '37g Y '5!": V and Merwin H. Stewart, '37. The society grew out of an association formed among its mem- bers for election purposes. There are twenty- seven active chapters, and one inactive, the . Q latter being the Alpha chapter at Harvard ' H University, which became dormant in 1872. A ,Y The Union chapter was the iirst one there to iiii hlldiisesneljliihieliltfalifgiiei itaiiaclfilihil Cdisitlocihdid coniine the membership in the fraternities to the upper classmen. A few of the prominent members include: Williaiii Howard Taft, Col. Henry L. Stimsonp Hiram Bingham, Gifford Pinchot, Sir Henry Thornton and Edwin A. Grosvenor, former president of Phi Beta Kappa and of National Geographic Society. 169 'l ml l r ii ill all I I A TJ ,..,, ' , ,.-ig, .f ll' A all 3 gi-5-1 Ft'5'7ff" DELTA UPSILCN Founded at Willianis, 1834 Active Chapters-56 Union Chapter of Delta Upsilon . . . FRATRES IN FACULTATE Thomas A. lWilson Frederick L. Bronner FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Ernest Andrew Capelle Thomas Patrick Finegan Allen Wlalter Henderson Leslie Gilbert Holleran WValter Forfar Jennings Alton Stores Johnston Nlfilliam Roger Killeen Robert Emslie Murray Charles Donald Schuman Edward Francis Sullivan Walter Arthur Thurber 1934 Robert Clair Cooney John Nicholas Marcellus, Jr. Carleton DeVillo Gardinier Wlilliam Gordon Neese Ellis Burgess Garrison, jr. Robert Samuel Oppenheim Harrison Philip Lindabury, ,TIT Elmore Conrad SCl'1llITlH-U Robert Hallock Smith 1935 John Irvin Argersinger Donald Bailey Moulton Paul Harold Beik . Herman Henry Rauch Richard Edgar Davies Robert Randolph Reed Vtfilliam Henry Fitzgerald Chester Malcolm Rhoades, ,lr John Groet Ralph Donald Semerad VV'illiam Spencer McCord Mans NVellington Stearns, Jr. 1936 Melvin Thomas Boright Richard Masjoan Earle N. Cooper Robert H. Mende VVilliam Eugene Goff Joseph Milano Harry Owen Lee Robert Carver North Collins E. McGovern Carl Eric Olson Roger D. Sherman 170 1838 M xlml v!N p lI ,! lf, P I A 'Delta Upsilon was founded 'as an or- ! ganizcd protest .against the ClO1T1111Zl.t1011.111 college affairs of the small groups tormmg ijf fp the secret societies. It was charged that under the veil ot secrecy they assumed 3.,l,U control of the organizations, gaining' in- 1 Huence in elections and prominence at ' AIA 'V commencement for reasons other than Q- merit. In addition to this, there was much 45 popular opposition to secrecy, and there iililiii if '.AA Ijiiif i appeared a sudden evolution of local or iii' iili ii'i ....A i ...,,, "4 '.'i' li sectional antisecret societies in most col- leges to which the fraternity system had ' i fi fl' been extended. These antisecret societies, with but few exceptions died or were amalgamated into what became Delta Upsilon. As the society grew the relations with secret fraternities changedg from open war the opposition became aimicable rivalry, and today, these so- cieties are cooperating, although once bitter enemies. The parent chapter was formed at Wfilliams College in 1834, and since then fifty-six chapters have been formed, all but three of which are still active. l l 4 171 V ' ?l TI-IE ' CHI PSI Founded at Union College, 1841 ' Active CllH17lC1'S-25 Alpha Pi of Chi Psi . FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 john Frederick Dearstyne Wlilliam Bruce Knoderer 1934 Edward Monchow Bradley John Hackett Chambers john Barrett Russell James Courtney Young NVilliam Livingston Draper james Stokes Gillespie Karl. Damerow Wfilliams 1935 Stewart George Armitage Harry Mansfield Baker Clemens Frederick Hathaway Wlalter Henry Holdridge 1936 John Garfield Dreher Charles Dusenberry Kennedy p James Edward Kimball John Kenneth .r ' A' swf. -I ' tai: 1 N la: :iii h ,G 1 172 ... ll' """"" ra: ease y - L- - ... ..ii.i-4uu- 1 """""' Homer Thomas Jennings john McCrea Keeler Franklin Robert Morrell Thornton Wfilson lfVhipple, Charles Richards Leake, III Carl Marshall George Northrop Melinette Young H .,W.V, ,H Chi Psi, the fifth frat- - ernity originating at Un- ion was founded May 20, 1841. The idea of the - founders was to stress good fellowship and man- ly spirits, the social prin- ,Y ciple being more empha- . . fx K 1 y sized than the literary. K There are twenty-live active and ten inactive Alphas, as the chapters are called within the frat- -- I ernity. The Lodge at Union was erected by the chapter and fraternity as a memorial to Philip Spencer, one of the founders, who gave his life in defense of the secrets of the society. The original lodge at Cornell was completely destroyed by a fire in the early morning hours of De- cember 7, 1906. Four members of the chapter and three firemen lost their lives. Two of the four members who lost their lives had escaped from the burning building, but upon finding that their roommates were missing, with true Chi Psi spirit returned to find them and perished with them. ' 'w-u:,..,..X , . 5 173 E- 1-V' ,, v e A4 -is 9 ' alll E THETA DELTA CHI Founded at Union College, 1847 Active Chapters-30 Alpha Charge of Theta Delta Chi . 1847 ' FRATRES IN FACULTATE Robert XV. Crowell Morton C. Stewart Dwight Van Avery FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Sheldon Daniel Blood l 1934 Charles Edward Buchwald james Patrick Horan Charles XVilliam Huntley C 1935 Richard Bruker Allen Martin Benedict Bloom Alton Clifton 1936 YVilliam Harris Phillippi Calbert Byron Selmser W'illiam Morris SQL 49172 xx ,im 174 l john Kennedy Lynch, jr. Harry Francis Lamoreaux Larman Scrivner Sherwood Morton Collins Stewart, Jr. Philip Hutt Charles Crabbe Thomas XVest Lewis Earl Travis Robert Jerome YVeiler Hfheeler A 1 ra. " .avr s Fw ,wh --:Q-1. ,N W1 ip I ff f .E,- QB ,F X ltr! M11 -ky 1 K lil' 1 1 f . 2 1541 ew ig at fseffaapo 7 --xouresat 1 'izswwpe Theta Delta Chi was founded at Union Qctober 31, 1847, by Abel Beach, Andrew H. Green, Theodore B. Brown, VVilliam G. Ailcin, Williaiii Hyslop and Samuel F. Wfile, all of the class of 1849, of whom four were meitzbers of Phi Beta Kappa. Union was at its zenith of prosperity in 1848, and the class of 1849 was the largest the- college had known. The Alpha charge, as the chapter here is called, became inactive for several years, but was revived February 17, 1923. There are thirty active and sixteen inactive charges, giving' the fraternity a total membership of over 11,000 men. A Hag of the three fraternity colors was adopted in 1869, and was displayed from the Astor House in New York City in February, 1870. It is probably the first time a llag was ever adopted or displayed by a college fraternity. 175 -1 Y, lla- Xi ALPHA , DELTA PHI lrouncled at Hamilton, 1832 Active Chapters-28 Union Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi . 1859 PRATRES IN FACULTATE Charles Newman Wfaldron Edward Linus Carroll FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 John Crane Gardiner, Ir. yVilliam McCarroll Mark Wfilliam Packard Palmer 1934- Thomas Temple Acheson Frederic Russell Bridge Ivor Peterson 1935 Kenneth Peter Clifford Reynold Marvin Crane 'Harvey Paterson Groesbeck, Jr. Rankin G. Hinman Thomas Daniel Powell, H1 VVeld Day Shoonmaker Karl Frederick Schwenger Henry Patton Cwulnac Douglas Visscher Smith W'olcl XVilliam Francis jenkins james Lee Loomis, Ir. Thomas Clements Remsen Harry Summerhayes Wlilliam Augustus Vxfaldron, 11 1936 John Barker Emans Clark Taylor Shields Phillip Little, III Van Antwerp Vlfalclron George Robert Vkfarner l'll!1ll"'i Si' If .lvllil lil .1 " in 5 176 " - if as Alpha Delta Phi was founded at Hamil- ton College in 1832 by Samuel Eells of the 17.5 , it-ifif' i class of '32, When he entered college there '7!f: :'iY5'i45 "'f, . . . . XIX i 5., ig'r.,,L , , two literary societies at Hamilton, between X ,-its ' . . . . . -1 ' t ' Qi' which a bitter and active rivalry existed. , Jai. Q -31 7, 1 - I -1 ks g-L i He Joined one of them, but the struggle of , xg, . , , vt- -V. -'53 M Q' ' .5 I FN supremacy became so desperate that he de- -Z. .-. 1 55,1 I u G i L 1,4 ig A termined to form a new society. In a his- 'ir elle - , - . . . -. Zgdb ieaeo 5pvl.Eij"s- tory or the foundation of the fraternity, gl" 'Mlf. M,.z3-- Mr. Eells says: "The new association hrst A, 2 - 1 fn must exclude that jealousy and angry coin- petition and secondly must be built on a more comprehensive scale providing for every variety of taste and talent, and thirdly it must be national and universal in its adaptations." The Union chap- ter was derived from a local society called the "Fraternal Society" founded in 1833. The fraternity now has twenty-seven active and seven inactive chapters and was the Hrst of all fraternities to establish a branch outside of New York or Massachusetts. 177 5r'1'f"'ii i 'll Q4 T F--f g?,ga'.3iil1.p l ' ilfflf, .lui y.,Liiil. :if TIL : V f-gf'i55"""' '- .n 13 1 fl f, ffm 1' yr ml UE' , fa?-f W, 4 an ' f 1,1 :ZZELS F9 'e-"',-"vw ' THETA NU EPSILCN Founded at VVes1yan University, 1870 Active Chapters-I5 1 Gamma of Theta Nu Epsilon 0 0 FRATRES IN FACULTATE VVilliam Fielder Samuel Hesson FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 A Frederick VV. Arnds William T. Eldred Albert I. Lender Raymond C. Bonk Edward R. Lender Edward B. Mates NN-filliam H. Spencer Donald C. Vlfalkerh 1934 Loren L. Brandow Chauncey P. Foote, Ir. Neil Hesson Gerald Crowe NVillian'1 Fraser James L. McGrane Paul S. Stackpole Byron E. Phelps 1935 . Lauren. Edward Smith 1936 Frederick P. Dunn John D. H all james T. Hollenbeck Michael Lavorgna Charles T. Male, jr. Bruce H. Stewart Henry M. Swan Robert E. Turgeon 178 l 1874 - Theta Nu llpsilon was founded at p ' 1 XVeslyan University, Middletown, Con- - necticut, on -December 5., 1870, and fol- lowed a hectic career until 1923, when the policy was adopted at the Philadelphia .1-Q' il,. .ff-il convention which delinitely placed the 'if' order in the status of a general academic fraternity. It was founded for the pur- " -gvflffifi pose of bringing together a group of con- , genial fellows who possessed ability for . leadership, and were representative stu- 8 one r " 4 saw i dents in all phases of college life. The 'ibm fraternity grew too rapidly, and at one time had as many as eighty-two recognized sub rosa chapters, which have now been suspended and are no longer entitled to use the name. Fifteen chapters now exist and much credit is due to those who served the society on the grand council since 1920, because the most important constructive work that will effect the future of the organization is due to these faithful workers. 179 i ' '-ll BETA THETA PI Founded at Miami University, 18.1.8 Active Chapters-S7 Nu of Beta Theta Pi I . . . . 1881 ' FRATRES lN FACULTATE Edward Ellery Nelson Wfallace Nitchman FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Wfilliam Landreth Bailey Nelson Pitts Collamer Duane 'Wlilson Crichton 1933 lYilliam Tindall George Donald Edward Nitchman Marcel Jaques Suter R olvert Hoffman Wfiley Charles Viilliam Bennett Dorsey Follin Hughes Wlilliam Theodore Brockwehl Charles Laurence Dain Duncan Scott McNab Arthur A. Bullard . Burton B. Delack Clement A. Finch Esmond XV. Gifford ' e'-fbi. -1 PK . , r-" U . 'P '-F ... W ' 1 151 isa WEE: 1 IEEE 'ai 5 ll'1...QL.. ll E 4 . .L -I ,., ,i-..--111 1 "1" 1934 Boris Radoyevich john King Sullivan 1935 Stanley Eldridge Mower Eugene Ellsworth Ryon Frederick Antoine Xklaterman 1936 John L. Hollenbeclc Charles M. Krull Robert E. lNells Richard L. Wfoodruff Homer D. Swart 180 IKNET ul f Beta Theta Pi was formed at Miami Univer- NS-Gwp knitxudflffaf . my J e,x:0k,xK ayff W. 1 v V- 4 . . 1 . . bd. - sity, Oxtoicl, Gino, its first formal meeting emg S tm W -aww , . held August 8, 1839. john Reily Knox '39, desig- ig fill E' f j 2 - . . S nated in the fraternity as "Petter" Knox was the -'lllllllr1'lIIIIll-1'lWU"' moving' spirit connected with the founding. The I society was the first fraternity to originate west of the Alleghenies, and at the time of its organization, T- Alpha Delta Phi, which established a branch at lVliami in 1833, was the only fraternity with a west- ? T? ern chapter. The presence at Miami of Alpha Delta Phi and opposition to it led to the formation of Beta 'D I -1' : si ""llllll W A my . - . . . . W 'W ' ll Theta P1. The traternity incorporates Clgllty-SIX 5 active and twenty-two inactive chapters. Among prominent members are: United States Senators VVilliam E. Borah, Robert M. LaFollete and VVilliam H. McMaster, Supreme Court Justice Wfillis VanDevanterg Ambassador Dwight VV. Morrow, Owen D. Youngg jay N. Darling Q"Ding"j cartoonist, Paul V. McNutt, American Legion Commander. I o l,'u Nw' If l4'lUjll4lli l 'X' ,n LEA 5 if e? if J-L N4 'xl x " ,Q 'vm CL W!! It W1 gtfzmfw lflllggi all 'Htl :QRS ESR ESFKISQI-G:-',a1.i: up , ".' A :uv 1 Yr' D 'I PHI 1 .- DELTA ' I 9 1 - it 1 A S 'Wa X ' ' Him 3 - THETA 5 A iz.: 11 ' , Y 'ff Founded at Miami University-1548 , ,i 1 U PIA Active Chapters-102 A "' 'i ' ' A ." ' ' f New York Beta of Phi Delta Theta . FRATRES lN FACULTATE John Harold XVittner FR AT R ES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Gerard H. Caye Frederick XYalter Dill, jr. Thomas Powers Clinton john C. English George XV. Codnian Frank S. Higgins David XV. Corwin Charles E. Wiillianis, Jr. Alexander Stephenson 1934 Edward Theodore Barna John P. judge Daniel Francis Flinn, ll Harry Brackett Parker, Jr. Charles Burt Griliith Wfilmot Dickinson Griffith Robert Franklin Blatchley Frank Connelly Charles Richard Davis Brant Ditmore john Emory Burton Robert Forte George Guthinger 1935 Clement Smith Charles Robert Tinker Edward Frank Melville Parks Hargrave john joseph Moffett Alden Pickett XfValther Francis Gain, jr. 1936 Iames Keegan VVilliam Rynasko Arthur Einkell George XV ard LUV jf 182 nhl"-' N n I :Jig ? Z. WL 1883 '- 5- Phi Delta Theta was founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, December 26, 1848, by Robert Morrison, '49g john McMillan VV'i1- - my .. YQ.. . r v My qw ef ' , ,s 12 Ek son, '48g Robert Thompson Drake, '5Og John XN'olfe Lindley, '50g Ardivan XfXIE111iC1' Rodgers, '51 and Andrew Wfatts Rogers, '51. Morrison first proposed the organization to Wfilson, and -is, -5 E- they were joint authors of "The Bond of the :J E i Phi Delta Theta," which is a statement of the N principles of the fraternity and has never been E-5 -' 'L changed. The founders intended that the so- ig N' fail flint 11 Clety should be extended to other institutions, ' Q5 ' In mmm!" E and today the fraternity embodies an active chapter roll of 102, while 21 chapters are in- active. The first meeting of the founders of Phi Delta Theta was in VVi1son's room in the north dormitory which still stands, and the room was later marked with a granite tablet. The fraternity now maintains a general headquarters at Oxford, Ohio, in a building owned by the fraternity. 183 n - -LL5-1. x igi,i 1 ,.. 1? x Av? I 14- Wal, wr, ll I , '- agp!! '. I in , V 1 F., . 1 1- , .W A ffl F- ' ' ' ' r f ' ii ,I x - 9 .,1gg-v"q'2.:+.'f ii t ,, ,im f'- M14 r 1 'vi 2 ' 'Z .J R. lf I llur RW M PHI SIGMA KAPPA Founded at Massachusetts State College, 1873 Active Cl13.DtCl'S-46 Beta of Phi Sigma Kappa . 1883 FRATRES IN FACULTATE John Albert Sanford FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE l933 john I. A. ,Lyons Frank Xllallace Morris 1934 Paul Adanti Francis D. Gelsleichter 1935 Benjamin A. Brown Hugh R, Elwyn Daniel A. Guttman Donald E. Rowlands Peter I. Sherwood joseph R. Horvath, Jr. Harold D. Strickland George XV. Papen I-I. Grant Towne Ellwood lj. lVengenroth Gilbert V. Nlfoodside 1936 Gustave Brunner Donlin Grady Eugene I-Iull x' Y.-' , , A Lfllf v ---elf' Sir... my NCS , J A lll'll' ' ,Li 7 ,Q 1' lllllws fl ll' "W 184 an 'I it-EM:-I M, aa a-1, S W aa:-.its Gerard A. Neumann james Seymour David P. Stockwell Phi Sigma Kappa was founded at the Massachusetts NX f"' Agricultural College, Amherst, March 15, 1873, and for .44 live years had no exoteric name, but was generally T known. as "The Three T's'l. The fraternity became na- , T tional in 1888, due to the activity of the alumni members xrssaf,-552 -. N, lil 1 I 'Stiff 1? ' ' "4-, -an iv- Q, S1Fm'i9'tI.i? f'?Z"'f .1 , LL at ,, , QTQZA T 1-1 ex x rl, ,,,r ,i I I 1' i X c . .. ' 'J 1 J J t. " who went to the Albany Medical College for graduate "13Ir5 study. For a little while the parent chapter was desig- nated as Pi and the Albany chapter as Alden March, after the founder of the college. In 1922 however the latter chapter established itself as Beta at Union. There are forty-six active and live inactive chapters. Two thousand six hun- dred members of Phi Sigma Kappa are known to have been enrolled in the allied armies and navies during the VVorld lfVar, of whom 1ll4 were com- missioned, 73 decorated for bravery, and 60 gave up their lives. l l ' 'L .',,i N V: MN . i tr gi Qilgiilgliiialll Hal tl K I ' l ,i , .ii'il':-i Liliiwifi ...P A..i L -- i 'vii -lf 1 'P ,I .5 -7, ...- W WlVl.'!'!234 PHI GAMMA DELTA Founded at il-Cl:fC1'SO11, 1848 Active Chapters-70 'Q Chi of Phi Gamma Delta . . . 1893 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Augustus I-I. Fox Raymond Morse Iflerricl f Daniel Rich ard W eeks FRATRES IN UN1VERS1'1'ATE I-larold jark Ackley, Ir. Parker Northrup Bridges john Richard Dalton Blanchard Everett De Groff Bliss Pierre Malcolm Hulsart, Jr. Wlarren Ackerman George Locke Ehnendorf Malcolm Lockwood Grilling Ralph T. Beach, Jr. Willis I-I. Brandow Guy B. Griswold, Jr. 1933 XVil1iam 1934 1935 1936 Raymond Girvin Friend Jay Miller Parker Carl Cordes Johnson Edward Leon Taylor Gilbert Wlallace Tuck Donald G. Sutherland Robert Reed Thompson Iohn Mills Vklhitke William G. Keens Douglas G. Marowe John O. Page Clinton F. Sekol 4 'Jw A 111 1 Ei?fE3:: :if ' Q 'I E-45l,a-Q-L-3531. I n 186 -, Phi Gamma Delta was founded in the room 6' , I lg of john Templeton McCarty in "Fort Armstrong", V , a dormitory of jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, on the night of April 22, 1348. A ' 1 as mf-wmbhsww constitution was adopted on May 1, 1848, which building at Canonsburg, is in perpetual careaof the fraternity, and bears a bronze tablet in memory S K of the founders. In 1909 the graves of all the founders of the fraternity were marked by suitable memorials. ln 1868, the faculty at jeHerson College abolished secret frater- nities, and the grand chapter was transferred to New York City. Chi at Union was established in 1893, and has lived a stellar existence during the two score of years since its origin. is recognized as Founder's Day. Seventy active and twenty-four inactive branches make up the chapter Yroll, 'and graduate chapters Jrekist in 25.5 : sg-I seventy-thiee cities, and giaduate associations in thirty-seven, including Shanghai, China. The Mc- 1 Millan Log Cabin, the lirst Jefferson College X x QQ , fun l'Mnw1df" 6 l 187 ffffxl .--1-4. l l ?l - s N E .. ..M..i.--1 3 . l-.l--1 PHI SIGMA DELTA Founded at Columbia University, 1909 Active Cl'l3.DtC1'5-23 V. Epsilon of Phi Sigma Delta FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Lewis I. Horwitz Sanford Brand Richard Diamond M areus Horwitz Joseph Cohen Arnold E. Dubb Irving Dworsky Morton Gold 1933 Melvin S. Myers Reuben Sorkin 1934 Samuel S. Keats 1935 Seymour Horwitz George Polansky 1936 Arthur R. Greenberg Milton Kohn Harvey M. Lifset Irving A. Lifset Leon Saiewitz 188 1914 Phi Sigma Delta was founded at Columbia University, November 10, 1910, by Alfred Iaason, Maxwell Hyman, Herbert L. Eisenberg, Wlilliam L. Berk, Joseph Levy, Herbert Minsky, Robert Shapiro, Joseph Shalleck. There are twenty-three active chapters and one inactive chapter. There are graduate clubs in New York, Albany, Providence, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, Dallas, Los Angeles and Denver. Government is vested in a body known and designated as the executive council of Phi Sigma Delta fraternity consisting of the president, vice-president, executive secretary, treasurer, chairman of the internal expansion committee, chairman of the external expansion committee. and three fratres elected from the body of the fraternity. There is a cup awarded to the chapter whose record is most excellent, one to the second best chapter, and one to the chapter highest ranking in scholarship. A scholarship is awarded to the graduate who ranks highest in scholarship, and an award is given to the passive whose service has been most meritous to the fraternity. 189 W 7 IJXNIBILA CHiI fXLPILA Founded at Boston University, 1909 Active Chapters-SI Rho Zeta of Lambda Chi Alpha . FRATRES IN FACULTATE Frederick VVarren Grover W'ilson Leon Godshall FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Robert Frances Burns Edward lfVatson Buell Rudolph VVilliam Strobel 1934 Robert Bruce Gottschalk Frank Herman Joseph Vincent Agius, Jr. Clifford Oliver Apgar Sidney Albert Cole Charles Reilly Haynes Edward Joseph Hannan, Ir, Franklin David Randall 1935 1936 Ezaliiys T -ff, na,5'mzg igifwgii lhrllhi 5 imp. all 190 ' i Kenneth Vifilliam Knapp O'Brien Henry Adolph Hoos, Ir. Rodger Albert Kendrick joseph Raymond Koch Raymond Samuel McDowell Joseph John Rigali james I. NVestervelt 1951 if Lambda Chi Alpha was founded at Boston "" A Q University, growing out of the Cosmopolitan Law Club, which had been organized in 1905. X-Vhat is regarded as the first meeting of the Wx 'w - . Y I 1, -fr ., traternitv was held November 2, l909, and this JAC! N it I .-f ,, , ', , ' ' . 5599? A Ag p has been aeeepted by the tiateinity as its date 'lv F ifa: ., "'p ll ' of founding. Wflnle the fraternit f was organ- U HVA QA W . I e I b 3 I e ix' , ized with a view to national expansion, no at- A A J fx ' ' . . X ,, :-abs if tem at to establish new cha Jters was made until W M. , 'mtcpiv X 5 1 QQ! I 1 W the spring of 1912. The growth of the fraternity from then on was both consistent and substan- tial as an unbroken roll of seventy-eight active chapters indicates. The Union chapter, Rho Zeta, developed as an outgrowth of the BINV. Club, which formerly held meetings in the dormitories, but later rented a house and assumed the Greek name of Delta Theta Phi fraternity. This organization petitioned Lambda Chi Alpha, and its charter was granted in 1915. The govern- ment of the fraternity is by a general assembly which as a rule is held biennially. 191 A ' 7' 3 are ,wh 1: N 1 llll F- NW 'J Ln ,. ., lull 115- 4 .lt in' 5 X . KAPPA SIGMA Founded at University Virginia, 1869 Active Cll3.1J'lC1'S-IOS A Delta Tau of Kappa Sigma . . FRATRES IN FACULTATE Arthur Campbell Henry A. Schauffler FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Roderick Tripp Clarke Kenneth Keith King, Jr. J. Rudolph Schafer Egon John Toman Thomas James VVade Reginald James Xvillfillill 1934 John Thomas Burns Harold Ganung Robbins James Francis Sweeney 1935 VVilliam Thomas Brazell Wfaldemar Henry Toman Wfilliam Newton Lester Wfilliam Baker VX7ilson John Edward Robinson Jack Hamilton Linclabury 1936 LeRoy Dyal Philip G. I-lussong Gustav F. Hallstrom J, Howard VanEpps Wlilliain J. Beebe 192 1929 A ' ginia, December 10, 1869, hy NVilliam McCormick, George Arnold, Edmund Rogers, slr., Frank Nicodemus and John ' , Boyd. The founders were not denied opportunity to be- come associated with some of the dozen fraternities of the hvfi time at Virginia, but three of them, McCormick, Rogers i E and Nicodemus, had been close friends as young men in i b 4 ' Ilaltimore. They wanted to he together and under the I Ill I leadership of McCormick decided to found an organization of their own, The relations of these three, and Arnold and lloyd were so close, they have always been known in the literature and tradition of the fraternity as the "live friends and brothers." Kappa Sigma was the first southern fraternity to place a chapter in the north, and is now national in its scope, with 108 active and 19 inactive chapters, being rep- resented in every state with the exception of Nevada, Delaware and Connecticut. Kappa Sigma was founded at the University of Vir- .,, x A 4 . "'i'il:f,i ' V f.f1v 4 Ne' 'fs' ,. H i ffzkhififi 11-tl R if if 1, ,V,isi""il"W,i Ml- i i1,l,l- ji wi R4 wi an '11 i-fr is t- ,'y,,.,iA1- 'y' ii. 1 it WWI. V, .Y 'U 95 i lu 'll,ll'!4ff?gi 'f,. .,1,' 1. f:: - -- i f,yj,., n ll 1' 1 TIMII ' 7,',i 1 yr Wie? KAPPA NU Founded at University of Rochester, IQII Active Chapters--IS Iota of Kappa Nu 1917 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Irving Aaron Katz Joseph Sampson Olender Abraham Charles Levine Theodore Rodney Sadoclc Joseph Saidel 1934 Arnold Joseph Friedman I-Iarold Zelig Gallant Samuel Jackson Milton Albert Berger Orel Friedman Lewis Sol Karp Clarence Clark Charles Lovvenstein Arthur Joseph Katzberg Irving Alexander Kushman Milton Schwebel Samuel Simon 1935 H 1936 f-'fig' wi 194 Wllllgli ,L 'J Ei '- NMS N M 1.1 -is-.-F2 giisi afxfigig Nathan Stillman Raymond Lawrence VVilcovitz Joseph Aaron XVoolman Arthur Rosenberg Merton L. Zubres , g Kappa Nu was founded at the University of Rochester in 1911 by Dr. Joshua Bernhardt. Dr. Louis P. Gottlieb, Dr. Morris Lazersohn, Dr. joseph A. Lazarus, Dr. Harold Leve, and Dr. Abram Levy. Originally there was no in- tjelitiifpggt ?l'g2ll'llZl11g' zllllilssojlzttiozl Clesiineiltib mst J-Jjwf Q ' e 1,1 na in seo e. ' xv.: no uni , J, , N V when the Beta chalpter was organized at New l f i Qgkmlgf 1 X York University, that any thought was given to ' V expansion. The chapter roll now includes K ' eighteen active and Eve inactive branches. The consisting' of acts between deserving of taken in it or government is through an annual convention delegates from the chapters and an executive Council of ten, which conventions. Honorary ulembership is provided for 1nen who are some recognition by the fraternity because of interest they have in one of its chnptersg and who in other ways would be eligible by being unzlhliated with any other fraternity and by being themselves college graduzltes. 195 1, fi Gbyteg Y CHI ai Founded at Miami University, 1855 Active Chapters-go Gamma Zeta of Sigma Chi 1923 FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 Sedgie F. Griffith XV. Erving Parry 1934 SIGMA Purcell E. Dow VVilliz1m L. Hunter Robert B. Lape Theodore R. Mcllwaine Russell B. McKechnie John C. Moore Wfilliam VV. Myers Emmett S. Newman WY Luther Shimer Robert Brown Donald L. Engesser John E. Finch Edward Bastedo Alfred Burtch Irwin Esmond 1935 1936 I r-"" QQ,,.. -2 "" 'B' A 'IH 1 . 1..---- ' 'Ti' Charles R. Frost Donald NV. Hanford Glenn R. Rapalee 'William Green George McGee Benjamin Roberts "1 Y .' ll", ki , xx Sigma Chi is one of the "Miami Triad", js as three of the societies originating at Miami are frequently ca11ed, the others being Beta m m Theta Pi and Phi Delta Theta. It was es- J. -, Vvvfll - tablishecl 'Tune 28, 1855, hy Thomas Rell, iii.. james Caldwell! Daniel Cooperf 11enjamii'i ii-4-11 Runkle, Frank Seoheyl lsaae hlordan and Xlfil- T ' liam Lockwood,"who, with the exception of gi the last named, had heen members ot the ai , . , - . " d 1 ' kappa chapter ot Delta kappa 1:.ps11on. gg A Tl11'uL1g'11 a disagreeinent. the llrst six men 5,617 .DQQQB ,V XUIDGEQJ named, voluntarily withdrew from the frat- V ' --,riff . --- N NSIGUO. 1 ernity and immediately organized another so- ' " Ciety under the name of Sigma Phi. The founders, apparently were unaequainted with the eastern fraternity of the same name. In 1856, their ritual and records were stolen, and a new constitution and ritual were prepared, and the name Sigma Chi adopted. The chapter roll is made up of eiglity-1'1ir1e active and twenty inactive chapters. Gamma Zeta chap- ter at 'Union was established in 1923. .K I M X45 I fi Ni .mit it ,op ti Nigilmvfvf-Sxqx. is lim , J it--1 '1'i',fw 'lf f 'N jf ,,1QiQ':Qi,,1!li-B11 Qliil il 197 Q it -' "6-M115 if-Q: i 1 ALPHA PHI DELTA Founded at Syracuse University, 1914 Active Chapte F5125 Iota Chapter of Alpha Phi Delta 1926 FRATRES 1N LJN1VERSlTATE 1933 Peter John Bavisotto Mario Benaquisto Joseph 1-Bruno Cortesi Joseph Delilase Anthony DiGese1'o Michael Angelo Blase Anthony Coppola Anthony Dil.o1'enzo Thomas I. Bucci Edward Canimarota Angelo Caiazzo Albert Diamante Louis DiFrancesco Chester A. DiLallo James Peter Faulisi Erbino Remus Sabatini 1934 Albert Xlfilliam Dehilatteo .lohn Daniel Mirate Lewis joseph Yevoli 1935 John Gallo john Cuardinier Martin Virginio 1936 Nicholas Esposito Anthony Fantauzzi Mario Favoriti Michael E, Fiore Frank J. Gargano Robert Leone Frank Mazzarella 1:-ffl 1 1: ,EZ I L Sill -Lgy ix 198 L ,lm-5, ' im , 3114- -iv I .4 x l X x.Xi7' I 'Ki mx. l"lA mv Alpha Phi Delta wzw founded 'lt qymcuse Uni- VLl9lt5 111 l9l2 It cllcl not slut on 41 110111011111 P10 glenn untll Its umon ullh 'L loeal of a Qllllllill name ulueh had hun evstent lol ovu 'L yefu '11 COlL111llDl'l LllllVL,1SllX It IS 1 1'lO11bL.klfl1Id1'l tmtunny and thele at afienuon ot the f1 Zllllllltb lms been devoted to tha beholamblup plumes of ns student Z1l.lI1VllX lfach ehap tu h IS one ox mme fueulty dflVlSO1S xx ho look alter the sehol.11sh1p lkLOlllS ot the munbui or the ehaptu S 1 .A . . in 1 v L. 1 x "1 ' . , . 51, ' ' ' ' ' ' - X h S W 4' -. . F 1 . Y. - 1 - . . - 1 K - " 1 . . . A ' f' . . - . A . iw me tu enly -hve ehaptels, .lll fxetlve. lly tru the gmeat- .....gZ 1532" ' . .. ' o 4 , 1 I -: fr Xe V' i M . ' I ., 11 4 I Y Q . .n V , S 4 - K l .. ' in . - V . . W l - 2 S 1 i - - A 1 f r f - 1 ' ' 1 Low stancling, that is ll percentage lower than the general university stanclarcl, means automatic suspension. lnclivirlual failures are 1'CfC1'1'CCl to the faculty advisors. Chapter schol:u'ship keys are zulvznclecl to the most deserving members usually by the alumni. Several scholarships are provided for study in Europeg two of them for one XCZIIJS grzuluate study at Italian universities. l --' -1 'L5 I ZTYLELX - figiig "'i5'VTT 1 , if 4 ' :Tl . W, 199 4' l 1 A ' l , I 1 1 l l will-f n J 'l l l V f 1 1 T333-' u ' l +-1flgf'vfJ ,Ill l 1 ,- ,my ,QXA 'MII l f . A J A 35-:Hg -Q1 will ,ff-,Q 1 iii ali N f 'lv I p I ff-11? wi ill S L glflin 1 " 3111 I' Q DELTA CHI Founded at Cornell, ISQD Active Cl1H.1JtGl'S-37 Delta Chi In Union University, 1897 In Union College, 1927 FRATRES IN FACULTATE Edwin VV. Hamlin Anthony J. Palermo FRATRES IN UNIVERSYFATE 1933 Arthur Iversen James Grant King XV ard Hageman Buinpus Gervase osenh Connor J 1 Henry W'ithington Dill, Ir. George Thomas Heffernan Eugene joseph Hanratta, Ir. James Graham Burke James Harry Chrysler Roland Lawrence Faulkner Donald Felix Flora Livingston Ackert john Francis Kearns john A. Burke Hugh F. Fitch Stephen Eugene Foley 1934 1935 1936 Horton Eugene Lindsley Henry Gordon Markle Frederick Spencer Tebbutt lValter Brunner Himes Dual Alastair Macintyre Robert Stewart O'Fee Cecil Yanney Smith Edward F. McFee George Ylfilliam Stroebel, J Vvilliam H. Milne, Ir. Donald L. Munro Lawrence F. Paulus james B. XVells 200 Q o-Q J J vii QCD J CDOJ figoooow ooo ggg gun npf J -fl Q E Q 5 malllmi mglllrl' E 3 mil Q J t' 4. E o 45' Q Q ,QQ .... 1 'X Delta Chi was founded at Cornell University in the spring' of l890, hut was not recognized hy the university until Oe- toher 13th of that year. :incl this latter date is eelehrzmted as the date of founda- tion. The ucitnzitinjg' motive of the frat- ernity was to create an organizzation of a distinctive llUT1l0f1'C1'lClly, the better to pro- mote friendship, develop eharzieter, :md- vanee justice and assist in obtaining for its iminhtiis '1 sound edne'1tion. Phare 'ire thirty-seven active and six in'1etivL chip- ers. In tie early jxwrs of tht fmterni 'f :L nmjority of the inenihers were eilewlgul in the studs or the hm, .ind is .i means of tightening the bonds 11'1lOl1g its mem QM Q ' ' f L 1 ' X X . QD NX ? Q i In J f 2 . - , l".H Q Q WMM 1 I .K . K tj lll .uhh I I I 1 t 1 'Y A ? 7f Q gb 2 ' . .. , 1 , . , , , . , A ,il . bers more securely, ineinbership in other societies, including' professional frat- ernities, was prohibited. Cllallglllg' conditions in the colleges and universities, however, early in the life of this fraternity not only aineliomted any tendency to take men froin certain limited courses but encouraged extension into all col- legiate departments. l l W'-' "' -- ,e ' , 'nflflk J Lv' gf" ,jijif W L."'4ff 'M if? "5.I'7"'r"'? '- vat, i' :L ' ,nilwyf "-'ip -I it ts' Xfi- A l ,. i 345599, ,JUUI 4, 1 ..1 .j - , A , .1 G i' .523 Qu 'xiii-z:'jVJZv':11 1 l 201 i!i i,:lW'wlW"l l i as 2139! 1. ,. i if ,ff,1i..ff,i i , W, l':5-ij1fi3il1"'44 i Irv i' ff Y I Ai- fJl . -,, '-:C WlallV5'flf'?i4 DELTA Founded at Union, 1923 Active Chapter-1 Delta Pi Nu 1923 FRATRES IN LfN1VERS,lTA'1'E 1933 Joseph Kenneth Donahue Marshall XY1lll2111'1 Quandt John Paul Galaha Joseph Anthony Reitford George Lyon Peeke Charles Martin Single Eugene Joseph Zielinski 1934 David Schwartz Parker 1935 Frank Vincent Chonski Herbert Gerhardt R. Spieske Elmer Frederick Van Buren 1936 Raymond Robinson 1 Robert Schoerller Charles H. Quan dt .L VI' Nl' rt 1 f' l '12 2.25 Ei- - 'YL' '57 .Biff--fp W 202 I file-3-f .,' -life: 52' 111 in ' r' " l ill' xi "lb ff'9Q r fir Asktyfil ll' f fx XX!! The Delta Pi Nu fraternity was founded with the sage counsel of Dr. Charles Alexander Rich- mond and Professor Charles N. XValdron at Union College on October twenty-third, 1923 in North College. It was formed for the purpose of promot- ing friendship, the diffusion of liberal culture, the development of character and the arlvancement of the social and physical well-being of its members. of the jeweled 2. V s rj x ' .f Qs I I 'jp ZA' - iii- ffkz' G O Q bs ' xx ii ig, , X e ,4 lik . J ri Qix years followi The badge of the fraternity is monogram type, with the "Delta,' super-imposed upon the "Pi" and the "Nun, The pledge button is an oval shaped one with the blue and the white lields separated by a reverse curve gold band. gf its founding the Delta Pi Nu fraternity left North . 4 c UI- ., , c College and moved into its new home on Gillespie Street. In the fall of this year, Delta Pi Nu will celebrate the tenth anniversary of its founding. 203 4 1-9"Qe ALPHA MU SIGMA Founded at Cooper Union Institute, IQI4 Active Chapters-IS Alpha Mu Sigma FRATRES IN FACULTATE Milton Enzer FR ATRES IN UNIVERSITATE Gerald Melofsky Nathaniel Al erzzinder Miller 1933 Alnrzlhzim 1511216 Sehnipelsky 1934 Paul Finkelstein Philip Harold Frankel Alex Henry Klein Irving Handelman Irving Rzibino Jerome Sigmund Rosen XVi1liam Freedman Samuel H. Silberlcrause Abraham Smith George joseph Zippin 1935 Leon Rosen Howard David Seld Ben Norman lA7CI'l11'lIUZlll 1936 1-I ermzin Kudon Morton Yulman 1 ' f' way. -I " 1 '-..l.11l"' 1. 1-1- up Alpha Mu Sigma was founded at the Cooper Union Tn- flfn llll stitute of Technology. March 21, 1914, by Irwin S. Chanin, Henry Charles Dinney, Irving H. Fisher, Edward D. Fox, 1 Henry I. Gilbert, Theodore F. Haynes, Julius Liebing, v:::I '3-55iff.fQ.Q ii Benjamin Rothstein, Saul Shaw, Samuel H. Solodar, Jonas 1. Specimer, and joseph Spies. Wfith no thought of nation- alization, the founders banded together with the common ideal of fellowship and fraternalism as their aim. There are eighteen active and two inactive chapters. The legislative, judicial, and executive powers are vested in the chancery, composed of live officers and a representative from each chapter, active and alumni. The annual convention meets during the winter holiday vacation and has thus far been held only in New York City. The frat- ernity celebrates Founder's Day each year on March 21, with a banquet. A silver loving cup is awarded annually to the most progressive chapter. 205 X557 " gp NN x A415417 I I . Zeta Beta Tau was founded December f.1'.f E3ui 29, 1898, by a group of Jewish college men 2 A-,gt . . . Y . . -'-- ' - -1 meeting 111 the city of New York. Origi- l""'1'lllWUim ' lH"""""""""'Hi nallv, it was referred to simply as the ZBT fraternity, the initials naturally apply- ing to the motto which the founders as- sumed. They had no thought of organizing , Q iilillitff ' H- ,A A : v f- 1, .1 I ."":-..' - if 2 J C- L ' I1 if il' 9 ii i L Creel letter fraternit inte dim their 2 9' WMS 1 ' 5' lg society simply as an organization designed I , 'f 41 rw 212' Q , 1 , 4 5 ,, y M ' . . 'x.--. - - -QM . -'-It TW' ' 'cfs gf.-1-at-if ,ff-1 . 1 E415-1'fl 44 3 ,' . 1 X, H -' 4 aim, Q, xl! wsugr 1 2 I 'fi-rv W ,is ,, I. , 4 .1 1 i 1 f "S 1 ' 4 L as lg . gi ., . 1 W. . ' S .5 n . 4 1 Q X X Xxx 4 L l L X ., 14 .. ,I-1 Xa 4 15, +1 - -, n ill" iii WP" 3 fs 11 u.a:..:ig2 7 3 rg-57,33 to foster and encourage the spirit of Juda- V,, !,,f" 'c f k WE ism. But it soon became apparent that jewish college men in colleges other than those situated in New York were interested a fraternity, because they were not members of the fraternities existent in their colleges. The insistent demand for an exclusively jewish Greek-letter colleve fraternity therefore chanved ZBT b b into Zeta Beta Tau. From this beginning the fraternity has grown into a .mummy 1 1 1 K -, -- ,, t,,r. in any society which called itself national organization with thirty-four active chapters. It has maintained its exclusive Jewishness, and, to a very great extent, the idealistic mission of its founders. Zeta Beta Tau . . . . 1909 Founded at College of City of New York, 1898 Active Chapters-34 FR ATRES IN UNIVERSITATE .. 1934 Julius Golderman Sidney David Markman 1935 ,lack Friedman 1936 David Cohen Manuel Sugerman Elle illli il. -, I - QD at l -vii 22 E is ir 206 , 1 a. . GARNET Key and Blade Club Founded at Union, 1923 Active Chapters-1 FR ATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 1933 O. Harold Bratt l-lildege George Loiselle John Herrick Hayman Joseph Arthur Haney Julius Hummer, Ir. Donald Franklin Mcliechnie XVilliam Kwiatkowski Frank Adams Squire, Jr. 207 . - 33. If in.: gm! : zq15'i!2.n541 ' ' ' if -1--fa 'S I I A+ I I- J. ,- A ,U QM f'.,w,,. .1-I ' . ,, J l.5.1,, W i" 'ls 5125.2 'la L.-4.:'..v-if 1 4 f ""' T14 TI-I' 93 Pyramid Club Founded at Union in 1902 'llhe Pyramid Club is an organization of Neutrals for the purpose of furthering fellowship among those students who are not members of a fra- ternity. The Pyramid Club endeavors to aid and encourage the participation of neutrals in social affairs and student activities, and to see that all students shall have have an equal opportunity to reap the full benehts of college life. Our members always take part in college activities as neutrals, rather than as club members. Wihile it is often necessary for club members to take the initiative in organizing neutral activities, no neutral is ever refused the right to talce part in these activities. It is our belief that every neutral has an equal right to be considered as a potential member, whether he happens to have friends in the club or not. The petition system is therefore used for selecting members, and petition blanks are available to any neutral upon application to any member. No person is ever considered for membership unless he has submitted a petition. The Pyramid Club does not believe in the pledging system as practiced by the fraternities, and therefore grants its new members the full rights of membership immediately after their election. A petition is voted upon only once. Prior to this vote, a petitioner is not a member, or partial member, in any sense of the Word. A neutral who joins the Pyramid Club remains a neutral in his relations with other organizations on the campus. He is at all times free to join a fraternity. It is not necessary that he consult with or withdraw from the club before he accepts a pledge pin, since the act of pledging automaticallv terminates his membership in the club. It recognized that as circum- stances change, various members will from time to time, find it advisable to join a fraternity. XVe therefore do not hold it an oltence for a member to leave the Club to join a fraternity, or for a fraternity to attempt to interest a member in the advantages that it may have to offer. The Pyramid Club recognizes that there are many types of students in this college, and that one type of organization can not possibly hope to meet the need for a way in which those students who do not choose to live at a fraternity house may meet for entertainment and the exchange of ideas. It leaves to the fraternities the province of supplying the more extensive and expensive forms of collective action. 208 lang 'I ...- ' ififf' "l' X av: M01 .il ei ll i Milt: Q af XE: 'S 92 'r GARNET Pyramid Club GOVERNING BOARD L. R. Lewis, '06 A. Q'Donnell, '06 F. L. Moore, '07 113. M. Stark, '10 Professor C. T. Male, '13 1933 Donald B. Bzlnnerman Donald Knox David S. Brown Donald Pelliciari Elmer XV. Ellerhoff Henry Piatkowski john lzltomzlse T. Wlzxtson Smith Romzlyne S. Vigzlrs 1934 Elvin Clapper Louis Milone Robert Griffeth Anthony Monda Edward Kern George A. Moore, Ir. Wlilliznn D. Newman 1935 George G. Hayden X'N'ill12l.1T1 J. Leahy, Ir. 1936 Nelson A. Foot, Ir. George F. jones 'sf' fi-:af f if -1 .Q , . L., -' 1- '1 mm in . Ay 5 209 A-F Q J ' 1 ...- 45' v"i?',iH! .. 3 .7 I ,. 42? A319 611 pg I ,I 'll lllf 53. U . .ll ' iiii:::: LJ! " 1 1. ""' 45 jp: Q ESQ A 5 X A A r . iff' ,pniiukgqlr LZ- 'ggg Piggy 1 El ug? X ,'iZf.,s:nF, F' is :im ' -if gf,- . z ,K f imggdffd '-,QI P. ggi?-if: Fppigf-x 2,0 'x 'igpjgffjg 'A ,' Q. I3i,55,f?43 lx . 1 T, in Ki irjg:dLH7w A rl' fi! 'uw-E:r"gA:rw"3' , X A ,J Eg,-V5.5 5,5 I 31-'Q,"1j'r iY'I",'?' t7gj"f?jx . MHA, 3555- agssll .Zigi 5.355 N Z :lx r :i 1 2.f',fX jj ,,"x'-:KAL 1 ' A , Q f1fi?aZg?g,fCJff!X!l , 'W X .fiaf NN ' fwn' V A. H .ilk -, 1 JERQZ-his Y 3 . 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A gif Q 355519 x C'5i'?,g5' , 'Wifi - X',,,.,,w14!1 U5,' 4-ii ffdgj LSL .ii ggfwzik Z .yxiifhi jz lfgm ,iiaxilbgi -,q,,FrLx5,:lii3A:!L ",,vf:Sjg4, .Q lg, gjigqfegw ,ilifmf Uyiwjggidrr il, 'S Y, Ani5?:igg-'r,2: 2 ,xv-'hwelifi X-,yglgrgw Q J4:iJ5,y'Q' gg I I - - wx -xv',.3,g: ,QQ dejxig, ef,jf:,g55,, ' - Qiirf :ww-,Wil x'1,f"if ffmilgf' u ffffw A x:7L?f1Jvf,:.1ff5,,i.lg, .:8,,,gi.i55:fg, I ,maxi . - ,cbhgitigz 6,13 , x?ViGC,' 1 ,figjxlgif x-,fpigaf - Mp,-..,,f Q g,fQ,.E454ju '2'g:5.--Trng ' 2,51-'Q fj,.Q,35 E ' ' 753455-, 1 -la51r- 719-fi1"Z J5bg5Q,,gix:API.:.5AE, X 'jf ny, ' I 3 -A 31. ,n,g!'A-i' ,fffgwiffgfk 1 , ' , ' 5.1 Y gffggiggggg, '. ,EL 111, 4 5' fIf.g4f55: , ,g Mug- W, HIE? , i,g6p,fjs',: , fifjwix il,2,i":fQg?L,- '55-gg I ' - .vglijfggg gqggffn' ' - ,ga wtf:-.gf Af r.fy.:'ggg- , gg- , -3555 'if?f322?f1 - ' ' ':.:gf-5fag:.- X- ' 'af x X f - X X HLETIC Zi? 2533 nilau 5"',3.ff 73 .I 5 22-3' 1 1 Sv 12? ' I v ygv4 g wwi 1 -4isi!4Q.,f 1' 2 isaiii-: '-I' 1'--I' !l3l"""" ,im ' Athletic Board J. I'IAR0l.D W1'r1'NE1z,. .-lssociulc Professor of Physzcal Educalzozz Head of Depmtlnzeazt of fltl11rrlic.r GARNIETI UNION COLLEGE GARNET 1934 Q FOOT- BALL Q THEN HERE'S TO THEE, THE BRAVE AND FREE Q WILLIAMS 0, UNION 6 O RAIN 46 65 YARDS FOR A TOUCHDOWN Q FAKE END RUN O WHO FUMBLED O BOY WAS IT COLDQBASKETBALLOAND SUNK IT FROM THE CENTER OF THE FLOOR WITH TWENTY SECONDS LEFT Q LACROSSE Q PERFECT SEASON Q SLIDE KELLY SLIDE O FORMER TEN SECOND MAN O LOVE FORTY O NO ICE 65 THREE OVER PAR Q THEN HERE'S TO THEE, THE BRAVE THE FREE 213 .42-'55 E.w 11. .eeePEL" II' L7 2.1.5 . 2.-A-11 Left: RICHARD VVHELPLEY, Mgr. of Football Right 1 GEORGE CODAMN, M gr. of Lacrosse Le 'E t : ROBEIIT VVILEY Manager of Crass- Country Right 2 DONALD NITCHMAN, Mgr. of Baseball Left: JOHN DEARSTYNE, M gr. of Track Right: JOHN PARKER, Mgr. of Basketball 214 1 . GARNE-T CAPTAIN ASHMORE L. L. MITCHELL-Football "Ash" came to Union from Kent School, Kent, Conn., where he was captain of football and active in under- graduate activities. At Union he has been awarded the right to wear the major "U" in both Football and Baseball. He has been honored by election to the chairmanship of the Student Council which likewise carries with it the honor of acting as presiding officer of Student Body meetings. At the close of his junior year he was Utappedn as a member of Terrace Council. During his sophomore year he was active in the college theatre circle. He played an important role in the original play by Codman Hislop entitled, "From VVhich He Lookedu. His home is in Crestwood, N. Y., and he is a member of the Sigma Phi Fraternity. "Ash" is succeeded as captain of football by Austin Fox of Buffalo who is a member of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity. CO-CAPTAIN FRED. NVALTER DILL Baseball "Bus" Dill came to Union from Schenec- tady High School, and has been active along many lines in his four years here. In addition to being Co-Captain of baseball, l he was President of the Junior Class, Cap-- tain of Basketball in his junior year, and has served on the Student Council and the Terrace Council. I-le played freshman foot- ball, and later was a great asset to the var- sity team. CG-CAPTAIN HARCLD I. ACKLEY Baseball D11.L Harold I. Ackley was chosen as a Co- Captain of baseball, because of his excellent playing as was brought out in the 1932 sea- son. Ackley rarely failed to make a hit, and the box scores credit him with one home-run, two two-base hits, and three three-base hits during the season. "Red" came from Johnstown High School where he played varsity baseball ani basketball. l-le has continued with fine work in the , latter at Union in addition to baseball. MITCHELL .ACKLEY 4 1 I Qg"'i- A r +4 u li, -.. ' 215 . 13 ,p '!'g7.ai5 'W.."..E'-N1 um 'Iii-TIxq , r all ll S Xi la WUI' ,, .A J - ,M "A, 1 ffugjel'-'IM ln FINNEGAN IJIOLLERAN CAPTAIN THQMAS FINEGAN Lacrosse Besides being a member of Delta Upsi- lon, i'Tom" has been on the lacrosse and football teams for three years, being cap- tain of the former. He was president of the sophomore class and was on the Soiree Committee. The next year he was chair- man of the Junior Prom Committee. He has been on the Student Council for two years and was tapped Terrace Council. CA PTAI N ROBERT MURRAY Basketball Before coming to college, "Bob" prepared at Schenectady High School. During his college career, he represented Union in football, lacrosse, and basketball for three years, being captain of the latter sport in his senior year. He has been a member of the Student Council for two years and was tapped Terrace Council. "Bohn is a mem- ber ot the Delta Upsilon Fraternity. CAPTAIN GILBERT HOLLERAN Track One of the best runners to come to Union in a long time, "Gil" has been a member of the cross-country and track teams for three years. As a reward for his line work, he was elected captain of track in his senior year. He was president of the Union chap- ter of Spilied Shoe and belonged to Delta Upsilon. CAPTAIN ERNEST CAPELLE Cross Country Since entering Union from Hollis, L. I., Capelle has been the mainstay of the cross- country and lacrosse teams, being one of the leaders in the former and a defense man in the latter. During the winter, he was a member of the indoor track team. "Ernie,' was president of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of Delta Upsilon. 216 M U R RA Y CA PELLE Football - 1932 , STAFF G. ELLIOTT HATFIELD ......................... ....,...... H ead Coach LEONARD SCI-IRECK ....... ...... A ssistant Coach AUGUSTUS H. Fox .......................... ...... A ssistant Coach ASHMORE L. L. MITCHELL ....... ..................... C aptain RICHARD H. WHELPLY ............... ...... B 'I21I12lgC1' A511 MORE NIITCI 1 121.1 FREDERICK DILL .ARTHUR IVERSON :ROBERT MURRAY DONALD NITCJ 1 MAN CHARLES SINGLE G USTAVIZ BARN E'.l"l' PETER BAVISOTTO THOMAS FINEOAN JAMES FAULISI AWARDS Alajor "U" CLARK PRATHER RICHARD TEET THOMAS ACIIESON IAUSTIN FOX :HARRY CHRYSLER HARRY PARKER ROGEIQ ICENDRICK JOHN F1NC1.1 105151-171' AGIUS CHARLES DAIN G. ELLIOTT ITIATFIELD Coach DONALD MOULTON RALPII SEMERAD VVILLIAM VVALDRON GEORGE PAPIEN "aUa" VVILBUR DAHL EDWARD SULLIVAN PIENRY GULNAC ROISIERT' GPPENHEIM ' LIIIFC. "!il1IT L S'Q. A 217 .sw X 13,1 A 11 iullll at 1 he "' :L " -f""'f ,- 1 411 1 A H gm- -30.21 rj lv :lllf WESLEYAN at U I0 N October 1, Union lined up against the strong VVesleyan eleven on Alexander Field. The loss of many of the keymen of last yearls team made the outlook for a success- ful season uncertain. Both teams started cautiously, each trying to find the other's weakness. Wesleyan soon found our's, hitting the center of our line in a steady march down the field. Early in the second quarter, Housley, Wesleyan fullback, opened the scoring with a field-goal from the twenty yard line. Later in the same quarter Schlums added to their score with the first touchdown of the game. Housley scored their last in the third period. Union scored in the last period mainly through the etiorts of "Bush Dill, playing his first varsity football game. After returning the Wesleyan kick-off twenty yards, he circled left end for a nity-yard gain. This he followed up with a pass to lverson over the goal line. The playing of Schlums, Wesleyan Captain, was spectacular. Plunging through our line, he averaged over four yards every time he carried the ball. The one hundred and forty-Eve yards he amassed was almost half of Vtfesleyaifs total of three hundred and twenty-seven yards. CLeft: Ash- more Mitchell, Captaing Right: Aus- tin Fox, Captain-Electj im Wesleyan 16 - Union 6 X t 218 l V - AMHERST at Unto N October S, Union was defeated by an Amherst team which was anxious to avenge their close defeat of last year. Our players met a hard charging outfit which used its deceptive plays to the best advantage. Amherst showed a team well drilled in the Vtfarner system by its new coach, Lloyd Jordan. Their oltense consisted of numerous reverses and spinners executed remarkably well for the short while that the team had prac- ticed them. In the hrst period our offense, led by Bavisotto and Faulisi, worked better than in the previous game. Both carried the ball around the ends for substantial gains. Soon, however, Amherst forced us to punt and our offense weakened. Captain Cadigan was the star of the Amherst team, accounting for both of the touch- he passed to Curtis who ran twenty yards for their first score. After a series of successful rushes H 1 in the second quarter, Cadigan plunged through the Union line for their second score, , The Union team showed a notice- able lack of fundamentals, the tack- ling and blocking being very weak. Our plays lost much of their effec- tiveness because of the slowness of the team. CLefI: Frederick Dillg Right: Thomas Fineganj downs. In the hrst period r. ..- . Z Amherst 12 - Union O w -.A.- :-L - - S Q -WZ'-Pl-U-W 'MM tk.-5' tv In 1 I -1.1- .l, H? V. an . . '1. .' '-if t'5'G!ff2a1:. JL, - , - ' ff" 'r If 4- ,'-:V-au :' 5-1 s- "' 'Kan filth - -15 ily A: Str 3. 'gf U H13 .1 L- 4' U' .IE 1. .. ,4- ' :- ab.: as . . - 6 F' EE 'S 2 I- s. .. S.. .. .. 1. J MQX r w' Q rm fl l Ill Q an 'I f 'qi 'i',..--Q' f 12.2. Y 'iii la jIiIL.,Q.1.,l ini ease 5 5 ---: I-IE 93 HOBART at GENEVA EFORE a large Alumni Day crowd on Boswell Held, Union started a winning streak, which was to last through the remainder of the season, by overwhelming Hobart. Murray was the first to score for Union as he took a pass from Dain over the line. Following this, Union scored almost at will, pushing over two touchdowns in each of the last three quarters. Faulisi, Dill, Bavisotto and Iverson accounted for one touchdown apiece while Semerad scored twice. Hobart's lone tally came in the second quarter when they forced Union to punt deep in our own territory. The punt was partially blocked and Harer ran it back to the two-yard line before being downed. After two unsuccessful attempts, I-larer crashed through our line for the touchdown. From then on, Hobert never threatened, failing to carry the ball beyond midfield. Rich, safety man and fullback of Hobart, was the star for his team, three times tackling "Chinn Dain after the latter had run half the length of the field through the rest of the Hobart team after catching , Rich's punts. As a unit, the Union team played its best game of the year. CLefl: Donald Nitchmang Right: Gustave Barnettj Union 46 - Hobart 6 w l ---Q lax-A '- ' i L, w 'u..L?":.,g. f ., - 220 A V-iw . 77x77 J R. P. I. at TRCDY N October 22, Union, playing its thirty-second football game against R. P. I., regis- tered its twenty-fourth victory over that institution. The game was played in Troy on 'S6 Field before the largest crowd ot the year. Both teams were strong defen- sively, Union's advantage coming in its passing attack and its ability to take advantage of the breaks. After both 'teams had failed twice to score when in position, Murray caught a pass from Dain over the goal line. This culminated a forty-tive-yard march down the tield. This drive was featured by two dashes oft tackle by Chrysler netting thirty-two yards and a pass from Dain to Semerad for thirteen. The second touchdown was scored Five plays later, after Faulisi intercepted an R. P. l. pass and ran to their tifteen-yard line. Following this Ba- visotto scored on a plunge through center. The most spectacular play of the V' game occurred in the third period. " XN'ith the ball on the forty-nine yard line, Union completed a double pass which gained forty-tive yards. Chrysler took the ball from center and tossed a forward pass to Mur- ray, who tossed a lateral to Dain. The latter ran to the R. P. I. six yard line before being downed. CLefl: Robert Murrayg Right: Clark l"rather.j Union 12 - R. P. I. O 221 1 WILLIAMS at U I0 HE victorious Union team returned to Schenectady on October 29 to defeat Williaiiis 6-0. Although our rivals possessed a poor record for the season, they were out to beat us in preparation for their iight for the "Little Three" championship. It was only through a break in the game that we heat them. This came in the third period when Austin Fox, Garnet center, grabbed a fumble by Gordon of Williams and ran twenty-two yards to the eight yard line. After three smashes at the Williams' tackles had failed, Dill passed over the goal line to Murray for the score, VVilliams failed in their only oppor- tunity to score when Captain Mitchell knocked Markowskfs pass down in the end zone. 'LChip" Dain led the Union attack in the first part of the game, but it was "Bus" Dill who was the star in the second half when Union showed its greatest power. ln addition to making several long runs, Dill threw passes including the one scoring the touchdown. Union outrushed VVilliams 165 yards Y to ninety-two, but the latter gained l fifty-six yards on passes to thirty- l seven for Union. CLeft: Peter Ba- visottog Right: James Faulisij Union 6 - Williams O 1 222 - RGCHESTER at RQCHESTER LAYING its last game away from home for this season, Union defeated Rochester on November 5. The Garnet team started scoring in the first quarter as Dain plunged over the goal line after Rochester's punt had been blocked on the one-yard line. Early in the second quarter, Union started a march from its own twenty-six yard line which resulted in its second touchdown. This drive was :featured by two forward passes from Dill to Finegan, the second of which scored the touchdown. Later in the same period, Semerad caught another pass over the goal line for the third score. Dill kicked the extra point alter both of these touchdowns. Rochesterls stubborn defense held back the Garnet attempts in the third quarter. Toward the end of the period, however, a Rochester fumble paved the way for Union's last touchdown. This was scored on an eleven-yard run by from Dill to Semerad gaining twenty- Throughout the game, Rochester was never dangerous, registering only six first downs to Unions four- teen. Captain Mitchell, Dain, Dill and Chrysler played well in the Union backfield, Dill being especially prominent for his passing. fLeft: Thomas Achesong Right: Harry Chrysler following a pass five yards. . Chryslerj Union Z8 f Rochester O 'Zi-.1 Sign 4 ' rf 4 - Q' gZ5-:r9f"'i- 1 V fi-23409 ui f' l'i G W 1 ' A ill-I L lvv,--'z A t-' l 223 , TI 'la 17" ilxh ix v Ill, H- 'NW M ' 1 7 -- Lggiv' It ,tx f EQ 71255 r l ll' gk' + HAMILTO at U IO EFORE a large crowd of Alumni, who returned for Home-Coming VVeek-End, Union beat Hamilton in the fortieth football clash between the two schools. The only score of the game came in the second period after Hamilton punted to our twenty-three- yard line. Here Union started a seventy-seven yard march in five consecutive first downs. Unix, Chrysler and Faulisi brought the ball to Hamilton's ten-yard line from where, after a four-yard loss, Dain passed to Finegan for the score. Semerads kick for the extra point was blocked. ln the second half Hamilton came back with a rush in a desperate attempt to even the score. ln a series of forward and lateral passes, Hamilton reached our sixteen-yard line where they were stopped when Fox knocked down a pass on fourth down. After Union Hamilton started another passing atta ' ' - ' ' to Union'5 twenty-two-yard line as the game ended. , Union was superior in the Hrsl X l half, making ten First downs to Hain- ilton's three. The latter came back in the second half to hold Union even. CLeft: Charles Daing Right: Donald Moultonj ck which brought the bah had pnnled out of danger, ' 1 Union 6 - Hamilton O ' - i. , 224 AGARIN Track and Field - 1932 S STAFF WILFORD H. ICETZ ......... .... C oaclz. MYRON J. C01-IN .......... ...,....... C aptaiu C1-IEs'1'12R M. SAWTELLIQ ................ Manager JOHN F. IDEARSTYNE ........., Assistant Manager AWARDS lhllllj.01' "U" Cohn, Holleran, Sleight, VanWe1't, Turner, Reeder, Savage, Kazmierczak, and Parker. WILFORD Kmz Coach lfaUa!I Mirate, Gallant, Forbes, Hill, Gulnac. SCORES Union-39 2X5 Amherst-86 315 Union-47 Hamilton-79 Union--20 Manhattan-106 Union-51 Middlebury-75 Union-60 lf3 R.P.I.-65 2X3 225 V"'i - f I l -fw""P 11aleeee,1l a,,1 ' 1 3.77 '7 -2 A? Ez" xgklix If . 'agen--1 'hh'-:I fkl iiflli 'I I l 'lllfzlrlfzfl !?'flll'1 Fllll Lfitg. Wag 1 l lim yu . :::::-21' - UNION vs. AMI-IERST Alexander Field, Schenectady, N. Y. April 23, 1932 X UIll011-39 2f5 Amherst-S6 3fS Beginning with the Amherst meet, the 1932 season proved to be one of the most disastrous a Union team has yet experienced. With only three letterinen from last year on the squad, Coach Ketz was faced with the problem of building a new team from in- experienced material. In their first meet of the season, Union gained only live hrst places out of a possible total of fifteen. Led by Captain Cohn, Union scored 392!5 points to Amherst's 863f5. Cohn was the star of the meet, taking a hrst in the 120-yard high hurdles, tying Savage also of Union, for lirst in the high jump, and coming in third in the 220-yard low hurdles. Another high scorer for Union was Van Wert who won the running broad jump and tied Van Schenck ot Amherst for first in the pole vault at the height of eleven feet six inches. This was only a little more than two inches under the Union College record and by fill' the best performance seen on Alexander held last year in that event. Union's noticeable weakness was the lack of good men for the shorter dashes, getting only a third place in the 220-yard dash. This was earned by Forbes who also placed second in the 440-yard dash, leading his team-mate, Hill, over the line. We fared a bit better in the longer I'l1I'lS. Kazmierczak won the two-mile run, Holleran came second in the mile, and Sleight and Gottschalk ran second and third respectively in the SSO-yard run. As for the field events, Gulnac placed third in the discus throw and Faulisi third in the javelin. VVe failed to place in the shot-put. One Amherst record was broken during the meet when Van Schenck, star pole- vaulter and discus thrower, tossed the latter 120 feet, S inches. O UNION vs. MANHATTAN Alexander Field, Schenectady, N. Y. May 7, 1932 UlllOI1-20 1l2t1'll1Hff2ll'l-T06 VVhen Manhattan University came to Schenectady, it was expected that Union was in for a beating, but a slaughter was not anticipated. The Garnet team was somewhat crippled because of the loss of Van W'ert, star pole-vaulter and broad jumper, who had broken his arm during a practice session, His presence would have meant two possible lirsts, since his marks of the previous week were far above those attained by the Man- hattan men in his particular events. Manhattan possessed one of the best track teams among the minor colleges in the East. Their squad was well rounded, with some good men in each event. This is shown by the fact that in seven events, Manhattan swept all three places and took every one of the first places. Out of the tou'i'teQenevents, Union was able to gain only eleven places, in- cluding live seconds, and six thirds. ' As was the case in the previous meet, Captain Cohn led the Union team with a 1' yr 1 tJfTi 4 f-1-fi - 'J f,':-"""e' X!! lvtlfbf A l ix, l'l5'.i.lil' f Nl-. A with - 4-1Zj,j1T'L-j'71 second in the 120-yard high hurdles. a second in the 220-yard low hurdles, and a tie for second in the high jump. In the latter event, l1e tied Alex Turner, another Union man, who also earned a third place in the 120-yard high hurdles. Our other second place went to Gallant in the javelin throw, heating out his teammate Faulisi who finished third. In the two mile run, Kazmierczak finished third to Ryan and VValsh of Manhattan. Since this race was run on a rainy day, Ryan's time of nine minutes, forty-one and seven- tenths seconds was very fast. Gther Union men to place were Mirate, coming third in the broad jump, and Reeder, running third in the 220-yard low hurdles. The events in which Manhattan scored a clean sweep were the two dashes, the quarter mile, halt mile, and mile as well as the shot put and the pole vault. 0 UNION vs. HAMILTON g Clinton, N. Y. May 14, 1932 UHlO11-47 Hamilton-79 In their first track meet on foreign fields, the Garnet team fared a little hettcr than in the two previous engagements, but the improvment was not good enough to produce a victory. Against Hamilton, the weakness was still evident in the dashes and tl1e shot put, gaining only a third place by Forbes in the 440-yard dash and being' shut out completely in the Ion-yard and the 220-yard sprints as well as the shot put. The most notable performance of the afternoon was that of Harry Parker who threw the javelin 174 feet, 23!4 inches for a new Union College record. ,The former 0112 was established hy Hoxie of the class of 1927. Gallant finished third in this event. Union took all the places in the high iump when Cohn, Turner, and Savage finished in a three- cornered tie for first place. Cohn also took a first place in the 120-yllffl. high hurdles, leading his teammate Turner who finished third. 'ffhe only other first place to go to Union was won hy Captain-elect I-Iolleran when he led Denman ol' I-lamilton and Sleight of Union across the finish line in the half-niile. In the two mile race, Lape and Kazmierczak tied for second behind Prichard of Hamilton. The latter also led Kasmierczak across the line in the mile run. Union placed two men in the 220-yard low hurdles when Reeder ran second and Cohn third. Reeder also scored in the pole vault hy tying Areson of l-larnilton for second place. In the discus throw, Barnett finished second. Mirate also won a second place for Union by virtue of his per- formance in the broad jump. O UNION Vs MIDDLEBURY Alexander Field, Schenectady, N. Y. May 21, 1932 Union-5t Middlebury-75 Back again on its home held, the Union team continued its improvement over the previous meet, hut was still short the needed points to defeat Middlebury. With Captain Cohn leading the way, 'Union scored SI points against the opponents' 75, 2 Umw- ni ll tfhi?-' ' t' :.l g': ' Lu i, A-,.,... M . .1 .ggy Q in 'ii Tl gens-L. ' BQ g. ?.l +A -. n - - . 7 9 iff lt ' X Q ilf 3 ' pf. T956 .l'-'- flwiif ce wait.. er sew 'C ,gtg Q ii: ty vat: 'Wi KEN-1,1 us ilu" """' 1 :FS ' tif' pl , I . . 1,-l.-1 1-ii-s ...guns ,Ll-1:1 Scoring in four events, Cohn was high man for the Garnet team. "Mike" placed first in the 120-yard high hurdles, second in the 220-yard low hurdles, tied Turner for second in the high jump, and placed third in the broad jump. Union swept all three places in two of the events. In the 880-yard run, Sleight finished first, followed by Holleran in second place and Childe in third. In the running high jump, won by Savage, Turner tied Cohn for second place. This, however, was offset by the fact that Middlebury took all three places in three events: the too-yard dash won by Brown, the mile run won by Harwood, and the 220-yard dash won by Prochazka. In the quarter mile, Hill ran a splendid race to finish second closely followed by Forbes, his teammate, Kazmierczak finished second in the two mile run, followed by Dow. The latter, running his first race, showed lots of courage to beat out his Middlebury rival for third place. In the pole vault, Reeder tied Collins of Middlebury at the low half feet. Mirate finished in second place in the broad jump which of Middlebury. Three other places were garnered by Union men second in the shot put, Parker second in the javelin throw, and Gulnac second in the discus. mark of ten and a was won by Brown when Hoffman was O UNION vs. R. P. I. Alexander Field, Schenectady, N. Y. May 28, 1932 Union-60 IX3 R. P. I.-65 2f3 On May 28, Union closed a very dismal season by losing to its traditional rival, R.P,I., by the score of 65 2f3 to 601!3. As the score indicates, it was the closest match of the year and was not won until the last event was carried off. This was the broad jump won by Parkhurst of R,P.I. Van Wert, laid up since the Amherst meet with a broken arm, placed second in this, followed by Mirate in third place. The lack of balance of the Union squad was shown by the fact that each team won the same number of hrst and second places, with seven apiece, but it was the third places which won the meet. Had Union had enough men to aid the first place winners, we would have won the meet, but R,P.I., with a better rounded squad, carried off the meet by virtue of winning ten third places. Captain Cohn, running his last races as a representative of Union College, carried off individual scoring honors by winning the 120-yard high hurdles, the 220-yard low hurdles, and tying Savage for hrst in tl1e high jump. Turner finished third to him in the I20-yard high hurdles and tied two R.P.I. men for third in the high jump. In the 220-yard low hurdles, Reeder finished third. Captain-elect Holleran and Tecle ran one, two in the mile, In the quarter-mile run, Hill and Forbes placed second and third respectively to Billard of Rensselaer who also won the 220-yard dash. In the latter event as well as in the 100-yard dash and the shot put, the visitors made a clean sweep of all three places. By bettering his time of the previous week, Sleight finished ahead of I-Iolleran to win the 880-yard run in the good time of two minutes, three and two-tenths seconds. Gallant placed second in the javelin throw and Gulnac did likewise in the discus. 228 1 GAR.N Cross Country STAFF NVILFORD H. KETZ ...........,................. ........ C oach ERNEST CAP1a1.L1z ,..... ........ C aptain ROBER'1' H. VVILEY .......... ................................ Il lanager PAUL G. STACKPOLE ......... .......... A ssistant Manager ERNEST CAPELLE GTLBhI1i'l' TTOLLERAN CHARLES BOERNER - 1932 T AVVARDS VV. H. IQETZ MUN Coach DEAN A. TEELE VVILLIAM J. IQAZMIERCZAK THOMAS C. REMSEN lfAUA!l GILDO MIRATE THE TEAM 229 3 5 Yfvlqw 4 , i lr' Mann M 're S ef R 55'-ggi? -Q I N s Q IJ' ,Q :WT 3131 1' W' M 17, I QM 2- .-. -rs ' N '52 if V' .'I .,k, xx'-M ' U gun J A 'I I-IE 93 - - - - - The Season HE Union College varsity cross-country team opened its season auspi- ciously on October 8 when it defeated the Colgate hill-and-dalers over the new Alexander course by a perfect score, 15-40. The entire field of Garnet entries crossed the finish line before a Maroon runner came into sight, the tenth Union harrier finishing almost three minutes ahead of Jeffries of Colgate. Only two of the upstaters were able to complete the course. Captain Capelle and Boerner tied for first honors, covering the course in the slow time of 27 243. Teele, Remsen, and Holleran, finishing in third, fourth, and fifth positions, respectively, ended the scoring for Union. On October 15, the Garnet cross-country team succumbed to the Manhattan squad on the Alexander course by the score of 19-36. The New Yorkers boasted a. fine aggregation of runners who succeeded in completing the course in the record time of 27:06 minutes. Three of the Manhattan men crossed the finish in a dead heat for first place. Holleran of Union was the first Garnet runner to reach the tape, scoring in fourth place. Capelle, next in line for Union, was in fifth place, followed by Teele in eighth, Boerner in ninth and Kazmierczak in tenth positions. Led by Captain Capelle, the Union team defeated the R. P. I. harriers by a perfect score and also broke the record for the 4.6 mile course which was set by Syracuse the week previous. At the mile mark, three R. P. I. men took the lead, closely followed by nine Union runners. At the first long hill Union took the lead. Throughout the race, Union had seven runners closely bunched, six of whom crossed the finish line before an "Engineer" completed the distance. Following Capelle in first place, came Holleran in second, Teele and Boerner tied for third and Remsen and Kazmierczak tied for fifth. Once more the Garnet harriers crushed their opponents by a perfect score. The victim this time was Williaxris, which fell, before a well-balanced Union team on October 29, in a dual meet held on the Purple's home course in VVilliamstown. This time it was Tom Remsen who set the pace most of the way, but Cap- tain Capelle, Holleran, Boerner, Kazmierczak, and Teele all crossed the finish line together in the time of 25 :54.2, a new record for the Williaiiis course. The old record was 26:11, established by Vermont the week previous. Mirate was the seventh Garnet runner to cross the finish line and was ahead of the first Vlfilliams harrier. The race was Union's from start to finish. The Garnet run- ners were not extended to win in record breaking time. A sprinting finish by Gil Holleran helped him clip twenty-three seconds oi the Alexander course record on November 5 when he led the Garnet harriers 230 A A flj figifl ! XX to a 15 to 40 victory over City College of New York. Holleran's time for the 6.2 mile course was 35 134. Dean Teele and Captain Capelle also broke the old record which was established last year by "Chick" Boerner, then captain, against R. P. I. Teele was clocked in 35:45 and Capelle in 35:50. Boerner's record was 35 :57. Holleran led at the start, passing the mile post in 5:13, but dropped back at the lyi mile mark. At the half-way point he again assumed the lead and never was threatened. Volhell, who was the first Lavender man to Enish, trailed eight Garnet men. Capturing ninth, eleventh, fourteenth, fifteenth, and twenty-first places, the Garnet harriers, led by Dean Teele, took second in the annual Middle Atlantics Championship race over the Van Cortlandt Park course in New York City on November 21. The Union men placing after Teele were Capelle, Kazmierczak, Renisen, and Holleran. The highly favored Manhattan team won the race with the almost perfect score of sixteen points, its captain, Jack Ryan, came within two and four-tenths seconds of equaling the meet record of 30:07 established over a slightly different course in 1927 by Arthur Irving Totten of Union. In taking second place among the six colleges entered in the M.A.S.C.A.A. event, Union defeated Alfred, Lehigh, Rutgers, and Lafayette to bring to a close a very successful season. During the year, Union set records at Williains, R. P. I., and at home, winning four dual meets by perfect scores and losing only to the strong Manhattan team. Scores Union 15 Colgate 40 Union 15 R. P. I. 40 Union 36 Manhattan 19 Union 15 VVilliams 40 Union 15 C. C. N. Y. 40 231 - .?Z-FQK 7f 44, ffffq 4 'fm tkgi-131 in " im. if f ,aw i rq P 5 I H IW ' 'Q-301269 'lg ',,if-Mgt. 1. eil- 2 2 5,1 3 , vf. " " as l, gains- 1 IFE.. ' ' Ca sas Zi' "' . 1- TI-IE I934' Union College Track and Field Records OUTDOOR RECORDS 100-Yard Dash-9.9 seconds ........................................................................ JOHN A. TIEDMAN, '26 220-Yard Dash-22 seconds ........................................................................... JOHN A. TIEDMAN, '26 440-Yard Dash-49 475 seconds ..................................................,............... TIIOMAS S. BOWIE, '30 880-Yard Run-1 minute, 57 415 second ...................,................ CHARLES AUSSICKER, ' 31 '28 f H. 1' 'D ' 1-Mile Run-4 minutes, 25 475 seconds ..................... 4 XM Ei'Vt,2EE-iIx',30 2-Mile Run-9 ininutes, 40 175 seconds .......... .............................. A X. IRVING TOTTEN, '28 120-Yard High Hurdles, 15 275 Seconds .......... ............................ HARRY B. DUANE, '27 220-Yard LOW Hurdles, 25 seconds ................ ......................... R . R. GRAM, '23 High Jump-5 feet 11 174 inches ................ ................... C IIIARLES SAVAGE, '32 Broad Jump-22 feet, 2172 inches ............ .................................. P . T. MALIN, '16 Discus Throw-123 feet, 6 inches ................ ...,......... O SVVALD H. JOHNSON, '33 16-lb. Shot Put-40 feet, 8172 inches ........ .......................,.. R ALPII STARK, '31 Pole Vault-11 feet, 8 7 78 inches ..........................,............,,............................ ELLIS SADOSKY, '29 Javelin Throw-174 feet, 2 374 inches ................................................ HARRY B. PARKER, '34 Cross Country-Alexander Course-6.2 miles-34:22 ......... A. IRVING TOTTEN, '28 THOMAS BOWIE, '30 l-Mile Relay On Boards Outdoors-3 minutes, 27 seconds JOHN MCCAGUE' ?'2 VICTOR NIGRINY, 30 WALTER HARRIS, '32 1 THOMAS BOWIE, '30 1-Mile Relay-3 minutes, 21415 Seconds ............. ........... ' Qfi'g','E'Oi"IlfI?g'Ri'Ii'3, WALTER HARRIS, '32 INDOOR RECORDS 50-Yard Dash-5 37 5 seconds ...................................................... 70-Yard Dash-7175 seconds ......................................... 300-Yard Dash-35 Seconds .........,............................ 600-Yard Dash-1 minute, 21 375 seconds 880-Yard Run-2 minutes, 1 second ........................ 1000-Yard Run-2 minutes, 21 275 seconds 1-Mile Run-4 rninutes, 35 3710 seconds ..... 2-Mile Runf10 minutes, 7 seconds ..................,.. 45-Yard High Hurdles-6 275 seconds ............ 60-Yard High Hurdles-8 275 Seconds ........ A.ARON H. FEINSTEIN 9 JOHN A. TIEDNIAN, VVALTER HARRIS, VIC1'OI1 NIGRINY, LORING MCMILLEN I LORING MCllflILL1iN, A. IRVING TOTTEN, LORING MCllflII.LEN, HARRY B. DUANE, HARRY B. DUANE, 70-Yard Low Hurdles-9 seconds ..,............,..... ......... W ILLIAM H. LEHMAN, l-Mile Walli-9 minutes, S 275 Seconds ......... ......................... R ALPH STARK, High Jump-5 feet, 10 374 inches .................... .......................... 1X QYRON COHN, Pole Vault-11 feet ............,............................................... ........................... E LLIS SADOSKY, M-Mile Relay-1 minute, 35 375 seconds ........... ......... B OWIE, '30, MCCAGUIE, 1-Mile Relay-3 minutes, 27 seconds ............ 2-Mile Relay-8 minutes, 18 275 seconds ..................... f f N! ng Av, 5... 1 'ljiqxil PE ssl W1 X NIGIQINY, '30, HARRIS BOWIE, '30, lWCCAGUE, NIORINY, '30, HARRIS, ROTII MAN, '30, EUNNELL, TOTTEN, '28, MCMILLIEN, v '29 '26 '32 '30 '28 '28 '28 '28 '27 '27 '32 '31 '32 '29 32, '32 '32 '32 '28 '28 J J 1 Basketball - 193 2-33 STAFF l1OBER'1' ML'1zRAv . . . . . .Cdfifllilflw I XAIILLIAM I-IAMJMAN . . ..... COGCIII JOHN XV. PARI-:Inq .. ........ Jllanaym' Doksmr F. HL'G1I1as ..f1ss'ismn1 Manager XVILLIAM I-lximmmz AXIVARDS Coach, HUM Murray, Dill, Jackson, Ackley, Higgins, McDowell, Single. "aUa'J Parker, Moiett, Smith, Rotunda, Semerad. Left lo 7'ifjlIf-Sl'llld'l1C Cuptaixi-ulvct Dow, Captain Murray, Acklvy. Strlizdilig: Maiiagvr J. Parkvr, Single, H. Park:-r, Coach llarclnizm, Dill, Higgins, Assistant Manager Hughes. HUGE ' ee' Hull f U 'va-.nm T. E H qi, I-'2:c2'i,L-3,14 " Af'- Fxf. if: ,Ev N.-1 1.4 J 151. '7' . E.. Q K 75 EJ . 233 'Y -'15 ' l 9.2 ,5 E 7,301 Hi 1 I pl X Yl'il FW "1'f' f 'I' I - f X 1-. :-':::i-5-wg N ', 54,5 . 35,-fgga-TT' 3 -:-qi" Q fr- , I-IE 93 Season's Resume Scores Union Brooklyn Poly- Union St. Lawrence , technic Inst. . . 30 Union Rochester . . . Union Toronto U. 33 Union Crescent A.C Union M. I. T. ...... 33 Union R. P. I. Union Stevens Tech .. 29 Union Wiesleyan . . . Union Xaiilliams ..... 40 Union Vermont .... Union Rutgers ...... 36 Union R. P. I, . . .. Union's 1932-1933 basketball season brought to a close the twenty year reign of "Bill" Hardman as coach. Mr. Hardman's career at Union has been one of success. During his period as mentor, Union has had some very fine teams and many brilliant basketball players have been developed. One of these players, Nelson Nitchman, is to succeed his former tutor as varsity coach. "Nels" was a distinguished athlete while at Union, playing on the football, base- ball and basketball teams and being captain of the latter during the 1929-1930 season. Since graduating from college, he has been freshman coach of baseball, football and basketball teams as well as assistant coach of varsity teams in the same sports. During his career as freshman coach, his football teams have lost but one game in two years whereas his basketball teams have not been defeated in the same period. This year's varsity seemed to be a team which could play well for a few games and then go completely to pieces. This is borne out in their line showing in the first two games followed by a reversal of form and the consequent loss of seven consecutive games before they pulled themselves together to win three of their last four contests. At the start of the season, Coach Hardman found himself with six letter- men as a nucleus around which to build a team. In addition to this, there were some capable reserves from last year, as well as several fine sophomore prospects, VVell fortified with this veteran and reserve material for every position, the team looked forward to a successful season. I..ed by Captain Murray and Captain-elect Dow, Union defeated Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute in the first game of the season by a score of 45-30. In the second game, after Toronto had overcome a seven-point lead in the first half, Dill, Union forward, sank three field goals in succession to defeat the Canadians, 36-33. As in the first game, the foul-shooting of the Union team was outstanding. Playing its first game on foreign territory, Union started a losing streak which was to last for seven games by bowing to M.1.T. 38-36. The next night a tired Union team lost to Stevens Tech at Hoboken by a score of 29-21. Dill was high scorer with 15 points. Returning to Schenectady, Union lost to a superior VVilliams outfit by the score of 40-34. The play was featured by the body-block offense used by Williaiiis and the shooting of Ackley, Union center, who led both teams in scoring. 234 Rutgers were our next opponents. Paced by Grower, a sophomore forward who scored 21 points, they defeated Union 36-31. The next week the Garnet. traveled to St. Lawrence to receive the worst beating of the year. The Scarlet showed a superior brand of basketball to defeat us 46 to 16. The team tried hard to snap its losing streak by defeating Rochester in a. listless game, but failed by one point as Rochester won 32-31. The Garnet played better basketball in the next game, but were defeated by the Crescent A. C. of New York by the score of 47-37. In the first game with our traditional rivals, Union surprised R.P.I. with a new line-up and a new spirit. Rensselaer never had a chance to get set, scoring' only two foul shots during the first half as compared to Union's thirty-two points. They could do nothing to the Union substitutes in the second half, the- fmal score being 64-ll. Ackley scored twenty points, leading Murray with fourteen and jackson with ten. Finishing up its season away from home, Union won two and lost one. Vxfesleyan was beaten 37-36 by virtue of a technical foul called in the last minute of play against the home team. Murray made the try good to give our team a. one point advantage. ln the game with Vermont, Union saw a nine point lead vanish in the second half, winning by a single point, 34-33. An upset was scored by R.P.I. in the final game when Union was defeated by two points, the result being 42-40. THE SQUAD Front Row-McDowell, Moffett, Rotunda. Micldle Row-Ackley, l-liggins. Bark Row-lrluglies, Single, Barna, Smith, Coach Hardman, H. Parker, Semerad, Jackson, J. Parker. N KJ-5 v1 rg' gms!! I ""'- 'A mmm it-E uri' v:::i::.'ul'1uHfiir1 , nfl, -I if. 'Q I "'::::3ifl ii 'HP' I l :si-::..llIlHL' 1,21 Q. ...H , i pf illlll .....l.lz... V2 'I 11:5 I - .HI new-is -1- Lacrosse STAFF VV1L1.IAM I-IARKNESS ........ 1 1 Coach SCHUYLER ADAMS ...... ...... C apfain. EDWIN I. NIEDDIZN ................,.......... lwanagcr GEORGE CODMAN ......... flssixfant Manager PIARKNESSY, Coach TEAM DAVIS, DILL, Goal NOIIRIS, Center YOUNG, JENNINGS, Point VVYATT, Tlrivfd flifafk LENDER, Cover Point CINELLA, Second .+l1'tack ADAMS, GILLlE'1"1'E, Fimi Defense VV1TH1NG'roN, VVILLIAM5, First .flttacl MURRAY, Second Defense F1N1zGAN, Out Home CAPRLLI3, Third Defense FOOTE, In Home 236 G RNE - - - - - Season 1932 t Resume of The 1932 Lacrosse Season FTER culminating a spring training with an invitation five day practice Rik period with Army at West Point, the Varsity set out determined to equal the success of the 1931 season. The cancelling of the regular contest with Long Island University left an opening for a practice game against an all-star team made up of Union alumni. This match proved to be the initial step towards a successful season. After a stirring contest in which some line strategy was executed by both teams, the Varsity emerged victorious by a score of 10-4. L On April 20 the team traveled to Geneva and avenged its defeat of the previous year at the hands of Hobart. The Garnet returned victorious with a score of 4-2. It was not until seven minutes before the close of the period that either team was able to score. Witliiiigton then broke through the Hobart de- fense and shot a goal. Finegan scored a few minutes later. Foote added the third tally, and Vlfithington soon followed with a second goal. Throughout the game a drizzling rain fell which left the held muddy and slippery. Again the Varsity traveled to West Point only to be defeated 15-3 by a vastly superior team. After holding Army to a 4-l score for the first half, the loss of Davis as goalie served to weaken the team. The three Union shots were accounted for by Gillette, Dorn, and Cinella. A ten minute overtime failed to break the 3-3 deadlock in the game with Springfield on Alexander Field, May 12. Davis as goalie played a fine game, making 14 out of l7 stops against Springfield. Norris was first to score. In the second half Norris again scored, and Cinella made the other point to tie Springfield. Defeated by Rutgers, 9-1, at New Brunswick, New Jersey, Union held the Rutgers team to a 3-1 score for forty minutes, but was unable to keep up its defensive play for the remainder of the game. Union's lone score came from a midfield heave by Young. I-Iome again to play C.C.N.Y., the Garnet met its rivals on a wet and muddy field. Throughout the game the Varsity placed shot after shot in the cage. The game ended with the score 13-3 in Union's favor. In the last home game Union defeated Wfilliams. After romping through the game apparently scoring at will, Finegan, Wyatt, and Foote were found to be tied for high scoring honors. The score was 13-4. Union then traveled to Syracuse to play the iinal game of the season. After a closely contested battle, the Orange finished ahead with the score 6-3. VVith the loss of seven regulars, including VVyatt and Norris who were chosen ALL-AMERICAN last season, by graduation "Bill Harkness" found him- self without an attack group, but there were no losses in the defense positions. 1, 1' Ng! 4 x lil ple ll omg ff as S' Q' 7'-' S I M1T',1, oft. i ly- wg N: V I MM. Willlzit Iff, 'li !..m?ft.Q!i..f I-lllll satan 2:-'et ' 237 55-.qrg5v'g:'m',- -' p., ,a'- A V -q xxv' Q 57 h I934 Baseball - 1932 STAFF ...........C0ach G. ELLIOTT HATFIELD NELSON W. NITCHMAN . . . .... Assistant Coach GEORGE A. CAMPBELL ........Captai1'1, EVERETT C. VVHITAKER ........... Manager DONALD E. NITCII3iAN ....... Assistant Manager COACH HJXTFIELD AWARDS ,Major "U" Campbell, Ackley, Dill, Gray, Irwin, Meredith, Van Acker, Bavisotto, Girvin, llflitchell, Wl1italce1', Nitchman, Sabatini, CaUaj. L 233 f l -'.u..n-J. XX SWIM Baseball, 1932 The T932 baseball season was otticially launched when the call :For men was. made and thc candidates reported to a new coach early in March 'For pre-season conditioning. Upon assuming his duties as Assistant Professor of Physical Education 2tllCl.AlIl1l?l1QS, Coach I-larold J. XfVittner turned over his position as baseball me-ntor to G. Elliot Hatheld, who soon proved his ability by producing a skilled nine. Such powerful slnggers as Revillc, captain of the T931 team, Kahn and Lou Bruhn were missed greatly. The absence of George Yackel, whose skill on the mound had batiflf-d many opponents, and that of Terry, whose brilliant work in right lield gaitierl him an enviable reputation, was deeply felt also- l-lowever, Schuman, '33, Van Acker and Bavisotto showed promise of being good replace- ments for the men lost through graduation. On April Igth, many skeptical spectators lined Alexander Field to watch the hrst official game of the T932 51-35011 which was played against Northeastern. 'Due to poor weather conditions, the team had practiced little in the fn-ld, and therefore it was with great intensity that the hrst three scoreless innings were Watched. In the second hall' of thc fourth, the Garnet batters opened up and their lirst run of the season came in. Union -scored in every inning but the sixth from then on, while Northeastern was held scoreless. Mereclith, the Garnet's veteran pitcher started his season well by striking out eleven oppos- ing batters, and allowing but two walks and two hits. Ackley, Campbell and Dill displayed excellent batting ability, The score: R H E Union ................... .. o o o 1 2 o 2 1 fl' - 6 9 4 Northeastern ................ o o o o o 0 o o o - o 2 3 Batteries-Meredith and Ackley. Three-base hit-Acklcy. Two-base hits-Campbell and Dill. Stolen bases-Dill, Garrison. Struck out-by Meredith II. Bases on ball-off Meredith 2. With but a three day rest after the victoiy over Northeastern the team found itself bucking up against a stiff rival, C.C.N.Y. The first two innings of the game, played in Schenectady, were scoreless, but in the third it looked as though Lyle Meredith, who had proved himself such a mighty ball tosser in the game with Northeastern, had not had time to fully recover from thc strain. l-lc allowed thrcc hits and a walk in the third, and that, -coupled with an error by Garrison and one by Mitchell, allowed the visitors to score live runs. Meredith quickly rccovcrcd from this let llOlV1'l by allowing but one more hit during the thrcc additional innings which hc pitched, but the New Yorkers maintained their lead and defeated Union 5-0. Sahatini took thc-gmound For the three remaining innings, holding the Lavender to two insignificant singles. The score: R H E C.QN,Y. ..... ............... o o 5 o o o o o o - 5 6 1 Umon .................. o o o 0 o o o o o - 0 5 4 Iiatteries-Meredith and Acklcy, Sabatini and Gray, Two-base hits-Mitchell. lrlits- ol Mcrlcdith 4 in six innnigsg Sabatini 2 in three innings. Struck out-by Meredith 6, Sabatnn I. Base on balls-off Meredith 4. On April 30, the Union ball shooters asserted their authority trouncing Stevens In- stitute on the Engincens home diamond. Meredith and Dill were in the box for the Garnet, the former pitching eight innings, the latter ohicring relief in the ninth. The Union batters were hitting well, and everyone but Gray made at least one hit during the game, while many made two or three sate hits. Irwin, ccntcrlielder on thc Garnet team, made the bcst average by rapping out live safe were put on the mound for the Jersey heavy slnggcrs from Schenectady. The Union. The score: hits out of six trips to the plate. Three pitchers team, but 11ot one was capable of stopping the game ended with a :fourteen-four victory For R H E Union .................,..... 2 6 1 o 2 1 o o 2 N- I4 16 7 Stevens ..................... o o o o 1 o 3 o o - 4 S 7 Battcries-Meredith, Dill and Acklcy. Two-base hits-Campbell, Dill, Irwin. Stolen Zhascs-Dill, Irwin. Struck out-by Meredith S. Bases on balls-off Meredith I. Sacrifice hits-Campbell, Dill. ' 239 - 'plan' fgf-yffgi tl' 'Z nhl! lq ll ,, I "1-I ' Q 551, I ,tix fl alflggf ,ie-.X 5.1--L 2 2--'I --" ill ll it 1 V i " ,l fl - I- Q Wednesday, May 4th, found a clash of colors as well as a clash of skill on the home diamond. The Orange socks of the Syracuse nine were in dead opposition to those in Garnet of the Union players, while the socks from the batteries of both teams were also quite opposite. The Syracuse boys found Bus Dill, who started his lirst game of the season, for twelve hits, while the home team scored but six hits from Kilffney, the Grange pitcher. Five errors, and two bases on balls aided the visitors greatly in securing seven runs. Union's only score was brought in by Irwin's single after three consecutive bases on balls in the fourth. The score: R H E Syracuse ........... . .... o o I 0 I o 3 2 o - 7 I2 o Union .... ,.... .... .... ...... o o o 1 o o o o o - I 6 5 Batteries-Dill and Aekley. Two-base hits-Ackley. Hits-of Dill I2. Struck out- by Dill 6. Bases on balls-off Dill 2. Sacrifice hits-Girvin. After a nine day rest, due to the omission of the Colgate game which was cancelled be- cause of rain, the Garnet nine was taken over 4-3 by the University of Rochester in a twelve inning battle on the Alexander diamond. Rochester, first at bat, scored two runs through the agency of a walk, a hit, and a helder's choice, but a home run by Aclclcy with Mitchell on base tied the score, and the game remained dead-locked till the twelfth. A hit, a sacrifice and an error brought Drojarski, the Rochester short-stop, in, and a double sent another man across the plate for the University. Union threatened to again tie the score in the last half of the twelfth, when Ackley scored after hitting a three-bagger, but the team was unable to eke out another run. The score: R H E Rochester . ........ . 2 0 o 0 o o o o o o o 2 - 4 9 o Union . ...... ....... 2 0 o o o o o o o 0 o I - 3 5 5 Batteries-Meredith and Ackley. Home run-Ackley. Three-base hit-Ackley. Stolen bases-Bruhn 2, Meredith, Dill. Hits-off Meredith 9. Struck out-by Meredith 21. Bases on balls-Off Meredith 5. Sacrifice hits-Campbell. Defeat was again suffered in Schenectady on May 18th, this time from Williams by a score of I2-3. The game was quite an even match until the fifth, when the Vifilliams- town players strided out, leaving the Union men in the rear. On the mound, neither Meredith nor Sabatini was able to hold in check the well placed hits of the invaders, Williams batted out fourteen hits, while Union obtained only six against the visiting ACKLEY ON HIS NVAY TO FIRST BASE 240 moundsman. Campbell took thc batting honors for thc Garnet by landing two hits out of thrce tries. The score: R H E Williams .................... OIlO34O3:l4-121.1 6 Union ..... . .,.........b ...... 1 OOIOIOOO-367 Battcrics-Meredith and Ackley, Sabzttini and Gray. Stolen bases-Dill, Campbell, Acklcy. Hits-off Mcrcdith 9. Struck out-by Mcrcclith I, by Sabatini 1. Bascs on balls- off Meredith 6: off Sabatini 3. Forty-nina victorics out of sixty-eight games was Union's record against Hamilton, until Saturday, May 21, when thc Garnet nine put their wins in round hgurcs by making it half a hunrlrnd triumphs. The tvzun svmnvcl to l1avP found its pep once more, and they whipped the Buff and Blurt by a score of I2-6 on Alcxandcr Finldp Bus Dilli pitchfed the cntirc yzzunr- for Union. I-lnmilton brought ll11'f'0 pitchers with thcm, and all three were used during thc course of the gamma but noun of thcm could stem the tide of thc Union advance. Bus Dill hit a thrce-laaggcr, and Bavisotto and Van Acknr both lztnrlvd two base hits. The scorc: R H E Union ............... ....... o 2 3 1 o 4 I r 4:-I2 16 I2 l-lzunilton .................... o 2 o 0 o o 1 o 3- 6 I3- 4. .l3ztttcrit's-Dill and Aclclcy. Two-linsc hits-Bavisotto, Van Ackcr. Thrcc-base: hits- Dill. Sztcrilicr--Camnbell. Stolren buscs-Brulin 625, Meredith, Girvin. Struck out-by Dill S. Bases on bulls-off Dill 2. I-lits-off Dill 13. The tvznn lJvgan Zl SU'f'1l'lLl0LlS wcclq by playing thw lirst of thrcrf tilts at VVPst Point. Both tr':,uns scorvcl two runs in thc lirst inning and 'For thc next livc, ncithcr was able to scorc. In thr- svvc-ntli inning thc Army stzlgvtl at rally, lirin51,ing.r in live runs, which enabled thom to cnioy a 7-3 victory ovf-r Union. Mcrcdith pitched :tn cxccllcnt Qalnc, ztllowinfr but 8 hits, whilr- Coughlin, thc Cadet twirlvr was found for six, our ol' wlnch bcing u time-V bziggcr by Acklcy. The scorn: R I-I E Army . ...... ............. . 2 o o o o o 5 o xt - 7 S r Union ....................... 2 o o o o o o 1 o - 3 6 6 Bztttcrics-Meredith and Acklvy. Thrcc-bzisc hits-Acklcy. Hits off Mcrcdith 8. Struck out-by Mr-rndith 4. Buscs on balls-off Mcrc-clitli I. MEREDITH HOLDS ST. LAVVRENC5 TO TWO HITS ,a fs J' li 1 mln Jffggfr' lib-1 rf -ii 'Sz fx .i Liss' ll Q Slllztg il' iz-flag TRY? eil, '53, X lu" ' iff li' tw' lll 24. 'illlllll"rTllllll' ill -..till it-V llll 5 iiiiiifi- U QU' ,y ...... The second game of the week was played on Alexander Field, May 27tll, against Clark- son Tech, which suffered a 4-I defeat at the hands of the Union hall players. The fact that the game was called in the seventh on account of rain was very displeasing to Clarkson, for they had iust scored two runs in the first of the seventh which were not counted. Union scored three of her runs in the First, as the product of three hits and three errors. Another Union tally xx as made when Campbell hit a double, stole third and came home on an error. Sabatini was on the mound for Union. The score: R H E Union ................................ 3 o 0 0 0 I - 4 7 0 Clarkson ....,........................ o 0 0 o 1 o - 1 4 4 Batteries-Sabatini and Ackley. Two-base hits-Sabatini, Campbell. Stolen bases- Campbell fzj. Struck out-by Sabatini 3. The day following the victory over Clarkson found the Garnet nine in a conflict with their traditional rival, R.P.I. on the Union diamond. The Garnet team held the lead for the Iirst three innings, but in the sixth and ninth, the Cherry and Whitrt made six tallies which secured for them an S-3 victory. Dill and Ackley performed well as a battery, Dill striking out fourteen men, while Chase, the opposing pitcher struck out only four Union batters. The home team put up a splendid light, but the Engineers were heavy hitters and took full advantage of eight errors made by the Schenectady nine. The score: R H E R.P.I. ...,.... ..... ,.... o 0 o 2 o 5 o 0 1 - 8 I2 6 Union ....................... o o o 2 o I o o o - 3 6 5 Batteries-Dill and Aeklcy. Stolen bases-Dill. Struck out-by Dill 14. Bases on balls- ott Dill 1. Sacrilice hits-Gray. Two days later, on May 30th, the Union baseball team completed its strenuous week by holding Massachusetts State Agricultural College to a 4-3 score on Alexander Field. The Aggies pounded Meredith for nine hits, while Irwin and Dill connected with the fast ball of the Mass. moundsman for triple and a double respectively. Union scored two runs in the fourth, one in the sixth, and threatened in the remaining innings, but was not able to bring in another run. The score: R H E Mass. State ................. o o 2 2 o o o o o - 4 9 4 Union ....................... o o o 2 o 1 o o o - 3 6 5 Batteries-Meredith and Acklcy. Three-base hits-Irwin. Two-base hits-Dill. Stolen bases-Dill Cgj, Bavisotto, Meredith, Girvin. Struck out-by Meredith 7. Bases on balls-off Meredith 4. Sacrifice hits-Gray. On June 4th the team avenged their defeat of the previous week by smashing R.P.I. in a IO-0 victory played at Troy. Four ball tossers were used by the Engineers, but Union hit them all readily, obtaining thirteen hits throughout the game. All but Bavisotto connected for at least one hit, and he scored on a walk, so it appeared that the entire team was on its toes to take over the well known rivals. The score: R H E . Union .... ....,.............. o 4 I o o 0 o 2 3 - to T3 IO Rensselaer .... ............... o I o o o 5 0 o o H 6 7 9 Batteries-Meredith and Ackley. Two-base hits-Meredith and Dill. Stolen bases- Dill. Bases on balls-oft Meredith 5. Struck out-by Meredith 6. The baseball team wound up its season with a 440 victory over St. Lawrence in a Commencement game on June 18th before an audience composed mostly of seniors and alumni. Meredith pitched his last battle with commendable skill, holding the visitors to two scattered hits. Bavisotto took the batting honors by rapping out two hits in as many trips to the plate, one of which was a two-bagger. The Union batters landed six safe blows and made four of them count. The score: R H E Union ........ .. o 0 3 o 1 o o o t - 4 6 2 St. Lawrence .. .. o o o o o o o o o - o 2 2 1 I . iz'-9-3 , , v -w""Zf?l . in " f NN. ni? N Q 'REE' 242 -X , , 5 - 1, H i,-gg-71.2 2 -""i:"i L P i rrf' Batteries-Meredith and Ackley. Two-base hits-Bavisotto. Stolen bases-Campbell, Bavisotto 125, Dill, Mitchell. Struck out-by Meredith 5. Bases on balls-off Meredith 4. Our professors tell us that it is best to learn details First, then we may grasp the whole situation from a rapid review. We have just observed the details of the 1932 baseball season, and now let us make a Quick summary. The team looked forward to fourteen games, and only one was cancelled-Colgate, and that, 011 account of rain. Of the remaining thirteen, seven were lost, and six won. The team played good baseball in every game, and though little weaknesses would creep in once in awhile, the ever alert players were quick to see them, and immediately set about to Find a remedy. Reluctantly now, we must think of the men whom we have lost through graduation. VVhcn the call for pre-season practice for the 1933 season goes out, six excellent players will be missing from the ranks. Lyle Meredith, who has been a pillar of strength on the mound for three seasons, will not be there, nor will Captain Campbell whose skill on second has halted many an opposing runner on his trip around the bases. Van Acker, in centerlield who had a habit of plucking down would-be homers just as they were con- sidered "over the fence" by the spectators, and Irwin who covered right field equally as well have passed through our portals. Lou Bruhn, who had a penchant for stealing bases, and Gray, whose work on first base excited many gasps from the bleachers, have also left us. Although the results of the IQ32 season were somewhat disappointing, tl1e fact remains that Coach Hatfield developed a strong nucleus for next season. The return of Dill and Ackley who were chosen as Co-captains for 1933, promises to be one of the strongest points for the next season. Union Northeastern . . . . 0 Union . ..... I2 Hamilton . . . . Union C.C.N.Y. ... . . 5 Union ...... 3 Army .. . . Union Stevens . . . . . 4 Union ...... 4 Clarkson .. . . . Union Syracuse .. . . .. 7 Union ...... 3 R.P.I. . . . . . Union Rochester .. . . . . 4 Union . .. . 3 Mass. State Union Williams ...... . . I2 Union ...... IO R,P.I. . .. Union ... .. 4 St. Lawrence .... o C0-CAPTAIN-ELECT DILL AT BAT 243 gvl If vw :il 2555? 2 Wrs '71, 4 tj I is ef, ig -R. lfimls liege: s - - he " 1 " 1. gn ffff l H af' a. : fl,-15:55 ', Q 1 ini-V 1' ., ,- "' lt. ' - W?-'I-Ji 244 GARNET UNION COLLEGE GARNET 1934 QP KNOCK HIM OUT O GET YOUR FINGER OUT OF MY EYE Q DEFEATED QQDEFAULT O BREAST- STROKE IS HIS BEST Q SIX ONE Q SIX TWO O IN STRAIGHT SETS Q SOFT ICE O THROW HIM O WHO MADE THE ALL FROSH BACK- FIELD 0 HIT THE BOTTOM OF THE POOL AND KNOCKED HIM COLD 49 THIS IS NO LADIES GAME Q AIM WHEN YOU SHOOT Q START AS FAST AS YOU CAN Q THEN DOUBLE YOUR SPEED AND OPEN UP ON THE HOME STRETCH O WHERE DID YOU PLAY 245 VaIM ' r WWI 'IL , f' v 67 A 515 ' I W , XX Flfm Tfgf , Fiffff fi? 5:5 ggi - 6 L' 1+X 3 MINOR SPORT D MANAGERS A . l 3 1-01-IN C. ENGLISH, Juuus HUMMER, JR Manager of Hockey Manager of Golf 19324933 T933 DUANE W. CRITCIITON, Plxluuau N. BRIDGES,- Manager of Swimming Manager of Tennis 19324933 T933 246 Swimming ---- 1933 VV11.1.mM LEONARD .. . Cough ROBERT S. CDPPENHEIM ------------ Cllffffllll IJUANE W. Clue!-1'roN .... ............... . ............ 1 'llanager JOHN MAucE1.1.us , ............................... A.vxi.sla1-it Manager THE SQUAD Captain Oppenlic-im, Manny, lllark, Squires, Nc-vse, li. Schuman, D. Schuman, Burcl, Stearns, Griffing, Argersinger. Union 25 ......... Union 25 .... Union I7 .... Union 38 .... Event 40-Yard Dash 50-Yarcl Dash .... 100-Yard Dash ....,... 220-Yard Freestyle .... 440-Yard Freestyle .... 100-Yard Backstroke 150-Yard Backstroke Ioo-Yard Breaststroke 200-Yard Breaststroke 200-Yard Relay ...... 303-Yard Medley Relay Scores .Aniherst 46 Williams 52 RPI 54 Trinity 39 UNION'S TANK Rl Record 0:19 3f5 0:25 0:59 2:3I.2 5:41.6 1:14 1f5 1:57 1:21 . 2344 4X5 ....1:45 .... 3.31 Union Union Union Union R. L. L. R. R. I. C. 49 56 37 44 LAI Cl fx V Z 3 U7 zwiwwoow ....Conn. Aggies 28 .....Roehester I5 .....Colgate 34 ..........Cornell 27 Holder Oppenlieim, '34 Clapp, '27 Clapp, '27g Oppenheim, '34 Oppenlieim, '34 Brubacker, '25 Perkins, l2Q S. Oppenheim R. VV. F. Bonnell, '30 VV. F. Bonnell, F30 g H. Terry, '30 I C. B. Perkins, '29 J. B. Little, '29 i L. C. Clapp, '27 I NV. G. Neese, '34 D. C. Schuman, .33 l J. A. Marley, '34 247 ll szzgmfcl ffm 'FZ' .J: li .rim 4 - gp ' ":.,- gh! J 'uw Y .. Q 1 LL, .., 'Q -i ' ia 'WH-' 's ' jiri ,Q 2-"L+ ,, 'lil I H V' y .. . ' I, E TTL H5 E 1 fi ., fjg- E x' if 'lg -1'-v-4" H-'NWA ll s I f4 iRI!iilif5l"ii eg ?T le Tl-IE l934 Tennis - - - - 1 932 OFFICERS PROP. HUGH MILLER ....................................................... ............ C ouch GROVER E. T'IOTALING ........................................,....... ........................... C ajztain JOHN W. HORSTMANN ........ ......................... .................................. ll if amzger PARKER N. BR1DGEs ........................................................................ Assistant Manager TEAM Hotaling, Higgins, VValrath, Iversen, Keats, Sax, Chrysler. H E Scores Union 2 Colgate 7 Union 2 Amherst 7 Union 9 St. Stephens O ' Union 5 Hamilton 1 Union 1 Princeton S Union 7 R. P. I. 2 Union 3' St. Johns 4 The Tennis team had a mediocre season winning only three matches out of the seven played. The only color of the season was furnished by Captain Hotal- ing and Frank Higgins when they won the doubles title in the New York State Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament. Union suffered a great loss by the resignation of Professor Hugh Miller as tennis coach at the conclusion of the season. Professor Miller has guided Union's clestinies on the courts since 1927 and was the founder of the New York State Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament which has been held here for the past four years. r l 248 GARNET Hockey - - - - 1 933 STAFF WILLIAM HARKNESS ......... ...................,............... ......... C 0 ach JAMES C. YOUNG ............. .......... C aptaiu JOHN C. ENGLISH ...,........ .................................. M cmager VVILLIAM BUCHANAN ....... ..................... .......... A .v sistant Manager TEAM Young, Fox, Williariis, Schoonmaker, Jenkins, Hutton, Wagner, Heusted, Flora, H. Dill. Scores Union 3 Hamilton 7 Union 3 Army 10 Union 3 Middlebury 1 Union 6 Colgate l Scheduled game with Cornell, Mass. State, Victoria, M. I. T., Williaiiis and Ainllerst, were cancelled due to the adverse Weather conditions. 249 .. SE sggggf- V"5z"'C-.33 .', nl ,ei 252, ,LJ fu all I . ill iii-egg: YQJIII. ,IQL --"' -if 'nl' 1 yr " il infill?-1 F'r"'1"9f" 5 'I x, A ' il" of , N f gg fi? Tl-I 93 Golf ---- 1 932 TEAM - Captain D. Stewart, Captain-elect Hummer, Vlfasinansclorf, Burleigh, Piatkowski, .Weeks, Crichton, Blood. Scores Union 2 Colgate 4 Union O Amherst 6 Union O Cornell 6 Union 1 VVilliams S Union 1 VVesleyan 5 Union 3 Middlebury 3 The golf team, built around a nucleus of two veterans, struggled through an uneventful season. After losing the hrst match to Colgate, Z-4, our niblic- swingers were unable to rise out of the Slough of defeat. The one bright spot of the spring was the victory over the faculty team, led by Dean Garis. The score was 4M-IM. Three lettermen are left for next year's team and a better season is expected. Left to Right: Crichton, Captain-elect Hmmm-r, Captemin Stewart, Wm-ks 250 Freshman ports - - A FOOTBALL NELSON W. N1'rcuMAN ...... .......... C ouch JOHN J. A. LYONS ............... ......................... A Ianager CHARLES W. B15NNE'1"r ....... .... 1 'issislant Manager JOSEPH E. NIILANO ........ ........................... C aptailz CROSS-COUNTRY W. GORDON NEESE .. ....... Manager WILFORD H. KETZ ........ ....... C oach NELSON W, NITCHMAN, Coach 1:1'I:'.Yll7lIfl7Z Football BASKETBALL G. ELIOT HATFIELD ..... ........ C oath DAVID W. CORWIN ...... .... Il lanagcr Milana, Sain-witz, Woodruff, Irvine-, XVald1'On, Betts, Lnmbpth, Bullard, Greenberg, Ross, Marotta., Little, Nnguszewski, XVi1linms, Stevenson, Nvalon, Dihnllo, 'Warner, Lnvorgna-, Burton, Krull, Hickey, Boyle, Rosm-nbc-rg, XVOjcik. Guthinger, Musjoun, Cammrnottn, Knrazus, lNIcLnughIin, Melinette, Pobielski Snwicki. ETH1114-ef .,,,...1 ! Ag! n al ,- vs.. 5' 1 1 I 2 -1 :.l2'..l LM 1 Fair' ' 1 i'!'21'g'.'fF"5f ' -w 1: -: QQ: L:.-ns A TI ll -li f ,I . I S 5 : 'i . 251 H i I T- -1 1 Q, - - T.. - E l -, ' 1' Fwy. 'I fm "' If :f ' 1 tai: l -E15 :an I ' mm in g 4' - TI-IE l934 Union Union Union Union Union Union Union Union Union Union Union Union - - FOI' 193 2-1933 FOQTBALL RESULTS O Kent School 0 7 Green Mt. College O 26 Williams Frosh 0 CROSS-COUNTRY RESULTS 24 Colgate Frosh 31 25 R. P. I. 30 BASKETBALL RESULTS 25 Mount Pleasant 35 28 Burnt Hills 14 35 Gloversville .. 11 34 Manlius 16 21 Cohoes 23 37 R, P. I. 20 252 253 ff we 1'v:z-f+55g- .fw.w1:a1.2ff'YcVXarfax 1:.wm5f-df-P-f.wf:,f'?1.-1N'-f-'zfw-",zw.' 1 WW 5.31 V. - . AV ,f f VX- ,.g,f9.g5-gQ,,- N Vivrg-Vw.--1.,,, pi .g..gwg,.1U-V , fix-.fn -sqxmfgtfyfmyx,-1:AV-.1.,1.m..,1.V:ff...-.-, x- , Z :,. .,.,44f-,.- .V .H-fr , -, . .. Nw..-y f'--f . rival. . 41 .. I V,v 1 1.-fy---,--J ':w,-4fV--w.L.-fV-,f.'.f- S X fy, '76 I.t.:s2mf'g1h N 'V fnixiuiiln. X L1-' f 'j'y2:'2zf 'l' 1f4V1sV'Jff2Wi1,'5i3f1Ifds?wf117'-g A y Q-"5.fg4:5.'5?1fJfLf:gi-S QL.-fgrvf-'37'f?-,"3-. 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N, X X., - '5.?',43,2j-:V -it efayg 1-ffyfz-"Gif-',i1fi'fP' - A ,f X :'. . gg -.'H.1.f: n Rx ru- 44- ,--un -1-pf-a ,217 ,raft - ,- , X :ff".'1+:g,5 fi 'ylsgy '-,A X "-, ' ' ' 2' '.i'-.'fl'Gi!4- 5" 5' ,Vf ,J 1 E., i14p.,.w R .X Xsfrwr 'A4J, K. 1.-:' 1, 4- iq- 1 -. X R- -T ,f ,N ,IJ .M I xx X I . ':,' f"'u' '-k x. j' . ,. .- .3 gg-E f - .I X :-2153. 25 12? ,ff X"-R., , .V ,ff . ,wtf-..1 .1'z,,,.,,3x:4 xx N., , r,,f' N '11:sVf5,.tfV.'fii'5 H, EXAM-' ,, , ..-H--' RGANIZATIONSH " 5,2339 Maui QQ 5-"' ' 3 '7 . F "' , It 1 ,, L, 411' VS JE? U l 1 'L5wUk?6:?CL7f x - ..aisi44 f he ' iiiiiiii .Jul gi. ,Tzu v '5 il 'ff s' . ' ,- 'l lr A ,gi lllllll H- 'NW 'll If L S E 'F-Tele: 1 2 73" ' L l 1 The Student Council OFFICERS A. ASIILIORE L. L. MITCIfIE.LL ................ f .............. ................. C lzairman FFFIOTYTAS P. FINEGAN .............. ........ I7 ice-Chairman DONALD E. NI'l'CIflBIAN ..... ............ T reasurcr G. GERARD BARNETT, JR. ......................................... ......... S ccrctary SENIOR BCARD G. GERARIJ l3ARNE'I'T PETER I. BAvIsoT'ro JOIIN F. DIiATiS'l'YNE FRED-BRICK VV. TJILL, IR. THOMAS P. FINEGAN FRANK S. I-lIc:4.:INs ASIIBIKJIQE L. L. TXTITCHELL ROBERT lX'l URRAY TDONALD E. N'l'l'CHMAN TIIoIxIAs J. XIVADE JUNIOR I3oARp : if -DANIEL F. FLIN-NL H ' HELLIS I3. 'GARR1soN HENRY P. GIILNAC BXLEXANDER M. TURNER SOPHOMORE BQARD DUNCAN S. MCNAB TQALPJI S EM' ICRAD WILLIAM A. XVALDRON FRESHMAN BOARD ROBERT NOIl'l'LI VLAN VEcIIToN TRUMIIULL As the governing body of the college, the Student Council draws its rep- resentation from each of the four classes. Of the nineteen members constitut- :ng the council, there are ten seniors, four juniors, three sophomores, and two freshmen. These men are nominated for election by the outgoing council before Moving-up day in the spring and assume Omce at the First regular meeting fol- lowing the election. The freshman board is elected by the council in the fall. In order to prevent deals, the outgoing classes nominate the members of the incoming classes. These nominations are not disclosed until election time. So that the council may carry out the work of obtaining speakers, donating special gifts, sending delegates to student conventions, and supporting college functions, there is a fifty cent tax per semester on each student for a Student Council fund. 256 Since its inception, the council has accomplished many notable achievements. After much agitation on the part of the council and the giving up of Sophomore Soiree and a football week-end by the students, a Thanksgiving recess was granted by the college. Other major changes made by the council were the abolishment of all freshmen sports except football and the giving to the fresh- men the right to vote on matters brought up in Student Body meetings during the second semester. During the last election of class ofhcers, quick action by the council dis- closed a deal in one of the classes. The vote was recast and the offenders were prevented from running for any office during the remainder of the school year. In drawing up a new set of dance regulations, the council provided for :nore freedom for the fraternities holding dances. The old semi-closed dances were abolished by providing that the houses invite as many guests as it might see ht, but that in doing so, the house was to be held directly responsible to the Student Council for the conduct of the students at the dance. The Student Council provided a sum of money to send to Lehigh University a group of political science students under Dr. Godshall as the representatives of Japan. There they won the cup, later donated to the college, as the best delega- tion at the league. Upon Mr. Hai-dman's retirement as coach of basketball after a service of twenty years at Union, the council gave him a handsome watch on behalf of the student body. 257 11 lm f X 1v , gr-if ' yw riffs "" 7 1 rl tl L ll' Ei '- iiliitve ,i gil - - - - Student Body OLLEGE activities and functions are governed and controlled to a large degree by the students tliemselves, organized as the Student Body of Union College. The Student Council Chairman acts as presiding officer at the regular meetings which are held on Monday mornings at the usual time for the daily chapel service. The meetings are held in the old chapel. It is a tradition of the college that the freshmen shall sit in the balcony and must not leave until the upper-classmen have all left. The only officer, other than presiding ofhcet, is the secretary, who is appointed by the president. At the meetings of this body, all business concerning student activities is transacted and it is the one place where any undergraduate may voice his opinion on any matter which may concern the student body as a whole. A motion was passed last year giving voting power to the freshman, but the upper-classmen still hold unique the privilege of the floor. The motions passed and the opinions held by this body are seriously considered by the administration. A school holiday was changed last lfall, being taken from one Week-end and added to the Thanksgiving vacation. The body abolished 'Freshmen sports, deeming it wise to follow the example of several other colleges. It was hoped that by doing so, intramural sports would be entered into more whole heartedly. The money saved by this means was to go toward improving the inlirmary. A long discussion centered around the abolishing of the present Inter-frate1'nity Council and drawing up a new or- ganization, giving the neutrals equal representation, but, as yet, no step has been taken to carry out this plan. This yearls officers are Ashmore Mitchell, pri-siding olilicer and Ralph Scmarad, secretary. Asnivioiuz L. L. NTITCI-IELL, RALPH D. SEMERAD, President Serrclary 258 ,GARNET Sigma Xi Union Chapter GF F ICERS PROF. CHARLES B. PIURD ............ .......... P resident PROP. EDWARD S. C. SMLTH .. ......., Vice-President PROP. FRANK J. STUDER ................... Secretary-T1'easurer Prof. Egbert K. Bacon Prof. Ernest J. Berg Dr. Leonard B. Clark Prof. Ernest E. Dale Dean Edward Ellery Mr. Augustus Henry Fox Dean Charles F. F. Garis Prof. Frederick XV. Grover Dr. Sylvester J. Haefner Prof. Anthony DeH. Hoadley Prof. Charles B. Hurd Prof. Charles T. Male ACTIVE MEMBERS Prof Prof Prof Prof Prof Prof Prof Prof Prof Prof. Prof. Prof Prof. Peter I. YNold James XV. Mavor Hugh Miller David S. Morse Vladimir Rojansky Mortimer F. Sayre Frederick C. Schmidt Edward S. C. Smith Frank Studer XfVarren C. Taylor Everett NV. Thatcher John N. Vedder Thomas A. VVilson ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Mr. Earle M. Bigsbee Mr. Peter S. Miller Mr. G. Arthur Campbell Mr. Earl F. Rothemich Dr, Edwin NW. Hamlin Mr. John A. Sanford Mr. F. XY. Toppan ASSOCIATE MEMBERS ELECTED, 1933 Henry XV. Dill, Jr. Stanley .l-l. Graves Thomas Michael Kelly Edward Rudolph Lender John J. A. Lyons Donald E. Nitchman Charles Lawrence Raymond John Ruiz Daniel L. Rutenberg Abraham I. Schnipelsky J. Carl Seddon Benjamin Mackay Wfalker MEMBERS ELECTED, 1933 Dr. Gerrit Bevelander Prof. John L. March Dr. Ernest M. Ligon Dr. Anthony James Palermo PROMQTED PRUTYT ASSOCIATE TO MEMBERSHIP Dr. Edwin XV. Hamlin 259 , ll:-'gurl sv M Sb- , ? i- ' .,js5?t..f'f' ' 'lip-554.3-3-, .fr-W F 'xv :ia Gif I ,A 5 5. W A -5 1- ' l . F E ? C: ..-.. . l ... ., Z .- I i 5 i - 1 Q 1 Y Phi Beta Kappa Alpha of New York OFFICERS DR. DAVID SHERMAN IVIORSE ........ MR. JOHN C. VAN VOAS'P ....... MR. ROBERT J. LANDON .......... DR. MORTON COLLINS STEWART RESIDENT ME Henry S. Baeler - Dr. Frank Coe Barnes Dr. James Wlilliam Black Frederick Liddel Bronner Edward Linus Carroll Dominick V. Cerrito Prof. Franklin Chester Chillrud Dr. Leonard B. Clark Dr. Harrison Cadwallader Coffin Morris Marshall Cohn Prof. Robert VVarner Crowell Dr. Frank Parker Day Vlfalter De Matto Louis Michael DiCarlo Dean Edward Ellery George VV. Featherstonaugh Augustus Henry Fox Jacob M. Frankel Dean Charles Frederick Garis Henry Glen Horatio Glen Edward F. I-lennelly Stanley G. Holden Albert M. Hull Dr. Leonard Chester Jones . . ......... Presiderzt . . . . .Vice-President . . . . . .Treasurer ....Secreta1'y MBERS ' Dr. George Dwight Kellogg Robert J. Landon Dr. Harold Atkinson Larrabee David E. LeFavour John Luskin Dr. John Lewis March Arthur L. Maxon Donald Lewis Millham Dr. David Sherman Morse Louis Oppenheim Mathias P. Poersh Rev. Clayton J. Potter Vladamir Rojansky Hyman Sacheroff John Albert Sanford Philip Alle1'ton Smith Dr. Morton Collins Stewart Everett XV. Thatcher John C. Van Voast Prof. John N. D. Vedder Bertrand Max XVainger Edward C. Wlhitmeyer Dr. Thomas Adam XVilson Prof. Peter Irving Wfold Dr. John C. Younie MEMBERS ELECTED, 1933 Allen Irving Bernstein Julius Emspak Sedgie Ford Griffith Lewis Irving I-florwitz Peter Triton Kapsalis Kenneth Keith King, Jr. Thomas Joseph 17" .a"J ' .:. I t fll- , 'Y - T11 .. E ll :' 15 , . ig- ' ' li? way' A 260 I E EF- p A p A '-,111 1-1 :. Abraham Charles Levine John Joseph Aloysius Lyons Harold Swanker MacGowan Donald Edward Nitclnnan XVilliam Packard Palmer Abraham Isaac Schnipelsky Wfade - - - Eta Kappa Nu PHI CHAPTER DANIEL L. RUTILNBERG .................................................. ....................... P wsfirleazt STANLEY H. GRAXVES ......... . ....... Vice-President XVALTIQR A. THURBER ....... ......,.,...,............................ S cc1'efa1'31 BRIDGES ...... ............................................. 7 1'casm'er SIQDDON ........... .......... C 07'7'0Sj707'IfZ'l77g Secretary PARKER N. JOHN CARL I. EVERIQTT LONGDYKE .................................................,.... Bridge Corrcsfaondez-it HONORARY MEMBERS DR. ERNIQST j. lYiERG i DR, PIQTI-:R I. XVOLD ASSOCIATE MEMBERS DR. FR1f:m-:RICK W. GRovizR DR. SYLVIES'l'l'IR I. I-lAi2FN13R Eta Kappa Nu was founded at the University of Illinois in 1904. It is a national, professional, honorary electrical engineering fraternity. Membership is confined to juniors and seniors in electrical engineering' who show proficiency in scientific subjects. Phi, the twentieth chapter, was established at Union in 1926. IMP l u IQAP f S 4 r ll S VF!! "f'1"llQ1j' .f.' '41 "'-' .1 ff.. 'I'l'p'l -he M QJ- 55 53. ,Z ' Q.. Jr ' lv o l P1 Gamma Mu 1 4 l i NEXV YORK ALPHA CHAPTER PROP. H. R. ENSLOW, Clzcuzccllor PROP. W. LEON GODsIIALL PROF. A. GORDON DIiXN'liY PROP. VVILLIAKI XV. BENNETT PROIP. CIIARLEs N. XNVALDRON DANIliL VXIIQIZKS VVILFORD TQETZ PTAROLD lX"lACGOXX'AN, P1'es'idci1it GEORGE TLIARRIS, Vice Prcsifient 'WILLIAM R. LAFLURE, SL'C7'L'l'U7'jY LEWIS L TMTORWITZ, Treasizrcr l-QODERICK T. CLARKE ALLEN RIZRNSTEIN IXLBIZRT VV. D1ilXfIiN'I1'I2O VVILLIAM P. TWALNICR VVELD ID. ScIIOONIxIAIcER PETER C. SH ER WOOD GEOIQGE SMITH CTEORGIZ T. HEEIPERNAN THOMAS VVADIE L. REED TRIP? HENRY VV. TULLOCH Pi Gamma Mu was founded at Wfinlield, Kan., in l9Z4. It is a national social science honor society with the purpose Of encouraging underg'1'zIduate Study Of social science. Alpha Chapter Of New York was established at Union in 1926. , 262 I l P 1 H F WILLIAM T. ELDIQED THOMAS J. VVADE ......... DANIEL F. FLINN ........ PHILIP W. BANKER GORDON R. DELI. RODLIRICIQ T. CLARK JOI-IN C. ENc.:LIsII GEORGE F. I-TARRIs ALLEN W. l'll2N,DI5RSON DORSEY F. HLlCi'l'l ES Pi Delta Epsilon UNION CHAPTER President . ...... ......... . . Vice-Pmxr-idcnt Secretary-T1'easzmIr AERAIIAM C. LEVIN15 FRANK C. MAXON, JR. lVlELVIN B. MYERs TROBIERT S. GPPENHEIM JOSEPII SAIDEL TI-IOIXIAS J. WADE DONALD C. WALKER CHARLES E. VVILLIAMS FRATRES IN FACULTATE DEAN CIIARLEs F. F. GARIS PROF. MAX XNAINGER PROP. IQAYMUND l'll2RRICK MR. D. RICI'IARD WEEIQS PROE. HAROLD A. LARRAIH-IIE MR. TVIILTON ENZER Pi Delta Epsilon is at national honorary journalistic fraternity whose pur- pose is to encourage Ul1ClC1'g1'Zl.ClLl21lCS to compete for positions On the editorial boards of college publications and to train them in writing. 263 'll Z'K1!Q'f P 5113 63 34 ' Wm. swf QL +7 J- 4- ,Y l I'- , -l i -- RE '.?- F1154 J-X ilk!! 4 Lf 4.w.:e- ' bi ' J l '- - l Q I i-Ir D' 5 41-. :Dav ie yr- -- is ski I ihi. 5.4! The Terrace Council - Senior Society Twenty-seven years ago the Terrace Council was formed as an honorary senior organization. Membership on the council has become one of the liigliest lionors that can be conferrecl on any Union stuclent by his fellow classmates. Each spring on Moving-Up clay, seven of the "n1oving-up" Junior class are Htappeclu by the retiring council. Extra-curricular activity, scholastic attainment, leadership, and popularity are all taken into consideration when new councilmen are "tappecl". Prior to last year, the Terrace Council was the governing body on the campus. Wlitli the creation of the Student Council, it was no longer necessary for the Terrace Council to act in that capacity. Now the only duty assumed by the council is the running of the Blocl:-Uzdinner. OFFICERS Asimzozuf L. L. l.'ll'l'l'llI2I.I. ........ President G, Cilamiali BARNIJI1' . .S'er1'v!cz1'y Romani' li. lXlURRAY ......... Vzre-P1'es1'fle11l DKlN.'NI.Il E. Nl1'L'IlRI:XN ......... Tl'l'tI.V11I'L'l' Fluzniaiucii VV. l,JIl.L, XVi1.i.mM T. Euuuan 'lqI'lUM:XS P. l:lNliG.'XN , i 264 GARNET Undergraduate Publication Board 1932-33 DIEAN CTIARLES F. F. GAMS .......... .......... I Jwsidwzt C11A1u.1ss E. XVILLIABIS . .,...,.,.,..........,...... ......... S ecrvfary PROF. IXNTIIONY DEH. PIOADLY ..,....... ........ T rcasurer FACULTY MEMIRERS IJIQAN C1a1Am,1':s F. F. Guns PROP. fXNTHONY DEH. HoAm.v Pmuf, RAYMUND F. I'IIiRRICK DR. PIAROLD A. LARRAUIQ15 1933 VVyII.I.IAM T. ELDRIED T'1:'N1i S. IIIGGINS Chzoluxlz F. IJARRIS 'I:11m.rxs j. XVADIZ 1934 IJANIICL F. FLINN JOIIN N. RIARCELLUS JULIUS GOLDEIQMAN Rom-:1z'1' S. OP1'1cNl-I1i1M 265 'I N1 Ig,- - Uliw H arm Ei: E 2. -1- f'f'i.l5'+ . -l '."-2'- ' qtnfl-Eg-A f-Y .. A .f...+ fini: J. V, 1-ll' Flu 91 ' . ..- 1 I ' E tam.: E5 55-75 il E? 5955 'I ... , .. 5. I i l :J TI-I I9 The Concordiensis 4 3 'qv' my X 7 h Wi?-1.": Nt'al W 4 Mztml, U 315225523 .ara -,V 3,1 THE WILLIAM THOMAS ELDRED, '33 MELVIN BERNHARD MYERS, '33 DONALD CHARLES VVALKER, '33 JOSEPH SAIDEL, '33 .,......... STAFF Associate Editors 1 . .Editor-itz-Chief Managing Editor .. . .News Editor ...Sports Editor' George R. Cory, Jr., '34 Lf. Vvilliam Huntley, '34 Arnold J. F1-iezlmzm, '34 Prince E. Olvson, ,34 Robert H. Smith, '34 Special Features Thomas P. Clinton, '33 VVilli:1m T. George, '33 Everett V. Connor, 532 Ashmore L. L. Mitchell, '33 julius Emspak, '33 Abraham I. Sehnipclsky, '33 Thomas J. VVacle, '33 Herbert VV. Smith, Jr., '33 VV11.L1AM T. ELDRED GEORGE F. HfXRl21S, Ea'z'tor-tin-Chief Busizzess .Wcmager 266 Bi-Weekly F H I Assislarzl Editors Milton A. Berger, '35 ClC1UC'llS F. Hathaway, '35 Riclmrrl M. Diamond, '35 Donald B. Moqlton, '35 Charles M. Grocsbeck, '35 Joseph A. VVOOlI'1'lH.I1, '35 Malzagmial Staff Glzouura FRANCIS l'lARRIS4, '33 ................. ..... B um-Less Manager FRANK CLAY lX"lAXON, JR., '33 ..... .... Circulation Manager M. C. D. V B. A. M Cmzziidnfe B11.s'i11.c'.vs Illanagers C. Stcwart, '34 Cmulc, '36 Fr:A'rH12us'roN1-IAUGH, '36 Gn.1z1zRT, '36 Go0muAN, '36 G1z1z1zNuE1eG, '36 KOHN, '36 Painter, '34 Rc'110rle1'.s' A. J. Katzberg, '34 C. LANE, '36 L. M M D. H. PALLUS, '36 RIG1-ITHAND, '36 SUc:A1mANN, '36 XNOHL, '36 SWAN, '36 267 El kQ I' I . f..,....' I 2::::::rm .umng I ,gg 3 .,,,,,,.,,, :r -:Hy ll Il...:eafal.IIu'y'gm'yf . I uu...::i:::l.. 2 umnlmnmlmmw I -.-.--: 35: . .4 n I A . -'25 ... Effie ' nm , u ,, ....ij.L1-1 - I-IE I9 The Garnet - - - - - THE STAFF DANIIEI. F. FLINN, II ................. Editor-in-Clzicf DORSEY F. HLTGI'IES .......... Photographic Editor ROBERT S. OPRENI-IEIM .,.. Business Manager DANIEL F. FIJNN, II, Editor-in-Chief ASSOCIATE EDITORS CHARLES W. BENNETT LOUIS TVIILONE ROBERT BREARTON FRANK OyBRIEN JOHN BURNS EVERETT PAINTER WILLIAM DRAPER DAVID PARKER DOIQSEY F. HUGHES, ROBERT S. OPIJENITEIINI, Photogrufvlz-ic Edilor B'usi11ess Rfanager ' ,' -rufh - 2 - '5 ani? 555 sz ,,. T I ' Fas I"' 1Ig1g...g..m I-. 268 :iii I H61 , .li-ll 1 -i-1 i l PAUL EIN KLESTEI N DONALD FLORA CI-IAUNCEY FOOTE ARNOLD FRIEDMAN JOHN PIAYMAN JOSEPH HORVATH Yearbook Of 1934 HARIQY PARKER JOHN ROBERTS HAIQRISON F. SAYRE DOLTfiLAS SMITH RO'BERT SMITH :EDWARD TAYLOR VVILLIAM I'lUN'1'LIiY REED TRIPP SAMUEL IQEATS ALEXANDER TURNER SIDNEY MARKIIIAN PAUL WASSMANDORE RUSSIi1.L B. NICIQECHNIIE LOUIS YEVOLI ASSISTANT EDITORS VVARREN ACKERMAN EDWARD FREDERICK NIINCI-I RICHARD M. HDIAMOND FRANK XAVIER SHIELDS DETNCAN SCOTT MCNAB MAUS VVELLINGTON STIZARNS THORNTON WILSON VVHIPIILE 'a ' """4Efa1' ff 1 iig'faG?PSq f Nl 'Lg' Q S an 'lg-Q' I9 RN-,I uf el! x ,U Wir 'I A' ' Aw ik " IW W'rfm"'1MP" li W ,E gig wars' 37,-. V 1 f f se ll 5, u J .hh xy f Z r The Idol THOMAS I. WAD1s ........................ ............. E diz'or-in-Chief CHARLES E. WILLIAMS, JR. ................................................... Business Manager ASSOCIATE EDITORS ROBIEIQT F. BURNS Lewis IRVING I-Iouwrrz E,VERI5TT V. CONNOR XVILLIAM P. Paimiziz VVILLIAM J. D1zLL15s CDTHNIEL A. P12NDL1s'roN, IR. The Idol, Union College student literary quarterly, is now completing its -sixth season. lt was started in the spring of 1928 and has been successful since its inception. Originally six issues per year were published, but in 1930 the format was changed and the magazine became a quarterly. The Idol contains short stories, creative essays, dramatic criticism, reviews of contemporary works of liction and poetry. Consisting wholly of undergraduate contributions, the Idol offers a means fof expression to the Student Body. Although forced to depend upon a limited number of contributors, the magazine has maintained an excellence of literary effort to stimulate the interest of a majority of the undergraduates and faculty in its writings. THoMixs I. WADE, C11ARLEs E. WrLL1AMs, Erfiffli'-111-C11'1L'f Busi11e.v.s' Manager Ei e i if Q f N 7 The Handbook The Union College Handbook is a compendium of useful facts about the campus and campus organizations, customs, traditions, and regulations, a guide of general information for the benefit of undergraduates, published annually under the supervision of the Publication Board which elects the Editor and the Business Manager from the junior class. This publication, colloquially known as the "Frosh Bible", is mailed to the incoming freshman class during the summer months in order to aid the new- comers in becoming familiar with the traditions and spirit of Union College. The members of the other classes obtain their copies of the Handbook upon registration, In order to better acquaint the freshmen with the fraternity system, upon which the social life of the college is based, there is a list of the fraternities as well as the dates of their foundings. There is also a map of the college grounds and adjacent streets, containing the locations of all the buildings connected with the college. The telephone numbers of the various departments are also included. JOHN N. NTARCELLUS, ju. JULIUS GOLDERMAIN' Edi50r-ii11-Cl1.igf Busirzess Manager 0 I uc 4 'I ef? 2 :L5",9L1r.b1'T-'19 I'i -.. u-is 'V ", 1 Q 4 ii! fr "' .arf ,h A 271 . -' WE Erg ,?g -'- -i ,K aw nth A 1, , J I I Ln 'fi' .UII WE- ' f f 2 1- '- TI-IE I9 News Bureau - - - 1932-1933 The Union College News Bureau selects, writes, and distributes the news of the campus to newspapers and magazines. Undergraduates assist in the work. Those who qualify are recommended for positions as correspondents for news- papers in the vicinity which wish to pay to have special reporters on the campus. The work is directed by Mr. Milton M. Enzer, '29, whose oliice is in the south section of Silliman Hall. Those who intend to take up journalism as a profession will benelit most from working in the college News Bureau, for in this work they are able to make valuable contacts with editors whose good will may result in future professional work. Glens Falls Post Slat-:dard Undergraduate Direclor Glens Falls Times . . . .Sclzenectady Gazette Albfmy K11icln'rb0clee1' Press flllumy Liveiiiny N eros . . . . Ifeportcr-at-large Reporter-at-large . . . .Albany Times-Uniolz Srizwzuzr WAGONER, ,315 ..... Rici-mrzn DIAMQND, '35 ..... .... JOSEPH Sr-XIDEL, '33 .... . EXRTHUR BAiz'rLE'r'1', '35 .... Wn.1.mM ELDRED, '33 ..... RANKINE HINMAN, '35 ..... JEROME Rosmr, '35 ........ .... 'l'HOMAs WVADE, '33 ....... ..S'r11eHectady Union Sim' l'h0!og1'afvlzic Edllor 272 E. B. NIATE5 Simian! Leader PAUL BACHMAN, '35 ROBERT BLATCHLEYV, '35 GERALD CROWE, '36 lJERl!liR'I' DIXONJ '34 O. HARmN PIALL, '35 WH.L1AM BAILEY, '33 NIELVIN BURIGI-l'I', '36 GEORGE DUNQAN, '33 ELM ER ELLER1-1OF1f, '33 EWALR I3OEH1x1E, '36 CHARLES RRIIIGMAN, '34 REYNOLD CRANE, '35 NtJlih'14XN CIIAUIIOURNIZ, '35 Glee Club PROFESSOR ELMER A. TIDMARSH ......... Director PROFESSOR XVARREN C. TAYLOR ...... lfacnliy Advisor BTELVIN B. NIYERS ............ ......... .71 lanager .EDWARD B. MATES Student Leader AIILTON M. ENZER ............... Publicity Manager FIRST TENOR JOHN BONNELL, '33 THOMAS BROWN, '35 THA1mm-:Us COWELL, '34 JAMES DICKS-ON, '35 LAWRENCE DUGAN, '34 JOHN JUDGE, '34 JAMES IQIMIEALL, '36 SECOND TENOR IJONALD H.NNF0lt'D, ,35 JAMES HORAN, '34 HELHEIQ1' PIAUSSER., ,34 JOHN 1X'IlRA'l'E, '34 JOHN REEUER, '33 FIRST BASS J ULIUS GOLDERMJXN, 53-1 l,AwRENCE IJILI., '33 HERMAN KUIION, '36 LESLIE LONG, '34 RALPH PARKER, .33 SECOND BASS XVILMKYI' GRIE1-'1'1'11, 734 HORVON LINDELEY, '33 ECIYXVANIJ KIATIES, '33 HYRNPI 1WAYER, '36 SIELVIN RJEYERS, '33 PRINCE OLIESON, '34 GEORGE SMITH, '33 I-'IQ VVILLIAM SMITH, '33 VVILLIAM SPENCER, '33 JOHN SULLIVAN, ,34 HAIiliY SUMMERHAYES, '35 VIIQGII. SAGE!!-, '35 JOSER1-I OLENDER, '33 A-LDEN STANTON, '33 THORNTON VVH1 R1-LE, '35 .l5liNJA1VII:N RORERTS, '36 REED 'I'RHf1', '34 CHARLES REID, '36 XVICNIIIELI. STAY, ,361 JOHN AIOORE, '34 O'I'l'lNIEI. PIDNDLETUN, '33 XVILM UT PLU M M ER, '36 T I 1 EOUORE VV I LMOT, '36 NVILLIAM SHIMER. '34 RALPH TRUMHULI., '34 QUARTET XVlI,I.,I:XM 5lXlI'I'l'I I 'Nitin' Tmom .JAMES S, HORAN .... Burilone IIIOM.-XS S. BRUWN I'IERI!ER'I' S. IJAUSSER ....... Second Tenor REYNOLD M. CRANE .... .... B ass 273 J-":"' Su 1 1 -AEA- af' f :gn-vga? uv f- 5,521 f I ...... . ,... R Q' .43 '. ' 2.34 f' 3 'iff ' f -- Musical Clubs - - . . El.h'llER A. Timmizslr. KlEI,VIN B. KHEYERS. Direffor IJDIISIIIUSX .llamzger HE Musical Clubs hzzvf- mlioyf-rl :ui active sr-zisou, bc-giuuing r-arly in SCDlK'lTllJC1' and ending with thc: prcsixmzitiou of awards in May. During thv iutc-rvf-uiug mouths, thc Musical Clubs have prasc-utr-cl thvii' work bc- 'fore zuulieuces 1-ighleeu timvs. Five progrzmis haw- lx-mi broaclcast, with favorable com- ments bviug 1'vcr:ix'f.-cl from :ill ovvr thc- country. The cluhs have made Iivc trips, :incl thc uxldergrziduzltcs were cnahhid to hc-zu' thc cluhs :it last svvvu timvs. A 274 . . . , . 1933 Local programs included two appearances of the Glee Club at daily assemblies, a Concert on College Night sponsored by the Schenectady Alumni Association, a benefit concert with Mrs. Lucie Bigelow Rosen in the Memorial Chapel, and two performances of the Gilbert and Sullivan Operetta t'Trial by Jury." The Glen Club presented programs in Kingston, l'lLlflSOIl Falls, and one under the auspices of the New York Alumni Association at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in New York City. Thirty members of the Club were chosen to represent Union at the State Inter- collegiate Festival of Music in Rochester. On the night previous, the men presented a concert at Keulca College. No small credit for the success of the clubs should go to Director 'I'idniarsh and to Edward Mates, student leader. Mr. Tidmarsh, by his choice of music, arrangement of programs, and capable conducting, controlled the efforts of the members of the clubs to give a maximum of pleasure to audiences. Edxrard Mates, besides being student leader of the club, conducted part rehearsals, composed choral numbers and orchestra scores, and was the piano soloist. Scheduling the various events was ably arranged by Melvin Myers. Under his man- agership, the Musical Clubs have been run eftieiently and smoothly, and more appearances have been made this year than for several years previous. The music the organizations presented is in keeping with the trend of collegiate choral work. It ranged from religious numbers such as l'laudel's "Trust in the Lord," through Gaul's modernism, "Mirage," to it Spanish love song, "Chalita." Many college songs were sung, and 'I'idmarsh's arrangement of "Home on the Range" was always enthusiastically received. if-H t -111 .1 "f':.e,. M S N XI Ur l Q15 .E I ::::m'mt "Hifi I .. ....... 15:1 'f""fP l I iaarsltllllnttt un.. , lin :zenith A: I' I' " 4 ' if - --.-fzsrflb . f2f':+- ,sl lg Ein .Tn 1 L 2.21 - 1 21.1-..'-'-7 'Y ,li 11 P.-I' 5 -.-QR - -Nr II -I" v W : 4 .1 ' RR! L Tl' f . Q ' ' :EZ in j r- : .V A ff.- .3 Ei 1' EE' A lA '-" N E Choir - - 1932 1 933 MR. E.I..MIiK A. VFIIIMARSH .. ...... Director - 1933 . . I'.1'mwARrm B. NINFES H. W1L1.1AM S1x111'H MEl.v1N B. AIYERS XXVILLIAM H. SPENCER VVALTER A. TLIUREER 1934 CHARLES S. BRIDGMAN LAWRENCE K. DUGAN WILMOT D. GRIFFITH I'fIERLlIZRT F. PIAUSSICR IQ.'XLI'1'I TRUMRULL ERNEST N. BROWN Txmlxms S. BROWN REYNOLD M. CRANE O. H1XltlJlN H.ALL CLEMENS S. 1iA'l'1IAVVAY CARL H. BERGMAN GERALD CROVVE ESMOND W. GIFIVORD JAMES ISUMIEALL F935 1936 ROBERT E. VVELLS VAN VECHTON TRUR ' . JAMES 1'IORAN JOHN C. MOORE 1'R1NcE E. O1.EsoN L. REED TR11111 jox-IN MIRATE RANRINE G. HINMAN FREDERICK IQNAPI' RAYMOND S. NICDOWELL THORNTON VVHm11.E VIIIGII. I. SAGER BYRNE AIAYER W ILM OT PLU M A1 ER CIIARLIES L. REIIB IIIULI 276 H 1 PIZOF. CHARLES 'II RIALIE PROF. TIENRY A. SCI-IALJE VVILLIAM L. BAILEY NIVILLIAII-I L. BAILEY JOHN VV. BONNELL RICIIARD BLANCHARII FRANK G. GIZRINCICI-I EM ME1"I' S. N EXVMAN BENJAMIN A. BROWVN THOMAS B. BROWN JOIAI-N N. DAI.EY M1I.0 NN. EAMES TJANIEL A. GU'I'1'IIIAN RALI-H L. BEACH TVIELVIN T. BORIGI-IT NOEL B. BURROIJGHS CLARENCE CLARK GERALII D. CROWE JOHN B. EMANS BTICHAIZL E. FIORE tXR'1'I-LUR J. FIRTH, JR. VVILLIARI J. FLYNN FLIER . . Union College Band .. Coafh .. Caarlz . ...... . . Leader 1933 JACOB R. SCHAEEER BENJAMIN NN. NVALRI-:R 1934 VVILLIAM D. NEWAIAN HARRISON T. OATAIAN VVILMOT D. GRIIfIfI'I'1-I T935 MAIQCUS I-lORwI'I'z ALEXANDER A. IQOSINSKI ELDON F. TVTATTESON VIIQGII. J. SINGER TI-IORNTON VV. NVIIIIJRLE VVlLL1AM B. VVILSON 1936 NVILLIAM GOFE DUJKNE FEA'1'HERS'1'ONHA IIc:1fI GUY B. GRISVVOLD, JR. GEORGE F. JONES CHARLES S. LOWENSTEIN CHARLES T. MALIE, JR. ROBERT J. MCMANUS DONALD NTUNRO CHARLES L. REID JOSEPH SIEGEI. ALVIN VANVALRENRUIIG 277 'uf ,fully In ,T I I MT MIA: T I IT 'S 1-as 5 LQ X fi J j..5..I ,. g:If:I'f2"1'I 46 ZW T I-T3 iv' 'E:p':"'xJ' - The H A Mountebanks NIGEI. P. AIJTMAN-, XVILLIAM L. IDRAPER Prcsidcnl Bz1.viz1e.f.v Ilfanuger juuus J. SITNEY ....... . . .... ................. S ccrctary XVILLIAM M. PREST ................ ............................... . Stage Managvr H. TENNYSON BALDWIN ........ ..... , -lssisfaazt Szfagv Manager SIDNEY D. MARKMAN . .,....... ..... 1 f'Issisz'a1zt Stage Managvr PROP. IQAYMOND I-11aRR1cK ..... ......................... F acuity z1d'Z'i507' MR. EDWARD L. CARROLL ......... ................................. D irvcfar MR. CODMAN PIISLOP ..................... .....A. , -Issisfzmt Director PROP. ROBERT W. CROWELL ........ .................L..,.........,... T 1'c'a.mrcr MR. 1X'IIL'1'ON M. ENZER ...................,........................................ Graduate Manager 278 AST college year closed with the presentation, at the end of Junior VVe4'l-C, of uiAl'Kl1'OClf'S and the Lionl' hy George Bl'l'1lZi1'4l Shaw. Directed by Jr. jeremy F. Bagster-Collins, starring Sidney Markinan, VValt1-r Hiines and Kenneth King, and with settings by Charles Townsend, thc- play was, on the whole, well received. The exodus of oflieers of the class of IQ32 lelt gaps to be filled in the executive com- mittee of the society. At the animal open meeting held on ,Tune 3rd, the slate of ollieers nominated at the previous executive committee meeting was tendered, voted upon, and passed unanimously. The Mountehanks were sorry to see Mr. Bagstcr-Collins leave us for Columbia, hut were heartf'nr'd by the prospect of having Mr, Codman l-lislop replace him as assistant director in the Fall, The annual College Day production of last Fall comprised two plays and a Glee Cluh concert. "Fame and the Poet", a satirical sketch by Lord Dunsany, and "" The Baker's Dozen", hy "Saki" CH. H. Munroj, were highly landed. The wit and subtle humor in the "Saki" comedy, characteristic indeed, of all the work of the "English O. Henry", were especially well brought out by Nigel Altman and Frank Shields. Angus Brown is deserving of great praise in connection with this play for, on the day before the produc- tion, Alden Stanton was laid low with sudden indisposition, and Brown stepped in, learned the lines, and gave a good performance the following night. "The Man Wlifm XNfouldn't Go to Heaven", hy F. Sladen-Smith, was given For the regular Fall production. As usual, Mr. Edward L. Carroll directed ahly and was in this instance, exceptionally well provided with good material in his actors. Especially line work was done hy James Young, as the atheist of the title, and by Sidney Markman, as the angel Thai-iel. The play, the setting for which was the entrance to heaven, possessed SCENE FROM ANDROCLES AND THE LION 'game Lrg? W74 4 1xi!faS?1?'i'gi , ' l "?1:.fi-si T5 54 2.2943 ,L W - - I .gs- l is is 'B :TEX '55 'H' V n ' A pi " if 4 W r 279 :L -i-xr li-is 72" " 'ang 'i h5..i".Ti1Ji f '4u..-:M-1 l 31-X fl 'll 'tw ,r SEL RQKQI' -,,, .1 in ti- l. f ff X fi- zi mataphysical quality that has not been seen in any plays produced on the M0llHtClJ3!1k'S stage. The symbolism implied by the showing of various types of people who enter heaven and undergo a profound spiritual change is however, a little obscure. Perhaps the play really does illustrate a speculative notion of the hcreafterg more probably it was meant to suggest that a state of mind was attainable wherein man may hnd disinterested compre- hension and spiritual calm. Exactly how it was attainable the play did not indicate. But the audiences praised the society's presentation of a play 'iwith ideas", even though most of those who praised were uncertain as to exactly what the ideas were. The Freshman play included in the Fall production was a French piece translated and directed by Mr. l-lislop and called "MQ Crystal and Mme. Bronze". 'Its full comic possibil- ities were, unfortunately, not realized, a failure resulting, in large measure, from the inexperienee of most of those taking part. The "Bakers Dozen" was the curtain-raiser of the evening, with Alden Stanton taking the part he had to give up so suddenly before College Day. He gave his usual sympathetic characterization, this time of a middle-aged society woman. The Mountebanks had long 'felt the need of good Hats and solid platforms and steps. Before the Fall production therefore, and after careful study of its hnancial situation on the part of the Graduate Manager, Mr. Milton M. Enzer, the Executive Committee decided to purchase a series of platforms, steps and Hats with doors and windows replaceable by jogs. Throekmorton shipped them and they were found to be all that could be desired. lnspired partly by the possibilities this equipment offered for the designing of simplified, SCENE FROM THE MAN VVHO WOULDNT GO TO HEAVEN 280 Appia-like sets, and slightly feeling its intellectual oats after its excursion into the feillm of Sladen-Smiths theological philosophy the Mountehanks decided to present "Hamletl' for the Spring production. Tryouts were held immediately after the Fall production, and the majority of the casting was done satisfactorily before Christmas. Mr. Carroll used great ingenuity in cutting the play, all the Fortinbras scenes being omitted and only the action having directly to do with the central character allowed to remain. Then came the end of the first semester. After the mid-year tumult and shouting had died, a small, silent group of men gathered in the theatre at scheduled rehearsal time-the tattered remnants of the cast that ineligibility had shattered. N1Vith indomitable pluck, however, Director Carroll set to work, poking into the most unlikely places among the students in his search for latent Thespian ahility-and was successful! Thus it came about that on March Ioth, llth, and by insistent demand again on the 13th, that the Mountehanks presented its lirst oifering from the pen of 'VVilliam Shakespeare. For the lirst time in the history of the Mountehanks theatre a play had to he presented for three performances and yet during the three months of rehearsals only a very few en- couraging words were given the "ambitious" Executive Committee and the director. Cold analysis following' the presentation of the tragedy reveals among other things that it "went over bign hecause Director Carroll "edited" the play so that it was "lJuilt,' around the title role even more than Shakespeare intended and that there was a Nigel Altman to give intelligent portrayal of the sensitive intellectual who is too analytical to act promptly, His acting was marked with the restraint of the professional, his diction was of quality rarely achieved hy American college men, and his feeling for the part HAMLET-A HALL IN THE CASTLE 281 is EQ ll 1 K-4 iw , .f'fs.,s J 'W li' in illlia lil 'l I ii ull' I' U y" ,nga . , was rx ' 2 fl 'Ui'-1 gm: I in at xi-,-LJ W ,s,.erf.2tl.'w MI .. .. 5--lflskxjwlgvi .V W 'li m 1 4.51955---151A hi TI-I I9 was expressed with a maturity that earned universal appreciation. Edward Mates acted with restraint and adequacy the part of Claudius, while the role of the Queen was com- petently played hy Alden Stanton. Reed Tripp as Lzertes, Clark Prather as Horatio, joseph Olender as Polonius supported. ln short the Mountehanks achieved a new high standard in its history of play pro- duction by taking advantage of tliese factors: a tine actor, an intelligent director, a Well equipped stage, and high type of audience. The loss of Altman because of graduation in June will be the lcecnest suffered hy the llountehanlcs in its past live years. For their Junior VVeck-end production, the Mountebanks were joined by the Glee Cluh in reviving the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, "Trial By Jury" and the presentation of A. P. l-Ierhert's "Two Gentlemen from Soho", a eomr-dy laid in a modern night-club and with Shakespearean language. Nr. Hislop directed the Herbert piece. Because of the uncertainty with which the "1-lamlet" was being built up following the mid-year ineligihility of some of the leading actors, it was decided against "touring" this season. Offers to exchange plays with Williaiits and with Colgate had been received. In addition to new scenery, the Mountebanks this season renovated and redecorated its ante-room, built a cashier's box, furnished and equipped a combination store-room and dressing room in the old Economies office timmediately north of Hanna Hallj, and purchased much-needed tools for the backstage staff. A project contemplated for next season is the building of a new switchboard which will be easily manipulated for com- plicated lighting arrangements-a feature which has lifted the college production out of the shadows of the usual amateur productions. HAMLET-THE GRAVEYARD SCENE Hamlet: Hath this fellow no feeling of his business, that he sings of gram' making? -. 1 I f5 7q s J- ' ,,.g-s-I' 'll Yah Mia? 4 ix I l fs 'l' 'I F Q97 l.Zs-iQ 282 : i.15-sl Resume of Debating Season, 1932-1933 I 1-ll? history of this organization extends back into the days of Wasliington's adminis- tration when Union tirst came into existence. In I7Q3 the Philomatheran Society was 'founded and three years later the second debating organization, the Adclphic Society, was created. The Adelphic Society was dissolved in IQ3O, and now Philomathean alone exists. In those early days of Union's history the society maintained its own library, many of the original books of which, are now in the Union College Library. The purpose of debating here is not primarily to win debates, but to give as many men as possible an opportunity to develop their forensic ability. As a result there is no permanent varsity debating team. The personnel of the teams which engage in inter- collegiate contests is chosen from among those who participate in practice debates held at the weekly meetings of Philomathean Society. The National Honor Society of Debating- Tau Kappa Alpha-is represented by a chapter at Union. It has been the practice in recent years to make extensive use of the radio in con- ducting home debates. This year seven of the home debates were broadcast by the General Electric Company station, WGY. The teams also made use of out-of-town stations on various trips throughout the year. The interest manifested in the radio debates is evidenced by large numbers of letters received from all over the country. Topics of wide interest such as Capitalism, VVar Debts, Unemployment, and Soviet Russia were debated this year, judges listened to the radio debates in their own homes and cast their ballots directly by phone. This year debating has been under thc active direction of Mr. Samuel M. I-lesson, a graduate of Union and formerly a member of the faculty. Director of Debating, Dr. W. Leon Godshall, has acted in an advisory capacity. An added feature to debating has been engaged in by the Philomathean Society this year. On April 28 and 29 thc hrst annual New York State Dcbaters' Convention on Public Affairs took place at Syracuse University. The purpose of this Convention was to discuss affairs of prevalent interest in New York State. Union was among the fourteen New York State Institutions of learning represented, and discussed the problems of liquor control, State linancial aid for education, reorganization of county government, and un- employment insurance. Eight undergraduates chosen from the members of Philomathean represented Union. At the time of writing, the Union debating team has engaged in eleven ot its twelve contests. Judges' decisions have been taken from the University of Vermont, Lafayette College and Middlebury College, the latter being an encounter which the radio audience was asked to judge, and for which a large number of ballots were cast. The teams have lost tive dcbatcs, to New York State College for Teachers, Boston University, the Syracuse University Women's team, Hamilton College and Hobart College, There have also been no-decision debates with Swarthmore College, Rutgers University, and Williains College. At the present time there remains but one debate on the tcarn's schedule, that with Elmira College for Wonicii. An innovation came to the college this year in the form of an "intramural debaten when, on April 24, representatives of Philomathean Society debated representatives of the Demostheuean Literary Society of Hartwick College as a part of the regular Philomathean meeting. N OO L:-I " - -i?7ii'!2' mmf vm' -...M A i , ,ii ' l ili':i!.lll ,LE J xxzzsiu. ,J E I. '. uiminiiniit - --."I5'I.'92 n J If Wag -SQ- F 0 Lwzka :gf - i :"i -- i l T I-I f 19"iA E I934 Philomathean Debating Society THOMAS J. WAD1c ........ ........... P 1'cs'ide1zt H. TWIILTON CHADDERTON ........ Vice-President JOHN K. LYNCH ............... . . . .... Manager of Debating ROBERT H. SMITH ........................ Sccretaffy-Treasurcz' G. F. HARRIS, Manager N. Y. State .lrzfersclzalasfic Debate League JOSEPH SAIDEL ................... Editor Intmfschalastic Dcbator MEMBERSHIP Bell, Burns, Clmclclertoxm, Clarke, Delles, Harris, Heffernan, LaFlure, Lynch Sorkin, Wade, Burke, Crowley, Schwebel, Smith, Strickland, Ward, Argersinger Diamond, Elwyn, Thomas, WOOlUl3I1, Grcensberg, Kohn, Langer, Lifset, Paulus Plummer. ' 'TWT' ll T 'lil 2 N 'iii 'ill l'1Q..Q.2..l 3- 28 :ess 4 .59 1 vgf f l GARNET The Junior THOMAS T. ACI-IESON .......... DAN11zL F. FLINN, H ......... ALEXANDER M. TURNER ........ IEDWARD T. BARNA DANIEL F. FLINN, mf-officio WILLIAM I. T'TEFFlCRNAN EDWARD M. T'Tlf'I"l'ON Prom Committee C lzairwzan Ex-Officio .S'cc1'ctary NV. GORDON Nmasm TQOl3liR'l' S. OPP15N111z1M L. REED TIRIPP ALEXANDER M. TURNER .n ',"ug1H H, m 'MM MJ bear: fv Af 11 rw uv. V' pfzg,ic4gp1jw5h MW EJ? "I '. 1A 4 :T 'H V - It: li NJ 1 1 Tl-IE 9 The Union College Christian Association OFFICERS VVELD D. SCHOONMAKER ........ .......,...... .... P 1 'csidcnt HENRY P. GULNAC ............... .......... T fire-President VVILLIAM B. IQNODERER ....... ,,.... ....... T 1 'easurm' KENNETH ICNAPP ............. ......... S ecrciary The purpose of the Union College Christian Association is two-foldg first it is an organization for social service to the individual man at college, and secondly to promote better and closer relations between fraternity nien and those com- prising the neutral body. The "Y" which is supported largely by the fund provided in the will of Horace B. Silliinan, Union '46, is a group which has a hne opportunity to do things of actual service for the college and the students. ln the past years the association has been in more or less of a decline but through a plan of a reorganization which is under way it is hoped that within the next year that the Christian Association will become again that body which shall give every student "the opportunity of striving in company with his fellow students to live an active, earnest Christian life." A Schoonmaker, Crulnac, Knoderer, Bloom, lfVest, Brockwehl. VVELD D. SCUOONMAKIER HENRY P. GULNAC VVILLIAM B. KNODERIZR iKENNE'1'H IKNAPP GORDON R. BELL CABINET Knapp, Bell, Clarke, Nitchinan, Stackpole, IQODERICK T. CLARKE DONALD E. NITCI'lBIAN PAUL G. STACKPOLE lldARTIN B. BLOOM iAL'l'ON C. VVEsT W'1LLIAM T. BROCKWELL g ' f QQ! .if 286 7 , 9 1 - - League of Evangelical Students UNION C H A PTER .FRANK Sounuzs . . ....... President CI'l.XRl.IiS l'IlNCIil,IiY . .. ...5'cm'cff11'y Ewixtm HOIil'lNli . ......... Vice-P1'c.vidc1z! Fmsiwzxucic 'l'U1cNi1u1.1. .......... Y'rau.vurer I-'uoiflissole XV.x1e1u2N 'll.XYl.OR ..... .... ..... ..... I 7 4 zrully Adifixor MEMBERS Othucil A. Pvnclh-ton Jr., Dztnii-l 'l'. llill, l-lowztrcl M. Hills, li'i'zuxk :X. Squires, Jr., l:l'l'flCl'lCli Tnrnlnill, Charles Tlionias, Ewald Bot-hne, Clutrles XV. Hinckley, Theoclorc Xwyllllllll. The Lrfagtic ol Evangelical Students is an intvrclvnoiniiiationnl stutlvnt niovt-mi-nt with branches in colh-gi-s, theological St'llll1lZ1l'lPS, :incl Hihlu schools throughout the Unitvcl States. The Ol'!2l1llZ11ll1JIl was founclvcl in 1925 as :t clvtinitv protest against an exclusive emphasis on the liberal lIlll'l'lll'L'lIlll0ll of Christianity among thc' stuclf-nts of Aint-rica in thi- institu- tions of higher learning. Thi- mirposv is to witnvss to the truth of tht- llilmlu and to contcncl earnestly for thi- Christian cloctrinv among thi- stnch-nts. Thi- lmvlivfs of the Li-agua are the 'fundzunvnlztl doctrines oi' thi- Christian church :ts svt 'forth in thi- lloly llihlv. The Union cliztpt:-1' was orgzuiiza-fl in Izniuztry, 1932, :incl since that time has hi-cn un- gztgecl in various livlcls of work. Various tonics of rvligious inte-11-st are announcc-il and fliscussccl from time to time in op:-n forums. Thi- chztpti-1' hats sponsor:-cl sm-vvrztl daily chapel scwvicvs :xt which nrominr-nt pr-rsoiis lmvv spoken. Oni- ol thi- gn-ati'-st activities has liven the sending of cle-pntntions compost-ml of witnessing lUi'l1llJl'I'S to Cl'1ll1'Cllt'S about Schenectady. Klemhursliip in thc- Union clmptvr is olmtztinvcl lmoth through invitation and petition :mil is open to all classes. ,til ' 287 The French Club aga GEORGE HARRIS ........................ DONALD lVlOUL'l'ON ....... IRVINO BUSH ................ BURTON DELACIC ..., GEORGE HARRIS DONALD MOULTON IRVINO Buster XVILLIAM PITILLTRPI VVILLIAM VVHEELER ROBERT VVEILER IJALXVIN NILES IXRTIIUR BTNLEY French Club MEMBERS H ARDIN 'l'lALL ADRIAN ROGERS BURTON DELAC'lC CI-rARLEs REID ARTH UR PLUM MER GUY GRISWOLD l-ROBERT SHREVIC BENJAMIN XN1LsoN Prcsidmt Vice-President Secretary Trcasurm' CiUSTAV RRUNNICR FREDERICK ARNDS IXLDEN STAUNTON GEORGE FLMENDOR1' VANAN'I'Wl5Rl' XVALDROR R UB ERT VV A R N ER Pl-llLll' LITTLIE ATQTH UR FINKIELL in carried out an active program for the year in ful Hlling its purpose of familiarizing its members with French customs, hrstory and language. ln addition to hearing lectures from members of the faculty who have had travels in France, the Club had a Christmas party and a dance in con- junction with the two other modern language clubs. The French Club feel proud of its president who is the only Union College student to be awarded a scholarship to Bordeaux University, France, and is grateful to its faculty advisor, who has constantly been an aid to the club, and always added interest to the meetings. 288 Spanish Club The purpose of the Spanish Club is to provide an opportunity for students taking' Spanish to get in closer touch with the languages, customs, and traditions of Spain and the Latin American countries. It offers Z1 chance for Conversation and discussion outside the class-room. The Club is often host to il speaker who talks on some subject pertinent to the study of Spanish, :Incl Z1 discussion usually follows. The meetings are held every other Tuesday evening' in Sillinian Hall. OFFICERS .AUSTIN Eox ...........,....... ............................,...... GII,ImI:'I' XVooDsIDIz ..... J. OSSA .......................................... ROIIIQIIT LAPE ................................ EDUARDO GORIIZZ-DLTRAN ..................................... MEMBERS ARTIIIIII IQONIICCZKA CIIARLIQS KIIULI, R o I3 If Irr L A PIC CI IA Iu.If:s 1.1-:A Ii I-1 H. LINIJAIBURV Roiaicm' LIQDNIE D. CDIIIQN A. CAPPOLA G. F. DUNCAN AUSTIN Fox EDWARD G. FRANK EDWIN l'lll'I'ClITNS IJ7'CSill1L'l1f Vl'lCC'-P7'C.S'lIfL'7If Scc1'cfary T7'CUI9'IL7'C7' Faculty fldfzwisor RONALD LINDSAY I. D. ilX'lIRATE EDWARD .ll'lINCII, ji. OssA VVILLIAM lQALl. W. F. XVINNI: l 289 I German Club RAYMOND RUSKOXVSKI .....................................,..................... .............. P resident IXLBIERT NIORRISON ........ ................. I f"icc-Prcsidarzt' M oR'ro N ST ENYART .... .....................,.......,.... ...... .S ' acre tary- Treas-1w'c 1' MEMBERS Livingston Ackert Riclmrd .Xllen Robert Bain Gilbert Betts Michael Blase Raymond Budney Nicholas Diltlarco Orel Freedman Charles Goddard Edward Hannon Philip Hussong Louis Karp Xxlillilllll Kline Tillany Lawyer Alznnes McGrane Douglas Marone Albert Morrison Tlioinas Ordway NV alter Paskowslci Irving Rahino John Daly Raymond Ruskowslci Carl Ruthe Eugene Ryon Morton Stewart George Strobel Max Taylor Gilbert Tuck David VVallis john Potocki Morton Yulcnian Under the leadership of Mr. Kurt von Forstmeyer, the German club became very active this year, holding' meetings every other week, and drawing up a new constitution, and reorganizing its meetings. The two most outstanding events of the year's activities were-the very interesting Carnival celebration at the German Turnverein of Schenectady, and illustrated lecture on Berlin, Nurnburg, and the Bavarian Alps given by Mr. von Forstmeyer. The German Club has de- cide to adopt for next year's meetings certain rules and customs of the German fraternity club eveninffs conductinff their prog'r'uns according' to German frat- ernity regulations. ta: 6 sf 'J 290 American Society of Civil Engineers ERNEST CAPEILLE ..... ROBIiR'F KENNEDY , ...... GILBERT HOLLERAN ....... C. BOERNER PROF. HUGI-I ERNEST CAPELLE GERARD CAYE CLARENCE DAXVIES FREDERICK DILL, JR. C. BOERNER JOHN GURRY FREDERICK HONAN CARL BERGMAN OFFICERS MILLER ,....... MEMBERS 1933 RICHARD TEFT' GILBERT PIOLLERAN TI-IDRIAS IQELLY EDXVARD LENDER 1934 Ro R ERT IQEN N EDY T. R. MCILWAINE 1935 ROKTI-LR IQISNDLEHARDT IQENNICTII LARSON 1936 EDWARD COMMOROTA MARICENZIE LUNAN 291 President- I7 ice-Presid 01115 Sccrezfary .......... T7'6'llS1,L7'6'?' Faculty Sfv011s01f ALBERT NIAESS GERALD NIELOFSKY CHARLES SCIIVVENKER JOSEPH REITFORD LOUIS VVILLIA IIS VVILMDT VVILLIAMS ELDON 1X'IAT'l'ESON GERARD NELTNIANN lUU"'-'ll-I-Wg, 'P -' Y, -A J' , I E ri l? lv. " 1 -i f "' l-1 . -'ff .- .. ..'slL'.". '-Z: ' n ec.-9 g Q .. fi.-. ,, ' 1'- yi if 01- 42 gif: E.. : I? k,. .I I E? 35155 F I U E 'E E I i 91 I - ". iii' Y 1-1 - The Hale Club l EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MR. C. N. VVALORON PROFESSOR B. M. MVAINOER SEDGIE GIIFFITH FACULTY MEMBERS PRES. FRANK P. DAY PROF. IMORTON C. STENVART PROE. RAYMOND M. HERIQICIC PROF. JOSEPH D. DOTY PROF BERTR-NND M. XIVAINGER PROE. PHILIP STANLEY PROF. JAMES S. GREEN PROE. FR'EDER1cK L. BRONNER PRUF DWIGH'F VAN AVEIQY PROP XVILLIAM VV. BENNETT PROF. PROF. PROE. HAIQOLD A. LARRAHEE JOHN N. VEDDEll LEONARD C. JONEs MR. C. N. VVALDRON MR, E. L. CARROLL MR P. A. SMITH P ROE PROF. EARL E. CUMMINS VLADINIIR ROIANSKY llflk. D. R. VVEEKS MR. I. A. SANFORD MR. M. M. ENZER STUDENT MEMBERS Altman, Bunker, Connor, Wacllt, Gilletto, Palmer, Nitclnnan, S. Griftith, Emspalc, Hilsop, Burns, VV11SSITl23.I1Sll0l"F, Sitney, Roberts, Trip, G. Cory, I-l. Dixon, Hausser, Sher- wood, Locke, R. H. Smith, Warcl, Markman, Eisvnbud. The Hale Club is a new Organization which was begun during the autumn of 1932 after the old English Club was disbuiirlf-d. The members of the .faculty who had been members of the English Club were invited to join and also the members of the senior class xxho had been elected into the cluh last year were asked to come into the new Hale Club. Most of the faculty 111f'l11lJf5I'S of the former clulm, and all the student 1TlC1'l'llJCl'S along with several new faculty me-n ioinvd the Organization. The club is named in honor of the late Dr. Hale, and the procedure is carried On in Li way which the members think would have pleased Dr. Hale. Some member reads a paper at the monthly meeting, after which other members discuss and criticise the paper. The club has no constitution or other OFFtcial documents. It has two purposes: the fostering of intellectual activity, and the promotion of betterfriendship among the teachers and the students. ii' " if T i 5 x YES" f .Til .le ... h -ff, ' PF- ' if in Ei: 'I rx' I kv fl -e. , .,., '- -'-i--' 1 ' 1 292 stir' - 5 1 N,-:T Y, m., .V xfw' ,,,f" 'gym r r l 1 gi '-: in l' -1 1 .. - i l Q. . i , , , . Chronology ugly faces which desecrate thc preceding pages ne extend the privilege of skipping our unsoplnsticated tale ot the college year. lt is our hope to compile a review in the following pages that will con- tain the news of every significant undergraduate and faculty activity. ln order that no important and interesting event may be left unrecorded we begin where our able predecessors of last year's Garnet have left off- O those dauntless souls who have wallowed through the slough of MARCH, IQ32 .First group of Student Councilmen are elected. "A far-seeing and sacrihcing Terrace Council made possible the immediate formation of a new undergraduate Student Council," declares the Concortliensis. Willianis sent over its "Cap and Bellsf' who gave an enthusiastic pro- duction of "The Dictator" by Richard Harding Davis in the Mounte- banks Theatre. Professor A.. Gordon Dewey petitions Herbert Hoover, with other economists, to bring economic pressure to bear upon japan if she con- tinues l1er advance into Chinese territory. President Day becomes a full fiedged American citizen and delivers the address of welcome to his fellow neophytes living in this vicinity. Union Glee Club misses by 2.1 to retain its state championship. This is the closest that a second place winner has come to winning in the his- tory of the state glee club festivals. The Constitution Committee of the Student Council receives a letter of thanks for its splendid work, Those patted on the back are VVillian1 Harryman, james Foote, Grover Hotaling, Frederick Wyatt, Charles Townsend and Philip Banker. Friedrich Schorr, Metropolitan Baritone, is presented by Mrs. Walter C. Baker for the benefit of the Student Loan Fund. Over 51,000 is realized from the large audience that heard this fine artist. The Studio Players, an experimental dramatic group of students sub- sidized by the Mountebanks but independent in their choice of plays and method of presentation, is formed by D-Cady Herrick, Il, president of the Mountebanks. They present Galsworthy's "The Little Man" and a parody "Head Over Heels Over Europe" on the fourth anniversary of the opening of the Mountebanks Theatre when it celebrated the paying off of the debt of 35,000 to the college trustees. Union choses two valedictorians for the first time. Louis Di Carlo, arts, and Herman M. Frazier, electrical engineer, are only a fraction of a point apart in their averages, so the faculty does the gracious thing. APRIL, 1932 Williaiii Aydelotte, former national indoor singles and doubles cham- pion is selected as varsity tennis coach, without salary. Union's doubles team of Higgins and Hotaling wins state inter-collegiate title. Union Glee Club selected to take part in special broadcast to Central and South American states in celebration of Pan-American Day. Students try a "passive resistance" campaign against compulsory chapel. The results: "chapel" becomes "assembly"g speakers from the faculty and vicinity are brought in frequently. 293 l lx-'N L' Il VJ xl 'l 7 MAY, 1932 freshmen given privilege of voting in Student Body Meetings. Aca- demic students given the chance to major in sciences. Prize Day is started on the campus. Dr. Larrabee calls it the "in- tellectual block 'U' dinner". An oil portrait of Chester A. Arthur, '48, President of the- United States, by Ernest L, Ipsen, is unveiled during the ceremonies. lt is the gift of Elihu Root and other friends of the 21st President. Most awards usually given at Commencement are distributed. Noble Sissle and his band play at Prom. . The Mountebanks present t'Androcles and the Lion" under the direc- tion ot jeremey F. Bagster-Collins, new instructor in English. President Day is kidnappedg the suspects include Dean "Scarface" lillery, "Groucho Marx" Lippitt, and Gandhi- according to the green inked Concordiensis. JUNE, IQ32 A Kappa Alpha wins the cup for the best singing at the annual Spring Night festivities. . Seniors vote Phi Beta Kappa and Senior Class president as the two highest honors. The lconoclast, an independent literary annual, makes its appearance. The editors are Louis Di Carlo, Milton Lifset, and Philip Banker. It contains no Fiction! Essays and editorials stress the importance of "sub- ject mattern over "form." Sir Francis James lfVylie, longtime permanent secretary of the Rhodes Trust, delivers the Honorary Chancellor's Address at Commencement. AUGUST? sEPr151uBER, IQ32 The newspapers throughout the United States carry news that our own Dr. Edward Everett Hale has dropped dead in front of South Col- lege as he was walking home from the Public Library. Special memorial service is held after college opens. Dr Barnes retires as Secretary of the college after 33 years in that post He dexotes himself entuely to running the Modern Language de partment The Cixil and Electrical engineering departments are merged into the Department of Engineering under Dean Berg Phi Sigma kappa wins Final leg on Berg Scholarship Cup Dean Berg offers another cup Idol fights hangoxers trom the frontier tradition result almost in ciul war only three sophomores turn out against the freshmen who amuse themselves by painting themselvcs red OCTGBER 193 Hal VV1ttner announces that the Athletic Department has made a surplus of more than 33 ooo for 1932 Il phenomenal achievement College Joins with city s school sy stem in giving an extension fresh man course in high school for credit Union thus becomes co ed in a sense for mostly girls sign up for the course The Student Council does avxay with Frosh Peerade The Student Service Bureau is organized by M M Enzer Solici tation and distribution of periodicals laundry service etc 1S handled by 294 1 bureau under the management of Henry Gulnac, '34, and Douglas Smith, 34- "Concordiensis" conducts poll among students on Presidential Elec- tion. Faculty speakers present platforms of three parties: Professor Cummins, Socialist, Professor VVainger, Democrat, and Professor Vlfold, Republican. Students vote: Hoover 424, Roosevelt 1323 Thomas QIQ others 9. Amherst, Wesleyan and VVilliams exhibit similar lack of cere- bral fortitude. Walter Lippmann is named the IQ33 Honorary Chancellor. The Car- negie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching includes Union in the list of colleges to which it will send an accomplished artist to stimu- late appreciation of music. Samuel Chotzinoff Hrst lecturer. NOVEMBER, IQ32 Students vote to suspend Sophomore Soiree indefinitely. Varsity football team after losing to Wfesleyan and Amherst, defeats Hobart, R.P.1., NVilliams, Rochester, and Hamilton. l1Vhile Seabury and his aides Cincluding james Finegan, 'ozj are giv- ing Jimmy Walker a good dose of shoe leather in New York, the Stu- dent Council takes notice and throws out a phoney election. Rumor per- sists that ,34 is involved. Graduate Council votes to allocate its unrestricted funds to the Stu- dent Loan Fund. , Mr. Harrison C. Cohiu turns Silliman l-lall into a second-hand book- store under auspices of Faculty VVo1nan's Club. Money given to Student Loan Fund. Spencer Lecturers announced: Dr. Julius Curtius, former foreign minister of Germany, C. Hartley Grattan, author, and John R. Allardyce Nicoll, English historian of the drama and now head of the Yale dra- matic school. DECEMBER, 1932 President Day announces his "Eight year plan" for Union College. Colonel Miller resigns as professor of civil engineering effective after a year's leave of absence next June. james M. Gowcnlock, '75, dies in England, Leaves gifts to Union College and Delta Upsilon, and to members of his class. JANUARY, 1933 Professor Sayre is chosen to represent U. S. on international study commission for elasticity. Professor E. S. C. Smith reappointed 'for a third time to the division oi geology of the National Research Council. The Student Publications Board donates S300 to the College Library. Following Mr. Grattan's lecture on the James family, a symposium takes place the following morning. A goodly crowd hears some excellent papers, including one on the connection of the James .family with Union College by Codman lrlislop, '31. The Faculty liberalizes the sophomore A.B. curriculum by allowing students more freedom in choice of those subjects in which they may wish to major as upperclassmen. FEBRUARY, 1933 Student Council seeks to abolish Interfraternity Council. Students 295 out-vote Council despite exhortations to the contrary by ohicers of the lnterfraternity Council. Conscientious assistant manager of swimming measures the pool, stag- gers team with the announcement that the tub is eleven inches too long. Tough on the present record holders. Student Council votes to curtail the freshman sports. Student Body supports move, but retains frosh football. Need for college inlirmary is stressed by Dr. Clowe. Student Council proposes to use portion of present activities tax for the maintenance of an inlirmary to be provided by the college. Dr. Day undergoes serious operation. Recovery is slow. Plans con- valescence in Florida. A new Student Publications ofhce is planned for Silliman Hall. Oflice is furnished with model equipment. Upper Silliman Hall now also houses College News Bureau, and Student Service Bureau. Connecticut names its new state highway for Eliphalet Nott, and grants piece of land upon which to erect a tablet in honor of Union's great president. MARCH, 1933 Phi Beta Kappa opens gates wide, admits thirteen students Csix more than last yearj, and initiates hear splendid address hy Edward L. Carroll, '27. Sigma Xi not to be outdone elects twelve students and Five faculty members to membership, three of its student neophytes, however, have been previously tapped by Phi Beta Kappa. Andy Kerr, Colgate football coach, addresses 260 at sixth annual Block "U" dinner in gym. Required Sophomore gym is abolished. Mountebanks plan to present jointly with Glee Club a revival of the operetta "Trial by Jury" and A. P. Herbert's "Two Gentlemen from Soho" during Prom week-end. George Harris, '33, wins foreign exchange fellowship to study in France with full expenses. Also heads Union delegation to Middle At- lantic Colleges Model League Assembly and brings back cup for best per- formance. Ozzie Nelson and his band is engaged to play at Prom. APRIL, 1933 Psi Upsilon plans to hold centennial celebration on Union Campus in the Fall and is breaking ground upon which to build an 58,000 me- morial ta "Seat of stone"j by the Hagpole, facing the library in honor of its founders here. Announcement is made that Fred VVyatt has been chosen for the All- American lacrosse team with Bill Norris as alternate. Banks are closed. Beer Hows legally. Dean Garis declares that Union College has only one rule regarding conduct of students: they must behave like gentlemen. He refuses to make rules for the new beer. Bill Hardman resigns as basketball coach after twenty years here. Students present him with gold watch. Worcl comes that the YVellesley girls have voted Union men second best college type in the East. Many are wondering how to interpret this rating. Neutrals stir into life, plan a banquet. This review would hardly be complete without reminding you, dear reader, about the times you crashed the columns of Union's own dear VValter VVinehels: Tobey, Tee Pee, and Mahatma Gandhi,-dear old snoopers-these-yowsah l IIN' B.'Y "Boxer" HJ, Irv: 296 GARNET Quality Family Laundry INCORPORATED We Specialize in STUDENT BUNDLES 'QQ-f Phone: 28209 1658 LAKE BLVD. SMART CLOTHES Clothing, Shoes, Hats, Haberdashery Catering to the Discriminaling Taste of the College Man. 1897 1933 Always at Your Service With one of the most complete plants of its kind RINDFLEISCH CLEANERS-DYERS PHONE 4-3161 STEEFEL BROTHERS Office Plant STATE STREET ALBANY, N.Y. 116 JAY ST- 1801 UNION ST- COAST TO COAST-CITY TO CITY DELUXE MOTOR COACHES PLEASURE, CONVENIENCE, SAFETY and ECONOMY G. A. WELCOME SL SON 1711 Union Street Call for Estimate Phone 4-9444 FRIEDMAN 8: CO., Inc. Symbolic for nearly a half century of all that is choicest in M E A T S CENTER AT LIBERTY STREET 297 Comlbliments of A FRIEND v.V.g:ZFSE 9 fn- Lfmila jnlvel U JZ 5 -'v 1' T5?1,iJ . ' E 'll '1 4.1: fam. Sax 1-: I 9 '24 F 1-1 gd." . 5 .Wa r ,J J 'nu' 7-Tl :ij A yn. l IM. ' ll., A . l1' . ' 4 iii-ggg: ' -jllll A I ..-- -'U TI-IE I934 ' 1? ful.. ln N W YORK UNION COLLEGE HEADQUARTERS ARE AT 0 HOTEL MCALPI "The Centre 0 Convenience" Broadway at 34th Street YOU will find a courtesy and friendliness at the McAlpin that indicates the spirit of service which prevails at this fine hotel. Large, comfortable rooms with bath, the most conven- ient of locations and a deference to your slight- est Wish. As for ecomony, the McAlpin offers, dollar for dollar, the greatest hotel value in New York. On your next Visit, it will be our pleasure---and yours too---to welcome you to "Union College Headquarters" in New York. Room rates start at 53.00 sLl'5O 55.00 per day per day per day Single Double twin-bedded When may We expect you? JOHN VJOELFLE, Manager. wwll.:lZ2f3g r'rT'f' ' ,H : ' i f at -x ff Nl-.m'a ""' lT 1' 4 K T, I -! if F1 5 5'- 298 GAARNET Compliments of LEO BRANCHE 3 SO. PEARL STREET ALBANY, N. Y. TERRACE INN 24 NOTT TERRACE "Tremblay's " Meals or Lunches at all Hours SCHOOL SUPPLIES CIGARETTES CANDY VINICIUS MEN'S SHOP FEATURING FASHION PARK CLOTHES MALLORY HATS MANHATTAN SHIRTS ARROW SHIRTS FOWNES GLOVES NOW LOCATED ON STATE STREET NEAR CLINTON SCHENECTADY, N.Y TI-IE ACME BARBER SHOP 509 UNION STREET EIGHT OPERATORS NEAR THE CAMPUS MANICURE WHILE YOU WAIT Compliments of Geo. W. Herath "BLUE COAL" The Color Guarantees the quality LAWN SEED, FERTILIZER, FLOUR, GRAIN Winne Sz McKain Co. 624-631 PEEK STREET SCHENECTADY, N.Y. PHONE 4-3176 FRANK FERRARO Fruit ami Produce -.,.r Wa1ker's Pharmacy sos STATE STREET Opposite Savings Bank 5 Il:-warn: rv xo xo -I 0 1' A L1 sl Q CD 'TI '1 0 0 U 0 i E. 2 '4 - ...-.... .EPMI '1 . ,..., "-- Q :::::..'u1.um,rw ,531 ,.-...ia ilkll ..lLfl.lz- E I: 'gg I' -'I' " 4 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW' -1-.-455: . .4 My Tl-IE l934 Repairs! , painting! Schenectady s D r' I . ecora mg Leading Clark Sz Whiteman, lnc. . Print General Contractors and Builders "Quality and Beauty are ,DJ the outstanding features 'J of our Work." The 44 HAMPTON AVE. PHONE Gazette Press BOULEVARD PHARMACY JAMES W. WALLACE Pharmacist 1101 PARKWOOD BOULEVARD SCHENECTADY, N. Y. COMPLIMENTS OF JOSEPH NUSBAUM'S GOOD CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN r19"?v2s.' 447 STATE STREET SCHENECTADY, N. Y. Alling Rubber Co. Bellinger Tennis Baseball Golf Fishing Tackle Automobile SUPPHCS The Place to Buy Your Raincoats D Paint, Floor Wax, Glass, etc. 254 STATE STREET Phone 4-3403 126 Broadway Schenectady, N.Y ' il 4' 1 : ...-1.1 v ,ev -:sian . K V 300 'l-lQ...L.. :-. I3 GARNET The Booth Studio 65? Oflieial Photographer for Union College 1932-53 "The Home of Fine Plzotogmphsn 243 STATE STREET SCHENECTADY, N.Y. qk?I:3,'y,',"gW'jwwf S L emwpfw 'Alf 301 5.:1'4.?i!5fTJjX',. 4+ - . Tl-IE I934 Tlaerelf zz Preference for JERSEY ICE CREAM AMONG ' Beta Theta Pi Complzmenrf of Delta Chi Delta Phi Delta Upsilon Theta Delta Chi Kappa Alpha Phi Gamma Delta Phi Delta Theta Phi Sigma Kappa Sigma Chi Sigma Phi COLONIAL ICE PHONE 4-9106 Complimenff of nz F R I E N D In Qifpprecmfiofi fwf the patronage qt the FRATERNITIES J M. GAFFERS COAL CO., Inc. Q , SCHENECTADY, N. Y 5- .HX :.4'.1V 4 B 1? 'X TYIDUQ ' ' if 211 PARK PLACE 5 . E ,Y - I -7,l I' i l 302 .mm -lr 'X 'W r i. 2 GARNET Clark Witbeck Co. WHOLESALE and RETAIL HARDWARE STRIVE 503320133 SEZZQSZE There is also a financial "Degree" Worth striving for: It is expressed in numbers instead of Letters and it represents in Ss and cts. your Degree of SUCCESS in Life One Dollar opens a Savings Account and DETERMINATION helps Snu-nrt and Distinctive JEWELRY it to grown for Fratcrnity Bien and TVomcn of discrimimltion Put your .l'IlZ'i7Zg.f in a Savingx Bank Send for Your Capv of flze 1933 BALFOUR BLUE BOOK containing H116 gift suggestions or BALFOUR PARTY PLAN CATALOG featuring party motifs and favors L.G. Balfour Company ATTLEBOR0 MASSACHUSETTS THE SCHENECTADY SAVINGS BANK where Clinton Crosses State ESTABLISHED IN '71 H O L T Z M A N N ' S SC.HENECTADY'S LARGEST CLOTHIERS Sole Agenff for Clothes Society Brand Nettleton Shoes Hickey-Freeman Co. Dobbs Hats Adler-Rochester Mark Cross Gloves Main Oflice: 318-320 State Street The Schenectady Trust Company Member Federal Reserve System Member Clearing House Association Bran yvvme Branch Mt. Pleasant Branch In n 'fr' gy' I 1050 State St. 439 cfm St. ,,i gtifwia'-ft SAQ' 1 969 fi". 'si d . :2t'!QlW7ff,55i 1755 v f Le- .4 -- ' 303 1 its - Tl-IE I934 Peckham CO When you need ANYTHING from ' the Drug Store if BRANDHoRsT's MILL WORK To DETAIL is a good place to come to Nott Street Phone 4-3371 "On the Corner" Union St. and Gillespie Where Youfre Greeted By Folks From Home Hotel Lexington is the New York Rendezvous of Central New Yorkers. It's unusually convenient from the Grand Central Station. 853 and up for one person, S4 and up for two Restaurant prices are economical too. HOTEL LEXINGTON LEXINGTON AVE. AT 48th ST. CHARLES E. ROCHESTER, General Manager cF0l'7l7t'l'b'1Uifb VH11CHl'!tf, SINCE Hotel Van Curler 1833 Complete FIt7'7Zi.l'h6'7"J' Headquarters for Union Students to and Alumni SMARTLY DRESSED UN1oN MEN Ffzcilitief for LARGE. AND SMALL BANQUETS H. S. CG. HAROLD O. KINIBALL, Mmmcgiazkg Dirxtor SCheuCCfady,S G-fegfggt Srjgre l I 'msg -fn-I N , 1X ,t-. 4 XS mmm mmmm LESLIE, SEMPLE SL GARRISON, Inc. 1 l Q ' ' ,Q ' 1 Q, - Q " 5 , .Siocml and Cammertml Ellgfd vent i t i l? . . 1 " Q71 ' - lm lwll 'X rlli Commencement Invitations, Announce- ments, Letterheads I I I MP3 Q ' ikiiligl I' I m l til in to i f I IV "' 'T . THE TUCK SHOP Fraternity Stationery Social Stationery 722 Eastern Ave' 315 Lafayette St. Schenectady, N. Y. Sunday Dinne Ser ed fr 12 to 8 'S V Om Phone 411502 BREAKFAST-LUNCH-DINNER Mx' 'V illilii' ii. ,J 304 Z .GARNAET Schenectady Art Press GOOD PRINTING Prifzterf of Carzcoffsiiemif for Z5 Yearxf Buell Sz MacDonald College Publications and Fraternity Printing a Specialty Complete Home Fznfnirbenr 431 Franklin Street., between Jay and Center Phone 4-3816 J. I-l. COMO, Prop. O 663 St. Regis Pharmacy CHARLES R. CAREY 131-133 Broadway Q Q SCHENECTADY, N' Y' six HUNDRED UNION STREET DINING - DANCING GA Y if Schenecnzclff Intilfzfzfe Rerzriegwzar U CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS GULL I PARK LAUNDRY STUDENTS WORK A SPECIALTY 27 JAY STREET - - PHONE 4-9011 THE WALLACE CO. "Always Reliable" SCHENECTADY, N.Y. Most people find they almost never save by buying the sort of things to be had at lower prices than the Wallace Store offers Wallace Merchmzdire if ALWAYS qf jim' grade-fm Jrcand: or impeqferf merclafmdixe For House Linen Service Call For Coats, Aprons 8: Towels Call ACME HOUSE LINEN SUPPLY AMERICAN COAT 8: APRON - aiggygigggggseg co., INC. SUPPLY oo., INC. l "' f3 i V-d!.A4l7f5"5 1 , 1 gvgfgiggf-' 1 Phone 4-9310 Phone 4-3166 ily!" 'fjxj 2. -1' , li 305 .V fuse ffetie U ION UNIVERSITY UNION COLLEGE The College offers the following courses: 1. COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE or A.B. 2. COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE or B.S. IN CE. OR EE. 3. COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.S. IN CHEMISTRY 4. COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.S. IN PHYSICS 5. COURSES LEADING TO GRADUATE DEGREE For mmlargue or other mformaztian, nrldffefr SECRETARY UNION COLLEGE SCHENECTADY, N. Y. Ye"-23? I l....!.J 'JI Au 2 -.1-f girl' LPG! .. -- P' . .jlf1"..j' , 'qw A I . A- 141'-15'-1 f"' -0 Q34-:S Me, - ill! - 'v "!.n"- I I iaiia V. Il! 'I iiQii3E5:"' ' 2357 Under Supervision of United States Government 31676 Interest Paid on TIME DEPOSITS Any Amount TELEPHONE 4-4111 The Union National Bank Schenectady, N. Y. 306 GARNET Defifgning nnd Encgmvinfg In The gnzfner of 1934 By The Canton Eunfgmvinfg if Elecfffozyfpe Co. , Canton, 01920 . 307 Wu my gfw 'Wm gli-X., I, A van' . bank ...Ji-ri? ' ' if A.-1' .fx 'S I? ig 'F U5 V1 If WL fat! If " "IA Ni-5' 9 -' " PRINTING AND ITTSBURGI-I RINTING CoMPANY 530 FERNANDO STREET, PITTSBURGH, PENNA. Printers ol: Publications, Catalogs Clllustrated and in colorsj School Annuals ancl Com merclal One Faculty Adviser "As to your service and workmanship on our book, writes: we are certainly pleased, for the inserts and border, as Well as the other color sections, are quite up to our expectations, while the printing is done in an excellent manner." Another Appreciatecl "I hesitated until now to write our commendation oi Missive: the exquisite book you produced lor us. Ir has won wide acclaim from the student-faculty bodies, and several newspapers from this end of the State have gone into great detail pointing out its merit. We are proud oi our 1932 'Pioneer'." WE PARTICULARLY INVITE CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE PRINTING OF YOUR "ANNUAL". 0 0 MAY WE GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE ? 1 '-"mt-"' 1 sock aimprmcs A NET Autographs N520 , Q2 309 ' 3 lu 0 .. ...,f 1 . ,1'3"f M 1 Sraaff' ' -f'3'T::'12:- '25-: W .: .Z .7 --- E ,Q 'v-.:95,l'5, f I .-ll uh A. fl 17' 5 , K' 'P 53 .l ' -, 71 Ei ffffi :4 ,'I 2 v-: Enzg . : ' 2 U S 5 - llli- Q--ig-1-. 1 N 1: v'+l1.'.l?'f22-4 'r L L Q 1: w V 3 ..' 2 HTHE I9 Autographs A520 310 ARN ET Autographs N520 311 'Wx RW I WU Ll Erbs It 'Y mr Wf"' I' " ,I lwbhx, 1 N4 .l J., 11' ' I. , !kRgffQ.fl.,' i"" Qt I: '..:.'51f.. x r' bfi: 5' -5- sg 53 f?f.fr1i9'.':'b:' - -" 'lf ,ff-gr .r-' ,Ll '-1 1. q A-"' ,N "f bo ,,1'fi'2, "La,-i " 'Q 14 ' 411' 2 'E '.., ' 51,51 r f gtjrrqavihq L' A y'f?'- ""n .fl ag., 4 1' 'I ' I .,:' ! I, 5 M ln.. 'ef , f .. N ' ...mi l 111 j, ,. iiiaaee: '15---1 JZ Tl-IE : I9 Autographs N526 312 W XX X X X X X X X X XX X XX X X X X XX X X ' X X 'X X . Xl X X X X X X X . X, X . 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