US Navy Recruit Training Command - Keel Yearbook (Great Lakes, IL)

 - Class of 1971

Page 1 of 88

 

US Navy Recruit Training Command - Keel Yearbook (Great Lakes, IL) online yearbook collection, 1971 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 88 of the 1971 volume:

l P w an-in 4 3 2 K v Q 1 i T ?iz 5l 1 I1 pagans-an-u-4 fum-4 I 'E un' anmva xkadidid-Abd 'fc wma ,Q ' " '. 4 4 ,Q 1 ,wif A ,A ,r rf: jg: af fr ,f I X TheKEEL iz QW , H X . X - -if' -64,5 ,::'T?,:.4..s sn, 4 5 ,,,. M5 'nag ' '5 1 .1 l I , 1 . fl Qs.-., r 1 I t 3 X Gradw 595011 flfllli l 'S -6 I i ,. 4 f ,. f If 1 J i ul 1. . if ' V. UM' Headquarters- Recruit Training Command SMNXN Graduation Practice on RTC Grinder New Galley NAVY CREDO GUARDIAN OF OUR COUNTRY The United States Navy is responsible for main- taining control of the sea and is a ready force on water at home and overseas, capable of strong ac- tion to preserve the peace or of instant offensive action to win in war. lt is upon the maintenance of this control that our country's glorious future depends. The United States Navy exists to make it so. 1 WE SERVE WITH HONOR Tradition, valor, and victory are the Navy's heritage from the past. To these may be added ded- ication, discipline, and vigilance as the watchwords of the present and future. At home or on distant stations we serve with pride, confident in the respect of our country, our shipmates, and our families. Our responsibilities sober us, our adversities strengthen us. - Service to God and Country is our special priv- ilege. We serve with honor. THE FUTURE OF THE NAVY The Navy will always employ new weapons, new techniques, and greater power to protect and defend the United States on the sea, under the sea, and in the air. Now and in the future, control of the sea gives the United States her greatest advantage for the maintenance of peace and for victory in war. Mobility, surprise, dispersal, and offensive power are the keynotes to the new Navy. The roots of the Navy lie in a strong belief in the future, in continued dedication to our tasks, and in reflection on our heritage from the past. Never have our opportunities and our responsibilities been greater. . - 2 1 : ,rfe-J. fr at e..9'-'F 1 Camp Barry Galley Old RTC Headquarters F ii! 'I ' i fi-.Iialyfgl " , ' ,ff2l,'?4 - H g.fTe+'f'T 43' . , Q an , fe L: sg w 4' . 4 .- l ,cost T." f'z': . t W .",..- ', fx- ,L-. .. .- 45-,'rN, .. - . - ' Ju- 4 x. I X f 4 , - ... al s -4 , , 1-. ' ,I ..14Tx 4 A .11!1""c E 'ql Recruit Barracks !.' J ' l -4 l L i -A A , - d' ' . ! -Ar - " 1 ' ' . ,,,,..., 's '2' W4 5- 1 . V" - isoe- xi , v'- A' . wir.. XX' 5 K :' avi, 51 'in I xtx u 'f ...xg in IING png ' iiggziwfa-g5, ..y, ,.ng.g:-1 a.,41v.q. - . , 1:V,kv,m,,mHh, QSM., 1 ,xv ly-ggnq ,, h l, ,A V . ,:- M .,,.. 5 ',.,.- fc - I- -. N, A ., Q' -L11 Q -' " H ,M,-,M-W M -1 Ag, vs? .. 4 W1 fl " " -W www-wx,-Mnf K -MT? '71 , ,wgww -'1ig2r2f:Q,:'.f1-1" Zvi "1 -"-' N . .. ' A:.,.i......u '....f1- av .Q3,iwwl,.. , V, R K of VBW, Q, .135 . 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X 04,0 1 Q XX 47 lf XSS ZZ f X Q Tpa ln C0019 J QT LAKES, IL!-is f 1 xXXXxsS' f ff- X f I 'ii I' lik 121 j 5x 5 ' Tl ', MISSIGN The Mission of Recruit Training Command is to provide a Training program which will: -effect a smooth transition from civilian to Navy life -foster patriotic behavior -affirm thedignity of theindividual -encourage high standards of personal responsibil- ity, conduct, manners, and morals -create a desire for self-improvement and advancement -provide the recruit with knowledge and skills which are basic to all naval personnel -develop pride in unit and the Navy and a desire to observe appropriate naval customs, ceremonies, and traditions -provide the Department of the Navy with personnel possessing an effective level of physical fitness GREAT LAKES Great Lakes was commissioned as a Naval Training Station on 1 July 1911, received its first trainee two days later, and was officially dedicated by President William Howard Taft on that first recruit's graduation day, 28 October 1911. The mission of recruit training at Great Lakes has varied little since its early days, but the facil- ities and the techniques have changed significantly over the years at Great Lakes to meet constantly changing needs. The original thirty-nine building complex pro- vided facilities for 600 recruits undergoing sixteen weeks of training. More than 125,000 World War l sailors began service in the Navy at Great Lakes. Emergency build-ups brought the number of buildings to 775 with a capacity of 50,000 men on a twelve-week training schedule. Depression years saw Great Lakes at a stand- still, but World War ll saw a rapid expansion pro- gram to relieve strained facilities. A growth to almost 1,000 buildings was able to handle a peak on- board count of 67,000 recruits as Great Lakes trained almost 1,000,000 men for the fleet. At one point, the demand for more men was so great that the training curriculum was a highly-accelerated three weeks. The normal post-war recruit population has been 10,000 with significant increases during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Women for the regular Navy trained at Great Lakes from 1948 to 1957, taking a ten-week WAVE training course. Two-week and nine-week ready reserves have taken basic training at Great Lakes since 1950. The staff under normal conditions is made up of fifty officers and 650 enlisted personnel to train 60,000 recruits annually. T110 t1'110 1110a11i11g of discipline is 1101 punish- n1011t 19111 that d0u0l0p1110111' of s0lf control and I'Clll?1lL'0l'li 10111011 0111112105 111011 to strive for per- f0cti011 aizdrlcconzplislzgr0at110ss. .Q ,J ' In Ji 5.1- 'fm '.:, i ,RJ S B. NGVBI li? first Edtcayed 1at first If Lakes he facil- Ificanily flST6H1Iy IQX pm. SIXTESII 5 began Brgency s to 715 veweek I stand- ion pm lwth to eak on- trained r point, hat the d three an has ng ihe ' GFEBT WAVE 5 have ade UP 0 train uh' and ff' ,xx ri" P51391 Xisefv ,Nm 1, .. 5.12 fx Q I ...A,., ff - 'nfs , x -QW! 1 x f Qfmx ,My ,.,, ,K :gm Xl 72 , ,:,.,i2f" """' '31""" ' ' " . f' x . KJ ' 4 X x f V ,Ai ' W X all FIRST LOCK GREAT LAKES R -von " ub- 1,1 w,,,,4,,f..f"' y '4 The TFBUSITIOV1 from civiiiah To Navy life begins ai the Receiv ing Division. Here The recruits receive haircufs, medical ahd deri- Tal checks, immuhizafioh shots, and uniforms. "Recruits-Proceed with Caution" Camp Barry Gate iQ YARD ON RiGiI-iii' About To Come Aboard i 5 .. ,i , , , .. 'b 'w2""W:7 ,fmt nw1g,gaw'!i..axmo1fT-'-""-""W" k 'A FY z"""C':,q J Qi, ' N . R 'bl A ff' ,f . .u Www NW' :xi X K X H ., N l N W " l wid I Ns - qw 1 if wx' WN 1 WM X x pw . ev QM! X X . X 1 ,.,4.,,5, N 7- ik x The-Great Equal Y 4, f 1 A ' f 1 1 '7u'I" X 'T lv' -as up., xfli l ,Q-QQ it.-6.-.V - dl .11 iv P54 f VW' 7 4. W N Manu- 'M . ,.... . gfqg Q . . xQgig5XjL . P .xx x,..., , .Diff i'Lt.t ....,- Q 'Sf J . Lux, X x XX Q X figs 'VTX i wi N N x x xg A A4 wr w I v x Vi X. Y I lil Out A ,F xg: A4 AK... M Z , W Receiving Chit Books Forming Up A ' 1 A y ' a A ' .A - t ' VY "W 'iii 1Z5""',VS5'i- fy 3" fi ii! 5,1153 lu .4 A, - 3 'E A A A ,, ' , , vw iss . 1 AVS A .. AM , W3 " y ,F wg Aff.. f, 1,59 fs' an l I ,gxih x fl A A 1 -. V 1. Q"'X,., ' f f y, A3511 . A' X .' ,, ,A ' , -j ,A A 3 if A " A W-1, M ' A " 1A 7 'ff' A 'YNY ' 'iff'W"'f 'is' 1? ' lk 't - A ' - A ' f is . 'A A A A A il Q mwah, f A ss A may . A 11. I icy 4 "ffm" - A 1 A y, nj" ,, ,Q ' I' ' 3' ,A Q, A ,-rg-,, - f . A ' -, -1 A - 'N A . r , x A . A' gA- " "1 g'gr,A? 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A' i Y Apii ' fi 'A A MWF' , fi A-'I f, ' I if 'Q ,f "A ,fa 2- ' gif' f -' A 'Q -,Ai'f'fLJ ' N- - 'IL 'Ei :IG :ft xg ' fb 'r w ' aaK'Affiiif" At. -M-. '12 fi :ra . es-i" if ' 1 . tif B in . A , , .x , V-- ,A A ,..-A E - ,..A.,y 'CAAQJ1 ,gl ENN iii: A s 25, Q if sf- ASQ :-A Q ' A Y,.4 uw A - if A A- JA i .Afi .:'f A --'1 ' 'df 32 'Wi 'EH' L., ' "A T- f Q fifi X ,I .I 1 Af ...R Ac, i Aj ' , ,A A . 6 A ' Anim 1 ,J ' A I 'ii-1-si gpm-dL,4c ,A WWWXQASI -,Am',"7?sT"'S'f J A, KIM. A, AML, 0-ASH ww 41654. A ' '- T A WWW W M 'Hgvw--,,2"vf,,,, 'H-....w.. VZ Wiki., my Ag, Receiving Ditty Bags Preparing Stencil Kits , ,AAAA A-ft' LIFE AT CAMP BARRY '3:5"-N ,, A !',-.,M.. -4, 2' " -:A 'A' ' ' A 'V I f X A, ww- A Q., N57 I ,,..,,A. X. A , - - A A, 'f ,IMA ,ff ' ,, M M ., W , . As, f sz, -sv, Z us, ,, I , A T, ' 'f ,aa ' 4, rf ss 5 Mp . I AA A, WR V I X sg, 5 " ..AA,,QgsA, W ' A, V in M. .W , -, , aww, , M It ,, ,, V1-M ss ,N " : A " A 'f u :',,. f WW' ' ' - V M-M ' Q V AL fy M' i . J M A . A "' , A A, ' ,L A, - .gf , I A, s ,AA ,, g nf 'N' em, Sv ' Explaining Blood Test DGHTGI X-RSV K Wm. 'W-M., 'ar Q! - Es k V' ,4 f Q -A ig, f ' ,Q Blood Sample ul TI 7 of 4.14- , , ,,. .,,,,., ,, ,V .,,, V ,.,.,!, , IWW., , . .,, , I, n V n I ' M ,Xu . ,gf . N 1 A M: QM ,Q f 4 , .. If I fx ' W kh,,,z V 1 ?s.',j , 1 . Vi' fi!! rv? ., ., f .-57 Vw. X . , .wg- 5, -N 5 5 CG 1 x '2 LL Q. . If F 4444. 'N x R4 3.52 M-haw "' K Ni ' x., XY A Lx' .JA -Mm. m......:.4.-.- .,,,,....n..gw.s.N..w . . ,. X ' - - 9 Games Telephones ...,,......,.,... M. , 4, Friendly Compehhon AT The CompIeTion of processing, The men are formed inTo companies, assigned a company com- mander, and begin The primary phase of Their Train- ing aTTer moving To Their nevv "home" aT RecrUiT Training Command. D, Company Commander Picks RPOC . 'Jr' f X J ' x ..4 rg. N J li-,.-Lv 1' 1 Forming Up To Leave Camp Barry Leaving Camp Barry EnTering RTC Through Tunnel . -Ai V Loading Bags 'T ll., :5?'?1svf"' LJ!! E iRPOc ng Bags THE COMPANY COMMAN DE R. . . . is an outstanding chief or first class petty officer who has been selected as part of the corps of company com- manders at Great Lakes. Prior to "pick- ing up" his first company, he has been trained in techniques of instruction, principles of leadership, and admin- istrative procedures in schools at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, both at Service School Command and at Recruit Training Command. The company commander instructs his recruits how to keep themselves, their clothing, their equipment, and their living quarters in a smart and ship- shape manner while he leads them in military and physical drill so that they gain military proficiency and physical stamina. He also helps them to ex- ercise increasing amounts of individual and group responsibility as they grow in the qualities of self-discipline nec- essary to carry out the exacting routines of life as men of the United States Navy. The company commander is gen- uinely interested in the needs, welfare, and problems of the recruits he com- mands. He must be formal yet friendly so that though he is fully and firmly in control, the recruits do not have to hesitate to approach him for his as- sistance with their problems or for his referral to the appropriate member of the Navy's professional corps: The chaplain, the medical officer, or the legal officer. The company commander, most of all, is an inspiring example of the suc- cessful Navyman upon whom the recruits can pattern their own lives as sailors and as citizens. BARRACKS LIFE One of the more important lessons the recruit learns during boot camp is how to live with others in a military organization. Life and living conditions in the Navy differ so greatly from anything he has known in civilian life that learning to live in close quarters as a member of a military group becomes a maior function of recruit training. The barracks is not only a place to sleep and to stow clothes, but it is the most important class- room. Here, the recruit learns by doing. The scrub- bing of clothes, the cleaning of the barracks, and the constant inspections all serve but one purpose- to prepare him for a successful life during his tour in the Navy. Quarter Deck BRT l Stowing Rifles NS Posting the Watch General Orders ot the Day General Orders ofa Sentry 19 BARRACKS LIFE 1 'nilln ,Q '1 Xi Pmdmg rr- Ironing ...L..,.f. Sfovving X, Us 1 SpiT8. Polish digg 4 Y' Washing Stenciling Out Dryin ry---ffa Drying Room gi f Y 'Q T Washroom Compartment Field Day -gp-1 fw- , I Gear Locker Nite Siudy MaiICaII Letter Time Smoke8. Coke BARRACKS LIFE All is noi work in the barracks, for The recruit learns the need of fellowship and relaxation. Mail call is one of his mos? precious moments, and The Time he Takes To write home is Time well spent. INSPECTICDN Mornlng Worknng Party Uv , 'TQ t A. .W A Inspection of the Watch Inspection of the Compartment r d,...! -ef-'W' X , W1 JW f Proper Sfowing Locker Inspection Proper Folding 25 F1115 - ..... I1 -tual . I,-., I1 V If ,,, W W, Kd. 17" ' wx S Inspecting Uniform ' ,E l l l lniforifl INSPECTION Inspecting Rifle Holding Position Polished Brass 7, Ir1SpeCTir1g "T" Shiri 27 S5 US h-UPS Crawling Monkey Bars Six-Foo? Wall 5 il Tire Line Cargo Net ow I I I I I E va F! I I I I I I I I I , 4 I I Parade Rest MILITARY DRILL He will probably never carry a rifle after he leaves boot camp, but much of a recruit sailor's time is spent learning the fundamentals of military drill, the manual of arms, marching, and physical drill under arms. To stress the essential value of military drill, battalion, regimental, and brigade Drill Flags are awarded on a competitive basis among recruit com- panies. This gives the recruit a tangible incentive to progress from an unsure boot to part of a precise military unit by learning the importance of instanta- neous response to orders and the absolute necessity of teamwork with his shipmates. From military drill, then, the recruit learns the Navy's plan of operation in peace or war: knowl- edgeable, coordinated, and immediate action. Present Arms Rifle Drill Present Colors X R -5 E 1 1 1 X Ov Y rl ti: N W 1 we-it Y 5..Q1A Nxiaxrgxwxi: Sv l. Q E4 , - Q X r x . 'Q' LE L15 .15 if : F ' ' f ' r my as 2 A . 5 1 if 92 EE 52 "1-'W gap REENTAT 0 N ORIENTATION The salute is symbolic of the tradi- tions and customs of the Navy. This is but one discipline learned by the recruit Q "FH ,I as part of his physical and mental orienta- tion, to help him develop pride in his personal conduct and military manner. He becomes more aware ot his role of a sailor-citizen and of the Navy's role as part of the government of the United States. Drug Awareness 5'-S J fa.-.ap fmxt fs 1 w.. 4 as' 6.1 1 H if J' J' 4 5.1. . Defensive Driving 2 f if 8 X 5 111,- is , ,, Ii! Classitif, M, H l l l l f - X 1 4 N urxdnuun'usw M 4. A A as A 3 is nf sy v yr P l .. Identification Cards - l i Classification Interview X'-M iq, x V Www.. 'v i X I Dog Tags Finger Prints CLASSIFICATICN The Classification Division considers the recruit's potential, as demonstrated by testing, occupational experience, and education. Combined with the desires the recruit ex- presses during a personal interview, this information is used to recommend a iob class- ification, which is submitted for approval to the Chief of Naval Personnel. Approxi- mately two weeks prior to completing train- ing, the recruit is advised of his individual classification. n l 'f"'X"'v:-s- - Q "sf ww In TV CLASSES Closed circuit Television allovvs one instructor and one cameraman to reach up to 2400 recruits at one time, This has proven to be the most efficient and effective method of presenting many sub- iects, such as First Aid, History, Ord- nance, and many other video-taped areas ofstudy. K 'fins- QI K y- gd If is 'WA TV Classroom On the Air" ,-. i 4 X, 5fi,.,c Q V 5,3 S -' ff! K lf K' . ' F .aff ...- Y, - . f sm X l .gulf Wm lg xa A. Al? 'J Q i , 'W 5 I. Y A -ANN, .Q,4 MW.-..,Af:, . ...,., . ,. - ,...,,, . .- fv--NX- ., L' in ' ' ' ,f j5'l'f' ' ',1.Lf'1 . X ,-, f rw-4 f- , ,V .,. . V 0 ,Y v... . ' ' "ww , - 1, . ', ' W. ' . . 31" if . mi ,Q ffl? f M- , ., 4 ., - - ,, , , Lp, -, . Wm , , fs- Q?-0-.H - .Vw 'ef ,, f , .qwkgigs f W '- ' , 1 b Y- n.: I. IQ F -' ' 'QQ' ' ,,Mm ' 2?-fa-if ,'-' 2 '45 - ' vi i Y. K x . I if- N . '-11521 , "' - ' ' ,, '- '25 -4 -Gif! ' .FU - - ' I ,. 7 H- 'lf ' f " , - 'J' -. . 'led i - - A 4-N 1a1"6' ' M 5- .,13? 3. ' ' ff: 'L Q, ' T A A '- V -. M11 ' ,, S 1 . " . , go , I , . k ' K ' -wa 4 ,, V , , ., ,bu u' '-af N ,rv .-,Q ' V A .. T M M.- MM - - V! . A , .Aki Q , .' W"' FY ' - ,- VV ,- zqgg, . M- ., ,Q , . .513 , K F ww. N., NJ vs' "iff ' ,. ::,K.,f,. eu W A, ' I W if an , ' , if , ,, . .4 H " ii f - , HW . 'ul sm I N 'Q ,g-Q-an M fi, Q. ,. ,A n Wm my 1 9 H, . A Az ' A Q-.V '- T' M . , , 'F -M- 2 Q - ,A Y , V V 3 AN , ,. I :Hur L 3:5 35.15F Xi? 15 X3 , lf: ' W' J' Mi -2 fl - V gif! fx if' 4 12 :ii 1 w "V 1 ' sr- . I F ., , ,,,L1.f.,g,.--1..k,L .--.U -3 , U..-.af -:J.f....,.,1... i-r.A3-Jlinli0kgni--.-eAn'.f1N6A-1Ai-.:-2,iilQ.QL-Zig:XA-,. .Lx.f.f.L.s.,1.f.mu..h..r. .-,-,,,m -. . -1-T. -1 -' Q',Mni.i:-. ,,-cz' ' WATER SAFETY A skill which is vital and basic to every sailor is svvimming. All recruits spend many hours in Water SurvivalTraining Tankslun- officially, swimming poolsl. Some are taught to svvimg all are urged to learn to swim better. Particular em- phasis is placed on "abandon ship"procedures and surviv- alflotation. Lifesaving Hold i 'jp' 'l ' L, N-.- f x J 5 i 1 x -I1 i-ff, .. , ' i 4 I - - '.-, """hr i ' " V "7,f:,69f'.1f+ -- pts ' - W. 1 f 4 -:::.f.:1"""-It -- ' is Q- ..., W 1, gy. U- A ' E' 1 Qi" - -W L- - f -. P-fr' .. 'i -ag .: i i f-'Q A- .. iL - i 1 ..-A - 1 g .n.."'i'f.L'2.-V L ,Z,L:.,... -hifi-T-N ff- A- . , l ., ' 141 Q -ig -'xv I 4 . K h ,:. ' A: Q, aff- in .. , , A fbi' lv?" . - L , 3 . 4 Lugz I -i'-mg 4 L M, at-Him, 29 , A V A md' V '- "'i'e.. V., ML' V - ,gulf -M .- if iw:U - , A A -'J J . ". l'gif'l "ir 37 NA ' 1.25 r 5' -'Tim ffl-W3 'V N, gy' ' A ' A i . .3'i'Q . 1 ' -5 if ' " " - ,,.?T ,W A 1' J Ez.,-Q. - , I ., f rifgufwtf if Q12 t' r. A 'L '-' Q ' ' . ,,,, T, at., I A 4 M VM ' Q J f rv: A " V, . 'Q ii " , '- U ,Liu 5 A .i ' f H i- L , t li 4 A l s L ,, ' ' Z a V '-. ff ,ff 4-fwwq, 'V ,,,,,, '55, A' . 'law , L. , .f?5""f3f'iv ' "Q" W- A 38 Lifeguard Leap Tower LGBD l,.i-ZQ 9. 1 f-.. WW 9 LV Huff ORDNANCE AND GUNNERY The Ordnance and Gunnery Division in- structs recruits in naval armament, ordnance safety precautions, ammunition handling, and the use of small arms. Safety precautions are especially stressed. All recruits are given live firing practice using the .22 caliber Moss- berg rifle and the .22 caliber Ace pistol, mounted on a .45 caliber frame. Recruits do not fire the high-powered Ml rifle since such powerful weaponry cannot be fired indoors. However, they do receive instruction in handling and field-stripping this rifle as well as the .45 pistol. Instructors demonstrate firing the .45 caliber pistol. During televised classroom periods, the men are taught the operation and maintenance of the submachine gun, the Browning Automatic Rifle CBAR7, .38 caliber pistol, and other ord- nance encountered in the fleet. Recruits Live-Fire Indoors XM-.Q-an 'QM . - W -H ' , vw , mwfifgxi 3-Ha, fs Miffliniiif MGWSE s E A M A N s H I P and The Tools of The sea l 'W' -, LFE ' I. Q Anchoring XXAVJ- x CA P9 Navy Compass The Hatch Steering s 'X f e Q XX ,xv f""q -wld' f The K notboa rd .Eg V7 Z ky 3,5 ilawai SEM?-f sfwyw K zgf, X Ui' wx '48, , N DAMAGE CONTRGI. AND FIREFIGHTINC5 The mission of the Damage Control Training Division is to acquaint each recruit with the basic principles of extinguishing shipboard fires and con- trolling any storm or battle damage which his fight- ing unitmay sustain. Damage control training is accomplished both in the classroom and in structures designed to sim- ulate a naval warship. Controlled oil fires are ig- nited in the "ships" and it is the task of the dam- age control team to actually enter the structure and extinguish the flames. All such training is con- ducted only under the strict supervision of a trained and experienced petty officer. Instruction is also given on self-protection against nuclear, biological and chemical warfare. As part of this training, each recruit puts on a gas mask and passes through a chamber filled with a harmless but obnoxious gas. While in the chamber he removes his gas mask briefly for a dramatic demonstration of the protection it provides. Confidence is instilled in the recruit as a re- sult,of the damage control and firefighting instruc- tion. Armed with training and the knowledge that shipboard fires can be extinguished and damage corrected, the Navyman may save many lives and keep his fighting unit afloat should disaster strike. Open Oil Fire 3 ? f' 5 1 r F F I P K Q 4 A i Q E sf ' Ax, hw' W l , 4 1 i :--. ""' :Ugly "Ja: 'K ' "'if1""'f?ft what--4 w ,, ' '- ,- USN Trying on Gas Mask X Demonstrating Gas Mask Individual Instruction A ff, i 1 N si --Q....,,,W. i If " -. .iw-'Fwy rwmwx A Xe, f f ff' W K, I. 5 , , PM? l G -is eff J , J -12-.1 1' f' fi-- i F A, -.1 ii i 'x i x 2' . -'f e, .. it hi: ,' - 4 ' rw . .uf-13, i" f '- , Y. A ' ' -1 K. r 14.55 F, ,, V I ,rrglatf-- 7 , V r V - ,. '- ' i . T, ' - "ff " V , . , , V , Y Q! Q ba 5 1, ,g .. f ' "4 ' - G, iw ' - ' ,, ,r.,:f A , , . A . A s ra A gf ' n V' f WI x :F pet? Q ,. '41 Q ' I ' i IA kwin . I", 'sv 1 j 1 2 e Q in G1 -If K 5 3. . ., .Q -. -is SHIP'S VVGRK TRAHNING :'..',:' 'fo' r 1- A. iff ' ' 4 Service Week-the iifin week of Train- ingfis devoted To insiruefion and praeiifnl experience in siiipfs Work Training. Galley Chow Line x Xa X20 my 'T' .li 'X , E ,Q I , . Food Preparation Scullery an N fa. 1 fjw 4 V 4 , '5 41- , , -- 'ww- Xl- 1 ' - .Q '- ',g,-- Hrs: , .u,,f, A ,gi "4 -- u. ll-'l' I. 'ka' Wi' .' ,. A .1' ' Q I ,hh 'n.w, A I, I r ' V, Nl' , " -' -Mix ffU1"91frs4v . r Guard Mail Work Sentry Duty SI-lIP'S WORK TRAINING Though mosi recruiis assist in The messing of The crew, others perform housekeeping chores, vvaich sianding, and messengerduiies. Striking the Time gt-uv' ,... jf-:'g"t E1 F'-4'f"'Y' Awww' , , r- in sv Smut, 'is' ' .,,,Q, gf- ,, K idkwif , UQ , 0' ' ,rw 9,1 95215. .ffl viifq fx ww N., ,,., ,H , ,fi Wm A, -ffl, ,V ' ",,, 731 'Y ,ws 5 X? RECRUIT RECREATION Of the various forms of recreation avail- able, the two most important to the recruits are probably liberty lusually granted two weeks before graduationl and visitors. Navy Exchange operates cafeterias and stores to provide snacks and necessities. The profits from the Exchange provide Special Services with funds to operate bowling alleys, TV lounges, swimming pools, libraries, rec- reation centers, and movie theaters for off- duty enioyment. The Weekend Watch Must Stay Behind C.. .vm-r '. 3: ' , "1f,?35e 5:2441- - he :Jia , "fZ"V'.T1f.' 31' 4. . vi K "Pc Freedom Chit X ..4n""d , .ff-ll .aaa ,nt JY ""--..,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Visitors Are a Welcome Sight Special Services Bowling Alley Recruit Recreation Center ASMO'S lAssignment Memorandum Orders? Because of the closeness he feels to his fellow recruits, it is difficult for a recruit to "lose his company." Though he might be HASMO-ed" for violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice or breaking of command regulations, it is more likely that a recruit is re-assigned to a later- formed company because of failed tests or a need for remedial reading work. Or, he might be hos- pitalized due to illness or an accident. It is not easy for a recruit to leave his friends in his orig- inal companyg but it is a mark of maturity when he can make new friends in another company and work with them to attain that ultimate goal of graduation to thefleet. Sick Call May End Up in "ASMO" "ASMO" Processing Center RY lOl,7 x a60llRS 0500-lO,iO .. 13004500 Dlil 9 Gs cas? ANYTIME w X s 'ss-L 'X a L .,,. -Q t B ...Mx x .K N six n s Q! x hx vain. as . N , 9 xnxx fc r Q - 'B ut gf - ,Q get its ' A ,.: r . , xx RECRUIT TRAINING COMMAND NAVAL TRAINING CENTER GREAT LAKES, ILLINOIS AIN WALLACE L TALBOT JR Naval Training Center IOMMANDER L, A. HAMILTON rxecutive Officer Recruit Training Command CAPTAIN F. M. SYMONS Commanding Officer Recruit Training Command LT. COMMANDER ERNEST W. BRYANT Military Training Officer Recruit Training Command 57 1 Q REGIMENTAL COMMANDER LTJG E. M. Paulsen USN BATTALION COMMANDER RDCM C. J. Fecht USN BATTALION ADJUDENT RDC L. Zeoli USN BATTALION MASTER-AT MM 1 C. D. Johnston USN COMMENCED TRAINING CGMPLETED TRAINING 13 September 1971 19 November 1971 2nd Regiment 21st Bottoluon -ARMS if ..,..N..,, M HM- -.,1.m.1.m-s.m,f......Ls.ssM..sw.laf,.,ifl.2.,s.a-y,. Adams, Boy Aubuschon, Harold Avis, Steven Bachmann, John Baldwin, Mark Bambino, Rudolph Banks, Gary Barnes, Walter Best, Howard Birdsell, Gary Bradish, Kevin Brunelle, James Bughman, Harry Cain, John Chandler, Gordon Cilinski, Frank Clem, Donald Couther, Martin Darguzas, Frank Davis, Jerry Diottaviano, John Dean, John Distaso, Patrick Eifert, Robert Floress, Donald Ganicky, Paul Gerlach, William Gilliam, Glenn Gonzales, Joseph Hartmann, Kenneth Hayes, Steve Hedrick, James' ,N f ,s X. Mgwwweswnmmswmwsasewwtmmawss Helm, Kurt Hickman, Aloysius Hobbs, Edward Hutchings, Richard Kapp, Robert Kirk, Steven Korbal, Martin Kuhr, Dennis Lamberson, Jeffrey Long, Dennis Lyles, William Malia, Dennis lVlcCarron, Thomas Nlclvlaster, Bruce Miller, Benjamin Miller, James Mitchell, Gary Mixen, Russell Mola, Thomas Moudry, William Nealis, Tobey Palmieri, Andrew Palermo, Salvatore Pala, Joseph Pedersen, John Price, Ronald Rimmer, Richard Seibert, Thomas in ik 'us 2, 12.9 fl ii wtf ci' w--0 TQ f""? H ,Qi I A V6 4 nfl 1---'C xV??iff ,F rw .N df ,VL 1 1 , 1' 1 ,ii-W it W'- gps0 W, Mm swf QW av-"' sts. tw f 3S Simon, Robert Spinelli, Joseph Swift, Preston Varble, Thomas Waddell, Thomas Wooding, Douglas Batchelor, Steven French, Michael Westrich, John Ayuso, David Lipscomb, Harry Laurie, Michael Wingenbach, Dale McCullough, J. L. Spillman, K. Dutton, Robert Nlohs, William Taylor, Roger Chique, Ricardo Krauze, lmants GRADUATION The graduation review is the climax of Training for the recruits. Under the leadership of fellow recruits, the graduates display their newly learned abilities in military drill and military bearing in the Navy's traditional pomp and ceremony, not only to the reviewing officials but also to relatives and friends who are ableto attend. The special recruit units-the States' Flags Com- pany, the Drum and Bugle Corps, the Drill Team, and the Blueiackets Choir, composed of and com- manded by only recruits in training-help to create a vivid and exciting picture that will last in the recruit's memory for the rest of his lite. Flags Won by Company ,,--" - ..- . ' v , 1 ,MN - ..-1 .,,,.. V ' S Em- 'si fL'Eg"'fS Q' !f:.:fQhfa:.19mEE2 W- -rw Nm- "W- jgwnar 1.-rv, .uh x ..-QM ow hm .wif Yi -W, "w m u - WE' N-.Ss ' '- ed- X,-xgg5551gi, W wpmr pu ll i' - F-in 9: l . 'HQAZR -1 - . u1mQ,Q,'.'f i 'QW I5 K 'Q 4' ' . 1- 1 " "' ' ' ' -rn -1' , 4' L u' Qui, QA, . 195' lu- 1 Marching To Graduarion K '. l J . ' l ji' 9 L, ,xmflf -ln! Readyfor Outdoor Review Forward-March" at F X, , 1 :,, f . mg -iff' , w, 'YJZ 1 r fir Q: 4' fr Q ...aff -4-5 Formed Up for Indoor Review ,-SEQ ,J gm fi if ', . 159f'gK Jw 4 'L f r ' x ,Jr ,, fb ' 5 .j ,gan-aww! gr' ,av-'CLI' r . rn , 4 "Bugler-Sound Assembly" Formed Up BH ' 4 ' 1 Dressing Up S Q x 1 X 1 ,xi-2 , w- '4B Qss if 1 N-,xNx . Recrui1's View i --.i Q Presentatnon of Brigade ' fr, 5 Y 1 Feb 0 4 B ,' Ei . . 'Q rx- .59 VfL'...L. 'f 0 , , . ,Z I 3 M' FQ a " ' ut' MA 0 ' V 5' ., P ' 15" S '2 1 'vig 1 W' V' Q f X 2 , t 1' - A . , "Oom-pa-pan" Band Takes a Breather 1 t g ' fgt Ii in Y 3l'! n- '-""""l"'tls. X 'fe "Sound Ott' by Naval Traunung Center Band 'National Anthem" Sung by Blueiacket Choir Blueiackets Present Navy Hymn .1 4, ' f.- mdk t t L' iv' 15? , A it X ' We Q , x, Q Y V, f .P at N J 1 H J , "T-zi."433 B- if ,-nn 'fly Q , 9, Honoring Company Commanderofiheweek ,4- J Physical Drill Under Arms Commanding Officer Taking Salute Reviewing Officer's Inspection Refl P T ' 1 - L I ' i Hi- - '3- T.. d', iia. -5 Q B "I "ig ', 2 -Lil- eclions Physical Drill Under Arms 4 445555 -I It x New tif a Ie I - Q w If I I mi: I I fqfxixvt it . ' I U ' "' ' I ,I 'is ffl Ig -is I 9 II 3, 1 'F' 3 fha: 1 I 2 I fl I I t I I I I I I I G I I I I I 1 Qlleen Anne Salute Drill Team Performs Single Circle Salute Recruit Special Unit Drill Team Exhibition CReverse Queen Anne Salute? 'Elm' Recruit Special Unit States' Flags Company At Ease Presentation of Colors Q-we i I .l-.Lim COMPETITIVE FLAGS 'A' FLAG llefti-Athletic superiority in team and individual events is recognized by the weekly presentation of an "A" Flag to the company within each battalion which achieves the most points. 'C' FLAG lrighti-The purpose of this flag is to foster citizenship and encourage participation in extracurricular and pa- triotic activities. Companies earn points each week for membership in regimental choirs, attendance at savings bond and allotments classes, and taking part in the command's public affairs program. 'S' FLAGS-The Battalion "S" Flag lleftl is awarded weekly to the company in each battalion scoring the highest on scholastic examinations. The Brigade "S" Flag lrightl goes to the recruit company with the highest score among all the companies intraining. STAR FLAGS-Star Flags are awarded weekly in the field of cleanliness as deter- mined by barracks, locker, and personnel inspections conducted by a staff unit known as "Brigade Inspectors." The Battalion Star Flag lletti is for the winning company in each battaliong the Regimental Star Flag lcenteri for the winning company among Battalion Star Flag winnersg and the Bri- gade Star Flag for the company in recruit training compiling the highest overall average. Bmoxx of 3 ' f""'-qw. www 55TID.1-'rw-mm, ., . l' i' .- , it T lf ' l lf? T T if . T lg? , lg if . V. 3 . Q "T V 51 will I 'Wt ' A ' it . f in- ,, ,M ff , - ' 9 Wil? :- my V xmlxy-iw Y"lti, ,Q 5 , Q, l if fi if it . it l it , - il My 1' if . A lgltfi ' i .,, in-lg ' ' ' , if T :SK if - g g, - f . i.,,f-Q f l 'ov v-1 , V i if Q TW n 1 ,Y I 'X LZ' A, i ' , 1 Q V. 'lx fly it , me A .. lui: . 5 T M f T 3 .T K Q -. ,T , M tQ',ffX' fit? . IV fi ,QM N, T , '24, A it f 1' , - ' T T- wfyfffit- - ww:- Y , - -, f ,pf " Q if , ' ' ffiehiil' -fl 1' ,ii'V'Jl ' 1 ',,-13, .ffl . -11:34 J c 'M gf" If V Y . - , -N' " -- . ,f i"":z':,m:4:.ix.3i-xr an-sxmnw4:'.frm.H-Efmw ,- . .W M-0 A um-admit -i ' W' DRILL FLAGS-Teamwork by recruits is rewarded weekly with Drill Flags for pro- ficiency in close order drill, the manual of arms, and physical drill under arms. The Battalion Drill Flag Cleftl is won by the company in each battalion compiling the highest average in competition, the Regimental Drill Flag lcenterl by the company scoring highest in competition among Battalion Flag winners, and the Brigade Drill Flag irightl by the com- pany in recruit training demonstrating the greatest proficiency. 'E' FLAGS-"E" Flags Calso known as "Efficiency Flags" or "Rooster Flags"l are the symbols for overall excellence in a given week of training. Each com- pany in a battalion has the opportunity of winning the weekly Battalion "E" Flag lleftlf the company with the highest score in a regiment also wins the Regimental Efficiency Flag Ccenterl, and the company with the highest score in recruit training wins the Brigade "Rooster" Flag irightl. QOYOR www -F COLOR coMPANv FLAG-This flag is earned by me M recruit company attaining the highest overall average among the group of companies with which it will graduate. The company that earns the distinction of being Color x Company at its graduation also receives the honor of A I "Posting the Colors" at the graduation review. additional flags. HALL OF FAME FLAG-This flag represents supreme achievement in recruit training. A trophy accompanies this rarely-achieved flag, and the company which wins it is enshrined in the Recruit Training Command Hall of Fame. To receive this flag a company must win three "E"iFlags, five Drill Flags, five Star Flags two S Flags, one "A" Flag, plus a combination of any four : . ,hifi 'Pv- 1 1 dt: ar ' 1:1-: . IA V 11, F m s V r 5 5 LQ ls Y K K 5 . J , , . , . .. . ' - V . . W- . . '. AS. ww -, KW . fy 7 ' 1 sf, ' I F ,. . wi P' 4 I l r V l Q F I , 1 ,B 'Fil ':'55NQ? Q , .,l 31 3 - 1 YE g if X' ' ' wif ff. Y Mx l , , l I I , s ..-4-,.f-.:14qw,..,-f.4.f,.h,-.fc ,1::,.,. 75,5635-w,fxga::-A-f -f-ef-ffrqyvfi C .qv,n q-nggzrg-vi2g.e.f4-,+A qw+.-3,v-gqgyn-.,-c11an.f,gss:-4.-'wg-1 2,-,'-.:f.nx,r vw-'fx-1.-v4-wr -M 1-- ' ' ' ' -' ' A '. , - ' - . .,1, JIT.:-L, ' ' f 6, -.. , - .. , 1.1. , ,, , ...,41:,.:---J-A. f' 1-1.-1-ff --A-iff :J-.apr-'-""',-iir ' .1 , -f-,:Q.1A-1..,..:.....- 1.-f.w..u " pfsa,-s5v..m'- f'r'..' '- '--ff f-2:3--, - L'-4-s:..f - ' 'vn- ' ' 3 ' . , 3 . -- qw , , '-.- 3-.. Y, - ,.-,.A-'-, ...fp--, my -4 --- , Y.,.--,-, -. - A ' 1 w . - V -,L V: .- ., .--. -A ,-1 -X .41 ,R :,.,:gl.,',-Hi., 'Z yrs.--2 .-,- I -V .- x.. , -. 7 V- it - . , .. - - - , I ., fy .- -- , al, 'k 12. ' - 4 ,:.-'Lg 'K ' , V 1 Q ' -. , ' . Q ' , ' , V 1 f. .- "'7Qw3A-,A - 1: if -. " '-',1,--lgyilfuv i-fijf, ' 11 -fi-:igffa '.f:,.f. 5rfL1'f"'-Q-EA jr .' E - 1 f 6,5- -- ,Qj .l-,713 r "Lv ,,1. .- .."11- A , , V-4: ,..: -', 5--:" Lg' , ' 3 ,' 'llvvfijj 'Till' ' ..Q',,.-Cf, "Q1"I1r"lQ1:5-"' 1.1, -- 1. . ' J ., .ffl U- f----f -. - f - -.,g .,,.--1 , , - - --A M., ,' Ii flak , v- .,.. 4 - V - t f-v w, .--g-- - :f-- 'f -q..--- - H U ia- S S in Final Recruit Pay A Wake-Up io Go Airline Tickets Can Be Confusing fa.-1 W - STB!! l. 11 FINAL DAYS K 4, Q .4 ., fi 'QA ' W5 Qvcfer 1 . Q ,V H. ' r , . , ' K Q ,, 1 1 I r 'Q .. .., 1 " ' ' 7' 'f !',-J 25:7 12.311 1 ' - -" ' 'zum an ' 9 - l 'N-.-+.r"F.. + ff ,, ,, V 1 ,, .U A ,K I g"o!- 1, I ',-'09, ' 'X ' ' .5 ., r ' I 0 Ol. 1:1 q.u f - A U 3' M -1 ' A .' k , My "7 - , .wyx-i . " M 0 - ' ' ' ' --5, L 4 i r-4 -Q Q. 0- 'rs r 0 J- 9' " 9 -"N"- X--.., "- I 1-" " -wa., f -f.,, .0 .- --l.::jT.,, a. . ' . an , ,uw-uw il' V 1---' - 1 -. 1 ..4 r- Y- , 1 :S ' ' ' Q V 'sih 3 z '. , ""' af' , of ff S ' ' X . f !" in O 1 I . 1 ' 4 0 0 - ' -"" W , 0 . .r, ,M 9 .4 1 1 P K v, .. Ll if P 1 , 1 A .


Suggestions in the US Navy Recruit Training Command - Keel Yearbook (Great Lakes, IL) collection:

US Navy Recruit Training Command - Keel Yearbook (Great Lakes, IL) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

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US Navy Recruit Training Command - Keel Yearbook (Great Lakes, IL) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

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US Navy Recruit Training Command - Keel Yearbook (Great Lakes, IL) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 1

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US Navy Recruit Training Command - Keel Yearbook (Great Lakes, IL) online yearbook collection, 1976 Edition, Page 1

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