US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA)

 - Class of 1961

Page 1 of 104

 

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1961 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1961 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1961 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1961 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 104 of the 1961 volume:

v 5 .1 The Publisher wishes to acknowledge the fine cooperation received from all per-5 sonnel while compiling material for thiss publication. S S it Ei Additional credit is hereby given to the U. S. Naval Training Center, San Diego, California, for the use of certain Navy photographs. 3 Jostens Military Publications islproud to 1 have had the honor of producing this if book. We hope you are pleased with it '1 and we know you will prize it more ' pl highly with the passing years. 7 PUBLISHER S STAFF Charles C George. . . Supervisor PHOTOGRAPHERS Wllllaln H Bonsack Carl O Hansen SECRETARY Lynn Burke NIILITARY PL BLIC ATIOWS 966 B Exchange Park Dxllls 3: Tex is '1 9' . ' i . . . ... .. I a . . ' if - 1 g , . I 4 1 1. 1 ' N ' -, . 1 zz. 4, iz, ,I 2 ,.1. -1 ...Ct-1 x- - ,,.. . ,.w .,.e- ' 1 . ". ' -" :V- 1357 ' W ' 11fr:':w:' 11' 4-X1 .' , wff, 3,5 1'-'.:f?Lfi,f' .1'1'v 7 ' f ' "a- 1 X 'X X3 ,,....c, 1-. . -.I . ,n t.'A,,,7.,v... - in R -- . .Tiw-:.'-., I -- 1. 1 . 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V, H! YU, 1. :Q uf.. as -A 1 ' ' .1 - -1'f,E'?f1:'1f51f-','k.. 1. , 3' 'fx 1 51--, ' '-.'-M5-'::i"' 5' ' ' L Tig-Q". ' f ' . J- L ' 1 -' -51 ,Zi ',2 X - . - 1 :iw 3' 1'-' . .ft-Lf' - 1 'F 'nf'f'fq ::"3 Q' ' ' - Kgrq' 4. ., 1 1... 1 ' -- in 3 - 1.5.1 . ' 21 11. ff :' ' I gm .1-1-5'-1, L, . . ':.:Z"' 3-I1 3-2, ' " F . fn :- , . . A,:l'g?R 1 '3'-. . ,,. 1 354. - ll 1 .. 4. w 1 X Ns' - .V 1- -+1 X ' lil - ' A-.vs--2' .- . .AQ - :, H F .:. 524. , T., f ixw... I ..M. 1 . 1 X 1 11 - -11 1 1 --ar 1 .1 3 u ,Jw ,,..ff-"""""" llll9"" ,, .A .D if 'Q fu an Q ,L . '4- i""""""W Q J, ,, M.. xv w.- W 0 uw. ew' f . ' ,mf - -f-.. a . 1 4' "Nh'.'?" " ' I 1 D -Wf- .0 Q ., lp, MMV mi! +W.M,,i ' 'L K HWMV: -mm. ,,...,Q ,,.... WM -'wmv 'M " R ww l Q if If 1 S 'E I' lf '4f", , 'Q' , , '1 '. ,J-Z3 '1w ,, A -- Q J 4 , 4 44.. .ff ' ' " 'f'2p 4 isvx' of ' ,..,.,. f m , 1, l"-i"'J- 4, P Am,4-',,.. t X 3 ,A- Q " Q., "Mr v,'H -'. .. Q 6 ,gy ,gm ' 'f - : ' , ' g - , ff, NNY-W , ,,,.v' f 5-. -nv: ' 1. Q Q X- P . . ? , 0 ., EVE' 1' v N 1' - 1 'sv A-.4 if .., L L, ' . ., , '-Via. U., ' :fur f?rQf,d,2',f "?' ff. M 5 1 'ftg X NNXM :W - l S 9 X' r. ,- .I w ' fn I l 1 lff , ,D so Q gn u. s. NAVAL TRAINING CENQTER Scan Diego, California i 1 8 Q2 'l t, OUNTLESS GENERATIONS of seafaring men U, have come to regard the anchor as a symbol of cf their profession and a mark of security to the ships on ,J which they serve. By the Romans the anchor was regarded cl as a symbol of wealth and commerce, while the Greeks gave to it the significance of hope and steadiness, a mean- C' ing that persists in religion and heraldry today. The symbolism of the Greeks was carried on by the early Christians with a meaning of steadfastness, hope and salvation. Here, too, in recruit training, the anchor has special significance, not only as the symbol of the recruit's new life and surroundings but also as the steadfast symbol of the security in his new career that his recruit training will give him. In the pages that follow, the daily life of a recruit is traced from his initial arrival at the Naval Training Center until his graduation some nine weeks later. 33 1 4 s Q s 1 1 fi .v, --.JH I 'ICJIELY' THE NAVAL TRAINING CENTER, San Diego, had its inception in 1916 when Mr. William Kettner, Con- gressman from the Eleventh Congressional District of California and spokesman for the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, interested the Honorable Franklin D. Roose- velt, then Assistant Secretary of the Navy, in establishing a naval training activity on the shores of San Diego Bay. Due to the Nation's entry into World War I, further development of this plan was postponed until 1919, when Congress authorized acceptance by the Navy of the present site of the Training Center. The original grant consisted of 135 acres of highland donated by the San Diego Chamber of Commerce and 14-2 acres of tideland given by the City of San Diego. Construction work began in 1921, and on 1 June 1923 the U, S. Naval Training Station, San Diego, was placed in commission under the command of Captain flater Rear Admirall David F. Sellers, U. S. Navy. At the time of its commissioning in 1923 the station bore little resemblance to its present size or arrangement. At that time Camp Paul Jones housed the entire population of the station and the maximum recruit strength was 1,500. The period of recruit training was then sixteen weeks. The shore line of San Diego Bay extended considerably further inland than at present, and the land now occupied by Preble Field, the North Athletic Area and Camp Far- ragut was entirely under water. The recruit parade ground was located on the present site of the Public Works garage. During the 1920's the Recruit Receiving and Outgoing Units were housed in the Detention Unit, known as Camp Ingram, which consisted of a group of walled tents adjacent to the south boundary of Camp Paul Jones. Until Camp Lawrence was completed in 1936, recruits spent their first three weeks of training under canvas in this Detention Unit. In 1939 a construction program was commenced which within three years was to increase the capacity of the station four-fold. This expansion went hand in glove with a large scale program of harbor improvements by means of which the channel and anchorages in San Diego Bay were deepened and 130 acres of filled land were added to the eastern boundaries of the station. By 194-1 Camp Luce had been completed, and the construction of Camps Mahan, Decatur, and Farragut was already well under way when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Virtually all this construction work was completed by September, 1942, when the capacity of the station had reached its wartime peak of 33,000 men, 25,000 of whom were recruits. The period of recruit training during World War I1 varied between three weeks and seven weeks. In April, 194-4, the Secretary of the Navy changed the status of the Training Station to that of a group command and redesignated it the U. S, Naval Training Center, San Diego. Under the Center Commander were estab- lished three subordinate commands: The Recruit Training Command, The Service School Command and the Admin- istrative Command. The years immediately following World War II saw a considerable reduction in population of the Training Center despite a post-war expansion of the Service Schools, and by the end of 1949 the population of the Center had dropped to a twenty-year low of 5,800 men. Six months later, when the Communists invaded the Republic of Korea, an immediate expansion of all Naval training activities took place and by September of 1950 the Center was again operating at nearly full capacity. continued on next page' HI SCITCJIHY continued During the early months of the Korean conflict it became apparent that the demand for trained personnel in the rapidly growing Pacific Fleet would require further expansion of this training center. Accord- ingly steps were taken by the Navy Department to reactivate Camp Elliott, formerly a World War II Marine Corps training camp which is located ten miles north of San Diego on Kearny Mesa. On 15 January 1951 Camp Elliott was placed in commission as Elliott Annex of the Naval Training Center for the purpose of conducting the primary phases of recruit training. In March, 1953, in line with the planned reduction in size of the Navy, training at Elliott Annex was discontinued and it was placed in an inactive status. During its two years of operation, over 150,000 recruits received training there. Late in 1952 projects were approved to convert some recruit barracks into classrooms and to extend training facilities by con- struction of a permanent recruit camp on the undeveloped Training Center land lying to the south and east of the estuary. The six converted barracks went into service as recruit classrooms in April, 1953, and construction work on the new camp was completed in 1955. With the completion of this project the Naval Training Center filled out to its present boundaries of 4-35 acres. In the furtherance of its mission of supplying trained naval personnel to the fleets and ships of the United States Navy, each of the three subordinate commands of the Naval Training Center has important roles to fill, The Administrative Command has the responsibility of conducting most of the Center's administrative business and furnishing a wide range of services necessary to the daily life of the large community which the Center has become. The Administrative Command has the responsibility of maintaining the Centerls buildings and grounds, Camp Nimltz E If ' ,I .iigiiifiiiiff-F5.W:f'JGXliHLx and through its facilities all personnel on the Center are housed, fed, clothed and paid, and receive their medical and dental care. The Administrative Command also provides such other community services as recreational and Navy Exchange facilities, com- munications, postal and transportation services, and police and fire protection. Under the Service School Command are grouped more than twenty Navy Schools in which recruits as well as men from the fleet receive training in the specialized duties of certain ratings. Most of these are Class NAU schools, where non-rated men learn the skills and information necessary to them to perform a specific petty officer rating. Among these schools are those which train fire con- trol technicians, electricians mates, radiomen, yeomen, commissary- men and stewards. Other schools teach specialized skills such as motion picture operation, teletype maintenance and stenography. The present capacity of the Service Schools is about 5,000 men. The largest of the three commands at the Traning Center is the Recruit Training Command. Here the recruit undergoes his transi- tion from civilian to military life, learns the history, traditions, customs and regulations of his chosen service, and receives instruc- tion in naval skills and subjects which will be basic information throughout his period of naval service. Most of the facilities of the Recruit Training Command are centered on Bainbridge Court and occupy the western half of the Training Center. Here are concentrated the barracks and head- quarters of the recruit brigade, and nearby are located the mess halls, classrooms, athletic fields and recreation buildings used by the recruits. Now in its thirty-seventh year of service to the Navy, the Naval Training Center, San Diego, faces with confidence the challenges of an unsettled world. Farragut Court w van---irwkiii L. 1-l,iiQi7" Hi!!! 4 twig Q lfttifxpxfh .cf M F-M,,,,,,,, ..,.. X K .fg?gwr,:,:5cf1ft-'f 'Na bf . l ..., ZR ni I by i"llNl'IN"'5W fill gpm ,f ,, 1 ,,, zz., A,,'fJ ig .xg .Q jc 1' I 3,4--f' , -' ,.1-"",.-NIS" 1 f,-' Q-H A X F7 JR. - 'M'W"'- X-.4, 1' 1 ., Y 4.71, r A '11 f A, ' 'Egg-k iwi-rf' --A A",f,1,,i , asm w W 4 , k M , 1 A ' 'Emi "-. ' V4 q'5Zk.ek5,V.,,,ysxf-w1j:,', L Q-Vlg., - 5 -,545 , .xiwf ff 2 . ,. se '- wive- : L I l1'ZlKB AWN 'li HQUEJI' il! lQ1Il1I V339 IN O. WIl,I,lfXM CLOICIWICR, I' SN CKJIILIIIHIIIXIDIIQQ' Oyizrcr Recruil 7'I'lII.IIillg C0lILlIlHlI!l COMMANDER VINCENT R. DAHLEN, U.S.N. Executive Officer Recruit Training Command f fx JQINIQ Ull 'll "1 I nvocut "'-5 dk- '22, , Honor Company 9.2 syvf'-z' f few- W ,,,,,........- 452 ft- 'Nvifhsz' ' . X ,, 7 F . ,SM B- , mfflg' IQ ,E ' A ,.- 'Mg -V-.-v , I .1 Q Q, J' - gif' fix, , . . W 'lu Reporting L: Wawlgikf-,i-' -..,,,-Q amp n A Snr, I Present the Bngade .41 Recruit Training Commander Presents Brigade Award GRADUATION ACH FRIDAY AFTERNOON on Preble Field all graduating companies participate in their hnal Recruit Brigade Review. Here, entirely under the command of their recruit petty officers. the graduating companies go through the now fami- liar parade procedures and pass in review for the last time. At this Review. the Commanding Oiiicer presents the Brigade, 'Aca- demic. and possibly the much cov- eted Efiiciency award, to one of the graduating companies and presents Honor Certificates to the Honormen of each company. Finally the Com- manding Oliicer or a distinguished visitor makes the presentation of the American Spirit Medal to the one recruit who has been chosen for this award. One day during the following week the recruit company will complete its last day of training, and its members. having sewn on their apprentice stripes, will be eligible for graduation leave and reassignment. Recruit Training Commander Presents Academic Award AMERICAN SPIRIT HONOR MEDAL This medal and certificate is K twat awarded by the Citizens Committee 'fi 7 fm- for the Army, Navy. and Air Force, 7 ' g - I 27 Incorporated. One such award is pre- gggf' AJ ' .-4' sented each week to personnel who - A' -V are completing basic training in it JJ the four services of the Department Q- V' of Defense. I' ' The recipient is selected from the honor men and Apprentice Chief v ti' Petty Oflicers of all graduating com- panies and is that recruit who has best demonstrated those qualities of in "fs, leadership which express the Ameri- A iii? 5. , , sitio'-ag can spirit. namely-honor, initiative, loyalty, and high example to com- rades-in-arms. Presentation of the American Spirit Honor Medal Recruit Training Commander Presents Honor Certificates Fi 1 any .. J: -un.. To win the Efficiency Award a Company must have won each of the weekly The Brigade Award is presented to that graduating company having military awards, Brigade award, Academic award and two athletic highest overall average for the entire competitive period. championships. q"Mt""'f' 1 . lhnag.. .S D -1 2 1 at gg: -1 S The Academic Award is presented to that graduating Company which has The Weekly Military Award is presented to the Company having the highest ' " ' ' ' th B ttalion achieved the highest academic average in compe companies in the Battalion. Company Guidon - Each company is issued a blue flag with gold numerals corresponding to the company number. It is carried in front of the company when in fOfmClTiOI1. The stars represent awards the company may have won. Red star -Weekly Military Award Winner, White - Weekly Military Award Runner-Up, Gold - Brigade Award, Blue - Academic Award. tition with the other weekly average in competition with the other Companies in e a Competitive Sports streamers are carried on the Company Guidon. They represent a Championship in the following events, Left to right: Red and White-Rope Climb, Blue and Gold- Athletic Efficiency, White -Volleyball, Blue and White - Swim- ming Meet, Red - Basketball, Green and White-Track Meet, Gold-Whaleboat, Blue-Softball, Black and White-Tug-O-War. L LW Kg, -- 5,--wggsfgggggggggzLx,Wf,L,:ffLf5gg5gwmLfwLm-W, P,fw+,- , -- 1 L: L1 Mr- W,,. ,L L L,L,.,,,.. L L L L, Drum and Bu le Cor s L V.V,h. L,L,LL ,,.A,kL,A LLLLLL5L,L,,,g,:iL, .,., L ,V , L MLW 9 P m,L. mg ,L ,LW - H fu Q- XLQKLLM-Lf A-ffA- -,-f- -. .,-f ,--ff1'f:',L ,.-f -f , ,.,.f ,,- L1LL,,Lm,:-,L,,L-f:- -ff 3 M. ,, L L, ,L L ,.,... 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' X- ' L V :V VV '1 .V V Anwn- 'V V 'ig TV ., V V V 'V V. .wp Ai I 5' C 12V Q.'i "Vf 'V 4 V X V Q " 1 " H i 75, " I - Vw V y"""' vi 'fm ' or F i l fi 5342 - K V "f'1'f""i f'L3LwV .,x. . V Vqii i f V"V ,MQWVVV Z i gy My L ll I ' U ..7, I K 5 k wr 3, N In LAV V V ,,,, .i w V' Q In M V, W NM-.ks -M3 V . .,.- It V - . I --Ap. .., V ' . K ,"f"'ffff1 V f f ' m.7'PY""""" ',..- V P' V ' . ,gf -- ll , ,' - Q 1.-. ., r ' -, V' ' ,v 'V' , K I!1g1f,-' '-v'f-' -v-rf-f"" ir ' ' ' - ' ,Mg 41.41-ana V M . . - . V V . V. .V:ff:'::'fr6: .ff:y-.gg 1-vs rn . J-...wifi-::.:.,i?.,n'. .QT-.:,-L,,1,, . , V . . , .. P V A W ,V 7' P x I '.'.V' .JS-' L' ' i.. J--V ,A-in 'U IM!-1-.MV A V ms' ' ' ' i . 'g 1 . MJ f V 'f""g"'f"7"7 "7"f"'7 . M M - f ' c - - " '. '.'-'1 "' ' V ,,.,A f A," fg "'V ' .'..,,' .,A',A,' ' 'rf ,VVV -Vpx.1f4 ' I M' A' ,al-kfW'+ ' . "- V ' ' . V 1 V4 3, ,gr " 'V :l.,l" -",.4w""' r'f""' " ' , , V V V V, - V V V, 1. V V V1 V V V V Jr Va, 1 V . V V Vs V . V M I . id. 8 I , s., 3 .M .Vg LS L.. v i . l .F VV Q 'vi' ' ' . Q "-C' -w t' La ' ' 'H W- n 5' I V' qi' -0 .g f -vi. --off O . ,,. N V . X If V , I VV V 2 V V' ' ' fu 5,1 Q ' . V V V. V V qs -V 4- -V .. V, - A :V V. .zu . 4 V ,.,V, w .V . fVVl YV Q Q 9 :lr g M xy 1 V i .7 i ' ' W 8' ' ' ' A V - . I ffiiif'-' 244. Officers Cenier Honor Company Passing in Review VI V -' In . wi J ,4 w ww ' "" ,,.. 7 . z,,. .wfg5Xi'13,f-4,5 3 1 W' . .,. 2, 1 Salad Bar 2.2: '--1---f :2":" .fi 'tbl 3 '- 328 1 , ' U -fi 5 A-,ge L 5 7115-we . m -if -"' Mfr' 5 im' .A SHS Boat Drill The Company Honorman, selected by his shipmates, receives an his Commendation from the Commanding Ofiicer at Meritorious Mast. I 2 The Academic Award Winrier and the Outstanding Recrult also receive their Commendation at this time. Fire Fighting W-is wr Us .vi ., A + .V 0 , 3 59 We ., . Captains Meriiorius Must "A" Range QW: -an-.,, 8. IARC!!! New 6 'M i fi A. J A - af'-wav. V! .1 Ui' x- ':,x. -.. ' 'ss Q an ., s"f -m wqqtk x.. in Q 'm- 4 if.. I 5 S 3 ? 3 2 E ailfs-,mx-'f,wiws,,rf1rv,Lei '.sQhfnWwS4s,+ri,fzgiweluiviwazexqzm1'we:Qsu1vrfmW+w:w'ez4w?swxwwQ-ww , . ' imarfw"f"t' ...A -,n32'l'!'-fgwamnmg W ,www Yelmmvwvawmf-f 1, "Wm" '4.M..mmlil1d T THE RECEIVING and Outfitting Unit, better known as "R and Of, the recruit receives his first introduction to recruit training. Here he is given thorough medical and dental examinations, takes various mental tests and is issued his outfit of Navy uniforms and clothing. Soon after his arrival he and some seventy other young men are assigned to their recruit company. As a newly formed company they are "welcomed aboard" by an officer repre- sentative of the Commanding Ofiicer and are placed under the charge of an experienced senior petty officer who will be their company commander throughout their period of recruit training. Each company commander is a carefully selected, thoroughly experienced career Navy petty oliicer of demon- strated leadership ability who has received special training in working with recruits. Recruits Arrive v 441. lx is PROCESSING In his new company the recruit will meet young men from all walks of life and sections of the country, Among these men who will be his "shipmates" for the next nine weeks, he may form friendships which will be lifelong. One of the most important steps in the "in processing" stage is the administration of the Navyls General Classification Test battery. The results of these tests together with a later meeting with a trained classification interviewer will lead to the selection of a career pattern in the Navy, and in some cases, to special schooling after his graduation from recruit training. Having donned his new Navy uniform and shipped his civilian clothes home, the new recruit is now ready to move to the Primary Training Regiment where his company will Ngo on schedule." -qv , ' . f - ,.,, A-vm , Chevsf X Ray Physical Check Up Y W if :LW 2 Q Teefh Are Thoroughly Checked and X Rays Are Taken xx y y ai' g f ,,, V J I 'sw E First Hcurcuf -,,.........,.., 401 Q 91? 12 Checking For Unnecessary Personal Geclr 'fri ,ijyfga V xr by A?:1,:s:'g in 4 4 ,V 'fr . Q' L , , , nL.'gsY:.a,....w-rv-A-L' " W V uae- ,Am nwfwy r-ani, ,I . sr fs! EG Xl ffl! 'ISIN Your New Address ', C5 M Ee' 2a2s?'4 W awp 41 ii Ditty Bog Issue ' 1. V Lf C K Q , X :L A New Company Is Formed 5, -WW 1 f5TiHttIf S., i .An Checking Contents ffgewk ibpfww. 9 f' Aman Shoes Must Fif The Hat-A ScziIor's Badge Clothing Issue A Perfect Fit 'if N215-S43-B645 150691874 MAI S, BUTTON "WW, "4 SUM Filling The Bog ,f W 'QL 1 Clothing Check .Lu- 3 , rw,,,Z - ,W-"' 1'3- ly, JJ , ff ., ,f I , 4 ,f , :M Marking Clothes AVING LEFT CIVILIAN LIFE behind him, the recruit at once finds himself in unfamiliar surroundings where he is governed by a new code of regulations, where words and phrases have acquired new meanings, and where new obligations and responsibilities have been placed upon him. In the classrooms the recruit receives basic information on the rules and regulations by which he will be governed, thc- history, traditions and customs of the service of which he has become a part, and the privileges and obligations which he has assumed as a member of the naval service. Here, too. he gains a better understanding of the government of his nation and the role he plays in it. Through lecture and discussion hc becomes more aware of his responsibilities as a citizen and the responsibilities that his country has assumed in the world of today. I DOCTRI TIO The Navy's rating structure and its system of career advance- ment are explained to him. He is taught how to recognize the various naval ranks and ratings and the opportunities he will have in attaining petty officer or commissioned ofhcer status. As the recruit progresses in training and becomes more familiar with naval history, the names of Paul Jones, Preble, Decatur, Farragut, Nimitz, Halsey and other naval heroes in whose honor the camps, buildings and streets of the Training Center are named take on new meanings. By learning of the deeds of these heroes of our earlier naval history, there comes a realization and acceptance of the proud heritage carried forward by the man-of-warsman of the United States Navy. General Classification Test 'S'--.... . N Qs if -.,,,kyh N V ,JEJL ,4 it 'fk f Mx . 'MQ' Classification Interview Third Week Test i Su 9 , 1 Y EQ Y., if s U Q 3 9 if A S 4 , 'S V ii Q2 1 DO V 2 5 9 1, .. i B 4 4 7 gg 7 C 5 R . 'I 1 X! 0' V I i i - Sf pg 4 se i 9 9 U I' , F' ' . .1 i vt fi gf in 1 J, A X Proper Salute I gf! ' , x 'V . 1, -M, Hyg Q Career Opportunities x K. ft ,mr , 1 son num sn rm mmm amen NAVY WZZHE EQKEXRENW U75 Ut THE AAAS F :M ARK UST RADX SONA MPORTANQE RATXNQ GRQUVS. ADVANCEMENT me MAR so SMS NKARKAQS Driving Etiquette SUBNNARX CMS sum tub STRXPES GENERAL BXLMET OL XA ACTOR E th Career Selection ORDNANCE and GUN N ERY T0 BE AN EFFECTIVE fighting unit, a warship must be capable of inflicting maximum damage upon the enemyg to survive, it must be able to defend itself against hostile attack. In Ordnance Training, the recruit learns some of the the duties performed on board ship by "The Man Behind the Gun." Ordnance and Gunnery training begins with instruction in the use of small arms. At the snapping-in range, under the guidance of experienced rifle range coaches, the recruit learns how to load and sight a rifle, how to adjust the sling, and how to fire the weapon from the several positions, Later he will spend a day on the outdoor rifle range firing the Garand M-1 rifle "for record." He will also be instructed in the use of the service pistol and carbine and will witness firings of the Browning automatic rifle and the Thompson sub-machine gun. Throughout, the safe use of weapons is stressed in instruc- tion and rigidly enforced on the firing line. ln advanced training the recruit receives an introduction to the larger weapons he will see on board ship and learns some of the principles of their operation. Although he will not witness the actual firing of these shipboard weapons until he goes to sea, he receives practical experience in sighting and loading a five-inch gun, using dummy ammunition. He is shown the various types of ammunition he will encounter and handle on board ship and learns the necessity for strictly observing the safety precautions which are necessary for his own safety and that of his shipmates. Loading Drill, Five-Inch Gun J 'F r sat 5535513 'rug-1 , L -1 'lim Q' v J Y X ZVVVAL VA ii T l i f i 5 .ww in ,J wp" 3' Carbine V. Q-,V V,- rf-, 1 ,V Q ,,z-gvf,-3-5 , .A . yn s jk .gui ' 5 V " A " .,.,,,y' Vyfnm V. , v V V i V in V' MV ',tw.f15 N 'ag QHKH, ' - " WH 1 ..:jVfm. r.,L'ifgfQw - 4.'-A1 . - 5 ,fx-2? 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The Firing Range On The Firing Line Ronge Controller M: ,aaa-a-an ........1 AQ Cll :?:p.'sv-n4-- ...Q f-1 I-.. ima.. .., - ffv12i:fkL..5,,,.,aQ. 3 . ff'-'-'fffv- ff-L. .m u - ,i,i , dw . V . lgqlqkg .nzyhng srrgarilfq- 11,575-,rm it ' f iff , , -' 3:14 gg,-N :A,,., ,- 4.8,-:ww M' -n 4 "4 'n WH-ni f if f. i, ' Y f,'f x 'AVF .i V ii i1m"'5EhVfWf'9MlBji ii-7 1335521 IEfises,? f? ,w...i. 4 in f'1T't,."""' i - - ' 5 nu ' , .,4:2.1 ,.. V U . X i Q. .V -4 ' ,,'- 4 if , -.f 1, MM. .' - - -.- 1ug1 A X Z, ,gk . W5L,5,f29Ae,..QfF-'W ff-W1 v - Q.,-Q P K . N - f V , , r - , , . imdb. ,,,,,1, 1 rc-.V s -Wig A 4 . ,. 'rr 1.1 ,Q -- 1-L., ., mga in n - . 13 V , -cup- ' ,- ' i , is ' v ' A' iQff:i.fVlf.,g -- f L , H " -f 2.f1i.1i1:i.i2zff' -W NA f s I - N nf. r n . Q , I ,ViVi,,K'zJ' .4 .Y --' , '-frm.: fx " ' ,, will , V if "fi A 'Cv :MA A , - . M . -.- Q4 -i ' ,, X- A' - ,Q""'i'3"5'-f"n'T"' . .W ..,, 'ix ii " . 'lc-in , rw-MZ: 'W ' ami? -Q,-Q, L k,- ,- f in k 4' . .5 J, UH' , 4 , I L x Nh ,Mg 7.1. 1 , I ,,,.. if, ' ',Z::,3EiA:, L i I jk. , I 4 . WW , A ' A 1 is A 6' iw If X fl be E ,U I v I - 'K :, BAN: . . h . ' N N., - cu A I' 4... 30,-V - an - ,, .ww-i.., -J" bi i ' ' 5. ,. ... , x - AL... 9,Aji up K ,k,, M ' s .0 -A Q . '5- 3 0 ar'-115' ,Q - . -A. . -H-ws -N- Loading A Minor Adiusfment Repairing Targets-In The Butts F IRIN G POSITIONS Kneeling is , f'5 N X .- I 'i If cvs? 5 w .fag - .1 1 X X .L .nf RIFLE Wfxvf 3 , . N0 smovamc 'Q ' ! I Q T,,,.Lf- ,gg CARE ww " N - wk X H Eff Q O MEN WHO WILL "go down to the sea in shipsv a knowledge of basic seamanship is fundamental. Although some seamanship skills can be mastered only from long expe- rience at sea, the foundations upon which these skills are based form an important part of recruit training. Emphasis here is placed upon teaching the recruit the language of the sea and the names and uses of the tools of his new trade. Among the subjects taught to the recruit are marlinspike seamanship and knot tying, steering and sounding, anchoring and mooring, and the recognition of various types of ships, their characteristics and structures. He learns the principles of shipboard organization and something of the role he will later play as a member of his ship's company. He receives practical instruction in the use of the sound-powered telephones by which personnel stationed in various parts of a ship may communicate with each other. .. , ws 'V Q 5 ,. Atari' ,, w':i17:f--k-Qi -Q: w:t,g-Aff A .ly j,'f1r-:ff-1 c 5 K hw ., I f i-X iillit i X X"' fit : ' fi.-li -iiiffllnan i SEAMAN SHIP To facilitate practical demonstrations of these subjects the RECRUIT, a scale model of a destroyer escort, was constructed on shore for use by recruits. On board this landlocked ship practical exercises are'held in stationing personnel for getting underway and in anchoring, the handling of mooring lines, the manning of watch and battle stations. Small boat drills are conducted the year around. Each recruit receives practical experience in pulling an oar in a whaleboat and learns how these boats are lowered, hoisted and secured on board ship, Inter-company boat racing is an important part of the Recruit Brigade competition, and competition among the leading boat crews during each race is keen. By the time he completes recruit training the recruit will have learned many of the fundamentals of seamanship which will stand him in good stead on board ship. .-v""" ,..-- I r l E l Flemishing Line Sf A I V814 R F. 8 ,X g Ill -M-:wan-Q...,,,,,, Double Up and Secure W IM puffs' 4 Wy ,saga PTI. i Ei an , Hoisting Colors io the Goff Marlin-Spike Knots Mooring Ship fm 5 .. 1 mn , ',:.fi'.aa:2':- I w fl W filf' iv :z,,v,1k A --..1.1'Qfm-S. , -A I , , 3 Y ' 5, + , M , , 1 afimw' 4 f-- , f'4f32:4:A.s1iisww..--A , L- . .:,,x,..., m. A. f,, M ff E mf W 'Q X ws 1 xl .mm a -.vw-.WM 'rw 19 in e-. SU. a 'X I W' af , ,X w K "7"'f"T'M :Ji i 4 1 . i it ,E 0 .HHJ ,. ,ooo S M' 1' 'I . fi - F 2 - lfl L1 ,f 'S 1. , fi., Q -ff . 9 up f fx Az ii f'-' H' Q .M 1 K ,1 Vsafmg 2 S iff, 7, N c 41 ,x .sxeffd N - ll ' wg3 1li'Q 5' J5A,L1,,,,i,, AMF- , V . X V 'fs ik: W ' .0 Q . 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W, , ,, M, W I b Qi -A -K 'mar' 3 """QF!,,'Qv-v'- W an HE PAGES OF HISTORY of World War II are filled with instances where brave men, given the proper equipment and the necessary uknow howf' were able to save their ships from apparently certain loss following severe battle damage. Fires were extinguished, Hooded compartments plugged and dewatered, and the wounded cared for, to the end that the ship survived and returned to fight other battles. Damage Control instruction for the recruit is designed to teach him the fundamental principles of fire fighting and a working knowledge of the equipment which may save his ship and his own life. Probably one of the longest remembered days of recruit training is the one spent at the Fire Fighting Center. Here the recruit learns the chemistry of fire. basic principles of DAMAGE CO TROL combating fire, and then spends nearly an entire day extin- guishing actual fires. Under watchful supervision of trained firefighters he will put out serious fires under simulated ship- board conditions. Alter receiving this valuable practical experi- ence he will have lost most of his fear of fire and will have gained confidence in his ability to combat serious fires. The recruit also receives practical instruction in the use of the gas mask, oxygen breathing apparatus and other equipment designed for his personal protection. ln the tear gas chamber he has the opportunity to test the effectiveness of his gas mask. Basic instruction is also given to each recruit in the probable effects of an atomic explosion and the measures he should take to insure his personal safety and survival. Compartment Fire if? NX "Nw-..-y . ...t, zxlrfb' ,L :SM 5? . jjj.. gflf, ff lkzf-'lv'-w P Mm4w5-,.f1. w5:wiw,, r ,. r :Ark nw as M Qaggqmt , , . i ' ,. 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A. 5 Fitting the Gcls Musk l 'Ying ye, :fff ly . ,fy I wi is ha I I W ,...T..l w 'U "M f,k.,p me ' :S R . "elf fx ' ' .MT -55 W s 5 1, ::N 1 7 sfffi , . -' Z 5 . 5 ,, 9 f :L lf? I K, J.. I E W ,mv 'U 1' ' - try, 1 1' f Q K. , X 1.5, V W 5 5 c - .- fw- yr XJR , 'Y - v S 1 x X I E ,fs V E i fx , pf ini' L-5 , 1. . . l,,.,,,.- 4 , - -g-W 1 er xi nf gs ' " .59 U"' .4 4 ' .fx 5 Tear Gas Check for Leaks if The Pockei Dosimeter Cobalt 60 Lg ,. I' S QL ,, K, -, fa. f? A E .Q K 1 Film Badge MILITARY TR INING THE MILITARY DRILL, watch standing and inspections that are all a part of the recruit's military training are generally new experiences to him. The marching, the facing, the manual of arms at first seem difficult beyond all reason, but after a week,s practice, confidence begins to appear and by the end of primary training the company has become a sharp appearing unit. Even though the navy man seldom carries a rifle or marches in a military unitiafter he completes his recruit training, there is a definite and important place in recruit training for military drill, with and without arms, The military control of the company is gained and maintained through constant drilling. Leaders are discovered and developed, and others learn instantaneous response to command. All develop coordination of mind and body, and an "esprit de corps" grows within the Brigade Front company. Together with physical training, military drill is a part of the physical conditioning or Hhardening up" process for the recruit. But most of all, military drill teaches the recruit the importance of implicit obedience to orders and the importance of the individual in a .military group, whether he be in a marching unit, on a gun crew, in the fire room, or on the bridge. Inspections will always be an important matter in the life of a man in the Navy. In recruit training the vigorous com- petition maintained between the recruit companies is based largely on a series of regular inspections which serve the double purpose of teaching him the requirements of military life while comparing his performance and that of his unit with the performance of others in training with him. dmmams wmwmmmxs wmwwmwiwMmssf sw.wwamww.mmswwsmwwnwwtwmswpwammass.ww , ...aaswawmm iss,,awrytfwfrfrmewr I, xml -1 Physical Drill With Arms Present Arms fQf5wW,:1Wf, fm.. W,,..v V4 W,.. in Q, mu 'is-up mf-gi:-W, img gsssiziiiasiizsszzfiffwslfi s -s s gi 'K if? , lf, . it 5 ' 1 5 r 'via sg: z1.fm1 'QQ 'fu- Q My is: mfr, , My v,:::.m- fsiffs if 221 'QS ei rt fm ,Tw 1, ' 4 F EM I " 1 h ,,, fm ' ' P 2 I E Lp, f I' ' V. 3 Y f."'Z'?1:'N - "3?"f.QB" xxx 3' I+.,: f iI+f.1,x-.g- 1 A I wf H' , I. . x J 55,54 ilwni , 5 ifwwx K A, , , A + 4 I Lg , 1 I- LI. 'lf' 'WAI qs iii: MQ.. 2+ 4' A k H . 'S ,X J., "ff-wg-I , .. J , j PM ,IMsii1Qm,,m.....x ' ' ,iMII,,,, I B. . iw V I . 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" I- f , , :I ., ' f ' ' 1 -1 1. -7 " A t 2 ' ' if , z "' ' f "' gf I H! " wi ' " ' 3 nf L,.. 4. ' ' ' 4 , ff , f ,, 3 'H I ' 'I +A if I , 4 f .'m" -1 L .M ' L, -- , , I Z 'f , f I II I I ' f , K ,V.k g VV A ' I- I , .I.' Ig '7I- ' Q, 1, "" ," "" I 7 N .. I W, I-'-i , f 1 ,W-I,, ,. ,I I,-I QM, ,iv ,mf M WAI I ,. fi- -,.I,53fzm,ag,,x ,.,.w,,fI ,.1, I ,w,.,,..,.,..,. I I ,Mn H-If 'I MR f .gk 45 L' -I.I f , .2 , .. ,,I,,A,yQ,,,f qw . JWK, ,..v ,Af ,,.L ,YV , -I tw ' I -- . I, I-',I ,, ,WI M X fi, ' Ma gi? - I ' L"' , ' Z A - ' I 'll ' '-I' ' ,. 2 If A 35- K ' ' YQ, Tggimfa? Passing in Revie w ... Reh Cqrsul Side Lunges wi-M, 'wiygs v Q 1 S Auf -SLP?" jf? Af f fi' wjggff , Fw N II-Iv-,:I?m.ffwvs Y nf -, MM-Iv 'ff' 1+,QzIIw,I fa s 1 xx .Wm , if 'kv ji r ff N f r 5 .lj 1 .,, f -1 1 f' Y W Q' ff ,if ff! r f W! il, 3413! l 'TW X' ff Nine Count Manual rf , R1-rr,.fiwf W ' Yuma ' fr I Port Arms 1 . - B - ,,,,,,.,-q,,,qqv'ggggg,,g:na'nfcauvmwmllQ'x JL. sv' T ,' W, w V - 'W K Q iq," - -9- H ' I . Q: 4 gn' 1. x ,t Q 3 'X Q, J' .xffd .,. Q, s 1 ", r"'-.J""""'! mf ae., nn Present Arms new K + in W A , . I , L,,L, .4..: M , LV , , ::,m , , , -,,i. ' f w--1,4 as .- - .ef-kt -' ,s,.s: Personnel Inspection Inspection Arms IW 'QM f 6 1 ev 1 Stuck Arms X. kvtilz Q QV Ai ,ms J ,,.. o . or Q , rf, I 4 f "'q: S we ff uf M -rf-L Com pa ny Staff ' Txllfewg.. 4: ,g In mmf, ' Q gif gf ,Q x .rf ,ww V5 ifi' A' M no 3 M EQEMSEQK v' 443: f r f Dress Right Five and Dive Q . k .k...mq5mgggM fy, ty, A kg, ,jg Presenting the Infantry Flag The infantry training pen- nant is awarded to that primary company who on its 3rd week and Sth day of training has achieved an infantry mark of 3.90 or better. The purpose of this pennant is to promote a competitive spirit and pride in a job well done. O BE OF MAXIMUM effective use to himself and to the Navy a man must be in top physical condition, must know how to care for his body and must be able to survive in the water at sea. To the end that all navy men may meet these demands of naval service, they participate in a physical training program that involves strenuous physical exertion, instruction in swimming and sea survival, and instruction in first aid, lifesaving and personal hygiene. When they report for duty some recruits are soft, some are overweight, and some are underweight. To build some up and trim others down, and to condition all for the rigors of life at sea, a well-planned physical training program is integrated with other phases of training: military drill, an active outdoor life, good food. good living habits. These physical training activities emphasize correct posture and muscular coordination and strive to develop a respect for authority and habits of instantaneous response to commands. 311 T,:j1yfjifG 11155: fl 1. - .. . 3.9,-S., :P-w,A,,,r ,V 'f - 'fl' '11-f1f...5' if - , 1- . f .- .. -: , f .tpq-glfifrfgge.gf ' PHYSICAL TR INING All men mf particularly sailors whose life will be the sea- must know how to swim, how to use life jackets and, if no jacket is available, how to use clothing as a flotation device. Many hours are spent in the swimming pools, Non-swimmers are taught to swim, qualified swimmers improve their ability, and all recruits learn sea survival and water safety. Stressed constantly in the Physical Training Program is personal cleanliness and the importance of health to the indi- vidual and to the Navy. A knowledge of the medical and dental services available, the prevention of infections, correct eating habits, and the care of feet, mouth, and teeth is provided by competent medical instructors. The recruit also receives first aid instruction so that he will know how to care for himself or for his injured shipmates under circumstances where immediate medical attention is not available. 2?!'545?5iwiE'fzl.1'iFMfl3wM' fviiwkglvlt- at ' 1 .W ,-K QQQ5, ,nf 0 ig, - i Softball ,K -. 4, -- 5 , .33-f , f' ' -. Vi Mt. Ml - N, n . , .. N- f ,. -Q . . -Q . . - -A :M ., .M ...1.m1...V,..r.. -1. .. V- -. , V. - V , . , . . VV Q -V ,lj ,. F M 5 If A -+A , ' ' M. ., M V, v ' L75 Q vb xl ......- LA'f S LV L, E' 3 A V-,,-. +,-L, , AII' I , gn F L. - A 3 TV kk T'5l,.g.ff:.U f , is annum-sf-1 llil"""'- g Volleyball LWL..,...f. ' -!'f,..,...:nl .P-ir' E 'i ni ii k L MWLAMQ Basketball l 'fi M Q K H , W, A X,,,- K , f x -... I 48 ii I' ij kwa 1,3 , K -ff: -4 R 3 L 'fr l ,wk I it ,,,'. ,:1'ffE.1?f5fl12fff 3 fl ,,., ' I ' ' K' ' ' rj A . :uf f- I 1 , fav , " ' 31: lt ,, i , M ,gg - Lrg, l l.A, Ta i K A K W URVIVAL Q., ff ,sl .,5W "w i'Q. ff' . , 59 f W5-5--5' Nj , . V +? W ' , , T P " z g Q .. wg, xv, wx ., Q af , 4 .4 ' my--AQ. M--1 "- I . , 'Wi "?.w ' 4 f, I - L ' Q, . V 41' , .J vi -.Q ,i . T , 2 , , . A - f- ' .av A an ' - . A W.. ,xsijmfx .QW 44, 4, it 'K ,awww Ym, fb . ,MIL M. wi ABANDON SHIP DRILL my Q s Sw ww w 4 5 l 5 1 L F, , P t H tis J! M ,.a...-.wand kiS...,.W,.. Q , . 5 . -E ... ...J QAM ' f' 41 'WW R- an-..l""' 31,4-W +-Um-vs W9 5, ,M,.- W ff 5' - .. A H . - V V A A u L. M Ar A 7' 'gwm' . i. . V -6 m..,.,N .Ai A ' 'T ,- " ' Lil My - A "M ' f g -'WY M Aifikaefq' 3 1? l ,X w W ww' J M -- g -m-Wfhmw MQW .f ,. 1"F1 -..gh 5 x as 5 .W H' . . ,X .- 'rf , A ,M W at-s-LW, .... I A"" Mr- mn... M --.....w.. ,, .-M N Nxt ... k ' H5371-ie -fu .ww J?-?lW"" .. QW. .-ff! xv. VK ,fx Q MM I Y ,Q V V- ,ww I .Mg - w if-Q ,M . ' ' if q,. m.4.. R 1 w w Q ,. ,1 ,Q L- k Af" ' - " :fi - "' . yn. 'TLT' k . 'f' V ,..sN'1 ' W ,,,. A ' yt . . V . ,:Mw-- A N . LW,: .W . WW. W . f .. . . . , vs , LA - V . ""M?w ,-, '- . ,, 2 xg , Y"L' . K .,. if .flvw...,.,- .,, ,i f: K I .. . 'jg 1 M WWW! ,. , ""l"" 'R' - ' f-.. , - L' ' . wha an ,bww ,W 3" Wwe FLOAT OR ASHORE, each naval unit is generally a self- sustaining unit. The messing of the crew, all the house- keeping chores, and the watch standing must be performed by those assigned to the unit. Throughout his naval career, regardless of his rate or rating, each man is in some way concerned with these service duties to which the recruit is introduced in his Ship's Work Training. In any unit, men in the lower rates will usually perform the Hchoresl' and those in the higher rates will supervise themg all must stand watchesg and all must live together in the same ship. The fourth week of recruit training is devoted to instruction and practical experience in Shipls Work Training. For eight weeks of his training period the recruit is waited upon in the SHIPS WURK TRAINING mess halls by other recruits and for one week he takes his turn in performing these important tasks for his shipmates in recruit training. Although the fourth week is specifically designated for training in these service duties, much of his training continues throughout the nine-week training perod. Every messenger or sentry watch and every cleaning detail is a part of the recruit's training in the problems of community living. In the Recruit Training Command it is believed that the things a recruit must learn in Ship's Work Training can best be taught by actually doing them, for experience is the greatest teacher of all. -fissile Qngfagiie-fg2-19 z1.f,"gp4,rf.,5--I-4 1,5 ? Q1 KL-,f -, l 4 , . . M f M :1fiff.,5. A vu , M 1 ,. - . K ..f,,., K ,. . f V iw-Vg 1 fkiwlk ' 598 , ' as -lfx Q -- ,--. I fp . , 1 '- ' KF V: , 5' . ' , 1 , ' , ,K -51 -w::s,:uL-:e.:y,K1,w. . ya, ., f, ,,,. , 3, ,, K ,. --, ., . v . - ,K , . ., Q QQ-L, 3::jk5:,wl:gQ-"'j Ivy: ,:fw.',: 3.34, omg, z . eq. I M -1, 5' 1- ,W '- A. V WML me mmf - :gli ,, 5 3 ,EV s wx ,7-1 n-W A Hearty Breakfast f 7 ' y 1 X 4. Lots of Salad Plenty of Rolls ,,r"" O . 4 O - Hof From the Oven FOOD ,,,,.f-ilk., W1 Q, W. K fin I- AII You Con Eat A King Size Menu Dessert 'Y L , 1EE 1 :,. . N , Qi 9' h 1, is, ' f 'Q-:' :-, ':" fy W5 , ' X I T Q , Q 3 f M Q. g Cut cus You Like It if Sure lt's Good 2 f ' ws, J All The Milk You Con Drink Lunch SCULLERY 'K x All Through Scrubbing Down ,X , ,L X ,,,., Regiment Three Gear Locker Cleaning Gear Issue .si Bucket Issue Shining Brightwork ,rs rv-"""" Messenger Fw: Polishing Decks mmmmw .um-i,.,V .,. .-M.. ,- 13,3 -,E .4 - f ' -' V! T. P , Q.. ., NN pw 9? ,Q ,xi 1- ,Q Md- " 2-3:56 Al- fm' i 1 E Q H r 1 3 E f 'T 'A NJ.-f 1 1" 47's ' " 4 ..., W 41g"""T,LW'tA L V 4 ff V 2 ' 1? qi 1 y ',':V. :lla 1 " -,,. I' V 'W r A .: cg, 5 5 b Q , 5 J ' f lg fx i V if rm S 13 f 3 , I 3 X F 'E 3 2 Q lr . I I ROBABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT thing that a recruit must learn during his recruit training is how to live with others in a military organization. Life and living conditions in the Navy differ so greatly from anything the young man has known in civilian life that teaching him to live in close quarters as a member of a military group becomes one of the major missions of recruit training. At the Training Center his barracks is the recruitis "home" It is in his barracks that he spends an appreciable portion of his time in training. Here he establishes himself-in a sense, drops his anchor-for the nine weeks in which he will be experiencing the transition from civilian to military life. The barracks is not only a place for the recruit to sleep, B RR CKS LIFE it is his most important classroom. Here he Mlearns by doing." He learns to live with others and to take care of himself and his belongings. The scrubbing of his clothing, the cleaning of his barracks, and the constant inspections all serve but one purpose, to prepare him for a successful life during the remainder of his tour in the Navy. And it is not all work, for the recruit must also learn the need of a Navy man for the companionship of his fellows, for mail from home, and for amusement and relaxation. He should also develop the habits of writing letters and budgeting his spare time. These things he learns in his barracks life at the Training Center. L H xii .a i Vi' L' 1 E 2- if -4 2 any? -fs. T , , na. f' " - -W Q, ' -V f ' LI ' i f ' 1 3, 4 ' Z f 1 .zlf fg dw. ,iiwui ,,,, , , . 5 1 I iam MH, W flafffw ati 'F K.,- 'X ,.,...-Af -urn' ,W i -.-, Q. K , M E f 35 -2 7 wg., xi H env' 6. . wisffff .. ' mffll W M , .,,m,,,w ,gym ,j iw' ' Sie Q Ms Scrubbing Clothes Mail Call iw X? , ,, , j 'ff J ".,,M,mw-K' ,AE Yak V V V, ,,, -my 'i.f?ff:r " A 'I i K 11 ' mi' . ML ,,,,, . . 5 ax f V Y J ff R Qv M Q4 Fw M fgqgsgea , . , ea- if M f Iii X i i Jill E.wi.:Qg.M14.Q. "T" W' 'W ,.,.-Q-W" f ' QK 25 w 'Wfrfw K Z h hh' h ' ' 7f??'N""""'7 , eng M, A, an ,, .E q, :LV H , ,k, V .A,L gqktg fp mf 'f, 4: gTm2'fff faf iwwffW , V- A m' -' 12'L ,E, fl: fKA HI PZ: Z". -k w , K V V, h gk .. 4 T' Y f 'J' V i Q 'f Q, 3 ,gpg if I ww 391 WWW ff' S1 K 'i 3, Z N LT S ' N F:'LLI: epllisg. Boning Up ,,-f' --...J +4 fi 'Mig KK P' X M .,,f L9 lt? what Bag Inspection Care of Clothing V I bf uv" Fold Them Like This w Bog Layout , E Q I 5. 'WW' in C-li 1' lg Q, MM, , 4 , l Bull Session W ,ffmffi Nw 'NM' .nliif i f 5 Q W Y N rvw .xl X? 'qv RELIGIOUS LIFE N MAKING THE CHANGE from civilian to military life, l the does not leave behind the religious beliefs at home. Instead, he is given every oppor- to maintain and strengthen his an opportunity will acquaint him will explain God, we pray to thee For those in peril on the sea I izffii I g , fg-iiliiiiL,,, ,Qtr I no I I ',.. If bv x r e s, .511 15 L ' - S, , ii? ,ge .Q Rf -A 'Q 'Qs I , f , o 3' az., M, ,,.., Q' - , ' M V' J' "' 1- a aa-:A as flier -H51-E LMI- ,I , f ' ,L ,, .r.. ,, in rrr 'V M A Y,.,'l.E.3,r.'5 -9 . .. A 'Q Gig . y ""3QiQ!-g,z',,-1:3 I ew ss Na" W r ,f 'X y li r fame -ff r A a H., ,i W" " fi t6 X ' Q'o'b""f'- X , 1 37 If if Af' .. M ' 5 5 X XQ.....w' 1 l 1 gk an -. I 31- ' ,I wi 2 js-is ,X ff 4' " Q . mfr 7 21 bi " 4- Q I Va L., k 1- -1 N7 ,. 1' " J' fs' ii ' W. 4 , fr- ' I IJ' "' T fix K L V L .1 nf' f 4 5 H an ' if Lf' X ag. 5 ' ,A-P, rl' in ,Z 5' My 5 l "" W v In -'-. f , 4 ! , il i 'Y R f my I7 1 'ff - jf it ifraag I ia X f ,V Ox 1. N 4,6 I .-o ' P W 1 ,, 'ixe-fi' Q' '- tl 6 5 4 Ji ,B e I X, V 'Y Q' A 3'!"Q ,E "' 'K x .fx 1 , KJ v I 3 y ' f :yr 'L " E I 7 P-Q., ,o,, K T". im ., f ,, . N .,,. 4 . ,..a,- -. , churches t x cwrlitate ' h 1 5' fi" l 3511 g H, " it V "" X "lf" Q, -'ff 'Hanga r so are an egral part of recruit " ij' l' 'T gf g-N fy, 1- the If res onsibilit s 'N , timmy 3:1 ,A , , , - - - - " a t , 'lx,2iwwl12:b:w' , -1 t e station by Joining l- i' 1 accom ' ices. 'I . , h 1 - t t e Cha am A '- Y to glve a we - I d ' I I v wt encourage to take his personal pr . n .A 1 Waggaqw his choice at any time. The chaplains also maintain close 'aaa' contact with the Navy Relief Society and The American Red Cross in obtaining financial and other assistance to those in need. me-F. W.. .M-"" 'Q WW, me 1' H + ' s 2 E r V I siilit Communion ij :ii X , Q S f 2 3 if Wg x, NME .cg "ww Chcuplc:in's Interview A N . f 5 2 55 kim? 'W-. f"!'l Catholic Service aw ,..' .'-yf-ri,-QW, g,-,' A ,, . -W 7 "1:W fnrlzwkx ,f', , by R f?'E'g' dizi1f A -1 M , , ,W 'wr- Jewish Service Choif gi ,, , .,,,.,..-.- ,FW - - H Protestant Service, Q ,L-N 9 JJ , V 4 V A-3, A k - R' .A ' 'il enum M HH - ' M, 1 e 3. ll 1 Q , 2 Wd w " 1 'fanny lg , 1---. -1- -2' A ' 4' I Church Pennies SZ 1 sf- " ' "Jil-1.9-.g-'in 'limi' ' ' h x H, 6 , 1 1 w .ef 3... M' J - 16 I 1-21 .519 ,, 1 , , 'Q' ' Pu f Yggf. ,rr - lab ? k fgzii QQ 1 V Q o. 1, . N E! . ,. a . ,'.k,, 'Mu i ' ,.a ' ", .. "WW "" Q , ' - v-:fum FA' 11' ' igqfl :"!E4?h . 1 5 ' Q XL V I 'T ' .F "'- if ' ,x 4, , . ,, 'lr V3 if-' 1' 462, gf .-S? 4.33 if ,. fin, 3 . , zxsg 1,-, , '-,'5 Q Q I V L ,B .:" X ' ' ' KA - ' K 2.',.f.Yf Q r, A s A i , ' - - Q 1 6- """' DW "M I 'Jigs A S 'f-'J-ffIEv"'f1' 'W YQ. 1? , .1 ggi-. A-.. ' 'A if if V ' ,L x K . ' ..,, , .,,. If p W 1 T f , WH. N , , ,, .: ,, , 1. , m Ly1f1 v n: ,,JW, , ., ,:..4.,,,f1L,,.:, .- . Wkjuihki Q: L Q X ,.,, Y 2 f .iii ' ' ss, ' ' kg .5k,gi!uf..1iM . .f,1:H..1,, - ' '- H.. at is ,, ' 554 i O -'b-'L-- L i..Y'1'fj:15f,ff5i'l., MARRMGI N 's Q 1, R if I 3 I x fs. f3vff5.L: Yr. .,,5,..ml r ' ls s X RECREATIO IECRFATION PLAYS AN important part in the recruit's training at the Naval Training Center. Throughout his life in the Navy, many and varied recreation facilities and opportunities will be available to him, but he himself must learn how to make the best and most worthwhile use of these opportunities. During his hrst Meeks of training the recruit has little or no time to spare from his daily routine for recreation. In order to bring him through the loneliness and sharp read- justment to life in his new environment, a special effort is made to keep each recruit fully occupied throughout each day of primary training. and he therefore has little time or inclination for the recreational opportunities which lie ahead of him. Liberty to visit San Diego is not granted until after the sixth week of training. The recreational facilities of the Training Center are many and varied. ln the recreation buildings in the recruit areas there are excellent libraries, game rooms, television lounges, billiard rooms and bowling alleys. lVlovies are available on certain evenings and on week-ends. Nearby is a well-equipped hobby shop where the recruit may turn his hand to almost any hobby craft of his choice. The facilities of the Navy Exchange store, soda fountain and snack bar afford him oppor- tunities to purchase his needs conveniently and at reasonable cost. An attended telephone exchange makes it easy for the recruit to call any place in the country in an emergency, or just to hear familiar voices from home. Athletics also play a part in the recreation program. lnter- company softball, baseball and volleyball games afford a diversion from the daily routine. and spectator interest in varsity athletics is often keen. During his Oli hours the recruit It -sm,-Q-...Lv ,N """ Jute- , ' lb-w--........---Q--w......... .1 if . una... 1 Wwrruan-gap Son Diego Zoo RECREATION tx Continuedly may also use one of thc swimming pools or play golf, tennis or handball. Recruit boxing and wrestling bouts and impromptu entertainment acts afford interest at periodic Recruit Smokers. Commencing his seventh week of training, each rccruit who has earned the privilege is granted a twelve-hour pass, either on Saturday or Sunday afternoon. During his liberty hours the recruit is 'ton his ownf' to select his own form of recrea- tion. but by group indoctrination he is reminded that he has an obligation to the uniform he is wearing to conduct him- self in a manner which will bring credit to himself, his organization and his Navy. The San Diego recruit is particularly fortunate in being stationed in a city which has so many worthwhile attractions for its visitors. lfine beaches are at hand for those who wish to relax on the sand or swim in the surf, and the amuse- ment park at Mission lieach is a popular attraction. llalboa Park, with its excellent zoo and other scenic and recreational attractions. is always popular with the recruit and 1nan-of- warsman alike. The shopping and amusement facilities of down-town San Diego also attract many Navy men on liberty. The USU and Armed Services YMCA, together with local churches and conununity organizations all do their part to help the scrviceman enjoy his liberty in San Diego. The home hospitality programs the Hllnder Zlii dances and the Java Club offer pleasant memories of recruit liberties while in San Diego. For families and relatives who may have occasion to come to this Training Center. the Reception Center affords con- venient and attractive surroundings for visiting or for taking a picnic lunch. fs- if512122Izizlzlzizltlilfrite-E if-rfofofofofofofoftfefvfefo,.Q.-o,.0,a .XXX N Ships of Yesterday ond Today 3 gmwwf . X.,-fi 'M N. Navy Exchange Store -I Hn, Recruit Smoker Fountain Patio "0 osf----wnm..........-.. ,,R, 4 PACIFIC TELEPHON I 26 I A., ' 1 - f-,- V,f,.f A , .,m mm F, .wx RECR IT PIC IC A Picnic is given for the Weekly Award Winning Companies as Q reward for outstanding Company , performance in recruit training. wvvrnqzgr N wb ,wg Mx 'VW ,.. ,,., 0 5, M52 'F Q24 I If Q 63 .15 :YI ,I , II I II M ?,Ii35i3jI,. it ,,j,,i,gMf.yi,f , mfgfgqqifqg A bi H A M ::r,,z, I I- f 9 ,ww M W 'B' I 'W Qw 1 ,I at t I A W 'L I x if 1' A ' , 'QQ ,ig at My X, Is . it 4 I A I . fi V ,, I- " .Q if I V. LA 3' 'H ,firm I, ' ,Im I f , I ,Lg 3, M J II I In ,I ,I 1 i -W '.4m., - M ' ' -x,,Im,H ' K ft ,N ...E ,I A . ,I -fs-Sffi' - M ,Q I I J - MM-a,p,I 7, N II . , M N L. y -M, ,V ,I - If -,W I -- QW i',3,,,!- wht' ' , .ff -QIJIMIIJI """"1 :ff +7-:'f7"i 'Q r'5"'1'i29A1,...'?'F'f' - , :mer-Imggfv ,. ' 7 ,I Q. M,,J.,,, gym, If .I I Ig,..Q-if fy.,-I in W f -WH H' - ' WI, IM-1x5gw.g',g.i,,:L.eQff I 4 RSL .. I,,fg,I-N -' Q-' f I . ,gg',x'fj, " I ,V " A It xxrifliiwx .if J ws AW' I 1 W gsfffwigmg I 4 RECRUIT LEAVE Cashing Final Pay Check os ca Recruit AGERLY looked forward to throughout recruit training is graduation and recruit leave. Upon suc- cessful completion of his training each recruit is eligible to take fourteen days leave, or if he desires, he may go directly to his first duty station and save his leave for a later date. Before graduation the recruit is given full information on transportation facilities to his leave address and may purchase his rail, bus, or airline ticket right at the Traning Center. Wllhe big day" dawns early. After 0530 reveille and an early breakfast, the members of the graduating corn- pany draw their iinal recruit pay, stow their sea bags, pick up their leave papers and leave for the train or bus depot or the airport from which their graduation leave journey will start. Stowmg Sea Bag :rf3,g-.m 5,:y,J,w, 35, ,f 4, J. ty. S 2 .,1y Q, W ,W . H1 m v MMM figs A R2 " Q M -, -, -, - if V V frif, W- WM HMA , M K nf fmaie A ' 1 , Q 1 ' u K 8 7 ,ge V, J Af eg 1 , ,I i if 3 QE is 525. Y e 'L 9 : - I Zi trvf U I L ? . , 1 N ' fd ' fi 4 ,' A 1 . , -.Q 25 zv. M. J '15 ' A T . '. 4. f 'wr' I ff 1 I L Nik it ' L36 Q' gf 2 A 'gsm 1' , ,vigil if n Q . 43. 545 6 mn H, E Li viiivf-gif W wx A A Jw-. ' ' 3 my V if. Y, .gf . ,., ' km .gg 1 W 3 xr f .. nw 5 .' A V 5 ffwf V ,L Q' :I f f 77 - ' s J is if Q b -1 hx, ni Q K, S if- L, la. -I . 1 ,S , 1 My , -I L1 .wi '- ru:- mjrpf' -' 2-Q . 5 4 Olllpillly 61 - 396 G. P. ROSENBLATT, SF1 LTJG G. E. GONION Company Commander Battalion Commander Albright, D. L. Allen, johny L. Auten , jimmy L. Beckert, N. J. Birt, john A. Blackmon, B. D. Blackmon, G. D. Bobbitt, James R. F- J. PALMITER ROBERT D, AAHI. Recruit Chief Petty Officer Honorman li' AUX - ll'- ' .. ,,. ' nf' Bratcher, jimmy C Brooks, Roger T. Brown, Benjamin C Cagle, Robert L. Cameron, Roger D Chase, Craig H. Chew, jay A. Clayton, Ross J. Crowley, john J. Davis, Phillipe K. Decker, David J. De Loach, F. A. De Vore, Loyd N. Douville, C. Dulaney, D. J. Edward, R. L. Eger, George P. Enrico, Danny R. Gauwain, G. H. Haley, Curtis N. Hall, Verner Harris, G. M. Hartman, R. N. Haynes , Edwin L, Hellman, Melvin J. Hennrich, Gary E. Jensen, Gary R. johnson, Allen J. Johnston, Daniel T. Kane, Howard S. Kuha, Roger C. Kuhns, Kenneth R. Lackey, John B. Lawley, Richard P. Limanen, Ralph F. Martin, Robert E. Matheson, Thomas Mclnerney, james McKan, Martin C. Miller, Jimmie A. X I Mitchell, Levon Morse, Fred L. Nelson, K. I. Peck, G. C. , jr. Petillo, Bruce N. Rea, Roger T. Rodney, Douglas A. Rowe, Gary R. Schiller, Duane I. Schmidt, Dennis K. Schumacher, L. O. Silas, Richard E. Slaby, Robert E. Smith, Bob E. Smith, Thomas E. Suker, Robert O. Tennyson, R. K. Townsley, Robert H. Walker, Bobby R. Weaver, Frederick O V? Wheeler, Roger A W1 J. L., Jr. i son , Wing at Y g D William M nnis z f1hff,J.R. XI Xl V if 'C W A lf' fx 4 .... Bag Inspection ' ,flag , Haircuts xjgb, L i hd '-f gf' 1 x 97 ' if ' F I llnuri 4 WW had -gi. 1 , 35' i WAV 4 X Q fir vu I , i? rH f' f' v ,. 2--P I Iffw , f fgffffgx 1 in r r 1 :rug kr f4'ygfffm' if C2 g and 4 Y, .-,-., J V' 5 X., -J? 'T Barracks i Life 13 gn ,,..,-v- 'Q-.h NNW , XX: A? S 1 ,Aff Fire Fighting DCP' ,ff I 'B hx if vm 'L it ' gr Small Arms 'K V R 'vw xx A wr f NNE Y . . 9? ,f 7,9 I 5 f W , .Q ' 0 T .E ' ,, .4 ...V V ,. A 'Fil i, fm 1, ,. Infantry Drill 5 VW 3, ,,J..,,,,, 1. 'WL Xxg' 3 Wfxfxwx, A f , 'Q W' 8 X sv5..1.... 1 , .. . l l Q 1 Y',v I? if v ?f Q 4 115- I 5.565 . any 'fu-9' Departure O- O I 7, OO 4 O xi Kiwi? - - 1 . Of f ' g COMPANY COMMANDER G. P. ROSENBLATT, SFI AND PETTY OFFICERS-3 OCTOBER 1961 xi? nik K K,,:,X, - I K tk- 1 - ,, ' O 1 , W If f H ' -..' ' 'A 'V ' - ' I M- fx .r E O O .O .?"'f".'!'C' fxffw ffm iszf'fv:3n ' lI Uk S Xt O A Q if .O A' N 1 Jff4r'i3vLs4F-rx.: X-'fktx t"JFSH'. va 'wx in if I A 'ri I 'rC1'!'.' n X W 1 W... M, -... W..- O ' ' ' 5----.. .. , ,, I L O ,O .,5..3,,.3.5 1 O U O 4, , A PASSING IN REVIEW O O O . .ana xt ni'aiWnfn'1iSQfJAaAh2.2.-L 2 I f, fwfr If ,fO.ff.,, ., O f 4 13 -1 Z Compan 5 J LQ GEORGE P. EGER Academic Award U l-L MARTIN C. Mc KAY Outstanding Recruit ROBERT D. AAI-IL, HA Honorman J AT 34, 1 O M.. BOBBY R. WALKER Outstanding Recruit


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