US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA)

 - Class of 1953

Page 1 of 96

 

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1953 Edition, US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 96 of the 1953 volume:

Y Q55 W., , . ' .ff-fsqvgla' 9 f", i ' l ifxigff ,-Q fJ'3,,5,, Lv- ,,,., ' QQ 1.4- ,- V' M Z,-El' Tu 1 612.32 LL. fm' , 1 ,-f. , f .,. mffj,,.,k,7?,rx, 44, .,hL,,...L. ,7L,,,, ff .. v A... P- ym 1 'WH 323 ., 1'f'.,4.-k...,,f., 'f- ,U f -' N1-4 lib .,g5,5.4-M Q Ni" Am -14 7 ' al ., 1 v . ,I f., 5, ., ,,.,g. ,r .m.,' V-'SWE fc Q. Q. A H-wPg"z "1 4 , 1 Q. 1. 1 , U . , - nm N 3, N: - 'f , V s 534651 ' Q., N A 211. :XJ w 1 -' '5-ff fw ,nf ,L V 1, ,G PA' ' ' , "Mm 'aww ,, 1 I HP - V , .gin L, ' JA . ,Y ,I A ' M I -1 W 5 , '.5VA A4wMH ' 2 50m-?w-1' if ' , '- - ny ' sS3p...L.iz.,e ,.fQ..,...L0:,,A,w..v.yi fn 'B .5 In , W, n f JA, ...mf .diss Va- .,,,,4 1. F' 9522, f 'ff' ' ww "R 2,511 A by Q, V., iw if- , A I, ,K '.-fwznw V , . , . . . ' ,, . r aws- 4- . -' ' ' V5 'A .1 Www. 'wif f 1f,v,.:,Qf f,eu,+1'.,,,,N,3:1. N v' , ' ,,- f -V .f .V M 'J M , , f Af1xa4z.v.-912121564 -, mgx, , V.:fewnffwwff-,-1'fE:.f,, .M-.f , ,.,,, A 7... N ,4.7 y , .- , J mf" -1 1 '1 ., . f ...wang . ' jV?5fL'21 It , My-' ' '4-3,54-.anna-1 - Q43-'wry--wggf"' D 4,59 i:,3.,f,fg3, ., n My .2-G ff'.?Mrk?4'+: m,,c.'f im.. . Q M kgq .,.1.if'5'. 2.3, , - A x, ,,,1.,f,, .V . M, Q, ,V.v,5W,f: -Q ' -,mu-N '- 1 .pl ,LR ,ai , ., ., , V x .. :xg- .s-f---X ff' 443. 55 yi.. uf. ... mxismf, Msg, , .. ' ,,. .A-,Q gem 1:Q'st'igp- ' u .. , .Y-wx l'KsXV'-X :. ir . N N x X , Vx . . ', 'N x X We.. Ai W , ..as.-. , 'Q Q ,-. , -inf Wh tux. . nn., -'V . uw bu-Lihj AQTN' MP5 ' ,., Wasil-.!',l Fling, ,, 1- ' '5. in f' .f E A , ':"",1+ y2'i."'4:fJ' M 711' 97 . , , ,,1'4 ,te L1 .qu J x , n N U w 5 l' ,H I I Q77 '21 W' 'fb"'Eb'. ,rf 'Viz - ,Armin . In ' .v 4 -O03 H " --- be .av new-X:-01 JL' A 4 ar ' 4 ,Q - 3 1 1 " L.: 'Nw ' ' sf- ' me .A B 4' in H u I 4 ! 0 Q A -.... -A , A .. g 4 s' x ..q':q?ag'Lf7f"L'vs., ,fy .. ... ' fix 'fir -. ,'.yk : . - . .45 t -L - X . Qian .. ' 5 4 4 , , . 4 , . Ng, r px V' S. M X ik- .,-" ' E ,o ,.., , un" ln. .fl If v "I: 1 V' f' ...gf J ' .- 1 -Q-4-1 drfd' 4 1 A all -w Countless generations of seafaring men have come to regard the anchor as a symbol of their profession and a mark of security to the ships in which they serve. By the Romans the anchor was regarded as a symbol of wealth and commerce, While the Greeks gave to it the significance of hope and steadiness, a meaning that per- sists in religion and heraldry today. The symbolism of the Greeks was carried on by the early Christians with a meaning of steadfastness, hope and salvation. Here, too, in recruit training, the anchor has special significance, not only as the symbol of the recruit's new life and surroundings but also as the steadfast symbol of the security in his new career that his recruit train- ing will give him. In the pages that follow, the daily life of a recruit is traced from his initial arrival at the Naval Training Center until his graduation some eleven weeks later. X -Ax X X X r Y-w--,......11..,:i,- -, 6931- -.f.,,e, -:VY wr- ..- X-, -v-V,..g-v,-., - . .. -,Y V -. ,- : - THE 1 ' j f 1 4 x 5 ' C K I X j Zz .Z ' ' 1 . ,. .nk ' - film' ,uf ,fi W-6 12 ffm fe 7' x A ,Aw wx! , f ,V , 5 '75 A lx, wma f,, F 1' YM li Y fry. 4 ALBERT LOVE ENTERPRISES I09O CAPITOL AVE., S. E. ATLANTA, GEORGIA Y n 2, ff F I . iff 'x I ' ' x if ' 2 Head-quartefrsg Recruit Training Co-m m'emd Y x J .X X -ip :Ji 5: ,jd -, Jw.-:...gQ,,-L Av..- 1 -ec, .Y - ,: f H W kv 'il-Y 1- Qi' -,HY Y V-4' W K Y n.,..5:9... .A,,,..-,.t..,-e'--.T.,,,:..:,.,,.,.. ..--.v-V " ' f X 4 f. I Kg? fp, 5 - ini- "S cAPrAlN D. F. MQLEAN, U. 5. NAVY A ff Commander . P J! Naval Training! Center 7 .-.......... -...-.Y-,., W . 1 . 'N x X X X . 1 , 1 ' I f' "H-E "S"-i'w ' rr - -Ml--F-V--M ----A+--Af---------A---H CAPIAIN G. tN.VWILLC0X Commanding Officer Administrative Command n X , W 3. V ,...,.,5-::f- Y W C Y- . 1 H" -iS'4i:l-5'--4 fi-1-Y' 'Y - ""- - - ' ' 4 . 51'-4 F- Z. KY. 'Vx' "', ,M , 1 ' 'hw f S " I '-' 'WT' I J' 11- .lv s - :L - 3 - -.ALL lf xx N x 1 mls 5 pv . " '5-52 A 5-5 I jr . 1 1 'Q il Y 1 f----Q - -- --nav-f-w , .,,V , , ,, "'ff'Y'7?"""!i?"f""wf?S-""., , , ff!rz.g.?.ff-- , 1.,, M 4 , ., ., ,, '4":. f"'H.r CAPTAIN D. I. THOMAS, U. S. NAVY ' Commanding Officer Recruit Training Command .un 1 E "' . " X couuuumnsn r..w. umson, u. s. NAVY Exoeutlvo Olicor Q , A Recruit 'Iralnlng Command lsfrahon Build: A . ,Q s,.3'.3'If. fag R Q s IN H T Y ABM? IS on The Naval Training Center, San Diego, had its in- ception in 1916 when Mr. William Kettner, Con- gressman from the Eleventh Congressional District of California and spokesman for the San Diego Chamber of Commerce, interested the Honorable Franklin D. Roosevelt, then Assistant Secretary of the Navy, in establishing a naval training activity on the shores of San Diego Bay. Due to the Nation,s entry into World War I, further development of this plan was postponed until 1919, when Congress au- thorized acceptance by the Navy of the present site of the Training Center. The original grant con- sisted of 135 acres of highland donated by the San Diego Chamber of Commerce and 142 acres of tide- land given by the City of San Diego. Construction work began in 1921, and on 1 June 1923 the U. S. Naval Training Station, San Diego, was placed in commission under the command of Captain Clater Rear Admiralj David F. Sellers, U. S. Navy. At the time of its commissioning in 1923 the station bore little resemblance to its present size or arrange- ment. At that time Camp Paul Jones housed the entire population of the station and the maximum recruit strength was 1,500. The period of recruit training was then sixteen weeks. The shore line of San Diego Bay extended considerably further inland than at presen.t, and the land now occupied by Preble Field, the North Athletic Area and Camp Farragut was entirely under water. The present Reception Center was then the Administration Build- ing, and the recruit parade ground was located on the present site of the Public Works garage. During the 192O,s, the Recruit Receiving and Outgoing Units were housed in the Detention Unit, known as Camp Ingram, which consisted of a group of walled tents adjacent to the south boundary of Camp Paul Jones. Until Camp Lawrence was completed in 1936, recruits spent their first three weeks of train- ing under canvas in this Detention Unit. In 1939 a construction program was commenced which within three years was to increase the capac- ity of the station four-fold. This expansion went hand in glove with a large scale program of harbor improvements by means of which the channel and N4 t' anchorages in San Diego Bay were deepened and 130 acres of filled land were added to the eastern boundaries of the station. By 1941 Camp Luce had been completed, and the construction of Camps Mahan, Decatur, and Farragut was already well under way when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Virtually all this construction work was completed by September, 1942, when the capacity of the station had reached its wartime peak of 33,000 men, 25,000 of whom were recruits. The period of recruit train- ing during World War II varied between three weeks and seven weeks. In April, 1944, the Secretary of the Navy changed the status of the Training Station to that of a group command and redesignated it the U. S. Naval Train- ing Center, San Diego. Under the Center Com- mander were established three subordinate com- mands: The Recruit Training Command, The Service School Command and the Administrative Command. The years immediately following World War II saw a considerable reduction in population of the - -We ' X bpcrfff Xaufailzgq """"'lsv.,,, n Gate, Naval Training Center Training Center despite a post-war expansion of the Service Schools, and by the end of 1949 the pop- ulation of the Center had dropped to a twenty-year low of 5,800 men. Six months later, when the Com- munists invaded the Republic of Korea, an imme- diate expansion of all Naval training activities took place and by September of 1950 the Center was again operating at nearly full capacity. During the early months of the Korean conflict it became apparent that the demand for trained per- sonnel in the rapidly growing Pacific Fleet would require further expansion of this training center. Accordingly, steps were taken by the Navy Depart- ment to reactivate Camp Elliott, formerly a World War II Marine Corps training camp which is lo- cated ten miles north of San Diego on Kearny Mesa. On 15 January 1951 Camp Elliott was placed in commission as Elliott Annex of the Naval Training Center for the purpose of conducting the primary phases of recruit training. In March, 1953, in line with the planned reduction in size of the Navy, training at Elliott Annex was discontinued and it was placee of Ops there. Lat S0I'ne 3 trainir TCCruiw lallfl lf 51X col claggrc the Ill With I ing Q, darieg In Elaine' Ullltgf 00111111 poflali . llfitivf I Y , 2 xpansion of P49 the pop- twenty-ytaf an the Com- L, an iIIlITlC' ptivities took Center WHS 11 conllid it trained Per' Fleet would :ling CCl'1lCf- Depart- avy World rly 21 whifih is lo' earrll' Mai' 5 ptacedlw ,al Trainlllg rimary the P, ,C 953, H' It 5 the NaVYf d and if was placed in an inactive status. During its two years' of operation, over 150,000 recruits received training there. Late in 1952 projects were approved to convert some recruit barracks into classrooms and to extend training facilities by construction of a permanent recruit camp on the undeveloped Training Center land lying to the south and east of the estuary. The six converted barracks went in to service as recruit classrooms in April, 1953, and construction work on the new carnp should reach completion in l954g With the completion of this project the Naval Train- ing Center will have filled out to its present boun- daries of 435 acres. In the furtherance of its mission of supplying trained naval personnel to the fleets and ships of the United States Navy, each of the three subordinate commands of the Naval Training Center have im- portant roles to fill. The Administrative Command has the responsi- bility of conducting most of the Center's adminis- trative business and furnishing a wide range of Luce Audit services necessary to the daily life of the large com- munity which the Center has become. The Admin- istrativc Command has the responsibility of main- taining the Center's buildings and grounds, and through its facilities all personnel on the Center are housed, fed, clothed and paid, and receive their medical and dental care. The Administrative Com- mand also provides such other community services as recreational and Navy Exchange facilities, com- munications, postal and transportation services, and police and fire protection. Under the Service School Command are grouped more than twenty Navy Schools in which recruits as well as men from the fleet receive training in the specialized duties of certain ratings. Most of these are Class "AH schools, where non-rated men learn the skills and information necessary to them to perform a specific petty ofhcer rating. Among these schools are those which train fire control tech- nicians, electricians mates, radiomen, yeomen, com- missarymen and stewards. Other schools teach spe- cialized skills such as motion picture operation, tele- b .'. A Regimental Headquarters 1 I ,l 4 ' X -' ' . af:--tQ'z"' W 'Lg-, if ' f'f:'Y' 5 gr ' '3'ff33'S5 1 1 i . 1 f , E . 4 ' NNW-, -, MM, , Md,,,,--M,A,,.,.,,.,..ga. type maintenance and stenography. The present capacity of the Service Schools is about 5,000 men. The largest of the three commands at the Train- ing Center is the Recruit Training Command. Here the recruit undergoes his transition from civilian to military life, learns the history, traditions, customs and regulations of his chosen service, and receives instruction in naval skills and subjects which will be basic information throughout his period of naval service. Most of the facilities of the Recruit Training f ' -',' N Recruit Barracks' 2 Patio of flied-tdministration Building 3 Command are centered on Bainbridge Court and occupy the southern half of the Training Center. Here are concentrated the barracks and headquar- ters of each of the three recruit regiments, and nearby are located the mess halls, classrooms, athletic Fields and recreation buildings used by the recruits. When completed, the new camp will add a fourth regimental area to the Recruit Training Command. Now entering its thirty-Hrst year of service to the Navy, the Naval Training Center, San Diego faces with confidence the challenges of an unsettled world. . , 3 e r 5 i ,,,,-,.,,.ll 4 Y U? il fi-X ii i 151 fl A ' ' ff' ' 'iw' 1 'i xxjk-1: A ff. .V ' 1 1 ZANK: . I --....,.,-..........J -0:1-1-swan: , -2'-ij .2 -f-1:1 Vik.: :g- 'Tuff .zrixuvi ,tlu. 2 eau. v-1 . :,,....,:...k .A . 4-S- fx X . 7 " YI 'Vi 'W i i ' I J ' 1 DX' ffA X- ' fri: WI W 9 x ff " y X .x 1 I 1 MJ 1 xx N X - I f f i sl wg FD M f' X i . n is . v-I R., - Xxjf N .- Q' x fri f ,fx X Al 1 if N15 W N k sq .V XX A E Y N I J' 'j 7 ,fx'S'- . Q M .V XY 4 X a I ,Q ,....-.-.., Q! A 5 E m I l I 1 c 5 e 1 I J i v 1 1 ,5 --'K-...,.. A -""- --.-Q...--.J ta X f N V 1? 45? , YV immffvv J ' You ARE Now MEN A UNITED1 STAT E5 NA Uma 'rRAD 1TI'oNs OF mr SERVICE A rMAND 2YoUR UTMCDST Er FORT fsffgy ifilf ,vii D2 ' . ,fGlVE ,iIT CHEIER A, ,, f yv:I LL,1NGLY:' WAN 4 as X '45 W, X w e-fw 1 ,,, f X Jzfx-ff, , ,' 4' ,f wix ff ff W wwf, ,if , I W , 1 neer young men Oi the country. 'shrpnintes' fgf 'nn friends hips ill the Gill pm. of the Naiyig The results oi ieeting with 3 lead to 3tI1Ci the se- in some rndnation from uniforms and 3 new recruit is Training Regi- 1 schedule." -H-,-,, -,,.. M-H' . ".-r, ,,....a weighing "' Dental x'ruYs ' cheSf Checks of . . . Blood ' ' , . EY95 X ff ,'-'. gs M... ... 'x a 1 fi :XS ' Wx xv. El f , 4' x 2' r, ,,-.A.,,4L W Af , y ' :fe 4 ?MZ' I 1-gy' 221437 XX 1 ' H Nw J .' N'- , 0 , -, I V .5 . -s. .- J-ma-Hwy.-WW. : ,-vs.. ,............,. ...WY , . . , 3 -L-hw-.L-N'--..a4L,.1 A -4 . -rQf:- ,- H- A-, .,,,.., f ,.--y:l.a.-,-f Fix--.-, -i,.,,.e ,. ..4-,..--, "'1f..A-.A,., f,..A..U-.,,-, '. Y aff, 1 , I Q' A xv 1 ., X M 'vs .W an - E F .-1 H, H P L 1 .. I-.M . J., - Y, ZS A A . W 'T' .f .122-, 031. -ivlfsm 111- ef- - A R -1131 ' -.- vm 1-H - .fr-' Y -S- Q V K f in W L iw it Q, f gif S A :Y mg Saw Q -M in T . X Q I X A wav xx Mx 1-,f QX JN.. ,X X , x V K QXX Q hQf ,P x,-V M,.4.,,,,,,,.i,,,, ,..-,-..,......--,,.,...., .. .1-....-. , ---.,,.,-...V .. . . A A - 5- . 4-A. o X : XS rs. ,,w"""r ,Q-"W . Marking Y E , 1 2 ,ww Final Inventory Civvies shipped home xx V ws' , All R. 1-als . ,,.g.Kfj,a5. , , . x iixw, "T 'f A' if . Arg-V' ' ff--W t, f nl. 1 -, 4. V. NrfffW!f'ffWN1T .DOCTRINATION Having left civilian life behind him, the recruit at once finds himself in unfamiliar surroundings where he is governed by a new code of regulations, where words and phrases have acquired new meanings, and where new obligations and responsibilities have been placed upon him. In the classrooms of the Indoctrination Division the recruit receives basic information on the rules and regulations by which he will be governed 5 the history, traditions and customs of the service of which he has become a part, and the privileges and obligations which he has assumed as a member of the naval service. Here, too, he gains a better understanding of the government of his nation and the role he plays in it. Through lecture and discussion he becomes more aware of his responsibilities as a citiien and the re- sponsibilities that his country has assumed in the world of today. The Navy's rating structure and its system of career advancement are explained to him. He is taught how to recognize the various naval ranks and ratings and the opportunities he will have in attaining petty oflicer or commissioned officer status. As the recruit progresses in training and becomes more familiar with naval history, the names of Paul Jones, Preble, Decatur, Farragut and other naval heroes in whose honor the camps, buildings and streets of the Training Center are named take on new meanings. By learning of the deeds of these heroes of our earlier naval history, there comes a realization and acceptance of the proud heritage which is carried forward by the man-of-warsman of the United States Navy. riches First liberty S Blueluckefs Manual llllf . l up I W' Citizenship 7 I X 9 ff' -4-M E V5-f X253 1 .f x X . . , I 31-221 'Vs X, ---'X An., W 1 ' W 1 I X ' ' 5 H-x """"'1 K f. D I my X1 I I 'X 1 I1 fx LWMWEWNJHM XJQ 4E22f1SiQwffr,,. 1- . ,. kfi . , ffm 5 f ' f A: 1,2 fi .ffgxxf 6 ,1L'Q2r 1 2' W- - '- n ff-.ww s Mc, ,i3.Qf0w1J Lv, ? sf x .. ?-- fN..Hf17-- f'N 1'X "' 'W mx 7 F' 1 v I 2011 ff lffS1QMUf!TTfTMl1Xf x X x . x , X 1 E i J ! I l 1 ,..Y---...,., ...Y .-.,.4.....-...,. ..,-..,.,.- -.., -..V .. . .-..,.,. b-f,.J ORDNANCE 81 GUNNERY To be an effective lighting unit, a warship must be capable of inflicting maximum damage upon the enemy, to survive, it must be able to defend itself against hostile attack. In Ordnance Training, the recruit learns some of the duties performed on board ship by "The Man Behind the Gun." Ordnance and Gunnery training begins with in- struction in the use of small arms. At the snapping- in range, under the guidance of experienced rifle range coaches, the recruit learns how to load and sight a rifle, how to adjust the sling, and how to fire the weapon from the several positions. In the small bore gallery he has a chance to test his marksman- ship using a .22 caliber rifle. Later he will spend a day on the outdoor rifle range firing the Garand M-l riHe 'cfor record." He will also be instructed in the use of thc service pistol and Carbine and will witness firings of the Browning automatic rifle and the Thompson sub-machine gun. Throughout, the safe use of weapons is stressed in instruction and rigidly enforced on the firing line. In advanced training the recruit receives an intro- duction to the larger weapons he will see on board ship and learns some of the principles of their opera- tion. Although he will not witness the actual firing of these shipboard weapons until he goes to sea, he receives practical experience in sighting and loading a five-inch and a LLOMM gun, using dummy ammu- nition. He is shown the various types of ammunition he will encounter and handle on board ship, and learns the necessity for strictly observing the safety precautions which are necessary for his own safety and that of his shipmates. ,. . I 44-4 tl z Ammunition Handling S""'nv Left and above: loading Drill R ,Win 1 A f M nw M. Q Ni X X X bww! Xl MQ Q E291 Y-:X v x V 542.1 "XM , 'N n'!'Xg4l6 J, .' 'rf A." .mp ,A ug L 1 ' - x I' ,Li 'x 1 X29 I , lj R.. , dl ' , s it' ','Ii:'V'LX . Q .X.' 9' 4 WN I I if 11 lv A I , - I H' J i' , i :X f ,kv 'u --1-Q-f 15' " -gpq..:f-..-Q QTALT: f .: f ,.. vw- a- g,,g ,Tins -- -,rf ,Q ., ,V J.-.-gm wwf Nh N. , W-v-...,.., -.. ,R ww , I , ' A V A Qiinillfl Miflfkary ' UUUHU ufH"" Q 0 in S "3!1fii?"' 394' ' wx X .-g pw-rf X 4 , , .X-,f S . X Q, ,Nl 'mfizii A. .r- ,L 1-nur .-,. To men who will "go down to the sea in shipsn a knowledge of basic seamanship is fundamental. Al- though some seamanship skills can be mastered only from long experience at sea, the foundations upon which these skills are based form an important part of recruit training. Emphasis here is placed upon teaching the recruit the language of the sea and the names and uses of the tools of his new trade. Among the subjects taught to the recruit are mar- linspike seamanship and knot tying, steering and sounding, anchoring and mooring, and the recogni- tion of various types of ships, their characteristics and structures. He learns the principles of shipboard organization and something of the role he will later play as a member of his ship's company. He receives practical instruction in the use of the sound-powered telephones by means of which personnel stationed in various parts of his ship may communicate with each other. To facilitate practical demonstrations of these sub- jects the USS RECRUIT, an almost full-scale model of a destroyer escort was constructed on shore for use by recruits. On board this land-locked ship practical exercises are held in stationing personnel for getting underway and in anchoring, thehandling of mooring lines, the manning of 'watch-and battle stations. Small boat drills are conducted the year around. Each recruit receives practical experience' in pulling an oar in a whaleboat and learns how these boats are lowered, hoisted and secured on board ship. Inter-company boat racing is an important part of the Recruit Brigade competition, and competition' among the leading boat crews 'during each Satur- day morning,s race is keen. By the time he completes recruit training the re- cruit will have learned many of the fundamentals of seamanship which will stand him in good, stead on board ship. AAA Wt 3,1-4' , Mx gggq, ,V D ,M 42 ,, . 'P -0 ix ' Yxk , MV Aw www 52 ,ns sw ns. N, 3 . 4 I UBS Mooring Drill X jf s' 5 .,,gA, 'I I A , A ,ff x , w' . ,K 3 ' ,, x V 8 'Z 2QmWw,W '2 M- vm gf 'I W y I , aff M 5 I f 'gif ' fi f .1-4 .- . M .,., M X f 4 .ggi wg f ew in . f .f A K Z . 1 f - ,, , ,- Blix f Y I , 'A gf, Line handling ..,.......a,..,....,.,,.v-f..,.xf ,.M.......m..,,w.,- V MA-WA i 4 Q mg ' Q ? Q 2, L 4 1 V 5'ee"l"9 Engine order telegraph jr wg ffl' ,Vi t v !?g??f5 ',Qf7Qff9'Y, 9'! 4 ' , ms: f 1 S - Q" . ig' ' W wmv? 'v' V" v'i7+, U K ,z Q f' i.1, ' 2 , ' ,fn - f , ly, 4 ' -Y-Y x V A F xx ' If . . im Q A N' 2 . , f ' Q, X4 mc, ,,,-,g -nf 4 ,V A x-A A lg, 1 ,M . X Q .. 1. f 5 x Q .5114 glTffT"x-fg,apjf'Q"'4'F3 X x A S - A ' ' ' M my, N ,, W' W 4-11.5, Q, .J'Q..'-f 3' '..,g,-02.4 gi i x m K S I V M71 l , It 14 jp, ge aw.,4, mi, ,.,:. D 'RW M- 3.5 ,K K x ' , X. , f- 1 -M wma fx ! W. --9' 'M " - 1-, " W Sf, - ' " J' X' ' s L S1 x S' i Aff. 4, x WMA wh, V "'N'43::ggQ"55fg.-.Q--,M W, iw' ' rw 5 v 'if , ""' -I M' MP3-'l"f "4" X , A J . f , , , r g 1 l Vi ,,.,.. ,F 1 w X . f -f ff , Q f f w,,Cw.h..: , .-A we S ' .M?,,W,1' W H , , ! A 1, A .,., 5 , WL N--oem. X , ,A gh l gt 0 Wa 1 , ,Q f-Q F 1 'X 'C ' ' ... . M M ., sf - - , " Q "f--v K ' P, .,., . ,M m f, We f A, , Q, . t .W . , -M , -f . . f-f '- ' Jr X f . , W " : M A , .. X ag-J 4. 4.-.. . 'f 1 , ,nf - X I , ' an - . v , P V ,, , , X 'Q J F ,Q F J 1.V' ' ff V V , 2 v .wx 1 jf, Y ' X A- 'f' V 9 V Lv ,i N ,Q 7 .:,.., ,. ,,,, 0 oat Drills is 'Q:,,, ,. N. M1 fc:-Kean' aff 1 la 141' ' -ywmwxi X F? in if is 5 ,N ,, . KA t Px +A F X b -Eufmki ...f -.........v-,....... gpm? 2 QQ ,A X 5 9 X X 3 ,xx ,V Yxgfm, Y N Igfgfi Xf 1 A, --wp .,,..Y,.,,-.,,,.. f.. x.,1,....-.7-.if-.Nf-:Qp1ff:..fggl,g5, -4-35. ,z '-:-gg3L::.- A,-x.,.A,,,'faf,,i-L,,yg,,I,1,,,,?s L 3,?,, 11- --E4 -vg:-jggr -115 V L-ff.-, - L, v-M :.- , - 1-.-E.. ,f -- ' '- . - ' K .Y 'Y' V , , 1 V ,. "' 1v'f4-"'--'f'-'-------N :- 5 A? X X . , z in ..... 1 1: X' X ' 'r r 1 - I K2 X F XX' ' H " x, . b 1 1 - .I , W Q, ' a ' .1 i L 1 5 32 J . fs--f. v W xi? K 341 -EN 'N vf x e ,H-X " ,N . ' , 'Vi x Q X' S3353 nf! .-,+- . xx 1 1 1 1 ,f X iw . 1 CWS 1 U MX M Ak ig' Lg X ,tux li ,a ., , ' .gr-ixfl ..., -f .. ,.,A,""L,ATA' Riff A-k-I Xxxrf N i iw R 1 'N NR 5 B ,th ffxx - , D ' ' , Q , ? x w X' ! ' V 1 Lyn, , - - x s' fx . Psy N E.--1 -1 . --gx JZ, I1 . X X , . - M .ws ' R X x Qu . xx- , - I x .- X -. -X '3.,:...-f . ,,,-.. ..,.. Q . - - Q -1 ,g X I A at - ,W .-- M . ,,,,...,. ., .... . ----f-2+-"D" x v - X ,. -----' F .,3S,x,f.- ' - xl I A 1 ' V W' . 4 FAN 3 X is - x ,b W xx. X I.: I--H Q 535- ' vi ' vi 3- ' - ' , ' -,g -Q . -. . . 4 - S X . . X Q . . N: ' Vg X X... ' 3 x . . X .-X Y x ' - 5 -QM A fy- . 1 A . -XQSX '- , '-,,f.-uv' S' - x 1 . V . - 9 " "' .4 f --wil" 1 5 . -X Q -'x ,sv M15 uv-'M-- 3-9 ' H. . , 1 xx n gi. --.. ,499 M 7'2- 'A '-if-5 ' - 'Iii N -- QS. -lfifgg f - "4 ' ' " xv ry A M- W wwMf?fwg: -f N fx XX R 9 ' ..- gn.:--8 'kfim' '. ,- -' ,M-if-j - - , ...N , ,1 rail' ,,,, A -M A-. Xxz,E'?i7'i!fX' S- X L L Air X-aff 1 - I . ., ' w'9f3":1f - -fa, ,lm-L W4--rf-lii -' vii:-Sf--.Y f X 'RUN' x. ski' , -wi -P , X -W, - ,- --f .v I: T F. ,-..,....-.-..-...... .--. .. MM ww .1. ss... + DAMAGE CONTROL i The pages of history of World War II are filled with instances where brave men, given the proper equip- ment and the necessary 'gknow how", were able to save their ships from apparently certain. loss follow- ing severe battle damage. Fires were extinguished, Hooded compartments plugged and unwatered, and the wounded cared for, to the end that the ship survived and returned to fight other battles. Damage Control instruction for the recruit is de- signed to teach him the fundamental principles of fire fighting and a working knowledge of the equip- ment which may save his ship and his own life. Probably one of the longest remembered days of recruit training is the one spent at the Fire Fighting Center. Here the recruit learns the chemistry of Hre and basic principles of combatting it, and then spends nearly an entire day extinguishing actual fires. Under watchful supervision of trained firefighters he will put out serious fires under simulated ship- board conditions. After receiving this valuable prac- tical experience he will have lost most of his fear of fire and will have gained confidence in his ability to combat serious fires. The recruit also receives practical instruction in the use of the gas mask, oxygen breathing apparatus and other equipment designed for his personal pro- tection. In the tear gas chamber he has the oppor- tunity to test the effectiveness of his gas mask. Basic instruction is also given to each recruit in the probable effects of an atomic explosion and the measures he should take to insure his personal safety and survival. AAA Atomic Defense N02 el I U31 iris ffighlirg Cid fl? pm. hii fear is abiliv x lcrion in pparaun mal pm- me oppor- uk. 'ecmit in A and the 111 safety AM 5 9 . I warfare Defens Chemmu 5. M. 1 ,,,, ',,,..,..Q ,,,,,, Y-..--f.-.-- .nt-.-f-W -- .hi . G...- nf' Rx 1 L ' X 39" iff ? 'Li I N L ' , ,. Q 'hw' Six' x V' Q m 'X -X, 'Q wqf. vw ' Vx , X. , 3, . " gg a , .1 Q, 2 l Q . X L of 'Egx Q V N? 2 -W? ,gf ,Q vi Jima? wk QM. 51 ,. N. .A , S i iz ,Q . was . X 3'-if x fr 16 AC xinn W A-1---eg' S ff!! Aa S M bg. Q IU 11 X lx Q if ,W 7, aff., V QMZCC' 1- 'C , I 7 'ZZ75 4 fd lj fw " , ff, X , , A we ,f, 1.6, , , y X94 f ,.,, . , 4 an-,Q A-, . MX 'A N-. - 3. .- x, 5 , ' 39X+5fffgSw.s. ,X fiw:fsgx,v . N. - X My -if ' 4, an qi 1 I5 mx 2 -gs?-. -V - M, , 1: - ff' L 5 -gfgyiaxflq, .1.--5,g--.-- , I 7 , Y -'vi-1 , rw- ' ' K 1 r Lung, ' . ,-f,4, , , R x V I 5'-C ' fi af' u. " f, ,.1. ,n.. - , . '1 f if :', 'ri' ' M . .,,.. K 'Q I 1 N. i A X-.Q - ',,,.f L: N-. 5' .-..k.. f'K 9 5? B' Q aw' 4, ,M-5 -5. - .ff-...,. ,. -.. 4,--.-.,vi-1 1- . -A-'- "- " '- 1 f X I .K .JL ,Q x ,4A A , 'AQ ., T' 'e 1 ' f T . , . ' f - , - , I l , , Mqffkj-'hr f,'gfm'-1,a:a.:v41':,a'?fs er uf l I Sl C A I. A r Q fl .,, , , is v .f , . -, , , , ff , .rf-4 rv.-U-. - .ro- 1 ft X ., , t 1.1r'xia'1,b7,'4'.,t.y V z- if t r. ,A ' ,1-, ' Y . - V, , r ,-- - V- r ff-av1.':lu"'1, ,mf 'B gg 3-'g " -x-:fl -'Q 1 ,Z:'f,,.: ...gp ,.- ,Q -,.gf.:--,1f,,f,,..Ara,if-kfaiafs-ftfifi-S'3S2-eflmcT, H " l To be of maximum effective use to himself and to the Navy a man must be in top physical condition, must know how to care for his body and must be able to survive in the water at sea. To the end that all navy men may meet these demands of naval service, they participate in a physical training pro- gram that involves strenuous physical exertion, in.- struction in swimming and sea survival, and instruc- tion in first aid, lifesaving and personal hygiene. When they report for duty some recruits are soft, some are overweight, and some are underweight. To build some up and trim others down, and to condi- tion all for the rigors of life at sea, a well-planned physical training program is integrated with other phases of training: military drill, an active outdoor life, good food, good living habits. These physical training activities emphasize correct posture and muscular coordination and strive to develop a respect for authority and habits of instantaneous response to commands. All men-particularly sailors whose life will be the sea-must know how to swim, how to use life jackets and, if no jacket is available, 'how to use clothing as a flotation device. Many hours are spent in 'the swimming pools. Non-swimmers are taught to swim, qualified swimmers improve their ability, and all re- cruits learn sea survival and water safety, Stressed constantly in the Physical Training Pro- gram is personal cleanliness and the importance of health to the individual and to the Navy. A knowl- edge of the medical and dental services available, the prevention of infections, correct eating habits, and the care of feet, mouth, and teeth is provided by competen.t medical instructors. The recruit also re- ceives first aid instruction so that he will know how to care for himself or for his injured shipmates under circumstances where immediate medical attention is not available. AAA l be ihe jlifkerg Mlm' as in Alhe 0 Swim, lallre. ag Pro. HIICC of knowl. ble, the HS, and lded by also rc- Jw how Sunder ntion is All X V, Y glib - "4,f.-mam-A ::4Q:.:iQ i11.4fQ414:1:m:m.,i:if'.f25L:gu.14.'znQf:.i.fnAi's.2Azi,i'31,....' ff-'f',.r"::J..fP...51.Q 'kfgup32:-....m"i"m:n.yEKM.'f'.,.ri? EE if! -Q ,..,,A AA - L 3 L If Q I Til 5 U 5 W ? : f . 5 1 If 9 I S 2 2,3 if i,.g ,.g P .. i' 1151? E' 475. 5 if P, rn: ., Q51 V x-, .fi L' 7 ' 'fFj if! Eli! 5 'A 1, ,W N GR ..1 L L :gf A Emu gl . :X 3: :--i " it I 4. .A l 1 .1441 v ixitibiib' -v . ,N , 'NB f Tx A+, mx 4. .1 K x .vw J A ,W N X 1 , J 3fj'afifQ1'yQ kg ' K , X STX x ff XA f 1 , . Q f N f X xfff 1 ' f X 1 .4V,, 5 V , 1 1 ,XX X Nl ff 1 . 4 X A B I 5 , 5 Q., ,f-. 5 f s x X 'Nb'-Y N.......-v - XH- X 1.xFf'L.,lfLr" mu X 5 E 'fi E iff X I xv, MILITARY TRAINING The military drill, watch standing and inspections that are all a part of the recruit's military training are generally new experiences to him. The march- ing, the facing, the manual of arms at first seem difficult beyond all reason, but after a week's prac- tice, confidence begins to appear and by the end of primary training the company has become a sharp appearing unit. Even though the navy man seldom carries a rifle or marches in a military unit after he completes his recruit training, there is a definite and important place in recruit training for military drill, with and without arms. The military control of the company is gained and maintained through constant drilling. Leaders are discovered and developed, and others learn instantaneous response to command. All de- velop coordination of mind and body, and an "esprit .- .. .. .-.i.,.,,..-,..- .... .........,.-...,,..-.........., de corpsl' grows within the company. Together with physical training, military drill is a part of the phy- sical conditioning or "hardening up" process for the recruit. But most of all, military drill teaches the recruit the importance of implicit obedience to or- ders and the importan.ce of the individual in a mili- tary group, whether he be in a marching unit, on a gun crew, in the Ere room, or on the bridge. Inspections will always be an important matter in the life of a man in the Navy. In recruit training the vigorous competition maintained between the recruit companies is based largely on a series of regular inspections which serve the double purpose of teaching him the requirements of military life while comparing his performance and that of his unit with the performance of others in'training with him. AAA ,V L? 2,13 ,bxt 'X x N Y 1 l s l x.' .1 wuh W Dhy. fOr the mes 1hQ I0 011 a mili- itx Ona nlattcr raining fen the cries of purpose my life 1 of his ngnith X - A L 15, N r K 1 1 I 1 W 1 i L 1 1 1 1 1 ,, -71f"Y ,f - W9 Ei I - , I, ' f MMJVI If ,W U. if kW: 'f W Q x f V x I J 4 ,, w f km f Z 'R . 1' , 'Sf-P 53 ' V S K X 1 1 3 5 4 1 X., ' ,Mffw , f I Mx fff ,xl v x V 1 fy ,ff R! X X, , . :Wff 1 X I R I f lf! ,f . ,W ff , fx, K I fftqf X XX! , , ,,A..... -,,,,M.. ,,,, -.. f f ' ' 1' f k V I , f , , 1 , f , Q ff , X- ! xx 1' X N f ,.,1 f X , x ,f ' , 1 .. vm, WW I ? S 5 i 01" MGX . N , Sfiffr ' .YI lu SE 5 av. ,-0 num ,W , , V gf' 'ww ' f f , ,, -P90 ' V ."H4r..,.,:n A l .. V S - 2 V, - - - - 3 A 'i ' -' A7 J .r 1 I 7' M I , 5 , ' ' - - 77 l .. I M aw, ,x Q , 54 ""Wu-ufnf' ll 1 YM 'fu -1 , va 5 r ' I 'L 4 Q. V Q Q 'I A , 4 - Q 3 5.1-'6,,.gl,, ' If ' f 7 H 'nf A lr-M ' 1 .. 7 " L...-. 5' - ' ww' , - ff I - ' 4, , H ' E-ff? 4 'ef H - f swf' my W , , Amt "ww A ,.-I If ,, - .Q 3 , . My Thr A I ,,,,, L Y I . ,.., m YM ' W' .is by .4,z..... h ,,,m.,,M 'M"'f', V X In Y 'M?.9"" ' ' 'vv - " , -J V X . Y My nur ' N ,mf W ' .. H , , l ,- P S WV .. Z 4 .1 1 , 'W K" MV Q' Y . a ,, yy AAIV 'fd s ,gl 424 f - --' We -V K Q f "W A ,, 5 .,-. sq k : R 1 -,, x lf - W' fl ,A , ' V Z "" J A1 Mkvff, . x' 'W ' ' Lb w, 5 V.. I , ' Q ,,,,3,,.M..v,l't x , ' ' WIA' A v mn, .,M..,,.....,. ,.. - A . ,.,,, If I I up i , 2 , ffa , A '. ig, , vf ' ,V , V x ' 'XX K' , Q1 'Iii ,, Q., k W ,, N , g, MZ, , , , v V. Wg ,X 'W 2 - 5 ' Mfr' 57' A W Z . .Qi G , 'vw ' A, ff ,, , W gl N M' . N f , , 1 f 1. ff- . , ,,,, ,,,, -- - ' , -f,,, ,1,fW,Wf.g ,. .. fi , . X ' If' ' ""'i VW ' wwf 'ff ' f ,,'V . MW W""" 1.-.ei , 3 J, ax: ' Q :,...,,'f f' 1' ff "" 'f A tx Mm, ,' ., 5 1 -3.5553 ,M ,. f 1, V Az, A if 4, i 4 4 X xllvjisq 1 I f , V w:fg5j-:5,,!-g:,- - - x , I Ii " X iff ,af .y J mfiavwf, wi ffifvfwf' ' .. ' ' ss x P x . ff 'X, ' ' Tf'gv',-2" fc,-, " ,, ' f' "5 ji Ti, -'X - MS ,wp 1,4,f1,fw.., ,f f + I f ,x.. - . . b A - -W 41 17 x .fa ami 1 2 Q r 1.319 ll. 1 s I .W 1 o ,Q- ,-1 -- i A-x ,Mf- A-,w XXX XX XX K V - .- ..Y.- ,..,, .....1-,a-- -- X X W NX XX NN xx Y X ' 9 X fN,.,,,, . - Q X . N... , Su V .r,, -GY - N X ' 1 WNW " H, , V -mb an MM R X ,...Q. f ,,,i,., 'X . v K QiiN,.,Q,,aai!! v v , L .xx..x M , i ,f 5 C O if 'i cl Q Q A x i S i . : WW Q . M sw ' X.-sm-E , X. .X 4 A X .A QRS Brigade Commc1nder's Inspection , ul lm In on V121 hw 3 Q- , V L., -.SS 3 5 I, 154. 'Q -1 S, , L- J xi J' I iff, J .fm ww ,MA ff? Vww ' h f ,Z j., W 4 v 1 KN sl f ,Q X l J' ml A 5 , 1' 2, , M . mf f, 2 , ' ' MW 404774 f if My M W , ' 'f 7 f ffq. , W P Q gk, I 'V ,,, 'I 1 fiff V - ,,..,.ff ff ,, W y Mfg- ,lf ,' 3':?13j,,,4ggg4 , W J , a ww 712 f ' X X jf 'u A , ,Q :nm nwaanf 5133, fy J f ,- , ffffwmfxgfm Q, E Wx ' , W z:,fZLJz4'25LZ , f f W I- uw: Am viii 1' vim- , ' Wm, A Wu ' 1 if W WK , Kit gjgiuf ,f W7 , ,A U ..VA , l ' f rw-.."ff I V. A I ,,,,.,,y,, A, I. L f My :ALT .wx mf nm ' Wm 2 450, K' Wx My W , v 11747 V f: W, f 1 f f f x ' H 4 w- f 6 - N 347,35 f P 792 151 ,J E A .,,1 f 4.. f . ,,' f If f -' 5 , :swf f ', 5 , gg ,, :J U P, 1 5 , au . Liziei ' 'Macau I , :mang- ' 1 Qcmlgh , I '99 NW 1 X X 1 3 K X , ,XY 2 'YW . JY iff? wrfiy .4-A .Ai , 1 Wag, ,f , f , ' Us , .1 , ,e J, Q., W f , sf Sl'lIP'S WORK TRAINING Afloat or ashore, each naval unit is generally a self- sustaining unit. The messing of the. crew, all the housekeeping chores, and the watch standing must be performed by those assigned to the unit. Through- out his naval career, regardless of his rate or rating, each man is in some way concerned with these serv- ice duties to which the recruit is introduced in his Shipis Work Training. In any unit, men in the lower rates will usually perform the "chores" and those in the higher rates will supervise them, all must stand watches, and all must live together in thesame ship. The fifth week of recruit training is devoted to instruction and practical experience in Ship's Work Training. For ten weeks of his training period the recruit is waited upon in the mess halls by other recruits and for one week he takes his turn in per- forming these important tasks for his shipmates in recruit training. Although the fifth week is speeincally designated for training in these service duties, much of his train- ing continues throughout the eleven-week training period. Every messenger or Sentry watch and every cleaning detail is a part of the recruitis training in the problems of community living. In the Recruit Training Command it is believed that the things a recruit must learn in Ship's Work Training can best be taught by actually doing them, for experience is the greatest teacher of all. ......- , , V I I ,ML wg 'X N . x R S L B 1 1 1 AV ,WU WN em 3 -x. X X QMQXS QQ ...-,H MW W A ,-, 'Jff x -X X Ljwjlxlwf DIXA X ff X 'x I 0 .f X ' V-N 1 l X i . W 5 if x 1 X . -N, X f f ' QS lx N. ., xi xxk ywf-':,g ss' . , x . Ns-f-. x in N-AQ' x xkaxw- A , X53 NNQ Q., X -X - M H M A -,.. ff- X X Y aww, L H NX X - , , X Q, T .fy - N' .X :Q N N ' SFX, ik N N ww X xx .is , V.,. . X X Q ww, K - Kkflv- ft . AX, 'xf . Q2 L fi f 7 7 ic? fc BARRACKS LIFE Probably the most important thing that a recruit must learn during his recruit train.ing is how to live with others in a military organization. Life and liv- ing conditions in the Navy diifer so greatly from anything the young man has known in civilian life that teaching him to live in close quarters as a mem- ber of a military group becomes one of the major missions of recruit training. At the Training Center his barracks is the recruit's "home". It is in his barracks that he spends an appreciable portion of his time in training. Here he establishes himself-in a sense, drops his anchor- for the eleven weeks in which he will be experiencing the transition from civilian to military life. The barracks is not only a place for the recruit to sleep, it is his most important classroom. Here he Ulearns by doing". He learns to live with others and to take care of himself and his belongings. The scrubbing of his clothing, the cleaning of his barracks, and the constant inspections all serve but one pur- pose, to prepare him for a successful life during the remainder of his to-ur in the Navy. And it is not all work, for the recruit must also learn the need of a Navy man for the companionship of his fellows, for mail from home, and for amuse- ment and relaxation. He should also develop the habits of writing letters and budgeting his spare time. These things he learns in his barracks life at the Training Center. IQ HCT? he NTS and The DHITHCM, me pm. lfillg the must also Ilioluhip r HHIUSC- 'elop the 1is spare ks life at ML IQ f X as I E v I 1 I X s ,,,, W 7 , Um nv I f 5 I 2 v x I 1 1 WW' V Q m,,,,,,fA 4 ,Q 'aww f 7 -Q-wwf .wa Q, if 4555 I ll' is X I 1 f L 1 W..f.,4 g . I NW L 1 5152. g v fix .ll Hg flu vi MQQI ri ng, 9, 551 y5le 2?Es E91 vp, 15151 fiiE U31 li2a W!! wzif sim s!! way? Els , Viz? i -?! F PE ij! li AWE? WNV r 'if 'lifts WM: lx 1' Nw ffiii X132 AC 4 r V A ' - - : 4 v I 1 ' Y Q 1 1 1 KI V , . 1 1 ' 1 X , . 1 Z X 2 . 1 , 1 A I fl wr ui! my x'- ,1 151 :ff '5 J ,N 79? " 5 f v X fi jl lk 5: H ii 43 El fi 5. ri 22 W I .! gi gs E: If ,I fi I I E Z: I! if L5 I .I I ...A ji 'v A.A- -L Q' Q X, -ff A W'-N. f f lv ' '4 'Ax Hy, Wm 9 g A a . X f f 1 . ,, ,f ' y 'll n p V- 1 ff" ky: Q .' f -f 'NA' X 1 . f p . . , A ' W. " 4 ,f ,Mx , fa .71 fm' gi fy W 4' 'Q' . , gy wr ! 2, E f' 'f M 4. ff ai , , X , W 1 Q 4? X ' X , ,, Q 1' fy 42' , f,ylfV3l5f1Z s- "1 'Ny' 5 Q Q, f 1 5 .W f A x A.. xg :X X ' , 'N jg' Q ,, . Z x ' gy 4 f , 5 xg X X :A .31 W, f - , Q--.m. -..W-...,-A, ,gy . L in N f MIS. . ,fri , K , VA QT 1 ,, lx. ,. - x In H'-G V . I N Y V f LQQQ .nf G A V .:.. .. Q Q. Lx X x M N xi.-. , Q is 4 ' 'swim , V X X , , 95 ' X Q QF I X 41+ ' f 4 X , X f X V X x y K 9 . ' wma., . ' ' ,g,.e:11 ,," S f fx w ffdfifff A -wfxw ,, X, Q . M may s Q Q A ,fp X WW 11355025 '1 Sw, Xa 1 5 ans-j xx: X W?-... ii? 'i R . I Tl' X T' 3 A- 1. 1 W5 Qafigv- f f Q l 'O I Q f 3 P ' I ' ' NA E A, X I ,, Z: ,f wg X 5 "W 3 5 i f S? -. 1 S 1 5 ,,. ,, . ,,,, xd- 5 ,ff Q .fs 4 1 S ,2, f 5 X 2 M. ' -1 N A " za.-2, N , YES, Q . '-iq '44, , N J . I 2 . I ' 11 sf , M K . . .1 7 , , , .Q V ,M 0 ' ' Q., f 1 V gf-2. ' W " 7 'Ext . mmf K 'L 'iw A f .1-'W ' J x W Y 2' 1. 2 X4 xv, M3 M I U3 RELIGIOU I.lF E A mf - . fr, fx JMX , X ,ffm ,,f 40' mx ,SW I 5 - gfwksd-QfSfiwg,xwf'?pf . f' 'N ' KM- , ' N' if Kmq . Aww xg 'fi Q, f wx A f' NWA my fizmqf' M, RQ' , f iff! A x 254514. f , ' A-f!f"'ifMN -' Said. k Q ' .-fx W, k '- 'WW i x Q23 we if X , Stix 1 X xxx X xx- X. Y ,NX mx s .....', -1, V RELIGIOUS LIFE In making the change from civilian to military life, the recruit does not leave behind the religious beliefs which he learned at home. Instead, he is given every opportunity and encouragement to maintain and strengthen his religious interests. Soon after his arrival, the recruit is given an op- portunity to talk to a chaplain of his own faith, who will acquaint him with the chaplain's role in the command and will explain the religious programs which will be available to him during recruit train- ing. Regular divine services are conducted by chaplains of all faiths, thus giving each man an opportunity to worship in accordance with his religious background and present inclinations. Voluntary classes of re- ligious instruction are held regularly for the benefit of recruits who desire to prepare themselves for church membership. The chaplains cooperate closely with the local churches to facilitate membership or attendance at services in those churches. Character guidance talks given by the chaplains are an integral part of recruit training. These are designed to foster the growth' of moral responsibility, spiritual values and strong self-discipline within the recruit. Recruits are encouraged to participate in the reli- gious life of the station by joining the choir or pro- viding musical accompaniment at divine services. In time of distress or personal emergency, the chaplains stand ready to give advice and counsel, and the recruit is encouraged to take his personal prob- lems to a chaplain of his choice at any time. The chaplains also maintain close contact with the Navy Relief Society and The American Red Cross in ob- taining financial and other assistance to those in need. Protestant Service .s X I , Q N, ss, f Q , N if , xv W ss, .. . 1 RSX X K 5 1 2 ar s . I s- wf s I s I v 2lSZ'ff':t ' Z X 5 I ii "-' f is : f " A X ,Q if .... T s fksy "1 S Y ,. 2 s. sr E X 1 4 ff 5 1, L X W 1 l E H 1 4 M. N7 aw ...,...f- My X mmf' M,-,f-'K f' - -,H ---f-.--s1oql7v"-- --1 --:fin - --f.-u-xfq..- K -1 .. -5 V. -f -V 1-..Y:,,,,- :gf L -rm, - .ivy Q ,lr ,,,,,, .v.,...-... , - A-, 46615 f, I C I C 0 L I SA was D JD -...M ' l A-4--'Z ,A ., v f'?.! ',V.,,-'ul' J , 0 I , 1' H J 4,1 f .A 1 -' A .f QNX , 6, . - . 'Q X , ' w '-UQ. - 't I, , ,K fl, , - . '- La. ,E3?af.- - ,IN ar :....:f! 4 q,l , i: 2 , 5 1 X If 45 X 0 1 . . I V 1 i 1 I -.. s, , gf ,a,.. 34 Wi 6 yy vf ,, X "2 f fr M V? QL 1 3 1 I If I, I IJ fi I I ' BE 'ii :EQ ga: Y S8 M rv 2 Q H My -45-dx , 'aiu-A " 5' o'-Y f - UQUEU BAN 'V .J . ." W ' "fl It - A AMX x 1 , ff fx x ' X N: gg- i"f': ,- 4 4 Q U53 gwgwblf fifm 10 xy: X iv' - Q kk L. ' 3 f, "',qQ W K 4 9. ' M f X "" '11, W . ' -X Q N -' , .-if 'I ' r -N, V ,,,, ,..., ' -1-:af-.:. fy' , N - . x XX ' 4- .9 -W 'x O X W 3 ,, W ' X fx X X N El '12 ' ' ' , 2 2 X if f ' NN 9 X W If X Qs ff W fMWWwW, ,MQW x X Y- N N 'tx Q Nw SX . K tk - Q xl lxhpx A , X N N X K X N Q NF Nc A J "1 '3-4.-1 1-1-- v- Q f f 'fy 4 ,VVV 1 , ' W 1. 11 N-.....L 12 ,g If 37 MJ' ,X 7 ' Qskx .s . , xii' 44 :tau xl' 1 'L 1 3 K f A lk. X ,--" 'S 1 X , X y . s . f ' LS ' 4 wi. ,, x 2 A Q,.,,L - , . 'I 1 pn!! pv- ,R , ,j,g,, ..,- ,-., A-Sip-.4 1: .-.41..:a ff A -' mf...-,.. 'x Q S yhnfvnxxxx WNW' 'Y W, . ,0,, W A Y X W1 ,iw if f.- ?3"4.w,.,a: ,fb N N.. X. mmxxmxwg i W. 2 , QM, ' ii I I QT T 7 f gf'-1-A fl f 1. X, V w ff ls I. M r ,JW ff N w'i5f W I , WWA f Q f P .ff-f fu Nl- 1 K v wg. K Q- x f M-M X ,-,QL -lr ii.. -11:-.:z.CF' ,fv- F f yifis 1557 N . ,,. .g,..mW--", X 1 I .Lv s I w 4 1. Q95 l qt! S0 Q-J 1 up washunnmuunuuqgggw, 1 0 55815 mi .-.L-,..-,.-..-... -7. -.-K.- ....-..., .......... , .-,-. r. - f- . in-L+ Y-1 ' ,.- X E. ff. ng"f.,' -4 sq N 4 xx ... N. S wk gm. " ,N r . P fm , V mfs ' , . ,Q-,,,Q, ' ,. , J . .wiv . A QQ A X..-kr gig, ,Q h ,,J35g?g,if:X'?'K M., ,. if :Q ,AQ Wsfxv-+"tv'1"XM 4.- ,lam,ia'fZ7g "fn ' - , We , x gg N, ww wWx'.xwQ 1, x'SiN5ggA.'.X:1, .4 rw 4 K f ww Q . in -gsm . 'wfitfsfff m , 9,631 , giifulj Q X I ww xx, xx ,AX , M, W ' K , X 1 A . ,. - ,Ml - , I V , 4: effigy" f - gf" W, N View 1 x,,i2l'A 3 K W X Hwww LLL' f ,. 'V Q af: ' I Iflf"fvg7m??,4WWM6,:,Qf?f3g-52,X,N ' WV ,I 4 - ,. Y--.--...' fli' . V 1 -' .. fy.'v'fffw,, . A---X' f X , X 'J 7,1 5 X f I Ni- M., -, ...R -Q--.. if--.... fi: ff! H! Nz 1 GRADUATION .AN Q. 11 eniiimunrnon Each Saturday morning on Preble Field all graduating companies participate in their hnal Recruit Brigade Review. Here, entirely under the command of their recruit petty oilicers, the graduating companies go through the now familiar parade procedures and pass in review for the last time. At this Review, the Commanding Officer presents the Brigade award, and possibly the much coveted Elliciency award, to one of the graduating companies and presents Honor Certificates to the Honormen of each company. Finally the Commanding Officer or a distinguished visitor makes the presentation of the American Spirit Honor Medal to the one recruit who has been chosen for this award. One day during the following week the recruit company will complete its last day of training, and its members, having sewn on their apprentice stripes, will be eligible for graduation leave and reassignment. jg 1-lik -.aqgiun-f ff' -r 1 . A, , Ln 4 FHIKQII A 1 lqtv K.. .ibm-. I N1 'I-N. F. .ffw 1 .- llnfu , fi, E .lith- ..,. 5 M V 'wqv 1-iq.. -- Y is , 1 ,, In - ,aa ' ff Q ml ,f ,A I ff, , it AMERICAN SPIRIT HONOR MEDAL This medal and certificate is awarded by the' Citizens Committee for the Army, Navy, and Air Force, Incor- porated. One such award is presented each week to per- sonnel who are completing basic training in the four services of the Department of Defense. The recipient is selected from the honor men of all graduating com- panies and is that recruit who has best demonstrated those qualities of leadership which express the American spirit, namely-honor, initiative, loyalty. and high ex- ample to comrades-in-arms. '. ,G V-, . .-P g. .- ' 1 .rl RECRUI'I' LEAVE Eagerly looked forward to throughout recruit train- ing is graduation and recruit leave. Upon successful completion of his training each recruit is eligible to take fourteen. days leave, or, if he desires, he may go directly to his first duty station and save his leave for a later date. Before graduation the recruit is given full informa- tion on transportation facilities to his leave address and may purchase his rail, bus, or airline ticket right at the Training Center. "The big dayl' dawn.s early. After 0400 reveille and an early breakfast, the members of the gradu- ating company stow their sea bags, pick up their leave papers and leave for the train or bus depot or the airport from which their graduation leave jour- ney will start. . ,..,1...si A . i LT. A 1 GUFM limes E Bud B.l Rvbenl Rodney Wm 3055: G. Quit, I .lima R- Dil! C, C MPL L JW L Edvard p Cult, L Bw L E ,wg-.. 1, 1 X LT. ARNOLD E. BETCHER EDWARD T GRUHOT Mc Officer in Charge Director Company Commander Company Yeoman DRUM and BUGLE CORPS Gary M. Adcock James E. Annala Bud B. Ashford Robert E. Bair Rodney H. Bergman Leonard F. Blake Bobby G. Brock Charles D. Brooks James R. Cook. ' Dale C. Coolidge Joseph E. Covich Joseph E. Davis Edward F. Diehl Carlos E. Doser Errol L. Duke 1 gum: NWN nv--..f, 2 W Q 1 ,af . rv '--r' Q3 .iii ' Q ,g. iam!! .4-qs.. Ne-.5---. 'flung' X a W. ll :FQQ ' Cv-0 fb' X -'rr" 97? E aJ"'a""Q.o. IJNKX 'T-"l,,."f . V f fan K 1.x ef, Q s.,,,w 'Curmu- "'I."' if-A-1 "'NNv.3" 'lfqtrfv ...WW -.asm At? -:Av 'GWR 3. if Saul S. Estrada James R. Faircloth Keith B. Farris Humbert A. Federico Dean L. Flesoras Lloyd D. Fox Tommie F. Gadberry Raymond M. Galligan David R. Gary Milton L. Geisler David Haaser Cecil M. Hillman Ira L. Hood William P. Hurley Quhid H. Izatt Stanley H. Johnson Walter W. Jones Roger L. Kennedy Edward J. Kleiger Howard A. Lane Jesse F. Latham Don L. Leonard Sonny C. Leslie Tommy J. Lopez Gene L. Lyell George XV. Mettler Dale A. Miller Jnmes E. Moore Edwin F. Osterhaus Diesdado Palompo D H Ja Al Cz He Da W In De AQ QW ...xQ n ,Qt Roland K. Perrson Arne D. Peterson William Pittman Clarence P. Puckett Salvador G. Rodrequez Roy Sainz Joseph W. Salard David W. Shannon Harvey A. Smith Alton L. Spain Dean G. Taylor Howard W. Tindall James R. Tubb Alfred J. Turner Carroll D. Veatch Henry Vargas Darryl E. Wahler William N. Wallace James E. Williams Dean O. Worley Aquinlar Ff'x 71- " -V- L , . ip. I , A. ---x fa. 4 , 1 1 Q.,-f' 1 . Ni !! W!! X '44,- if? ,-1-.-g,:f--f- Ili 1""""ina' palm, ol" KV' 4' Q-Q if Y 5, I hiv an-N -ai,-A H.-n -sf I- ,-nf """"':s. 1 P1143 Li L A 4-mx 'livin Lx fx K' ' owjrwi V -ru ...F"3, 'Win-1 hs. 1- ........... F! L .N -, X Z!! , ,,,, , , , , , I I A Q 1 V, f i ff' ,f , V ,y , ,W ,. 4 X-.. . , ' --2:-,. I ff f ., 53' ,, C" 'Q ' : Q- ,t ,W ' ', V KL ' Q ,, f Q", -. , 3' Y fg 1 ' - ' . . f , Q L ff fy Q P ' L' ' " 4 ' W . .M 1 3 , , A V gk I Ax sl fi. b- 1 , ,g. ik ff I 4 .bm If 5 , f Q V - X - . , . ,, Q 1 2 1 , A3 A ' Q 1 -ag uf. 1 V -fl H V t fi V' -' ' f, ' 'I ' x Aa V ,il ' I X ' x 'fn wif 'rth' ,Z 1 -V 'H "1 M' 7 13' 1 , f , A., xt' g ! G 5 .x l ,f .1 , - 1 ,fd f f 1-.4 ' If , i r if . ,, , 'P F-I 0 I ,, ' If f -W 5, 4 , ff! ,', HL T xi 3 1- 1 K? ,. I , 'ff' I ff- 'Q ""' f If , ,A , ,, , , if f"' V ' ' , VN A ' nv' - .A XV Aw--gn Q S " sw 1 5 " , ,Nr 1 ,,,,,,, M Q W , v J N ' 3' ' !"'zt' fy , ' ffm' " 1 . , f L X 5 s af' Sf f Z ,,'. L :- 1, Mx" 1 ., i N Tj? ,N I K 1 , f I 'iq' - , If , . I , V 1' -F F ' i , 5 ty' I A 'Q , f' J, . I h. 1 1 1 , , V ' r ' ,f Y X' A1 , , ,. L A r- ' .v 0 Q1 f fl ,, J - . . L". ' 1' f 1 Q I g ,- - 1-4 wav N 'I' F . , ev . " - -'f E K! K Q- ,. V xi N , H , ,Nw 6-'4 1 I Y X4 if 1 .. ff ' if L me 5 ., ...mg . f if A eijff gf X , 9 if X . 3 . up X X .. , - 7 , 51 ul X ' -Qff X .4 4 A' L X u , -f .-Q 1 r 3 Nl Q Q. , .L X X X x X, X . K' x r Y ' ' xt ' 19 Sw Si x X G J-A qqi I E was ' WW' lm 5 . 'X 3 j . X In 'A tx i Q ,jf 1 V ' I X X, X X, X fa, f 9 '. XXX V ,haf 1 ' X V - ,J SA y, X NX kg -A. ki Q J , 1.X f x X ' u Y X X 1 1 A ' 'J N 23 X A' X 4. Xl fl X S k gs I l '6 - V2 ' in M' ' X .X - a r' ,hu f -AX., P' 1 ' - XL .ff X-WX-X., uv' 'X . Q Q X . X EXE L L 4 , X X ,X A-1, ,,, D X13 X H ., in a- -' Ji' ' .' ' ' 1 V ...L , 'X . fig-is X' 'i ' XX. X, M Q ' ,nn 51? '. I, A :L .... . ' ' Q ' I iv X 5? ff f1X.L X. .W ' xx QX ,, X -X ' bf- X N' X? , E uzqtn- X "5 - Q A X X .X ' gp . XX - ' ' , .Xg X ' ' X Xi -X -..S XX 'W 'A ' A an K f -r- ' gig .X X ' X X X ..X - X j X . X, " XX A .X ' xi 4 M X ,, :XN XX XV, QXXQXXM X K 1 f' X X K iq X-f XX X 'Xm,22'XxXvXb4QQTxT5 VA-X--fzi W G fx' ' W ' X ' . X XX -X q H N NX . W 'YQ yfxiiffxs . my X X - 'X 1: X X...,,,,,1 X X -XX+ X Xf X .X kwa' . .- Q. N ' N' , X wiv W' -X X X A -XXX: 'uf' JN X X f N X if ' -' 3.'1'f'-'X:3:XXi:fX' fix 'X,X'fW3Xf-fGG?g:Ex1f2f3lfiAXQiiQX if?" 5:Xif?SIs?sTXgffEXgi9X7'3X'f:f . 4 X P-' xii X . ' .- X J f " ' xXhX X ' ' X X L .X 35611: if ikfikf' ' x . x 'L Q' f ' X X I M It X, mwiifjff ,WX ,X l,Xv.XXi'i5Nf". XXX X f ' X R X- 9 X N - U, ' X Yir' VET! fx SQ . x X " 1' , ' fx NX ' X,- V N' wa y , I XIX x . I. Q ,, X JJ XX f X Ly, ,K L A 5 . ,XX X X X- f ' ,Aw f X . x " ' X XQ ,nl 1 1- ,X :H M - X' A -. 'ff 4 fu I X : X, U XX L- LL X X' 1' XX X X wi. ,XX A X 4 . X .X X 5 3 , . ., 1 '-X ji i 1 , I f. .. RSX , X F' , W ,K Q, M rex A X .Af -.H XL XXX X dx g , X .X ' X1 ' ' , x 1- X , N ' 'Y' 4410195 Q - ' XXXXX X v. ' .X .X XX X X XXXX , XX AX X X , X. X '-..,-:xv-QX--..iy .tibw A X X .X.-. N 7 "-3-RX X5 X , ' X X - ' If - I. 79,-,X XvSXX4:awf , X A K' ' 5 x' 1 X .QX l I A X. im Xa X QXX, X x ' ' . A 11j'gX7:5f5X-115- XX. x h. :'1XXf:-'Fig 'frw : . X - X, -X l X , ,5WfX,,gsX31 , A XXN 1.5 XA: -'N--ff: . X WJSGQ 1 1. X my H X 3- 'X XXX, X.f,Xf-,m.1..X-WI., XXXXX. X. X h .1 1 , X V"K'- X W Q1 ,X ww v . , 4 Sf, A S 'Tj-. -7 X -sz f ! 1 'V' X. X' X K X 42,3 fhf I " V '4 , X -.il x ' . - I ' 'Q 5 ' X - . - 'ff fX M 35,2142 .' MH' ,X Q , 5 f fy.-0. x X Q 1 -3, .LM ,X V! L .L ' 1 ' 4 2. - Q L' 4. '5 6 w ' if 5 -ul if M -'-'N P' N, 9 ff' 5 :X H X. lf? A ti. I 4 ' .aff Q, I ,Q ,jg Kgfv ?4.Xfx.gngag,-Egg, 'QL N. M A 'fn,2d"q!s SQ 6'-fxiqygu 'YQ . -gfdfqi 'Wi AZ, ,ug . Am ' , ' ,- 2,3 ,... X.X. W 4.4.2 , , If I X Q .,.ma:-u , ' '4 -X. 5 ""'u..1 X ' X ':.X-:Xwsni Yftflfffff, X V 'ff xl I 47533 l f' W ..... .... ,ww V , X. X . 5-fgff k XISAXX' '- -"- : + kv." i .f-ar V'-Xyfw ' - x ,1f.:5'a-f,.w'1X:y.'-ffliV p'fJffsXfm4 fwfixiig,-W 2 ' "9 'g . 514-.ii?'i'fX2fL 1-fir: X44v,i'fXX "" - ' ' ."'a-X. -X fy, 'f "'f-:Ae f -.Qwsifffifffr g -mtvw--.,. ' 'X - , 'ti f..-g..'--.x w g ff Xtfggvgwf gm .M X,XffNy-gy 5, 54-4,2-w::fQ'2-,": ' ,,4'1+XXXwz-XV ' : Q' -XX' 4 ' X 1. f '1 '?'-5? .155 ' - f "'s., w X V Ss 3 1,5 Y 0 ,wi Nr xi' B K 4 . n ss, X fn., L if , ' x 31 DNB!! . 1 '- V I fi ' Q X 5 X 5 X v 1 X Z X X X 5 X 455. X .W X ,X .XF Q 'ii ' sf- - H! XX S X X .. X X .x X52 K A. ' .ef gf -,4- 'n r 'T-.T 5.1. jimi! v"f,,.rCx,f'Vf wif, .Jud J Rvws L zwmqf Qypkmff' " ' 'if'WQg '5i954fgE: 5 . iff' '56 7 'Q 5.95-vi HAMA n H J V I i 1 1 W 4 may me AJ' ., AL . an 5173111573 ' ' .- Q A .M QQ l Jn ,M fm? if . .-. ' Q-' ya i L ,, 4 1 X X . . iiewwg 'mia 1. X G X X ' f' . '- g X 'X v- g1,ys.g - ,,-- X., -EXL.f',g,. ..fE4'.. 54 . 'A Q- MS "i v ' M ' xx' 11'-+54---,- 'W "N ig ' AA '..f' r " ' A J . ut ' M ,r , 1,9 if' -X AA.-1 X39 ,1 ,ff 1' 4 .I fy! Ah, ' .MZ .M 5, -' ' a x 4. 1-U' "' . ,, ' .jd "X, L ma 'QL 4, - ,af A w-sg?i,3 L-"ny - 'Il' I x. M 15 .6 I' h - ,Nm L -it-QLTIMQ -"H"-I "-55'-'9""51f"'.F ' ,,', fr-'P' ' K' ' f :Vim ,,,, ' .fm , k . 2,--3 3 ,, Q Qs . 9 'Q-t w""A' ---if 2 -' ggi k SVS 31 1 3 . A .H WG VV!! k K . X fu "'1S-guavltg 'vii '.A4f"W" 4 ,7f",,, 'X,'gcf+'--ff XT Hzfffyffk ' 15' , Y 5. . A I V. -. - -wr -.W ,- 'wg H fu I, -.1 . I .f Q '- Xe-f' A5-2"-1. 'X' X ga' , lzffkiuf. 'ff' lui? vrfgfl f 1, Xi. X .-XXX AX. gsm Q, LL. X X X: .5 . .W .X-XX X 1-X-XX. -X Xx.. .. XX'-XX X Q . XXX ak . -.X X X XX X,..XXsf . . X. . A XX- X 1- X . :N T1 xx XXX . .X -X X Q . ' XX. . . . 'J i K 2 X U . .. - 1 , ' -L.X . ' . Y 5 T if X 1 I fs" ,Q -1 ' f f ' 4. 4 . i Zh! I X 1 X G, ,, , NW .4 ,Qui Y. EX vi . X . .. I ' Vrfsfw . , -M fog 1: 1, OV f 'K f, " ' ' 1 f ' 1 fi ' - 'Y - ,' , 'z ' ,Af .. X fy X 7- X. X : X X-X 1. . XX-MA . I -. ,fl Y - f fo ,. ' V - U .' ff' 4 fr. MX ' Y . . il -. XX. . ' -X. XX X. ',. .Q-X X X S 'Xpf .' 'pls , " M, V F f ,,,, 4 I ' 1 I - A , , ' f t w . N' . L 4 5 Q . X fr ' . X :N A 1 x . sfo. gm. X QXXXX . iz X 'MLA 1 A , y ' I K . 1 "' ' ' v u 'V .vw-,,v'g, 1 ,I ' U s 'T' al .154 H' X v N rxxwm A 4.1 if V x P f F 1'-I ' 5 ,,:,, S1 X rdf N +1 . is x ' X ' XSQEQ EXE NJ Q X K A X 4.1. .1 - , .A-J, vm' 4 ,gf 1 un X XX X X f.., N. Q-E xl? '.XNX-N xx - 9 V ' , ,, , y . 4 T X .. " ' + A f iii. . " it K "'J'gg . Q I 1, MX. f.,V.XW if . . 1 fi x f ffff . L . .. .X X. .. ' ' ' if ' x L. ii 5 W. lava X "if + W i WX? XR W YY XX NXXQSXXXXXX - 'X ' - - X . X 'H X X-:X W X. N .,i,. x u hs? - N' T4 QW - :rim qw BN 5 1 FN, I S f' .1 n 141 I is K "tt" 'Wt 'vliliiz-. -9-... .f , V w A 'W ' - - -M : , mmm. ,. V' f -fm, -V '- A. r A Q ' , 'K - " 1, 'K . fmwfsgmw-'e,w1Mw1iM ,, , V' " "H A "5 ff fag! :. A 't J., "'..4r':"5:7:55'G"i-2 , . ,,:.fg"' . K, ,A L ,M F I? up-Qu-Ermfw. raw' 1 My . 91" 5. M K i 1 I 5 s 1 ,M I 1 I i ' nv 5 1 1 n i I 1 I. 4 n E , E., 'WSH -In l:X'. if gpppllllllql. rffz , A ,. -.. , J .,. ,, M ,, , - an V '-2-+9 ' 'ff' .wa ,015 Ex' 1. V -'Ya , 'MMQ4' 51' 541' ,Q - j . , Q W N vu U ,G Q' 1 ,,,5Vvafs,g , ,A , ,9,Q-f--1, A J - ,-, ,-I. .-11, 1, A .-.MN -v , n N ' 1, . -' .'.. N ' . 'l ' 'i ' 'lf , 'V wif H . - . . ' ' ' f- ' f ' , f ' A . , ,. ,A ,, ML, .t A "2 '- -f Qwgsw, , 4,-V, .,, ,.- , ,"', N-ff , 'ff' 3 'J -9 -x , f ., .,,.u1,, fa 45' '?'?.f-gwwf , ff 'ww-37 A bf f 14,9 fr. . - yn ' ' hz" an , ' . Aw 'I WW, ,, ,X . 1 - 9' ' " i 4 I :W 'li 1 J., 50:5 iz' I1 A Q 3 f V, W P f if nuff-'fVMlx54'3-ff J' 1 R+? an L,,. 5, ,. W ,iVv1pA4ff . V, , A I, V, i A MM 'Qi' M, 'VL' A ,'z:!,.z4l ' A Lg , . 0. , ,i , ruff Ln- ,fx-4 Ag'-Q" " '- . vf' "I ' lr' ,A-,,. , ' :Jil J .1 . I Q y f,.:8,,,.pni ,,p,,f - 4 , -I if ,a Y. . r - . , "'-'--'. .""1...v- A A ,,,,. w g. 4 if H- 'Q,,..4+,.,-.-.Y ,f4Q:.f'357j33-, , . ' A 4 ' 4 I 'I I 'U' 4. : , H hh ' ' l..4-.,.q:411,- ' H V I-'WY U u'-'lm M1 5 V ggpf F n ,, , . ,, -1 ui.. M- . 9' " , A . -n www 101: 4 In ll 1 4 I ,., A, v ,3 1 -I' 3" 4 tj v - - ,F I 'N-, ","U"fl!.ll ' A"'f15? AML! 4 H ' JM 14. --p J., ,, J . , AIQ 1 e 4 ., .Q 4 XJ 2.5 wma, -V ., 129 .Ai -fi" uf, I'-we 1 "" 7 3 Q .-3 - 'f2P9""' ' ,.,.'qf-fzyggf-vw-115 'Vi' r 4 A f'vg"'l"7i1:q- ff. , ,, M W9Y9',.J?95?i' 4 ,N 4" ",?' ' I' 5. ' N- ,, . 1, Q .mA35:1j,,g,',, if . 4, s l Hfmlla D-, -new 1+-3-as ,,.J- 'AFA ' 1-"' ' QL fm " bf-+'..X .1 , . 5 , ' H, , U, A Q, 11, T., "'.'gfZ24geff,.w. 1 , J ' W ' 'I' U -1 M.. -.Na '- pgppnlflfv 9 . I 'J' , 4 f ummvw 'Ufilllfl ,I ' n lf! ll t ' 1, Vt' PIM? Wwmwf ' 01 N "W ' MH ,.,,.., 1,-f"f, , ,r.,,,- v-A -, " ' Q' 'F5"'g .JL ' .. . '-" " -1 ,., me-.-A, , , -'QQ . 3 S ,, rf A ' -' ' 48 1 vw ul YP rf ,IF Q n " ,xr . I ,--. Q. . S a ' I I.. 4' ., t ' . .Q- 'fins -I O - -. ' T5 ..." Q 0. ., X. 'R' -3 Q rf' "' . ' NU - 1' ., -Ai " 3-? .x:i"',Al.x 'if 'Lb 4' l'..'f,s . ,. vp- ' -,f- 3' U 1 ..... lur' I, b 'ur' ' 'Q ,.f'3' ' ' -.-f x v 1:11375 X 1 1- - nb.-A - z, Hi ' M- yxidmrz-l5V' ' . ' .-" A' - jg, 1 . ' ', :f:'ff,.53:1,tyg " ia! ., ' L f , -.. A ' -ww: K-gk -' - H . -'T F- My ' ' 'L 'i-2-"Gt5'TL1f4.1-- is 7:--'-' ,,. I .1 ,. v, ,z' ' ! 'f.f"2,:s, " 1 :A Q N , H X, lf.. 4 - Hgpgkg, Q., - Q . ., - ' - W "PAUL, - ' A 1 ..',,..4"rT ' ' 55 A, . - J.. r , .. - , ' o 'Q O .. A r V ,, , - 4 'wg . . D .Ml A Lan, . ,,...',h , .. . - ff M . -, . Qi, x ' 7 L A X' x .5 1 IL' 2 , vw any 5. f 0 R 1 -jg, , , 'hr . ft- V. 5' -1,-gg X A Xl 1 X -:PW YH' L, ' W -A D ' 1 iii' :""" lf-i24f,:?" f' 4 iv J A W 1' if 3 , . ,A JW uf, F, ,VM NJ -QR: i',,35,., 'Q V


Suggestions in the US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) collection:

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

1964

US Naval Training Center - Anchor Yearbook (San Diego, CA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.