US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA)

 - Class of 1975

Page 1 of 62

 

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1975 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1975 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 62 of the 1975 volume:

Y e 3 Q E 2 'E 2 3 2 2 E . s h 1 . t, K. Q A ' -If 1' FORT GORDON HISTORY 1. As new ideas gradually replace the old, Fort Gordon continues its planned modernization with improvements geared toward the fast-paced world of today's soldier. Improvements in housing and recreational facilities, as well as medical and educational opportunities are designed keep Fort Gordon Hon the move" in response to the Army's ever in- creasing demand for professionalism. 2. The post's rapidly changing profile is high-lighted by the new Dwight David Eisenhower U. S. Army Medical Center. This, plus Fort Gordon's growing role as home of the Army Signal Corps, make the 1970's another decade of historic progress at the Fort. 3. Fort Gordon was activated December 4, 1941, three days before the bombing of Pearl Harbor. In those first war torn years, it was called Camp Gordon, and not until 1956 did the Secretary of the Army make the post a permanent military installation and change the name to Fort Gordon. 4. Throughout those first years, hundreds of thousands of infantrymen trained on Camp Gordon's newly cleared ranges, marched on its unpaved roads and lived in drafty wood barracks. 5. These men were members of three famous divisions which trained hereg first the 4th Infantry Division tthe Rolling 4thj commanded by Major General R. O. Barton, a native Augustan. 6. Next in line for Fort Gordon's training was the 26th Infantry Division. After one year of training, demands for fresh troops sent the 'tYankeei' division departing for Europe. 7. Then in September 1943, the 10th Armored Division iTigersj came and trained for a short time before leaving for foreign shores. In 1972, after a 31-year absence, the Tigers returned to Fort Gordon. That year the Army Chief of Staff directed the colors of the 10th Division be returned to Fort Gordon for a permanent home. 8. About the same time as the divisions were training, the Camp Gordon Station Hospital was constructed, made up of 139 frame buildings with a 300 bed capacity. Today, it has an authorized capacity of 1,100 and soon will be replaced with the new 14-story teaching hospital. 9. In 1948, the US Army Military Police School began Operations on Fort Gordon. In 26 years, it has played a major role in the development of the fort, but now is only a part of Fort Gordon's history as it has moved to Fort McClellan, Alabama. 10. The 1st Basic Combat Training Brigade was activated on 1 July 1975, an event which marked the return of basic combattraining to Fort Gordon after an absence of five years. After a short and intense preparation period, training began on 3 October 1975. The Brigade has since become known as the itRattIer" Brigade and has adopted as its unofficial emblem the crest pictured on the cover of each graduating class program. A color reproduction would show 13 white stars on a field of infantry blue, representing. respectively, the 13 original colonies in honor of the bicentennial, and the Infantry which is the arm of service most closely identified with basic combat training. The rattlesnake signifies our nations readiness to defend itself. The nickname and motto are written on ribbons of Signal Corps orange representing the ultimate specialty to be performed by the majority of the brigades graduates. 11. The Consolidation of communications training and the construction of the Army's most modern medical center at Fort Gordon offer visions of even greater things to come as the post continues its tradition as a primary training site in the US defense structure. COLONEL GEORGE ARTHUR GRAYEB, JR. Commander, 1st Basic Combat Training Brigade Fort Gordon, Georgia 30905 Colonel George Arthur Grayeb, Jr. was born in Fort Shafter, Honolulu, Hawaii on 18 August 1928 and graduated from Drew Preparatory School in San Francisco, California in 1946. He attended the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York. On graduation from the Military Academy, he was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry on 3 June 1952. His initial assingnment was with the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team in Japan and Korea as a Platoon Leader in Company B of the 187th. After serving in various positions with the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team for almost three years, Colonel Grayeb was assigned as Commander of Company K, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, Fort Campbell, Kentucky in January of 1956. His next assignment was that of Airborne Recruiting Officer in May of 1956 with Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. In September 1956, Colonel Grayeb was assigned as Aide-de-Camp to the Deputy Commanding General, XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Colonel Grayeb's next overseas tour was an Instructor at the Jungle War- fare Training Center, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, US Army Caribbean in October 1958, he was then assigned as Commander, Company A, 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, US Army Caribbean. On 30 August 1960, Colonel Grayeb was assigned as Assistant Professor of Military Science, Georgetown University, USAROTC Instructor Group, Washington, D. C. After three years as Assistant Professor of Military Science, Colonel Grayeb was a student at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Upon completion of Command and General Staff College, he was assigned as Senior Regimental Advisor, 7th ARVN Division, Republic of Viet- nam. Following this assignment, Colonel Grayeb was Aide-de-Camp for the Deputy Commander, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Upon completion of the Armed Forces Staff College in 1966, Norfolk, Virginia, Colonel Grayeb assumed duties as Chief, Student Evaluation Section, Secretary's Office of The Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia. In 1967, Colonel Grayeb was assigned as Deputy Secretary, The Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia. He was then assigned to the 8th Infantry Division as Battalion Commander of the 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry and later as Assistant Executive Officer, ODC- SOPS, Headquarters, USAREUR. Returning to the United States in 1969, he was a student at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Fort McNair, Washington, D. C. Upon completion of this course of instruction, Colonel Grayeb was assigned as Staff Officer, Atlantic Division, Operations Division, ODCSOPS, Washington, D. C. Comple- tion of this tour of duty brought Colonel Grayeb to his assignment as Chief, Management Assurance Division, Military Equipment Delivery Team, and Deputy Defense Attache to the Khmer Republic fCambodiaj. Colonel Grayeb returned to the States to become Branch Chief, Far East Division, J-5, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington, D. C. Colonel Grayeb was assigned as Commander, 1st Basic Combat Training Brigade, Fort Gordon, Georgia on 6 August 1975. EDUCATION United States Military Academy, 1952 iBSjg The Infantry School, 1952 and 1957: Com- mand and General Staff College, 1964, Armed Forces Staff College, 19663 Industrial College of the Armed Forces, 19703 The George Washington University, 1970 iMaster of Science Business Admini CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF PROMOTIONS RANK TEMPORARY PERMANENT RANK TEMPORARY PERMANENT 2d Lieutenant 3 Jun 52 Major 21 May 63 3 Jun 66 1st Lieutenant 3 Dec 53 3 Jun 55 LieutenantColonel 13 Feb 67 3 Jun 73 Captain 11 Sep 58 3 Jun 59 Colonel 1 Feb 73 LIST OF DECORATIONS AND AWARDS Legion of Merit 0 Meritorious Service Medal 0 Army Commendation Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters and "V" Device 0 Joint Service Commendation Medal 0 Republic of Korea Unit Citation 0 Khmer Republic Medal with Silver Star 0 Meritorious Unit Citation 0 Vietnamese Unit Citation 0 Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Silver Star 0 Air Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters 0 Vietnam Medal of Honor f1st Classi 0 Bronze Star Medal. INTERESTS AND HOBBIES Colonel Grayeb enjoys tennis, handball and soccer CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF ASSIGNMENTS FROM TO Student Officer. The Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia Jul 52 Dec 52 Platoon Leader, Company M, 135th Infantry Regiment, 47th Infantry Division, Fort Rucker, Alabama Dec 52 Jan 53 Student Officer, Ranger School, The Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia Jan 53 May 53 Platoon Leader, Company B 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, Republic of Korea May 53 Oct 53 Assistant Battalion S-3, Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, Japan Oct 53 Dec 54 Headquarters 81 Headquarters Company. 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, Japan Dec 54 Sep 55 Platoon Leader, Company K, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, FortBragg, North Carolina Sep 55 Dec 55 Commander, Company K,187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, Fort Campbell, Kentucky Dec 55 May 56 Airborne Recruiting Officer, Headquarters, 101stAirborne Division, Fort Campbell, Kentucky with duty station Fort Chaffee, Arkansas May 56 Sep 56 Aide-de-Camp, Headquarters, XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg. North Carolina Sep 56 Jan 58 Student Officer, Infantry Officers' Advance Course. The Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia Jan 58 Oct 58 Instructor, Jungle Warfare Training Center, Headquarters 8 Headquarters Company, 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, US Army Caribbean Oct 58 Jun 59 Commander, Company A, 1st Battle Group, 20th Infantry, US Army Caribbean Jun 59 Aug 60 Assistant Professor of Military Science, USAROTC Instructor Group, Georgetown University, Washington, D, C, Aug 60 Jun 63 Student Officer, Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Jul 63 Jul 64 Student Officer, MATA Course. Fort Bragg, North Carolina Jul 64 Sep 64 Student Office, fSp1 Frenchj, Defense Language Institute, Monterey, California Sep 64 Dec 64 Senior Regiment Advisor, 7th ARVN Division, US Army Military Assistance Command. Vietnam Dec 64 Apr 65 Aide-de-Camp - Deputy Commander, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam Apr 65 Jan 66 Student Officer, Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, Virginia Jan 66 Jul 66 Command Sergeant Major Horace H. Howell Command Ser- geant Major Howell was born in West Palm Beach, Florida on 1 March 1926. He entered the Army on active duty in January 1948 with the 510th Tank Battalion at Fort Polk, Louisiana. From Fort Polk, he was assigned to the 42d In- fantry, 2d Armor Divi- sion at Fort Hood, Tex- as. Next, he was stationed in Korea with the 7th Infantry Divi- sion, then to Fort Ben- ning, Georgia with the f ntr Division From Fort Bennin he was a ain 30th In a y . g, g overseas to the 9th infantry and 371st Armor Division in German Vietnam as an advisor then to Fort Gordon with the 2d Basic Training Brigade. From Fort Gordon, he was stationed in Thaila there back to Fort Gordon with the 2d BCT Brigade and the MP next assignment was to Fort Sill, Oklahoma with the 30th Infantry, 1 n V USAMPS. From Fort Gordon, he went back to Germany with th Brigade, 3d Armor Division and once again was reassigned to Fort don with the MP Brigade, USAMPS. CSM Howell was assigned as C mand Sergeant Major for the 1st Basic Combat Training Brigade at , . P Gordon, Georgia in August of 1975 CSM Howell is a high school graduate and has attended several Academies. His date of rank is 30 June 1966. Among decorations he received are the CIB, KSM, UNSM, NDSM, AOM, Good Medal Award Award, ARCOM, WWIIVM, EAME, ABSM, AFEM, NDS Overseas Bars 2, RVNCM, wfdiagonal device!VSM. G M, 'IS t i Chief, Student Evaluation Section, Secretarys Office, The Infantry School, Fort Benning. Georgia Deputy Secretary, The Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia Battalion Commander. 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry Division, US Army Europe Assistant Executive Officer, ODCSOPS, Headquarters, USAREUR and 7th Army Student Officer, US Army Element, Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Fort McNair, Washington, D.C. Staff Officer, Atlantic Division, Operations Division, ODCSOPS, Washington, D.C. Chief, Management Assurance Division, Military Equipment Del Team Cambodia Deputy Defense Attache, Cambodia Staff Officer, Southeast Asia Branch, FEISA Division, J-5, USA Element, Office ofJointChiefs of Staff. Washington, D.C. g Chief, Southeast Asia Branch, FEXSA Division, Deputy Director, PMA J-5, USA Element. Office of Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washinton, D.C. Commander, 1st Basic Combat Training Brigade, Fort Gordon, Georgia Jul 66 May 67 Aug 67 Nov 68 Jun 69 Aug 70 Aug 72 Aug 73 Feb 74 Aug 74 Aug 75 Jun Aug Aug Aug Feb Aug Q AW DEPARTMENTOFTHEARMY fj5gJ?52Qw HEADQUARTERS19TBA9CCOMBATTRAHHNGBRGADE C. ,i , X ea Y 5,9 'Arr s 0' NT Or +9 TX 00 A v A Y' JA :t1af3lGf'6 Q ,2,lIlH,g,Q ,,, FoR1'e.oRooN,c.soRGnA aosos . lang. . 6 O' V 1 IN nzprv REFER TO ATZHTB CONGRATULATIONS, SOLDIER! Just as the weapons of modern warfare are being constantly improved, so is the Army's most potent weapon, the individual soldier. In the future, as in the past and the present, you, the American soldier, are the ultimate weapon as the United States continues to meet the challenges of the rapidly changing world around us. Guns, tanks, missiles, and switch- boards are only as good as the men who operate them. That is why you have been trained -- night and day -- to prepare yourselves to meet this ever increasing threat to our democratic way of life. Men before you courageously fought, bled, and died to build our country into the mightiest nation in the free world. Now it is you who must meet this challenge. You must be prepared to make any sacrifices necessary to preserve our American way of life, a life based upon the dignity of the individual. This challenge calls for highly trained soldiers, ready to move, and to move fast. It calls for soldiers equipped and trained to fight, whether with rifles, radio equipment, or nuclear weapons. Your training has been rough and realistic as its main purpose was to prepare you -- the American soldier -- to meet any enemy anywhere in combat and defeat him. You are now a member of the finest army in the world. It is you, the individual soldier, who must keep it the finest. Congratulations, soldier -- you have now joined the ranks of the legions of citizens who have served our country in war and peace. L- I 9 3 GEO GE A. G YEB, JR. Colonel, Infantry Commanding Lung ,. ,,+'f?. 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Suggestions in the US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) collection:

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 49

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US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 56

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US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 28

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US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 23

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US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Gordon, GA) online yearbook collection, 1975 Edition, Page 33

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