US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1973

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1973 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 32 of the 1973 volume:

u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis- sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup- ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla- toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non- commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en- tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu- late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train- ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub- jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT G. CARD, JR. C om m a ruling G e neral US Army Training Center and Fort Ord Fort Ord, California General Gard came to Fort Ord from the Pentagon where, since June 1971, he has been the Director of Human Resources Development in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff tor Personnel, Department of the Army. In this position he was responsible for leadership and behavior; personnel services, race relations equa ' opportunity, and alcohol and drug abuse policy. General Gard served in Vietnam with the 9ih Infantry Division, Initially as the 9th Division Artillery Commander from August 19GB until May 1969. and then as Division Chiefs Staff until August 1959. General Gard was born at West Point, N.v., on January 28, 192S. He graduated from Texas Military Institute. San Antonio. Texas, in 1945, and entered West Point m 194-6. Graduating from the US Military Academy, he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant of Tiefd Artillery. During the Korean War, General Gard comma ndeu a firing battery of the 145th Field Artillery Battalion in combat. After attending Harvard University from 1955 to 1957. he joined the faculty of the US Military Academy, where he was arf Instructor in i960 he returned to Harvard to participate in, the Science and Public Policy Program, earning his second graduate degree. After attending Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, General Gard was assigned to. US Army Europe. He commanded the 5th Battalion (Airborne), 51st Field Artillery, and then returned to tne United States to attend the National War College in 1965. From the summer of 1956 until his departure for Vietnam in August 1965. Genera 1 Gard served in several key positions in the Office of the Secretary of Defense in the Pentagon, including Military Assistant to the Secretary of Defense. BRIGADIER GENERAL EDWARD MURPHY MARKHAM. Ill Deputy Commanding General US Army T raining Center and Fort Ord Edward Murphy Markham. Ill graduated from the Unded States Military Academy, West Point. New York in 1951 as a Second Lieutenant of Infantry. He attended the Officer ' s Basic Course and the Basic Airborne Course and Jumpmaster Airborne Course at The Infantry School, Fort Banning. Georgia. General Markham served r Korea in 1952 as platoon leader, executive officer, company commander, and operations officer with the 1 7th Infantry Regiment. He subsequently served as Liaison Officer. G3 Planning, with tne 7th Infantry Division. In 1952 as First Lieutenant he was assigned to the 82d Airborne Division, Fort Gragg, North Carolina. After obtaining ois masters degree in Civil Engineering, Genera Markham was assigned to the United States Military Academy as an instructor and also later served as ar Associate Professor of the Department of Mechanics. After completing the Advance Course and Ranger School in 1958-59 at Fort Henning, Georgia. General Markham was assfgnod to Germany. Promoted to maror tie served as a company commander with the 52d Infantry, and as Staff Officer in both Operations and Logistics, 3d Armored Division. Upon completing the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leaven worm, Kansas. General Markham was assigned as Operations Staff Officer, SoinT Chiefs of Staff, Washington, D,C- As a Lieutenant Colonel he graduated from the Armed Forces Staff College in 1966 and then went to Vietnam as a Battalion. Commander, 1st Battalion. 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. In 1967 ho was assigned as Plans Officer, G3 r Headquarters- I Field Force, Vietnam. After attending the Army War College, Carlisle Barracks. Pennsylvania, General Markham was assigned as head of a force planning branch, US Army Element, Pacific Command, Hawaii, General Markham was Commander of the Isl Brigade 4th nfamry Division. Fort Carson. Colorado, when selected for promotion to Hrigooier General, He was transferred to the United States Training Center. Fort Ord, California, on 29 July 1 973 to become the Deputy Commanding General COL William T, Leggett Jr, Brigade Commander HEADQUARTERS HEADQUARTERS COMPANY Commenced Training: 1 October 1973 LTC Le$ S. Ihara Battalion Commander FIRST BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Completed Training: 15 November 1973 CPT James D. Robertson Company Commander 2LT William M, England Executive Officer 2LT C.A, Lieske 1SG Ray mond A. Coulter PSG Thomas Rogers Training Officer First Sergeant Senior Drill Sergeant SSG Miguel Pablo Drill Sergeant SSG Henry L Polk Drill Sergeant SSG L, Young. Outstanding Drill Sergeant SGT R.A. Heard Drill Sergeant SGI Ronald Johnson Drill Sergeant SSG Aiken Johnson SP4 Sakata Supply Sergeant Company Clerk SGT Kn i fton Drill Sergeant PFC Douglas Pannel Armorer Supply Clerk William Akui George Alpaugh Michael Alta mi rant Paul Archuleta James Bambula James Behrends Roberto Bejarano John Blunck Ken Borg jimmy Bourda John Brazelf Louis Carrow Johnny Carter Daniel CasteSo Verl Caswell Donn Clark Robert Colburn Steven Conrad Roy Goto Loren Coty Charley Crawford Alfred Gripe Gus Crocker John Croliey Jack Cuellar Avery Del ton Donald Demott Robby Doyle Randall Dudleston Benjamin Dunn Thomas Dunn Ronald Egan Charles Elderts Rick Ellis Ricky Estep Faamasino Faaliliga Hixlord Francts Howard Fu Joe Garda Virgilio Garcia Ronald Giflett Michael Graddy David Hall Wesley Hall Garlyn Hanel Richard Harrington Ronald Hartman Kin Hasseihalch Charles Hedges Anthony Herrera Stephen Hewitt Marcus Hopkins William Hula Robert Huth Dennis Ingham Jose Jaramillo Russell Johnson Tyrone Johnson James Jones Kenneth Just Michael Knoles Earl Kurtz Allen Lalim James Lambert Richard Lanmng Robert Lee Kelly Levitt Richard Lewis Robert Louisville Alfred Lowe Bobby Lowrance Jaime Lucero Bobby. Lund Robert Lyons Edward Majeski Barry Malone James Manriquez Jeremiah Marshall David Martinez Dean Martinez Richard Mayer James Meaddows Carl Meeks James Metiers Christopher Mitchell Steve Monfils Robert Moritz Ronald Montz Clifford Moreno Terry Mullen Michael Murphy Larry McBride Patrick McCarron Michael McCarty Chris Nelson Juan Nevarez _ Loren Olson Bob Pedro Arthur Penson Malaeimi Penu Rafael Perez Daniel Peno Eliud Pinero Ireneo Pinptn Ambrose Porter John Preyer Michael Quiroz Daniel Ragsdale Scot Rasmussen William Renecker Buenaventura Revilla John Richardson Ralph Riojas Templeton Robson Jorge Rodriguez Robert Roper Roberto Ruiz Timothy Rush Randal Saenger Luis Salas Serafin Santos Laurence Scarberry Carfos Seales Herman Skerrett Michael Skiffington jay Slaughter Everett Sloan Terry Smathers Mervyn Smith Donald Sparks Leonard Theiss Rickey Thornton Robert Tidwell David Toscano Mario Toscano Santiago Trujillo J u J i OS Turner Raul Villareal Allen Wade Paul Walters Jonathan Watson David Webb Orin Wenzel Dennis White Ronald Williams Earl Brooks Jimmie Caldwell Sylvester Chappie Anthony Davis John Davis Paul Edwards Leroy Elder Hixford Francis Ruben Galindo Charles Hall Richard Noriega Tony Pressley Paul Reed Leonard Verbruggen Thomas Earnest Photo Unavailable Roy Bell r e J3 graduation Outstanding Graduates With Outstanding Drill Sergeant L. Young. ; : .-W HO’s Company Won Trophy for Best Marchrng Unit at Graduation JfHs ‘BoofcjBetcmgs ' Tot Jerry tDefkme vT$vart P.O. Bq;cZ92616 , Ehrtan, 0192329-2616 u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela- tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him- self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir- tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as- signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al- together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier.


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