US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1972

Page 1 of 312

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1972 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 312 of the 1972 volume:

COMPANY A FIRST BAT!%4JON FIRST BRIGADE u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis- sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup- ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla- toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non- commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en- tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu- late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train- ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub- jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) U. S. ARM FORT ORE : MJV 171 w ' H Chapel Bowling Alley SERVICE CLUB POST EXCHANGE 24 Hour Snack Bar HOSPITAL mmlti ORESSaa ofP«ESCsi?r Duiryuir 9m BEACH RANGE INFANTRY WEAPONS DEMONSTRATION GRADUATION CLOTHING DRILL AND CEREMONIES ■0 - ■ • ' 44 0 i ----- ddf m xu 4 I EPAWMENJ PAMP T.V. AS TEACHING AID r I CONFIDENCE COURSE OBSTACLE COURSE V. 2 •- . •ju- • INDIVIDUAL COMBAT TRAINING } r TO THROW FPOM THE STANDING POSITION STAND : } PULL PIN throw “PICNIC” IN THE SUN tfi RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP The drill sergeant teaches the fundamentals of military life. He instills in the trainee a sense of loyalty to his fellow soldiers and to his country. By personal example he inspires respect for his profession. The Army instructor imparts to the trainee the military knowledge and special skills that are essential to the men of today’s A rmy. These professionals are the backbone of the Army. TO THE NEW SOLDIER This book is about you and your comrades in arms. It portrays your transition from civilian to soldier — a change which has been experienced by millions of other Ameri- cans before you. It marks your own successful entrance into the finest Army in the world and the continuation of an almost 200 year old American Army tradition. Today, as in the past, our Army is only as good as its individual members. Your record thus far indicates that you are a worthy addition to the Army and that you will contribute to its proud traditions. As you progress with your Army career, apply and expand upon the knowledge and skills you have gained during these few weeks of Basic Combat Training. This Pictorial Review Book should bring forth many memories in the years to come, both in military and civilian life. PHYSICAL TRAINING RADIO OPERATORS COURSE Theatre — Post Exchange Golf Course ! I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! For two centuries I have kept our Nation safe, purchasing freedom with my blood. To tyrants, I am the day of reckoning; to the suppressed, the hope for the future. Where the fighting is thick, there am I . . . 1 am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! I was there from the beginning, meeting the enemy face to face, will to will. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge; my frozen hands pulled Washington across the Delaware. At Yorktown, the sunlight glinted from the sword and 1, begrimed and battered . . . saw a Nation born. Hardship . . . and glory I have known. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour, showed the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age, I am the Infantry! Westward I pushed with wagon trains . . . moved and empire across the plains , . . extended freedom ' s borders and tamed the wild frontier, I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! I was with Scott at Vera Cruz . . . hunted the guerrilla in the mountain passes . . . and scaled the high plateau. The fighting was done when 1 ended my march many miles from the old Alamo. From Bull Run to Appomattox, l fought and bled. Both Blue and grey were my colors then. Two masters I served and united them strong . . . proved that this nation could right a wrong . . . and long endure. I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! 1 I led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . scaled the walls of old Tientsin . . . and stalked the Moro in the steaming jungle still . . . always the vanguard. I am the Infantry! At Chateau-Thierry, first over the top, then 1 stood like a rock on the Marne. It was I who cracked the Hindenburg Line ... in the Argonne, I broke the Kaiser’s spine . . . and didn’t come back Till it was " over, over there.” I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! A generation older at Bataan, I briefly bowed, but then I vowed to return. Assaulted the African shore . , . learned my lesson the hard way in the desert sands . . . pressed my buttons into the beach at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with determination and resolve. 1 am the Infantry ! The English channel, stout beach defenses and the hedgerows could not hold me ... I broke out to St. Lo, unbent the Bulge . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and swarmed the Heartland. Hitler’s dream and the Third Reich were dead. In the Pacific, from island to island 1 hopped . . . hit the beaches and chopped through swamp and jungle ... I set the Rising Sum. I am the Infantry! In Korea, I gathered my strength around Pusan . . . swept across the frozen Han . , . outflanked the Reds at Inchon, .a and marched to the Yalu. FOLLOW ME! Around the world, I stand . . . ever forward. Over Lebanon’s sands, my rifle steady aimed . , . and calm returned. At Berlin ' s gate, I scorned the Wall of Shame. I am the Infantry ! My bayonet ... on the wings of power . . . keeps the peace worldwide. And despots, falsely garved in freedom’s mantle, falter . . . hide. My ally in the paddies and the forest ... I teach, I aid, I lead. FOLLOW M E! Where brave men fight . . . there fight I. In freedom’s cause ... I die. From Concord Bridge to Heartbreak Ridge, from the Arctic to the Mekong . .. the Queen of Battle! Always read . . . then, now and forever, I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! AMERICAN SPIRIT HONOR MEDAL The American Spirit Honor Medal is a medallion provided under the auspices of the Citizens Committee for the Army, Navy and Air Force Incorporated. In December 1940, a group of patriotic civilians established the “ Citizens Committee ” for the purpose of providing men serving in the Armed Forces articles not otherwise available to them. First used in World War II, in what was then known as the Second Corps area, the American Spirit Honor Medal was an award for outstanding service. Early in 1950, the four military services requested that the Citizens Committee again furnish the medal as an award for the Out- standing Recruit upon completion of his basic training. Reinstated at Fort Ord early in 1967, the American Spirit Honor Medal is awarded weekly to the individual among all the graduating basic trainees at Fort Ord who displays in greatest measure those quali- ties of leadership best expressing the American spirit, honor, initiative, loyalty and high example to comrades in arms. BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM LOYD WEBB, JR. Deputy Commanding General William Loyd Webb, Jr. was born in Mineral Wells. Texas. September 30, 1925 He at- tended Texas A M College lor two and a half years before being appointed to the U- mted States Military Academy. West Point, New York. After graduating from the Acad- emy in 1947 as a Second Lieutenant of Cavalry, he attended the Ground General School at Fort Riley. Kansas, and went on to the Officer ' s Basic Course at the Armor School at Fort Knox, Kentucky. General Webb’s first assignment took him to Japan lor two years as a company of- ficer and a battalion staff officer with the 7th Cavalry Regiment. Upon promotion to Captain, he was given command of Company F, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) in Korea, where he received the Purple Hear! and Bronze Star Medal for Valor In 1951 he returned to the United States as an instructor and iater a unit commander for the Officer Candidate School, Fort Riley. Kansas. This assignment was followed by the Advanced Armored Officers ' School at Fort Knox. Kentucky, from which he grad- uated in 1953. General Webb s next three years were spent with United States Army. Europe, in Ger- many. He served 18 months as a company commander, battalion executive officer, and battalion training officer lor the 29th Tank Battalion. 2nd Armored Division. As a Major, he became the G-3 Training Officer. 2d Armored Division, prior to becoming the As- sistant Secretary General Staff. Headquarters. USAREUR. in 1955-56 In 1956 he attended the Command and General Stall College, Fort Leavenworth. Kan- sas. and in 1957-58. attended the University ol Pennsylvania where he obtained his MA in English Literature. General Webb was assigned to the United States Military Academy as an instructor in 1958, serving for two years as an English Instructor arvd a year as Associate Professor of the Department of English He was reassigned to Germany in 1961 to serve 18 months as Staff Officer far the Organization and Training Branch. DCSOPS. Headquarters USAREUR During this as- signment. he received a promotion to Lieutenant Colonel and assumed command of the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron. 14th Armored Cavalry, on the East-West border, from 196310 1964 After completing the US Army War College in 1965. General Webb was retained as Assistant Director for the Department of Strategy. A year later he became Chief of the Plans and Policy Section. Directorate of Instruction, (or two years. He was promoted to Colonel m 1967. General Webb went to Vietnam as the Chief of Operations Analysis Branch. J-3. US Military Assistance Command. Vietnam. In 1969. he commanded the Support Com- mand for the 1st Infantry Division. In September 1969. he was assigned to the United States Military Academy as Com- manding Officer of the 4th Regiment. US Corps of Cadets, for 18 months before at- tending the Management Program for Executives at the University of Pittsburgh, Pit- tsburgh. PA. Then he returned to the Military Academy as Deputy Commandant of Cadets from May to August 1971, Upon being selected for promotion to Brigadier General, he was transferred to Head- quarters. United States Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, to become the Deputy Commanding General MAJOR GENERAL HAROLD G. MOORE Commanding General Harold Gregory Moore was born in Bardstown, Kentucky, February 13, 1922. He gradu- ated from St. Josephs Preparatory School in 1940 After two years at George Washing- ton University he was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He graudated as a 2nd Lieutenant In 1945. After completing parachute school in December 1945 he was assigned to Uth Air- born Division in Japan. In 1948 he returned to the United States and was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. N.C.. where he was awarded Master Parachutist wings in 1950. Moore was assigned as company commander with 17th Inf. Regiment in Korea in 1952. Later he served as regimental operations officer and was promoted from captain to major in April 1953. In Korea he participated in several battles including Pork Chop Hill. From 1953 to 1956 he was a faculty member at the U.S. Military Academy as instruc- tor in Infantry tactics. The next assignment was to the Air Mobility Division, Office of the Chief of Research and Development in the Pentagon. Here, from 1957 to 1960 he monitored research and development of aerial delivery equipment. Then came NATO duty in Oslo, Norway, on the Operations staff of Headquarters Allied Forces of Northern Europe. In June 1964 Col Moore was given command of 2nd Battalion, 23rd Ini. 11th Air Assault Division. Fort Benning, Ga. When the 1 1th Air Assault Division was inactivated in July 1965 his battalion was re-designated the 1st Battalion. 7th. Cavalry Regiment. 1st. Cavalry Division (Air Mobile). In August the l$t. Cavalry was sent to Vietnam In Novem- ber 1965 the battalion attacked and decisively defeated a North Vietnam regiment in the historic battle of the ladrang Valley. In December 1965 Col Moore was given command of the 3rd. Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. This unit fought in several battles before Col. Moore left Vietnam in July 1966. From September 1966 to August 1967. Moore served as chief of the Vietnam Section in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. After eleven months as a Fellow at the Center for International Affairs, Harvard Univer- sity. he served on the slaff and faculty of the Army War College for two months. Upon being selected for promotion to Brigadier General, he was transferred to the Pentagon. There he served as deputy director of plans. Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations. Department of the Army, from August 1968 to June 1969. General Moore assumed the position of assistant chief of staff for Plans and Opera- tions (G-3), 8th U.S. Army in June 1969. He became commanding general, 7th. U.S. Infantry Division in May 1970, and a year later. 1 May 1971, was assigned as command- ing general. U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord. COL Richard R. Peabody Brigade Commander LTC Robert Nourse Battalion Commander COMPANY A Commenced Training: 29 November 1971 FIRST BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Completed Training: 4 February 1972 CPT Wallace P. Brown Company Commander CSM Robert 0. Hunter Battalion Sergeant Major 1SG Roy L. Land First Sergeant PSGM.E.Hood PSG Curtis Easter Senior Drill Sergeant Training NCO PSG Joseph Salas Drill Sergeant SSGT. Collins SSG Donald A. Currie SSG Ernest Johnson SSG James Morris Outstanding Drill Sergeant Supply Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant SSG Clyde M. Poland Drill Sergeant SSG Workman Drill Sergeant SGT Kent Beck ADI SGTE.A. Neher ADI SP5 Arvin Webb Company Clerk SFC Rayford Bagley Mess Steward SSG Ephriam D Scott SP6 Johnson Assistant Mess Steward First Cook SP6 Watson First Cook SP4 Rudolph Franklin First Cook Donald Amos Thomas Anderson William Baggett G.M. Briley Henry Barnes L. Beiley Tommy Bell John Benham Gregory Brown Michael Burch Bruce Busbea John Bustabade Luis Campos Timothy Chamberlain D. Chapman Caleb Clement Jr. Steven Coburn Gary Collier Randall Coroneos Howard Corrales Marvin Crippes Charles Dabney Paul Dawson J. Deiter Thomas Deltorre Glenn Dixon Willie Dorsey Charles Draper Rooert Dnnkwater Rooert Dwyer J Elmore Lawrence Espeieta Rodme Ewing Ronald Fabros Steven Fitzgerald Monte Fowles Richard Fraley Woodrow Fntz Tim Fntzpatrick John Garcia Victor Goode J Groves William Harden Curtis Hass Ftobert Heagy Michael Hill Christopher Hoadley Wallace Jackson Steven Jensen Johann Jung t I Richard Justm Michael Kearney Michael Kearns George Keeling Rex Kienzle Ernest Knight James Lawrence Terry Lloyd Kenneth Macrae Jimmy Manuel Steven Madwell Dennis Meixner Robbins Menda Carlos Mendoza Gerald Miller Jackie Mills Kerry Mock Steven McCray Raymond McMurraj Robert Natenstedt R. Nauta John Nelson David Ng John Norfleet Thomas Norton Bradford Ogburn Randy Olsen Paul O ' Neil Steven Orsua Bruce Ott Earl Payne Mario Perez Francesco Perri Andrew Phillips G. Pike James Pollock Paul Portch Garland Potvin Antinio Quiambao Milton Quintana William Rackley Theodore Rein Ronald Rivera Arnie Robinson F. Rodezno Juan Rodriguez Raul Rodriguez Thomas Rose Larry Rosenberger William Ross Dennis Sable Denny SadulsKi Leonard Sanderson Michael Santos Charles Sauceda Thomas Schoderbel- Lester Scott David Sessions Steven Shirley Anthony Smith Cleveland Smith Ted Smith James Snyder Leland Soon Edmundo Sosa Michael Southard Richard Stephens Charles Stevenson Michael Storey Ray Stout Dennis Suter Hideo Tanaka James Tate Donald Thayer Richard Thomas Vernon Thompson William Toles Eric Tuma Donald Valenzuela Roy Watson Clarence Wavrm Ransom Welch Gary Wells John Williams Gim Wong Marc Ziegler Mark Bnrmngham Gerald Engler Dennis Fioranelli David Kelly rvC ■ 1 MtaMk JV. ■ MNf( ft® gll tv 1 $$ EL m SSG Collins and OutstandingGraduates u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela- tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him- self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir- tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as- signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al- together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. ■ u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) U. S. ARMY FORT ORJN _ 3a fTJTTTTTTn g Community Service Center Soldiers Club—Gen. Joseph Stillwell Hall Chapel Bowling Alley •j ‘Hi ' , v 1 POST EXCHANGE W E M r i HOSPITAL !K ss “BAci -,S of prescription Mk handing to ' • PHARHACST CLOTHING w HMHi S CONFIDENCE COURSE 1 MMj n f— 1 " 1 1 , f STti t rH RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP ttfzd -■. it (• r. .-• • - -• ' i.. ,. ,..;. xT?s ■ .C Sr =-$:v ‘ i • ' The drill sergeant teaches the fundamentals of military life. He instills in the trainee a sense of loyalty to his fellow soldiers and to his country. By personal example he inspires respect for his profession. The Army instructor imparts to the trainee the military knowledge and special skills that are essential to the men of today’s Army. These professionals are the backbone of the Army. TO THE NEW SOLDIER This boo k is about you and your comrades in arms. It portrays your transition from civilian to soldier—a change which has been experienced by millions of other Ameri¬ cans before you. It marks your own successful entrance into the finest Army in the world and the continuation of an almost 200 year old American Army tradition. Today, as in the past, our Army is only as good as its individual members. Your record thus far indicates that you are a worthy addition to the Army and that you wdl contribute to its proud traditions. As you progress with your Army career, apply and expand upon the knowledge and skills you have gained during these few weeks of Basic Combat Training. This Pictorial Review Book should bring forth many memories in the years to come, both in military and civilian life. § • vyl . ; : - ■. - 4 -5 £ ; -?»’- ' I C.»- " ■ ’- ■• It --i .... ... 1 X • - | ) RADIO OPERATORS COURSE Hospital DRILL SERGEANTS CREED I AM A DRILL SERGEANT DEDICATED TO TRAINING NEW SOLDIERS AND IN¬ FLUENCING THE OLD. I AM FOREVER CONSCIOUS OF EACH SOLDIER UNDER MY CHARGE, AND BY EXAMPLE WILL INSPIRE HIM TO THE HIGHEST STAND¬ ARDS POSSIBLE. I WILL STRIVE TO BE PATIENT, UNDER¬ STANDING, JUST AND FIRM. I WILL COM¬ MEND THE DESER VING A ND ENCOURA GE THE WAYWARD. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM RESPONSIBLE TO MY COMMANDER FOR THE MORALE, DISCIPLINE AND EFFI¬ CIENCY OF MY MEN AND THEIR PER¬ FORMANCE WILL REFLECT AN IMAGE OF ME. I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! For two centuries I have kept our Nation safe, purchasing freedom with my blood. To tyrants, I am the day of reckoning; to the suppressed, the hope for the future. Where the fighting is thick, there am I.. . I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! I was there from the beginning, meeting the enemy face to face, will to will. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge; my frozen hands pulled Washington across the Delaware. At Yorktown, the sunlight glinted from the sword and I, begrimed and battered .. . saw a Nation born. Hardship .. . and glory I have known. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour, showed the fury of my long rifle . .. and came of age, I am the Infantry! Westward I pushed with wagon trains . . . moved and empire across the plains .. . extended freedom’ s borders and tamed the wild frontier, I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! I was with Scott at Vera Cruz .. . hunted the guerrilla in the mountain passes . .. and scaled the high plateau. The fighting was done when I ended my march many miles from the old Alamo. From Bull Run to Appomattox, I fought and bled. Both Blue and grey were my colors then. Two masters I served and united them strong . .. proved that this nation could right a wrong ... and long endure. I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! 4 I led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . scaled the walls of old Tientsin .. . and stalked the Moro in the steaming jungle still ... always the vanguard. I am the Infantry! At Chateau-Thierry, first over the top, then I stood like a rock on the Marne. It was 1 who cracked the Hindenburg Line ... in the Argonne, I broke the Kaiser’s spine . . . and didn’t come back ’till it was “over, over there.” I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! A generation older at Bataan, I briefly bowed, but then I vowed to return. Assaulted the African shore ... learned my lesson the hard way in the desert sands . . . pressed my buttons into the beach at Anzio .. . and bounced into Rome with determination and resolve. I am the Infantry! The English channel, stout beach defenses and the hedgerows could not hold me ... I broke out to St. Lo, unbent the Bulge .. . vaulted the Rhine .. . and swarmed the Heartland. Hitler’s dream and the Third Reich were dead. In the Pacific, from island to island I hopped ... hit the beaches and chopped through swamp and jungle ... I set the Rising Sum. I am the Infantry! In Korea, I gathered my strength around Pusan ... swept across the frozen Han .. . outflanked the Reds at Inchon, .a and marched to the Yalu. FOLLOW ME! Around the world, I stand .. . ever forward. Over Lebanon’s sands, my rifle steady aimed ... and calm returned. At Berlin’s gate, I scorned the Wall of Shame. I am the Infantry! My bayonet ... on the wings oFpower .. . keeps the peace worldwide. And despots, falsely garved in freedom’s mantle, falter . . . hide. My ally in the paddies and the forest ... I teach, I aid, I lead. FOLLOW M E! Where brave men fight .. . there fight 1. In freedom’s cause ... I die. From Concord Bridge to Heartbreak Ridge, from the Arctic to the Mekong .. . the Queen of Battle! Always read .. . then, now and forever, I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! AMERICAN SPIRIT HONOR MEDAL The American Spirit Honor Medal is a medallion provided under the auspices of the Citizens Committee for the Army, Navy and Air Force Incorporated. In December 1940, a group of patriotic civilians established the “Citizens Committee’’ for the purpose of providing men serving in the Armed Forces articles not otherwise available to them. First used in World War II, in what was then known as the Second Corps area, the American Spirit Honor Medal was an award for outstanding service. Early in 1950, the four military services requested that the Citizens Committee again furnish the medal as an award for the Out¬ standing Recruit upon completion of his basic training. Reinstated at Fort Ord early in 1967, the American Spirit Honor Medal is awarded weekly to the individual among all the graduating basic trainees at Fort Ord who displays in greatest measure those quali¬ ties of leadership best expressing the American spirit, honor, initiative, loyalty and high example to comrades in arms. BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM LOYD WEBB, JR. Deputy Commanding General William Loyd Webb. Jr. was born in Mineral Wells. Texas. September 30. 1925. He at¬ tended Texas A M College for two and a half years before being appointed to the U- nited States Military Academy. West Point. New York. After graduating from the Acad¬ emy in 1947 as a Second Lieutenant of Cavalry, he attended the Ground General School at Fort Riley. Kansas, and went on to the Officer ' s Basic Course at the Armor School at Fort Knox. Kentucky. General Webb ' s first assignment took him to Japan for two years as a company of¬ ficer and a battalion staff officer with the 7th Cavalry Regiment. Upon promotion to Captain, he was given command of Company F. 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) in Korea, where he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medal for Valor. In 1951 he returned to the United States as an instructor and later a unit commander for the Officer Candidate School. Fort Riley. Kansas. This assignment was followed by the Advanced Armored Officers ' School at Fort Knox, Kentucky, from which he grad¬ uated in 1953. General Webb ' s next three years were spent with United States Army. Europe, in Ger¬ many. He served 18 months as a company commander, battalion executive officer, and battalion training officer for the 29th Tank Battalion. 2nd Armored Division. As a Major, he became the G-3 Training Officer. 2d Armored Division, prior to becoming the As¬ sistant Secretary General Staff. Headquarters. USAREUR. in 1955-56. In 1956 he attended the Command and General Staff College. Fort Leavenworth. Kan¬ sas. and in 1957-58. attended the University of Pennsylvania where he obtained his MA in English Literature. General Webb was assigned to the United States Military Academy as an instructor in 1958. serving for two years as an English Instructor and a year as Associate Professor of the Department of English. He was reassigned to Germany in 1961 to serve 18 months as Staff Officer for the Organization and Training Branch. DCSOPS. Headquarters USAREUR. During this as¬ signment. he received a promotion to Lieutenant Colonel and assumed command of the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron. 14th Armored Cavalry, on the East-West border, from 1963 to 1964. After completing the US Army War College in 1965. General Webb was retained as Assistant Director for the Department of Strategy. A year later he became Chief of the Plans and Policy Section. Directorate of Instruction, for two years. He was promoted to Colonel in 1967. General Webb went to Vietnam as the Chief of Operations Analysis Branch. J-3. US Military Assistance Command. Vietnam. In 1969. he commanded the Support Com¬ mand for the 1st Infantry Division. In September 1969. he was assigned to the United States Military Academy as Com¬ manding Officer of the 4th Regiment. US Corps of Cadets, for 18 months before at¬ tending the Management Program for Executives at the University of Pittsburgh. Pit¬ tsburgh. PA. Then he returned to the Military Academy as Deputy Commandant of Cadets from May to August 1971. Upon being selected for promotion to Brigadier General, he was transferred to Head¬ quarters. United States Army Training Center. Infantry and Fort Ord. to become the Deputy Commanding General. viou w rr M - Harold Gregory Moore was born in Bardstown. Kentucky. February 13, 1922. He gradu¬ ated from St. Josephs Preparatory School in 1940. After two years at George Washing¬ ton University he was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He graudated as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1945. After completing parachute school in December 1945 he was assigned to 11th Air- born Division in Japan. In 1948 he returned to the United States and was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. N.C.. where he was awarded Master Parachutist wings in 1950. Moore was assigned as company commander with 17th Inf. Regiment in Korea in 1952. Later he served as regimental operations officer and was promoted from captain to major in April 1953. In Korea he participated in several battles including Pork Chop Hill. From 1953 to 1956 he was a faculty member at the U.S. Military Academy as instruc¬ tor in Infantry tactics. The next assignment was to the Air Mobility Division, Office of the Chief of Research and Development in the Pentagon. Here, from 1957 to 1960 he monitored research and development of aerial delivery equipment. Then came NATO duty in Oslo, Norway, on the Operations staff of Headquarters Allied Forces of Northern Europe. In June 1964 Col Moore was given command of 2nd Battalion, 23rd Inf. 11th Air Assault Division, Fort Benning, Ga. When the 11th Air Assault Division was inactivated in July 1965 his battalion was re-designated the 1st Battalion. 7th. Cavalry Regiment, 1st. Cavalry Division (Air Mobile). In August the 1st. Cavalry was sent to Vietnam. In Novem¬ ber 1965 the battalion attacked and decisively defeated a North Vietnam regiment in the historic battle of the ladrang Valley. In December 1965 Col Moore was given command of the 3rd. Brigade. 1st Cavalry Division. This unit fought in several battles before Col. Moore left Vietnam in July 1966. From September 1966 to August 1967, Moore served as chief of the Vietnam Section in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. After eleven months as a Fellow at the Center for International Affairs. Harvard Univer¬ sity, he served on the staff and faculty of the Army War College for two months. Upon being selected for promotion to Brigadier General, he was transferred to the Pentagon. There he served as deputy director of plans, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations. Department of the Army, from August 1968 to June 1969. General Moore assumed the position of assistant chief of staff for Plans and Opera¬ tions (G-3), 8th U.S. Army in June 1969. He became commanding general. 7th. U.S. Infantry Division in May 1970, and a year later, 1 May 1971, was assigned as command¬ ing general. U.S. Army Training Center. Infantry and Fort Ord. MAJOR GENERAL HAROLD G. MOORE Commanding General COL George W. Tracy Brigade Commander HEADQUARTERS HEADQUARTERS COMPANY LTC Alfred B. Pursell Battalion Commander FIFTH BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Commenced Training: 14 August 1972 Completed Training: 11 August 1972 1LT Stuart E. Harkness Company Commander SSG Thomas Matsuda Supply Sergeant SSG Jorge Lastra Assistant Supply Clerk PSG Jeff Wood Training NCO SSG Thomas Brown Drill Sergeant SSG Romon Holguin Drill Sergeant SGT Charles Davidenko SGT James Goins Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant 2LT Daniel Faltermeier Executive Officer Photo Unavailable SFC Turner James Mess Steward PSG Chester Nusom Senior Drill Sergeant 1SG Larry Young First Sergeant SGT Edward Kornegay Drill Sergeant SP5 Jimmy Lafferty Company Clerk Steve Barber Kenneth Barker Edward Bell R. Belzner Dennis B ennett R. Betancourt James Bigham William Bisson Oscar Blazio Alvard Bonilla Rick Borjas P. Brazel Frank Bristing Charles Britt Jerome Brolan Ronald Brown Russell Brown Douglas Browning W. Buntain Kenneth Burcham Allen Adkins Stephen Alfonso Charles Anderson Dana Anderson Robert Atack M. Buterakos James Cannon Jerry Carter R. Casey James Cassity L. Catt Richard Caty Carlos Chavez B. Clarence Mark Clevenger Gary Collins Brent Cornelison Gary Cox Walter Cox Kenneth Dale Rocky Davis Russell Davis Robert Dennen John Deveau Anthony Diaz R. Dillinger Richard Downey Stephen Downey Michael Driscoll Rodney Ellsworth !SSS6 William Farley Patrick Farmer Ernesto Fierro James Fisher Alfredo Flores C. Franklin Wayne Frazier Gene Gregg Robert Guarnieri Andrew Gutierrez Michael Enriquez H. Entjer David Escarzaga Curtis Essen E. Evans Gilbert Gutierrez Tomme Hagen Daryl Hale Melvin Hale Larry Haley Joseph Hamilton William Hanes Van Harmon J. Hart T. Head R. Heath David Heaton R. Helman B. Hendricks Gary Hennings Jesus Heredin Jess Hernandez G. Hillis L. Hollingshead D. Hsieh Elmer Huse Joe Jackson Zenovy Jakymiw Danny Jones Kenneth Jones Benjamin Jurado Thomas Karns Edward Kaupu Harold Kent S. Kohn Allen Krever Robertson Landgraf Hugh Laney J. Langfield Thomas Langford David McAninch Sheldon McDonald James McHugh Zavier Nady Daniel Naranjo Peter Larsen Alex Lemieux K.Lenski Allen Linhart Steven Long Rogelio Lopez Charles Lunceford Jarrett Magdaleno Stephen Manthe S. Martin Armando Martinez Richard Martinez Carlton Matthews Robert Mendoza Terry Miller David Mills Alonzo Mitchell Gregory Montes Terry Moore James Muhs ' ' ■ A. ' lT ' j®«= SS cTtic « 7 ?« aw® D. O’Crone David Ortiz Joseph Parmley Michael Patrick Ruben Pena Richard Peterson Glen Pieri Ramon Ponce Ralph Portillo Charles Pruitt Michael Persey Daniel Rafferty Delfino Reys Harry Rhinehart Michael Rice T. Richards Timothy Riley Jay Risner William Roach Leroy Romero Charles Neer Michael Newton Michael Newhart Ryusuke Noda Michael Oberman Thomas Ross Ronald Rozelle William Rustin Daniel Sanchez Mario Sanchez Michael Sandbach Francisco SanJose T. Scanlon John Schultz David Secrist Edgar Seda John Severs David Simmons Ronald Simonis William Sims William Sizemore Michael Soto K. Spich Dennis Spude Terry Stalling Ronald Stern Albert Stewart John Stropko George Stroud Terry Stuart Joseph Sturdeuant Milan Sunio David Suzuki H. Sweeten Wesley Taylor Donald Tews Dennis Thomas John Thompson John Thurlo Frank Townsend I I Ronald Toy Jerry Tryon George Turner M.Utt David Vanderpool Anthony Veron Jess Villa Thomas Wakefield Thomas Walker Perry Warren Walter Wendt Mark West Larry Whaley Kenneth Wheeler James Whittemore Michael Williams James Willis C. Wisler John Wood Alan Wride Stephen Yates Fernando Zamora A. Zanzal R. Zimmerman Arden Bell D. Gustaucson Jose Portilla D. Schudo Tim Soristo Thomas Walls Photos Unavailable David Crown Darrell Hagger Cecil Herbert Robert Pasey Kenneth Saich m m , «S«E ». « .V 5 T» 7 mi 4mw Ki I a- • 1 . 1 mm Z- -• _ mm t u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. .f.% h u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28 500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits drafteeS and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration Food Service Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) Community Service Center Soldiers Club—Gen. Joseph Stillwell Hall Chapel Bowling Alley POST EXCHANGE SPORTING GOODS PHOTOG RAPHY «toawustj »WBiIS TJSia •nmm " B»or oiu»m te M f INFANTRY WEAPONS DEMONSTRATION - 21 . ARRIVING 1 1 ijd k; ww BIVOUAC I RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP The drill sergeant teaches the fundamentals of military life. He instills in the trainee a sense of loyalty to his fellow soldiers and to his country. By personal example he inspires respect for his profession. The Army instructor imparts to the trainee the military knowledge and special skil ls that are essential to the men of today’s Army. These professionals are the backbone of the Army. TO THE NEW SOLDIER This book is about you and your comrades in arms. It portrays your transition from civilian to soldier—a change which has been experienced by millions of other Ameri¬ cans before you. It marks your own successful entrance into the finest Army in the world and the continuation of an almost 200 year old American Army tradition. Today, as in the past, our Army is only as good as its individual members. Your record thus far indicates that you are a worthy addition to the Army and that you will contribute to its proud traditions. As you progress with your Army career, apply and expand upon the knowledge and skills you have gained during these few weeks of Basic Combat Training. This Pictorial Review Book should bring forth many memories in the years to come, both in military and civilian life. Jv I. i 7 ' V-.i ' j- M m .vV-SBU-rTT ' ic WMk: I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! For two centuries I have kept our Nation safe, purchasing freedom with my blood. To tyrants, 1 am the day of reckoning; to the suppressed, the hope for the future. Where the fighting is thick, there am I.. . 1 am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! I was there from the beginning, meeting the enemy face to face, will to will. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge; my frozen hands pulled Washington across the Delaware. At Yorktown, the sunlight glinted from the sword and I, begrimed and battered .. . saw a Nation born. Hardship .. . and glory I have known. At New Orleans, 1 fought beyond the hostile hour, showed the fury of my long rifle ... and came of age, I am the Infantry! Westward I pushed with wagon trains .. . moved and empire across the plains .. . extended freedom ' s borders and tamed the wild frontier, I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! I was with Scott at Vera Cruz ... hunted the guerrilla in the mountain passes ... and scaled the high plateau. The fighting was done when I ended my march many miles from the old Alamo. From Bull Run to Appomattox, 1 fought and bled. Both Blue and grey were my colors then. Two masters I served and united them strong ... proved that this nation could right a wrong .. . and long endure. 1 am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! ‘ I led the charge up San Juan Hill .. . scaled the walls of old Tientsin ... and stalked the Moro in the steaming jungle still .. . always the vanguard. I am the Infantry! At Chateau-Thierry, first over the top, then I stood like a rock on the Marne. It was I who cracked the Hindenburg Line ... in the Argonne, I broke the Kaiser ' s spine ... and didn ' t come back ' till it was “over, over there. " 1 am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! A generation older at Bataan, I briefly bowed, but then 1 vowed to return. Assaulted the African shore ... learned my lesson the hard way in the desert sands .. . pressed my buttons into the beach at Anzio .. . and bounced into Rome with determination and resolve. 1 am the Infantry! The English channel, stout beach defenses and the hedgerows could not hold me .. . 1 broke out to St. Lo, unbent the Bulge ... vaulted the Rhine ... and swarmed the Heartland. Hitler ' s dream and the Third Reich were dead. In the Pacific, from island to island 1 hopped ... hit the beaches and chopped through swamp and jungle ... I set the Rising Sum. I am the Infantry! In Korea, I gathered my strength around Pusan ... swept across the frozen Han .. . outflanked the Reds at Inchon, .a and marched to the Yalu. FOLLOW ME! Around the world, I stand .. . ever forward. Over Lebanon ' s sands, my rifle steady aimed . . . and calm returned. At Berlin ' s gate, 1 scorned the Wall of Shame. I am the I nfantry! My bayonet ... on the wings of power .. . keeps the peace worldwide. And despots, falsely garved in freedom ' s mantle, falter .. . hide. My ally in the paddies and the forest ... I teach, I aid, 1 lead. FOLLOW M E! Where brave men fight ... there fight 1. In freedom ' s cause ... I die. From Concord Bridge to Heartbreak Ridge, from the Arctic to the Mekong .. . the Queen of Battle! Always read ... then, now and forever, 1 am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME! AMERICAN SPIRIT HONOR MEDAL The American Spirit Honor Medal is a medallion provided under the auspices of the Citizens Committee for the Army, Navy and Air Force Incorporated. In December 1940, a group of patriotic civilians established the “Citizens Committee " for the purpose of providing men serving in the Armed Forces articles not otherwise available to them. First used in World War II, in what was then known as the Second Corps area, the American Spirit Honor Medal was an award for outstanding service. Early in 1950, the four military services requested that the Citizens Committee again furnish the medal as an award for the Out¬ standing Recruit upon completion of his basic training. Reinstated at Fort Ord early in 1967, the American Spirit Honor Medal is awarded weekly to the individual among all the graduating basic trainees at Fort Ord who displays in greatest measure those quali¬ ties of leadership best expressing the American spirit, honor, initiative, loyalty and high example to comrades in arms. MAJOR GENERAL HAROLD G. MOORE Commanding General Harold Gregory Moore was born in Bardstown. Kentucky. February 13. 1922. He gradu¬ ated from St. Josephs Preparatory School in 1940. After two years at George Washing¬ ton University he was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He graudated as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1945. After completing parachute school in December 1945 he was assigned to 11th Air- born Division in Japan. In 1948 he returned to the United States and was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. N.C., where he was awarded Master Parachutist wings in 1950. Moore was assigned as company commander with 17th Inf. Regiment in Korea in 1952. Later he served as regimental operations officer and was promoted from captain to major in April 1953. In Korea he participated in several battles including Pork Chop Hill. From 1953 to 1956 he was a faculty member at the U.S. Military Academy as instruc¬ tor in Infantry tactics. The next assignment was to the Air Mobility Division. Office of the Chief of Research and Development in the Pentagon. Here, from 1957 to 1960 he monitored research and development of aerial delivery equipment. Then came NATO duty in Oslo. Norway, on the Operations staff of Headquarters Allied Forces of Northern Europe. In June 1964 Col Moore was given command of 2nd Battalion. 23rd Inf. 11th Air Assault Division, Fort Benning. Ga. When the 11th Air Assault Division was inactivated in July 1965 his battalion was re-designated the 1st Battalion. 7th. Cavalry Regiment. 1st. Cavalry Division (Air Mobile). In August the 1st. Cavalry was sent to Viet nam. In Novem¬ ber 1965 the battalion attacked and decisively defeated a North Vietnam regiment in the historic battle of the ladrang Valley. In December 1965 Col Moore was given command of the 3rd. Brigade. 1st Cavalry Division. This unit fought in several battles before Col. Moore left Vietnam in July 1966. From September 1966 to August 1967. Moore served as chief of the Vietnam Section in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. After eleven months as a Fellow at the Center for International Affairs, Harvard Univer¬ sity, he served on the staff and faculty of the Army War College for two months. Upon being selected for promotion to Brigadier General, he was transferred to the Pentagon. There he served as deputy director of plans. Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army, from August 1968 to June 1969. General Moore assumed the position of assistant chief of staff for Plans and Opera¬ tions (G-3), 8th U.S. Army in June 1969. He became commanding general, 7th. U.S. Infantry Division in May 1970, and a year later. 1 May 1971, was assigned as command¬ ing general. U.S. Army Training Center. Infantry and Fort Ord. BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM LOYD WEBB, JR. Deputy Commanding General William Loyd Webb. Jr. was born in Mineral Wells. Texas. September 30. 1925. He at¬ tended Texas A M College for two and a half years before being appointed to the U- nited States Military Academy. West Point. New York. After graduating from the Acad¬ emy in 1947 as a Second Lieutenant of Cavalry, he attended the Ground General School at Fort Riley. Kansas, and went on to the Officer’s Basic Course at the Armor School at Fort Knox. Kentucky. General Webb’s first assignment took him to Japan for two years as a company of¬ ficer and a battalion staff officer with the 7th Cavalry Regiment. Upon promotion to Captain, he was given command of Company F. 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) in Korea, where he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star Medal for Valor. In 1951 he returned to the United States as an instructor and later a unit commander for the Officer Candidate School. Fort Riley. Kansas. This assignment was followed by the Advanced Armored Officers’ School at Fort Knox, Kentucky, from which he grad¬ uated in 1953. General Webb’s next three years were spent with United States Army. Europe, in Ger¬ many. He served 18 months as a company commander, battalion executive officer, and battalion training officer for the 29th Tank Battalion. 2nd Armored Division. As a Major, he became the G-3 Training Officer. 2d Armored Division, prior to becoming the As¬ sistant Secretary General Staff. Headquarters. USAREUR. in 1955-56. In 1956 he attended the Command and General Staff College. Fort Leavenworth. Kan¬ sas. and in 1957-58. attended the University of Pennsylvania where he obtained his MA in English Literature. General Webb was assigned to the United States Military Academy as an instructor in 1958. serving for two years as an English Instructor and a year as Associate Professor of the Department of English. He was reassigned to Germany in 1961 to serve 18 months as Staff Officer for the Organization and Training Branch. DCSOPS. Headquarters USAREUR. During this as¬ signment. he received a promotion to Lieutenant Colonel and assumed command of the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron. 14th Armored Cavalry, on the East-West border, from 1963 to 1964. After completing the US Army War College in 1965. General Webb was retained as Assistant Director for the Department of Strategy. A year later he became Chief of the Plans and Policy Section. Directorate of Instruction, for two years. He was promoted to Colonel in 1967. General Webb went to Vietnam as the Chief of Operations Analysis Branch. J-3. US Military Assistance Command. Vietnam. In 1969. he commanded the Support Com¬ mand for the 1st Infantry Division. In September 1969. he was assigned to the United States Military Academy as Com¬ manding Officer of the 4th Regiment. US Corps of Cadets, for 18 months before at¬ tending the Management Program for Executives at the University of Pittsburgh. Pit¬ tsburgh. PA. Then he returned to the Military Academy as Deputy Commandant of Cadets from May to August 1971. Upon being selected for promotion to Brigadier General, he was transferred to Head¬ quarters. United States Army Training Center. Infantry and Fort Ord. to become the Deputy Commanding General. CPT John M. Riedel Company Commander LTC John M. Kirk Battalion Commander THIRD BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Completed Training: 11 October 1972 COL George W. Tracy Brigade Commander COMPANY B Commenced Training: 21 August 1972 ISG Roy Bailey First Sergeant SSG Tim L Hutchins PSG Tulaga Seau PSG Hector L Diaz Senior Drill Sergeant Former Senior Drill Sergeant Training NCO PSG James Phillips SSG Clifford Berg Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant SSG William J. Morales SSG Johnson Supply Sergeant Drill Sergeant SGT Angel Garcia Outstanding Drill Sergeant SGT W.L Godwin Drill Sergeant SGT Douglas Preston Drill Sergeant SGTTJ. SImers Company Clerk SFC Harold D. Bilyeu Mess Steward SP5 Clinton E. Hopkins First Cook A ' ' 2 ' SP6 James L Veres First Cook KP’s Christian Acosta Miguel Acosta George Aki J. Albright Oscar Amaya Donald Anderson Mikel Anderson Louis Arrelano Robert Bailey Vern Battease Albert Bean Rick Beer R. Beetz John Bradley Joseph Brannon David Bratten Benjamin Brown Raymond Brown Thomas Brown William Buck Dale Bunnage Joseph Busenburg Douglas Buttke Bobby Byrd William Chard Harold Cheek Archie Chrestman C. Christensen L Chafer Jerry Cleveland Michael Coatney K. Condon T. Coolidge Roger Cornwell Freddie Corum P. Costner Barton Council Ray Cowden Michael Dalton Dekick Daniels William Daniel Jack Davis Richard Davis James Degteau Charles DeWitt Dennis Dougherty Ronald Eastwood Whjer Ennis Robert Fahrenkrug F. Famania F. Harris J. Heisterkamp Charles Hoomes Francis Holokahi Steven Holt Lee Farnsworth Bruce Flack Dale Fowler James Franks Carlton Fucuals B. Frusley John Funk Randy Getchius Rodney Gillispie Kenneth Godwin John Goede James Gonzales Edward Gover Otto Graeser Allen Graf Edward Gray Ray Green L. Guardipee S. Haggard Alan Hale Steven Hougham Ricky House A. Hubbard C. Huffman V. Hughes Gary Kontny P. Kruse Gary Land William Leverton A. Lewis Ted Ichino Robert Ingalls J. Ivie Robbin Jackson Daniel James Frank Jensen Norman Johnson Richard Johnson Thomas Kam Glenn Kattelman Carl Kelly Ronald Kern Robert King William King Parry Kleinsasser sjr—w Ronald Lewis Rick Liebee Reginald Lindsay Jack Loper Alfred Lopez Jeff Lovell Lynn Lowe Pete Lozand D. Lussier Charles Mabee David Maidens Charles Martin Ralph Martinez Thomas Mayhill J. Mendoza Dennis Moore Manuel Moreno Robert Morgan Lyle Mueller Thomas Mundt Richard Meservey L. Merz M. Melich R. Mione Stephen Molnar Richard Neal M. Neill Richard Nichols Albert Olguin Kim Oliver Fedencio Ortal Monte Overacre Leslie Owens J. Parker W. Patton Stephen Petrucci Jerry Petty Dale Phelps A. Phillips A. Plascencia S. McCanse Gregory McCune Brian McGutcheon Stanley McDonell Gary Nail Lyle Preston Richard Prill Tommy Pruitt Jerry Pryor Jackie Quails R. Robbins Daniel Rodriguez Edward Rodriguez Gary Rogers K. Rosander Rene Quezada Forrest Quinn Robert Rakowski L. Randle Tommy Reid M. Rydeek Florencio Sanchez L Sandoval R. Santa Cruz W.Sase Gawhenie Scott James Sequin M. Shapiro David Sherman Jackson Sherman J.Skellie Ronald Smith Dale Spurgeon S. Stalder Robert Stenberg Michael Stumpf George Taitano Samuel Taylor Sanford Taylor D. Terry David Bray John Cimermancic Richard Comings Guy Wheatley Thomas Rogers Danny York Kenneth Young J. Zannocco R. Zeideer Raymond Zeren Charlie Theyel Robert To rres Walter Trent Rudolph Valencia William Viele John Volkman Carl Wandt A. Warden Eddie Wilson John Wolfe Photos Unavailable Lonnie Chafer Gabriel Ortiz Billy Trusley Konrad William u Christopher Kerin u I l i ; ' ww®: U u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechdnics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. ■ ' r ; V■ ' r- ' y :. ' ' :.• • ■, ' ■• ' (• ' ;• ' ■ ' ■ ' ■ ' W ' ‘ ' ' y »i - -1. w, t. !; .v ' .v, .; yv..;AiV, I vv ?• y»r v .WiV»f. ' A ' .;. ■i’;. ' . ' )! ! ' ’ ' . ' . ;■V: • :v; J ' !lvi ' Vli;■ »■y ' J: ,• ;.■ A •; ' j : ' lV.•l h 1 • ♦ ys 4 % ‘ ' i I » • »■ ' w 0 ' ir. V ’ H : v ' v... -,•» i V ' i. .‘i ' M ' ' uw ;’ y v»». " fA ., 0 ' ' ■ " ’i) , ' . ' vV-Vvi V ' 4 ' ' I ' ' ii ' i ' ' ' A ' t‘fV ' . :•. . • • y ■ ' • ' V bv ’Ai. ' =llSiiiiiiii|lil fli ;• .vj 4 ' ' :’ ' | i 4« ' ■}’ •v ' y ' , :. .vy ' i y : .vv;’ ' y ■.:■ ' ■ -S ' - ' :; ' , • ' . .. t •• ' ' i V ' y ' • ; ' • • ' v ' l ' i ' ' • ' v i ’ ' 1 1 ' ’ v■■ ' • . •-A • ? .v; (, ‘•.’.v... ■■ ' ' V ' ' A-: •■■vS ■;v- v ' ;- ■ . . , . s 1 ' v ■: , ' ' ■. ' ' ••. •• ' .■ ' ' 4 ' ! “ ' . ' " . ‘ •; Sn-V. ' - ■ V ' ' ' , . ' -- - •■• . 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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

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