US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1969

Page 1 of 264

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Page 10, 1969 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1969 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 264 of the 1969 volume:

(AIMING CENTER INFANTRY 1 CSUMB Library u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) T 1 X (Warm iSprs. " lilpitos Ctila jimiH l yl ' i ' . J Hit 4 5unm , . ... Ivn TOLL Redwood v 4kA nw Menlo X ? V X«MPk N woo¥sid Palo xv ' •■ ' Ku fcl 2 La V ) 1 J AI , t0S r HondaJ 6 . Santa 84T l vX ' v L VGr o roon 7 -s ' ,lo a rat 0 a® (i fiN iSi n JOSC Tale ' 13 araioqar I - ' X not Park .Jlf ' w ISLaHI . yv:i, Coyote If ■ fv .x $L GO Mum Pock £ aNtfjT M A aMc. ‘ 4 ' WNi 6jj rt ri 1 a ’ L nm k -MT JHKSS Jlr a ' d ' A “ cv? 1 ' v Vr 4 " .s m i ' Big Basin, -1 rV.|| f .(yJ ? 6 ; 6V Rodwood JjLf] rVo fLOS “(V 4 rj A « , i7r r l(( Catos ®CV riT J bH° ,y City N VJ{ y ' VAVKLaurol Almadun Madrono 0 der jsp ? " 17 ) V r Ben tomond He 1 !Bonny oon A |eHR 9JWi£ iS ' - Ccorr.M lb I, TRAINING CENTER. INFANTRY AND FORT ORD. CALIFORNIA COMBAT DEVELOPMENTS COMMAND EXPERIMENTATION COMMAND UOO (itllo? LRitaJ i roti Ot j , uUt t ( Montefi Cii .A mcl Mt% moo If 70 % St fri VL Clemente. tOem V?l i I an Buonu 0J Vista f VI N ANA nv+Hi, 410 mess hall interior stacked gear m m wm m mi 4 4 » m .IIWJE. iili l.liCJ S1EUI lai. JlKft-Nif • I! Jftfig u» i ini urn 113. i ' l t ! :B service club pugil sticks bayonet library nrr » :£hU“ rz?A ?„+ SPT- P Ik i MK SURA A - v i • k obstacle course hospital monitoring an x-ray on closed circuit tv. M WffTpl n ill ®| Ji ' A pugil sticks mortar range ■ • i fSr r .-i j ?m - 8 V " • i jSWa mWM Wni ■ -%¥. . $jk J ' 3k w v oi Q y 1 • — j . Ll ( T ' or Half-Silhouette. 200 Mtrs £ Under SIGHT PICTURE GROUND LEVEL ALL VISITORS PLE ASE REPORT TO THE ORDERLY ROOM E " or Full-Silhouette. Over 200 Meters SIGHT PICTURE LEVEL library TTmwrTi V. miscellaneous FORI ORO m MOBILE! REJNLISTMENT OFFICE! -— k STAY ARMY K £ ” «. ktf§M Jr Mil mb 9 NEED A CCYiPUTCfi T « " ME THIS OCCISIIIN lf u s cc VOIW 8 K,. III tout CAKfll COUHIIOI CODE OF CONDUCT . 4 |VI - I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM AN AMERICAN FIGHTING MAN, RE¬ SPONSIBLE FOR MY ACTIONS, AND DEDICATED TO THE PRINCIPLES WHICH MADE MY COUNTRY FREE. I WILL TRUST IN MY GOD AND IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA shipping american spirit honor medal The American Spirit Honor Medal is a medallion provided under the auspices of the Citizens Committee for the Army, Navy and Air Force Incorporated. In December 1940, a group of patriotic civilians estab¬ lished the " Citizens Committee” for the purpose of providing men serving in the Armed Forces articles not otherwise available to them. First used in World War II, in what was then known as the Second Corps area, the American Spirit Honor Medal was an award for out¬ standing service. Early in 19 5 0, the four military services requested that the Citizens Committee again furnish the medal as an award for the Outstanding Recruit upon completion of his basic training. Reinstated at Fort Ord early in 1967, the American Spirit Honor Medal is awarded weekly to the individual among all the graduating basic trainees at Fort Ord who displays in greatest measure those qualities of leadership best expressing the American spirit, honor, initiative, loyalty and high exam¬ ple to comrades in arms. — ' -IBiPiBI.. drill sergeants creed I AM A DRILL SERGEANT DEDICATED TO TRAINING NEW SOLDIERS AND INFLUENCING THE OLD. I AM FOREVER CONSCIOUS OF EACH SOLDIER UNDER MY CHARGE, AND BY EXAMPLE WILL INSPIRE HIM TO THE HIGHEST STAND ¬ ARDS POSSIBLE. I WILL STRIVE TO BE PATIENT, UNDER¬ STANDING, JUST AND FIRM. I WILL COMMEND THE DESERVING AND ENCOURAGE THE WAY¬ WARD. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM RESPON¬ SIBLE TO MY COMMANDER FOR THE MORALE, DISCIPLINE AND EFFICIENCY OF MY MEN AND THEIR PERFORMANCE WILL REFLECT AN IMAGE I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. • J ' : . I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along ther 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand,. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) ( MAJOR GENERAL THOMAS A. KENAN Commanding General Major General Thomas A. Kenan was born in Atlanta, Georgia, October 10, 1917. He received a reserve commission of second lieutenant, Infantry, upon graduation from The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, in 1939. He became a Regular Army officer in September of the same year. His first assignment was with the 226 Infantry Regiment of the 4th Infan¬ try Division at Fort McPherson, Georgia. For more than six years he was with the 226 Infantry and the 4th Division, serving in the United States, France and Germany, where he held the positions of company commander, regimental S-3, battalion commander, and division G-3. During World War II, Major General Kenan participated in the landing on Utah Beach in Normandy and commanded the 26 Battalion of the 226 Infantry during the Hurtgen Forest operation. During the period March 1946 to May 1948, General Kenan was a student at Ohio State University where he received degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in personnel administration. Subsequent duties were in the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-l, Department of the Army; Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers in Europe (SHAPE), at Paris, and the Army War College. He is also a graduate of the Command and General Staff College. After graduation from the Army War College, he served a tour of duty with the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Department of the Army. On May 7, 1958, General Kenan was transferred to Fort Benning, Ga., where he commanded the 1st Battle Group, 11th Infantry, 26 Infantry Divi¬ sion. On 1 June 1959, he became Chief of Staff of the 26 Infantry Division. In March 1960 General Kenan was assigned to Eighth U. S. Army in Korea where he served as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-l, until he was recalled in April 1961 to fill the position of Chief, Manpower and Training Division, in the office of the Director of Military Assistance, OASD(ISA). In November 1962 he was designated Director, Administration and Management, ODMA OASD(ISA), and in March 1963 was reassigned to the Office of Reserve Com¬ ponents as Deputy Chief. Decorations are the Silver Star, Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman Badge and the French Croix de Guerre with Palm. BRIGADIER GENERAL JUDSON F. MILLER Deputy Commanding General Judson Frederick Miller was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, December 5, 1924. He attended Oklahoma Military Academy at Claremore and enlisted in the Army December 7, 1942. Following completion of basic training at Fort Riley, Kansas, he attended OCS there and was commissioned in the Cavalry at the age of 18. His first assignment was as platoon leader with the 42d Cav. Recon. Troop (Mech) at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma. General Miller served as platoon leader and troop commander in five Euro¬ pean Theater campaigns during World War II, and was wounded in action during the Ruhr River crossing in the Rhineland in February 1945. After the war he served as troop commander in Austria. Upon completing the Airborne Course at Fort Benning in 1947, General Miller was assigned to the 82d Airborne Division where he eventually served as assistant chief of staff in 1950. During the Korean War he served in six campaigns with the 2d Battalion, 187th Inf. Regt. (Abne), and later with Headquarters Eighth US Army. Returning to the US in 1952 he attended the advance course at the Armor School and was appointed instructor of tactics at the school. During the ensuing ten years General Miller served with the Combat Developments Group at Fort Knox; in field command positions with the 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Germany; with the US Second Army at Fort Meade, Md.; and as special assistant to the commander-in-chief, US Strike Command, MacDill AFB, Florida. In February 1966 General Miller assumed command of the 2d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, and later commanded the unit in Vietnam as a brigade task force commander. On January 15, 1967 he was appointed the Division ' s Chief of Staff, and in March he commanded Task Force Ivy, an independent brigade-size force. He was returned to the US in August 1967 and served on the Army General Staff in Washington, D.C. In May 1968 he was transferred to the newly organized Directorate for Civil Disturbance Planning and Operations where he served successively as Chief, Plans Division and Directorate Executive Officer. He was promoted to brigadier general September 3, 1968, concurrent with his assignment as Deputy Commanding General, US Army Training Center and Fort Ord, California. 1LT Peter L. Kolstrom Former Company Commander HEADQUARTERS HEADQUARTERS COMPANY Commenced Training: 10 February 1969 FIFTH BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Completed Training: 4 April 1969 COL William F. Etchemendy Brigade Commander LTC L. H. Sugg, Jr. Battalion Commander SP4 Lindeman First Cook PFC Bridgeforth Armorer PFC Name Kitchen Staff James Beach Archie Begay Helen Bender Agosto Bermudez Berrios Berrios Berrios Berrios Jerald Black Douglas Brown Cecil Bruns Gregory Bruns Andrew Caddes Robert Carl Kenneth Carpenter J. Castro-Velazquez Tommy Chatmon iYvV ' Lonnie Allen Alfred Aranda Roberto Aviles Anthony Baiza Leonard Ballard Daniel Abeyta Tobias Agurrie Dennis Ahlstrom Isiah Alford Waldemar Alicea Michael Clokey Larry Colgan Hector Colon Francisco Cordova Raymond Coutee Richard Crabb Harry Crawford Peter Craycroft Ignacio Dalton Felton Dayay Christopher Decker Michael Dennis David Devitt Fidalgo Diaz Glenn Dicenso Frank Dudinski Olin Durbin Kevin Erdmann Mike Eskey Manuel Faria David Fast Thomas Ficher Gary Fullerton Wilfredo Garcia Jack Gleason hiliU ' J ij ' AUidf Kenneth Goodwin Timothy Gorsuch Lorenzo Guerrero Michael Hagen John Harper Charles Hartz Richard Hawkins Mark Hendershott Brian Hentsch Randy Hetrick Frederic Himbt Lawrence Hitt Richard Hoffmann Raymond Hoog James Hutchins Dale Jones Philip Johnson Gary Jones Joseph Jorgenson Marvin Kasteler Gregory Keay Stephen Keddington Alonzo Kescoli Howard Kettler Mark King • s -r , I. J Y 1 . . V 1 T C” — wr Tn David Morin Robert McAndrew Craig McKinney Michael McLarry Rudy Ne met z Al Kishida Andrew Knox James Kruse Paul Kruska Gary Lahna Alfredo Latimer Enrique Lee David Linn George Long Floyd Lopez Douglas Lowe Daniel Lucero Ricardo Luna Rodney Mason William Messer Kenneth Miller Francisco Miranda Charles Moffett Wayne Moffett Johnnie Montijo Jack Neumann Alan Novodor Gary Obearle George O ' Connor Richard Oda Michael Ontiveros Victor Perez Allan Perkins Jose Plata Marvin Powers Michael Pyne Thomas Quintana James Raymond David Ritzinger Fernando Rivera Juan Rivera Dennis Ronberg Diego Rosales David Ross David Rothbaum Louis Rothey Rudy Sahagun Pete Sanchez Antonio Santiago Dennis Schritter Duane Smith Richard Smith David Souza William Spaniel John Spillen James Sprague Douglas Squire Herman Stack Grant Stull Thomas Tarter Donald Taylor Terrence Ternes Rolland Theobald James Tomlin Edmundo Torruellas John Toulouse Josep Uliana Richard Valenti Gary Veale Bruce Vining 9 ■j3w Douglas Wakeley Dannie Walker Donald Walker Steven Waller James Wade James Webber Arnold Westfall Dennis Whitener Forrest Wilcox Willard Nahrgang Ronald Bischoff Steven Willert Albert Winterholler Randall Young Thomas Zanitsch Russell Bostick Gregory Bruns Terry Chaney Phillip Cloud Terry Corrigan Wallace Cozens William Foutz Robert Fraser Michael Hagen Leon Jackson John Miller Lak Sir Napier Robert Ontiveros Lisle Pottorff Richard Procter Michael Ritterbush Lionel Rogers Patrick Sevier Richard Silverman John Silversten John Spiller L. Trujillo 1 . r.4 wi rfiUri k x ■ 1 ”♦▼ ' ' yJ . .‘S«n ' iVSra ' w. j ; J?t v fctfi rtoitfi $i ,f , ms m s iv- graduation Outstanding Trainee Award Winners u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, an d during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. saw. — ' . t ;; •• •i ’ ••v,;’- . ; • i i ' ■ i, , ■ " . ' ' i. • ■ -f ... ’ ; V ' V. I v V: - ! , ’ . •t •• • • V iVV • ;-rv. r-f ’ W 7 { ' ft. 7 ? ft • ♦ .» •: ' V ' j v- , , • ,! , V ' ' ' 7 ‘ . r v. ■ • .■ v V S ' . » • ;• c • l I v- ' U ! Vj i ■ s ■ . ' W:V • • lv ' ' • ‘ • | ' . . • » ' is 4 » V,7 ( ' ’V ' l W I, I ? ' 1 f ‘ il, l« »}• k , Ws Vi VS : ■V ’ . ■» • ; .• . ■ •• ' »■! i- V .»» V , vv!. ’■ A»V, y •. V vr. ;y V»-V» . i • , . i t . v » • - ' V • ,‘-V-W? WV •! . • % » ' •■ . .y- o Av .v •. i ' , v ,y t ! ' a- ; ' . ; ■ ’• . •• • : ; v -- ; sVV- V ' v . 1 ... • : V- VV: ; -A . V ' v vi ' V; ' 3d BATTALION CSUMB Library u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28 500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is as signed as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) an T iWVvIO Tt ' ?S ?-s”S£7 nr w ’ % il i mms ps; rp k ' Ns» ' ' mn. $! ftl rfd,Palo V ' iew£««, ft iw«m fy lllpitas !dL 00 A vm RocA rt A :;l _ wa Wk: A lo San, “ ' filar i L 4 V 3 11 Stale " VA Big QAsIntj t _ _ •Black Mini 5(9] aratogffi 6 Vo)rgroon ' nJos€ 9; J l jV ,oyote L “ tf 0 BM n;— f V ,, A (©T o JUJX U los ?vp rt CjK KfoMwrM llGatos l)ioi« D»rhry V CWtt £ V)Holy City N t 0 J v AVKi aurel Alrrindon Madrono VBIg Basin 9 r a ' 10 JJ f — v 3798 12 J oma Pnetp . ,,o K .. lenry Cowell -iCv,-,!, »(ionV W BedwtJixIs St. ’A, V; " C Jt flfc UJ oquol f n? 1 iptos vCorral Mt mm. ., , a ,49, l 4 , toy -4 TRAINING CENTER. INFANTRY AND FORT ORD, CALIFORNIA COMBAT DEVELOPMENTS COMMAND EXPERIMENTATION COMMAND r uno- daloi Th Ysanti o’ " 2 aloft Ord. ' Z, AVailde % Sll .at mil Misaon WO % £, Clcnwnto, Oam ( ?? r- ' J l V 9 %£ c Carmel c « Valley 1, .VIN ANA y J- «CC flv x i, mp 0 iwtooi u6A» Con X " 1 w Wll oaria , • Vb-j, Uf imW: m m drill and ceremonies marching ....... SSXS ■ service club pugil sticks bayonet library ' -aF I - L. jT 3 J I muJ i I T monitoring an x-ray on closed circuit tv. hospital record ranges arrival 1 i pugil sticks ■ fe m bayonet crafts and hobby shop it mm mM ■ □□□□□□ Alt ABOUf IEATKBR: PCS LEATHfk •r +vrar. LHF-459 imBnauKa grenades sights and signs ALL VISITORS PLE ASE REPORT TO THE ORDERLY ROOM " E ' or Full-Silhouette, 200 Mtrs £ Under SIGHT PICTURE £ " or Full-Silhouette. Over 200Meters SIGHT PICTURE GROUND LEVEL Qi J 1 1 Wj GROUND ' LEVEL BOTTOM CENTER CENTER OF MASS library monterey bay and seaside miscellaneous ■I STAY ARMY Kt FORT mm MOBILE! REENLISTMENT OFFICE! , g|g!w ' == i TOUl (Utd (OUISIIOI TO MAKE THIS NEED A I CCMPUTEfl OECISIIInJ CODE OF CONDUCT -‘VI- I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT l AM AN AMERICAN FIGHTING MAN, RE¬ SPONSIBLE FOR MY ACTIONS, AND DEDICATED TO THE PRINCIPLES WHICH MADE MY COUNTRY FREE. I WILL TRUST IN MY GOD AND N THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA r shipping american spirit honor medal The American Spirit Honor Medal is a medallion provided under the auspices of the Citizens Committee for the Army, Navy and Air Force Incorporated. In December 1940, a group of patriotic civilians estab¬ lished the " Citizens Committee” for the purpose of providing men serving in the Armed Forces articles not otherwise available to them. First used in World War II, in what was then known as the Second Corps area, the American Spirit Honor Medal was an award for out¬ standing service. Early in 1950, the four military services requested that the Citizens Committee again furnish the medal as an award for the Outstanding Recruit upon completion of his basic training. Reinstated at Fort Ord early in 1967, the American Spirit Honor Medal is awarded weekly to the individual among all the graduating basic trainees at Fort Ord who displays in greatest measure those qualities of leadership best expressing the American spirit, honor, initiative, loyalty and high exam¬ ple to comrades in arms. I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . • will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation s de- fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship ... and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel J. . and around the world, I made my stand, mm ■ Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL THOMAS A. KENAN Commanding General Major General Thomas A. Kenan was born in Atlanta, Georgia, October 10, 1917. He received a reserve commission of second lieutenant, Infantry, upon graduation from The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, in 1939. He became a Regular Army officer in September of the same year. His first assignment was with the 22d Infantry Regiment of the 4th Infan¬ try Division at Fort McPherson, Georgia. For more than six years he was with the 22d Infantry and the 4th Division, serving in the United States, France and Germany, where he held the positions of company commander, regimental S-3, battalion commander, and division G-3. During World War II, Major General Kenan participated in the landing on Utah Beach in Normandy and commanded the 2d Battalion of the 22d Infantry during the Hurtgen Forest operation. During the period March 1946 to May 1948, General Kenan was a student at Ohio State University where he received degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in personnel administration. Subsequent duties were in the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-l, Department of the Army; Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers in Europe (SHAPE), at Paris, and the Army War College. He is also a graduate of the Command and General Staff College. After graduation from the Army War College, he served a tour of duty with the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Department of the Army. On May 7, 1958, General Kenan was transferred to Fort Benning, Ga., where he commanded the 1st Battle Group, 11th Infantry, 2d Infantry Divi¬ sion. On 1 June 1959, he became Chief of Staff of the 2d Infantry Division. In March 1960 General Kenan was assigned to Eighth U. S. Army in Korea where he served as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-l, until he was recalled in April 1961 to fill the position of Chief, Manpower and Training Division, in the office of the Director of Military Assistance, OASD(ISA). In November 1962 he was designated Director, Administration and Management, ODMA OASD(ISA), and in March 1963 was reassigned to the Office of Reserve Com¬ ponents as Deputy Chief. Decorations are the Silver Star, Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman Badge and the French Croix de Guerre with Palm. BRIGADIER GENERAL JUDSON F. MILLER Deputy Commanding General Judson Frederick Miller was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, December 5, 1924. He attended Oklahoma Military Academy at Claremore and enlisted in the Army December 7, 1942. Following completion of basic training at Fort Riley, Kansas, he attended OCS there and was commissioned in the Cavalry at the age of 18. His first assignment was as platoon leader with the 42d Cav. Recon. Troop (Mech) at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma. General Miller served as platoon leader and troop commander in five Euro¬ pean Theater campaigns during World War II, and was wounded in action during the Ruhr River crossing in the Rhineland in February 1945. After the war he served as troop commander in Austria. Upon completing the Airborne Course at Fort Benning in 1947, General Miller was assigned to the 82d Airborne Division where he eventually served as assistant chief of staff in 1950. During the Korean War he served in six campaigns with the 2d Battalion, 187th Inf. Regt. (Abne), and later with Headquarters Eighth US Army. Returning to the US in 1952 he attended the advance course at the Armor School and was appointed instructor of tactics at the school. During the ensuing ten years General Miller served with the Combat Developments Group at Fort Knox; in field command positions with the 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Germany; with the US Second Army at Fort Meade, Md.; and as special assistant to the commander-in-chief, US Strike Command, MacDill AFB, Florida. In February 1966 General Miller assumed command of the 2d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, and later commanded the unit in Vietnam as a brigade task force commander. On January 15, 1967 he was appointed the Division ' s Chief of Staff, and in March he commanded Task Force Ivy, an independent brigade-size force. He was returned to the US in August 1967 and served on the Army General Staff in Washington, D.C. In May 1968 he was transferred to the newly organized Directorate for Civil Disturbance Planning and Operations where he served successively as Chief, Plans Division and Directorate Executive Officer. He was promoted to brigadier general September 3, 1968, concurrent with his assignment as Deputy Commanding General, US Army Training Center and Fort Ord, California. COL William W. Etchemendy Brigade Commander LTC Calvin B. Nance Battalion Commander COMPANY B THIRD BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Commenced Training: 12 May 1969 Completed Training: 3 July 1969 1LT Charles K. Crawford, Jr. Company Commander CPT Stancil D. Hunt Former Company Commander 2LT T. M. Seffrin Training Officer 1LT William Gage Training Officer E-8 Garfield Wells First Sergeant SFC Elvis Thomas SFC Candler Senior Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant SSG Bonnard ADI SSG Dennis Cookman SSG Forman Mess Steward Drill Sergeant SSG Janotta Drill Sergeant SGT Kessler Outstanding Drill Sergeant SGT Whitehead Training NCO SGT Young ADI SP4 Huber Training Aids SP4 Owens SP4 Strange Cook First Cook E-2 Assmann General Clerk PFC Meyers Armorer SP4 Cadena First Cook SP4 Cleveland First Cook Leonard Accardo Gregg Adams Haik Arakelian Rudolph Aranda Henry Arrington Kenneth Arseneau Dennis Bailey Richard Barela Richard Bezjak David Bird William Bleckman Theo Bluhm Marion Borgheger David Brinker Donald Brinker David Brown Michael Brown Tommy Brown Larry Byrd Martin Carlson Earliest Ceaser Arthur Chambers Robert Chansler Bob Chavez Steven Cohen m.n Marcus Davis Tom Deckard Joseph Della Gala John Demakas John Dickie William Doyle Garry Duncan Herman Duran Abram Edelson Ronald Ellis Pete Engard Steven Fehrenbacher Dennis Filosa Elliot Fink Robert Floran Donald Conaway Samuel Cook Adolfo Coronado Donald Cress Frederick Dana James Fox Paul Gablehouse Joseph Gall Ervin Geisler James German Clifford Gibson Eugene Gieselmann George Goins Raymond Goldstein Stephen Grafton Donald Grammer William Green Steven Grover Gary Haagenson Vernon Hall Steven Haver Richard Hendrixson Patrick Henry Richard Hildreth Stephen Hfelt Gary Holbrook James Holloran Dennis Howard Donald Howard James Hoyle Michael Hutjens Leigh Ichinose Lonnie Jensen Willis Johns William Johnson David Keller James Kelly Eric Kerness Berry King Stanley Korte Leonard Kraus Jerome Lamm Donald La Pointe Louis Larose Lon Lassere Dan Leavitt James Letner David Littman Randall Lujan Richard Lukas Agnelo Maciel Peter Mangione Harvey Marlowitz Robert Marty Atonio Masoe Thomas Joyce David Kapp Lawrence Katen Ernest Kawai William Kawalick Van Meredith Zachary Millon John Monroy Stephen Moreland George Murray Charles McDaniel John McMullin Robert Nogales Scott Olsen Dominic Pacenti Jimmy Parich Jess Parker Dale Pate Caesar Perales Kenneth Peterson John Plank Ronald Prather James Ray Randy Ray Gerald Rebein Michael Rich Kim Ricketts Richard Riddlebaugh Robert Riley David Rimkus Thomas Rooney Carlos Ruiz Robert Runyan Alan Sadovnick Rodrico Salgado Robert Smith Frederick Stinchfield Virgil Stokesbeary William Stone Charles Straatmann Robert Salisbury Myron Samisch Daniel Sanchez Kirby Sauls Wayne Schmidt Steven Seay Jerry Sena William Silva Carl Simms Robert Smith Robert Ritter Chester Robison Christopher Robinson Frank Robinson Kenneth Roesner James Struthers Stephen Sutherland Richard Talkington Robert Thousand Raymond Trost Arthur True Paul Trujillo Orlando Valdez Antonio Vasquez Robert Vaughn Thomas Wallace Billy Ward Charles Warren Larry Watson Kenneth Wicks Stuart Wilens Charles Willhoit Steven Williams Kenneth Winter Larry Wolfer Richard Zertuche Richard Coleman Ted Cumming Garry Giles David Laribe Troy Miller Kenneth Peterson William Smith Steven Coons Thomas Kilfoil Jonathan Lewis Photograph Unavailable Richard Glosman V !«M6 : i 4 0v ;v; t; v Vr : -ttv •?.?. , ;£ iy- $s ' i iii ti»‘.t-vr PS " -t -.t-tv- i — ’£ ’ ( vvr ' -ir- n v-.’cr x w a SGT Kessler Outstanding Trainees Graduation u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycl es. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. ' ARTERS AMD hi AD QUARTERS CO. JTALION 3d BRIGADE CSUMB-Library [7 ] j ’£ 3 ] M 8 ® ,1 14 m m [ . u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) tedwood , iCItyVMenlo «PI V .Woo lde PalO r 8 Sj f M° f L6s (4 lew£? w r tOn " KV IU T Mission 1797 “ ' mx i Warrn, L$P rs If {caialgra,, tyfa };[l)4 |W Htx Mvir.01 La iunnyl iiipitas H|| !oV tfl Mum Rock »A ' 44 5 ;]L R ' k JMlp - 6fi Hnr 11 J Alios , a«1o San, ti?= 1 MtOrX Z , iijM nw vt ' V ■ " oV rMno© c -p MkS in Jose • w ft—. " 7 , ‘S N! ' I N fl 0 Bonin . S Rodwoods ro Newell WCrlRtJ Gatos . » Holy City rfgff ' oyoto .Laurel Alfpadon Madrono f A 3793 totos iCorral •N Mi Aromas! TRAINING CENTER. INFANTRY AND FORT ORIX CALIFORNIA COMBAT DEVELOPMENTS COMMAND EXPERIMENTATION COMMAND r«N , fort Qr ' d; Seaside k, lontei JR) Buona po; Vista” 6 Zot mcl Minion 1770 £, Chnycnio. £Xvm( L?7 ▼- Carmel ri galley J l % 1 ANA i VCN VK 0 Vtr t f 4 t I S c stacked asAsairiiSifff iL li® mar service club pugil sticks bayonet library ■ . ' y ' beach ranges V d obstacle course XT] n ' j j 1■ " T TJpSrjsr 2 ' I arrival clothing issue ' :■ ' • ' " m . • . ' ■ range firing ] pugil sticks ,r.K •t T ' t ! ' , i ■ » k V! mortar range •- - 4-3 fi ' gP __ 1 v ' S ' ■ U£i5gS X ' ■? lip. mi: • crafts and hobby shop ftrtti 0 ) “ LHF-459 Mi r Wp Sr p«;%vA’| i3 r pr tents grenades ■ ' F " orHalf-Silhouette.200Mtrs £ Under SIGHT PICTURE KD LEVEL BOTTOM CENTER V sights and signs E " or Full-Silhouette. 200 Mtrs £ Under SIGHT PICTURE GROUND LEVEL BOTTOM CENTER ALL VISITORS RLE ASE REPORT TO THE ORDERLY ROOM i " or Full Silhouette. Over 200 Meters SIGHT PICTURE Q GROUND LEVEL 1 CENTER OF MASS CODE OF CONDUCT .nil villi - I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT l AM AN AMERICAN FIGHTING MAN, RE¬ SPONSIBLE FOR MY ACTIONS, AND DEDICATED TO THE PRINCIPLES WHICH MADE MY COUNTRY FREE. I WILL TRUST IN MY GOD AND IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMER ' C-A. OK • american spirit honor medal The American Spirit Honor Medal is a medallion provided under the auspices of the Citizens Committee for the Army, Navy and Air Force Incorporated. In December 1940, a group of patriotic civilians estab¬ lished the " Citizens Committee” for the purpose of providing men serving in the Armed Forces articles not otherwise available to them. First used in World War II, in what was then known as the Second Corps area, the American Spirit Honor Medal was an award for out¬ standing service. Early in 1950, the four military services requested that the Citizens Committee again furnish the medal as an award for the Outstanding Recruit upon completion of his basic training. Reinstated at Fort Ord early in 1967, the American Spirit Honor Medal is awarded weekly to the individual among all the graduating basic trainees at Fort Ord who displays in greatest measure those qualities of leadership best expressing the American spirit, honor, initiative, loyalty and high exam¬ ple to comrades in arms. drill sergeants creed I AM A DRILL SERGEANT DEDICATED TO TRAINING NEW SOLDIERS AND INFLUENCING THE OLD. I AM FOREVER CONSCIOUS OF EACH SOLDIER UNDER MY CHARGE, AND BY EXAMPLE WILL INSPIRE HIM TO THE HIGHEST STAND¬ ARDS POSSIBLE. I WILL STRIVE TO BE PATIENT, UNDER¬ STANDING, JUST AND FIRM. I WILL COMMEND THE DESERVING AND ENCOURAGE THE WAY¬ WARD. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM RESPON¬ SIBLE TO MY COMMANDER FOR THE MORALE, DISCIPLINE AND EFFICIENCY OF MY MEN AND THEIR PERFORMANCE WILL REFLECT AN IMAGE OF ME. 1 I I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation s de- fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand, Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) I MAJOR GENERAL PHILLIP B. DAVIDSON, JR. Commanding General A native of the American Southwest, Major General Phillip B. Davidson was born in Hachita, New Mexico, and attended both Muskogee Junior College and Northeastern State College in Oklahoma before entering the Military Academy in 1935. Upon his graduation he was assigned with the 2nd Cavalry Regiment at Fort Riley, Kansas. During World War II General Davidson served with the 3rd Recon Group (Mech) in Europe, participating in four campaigns. Other over¬ sea assignments since the end of World War II have included work with the Intelligence Section of the Far East Command; in Paris with EUCOM as executive officer of the Military Assistance Division; and in USARPAC as ACS G2. Between such oversea assignments were many stateside jobs including professor of military history at the USMC, West Point, duty with the Manpower Division, Office of the Secretary of Defense, and deputy CG at the Infantry Training Center, Fort Dix, N.J. In 1967 he became assistant chief of staff for intelligence with the Military Assistance Command in Vietnam where he served until being assigned as commanding general of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord on 2 June 1969. In addition to his studies at the Military Academy, General Davidson completed the course of study at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, in 1946, after which he stayed as an in¬ structor in the Intelligence Department. Other educational courses include the Army War College in 7 954, the National War College in 1962, and continued graduate work both with George Washington University and Boston University. With the assistance of Major General Robert R. Glass he co-authored the book, " Intelligence is for Com¬ manders ' General Davidson has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, the Silver Star Medal, the Legion of Merit with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart, the Joint Service Commen¬ dation Medal, the French Croix de Guerre, and the National Order of Vietnam, Fifth Class. He is married to the former Jeanne Eleanor Considine of Muskogee, Oklahoma, and they have three children, Phillip B. Ill, John C., and Thomas. BRIGADIER GENERAL JUDSON F. MILLER Deputy Commanding General Judson Frederick Miller was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, December 5, 1924. He attended Oklahoma Military Academy at Claremore and en¬ listed in the Army December 7, 1942. Following completion of basic training at Fort Riley, Kansas, he attended OCS there and was com¬ missioned in the Cavalry at the age of 18. His first assignment was as platoon leader with the 42nd Cav. Recon. Troop (Mech) at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma. General Miller served as platoon leader and troop commander in five European Theater campaigns during World War II, and was wounded in action during the Ruhr River crossing in the Rhineland in February 1945. After the war he served as troop commander in Austria. Upon completing the Airborne Course at Fort Benning in 1947, General Miller was assigned to the 82d Airborne Division where he eventually served as assistant chief of staff in 1950. During the Korean War he served in six campaigns with the 2d Battalion, 187th Inf. Regt. (Abne), and later with Headquarters Eighth US Army Returning to the US in 1952 he attended the advance course at the Armor School and was appointed instructor of tactics at During 11 the ensuing ten years General Miller served with the Combat Developments Group at Fort Knox; In field command positions with the 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Germany, with the US Second Army at Fort Meade, Md.; and as special assistant to the commander- in-chief. US Strike Command, MacDill AFB, Florida. In February 1966 General Miller assumed command of the 2d Brigade 4th Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, and later commanded the unit in Vietnam as a brigade task force commander On January 15 1967 he was appointed the Division ' s Chief of Staff, and in March he commanded Task Force Ivy, an independent brigade-size f° rce - He was returned to the US in August 1967 and served on the Army General Staff in Washington, D.C. In May 1968 he was transferred to the newly organized Directorate for Civil Disturbance Planning and Operations where he served successively as Chief, Plans Division and Directorate Executive Officer. _ . , , 10 , 0 He was promoted to brigadier general September 3, 1968, con¬ current with his assignment as Deputy Commanding General, US Army Training Center and Fort Ord, California. COL Paul E. Nottage Brigade Commander HEADQUARTERS HEADQUARTERS COMPANY Commenced Training: 11 August 1969 LTC CLyde On- Battalion Commander SECOND BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Completed Training: 3 October 1969 " MOTTO " Throughout All History No Motto Has Offered A Greater Challenge Than Ours Ir HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 2nd BATTALION. 3d BRIGADE WEfSU We Endeavor To Succeed Universally " Requires Every Man ' s Unlimited Devotion To Duty In Order To Insure Success In Any Given Task Regardless Of Tune Or Place. Weather Permitting As A Reminder Of This Great Challenge. We Have Adopted The WETSU Bird Whose legend Is Below This Bird Was Selected For Its Characteristics Of Gracofulness. Strength Of Flight. Kecnos Of Vision And Endless Surveillance Over The Land The Razor Sharp Talons And Bill Signify The Units Ability To Seize. Devour. Digest And Accomplish Its Mission. CPT Monta Euler Company Commander And RED On The Perch LEGEND OF THE WETSU 1 The Bird Is Superimposed On A BLUE BACKGROUND Indicative Of Our Infantry Heritage 2 The BLACK PLUMAGE Signifies Heroic Participation In Night Training. 3. YELLOW In The Bil And Breast Signifies The Sand Of Fort OrcLWith Which Wo Have Such Close Contact. . 4 The RED On The Bill Symbolizes The Blood Of Our Fallen Brotht Is The Blood Of The Red Menace That Opposes Our Country 5. ROYAL BLUE On The Bill And Talons Attest To The Devotion And Valor Required By All WETSU Members Who Have Learned To Quitcherbellyachen ' ‘ ' t 6. The GREEN COMBAT PACK And Helmet Are Symbol 01‘ ' +he Long Hours And athers ! 1 i r i I PSG C. A. Burwell First Sergeant PSG Van Peski SDI SSG Bailey Drill Sergeant SSG Bentley Mess Steward SSG Bryan Drill Sergeant SSG Young Supply Sergeant SGT Balchune Drill Sergeant SGT Clifton Drill Sergeant SGT Fernandez Drill Sergeant SGT George Supply Sergeant SGT Sage Drill Sergeant SGT Voges Drill Sergeant SP4 Estes SP4 Garcia Assistant Supply Sergeant ADI SP4 Gaudreault Company Clerk CPL Kislingbury ADI SP4 Parker ADI SP4 Swetman ADI PFC Gravman Training Clerk PFC Johnson PFC Mendez PVT Moore Supply Clerk Supply Clerk William Abram Clyde Acord Victor Alba Thomas Allen Marvin Anderson John Anker Frankie Apachee Roberto Arce James Archer Joseph Arensdore Harold Armstrong Desemio Aviles Jesus Baca James Badaluco Martin Baguio Nelson Bahe Julian Baldonado James Barker Ronald Barker Roberto Bastidos Mark Bauer Barry Baysinger Duane Bazzel David Betts Marcus Bishop Thomas Brady James Britt James Brose Gerald Brownell Joseph Buckley Jose Burgos Harvey Bushee Raymond Camarena Dino Candelaria Charles Cardinal Frederick Carman Michael Carman Anthony Castro Allen Chensvold Craig Christensen Brent Cleverly John Coleman Gary Conklin Luis Corona Donald Crandall Robert Davis Howard Dan James Degen Roy Deviso David Dimas f John Dugan Francisco Duran Robert Dziedzic William Eggum Evart Empie Hernan Enriquez Franklin Epstein Raymond Eskeets Harvey Evans Derek Farrer Joe Ferguson Thomas Footit Thomas Franco Robert Frazier Timothy Gabhart Steve Gallardo Stephen Gallet Jose Galvan Lorenzo Garcia Thomas Garegnani David Garza Reynaldo Garza James Gipson Rudolfo Gonzales Roger Gregory Douglas Grenz John Griswold Gordon Groskopf Alfred Grzesiak Robert Gwin Michael Hagen Stephen Haker Jack Hampton Matthew Haproff Stanley Haramoto Michael Heldt Keith Hill Keith Holmes Raymond Horlacher William Hudson Ramon Huezo Mark Hull Gary Jalbert Karr Jenkins Kenneth Jernstedt Bruce Jones Milton Katz Rodney Kauhaahaa Daniel Kawakami Paul Kearns _ Pascal Martin Quentin McBride Thomas McCandless Charles McCorkell Robert McDaniels Jack King Rex Kirkham Buddy Kooyaquaptewa Robert Lack Kurt Landon Ronald Lastice Benny Lee William Leigh Richard Levario Norman Lilly Danny Linville Frederick Long Armando Lopez Rudolph Lopez James Lovejoy Charles Lovers Brian MacDonald Michael Maher Benjamin Marquez John Martin Patrick McDonald Terry McKay Roger Medley David Millard Robert Mills James Molloy Gilbert Montelongo Tim Moore James Mosa James Murphy Peter Nagy Melvin Nakano Jose Navarro Ambrose Navasie Gordon Nieffenegger William Odencrantz William Oku Robert Olson Patrick O ' Rourke Ricardo Osuna Peter Palumbo David Pardue Ralph Parry Richard Pascale Roger Patton y Eric Peerenboom Gerald Petersohn Carl Pfeiffer Joseph Phillips Steven Piland Michael Pillsbury Herman Plummer David Prescott Arnold Price Richard Pulliam Oscar Ramirez Xavier Ramos Robert Rast Neil Ray Ernest Reyes Henry Reyes Andrew Reynolds Joseph Richards Donald Righter William Riley Carlos Rodriguez William Rodriguez Joseph Rosta Dimitrios Roumpekas William Russo Pastor Salas James Salazar John Salazar Fernando Sanchez Elmer Savage William Schenk Paul Scola Brian Seelos Peter Serle Carl Seyboldt Henry Shaw Marco Shaw Richard Sherman Raymond Silcox Manuel Silva William Silveria Cordell Smart Donald Smith Martin Smith Eric Smute Terrell Sparks Thomas Stangland Michael Starke John Stephens Jeffry Stephenson _ Roy Swafford Larry Swartzlander Melvin Taliman Michael Taylor Thomas Thompson Ruben Torres Jesse Trapse Percy Trujillo Danny Tsaipi Terry Tucker Clifton Underwood Ismael Vallejo Bruce Vandever Christopher Van Scoyk Darrell Van Wagner Gilbert Varela Manuel Villafuerte F. Villavicencio Henry Wassmer Elmo Webb David White Walter White John Whitesinger Larry Zendle Donald Zuber m 7. K hi 3 Amundsen Jerry Albert mm :Hf3 SGT Sage PVT Molloy, Outstanding Trainee SGT Clifton, Outstanding Dl and Award Winners graduation u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier.


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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

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