US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1968

Page 1 of 118

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 118 of the 1968 volume:

TRAtNIMG CENTER COMPANY C 1st BKIGABK C$UMB ' |.ibr$ry ' u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28 500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) stacked gear ' ’ B(i A’ A ' . obstacle course A monitoring an x-ray on closed circuit tv hospital Xw expert expert 68 ' 1 2 sharpshooter 54 - 67 marksman 36 - 53 basic rifle marksmanship 1 - basic rifle marksmanship onet chemical, biological, radiological warfare individual tactical training tt hand to hand combat " F i obstacle course mortars recoilless rifle •nnh Vrv, basic army administrative course iiHT " food service school %;-cs cONTKa CHWH ' lDWiWJr radio operators course communications course I information office radio section vehicle UWTS drivers course [oFuMITS K ' ' I K. ' , " , : ' s« Bo ST ,?a V Ktk mm ■■ BIISFK. ' ■ is 1 " Wmi ■ ' ■ S;,‘ ' g I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nations de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . a.nd glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Na tion born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry, I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit. Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to remrn. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . , crossed the frozen Han marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) 1 I I I MAJOR GENERAL THOMAS A. KENAN j Commanding General Major General Thomas A. Kenan was born in Atlanta, Georgia, October , 10, 1917. He received a reserve commission of second lieutenant. In¬ fantry, upon graduation from The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, I in 1939. He became a Regular Army officer in September of the same year. His first assignment was with the 22d Infanti 7 Regiment of the 4th Infantry Division at Fort McPherson, Georgia. For more than six years he was with the 22d Infantry and the 4th Division, serving in the United States, France and Germany, where he held the positions of company commander, regimental S-3, battalion commander, and division G-3. During World War II, Major General Kenan participated in the land¬ ing on Utah Beach in Normandy and commanded the 2d Battalion of the 22d Infantry during the Hurtgen Forest operation. During the period March 1946 to May 1948, General Kenan was a student at Ohio State University where he received degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in personnel administration. Subsequent duties were In the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, Department of the Army; Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers in Europe (SHAPE), at Paris, and the Army War College. He is also a graduate of the Command and General Staff College. After gradu¬ ation from the Army War College, he served a tour of duty with the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Department of the Army. On May 7, 1958, General Kenan was transferred to Fort Benning, Ga., where he commanded the Isi Battle Group, 11th Infantry, 2d In¬ fantry Division. On 1 June 1959, he became Chief of Staff of the 2d Infantry Division. In March 1960 General Kenan was assigned to Eighth U. S. Army in Korea where he served as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, until he was recalled in April 1961 to fill the position of Chief, Manpovver and Training Division, In the office of the Director of Military Assistance, OASD(ISA). In November 1962 he was designated Director Ad¬ ministration and Management, ODMA OASD(ISA), and m March 1963 was reassigned to the Office of Reserve Components as Deputy Chief. Decorations are the Silver Star, Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Purole Heart, the Combat Infantryman Badge and the French Croix de Guerre with Palm. 2LT Leslie P. Gisler Training Officer 2LT Tom Mateczun Training Officer 2LT Jack H. Brookhart Training Officer 2LT Ronald G. Schmidt Training Officer E-8 John L. Everson First Sergeant PSG Archie Hodges Senior Drill Sergeant SSG Darrell Dean Supply Sergeant PSG LeonardI Trevino Former Senior Drill Sgt. PSG J. P. Cruz Drill Sergeant PSG Vera Drill Sergeant SSG Earl B. Herring Mess Steward SGT Callaway Drill Sergeant SGT Doughty Drill Sergeant SGT Hokutan Drill Sergeant SGT Langlois Drill Sergeant SP4 Crawford Company Clerk SP4 Vaiz Supply Clerk PFC Tapp Training NCO SGT Amaral First Cook SP4 Busch First Cook PFC Morris PFC Simmons E-2 Richardson E-2 Smith First Cook First Cook Cook Cook Martin Adams Frans Ackermann Larry Acuna David Aker John Alford Vernon Archer Diego Armijo Thomas Austin James Bagsby Robert Barrentine Ronnie Bean James Beaudin Brad Bennett Steven Bennett Terrence Berning Dennis Bjorhus Bruce Black Dennis Bowman Ronald Brandt Johnny Brenton Bill Brown John Brunner Ronald Caballero Gregory Carlson William Casados E. CatalanottI G. Church, Jr. Gary Cochran Joe Crowe Edward Crowson, III Jimmie Davis John Davis Larry Dawson David Digiacomo Brian Doherty Gerald Dubois Robert Duncan Mickey Elder Richard Engstrom George Epperson Gilbert Estrella Ira Faben Eric Farkas Michael Ferona Travis Flanagan Steven Fleming Richard Flynn Michael Franchi Bruce Fuji! Serapio Garza, Jr. Gregory Gibeson Dennis Glaser Denis Gray Gumesindo Gudino Jack Guthrie Orlando Gutierrez David Hall Ernest Hansen Warwick Hayes, ill Clyde Holliday William Hotchkiss Jay Hunison, Jr. Dennis Inouue Charles Iverson Joe Janes Frank Jese, Jr. George Johnson Joseph Johnston, II Thomas Jones Howard Kaminsky James Kendall D. Ketting-Oliver Glenn Keuman Richard Kim John Kinzie, Jr. Michael Lawrence Karlis Licis Olimpio Lizada William Logan Robert Lopez Rene Lorlo Donald Ludeman James MacDonald John Mansfield Sergio Manzano Michael Martin Miguel Martinez Philip Meider Winston Melton James Mendonsa Michael Menser Charles Mllilante Thomas Miller Robert Monnier Daniel Montes Raymond KlepczynskI Nelson Koch David Kraeger Fred Kuhrt Edgar Lafferty, III James Moore Michael Muggelberg Ray Muneoka Albert Myles Terry McCarthy Richard McGaw Carmie McKay Richard McKelvey Theodore Nason James Neisler John Nelson Nicholas Netherton Keith Neumann George Newsome Lawrence Nicholas David Nitschke Steven Nuckolls Larry Olson Alexander Orozco Herman Oshiro Harley Oursley Richard Palmer Stephen Parkhurst Raymond Parra Dale Perry S’5 Michael Pierce Richard Potter Richard Porter Larry Powell Dennis Pyle Arthur Quaid Craig Rabenneck Herbert Rabinowitz Michael Reed Foster Reynolds Charles Roberson Michael Roberts Rudy Rodriguez Robert Rogers Donald Ronia Ronald Rzucidio George Samaniego Luis Sauidia James Scott Roger Seeward Norman Shannon John Silva Daniel Smith Donald Snowden Michael Stevens Stephen Stratton Chris Tharp Mercy Thomas Marvin Thompson Robert Thompson Robert Timeyer James Toland Roberto Torres Leon Tridle Charles Trisko Bernardo Urrea Roy Van Guilder Ricky Vaughan Thomas Villa Leland Wakamatsu Keith Waller David Wallner Patrick Wass Lloyd Watsek James White Danny Wilder Stephen Williams Darrell Wold Lewis Wright Gary Yonashiro Francis Young Richard Zinnato James Hicks Roger Sewell The Outstanding Trainee E-2 James M. Kendall was In the hospital at graduation time. SGT Mendez, SGT Moudy, SGT Moger, CPL Friday AOrs rt7 ' i5! u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. i s COL William W, Etchemendy Brigade Commander LTC Theodore Wyckoff Battalion Commander COMPANY C FIRST BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 10 June 1963 Graduated: 2 August 1968 2LT John T ay for PSG Eferain Sierra First Sergeant PSG John M. Hall Senior Drill Sergeant SSG Carlson Mess Sergeant SGT Ailes Drill Sergeant SGT Jewel Drill Sergeant SGT Smith Drill Sergeant SGT Ph ipps Drill Sergeant SGT Torres Drill Sergeant SGT Shimizu Drill Sergeant SGT Tstcze Drill Sergeant SGT Hicks A-l SP4 Danis! SP4 Coldasure Company Clerk Armorer PFC Norwood Mail Clerk Kftchen Staff Tj ' V? s 77 wt Roque Aguon Peter Ahlgrim Raymond Alvarez Ricardo Aragon ? Arauzamhesse Michael Arehart Ronald Arias Robert Ban is Paul Battisti Gerard Belleville John Bergland Gustano Boites George Boyle William Brown George Bumgardner William Burgess Donald Cate Richard Calzade William Cameron James Campbell AEan Carver Frank Carlos Ramon Champaco Peter Chavez Jose Chavez Fredrick Clark James Claven Michael duff Albert Cobb Wayne Cobb Allen Cole James Collins Samuel Corella Ronald Critchlow James Crocker Fred Cuccia Patrick Darner Clarence Davies Robert Deyoung Sherman Draper Bernard Duran Alex Durazo Francis Emmons Thomas Encinas Jose Escobedo Gilbert Espinoza Octavio Estrella Kent Farfey George Farris Vincent Fazio Jose Fernandez Frank Flores Stephen Francis Leonard Fu ernes Joseph Garrido Mon Gee Richard Ginther Jimmy Glass Peter Gonzales Peter Gumabon Wilbert Hamilton Randolph Harris Lee Hartung George Harvey Norman Haven John Haynes Warren Haywood Gordon Hefn Jerry Henry Robert Hey good Oran Holben Michael Holland Timothy Hooker Thomas Horejsi Mark H organ Garry Howell Leonard Isaak Kenneth Johnson Kenneth Johnson Stephen Johnson Rodger Kennon Mart Kessler Bobby King Wayne Kitaura Rudy Krantz Walter Kremin Charles Lamb Guy Leavell Ronald Lee Patrick Letizio Joseph Licata Paul Loeffel Charles Lopez Theodoro Lopez Gary Lorenzini Donald Lovelace Wilfredo Lucas Ray Macias Ronnie Magana Stephen Mahoney Larry Martin Robert Mastrofeo Ronald Mathews Jimmie May Richard May Edward Medina Abelardo Mena Charles Montagna - C Paul Montague Michael Montesantj Tronys Montoya Edwardo Mora Robert Moreno William Morris Dan Morrow David Mortimer Arthur Moya Thomas Munro Terrance Muren Michael Me Breen Chester McCarty Frank McConnell Steven Me Lave in Michael Nagaoke Stephen Nelson James Nicholas William Oglesby Ronald Olsen Joseph O ' Neil Ivan Ouka Timothy Ragand Arthur Passanando IVlanuel Perafto Dennis Peters Glenn Peters Roberto Pineda R, Pokrzywinski David Poole Robert Potts Antonio Quichocho John Rees William Reid Gary Reiter Richard Reynolds Sergio Reza Edward Rios Frank Rivas Clifford Roe Lloyd Ross Rodolfo Sandoval ifllilf ' 1 1 r 1 F, San Nicolas R„ San Nicofas Layne Santos Carl Schmidt Charles Sch meter Wayne Smith Richard Soussens Mrchaei Springer Michael Spurr Robert Stace John Staley Joseph Statti Date Troutt Aleio Untalan Michael Uhorchak Cfement Valencia Juan Veizaga J. Wagenbrenner Kenneth Walker C. Wallenburg Richard Walters Donald White Gary White Paul Wibier Jon Wilcox a . ■■■ w ' m ' liTJi ' n, ■ vr-rfttF FSW- ■ ' ■■Utw T ? fit V- ? ' :Vi% { , i 5 : Outstanding T rarnee Award Winners graduation -v v,- " T? 1 1 B " " f C I ' Tf p?- L ' " ‘ ,n ' u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela- tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him- self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir- tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as- signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al- together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to fake his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. , ,; ' .v.v. .;w.w- " •vwv ' J - " J . , Ay. f ' .v. ' WSftJii MnNNNtfMP f$T - ■ j hV lF.V JMMl lf “ A I gPfPSi . ■ liiiiiiil 11 f r f, r J w.-v. • •• ' • •■ - - shsf ?. • ;v : ? ,, -a-: ;; ;•■;- ‘ 0 £.★== . | |Z 1


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