US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1967

Page 1 of 352

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 12, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 16, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1967 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 352 of the 1967 volume:

,W " v 3' ,wr s 3' A 1 ' L ii. if 5 5 415' W - Q.. . 'V ,.,, 4 - "' 'S' if 2 Q.,'m" M iq ., , , A 4 -AA S -n ' fl- A-, 5 ar w U ', ' , 1 if as 'Uv ' 'gr 5 u. s. army training center, infantry, fort orcl, california Fort Ord was named after Maior General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont's Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis- sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord's four training brigades each year. The Ist and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training, the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training llnfantrylp and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup- ply, Automotive Mechanic's Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the "feel" of becoming a soldier at his first stop - the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla- toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non- commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en- tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. A No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu- late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: "This We'll Defend." This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as "Aptitude Test," "Classification Interview," "Language Qualification Test," "Clothing Issue," and "Preventive Medicine Orientations," become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subiects presented during basic train- ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub- iects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. 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V basic army administrative course radio operators course ' 1 V '-.MN f, ,qu v f Q A 1 A -5 2 ,r-1:-gr'-?g',g' ,. - . ..-,V x 2' Q ' K pq - K T fra! , Q MX communications cout. information office radio section chapel 'Y iv P M p f. Nix 'Wig-5 ,A -N Xlzaxf' 1 X K S Q 2 2 1 1 sswmi LifQ:bf'T5s S w-J Q, S gf " "k' ' fi' K k yk 'Mim .., :Z Q """Q' K-xwf W',.,,...,,-5.5m ' ---- , . H Haig ,.. W- - -"',LAp,:- r awww, - . wa "' - WSF' f' A . -mph ff K . ,. k k - X J 5, -3.-ff 5 X M I ,Si W 5 S X drivers course -W - f- - --3 I i I A 1 f i 1 1 ! 1 xx X - - I Y g K V drill sergeants creed I AM A DRILL SERGEANT DEDICATED TO TRAINING NEW SOLDIERS AND INFLUENCING THE OLD. I AM FOREVER CONSCIOUS OF EACH SOLDIER UNDER MY CHARGE, AND BY EXAMPLE WILL INSPIRE HIM TO THE HIGHEST STAND- ARDS POSSIBLE. I WILL STRIVE TO BE PATIENT, UNDER- STANDING, JUST AND FIRM. I WILL COMMEND THE DESERVING AND ENCOURAGE THE WAY- WARD. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM RESPON- SIBLE TO MY COMMANDER FOR THE MORALE, I DISCIPLINE AND EFFICIENCY OF MY MEN AND w 4. THEIR PERFORMANCE WILL REFLECT AN IMAGE K OF ME. Y E . ' " " ' ' " " -"' 'v'..,1.,,- ,- N -1--Q --W , , ..-f' -If -Q- A ""--M -1-A Z ,,,,f H ,f usp: my A uh 1 W M zz- ,ff . ? , if ff"'4i, , . ,V I, f, W. ,w we , V, ,,., ' ' M A 72,1 .ew .Jmwfyr V I li N . x 1' R 0 , 'H , 5 , g .. . " V , Wi , , U 1 . 2 7' 'RH' .-A -'yn 'Tw , ' id V A vi' M , ak 'Zi W W Q A4 Yi' ' 'rn-H I AM THE INFAN TRY .I am the Infantry-Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation's de- fense . . . I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains . . . to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! I With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun- tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro-and disease-in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn't come back until it was "over, over there." At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the "Bulge" . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The "Thou- sand-Year" Reich was dead. , From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow . . . I did re- turn . . . I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation's defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry-Queen of Battle! Follow Me! CReprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazinej MAJOR GENERAL THOMAS A. KENAN Commanding General 'lajor General Thomas A. Kenan was born in Atlanta, Georgia, October O, 1917. He received a reserve commission of second lieutenant, In- antry, upon graduation from The Citadel, Charleston, South Carolina, 1 1939. He became a Regular Army oflicer in September of the same ear. is first assignment was with the 22d Infantry Regiment of the 4th ifantry Division at Fort McPherson, Georgia. For more than six ars he was with the 22d Infantry and the 4th Division, sewing in e United States, France and Germany, where he held the positions of mpany commander, regimental S-3, battalion commander, and ivision G-3. uring World War II, Major General Kenan participated in the land- lg on Utah Beach in Normandy and commanded the 2d Battalion of I8 22d Infantry during the Hurtgen Forest operation. uring the period March 1946 to May 1948, General Kenan was a .udent at Ohio State University where he received degrees of Master f Science and Doctor of Philosophy in personnel administration. Iubsequent duties were in the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, 1, Department of the Army, Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers Europe CSHAPEJ, at Paris, and the Army War College. He is also graduate of the Command and General Staff College. After gradu- Lion from the Army War College, he served a tour of duty with the flice of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Department of I8 Army. May 7, 1958, General Kenan was transferred to Fort Benning, Ga., Here he commanded the 1st Battle Group, 11th Infantry, 2d In- ntry Division. On 1 June 1959, he became Chief of Staff of the l Infantry Division. March 1960 General Kenan was assigned to Eighth U. S. Army in orea where he served as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1, until he was called in April 1961 to fill the position of Chief, Manpower and 'aining Division, in the office of the Director of Military Assistance, ASDCISAJ. In November 1962 he was designated Director, Ad- inistration and Management, ODMA OASDIISAI, and in March 963 was reassigned to the Ofhce of Reserve Components as Deputy lief. ecorations are the Silver Star, Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf uster, the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman Badge and the 'ench Croix de Guerre with Palm. BRIGADIER GENERAL FREDRICK C. ROECKER, Deputy Commanding General Frederick C. Roecker, Jr. was born in Walla Walla, Washington, 11 July 1919. He enlisted in the Washington National Guard in 1934 and served until 1938 in 161st Infantry Regiment and 116th QM Regiment as a private, corporal and sergeant. He completed high school in Walla Walla and attended Drew Preparatory School in San Francisco, California, prior to entering the United States Military Academy. He was commissioned a second lieutenant, Infantry upon graduation in 1942. General Roecker joined the 134th Infantry Regiment, 35th Infantry Division, and served as platoon leader, company commander, battalion operation officer and battalion commander during World War II. He was decorated six times during tive European campaigns, including the Silver Star and three Purple Hearts. He was promoted to Lieu- tenant Colonel in 1944. Upon his return to the United States in 1945, General Roecker was assigned to the 11th Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division as a battalion commander. He attended the Command and General Staff College in 1946 and after graduation was assigned as Commanding Oflicer, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in Japan where he also served as Regimental Executive Officer and Division G-3. Other assignments included instructor in the Department of Mechanics, United States Militarv Academyg Harvard University where he re- ceived a Master of Science Degree in Civil Engineering, Executive Officer of the 27th Infantry in Korea where he subsequently served as an advisor to the 25th Infantry Division, Republic of Korea Army. Upon completion of Korean duty, in August 1954, General Roecker served in Oregon Military District, Vancouver Barracks, Wash., and in 1956 was assigned as Executive Oflicer, Infantry Branch, Officer Assignment Division, TAGO, Washington, D.C. Following graduation from the National War College in 1960, he commanded the 1st Battle Group, 31st Infantry in Korea. In July 1961, he was assigned to J-3, Office of the Joint Chiefs of Stai. On 1 October 1962, he became Executive Officer in the Ofhce of Per- sonnel Operations. On promotion to Brigadier General, General Roecker returned to Korea as the Assistant Division Commander, 7th Infantry Division, for his third Korea tour. He took over duties at Fort Ord on 31 July 1967. COL Jack Samson MAJ Earl R. Sykes Brigade Commander Battalion Commander FIRST BATTALION COMPAN Y A FIRST BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 2 July 1967 Graduated: 26 August 1967 CPT Robert D. Sweeney, Jr. Company Commander . . J 1 . f- .1 .-W ,.':fr:-wwf'-, . , .wcgafgfzzgtgkwgkqgiwg-evra? ,hj.Wlf5Q.,5.mMgge'Q1'S,, vqjsyf-5iQ5,g.ed4. xQ'3:ew+.fr24.offr2f:n.mevww1i:.waf49-7.Lu ,g,1.m.u:.:.1aifwmmfs.,. '+sa1f.:eSs13sfxf,-f1ar?:L?2tZif,aaf . rtvumwf-,Jaf.ff:seJ,a.frfao:4-fmf.f-,e1u+mv+w1il.xfi PSG Libed PSG Lively 2LT John L. Griffin 58 Yoshihafu okamufa Senior Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Training Officer FirSi Sergeant D' , 3 PSG Spickelmier SSG Austin SSG Thomas SGT Carreira SGT ESkrid9e Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant SGT Padgett CPL Pedersen PFC Coley SSG Warner SP4 Eckhardt Drill Sergeant Drill Corporal ADI SUPDIY 5el'9eanl- Arlnerel' i n it N S X F i if sf 3 RP' aff :rf f . , - - 5 '--- is . 3 f.Q'f K ' Q u . ,L ---. gil -3 A Sass S sg . xii?"- , KK NE, aww n s X,-wx K xv Q SP4 Jurado SP5 Mullins Company Clerk Mess Steward R SP4 Martin First Cook x S5113 ,WL 1 YQ S Q. SP4 Lopez First Cook f X 5555 , S S gf 5 2 - .4 I ggi so 1 q ogg. 1'. - 1 .f T, if b ' .P -::,g S is , A 9 S f Y SP4 Soddy Second Cook Xa ei 'I CNN. y.-wg. Alberto Acuna John Alley, Jr. Guillermo Aluarado Miles Anderson George Andrews Duane Arentsen Edward Armijo Donald Ashton Richard Backes Bruce Bartrug William Bauserman Wilbur Beezley Gary Bellamy Armando Beltran Richard Bemiller Bruce Bennett Pablo Benrumen Robert Bethe Robert Bias Lawrence Bieniek Leon Bigler Dennis Bittikofer Leslie Blanchard Steven Bowman Robert Brister Hans Brouwer Robert Bryan Frank Bryant Hubert Bryant, Jr. Thomas Bryant Michael Buford John Cairns Martin Canavan Franklin Castro Terrence Chideckel Roger Clemens Michael Cline Carl Cole Larry Colt Steven Cooke Terry Dannerberger Michael Dombrowski Val Dornay Lawny Dosher Clarence Drewry James Eatherton James Edwards Dustin Elford Alan Elliott Erlindo Esquibel Stephen Ewing James Fannon Terry Feister Donald Ferguson Efrain Fierro Gilbert Figueroa Perry Fletcher Edward Fulgona Patrick Furry Guido Galluzzo Ruben Garcia Wayne Garner Roger Garrett Lawrence Garrison Jr William Gerber Peter Gianarakos Jack Gibbs Charles Gillespie John Gleason Carl Goebel, III Robert Gordon Randall Graves Clarence Griego John Grigsby Emilio Guajardo Presley Guio, Jr. Roy Hale Robert Harris Wilbert Harris Da Shell Hart James Hawks Charles Haynes John Heitzke Ernest Herrera Randall Hildreth James Hill Ronald Hillin Wade Holloway, Jr Timothy Hollar Harry Huckestein Donald Hyatt Edwin Irons Johnnie Jacobs Arthur Jacomin Carl Jantz Leo Jenks Gerald Jones, Jr. Clifford Johnson Gary Johnson Larry Johnson Timothy Kennedy Clarence King Frank King Gordon Knight Ronnie Konishi Karl Kraushaar Brian Kruse Donald Lacy William Langhagen Norman Lefebure Bruce Leonard George Lesser Harold Lindsey Henry Lopez Randal Lowe Pedro Luna Peter Mablem Pasqual Marino Frederic Martin Michael Martinovish Steven Matheson James Matlack Joe Mauricio, Jr. Michael Merlo John Meyer Gary Miller Harold Milligan David Miranda Gibbs Mishoe Robert Montes Tommas Montez Ronald Montgomery Kerry Morford John Moser Kenneth Muckenthaler Hendrik Mulder Gary Murdoch Mark Myrononicz Thomas McAvoy, Jr. John McCallum Edward McFarland David McGhehey David McKenna Joe McKinney Thomas Nixon Carson Nunes Charles Oehl Santiago Orate Thomas Ormsby Benjamin Ortiz Michael Padgett David Page Richard Peacock Terry Peck James Peckruh Edwin Phillips Edmond Pichette George Platz Martin Pollerana, Jr John Posco Ralph Poultney, Jr. Michael Price Paul Pruitt Vincent Puccio Christopher Quine Louis Quintana James Randall Darwin Ray James Reagan, Jr. Nickolas Reyna, Jr. Paul Reynolds Thomas Ricci David Rice Domenick Rivera Lawrence Robinson Lester Robison Hector Rojas Antonio Roman Anthony Romick Angel Romo David Rosenberger Thomas Rossiter Robert Roybal Richard Rudolph Richard Russell Joel Samford John Saunders Dean Schillinger Michael Seeds Ronald Sharman Thomas Shipp Nlartin Silvestri Bruce Sinclair Dennis Slate James Slonaker Benjamin Smith Philip Smith Thomas Smith David Sorensen Roy Spraggins George Stassi, Jr. Stanford Steele Peter Stern Ralph Stewart, Jr. Richard Stoudt David Swenson Kenneth Tamblyn Chris Taylor Benny Tellez Kazimierz Terpilowski Willie Thompson Michael Thoreson Michael Travers John Tullos Larry Twyman James Underwood Howard Vaughn Eugene Vaughn, Jr. Robert Vanty John Virgin Michael Wagy Michael Walsh Harold Ward William Warren Alfonzo Washington John Weiss James White Terry Wilson Jerry Wimberley John Winter John Wirth Yuet Wong Daniel Woods William Wulff James Young, III Tommy Younger Ronald York Paul Zimmerman Harry Love Douglas Szymansk am . Am ,K Jw- w.. '.Z""J 'QUWG' rf' NCL i 'Q Q . jmwgfi K L Q91 ,,,., ,: , ..,, S f , 3. ,ir FN , 5 5 fha - Q S, was ff 4 my . ,,,,i -:eq Qs X -...Agni , -40" R 5 x ,fm A 43.1 f , X fa -user' 0 XA 11 X 19" -5. 'L' . .NX 6 N. 'gg X A K. I , , fix Q 'sl K hlI""""' iz.. .E xv'T1' .h-, L:F,75.t-f,v1,,.r-:,7,15g.:?cg7-!fC3fg,7ff!G9'-T5Ny I-,541-gpcvg,-,A I' I I l,,.x,y-Av-f-1-Y:-vzfQf,',s-any . Y 'img J',"""I,., fri-ivy:-v-1-1' 5.-r-17:15-X-+w.fjg1'p9wf.Kv,f'Qg1ya'qQ ,lgls ,L ,,,,..,..,,.,,-, - , L- .- , . , v,1.- 1 ' '-- .., V. --'.1 - -- . f-.Kms-wil awww?-fwdele-wfrfP?f5'?ErfGe'vfLJve9HW5, 2'S'E 3h.v17ff?'ff:5,5fSB4xEl- as .mr-ll-ff ww-V-s+Mf'-Kmfvfw-i+'e,sw2y1Vw1 .kw- :?:i'v3ii4L?7"?J41-1?+a'Sf'?r'a5ziffc?i?4vE'F?i5-L9s1ifT:9v'Ef'L484,w3-1-inif-1753if:fl a'fe.-3"u3T?lfib15f.'E?17?5?41'i45rlhY3?iL'ihiS?5'sf5'r52Pf2F,xYfM11if4:?:57if31i1-?'?3C0r1s?Tfvf?ifs+f?1?4'fE:ggL1?xfT v' I i A rs N m Q I w Q Q 1-'aw 'E at -an gi? 'R xxx? Kgs K W mx -p-Nuns ' f 15 W, -s .Elf A J H. 1 K 1 , l , - I . f K ,E MW I ,xv . f -.-an -4-Q--- f -nun-Zlluqnvv .-A ll ., A, .H ' 1' 5 Q S f 5 s kk 'A .ij wx M SB if graduation outstanding trainee 4 Ir. L rw f':x11-,i4.v'?'-L-224mv-r.Jx:YhP4vE'?1iL1sfxg'37rfafsw-m'.H'.:-1.8-fwat-'9fw'S..n.,.:i-ffiii?3F?22l6sf.hY5.-.fihb9,z'gz-'ati-.nwif .. -1-f..c4:.':51J:iiff?fk-1':W:fv.:.afs+f?L14"i'71..mfs u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, california cont'd body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee's time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military iustice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela- tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him- self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir- tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as- signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subiects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al- together the Army provides courses in some 625 subiects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. ?? 1.2 7 " Q 99 In Q fr? , vj' . RFQ' ni M' ,YV I-5 ,is 'Us ani X . ,gli '15 1? uf!! , Q 1 -fy 1 , '1 2' , Z Q ,,. Q -1 , f 3 ,I 1 V wXu.u 5 , 1 v. .vw , A , Q ' I 5, :' ' Q -i .' ' fa 0 L' ' 'tri QQ a W! J.5. ARMY RAINING CENTER COMPANY B h BATTALION 1st BRIGADE CSUMB Library u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his firs t stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: This We II Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) J Warm Sprs. ' m _ 5 Redwood r 2MPk N " sS l r ' VWoofiside Palo W 8 r j 2 La ' tf fiv8Hondal6 Cnla jeratt £yt lit h Mvffctt 1 tWtK ffl Alum Rock Park KTW A A«i Sln, f Si -DlackMtni fl jf ftis n; XP ? K »V(XX S Jibs " rK. . £; c Ci Catos »i TNf3)i01 TO, Holy City I " ' H AVjSJ-aurol AlfT}adon M.idrone ' •qW TV A37SW l|2 j s K (A Z r-J-oma Ptiei l u rlonry Cowell -- W-Rodwmds St. Pk. BS.. U% oquol f 1 JQgL 3 Aptos AftM l Crtfie$ Bio Basin J V oidder Ben Lomond® BonnyjM«Lj l P®® n A Feltoa 17 Corral une P°%i icaslde -1 Cat me! Mission WO Carmel Valley .Sa »V; % Clemente. iChmi VtN ANA a « K o 4 SI MES ARMY asSL ■ WaNT C ' lf) E SECTOR reception center and first meal h r clothing HflH room 1 ? 1 1 li ' i f jk f ■ f II pMSMBlIfry N.i ' ■ ; ' jfP ij |fl “ • ™ ™l II •=:?5 R i Mji If : . ' 1 $ Ll ' ' | f rt hospital mm physical training HAND GRENADE ASSAULT close combat course long, proud history basic rifle marksmanship m-14 classroom MARKS THj ;■ «b— i W ‘ l ’ ! . p l m A ' Si -f ..Mfe bayonet chemical, biological, radiological warfare ■ ' ] p f 1 ' m r 1 I OT ' r t ;4 ▲a v V I r • i $1 ill, : Ml i.T! iilV ■ 1 IT 1 f U if ' obstacle course automatic rifle mortars • f L ' V, h [i isi mm machine pistol classroom - pistol basic army administrative course food service school iililT " , « rfvytn r radio operators course j information JH office radio section £ 3 H chapel !‘ r- li ght vehicle drivers course ' offiiuiTS drill sergeants creed I AM A DRILL SERGEANT DEDICATED TO TRAINING NEW SOLDIERS AND INFLUENCING THE OLD. I AM FOREVER CONSCIOUS OF EACH SOLDIER UNDER MY CHARGE, AND BY EXAMPLE WILL INSPIRE HIM TO THE HIGHEST STAND¬ ARDS POSSIBLE. I WILL STRIVE TO BE PATIENT, UNDER¬ STANDING, JUST AND FIRM. I WILL COMMEND THE DESERVING AND ENCOURAGE THE WAY¬ WARD. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM RESPON¬ SIBLE TO MY COMMANDER FOR THE MORALE, DISCIPLINE AND EFFICIENCY OF MY MEN AND THEIR PERFORMANCE WILL REFLECT AN IMAGE I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine ... led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.’’ At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT GEORGE FERGUSSON Commanding General General Fergusson was born in Chicago, III., on 20 May 1911. He attended Beloit College in Wisconsin and in 1932 entered the United States Military Academy from where he was graduated in 1936, being commissioned in the Cavalry. His first assignment was as a troop officer in the 11th U.S. Cavalry, Monterey, California. He served with the Pacific Coastal Frontier, San Francisco, and later in Hawaii with the Artillery Command. A few months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, he returned to the Mainland and was Commander, 7th Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized), 7th Motorized Division at San Luis Obispo, California. Shortly after the redesignation of the 7th as the 7th Infantry Division, Gen¬ eral Fergusson—then a Lieutenant Colonel—was assigned to the Division ' s General Staff. He transferred his commission from Cavalry to the Infantry and accompanied the Division to Fort Ord for later employment in the Aleutian Islands. General Fergusson participated in the Aleutian Islands (Attu), Central Pacific (Kwajalein), and Philippine (Leyte) campaigns. Subsequent assignments included G-2 of the Central Army Pacific Base Command in Hawaii, and later, as Deputy G-2, Headquarters, United States Army Pacific. After attending the Strategic Intelligence School he became an instructor at the Command and General Staff College where he served until January 1948 when he attended the Armed Forces Staff College. From July 1948 to July 1949 he was Chief, Dissemination Branch, Intelligence Division, Department of the Army. Other tours included Army Representative on the Staff, First Task Fleet, United States Navy, Coronado, Calif.; Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, Fort Ord; Korea where he served as Deputy G-2 in charge of Combat Intelligence, Headquarters, Eight Army, from July 1950 to July 1951; student Army War College, Carlisle, Pa., and graduated in June 1952; Chief, Southeast Asia Branch, Foreign Military Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense; Deputy Chief of Staff, Headquarters, United States Army, Pacific, Hawaii; Commanding Officer, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Following the Army ' s adoption of the Pentomic Division Concept, he was named Commanding Of¬ ficer, 1st Battle Group, 14th Infantry. In August 1957 he was assigned to the Naval War College as Chief of the Army Advisory Group. On July 12th, 1961 he was assigned as Assistant Division Commander, 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany. On November 1, 1962 he was promoted to the grade of Major General as Chief of Staff, Headquarters, Central Army Group (NATO), Seckenheim, Germany. He assumed Command at Fort Ord on July 1, 1965. BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM E. SHEDD, III Deputy Commanding General Brigadier General William E. Shedd was born in Washington, D. C., on 20 January 1920. He was graduated from the Fishburns Military School at Waynesboro, Va., in 1937 and commissioned a 2d Lieutenant in 1942 upon completion of the U. S. Military Academy. Brig. Gen. Shedd joined the 14th Armored Division when it was activated in 1942. He served as a tank company and headquarters company commander during the division ' s training period prior to entering combat in Europe in World War II, where he was in three major campaigns. After the war he remained in Europe on the staff of the 3d U. S. Army and U. S. Forces Austria, returning to the U. S. in July 1948, being assigned to Fort Knox with the 3d Armored Division. He also attended the Advanced Armored Course there. Other assignments include a tactical officer at West Point; the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.; U. S. Military Assistance Group, Republic of Philippines; commander, 44th Tank Battalion, 82d Air¬ borne Division. During this tour he became a qualified paratrooper. After serving three years (1956-59) on the faculty of the Command and Gen¬ eral Staff College, he attended the Army War College and from there became G3 Plans Officer with Headquarters, U. S. Army Pacific and Hawaii. He next served first as aide and later executive officer to the Commander in Chief, USARPAC. In 1964 he was Brigade Commander and later Chief of Staff of the 2d Armored Division, a position he held until June 1965 when he became Senior Advisor to the Capital Military Region, Viet Nam. He reported to the U. S. Army Training Center, Infantry, on 15 May 1966, as a Colonel. He was promoted to brigadier general on 1 September 1966. COL Frank E. Burgher LTC C. L. Horton Brigade Commander Battalion Commander COMPANY B Started Basic Training: 16 January 1967 FIRST BRIGADE FIFTH BATTALION Graduated: 11 March 1967 CPT John E. O ' Grady Company Commander 2LT Harry Holt, III 2LT Alfred A. Lehtonen 1SG Nestor Ortiz First Sergeant PSG Ramos Senior Drill Sergeant PSG Brown Drill Sergeant SSG Jackson Drill Sergeant SSG Feliciano Drill Sergeant SSG Broadstock Drill Sergeant SSG Green Drill Sergeant SSG Windsor Drill Sergeant SSG Howard Mess Steward SP4 Nocks PFC Prodanovic PFC Toskas SGT Ansolabehere Clerk ADI Drill Sergeant Timothy Albert Thomas Anderson George Artist Kenneth Avery William Bailey Ronald Baker Ronald Banks Richard Bayer Byron Beckerdite David Best Lucien Biggs Ronnie Black James Blacker Robert Blunt Tracy Boisjolie Jerry Bomboy David Botts Marvin Bowers Robert Bretz Raymer Brown Richard Brown John Butchko Robert Butterick Donald Carlson Richard Cezar David Clark Edward Clark Robert Clemings James Cleveland Gregory Cook Ralph Cota Gregory Cummings Wayne Cunday Kris Cunningham Ronald Dillon Darrell Diede Donald Dornberg Steven Dunn Lance Elane Harvey Eisner, Jr. Miguel Escamilla Ricardo Espiriti Robert Exner Michael Ferreira Mark Fielding James Forbord Joseph Fornara Douglas Frogley James Fry Robert Gaiovnik Pete Garcia Roy Garrett Roger Geiselhart William George Clyde Gilbert Charles Gillham Samuel Gillies Manuel Gomez Joseph Gross, Jr. William Gust Robert Hagen Kenneth Hailey Larry Holmquist Spencer Hanks Richard Hauwiller Wayne Hayes William Hayes Gary Hazen John Heenan Arthur Hernandez Duane Hess Michael Hogan Clifford Holland James Hon Kevin Howe Robert Krogle Harold Laloian Henry Lara William Laraway John Letton Larry Liggett William Lees John Locke Jesse Locksa Daniel Lopez James Malmgren David Massaro Patrick McConville Richard McCullock James McDonald Robert Kenney Emory King, Jr. John Koopmeiners Michael Krause Dennis Kremer Michael Hunter Harold Huver Patrick Juneau Larry Kallod Edward Kaufman Stephen Miller Michael Milz Oliver Moore Kent Morris Charles Morse Mark Nakamura David Nesja Joel Nevens Blaine Newnham Richard Newton Kenneth Nornholm Joe Ochoa Peter O ' Dowd Stephen Olmstead Arthur Ornelas Gerry Parmantier William Pearson, Jr. Michael Peterson Raymond Pfeffer Jon Prigg Bruce Prince Lee Reinhold, Jr. James Richards Kenneth Riggs Jerry Rita Simon Rodriquez Kenneth Robotnik Harrison Ross, Jr. Albert Ruiter Homer Rushing, Jr. Robert Rushing Daniel Sampson, Jr David Scalise Harold Schulz, Jr. Albert Schuster, Jr William Scully, III Dennis Shepherd Alan Shipley Bradley Slipka Roger Smith Warren Stacy James Stark Raymond Stewart Ralph Stude Tom Tanabe Mario Taormina Kirk Terrill William Uberecken Richard Vaitonis Richard Van Houten _ Michael Vessey Darrell Vittone Robert Waldear, Jr. Bruce Walker Ernest Walker John Walker Jerry Watkins Michael Weisberg Gary Whipp Raymond Wiesner David Wilson Wayne Winter Gary Woodman James Wyatt Timothy Bristol II tm u. s. army training center infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also de voted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. U-i BRIGADE CSUMB Library u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) Redwood XCItyvMOiiobjJ A NJWoofisIde PalO 8 La dHondal o y Mt n ' Motlctr Mltw SfVtBk ®° Ns=s i a % sa " r-fl rtcA M n r 0S bHolyCIty ' kVKlr " if l Alrrindon Madrono, AV yV A 5W Ij2 5 rff K x -viom V ci i ©Vr ' ' Hivnly Cowe . Bodwaxla SI. f‘k U %oquolX tsiwjft Critic] Big Basin 0 V 3oi{jder B«n l.omomi 1 17 Corral ' 0, f( catldc F " slAlE SAW t ?$lfe ECT0R F " S1 A1ESAW t ?$lfe ECT0R V r% Minion if 9 t w " -) ?—i- opfo. 1 j ft ran tylar ibLllU A ym floc ' A A .! ParA Ml Tba vX ' dYcXEvornroon Ypfc. « u 5 n Jose IJu jrPotioittJD fSaratonar (•W am P b [ ll : ' Oc II JO iKKi % l 3 BKnSESi ft | 119t Bia llisin— . • r2T 8 ' «V ' - v - ft) Muona y Vista i.Mmei Ml SilOO 17 JO Carmel c Valley 1 ns ' Clomcnto. v_ f VI N ANA Wvh 0 V t t n 4 v. |W ' WIIOAMIA , WVj| center and first meal INCOMING PERSONNEL UEPORT HEM ■■■ dental check — room ♦ •. ■ % fu j uitmimiHIIHiiiniiiniiNtt-. i. y J T i . f 11 dHHESflK T ! ■ m i ? H ' rvj Tti • Hfe ML P mI KilWBi! . HasCiStl. ,i.r « i J L ■ 4 ;;...-El . J : m Jm% marches and inspections hospital 2nd ave. ■ ' jWV j ' . -V pacific grove first aid inspections vy t — shots mess basic rifle marksmanship 41 r . tf g • S! tA grmu i sharpshooter 54-67 E X P 68 - I’ 2 W RKSMAM 36 ' 53 basic rifle marksmanship basic rifle marksmanship m-14 classroom MARKS chemical, biological, radiological warfare st K : ; 3»- - . individual tactical training •st hand to hand combat rocket launcher w. u Ife J automatic rifle lUUA‘A radio operators course X.. communications course r y «j vehicle drivers r lai drill sergeants creed I AM A DRILL SERGEANT DEDICATED TO TRAINING NEW SOLDIERS AND INFLUENCING THE OLD. I AM FOREVER CONSCIOUS OF EACH SOLDIER UNDER MY CHARGE, AND BY EXAMPLE WILL INSPIRE HIM TO THE HIGHEST STAND¬ ARDS POSSIBLE. I WILL STRIVE TO BE PATIENT, UNDER¬ STANDING, JUST AND FIRM. I WILL COMMEND THE DESERVING AND ENCOURAGE THE WAY¬ WARD. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM RESPON¬ SIBLE TO MY COMMANDER FOR THE MORALE, DISCIPLINE AND EFFICIENCY OF MY MEN AND THEIR PERFORMANCE WILL REFLECT AN IMAGE I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine ... and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight ... and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT GEORGE FERGUSSON Commanding General General Fergusson was born in Chicago, III., on 20 May 1911. He attended Beloit College in Wisconsin and in 1932 entered the United States Military Academy from where he was graduated in 1936, being commissioned in the Cavalry. His first assignment was as a troop officer in the 11th U.S. Cavalry, Monterey, California. He served with the Pacific Coastal Frontier, San Francisco, and later in Hawaii with the Artillery Command. A few months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, he returned to the Mainland and was Commander, 7th Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized), 7th Motorized Division at San Luis Obispo, California. Shortly after the redesignation of the 7th as the 7th Infantry Division, Gen¬ eral Fergusson—then a Lieutenant Colonel—was assigned to the Division ' s General Staff. He transferred his commission from Cavalry to the Infantry and accompanied the Division to Fort Ord for later employment in the Aleutian Islands. General Fergusson participated in the Aleutian Islands (Attu), Central Pacific (Kwajalein), and Philippine (Leyte) campaigns. Subsequent assignments included G-2 of the Central Army Pacific Base Command in Hawaii, and later, as Deputy G-2, Headquarters, United States Army Pacific. After attending the Strategic Intelligence School he became an instructor at the Command and General Staff College where he served until January 1948 when he attended the Armed Forces Staff College. From July 1948 to July 1949 he was Chief, Dissemination Branch, Intelligence Division, Department of the Army. Other tours included Army Representative on the Staff, First Task Fleet, United States Navy, Coronado, Calif.; Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, Fort Ord; Korea where he served as Deputy G-2 in charge of Combat Intelligence, Headquarters, Eight Army, from July 1950 to July 1951; student Army War College, Carlisle, Pa., and graduated in June 1952; Chief, Southeast Asia Branch, Foreign Military Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense; Deputy Chief of Staff, Headquarters, United States Army, Pacific, Hawaii; Commanding Officer, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Following the Army ' s adoption of the Pe:rtomic Division Concept, he was named Commanding Of¬ ficer, 1st Battle Group, 14th Infantry. In August 1957 he was assigned to the Naval War College as Chief of the Army Advisory Group. On July 12th, 1961 he was assigned as Assistant Division Commander, 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany. On November 1, 1962 he was promoted to the grade of Major General as Chief of Staff, Headquarters, Central Army Group (NATO), Seckenheim, Germany. He assumed Command at Fort Ord on July 1, 1965. BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM E. SHEDD, III Deputy Commanding General Brigadier General William E. Shedd was born in Washington, D. C., on 20 January 1920. He was graduated from the Fishburns Military School at Waynesboro, Va., in 1937 and commissioned a 2d Lieutenant in 1942 upon completion of the U. S. Military Academy. Brig. Gen. Shedd joined the 14th Armored Division when it was activated in 1942. He served as a tank company and headquarters company commander during the division ' s training period prior to entering combat in Europe in World War II, where he was in three major campaigns. After the war he remained in Europe on the staff of the 3d U. S. Army and U. S. Forces Austria, returning to the U. S. in July 1948, being assigned to Fort Knox with the 3d Armored Division. He also attended the Advanced Armored Course there. Other assignments include a tactical officer at West Point; the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.; U. S. Military Assistance Group, Republic of Philippines; commander, 44th Tank Battalion, 82d Air¬ borne Division. During this tour he became a qualified paratrooper. After serving three years (1956-59) on the faculty of the Command and Gen¬ eral Staff College, he attended the Army War College and from there became G3 Plans Officer with Headquarters, U. S. Army Pacific and Hawaii. He next served first as aide and later executive officer to the Commander in Chief, USARPAC. In 1964 he was Brigade Commander and later Chief of Staff of the 2d Armored Division, a position he held until June 1965 when he became Senior Advisor to the Capital Military Region, Viet Nam. He reported to the U. S. Army Training Center, Infantry, on 15 May 1966, as a Colonel. He was promoted to brigadier general on 1 September 1966. mm COL Frank E. Burgher Brigade Commander LTC J. J. Ondishko, Jr. Battalion Commander COMPANY B Started Basic Training: 30 January 1967 SECOND BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Graduated: 25 March 1967 CPT David H. Boyd Company Commander 2LT L. F. Roy Training Officer 2LT S. 0. Sutton Training Officer E-8 Charles A. Ellard First Sergeant PSG Ross Senior Drill Sergeant PSG A. A. Valiente Training NCO Drill Sergeant SSG C. Brown Drill Sergeant SSG L. Merchant Drill Sergeant SSG W. R. Miller Drill Sergeant SGT Yonan Drill Sergeant SGT A. Smith Drill Sergeant SGT Snyder Drill Sergeant SSG Staley Drill Sergeant SSG A. Mims Drill Sergeant I I , ! I i SGT McIntyre PFC Kuntzelman PFC Reineck Drill Sergeant ADI ADI SSG Willie L. Edwards Mess Steward SP4 Montoure Company Clerk SP4 Drouin Armorer PFC Lohe General Clerk SP5 Cryder First Cook SP5 Bullene First Cook SP5 Nelson PFC McAdam PFC Fisher First Cook Second Cook Second Cook Steve Adams George Aktines, Jr Ronald Allen Ronald Anderson Stephen Anderson John Andress Kenneth Andrews Thomas Arriaga Kent Ashcraft Michael Ashlock Danny Autrey Allan Aycock John Banke Robert Barger Gregory Bashaw David Baty James Bayer Allan Beaton Michael Biedul Andrew Biser Tony Black Wayne Black Freddie Blevws Dennis Bocchi Louis Bourgeois, III I I I Gilbert Bracamonte Robert Brinkworth Kenneth Brondell, Jr. Garry Bryant Gary Burbach Lawrence Byerly Wallace Byrd Edward Cabrera John Campbell, Jr. Jerry Cantu Robert Cardillo Thomas Carlevaro Thomas Casazza James Chamberlain Wayne Chiatovich Jack Choppin Robert Church Thomas Cisco Thomas Clark Raymond Cordeiro Philip Cornyn Ralph Costa Pleze Crawford, Jr. James Crocker Lee Criger Walter Cox Ronald Cozart Raymond Decious, Jr. Randolph Degregori William Dixon Robert Dogoli Frank Dolls, III Lanis Domio Richard Downing Michael Dumler Jerry Durbin Robert Dworsky Gary Elliott Donald Ellithorpe Charles Ellsworth Ernesto Encinas Henry Engelman Paul Ennis David Eshelman Frank Fenlon, Jr. Ronald Figueredo Thomas Fink Malcolm Frame Michael Francois William Gannon I John Garcia Macario Garcia Raymond Garcia Michael Gardner Michael Gavin 1 i William Ghiglia Craig Gibson Phil Gillis John Gilmartin Bruce Gitelson Gerald Goodman Charles Gormley Michael Greslie Stephen Hage Gerald Halgreen Charles Halsey Steve Hampton !j Clelaind Hanshew Charles Happe Thomas Hare Raymond Harris James Hart, Jr. Clifford Harvey Mons Hauge Jerrold Hawley James Henderson Lonnie Henderson Marvin Herbst David Hickman Arlen Hofman Vernell Holte Edward Holzberger Dannie Hoy Lonnie Hughes Lynn Humbert Ronnie Hutchinson Mark Jenkinson David B. Jensen David W. Jensen Art Jerdugo Pedro Juarez Mike Juno Jesse Kahn Joseph Kapp William Kelliher Robert Kemp Kenneth Kidd James Kiernan Jimmie King Alan Koransky I Eugene Kotzian Larry Kruljac Arthur Kuhner, Jr. Charles Landress Raymond Lapuma Christopher Larson Bruce Larue Gerald LaSalle Verlin Lee Raymond Leong Gary Lieb John Livzey Elmar Lobato Charles Loftn Randall Longinaker Howard Lurie Raymond Lynch David Maccianti Kenneth Magdaleno Warren Magnusen David Marcetti David Martin Alexander Martinez Jess Martinez Thomas Masini Joe Masukawa Joseph Mattis, Jr. Eugene Meyes Harold Millar Larry Miller Robert Miller, III William Miller, III Terry Mitchell Gerald Molina Frank Montoya Francisco Moreno Melvin Morgan, Jr. Arthur Morigi Thomas Morin Lawrence Morita William Murphy Paul McCarthy Ralph McMoran Leland McSwain Arthur Nowell, III Arthur Nunez Philip Nutzhorn Anthony Oddo James Oliver Thomas Page James Patterson Juan Perez Rhoderic Perth Jerry Petievich Robert Petrucco Thomas Petry Paul Poindexter Felix Quiroz Gerold Ray Marvin Rayner Charles Reese Frederic Rettenmund Dennis Rhoades Thomas Rice Alfred Riichards Jack Robertson James Rogers, Jr. Robert Rollins, Jr. David Roof Joe Sainz Albert Sanchez Stephen Sawyer Paul Schemack, Jr. Steven Schultz Erik Shank John Smallenburg Charles Smith Melvyn Smith Thorne Smith Anthony Speer Charles Standefer John Steffon Don Suminaga Dwight Sundahl Martin Tarmo Lawrence Tettleton Larry Tidwell Allen Tingwald Eliud Torres Michael Tuszi Joey Uzzardo Victor Vaughan Bruce Vaughn Dennis VanZandt Jan VanZant Dennis Waldinger Emile Waldteufel Gary Warren George Watson Marc Webb I I I Stanley Weinstein Rodney Welz Douglas Wiley James Williams, Jr. Leonard Williams Clyde Wood Richard Yoakum Terry Zimmer Robert Zirbri, Jr. John Anderson Thomas Apgar Jeffrey Ferguson David Hardy James Papas, Jr. Art Verdugo [« 3 i; «$ r-v-t ■ -: n |N- ■ ■ 7’ rrr?pr« F . ' wAOTV 1 v ' ‘ I » ikAj. Ur :vr, ■tc graduation u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength, endurance, agility, and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier. 1 U.5. ARMY TRAINING CENTER INFANTRY COMPANY C 1st BATTALION 1st BRIGADE FORT ORD CALIFORNIA CSUMB Library u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California Fort Ord was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord, who served with Fremont ' s Army in the early California days as a lieutenant. Fort Ord covers more than 28,500 acres of rolling plains and rugged hills which make it ideal for its Infantry Training Center and Combat Support training mis¬ sions. Located on the beautiful Monterey Peninsula, Fort Ord is 115 miles south of San Francisco and 340 miles north of Los Angeles. Thousands of recruits, draftees, and reservists are trained in Fort Ord ' s four training brigades each year. The 1st and 3d Brigades conduct Basic Combat Training; the 2d Brigade provides Advanced Individual Training (Infantry); and the 4th Brigade conducts the following Combat Support Training courses: Basic Army Administration, Food Service, Basic Unit Sup¬ ply, Automotive Mechanic ' s Helper, Field Communications, Light Wheel Vehicle Driver, and Radio Operator. Even before the recruit enters formal basic combat training, he begins to get the " feel " of becoming a soldier at his first stop — the Reception Station at Fort Ord. This is where the new recruit is assigned as a member of a pla¬ toon of 48 men, under the command of a Drill Sergeant, an experienced non¬ commissioned officer who will lead, train and guide this platoon for the en¬ tire eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. No one mistakes the identity of a drill sergeant because he is distinguished by his erect military bearing, his olive drab campaign hat, and his immacu¬ late uniform which bears the crest and motto of Army Training Centers: " This We ' ll Defend. " This motto, which is also inscribed on the Army Flag, depicts the determination, devotion and constant readiness of the American soldier. During his time at the Reception Station, such terms as " Aptitude Test, " " Classification Interview, " " Language Qualification Test, " " Clothing Issue, " and " Preventive Medicine Orientations, " become familiar words to the new soldier. Upon completion of this initial processing, he is assigned to a training company for eight weeks of Basic Combat Training. There are five general categories of subjects presented during basic train¬ ing. They are Administration, Command Information, General Military Sub¬ jects, Tactical Training, and Weapons Instruction. In the first week the trainee finds that physical conditioning is one of the activities most stressed in basic training. Immediately he begins a series of (Continued inside back endsheet) Warn iSprs.“ jrm n Moffett mi4 {jQAIum Rock Pork GiH.lir Black Min - i XS Redwoods? 8 _ ft wlP ffe V BiQ Basin ,; V Bou der cJfejLfcL X Ben Lomond HPfmofJll efi os K1 Catos d-nv 3T10IS SSfijHoly Clty;K0 " AaSki u,cl Alrr adon Madrone C 3798 (12 5 O ' VVV Cowell Jr Is SI. Pk. ( uo Z 1 Aptos l? Corral ffott Ord. asJde 4 VN Jg) Buena Cafmel Misnon I 0 Carmel VValley 8 DWV; Clemente. I Dam ( VrN ANA yJ i TK 3 Vei lent i ) L jc«.v ' Wl OANI A jUiU )U . STATES AfiA K [ER5 Uantbv E SECTOR room marches and inspections - ► - J first aid sighting-in ' :: ... ■ • ' ' ' ;-■■ - , • • ■• ' • • • , .... »£«»• •v« - ' V ' 106 recoilless rifle TWAINIHor TRAINMRI iM 8 RI 6 A 0 I 1 f J . J£l y food V g F IELD MESS service school long, proud history inspections „ expert gcjflU■ expert 68 " 112 5HARPSHC0TER 54 ' 67 msrkSMAN 36 - 53 m G BUUBl basic rifle marksmanship s m-14 classroom MARKS i§ 1 a II Qftr . yngU i» j M- , - ' i . ■ 4 . •-V: ' ,® ' T Sfc bayonet close combat course , w a W£« iAJkI ju hand to hand combat SJ s • LZ r. m- obstacle course mortars ■ jjg ] 1 rr m i a V .TO8J mil , ' ,,1 • ■pr tyf machine gun r n w % i m. i maeai s pistol classroom-pistol iUUAAA, food service school basic army administrative course iiU|— f radio operators course communications course chapel information office radio section nifmmSm vehicle drivers course fofF LIMITS I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cru 2 . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT GEORGE FERGUSSON Commanding General General Fergusson was born In Chicago, III., on 20 May 1911. He attended Beloit College in Wisconsin and in 1932 entered the United States Military Academy from where he was graduated in 1936, being commissioned in the Cavalry. His first assignment was as a troop officer in the 11th U.S. Cavalry, Monterey, California. He served with the Pacific Coastal Frontier, San Francisco, and later in Hawaii with the Artillery Command. A few months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, he returned to the Mainland and was Commander, 7th Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized), 7th Motorized Division at San Luis Obispo, California. Shortly after the redesignation of the 7th as the 7th Infantry Division, Gen¬ eral Fergusson—then a Lieutenant Colonel—was assigned to the Division ' s General Staff. He transferred his commission from Cavalry to the Infantry and accompanied the Division to Fort Ord for later employment in the Aleutian Islands. General Fergusson participated in the Aleutian Islands (Attu), Central Pacific (Kwajalein), and Philippine (Leyte) campaigns. Subsequent assignments included G-2 of the Central Army Pacific Base Command in Hawaii, and later, as Deputy G-2, Headquarters, United States Army Pacific. After attending the Strategic Intelligence School he became an instructor at the Command and General Staff College where he served until January 1948 when he attended the Armed Forces Staff College. From July 1948 to July 1949 he was Chief, Dissemination Branch, Intelligence Division, Department of the Army. Other tours included Army Representative on the Staff, First Task Fleet, United States Navy, Coronado, Calif.; Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, Fort Ord; Korea where he served as Deputy G-2 in charge of Combat Intelligence, Headquarters, Eight Army, from July 1950 to July 1951; student Army War College, Carlisle, Pa., and graduated in June 1952; Chief, Southeast Asia Branch, Foreign Military Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense; Deputy Chief of Staff, Headquarters, United States Army, Pacific, Hawaii; Commanding Officer, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Following the Army ' s adoption of the Pentomic Division Concept, he was named Commanding Of¬ ficer, 1st Battle Group, 14th Infantry. In August 1957 he was assigned to the Naval War College as Chief of the Army Advisory Group. On July 12th, 1961 he was assigned as Assistant Division Commander, 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany. On November 1, 1962 he was promoted to the grade of Major General as Chief of Staff, Headquarters, Central Army Group (NATO), Seckenheim, Germany. He assumed Command at Fort Ord on July 1, 1965. BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM E. SHEDD, III Depiity Commanding General Brigadier General William E. Shedd was born in Washington, D. C., on 20 January 1920. He was graduated from the Fishburns Military School at Waynesboro, Va., in 1937 and commissioned a 2d Lieutenant in 1942 upon completion of the U. S. Military Academy. Brig. Gen. Shedd joined the 14th Armored Division when it was activated in 1942. He served as a tank company and headquarters company commander during the division ' s training period prior to entering combat in Europe in World War II, where he was in three major campaigns. After the war he remained in Europe on the staff of the 3d U. S. Army and U. S. Forces Austria, returning to the U. S. in July 1948, being assigned to Fort Knox with the 3d Armored Division. He also attended the Advanced Armored Course there. Other assignments include a tactical officer at West Point; the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.; U. S. Military Assistance Group, Republic of Philippines; commander, 44th Tank Battalion, 82d Air¬ borne Division. During this tour he became a qualified paratrooper. After serving three years (1956-59) on the faculty of the Command and Gen¬ eral Staff College, he attended the Army War College and from there became G3 Plans Officer with Headquarters, U. S. Army Pacific and Hawaii. He next served first as aide and later executive officer to the Commander in Chief, USARPAC. In 1964 he was Brigade Commander and later Chief of Staff of the 2d Armored Division, a position he held until June 1965 when he became Senior Advisor to the Capital Military Region, Viet Nam. He reported to the U. S. Army Training Center, Infantry, on 15 May 1966, as a Colonel. He was promoted to brigadier general on 1 September 1966. CPT Donald W. Stewart Company Commander LTC John Q. Arnette Battalion Commander COL Frank E. Burgher Brigade Commander COMPANY C Started Basic Training: 16 January 1967 FIRST BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Graduated: 11 March 1967 2LT Forrest E. Mueller Training Officer 2LT Joseph L. Soczek, Jr. Training Officer 1LT James N. Schmit Training Officer E-8 Charles Majors PSG Leonardi Trevino PSG Gibson PSG Vera SSG Alford First Sergeant Senior Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant SSG Huey SSG R. S. Matsumoto SGT Klein SGT Parker SGT Martin Drill Sergeant Training NCO Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant PFC O ' Connell Second Cook E-8 Patterson Cooks Helper SGT Morrow SSG Darrell Dean SSG Earl B. Herring SP4 Sinn SP4 Heuwetter Drill Sergeant Supply Sergeant Mess Steward Armorer Company Clerk PFC Peters General Clerk CPL Doughty ADI SP5 Gay First Cook PFC Amaral Second Cook SP5 Reyes First Cook s Gerald S. Albert Justin G. Alcantar Douglas A. Allan Barry Anderson William K. Anderson Charles R. Ashley Edmund V. Aversenti James J. Bailey Fred T. Baker Robert L. Barrell Jack Batchelor Donald A. Bell John M. Berry Robert L. Berryman Dennis Bettencourt Gary J. Bishop Jerry F. Bloor Nicholas R. Boffa Roy F. Boelli Alvin R. Brown Kenneth A. Brown Larry D. Brown Stephen R. Brown Robert H. Bryns Paul D. Burkhart f David S. Burton William L. Cady Steve 0. Campbell David R. Campidonica Charley 0. Cano Jean Jacques Caroon Charles C. Carling Gerald J. Carlson Richard L. Carone Kenneth G. Carter Ronald A. Cartwright Johnny E. Cavaness Richard J. Coon Gary Copperrider Dean M. Corcoran Arnold Cordova George E. Corvelo David D. Craig Keith Craik Jerry A. Davis Keith N. Davis David A. Desousa John L. Dick Edward S. Dougil Dennis D. Dresden William W. Drew Ernest Duarte Frank H. Duran Paul D. Duncan Robert M. Eason Donald Eggebraaten Richard W. Elliott William R. Elliott Stephen P. Ellman Leroy Eng ram Pascual Enriquez Kenneth L. Erwin Anthony Evangelist Dennis J. Fabry Daniel Fagundes Joseph S. Farkas Bela Feitli Robert Figueroa Charles H. Fintel John C. Finel Raymond Fisher Don R. Fletcher Gayland E. Flint Allan Fone Edward Foose Barry A. Ford Erik Frost Jesus Gamboa, Jr. Glen D. Garner John D. Gilbert Mickel J. Gilder Theodore Gizewski Richard R. Good William B. ' Gordon Vernon L. Grace Michail A. Gragg Bruce W. Griffin Richard J. Groener Darryl G. Gustafson Jerome K. Hadley Joseph E. Hagan Dale Hall Marvin E. Hamilton Christsen Hansen Dale F. Hansman Kenneth D. Hartberg James A. Hartman Harry W. Harwood Russell Hazelett Charles B. Herring m James 0. Higgins James H. Hokanson Vincent Hozier John C. Jensen John J. Jermanis Charlie R. Johnson Rayburn Jones Stephen M. Kass Harris Kaufman Harry S. Kelsoy Lester Kincanon John Kinsworthy Jai H. Ko Stephen A. Koblick George Koen Gene A. Kreger Robert Lawrence Raymond S. Leuscher Thomas E. Liptrop Andrea Lussoro Patrick R. Lyman Danny Mace Thomas Macris John Maddux Daniel A. Manzanedo It. U Dallas Mayfield David A. Mazzeo Paul McCulley John M. McEwen Thomas McGuire Max McKee David Mellard Rodolfo Mendez Ronald C. Mendoza Paul Meshekow Gregory L. Middleton Dennis Millenacker Robert W. Miller Donis Montoya, Jr. Jim Morgan Tim Murphy Barry Nemanic Gary Newman Quinn Newsom Richard Nicol Kenneth M. Marberry Arture G. Martinez Gilbert Martinez Martin Martinez Chari E. Matteson 7 David Norris David Nunez Victor Oliver George Ormsby Dennis O ' Roark Adam Osuna Jon Otte Gary Packwood Ronald Palumbo Laurie Park Gary Parks Robert Parm ley James Peek Daniel Perry Gary Petty Douglas Pfeiler Thomas Pires Andrew Pool, Jr. James Prater James Proctor Richard Ptacek William Quine William Radke Stephen Rawline Gregory Reynolds Mikal Smith Ralph Smith John Souza Robert Squaires Michael Staples Walter Steffen, Jr. Timothy Stokes Robert Stover Stanley Strain John Sullivan Alfonso Sunseri Frank Sutton Elbert Taylor Larry Teeter Paul Teter Gary Thomas Terral Thomas Robert Thompson Bruce Tobia Ronald Tonelll Charles Treiberg James Tubbs Joseph Urban Denis Van Dam Kenneth Virnig ‘j -+± ' . ' rrr fl K ■mv msm W.j iri l ' HNB w c arc rr A km Peter Vryens Robert Walker, Jr. David Watters Leonard Wilson John Winn Louis Wren Ben Wright Carl Wright Thomas Kasten £ 0 : »rs i» A ; DwSX ! •.5 ‘ fc . ft .5 u. s. army training center, infantry, fort ord, California (cont ' d) body-building exercises designed to develop strength endurance agility and coordination. These conditioning exercises are gradually intensified as he becomes adapted to his new environment. During this initial phase, the trainee ' s time is also devoted to drills and ceremonies, lessons in first aid, map reading and military justice. Character guidance classes, administered by Army chaplains, explain the interrela¬ tion of spiritual and patriotic values. Hand-to-hand combat is introduced to teach the fundamentals of unarmed combat and to instill in each trainee confidence in his ability to protect him¬ self from an armed or unarmed enemy without the use of weapons. Also taught are the basic skills of bayonet fighting. Intensive training is given in basic rifle marksmanship, and during the training period the recruit vir¬ tually lives with his rifle. At the end of this phase of his training he fires his weapon for qualification. During the latter part of his training he goes into the field for bivouac where he receives tactical training, familiarization with hand grenades, and participates in live firing training exercises under simulated combat conditions. Finally the trainee must take a graded test on all aspects of Basic Combat Training. When he passes this exacting test, his period of basic training is over. On the last day the new soldier parades for his graduation ceremony knowing he has mastered the fundamentals of soldiering. But Basic Combat Training is not the end of the learning process. Next comes Advanced Training. Depending upon the type of training they have chosen, or have been as¬ signed to, most trainees will receive two weeks of leave between the basic and advanced cycles. Some men will return to Fort Ord. Others will be sent to posts throughout the country that specialize in subjects such as Infantry, Armor and Artillery. Some will become skilled in one of the Combat Support fields, such as mechanics, cooking, administration, and communications. Al¬ together the Army provides courses in some 625 subjects. After Advanced Training, he is ready to take his place alongside his fellow soldiers in a unit, confident and fit to shoulder his share of responsibility as a soldier.


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) collection:

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

1964

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

1965

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

1968

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1970 Edition, Page 1

1970

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