US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1965

Page 1 of 176

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1965 volume:

CA llJI ' ' 0 ' R’Nill4 TiKAMiNllINlG CEifi llElR; COMPANY B 5th BATTALION 1st BRIGADE CSUMB Library history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostiy in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. in August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The iate General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) physical fitness WBWBf 1 .rf.i i ' ;ii-:i. j 4 %N ; - . % ' ■ • • ' V . ' 17 -mile drive presidio of monterey golf course red colton hall cross clothing issue f- i.S ?V i _; ir»r -• tramiire -•? first aid model of a minefield 1 COMPOSED Of 3 S™psS7nD|« i ANTl-PERSOfffi MINES ANTI-TANK MWES ANTI-TANK MINES CLUSTER A STRIP marking FENCE 5 E lane MAKKtH Sketch of {his Minefield. land mine warfare 1 w 1 j » ...-.--j _ 1. ima m r’ff u m ..i class a inspection 4 mount ' I- field mess " ' y tie - 4 s , r. 7 r m p ■0t m ■tm m recoilless rifle grenades rifle sv: l ' T «1CLa k:4 t4 M M 1 I -JL Fi ■ iJ’IIw J 1 k 1 " j ' -i-- IlM Hl ■HI 1 t [ [ - HHl 4 ! ■M m field bakery vcr’:y.:-]: ' v u uk ■tMllj+djrbi %!j imxm ■fSsw® Ytf hospital The Fort Grd Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni- formed service personnel and their depend- ents, It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. electronics and ordnance I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry— Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de- fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun- tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine ... led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro — and disease — in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou- sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re- turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry— Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT GEORGE FERGUSSON Commanding General General Fergusson was born in Chicago, II L, on 20 May 1911. He attended Befoit College in Wisconsin and in 1932 entered the United States Military Academy from where he was graduated in 1936, being commissioned in the Cavairy. His first assignment was as a troop officer in the llth U.S. Cavalry, Monterey, California. Ho served with the Pacific Coastal Frontier, San Francisco, and fater in Hawaii with the Artillery Command. A few months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, he returned to the Mainland and was Commander, 7th Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized}, 7th Motorized Division at San Luis Obispo, California, Shortly after the redesig nation of the 7th as the 7th Infantry Division, Gen- eral Fergusson — then a Lieutenant Colonel — was assigned to the Division ' s General Staff. He transferred his commission from Cavalry to the Infantry and accompanied the Division to Fort Ord for Fater employment fn the Aleutian Islands, General Fergusson participated in the Aleutian Islands (Attu), Central Pacific (Kwajaiein), and Philippine (Leyte) campaigns. Subsequent assignments included G 2 of the Central Army Pacific Base Command in Hawaii, and later, as Deputy G-2, Headquarters, United States Army Pacific. After attending the Strategic Intelligence School he became an instructor at the Command and General Staff College where he served until January 1948 when he attended the Armed Forces Staff College. From July 1948 to July 1949 he was Chief, Dissemination Branch, Intelligence Division, Department of the Army, Other tours included Army Representative on the Staff, First Task Fleet, United States Navy, Coronado, Cal if r ; Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, Fort Ord; Korea where he served as Deputy G-2 in charge of Combat Intelligence, Headquarters, Eight Army, from July 1950 to July 1951; student Army War College, Carlisle, Pa., and graduated in June 1952; Chief, Southeast Asia Branch, Foreign Military Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense; Deputy Chief of Staff, Headquarters, United States Army, Pacific, Hawaii; Commanding Officer, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, Following the Army ' s adoption of the Pentomic Division Concept, he was named Commanding Of- ficer, 1st Battle Group, 14th Infantry. In August 1957 he was assigned to the Naval War Coliege as Chief of the Army Advisory Group, On July 12th, 1961 he was assigned as Assistant Division Commander, 24th Infantry Division in Augsburg, Germany. On November 1, 1962 he was promoted to the grade of Major General as Chief of Staff, Headquarters, Central Army Group (NATO), Seckenheim, Germany, He assumed Command at Fort Ord on July 1, 1965. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK LEROY GUNN Deputy Commanding General Brigadier General Frank Leroy Gunn is Deputy Commanding General of the U. S. Army Infantry Training Center, and Fort Ord. General Gunn arrived here from Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, where he was chief or a strategic studies group U.S. Army Institute of Advanced Studies, He and Mrs. Gunn (Doris K.) and sons Lacy and Frank live at the Presidio of Monterey, The Fort Ord Deputy Commanding General was born in March, 1920, at Crawfordville, Virginia. He is a graduate of the University of Georgia with a B5 degree in plant pathology. Among his career highlights was WWH service In Europe where he served in Staff positions and as Battalion Commander in the 39th Infantry, He also served in that theater as Commander of the 749th Tank Battalion. He is credited with eight battle campaigns during his European service. Following tours at Ft. McClellan, Alabama and with the South Carolina National Guard at Charleston, he became Chief of the Management Division, Comptroller Section of Headquarters, Ryukyus, Far East Command. He later served in staff positions at the Army Infantry School at Fort Bennlng, Georgia and in the office of the Deputy of Staff for operations at the Pentagon. Prior to hrs assignment at Carlisle, General Gunn was chief of Staff of the First Cavalry Division In Korea. Among the service schools he has attended are the Command and General Staff College, Armed Forces Staff College, Army War College, Canadian Senior Staff Officers Course, and Special Weapons Course at Fort Leavenworth. Decorations and awards include the Silver Star with Two Oak Leaf Clusters; Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster; Army Commendation Medal; Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster; Combat Infantry Badge; General Staff Badge; French Fourragere with Palm and the Belgium Fourragere. Lt. Col. Malcolm A. Sussel Battalion Commander CoL William K. Dleleman Brigade Commander HEADQUARTERS HEADQUARTERS COMPANY THIRD BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 15 November 1965 Graduated: 7 January 1%6 Capt. Michael G. Glynn Company Commander X ' j ' viiJT A I t f i ' Vf; nVfr h . r T7f , T 1st Lt. Gary R, Thompson Executive Officer 2nd Lt. Erwin R. Chapman Training Officer 2nd Lt, John D + Carey Training Officer E-8 Ray A, Myers First Sergeant PSG Boykins Senior Drill Sergeant PSG Cranfield Drill Sergeant PSG Ortiz Drill Sergeant SFC Akin Drill Sergeant SSG Bogucki Drill Sergeant SSG Ford Drill Sergeant SSG Saavedra Drill Sergeant Sgt, Bowles Drill Sergeant _____ Sgt. SanDovat Drill Sergeant SFC K. W. McAuley Supply Sergeant RFC Tannahilf Company Clerk E-6 R, M, Johnson Mess Steward Sp 5 Estela First Cook 5p 5 McESroy First Cook RFC Carrano Second Cook Dominic Adamo Nicholas Aguilar Glenn Allen Gary Anderson Kenneth Anderson Andrew Aragon Jesse Austin Chester Baker Richard Biccum John Bird, Jr, James Black James Bodeen Michael Bosch Ray Bosrich Stephen Bongher Ralph Boulden Donald Bouwman A vie Bryan Charles Burnham Sidney Burns Rick Caporgna Ted Canons Robert Carlson Timothy Carpenter Will ram Carrigan Carmen Carrillo Gerald Cattano Ray Cavagaaro David Chase Garry Chastain Burton Clark Melvin Clifford Kenneth Coggins Don Coleman David Conrad John Cornelius Fred Cornett Waldron Criste Robert Crowder Robert Crump J. Cueva-Gomez Raymond Cyphers James Dautrich Jerry Dean David DegoJier Glenn Devan Felipe Diaz Robert Dixon D. Dockstader Terry Dorman Teddy Downs, Jr. A fan Doyle Gary Esplau Herbert Everitt Douglas Falconer Richie Flint Nicholaus Frey Francis Fruitt Michel Frye Charles Galyan Arthur GIT Robert Goldman James Graham Dennis Green Robert Grogltsky Jeff Grotenhuls Keith Gustafson Raymond Haigh William Hamblin James Hamlin Robert Hammond Timothy Handel Carlton Hansen Ronald Hanson Isaac Hao, III George Harmon Terry Haws D. Hernandez Roy Heumann Ralph Hinds R r HofTpauer Keith Hole Stephen Horton Richard Howard Lucas Hummer Thomas Jenkins Paul Jensen Arnold Johnson Michael Johnson Roy Johnson Charles Jordan Max Jones Tex Jones Forrest Kahle Charles Kearns J T Ke Hermann James Kennedy Marc Kerner Adie Kerr Walter Kingsbury George Kirkland Donald Komoda C. Kozak iewlcz Patrick Landon James Leimbaeh Charles Lewis Steven Lewis Arthur Logon Raymond Lopez Joe Luker Ernest Machado Michael Malo Larry Mangold Lean Mann, Jr. K. Mathieson Ivan Mauch Allen Mayea Mark Miller Ronald Miller D. Montgomery J h Montgomery David Montoya D. Montrose James Moomey James Morgan James Morrison Arthur Morse Ronald Mosier Dennis Mullaly Kirk Muth Clayton Myers Dale McClendon Daniel McGuire Bruce McKee James McLeod P mm. i Dan McNamara Michael McNeal Clyde Nelms John Nelson James Norman John Gian Clifford Oliver Jesus Ortega Gerald Os lager David Oxford Royce Parker A, Partridge Michael Pearcy James Peeler Ralph Pena David Pentland Danny Peterlla R. Petersen Ronald Polvado Paul Pouliot Richard Powers Timothy Powers Paul Randis Charles Riddle Stephan Riley Russell Rimef Thomas Robbins Scott Robisch Henry Rodgers Aurefio Rubio James Sager Dinnis Sanchez Lee Schleinfng W. Seabrook Dickie Sears William Shewey Bert Shook Gregory Siadaf Mark Sieckman David Simons Weil Sitton D h Slaughter Larry G. Smith Larry IVL Smith Ray Solomon Kenneth Soohoo Terry Soriano Arthur Steffen R, Stein bock Roy Stone n Charles Street I. Strickland Miles Summer Eric Swanson R. Thompson R. Thompson Rassac Tijani T h Tillfnghast Allan Tilton James Torok Jose Torres Jerome Trzicky Lee Varain Steven Vaughn Pedro Vega J r Vermillion A. Villalobos William Wall John Walker Robert Warren Harold Wei lens Howard Weschler James Whitmore James Williams Robert Williams msmam 3G m ► OT $wri9 iV;, , tf i$« fi ; ™.Kf rU jm W W ' AJ rri lT r v ' ' ■ m graduation history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000 ,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. it is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. ■ TATES ARMY , e9 5 f QwT HEADQUABIERS 9.30 .. IERJNFANTRY ax:- cron ' I F0 J 13 nummo mg CENTRAL DEFENSE SE H 1H U Q RK1 reception center and first meal PERSONNEL ?EPORT HER y! MW!" M "9.qu dental check Ida!!- mess hall marches and inspections 4 3' u !. :- . 5-ha'.-'J--yu i" f an... x. . .. , fLL ' ' . W K . 1 ', 1 fli 3.1, . 5 1,, I 'x .' I r W ', f hospital W , $ m'un h!! a: QM, W W ,1. , r ;!1 lmltuj , I w raw; A N "v .4 1 6 recoilless ULT cm Inc: c 056 combat course grenades service school receiving center lssue g n .1 h t 10. C y. in-JJAWV '33. x'WWWiWGmVy': rxfTin'v Tiff? Jaggiw Wig 1:35. N232" $35,; V343? ukrtvgn'H k" gfkaWSeW'l-Wayg DYE NEW W594?W1WW?W 3? 9:2: 538 z; y-Ewhrvm W Wuiifi'iz. WWEWW :1, W ,WWIWW ,- . I -. ..,u 3 JW- E ii: a, c 9" . n mam 9 9;??? ma; 3 I in A W 1; 3;, 1k 4" A1132. 3 W .2 5. $23 1,;th ' I. 553. 5i 3, 4 a 13.1: L :33 Ii wk, Um! 112$ 2:234: a: x ., - , hW eWiWi-tx ,. W ; at- t a Aria V Ir $3 a + , trainfircf: 1 C1ass ro0ih ' trainfire OKDEL OF A MILIE 1' , COMPO$ED OF 3 STRtPS MBMAND 10E 1.; a9 .n 1a d m m m L 11,2 6.; Livia , , xi? w W: t n u o m d r a u g ield f x A L N? .Aka. ?muxx e S r u 0 C t a m 0 C e S b C m. i 1 me field mess renades nan:- -, x L L :52... hospital , The Fort 0rd Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni- formed service personnel and their depend- ents. It is a fully accredited hospital With a superb staE of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. hobbies 96:; Q01 Rah 0an Jndtudoi I AM THE INFANTRY I am the InfanttyeQueen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Natiorfs de- fense . . . I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga. . and matched with the pioneer across the plains . . . to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun- tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for b0th the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conHict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro-and disease-in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Mame . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I diant come back until it was o,ver over there." At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore. .dug my nails into the sand at Anzio. . . and bounced into Rome with a rower in my helmet The Channel and the hedgerow could nOt hold me. I pushed back the uBulge" . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The uThou- sand-Year" Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow . . . I did re- turn . . . I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight. . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nations defense. I am always ready. . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry-Queen of Battle! Follow Me! tReprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine9 .'--3. WW Wit? 9' WW nv$PFT r a- 9M19 x tw'immgggtmehmvpn $1433ih x95?! Car 51.91153 "II; wgng H944: .MWge-g', "14;;9'Mm ardkmrw Z; 3299'? WWW 'MWN: .CQME" .9 WV ertah A 1 Q , AESWRim dwivwn J19. mi; ' Whammy ,. 1191111119: 9: MAJOR GENERAL EDWIN H. J. CARNS Commanding General General Carns was born on 22 May 1907 in New York City, New York and is a 1929 graduate of the Military Academy. His early assignments included cavalry duty in Texas and Kansas; 20th Armored Division during the second World War and European duty in Austria following the war. During World War II, he spent two years in Headquarters, Army Ground Forces, where he was concerned with matters related to the organization and training of our expanding Army. Toward the close of the period he observed combat action in the Admiralty Islands and in New Guinea. In July, 1944 he joined the 20th Armored Division and subsequently participated in combat with the division in Central Europe, serving successively as Chief of Staff and Com- manding Officer, Combat Command B. In 1950 he was assigned as project ocher, Joint Logistical Plans Group, Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington, D. C. From this assignment, he became deputy secretary and then secretary for the Joint Chiefs. Following the Korean War, General Cams became deputy commanding general of the 24th Infantry Division in Korea; senior adviser to the First Republic of Korea Army, and commanding general of the lst Cavalry Division in Korea. He took over as commanding general, U. S. Army Corps, tReservei Fort Law- ton, Washington and from there he went to Pentagon duty as Deputy Chief of Staff for operation. During his Army service he has been awarded the Legion of Merit and the French Croix de Guerre with silver Gilt Star among other decorations. 0n 2 April 63, he assumed command of the US. Army Training Center, Infan- try, and Fort 0rd, California. The command includes, in addition, the Presidio of Monterey, Hunter Liggett Military Reservation, and Camp Roberts, California. He is married to the former Jeanette Anne Chamberlain, and the couple has four children. Michaei P. C. Carns, lst Lt., U.S. Air Force, Edwin H. J. Jr., 2nd Lt., U.S. Army, and two daughters, Mary S. C. Cams, and Jeannette A. Carns. Wt n2: .' ,, w: 131:2"!!! m I m BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK LEROY GUNN Deputy Commanding General Brigadier General Frank Leroy Gunn is Deputy Commanding General of the U. 5. Army Infantry Training Center, and Fort 0rd. General Gunn arrived here from Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, where he was chief of a strategic studies group, U. 5. Army Institute of Advanced Studies. He and Mrs. Gunn tDoris K3 and sons Lacy and Frank live at the Presidio of Monterey. The Fort 0rd Deputy Commanding General was born in March, 1920, at Crawfordville, Virginia. He is a graduate of the University of Georgia with a BS degree in plant pathology. Among his career highlights was WWII service in Europe where he served in Staff positions and as Battalion Commander in the 39th Infantry. He also served in that theater as Commander of the 749th Tank Battalion. He is credited with eight battle campaigns during his European service. Following tours at Ft. McClellan, Alabama and with the South Carolina National Guard at Charleston, he became Chief of the Management Division, Comptroller Section of Headquarters, Ryukyus, Far East Command. He later served in staff positions at the Army Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia and in the omce of the Deputy of Staff for operations at the Pentagon. Prior to his assignment at Carlisle, General Gunn was chief of Staff of the First Cavalry Division in Korea. Among the service schools he has attended are the Command and General Staff College, Armed Forces Stahr College, Army War College, Canadian Senior Staff Officers Course, and Special Weapons Course at Fort Leavenworth. Decorations and awards include the Silver Star with Two Oak Leaf Clusters; Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster; Army Commendation Medal; Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster; Combat Infantry Badge; General Staff Badge; French Fourragere with Palm; and the Belgium Fourragere. Col. Frank E. Burgher Brigade Commander HEADQUARTERS 8: HEADQUARTERS COMPANY Started Basic Training: 28 June 1965 Maj. Gay F. Baldwin Battalion Commander FIRST BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Graduated: 20 August 1965 Ist Lt. Howard M. Mouser Company Commander 2nd Lt. James Farthing Platoon Leader E-8 Elmer M. Brokaw PSG James W. McEneaney First Sergeant Senior Drill Sergeant PSG J. T. Romero SSG A. Diocson Senior Drill Sergeant Drill Sergeant Hrsknmma y r; 151w r; 4K ,5; 3,19; mvfgi 11491;, M Vrv4is6qrva 5.91.9 131$: 2:?- 2nd Lt. John P. Connors Platoon Leader PSG R. E. Clampitt Senior Drill Sergeant SSG. D. J. Keyes Drill Sergeant PSG E. S. Ellis Senior Drill Sergeant SSG. N. A. Rasmussen Drill Sergeant :-- 9 :m9wgga. W99 lrrrfzezgt. Kw iwixt 2nd Lt. Johnye Taylor Platoon Leader PSG A. J. Greenia Senior Drill Sergeant SSG C. E. Tucker Drill Sergeant I 21; gij tum Jmchow, PFC W. Venturelli 3W: 19-4-2 SSG White Drill Sergeant Supply Clerk Sgt. D. A. Castro Drill Sergeant Pvt. K. L. Winter General Clerk x.:,e.ul,:? WZVWGLWW ww mz5mwjf wmaigf Mvmwwh WW Mw 5 7 v. 214 V3; Sgt. R. W. Shaffer Drill Sergeant SSG Uriel Vega Mess Steward $4" 5 351'! $53 WJ25$3119 SFC M A. Jacobsen Supply Sergeant SPl5 L. R. Mogerman First Cook PFC J. P. Mokski Company Gerk SPl5 R. L. McBride First Cook Glenn Abe Vernon Ackerman Raymont Aguilar Robe;t Alfonso Charles Althaus Manuel Alvarado Marsilo Aquinde Manuel Argomaniz Joseph Armenta Felix Arriola John Assaturian Michael Atwood Ranny Autrey Jesse Ayala Roger Baker Samuel Baker Norman Barney Richard Barriga Eddie Barth Albert Bartos Edward Beggs Ivan Bennett Gary Berlau Leroy Binyan James Black C. Blackhurst Randolph Borene Terry Bowles Gerald Brisgel Cecil Bronkhorst Edward Brown James Brown Richard Brown Robert Buck Steven Burke . WWW! we. - C. Burns Ralph Burrus Larry Busboom Robert Busey Robert Butler Michael Cagliano Raul Cardoza Ronald Chow Ueloy Coltrin Edward Cordeiro Wayne Correia Brent Cunningham Alan Dattage Thomas Deats Alton Degama Erick Deponte James Ellerson Norman Enyart Armando Estrada Gary Fleck Kenneth Flippin Glen Foster Roy Foster L. Friedman Milton Fujino Dennis Fukuchi Dale Fyles Charles Gable Danny Garcia Louis Garner David Gates W. Gerringer James Gibson Gary Glynn Lynn Godf y Thomas Golobif Stephen Goodspeed Conan Grames Harvey Grant Jackie Green Gary Guymon William Hackney Donald Hall Murlyn Hallenius Randal Hammons Harold Hart Walter Hartley Dennis Heck Gerald Henkel Larry Hiner a- $933 5 L - . . $ mm m m? A My t mzamzomo Gregory Hodsdon Warren Holloway Frederick Holmes Willard Hubert Agustin Huerta Clifford Hurley Richard Jackola William Jarrard Melvin Johnson David Jones John Stanley Jones David Juenke Dennis Kahula John Kalalau Roy Kaluna Randolph Kaoni Craig Kelly David Kimball Edward Kimberly Bruce Knudson Lonnie Koroush Richard Kramer Harry Kuikahi Donald Lackyard 1mrmmamwzwvwvw R" w wax Ml'waww gECMK-y. ' , . v. 1? ' .7 - ; n ' van-ewv w: ' A .. 49? . . ??,Mwwmymxm mufui:Mv1$::NJV.;;.t,rth , . .M$ .- ' '-- . xanuwiimfi Robert Laguna R. Landfried Stan Larsen George Leon Billy Lewis John Ley John Leyva Richard Leyva Donald Lockhart Thomas L d Roger MacEwen R. MacLachlan John Maher Theodore Main Tony Majalca Richard Markle James Martian Robert Martian Gary Maw Rodney Medeiros C. Mehlschau Kenneth Moeckel Paul Moore Michael Moritz Alan Murdock Nxxlm WWJITZ: Jag w Mm am If vl'k :75? RESQK ad$hgu L I 3924..qu Freddie Murietta Daniely Murphy T. McCarthy James McGeachy Brian McGill Daniel McGrath Gary McMullen Delbert Nelligan Larry Nepsund Roger Neslen W. Neumeister C. Nicholas Kent Nielsen Clyde Offutt Victor Oldham Anthony Oliveira Wilbert Olson Larry Palmer Richard Parker Glenn Pattie John Pearce Henry Phillips Amos Pishion Edouard Pomme Scott Potter 31': 'gAIqW Wk mv- ' 'mwm6"fE?'tQ'K,?7W'-m .IRXW'M! 'ongj 7 " - ignw ' -ii-fi'fichu 1145-4 KM$R QM n . Charles Powrie Dwight Pratt Gary Pugh Ronald Rabello R. 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Suggestions in the US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) collection:

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

1963

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

1964

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

1967

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

1968

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