US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1964

Page 1 of 360

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 360 of the 1964 volume:

CA llJI ' ' 0 ' R’Nill4 TiKAMiNllINlG CEifi llElR; COMPANY B 5th BATTALION 1st BRIGADE CSUMB Library history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostiy in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. in August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The iate General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) physical fitness WBWBf 1 .rf.i i ' ;ii-:i. j 4 %N ; - . % ' ■ • • ' V . ' 17 -mile drive presidio of monterey golf course red colton hall cross clothing issue f- i.S ?V i _; ir»r -• tramiire -•? first aid model of a minefield 1 COMPOSED Of 3 S™psS7nD|« i ANTl-PERSOfffi MINES ANTI-TANK MWES ANTI-TANK MINES CLUSTER A STRIP marking FENCE 5 E lane MAKKtH Sketch of {his Minefield. land mine warfare 1 w 1 j » ...-.--j _ 1. ima m r’ff u m ..i class a inspection 4 mount ' I- field mess " ' y tie - 4 s , r. 7 r m p ■0t m ■tm m recoilless rifle grenades rifle sv: l ' T «1CLa k:4 t4 M M 1 I -JL Fi ■ iJ’IIw J 1 k 1 " j ' -i-- IlM Hl ■HI 1 t [ [ - HHl 4 ! ■M m field bakery vcr’:y.:-]: ' v u uk 1 The Fort Ord Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni¬ formed service personnel and their depend¬ ents. It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total I medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. KENT sports wm J!?; «««•■ electronics and ordnance iK . -. ’ Ar t-, -i - chapel fc . ?■ y ’ :1 S w ft I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit. Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio ... and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight ... and die, for freedom, you will find me I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL EDWIN H. J. CARNS COMMANDING GENERAL ' f General Cams was born on 22 May 1907 in New York City, New York and is a 1929 graduate of the Military Academy. His early assignments included cavalry duty in Texas and Kansas; 20th Armored Division during the second World War and European duty in Austria following the war. In 1950 he was assigned as project officer, Joint Logistical Plans Group, Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington, D. C. From this assignment, he became deputy secretary and then secretary for the Joint Chiefs. Following the Korean War, General Cams became deputy commanding general of the 24th Infantry Division in Korea; l senior advisor to the First Republic of Korea Army, and commanding general of the 1st Cavalry Division in Korea. I He took over as commanding general, U. S. Army Corps, (Reserve) Fort Lawton, Washington and from there he went to Pentagon duty as Deputy Chief of Staff for operation. During his Army service he has been awarded the Legion of Merit and the French Croix de Guerre with silver Gilt Star among other decorations. He is married to the former Jeanette Anne Chamberlain, and the couple have four children. Michael P. C. Cams is a Lieutenant in the Air Force; Edwin H. J. Jr., is a cadet at the U. S. Military Academy at West Point; a daughter, Mary, is j a student at the University of Washington, Seattle, and the youngest daughter, Jeanette, is a high school student in Seattle. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Brieadier General Frank J. Canfield, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, Cali- fornia, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1934. From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide to the Governor, of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat. General Canfield w as then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement ac¬ tivities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War II, General Canfield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 1950 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Military Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1952 General Canfield was a Department Director at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, 10th Infantry Division, stationed at Schweinfurt, Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Md. From that post he came to Fort Ord in September 1961. His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition to service medals. General Caufield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commenda¬ tion Medal and the Croix de Guerre (Luxembourg). General Caufield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Catherin and Caroline, and a son, Frank Jr., who is a First Classman at the United States Military Academy. Lt. Col. Kenneth R. Beard Battalion Commander FIFTH BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Graduated: 14 February 1964 Col. Glenn E. Muggelberg Brigade Commander COMPANY B Started Basic Training: 9 December 1963 2nd Lt. Bruce Paton 1st Sgt. James Finch PSG Graf SFC Freddie Phillips 2nd Lt. Renzo Smith SFC Crowley S Sgt. White S Sgt. Perez S Sgt. Ussery S Sgt. Robishaw i ' ' V ' ( r ■. S V ' ' r: ' . r : -f ' ' i. ! • ! James Adams David Amundson David Anderson James Anderson Stephen Andrews Allen Ashley Billy Atseriak Martin Attebery Rand Auckland Richard Avery rr c I Antonio Avila William Babcock Gary Bachaus Robert Bacon Jerry Baker Leonard Banks Sydney Barrat Maxie Barrett Elvin Bell George Bissonette Gene Blackburh Wilbert Blair Roland Blais Roland Blake Robert Bloemer Ralph Bode Douglas Bowen Robert Bradford Richard Brady Robert Brewer James Brigance Roy Brogden, Jr. James Brown Jere Brown Gerard Bruce Edmound Broussard Michael Buckingham William Bucknall Ellory Buddie Louis Bulfer, Jr. Ronald Burnett James Caldera Kenneth Campbell Melvin Cardoza Leroy Carney, Jr. Jimmie Carr Steven Casey Castro-Valencia Joseph Cesare Victor Chan Arthur Chapa David Chaplin Dale Chartraw Larry Chorn Dean Christensen George Christie Stanley Cisney Colin Clark Hugh Clausen James Cochran A ■ ' A George Cole Craig Coleman Stephen Collins Victor Comstock Elmer Cornelius Dennis Cox Maurice Cronin Max Curran Robert Daly John Day Richard Deering Robert Deetz Michael Delaney F. Delrosario David Desmond Thomas Dillon, IV James Dirker Ronald Dixon Bert Dobbs, Jr. Dennis Donohoe Raul Donoso Bob Doughty Donald Douglas Michael Drake Gary Edwards i Rayfield Edwards Eugene Eliason Grant Elsby Keith Erickson Gene Ernst Ronnie Evans Thomas Fettke Wilbert Fisher John Forrest Gilbert Foster Glenn Fox Gerald Frickel Dennis Gallowary Leon Garbers Richard Gonzales Merlin Haile Richard Halgate Kenneth Hansen Daniel Harmon Richard Hartshorn Harold Herman Albert Hopper Micheal Howard James Howea William Jackson Eldon Jennings Thomas Jensen Dean Johnson Arlo Jones Loren Ketchum Robert Killam Carel Kimmey G. Kistenmacher Harley Klein Samuel Kloozko Ronald Kohler Gilbert Leivas Randolph Lindsey Steve Luppert Robert MacDonald Lawrence Mardid Richard Mallory John Mann George Matthews Calvin Mazza Max McDonald Jim McFarland Charles Mealor Randall Menoeisohn Owen Michaelis 1 - Bruce Miller Robert Miller Phillip Moisa Mauricio Montoya Alexander Moren Norman Morris Donnel Murphy Travis Nash Gene Nelson Kurt Nelson Robert Nolfz Gary Noonan John Ochoa Ronald Okimoto James Orr Louis Ortega Thomas Osowski John Otten Billy Owens Claudie Parson Shelton Pearson Pee Person, Jr. Chris Peterson Gary Peterson Robert Pettingell Steven Preuss Joseph Ramirez, Jr. Alvin Rasden Franklin Ribera Richard Rice Michael Riggs Richard Robinson David Rogge Sidney Romero Barry Ross Woodie Rouse Roy Russell Samuel Russell George Salter Robert Sandbery Paul Sanders William Saueker Lance Schlichter Malcolm Scribner Edward Sharbono Bobby Sharp Thomas Shine Robert Shoberg Charles Slawson Walter Smith Jerry Snelling Fred Snively Ronald Springer Craig Stalker Dennis Stassens Donald Steinman Leon Stempel Richard Stoehr Fred Swain Reece Swofford John Tamasauskas Wing Tang Ray Thiessen William Thomas Richard ThuU Clyde Tippie John Verburg, Jr. Robert Walker David Walz Arthur Webster Lee Welch Terry Westergaard Floyd WestfaU Robert Whitfield Robert Wikoff I Kenneth Wilford Calvin Wilhelm George William Robert Wilson Robert L. Wilson Jeffrey Woodard Guillermo Arias John Tarman dismounted drill dismounted drill 1 1 f A nMMl 9-K trainfire trainfire close combat (0r. ' i close combat road march individual tactical training itTv- 1 hand to hand combat (CMIHl hand to hand combat hand road march to hand combat our training through history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000 ,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. it is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. ts COMPANY B MU BATTALION C ' SUMB Library LgNtfHWHp r s ; v y " ' _ - BWIB,B . history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte¬ rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) i? Z a i ' U ' itt r - i l ios £ n M ©§« i L physical fitness .»«cW •« 17 -mile drive presidio of monterey golf course red cross colton hall and of club interior exterior new service receiving center ■jW £f| r. | p3f KX $ It tev tw S dental check clothing issue bayonet WL r ral! trainfire classroom sW first aid • ' SK ' -S pi machine dismounted drill •V . ' ' V r " , ' C V 1 . .3flH| ► I 4 1 p » ; dlfi | S| || ■PHtlpM lOUSC mWMmMM s wMwm rwyi " w fe .C lifx is i cmM» - 4 AH p - jyvfl || | A inspection guard mount MgW field inspection ftg tel m JS ' XiA § Op® B close combat course • m . " •v- . A ' V W x . t; ' i • VjLT «fc -« $ V , 1 .•■ ' ■• i 11 ‘ - t ;. - f m • K » £ T- Sf£.J £ JfcS |i’| 5 . 0 ' m p 5 S| sm m m a irw field mess 4 $§3 fc i m M % $£ Zbr m m. £ 4 S p QT3S32 r t N recoilless rifle hand grenades ✓ grenades rifle ss im mess hall ■ ' ' , 1 K: v. tJS fjfcs ifi Fi 1 4 HBHBHn 1 i I i4 • r 3 field bakery £ « post locator and barracks life IMMOIP hospital The Fort Ord Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni¬ formed service personnel and their depend¬ ents. It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. 1 J »•» tt-is1 ■ill , ' Hu jLwJ • V lA j r.i. ' •I. ' S V. J hobbies (lulc Ciaf i tPftAbiudci 1 PHjjSravr- [m. sports electronics and ordnance ( vr s r r .V k --J U4 l .r 5 chapel I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine ... led the charge up San Juan Hill ... and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was “over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine ... and seized the Heartland. The “Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight ... and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL EDWIN H. J. CARNS Commanding General General Cams was born on 22 May 1907 in New York City, New York and is a 1929 graduate of the Military Academy. His early assignments included cavalry duty in Texas and Kansas; 20th Armored Division during the second World War and European duty in Austria following the war. During World War II, he spent two years in Headquarters, Army Ground Forces, where he was concerned with matters related to the organization and training of our expanding Army. Toward the close of the period he observed combat action in the Admiralty Islands and in New Guinea. In July, 1944 he joined the 20th Armored Division and subsequently participated in combat with the division in Central Europe, serving successively as Chief of Staff and Com¬ manding Officer, Combat Command B. In 1950 he was assigned as project officer, Joint Logistical Plans Group, Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington, D. C. From this assignment, he became deputy secretary and then secretary for the Joint Chiefs. Following the Korean War, General Cams became deputy commanding general of the 24th Infantry Division in Korea; senior advisor to the First Republic of Korea Army, and commanding general of the 1st Cavalry Division in Korea. He took over as commanding general, U. S. Army Corps, (Reserve) Fort Law- ton, Washington and from there he went to Pentagon duty as Deputy Chief of Staff for operation. During his Army service he has been awarded the Legion of Merit and the French Croix de Guerre with silver Gilt Star among other decorations. On 2 April 63, he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infan¬ try, and Fort Ord, California. The command includes, in addition, the Presidio of Monterey, Hunter Liggett Military Reservation, and Camp Roberts, California. He is married to the former Jeanette Anne Chamberlain, and the couple has four children. Michael P. C. Cams, 1st Lt., U.S. Air Force, Edwin H. J. Jr., 2nd Lt., U.S. Army, and two daughters, Mary S. C. Cams, and Jeannette A. Cams. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD Deputy Commanding General Brigadier General Frank J. Caufield, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, California, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1934. From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide to the Governor of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat. General Caufield was then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement activities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War II, General Caufield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 1950 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Mili¬ tary Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1952 General Caufield was a Department Director at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, 10th Infantry Division, stationed at Schweinfurt, Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Md. From that post he came to Fort Ord in September 1961. His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition to service medals, General Caufield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commendation Medal and the Croix de Gue rre (Luxembourg). General Caufield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Catherin and Caro¬ line, and a son, Frank Jr., who is a Cadet at the United States Military Academy. Lt. Col. Frederick R. Gehring Battalion Commander FOURTH BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Graduated: 10 April 1964 Col. John I. Pray Brigade Commander COMPANY B Started Basic Training: 17 February 1964 1st Lt. Paul J. Johnston Company Commander 2nd Lt. Donald Robinson 1st Sgt. Janies H. Graves M Sgt. Louis Montoya PSG Chandler PSG Glynn SFC Miles S Sgt. Mclnnes S Sgt. Hayhurst Sgt. Prine Sgt. Miller Pvt. Pfeuffer Sp 4 Gaines Company Clerk Everett Ahlbom Gary Anderson Ray Baker Ronald Baker Ronald Barnes Jerry Barrington Lowell Beckman Joe Benites, Jr. Kenneth Bioner Raymond Bird Harold Black Ronald Blair Norman Blake Jay Bliesner Fred Bodily Tommy Borland Lockhart Brookbank Warren Broderick Edward Brown Carl Brown James Brown Robert Brown Thomas Buck Gordon Budar Ralph Burnett, Jr. Thomas Burton Clarence Busby Wesley Butler Richard Carr William Carrington Micheal Casagranda Benjamin Chinbong Tommy Christensen David Clark Charles Clemons 1 Michael Cluff Larence Cooper Phillip Corbin Clark Cordner Leo Cruise, Jr. Dennis Cullen Michael Cunningham Vincent Cunningham, Jr. David Dahl Donald Davis Thomas Demarois Jimmy Denos George Deutsch Blair Dixon Frank Dukes Michael Eastwood Royal Edwards Michael Eldredge John Elko Dennis Emmons Barry Evans Gary Ewell David Falleri Thomas Filion Daniel Finn Sanford Fleming Robert Flowers Kenneth Foster Alan Foster Stephen Fowler Douglas Freasier Jack Friedman Joseph Frishie Glen Frisk Jose Fuentes Frank Gallo Albert Garris Mason Gebe Linn Glessner Richard Gomes Harvey Gore Bert Gunsalus Sylvester Gualco Gerald Guibor Lawrence Gurney Henry Haberman, Jr. Thomas Haddock Richard Hagenah Ken Hane Kenneth Harlan 5 m Dennis Harrison Robert Hatch Paul Heaney Doyle Hensley Mark Hinkle Harold Herr Leonard Henrikson Fred Heppner William Hertle Robert Hewitt Frederick Hinds William Hines Karl Hodges Raymond Holmes Charles Honeycutt John Hosford Ronald House Kenneth Howell Robert T. Janson James Jensen Hilario Jimenez Marion Johnson James Jones Leroy Jones James Kahn Danny Loy Robert Luglan Fredrick Lundgren Michael Lynch Frank Mah Albert Kellar Paul Kenne dy Mark Ketterling Lawrence Kirk Reginald Klatt Ronald Kosaka Thomas Lapitan Dennis Lassen Allen Lawson Chaunley Leach Frank Leach Richard Lear Ronald Legowik Jason Lewis, Jr. John Lewis William Lewis Thomas Liebert William Lipka Eldon Lipp Danny Lockman Douglass Mapes Larry Mattheis Dennis McAffee William McHone Robert McQuitty Charles Miller, Jr. Stephen Modesto John Monroe Richard Mott Hiawatha Mucher Harry Murer Wayne Murray, Jr. Victor Nacel Arnold Nakkerud Lynn Neal Ronald Neely Gerald Nelson Kenneth Neues Ace Noland, Jr. Ronald Obert Fidel Olmeda David Osborne Peter Pappas James Patton Arthur Paulson Jimmy Pecha Alvino Perez Walter Peters Robert Peterson Franklin Peterson Enrico Petri Jimmy Pettigrew Jim Poston Earl Pugh, Jr. Terral Rampley Wayne Randall Samuel Reed Jose Reyes Gene Rice Dennis Ritter Burle Rodgers Robert Roggio James Rose Peter Rose Michael Rossetti David Rousey David Rowe Horace Russo, Jr. James Ryan Enrigue Santos Rodney Sauvage Larry Schlegel William Senuty James Silbester Dennis Skolrud William Slaton Jimmy Slover Charles Smith Gail Spohn Kenneth Spradling Carl Staley Richard Stanley Tommie Starling, Jr. Lawrence Stewart Dale Strickland Stephen Summers Ronald Swan Billy Taylor Conrad Tevelde Douglas Thomas Frank Towne, Jr. Victor Trevisanut Obert Tu Phillip Tutino Thomas Ulstad Leland Van Tol Gary Vaughan Redro Vea, Jr. Charles Vinci Bruce Wallen Robert Ward Raymond Ward James Wark John Warmington Richard Watson Robert Waura Vernon Weast Dan Welty Michael White Charles Wigen James White Robert Whitman Ronald Williams Garlon Williamson James Wilson Stuart Wilson James Wolcott James Yingst Lawrence Young Julian Ysais Scott Alexander - .» 7 - —+• ' - . yr»] .vr; r .» y w. ; vry y y 7 r i " v r ■» tw; AL DATA ERATED : HE FED I SEMI-AUTOMATIC OliD HR WlAPOM . t‘ Vi J v i 0 -VTx r-. ' . i I t u prH ■v JL -Vi I K fe?l ■ y J ■ | 1 9 11 a -£ ' ■; ' •• a Ifc i i n history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. wmm { vf f Jy , TRAIN IN© COMPANY B 1 § t BATTALION 3d BRIGADE history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846 was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21 -gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre- mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) mw m IV fc,A r v! ' V« j mJBr tfiainMr ■ , l , 3SPp 1 ' ' ' v Wi ' : $ 4 ' . i mmsmsrn WMmm ssSiS; xmx St close combat course MM iM| WiSSt H ' lllll sfelii MMi besS - .v - V : ’. PlBpISi WM»S _ j £‘ y VS vv 17-mile drive presidio of monterey goll course red cross colton hall interior and exterior of new service club 7si% ’.-ji " ' warauMBiiiww receiving center check dental ‘I •teSS 7 4j 2 : SsSSES ■■gm iwi a ?M %M trainfire Sr® " ' v • , • • • ? ■ classroom IKJX1X iW trainfire land mine warfare cbn physical fitness test ■BS™ machine gun dismounted jfppf “ ■ ' K r C I lg£ 7 iflf i wj 1 house 1 u - 9g u H; I k f= u S Aj Pt I % S I I nr£ i 3fo shots r mount s ' - sgs® •3-sy 1 4v£r|I W M |P§ f-- j V “t if-|| • 3% flU 1® field gjjS 7 1 A WUi ■ inspection -i ■ v ;- 7 S I®1 £t gff g ?j»-:2wC ■ wement r 1 ISi SSVJ .■ v. t ... • close combat course 1 : ft m m 3 ' t M ' Zl ' JtsM 1 .V v ' . 5 4 1 Vi i t 2 - ' " 5 |.t Sli Is jfe iT3L J field mess X : ; £ i hand grenades tm ‘ • . rifle grenades is V l mam ULr_ 1 u .Z11J field bakery -■■ 1 • -‘ 4 ¥ . ' £ ?, i. 4 i 7 -o «• ». £.. . 1 0 i The Fort Ord Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni- formed service personnel and their depend- ents. It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. sports electronics and ordnance I AM THE INEANTRY I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de- fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorkrown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun- tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine ... led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro — and disease — in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. 1 stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou- sand-Year ' ’ Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re- turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL EDWIN H. J. CARNS Commanding General General Cams was born on 22 May 1907 In New York City, New York and is a 1929 graduate of the Military Academy. His early assignments included cavalry duty in Texas and Kansas; 20th Armored Division during the second World War and European duty In Austria following the war. During World War II, he spent two years in Headquarters, Army Ground Forces, where he was concerned with matters related to the organization and training of our expanding Army. Toward the close of the period he observed combat action in the Admiralty Islands and in New Guinea. In July, 1944 he joined the 20th Armored Division and subsequently participated in combat with the division in Central Europe, serving successively as Chief of Staff and Com- manding Officer, Combat Command 8. In 1950 he was assigned as project officer. Joint Logistical Plans Group, Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington, D. C. From this assignment, he became deputy secretary and then secretary for the Joint Chiefs. Following the Korean War, General Cams became deputy commanding general of the 24th Infantry Division in Korea; senior advisor to the First Republic of Korea Army, and commanding general of the 1st Cavalry Division in Korea. He took over as commanding general, U S. Army Corps, (Reserve) Fort Law- ton, Washington and from there he went to Pentagon duty as Deputy Chief of Staff for operation. During his Army service he has been awarded the Legion of Merit and the French Croix de Guerre with silver Gilt Star among other decorations. On 2 April 63, he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infan- try, and Fort Ord, California. The command includes, in addition, the Presidio of Monterey, Hunter Liggett Military Reservation, and Camp Roberts, California. He is married to the former Jeanette Anne Chamberlain, and the couple has four children. Michael P. C. Cams, 1st Lt., U.S. Air Force, Edwin H. J. Jr., 2nd Lt., U.S. Army, and two daughters, Mary S. C. Cams, and Jeannette A. Cams. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD Deputy Commanding General Brigadier General Frank J. Caufield, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, California, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1934. From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide to the Governor of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat General Caufield was then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was Involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement activities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War II, General Caufield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 1950 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Mili- tary Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1952 General Caufield was a Department Director at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, 10th Infantry Division, stationed at Schweinfurt, Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Md. From that post he came to Fort Ord in September 1961. His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition to service medals, General Caufield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commendation Medal and the Croix de Guerre (Luxembourg). General Caufield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Catherin and Caro- line, and a son, Frank Jr., who is a Cadet at the United States Military Academy. Col. John I. Pray Brigade Commander Lt. Col. Byron M. Bonham Battalion Commander COMPANY B Started Basic Training: 2 March 1964 ftttl FIT S5T IS 1st U. Ross B. Richards Company Commander FIRST BATTALION THIRD BRIGADE Graduated: 25 April 1964 2nd Lt. Ronald A. Waldvogei Executive Officer 2nd Lt, Richard B, Neuman Training Officer E-8 Waller E, Adams First Sergeant PSG Patrick Schgen SDl JVl Sgt, Sidney Olden Training N r C + Q. B. J, Chase Platoon Sergeant Medeiros Platoon Sergeant i SFC E. Morris Supply Sergeant Sp 4 Williams Company Clerk SFC Castellano 5SG Navas 5SG J. Wortimack i Sgt. W. D. Shepherd bgt. Horstmann Sgt. Shelehon Sp 4 Hollis Supply Clerk E-2 Howarth Mail Clerk Sp 5 Sparks First Cook Bruce Ahlborn Robert Airis Dennis Albrecht Antonio Amador Gerald Anderson Perry Anderson Sam Angeloff Lewis Arends, Jr. William Ayres Benjamin Balducke Grant Banker, Jr, Thomas Bartlett Dennis Barton Paul Beaudoin, Jr. Douglas Bennett Gerald Bernard Richard Berntsen Richard Blackman Stuart Blank Alien Bodenhamer Arthur Boel! Robert Bogart Gerald Bossard Robert Bowers Robert Boy Dwight Bradford Willie Brent Lester Britton Hugh Brogan Kenneth Bronson Bradford Brown Nathaniel Brown Oliver Brown, Jr Roger Brown Edwin Bruner Thomas Buell William Burns Terry Bursell Hubert Burton Richard Burton John Butler Kenneth Buxton Monte Carr Herman Chaney Raymond Charles Jesus Chavez Abraham Chow R. Christenson Richard Christman Donald Civerolo Jerry Clark Albert Cobb Alan Coffey Melvin Cohen Dwight Compton Currin Cooley Kenneth Cornelius William Cornell Thomas Costanti Willey Crowson Ruben Cuevas James Daniels Jerry Day Medina Defrias Terry Degani Dallas Deusen Jeddie Disco Steven Dow John Engstrom Stephen Evertson Robert Fehr Daniel Fieldstad Donald Floyd Vance Fowler Daniel Fox Richard Franklin Hewitt Freeman Joe Gallegos Paul Gaspard Michael Gearhard Charles Goertzen Juan Gomez Albert Goon Sherman Guthman David Hall Dermis Hatfield Orriri Hatfield Kenneth Hatke Charles Hawk Latrella Hayden Willi Helfberg Michael Henn Kent Iverson Thomas Johnson Michael Kellerman William Kelly Junio Kindle Earnest King Richard Koch Donald Route ha k Jack Kuykendall William Larfcer Henry Laub, Jr, Paul Lavorico Richard Lee Bruce Lewis Carlos Lopez Louell Johnson Martin Luvisi William Martin Daniel Martorana George Mtcheau Larry Mills Albert Mitchell Ed car Mrto Donald Monkress John Montesanto Cleophus Moore Lawrence Morse John Moser Robert Moss James Moulton Malcolm McDonald Ronald McKendell Arthur McLaughlin Arthur Nickell Efmer Morris William Norton Robert Oden Ronald Ohfson Oscar Olivas Robert Olivas Robert Oman Man old Ortega Daniel Ortiz Lou Ortowski Stephen Osowiecki Rochard Pagliuso Edward Pajak Barrett Patterson Andrew Paukan Arthur Payne Edward Penn Jose Perez John Perello Colin Perry Donald Peters Benton Pettee Carlos Piche Rhilip Presicci Kenneth Proctor Paul Quackenbush Jerry Quintana Peter Ramirez Stanley Ramskill Jose Rava Dwight Reed James Reese William Reeves Larry Roberts Terry Robinson Kenneth Robertson William Rose Dale Ruis Helmut Ruzicka Robert Rydland Denis Sauvageaii Hans Schmidt Ronald Schmidt Jerrry Sellman William S Herbert William Short Nathan Sisson Karl Sloan, Jr. Bennie Smith Allen Starr Douglas Steele Date Stinson Dale St. Marie Robert Swint Ronald Tabor Waymond Talley William Thaler Reed Thompson A, Thorgrlmson f Craig Towner Scott Townsend Dana Traxel Bill Torbee Dennis Truby Davis Tucker Jack Ubelaker Troy Unruh Daniel Van Houten Stephen Vezirakis George Veneent Jerry Voss Kenneth Wagner Aubrey Waite Ronald Wakefield Benjamin Walker James Walker Lawrence Walter William Warner, Jr. J. Washington Pauf Weaver John Weigand Billy Whitmore Robert Whitney Jan Wick Stan Willard Jewell Williams Terry Wirth Victor Witmer Danny White Kenneth Durnin Nickolas Benedict John Bossieux George Dale Boyd Hanks Daniel Johnson Jack Herem our training through the St eyes of the camera I T. 4 Vv; t vVr h ii X. I i,4; s. isfr ' i. 4 .win iV v; V Mfaawwr ■wl? »ft graduation history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostiy in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. in August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The iate General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) pH 3 4 , :edwood v J XCity Menltf | , lit H m r f a Rock Mb ft Pnth J Mt A, l.i 6 a ft] JL+i Xk 1 a Mo pW£ f Min. Jk) 1 || • ' 4 6 j ' o Mo iwl f§Bs 22 11 Art , v r Evergroeni San Jose “ 8 0 ttismL k ffo podal offlM 0 Gatos ffeVH « ; Holy City N w Al mad on M. ikl.aWwS A ) _ . Mm ' Wi i Dig Basin J V ! ou r jkler acirono lama Mei i Bern Lomondy HeffriorLLv |io MW| - XL SantAT«mLLjr‘ ,roma ,j cv O rf tuilde Buena Vista Monteri M tutiiyn mo % N Car mule is.. " Valley ’ SSfVv VI N AHA y ,: tVHKa |ityta WV A CwwV WllOAAlA •U • service club library day room ' •) yi mrrr‘ dependents school pacific grove 2nd ave. T Tt ' V gfmu 1 1 ij i physical training iilVIHVil ' Sil, , ... . „ j iniiTJHW ■ -- K ■ m • " 1 individual tactical training long, proud history 1 -V- ' • iti ' ik ' i -V-, ' ■■■■:, 7 ■ ti ;.v P • : ' ' r bayonet 5 =, rrainfire classroom 1 ; 1 r ’C V JH Br 1 tr,,. H 1 lfl ■ jA s2| 1 • V . - ; In r J-i r ■■m -I f land mine model of a minefield ( COMPOSED 0F3STRIp1.Sd LU WTl-PBRSOftfcHtfS (T) AwnjiNKwe fjtk ANTI-TANK MIN ' S CLUSTER warfare physical fitness test machine gun aM ■f-SZ v • dismounted drill house mount inspection ' £s?t ■t. j r. f S im ffg H- ' ■ 4 iJhj 4 E r S iM?- -— 5 x tel BB : « 8 == “ 1HI HI RBH close combat course • • ' ' ' ' ■ r6-sl -V- - " Si V fefj yPi field mess hand grenades rifle grenades § — M(j-»A«iKya 2r®Jr V • u • . ♦ t« a » J ,. Cj 2 -V ' ■ »► ' ■ ' ■T i ' . ■ ' , r . -,;■ ■■ 2 ... ' . ’■■•• .’-s ■■•.; . v ; ' hVa hospital The Fort Ord Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces R egional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni- formed service personnel and their depend- ents. It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the held, at the unit, and in the hospital. ' text sports Ijp ■ ’ 3 jg? and ordnance u. I — U J L— -ip IB r ■1 T ] t ' ' ,LJ i ||i§jjB|[jB’ it..- . H 3 si s§ chapel 0 F I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation ' s de- fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun- tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine ... led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro — and disease — in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou- sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re- turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL EDWIN H. J. CARNS Commanding General General Cams was born on 2Z May 1907 m New York City, New York and Is a 1929 graduate of the Mrfitary Academy. His early assignments included cavalry duty in Texas and Kansas; 20th Armored Division during the second World War and European duty in Austria Following the war. During World War II, he spent two years in Headquarters, Army Ground Forces, where he was concerned with matters related to the organization and training of our expanding Army, Toward the dose of the period he observed combat action In the Admiralty Islands and in New Guinea. In July, 1944 he joined the 20th Armored Division and subsequently participated in combat with the division in Central Europe, serving successively as Chief of Staff and Com- manding Officer, Combat Command B. In 1950 he was assigned as project officer. Joint Logistical Plans Group, Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington, D, C. From this assignment, he became deputy secretary and then secretary for the Joint Chiefs. Following the Korean War, General Cams became deputy commanding general of the 24th Infantry Division in Korea; senior advisor to the First Republic of Korea Army, and commanding general of the 1st Cavalry Division in Korea. He took over as commanding general, U. 5. Army Corps, {Reserve) Fort Law- ton, Washington and from there he went to Pentagon duty as Deputy Chief of Staff for opcjatEon. During his Army service he has been awarded the Legion of Merit and the French Croix de Guerre with silver Gilt Star among other decorations. On 2 April 63, he assumed command of the LLS. Army Training Center, Infan- try, and Fort Ord, California. The command includes, In addition, the Presidio of Monterey, Hunter Liggett Military Reservation, and Camp Roberts, California. He is married to the former Jeanette Anne Chamberlain, and the couple has four children. Michael P. C. Cams, 1st LL, U .S, Air Force, Edwin H. J. Jr., 2nd Lt r , U.5 Army, and two daughters, Mary S. C. Cams, and Jeannette A. Cams. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD Deputy Commanding General Brigadier General Frank J. Caufield, Deputy Commanding General, U.5. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, California, was graduated from the United States Military Academy hi 1934. From 1936 to 1939 he was military ' aide to the Governor of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European, 1 theater of combat. General Caufield was then assigned as a troop movement officer In the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement activities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War II, General Caufield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949, In 1950 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Mili- tary Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1952 General Caufield was a Department Director at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army . War Collie at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, 10th Infantry Division, stationed at Schwoinfurt, Germany. In 195B he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holahird, Md. From that post he came to Fort Ord in September 1961. His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition to service medals, General Caufeld has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star MedaE, Army Commendation Medal and the Croix de Guerre (Luxembourg), General Caufeld and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Catherin and Caro- line, and a son, Frank Jr,, who is a Cadet at the United StaLes Military Academy. Maj. Charles 0. Neal Battalion Commander Col. Benjamin F. Cook Brigade Commander COMPANY A Started Basic Training: 12 October 1964 SECOND BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Graduated: 27 November 1964 2nd Lt. Angel A. Jimenez Company Commander 2nd Lt. M. V. Katz Platoon Leader f M Sgt. D. K. Hanakeawe First Sergeant 2nd Lt. William H. Doll Executive Officer 2nd Lt. Kenneth M. Racette Training Officer PSG Bennie G. Holmes S.D.I. Sgt. Williams SFC William P. Smith Sgt. A. L. Smith SFC L. R. Dethlefsen Training N.C.O. 1st Platoon Sergeant 2nd Platoon Sergeant 3rd Platoon Sergeant SSG H. Rosenfeld Mess Steward SSG M. G. Jacquez Sp 4 H. A. Maxwell Supply Sergeant Company Clerk SSG I. S. James 4th Platoon Sergeant PFC Richmond 5th Platoon Sergeant PFC D. S. H. Quon Mail Clerk E-2 Marlin Supply Clerk Sp 5 Brooks First Cook Sp 5 Reyes First Cook Albert Belair Vincent Belkle Preston Bell Larry Bivins Charles Blocher Thomas Bod me Eddy Bowen, Jr. Terrence Bradley Richard Braun Frederick Broder Robert Brookes, Jr. Larry Bullard Major Burbidge Dennis Burling Robert Burrus Dennis Bush Leonard Cantrell Lloyd Chambers Rudy Chambers Harry Chavez Gay win C fling Willis C fling Gerald Chisum J. Christiansen William Clark ' 77$ m r t r Michael Cole Richard Corning Steven Crane William Crook Frank Cruze Stephen Cull Robert Darby Robert Davis Ralph Day John Delacruz Erich Demorest Jackie Divinity Patrick Dixon E Dominguez Richard Double E, Dougherty Ronafd Driskeil Thomas Duffey Rocky Edwards Vernon Edwards James Egan Richard Ellison Stephen Engel Michael Ewell Marvtn Fentis Edwin Fink Kefth Fowler Richard Fuher David Fury Eusebio Garcia Arthur Gilbert Richard GiuntTnl Chris Groshong L Grossberg Stevan Grosvaid $. Guerrero Chris Gutllot Daniel Guilmei Lonnie Guinn Herman Hama da Howard Hasting K. Hendershot Michael HTght Waiter Hoffman Charles Holdorf Frank Holbuin Douglas Honsinger R. Hornberger Jimmy Howard Jimmy Howe T. Hundhammer Ernest Hunt Steven Ingalls John Irons Roy Iwasakl Ronald Jacinto Burton Jansen John Johnson Johnny Johnson Douglas Jones James Kahn Joseph Kalahiki Richard Kennedy K. Kenworthy Thomas Kiker James Kittleson Clavin Kosekl Victor Lares Johann Lee Paul Leese S. Lightner Ronald Lind Albert Lindsey Victor Lopez Gary Lowe Paul Ludlow Steven Ludwig Richard MacNally Peter Malacznik William Mallory Gary Martin Frank Masovero Richard Matson Reynold Matsu moto Ted Matthews Arthur Mennick Michael Merle Thomas Metz M. JYKckeison Benedict Miller Roger Minniss Cruz Moreno F l Muratnoto Michael Myers V, McCullough T, C. McDonald John McKay Robert McKowan Earf Nagasawa Joseph Nakao i.4 iVV- - ?. : .‘raj -,• }• j s r£ ' Steven Nimocks Jerry O ' Bar R. Oezacbowsfei Dennis Ohta Michael Onifer Henry Ortiz Steven Owens Eben Paawhaw Fred Padilla C. Paishom James Pappas John Parker 0 Perry Michael Peskin William Peters Walter Pierce Patrick Pirtle John Polish Marten Pratt Wayne Ranes Gregory Reams Bruce Reynolds Daniel Robbins F. Rebel lo Joseph Rose K r ■ J ? « r; ... . William Roufaos Delbert Sacks, Jr. Kenneth Sanders Lionel Sawai E. Schweiekert James Slater Gordon Smith Hubert Smith Howard Snyder Gerry Stacy S. StancITff Leroy Stephan Paul Stewart M. Strandberg G + Streeter Richard Swan Walter Takafuji D. Taniguch Jeff Tardiff Aaron Tarrant H. Tateishi Warren Taylor Ronald Teruya Carf Tignino Charlie Tollini Thomas Toomey Richard Towner Lloyd Tyler Richard Vance R, Vanderhoof Stephen Viehmann W. Von Oelhoffen W. Wakamiya James Walden John Wautelet Dennis Webb Murray Weinberg Steven Wicker Jacob Williams Leland Williams John Wipf Michael Witsoe Marvin Woolley G. Yahyowan Peter Yamada Gordon Young David Zeidfer John Zellner Francisco Villa our training through the eyes of the camera ♦yrM " i»r i A£ £ m3h m I v « l l i f history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. 4


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) collection:

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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