US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1963

Page 1 of 192

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 192 of the 1963 volume:

; Vv; TRAINING CENTER COMPANY C 10th BATTLE GROUP 3rd BRIGADE history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21 -gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre- mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) Ml : 3fS bmbw ill V i SKSSSF SSS mm uuk ; r fM wnxii j : mL. • mm ' jm ' l%t» physical fitness Sgg Wtmmm . . . . ntti ' v ; vVy ... 3 , . , L ,.- ,£; ■ __ pfp PlS| I :v ' v-vWWflKfiffi WM lN V-V. ' “f nii ' n H . 1 ’,v 5 y.vx. 9 U a r t. ? V S, k ws MS 17 -mile drive presidio of monterey golf course red cross colton hall MHB8fR£i ■ ;l; - ■■■■ ' ■ -. ' S3 :: - v ;.. „ •„ • - . • mmem e M ■ 1 . • ■;- - ' .■ ' ■;■.■. v : : ' - ; " " ' ' --v w.. ■ ■ mm i V± ' : ‘SKBSMC interior — ljl ir Itti llffi (|;pi Bft FaS? " i.ia-g HJ r i jfiT i i f V ! 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" x • - ■• ' y.;?: : • - ' The Fort Ord Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 7 5 000 uni- formed service personnel and their depend- ents. It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. 3s©sap( . hobbies ;V : ; ■ flak. Gia{1 (J ' nMiadcL . ; ‘kT t j® s ports 1 . ■ -V;r ' ■ ■. 4i ' V -v -r afss gsfcsi s H J !■ ■■ wS k ' . " r ■ ' =■ ri v ns I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de- fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun- tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro — and disease — in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou- sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re- turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL ORLANDO C. TROXEL, JR COMMANDING GENERAL Orlando C. Troxel, Jr., was born II February 190S at Fort William McKinley, P.I. He attended schools an Army posts and Washington, D.C. On 11 June 1931 he was graduated from West Point as a second lieutenant. Early assignments included Field Artillery school and units He was graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fore Leavenworth, Kansas in 1942, from where he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division, later becoming Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the division. He remained in that position until after the division landed in Normandy in june 1944. After landing he became Assistant Chief of Staff, G 3, of the VII Corps and remained in that position until January 1946. Subsequent assignments included appointment as a member of the Joint Operation Review Board, under the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Armed Forces Information School as a member of the faculty; 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, as Commanding Officer, Division Artillery; member of the faculty at the Command and General Staff College; National War College; 1st Cavalry Division Commander; Chief of Special Warfare, Department of the Army; Director of Organization and Training, Office Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army; Chief Joint Military Assistance Advisory Group, Korea (Provisional) From Korea, he was assigned to Fort Ord, California, where on 20 January 196 J he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord. General Troxel has been awarded the Legion of Merit, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Bronze Star Medal, with Oak Leaf Cluster: Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre, with Palm (France) ; Order of Leopold, with Palm; Croix dc Guerre, with Palm (Belgium); and Order of Fatherlands War (Russia). He is married to the former Miss Lucy Pratt Reynolds. They have a son, Roy Reynolds Troxel. BRIGADIER GENER AL FRANK J. CAUFIELD DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Brigadier General Prank J. Cau field, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training Center. Infanrry and Porr Ord, Cali- fornia. was grad na red from the Uni red Scares Military Academy in 1934. From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide ro rhe Governor of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until Ocrober 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat. General Cnufield was then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges ro the beaches along rhe entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement ac- tivities until the end of hostilities ill Europe. After World War IL General Canfield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 1950 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Military Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office Jater became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe ( SHAPE). In 1952 General Canfield was a Department Director at rhe Command and General Staff College, Porr Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, I OrJi Infantry Division, stationed at Schwcmfurta Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School. Fort Holabird, Md, Prom that post he came to Port Ord in September 1961. His promotion ro brigadier general was announced on August IL 1961. In addition to service medals. Genera] Canfield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze star Medal, Army Commenda- tion Medal and the Croix de Guerre (Luxembourg). General Canfield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Qirherin and Caroline, and a son, Frank Jr., who is a First Classman at the United States Military Academy. Lc, Col. Arthur P. Murphy Battle Group Commander Col. Leonard E k Garrett Brigade Commander COMPANY C THIRD BRIGADE TENTH BATTLE GROUP Started Basic Training: 4 February 1963 Graduated: 30 March 196 } 1st Lt, Francis Warfel Former Co. Cdr. 2nd Lt. M. Beacon Company Commander i ♦ — rrrr rr ? c t ' y c- ' vi ' ■ ? ; !i « v-, iUr s -v vJ ' ■vU " . y :V a 9 ai !i ?. .J i -4 W ? r flas ' ?■? r, ' : ' S Sgr. Flores SFC Sanford SFC Rice Sgt. O ' Neal Sgt. Avilcz Sp 5 Wyatt Mess Steward Sgt, Dupree Sgt. Bacon M Sgt. Macagba Training NCO SFC Williams Supply Sgt, Ray Bowen First Sergeant 2nd Lt. D. Fletcher Executive Officer M Sgt. E. F. Troll in get SDI :.K’ 1 i : Sp 4 Manly PFC Mugnerza Company Clerk kitchen staff 1 Bernardo Ace do Gilbert Adams David Adkins Eddie Aguilera Gary Allred Fidel Alvarez Keith Anderson. David Andrews James Anneblo Jesse Apedaile Robert Armstrong John Baker James Balog Byron Bartlett Joseph Bartley Jimmy Beal Kenneth Beekman Garry Bernhardt Dewey Bernu Matthew Berryhill Donald Bickle Alma Biesinger James Birdwell Ronald Blumberg Wade Boner Philbett Bonifas Charles Booth Max Boyer Geroge Buckley Dale Busby Jack Camp Steward Campbell Gary Carpenter Robert Carroll Leonard Carter Patrick Cazinha William Chapman Dennis Chastain Kenneth Chjlderston Robert Clark Steven Clark Thomas Clark DeWight Cojegrove Billy Cooper Roy Cooper John Coronado Paul Craig Robert Cramer Donald Crismore Donald Cross Prank Crow Verlon Cullum Dean Dastrup Gary Davidson Jimmy Davidson Richard Davidson Daniel Davis Thomas Dean William DeGuzman Epammondas Demos William Desmul Richard Dillon Michael Drapeau Andre Dubrecil Kenneth Dyer Gordon Eaken Harold Elgin Wm. Elliotc Dennis Erikson Lupe Esquibel Theodore Farkas Harold Farrand John Faulkner David Fix Xavier Flexen Herbert Forbes James Foster Amos Franklin James Fraser Brian Frazier William Erich Leathon Gage Jerry Gaines Francisco Galvan Maurice Gandy Alejandro Garcia David Geisler Wayne George Joseph Geronilla Timothy Glick Joachin Goldsmith Jorge Gonzalez Ronald Goodman. Benjamin Goodrich Max Goucher Joseph Goulartc Oscar Grant James Grasky Rodger Graves Benjamin Green Gary Gross Douglas Hacklcman Howard Hagen Gerald Plall Ronald Hallam Bernard Hammer Darcy Hammit Larry I I an sen Ronald Hanshaw Chester Harris Stephen Harris Thomas Harvey Alan Heald Norman Heibel David Hertz Melvin Hicken Dennis Hi Id Everett Hollenbeck Chas, Hollingsworth Jeny Hong Gary Honn Gene Hooker S. L. Hnnncr Chester Hughes James Hurt Jefferson Inani Ronald Jackson Anthony Jaramilio James Jastrumski Peter Jensen Klari Jeppsen John Johaneson Dean Johnson Johnnie Johnson Harold Jones I Wallace Jones Walter Jorgenson John Kabaj T. Kagcyama David Kanecn John Karsemeyec Timothy Keller Steven Kelsey Gordon King Lindo Kinzli Leland Kramer Roland Lakes David Langrock Albert Lara Valdean Larsen Jack Lawson Gary Leclditer Robert Levine Charles Lewis Edward Lidyotf Lynn Lighcjfreld Larry Little John Locke William Loehr John Lang f V j - £, ? £ «V W ' ' ■ i ; ' Zan Longstrath Lee Luce Edward Luther William Maier Chas. Mailloux V. Mnldonado-Gomez Dennis Mantei Richard Marriatt James Martin Paul Marrin Cesar Mata Ted Matsushita James McCallum Larry Miles Harold Miller David Moore Earl Morris James Moser Harvey Mods James Mods Manuel Munoz Serge Myers Ronald Naranen Steven Ncbcl Lydin Nick son r m r r? r t r - 7 v? 7 y- • f Ltd A ' 7 ' F r? - • ■ v. ' J .v. ifi 1 Vi 1 V- T- ' f : ‘afrtf r V fcu- . Holger Nielsen Virgil Niewolner Chastain Nolan Wm, Norlander David O’Connell Collins Ogawa Jonathan Ohaslii Ronald Olsen Harry Olson Orville Omland David Ortega Lavon Owens Phillip Pack Walter Parmeley James Paschelke Walter Perazzo Richard Perusina Paul Peters Dean Pet rick Gaylynn Prentice William Proctor Ronald Raichert Darrel Raney Gerald Reaves Robert Reed Herbert Riggs Alfred Rivas David Roberts Laszlo Rohrwild Michael Rossclle James Rude Edward Salem Byron Salsby Jim Sarnowsky Stanley Sato Belisano Savedra Wayne Sawyer Richard Sayers Karl Schalow James Schandler Boyd Schiess Earnest Schoolcraft Jackson Schultz Edward Schwak Donald Seliski Kenneth Sexton Del Sharp Gordon Shell berg Russel Sholar Lawrence Shrimp ?iy + 3 i % c ;; Charles Shupps John Sidels Robert Smith Ronald Smith Luis Sotelo Robert Spahn ¥m, Springer Gary Stazenski Douglas Stern Thomas Srone James Scringfello Earl Takahashi Eugene Topp Vernon Taylor Charles Tennenc Robert Tcske Michael Thaw Stanley Thomas Tom Thompson Philip Thorne Alan Ucsatojo Henry Uribe Jack Vail Mylan Valentine John Vicinzi ! ■ Sigitas Vingelis Ellis Wad e James Wahle Roy Walker John Walton Richard Wardein Lewis Watkins David Watson Barry Watts Wm. Weaver Harold West David. White Wm. Wilky David Wilieford Jeffery Willey Rickey Williams Ross Wilson David Wolf John Wollard William Woodlams Thomas Wright Richard Yasuda Peter Young Robert Zielinski John Neilson : V- ' j ' i£ ' $?% £fs W mmMM open house i ,i. r - r 4 ' ;V V-- ,- v ; 1 , J ,- -K rV ' V rifle grenades hand grenades ■ v f r Si t ' 1 l - jj J ■! lj!f . ■ .vN i ' { )■ ' [ f-. J; ' Th tt fS CyrSi " i . |3 -J SSftfc . : : . S. . ,-. ' ' mount v J ' ' VV- r « : - -r. L f - ' f ; ' Vi f ' ?vV : ' £?i ‘% •■-.■ l - ■■■ ' - ' ■:■ -;m ■■ p— v , X7 , fr " r " - .- r .., . - T l T 1 -r V L,-!h - ■- " : V rt. ; • v. v jl ' - ! 7 - t : , ' 3 T.- F . ■ ,Pv a? :r- ' K .: : z a 777 f z i T T ) rvr ;. r; T “ f s fcwi 7 — 7«r ltj : ' 7 ' ;’ ' 7?7 1 ' r— bayonet ■ ' .¥ , ' - ' J i- j ; . - - 1 v. iv A f Vi - H M ; ] ■ : rr: ■£ r a -! ' " v ,j = «i ji;- i ■ - r : T vV 4 tirt bayonet close combat si chemical, biological and nuclear warfare ; - .v; ' ■ r v- .fr vf jt. ■ ! . a jk.SvJ yUV Vr S ' -Vn : ' r Vo- l i-L -L -S ' ■% ■ • tU 4 ; ' . ' ' . ;■ r?i training through the eyes of the our -= r w ■ r i.V ' : ' h?v v; ' n -:; U j i. ' ksTi ■ $$ Ji StsSSSjift " te f ?. wWy? ; ? yv: j Sv ? n ? V : ' history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches, it was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. in September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. TRAI N i NG CENTER COMPANY B 1st BRIGADE 5th BATTALION history of fort ord gAIUNG PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21 -gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre- mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison, It was named Gtgling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe” Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) US ms ki ' 1 1 " Hk 4 ' • ■■ - ■ ■’ ■ v r ; v : -- mnxm w wmm tfemfyggfjfe WMmm physical fitness ■j m£ §g||i|| kmm r . t . v , ’-J } J 1K¥ I ' -V-KX ' Vr ' V X mSfj ■ ' v wv.Wj-.V. ' iVl S«c®5 ®SsS ■ ' -’ ■ • ‘ . ' ' V-. fJvV ' y ■• », .•$ ' ■ PS r " ' am rf v v-Zv v •vOT M SiifeJlii SjMstsiSWsas ’ Ppspip ■;§§ $ m$K, W§ ,.§i|l®| I ffiBtagMl |W«taMS8H BBSgwBBHi|BHBH : vv : :r V- : ‘ 1 ’ ' - 1 - v , : - ■’•• ' ’■- ' -■ . It ; . , ‘ 17 -mile drive presidio of monterey golf course red cross colton hall interior and exterior of new service club jssw first aid trainfire maps COMPOSED OF3‘STRiP5=ABiOAND M ' TANK JjjNES. marking, pd Sketch of ikii Minefield. Mi $$$■ land mine warfare physical fitness test machine jir rum MM dismounted drill open house W : " v1, ■ . inspection rnmsm mount I HP.1 inspection § cover and movement .. ' ' J £! »w 8 £ r ' Sf figfa ' ' close combat course ===== recoilless rifle ® — hand grenades [ V ' fp ' r- ' wOk ■ : : : : ! : “ ; ;-V " w A V . .... post locator and barracks life mam mm hospital The Fort Ord Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni- formed service personnel and their depend- ents, It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. .. ' - hobbies I ' [■% W M Vs. ' Z ' -- % sports • ' -•- ' i V : ;- ' S ; , liiS IS? ■ ' I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de- fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I w 7 ent to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun- tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine ... led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro — and disease — in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa, Follow’ me! At Chateau-Thierry, I w r ent over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Baraan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed ro return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore , . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow 7 could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou- sand-Year” Reich w 7 as dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific . . . hit the beaches . . . and chopped my w 7 ay through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow’ ... I did re- turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel . . . and around the w r orld, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you w 7 ill find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now 7 , and forever. I am the Infantry — Queen of Battle! Follow 7 Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL EDWIN H. J. CARNS COMMANDING GENERAL General Cams was bom on 22 May 1907 in New York His early assignments included cavalry duty in Texas and and European duty in Austria following the war. City, New York and is a 1929 graduate of the Military Academy. Kansas; .Oth Armored Division during the second World War thi S assignment, he became dlp„“y mS ° ' " “ D ' C R “” He took over as commanding general U S Armv r „ -r Pentagon duty as Deputy Chief of Staff for operation. ’ ' eSerVe; ° n avton ’ Washington and from there he went to ™ Z“ b ” L -» Me™ » French Crohc de Cnerre wirh sheer GO, Sta, “zzrz sz Tr - « “ - c a™ is . a student at the Unreersitg „I Washington, Seattle, and the gouhgest daugh’ 7 “l3e“ BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Brigadier General Frank J. Canfield, Deputy Commanding General, U.S, Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, Cali- fornia, was graduated from the United States Mi 1 i tar y Academy in 193 -k From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide to the Governor, of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1 94% when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat. General Canfield was then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement ac- tivities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War 11. General Caufi eld had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 19.50 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Military Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1932 General Canfield was a Department Director ar the Command and General Staff College, Farr Leavenworth, Kans. In 1934 he attended the Army War College at Carlisle Bar tacks. Fa. From 1955 lo 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7 th Infantry, 10 th. Infantry Division, .stationed at Sell we inf urt, Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Md. From char post he came to Fort Ord in September 1961- His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition :o service medals. General Canfield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Army Comm end a- non Medal and the Croix de Gncrrc (Luxembourg), General Canfield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Cat fieri n and Caroline, and a son. Frank Jr. ? who is a First Classman ar the United States Military Academy, Col. Glenn E. Mug gel berg Brigade Commander COMPANY B Lt CoL Kennetli K. Beard Battalion Commander FIFTH BATTALION FIRST BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 7 October 1963 Graduated: 29 November 1963 1st Lt. Carter Morey Company Commander 9 -- i “i -1 ' v’, v ” b ’-y ■ : ;■ - 1 t -rs revyyei ' w j j . ■ ir 1 ■ « i K»y»v %V 7-5 K:.. 1 Jamas Finch First Sergeant ilWWMig mb am ■ mu- SFC Freddie Phillips SDT 2nd Lt. Bruce Pa ton I PSG Graf PSG Rowell M Sg t . F r ede ric k SFC Crowley SFC Tyqmengco Training NCO S S gt . Robishaw Sgt H Owens S Sgt bite S Sgt. Perez S Sgt Ussery Alfred Aldridge Robert Andrea sen Bl air Andersen Bryan Anderson William Anthony Donald Aubry N or m a n B a 1 le n ti no Roger Barker James Bartlebaugh Michael Beckham mwit i I Dennis Bergstrom Charles Bernard Michael Blanc arte Dennis Buidesen Richard Booker Mick Bosustow Kenneth Braime, Jr. Scott Burchill Morton Camp be 11 , Jr + James Cardwell Paul Carlson Rickey Carter Tom Clark Dwight Cole Ronald Cole Benjamin Colwell Robert Comini Prentice Cook Clarence Cooper John Crowder Richard Ehlers Enroll Ferguson Gary Fernandez Anthony Fcrrucci Jerry Fires r-z , 7 -VV v David Fridleifson Charles Gale Roger Garrett Stuart Gaylord Joseph Gilbert James Glynn, III Fred Gould, Jr. Michael Grom an Freddy Groves John Fla nr ah an Dennis Hadield R ay ni on d hi ay as hid a Daniel Heikka David Hendry Virgil .Hereford William Pieter Kenneth Hirabayashi Raymond Hill Merritt Himhaw, Jr. Alvin Hite Roy Hockncl! Robert Hodges Richard Holdway Ronald Holz James Houseman I I Joseph Howell Glen Hudson Robert Huntsbcrry Robert 1th Albert Jackson Bernard Jacobs L. David Jacobs William Jacobs Raul Jara George Jones. Jr. Kendall Jones Michael Jones Barry Johnson Theo Johnson Michael Johnson Garry Jorgensen Nick Katsaneyas Larry Kcllar Day id Kelly Jerry Kelly Thomas Kennedy Frank Key John Kriby Wayne Kirtley William KHew T er Ronald Kohtmeicr Richard Kraber John Langley Thomas Larkin Delon Larsen Michael Lasher Louis La turner Patricio Leclerc Scab Lee Brian Lewis Jerry Linsncr Jon Long worth Darby Lucas Jerry Lyman Harold Lynch Gary Madrid John Martin Joseph Martinez John Massey 1. Matthewson, Jr. Leonard McConkey Richard McDonald Donald McVey Diomede s Mercado Bruce Millar I | I I James Miller Michael Mitchell Erich Mi t sch Eloy Molina Andres Mont cion go Ronnie Moore Martin Morales Robert Morales Raymond Moreno Herbert Morcv, Jr. Paul Mullis James Myers Joseph Myers, Jr. Stephen Nabaum I.ar.ry Nakashima Jackie Neely James Nelson Kenneth Harry Nelson Kenneth I.. Nelson Jerome Nichols Max Nielsen Ronald Norton Frank Ochoa Gary Ogle Alfred Olson ISiMM TT-V- r-r— ■. ” f - — l. ' f 7 CC 1 iKT .± ?A t ' if ' Ji ; i . V •t ' .Nfc+i “Vft y Robert Olson Dale Omerson Dennis Pagenkopp John Fanner Frank Parra Richard Parrish Douglas Peal Daniel Pearson Pedro Perez Jan Peterson David Phillips Robert Pond Robert Port man Ronald Rasmussen Usama Rassam Harry Ravines Larry Ray m os Brent Rice Derr el Rice Gerald Ring Guadalupe Rivera Rafael Rivera Jesse Roane Gary Robinson Angelo Ross, Jr. ! I Ellsworth Royer Harry R up pci Gilbert Sandoval Luis Sandoval Donald Schatz Bcrnd Schmidt Stephen Schneider Alois Schubert j Jr. Carlos Schulz Heinz Schulz John Schwab Donald Shelton Alvin Shepherd Robert Shop her David Shoemaker David Simmons Carlo Smith William Smythe, II Dale Steadman Lawrence Steen Jack Stoddard, Jr. Raymond Sweeney Ronald Swenson William Taylor Ronald Tegland ■j » u s V ' i.y.v fW- -rW ’H ' ' ■■hjfx ' i. .: ' i -ii.w ■ j Jif It £rir ' -w A ' O- ac- , ii .V.VCUt v J ! J f Ti ' C 1 -va ' Bobby Thomas Larrcn Thomas Ralph Thompson, Jr. Frank Thrall .Rudolph Turnamar Abel Trujillo Carl Turner Roy Turner j Jr. Ronald T uscany Roberto Ulloa Richard Uphaus N ar ro Van Lee u w en Terrence Van Oss Henry Velasquez Alfonso Villanveva Howard Walker Louis Watson Thomas Weinerth, Jr. Frank Wheat Alfred Wiediger Robert Wilgus Donald Williams John Wilson Paul Wolf Merlvn Woods I m 1 ' lr7T“» r nr t-jv— 1 — 3 .-- £ r ► ' 7 7 SfS? ' ' " ' V ■ 1 ¥V f S i ■ 5 ?, ■r r; ■tt " ■; trainfire first aid hand grenades s 1 If a ■4 y. 4 L : “ L K " 1 ' ' f+ .r " , . iVrj . L V iL y i l ' ‘- ' T V ' - • - - ,. TT ' f , .“ T vTT , i: V F “VS A -Tf7 . £ nrrTrJif- -.vr— - T - 6 - , ? ' r jr •■= " ; T r ' s : !?£-£«■£ : sf W rv T Tl ' {. J‘. i t 3 . S v- £ 2 , ' ; ; £ ' | close combat , ■ i- " : - t ■ l v r; r r, { vr f ' -y’TH ' " ■ - J,rTa ' W- r 1 j-s - , ' pt ■ f .{■ ;K «y. ' i v % Atf viTv tymh ; . -‘ ! Hd ry y.V ■ -• ‘ . W - : , rV fr ; ISvt.S Wr 4 .k - -s v, ! W V ' - i. individual tactical training ■ I hand grenades our training through the eyes of the camera history of fort ord (contd.j By the end of 1941 more than $13,000 000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. it was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches, it was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War il, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter, This was the framework for the re-activrafiors of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. in September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the Batter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany, With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940, Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys, San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison wiSS fee composed of the permanent- type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. 5®Lj ' : ?b


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) collection:

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

1964

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

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