US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1962

Page 1 of 230

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 230 of the 1962 volume:

COMPANY C 1st BATTLE GROUP 1st BRIGADE ' • (ZStJMB Library history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846 was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph ' ' Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) 7 ' 5 8 • ;a j 7 4 ' , P m m -?K32 m m V X . g I « 2Xl marching 5w ryy VT, .V X ■ X ' ?jr. m ' • training area trainhre Xi Ji rVA mm m flame thrower grenades automatic rifle is :X ps s 7Vy«f.. ; £ V jg l £ »v f 3 : Vi r v colton hall line coast ,:» H. ' v{ y , ' ' Ti!J }n ' p l r,+ nS. »• ut h € r rV y. i 4, Sfc fc£ ?Vj § Ss i | S | I fcg I 0 § american red cross soldiers club presidio of monterey toward ft. ord Wti)» mmmmm ■X ' , r »v being outfitted from head to toe clothing issue mmsm CJ f.M.M ' ’. m £h m Jirl’T dismounted drill x-vl w refill fw ■:. v »»S? physical training first aid }-. • Vif u .i r -Hi:• « map reading land navigation m „ , , w ,. . j . £ •pig few m KB ss " C • ir ' V ' A rs r r ' .r: f£ : v shots Hi : : w HI- — infiltration course m ■ i ' K . ; ■Kfl stacked rifles guard at impact area marching, marching at the front gate simulated atomic blast ■■ " T « r, j signal training class work pole climbing on-the-job trainees take active parts in P. I. O’s daily radio broadcasts and in the production of the weekly post newspaper, the fort ord panorama. basic army administration school hobby crafts food service school S1W«P «■ _ - • hospital V n i 1 if •yl 1 t “fl i M 1 f ' |p I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line ... and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was over, over there. At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore ... dug my nails into the sand at Anzio ... and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine ... and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . .. .and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me. (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL ORLANDO C. TROXEL, JR. COMMANDING GENERAL Orlando C. Troxel, Jr., was born 1J February 1908 at Fort William McKinley, P.I. He attended schools at Army posts and Washington, D.C. On 11 June 1931 he was graduated from West Point as a second lieutenant. Early assignments included Field Artillery school and units. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in 1942, from where he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division, later becoming Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the division. He remained in that position until after the division landed in Normandy in June 1944. After landing he became Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the VII Corps and remained in that position until January 1946. Subsequent assignments included appointment as a member of the Joint Operation Review Board, under the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Armed Forces Information School as a member of the faculty; 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, as Commanding Officer, Division Artillery; member of the faculty at the Command and General Staff College; National War College; 1st Cavalry Division Commander; Chief of Special Warfare, Department of the Army; Director of Organization and Training, Office Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army; Chief Joint Military Assistance Advisory Group, Korea (Provisional). From Korea, he was assigned to Fort Ord, California, where on 20 January 1961 he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord. General Troxel has been awarded the Legion of Merit, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Bronze Star Medal, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre, with Palm (France); Order of Leopold, with Palm; Croix dc Guerre, with Palm (Belgium); and Order of Fatherlands War (Russia). He is married to the former Miss Lucy Pratt Reynolds. They have a son, Roy Reynolds Troxel. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Brigadier General Frank J. Caufield, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, Cali¬ fornia, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1934. From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide to the Governor of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat. General Caufield was then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement ac¬ tivities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War II, General Caufield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 1950 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Military Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1952 General Caufield was a Department Director at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, 10th Infantry Division, stationed at Schweinfurt Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Md. From that post he came to Fort Ord in September 1961. His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition to service medals, General Caufield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commenda¬ tion Medal and the Croix de Guerre (Luxembourg). General Caufield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Catherin and Caroline, and a son, Frank Jr., who is a First Classman at the United States Military Academy. Col. Carl A. Peterson Lt. Col. Jack E. Smith Battle Group Commander Brigade Commander COMPANY C FIRST BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 12 March 1962 Graduated: 4 May 1962 Capt. Charles Frank Company Commander E-8 Stanley F. Bilicki First Sergeant M Sgt. J. T. James SDI 2nd Lt. Rodger Stanton Platoon Leader 2nd Lt. Raymond L. Mobley Training Officer M Sgt. Morales SFC Brown SFC Thompson S Sgt. Bowlby S Sgt. Rivera E. Pagan Supply Sergeant PFC Frank Company Clerk Pvt. E-2 Seymore Mail Clerk SFC Darling Mess Steward Cpl. Smith Sgt. Byrd y ..y ■?, ;• Sp 4 Carrillo First Cook i PFC Hedrick Second Cook J. H. Aarestad James R. Ackerman Daniel K. Adkins Walter C. Adrian John K. Akana D. P. Albrich A. Alcantara D. R. Alexander Leonard E. Alfaro R. D. Allen, Jr. Sp 4 Macon First Cook Sp 4 Moore First Cook Sp 4 Williams First Cook rti CmrJ SUBJECT: Summary for Training Cycle Book. Graded Test Results. Out of over 260 companies tested, C Company placed 1st—a new post record. 93.17% average. Rating excellent. 108 superior trainees. This is the most superiors in any given company tested. A, Pvt. E-2 Roth Second Cook D. P. Alston R. P. Alvarez K. W. Amburn Garry E. Ancell J. R. Anderson L. W. Anderson R. E. Anderson T. J. Anderson Robert S. Annett A. C. Andrews James W. Apple, Jr. L. Arce-Gutierrez Donald F. Arens T. E. Atchison Mario F. Aualli W. L. Avery Manuel S. Baca John C. Bagnard Burnell E. Baker Dan P. Barrios David Barron W. L. Bartsch James N. Batty David L. Baum C. H. Beacock Kenneth D. Beal D. C. Beardsley D. D. Benkowski Gerald Benkowski Gary R. Bennett R. G. Bennett Robert E. Benz W. L. Bergstrom Charles A. Berry Albert Bertagnole Stanley H. Bethea R. Bettencourt Carl M. Bischel Joseph R. Black A. R. Blackburn Richard R. Bliss T. J. Boekweg R. H. Borden David Borjon Neil G. Bowes Ronald R. Bowman Clair V. Boyer John R. Bradley R. L. Bramble C. M. Broadway ■ D. H. Brockett L. D. Brockatt Douglas P. Brown Richard G. Brown Walter A. Brown S. W. Buckley James G. Buer Daniel M. Burch Ronald C. Burow Robert H. Buss W. A. Bustos B. E. Butler C. G. Calhoun G. C. Campbell Todd L. Campbell J. P. Caporgno G. F. Cardwell Larry W. Carver Raymond G. Castro Robert N. Castro Stanley R. Castro Doyne L. Cates Charles H. Caton Galen Chamberlain M. R. Charbono : V? ' -r tEf ■ •: c r,y r j ' 7 • « R. J. Chavez M. C. Chefney R. P. Christensen J. L. Claussen R. W. Clothier J. A. Cofrelt W. S. Collins T. P. Collup Robert B. Combs J. O. Conrey David Contreras Arthur M. Cooper George R. Cooper Clyde C. Cox, Jr. Raymond C. Cox B. S. Craft F. C. Crandall Theodore K. Crane T. J. Cullinan W. M. Cummings Ronald L. Dalbey Daniel D. Dale H. W. Daniel D. W. Davies F. B. Davis Leroy A. Dayton Hugh M. Deacy R. G. Denney H. M. De Selle E. Des Jarlais George Earlywine D. A. Edmund Loren E. Ellis Roger M. Engels E. R. Espinosa George C. Estes Richard M. Fago Archie A. Faul D. E. Fernandez C. D. Filyaw V. L. DesRosier Joseph T. Dickie Dennis E. Diebola Thomas E. Dike Neil S. Dodge L. C. Dollar Warren Dong R. D. Draper R. D. Duerden D. R. Dunmire James H. Forbes H. R. Frandscn C. A. Fraser A. T. Frazier R. L. Freeman B. Freidenreich S. D. Freitas Michael A. Fuchs D. J. Gagliardi J. F. Galindo L. G. Gagnon L. A. Gamble Agapito Garcia Mark J. Geiser R. E. George Louis T. Ghanam L. P. Gianno C. L. Gillman Leon T. Glover Michael Gonzales Paul L. Gordon Don C. Goza Steven R. Graf D. E. Graumann Jay D. Gray D. Groschinsky R . A. Guardado L. C. Gunderson Leon Guy B. D. Harney E. J. Hartman T. J. Hassler Gerald E. Hatto Paul W. Hearn M. B. Heater Ronald J. Hexcm Arnold D. Hill George L. Hines Clair E. Holland Kenneth L. Holt Darrel L. Hopkins C. C. Howell S. O. Hudson J. W. Humphrey Jerry L. Huwa Jack M. Ipock E. J. Jacques James S. Jewel D. L. Johnson E. E. Johnson Larry D. Jones L. P. Jurado D. E. Kennedy Frank L. Keser T. A. Kincaid Charles F. King Robin V. Kost H. W. Krueger J. W. Kuschel Roger L. Lane Merle L. Lemon James F. Lewis L. L. Linville L. J. Lo Cicero Flarold T. Logan G. B. Louton Richard A. Luna Jerry E. Luper John Lutt Edward L. Lyons Charles A. Manley Yale G. Mar R. R. Martinez M. S. Mattoch K. L. McElroy Stephen MeGirr J. D. McGowan D. C. Melander Alfredo Mendez Aubrey Moore F. M. Musland D. L. Neumann J. R. O’Donnell David Olivas Donald R. Oman Jose Padilla W. A. Patterson D. H. Philips E. V. Porter R. L. Portillo John G. Richards Joel W. Roberts C. A. Robinson S. F. Rogers R. F. Romero R. A. Powell Russell L. Power Manuel Puga Cornelis Reintjes Odis E. Revia R. T. Tanimoto Joe D. Tenney S. M. Terry Eugene N. Tozer V. A. Transano F. Rosales Melvin D. Ruddy Thomas J. Ruiz R. A. Sanchez W. J. Schultz E. G. Shields G. M. Silvertsen Timothy Smircich Craig M. Smith Edward L. Smith Kenneth W. Smith Tommie R. Sparks B. G. Spurlock R. D. Stanford J. E. Stelzer N. W. Stoughton Gordon Swanson F. R. Sweeden R. N. Tait, Jr. Roger D. Talley P. K. Treanor L. S. Turn bow C. J. Vaughan Richard F. Wagner Norman V. Walker Larry V. Walters W. R. Ward Clifford A. Ware Bernard S. Wargo John B. Watson D. F. Weinmann Lloyd R. Wilkins J. T. Wilkinson David R. Willey N. E. Williams G. P. Wirkkala G. R. Woldt Daniel M. Yanez R. D. Bostick Clarence E. Barton Picture Not Available Wm. A. Baumfalk first aid ' S? S L?S ' v ' - ,, sr » ' :£i:: • •• 1 trainfire sttaw HC ' .n r actors SflAWnM fclSEj® ] tyOftS ' 1 ® . LEFT ARMandHANI 2 BUTT IN POCKET« SUM 3 GRIP OF RIGHT £j 4 . RIGHT ELBOvSjj kl SPOT 6 BREATF H 7 relaxa J viGMD rni - trainfire open house cover and movement i ?k 4 t++i V: .V. l ANW ' V. . x ”. v ' iV: I our training through the eyes of the camera 0 a ».1 t . v T rx ' f k x-xcw-. ' iVj ,. ,4. av4, v: t. i.vVrf ii ' - j I outstanding trainees graduation f history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. V 11 v fTuj% - U.5. ARMY TRAINING CENTER INFANTRY 10th BATTLE GROUP 3rd BRIGADE CSUMB Library m te, C Ul Sjusj Aa. Ckif tfuru , Uv. ' nvsim, rvu CrJ ' il ' d njJi O -ao SN. Wnpc_ oWl 3lAri- Qftl 4 L y ' frui ' c - -bluV ‘WlWkuX 01 , pWCfry o . -tWo. -few, cot o aJ C J -CJL cy ?) history of fort ord S AILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte¬ rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar I to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph ' ' Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) Mr ft M|JUii|fl|cyffl 9 ♦ ' v - physical fitness l pJLmrm ® jit-. _ - _ |—BIT 17-mile drive presidio of monterey red cross golf course colton hall -ivfflkVi.V-vv :v V ,- • _ ! ? % • C ’ v ' 4 mm m bayonet first aid £ « F y {p • riM trainfire classroom gplfewfc »SS •fc-lVrW t WWtn4ff m §g|g$ i 00 land mine warfare ' tv f . - r Vp j. ' i’W MODEL UFA mine " eld composed 0F3 ES LL) ANTI-PERSONNEL MINES ANTI-TANK MINES JF iMCOMit ANTI-TANK MINES lUGffll CLUSTER STRIP marking fence SAFE UNt MARKER Sketch of this Minefield. fitness test physical L i ; ■ ' ' i r u tj ,•1 machine gun dismounted drill l ' SSp - ! r - WWk m f ' w ngL ' ji C I 1 ® mg A nur m-14 classroom and house 0m - r Lj fcPr ; H r- " : 1 1 $ If 5 ms | jMBBRfcr I , 1 1 i 4 j v iH - fT.T8rJ! M UP L iwwp—t HhB»S1K - — «— wm . 1 I M wflr I ft - i Eg - f ;—- m ijK ( lv . F £ " - - ' ' ' ‘ -ii • pi ' ■ ‘J class a inspection guard mount M pi §0J mw AJT v? ufp .-. mg fe |® full field inspection m [? £ S movement » . ■ UMvj « ' f Y % THBl rv fr- L Z5% ' Pr t close combat course : to ' w Ti u? : hand grenades |W»$ mm F —-- " -5«.J y £- 1 ' ' " r — ‘ A- j — . ‘ HF55%f I field bakery $m? : mm piptiKgl v Jik£: Skvr t ■±fck ‘fc icator and barracks lifaBMi »XV t f r S £v -«t vdfc 1 j » ’ll 11 II mmm The Fort Ord Hospital has been designated as an Armed Forces Regional Hospital by the Secretary of Defense furnishing complete medical care to approximately 75,000 uni¬ formed service personnel and their depend¬ ents. It is a fully accredited hospital with a superb staff of physicians, nurses, and other medical personnel. The hospital provides total medical services to the trainee on a round- the-clock basis in the field, at the unit, and in the hospital. f vWvm R; r Bf|£ z5 i 1F| [Til i i if£ II JMiLl lyu w ’. hobbies fhiU Ciafh c fid tudcL 1 A m ' jro -V ’ ' $ ’• § mvm 1 a ; ; | v v-, :: sports k ’ ■ i . Jm i ir - f, .. i i electronics and ordnance I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship ... and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill ... and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there. At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore ... dug my nails into the sand at Anzio ... and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine ... and seized the Heartland. The Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From chopped turn . . island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches ..and my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... 1 did re- . I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Hat, matched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight . . . and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nations defense I am always ready . . . now, forever. I am the Infantry-Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) v MAJOR GENERAL ORLANDO C. TROXEL, JR. COMMANDING GENERAL Orlando C. Troxel, Jr., was born 15 February 1908 at Fort William McKinley, P.I. He attended schools at Army posts and Washington, D.C. On 11 June 1931 he was graduated from West Point as a second lieutenant. Early assignments included Field Artillery school and units. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in 1942, from where he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division, later becoming Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the division. He remained in that position until after the division landed in Normandy in June 1944. After landing he became Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the VII Corps and remained in that position until January 1946. Subsequent assignments included appointment as a member of the Joint Operation Review Board, under the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Armed Forces Information School as a member of the faculty; 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, as Commanding Officer, Division Artillery; member of the faculty at the Command and General Staff College; National War College; 1st Cavalry Division Commander; Chief of Special Warfare, Department of the Army; Director of Organization and Training, Office Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army; Chief Joint Military Assistance Advisory Group, Korea (Provisional). From Korea, he was assigned to Fort Ord, California, where on 20 January 1961 he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord. General Troxel has been awarded the Legion of Merit, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Bronze Star Medal, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre, with Palm (France); Order of Leopold, with Palm; Croix de Guerre, with Palm (Belgium); and Order of Fatherlands War (Russia). He is married to the former Miss Lucy Pratt Reynolds. They have a son, Roy Reynolds Troxel. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Brigadier General Frank J. Caufield, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, Cali¬ fornia, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1934. From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide to the Governor of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat. General Caufield was then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement ac¬ tivities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War II, General Caufield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 1950 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Military Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1952 General Caufield was a Department Director at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, 10th Infantry Division, stationed at Schweinfurt, Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Md. From that post he came to Fort Ord in September 1961. His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition to service medals, General Caufield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commenda¬ tion Medal and the Croix de Guerre (Luxembourg). General Caufield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Catherin and Caroline, and a son, Frank Jr., who is a First Classman at the United States Military Academy. Col. Leonard E. Garrett Brigade Commander COMPANY B Lt. Col. Arthur P. Murphy Battle Group Commander TENTH BATTLE GROUP THIRD BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 8 October 1962 Graduated: 1 December 1962 m. M ' SP 4 Gaines Sgt. Rochester Sgt. Woods SFC Mooney James H. Graves First Sergeant SFC Shephard SFC John R. Thomas SDI SFC Miles Mess Steward SFC Chandler PFC Thompson SP 5 Wilson SP 4 Meekins Frederick Abbott Bondla Alexander Brent Andersen Roger Anthony William Arnold . hr mu! force!f r Cords ■ m! nf first (’ nee PMn e Malcolm Atterbury Jerry Baldwin Joe Banks Bill Barendregt Dennis Barkley Roger Barr Benny Basel Henry Beel Stephen Beeler Oren Bell Edmond Berg Gary Beydler Ralph Born Gary Boyle John Braun Keith Brinley Robin Brockmueller John Brose Roger Brummond Lawrence Buell Jerry Burdick Ronald Butcher Matthew Buzzell Garreth Byrd Edwin Cagasan Forrest Calhoun Manuel Calzada Chris Camacho Timothy Caryle Craig Carver Bernard Crawford Jeffrey Dale- Robert Dauenhauer Loyd Davis Terry Davis William Davis William Dearinger John De George Joseph Delaney John De Pompa Louis Castaneda Ramon Castaneda Edward Castro Ronald Cataraha Melford Christianson Frank Cipriani James Clark Archester Clayton L. T. Cole Joe D. Coleman Douglas Conover Robert Corella Rogelio Cossio Donald Cox Freddie Cramp mmmm Robert Dexheimer Dennis Dickey Arvid Diemert Richard Douglas John Dravenieks Leonard Duarte John Durham Albert Ellis Gerald Engel Robert Evans Delano Eyer Pete Fachko Warren Fairweather Jimmie Fancher Roy Farrant Spencer Fisher Franklin Fitzgerald Kenneth Ford Larry Foster Gilbert Fuentes Raymond Gallegos Victor Gangitana Richard Gann Richard Gatlin Thomas Gerbi } «£$$ m; 4, ' Ov v; t v.r. .JXi ' 1 Va ' ? fc wl ilhkMrti t+yiir. Peter Hermann Barry Hilbert Bob Hill Franklin Hodges Jack Hooper Leo Houston William Hudson Jesse Ikei David Jackson Kenneth James Richard Gerfen David Gibbons Hugh Giovani James Goetz Carlos Gonzalez Gary Gores Richard Gow Walter Green Clarence Gronning Mitchell Grauer Robert Grove Weldon Hadnot Leonard Harms Ray Hasegawa Paul Hatae John Johnson Leland Johnson Lowell Johnson Gary Jones Rosslyn Jones Fun Jung Clayton Kalima Dale Keith Michael Kim William Knighton Theodor Kohers Bobby Large Douglas Larson John La Rose Walter Lee William Lee Patrick Lehr Fred Lemka Philip Lentz James Leonard Donald Levins Jerry Lincoln James Lodi Manly Logan Lawrence Lucero Isaac Mack Frank Marshall Ronald Marshall Jay Martin James Masada Richard Matern Wolfgang Mattschei Greggory Maurice Edward Maxwell Jerry McAlister Gary McCormack Herbert McDaniel Patrick McHenry John Mele Larry Miller Samuel Miles James Miller Melvin Mims Dean Mitchell Rodney Miyashiro Tamihiko Mizatani Eliazar Montano Charles Moody Paul Moore Robert Moore Alvin Morgan Donald Morrison Richard Morton Ronald Moser Jay Moss Richard Marimatsu James Neal Dean Neary Jack Neiman Barry Nelson David Nelson Dennis Nelson Paul Nelson Thomas Nelson Erik Nielsen Dick Niggebrugge Ronald Oeltjen Troy Oldham David Oar Jack Orth Jon Mueller Frank Mulrime Lloyd Murphy Gerard Murray Larry Musser Leon Osterland Gilbert Palacio James Parsons Gary Pearson Walt Phinney Ronald Piette Kenneth Pittman David Plessas Timothy Price Ernst Puscher Charles Qualls Willard Quaring Stephen Rains David Ramsey Raymond Ramsey Manuel Rangel Paul Reed Steven Rees John Renaud Roy Robbins Gary Rocklin Caesar Rodriquez Rudy Rodriguez Raymond Rozzell Maurilio Sanchez Leonard Sanders John Sarboe Merlin Saulny Michael Sawyer Walter Schroeder James Searle Joe Sedillo Carl Segawa Robert Scogins Vincent Shepherd Mike Shew Roy Shibata Edwin Shimabukuro Berton Simon Stanley Slaton David Sionecker Harry Smith Ronald Smith Ronald Smith Steven Smith Karl Sorthun Donald Sotak Antonio Sotero James Sparrow Paul Swannack John Tabor Dwight Thompson William Thompson Thomas Tipton Joseph Titone Phillip Titus Frank Torres Theodore Tourville Harvey Turnbull Tommy Turner John Valenzuela Richard Vera Roy Walker Thomas Weiss Donald Wentworth Jerrold Windsor Wayne Young Mario Zeller Byron Dunker Daniel Heisler Sadao Naguni Harold Rickard ml rifle instruction trainfire hand grenades a IT 1 E7 ' £ A, i r f h ' l ' i .l re W field chow 1 cover and movement our training through the eyes of the camera history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. MAJOR GENERAL ORLANDO C. TROXEL, JR. COMMANDING GENERAL Orlando C. Troxel, Jr., was born H February 1908 at Fore William McKinley, P.I. He attended schools at Army posts and Washington, D.C. On 11 June 1931 he was graduated from West Point as a second lieutenant. Early assignments included Field Artillery school and units. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in 1942, from where he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division, later becoming Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the division. He remained in that position until after the division landed in Normandy in June 1944. After landing he became Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the VI) Corps and remained in that position until January 1946. Subsequent assignments included appointment as a member of the Joint Operation Review Board, under the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Armed Forces Information School as a member of the faculty; 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, as Commanding Officer, Division Artillery; member of the faculty at the Command and General Staff College; National War College; 1st Cavalry Division Commander; Chief of Special Warfare, Department of the Army; Director of Organization and Training, Office Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army; Chief Joint Milicary Assistance Advisory Group, Korea (Provisional). From Korea, he was assigned to Fort Ord, California, where on 20 January 1961 he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord. General Troxel has been awarded the Legion of Merit, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Bronze Star Medal, with Oak Leaf Cluster: Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre, with Palm (France) ; Order of Leopold, with Palm; Croix dc Guerre, with Palm (Belgium); and Order of Fatherlands War (Russia). He is married to the former Miss Lucy Pratt Reynolds. They have a son, Roy Reynolds Troxel. BRIGADIER GENERAL FRANK J. CAUFIELD DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Brigadier General Frank J. Canfield, Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry and Fore Ord, Cali- fornia, was graduated from the United States Military Academy in 193 4. From 1936 to 1938 he was military aide to the Governor of Puerto Rico. He had various assignments and attended Army schools until October 1943, when he was assigned to command an Infantry battalion in the European theater of combat. General Canfield was then assigned as a troop movement officer in the Normandy invasion. He was involved in scheduling the movement of troops from barges to the beaches along the entire Normandy beachhead, continuing troop movement ac- tivities until the end of hostilities in Europe. After World War II, General Caufield had duty as military attache to Spain from 1947 to 1949. In 1930 and 1951 he was intelligence officer of the Military Assistance Advisory Group in London, England. This office later became part of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE). In 1952 General Caufield was a Department Direcror at the Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kans. In 1954 he attended the Army War College ar Carlisle Barracks, Pa. From 1955 to 1957 he was Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, United States Army Europe. He subsequently commanded the 2d Battle Group, 7th Infantry, 10th Infantry Division, srationed at Schweinfurt, Germany. In 1958 he became Assistant Commandant, United States Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Md. From that post he came ro Fort Ord in September 1961. His promotion to brigadier general was announced on August 11, 1961. In addition to service medals, General Caufield has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Army Commenda- tion Medal and the Croix de Guerre (Luxembourg). General Caufield and his wife, Catherine, have two daughters, Catherin and Caroline, and a son, Frank Jr., who is a Firsc Classman ar the United States Military Academy. Col, John C Barney jr. Brigade Commander Lt, Col John P. M. Hughes Battle Group Commander COMPANY C Started Basic Training: II December 1961 NINTH BATTLE GROUP THIRD BRIGADE Graduated: 9 February 1 962 1st Lt, Robert D. Taylor Company Commander j Si vf Tp f 4 V v v o . ft i , ' r - n % » rvT , " t- — r J V Ai ivto o " S flSl: , ' +i i 1st Lc. Thomas F. Wright Executive OfHeer 2nd Lt. John A. D ' Angelo Training Officer E-8 Lester Heath First Sergeant M Sgt. Hegg SDI SFC Williams Sgc. Aki Training NCO SFC Crump SFC Scott SFC White Sgt. Peterson Sgt. Hale Sgt. Hice Sp 4 Albert Sp 4 Drake Supply Sergeant Company Clerk Sp 4 StrokJund Sp 4 Cerda Pvt E-2 Washington Company Armorer Mail Clerk General Clerk SFC R. A. Gumbs Sgt. Taylor W s Saddler Mess Steward First Cook ' rsc Cook Sp 4 Johnson First Cook Sp 4 Skinner First Cook PEC Mahl Second Cook PFC Swift Second Cook PFC Ryan Second Cook % l Robert L, Alley Daniel E, Alto Raul Amado, Jr. James G. Arata, Jr. Edward R, Arnold James A. Ayres Warren I Baca I James P. Baldwin Daniel C. Bame Curtis W. Barber i b + .■ ' VJ £ fW BrnkWr Wilbur Barnes Gildardo H« Barrera Charles M, Bennett Douglas K, Berg Stuart C. Berman Joseph Bernauer, Jn S. G, Betcher Robert L. Bickel T, M Billings Michael L. Birncy Thomas R. Bison Ivan D. Black M. E. Rlakley John W, Blalock Gareth V. Bowen D. A. Erandow Benno Bredhof Gene A. Brewer Charles M. Brown Eduard Bruess H. D. Buzzell J, G, Caldera S, E, Car dine t, Jr. James D. Caron P. S. Carpenter Jr- v ik ' mmmm J Castillo Del Muro Alan E. Cates Bobby D« Cherry D, J, CJausse John R. Clements S. B Cochran Michael O, Collins Cicero M Cooney Talton D. Cooper Leon D. Grincr L. D Critchfield Charles E. Cross Pedro A, Cruz Clinton W, Davis R- EL Dcguchl E. L. Dickman Thomas S, Drab Edward G, Elder Alva D Enniss Jack D. Estep W. L. Gaceta Lee E Gaither G. D. Garwood T. C, Garwood Charles E, Geek I I 1 I I I G. E. Greenberg I. Greenberg George R. Gucker D. Gutierrez E. G. Gutierrez E. D. Guitcrrez E. D. Havner T. C. Hankins James L. Hannett James F Hansen John E. Hanson Frank Haywood R. D. Hedcgaard K. D. Henley J. J. Hepfncr, Jr. Robert A. Herren A. E. Herrick J. S. Herzman G. E. Hczel W. A. Hoffman Robert E. Hollis H. W. Holm berg Phillip D. Hood E. R. Hopkins R. C. Hopkins, Jr, ISL Howard Richard L. Howej Jr. Jerry D. Howell A. S, Huska, Jr. D. M. Hyde, Jr. M. 5. Uson R. Y. Inouye V. R. Isham Ross A. Jacobs J. W, JafFray John A. James, Jr, Lauren H. James Allen F. Johnson G. M. Johnson I Yen D. Johnson Lloyd K, Johnson M. B, Jones Jr. M. C. Jordan R. E. Justice M. L. Karaba Ernest L. Kempf Martin J. Kerby R. E. Ketchersidc R. C. Kliewer Donald A. Kline i i I I I 4 i vfr, f -i Major M. King, Jr. J. W. Kriaucziuhas K. C. Kurtz E. C. Lankford K. A. Lanz Tom D. Lans Howard G. Lee John Lee M. H. Legrand J. W. Leonard Jerry A. Lewis G. F. Lingerfelt A. R. Loerch L. C. Longbrakc Elias F. Lopez Riley E. Lott, Jr. Eddie S. Lucero C. A. Lungs trom John C. Luthin Carl Lux Marvin R. Lybbert Thomas O. Lykins R. L. McClain M. C. McCluskey D. J. MacCorkell R H. Mngdlin G. Maldonado J. L. McCormack T, McCulloch Gale L. McNabb T. H, McKenzie W. S. McKibbin D.lt. McNeill J. I. McWilliams Julio O. Medians Theodore L. Mesa Darrell R. Meyer Patrick S. Miller Janies E, Milligan Fredrick H Moeckly Seferino Moran Darrell D Morgan William C Morgan Carl J- Maskable, Jr Bernard E Mues Mitchell W s Nolan Lloyd E. Norman Milton S. Ncz Donald G. Ober Vito D, Olivo Robert D. Or teg, i Nobuo Oshita Robert W. Palmer Cesar Parra D. M. Parretc M. Patzkowski D. C. Pearson P. G. Pearson Juan T. Pena Norman R. Peyton Andalecio Pino Rodger H. Pope Steve Porras James R. Price Leandro H. Rangel D. D. Reinhardt L. E. Reynolds M, H. Ridosh Ronlcy N. Rinear P. A. Rivera L. M. Robinson T. J. Roche Marvin J. Rody Roque R. Rosas Daniel W. Russell David E. Russell Edward F. Sacks A. C, Salazar Peter R. Sanchez W. O. Sandoval Alan F. Saunders Richard A. Sayers A, R, Say sell W, G. Shelton Lynn R, Schiele N. E Schirle M, Schlinker Ronald G. Sears M. L. Sety Iwao Shintani C. D Skolrud M. R, Stoboden C. J Stasser, Jr. Daryl D. Smith Lewis A, Snow Isaias Sotelo Joseph R, Souza A, B. Spiritelli L D. 5t Clair U. R S telle J. W. Ziegler M. P. Stewart Roy L. Strickland Dale A. Strommer John E Stuart Richard J. Suter K. N. Swanson Y. M. Tanikawa Howard G. Taylor Stanley F. Taylor, Jr. Fred N. Thompson T. W. Thornhill Kenneth D. Tuck D. T. Turner A. A. Valdez Robert D. Vaughn G. Q. Vivier J. C. Von Essen Clarence Wadlcy Steven F, Wager J. W. Waggoner D. C. Walker Jim L. Wall Joe A. Washburn Robert L. Webb L. G, Webster Richard G. Weil L W. Wentworth James A. West Thomas M West, III R, G. Whitehead Owen D. Wilhite D. G, Williams F. W. Williams O. S. Williams, Jr. R. T, Williams T. D, Williams Stephen L, Willis Richard E. Wishon Robert G, Wilson John L, Wood Loren G, Woods R. M. Woodward Roman Yneges Leroy G. Andrade Wilfred J. Butterfield Warren E. Contreras Gary D. Hendrickson Elvin B. Johnson Paul L. McNally ■ " ' - ■ T -l HW first aid ; V 1 p ipgri B$©isss:Ks? w g?«5Sv 11 1 m-1 rifle instructions r trainfire t Cl 1 V li . s • p rfJi! Wm | ; » $»• - r bayonet I I .$ - SAv ' ! ' AAV V,V 2 .’ ' tO ■ " A rtt ' K VJ A rM +W , tA J_ jVin ' .iLj , l ' " I ' ( ■ il V-Ti! 1H Jfcr. f - -. .1 _ t w.- i " A -x-i " %■ _s ■n_i . f V- ' . 4 w?jt vj V ■ h A 1 ?! : AAA yj J m m t, cover and movement chemical, biological and nuclear warfare our training through the eyes of the camera I | jj history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. ' v, .4‘, iMdii ' to 4iti ' iwafti y » imw " •ml ;« ijk ,‘ ■ c’ r . vum- • " m ' .■■vwtrA- a ■ . ' ir. ' ■ ' v t », ,, QfMM» ' m x k Vn.i • »• 1 WjK . " " t; :.. 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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

1965

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