US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1961

Page 1 of 228

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 228 of the 1961 volume:

1st BATTLE GROUP 1st IRIGADE $f| l ' fl HR Bpp P ■ ' . . ■ ___ CSUMB Library history of fort ord S AILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte¬ rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11 th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) All Rights Reserved ALBERT LOVE ENTERPRISES, Atlanta, Georgia On- ;W: TiTU m mi marching training area - ■ • m „ w — — _ ■ ■ ■ grenades flame thrower m m ' 0 w m T ' , % 0i i ' sri” ■Qw M m m • 4 % A VA % flfcjs « $ gTc r ' coast line col ton hall i american red cross soldiers club p3 1 r). % Is v U . r y i ♦. s 5 r l § • ' £ Sk presidio of monterey toward ft. ord simulated atomic blast 106 recoilless rifle ,4-2 receiving center check dental Jsn MfefW $w£ ifS v r lV ■■ ' 52 % ara r- - dismounted drill physical training map reading land navigation i££».™ -V-TP , w 1 v.. . ' J .. fr , • V yV fy,4 ,,u Sp gas infiltration course iV 3L « U w «... . mortar squad patrol flame thrower at the front gate simulated atomic blast guard at impact area marching, marching stacked rifles i learning to march auto mechanics course pole climbing Rignal g llllinin|§S gpra S class work on-the-job trainees take active parts in P. I. O’s daily radio broadcasts and in the production of the weekly post newspaper, the fort ord panorama. basic army administration school m A signal communication T TT hospital v 4 r It evil jgtjk i 4 I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han . . . marched to the Yalu. Along the 38th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight ... and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always ready . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! (Reprinted through courtesy of Infantry Magazine) MAJOR GENERAL ORLANDO C. TROXEL, JR. COMMANDING GENERAL Orlando C. Troxel, Jr., was born 15 February 1908 at Fort William McKinley, P.I. He attended schools at Army posts and Washington, D.C. On 11 June 1931 he was graduated from West Point as a second lieutenant. Early assignments included Field Artillery school and units. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in 1942, from where he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division, later becoming Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the division. He remained in that position until after the division landed in Normandy in June 1944. After landing he became Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the VII Corps and remained in that position until January 1946. Subsequent assignments included appointment as a member of the Joint Operation Review Board, under the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Armed Forces Information School as a member of the faculty; 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, as Commanding Officer, Division Artillery; member of the faculty at the Command and General Staff College; National War College; 1st Cavalry Division Commander; Chief of Special Warfare, Department of the Army; Director of Organization and Training, Office Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army; Chief Joint Military Assistance Advisory Group, Korea (Provisional). From Korea, he was assigned to Fort Ord, California, where on 20 January 1961 he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord. General Troxel has been awarded the Legion of Merit, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Bronze Star Medal, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre, with Palm (France); Order of Leopold, with Palm; Croix de Guerre, with Palm (Belgium); and Order of Fatherlands War (Russia) He is married to the former Miss Lucy Pratt Reynolds. They have a son, Roy Reynolds Troxel. BRIGADIER GENERAL STANLEY R. LARSEN DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Stanley Robert Larsen was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, 11 November 1915. He was graduated from the United States Mili¬ tary Academy in 1939. Prior to World War II, he served as a company officer and company commander with the 2 5th Division, Schofield Barracks, T.H. From 7 December 1941 to the conclusion of World War II, he served with the 3 5th Infantry Regiment of the 2 5 th Division. During this period he advanced from company commander of a heavy weapons company to regimental commander. He par¬ ticipated in all four of the campaigns in which the 2 5th Division was involved in the Pacific during World War II, earning the Distinguished Service Cross as well as the Silver Star for gallantry in action. From 1942 to 1944 he rose from captain to colonel. Subsequent assignments included that of instructor at the Infantry School, Fort Benning; War Department Public Relations Department; Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth; Chief of the Pictorial Section, Public Information Division, United States Army; Assistant Secretary of the General Staff, Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army; Aide-de- Camp to General J. Lawton Collins, Chief of Staff of the Army, serving in that capacity until July 1951. Other assignments took him to the Basic Airborne Course at Fort Benning; commander of the 32 5th Airborne Infantry Regiment of the 82d Airborne Division; Deputy Chief o.f Staff, and later Chief of Staff, of the XVIII Airborne Corps; grad¬ uate of Army War College; Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Allied Forces Northern Europe, Oslo, Norway; Assist¬ ant Division Commander of the 10th Infantry Division in Germany; Assistant Commandant of the U.S. Army Infantry School; Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations of the Eighth U.S. Army in Korea. On 17 October 1960, he was assigned to the United States Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, California. Started Basic Training: 19 December 1960 Graduated: 25 February 1961 COMPANY B FIRST BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE f 1st Lt. Clayton C. Harlee Company Commander Col. Pierre D. Boy Brigade Commander Lt. Col. Jack E. Smith Battle Group Commander 2nd Lt. A. Boucher Training Officer 2nd Lt. William U. Walsh 2nd Lt. Peter L. Mann Training Officer Platoon Leader John Nick First Sergeant M Sgt. Bennie C. Ellington SDI M Sgt. Elliott Training NCO M Sgt. E. Hernandez SFC Bobby G. Vest Sgt. John J. Gallagher Sgt. Henry L. Dunn Sgt. William Moore SFC A. J. Evangelista Sgt. Andres A. Montoya Mess Steward First Cook Sp 4 L. J. Banks First Cook Ernest L. Adams Franklin Aguila Ralph D. Aldrich Ellsworth Ambuehl H. L. Andrews Mariano B. Apodaca James Ashurst Willi W. Bahr Gerald Baker Harry A. Barge PFC J. L. Cook Second Cook Pvt. E-2 Gary Lewis Cook Pvt. E-2 A. Liacopoulos PFC Charles W. Allen Cook Company Clerk Horace R. Batts Colin Bearstail Carl E. Beers Peter B. Berendsen Jerold L. Bernardy Donald F. Best Raymond H. Beyer Jack P. Biotti Michael D. Bishop Daniel P. Bockes Loye L. Bohannon F. K. Boothby Carlos Bracamontes Larry C. Brandvold Lyn L. Brasfield Richard J. Breda Jerald G. Brewer K. L. Brinkman John W. Burke H. W. Cameron Ovid D. Casey Gerald L. Caron Jose F. Castro Richard M. Cerri James E. Clark John R. Clark Ronald R. Cobb Dennis E. Coffey Earl R. Codings David Colmenero Gareth W. Conner Randell W. Corley Oscar P. Cota P. O. Covey Harold E. Davidson D. J. Dettmann Robert J. Diaz Donald R. Dodd Talivaldis Dumpis Hobert Durham Ralph E. Elfman Elton E. Elliott Arthur Q. Esparza Ronald Evans Wendelin Fettig Robert V. Fierro Frederick W. Finke Harry W. Franklin J. R. Friedenbach John J. Gamble Gary E. Garbush Bichard J. Garcia David H. Gardner Philip R. Giesing Eskew Goff David Gordon Ronald W. Green Albert Grijalva Donald L. Grindahl David D. Gubera James M. Haley Tommy J. Halford David L. Hanson William Harden James R. Harvell Frank E. Harvey Alfred G. Haselrig Ernest W. Hazard James T. Heck J. E. Heckman Charles W. Heino L. B. Heller R. D. Henderson Mack J. Herrera F. L. Hollen Leroy Hollinberger John R. Hopkins David R. Hosmun Lester R. Hudson Davie Humphrey James R. Isbell K. P. Iversen David B. James G. R. Jelle D. G. Johnson R. E. Johnson Wendell C. Johnson W. A. Johnson William E. Jones C. D. Julian Dean L. Karges John E. Keith Larry L. Kelly George F. Knuckey R. H. Kobayashi Percy J. Kram W. C. LaFave Dennis W. Land John LaRosa Arthur R. Lawrence C. R. Lewellen R. Llewellyn K. E. Lofgren Lee Look Edward R. Lopez Dale A. Lyski William A. Macy James M. Major Harry. L. Malette Theodore Marts Bernard D. Mason E. G. Mathis Peter Mayer David W. McClard W. H. McCrae G. W. McDowell John J. McFarlane Donald L. McNary W. C. McRea Valvin D. Meeks Paul R. Merlin Domenic C. Mezzetta Willard A. MUler Willard H. Miner Thomas Miyasaki i Howard M. Moergeli C. E. Mumbower Leroy H. Myers R. T. Nagata Ray W. Neinast C. A. Nichols Raymond P. Nohegl Jackie L. Norton W. F. O’Donnell George M. Oerloessy Andrew Ortega John B. Paetow W. E. Paris David B. Parker Randall J. Parmelee Edward Pattynama Marlin K. Payne Nelson Pena-Rivera Oscar R. Perez James N. Peters Roger L. Peterson S. J. Petrowski L. B. Posilippo Donnie R. Prather V. L. Prince W. J. Quinn Robert L. Rankin Dale L. Ray Gerald Reineke Richard Reineke Vernon L. Reinhart George C. Reller Harley L. Riggins Robert D. Riley Michael G. Ritter Samuel I. Roberts Melvin V. Robinson Armando Rodriguez Pedro C. Romero Julio L. Ruffini Michael H. Russo Thomas P. Ryan Manuel R. Sanchez Eugene L. Sandau Douglas Sande Kenneth F. Sawitzky D. B. Sbragia Robert W. Scheller Robert H. Schmidt Milton J. Schoof John L. Shockey N. M. Silva W. B. Simpson D. W. Skaugstad Nicholas R. Smith D. Smyrnogiannis John F. Solano Sherman J. Soli Leonard A. Stanton Clifford H. Stapp Larry D. Stark D. H. Steigelman Bobby R. Stewart Dan G. Stotts Charles R. Stout R. J. Sullivan T. J. Sullivan Gerald R. Swanson Eddie H. Tanaka Charles W. Tandy David K. Scott Jay L. Sessler Raymond Shamatt Gary A. Shaw M. Shellenbarger Charles R. Taylor Lionel A. Terra Everett M. Thomas J. E. Thompson M. E. Thompson John A. Thomson Terry A. Turk L. F. Turner Leo Turner K. D. Tuten James Tweten Frank J. Van Hoof J. H. Von Kampen Ronald J. Veges R. A. Villalvazo R. L. Volk Ray H. Wadley K. E. Walker Foster Wallace Thomas C. Watson John B. Weber Lewis L. Welkum David C. West E. D. Wetenkamp Rodney J. Wight Charlie Williams Paul D. Williams Floyd L. Willmott Joe H. Wilson Gordon R. Wooden Otha R. Woods G. S. Yasukochi J. R. Zielinski Chester R. Hudson Norman Jay Robert E. McCrory C. S. Revuelta Charles S. Stout John W. Stovall first aid first aid m-1 rifle instructions trainfire trainfire trainfire bayonet hand grenades ' la ( i . _ . • _ .•_1 hand grenades rifle grenades ft y cover and movement our training through the eyes of the camera .• jg. } ■ r " ‘ v-: - ■ " . - U M V ' - : ' ■ Sfc jiA _ ' 4p k i w jf SfcZ HCEr graduation outstanding trainees rT ' - rTTTT.- TT»(«:?w -A cn-yv r fok ' r tffovi fStfCdtiWfi ; Inv ' sftfiSftetJL -VJr 5 “■ .!.%• ,-rx .. • lw I h . , v, 11 t?C ,. r »T 7 WV yy , :«£ » j • rt 4VvW t rnw - ' h £ ic v ' • $v " » j3Br | i i ■ i ' m g 1 J %rTW ■ V Ml , are- Wv .; -wwilF juu£ ■■{ fl ■ i j j£ll . •i’V ®l 1 history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those u nits that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. MM m r •;V - - 4- C V • - f. i v v 4 c ( t •, f I ! f- I - { 1 : C. t : - v V : ; :■ • O r •;; ; - ; v • ; : : ; ’it ' ■■ • • .-• • - • r r. • , ■• ' ' y. - v ' ‘ ' •• . ' ' • ' ' . . . ' - - ’ ' ■ - ' r ' ' r history of fort ord S AILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte¬ rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon¬ terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) m ■£ 1 p N i g? JUriM A«erve f »lfr£ftr I0r£ ENTERPRISES, Atlanta, Georgia I 28 ,. r £ 4 •yH ' rJ ' %4 V ?» sq P |§ §£ ora 4SS ?i 5 gftis ?% ip md m vrr r t ®X KS .v-«T!r ' ' ■ ' . V 5SK Sij t HdL £f£ g II f W ■ % marching training area v V ' •V • : -V flame thrower automatic rifle -- - i T » s0i ft ■ : ec m . ' !$» r ? V, ' V 55 £V gw m •CY ' £?$£ 1 S.S? m T,, %gi m rrfe-ft ;£jg M f l 3£ ?-- £ ' «j II ifev s£ Pi ys coast line colton hall fort ord golf course 54 £2 V?-. % te g r;£ $ I $ ' 5 -•g » $ I i t || I s « r I I ' i» •$ • .»4 § american red cross soldiers club presidio of monterey toward ft. ord • -v-f ' r. ■ ■£ 5 : gpfrl dismounted drill " t - Lm i vv. .5 physical training first aid land navigation map reading infiltration course -S i “■ mB V L m w £ r riy T close combat course mortar Hm-S Sr ” y ?T» v ' A ■■■■ I I I ' " W recoilless rifle at the front gate simulated atomic blast stacked rifles guard at impact area marching, marching learning to march auto mechanics course pole climbing signal training class work on-the-job trainees take active parts in P. I. O’s daily radio broadcasts and in the production of the weekly post newspaper, the fort ord panorama. A m basic army administration school m A signal communication SliSfelgOT hospital ) ' ' a f. : ' Elf Hjl T flj 1 I AM THE INFANTRY I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! I meet the enemy face to face . . . will to will. For two centuries, I have been the bulwark of our Nation’s de¬ fense ... I am the Infantry! Follow me! Both hardship . . . and glory, I have known. My bleeding feet stained the snow at Valley Forge. I pulled an oar to cross the icy Delaware . . . tasted victory at Yorktown . . . and saw our Nation born. At New Orleans, I fought beyond the hostile hour . . . discovered the fury of my long rifle . . . and came of age. I am the Infantry! I pushed westward with the Conestoga . . . and marched with the pioneer across the plains ... to build outposts for freedom on the wild frontier. Follow me! With Scott I went to Vera Cruz . . . battled Santa Anna in the moun¬ tain passes . . . and climbed the high plateau. I planted our flag in the Plaza of Mexico City. From Bull Run to Appomattox my blood ran red. I fought for both the Blue and the Grey . . . divided in conflict, I united in peace . . . I am the Infantry. I left these shores with the sinking of the Maine . . . led the charge up San Juan Hill . . . and fought the Moro—and disease—in the Philippines. Across the Rio Grande, I chased the bandit, Villa. Follow me! At Chateau-Thierry, I went over the top. I stood like a rock on the Marne . . . cracked the Hindenburg Line . . . and broke the back of the Hun in the Argonne. I didn’t come back until it was " over, over there.” At Bataan and Corregidor, I bowed briefly, licked my wounds and vowed to return. I invaded Tunisia on the African shore . . . dug my nails into the sand at Anzio . . . and bounced into Rome with a flower in my helmet. The Channel and the hedgerow could not hold me. I pushed back the " Bulge” . . . vaulted the Rhine . . . and seized the Heartland. The " Thou¬ sand-Year” Reich was dead. From island to island, I hopped the Pacific ... hit the beaches . . . and chopped my way through swamp and jungle. I kept my vow ... I did re¬ turn ... I set the Rising Sun. In Pusan perimeter I gathered my strength . . . crossed the frozen Han marched to the Yalu. Along the 38 th parallel ... and around the world, I made my stand. Wherever brave men fight ... and die, for freedom, you will find me. I am the bulwark of our Nation’s defense. I am always r eady . . . now, and forever. I am the Infantry—Queen of Battle! Follow Me! MAJOR GENERAL ORLANDO C. TROXEL, JR. COMMANDING GENERAL Orlando C. Troxel, Jr., was born 15 February 1908 at Fort William McKinley, P.I. He attended schools at Army posts and Washington, D.C. On 11 June 1931 he was graduated from West Point as a second lieutenant. Early assignments included Field Artillery school and units. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in 1942, from where he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division, later becoming Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the division. He remained in that position until after the division landed in Normandy in June 1944. After landing he became Assistant Chief of Staff, G-3, of the VII Corps and remained in that position until January 1946. Subsequent assignments included appointment as a member of the Joint Operation Review Board, under the Joint Chiefs of r Staff; Armed Forces Information School as a member of the faculty; 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, as Commanding Officer, Division Artillery; member of the faculty at the Command and General Staff College; National War College; 1st ( Cavalry Division Commander; Chief of Special Warfare, Department of the Army; Director of Organization and Training, Office Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations, Department of the Army; Chief Joint Military Assistance Advisory Group, Korea (Provisional). From Korea, he was assigned to Fort Ord, California, where on 20 January 1961 he assumed command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord. General Troxel has been awarded the Legion of Merit, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Bronze Star Medal, with Oak Leaf Cluster; Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre, with Palm (France); Order of Leopold, with Palm; Croix de Guerre, with Palm (Belgium); and Order of Fatherlands War (Russia). He is married to the former Miss Lucy Pratt Reynolds. They have a son, Roy Reynolds Troxel. BRIGADIER GENERAL STANLEY R. LARSEN DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL Stanley Robert Larsen was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, 11 November 1915. He was graduated from the United States Mili¬ tary Academy in 1939. Prior to World War II, he served as a company officer and company commander with the 25th Division, Schofield Barracks, T.H. From 7 December 1941 to the conclusion of World War II, he served with the 3 5th Infantry Regiment of the 25th Division. During this period he advanced from company commander of a heavy weapons company to regimental commander. He par¬ ticipated in all four of the campaigns in which the 2 5th Division was involved in the Pacific during World War II, earning the Distinguished Service Cross as well as the Silver Star for gallantry in action. From 1942 to 1944 he rose from captain to colonel. Subsequent assignments included that of instructor at the Infantry School, Fort Benning; War Department Public Relations Department; Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth; Chief of the Pictorial Section, Public In ormation Division, United States Army; Assistant Secretary of the General Staff, Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army; Aide-de- Camp to General J. Lawton Collins, Chief of Staff of the Army, serving in that capacity until July 1951. Other assignments took him to the Basic Airborne Course at Fort Benning; commander of the 32 5th Airborne Infantr) Regiment of the 82d Airborne Division; Deputy Chief of Staff, and later Chief of Staff, of the XVIII Airborne Corps; grad¬ uate of Army War College; Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Allied Forces Northern Europe, Oslo, Norway; Assist¬ ant Division Commander of the 10th Infantry Division in Germany; Assistant Commandant of the U.S. Army Infantry School; Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations of the Eighth U.S. Army in Korea. On 17 October 1960, he was assigned to the United States Army Training Center, Infantry and Fort Ord, California. Col. Carl A. Peterson Brigade Commander Lt. Col. Jack E. Smith Battle Group Commander COMPANY C FIRST BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 15 May 1961 Graduated : 8 July 1961 1st Lt. Edward O. Miller Former Company Commander 1st Lt. Vern W. Stutsman Company Commander 2nd Lt. Robert C. Nargassans Executive Officer 2nd Lt. Roger W. Avers Platoon Leader 2nd Lt. Victor J. Torres Platoon Leader 1 E-8 Stanley F. Bilicki First Sergeant M Sgt. Cornelious L. Lloyd SDI SFC Jack E. Barnes SFC Colson SFC Ponce SFC Carlos Mateo Sgt. Rivera E. Pagan Supply Sergeant Sgt. Booker T. Poole Sgt. Alton L. Byrd, Jr. Cpl. R. Carrillo First Cook D. R. Abcarian P. A. Abeyta R. C. Acheson Richard F. Adams D. F. Albright C. E. Asher M. C. Atkinson M. D. Auman J. W. Balister F. O. Barnard Sgt. Vernon D. Godsey Company Clerk Cpl. P. A. North Mail Clerk SFC Darling Mess Steward V ll Cpl. William Moore First Cook Cpl. C. Williams First Cook CO. C—1ST BATTLE GROUP, 1ST BRIGADE, FORT ORD, CALIF.—July 7, 1961 SUBJECT: Summary for Training Cycle Book. Graded Test Results—Average 90.24%. Of over 100 companies tested, C Company placed 4th on Post and 1st in 1st Brigade. Broke the Post Record on Dismounted Drill with a 84.9%. 100% Passed the Graded Test. f 1 ' fr- J. D. Barnes Edward Barr Ralph C. Blades Charles A. Bowles R. Branchcomb D. E. Branham Harold L. Bunch Kenneth E. Bush P. L. Cairo L. R. Cattron V. A. Cedrone M. W. Chapel Warren C. Clark N. L. Clowers John Cocchia D. R. Coffman James E. Cox Daniel L. Craib Jack W. Cygan T. J. Craig F. J. DaSilva Eddie L. Day Robert DelValle A. V. Denby M. R. DeShane .viA Douglas L. Dexter Ronald V. Diaz Eugene C. Dillon Dale E. Dodds Russell K. Duke William B. Duke G. R. Easthouse Charles Edwards L. D. Eisiminger J. L. Falconer Douglas Frazier R. M. Freedman Ronald D. Fuller John M. Garcia Robert L. Gay Melvin D. Gilley Robert W. Glover A. Gomez E. A. Gonzales R. C. Gonzalez M. J. Gorham Floyd L. Green C. E. Grover James C. Hargis Curtis Hardy J. R. Herbert R. Hernandez R. B. Herrick W. A. Hollowell Glynn Hurley William J. Harp R. E. Harriman Don W. Haswell Gary K. Head R. C. Henisk 3 f c J ' Terry L. Hunter John N. Husted Ramon Iturbe P. L. Jackson Errol Johnson Antonio Lozano H. E. Lucha R. D. Marshall T. E. Marshall Lloyd R. Martin W. McAllister Earl L. McBride Jimmy J. Miller R. Moehring Robert G. Monaco George W. Moniz J. S. Montes John P. Moore M. H. Morgan Barry G. Morrison Dan W. Mosier Reinhard Mueller Raymond Murphy Roy E. Murphy Robert M. Nawfel Daniel L. Nelson Donald R. Nelson Steven O. Ness Leland E. Nicholes Richard O. Nichols Glen T. Noles B. R. Norback G. C. Nussbaum Ernest F. Ochoa Paul S. Olmo Yonco Onozawa D. R. Ortega Robert E. Osby Jordan D. Ostrow Jerry D. Owens A. L. Parkhill L. W. Pennington J. W. Peratrovich Kit Petersen R. A. Peterson G. B. Rachel D. C. Ramsdell W. E. Reeves John W. Reiter R. L. Rhodes Leonard C. Rial Dale H. Richard Russell W. Ristow R. E. Roberson M. Roskelley William E. Rowe Robert J. Royse Larry G. Rucker R. O. Rudoloff Glen A. Running B. R. Rustin R. W. Rutkowski M. G. Saborio Paul L. Salas D. E. Salazar Glen A. Savage T. G. Schmallen E. P. Schneider K. Schoonover James A. Scott D. M. Shanley C. Shicksnider B. J. Schockley Steve D. Shultz Frank E. Silva Jules B. Silver Onofrc S. Sison Robert E. Sitnik Howard F. Smith Joseph A. Smith Mark G. Smith Paul F. Smith David O. Smoot R. L. Snyder Fred D. Solomon W. M. Spear R. E. Stallcup C. A. Stanley David T. Steele R. C. Stipp A. G. Strebel Roberto Stuart Larry D. Suther E. Q. Tapia L. V. Tauvao R. R. Taylor Nathan C. Teal Reymundo Tellez Billy W. Thoma s Larry V. Thomas D. M. Thompson Loran B. Todd L. J. Torres Albert R. Tozer Danny M. Tripp C. A. Troup E. Trujillo J. H. Tucker T. W. Tucker W. P. Tuthiol Atanacio Vega Michael J. Vega R. W. Watson E. R. Weber Frederick Weis Allan F. Weiss Robert P. Welch D. G. Welcher Dale S. Wells G. T. Whitcher Archie White R. S. Willey K. L. Williams D. L. Willingham B. L. Wilson R. J. Wilson W. A. Winterton Michael R. Wirth G. R. Wittman Warren R. Wright Ronald W. Yost Donald C. Zeller H. F. Alexander Ervin Besler L. J. Broussard R. J. Burville Louis Espinosa Fernando Torres : v l v . tl V4 S • ; • •’.» - .‘ v X ' i V»: - • i m-1 rifle instruction iV- ' . ' A. ' ! »r? Wr trainfire •ii- .U trainfire ' £ iiPiii ,?. sS j.vi Va J ' vVi- i ra? •:?! tf. ' ittSwi? - ' .i i r iiwxli. hXr ' j -4 W t v ivtopaJS -Wv} ■ chemical, biological and radiological warfare open house Ini. open house i drill team house open W v-: ' hand grenades ’ i S. i ' r i r ' h « ' A ' -f v j and movement rr W h -VTx TO: • ' £. r. Y. " -Vn • " •¥ v ' .» v r. i our training through the eyes of the camera graduation outstanding trainee outstanding trainees KMI w sas a j.X, DUATION history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. Col. Pierre D. Boy Brigade Commander COMPANY A Lc. Col. Jack E. Smith Battle Group Commander FIRST BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 20 March 1961 Graduated: 13 May 1961 1st Lt. Ronald H. Pacheco Company Commander 2nd Lt. Kenneth E. Harvcll Executive Officer Ernest L. Woods First Sergeant A 2nd Lt. James A. Eakle Training Officer 2nd Lt. Robert C. Nargassans Platoon Leader SFC Casillas SFC Romero M Sgt. L. Trevino SDT Sgc. Gulbranson Sgt. Sainz Sp 4 Crow Sgc. Denton Rinehart Supply Sergeant I Sp 4 Pyle Sp S Arrey First Cook PFC Case Company Clerk Pvt. E-2 Anderson Second Cook MSgt J. V. Frangclia Mess Seaward Sgt + Cook First Cook and Baker Pvt. E-2 Crowley Second Cook Pvt. E-2 Cartwright Second Cook J. Abinanri At Acosta -Area Raymond A. Aguiar Jeter H. Albert E. E. A I diva A. P. Andreadk David S. Arata Clarence T. Baca Talbot D. Bailey Reed B. Baird Charles D. Ball D. T. Barnard James H. Beaman Marton W. Berger Clydt N. Black R. D. Bolton Dale A. Bos tad Rex B. Bounds Ronald R. Bowles T. A. Bowls C. E. Bradshaw J. L. Brosio Colon Brown Dale D. Brown Gail N. Brown M. E. Brown Richard E. Buck Alfred H. Bush Byron L. Bymers Andres R. Cabasa L. E. Canter R. F. Carpenter D. L. Casciato B. V. Cavanaugh Humberto Chacon G, Chambers Ralph D. Chavez Chester L. Clark Retd G. Clark Roy E Clark Devae D Cluff William E, Cole Rory Condon N. W. Cornett Jerry B. Cosby R. L, Cossack C. C Crowley D h j h Cummings T, B. Davis Michael E, Daw R. L, DcLong Karl C Deppe J, M Dessen T. M. Difflcy Ted E. Dobson Walter M Draper Robert N. Drue James R. Duane T. L. Dunnigan A- B. Edwards f f;-W £ V Jf . - ' ,£, - 1 «. “ f- , ; - Paul Espinosa Robert L. Estes Abel Fabela James $ Facer Federico Felan E, M. Fernandez G, C. Filger Darryl D. Fine David M. Flores Philip Fong M. G, Ford S, D. Ford R. E. Forsythe P. A. Freeman K. Freudcnberg S. F. Briesen R. P. Gabel Anthony Gaflfke S H, Gakon D 1G Gama Jack Y Gardner Ronald A. Gass R. H. Gasscnberg C. R. Gibson R. L. Glenn B H. W. Gobler R. D t Gomez M. R. Gonzalez J. L, Goodman J, B. Gosncll N. L. Gough P. R. Greco Jerry L. Green E- E. Griffin Eldon R. Grimes Jay L. Grygla Ray R. Gurrola E. R. Gutierrez Paul J. Haan W. A.HabeJc L. D, Hackett D. B. Hacking D. H. Hadfieid j E Hammer Walter E. Han by Norman G Hansen C D. Hanson R A. Hart R. L. Harvey D. R. Hathaway • 1 ' £ ? c t iVWJ ca .‘VP Wwl fvi 7 tfrSt i 4 ¥?£ : -V£ M Pu .1 V.n M i «v T. M. Heath Phil J. Hein R. E. Hclsby G. E. Henderson A. W. Herrera Gregory Hidalgo Derry l J. Hill Wilbert J. Hill Craig E. Hobson S. K. Hoshida Merton D. Houdek Richard A. Hoyt Rudolph Hubli Robert E. Hughes R. G. Humphreys Roy S. Inouye N. I. Jacobson Charles Jenkins Gaylcn A. Jesmcr D. S. Johnston Paul M. Jourdan Gabor T. Retting Kenneth P. King Fred R. Kramer K. I. Kramer V, ' • ' . ' 4 D. Kristjanson Suivan R. Kualey David H. Lang R. M, Lcbario Barrett F-L Lee Denny Loon John R. Lew D, L. Liljegrcn D, 1 " . Lindblom H. W. Lind felt Fred V. Loh man B. J, Long H. S- Long street A, S, Lowy C. J. Mack Kenneth J- Mack j, B. MacMillan j. J. Mad docks Bobby J. Mnpes R. Margherka Kazuo Masai W, L. Marhcson J. R. McAndrcws M. L. McDonald J, L, McKinley , . .. H IL ir , „ ;tf • C. R, Meacliam Richard A. Means Alfred Mendes Ramon L- Mesa Paul Mirelcz P- W, Mitchell C. W, Moatc E. A. Moreno C. M. Mlillincr Peter H. Murphy V- 1). Naucnberg James A Neal Ronald Nelson John E Norvcli D C Odcnbrerr D, S. Oliveira Devon C. Oliver A. R, Olofson John L. Ortiz D. R. Osborn J. T. Ossanna Alfred L Pace Glenn L. Palmer Charles E. Papsc Donald M. Parker Walter Pearson Robert V. Peluce Gordon C. Peters B. Peterson N. L, Phillips JG W. Pierce G. E Pittman L, 1G Pouppirt Roger W. Powell John F. Power James M. Pratt Thomas PX Ramson G, E. Rasmussen D, Ei Rcdigcr Robert E. Reed John EL Reid W, C. Rculing E. J. Richards Allen G. Richman C. R. Richolson Gary A. Rodman Joseph Sais Robert B Sandler James L Scallon Ronald EL Schcr I4-V ; ‘H HP SWA Frank Schippcr M. Schneiderman Stephen C. Schotc Ralla E. Schou Richard P. Schuif Robert R. Schwartz Virgil G. Searcy Arthur G. Sheldon Steven J. Shcrrick Fredrick V. Shields Phillip K. Shields John W. Shicrman Paul A. Slocum Perry S. Slocum Jerry A. Snyder D. E. Sorenson R. J. Souza J. C. Spalctta D. D. Speers L. R. Spencer R. W. Spencer R. W. Spiller R. G. Stancer R. A. Sterkel James J. Tonna Gilbert G. Toso Cal vin E, Urry R. J. Vic tori no John P. Ward Mark P, Ward Roy H, Warren Harley G, Watson John H. Wcibcl Kent Wet sen berg Richard J. Wells Richard L. White Roger D- Williams Robert N. Wood A, W, Yarbrough D. Zollinger Fred Anderson Arnold De Leon Larry El am Reynaldo Espinosa William P, Kccshan Elbert Wood «; -VT ■ n .i .V jV .v . - } Vi V.; ' V ; .nVttf Vs % r Vi fWiVS( : 4i •si 5H trainfire ■ ' ' i i v i Ms ' 4 fee j VSJi 9 0» £y 3S . , ■ 4 fo}L fr+y!tri}f ' X i fjK; ■ ?. , " ,f sv r.j j ' s ' ,- ' ■ chemical, biological and radiological warfare house ??■ - r ■ ■ f U ' , ’ T ■ 1 VrJ : ' p :.sy- . SfiSf ». • 0 : m - ... ....... ' riifr V y+gijrtyi 4 fg- i4 ' tfA rift ' Arffij tavtf ? wi jffPU ,i 4 ri + i SS ' £ ' 5 Vfe EQ feHte iv i. w u ' i fsa a v . ■, j 1 ii ..yak Sj v% vj j . v j „wj A . Wr u . e :s our training through the eyes of the camera history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivatio n of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America.


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) collection:

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

1963

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

1964

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