US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1960

Page 1 of 424

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1960 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 424 of the 1960 volume:

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And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with 'Fre- mont's Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Maior General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. M It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post's present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an 'ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. ln August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was 53,000,000 to constructibarracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General .Ioseph "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell was in command. lcontinued inside back end sheetl 1, ' 5515:131115555fi'fH22ASfRa'11ZHT:mqi-im:mE22r+::ff5aff":n:'F2fnwfmfvzswff-"snr ,M-eww,---Efffg m-fm-Wm., -sm--1-r ,N .., E-.A -rw.. f, M.,-,K - C .Y-, -, . f ., . ., Y , . ,, -.-Y---'-'lf - ' H 1.4 .51 'fri' . 'm P14 ' U-2. Af' eu' 'F-HL:-12'-:ss x mwah-v f:'ff,"1'a'4 asm-1" .412 s'2'uUf. 1aL."vM1f-Sep V3L1fH1a,'p. H- ,N W. mv 915,149 "'?zf:Xf'qw:x'Kf Tw FG" ?".E:'W 'mi-T?-.!W'1w:mfI'-. "U7""1-I"-"MTW N. g..'.',xf1i1g.'-1 1:11w5:fg1E,.1-cpyih isa:-Q5 ,LS H, , ,-154-'.'-1-1, wg, f-a,f.1J2,: '1 'fin'-'g',.g1g.'1g ,Jff-fl1131-,""f-vaii Wf15u.u'15'.3y1!5'v-Z'-L 4'-,iii .V ,Q f.'f:3fa"'1:: 9-vig'-fizf:.,r5,-'fI?3i?"'ii' wE?:..1N Q .'sig,Qe,w',s5Eu1.gy 1: Q'z11ivEf:.fv,,,3J 1.4-L1a,511eB'mwewp-,:ff1w:.Qa:,w.L5w ,.rg:.-.-fg- VM,-,,f,1,,-N -. -f..,,.,!.,:r, .9.nwqg.1w:- - f,,.1,q,r- ., ,.1:-+fgf,e,f,g,i.,,,, , -. , ,il I M.,.,? . 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Z f, N . laiiff 22246112 q. - QM :N N X 3 ,f- 11' , ,. swf' wumqwd, W '51 ,,,3x..:"M?'m 1 .,Qw. y ' Q 4,4 M All Rights Reserved ALBERT LOVE ENTERPRISES, Atlanta, Georgia w LJ I , f 1 X v x 9 552 . 411. wmv' 1. ,, 195'LAlfff:' 4 A , kV I ,aj , , Mir Al 'M .AM 'nf , l I V AEE-Zn. an MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE COMIVIANDING GENERAL MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE was born in Cleveland, Ohio, 27 March 1903. After attending Miami University at Ox- ford, Ohio, for two years, he entered the United States Military Academy, graduating in 1928. ' General Fritzsche's first assignment was with the 1Oth Infantry at Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Subsequent, assignments include: The Infantry School at Fort Benning, 15th Infantry at the American Barracks, Tientsin, China, instructor at the U.S. .Military Academy and later commander of a company of cadets there, Command and General Staff School at Fort Levenworth- Intel- ligence Officer, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Houston, Fort Knox with the 6th Armored Infantry Regi- ment, 1st Armored Division, as Operations Officer and later Adjutant, Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, 1st Armored Division, Fort Knox and in the European Theater. , Office ofthe Chief of Staff of the Army, tactics instructor and Director of Physical Education at West Point, Executive Olti- cer, Department of Tactics there, Intelligence Staff Officer, 12th Army Group in Europe, Deputy Assistant, and later Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence of U.S. Forces in European Theater, Assistant Deputy Director of Intelligence, Division of the European Command, Intelligence Division of the Army General Staff, National War College and upon graduation in June 1949, assumed command ofthe 23rd Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis, instructor ofthe Army War College, and a tour at Carlisle Barracks. Far East Command in April 1952, and became Assistant Commander of the 25th Infantry Division in Korea, appointed As- sistant Commandant ofthe Infantry School in May 1955, to Korea as Chief, United States Military Advisory Group to the Repub- lic of Korea, until appointment as Chief of Staff, Fifth U.S. Army in June 1957. ' He was assigned as Commanding General of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, 15 Octo- ber 1958. His decorations include the Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Bronze Star Medal, and foreign decorations includ- ing the Belgian Croix de Guerre with Palm, the French Legion of Merit and the Czechoslovakian War Cross. b BRTGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR DEPUTY COIVHVIANDING GENERAL BRIGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR, born in Denver, Col., 30 December 1906, was graduated from Tulsa QOkla.j High School in 1925, attended West Point and was graduated in June 1931. Following graduation, he held various troop assignments with Infantry units in the United States and Hawaii and attended the Infantry Officers Advanced Course in 1938. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff College special course in 1941, the Armed Forces Staff College in 1951, and the Army War College in 1957. ln March 1943, he was named AC of S, G-3, of the 80th Inf. Div. and served in that capacity throughout the campaigns of General Patton's 3d Army in Europe. He was Military Attache to Equador in 1946 and in 1947-48 was assigned as Asst. G-3 with the US Army Group in Turkey. He was then assigned to the Office of the Asst. Chief of Staff, G-3, Department of the Army in 1949. ln 1953 he was named Commanding Officer of the 33d Infantry RCT at Ft. Kobbe, CZ., and in 1955-56 was the AC of S, G-3, US Army Caribbean. He was assigned as AC of S, G-3 with 1 Corps CGroupl in August 1957, and in October was named Chief of Staff, I Corps CGroupD. His awards include Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Commendation Ribbon wfMetal Pendant, French Croix de Guerre wf"Palm, Belgian Croix de Guerre wfPalm, Order de la Couronne wfPalm COfficer grade, Belgium, and Abdon Calderon 1st Class, Equador. COLONEL H. F. HABERMAN, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 6 July 1912. He was graduated from Ripon College, at Ripon, Wisconsin, after which he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, Infantry. After assignments to Fort Benning, Georgia, and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he served in the European Theater with the 39th infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, followed by a tour with the Munich Military Post in Germany. ln the spring of 1949, Colonel Haberman returned to the U.S. as Deputy Commander of the Student Brigade at Fort Benning. He activated and commanded the Offi- cers Candidate Regiment there for over a year, in 1952, he was assigned as Senior Army Advisor to the Hawaiian National Guard. Colonel Haberman became Chief of the Fifth U. S. Army Reserve Components at Chicago in 1955 where he served until assigned to Fort Ord in September 1957 to command the 4th Brigade. He assumed the duties of Chief of Staff here in October 1958. COLONEL l'l. F. HABERMAN Cl-HEE OF STAFF FN it , X, F -4 O ! ,!1 ,,,.,....,-f-we . f- K .. ......A.-Q --i f-"",.,,," Jw " "' W: e i F 5 5' 1 sl X? 2:7 ' f a 52. 43 A .:fir9 x familiar scenes 4 1 9' 5,5 ' 5 , fax a M , x ,Wi Q. 3: , X 5 9' KR'-Q A v f ff-N-.-......, w ,.,.,,., cf ,wwf mil.. na!.m.,. , ,WIN , ' ' wx- Hwwh 'fi Ns SO american red cross presidio QE monterey toward Ft. md if il J " f ' 1 wif 4 rg. 1" 'Y' 5 ,I3 '.,-1:1 ,Q 1 ' ,, 5, ' L I . i. '23 QQ 23, J .. 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',.!-4 .,,,.X-, ,. , mmf Ln YE 1 rl ffa W . f if 1 ., , ,fi , -"V: 2 '11, ,. 1' 1 xl 1 i? -5, ff- A' '1 f. , U-Y ...-. 4- i..-,.... 4..., iw,- on-tlwe-job trainees talce active parts in P.l.0.'s daily radio broadcasts and in the production of the weekly post news- paper, the fort ord panorama. F , Ml- "-:.:.q,M education army pl'OgI'6 m hX X wx ' 4 ":T.-...'-1 1. t3 'a- - ,CY "-vf-. ., ' r V' W 479' MQW' f' 52. a Q f -Y' Q , , -', -.-.ff ., X 55. Y- xl . 1.x . .-rr, A . m 1.- food service school hobby craft ,, -if . U X 0 ' if .. 4 . - . "' ' ,, ' s' 2 1 5 ,,,.., mf? A .. K 'ii '41 ' ? 1 V 4 V73 . R.. L h-I -K QL' " ,U,u:Q. iiifwfiw zjummjf, ..-, .T -.-' ,- - -,W-1393-,wf,.Y ......,..-. Fix- ,Q-, ,A-' H Qfcik. au 5 . , wr- Bin ff iv C0 PA Q SECOND BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 21 March 1960 Graduated: 14 May 1960 Col. Pierre D. Boy Capt. Ray H. Crown Brigade Commander Company Commander V 14.5,-..:q?FN R W'-W7 L Arr! f Sf sw Maj. Charles W. Walker lst Lt. John J. Zavertnik Battle Group Commander Executive OEICCI' 2d Lt. James H. MacDonald 2d Lt. David J. Smith MfSgt. D. N. Jackson MfSgt. Ninneman Platoon Leader Platoon Leader Platoon Sergeant Platoon Sergeant William H. Harkins MfSgt. L. N. Garnett A SFC E. D. Dilling SFC J. C. Doughty First Sergeant SDI Mess Steward Supply Sergeant SFC Y- Nagafo SSC- J- H- Crittenden Sgt. W. B. Frisbie Sgt. P. Squiabro-Rivera Traimng NCO Platoon Sergeant Platoon Sergeant - Company Arrnorer CPCDOCOQ0GQOOQ0QGCOCQGGQQQSOQQOOQOOCCHQOQOGOO Pvt. E-2 J: E. Wood CLOIHPQHY Clerk Pvt. E-2 L. J. Nelson Mail Clerk R. V. Alessandra Luis R. Alvarez Manuel Amador Roger W. Anderson J. V. Andrisan Larry L. Armis R. C. Armstrong R. D. Armstrong fi f-. fx fx GQCOOOOQOQQQQCDOQQCDC0000CCCCiffiffi'OCDQOCPCW'Of VN V147 .. V .,,. -, .,, L, Bobbie R. After Troy G. Asbury L. C. Ascarrunz Sylvan L. Babcock Raymond T. Bailon Jerry A. Baker John Ball Dennis D. Bass Darrell Bauer James Beagle N. R. Beckley W. R. Bellah Gordon Bennett Harold E. Benson S. B. Beuttler R. G. Blackburn 0000000fofnoooclooooooocQQQQQQQQQQQUQQQQQQQQ 1 Whitt L. Blunt R. B. Borrego Nelson E. Braden Ql"""" ' James L. Braley R. P. Brasseur Richard H. Brazil Howard G. Briggs R. E. Briseno R. W. Broemmel James O. Brown G. D. Brunton J. W. Buseaglia Wayne T. Byas H. E. Calhoun P. J. Carney J. A. Carpenter GCDGGOCDOCDCDOOOOOCDOQGDOQGCQGGCDQCDQOQQGOOCQCDCCDQC D. Castellano R. C. Caudillo B. L. Chambers jimmy Chambers H. E. Christensen William L. Clark W. S. Cleveland DeBee L. Corley L. A. Correa John T. Correll R. W. Coultas Freddie J. Covey Larry E. Crow O. L. Crowder Joseph Daly Clifford T. Davis oooooooooo do fwooooooo Qoooooooooo 'wo UQQQQQQQQ James T. Davis Lewis R. Davis G. E. Dohse Wayne E. Engle M. L. Erickson G. N. Evanson Clarence D. Fair Ryan M. Fair E. D. Ferguson R. B. Fernandez fm' ummwm E. L. Finnerson M. G. Fletcher E. J. Florance Charles E. Ford Charles H. 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L QQ QYN " 1 uf . ! 4' Ma:-' - , J ' - A 9 sm. 'Bi ff-g 45 , J. az Q4 guy X5 48, A Xit 1 D S' if Pk 1 , X .fa K4 Q X, X x lg ' 4 1 gf , I 51 X 53? if xr it V I ' " rf! F' X ' 3 ' S 2 gf Q Q 9 K I X9 X Wx 1 Rx , Q , Us f 5, ,af 3.-:-, , :max if wv -u a' f, ' .V W 95.5 , I 42411 6' V vm 9- 1' Q CDDOGCDCDGCDQOOCDCDCDO00OOGQOCCQCDQQQOOVNOOQCWOOWG F our training through the eyes of the camera ' i Y - ,-....m.. . , I I 2 I V 1 9 r i W I, VCCOCGCCCOGGQUCCQOOQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ00 LJ w 1 W 1 CDQCDQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ,qj3QQQQ,-QQQQ QQC-ijii graduatlon outstandm g tramees ,fx ,rj ,fx W,-X ,f-f-, I, V fx, ,Ax ,X V,-X .Ax fix H K 'AN If A N ,Ay ik rx 'A I FX 'x A A fx Jvy UUQLfQUU,IUU.,f3,Q213UQQa.fQ1QQw,ufwQL,wQQQQQQQUQGQ 1 I history of fort ord fcontd., By the end of 1941 more than 513,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. ' l It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced liungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision thathit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. P Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. , Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean's Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation's most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post's master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The' Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. TRAINING CENTER INFANTRY HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS CO, 1st BATTLE GROU 1st BRIGADE history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846 was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21 -gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward C resap Ord who had served with Fre- mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. it was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilweil was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) AN Reserved AT.MRT TOVT. F.NTRRPEUStjS, Atlanta, Georgia MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE COMMANDING general MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE was born in Cleveland, Ohio, 27 March 1903. After attending Miami University at Ox- ford, Ohio, for two years, he entered the United States Military Academy, graduating in 1928. General Fritzsche ' s first assignment was with the 10th Infantry at Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Subsequent assignments include; The Infantry School at Fort Benning; 15th Infantry at the American Barracks, Tientsin, China; instructor at the U.S, Military Academy and later commander of a company of cadets there; Command and General Staff School at Fort Leven wortlv Intel- ligence Officer, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Houston; Fort Knox with the 6th Armored Infantry Regi- ment, 1st Armored Division, as Operations Officer and later Adjutant; Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, 1st Armored Division, Fort Knox and in the European Theater. Office of the Chief af Staff of the Army; tactics instructor and Director of Physical Education at West Point; Executive Offi- cer, Department af Tactics there; Intelligence Staff Officer, 1 2th Army Group in Europe; Deputy Assistant, and later Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence of U.S, Forces in European Theater; Assistant Deputy Director of intelligence, Division of the European Command; Intelligence Division of the Army General Staff; National War College and upon graduation in June 1949, assumed command of the 23rd Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis; instructor of the Army War College; and a tour at Carlisle Barracks, Far East Command in April 1952, and became Assistant Commander of the 25th infantry Division in Korea; appointed As- sistant Commandant of the infantry School in M.ay 1955; to Korea as Chief, United States Military Advisory Group to the Repub- lic ot Korea, until appointment as Chief of Staff, Fifth U.S. Army in June 1957. He was assigned as Commanding General of the U.S, Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, 15 Octo- ber 1958. His decorations include the Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Bronze Star Medal, and foreign decorations includ- ing the Belgian Croix de Guerre with Palm, the French Legion of Merit and the Czechoslovakian War Cross. BRIGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL BRIGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR, born rn Denver, Col, 30 December 1906, was graduated from Tulsa (Okla.) High School in 1925, attended West Point and was graduated in June 1931. Following graduation, he held various troop assignments with Infantry units in the United States and Hawaii and attended the Infantry Officers Advanced Course in 1938. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff College special course in 1941; the Armed Forces Staff College in 1951; and the Army War College in 1957. In March 1943, he was named AC of S, G-3, of the 80th Inf. Div, and served in that capacity throughout the campaigns of General Patton ' s 3d Army in Europe. He was Military Attache to Equador in 1946 and in 1947-48 was assigned as Asst. G-3 with the US Army Group in Turkey. He was then assigned to the Office of the Asst. Chief of Staff, G-3, Department of the Army in 1949. !n 1953 he was named Commanding Officer of the 33d Infantry RCT at Ft. Kobbe, CZ., and in 1 955-56 was the AC of S, G-3, US Army Caribbean. He was assigned as AC of S, G-3 with I Corps (Group) in August 1957, and In October was named Chief of Staff, 1 Corps (Graup). His awards include Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Commendation Ribbon w Metal Pendant, French Croix de Guerre w Palm, Belgian Croix de Guerre w Pa!m, Order de la Couronne w Palm (Officer grade, Belgium) and Abdon Calderon 1 st Class, Equador. COLONEL H. F. HABERMAN, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 6 July 1912. He was graduated from Ripon College, at Ripon, Wisconsin, after which he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, Infantry. After assignments to Fort Benning, Georgia, and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he served in the European Theater with the 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, followed by a tour with the Munich Military Post in Germany. In the spring of 1949, Colonel Haberman returned to the U.S. as Deputy Commander of the Student Brigade at Fort Benning. He activated and commanded the Offi- cers Candidate Regiment there for aver a year,- in 1952, he was assigned as Senior Army Advisor to the Hawaiian National Guard. Colonel Haberman became Chief of the Fifth U. $. Army Reserve Components at Chicago in 1955 where he served until assigned to Fort Ord in September 1957 to command the 4th Brigade. He assumed the duties of Chief of Staff here in October 1958. COLONEL H. F. HABERMAN CHIEF OF STAFF ■pi mmmimmw mkimmh; injam mi iSSw «»■ " ••• u i feliKi Ss ' i ; ' fMp? american red cross presi io of monterey toward ft. or d mm BPS ' ■;: ' m. : IS v wwyiSffppi rlnMI alaSillS I bayonet training . .-i.iia. ■ :Emtl Ws mMm m tra infire close combat course Ills mm. WBip$j piu a MiB squad patrolling dismounted drill pole climbing :« ' mmmm pPw?liM p,iii.|i| ,; iin, • • " ; : J :$k k; ' ■ ' ■ " ■•. s • -niEfi l| : fBg ifli ii __ 3 B|S£$ •• . ' p -M fiM I :j : ‘Jr Jlp chemical, biological and radiological warfare simulated atomic blast receiving center gpllll 1 M • i” ; ... . ... ■ %;gpl; IfJI g ssr , ■ mrz m mmwm yi bunk making writing and calling home issue V shipping to training company processing I physical training P- - with rifles first aid signal communication ! rifle instruction circle arking and pasting targets m-1 known distance range ▲ ▼ transition and Field Firing T ▲ field fortification ▲ ▼ bayonet T M infiltration course open ouse hand grenades rifle A rocket launcher 4 automatic rifle mines ▼ mortar m-1 classroom T chemical, biological and radiological warfare A close combat course Field Firing squad patrol Name thrower learning to march :rW£rv. : : ?s P TSJgPpPSHS - ijS3g 9%fUi field inspection compass maps bivouac marching marching . . . . stacked rifles A m basic army administration school ™ A on-the-job trainees take active parts in P. I.O s daily radio broadcasts and in the production of the weekly post news- paper, the fort ord panorama. army education program Spjjp mm Food service school hobby crafts HEADQUARTERS HEADQUARTERS COMPANY FIRST BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE Started Basic Training: 14 December 19 59 Graduated: 20 February, I960 CoL Pierre D. Boy Brigade Commander Maj. Aims ley K, Mahikoa Battle Group Commander Capt, Karl W. Thomas Company Commander 2d Lt, G. W. Cubine Executive Officer 2d Lt. Scott Training Officer Boyd M. Webster First Sergeant M S gt. D. W. Eplin SDT Sgt, Alderman Plat. Sgt. Sgt. Martin Plat. Sgt, SFC Rouse Plat. Sgt. Sp 5 Diaz Plat, Sgt. SFC Llanos Supply Sgt. Sp 4 D. L, Nelson Company Clerk mess personnel FFT SCORES: 1st Test: 186.8 2d Test: 273.4 Difference: 84.4 TRAINFIRE: Proficiency Test Percent of Qualification: 100% Number of Experts: 15 Number of Sharpshooters: 8 3 Number of Marksman: 122 6- Superiors 128- Excellent 77- Satisfactory Alfonso Acosta Phillip M. Adcox Rudy A. Alarcon John R. Albitre Manuel J. Alderetc Leslie R. Allen Danny A. Allred Richard J. Antony Kyle D, Asbury Raymond E, Atkinson Jorge S. Aviles Raymond Ayala Henry T. Babcock Donald A. Baker David F. Balbi Irwin C. Baldwin Gene A. Barnes Peter G. Bax James B. Beckum John G. Bei Douglas L. Benson Jacobo E. Bermudez Arnold D. Bernard Ronald L. Bissell - ■ F 1 -kj ' Johannes H. Bletterman Thomas P. Bonalanza Jesse E, Booth William M. Booth William S. Brabb Elmo R. Bradley Touie L„ Bradshaw Arturo M. Brewer Joseph E, Brown James A. Buer James F. Butler Leland TL Cagle John E, Caldwell William V. Caldwell John F, Camacho Philip Carpenter Frcdric J. Castro Richard Castro John Chang Ricardo Chavez Vernon R. Claves Oliver A, Clay Russell L. Cofer Martin W. Connolly George C Cornell James B. Cornforch Rogelio D. Couder Bcnci Count Stenbock Hal L„ Cowdell Benito R. Crespin Duane M. Davis Frank E. Dean Nicholas Dendrinds Cipriano P. Diaz Dick A, Dickranian Louis Dixon Patrick D. Donnelly Lari T Dredge Albert C. Drew Robert P„ Dunlap Bennie A. E debum Joseph $ Eddy Benjamin T„ Ellington Charles J. Ellis Norman Eng Robert C. Erickson Thomas Escoio Ira V. Evans Robert L. Farber Arthur J. Fabrc Bernard E. Fargen Stephen B, Fern aid Sammy E. Fernandez Fred J. Ferren John M. Filippini Gary K. Floch Ming G. Fong Donald E. Foster Dieter R. I-L Frauze Jose F. A. Gallegos Albert D, Gill Morton J. Goodman Tyrone E. Gopher Rustheoi Graham Harold Greene Thomas M. Halverson Gerald L. Hamm Jerry D, Hampton Larry D. Haug Franklin B. Hay ward Thomas £. Henderson Alfonso F. Hernandez Charles A. Hightower Richard R. Hiller Chris G. Hontalas John S- Hopper Joseph T. Lf Houston Richard Hum Clark B. Hust Irvin Y. Inouye David D. Irwin Terry L, jeppson Gary D. Johnson Jurgen. F. Jung David J. Kathman Howard R. Kearns Porter W, Kearton Cecil J, Kecse John B Kehrcr Richard E. Kehrer Edward J. Kenney, III Avon L. Kerwirz Melvin C. Kiehn George King Ronald L. King Mervin L. Kirn fJ-: ; •- S j still S us umu Kobata Erwin Kock Harold J. LaChapellc Richard LaFiame Roland E. Lee Donald W. Lei van Lcwellyn S. Leyva Henry Li Cai ro]] D. Libercojt Roy W. Locrch Juan A. Lopez Jerry L. Lotze Michael T. Lynch Robert L. Marcharc Ruben M. Magallanes Thomas D, Magdalik Alejandro Martinez, Jr. Billy R. Maxwell Ronald S. L. Maxwell Jerry £, Michael Odd C. Michel. sen Gail D. Miles Jack J. Moiseoff James C, Mole Troy L. Moore Lynwood Munson David A. Murray Do n way ne Neal Predrag Ncbreklievski Charles L. Neff Dennis R k Neil Hans D. Neubert Masaaki Norihiro Charles K, Noyes Jorge H. C. Ochoa Stanley E, Olson Marvin J. Olsen Henry H. Onego Robert E. Pauliny Merle G Pearce Leonard L, Pccht Roy D. Pelletier Efrain G. Perez Angelo P. Pitto Everett W. Pitts Carlie Pleasant Raymond Przekop Andres A. Quintana W Donald A. Raade Gerhard W. Rauch Bobby R. Richardson James P Robertson Richard E. Rogers Jesse G. Sadorra Kenneth D. Saine Yoshiharu Sakurada Hugo Sanchez Janos Schwarcz Ronald F, Scoct Robert V. Shaw Jack L k Shermer Leonard T. Thomas Danny E. Thornton William W. Trainman •••••••••••• W Robert R. Ulin David S. Vail Francisco Vejar James W. Vestal Charles L. Walters Gar}’ " N. Watkins Samuel L. Williams Owen K. Wilson Clark R. Wood Edward D. Wood Frank M. Wood Gene S. Wong Edwin Yee Jason G. Yuen Joachim A. Zitnik Robert L. Smith •••••••••• chemical, biological and radiological warfare ■ ■ s , ' " V ■, w I full field inspection rifle grenades S H ! s,= -m , infiltration graduation : ,■ :i 4 - . our tra in i n g through the eyes of the camera history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. it was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War li, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was repla ced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. COMPANY 13 3rd PATH!: GROUP fst BRftOADI •• • V ' V » ’ CSUMB Library history of fort ord S AILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte¬ rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre¬ mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc¬ tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE COMMANDING GENERAL MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE was born in Cleveland, Ohio, 27 March 1903. After attending Miami University at Ox¬ ford, Ohio, for two years, he entered the United States Military Academy, graduating in 1928. General Fritzsche ' s first assignment was with the 10th Infantry at Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Subsequent assignments include: The Infantry School at Fort Benning; 15th Infantry at the American Barracks, Tientsin, China; instructor at the U.S. Military Academy and later commander of a company of cadets there; Command and General Staff School at Fort Levenworth- Intel¬ ligence Officer, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Houston; Fort Knox with the 6th Armored Infantry Regi¬ ment, 1st Armored Division, as Operations Officer and later Adjutant; Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, 1st Armored Division, Fort Knox and in the European Theater. Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army; tactics instructor and Director of Physical Education at West Point; Executive Offi¬ cer, Department of Tactics there; Intelligence Staff Officer, 12th Army Group in Europe; Deputy Assistant, and later Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence of U.S. Forces in European Theater; Assistant Deputy Director of Intelligence, Division of the European Command; Intelligence Division of the Army General Staff; National War College and upon graduation in June 1949, assumed command of the 23rd Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis; instructor of the Army War College; and a tour at Carlisle Barracks. Far East Command in April 1952, and became Assistant Commander of the 25th Infantry Division in Korea; appointed As¬ sistant Commandant of the Infantry School in Moy 1955; to Korea as Chief, United States Military Advisory Group to the Repub¬ lic o f Korea, until appointment as Chief of Staff, Fifth U.S. Army in June 1957. He was assigned as Commanding General of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, 15 Octo¬ ber 1958. His decorations include the Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Bronze Star Medal, and foreign decorations includ¬ ing the Belgian Croix de Guerre with Palm, the French Legion of Merit and the Czechoslovakian War Cross. BRIGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL BRIGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR, born in Denver, Col., 30 December 1906, was graduated from Tulsa (Okla.) High School in 1925, attended West Point and was graduated in June 1931. Following graduation, he held various troop assignments with Infantry units in the United States and Hawaii and attended the Infantry Officers Advanced Course in 1938. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff College special course in 1941; the Armed Forces Staff College in 1951; and the Army War College in 1957. In March 1943, he was named AC of S, G-3, of the 80th Inf. Div. and served in that capacity throughout the campaigns of General Patton ' s 3d Army in Europe. He was Military Attache to Equador in 1946 and in 1947-48 was assigned as Asst. G-3 with the US Army Group in Turkey. He was then assigned to the Office of the Asst. Chief of Staff, G-3, Department of the Army in 1949. In 1953 he was named Commanding Officer of the 33d Infantry RCT at Ft. Kobbe, CZ., and in 1955-56 was the AC of S, G-3, US Army Caribbean. He was assigned as AC of S, G-3 with I Corps (Group) in August 1957, and in October was named Chief of Staff, I Corps (Group). His awards include Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Commendation Ribbon w Metal Pendant, French Croix de Guerre w Palm, Belgian Croix de Guerre w Palm, Order de la Couronne w Palm (Officer grade, Belgium) and Abdon Calderon 1 st Class, Equador. COLONEL H. F. HABERMAN, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 6 July 1912. He was graduated from Ripon College, at Ripon, Wisconsin, after which he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, Infantry. After assignments to Fort Benning, Georgia, and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he served in the European Theater with the 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, followed by a tour with the Munich Military Post in Germany. In the spring of 1949, Colonel Haberman returned to the U.S. as Deputy Commander of the Student Brigade at Fort Benning. He activated and commanded the Offi ¬ cers Candidate Regiment there for over a year; in 1952, he was assigned as Senior Army Advisor to the Hawaiian National Guard. Colonel Haberman became Chief of the Fifth U. S. Army Reserve Components at Chicago in 1955 where he served until assigned to Fort Ord in September 1957 to command the 4th Brigade. He assumed the duties of Chief of Staff here in October 1958. COLONEL H. F. HABERMAN CHIEF OF STAFF I bayonet training ’■ c squad patrolling dismounted drill pole climbing simulated atomic blast S ,.. 8 « Si ' P p ,v - A ■ hr A • ✓ — — . ' — M MM receivins center RECEIVING POINT bunk making writing and calling home issue processing shipping to - training company KT ONE THOUSAND ONE POSITION first aid signal communication marking and pasting targets rifle instruction circle ipfe ; gjgg: n-1 known distance range transition and field firing $■ : s6 sports and recreation dm . A rocket launcher ◄ automatic rifle mines ▼ mortar m-1 classroom ▼ machine Suns •¥ . jPU. chemical, biological and radiological warfare A close combat course Field firing ▼ field inspection compass stacked ri fles dm guard at impact area marching marching . . . . simulated atomic blast at the front gate signal training class work ■HT ‘ Kkl -r Y ' v ' - 11 n i sJI | TMTIWC 1 UmpMjfiri Uj ' -- -l |i |Jrjr k -Jjsm ■ L ’ vWolHinRf I !i JG imMiLr M M mm auto mechanics course drivers course basic army administration school peciai service bookmobile FORT ORD. CALIFORNIA SPECIAL SER iS 2-job trainees take active parts in ) s daily radio broadcasts and in oduction of the weekly post news- . the fort ord panorama. ioilst. aiAPri COMPANY B Started Basic Training: 15 February 1960 THIRD BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE Graduated: 9 April 1960 Col. P. D. Boy Brigade Commander Capt. G. Lynch Company Commander Lt. Col. R. E. Niffenegger Battle Group Commander 2d Lt. George Hooker 2nd Lt. George Mendonza Sfc. Clark Sgt. Williams Sgt. Poindexter Sp 4 Ruzanski O.J.T. Duncan 2d Lt. Lewis Wood 2d Lt. W. Honjiyo L. Heath First Sergeant M Sgt. J. O. Baker SDI M Sgt. Lambert Sfc. Bailey Sfc. Currie Sfc. Norman I Lonnie A. Arndt David E. Arnt Andy V. Apodaca Robert J. Axtell L. S. Baker Pete Baclig Ernest L. Barber Donald F. Bird I E. Boguslawski Ralph Bonefeole Allen L. Bonnett Jerry B. Bowman Royce I. Brace W. Brinkmeyer Shirley Bruce Roger S. Baunet E. A. Brunner Albert E. Bundt Jerie G. Burnside Billy Carpenter M. L. Cartright D. E. Chandler Alfredo Chavez K. Christensen |o £9 Joe C. Copeland Luis C. Cortes J. P. Cosgriff Jimmy L. Crane Alvin R. Crawford C. Crismon D. Daetweiler Earl R. Daigle Gary L. Davis Jimmie D. Dean D. J. Deblieck Samuel R. Dick Gordon E. Dige Jerry D. Dunaway Chester W. Dunkin James E. Dunn Erlin D. Erickson Verle P. Fairlee Floyd A. Fike J. A. Fisher Federico Flores L. A. Franklin Mack R. Fry K. R. Fulton Max N. Gabriel Steven S. Gallant Jose Gallegos Lee J. Garlock Gilbert J. Gibeau Edward E. Giles Richard E. Gill John E. Glenn Jasper A. Golden W. E. Gorham Patrick F. Gough Richard L. Gundel Ronald W. Gundel Ronald C. Hallett Laszlo Hanko Delno P. Hansen Gerald S. Harris Robert G. Hash Karl E. Herkamp Martin Hernandez Glenn E. HofT Billie R. Hook R. L. Horman Cecil H. Horn Richard C. Hughes R. W. Humiston William Hunter David J. Innis A. Jaramillo G. B. Jeane, Jr. Gail L. Johnson A. N. Jorgensen Harold E. Kamm C. A. Ketchum William L. Kice Raymond Kidwell D. R. Kneebone Thomas H. Kober Francis A. Kuhn Jerry B. Kyllo D. G. LaFlamme Freddie Lanman Victor L. Lara John P. Leonard Alex P. Lopez Thomas M. Lopez Ival J. Lyons Robert W. Lyons Charles Machado Rannaldo Madrid D. K. Malone John V. Marquis Eugene Martinez G. L. Mauldin J. L. McDonald B. M. McGrady W. O. McKeen Robert McLaughlin John D. McNeil Melroy L. Medhus Reynold W. Menzel R. L. Michalski R. E. Mileger Thomas J. Mills John D. Moates M. E. Molberg Richard P. Molina David J. Montoya Daniel R. Morgan R. A. Mottram Gerald M. Murphy Doye T. Myers Daniel E. Navarro Evan D. Nelson Murel S. Nelson Roy E. New S. Nichols M. G. Nietfeldt W. H. Nordeen R. Nordstrom D. A. O’Connor Edward G. Odoms Wayne K. Okabe W. F. Oswalt Terry R. Perdue Ambrose Pechuli Richard P. Petersen Gary A. Peterson Keith M. Peterson Marvin E. Peterson Gary M. Pfannes Frank R. Pool Deloy V. Pope Jerome Pregon Walter R. Pyle Gerald H. Quick Gary W. Raisio J. D. Randolph Joseph W. Rattey J. L. Redeker R. H. Reinecker Johny G. Reyes Marvin W. Rise John E. Roberts E. L. Russell Anthony Saenz M. G. Salcido V. Sanders R. Sarabia Leo D. Schmall R. M. Scott Charles Sedlar Larry S. Sell Robert L. Serres Robert Shannon P. A. Sharrock D. Sheppard L. V. Siljenberg L. K. Simmons Robert Sloveny Ronald G. S pann R. T. Spencer Steve E. Sperber Kenneth C. Suitt Donald C. Swenson Donald R. Thomas Harry A. Thomas B. E. Thompson Karl R. Thornton T. J. Thornton David L. Todd Daniel Torres N. L. Skinner Roger C. Slwooko Archie L. Smith Robert L. Smith John H. Trask Raymond C. Trejo Gary Trowbridge Mark S. Trueblood Johnie L. Tuck Charles R. Tucker Carlos P. Tydingco John W. Tynan Robert Underwood Gary E. Vance D. V. Moorhem Manuel T. Varoz Alford Vickrey Jerry C. Vosti V. E. Wagenaar Dean L. Watts Richard Willis R. Wolfenden Junior L. Wood Ronald H. Wood Edward Woodburn Donald Woodrome Harry Yasoki Go Eugene L. Zaretzke Paul Duncan K. A. Bean S. Bibiano C. Bird Jack T. Waxman George J. Wees Emmanuel Whitley Gary E. Wiens E. Brunner D. R. Cales G. R. Donnelly D. L. Driscoll R. Freeland J. K. Guro A. D. Hayes R. L. Kulm M. E. Mayo J. P. McDermott H. L. Rattey A. Sanders R. R. Saver K. Shook D. L. Skipworth K. K. Takamoto W. D. Vanzant K. Herkamp dismounted drill dismounted drill hh chemical, biological and radiological warfare ■ ,.Api mjr m-1 rifle instructions ■ amm our traini n g through the eyes of the camera graduation history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di¬ vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen¬ ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi¬ sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad¬ ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. history of fort orcl AILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed fthe area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American fiag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with 'Fre- mont's Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Maior General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. M It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post's present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an 'ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. ln August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was 53,000,000 to constructibarracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General .Ioseph "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell was in command. lcontinued inside back end sheetl THIRD BATTLE GROUP FIRST BRIGADE COMPANY A Started Basic Training: 21 March I960 Graduated: 14 May 1960 Col. Pierre D. Boy Brigade Commander Cape. Homer Roth Company Commander Et, CgL R. E. Niffeneggcr 2d Lr, George Marecek 2d Lt. William A- Sieving Battle Group Commander Executive Officer George Crabtree First Sergeant M Sgt, Russell Williams SDI 2d Lt. Michael Simon M Sgt. Johnson SFC Peyron SFC Gomez SFC Seymour SFC Ray Mess Steward Sgt. Richardson Sgt, Mason Sgt. Bellamy Supply Sgt. 2d Lt. Mareeek and SFC Ray Mess Officer kitchen staff Louis M. AdJer Billy W. Allen James W. Alien Ybarra Andres M. K. Arnold John Asbbce S. W. Barlow T M. Barnow C. L. Barrett C P, Basford David L. Bass Agapito Beltran Robert C. Bennett Billy A. Berry T. R, Birch Robert L. Bird B. G. Blissett Robert S. Rlymn Paul J. Boehm Robert H, Bolton D. D. Bowles P. L, Brookins Chest cen Brown Loren Burns E. E. Cantrell J. N. Chavez li, Christensen R- M. Christensen Dennis D, Clark E Clements G h R. Clements Gary G. Cole R. J. Collins Gary Cook R. L, Cooper M. T Corbett L. J, Cordon R, L. Corsaro J. H. Crabtree R. M. Crisp D. J. Cross R. N, Cummings Robert Cunard William Cupp Ted E. Curtis J. M, Davidson J. E. Davis W. M. Davis Paul C. Detmer P. M. Doubelt R ( H, Drazan Roger K. Duerr Frank M. Dunn R. J. Durst Homer D. Eason T. F. Eldridge -•ft W. R. Elliott L, A. Falsetti J, E. Fennaey Dale H, Figaro Walter L. Fisher L. E, Fleming Melvm S. Fleming Delbert B. Ford Robert E. Fowler J, N. Gabryshak L. L. Gallegos C. S. Garside j. K Geisleo T, W, Gentry Daniel C. Gray O, Griffith Ramon F. Guerra Bruce Hall Roger Hamton R. A. Harden G. M. Hardman Carlton L. Harp Layton Harrell C. F. Harrington J. H. Harrington Donnie F. Hart David Hatch A. V. Heifer n Walter F Herd H. R. Herman M. A, Flesh maty G. L. Highland gin C. R. Hilliard M. H, Hollmberger R. J. Hollingsworth Deryl Hopson Paul Horton F. Hubbard J. D t Huntley Tom W. Ito Ralph K, Iwasa Edward Jacobs Robert A. Jacobs K, J, Jaskala Dale J. Jenks Gilard Kargl J. A. Kasper L. F. Keefer R, Kellejian David L. Kelley W. K. Kellogg Roy Kelm Lewis J. Klim K. E. Kraemer T. N. Kranig Clifford N. Kruege Robert W, Lamar Carl H. Lang J. D. Larkin M, Lcadbcttcr Richard Lee Juan J a Lopez John Lupc Raymond A. Lyda Dave R. Mag gar d R L, Manning J. E, Marshall E. B + Martin Don W. McDonald A. E. McKinney A M. McKinley P. D, McNamara Dale B Miller R. M. Miller Carl F, Mitchell Lyle M. Moore Harvey Morgan Charles R. Ncher D. E. Neuteboom S. R. Nielson Billy T. M. Niu George Norman Edwin L. Oliver William Owston Edward D. Parks Nely Parrish J, H. Patterson Harvey Pearcy D. C. Pedersen Rafael Perez D t J, Peterson J, Petterson j, P. Peterson L. D. Peterson Ralph Phillips Roger W. Preiss Walter Rakestraw David Reese Clyde W, Reiden Rick Regan John C T Ries Richard F. Rinio C. Rodriguez J. Rodriguez J. R. Ronneberg Martin P. Ross R. C. Roy sum David Russeti E. C. Salyer D, Schwartz C. L. Sell wend C. E. Scitcm William B. Shook G, A. Short W, L. Simmons J, L. Sisneroz C. B. Si us he David J. Smith John Smith Douglas L, Snow John V. Span Elton Spoon Garry Stacey Waiter Stenning J, D, Stephens Jim EL Steward L. W. Street Robert Stutters David W. Suding T. W. Siuherin Richard Sway Robert A. Tapp m Richard H. Telkamp N. G- Thomas J. M. Thompson J, Thompson A. Tjaden David E. Torres Jim Unruh Enrique Valdivia Thomas J. Vaughn Gary Vollrath L, A. Haddington E. Wallace C. A, Walters Stanley D, Walters W. H. Walters Bobby J. Watson Bryan D. Watson Frank H, Wells D. K. Whitaker W. W. Whitten C. H t Widdowson J D. Willey J. B. Wise G. R. Woodward A. J, Young Bernard Young R. Younkers Clifford E. Erker Uli Frank Lujan Robert Wood | ;f ' | | | dismounted drill •••••• chemical, biological and radiological warfare cover and movement field chow cleaning weapons our training through the eyes of the camera history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches, it was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the bustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846 was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21-gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. It was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre- mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War clashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 15,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain is similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. It was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stilwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) All Rii;li[ Rc ' cr d ALBERT T.O V£ EN. " I ERPRISL5, A llama, Georgia MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE COMMANDING GENERAL MAJOR GENERAL CARL F. FRITZSCHE was born in Cleveland, Ohio, 27 March 1903. After attending Miami University at Ox- ford, Ohio, for two years, he entered the United States Military Academy, graduating in 1928. General Fritzsche ' s first assignment was with the 10th Infantry at Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Subsequent assignments include; The Infantry School at Fort Benning; 15th Infantry at the American Barracks, Tientsin, China; instructor at the U.S. Military Academy and later commander of a company of cadets there; Command and General Staff School at Fort Levenworth- intel- ligence Officer, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Houston; Fort Knox with the 6th Armored Infantry Regi- ment, 1st Armored Division, as Operations Officer and later Adjutant; Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, 1st Armored Division, Fort Knox and in the European Theater. Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army; tactics instructor and Director of Physical Education at West Point; Exe cutive Offi- cer, Department of Tactics there; Intelligence Staff Officer, 12th Army Group in Europe; Deputy Assistant, and later Assistant Chief of Staff for intelligence of U.S, Forces in European Theater; Assistant Deputy Director of Intelligence, Division of the European Command; Intelligence Division of the Army General Staff; National War College and upon graduation in June 1949, assumed command of the 23rd Infantry Regiment, Fort Lewis; instructor of the Army War College; and a tour at Carlisle Barracks, Far East Command in April 1952, and became Assistant Commander of the 25th Infantry Division in Korea; appointed As- sistant Commandant of the Infantry School in May 1955; to Korea as Chief, United States Military Advisory Group to the Repub- lic of Korea, until appointment as Chief of Staff, Fifth U.S. Army in June 1957. He was assigned as Commanding General of the U.S, Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, 15 Octo- ber 1958. His decorations include the Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Bronze Star Medal, and foreign decorations includ- ing the Belgian Croix de Guerre with Palm, the French Legion of Merit and the Czechoslovakian War Cross. BRIGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL BRIGADIER GENERAL A. G. ELEGAR, born in Denver, Col., 30 December 1906, was graduated from Tulsa (Okla.) High School in 1925, attended West Point and was graduated in June 1931. Following graduation, he Held various troop assignments with Infantry units in the United States and Hawaii and attended the Infantry Officers Advanced Course in 1938. He was graduated from the Command and General Staff College special course in 1941; the Armed Forces Staff College In 1951; and the Army War College in 1957. In March 1943, he was named AC of S, G-3, of the 80th Inf. Div. and served in that capacity throughout the campaigns of General Patton ' s 3d Army in Europe. He was Military Attache to Equador in 1946 and in 1947-48 was assigned as Asst. G-3 with the US Army Group in Turkey. He was lien assigned to the Office of the Asst. Chief of Staff, G-3, Department of the Army in 1949. In 1953 he was named Commanding Off cer of the 33d Infantry RCT at Ft. Kobbe, CZ., and in 1955-56 was the AC of S, G-3, US Army Caribbean. He was assigned as AC of S, G-3 with I Corps (Group) in August 1 957, and in October was named Chief of Staff, i Corps (Group). His awards include Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Commendation Ribbon w Metal Pendant, French Croix de Guerre w Palm, Belgian Croix de Guerre w. Palm, Order de la Couronne w Palm (Officer grade, Belgium) and Abdon Colderon 1 st Class, Equador. COLONEL H. F. HABERMAN, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army Training Center, Infantry, and Fort Ord, California, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 6 July 1912. He was graduated from Riport College, at Ripon, Wisconsin, after which he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, Infantry. After assignments to Fort Benning, Georgia, and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he served in the European Theater with the 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, followed by a tour with the Munich Military Post in Germany. In the spring of 1949, Col one! Haberman returned to the U.S. as Deputy Commander of the Student Brigade at Fort Benning. He activated and commanded the Offi- cers Candidate Regiment there for over a year; in 1952, he was assigned as Senior Army Advisor to the Hawaiian National Guard. Colonel Haberman became Chief of the Fifth U. S. Army Reserve Components at Chicago in 1955 where he served until assigned to Fort Ord in September 1957 to command the 4th Brigade. He assumed the duties of Chief of Staff here in October 1958. COLONEL H. F. HABERMAN CHIEF OF STAFF american red cross presidio of monterey toward ft. ord Spi«»Si ■« £ -..jmt- :. m jiijlfa :3n If d+i+Ai bayonet training trainfire ' mmmm Itor.. • C.,z. mm I ■ I Aiiiw a . close combat course m •:■ : i i M iSHWf - v T f 7 ' Ty r - a .fet ' j,. Met Pn fPrSi 3fK mxsSmmsmsmii : - : : : :- ' L V .; ' • . . .-■ ■mi pit i ; l|§i| Mbi ®niw«aiwi wi % . . ' » ! ' - H Pfl :9k iMiii " “4 w : ™VS£i lilii Srafi?® ' ' twrnrnm; hReKhm squad patrolling dismounted drill pole climbing Flame thrower chemical, biological and radiological warfare simulated atomic blast receiving center 1 " SilM Wtiffl jM ■ii; 4° : J§8 2 w. - v$ . 4 ■• Si v ' !■?■ . 7 ' ' L - : ■ ' Vo.otyy:; spll fl s , ;% ; r . : v; s fFEa bunk making writing and calling home clothing issue hair cuts shots dental check ‘ processing shipping to training company r physical training p. t. with rifles fST; first aid signal communication marking and pasting targets rifle instruction circle m-1 known distance range transition and field tiring k A fic :1c j Fortification ▲ bayonet ▼ i A infiltration course open house i r A rocket launcher 4 automatic rifle mines W mortar m -1 classroom T chemical, biological and radiological warfare A close combat course field firing Y squad patrol • Flame thrower learning to march dismounted drill maps and compass rield inspection bivouac i guard at impact area at the front gate marching, marching . . . . pol climbing signal training class work I A hi basic army administration school “ A r rood service school hobby crafts 2K nj - T v , x ■ ' . |£ J s ' y.v,i ' TENTH BATTLE GROUP THIRD BRIGADE COMPANY B Started Basic Training: 4 April 1560 Lt Col. C, L, Stahler Brigade Commander Lt. Col. Robert B. Dexter Battle Group Commander Graduated: 28 May 1560 Capt. Joe E. Griffith Company Commander 2nd Lt. Donald Hopkinson Executive Officer Junior Cook M Sgt, Trollinger Firsc Sergeant SDI SFC Dixon Training NCO SFC Rice 1st Platoon SFC Diaz SFC Evans 2nd Platoon 3rd Platoon SFC Weaver 4th Platoon AFC Sheppard 5 th Platoon M S gt. Jones M Sgt. Ordonio SFC Young Sgt. Wetmore Sgt. Brenner Mess Steward Supply Pvt. Lyons Mail Clerk t- t 1 1 Dale C. Adams Michael D. Adams J. D Ainsworth R, J. Almanzan Maris Andersons Weldon C Barker Donald G. Barrett Milburn G Barton m 4 || D, J, Battista Nicholas J. Bell Lorin E. Benson FL F. Blackman Delbert D. Bolin Kenneth L. Boling A. BonfigLio R, F. Bor dwell William D. Bowers Ronald D. Bradley John W. Brinkman G. P. Brittsan Ira W. Brock Laurice G. Brooks William Brooks G. G, Brown Glenn E. Brown F. Brtmdage Danny Buccola John Bunge Jerry E. Burns Robert M Burns William Butler Malcolm Campbell M. W. Cash man Bruce Cecil P. S. Chavez Edward F t Cocca R. M, Coffey Elza Cornog P. J. Couchman Jay D. Coulter Bruce A. Cowie Earl C, Crane Norman Crystal Travis Davis John W. Dawn Robert E. Day N. R Denting Daniel J, Deleury D. M, Delgenovese Ronald K, Dellen Kenned E. Dennis Manuel L. Diaz Mace E. Dickens Charles Dillard W, c. Dillon Stephen C. Dodge John Duffy Samuel Dyen John Edwards Richard E, Ellis Charles B Elsee D. C. Englert Donald. L. Ewert C Fitzsimmons Deve Franklyn R. D. Freeman Keith Frye James L. Gallo C. H, Giddings Paul A. Gignac Raymond Gilson D, C Goodwin Gary E. Gray W, R. Griggs R. D. Grimstad Larry A, Grinde Edward Hamaker K. R. Hamasaki Melvin E. Harris Robin K, Harris Charles Hart Eugene Hasse F. G. Hawk Glenn H. Heath David J. Henry Henry Hines William C. Hix Jerry Hofifelner Bert C Hoffman Jerrol Holmes M. G. Hubbard James F. Huff Fredrico Huerta Thomas Huff Donald Hunter Bill G. Hurd John D, Ihde Marion O. Imrie C. E. Jacobs G. H. Jennings W. M. Jennings Edwin C. Johnson Paul R, Jolley Charles F. Jones ••••••• Donald W. Kaiser Robert J. Keaton William D. Kelly Albert Kerr Roger T. Krnseth Hideo Kiso f, L. Klaproth Daxton Kluksdahl A. L Knacbcl R. Kovacich Joseph j. Krolin Richard Lamb Ronald D, Lane Roy A, Lasby Howard CL Lim Gerald E. Lohse Lazaro Lopez James A. Loupe Jame J. Madrid Gary Marcum ‘Clarence Marker Michael Marks Alfredo Marquez David A, Marrs Alex Martinez Gabriel Martinez J. D, McCornuch M. R, McCulIcy P„ J. McGovern Henry S McKee William Meyer Keith Metzler Richard Miller Charles Mitchell W. D, Monahan Alvin R. Moore D, H. Morris Oscar Murillo Neil R. Murphy Tooru Nakahira K. Nakakihara John M. Nakao Norman L Nelson Elza R Nichols James J. Nickson William A, Nunns P. M. O ' Brien Henry N, Oda I Harry K. O’Hara Gary R. O’Keefe David Owens Leslie E. Park ' Rodney Parkhousc R„ B. Patterson Bobby C. Payne Rovcc R. Peace G. P. Pender cd E. D, Pennington Thomas D, Pedigo Kenneth Perry George H. Peters J Pfamonden D. R Pledger Dudley G. F, Poon P. Portillo H. R. Pridmorc Thomas A. Purcell Albert Quintana Jose A. Quiros John W. Rachal Stephen D. Ralls Billy L. Reed G. Richardson M. M, Richardson William Rigsby M. N. Ringheim David Rodriquez Larry Kh Rounds Donald F Rose John Rossclli ) Loren L. Ruse J. T. Schaefer Lyndel Scheibly M. G. Sdhimmels ' G, E, Schjeldahl Ronald K. Schut R. E. Schwartz W. L, Scofield David H. Scott David L. Sebcns Alan Seguine D. LL Shirley Frank E, Smith Kent L. Smith Lander J, Smith Lloyd L. Smith Lloyd D. Snyder Lloyd B. Sparks R. G. Spaulding Floyd V. Spaur K S. Sperling Dan eel Stabile C, R. Steele J. A. Stevenson James Stewart Joseph A. Stewart Lemuel L. Stewart Erhard Stockl c Phil Stratton Wayne Swisher A. Szentkiralyi E. F. Thatcher Terry P. Troester Eldon Tupper J. C. Turturici John Twomcy W D. Vanderlow Burton Walker Daniel H. Wheeler G. Wilkerson W, E. Williams G. E. Wonacott Bruce B. Wright Delbert Wyss i Edward L. Young Robert Dolan Andrew Dumitra Harry Foltz H. K. Gepner D, R, Grinager A. A. Robbins Alfredo Silva, Sr. dismounted drill chemical, biolo ■ ical and radiological warfare ' open house jig:- s ' ' ■ cover and movement ; w training through the eyes of the our x drill team graduation -iSSHP -5.S - history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-aetivation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America.


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) collection:

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

1963

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