US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA)

 - Class of 1958

Page 1 of 176

 

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1958 volume:

history of fort ord RAILING PROUDLY into the hustling harbor of the Mexican port of Monte- rey on July 2, 1846, was the trim Frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore John Drake. Five days later the stars and stripes were officially raised above the Customs House, and a 21 -gun salute proclaimed the area as Territory of the United States. The Customs House still stands today. The American flag, altered only by the addition of stars denoting states of the nation, still flies. And since that day the United States Army has played a prominent and significant part in the development of the Monterey Bay area. St was a young officer of that era for whom Fort Ord was ultimately to receive its name. He was Edward Cresap Ord who had served with Fre- mont ' s Army and who was a lieutenant when the nearby Presidio of Mon- terey was developed. Lieutenant Ord distinguished himself in many bitter Civil War dashes and he rose to the rank of Major General. The need for a military reservation that was to become Fort Ord arose from the stationing at the Presidio of Monterey the famous 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery. The terrain in this area was ideally suited for the maneuvers of the finely-mounted riders and the horse-drawn caissons. It also was large enough for a field artillery impact range. It was in 1917 that the government bought some 1 5,000 acres, lying mostly in the area of the post ' s present East Garrison. It was named Gigling after a well-known German family that had come to the country many years before. The present-day post, which includes that original land, contains more than 28,600 acres. Its terrain os similar to the varied types American Servicemen have fought on throughout the world. This diversity makes it an ideal Infantry training grounds. The transformation of the reservation from that of a maneuver area to a permanent post within such a short time was a near miracle of construc- tion. In August, 1940, when war clouds of Europe drifted closer to America, the first building contract was let. If was $3,000,000 to construct barracks for the newly activated 7th Division. The late General Joseph " Vinegar Joe " Stillwell was in command. (continued inside back end sheet) A i k ' ghts served Al3 r PT LOVL tNTFF ' PRiSES At nia e o™ ' . US. army training center in fantry California major general william m. breckinridge, usa commanding general A fLLIAM MATTINGLY BRECKENRIDGE was born in Washington, D, C.,, November 6, 1905, After studying at the University of " Virginia in 1922-23, he entered the U, $, Military Academy from which he was graduated in 1928, being commissioned a second lieutenant in infantry, Pre-World War II service included two tours in the Panama Cana] Zone, student assignment at the Alliance Francaise and the University of Paris and duty as instructor in the department of languages at West Point, In World War II he served as a battalion commander, executive officer and commanding officer of the 10th Infantry in Ice- land, England, Northern Ireland, France, Germany, Luxenbourg, Czechoslovakia and Austria, participating in six campaigns. Following World War M, General Breckenridge held important assignments in the Pentagon, the For East and Stateside. He is a graduate of the National War College as well as the Infantry School. His decorations include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, Commendation Ribbon, Combat Infantryman Badge, War Department General Staff Badge, Belgian Order of Leopold and Croix de Guerre, French Croix de Guerre, and Russian Medal of Merit. He was promoted to Major General March 25, 1957, with date of rank of May 4, 1952. brigadier general fred w. sladen, jr. deputy commanding general jTRED W. SLADEN, JR„ was born March 13, 1906, at 1 Vancouver Barracks, Washington. He is a graduate from the United States Military Academy, Class of 1929. During World War II he joined the 30th Infantry of the 3rd Division at Fort Lewis, Washington, and later commanded the 1st Battalion. He went to North Africa when the regiment went into combat in 1942. He served as G3 of the Division as they fought through Italy and Southern France, Following the war General Sladen was assigned to West Paint as tactics instructor. Other service includes G1 Section, Headquarters, U.5. Army, Europe; Career Management Division, Washing- ton; Assistant Division Commander, 2nd Division, Fort Lewis, and Chief of Staff,, I Corps (Group), Korea. Awards and decorations include the Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star with V, and two Oak Leaf Clusters; Purple Heart, Army Commendation Ribbon, and Combat infantryman Badge. His foreign decorations are the French Croix de Guerre with Gold Star and the Italian Cross of Military Valor. mam HORN IN KOSCIUSKO, MISSISSIPPI, in 1914, Colonel James E. Landrum, Jr., attended schools there until his entrance in 1932 as a Cadet in the U. S. Military Academy, graduating as a second lieutenant in 1936. During World War II he served with the 77th (Statue of Liberty) Division as a battalion commander and regi- mental executive officer. After the war he was assigned to the Department of Tactics at West Point where he had served previously. Other assignments include the Cana- dian Army Staff College as an exchange student; the Armed Forces Staff College; G3., General Headquarters, Far East Com- m and; Chief of Staff, Military Assistance Advisory Group, Japan; student, U, $. Army War Col- lege, continuing there as a faculty member, first as a director of the U. $, Foreign Policy Course and later as the chief of the Evaluation Section. His decorations include the Silver Star, Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Clus- ter, Purple Heart with two Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Combat infantryman Badge, colonel james e. landrum, jr. chief of staff SiSiir parades TT ’ Tii -Ty «i» aBBM Ipfg; ! aHi, f p lflll : . ' : ’-: ; • Basrah r= iti s ! I ' i Ml £l®3 ■tftfraf I- ' l rT fWWtfe- .. american red presidio of monterey toward ft. ord i h f 41 n’lrWHnffntpi M-fnStof r HUil . r-fc :... . i -■• - S H . : m-1 known distance range dose combat course fpggP squad patrolling — hikes dismounted drill recoilless rifle A mortar ' WSm grenades A rlame thrower «, SImMS • . ISKSlW : mmm receiving center S. 3 $0 m - j?y- ; - •• - . R.f i i • r . : , £ ' • fess : ,: V . v- -V ' t:.,- ' Wi- v m : .. clothing issue 1 », ) imm L ' L ' wk 4 rri - ■ ., , „ ' :i „ V-: SS hair cuts shots dental check processing shipping to training company :]£$: 3 ; ' IBsp . ■; physical training p. L with rifles first aid signal communication marking and pasting targets m-1 known distance range transition and field firing M infiltration course ‘ ■’ J . " , j ;■ ' . J-oVfjs’SBM PIP IOIHST, CHAPlI mm ■I , t A rocket launcher 4 automatic rifle mines W 3 mortar m-1 classroom ▼ chemical, biological and radiological warfare ▲ close combat course squad patrol ?iame thrower field inspection maps compass bivouac ' KQUoiA rm W W: iu guard at impact area marching marching . , . . at the front gate signal training class work drivers ' course auto mechanics course HR ifltiil i - ■■ i: :■ V: v • . - administration school ™ A army peciai service bookmobile ,RT 0R0. CALIFORNIA on-the-job trainees take active parts in P. I.O s daily radio broadcasts and in the production of the weekly post news- paper, the fort ord panorama. 1 1 rood service school ▲ hobby crafts ' ■LvI-lO ' . ' ! Hpisr. CfiApn Wig COMPANY Formation Dote: 21 April 1958 THIRD BRIGADE ELEVENTH BATTLE GROUP Graduation Date: 14 June 1958 Lt „ CoL Allen L. Swaisn Br igade Commander Ma j Charles E. Knudsen Battle Group Executive Capt, T. V Pearson 2nd Lt, PL R. Munson Company Commander Executive Officer M Sgt T G. M. Trammel SFC J. D, Cooper First Sergeant SD1 J. W Abro q ; Jr Gera Id L Adams Vernon W Adkins Irv in E Anderson Richard 5. Anderson Frank M Anthony Michael D. Archer A. P. Aren i var R obert L« Bai ley John F. Bales H. W. Barbarick Charles J, Berg in M. K. Bertelson Richard E Black David G B obb Donafd E . Boone L. E Brocketf G . E . Brommer Gera Id F . Brown Gera Id K. Brown John W Brown J ohn Wp Brown Leroy W . Brown R chert S . Brown Bfarne W, Bruun J , A . B utk ingha m Larry R „ B Unton j a me$ L Ca I houn Res Ituto Ci Ca 1 rca Mp V « Ca mor i 1 i o W, J, CampbeEi R . Camobe 1 1 E. R, C a n n o I e s , Jr. C. R . Car Ian, Jr. M W Carre, Jr. N. S. Casebeer James R . Ca ssel I Mt C. Ca st i I 1 o W . W „ Cava no ugh Y ee F . Chan Chris A. Chaves R udolph R . Clayton Claude E. Cochran E , C Combs, Jr. Lo land A Conf i Harry Cordon Orbendilo Coronado Billy C- Coston I Roger D. Couture Lorry R . Craig T h o ma s e E . Cram Marshal 1 E- Crewse F. F. Criswell Nathaniel Crosby Car I D . Da vey j „ M. Del la bona W. J . P ♦ Der i ckson Charles A. Doan, Jr. Patr i ck D orman Dale L. Douglas Virgil L. D rew Jose A. Duarte Ra I ph H . D unn Ronald E Durham H. S. Ebbinghausen M, A Edmondson Philip R . Ed ward s Lewis W. England Alfred C. Erion R obert L Er i on Harold Farris W G . F la nago n Bronson C Flint Gilbert Fong Kenneth H, Foote R i chard C. F oran H, A, F urn ish Henry Gee V K ■ Germol us | I r. I 1 ! 1 ,• ■ ■ ”.v J- ■ ■. ..j ., I-: ' ‘ i ' , :S », » §? I h r gsM S w h jhl : || | . Paul H . G ood man Robert H, Hancock W, H. Henderson, Jr, Donald E. Henninger Otto K . Hermann Dona Id R, Hicks R ana Id H . H ad ge s Ross W . Hoffma n James Holden Thoma s C. Hughes Lionel L. Irish Oscar C. Jacobsen Carl S. Jess C E . Johnson R . A J ohn son Jackie J one s Neal J , Keegan Leon D. King Kenneth F ♦ Kline Kenneth F Roller Richard W Kra b be R i chard A „ Kra ft R . 5. Kris m-a n ' -V. K. Kuhn, Jr. Ryo Kurcki Arthur M. Lambrc Charles Lau H. E Lauteren N D Lavender Cloir K. Lee Sam G. Lee Winfield Lee N. A. Lefthand Rex K. Lendah t Shirley G. Leslie William A. Long W. R. L uttrij 1 1 Dan D- Marrs P. A. Martinez, jr. Robert L. Massoni Terry A. Zeller W r J , McDo e 1 1 F. J, McElhaney D. A. McLaugh I in Enrigue Meza Gary B . M i J ler E S, MitsgJes Ronald V. Mjelde Donald L, Monday R ichard E . Moody J . G . Mooney R ana Id C, Morton Refer J „ Mugg |er John F. Murphy Ratrfcjo S. Na|era Bryce R . N oe I Henry O ' Connor R . C . O ' Conn or A. L. Olszewski E J, Olszewski fiHl 1 Norbert C- Omero Peter W . Qrontek Armando M. Orana H. F . Overbeck, [ 1 1 Peter Owens Glenn 6 . Pal mer John D. Patten B. L. Pearson Edward H . Perry William D . Phelps Herbert W. Phipps David L. P ierce J ohn S. Popov i ch D ona Id R , P ower s Donald L Price J ohn J „ Rag sda [e C . A . R ed f ie Id Edward F+ Reeves D . J . Rhea ume R obert W, R obb i ns Charles J, Roberts Me Ivin J . R oberts Dana Id E , R ogers Mark K. Rogers John Serma Emilio B . Sicahio R chert B , S i I va Gera Id p . Slater Ed ward T . Smith G , F . Saren s on J i mm ie H . Stake D G. Stalk fleet J . A , Strong man H- H. StubhfefEeJd Jose W. Suarez Daniel F. Sullivan Jj Ji y | i, % i i f f | ! I • n II if fl I I’ % % % ' i -H3 ■■?. . . » % ,« » N ick T atarkfs Eugene C Teal J orge R. T enor i o R upert T eeky R. A. Thompson W. P. Thomps on w. M, T hemps on R. G. T harnton i P. R , T 1 1 lot son Gera Id W T oney R . W T orren $ G ord on T reptz Wayne L, T urner G , A, Twitchell Lloyd D- Urbach H. A. Van V uren A Ibert Vargas J. D - Vargas, Jr, Vincent Velasquez R. C. Vietti, Sr, Pete Voutis W H- Warwick Wi 1 1 tam H. Waters Edward W. Watts G. H. Weatherfon $rr y? • .■ | i s « iSSttaa " V I S ■ sfe p . , ■ - J a mes P . We I Es Harold D + Weston R obert M . Wetze I R. R . Williams Ronald Q, Willis James R. Wilson And re w E Wong Masao Yanase Edward Yee ©©@®C ' ©@©©@ ©©©©©©©©© physical training physical fitness tests 4 m-1 rifle instructions grenades ] zmm. garrison dismounted drill Si Inspection our training -through the eyes of the camera ' xf-r Iwf fi % ■ ImSm history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific, It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the dose of World War M, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America. COMPANY A Formation Date: 3 March 1958 FIRST BRIGADE THIRD BATTLE GROUP Graduation Date; 26 April 1958 Cal, Lewis E. Manes s Brigade Commander Lt, Col, Joe E. Starns Battle Group Commander Maj, Manuel 5 Lu[an Battle Group Executive Capt, Wifi ram H-. Brewer 2nd Lt, R. C. Bunting M Sgt, Robert E Peardon Company Commander Executive Officer F irst Sergeant M Sgt. J, H. Rush M Sgi, T, C, Brailsfard Former Senior Senior Drill Instructor Drill Instructor 0 ur former Com pony Commander, Co pt. Mon u e 3 S. Lujan, was promoted to the rank of Major and trans- ferred to Battle Group d ur 1119 the ear ly part of our train ing. W, H, Ackerman Wilbur Ahtuangaruak Frankie Akpik Paul A, Alcorn Vernon L. Alcorn Jerry L. Alien George M Allison Jim D, Annis John A Barfieff Frank Batmafe Steven L Beiser Glenn F. Bell H F Berbereia M, Kenneth Bezich Jerre It B Ea ke R S B lanchard E. A. Bourassa, Jr Monte R. Bower Gary C. Brim Haro Id W. Brimm David W Brown V B Buattner Paul M. Bullock Donald H, Burks B E Butterfield Roger R, Cockier Ruben T, Campos Fred C Caso Robert V Centen. Norman J Cheu Eddie R, Cb i pp Mark M» Chorno Jerry M. Church i I C. 0. Clawson R, D, C lements A N Coke, Jr, Harold! R. Collins Edward R. Comport J, F, Conley, Jr, Frank L Connolly Lais Cordero V, T. Costanza James H, Cothern Robert D Courts Stanley Y, Carry Stan ley J Dav i 5 Stuart A, Dav is D, L. Delaney W H. Dem ing Edmund Denny C, A, DJBernardo A. A D iCar J o Ra I ph W» D ixon Jack Druskovich Wi IE iam A Ecke s M. B Eckhardt Gerald L. Eghert Everett L, Ehda F R, Eichert Rona Ed J. Enns E. R ErEcksen Joseph A. Evers Terrance J Faber Douglas A. Fettel T ony Foster James R. Franks R S Freeman James R. Fries Carl Gage Peter A. Gant Robert F. Graber Gary B Graft T . E Green, Jr Michael Greenberg Max L. Griffiths Dennis G Guenther Gary L, Guhlke Donald E Guizzo W D » Gut rerrez R. C Hamments Theodore F, Hanke Hanker A Honken Horold Hannon Lynn E ♦ Han as Clay W, Harmon R H. Harpuder Vernon Q. Harvey Harold R. Hayes Joe F + He inz Larvae W. Helejn V D , Henning W M I iam H ida Igo A A H itcheack Mark A. Horne Arnold L. Hudson R, W H utch Enson Jim K. 3 washita Duane C Jacobsen Janies 0 Jamieson Robert C. Jarrett Robert D. Jefsvik James L Jenkins Anthony T. Jez in D t H Johnson E. G. Johnson T. L Johnson Wilson Johnson J. R. Johnston Robert L, Gary Kay George J, Jones Kemper R« D. KennarJ i ,1 4 R D Kennedy Khachad oar ian Mel v in L. K tnney N. A, Kirs hen S R. Koonm Samuel La Rosa, Jr, R B, LeDesma Kenneth G. Leland Vince Lincir, Jr, H, J, Lind berg Joe Lopez James W Lott Peter W. Lutby Earl E, Lyons Louie E, Mahler Robert R, Makj F. J. Malmstrom N F Mangelson Reed 0, Mann Lmo A Mors jJ J o A. S, Marsoobian Neil S Martin John J. Mast Philip Mathis L Ei McDaniel J. F McDermott R P . McDowe ] l William McGee W. C. McHenry Gerald McKittrick R. K, McKnight Roland Medel F. A, Mendoza, Jr Manuel H Miller DrviJfe W. Miller Donald P, Mills Jack W Mills Henry W M itche 1 1 Phillip S. Mitchell Arnold V MoSnar Evertt M. Moore Lincoln A Moore D T Morehead Joe C. Morgan Stanley G Morrill Henr y E Muf ler R i chard F, Mul ler Robert R Murray Joe L, Muse F. A„ Newcomhe John Nokapigak P. A O’Brien Douglas D, Pafrtior Edward B Palmer Edwin J Pgrish James L, Peakes Dean A Pera Denms E Perkins Robert H. P insert Jack D . Piper C. Piscitelfo, Jr» M- P. Pivroff Howard PoJJyea Leonard E. Pretf Kenneth W Pritt Dennis E. Putney Clifford G Guise I James. Ransom H. F. R ichards C G. Retards Alvin Rodrigues R ichard G Rosene Raj ph T. R us se f I Arthur P Sand Jan L Savage L M, Savage JVL D, Schotthoefer Rolf H Schou P E Schroeder Jackie D Shannon Jay P, Shelton Marvin Sicher A. B. Simonds Verne Skipworth Lawrence Smith R. E« Smith, Jr. R Ichard T . Smith Wi 1 1 iam B . Smith Lawrence HL Sobel Ca I v in C Sat inger Forrest Solomon, Jr Clifford A. Soxie F. FL Spanfelner Robert L - Stanley J R . Sternberg T. L Stevens 1 f t G . C. StrohJ, j I [ Clifford R, Stubbs James SuUivan Richard D, Swanson Benjamin F. Taylor C. R. Taylor, jr, Craig V. Taylor George R. Taylor H. K Thompson K . D , T hompson L. W. Thompson, lit R ono Id L Tos i C V. T ra ughber D. V- Travagl io L. D. Trowbridge Kenneth D, T rusty J. F, Turya, HI David C. Velin Charles A. Vejar A I fen Wah Stanley C. Walker Roger M. Walton Robert C« Ware Elmer D. Watson F. Henry Watson R ona Id L . Webb John R . Webster Marl in M. Wei fs B. D. Wesfermart Lynn C White Dennis E- Wilde C, C Williams, Jr. . .. i c — grenades chemical, biological and radiological warfare infiltration physical training m-1 rifle firing instructions 1 I 1 . ■ ■ - bivouac j dismounted drilE our training -through the eyes of the camera -ii : history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific, it was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific, At. one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord, Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4fh Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940, Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed info the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America COMPANY A Formation Date: 5 May 1958 FIRST BRIGADE FOURTH BATTLE GROUP Graduation Date; 28 June 1958 Col. Lewis E. Maness Brigade Commander Capt. Jimmy W. Parker Is! Lt. John H. Tonack Former Company Commander Company Commander Battle Group Commander 2nd Lt. Hute H. Woods Executive Officer 2nd Lt, B, F. Harrington Training Officer James R k Storm First Sergeant M Sgf. John H. Beecrafl SDI PFC T. Spitler Company Clerk Kenny C. Abbot! Arthur N. Allgaier Larry Alterman Frank Appodaca Paul Appodaca R. J. Atkinson Samuel F . Austin Kenneth W. Ayers K. Wi Barnhart J. D. Barone Lowery Bass, Jr, Larry L . Beard Cecil J. Beisner Nicholas A, Bell S. D. Benjamin Stanley T. Berg W. J, Berube 1 W- R. Bettencourt, Jr . John F« Bowling Clifford Bracken R G. Bradford R J, Bra nsten Hazen S. Bright R usse I J W. Cab 1 1 1 Aaron U , Ca IE Rau] P_ Cantua Michael Carpenter Gary L. Carter Rodney W. Caswell L I oyd D Chand Jer John V Chavez Warren EC Cissne Gory L. Coger H, W- Coleman J. B. Corgiat, Jr, James R, Cota L, E - Cov ington Clifford Daniel, Jr. J immy D. Davis George DavJontes F« E. DeLorenzo John W. Dollar David R. Dowdle Gary E . Earl D G- E Idr idge Wilburn E llswarth F loyd Eunice, Jr. William B. Eunice Thomas Fiege E . S, F ig ueroa A] len E F loyd Darrell R . Foster E l lory J. F os ter Char les R . F urdert J . L . Gard i ner, Jr. James R Gil bert David C. Goldberg Edelmfro B» Gomez Frank A, Gonzales M, L. Greenlee Vern B. Gren Brent W. Grim G. E. Grosvenor James N. Guppy U. E. Haddock, Jr» Ronald L. Hadley D ona [d H » Ha 1 1 Rona Id D Hall G- L. Hampton Ira B. Hancock Jame $ E . Han ty Allan Hanson R ona [d S- Harri s Willis L. Head Gera Id V . He J man Eugene Hering, III Thomas Hernandez Richard J, Herrad Joseph E- H Ickey John W. Horton Ronald E Huff D, M. Hutchison Oren H, Isham R, A« Jackson R. L. Jackson George K. Jarvis R . T - J enn ing s Joseph A. Jensen Ronald S. Jensen J, Jesolva George G. Jones V ietor E J one s I. V, Ko+eckE Nick L, Kraft Jerry G. Krahne J- E. Kulcsar William R. Lamarr A. C. Larson, Jr. R. G. LeBrun David A. Leith H. L i vingston, Jr. C. R. L off land W W. Longmire Ernest M. Loudon Frank A. Lucero Jase A. Lujan Lynn J. Lund L, E« Luther M. MacDonald C. R. Madison Dona Id F Ma I Id Carlos R. Mangum Wi J t la m V March C. M. Margefts P. M. Markgraf Edward C. Martin Jack A. Martin James J. Mateos A. M. Matsumota C. W. McDana Id J. C Me Far lane Max D« McKinney Char [es A . Meade Carl L. Mo ' lzahn Ernesto F, Moreno Albert J. Myrter Paul H. Neja M. G- Niederhauser Larry W. N ie J sen Myron C. Norman Carl H t Nor strom Albert D. Obroy E. Z. O ' Brien J , C. Oh I ing, J r . Doug las C. Oliver R ud o I f D. Pabst Bruce F. Palmer Bennie Parker De e C, Passey Jack L. Phelps V ladiimir Popovich Preben Poulsen H. G. Puderbaugh Robert M. Resnfck George W. Rich Melvin W R idge Warren T . R Hey Lujs £ . R ivas H. W. Roberts Car] R, Romstad P. C, Rubalcava R uben G . R ub ia Lawrence M. Salk Rolf M. Sannes R. E- Schottstaedt JL F . Schroeder Alan R, SeweJl David T. Sharp P. E » Shoema ker Ruben T. Sierra G L . Sme Itzer Jp B. S per .ling James C. Staiter Thomas A. Stang John H, Stedman V J. Steward J S m M. Stewart W 1 1 lard R . Stroud Adam Sugg s i. E. Tabyarvan E, F. Taccogna Vi ncent G , T erry C. G, Thompson J« H. Thompson P E . T homps on George Thornburg ■ . .. . £ 1 : -x . r ' . , K I - ■ . -J ‘ .. w ■ + v ' ■ ■ • ' 1 1 . k A. L . T hornh i 1 1 James £ „ Thorpe Otis Thorson, Jr. R . L . Van Deren Ph f [ 1 p E . Wa [esch E Hi ott L . Wa lke-r David A. Watkins John Wenzel D, E. Whiteside George E. Wing L. E. Wingard R ichard D . W inz er Howard Wong Wa Iter L . Wong Doyle E Wood S. T. Wood y Jr. L ' ; f T. H. Wood, Jr. J, H. Woodford A I fred J . Wood s J , L. Y arborough Ronald J . V oung Albert A. Zuool ly Charles G. Sutton ■ •; • S V : s ; i f physical fitness tests bivouac infiltration • • ' • v ' t % I , ' .. V . $■£ - flgffrH : ' 1 1 flitii i % M " ■ saa wm a : ; ,.v., , X ;-M. ft . cover and movement grenades imm $ • ; mi MfcMftK mm i.m |M ff ftHI i m ; . 5 ; - ; . j f- M» :: •• - ■ ' ' V ' ■ , :•■ - ■ - dismounted drill I snapshots house open our training -through the eyes of the camera history of fort ord (contd.) By the end of 1941 more than $13,000,000 had been spent and the main garrison served as training grounds and staging areas for myriads of American troops who were to find their way to Africa, Europe and the Pacific. It was at Fort Ord that these men prepared to hit the beaches. It was here they practiced jungle warfare, hand-to-hand combat, and most of the same tactics that present-day soldiers stationed here experience. Among some of those units that were stationed here was the 3rd Di- vision that hit Anzio and then went tearing through Southern France. This also was the home of the 27th and 43rd Divisions, each of which fought and won many battles in the Pacific. At one time more than 50,000 troops were stationed at Fort Ord. Following the close of World War II, activity here was at a slower pace, centering around the Infantry training mission of the 4th Replacement Cen- ter. This was the framework for the re-activation of the 4th Infantry Divi- sion which assumed the role of training soldiers for the Korean conflict. In September, 1950, the 4th Division was replaced by the 6th Division and the latter continued the mission of training troops. The 6th remained until the arrival in January, 1957, of the 5th Division from Germany. With the inactivation of the 5th in June, 1957, Fort Ord again was designated an Infantry training center. Fort Ord was named a permanent Army post in 1940. Its westerly border is the Pacific Ocean ' s Monterey Bay. It is only a few minutes from historically rich Monterey Peninsula, as well as from Salinas, the hub of one of the nation ' s most productive agricultural valleys. San Francisco is 120 miles to the north, while Los Angeles lies 340 miles south. Ultimately, according to the post ' s master plan, the entire garrison will be composed of the permanent-type, concrete barracks in which many troops are now quartered. There also will be additional permanent ad- ministrative, supply and recreational buildings. The Spanish Conquistadors and the Indians who roamed these hills when Commodore Drake sailed into the Bay more than a hundred years ago would have shaken their heads in disbelief and wonderment if they could have visualized this area as one of the most important Army posts in America.


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) collection:

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

US Army Training Center Fort Ord - Yearbook (Fort Ord, CA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

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