US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC)

 - Class of 1987

Page 1 of 96

 

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collection, 1987 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collection
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Page 12, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collection
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Page 16, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1987 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Jackson, SC) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 96 of the 1987 volume:

ilu 1-I Q., , . --ws,-"' ,. 'ww- 'Q wr ap 5 A.. i , 8 '- A .4 , , 4 M. -, .,, , gf ,A - ,v-.fag lj 1255-V f iw H AQ ,,,. K-,K ' ' 1. .-9 - L , - , ""' if ., .A 1:41, , . "'tFm., , f ' 'fb' 'M '-L if-vi. ' H v K, Q. -Rv, 'N-Q I .6 . , J, 5 ' x QQ' ,, ng.. K , . - H", ' , M: . ies 4. ' -fs 'Hs we 3 V of Wei .Q ,Q ,W -minion-f-9f4'q6,,,,, ?"'u ' 'Q fi , A 941' , '4f qi fs- , ,. -gf ., W- ,V ,s -. 'E 4' Ji, I' -. Q' ,ia me , V b Y F if f 6 , 9,-V J , V . J f. lf . ,-1 1' 1. 4, 1. V My L l R . " x X : . 4 2 .1 'ii V W ww www 1 . , 4 w ,XV in 1 W ? -v A I ,M w Wffvxlcffwaqfm UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING CENTER FORT JACKSON SOUTH CAROLINA "VICTORY STARTS HERE" MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT B. SOLOMON UNITED STATES ARMY Major General Robert Bailey Solomon was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He enlisted in the United States Army as a tank crewman in November 1951 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in No- vember 1952 after completion of Armor Officers Can- didate School at Fort Knox, Kentucky. During the past thirty-two years, General Solomon has served in a wide variety of leadership and staff management assignments. His early troop duty as- signments included service with a howitzer battery at Fort Carson, a medium tank platoon and engineer group in Korea, mechanized infantry and tank units in Germany and an aerial surveillance detachment at Fort Knox. He has served with the 11th Cavalry Regiment, the 45th Infantry Division and the 3d and 4th Armor Divisions. He commanded the 1st Battal- ion 35th Armor in the latter. His staff assignments include duty with Military Assistance Command Vietnam, VII U.S. Corps, U.S. Army Forces Command, Department of the Army and Headquarters Pacific Command. His most recent assignments following his promo- tion to Major General in 1978 were as Chief of Public Affairs of the Army, Deputy Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief-Pacific and since August 1981 as Deputy The Inspector General of the Army. He has earned degrees from the University of Bal- timore, the University of Maryland and Johns Hop- kins University. His military education includes graduation from the Armor School, Command and General Staff College and National War College. He has served in Korea, Vietnam and on three occasions in Europe. Travels associated with his as- signments have taken him to Tunisia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Bahrein, Pakistan, India and Israel and most recently through many of the Pacific Basin nations. General Solomon is married to the former Frances Nathanson of Baltimore. They have three children: Sharon fJacobsJ, a Captain serving in the field artil- lery at Fort Campbell, Eric and Leah. 1 O or , DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY " AQ, HEADQUARTERS UNITED s'rA'rEs ARMY TRAINING CENTER AND Fon'r JACKSON 5 'iff Pom' JACKSON, SOUTH CAROLINA 29207 21 ' , V1 X? QxNh4v!jWm or AN nmv ro "NL1f" Arrznnou or ATZJ-CG Congratulations on your completion of basic training. You have succeeded in the first step of your path to becoming a soldier in the United States Army. The training has been tough and demanding as it should be. You have learned the importance of discipline and teamwork and that being a soldier is chal- lenging and rewarding. Advanced soldier training is your next challenge. Skills that you have learned in basic training will be reinforced and built upon. You will learn a specific military occupatipnal skill which will allow you to take your place in the Army where you can make a valuable contribution to our great nation. Strive for excellence in everything that you do. Wear the uniform proudly. The discipline and values that you have learned to accept in training at Fort Jackson will serve you in good stead in the future. All best wishes for continued success. ROBERT B. SOLOMON Major General, USA Commanding mm' X: x 'A W A I FQ!! ' Ei K 1 A J - sl wi s I y 4 , , N kt' ,tidy Q QW, an . 4 V WWA! K LS ikf kr 1 'rl ' J 1 .i!,!'m,w 'A 'Q' ' t 2 K ' Q ' ' C 2 If 'Y K"s.' 5 , VL ' , 's -'Q x , xx K F xr 9 Q-mb K' I A HEADQUARTERS .32 WW' . We V-w513x'f.7,A.. . . 1 1 no'25'9nU2Unu'ou q ' ' E HISTORY OF FORT JACKSON "VICTORY STARTS HERE" Although Fort Jackson was estab- lished to answer America's need for trained soldiers in the gathering storm of World War I, the very first fighting men to walk through these gates could point with a certain pride to a rich heritage and trace their military lineage to one of the earliest battles of the American Revolution. In June 1917, Company E, 1st Regiment, South Carolina Infantry became the first unit to arrive at the fledgling Camp Jackson. This unit was derived from the Second Regi- ment, South Carolina Line, Conti- nental Establishment which defeat- ed a British fleet in the battle of Fort Moultrie six days prior to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Although named for Major Gener- al Andrew Jackson, a native son of the Palmetto State and seventh president of the United States, the fort is actually situated on the for- mer estate of General Wade Hamp- ton, who served as an early governor of the state and as U.S. Senator. The initial site for the cantonment consisted of almost 1200 acres and was purchased by the citizens of Co- lumbia and donated to the federal government initiating a long tradi- tion of mutual respect and concern between the city and the fort. With an ideal climate for year- round training, the site designated Camp Jackson was chosen as one of 16 national cantonments constructed to supply the war effort. The pressures of war brought swift changes. Within 11 days of signing a contract to construct the post, the 100-man camp guard arrived. By the end of the first month, the labor force had grown to more than 1,200 and the first two barracks were com- pleted. Two months later this force had grown to almost 10,000 men. Virtual- ly overnight the post had grown from a sandy pine and scrub oak forest to a thriving training center complete with trolley line and hundreds of buildings. In the third month following the beginning of construction, some 8,000 draftees arrived and began training. Under the post's first acting commander, Brigadier General Charles H. Barth, its first military unit - the 81st "Wildcat" Division - was formed. Members of the origi- nal camp guard who had been the first to occupy the fort were moved to Camp Sevier in Greenville, South Carolina and were incorporated into the 30th "Old Hickory" Division. More than 45,000 troops of these two divisions trained at Camp Jack- son and saw action in France as part of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. In less than eight months this vast military installation was completed. Where before there were sandhill forests and swamps, a new city stood. It boasted theaters, stores, kitchens, barracks, officers' quarters, training facilities, stables, warehouses, ga- rages, an airfield, roads, bridges, rail- roads, water and sewer lines and was distinguished by having the largest government-operated laundry in the country. The hospital consisted of more than 80 buildings covering some 15 acres at the highest point on post. But almost as suddenly as it had begun, the clamor and activity sub- sided. With the signing of the Armis- tice in 1918, the famed 30th Division was deactivated at Camp Jackson. The 5th Infantry Division trained here until deactivated in October of 1921. The installation reverted to control of the Cantonment Lands Commission, and from 1925 to 1939 the silence of the post was broken only by training exercises of the South Carolina National Guard. In 1940, the installation, once again under federal control, was offi- cially designated Fort Jackson and was organized as an Infantry Train- ing Center. Firing ranges were con- structed and more than 100 miles of roads were hard surfaced. During World War II the "Old Hickoryv 30th Division was one of the first units to occupy the Fort, just as it had in 1917. Among other famed units to train at Fort Jackson during this period were the 4th, 6th, 8th, 26th, 30th, 77th, 87th, 100th and the 106th. The 31st "Dixie Division" trained here during the Korean War. Literally thousands of troops were trained by other units at the Fort during the Korean and Vietnam con- flicts. Today, Fort Jackson is officially designated as a U.S. Army Training Center where young men and women are taught to look, act and think as soldiers, always. From its earliest days, Fort Jack- son personnel have exemplified the "can-do" spirit with the drive and the determination to get the job done. With some 70,000 soldiers trained here annually, it becomes clear that this is a living heritage and a tradition which continues today. Fort Jackson is one of the largest training facilities of its type in the world today. Some 70,000 soldiers are trained here annually. The post is almost 53,000 acres or 82 square miles in area and there are more than 1,700 buildings. Access to the instal- lation and its training areas is pro- vided by more than 130 miles of un- surfaced roads. The first flag unfurled over the post in November 1917 was flown from the tallest flagpole in the Unit- ed States measuring some 153 feet. The first all-black regiment of World War I was organized here in July of 1917. Organized as the First Provisional Infantry Regiment fCol- oredl and later designated as the 371st Infantry Regiment, this unit was officially assigned to the French army. It was cited for bravery under fire and received more than 100 indi- vidual and unit decorations. The first all-female brigade was es- tablished at Fort Jackson in July of 1974. It was designated the 5th Basic Training Brigade. In keeping with its record of his- torical firsts, Fort Jackson became the proving ground for the integra- tion of basic training by sex. Both men and women are rquired to meet the same rigid standards of excel- lence. - - was -H. "tN.n 'J' I 'ff'-f if EL . H S EQ .S 5 WORLD WAR I WORLD WAR II Z f f? , M , ,L RRR T, 3-:,f3..... .iw v x A Uyxm:k.- K Q, ,. sg ' " R if R R W .R if K ' ' RRR .E Q if S R7 1 Q , R ' ii .f 'W 1 29 fvh 'flag ,gaig , 4 ..,,K B" N, -'H vi? 75' - V P if M ,QM 'Q 'if' if X' 5 -Q Hn- 'N..,,,,. ..,.. ,Qi " - L -- if K ' ' A X: . Q, ,, A Nb su ' 5 " ' ,, , wh ,,,. .WW KOREAN WAR VIETNAM WAR SCENES FIRST BRIGADE HEAD- QUARTERS SECGND BRIGADE HEAD- QUARTERS BATTALION HEADQUARTERS TROOP BARRACKS ' Q 1, "1 -h . y' +V, . ,-,,w . .,, ,V W , and w ' 4 M I I I .W " 'gum A - - ' www' 'hw-Q .W 'Wm 1 ,pd .nik " -',sf'2'-' '1-- 'r.,L::," ,i N . -is ,-Q-Q S 51513 -up fmm' -- ---:Q 'fig vera-A ma 'W .ah ,M Q 7 " -,-:nf P 3,4 1' .M Hum., Q 1 -Wm Aff-fiiedismw --...gf -.,-4 if . 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Q Q , ' ' - 'aug .-,vm . 52"-1 DENTAL CLINICS GYMNASIUMS POST OFFICE W 'Wrgfg A ' 'NSF - Q 3 ' M K .xy ",,,,.N .W . u,,,, , ,,... ,W , , ,. x - - , - X W , , b f f Sag ,F : ' ' ewmsxsff, ,ny L ,..w...,,., -.-M.. -N . - , ldhgu' ,HM . Jud' 9585 fimxfm. .- ' ' MAJN PIL BOWHJNG CENTER SKATUYG RINK K 4 WELCOME CENTER ARMY COMMUNITY SERVICE LIBRARY Ni ' W1'93"Y??f'3f:Wf'Mff9W'!"'FJf'1M71'Af pt if 1.7 W WA .V - , , . - , . '- ' 'N V , h4'f3'f , - V Lfl d -. 5' , R 5, 3 -3 QQ 'Q' f ...,, Lf, Vx-gif .:-df.. . xv gi . Q . .V--4" Z -j Q , ffl? "mar-.x ,g. 5, Q' li.. , J.. wi., ggyg 'Q ,QQ " N' JW W ern. , Q Wlfzi-ft"?4:!IQf7if"'3'1f'i4' -?a1g?f',g:::+'-w,ifii+,'3,,,:s--'?"g-,fff'1gE1g,:'w- fgfif, H-12. '.s'.riif '- 'K 9' ' 'L' H '-wi ' ws: b' nZ'i'v Av. , "m-'A'--SBP?-"'f'7 'f12"2,'?ff.T45Zl2asf:erf'-251 ',1s:ffIE',n?wY..w-,siwz Us Nm Iwxfx Jiif1f,-f-f,.-- M.. ,:f:1s.,,,.Po 5? QI.. M.. Y,73'rWrw7- 4,,',5g2,:fmg5:w'g :i-A -gg 'wg ,. M ,ui "W w'f"w.mFwL.H 3"-.J .Jw W"A'W V E ', . 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N K M . w.WmWMwdwvswmA,,WmwwW,,, H ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, m,,iM, a:mgiwKAMW WWW Wh f mf' W , M ...W Mun, NR, X BRA CH K k 'I In , -. f "' B wuw, , , -Y ,am an ,,,W... , K? ff, gm ,M 8 . - , , ,A ,X Y D .W M... M M,,,M,,,, .M NQJQQWQW 5 I 2 1 2 5 . K ,L X X3 Q V1 2 M gn: 5 N -.W.W,F,.,W,mWW M., .,,..w,,mL...,, Q Qi, ., !f:M:i',.g,'.fi ,Z Q., .Awww W Q www-ww. Wm:,15g,,.,k:f-,mwmmmgmkml 4 , o , Q 41. -A wx. V, X fi.. ' X """" 1':- ' V ,WNW K If - cn .cmumummmnxan-7. .WL .......y ' ' ' ' n HHH if 1 1 , 4 MM m I QR ,,-cf? -vw L- fx- W, ff ...Af CHAPELS , ,... A - ..,..-.-M-H PM V--ur, 5 If my 17.53. A W 'W 3 Y N ,Wi '. l f. u . fi y, '? '9?"' W "M 3,3 Q: f-'. -sw . 'ww 111 .A.',fW,f..W.1 L . , , A . K ,, W i.,4,,Q, 5, , 'C - y - f . if' f mfs ., F' ' -- -V Y, '. '- uyu , L Q, -- ,Lg -2,-A 4-xg.'g'.n A -' 1 fl ff -s 5 3 , . 5.4. M X ' ,V .' v Wifi? , 1. ff "ws mf- . A. 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A Www vw rgggrmjw AM W A YH 'Wm W L in V yvv, A 3 I HQ, VY L k,+f,Qv. , W agxgf M , 'X- wif " wiv' ww yu Nlfl' 1,1 'S Y F' z -' 1?s,,,W, fMQe,,x Nyfww 'fwz w f if ww ' 2' ,V M, V .X ,W X v M, ...xg , ff , ids., T A Q 4 '1 F ,, ,, .- ",-Q52-f+Xa.Q' X J ' yi 'Q W-,Az .-.- - 'eww,, K, L, ,f gg, ' " '-- zgf' ' .K 55 ,QI 4 .,k,a, f53 .Amy 91,1 zE,My,w , QA , ff X f gww 11 an f 5 gg? ff - fsif'1f'f?2ef.'f"-3, 'ig ini: P iiixme F 'L-33,1 ' Z T 1S3"'fif 'Z 5553 In W Z . sfarkh W' 'Q f ggwf HJ 4' ff-if " ' ' ,W ' f .Q Va ww"?-iilimgw Mx Kfhfiyg. W, Ni. WL fy . Q "Wx . gi . Q, -X W 4 'HX ' Xxx' 1 K WW i f D Y :- mfg ' ""'K"iT' X-C"'z.'1, Y -vn- s. A I' !" Q A N 5. yy xtvl if ARMY MUSCLE A soldiers training day is not complete without physical training. 1 . -ff. ,, 2, ",. wx .w L,V,f,3,. w-5, YQ, Y w. b ,o v if ' 75 5 1 I WW M 4 'ww W5 vii 'Y 51 A , Q il QF M ,W sf 1 ' v 4 wq Q 4 4 ,W W L 'i ' mf mm WM ffm , fff23f1W, 5" avxiviwg Vifglwm f , Y W ' wi JM U , Swggvy 's1Qs,SEQiMgY 'EQ V +' , 14 Q .J E . 1' ' -fi . Q'-vw H f A 1,415 mm if - 41. M, 'K 1 MA 'UW MARCHING Moving from one location to another is frequently accomplished on foot. It's called marching and basic train- ees do a great deal of it. V - .M 4, f M. A w .-J. .-Qi. ' wwf M' W ' W.. . f'-511+ . M. W A ' W. ,M ei ,Aff W , K f - '. Munn, . ,, :M M ' A wi ' 'z 4. V--Me'--1-wtf' if Y 4 V3 E "AA, ,W 1 1 Q' J' f V awww Q 5' 'A 4' 'V' ' if MQ 5' V 'if' . ., - A Q E Whig , I T I 11, , K J. gy A, . . V 2 1. I S- ag. ,ff ' -i"if'f'f1 C, Q -,Q-1- . M ' 3 fi +L ff , fff -X 4, E A' 3-'X' , '-many. , A? 'im,', .5 ,W 1A-' 3 'mm N 1 . . , 1- , ' -A ' "', awry- -1 ww' VP' 1 ' 3455? 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KR, E' a Q Q xxy, Q. y I . , fm, , My , 'ix Y V , i' "M wiv EM 'fa yi NV ' ' Wu, ' x W M ' -M4 F I . -if-M DRILL Mind and body become coordinated and alert in response to the sharp commands given by the drill ser- geant. The soldier soon develops an awareness of his potential as a mem- ber of his squad and his platoon. flax 'mv ,YW 'YA' -must -all-s VICTORY TOWER CONFIDENCE COURSE Scaling high barriers, swinging over obstacles and ' ' ntable ob'ects . . It's not for rolling over lnsurmou J . the timid. One trip through brings a new sense of confidence. 5 ,..M .-A'f- If if i I E 1 I ,, 1 4 i ...----"" 9 3 1 4 iii: i r of'?6'iffe FIT TO HHN OBSTACLE COURSE av- . . , " f A-,' ,, 3.f1ubff, W The obstacle course bullds stamlna and pre- 1' , , f or Q LI,3w5ft',,tifZ1i1ii':iAw . 3' W, qmymgg ,,5Anfu-eff ,- pares the soldler to be able to move through -jzf and past obstacles in a variety of terrain. 7:v'i'LW"? r A ,.--' 1 A-o'1 , . , , My , ' xi , A 'YT ' V , ,, va A, Y 15 I I I fi 5 ! -l ,. . ,S . N ' 5-w, 2 9 A V' . . A 'gtg Ni lux ' thnliga ' 'j 3 Q 4 f 1-V Q , J Q., V-L5 f 1 Y D X523-' . ,-1-f' -.-5-Ki', -. h L 4f"jJ M M4 , B 5-cv V . fs"'wl"" . , , "- 1 an w r' "4 J QQ-if ,.., -A, C . Q, is ,tw -dy-ig! qw - 1 it H if s ,Wlm:'g7'i ,, 'W'--'N n 2 ' g 4? E n " ?.-4 " 'iif1w i'l 11 i,ie A?"w3pg 'wifi' 12 .ll WN 'gimw ' MW f 3' X f 1 4584 fu f F fv, H In 25 a FIRST AID Through lectures, demon- strations and practical work the trainees become profi- cient in the fundamentals of first aid. They learn to use splints, ties and dressings and how to give treatment in a variety of emergencies. my .1- wi W T, ' 'S il M' . iffi- ., f E ww igmw ,R ,Z A , we W if Wu 4 , W ww K M 21 f 4 -V 5, W' K 'E 135 Q ,V X A T M 'say X W - A vw' V 'M ,f ' if W' W- M Ai' . H X f if M .ggi 5 .- 5 k W ' my Em my , , 4 " :fx " R X vw X 4, A . V ww wg -.. , I-rf, dw mv qw MQW, 1 f' X 'dang X lq?3WH. 4 my -'V ff g'fA::.z'E , :tv 'H vm 2' ' A , X Q - G -W-mf, :fw ,gm 3-QFX "im K 2 NA, M. W XL ,. 'xv Q .xx 1 Q 'r Y, A :iff M Wm. .nqf'.'.w . .Mgr A 21 4 fb ,i . ,gif a. 1 - Xa K K , ,M L by E we S" YV A A f 4 Wu f 1 , :SVN y .y wi ,X We at wg ,fu w 5 E 1 1. W W Q , M ,fy Y' W1 e A A X12 nw .- K x kffafff ' ' 1'-Svl-M4 ' 'lf .X W X vp., 1, . V M , 'f M' K , V .F 'gt' .43 f .-'lf :FE N nr Sm x , ii i W-6' ,J L . ' u se A f W. ,W NUCLEAR BIOLOGICAL CHEMICAL TRAINING In the face of the uncertainties of warfare in the future preparedness is essential. The Army trains its soldiers to protect themselves against nuclear, bio- logical and chemical attack. Practical training in the use of the protective mask is a Vital part of this training. W mm. ww' pf 4 , 1 J:-if' MVT' - 1 -' W, N' a ' MUN V 'K y S F"'il" -maui " " .fsqqrv 3 B uf, fm Us K, 'Q Q-. ag., 1' I VW Q x, x w Ti - I il? K""'Wi' A7 M f , Q? na K Q wiv f , Q M13 x ', , 1 u gw ww Hi..-w, - Y 4-AU' 3 ' Q X 1 . X Q ax 1? ' 4 fs , 'Ps 3'f 5 A M- 9 'F KITCHEN POLICE Of course there is a continual need to peel the potatoes and keep the dining hall equipment clean. R r ,Vg XERQQE COMMUNICATIONS Communications in the field are often by radio. Soldiers learn how to use the equip- ment as well as the basic techniques in transmitting and receiving messages. .S--nr 4 ' , U My Z ww jW,,,,,,w WMIE 14 Q Www ' Fr: 'gif .5941 ' , ,se MAP READING - ,, Instructions on relating map features to A actual ground locations, also to locate and ' W ffnfl determine grid coordinates. wmggfvx, 'T if L , g' I 1' If 'Q UL F2751 QW, f u 1 1 ' 1 BASIC RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP The soldier and his weapon. First the ba- sics. How the rifle worksg how to take it apart and reassemble it. The Trainee is now ready for Field Firing. " MV -if 'Q- 3-1' f aw' r . "Y- L,,.., ' :iv A U-'F' yx ...--JE 1" ,, ' x Tix A .WWW We. "Q..,. S Q 'L+ . 'FY '4 i, H an T , so 3 ' 1 Sis 'ii in A E5 V Q "" fb T ,Wx . h .A ,,-A-,Ty W h if .N S Y rt 4 V Xi ' iv . vi" 'ir 'A W W . N fm L ww A M, , wi, , ,V 7,-9,1 4" M , Q x V if 1 M 1 1,!, lx L ,T 'H s. tttt A M Aft? , 'E 'Q 2' r ,. F.r V "A ' it 1 .. ig ra.. ix lv Wiki? . 'iw "W -122 Y ' 5 ' 4 . +-ff-tundra if W., ,ff-5'P ply, Q ri 5:11 , 'Q tmms '- W T . 'A W p , T ' mi it CHOW IN THE FIELD Troops in the field need lots of nourish- ment. The Army provides good food and teaches the trainees how to keep mess equipment clean and sanitary. , if gov.- vm.. :ii , - - ' iriniwsf . snrr is Q ' I , M' mtl' 4. ...l. BAYONET RIFLE DRILL To provide an alternate form of physical training and primarily to increase the spirit, cohesion, aggressiviness, and self- confidence of the Soldier. W Q f IU! av - 4 ,Q 0 a , N. . . M ,, fn J fwksd w' may 4' vp v"W yu'r5.MM"q, K Q ' f " L WWW AJ , , MM! Y B V :Av YP 2 Q13 QQ, Q T: -:R f M as ,,. 5,'Qfmn.,, GRENADES Instructions are given on characteristics and capabilities of the grenade. Demon- strations using colored smoke as well as the use of the grenade in combat situa- tions. wx , ., 7 A 'WWW fmt' W, - W , vs. bl I I a ' ' -1 r x . ' , 1 I I 1 In X 4-. W ,Q , ' Q ., W' . n nu f 4 -.-fy W 1 A.. - A. S, ww f?".'A1n 1 -.M x ."'wiI' if f..-A , -:EAL p, ,,, ,W ,-5 Maw. 'Q wesglgyfl "If ex- .Wy H ,Xvf1f4gIg'Mz,: 'W v Vgw d 1 ' ' J,,,wf,i3' xii !11f?313sN ,, Am W ' X' XXXX 4 - A m. iam 1 Q f X MLWQQviz-zewf,,f H X - W , W S1 N bi, - ' f f f .Q - 0.4 ,Agia ... 'N' 'ix , J .,wbk22"""MNL' X -w+WM'Am'hsix1m5 awww , k 4 V Wm. ' A Wi? AME, V ww ,V X W U.S. WEAPONS The soldier must become familiar with the Army's basic weapons. Here the Trainee receives instructions on the use of the M-60 Machine Gun, M-72A2 L.A.W. and the M 18-A1 Anti-Personnel mine. xxx Y- - , 4 , .- M 4 nu,- 'lux' J Q U1 ,Q ta Pisa-f. .gi TACTICAL TRAINING To teach the soldier an understanding of individual tactical techniques for offensive and defensive combat. To demonstrate the use and affectiveness of U.S. weapons and develope confidence, aggressiviness and teamwork. To teach the proper application of cover, conceal- ment, suppression and teamwork in offensive and defensive tactics, and to provide an appre- ciation for noise and light discipline. ,ff , If ' ff" X , 5 Q :gg-' or , ii- 1' 1' ff 'lla 1 A if G ' ' f ' l f ' "' fi? " X P' l, " .Q if , 1 w- .1 he A P s i ,, 311, lg 4 vs A 1 E , f 1. Q H FIELD TRAINING EXERCISE It's more than just living in the outdoors. Soldiers must learn to function in the field in any terrain and climatic situation. The first FTX stresses that reality. 'j"'i,.Lf', -14 f-swf Agn., Tech-',, , -wif .Q ' X-'Q iigfe -1 ,QyLJ.w,.q If "ffNff'gQ,,Q'Z2'1. - f- .,.4 f-ig',,,. -"fu, f,:,.r.-V ' Y' 'I f , 7 w 4 A Q52 . 13 , 1 k ' Ei: ' 'Xi' ' nv fix W A M, ,- ' J 'gig 114- 75 .. . . . -22 ' ,- ' bw ' ,-ml ' :w i-' vi? V ' - Ywsxw WW - ,Lv vw 1 vimbqbf ' ,, ,NW ff I - - 'ff' 1 uf. ' 11 -1- 1' 1 ' Riff , . ., 'Hifi 3 2.25 ,, f 'if' 45' Q: . , A gin, vwjjkigsl '64 Q- -3 ' , '-uf 6 ,iq RWM . , W , my . ,I w n ' . 15 A33 I -.1 " A New ARMY PHYSICAL READINESS TEST The physical readiness test is a measure of the stamina each person has acquired. tw' X .nf 3' X ' f' i :f? sfs K:af QQ 'r"" ' V . F - , : gig " 5 s , ' 'f"' ' ii' Y f I 1 v, iv' Y' H 1 1 AZ, M Q 4 M s W J hw Y Q if M Q + W 1 X is wr? 'gn " ww W' -Q .2 ,J , U, GRADUATION The long journey is over. The graduates reveive their diplomas and those who ex- celled are recognized for their achieve- ments. For many graduates, families also attend to observe the ceremonies. N 5 . Q . .1 ' P . . 3 '- , . E Q: , ,. 4 A 'J' '!'f75t'X WM P 4 ,H , N m4f+akfW'5Tivj3?5+1i Wjxwfiw w f'k..,', e., .5 ,-xii. J f K a .Q A...-1 M...--I , . .,,,.-vw' -mu ' .K xg L 2 1 QQ X SECOND TRAIN ING BRIGADE COL ALFRED v. BAKER CSM ARVIN G. PARKS COMMANDER SERGEANT MAJOR SIXTH BATTALION CSM AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS JR LTC w I LL I AM HELD COMMANDER SERGEANT MAJOR DELTA COMPANY STARTED TRIANING A COMPLETED TRAINING CPT STEPHEN R. POWELL 12 November 1986 19 January 1987 1SG JAMES A, SANDERSON COMMANDER FIRST SERGEANT MAJ Dellon Nlchols Brlgade Chaplaln SFC C- Bufford SSG J. Moeller SSG J. Covlng+on Sr. Fleld Leader Pla+oon Sergeanl Plafoon Sergeanf SFC J. Marsh SSG M. Llsberg SGT A. Alamo Pla+oon Sergeanl Plafoon Sergean+ Assf. Pla+. Sg+. SSG P. Cargans SSG C. Pringle SFC D- Harrison Ass+. Pla+. Sg+. Assf. Pla+. Sg+. Assf- Plaf. Sg+. SSG J. Duncanson SSG G. Moore Ass+. PIa+. Sg+. Ass+. Plaf. Sg+. NO PHOTO AVAILABLE SGT Mon+anez 5 Y s R. Abraham S. Abram L. Adams L. Adams P. Adams V. Agle 1 l l M. Alamlna H. Allen A- Alsfon R. Anderson C. Barnes S. Barnes l l V. Bass S. Bell S. Besl R. Bobbi++ E. Broecker A. Bro+her+on l S. Brown T. Brown D. Buford J. CarenTer D. Carpenler K. Carroll L. Carler C. Cherry J. Church A. Coakley P. Cockrell M. Colberf s, 4. new. S. Cordry D. Corllss T. Cowles A. Cur+ls L. Darby S. Davls T. Davls B. Dawson L. Dawson M. Dennls R. Dlfede D. Dodson J. Dorse++ A. Draper P. Duke G. Elmore M. Endonlla A. Engle if --Q V. Evans B. GaI+her B. Gay L. Germain I. Givens E. Gomez J. Gonzales B. Grassman A. Gray I. Grlffln H. Hale V. Hall J. Hanks J. Hardy C. Harris E. Harris M. Harfner R. Hawk M. Hendricks R. HIII S. HIII T. Hlrschfeld S. H!sbon H. Hodge J K. Holmes M. Hols+eIn S. Hovls M. Jackson P. Jackson R. Jacobs w i L. Johnson M. Johnson H. Johnson l T. Lancas+er L. Leddy L. Lee S K. Huber F. Irby J. Jackson B. Jamlll J. Jason D. Ja+Tan S. Jos+ D. Karsner B. Klng l E. Lewls L. Libby L. Lovell l Z- Lowman R. Lowry M- Lundqulsl' A. Masfers C. McClln+ock A. McGuffee 1 l o l N E. McGuire S. McIn+yre S. McSwaIn G. Melendez S. Mlelke E- Mlller' 1 N S. Mills C. Mlnusselby A. Mlranda X K. Ml+cheIl J. Mdck B. Moore l R. Moore C. Mor'lon A- Munoz R. Napier K. Neal T. Nelson R l T- Nelson K- Nlcely R- Numlkoskl D- O'Hara C- Ollphanf R- Oliver .N 4-. L- Parker J- PaT+erson M- Paulo S- Peferson A- Pe++le D- Phllllps l L- Plnlon M- Prlce A- Qulnones C- Radzlejewskl M- Ramos D- Ra+llff L- Reynolds C- Robinson T. Robinson E- Rodrlguez P- Rodrlguez K- Saddlemlre ? 5 T I M. Salmond J. Sanders T. Sanders T- Saunders T. Schuffer+ Y. Sha++o V. Sheffield L. Shields J- Shoesmlfh D. Smallwood A- SmI+h J. SmlTh T D- Sonla A- S+eeIe A. Sfemler L. S+rea+er C. Sfrlebeck S. S+rlnger T A- Talkes M. Taylor K- Throckmorfon T- Tidmore B- Todd B- Tollolo T T J. Treadway L- Turner T. Tved+ S. Halker' H. Walker M. Hard V. HashIng'I'on C- Va+son K. Hay R. Vesfry T- Vhlfe C. Hllllams K 1 R. Vllllams M- Hilson P. Winder J. Vomlck A. Hya'H' K. Young N0 PHOTO AVAILABLE I S. Green D. Gulllory P. Hov1s S- Johnson T. Lee M. Miller J. Nelson E. Nichols C. Tenlson A-. 'T K .mann Kwai Sweat ' Sibfhyillbfb klQKO vUoLd73UldDNQlQ, S Mmm. ' mmm fYX00lQ0. 0041! at xlffwaovfpan U W, gc Q 'xi QW 'K -.1 N +rT"'fifW , X , 'TT :Q f"""A Www ggpfwix' 'F + 25525: 'HW' W sr N f- I jf: k 1lN5 IQ- f if' ' K L 6 W! MH m,2 ,m,: m gg, 5 axxg R, . - .fi A ,Q if Sgt 'N Sm 'ff A -e Km. N ,, Ns V H 'W' if.. W, M 5 N Nl X My we -,Q .. , ext: i w? 'E 'wma - MNH' -N0 -ww" Q.. 5 -fr Q!" .ax .M- K wigs. 1 Q K .sam Q 1 M, 'W erqxi X ,lx y fs ik- N .gzwff L Mhz 2 M ' :A ' yy. up X-A W W x N 'E 1. Mew' M . f-m,g..,,q- ,- 'S"'A if Jvfxw ,,gV':'Q- , K M-Q - f ww? .- ., Af- M--5 . 5.4 .. MV? hm 'N -f . SI: ,X 5 .,,-f ,f if SGW I ,,n-- .9-iffo -L- -fw'-fwlf . .M ww new ,L Q. SHIPPING OUT When friends say good-bye to each other and go on to advanced individual training. Its a hectic occasion, but one has time to reflect and appreciate the most trying eight Weeks that most will ever experience. ,, eeeppcp cc, , 4 4 RN. . V I ' qfqh , me .Q-1 1- if 14" 'kv "Rai: N ,A ,Nia X -f V' 4 J V. .,.. f .r - w, M ,M E wmgmwwfq WW W Wwffwl .MM?ffxf3'fjvJ3Cff ww PM 1wQ?m WMV VWMWW5 WgQQWi QWMMWWW yfNWW w 17 E N Nw Q W A N ,K J, wwf WMV U ' fn M gig wi Q Vg TSS 9353 il E5 QNSGX X3QiTf?PjXQUw 1 1 x X KQAWX 450303 S - Q36 Q ,X 0 wvwim 0003 . qw y k he 1,A, ff J 1 V mifiybggk iw, "25V2Qg'g J VE Ng is 2 Q, Q6 RM fpfwqowm? 1 qi' QSM 'N Ki Wg are pwffgxj up I qpmf ufv W2 5' 5 Sak - Q K EW 6 2 A Q ' ' V L gg?g52bO? a AXNM g , if f-Mjgdjwjj, ' HL ' ,Oxy 6Q5iQ3Kmy Txmfir OX fd! Lowa


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