US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR)

 - Class of 1957

Page 1 of 96

 

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1957 Edition, US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection
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Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 96 of the 1957 volume:

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Q X Q I Q fCllOl'LlSJ "For its hi, hi, he in the field artillery, 'tCount off those numbers loud and strong two . . . three "For Wll61'6,81' you go, you will always know 'That those caissons go rolling along." 'W S? .v 4-W. m L 1., ii ' fs 2 f -,s 045' , who as .Suk W ui Annex- ff A 75" -1 'A 4 . ,ali : "fi 1? I, 'x,v A A --1 - ,YQ 5 J Q kt 'au '- ,: f. xv 4 5 M M I Q 5 , if R' 1 4 Y X Q., X ' ' my l +- -. . AA ILYM-4 W Fw 1 -r mf 1 M J ,, f' ,w W AAF" .ff ' , , :N + ' 1 x " W.,.f,w' ii! M . ' 'Wa t V V a...-...W 9 4...-qnve-few' Jff' QPF' T152 , 1 4 A L. A. . E l I I i x I r 4' The United States Army Training Center, Field Artil- lery, at Fort Chaffee is the only post so designated in the U.S. Army. Its mission is to give basic artillery training, as well as basic training, to inductees and new enlistees. The field artillery has been an integral part of the United States Army throughout its history. Since George Washington's time, when lack of adequate cannon cost our forefathers heavily, the mission of the artillery is to provide close and continuous support for ground-gaining arms, and to give "depth" to combat. The artillery works closely with infantry and armored units, supporting these branches with heavy firepower in both short and long range operations. Each armored and infantry division has within it sufficient artillery to provide it with its heavy firepower. In its support mission, artillery provides a fire "cover" for advancing units, pinning down enemy positions with bombardment so their retaliatory fire is reduced. In its depth mission, artillery harasses enemy positions not reachable by small arms fire, extending the sphere of action far beyond the relatively small front-line zone. The artillery's armament today, including rockets, mis- siles and the atomic cannon, as well as more conventional weapons, is the most powerful the world has knwon. The first artillery training school was established at Fortress Monroe, Va., in 1824, one of the first of the Army schools. The Artillery School and Guided Missile Center presently is located at Fort Sill, Okla. The insignia of the field artillery is crossed cannons. Artillery braid for garrison caps and other uniform wear is red. From the "gun-pointers," "bombardiers" and "mat- trosses" of the Revolutionary War to the forward observ- ers, FDG men and cannoneers of today, the field artillery consistently has been a bulwark of U.S. Army strength. aa,AhedvMk,Akmq.. 0 To be trained to fight and survive in combat so that if the need arises you will be prepared to fight for your country. 0 To protect. defend and preserve the principles of the American way of life. 1 To prepare yourself to meet crises which threaten our democratic way of life. 0 To fulfill your obligation to your country with courage and determination. tChaHee Fort Chaffee, created to accommodate part of the greatly expanded Army at the beginning of World War II, was named for Major General Adna R. Chaffee, first chief of the U.S. Armored Force. Construction of the 73,000-acre post was begun in September, 1941. Most of the original buildings, con- structed of wood on concrete foundations, are still in excellent condition. The post operated as a training center from 1941 -to 1944, then became a personnel center until it was 1n- activated in 1946. Chaffee was reactivated in 1948 as the home of the 5th Armored Division, with the mission of processing members of all services, giving short basic training to former Navy and Coast Guard personnel, and giving regular basic training to newly-enlisted and inducted Army personnel. The post was placed on standby status briefly in 1950, and was restored as a regular training base in September of that year. The 5th Armored Division was inactivated in March, 1956, and Chaffee was re-designated the United States Army Training Center, Field Artillery. The post was given permanent status by the Department of Army in March, 1956, and its title changed from Camp Chaffee to Fort Chaffee. Chaffee lies about eight miles southeast of Fort Smith, Ark., a city of 56,000 population on the Oklahoma border. The post is approximately 135 miles by highway from Tulsa, Okla., and Hot Springs, Ark., 160 miles from Little Rock, Ark., and 195 miles from Oklahoma City. Approximately 80 miles due south of the Missouri line., Chaffee is situated in the picturesque Ozark Mountain region, with many points of scenic and historic interest surrounding it. The post has almost perfect climatic conditions for training purposes. The area has mild winters, hot summers and no fog. A sensible summer training program, in which uniform and training regulations are relaxed to permit maximum comfort, minimizes heat effects on trainees. K? 'Wai' rv--.......,-iz U39 OR GENERAL MAS WELDON DUNN Commanding General Thomas Weldon Dunn was born in Fort Worth, Texas, Septem- ber 12, 1908, the son of Mrs. Mary Bryan Dunn and the late Thomas W. Dunn. He graduated from the U. S. Military Academy June 12, 1930, and was commissioned a second lieutenant of Field Artillery. His first assignment was with the 12th Field Artillery Regiment at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He entered the Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, in August 1933, completed the battery officers, course a year later and joined the 11th Field Artillery Regiment at Schofield Bar- racks, Hawaii. In December 1936, he was assigned to the 17th Field Artillery Regiment at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He became a gunnery instructor at the Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, Oklahoma in August 1939, and in July 1941 was named a gunnery instructor at the Officer Candidate School there. In December 1942, General Dunn went to Brisbane, Australia, as Chief of Branch instructor at the Officer Candidate School for the U. S. Forces in the Far East. He was named assistant director of training there in June 1943, and director of training in November 1943. The following April he became assistant Artillery Officer of the Sixth Army, with which he served in combat in New Guinea, Leyte and Luzon, later accompanying that organiza- tion to Japan. General Dunn was reassigned to the Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, in February 1946 as assistant director of gunnery. In July 1947 he was named coordinator of Artillery training at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and in June 1948 became an instructor in its Department of Analysis and Research. He entered the National War College in August 1949, graduated a year later and became a member of the Policy, Training and Organization Section, Joint Strategic Plans Group, in the Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In July 1951 he was appointed assistant to the Director of the Joint Staff in that office. - General Dunn was assigned to Korea in January 1953 as artillery commander of the 40th Infantry Division. In December he as- sumed command of the I Corps Artillery. Returning from Korea in January of 1954 he became Chief of the Organization and Training Division in the Office of the Army Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, Washington, D. C. In August 1954, General Dunn was appointed Deputy Com- mandant, Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. General Dunn assumed command of the U. S. Army Training Center, Field Artillery, Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, July 11, 1956. Among his decorations, General Dunn has been awarded the Silver Star Medal, Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star Medal and Army Commendation Ribbon with Oak Leaf Cluster. .-12 -q-- - :-1 L--. f"ET'f ' I ,- fi ,-L, -f. sg.. r .. f , 5 . - ,,.'. PT? at- . QF-12,1 A I Q 'k" -iiiilfii Q, f 7" -- -at Q - vw - K He graduate - I ' . 1 ' ff ii 2 L-" ' ' . , " ,,'. -ici'iiifa-"iztPrg.4,s:f:TWL?-?f:a,ttS'iheist-iv ' N- and was I r i L s xA:,, L 15:-ff? LLA,i1 tl L',' Sf -'i,".L' "LhL iieffii '-A-," fe 0 ' sett -Eseld Anineryt .SCHB6 Q-, Fort Monmouth, New Jersey,--5-irr1i1e935g He tige- Field Artillery School from 1936 to 1940, and, ditty-in Hawaii, returned to the Field Artillery School in' 1941- iiii ofthe Department of Communication. During World War II, General Mace served in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations in Italy in 1944 and 1945 as Executive Officer, IV Corps Artillery, and as Commanding Officer, 424th Field Artillery Group. He participated in the Rome-Arno, North Apennines, and Po Valley campaigns. Following World War II, General Mace served on the Staff and Faculty of the Field Artillery School in 1946-47. He served as Executive Officer, Army Field Forces Board No. 1, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, in 1947-49. He attended the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in 1949-50, and, upon graduation from the College in July 1950, went overseas to the European Command. In Germany from 1950 to 1953, he served as Executive Officer and then Commanding Officer of the Ist Infantry Division Artillery, and later as Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, V Corps. General Mace returned to the United States in July 1953, and after one year with Headquarters, Army Field Forces at Fort Monroe, Virginia, was reassigned to the Far East Command. Arriving in Korea in September of 1954, he assumed command of the 7th Infantry Division Artillery, and con- tinued in that assignment until July 1955, when he joined the Korean Military Advisory Group. After a brief period as Senior Advisor to the V ROK Corps, he was designated Senior Advisor to the lst ROK Army and completed his Korean tour in that assignment. He returned to the United States in December 1955, and was assigned to Headquarters, Third Army, at Fort McPherson, Georgia, as Assistant to the Deputy Commanding General, Third Army. In April 1956, he was reassigned to the United States Army Training Center, Field Artillery, at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, where he is now serving as Deputy Commanding General. Among his decorations, General Mace has been awarded the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star Medal and the Army Commendation Ribbon. His foreign decorations include the Brazilian Medal of War, Commander of the Order of the Crown of Italy, the Italian Cross of Military Valor and the Order of Military Merit, Taeguk fKoreaJ. awake W .kAf1t'i , N- . ,P COLONEL FREDERICK G. STRITZINGER IV Chief of Staff , Ht., .-,.- -WW., F. .- BRIGADIER GENERAL RALPH ROBERT MACE Deputy Commanding General Colonel Frederick G. Stritzinger IV was born April 23, 1906, at Angel Island, Calif. He entered the Army as a second lieutenant in 1928 following his graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point. During World War II, he served in the Aleutian Islands and in Europe, participating in campaigns in Italy, France and Germany. He served in the Far East during the Korean conflict. ' Colonel Stritzinger was named Chief of Staff of the United States Army Training Center, Field Artillery at Fort A f 4t.Q-fy? ' Chaffee rn July 1956. Prior to this time, he was Director of I ,V the Department of Communications and Electronics I -. Q 7 -Q The Artillery and Guided Missile School at FortgS.iQl,Q,g5' . . . . 1 , Hrs decorations 1nclude,'the Legion 1 J 'Q-if ,,.-' Z Medal, and the Korean and . - 'elif if. Q f- .sXx.wt-oe,-7a.+oM,t,t ..,- 6,mgf.M.W..xt.,.,,. , ,, ..., , , ,,a.tps,, ., S -a--- '.-I ' - -ees war,-.f.'.g.N 4is'9fY3f"'f1i'1 -, ' . if M - Q A ' 'V-1--rffli - if H 3 swzghg I ie, te 'fig s r , ff' :N K ,gt I i A W ,1,,?g'?.,? . . ,,.. t- V. , at . ,f -t.-wt . . t A Q-:Sake af- ,Q-1-wif-2931: , r . 5, I 5 1 ' bw' " JW' Y- ny.e.f"f 1 to Y . 'Wil - 1 'wiiisf iGm'241as,1 .f,?-.Wt--2 " A W ' -it - . ' lwisfnafaxlnz-if . "is"iIW 'i"'5,'W'1"5i3" "Q st A ' -- " Rai?-W'?2sQX" 5i W15,51'Y'- A143 , t iii ma..teaxetaQiit'4,e-tes. time 1 - - W .- ew -w g . f W...-, ..t1,,g, ,VL 7 Y me to t - , . . . t... .. ,s ra QM I 1 New Arrivals in Fort Chaffee New Apparel From Head to Toe eimmng issue Fitting the Uniform Demonstration of the Proper Way to Make the Army Bed The First Army Haircut Orientation Lecture Tests Reveal Alrilities and Aptitudes f? ,Q fx ,flu x S, J 6" 5' K 5, I 'px i "H+: Individual Records Are Initiated and TllO10llgllly' Checked sn is Begim fe il' ilauou 5 Kew CW SCYXC S wh . ,Pan 0 Tw EYE Egwli Mau ls lut6YV law ed im' Cl as-stilcau 00 iw ID Picture and Record 'Established Partial Pay Is Advanced Shopping in the Post Exchange The More is ' ff C0mPXeted i i- .for Training Processing New Quarteru M366 to 2,-QQ 4 4 fg?46, -25? 1 -25 22.2 44 4 C Study ofthe fundamentals . . . Military Justice, proper wear of the uniform, military courtesy, guard duty, the manual of arms, first aid. First contact was established with the most constant companion during basic, the caliber .30 M-1 rifle . . . and repeated performances of dismounted drill . . . plus physical training. Barracks' Life Was Active Dismounted Drill Preparing for Inspection Q ef E 1 f - L f. A , W-1 f,.,.,.f..,-M ,A , N- W., -.,ifh,,:,vW,,,,k,...m-,MW..W .. ,,,.,.,M..,.W...., Y 7 V V -' ,MQ ,. L 7 V I i , r 1 Fust Aid Instruction r r s I I k r n , F , V .. .. V , -f W W V. .4 ff f ff-WM. ..v,vA,pv,w,w,vW M, Lmwm- V. :Hmymf:rfffzisffwffff-M,,a,1f.-fi- msmfffifwww r 4 5 Z,--.M , Q w Q1 1 Y ,mf Awwf,Lff,.m.Lff - ' .H Y ,. , . 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' ' 5uYff,:5:." ,. f y N . 5 -, ,?1r.f+vg,... ax - "N el Q Q 'Nw Us 'ew SRM ,1 R' 42:42, , " E - -.14 f f-eagff' 7,1 , S, F , .. - . , ggi: 1 .- :,,.,4.-g.,5,.f-i A 3 '-i'i-- -f'Lsi.',,L ' k ' -'ciszifsf'9111. my M, ,Q A Q 5, " ggzvmwmu 1 mgwwsjm w - .Ax.5..ww 322331. -V 2 if 2-1 :1?.4f2Q:g1 in Qffi., if fig2g1sQ.ffi.sQX W A :Ez-sef.2f.4f:f:gi3a .s:g1ns,3,',yfg,.2 K 5- 1,-1,ffg:,X,:, Ms, .mx..4,. - ' K 'flfiizafigsg 3-f K Q ' f - f -'ELFCIYFFS7 , , .,.. ,Wise as .:s::Qv.:5' wsffsv.. fs .-gxggji 'FHSL351' 7 falzw 2 K-'klillfis 2.5.55 w ,fgfilihsg 1 ,if -.lQ5i3ii?5SL -1 f "-A. 1 ,ii k,,'. ,-5-fwfgffzf , fgiiiii "Wi:2?55V515f,sYE N S .-f,..,..q.g5lQ.6 W -1915.5 K. .6-1.35 ,I M, , Q f SQ-7V 1 - mafi V 71,-sgssgzmi 2 S A S S ,,.::'f rf ffsnshmu-xx ,L fir- 1 Tgbh',g:w,fVm"ks :Q ,- ,ffl - fl ,.,f 2 W-s22.z2w2..e-.s, sv..,,L.f..Sf:i4lKgffG2 ' : .. W- 5 ' '-"'k S5iigf2g2i55'z4siMast- ey-ggffva L ,,zf3,ia:,:QkYfsxigafzffi-aggkwfgxf ' f Y M, ,ms QW 2 W5 fri 5 qw Q.. Q,-x , , 4. iqxww QfL,mfv.s, :.. ., f- ' 5 '- f --:,fas22?'iEsg.25.g,,,.fz,gf-f,f,..27, g -. .. - r l. Y '2:i?i???i2f1W1g.J'T?11s,z2i7U ' if -' "2-'.2.1f f 1s,i2 Qqakf lgffiw' 5 I-:': iiikxli' 2. ' .' - ,, A Down to work in earnest with a run on the Strength Course and the Con- fidence Course . . . classes on map read- ing . . . and how to camouflage. Procedure in taking apart and putting together the M-I . . . and first lessons in the complex task of firing it accurately. Physical Fitness Test Compass Study and Map Reading oudb ?'.w M-'JQAMQHUIM-.MWQAHV 'W V ,-Lr?iW 1'C1ill1i112l1'y if le l1St1'UCti011 f f CIRCLE . , at ,K Q . . , ,f yu ,A A M V s 4 W iw Af-?'f13 M xJ'ekA,,,:,x '-Y mfg J . -nu is l'?'L?41i ,J Wh-,pm Qmwnamnwwnmw, 'C -'DK-isydywi xp -sf ,,,f1..,, 'ag Individual Protection -M the Use of the Gas Mask fs. ,bu Q i. my i W-vi,,g,., any A 'fi ' - A --wl.J..,M """'-.M If , fi, 4 's-fiw of ' ' Ji f A --4' ' 'rzftfwvvf ' FA ami. ' , lf' 4 wf,...f"Y1 M, , gow" F, v we' if , M", 4 ' 1 . I - Camouflage and dv-nr .,,- , 14-..., Coucealment ,ek I., -"' uf, lx Ni, Tu an-A2 71 ,gy ,'?!,,1T'? 'X W' V' xiii? 1 .fb Z.. ,A if : ,Wig fu Y V 3' The third week brought more PRI work with the M-1 . . . and a chance to study and fire the caliber .30 Carbine. Introduction to the Army field radios . . . and the toughest of the close combat techniques - bayonet fighting. There were inspections . . . and all stood retreat. Firing the Caliber .30 Carbine 13 .K WW yi 4.x- M gl 89? a mt if ,f"W'. J onet Trainin Ii 55+-1 fx f., ,s .. VYLV L-,w.w--f , 2 -vm. - , A N W-wissigfvm:i1,if+.wI' my J X - -'-. , XS N Q Aff-.f A sv'-ie .-.iglfgi .5 Q. K " Tgfiiiiiikkll X ,. Y . 1.,L N, Fx'-9 wk K, T , INSPECTIONS :QM In Ranks and in Quarters The climax of rifle training, four zlays on the range actually firing the M-I . . . first for familiarization with the weapon, then for qualification as marksman. sharpshooter or expert. Also time to squeeze in dismountefl drill, physical training . . . and a few classes. , Y 1. Q., , - - mm 'Af . W' 'fs wh M 1. 'vfiir-55' W- mwatwtw- W 'K at 3 5 44 Amiga? " 'RR mmf 1 ' fig in 'iffy W -wmwg , f Z! 'X L, tf w , ,M 2135: Y, ,N K si g:mFwWU,,,1, HM ,,,',-wa, mr" X-,. M- ,A 'J ' Y- fig' fin lr' frggzii iff ' ' 37 , E' , , 3 1 , ' A ' Eiz rw ' Q, :K , ,if ,Q LQ!-Qffu W W ' if '..,"Y'u" 'L"HwW.ilw.g,,'. ' 1 1 W - H ,Wu W ww,-ff, v ww, 4 wi if x Known-Distance Rifle Range Checking Targets Firing Line V 1 1 wfim M 'Q W: Q1-Sf: Qfssifvfi W -Wx lwwmswgfi- fx 2, fig-1 ff: fi:,z:1Qzwezu 5 zz' ?se5:f'S?i5Q, muff wee , Wx. as 12134 ii' 'V fi as Jw -iw 43- L fs 224 fm, if2f'2Wf55W Wi fffii 'lui Yiiimff J Q, ,MWA i 2,25 My . i fag i .ggi f Iggff, - 1. en A , -:Ii ., I -: L 51311 lswffwf- 5,1 fegxv i iff? Vs- f, f 'f-,i'1.,: ' Q5 if-gi f ' f Viyili, ,fgiigsgi i gy? is K , z 5 .1-52715 x i Tl? Q as Sa ww fi 'K '41 ff W1 9 L 5 2,2 .,,,i,..n 2 QE gf 2 31? 5 Q Q 5 gf Y i Qq mg, H rw Q 1 i r ,gfer- X ,K ,fkgj X ,.. 1, , K KAN i n g HE fi. . ' '5 T Xxx- in the Pit O 4 ri . udlification Scores The fifth week began with M-I firing on the transition range . . . and inclurlezi night firing . . . the final and big test in bayonet training. Classes ottenrlefi concerning how the .flrrny fights by squads, and where each sol1lier's place is in the squad. Hasty fortifications were built . . . anfl reriews by the battery officers. TRANSITION FIRING The Bayonet Proves to Be an Effective Weapon at Close Quarters xi Below Ground . Above Ground K V Mg Squad T.1c,,t1ch X Familiarization With .30 Machine Gun .Ji The sixth week was a busy one. First the classification inter- view, to help decide our future in the Army . . . then the Basie Military Subjects Test, to determine how much had been learned . . . and finally, the caliber .30 machine gun . . . in the class- room and on the ranges. Study included mines and booby traps . . . and at preview of bivouac. gr Nw ,QM .5 'R , V f i Lge j f if -,- ,Q ,- -,: ' 'i M 5,3 - Ze, Y Rib 'V i- iw Y Q ? k if :ms g if k w V M-I ,Q .. J ,K - ,U 'gi I ,fu F ' gin .. it-mx i QA, M 1.1, , ' Q z .' I A , I iM,,,,i5,3taA., . - . N we 89- 'sv ' f ,4 ' ' W W ' 'M' . W 'W-A MW km, T , . k - :.,k1A.-555351-si -LQ www- "ffm 1 5 1 ' A " , fs. f A J i Mag ii? A , V . A KKKA NM M y , 1 ' '-swfaaszgzilxgqssyiesffisigwslkL2If , W ' 'K M W . K .-zzzfmfq , - 2- .Q N l ws- 1, iw-N p f' - 'f V ,2 1 K www ' H-ws: mi?l2g,1'-iffiff ffQ'7'5 V 1 7 ' " 1 ' 5 Y A ,L Vg -Q,'--:,::g5.:.,--3-55,6 -' ,trvgglfiw will-' ,g My g X- ,.- 0.2-V, 15:-we f. . .eff-:Av .... ,Q ' 1: gy--wa-V . -' - f A H , -, f-:g4,,,,1. wL1 93,1 X, wa., W -,,m,,- -Q .3 .A 15 , 91, I vgw, ,gas ii ' " K Y-K 1 ' . Mkm viggy- W, fr W, 1- - W fm MQ-g --.1 .,,. Ly--if ff ' " 5 W-ra,--Q. g,1!1k, Q ' 553, ' Q, fl- A ' ' ?'e.f'-v-Q,-pkm- ' I , ' K k',f'.f1' f M 3 wtf, ik. ,,- - N ,.,.1-fi"'..,,f.,n.- gm -- ,..,A I .saw ... L - A Q ,-y-qsN,.Q-,'-.,,..h.- 4 ' X. . W' . HM A Y 1. N 1:4-..' I w -- ..- M., . , A 'Pu N' Q Q. I , im. ,, e 'Sa pp. 'Y 1 On the MACHINE GUN RANGE 'Q Wy ,gf Checklng Targets Mines and Booby Traps 5 f i Basic Military Subjects Test i Long to remember . . . the start of lzivouac, with full packs and a long, steep hill ahead. After the march there were tents to pitch . . . holes to dig . . . before settling down to putting into practice what was learned in the classroom. Techniques in throwing grenades and firing the 3.5 rocket launcher were included . . . then the return to the battery areas in time for another review. W M 7 I , ,f ,Q X ' , ef X , , .Wm Y ll i ,M V . cpm W' .. X 3 if MW X XM viAmpWA,x:cwxxy MX 'cm ix ,gi OQWSA-wi ' X9 V Not Exactly a Picnic! in if ,Z J' 'S ,Ed- fr . i ,, , 4 Fx New - R1fle Grenades ""hda:'5 ww Hand Grenade Pravtice fi. am! via DQHVWFM R... ITHVIIIQI Inc' C1'el1u4lvs gif' 'WW' X an ww, ffm ,f' 3L5 ROCW We--MW Launchel ff if 1 12 1-ffimw' :2iw Sa5a3:,fmif S. I - Y . ' ivg--A2252-15Lz - 1,f-,gxfw -'agamefsfl A fkfgwfqgl. mia? ,:Af,Q.P.w-,,, .Q . :Raging Yffe?-2:r,1gxQ-ew-ff+i f , .11-svn L- , ,T1-f5l2i?'ri.s2i':7. 1+ ,JEwfkifkifi,2Z??E?1fbQ S X , i S1 -3:1225 1: vw f r r 3 f'tsiltfniiKF?-f53i.?U2T1S?s2'il?, f ' g ere- if 252z5,'?eg,tg,twW,sse43z'1sgg,? lainie' Xfiw 1 H Q N242 Qafeaffw New if :L gg 1-f A The final week of basic . . . highlighted with a graduation review at the end. During the busy days another high spot was firing in close combat . . . crawling the infiltration course, with live .50 caliber machine gun fire overhead. Then another PT test . . . another BMST test . . . over the confidence course again . . . drilled more . . . and, finally, a leave for home before reporting for new duty. --X N f QA.. Ever F re ai fl ,4 1 T! ii CLOSE COMBAT 'BN - ii' 4 S '5 gi- 3 .mdk ,iii g X KX mm., , . v Y 2 ff,-.f 1,1 , A A ax , M A Trial of Combined Training Q 5 lg FT. , . is i" if if ' . Q A f 5 , .f if Fi f ,Mim- f. yr 2 v ' yu' f , Lam W ,. Q-gm ff, ll Jwiwf 4g?fQwQ1w van ,MMP Signal UOfNHllllliCi1li0IlS Full Fledged Soldiers Now . First Leaves Begin . With Orders for New Assignments if The job of teaching men how to become artillery men is far tougher than simply telling them how to toss a shell into a field piece and pulling a lanyard to fire it. Today,s artillery weapons are intricate firing mechan- isms, capable of pouring out thousands of rounds of ac- curately placed barrages -- providing, and ONLY pro- viding that the men serving the piece and operating the fire direction center have mastered their jobs. To instruct trainees in proper use of the sighting mechanisms and other in- struments of fire control, cadremen employ long hours of patient instruction, begin- ning in classroom and, later, in the field. -v--mv-M... Howitzer Team Sets Up Gllll in Position Using the Quafiraiit FDC Tent C onimllllicatiou ff' 5 for Aiming Howixzer Aiming Circle Gun Crew Receives Aiming Instructions A-K In Rain or Shine . 1 rf' A .af hLmYL X L X f .iff 6 ARMY as a career if' sf 4' ,. 1 A full-time soldier has the satisfaction of serving the defense and welfare of his country, knowing his job is secure as long as he does his job well. Steady income, advancement in rank, annual leaves with pay, health and family benefits, plus a co- ordinated retirement plan are a few of the ad- vantages automatically enjoyed with a service record. p The United States Army has continually made available every advantage that will induce physical and mental development of an individual, which en- hances his realization of better living . . . for him- self, his community and his country. The Army provides schools for specialist training in all phases of its operation. In addition to the educational values these various academic centers afford, the career soldier will have opportunities to broaden this academic study with firsbhand visits to many interesting countries of the world. These advantages are a privilege of an Army career. No other business or organization in the world today can offer the freedom and broad scope of choices in selection of a secure future . . . a career in which to grow and develop for a personal fulfillment .of better living among free people. 4 pql . 4 fi 4 15 -s 3 1 i J i 2 3 Q ei 5 3 all sf . -1 A i .3 1 future ancl education with YCUR ARMY The Army wants men who can use their heads as well as their hands. Because of this, it encourages ambitious soldiers to continue their schooling while on active duty. To help them do this, the Army has set up an extensive Troop lnformation and Education Program. Soldiers who continue their education while in the Army find themselves better prepared for civilian life when they return to it. Most of us know something about the education benefits of the Cl Bills which were a great boon to the veterans of World War ll and of Korea who returned to school after their period of service. Few people, however, are aware of the edu- cational opportunities that are found within the Army today. A soldier can go to school while in the Army and prepare him- self to receive an eighth grade certificate from the Army, a high school diploma or high school equivalency certificate from his home State, or even a degree from an American college. Besides this, there are many useful vocational and technical courses open to him. ft Wh so ,g M lt ,f vs. it y at rrr Q The Army will assist all personnel, enlisted men and officers, in the payment of tuition to the amount of 75 percent, up to a maximum of 57.50 for each hour or point credit taken. Thus, a soldier taking 6 hours of college work at a cost of S12 an hour will have a total tuition of 5572. The Army will pay 3545 1357.50 x 6 hoursl, and the student must pay the balance of 3527 and purchase textbooks and special materials from his own personal funds. Many schools will allow him to pay his part of the tuition on an installment basis. The Academic Levels of Instruction Include 1. INTERMEDIATE C5th Through Sth CradesD 2. HIGH SCHOOL C9th Through 12th Grades? 3. TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL fflenerally on High School Levelb 4. COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY University oversea branches have made the Ameri- can university campus worldwide. In the Caribbean area, a serviceman can enroll for courses taught by facility members of Louisiana State University. The University of Maryland makes similar arrangements for soldiers in Europe. The University of California serves the Pacific area, the University oflHawaii con- ducts classes for men in the central Pacific islands, and the University of Alaska serves troops in that territory. Each university determines its own entrance re- quirements. When a serviceman completes any of these courses, he can be sure he will receive the academic credits granted by the sponsoring institution. hnical schools and what they teach Army schools teach more different kinds of subjects than perhaps any other single school, college, or university in the world. There's a 300-page Army School Catalog lllepartment of the Army Pamphlet 20-2U which lists and briefly describes allnof the school courses. You will not get all of that information in these few pages. However, here's a partial listing of the great variety of general fields of study which you will find in Army schools: Ag-Cgnnting Optical lnslruments Repair Airplane Maintenance and Repair PClClfl-Ng and Crating Automotive Operation and Repair Personrlel Procedures Business Machines Operation and Repair Rllarlnacy Chemical Laboratory Techniques l'lL0150grflplly Construction l'llySiCl1l Therapy Cryptggraphy Prillliflg Diesel Engine Repair PSyCll0l0gy' Drafting Public Information Electricity Rflllflf Elegtmnicg Radio Operation and Repair Explosives Handling Railway Operation and Maintenance Food Service and Management R6ffigCTUli0fl Gasoline Engine Repair Social Work Heating and Ventilating Sound Recording Helicopter Operation and Repair Sl6v6ll0fiHg A Languages Tabulating Machine Operation and Repair Laundry Operation Telephone Equipment Installation and Repair Mapmalting Television Operation and Repair Marine Engineering Transportation and Distribution Management Medical Care Warehousing and Storage Medical Laboratory Techniques Watch Repair Motion Picture Photography Welding Office Methods and Management Woodworking u'3.I" 3? i ' pw L 1' X 11 3,-5m,,,. wf ff is-gig:-1 ' ' F N M1 ,.,f we HQ""" --Q.. g ww fs t wax ?' an important part of your education in today's army MLK QMMWU WD f ,uK3"f-'5 rw , . fs' K L M .L hw Srv- ' ,- -f p4, .W-Af-nv '9"?'w M84 ' N, 5, mw, wmv of today . . . As a soldier you will help shape the destiny? j s pf all people. Therefore your choice - il. Y - A - oo'lll.11 ET s oooo - l oool Army as a career must be pursued wlth fulness. F aithfulness to God, to yourself slle f Qi f o L loll f ill' lee1'e 7 V- ,,.l ,V3r.1L ,'k.y .:l, Vkkk .L:i.LV Amerieah of YOU must pwiecf your bestfeseffoffs- You? llslees loele llse sl'e 1 ssssl lslol ff? e-'. l-l:" 'll" ll"1 fff 1'ffljf3T1l?Zfije'f5f51fji1ij. ft of Rf 9511611 Will? sliiimff llll S' Iljfbga le'L- i si:,QQiglg511lf11f1i'-i.L ,4,l '-l. K ,. ,.L'- - 3 s "" ""S- X 7 ssls ,,.., H ' s eess M COLONEL ROBERT H. DAWSON 5 Regimental Commander 4th BATTALION 2nd REGIMENT December 3, 1956- February 8, 1957 LIEUTENANT COLONEL DONALD G. THOMPSON CAPTAIN EDWARD F. DAVIS Battalion Commander Battery Commander in iw , ,Nc , c......, CADRE - First row: PFC Michael Magliore, Sp2 Floyd Mason, Sgt Wilbur Edwards, SFC Kenneth Fitzgerald, Sgt Donald N. Roach, MfSgt Loney. Second row: Capt Edward F. Davis, Btry Cdr, SFC Ben J. Lawley, PFC David G. Thompson, PFC Dolphus Crandle, Sp3 Gregorio Marrere, Sp2 Lester Sullivan, Sp2 Bernard Jones, Sp3 Manuel Sanchez, Sgt Bobby D. Hughes, SFC Leroy W. Thorpe, Cpl John W. Boland, Lt Del L. Briscoe. Adams, Richard E. Adelgren, George R. Allen, Walter F. Baldwin, John E. Banks, Percy L. Beeman, Richard L. Bell, J. B. Betker, Aloysius N. Blazer, Bay B. Boswell, Lee Bowers, Frank W., Jr Alexander, Harry W. Brinkley, Floyd B Browning, Don J. Bryan, Bobby G. Bryant, James C. Buelt, Allan W. Bullock Jerr D Q Y ' Burnham, George N Burr, Raymond W Butcher, Cecil H., Jr Butler, James H. Byers, Matthew A. Carlson, Lee R. Carmack, James V. Carrell, Lyndle G. Carter, Paul Cauther, Ben M. Cavender, Howard R Chipman, Lucian E. Clark, Isaac Coffman, David V. Congdon, Robert A. Coon, Billy J. Cooper, William H. Cowling, Marion F. Cox, Nlitrlwll Crowson. George D. Crutchfield. Hubert C. Currie. Lovster D. Curtis, James J. Danielson, Larry R. Davis, Henry Dempsey, Roy D. Deganis, Alfred J. Denton, Robert E. Dorsett, Wfillialn E. Douglas. Vlfilliam J. wfif 2? CONFIDENCE COURSE I ,iff Downing, Joe H. Driscoll, Dean F. Duncan, Louton W. Dunning, Roy J. Ellard, Billy J. Ellis, Richard A. Eness, Paul G. Erickson, Ronald F. Evilsizer, Carl E. Ezell, Mason Foerster, Klaus E. Foy, Thomas J. MA li uf g1lx f. Fraley, Arvil, Jr. Francis. Thomas J. Freeman. Thomas A Gray, Robert Grether, Robert A. Grimm, Richard R. Hagan. Richard N. Hall, George W. Harrison. Albert L. Harrison, Richard C. Hartley, Richard Hays, Jessal W. EADING Ileufl. Charles li. Helgcson. Rodney Herclt. lylonalcl H. A HlljIIlixI1Z.K6IlIl0tll,l. Higgins. Richard Hill. Clifford Hinklc. Walter R. Hinton. James H. Hook, Uarwin D. Hoss, Hubert W. Howard. Robert E. Hughes. Glenn D. WD" BATTERY ON Hunkins, Eugene E. Hyder, John F. Jacobson, Harold A Johnson, Earl W. Johnson, Travis G. Johnson, Webster Jones, Donald C. Karg, Willard P. Kilgore, Willie J. Kimball, Ronald D. King, Albert L. King, Charles W. THE K - D RANGE King. Dennis King. Patrick E. Lamb, Dean E. Lamb, Willard E. Lune, Charles A. Luuernian, Donald F Lawson. Kenneth D. lieihee. Wax H. Legueur, Edgar E. Leu, Gene A. Levis, Robert E. Long, Thomas R. DRILL l,OYlIlgI, lrvon Luvlmlw. llwuy nv Lys-ll.Cl1arlie ll. Lymrll. llugll lVl. Mack. Darrell L. I. Maqllire, Cllarlvs .l May S. Lucas McComb, Teflcly J. NlCGLllI'C. xllf,'llilQ'l McNlillzm, Marx in lVley4'r, l'l1lwz1rml .l. Nlillaml. Larry ll. J vfu 'nl' 'VE Mitchell, Bobby G. Mitchell, William E. Molitor, Marvin R. Moore, Clarence E. M Morgan, Robert J. Murr, Lynn C. Nelson, Roy J. Neppl, Orville F. Obst, Carroll R. Offerman, Andrew J. Olson, Robert E. Olson, Vincent L. Osborne, Claude W. Owens, Arlie D. Park, Edgar E. Pasichnyk, George Pavek, John R. Pelton, Ronald D. Peterson, Dale O. Pickle, Joe B. Pitts, Dallas F., Jr. Plumle, Charles G. Polipnick, James F. Pottebaum, Eugene J Price, Ervin L. Pride, Charley F. Rauber, John E. Rawdon, Billy L. Reedy, Chester L. Reynolds, Wymond J Rodenhauser, Elsie H Rogers, Kenneth W. Rohde, Merle M. Rokala, Earl R. Sanders, Glenn A. Sargent, William D. Schichtl, William E. Schloss, Robert C. Schroeder, Jerome L. Scoggin, John W. Selnron, UllilFl0S lf. Sells, J. C. Shull. Joseph ll. Spaustat. Lawrence Spencer, Roy ll. Stadtherr, Joseph W. Svenclsen. Williaxll E Swanson. Cerharcl A. Swanlek, John F. Tabor. Lemuel E. Talley. James E. Tanlcersley. D. L. Trammel, Jerrold L. Tyson, Vernard D., III Underhill, Jimmy D. Unseld, Max J.. Jr. Venloerg, Lowell K Voight. Ronald W. Wade, James R. Walker. Clovis E. Walker, George R. Walker, Tommy D. Wallace, James W. Wallace, Jimmy W. Wayland, John E. Weber, Jacob G. Weisenberger, Tony, Welch, Louis H. Welch, Neil W. Wendt, Reuben M. Westerhaus, John H. Westhoff, Michael U. Whelchel, Alva T. White, John F. Whitten, Raymond G Wieker, Gene G. Wilkins, Philmore, Jr Wilson, Claude G. Wipf, Verlyn J. Wischmann, Hugo H ROCKET S AND GRENADES Wiselnan, James E. Woods, James A. York, Delmer Zimmerman, Jerry H Not piclurerl: Broyle, Donald C. Hamil, Andrew C. 'f fjf . ig :Mil ' if T 1 Y -YYW-V A WW VW , . Q N AYONET DRILL HE aasmvwll , - , K f - ' wfzwfz-ax-fQs,f T W 5 Q HQYMQTQQPSHEL j xv K f fi?" kfleaifgiiw H 1ffi2:iFWU I K ' ifinlifl- 2 ' ., il.. af ,I ,x T Q x ' HASTY FORTIFICATIONS Ann I wiv df, . -4 A C .-K. X. 31 ,nk ig, ffa L-w.a..M,f MACH1 E UN SQUARE Mg 4 .:,'iL,, w Q .v 5 5 ' 1 v Ta 'lf.fmf1L7 f f J. A wx, 6, 5-Q,.:w 2 J J I BASIC MILITARY adam.. :.m..Q..Iy:wM.,mmfv4uxM a pp 'T w '?Qwf""'-'1e. T! il mmm N 5,1-9 I' 4 41 -nf W W A v iv Wy in 5 F 1 L Q fx 'Vw JA X W. W 1 X 'A' 3 R NW rf S M, i nw 1.1 ' ' 4 fm, , D' E '54 V .M H4 ' , Y 3- if 'kai I n I . . V ,M Nw., M av N- ,. ---- T T v X R TT K im: N if -...,, SUBJECT TE T . ,ww , If M an-GPM K' -n ffff-'W-,ZW-AM .ff fffk you 'e Q iff-,A 'K gl' -we . v, vig CLOSE COMBAT , ""'W-s-..- ff' TN. :Q 'L-1 MD9' BATTERY PLATOON SHOTS G,-ew .Lk- ,nm X 5 1 Col Dawson presenting plaque to Capt Davis and Trainees - O S nh "IW -57? SIGNAL COMMUNICATIONS --..f" 1,,I J My W-MM 744 ARMED Foaces PUBLICATIONS AYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY ALLAS U S A


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) collection:

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 24

1957, pg 24

US Army Training Center - Yearbook (Fort Chaffee, AR) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 36

1957, pg 36

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