US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY)

 - Class of 1958

Page 1 of 134

 

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1958 Edition, US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 134 of the 1958 volume:

. , K L :FQ ' ew " ' W A W Q - .-.w, 1-1 ,F X ,, . M'5'5"1' ,W 5. 'www' 45 .t 1 " A VZ ffl, 1. . wx' V V , . , H ,f.-,,,fQfg,1f. Ls,1m,,f1,wL,,h: f N , Q , f, , R 1, .,vY4g,, up f4g5fv,s wff V , P f ,.. , Q 4, V -Q., 1 g l ' H u.',e2f2?wwW?w, , EQ", 273. 1' ' A ,wf+Plsf32'1M Q 53- iw' ' ' ff' -- 'W ' I '-1 N f , ,fv ' 1 'Q H - A S A ' g y ? --'- 1 'ff 1 ' 'L M, A ,- 'wsffag , , V , Eigng ', - "-.fg?'r5W5f:,.,4,- R N Q A f A , "" f 'kt W as ' ' - ' ' vf?5?'?b, eg? A 1 I W' af 4 K' ?'3A'r'8 A 75 Y ' Q1 5, 5 gg.-1 4, 5 - wavy 'f'Q-sid Qg A .ff-, . , 5 . if 'fifijffifovr f 3 if I f X -'--- 4 X fl llllllliwllli Q gi' ig? ' i H' K, L Q . W I Q 9 'kj IKM ff' t5-jf"Nfx,. -,N ,I x 0 Q7 551, 1, ,.x D 5- M. x N19 LAWMW Q-A-A W 5- 4 QB. 5: Q. 6' ""' Q- y 1 3 f"' -1151- t-' f-hi W D3 rip. fx ff, XX X fl-f' ,fb Q f' Q ff N 'WW ff fy x 4 1 X f A f fa 'i X W XX h K Yi 4 , 1 N'-" , H fi Q iw , A uw Q bf ' fp 'Q V '-'Zig Designed and C, JB Y, 4 i n 'sf V T ., pybyse-Rvlcecomggififgi XX f ' 0 -:QT WMKAQ-M ONSylNC. .X isa! Y 1 as 5 E P ORT KNOX, Kentucky . . . the Home of Armor, and site of the U. S. Bullion Depository, was tirst established in 1918 as Camp Henry Knox in honor of Maior General Henry Knox, Chiet of Field Artillery from 1775 to 1782, Chief of Stat? of the Army from 1782 to 1783 and Secretary of War from 1785 to 1794. From 1922 to 1932 Camp Knox served as a summer training camp for units of the Fifth Corps Area. In 1932 Camp Knox was designated Fort Knox, a permanent military establishment. Since that time it has been con- sidered the home of United States Armor. In 1935 the Treasury Department established the Bullion Depository at Fort Knox. Not generally known, however, is the fact that the Gold Vault was used as a ',,j'jf., t ..: .- , '-QQ'-, , ew, 5 gm, 3 I sffk.- tvifi 'Nw Wigs.-W --.. ,, ' ft . , W' ff 1, 'vw is A 5 ZX 'wt -r rbrs V at , E Ms?-253 isa-fig ' 1 1 . - fl ' ,Ass ,. 5 ln: . -i" ft x . ' J ' - " A f - ' ,.,, A ' i st' V "-s A q i' il V A+ , ' " I .. '- rs .- . 1 ' ' xg .,., Y . H - Y .. , .. ,,.. . Mg- , A. Afff 1 ,, ,MH . , ,t.. I s 5 ' , ,A ' g g" - ,.,,,. kykky. 1 " -"', 3 . s"- ,,s,t is .. W ,..i . sz fys- gf-few-we -- ,M-Milfs--7 fr fft- ., ,--.' if- ., fmiizgf-'ss M--Siu-fififsrsg:fifwsr1,--is esszclr-fi twwfffwmi: fr f :ww-1. , Q., , 1- , s Q 1 . 1 - f, fmfczsfsegififsfafefsgeeztzs'eww sf--,fffazif - -, - f 5. ' H 1 ff.-fuses 5 - , , , 'gl V 1 , . ., . war time repository for the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the Magna Carta, one of the Guten- berg Bibles, and the original of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. 1 1 HE CONTINUAL expansion and improvement of armor training at Fort Knox since pre-World War ll days has made it possible to keep thousands of men prepared for combat in the event ot armed aggression. Organized armor training at Fort Knox had its inception on October 1, 1940, with the establishment ot the Armored Fiorce School and Replacement Training Center. Although the Armored Force School soon became a separate organ- ization, the Replacement Training Center continued to train new enlisted men until 1947. On July 14, 1957, the Third Armored Division was reac- tivated and assumed the duties of the Replacement Training Center as a training division. The Third retained this mission until March, 1955, when it again became a tactical division and was assigned to European duty. The Armored Replacement Training Center superseded the Third Armored Division on March 15, 1955. ln October of that year the training at six-month Reserve Forces Act volun- teers began. More than 26,000 soldier passed through initial training courses at the ARTC during its first year of existence. ln 1956 the ARTC was designated as the United States Army Training Center, Armor. Today USATC Armor is com- prised of two armor training regiments, two basic combat training regiments and a specialist training regiment. lnstruction is given in Basic Combat Training, Advanced Individual Training, Armor, Basic Unit Armor Training and Specialist Training. Specialist schools are provided for inter- mediate speed radio operators, general clerks and clerk- typists, automotive maintenance workers, general supply clerks and parts supply clerks. USATC Armor comprises approximately half ot the popu- , , A. f .Jan - 1 5USATQAi Q .,.s. T lation of Fort Knox. ln addition to RFA volunteers, enlisted men now assigned to the Training Center include Regular Army Enlistees, lnductees and Enlisted Reservists. Larger than any Fort Knox training center of the past, USATC Armor now has facilities capable of processing more than 15,000 trainees at one time. - . Q.. . 9 if C4 fww 21 I. WN X gy f .M A w S, f JW -. Uggzigg, 4 kg, GS F , K , ,ka Q fa , 'Q I4 55: 5 . 'Q 94 M M 2 2 M .,,.3i,-.1gl'i,Tiigfgs, W f. 1 4 . 1 A Q wk' 5 Qifii hh' R ,- 426114 gyi-gf, mf, ax ' -vim , ,, ,q.,Q,y , ,QE , ' 'W Qilfifif ' gm, ' " vi.ffff ' 3: ,T QM , ,V .L,yg.f,fg, ' A ' fbi f- . - , . f' -- ' N ,..,. . W , L - '4 4' 'itiiitpggx A l W 1 f :iv 2 '34 X . ? iw F E ,y . M, ,f psig dm ,. Wx . :,4:,l K w, h' K LL..g f-an 4 :Ziff W--f I Q ,L - 1 QI' M ,L 1 QV! rx 3 pg 5. A N P . ss N2 'wi 'Z - ' i ' ww f C gg M -61+ H V X. . x X. A , M ,.g:,-,fy 4-J t-gh. A A . w ' aw ' - -A , iw-mf-e'f: ifgyflcf ' TJ' afar7.,"2..:fswf'L"' f 1r..s'Zv'S Sin-A-Q.,--w".'s-I-ffilfifli ' A 2iS'-,'L'.",'fff4fi5K3f fff.i11-wii-via .- .,fi,321ffi-1.'1fw.'f Lt t A ,af " LQ fi'-':fFxf'i, f or ,. ' 1 xfafd '-lf'L5'fii 158+-22 . ,"f"'12frG2-ti, 1,-1, ,:ffff2?E'L .- -img' E, 4vfa2m?,,,,, w- gi?Jef'were-.f'31QPfff:ff'f:"?f5-o'gf .,:1sff V, 4 ,few gfsrfe A tr 'M-s+1.,m.,-1' : ' - '+: w - fy,5M1r1,x.?f'UfQ:g-axis''41?'i4l-fiizf "'-1 -:'-J-U3 J' 1 M -AK. rriff- 1 , , . 1:3-Qweasffmw 'af f,.,..f-often Q, ray we . fi , W jgw3f,g,f,cgggg.5,fg',.gk e -gg: , M, ,Q-gqgv ,j,g.g,':3:3" 1i:gx,qv1 fig ' , , ,gs 1-gk, rss. , t,tQ,y4g, ,.,f -3-..:iL,A,, 4, ,,.a,,,M,,,t3g,1 Aw . , Q - , ,, ,, wa. 1--fxfigwe, 1.17.73 ,g,,w,Q- ,Q at -A .. fvfffQag1jnvff3.- -1 Isxag gie. , ,,fLnjs511jgz," .,'fnrwe-fe-' nw wtirf 'F t,.fsf1,?fs1," -- 'awake wf1 fsa,f!E,-- ,W-?12'.,Aiei2.f'gPefRJV- f '- . Y. ' ' 5' 5-,iggigi . I ' .jfs 515+ . M1 I 1. E -z. af ,,-esteem. ,jg ffaf,1:g,-5 ' - ,A age f 35 :win E 1 " ,g,,f.g:f-f.,e-gb M' '5:5?i"Z.' WG? M? , E, .fu 1 xLW' 123' if tiiaffgrmbe J 'Ziff -A 7"f9:o?2E'22r?4' z - i ,L HEADQUARTERS US ARMY TRAINING CENTER, ARMOR oEF1cE or THE COMMANDING GENERAL Fort Knox, Kentucky T0 THE GRADUATES OF BASIC TRAINING In this era of nuclear weapons, rockets, guided missiles and other modern tools of warfare, the most important element of National Defense remains the man who employs these tools. Man's natural habitat is the earth and in war he must eventually defeat his enemies by struggle on the ground. Hence the necessity for well-trained soldiers of the United States Army. V In combat the soldier faces many unnatural, difficult and trying situations. lt is, therefore, essential that every man be thoroughly disciplined, technically qualified, and physically, morally, and mentally conditioned to survive on the modern battlefield. This has been the purpose of the military training you have received will TSCSIVB In the fl1TA1I'9. here at USATCA and How much benefit you receive from any training, of course, depends to a considerable degree on how much you put into it. Here at the U.S. Army Training Center, Armor, your training has been a well-rounded program designed to provide you with every opportunity to develop the attributes of a good soldier. We feel, too, that in many ways you have developed a greater sense of responsibility and a greater awareness of the world around you and, therefore, have become a better citizen of this great country of ours. It is hoped that this book in the years to come will serve as a pleasant reminder to you of this brief period of your military service in USATCA, of the truth that soldiers are made, not born, and of your continuing duty to insure that the defense structure of this country is always maintained at the highest degree of readiness. ' wma PAUL A. DISNEY Major General, USA Commanding 'fn . W: My , iv 4 42 3136533 :kia 23152 ' My A , 2 Q Q ws, g Q 5.-v w af M .5 : Sf - a H' 2 if 4. .M , 'ff 5. ' :- -bw X Q AQ'-vw Ji? ',' ff Q .- k R 3-HL ,sq .Y ,Q K X, , fy Y J Zh ff. y .uk , X K: gg ,S 1 in -0? ' YV -, ,eff 15 .f W 1, A ak e 'fr s X k 'W .Xflfz 4 x x Q ' K Q i 1, - , ' , iQqRJ,i.: A+ 3 riff' ,f ' ' f. L, ,wgffgf -,fx 4. 5. f. V,'. , ' ' f? ,lag-.,:n 572555 ,fy 55.4, if . .r W, . - If :gf xg Q? 'Lf sew if H55 Eu ., Q 1-,. , . hav ,. Av gmf-,K A 5 Q . .H 0 , '3f?f4?- , " , .V v f. ' -1:3321 ' M' uf? ., In Qi ,Q v fi , Qf 5, R , - e ? M3 gifs? 'W ww K' Nu A ME, LEJXSKF gf. rg ug ,fm 51 -.A if . H ,J 5? f H' S M W M Q5 A 4 95 M Q QW if 4.5 ivemr? , 5? v I I Jguwgtri' H H' Q H B v . .w11lusnJ vi. mmfmza ,, M ' I fig, Qi' M. I . ?- .. ,.,, ,. A ,M a ---HN, mms, M.-...,. H 3 y--f., , 157 ' Q.. J Rf- Q , , 'C -rips 2?'NxLf, 3:22- 1 .X , sw f ,7, 4 ,wa,,,g35v! f f , l Z .gif , ,AL iii From a group of civilians the rapid transformation to that of a well-trained soldier begins Guard detail prepares to fold flag following refreal. fi A -mi-it M-ffwpfgafr -mQ2,1vi me V+ 'A' i " - - -' -wmv' New barracks represent advanced planning for improved living facilities Training company area is carefully maintained, l:Ul1PANY H Soldiers progress to squad tactics in the field Soldier learns to fire properly from all positions. ri ,1 I .? wwff' A wi! gag if i"' p R 414'-Re, QI? 'sift 4 , 5 1 ' -.- 'W " tr 1 1 ,.-:ggi MXXQQVAW, A 4 Q 54, r.. 4 ,W xx Close supervision corrects ony possible error in technique. The rifle grenade widens the scope of the soldier's fire power A well-stocked library is available to interested Theatre facilities are conveniently located for use during oft-duty time nv fcxox mf.-Wfmf' 2 - - 1-,sg J F'f 5 --iii?-l ' Q1w I',:'k :Q - if : ' i lg,.,,. H3 . . WZ. es- T11 1 M, , J H-V ,f we ' E , ,X 1 B, i Q L My fl J-ef 7' 3' ill 'il FS! ifjlltk ' W-M v'V"' Y illsiililiili 1, lllllllg :Mi "l "'!'! 'lllllii' 'IE' ' rg ' l-Qi? if lllllb i ' il lllllf "W l ll .lu ,,NN ill"1realli'l:llii51'Ull'l ' lll l ,W w xmmxwlw wimw,:1 1,135'353,1,,151,11iR3Q51,3l,llllwi,i,gge will-all -'si,iliillll3llll,lWgllrgiligxlxgfiwW, gyw Y M ,rieee-1 ,M 1--.- ii 1. lv. lb- -- We Y W-- f qi ml 'ill W YM, n.,, ., ,,,il rw 'li ,ii -.iii i , will V W ,l,,W, M,-is ,fr l. , M J, , 2ilie5?gs,,,wm l'wfl"i,,' 2 M4 feigfxtqiliillwllllllge VJ The availability of good sports facilities is represented by the Sadowski Field House Head-on View- Fort Knox Gold Depository .. 1 -Whme if-? lg? Uh, M 2? 'iff M IIIITIIFI I 4 2 i5ll mn W :ssl ug N E HI Ill! m 53 ii! llll ng Q 5 all an Q Hmmm! a es ,Wei A 1-we-ill Ireland Army Hospifol iypifies the modern medical facilities that are established for care of Army personnel Patton museum represents the proud battle heritage of Armor mga ggi we aa: asia xx: wfiff -iff? , 'MQ sv V ,,.,3Q.,,, ,.,Qg,.,,i 4. W ,K M W Y Q A ,- 51 Q5 - 14 ,wfkvm , fTW y Nw s fi it .. M , 6 . Q54-',f5if f A gn -Q 55 f ,wgj 3' . ? 'L A-.cx'eif,v' ' 'zflkiis 'Q 1 Q f - ,f,.-fb-gif 6 1, The principle of religious freedom on which our country was founded is represented in the U. S. Army. Places of worship for all faiths can be found at Fort Knox The civilian is not easily recognized in this trim, tough soldier, Backed up by the acquired skills of his training and the vast moral and economic strength of the United States, he stands as a bulwark of freedom in our world FROM ClVlLlAN TO SOLDIER he civilian passes rapidly through the transitional processes and is exposed to military routine as soon as possible. He begins to assume identity and learns to react to orders. all xi N 't' ll l W A Personal Interview , ' ,,, 52 Completion of Identification Cards if 3' gf W I . A 1 x I X I S 1 ' IT 111 Mfr lil Q Ml l N- ll soldiers are given a complete Physical examination upon their arrival at Fort Knox. ln this way the findings of the previous examinations are confirmed and entered in the permanent records that will accom- pany the soldier during his 'period of service. exam Qu Medical olificer checks heart and chest so t Eyes, ears, nose and throat are next Corpsman records blood pressure 2 am l .s - s , fl' Supply clerk checks fit of Combat Boots CLOTHING ISSUE Soldiers must have adequate, good fitting uniforms and clothing before entering their rigorous Basic training, Second check of clothing issue A good uniform fitting is assured Soldiers are ready for training i , ,A-img, :Q-wemw , -gl m:w,,: w ,ef This is the M-'I Rme Sergeant acquaints soldiers with rules and regulations of housekeeping. Care and maintenance of the M-l rifle is not overlooked. Clothing and footwear in top shape at all times There is a proper place for all issued clothing There is a procedure for hanging clothing The new soldier now meets the Company Cadre, and the many new regulations that govern his life are explained to him. Brass must be kept spotless Good food in 7 clean, modern mess halls nt' 'ia Q 4 I 4.-m' i 1 l a X gn it L an The bulletin board must be read every day The neat appearance of this row of barracks reflects the emphasis on order and discipline among all trainees. ' . 'I au: mai? 'Mew All mirrors and other barracks equipment must be kept clean CC-AREA mp... 2 las, , Y , . , .. if :: 7X'ii'-. 3" if 7 trrklwwf :SEEK 1 1 1 -"-' 53f"i':.:.' ::E-Q'e::..i1'.5-l.,:.. ' ' " T,-.QJ " E" "'m3iE :: '35 : ' l ei' 1. l ,itaa 2' l ff'-,ie 15?-Z-we S za M3 :digg "Dress right, Dress." Military drill begins immediately and acts as a cementing M I LIT A R Y force for the squad and company. Through these drills, D R I L L the soldier begins to act as part of a team. Lack of pro- ficiency is evident in this early stage of training. Ready to march in good order. Manual of Arms is practiced under close supervision ' H155 , -,11S S .,...,,,, - .. 14: 1+ . 5 .L g L,-L 1 V. ,gym-pgig, as 1,-A. Jgxr, 55.5.-, -'gg Squat lumps teach coordmahon if Physical training is done in unison to further emphasize teamwork PHYSICAL TRAINING The next exercise wiII be . . . yL I 1 Nlfefe IX-li I XV 5 III I I E? --sa Instructor explains proper method for disassembly of the M-I Rifle THE M-I RIFLE Instructors display clip loading procedure on large model of M-I rifle. ,,,,.,. Instructors demonstrate each detail in proper , 'Q'- ,,. , W hCH1dliI19 of M-1 Rifle Silhouette charts clid in training C LASS RCJCM ,O It seem sto fit Ronge officer times firing order to test speed of the trainees. "Now, your left crm needs correction" M-1 RIFLE-P R I CIRCLE O O I Proper kneeling position is exomined by the instructor ee-asf ,- ' Lmwzu-, wsgiswtf A f Kb 55 Ha ' 1 , "g ' : X- in - K, miie i -if W sf uw f 3, pw, V 11,51 . 'x Soldier receives Cid in P"0Pel' Prone P0Slll0n After the soldier has received his mechanical instruction on the M-I Rifle, he 'rhen must learn the proper tiring positions for this weapon's use. Overall view of P.R.l. Acircle Weapon cleared, bolt open Posting up the target Instructor checks to see that trainee has properly cleared his weapon. Trainee adiusts his rear sight. mmrhh K A . W gf . may -Q f, Q 1, ' Instructor adiusts sitting position Insertion of initial round Firing line-i OOO" range. 0 Trainees check scores on targets. :cw-vu-.,-M 4.1- Good example of proper sitting position. "I hope my score is good enough for expert rating." M-1 RIFLE K-D RANGE Trainee firing for score from kneeling position. if W i , . K Cadreman udiusts soIdier's sitting position tV,: i-1, 2, hmm' I fm. mAi3,,,. R mfhggx V -, M M- M , Remember everything the instructor showed us about proper firing procedure View of Known-Distance range from firing points iw Wfffv QVX ro sive LIFE AND Pmasznvs HEALTH or begins class forearm is examined Tourniquei procedure is practiced FIRST AID Soldiers practice on each other 4 ll soldiers must learn to be self-sufficient in case of iniury in the field, Through First Aid Instruction, soldiers ore taught the essential procedures for self preservation. Instructor displays Cl combination fence. ield fortifications are necessary to the sol- dier in the field. Proper use of the various kinds of fortifications that are taught in basic training will afford maximum protection from enemy fire. Trainees string barbed wire FORTIFICATICNS Trainee takes position in foxhole A well prepared fortification with sand-bagged over- K. 5 it head protection 1 A well concealed fortification W- was P' i ii K fm uw E 3 Trainee tcikes cover in well-ccimoufloged position Soldiers report movements of opposing troops from well ccimouficiged position. V, Mfg 4, i -.VK I 1, i . ' A wf 4' U F I-A G E f"'-"-"K-'f 'WWQBWX-F' New ,L , '-Y AQ, 41 ""i!J'iPSft'QgX"1'x to .r it , W' xvunvrp ""w-.,a.- t - nowledge of camouflage and concealment is important in hiding the soldier's activity from observation by the enemy. Therefore, closely supervised instruction is stressed by the instructors so that the soldier learns his lesson well. l'15lfUCl0" eXPlUlnS details Of U field Shower- Hot water for cleaning purposes is obtained through use of an immersion heater. FIELD SANITATION lnstructor explains construction of a proper latrine. ff X r hen troops are liv- ing in the field there is the problem of good health and proper hy- giene. Waste and ref- use that are easily re- moved by plumbing and garbage removal in barracks are not available in the field. Therefore the soldier must learn the neces- sary techniques to ac- com'plish these re- moval and disposal tasks. N gm ' 4 Wff' ix l 2. .Md Y, i Q Q Trainees prepare for field inspection MA H E S A N D Inspection team examines soldiers' tents and laid BIVOUACS out equipment. Company on road march with full field pack Company front ready for inspection Va?sXQw':'s 1 V' W ., Niifx-A 35 ha '4 WH ig , ., afx4w. ,gf nf: ini H'fwrn,"Ew rex? .3511 ,K ,rpszi 5 Q-J 31455 ,M Soldier fires at target under close dlrechon ofthe instructor yu- , 'Q - , ., kawvh A ri. , XA H N: Kneeling fire at target that has iust been raised nsition range Soldier aims from concealment Squad deployed for advance along road Squad deployed in diamond formation. SQUAD TACTICAL TRAINING he infantry squad's teamwork becomes a reality under the training of experienced instructors. In this phase of training each man learns his mission within the squad 5? framework. He also learns that each man is dependent upon the other for the success of the mission. A W fi Ji, "f1.f?.J Trainees form ' ' defense line behind good cover Skirmish line advances and fires. f" X 5 . v- ,Mg 'H' 'Z' ,- -ms "' "' A! , my ' ' A M, . 0 ,f ,, U ,,,,..fq..,nfs. s.. 1, A up iff . .. li- ' ,A , .W K I I M A rx .-,f if W ky W ,fy " ,f , . ,1 M9'5x."X . , -,Z 'N 1 L ' , .4Wff'i,,"' - , 'i 545. -L2 'H ' ,i 's 7 fiiaigfgti in H . K ,QI if fi: X JV f " A f f" ' 1 1 f A Q , ff Q .Mg if 'Lg' "fi in I, ' V Y Jx v ,, f 4 'mv 'W , H' if J 11.-'xref A f i,Z!,L-bzi:,ffgMW11,,. 'iv ,hi 1, ,y ip, vjig s 1 ' ' f mf Lssgi' .M "7Z'Ajf2v'Q,,v', P' ri, 5"tQVf f fwiffb-3-. 4 V ,Q Y "'t' X '. - g , , shi ,f fy V ' A. 'V ,,, 1,"V V , W ,' ' A ' fr , is wwf . ,ss -is , ,Q a ,F , i Avi so rw, I QM, Aww , V ,K , 4 ,,.. . I , I , W K, H , I A Q K ,V V2 if W 5,4 Q, , A W, an , 3 f ,qi , f , ,rv ' ., 4 , V f is ,, W ,V ss ,, - W' fi, , si, r s , r t 3 fi f s , .W " L f "" V ' M ' W-. ,sfsffw f ' ' , ,M " " f , ,, I 'M' aw , Z, ,, ,, QU, 'e by . Q' 'V 'iff f ff" ,W 'i - tg ifwzf if ' 5 A, V , f ', , sf V ' ff V QA ' qw wb 31 I , Q .f -.wr 1 , sh, t , . f- W :aw " , ' f . , , L' if Wim' K 4' . g ik W.-v , ' '41 'P t , X A ffl' 'f . , ,, ' mv ' "MQ . .Adv . 1 s., We ,1 J ,ff K A .ff , A mf ij?-4 V I 4 5, A " U7 , ' N A . . f L! ' ,V WW H ' H v 'L .,., 'LM f -' "idk fi-0" W WHL vi i' lily ' X ' ' i' fi I 7 A L , 5 ,2 , it ,l V .- , 5 .ff ,.,,mu L ' My :gi , f , Wm M , f , ci . I A f , A N I ,, r., vi, fi: gf ,W at 3, V: V as ,, I , , Q A an ,, kr I I f H usted, .. K ,t 1 , YM sw' Q, A V "', y s,,, A " fgcfilamss, ii 27' - i 'ite' use Lump., , 3,e,f:f'if-'ll rallies' ou. . s, Ik, 45 , ,L I. . , .. ..,, , H .. W l View of range from firing point lnstructor explains features of terrain target . - .4 gf' ff , mf TECHNIQUE echnique of fire is an apt descrip- tion of this phase of training. The basic infantry squad cannot be truly effective unless its fire power is properly directed and distrib- uted. Therefore the firing range is set up to emphasize this need through terrain layout and num- bered position areas. 1m :L Soldiers replace targets. Firing order completed Soldier advances to firing position ndividual day training exposes the trainees to a variety of problems in the field. As a squad they move against a variety of obstacles including a well concealed de- fense position. The skill of the squad is appraised at a critique held by the instructors. Trainee takes position with good elevation. , ,, 'r" Yu .pg v, 'isp ' ' M mv, nw ew so ,. AX , tm., aa A 2 'NWN as Well-concealed soldier f'r ' U z f r N-.. 5 , or X yr jifwi Q1 ,fa L1 Good position for covering fire Clearing The obstacle 'kk 4482: .4 if' '45 - Q ml Infilfrafing o barbed wire position. 'Ik 645-A ' Qi! f wffzfz.. V 3 Qf, - r W, 3, f N 93 , . 3, J V 'L K , 5" , ,, ,iq 'QQ H A V Q , 1 1 , 7, .6 VL' 5 VAA I- 2 L , ., W, in W- , ,W Y ,. . I ., ,. 4 ' f orrr "" ' , ' x ' ' A f, ,-., X afzaww, ,,.. , .N ,, .www " ff I A V wr. 4, , - , 'Hy ' : M 4' 1 fi -' ' Tiw ff YS- f ' f K' m T ' A i Lf In WM' , H , H Ly' N . A, X 1 an , rg . CBR nstruction in Chemical, Biological and Radiological Warfare is needed to protect the health and effectiveness of the soldier who may be subjected to these types of attack. An integral part of the soldier's field equipment is the gas mask. This form of protection has not been necessary in recent combat experience but there is no guarantee for the future. Instructor explains details of construction Proper fit and tightness are important w X Which way is out ear masks prior to Gas Chamber his course is set to test the physi- cal toughness and dexterity of the soldier. The obstacles to overcome test his balance, climbing ability, speed and endurance. I hope l make it!" Overhead ladder crossing tests arms in There must be an easier way 1 35 ENGR STE? OVER Onward and upward Along drop tothe gro Mmm as f5s M fy L, if ,ff we UH is W ,Um fwfga My my , , -av ,gr ., , r S- Q 1 r ' 5 'i r -..Q 5' ,k . 1 M f - P f - MM ,xg ,Q f f J 5 -Qu in K :Bk X ,, 'ff br N-,f Y xii' Q., Q ,A n J, Shia, ,.,,,, M W, 4 M- '- ff cw cg: kt '31, , V Q , .frkf Al X Y ' fb ' ,.w"'f,1 Mg M . K , Q: Proper implacemenf of anti-tank mine practiced Instructor displays anti-personnel mine K S iwffyil f 'LMA iw, 9 nr 2 fl. A . 4 it r 1, ,-. N rr l fand mines are designed to restrict movements of personnel and heavy equipment on open terrain and in built up areas such as towns and cities. Although primarily defensive in nature, these weapons, properly placed, can aid in protection of areas with a minimum number of troops. Therefore soldiers must learn their usage and proper removal. Mine is ready for concealment z K F 1. 1 , ,,, v b, 2 w' av my 5 as S 9 in S fr fi ei W Y Trainees prepare to lay a mine field Probing for mines is a ticklish iob Trainees enter trench at entrance to infiltration course. Troops crawling through course he infiltration course tries to create realistically the sounds and conditions of battle through exploding demolition charges, barbed wire and a machine gun firing live ammunition dispersed over the area at a controlled height. ln this way the soldier must utilize the lessons taught over the preceding weeks to properly complete this phase of training. ww Preparing to crawl und er barbed wire Instructor to open fire. Crawling over open ground. Trainee advances after completing infiltration course. www 'W E A if Members of squcd encircle crggressor Enemy is closely guarded 'K X aff x x nasal 1.1.-4 f x ax gnc 41 ,sl N, , -,i ,- we W wc.. M .M W ' 2' Aww- .X , ., W wayc Aggressor machine gun emplacement Prisoner ready for removal to rear Captured soldier IS searched for concealed weapons and information ,v J -Mfr me -Egg ,ii s,,,-448,11-sf 7 A was 'K . wgai . s.,,,,,,,, .. ,, ,, r ,... --' 1 , New is 1f2Ew,f,L,asx 'fr My .,1sL-ze!" - TQFWW iii,-.lfisfl-'Til' f A j ,. A Soldier fires of target from concealment Soldier uses every possible means of protection. CLOSE CCM BAT Advancing to the next line of fire. X , f'-if-,rm 'B . J -14 Wwe gg- r.A. A 1 V, G A 3 , ,-3? , , 'f Q-. 15 is iii , ..,23g,:s 1 -, -au, 5, 1, ' H Q, ,, A-,,.Qf" 'Eff V. rv 4 I.. INV -, 4- 335, year. ,Visas je r ,W , in r. 1 ,I XQV ,, v- 1 X. s':4'f'i? .Nil X " A X Q U '5 sg: 75' I u 1 m, . sf.,-. 'F ,V V ML, yd, -fi ,fs ..tf" My Q., .I ash . if i N my L, , , Wh V,.V ,R M V L,.,vN' ,, ax, w V in . f.V I 25 if asa' .. X 1-:W 1 ,, X L k 1 , A N 527 V " V X A' Vw, ,V , V w V 'F 'Q' n -' 'ki ' V ff . A 1. . img ,HV . . . V " ,fm ,, -f 'V A an Vx. ,. , n if A V v Ve V V f n fwfr- , P' . ,, 'V A wfpm-QS 9 V M.. .V as 4 V, 7 - , ,F 4 su mx VJ., V ? ml 6. -fs I, , , W V , . , ,Q , 3-8 M, ' 3 Sv EV .I "Q fi.. 'Bi ' Jr Wm' Ya, ii? ' 49" Squad fires from concealed positions. Members of squad advance , 4 l ...gn .,, M ww Q V, -'Vis "if, L , W +V 1 V f' ' V -Q V 'V 'M ' Vg V 'N '- , , ,Q ' J, 1f1i'4g"aaf?5ii VWTQ if 4 325:14 ' Q ' K ' 'f,-Vi 'f:4 Q GV' if V. -V,,V"Qw,s A - Fifi-Ev A awk f Q V V ,-Vp va' V .VV ' V' + V 1 V, YV 4 fff , ,MV Ax . .argxgpkx ,,Vy.S1E. ,ZW Q. . M A f ,V . A I M 4 4 .3: 9, 4 CQMIV VA K. I 23,2 ' A ' ' V' V 3 ' k k k ,. V V ,- 1 - V V ' g ' ffguf- 'E , J , ..fVfi,,,ggj,x,'1SV'3,z:1gV Xp, A ' ,, ,' L 7 P Y' . V " V ' 2 f ff' ' L fin? V 5 ,L V' M-.V'AV , - VV + ' "W R-ff' A . . , 'W VV ,,f, -ff -L gf .- ,, , V , A K W , k z y LA 'L ti.. QW S .w ,B . ,V X 3 K Q . 'bu Iv ., W ,L .. w I I , rm WA. , ,L 'VV s I 1 VV , yy .W . - ' : 4- . ff, .z . .. .V RW' - 'J 121 iff, 4:7 -r 'V sn 'Q' V , x 'V3F"54ii ' V ' ' ' Vf ,V y .VM V, "S VV, 4 y V. fs. At , ' , x ' ' 2.1. , " V 4, , 5 :Z in . I I Y . 44' .. M 4 ' ' ' V Vg w , V. QM- ,ff ' A . . ' A ' ' V VIA' 'ix ' 'Eff X 3 V 'xi' 'L 5 -1 , f ', few, V ,, V ,V V A ,. V, . ' V A , 5 ,, ,Y , A I 4 44, M A qw , , V. . k PM Vfl-f' A 51411 , - Q XV VW A 3:7 fi? 154 it ' D in V' ' I N? ' ' VZ,w.,, 'Wf.,,,,?giV VV ,ge V ,. 4, fV,4'yV WM? ' 3' . V, if , , V ' V, my of wif? V ,V Q Vi V - 1 ua' ' ' Van ,- Y - ,V . glZfg,V,wnva3Lf,.! V4 V gm A L V W Q , ,,,' 'M I s 1 Tw? V 4 V pffffw V Magis V ,V , V, V37 V V 'Sf - 'fgg-+L' K-W1 1 'I' VV WV , ' , . ' A .V , T 'L T' " W , 75 V, 'fi V r' I V. V ws.-A A 7 I .f H. KA Myifk I M Vx , Y' ' 'fi ' M ' 95 L 'VC ,V . ,f V ZQV, f , JVM, H . W ,I , VVKV ,J , ,Z , -V JF f f V f - T si5VVQ,,4'f .Vs Le' , V " HVZWVIY' ' - 'fuwiglizas Q 15,59 V -V V V 2 V V L? ' I ,, ,V '- , 'X ,ff ' 25' V , V Z' YQ Ziyi ,HV ' V, f V A. -Hfiwg , i if V , V' Q, 'ms if-'if' x K if V, sxijyn f , , L 4.3 sf . 3, 1 , ygiragfwpguwq NV . A W Affzqh vii K. Q V L fi? rl' , . ,g V , , Vi Ui,V V 'iVg,,1f , K fav ,i 1' "A . I ., ,V ff ' , V , ,VV was V H , Vs, ' N V,-V L- ,V M , ,,,.VV'meV, 'V Q L f V1 ia,',:'E, f.-3, ' i V A ,dwg Q s,,535,fgL,m,L Tastes Good! The chow line gathers And now the dessert A "t F qc, K K W I Li: ' it K ,K 3, ,sy ,, 1 YE2:1a'e, sltstt A M -FPL A final rinsing How about uno rving?" I- i PU 2 ll the pin, . .1-v- Insfrucfor odiusfs frcuinee's crm To demonstrate proper throw. Soldiers practice firing from prone position. , ff i KW' Q, M J' Zi" we 7 1 "Y'-3"-if - I egg! "- - - . ' i s " '-0 ':i-Fay 'E Bi' .. A -,V ., , I, f V -,Q-,.,, ! y .Lk ,Q in N, . .sh . A . if + ax!! k RL il,-S Q,-.X kr, e , ,A , E ,, N , n Q, n .4i..,,9, -Ita, ,.,, ,-311,-' K M ,..,- -x ' --9 , - V, , ,,. . V1.1 - ' I - . I .1 If , e - ' - Q, , .. -Q, .. ,- ' ,W 4 -2-I Q Q- - ww - ,,,- gig " ':f".51f. , ' 4'-Sw fi. is is - ,re .5 ' f -Q ., . an 'Nl M J fu 1, 2 'i so , i. 1 gf - " i i , 1 ' , f ,, . la A I A 5-A ls . , . .. i ,- , V A rin , ifgzvf - A A it L 5 .. - '. fs wsiasjff f+f,,,,g!"g,,. . -,J ly., Q, Q hr Leglku ah h., L .1 Q Ilya A !.u,.mKM .V Q , ' i A - 2 ' If ,Q i ' ff, 3 . , f ' A Q ' 1 ' A K "if -A A ' L. W " N A 5 ii Jovi 3 , ,H if ' w. 'yi' J' - . vw- - 5 d-Q -- - ,, 5 Mg ig , ,,, 4, . so X by , do il 45 'K x K ik I if .i W. .V ,. - it 1 h A M , I J yi-I. 1 . ,, r 1 1: ti v ",.--. P , Q A is A Y' ' --,ff1fz1,:-Pie' f A,i, "Qk2iQ" f s -4 -- A fYJa'Ff5++ s Ez: r - 1 Y -'.-- . K 4 i?pj?': 8, Q 's 5 e 1 . 4 X G, in " ,s ,psf A 4 QA. -' v if 4' aim' If - L 5 ' -'W' - " X 41, . M ,, .1 ig nj ,I 45,5 A' , 1, K .. ' - n f ' ' , W . A. v D " V f K 3' X i . s sf I ' ' fl 1 Q A' i . ,I. iT ' s 'V , M 'E' - -If l'-f S ,i 2 "fr ""-Z , L '7' fx' 4 fi ' 'f I ' . P J, ' . , X- V m J s f, . fe- i . A' 'fills 9 - if "" ' N i' ' arf" s ' ' 3 br A , LW -, , w w f' " K 7 - sf, . ,. w- f K -Sv, . VV-' ' D- I- - 1- -.- M f -, ,. .,Qg3, 5?'1-fe, ' -..f' V . A ' M K. warg? ' b ,, , -N V 1 LX,'1,qiis,-mg., 34 ei, an , i W' V ' -7- s fp gl' I 5-?f'i ' A' 37 ,. , 'lf-'ii ' -iff f, , A-' H yy- ,, , -' W M ,qw K-gas 4 ,, . -H ' 5 -V ' . , . swf., W-" . . Y' ' ' 1 . N.. " A., ' ' ' K' 5 :vi Q, 12, Trainee shows good form of kneeling position. Soldier takes cover behind firing point, A . am .-E N Q.. ww, is-.,4, . I . .1p:??b:f:i-- -1, ,, 12 , 4 -iziwu, f N 1, .. V M M W, .1 JL' 12 . I Q.. , , b H-,tv ,,.- fox" AVXA ' ' A NC? ,f 1 ' ,W -X A e f ,am V 7 ,L H 1 I 4,..A.s I, 2 , .,,V I 4 M 'M' , 'yn , , wr, ' W A 'NQIA , iw ' vgwi' ggi: " ' 4 'af 755 . -,455 A jg' V '- if N RIFLE GRENADES ike the hand grenade, the rifle gren- ade is another weapon in the arsenal of the soldier. These weapons give greater firepower and range to the sol- dier. Detcliled instruction on the use of these weapons acquaints the men with the capabilities and limitations of these weapons, -nun.. Slum., 5,?j p 511. i eel?F!""'f97'22ifisIw7441z'!5Q5e?i61sSaY:fm5?ev:1-is is . 39- ' l Hf Br -5 tis!! -q-ug.-I. Q...-,gwwam Instructor adiusfs stance of soldier prior to firing rifle grenade Ready on the firing line. Cleanliness is not overlooked by soldiers on bivouac. Drain ,le age ditch must be properly placed fo insure dry sleeping Sf- ,' ?4f?RIe" 'WW-Q A eq 7' X sz, M fl K W4 V Tenf equipment is checked A well-emplaced tent Supplies unloaded from supply truck A Magus ' A me A ,L 'F lifxiiwm i 5. H .gp -we-v"'bF' 5 w Just Q few more pull-ups Make your chest touch my hand paw i as 4,353 gf ,aw hysical fitness training phase of basic training is designed to toughen the body. The extent of this toughening process is tested toward the end of the training cycle against a norm that has been established from statistics gathered over a period of years. Each trainee is tested and records are made for future check, New group prepares i for-set-up test ,gL1,"t,f4t5"gf2t1?fi?ii -1 . wi Keep those legs stiff ' as 1 as rs , , .W This weapon is clean, soldier ! Maior General Paul A. Disney, Training Center Commanding General, personally inspects training progress al' barracks' inspection MARS? Soldier scrubs clothing .ff A close shave is needed for inspection Company prepares for inspection in ranks -,,v-'Q ,fi wx 3 A' . ' ' FA Moving in for the tackle IW Sports are emphasized as an additional means of conditioning of mind his and body through competition. The athletic facilities are widely varied. A home run in the making 41 , , mx f , 1. dd 'uf' A I x ' sw ' I A f Q XX if -Fi B X, E X X 'KN Mrk 5 S if Ni -.- rg ix ' "'.' '. S is X "' - lt ' L, X 9 ,gb-1-N--1 1. x N V f Limxlw' K W jf K .61 ' fl' -f Qa J , Q f 'rf - ,. ' ' , . - Ly , Lf ff, V . J it 1- - I 570 --V f"'fx fi?-!N f xxx f ff X I . ' N 'sx 'K :TW f X K fx fx X 1 vit X I - -X ' 1 Q ii! ' Q 9 gh Z " '-'ff 'N' V ' f Kfmmvvffw "" N kr' ,Q X J' f ,, . vm, A 5 Q X WxAPT.-,,,2,,-I-f?XXQ f' , ' '51 4' X X Swivel Wafqpmv "Q 4, .Qs mf ., .,-5 ,..-f -A. CN Q Here I come! Do you have a dofe, dear? A good book is very restful 2833 E I' G IX 3 ffl t r -S -x. Q-.1 5 at F-,mp f PARADE pon completion of training, the companies pass in review to dis- play their fitness for duty as fully trained soldiers. The lessons taught have been rapidly learned. 4 M' flll li f QMTQTQ ,,,f""'Mi'h hvvl ,, 5 N Q tw-MM W, . t A "ist lS5llFi'lli 'Q Mffrw-eff 1' ,Via , M " 'fu i 'K -V R Q I-vs Regimental review Color guard eww : '- '- ' f - H ' ,":"":' - X S l " ,. ,, ' f 5 sg' ,sag s a is ' ' to f 1'-' in We ' -E mg "'-'3fs'f?,iM f l- ff '-' 4: . D' a ll J . , .- , 'g.",Lf""'?L1-'Q 'P we ' ' .,:. V 'X 'n .5 .Q"':l V' X' -s,i ?i ,ffl , t ff , - 1 1 --:M lm 7. - .,,. , .1 A, -as ,W fzgfg, .. ., 'Vw , .t V, L W ,W Wu H, I, .6 t ,i.,tm'As, 1, .4 ,I ,. . gl sw, s'aw,.,?gim.Q,n o r 3 sv, 'ISJF' was wg- 4- ifli-fl. fi - V . p .iz r - .' ' 4 5' fj, 1 jf , ' , " ' . -- 3 ' - " I ts: ' '.f ,."ii: I f if zffff X ' ' if w e 3 W kiwi .,,. J' .i , ,sw , . l i 'ff' 'E' fl ' K. 'O is ' V 31-LH . I x 751- l 'fin i f "lf W - F," -- ' V . . ' ' ', ' 5 E . 3 p ., , t it I 4. is ,QF F A Q I Y? . 1 Saw ,. H 5 . . . J ,y 3 3 ' 2 all ,K exp 55 -f r Y l s fu W 5 V F11 - ' '----L1:f--r -" -is - hazy, swf .- '-M - - wi f. f-k, . - ,z . A ' f t V t ls., Z Wag , .. L gsiislyrf ' fr -N 5 K Ag ilffwf-' ,. :fi ,Flin--l'lQsz'7, ' V 'f5l.,ris- 5 sfuiiff 4' I 'K--,.i,r'f A . 3 N w gi If V Q .V I t S my V I .V Q - , - ,.., 9 L . ' 1- .. I t ,- I it .xg r ' K ' ,, A A A J. jf. L all bmi - .im I Q P 3 2 9 K i Massed companies. Eyes rig ht h f iw T., 'X J 5 ,i'..' - ' i in V .-.,, ,ik Y?- 3?: i ' 'ifriw ' , f- -14w. "' 15:1 K S ' 1 w w X5-..!"l 5 WI C.B.R. testing V i w Anti-tank mine is disassembled PRQFICIENCY TESTS p :af 1- Various skills that have been emphasized during the course of basic training are thoroughly tested. Each soldier must pass this series of tests before graduation from basic training. Throwing grenade from kneeling position. . 554 'aa .rx Hi . 4 3 W 35 ,M sf" H -. - ., . ,K -Y. .N A- ' 'A JQAXX is if Q-it-s A s- -... .N f . x ' '- 1 -4. , , .M , ,Q , - f e ,, L3 Q , -ye.. I, V ' is . 4 ,MXN - 1 XKVN I Y ea .1 ,J 'MA' 5 " V,-.- ,.,. - LM, , M f " vf"" wifi " - '..,i:r- A ,sf s- A f ' f - ' W fax 1- sf. - Vie . v--'wx -L5 vw- fx is 511. Q, ' rx 1 ,- ' f- A f f f - xr 2 1-Is. , 14.7, .sw nf ,- s' .-, , v w First aid is tested using dummy patient. Testing on manual of arms Crossing barbed wire U1 9, Cadre checks clothing issue forms CLOTHING CHECK Proper identification markings must be completed efore reassignment to new duty a final check of all clothing and equipment is made to assure availability of all items prior to leaving the training company area. Issued clothing is folded in preparation 'For packing Final items are checked ' ' r ' I f f u fm 'WIN U , 'ff ' X X! K gil S, d E lx 7 L fp M3 First sergeant completes soldiers' records at end of trainin 9 Company Commander p AWARDS n every training company outstanding skills are developed and rewarded by Trophies for excellence in marksmanship. Leadership and all around proficiency is rewarded by naming the outstanding trainee of the cycle. WN X wQ .,f9' ez - f A ,fx w s 'lf lil lbi 1 c ?f . 9 -f.-,f,.1 -5:1 --:- - .-..- f---. 1-. :-1.'::' 'gb :CBJ-'-'H 'ref-L N' 1 fl M x. A A 1 37 - it 'E si i lr- 71 .,-' .7 'i' 1 is 'J s ' -ina V N 7 9 . t X X Q I I 1 'fp 0 1' I N. . . I ., - . -1 ZA - 1lZ"lw..'57 ., 'Exif' 1 ll ' 5 rngjitjfz' , bggktb.. , .v- FZ" f - X -4.5- . .1, A .l A fa?-mzsf ..,,ff..-- A J3'a'5l-195335 4 ,Q P ll ., 't:, a1: -' ':'-.---,-.- ..,. , ' :is-,V Z., . Q -, 157 SQIVIARKSIWHNN ield equipment, bedding and the M-i rifle remqin within the training company area upon bqsic training completion. Ali soldiers are required to return this equip- ment prior to reqssignment. Kwwwmm --,.,,,,, , K CQMEELEWES TRAINING The first leave is granted to the soldier upon completion of basic training and be 'fore assignment to new duties Ready for new duties y-.1' lf? mg.. 'U 9 I is ft IV TRAI EE' I .,-,. ' ....:.,.,.- I M1 1 I 1 fy X ew I as X CW' IM, X ltlrrievffff X 1 iv lyk! I r 'V Y. ll is ' A I I I -..jj Q,-Q. l 'in l I I I . X, I l I I A ..., 4 I gl EQ .,..,,.J .NJV-N .A,.j-1 , Y -- W,--...f" ,Qi PRAYER Dear Lord, who hearest each soldier's prayer, I look to Thee in humble faith, Asking Thee to guide me, mind and body, That I may honor Thee throughout my military service. Should the way be difficult, Teach me to use the reserves of strength and endurance With which Thou hast endowed me. Keep me aware of those beside me Who may need my helping hand or my friendly counsel. Should I be lonely or in distress, Let me remember that man grows in stature As he sacrifices for his loved ones and his country, That they may not fall under the dominion of those who deny and despise Thy laws. As I grow in physical power and stamina, May I also increase in vigor of mind and force of character And come to know more fully the measure of my responsibilities. Grant that I may become a soldier and a citizen Whose knowledge, understanding and skill Will enable me to play my full part in keeping strong and secure. this land Give me the wisdom to spend my leisure hours constructively, To choose my friends carefully, And to lead a life that is morally upright, May my faith in Thee and my habits of worship Serve to guide me daily Toward a mark worthy of emulation. Enkindle in my heart a desire to excel And to reiect all temptations to be careless or indifferent. May I make a record deserving of my nation's trust, Deeply satisfying to me and to all men, And ever pleasing to Thee. Amen. Regimental Commander Colonel THOMAS J. LAWLOR COMMANDING OFFICER 4th Training Regiment TRAINING REC-IMENT Battalion Commander Maior DANIEL L. MELVIN COMMANDING OFFICER 6th Battalion co. C-13th BATTALION--4th TRAINING REGIMENT GRADUATION DATE-SEPTEMBER I3, 1958 ND CADRE COMPANY C-GRADUATION DATE-SEPTEMBER 13, 1958 OUTSTANDING TRAINEE . PVT. RICHARD P. SELLERS 'IsIfLI. PAUL G. HASSELL, Company Commander MfSgI. DAN H. DUKE, First Sgf. 2ndfLI. JORDAN, Executive Officer Sfc. JAMES HOLMES, FieId Firsf Sgf. COMPANY CADRE Sfc. LANG C C SQL GREEN SQL. TEMPLETON Sgt. ALLEN Sfc. McFARLAND Sp2 STOKES Sp4 HOLLIS Supply 591, Mess Sgt. Operations Sgf LL L S S .,A. L, zi' - f 1 - 1 - ' ,- "'V- 2 LL Y COMPANY CLERK SP3 WWSON COMPANY coolcs Left to Right spa. MACZKO spa BUOHL Q X7 I fx X ., ,. X f x L -f- , Q39 INOCULATIONS W, , :: .. , 3' 'f .43 A 'Z Y Q a gh K 1, if ,, : W ' -,HM ,sf 2 , i , L ' .:s" 51 .H . A ,,: W,.W , ,, Q gif-zw, g . 5 ,Aix - 1 f .M2 fm 2, mm 41, 5 new avfvf X, X! ,A an . 4' vw nl .Q Z- .Z 4 , Z Lu I aff :Q IQ, X ' iz. Xxql Cx j W ff! XXX fm: fi! W O -!""?f Fredrick M. Allen Norman K. Allen Garnet F. Anderson William J. Artrup Richard P. Baker Stephen W. Baker James T. Baldwin Raymond A. Balint William D. Batthell Victor B. Bauer Larry G. Baumgard Marvin B. Bell Billy B. Beltz Bernord F. Berro Howard V. Black James W. Blackwell Claude E. Bloome Zoltan l. Boker Duane H. Boudinot lohnnie L. Bradley DISMOUNTED DRILL f , V4 X bl id 1 I I i T I' ffx R H1 l 1- james R, Brrdges Edward L. Brown Michael W. Burley Ralph M. Calson Bobby R. Carmiole John Carter Leslie B. Carter Carmen W. Crauso Donald Castenholz Amedeo Chiovilti John A. Clark Virgil Clevlnger Charles Cole J. C. Collins Roger S. Combs Harold E. Compton Denver L. Comkle John L. Connable James R. Cork f r ,. an Q r , wi 'wwf Q 7Q,2i XlQfl Thomas C. Dean EImerS DePIanche Mrchaell Devine KennethL Domer CarroIIG.Dorroh erin Lamar M Durst Bruce W Dye Bobby R Easterlrne Richard C. Edgett Phallp C Edwards Eugene H Emlg Cephus C Eplrng Romaine S. Erickson M., 3495! K" Frederick G. Evans Ronald A. Fazio George R. Fetters Robert L. Fetters Lynn M. Fitzgerald Richard F. Fleck William R. Foster Sandy R. Foutz lack L. Franklin Bernard A. Frantz lohn V. Frost William R. Fuson Willis H. Fylfe lames Garland lohn Gayan Howard H. Giles Peter L. Good Stanley l. Gorajec David L. Graham ' Harold l. Hackworth Jon D. Hamelink G60rg6 Hamplmi Knute E. Hamre James K. Harrington John L. Harris Leslie Harrison Culons M. Hayes Thomas W. Heckerd Wilbert C. Hill Alvin L. Hogseth James P. Hohman Fred J. Hopkins Fredrick R. Hunter James M. lfft Daryl E. Jarrett Francis R. Jenkins .f -D Clayton E. Harris Charles E. Hensley James R. Hosek Donald R. Jewell Knowledge gained through Classroom and P.R.I. instruction on the M-l rifle is applied on the various firing ranges, lOO0",-K.-D. Transitional, and Close Combat. Through these firing exercises the sol- dier becomes familiar with this weapon and its capabilities. Aiello lohn Charles E. lohnson George F. lohnston Carroll L. Jones Franklin E. Jones Leroy F. Kessen Robert L. Keyes Roy Kirshenbaum Larry A. Law lames W. Lemke lohn L. Leonard Lowell G. Kilgore Larry T. King Harold G. Kinney lames E. Lee Laurence H. Lee Serge D. Lee Delmar A. Lewis Roger D. Llnscott Lawrence Litchfield ,fr Jerry L. Lowery Michael Mahon Thomas S. Maloy Howard P. Manlet John D. McAfee Larry G. McElroy Dean A. Mclntire Lester L. Mclntyre Marshall W. McKenzie James A. Meier Arthur Merriweather Kenneth E. Miller James R. Moffett Kewey Moore Louis Mosgueda Thomas D. Neff William N. Marshall James R. McKenzie William M. Misamore William E. 0'Daniel its-3 H' 9 5 Sigma' I Wulf Nl-.QV .pn g.,..qnv"' -iff Af' ,f""" Herman L. Okonski George J. 0'Neil Bob R. Palenick William A. Pate John T. Pender Jake A. Pennington Robert L. Piene Stanley M. Plattenburg Donald B. Plumb James Pollard Q.:-wir William R. Pongvance Joseph W. Pottmeyer Donald A. Powell Glenn E. Puckett Elmer J. Purvis William A. Querfeld David K. Quinlan Carl B. Reed James A. Reedy James F. Rexnolds 5 lohn A. Richter Richard P. Riggle Talmadge C. Riggsby Paul W. Ross Charles G. Rutter Frank 1. Santora lack A. Sayer lohn E. Schweingrouber Richard P. Sellers Peter l. Shaw William F. Shollenberger DeFord Shrout William L. Simpson Robert C. Smith Thomas C. Smith Ewell D. Smoot Shephen A. Stahr Marion E. Starko Paul R. Stevens Alan A. Stichler .,.. N' Q jp-.,f',Ef ,W f' 'V if Q,P1,z.5. 1 my K Nga. yu Q L ,- qw , mg, an 'fm 2 Bobby A. Stirmett Edward l. Stookert Paul M. Stoops Gerald E. Sprague William l. Tarka Donald E. Thom Donald C. Thomas Billy R. Thompson Robert L. Thompson Robert 1. Timlin loseph l. Timer Henry L. Tosl Harlun Trent Nlarlyn G. Troyer Eugene E. Urbanskl BETTY Wfigonlander lohn S. Waldrop Ray N. Walker Howard W. Watson Wlndell E. Watson MINE WARFARE K fs? 0 O .M G I X 'D Q 5? 7 QQ X Charles A. Wenzel Ronald A. Wickstrom Paul E. Wilt Eugene 0. Winders James R. Windrow William l. Wise Dennis R. Wood loel L. Woodrum Charles T. Youk NOT PHOTOGRAPHED Eugene N. Karadeema Ronald D. Sova H INFILTRATION COURSE E -..A 1. .. 1 I W l 1. 0. N if it Lvff arg A 4 mi t f '- W W ! Wi 4 ,,,,, S. l M l l 5 A Q Y at if A 'L-an w...,,,,,.y- vl"ge.............-.' M' MAKING TIME THRUUGH One of the greatest opportunities that comes with Modern Army Green is the chance for each soldier to become a skilled expert in his field through Army job training. Some of the men in this class will be sent to Army schools, where over l50 combat, technical and administrative courses are taught-M everything from missiles to medicine. These Army students will get top professional training, learn by using the most modern JUB TRAINING equipment, the best facilities in the world. Other men will find they can learn their job best through on-the-job training. In this case, they will learn by doing, supervised by experts who know the requirements of the job from the ground up. Whatever his job assignment and whatever type of training he receives, every man in this class will become a specialist at his duties, with the skill that assures a job well done. QW ti MAKING TIME ll.. X. rnutfw 'Z .42 ,I THII UGH EIIUIIIITIIIN In addition to job training, the modern Army otlers each man the opportunity to pursue his formal education. The United States Armed Forces Institute conducts the largest correspondence school in the World and has helped thousands upon thousands ot' soldiers to get their high school diplomas. The Army has also arranged with many civilian schools and colleges to permit soldiers to attend courses in their off-duty hours. Under the Tuition Assistance Program, an ambitious soldier can get a college degree. What's more, there are Education Centers in hundreds of Army posts which daily teach subjects the soldiers themselves have asked for. The modern Army has found that the greater an education a soldier has, the greater contribution he makes to the Army itself. This is why the man in Modern Army Green is urged to carry his education forward as far as possible. ., .,. .-.s c A AY . l V l -'Q 4.4. . -At 's 3 X -Nm, I.. if vt g l ft - b mv-W' ' . M' ' A ge xii as 'fl ' f ',, Q ' si f ar ales! .., . ,4 - 1, ' 'Qi munw: .w,r-.qj,5 nk I- 6 . . I A I e f' A w e Q51 A Y, 4?'i'f'TT e . i i- . Sk Q' -"'- tr" Q ,P-5 ' - ' L..,:2I'e1c','1tiggllil . X .sf , as tg K NIH! nn i - ..mH."ifitII I I l 'V - . . - i f . ,M , .,., ..,, 3 i . if :fi ... ,A g iz k,Xg,.,m31nn1UI 1 , r n V' l D V4 Q...--F .A y gggif' . V V xx.. . 1 t f-us U 5 1 ,,. I 'V A 'V ,, hi , I I 1' I R A + e mlm ,. is, . it et X - i "-2 - A if . ,.,X , - .. ' MAKING TIME THRUUGH TRAVEL Modern Army Green is recognized the world over, and travel opportunities in the modern Army provide a valuable education in themselves. Assignments in various parts of the United States enable a soldier to understand his American heritage. But, beyond that, most soldiers have the chance for an overseas assignment. These foreign tours not only provide the fun and thrills of adventure in exciting foreign lands . . . but in traveling and observing different ways of life a soldier will find new meaning in his own. .,.!F,g..t Mi,gl7'3ifi?,1iiiii5 ., H, ,z., lim ' i?f'lii2j?iF-ff2'S2?6?!iiL.f "" NM - Q i' QWQL H- ' f- 1, 1: .unc 1223?-21i'v,, izleast.i:fgg,gizw5 gH2aim, K ' ' .Z -1 Qf,,gw,,5g,:f,f,r,.,wi .. wt., Yr sm me E, i' ,flif!E1?S?iZEeki'E'E, eg lx? ,, 5, 1? ir 'ge' , sis. gr Y Every soldier grows in the Army . . . grows not just physically but grows into a new maturity. The spiritual and moral growth of its men is of the utmost importance to the Army. The opportunity for a soldier to worship in his own religious faith is a fundamental part of Army life. THHUUGH it cnnnncrrn nsvfmvmfm All 134i Besides the active programs conducted by Protestant, Catholic and Jewish chaplains, each stands ready to counsel any soldier on his religious or personal problems. Army discipline has its basis in self-control, self-respect, self- reliance, honor and honesty. This discipline creates clean-minded, clean-living soldiers who are aware of the responsibilities of good citizenship. The man in Modern Army Green is a credit to his country. X rx 'D v-, ffm 1' uf'-N , t 9 Q7 MAKING TIME THRUUGH lsnnfnsiuv mniuims lt is hoped that every man in Modern Army Green will climb up the leadership ladder. While every soldier cannot become an olhcer, each man has an equal chance and each is given promotions as they are merited. The Army's Oflicer Candidate Courses are always open to properly qualified enlisted men. As each soldier becomes capable of handling greater and greater responsibility, his self-confidence increases and so does his stature as a leader. iq .JC U +I: -1 hw -fb H .',,


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) collection:

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1987 Edition, Page 1

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US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 112

1958, pg 112

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 34

1958, pg 34

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