US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY)

 - Class of 1957

Page 1 of 104

 

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 104 of the 1957 volume:

S- 1' JW ' if as 1 l 'Nh sr I ,fl Lk,, Q, 1 Y I I I ,F an ,Q I wi j I is rg, I I J 1 Q 3 1 A fa in ' , ' ew , THE UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING CENTER , ARMOR FORT KNOX KENTUCKY A ,x . I N ' ,mmf . ' Q . . : swim ,. , WV W !,,, k I I I V 'P F"' P 11' R059 Han ff Y " wf"'fj a ff Eg J "" "Qi fg ' Y Y ' S' .K Q I S gjqiggubi k -mb fx V . Y 51 W fn ,f E ff ' 1 ' 'aw f' fo? , f H .Y In ff 1' 1. .W -J V, ,png rw, ...A X jg 'V I 2 C WW, H f xxx Q , V , f, ,,, MW ,. ' ff" 'PX "' ? r n Q f v Ax, Y. ,- 5 . f -A Q Yf f 1 w N D , T ' Forf Knox heme Barracks ,ul SCENES AROUND 6 ' o llllg' feafef -.. nv W X -f"K 1-ng, f J: A THE PGST ub gaunffy CI , zfzfqyy ,,,,,W., A W ' W' S.A'4 Mixing: V Rt 96 , . . 'fig' wh' 1 tina 5 Post Flag .fefpme 0 Post Headquarters 06 p11 l ,mii Major General Paul A. Disney assumed Command of the U.S. Army Training Center, Armor, on September 22, 1956, following a tour of duty as Commanding General of the 4th Armored Division at Fort Hood, Texas. Born in Waltham, Massachusetts, on November 16 1904, General Disney be a h' g'n is military career after his graduation from Norwich University, Vermont, in June 1927. That year, he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant of Cavalry in the Officers Reserve Corps and received a Regular Army commission in October 1927. A veteran of six major campaigns in World War II, General Disney served with the 2d Armored Division, commanding the 82d Armored Reconnaissance Battalion in the North African and Sicilian campaigns and the 67th Armored Regiment from the Normandy landing in 1944 to the Elbe River in German General Disney was G3 df the Cavalry School from December 1945 to August 1946. From july 1947 until May 1950, he was assigned to the G3 Section, Office, Chief of Army Field Forces in various capacities including Chief of Maneuvers and Special Projects Branch, and Chief of the Armored Branch. After graduating from the National War College, General Disney then served in the Pentagon in such posts as Chief, Strategic Logistics Branch, G4, and Assistant Chief, Plans Division, G4, Department of the Army. In Korea, General D" isney was assigned as Assistant Di- Major General PAUL A. DISNEY Commanding General vision Commander of the 25th Infantry Division in May 1954, and named to the same post in the 3d Infantry Division in August of the same year. In October 1954, he became Deputv Chief f I o Staff for Administration, Headquarters Ei hth A , g rmy fForwardJ. General Disney then served Chief of Staff E' l h . . , igit Army CForwardJ and Chief of Staff AFFE and Eighth Army in Korea from April to September 1955. General Disn-ey became Assistant Division Commander of the 4th Armored Division at Fort Hood in October 1955, and became Division Commander june 5, 1956. General Disne h ' y as been awarded the Silver Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster Bronze S . , tar Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters and V Device for Valor, Purple Heart, Army Commendation Ribbon with Metal Pendant, french Legion of Honor, French Croix de Guerre with Palm, Korean Order of Military Merit Taeguk, and several campaign medals. The U. S. Army Training Center, Armor, under General Disney's Commaml, consists of five Armor and Infantry training regiments and one Specialist Training Regim-ent. The overall mission of USATCA is to train Army of the United States and Reserve personnel in Basic Combat Training, Advanced Individual Training in both Armor and Infantry, and Basic Unit Training, also in both Armor and Infantry. In addition, selected individuals are trained in military occupational special- ties such as Automotiv-e, Clearical, Radio, and Supply. HEADQUARTERS THE UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING CENTER, ARMOR OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING GENERAL FORT KNOX, KENTUCKY TO THE PARENTS OF THE GRADUATES OF BASIC TRAINING In this era of nuclear weapons, guided missiles and other modern tools of warfare, the most important element of National Defense remains the man who employs these tools. Man's natural habitat is the earth, and in war, he must eventually defeat his enemies by struggle on the ground. Hence the necessity for well-trained soldiers of the United States Army. In combat the soldier faces many unnatural, difficult and trying situ- ations. It is, therefore, essential that every man be thoroughly disciplined, technically qualified and physically, morally and mentally conditioned to survive on the modern battlefield. This has been the purpose of the military training you have received here at USATCA and will receive in the future. How much benefit you receive from such training, of course, depends to a considerable degree on how much you put into it. Here at the U. S. Army Training Center, Armor, a well-rounded program has been instituted to pro- vide you with every opportunity to develop the attributes of a good soldier. We feel, too, that in many ways you will have developed a greater sense of responsibility, a greater awareness of the world around you, and therefore, will have become a better all-around citizen. It is hoped that this book in the years to come will serve as a pleasant reminder to you of this brief period of your military service in USATCA, - and of the truth that soldiers are made, not born. PAUL A. DISNEY Major General, USA Commanding Colonel PERRY E. CONANT Chief of Staff Brigadier General SHERBURNE WHIPPLE JR Deputy Commanding General GE ER L STAFF Lieutenant Colonel Major GEORGE H. ANDREWS EARL H. HEISS Adjutant General G-1 Captain Lieutenant Colonel JOHN W. ARNDT CHARLES F. RYAN G-2 G-3 Cx, fm. Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant Colonel JOHN C. NOEL MERT M. L.AMPSON G-4 Chaplain ,, 4 3 W 1, . ,. A 1' iii j X 2: X un. llniau Zlmier ad Physical Training Obstacle Course Prelfnlina 'Y Rifle In sU'UClf0n C0 Loading the M-1 Rifle llfse lndividll Class al weavons Til 8 Basil' Combat Basic Combat Training at the United States Army Training Center, Armor is a team endeavor, requiring the maximum of both the new train-ee and his superiors. The main purpose of Basic Combat Training is the development of quali- fied riflemen, whose individual talents will be supplemented later through more specialized instruction. Four training regiments are responsible for administering Basic Combat Training to Regular Army, Selective Service and Reserve Forces Act.per- sonnel at the USATCA. Carefully screened officers and non-commissioned officers are entrusted with the mission of transforming young civilians into well-trained and disciplined soldiers, prepared for efficient and honorable service. A very intensive program, Basic Combat Training covers over thirty major subjects--from military courtesy to squad tactics. Major emphasis, however, is placed on mastery of the M-1 rifle, the basic weapon of the Infantry, More than a week is devoted to handling, maintaining and firing the 9M pound weapon, and the trainee finds that it is practically his constant companion throughout the training cycle. When he completes Basic Combat Training, the trainee realizes that his weapon is his "best friend" in combat. In order to obtain the maximum from Basic Combat Training, a man's physical condition must be continually improving. This is achieved through daily participation in the "Army Daily Dozen"--a series of calisthenics designed to harden muscles, slim waist lines and increase physical stamina. In addition to intensive exercise, the trainee's physical condition is improved by good food and a well-balanced diet. Trainees also receive instruction in such varied subjects as bayonet drill, first aid, interior guard duty, camouflage and concealment, mines and booby traps, signal communications, field sanitation, intelligence, night vision, battle indoctrination, map and compass reading. They learn that combat, unlike a baseball game, is not postponed because of darkness or inclement weather. Combat conditions are simulated whenever possible and practicable, so that the men can be taught what to expect in the event of national emergency. During the seventh week, trainees live in the field as combat soldiers. They "rough it" by sleeping in tents, eating outdoors from mess kits and waging a constant battle against the elements, The trainees also participate in mock battles against "Agressor" troops from their own company, who are dressed in different uniforms and instructed to attack and harass when least expected, Approximately 220 men train together in a company, with each company broken down into four platoons, that occupy four barracks. Each platoon is l Ml:S'5f0II Trafbfh directly commanded by a platoon sergeant, a well-trained and highly-qualified soldier, who is usually a combat veteran of World War II or the Korean conflict. He is with his men from reveille to retreat and often during the evening hours for informal and instructive "bull sessions." The platoon is also broken down--into four squads of about a dozen men. Squads are directed to fellow trainees with unusually high aptitudes and leadership qualities. The squad and platoon systems instill in the trainees a pride in each of these units and there is always spirited competition for the designation of "best squad" or "best platoon." Trainees become endowed with a formidable esprit de corps and a sense of unit identification. Instruction in the various Basic Combat Training subjects is given by specially trained officers and non-commissioned officers from regimental in- structor groups. An instructor group is similar in structure to a college or university factulty, with each "professor" a specialist in his field, who also has the ability to pass on his knowledge to the trainees. In addition to formal instruction from regimental personnel, the trainees receive individual in- struction from their platoon sergeants. Contrary to popular belief, the Army isn't an impersonal organization, Each trainee at USATCA receives all the individual attention necessary for the development of a competent soldier. While Basic Combat Training is necessarily intensive, because there is a great deal to be taught in a comparatively short period, the men receive an ample amount of free time for recreation. Fort Knox is a large city with excellent recreational facilities. Men can participate in any sport, or read books from well-stocked libraries. There are large swimming pools and base- ball and football fields near company areas. Convenient service clubs provide the trainees with excellent facilities for letter-writing, reading, listening to music and just plain talking. Weekly dances and shows are also held in each service club and the latest movies are shown at the post theatres. Trainees also visit nearby Louisville, a large, progressive community with impressive recreational and cultural facilities. Tours are also arranged to Mammoth Cave, the birthplaces of Abraham Lincoln and Daniel Boone, Stephen Foster's "Old Kentucky Home" and the beau-tiful Bluegrass Region. The trainee's spiritual life is highly stressed during Basic Combat Training at USATCA. Character guidance lectures from Training Center chaplains are an integral part of the training curriculum and the men are encouraged to attend services of their choice at one of the many post chapels. The chaplains are also available for individual discussions with the men at any time. Thus, the Basic Combat Training program at USATCA may be considered two-fold. While the development of a well-trained soldier is naturally stressed, the development of a man is not forgotten. Upon completion of Basic Combat Training, the trainee is not only a trained riflemang he is also a worthy citizen of his community and his nation. Close Combat Course Lo . C g .Feng lion Rang e Q Tra - . 'I'rans1 nsmon Range ,gi 51521551 Q Close Combat Course Wave 'sq Xu .--.em ' Rifle Grenades Tfansitifm Range P hysical training sw,- L N,-p!ff4 ,w an gb vw.. fir' 4 fu' if X L Combat Course Hand Grenades X1 S. 3 , it Muay L, Sign ., l?,,1.,. I 'f ,'i.Q1f"V5k pf mm, .41 ff, if -4, , ,I W- ir Aw A' 1 A Fr' 1' ,. . f Q. 1 f- .il A 9 1 .,,,3,..,.wNn-., WM, H, ,,, A wr. .. sqm, ,V duff. Q, f-han-4.-.,.1,Q 1-35. , 15,-ggfg.-55, 1' I .,:.4,a4f?,Q1g 1' f5z:ffff'11g5g,g .N A fr wg -am: 3+ 1, X -,4,zxL,g1:' :"'f?,:fj11 1 L ,gixs N ln Q M :Q WL, .4 ya ' Q .. - W" fn -" ", .f'f: Ng 5 ,1 ' 51 ff A 4 J' y .J 51 2 , 'Q ,J s'v. -X,-1 .Q f- Q. f :,.-5 ..,.,,.f4,:. H1 ,kbs 32 9321 , yin g. Z, 4, ,v f-H XT?- Qu wr , 'if g ' 2 f ' 1 4 9 fig V ' wx . s 'fi'-iw A, WM Q 1-W , ifelj 1 ,gy ,s 5 i' J .-eff ,-f""' Colonel GEORGE W. ENGLAND 4tl'1 Training Regiment, Infantry W I L"'-'Hun-ff Colonel THOMAS LAWLOR 3rd Training Regiment, Infantry M... Colonel LEROY E. FRAZIER sth Training Regiment, Infantry IW' Map Reading Gas Mask Drill Gas Chamber M 1 'M "Z,-. 'f V.-. mf., 4 a a V id L .' . , . 1 A 7 Asif' 2 PM V , ' , 'U 'fllew 4-3 g A l,ff2,V,i. 1 VXIVN , ' N A """""M First Aid - Leg Splint A Squad Formation Class 'Q A.?' ww, ,gy , af ll fm, x hi . K . ,WV v 9 ?fx.A,,, , .,A. ,Lf 2 Q - ffm. gf 'rf 35:5 W df' J: .XV wig M J ' r Z" at K' 1 uv, f 'iilbll wg 'v1'va.y,, fm, f K My aff' ,hw ,...- , .ah 4 """w"!x M-wmsfix f""'N .. ,..,.......f HAIRCUTS FN-. HAIRCUTS-Everything in the Army must be uniform--in- cluding hair styles. Trainees receive that first regulation haircut during the processing period and must keep their hair short and well-groomed throughout th-e training cycle. MEDICAL AND DENTAL CHECK-A healthy soldier is at good soldier and the Army does everything possible to not only maintain, but also im- prove the health of its men. MEDICAI AND PENN! Cliff!! an- +---'-""' L'l077ilN6' l5'5'l!E f 1-N... RECORDS CHECK AND CLASSI- FICATION-The Army strives to use every man in a field in which his talents may be best utilized and developed. Therefore, early in his military career, the trainee's educa- wifi, ff! , J it ' f 'iz f if xv N801 , ii 5 tion, training and work experience is carefully recorded for future ref- erence. This information, supple- mented by the results of aptitude tests help the Army choose the field in which the man will eventually serve. RfCORD5 ffifflf AND Clv455'lF!047!0N COMMANDING GENERAL'S ORIENTATION-An impressive ceremony marks the Command- ing General's orientation address early in the training cycle. At that time, the Commanding General greets the new men, ex- plains what they will learn, and what is expected of them as soldiers. c0MM'4ND V " " 5,55 sw- ,ww , , .- fe , 1. he , R nwf' do a if WM ,M M , Li fem s or t it as , , fs We Mag, r- .Q-,. ' s ' W " f. 1' S PARADE PRv4L'7'lC'f PARADE PRACTICE-Many hours of drill transform young civilians into dis- ciplined, skillful soldiers. Troop move- ments are best achieved when the soldiers are well-drilled in marching. The trainees soon exhibit their skills in battalion and regimental reviews. sw V sv' I M-I MECWANICAZ TRAINING M-l RIFLE-Learning to handle and maintain the M-1 rifle, the "soldier's best friend," occu- pies a large segment of the eight-week cycle, A soldier who knows the mechanics well, is in a position to become an expert when he ac- tually fires the weapon on the range. 'QP' ' PIN Od FIRWA6 ffm' ',,x? -omg Q' aff" xypft, Hi-K' ,Aft - YU ffm PRI CIRCLE-On the preliminary rifle instruction circle, the trainee learns the fundamentals of proper position, sighting procedure and the importance of thc initials, BRASS ibreathe, relax, aim, slack and squeeze.J M-I P. R. l. CIRCZE 53.45 Gi i l . V' i V1-uv . ' x . A U in f 1?-L,l, f 'Q is i 2 I E x l I a 5 , .sf - '-154:-,2A1f,f,...:. 1 ' lf" ' K i ' --:W ' WU 5' K K-D Rv4N6't' K-D RANGE-After mastering the fundamentals, the trainees fire on the known distance range. They must attain a qualifying score on the range before they can successfully complete their basic training. The Army feels, with justification, that there's nothing quite so important in combat as the skill- ful use of the rifle. W-n....1 ,QA TN-X. ?1, J N, -E . ff' TRANSITION RANGE AND TECHNIQUE OF FIRE - The Transition Range and Technique of Fire exercises are provided as a means by which the trainee can be taught the use of his M-l rifle as an effective weapon in combat. All types of covers are provided from which fire can be di- rccted, TECIINIQIIL' 0F NRL' TM 5 ,f?"f'4s.Qil1s W rm, . , ,Vg ,V , ,. 1,f2g5,g,vv1k1"'n"W' . .K V, I V. 5 . hex, , N L'li0W 77015 J 'J' .4 Q5 ' W' ..auT 1 omfr wAuT Porlwoes IN MV ICE CRE... HZ 1 1. 1 "'..i?,.'.,5. ,WM K ' if wk H-I' it uv 'av xx llVNOC'0lfl 7l0lV.S' "5'fi07'5' " INNOCULATIONS-Shots ane not only fired from weapons during basic combat training. They are also ejected from the business end of hypodermic needles. During the eight weeks, the men are inoculated against tetanus, typhoid, smallpox and polio. The men feel that the slight discomfort caused by the shots is worth bearing for protection against the dread diseases. 6'eneral 0 ders l. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8 9 10 ll To take charge of this post and all govermnent property in view, To walk my post in a military manner keeping always on the alert and observing everything that takes place.within sight or hear- ing, To report all violations of orders I am instructed to enforce. To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guardhouse than my own, To quit my post only when prop- erly relieved, To receive, obey, and pass on to the sentinel who relieves me, all orders from the commanding officer, offi- cer of the day, and officers and non-commissioned officers of the guard only, To talk to no one except in the line of duty. To give the alarm in case of fire or disorder, To call the commander of the re- lief in any case not covered by instructions, To salute all officers and all col- ors and standards not cased, To be especially watchful at night and during the time for challeng- ing, to challenge all persons on or near my post, and to allow no one 5110 d GUARD MOUNT AND GUARD DUTY - Guard duty is important. The manual for court martial provides severe punishment for violations of orders by sentinels and guards. There are eleven general orders to guide the trainee in performing guard duty. He must learn these word for word and under- stand their meaning. to pass without proper authority. Moam' ""'!?m 51. 1, , ,3 1 Vs, , 3 Q, V7 ,. W s. xg an 'K' j Q. - 5 -, . , 7 A I Q A , ju...-, , E A A f -nw , ,L Z ,-3 S - ., J., I .,,. - K W li .,-. 'S was as V F IQ SU E7 - 'Q k Q ' 1 KI' ' ' "- S 4 It S. X N.. xl is I 1. sg A ' 's ' Av :WIND AND Rl!-'lf 6REM4Df5 ,ff 'fr e ' 7 , .TIV9 X a f' "" o f f" , sl. I f Y -z Q' N W2 . ' gy-12g-,,' L K . s i, r piQaj K . 2 -11:1-Q wh'5Yf"' rass e fa C 1 4 ' T ' 1 as 5 X ,M . If YS W E f U Q me L ' ' A JM wwssmeeweas Q ,- N v ai I 2 M M K be 9 U' -Ina x Q ',r Q E4 M x gr ' s in in , F lm ,Q ,XX we Q MI... wwf ,Q an F 1 X 'f s 2 3 J ff' sg? x in f 'MW if mx' W, f M if wi Q A . HAND AND RIFLE GRENADES GRENADES-Hand and rifle grenades enable the rifle- men to destroy enemy objectives at close range and serve to fill the gap between the M-1 rifle and the bayonet. Both offer effective and potent firepower when properly used. :Pvt We ,',- LL,-, 'L,. mf A "' Z s ' -' ' - ' ' 'L ff "L, 1 u to i tttttt V -. L ,, ' A as - L ',-L Q s"i3 A"L, , -75 ' " , V -f"' - - ,.-'L, I , - r ,., A 'V at itaate sats . ' m,.:,. W, K'L' s tef - 'Lm'A H L' CLOSE COMBAT COURSE- , -. Close Combat training, undigl s C OO d 11 f F' 'i " l 1 ' C simulated combat conditions i ,.'. - ,M egs ,,,, -N. f ,- -- I 'A ' "" ' 'W'i "'WgggtfF3'i' W ii af' ez 544+ . ,-35,5 V K -f M- wq,,l ,K .V , f 5' if ' v t. its ,af 'NJ . vii i-t!v:1 s t, - . ' ' S V 'WN' 9-zz f..lv'5-K fl ' ' :: ' ', WH' -' 'F,f2'f,:iA-fax ' . P 21 .ff " : I :st 461.1 5112: ' 'f': iw ' V f . "wif-v-Zia-Q-f 'H ,. ' -ailwigwi 2 ez. H: ,L ,ew w ze- 'f e-R tiff 1' J- :w i " '.1" '.9 , "Z i ' ' j lj 2' -L ,Q k i , - H is designed to teach the trainer to apply what he learned dur ing formal instruction. The trainees are grouped into small teams which advance ovel ground covered with obstacles QM M wwf WW' K COMBAT of various kinds. As they ad- vance, targets suddenly appear and are fired upon. The course teaches the men to stay alert, ready to use their wea- pons at a moment's notice and gives them confidence in them- selves, and their buddies. 'H-.rx ,ff ' -X11 , -',.xR:.P BARRACKS-Life is many things, but it's never lonely. New soldiers find many others with similar interests and there's always a steady stream of con- versation among the trainees, In the barracks, the men become more than a squad or platoon. They become buddies. . fr! 1 Q. 4 'Ne Barracks :Ye X X A " ., . , N 1 7, c,6!v6lf97zAcYn11i1Cy4Cf4'fIfl:4,,i!Z,E' 'Wy Barmck 9 : f ! ,' f 1' 1 . ,XA , 3 ' , . ,,,,,QZ' gp!-,f,f,'LL 1. -EJACAW . vylfffxafmgamddlafxw 24 4 fmmf W sa JZ ffm f6'f"a'9 fda ARMED F 5 3 ,aim Mabry A945041 ,ifzkyfwqxxm Q 0 1o1f,1z1'f1.w!da Aff, ,Qi-1 y K? as Yam 12 N 'K m"6'y""mfMff 41 layfcfaimiflmzpmbmm A5 If! 19, Emfffwmhzn ,,,' fy, V an 5' 521145 mf'ff'1f M5'b,0Mpwf,,,Q,4,-Mx ln. -'1o , an ,aa44mLA,QA,,,,5ml,mg, afozaiu an Ai.:l'n0r.4nJ,?4:,fff,,5,Z2',,f,7! '77404,'a,nJwmfMm,,.mfdfyQg, 745, Az 8, .70 Qtr ablm an mu offu M 54071121 'fl Jo Cay f1f4f14z run avi wma! MV K 2 g, 0' 2,0014 al A .wmfala fdffwi-fiwf 1' JG Q, Am ' 4 A, 4 , iawyd mam farm, zy ,mtfzzmim JLMWWM 'W :Ye 17" MINLS' AND 3008? TRAP! BIINES AND BOOBY TRAPS-While the Engi- neers are specialists in mines and booby traps, every soldier must become familiar with their functions. Trainees learn the principles and techniques of mine warfare, types and functioning of various mines, trip flares and traps, plus disarming and probing for enemy mines. ,y""""'4 ,V 'M PIWSICAZ PHYSICAL TRAINING-Men in good physical condition have a far better chance of doing their duty in combat and living through their ex- perience-therefore, the trainef is called upon to perform 7Rv4lNlN6' :renuous duties during his 'eriod of basic training. He i urged to set for himself the tighest possible standard of hysical fitness as it will make or a much more successful lrmy life. IR .11-swf' H 5 .A H9 N . TVY 3. wma 'MW W A AY, R i 1 - if X 'if WP' t . V A 4 wi? E i' "'+ l kk jssd W bmw 3 tl, 4 X1 Kis, 1, 5 uf N-W' A .- 4 415' 4 Q-.u QX r M A g ,,- 1 E""t.iv , .... V, 'AH' ,., V f. f"?fk"'v?5??1,,a9' -. Mm- " ds "-wa, ' V LV. ,. - F' Q ,M A Vi: A -- my-f .,.. V Fi ,Q s w ,M A ' ..,,,,,,, if K W , A V A N . K is if, 3 V , . - f-1.3.5-a' 'gi M " . , 1 co X : I , - mf my 4 " i 3. idx f V .4 ' Kit Q-1 ' f' I, "1 ,r 'f ' s U1 f A va . gg i , , ?""'w.79 We-gagra' W Af"-.1'f 'YW 7 4. 4,2 1 L we ' K I 1 ,mf A ' ,f,, ,Ari l ' 7 V5 'jk fm-xyif i, W A miwjf-'+,1, , W, , Ng F ef' gr ll- 41358911 A ,A A P Am ,I fi vwygf -R ' f,V h .f 4 ,b --ly' 1' Q N ,aww , V, 1 'f f Lean, AU, 'l6'LWkA,,A. ,wif 234 fy M-f'??ip'g. ef 'w wfzzsm sf 'ffffv 237 gi,f2g:Qb9'L""' w f A 'L,, "S, .W af ,f N, K A '1,'v v W . f 1- w 'Lmw Q f iff-'45-" J ' 'N Af "F ' 1 ff5' L CONFIDENCE COURSE-The confidence course is designed to toughen the trainees and develop self-confidence. Some of the tests are easy, while others are extremely difficult. Most trainees, however, thoroughly enjoy seeing what they can do. Hman Q0 w N k INF ZTRATON 6001? 5 L Q.. , V: ag 'Wt wm1 1 .w -vm., Z Q :M ' 'A , W .iii 5 ig, biww,.s X x ' V X yy . 5 fi 'N Q- W, ff wg Wlwww, , I . .v F .M '14, K 1 ' ,, P f. if - M Mwv fmrwmgfQ'f wg ua I gy Q 14 H. xy-at ' . , J . uf gi Rf Q ' ,E px "'- , ,gm ,J - .Mr-,, X... 'Salam .six 3 R ,iw M M .. fw..,,A,,,Qt 'L gym s ? A Q S 4F??, f ' Q 'i '-flaws ,M ,Q K? F ", 7 "Q, wwaxrM yvEnFWvw5hf5E an S V, H ,, , ,, A M ., gi H ' m f -fi"-23" 1' Q Q ag, f 1. -my 'mf f 1. f ' pu ' 1' X ' Qfiulf .. 1 2 1 ,. A LLL,-, Q AL - ' 1 2 rg ,Q as 1 32 'hwwf' - i 'L . V 5 W . V Q 7 ' Q F Qfsfwm qMi',",14 fl" Ago - agggfeas ,. , Q as-'if -f -QS li ' f' 1-WK ' .1 Qkuaw, 1 My fm Ly, f ' , . W v. ' .H ff LA.-15, 4. ' mf ' """"" ""- --f-..,,..q,, ... 1 . -Q .. , .0 ,M,A,., 4 wa. . Qt? ' ,W 'f' - - 2" Q, .. Aw ' H g if . ,f 7 ' fy 'M-2 ' 4' JMS.. A' ,H.,y- 1- ff A - 4 X! , , N 0 1-M... -1' ' fb QL, ,'f...- .mf SIE? lf' I ' M. 'g"w,,fl if Y 'xg A ,A , ' .5 vf .Q .my Nw wg., 9 ' -- ' ray, 1, F Q M K Lkyy hxrrirmh I 'Dfw -x ,.. ? , W,.M,,,.,., .A , - , , -K A.L. ' e 4 W 'Ms WM:-.wwf nf .L J' Q.-W, . Y x X ww 1 Q 1... 1 , ' ' , , A V ' iq, ' A . +1 KL -3, K ' , A ,ffj-,Fm-A'q5sW,c,. K A . ' . I Q, Wgm .M . AL 6 gsm ,,,g,,,x in , I V. mV4kf.,.M .- N J'-'s M hffyv af, . ,yy . .J-,.,.a ,f-Q? har .fyggg ilw - . L, 71, ' XP 3y',4,- v..,.,,.,j"' vqgffw' ,plump fs-4 'K Tw ' EY GASA Q its -,,- t N Au: 1 f,mfz," Q 5 1,55 ,Q ' 75555, wg 3- 7: ,,L, ,, wr .,'. Vasa: , if is ,, :Na 4 xwlfjr 5 wif' l WL 45' 1' PROTECTION A G A I N S T CBR ATTACK-In spite of .weapons in the past, the Army must be prepared in the event of possible future attack. Ac- cordingly all trainees must ISERY HIL AS CHAMBEF img CHAMBER N, 1 f 'av know how to protect themselves against CBR attacks through the use of the gas mask and other protectives, and how to this 4 -it Q xg. Lg gas-f Q, W,,ff"1 421' I ' f fa, 2, it fgwe .iii af wg advance during combat when CBR agents are present. -.......J , it 41' K N ., h 1 X iw .t Lf W, ,L my "P M - i'f-if ' , - gf y 4 , A -, .' ,D , N A Wff W ,M ,S wa. A , ""-wQW- V' A w ww - -A - , 'f M A S. K QTL zlk F M A f Q 5455 WmfR3v!aQ:Qs.W Y W vii X M ,lk ,. I -- 'ak M M L. .. i ,jf,g,j W ,. ,Q .W .L Y C'f1ow 171 file I-'field """"-H-.me,,,,m...., , I lj. .MM 4' . Mm an . yn, . . "" Tst igf H ' I if , V' HQ :"' K N5 f 4'-:ff in V I N ,W P" W X Z M K I W M is Q , - L ...V ,V , '- 1 nz' Eff, ,i,.,.qfmxU, V 4 A 3 VM, ii Im il H W . . . A f?,M,,,E X Qu 1 X mwv2'r"'l.1 - P' . . ., D ,,, , ..' 't:2'l""A 'z if 5 Q 5 K x NQH .. , 'almx ' ....XQ, 'K '5 w A X . 4 4 1 If A Y f Y. E M , 'Eff .I ,'m ul 'SAI '.ivl..,l'l .1 aj ,l1g. fda." fir. . , , 'F 'fb' ' ' 1 -. 'N , -sf " 3 V f , A Q B 2 I ,lm E Z Q gk ' K W Q is '15 . M ff 1 4 2 . . A 5 Q xiii? xv. 'mn-N gf 41 D f In , :vii ,4- 'X . ? ,. A ...ax , 1 F ii ...Q Vw. 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N 1 , as - f 'ew W -1'.. ,A F1 my 'N5f"5w14w"??9S'3f., f2 L'A' 'Y Migljg' .-.3-54.-' 51 - ,jgf -maxi? ...ig ff fa' . nw-,fw L? ,kb ,ge ,A 2 , 1 19,-W ff! wi W 'xr Af 2' Q 3 ' 9' UQ' ' wi ww- fffy 14' 'X R Q " , 1 5.- l Nl 6' QE 17 75- PROFICIENCY TESTS - How well did the trainee learn it- all? Final proficiency tests find the answers. From compass reading to first aid, the trainee must prove himself completely proficient - and fully worthy of graduation. Every "station" along the test route provides another measure of progress. And the trainee must score high all the way to convince the Army he's ready for bigger assignments. It's a tough test, and those who pass it have jumped a major Army hurdle. i iw,.q', !iKA..,,5V L R , Y .7 Xfmfaigi-'W X A Q ,A ...t V' v we 5 f . F Ei N' 2 ? , it 5 Q It 1 fix K P a lv +V! e H .ii s y I ' 1 x Q -.Sf fi- "-xx I H , fx ft , ,Um - ' X 1 'Tail . www, ,5 we . 5? fx-W , 3 ext: my . r We i2'ii3aE"w'?y , IW V 2 9 4 gnu E -1 1.2321 -' 4 ,assi- x 'aww 'TWT i n it ' , I ' fi' 5 ' i k i : e ,Qi N yrrx W- ls' A I i N ' hif i- N 593' K .. ,:,, N , I L ids . 4. - vw v V' A 1 " J -6 A' fl K if W' M Q 'tw its . it 'wx- '5 1 'N f.. a. b , , ,yt ' 4. . 1 , W N ,gi X, ,D 1 ,sf 'sq' Q, - A F. f il I P . 7- V , ' wi, ,i ' A rw 'i ft 4 Wie-1 ' . 55-2 Q. ,t,fQ-we We ' X st 'il an ' ""'wf"3'7i9i'- Wm' "" . '4 T ' H56 Y 1 s ,gf 4 'A , Q mx Q at e f 4. ' 7' ff A ' if v '1 . it, F w " 'Hubby-4.4 asf t i rsor or GRADWI 7l0N 1 v Q 3 Q K Lieutenant Colonel GEORGE E. HEDRICK. JR. Battalion Commander " 'wr ...Q if fi!! Q Oo 353, 64:4 . 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WQLQ, 0 'Z' 0205 Es Q'!v3'1 ,Qng I "fi Q' 0 .zxgzl 90 Master Sergeant MXSGT ANTHONY LESTER HERALD Operations Sergeant Sergeant Major Headquarters I M Baffahbn 4fb 7 ahnhg Reglbrefm Infantry Wu. QC int. 1 A '-Q... Captain L. ERNEST A vAss -"'!'3 0 n 0 o .S,o:o'0sQ3q. o Executrve Offrcer .-.-...Z-' Q Q' 0 o'dw'o'Q' Q"f'Q': Q' ' ,..Q,, ,fps u 'son , Q:o'0Q io' Q' Q' ' Qzzr: Q 5 "6'.Q' 'fo' QQ' 0-o'o' gs Q sq"N0Qo ,O 0 H . Q Q Q o s "9q'Q,.'b."g3:.,7 'Q ef: 'exit 5. Q QQ.-'Q e'-' Q-H ' s H 6-I-Sw. Ox." xi!! 0' 0 'O s,Q,Q' ,' X, Mg v" o'0 'Q:Q Q , Q 'Q Q' 'ignvp e O 5. xg . tl' 242' Oo' 3 ' gsm. .2303 . U O O ,-, , .5 QS I 5 , 'Q' , .- s Q' r ,v ,QQ 'Q' 'Q'Q Q' 0, , Q, 9. 0,91 . ', , .., Q , 0. ' , .. 0. 1, Q, ,,-4 'Qu 1 4.99, ,r . ,o Q Qu' or o ,o 4 Osqoo Q s oe' Qu 0 " ' o'0' o's 'ssfqi 9 x ' ' '- Y: 'S'-."2.2:1 ' -' ' 'Z-:Q Q- 'R ' -2-:-22 "fn ' 1 '-.. ES". 0 '.-fa., ' Q O, 'QQ 0 .Q q.Q,Q,-Q. ,Q, . 'g. 9'-1,0 ', ,Qg. 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Q' Q 'Q Q-gm-Q 4 94, ' Q 0 ' "' "' .3 'fi-s "' 0 ve 'O-?7'v -2 as .' .w.-N :-. Q' 'M .. 5 . ,' D ,9og50.,'o.00. 9 vgismbs, 55.9, 0 .554 Qt: . s.,'g. g. ,sg "Q Q. . 0 'G :QQ.ff,Q,:Q.:,z,s Q., Lv, sag, f,sfQ'o 9 '30 zQO 0,8354 .QQ5 Q' No ." -'o ev.-. -Q 5' ' QOQ 9' 39' Q'o,' 9,9 ,Q s.. ., 5 .,5 Q ' 9 . Q l W S 7' 'f-3' -so SGT MILLER SFC KUBLNICK PFC KELSO S-4 Sergeant Clerks Company B Captain DOUGLAS W. STREUBER Company Commander ' 13171 Bafrahbn 4M ffdlhlhg Reglhzenf Infantry 2nd Lieutenant DAVID P. SCI-ILIEPER Executive Officer g ' J- 'I 'ii 'Nrfd' .,. H gf A . N 1 W: 5 4 X. X wr' MfSGT MfSGT PFC MYHIS PFC PHILLIPS RICHARD LEWIS ROBERT C. HORNFECK SP2 ALBINO PFC MIKULA First Sergeant Field First Sergeant Supply Clerks ,. ' 62,- 3! f- : .. . ' Wi 55' n X ' J N ' x . : M ir? MESS SERGEANT AND COOKS 'Winn CA DRE D5 L X A 1 'I P T 4' x uh E H ' vb 1 p -. 3 -. wg, 5-of Alber, Ronald W. Allinger, Richard M. Arnold, James F. Badowski, Carl B. Baldridge, Bruce I-I. Barco. Robert J. Bartsch. David E. Beans. Marlin W. Beasley, Raleigh L. Bendell, Bruce A. at gm 3 Biro, Stephen E. Bischoff, Reldon G. Boatman, John C. Bohlayer, Morris L. Bosworth, W. T., Jr Bouscaren, Pierre, Jr. Bowling, Dewey H. Bowman, Donald G. Boyer, Marion T. Bradway, John T. SDM Briggs, Robert E. Brotnetsky, Walter Browning, Shirley C. Bruce, Emery C. Brunner, Chester C. .043-t Bnie, william T. Bulko, Michael S. Burgess, Leslie L. Cairns, Emmett R. Carpenter, Harold G, im? Carrick, wayne D. Carroll, James H. Caulfield, John J. Challdey, Garnett L. Click, Russell S. Cramer. Arlington W. Cross, James E. Davie, Albert H.. Jr, Davis, Vincent A. De Luca, Louis F. fr: 'if A-wi Dessen, Alan C. Dicke, Don L. Dixon, Donald R, Donovan, Thomas A. Dowler, John D. :SEP Dunford, Robert L. Earles. Tommy L. Edwards. Douglas B. Edwards, Jonathan, Ir. Edwards, Robert L. Evans, william R. Fanen, Philip M. Ferrell, Stanley D. Fejes, Robert D. Fischbach, Donald P Fletcher, William R. Fuller, Jack D. Gaines, Everett V. Gaunce, James O. Gedert, Bernard M. dm Gintling, Edwin W. Glarer. James E. Godard. Porter W. Gold. John A. Graham. George L. Grauze, Dailis L. Greene. Gerard J. Haas, George E. Haddon, Joseph M. Hall, Shelby D. S Q2 Hargetr. .Albert L.. Jr. Hartman. Herman B. Hasselbach. Gary N. l-lavyer, Bernard W. Hawkins. Thomas W Hemsing, Henry F. Hendershot, Marvin D. Henry, Charles Hickman. Robert L.. Jr. Hider, Bill R, if Hines, Rey Hix, Larry E. Hixson, George A. Hodges, Randolph C. Huether, Paul F. 119, W gr Huff. Ralph L. l-luffstutler, Arnold N. Tyoob, William G. Ianda. William A. Jansen, Onas W.. Ir Johns. Robert A. Jones, John C.. Ir, Jung, Raymond C. Keehfuas, George W. Keith, Roger H. Kelley- Thomas G. Kelly, Joseph I. Kepler, Gary A. Kessler, Harold W. Kight, Edward H. ,M i aim., .gum iv' N 1 "r King. Howard R. Kirby, Ashburn L. Kirkner. Richard C. Kofron, Joseph S. Lampe, James R. Larson, Robert D. Layman, Robert M. Leary. Donald P. Leonard, Jerry V. Le Vander, Raymond Lewis, Solomon W. Linson. Ronald L. Lipscomb, George W. Lipstein, Richard S. Lockhart. Robert S. Luxenburg, Herbert L. Marks, Marvin L, Martin, Richard T. Masters, Paul B. Mc Dougal, Neil E. we-gang Michalak, Paul G. Miller. Bobby L. Miller, Earl L. Miller, Ernest W. Miller, Gerald T. fl Mitchell, James R. Moffatt, Wayne D. Morrison, Ray H.. Ir. Nelson, Donald B. Newman, Jarvis W. Nierwinski, Alexander Nopper, David M. Norris, Verne W. Oaks, Jerry w, aaa Nagel, Donald F. Nelms, Herbert C Nitschke, Lonnie H. Noe, Earl B. Osting, Norman E. Palmieri, John A. Parrish, Charles E. Peace. Loyd W. Peluso, John R. Perry, Richard F. Peters, Steven E. Petrochilli, Elwood M. Pike, James P. Plummer, Joseph R. Poling, Robert H. Poole, Joel R. ,idk Posell, James M. Rader, william V. Ramage, Thomas A. Redding, Rex E. Reinaker, william E Ritter, Earl S. Robinson, Bobby J. Roden, William E. Rogers, Charles W. Rogers, Paul w. Ross, James A. Rust, Robert B. Salada, Jimmie D. Saunders, Willie T. Schoonmaker, Jay P. Schott, Thomas J. Schroeder, Gary K. Schultz, Robert L. Sessoms, Claud H.. Jr. Sewell, Jerry C. Shark, John H. Shaver, william E. Shoemaker, Jack W. Sibol, Michael A. Siegle, Emil H.. Ir Simon, Peter C. Sizemore, James H. Slatex, John H. Sledge, Clay G., Jr, Smith, Rodney F. . W Y Snyder, Harry J. Sowden, Richard L. Speed, David E. Stankovich, George St. Clair, Lawrence Stine, John D. Stitzlein, George E. Stockman, Austin C.. Ir. Teele. Donald I. Terrell, John L. Thacker, Richard A..Jr. Trippetti, Robert J. Tumazos, Thomas C. Tyszkiewicz, Edmund L. UIEIY. William S. Vickers, Norman D. Volkmann, Ronald J. Warfield, Joseph E. Whipple, Herbert Wilbur, John P , fr lx. Q :ly KM ,, EW SW 1 "'- 1 ffm ' Y' gvwaw. , ffm- 'Q A Q '51, gy, -gy gm UMR, ,R 4? W . .V 'K F 59+ 'fifgl' Q gg 2233 T' - .-:-f , Wilhelm, Asey H., Jr. Willey, Frederick I. Wilson, Alan L. Wozniak, Edward J, ,SZQLLJ ,: 'S' K N... 2 iamounfeof Eid!! ,,,.g , A Q.. 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M A L. . elf ' LVN 5? ,N ag .mf 1. yfY,..13,,: 1 "flim- '.. ff' .4 . ff 1 ' 4 ,-A 'ff' ff- A 0' S Nwtavnw V A We 3551-,A A.',"iN A Y A , .iw fw A4-Mfvh Q' Y 'mQp'g. gi .ACK E Aan! Qdnd 815 val' 43' - Q iv? K , .W ---- f f K ,,.- .- .. 12 f 5? f if-ff, , ' :fi ,g-wi: ow in '-2.2 me EMC! AV I ,M 11, rf' ,arf f W an W HW 5 fs X aw 3 4' K r ,lf S W 1 fl fn Miami . Wim U7' ?, X , i , My X I ,f VPMWJW V M 1 ' M .. S K 1 GV M gg ' w"i 3, W ww , vf, my V ,' 1, fs TSS . Sf . it ,fir , QQ .sm ,K .Q is 2? x . ' .wi " ,L "P - uf if ww Wm, , gs, egg 6 ,, x ' ' I lm , , ,,.,m7K ,M5W:,,w5 ,fy ,V53f. I Q , ,. , , . J-fnkw,V,,Zg - ,W-J f ' mf A , E 5 . - u 5 f:' x - H if ff W w ,Q , ! Q.. we if ii is f 3 5 fy T 2? V- 7 , 15 1 E 1 ro iciencg L jg my 4-N 1' " ,f ,.-Q 7--w - X cAT'0 l Muurmtv PUBU MILLER PUBLISHING DALL AS, COMM Your command has made it possible for you to obtain a copy of this publi- cation. Every effort has been made to portray with words and pictures the interesting places and major activities in which you participate during your training period. Miller Publishing Company is proud to have had a part in planning and producing this book. We hope that you are pleased with it. We believe you will prize it more highly with the passing years. Publisher's Staff Irving Kimmel ..... Field Editor Photo ra hers Donald Bowman g p Michae1A. Vowels Art Director David S. Knox Layout Department Lorie Benrubi Margaret Smith Billie Drerlllarl Hazel Thomas Colleen Knowlton l i 4 4 1 1 Q 4- - V. f1rq:gi1afQggQQ,5'.,,g lim


Suggestions in the US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) collection:

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

1969

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1987 Edition, Page 1

1987

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 42

1957, pg 42

US Army Training Center - Armor Yearbook (Fort Knox, KY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 61

1957, pg 61

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