Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA)

 - Class of 1966

Page 1 of 136

 

Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 136 of the 1966 volume:

‘V tiS ees ' X » . TURNERS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL v v ; •Va. K..U AW ' • ' , -1 Yv5C ' A tree is planted by the waters. Its roots become firmly established. As the tree grows powerful , each branch becomes strong and sure. Finally the tree reaches the peak of its strength. Its branches spread proudly and reach toward the sky. A class is formed near the waters , deeply influenced by its heritage. People , activities , and knowledge in- fluence it. As the class earns recogni- tion and prominence , its members become mature and certain. Finally , the class reaches its climax. Its mem- bers separate and strive toward the achievement of their individual goals. MR. JOHN F. BASSETT 2 The light in the forest. A shaft, piercing the dark uncer- tainty of our youth and guiding our steps toward greatness. An example to imitate, to respect, to admire. An application of inexhaustible spirit to the achievement of every goal. A reliable friend, a loyal supporter, an infallible leader; but most of all, a man. We met him as Freshmen, and through the years a strong bond has grown between us. His hearty sense of humor accented by a broad grin made every trial seem easier. With a strong sense of responsibility, he inspired us to make the most of every opportunity, never to give up when the going got rough. As our friendship grew, so did our respect and admiration for this man who greatly influenced our lives. The impression which he left on the Class of ’66 can never be dulled by time. He has led us to the climax of our high school career. And so, with pride in our hearts, the Class of ’66 has the honor of dedicating this yearbook to you, Mr. Bassett. MR. ARTHUR E. BURKE The strength of a tree depends on its roots. With the help of our Superintendent, our roots have grown sturdy and staunch. He was an example to follow, a person to respect. Although he was seldom seen, his presence was always felt. He continually strove to help us and to benefit Turners Falls High School. We salute you, Mr. Burke. 4 MR. WILLIAM A. COOK When we entered the halls of TFHS as Seniors, we saw a change. This change was a man — short in stature but tall in ideals. He was always willing to serve, to listen, to advise. We admired his sincerity, integrity, responsibility, and most of all his understanding. He upheld tradition yet encouraged progress. He played a very important role in shaping our lives. For your friendship and understanding, we thank you, Mr. Cook. 5 MR. ROBERT L. PLAISTED One man has carved his name distinctly in our past. He has guided us through uncertainty, fear, and awkwardness. He has given us assurance, understanding, and poise. He has served as a teacher, an advisor, a friend. He has helped us to gain strength, to earn prominence, to achieve our highest goals. To you we are deeply indebted, our Class Advisor, Mr. Plaisted. 6 MR. GEORGE F. WRIGHTSON In our forest of knowledge, one man stands sharply silhouetted against the horizon. To the Class of ’66 he represents one of the most influential factors in our lives. We are deeply indebted to him for his encouragement as a respected counsellor and leader. We are proud to call him our friend. He has secured a position of prominence in Turners Falls High School history, and a place of deepest regard in our hearts. We will long remember him as one of the most important personages in our high school career. His high ideals and principles have influenced us to reach still higher toward the achievement of our goals. With pride, the Class of ’66 dedicates this page to Mr. George Wrightson. 7 FACULTY % MISS BERTA MARIA NUNEZ B.S. — Havana University B.A. — Doctor in Education Spanish I II. Spanish Club Advisor. MR. ALBERT JOSEPH ROUTHIER B. PH. — University of Montreal, M.A.T. — Boston College French I, II, III and IV; French Club Advisor, Guidance Counselor — ’67. MISS LOUISE MAY CLARK B.A. — University of Vermont MRS. JUDY FAITH FINKEL B.A. — Boston University M.D. — Middlebury Latin I; French I. French Club Advisor. 8 MR. CHARLES HOWARD GALVIN B.S. — Norwich University College Chemistry, College Physics. MRS. JEAN N. MARTIN B.S. — Wisconsin Teachers College Algebra II. MR. JOHN FRANCIS BASSETT B.S. — Arnold College Biology; Head Football Coach, Track Coach. MR. RAYMOND LEONARD GARBIEL B.S. — University of Massachusetts Plane Geometry, Review Mathematics. MR. EDWARD JOSEPH BOURDEAU B.S. — University of Massachusetts M.S. Ed — University of Massachusetts Algebra I, Applied Mathematics; Assistant Football, Baseball Coach, Athletic Director. MR. RICHARD MICHAEL FARLAND B.S. — Boston University General Science, Practical Chemistry, Practical Physics, Freshman Football, Freshman Basketball, J.V. Baseball Coach. 9 MR. GEORGE FRANK BUSH B.A. — Williams College M.E. Ed. — University of Massachusetts Ancient History, Medieval- Modern History, Assistant Basketball, Tennis Coach. MR. THOMAS PAUL QUILFOIE MEEHAN A.B. — American International College U.S. History; History Club Advisor. MR. ROBERT LEON PLAISTED B.A. — Bates College L.B. — University of Maine Law School U.S. Government; Guidance Counselor Class of ’66. MRS. VIRGINIA MARY CALL B.S. — University of Massachusetts Typing I; Shorthand I; Personal Typing. MR. WILLIAM EDWARD ROBERTS A.B. — Brown University Ancient Hostory, Government, Social Science. MR. ROBERT ALLEN AVERY B.B.A. — University of Massachusetts Bookkeeping I, II III; Assistant Track Coach, Cross Country Coach. MISS MARION ANN NADEAU B.S. — Salem State Steno I II; Typing I II; Office Practice. 10 turners falls high school library MRS. JUDITH ANNE WINN TFHS Secretary to Mr. Cook. MR. JAMES CHESTER HUMPHREY William and Mary College Administrative Assistant. MISS MARGARET PATRICIA CREAN B.S. — University of Massachusetts Commercial Arithmetic, Geography, Law Training. MISS MERY CATHERINE O’BRIEN B.S.E. — Massachusetts College of Art Art Supervisor, Art Appreciation, Freehand Drawing; Art Club Supervisor. MR. DANA HASKELL PROUTY Fitchburg State B.S. M.S. Med Guidance. MISS FLORENCE ELIZABETH ARGY Eastman School of Music Gregorian Institute of America Choral Music Supervisor, Glee Club Advisor, Director of Vocal Music. MR. HAROLD SOLOMON KACANEK B.S. Mus. Ed. — University of Rochester, School of Music Instrumental Music Supervisor, Band Director. MR. MAURICE FRANCIS DONOVAN B.A. — Boston College English III; Dramatics Coach. MR. PHILIP ASHLEY CAPEN A.B. — Curry College English I, II. MR. FREDERICK BARNS OAKES B.A. — Tufts University M.S. — University of Massachusetts English IV ; Camera Club Advisor, Alter Ego; Teen Scene Advisor. MRS. CHARLOTTE ZELUMA POTTER B.A. — University of Maine Guidance Counselor-’68 English I. MR. WILLIAM JEREMIAH THOMAS CONNELLY B.A. — Amherst College M.S. — University of Massachusetts Spanish II; English I; English HI. MR. WILLIAM STEINECKE, JR. B.A. — Brown University English II; Faculty Advisor for Netop- Yearbook. MISS EUPHRASIA A. PURRINGTON B.S. — Boston University M.A. — Boston University R.N. — New England Deaconess Hospital Certificate in Public Health Nursing — Simmons College School Nurse. MR. RICHARD CHESTER KOSSAKOSKI B.E. — Keene State Teachers College Mannual Training, Mechanical Drawing. Uppw V ' Jmik ia MRS. PATRICIA KATE LILLEY B.S. — Plattsburg State Teachers College M.S. — University of Massachusetts Home Economics. MRS. CHARLOTTE ROBINSON B.S. — Boston University Phy. Ed. Sargeant University Physical Education. MR. HAROLD RENE FUGERE B.S. — Arnold College M.S. — University of Massachusetts Physical Education. MISS HELEN ELIZABETH MC GILLICUDDY B.A. — Connecticut College For Women Librarian. 13 E N I O R S SHARON ADRIANNE TATAKIS “Tatack” Serving as our Class Secretary, Sharon’s enthusiasm never dimmed. She played volleyball, basketball, and softball for four years. She was a library aide and an office girl. She was a member of the Art, French, and Camera Clubs, and as a Senior served as Glee Club Secre- tary. She was a member of the Netop and Yearbook staffs. Sharon had a wonderful personality and served our class well. FAY JEAN O’RILEY “Rile” Always friendly and reliable, Rile served as our Class Historian. She was a Teen Scene writer and a News Editor for our Netop and Yearbook. Rile was a J.V. and Varsity cheerleader and served on countless dance committees. A member of the Camera, Commer- cial, History (Secretary), and Spanish (Vice President) Clubs, Rile played basketball, softball, and volleyball. She served as secretary to Mr. Steinecke and Mrs. Potter and as Head Bank Day cashier. She was a Pro Merito student. MARCIA JANE HALLADAY “Marsh” Marsh, with her sincere interest in everyone, was elected Class Trea- surer for two years. She repre- sented our school at Girl’s State and in the Mohawk Trail Queen Contest and was a Junior Prize Speaker. Marsh served as President of the Glee Club. She earned a Pro Merito rating and was Rewrite Editor for our Netop and Yearbook. She was an office girl and a mem- ber of the French and Drama Clubs. She served on several dance committees as well. DENNIS MICHAEL COUTURE “Cooch” Outgoing, determined, Cooch was our Vice President. He was in the Chess, Art, Camera, Spanish, His- tory and Glee Clubs and was the History Club Vice President. Cooch served as News Editor for Netop and Yearbook. He was a Teen Scene writer, a Junior Prize Speak- ing alternate, and attained a Pro Merito rating. He served on count- less dance committees, and was a member of the track and Freshman basketball teams. Cooch’s engaging personality won him the admiration of the Class of ’66. ROBERT WAYNE PARKER “Bob” Bob Parker — leadershp personified. As our President he stood at the helm of our class. He was our foot- ball captain and for his accomplish- ments received the “Canon” Novak Award. He served as an Executive Editor of our Netop and Yearbook, and was an alternate for Junior Prize Speaking and Boys’ State. Bob received the Harvard Book Award. He was a member of the track team and the Art, Spanish, Drama, Glee and T Clubs. Bob left a distinct mark at TFHS. SUSAN GAIL ADIE “Sue” Sue displayed her good sportsmanship on the volleyball court and the softball diamond. In her Sophomore year, she worked as a library aide. She was a member of the History and Spanish Clubs and the Sophomore Social refreshment committee. Sue’s enthusi- asm made her a welcome member of the Class of ’66. LINDA MARY ARCAND “Archie” Because Archie worked, she was unable to participate in any after school activities, but her cooperative spirit was evident as she was a competent library aide during her high school years. Her willingness to help was most welcome by faculty members and students alike. PAMELA JEAN BASSETT “Pam” Small but energetic, Pam participated in the Community Service, Commercial, and Art Clubs and was Glee Club Librarian and Commercial Club President. She was a Bank Day cashier and secretary to the cafeteria staff. Pam was on the tumbling and basketball teams, an usher for the Junior Prom and a member of the color guard. PAMELA ANN BEAUBIEN “Pam” Whatever this girl lacked in height, she made up for with her bubbling personality. She was co-captain of the Varsity Cheer- leaders and participated in tumbling. Pam served on the decorat- ing committee for the Sophomore Social and Junior Prom, and was a Junior Prize Speaking alternate. She w’as a member of the Camera, Commercial, History and Glee Clubs. She was Miss Brundige’s secretary and a Bank Day Cashier. 16 ROBERT MARCEL BEAUBIEN “Sparks” Sparks’ humor and wit added fun to all his undertakings. He participated in football and track, and was a Band member. Sparks decorated for the Sophomore Social and Junior Prom and was a member of the Art Club. ROBERT EDMUND BELLEMARE “Bob” Bob’s humor and fun-loving spirit won him many friends. He participated in basketball and track. He was a member of the History Club and Glee Club and helped out with the decorations for the Sophomore Social. Bob’s quiet, humorous persona lity was a welcome addition to our class. GERALDINE ROSE BONNETTE “Geri” Rather quiet and reserved, Geri held a part time job and still participated in school activities. She was a member of the Art and Commercial Clubs and proved her commercial capabilities by serving as secretary to Mrs. Finkle. She played volleyball and decorated for the Junior Prom. Geri’s soft voice and shy manner were refreshing additions to the Class of ' 66. DAWN MARIE BONZEK “Dawn” Bubbling with energy and school spirit, Dawn was a cheerleader for four years and was Varsity Co-captain. Dawn ushered and decorated for various social events. She was a member of the Art, Camera, Community Service, History and Glee Clubs; was a tumbler and served as secretary to Mr. Bush. Always smiling and sociable. Dawn was a popular member of our class. 17 DANIEL BOURDEAU “Bordo” An able athlete, Bordo earned T Club membership by playing football, basketball and baseball for four years. He was in the French, History and Glee Clubs and served on the Magazine Drive Committee. Bordo ushered and decorated for the Sophomore Social and Junior Prom. His spirit made him an invaluable mem- ber of our class. DAVID LIONEL BORDEAUX “Dave” Always with some prank up his sleeve, Dave was voted our class comedien. He played basketball, football and baseball. Dave worked on the Sophomore Social, Junior Prom and the Freshman Wel- come. He participated in Junior Prize Speaking and was a member of the Glee, History, Art and Chess Clubs, and was President of the latter. A great guy, Dave will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. JANICE BROWN “Janice” Janice, was a cheerleader for four years and captain of the J.V. squad. She participated in the Art, History, and French Clubs. Janice was on the tumbling team and was a library aide. She worked on various committees for social events. Her boundless energy was an asset to our class. ROBERT KENT BROWN “Bob” Bob’s terrific sense of humor earned him a special rank in the estimation of his classmates. He was a member of the History, Chess, Art, and Glee Clubs and was on the track team. In his Senior year, Bob was elected as Librarian of the Glee Club and Vice President of the Camera Club. 18 WILLIAM FRANCIS BROWN “Bill” With his quiet but wonderful sense of humor, Bill won the friend- ship of his classmates. He played baseball and basketball for four years, and in recognition of his aca demic abilities, received a National Merit Letter of Commendation. He ushered at various social functions and served as President of the History Club. Bill will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. CHRISTINE ANN BRUNELLE “Chris” Chris, with her friendly smile and efficient manner, was an asset to our class. She served as secretary to Mr. Avery and Mrs. Rob- inson. She was a member of the Commercial Club and a Bank Day cashier. Chris will long be remembered by her classmates. DENNIS CRAIG BRUNELLE “Bomber” Commitment to outside responsibilities prevented Bomber from participating in many extra curricular activities, but he managed to participate in the Spanish Club in his Junior year and the History Club in his Senior year. Bomber’s restrained but con- fident manner will long be remembered by the Class of ' 66. PETER JOSEPH BUREK “Pete” Quiet and jovial, Pete will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. He was an active member of the Art Club during his Sopho- more, Junior and Senior years. However, a part time job prevented him from participating in any other extra curricular activities. 19 WILLIAM JOSEPH BUSHA, JR. “Bill” An avid basketball enthusiast, Bill participated in that sport for four years. He also played baseball and football and was Sports Editor for our Netop and Yearbook. He was a member of the History, Spanish and Art Clubs. Bill was a Junior Prize Speak- ing alternate. He ushered at various dances and served on enter- tainment committees. Bill ' s quiet sense of humor made him a popular member of the Class of ’66. CYNTHIA MARIE BURNHAM “Cindi” Ever willing to help, Cindi greeted everyone witli her warm smile. She was in the Spanish, History and Glee Clubs, and ushered for Junior Prize Speaking. Cindi served on the Sopho- more Social decorating and entertainment committees, Junior Prom decorating committee and was chairman of the Freshman Welcome refreshment committee. She was a valuable asset to the Class of ’66. JOHN CAMPBELL “Buana” Although he was one of the quieter members of our class, Buana made many good friends. He was especially appreciated by mem- bers of the Drama Club since he served on many prop committees. He was also a member of the Freshmen football team. Friendly and good natured, he was a welcome addition to our class. SUNDA GAY CADRAN “Sunny” Sunny was a petite and cheerful class member. She wrote for the Teen Scene and Netop staffs. Sunny was a member of the Art, French, History, and Chess Clubs and the volleyball team. Her pleasant disposition will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. 20 WAYNE HAHOLI) CAMPBELL “Ching” Ching, good natured, was liked by everyone. He participated in football, basketball and track, thus earning membership in the T Club. Ching wrote for the Netop Sports staff and was a mem- ber of the History, Spanish, and Art Clubs. He was also on the Sophomore Social entertainment committee. Ching’s terrific sense of humor will long he remembered by his classmates. PHILIP GEORGE CARME “Phil” Phil worked throughout his high school years and was only able to play football for one year. His friendliness and good humor made him a welcome member of the Class of ’66. RICHARD ADRIAN CHAGNON “Dick” Dick, a quiet but friendly person, contributed to our class mainly through his interest in our musical activities. He was a member of the Band and Swingsters, the German Band and the orchestra for “Annie Get Your Gun.” He participated in the Commercial Club. Dick’s easy-going manner made him a welcome member of our class. ALYCE LOUISE CLOUGH “’Lyce” ‘Lyce, with her bright smile and helpful manner, was an asset to our class. She was a member of the History, French, and Glee Clubs. She wrote for the Netop Feature staff. Warm, earnest, ‘Lyce will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. d JO ANNE BERNICE COUTU “Jo Anne” A quiet but efficient worker, Jo Anne was a member of the Home Economics, Community Service, and Commercial Clubs. She was on the Netop and Yearbook typing staff. Jo Anne displayed her athletic ability by participating in softball and tumbling. She served on the refreshment committee for the Sophomore Social and she was one of our able Bank Day Cashiers. Her vigorous spirit made Jo Anne a valuable member of our class. EDWARD CHARLES CRAIG “Claiger” Claiger, an easy going person, was a member of the football, base- ball, basketball and track teams. He was in the cast of our Christ- mas play and was a member of the History Club. Claiger’s sense of humor combined with determination won him many friends. LAWRENCE JOHN CROCHIER “Croder” Croder was a guy with a great sense of humor. His outstanding scholastic achievements reflect his exceptional abilities. In recogni- tion of these abilities, be received a National Merit Letter of Commendation. Croder was a Junior Prize speaker and a member of the French, Chess, and Glee Clubs. He ushered at the Fresh- man Welcome, Sophomore Social and Junior Prom. His appealing manner won him the admiration of all his classmates. KEITH EDWARD CROSSMAN “Keith” Where there was music, there was Keith. He was an eager parti- cipant in Band activities and was a member of the Swingsters. He played in “Annie Get Your Gun” and the German Band. As a Senior, he was also in the Glee Club. Keith’s comical nature will long be remembered by the Class of ' 66. MARY JEANNE CURRIE “Currie” Mary served as Vice-President of the Commercial Club, was a Band Day cashier and Teen Scene typist. She was a Freshman cheerleader and was on the tumbling and volleyball teams. Currie was active in the History, Commercial, Art, French, Community Service and Glee Clubs. She also ushered and decorated at various social events. Currie’s friendly smile was an asset to the Class of ’66. PEGGY ANN CROTEAU “Peggy” Peggy’s quiet personality followed her through her four years at I FHS. Her activities varied from ushering at the Freshmen Wel- come to participating in the Spanish Club; from being a tumbler to joining the Art Club. Peggy ' s shy smile and reserved manner made her a welcome member of our class. JAMES THOMAS DEERY “Jimmer” In spite of the fact that outside responsibilities prevented his participation in school activities, Jimmer was always willing to lend his support to our activities. His friendly disposition will be remembered by all. LAWRENCE FRANCIS DEERY “Larry” Fun loving, friendly, helpful, Larry was liked by everyone. He played football for three years and basketball for one year. Larry was a member of the Art and History Clubs and decorated for the Junior Prom. His jovial attitude will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. 23 STEVEN WALTER DEJNAK, Jr. “Yoho” Always quite shy, Yoho had a quiet but congenial manner. He served as the competent manager of the basketball team for three years. He was also a member of the History Club. Yoho ' s quiet and sincere ways made him a fine member of the Class of ’66. MICHAEL WESTON DELPHA “Mike” Wherever there was sports, there was Mike. He was a member of the baseball, golf, basketball, and track teams and thus earned membership in the T Club. He was on the Junior Prom decorat- ing committee and was a member of the Spanish and History Clubs. Mike was sports editor for our Netop and Yearbook. His flashing smile and good sportsmanship won him distinction in the Class of ’66. GLORIA JEAN DENKIEWICZ “Gloria” Always on the go, Gloria managed to hold down an after school job and still assist her school as a library aide for two years. She was a smiling, fun loving member of our class. HENRY LEON DESO “Hank” Hank, quiet and shy, had a smile for everyone. Although a job kept him from participating in many extra curricular activities, Hank was on the football team in his Junior year and on the basketball team his Senior year. The Class of ’66 was proud to have him in its ranks. 24 5 ? JAMES FRANCIS DEVENEY “Dev” Dev’s quick wit and mischievous smile made him one of the most likeable members of our class. Despite an afternoon job, Dev found time to play on the tennis team in his Freshmen and Sophomore years. He also served on the Sophomore Social entertainment committee and the Junior Prom decorating committee. The Class of ’66 will always remember his comical but cooperative attitude. WILLIAM POWERS DEVINO “Bill” Bill, with his easy going personality, was a member of the Glee Club, History Club and Art Club. He devoted much of his time to the Netop and Yearbook staffs. He helped to decorate for the Sophomore Social. Bill also played baseball and basketball. His witty remarks and friendly manner made him a popular member of our class. MICHAEL JOHN DRAGO “Mike” Mike was a member of the golf team. He earned a Pro Merito rating and decorated for the Junior Prom. Mike managed the varsity football and basketball teams and was a member of the Art, French, and History Clubs and the Netop- Yearbook Feature Staff. His quiet but confident manner will long be remembered by our class. JANICE MARIE FARRAR “Jan” Jan, was a member of our class in her Senior year. This fact prevented her from participating in extra curr icular activities but her friendly manner made Jan a welcome member of the Class of ’66. 25 i STEWART FREEMAN FAULKNER II “Freeman” A sense of humor and a blushing smile marked Freeman’s years at TFHS. Freeman participated in the Band and Glee Club, of which he was Vice-President. He won second place .in Junior Prize Speaking and played in “Annie Get Your Gun” and the Christmas play. He wrote for Teen Scene and was a Managing Editor of the Yearbook and Netop. He was our Boys’ State dele- gate, and was a member of the History, Art, Camera, French and Commercial Clubs. He helped with social functions. Freeman’s fun loving manner will be remembered by the Class of ’66. DENNIS ARTHUR FISK “DENNY” Denny was a quiet but well-liked member of our class. He played baseball and football in his Freshman year and baseball in his Sophomore year, but an outside job prevented him from partici- pating in other extra curricular activities. Denny brought fun and laughter wherever he went. BRUCE CHESTER FISKE “Bruce” Bruce, a great guy with a friendly smile, participated in football and helped with our Prom decorations. He was a member of the Camera and Spanish Clubs. Bruce spent much of his time working but served on the business staff for our Yearbook and Netop. The Class of ’66 will always remember him as a buoyant person. SUSAN KAY FLEMING “Sue” Sue’s friendly manner was a welcome addition to our class. Sue was a member of the French, Art, History, Camera, Community Service, and Glee Clubs. Sue wrote for the Teen Scene and was a member of the Netop and Yearbook Rewrite staffs. She served as a member of various dance com mittees. Her school spirit will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. 26 TURNERS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY DAVID JOSEPH FLYNN “Dave” Although rather quiet, Dave was an indispensable behind-the- scenes man. He was our very capable stage manager for four years. His audio equipment and extensive knowledge added to the success of countless dances. Always reliable, Dave was a vital member of the Class of ’66. MARGARET LEE FORSYTH “Peg” Although Peg held a job training horses, she joined the Art, Camera, History, and Spanish Clubs and was an usher at gradua- tion. Her quick wit will always be remembered by her fellow classmates. JOHN FRANCIS FOWLER “Jack” Rather reserved, Jack’s outside responsibilities occupied much of his time. Jack participated on the track team for one year and the Art Club for three years. He served on the Sophomore Social decorating committee. Jack’s quiet but cheerful nature made him a welcome member of the Class of ’66. CHRISTINA FUGERE “Chris” Chris’ cooperative spirit resulted in her participating in many activities. She wrote for Teen Scene, Netop and Yearbook, and was able to maintain a Pro Merito rating. She was a member of the Band and the French, Spanish, History, Art and Chess Clubs and Camera Club Treasurer. Chris ushered and decorated many social functions. Her determination won her the respect of her classmates. MARGARET ALICE GARDNER “Marge” Marge, one of the more personable members of our class, was in the Commercial Club and was a Senior Bank Day cashier. She served as secretary to Miss Purrington. Marge was on the re- freshment committee for the Sophomore Social and was an alter- nate for the Color Guard. Her witty sense of humor was an asset to our class. WILLIAM FREEMAN GARRAND “Gerund” Gerund’s comical antics were welcome assets to our class. He participated in the French, History, and Glee Clubs and was French Club President. Gerund played in " Riders to the Sea” and wrote for Netop and Yearbook. He ushered at the Sopho- more Social and Junior Prom, and decorated for the latter. Friendly to all, he will long be remembered by our class. RICHARD BRUCE GATES “Rick” Joining our class in his Sophomore year, Rick, with his out- going personality, soon became a leading member. He participated on the Chess, French, History, and Camera Clubs and the track team. Rick was a Managing Editor for our Netop and Yearbook and earned a Pro Merito rating. His fun loving but conscientious manner made him a popular member of our class. TERESA AGNES GOLAMBESKI “Teri” Teri, was a happy-go-lucky member of our class. She was on the refreshment committee for the Senior Farewell, a Bank Day cashier and Miss Purrington’s secretary. She was a member of the Commercial Club. Teri w T as a welcome member of the Class of ’66. 28 CHARLENE MARY GOLONKA “Char” A snappy smile, dependability, boundless school-spirit — who else but Char? She was Editor-in-Chief of our Netop and Yearbook. Char wrote for Teen Scene and assisted on many dance commit- tees. She was a member of Glee, French, History, Camera, and Art Clubs, and participated in “Light Competition” and “The Great Choice.” She also maintained a Pro Merito rating. Each job she handled with a sensibility and friendliness which made her an outstanding member of the Class of ’66. JOHN RAYMOND GOULD “Juddy” Juddy’s jovial attitude was exemplified by his role as a cheer- leader in our Turkey Day ralley. As a member of the football and track teams, Juddy showed his enthusiasm and drive and became a member of the T Club. He was a Band member and played in “Annie Get Your Gun.” He also decorated for many dances. Juddy’s comical antics livened all our activities. NATALIE CHRISTINE GRANT “Nat” Nat’s friendly grin was a welcome part of our class. Nat played basketball and softball. She was a member of the Spanish, Camera, Art, Home-Ec, Community Service and History Clubs and was a Netop-Yearbook typist. She ushered at the Sophomore Social and decorated for the Junior Prom. Nat’s pixie like manner will be remembered by her classmates. BETTY JANE GREENE “Bet” Bet’s gay aptitude for team work was evident as she participated on the softball, basketball, and tumbling teams. She was a member of the Home Economics and Commercial Clubs, and served on the Sophomore Social refreshment committee. Bet was a Bank Day cashier. Her quiet nature won her many friends. 29 ELEANOR JEAN GRUSZKOWSKI “Ella” Although Ella had an afternoon job, she was a loyal member of our class. In her Senior year, she was a Bank Day cashier and participated in the History Club. Ella’s efficient but quiet manner won her the respect of all. STEPHEN JOHN GUSAN “Steve” Always ready to tell a joke, Steve was a comical member of our class. He was on the Junior Prom decorating committee and a member of the History Club. An outside job prevented bis partici- pation in other activities. Steve’s antics were a welcome part of the Class of ’66. DALE LINCOLN HURD “Gerts” A valuable aide to our class, Gerts served on the prop committees for the Junior Prom and the Senior Play. He was a member of the track team in his Senior year. Gerts was a quiet but fun-loving member of the Class of ’66. GAIL CHRISTINE JACOB “Jake” Jake was a girl with a sense of humor and lively spirit. She participated in the Community Service Club for three years and was on the Sophomore Social decorating committee. She played softball for one year. Her winning smile will long be remembered by her classmates. 30 JAY JORDAN JAMROG “Jay” Fun-loving and comical, Jay participated on the track and basket- ball teams. He was a member of the Art Club and decorated for our Freshman Welcome, Sophomore Social, and Junior Prom. Jay’s friendly smile and willingness to help were assets to the Class of ’66. BRIAN ALLEN JOHNSON “Bri” Rather quiet, Bri was a Freshman football player. An outside job prevented his participation in other extra curricular activities but his interest and support made him a welcome member of our class. FAY LOUISE JOHNSON “Fay” Fay was very interested in music and played in the Band and Swingsters. An aid to the Commercial Department, Fay served as secretary to Mr. Capen and was a Bank Day cashier. Also a Teen Scene typist, Fay was an efficient member of the Class of ’66. CINDERELLA LEE JONES “Cindy” Cindy was always a cheerful and friendly person. She was a member of the Commercial Club. Her sincere attitude will long be remembered by members of the Class of ’66. 31 ROBERT ALAN JUDD “Bob” Bob transferred to TFHS at the beginning of his Junior year and quickly became active. He was a member of the Drama Club and performed in two plays. He decorated for the Junior Prom and was a member of the Glee Club. Bob was the Netop- Yearbook business manager. He was in the T Club and played football. Bob’s honesty and cheerfulness won him many friends. BARRY FRANCIS KOSTANSKI “Barry” A modest pride in his achievements and a friendly manner made Barry a well-liked member of our class. A star on the baseball, basketball, and football teams, he gained membership in the T Club. Barry was a member of the Netop Sports staff and the Spanish Club. He ushered at the Freshman Welcome and dec- orated for the Sophomore Social. Barry’s determination won him the respect of his classmates. CARL BERNARD KOVALSICK “Carl” Carl was a rather shy and unobtrusive member of our class. He confined his extra curricular activities to participation on the Sophomore Social decorating committtee. Jk M0 VALERA JANE KROL “Bake” Bake, fun-loving and cheerful, was a popular member of our cla- . She participated in the Community Service. Art, Chess, mi . lei long be remembered by the Class of ’66. 32 LINDA JEAN KURKULONIS “Linda” Linda exemplified her pleasant and co-operative attitude as secretary to Mr. Avery and Mr. Farland. She participated in volleyball and Glee Club. She served as a Head Bank Day cashier, was a member of the Commercial, History and Com- munity Service Clubs and was on the Netop-Yearbook News staff. Linda also decorated for the Junior Prom. Her individuality made her a respected member of our class. JUDI ANN KRUZLIC “Judi” Judi’s charming smile brightened all her activites. She won first prize at Junior Prize Speaking and also demonstrated her abilities in “Riders to the Sea”. She was our Drum Majorette, a Feature Editor of the Netop and Yearbook, and a Teen Scene writer. She was an Art and Camera Club member and an Office girl. Judi served on many of our dance committees. Reliable and spirited, Judi was an asset to our class. RONALD HENRY LACZYNSKI “Ron” Although Ron held an outside job, he was an outstanding mem- ber of the football team for three years. His blushing personality made him a genial member of our class. JOHN EUGENE LEVEILLE “Lev” A determined athlete, Lev fought to the finish on the football field, the baseball diamond, and basketball court. He earned membership in the T, Glee and Spanish Clubs. He ushered at class social events. Lev’s teasing and comical manner made him a popular member of the Class of ’66. 33 MARTHA ANN LUIPPOLD “Marty” Quiet, with a quick smile, Marty made her presence felt on the basketball and volleyball teams. Marty was a member of our Sophomore Social refreshment committee. She belonged to the Chess, History, and Commercial Clubs. Petite and earnest, Marty was a helpful addition to the Class of ’66. JOANN LEWANDOWSKI “Jo” Fun to be with, spirited; that was Jo. She was on our Sophomore Social entertainment committee and ushered for the Junior Prom. She was a Bank Day cashier. Jo was a member of the Camera, Chess, History, Community Service and Commercial Clubs. Everyone will remember Jo’s sparkling personality. CAROL ANN MACHAIEK “Machaiek” Carol’s amiable nature added sparkle to each activity in which she participated. She was a member of the Commercial, History and Glee Clubs. She served as a typist for Netop and Yearbook and helped with ticket arrangements for the Sophomore Social. She worked as a Bank Day Cashier. Carol’s jovial manner won her many friends. MARY ELLEN MACKIN “Mac” Mac, with her cheerful and friendly manner, was a Pro Merito and a Re-Write Editor for Netop and Yearbook. She was Secretary of the Band, Vice-President of the Glee Club and a member of the District Band. Turnaires, District Orchestra, and played in “Annie Get Your Gun” and “Riders to the Sea.” Mac won third prize in Junior Prize Speaking. She participated in the Art, Chess, French, and Spanish Clubs and served on numerous committees. She was also an Office girl. 34 CAROLYN ANN MADDERN “Lyn” Lyn was a member of the Freshman tumbling and basketball teams and was a twirler. She was also a Freshman cheerleader. She was Treasurer of the History Club and was a Glee and Art Club member. She decorated for the Freshman Welcome and Junior Prom, and ushered at the Sophomore Social and graduation. FRANCES MARIE MAKAREWICZ “Mack” Bubbling with energy, Mack was an enthusiastic participant in many activities. She assisted on innumerable decorating and ushering committees. She played volleyball during her first two years. During her Junior year. Mack joined the Community Service Club. Her Senior year found her a member of the Camera and Commercial Clubs. She also served as a secretary to Mr. Donovan. STEPHEN ALBERT MARCEAU “Mason” Mason’s friendly antics and shy smile distinguished him during his years at T.F.H.S. He played tennis and earned membership in the T Club. Mason was on the Freshman baseball team, the Sophomore Social entertainment committee, and was a mem- ber of the History Club. His good sportsmanship will long be remembered by his classmates. LEON FRANCIS MARKOWSKI “Lee” Lee, our class photographer and President of the Camera Club, was a jovial and co-operative person. He served on the Netop, Yearbook and Teen Scene staffs and was in the History and Art Clubs. Lee played in the band and was on the Junior Prom and Pumpkin Prom decorating committees. His efforts will long be remembered by our class. BRIAN RICHARD MARSH “Swamp” A boy of many talents, Swamp participated in Junior Prize Speak- ing, and “Annie Get Your Gun” and was the master of ceremonies of “Rider’s to the Sea”. He was in the Band, serving as President in his Senior year, and the German Band. Swamp participated in the Camera, Chess, History, and Spanish Clubs and the track and tennis teams. Swamps confident manner will long be remem- bered by his classmates. KAREN ROSE MARTIN “Karen” Karen was interested in many activities. She played volleyball and basketball and was a member of the Art, Spanish, History and Camera Clubs, and was also a library aide. Karen was on the decorating committee for our Sophomore Social and Junior Prom, and ushered for Class Day and Graduation. Karen’s helpful man- ner won her many friends. RUSSELL DAVID MAYRAND “Russ” Small in stature but not in ability, Russ pepped up our class with his boundless energy. Although he worked, Russ served on the decorating committee for the Sophomore Social and ran the pro- jector for four years. Russ’ desire to help has not gone unnoted and the Class of 66 will remember him. SHARON MARY MARTIN “Sharon” A long list of ac tivities prove Sharon’s loyal support of our school. She played volleyball and basketball. She served as a library aide and decorated for the Sophomore Social and Junior Prom. Sharon was a member of the Art, Spanish, History and Camera Clubs and maintained a Pro Merito rating. She ushered at Class Day and Graduation. Quiet, but active, Sharon added much to our class. SUSAN PRISCILLA M AYR AND “Sue” Sue’s terrific sense of humor added to all her activities. She was a member of the Band, Swingsters, German Band, and was chosen as Band Council representative, Band Librarian, and Editor of " Band Beats.” She played basketball, softball, and volleyball, decorated for the Junior Prom and served as secretary to Mr. Fugere and Mr. Kaoanek. She was also in the Commercial Club. PATRICIA ANN MILKEY “Pat” Pat’s talents were many and varied. She participated in Junior Prize Speaking, “Riders to the Sea” and “Annie Get Your Gun.” She maintained a Pro Merito rating and received a National Merit Letter of Commendation. She was a cheerleader and led the Freshmen squad as captain. Pat served on the Netop-Yearbook staff and was Teen Scene Editor. She was a member of the Art, French and Camera Clubs, and played softball. Pat served as our Class Treasurer during her Sophomore year and worked on many dance committees. CHRISTIE ANN MINER “Chris” Chris was noted for her willingness to serve. She was in the Band and the Art, Commercial, History, Camera and Glee Clubs. Chris was a Bank Day cashier and a typing editor for our Netop-Year- book staff. She was on the volleyball team and a member of the cast of “Annie Get Your Gun”. Chris served on many dance com- mittees. BARBARA ANN MOLONGOSKI “Barb” Barb, participated in the Spanish, Art, Community Service, Com- mercial and Glee Clubs. She served on the Freshman Welcome decorating committee and aided the Commercial Department as Miss Argy’s secretary and Bank Day cashier. Fun to be with. Barb was a popular member of our class. 37 RICHARD THOMAS MOORE “Samson” Samson was a cheerful, friendly, and helpful classmate. He played on the tennis team for two years. His participation on the cross country team earned him membership in the T Club. Samson’s good sportsmanship was a welcome addition to our class ' . FAITH ANN MORIN “Fay” Fay, with her pleasant and efficient manner, was a member of the History Club and a Netop and Yearbook Typing Editor. By decorating for the Junior Prom and Freshman Welcome, Fay proved her willingness to work. She served as Mr. Connelly’s secretary, was an Office Girl, and Bank Day cashier. She was a devoted and active member of our class. KENNETH GENE MORIN “Milt” Milt was a reserved and quiet member of our class. Although outside working responsibilties prevented him from participating in many extra curricular activities, he was a member of the track team for one year. His restrained but humorous actions made him a welcome member of the Class of ’66. JOHN THOMAS MURPHY “Murph” Whenever there was work to be done in the Art room, Murph was there to do it. He demonstrated his talents by participating in the Art Club and decorating for almost every school dance. He also was a member of the Commercial and History Clubs. His remarkable talent and creativity were great assets to our class. 38 CHESTER JOSEPH NAPIKOSKI “Chet” Confident and determined, Chet participated in track for four years. He was a member of the Spanish and History Clubs. His school spirit and sincerity will long be remembered by the Class ’ 66 . THOMAS J. NIEDZWIECKI “Nedz” Nedz was a friendly and helpful member of our class. As a Fresh- man, he served as football manager. He decorated for the Junior Prom. His musical abilities led him to membership in the Band and Swingsters. Nedz’s helpful and cheerful manner will long be remembered by everyone. FRANCIS EDWARD NOGA “Fran” Fran, a boy with the wonderful talent of making people laugh, was a welcome asset to our class. In his Freshman year he served as manager of the J.V. baseball team. As a Sophomore, he played football and began his three year membership on the tennis team. Fran became a member of the T Club in his Senior year as a result of these efforts. His terrific sense of humor will long be remembered by his classmates. CYNTHIA ANNE NORWOOD “Cindy” Cindy was one of the more reserved members of our class. She showed her willingness to help when she served on the refresh- ment committee for the Sophomore Social. Always kind and thoughtful, Cindy will long be remembered as a very sincere member of the Class ’66. 39 DONALD RICHARD PALMER “Don” Rather quiet and shy, Don was a welcome member of our class. He was a member of the Chess and Spanish Clubs. Don’s friendly smile will long be remembered by his classmates. JACQUELINE ANN PALMER “Jacki” Jacki was always a quiet and shy person. As a Senior, she was a member of the History Club. She served as Miss Nadeau’s secre- ary. Jacki’s pleasant manner will long be remembered by her classmates. CAMILLA ANITA PAULIN “Camilla” Camilla’s amiable and emphatic laughter brightened many activi- ties. She was in the French, Spanish, Glee, and Art Clubs and played volleyball. She ushered and decorated for many social functions. Camilla will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. WAYNE G. PERKINS “Perk” A shy smile and quick wit marked Perk’s four years at TFHS. He served as a capable and helpful football manager in his Senior. Perk was a member of the Spanish, History, Chess, and Art Clubs. He also ushered at the Junior Prom. Perk’s fun loving manner will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. 40 MARY ELLEN KATHARINE PERVERE “Mel” Fun to be with, enthusiastic, Mel was an Executive Editor of our Netop and Yearbook. She was in the Spanish, Camera, Art, History and Glee Clubs and the District Chorus. She was a Junior Prize Speaking alternate and served as an usher and Business Manager of that event. She participated in volleyball, softball and was captain of the basketball team. She was a Band member and library aide. She wrote for Teen Scene and participated on many dance committees. Mel’s talents were assets to our class. EMMANUEL PAUL PFERSICK “Manny” Manny’s shy but engaging personality won him the respect of everyone. He played football, basketball and baseball and gained membership in the T Club. Manny was elected Student Govern- ment Day representative. He participated in the Spanish Club and ushered at the Sophomore Social and Freshman Welcome. His sense of humor was an asset to our class. STEVEN LORING PLANTE “Steve” Shy but sincere and determined, Steve made many good friends. He was a member of the Art, French, History, and Glee Clubs and, as a result of a three year participation on the track team, the T Club. Steve was a reliable Teen Scene and Netop writer. He also earned a Pro Merito rating. Steve won the respect of all the members of the Class of ’66. ALISON EVE PLEASANT “Alison” Alison was a lively and respected individual. She was an enthusi- astic member of the Art, Camera, Chess, Spanish, and Glee Clubs. She was chosen as a Junior Prize Speaking alternate and ushered at that event. Her boundless energy was an asset to our class. 41 DONNA MARIE PLISKA “Plisk” Plisk’s enthusiasm was evidenced as she was on the refreshment committee for the Freshmen Welcome and ushered for the Sopho- more Social. Plisk was a member of the History, Camera, Com- mercial, Glee and Art Clubs. She was a Bank Day Cashier and secretary to Mr. Oaks. BRUCE WOODWARD POLLARD “Bruce” Bruce’s jolly laugh could be heard throughout the halls of T.F.H.S. He earned a Pro Merito rating but chose not to partici- pate in extra curricular activities. He was a fun loving member of the Class of ’66. I RAYMOND JOSEPH PUCHALSKI “Pooch” Pooch’s main interest was centered around sports at TFHS. He played baseball in his Freshman and Senior years and was a vigorous supporter of other athletic activities. Pooch s fun loving spirit will be remembered by all. THOMAS JAMES PULA “Tom” Tom’s terrific sense of humor and flashing smile were definite as- sets to our class. Tom participated on the track and golf teams for two years and the football team for one. He was a member of the Chess, Sanish, Art, and History Clubs. He also ushered at the Sophomore Social. Tom’s buoyant personality made him a well liked member of the Class of ’66. t 42 JONATHON RASTALLIS “Jon” Always joking, Jon was on the baseball and basketball teams and was an outstanding backfield man on the football team. His talents won him membership in the T Club for two years. Jon’s friendly and carefree personality made him one of the most likable mem- bers of our class. 5 RONALD FRANCIS REES “Ron” Ron’s good sportsmanship and friendly personality followed him through his years at Turners Falls High School. He was a four year member of the football team and earned membership in the T Club in his Senior year. He also participated in the History Club. Ron’s blushing smile will long be remembered by his classmates. DONALD J. REGAN, Jr. “Don” Although he was unable to participate in many outside activities due to his work in the afternoon, Don found time to decorate for the Junior Prom and Freshman Welcome, and was a loyal mem- ber of the Art Club for three years. Always smiling, Don was a welcome addition to our class. DAVID BERNARD REIPOLD “Remo” Although Remo had outside working committments, he found time to play on the football team as a halfback for three years. His interest in art led him to membership in the Art Club. Remo also served on the Junior Prom decorating committee and helped with Senior Play scenery. His witty humor and helpful manner made him a welcome member of the Class of ’66. 43 HENRY MARTIN REIPOLD, Jr. “Bucky” Bucky was one of our very quiet classmates. He was an eager member of the track team during his Senior year. His subdued and modest manner made Bucky a welcome member of the Class of ’66. CAROL EDA RICHOTTE “Carol” Whenever shouting could be heard in the stands, Carol was there cheering amongst the cheerleaders. Her participation in J.V. bas- ketball, volleyball. Chess Club, Art Club and Commercial Club, showed her enthusiasm and interest. Carol served as a Bank Day Cashier and library aide. She ushered at the Freshman Welcome, Sophomore Social, and Junior Prom. Her candid sense of humore will be remembered by the Class of ’66. RICHARD CHARLES RUDINSKI “Rich” Initiative was personified in Rich. His notable performances on the football team resulted from his undying spirit. He was a member of the Ski and Track teams and thus earned membership in the T Club. Rich was also a Glee and Spanish Club member. His endeavors will long be remembered and appreciated by the Class of ’66. GERALDINE RYAN “Geri” Geri’s blushing smile and cheerful laughter were assets to our class. Geri was a member of the Art, Commercial, History, Camera, Community Service and Glee Clubs. She served as Secretary to Mr. Capen and a Bank Day cashier. She also ushered at the Sophomore Social. Fun to be with, Geri was liked by everyone. 44 THOMAS FRANCIS RYAN “Tom” Always on the move, Tom Held an outside job and was still active. A football player and a participant in track, he was a member of the T Club. Tom was on the Junior Prom decorating and planning committees and was a member of the Art and History Clubs. His casual manner made him a popular member of the Class of ’66. CHESTER J. SAHARCESKI, Jr. “Swets” Swet’s easy going, friendly manner won him many friends. As basketball manager, he proved a valuable aid to Coach Cournoyer. Swets was a member of the Chess Club for three years and the Art Club. He played Freshman football. Although he held a partime job, his school spirit never dimmed. LINDA ANN SAULNIER “Lin” Lin’s limitless enthusiasm made her a member of the French, Chess, Art, History and Glee Clubs, and Secretary of the Camera Club. She managed the girl’s volleyball and softball teams. Lin was a member of the Netop and Yearbook staffs and Alter Ego Editor. She planned entertainment for the Sophomore Social, decorated for the Junior Prom, and ushered at Junior Prize Speaking and Graduation. She served as an Office girl. With her direct manner and bubbling personality, Lin handled all jobs well. BARBARA JOYCE SEREDEJKO “Joyce” Joyce was a member of the Spanish, History, Commercial, Com- munity Service and Art Clubs. She served as a secretary to Mr. Donovan, library aide, and Bank Day cashier. Joyce was a Feature Editor for our Netop and Yearbook and a Pro Merito. She served on several dance committees and participated on the tumbling and volleyball teams. Joyce’s determination was a de- finite asset to the Class of ’66. 45 MARLENE MARY SERRELL “Marlene” Marlene was liked by everyone. She was a member of the basket- ball and volleyball teams. Marlene decorated for our Sophomore Social, and Junior Prom, and was a member of the Art Club for three years. Friendly and cooperative, she was a welcome member of the Class of ’66. MICHAEL SHANE “Shaner” Quick witted, comical, friendly, Shaner was liked by everyone. Although much of his time was devoted to an outside job, his co-operative spirit and engaging personality will long be re- membered by the Class of ’66. LESLIE ANN SHERIDAN “Les” A mind of her own and determined attitude were Les’ chief at- tributes. She was a member of the Chess, Camera, History, Art, French and Glee Clubs. She was a Pro Merito and was on the tumbling team. Les wrote for the Teen Scene and Netop-Year- book staffs and assisted at various social functions. Les was a Junior Prize Speaking Alternate and was also chosen as alternate for the Mohawk Trail Queen contest. Les was a popular class member. LINDA JEAN SICARD “Lyn” Lyn’s spirit and vitality were definite assets to our cheering squads. A Freshman cheerleader, Lyn put her experience to good use as captain of the J.V. squad. In her Senior year Lyn’s pep won her a spot on the Varsity squad. She was also a member of the Art and Community Service Clubs, a tumbler, an usher at the Junior Prom and a member of the refreshment committee at the Freshman Welcome. 46 “Sue” SUSAN MARIE SICARD Sue’s energetic spirit made her a welcome member of our class. She served on the refreshmnt committee for the Freshman Wel- come and Sophomore Social, and ushered at the Junior Prom. Sue was a member of the Spanish, Art, Community Service, Commercial, and Glee Clubs. She was also a Freshman tumbler. Sue’s smile and pleasant manner will long be remembered by everyone. EDWARD ANTHONY SIWIZKI “Sawick” Easy going and friendly, Sawick was a determined baseball, basketball, and football player. Sawick ushered at the Sophomore Social and Junior Prom and was a member of the Freshman Welcome decorating committee. His shy acknowledgement of his accomplishments won him the respect and friendship of his class- mates. ROBERTA AUGUSTA SMITH “Bert” Bert, confident and humorous, was a J. V. cheerleader in her Sophomore year. Her willingness to help found her serving as a library aide. She was Miss O’Brien’s secretary and was a member of the History and Commercial Clubs. Her satirical but comical sense of humor will long be remembered by the class of ’66. GARY JAMES STAIGER “Gary” Always happy-go-lucky and humorous, Gary served as football manager in his Freshman and Sophomore years. He played bas- ketball for one year and was a member of the History Club. 47 WILLIAM PERRY STEBBINS “Wallace” Wallace’s outstanding contributions to our Class were especially evident on the football field and baseball diamond. His speed and toughness made him one of our most valuable baseball players. He also ushered at the Sophomore Social and was a member of the Sophomore nominating committee. His good sportsmanship and blushing smile made him a very popular member of the Class of ’66. DOREEN STOKES “Doreen” Doreen, will always be remembered by her sparkling smile and bashful character. She participated in tumbling and belonged to the Art Club and was one of our quiet assets. JEREMIAH JOHN SULLIVAN III “Sully” Fun loving yet responsible, Sully played football, baseball, and basketball and was a member of the T Club. Sully was President of the Glee Club and a Junior Prize Speaking Alternate. He was Treasurer of the French Club and ushered at many social events. He was a member of the History Club and was in “Riders to the Sea”. His engaging personality made him a valuable member of our class. EDWARD G. STONE “Ed” Ed was very shy, yet he was a tough member of our football team. These qualities won him the deep admiration of all his teammates. He also held a part time job. A guy of few words, but creditable actions, Ed easily earned the respect of all. 48 DAVID NOEL SUPRENANT “Supey” A small and agile athlete, Supey played great football for three years and participated on the track team for four years. He served as a basketball manager and earned a three year membership in the T Club. As a Senior, he also joined the History Club. Supey’s shy but pleasing personality won him ma ny friends. CYNTHIA LOUISE SUMNER “Cindy” Bright and cheerful, Cindy was an efficient secretary to Mr. Prouty. She was an alert Bank Day cashier and decorated for the Junior Prom. Her sweet smile and congenial manner won her many friends. KATHRYN MARY TANYUK “Kathy” Kathy, a very quiet but friendly girl, was on the refreshment com- mittee for our Sophomore Social. Her interests were concentrated on the Art, History, and Spanish Clubs, and she participated on the girl’s volleyball squad. A true asset to the Netop and Year- book typing staff, Kathy will long be remembered for her reserved but charming manner. CHESTER TELA “Chet” Chet was always quiet and shy. Because of his reserved nature, Chet never participated in any school activities but was a great person and a proud member of the Class of ’66. 49 RONALD JOSEPH THIBODEAU “Ron” Ron’s artistic talent won him the position of Art Club President. He decorated for countless dances and was on the Yearbook art staff. Ron was in the Camera, History, French, Spanish, and Glee Clubs and the District Chorus. He was on the ski team and ushered at several dances. Ron’s creativity was an asset to our class. DAVID GEORGE TIBBETTS “Dave” With his jovial smile and quick wit, Dave managed to leave a lasting impression on everyone he met. Dave had outside re- sponsibility in the afternoon, but he found time to usher at the Freshman Welcome, and was a faithful member of the Spanish Club during his Junior and Senior years. Dave’s terrific sense of humor added much to the Class of ’66. CHRISTOPHER PAUL TREWHELLA “Red” Red was an easy-going bay with a ready smile. He was active in the Camera Club and was a member of the Band during his Freshman and Sophomore years. He was also on the ski team. Red’s great sense of humor will long be remembered by the members of our class. DONALD LOUIS VALLEY “Don” Don, an energetic member of the Art Club for four years, dis- played his artistic abilities by decorating for the Sophomore Social and the Junior Prom. He was also a member of the Glee Club and History Club and was a very helpful addition to Year- book and Netop staffs. Don’s great sense of humor will never be forgotten by the Class of ’66. 50 BARRY JAMES WALKER “Junior” Junior was a friendly but quiet member of our class. He played in the Band for two years and participated on tbe ski team. Junior was a welcome addition to the Class of ’66. CAROL ANN WALSH “Carol” Carol’s cheerful attitude followed her through her years at T.F.H.S. She was a member of the Commercial Club and served as an efficient Bank Day cashier. The Class of ’66 will long re- member her friendly smile. WARD ALLEN WHEELER “Ward” Ward was a gay and friendly classmate. His cheerfulness won him many friends. Ward was an asset to our musical department as a member of the Band and the Swingsters for four years. He was a very likeable member of the Class of ’66. JEFFERY ALAN WHITE “Whitey” Whitey’s avid interest in sports was shown by his participation on the track team for four years and the Cross Country Team for two years. He was co-captain of the Track Team in his Senior year. Although he confined his extra curricular activities mostly to sports he also participated in the Spanish, Chess and T Clubs. His witty sense of humor and good sportsmanship made him a w ' elcome member of our class. 51 CYNTHIA ANN WICKLINE “Cindy” Cindy was a quiet, but friendly member of our class. After school responsibilities kept her busy throughout her high school years, but she still found time to become a member of the Commercial Club. Her ever cheerful smile will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. DAVID ALLEN WONSEY “Dave” Dave’s quick wit and comical antics were welcome additions to our class. He participated on the track team in his Freshman, Junior, and Senior years. Dave’s shy but pleasing personality will long be remembered by his classmates. RONALD DOUGLAS CLAPP “Ron” Ron joined our class in his Senior year hut soon won recognition and friends. He became a member of the History Club. His co- operative and congenial manner made a welcome member of the Class of ’66. PETER BARRE ZSCHAU “Pete” Fun loving and carefree, Pete was a member of the History and Art Clubs. He ushered for the Sophomore Social and was on the Junior Prom decorating committee. He was a member of the track team. Pete’s friendly smile and happy-go-lucky spirit will long be remembered by the Class of ’66. 52 53 THE WAY IT WAS As young saplings we entered the halls of TFHS. We were insecure, uncertain, yet eager to become a part of this forest of knowledge. Quickly we were made to feel at ease in our new environment as we were officially welcomed by the Seniors at the annual Freshman-Senior Reception. Soon we began to unite to form a sturdy founda- tion upon which our tree could grow. Who will ever forget those first few days as we searched through the corridors for the right room always keeping an alert eye open for that first floor elevator. (We never did find it!!) Eagerly we joined in what limited school activities we could and how proud we were to see many of our class members in the cast of Annie Get Your Gun. All too fast the days and months passed by, and soon we were no longer the shy, bewildered Freshmen, but the alert, sophis- ticated Sophomores. As Sophomores, our growth progressed as we elected our class officers. Robert Parker was elected President; Dennis Couture, Vice President; Sharon Tatakis, Sec- retary; Patricia Milkey T Treasurer; Fay O ' Riley, Historian. Immediately after this we chose our class rings, our symbols of belonging. How proud we were to display them. We were anxious to show our abilities, and show them we did. Why our first function as a class, the Sophomore Social can only be considered as a complete suc- cess ? ? ? The roots of our tree were furthered strengthened as, in our Junior year, we again elected class officers: Bob Parker, President; Dennis Couture, Vice President; Sharon Tatakis, Secretary; Marcia Halladay, Treasurer; Fay O ' Riley, Historian. As Juniors, we were conscious of our new status and united we started to prepare ourselves for what lay ahead. The fact that it was the Golden Anniversary of the annual Junior Prize Speaking Contest inspired us to make a good presentation. When the curtain opened that night of April 30, the eight nervous classmates gave a dramatic rendition. Our class proved to be quite talented and a choice of winners was difficult. Judi Kruzlic received top honors for her interpretation of ‘’King Lear” by William Shakespeare. “A Work of Art” by Anton Chekov rendered by Stewart Faulkner won second place. Third place went to Mary Ellen Mackin for her highly dramatic presentation of “Was it a Dream?” by Guy de Maupassant. Other participants were: Patricia Milkey, Brian Marsh, David Bordeaux, Marcia Halladay, and Lawrence Crochier. For months our class prepared itself for our Junior Prom. Our hard work and dedi- cation paid off, however, when on May 14, a once hare and cavernous gymnasium was turned into a gay, picturesque dance hall. A 14 foot flower covered windmill, complete with rotating blades, was the focal point of a scene in Holland. All too soon it was over. The last notes of the final waltz had faded into the night and all that remains of that wonderful evening are a few crushed flowers, perhaps a dance program and many wonderful memories. With the announcement of the new Netop and Yearbook staff our class issued the last edition of this year’s Netop. Already we were beginning to feel like the “High and Mighty” Seniors. Thus the outstanding events of our Junior year passed by and we eagerly looked forward to summer vacation when we would have a chance to catch our breaths. How happily we had departed, knowing that when we returned we as Seniors would be in power. But would our dreams come true? News of the resignation of Principal Wrightson came as a shock to most. The whole school felt a deep sense of loss. As Seniors we looked with uncertainty at the man who would replace him. We realized that he would be different from Mr. Wrightson but just how, we weren’t sure. At our first assembly, as he stood nervously on the stage, we got our first in sight into his personality. “I graduated from Greenfield,” she said, “but it took me a few years to make the big time!” We had a friend, and Mr. Cook quickly won the respect and admiration of us all. We began our Senior year by welcoming in the Freshmen with the usual Freshmen Reception. We soon discovered we were a class with great ambitions. We had pride and showed it as we expressed ourselves freely in the pages of our newspaper, Netop; in our Teen Scene reports; in Alter Ego ; and in our yearbook. Who will ever forget the date, November 25, 1965: the time, between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.; the place, Sheff Field; the occasion, the 39th annual Thanksgiving Day clash; the outcome — VICTORY for TURNERS, the first in 15 years. Yes, fifteen years of tears and disappointments had finally come to an end as we dramatically and decisively beat Greenfield, 28-14, in a terrific team effort. That evening St. Kazimier’s hall was filled with excited students and a swinging impromptu victory dance was held. Everyone was thrilled by the Turkey-Day victory but for the Seniors it was an extra special event for it was OUR YEAR. Senior Play was another success credited to our class. The play that was chosen was, “High Cockalorum.” The actors and the actresses spent many hours at rehear- sals. These many hours were filled with humor, encouragement, and sometimes de- pression; but always filled with the mystery and the excitement of life itself. From this experience was gained a greater cognizance of human nature, and knowledge of having truly accomplished something long to be remembered. All to soon the years have slipped through our fingers. We have grown strong and straight, and now our branches reach out to the outside world. We drop like leaves, each floating in his own direction, wary of what lies ahead. by Fay O’Riley 55 IVY POEM To others you speak not a word, But to us you unfold The hidden secrets That betray your silent leaves. You are the sole heir To bygone days, And now — all of Us that stays. From this sanctuary we must go, But our legacy we leave to grow Live on lovely vine — Burgeon forth and climb. By Lawrence Crochier 56 I ! ' ' " V J SSSB " 5 issiiwi r ilia 4 Up r B 3 u ’ jk mm CLASS WILL Sue Adie leaves her broken desk in Room 1 to the poor kid who gets it next year. Linda Arcand leaves her position as library aide to any industrious person who wants it. Pam Bassett leaves still looking for a blue Chevy. Pam Beaubien leaves her bubbling personality to Barb Cadran. Sparks Beaubien leaves in a Mustang. Bob Bellemare leaves just as he begins to understand Mr. Garbiel. Geri Bonnette leaves her geometry book to any poor Sophomore. Dawn Bonzek leaves with Jake and Geri for Cape Cod. David Bordeaux leaves his quota buster sticker on the Room 1 clock for posterity. Dan Bourdeau leaves his human public address system to Brownie. Janice Brown leaves the unfinished plans for Janie Currie to carry out. Bob Brown leaves his French pronounciation to Mr. Routhier. Bill Brown leaves his sense of humor to next years Room 1 students. Chris Brunelle leaves her typing record to her sister-try to beat it ! Dennis Brunelle leaves wearing his TIKI. Peter Burek leaves — still looking for a barber. Cindi Burnham leaves with a basket of chicken. Bill Busha leaves the basketball courts. Sunda Cadran leaves her tape recorder to Mr. Meehan. John Campbell leaves his scooter to Chuck Cocking. Wayne Campbell leaves his can opener to any fool who wants it. Philip Carme leaves with Gloria. Richard Chagnon leaves his first trumpet chair to Donna Dupuis. Ron Clapp leaves just as he gets here. Alyce Clough leaves still typing her last comparative essay. Jo Anne Coutu leaves for Greenfield. Cooch leaves — still trying to get a diamond ring out of the gum machine. 61 Craiger leaves his yellow socks to Bill Barber. Croder leaves his lunches on top of the lockers. Keith Crossman leaves his name on the lunch list. Peggy Croteau leaves her wardrobe to smart, young sophisticates. Currie leaves her frizz to Barb Cadran. Jim Deery leaves his hot car in the garage. Larry Deery leaves — still limping. Steve Dejnak leaves with a Yo-ho. Mike Delpha leaves his bubble gum to his sister. Gloria Denkiewicz leaves with Philip. Henry Deso leaves his seat in history to some unfortunate Junior. Jamey Deveny leaves his seat in Room 1 to anyone who wants it. Bill Devino leaves — still smiling at Mr. Garbiel. Mike Drago leaves the management of the basketball team to Chi-Chi and the Shiek. Janice Farrar leaves — what a way to go-go. Stew Faulkner leaves in his “red bomber”. Dennis Fisk leaves without Pam. Bruce Fisk leaves for destination unknown. Sue Fleming finally gets rid of her slide rule. Dave Flynn leaves the “modern” stage equipment in the auditorium. Peggy Forsyth leaves on horseback. John Fowler leaves his seat in Room 2 to any Junior fortunate enough to get it. Chris Fugere leaves still selling tickets. Margret Gardner goes to meet Henry. Gerund leaves with a great big “Jippee”. Rick Gates leaves the mess in his locker for the maid to clean. Teri Galambeski leaves her sense of humor to Sue DeMeo. Charlene leaves a plate of kielbasa for the guys. Juddy leaves six empty tin cans. Nat Grant leaves her food supply to hungry Juniors. Betty Greene leaves to go “Duck” hunting at U.M.. Ella leaves her sneakers to Geri Carson. Steve Gusan leaves his seat in Room 17 to Mary Lou. Marsha Halladay leaves her outgoing personality to Mary Grimard. Dale Hurd leaves-willingly. Jake leaves looking for Dick. Jay Jamrog leaves still looking for a ride (anywhere). Brian Johnson leaves in search of a comb. Fay Johnson leaves the bandroom to her sister. Cinderella leaves with the one who found her glass slipper. Bob Judd leaves on a record run to recess. Bake leaves with the crowd for the bowling alley. Judi Kruzlic leaves her baton to future drum majorettes. Linda Kurkulonis leaves her hairdoes to Cathy Conway. Ron Laczynski leaves Mr. Plaisted in peace. Lev leaves the right end spot to anyone man enough to play it. Lew goes without Kim. Marty leaves in her Mustang. Machaiek leaves with the color guard. Mac leaves Judy and Mr. Cook in peace. Lyn Maddern leaves her car in a snow bank. Frani Mac leaves — still talking. Steve Marceau leaves his tennis racquet. Leon leaves his darkroom to anyone who has a flashlight. Brian leaves his beat up hooks on existentialism. Karen Martin leaves her Physics book to any girl who can pass it. Sharon Martin leaves — still being called Karen. Russ leaves for a girl in Greenfield. Sue Mayrand leaves an over-worked clarinet and an emptv chair to Priscilla Chis- holm. Patty leaves her afternoons in Room 3 to Nedine Potter. Christie leaves hut not before writing Tucker Frederickson on the hoard. Barb Molongoski leaves for North Pharmacy. Dick Moore leaves his position on the tennis team to anyone who wants it. Faith leaves her chewing gum to the Juniors — don t get caught. Ken Morin leaves in his truck. John Murphy leaves still making flowers for the windmill. Chet Napikoski leaves his slide rule to Rich Sojka. Tom Niedzwiecki leaves on his motor scooter. Francis leaves his guns to next year’s hunters. Cindy Norwood leaves her hours of typing practice to Marcia Stone. Rile leaves unattended. Donald Palmer leaves with all his detentions served! Jackie Palmer leaves her seat in Room 3 to the next lucky person. Parker leaves the school spirit that has always existed. Camilla leaves still singing. Wayne Perkins leaves the managing of the football team to anyone who wants it. Mel leaves the future of the girl’s basketball team to Mrs. Robinson. Manny leaves everything he can’t carry. Steve Plante leaves free wheeling on his snowmobile. Alison Pleasant leaves with her guitar slung over her shoulder. Donna Pliska leaves a package of gum to anyone who wants it. Bruce Pollard leaves without Debbie. Pooch leaves his accident free Chevy. Tom Pula leaves his skis to anyone who is fortunate enough to skip a day. Rastas leaves for the Marines. Ron Rees leaves in search of Sue. Don Regan leaves Marcia until ’67. Dave Reipold leaves his book, How To Move Bridges. Henry Reipold leaves without argument. Carol Richotte leaves her shorthand equipment to anyone who wants it. Rick Rudinski leaves with his name still on the locker. Geri Ryan leaves with Dawn for Amherst. Tom Ryan leaves in a hurry as usual. Chet Saharceski leaves his red suit to next year’s Santa Claus. Lyn Saulnier leaves her arguments with Mr. Donovan to any brave Junior. Joyce Seredejko leaves Miss Nadeau in peace. Marlene Serrell leaves her glasses to posterity. Mike Shane leaves for a visit with Uncle Sam. Les Sheridan leaves listening to “French”. Lin Sicard leaves to meet Bob at 1:00 o’clock. Sue Sicard leaves still trying to figure out the latest joke. Sawick leaves his terrific rally speeches to Tra. Roberta Smith leaves in her Stanley boots. Gary Staiger leaves all the teachers in peace. Wallace Stebbins leaves his linebacker spot to Pete Paulin. Doreen Stokes leaves her Latin IV book to anyone who presses flowers. Ed Stone leaves willingly. Sully leaves to find Betsy. Cindy Sumner leaves smiling. Dave Suprenant leaves with regret. Kathy Tanyuk leaves the typing room to next year’s typists. Sharon Tatakis leaves her taxi service to Bill Legere. Chester Tela leaves quietly. Ron Thibodeau leaves the art room to Ronny Gibson. Dave Tibbetts leaves his English IV book reports to other advanced readers. Chris Trewhella leaves for the First National. Don Valley leaves finished with women — at least for a while! Barry Walker leaves his secret of how to pass history tests to future Seniors. Carol Walsh leaves to be with Charlie. Ward Wheeler leaves a broken reed to Gary Bellemare. Jeff White leaves his seat in Math to John Demo. Cindy Wickline leaves to be with Gary. Dave W onsey leaves without argument. Pete Zschau leaves Mr. Garbiel in peace. BABY PICTURES Stew Faulkner Jackie Palmer Carol Richotte Tommy Ryan Henry Deso Lin Sue Sicard Lyce Clough Denny Fisk Dave Bordeaux Don Valley Les Sheridan Leon Markowski Phil Carme Sunda Cadran Bob Brown Jo Lewandowski Donna Pliska Carol Walsh Larry Deery Mike Drago Tom Pula Roberta Smith Barry Kostanski Ron Clapp pr ■ i . - Jo Anne Coutu X A ■ ti Fay Johnson Mike Delpha Faith Morin Jim Deery Lin Saulnier Marty Luippold Larry Crochier Steve Marceau ]ayj Jamrog Cindy Jones » Jack Fowler V. V A 3 Fran Noga Sue Adie Mel Pervere Mary Jeanne Currie 1 W Natalie Grant Dave Wonsey Christie Miner Jerry Sullivan John Campbell Gloria Denkewicz Chris Brunelle Carol Machaiek Bob Bellemare Marlene Serrell Jamey Deveney Pete Zschau Peggy Forsyth John Murphy Sue Mayrand Cindi Wickline Barb Molongoski Martin Twins Dave Suprenant Gerry Bonnette Janey Brown Cindy Norwood Fay O’Riley The date was May 14. The parking lot was crowded and the gym corridor was filled with nerv- ous chatter as the traditional Grand March com- menced. The girls, each beautiful in a soft gown, and their escorts, somewhat unaccustomed to their formal evening attire, seemed awestricken at the transformation of the gym. A 14-foot flower- covered windmill, complete with rotating blades, was the focal point of a scene in Holland — our theme. The Grand March wound through the tulips and carnations. Soon the floor was a mass of whirling colors, as the couples danced to favorite tunes played by Dick Perry’s orchestra. All too soon it was over. The last notes of the final waltz had faded away into the night. JUNIOR PRIZE SPEAKING Judi Kruzlic Stewart Faulkner .. Mary Ellen Mackin Patricia Milkey ..... Brian Marsh David Bordeaux Marcia Halladay . Lawrence Crochier King Lear A Work of Art Was It A Dream? A Successful Season Oedipus Rex The Exodus .. The Imaginary Invalid The Enemy of the People 71 WANTE ULfCOPflUi Ibll naii p EWAf MERNLY 1 T 0 % 4 72 “HIGH COCKALORUM” CAST Floyd Jeepcr Zenobia Finch Hetty Whipple .... Phoebe Atwater ... Sheriff Deputy Bonnie Lee Dover Agnes McGregor . Dennis McGregor Boy With Cornet Five Ladies 1st Squaw 2nd Squaw .. Sam Sleet 1st Cowboy .. Little Brother 2nd Cowboy . Billy Nadine . Stewart Faulkner Robert Beaubien Charlene Golonka Patricia Milkey Christine Fugere Brian Marsh Larry Deery Lyn Saulnier Mary Ellen Pervere Dennis Couture Robert Brown Jo Ann Lewandowki Leslie Sheridan, Sunda Cadran Marlene Serrell, Pam Beaubien Dawn Bonzek Cynthia Burnham Leon Markowski Robert Judd Ronald Thibodeau John Gould David Bordeaux STUDENT DIRECTORS Fay O ' Riley, Lawrence Crochier PROPERTIES COMMITTEE Francis Noga, Christie Miner (Chairmen) ; Geri Bonnett, Jay Jam- rog, Peter Zschau, Geri Ryan, Russell Mayrand, Tom Ryan. MAKE-UP Mary Ellen Mackin (Chairman) ; Valera Krol, Gail Jacob COSTUME COMMITTEE Barbara Molongoski (Chairman) ; Camilla Paulin, Sharon Martin, Karen Martin, Lyn Maddern, Cindy Jones, Mary Jeanne Currie, Donna Pliska TICKET COMMITTEE Sharon Tatakis, Christine Fugere “This is a big day in- my life and in the ladies .... you’re about to embark on an honorable profes- • 99 sion. “C’Mon, Bonnie, ladies are sup- posed to like to dance.” “Who’s he?” i 74 “Don’t get up, any of you! That includes you, Dennis McGregor. It’s a sorry thing when I can’t even trust you to behave yourself.” “What are you going to Kansas City for?” “I don’t — I’m going to be a lady!” Fay O’Riley (Student Director) Mr. Maurice Donovan (Director) Lawrence Crochier (Student Director) L 75 RIDERS TO THE SEA The scene of this Columbus Day play, writ- ten by John Synge, was a simple fisherman ' s cottage. Sadly, it was not a home. It had been when Murya’s (Pat Milkey) family was safe and Cathleen (Judi Kruzlic) and Nora (Mary Mackin) shared six fine, healthy brothers. The sea beckoned the last man of this dwindling family to his end. Bartley (Jerry Sullivan) could not be swayed by the mournful pleading of his bewailing mother, and left. “The bles- sing of God be with you,” was her resentful adieu. Peace came to her at the highest price, the death of Bartley, her only remaining son. Joined by her neighbors, Marsha Halladay, Richard Gates, Linda Saulnier, William Gar- rand, and Robert Judd, she mourned his death. THE GREAT CHOICE Fred Eastman is the author of this presentation. Kruger (Bob Parker), an Ameri- can Army commander, shows the dangers caused by nationalism. Despite protests from Isabel Goodman (Charlene Golonka), his son Herman (Tom Potosek), his secretary Paula (Pam Sabato), and Doctor Thompson (Dave Bordeaux), Kruger’s mistaken sense of duty and cold stubbornness force him to sentence Anne Goodman (Anne Maddern) to he shot. He insists that she attempted to go against the will of her country in time of war to aid a youth movement which put love of God and humanity above patriotism. Miss Lee (Kathy Bonnette) and an army lieutenant (Alva Koch) encour- age Kruger’s actions. In an attempt to rescue Anne from the firing squad, Herman is killed. Thus Kruger is forced to pay for his mistakes. SILENT NIGHT This Christmas play by Ada Goepp depicted an average family during the hectic Christ- mas season. William (Stewart Faulkner) and Louise (Cindy Hardy) were exhausted after last minute shopping and gift-wrapping. They bickered over trivial matters. The Martin chil- dren, Barbara (Mitzie Koscis), Thomas (Mark Sweeney), Penny (Fay Jean Guy), and Jody (Chris Connelly) contributed to the tense at- mosphere by arguing over ridiculous topics. The family had forgotten that Christmas means more than exchanging presents. This image vanished when, amidst the fighting and com- plaining, the family heard the voices of carol- lers in the distance. The family remembered the true meaning of Chistmas. 76 TURNERS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY llw fr -J ll ' jfw [li 1 1 ■ • tfjftSfVl PRO MERITO SOCIETY Daniel Bourdeau Sharon Martin William Brown Patricia Milkey Lawrence Crochier Chester Napikoski Michael Drago Fay O’Riley Christine Fugere Camilla Paulin Stewart Faulkner Mary Ellen Pervere Richard Gates Emmanuel Pfersich Charlene Golonka Stephen Plante Marcia Halladay Bruce Pollard Fay Johnson Barbara Joyce Seredejko Mary Mackin Leslie Sheridan 77 FRENCH CLUB William Garrand (President) ; Patricia Milkey (Vice President) ; Leslie Sheridan (Secretary) ; Jeremiah Sullivan (Treasurer) ; Mrs. Judith Finkel and Mr. Albert Routhier (Advisors) SPANISH CLUB Brian Marsh (President); Lucinda Hardy (Vice President); Karen Hoynoski (Secre- tary); Catherine Fugere (Treasurer); Miss Berta Nunez (Advisor) 78 HISTORY CLUB William Brown (President) ; Dennis Couture (Vice President) ; Fay O ' Riley (Secretary); Carolyn Maddern (Treasurer); Mr. Thomas Meehan (Advisor) ART CLUB Ronald Thibodeau (President) ; Linda Saulnier (Vice President) ; Kathy Conway (Secretary) ; Anne Gamelin (Treasurer) ; Miss Merv O’Brien (Advisor) 79 GIRLS’ GLEE CLUB Marcia Halladay (President); Mary Mackin (Vice President); Sha- ron Tatakis (Secretary) ; Pamela Bassett (Librarian) ; Linda Saul- nier and Carolyn Madden (Riser Movers) ; Anne Courtemanche (Pianist) ; Miss Florence Argy (Director) BOYS’ GLEE CLUB Jeremiah Sullivan (President) ; Stewart Faulkner (Vice President) ; Robert Brown (Librarian) ; Miss Florence Argy (Director) 80 CAMERA CLUB Leon Markowski (President) ; Robert Brown (Vice Presi- dent) ; Linda Saulnier (Secretary) ; Christine Fugere (Treasurer) ; Mr. Frederick Oakes (Advisor) CHESS CLUB David Bordeaux (President) ; Daniel Bourdeau (Vice President) ; Dennis Couture (Treasurer) 81 COMMUNITY SERVICE CLUB Miss Helen McGillicuddy (Advisor) LIBRARY AIDES BANK DAY CASHIERS COMMERCIAL CLUB Pamela Bassett (President), Mary Jeanne Currie (Vice President), Patricia O’Connor (Secretary) ; Carol Richotte (Treasurer) ; Mrs. Virginia Call, Miss Marion Nadeau, Mr. Robert Avery (Advisors) 83 VARSITY CHEERLEADERS Pamela Beaubien (Co-Captain) Dawn Bonzek (Co-Captain) 84 — ___ J.V. CHEERLEADERS Janice Brown (Captain) TWIRLERS 85 Judi Kruzlic (Drum Majorette) 86 BAND Brian Marsh (President) ; Mary Mackin (Secretary) ; Keith Crossman (Manager) ; Mr. Harold Kacanek (Director) SWINGSTERS 87 OFFICE GIRLS STUDENT COUNCIL 88 SPORTS 89 FOOTBALL 90 CREAMED GREEN 28-14 91 BASKETBALL 92 93 BASEBALL 94 CROSS COUNTRY TRACK 95 TENNIS GOLF GIRLS’ BASKETBALL 97 SOFTBALL Mrs. Charlotte Robinson (Coach) 98 MANUAL TRAINING CUSTODIANS i . CAFETERIA STAFF 99 LITERATURE 100 YEARBOOK l 101 THE NETOP EDITORS Charlene Golonka (Editor-in-chief) ; Mary Ellen Pervere, Robert Parker (Executive Editors) ; Mr, William Steinecke, Jr. (Ad- visor) NEWS STAFF Dennis Couture, Fay O ' Riley (News Editors) ; Wil- liam Garrand, Alison Pleasant, Linda Saulnier, Linda Kurkulonis, Lawrence Crochier, Sunda Ca- dran FEATURE STAFF Judi Kruzlic, Joyce Seredejko (Feature Editors) ; Michael Drago, Lesley Sheridan, Christine Fugere, Alvce Clough, William Devino 102 MANAGING EDITORS Richard Gates, Stewart Faulkner TYPING STAFF Faith Morin, Christie Miner (Typing Editors) ; Carol Machaiek, JoAnne Coutu, Natalie Grant, Kath- ryn Tanyuk RE-WRITE STAFF Mary Ellen Mackin, Mar- cia Hallady (Re-Write Editors) ; Susan Fleming, Steven Plante, Patricia Milkey SPORTS STAFF Michael Delpha, William Busha (Sports Editors) ; Barry Kostanski, Wayne Campbell, Sharon Tatakis BUSINESS STAFF Robert Judd (Business Manager), Donald Valley, Bruce Fiske, William Devino 103 Compliments of ST. STANISLAUS Turners Falls, Massachusetts Compliments of WELLS TOOL COMPANY Greenfield, Massachusetts Compliments of GEORGE H. REED AND CO., INC. GENERAL CONTRACTOR DIAMOND CORE DRILLING 24 Franklin Street Greenfield, Mass. Compliments of STEVE’S BARBER SHOP Over Wool worth’s Greenfield, Massachusetts LIVE BETTER 104 BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1966 CAMILLE A. PAULIN REGISTERED BARBER Turner Falls, Massachusetts SKIBISKI INSURANCE SERVICE INC. SKIBISKI REALITY Insurance — Appraisals — Real Estate Tel. Sunderland 665-2191 Greenfield 773-7176 MILLERS FALLS BOND MILLERS FALLS ONION SKIN OLD DEERFIELD BOND GIBRALTAR ONION SKIN MILLERS FALLS EZERASE BOND and ONION SKIN MILLERS FALLS OPAQUE PARCHMENTS MILLERS FALLS PAPER COMPANY MILLERS FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS COMPLIMENTS OF STRATHMORE PAPER CO. 105 LaPIERRE’S, INC. Westinghouse Appliances ‘YOU CAN BE SURE IF IT’S WESTINGHOUSE’ TELEVISIONS STEREOS RADIOS at our new location § 193 MAIN ST. GREENFIELD, MASS. For the Best Tire Deal in Franklin County, Trade at . . . ALIBER’S ART’S TIRE SERVICE, INC. “WHERE THERE IS NO 10 Silver St. Greenfield, Mass. COMPROMISE WITH QUALITY” GOOD LUCK TO LAWRENCE SHOES THE CLASS OF 1966 SHOES FOR ALL THE FAMILY GRIBBON’S MUSIC CENTER 219 Main St. Turners Leads the Way — Others Follow Greenfield, Mass. BARRETT BAKER Compliments of STATIONERS — OFFICE SUPPLIES WAINSHAL’S Typewriter Sales and Service 306-310 Main Street 377 Main Street Tel. 773-3015 Greenfield, Mass. Greenfield, Massachusetts _ 106 RUCKPS GOODYEAR AND GENERAL ELECTRIC BEST WISHES TO PRODUCTS CLASS OF 1966 “The most of the best for the least” Tel. 774-4791 OLD STONE LODGE 19 Federal St. Greenfield, Mass. WILLIAM’S GARAGE For Smooth Driving SMOOTH SAILING AHEAD SO LONG — HAPPY DAYS SENIORS OF 1966 — Specializing in — BEAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT SUN SCIENTIFIC TUNE-UP L. A. KOHLER CO., INC. Like You Were Tops in Everything We Sell 147 Second St. Turners Falls, Mass. 75 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1966 BOARD OF SELECTMEN PLEASANT INSURANCE EDWARD STOTZ, INC. AGENCY, INC. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS GENERAL INSURANCE REAL ESTATE Tel. 774-4257 77 Avenue A Turners Falls, Massachusetts Serving Franklin County 107 Dependable Service BEAUBIEN AND BONNETTE COAL CO. COAL — RANGE AND FUEL OILS Tel. 863-4581 60 Second St. Turners Falls, Mass. Compliments of DR. ALBERT GIKNIS Compliments of FRANK’S SERVICE STATION Frank Kersavage, Prop. Millers Falls, Massachusetts Compliments of HAWLEY PHARMACY Millers Falls Tel. 659-3327 HAWLEY PHARMACY, INC. Turners Falls Tel. 863-2473 Compliments of HAROLD B. MYERS gulf Millers Falls Road Turners Falls, Massachusetts Compliments of DR. FREDERICK MILKEY Compliments of BILL’S LUNCHEONETTE Millers Falls, Massachusetts Tel. 659-2556 HAIR STYLING — COLORING CUSTOM PERMANENTS WIG CONSULTANT Tel. 863-9077 JUNE’S HAIR FASHIONS June Escott 74 Prospect Street Turners Falls, Mass. 108 Best Wishes for the Future To the Class of 1966 From CARMINE’S BARBER SHOP “The modem shop with old-fashioned service” Carmine Deprete Millers Falls, Mass. CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1966 WARD’S STORE Millers Falls Peg and Morgan Browning If anon fb ' - 0000 v ' COFFEE Home-made Ice Cream Sandwiches and Lunches at GOULD’S Tel. 659-3052 Millers Falls, Massachusetts Compliments of Window Shades — Venetian Blinds Good Luck to the Class of 1966 WHITE SWAN BEAUTY SHOPPE Tel. 659-3309 51 Main Street Millers Falls, Mass. Congratulations From MACKIN’S FUEL OIL EXCAVATION SAND AND GRAVEL SHOVEL WORK Tel. 733-3622 Greenfield 659-3334 Millers Falls LUNT SILVERSMITHS Greenfield, Massachusetts Compliments of GREENFIELD MOTOR CLUB Francis A. 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CHARRON’S PHARMACY Franklin County’s Most Modern FORBES CAMERA SHOP Drug Store PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED 339 Federal St. Greenfield, Massachusetts Greenfield, Massachusetts 111 Compliments of JARVIS WELDING MFG. CO. Millers Falls Road Turners Falls, Massachusetts CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1966 BARBARA’S BEAUTY BAR 111 Avenue A Tel. 863-4000 Turners Falls, Massachusetts CONGRATULATIONS FROM THE PIZZA VILLA FRENCH KING HIGHWAY GILL, MASS. Compliments of CONGRATULATIONS From the GARDNER’S FRENCH KING MOTEL AND RESTAURANT 108 L Street FINE FOOD AND LODGING Turners Falls, Massachusetts Banquet and Reception Facilities The FRANKLIN SAVINGS INSTITUTION “THE BANK ON THE CORNER ” 112 BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1966 THE ROCKDALE STORE TURNERS FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS 113 MILLERS FALLS COMPANY MANUFACTURERS OF AMERICA’S FIRST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE OF © ELECTRIC TOOLS CONGRATULATES THE CLASS OF 1966 114 CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST Compliments of WISHES TO THE CLASS OF ’66 RITA’S BEAUTY SALON from Rita Tuminski, Prop. JUDD WIRE MFG. CO. 80 High Street Turners Falls, Mass. Tel. 86-2663 YOU CAN DO BETTER AT CARROLL’S SUPER MARKETS MILLERS FALLS ORANGE GILL GOOD LUCK! TO THE CLASS OF 1966 CARROLL BROTHERS EXPRESS, INC. SERVING WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS CONGRATULATIONS, CLASS OF 1966 TEN PIN BOWL Featuring 32 AMF Automatic Pinspotters 20 Ten Pins 12 Candle Pins 89 FRENCH KING HIGHWAY, GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS PRescott 4-4341 115 Compliments of THE ATHENS RESTAURANT “Where Friends Meet” Montague Road Turners Falls, Mass. PIPIONE’S SPORTS SHOP BICYCLES— ALL BICYCLE REPAIRS Parts and Accessories Full Line of Sports’ Equipment 104 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. DORAN, INC. PLUMBING, HEATING AND APPLIANCES “We Sell — Install — Service and Guarantee’’ 11 Bridge Street Millers Falls, Mass. Tel. 659-3543 Compliments to the CLASS OF 1966 From the CLASS OF 19 67 Compliments of FRENCH KING BOWLING CENTER 16 Modern Lanes and Snack Bar Reservations Tel. 659-3047 French King Highway Millers Falls, Massachusetts GOOD LUCK TO THE CLASS OF ’66 Compliments of RUBIN’S AUTO SALES Turners Falls, Mass. 863-8271 DELUXE BEAUTY SALON Josephine Krol, Prop. ALL KINDS OF BEAUTY CULTURE Tel. 863-4651 Turners Falls, Massachusetts Compliments to the CLASS OF 1966 From the CLASS OF 1968 116 v v5 X IN GREENFIELD IT’S . . . WILSON’S FRANKLIN COUNTY’S LEADING DEPARTMENT STORE Since 1882 Where Your Mother and Grandmother Shopped RECORDER GAZETTE Since 1792 Franklin County’s Own Newspaper All the News of Turners Falls and Other Montague Sections “A Complete Home Newspaper For All The Family” Telephones: 863-4441 or 772-0261 Turners Falls Bureau 6914 Avenue A Compliments of BEAUBIEN’S SUNOCO SERVICE STATION Tel. 863-4335 101 Third Street Turners Falls, Massachusetts Compliments of GODIN 5 100 STORE 151 Avenue A Turners Falls, Massachusetts MONTAGUE MACHINE CO. PAPER MILL MACHINERY Maintenance Work For Neighboring Mills Turners Falls, Massachusetts McCarthy THE CLOTHIER Tailor-made Suits a Specialty Turners Falls, Massachusetts 117 C x x 5 x 5hv9T X CONGRATULATIONS ! Class of 1966 Best Wishes for the Future CASUAL COIFFURES Tel. 863-2833 Carol Biano Patricia Letourneau 168 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. Linoleum and Tile Floors Ceramic Tile Formica and Vinyl Counter Tops BARRY FLOOR AND WALL COVERINGS Tel. 863-4409 177 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. Compliments of NADEAU’S CLOVER FARM STORE QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES Open Daily 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. High Street Turners Falls, Mass. Compliments of BOB’S AUTO BODY 24 HOUR WRECKER SERVICE Tel. 863-2112 303 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. COUTURE BROS. INC. 187 Ave. A Turners Falls, Mass. 01376 Tel. 863-4346 PAINTING AND WATERPROOFING CONTRACTORS Gasoline Station Installation and Maintenance Wallpaper — Paint Supplies — Glass For Safe and Courteous Service CALL VETERAN’S CAB 863-4393 Office: 78 Ave. A, Turners Falls, Mass. COMET CLEANERS 123 AVENUE A Turners Falls, Mass. PHONE 863-2043 Harvey R. Fleming, Prop. Compliments of ESCOTT’S SERVICE STATION BSA MOTORCYCLES Sales and Service 118 SIGDA FLOWER SHOP 284 HIGH STREET Greenfield, Massachusetts Compliments of SPORTHAUS SKI SHOP — SPORTS WEAR 320 Main St. Tel. 773-3876 § Across From the Common Greenfield, Massachusetts Compliments of POLISH CO-OP STORES 96 Fourth St. 39 Eleventh St. Turners Falls, Massachusetts FLORIST TELEGRAPH DELIVERY | CADE’S FLOWER SHOP § 54 Avenue A Turners Falls PARTRIDGE-ZSCHAU, INC. INSURANCE — REALTORS Telephone 659-3318 MILLERS FALLS ROAD TURNERS FALLS, MASS. Telephone 863-4331 106 AVENUE A TURNERS FALLS, MASS. INDEED WE DO!! SELL LIFE INSURANCE 119 Compliments of CENTER PHARMACY JUREK BROS., INC. Open Daily 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tel. 863-4879 Free Drug Delivery 53 School Street 131 Avenue A Greenfield, Massachusetts Turners Falls, Mass. EASTERN TEXTILE COMPANY Compliments of Distributors of COTTON, SILK, AND RAYON ST. KAZIMIER’S SOCIETY DRESS GOODS Tel. 773-7516 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. Greenfield, Massachusetts COMPLIMENTS OF ARCHITECTURAL STONE COMPANY TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS ARE YOU LOOKING FOR . . . Printing that will compliment your message — help win the attention of your customers and prospects? Drop in and let us show you the fine printing we do. FRANKLIN COUNTY PRESS “LETTERPRESS — OFFSET” 60 AVENUE A TEL. 863-4625 Turners Falls, Mass. 120 ESLEECK MANUFACTURING COMPANY THIN PAPERS TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS GOOD LUCK TO THE CLASS OF 1966 LIONEL’S BARBER SHOP 110 Avenue A, Turners Falls, Mass. SINGLEY’S FURNITURE APPLIANCE STORE 173 and 169 Avenue A Turners Falls, Massachusetts CONGRATULATIONS ! Class of 1966 Best Wishes for the Future VALLEY STUDIO “EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC” 74 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. Compliments of AMERICAN HOUSE FINE FOODS 25 Fourth St. Turners Falls, Mass. A. H. RIST - INSURANCE Since 1888 Fire — Bond — Casualty- Automobile — Life — Marine Notary Public — Burglary 56 Fourth Street Turners Falls, Massachusetts Real Estate Sales and Appraisals Compliments of GRIMARD’S SHOE SERVICE Paul Grimard, Prop. 103 Avenue A Turners Falls, Mass. 121 Compliments of Franklin County’s Finest { FRANK’S “FINE FOODS” See PONTIAC for ’66 “The PRIDE of GM” at 217 Federal Street SHEREMETA PONTIAC, INC. Greenfield, Massachusetts 415 Federal Street, Greenfield ; — YETTER-The Florist CONGRATULATIONS ] TO THE CLASS OF 1966 ( Quality Flowers Since 1907 CORNER CUPBOARD l i Tel. 774-4305 SNACK SHOP J Greenfield, Massachusetts Corner of Chapman and Main Sts. ( Greenfield, Massachusetts 1 Compliments of COMPLIMENTS TO THE HALLMARK STUDIO, INC. CLASS OF 1966 ' 314 Main Street GOODNOW’S . Greenfield, Massachusetts DEPARTMENT STORE ! CLEARY’S JEWELERS Compliments of ) Oldest Established Store in Area Selling and Servicing CARROLL TRAVEL BUREAU l DIAMONDS — WATCHES — SILVER JEWELRY — CHINA — GIFTS of ( 248 Main Street Greenfield, Mass. Greenfield, Massachusetts 122 A. M. GAMELIN CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER FOR 1965 - 1966 SENIORS MONTAGUE CITY AND GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Compliments of JOSEPH RIEL HEATING PLUMBING Compliments of CHALET BARBER SHOPPE “TO LOOK YOUR BEST’ BAUCH’S ESSO STATION 193 Avenue A Turners Falls Massachusetts LUBRICATION, ESSO OIL, TIRES CUSTOM WASHING Tel. 863-4378 Compliments of FALLS THEATER THE CORNER BOOK STORE, INC. Blank Books and Stationery Newspapers — Office Supplies Periodicals — Greeting Cards 116 Avenue A Tel. 863-4569 Turners Falls, Massachusetts ELLIE’S LUNCH HOME COOKED FOOD AND HOME MADE MUFFINS Booth Service Air Conditioned 63 Third St. Turners Falls, Mass. Compliments of SNOW’S ICE CREAM CO. Greenfield, Massachusetts GOE. STARBUCK SONS, INC. Established 1872 Quiet May Oil Burner STEAM, WATER AND PLUMBING CONTRACTORS Sheet Metal Work Turners Falls, Massachusetts 124 For Repairs — Bring ’Em To Us ! AL’S BODY SHOP FENDER AND BODY WORK WRECKS A SPECIALTY Jet. Montague City Road and Ave. A Tel. 863-4835 Turners Falls, Massachusetts Compliments of TURNERS FALLS COAL CO. Phone 863-4321 Fifth Street Turners Falls, Mass. AVENUE A SNACK BAR THE URGIEL FARM FEATURING COMPLETE MEALS POTATOES AND DAIRY Delicious Foot-Long Submarine Munns Ferry Road Open from 6 a.m.-p.m. Gill, Massachusetts CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE 1966 GRADUATES OF TURNERS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL WHAI AM, WHAI FM CBS RADIO NETWORK Greenfield, Massachusetts Banlcu ’s OF GREENFIELD Compliments of BOSTLEY MOTOR COMPANY LINCOLN MERCURY COMET 38 Hope Street Greenfield, Massachusetts 125 T. O’Toole Sons, one of the first printers in the nation to produce yearbooks by offset, bring to you progressive ideas tempered by experience and a reputation for pains-taking workmanship. Personal service to advise you on ■ Yearbook Production ■ Themes ■ Layout ■ Use of Color ■ Fitting Copy ■ Line Drawings ■ Advertising ■ Proof Reading ■ Photography ■ Produc- tion ■ Personal Service At All Times T.O’TOOLE ■ SONS. INC. KEELER AVENUE, SOUTH NORWALK, CONNECTICUT 06856 CONNECTICUT 838-4761 NEW YORK M El rose 5-4112 S. Yearbook 2 (Peske Tuk-1966) CW v fvo 2 . F. H. 3. Yearbook (Peske Tuk- 1966) - ' ' TURNERS TALLS HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY TONERS FAlLS HIGH SCHOOL LIBRAB T A tree is planted by the waters Its roots become firmly established. As the tree grows powerful , each branch becomes strong and sure. Finally the tree reaches the peak of its strength. Its branches spread proudly and reach toward the sky. A class is formed near the waters , deeply influenced by its heritage. People , activities , and knowledge in - fluence it. As the class earns recogni- tion and prominence , its members become mature and certain. Finally , the class reaches its climax. Its mem- bers separate and strive toward the achievement of their individual goals.


Suggestions in the Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) collection:

Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

1963

Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1968 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1969 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
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