Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA)

 - Class of 1962

Page 1 of 120

 

Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 120 of the 1962 volume:

■ r DEDICATION Excelsior! Is there any other word, is there any other concept that embodies to such a great degree the spirit, the integrity, the character of the " man behind the scenes ?” He can no longer avoid his deserved position in the team sports pictures. He can no longer deny credit for the excellent scouting reports for our Saturday football games. He can no longer refuse recognition as being one who stands forth as a prime example of dedicated teaching, superior coaching, unflagging guidance. In the classroom, on the playing field, his knowledge and enthusiasm have contributed to our store of experiences and to our development as individuals. It is, in acknowledgment and sincere appre- ciation of our unpaid debt, that we dedicate this, our Y earhook, to you, Mr. Edward Bourdeau. bie of contents DEDICATION MR. BURKE MR. WRIGHTSON MISS LITTLE FACULTY " WERTO” SENIORS ACTIVITIES ADVERTISING Editorial Staff — Standing, Constance Ka- baniec, Michael Janos, Frances Duncan, John Zywna, Martha Luey, Michael Mc- Carthy, Patricia Makarewicz; Sitting, David Martineau, Judith Humphrey, Co-Editors. Rewrite Staff — Standing, Frances Dun- can, Editor; Sitting, Marsha Jalicki, Merrilyn LeVitre. Managing Board — Robert Kozik, Joseph Simanski, Raymond Berry. Typing Staff — Carol Zmuda, Shirley Klepadlo, Sharon St. Germain, Judith Crossman, Linda Houle, Margaret Ver- rier. News Staff — Standing, Constance Ka- baniec, Michael Janos, Co-Editors; Sit- ting, Sharon Hilliard, Sarah Lizotte, Roberta Drinzek, Susan Bourret, Nancy Bray. Feature Staff — Standing, Michael Mc- Carthy, Martha Luey, Co-Editors; Sit- ting, Noreen Molongoski, Karen Plante, Jacquelyn Jenkin. Sports Staff — Standing, John Zywna, Editor; Sitting, Donald Brown, Ray- mond Berry, Joseph Simanski. MR. ARTHUR E. BURKE John Jones, a T.F.H.S. student, has only an im- personal contact with Mr. Burke. He might see him walking through the hall — perhaps stop and talk with him — feel important. But then John goes on to his classes, activities, so much more time consuming . . . immediate. Who is Mr. Burke? Who is responsible for the standard of classes, the activities, the school? The impersonal becomes familiar. MR. GEORGE F. WRIGHTSON When a man’s value is recognized by an entire community, then he must truly be an asset to its af- fairs. Such is the case of the man who is in the prin- cipal’s office at Turners Falls High School. His value is recognized by all, and especially by this graduating class which has grown to realize and appreciate, in the four years we have spent near him, the friend- ship and aid that he offers to us now and in the future. He is always taking a sincere interest in all activities in which we have participated, whether or not they are connected with school. This is the main quality of this man that establishes the respect and esteem in which he is held. He is always among us — our successes, our failures — and even though we will leave T.F.H.S., we are aware that we will not leave the thoughts of this man who will still continue his quality of aiding us. For this we thank and especially commend the man George F. Wrightson. MISS OLIVE LITTLE 1958 - 1962. Our class was part of the bewilder- ing stage of high school. Miss Little, our guidance counselor, advised us in moments of confusion and doubt. She gave her undivided attention to our every crisis, real or imagined. With the interpretation of numerous test results, she aided us in our intellectual development and in the planning of our future ca- reers. Most important, her interest and faith in us helped protect our class from dissension and dis- ruption. 10 Mr. Frederick Oakes — Senior home room 3. Mr. Oakes teaches Senior English and one Sophomore English class. He is advisor to the Camera Club. Miss Evelyn Lindsay — Junior home room 1. Miss Lindsay instructs classes in Plane Geometry and Review Mathematics. As we take our last journey through the first floor rooms we see our faculty instructing the students in diverse subjects, symbolic of the co-operation of all departments — of the interchange of ideas on every floor throughout the school. Mr. John Bassett — Post Graduate home room 24. Mr. Bassett teaches Biology. He is Coa ch of the Freshman Football Team and the Track Team. Mr. George Bush — teaches Ancient and Medieval and Modern History. Mr. Maurice Donovan — is the instructor of Junior English and one class of Latin I. He is head of the Dramatics Department and faculty advisor for the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. Mrs. Elizabeth Wilczynski — is a member of the Commercial Department. She conducts classes in both Shorthand and Typing I and II. ©(D (D (D ® D © „ @®(f 1 © ' a; (s ' d (?) (gVh) (j) i k l) C @® ® © ® (b ® $ C D , s.mijic .• t ohov Twt writers Inc Syracuse li Mrs. Charlotte Potter — Freshman home room, Conference Room. Mrs. Potter conducts classes in Freshman English. Miss Mery O ' Brien — Art Room. She is in charge of the Montague Public Schools’ Art Department, and instructs classes in Art Appreciation and Freehand Drawing. Miss Helen McGuillicuddy — Freshman home room, Library. Miss McGuillicuddy is head li- brarian and holds a Library Science Class. Reaching the 2nd floor, we pass the rooms and hear the dialects of the different lan- Mr. Fred Kenney — instructs Senior classes in American History and teaches Medieval and Mod- ern History. Mr. Kenney is the Varsity Basket- ball Coach and is head of the History Club. Mr. Albert Routhier — Junior home room 27. Monsieur Routhier instructs classes in French I, II, and III. He is Junior Guidance Counselor, and French Club advisor. Miss Louise Clark — Sophomore home room 14. Miss Clark instructs the language of the Romans, Latin I, and II. Mr. Robert Plaisted — Sophomore home room 25. Mr. Plaisted instructs Sophomore classes in Amer- ican Government. He is head of the Debate Club. ;uages, the past events that made history nd the noise of pencils sketching. Mr. William Connelley — Sophomore home room 4. Senor Connelley instructs Spanish I and II classes, and classes of Freshman English. Miss Olive Little — Senior home room 21. She is head of the Commercial Department, and has classes in bookkeeping I, II, and III. She is the Guidance Counselor for the Senior Class. Miss Margaret Crean — Sophomore home room 26. Miss Crean conducts classes in Commercial Law, Geography, and Arithmetic. Mrs. Jean Martin — Freshman home room 20. Mrs. Martin has classes in both Algebra II, and General Science. Mrs. Louisa Barclay — Freshman home room 15. Mrs. Barclay conducts Sophomore English classes. In addition, she is the Sophomore Guidance Counselor. Continuing to the third floor, we see the busy students in room 16 — our biggest study hall. We turn to the other rooms and see classes of Algebra, Chemistry and Eng- lish. Mr. Leo Van Beaver — is a member of the Science Department. He instructs classes in Practical Chemistry and General Science. Mr. Charles Galvin — " 3rd floor mayor. " Mr. Gal- vin teaches both College Chemistry and College Physics. 14 Mr. Edward Bourdeau — Freshman home room 16. Mr. Bourdeau instructs Algebra I. He is the As- sistant Varsity Football Coach. Miss Florence Argy — is Director of Vocal Music in the Town of Montague, teaches Music Appre- ciation and instructs the Boys ' and Girls’ Glee Clubs. Mr. Donald Short is the Director of In- strumental Music in the Town of Montague and conducts the Band and Swingsters. Mr. Warren Brigham — is the conductor of the Orchestra and gives lessons to the participants. Mr. Richard Kossakoski — instructs students in Manual Training, and teaches Mechanical Draw- ing during the afternoons. Mr. Harold Fugere — is the Boys ' Physical Edu- cation Instructor and is in charge of Driver Edu- cation. Mrs. Helen Reidy — drills the Girls’ Tum- bling Team, coaches the Girls’ Basketball Team, and instructs weekly gym classes. As our faculty cannot be categorized by departments — neither can they be divided by floors. Some of these teachers instruct on all floors — some in the grammar school building — some in the auditorium — yet all are unified in developing the " many-sided” stu- dent by establishing a relationship between all subjects and fields. Miss Alice Reum — Senior home room 23. Miss Reum is the teacher of Home Economics and head of the Home Economics Club. Mr. Constantine O ' Doherty — teaches Social Sci- ence. He is the Varsity Football Coach and Di- rector of Athletics. DNALD F. BROWN " BROWNIE” On stage, on the gridiron, in the classroom: )n always did his best to aid our class. He s elected to the office of President in his lior year. During his final year, he had the nor of being Co-Captain of the Football am, climaxing his three years of Varsity npetition. Don was also a member of the rsity baseball lineup for three years. His me appeared on the masthead of the Netop d Yearbook, signifying his work under the ading Sports Staff. He was a Junior Prize eaker, presenting The Soul of the Great ll, by Lafcadio Hearn; he. portrayed the De- lse Attorney, Greenwald, in our Columbus y presentation of Herman Wouk’s The ine Mutiny Court Martial. Don also played ■ part of Thad in the Senior Play and ap- ared in the musical comedy, Swingin’ High. ARCIA JANE BEAUBIEN " BUBBLES” " Bubbles " most aptly describes the vivacious rsonality of this girl, who was chosen Class cretary for three years. Outstanding among r activities was her membership in the Pro erito Society. Her dramatic capabilities ned her the honor of being a participant in nior Prize Speaking in which she presented e selection, School for Scandal, by R. Brins- ' Sheridan. Marcia was also Mistress of Cere- anies for the Columbus Day Program during r Senior year. She played the important role Betty in the Senior Play. In her Junior year, ■ was chosen as the representative to Girls’ ate. Interested in music, " Bubbles” was a ember, and also accompanist, of the Girls’ lee Club for three years. She was in the Or- estra two years, and was selected for District torus as a Senior. I JUDITH ANN HUMPHREY " JUDY” It is difficult to summarize the vitality and leadership that is so much a part of " Judy”. Proving her scholastic ability, she attained a Pro Merito rating and was Co-Editor of the Yearbook and Netop Staffs in her Senior year. As Class Historian for three years, " Judy” pro- vided leadership needed to make our activities successful. Displaying her musical abilities, " Judy” was a member of the band for four years, and the Swingsters for two years. In her Junior year she was chosen Co-Student Di- rector of the band, and in her Senior year was Student Director. Her musical ability was fur- ther displayed when she was selected to Re- gional and All-State Band for three years. Athletically she played J.V. Basketball for one year and Varsity for one, also. She was a mem- ber of the Art, History, Community Service, and French Clubs, and was Co-Chairman of the Senior Play Make-up Committee. " Judy” is to be commended for the inspiration she has given to us all, and for a job well done. MARTHA ELIZABETH LUEY " MARTY” A list of " Marty’s” achievements in high school might begin with : ( 1 ) she was a Pro Merito, (2) she was our Class Treasurer for three years, (3) she was Vice-President of the French Club in Junior year. It could continue with facts such as " Marty” was a J.V. and Var- sity Basketball player for three years and Cap- tain of the twirlers in her Senior year. Martha sang in the Girls ' Glee Club for three years and became Secretary of this club when she was a Senior. She got a little bit of farm life, when she played the part of Anne in the Sen- ior Play. To the list you would still be adding: Art Club, History Club, Tumbling Team . . . JOHN JOSEPH ZYWNA " ZYV” Zyv was Vice-President of our class for three years. He was a standout in athletics and climaxed three years of Varsity Football as Co- Captain in his Senior year. He also participated in baseball and basketball for four years. The result of his outstanding sports abilities was his acceptance of the Canon Novak Award in his Senior year. In our Junior Prize Speaking contest, John won first prize with his presenta- tion of Leopold Lewis’, The Burgomaster. Be- cause of his writing ability and leadership, John was chosen Sports Editor of the Yearbook and Netop Staffs. He was Vice-President and three year member of the Boys’ Glee Club, and a two year member of the History Club. During his Junior year, he was elected as Turners’ representative to Boys’ State. John continued his acting ability by portraying Lieutenant Ste- phen Maryk in Herman Wouk’s, The Caine Mutiny Court Martial, during his Senior year. Because of his all-around abilities, " Zyv” re- ceived the Harvard Prize Book Award at the 1961 Graduation. He also served on the Prop- erties Committee for the Senior Play. BERTHA ALIDA ADAMS " BERTHA ' During her four years at T.F.H.S., Bertha maintained a Pro Merito rating. As a Junior and Senior, she proved her mathematical ability by working as a Bank Day Cashier, and during the former year, she was one of the Head Bank Day Cashiers. Bertha was a member of the Community Service Club as a Sopho- more and Junior, ushered for Graduation and Class Day, and served on the Senior Play Costume Committee. As a Senior, Bertha was one of eight who received the honor of achieving 100% on the Noma Spelling Test. CYNTHIA EDITH ANNEAR " CINDY " Where ' s " Cindy”? There she goes, strolling down the corridors with official messages, carrying out her duties as an efficient office girl. Displaying her musi- cal interests, she was a member of the band for three years and was in the Girls ' Glee Club during her Junior and Senior years. " Cindy” was also a participant in the Art Club for four years, was in the History Club during her Junior and Senior years, and belonged to the Senior Play Ticket Committee. JUDITH MARY ALLEN ' JUDIE " " Judie” began her high school activities by joining the Art and Community Service Clubs in her Freshman year. As a Sophomore, she became a member of the Girls ' Glee Club. " Judie” continued her activities by joining the History Club, and serving on the Junior Prom Decorating Committee and the Senior Play Properties Committee. SYLVIA ANN AUBREY " TAFFY” " Taffy” was an efficient classmate, as the Home Economics Club can readily testify. She belonged to this organization for two years and proved her value at the banquets which this club prepared. On Saturday afternoons, one could find " Taffy " at Sheff Field, working at the food counter. The members of the club rewarded her for her efforts by electing her as secretary in her Senior year. She was also Mrs. Martin ' s secretary during her Senior year. 18 NOREEN ANN BAIRD " BAIRD " " Baird” could be seen among the blue and white of our Twirling Squad for three years. In her Junior year, she served as Co-chairman of the Junior Prize Speaking Ticket Committee and on the Program Committee for the Junior Prom. Her business manner was demonstrated when she ably held the position of Bank Day Cashier for two years. Chosen as usher for the Sophomore Social and Junior Prize Speaking, she admirably fulfilled her tasks. Noreen ably portrayed the part of the flirtatious Corrine in The Egg and I, and was also one of the cast of Swingin’ High. " Baird”, in addition, participated in three clubs: Art, Com- munity Service, and Girls ' Glee Clubs. CAROL ANN BAKER " BAKE " There ' s " Bake”, marching snappily among the blue and white uniformed twirlers, in which she participated for two years. Other activities that were included in her interests were the Girls’ Glee Club for two years, the History Club for two years, the Art Club for three years, and the Community Service Club for one year. In The Egg and I, " Bake” portrayed Thermometer Tessie. Contributing her services to the class, Carol served on the Junior Prize Speaking Ticket Committee and ushered at the Sophomore Social, Junior Prom, and Junior Prize Speaking. : 1 m PHYLLIS JO-ANN BAKULA " PHYLLIS” Phyllis maintained a Pro Merito rating for four years and also participated in many activities. Dramatically, Phyllis was an alternate Junior Prize Speaker and the Mistress of Ceremonies for our first one act play, A Present for Mr. Lin- coln. During her Freshman year, she was chosen as a Freshman Cheerleader and, due to her outstanding ability, was elected Captain of the J. V. squad in her Sophomore year. Phyllis was also an active participant in the History, Art, and Community Service Clubs. In her Junior year, she served on the Junior Prom Decorating Committee and ushered for Junior Prize Speaking and Class Day. Phyllis portrayed Miss Linden in the Senior Play. MICHAEL PAUL BARNES " MIKE” As a Freshman, " Mike” played third base for the Baseball Team, and as a Junior, he was a center on the Varsity Football Team. Due to an outside job, Mike was unable to continue his extra-curricular activities in his Senior year. However, he was on the Ticket Committee for the Senior Play. 19 JOHN GUY BERGERON " JOHN ' ’ " John " was an adept worker in the shop department winning much recog- nition and several awards because of his excellence in this field. He appeared on television as representative of our school to demonstrate a desk he had con- structed. John generously donated the portable laboratory he built, to the Gram- mar School. At our Junior Prom, he served as a ticket collector. Although a part time job prevented him from taking part in other activities, he won much praise for the school. RAYMOND LEONARD BERRY " RAY” " Ray” was a member of the Pro Merito Society throughout his high school years, and in his Senior year was chosen President of this organization. Also in his last year, he was chosen Business Manager of the Netop and Yearbook Staff s. His administrative ability was further shown when he was elected class President for two years. During his four years here, he played an active role in sports, holding the position of quarterback and halfback on the Football Team, and was an active participant in baseball and basketball. Due to his athletic ability, he became a member of the " T” Club in his latter three years. His musical and dramatic abilities won him parts in Swingin ' High in his Junior year, the Caine Mutiny Court Martial in his Senior year, and the Boys ' Glee Club for two years. In addition, he was a member of the French and History Clubs in his Junior and Senior years, and was on the Senior Play Ticket Committee. DEXTER TIMOTHY BLISS " DEX” Ever see a father at his daughter’s wedding reception on the auditorium stage? Well, this was seen the night " Dex” presented Edward Streeter ' s Father at the Reception, in the Junior Prize Speaking Contest of 1961, receiving third prize. He was a member of the Boys ' Glee Club for three years. Combining this musical-dramatic training, " Dex " played Senator Whiffwaff in the musical comedy, Swingin’ High. During his Senior year, he was the Attorney in the one act play, Caine Mutiny Court Martial, by Herman Wouk. Dexter was also a member of the History and Debate Clubs. HENRY FRANK BONZEK " YOGI” " Yogi” was a guard on the Freshman Football Team and exhibited his skill on the diamond as a second-baseman. As a Sophomore, he continued his base- ball interest by playing the same position on the Junior Varsity Team. " Yogi,” who relinquished his time to outside responsibilities during his Junior and Senior years, discontinued his extra-curricular activities, but was able to serve on the Senior Play Properties Committee. 20 pression for her vitality in cJ for three years. She also found the Camera Club her Senior year. In UUUi the Costume Committee for Senior Play. ' •I NANCY ANNE BRAY " NANC” Two gold plumes stood out among our Twirling Squad. One of these was worn by Nancy Bray, awarded to her in recognition of her position as Lieuten- ant Commander. The Netop gives no plumes, but Nancy was an appreciated member. She was a Freshman Cheerleader and a tumbler for four years. In her Senior and Junior years, she belonged to the History Club and was an able manager of the Girls’ Basketball Team. " Nanc” was in the Art Club for four years, and she also ushered for the Junior Prom. In addition, " Nanc” portrayed Elsie in Call Me Mac, the one act play that was presented for Veterans ' Day, and played the part of Paula in the Senior Play. MICHAEL ROBERT BRAZEAU " MIKE” Every Monday and Wednesday morning, " Mike” was in the cafeteria, sing- ing along with his fellow Glee Club Members. He was manager of the Basket- ball Team during his Freshman and Sophomore years. As a Sophomore, he was chosen to the Nominating Committee for the Class Officers. Mickey was a member of the Art and Debate Clubs for two years, and the History Club for one. Bongard, a French peasant in the one act play, Call Me Mac, and Ross, in the Senior Play, were both portrayed by " Mike”. CHARLEEN NAN COCKING " CHARL” " Chari’s” accomplishments included her membership in the Pro Merito Society. Her Junior and Senior years, she gave up her free time and study halls to serve as an office girl. As a member of the Art Club for three years, the Com- munity Service Club for four, and Le Cercle Francais for two, her after school hours were busy. " Chari " was creative and decorative for the Sophomore Social, Junior Prom and Freshmen Welcome. In addition, she ushered at the Junior Prom. Charleen portrayed Lolly, one of the hiking girls, in the Senior Play, and Julie Burgess in our Christmas Play, Christmas at Home. MARY LOUISE COLLETTE " MARY LOU " With her culinary talents and her ability to sew, " Mary Lou was a wel- come addition to the Home Economics Club. She also was a member of the Senior Play Costume Committee. However, because of outside interests and re- sponsibilities, she was unable to participate in other extra-curricular activites. I ales: these were the duties y extra-curricular activities. His osition on the Tennis Team in his KATHLEEN RUBY ELIZABETH CORBIN " KATHY” " Kathy " , an exuberant classmate, could usually be found in the library, where she worked as a competent librarian. She also devoted much of her time to the Community Service Club, in which she participated for four years. She be- longed to the Home Economics Club during her Freshman year. The Camera Club was another activity which welcomed her membership. " Kathy” will be remembered as a class worker, always willing to give of her talents. JUDITH ANN CROSSMAN " JUDY” " Judy ' s” cheerleading activities commenced when she was chosen a mem- ber of the Freshman squad. She was then selected as a Junior Varsity cheer- leader in her Sophomore year and was promoted to Captain of the " J.V.’s” as a Junior. Her cheering activities were climaxed when she was chosen a Varsity Cheerleader in her Senior year. In this same year, she served on the Netop and Yearbook Staffs and worked as an office girl, Bank Day Cashier, and secretary to Miss McGillicuddy and Miss Clark. A person with many interests, she be- longed to the Art Club for three years and the Home Economics Club in her Freshman year. " Judy” was chosen Chairman of the Freshman Welcome Deco- rating Committee and served as an usher for Graduation, Class Day, and the Junior Prom. She was also Co-chairman of the Senior Play Properties Committee. MARGUERITE MARIE DIAGNAULT " RI” As a Senior, " Ri” was a member of Le Cercle Francais. Her " I second the motion . . .” could be heard above the murmur of voices at the History Club meetings during this same year. " Ri” realized her athletic aspirations when she played forward on the Girls’ Basketball Team as a Junior. Marguerite served as a member of the Junior Prize Speaking Ticket Committee, the Senior Play Ticket Committee, and as an usher for Graduation. She also belonged to the Com- munity Service Club for four years, and helped Miss McGillicuddy as a Library Aid. J MICHAEL EDWARD DALE " MIKE " Although Mike was an active supporter of Class functions, he was unable to participate in any activities, due to outside responsibilities. But his original wit contributed a touch of spice to the Class of 62. 23 VIRGINIA ANN DAUPHINAIS " GINGER” Throughout her four years of high school, " Ginger” participated in several activities. In her Junior and Senior years, she belonged to the History Club. She was a member of the Art Club for four years, and while a Senior, " Ginger” joined both the basketball and tumbling teams. She served as Mr. Bassett’s secretary, and ushered for the Freshman Welcome. " Ginger” also contributed to the Senior Play by serving on the Make-Up Committee. MERRIL HOWARD DAVIS " TWINKLES” Crack — the bat makes contact with the ball, and Merrill makes another hit for the Basketball Team, of which he was a member for two years. As a member of the Art Staffs of the Netop and Yearbook, he contributed his artistic talents. Merrill served on the Junior Prom Program Committee and was an usher for the Junior Prom. ROBERTA MARIE DRINZEK " BIRD” The Netop and Yearbook Staffs welcomed " Bird” as a hard working mem- ber of their groups. As a Freshman, she joined the Home Economics Club. Dur- ing her Junior year, Roberta’s voice could be heard echoing along with the other members of the Echo Choir. She was a Bank Day Cashier as a Junior and Senior and used her skill in the art field on several decorating committees. " Bird " was Mrs. Reidy ' s secretary during her Senior year. ALLEN GEORGE DUBE ”AL " Allen displayed his musical talents in several ways; ONE — he played the tuba in the band for two years; TWO — he sang tenor in the Boys’ Glee Club during his Junior and Senior years, and THREE — as a Junior, he participated in the musical. Swingin’ High. Music was not his only interest, however, for he also played football in his Senior year, and was chosen for the role of Fishface in our Senior Play. " Al” lent a helping hand in the cafeteria by washing dishes during his Senior year, which was well appreciated. 24 PATRICIA ANN DUDA " PAT” " Pat " took an active part in the History Club her Junior and Senior years, and was a member of the Senior Play Costume Committee. Her friendly attitude and co-operative nature made her a fine member of our class. f FRANCES IRANA DUNCAN " FRANNIE” " Frannie” was a zealous person throughout her four years at T.F.H.S. Cheering was one of her major interests. She was a Freshman cheerleader, a member of the J.V. squad in her Sophomore year and in her Junior year was promoted to the rank of Varsity Cheerleader. Scholastically, she maintained a Pro Merito rating. Correcting errors was her job as Rewrite Editor on the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. As a Junior, she served as an Assistant Head Bank Day Cashier, and in her Senior year, was promoted to the position of Head Bank Day Cashier. " Frannie” contributed further to the school by ushering for Class Day, the Junior Prom, Graduation, and Junior Prize Speaking. She was also on the Junior Prize Speaking Ticket Committee and the Senior Play Properties Com- mittee. HENRY WALTER DYMERSKI " MOOSE " " Moose” contributed a great deal to the class of " 62” in regard to the music department. Adept at playing the trumpet, he participated in the band for four years. During his Junior and Senior years, he was a member of the Swing- sters. As a Junior, Henry was elected Stage Manager of the band and also played in the Brass Choir. Surely " Moose” will be remembered for the music and spirit he added to our class. ROSE MARIE THERESA EMERY " ROWIE " " Rowie’s " talent was coupled with enthusiasm. She was in the Girls’ Glee Club for three years and in the French Club for one year. As a Home Ec student, “Rowie” served refreshments at the concession stand during the football season. She assisted at the Football Banquets and at the Senior Farewell in her Freshman year. 25 CAROL ANN GAINES " CAROL” Carol displayed her varied musical talents by engaging in several organiza- tions. She was active in the band for three years, and also belonged to the Girls’ Glee Club for two years. Forensically speaking, she participated in the History Club in her Junior and Senior years. Because of a part time job, Carol’s activities as a Senior were limited. However, she was on the Senior Play Properties Com- mittee. ALICE MAE GELINAS " ALICE” With a flute under her arm, " Alice” hurried to band rehearsal every Mon- day and Wednesday during her Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years. A girl of varied interests, she also belonged to the Art, Camera, and Glee Clubs; in addition, she was elected Secretary of the French Club in her Senior year. Alice lent her services to Graduation, Class Day, and the Junior Prom by serving as an usher at these activities. During her Senior year she held the position of secretary to Miss O ' Brien. SUSAN ABIGAIL FEYRER " SUE” " Sue” immediately started her high school activities by joining the Com- munity Service Club and the Home Economics Club in her Freshman year. Dur- ing her Sophomore year, she served on the Class Officers Nominating Commit- tee. Junior and Senior years found Susan as a Bank Day Cashier and an usher for Graduation and Class Day. As a Junior, she was honored by the Noma Spelling Achievement Award. An above average commercial student, Susan also served as Secretary to Miss Clark. NANCY LUCILLE FUCHS " NAN” A Pro Merito rating! That’s quite an achievement for a Senior. " Nan " held this rating even though she was absent from school in her Sophomore year. She was also an ardent chess player; therefore she was a member of the Chess Club. Nancy, during her Junior year, served on the Program Committee for the Junior Prom and was chosen to be an usher for the 1961 Graduation Exercises. In addition, " Nan " held membership in the History and Camera Clubs in her Senior year, and as a member of the Properties Committee, helped to make the Senior Play a success. ROBERT ANTHONY GOLONKA ■ ' GUNK” As a tribute to his outstanding achievement in the National Merit Scholar- ship Test, " Gunk” received a letter of recommendation. Throughout his four years in high school, he maintained a Pro Merito rating. During the winter months, " Gunk " was an enthusiastic Manager of the Freshman, Junior Varsity, and Varsity Basketball Teams. He was a member of the Art Club during his Sophomore year, and during his Junior year, served on the Prom Decorating Committee. GLORY-LEE GOODWIN " GLORY” " Spirit plus” — plus a great deal of interest in activities. Hard work and personality made " Glory” one of our most valuable classmates. Her various in- terests in school included the Girls ' Glee Club and the History Club during her Junior and Senior years. Also, " Glory " played the oboe in our Concert band. She ushered at the Junior Prom and participated in several Home Economic activities. Busily taking dictations from Mr. Bordeau and typing his letters and other material, Nadine was an efficient secretary. During her Freshman year, " Dede” was a member of the Home Economics Club, and served on several refreshment committees. " Dede” was also a member of the Art Club, History Club, and Senior Play Costume Committee. NADINE NATALIE GRANT " DEDE” JAMES ARTHUR GREENLEAF " SCOOP” " Scoop”, who represented T.F.H.S. at the Student Traffic Safety Council at the University of Mass, in his Junior year, was elected Chairman of the Teen- Age Driving Education Conference held at the University of Mass, on November 4 of his Senior year. This was the first time a student from our school has been elected to this post in the state-wide gathering. " Scoop " participated in football his Freshmen and Senior years. He was also a member of the Art Club his Sophomore year, and served on the Senior Play Costume Committee. 27 " GOOG” STEPHEN JOHN GULO JR. " List all the activities in which you have participated,” said the paper. So Steve thought. 1 was a Pro Merito for four years! Managing — hummmm. I guess it could be called my main activity — manager for the J. V. Basketball team in my Sophomore year — Varsity Basketball Team in my Junior year and the Junior Prize Speaking business manager. Clubs? Well, I was a member of the Glee Club and the Art Club for three years, and the History for two. Anything else? An actor i n the Christmas Play and a member of the Prom Decorating Com- mittee in my Junior year — that’s all! MARCIA LOIS HALL " MARCY” ’’Marcy” became a member of our distinguished color guard in her Senior year and, with this group, she attended all the football games and parades as a representative of the school. She joined the Art Club during the same year and participated in the Tumbling Team in her Junior and Senior years. " Marcy” proved to be an efficient and capable secretary to Mrs. Barclay. Janet, the twelve year old sister in Christmas at Home, was ably portrayed by Marcia. She was on the Properties Committee of the Senior Play. DIANE JUNE HASKINS " PURSIE” Shooting for the basket — passing the ball to a fellow player — " Pursie” was good at both, enabling her to be a member of the team her Senior year. Besides basketball, Diane svas a tumbler her Junior and Senior years, and was a member of the Art Club. SHARON LESLIE HILLIARD " SHARON” Jinny June Goes to the Wedding by J. L. Harbour; this piece will long be remembered because of Sharon ' s fine interpretation at Junior Prize Speaking. For her excellence, she was awarded second prize. Sharon proved her scholastic ability as a member of the Pro Merito Society. For three years, her voice could be heard in harmony with the Girls ' Glee Club. The French, History, Community Service, and Art Clubs also had Sharon’s name on their rosters. As a member of the Netop and Yearbook Staff, she displayed her energy and willingness to work. Sharon also ushered at the Sophomore Social and Junior Prom and was a mem- ber of the ring committee. Sharon was Mistress of Ceremonies for our Veterans’ Day play, Call Me Mac, and played the humorous part of the Lingery Lady in The Egg and l. LINDA MARIE HOULE MARGARET ANN JAKOTOWICZ MARGARET Margaret, during her Junior and Senior years, was an efficient Bank Day Cashier. She was in the Girls’ Glee Club for three years, and won a part in the musical, Swingin’ High, at the end of her Junior year. As a Senior, Margaret held the position of secretary to Mr. Plaisted and took part in the Senior Play by selling tickets. " LYNN " CARL THOMAS HOYNOSKI " TOMMY” T.F.H.S. had its own Satchmo. Carl was the cornetist in the band for four years and played in the Swingsters in his Sophomore, Junior and Senior years. " Tommy” was appointed Co-Student Director of the band in his Junior year and Assistant Student Director in his Senior year. Six tryouts placed Carl in District and All-State Band for three years. Carl was a member of the Pro Merito Society. In his Freshman year, " Tommy” played football, basketball, and baseball. He carried out the duties of Treasurer of the French Club in his Junior and Senior years. " Carl " played the part of Grady in the Senior Play. " Lynn” was quite active in a variety of activities during her high school years. As a member of the band for three years, she was chosen Secretary in her Senior year. She sang in the Glee Club for three years as a second soprano. Dur- ing her high school years her athletic interests centered on basketball and tum- bling. As a commercial student, she was chosen Bank Day Cashier and was awarded several certificates of Noma Spelling Achievements. During her Senior year, she was on the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. She was also a member of the Chess Club and Art Club for four years, and was on the Costume Committee for the Senior Play. JOYCE MARIE HURD " JOCEY” Passing by the Art Room on school days, you would be likely to see a dark head bending over the drawing board. This was " Jocey " applying her artistic talents. Because of outside responsibilities, " Jocey” did not participate in any other class activities. MARSHA JANE JALICKI " MARSH” Marsha, maintaining a Pro Merito rating, contributed much to the activi- ties in which she participated. She was one of the members of our Netop and Yearbook Staffs. As a skilled player of chess, she held membership in the Chess Club her Junior year. In her Senior year, she was a member of the History Club. " Marsh” ushered for many school occasions: Junior Prize Speaking, Class Day, and Graduation. During her Senior year, she portrayed Mrs. Burgess in the Christmas Play, and was one of the ticket sellers for the Senior Play . MICHAEL MARTIN JANOS " MIKE” " Mike’s versatility was proven by numerous interests and activities through- out his four years of high school. He maintained a Pro Merito rating, and was the Co-Editor of the News Staff on the Netop and Yearbook. " Mike” was a member of the Basketball, Tennis, and Track Teams in his Freshman and Sophomore years, and the French and History Clubs during his Junior and Senior years. He played Captain Blakeley in our Columbus Day presentation, The Caine Mutiny Court Martial by Herman Wouk, and was chosen an alternate for Junior Prize Speaking. This acting ability led him to the part of Don in our Senior Play, The Egg and l. JACQUELYN FAYE JENKIN " JACKIE” Into almost every activity you ' d look, " Jackie” was there, for her interests were many. First of all she was on the Feature Staffs of the Netop and Year- book. Secondly, she was a band member for four years, and in her Sophomore and Senior years she was chosen for Regional Band. Thirdly, she played J. V. Basketball and Varsity Basketball for one year each. Fourthly, she belonged to the Art, History, Camera, and Community Service Clubs, and w ; as an usher for the Junior Prom. " Jackie” was a part of the Senior Play by serving on the Make-up Committee. CONSTANCE KABANIEC " CONNIE” " Connie ' s " portrayal of the attractive Miss Cook in the musical comedy Suingin ' High showed both musical and dramatic ability. This same ability was displayed when she became an alternate Prize Speaker and a member of the Girls ' Glee Club for three years. During her Senior year she worked diligently on the Netop and Yearbook Staffs as Co-Editor of the News Staff. As a Bank Day Cashier in her Junior and Senior years she applied her commercial at- tributes. She was an active member of the Art Club for two years, Community Service for four years, and the History Club for one year. A continuation of her dramatic ability w ' as her portrayal of Tonie in our Senior Play. 30 SHIRLEY JEAN KLEPADLO " SHIRL " Shirley was a four year cheerleader. She was on the Freshman Squad, the J.V. Squad for one year, and in her Junior year, was chosen to appear on the stage every Friday during the football season as a Varsity Cheerleader. She main- tained a Pro Merito rating. An able typist, she was on the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. When she was a Freshman, " Shirl” was in the Home Economics Club, and as a Junior, she was on the Junior Prize Speaking Ticket Committee. Shirley served no the Senior Play Make Up Committee. Being secretary to Mr. Donovan was also one of her many activities. PAUL JOSEPH KOBERA " KABOOB” The T.F.H.S. sports program was benefited by " Kaboob’s” participation in it. He played football in his Freshman and Senior years, and third base on the Freshman, J.V., and Varsity Baseball Teams as a Sophomore and Junior. " Ka- boob " was a member of the " T” Club and Art Club for two years. In his Sopho- more year he was on the Sophomore Social Decorating Committee. STEPHEN CHARLES KOCSIS " STEVE " " Steve” had a sport for every season. The line up went as follows: Fall: Steve was a member and Manager of the Football Team; Winter: he was found out on the basketball court for two years: Spring came, and baseball was Steve’s pastime for three years. " Hi-Baby " , a hungry individual, was well portrayed by Steve in our Senior Play. He also was a member of the Art Club and served on the Decorating Committees for the Prom and the Freshman Welcome. JAMES BERNARD KOLDIS " JIMMY” " Jimmy” leaves behind him a long list of achievements in both scholastic and athletic endeavors. He held the positions of forward in Varsity basketball for two years, the latter spent as captain, pitcher for the Baseball Team for four years, and end on the Varsity Football Team. These accomplishments qualified him for membership in the " T” Club. " Jimmy " also sang in the baritone section of the Boys’ Glee Club. BRIAN EDWARD KOVALSICK " KILLER” " Killer”, a very active member of our class, contributed his talents to sports, various clubs, and dances. " Killer” was a halfback on the Varsity Foot- ball Team for three years, and was also a consistent scorer on the Track Team — in the pole vault and the 220. Brian was unable to continue playing football his Senior year because of an injury received at the Turners-Amherst Game. His athletic ability was not wasted though, as he helped to coach the Freshman team. For three years, he was a member of the " T” Club. " Killer’s” artistic ability was easily recognized by his contributions to the Junior Prom Decorating Committee. As a member of the Senior Play cast, he convincingly portrayed the part of " J. J.” Also in his Senior year he gained membership in the Boys’ Glee Club. ROBERT JOHN KOZIK " ROMPER” What’s a " Romper”? It ' s a Pro Merito and a Managing Editor of the Netop and Yearbook Staff. There could be many of these? Well then, it’s a singer in the Boys ' Glee Club, and a little boy in the play, A Present for Mr. Lincoln. Still an open field? It’s a member of the Basketball and Tennis Teams for four years, a head ticket seller and decorator for the Junior Prom, and a member of the Senior Play Ticket Committee. That ' s what a Romper is. And there’s only one. MARY JANE KURTYKA " JANIE " " Janie " was a member of the Home Ec Club her Freshman year. Later, since she was attending Hairdressing school at night, she was unable to take part in other extra-curricular activities. PHILIP JULIUS KOSTECKI " PHIL” " Phil’s’’ athletic prowess was demonstrated by his four years on the J.V. and Varsity Baseball Teams. His dexterity with facts and figures proved him an excellent Bank Day Cashier. In his Junior year, " Phil” collected tickets at the Junior Prom. Although he had many outside duties, Philip was still able to attend school functions. His spirit was a tribute to his class. RO BERTA MAY KUZMESKUS " BERTA” " Berta " was an active member of Le Cercle Francais for two years. Possess- ing both interest and ability ' in art, Roberta furthered them by being a four- year member of the Art Club. In her Junior year she was a forward on the Girls ' Basketball Team. She belonged to the History Club for three years and also served on the Decorating Committee for the Sophomore Special and Junior Prom. " Berta " participated in our Senior Play as one of the ticket sellers. ERNEST PAUL LAFLEUR " ERNIE” " Ernie " found little time to participate in any extra-curricular activities, but his support of the school and class was appreciated by all. Skillful in the arts of manual training, " Ernie” was called upon to construct scenery and staging for many of our plays. ALEXANDER FRANCIS LAHOSKI " AL " 1958-1959- You are passing a room in T. F. H. S. and you hear the word check called out. Is this a bank? No — it ' s meeting of the Chess Club, and " AI ' s” face, set in concentration, can be seen. He was an extremely active member of this club during his Freshman and Sophomore years, but other responsibilities prevented his further participation in more events. JAMES CARROLL LAWLOR ”JIM " Jim was a sporting enthusiast and had a specialty for every season. In the fall of his first two years, he was a member of both the Chess and Debating Clubs. When the first snows of winter fell, " Jim” was there with his skiis beside him. As the ground thawed, he reported for track practice, and later, during his Junior year, he spent much time and energy on the tennis courts. These were not his only interests, however, for he was also an Art Club mem- ber for two years, and was Co-chairman of the Decorating Committee for the Junior Prom. Jim ushered for the Sophomore Social and served on various nominating committees during his Junior and Senior years. In the Christmas play, Jim portrayed Johnny, the son who returns home at the last minute for Christmas. He was also on the Properties Committee of the Senior Play. 33 ROBERT GEORGE LENOIS " BOBBIE” ' Bobbie” proved that music and athletics can mix and even compliment each other. He was a member of the Tennis Team for four years and belonged to the " T” Club during his Senior year. As a member of the band for four years and the Swingsters for three, " Bobbie” was a very active musician. He took part in the Chess Club for four years, ushered at the Junior Prom, and was on the Senior Play Properties Committee. KATHLEEN ANN LEIGH " KATHIE” " Kathie " served for four years in the Art and Community Service Clubs. As a result of her keen interest in science, she participated in the Science Fair at the University of Massachusetts her Junior year. At this fair she had on display an experiment demonstrating the importance of a good diet. " Kathie” was a member of the Hlpme Economics Club, and during her Junior year, she helped with the decorations for the Junior Prom. BRUCE THOMAS LETOURNEAU " BRUCE” Bruce entered T.F.H.S. with high enthusiasm for achieving his self set goals. Did he make it? Well, his classmates think so. As a Freshman he was active in basketball, the Chess Club, and the Debate Club. During his Sopho- more year he ushered at the Sophomore Social and aided Miss Reum at football games. He also served on the Ring Committee and was a ticket seller at Junior Prize Speaking. Membership in the French Club, Camera Club, and dance committees finished out his Senior year. MERRILYN JEAN Le VITRE Music, helpfulness, and energy: these words adequately describe Merrilyn. In the band she played the French horn for four years. Further evidence of her talent was shown when she was selected for Regional Band for three years. During her Sophomore and Junior years, " Lynn” sang second soprano in the Girls ' Glee Club. She was also a member of the Netop and Yearbook Rewrite Staffs. Merrilyn ' s other activities included the Art Club, her position as head usher for the Junior Prom, Treasurer of the Camera Club and Secretary of the History Club. She was chosen assistant coach for the Senior Play. " LYNN” SARAH ANN LIZOTTE " SADIE " " Sadie " participated in many activities during her Senior year. She was elected Secretary of the Pro Merito Society; assumed the humorous role of Deli- cate Daisy in Betty MacDonald ' s The Egg and l; and also contributed many arti- cles of local concern as a member of the News Staff on the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. As a Junior Prize Speaker she gave her interpretation of The Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen. Sarah belonged, as a Sophomore, Junior, and Senior, to the Girls ' Glee Club and the Community Service Club. In her first three years of high school she was a forward on the Girls ' Basketball Team. Two of these were on J.V. and one on Varsity. In her Junior and Senior years she was a member of both the History and French Clubs. Sarah played the maid in the Christmas Play in her Junior year and staunchly defended capital punishment in the History Club Debate during this same year. " Sadie " was also on the Junior Prom Decoration Committee. LOUISE WINIFRED LOCKHART " LOU” Louise, a lively and likeable member of our class, was a member of the Tumbling Team for four years and a twirler for two years. As a Senior, " Lou” held the position of forward on the Girls’ Basketball Team. She was also a member of the Art and the History Club. Always willing to donate her services, she was Co-chairman of the Junior Prom Decorating Committee and served on several other decorating committees. For the Senior Play, Louise was one of our helpful ticket sellers. DENNIS T. LOVELAND " DEN” Dennis was an able baseball player during his Freshman and Sophomore years. He was a member of the Art Club his Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years. A part time job kept " Den” from joining any other extra curricular activities, with the exception of the Senior Play Ticket Committee. PATRICIA ANN MAKA REWICZ " PAT” Line 1, file 3. This was " Pat’s” position on our Twirling Squad for three years. Her artistic talent earned the position of Art Editor of the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. " Pat " extended her talent by serving on the Decorating Com- mittees for the Sophomore Social, the Junior Prom and the Freshmen Welcome. The Art Club and History Club also had her name on their membership lists. In her Junior year she was a member of the Junior Prize Speaking and Swingin’ High Ticket Committees. Also, she served on the Sophomore Ring Committee, and was Co-chairman of the Make-up Committee for the Senior play. JUDITH ANN MARTIN " JUDY” ' Judy ' s " interests varied during her four years at Turners Falls High School. Her scholastic ability resulted in membership in the French Club for two years. Her interest in art resulted in her membership in the Art Club in her Sophomore year. In her Junior year, she was an active participant in the History Club. As an usher for the Junior Prom, Class Day, and Graduation, Judy proved to be a helpful and enthusiastic member of our Class. DAVID GEORGE MARTINEAU " BOOBER” Dave’s ambling gait carried him far as the Co-Editor of the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. Whenever a person with dramatic ability was needed Dave was available. He was an alternate Junior Prize Speaker. In his Junior year, he portrayed an old Negro in our first one-act play, A Present for Mr. Lincoln. Herman Wouk’s character of Lt. Commander Queeg will never be forgotten because of " Boober’s” excellent performance in our Columbus Day presenta- tion, The Caine Mutiny Court Martial. " Boober,” on the Basketball team for four years, also played Freshman Baseball, and was on the Track Team his Sophomore year. During his Senior year, Dave was elected President of the His- tory Club. Dave’s fine baritone voice won him a position in the Boys’ Glee Club and a part in our musical comedy Swingin ' High. Besides being in the cast, " Boober” was chairman of the Properties Committee. In addition, Dave served on the Sophomore Ring Committee, on the decorating committees of the Sophomore Social, the Junior Prom and the Freshman Welcome. JOHN MAYNARD " JOHN” " John " was a quiet yet extremely friendly lad. During Junior and Senior years he was an active member of the Art Club. He also was a participant in the History Club in his Senior year. In his Senior year, " John” was on the Properties Committee for the Senior Play. ROBERT LOUIS MAYRAND " BOBBY” Although " Bobby’s " part time job took up most of his after school hours, he found other ways to serve the school. Thanks to " Bob’s” help in running the movie projector at our assemblies, we were treated to many films. He also con- tributed his services to our class as a member of the Senior Play Properties Com- mittee. ELIZABETH McCARTHY " LIZ” " Liz” participated in many class activities and received the following re- wards : Sophomore Year — She ushered for the Sophomore Social and joined the Art Club. Junior Year — She ushered for the Junior Prom and became a member of the History Club and Glee Club while continuing her membership in the Art Club. Senior Year — " Liz " again joined the History Club and was elected by the members of the Glee Club to the post of Librarian. She was also Co-chairman of the Ticket Committee for the Senior Play. Four Years — She upheld a Pro Merito rating. MICHAEL BERNARD McCARTHY " MIKE” " Mike " was promoted to the Varsity Tennis Squad as a Sophomore, and continued as a Varsity player for his remaining two years. During the spring of both Sophomore and Junior years, he entered the rigid competition of the Western Massachusetts Schoolboy Tennis Tournament, in which he reached the Quarter Finals his Junior year. " Mike” was a Feature Editor on the Year- book and Netop Staffs and a member of the History Club in his Senior year. He took part in the Chess Club for four years and joined the Debate Club and Football Team in his Sophomore year. " Mike” showed his interest in our Junior Prom by serving on the Printing Committee and as an usher. In addition, he portrayed Ralph Weatherly in the Christmas play, and served as Co-chairman on the Senior Play Properties Committee. " Mike” was a hard working class- mate, showing much enthusiasm at all times. CHARLES PETER MERRIOT " PETE” Responsibilities outside of school demanded the attention of " Pete.” Never- theless, he wholeheartedly supported the numerous class activities. ANN STEPHANIE MILESKI " ANN " " Ann” utilized her artistic talents by being a member of the Art Club for three years, and by serving on the Decorating Committees for our Sophomore Social and Junior Prom. A musician, she participated in the band during her Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years. In addition, " Ann” was a member of the History and Community Service Clubs for two years, and portrayed Mil- licent Ames in the Senior Play. 37 CAROL ANN MINER " CAROL” As secretary for Miss Little, you could always find Carol typing out work sheets or tests. In additon, she was a Bank Day Cashier and an office girl her Junior and Senior years, and a member of the Community Service Club. Carol was a participant in the Art Club for four years, and as a Senior, served on the Senior Play Costume Committee. NOREEN MARY MOLONGOSKI " MUGGS” As a Senior, " Muggs” was a member of the Netop and Yearbook Staffs, and attained membership in the Pro Merito Society. She demonstrated her abil- ity in the field of dramatics as a Junior Prize Speaker, with her rendition of Edna St. Vincent Millay’s Renascence. In her Senior year, Noreen portrayed Suzanne in the play Call Me Mac, for the Veteran’s Day Assembly. The climax of her dramatic participation was reached with the portrayal of Joan in the Senior Play, The Egg and I. Noreen, a twirler for three years, was elected Lieu- tenant of the squad in her Senior year. The History Club was one of her ac- tivities during her Junior and Senior years, and she was a three-year member of the Girls’ Glee Club. ' Muggs ' ” talent, artwise, was shown by her active participation in the Art Club and on the Decorating Committee for the Junior Prom. In addition, she served on the Make-up Committee for Swingin’ High. RICHARD LUCIEN MORIN " RICHIE” " Richie " was a member of the Freshman Football Team during his first year of high school, and as a Junior and Senior, he became a veteran in the mile run. He portrayed a German, Captain Koerner, in the one-act play, Call Me Mac, his Senior year. Because " Richie” worked during his four years of high school, he was prevented from participating further in our class activities. We thank him for the time that he contributed to T.F.H.S. ALICE LORENE NORWOOD " ALICE” Alice’s scholastic ability earned her a membership in the Pro Merito So- ciety. Her interests included the French Club, the History Club, and the De- bating Club. Each Thursday found her working diligently on the Rewrite Staff for the Netop and Yearbook. During her Freshman year, she was a member of our Color Guard. PAGE 39 MARY ELIZABETH OLSON " BETSY” Thump, thump, swish! Girls ' Basketball — and with Girls ' Basketball, nat- urally, goes " Betsy " . She was a member of the J.V. and Varsity squads, for which her eagerness and abundant energy were amply displayed. " Betsy” was on the Ticket Committee for our Senior Play. For her enthusiastic spirit, we will always be proud of " Betsy”. 1 GEORGINA THELMA PAULIN " GINEO” " One coke coming up!”, " Gineo” calls out as she works with the Home Ec girls during her Fresbman year at the football games. " Gineo” served again, but this time it wasn’t food — she was helping her community as a member of the Community Service Club during her Freshman and Sophomore years at Turners Falls High School. FRANCIS RICHARD PELLETIER " FRANNY” Francis was unable to participate in any of our extra-curricular activities because of a part time job, which occupied many of his out of school hours. But " Franny " added a great deal of humor wherever he was present throughout his four years at Turners Falls High School. LEE RICHARD PERKINS " PERK” A boy with athletic interests, that was " Perk.” He played baseball and football for four years, two of which were spent on the Varsity Football Team. As a Junior and Senior, Lee’s athletic endeavors resulted in his membership in the " T” Club. He held membership in the Art Club, and was on the Deco- rating Committee for the Sophomore Social. " Perk” also served as usher for the Sophomore Social and the Junior Prom. 39 GENE EDMUND PIASECKI " GENEO” Cyrano De Bergerac found a convincing double when Gene portrayed this character in Junior Prize Speaking. For the Veterans’ Day Assembly of 1961, he played McCrae Davis in Call Me Mac by Theodore St. John Cox. During his four years. Gene enioyed and contributed to the sports program, including football, baseball, and basketball. He qualified for the " T” Club for three years. " Geneo,” who belonged to the Art Club, served on the Decorating Committee for the Junior Prom. He also ushered for that dance and for the Freshman Welcome. He was appointed to the Costume Committee for the Senior Play. " K ' s” ability and leadership won for her the coveted position of Captain of the Varsity Cheering Squad in her Senior Year. Her academic ability was equally outstanding, and she was a member of the Pro Merito Society. The Netop and Yearbook benefited from her work as a staff member. Karen played basketball for three years and was an active participant in the History, French, Commu- nity Service, and Art Clubs. She was chosen as an alternate Prize Speaker in her Junior year. In her Senior year, she was elected President of the French Club. " K” was a member of the Girls’ Glee Club for three years, and won the office of Vice President in her Senior year. In the musical comedy Swingin’ High, Karen portrayed Connie, the female lead. Karen served as a member of the Make-up Committee in our Senior Play. RONALD WALTER PLUTA " RONNIE” Because of work after school, " Ronnie” was unable to become involved in any school activities after his Freshman and Sophomore years. However, he did find time to participate in the Greenfield Chamber of Commerce Safe Driv- ing Road-E-O. In the written exam he placed second, and scored first among the drivers. Those who played Freshman and Sophomore sports will remember the fun that was had with " Ronnie,” capable manager of the Football, Base- ball, and Basketball Teams, trying to cheer them up after those " Bad Break” games. DENNIS PETERS " PETE” With his quiet yet friendly manner, " Pete” could always be depended on to help a fellow classmate. We were unfortunate, however, in that he was unable to join any extra school projects, due to outside responsibilities. KAREN ELIZABETH PLANTE JOSEPH ALFRED RICHOTTE " JOEY” " Joey” was on the Freshman Football Team in his first year of high school, and belonged to the Varsity Team as a Senior. As a Freshman, he played on the Basketball and Track Teams, and during his Junior and Senior years, he participated in Varsity Track. As a Senior, " Joey” played Varsity Basketball. He contributed to the success of our first dance by ushering for the Sophomore So- cial. " Joey” entered the world of the footlights with the role of The Soldier in the Veterans’ Day Play in his Senior year. WILLIAM VINCENT ROBERTSON " VINNY” " Vinny” was a four-year band member and intensified his interest in the musical field as a member of the orchestra in his Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years. He also belonged to the Swingsters as a Junior and Senior. DAVID ROSS " DAVE” A hard-working jack-of-all-trades is a good phrase to describe " Dave”. Unfortunately, he was unable to join extra-curricular activities due to outside work. " JIM JAMES PAUL PUHALA Around a circle, around a track — there went " Jim " as a Sophomore mem- ber of the Track Team. He was a ticket seller for Junior Prize Speaking and belonged to the Art Club as a Sophomore and Senior. During the football seasons, he rendered his services to T.F.H.S. by dili- gently working every Friday afternoon liming the yard lines in preparation for Saturday ' s game. " Jim” was Co-chairman of the Ticket Committee for the Senior Class presentation of The Egg and 1, and also portrayed Dr. Burgess in the Christmas Play. SHARON LEE ST. GERMAIN " SHERRY” " Sherry " was a band member for four years and a trumpet player in the Swingsters for two years, playing for the musical comedy, S-wingin’ High. In her Senior year " Sherry” was appointed librarian of the band. During the day her arrival was welcomed in the classroom, for as an office girl she car- ried many notices of the different activities. " Sherry " won second place in the Massachusetts county public speaking contest. Sharon was on the Refresh- ment Committee of the Junior Prom, a typist and News Staff member of the Netop and Yearbook, and also Mr. Van Beaver ' s secretary. She enacted the part of Mitzie in our Senior Play, The Egg and I. SANDRA SELL " SANDY” " Sandy’s " steady beat could be heard as she marched with the band in her first three years of high school. As a Senior Bank Day Cashier, she dem- onstrated her mathematical inclinations. She was interested in both discus- sion and current events and therefore belonged to the History Club as a Junior. " Parlez-vous francais?” — This was " Sandy’s” password to the French Club in her Senior year. In addition, she was a four-year member of the Art Club and was on tbe Junior Prom Decorating Committee. CAROL ANN SHIRTCLIFF " CAROL” Carol was an energetic member of the Art and Community Service Clubs for three years and also served on the Junior Prom and Freshman Welcome Decorating Committee during her Junior and Senior years. Carol played girls’ basketball and was a member of the Tumbling Team. As a Senior, Carol was secretary for Miss Reum and Mrs. Potter. She was also on the Properties Com- mittee for the Senior Play. JOSEPH JOHN SIMANSKI " GEORGE” Books and athletics molded well in Joe, who held membership in the Pro Merito Society for four years, and the " T” Club for three years. His two years of Varsity football and three years as a J.V. and Varsity basketball player were two of the factors that gained him his " T”. He also supported the Track Squad during his Freshman and Sophomore years. In addition, " George” was a very efficient Co-Business Manager of the Netop and Yearbook Staffs. As a Junior, he was ticket chairman and a member of the cast of Swingin’ High. Joe was also a member of various clubs: Art, French, History, Boys ' Glee Club, and Turnaires. A member of the .History Club, he was elected Vice- President in his Senior year, and in the same year was chosen President of the Boys’ Glee Club, and was on the Senior Play Ticket Committee. EDWARD JAMES SIRUM " ED” " One dollar’s worth — and check the oil, please”; this was the call that " Ed” answered on week day afternoons. He worked with his brother at their gas station and was, therefore, unable to participate in any extra-curricular activities at the school. DONALD HOWARD STOKES " DON” " Don” was a friendly person, as all would testify, except those who hap- pened to play opposite him in football during his Freshman and Sophomore years. Because of the necessity of outside work, he was unable to continue in football or participate in other activities. However, his warmth and sincerity have left a favorable impression upon his classmates. MAUREEN GRACE SULLIVAN " SULLY” " Sully” was one member of our class who showed interest in almost every school department. Her membership in the Pro Merito Society proved " Sully’s” scholastic ability. Her musical interests extended to the level of par- ticipation and she was in the Girls’ Glee Club and was elected Treasurer in her Senior year. " Sully” participated in tumbling in her Sophomore year and was the Assistant Manager of tbe Girls’ Basketball Team. She also contributed much to the French and History Clubs for two years, and in her Senior year she was elected Treasurer of the History Club. In the Christmas Play " Sully” was Emily, and she also belonged to the Senior Play Make-up Committee. JAMES BRADFORD SUTTON " JIMMY” " Jimmy’s” outstanding sense of humor and outgoing personality were welcomed by his classmates. He participated in the Art Club for three years, in the Debate and Chess Clubs during his Sophomore year. " Jimmy " was a member of the Basketball Team during his Freshman year. He was on the Class Officer Nomination Committee, and was an usher at the Junior Prom. DAVID CHARLES TRACESKI " DAVE” " Dave” was always loyal and helpful, and in his Freshman year this loy- alty was especially evident as he played Frosh football and basketball. He was also a Track Manager during his first year of high school. At this time a job interfered with his further participation in school activities. RICHARD CHARLES ANTHONY THAYER DICK " Dick” displayed his talents in many ways. He demonstrated his creative and oratorical ability by participating in the American Legion Essay Contest. After trying out for Junior Prize Speaking, he was rewarded by being named an alternate for this activity. He was also an active member of the Debate and French Clubs. " Dick” was also on the Properties Committee for the Senior Play. LORRAINE ESTELLE TRUDEL " TRUDY” During her Freshman year, Lorraine was a member of the Art Club. She also served as an usher at the Freshman Welcome her Senior year. In her Junior year she won third prize in the American Legion Oratorical Contest. " Trudy’s” reserved, yet helpful manner, was her outstanding characteristic. ALEXANDER VINCENT URGIEL " SANDY” " Sandy” had to drop sports almost completely in his Sophomore year because it was impossible for him to practice after school. However, in his Freshman year his athletic ability was shown in baseball, basketball and foot- ball. " Sandy” was an usher at our Junior Prom. For seven years he was a 4-H member and was chosen to represent the club in Boston. There he be- came Massachusetts State Dairy Showman and received several trophies. " San- dy” was always a welcome member of the class of " 62 . " LOIS ANN VALLEY " LOEY” Lois ' s scholastic efforts were rewarded with a four-year membership in the Pro Merito Society. " Loey, " whose talents and interests were varied dur- ing her four years at T.F.H.S., was a band member for one year. She was a member of the Art, History, and French Clubs, ushered for the Sophomore Social, and served on the Invitation Committee for the Junior Prom. She also contributed her services to the Make-up Committee for the Senior Play. ALAN FREDERIC VARNEY " AL” Alan’s outstanding abilities in chemistry earned him the respect of his classmates. As evidence of his other interests in T.F.H.S., he participated in the Chess Club during his Freshman and Sophomore years. With his quiet manner, " Al” was a person of wit and perseverance. MARGARET ANN VERRIER " PEG " Busy is the word that best describes " Peg” during her four years of high school. She was able to maintain a Pro Merito rating for four years, and showed an interest and talent in music by participating in the band for three years and the orchestra for one. Margaret was chosen to be a member of the Netop and Yearbook Staffs during her Senior year. She worked i n the office for one year, as a Bank Day Cashier her Junior and Senior years, and was secretary to Mr. O Doherty. " Peg” was also a member of the Home Ec and French Clubs, and ushered for the Sophomore Social and the Junior Prom. SUSAN CATHERINE VERRILL " SUE” Band, attention ! ! ! 1-2-3. This was " Sue’s” most frequently used ex- pression as Drum Majorette of the band. Sue " maintained a Pro Merito rating for four years. With her gifted soprano voice, she achieved much recog- nition. For three years " Sue” was a member of the Girls’ Glee Club, and in her Senior year was elected President. In her Junior and Senior years Susan took part in the Massachusetts District Chorus and in her Senior year she won first prize in the Franklin County Fair Talent Competition. The musical comedy, Swingin’ High, also had " Sue” as a member of the cast. However, she didn t limit her activities to music. She was an alternate Junior Prize Speaker and portrayed the mother in our first one-act play, A Present for Mr. Lincoln. For three years she was an active member of the History Club. " Sue " was chosen to represent our school in the Mohawk Trail Queen Contest. She was also a member of the Senior Play Costume Committee. 45 RUSSEL SCOTT VIVIER " SCOTTY” " Scotty” became the unofficial stage manager of the high school by op- erating the movie projector for assemblies and by taking charge of lighting effects for numerous plays, concerts, rallies, and dances. An enthusiastic sports- man, he participated in track and football during his Sophomore year. As a Junior, he served on the Ticket Committee for Prize Speaking, and took part in the musical comedy Swingi n’ High. He made a valuable contribution to the Netop Staff by taking many pictures for our Yearbook. EDWARD STEPHEN WABECK " BABE” Although " Babe” did not take part in extra school activities, and was very quiet while he went from class to class, he was a tremendous outdoor sportsman. Hunting, fishing; yes, those were " Babe’s” activities. Year in and year out he would gather the interest of his classmates with his exciting ad- ventures. His friendly nature and humor made him a valuable member of the class of " 62”. CHARLES JOSEPH WALSH " C. J.” " May 1 help you?” This is the expression you would hear if you hap- pened to be buying a new pair of shoes, for Charles spent his spare-time wqrking in a shoe store. Because of these outside responsibilities, he was un- able to participate in any of our extra-curricular activities. GRACE EDI TH WELCH " GRACIE” Extremely well-versed in music and song, " Grade” participated in the band for four years and was a member of the Girls’ Glee Club her Sopho- more, Junior, and Senior years. During her Sophomore year, Grace was a member of the Art Club. She was also an usher at the Junior Prom, and a member of the Senior Play Properties Committee. 46 V. JUDITH LINDA WILLIAMS " JUDIE " Although " Judie” did not come to Turners until her Junior year, she soon became an active member in many of our organizations. As a member of the band, in her Junior and Senior years, she diligently practiced every Monday and Wednesday afternoon. In her Junior year she worked as an able Bank Day Cashier every Tuesday morning and, as a Senior, became Assistant- Head Bank Day Cashier. As a Senior she was in the History Club. " Judie”, who helped to make our Junior Prom a success by overseeing the serving of refreshments, was also Chairman of the Freshman Welcome Refreshment Committee. In addition, she was on the Senior Play Ticket Committee. DENNIS WONSEY " DENNIS” Dennis was employed in outside work during the afternoon, therefore he was unable to participate in many extra-curricular activities. He did find it possible to become a member of the Boys’ Glee Club, and to usher for the Freshman Reception. BRUCE DAVIDSON YUKL " USE” Rhythm ! ! ! That was " Use’s” middle name. He was a member of the band during his first two years of high school. During these same two years he tap-danced in our annual Variety Shows. Bruce, a tenor in the Boys’ Glee Club, was in the cast of Swingin’ High. He was a member of the Art Club and was an usher for both the Junior Prom and the Sophomore Social. Bruce portrayed the part of Mr. Manic Depressive in our Senior play, The Egg and I. CAROL ANGELA ZMUDA " ZMUDIE” Because of her scholastic ability, Carol was a member of the Pro Merito Society. " Zmudie,” a four-year cheerleader, was on the Freshman, J.V., and Varsity Squads. This latter honor came in her Junior year. She belonged to the Netop and Yearbook Staffs as a Senior. Carol, in her Sophomore, Junior, and Senior years, was a member of both the Girls’ Glee Club and the Art Club. Membership in the Home Economics Club was also included in her Freshman activities. Her efforts as an usher for the Sophomore Social, Junior Prom, and Junior Prize Speaking have been gratefully appreciated by the class. In addition, " Zmudie” served on the Prom Decorating Committee, was secretary to Mr. Connelly, a Senior Play Ticket seller, and a History Club member. 47 CITIZEN MAXIM MY CAESAR THUMBS DOWN Bertha Adams " Not really.” Mr. Fugere Commercials Judith Allen " I ' m indebted to you for life.” J.F.K. People who are conceited Cindy Annear " For crying out loud.” Mr. Galvin Black eyes Sylvia Aubrey " Oh, really?” Barry Rosie Noreen Baird " Don ' t be nasty.” Charles Kevier (C.A.T. ) Mugg’s Mortuary Carol Baker " What I say amounts to nothing.’ Mr. Kenney Fish Phylis Bakula " C ' est la vie, n’est pas?” J.F.K. Boys who need haircuts Michael Barnes " Hi Mandy.” Richard Writing composition Marcia Beaubien " Sade!” Christopher Study Period I John Bergeron " Gee-whiz.” Pat Garrett Someone chewing gum Ray Berry " Oh! No you don’t.” Irene Girls who smoke in public Dexter Bliss " Hi.” Mary French Henry Bonzek " Is that a fact?” Sam Huff Cleveland Browns Beverly Bourbeau " You’re spoffing.” Bullwinkle Presis Susan Bourret " Holy Smoley! " My teddy bear Conceited people Nancy Bray " Godfrey Dinah.” Dr. Kovalsick Stepping on my white sneakers Micael Brazeau " Son a Gun.” Fred Flintstone Homework on the weekends Donald Brown " Cha-cha-boom.” Jimmy Brown Barnsey Warren Charrest " You don’t say?” Popeye Studies Robert Cloutier " Oh no. " Problem solvers Quiet study hall Charleen Cocking " Listen, kid. " Charles Xavier (C.A.T.) Nimrod Mary Lou Collette " Well, anyway.” George Onions Katleen Corbin " Oh Gods!” p School night curfew Judy Crossman " Isn ' t that adorable!” Bobby Pat doing windows M. Daignault " Oh Gee.” Dr. Kildaire Modern hair styles Mike Dale " It ' s a Doozer.” Sam Huff Lonely weekends G. Dauphinais " Oh Brother.” JB. Gossip Merrill Davis " See that.” Dudly-do-Right Gym during exam periods Roberta Drinzek " Are you kidding? " ??? Commercials Allen Dube " Yes, Wilfred.” George S. Teachers Patricia Duda " Good grief.” Mr. O ' Doherty Boys Frances Duncan " How about that?” Phil Bad drivers Henry Dymerski " Stupid.” ??? Girls Rose Marie Emery " Craaazy!” Who knows? 9:30 curfew Susan Freyer " No kidding?” Mr. Fugere Mother’s curfew Nancy Fuchs " Do Svodonya.” Robert Poetry Carol Gaines " Oh no! " Bob Waiting for the 1:15 bus Alice Gelinas " Oh brother. " Frank Sinatra History Robert Golonka " You know it.” Boris Karloff English teachers Glory-Lee Goodwin " My Goodness.” Mr. Kenney Sweet potatoes Nadine Grant " I’ll say. " Mother hen Goats James Greenleaf " They can’t do that to me.” George Red hot Fords Steve Gulo " Beats me. " Sord Cartagan 620 yard holes Marcia Hall " Is that so?” Kenny Mistakes in typing Diane Haskins " C ' est la vie.” Earle School Sharon Hilliard " Oh for crying out loud.” Lady Sneerwell " Grow up child.” Linda Houle " You’re square in a round about way.” Cheryl Jean Disc Jockeys singing with records Carl Hoynoski " It’s a hole in one.” Sam Snead A double bogey Judy Humphrey " Dreamer. " Huntley Brinkley Early mornings Joyce Hurd " Oh, twerp!” Sumner Working M. Jakutowicz " Oh, beans!” Speedy Gonzalez Gym class Marsha Jalicki " Think positive!” Non-conformists Ailurophobians Michael Janos " How ' s business?” Cherries Fo Mo Co Jackie Jenkin " I don’t care. " My teddy bear Pickles Connie Kabaniec " Hi ya kid?” The owner of the Crossroads Waking Baird Shirley Klepadlo " Oh nuts! !” Santa Claus Outdoor rallies Paul Kobera " I don ' t get it. " Abner Haynes Incessant talkers Steve Kocsis " Cool as a moose.” Jayne Mansfield Flash Gordon’s rocket ship James Koldis " Wait til next year. " Spahnie New York Football Giants Philip Kostecki " Get out of here.” Sarge The National League Brian Kovalsick " Hark.” Miss Reum History Robert Kozik " Well, here we go again.” Bullwinkle the moose White shirt and tie Mary J. Kurtyka " Oh no!” Alvin Going home early Saturday nights Roberta Kuzmeskus " Good Grief.” Redheads of Millers Falls Kill joys Earnest Lafleur " That ' s right.” Myself Olds powered Chev 48 CITIZEN MAXIM MY CAESAR THUMBS DOWN Alexander Lahoski " Wow! ' ’ Red Skelton Work James Lawlor " What a claud!” Vic Tanney People with superiority complexes Kathleen Leigh " That’s all right. " Roy Guys wearing Bermuda shorts Robert Lenois " What! " My father’s car Salo Saturday nights Bruce Letourneau " Obviously.” Money Procrastination Merrilyn Levitre " Oh-h-h for Pete’s sake! " D. W. Work Sarah Lizotte " Mash!?! " Hambone (at times) Hambone (the rest of the time) Louise Lockhart " Oh for goodness sake.” Chet Greenfield girls Dennis Loveland " I don’t know.” A. Einstein " Can I have a ride?” Martha Luey " I ' m embarrassed!” Mr. Bassett Frogs P. Makarewicz " I ' ll try.” Aunt " J " Judy washing windows Judith Martin " No, you’re kidding. " My father My sister D. Martineau " Thank gosh it’s Friday.” Jim Taylor G. H. S. John Maynard " Drop dead, please. " Charlie Tests Robert Mayrand " Peel out.” A1 Capone Power glide Chevy six Elizabeth McCarthy That’s life.” Mr. Galvin English III Michael McCarthy " Ace. " Pancho Double fault Charles Merriott " Oh. " My boss Girls who take advantage Ann Mileski " For heaven’s sake!” Roger Maris Writing poetry Carol Miner Oh ya!” Washing boards Noreen Molongoski " Really!” " Don” Baird’s brewery Richard Morin Waddya mean? I wasn’t here.” Mr. Bassett Short weekends Alice Norwood " Raunch.” Skip Filling out questionnaires Mary Olson Holey Moley.” Me My brothers and sisters G. Paulin " How do you like that for apples?” J. C. Gym Francis Pelletier " Count from 1 to 10; then blow your lid.” Pay checks Girls who cost too much Lee Perkins " Honest man, I just don ' t know.” " Lulu” Walking to school Dennis Peters " Huh?” Daddy Warbucks Honor Rolls Gene Piasecki Well, 1 feel like this.” Myself Evil Women Karen Plante Now you speaka my language, " To-odon” Indecision Ronald Pluta " Oh, well.” Carol My car James Puhala Now or never.” Ted true bloon Fat men Joseph Richotte Let’s have a party.” " Lulu " Homework William Robertson That’s nice.” Irv Manning Algebra II David Ross Help! Maynard G. Girls Sandra Sell Life! " Guess Staying in home room Carol Shirtcliff " You know it, kid!” Mr. Oakes Exams Joseph Simanski " Good thinking!” Jose Jiminez General Motors Products Edward Sirum " Ya man!” Mr. K. You guess S. St. Germain " Jeekers Crow!” Mr. Wrightson Typewriters that don’t work Donald Stokes " Anything.” Donald Duck Cold pizza Maureen Sullivan " Nimrod.” Mrs. Mole Charles Xavier (C.A.T. ; James Sutton What’s the matter for you? " Miss Little Honor Rolls Richard Thayer " Brevity is the soul of wit.” Guisseppe Verdi Modern music David Traceski " How about that?” Sam Too much homework Lorraine Trudel " I don’t know.” Rex Harrison Housework Alexander Urgiel " What’s up Doc?” Mom and Dad Making speeches Lois Valley " Gee winikers.” Huckleberry Hound Math Alan Varney " I don’t know.” Albert Eeinstein French II Susan Verrill " Heavens.” Miss Little Unco-operative people Margaret Verrier " Oh my Goodness!” Mr. O’Doherty Quiet Russell Vivier " If at first you don’t succeed, give up!” Yogi Bear Burned out lights Edward Wabeck " Suffering succotash.” Maynard G. Krebs People who talk all the time Charles Walsh " Bolshevick. " Adam Troy English Grace Welch " What’s going on here?” Anyone who gives me an A Lockers that refuse to co-operate Judith Williams " Oh! My goodness!” ? ? ? ? Disc jockeys that sing with records Dennie Wonsey " Well, I could say something, but I won’t.” My license Trying to understand girls Bruce Yukl " I would do it if I did it.” Gene Kelly My truck Carol Zmuda " Wait a minute.” Mr. Connelly Schemes John Zywna " Ba gosh.” Lou Groza Cars that have to run on gas! 49 IVY POEM Straight up the red! The green And ivy grow. Corners and bricks, Students, stars, space, Hail to them! Trains of ivy Circle round the moon, Hopes, ideas, knowledge. Saint Peter’s Gate! There stands The wall and ivy. Judy Humphrey 50 Class Song We say farewell to Turners High Where all our joys have come and gone All of our games and dances too We leave them here for someone new. Hail to our Alma Mater, Turners Where all our hopes and dreams began You’ve guided us throughout the years Faith — trust in you we’ll always have. 51 We go our way and to you we say Goodbye dear Turners High. Words by: Linda Houle M usic by: Sharon St. Germaine THE EMPIRE 7th CENTURY B. C. A city begins to grow. It is weak — wobbly — beginning. The Etruscans capture Rome. They rule wisely — progress — experience. 5 th -3rd CENTURY B. C. The Etruscans leave Rome. The city cele- brates its independence. After the usual period of confusion and floundering, alone it advances. Military — strength Government — stability A. D. 1958- 1959 A Freshmen class enters T.F.H.S. It is weak, the students come from many schools — uncer- tainty — bewilderment — beginners. Reign of the " upperclassmen” Festival — Senior-Freshmen Welcome Teachers give encouragement Miss Little — advice The boys are united through sports. All stu- dents are united through activities. Band, Cheerleaders, Community Service, Art Clubs, Girls’ Basketball Graduation 1959 — A leader — Ray Berry A. D. 1959-1960 The dictatorship of the upperclass and teach- ers is over. The Sophomores help plan their own scholastic program, their own " extra” activities. Coat of Arms — Emblem — Class Rings Council — officers elected President — Ray Berry Vice President — John Zywna Secretary — Marcia Beaubien Treasurer — Martha Luey Historian — Judith Humphrey Glee Club, Debate and Chess Clubs Men of Rome — Varsity Sports Carnival — Sophomore Social Jingle Bell Rock 52 3rd CENTURY B. C. - A. D. 1 Rome is now in possession of all of penin- sular Italy. Civil wars occur in all countries, cities, but Rome unites. To this time, wars fought only in self-defense. Now for glory. A. D. 1960-1961 The Juniors are powerful upperc lassmen. They are conscious of new status and therefore enjoy it. Civil wars occur in all schools, classes, but Juniors unite. The Forum — Prize Speaking Feast Day — Junior Prom (Honor Neptune, god of sea) Council re-elected Juniors are important in all activities. They join more. Now too for glory. Band officers History Club Netop and Yearbook staffs Illustrious Senator — John Zywna — Har- vard Book Award 1st -2nd CENTURY A. D. Rome balances at the height of its power. It is high and it is great. It loves its greatness. A. D. 1961 - 1962 The Seniors are in power and love power. Studies are so important but band and sports and glee club and all clubs . . . Drama — Caine Mutiny Court Martial, Call Me Mac, Christmas at Home Change in Officers, Donny Brown — Presi- dent Comedy — Senior Play, The Egg and I Revelry — Senior Farewell Yearbook Triumphal March — Graduation As the Roman Empire fell — our empire falls. But Rome is in our lives today in language, laws, arts, and principles. Rome fell and Byzantium was born. But Rome is in our lives today. By JUDY HUMPHREY 53 CLASS TABLET We, the members of the Class of ' 62, do hereby bequeath these precious neces- sities for success in high school life to those less fortunate than we. We trust the proud legatees of these priceless treasures will cherish them always and look back on the fivers with fondest memories. Bertha Adams leaves her spelling ability to the Junior who needs it most. Judy Allen leaves her soft, slow voice to Vicky Makarewicz. " Cindy” leaves everyone’s sweaters to their rightful owners. Sylvia Aubrey leaves her smile to Nancy Kreymas. Baird and " Muggs” leave for Richard’s walking (?) ! Carol Baker leaves her tattered rain hat to anyone who dares to be seen in it. Phyllis and Ann leave still anesthetized. " Mike” Barnes leaves and is he happy!!! Marcia leaves but Clayton’s right behind her. John Bergeron leaves his copy of " Wild on the Highway” to Mr. Fugere. Ray leaves, but he’s coming back for Irene. " Dex” and " Denny” leave in their cars for the " Untouchables” set. " Yogi” leaves his coin collection to Tommy Brown who’s always looking for change. " Bev " leaves the band. They couldn’t afford any more drum sticks. Sue Bourret leaves her constantly changing hair-dos to Pam Lenois. Nancy Bray leaves her walk to anyone who can keep up with her. " Mickey” leaves for Pluto. " Brownie” and John leave a job well done. Warren Charrest leaves — carrying cartons. Robert Cloutier leaves for " the wild blue yonder. " " Chari” leaves amid stale birthday cake and crumbs and burnt pizzas. Mary Lou leaves to follow her sisters in the nursing profession. " Kathy” Corbin leaves the mirror in the Girls’ Basement with best wishes. Judy Crossman leaves Barb a whole seat on the Montague City bus. Marguerite Daignault leaves Lois to follow in her footsteps. Michael Dale leaves plenty of room behind the lockers. " Ginger” leaves a can of hair spray and a pair of scissors to Carol Biano. Merrill Davis leaves his record breaking typing ability (10 words a minute) to tnyone who’ll take it. Berta Drinzek leaves her attempt to be a secretary to Linda Girard. Allen Dube doesn’t mind leaving the cafeteria and all those dirty dishes. " Patty” Duda leaves her " height " to the Jones sisters to share between them. Frannie leaves still trying to get into Norwich University. Henry leaves his sister to take over his spot in the band. Rose Marie leaves her culinary talents to Shirley Boivin. Susan Feyrer leaves her shoes for brother Eddy to fill. Nancy Fuchs leaves her slide rule to Dave Krejmas. Carol Gaines leaves Mr. Bassett in peace. Alice Gelinas leaves with a carload of classmates, as usual. Golonka and Wabeck leave for the old fishing hole. Glori-Lee leaves dancing. Nadine leaves her seat on the Millers Falls bus to Karen Koldis. Jimmy Greenleaf leaves his Chairman’s gavel to Joan Rastallis. " Moneybags " Gulo leaves the combination of his safe to " Pearcie.” Marcia Hall and Diane Haskins leave those long walks over the bridge to Janie May. Shar leaves her bottle of Light and Bright " to Linda Zschau. Linda and Sharon leave their " Unfinished Symphony” to the Class of ' 6 3. Carl leaves for the golf course. Joyce leaves her History seat to Dwayne. Margaret Jakutowicz leaves her quiet ways to Janina Mirecki. Marsha Jalicki leaves her membership card of the Cat Lovers’ Society to a fellow feline fan. " Mike " Janos leaves his " Hot Bomb” in the parking lot ’cuz it won’t move. Jackie leaves her long hair to Carol Biziewski. " Connie” leaves — still talking! Shirl, Berta, and Pat leave as the " real reds.” Paul leaves memories of the day he played guard. Steve and Brian leave Miss Reum in peace at last. " Jim’ ' Koldis leaves all those homerun baseballs in orbit. Philip Kostecki reluctantly leaves the baseball diamond. " Bob " and " Mike” leave 50 pairs of hard worn sneakers to Garry and Paul. Mary Jane leaves her waving lotion and curlers to Gloria Dejnak. Ernie LaFleur leaves with his head under the hood of a car. " Sandy” Lahoski leaves his Millers Falls Drum Corps bugle to Tommy Currier. Jimmy Lawlor leaves still trying to figure out his Math. " Kathy” Leigh leaves her mice to roam the halls. Bob Lenois leaves marching to those who can. Bruce Letourneau leaves for the Recorder Gazette building. Merrilyn leaves her French Florn to Alice Coffman. " Sadie” leaves everyone wondering who " Hambone” is. Louise leaves still throwing parties. " Marty” leaves her blush to Louie Krol who sure could use one. Judy Martin leaves her sisters and brothers to follow. Dave and Judy leave their second home in Room 23 to next year’s Editors. John Maynard leaves his secret sandbank elevator to Billy. Bobby Mayrand leaves his Tarzan calls to anyone who can climb ropes. Liz leaves still dreaming of Christmas Concert Robes. Charles Merriot leaves his crutches to his brother — just in case. Carol Miner leaves her typewriter to Karen Huber. Alice Norwood leaves her scholarly mind to Annette Krejmas. " Betsy” Olson leaves various parts of her car strewn all over the Gill countryside. Richie Morin and David Traceski leave packing groceries to anyone who knows that the bread doesn’t go on the bottom. Georgine leaves cringing every time someone calls her " George.” Francis Pelletier leaves his job at the gas station to any grease-monkey. " Lulu” leaves his jokes to anyone who can handle them. Dennis Peters leaves his Rinehart (?) penmanship style to anyone who can de- cipher it. Gene leaves his harem to " Ricie.” Karen leaves her horsewhip to next year’s cheering captain. Ronnie Pluta leaves his Road — E — O title to Brian Kerr. Jimmy Puhala leaves — fortunately for Mr. Galvin. Joey Richotte leaves running — trying to break the five minute mile. " Vince” leaves on two wheels. David Ross leaves still sorting out his radio parts. Sandy Sell leaves her giggle to Norma Sweeney. Carol Shirtcliff leaves her pick up truck to Josefa Welcome. " Big Joe” leaves his tactics for getting through low doorways to " Zoo” Zewinski. Eddy Sirum leaves his desk to any lucky Junior. Donnie Stokes leaves his fireman’s hat behind as he rushes to catch the Gill fire truck. " Sully " leaves and for once she’s got her glasses with her. Jimmy Sutton leaves his " Butterfly” methods to Gary if he can keep up without getting dizzy. Richard Thayer devotedly leaves in quest of Ceasar’s assassin. Lorraine leaves her quiet ways to Marion Housman who really cannot get much quieter. Alex Urgiel leaves pointers on how to milk cows to anyone who wants to. Lois Valley leaves for Wilson’s dressed in black. Allan Varney leaves his mathematical mind to Paul Trudel, who really doesn’t need it. Margaret Verrier leaves the key to the bank vault to anyone who wants to get rich quick. Susie Verrill leaves in search of Bali Hai. Russell Vivier leaves the spotlight to anyone who can aim it. Charles Walsh leaves his card " Have Shoe Horn Will Fit.” Grace Welsh leaves still warming up her instrument. Judy Williams leaves her Bank Day to ahy Junior who’s insane enough to try it. Dennis Wonsey leaves no trees standing. " Use” leaves on a raft — Huck Finn style. Zmudie” leaves for a long, treacherous journey home. The Class of 62 leaves Miss Little a well-earned, giant-sized bottle of aspirins. 55 This book is dedicated to Mr. Bourdeau, and with- out detracting from this long overdue honor we wish to thank the man who made this yearbook possible. We of the Netop and Yearbook Staff all join in sin- cerely thanking Mr. Donavan for the wonderful friend- ship, patience, advice, and precious time which he has given to us. The task of publishing several issues of the Netop and this Yearbook has been fun, hardwork, profitable in the sense of experience, and perhaps at times it has even been discouraging, but in each of these we were with a man who was able, by means of a frown or a laugh, to cause us to meet our deadlines. We thank you Mr. Donavan for all you have done with us, and we of the staff will never forget you. 56 " THE CAINE MUTINY COURT MARTIAL” The class of ’62 chose as its first production of the year a dramatic account of the events involved in the well- known, fictitious " Caine Mutiny Court Martial.” Lieutenant Commander Queeg (David Martineau) of the ship Caine, and his attorney, Lieutenant Chalee (Dexter Bliss), bat- tled side by side to prove the defendant guilty. Lieutenant Maryk (John Zywna) and his defense attorney, Lieuten- ant Greenwald (Donald Brown) struggled to prove that Queeg was mentally ill and in no condition to be in charge of the Caine. Keeping a complete account of the trial was the stenographer (Raymond Berry). Led by Lieutenant Blackly (Michael Janos), the jury, composed of Joseph Simanski and Henry Dymerski, sought to decide the fate of the accused. " CALL ME MAC” " Call Me Mac” was the mysterious Veterans’ Day play put on by our Senior Class. The setting is an old barn in Northern France, which legends tell of being haunted by the ghosts of World War I victims. Michael Brazeau portrays Bongard, the peasant farm owner and father of eight-year-old Elsie (Nance Bray) and fifteen-year-old Suzanne (Noreen Mo- longoski ) . As the play begins, Koerner, a Nazi officer (Richard Morin) is questioning Bongard about his haunted barn. When they leave the stage a wounded American flyer (Gene Piasecki) enters the barn to seek refuge from the German army. The story is climaxed when Mac, the flyer, finds that he is in the company of a World War I ghost (Joe Richotte). The ghost tells the story of his own fight- ing in World War I and compares the ideals of the two wars. CHRISTMAS AT HOME What is " Christmas at Home”? It is many different things to different people. To the Burgess family it meant a day of growing, a day of change. To Julie it meant her first beau — a change into a young woman; to Janet it meant changing into a young girl with the realization of the true meaning of Christmas: to Emily it meant the change to womanhood with her first marriage proposal; and to the parents it meant seeing their children growing older and farther apart from them and the past. To the student body at Turners it meant a play put on by the seniors and directed by Mr. Maurice Donovan. To the members of the cast it meant pride and satis- faction in a job well done. The cast was as follows: Char- leen Cocking, Marsha Jalicki, Marcia Hall, Maureen Sulli- van, Michael McCarthy, James Puhala, and James Lawlor. 58 SENIOR PLAY Words are failures in describing those two most won- derful nights, February 15 and 16, but memories can bring back that day of tryouts; and the day following, which was filled with anxiety that spread throughout the school. We cannot forget how speechless we all were when we heard the results, nor how proud we were not only of our- selves but of our classmates. We remember the first re- hearsal when we were all late due to the heavy snowstorm — and all the rehearsals following, with lots of hard work mixed equally with fun. We hardly can forget the time Don tipped over his chair, nor the many times we spilled soda on the carpet and tried — oh, so hard — to conceal it. Allen always managed to get in the spotlight at those breaks with his homemade bottle-opener. We always could count on morning rehearsals for a good laugh, as the cast slowly drifted in, not as yet fully awake. Then suddenly we realized that it had come. All our work was to be pre- sented to a live audience. The days of performance came so fast but went even faster. Now, as we take a last look across the stage, we see once again Mike and Marcia realistically portraying Don and Betty MacDonald, a wonderfully warm couple striving to make their dream come true on a chicken farm. They become discouraged at the pessimistic words of Mr. Man- nix, played by Bruce Yukl, but are revived when Delicate Daisy appears to comfort them. Sarah Lizotte, as Daisy, comes back, though, trying to get sympathy by telling the couple of her aches and pains. Other problems arise when the MacDonalds ' two teen- aged daughters — both at that dimsicle boy crazy stage — bicker at each other almost continually. Marty Luey, as the older girl Anne, becomes interested in Thad (Don Brown) but is challenged by Corrine, a very pretty but possessive girl (played by Noreen Baird). Thad becomes involved with both girls, but after careful consideration, decides in favor of Anne. Joan, however, is confused and slightly mixed up. Noreen Molongoski, as Joan, first finds a boy, Hi-Baby (Steve Kocsis), who thinks of nothing but food. Next she turns to JJ, portrayed by Brian Kovalsick, who thinks either of math or football. She is finally encouraged when Ross, a camp counselor, played by Mickey Brazeau, comes to her house. She is then assured that she will be busy enough with the boys’ camp next to her house. Although the MacDonalds wish to lead a quiet life, they are disturbed at numerous occasions. The Lingery Lady (Sharon Hilliard), bursts into the house, upsetting Betty by trying to sell her a scandalous pink slip. She turns to Anne only to make her unhappy with service weight stockings and a corset intended for Joan. The enthusiastic Millicent Ames comes into the house- hold and disrupts it with her little " gems” called the camp- ing girls, played by Nancy Bray, Carol Baker, Charleen Cocking, Connie Kabaniec, and Sharon St. Germain. Anne Mileski as Millicent quickly realizes that this country life is not for her, and she and her camping girls go bounding back to the city. Although these intrusions seem like an endless defeat, there comes a small light of encouragement when the effi- cient county agent as played by Phyllis Bakula brings good news to make the household happy once again. Anne’s pet chicken, Primrose, won the county fair egg laying contest. The agent even brings an experienced photographer, Carl Hoynoski, to take pictures of the hen, which is to give the MacDonald farm some much needed individuality. This is not all that happens to send the MacDonalds on a new road to success. An electrician, Russell Vivier, comes to tell the family that there will be poles coming up and that Betty can use her electrical appliances at last. He also gives a lamp to the family for being the first ones on the new line. Success at last for Don and Betty. Sucess for the cast. 59 " I didn’t know the horse was dangerous at both ends!” THE CAST Don MacDonald Delicate Daisy Anne MacDonald Joan MacDonald Betty MacDonald Thad Corinne Mr. Mannix Hi-Baby Fishface JJ Lingery Lady Millicent Ames Paula Tonie Lolly Mitzie Tessie Miss Linden Grady Ross Larsen MICHAEL JANOS SARAH LIZOTTE MARTHA LUEY NOREEN MOLONGOSKI MARCIA BEAUBIEN DONALD BROWN NOREEN BAIRD BRUCE YUKL STEVE KOCSIS ALLAN DUBE BRIAN KOVALSICK SHARON HILLIARD ANN MILESKI NANCY BRAY CONNIE KABANIEC CHARLEEN COCKING SHARON ST. GERMAIN CAROL BAKER PHYLLIS BAKULA CARL HOYNOSKI MICHAEL BRAZEAU RUSSELL VIVIER 61 JUNIOR PROM At eight o’clock, May 12, 1961, the gates were opened to a paradise — the Paradise of the Deep. The gym, decorated in sea blues and greens, looked beautiful to the dancers and audience. Music was played by Dick Perry and his orchestra. The last number of the evening was dedicated to future memories, but, although the Prom was over, the enchantment of the sea remained. 62 NEPTUNE Neptune to the Romans, Posidon to the Greeks, god of the sea and brother to Zeus, to both peoples — a way of life. Whatever he was called, this god ruled over an element of nature which they both loved and feared; the sea. To them the sea was some- thing both fearfully strange, and yet wonderfully new — Strange in the fact that they did not comprehend its secrets, and new to the extent that it could lead to new and better lands. Perhaps it is appropriate in this respect that our Junior Prom was on a theme concerning the sea, and that Neptune was present as a decoration — as he fits well into the theme of our Yearbook. For he might mean to us, as to the Greeks and Ro- mans, a symbol of something that is both fearfully strange, and yet wonderfully new. Only to us he would represent the excitement and fear of the seas of the future. 63 JUNIOR PRIZE - SPEAKING On with the show! After seven vigorous weeks of rehearsals, the eight jittery con- testants were given last-minute instructions, best wishes were extended, and all eyes turned to the clock. The long-awaited evening had finally emerged into an anxious real- ity. It was the night of May 5, 1961, when the lights were dimmed amidst the expectant hush of the spectators, signaling the 47th annual performance of Junior Prize-Speaking. With intermingled delight and appreciation, the audience responded towards the eight finalists, whose unique interpretations of their individual pieces were a credit to their class and to their efficient coach, Mr. Maurice Donovan, whose direction made success possible. The program was as follows: " School for Scandal” (F. B. Sheridan), presented by Marcia Beaubien; " Cyrano De Bergerac " ( Edmond Rostand ) , presented by Gene Pia- secki; " A Doll’s House” (Henrik Ibsen), presented by Sarah Lizotte; " The Soul of the Great Bell” (Lafcadio Hearn), presented by Donald Brown; " Renascence” (Edna St. Vincent Millay), presented by Noreen Molongoski; " Father at the Reception” (Edward Streeter), presented by Dexter Bliss; " Jinny June Reports a Wedding” (J. L. Harbour), presented by Sharon Hilliard; " The Burgonmaster " (Leopold Lewis), presented by John Zywna. Thunderous applause greeted the contestants as they entered the auditorium to await the decision of the judges. Before the prizes were awarded, each speaker was pre- sented an oratory medal. Dexter Bliss, who captured the poignantly amusing atmosphere of " Father at the Reception,” was awarded third prize. The old South came alive with the excitable Jinny June’s interpretation of a wedding, for which Sharon Hilliard was presented second prize. For his striking portrayal of a man struggling in the clasp of death, John Zywna won the coveted first prize. Thus was the perseverance and per- fection of an unforgettable night drawn to a triumphant climax. 64 LE CERCLE FRANCAIS Enjoyable, enlightening, and a world of fun, the French Club was a welcome diversion from the for- mality of the classroom. Highlighted by movies or slides on France, and then refreshments, the meetings were always interesting and informative, bringing us to a more complete understanding of the French language and culture. Under the guidance of Mr. Routhier, meetings were conducted by Karen Plante, President, and other officers; Gerry Simons, Vice President; Carl Hoynoski, Treasurer; and Alice Gelinas, Secretary. Senior members included: Michael Janos, Ro- berta Kuzmeskus, Maureen Sullivan, Donald Brown, Martha Fuey, Judith Humphrey, Charleen Cocking, Sharon Hilliard, Judith Martin, Sarah Fizotte, Joseph Simanski, and Marcia Beaubien. THE HISTORY CLUB The question of " Federal Aid to Education” was tossed about the crowded library as the Seniors of the history club defended their ideas on the issue. But one debate wasn’t enough for the enthusiastic mem- bers, as the Juniors also presented their version of the debate. It was a profitable year for all members, and even those students who weren’t in the club, but attended the educational debate. Mr. Fred Kenney headed the club as advisor and worked along with the officers: David Martineau, President; Joseph Si- manski, Vice-President; Merrilyn Le Vitre, Secretary; Maureen Sullivan, Treasurer. ART CLUB Boston here we come” was the motto of the Art Club as they left for their annual trip to Boston. They arrived in the city in the morning and spent the day visiting different Museums and the Art Festi- val at the Common. This club is one of the largest clubs in the High School with members from all four of the classes. The officers of the club were: President Joe Simanski Vice-President Ed Zewinski Secretary Linda Houle Treasurer Karen Kells COMMUNITY SERVICE CLUB " Outside activities” for the Community Service Club members included canvassing the town for dona- tions to various charities. Miss McGillicuddy led the Club on these campaigns which represented the school’s contribution to the community. Funds were collected for the Heart Fund, the Red Feather Drive, and the Farren Memorial Hospital Drive. 66 HOME ECONOMICS CLUB No matter what the weather was, the members of the Home Economics Club could be seen selling re- freshments to the hungry spectators supporting the football games. This was done under the guidance and leadership of Miss Alice Reum. When the foot- ball season ended, the team was treated to a delicious full course turkey dinner. In early spring this club prepared a tasty smorgasbord for those who partici- pated in the basketball season — the coaches, the players, and the Varsity cheerleaders. In June, a trip to Look Park climaxed a year of hard work. OFFICE GIRLS Under the supervision of Miss Patricia Smith, the efficient office girls performed many of the clerical duties of our school. The Senior office girls were Susan Verrill, Sharon St. Germain, Carol Miner, Judy Crossman, Charleen Cocking, and Cindy Annear. These girls devoted study halls and free time to sign- ing passes, posting and distributing notices, and doing " odd jobs.” LIBRARY AIDES Since 1954 the High School Library has employed the services of volunteer library aides. The students are chosen by Miss McGillicuddy. Volunteers are trained on the spot by the students who are already working in the library. There are usually two aides for each of the six periods. The aides check books out and in, learn to classify, count the daily circulation and arrange books on the shelves. We are very fortu- nate to have an unlimited supply of library aides avail- able because of the continued interest of the girl students. SENIOR BANK DAY CASHIERS " Bank Day!” can be heard every Tuesday morning as each Bank Day Cashier enters her assigned room. They collect money and encourage students to save regularly. Under the helpful guidance of Miss Little and the Head Bank Day Cashier, Frances Duncan, the following girls perform this task: Roberta Drinzek, Carol Minor, Margaret Jakutowicz, Carol Shirtcliff, Sylvia Aubrey, Linda Houle, Judy Crossman, Bertha Adams, Judie Williams, Susan Feyrer, Margaret Ver- rier and Noreen Baird. MANUAL TRAINING Simple carpentry is no longer a major part of the Manual Training class at T.F.H.S. Under the direction of Mr. Kossokoski, the students are assigned to one of two groups: the advanced group or the Freshman group. Each student of the Freshman class is assigned to complete a major piece of furniture. The advance group is prepared for more skillful work by courses in drafting, woodworking, and machinery, thus de- veloping the students in shopwork. These advanced courses allow a student to further his training at an electrical or technical school. DRIVER EDUCATION The next time you see a car going up a one-way street the wrong way, look at it very carefully. Behind the wheel you will most likely see a young, frantic, confused student driver, and beside him a calm, pa- tient, courageous, kindly-looking gentleman. That car will be the Driver’s Ed car, in which many students have gained the skill and confidence necessary to a competent driver. Through Mr. Fugere’s training, his pupils have also learned the values of safe and courte- ous driving habits. CAFETERIA When the recess bell rings, a rush of hungry stu- dents head for the cafeteria. Here they can purchase light lunches to sustain them until the final bell. At one o’clock, the " caf” is again alive with activity. Hot lunches are provided for teachers and students who are staying for the afternoon activities. Our thanks to Mrs. Steiger, Mrs. Gray, and Mrs. Kuklewicz, who have served us well. CUSTODIANS One of the many traditions at T.F.H.S. is the friendly smile of the capable custodians. The character of Steve and Charlie is such that they not only add to the physical appearance of the school, but also to the general friendly atmosphere. BOYS’ GLEE CLUB Hard work, the keynote of all successful organiza- tions, was a major asset to the Boys’ Glee Club again this year. With only the half hour period before school in which to practice, the boys’ rehearsals were limited, but their spirit and vocal abilities were not. Under the leadership of Miss Argy, the boys per- formed at the Football Banquet and at the Exchange Concert with Hopkins. THE GIRLS’ The Girls’ Glee Club, under the direction of Miss Florence Argy, spent many hours prep aring for their annual exchange Christmas Concert which was held with Hopkins Academy this year. The girls will be remembered for their fine performances and their participation in the Music Festival. In their exchange concerts, the girls succeeded in making friends with the neighboring schools and spreading good will for GLEE CLUB Turners Falls. They were certainly an addition to our Musical Department. The officers of the club were: President — Susan Verrill, Vice-President— Karen Plante, Secretary — Martha Luey, Treasurer — Maureen Sullivan, and Li- brarian — Elizabeth McCarthy. 71 THE DEBATE CLUB The Debate Club, an extremely active organiza- this year, was comprised of approximately twenty Sophomores. Mr. Robert Plaisted was the organization advisor. The club held its meeting in the Library every Thursday afternoon at two o’clock. A debate, consisting of prepared speeches on both the pros and cons of a designated subject, was held each week under the direction of a qualified moderator. Fol- lowing this debate, a rebuttal was held. The club initiated a series of debates with surrounding schools, and is considering a number of other activities for the coming school year. Officers were: President, George Sibley; Vice-President, Thomas Evans; Secretary, Bon- nie Ryan; and Treasurer, Harriet Sheiffer. CAMERA CLUB Snap, click, shudder — the Camera Club is in view! In 1961, under the guidance of Mr. Oakes, the Camera Club was once again off to a rousing start. The meet- ings, held once a month, provided a variety of enter- tainment, including snapshot contests, movies, hints on picture taking, and a field trip at the end of the year. Officers elected for the year were: Michael Mc- Carthy, President; Martha Luey, Vice-President; Noreen Baird, Secretary; and Merrilyn Le Vitre, Treasurer.Other Senior members were: John Ber- geron, Alice Gelinas, Robert Myrand, Ann Mileski, Sarah Lizotte, Marsha Jalicki, Russell Vivier, Nancy Fuchs, Richard Thayer, Patricia Makarewicz, Jacque- lyn Jenkins, Francis Duncan, Susan Feyrer, Rose Mary Emery, Margarite Daigneault, Carol Miner, Constance Kabaniac, Charleen Cocking, Kathleen Corbin, Brian Kovalsick, Ronald Pluta, Roberta Kuzmeskus, Susan Bourret, Judith Crossman, Carol Shirtcliff, Alexander Urgiel, Cynthia Annear, and Charles Walsh. 72 PRO MERITO " Room 23? Right this way, please.’’ Exit a Senior Pro Merito guiding a bewildered parent on the night of Open House. Acting as guides at Open House was the official duty of the Pro Meritos during their Senior year, but their more important job for four years was main- taining a ”B’’ or higher scholastic average in order to remain eligible for the honor society. Many of the members of the Pro Merito Society were also out- standing in extra-curricular activities. The officers of 1961-1962 were: Raymond Berry, President; and Sarah Lizotte, Secretary. Members of the Society were: Stephen Gulo, Shirley Klepadlo, Carol Zmuda, Karen Plante, Bobby Golonka, Nancy Fuchs, Margaret Verrier, Frances Duncan, Carol Baker, Phyllis Bakula, Joe Simanski, Maureen Sullivan, Eliza- beth McCarthy, Sharon Hilliard, Lois Valley, Marsha Jalicki, Bertha Adams, Judy Humphrey, Martha Luey, Marcia Beaubien, Susan Verrill, Don Brown, Bobby Kozik, Mike Janos, Carl Hoynoski. GUIDANCE COUNSEL As Freshmen, the future was far distant; we were uncertain at times of what paths to follow and which courses would allow development of our individual abilities. At these moments, the guidance counselors attempted to impress upon our minds the importance of academic and social achievements. Through their direction, the future took on a new aspect and mean- ing; for this we owe them gratitude. VARSITY CHEERLEADERS " A flash of blue and spirit too . . the Varsity Cheerleading Squad. These ten girls represented the necessary ingredients of spirit, originality, appearance, and plenty of hard work, combined proportionately to produce a successful squad. Whether it was leading cheers at the football and basketball games, sponsoring the Thanksgiving Rally and Cheerleaders’ Dance, or participating in the Cheering Tournaments, the girls always contributed their best for TFHS. Senior members were: Karen Plante, Captain; and Frances Duncan, Shirley Klepaldo, Carol Zmuda, and Judy Crossman. T CLUB Although it is not an active organization, the T Club has perhaps, the proudest members. It con- sists of all boys who have earned a varsity letter. The senior members were : Brian Kovalsiok, Ray Berry, Joe Richotte, John Zywna, Jim Koldis, Don Brown, Lee Perkins, Steve Gulo, A1 Dube, Dave Martineau, Joe Simanski, Bob Golonka, Paul Kobera, Gene Piasecki, Mike McCarthy. THE J.V. CHEERLEADERS Co-captained by Marion Housman and Sandra Regan, the J. V. ' s were an asset to our cheering sec- tion. These girls practiced many hours — working for perfection, with much vitality and school spirit. They cheered at football and basketball games and partici- pated in the Thanksgiving rally. The squad included: Donna Bray, Harriet Schafer, Cheryl Berry, Joannie Bednarz, Vicki Makarewicz, Carolyn Cossett, Carol Oullette, and Kathy Dion. Acting as manager was Janice Bordeaux. THE ORCHESTRA With a hand poised in the air, Mr. Brigham brings the orchestra to attention. As his hand descends, both he and the waiting crowd are greeted by a wave of music. What is the occasion? Well, it could be Junior Prize Speaking, Senior Play, Commencement, Class Day, or the last assembly, for we were supported by this organization at each of these activities. Look- ing into the orchestra pit, we find that the musicians represent various classes. Vincent Robertson was the Senior. Now, with a final gesture of his hand, Mr. Bing- ham brings silence as we file out for the final time. THE BAND The Class of 62 was " lucky” — for during their four years of high school, the band initiated several new musical programs. The most important of these was, of course, the exchange concert — with the T.F. band, led by Jacob Liberies, journeying t o Beverly, Massachusetts, in I960, and to North Kingston, Rhode Island, in 1961. The band was also able to take in- creased pride in their marching ability — " graduating” in I960 to a full time marching instructor, Mr. Juddy Gould. Two members of the Class of ’62 became the first Junior band officers. In 1961-1962 the band experienced another change, as Mr. Donald Short took over direction. The officers of that year were: Student Director, Judith Humphrey; Assistant Student Director, Carl Hoy- noski; Secretary, Linda Houle; and Librarian, Sharon St. Germain. THE SWINGSTERS The first few measures of the " Skinging High Musical” were heard, and the lights were turned to the Swingsters in their striking white blazers and black bow ties. The dance band was heard not only at the new musical comedy of 1961, but also at school dances. Seniors who added their musical assistance to the sax and trumpet sections were: Judith Humphrey, Robert Lenois, Sharon St. Germain, Carl Hoynoski, and Henry Dymerski. TWIRLERS The summer of 1961 came and the twirlers voted to have a different type of half time show for the coming football season. And during the 1961 season they presented more precision twirling and marching drills. The twirlers also served as ushers for activities of the school, took part in the Thanksgiving Rally, and marched before the band in numerous parades. The Seniors on the squad were: Martha Luey, Captain; Nancy Bray, Lieutenant; Noreen Molongoski, Lieu- tenant; and Carol Baker, Noreen Baird, Louise Lock- hart, and Patricia Makarewicz. Susan Verril, drum majorette for 1961-1962, di- rected the band at many assemblies and led them in parades and football half-time shows. Drum Majorette Pap. ' l wii burners Doss It Again: Beats Frontier By Two • A | : | The Indians can count them- 1 forced a mid-court tap and ® 1 iV " By JL 1 H)X , k m thif one Fran an out-of-bounds award [VRNF.RS FAl ..s - Four " es 1 t ‘ ed 2 ' ' — -ior The Skins had seven shots « ' w ins t.y total of sev-iW.sso - ossed - TF hoop before the final Minis That vis some Wmondo- » »-. couldn t bring off the 3- i2 : HKord for point e.onopp t ymendo 4 - face of fierce 2 _J: 2 -C fight- 3-7 ‘ T ecv,,„_ h « vt« ir n TKJRNF.P freight vs ir ■D » " of record for Turners Falls, other pin Tin got the i nic c varies; ,J? n r TH ' ' " -Tnr 0-5 «-8 B», k „ „ r " _ O ,o « ' " • ». 11-3. ' B C.« ri ' KweeM falls ' 0-7 • ■ ' PTON ., I, 20 19 ,o 1 J 16 J6 JV ___ V e Vl f ' f . •j . s ■’s ’ r Jfi e ' P U . , “ l 6 ' ■ ' W - . " ' M, - ' O 6°- n ' • ' • ° ' oN fee “ o nohevtV can ird cn -J. v,r . - 7 o Refai TFHS’s 1 nbr i rn ' l l Mirv.t ' • lkrn fo Mip hrt c - r r i Could Proble ni;h( ° h , ' .0 °P 0° Pvll " fcV-UP ' ' was i° a n0 wind uv i w FOOTBALL Desire and spirit and " a little extra” was the story of the ’61 football team. After starting the season with 3 wins and a tie, the squad ran into a maze of injuries which disabled the entire starting backfield for two Saturday ball games. The eagerness and ability of the underclassmen to fill the vacated spots were fine ex- amples of that unexplainable " something extra.” All was not lost in the final 3 — 5 — 1 record, for there is always more to a ball game than the final score. What is put into the game and what is derived from the game are the more important considerations. The Senior members of the Football Team were: Co- Captains John Zywna and Don Brown; and Joe Si- manski, Gene Piasecki, Brian Kovalsick, Charles Durant, Joe Richotte, Ray Berry, Lee Perkins, James Greenleaf, Allen Dube, and Paul Kobera. 12—0 RECORD Greenfield 5 — 1 Westfield 4 — 2 Northampton 5 — 1 Chicopee 4 — 2 West Spring 6 — 0 Holyoke 5 — 1 Greenfield 5 — 1 Westfield 6 — 0 Northampton 4 — 2 Chicopee 4 — 2 West Spring 5 — 1 Holyoke ... 4 — 2 TENNIS 196l was a big year for the tennis enthusiasts of T.F.H.S., as they breezed to an un- defeated and untied season and their second Valley League Crown in three years. Under the able coaching of Chris Garrahan the Indians ( Stone Face” McCarthy, " Romper” Kozik, Stogie Sicard, Superboy Simons, and Muscle Brain” Lenois) smashed through all opponents, and had convincing victories over stronghouses Chicopee, Holyoke, and Greenfield. Last seasons 14 — 0 records is a fine incentive for the 1962 campaign, which will be the 3rd season of varsity competition for each of the players. The powerful T.F.H.S. Rackets” will be in full swing this spring as the boys have high hopes of making the New England Tourney. 83 VARSITY BASKETBALL 65-46. As you well know, this score constituted one of the major accomplishments of the 1961-62 Varsity Basketball Team. Under the coaching of Mr. Fred Kenney, the team managed to post the best record since 1947, including this major upset over a fine Holyoke team. The T.F. team had height, shooters, and depth, and all of these factors combined to provide the loyal student body and townspeople with an exciting brand of basketball. Senior members of the team were: Jim Koldis (Captain), John Zywna, Joe Simanski, Dave Martineau, Bobby Kozik, Joey Richotte, and Ray Berry. J.V. BASKETBALL For the second year in a row, the J. V. Basketball team compiled an outstanding record. Although the boys may have lacked a delicate shooting touch, and outstanding polish, they made up for it with aggressive play and hustle. Composed of eager sopho- mores and steady juniors, the club makes the future basketball picture look bright. Mem- bers of the team include: Mgrs. Doug Riel and Paul Trudel, Charles Lockhart, John Al- bright, Rich Wondoloski, William Smith, John Kliska, Fred Wissman, Dave Brule, Noel Potter, Len Desautels, and coach Mr. Kenney. 84 THE GIRLS’ VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM " Get it, get it, — get that ball” — the fans in the bleachers are wild as the girls’ basket- ball team wins over Arms. In addition to Arms the girls compete against Greenfield and Pioneer. Hard work and a belief in the good sportsmanship code combine to produce fun and success for these girls. Senior members on the team are: Ginger Dauphinais, Louise Lockhart and Betsy Olson. Maureen Sullivan is the manager. GIRLS’ J.V. BASKETBALL The J.V. basketball team was active in providing girls with an opportunity to develop their athletic abilities. The girls played the preliminary games against Arms, Greenfield, and Pioneer, and they were always on hand to cheer for the Varsity tern. Mrs. Reidy was the coach and Dotty Sac the manager. Cindy Annear was a Senior player. 85 TRACK Track is rapidly becoming a major sport at high schools throughout the country. The situation is certainly no different at T.F.H.S. where track has always held a prominent spot in athletics, and is ever gaining in popularity. Mr. Bassett’s eager and able track team boarded buses and traveled to many meets with the hopes of capturing first place, and also with the dream (that often turned into an actuality for the Indians) of bringing home several trophies for our trophy case. Team trophies were won at the Springfield Relays, Western Mass. Track Meet, Franklin County Fair Meet, and the Valley League Meet. The success of the team depended upon the work of all, experienced and novices. The Seniors were: Joe Richotte, Brian Kovalsik, Michael Janos, Russell Vivier. BASEBALL Crack! Nearly every afternoon last spring the sound of ash meeting cowhide, dust from sliding spikes, snapping of baseballs against gloves, and shouts of encouragement such as " Chuck ’em in dere baby boy, ” could be heard and seen on the diamond of Sheff Memorial Field. These were the scenes and sounds created by the T.F.H.S. boys participating in the " American Game. " Teamwork and skill revolved around the diamond and the team made a commend- able showing in the rugged V.L. The Seniors on the squad were as follows: Don Brown, Jim Koldis, Lee Perkins, Gene Piasecki, Paul Kobera, Ray Berry. 86 P.rnitKi r eccic . $ A. M. GAMELIN Class Photographer for 1961 — 1962 . . . SENIORS . . . MONTAGUE CITY and GREENFI ELD, MASSACHUSETTS 88 Compliments of THE GREENFIELD SAVINGS BANK 391 MAIN STREET GREENFIELD ,« iotpjrton Greenfield, Mass. COMPLETE DINING and BANQUET FACILITIES GOOD LUCK To The CLASS of 1962 GRIBBON ' S MUSIC HOUSE Turners Leads the Way — Others Follow YETTER - The Florist QUALITY FLOWERS SINCE 1907 Phone PR 4-4305 GREENFIELD MASSACHUSETTS Compliments of THE SNACK BAR GREENFIELD MASSACHUSETTS POPULAR MARKET RED and WHITE FOOD STORE § 58 THIRD STREET TURNERS FALLS ALIBER ' S " Where there is no Compromise with Quality” 89 GREENFIELD RECORDER GAZETTE SINCE 1792 FRANKLIN COUNTY’S OWN NEWSPAPER All the News of Turners Falls and Other Montague Sections " A COMPLETE HOME NEWSPAPER FOR ALL THE FAMILY” Telephones: UN 3-4441 or PR 2-0261 TURNERS FALLS BUREAU 69V: 2 AYE A Compliments of PARTRIDGE - ZSCHAU INSURANCE AGENCY — Realtor s — 106 AVE A TURNERS FALLS Telephone: UN 3-4331 12 MAIN STREET MILLERS FALLS, MASS. Telephone: OLdfield 9-3318 When in Greenfield stop at Compliments of CARL ' S RESTAURANT for AMERICAN HOUSE Fine Foods A Dinner — A Sandwich or Some of Our 25 FOURTH STREET Home Made Ice Cream TURNERS FALLS CHESTER STEMPEL BUILDER — CONTRACTOR Tel. OL 9-3368 MILLERS FALLS, MASS. 90 In Greenfield it’s . . . WILSON ' S Franklin County’s Leading Department Store — Since 1882 — ★ ★ ★ Where your Mother and Grandmother shopped. ★ ★ ★ ESCOTT ' S CITIES SERVICE MINOR REPAIRS Tel. UN 3-4028 AYE. A TURNERS FALLS, MASS. Compliments of ST. KAZIMIER ' S SOCIETY AVENUE A TURNERS FALLS Compliments of ARCHITECTURAL STONE COMPANY TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS STRATHMORE PAPER CO. Mills at West Springfield, Woronoco and Turners Falls, Massachusetts — Manufacturers of — Bond, Writing and Thin Papers - : - Book, Text and Cover Pages Artists Papers and Boards - : - Blue Print Base Stock Wedding Papers and Bristols - : - Index and Ledger Papers Greeting Cards and Specialty Papers PAPER IS PART OF THE PICTURE FOR THE BEST TIRE DEAL IN FRANKLIN COUNTY trade at ART ' S TIRE SERVICE 10 SILVER STREET GREENFIELD Compliments of 281 MAIN STREET ■ CREEN FIELD. MASS. 77 " Curtains — Windows Shades — Draperies Venetian Blinds — Ready-Made Slip Covers LaPIERRE ' S, INC. WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES " YOU CAN BE SURE IF IT’S WESTINGHOUSE” 48 FEDERAL STREET GREENFIELD, MASS. Phone PR 2-0296 59 FEDERAL STREET GREENFIELD, MASS. Phone PR 3-7714 92 Good Luck to the Class of 1962 WHITE SWAN BEAUTY SHOPPE Tel. OL 9-3309 51 MAIN STREET MILLERS FALLS DELIVERY BOY. . . . . . dashing at the speed of light to bring you the clean, the modern . . . the electrical way of life. Reddy Kilowatt serves you throughout your home. Just flip a switch and dependable electric service is brought to you instantly . . . the Reddy Kilowatt Wav! Investor-Owned Electric Light and Power Companies | Compliments of BEAUBIEN ' S TEXACO SERVICE STATION Telephone UN 3-4335 101 THIRD STREET TURNERS FALLS f tooo V ' COFFEE Home-made Ice Cream Sandwiches and Lunches AT GOULD ' S Telephone OL 9-3052 MILLERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS 93 V Compliments of Compliments of j | CHAPIN AND SADLER GEORGE H. REED AND CO. | General Contra ctors t A Coal — Fuel Oil 24 FRANKLIN STREET GREENFIELD $ ? BUS TRANSPORTATION PR 4-4990 | Compliments of $ § Compliments of 4 § | HAROLD B. MYERS GRIMARD ' S SHOE SERVICE 1 —GULF — § | | MILLERS FALLS ROAD $ Paul Grimard, Prop I J TURNERS FALLS 103 MAIN ST. TURNERS FALLS | | PLEASANT INSURANCE CLEARY ' S JEWELERS f | AGENCY " Established 1928” | S General Insurance JEWELRY — GIFTS — CARDS | 3 Real Estate ? $ Phone UN 3-4318 Expert Repairing k | 77 AVENUE A TURNERS FALLS 248 MAIN ST. GREENFIELD, MASS. $ y Compliments of W. S. CASSIDY, INC. f | THE w) | GILL FIRE DEPARTMENT PONTIAC.. YOUR NEXT CAR 4 Strato-Flight — Hydra-Matic k § GILL MASS. TURNERS FALLS and GREENFIELD | 94 £ | WILLIAM ' S GARAGE DELUXE BEAUTY SALON i — FOR SMOOTH DRIVING— Josephine Krol, Prop. ? 7 — Specializing in — ALL KINDS OF § § BEAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT BEAUTY CULTURE | | SUN SCIENTIFIC TUNE UP Dial UN 3-4651 | | 147 SECOND ST. TURNERS FALLS TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS | A Congratulations to the | CLASS OF 1962 I § Phone Dial PR 3-5171 $ § | CORNER CUPBOARD GARDEN | | SNACK SHOP BEAUTY STUDIO v Corner of CHAPMAN MAIN STS. 359 MAIN ST. § GREENFIELD GREENFIELD, MASS. | f Compliments of COMET CLEANERS § LICENSED SANITONE CLEANERS | BILL ' S BARBER SHOP " Sanitone in Incomparable” § We specialize in all short and fancy haircuts. Dial UN 3-2043 | 4 COURT SQUARE GREENFIELD 123 AVENUE A TURNERS FALLS $ | CONGRATULATIONS ' | CLASS OF 1962 Best Wishes for the Future VALLEY STUDIO " Everything Photographic” CADE ' S FLOWER SHOP 74 AVENUE A TURNERS FALLS 54 AVENUE A TURNERS FALLS | 95 $ Best Wishes to the CLASS OF 1962 ★ ★ ★ THE ROCKDALE STORE ★ ★ ★ TURNERS FALLS, MASS. 96 Compliments of For Repairs — Bring ’em To Us! AL ' S BODY SHOP X v Compliments of For Repairs — Bring ’em To Us! j BILL ' S RESTAURANT, Inc. AL ' S BODY SHOP 1 Fender and Body Work Wrecks a Specialty § | 30 FEDERAL STREET Jet. Montague City Road and Ave. A | GREENFIELD Tel. UN 3-4835 TURNERS FALLS, MASS. | £ BRAFF RICH, Inc. y § Compliments of § | COMPLETE OUTFITTERS FOR § MEN and BOYS BOB ' S AUTO BODY § A 24 Hour Wrecker Service y Telephone PR 4-4344 y Phone UN 3-2112 § § | 120 MAIN ST. GREENFIELD, MASS. 303 AVENUE " A” TURNERS FALLS | | CROSS-ROADS DRIVE IN Compliments of § j Lunches — Dinners POLISH CO-OP STORES 1 § | COMPLETE TAKE OUT SERVICE 96 FOURTH ST. 39 ELEVENTH ST. 1 4 TURNPIKE — MONTAGUE RD. TURNERS FALLS | f RUCKI ' S § GOODYEAR and GENERAL Congratulations to the y CLASS OF 1962 ? | ELECTRIC PRODUCTS From || V " The most of the best for the least” y Phone PR 4-4791 FOLK ' S GROCERY | § 19 FEDERAL ST. GREENFIELD 136 " L” STREET TURNERS FALLS § 97 i f ' ' . Best Wishes to CLASS OF 1962 OLD STONE LODGE GEO. STARBUCK SONS, Inc. Established 1872 QUIET MAY OIL BURNER Steam, Water and Plumbing Contractors SHEET METAL WORK Flue Lining, Clay and Orangeburg Pipe General Kitchen Furnishings TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS SHADY REST Compliments of Wally Rachel MILLERS FALLS ROAD TURNERS FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS SINGLEY ' S FURNITURE and APPLIANCE STORE — FRIGIDAIRE DEALERS— 168-172 AVENUE " A” TURNERS FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS Congratulations and Best Wishes TO THE 1962 GRADUATES of TURNERS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL WHAI-AM plus FM GREENFIELD MASSACHUSETTS THE FRANKLIN SAVINGS INSTITUTION WE OPERATE TO SERVE YOU! Savings Accounts, Life Insurance and Real Estate Loans OVER 125 YEARS OF SERVICE IN THIS COUNTY! GREENFIELD MASSACHUSETTS Best of luck to the class of 1962 Nutritious DAIRY PRODUCTS PASTEURIZED MILK and CREAM — ALSO HOMOGENIZED SOCQUET J. I. Case TRACTORS and SERVICE Telephone UN 3-2375 HILLSIDE ROAD TURNERS FALLS, MASS. Compliments of SPORTHAUS SKI SHOP — SPORTS WEAR 320 MAIN ST. GREENFIELD, MASS. Tel. PR 3-3876 Compliments of HALLMARK STUDIO Inc. 314 MAIN STREET GREENFIELD NOW TWO STORES IN MILLER’S FALLS AND GILL CARROLL ' S SUPER MARKET " OUTSTANDING FOR QUALITY FOR OVER 30 YEARS” 101 Smooth Sailing Ahead THE So Long — Happy Days CORNER BOOK STORE SENIORS OF 1962 Inc. L. A. KOHLER CO., INC. Blank Books and Stationery — Newspapers Philco Television — RCA — Decca Office Supplies — Periodicals Greeting Cards for all Occasions Columbia and Capitol Records 75 AVENUE A TURNERS FALLS Phone UN 3-4569 116 AYE. A, TURNERS FALLS, MASS. ESLEECK MANUFACTURING COMPANY — THIN PAPERS — TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS Compliments of A. H. RIST — Insurance THE INKWELL NEWS Since 1888 AND 56 FOURTH STREET SMOKE SHOP Fire — Bond — Casualty — Automobile Life — Marine — Notary Public — Burglary 72 FEDERAL STREET TURNERS FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS GREENFIELD, MASS. Real Estate Sales and Appraisals FRANKLIN COUNTY GREENFIELD, MASS. Dial PR 4-4324 102 | GARDNER PAINT STORE Compliments to k $ the y y Wallpaper — Paint — Boats ? Motors — Trailers — Water Skis CLASS OF ’62 | Life Jackets GOODNOW ' S | | 108 " L” STREET TURNERS FALLS DEPARTMENT STORE | i Congratulations to the CLASS OF 1962 $ § § Compliments of THE CAPTAIN TURNER ST. STANISLAUS § § Phone UN 3-4836 ? AVENUE " A” TURNERS FALLS J § TURNERS FALLS y Congratula tions to the | CLASS OF ’62 | Compliments of THE BERKSHIRE f | WARD ' S STORE | MILLERS FALLS GAS COMPANY GREENFIELD y Peg Morgan Browning | RICHARD ' S DRIVE IN | TASTEE FREEZ SIGDA FLOWER SHOP | £ Car Hop Service v Feature in Grinders 284 HIGH STREET | £ Clams and Scallops | Tel. UN 3-2170 TURNERS FALLS GREENFIELD § 103 5 | McCarthy Compliments of § | — THE CLOTHIER — HAWLEY PHARMACY | y Tailor-Made Suits A Specialty MILLERS FALLS — OL 9-3327 | | Dial UN 3-8461 HAWLEY PHARMACY, Inc. | | TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS TURNERS FALLS — UN 3-2473 | ) DEPENDABLE SERVICE § § Best Wishes to the § | BEAUBIEN AND BONNETTE | COAL CO. § CLASS OF 1962 4 v Coal-Range-Fuel Oils t Phone UN 3-4581 § SWEENEY FORD SALES § § | 60 SECOND STREET | TURNERS FALLS § TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS jj | ARBEN MONTAGUE MACHINE CO. 1 Quality Furniture at Low Prices. —PAPER MILL MACHINERY— § K Franklin Counties Largest and Most Modern § Furniture Showroom. V Maintenance Work for Neighboring Mills | MILLERS FALLS RD. § TURNERS FALLS TURNERS FALLS MASSACHUSETTS | COUTURE BROS., INC. Telephone OLdfield 9-3543 § Painting Wall Paper Supplies S Painting Decorating Contractors Picture Framing f Glass H. A. DORAN § Fuel Oil Bottled Gas Plumbing or Heating | Tel. UN 3-4346 " We Sell . . . Install . . . Service . . .Guarantee” jj TURNERS FALLS, MASS. 1 1 BRIDGE STREET MILLERS FALLS | 104 105 $ Compliments of SIRUM ' S CHEVRON STATION | | MONTAGUE GARAGE Route 63 MONTAGUE, MASS. | Range and Fuel Oil Tires — Batteries — Accessories j Auto Repairs l | Tel. FO 7-2700 Telephone: FO 7-9378 | Compliments of | RITA ' S BEAUTY SALON Congratulations! § from § JOSEPH C. SZENHER 1 ? 80 HIGH STREET | Jeweler | 4 MORMON HOLLOW ROAD | | UN 3-2663 OL 9-4264 | i Compliments of SNOW ' S | Milk — Cream — Ice Cream Ss 1 BILL ' S LUNCHEONETTE " Home of Greenfield Dairy” j § MILLERS FALLS 80 SCHOOL ST. GREENFIELD | l OL 9-3556 PR 3-3689 $ Compliments of L | THE THOMAS MEMORIAL GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB | | " FOR YOUTH OF ALL AGES” | I l 106 kK-) % THE URGIEL FARM h Potatoes and Dairy J vj, Compliments of TEN PIN BOWL Featuring 32 AMF Automatic Pinspotters 89 FRENCH KING HIGHWAY GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS MUNNS FERRY ROAD ★ GILL, MASSACHUSETTS PRescott 4-4341 CENTER PHARMACY Compliments of 131 AVENUE A. TURNERS FALLS JARVIS WELDING Phone UN 3-4879 MFG. CO. — Free Drug Delivery — MILLERS FALLS ROAD Open Daily 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. TURNERS FALLS Compliments of Compliments of TURNERS FALLS COAL CO. FRENCH KING BOWLING CENTER Phone UN 3-4321 12 Modern Lanes Snack Bar Reservations Tel. OL 9-3047 FIFTH STREET TURNERS FALLS FRENCH KING HIGHWAY MILLERS FALLS Compliments of FRANKLIN HEAT CONTROL CO., INC. ALUMINUM PRODUCTS Sidewall Covering — Aluminum Sidings — Awnings — Jalousies Aluminum Windows — Storm Doors — Patio Covers Railings — Roofing — Perma-Stone " Locally Owned and Operated” James Baird James Hanrahan 41-43 BANK ROW NORTHFIELD 649 UN 3-2133 PR 3-8207 107 t. o’toole sons incorporated, offset printers and binders since 1891 keeler avenue • south norwalk, conn.


Suggestions in the Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) collection:

Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Page 1

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Turners Falls High School - Peske Tuk Yearbook (Turners Falls, MA) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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