Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA)

 - Class of 1952

Page 1 of 340

 

Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection
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Page 14, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection
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Page 8, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection
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Page 12, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1952 Edition, Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 340 of the 1952 volume:

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Vw ' - " - - - 'Q U J v 4-' ,-.4. ga- S A vu-.r K ' . ...aaigl A, A Centennial View . . . YESTERDAY mm' TODAY at Tujiv College 4171 X 3,1 .. ,... ,ish -.. - .... nz, - Y- "' :MTs a leader in campus activities and as an honor student while an undergraduate at T ufts, Leonard Carmichael indicated the leadership and brilliance that have marked his career. After completing his graduate work at Harvard he was a successful scientific investigator and teacher at Princeton and Brown, and an equally successful Dean at the University of Rochester. Qffs President of Tufts since 1938 he has guided the College through the clifiicult years of World War I I , and the period of adjustment in the postwar period. During his presidency the College has increased its physical equipment, its endowment and its academic prestige. e is a recognized leader in higher education and has served as an oficer in many national scientific and educational organizations. IU ember- ship in many important national and state commissions indicates the extent of his ability and interest. He renders service to Tufts, to education, to the Commonwealth and to the United States. Throughout his career he has continued research and scholarly work in his chosen field of physiological psychology. His ability in psychology is attested by his books and articles, by the fact that he is a past president of the American Psychological Association, and by his membership in the National Academy of Sciences. Qjlfodest, unassuming, versatile he makes friends for Tufts and en- hances its reputation. emi .Q has ' Au-::.x,.....-. . .-.U sis:-. ' M HK xi f - 1 :QS vfisgl- .'-pw43'f'22J'fv , iii? ' "W fl Zi 224.1-,,bi' ?sLhi5sfifEXi' ff 5'5mfff's 'F ' t' 'An vw. ,f. . X ..-4. 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W xg., If B Q1 My ,gi ., ,M H ,,,w,,,,,., ,ll ,,f2fa2,,.,.va'.ra".xQ , :.. 4 Q f - Hz: ' '- f wg.-: , W .M -. , '-:-,sg---',gT.imsk Qs Enffgv' 4 .vm vp safe'-W.-ug-L .fn 3'f5.lq,,, .' . 3 mfgig , Q:..,2'tt:-' 1 n:f:na:.ffz .wsu ' 1,5 ,gg 5.3.1 M, ,:., gg ...?...:,p 1 . -. . 'X -51245-.y :. .5-mpg'-1f,',i is gifs 75:11 .il -, 1. -s N'-2555-,-ff 'L1l..:- " " "'-'7l7W"' L-3212-412'--N., R' 13' 4181 LEONARD CARMICHAEL President of the College -I I A century has passed Charles and Hannah Tufts for whom the College is named. 4201 cz century of enlightenment, Tufts College was chartered by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1859. The original act of incorporation stated that the funds of the college should be used "in such manner as shall most effectually promote virtue and piety, and learning in such of the languages and of the liberal and useful arts and sciences as shall be I'6C01l11T1611d6d.,, It was further provided that no particular religious opinions were ever to be required of officers or students in the college. The motto of its seal, Pax et Lux, has become the motto of the college. The movement that led to the foundation of Tufts began almost before the end of the eighteenth century. By the 18410,s funds were being actively canvassed for the new institution. This was a period of rapid economic development and intellectual and social ferment in the country. The American inland empire was pushing westward. For the first time, large-scale manufacturing was being established. Every ocean port of the world was coming to know American com- merce borne by fast sailing ships, many of which were built in yards on the lllystic River in the shadow of Tufts College. In 1852, in spite of the gathering clouds of the slavery question, enterprise and optimism about the future were in the bracing sea breezes of New England. During this active period there was, however, a growing discontent with the state of higher education. A new enlightenment had been responsible in New England for the rise of various liberal churches and for the The "College Edificef' now Ballou Hall, 'in its earl'ie.s't days. since the inaugural year. religiously heterodox transcendentalist move- ment of Emerson and his associates. Science, especially hardheaded applied science, was exerting a new power in the world. The rigid Calvinism of the time was shaking. In this feverish, active, and forward- looking industrial and yet religiously alert period education alone seemed to present too static a picture. Yale, Brown, Dartmouth, VVillian1s, Bowdoin, Amherst, Middlebu1'y, and most of the other existing institutions were rigidly Calvinistic or dehnitely affiliated with one of the then Ve1'y conservative Protestant churches. Presidential oflices and memberships on the governing board of these colleges were typically held by ministers and tight-lipped theologians who viewed the new liberalizing movements of the day with mis- giving and even alarm. Long, compulsory, daily chapel exercises were the rule in all colleges. Proselyting for the denominational faith of the college was a standard practice. Any student who entered a college without having already become a member of the church controling it was from the first subject to strong pressure. In such environments boys who had been reared in homes of the new religious liberalism were often brought back to old-fashioned o1'thodoxy. An old letter tells us that they returned home to bewail the fact that their own parents were eternally damned. As a result of these conditions, men and women of liberal religious tendencies were anxious to provide a strong college which did not have about it what they had come to consider the shackling chains of reactionary thought. Harvard, alone among the institutions of higher learning in New England, had already been won by the forces of religious liberalism. A few years before the founding of Tufts, Harvard had essentially become a Unitarian college. But to many cautious, middle-of- Festival at the Dedication of Tufts College. i221 With ci doctrine of liberalism via P7'0-fC-9S0?',-Y Row in the early years. the-road religious liberals of the time, and especially to the members of the free but not radical Universalist Church, Harvard had already gone too far in its opposition to orthodoxy. A Because of a reactionary spirit on the one hand and what seemed to be an extreme radicalism on the other in existing colleges, many liberal individuals were deeply dis- turbed. This was especially true of the members of the Universalist Church, which was the most rapidly growing denomination of the time. The 150,000 members of this church in New England had long felt that a different sort of college must be established. An earnest group of men and women in this denomination and in other related churches therefore decided to found a new and truly liberal college, one that would be fully non- sectarian but not anti-religious. Above all they dreamed of a college of high academic distinction in which toleration and real religi- i23l' ous freedom would be, established from the Hrst. Those who were interested ill the found- ing of the new college were more agreed about its academic and religious characteristics than they were as to its location. It was variously proposed that the institution should be established at Canton, New York, Franklin, M8SS3Chl1S6ttS, and in other places. It was even suggested that the college should be established in Cambridge. Those who made this proposal had in mind the separate colleges of Oxford and Cambridge. They felt that a new college could be founded in association with Harvard that might be quite separate in discipline and doctrine but still enjoy certain of the advantages of a university association in the English sense. Of course this proposal did not prevail. Down through the years, however, Harvard, seeing in Tufts another institution devoted to the new re- ligious liberalism, has assisted the younger ana' earnest academic goals College H ill from Mystic River in the 1850's showing ship on ways. "Gem of the Ocean," built in M eclforcl, M ass., 1852. Wlore than 70 clipper ships were builtin Medford during the early years of the College. - 'I24I' the Hill was illuminated. Early :lays of present Tufts College golf course. Alumni Day baseball games in the 1920's. ,.. -Alu i- . 'IQ-GP -- y-.. -.vs Edfbl diligent czczfivit college in many ways. In this connection it may be interesting to note that when Tufts was founded Harvard by modern standards was still not a large institution. In 1852 Harvard had 3Q0 undergraduates and an endowment of 2B888,611. It may also be interesting to Bostonians of the present day to remember that when Tufts was founded educational work had not yet begun at Boston University, Boston College, VVellesley, Massacliusetts Institute of Technology, Rad- cliffe, Simmons, Northeastern, Brandeis, or the other institutions of higher education in this region. The decision that led to the founding of Tufts College on an independent campus partly in Medford and partly in that section of Charlestown which had recently been named Somerville was determined by a gift of land from Charles Tufts of Charlestown. The Tufts family came to the lVIystic Valley region in 1638 from Malden in England. The Tufts Mansioll in M6dfO1'd was o11e of the early "Great Houses" of New England. Charles Tufts was a large landowner in the northern part of suburban Boston. He supervised the farming of much of this land and was also a successful manufacturer. The original gift was twenty acres on what had up to that time been called VValnut Hill. Later hir. Tufts largely increased his gift of land to the new college, which was given his name in gratitude. Symbolically Charles Tufts pointed to the top of the windswept height he had given to the new college and said, "I will put a light on it." Once the decision had been made to build the new college the plan won wide financial Approach to the College as seen .s"ia:ty years ago from the Revolutionary Powder H ouse. Y ..'-,513--. ,f 1 . - , .1 - 2 , ' .. " -ry:-sr TA., :Q-, ,.: F., j"5:ET"-'Zi' 'T' 'U' , --F25 'J -"" ,, ,g -55 Rigas: ' K r' fQza:1'j 95,5 mfg? 1 ' Y ' ' may , 52. Q vga , gf' rf Em f fl' L rr . -N N, if . y . , vin? F, L I ,, .1 VK, ,LEP W,-,Ap YW, ,, g gf: I egg? , . -L V.. V fagfsn 1 Y V if ,gr inf' ' '-fl ' .Y - - .1 -,., ,, , Ea , . g g 1261 and steady endeavor mode Hosea Ballou II, first president of Tufts College. support. Theuwealthy and aristocratic neigh- bors of the college in the then residential Boston suburb of Charlestown were especially generous in their gifts. John Harvard, for F3 D whom Harvard University is named, had also been a resident of Charlestown. The colleges besides Harvard and Tufts that have been named for residents of Charlestown, "the mother of colleges," are Carleton in lVIinnesota, flolby in Blaine, and Doane in Nebraska. 1271 Among the early benefactors of Tufts who lived in Charlestown may be mentioned Dr. VVilliam J. VValker, who gave generously to the college and left 5BQ50,000 to Tufts in 1865. In terms of gifts to education at the time this was a notable benefaction. Dr. Walke1', one of the well-known surgeons and physicians of New England, was a graduate of Harvard in the class of 1810. After studying medicine with Governor John Brooks of Medford, he went abroad and continued his medical this scene our reality Ballou Hall and Chape -f 23 1- enerous initiating donors education in France. Besides his generous gift to Tufts he also left bequests to Amherst and to other institutions. In the fine portrait of Dr. WValker at Tufts he holds in his hand a copy of Sir Thomas Browne's Relfigio Medici, a book which many years later was also a favorite of Sir VVilliam Osler. Other early donors to Tufts College were Richard Frothingham and l1is daughter lVIary, later M1's. Thomas A. Goddard. Mrs. God- dardis husband was one of the merchants and ship owners who made New Englandis com- merce known all over the world. Mrs. Goddard gave Tufts its chapel and its first gymnasium to provide, as she said, for the spiritual and physical needs of the students. This first Tufts gymnasium, since its re- modelling, is now Goddard Hall of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. The Honorable Charles Robinson, Jr., Civil War mayor of Charlestown, was a benefactor and president of the Board of Trustees of the new college. His son, Sumner Robinson, 388, a Boston lawyer- and also for many years a trustee of Tufts, contributed by his wisdom and his philanthropy in many ways to the college. Robinson Hall and large endowment funds have been gifts to Tufts from this family. Silvanus Packard of Boston by a bequest established in 1858 left a fund which now exceeds bB280,000. On July 23, 1853, the cornerstone of the first building, now called Ballou Hall, was laid with appropriate exercises. Over 1500 persons were p1'esent. This original "college edificei' still stands, although much altered Royall H ouse, colonial mansion. -l29l a. with the aim of knowlecl e internally. It is now the administration building of the college. In architecture it is a simple Italian Renaissance structure. As originally planned it contained a chapel, a library, recitation rooms, a dormitory, bathing accomlnodations, and, interestingly enough, rooms for two literary organizations. The societies which used these rooms were called the Mzitlietican and the VValnut Hill Fraternity. Other intercollegiate societies soon followed. In 1855 and in 1856 two national fraternities were founded at Tufts. At later periods other national fraternities have established chapters here. Before the present beautiful fraternity houses were erected on the campus, meeting rooms were rented in Usher's Block in NIedford Square. Here the gown sometimes mystified the town by dark-hooded 1'itual performances. Before the building of Ballon Hall was complete, the Reverend VVilliam A. Drew, editor of a prominent religious magazine of the day, sat beneath a window in the un- finished chapel and inscribed a quotation in Latin from Horace and added these words: "Sacred to a progressive literature and to an enlightened piety be this placelu-a prayer that has been a worthy guide for the college through the years. In 1854 students entered Tufts. Regular freshman class work began in 1855. From this time on academic work has continued without interruption. The first president of Tufts College was Hosea Ballou II, a man of wide learning in the ancient and modern languages and in High hat mowing at Tufts. -'I30l- . gn - I . gn . wfeetteel our institution. Tufts College main l'ib1'm'y building. Packard Hall, once the library of the College 'I 31 It enuine regress marked Tufts College just before the Civil W'ar. history. Before becoming president of the college he had been given an honorary Doctor-is degree by Harvard. He was also an Overseer of Harvard. After his appoint- ment as president Dr. Ballou spent a year traveling and studying in the universities of England, Scotland and the Continent. Many of the methods of instruction which he initiated in the new institution were based upon his vivid impressions of education as it was at that time conducted at Oxford and especially at Edinburgh. Dr. Ballou's ex- tensive library, containing rare books in many languages, still is kept as a unit and has an honored place at Tufts. President Ballou died in 1861 and was succeeded by Alonzo A. Miner, a member of a distinguished New England family. He served as president until 1875. Although not himself a college graduate, Dr. Miiier re- received honorary Doctor's degrees from Harvard and from Tufts. His presidency was marked by many advances. Goddard Seminary in Barre, Vermont, also named for Thomas A. Goddard of Charlestown, WVest- brook Seminary near Portland, lVIaineg and Dean Academy, endowed by Dr. Oliver Dean of Franklin, M3SS21Cl1l1SCttS, were either estab- lished or specially nurtured as preparatory schools for Tufts by President lVIiner. Dr. Dean, as well as M1'. Goddard, was a generous benefactor not only of the school that bore his name but also of Tufts. Dean Hall, one of the older dormitories of Tufts, is named in his honor. These private schools developed by Dr. Minei' played an important part in the early history of Tufts. Today applicants for Tufts are about equally divided between those whose college preparation has been secured in public and in private Secondary schools. Dr. Mi11C1', like many of the early leaders of Tufts, was active in pre-Civil Wai' days in the antislavery movement. The mansion of 4321 the years 0 our able leaders. lVIajor Stearns which once stood on part of the campus was a station in the so-called underground railroad by means of which fugitive slaves from the South were helped to escape to Canada. Stearns Village, the present Tufts married veterans, housing Center, is named for lVIajor Stearns who bequeathed the land on which it stands to the college. Once the War between the states had begun, the College was active in support of the Union cause. Undergraduate classes, however, continued without diminution of numbers. Indeed, in the year of Gettysburg the largest classes up to that time entered Tufts. In all, sixty-three graduates of the college served in the blue of the Union armies, many with distinction. VVinsor Brown French of the class of 1859 was made Brigadier General and was the 'drst man to gain, the heights of Fredericksburg. Tufts men also played an important role in the Spanish- American VVar and in the first and second world wars. The main entrance leading to the college and the beautiful new War Men1o1'izLl Library are tributes to the men and women of Tufts who have served and died in our nation's Wars. Tufts is proud of the fact that it has undergraduate Naval and Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps Units and Army Reserve Officers Training Corps Units in its Schools of Nfedioine and Dentistry. The first alumnus of Tufts to become president of the college was Elmer H. Capen, Student group at Tufts seventy years ago. i 4 v - . ,A - it -' . -. ,,.f...... - V V ll .l , Vffffli. . .1--. ' ', . .. QQ, ,L -.A..--- ..-.-..L.....- -..-....., - -..- .l....--....--,-.. .W..,, 4.1.-. . .,.-n . -- -Y - ax and ux, the strong motto, '60, who served in this office from 1875 to 1905. Dr. Capen was a man of outstanding ability, and much of Tufts as we know it today is the result of his able mind. VVhile Dr. Capen was still an undergraduate the town of Stoughton elected him as its repre- sentative in the Massacliixsetts legislature. After graduation Capen studied law and was admitted to the bar but soon decided that instead he wished to enter the ministry. After theological training and a pastorate in the West he was called to the First Uni- versalist Parish in Providence, which position he resigned in 1875 to accept the presidency of Tufts. President Capenis son, Samuel P. Capen, '98, is the distinguished Chancellor Emeritus and true builder of the modern University of Buffalo. President Capen's successor, Frederick W. Hamilton, '80, a businessman and clergy- man, also did much for the development of the college. He was in turn succeeded by Williani L. Hooper, ,'7'7, as acting president. Hooper was a physicist and also a pioneer electrical engineer. Dr. Hooper was followed by Herman C. Bumpus, Brown University ,84Q. He was one of AH161'lC3.,S well-known biologists and was especially interested in the development of science at Tufts. He resigned in 1919 and was succeeded by John A. Cousens, ,98, who served from 1919 to 1937. Under the statesmanlike administra- Nol 8 West Hall seventy years ago. 4341 1 l remains through our growth West Hall eighty yea-rs ago. tion of President Cousens, rapid physical and intellectual developments took place which have given Tufts much of its present character. President Cousens was succeeded by Dr. George S. Miller, '06, who served as acting president from 1937 to 1938 and as its able and resourceful vice president until 1951. President Leonard Carmichael, '21, has been at Tufts in his present capacity since 1938. Maily special points in the century of Tufts, life stand out. First of all it has by votes of its Trustees avoided the easy tempta- tion of bigness. The constant effort has been to make the college better rather than larger. Tufts now has useful buildings, a beautiful tree-shaded campus, and a growing 1351 endowment of invested funds. The total worth of the college today is eighteen million of which over ten million is endowment. Only nine institutions in the country with the wo1'd "College" in their titles now have a larger endowment. Tufts is fortunate in its special funds for scholarships and graduate fellowships. The small faculty of early years brought wisdom from many institutions. Ma1'shall the scientist came from Yale, Tweed and Keen in rhetoric and Latin from Harvard, Schneider in Greek from Basel in Switzerland, Shipman in English from Middlebu1'y, and B. G. Brown in mathematics from Harvard. These men and their associates established bese 661761 scenes denote Quadrangle before the campus fence was built. Early Tufts boat house. i361 our ontinuecl trans mfmeztion, 9 mg. An early Tufts crew on the Nlystic River. Tufts sailboats on the Mystic Lakes, near present College Yacht Club House. 1 ... 3. 4353255256 Vw 4 ,W vu Q.: gg-Nu -uf- f 146 .4-. A-Q -.,, -f37lh --- ve- - the strength of our independence. '-Si ' TT' " N Wlzi. 7 7 ' B 1.-' as .H . is 1 x ' L gf 2 . N H firm. 5 71 a. -f,.'?- isa' ul ... was-'..nmaf,. J. . i . Q w l Site of present Consens Gymnasium showing Major Stearns' mans-ion in the foreground. the high Tufts academic tradition. Among other teachers and deans of the early and middle days were Anthony, Bacon, Bolles, Bray, M. T. Brown, Channing, Cushman, Dearborn, Denison, Dolbear, Durkee, Fay, Frothingham, Gott, Graves, Harmon, Kings- ley, Knight, Lane, Leonard, Lewis, McCol- lester, Nfaulsby, Pitman, Sanborn, Sawyer, Start, Thayer, Tousey, VVade, WVhitte1nore and WI'C11. This group made a notable faculty. Today a number of Tufts teachers and research men have national and indeed international reputations. The progressive and liberal spirit that led to the establishment of the college has always made scholars feel that it is an attractive intellectual society with which to be associated. The founders of Tufts were determined 4381- to build a strong institution that would follow the via media. In looking back it seems that moderation has been the watchword of the college in the various religious, social, political and educational storms that have swept over America during this first century of the college. Over and over Tufts' stand in these controversies was one of upholding not one extreme or other but rather standing for the common-sense course that ultimately leads to sure progress. Tufts is an independent college. It has been alert in testing ideas but cautious about accepting the new merely because it was novel or had achieved famous endorsement. The college, however, has made its share of educational innovations. In 1899, for ex- ample, it was at Tufts that the "term hour" 0 these original leaders, Alonzo Ames Miner, president 1862-1875. system now almost universally used through- out the country in assessing academic work was invented and first established. Tufts was possibly the irst college of distinguished academic reputation in the country to allow the substitution of two modern languages for Greek in its admission requirements, a plan that later Won universal acceptance and in turn has seen later modiications. Today the college emphasizes general education but not in a Way to challenge Tufts' basic philosophy, which is to provide for each student by proper guidance a special curriculum best for the individual. Tufts thus has solved the dif- ficulty of the "lock step" of blanket require- ments and also the abuses of the free elective system. Academic life in the early days on the Hill seems remote today. The first simple programs had more in common witl1 the established pattern of ancient Renaissance 'l39l Elmer Hewitt Capen, class of 1860, third president, 1875-1905. F reclerick William H amilton, president 1906-1912. cezlbezble emo' reseurcqful, university study than with the full and active curriculum of today. At first only one course of study was offered and that was almost completely prescribed for all four years. The curriculum consisted of Latin, Greek, mathematics, history, rhetoric, religion, physics, moral science and political economy. French, German and Italian were elective subjects in the junior and senior years. Today Tufts offers courses in many depart- ments grouped in several separate but co- operating schools. Students who applied for admission in the early days were examined in Latin, Greek, algebra and history. Tuitio11 was S535 a year. Room rent was 3510 to 9515 a year, the library fee 355, and board 32.50 a Week. Each student, however, was required to post a bond for SSQ00 before admission. The -young Tufts was a most liberal but certainly not a nonreligious college. All William Leslie H ooper, acting president 1912-1914. -i401 students and faculty attended morning and evening prayers every day. A special Biblical exercise was held every Saturday evening. All students were required to attend church on Sunday, Thanksgiving and fast days, but the selection of the church was left to the students' parents or guardians. It is not buildings or even courses of study that make colleges, it is the people- teachers and students-who express its spirit and give it life. A few such individuals may be mentioned here. Stephen M. Babcock, '66, after taking the Doctor of Philosophy degree at Gottingen, became professor and later dean at the Uni- versity of WVisconsin. He developed the iirst practical test to determine the amount of butterfat in milk. The Babcock Test, now used all over the World, has made the modern dairy industry possible. Interestingly enough, this test has hardly been modified since its Herman Carey Bumpus, president 1911,-1919. we credit our advancement. John, .fllberi Uousens, president 1919-1937. development years ago by Dr. Babcock. Arthur Micliael, a graduate of Tufts, studied with the great chemists and physicists of Germany, including Bunsen and Helm- holtz. After receiving his Doctor's degree he established a private laboratory on the Isle of YYight in the English Channel but in 1894 returned to Tufts as professor of chemistry. Dr. hiichael was one of the first theoretical organic chemists of America. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and received honors from learned societies throughout the world. Dr. Frank WV. Durkee, long head of the Tufts Chemistry Depart- ment, is remembered with respect and grati- tude by many Tufts graduates who specialized in this significant modern science. Tufts has long been known in chemistry because of the thoroughness of its undergraduate courses. Among dozens or even hundreds of notable Tufts chemists may be mentioned 41411 George Sfewart ,V'1'Ileo', acting presfident 1937-1938. Arthur B. Lamb, '00, former director of the Harvard Chemical Laboratory and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard . The late hlinton VVarren, ,70, took his Ph.D. degree at Strassburg after graduating from Tufts. He was professor of Latin successively at Johns Hopkins and Harvard. At one time he was Director of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome. He was one of America's greatest epigraphists. VVilliam L. Hooper, ,77, who has already been mentioned as acting president of Tufts, was one of the original minds of the day when electrical engineering was just beginning. As a physicist Dr. Hooper was first attracted to the new and developing field of applied electricity. In collaboration with the then infant General Electric Company he made some of the fundamental advances in electrical power machinery that are still in use today. Years ago these scenes Olcl College Hill Railroad Station site now occupied by Tufts College Press. Sketch of Tufts College thirty years ago. . e .. pwigff zgfixss, ZQEFM we ' 22235 2 vm Vu" agggazz Xl' ' gage V 1 , I 5. 1:g., ,.,:- 'Q - , if :' : ., .. l A V. S , , H Z, , Nj Q ee, t s ef . f 2 A' 'E 51' ' ' so ' A-3:-1 M t me mr 1-. 1- H gm H : t gg H -an-..fu,,. . .. sf ssfss t 4421 I depicted t Pica! ups . . . 1 Q 1 A-fiEi'S12f"!S.f,,'..i-.'. .mgg eu.,n.sL'2nj3 gl.. Q5 -.,-""""",. -TZ. Old Goddard Gymnasium. The victorious Tufts football team of 1876. , 'l43l' the ollege pam , the reservoir, Fifty years ago the Tuftonian published a sad poem on the passing of the College pump. For example, he designed the first slotted :trmature for dynzunos. Fred Stark Pearson, ,83, 'one of Dr. Hooperls students as assistants, even as an undergraduate was one of Americafs pioneers in the world-wide expansion of the electrical osss ' if ' .. ,.., , ..,i. sw. ,Qi ..,, .. fi ii: I- If rf. 5 "East Hall will shine tonight," eighty years ago. power industry. As at scientist he designed basic items of equipment for electric power stations. As an executive and entrepreneur he was responsible for the development of the electric power and electric street car systems of many of the capitals of South America and Old College reservoir showing reflections of gatehouse, radio mast, and West Hall. 'I44l now cz startling comms! Interior-'old chemistry laboratory. Elff67"ilI7"dm0d6'7'7Z Pearson M'emo1'ial Chemistry Laboratory vi - . V' t -W, ,W .V -.. -- . A mf, . 4145! van- --wi - - v -rv: ' to the ufls emu' to Class Day of yore. of some of the principal cities of Europe. Dr. Pearson died in the sinking of the Lusi- tania. The Tufts College chemical laboratory is named in his honor. Wliile a member of the faculty of the Tufts College Medical School Dr. M01'tO11 Prince Wrote his great books on the dissocia- tion of the personality which had a funda- Ballou when campus trees were small. w W, 532 'a I .mi gd' 'Mfg mental part in ushering in the Whole modern dynamic movement in psychology and psy- chiatry in America, France and Austria. Other Tufts professors in medicine and dentis- try have contributed to the notable advances of these fields in the last half century. From 1892 to 1912 John S. Kingsley was professor of zoology at Tufts. He was one of Barnum biology and geology building before modern additions. 1 t ' T 'friifz-E412 l46l the opportunities we now enjoy. The "Large Chapel" in Ballon Hall eighty years ago. those responsible for the development of the subject of comparative anatomy in America. Through his own investigations, his books, and his translations of basic German handbooks he possibly did more than any other man to establish in this country the pattern of this great field which is now recognized as one of the principal premedical subjects. Professor Herbert V. Neal in zoology and Professor Fred D. Lambert in botany also added to the lustre of this always notable Tufts depart- ment. Among many Well-known biologists to graduate from Tufts may be mentioned Charles H. Danforth, professor of anatomy at Stanford, member of the National Academy of Sciences and authority on the development of the endocrine balance of the organism. Charles E. Fay, '68, long head of the modern language department at Tufts, was one of the early members of the Modern Language Association of America. Known throughout t.he world as a mountaineer, he l47l --.ugmzs was knighted by the Prince of Monaco for his contribution to the scientific study of mountains. The Canadian government has named a peak on the Continental Divide, Mt. Fay, in his honor. P. T. Barnum of circus fame, an early Tufts Trustee and an active Universalist layman, helped the teaching of biology at Tufts by giving the building which bears his name as well as many mounted specimens for the Tufts lVIuseum. In 1885 after Jumbo, the largest elephant ever to be in captivity, was killed near a circus train in Canada, Barnum had Jumbo's skin skillfully mounted and presented to Tufts. Thus this great animal still presides majestically over the Barnum Room at Tufts. Jumbo is the mascot of the college. V annevar Bush, ,13, was amember of the Tufts faculty and later vice president of the lVIassachusetts Institute of Technology. He is now president of the Carnegie Institution Early engineering laboratory. nr engineering development in Interior-Bray lllechanical Engineering Laboratory. Earterxior of one of the modern engineering laboralories at Tufts. 1481 be an earl and eezgerbf w l K Early electrical laboratmy. Students testing Equipment in Electrical Engineering Laboratory. 4491 l with l An early radio broadcast from Tufts showing Professors I. Andrews, H. Rockwell, and H. Gilmer. Dean G. C. Anthony is at the microphone. of Wasliington, one of the worldis greatest research organizations. During the second VVorld War Dr. Bush headed the Office of Scientific Research and Development which directed the war-related research activity of the nation. Bush is a niember of the National Academy of Sciences and has been awarded knighthood by Great Britain. During his years at Tufts he developed the gaseous rectifier tube and made other notable ad- vances in electronics. Norbert VViener, '09, professor of mathe- matics at the lilassachusetts Institute of Technology and originator of the science of cybernetics, is another of the group of Tufts graduates who have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. He has made contributions in research in several fields of pure mathematics. Professor Amos E. Dolbear served at Tufts from 1874 until 1910 as professor of physics. Dr. Dolbear is one of the men who invented the modern telephone. Authori- ties attribute to him the invention of the re- ceiver as we now know it. His patents were competent guidance Stephen M. Babcock, '66, in his laboratory at Wisconsin. later sold to the Bell Company. Dolbear also invented what we now call the condensermicro- phone. He sent wireless messages from Ballou Hall at Tufts College before anyone else in the world had sent such messages. In connection with T ufts' long history of relationship to the development of radio, physics and engineering it is interesting that the first regular broadcasts in America were sent out from the station and the high mast then located on the north slope of the Tufts campus. Tufts, interest in the scientific basis of radio and television develop- ment continues. Today the college is actively at work upon extensive research in this field for the Air Forces and the Signal Corps of the Army, as well as upon topics in this field re- lated to pure physical science. hlany other distinguished faculty mem- bers and graduates of the college could be mentioned. Some have become state govern- ors, two have been members of the Cabinet of the President of the United States. Tufts has also produced judges, doctors, lawyers, clergymen, educators, scientists, engineers, great businessmen, admirals and generals. f50l and histmf 'cal signgiccmce. It is not inappropriate, however, to single out for special notice at this time some who have given the college its financial strength during its first century. Heading this list is the name of Austin B. Fletcher, '76, a member of the bar in New York City and a successful businessman. He left the college almost his entire estate of more tha.n 353,000,000 Part of this gift was used to establish the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts College, which has served the nation well and brought honor and distinction all over the world to the name of its principal bene- factor. This school is in certain respects jointly administered by Harvard. Among many other names associated with generous gifts to the endowment or buildings of the college besides those already noted may be mentioned George G. Averill, VVilliam Bingham Qnd, Eugene B. Bowen, Sylvester Bowman, Henry W. Bragg, Henry J. Braker, Earle P. Charlton, Wlilliam E. and ltlarion L. Chenery, VVilliam L. Clayton, Edward E. Cohen, Thomas Crane, The Charles Hayden Foundation, the Godfrey NI. Hyams Trust, Henry C. Jackson, John D. VV. Joy, Eugene M. Niles, the Theodore Edson Parker Foundation, Harry and Hannah Z. Posner and Sumner Robinson. Tufts students now come from most of the states of the union. In this centennial year there are eighty-eight students from forty-five foreign countries registered at Tufts. Building at Tufts has been almost con- tinuous. Tufts now has-large and small- over eighty buildings. The growth of the library has been typical. The original library soon Ollllgl'6W its first rooms in Ballou Hall and was moved to what we now call Packard Hall. This building in turn became too small and the Eaton Library was given to Tufts by M1's. Andrew Carnegie in memory of her pastor, C. H. Eaton, '74, The new Radio lower on Tufts campusefirst broadcasts in America from this site. Nigga W Rs fr 'Q ,' pa .if F ' ' " L M, I :ml A if Ii . ,, I Y fill V2 I I W , f 4 RH WX, E Qs! . A M f", S ' 13-V ' v X35 l , . ras Y SEZ lg! 2-1 'E I K P V.. r . 1 f' 'X S.. 229 ' iii L A f .. A lil If 1511 We recognize our bene ae ors, WVar Nlemorial Library now supplements this building. Tufts has more than 250,000 books. In many of our American states there is no library as large as this. The new library has a number of notable features such as a room for listening to recordings, upwards of a hundred study carrels, special seminar rooms, comfortable recreational reading rooms, and separate studies for faculty research workers. The early 'gphilosophical apparatusi' or scientific equipment of the college was brought together by Professor John P. Ma1'sl1all. He even learned how to grind lenses to help in this work. The modern Tufts has good science laboratories. Taken together, they represent an expenditure of more than three million. Possibly no "College,, in the country does more scientihc investigation than does Tufts. In this centennial year research pro- jects with a total budget in excess of two million dollars are under way. This work is not only important in its own right but it is most significant indirectly in the part that it plays in undergraduate education at Tufts. The new home of the Tufts Medical and Dental Schools on Harrison Avenue was first occupied in 1949. This monumental eight- story building provides teaching and research facilities for these two schools and is located near the Tufts teaching hospitals which together make up the New England Medical Center. The modern Tufts is a complexly organ- ized institution. The School of Religion, later called the Crane Theological School, was College chimes before installation-gift of Eugene B. Bowen, "76. Austin B. F lezfcher, '76, Tufts' largest donor Henry J. Bruker, generous Tufts donor. l52l ex ansion still continues 13.45 I Part of Reading Room-lfletcher' Library. Alt. Fay, named for C. E. Fay, '68, on Continental Divide in Canadian Rockies. 4531 . .1 yn 1 lo or W 'ae 1 53 C rt fu' ' W ,, , Li 'f A' H5 +V? Interior-Crane Chapel . Charles Ernest Fay, '68, Professor of lVIodern Languages and mountaineer. department by department. established in 1869. This school is today affiliated in certain respects with the Divinity School of Harvard University. From the first this school has been nondenominational but its primary obligation has been to the Universalist and Unitarian Churches. A course leading to a degree in engineering was established in 1865, the same year that instruction began at the Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology. From that time to the present the role of engineering education has grown in importance at Tufts. Today the School of Liberal Arts and the School of Engineering complement each other in provid- ing some of the special advantages that Tufts offers undergraduates. Courses in the liberal arts can be supplemented by the work in the notable scientific departments and laboratories of the School of Engineering, and offerings in the social sciences and humanities in the School of Liberal Arts enrich the modern engineering curriculum. In 1893 the lVIedical School was opened and in 1899 the Boston Dental College, founded in 1868, became the Tufts Dental School. In the year of the establishment of the Medical School President Capen Hrst used the word "University', as applying to Tufts in the Latin ritual of the awarding of degrees at Commencement. The new building of these schools has already been mentioned. Today more doctors and dentists in the New England states are graduates of Tufts than of any other school. Dr. Benjamin Spector, professor of anatomy and the history of medicine at the Tufts Medical School, is the author of a complete history of the first half century of the Medical School. In tl1e last decade both the Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have given a new emphasis to research and have become, indeed, not only teaching centers but institutes for scientific investigation in these great health fields. Woiiien students were first admitted to Tufts in 1892, and in 1910 the won1en's division was organized and chartered by the Commonwealth as Jackson College. Many Woinen who have won national distinction have graduated at the Hill. Jackson has always offered a p1'ogram of studies which is fully coordinate with Tufts. In its physical plant Jackson has also seen rapid development. Its most 1'ecent building is the Henry Clay Jackson Gymnasium which also serves as a modern student center for Jackson College. Tufts has 'a Graduate School which "Princess I da" an operetta of the early days. 4l54l- ' ,ll 1+ S: -U, I--t r-E I3 1 H, FE 14' if I' The legend of umbo, :za--bf si ..-uri ' 1912- A Wwf?? .V ' 'ufts' own Jumbo on his way to Bm'-num Ilfuseum. Jumbo 'in his new home. M fc? , ,-,.4-vw' mf , . uw, A iv . .55 41551- ewis FN Dr. Leo Lewis emf Ima M alter, ' , gives work under the supervision of the Faculties of Arts and Sciences, Medicine and Dentistry. The degrees of Blaster of Arts, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy are awarded by this school. Tufts has a division of Special Studies which offers adult education courses and also provides academic work under a cooperative agreement with the Bouve-Boston School of Physical Education, the Boston School of Occupational Therapy, the Forsyth Dental Infirmary, the Nursery Training School, the New England Con- servatory of Music and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. By special arrange- ment all courses in art at the School of the llluseum of Fine Arts are open to Tufts and Jackson undergraduates. Tufts has chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, and a number of other specialized honorary academic societies. There are also student chapters of national societies in civil, mechanical, electrical and An early Tzdts Glee Club. cmd the confident spirit Tufts baseball team, 1870. chemical engineering, and in other special fields. In the early days the Tufts campus was an isolated community. Student life was restricted to the campus and college buildings, At first there were not even regular roadways to the college. An old cart path 1'an through pa1't of one of the Tufts farms, passing what is now Capen House and turning up by what is now the Presidentis House to the top of the hill. This path was used to haul the materials used in the construction of the "college edificef, The railroad built a few years before Tufts began provided the only con- venient means of coming to or going from fl57l "College Hilln as the Tufts community, railroad station and post office were then officially called. In old catalogues the follow- ing note appears: The Woburn Center trains which leave the depot of the Lowell Railroad in Boston stop at the College station. A few Boston and Maine trains still stop at "Tufts Collegef, but even the "new', college station has now reverted to Tufts and is used as a workshop for the Drama Department. This department, incidentally, has not only this workshop but also a building exclusively devoted to tl1e first regular arena 4 1 ereeztec! this modern Picture theatre in New England. Down through the years Tufts has been well known for its student dramatic performances and its de- partment of Drama and Speech. Something of the primitive nature of transportation in the early days of the college is indicated by the fact that at least oc- casionally Tufts students would walk to Medfo1'd, hire a rowboat, calculate the tide, row to Boston, attend the theatre or a concert as Tufts students still do, and return with the tide. In these early days there were only one or two houses between Tufts and the Myfstic River. Tufts students in the Hfties could walk down to the pungent shipyards and watch great East Indiamen and clipper ships on the ways and smell the odors of pine and tar. These healthy smells XVCP6 not unmixed with the special odor produced by the then prosperous business of distilling M6dfO1'd rum. The Tufts community, now no longer isolated, still has its connections with the Bowen Gate and Goddard Chapel tower. Interior view of new W'ar Zllemorial Library. Mystic River. For some time two boat clubs each with its separate boat house and boats were used by rival Tufts societies on the Nlystic River. The present Tufts Yacht Club house and its fleets of sailing dinghies on the ltlystic Lakes at the head of the Mystic River are the lineal descendants of these early nautical ventures of tl1e college. Tufts sports too have a history that goes back almost to the period of the Hfties. The first Tufts baseball team was organized in 1863, the first football team in 1873. In the early 18'70,s Harvard still played so-called Boston football. Tufts took up the new American game of modified rugby and in June 1875 beat Harvard by a score of 6 to 0. This was Harvardis first game with an American college under the new rules and was prior to the first Harvard-Yale game. The first intercollegiate football game ever played by Bowdoin and by Amherst College was also 1531- in co ntrezst with our rum! origin. The old college willows--road to Medford Square past present Cousens Gymnasium site. with Tufts. Series of football games with all the other older colleges of New England date back to the infancy of the game. One of Ya1e's ea1'liest games was with Tufts. Today Tufts is known throughout the count1'y as a college in which the "amateur spiritw in sports is ardently supported. Intra- mural and intercollegiate varsity, junior varsity and freshman teams give an oppor- tunity for team play to all interested Tufts One of Americcfs first .successful gliders was clesignecl and built at Tufts. l59l and Jackson students. Today Tufts or- dinarily has varsity and also often junior varsity and freshman teams in football, baseball, basketball, indoor and outdoor track, wrestling, hockey, swimming, soccer, cross country, lacrosse, golf, tennis, squash, fencing, boxing and sailing. P Other extracurricular activities besides sports had an early beginning at Tufts. In 1864 the first issue of the Tuftonian, the first college publication, appeared. The Tufts Weekly celebrated its semicentennial in 1946. The Jumbo Book, as the college annual is now called, replaced the Brown and Blue which began in the 1880,s. The Ivy Book or fresh- man bible has been published for almost fifty years. The Alumni Review and special publications of the Medical and Dental Schools now also appear regularly. founded in 1866, started music which under Pro- , '87, early brought great and won it the name of .', 'EDear Alma Mate1'," The Glee Club, a great tradition in fessor Leo R. Lewis distinction to Tufts "the singing college the hymn of the college, with words by Nlaulsby, '87, and music by Lewis has in- F-1 spired many generations at Tufts. "The Brown and Blue" and "Tuftonia,s Day" with music by Newton, '90, and Hayes, '16, are among the other favorite songs of the college. A book of 369 pages, "A History of Music in Tufts Collegef, by H. A. Hersey, 303, was published in 1947. In this book are included the history of the Tufts orchestra, string quartets, instrumental groups, student operettas and a long series of "Tufts Nights at the Popsf' Tufts was the first college to have a special night at Symphony Hall. In the early years students were not permitted to leave the town of Medford in which their dormitory rooms were located without special permission from the faculty. The young college was active in the life of Medford. The establishment of the "College Hillv post ofHce, however, contributed in mf seco nc! century setting off the academic community from its parent Medford. More and 1nore "the Hilli' became an independent village. Where Tufts, own golf course now has its smooth greens and even beyond the present Powder House Boulevard was an extensive pond. This was used for boating in the spring and autumn and for skating in winter. In the early days most of the members of the faculty of the college owned cows which were pastured on the shores of this pond. The remains of the orchards and stables of this earlier agricultural day may still be seen by the observant passer-by on the slope of the hill below Professors Row. Student activities have continued to develop at Tufts as the college has grown. Today there are many undergraduate societies. Tower Cross, Ivy and Sword and Shield are respectively the senior, junior and sophomore The old Medical anal Dental Building on Huntington Ave. ll 1 Wwgjmw Wa., N ,. X .,.,. X Xyty X ,. XX . ,. X . X XX XX XX X X WM,g,,, X, 4 LW X Wrmfyw-L.. X XX ,..... V ,,X. - 1 W4 . . ,I V X LX Xi X . ,,4,:,,.. iii-fjv5,.yZ.: X X XX XXXXXXXiJ12i is X: , ,aw , -- , , , . . .. , , , .- f , . .ff X ,,,.-,.,-,E-4,-.X . 9 F, XX U-MX,XX,,,,, -s.. i . U, ,X L -X ,L X .,, , , A' - , f , -.- 1 'rE:9.A5'? 4.11, "Q--1 -4 Lg' '- .wk .fl-323635 . ...si '-fel Q-'4'f" e"""" 2. . V ' 1' ' ' . ' ' - 40--if '. f' - 9-'sggu-1w"f'r '- .P s ' -.1 -J . ' f' r- 9 -4 T -I f "'-1.94-f.: ., . ' 21.-'AJ g , :. 1-: wh- ' " -' V - i -r Q - X r-wi'-- "A -. 'M 'K 'X w- XM'-N-Mfr a'- H Q. T-9 , ll f:m:r"'..i.S2i'r-Y"":z'..1:M'::fr?1ITZ-w . .fri-smixvii., .1--i,W"". 'fb -+ ffl. - X- - .. 5, .- - J-qw., Q, - , 'W A W .. A. .. . . 9 . W. Na - . . , . - ,..--,,,-..f .., , .. . ..-. ,. , , ., ..,. 1 .. ., .. .. , -.. l60l marks cz new ups em . . . 1 r 1 , r ' An Anatomy Lab of the New Jledical School lhe pr: sent Puffs Jfedwal School 1- 1 fu , f,. 1 '- -Hill' cm em to ibmise I A corner of Hamilton Blemorial Swimming Pool. Tufts own golf course on the l1J6!,f07'fl campus. 4621 the noble clmllen e is if-, '- --sig Navy ROTC on parade. S. S. Charles Tufts, launched Oct. 10, 1944. 5 f 5' 1,5219 4' x I 4 N33 95, 'N 1 ' E 'F X .Q ijt '1 .Y Ez? A -i631 . 1 .f'eiJ: QQ W ag of learning. 'Jae X r, , i,1 F1-sivfgi .-rig ::' ' Nt if - ...mba ... Skiing on the campus. societies. Departmental, 1'eligious and hobby clubs have also been started and now flourish on the campus. For almost eighty years there has been a chess club at Tufts. One has only to look at the bulletin board in the Kursaal fthe student soda fountainj or the Taberna fthe student book storej to gain an idea of the multiplicity of student activities which have grown from the two grave literary societies of pre-Civil VVar days. An alumni office and a placement office keep in touch with gradu- ates and with employers of Tufts students after they leave the Hill. And so the first active century has passed. It is clear in the minds of her sons and daughters that Tufts was not founded to be and is not now just another college. It was founded as an institution set apart by a truly liberal aim. Its graduates think that this character of their college gives it a special spirit. Fifty years ago in an address to Tufts undergraduates Professor Thomas VVhittemore, '94, gave a clue to this con- tinuing and special attitude of mind that is the true Tufts. He said: "One youth comes up and asks the college to give him wealth, another to give him position, another to give him power, another to give him knowledge. And the college, wise with the lives of her children, looks deep into their eyes and says, 'You know not what you ask., Her highest ideal for you is in an educated man, by which I mean, a man in whose training there have been no oversights, who is cultivated as well as learned, who has pure manners as well as fine skill, who has high moral character as well as great powersf, In its first century Tufts has, to use the words of its charter, promoted virtue and piety. It has lead many able students into an understanding of the liberal and useful arts and sciences. Today the almost twenty thousand living Tufts Alumni hope that Charles Tufts' light, even though it may come to depend on atomic energy and not on Medford whale oil, will shine ever more brightly during its second century on his hilltop. f64l- 15' 545' Q Q25-gf 1 'f i mg i . 1 -1 .FK ,av af ,X ,gg W,- , ,, ,dw f. 1' ,-L ,4,',-.u '. . ,,Qcf-17'??"713E ,M M, f.x ....,,, , s , w ,.,,gM..,J wr gms ,QQ X 2 f .SV Q .Aw I gif?-in flfofs ,QV-W. W ,, 1 '- .aiwlikiff LES V: is 3545- if J, Cm 'J-fait." ,I ' W. .- , 4:14. Qmmxl nw. M, Us A ,,, .gi ,. f-Crm ,WN fi iff? ,X xg V ,,,.g,w V,-7-'X - if-1wM'3 5' 31. ,, mx V ,H wx, '- 1-.Q 1' 5. 'xlxf'-'12 .-" '-4 is 'aus - ,,. ,- .-X-.j5,,f,'fD. - 'w ' 'iff Mfr---.I-, -f M, ,, 13'?!',.'L,f,1,.4Jg 1510 f ,, sf' Q 1gQ.,, A was W ' V M11 z W H1254 my k -z -"':'w vw - iv Mffsg, , , ,M ,mm 3' Af . . A fr X-1 Ni, -X 1 MN., A, . - - - ,ms " 'nzsfiflw' ,QM , ,JK T49 b,2s:vg,:',.g',5: , ,y,qz3gC',Ngl4.iQ JM ,, qw 2,5 . ffafS2,,fg,-'xf,Qfs'23-:,, ,TQQNzf5,j,,J1ff'sA- ,U fx fjgicm ff, QV, ag, -A1p,', X 2-K -- , A. 'TTM -X V ' '5ac1, , sv , -v ,.,,, V5 fi ,yu V. MYQQ- j,,- , -ff f 5' -gi 41 f? 'y y,2'!:.E,g,f,?s 515.215 s.. , fw',f".E I: Zig 52' 2 lf. Q, ,W 7555? if ' JEZH 'Q wk fig-3,'.:n l?,3f,:s,,,kjAw ,Muna fV5V,5'f? 5' z 'Ba ,agv-fi-yi'-f' tru,-'Q my Hgp-ig - ,. ,QW ggp .,-'gf,,m gr., X .fag "QM ' 2 . 'WJ i, , :QM .ru i , ,qv Maxim ., n .W ge I, xl A-,X .4 fi R aM,a E M M gg-E., V K Y. M jx' Y' E an ,-EL . t Mk, M -w L-5 mmm Us KW QM, M 1 iii? E A W .... M Ax.. . au. . . . pu. 'aa.:': '::-- -- -- -- .a.-:.v,:,zv.:- M 'fi Q my ' :.: .: x xi' ...:.: 1 -- I EFX X 5535: M - -:Fair Q E: ,E E in af - E. W ,.X: . M . .Q V gy M, SF, f ,I T -.J MM -AMW Y :V :MMM Mf A :M-M iii. My SW-MN -M4 MM My Mr, M Q.,-M RLQJEI4.. . MW- . ,,,v,f.., HF ,Mg ,,,, , , awww MMF , M M ,-,, W, .M . . M MM-fr , -,. Q:-s f ww mpwggg gi, s.f QQ dw! W mm ,fwmg lmwguv,-MMM , X .q.,,1,MQ H Lrgjsg: 1' Q' M Mkil M EM if i w a H ' 9' 'iw 4 T- A MMM QW ,M . .wx ff.,.M1., .KM t ., I MJMV , Q K 44 WMG K A - .3-.lg 4 -g t M1 M Aw. W , was :gf ,SM . new Wkii xw. Y 1 , M , M W Wg "L A Qi' ig iM""K ' W.'k ji. '-T Mi,ZiSg,f,,. . N L , ' , 4225.25 5 EL , Eff 'ln5,M ' fd f ww: Q , 5 3, - 4. .54 Q 4 A 3' M X M all in .1 ' Agfffy M wi, 'fi HEL -5 Qi . :S F X' any . ,ff ' M Efilfw .Q M. 93226: VXI-5 'Kwik E Q fm : mf' 1 iw fr una , A Misa rmmgss an .wg rx avi U A '2 gmfllz 4 Q, 1 Q M ES '4 . 4. :rms Q X 'W Q ,QQZLEW Ji f EU Mix: ' " Qlif,,'3?l,1j, ,Y f W .i. . W, si' Qin , 'ix Gi :A , ..,. z ' .fx iw P. T. Bmvmlnz of oifrcus fame .clflL6'7'0,S one born every vnzvzutcu The Tufts College station 5 . ' now occupied by the Weelcly M was ' .iii Jumbo fame and P. T. Barnum tradition has carried our college through 100 years of successful academic study. Tufts is also proud of other merits it possesses, merits difficult to measure. Our eificient student govern- ments, the college paper, and the Tufts annual justly deserve this reputation. The college takes pride in its student administration, The Weekly, and the Jumbo Book. These activities create for the student responsibility and leader- ship. 'IGSP -:SUE THE LITTLE OIES I LET RIDE UH TIIEIII GIMIT. DDCILE ..,, ....,, .-L, ,1n.....,,,5.Ta,,w ,,. -zzz TIIB UIIIY IIIIISIUIIHII E and HISTURIC LURD oi YI e I1 I 5 5 3 '6 E 2.4 1 THE GENTL E sums 'kloldlly GHUIIIB Ill THENEUIDOUS HEIGHT IIJFT 'S-. Q 1.915 C'entu'ry Fund Drive Cuftis Hall-1908 czjectiovzatelgj called "the dive A circus poster used by the P.T. Barnxmn cfzfw-us fum W. lrllqlt , .. Jia. mf... - - 1952 presented its BILL SEIBERT, PRESIDENT numerous problems The Student Council of Tufts College has steadily progressed in power and prestige since it was established in 1924. Prior to that year there were numerous organizations, in- cluding honorary societies, but there was no co-ordinating body for student activities. A committee of students was appointed to in- vestigate student councils at other institutions and its proposal was finally presented to the enti1'e student body in Goddard Chapel. After some discussion, the constitution was adopted at chapel, by an almost unanimous rising vote. The new Council met for the first time on June 14, 19241, and elected officers for the coming academic year. Raymond L. VVilson, ,Q5, of Schenectady, New York, a member of the council as editor of The vveelily was elected as first president. Dean George S. Miller' was appointed as faculty member and remained so until VVorld 'War II. The functions set forth in the original constitution were "to delegate powers and to have general supervision over all organized student activi- ties, and the power to interfere in case organi- zations are working to detriment to the college and to themselves." The Council has always supervised and co-ordinated student activities teacher . . . ? STUDENT COUNCIL si. fI70l WP' Y v .. . - Y-, ,Y YY, to this yeczefis council for ciecision xsw Richa-rd Goodwin, Secfy. David Burns, Cowes.-Sect'y. Henry C'1m'y, Vice-Pres. on this campus. It has been interested also, in student welfare and conditions in general, which might be beneficial to students. After VVorld WVar II, the student council was faced with the difficult task of reactivating the entire activities program. Freshman tra- ditions Were reinstituted, as were honorary societies, the Jumbo Book, departmental clubs, Varsity Club, Junior Day awards ceremony and Class Day. This entire pro- gram had been dormant for almost three years and it required many hours of planning and demanded strong leadership. The student council members were responsible for all of this as Well as the completion of many new projects since then. Jones, Cook, Bennett, Hendrix, Rabe, Bruns, Aliapoulios, Kuchta Schreiber, Garvelis, Burns, Siebert, Goodwin, Kraus, Bottomley 1711 STUDENT COUNCIL AA ,- l Honest Smiddy I just parked here 'fi V xxx! O -V . :zap ,.. Q including honor system . . . voting rules, S The Presid en ts agree THE HONOR SYSTEM x r D be ' 'W Q v39:N VQ'TE:"Tj' l A Q :-, ., Q xx QWUIP5: LEE-ZNJ 4 mf ..' ,S x Q Ex QQIQ' . QSM QOQVFSE- ,N , 5 X M4 EAI X, V MQ5 V fm rc? V Y, 'lr TUFTS STUDENT COUNCIL T S.--f . A The New Voting Rules QI 72 1- Il6'i ' ' J ' f E '7' A A Sl!IhgInOn The Coundl -"-1 Emil lkiApplnldiil1cnllndlAxnt1'ldr llhamen- 'N BIulnd!lirldllludlLcilldulk0'W lk bun 4 th - --. - umm 4 in M-Ku ,num-4 umm may my: n -.. mnnpu- an -..n.1.non.a,n-.ap-L n-u--sufwm.,m,.un-lna-lapulm. -Q-A-umuqp.1-ua-..a-a-na....n.o-lfdr-.ff m-A-.n,.1anw.n-umulywywuuw-m aamfmsu mf-.-mu-vs-ym muwuh- pmawny 1 ua ann I VP luuunmqumuanmu: mm an n .mano-nun ua- un, un: nun no-ua. pau-qnqun-aan-nm llsllamlwllrilli. vrnqnnunnnmunu- 4-I rn -up-1 u un :- euuuaunuamlnnuu- ml-A-nlnrmu-u-u-11 nu3.""1lnlall1.""llhl nhn."u.nq-nn-w -I an 5-nf 1 -smug 1. :ard-u-mnaym -vp-a nu mpnmuu- -u nu-nnnnvnnuunn: is-up-a-naman -an--Q.-nn-f q-uuinuunn nam-ann:-v-q. -nynn--n-...- -u,hun.n4g.u-'nv mn-:yuan-v :mu-wmmuuuuuu L-auunm-lv-a.nu.xu our-mu m n-mum ua nu -un mana 1-mn-can -u-unc---nu-. n-:nun pn-A -c nu un 1.1 on-.ax -nupn-num-Anna. uuuam-u n-xn-u-r pq.-uunununumnu. nunaudm-un, nanvnnnuamunpl- muuns-un-annum-a umlqunuqumunwl, nm-nunnn.ulu.um mmuaxw-nunuuuur naaufmuumnunuu annum. nl-nm-u-nn pm -nu m -un:-un um an nn na nn-u -nu -mu: mu mn-rv. u --up. nr... an-ng .4 an on-mx nu. n . nun .1 an xm -nn uu u mn run, u -nun nm mn -um u u- mme u nu ca-uua num- -m -me nu, -.1 I. mu-mm ..- .nn mmm-1 m vm. nun vu I-ma-4 u nu hrlvsd lm- ul- ma. nm nu u... .- --amrmm mm u on 1. nu uuu- .1 .num nu nu - mn n p-mu, -m nm umm -.1 :num annum- -. ,mm ua u n. mm 1- mu nn .1 .nun um an c--un nund an nu- m neun: nu. nu wr m 1.-an 4 n nnmn enum- lu, .vnu-c -1 n. mum num nn nf uw -nun .4 an no-ml. 'rn cum: nu ln: mn .1 nu umm pm- n me uma u-vu: lu ummm- nun nu an -...nu 1. -m m nn -u m-ann nn mu -nn. lu moan :nun ol umm. --- uv-umm u -u. .M ps Q ua-.nu u m :mm sun an n-mn, m 'mm nn mn nu: 1. A nf. urn-na nn: unu n 1-penn 1, 'nn an nun n -nz- an-sq, 1. my .um nun .nm u nu nu na nm-nu u an nn. o on house dates . . . later library hour. Report on changes in the comfitution . its F ., af" . ' " rl? egg, . aj Wi Y. - , ' Q "' The Jackson Student Government at- tempts to co-ordinate the policies of the administration and the interests of the stu- dents by examining problems and proposing solutions to both groups. Headed by Presi- dent Barbara Keane, Vice-president Jane I-Iarbaugh, and Secretary-Treasurer Janis Rogers, the council was composed of dormi- tory presidents, class presidents, Jackson Ufookly editor, and presidents of the All- Around Club and Athletic Association. To relieve itself of petty judiciary functions, the council this year established a house com- mittee in each dormitory composed of four officers and the faculty resident. This group BARBARA KEANE, PRESIDENT also aided the Red Feather United Drive and continued supporting Evangelia, the Jackson Greek war orphan, under the Foster Parent Plan. A very successful Intercollegiate Stu- dent Council Conference Was sponsored and conducted by Jackson in December. Prob- lems common to women's councils in co- educational schools were discussed. Mjos, Degnau, Chase, Klebsattel, Gavrelis, J. Keane, Heacock, Kiely, Hynes, Pillsbury Roy, Derby, Carrolan, Harbaugh, B. Keane, Rogers, Kelley, Skinner, NVardwell JACKSON STUDENT GOVERNMENT l73l be Taps Week! ?-,,, at 7,-. stirred the cam us AM :sad B013 SCI-IREIBER, EIDITGR-IN-CIIIEL' Dick Goorlfzrin., Managirtg Editor Larry lVilliams, News Editor TUFTS WEEKLY 'I 74 I- Bob Zmman 111 ake up Editor Paul Rosenberg, Sports Editor J cm Rogers, Asst. Editor .-.+.,-,. with news, view , emo! controversy. Immergut, Hathaway, Gordon, Epstein, Jaffee, Alleyne, Aizley Stnndel, Pncini, Rosenberg CSp. Ed.j, Engquist, Page This year the Tufts Wfeelcly has con- tinued its reputation of one of the better smaller college newspapers in circulation. Editor-in-chief first semester was Shreiber and Goodwin second semester. During the spring a special centennial issue appeared in keeping with the spirit of the year. The Weekly contained more features, topics on the depart- ments and personalities on the Hill. Subjects for editorials were academic freedom, frater- nity discrimination, and more lenient dormi- tory rules for men and women. Sports, clubs, speakers, draft news, items from other colleges, previews and reviews of the Tufts theater and music and those in town were highlighted. The Weekly backed the immensely successful blood drive and was acknowledged by a cer- tificate from the local U. S. Navy branch. Representatives from the Ufeekly attended intercollegiate conferences. One was a nation- Manning, Pecci, Kelly, Adams, Jennings, Gregg, Siegel, Toltz, Klasse Bleaney, Reinke, Blariniakas, Gordon, Shea, Dysart, Epstein, Sklarcw Siebert, Magnoli, Scott, Sexton, Cox, Kuehl, Wender, Blazer 4751 fs' -ie nv- Ti- ,n H, bus smjflzwoclueed . . . at best . . . Editing Plarwzing First rim al meeting at VVest Pointg another was the Bert hand-Sets the heads annual ga,tl1e1'ing of the lVI2LSS2l,Cl1llSCUlS Inter- collegiate Press Association. All the students and faculty look forward to these Weekly issues. Y , Sam llloses ' I' 1 N , I A .. ,rl 1 2' l V4 Nik X 1 f 4, ,li 4 I E' K What does Goodwin f 'iv ------ have to say this week? ,I cl " l . Xi L ,, 'A " 'F Ima-vlffwk TUFTS RWEEKLY 4176? wwf ana' its circulation stimulated chatter. 3 Page proof , ,qsrb il 1 MPH. ' ISN yu w K s H -. "s-zz' 1 A 'ibm .VRF-QQ E xi:-.W-. xkiiyxisira X. S' 1-1 f-bc T- N om, M, 6 X. 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Q-q 5 T N' . ' 'JK "fi 2 4' x Q 'N TUFTS WEEKLY JI 77 P , 'E th is, the 27th volume 0 o o , F , Wi" ."',""'-'-- J X t' ,' " - '.- K 'AV' jj. IU!-'.r,v ss sign t Non- ,NN O f Q"'- f. lyclhl' VN ' ,I ffrilifg -. -Z, NN! gif-v3'Pf .1 X12 A M' ta: 1 V?-1 . ' ,AKT ., . f' :Qt WMS eo 0583 'I .:' li fel , XJ 'N , - w 1'-3 ?a"X'?i:h N Qb1N9A5 K 7 L J Og, J f sf 0 lf T Bon YOUNG A Envrolz-IN-CHIEF Dana. Berntson, Business lllanager ,f me - t he ,,.,. ,1, . Q Y l s fe fy! f fi 'S' fir f it Len Lombardi, Asst. Editor ,i. 1,4 1 . 'ii 1 CENTENNIAL JUMBO BOOK i73l The Tufts year book, known as the JUBIBO BOOK, was first published in 1917. This year's publication marks the end of the first century of the founding of Tufts College. The JUBIBO BOOK has recounted the history of the college through photographs from Mr. Joseph MO1'tOH,S compilation which dates back to the beginning of college life with about 5,000 pictures on file. The history has been Written in the style President Carmichael used in his metriculzttion address to the incoming Freshmen. It has included the of the entenniczl umbo ook H oi Lakso, Jackson Editor important changes as Well as some humorous highlights from the founders up to the latest improveinents. This publication also shows how the organizations and activity groups have followed the centennial theme. These sections have been arranged in chronological order this year, ranging from the under- 'v.f,,, an Bill M allinson, Dfalce-up graduate to the graduate sections. The suin- ination of activities has been portrayed with interesting articles and photos of a more un- usual quality than of previous years. Former year books have used solid color for eniphasisg this year there has been added the multi- color scheme. Each divider page was de- Kfingsley, Slzepard, Peterkin, Lubarsky, Callahan, l'Vooften i791 CENTENNIAT BO BOOK has em lzezsizeel one hundred years 0 , P -Q with 4. ' Williams, Faculty ,' Terry, Cornerstonesj Cahill, Undergraflsg C6 fill-W lllillarcl, n Senior S6Cl'l077,,' Arlelson, Activitiesg Dlfiller, Fraternities VJ. 22 iii v2 I A dlrigj l , Lg :ll x r Y w - 5 D 7 J . Clockwork .... f Ill hancls, noflngers Lombardi crvplains a point CENT ENNIAL JUMBO BOOK 1301 Signed to introduce the topic of the section to follow with a picture that typifies the activities of the particular section. Other pictures were taken by the JUMBO BOOK'S photography staff, Willialii Pitt, Lloyd Charlton, and Don McLean. Under the direction of Tufts historical background emo' development . H- N-1.-if-V., . , v 1' K ,, , 8" is A- A ' " ' 9 X? 'ml K 1w"3,. ggQ Q,xe?MSEWws .si J :TJ-gpgwe 4 3 .--Ill?-.jug lf "1 Q Gg4Eff3f'3'f2A ,f-5 - N . 9 Eve J "Lbs :l 91-fm ' , I X. f- 1- I?1l75f'.k-73a .gg 1, lW4bEs+ WW3fQMS , T -M,,x.5i-2 - -.tr N OW' - , l if flfi-liffpig .T a- , V L e .. .7 1 Bill Ireland, Asst. Bus. lllgr. It pays to advertise 1 Curry, Berntson, Ireland, Wlzittle H urry, lzurry, lzu1'ry.'.' How to juggle the books CENTENNIAI. JUMBO BOOK 4811 w if -asf' ? 7-2. , N- V 2:39. ' Wffoly. - fswgir ..-, if-'gfkf r Mig 1 4 N.. I 'Y rg' 1 if l' a. M- -- -.,,...L...V -- --gr vy jitztmfin a 5 ecitzl narrative st le 5351? Dwight Miller Bill Pitt Lloycl Charlton Alercancler, Pitt, Mclean .V Ti! O K F731 X X Iyx NW EJ kg l g 55.1, l N ,Q -3- 22 'fx X W M L xlMQlQ5 ,, t... Lfxx-A R .' - 'J ' ,X X 'NX 'V . , . I. .'- ' X Xxll xg' . ,XQ , , V f , X, . , ' - f . KX , . . -". ' L lm ,- ff ? I ', - -. 5 '- ' ' " w . ." l. ,i, in N ,I , b ag -Q.. ,I 'pmjgg gf 'Q it .- . O p 3, 21 i N gf. ff Lf 4, O f' KV? Xxx fx' .15-1:1-.--.gi- :U mln KC J fx it 1- I f WAN x r .1-:Q .Jawff K it wx if ,fb la! V f A f 1 CENTENNLAL JUMBO BOOK editor, Robert Young, and Jackson editor, Loris Lakso, the book has doubled its size allowing more space for material dealing with the groups on Hill which have had the most student appeal throughout the year. The growth of the publication has made it neces- At work in the "Salt Mines." 1321 gf -5-2 - -rx augmented with full-colored pictures. Dave Adelson fi , -' ',l l t ' , U 5.3 i J At daylv eml : l I- '. 7- eeee . ,I ' rl l . , ,, ff' i -"f ' i ll P'rQfes.S'i071al ,b X-X N 5 Advice ' L ' ' ' Nr ' , ', 1. X ' . , L ,VZ .X :, A , ,, . .V . .- f :HX -ft. " i1..f,l,s ef. .U N. -- V - V -Y V - ...V -g,:g. ' LL "' " .'..' ,.f:. '. Q -57 jf .-:L 3, ..,. .,,- sary to consider plains for larger working quarters for the staff. The JUBIBO BOOK is the finest college representative of the progress and growth of the college, as it sur- passes all other year books in size, color, interest, and quality, Williams, Whittle, Cox, McCle:in, Peterkiu, Raine, Kingsley, Millard, Curry Miller, Lubzirsky, Shepard, Williams, Callalurn, Terry, VVoottcn, Hallett, Davis, Cahill, Alexander Pitt, Ireland, Young, Lakso, Bernston, Mallinson, Aclelson 483i CENTENNIAL JUMBO BOOK x w 1. . wg QU. 1J WH 'M H ,wH' mfg? - Nw '?f N w,w':5X'2W ,wH- n.H if um Hg, .22 E' 2- iga Ei y 7 QV Q Z X VA r iv h 9 'X i. kW?AFwNf!Ww,f kwmgmmwvf awe zi, 'af WWNNW ' H aim wU'WQ ww 'SES SM ' sw m 5 . nik. , N Q Q54 X X ' , 4 L, , 4 ' -'L Q," ' 'M if :-1 :-: 2: Zfy R Qi, ,, -x Jw, .L IV i -A In K , ls Q E5E5EfQ", Q Tw, we X.Jf'1 'gg i zzz. I . Q .N I ' i'fwZ1h? :'- ' -5 A 'f-Ea! Vg? 3' A2kw ,Q 'gg i' g f ' .- 5 EQ 'i n g "-:, "W' 'E I. :lx , +1"f57m 1' N Aww N W " 5 'Y' Jw X '1 ' M V' zz :.. 5' gem' lg 4 H ? Fdjffifiw. i53fiQA .g?i , E i , 'Y w. A , f x s I V MM Q H x Q 1 in my my m W c W .Bef 25' ww H w H 1 Eli wm wwf' W uw - S. 3 1 "ew 3? A, I N 1 w. ,B ' f. ,A fis- ,- ,Qi 1651 ml"-1 6 .J w 1, , f W ww ,Em W k 5 S is :Q 14 w J wi. H- , W M 5 N . 4 . Q ' 1: A 5' Sy , ' -L, 1 1 3 7 M Q aw: ff Ar A ,', K A 1 K , , :' -A Y X , . ,A Y , . '15 N .,',11W , EQ, ,. " W I M-K A ., 6 Q 1 N JP, , . 'H 1 , Y, , N 1, . a -. . H 1 -.l H, H A iz 5 Q ff 1 "HIT 1- 1:35 N, Q. aw, I ,, 3 'Hifi N' 'tif '-Ea" '7 Q V: -,Q I. .5 X . 1- . " , 4:1 nf ' , ' ,Q ,vkv . -" Q ffm A .w H ' w ,H QW rv n " 1 X 1 s' fl . ,S X 4 .V mf , Q , V ' -' "1 .: 'Va ,i,,-as. 45' " in as W f H 1 -W uh ,w..,w,i 'H W .111 ' 'J' 'I' 1- . 7:- -1 gvfxn ' - H - . -, .L-.1 Q -- H F-13 ,. A-,X ,. ,N ua ,. , ,,, ' M M. , . . M ,L vu, gm. 'M wyw, M U, 'My ' M53 U ,J .. V, 3593 , ' i- ' W . F' P' ' . I I Q, 1 4 g Q J an ,- r . - -' ' f f fu . ' . - -' ' T ef' fx .2 .lf 'F ' , - V 1 m - , K ' 'ag - ' - ' 'k' - M. XM w . ' ' M X Ages, w,,.,,L , Q " -U .-. -:.. '.' v 1-1. ' ' Y-L 1 H' Ilomecoming Day-191 5 T he football Team 1876 Although the playing rules have changed somewhat, the rule of sportsmanship is untouched after a century of athletics on the Medford campus. The college teams, both of Tufts and Jackson, have maintained many distinctive undefeated seasons in their position among the smaller colleges of the east. The teams have a high quality of spirit and skill which combined with Tufts sportsmanship yields teams which we can justly cheer. i801 The Goclclalrcl Hall GfIj'l7Zf7lCl5"lj7,l77l 1 898 The constlructiorz, of the bleachers at the oval F 'reslzmen ynafimfing the ,fence arozmcl the Oval "W be season was not ez victorious one .pw 981: vs K . 'N 4 Ss G ss 31-L 5 .M W T? E 4' Meyers, Jepsky, Tragellis, Cook, Gerulskis, Bickert, Cressey, Burbank, Meehan, Moore, Thornly lVarner, Sterndale, Stewart, Farber, Bennett, Manly, Dente, Garvey, Asher, Sweeney, Fenton, Pipes, O'Brien, Richardson Asst. Mgr.Va.ssall0, Ferris, Farina, Howe, Aliapoulios, Sullivan, Capt.Wnlsh, Burns, Tulmo, Smith, Fenderson, Lawrence, Asst. Mgr. Hogan Burton, Shaw, Bowering, Griffin, Allegro, Gallagher, Cassell, Schmid, Marshall, Harrison 900113 LL Bob Young, Manager Ed Shea, Publicity Frank, Alexander trainer V T F lf Le -,,,.. .VfTfr' ,. ' L I ' 33,3 1 7' ff 'ISSI : - - we-f but their spirit was unciejimtec! 4.-1 FRED ELLIs, COACH On September third, the Football team led by Captain Dick Walsh and including Freshmen on the Varsity for the first time since 1945, inaugurated what was to be the worst season in sixty-ive years of Tufts foot- ball. Gone were twenty-three lettermen from the 1950 Squad, and Coach Ellis set his sights on building a team composed primarily of Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors. The single Wing formation was replaced by the T, A DICK FVALSH, CAPTAIN and Tufts, untried but willing, stepped out on the Oval against Bowdoin on September twenty-ninth. Bowdoin, with tl1e miraculous passing of Jim Decker, handed the Jumbos a 47-7 defeat. The Tufts score came on a twenty-five yard toss from Tom Myers to Freshman Dave Harrison. Dick Walsh was the defensive standout against the Polar Bears. Northeastern, headed toward its first Grimshaw, Ellis, Plause, Boston fI89l H, ,Y , v ,v,,-,,,.,-gc, ,Juli W - through heetrthreahing moments when The extra poznt Referee J erimiah flips the coin U Lawrence ozufwits them undefeated season in many years, took the Jumbos into camp, 39-7. The first half showed the inexperience of the Brown and Blue. Errors of omission gave the Huskies the breaks, and being a smart team, they capitalized on them. The second half was all Jumbo, but the damage had been done. Bill Burns scampered forty yards for the Tufts tally on a forward from Bob Meehali. Lawrence goes for ten more Lady Luck, who didnit cast the dice once for the Junibos all season, rolled Bates to a heartbreaking 13-13 tie. Again Tufts scoring Was all by the air route. Bob Meehan chucked, first to Bill Burns and then to Fresh- man end Earl Grifiin. The Jumbos played inspired ball the second half, and trailing 13-7 with only seconds to play, tied up the game. The try for the conversion was inches Wide of .Marshall about to go clown FOOTBALL um, ro mise gave way to misfortune. Talmo -looks for a hole . . Meehan passes M 'f' T Yfgixf , e .,:f1,-'L1 "f,j 5 LEX? I1 M .f vffi FQ T" 'by I! 'fd I 1 . ye 1 gy e ppl e e QXANQ :1q'iy,9,fd if 'gli If . X E i , I--V5.1 I I lx , J if we w f -M Xxx Iliff - W f ere f e 1 , 5 J Ie M 1 I x,gL.fe-ff-e' NNQQ, N Lx 1 5 lwI.IXy:,I11,,f A-agli L X . '!. ,-' x 1 . ,,.,,,.ff , 1 QQ -"' lf' , 1 47 .gd , xxx , , H x X-wg' K 1 D. U. Band pevgforms at Bowdoin game 4911 FOOTBALL The team tackled ez new mfmation ll Ill LEBUR Captain Rex .. I :L Al the left upright. The next Week, Jumbo, determined to make his return home a happy one, failed only by the margin of a missed Held goal attempt and an extra point that teetered ofif the cross lJ3.1', to agnnex Middlebllryis Panther as his first victim. Fullback Bob Garvey, aided by the terrihc blocking of Rex Fenderson, piled up the amazing individual total of 201 yards. But when the air had cleared, Tufts was on the short end of a 141-13 score. The Little Three Champion, Williallis, visited the Oval on October twenty-seventh, and outclassed Tufts 48-0. Halfback Bob Kulsar and lineman Chuck Salmon played offensively and defensively against Tufts, and combined to ruin Jumbo's chances. VVilliams was the best team to play in the Oval in 1951. Garvey, the game's standout, goes down on the thirty FOOTBALL . . . lacking the veteran ex erience The team watches as Williams controls the ball all afternoon .l I .F .C'. Queens and Jumbo Jumbo donned his SouthWest'r for his next contest with Amherst. The field was a quagmire and the heavy ball took peculiar bounces. Tufts was defeated 21-13. Quarter- back Min Aliapoulis ran the Jumbos excel- lently from the double wing, keeping the ball 011 the ground most of the afternoon. Tom Blyers and Bob Garvey did the yeoman work for the Jumbos. At Durham, Tufts suffered its worst loss at the hands of the University of New Hampshire, 60-0. Tufts was outclassed, and D. U. Band shows of for fans at Williams game 4931- FOOTBALL although incliv 'dual lberjirmcznces Splaslzes of the 1l'lTLlLE7'8t game f f ' r .N Q! X X5 r' - it 'X JE 1 .i . .-1 -..Y W 7 'W L, ' . 9 V w,."d'x--"J ,-- gy! 1 L N- 5 ' , 4-fy . Y! ,--f"' Ev-1 Tl .- " Qy f Q l.-2, V, H 1:-N1 w ' . : L' " 'X 'MF 4 P-4' 3 JE- " . v K' A 5, K T -F ' - -it Qxius - . 4- 1 - ' - ,J ,g ., " -, :V,, 1 -' X fn' "3 , 1 . , wi., ' .N " ' K FN' .- 2, X '--l , - f - ,fa - 'wi - 1 -' ,' 7 .' , '--:.,. - sv, ' F I ' E 1 . " 1, M Tigii, ' w 3 L -, - 4- 1? , - 1 x 'W " f ' ' I . -'.: 1- V ' ,J 'Q ff kg A -K U , ', g. fa, :Q , ,1 11 ,'-1-5 -' .. 5-A EN , , fm- Y 1 'D -- - , . " f35KY,f. e Y 'f ' 1 ' , I- - - ,, ,y:,. 1 ','-'3Q ,gTf?'L'f'f'f-gig, 1 ,U 2 -734,1-,f, 4' 5 T E -'M-,Q L ' - f..'f-wi? " " '?5zi.'r:fi"L '- '..f:f:,.f" la 1 if ' A E , V. V4 Y I fag Ja ,W fm.vu,,,, ..-, 4..,sw, ,M X,. Z , , ,. , ,. V.-1 " Q.-M 1,-,Q..., -X v V ' 1 M ""f5t7r:f".-K1'::'i . ' . .1 . 154- .1 ' . 5---3 " M"-F '3"'f'3f-J'?-fT5A'F?H Zhcwlq F-ff'??'1"i'llf11. V " ' ' ' 1 :.3 - .340 Qrrvglzifw -- NL i X fl Illyers goes over for the score yu New lingland mud W mriors at half-time . 4.- , .ii-I 1"-.'f-a y. -if' vs '35 gil .flgvf ir' FOOTBALL fl 94 I .1 could not be measured by ffm! scores. The team comes back for more . . . 4 . , W ,-c. -- l l i 1 , - 1 i 1 Q ,, q v x ' i -1 , 1 1 , , P' . x i i . Y 1 Waving to friencl in stands L 3 e N-K r 7,7 I ' wr lam l gl Y To - Q iff", battered unmercifully by the WVildcats. Coach Boston refused to use his reserves until the last two minutes of the game. lVIassachusetts came next, and in that game Tufts reached its peak. Wie completely outplayed a big, experienced TVIRLSSHCTIUSGTITS team, but with Lady Luck again refusing to look our way, tied 6-6. End Earl Sllllth was in the Nlassachusetts backlield all day de- fensively, While the passing combination of Cassell to Harrison was impossible for lWassa- chusetts to stop. The finale on Thanksgiving saw Trinity defeat Tufts 4Q-6. The score does not indicate . . . and the bcmfl played on Alone . . . as New Hampshire scores another FOOTBALL g ,-n-1 1 -1-In V The team worked bard fir toucbelowm, the game, for Tufts played Well. The high- lights of the contest were two sensational kickoff returns, one by Myers for 94 yards and the other by Dick Lawrence for 85 yards. Ed Sullivan was the standout defensively for Tufts at left tackle. The season was not a happy one, but it .l.1 A npr . Dick VValsh, two-Way center and most valuable player, was chosen on the All New England Small College Team, while Rex Fenderson, Dave Fenton, Bob Garvey and Tom Myers were given Honorable Mention. Inexperiencc, injuries and bad luck were the key phrases for tl1e 1951 edition of the Jumbos. was not a disastrous one either. Captain Cassel to M yers-coulcln't be stopped that clay. if - -r - ----- 1 --f - i l.11,,...-. ... L.. '- 1 - FOOTBALL fl 96 P '- - 1 but the em! zone was just out of reach. Irv Trinity was a blur all morn Ferris and Asher go in for the tack! 4971 FOOTBALL r 1 be boaters had az suv essful season mph? f'5-Ii...-Q Ps he Graff, Thompson, Brown, fBuckley, Tedford, Hosvlitt, Boraks Bohn Ccoachj, Schumb, MacDonald, Gravellese, Whyte, Ripley, Bolenderi Cnigxzl Kruzyna., DerHagopia.n, Bennet CCapt.D, Tomasso, Faigel, Bzlyley ., 'w, , , L Playing a tough eleven game schedule. 5 the Tufts soccer team experienced one of its 4 best seasons in several years, compiling a ',.f'," -' I W u - - 1 - , .,-ee , record oi six Wins, tour losses, and one tie. In I ,,,Q gQ 5 is addition to the wins over Suffolk. MIT, BU. "" Q 'iff X21 42'-,T Clarlqz and Brown, the Jumbos liounced their 'efsitifh' is tradltlonal rivals Harvard, while losing to fy' ' . -A , WPI. rFI'1I11tV, Weslevan and Amherst. The lil, 'T ' -T 9' T Y tie was the last game of the year, with hlass. i:Q-3 1' E l State. l W .-U John Bohn, Coach AL BENNET, CAPTAIN Bob Bolenderi, Qllanager l 93 l TN j 15214 Wx , Za Kiev 'Z wggy 5 Q-a af: ..1..- -- f ' - - ,, .. 1 ' ii ilu: ,1 'xxseirih zen .in ,QE Q, 35 W mv GQ V1 Kew' M ,N MM ., Q f 3' I M -Q QQSZESSZQQQVMT 'Nifgfif 3 W V' V . ISS Tiff' '- H2 ' if we nil 1, If A , Q I 5 f H," 129 J" 3' . -X, wif u , x, 'l L 4,1-... M M 1 ' -f .Y 4 V Aw M ,,. SN ,,, A V x an 6, Eg wg resbmen outslrinecl varsity by running Yeager Ccoachj, O'He G NICK CRMG, CAPTAIN arn, riecci, Christopher, Corcn, Vinton, Bow .3771 ,f ., l K 'FL ifj X, ix it XA !.g5w V- l , N ,f 1 Vez cmd Vinton in the B.C. m ect cring The Jumbo Vaisit l ' y iarriers, lacking depth, and plagued by injuries and the loss of Captain Nick Craig for most of the season, finished with ai record of three wins, four losses, and tenth place in the New Englands under the patient coaching of Pop Yeager -11001 Joe Griecci, this yea,r's lVIVP, and Tonmly fyI'I6ElI'1'1 were the teanfs lead' mg runners, while Earl Christopher, Art lNIcCann, Affi ., V 1 . , '-ff fl t ti fs tl l M it Stalwarts on the go: Griecci, O'HeaVrn, Coren 0 with ew 77 land bam ionshzliy. ,fff-I7 AL PRICE, FRESHMAN CAPTAIN Ingmunson, Stevenson, Price, Bowering, Wilkey, Lrdlarre, Yez, Sheehan Price, Bowering, and Stephenson keeping pace Dru Vinton, and the much improved hlike Coren made up the balance of the team. Bob Anderson was their capable manager. The Freshman Cross Country team, led by Captain Al Price, compiled the best record in the harrier history of Tufts. They swept to consecutive victories over the BUT, BU, and Northeastern freshman squads and then went on to be the first Tufts' team, Varsity or Freshman, to ever win the team prize in the New England Intercollegiates. "H01'atios" at the bridge 11011 Ls so Bob Anderson Manager be Bi Five filed the baskets Ferrari, Simons, Liband, Kowal, Gworek Sussenbergcr, Thomann, Bennett, Ceo-capt.j, Greenberg, Hcneghnn Fletcher, Ruth, Janello, 0'B1-ien ff? '7 l if fs ,fx p ff i If aff fl'-. fy 5' fi:-eil ffwkl ,r'.fv' W 1 , ' X31 7 ' H I ff' N X5 HN 2 Y - v MF" ffvx 1 Af if J! If be Rx xxawx X XR, T.. l -SPM ! X lx M .f f 9. ' x A ' 1 - r i r . , fy, Q5-fy, il if!" J X25 Ll.-,J W ' ' LJL7' if E134 AI. BENNETT F 'red Ellis, coach C0-CAPT. Bob Hook manage? X 11021 W All' ,. O .4 J ' aio 5 9 wi ' H X rf' X K.. .."2 I 1 Q 4 i ,.4'A X, "Wig, caring against Sill? competitors Lowell Greenberg Al Tlzomavz Bob lfuflz Bennett sinks one BASKETBALL .lolm Sussenbergel' .lack Henegan The basketball team, under the coach- ing of Fish Ellis, experienced but an average season, looking forward to later years when the freshmen plus the present varsity sophs should comprise a Stl'OI'1g team. Robert Hook and Al Dickerman managed a group which saw only three returning lettermen supported by freshmen and sophomores. The five seniors being lost this year are Kowal, Ruth, Fletcher. and Co-captains Shenfeld and Ben- nett while only Bennett, Shenfeld, and junior Greenberg won their letters last year. The freshmen squad, coached by VVoody Grimshaw and managed by Wlalter Aylward and Art Friedman, had an average height of 6' Q". This height, combined with varsity sophomores Sussenberger and Kil- patrick, are the main factors in bright outlook for the Jumbo hoopsters. 41041 . . . but bowing out to weaker teams . Nuff! UV L Q f , V ., x - .-"" , 1 1 eg . X , - W X , , w The Hoopster M ,4 I K w .xxx Swzmmers began ij LARRY IJALNIER, COACH BILL VDYLER, CO-CAPTAIN wzth cz mcmg start, This was the year for building in Tufts sports, and swimming was no exception. Coach Larry Palmer had the few essential veterans to keep the team going but most of all he had depth in all the events. Co-Captains Bill Tyler and Ken Richardson along with versatile Wlarren Haley were a few of the key members of a squad composed mostly of Sophomores. Dick Hennessey led the sophomore g1'oup along with divers Phil Wlhitman and Fred lWcCurdy. The depth so important to coaches was evident in the freshmen aspirants. Ron Connolly stood out in the backstroke, Tom Denney did the breaststroke, Bill Schmid excelled in diving, and Dick Brito did a fine job in the free style distance events. f I f wl fh XL Q L- IQEN RICHARDSON, CO-CAPTAIN ii Roger Pearse, Manager -I 106 1- coming up with az splashing fnisb. Pease Crngrxj, Davis, Quinlan, Gordon, Duko, Sklzircw, Shore, Titus, Hzirrison, Palmer Cvouchj Rvzlgnn, YYhihn:in, Haley, Ric-hardson CCD-f'apt.D, Tylc-1' QC0-Captj, Rt-ynolds, Hennesscy Whyte, Rapp, Grussing, Harling, Hammond, Berry Dick H en nessey -brec1stSt1'oke 'l'Va1'7'en Haley- freesiyle Clzarlie Davis- freestyle -I 107 1- .1 i m Tl.l"lLS1IlllCICSf7'0IC6 On your mark . . . SWIMMING Fine coaclvin 5 ,-.. Yj :itil ,li , ,A g iburrea' the icemen , is 'QA' 53311 , 3."14."l ,.-,-mf-ig? Q T- 1 -rw Charles 1-Irtlzur, coach xlll' T3 Elly Davis, Captaing Bfillfliowen, Mfanagcr OCKEY Riley, asst. coach: Arthur, coach After successful coaching stints at Hebron, Tilton, and Dartmouth, Charles 'iHafeyH Arthur took over the reins at Tufts this season with but a nucleus of veterans and a host of sophomores and freshmen. Al Power, Russ Sullivan, Phil Richard- son, and Captain Elly Davis comprised the group of dependable veterans while Tom Nolan headed the l' 1st of aspiring freshmen. The team had just an average record. How- ever, Coach Arthur achieved his goal of weeding out pros ' pects foi future seasons. Defendin 11081- g goal, Sullivan and Zussman voted . E. 's most im weed team. , i V Core steals the puck V, I f ,Q u W7 r 1 J P Nolan scores against A . U. s 1 icard owe?--9 N. "Keep your flobber up" 1 V- - ' X N ,V ,, 4 P' F ', I '4-'f"f . f ' - -Qv'fp1'.: W' 1'-C34 ' KI, J 3 ,fn " 'i , , x1','4,j2'If':'f2iiL-3 1:4 , 1-M X 2-54-fr.-yfqfn Q e 'fb-QL-f1.f -,fq:g4LVgQ,:fm1'1 ' 1 xl!-5 f ,-V,,'1, rv ., Q1-2' fc M '. 1. , fx ' ' .M A U . , Xax 53.1 wi," V " pg-J ., x , wr -J-fig. - ." f" ,-ffl? QQ. ,fwx-ff. , , . ,- ,f . L 1, ., 4 -I , ,-fg,:- X ' fx MHZ.. .' f u. "fs y 1 I NIL, l I K W X 'lla X r- , - . H ,. ,'v,,i,f:x.1 ,V p E' A, ,,,, , lvvvi ., ,fir ,ef I , X iff',, 't-81,1 !',..ff' ,. ,' 5- X N! i ' L . --x, "- H ,f 'J-4 1-2 ,J 'Y R If-' f' - V f' ,f f','f1':f+..:-...f" -Y I .,,-. L - -1 ",ifi1g.wYg-I 'J ' ' I V H .lf Nfl ' -"V fa V sf. ., ,- J , 1 Q. ,.u ,f 'Ig' w jjpvjja llly in , . vykmy, X , ene , eee A e ef H H X f fw Q ' 1 ,f 9 ,J ' Q rf , . 1 V 1, L ' J f . I .W f ,Q +, ww hp x 'Q - 1 V Va .e J. . A P. t Y - .1 W N .,H.1.,,, , Jgmfge , CK... , 1 ,Aw N, .Y ' 1417" f'11I1'x'n ATX'--' N .QQ yr ,f M .:,,,' WI " X. , 5 ,rw fda' Q4--. 'ASQ L' fifizgh- The 1'ucA-.star Q O Pf- S6158 up the play 11091 Meztmen succumbed to injinfies while 'U Dru Vinton, Captafivz, New Eviglrmd champ Cooke about fo be fhrofum Moore on top as usual , , fi , F, 1 1 ' i ' f' , 'fl w S am Ruggeli, Coach Hzunpered by injuries to Captain Dru Vinton and Bill lVIoore, Coach Sam Ruggeri struggled to keep the team on the Winning side of the ledger. The consistent point winners for the varsity were Hugh Blanchard, Dave Burns, Dru Vinton, and Art Mziistoras. The sophomores Charlie Housen, Bill Richmond, Bill Ricker, Gerry Gariepy, and Gerry Lewis gained much experience and will be mainstays on next year's varsity. Swain .s"itf'z"ng out 41101 Dingiv men carried of top honors CRACK CRAIG AND BUCKLEY Co-CAPTAINS Ding Dusseault, Coach Bob flnderson, Zllanagev Griecei, Callahan, Katz, W'il1iz1mson, Stewart, Packard, Perkins Ding Dusscnult cC02lCl1J, Collier, Sc-huler, Frascatore, Brooks, Hewitt, Hardy Yeager, Coren, Nicholson, Daley, Krueger, Engquist, Hall, Calkin, Enstrom, Anderson CMgr.D Schwartz, Goldberg, 0'Hearn, Jones, Farina, Sachs, Staclxenfeld, Rosa, Devin 41111 the lL'lL7Lfl7'!!Cll . . in tl1e'1f eleventh QPerenniaHy the top xvhining teani at THdtg the indoor track teani contnlued on tyfncaHy mdth.aivery successfulseason. ffhis year they faced the longest schedide in the lnstory of,Iun1bo track,including seven diud meets, the K. of C., the BAA., and the LCA.- A.A.A. 111eets. The team was hindered by the loss of Captains John Buckley, who graduated in F6b1'l.l?t1'y, and Nick Graig, who was unable to run due to injuries. The addition of some talented sopho- mores and freshmen gave the team unexpected depth in the running events. Representing the senior class were John Farina, Chris fl2L1'fl116l', Dick Rosa, Don IIard5g :uni hlanager l3ob gknderson. In the record deparunent,junior Bob Jones set at new standard in the broad jump MGU1 a nuwk of My 4yQQ and sophonuwe , 0274! .if 6,-5112 iif:"ffl3f ., 74-5224 24,541 ff" 25 cg.: 1 ,527 " A7 7,15 ' Z3 :ff affix , ------ -- l!ul'l?Q3't ,e 'Mk' "jf ,wiv "f"7'f?i . 1' l-el x V l. e l -9, , if I 1 'x 25" ' , ilu l vf If - f 1- L- 1, 3 ,, f :A V. ,fel ti. V, A 4, i. f , , df, f 1 n .1 W 5 A V 4 :LQ Rik ' 1 ' ,.', ,N 1, 4 Lg X ,Y 1 e w M , J ry, l ,N ' The Pole Vaulter Clayt Williams wzftlz a 12'-6" The mile and a half for two year olds undefeated seezso 14. Clayton Vllilliamson vaulted 12' G". Bob Jones was the mainstay of the team, consistently being the high scorer, taking points in the dash, broad jump, and high jump. He is also a good prospect for the Olympics. Jack Goldberg, after steady improve- ment, held down a strong place in the hurdles along with Andy Howitt. Jack won a second place, behind Harrison Dillard, in the hurdles in the B.A.A. games. Johnny Farina is perhaps the out- standing senior on the squad, being the Yi ,. r:il':,,.rl 1' A,f6Q'f,Q,:r,m, . . Qricpggqq' , ill V, 1 6 number one man in the 1000 yard run, helping ff 3255, an to prove that engineers do more than study. The Shot Putter l,,i' liymimit' 77 .X ., .- E: "S-,W,",4l,L".1f,,Y25' W The outdoor track team, composed , i HQrp,p' ,pZQ2 W . . . ff." , , K .xkgifeiv f , 'G.wif:... WH' baslcally of the same boys running the 1ndoo1' N F 1 ,illjfrcgfjiljgl , - M - " i fi .241 season, had the usual Jumbo success 111 Xl Evert? wlie iff! f mek' A , sk sygrzxil-,g,::Q,1 l Q 1 lj 2 . - A f Xu 'l'll rx sf . ff V N FQ "WV-, 'A F 'Sw L 3,4515 CQX -,mag The Broad Jumper T X "Rug" l 5325!"fli'f"i'lI5'lQllP'VTi fc-fri ' 1 ' of QSQ,?,sw2ff'N: gg gp: ,'f,g,',gN w,5,1,,f 'ff 2 Lf-sslieltlfiiiri f , 1237 X45 ,::.g7--1:-"::,::-a --'-1 PQ ,f 1:1 l ""i6RQ5?ff5l, .,,ffi.,,-,mel "--,H-qwNfggwx-.-g.:f ,-91',f1s1' ,,bg,Xwrhl1.4m ,ff my 4 'Yr-1 ,f-are w .wif .f ,f-'f,,.xL-xwxxivll'-5 A. ,ff ' ci.-w:,:,:,-ww'ff vf,,:f3L,f V t-'H' 'iid'-" Q -iw if f-"'v,1mf'f-,f .fll Schwartz Dick Rosa, aims at ihe record I The Steeple chase i V ., .f 1 , . , 51.7, .li smashing season hrought trophies Imlmer coach Halstead Gulyassy,Forsley QMgr.D Imboden Vargus Inn,-A ...W . Lany Palme? Coach S-f 5'-,:X',,,,,. urn -A x VY I- V .-' .U E . V' 'T 'fl ,. if 3 ' In V - . , ,Y ' - 1 , ,- -Z-7 . . ' VU ' X '- ' . '.x W ,. CO, , . gf. . il Q - A .1 . CNN Last year's tennis season was the best in the five years that Larry Palmer has been coach, and certainly it was one of the best in Tufts history. The team lost only one match, While Winning eight, and ranked high among New England teams. The first match played was with B.C., which Tufts won 8-1. The next match, Mass. State, was a 6-3 Tufts victory. The match with Brown was the Jumbos only loss, after this setback, Tufts rolled on through VVPI, 7-2, Connecticut, 8-1, and shut out B.U., 9-0. The netmen finished the season easily by defeating Babson, 7-2, Clark, 8-1, and Colby, 8-1. Dick Hills and Jerry Sapolsky went through the year undefeated in both singles and doubles play. Hills, most valuable player and captain-elect for this year, has left school to join the Air Force, leaving only Halstead, Imboden, and Gulyassy, last yearis captain, to form the nucleus of a new team. ff 0 , X l 1 ,', Q -'- gb' . , . .- "qua I The Netman Bob Gulyassy and honors to the spring sportsmen. 4-..,,' Wu... X Brown CMgrD, Billote, Ullrig Cco-captl, IIZIIIIHIXVELIY Ceo-captj, Ellis Qcoaclxj A Moulton, Titcomb, Wilson fs 1 Every spring afternoon finds the Jumbo golfers touring the 'K lmks at Sagamore Golf Clubg 1f not 111 actual competltlon, then chal- w lengmg one another, for the rlght to play 111 the next match. Captam lr. Carl MOl1ltOH 1S the only returmng letterman from last yearls team, which boasted a record of mne wins against two defeats. CARL NIOULTON C,x1"rA1N Nice form! 11151 af. he ncliam gamers ace am open Held A iff f +f VOM Ferreau, Romnmerel, Stafford, Ross, Bruns, Fonda, Tyler, Ertman, Ferguson Davis, Duffy, Webster, Creeden, Brown, Wise, Johnson, Sweet, DuBois Coach Ring, Crafts, Thompson, Gcrbis, Cole, M. A-ll- - .' f' f 'lc ic L, Kraft, learty Cmgrj ATAQRQSSE AL BRUNS AND IJETE Ross C0-CAPTAINS Inexperience was one of the toughest opponents that the Tufts lacrosse men had to face. The mediocre season of three wins and six defeats was highlighted, however, by some ie individual play. Pete Ross was high scorer with an average of four goals per game. The steady play of Ken Crafts, Bill Tyler, and most valuable player Dutch Gerbis could always be counted on, and Bruns and Ferguson were also outstanding. Floyd VVeb- ster, always a rugged player, was lost to the team this year due to an unfortunate accident, leaving a big hole in this yearis defense. 'bf N -1 116 I- X with cmticzlbvztecz' im efofzfemeni. Buster Craffs--Ertman, I5Vebster, Sfqffowl-Floyd Ufebster' Nice check! Q ,, W ,,,, 1951 RJWORD - 3 Tufts Opponent 6 VVPI '7 4- H21l'X7211'il 14 9 lwiddlelmury 44 1 1 BUT 9 8 UNH '7 9 Boston iL2lCl'OSSG ll C flulm . 1971111211115 11 5 UNH 10 3 Springfield 17 Yvun 3-Lost 6 Breather at haUtime -111711 B fu J it Riclcer, Coach Pre-game pep-talk -1- ,SCHEDULE s 1 1 Batesig 2 7 BU "5 Q 1'-if -1 , v 2 Amherst "Z 1 1 'B A Colby A' ,11 4 BU he 9 MIT'e...g LL 5 Northeastern 6 A 111. ,,,, 1 Bowdoin 5 ll01-3,1 o.1,4 'Trinity ' 10 "'A 6 2 U Mass -'A, A 3 W 5 U Conn ' A D 6 13 BC ' ' 4 1 BC 5 ' - 69 65 Won 5-Lost 10 With the loss of All-American Bud Niles and most of the 1950 team that played in the NCAA tournament, the Tufts baseball team had a big job of rebuilding facing them during 1951. The only returning lettermen were Captain Bob Lauber and Dave Lincoln on the mound, Bill Burns at second, and Al Bennett at short. Despite the poor record of Wins and losses, the season was not as bad as it might appear at first. Many of the losses were only by one run, and a lot of bad breaks clouded the record. Probably the toughest game was with Trinity, when Lauber pitched Well enough to give up just two hits, only to lose in the tenth inning by a 1-0 score. All of the games were not like this however, the Jumbos overpowered B. C. 13-4 to snuff out the Eagles' chances of playing in the NCAA tournament. 11181 ll: ll i be umbo aseys wound up, to swing - 51945 f P '46 Freelancl CMgr.J, Tweedie, Fettig, Wilson, Noble, J. Bennett, Thomann, Goldstein Fenton, Garvey, Buckley, Brosman, Boyages, West, Latham, Powers Ricker CC03.CllJ, Taft, Mullins, Burns, Sidell, Lauber, A. Bennett, Littlefield, Davis ,.. A nil" M-0 1 11191- ...n. : '.u.f Y- - -if- imo another spring with jwogbects Of the bag As a team, Tufts hit a respectable 253, and averaged better than one twin4killing per game. Individually, the Jumbos boasted an even better record. Outstanding in the lineup was Al Bennett, selected most valuable player, who batted 278, hit one home-run, three triples, and had 24 stolen bases against a team total of 42. Garvey and Powers shared batting 0 ' 1 . 1' E ,f - i' 1 ,Nj ag if u .- ,V f T . . I . f'-sr. 1-i.....,!l.Ls honors, banging out averages of 309 and 320 respectively. Burns knocked out 2 homers to lead in the four-base-blow departnient. One of Coach Ricker's criteria of a good ball player is his "clutch averagev-his average of hits with a man on board the bases. Here Garvey and Burns led the team with averages of 400 and 333, While the squad as a whole averaged 267. Littlefield goesiup F1-fiends of Al Bennet Davis running hard 9 I . so , 15'- BASEBALL -I120l- I XI' X K x N . 0 rounding third imc! sliding home. 2' if 4 A . YI ,, M J t 7 's f Coach Ricke-r and assistant 41211 BASEBALL Jlfiss Helen Iieedem, Head of flze Plnysical Erlucation Deparlmenf .Viss Hefle Rlloafls, Jliss ,W ary Frances I'I16'l'7"UCf07' Wright, Instructor The old Jackson Gym Q..-gr ,xg-f.:-5,-f.. , I O Lrfna -- - ,uw-A V, . . . be feminine ettlvletes retetineel The Jackson Athletic Association has made an excellent record of providing smooth inter and intra collegiate activities for all of the feminine athletes. Sponsored by lVIiss Beedem and led this year by President Arlene Kelley, the program is more varied than usual. The outstanding and spirited addition is Bou-Ja Day, an afternoon of fun and food with our new campus friends, Bouve. Every season of the college year finds the group busy with new plans. They sponsor everything from tournaments to dinners after the varsity games, also every Jackson girl will remember the popular early morning outdoor breakfasts behind Anthony House. an 1 5 4: fa ,,e LJ Terry, lValto'n.. Fruehan, Clough, Craven Glover, Kelley CPT6Slfl67Z.fD, Stlrubbe Ifreslzmen do the dirty work 41231 rw -V K., in .QL t, V rw- .... ARLENE KELLEY, PRESIDENT their title its eiennittl victors Civkin, Freeman, Terry, Sexton, Gavrelis CCaptainD, Chiswell, Fruehan Cooledge, Temple, Linscott, Ellis, Joy, Glover CM:magerj Whitehead, Webb, Kelley, Fairbanks, Williams, Craven The Jackson Held hockey team began the centennial year properly by having a loss free season. At least two goals were scored in every contest. Comprisecl of girls with experience as well as spirit, the team, led by seniors VVilly VVilliams, lwac lVIcKenzie, Arlene Kelley, Ricki Craven, Stretch Gavrelis, and Carol "STRETCH" GAVRELIS Miss Beedem "Mike" Glover CAPTAIN Coach Mtmllgfft' t -.J 11241 in eastern collegiate Feld Zrecke . Webb mul Fa1'rba11k.S' praciice u lunge Fruehzm, stopped every visitor that invaded the Brown and Blue home territory. In two games this season, Regis and Oranges at the half Pembroke, the CO-0l'lll.I1?ltQI,l teamwork was Jackson 2 Bouve 0 PZ1l'lZlCl1l2l.I'ly obvious. Both gznnes got off t.o 21 Jackson 4 Pembroke 3 slow start but Jackson displayed fine play in Jackson CFroshj 3 Endicott Q the final rally to score over both opponents Jackson Q Regis 0 and to make no break in their winning streak. Jackson 3 U.N.H. 0 Thefnal defenseg Whfiielzearl, lx'elley,Ga1vrelis, Fruehcm .lcfion wiflz Iiarlclifc -11251 Sleek swimmers stroked to victory I Tlnoines G 'Nhck M A Quimby E Curtin D Cowle B. Greene, L. Pickens, B. Scott, S. Piper, 1I.Donahue, C Cllllll A Wlupple NI Bass N x0l1'll6l J Elmer A. Faulkenburg, J. Miller, J. Hancock, L. Dittriche. Nlxss Betty Rhoads in back. Diligent practice on the part of the 1116I'111E.l.ldS of Jackson set the pace for victories over their two opponents, Pembroke and Radcliffe, in the 1951 swimming season. Girls governed by the stopwatch worked for events such as the 50 yard Free- style, the 25 yard Breaststroke, the lVIedley Relay, the Q5 yard Backstroke, and the Free- style Relay. Events demanding form per- fection were the Backstroke, the Freestyle, the Breaststroke, and Diving. Donahue wzth peifecz' fozm Pam Hancock 1 120 le . . . as the court girls Placed ive Mahoney, Russell, Dolph, Linscott . Temple, Welub, Civkin Far right-Miss Beedeiu CCoachJ With a combination of spirit and co- ordinated action the Jackson basketball squad has hopes for more undefeated seasons. Sparked by forwards VVilly Willialns, Arlene Kelley, and Swivs Joy, and guards A S K E T B A I- I- Dot Skinner, Ricki Craven, and Midge Hea- cock, the team has allowed none of the visitors to gather a Winning score. Their standard of ball playing has won the girls positions on the All-Collegiate Team. "Mike" Glover, jlanaggy Leard, Gawelis, Ellis, llliss Beedem, Coach p 11271 on New Englcmcfs All-Collegiate team First team Dottie will get it! 11281- to climax em undefeated reeomf Rickie Craven M id ge H eacock Dot Skinner Dirty Player Webb Ever graceful Kelley 41291 ." gi BASKETBALL be nezfteefs swan into racket action Miss Bette Rhoads CCoachl, Ellis, Kean: Harbaugh, Colt, Nutter Powderly, Friis, Wentworth, Strubbe The twelve girls on the varsity tennis team have given excellent displays of their court skill in their matches with competing A schools. They were scored over by Radcliffe, N N S but emerged the victors over Pembroke and U.N.H., and won top honors in the sport at the WVheaton Play Day. VV ith most of the players returning this season, the girls aim to be undefeated. Friis returns a, backhand A match with U .N .H . St-rubbe serves! 41301 in 77Z6lfClJ6S with strong set of opponents. A Ufednesdaiy night practice '14 1 V, , i, '.o 4 i gli This year badminton has become a major sport at Jackson. Full practice is required and full point credit is awarded to the participants. Pembroke, Radcliffe, and the University of New Hampshire are on the roster for the court contests which should be more competitive and skillful in nature since the sport is a new varsity attraction. Last season the score tallied with the Brown and Blue girls decidedly the defeated team in the circuit. Jackson did score over Pembroke 3-2 at Pembroke, but were beaten by close scores on their home court. More- over, U.N.H. and Radcliffe both came out on top in their contests with the Jacksonites. l 131 I Backcourt action, by Babs Brewer Lou starts the game Bobby and Ann talk it over Diamond enthusiasts were struck clown Far left-Bliss Vvright Qfloaehj Cahill, Lcard, Cooledge, Volmer Clllanagerl, Pickens CManagerD, Craven, Williams lVrigl1t, Ianantuoni, Kelley, Terry, Keacll Y . VY.. , fa: -Y m Y.-. ,N .Mx ax -N X it - ., ,, i. - il-, s 1' ,'. Y Y YH '- .ll ' ', r , l il K, L l Y Y ' .- f , V 1 u VHA" Q" nf Ll gg-ff ' 1. .Q- Les and Nat collect equipment Softball at Jackson has never reached the undefeated stage but they manage to give their opponents plenty of action. VVhile often rising to a game of fine steady play, they occasionally fall to a game full of errors. After LL extra innings of tight softball, the team, coached by Miss W right, downed the University of New Hampshire 11-10 in the final game of last season. Sally and Willie warm up nazi while fellow archers missed the mark l Only one lmllfs' eye? emo' loin opponents l5'oWLl Radcliffe and Pembroke went home as defeated teams as the result of Jackson bowl- ing victories. Under the coaching of llliss Helen Beedem and the management of Shirley Nelson, the team holds regular practices at the Hillside Bowling Alleys. ARCHERY On the archery range, behind the Jackson Gym, the team had regular practices for their one meet of the bow and arrow season. Four Jacksonites, Jane Metcaslf, lVIina Bass, Roberta Shepherd, and Jeep Hallett, represented the Brown and Blue group. The single contest, a tri-meet, was played off with Radcliffe and Pembroke at Radcliffe, with Jackson placing second and the Harvard Square girls taking top honors. Later, in a friendly meet, the members of the team competed for the Archery Trophy. Jeep I-Iallet turned in the best score. were s aired victory. Dagger, Derby, Kvedar, Nelson 11331 retttizfe dance jhtttinfeci ihterlbrettitio hs Clovkwise from bottom: G. Gamble, B. Lewis, E. McPeake, A. Friend, L. Lakso, A. Wiseman, N. Meras, D. Busi, F. Adams, A. Holland, I M. Glover, li. Shepard, J. Glancy, A. Murphy, D. -Mach' unn f in gmce . . . rhythm . . . sophistication. MODERN DANCE The main objective this year was to bring students into the group who were talented in some form of creative activity other than the Mode1'n Dance sphere. Bev Hill, Ione Dugger, Joan Lennon, Sperry Lee, and Ava Audet-poets, musicians, and dra- matists-worked on the Spring C1951j Per- formance, lending both polish and entertain- ment. Another co-ordinated adventure was work with 3P's and the Boston Symphony Orchestra to present "Peter and the VVolf.,' The busy dancers featured a Dance Open House in Ma1'cl1, a Spring Concert, and in Nfay matched their creative ability with Radcliffe at a Dance Symposium. -11341 lx S24 WW , , 1 . gf, f "JW W mg? ' ' 11 1 . 2 L ff , V. -- a M 1. M 1, 4 U- ,rrv ..,4 5 1 R, r A' 1 M .HQ 4 Aw rx MA' yu fs A 9 -. Wim? V 1 Jw' 1- ' Q NA' A .,,, z P ii 5if1:.f.f?4f.:e. -21133335 9 ff aw: , UU, 'F Q 553544 NWN-.. . x 1 sf 'N 5 1 V M fu, .2 in ' ,f 49 J' x W H ml 2 Ur' l fx xx, ,s W' 4. I H U sr r Mn iq? 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Y, 19. mf ...S T53 1 ,V .- 1 H owibles Day Parade .similar to M ayofralfity Parade 7 ypzcal lecture class0'00m 1900 The undergraduate at Tufts has a heavy schedule of academic lessons to master yet this does not prevent him from becoming an active participant in the various college societies, organiza- tions, and celebrations. The student has a memory book full of the many events that have made his college career a living remembrance. Generations of undergraduates have entered into the activity traditional to Tufts to make his college career more vital. ' 4 138 y A 14. i..lV 6,59 day ofthe Annual East 5 on W ednesclay and'1'l1ursc.lg1y of Anniversary Weekg and on the Fourth of July. The Public Commencement is heldlon the second Wednesday of July. - in 1 5'R L ,, , ,i iw m,,,t- 1 1 , EEITENSES. 0 - Tuition, .... . . L .il . . .l. All .0 in i'll.of?i J'LJ835,00 a. Room-rent. .' ...... , A .'., g,g.,,j'xom 87,60 to 16,00 " E ' Use of n n s' OMC f ,finer ngoulqw u' Board, nut inc uding and melee, . . 12,00 a week. Students, who choose, beer themeelygs. Students who have an their Cless, i and who are under no, conditions, ma5g,'jf necessary, keep School for a. period not exceeding 12 weeks, including the Winter Vacation, they continuing their ,studies the meanwhile. ' ' Early college ervpenses 415. 1919 J aclcson Day obstacle race l es i Spree ClubWbm'lesq'uiing the college glee club nl ,., .,., zmimf lass 0 vers jtazturecl azctivizjf DAY'E BURNS, PRESIDENT a very enjoyable climax. With the coming of Spring extensive plans we1'e made giving assistance to the Ivy Society with the tra- ditional Junior Prom, one of the loveliest Spring formals held at Tufts. That was followed by Open House at all the fraternities on Saturday evening. The Junior picnic was held at Crane's Beach. President Dave Burns provided the Junior Class with a full social year in its celebration of Tufts Centennial. First on the calendar was a well-received smoker, the first Tufts, Bouve, Jackson student function in the history of the college. Held in the intramural gym, it was a gala event with two hundred paper-hatted classmates enjoying the enter- tainment over which Bob Ma1'otta, master of ceremonies, presided. VVith its conclusion, refreshments of cider and doughnuts were served and dancing continued the remainder of the evening. In February, a mid-Winter dance began the second semester. That was followed by a second smoker which was equally as successful as the first. Also a co-ed event, it was of a barnyard motif and with professional entertainment bringing it to Greenberg, Trea.s'.,' Dix, Sectryu' Burns, P1'es.,' F orte, Vice-P1'e.9.,' Kane, Elma CLASS or '23 11401 ag- n- ana' abnnelant entertainment for all. Jackson 353 were their usual busy selves during this past summer writing to their little sisters of the incoming freshman class. Suggestions and information on Tufts life lent a friendly pre-school helping hand to all. Immediately upon return to college, the Juniors took the 355 class to an afternoon's outing of softball' and hotdogs at Nahant Beach. Throughout the year the Big Sisters have played their parts well by assisting the freshmen to shoulder their responsibilities. For the entire year, many of J ackson's activi- ties were in association with those of Tufts. The very successful co-ed smokers and the mid-winter dance were followed by an all- Jackson spaghetti supper in the early Spring. In Mfay came the long-awaited blazers which - i' - ' 1 .gym -'i - ' - . r i-xv" fe JOANNE KEANE, PRESIDENT dotted the campus with white announcing that the Senior year was close at hand. The blazer, however, could not be worn until Junior weekend at which time the ,53 Jaxon- ites showed an abundance of class spirit and enthusiasm in their salute to the approaching farewell to the Seniors. F olsom, llIar.,' Courant, Seetry. Keane, Pres. Jennings, Vice-Pres.,' lVIcK'inney, Treas. CLASS OF '55 4141i 'lliopoulios and Sieberi, C'o-editors of the Ivy Book . . . Slbotligbtecz' was the zmioef rom Decorations af the Prom .lum'o'r Prom 1951 11421 nncter the direction The Ivy Society, tl1e honorary society of the Junior Class is composed of ten men nominated by the previous year,s society and elected in the Spring by the Sophomore class to assume their duties the following semester. Their responsibilities include publishing the Ivy Book, planning and supervising the Junior Prom and Junior Day activities, organ- izing football trips, conducting Senior and Freshman elections, acting as ushers at formal Chapel functions, and other activities bene- ficial to Tufts in general and the Junior Class especially. Ivy Society emphasizes the pro- motions of school spirit by sparking rallies, encouraging away-game caravans and at- tempting to dispel the apathetic attitude too prevalent in many colleges. VV ith tl1e enthusi- asm greeting their efforts this year, it is hoped that the Loyal Order of the Coffee Pots, revived this year to foster school spirit, may be dispensed with again. .nl I! 5 , -In ,. of the Io Soviet . Dave F enton, President Jones, F razier, Bennett, 0'Connell Herlilzy, Fenton, Lawrence ' wi CSSEIETY 41431- wo patriotic dances were held PETE CooK, PRESIDENT Allowing Sword and Shield to handle the Freshmen a11d their tradition, the Class of ,54 officers set out to guide the class endeavors. Although the class did not meet as a. body, plans were made by the oflicers during fre- quent meetings at Delta Upsilon where President Cook presided. The fall semester was already too crowded with activity to have a well-attended dance, however, the second semester saw two Sophomore dances, both patriotic. The first was dated the day before VVashington,s Birth- day with the appropriate cherry tree and wooden-handled hatchet decorations. The second theme was that of Patriot's Day in vivid red, white, and blue with shades of Paul Revere's Ride and ecl1os of the stirring addresses by some of our eminent Boston statesmen. The Sophomore class has its share of outstanding and leading students. Dean,s List contains the names of many of the second year scholars, and the athletic program has been strengthend by the rising members of the class. WVith two years remaining here on tl1e Hill, the Sophomore Class can be depended upon t.o further college spirit, student interest, and activities. Griecci, Sect?-y.,' Small, Vice-Pres.,' Cook, Pres.,' llluesser, Treas., Shepherd, lllar. CLASS OF '54 4 14-1 y as main unctions of the Sophommfes. In accordance with the Jackson tra- ditions, the first activity of the Sophomore class was to greet the Freshman Class and inspire them with spirit. VVith Marsliall Nelda Shapiro, chairman of traditions, direct- ing, the frosh were seen wearing clashing attire, raincoats carrying stuffed animals or wastebaskets full of books. At the end of a week of hazing, the Sophomores treated the frosh at a Baby Party. Those freshmen who had not complied with the rules had to put on skits. Singing games and refreshments of cider and doughnuts helped to make the evening complete, but the new addition to this traditional party, a Baby Contest, cli- maxed the festivities when a prize was awarded for the best costume. In reality, the main object was a better opportunity to know each other, to initiate the Freshmen into Jackson, and to promote interest in school activities. The Jackson class of '54 has its share of outstanding members, scholastically, athletically, talent-wise, in clubs, and in other organizations. With its willingness to work and its ability we look forward to other successful years at Tufts. . . mu ' 'IN '...., 1 -, -lft-lj" . gl ' bfi" 1 H-' M . , fs' lx , 1 5 hyat, , I . ima' . .f -wr' l 1 .511 1 PAM I'IANcocK, PRESIDENT Shapiro, M ar.,' Ellis, Sect1'y.g Hancock, Pv'e.s'.,' Beitler, T1'eas.,' Sezvfon, Vice-Pres. 111451: CLASS OF '54 ,envi- Eezger freshmen quirereez' at traditions The rope pull mat mm- mme Leading the F Wlzere's your beanie, son? H461 ---an en owed by the Sword cmd Slzielcl The Sophomore honorary society, Sword and Shield, is composed of twelve members whose functions are to take charge of Freshman hazing, greeting visiting athletic teams, and escorting visitors about thecampus. This year the Sword and Shield Society ac- complished the hazing of one of the largest classes to enter Tufts. Prompting the entire class to observe tradition was an enormous task completed only through the unified efforts of the Society. In October, the annual Tra- ditions Dance, the first major college event was a great success with close to one thousand persons in attendance. Perhaps of more significance was the institution of the Fresh- man Book, brought to the campus for the first time in the history of Tufts. Through- out the year, the Sword and Shield group has tried to uphold the high standards upon which the college functions. Its present members, as well as those of the future will strive to accomplish even more in successive years. i K JOHN MQYBTAIION, PRESIDENT Illue.s'ser, lVeatkerlJee, Cook, Rockwell, Kilpatrick, Small, Grieccfi H art, J epsky, lllclllakon, Peterson, Kingsley .. 41471 E nthnsiastic initiates donned beanies How long will we have to wear these? The Freshman Slate ,, The drinks are on the Dean The Pmsiclent votes jg? -I 148 1- and zealous! efvezdec! restrietie ns. This most outstanding Centennial year was the orientation and matriculation of the 1955 Tufts and Jackson classes, the largest ever to enter. WVi.th the enforcement of tra- dition came Sword and Shieldis paddling punishments. The Freshmen, for the most part behaved as young gentlemen and only occasionally did they willfully disobey rules and Sophoniores. At the home football games they marched in a body to sit at the fifty yard line and parade on the field between the halves. Unfortunately, their customary Home-coming day rope-pull with the Sopho- inores was cancelled because of weather, but the beanies came off just the same. Under the guidance of capable officers, their first year with its Freshman Dance and organizational basis was most successful. Tufts compatriots in spirit, the new Jacksonites were initiated into a baby party, placards, green bow hazing by the most able Sophomore group. CHARLES DEVINE, PRESIDENT .Ma1'shall, M a1'.,' Pio, Vice-Pres.,' Devine, Pres.,' Rutter, Sectry. 11491 CLASS GF 55 eng ouse held fascination with the i Pouring metal in the Foundry Open House is an annual spring affair on the Tufts College campus. The Lambert- Kingsley Society organizes the Biology open house exhibit, and the members act as chair- men for the event. Students who are majors in Biology and allied courses, as well as those who are interested help with the experiments and demonstrations. Dissections, muscle group action and displays of work done in the laboratories are shown. In the physiology laboratory there are displays of nerve exci- tation and basic metabollism tests are ex- plained. In this manner the subject is pre- sented so the public can understand the material and it endeavors to avoid the technic- al end of the studies. The open house is supervised by Dr. VVarren and members of the department. At the Mechanica.l Engineering UF E , 1? " Wig. ,, Q G1 Q 0 .9 strange . . . unusual . . . Phenomenal. The Pre-ill e1l's Per' Peeve open house the Illitlll feature is the pouring of cast iron into sand-packed molds. A three- man team pours the metal from the ladle into the mold. Professor Smith is the faculty supervisor here. The Electrical Engineers zmmze students by suspending EL frying pan in the air by :Ln electronic trick and then proceeding to fry eggs in it. Displays in lumination and home lighting are conducted. Civil engineers perform studies in stress and strain by crushing concrete blocks for maxi- mum pressure and bending tree trunks. And the cupboard was bare I . Doc W hzfe ercplazns the vzervous sysfem mf! Apr -Il W 9 . W, J in we n gym -r '.f...A. A , ,, .AQNPGPFA ' 42-2+ ' .Q'fE'-W 'wiflfii ,E 35 ,N qq f., I' I 1 M , wr-X - ., Mayoralljf extravaganza barstin .spring Marcus Mal Springtime is election time at Tufts i it College. At that time rival candidates for mayor begin active campaigning all over the campus. This year the contenders were, under their campaign titles known as Mfarcus X iff f , if , . Anthony and Cleopatra Marcus the Protector Blarcus' dancing girls and the Trojan . . . Horse 41531 , . . . colorful costumes, uuusuul pluzjiwus It ickslzaw Rick H 0265513 Dial lVIooney, Sir Robert lNIullzu'ky, Rickshaw Craven and Caveman Bogen. Coniical posters enlightened the prospective voters. Crowds witnessed the Holy Pail, dragon fights and tong men. The peoples' choice was M3l'CuS Mal lVIooney whose many duties included leading the freslnnen, writing for the W eekly, and sponsoring the winter carnival. the Sage . , ,Q Rlfyf ,gg . The ton g men 4 15-1 1 YCR5 d 54-YE 3 gy' N J! as the candidates vim' fir Hizzonmf ,Sw Robert lllulmkey Tlwougk 'IlJ'Zf'IICZ, sand, and water in sec1 1'clz QI' the " Holy Pm!" mfniwzl snowflakes i cms armed ufts R R Q1 q . WI TER , , I I N xx ,N l E T-if W ' ' ' 1111? ,L , ,. f ., rw in , , in if-..1,f, ,g Q li V 5. W ! 1 Q f N-:X-Q, QV U ff f - ,- r , A , ,ff mai-. - ' ' 'i if ,. f S 'ff 'rr fb ,Lf if new N. T, -X 1, + f l '-' ln ex "7 ,jr -S 'll rl T" A I - X- K . K U.. ' ,- ,-xqlm 1 A N., H, 1 fag- ,Aj-E-, :wa . x -- 252 x . ' .. -lri,..- " X-pl 5 , '-11 ' , ' - E - liar- ' V wigs' ' " li jf' 'P ia Y A ' ' f r ,,f. . ,-5-L z1'!l': F '. Lil' .... T -. W ff." f . ,rw ' 'll' ffflfalff' 'Z f ' 'T 'ET .- L 'gl ' -, Yg' :F .-f -15-1 A ' R ' 2'-' ' V ff -Yfk-lm -'Nfl J' l' , mi 1- -: ALL.. . ' . .51 H. leiqni ,f Ile ' , 4 u ., . . if - -if . - A- .W , :- - Lwf .- 3 ' ,. -M15-f - egg, .eww .Y fu- f---ff.i,.' -'nf- ' if V- 2 lg!! '.' It sell ijmwfl-3,-' ' VJ' 2 - 4.39 77157 "V ' lnawv 1 :WL M l .-11" ' - ' I , ."'?f1s:g,. f- V ,: gat W' .-Any-T , , ' ' Lf-" 1 J: fire. A M .T ' .ali , A ,.-.ef gs? .-1 :A ,1 '1f:.-.,--03335, V14 ' 7' ' "iA7"fu'eI,, a., -5 5 1 e-Uk , Q1 V, The VVinte1' Carnival sponsored bv lXI:1v01 hlal lVIooneV and his council was -1 b'0' U . . 1, ig success despite the lack of snow. The entertziinnient. began on Friday night with concessions in the gym set up by sororities and fra,te1'nities h' h ' W 1C oflerecl everything from tally apples to a tunnel of love topped off by the Chi Omega minstrel show. Saturday night was the Wlinter Carnival Ball where Bill Tyler iuto uu icy museum 0 suow stutues. 67 NIVA was crowned "king,' of the Carnival. A few 1 t dwvs later with il heavy snow fall the scu p ur- I inf" began with enthusiasm. The statures represented IL Snow Elf, Pogo and Albert, t F'Tt1lCl' Time, The N ordwind, Cyrano, Hump y K Dumpty and nmny others. The Winners were Jumbo before his birthday cake by the D.U.'s and :L pink Jumbo by Nfetcalf East. H1 v,, A IQ ' N L' 'V -Qglprpxgl V QN 9+ V T ii in - Q x 1 . af " M -1Q:fs.' nh . Q sqwfs- 4 45? ,. , ,gm - -. P mg.. 454 is IP' f "ggi ' Tv' ' ' Y -- 5 VJ. An JL"-r -a' 4 .J N, . Ji! vs .V1 . -afar: ' gig!! r an - fs-gm: -, f2?+.-1 Q Aw' P 8, bw. '19f.e,:,, ,Q I Q 'L Wm? if 1 5 fax , Q Q Y 1 if 4 -f. Www- 1 Y! I l. . i ' X '- S3 2 5 L... 1 QV , A 5' 2 l ,fx E Y iff 5 - U S my -Q 4 'A' g, S S rr Xuan :Q . 5' X My if V A- A A 1 M se 58 ' ' .un , My I ' 'Q J XX vm Z 1 W W ' , L fx Wf 1 R H Y, i : ,, t Q 4 Us VE Q f I O VT 'K ' n' .. V 1? ' Y M A "-rfvwg. - : ' E W H , pm' fiihaihfw ' N ms fa... Qizw mf lag 1 U b M by Q 5' ,IH wha ,N A YE -5' ,fn L... 'W 3, " ' Q W I 5, H mmf g -...- H 5 , mf, 5 lx ,, 1 W? 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' ' ,, XA A 1. . ,- f 5' 'U ww -, , V i'f"vn , ' -1 A V ' guy., we 'in Q 11 , l 'hi' , 'HW it F Xa 5,4-,,, -.,,. 4. .,. av 'ir' 1 i as - LN I J Ml . I ll- 11 .. , ww N X ,. X N A X 1 W .mm wwk., gr, - , ...gan-163' ' mxffgik-lf' ' - Alpha T au Omega duwfng the 1'ecfonst1'ucti0n 7 eta Psi, founded at Tufis in 1855 E Fifty-three years ago Kappa Chapter of Zeta Psi began to maintain their impressive home on the corner of Packard Avenue. Time has produced many changes in the fraternal life at Tufts. New houses, new groups, .and new faces, until now at the centennial mark nine 'Greek brotherhoods are well established. p History repeats itself even at Tufts. Parties are nothing new at Delta Upsilon, the Thetes have plenty of enthusiasm, and the friendly spirit of the Hill still prevails. Delta Upsilon house party M ? il. cZw' ing the 20's s J ' 1 I T Iaarly 1 hate cntlausfiasts Intcrzfov' view Qf Theta Delta Chi 595 --.--f,fl'1 .1-+1 if ,, Y. IFC esta blisbes fraternity co mtttct COLLINS., PRESIDENT. did the vice squad fiml out this week? The Tufts College Interfraternity Council was founded for the purpose of stimu- lating good fellowship among the fraternal organizations, and for regulating the activities of its components. With these goals as a focal point, the Council has supported a movement of the new Eastern branch of the National Council to put greater pressure on the erasure of dis- criminatory clauses. It has begun its own movement to establish a metropolitan IFC to organize all of the houses in Greater Boston into a more united group proposing an attack on discrimination, greater public service, and enlightenment on the true Values of fraternity life. The Council aims at a later rushing period, a more thorough booklet on the Tufts Houses, and more Open Houses and Smokers, to enable the prospective brother to choose wisely. Just listening. IFC 41621 ,Wy-if , , , mm' presents az gala ball annual! IV. .., Iallulay, Pncml, VN eeks, Davis, lveclislcr, lNIcCartl1y, Lcsberg, Lewis, lloore, Carter, Fettig, O'Connell, Collins, Buckley, Siebcrt, Moulton. John and Joan at fha IFC ball. 11631 IFC Presenting --.- .4 if-P+ -A- Miss Andrea Pcrlstein Andy, a combination of sparkling brown eyes, chestnut hair, and a captivating smile, comes to the Hill from Leominster, lVIassachusetts. ,In the two years that she has been here she has become familiar to all as a girl with a pleasing personality and a striking igure. You may have seen Alpha Epsilon Pi's favorite sister painting posters for Mayor ltlal Nlooney, or serving at any of the Alpha Omicron Pi teas. At Leominster High Andy was as active in studies as she was in outside activities. Incidentally she was elected to the National Honor Society. Sociology, her major, and its connected humanitarian work is Andyis big central interest and therein lies much of the serious part of her personality. The future will see Andy doing social work, her ambition. She is looking forward to doing case work for a foundation, and we can think of few people who could be better qualified for the field. Her understanding and generositytogether with a pleasing sense of humor will certainly help her to success in the field she has chosen. A personality can not be described in a few lines, neither can the effect of a pretty smile or a soft voice be put on paper. Only in knowing Andy can you understand why she has been elected Queen of Alpha Epsilon Pi, Queen of fraternities, and Queen of the campus. I F C QUEEN 11641 F777 7 Jrn 1' 3 , va- - . . 'Q VW in.. nu ' , . afvv. ' Nas: ' -i- lw 'A 'J' 1 L' mx uname- ,gait 1 wif: if ,.phs6- - nigh A, ' la uw has Nm Y me --K ME H Q 5 ! 15325512 M3553 M n Q sg. SAE . Asif , ,H N NE, L, A v iw, 3.x . 25-Iii." 'WQEQWL Mau: HQ 1' - W? z, HH -- lvl, ' .ifssmfwr :H-f:i?1-f ullSisMVQQEMQQ-viiT-.-'WF-'iiwifw V V 1..-YW" W' Y-:.'f::"-: -- . ,. wp-, -1 -W - 1 wil' Y W ' ws Q Assam m , " ' -- A up I J gms-y, Wm, , , Q ,J , 'w , . w , Y . N , 1 . I J ff- H1 -w K, ww ,-, L I, a Each fraternity was re resentea' in Cappie Petrash, Phi Epsilon Pi. Pat Carb, Delta Ups-ilon. 2251 lllary Donalzxue, Theta Delta, Chi, Carol Clark, Sigma Nu. A 4 166 y the bonorea' and gracious court. rgzk - ,LA ,,, -.- A Joan Torpa, Zeta Psi. .M ary Ilg, Delta, Tau Delta. ' Q ww r a ' .Fx I 4 2 V Q 1- fi a 7 Wi T ing 1 my w ' i , 7 , Flo ppie Hubbm'fI, Alpha T au Omega. Beit Jenrzirngs, Alpha Sigma, P1111 -I 167 1- 3 s Qin Epsilon Pi .ll llvy' AL RO'FHS'FE1N, PRESIDENT. Practicing for the Clwristmas Sing . . . Eta Deutcron Chapter Eta Deuteron Chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi was established at Tufts in 19410 by the merger of Sigma Omega Psi with AEPi. Today with 446 brothers and 27 pledges, Eta D ranks as one of the top chapters in the national circle. The policy of having Well-rounded brothers won for Eta D the AEPi national extra-curricular award for 1951. They are represented on the Tufts Weekly, on which four brothers are editors, Jumbo Book, 3 P's, Debating Society, Forensic Council, Hillel, IR-H Club, Chorus, Odikon, and the Band. The brothers at 10 Dearborn Road do not neglect the academic side of college, for no less than QQ made Dean's List last year. Many claim membership in Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, Psi Chi, and Lambert-Kingsley. The AEPi's social calendar was tops as usual. Events such as an Annual lVIardi Gras, a VVestern Party, a Sisters, Song Title Party, Pledge Weekend, Winter Carnival and the Spring Weekend highlighted the year. The future looks bright for Eta D, including the prospect of a new chapter house and continued success in their activity. The typical Executive meeting. -I IGS le lg How Tlllflflh' Jacoby, Rubin, Schwartz, Zellner, Goulston, Fraukenberg, Slifxpiro, Kane, Kowal ftreas.J, Bernstein, Housen, Civen, Yett, Katz, Lzummyor, Scolnick, Wvalder, Faigel. Row Two: Merrin, Fine, Rosenberg, Glazer, Lezberg, Lzunpal, Factor, Plult, Teplow Cviee pres.J, Alpert Qsee.j, Sommers, Kusland, illerninlr, Rubin, Simons, Stzxndel, Gutternmn, Seife, Weissman. Row One: Duetch, Lustgarten, Aizely, Lindauer, Blazer, Goodman, Zinman, Jaffee, Rothstein Qpreshj, T:'memlmum, Abrmnson, Rubin, Todres, Holtz, Alleyne, Simon. 115 Chapters The A EPi'.s' entertain. All .IL.L.J! . - g r -nr il' Q9 fznesw , 'ef - 1 . ,L 'QL l ' 'L 3. -C' i' , ' ' -- 3 ' l lo - 5 X' llm14-llilizuvzlsff 'Xl 11691- Founded 1913 Established 1940 5 1 2ii,5i-. ... .. fur Mwgmmljlllfgl , is . U .L K v Tx i f lil! C if m fg 7 Hull ! F In H, U 1 I " ' .VX i X A D- , -2-' , - f ' '-zgflxq. , . N' ' Y 1 . . f 'Qf:-1":'- Q 'Q ' -4 ' 1-,,v-1.-qv - -f r :qi-:11's:.,o v' ..f. ,' 3. - " , -Qi. , Tqglgi In ASIS., Q - '.-4445, 4- f f- f-'-514-' - ' .A a ' xv I ff! ,xx I W m e-f i ld lf! P' X- 3 .--via..-T , g,f"f'- " -2 Q.-,225 I-1.1'?Z?W'T'Y f ,P Wg' is A i 54' 1' .' J' K X 1 , N X ,Q , xi e 9' ?- -v at ,J-1351 , ilu. .f Tv-. Fl l lr l Row Three: Vllhite, Klitzke, Salvo, Nickerson, Daley, Hill, Hollister, Arvidson, Black, Hergott, Fisher, Ingstrom, Lloyd, Saglio, lvolle, Siloway. Row Tufo: Rice, Bilionis, Saari, Nordin, Gregg, Nies, Escalette, Fox Csec.J, Hutchinson Ctreasj, Snmyda., Arc, Anderson, 1IcCann, Powers, lvadelton, Kurkjian, Faustine. Row One: I-Iill, Meuser, Lowe, Miniero, Allrnann, Clark, Field Cprcsj, Collins Qvice prcs.j, Goguen, Gurea, Servadio, Joyce, Davis, Sullivan, llIcCa1'tl1y. J A' . ' 4 V' . 1" Q ,in I 1 Q Founded 1931 Established 1931 A ' 69 Chapters P -Y - 2 an d X, ifffis l f ,, s lg l M g,73' --,V H ' 1 3, lla V- John Forti, Scarecrow. l 1 F, ff, . l 'ww 165 5 if e s lms, ,1 N' . ','I 'F 5 ! ,,V .yi , ,, l X ll' lull l,llR l ll l J ' 3, i ji, 1f?fl"U 7. ff I .a w F, i, l .fy -Q , X - ll l, ll, lfg'-:EM ll. X N in 5 ' 1 ffigwfi, Ml lx TW , ' IJ ll Twig' Y' ' K 5' ,ff i M ,Lu Aff' 'l 2'-7-1. " '- 11701 1-..,.,.. --. 419601 Szgma hi - 7 . . . I, Founded at Kale University 111 184-0, the Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity maintains fifty-five active chapters throughout the United States. Beta Iota Chapter was established through the merger of Alpha Sigma Pi and Alpha Kappa Phi in 1946. Alpha Kappa Phi was located on Hill for many years prior to the merger, and the brothers are still known as Kippies, a vestige of pre- war days. The "Casino Partyi' and the tradi- tional "Ratl1skeller N ighti' are typical of the parties held in the unique "Kippie Cave." The Pledge Formal held at the VVinehester Mtlsic House and the annual Alpha Sigma Phi Weelqencl centered around a beach party, clam-bake, formal dinner and dance, cul- minated the Kippie social whirl. During the winter season tl1e Edelweiss Ski Group provides an outlet for the ardent snow fans. The group comprised of Kippie sisters as well as brothers and pledges makes numerous trips to New Hampshire and the nearby ski resorts. Alpha Sigma Phi claims representation in all phases of campus activity, class of- ficers, honor societies, varsity sports, and the many other college organizations. Beta Iota Chapter DICK FIELDS, PRESIDENT Kippies and their Queen . . . Bobbing in the Cave. 11711 21" Alpha Tau Omega is having another Winning year. Their-scholastic achievement was noted Wlgen the house received the coveted award, the Conseils Fraternity Loyalty Prize. The award, a replica of Jumbo, is an incentive for more Gamma Beta gains. The house at the end of the Row demonstrates their desire for service to society and spirit of achievement with community projects and the substitution of "Help Week" for "Hell VVeek." Suffering pledges are history at A.T.O. Since the Tufts Chapter was established in 1893, they have continually produced men of leadership in every phase of campus life. Among its alumnae are included five faculty men: Dean lVIiller, Prof. Emery, Prof. Holmes, Prof. Littleton, and Prof. Ringer. Probably the greatest living Tufts grad, Dr. Vannevar Bush, is an A.T.O. The brothers have a hand in the fun on campus as well as shining in tl1e intramural athletics. This spirit has fostered a bond which makes the member doubly aware of the slogan: "Once an A.T.O. always an A.T.O." FZ Rancho, 110 Alpha Tau Omega tea . . . 41721 7- . . -, ir 1- -v - ' Row Three: Rube, Brown, Pipes, Roth, Cook, Bigelow, McLean, Taylor, Shaw, Fettig Ctreasj, Mullarky, Porter, Gardner, Noble, Sta.rkwezltl1er, Brewster, Lilburn, Hou' Two: Giuflrida, Mncoubrny, lllerliliy, Krueger, Blake, Drew, Donovan, Howe, Russo Csccj, Colson, Fitzsilrnnons, Gifford, Allen, Pusey, Murdock, Busc-nglin, Gavnnas, Baylrutt. 1fou'0nc: Connolly, Jorgensen, Powers, Simonzi, Wlecks, Gram, Vaughn, McGovern fpresj, Baker, Quinlan, Olson, Russo, McGovern, Yuill, HacA1'clle. 1 1,-. Q , 126 Chapters Founded 1865 Established 1895 W- T " 5 , .. Z V " I :ms .-f-vs.. . dwg - -' ' A' N- , l 4 i "-- :m ntlEf"""---N.4'Aj'x5 H: R F do 2 1 .. -1 I "WL: twigzzy r IT4k-'LPTM-f El Pm f-W 1 ."f-Q . f,. ' -, 1T0' r r r f : i l .pi ff' e 'r" we 'Q L .A s and Queen Floppw - .....- A Y in if 1 -+ " , ' rg - , I i - firm , lun ,I - .gpg ,QM-.".i,1'4 ff Q xl . i , . , 3 3-,gif il 'i .. M., 3 r m! " 4, ., -1 ,N U gl 'l , +- r - iff 1 r i 4 ' i ' rr- .f . M y 7. ,. njuisrg, r if-i rr? - . 7 "XM" 'A'-" -A-6-fxrffgmfr. ' "JL, r ' rr-I fem- --H123 f . -'nel-'mfr Af .. . J. -7111 , , 'Q 51' N .- N-Wg'-'S-K C - i. x. 41731 Row Three: Mc-Curcly, Curley, Johnson, Imboden, Shrurn, Raine, Riggs, Paige, Rockwell Norris 1 firley King Buto Bernaton Kelly Row Tico: Finn, Massey, Wlhituker, Vassalo, Shephard, Pitt, Potter, Doane, Tobin Lynch Richirdsoii Xoung Llnnehan Wlfilili Moulton, Wiggin, Davis, Feyrer, Sweeney, Bistany. Row One: Pio, Ireland, Recd, Schmidt Blenvcnu Chfwe Burnham Bushficld Stryker Cvice pres.D, Layman, Walsh Qprcsj, Fendcrson, Alizlpoulios ftreasj, Crafts fur J Darcy Rutter Russo I'oclc,n Ilg O Hart Howland, Rosa. Founded 1859 Established 1889 R - A 8 J if 'li li lg' l 4,4 15445 ard: 5 - l j ,-ff' - - , ff f lL Q-ii-A sfqfijnigillnl x R -F f, , 'E 2.-5 Z f 7 W ,. -s bij". 17 -""" l-13-,i:.T. 'la t ,,. Us . ...f- gif ll 2 VW -f-41, . 2 ' eil i ll 'N 'lf l.""'-5 li L -lamllllm' 1 ' I . ' i , ,g,",!L,,,,,,.. jlaliiliaf 24 .icy ,f Qi? 3 SQ' be ' ' 72,4 fo XW L If rv-43. ,vm . .Q -Y.. ,I . ,L.',,..1n . . ll? U ellfl Till! elfd Beta Mu Chapter The Delts may well be proud of their representatives on the Hill this year. There were ive Beta Ml.l,S on the varsity football squad, including the captain, and two hard- working and popular managers. They also pro- vided the Jumbo Book with three executives and claimed lnemberships in all the college honor societies. VVhen the dust and commotion of rush week settled down this fall, there were twenty-three new pledges, almost double last year's number. They were introduced on Homecoming Day which saw 154 guests at the Shelter. Delta Tau Delta has been a con- structive adjunct to higher education since the establishment of Beta lVIu Chapter in 1889, thirty years after national creation. An outstanding local policy is the pledge- advisor system whereby eacl1 pledge is as- signed to an upperclassman for instruction and advice. Delta Tau Delta is still growing. Last year two 1nore undergraduate chapters and Several alumnae chapters were added. The high spirit and teamwork of Delta Tau Delta means that continued expansion, as well as survival, is a certainty. DICK YVALSH, PRESIDENT bpring brfi11,g.9 the Delis out of fheir shelter . . . as lfVig prepares for the Clzristmas Sing. 41751 elm lbsilon ll 11-f P1-111, CARTER, PRESIDENT. Delta Upsilon is campus famous for its antic-mad band always dressed for the occasion. Supplenienting the tricks of the costumed musicians, the pledges performed many amusing stunts at D.U. chapters from Dflontreal, Canada, to New Brunswick, New Jersey. Appearing on the national scene as a nonsecret fraternity at VVilliams College in 1834, the Tufts charter was obtained fifty-two years from that time with twenty charter members. D. U. was well represented on the major college teams and sent many outstand- ing men into intramural competition to win one leg on the Trophy of Trophies. Last year they narrowly missed winning a second leg on the trophy. Parties are in their fifty-second year at 11-l- Professors Row. The climax of Rush Wfeek is the Casino Party and Gay Nineties Revue, the annual presentation being the hilarious D. U. skit. The Alumnae Party is a big social feature and the two formals are always anticipated, topping off the fun at Delta Upsilon. Tlzailv Clrris illalliuson. Cringle . . . Some 'wore tops and others ware bottoms 111761- Row Threw: Perry, Grant, Nlichielson, Gillis, Stewart, Egan, Starkwcather, Glimc, Todebush, Golden, Brault, Bowen, Katz, Bickert, Shoemaker, Prince, Riclmrclson, Ilitzlr, Bonnell, Halstead. Rau' T'll'0.' Weatherbee, ,l"ra,zier, Williams, Craig, Brooks, Hefllunfl, Perkins, llenrichsen, Esrey, Clabeault, Curry Qsecnj, Vanvick, Cushman Ctreasj, Taylor, Rogers, Fletcher, Charlton, Cooke, Brown, Torto, Duncombe, Petriccn. Hou' 0110: Collier, Snyder, Janello, Mastoras, She:-llan, Grussing, Dmucllovsky, lvhyte, lVersel, Pliilbrick , Holmes, Carter Cpresj, Davis, Ronco CVICC pres.J, Pzmclni, Aylward, Reis, Miller, Durkee, Thompson, Zanes, Swain, Mallinson, Vinton LJETQEJA 'ft 'Q ' 69 Chapters iff Founded 1834 Established 1886 ' YB: " lm ' F 1-f F 7" Bridge at Delta U psilon - I d 'LE' Q In llllwlllllllllll gy, 1 - 59- 1' 1 i. W? r I -Ii ,X --, X X i 5 DFI: fl.. UI Ii-8 if-- ,i, i fl'l",' 4 ' it x 1' f :fifty ' ff! ,rd - if L In ., zulix , 55' 'll ge -11 galil' ' g f 7 fi if A , 'f f lr ' 41771 Row Three: Gross, Goldman, Schuler, Field, Leinwend, Wylcr, Goldberg, fFreidman, Platner, Sklarew, Rozene, Greenberg, Rubin, Sacarob, Epstein, Galpcr, Wechsler. Row Two: Symons, Rapp, Lazarow, Mieunis, Resnick, Asher, Greeustein, Jones, Rich, Win- nick Csecj, Silverxnzm, Albert Ctrezisj, Primack, Dworken, Rittenburg, Woloshin, Miller, Levin, Zimmerman, Aron, Fastiff. Row One: Dean, Dickerman, Rismzin, Sholder, Levavitt, Zussman, Kraft, Stachenfeld, Robbins, Safirstein fvice presj, Greene Cpresj, Fogel, Adelson, Myers, Lotwin, Slabine, Eligavtor, Seigel, Gussak. gr 'ir Lg, Founded 1904 Established 1916 47 Chapters M .lf . - ' X5 5:- "i, ,ilk How did the stock market d0f0fZ!1,7j? -A 'Y i 1 Jin if G l f ffifrfffis 17 ff I! Eff: 73 ' 1-E1 '-iii' Vw Y s,lL,..' fl ! 'G G , if , f ' V 'M I .. N 1 X 1 1 'HL' A l fi l' F , 41781 ,J-lq. -v hi Epsilon i The Umicron Chapter of Phi Epsilon Pi was established on .the Tufts campus in 1916 by five men. Since that time it has continually grown until today it has an active membership of over seventy fratres and pledges. Phi Ep activities are many and varied, and they have been first place in scholastic competition more often than any other Greek group on the campus. Their varsity repre- sentation includes Richard Asher and Daniel Farber, footballg Lowell Greenburg, basket- ballg Jack Sidell, baseballg Robert Kraft and Barry Symons, lacrosseg Bobby Jones, trackg David Zussman, hockeyg and swimmer, Bruce Sklarew. Ingenuity and ambition spark the Phi Ep's in the annual Nfayoralty Campaigns. In the past three years, two out of three of their supported candidates have Won the title of His Honor, a record which gives a hint of the tremendous amount of energy expanded in the annual contest. The big white house on the hill con- tributes men of high calibre to the scholarship and to the extra-curricular program on the Tufts campus. Omicron Chapter SHELDON GREENE, PRESIDENT L6 Phi Epls' and their cowgirl queen. The boys gather 'round for a song. 41191 Sigma Nu f . sp.. :Qi ' gf? Q.: 'F-4. N, 4 . I. B013 RUTII, PRESIIHQNT. I 7l'1iliClf'f07L n-ight at Sigma Nu. How about cz date for ilzree of my Zeta Era Chapter Sigma Nu, one of the oldest national fraternities, became represented on the Hill when Phi Delta, a local fraternity at Tufts si11ce 1912, was chartered as its Zeta Eta chapter in the fall of 1950. From its in- ception, the brotherhood has fostered the ideals of leadership through participation in campus activities. Nationally, Sigma Nu was founded at Virginia Nlilitary Institute in 1869 and now' has 116 active chapters in leading colleges and universities in 447 states and the Dominion of Canada with scholarship funds to promote the intellectual development of its members. During the past year, this chapter is proud to note among its members, the mayor, the president of the senior class, and members of the various honor societies. Sigma Nu is also well represented in varsity sports, ROTC, and other important campus activities. The first event on a full social schedule was the traditional "Roaring Twentiesw party held during rush week, with additional informal parties with various themes, the Cliristmas pledge formal, and the Wlliite Rose formal in hlay. f i li li? if i I, I . wil Ri . 1 1 ini? 11801 vv . ,- .. Hour Three: Kingsley, Millard, lflnllzun, Burt0n,Reitl1, Mooney, Robie, A. J .Margeson Qsee. D, Learson, Chase, LOConte, Hussey, Payne, Gerrish. Row Tu,-0: Surtees, Boundy, Mazarellu, Cleveland, Siebert, Brown Ctrensj , Truesdale, Bolinder, Bertonazzi, Brower, Bennett, Hart, Thompson. Hou' One: Wales, Muncuso, Patterson, Fielding, Ruth fp1'es.D, Millard Cvice pres.J, A. R. Mai-geson, Swett, Boundy, Cousinenu, Ruclisill. U Swv ' K H eli , , 115 Chapters gg Founded 1869 Establlshed 1950 E 1 N 1 WQUB QT- -M Q 1 f : ,lim 'Q N--e V - l Ni IP- - . l I f f - Lg ul I Fielding and Millard spruce up. .. E.. 7' v S 5 , , . , Z - , 2 A . . P- We , li l Wx LE"...4 , - 1 1 -- iwgljl, -13-""'.- .1 ff f , , Z - I f , if- 1 ,f X I in X E A. A 'UH 4 181 y 51.4311 '- Q P1 403,33-. Z- x-g.,,'35. . , " ' ,,,f ' .'5"W.' ' '14 - ,ff-,f 1 ---nr w f , -J f X I r, 1 s-x.-1190.-bzzax.. ty f I I X .f 1 7 f,. NL.. , Z ..,. ,. . , ,Y - 1 Row Three: Cressey, O'Connell, Moore, Gordon, Loranger, Ingamnson, Rice, Sands, McKenzie, Toadvine, Cassidy, Spillane, Hennessey, Godzinski, Bussell, Sanderson, WVilkinson, Lobbadin, Poclmrski. Row Tzro: Marshall, Crosby, Crocker, Cicia, Alexander, Gangemi, Gulyassy, Ross, Price, Thompson, Badum QSec.D, Lundburg, Duke fl.I'63S.J, Cairns, Kinum, Papas, Jones, Small, Peckham, Sheehan, Denney. Row One: Miller, Tomasso, Costello, Corsini, Lewis, Whitman, Bryant, Lombardi, Ernst, Lincoln Qpresj, Houck, Harrison, Taft, Baffone, Spnrr, Bentley, Shore. W in gn r-Q! fini? ' X X 'i Founded 1847 Established 1856 gs?ml 29 Chapters 4, '5 Af .-fs .-2. If " ' ws E, 'L' dp X142 f V , is 7- Lombardz wo-rkmg for a change. M -'iw' I :fr 'Q-Jlf.. ix K' 1 I W .1 lsr 2 r KC 1:1 ' ' fl f '. , ' ll 1 .y ll .- I fy- "N i l xllr if El l Z 'Q 1,w,'.,,1'-Ifrl .of l r ' 5 ll ' , 'V' -'-l'f1"ff'f lr 1 Q H Q e Ig 1, ff , N . 1' r .1 Train ' --.. LJ"-1 I' , A121 'X 4 182 1 hem elm Chi 123 Packard Avenue is a lively place at any season of the year. During the fall, the house is host to the Thete football fans and their dates with "after-the-game" parties and with an extra-special whirl for Homecoming. The party spirit continues through the Christ- mas Pledge Formal and the culmination of social events is the Spring Formal and picnic. Kappa Charge was instigated at Tufts nine years after the national founding in 1847 at Union College in Schenectady, New York. Now it is the oldest charge in continuous existence of that fraternity. Winners of the Trophy of Trophies, the Thetes are continually first in the various athletic contests, not only intramural but varsity as well. They have a fine representa- tion in the extra-curricular groups on the Hill and their back yard hlayoralty preparations have supported such memorables as Pancho Lewis and Rickshaw Rick. The Thetes hold the record for having among their alumnae four out of the seven Tufts College presidents including President Carniichael. Kappa Charge DAVE LINCOLN, PRESIDENT 1 he Students of Theta Delta Chi . . . The Athletes of Theta Delta. Chi LL TA APHA 11831- Zeta Psi inf' BILL VFYLER, PRESIDENT The melodfious Z etes -C Kappa Chapter Enlargement of the individual per- sonality, promotion of friendships, and de- velopment of Scholarship keynote the activi- ties of Zeta Psi, the oldest of the Greek letter groups at Tufts. Its long-standing policy of maintaining small closely-integrated member- ship has rnade it opportune to foster both individual and ,group achievement. The brothers at 80 Professor's Row are Well known for their active participation in such college groups as the Yacht Club, International Relations-History Club, 3 P's, Band, and the honor societies. In athletics, the Zetes have members competing on all varsity squads and boast of having the captain of the track team and the co-captains of the ski and swimming teams. Intramural sports find the Zetes ready for action, too. A lively interest has always been evi- dent in the sockd lde in the house on the corner as well as on the campus as a whole. An active group in every lwayoralty Campaign, Winter Carnival, and Homecoming, the Zete spirit never lags. Ninety-seven years have developed the Kappa Chapter into a campus leaden Lose something 41841 Row Three: Keslcrn, Connolly, Curtis, llook, Reagan, Wahl, Becllry, Logan,l'ez1rsc, Murphy, Burlmnk, Mims. Roar Two: VVillian1s, Cook, Sterudalc, Jollustou, Dunn, Pratt, Yargus ltreusj, Maron, Pnllrnl,lx, Byrne, Rivllmoncl. Nolan, Gullagcr. 1?OIl'07lI'f lvilllilfi, Titus, Taylor, Moore, Lnyrlon, lflvtvllor fsvc. J, Tyler Cprosj, Carlow, Grant, Johnson, Lel"uvour, Russo. W9 v' 'LN' 'H ,, M qw . 22 Chapters 1353 -3 H -.Alf Founded 1847 Esrabllshed 1855 H551 y u? 9 4 B5 Q , iss .l Tb, 3,-in xx Y N4 , r -N " 5 X -ii,-q .:,,-,, Q i, 412: ia i : .l' Vg ll I-I i 4l'r',p.r,1, ' 3- ,Ld Q., f- nfl, 'Img-, V .:. Double run. 'fo - ,-, A l " - - A 1 'f?TLfl,lA-NQ A f S . ' r I l A' as --'rs ,is- s -I ' .- Q Q' fl ' I I I -Q1 1 - . 5' 'f l J I fI"- -- -sh ., -'Km F :fi-,Y f-' - H' fic- ll-Q'-'54 lp?E'5.xb,.- 'ff "'.'Jff " Q-A Q l ll,!'l-' .-2' -- awe- -- r 13415 ,. - 1 a--QWDK r --F lynl' in . 15' ' 'ff' '- -Xi' N '1i':j.:t.. ' 41351 - V . , 1 , nn ellenic is the governing council Zimmerman, Reinhalter, VVlxipple, Clark, Wardwell, Pickles, Murdock, Folsom. A lot of work, a lot of fun. Dancers at Pan-Hell Dr. Shapim charms B1 'iss Buslz, 'ASL PAN HELLENIC COUNCIL 4 186 1 1 r, 1 jackson smfmf t czctzwtzes. 0 3 The Panhellenic Council, composed 'of two active nienibers from each of J3.CliS0l1,S four sororities, has as its objectives the maintenance of high standards of sorority ' ' . .' . . ' . at life, friendly lHl,C1'-S01011f,y lelatlons tl futherance of intellectual ac- Jackson, 'ie L ' . complishinent and sound scholarship, the maintenance of high social standards, and the formulation of the rules which govern formal rushing on this campus. In order to accomplish these ainis, the ll ' Council sponsors yearlv a marsh- Panhe enic . ' . L L mallow roast and fornial tea for incoming freshmen, a Progressive Supper in which each sorority participates, an inter-sorority basket- ball t0llI'112ll1161lt, a semi-formal dance, and the presentation of a silver cup to the sor- ority obtaining the highest scholastic average during the preceding year. Bi-:TTY BIURDOCK, Lookinf u 1 the Philosophical Tefa-a-tele f' J I 4137i PAN HELLENIC COUNCIL 40661 Omimfon Pi NTARY ANN CAHILL, PRESIDENT newly acquired sorority "daughters.H Alpha Omicron Fi emphasizes the need for friendly co-operation in all of its many activities, both social and philanthropic. Tea and cookies after initiation. Delta Charge Delta chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi was founded in 1908 and is one of fifty-Hve active groups in the national organization. Under its code of high ideals-loyalty, learn- ing, and sincerity-the chapter has sponsored many Worthwhile projects. Foremost among these activities- are the philanthropic services to the Medfo1'd Community Center. Delta has planned monthly activities for the Center, including a hayride and a Christmas movie, and dona- tions resulting from food sales are frequently made. The chapter also contributes clothing to the Kentucky Frontier Nursing Service, and annual Christmas and Thanksgiving food baskets to needy families in the vicinity. The year,s social events included an inter-sorority cookout, bridge parties, a Foun- ders' Day banquet at the Boston University Club, and the annual White Rose Ball in February. Delta,s rush parties centered about the Ma1'di Gras and French Cafe themes, and the season concluded with the sorority juniors giving a banquet for their The AOPi chorus Zine 118811 . 9011.5 -, v ,ur-,, , 'XX as Q Q I Egg: lfflifrlw' Rau' Three: Kvedar, BICPCIIIQQ, Likely, Courant, Clyman, Gavrclis Csecnb, Fruehan, Kean, Mac-ali, Ricca, Donohue. Ron' Two: Struhbe Hynes, Powderlcy, Vllentworth, Borden, Mclntire Ctreas. D, Hayden, Clark, Smith, Reed, Dysart, Colburn, Slulhzade. Row One: Toltz Kates, Cahill, Zimmerman, Shepard Kvivc pres.J, Cahill fpresj, Torpn, Perlstein, Boudreau, Shapiro. 53 Chapters Founded 1897 Established 1908 A T . . ffffiiek f Colors Cardinal and Whlte They have fo work bqfore ihey can play. -11891 Ron' Three: Aho, Crane, MaeCr:1cken, English, Nelson, Bullard, Dietrick, Hnrshziw, Lentino, Howard. Row Two: Emery, Hopkins, Gamble, Ellis, Cohen Csee.j, Klcbsattel Ctreasj, Akeley, lValton, Clough, Glcnney, Miller. Row One: Miller, Orner, Nlurdock, Patter- son, Hall, Barnard Cviee pres.J, Potter Cpresj, lvurclwell, Lubarsky, Mann, Freeman, I-Iancock, l L27 X .gg ff N . 67 Lhapters Founded 1893 Estabhshed 1908 M' 'N f . . l., . Colors Blue and Gold yi bg "5 mf? lv f i VI, ' ietiiia? ' ' ,e ln- z u r Brand new pledges . . . sisters. 1 -5 l iff 11901 ,..!lL ,, 4191161 Xi Delta Alpha XI Delta, fostering the ideals of friendship, learning, and service, was founded in 1893 at Lombard College in Galesburg, Illinois. One of 7 6 active groups, Lambda chapter in 1907 became one of the first sororities to be established at Jackson and today meets in the chapter rooms in the home of Professor and lVIrs. Kelley on Talbot Avenue. - Besides maintaining an extremely full calender of activities for the school year, Alpha Xi Delta has the highest scholastic rating of the four sororities at Jackson and this year was again presented the Pan- hellenic Scholarship Cup. Notable activities of the 1951-1952 year were a discussion led by Dr. Bartlett on the United Nations, the annual Christmas party, pledge formal, and Founders' Day banquet for active members and alumni in Boston. The chapter contributed the pro- ceeds of a food sale to the national fraternity's philanthropic project benefitting needy child- ren in Brown County. Indiana, and donated clothing to llI'lClCI'1J1'lVllCgCd children. Lambda Chapter . JANE Po'r'rER, PRESIDENT. Alpha XI Delta's rushing season was highlighted by a gala shipboard party, featur- ing appropriate costumes by botli rushees and inenibers, and original songs and skits. Scenes at Port Alpha Xi Delta. I A Gum 11911 Chi mega iv' JEAN L1TTLE1v1ELn, PRESIDENT. cake sale for the Negro College Fund, Parents Day luncheon and program, and a final farewell dinner for the seniors kept sisters and pledges busy from June to June. The chapter room and kitchenette are located in the home of hir. and lilrs. Jan Friis. The Clzvi 0 peanut market. Chi Alpha Chapter Chi Alpha has completed its forty- second year. And, like its 111 sister chapters of Chi Cmega, it has tried to make each year count by encouraging Worthwhile ex- periences among its menibers. Chi O sisters will reinember making fun out of work as they painted the walls of their newly partitioned kitchen, wrote headlines for the chapter newspaper, and pulled ski pants onto innumerable Stearns Villagers at the nursery to which they gave time, money, equipment, and parties. Gallons of coffee at dawn initiations, boxes of tea at midnight study vigils, paragraphs of ine print on the summer Round Robin letter, a menagerie of stuffed animals at the tradi- tional pajama rush party-each has a page in the Chi O memory book. In keeping with its ideal of balanced living, the chapter's program included speak- ers on world affairs and on the potential value of sorority, readings by poets, and a. round-table on vocations led by alumnae. Each Chi O is required to participate actively in at least two campus activities. The pledge fornial at the Lincolnshire, peanut and apple stand at football games, .lane "Al J olsonn H arbaugh Y .-QQR.-.--fr-fx-f ' - - YYY'-'---'f---' -1 ' as ve- -71:-iv.slnm.1 S ff? 2 r 11921, Row Three: Terry, Bennett, Quimbly, Wisernan, Carrolan, Holland, Fitzgerald, Pickles, Sexton. Row'Two:'Levy, Colridge, Folsom, Metcalf, Viano, Heacock, Cllubbock, I-Iallet, Harbough, Joy, Costanza, Beitler, Bass, Chase, Moskol. Row 0ne:VKelley, Scott, Clark, Keane, Remiek, Williams, Rogers Cvice prcs.l, Littlefield Cpresj, Craven, Rogers, Reynolds, Fairbanks, Ilg, Lewis. o f ll 111 Chapters Founded 1895 Established 1910 S' I A C Colors Cardinal and Straw yy , kd Sabi, BNQMMH X F S M7 CS J ,T rlnotlzer Chi-0 pecmut Be graceful, Rick! 4193i tg wwe- M., ,., V V ,-, x w I L, N V .,.,, I Y --Q IJ' n 7 5 A A 3 "':' 'l X QI: r.-1 X V HV.. , ,..- ff fl' H ' .35 , - HP 1' I ' ' 'fx V' V 1 . t 5, ski 1 .1 2. -:ffl-A M H ,I 'ff " V mei '. e Q3 . ,., g ' ff' Si: Row Two: Bohn,,Hubbzu'd, Whipple, Volmer Ctreas.-J, Doran, McKinney Csec.D, Busi, Reinhnlter, Petrnsh. Row One: Perry, Glover Ross,-Jenkins, Lukso fvice pres.j, Feard Cpresj, Audet, Yvender, Johnston, Petrone. 55355 2 xg ,2.,':7i':- .. G11 'S A, im fx e 5 '54.zxfsf3sgQo H Q 1 If y 5 Nall X Wm s.f -.ln ft f 97' 4-LL J' ,, nk X , ,V AWP' 'if' K f ,Y 'E wa 5 : 551' 1. ,. Wiz? 4, i nil, S: .11 15 Z ' 5 1? " H W o. ' ' msd 'f :Bit 25:51. el.. fwfr, - 3 I K,-41'fiT 1 ,. ,rg . . 'F' 1, 11-'iam ' , K o 59 Clmpters Founded 1874 Established 1913 Colors Lavender and Maroon Another '-round for the officers .... 'l:'IL'ilf7:lIt'i07L .smiles -f1941- K WT' l 4. 1 ' :2 M11 M ,gy fig gg, 1 Sigma 011511761 Omicron Chapter of Sigma Kappa, established in 1913, has endeavored through its many and varied activities to maintain its standards of honor, scholarship, and friendliness, and above all-of mutual co- operation and assistance. As part of its philanthropic prograni, the sorority sends annual monetary gifts to the Blaine Seacoast Missioii, a Sigma Kappa national project. An annual event is the Christmas party given to children at the North Brighton settlement house, at which both clothing and toys are given to the young guests. Omicron's social calender, with an eye to fostering inter-sorority spirit, included an all-sorority scavenger hunt, and an even- ing tea with lVIrs. Paul Flint-managing editor of the Atlantic Monthly-as speaker. The chapter's rushing featured a football party, and the traditional Wedding, and the pledge period ended with the Initiation Ball in the month of lVIarch. Spring was high- lighted by an old-fashioned square dance, and a tea for mothers of sorority members. Getting the scoop on Sigma. Omicron Chapter BIARCIA FEAR, PRESIDENT. Each year begins with a grand cleaning and redecorating project on the rooms at Professor Yeagelfs home in preparation of the coming events, and ends with a farewell party for the graduating seniors. Umicron smfiles! 11951- 'WB-.. QU! xr- w wx Q M u u w X wx. 1 T he Blue Duclfling Club, typical of the fl07"777Jll07'y clubs The Glec Club-1892 It's a rare student that has many minutes to spare for our college has a complete selection of activities to match every undergraduate whim. Special talents may be accentuated or a particular interest can be satisfied. These activities provide another opportunity for the college student to become a versatile individual. Our centennial birthday year finds the Tufts man and woman 'every bit as active as our predecessors. new Tr f'!!'!b flip' ' L 1- 'A "'.iEf-' ,JSC '. 1. , Lf, I .. f J4- ,, , . Ai "' - - w u K , F N J I nf Rik' x ni w. V C X -A"--... W W llgbi v I A i Tufts College Glaczfor Palmer Pemnsulal, A7IlG7'C?l'Z-C'fL A If . B i. C - l I , -gi ,-E 'U ff .1 QQ ' ' Ji? -I , I 11 " 4 'P--f l gww-ffilmffz -1 ' . C . I-ff!-f54.2.m:".f,,,-,-,.,,.f"' Fi, ' ' Hr" ' -'f"f'5' ""wL-'11 dang-H.w..,. .. ' f V - A A 3 Pix production. of Ci Uncle Tomfs Cabin" uf 9-V , A ,. X . College sing af the old 'l'f?.S'C'I'I70?TV Prof. Le-wvfs cforzllllcfilrzg the bfmcl be laonownfy societies initiated PHI BETA KAPPA Hurley, Skinner, Kowel, Bennett, Keane Phi Beta Kappa, founded in 1776 at WVilliam and lVIary College, the oldest of American Greek letter college societies, has become the most respected of all national honorary societies, representing the pinnacle of scholastic achievement and success for college students. The Tufts Chapter, Delta, is among the 140 other chapters in various American colleges and universities. M6l11b6I'- ship is restricted to those of scholarly attain- nients, who are elected from the highest ranking students of the Junior and Senior classes of Jackson College and the School of Liberal Arts on the basis of three distinguish- ing principles of the society: morality, friend- ship and literature. Established at Tufts in 1892, Phi Beta Kappa continues to symbolize and uphold to students the Greek motto: 'cLove of Wisdom, the guide of lifef, 21 new fneni bers this eenf TAU BETA PI The national engineering honorary so- ciety, Tau Beta Pi, offers membership for men exclusively. The purpose of this organi- zation is: H. . . to mark in a fitting manner those who have conferred honor upon Alma Mater' by distinguished scholarship and exem- plary characterf' Undergraduate students Cocozella, Moore, fRichardson, Wood with scholastic averages in the upper eighth of the Junior class or the upper fifth of the Senior class of the engineering school are further considered and selected according to requirements of character, leadership and campus service in order to become members of the society. 42001 'Hi vwv- V V-B. , while si Chi cmd Sigma Pi Sigma PSI CHI Hagstrom, Kramonas, Nfattair, Jensen, Blomquist, Alpert, Dr. Hall, Sampson, Grem, Harris The Psi Chi organization of Tufts College is the national honorary society in the department of psychology. The members of this club are elected from those under- graduates and graduates who have achieved high scholastic standing and who have com- pleted eight semester hours of psychology. The purpose of the organization is primarily VVilliams, Levine, Fox, Kraus, Olef, Ronco for the advancement of the science of psy- chology by stimulating the scholarship and interest of individual members. In the spring, the annual Psychology Open House is held to acquaint students of other fields with the new techniques and accomplishments of psychol- Osr- co ncluctea' scientqic studies. SIGMA PI i SIGMA Prof. Knight, Page, Hansen, Levine, Mr. Perry, Doerner, McDonough, Scife, Leach, Larson Prof. Mingins, Dr. Ballard, Prof. Bostick, Prof. Comhes, Levoi, Bruns Prof. Bnrtnoff, Honkonen, McCarthy Sigma Pi Sigma is the only national physics honorary society. lVIembership which is open to men and women, is offered to those physics students who attain the societyis high standards of scholarship and professional merit. Undergraduates having completed five semesters of study, graduate students, and faculty members in physics or closely-related sciences may be elected to membership. The Tufts Chapter pursues an active program throughout the year, presenting prominent physicists to lecture or lead discussions at open meetings. 42011 1, sux nu- 4 7 Q, . eznterbury lub presented ooert Frost 'W W in 5 S N f 1 The Canterbury Club of Tufts College :se W T is an active organization composed of approxi- ME 5: 4x:'Wl't zzsaix ' .. . mately seventy members, the majority of is which are English majors. However, all who - s M- . are interested in that field are welcomed into Q liaseufa-01,8 . , W s w : M XM: membership. Under the auspices of this group a number of distinguished speakers are annually presented before the entire college. Une of the most popular and entertaining was Robert Frost, New Hampshire poet. Also enjoyed were Doctor Wfilliam Carlos Vtlilliams, noted poet and short story writer, and Bernard de Voto, past editor of the Sa.tu9'day Review of I.1ftefratw'e. The club holds Eve meetings a year at which time a speaker is introduced to talk on some aspect of the field of English. In this Way members are offered an excellent opportunity to explore the various realms of literatu1'e and to enjoy an authoritative discussion of many of its inexhaustible sources. Robert F1-ost . . . New zoglomcfs favorite poet. Blazer, Dysart, Aho, Rainke, Masse, Hallett, Hynes, Omer, Del Vecchio Dr. Blanchard, Littlefield, Cuomo, Keane, Likehs, Prof. Holmes CANTERBURY CLUB 42021 The ebators were tournament hosts Gallo, Goldshlag, Zinman, Goodwin The Debators of Tufts College are a group of fifteen. who meet and hold practice debates. Debating tournaments are held off campus in competition against such colleges as Georgetown University, University of Connecticut, Boston University and M.I.T. The Tufts group compiled the highest com- bined speaker ratings at the tournament in VVashington, D. C., and also the second best born . . . ? affirmative speaker rating. The honor society of the debators is the Forensic Council Whose members are elected by the team and auto- matically oifers membership to the president of the Debating Club. to teams rom major colleges. Gallo, Henrickscu, Sklarcw, Meaney, Zack Resnik, Zimnan, Goldshlag, Goodwin, Siegel F ORENSIC AND DEBATING 42031 rw. if 1- I LAMBERT KINGSLEY Spicler, Graff, Aliapoulios, Collins, Schcvack, Kowel, Bernstein, Fay, Rockett, Dourey Giard Guilette, Raymond, D. Miller, Rothstein, Hill, Strong, Sullivan, Swett, Litner, Abramson, McKenzie Milbury, Skinner, P. Miller, Potter, Gallo, Kelley, Santos, Hopkins, Bennett, Emery, Hall Tufts College has two societies for the biologically-inclined student. The Lambert Kingsley Society was organized to promote interest and research in biology. M6H1b61'Shi1J is honorary and only those students with high standing in the biological sciences may be elected. Annually the 'society presents an Open House with displays of student work. The second association is the Pre. lVIedical Society, an organization of Tufts and Jackson undergraduates interested in medicine and the NVarliurt0n, WVecl1sler, Freeman, I'IllilllII10l'ld, Broadley, Chase Spieler, Guerney, Hawkins, lvliller, McCraken, Glenney, Olson, Wvhittemore associated sciences. An extensive program of guest speakers, and informal discussions are held at the bi-monthly meeting. A third society devoted to a specific field is the lVIathe- matics Club which promotes interest in and familiarity with different phases of mathe- matics. The majority of speakers at the monthly meetings are student volunteers who offer talks followed by discussion in current and related topics. Benson, Anastasia, Hopkins, Guilette, Rockett, Emery Seife, Crane, Metcalf, Talmo Nigro, Gallo Haskell, Nickerson, Young, Sullivan, Dente PRE. MED.-QMATH CLUB 42041 RODIN SOCIETY .. .i...- . vw-, . Jones, Gordon, Tarker, Hammond, Mansen, Bean, Farrell, Brown, Spieler Goldman, Melanson, Wlxyte, Dr. Royce, Massey, Spencer, Nutter Two clubs offering its members ex- ceptional opportunities are the Chemical and Rodin Societies. Chemistry majors and others interested in this field hear speakers and discussions of the latest developments in chemical science at the Chemical Society. Meetings, held regularly throughout the year, feature speakers from the faculty of Tufts and surrounding universities and from chemical industries. This year the organization has established a monthly periodical, the Chro- nickel newspaper. The Rodin Society, through its semi-monthly meetings, has be- come one of the most popular discussion groups on Hill. Informal procedures, faculty guest speakers, and open discussions help members become informed about fields of knowledge other than those in which they are studying. It is the aim of the society to cultivate a broad, general understanding of many scholastic and artistic fields of endeavor. liernardin, Hammond, Serreze, Brown, Poole, Gordon Nickerson, Cohen, Hannan, Tllalniayer, Stedman, Buck Caxrelis, Snow, Kuelil, Evans, Miller, Kristal, Clmref Benedictis, Snntilli, Comeau, Robic, Finn, Jones, Colgate, Lentlial, Prof. Ullman, McKay, Peduto Mowbray SPENCER SOCIETY--CHEMICAL SOCIETY 4 205 y I - .wr . -,-. Wind mm' skill placed sazilmfstsecond VVhite sails belonging to the Tufts Yacht Club boats cover the Mystic Lakes every fall and spring. Students who do not know how to sail but seek the opportunity to learn are urged to join the club because it offers not only the facilities for sailing, but instruction as well. The pride of the club is its racing team which, being a member of the New England Intercollegiate Sailing Associ- ation, is eligible for competition in New England. If qualified, the team may go into the national regatta competing against such large colleges as Navy, Yale, Princeton, Brown, Perdue Etlld Ohio State. This year the team placed second in the nationals at Chicago. The club was started informally in 1936 but not until after the War, in 1948, was it formally established. At that time it received its boats and the present club house. in the bingo aliomzls . . . Blaucllzlrcl, Rittcnberg, Friend, Johnson, Bogen, Hammond, Heaney, Gordon, Hardy, Barrett Holmes, Leard, Cook, Mr. Friis, Jones, Littlefield, Elliot -1207? YACHT CLUB ew concepts in engineering cliscnsseci' 'H TY, Baxter, Hewitt, Paradis, Woodwell, Holmes, Peterkin, Eccles, Bradley, Borghi, Lilburn, Windsor, Schluntz, Melley, Close, Buesser. Hardy, Tedford, McConchi, Torto, Whittle, O'Ncil, Oppcdisano, Yafie, Salzman, Murphy, Stewart, Boonyaratavcj, Nelson, Boraks, Regillo, Fitzgerald, Barry, Blandino Cocezella, Sechet, Fattah, Wertheim, Astill, Pitt, Dix, Peacor, Richardson, Davis, Stephens, Flood, Newman, Millard, Penny, Zakarian McSwiney, Casazza, Fox, Paterson, Nebiker, Mutty, Giuffrida, Murphy, Carey, Walters, Palfrath, Simon, Levine, Atamian. A.S.M.E. The engineering students at Tufts College have banded together in societies pertaining to the various fields of engineering. The aim of these societies, AIChE, ASME, AIEE, and ASCE, is to provide speakers from their chosen fields, and to make trips to the nearby industrial plants furthering the stu- dent's practical knowledge of engineering. The four societies, through the medium of their publications and annual conventions, promote the newest concepts of engineering knowledge and techniques. The four are bound together locally through the Engineer's Council, with the major purpose of co-ordinating engineering functions and encouraging greater participa- A.I.E.E.-I.R.E Hassett, Lewis, Fitts, Boyd, Fisher, Healy, Russell, Foley, Titcoxnb, Wood, Getchcll Lynnam, Lazarow, Morrison, Wilson, Jackson, Morse, Wells, Lundberg, Pfingsten, Evans, Apalakian, Towle. Peterson, Vitkus, Haralampu, Frazier, I-Iirvi, Bincll, Ronbeck, Hendrix, Poirier, Bean ENGINEERING SOCIETIES 42081 by visitin industrial re resentatives. Lczberg, Allan, Wise, Kicly, Nobel, Starkweather, Parent White, Creedon, Prof. Reis, Prof. Gurnham, Mr. Palvelchek, Willis Alleync, Palrnieri, Bean, B'Io0re, Brady, Fitzsirnnnons A.I.Ch.E. tion in college activities. Y To this effect the discussion, the topic this year being "The Council sponsors the g'Engineering Open Effect on Regional Development Due To House" in the spring and an informative Industrial Expansion." ENGINEERS COUNCIL Gaudctte, Davis, Gardner, Fitts, Weiss Wood, Pitt, Cross, Hendrix, Cocozella 12091- ENGINEERING SOCIETIES RADIO WORKSHOP The Radio VVorkshop is a group of students interested in the production, Writing and acting of radio plays and variety pro- grams. The club, Whose members are closely connected with 3 P's, attempts to encourage th'ose artistic and cultural phases of radio today. Activities have included many trips to Boston radio stations, conferences with noted theatrical and radio personalities, and actual experience in presenting radio scripts. In production for this year was the script of Oscar VVilde,s Ccmterville Ghost. The Economics Club is a departmental club which is open to all interested students in addition to those majoring in economics or business administration. The club meets once monthly during the year, and brings to its members timely motion pictures, picnics and such distinguished speakers as the Assis- tant Regional Director of the C.I.O. and faculty members of Massacliusetts Institute of Technology who have addressed the group in the past. Professor Nlanly and members of the Economics Department are advisors to the club. Meuney, Barry, Spencer Guine, Salter, Cox NIayor's Council, active for the first time this year, is a representative body of students from Tufts, Jackson, Bouve, Forsythe, Sword and Shield, Fraternities, Engineers and the Cheerleaders. The socie- ty's purpose is to improve the school spirit as much as possible. Upholding this ideal, the council established a date bureau for Fresh- man orientation, handled the scoreboard at football games, put on skits between football and basketball games and ran the winter carnival. The council hopes to have an electric scoreboard for the Oval next Fall. Gordon, Mansen, Modestow, Ranta, Kilian, Phillips, Leinwand Glazier, Dcnring, Zimmerman, Lane, Titcomb, Dreselley, Audet, Reed, Fastifl' Tcplow, Merrin, Bogen, Mazzcrclla, Milliard Hardwick, Stryker, Maclntyre, Glancy, Prof. Manly, Adelson, Goldslilag, Mooney, Derby Carter Jenkins, Bergman ECONOMICS CLUB-MAYOR'S COUNCIL 42101 qu. Hammond, Holmes, Hannan Elliot, Merrin, Malagodi The Camera Club, which was founded in 1947, was established for the purpose of stimulating and promoting student interest in the field of photography. Membership 'is open to any student on the Hill and weekly meetings feature salon exhibits, speakers and discussion periods. Frequent field trips which offer ample opportunities for the members to perfect their technique are taken throughout the year. , ROCK AND DRUMLIN The Rock and Drumlin Society is open to all students in geology. The purpose of the organization is to foster and broaden interest in the field of geology. The club derives its name from Rock, which is self-evident, and Drumlin, from the type of glacial hill upon which Tufts is situated. The activities of the club include field trips, lectures and discus- sions. Highlights of the year are the open house exhibit ill the west wing of Barnum and the Spring beach party. Dr. Nichols is the facility advisor to the group. The Clarence R. Skinner Fellowship was formed in 1947 in recognition of the life and work of Dr. Skinner, former Dean of the School of Religion. This group is the Student Council of the Theological School. It was formed with the triple purpose of lj creating closer fellowship among the theological stu- dents and between students and faculty, QD learning more about religion in relation to current problems through guest lecturers, 3D governing its ow11 business activities. Hant, Jackson, Kelloway, Burlingame, Wilson, Meek, Mu.cPl1crson, Leu d Mel'l1o u , A 1 lioonyaratavcj, Seife, Pitt, Tudorck Munroe, Bozajian, Brown, Hawley, Sherman, Povey, Raymond, Oglesby, Mueller, Poirier Furber, Young CAMERA 'CLUB-SKINNER FELLOWSHIP 42111 be cheerers lea' the crowd in shouts JINX JENKINS. HEAD CHEERLEADER Mainiero, Denny, Curlmn, Platt, Marotta Fitzgerald, Hallett, Jenkins, Gamble, Bowen l l The Cheerleaders are an inexhaustible group of fourteen from Jackson and Tufts which rouse the spectators with pep and spirit at all the home or away football games. The blue sweaters and brown pants signify a hard working, undaunted collection of boosters. A new "fight" cheer was introduced this year and a spectacular acrobatic cheer called the "long T" was used after four years. The Tower Cross Society chooses the cheerleaders in the early fall after the tryouts for which all students are eligible. Then t.heir tasks begin with the rallies before the football games, and they continue throughout the basketball season. Onwfucl fo the fray CHEERLEADERS -f212l wiv., emo! excitement shook the stemtls. The Varsity Club of Tufts College is an organization, established in 1937, which has grown rapidly in significance because of its contribution to the college activities. The group approximates seventy-five members, all of whom are possessors of varsity letters. Their functional purpose is to further the interest of all students in the athletics as well as the athletes of the college. Une of the annually popular social events sponsored by the club is the Sports Dance, given in honor of the letternien of the preceding season. The money from this is used to aid worthy ath- letes in the form of scholarships. These scholarships are given both to the incoming freshmen as Well as the varsity letterinen who lllost valuable player of the year ,rj . 4. .. BILL BURNS, PRESIDENT have merited it and proven their sports ability. Money' is also received from the Nlinstrel Show given in the spring by the members and those non-members who wish to participate. The most valuable player in football of each year is awarded the Cooney trophy which is given under the auspices of the Varsity Club. There are also awards given to the most valuable players in the other sports. l'lCllll0l'SOll, Brooks, Aliapoulios, Garvey, E. Sullivan, Stewart, Powers, Smith, I-lalstoad, Fox, Polcari, llaskcll Meehan, Bruns, VVl1yte, Fenton, Vinton, Richardson, Mlillcr Talmo, Crafts, Dente, Bennett, Davis, Burns, lv2llSll, Tlioman, R. Sullivan, McCann VARSITY CLUB 12131- .Y .-rw fv- 0 ee cmd do-nuts were sole! by .S.A. Tannenbaum, Aho, Rabe, Klebsattel, Iflland, Burns Orner, Cohen, Prof. Wulsin, Kraus, Ricca As a member of the National Student Association, the Tufts-Jackson N.S.A. has undertaken a program designed to aid stu- dents and maintain services for them. One of the annual activities of the organization is the book exchange set up at the beginning of the two semesters. The exchange facilitates student sale and purchase of used textbooks. On Tuesday mornings for those who arose late and had to forego breakfast, N.S.A. sold coffee and doughnuts. Of the four films shown during the fall semester as part of a cultural program, Shakespeare's As Y ou Like It, starring Laurence Oliver and Rossini's i1n- mortal opera, Barber of Seville, were included. All students of Tufts and Jackson are 1ne1n- bers of N .S.A. and entitled to attend meetings and engage in N .S.A. activities. as the ujfoniezn Published Volume 8. TUFTONIAN Gales, Chappell, Smith, Breitenfeld, Nutter, Micunis, Gordon, Blazer, Established in 1940 as "The Tufton- ianf' the literary magazine of Tufts College is unique among college publications in that it includes students, faculty and alumni in its group of potential contributors. This year four issues were planned to present to the college a true cross-section of its artistic out- put. The editors of the magazine follow a policy of representing a wide range of material, including poetry, editorials, articles, essays Zoll, Bottomley, Prof. Holmes and excerpts from student-written plays and novels. Variety in make-up has been notice- able this year with appropriate illustrations accompanying the writing. Compiled, edited and illustrated entirely by members of the student body, "The Tuftonianv remains a genuine college periodical prepared chiefly to meet the diversified literary interests of the college community. 12141- v- ivan-- 0 -I-Iillevfs, as always, are czctiv The Off-Hill Club of Tufts College ? consists of a group of students who do not live on the college hill. The members number approximately two hundred and contribute a great deal to the activities on campus. They are no11-competitive participants in the annual Christmas sing Where they inevitably appear in gay, original outfits singing under the direction of Ione Dugger. The club has a group of carollers which sings at Christmas time at the homes of professors and at the various dormitories around the campus. At the Christmas sing this year, eight of the carollers dressed in coats and wrapped in scarfs sang "The Night Before Christmasf' In the winter the club also sponsors sleigh rides and dances which are held throughout the year. An Off-Hill newspaper called the ' 'Trav-Hilleri' has newly been established which is circulated twice a year on tl1e campus. The meetings have entertaimnent by the members and invited guests after the business and social plans have been discussed. -mf- ADELE DERBY, PRESIDENT mftici anis in Colle e cz airs. 5 Gordon, Martin, Rockwell, Kambaty, hVliiLt0lIl0I'C, Rleaney, Smith, Randon, hleade, Bernson, Hardwick, Uvani, Terhune, Greenhut Nobel, Guiliana, Hickey, hlartin, Goldberg Buckley, Forward, Stewart, Shuraf, Sullivan, A. Friend, Richardson, Quimby, Howalt, Smith, Pica, Hawley, Latenan, Cutter, Muse, Casareno, Kuehl, Leighton, Gatowske, lNIinnar Manning, A. Friend, Chevry, Pecci, Panagos, Gifford, Prof. Ullman, Burstein, Lee, Littlefield, Cox, Leighton, Costanza, Creenvvood Steiner, Edlund, Coughlan, Canzenelli, Tarker, Standley, Cliff, Garfinkle, Jones, Ingary, Sheehan, Smith, Bolles OFF -HILL CLUB 4215 1 x g x 'wi' ut. , , HM 1""""' ' Cv un ' .'fw12"iyl - QW., - 1 :3 i 47 -1 o "' U O ,mf-NP., u - n . ' P u - ,, S .-Aw FB' A N Q99- -r . 1 s . . . n the arena Control iower toflighf 9 Green paint e11e1'y'whe1'e He's lovely, h,e's engaged I A wi... .,,,,M The honorary dramatic society of Tufts College elects its I1lCI1lb61'S when they are in the end of the Sophomore or Junior year and have shown qualified work in productions. All students have the opportunity to tryout J. Nutter, Fantasia, N. Nutter, Gregoire, Salter, Lennon, Bottomley, Pnfratll Kcnlball, Dr. Balch, Metcalf, Kuetclm, Iffland 42171 PEN, PAINT, AND PRETZELS ' eil, Rice, Fitch mm' Mowcztt alfred PEN, PAINT, AND PRETZELS matic activities throughout the year. The society presents four plays a year. The out- standing selections this year were coincident with the centennial theme of the College. "Ah W7ilderness" hy Eugene O,Neil H9005 was also done in Barrington, Rhode Island upon invitation. The others were "The Adding M3Cfl1i11G,l by Elmer Rice Q19Q5j, 'gffaptain Jinks of the Horse lVIarines" by Clyde Fitch C18'75D, and HFZISTITOIIM by Anna Cora Mowwfzitt Cl850j. The new activities '21 guy cun't get any sleep armmrl here" "They ivonfzf 11111-f you- flzey're all clear!" C'l.L7'flL'Ii7L time 12181 for society merely by participation in the dra- ccufiet to czuclience, challenge to crew. "You tlzri'n.lc you do, but you clnnlt , . . " this year included the publication of the 'gCall Board," :L sheet announcing the coming plays and offering to all interested students the notice of tryouts. The honor society itself has EL small ineinbersliip in proportion to the number of students who actually work on tl1e production of the plays and who participate in them. "Come over and play in my yard." qzwy "But I can't pay the rent . . . " 2 PEN, PAINT, AND PRETZELS H Nutter, Romeo, A. Friend, Greenhut, Benson Scanrel, Holmes, Gallo, Leard, Melanson GERMAN CLUB Malone, Panagos, Hardwick, Knerlar, Prof. Newton, Cunningham, Spiclcr The language enthusiasts find three lingual societies here on the Hill. The French Club, "Le Cercle Francais,', is composed of French majors and other students with a speaking knowledge of the language. The society has undertaken a policy of having speakers connected in some way with France to stimulate a more direct interest in the culture of that country. Excursions to see native films and plays, talks by members of the group, and typical French soirees with appropriate songs, folk dances and refresh- ments are all part of the many social activities of the club. "Der Deutsche Verein von Tufts Collegef, the German Club, acquaints inter- ested students with the German culture and promotes further practice in the language Gross, Dr. Craven Magnoli, Bisson, Boyajian itself. Its meetings usually consist of singing German songs, followed by a speaker who is personally acquainted with the cultural or social aspects of Germany. An annual activi- ty of the club, one which is enjoyed by the entire campus, is the Christmas carolling of German songs all over the Hill. Known to its members as "Russkoe Tovarishchestovf' the Russian Club offers speeches and discussions on various phases of Russia and practice in speaking the language. Organized three years ago by interested students, the club has become known for its borscht and pirogue suppers of the past. The club is also trying to make arrangements to present Russian films with English sub-titles. Ahearn, Harshaw, Lukis, Cushman FRENCH CLUB-RUSSIAN CLUB 'T' 42201 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS HISTORY CLUB Blanchard, Stahl, Hammond, Freeman, Ranta, Mularky, Shea, Manson, Rabe, Simon Hayden, Cohen, Halpern, Klebsattel, Kraus, Chubbuck, C. Rogers, Powdcrley, Keane, Lubarsky, Freeman Goodwin, Coyle, Zack, Harbaugh, Hurley, Tyler, J. Rogers, Schricber, Greenhut The Liberal Union, the Republican 21 Club and the International Relations-History Club represent the social science interest at Tufts. The Liberal Union is an independent organization and is not allied with similarly named groups in other institutions. It is the only permanent political discussion club on campus and is open to all students, regardless of their political creed. Plans for this year included student discussions on current topics and speakers from China, Italy, Australia, Thailand, Pakistan and Japan. The Inter- national Relations-History Club which is open to all students attempts to present programs on history and foreign affairs which will be of interest to the college community. The business of the club is conducted by an execu- tive council with the aid of faculty advisers. The monthly meetings consist of both lectures given by informative speakers and student discussion groups. The main purpose of the club is to stimulate student interest in matters of vital importance in the area of international relations. The Tufts-Jackson Republican Q1 Club is the only full-fledged political club on the Tufts campus, and is a unit of the Massa- chusetts, Republican 21 organization. The program for 1951 included a se1'ies of lectures and discussions with the primary purpose of acquainting the members With the duties of the Republican pa1'ties so that they would be better prepared to participate i11 their city organizations. Blanchard, Spicllcr, Bogen, Sheehan, Hammond, Guttcrman, Simon, Bogen, Gordon, Shea, hilanscn, Rabe, Romeo, Stahl Yutter, Melanson, Remman, Halpern, Zack, Sichert, Tudorek Blanclmrd, Smith, Hannan, Cahill, Grcenhut LIBERAL UNION-REPUBLICAN 21 CLUB 42211 e w x x 1 x Nearby stream ----H ,-.. J.v:?,,gg' IV!lfI'f'i7lfj for fha Rz'312'lLO0I'S 2-L1 iz SMXJN -VX Lind up 'want the cabin Svlifurle enjbyea' their U ew Hampshire retreat The Tufts lllountain Club is an excel- lent organization for the students who are out- door enthusiasts and wish an occasional re- treat from the city atmosphere. The present fifty members enjoy hiking, Iishing, hunting, climbing up Nlount Vllashington, as Well as other mountains in the Presidential Range, Sandwich Range. and in the area of North Conway and Plymouth. They also have the privilege of using t.he club owned and operated lodge in Campton, New Hampshire. This is a six-room farmhouse "in the Wildernessn with a capacity for thirty. Chaperoned week- ends are provided and non-members are invited with a small fee which includes transportation, meals and lodging. During the winter months the lodge is used as a central point from which the group has its choice of many popular ski areas. Meetiiigs are held once a month at which time trips are discussed and planned. Also the club spon- sors square dances for all the students. TM C Cabin midst maimtains, lakes ana' orest lloltz, Iffland, Lcntllal, Thomas, A. Friend, Zimmerman, Rutter Lubarz-zky, Fielding, M:-ilagodi, Elliot, Scrvadio, Glaucy HILLEL SOCIETY Gutterman, Halpern, Zack, Kraft, Alpert, Lubarsky, Stahl Simon, Berger, Kane, Toltz, Abramson PHILLIPS BROOKS Quimby, Rainke, Likens, lvarburton, Ott, Whipple, Isaacs Garrett, Cliubbuck, Rev. Seville, Mrs. Leavitt, Kuehl WESLEY CLUB Allen, Freeman, Mengins, Hammond, Mansen Whittemore, Glancy, Prof. Mienging, Littlefield, Yuill CON GREGATIONAL CLUB Gucrncy, Emery, Cowles, Hopkins, Potter, Milburry Gordon, Gougan, Rabc UNITY CLUB There are seven religious organizations available for Tufts students. The Phillips Brooks Club represents the Episcopal Church. The main activities of the club include bi- monthly meetings at which prominent clergy and laymen a.re guest speakers and several group outings. A weekly service of Holy Communion provides for the devotional life of the Church. The Jewish student's social and educational organization is Hillel. Friday evening services, Sunday brunches with lec- tures or discussions on current religious and social problems, and traditional suppers are held throughout the year. Newman Club membership is open to any Catholic student of the college. Its purpose is to foster the spiritual, intellectual and social interest of its members. The club's activities are of this instructive or social nature. Wesley Club is primarily for Methodist students. It meets twice monthly for worship, discussion, social activities and all-round fellowship. The Christian Science Club's main intention is to serve the needs of those interested in the study of Christian Science. Weekly testimony meetings are held similar to those of any Christian Science Church. The Congre- gational Club, organized for the purpose of learning more about religion and current problems, has speakers and discussions, and co-operates with other religious clubs on Hill. The oldest liberal religious club on campus is the Unity Club. Regular meetings include suppers, worship services and talks. Monroe, Boyajian, Visco, Orcutt, Lenud, Wyman, VVarren, Raymond, Crane, Smith CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CLUB Linscott, Grasshoff Mich, Towle, Zerfing N EWMAN CLUB Robischard, Leclcrcq, Hardwick, A. Friend, Meaney, Chase, Drapcau Curtin, Thompson, Colburn, Smith, Richard- son, Cahill, Powderly Nigro, Tukis, Landrevillc, Smith, Hannon, lwagnoli, Anastasia ew aquatic czclclitio ns . . . jtatured .ii Buss PICKLES, PRESIDENT The hiarlin Club presents the swim- mers from Jackson who give their aquacades in the Winter and spring for the entertainment of the whole college. Here the girls display with grace and form a well-co-ordinated example of the water ballet. They may combine with the members of the Tufts Aquatic Club on some of their show numbers as was done in a duet by Nlary Donahue and Bill Tyler. The club sent their capable president, Bibs Pickles as a representative to the National Amateur Aquacade held in Hollywood, Florida this year. r .. l THE MARLINS The black hearts of jealousy UTIUI' Nw S5610 MARLIN CLUB 42261 interpretations in water mm' ballet The Tufts College Aquatic Club is a new organization for those nien who swim for pleasure. The club numbered forty-live this year, which included every member of the Varsity swimming team. The club offers life saving and opportunities for the nienlbers to give assistant instruction. The club was out- standing this year for its college water show. SNVTIIIHICFS from other colleges niziy he invited to participate as was Pete Dillinglizrun, star diver from lNfI.I.T. Also, Weekly splash parties are held for the students relaxation and enjoyment. THE AQUATICS 7? BILL 'FYLEIL PRESIDENT i ' f I l J I 'I ll zlucf, Tyler and llonczlziw I els Dil i-nglzmn, pine positifon 4.-1 -...--1' 12271 AQUATIC CLUB 1:1 U l-1 ,,,,', nckson organizes or social functions. Glover, Sexton y Roy, Skinner, Keane The Jackson All-Around Club, founded in 1897, is the social organization to which every Jacksonite automatically belongs. Its main function is to sponsor social events through-out the year for the enjoyment of each girl in Jackson. This year the Board, which meets several times monthly, sponsored the annual Student-Faculty Tea and Spring Formal. The year also saw the realization of a long- cherished dreamg the first Jackson All-Around Club dinner. Hugely successful, it was held in December in the Jackson Gymnasium, with Dr. E. K. Shapira as speaker. JACKSON ALL-AROUND CLUB Dr. Shapira 42281 I F . . . mit feeling The music organizations of Hill con- tribute to campus activities throughout the entire year. The Chorus has a membership of sixty who give concerts on and off campus. Some have been held at Somerville High and lVIelrose. A smaller group of singers is the Odikon Society with approximately twenty- eight members. They give a Christmas con- cert every year, and in the spring they toured New York, Connecticut, New Jersey and Philadelphia. Instrumentally, Tufts has organized an orchestra Which, as the Chorus and Odikon groups, is under the masterful direction of Dr. Thompson Stone. The thirty-two piece orchestra gives four concerts Odilconfs' annual concert Music filled the air A Dr. Thompson Stone MUSIC -122911 cmd cz chorus of voices in clczssics Tufts 11' I I P ' Y back MUSIC iesoy -- was not to be ontctone by instruments. , Mann 7'fnrmm'1'mr af Bowzloin game Prof. William King 'x on campus and features soloists. The concert band, which is under the direction of Professor VVillian1 Kin g, numbers fifty, who have played in the Hatch Shell in Boston. This group of musicians have given combined concerts with lNI.I.T. and have featured the brass choir. A smaller group, also under the leadership of Professor King, is the hand which plays at all the football games. A new addition to the group this year was Jumbo himself. a two- legged elephant who played the cymbals. These musical associations of Tufts provide ininiense enjoyment for all the students, faculty, and nienibers of the C0l1lIl'lL111llLy as well as for those who participate in the organi- zations themselves. 12311 The znczrclmf-r1,g mailman MUSIC , Q. ..L . K . ,Z,Q,f. ' ' fn, ef ..,,' ...S N., p - . ,hh 1 . , W ,QQ iw xiii 1 s in ' Qfgim X ya, Q 'b k . - As 2 f M. X ' W N -M, - gk- . r -,., f ,, ., ' A ' .K N' . K' -- xp 3. f 1 f?JfQfi.,"" mn' P , .. , rig 1, X 55116 V 'IP 6 m V V ' 1 - V 35 ' ' "' ' I 4, ..2igi,Qg5s 1 ,w?i+5H3.,,,..,,AQ,1:m, ,fain Vqfv,-,,g,iV4g!j1?ga2fQ N, . . -H.. 1,1 Q ,,' - - ' -V l -fi wx: me 44 ,Q s -- sz.fM5g'-, - 2 ,, ,QF , ,,,, K5 mg., 7 ylgaguv ,Ll . -1 L, iii, jr i" Li l. 6312 184, r R A 'K .G V ' '4- . ' " 5 t +15 fl- A A 2 ,ggi ' QW il 3.4, t I ,AM S R U, wang, - . yfgfgq -. 1, A 5 , ' r W 4 : 1 ,. Ki i , A ' " i a 1 1 if I I D X A ,,,. ,f H. '.:"Hi 'E I , I, --.ph - , o' , -uni YM 'MQ 9 v , ,hj.1a4:W Graduating Class of 1870 'Lf X Class Day "under the tenth 1927 . , f 'E f"lim'?'1-5 as 252 in ' Commencement Day is the climax of a Tuftsman's college career. It's a day of long gowns and mortar boards, speeches and the final mingling with the class as a whole. Afterwards, leaving the books and exams way behind, the student must be capable to answer the demands of the challenging world. The centennial class has a long line of integrity to live up tog integrity that has made this college campus Worthy of a century to celebrate. 12341- V-'S' '41 . 1, x, ' ' 4 LL: I Du.: HT- IA , EJ- 1- ' .' ,.. -1 ' 54,7 ' 1 J Ny... lf"4'2'?'-36-'f":wv f' M: , ,, . 1. " r '-jijwf my A V , LJ! ltfw-K-.fl . "gal mmf, l H M I 12-.fffav 'N ' ' .lx 1 .X-A . 'n-'f.'fl.,f',"':: 'S' , ' IITQ ':,'f'."-' ual: ZIV .1 If L- -1 -ASU: EH, 1 ' Q J' w UH ' , --qxjw ..., WA Y '-.Q -I.-' ,J ., a?S-Zfhibfi' A w53..g Mil. -.A - -!+"'?f'Qff' 'L' I o F iiiwgufkfp .rf - 1f.'.,m,f ,su -'--- 3 . n'If'1.1'..4 .1 ,, f'ffQQWii1E-all g. 1 gl ,gig ...H . K . .. ., V Y' l'ff- ' , ',' . " ? , lin..-ll'-W E 1 1.1.1-'I' - X 'T fm 'w-Q .' '1 -4. ', it 11" '. rwgyxi' -' gg.-W' ,.4.r5,-A. - . wj 2,9-i31.i': 'lar W . . "":1::.,.1-. 'W Qin' , .,1,,,A ,. 1' 'Q -' 7" '..:w.'f N- . 5.3. 92141-j1,, I g',jf:'L'., PF:-:af :f':':1j IQ., '-'. 5.1:-' iff-' 'V , ' 135332 , . ,HY , ' :L-JT 3, ., fi - if W ' .sf Ur . . t ..m.--. ,, ,, ow , ,. .V .. . iam . ' muuvw 4. .fm ---mm.,-i-,, JJ '!nL,1Ud525g X . :1s.a-'-.M :A f ,,:, A .' 1 I., M , ,WW .14 Dean TVren and 'II7llft'lfC'0'1LZCl be ,. af-r..,!P" ,- ,,, U 4 .- J 1. A Teddy Roosevelt H. H, q:LQ3,.: .UK 55.5, ' ...fu Y . .--' iii' , '--4' ', 313:-1 151' .Q . ' ' ix ' 1-':'--2'w,.ff13mf:'-9-i,.gg . I' ,i?E2I5'W3' vw-ffl" WML' f'QrQsf" ffl fi' .9,'s5?2g.v,me -- ',: z."'9'552QQFQ ' ' Wk :E - 'Q 1? A Y Wu.-EW-1.5: ni,.'4f: .fu ' ' ' ..e .-f ,. fx' fi-rg ' U ' . , W fT,,l ,.3J"frT.1 fa?- -'I , E, 2 Lg -f r-wap-5, i11,g.l,...,RQ,,1.,1','f1, , , Qnwfq , 1..2fW4:f5s.'f' .iw "Exfw'1n-' ...1 f ..,e's,fQgfJg5iQg2,,,fgggg ., - 'K it .'. 5 N ., eg 1aLJ""'w,""Tif':f"' -N - 1 . .5 .'.'5'.- wi,-'f.'1.Q 'ff . . , -M yy' 3 .S Hx, QE:-. N ' - . if! 1,1 .gifi mhz J .mf A ' Uh Q , wang? uv. . - s s 9 5 A group of the boys pose for zflzeiv' graduation picture NSA 7'Qfb'0Sllf?7L87Zt smud, Class Day-1 91?-3 VJ, The qjzicient leczclerslvzlb and guidance, Bill Tyler, Marsh Pende g f M Z Jim Collins, Treasurer FTS CLASS OFFICERS 12361- -4-yy fe-n. nu uncier the directio The men of the Centennial Class returned to the Hill in September with an eventful final college year facing them. At an early class meeting plans were formulated for a smooth execu- tion of the class activities and Senior Weeli, also the suggestion to dispense with prom favors ill order to aid Jumbo Book was favored by the class. January saw the class busy with plans for the Senior Mid-VVinter Dance among the first of the senior functions. Graduation was almost upon them with the Tufts-Jackson Banquet, the forerunner of Senior VVeek, the time of tradition and treats. June finds the Centennial men men on their Way to a wider world than that on the Hill, each with his own endeavor. n o senior o vers, Bob Y oung, Secretary BILL SIEBERT, PRESIDENT Bill Kiely, Vice President 12371- TUFTS CLASS OF i Y ...- i... Y ,,. Produced ce-0 eration in administration LAURA GAVRELIS, PRESIDENT Arlene Kelley, Vice Presiclent In September the Jackson Seniors were easily recognized with their White blazers as they entered their final year on the Hill. Early activity, promoted by Pres- ident Laura Gavrelis, was a tea in conjunction with Bouve which promises to be continued annually. Graduation was more realized when a sinall group of Tufts and Jackson seniors organized to draw up plans for the Senior lllid- VVinter Dance, the second function for Jackson seniors. The Spring semester was a hustle and bustle with many "senior only" functions. In early M2LI'Ch there was a spaghetti supper in the Jackson Gym, there were job inter- views, practice teaching, and a round of teas. lone Duggez ,Sew efaz y JACKSON CLASS OFFICERS 42381 ,.1ll, and kllowsbzf through the final yemf Bartenrler, four more beers! Jfury Lou Clzrubbuck. Tl'UflSlU'0l' .lean Littlefield, Marshal mam JACKSON CLASS OFFICERS . . . climaxec! by senior week. Collins, M allinson, Kiley, Curry, Young Dugger, Chubbuck, Siebert, Gavrelis, Littlefield Tufts Night at the Pops Class Day Spread with the Moonlight Cruise on the Wilson Line that sails from the harbor out to the historic Boston Light. Tufts Night at the Pops follows, with Arthur Fiedler conducting. The Class Day Spread served buffet style on the President's lawn precedes the Senior Prom, the gala evening party. Graduation exercises end the week, and then we are sent off-to the world. il Springis short stay on campus brings with it trips to Cranes Beach, finals, Senior VVeek activities, and graduation. The Class Day Committee becomes the guiding hand for these weeks that are to become packed with many, many memories. Senior Week is a fitting climax to four years of an active experience. It commences i 2:4 mm I Y G7'lld'ILClf'i0'Il 240 I 1 ,L -I ?lifA?,xQ' !-1 ?i'.1'1-J, ':',' 3.3-nf i'Tfc-g - ', Vg'-" 'l:xll'?.g'1', I ny.. x ' 1 'LV 'S' 1-Q : ,Qf - 13 1 wir ,nga A'l.,1--Ta fqvj -l .lxv , xl , I' Qi Donald C. Manny H! ' :way ib ,'. .II J'.xf. yt' -ls ll. xt 'Si 9 Q V ,, ,l 1'4" Eillj' 2" x .Z I j fx Q.- -- 1 Xl, J. A An-lib-lv annul! An- l'L'lf fond! Alqfh-ar flldiuh "' I""L': y-L13 Q ' "fx l. ".t,'4 15-IHAHFL I- -gl -K., iz.. - 'T "5 'T -" ' .M ,i'.5.' ?.L:.'4". 1.31 - lan' A 5 -V x I -ff. Q J'-1.3.-: sk! st ,- SUHIFOP ull BW" 'M th' ll" bl H' los' .J -.' aiu Huh wt wh, M.. a.0li.LY"f X1 If 5 fx? 'lf - 4:1 -H f' --- y -.,- ,i "A Vey? fr? :J Y'-1 . 1'-.Y .145 fi" 'af - -- J...7fi'l-33n':i5Pf3'!--F 1 'A 'I 1 f "1 .. - A A .:.-5-:Miww ' ' 1 5 nd fn-ge-4-hurl Drink if JOM D"i"5'f" Jo-m ll1'l I- 504- ll' 4' ""' 3-11Xk1.f3q"1"' .'5y7- 3 .!, 1-J ' V' , -A , .. ., , - M, .sg-1 Qgk-L 1",".".-'lg 1. ' " ' v- xl ::. ?1 l1i,'-2 U A 1' fr-uk.: r , - Y 'P ' -2 5. ' 'ui' fri .uf J i'13i:'1!i' xi Y", "wiv g ' ' Tp our Tm-by Ibm Pawn- ul " "5 W ' """' 'll ji 42, 5'f","",'1'1 Vg: " A ,W Aix . - - 7 , ,- A "x-"i"1,",. 'ltgflxl '-,I 'H V " Sfcln, Q.-nigh! ws Jrlnl wr ml! I-lon'l A- fond' fl All HU UHF' il' 'ff 4.12, K'..' "L-1 x huflft' ff' ' 5 I eww". 3 - I - 5 dx: 1 t. mxvaygi -' - l . razzgf 255: --aging.-gr Z?:v -,fl-j'i'5l--h3?...3- Q-gif I 511.31 ffrlv J A :ful up--Q +I.. NTT! In-dk-ef rw'-4. 'H-'U'-" """'U "4 W' H' 'i-I ' We ' H1 fi 1 V -if '1'- 'lu -H"' , - 'xi -. , 1 5,-.g,,' Q J' 4 J E-'L J: 5 W' ff? JJ:-. 'w" f-'Hz bmi to all ...eu .H Io..-L. sm.-4 w"" 4""" i' on Nmhmqfzf' hf- sf 'gl 1.5 1 He -ya .:'I'K: i lux, -x- V-X 1' 'L ij!!! A Cpolfirlethe ent 7-Qlggfsz 1: 1 u I 14,1 1 .' mics,-:rx Hallo-9e thh-Hve Siquate 'ff .I 'f'ef-3,1 Ilma G fo WQDE Cf get ' l xii I V. ,Kylix I.: C Pked PgOtt OUP 1 S 3' r"' Af. txt' lgnx apo Snb Qst , . MY Wh 'S th Und Oo u ' '31 " 1011 er awlfth p0n wi'-1 'And O four Sith? SQPV at li -ft. wh. s s eg Del' . We h tiffel to Obes year bell 'And ave le y .DI-actd-f6nces hes glithiiouthfuit our, 1 Iced to hung fore 5576 Da zfDer'I'i: ugh te nguo- g.. ' .Ie en 1' I We 6 C Ut If t U Of' take Olumnsf Wea zghurned the co OI' QDQZSCSSOUI-I 'He Stole ered IWISG I-'naps To UI, In J 'ZOV mop-fe eyes Ial-Z3 Walklwflljp titres, asf n Cul, Uh Useless! Stol Fapew HIS Steb the Spjwl' en 8 ell fu DSPSA S' -P9 IQOPH- H88 mi-Ze -. 35 be e be Sow? Spd and S.. 'VS le Hz-ts .Yond din mile fall ave b that the as W s, s Shine. 5fPepgfl5n?FS as gg Upon tblth will he Hllijzeace a . lo nd l 131: t LCM Moonlight Cruise . N .Q -- ' 9. .V J. , ,..-+.. ff? -me Z M-gina.. A ower C ross 5 onsmfee! mm us activities. To be elected to Tower Cross, the Senior Honorary Society, is the highest honor a Tufts man can receive. The ten elected members are campus leaders chosen to lead and stimulate the activity on the Tufts campus and to promote the highest good of their Alma Matel.'. The alumni of this society presently active at Tufts includes President Leonard Carmichael, Dean George Mille1', and M1'. Jan Friis. Their activity strengthens and in- gresses into most every phase of the college functions. The most important annual functions supervised by the group are the competitive Christmas and Spring Sings Well known for their spirit and excellence. This year as in previousyears competition for the plaques offered by President Carmichael year- ly since 1939 stimulated the participation of male and female group singers. The spotlight for activity this year was centered on the financial drive for Bill Garal- ski, the Trinity football player injured here on Thanksgiving Day. John Buckley, President Bermeit, Y ozmg, Bruus, Aliapoulis, Siebert, Tyler, Buckley, Walsh 42431 TOWER CROSS ,.,,, Z ,1- utstemclin mm us leaders selected George Cuomo Robert Schreiber Laura Gavrelis Dorothy Skinner , ,H .igggjs XX-X X . y , A gf 1. f N X - .1 -'XB x x- VJ ':' ' Nil? ,T f xi x - f V- pe . X -154 , K - T 4 o -- ? ' al i? Y 'TF ,-.Id tat' 1' f ?-Qs-+ ' in V 14 filjiql HW fi l1 x X el 4 oe . ff. 7,7 'X Hiking M ex I-:ge ER '. 15 .3 3"-' X-vw. A -: Q-' fn' -1 z -e . JV Lgiengi 'X fm ' o .'.'L , if?-ifflgjffgfil-li -9 nrilfjfzf, Ji 4"" ,,. ,RM UQ'-uf b EI5?w: : .1!1an?,?f?5 'uv,-L Q ' .-Wf1,'5'1Q.. lsffii' ' F I Q arg 1-Iszggfb -sw f fm Ep- ,za , ' 14,3 ,4 if X P.. rywzt, 1-,i , 4155 'iz " hz. wg QM: fr?u f lm f.'zfg:e.,' ff:f,E 'w sa14yf -. - nge, s,,-',i,,!5'Ee- -fir, f,,'-,5,fg.1,- 5 gran , -wma, vm . W' - ff' '..u4- " - Q, -f vQ??J"fH fill' 9 of Fifi' ' ' f' -- '2 ' gl?,gf.' , 'rzf 1 '1!"'2f'g5 -e t .us '5f'I'Ff.- ef"1"Vf:fL . -Q, -2. '-A xJf,Q4Li, V ,R..5j-,- E, .f"'1f': V7 1.-- rf-625 , in pg",-1: f - 4 ,gr 2:12221-i !4,1,,',g,:ay-wzgpb f y I'-jf' lf. re' ef -Q- Ze' -, f Ups' ji! - ,wp 1 . :yi viefff' " A! --- wi Q- ' ., if f ".:..-y. 5-1" d - - H enry C'urry -f 244 I'- ,.m... 1 j 1 J, EEE- ,L -1fF!5'iF!fli'lP f ill af. -.. ,E . by fvzcult and student re resentcztives. .gp 22, , .X ,2-wifi' ff '4 2 -Q , .' :QW lfL ' C ' ,V W Z 1- rf. " -rf' ' f, , jf x '51 ,ff as Lil' ' ' , - -J c ,, ww. en. , L ft? S fl, - 771' N.. 'ir 1 Y "' - 'W' , , Q 4 on 1 M f ' -. .iam QT l I. of x n V Richard Ufalslz ffmw , bV . .,. ' If' '-Pain 'MEP 1 ' "' r ..4' ,I L U . J olm Buckley William Siebert -S X . .,,gqiv,gw2 ri. 17 ll ,J ,C- NR ---L ,.-- L it-"UA, A IQL4 Zpffi, l I ,WAI X -1 ' 1 I , in , 7- ,' 'iifzflll e g, I ' ak ' am-'1" X 1 lfgwifi -u . e-- if F4 ...,g:5-,agmjgii.,n,fp ny. ilH.F"' f. -ia 1- 'El 735-1' is 'W 25'-E-'ffS'4ii,2i1fpilqlZffEiEi 5?!g is v' H lm 1 -Hs' FV f'-22 if ,,,,.,.v-Ja1-..1'j ,g K. ilfml Wi? 11? tiff? ?iI'flm ' -1313 jf -I Jillll'34ll'llE'tlf2fiifsiff-.'fff!ff"ll!fliif is brim .. 4. ,X W . ., - --i.--iv lg 1 P -Y-' i ' fwfr 1 . ..e. : -'Wi' '- Hi? v 2. fa D' UML l 'lln 'I IQ DQS X'Ix,Tl'.fHl' Gvtfqviu'!nUg.,45i:H-Iali- fvl ul --r sgxslr-fr fue 'X JrI'5i:fz:'fsi q ' - ..gr1WL-,Ev ' ,T All, ff'-age? v' -55213-ggs's.-95. ya,-1 ., 1 vm Y- -in--iv '- T AQQ F ,gqtgiqt X, -5 ' :--' . Q. X 3-is classes n1, nn S i gee ' A Rachel Craven 42451 Robert Young Nominated on individual lists submitted by responsible representatives on campus and members of the administration, the 1952 Centennial Jumbo Book is proud to accord recogni- tion to these .outstanding stu- dents of the Senior Class. These seniors, individ- ually and collectively, have shouldered the responsibility of bringing the Centennial Class to the pinnacle of achievement it has reached upon graduation. Their enthusiasum and interest merits the congratulations of the Class of 1952. - - - -- --E.f'4..n STANLEY ROBERT ABRAMSON 7514-19th Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Alpha Epsilon Pig Freshman Swimmingg Intramural Athletics 1, 2g Dean's List 23 Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, Deutsche Verein Club lg Rodin Soc. lg Tufts-Jackson Chorus 1, 2, 3. DAVID ADELSON 135 Touro St. Newport, R. I. A. B. History Phi Epsilon Pi, Treas. 33 Tennis 15 International Relations- History Club lg Jumbo Book, Activities Ed. 4-. MENELAOS ANASTASIOS ALIAPOULIOS 627 Summer St. Manchester, N. H. 113 D ,sf D 1 Biology e ta Tau elta ew 'd,g,1jd Treas.g ean's List: vy Societyg Tower Crossg Footl1?,lSl, 2,"37-'2L:--I.4ar11gert- ,ingsley Society 44 Intl-amu,.al Sportsg re-Medicagpc.fN 01, Wardroom Club Sec. 3, Treas. 4-g Varsity C16 ' ,mira Executl ommittee 4g Co-Ed. Ivy Bookg Clam'Ti'eas. 2g S ,g,,3,g,.,.-...e-M... .Q-., - D. P. Committee 2g Tufts Orthodox Clu gl' -J: 5' f A J rl ' H Ulla .l larcnasfvpl ' PE iq lil ' A B 11 'K' A l:tL: Il, 1. Alpha E silon Pi SecAl'2LgtA?yl res. Dean' lu ll ' ,m twi ix mir! C ff L Il I ! J ' f 56 Prentice lid. ,I 4 " ewtori ll Q kg. , l r I1-llll-al S1?01'f,SS q1'CllCSl3l'5x?M .R .MILL , . 5 l fl , W., . mtl , ..... .. .X KVM AJOI ,Q 1, mf ran k u 1 , llllllj ll QQ 124 B1'0ggSt- I i f ' 'in W nl 4' rf lliml a" Q B-S 1 . y ' l i' ll 515' A-fi llltral ral dl . l'ul' : 'j f. ja. nz 1 145 iw . Drun n 0 "Q ' Mgmt? -' e' 'i . mf-i. gl ' 'g l D IE-' Clu 11 Htlmlmlllnl. .: - , I ,Z A 1 -iii?-:ly2', E: W if lg mtl 'iii ' :seria l rig . - -A. ' ?1i-fif lr 'Y' Q -f Q1 1, - 2"'gezgH- - . 'A r l nmimn ' 'gif mdcmi- E It lx- l 'lub 1 2 'tleiiia " id .TAQJK f..i h e 1 lg ,H ,Q ,, on ' ' .. ' 1 '::,:.f r ,-. LS I . 'tang' 'Eidos LAWRENCE -ANDREWS I P P 288 Chestnut Hill Avef -- -7 ji 1 Brighton 35, Mass. -w A-B' Y VC, . 7, nf lg, Dean's List. RUDOLPI-I WILLIAM PASQUALE ANTONELLI, II 569 Commonwealth Ave. Newton Center 59, Mass. A, B, Government International Relations-'History Club 1, 25 Rodin Soc. lg Le Cercle Francais 1, 2, DEAN B. ARVIDSON 27 Holden St. Worcester, Mass. A. B. Economics Alpha Sigma Phig Indoor Trackg Outdoor Trackg Intramural F ootballg Yacht Clubg Edelweiss Ski Group. ROBERT BACIGALUPO 35 Moraine St. Jamaica Plain, Mass. B, S, Chemistry 42461 evwv'-qiiv-Y If RUDOLPH FRANCIS BADUM 1971 East 32nd SL. Brooklyn, N. Y. A . B. Economics Theta Delta Chi, Rec.-Sec. 3, fl., Track 1g ll1'terl'rabernity Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Economics Club 2, 3, 4-g Pre-Nlcdical Soc. lg Club HS". JOHN M. BAIRD, JR. 51 A Raymond Ave. Somerville, Mass. B. S. Chemistry Tulfhs Chemical Soc. 3, 4g VVesley Club fl, 2, Oll'-Hill Club 4. ROBFRI' BAKER 60 Castle Hlll WBILIIISNJRYXM5: Sffx' i C Bz ilzgv Alpha lau Omega V Pie nlramulal Spol re Medical Soc 'I ufts Choi us 19 Rovapf 'l G Brookline Mass fl Soczolog f l Lfyrurfgurigxlpalm 5 H 1 044 l it 4'-'N tl I ll 7 I!! JL lu ,wa xy l H J' WWUH Q M - 'E'0 ll IT S. Il ' , .- ' ' Q' V, -.- "1 R 1 'fr V' s'l"l"'+l' . gf" -L lm ll , ly ' , . 44.231, Mai ' bi" 1.5-1651 'l1l,1i.C ' f 3' ! ,. ' 3 V 11 ' ' iw D Q ,itll I' r u fl' W -ri 1 fl ll m re- . , 'fl M ul -if villTUfl QW' ' will l l vi ,ull J 7E-,Ml ,weeeeA'mW' Q qw 'lv ,llrzi , if 1, 1 llli! lllaj I :Nj Xl ju ' V L y W" li 1 .ll .I .'-, ' gi' jQ5',i-'fl iQ? I 3 F lin K l' .X A 'll , ,I .ly url e ' ziiigf.. M15 X-l?.gs..Jff.-"" 135.25551 1 i f !1, 1L'l Ef i ' .5 11 nl' . Ragnlqv Y 1,-, H2 Mix ' . . , mV,K.ij' i5: Hai l! Hillulllfld s w i 5 in 'llr lil Ml R' l u e Qi' ifeflvwi Kiwis rw ,. -iwu-- if fi -LQ 'ru J. 'lim EW WLM ' ' ll" ll' ,.1T.3?-if ll' l l f Z' ll ' a ff 1Z1f'Bg.,'il'l"i5'.' A 5 -. ' ' Ezqsg i 2' . C, A ' A1 , H l V 1 ' EFS j K ' vi I l Q immuw 'W' 'N lllbllllllff mug 'R'-S? f 'R A,-,,. AIPXKNDI R KBIK BILNNFIT 21 Dexter St Medfold Mass. Economics SOCLCI 2 3 1 Basketballl 2 3 4 Baseball 1 2 '3 l' Capt. KDOCCGI Baslxetballl 'Sword and Shield Ivy Society lower Cross Varsity Club LEO I Bl' RNARDIN 611 Iowc ll Sl Lawrence Mass. Chemistry Dean s list 1 2 3 Cl'l6II'llSlllY Soc 1 2 3 fl- V.-Pres. 3' Camera Club fl W acht Club l Newman Club t DANA MAR! IN BERNTSON 62 Pentuclxet Ave. Lowell Mass. B Business Administration Delta lau Delta' Intramural Sports' 1 couomics Club 3 4' Yacht Club 3' Phillips Brooks Club 3' lufts Band 1 3 1' I I' C' Band 4' lumbo Book Business Mgr. fl" Proctor 44. b BERNARD HARVEY BFRSON 2a Stearns St. Malden Mass. - - Chemistry-Biology Dean s List 1 2 3' lamberl,-Kingsley Society lv' Hillel' OIT-Hill Club' Pre-Med Soc. 12471- Andover-ndf 1 1 1 1 Billerica,Mass. A. B. History Baseball 1, Intramural Football 1, 2, 3, ft, Intramural Softball 2, 3, 4, Intramural Basketball 1, 2, International Relations- History Club 3, Off-Hill Club 1. ALLAN JOHN BOI-ILIN 41 Linnaean St. Cambridge, Mass. A . B. Economics Dean's List 3, 4, Economics Club 3, ft, TMC 3, 4. RICHARD KEITH BO UNOY 40 Deane St. Groton, Conn. B. S. Geology Sigma Nu, Intramural Sports 2, 3, 11-, Tuufts-Jackson Chorus E 2, Jumbo Book Committee 4, NROTC Newspaper 2, 3, "ll, 0-Ed.3. WITJLIAM HENRY BOWEN Westminster Bd. Bellows Falls, Vt. A. B. Business Adlninistrcztion Delta Upsilon, Hockey Nlgr. IL, Intramural Sports, Economies Club, 3, 4, TMC 1, 2, Yacht Club 2, ft, Varsity Club, Weekly 1, 2, 3, 4-, Jumbo Book 1, 2, 3, 4, Jumble 3, ll-. A' GEORGE H. BOWN 42 Merrill St. West Newbury, Mass. A. B. Sociology Jumbo Book Ill. THOIVIAS CASEY BOYD 111 Randall Ave. Somerset, Mass. B. S. Biology WILLIAM STUART BROWN Tower Bd. Hiverside, Conn. B. S. llfathematics Sigma Nu, 'Treas. Ill, Intramural Football 1, 2, Intramural Softball 1, 2, 3, 4, Math Club 3, 4, Off-Hill 1, German Club 1 2 ' 17- - . 412481 .. ,M - ...,, .. CHARLES ALAN BRUNS 2739 St. Paul St. Baltimore, Md. B. S. Physics Theta Delta Chi, Sigma Pi Sigma 3, V .-Pres. 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Capt. 4, Tower Cross, Varsity Club 2, 4, Student Council 4, Dolbear Scholarship. WILLIAM ALBERT BUCK 31 Church St. Wilmington, Mass. B. S, Clzemistry-Biology Oil'-Hill Club, Chemistry Soc. JOIIN GILBERT BUCKLEY 7 Gleenwood Ave. Needham, Mass. A. B. Government Zeta Psi, Sec. 2, V. Pres. 4, Sword and Shield, Ivy Society, Sec. T reas., Tower Cross, Pres., Percival Wood Clement Essay Contest, First Prize, Class of 1882 Prize Scholarship, Tufts College, Dean's List 3, 4, Indoor and Outdoor Track 1, 2, 3, Capt. 4-, Intramural Football 1, 2, 3, Intramural Wrestling 2, 3, Jumbo Book 2, IFC 3, V.-Pres. 4, Student Council 2, LR.-H. Club I, 2, 3, Newman Club 1, 2. WARREN .I. BUREK 57 Fourth St. Chelsea, Mass. A . B, Business A dminislmtion Economic Club, Newman Club. WILLIAM T. BURNS 15 Hawthorne St. Woburn, Mass. A . B. Economics Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Varsity Club 2, 3, Pres. fl-, Newman Club. ROBERT BRUCE BUSSELL 234 N. Granada St. Arlington, Va. A . B. Economics Theta Delta Chi fassociate memberjg Intramural Swimming 3, Lacrosse 1, 3, 4, NROTC. GEORGE CAMOUGIS 1 Main St. Concord, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Dean's List 1, 2, 3, fl-, Softball 2, 3, 4, Lambert- Kingsley Society, Tufts acht Tufts Astro- ' . 4' Orthodo nonncal Soc., Pres x Rifle and Pistol T 3, from I 249 1- . E PAUL D. CAVANAGH 15 Bellevue Rd. Braintree, Mass. A- B- Economics A. LLOYD CHARLTON 4116 West Main St. Boontqm, N, J, B- S- Physics Delta Upsilon, Football 1, Indoor and Outdoor Track 1, 2, Cross Country, 2, 3, 4, Camera Club 2, 3, 4, V.-Pres. 3, 4, Weekly 3, 4, Jumbo Book 3, 4. B I S I'SAXIgl!N0N CHVASTANET 29 razi t. f - St. Lucia, BWI B. S. J, .JJ I wfhemistry-Biology X I I JAMES R01?WC. as, . 46 Old Farm Rd. Wi I uf xham, Mass. B. S. ef" 1' ' ji' ndtfy-B1:0l0gy Alpha Sigma Phi, V.-Pres.1t-ffLam,bert- fi, sley ff A y ftp Class ETC 3, 4, Ijres. 4, 1, 2, clit of 1952 1 lreas. 4, Ldelweiss Ski GQQP, Ji H P 'Ka ligllllllllllfllllllllmllmllli kiilltlllflvfll I TC-"WIF- H A-lfflifijxfgllll l ll l ,ll " Vlkxx I X il: 'f-14 fin. mlllll A...--L... luq HJ S LQTXIAI 1-I-kxx-xgl 1 J T, We 'lf' lf 'J USHWYQIH el ' A al a" f .srl 157 Higbfandth? N 6,5 1 L kt: ,X will fvru . ' gs. We sl +411 rflfrrn wze y ' fl ill' I: lx A lv' if OW . I . ,Mt 1 .1 . l,C0Il'TlF.li1jEl pee g6fg.luy,-sll's1l. ' flftgarlfn il y fill- Ml llmllglfilltlll n1i?'.L?Q-L llivaf'-lrlffrl-eff litziiff' 1 Mail? t Incl , I in ,l.', lielatigusil y . 1555! 2 Airman 165311 K M311 fl? Jing S3 lllilum ll ul Lf ' . 2 ' ' .'. ,,. ' 'IF-I Wi. , f,-1-EW 1 T ' , " :-.-.-..-'T' H ' ' ' n 1 ' AH Q :3".,.',..,,f,ZF',,,Qi1Fe f. N K 'llhlllmlllli BWI, ' 'W' ' L F' Z' a -?,E2y2'e:-Lf'-1-.... . 7' A-LD' ' f li '-E7 i'4'i'i 2 I .fl Lf,-i w rfnsg . 2 -rrp . f MS lllll mum 1 3 ,, +C? - M'--1 ei . fs., KE ' ' "' W' 'N 'A - -- v-'v'-'TT' . W? :fy j ' "" "1 ' 256 Elm Sm. 31. 3,11-.W T:'ff1LgiE?arrlners,.Mdss. . 1 A. B. ' K-n-hy, 'W' d.Business Adminah' - Delta Tau Delta, Rec.-Sec. 1L,'Bwk 'L2Qi5'IQ 2, D3, 4-EDB Sword and Shield 25 Varsity Club'3"EU0non1iesIIRf57f1Ji1132i-'L1'- 'Sf Book 2, 4. Q---3 H MILTON T. CRAIG, JR. 34 Robeson St. .I amaica Plain, Mass. A. B. Sociology Delta Upsilong Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Varsity Capt. and Freshman Capt., Cross-Country 1, 2, 3, 4, Varsity Capt., Newman Club, Quarter Century Club Pres. 4, Varsity 2, 3, 49 German Club 1, 2. RICHARD S. CROWELL 11 Mt. Vernon St. Heading, M855- B, S, Mallzenzatics LEONARD JOHN CULLEN, JR. 213 Birch St. Boonton, UN- J- B. S. Bwlvza' Varsity Football 2, 3, Freshman Football, Sword and Shield V.-Pres., Ivy Society, Varsity Club, Newman Club. 42501 ROBERT S. CUMMINGS 21 Linden Rd. Melrose, Mass. A . B. Economics Economics Club, Government Clubg OIT'-Hill Club. GEORGE M. CUOMO 2136 Chatterton Ave. Bronx 61, N. Y. A . B. English Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, Pres. 4, Weekly 1, 2, Editor-in-Chief 3, Assoc. Ed. 43 Jumble 3. HENRY EDWARD CURRY ' 96 Chestnut St. Andover, Mass. A. B. ,Business Adrnfviftxzgiaix Delta Upsilong 3 P's 3, 4-QMEHGSRDTHII Swimminggflntramural Wrestling filldSW1lIll11iI1g.QfP3'COIl0l'l1lCS Club 4, New ian Club 1, 2, 3, 4-3 Weekly, J um16'Book Advertising Mgr., lassl NJ-Pres. lg Class Pres. 3' ' V W' ' , f, 5 1-Mi. 4.ll li, , 1 H fu' ' i'-lm' fl' EE My r 'Ili 5 in lli :U 3 'H . RCY . 29 Gat ' fe R' mill' 7 ' . li l-"li Chestnut l-HIIE7, Mass. ifm-ly -xy :2.f:lig1i , r I X conomzcs W , I E mi lqelt ll oceei' Ill, Q k L ' ' ix. 1' 1.3-1 3' l Q I 1 A ill ' 1 Hill Ill: l llilliflll ' JP ll l l l A51 I ill lgltli 1 gall? A ifflfvul' l -il xpwxni X I , ll 1 . A E L,S,A,,,g,,g,g M , ', nl' w ig Q X, ,all 1 ru il 1, ,,g, 5g,, fi :V si : 0 ' I L4 J ,fi ll " ii ' 'Ei' H '. 1 .HL ,. .fe V, ,li 1 H E,,,..ag5f ,Mm zfiggala 3 A97 1: H flu' P is 'Qi f LIVE, flwllllliwlllll I R, Titl e limi it ul Lgzgjllqlfxllmh ?g TWT AY' " l if 'fl'i11'7'a J- r' lk lr: l j--l " F711 is ' LLL' ei -J-CI' 4 - -Uqgwz. , -5 ' hlbrl E, llli' HuliUlMlfYli 4 ' 1-ii 5, Q. ,li mm W-it ,'- 4 2 ,QW ,Y.l.'l - 1' .,,,f',,fI X av iii- V vii 1- Sh , ' fvzef' fm 'fiiige f1,,-, f ,Cf lfg.glffQi'j'1T'11 .ii 1, 'X . ,Lg eff., 5.4.- Q 2- TMICHAEL EDWARD DE BENEDICTIS 1 '-86 M8FSt,Qfl'S'l. 3 I K " Medford, Mass. B. S. ' Chemistry Chemical Soc. 1, 2, 3, 4-3 Off-Hill Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4-. ALBERT CLINTON DEDRICK,,IR. 28 Wingold St. Ball River, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Intramural Football 3, 43 Basketball 3, 43 Softball 3, 4, Luigi Club 2, 3, 43 Pre-Medical Soc. 2, 3, 4, Republican Club 49 NORMAN RUSSELL DEXVAR 163 Oakley Rd. Belmont 78, Mass. A . B. Business Administration Cross Country 1, 4, Oil'-Hill Club 1, 2, TMC 1, Economics Club 3, 4. GARY CHARLES DICKERMAN 1542 Massachusetts Ave. Arlington, Mass. B- S- Chemistry-Biology Oil'-Hill Club, Yacht Club. 42511 -f ef-v-rv-f L - -- 1 W JAMES JOSEPH DONOVAN 66 Tainter St. Medford, Mass. A . B. Economics Alpha Tau Oniegag Football 1, Newman Club: Yacht Club, Economics Club, Class Treasurer 1. ROBERT FRANCIS DOWREY 58 Epping St. Lowell, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology . Dean's List 3, Lambert-Kingsley Society. THOMAS C. DRAPEAU 78 Sylvester Ave. Winchester, Mass. A . B. Sociology Newman Club'3, 45 Republican Club 3, Chorus 33 Odikon Soc. 3, 4, Mgr. fl-. MARTIN ARTHUR DWORKEN 47 Butler Ave. Bridgeport, Conn. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Phi Epsilon Pi, Rushing Chair.g Dean's List 23 Hillel 1, 2, Biology Club 1, 2, "Jumble" 2, Transfer from University ol' Connecticut. STEPHEN THURSTON ENGQUIST 911' Park St. West Lynn, Mass. B, S, Plzysicx Cross Country 3, ftg Track 3, 43 Weekly 3, 'Lg Transfer from Union College. PHILIP EDGAR ERNST 170 Larchmont Ave. Larchmont, N. Y. A . B. Economics Theta Delta Chi, Corr.-Sec. 3, 41, Basketball 15 Interfrateruity Sportsg Kappa Krierg Economics Club. HENRY ROSS ESCALETTE McGuirk St. East Hampton, N. Y. A . B. Economics Alpha Sigma Phi, House lVIgr. 43 Indoor Track 3, 43 Outdoor Track 3, 43 Yacht Club, Economics Club. 42521 l l lififf 'Av Sill? iv? if f' .. N Jff' if Xf , ft! ...,3f1'!',' . JL,-'. Wi "1 H N 13,5 Q ' -:Ti r 4 A 4 ' min if r Q was me eff! HAROLD GARFIELD FARRELL 26 Ridge Road Belmont, Mass. A. B. Economics and Business Administration FRANCIS KENNETH FAUSTINE 135 Texas Ave. Bridgeport, Conn. A . B. Economics Alpha Sigma Phi, Soccer 1, Outdoor Track 1, 2, 4, Indoor Track 2, 49 Pre-Med Club, Newman Club. STUART S. FAY 1451 Carroll St. Brooklyn 13, N. Y. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Alpha Epsilon Pig Dean's List, Freshman Swimmingg Intramural Swimmingg Rodin Society, P1'e-Medical Soc., Hillel, Laboratory Assistant in Biology. REX I-I. FENDERSON, JR. 1305 Ramona Ave. Lakewood, Ohio A. B. Economics Delta Tau Deltag Football 1, 2, 3, fl-g Varsity Club 2, 3, fl-g Eco- nomics Club 3, fl. RICHARD LEWIS FIELD 21 Whitney Ave. Beverly, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Alpha Sigma Phi 2, 3, Pres. -lg Dean's List 3, Lacrosse 1, 2, 39 Intramural Sports, Phillips Brooks 1, 2, 3, 45 V.-Pres. of Phillips Brooks Club 3, Pre-Medical Club 4. A MALCOLM S. FLETCHER 3 Hancock Pk. Everett, Mass. A. B. Economics Zeta Psi, I-Iist. 3, Sec. 4, Football lg Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4-3 La- crosse 1. RICHARD J. FORSLEY River St. Billerica, Mass. B. S. M athemalics Delta U psiloug Pres. 4, 42531 JAMES MARVIN GANGEMI 98 Summer St. North Adams, Mass. A - B- Sociology Theta Delta Chi. WILLIAM S. GEORGE 11 Highland St. Framingham, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Dean's List 35 Lambert-Kingsley Society 4-g Intramural Basket- ball 2, 3, flg 1Ill,l'8lIllLl'Hl Softball 3, flg Chemical Soc. 3, 4, Pre- Med Soc. 3, 43 OH'-Hill Club 3, fl. -GKRL1. GEORGE GIANNELLI 7 Newbern Ave Medford Mass Biology Intramural Softball Football Basketball lxlewugxn Club Off Hill Club lrlterrratlonalellrelatlons Histo rcs Club IIFNRY L G E 36 Grove St av hill Mass , C re r B o o y Lambert Kingsley Secret fl Prg-Med lClu 4 1 'bl rr Weekly Jumbo Book K 'l X pm Irllllfbw ,Pu I r Wi fl lmlltrlr will l Ulla la l mg? 4 a Wm etaskarfl-LM K W fu rrvr P, A B j lv- Emailer p a lah! nc 1,415 L .,,- rgrnrn r rr 5, E fl .il 5 8 Ghlil lvl lull ilM ll Igilfltggqllllogmchlmm 4 M55 K l u l llwllfll lllflll SW-llIlD'1'lIlgji:lf-2"3 4,lIn.trar Ili' ? l mar ful mf- glrrrrrrf 1, gi ,M ,t ll lllllbg 'KZ jg en 4-1- "'s.- PIIILIP HAROLD GOULSTON '7 Park Square Peabody Masq Glzemzstry Bwlogy Alpha hpsllon Pr l-Irat 5 1 Wardrooni Club 2 3 4 Chemical Soc 3 4 lults'1racer2 5 4 Hillel 1 2 3 4 GERARD EMIEL GRAF 863 Parkw ay Revere Maas Bzologv Lambert Kingsley Society Dean a Iret Soccer 5 4 Intramural Softball Basketball Newman Club JOHN GRANT, IR 178 Bridge St Beverly Maas Chemzslry feta Psi Intramural lootball Softball 3 1 Chemical Soc Wardroom Club, Rifle and Pl:-,tol Feam RICHARD LAURENCE GREAVES 28 Shepard Rd Medford, Mass 4 B Sociology r254y B. S. l "1 jr l llrr l ' I l-Wi. li . J J. -M A IA, ' Iijlrviwl rrrigimql I r". l .r .1 l l1ll5'lflg-.l lll"' 'l " ' - B 5 " ' , 1'L'2r4i. rl-fe ' .f L g' ' ' - -' ' r 'r-r"'rff.,--+ f- a ' kr 'ff-I 'lrzrfj N b" f'1 WW - A,-121-lf-rigl ' .sw ,, r"1f:? l rib if-'Y':'lli'l. rr-Q. lll? 'lllf "rv: ll 'llrllf r r 'rl-lllf in A "f l'X"xt,1 N 1, " fo ll' -Liu - zlllllrfllll-l' 'lr l lm! X ' If K iurp rl-mf-YT lui! Wuhan'- ,- N , , '-' ffl"'," :nl I I wx X lu. 3' a . f ,, e gr lr ir , l Y' .9 IT, 1 Y. ,FEI . qvrv. E ,AWP q .Q 1211. - . ,f , fp L r If , -1. 3 , ' F I- ' 1 Z5 Q ll' l . V - 'Lp ,lili- - - fr 'l, 2 I I r- . ,ll g '. Ui: iil I TJ' ag Hhrhlrh--,Lv V. .1 1fg',r4l3g L l M lr- fl- " l-'lrllflf' B llf AE!! K llll L llllllllllll l wi f 'if ll I' mir lliif ' fe -c , . ry - - - ' r ' :'f..f'ILL'11f1-Ll -.T "3 7 are ' rar, fe:f:a'xe1'lll'rz, , rY'T f .Fl r H . llli lg 11 ' 25-j ' l, : C' c I 4? fi Mill. 'fl I Q fil1?4-'ffig llll gf . 2 Q ' V33--STL? L2f'i'ff""flflf+-fQI!! ?3.,,1j"J , :gf-"-L""3 ' V V 10,77 Y -V 3 3.5. G . . ' A f B. S. I ' D ' - SHELDON KIMEL GREENE 156 Dean Hd. Brookline, Mass. A . B. Economics Phi Epsilon Pi, Pros. -1-, Economics Club 3, 4-, Jumbo Book 3. KURT GREENIIUT 17 Cutler St. Winthrop, Mass. A . B. History Dean's List 3, Soccer, Chess Club 1, 2, History Club 1, 2, Inter- national llelations-History Club 3, fl, German Club 1, 2, 3, Pres. 4, Hillel 1, 2, 3, fl. THOMAS QREM 7238 East St. Manny!! N8V?B1' B, , . 5 C 00 Alpha Tau 0ll ,Q List 3, Psi Chi, C apin Ssfholarsliiirji Lacrosse, I r ll l lu l N, K 5 Ml l ' 1E f -lilfvfssir 55sB,',f, l,,,1ck1 . ,,1,,.A .1 1 ,11 I B,.iage,g,,-1, COll1'1i - ,I , .. ,,-'41 ' 1 , ozvernmen lr' ,lf nlhll' a 'ii' lizlta llil Varsit A n' 62, 3, fl, 'llMC, Varsity 1 l lii rclwestra. ' Bl 'Qi X l lil' 1 1 A T1 M li i ll '111l 1 1 f 1 ll 111111 W2 lx 1 1 M 1 1 11 , A ,, 1ll - 111111, -1f"1u'13fiiFEi1T',1l-f iw" W 1 11 N1 l f 11 . 11' 1'-11 11 12, 111 1 1 12111113 RN L1 EE-li! IIU1, TXLQQHJLLIK 1 M :iq I ll ggg gqgiill s. ' ld Q 1 lbw, xiii, ,I ' I R 'f 1 ld ,. 1 K Q, .14 ,I 1111111111111111111 . W T f""'lllV 2i 1 'Ll ll 1lI1" ,ii 'I bi ,M if 1 Elm - ' l I1 1? 11 'll lhllll ' a .. . 1' 111 111.311 , 1 1 L- 1:0 i 2 2 'fa -1 H1 ,.li,d',Q 1? Eg1j,,,' il'1112111w111 . 3, - :lo 1 f 'fiil" i's-' llfl , HD at '13 4- 1 Miirff, 00. LT' ' 3 i"- ' 5? QI!! 5515, '7'5lR - was '1 i rilixillliil Ill ' If K I ET1- 11'M-llllill ff 1' ' "f'f'LfQf,,,,Qif, 1... 1 --flr ----- 1i r 5 - a - QQEMO P. I-IARDXVICK ,.1f1196F f1mmssLe. Hyde Park, Mass. A . B. Economics -German Club 3, Sec. 4, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Economics Club 2, 3, 4, Camera Club 3, 4, International Relations- History Club 3, 4. FREDERICK FARNHAM HARLING, JR. 54 Keith St. West Roxbury, Mass. A. B. English Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Wardroom Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, fl, NBOTC Band 1, 2, 3, 4. CHARLES P. HARRIS 23 Stevens St. Winchester, Mass. A. B. English ROBERT LESLIE HASKELL 579 Mountain Ave. Revere, Mass. A . B. Economics Football 2, 3, Varsity Club. 4 255 1 1.11.51 VIU., 1. - JAMES JOSEPH IIGEY, JR. 137 Summer St. Somerville, Mass. A . B. Government International Relations-History Club, Newman Club. DAVID LAURI HONKONEN 41 Forest St. Fitchburg, Mass. B. S. Physics Dean's List 3, Sigma Pi Sigma 2, Treas. 3, Pres. 4, TMC lg Olf- Hill Club 11-. ROBERT MARSIIALL HOOK 43 Parker Rd. Needham Heights, Mass. A - B. Economics Zeta Psi, Basketball, Mgr. 3, ft, Pre-Med Club lg Congregational Club lg Yacht Club 1, 29 Chorus 1, 2. JAMES EDWARD HOWE 160 Shaw St. Lowell, Mass. A. B. Economics Alpha Tau Omega, Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Economics Club 2, 3, fl. JAMES DENNIS HUNT 1 Rhodes Place Edgewood, Ii. I. A . B. Sociology School of Religion Dean's List 3, TMC 2, Congregational Club 2, Unity Club 2, 3, flg Skinner Fellowship 2, 3, 4. JOHN ILG 519 Beacon St. Boston, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Delta Tau Delta, Newman Club. JAMES WILLIAM IRELAND, JR. 29 Robinson Ave. Braintree, Mass. A. B. Economics Delta Tau Delta, Dean's List, Jumbo Book 4, Economics Club 3, 45 Yacht Club 3. 42561 l Cl . ..,- P... k ..-.- PHILIP JOHN JAMOULIS 765 Bedford St. Fall River, Mass. A. B. Biology-Chemistry Dean's List 2, 3, Chemical Soc. 35 TMC 1, 2, 3, 43 Pre-Med Club, 2lI'BHilliCill1b lg Internat'l. Student Corresp. 23 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, g an . CURTISS CLEMENT JOHNSON 280 Middlebury Rd. Watertown, Conn. A. B. Sociology Zeta Psig Lacrosse 1. HOWARD M. KASSLER 273 Mason Ter. Brookline, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Phi E silon Pig Dean's List 3, Track 2, 35 Tufts College Dental School,-Class of 1955. JOHN P. KELLEY, JR. 68 Pilgrim Rd. Springfield, Mass. A . B. Economics gage Tau Delta, Newman Club, Economics Club, Wardroom ROBERT H. KOLANKIEWICZ 3111 Richmond St. Philadelphia, Pa. A . B. Government Football 13 International Relations-History Club Executive Council 3, 4, Liberal Union 3, 4, Newman Club. LIUDAS J. KONCUIUS 328 E St. Boston, Mass. A . B. German JEROME KOWAL 68-43 Fleet St. Forest B. S. Alpha Beta Kappa, Lambert Freshman Freshman T 2, 3, 4-3 Weekly, A . B. Oil'-Hill fl 257 1- f-r.- 4- -- - vf -- -Q ,.. JOSEPH F. KUCHTA 35 Henry St. Winchester, Mass. A - B- Drama 3 P's 3, Pres. ft, Newman Club 1, 2, 4.5 Yacht Club 33 Student Council, Theater Board. CHARLES MORTIMER LAMELEIN 21 Earle St. Bellows Falls, Vt. A . B. Economics Economics Club 35 Unity Club 1, 25 Republican Club, Treas. 3. V.-Pres. ft. 'fm A .z 1 JBQYUIEEESLIEQ LAHS N 57 Spruce St. PM XX witfatertown, Mass. B- S- X fi" , K X- Physics Sigma Pi Sigma, Associafte iMembeli33I A mi, I M fr. 2. ' ARTIIUR W 1 ' llllllll E 3 ' I 5 . UQ! NN , A , f f- ' , ,ln 1 A115igAsh St. Lw I New m l rd, Mass. ' ' -. " 3- ,. it '1"i+'U"llmr '- 5fi'i2Z2T1Zi ?i:2.?t.5res,r.-e,f,r,f4Qg :ri 3' 1, Pr I, f 2 limi? llllllc 'lm' ,. ' ll lll' QWPQ l on P will typ R ui? llmmzl' F ,I UV ,P fn1.'i-.r,,f 'EN!7k A 'Xxy.'lAl 'X ffwm ,Q qQ5liWfXx wJ1,?-urik fb 'ln I ' K 19,71 I W A 'ii 'F 2 ,Elugw 'T 3".e'? L 1, 1 ,A it ur- ,fl- Ai si ri l9lll'l"' .1 152 'fir I ifflilililii shi: fi gi 33:5 1 ' l Y-' Qs X , 41 .f--Y .. ' fl' '1I51C3g F lllllllllllIIlll luu--- rf, 4 ,L+ 2- 1. ME 15,1 WU ph Wfulyllf fi Jig lmculnuu' llrlhit-1 Aniesgiigliil " ' Z7 -JMR' """r . 'LL' " -516 , X , , 'mailman Ilia lt lllllllpllllllll W I 21.115532--ialff -f?,,Q, WC-.. - DQ rr. f -ef1--F-1e?'i"Aiff..- ' - mf, 'Z p lg' if'-'-E., wifi- QQ., SANIUEL CHURCH LIKINS - Y' ' 216 Pooks Hill ' - Bethesda, Md. - - A.B. 2. - English , Phillips Brooks Clubg Canterbury Club, Treas. DAVID LINCOLN 91 Boston St. Somerville, Mass. A . B. Economics Theta Delta Chi, Pres. 4, Sword and Shield, 2, Basketball 13 Baseball 1, 2, 3, 43 College Golf Champion 2, College Tennis Champion 3g Inlzra-Fraterriity Athletics 1, 2, 3, fl, Economies Club 3, 4g Club '52, Phillips Brooks Club 1. CONRAD LITNER 95 Nichols St. Everett, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Deans List I, 2, 3, fl-3 Lambert-Kingsley, Al-3 Intramural Basket- ball, Intramural Softball, Pre-Med Club, Hillelg OIT-Hill Club, Chemical Soc. WILLIAM THOMAS LLOYD 623 Central Ave. Cedarhurst, N. Y. A . B. Economics ' Alpha Sigma Phi, Basketball lg Newman Club 1, 2, ASME 35 Economics Club 3, 4, NROTC. 12581- LEONARD FREDERICK LOMBARDI 84 Eastfield Bd. Waterbury, Conn. B. S. Clzemistry-Biology Theta Delta Chig Inter-Fraternity VVrestling Champion 4, Jumbo Book, Assoc. Editor 4. ROBERT ROSABAL LOPEZ 55 Dysart St. Quincy, Mass. .-1. B. Government Spanish Club 13 Oli'-Hill Club lg NROTC VVard Room Club 1, 2, NROTC Rifle Team 1, 2, Yacht Club 3, 4. DAVID B A RTON LOWE 117 Pe'k'1sSt. , A f" M A.B. IA H ,llllluu',!, B11s1f1zess,A43iizi?5islraZZiz Alpha Sigma Phi, llifflill lg !ECOIl01lliCS Club 3, 45 Tufts "21" EXiJg5T?d?oGfJlmolHwf?PHhWh4lWVWWWW w ill llll Q-1 lull ug lf .M l'D " 'Fld fiWlf..TvgL,1 ..Q.. liik, JR. U ' ,e"" " L' Medway, Mass. lf 1VWf6Ff1i!use,l"'.-fl Q E1 nl 1 Sociologgf i I HT Y FS' , 2, , erman K L c noiln' u 9 wman u , E MillE?illi14lx.4 gikqxiiigmldl b lu. fl b llfliillfllwj ' l" F Fsfllllllllll , ill xl i, if l X ,V I, lx l. 'If . "Nikki x W'- lx .-B.. l l in ll, lil K , ' Tvll L. A, Ui? 4" ,"' Qi . M 1251, ,ly lag: m 4 u L 2 .1 ll' ,T ui .J ,IW .o.f, 2521 . QSC M-.QWJMW Mwofwrfwuwqll A 4' ,pe X ":V,3'l li ,JV my .fi I, l x, ,1.v i. . q!, . - Lf' tw J is, lo. in ww' ll , Wy W. wie., f.?TBeaN5! t , . 1 .1 fiilxgr- , ix , .gy fdllililtlixf Q2 V- " Qlntl' I1 ' X Ld ' W 'Q QU 'm i A N., . Q 1- , ,lx ZWWBWUMWML lllwwwwtummtfof f ..-:rf - ' 3- 'i:'m, 1 , 1 ,lf ,, if xp, ,JV ...., 1, I if if ""' l 1? .igggijjfll ,iwf il z ll,ll-l?Hfy1:.g Ll, lngailwkzlltfg' fl :We for ' ii 1 yi I,,. . . 3A 9' -..f'f5gf'1-xslt:--' -'-'Qg",-1,4 fFi1,iQ,' .1 31" ,'v 1. - eanslllislg l:gggl'g3liliY1g.,,Il9,ilill ll lllllil jgy 1 l1jfW,,tl1u1Ml:l11lf5Qf V0 'J' ' so is " , i 1 1 'if M - .5 .T-'-- . in' 2, - ir "J, pi? f ,YiiiQLIJl'.kM, KEITH MALLINSON fffliiflfvwaifd Stfkr ' X Lenox, Mass. A . B. Education elta Upsilon, Intramural Softball 2, 3, 4-3 Football 2, ft, Wrestl- ing 3, 4, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Jumbo Book, Art Ed. fl-. RALPH HENRY IVIANSEN, JR. 89 Lincoln Ave. Pearl River, N. Y. A . B. Economics Wceklyg Economics Club, IH-I-I Clubg Rodin Soc., Republican ClubgbChapel Choir, Spanish Clubg Canterbury Club, NAS, Film 'oc. ALFRED TA DEUSZ MARCIN 843 Columbia Rd. Dorchester, Mass. sl- B- Education RONALD GLADSTONE MARCOVITZ 41 Clayton St. Malden, Mass, B. S- Sociology Weekly 3, fl, Oli'-Hill 3, 4. 42591 -.. .uses .1 L ll 1 4 .. 5 ARTHUR GEORGE MASTORAS 339 Pleasant St. Laconia, N. H. A . B. Economics Delta Upsilong Wrestling, Intrafraternity Athletics, Economics Club, Yacht Club. DAVID MATTAIR 1 Davidson Ave. Dorchester, Mass. B. S. Psychology Psi Chi, V.-Pres. 45 American Sociological Assoc. GEORGE MICHAEL McCARTl-IY, JR. 10 Winchester St. Haverhill, Mass. A. B. Economics GEORGE CAMPBELL McGOVERN Bay View Ave. Monument Beach, Mass. A . B. ' Education Alpha Tau Omega, Chaplain 3, Master 43 IFC 3, 4, Newman Club. ALLAN KING Mc0SKER, JR. 25 Prairie Ave. Newton, Mass. A . B. English Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, 45 Hockey lg Canterbury Club, OII'-Hill Club. JOHN DONALD McPHERSON 1075 Pleasant St. Belmont, Mass. A . B. Economics Band 1, 2, Mgr. 2. DONALD CHARLES MEANEY 470 North Broadway Yonkers, N. Y. A. B. Economics Weekly 2, 3, 45 Jumble 45 Newman 2, 3, 43 Yacht Club 1, 2, 43 Chorus 23 Radio Club 4g Debating Club 49 Cheerleader 1. l260l ALEXANDER MEEK, JR. 3 Moraine St. Andover, Mass. A . B. Sociology Skinner Fellowship 1, 2, 3, 4, V.-Pres. 1, 2, Unity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Oil'-Hill Club 1. EDWARD JOSEPH MELANSON, JR. 206 W. Maple Rd. Linthicum Meights, Md. A. B. English Dean's List 2, 3, Rodin Soc. 3, 4, Sec. 45 Canterbury Club 2, 3, 43 Liberal Union 4, Luigi Club 3, 4. SEYMOUR MERRIN 1344-fl-6 St. Brooklyn, N. Y. B. S. Geology Alpha Epsilon Pig Baseball Mgr., Wrestling 2, Rock and Drumlin Soc., V.-Pres., TMC, Weekly, Jumble, Mayor's Council. DWIGHT FRANK MILLER 892 Stratfield Rd. Bridgeport, Conn. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Theta Delta Chi, Dean's List 2, 3, 45 Lambert Kingsley 43 Intramural Swimming: Intramural Wrestling, Swimming Mgr. 2, 35 Phillips Brooks lub 1, 2, 3, 45 Debating Club 1, 25 Jumbo Book, Fraternity Ed. 4. HARRY THOMAS MORGAN 487 Broad St. Weymouth, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology CARL FRANCIS MOULTON, JR. 3 Bethany Rd. Monson, Mass. A. B. Business Administration Delta Tau Delta, Dean's List 25 IFC 3, 45 Soccer 1, 2 Capt. 1, Golf 3, Capt. 4, Intramuralsg Jumbo Book 2, 4g Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 43 International Relations-History Club 3. WARREN EDWARD MOWBRAY 280 Geneva Ave. Dorchester, Mass. B. S. Chemistry Pre-Med Club 2, 3 4' Soc 4' Biology Open I-Iouse Committee 3. I 261 1- WILLIAM McLEAN NEWETT 265 West Lake St. Winsted, Conn. l B S rllatlrematics Main Club 2, ag Phillips Brooks Club 1, 2. ROBERT FLETCHER NICKERSON 82 Green St. Stoneham, Mass. B. S. Chemistry gf:-n's List' Chemical Soc ' Math Club' Camera Club' Off Hill u MJUCLNF RICHARD NICRO 11 Mrddlesex Reading Mass I Bwlogy Chermstrg Pre Med Soc 1 2 3 I'reas hgmrcal Soclll 9 3 4 Newman Club 1 2 5 4 TMC4 rllCkrb 1 2 P113 hy Clubfl- RALPH TWVNOR I ll 8 Oakland St L-IL!-,I 'fab l, l lvl adck Masst Congre atmnal Club ILKKQFHHKEI al 'Re atlons lfflhlifogwlgalglzg H? pl Pre Mead Soc as 1,4 Il I ALI H ' 'U lit f w.lf...tlFlar ll K lMl lL 1392uZl1n4ef S T Aval?'lx nqyE1vl:l mtl ds: 2 4 11 an ffm KI 4 yi csaieermmmt it ll I IU s AB owen .11 ---- 1 'Wal , 2. lu lSani21c'Gl3,f X 'llfllll 5 IZ-'ff-Q3 ht- Hlulmullu ll 'Ef- lil Ji llll gif... WLILBEA-M -MZOIQLESBY 100 Bellevllle Ave Bloomfield N II-' Socniagy Camera Club 1 2 'S 4- Sec 4 Chorus 1 2 3"9d1krn'r 1-2'-:Iii ROBERT HENRY PARE 169 Prospect St W1llIlllBDS6tt Mass French Alpha Sigma Phi Freshman Honor Roll Dean s List 4 Intra mural Basket Ball Intramural Softball Intramural Football Newman Club 2 3 Oil' II1ll Club 2 3 I rench Club 1 2 3 PETER GF NE PARS 342 Harvard St Cambudge Mass Physzcs ROGFR NILFS PEARSE 255 14 Bates Rd Great Neck N Y A B Euglzslr I eta PS1 Soccer Freshman Varsity Swimming Mgr NEISA board of directors Canterbury Club NROIC N ROI C news paper Art Ed Dir NROTC band Band Orchestla 42621 B. ' r2 2 1 ' 3 ' ' 'r - -fsgf-1 -,2,: ' "' ' ' ' ' ' , 15T2",ll'!21,1r'g!' , ...yr 1 ,E '.Lg,,, tr! 11.19. . 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B :gil . l limi iw iilzvguglxg im. az,-,l i i mlnflnllinrl , . fri ' .iii Us A I' ., , - A , , e B ' it t fW6'ti1 .Lv if' 1 'ffl qi"l'W"' fi ,S wtf, U V li iwvvi, 4 'lf fuss i ,L ft I 2- l. 1 l L ERNEST FRED PECCI 23 Clinton St. Everett, Mass. B. S. Clzemistry-Biology Intramural Sports, VVceklyg Jumble, Photography Ed., Jumbo Bookg Camera Club, Newman Club, Oli'-Hill Club, Student Council, NHOTCQ Transfer from Harvard. DAVID MILTON PHILLIPS 36 Church St. Putnam, Conn. A . B. Economics Chorus 1, 2, 3, ll-3 Odikon 2, 3, Librarian fig Chaple Choir 1, 2, 33 Hoof and Mouth Club 1, 2, Phillips Brooks Club 1, 3, fig TMC 3, 4, Economics Club 3, 4. ANTHONY CARMEN POLCARI 30-A Medford St. Medford, Mass. A . B. 1 V frkzqyazies Dean's List 3, Football 1, ebMl' Ig Soccer 2, 3, Intra nural Softball 2, 33 Newman,.C 5 Off-Hill Club, Elionomics Club, International Iftclations-History Club, Spanish Club, Varsity Club H, 3, 4' 5'5" A ' lllllnif llnlllfllllliiilllmttil l l ll ll w rl- '1li,' .y, rr! 2, 680D.' 11l,N ' I' . j r , Uesne 1 gerrl, A ,. Lf. Union, N. J. , ?5f,,'.al,l' l ' i ' C Sociology .L ' I 11trainu oXtsg,WarTll'bomlClub, Oll'-Hill M156 .il ' . yaliig . i lil ,L will l A .1 1. i it rl N l " ug. v ii 1, Afxl l 15. " Ill' l , ,dural .li ,, ..., lm. , liltl.. 1'r2,.,4 mv iv ,aw Ni, lla 211113 -Fe RICIIAXR DOWLNIN PI,lSE f ?igkfj ,il fm Q " Hiy a -Q I rar ur Sw iiihn ll hou I I ' lla!! - 5 U' I . ' 7' iii 5 15 2 ' 'A' F -"Mr -fd-A in ,i 1' fl MA, C gli' ' lilliilligilfilm rff ':T ,xx I , u , .- ir g 'f 4' ,.,,ii.i1 x. l 1 .uit iigh t' 215355 " "H" T' T itll " . ' fiiflw if 4 fjQ1, - ill'1 Q i- W1i13ITCllflbiIirl- Qfllrulwlsl '75 ,CRV O'-'Al'f7T' f "W 1 fl"- fffl g 1 +1111 lllltlullllf ' x 1 ,f f, M Y Y W ,Y W -lf - W- - - H - - - - .. .-- - f .- .4 -. H' ing lf' ,, ,, ,, . .,. : 1.5223 :fit , ND'l f 114 wi., V ,, Y- all-Q . in ,,, ' tr ' " , LAW'-RENCE NUTTING REED 6 High St. ' , Q A Monson, Mass. A . B. Economics Soccer 35 Economics Club 1, 2, 35 EUGENE D. ROBIE Evergreen Rd. Natick, Mass. B. S. Chemistry Sigma Nu Steward ft, Chemistry Soc. 2, 3, Pres. 4, TMC 1, 44, Wardroom Club 1, 2, 3, 4-g Wesley Club 4-g Tufts Tracer-Editor 3, 4.3 NROTC. RUDOLPI-I J. ROMEO 97 First Place Brooklyn, N. Y. A . B. History Boxing 1, 2, 3, 43 German Club 3, 4, Newman Club 3, 45 Repub- lican Club 3, lt, Transfer from Ricker Junior College-German Club 1, 23 Student Christian Association, Pres. 2, Baseball 1, 2, Dean's List 1, 2. PAUL GARDNER R ONCO 12 Dearborn Rd. Medford, Mass. B. S. Psychology Delta Upsilon 2, 3, Pres. 4-3 Psi Chi 3, fl-5 Director of Varsity Club Show, Honorary Member-Varsity Club, Newman Club 2, 3: Olf-Hill Club 1, 2, Intramural Football 1, 4. 12631 JOHN P.Ym'SS ' 32 Fernwood Terr. Long Island, N. Y. Stewart Manor B- S- Mathematics Theta Delta Chi, Lacrosse 1, 2, 3, co-captain 4, Swimming 1, 2, 3, Weekly-Advertising Mgr., Math Club, Radio Club, Varsity Club. ALAN D. ROTHSTEIN 48 Lawton St. Brookline, Mass. B. S. Biology-Chemistry Alpha Epsilon Pi, Master ft, Dean's List 3, Lambert-Kingsley Society 4. BRANTLY RUDISILL 2114 Kenmore Ave. Glenside, Pa. A . B. Economics Sigma Nu, Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4, Jumble 3, Advertising Mgr. 4, Tracer 1, 2, Circulation Mgr. 3, 4, Wardroom Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Economics Club, 1, 2, 3, Varsity Club 4, International Relations- History Club 4, NROTC. CIRO A. RUSSO, JR. 114 Baxter Blvd. Portland, Me. A. B. Economics Alpha Tau Omega, Sec. 4, Newman Club 1, 2, Economics Club 3, 4-. Mosa' ANGELO Russo 114 Baxter Blvd. Portland, Me. B. S. Biology Alpha Tau Omega, Newman Club 2, 3, 4, Yacht Club 2, Pre- Med Club 3, 4. ROBERT A. RUTH 155 Washington St. Gloucester, Mass. A . B. History Sigma Nu, Pres. 4, Basketball, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Jumbo Book, Sen'or Pictures, Canterbury Club, International Relations- History Club, Wardroom Club, NROTC. ALLAN W. SAARI 93 Mechanic St. Fitchburg, Mass. A . B. English Alpha Sigma Phi, Chapter Ed. 4, Weekly 3, 41, Yacht Club 2, 4, TMC, Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Education Club, Edel- weiss Ski Group. 4264, 'Qt WILLIAM J. SAMES, III 602 S. Jackson Jacksonville, Tex. A . B. Physics Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Tufts College Band, Chorus. PHILIP B. SAMPSON 395 Broadway Cambridge, Mass. B. S. Psychology Phi Sigma Kappag Psi Chi. GEORGE P. SANTOS 59 Dudley St. New Bedford, Mass. B. S. h Biology Lambert Kingsley 3, Pres. 45 Dean's List 2, 3, 43 Pre-Medical Soc., Tufts-Jackson Chorus. MORTON SCHIFF 40-51 Denman St. Elmhurst, L. I., N. Y. Physics B. S. Sigma Pi Sigma, Football 1. ROBERT WEBSTER SCHREIBER 304 Halsey Ave. Union, N. J. A . B. Goverment Freshman Honor Roll, Dean's List 2, 3, 4, International Relations- History Club 1, 3, Executive Council 43 French Club 1, Treas. 2, Economics Club 2, 33 Canterbury Club 2, 4g Weekly 2, 3, Editor- in-Chief 43 Student Council 3. FREDERIC A. SCOTT 24 Teel St. Arlington, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology BURTON SEIFE 2065 Ocean Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. B. S. Physics Alpha Varsity Wrestling, Pre- Medical Soc. .4, 2, 3, 3, 4. 12651- gas. of , sixiiiirff ' HAROLD J SI-IEEHAN Chestnut St. N 0. Easton Mass Englzsh Theta Delta Chi, Forensic Councilg Swimming 15 Debatin 1, 2, 43 United World F ederalists 1, 2, 3 Pres. 4' Liberal Union 4 Newman Club 13 Canterbury Club 1, 2, 4 HAROLD li SIIEEHAN 18 Walnut St Natick Mass Sociology Delta Upsnlon Ivy Society Swimming 1 2 Newman Club l 2 3 4 Centenmal Book MARVIN SHENFELD 1625 University fbze. Bronx 53 N. Y Bzology Chemzstry Eugene M. Niles, B., H: Dav'is,.,Hem'y W. Br gg, George W. Eaton Scholarships, Basketball 3, CoICaptain4g,V1l1rsity Club is CHARLES .I SI M 242 School St 1, ki, I ll a erville M ss il V Government Dean s L1st 2 Intramural ,Football a oftball eekly Ass Circulation Mgr 1 Olf Ijhll Club 2 '13 l4 Inter a on, Rela- Umon 2 4 fillets L it ,J '11, L , flmgljifjjffbl' l , . ' ' - . N, if ' l :Wu K' f., - lr UH ' 1: w lx' ., " 1.1 X 'Cx . 1 Zoirfsfde Lafsilieft- 'D Alf 'ii ' 3,41P'Vt ffhffliral I lr if. fir'-ri t y l 1 lA lllillslbn L ima: gg 1 bpm, rqlr KH Br oklgrgg as? 4' 41011111 BND B 1i'3Sl4,B h ll Q CQ I Wplflsvisht fcdEl3nqa.c1eb5 ill if dwa- QQX 1 41,141 aqsnyguh3f4M.7-fflbr bb WMI Um Il ag lf gl Qgzf-. ,3- 1' ---+::L.I-, 37l"Ie1nlook St. . , ,L - ' Arlington, Mass A. B. X 'Q L, QQ , , Business Administratioiz Sigma Nu, Sword and Shield '23 .Iwiy Society'3g Tower! Cross 4 1911 Prize Scholarship Award, Weekly, Circulation Mgr. 1, 2 3, 49 Jumble, Advertising Mgr. 3, Business Mgr. 4, AIEE 1 NSA 1, 2g Student Council 1 3 Pres 4' Class President 1 fl IFC 3, 4g Co-Ed. of Ivy Book 33 Class Day Com. Chm I KWRENCL B SLABINE 186 Wallis Rd Brookline Mass Gouernmenl Phi l4ps1lon P1 liack Lconomlc Club NBO'l C CHARLES H SNOW Dayton Lane E. Hampton, L. I., N. X Sociology Dean's List 2, 3, Intramural Football 3, 4, Softball 2, 3, 43 Luigi Club 1, 2, 3, 4, llodin Soc. 2, 3, 4g Republican Club 2, 4, Eco nomics Club 23 Ring Committee for Selection of All College Ring ALFRED I SPIELER 373 Knox St, Lawrence Mass B, S, Chemfiqtry-Biology Iarnbert-Kingsley 4' I reshman Honor Roll' Deans List 2 3 Liberal Union 3 t' Dcutche Verein 3 4' Hillel 1 2 3 4' Rodin Soc. 2 4- Pre-Medical Soc. 1 2 3 4- Band 1 2 3 4- I uigi Club 2 3 Major Dom04 42661 11.3. ' ' ' S A.B. . ' n ' . " ' B' S. KA' M.,A.x-.Nt . L 1 , . s Nw, , 'D 1, . 4 - H, Lgr-f, .1 ' , a - A-B-, . . , . arg a ,t 5 1 'A v if ,im 1 - ' :',, 'ltlll ,J " ,li KW' ll mga,-I QM' ' N 'fel' ellljl M. ill: 3fl,fy'l, YmWLg5ffi':1rf . . qi.-i' W? gr. lm? ly 'i-W' Li. :Nfl ,rf .ww lik, Y F.. Aullzli Y . I . X- ' me ll! s 1 J 'l ll'.'11f ff ,ll fl Xl X K, -I S- 'XXX I! XML' we ef H1433 1 If p 'Q b . ff, A, 4 , Il nn I " Y fl fllit.,Iuuulumu. f f. 'Ilia' i t l.Nl1.nr'.ll,lfVp zlfflfg hgalff. ig r " l ' f 1 ?'1.:iMf?ff2.l.25'li-T , f C ' fe l: 32 Hifi' I 'f 1 't1'r'..'?' ' f.."1'1,2,3.,L'f'1 ff: ill ll .1 r . .-., , v - L. .. - ...... 'xl ,lt 1,515 ,I f ,, , 5- by P .,.. .1 ' ' 1'-1,53 f A g , Ll' UI' .fr - 1 :if f1.L:l1',i " I -. . :Li - .1 og -1 ' 'K or rf' 3- , A i -gifs 4 gf LL ,S i . ,lg 4 E L ,5ff,-'.?,jggj,!gj Q 'Q-Q H i-si':-':'s'r1'q .,-. - - f r - -- L., ---T.. Lf, Q, - A-P.. . I.. . . . ff 7 A.B. ' ' ' - 4' ' .V tions History Club 1 2,4 3, 4,, epubhcan 'fly 2 al-Ji ra SEM: F :fa w --- ---1 W .4-. NORMAN HAROLD STAHL 90 Linden St. Manchester, N. H. A. B. History Alpha Epsilon Pig Dean's List 2, 3, fl, International Relations- History Club 3, fl-5 Young Republican Club 3, 4. HAROLD F. STEDMAN B. S. Chemistrg Chemical Soc. fl-g Member ol' ACS since 19493 AAAS. RICHARD F. S ERN DALE ff'- 8 Summit Ave. muupwfj M2I 8SS. B. S. f f Physics Zeta Psig F ootb fig aft ll ll ll I . ,lu I t l"fai1 llrlll l ll.. Ill ,ll A.B.,5g,.v U51 Q W, .. 1p1Taf,'.Sigrha ig Tufts t Clhb 2, 4-i New nan Club 2, 13 Law lgel llfl Watertown, Mass --.I L , . 1l" :Cixi ae" 11' ' l 'l 1. Mu'1' 1 - L l EWWWHWfW' QHQLQMXM ! :D 3' ' 'I ...A +51 :WJ l 'l X, Wllll1llill1lll.l., I' ' .greg R f f. Nfow1l.l,l will'- .L ,lil om ' x .A 3 X N Jxuvnas BLAIWN STONE 'I JI A X xl gl! S ml I I I lx I 1 1 ,G ' lu U 1, 'Q "'L5l,u i sfefub 3 L 'lchlllglt ' 811131311 rflthr1gl4I3leSrlli? N 4Iig'a,IlMiilH: ., A L ,'fl',,'f:-,fill ,.., A if AEM Q,.i.22:,dliflillA.l Mit? xl ChjTF MQwWMMHJUmfAf 5771? ' I l3llo.1f"vYf' I ' WE lil' , P, Z ?Lfa1m1def15l7E-1577? fiffnlffmmfffi lllexhationlal haialilllllllfl off L L- .gg - ,g ibet if ll llhllwfllf' 1. gf, '51 'li' 1+L+f,g.gfifd' h 'ge -..J - . " ,jxli l3:"' . fiwlii A-NL 443,542-r . . A Clzemistrg-Bialoggl Y A near R1 PIFRCF sT0UT 211 I' I ongmeadow, Mass B S ' 3"-Alpha Sigma Phig Track 1, 44, Soccer lg Swimming 1, 2, 3, fl, Intramural Sports. ELLIOT WILSON STRONG 33 Windsor Ave. West Acton, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Phi Beta Kappa, Lambert-Kingsley Society 3, 43 Pre-Medical Soc. 3, 4-3 Tufts-Jackson Chorus I, 2, 3, fl. BRUCE WILLIAM STRYKER 353 Johnson Ave. Englewood, N. J. A . B. Economics Delta Tau Delta, V.-Pres. 35 Intramural Swimming, Baseballg Phillips Brooks 1, 2, Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 43 TMC 1, Inter- national Pmelations-History Club 3, fl EDNVARD LEO SULLIVAN 38 Campbell St. Woburn, Mass. B. S. lllatlzenzalics Football 1, 2, 3, 4: Varsity Club, Newman Clubg Oil'-Hill Club: Mathematics Club. 42671 23 Avalon Rd. West Roxbury, Mass. Dean's Club 3, 4 ROBERT TAFT 87 Main St. Greenville, N. H. A. B. Government Theta Delta Chig Baseball, International Relations-History Clubg Phillips Brooks Club. PAUL P. TALMO 24 Hall St. Somerville, Mass. A . B . Economics MATTHEW FRANCIS TARKER, JR. 224 Ingram Ave. Pittsburgh 5, Pa. B. S. Chemistry Rodin Soc., American Chemical Soc.: Newman Club: Das Deutsch Vereing Luigi Club, OH'-Hill Clubg Yacht Club. THEODORE ANTHONY TASIS 50 West St. Fitchburg, Mass. B. S. Physics TMC 3, 4g Canterbury Club 4. GAVIN ANDREW TAYLOR, JR. 715 Belvidere Ave. Westfield, N. J. Sociology A . B. Alpha Tau Omega 1, 2, 3, 45 Sociology Club. ALBERT HENRY THOMANN 4 Valley St. Medford, Mass. A . B. History Dean's List 3, Football 23 Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4g Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4: History Club, Newman Club, Varsity Club. Sec. 4. RAYMOND BERNON TOURTELLOT 9 Penn Rd. Winchester, Mass. A. B. Mathematics Football 45 Mathematics Club. 12681- "F" B. S. Pre-Medical Club. EDWARD LEON TOWLE, JR. Pittsfield Rd. Chichester, N. H. A . B. History Dean's List 3, Wrestling 13 Track 1, Wardroom Club 1, 2, 3, Christian Science Organization 1, 2, 3, 45 Pres. 45 Tufts Tracer 1, 2, 3, Editor 23 Tufts-Jackson Chorus 2. LEONARD FRANCIS TRAVEIS 23 Dudley St. Cambridge, Mass. A . B. Chemistry-Biology Intramural Softball 1, Basketball 1, 2, 3, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Wardroom Club 4. BRUCE JAMES TRUESDALE 142 Playstead Bd. West Medford, Mass. A . B. History Sigma Nu, House M . 4, Intramural Football 2, 33 Intramural Swimming 3, Music Club 2, 3, 4, International Relations-History Club 4. WILLIAM F. TYLER 130 Brook St. Garden City, N. Y. A. B. History Zeta Psi 1, 2, 3, Pres. 49 Swimming 1, 2, 3, Co-Capt. 4-g Lacrosse 1. 2, 3, 4, Ivy Society, Sec.-Treas. of Tower Cross, International Relations-History Club 3, V.-Pres. 4, Class Marshal 1, 2, 3, 4. CARL II. VANVICK, JR. 21 Kenville Rd. Buffalo 15, N. Y. A. B. Economics Delta Upsilong Intramural Sports, Economics Club. WILLIAM EDWARD VAHGUS 145 Kemper St. Wollaston 70, Mass. A . B. Government Zeta Psi, Sec.-Treas.: Tennis 45 Sword and Shield 2, Supreme Council 2, Sec. 3, Treas. 4. EMMANUAL VOULGORUPOULOS 216 Broadway Lowell, Mass. Biology B. 2, 3, 12691- FLOYD G. WEBB 184 Furnace Brook Pkw. Quincy, Mass. Q l A . B. Biology Freshman Football, Newman Clubg Oil'-Hill Club, Bowling Team g CLARENCE J. W'HlTTENIOllE Park St., R. F. D. 3 Putnam, Conn. B. S. Clzemfistry-Biology Pre-Medical Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Rodin Soc. 1, 2, 3, 45 Wesley Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Luigi Club,3, 4, Chapel Choir 3. ,if .Am WHITTFMORE 10 Rockrldge Rd J. X' W lesley Hills Mass P ll rMc 3 4 OfI'H1ll Club 3 Af X mmogl FPFTH Fr GEORGE DUNCAN DONALJ WH E C 2 Holland Pk Sin apbre Malaya eta PS1 on occer 14 wx 1 ng 3 4 0 o ID l U 1 S LLPII ls S B iacwgogy 1 2 N Pres 3 Preslflhlr rgrbfi' It llallub 1 I, Teeasllibrlji ll Yacht Club l conomlcs Club 4 u gl Club 1 2 41 'VW fT"b" ' 1, ,Y H fy NWN XNVL ly X yu gill Zllfsg Arg-C L V 1 41 eI?1'y'St -4 WW Q E wigs Fizlllsjw io JL' 6511 ll ll lfulogfff P Hgzgisglstl ,lug d Q If Boclykalfubl 1123 ll gl? lil 11115: QM -MMP ml H llc fo gli li mliallll 'bl EEAWQII gillgmlme X ' omni 'ff Q-T gs? 1' 1 -52+ QUE ,I- IIAROLD EVLliL'I'Hl1-ILSON Box L86 BelZl'ELLm1Ln .Masag Clnmniwy Burlvgw Pre Medical Club 3 1 German Club 3 1 Conaxcgatxonal Club H RICHMOND WOODS IR 204 South Main St VVcsL Haxtford Conn Economics TMC 3 WILLI AM C WRIINN 59 Inman St Hopcdalc Mass Saczology Skinner I ellowshlp 2 Plea 3 111.111, l Umty Club 5 l- Phillips Blocks Club 2 t SHELDON D YICELB XUM 119 Waslnnoton St Dorchestex Mass B S Psychology -I270l' 43.5. I 1 jk 2- .... ' 3 l ' .ff-fb. li" . " , , - JA , 1 fl,:'g,l:,l...ai Q3 .B. I - W :Hb gx WC.. K . if ' 2 ' in-1 if pw liar! LVN! on 1 ' 393:71 i. MJ' ,X V' 'oe 15 Aly? ,lip . if X- lg"Ti1iSffEv1 lflolllmuiz , 'JJ Q I rlgfqw 1 f,,.-C115-,V Qui-'Qgr?ifflz' , ,,,,, X lf, X3 A! ' A AL xl. lL-N11 , f W x -1 flf f,."il" ?""'l f 1 - f 'lf H 1 EP". ffw 1 ff d HE.. fl .ix -' ' lfyi ' V- ,gi , Y 1.4-: SA, '- 1... We' ly UU Sxlulllfilnuiil EE QQ TI 11 V. !l imlllllffllfrfullqlllfklU-ELI 'NHL-if lr' l - - A il " ll- :Vu ' --iff 1 ' 'f 1- - 2.7. -I y .1 li . 'Q 'I f 4 Q f ..-lt 'll' F3-if 25?.-gQef7- -A--fi-3 as-I , , ,C '. f-E 'Q 3,4-O U l i ' 11.13. R L' V ' l 1' ' SHIRLEY LOUISE AKELEY Box 264 Presque Isle, Me. A. B. English Alpha Xi Delta, Wesley Club 23 Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4, Chapel Choir 1, 2, 3, 4-g Odikon 2, 33 Chorus 2, 3. LUCILLE TE RESA AZZARONE T6-35-113 St. Forest. Hills, N. Y. B. S. Biology Newman Club, TMC. NANCY BARNARD 61 Cleveland St. X. Arliiigpfiirrl B S 4,-,ff f' Geo ogy Alplia Xi Delta, V.-Pres A-',m1iiLoek and DFUll1llHvSflE., Sec. 2, 3, Chorus 1, Jumbq,BooliPLub. 2, Art Stall' 3, Layout 4. ffWll.QfllM+ 2.S5?miis iilf' w ill l . H ill ll' A'0'b3Zali 4 F1oifefff1f1f'2"'l"i-eLE.liE fi1? '1G2P G?"f,,S1L?Wi.?1,,?.' lr rlil A A fi flwfwrekly 1, 21 5 'lla Qi lk ,Yi in ii I in.-- A 'PIX l lui I A ii i i'l'H'y,,, ,.L, I X il J lla: 2 V ,Vif fliifl-ii Ti' ,Q . fb juli W3 ' 5 T2 'CI-IAiil oi' Al 1: Tlll i- L QV, ' A , A?lfsl?5" f BI l.' - i fi-Ely: V li b E-l "Le ielki 2 -" 1 :"" l ' 'l 1' V ' 4 l mimiii l liumhllhl if 3- N W, 'B f i ' M ,.l,wI,1lll!lilMiIWllll V7-ll XB, , y W A, :sl -1u'.+ f igmk Min, 4 ,f is ',E.!1TwM3 1iig22m,,,,,,j,1 i,lgl 'gll p 2,15 'iwi-g,,lJQ"vs Vyinch , ,iS,,, ,.,,i 1h.,W Riff'hits'-l'Ql1v1muUfw fifgy fp Tgggzgj on iq, s iiillillllllp V ,.1-.--..,,.g- 1-1 is . W 1 04 ' i 1" ffl ...1 ,,..,,. Lf. .-- -W is-V ?-5 i'T'Y E-li, i-4155 iT? A ,Q SHERMAN BLOOBP- i 31g,Bl1ssell'St.i ' Melrose, Mass. A. BI French Congregational Club 1, 2, 3, fl-g Sec. 2, French Club 3, 43 V.-Pres. 43 Chapel Choir 2, 3, 4. ELIZABETH ANN BOTTOMLEY 8 Elton Hd. Barrington, ll. 1. W A . B. V English. Freshman Prize Essay, 3 P's 2, 3, Promotion Mgr. fig Tuftonian 25 Junior Ed. 33 Senior Ed. 4. MARGARET M . BOUDREAU 143 Princeton SIL. East Boston, Mass. A . B. French Alpha Omicron Pig Archery Varsity, French Club, Newman Club. SANDRA BETH BURSTEIN 485 Washington SL. Brookline, Mass. B. S. Biology Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4, Oil'-Hill Club 1, 2, 3, 4, German Club fl-. 4 271 1' Lislwmmmm www- Q. 67 F ogg Rd. A. B. Business Chi Omega, Rush Chair. 3, Treas. 4, Dean's List 3, Team 1, 2, Phillips Brooks Club 1, Sec. 2, 3, Pres. 4 Yacht Club 1, 2, 4, Jackson All-Around Club Sophomore Hep. 2, Treas. 3, Chorus 1, 2, 3, Treas. 4, Class of 1952 Treas. 2, 4. MARY CIAMPA 50 Everett St. Everett, Mass. B. S. Chemistry Gamma Phi Beta, Oil'-Hill Basketball, Oil'-Hill Club, Newman Club, Chemia, Transfer from Boston University. CONSTANCE CLARK 11 Hurd Rd. Belmont, Mass. A. B. English Alpha Omicron Pi, Wesley Club, Oii'-Hill Club. BEVERLY R. COHEN 6 Elmway St. Providence 6, R. I. A . B. History Alpha Xi Delta, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, United World Federalists 2, International Relations-History Club, NSA Purchase Card Chair. 3, V.-Pres. 4, Hillel, Jackson Student Government 3, Jumbo Book 3. ' MARITA DOROTHEA COURSEY 9 Maple Ave. Medford, Mass. B. S. Chemistry Badminton 4, Chorus lg Band 1, 2, Yacht Club 2, 3, 4, Marling 3, 4, Chemistry Society 2, 3, Treas. 4. RACHEL ANN CRAVEN 3019 Dunleer Rd. Dundalk, Md. A . B. English Chi Omega, Varsity Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Softball 1, 2, 3, 4, Sentennial Sentinals, JAA, V.-Pres. 4,, Marlin Club, Publicity Mgr. 3, 4, Chapel Committee 1, 2, 3, 4, Weekly 2, 3, Jumbo 3, 4, Jumble 3, 4, Marshal ol' Freshman Class. JOYCE MAUREEN DANA 42 Rangeley Rd. Winchester, Mass. B. S. Biology Chi . Omega, Varsity Field Hockey 1, 2, Varsity Tennis 1, 2, Freshman Essay Contest, Unity Club 1, Newman Club 3, 4. 412721- 1 1 .sw V Q , . i EZQSQ fikfn s if--:ss-if if! NANCY DAVIS 261 Fletcher St. Kennebunk, Maine A. B. French ADELE LOUISE DERBY 16 Burton St. Arlington, Mass. B. S. Mathcfnatics Varsity Bowling 2, 3, 45 Intramural Basketball 2g Off-Hill Club 1, 2, 3, Pres. 4g Math Club 43 Hillel Club 1, 25 Mayoralty Council 45 Junior Dance Committee 3. GLORIA TEFTI DRULIE 41 Willow St. Belmont, Mass. A. B. ' Hixlory Tennis team 3, 4g Canterbury Club 49 Liberal Union 45 Inter- national-Relations and History Club 3, 4: Orthodox Club 4, Phillips Brooks 4, Transfer from Lasell Junior College. IONE TERESA DUGGER 164 Jerome St. Medford, Mass. A . B. Sociology Alpha Kappa Alpha, Bowling varsity, Oil'-Hill Club 1, 2, 3, 45 Sec. 43 Chorus 1, 2, 33 Odikon 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec.-Treas. 3, 4, Student Council Oil'-Hill Rep., V-Pres. and Sec., Jr. Class of '52. MARY LOUIS EDGERTON 205 School St. Belmont, Mass. A. B. Sociology Chi Omega, Off-Hill 2, 3, 43 Congo Club 2, 3, 4, NSA 2, 3, 4. ANNE MARIE ELLIOTT 740 Penn Ave. West Reading, Pa. B. S. Geology Hockey 3, 4, Softball 3, 4, Basketball 3, 4, Rock and Drumlin Soc. 3, Sec. 45 Tufts Yacht Club 3, 43 TMC 3, 49 Transfer from Bates College 3. SARA LOUISE EMERY York Beach Maine B. S. Biology Alpha Xi Delta, Hist. 43 Dean's List 2, 35 Lambert-Kingsley 3, 4g Congregational Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Rec. Sec. 35 Pre-Medical Soc. 1, 2, 3, Rec. Sec. 4. 3, 4, Junior -I 273 I- A- 2, IANET WHITCOMB GARDNER 7 8 Chandler Rd West Medford Mass Economzcs Clu Omeoa Dean s List 3 LAURA LOUISF GAVHLLIS 8 Summit Rd Medford Mass Sociology Alpha Omicion P1 Rush Chair .3 Red Sec 4 lfield Hockey 1 2 3 4 Capt 2 Basketball 1 2 3 4 Capt 2 Mgr 3 Softball Mgr 1 2 JAA .3 Herbert 'Spencer Society 4 Jackson All Around Club Off Hill Club 1 2 Rep 3 Ccntenial Sentinals 4 Plllll1pS Brooks Club 1 2 Student Government 2 3 L Class Pics 5 4 Tufts Counoxl 5 4 7 DI' 'h.,11USS Gllll N 210 Bay State Bd l I Boston Mass B Q English Canterbury Club XX it MH lll 310 Silver St IULIEILLIZI, S1 l 'N :D veSr0c1LlJI0H Sigma Kappa 3 P s 2A ,xgfiy di W J TT -HI K fi ll fillull A il V MHIHSL fwblfl A hui HUYMLLLT1 In E Q1E Eliilggfjb' Soc w aim-s L g if lg ed ec 9151, f 5 ill llllllllllllllll f 36 ILE In I , 'W , .. y - Q. 7 -. 'V ' ylll will .' 9, A K . . E .Yuri 2. lm'Hiiig113f'i3l-" 7.4ff3Vj fslietb ,1 1 t ee B HliS1xi1nar" EiE: 1 -.: .4 r I i- 1' Sh l, in iififma in - Ou ipwlul ,ff L.. E Ei 54,7 -' rr?-My-P ---- --:.-- . Y if ir H ii, , . V- W , if '-nr- 71 V -V V: . f , K 1-tin hi ,..,,,--- f ..,. .., , L-:il-1 -1 my n n n i 77.1 3, f- --V 322 N.lult6mbgi.... ' ' -f . ' en:Na5A- . . "' Q in Y C Sociology - Dean s List 1 9 5' Jackson itudent Council 3' Modern Dance, H Y ' Group 1' Hillel 1 2 3 '4' Corres:Sec. 2 V. Pres. 3' Liberal, K N 'Union 1 2 3 4 V.-Pres. L' International Relations-History 1 Club 3 4' TMC 1' Canterbury Club 2. V ' JANE WORTH HARBAUGH 315 Plainfield Ave. Floral Pa1'k N. Y. . . . History Chi Omega Pledge .lrainer 4' Dean s List 2 3 4' Varsity Tennis 1 2 3 4' Varsity Badminton 2 3' International Relations- History Club 2 3 bee.-lreas. 4' Student Government V.-Pres. 4' Chapel Committee 2 3 4' Canterbury Club 1 2' Jumbo Book 1 2 Co-Literary Ld. 4. MARJORIE HARSHAW 94 lnlin St. Andox er Mass. , , English Alpha Xi Delta' Varsity Badminton 2' FMC 1 4' Fufts-Jackson Chorus 1' Canterbury Club 2 3 4' Russian Club 3 4' 'Student Government, KLICE ELEANOR HAYDEN 133 Church qt. Milton Mass. , , History Alpha Ornieron Pi' Dean s List 2 3' History Club 4' OIT-Hill Club 1' Minstrel bhow 2 3. 12741 4 f 1-if .4.B. ' , i I ' 1 f ' M- .. ,.i' - "rjgC1wIi,,- , is . J - , . A. . V it .R lin p - ii .- ' ' 1 ' 1 ' . . I I li "1 I . ' , . . . -3- M91 i , o. ,gy W 1 H31 tlll . ',' lllul 'I ,Al L ai I It f lil' 'rf l i lll WMM cw ,. M lvl - 6 ,rl l 1- ft I '-l K Cf ILIF4 . 191 U i P X fl "T . 31,1 A 'xllx HW I ' 1 - 'M L J' ' I ll ' 1' C 'H 3. -.2 ilslia D I WB MLX -'l fr i -' 11115 A ' Fr r v 17 . 'p - 1 I' 1 1 11 'lf ii ', 2x31 -, e AJ!! 4, Bra 01. fu. li' ill DHA V ii f' fi I E . Q J ' ' -fa vi E' lg ling. '88 W WE4 il? -.-' fl -7, Arlillxlf ,uelgnvlflf Y-CCC 'gi l- 1 Chv an 'ii I inf' iF ' " IU! N' 1 4 ' , ' 'I' ' 'i V, ' 531 ff ' C lit m y . r' . f LE 'ii l I G: ' all 9 : ' H 1 Y C , ls nllulflf, f-. X A X A gg L it A 'H' 1 .wr-r :wx I' K ... ,,, ,,, 7 4 ' ,.. is V , TT- A B , 1 4 B H i Y A B V V V l A B 1 , ' v 7 1, 1 , , , ns., , I1 in-11,1-gg Q ll l ,, ALTHEA HOLLAND 106 Summer St. Fitchburg, Mass. A . B. History Chi Omega, Social Secy. 4, Modern Dance Group 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3, IR-H 2, 3, fl-5 Phillips Brooks Clubg Class Historian 1, 2, 3, 4-. OLIVE ETHEL HOLMES 4-4 Prospect St. Newburyport, Mass. B. S. Chemislry Chem Soc. 2, 3: Yacht Club 2, 3, Phillips Brooks Club 1, Chorus 1. A PIIYLLIS IIOIT 5 Park St Middleb Mas filgblfmi' 'lravelli Scholarship Dearllllglllli-rs'f1 2 3 4 Laurfert Kingsley Soc 3 4 Congreg,at1onal"Club 1 2 3 4 Pre Med Club 1 3 4 ec 3 Student X H use res 2 I Stonehr 'an el l fl Spungheld Vt. ' fl ' lla B, 5, 1 ll Biologv I l'fwl1H1lpd1l1lX1 lD lta cial Chr li I e n s List ll Lam ell. Kingsley 4 re Med I bjl S lf 4 ngregational 0 ll 4 Secy 3 14- ll! l"fA hw l lllldnl ff' l l T fi' Sa t NNCF'AD1IlQHQ r Q2 M 4 ,la l llorus ,llmnnuna , I W4 , si 's la a 1 lkgulga gon will ll ,D 4:1 v y Gaiam! rg D n U vellsrqy fhl Q r , f, 1 l M llllvlll' f 1 if' SFIJORENCP LILA HUBBARD 29673 Buclia'naFS1: Arlington Va. Education gina Kappa' Student Council 1 4' Dormitory Pres. 4. LILELN MARY HURLEY 99 Pleasant St. Ayer Mass. B History Phi Beta Kappa' Dean s List- Archery Mgr. 3' IR-H 1 Secy.- Treas 4- Canterbury Club 1 2 3 4' Debating, Club 1' Orchestra ELIZABETH ANN IFI' LAND Beecher St. lor1ing,ton Conn. . . Psychology 3 P s 3 Sccy. 4' NSA 3 1' FMC 1 2 3 Secy. 4. ANNI I I 'IIABI4 TH 'Il NKINS 136 Hawthorn Bd. Braintree Mass. A . B. Education Sigma Kappa, Rec. Secy. 3, Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, Head Cheer- leader 4g Modern Dance Group 1, 2, 3, 4, Field Hockey 2, 3, Dormitory Social Chm. 4. 42751 ff ,i S I ll. 'llillflivlmllwllllll'H1l" flf 1 Il flillq .1 ll- ll ll , Will 1' ll' ' -' - , V ll 1-ull ml -' f lllliiizmm -. . , fill 7 il i X L' Lf' Nl mm km lll l xr 'lm' W 1 A , l ix 4, 1 ,X Alb - lglks. I , 'll lil' all 'V J ', l ' llll gi f ,F 'l.Fiy. l,,. ,ll - il. lv- , Lf - ffl J jizz' 'Li fill ? . H, 1 .l wI31HP-A , u1u!.uunmu ,? X lu: li l '.!,4.l . ' li 3 ll ' 1'-1, lr w wly -fy1f5lU'1Hr'l' sill ,' S J ig- iliillrrlzll .le l l. 1nl....11Qf Hg 'I ,. ja' 'l, U.i,. JV: X ll -l ' ' 1 N l ll. .. ll1n'.' lf lm l y jf Y, lillnlmup' QF! f'1 . .L fiuifl p-M-' I . 4 15 yr y as Q Dfiizilnis A ' A-Q 5 . . I A 1? . . H ' ' I 3' 1 vw in ull af' ll ' lui: ' Nu 1 . ' sw ,y V ,fe , . - ,f ll p .1... . ,C .LLM LW. . H ,Q l.l 7 ' BARBARA ELEANOR KEANE 131 Laurel St. Newport, N. H. A . B. English Chi Omega, Phi Beta Kappa, Dean's List, Basketball 1, 2, 3, Jumbo Book 3, Weekly 1, 2, Band 1, 2, 3, Pres. 4, Math Club 1, 2, Secy-Treas. 3, 4, IR-H 3, 4, Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, V.-Pres. 4, Student Council 3, Pres. 4. ARLENE MARY ELIZABETH KELLEY 136 VVoodside Ave. Waterbury, Conn. B. S. Biology Chi Omega, Lambert Kingsley Society 3, V.-Pres. 4, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, Varsity Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 1, 2, 3, Soft- ball 1, 2, 3, Capt. 4, JAA, Treas. 3, Pres. 4, Chorus 1, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, Modern Dance Group 2, 3, Sentenial Sentinals 4, Cheerleader 3, 4, Class Treas. 3, V.-Pres. 4, Minstrel Show 2, 3. DOROTHEA KELTON 1 Kenwood St. W. Somerville, Mass. A . B. English Dean's List 2, 3, Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4, Wesley Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Choir 2, 3, 4, Orchestra 1, Band 2. CONSTANCE LOVELL KEMBALL 179 Linden St. Everett, Mass. B. S. Mathematics Philips Brooks Club 1, 2, Yacht Club 1, 2, 3 P's 3, Business Mgr. 4. CLARA ANN KLEBSATTEL 306 Lenox Ave. South Orange, N. J. A . B. History Alpha Xi Delta, Treas. 4, Dean's List 3, 4, Swimmin Team 1, 2, International Relations-History Club 3, 4, TMC hihillips Brooks Club 3, 4, NSA Committee 3, 4, D. P. Committee, Jackson Student Government 4. JOYCE E. KRAUS 860 Fifth Ave. New York, N. Y. B. S. Psychology Psi Chi, Dean's List 3, 4, Tufts Yacht Club, TMC, D. P. Council, Chemical Soc., Hillel, lnternational Relations-History Club, Film Soc., Tufts Student Council, NSA, Chair. 1, 2, Treas, 4, Pres. 4. PHYLLIS CLAIRE KUEHL 35 Evans St. Medford, Mass. A . B. Sociology Dean's List 1, 3, Band 1, Assist. Librarian 2, Librarian 3, Student Mgr. 4, Phillips Brooks Club 1, 2, 3, Treas. 4, Oil'-Hill Club, Rock and Drumlin Soc. 3, Weekly 4. 42761 , r V. ,-.2 fx PENELOPE ARNOLD LANE LUCY MARIE MACALI MARGOT LYDIA MALAGODI v it LORIS GAY LAKSO 46 Louisa St. Fitchburg, Mass. A . B. Business Administration Sigma Kappa, Corres. Sec. 2, 2nd V.-Pres. 3, lst V.-Pres. 4, Dean's List 1, 33 Modern Dance Group 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3g Economics Club 3g Jumbo Book 3, Jackson Ed. 43 Stratton Hall Sing Leader 2, 3, 4. 572 Ridgewood Ave. Glenridge, N. J. A . B. Business Administration Varsity Softball 1, 2, 3g Economics Club 2, 3, 4, International Relations-History Club 2, 3, 4g Congregational Club 1, 2, 3, Sec. 23 Bridge Club 1, 2. JOAN AMELIA LENTINO 363 Mystic St. Arlington, Mass. B. S. Biology Alpha Xi Delta. JEAN DeWOLF LITTLEFIELD 25 Chapman St. Groton, Conn. A . B. English Chi Omega, Pres. 4g Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 45 Phi Beta Kappa 4, Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4, Sec. 4, International Relations-History Club 3, 4, Sec. 4g Congregational Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Chapel Com- ,g-. mittee 3, 45 Jumbo Book 2, 3g Weekly 2, 3g Class Secretary 3, Class Marshal 4. FAITH KINSEY LOOK CMRSJ By-Pass North Andover, Mass. A . B. Education Alpha Omicron Pig Marlin Club, Phillips Brooks Club. I U . f ft X 620 East John St. Little Falls, N. 1 . B. S. Chemistry Alpha Omicron Pi, Scholarship Chairman 43 Dean's List 1, 2, 3g Chorus 1, 2, Newman Club 1, 2g Chemical Soc. 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3. 67 Robin St. West Roxbury, Mass. B. S. Geology Rock and Drurnlin Soc. 1 3 Pres 4' TMC 2 3 4, Sec. 3, V Pres 4' A 42771 Woi ld NANCY AI-TSENG MIAO Liaoning China A. B. History PRISCILLA JANE MILBURY 22 Webster St. Haverhill, Mass. B. S. Biology-Chemistry Lambert-Kingsley 45 Pre-Med Club 3, 4, Chorus 1, Chapel Choir 2, 3, Congregational Club 1, 2, 3, 4. BETH MILIJER 250 Ward St. ' ,J L v , Newton Centre, Mass. A.B. J" li ll, Sociology Alpha Xi Delta, Dean's It5tf3gWlN',EJA 35 SWirl'l1niE4. 'Jax L '5?5E--fa' ' 'z::g 'g PHYLLIS PA1Lmhr,a,yf llr,, 1 ,ii fi River Rd J , 7 5' W" l1'.'i"lW llllfl Yardley Pa LJUCI f Ly l W ' L E Bwlogy p a i eta, 'ars MZ... "I ': "ills ' tk, Hg, 8,3615 f M ...J f .lgl L flirt, 1, ' ' , 4. - , ub' ,3. 491s 1 . 'E 'Y Kmgsley Steward 354 Ere Me lm Bl I eyglm N Club 2, Modern Da1i?5e'G5oggrp1,3l ' ' 1' ' lf' 'f --. 1!4 ', I I, 1:-,l l ,yi-L.-Q Uh, q. ML'-rp! 'wk ,lil w 'lfIl,' JW! Llf-f" lv X kiln 12 i All ' L fill, LM Q f X gtg, , E 'LMY1 5,4933 U L'-1 4, L X I V ' ' UL f ,,, , at J' ll!! ai 'ijt ff, -.. l 1' J ,fgalxylrrw iyglllqiuir. .26054S?efTQI'g1T wr W J l,rWi,'rrra,.n:.g,frf All-' .' llllllml it if fir' at , "' st entfi, llllllllllllllz 1 5 53 ,i.A. f ,Q xl. C 5 L milf I 'E k I P H ' 1, .. fE:.-1, A ,dw l M 'M w e l - 1 Lfllrlgllly g f Billlpgll 1. .,'Xlr1Wi1iaLuln' ll'i'L lgzig W. J l . 'nnuuuum l1ll'?5??ifi1l l4b--fi-lfellgg 5133. 7 l I l 'l Q A Y-F: VY HAY-W P KY v 1 if-A ig, C-.- C , ,- nf, A . e i'i'e'j"t' 2' to w -L f .1--W ff- - f'-5 ' " 1 . W I 2-1-gg--.,C.,,,.----,.....-Tw - ll r C C LL- if -4-'NI 113,-ei?-1ii?x!:si l l l lfWn , h e' 41, 3 Morelandwlill? - "'.I1iiLQi1incy4,M l' ' J, A. B. :T ,:r:::J--- .-,- Hmm:-L.i..-:,f Alpha Xi Delta, PanlTe'llenic' CoI1ncil:2:Seo.gQlh1ea,s,j.,VPres,-4- ' 'pf Dean's List 2, 4, Badminton 2, 3fCirTterhury-Club-1, 234341-apel : f' Choir 1, 2, 3g Chapel Comm. 2, 3, 4, Chorui 2, 3jCClass1caF-" 5' Music Club 2, 3, Congregational Club 1, 2, 3, Vice-Pres. 3, Education Club 2, Treas. 35 I. R.-H. Club 2, 3, Odikon Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Republican Club 1, 2. ELLEN CELESTINE MURPHY 36 Maple St. Manchester, Conn. A. B. English Weekly 35 Chorus 1, 2, 3, 43 Canterbury Club 2, 3, 45 Odikon 2, 4. SHIRLEY MARIE NELSON 2300 S. W. 6th St. Miami, Fla. A. B. Engl-ish Alpha Xi Delta, Bowling Team 2, 3, Mgr.g Jumble 3, Weekly 3, Tuftonian 2, 35 Tufts Yacht Club 1, 2, 3, 4, All-Around Club lg Mixed Chorus 25 Student Council 3. NANCY NUTTER 3 Black Horse Terr. Winchester, Mass. A . B. Drama Swimming 13 Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4, 3 P'sg Tuftouian 4, Mayoralty Commission 2, 3. 42781 -, .vig 1 PATRICIA O'DONOVAN 195-08 37th Ave. Flushing, N. Y. A - B- English Alpha Phi, Dean's List 3, Canterbury Club, T uftonian 4, Junior Transfer from Duke University. CAROL O. PECK 15 Oxford St. Somerville, Mass. A - B- History International Relations-History Club 4, Canterbury Club 1, TMC 1, Oil'-I-Iill Club 2, 3. DOROTHY JOYCE PERKINS 42 Rothsay Gardens Hamilton, Ontario A. B. Z ,.-- I vSogia1'6Ey Sigma Kappa, Co1'res. S6CQifliLllD6ElIl,S List 3, Phillips Brooks Club 2 3 'L fr' ' 1 .0 ,. 1 l ,Z 'fl .1 "H " f - 'ree 5: ,Q If ii ' ,, ff, ,I , Sanford, Me. ' - ,:,,..,.q,, ,,,..2 4,5 , If I. ,Mr 1 ' , mPiIliiiiXRE'lP,IIvEI3ihiiILl3S li if 1 1 ft 1 1 1 , il '1yi1ll"'H1,N"Uh, Hill, nl! iii ,1 ll ' lui E11 lzsh A-B-KW WL 1 '- 1- wflv' ig 'viildellerii -ou1icil"3, 4, Swimming 2, Jumbo ii", Vi"'lW'f.T,iBo'ok' 4,-'Marl fy,Qlub 3, ,oisxg Chapel Committee 2, 3, ft. fi Mis 'Pickles ox vii ml" by the Rtatioiiavwickle Packers ,.,:: " - l X 5 , ' N 1 N I r L i il ' i li ' l i --A-yr-,rf mm C .., rea, ,,,.,,t .,, ii M llkl , hifi L ri 1 'Afrfilbi i Ci it illf. ,pg -:FL f, T JOAN ,ADELLE VPIDLSRURV, My ,, ,rg I1,el5",'b . ' wx' W 'Maine - yi 1- X I E -,X srl! 'iv ,xxx 'y If A 2 it fe get eazrlifi A . i? 'ai . M I' i"V?'t'i',1C iw A , fail ,227 M ' " LW 1, 'xgxllli Fl, wif Q ,riiljlrrgfilllirrlil 'fl ,X '.f P ,,,.. i Q1 V ,' Y a .' IWW. fi , L i A I lv! lg A ,ILM 'tlqrfltlxilfluxg CKERD. 2 V - - iifiuil' ws 1, -'my ,I .rg , SJ 1002? A 1 mawnmalwy irttamaaaggatfidtgwt ,,,vx'1 "M ai iiw iaililoeki ima ltllllli ,, ,1SiCHl av cup 'j2g?gQojigi' Wion ,,NCq1bi31Q V.-Pres., , x '33, 4, f iMvzQQ , BW V QLQQIIIIILI' , 2,1 3, 4,l1LQIlZta 1fCl'ioili 1, 25 1 Qhegal., 0 ' -3 -,V 1, , 'f - 1, nfiffffii, - Y ' "' " ' fr I X ,X-I-,Q it-,t6U,llh1L! y, , 5, ,i -- -1 , Y YYWY - i I I I - L CC , ,4Q,-- L., H, r A 2- - - - ,fp - 4.- ,,,.,s-- e-- ifiigi rt, , ' lf ' - ---- '--N L,,,, - NORMA ELIZABETH REED 12 Valley Park St. 'West Medford, Mass. A, B, Economics Alpha Omicron Pi, Dean's List 2, 3, Basketball 2, 3, 4, Hockey Mgr. 2, Newman Club 1, fl-, Oli'-Hill Club 1, Minstrel Show 2, 3, IL. MARGARET MA RY REINHALTER 93 Verchild St. QUiIlCy, MHSS- A B English Sigma Kappa, Corres. Sec. 3, Pan-Hellenic Council fl-, Canter- bury Club 1, 2, 3, fl-, Tufts-Jaeksori Chorus 4, Minstrel Show 2, 3. NANCY ANN RICHMOND 22 Ma,-atl-1011 SL, Arlington, Mass. A, B. Jllusic 3 P's 3, 4, Odikon 2, 3, Chorus 2, 3. CONSTANCE J. ROGERS 500 East Center St. Manchester, Conn. A, B, History Chi Omega, Soc. Chair. 3, V.-Pres. 41, Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, Dance Group 2, 3, 4-Q Wesley Club, International Relations- History Club 2, 3, 4, Student Government. 42791 w 1 'J i aa, Lg, l ll l F 5 ? 1 3 1 6 Eaton Ave. Norwich, N. Y. A. B. Education Alpha Omicron Pi 1, 2, 3, V.-Pres. 4, Dean's List 3, Modern Dance Group 2, 3, Sec-Treas. 41, Archery 2, 3, 4, Jumbo Book, Wesley Club 2, Chorus 1, Education Club 2, Student Govern- ment, V.-Pres. 3. l DOROTHY M. SKINNER 4-A I-Iilltop Rd. Watertown, Mass. B. S. Chemistry-Biology Phi Beta Kappa 3, 4, Lambert-Kingsley 3, 4, Field Hockey 2, Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Marlin Club 3, 4, JAA, Pres. 3, Jackson Outing Club, Chairman 2, Jackson All-Around Club, Sec. 2, V.-Pres. 3, Pres. 4, Chorus 2, Classical Music Club 2, Chapel Comm. 3, 11, Student Government 3, 4. LOIS L. SMITH '76 Vista Ave. Medford, Mass. B. S. Biology Varsity Basketball, Softball 1, Newman Club 1, 2, Sec. 3, V.-Pres. 4, Oli'-Hill Club 1, Republican Club 3. PATRICIA J. SMITH 27 Summit Ave. Sharon, Mass. A. B. Education Dean's List 3, Chorus 1, Varsity Club Minstrel Show 3, Education Club 3, 4, Canterbury Club 4-. JOANNE C. STEERE 161 Carr St. Providence, R. I. A . B. Engl-ish Freshman Honor Roll, Dean's List 2, 3, German Club 1, Educa- tion Club 3, 4, Yacht Club 2, Canterbury Club 2, 3, 4. ANNIS MARY THOMPSON 38 Long Dr. Hempstead, N. Y. B, S, Chemistry-Biology Dean's List 3, Newman Club 3, fl-. DOROTHY MARY VANCO 91 Marlborough Terr. ' Bridgeport 5, Conn. A, B, Music Dean's List 3, Bowling Team 2, Tufts-Jackson Chorus 1, 2, 3, , Odikon 1, 2, 3, Pres. 4, Weekly 1. V 42801 A. Q 4. MARJORIE ANN VIANO 200 Pleasant St. Arlington 74, Mass. B. S. Biology Chi Omega, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 45 TMC 15 Pre-Medical Club 4-5 Oil'-Hill Club 23 Junior Dance Committee 3. NANCY RIDEOUT WILLIAMS 27 Morton Rd. Swampscott, Mass. A. B. Music Chi Omegag Varsity Hockey 1, 2, 4g Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 33 Softball 1, 2, 3, 4g Golf, JAA CSoph. Rep. and V.-Presjg Sentennial Sentinalsg Jumbo Book 47 Sophomore Class Pres.g Minstrel Show 2, 3. EILEEN E. WOLFE 2121 Westbury Court Brooklyn, N. Y. A. B. Government Sigma Tau Deltag Oli'-Hill 3, 43 Liberal Union 35 Transfer from Brooklyn College. MARY-LOUISE WOOTTEN Gibsonville North Carolina A. B. Sociology Alpha Omicron Pig Badminton 1, 2, 3, 43 Marlin Club 3, 4, Chorus lg TMC 1. BARBARA PATRICIA YOUNG 70 Fairmount Rd. Ridgewood, N. J. B. S. Mathematics Math Club 3, Pres. 43 Transfer from Randolph Macon 1. t . . 1 A to I it LIBERAL ARTS NON-PICTORIALS HAROLD M. ALLEN, JR. GEORGE FISHER ESTEY BERNARD M. 2 Fern St. Lawrence, Mass. 2 Garden Court Cambridge, Mass, 2709 Ocean Ave. N Y, B.S. Psychology A.B. English BAS'- KOW NKENSEN ARPAAH JAMES ARTHUR GOEWY LAWRENCE JOSEPH Winneha Gold Coast West Africa 9 Gedney Way Newburgh, N,Y, 115 Saint Rgsg St, Jamalca A .B . Economics A .B. Ecgngmigj . RICHARD STANLEY BLINSTRUB EDWARD A. GORDON 34 Beacon St. Chestnut Hill, Mass. Lowell SL, B.S. Chemistry-Biology B,S, KENNETH GLENN BOYER IQUSSELL LLOYD Bl'l1l1SWiCk, Maine 6 Elmwood St. B.S. Physics 3.5, ROBERT EARL BROWN 11 Harold St. Medford, Mass. 39 Be,.niSIg?BERT A.B. Education A.B. ' ' PAUL ANDREW BRYAN 4-1 Summit Rd. Port Washington, N.Y. 72 Eugitlgf CLIFFORD A.B. Sociology B S ' ' CHARLES M. CIIAPPELL ' ' ALLAN D Carter St. Berlin, Mass. Upland Rd A .B. English .B. ' MALCOLM STUART COLGATE TI.IOMAS J Stearns Village Medford, Mass. 3 Madison Ave ' A .B. Sociology A .B. ' JAMES DAVID DICKSON 23 Harvard Ave. Brookline, Mass. 35 Saga,n053Ui,i1ZLL A .B. Economics BLS' ROBERT JAMES DUFFY ARTHUR BOYD 40 Burns Ave. Quincy, Mass. 18 Church St. A.B. Business Administration A .B. CARLOS P. ECHEVERRIA JOSEPH WILLIAM JOLLY, JR. 33 E. Central Ave. Moorestown, N.J. 26 High St. North Wilmington, Mass. Chadwick Masq A.B. Economics A.B. Sociology A'B- L' 42811 JIQQ. A .. RICHARD APALAKIAN 429 Union St. Franklin, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering AIEE. JOHN AARRADEN ARTHUR 71 Oak St. Milton, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering ASCE. K'-, A 'l LEON' JOSEPH WTAMIAN 43 Pleasant Hill Avfei N, Dorchester, Mass. B. S. .f '7 img, aichanical Engineering Dean's List 2, 33 ASME.' 'f' 1 ,, TN lv . . , ,.wpi.ll5jafg'?'rT3lqlfj H ll ' WALTERl RIY ' 5 Timothy Ave. L, in I., l q lnlbfyerettl, Mass. B. S. , N' Ida wi. f Wm -T! IV'-W X if 1 +1 al- Baseball lg ASME. fri LL, ,- 'Eglin I ewal, Q1wr-H-L,,f4- IM ri 'Im -A-filwc -itll!! llll-'N' Jill" :fll....!lil5il 1' I Qgvgrl I X, ,YL W llmlnwfl an l-JL , l aff 1 jdfl QAVKY1' . ...,,. ,..vf7 Qi- L'ff' - ,455 -avr: F, x lnfl ,XXWXXN X1ifX.Xll'llAij,:4Sllllllgglllll I an ,api 20 . is uA.ll X, lfll r' 'lf . 2-Pfl l H all mllillil lata Sig . ' -a 5 .. Q1iNl'99'i'f-111.115 acft ubpuii . l L llllllllllltllhlllilgl all Y ' TV oo TI 5 llfrif W l!fARD'i'Ai,,,flNABD,.BArY,BUTI'g fl - gg l711lc.913,11 Mail' lil i75pg,K1?,5j12 Newton Hifn glg ., 'll51Il:llll"' ll- ll 'llllllliU'lTfi'l?l' I Ci ill... lx ,N , ggalg 1iptvangnral1SportsiASCdll. my lima M T .L ',lfM...l,,l, ll ly Qff.f'7fiiiAa:-A Q S I I ARTHUII TROBIDEON BEAN, JR. A .ff 29 Cross St. ' f . - Beverly. Mass. B, S, R' ChemicalEngineerinZ ' Tau Beta Pig Dean's List 3g Intramural Golf '23 Intramural Softball 33 AIChE Treas.g Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 49 Rodin Society 4g Oli'-Hill Club 3, 4. VINCENT PETER BEKSI-IA 606 Summer St. Lynn, Mass- B, S, Mechanical Engineering Football 2g ASME. DAVID BINCII 72A Seaver St. Roxbury, Mass. B, S, Electrical Engineering Track 13 Freshman Track Mgr.g Intramural Football 43 AIEE. Sec.g Oli'-Hill Club. VINCENT ANTHONY BLANDINO 25 Burnside St. Medford, Mass. B. S. Mechanical Engineering ASME 3, 4. 42821 LEON IDA BORGHI 97A Newbury St. Boston 16, Mass. B. S. .Mechanical Engineering Tau Beta Pig Soccer 1, 2, ASME 3, 4g Newman Club 1, 2. STANLEY WILLIAM BOYD, JR. 14 Ashland St. Somerville, Mass. Anqg. S. Electrical Engineering F ff-. JAMES J P BRADLEY, 26 Freeman Ave. fgverett, Mass. B. S. 1 Mechanical ling-ineering Baseba1l19A ix lll lmlr, A +llllll1lmY 47 Sh , Q I ,A lf lgalllilllllky All East Weymouth, Mass. l if-lx Q. fl! I 5 hernical Engineering Ei ,l1g,1.D55I1fsyist3g rgitramuralgpfp allt3,4IgAIC E2, EMQV.-Pres. 4. .ffa::,,gj5gfW1u..mtg, Q uk ,fn ,ll lll I 5 "L+ wp., 1 ,A . ,ity L l gqlh L04 C fr W1 llx lffasnlflw ml-ln, ul ll me :Sag . fi wf.1,','.,,lUganifluf. H fwirfwgf L 1 nl lf 6 M ' ' tl! . 1 .1 .N ' - frm ,ozfglbq .nf 1-'rwflflm Q A, :J A fjgfrllll -Ewa ,, 1 Vw ALAIN, ljl,RETRTQN.f.j - 4,1 -1 V lu I exe omhgms QW 1.111 ill, JH " 5 l VA, I SI-1 lkllbll ,Hxlv X' Illwlljx may W gl-BB , 'gr we get lf! Wlllllr.rlll1, lnlfll rr rr f 1 , I 1 l l ll !lIvlMUmlU' ggfflik W l ... , 1 AS-weem nn 'l F ,gi e ring X ' " '?l 'lf ' 'A M71 'Hlff 't fw Ei' h lllgklgfglllllrk-1911, 1 Pi'-C151 -1' 725,-L17 ,gzliwgz A nga ,.1Hmw?f'W ml fr gr'-Ml i ig x A w A . . -. llll . -Il L ll' ,ll -'MI rl V 1' f'Xri'l11.rsE1a'.l . Q ww X ES., ,, l .5, ,M1i.mM .v f . . ,F .4..1.l5l.,!ylt vllnmlrr wth. q ,4,, .1 , 8 gm-, gf. ffiHfit11?,f-.5-f.L.aQLffres 5 .j' ' --f .egng Q H f "tl itil lil VS "' i...QQf- 1 H' .J eflf SS 2 .i- 1.-.. 5-1--' ,ff , 'P'ff'7f'T1l,M1,jWil'i 15351. D , -A - 'f is XSTKNLEY ANTHONY CASAZZA . 18 Paul Rd. Medford 55, Mass. SWB. S. Mechanical Engineering Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 45 ASME. CHARLES RODGERS CLOSE 26 Aberdeen St. Newton Highlands, Mass. B. S. Jllechanical Engineering ASME ROBERT ANTHONY COCOZELLA 66 Lovers Leap Ave. Lynn, Mass. B. S. Mechanical Engineering Tau Beta Pig ASMEg Engineers Council. LLEWELLYN LUCIEN CROSS, JR. 16 Anderson St. Boston 14, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering ASCE 2, 3, 4, Engineers Council 3, 43 Pres. fl. 42831 lg 4 .1 l 4. ! n ,. fr li fl I l I A -L 'pe-V 1. 1-1-X--. .. B. S. AIEE-IRE 2 JOHN ALFRED FARINA 53 Bridge St. Newton, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering Delta Upsilon, Cross Country, Track, Football, ASCE. KENNETH GERARD FETTIG 5 Oakmont Rd. Newton Center 59, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering Alpha Tau Omega, Treas. 3, Baseball 3, fl, ASCE, Pres. 4, Varsity Club. HENRY J. FISHER 315 Milk St. Fitchburg, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering Alpha Sigma Phi, Dean's List 1, 2, Intramural Basketball, Yacht Club 1, Student Council 3, Engineers' Council 3, Mayor's Council 3, IRE, AIEE, Edelweiss Ski Group. JOHN J. M. FITZSIMMONS, JR. 3 Apthorpe Ave. Newport, R. I. B. S. Chemical Engineering Alpha Tau Omega, Dean's List 2, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4-, Football 1, 2, Newman Club, AIChE, Engineers' Council, Class Sec. 1. MARTIN G. FLOOD 12 Redstone Lane Marblehead, Mass. B. S. lllechanical Engineering AIEE 2, 3, ASME 4. ROBERT T. FOLEY 95 Bell-Rock St. Malden, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering AIEE 3, fl. JOHN HORACE FOSTER 21 Apthorp St. Wollaston 70, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering Yacht Club 1, 2, 4, ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3. 12841- CHARLES HENRY FOX, JR. 45 Union Terr. Jamaica Plain 30, Mass. B. S. Illeehanical Engineering Alpha Sigma Phi, Sec. 45 Yacht Club, ASMEg Edelweiss Ski Group. PAUL ASA FRANKENBERG 70-18 Groton St. Forest Hills, N. Y. B. S. General Engineering Alpha Epsilon Pig Freshman Golf, 1948 College Golf Award. PAUL NORMAN FRASTER 184 Chester Ave. Chelsea, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering Dean's List 1, 3g ASCE, Hillel, Camera Club. V DONALD ARTHUR FRAZIER 280 Commonwealth Ave. Boston, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering AIEE 3, 4, V.-Chair. 4. EDWARD PAUL GAUDETTE 88 Forest St. Winchester, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering Dean's List 1, 25 Engineers' Council 3, 4, ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4g Yacht Club 23 Newman Club 2, 3. ABRAHAM GREEBAUM 201 Bayview Terr. Port Jelferson, N. Y. B. S. Civil Engineering ASCEg Math. Club lg Hillel. GEORGE S. HARALAMPU 74 Pearson Ave. Somerville 44, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering AIRE 2, 3, 4, Treas. 45 IRE 3, 4, Treas. 4. Mass 4: 1. 4 285 1 HENRY EUGENE HIRVI New West Townsend Rd. Fitchburg, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering Tau Beta Pig AIEE-IRE. WALTER ERIC I-IOLMS 151 E. Washington Ave. Pearl River, N. Y. B. S. Jlleclzanical Engineering Tau Beta Pig ASMEQ Yacht Club 3, 49 Luigi Club 2, 3, fl-. 'iwbllbklm HQLVA IM AN 6 Istasyon Cad. f A Tigigrtzvmlstanbul, Turkey B. S. i G Vff'-"l:r,Y Elebtricg Engineering IRE 3, -'lg AIEIL 3, 4. ,Lf ROBERT EMERSETN 'JAC fwj' 13 Sglrcenwood Ave. LJJK-fl Hg' XA ' ' I am, Mass. B.. ff t'a,1En',ee'f, Ame 2:1-HE 2- ella?-fl-. J 'lil' ll' Emil. iuiillullliullf '51 'f:3HfF'wll11-' ' 2,...f-.lm W kg QW., K ,, iff W .?lllii5F'gfl:l,.f2 Vfvttil ul., T ,-,if,..1L.41'gWTE,l,32 r W f Ihl, Qi lzqfiqn lfluT'll1 1 L' N l " "f 3 ml fe- Xl - If' f-1. fp , fx ,t, ,f.' lQ,,5--lf ii,l"' f l,l'll,' 4l:,,5FL12'fl1 fir V A g .lj Vi l61jXk1,e,,if,lPY,dEMNI , il . 18 Mofton 1 3, ylbiliie M-A, , Bile, , iss? fl f1fllmMl,,,,, 5. fl " if ilfl Q5-2 94. 'gllllllllllllllllll ill " llvilil X' Q.. ililrflixfe 1 W' if ..- il ,lf-l-?3!l:l1lL1ljg,M-E ig. 3 l..NQl'fTl'A.bl ,LGEW U.'l. .1,., B-rg? th I V .1 ll 5f,.'ClleWl'iCflll '15 , " an elim f fy ff3.,li...5,evrwrQ1i ' - llyamllmlull gn. .1 ,g'f'ffAi'r'e -...-...- - ill 5 l . f' ' W 'Q -f 4' ef- y - f C, 1" "H, TAC-, f i -H 7' " 'T l ri ..-1 ' l'iLYz E5.ivJisLi11':f1-- i us shufuenf sn. --Twgzigiilffflsw-.-' 'MHESEIZ1--f B, S, AIeclzwwalEng - L ASME. ERWIN ALFRED LEZBERG ' 261 Russett Rd. Brookline, Mess. B, S, Chemical Engineering Alpha 'Epsilon Pi, House Chair. 3, IFC Rep. 49 Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4-9 A1ChE 2, 3, fly. RAYMOND GEORGE MANSOUR 376 Hampshire St. Lawrence, MHSS- B, 5, Civil Engineering - ASChEg Track 15 Orthodox Club. SOHIER DAVID MARKS 14 Brenton St. Dorchester, Mass. B, S, Civil Engineering ASCE 2, 3, Sec. fl. 42861 11 .. .., wvlfmm Q V - , ll'l 1 1, vig W? ,IOHN PRESTON MARON 254 Merriam St. Weston, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering Zeta Psi, ASCEg Yacht Clubg Chess Team 1, Chorus 1, 2. JOHN FRANKLIN MAY 14 Court St. Groton, Mass. B. S. ASCE 2, 3, 4, NBOTC. Civil Engineering BURTON G 4 ORGE 'McCONCHIE fxfxxf-fx 33 Meridian St. ill-lui!!! Malden, Mass. isiliem.. ff , , , , lf?f"f"Wfffi"ee'ing C 1 lil 'n " lr lllllltlllllrilll I , I Dk Q,'nc -Mas ....,..,B,..S17 rl Ill" L ll V l 'A f Civil1Engneeri1Z linl"1"l'iKhliF.ilii'2,'335gll4.l Wi I, . 6 lil fl 1 l L- ll lllllll l iii Q l ll Qi ll,llfll's li F , 5111 'ill' 'llll 'in l Kflvxifiifwxx Mille- lil ill . . l l if 4 'Ml llilf. 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'B.,S., f - ,,', - " llleehanical Engineering 1Sigmg,Nu, L.-Crhdr 4, Tau Beta Pig Dean's List 1, 3, 4, Intramural Swimming 3, Intramural Football 3, fig Jumbo Book 3, Senior V Section Ed. 49 Yacht Club 2, 3, Publicity Chair. 4, ASME 3, fig Mayor's Council 4, Chess Club 1, 2g Wardroom Club 2, 3, 4g . Tufts Tracer 3, fig NROTC. MALCOLM TYLER MOONEY 57 Lyford St. Laconia, N. H. B. S. Civil Engineering Sigma Nug Freshman Honor Holly Skiing 1, 2, 3, 4 QCapt. 2, flvjg Intramurals 1, 2, 3, fig ASCEQ Yacht Club 1, 2, 3, fig Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Wardroom Club 3, fig Jumbleg NROTCg MAYOR of TU FTS COLLEGE 4. EDWARD PATRICK MOORE, JR. 19 West St. Stoneham, Mass. B. S. Chemical Engineering 1 AIChE Student Award 2, Tau Beta Pi Freshman Awardg Tau l Beta Pi 3, Pres. 4-p Swimmingg Newman Club 1, 2, 34 Yacht Club 3, TMC fig Engineers' Council 3, V.-Pres. 4g AICIIE 2, 3, Pres. fl.. , NORMAN ALLAN MORRISON 85 Thorndike St. Arlington, Mass. B. S, Electrical Engineering Newman Clubg AIEE. 12871 ll " M ' GEORGE WILLIAM PENNEY, JR. 76 Francis St. Everett, Mass. B. S. Mechanical Engineering Oil'-Hill Club 2, 3, 49 Yacht Club 2, 4, ASME 3, 4. IRVING JOHN PETERKIN 4 Atlantic St. Lynn, Mass. B. S. Mechanical Engineering Oll'-Hill Club: ASME. WILLIAM A. PITI' 280 East Dover St. Valley Stream, N. Y. B. S. Meclzanical Engineering Delta Tau Deltag Jumbo Book 43 Photography Ed.g ASME 2, 3, Treas. 4g Engineers' Council 3, Treas. 4, Camera Club 1, 2, V.-Pres. 3, Pres. fl-g Phillips Brooks Club 1, Treas. 2. CHARLES HOMER POIRIER 286 High St. Greenfield, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering Newman Club 13 AIEE 3, 43 IRE 4, Camera Club 1, 2, Sec-Treas. 3, Pres 4. DANA ALEXANDER REGILLO 35 Tufts St. Cambridge, Mass. B. S. Mechanical Engineering Newman Club 2, 3, 4g Oll'-Hill Club 4, ASME 3, 4. ARTHUR W. REINHOLM 83 Fayette St. Lynn, Mass. B. S. Mechanical Engineering ASME 3, fl. DONALD KENNETH RICHARDSON 2048 N uuanu Ave. Honolulu, T. H. B. S. Mechanical Engineering Delta Tau Delta, Corres. Sec., 1, 43 Tau Beta Pi 3, V.-Pres. 4-g Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4, Football, Swimming 3, 4-3 Co-Capt. 4, ASME, V.-Pres. 3, Sec. 4g Varsity Club 3, 43 TMC lg Aquatic Club, V.-Pres. 4. -12881 wig! F I few "NU WU! JOHN E. RONBECK 66 Paul Revere Rd. Arlington, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering AIEE 2, 3, 45 IRE 2, 3, Sec. fl. PAUL C. ROSS 19 Central Ave. Hull, Mass. B. S, Civil Engineering ASCE 1, 2, 3, 4. JAMES F. RUSSELL, JR. 53 Adams St. Medford, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering IRE, AIEE 2, 3, 4. SUMNER SHECHET 55 Addison St. Chelsea, Mass. B. S. Jlleclzanical Engineering Alpha Epsilon Pig Dean's List 35 ASME 3, 45 Camera Club 4, Freshman Steering Committee. FRANK J. SIMON 69-16 Exeter St. Forest Hills, N. Y. B. S. General Engineering Alpha Epsilon Pig Freshman Honor Roll, Dean's List 3g Fresh- man Tennis and Soocerg ASME 2, 3, fig ASCE 2, 3, 'lip Hillel 1, 2, 3, 43 Radio Club 35 Math Club 2. EARL K. SMITH E-6 Stearns Village Medford, Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering Dettia Upsilong Sword and Shield, Football 1, 2, 3, 4g Track 29 AS E. GIRARD L. SPENCER, JR. 110 West 55th St. New York, N. Y. B. S. Civil Engineering Phi Epsilon Pi, Corres. Sec. 33 IFC 3, Swimming 15 ASCE, ASME. 12891- l WARREN JAMES THORBURN 14- Belknap St. West Somerville, 44 Mass. B. S. Civil Engineering l- Tufts-.Iaclcson Chorus 1.. RODNEY DORN TITCOMB 976 High St. Fall River, Mass. B. S. Electrical Engineering AIEE, IRE, 3, ft. NICHOLAS L. TORTO 31 East Park Ave. Lynn, Mass. B. S. M eclzanical Engineering liege? Upsilon, Intramural Sports, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 9 E 2 3 4-. L. y , ,J B:-S l:i11UnY L- EXVINT 24 New England Dr. -'Huy I"qlm-XB1attlebo1-0, Vt. B, S, -,cl "f -Q M I . lEvzgineering Delta Upsilon, Tower Cross 4283 7 1 ' - , l ',Co-Capt. 3, Capt. 4, Varsity Club 2, 3, . ' YJSLLIBCKS ll ll 1 1, 2, Class Treas. 3. Luv 31113. l1?'fn '.,J ,,,,, FW! gk ' ctlnwljaqlfl lflfll ll' e 513.23219 ZVg?F'f,ll1x,,f ,,.,. lifllflllllfflflw Il Fl ' 5' Wil 'MH 'W Q -. ill!!! 'ltfny M l ll., lf' -f V lay. X ' lf Wi. lwtlyifw h K9 fQgt ?0llllIlA . . ' , , 'tk l'.f,VQ,. We . ' Il mul...-.ll 928 East oadway ,X Idwfvxx ,S tllg ox, K, 2111-gg. B. S. f VW' 'Q ',AP6lf,l' T2 .-,i Wardroc3inCll1g,i,gQ: -QQ 15: 'K ' l r lf.,-,r 121, 'g W fig' 5 I lil 1 V ,M .1 Illlffu f8 Sl 1 " ml 1 il wi, -1 Um ' 51 ,51 3' 4 ' 'fffEf.:.f - ' .. ll Z- S+ P will ,',Elll.'l, llJl'lil1+lg21Qznng5q1 153515211 " I11W,l9g?f5l'lHll'll e asing, uv ,,.'4 ,lm l -. - .5 , , ,g if -iff ' , ' flugirf-. Lrg 'rj . ' .V ...J ll ,vl qlfllnllxllllllll' ll-'57 iff' li E B Hlvv ' E lm' 'l mllllllllllll lil l:l5lll , "L 1 'I A I + C V 2 ll Tl'.1. ',i.'Qj4'!Qlj',. -, 5- K -Nl ll 1 'll 1 K num: In uw ff' QQL- . l'i55'5 f' rfedfiii'-+ ' llMUl.lllllllllgl.v JELT' ' T :QEL ,v I TL 'T-'K-lvg-fl'?l'fi. BT., . L - Jo L : 16 Allen .. 44 ,jg , J g ev-- B. 'digg 454: RICHARD 1-f5ii3-W-1f1E5'iLE."..""'.,g Band 1, 2, 3, Newman Club 1, ASME 3, 4, Junior Class mittee. ARTHUR HENRY WII,.LIS, JR. Golf 1, 2, AIEE, IRE, Tufts Mourltain Club 1, Tufts Club 2, Wardroom Club, Band 1, 2, 3, 4, NHOTC. 12901 ASME4 TMC- - f -gl-,,: f , 26 Summer St. 'VV'eS'mu'l:lT88TlVfa'ss:' 3 B. S. Mechanical Engineering Com- 352 Revere St. Winthrop, Mass. B. S. Chemical Engineering AIChE, Intramural Basketball 1, Softball 3. RICHARD STANLEY WILSON 194 Mussey St. South Portland 7, Me. B. S. Electrical Engineering Yacht: FRED MELVIN WOOD 263 Main St. Groveland, Mass. B. S. Electrical engineering Tau Beta Pi, Corres. Sec.g Wrestling 15 Engineers' Council 4. THORNTON G. WOODWELL 68 North Main St. Mansfield, Mass. B. S. Mechanical Engineering Dcan's List 1, 23 ASME 2, 3, 114. ROBERT ARTHUR YOUNG 707 Washington Ave. Palmyra, N. J. B. S. Illcclmnical Engineering Delta Tau Delta, Corres. Sec. 3, Guide 'lg Dcan's List 2, 33 Foot- ball Mgr. 1, 2, 3, 4-g Lacrosse 1, 2g lvy Society 3g Tower Cross fl-g Jumbo Book Editor-in-Clliel' ft, Class Sec. 2, 3, 4g 2, 3. fa' fli- IlOBEI!Ti l'SON YU115. 53 Rochmond Rd Bang,hou India 35 lufts 'St Cambndge Mass 158 Pine lildgli Rd Medlold Mass 19 Belcher St Brockton Mass 186 F' st A L'ttl F ll , N. J. ' B- S- lr . - ,, . T. , . ,K lCfzi1Sili1Ial:E1iigi?neering ' ' Alpha cjjgjf . 5 -,l b All ' , A 'S 1, -, Dqqhfs List 15 Wesle qwf W ' HI ,dr om Club 3, fl, TMC 13 ""'fti l 'l'L 1 A ins. he 1, . nf' 'KF W'lY'.'1l'W9iQifll TfllE I ' L , C X 1, . , l mil , wi fl f ini, li r nn. g, m , Q J ll ill-4'-'XD Vit Hi 'ui rm .rg if ig 2 A 1 all ll., . Q fd .lf S X x llllll, 1- 2 I gm sm mf W H m N , 4 lq - Qllg a ,gg 'TT Glilg Klmfldxic V IIAXQI ,ll to 1, . in Ill X lv' ,if HVL11 X Lf 15.6, giddy . SS, A 112: 1 if 11 Ml rl will 5,-5' l- 9. F ffiig J lf". 1 -. . ,N ,A 2-+1-T ' i T ' imllvuf. l 1 ' l l , H l, jflx iz- M L, ,+V r lain!!-1 fl :H gi Mlilfilglilgllriizu gf? ii nl l il ell' A ' 1. f+Y1+"'ll'l'l'W"f' fy? A ff .W l i 'En lr 1 wi MW ni' ff - . M 313,-tis. 3-34, --1. i E JE!! ll X .X 1,1 jf -.N ai! 9 Q lil-rflfflaq.lllgigliviwmzn 3 L50 6 li mL,,,,,.,W. V V 'iiLi:fT4"A?jf ,o:,' 1" i Lim ll4,illllllUfillS31!L iv "fj"-' w"'A'ii"fQh-:4::g1v- -' ' ' P , W, T: 5 ,A-4, T 54- .ffflf -- 'figiwlii ENGINEERING NON-l'IC'l ORIKLS I MSIEYFETTIN AKCAHARMAN lx Zongu a 'l' , B.S. Electrical Engingiriinig B .S IIERBERT THEODORE BERNARD Peach Orchard Rd. Burlington, Mass. B.S. Civil Engineering B .S CHARLES TIIOMAS KIRK 7 Plaze Ave. Stoneham, Mass. B.S. Electrical Engineering B.S WILIJIAM BENJAMIN PARADIS 36 High Sl.. Rockport, Mass. B.S. Zlleclzunical Engineering 13.5 EDWARD DOSITHE PARENT 25 Prospect Ave. Newtonvillc, Mass. B .S. C Izeinical Engineering . 128 lutuvale bt Boston Mass B S 42911 A I o 4 5.1 'X I X ,M I' ', ,K .I , , 7- 1- , --.1 - I w al ' "6 R. '.' 391' , '53 '-V"rfp f'i',f '.,. -, '53-'fs 'ffl "1 AE". '--55: R. - . . . . . . ,. '-my '- ' fi 23. .V rf -.igywffl ' 5 ' ' 'J . - . , ' " ,'-Iva N ' l 9 ' -'wa' -H",-nn f 1 fm 1.-Q.. rf , ug -1-1- ff- - . K "- V "w'QQ'4' -1"i,f,-'M A . 'rx-x 1 f '+ 'YK'-'+ 1 K 4' K. K' -I WMM ,Taj 1 Jw .I whey! A ',,N,vwgA,.k,,, gx -E V . , E- , "' ' . I 4 , I V xg, gf .' Q.: '25 'IQ' I 1 Yo - V 1 Q .. -10. ' - sf' V , , -44, n J Q ' '. P- 2: ' 'A'-'f'2.fi1. 'S - .W lt, '13 43154: r. 6, f- f' - '--rs,--:CV-6 H, ' . ' 3' '. . V 25,2 -A ,. . . .M 6, V 2,g',5f',gm a, . 3 W . - 1 5 .34 gg .1 5,1431 -:rt W . , -1 s, - ,.n. + iz, A ' ' I I ,F .bk Je' x .4 . ..k"'-Fi' V- -' ivalw' WN 4- , " 6.5 Q rf .1 f www' Q - 1 b Y .f.-. " 1 'h 1 ' ,v 'U 8 3 x Q4 N A 1 N W -' K ' I ' Q-J . . ' 'VI A ff -1 ,. -f. -'af'-W. -' I .F 2 6 " 5. "w"'v-'.. rl 4 v , H W I- jf: '- X. .-. QL ,- gin- K 'A -..', .,.'- ,, . ga ' if uf B ' ' .' :SL -s. f U , Y - , ,,l V' .5 "6"'? -. YS. 4 RMT 'E ,I 'n f I h Z xi cunning 2555 L. x f - tgxfxhiiffz' h ' M O sl Y 4 ,..v--W-Q.--P if -- V ' 331 , W 5 y wifi 5 1 ! V 1 ' if ,,:.:.:.:.: nw? 'zgism nk ' .M .5 Q, 5 .H .Rini .I V, -'I Y, I AM .1 K' svn' f -o ' 3' 'W KJ.-L 'f' .f 1 it ' -5 X4 xg 1 ' 4 Y ' .- Q, . V I '11 ,Q T-vs 1' W ,S .- 'W .7 5,7 t ' D , 'gh gag X Y .. 5 vWF., , h :gi ,5 . sm- 4 A E' ' -ir ' 'Q' 'Q fi ,why . vm. ,-. L A M, .g Q ' ' 1 it-I' 'Q 5 57' f X:-IV? ' .-' l"'.'!SQv J' x- v,,'A ' ' ,br -4 " Rfkw: W " " AA.: .il,. x ik- .X - rzif v . 'X Cc? ?'l" 'XQI I I .a , . r M? .C Vo. w N E2 1 Q ' 1 W. 1 N , . . ' 1 ,Sl - 4 X J ' 'V 21. 1. . XA ' if 1 -'J f-W ' ! 3 ,fn ' w--4 .P ,--WT! .. , .f 11' ,gg feff'-C 'lf 'vfv IES' . .i . P Q . 'X ,Z Q-,Q in JS' ' ,Y 3 - Q ,q' .. ,X :L sf Q L ' 1 ' t -4 H ' Xffzf-ua' . 37 . X . f:-vsfiqjwifzai-is -i 'W . 11' 'I 'Li-fx: v ..':':' x".f ,Qi .' gain! X, 1 'A .41- ' If ,Tw -V 'A W- 1 FH 1 . Q -WWA 1 ww 6 .w. -fi .44 ,, naw! ,L wha'-4 "' ' 5' .33 " Qi.. .J V, ' P 1.4.-fx' V . . l 4 'J Lt ' - v, u 'J A 5. X , I ,fu ,, W u La. w .AL , Dr. A lonzo M 'll'I'l.87', Qnd yJ1'es2'clemf of Tllffs Hosea Ballou II, lst 79res1'clent of the college fmt The academic guides of our college career have been capable and resourceful throughout the first century of Tufts. These leaders have proven their worth in excellence in their particular fields and in their ability as teachers in those fields. At Tufts there is a close relationship between the students and the permanent members of the college community, cementing the associations made in the classrooms. 121141 3, 2' 'f vi-"' ' A Prqf. lllelmflle lllon-roe, college plwz'og1'alplze7'- 1 9 I 5 Charles Bray jbv' whom ' 'lf' ' Bray Laboratofry is named Dr. Elma H efwvftzf Capeen, ,60 3rd pfres'2fzlent Qf T14ffs Within allou all, major policies ADMINISTRATION Dr. Leonard Carmichael President of the College A graduate of Tufts in 1921, Dr. Leonard Carmichael, an internationally known psychologist with an impressive list of earned and honorary degrees and an ex- ceptional brand of integrity, has the honor of being our college leader in this cenntennial anniversary. Our distinguished executive has been a Tufts man almost since birth. His grand- father, Dr. Charles Leonard, was the dean of the School of Religion, and he enabled Dr. Carmichael to get an early View of the buildings that were to be his alma mater and profession in later years. Dr. Carmichael's accomplishments are Well known to the Tufts community and he is a member of every ranking professional society in his Held along with many other obligations that consume his valuable time already im- posed upon by the college presidency. Untiring eHort has keynoted the life of our president since his undergraduate days when he was engaged in many of the leading campus activities. He was a 3 Pls president and a VVeekly editor at the same time being tops scholastically. His presidential career began in 1938 when he was dean of the faculty of arts and science at Rochester. However, c'Greater glory can come to no man than to be called back to his alma materf, says Dr. Carmichael. His efforts have brought Tufts College to its culminative academic position among colleges in the east. 42961 are ab! directed by our e eczztives. Dean Nils Wessell IITTCG-IJ?'U-Sifldllt Qf the College America's youngest dean again pleased the educational world by becoming the coun- try,s youngest college vice president. Dr. Wlessell received his HS. degree from Lafayette College in 1935. He did graduate work at Brown University, where his close and warm association with Dr. Carmichael started. At the University of Rochester he received his Ph.D. degree in 1938. Dr. Vflessell came to Tufts College in 1939 as Dean of the School of Liberal Arts. He is a professor of psychology, and served for two years as acting chairman of that depart- ment. As a psychologist, Dr. VVessell has done scientific and mechanistic research on brain power and the effects of auditory stimu- lation on brain activity. The dean's personality is alive, bright, and alert. He is helpful to Tufts men and is understanding about their scholastic diffi- culties, because after all he did flunk kinder- garten. Dr. Wlessell is a trustee of Lesley College in Cambridge, lllassachusettsg a mem- ber of the American Association for the Advancement of Scienceg of the American Psychological Associationg and of the New England Association of Colleges and Second- ary Schools. The ClCZ111 is also a member of Sigma Xi, the national honora.ry scientific society, and he is an honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa. I 297 1 ADMINISTRATION rogressio ns 0 f students have received ' Richard A. Kelley Dean Qf Special Studies Assvfstcmt to the V ice-President A lively personality accompanies the Assistant Dean of Men, Richard A. Kelley, in his duties on the Hill. His office in North Hall is a busy center of activity all day long where he is a sympa- thetic listener to the latest problems of Tufts men. He takes time out to teach education courses qualifying with a B.S. and an lVI.A. degree earned at Tufts in 1937 and 1938. The popular administrator has done much to further the integrity and competence of the Tufts undergraduate on the MedfoI'd Campus. Perpetual motion is daily routine for Dick. ADMINISTRATION A Harry P. Burden Dean of Engineerfing A graduate of the University of Maine, but a loyal Tufts professor for nearly forty years is Dean Burden who has given the Tufts College Engineering School greater prestige under his capable leadership. The distinguished looking dean is al- ways ready to counsel and guide the individual student as their problems arise. The core of his activity is to disentangle the student from the complexities of engineering while they are still in a formative stage. Outstanding in the field of engineering education, Dean Burden is a valuable asset to the Tufts Faculty. 42981 Q guidance rom these capable d66l7flS. V Y 'A-WE I 3 .g 1' Z l n jr i i s 31 T gi . ln, John P. Tilton Dean of Gracluate School Dr. John P. Tilton, in addition to his regular dutiesas Director of the Division of Special Studies, which has involved academic supervision of Tufts, seven affiliated schools, and Director of the Tufts Summer School, is now Provost of the College, a newly created position on the Hill. A Colby College graduate, the new Provost received a master of education degree from Harvard in 1927, joining the Tufts faculty in that year. In 1923 he received a doctor of education degree from Harvard. Busy and congenial, Dr. Tilton is also Dean of the Graduate School and his office in North Hall is headquarters for his hetero- geneous activities. if W . Ii I ii 5 1 ga 1 ,g ' I W1 as :ea S? 1 . ri ' Edith L. Bush Dean rj Jackson Miss Bush has a busy day in her oflice at Ballou Hall. Since her appointment into the active position of Dean of Woliien in 1925 she has been invaluable to Jackson coeds who seem to find abundant problems that require her Well-qualified advice. The gracious dean and hostess graduated from Tufts with honors in 1903. She then launched into a mathematical career until she assumed her present duty as the Jackson coed guide. Her remarkable ability is highlighted by her pleasing appearance, her smile has given Jackson girls friendship and conhdence. ADMINISTRATION 42991 I-L . lose Contact with the students pmt! Raymond L. Walkley Libwwian Books, 165,000 of them, keep Mr. VValkley, a graduate of Yale and the New York State Library School, and his staff fully occupied in the newly expanded library. Since 1928, when Mr. VValkley first came to Tufts, the library facilities have shown considerable growth. He had only a mere 95,000 volumes to contend with! The invaluable classification system has been added and the new spacious VVar Memo1'ial Library is a realized drea.m. Obviously, books a1'e the librarianis chief concern and he has plenty at his disposal to hold his interest. ADMINISTRATION John M. Ratcliff Dean Qf Religion A leading Universalist clergyman with an abundance of vision for the future in his field, Dr. John M. Ratcliff acquired the distinction of Dean of the School of Religion in January, 1946. Since joining the Tufts colony in 1997, the dean has furthered the outlook and sphere in his department and measured his ability to high standards of religious education. Dr. Ratcliff, who was ordained in 1915, has since held many important posts in the religious field, which combined with his per- sonal achievement makes for a religious head of inspiring quality. 430011 steady improvement is their objective. Grant E. Curtis Director Qf Admfissimzs The traveling salesman of Tufts is Grant E. Curtis, the admissions officer and assistant professor in the depa1'tment of education. The gigantic chore of interviewing prospective students, studying applications, which total nearly two thousand yearly, and being assistant to the Dean of Liberal Arts quite occupies the aimiable Mr. Curtis. A graduate of Tufts in 1942, he then studied at the University of Chicago where he earned his masteras degree. Between trips and interviews he can be found as a loyal Tufts supporter at the various athletic con- tests. :li ' 'Lx ff err i , tus 'N"',5qa"f'f"f M M ia! at WM awww' ,. I L ubdfp' Yiff' ' Y M4-PW. P ..-If 'Q , 1' G swift' W. Stanton Yeager Director of Athletics In one corner of the expansive athletic office is the desk of Prof. Yeager, the Director of Athletics at Tufts, who, since his appear- ance on the Hill in 1926, has seen the athletic program promoted to its present intensity. Prof. Yeager, also a professor of Physi- cal Education, played varsity football at Iowa T eacher's College and Springfield College. Track, he admits, holds his chief attention in the sporting world now. The quiet but capable athletic director, whose home state is Iowa, has every hope for continued athletic achievement for the Brown and Blue. ADMINISTRATION 43011 -v be scbolczstz -. -n I I c mms and goals 0 Prof. C. F. Gufllllalll, head of Clzem. Eng. Mr. E. J. Mzwkwlcllko P1 l' Prof. H. C. Ries, Prof. C. F. Gurnllam, Mr. VV. R. Pavelc-llek Prof. A. H. Howell, If I 'W Lear of Llec. Eng. .. . , 'op J. Warner, Prof G II II . . . -ammond, Prof. D E Hig inl l . . g Y0l1l3lIl, Prof. A. Il. Howell Prof. F. M. NVCZI FACULTY vcr, hand of Civil Eng. 13021- Mr. R. L. Savage, Prof. E. F. Littleton, Prof. P. S. Rice, Mr. P. A. Dunkcrly Prof. C. H. Holmberg, Dea11H. P. Burden, Prof. F. N. VVeaver 1 mtg, 1 ujts students are brought nearer Prof. VV. E. F2l.I'Hll2lI.l1, Prof. A. YV. Leighton, Prof. P. H. Hill Prof. E. MacN:1.11gl1to11, head of ALE. 12 Nlenscr Dr R D Eddy, Dr. C. '. rf x'-, . . . Dr. G. G. Evans, Dr. F. L. Greenwood Mrs. J. Kennedy, Dr. C. F. Baker, Dr. P. H. Doleman, Prof. J. C. Littlefield 13031- Prof. K. N. Astill, Prof. S. Vannull, Prof. R. L. Harrington Prof. R. A. Smith, Prof. R. ll. Fittz, Prof. E. MacNuugl1ton Prof. E. E. Leavitt Prof. W. E. Farnlnun, all of Eng. Dl'!Hl'1f7Lg Dr. C. F. Baker I1 curl Qf lflzwuzlwlry FACULTY wma pu- un A u Y. ,-A ..w...1-nw... .- to jicus under the resourceful aid Miss K. A. McCarthy, Dr. S. Bartnoff, Mr. A. D. Dr. S. S. Ballard, head of F1-ost PhyS7'C'5' Dr. L. S. Combes, Prof. F. W. Pote, Dr. S. S. N - 1, Ballard, Dr. C. R. Mingins, Dr. VV. H. Bostwick .. .1 Dr. H. VVeintraub, Mr. J. E. Bishop, 1XIr. A. J. H Penico, Mr. R. N. Kozelka Prof. D. G. Fulton, Dr. J. A. Clarkson, lVIrs. NI. C. Dr. J. A. Clarkson, head of Mlztlz. Graustein, Prof. T. E. Blergendulll X. i U I A Y, , l. - l E grg " ., Y I A l lu 'u 7' Dr. Roys, llrs. P. Haywood, Miss E. VVeiant, Dr. H. Sweet Dr P. A. XVIIITCII, lzcuzl of Dr. P. A. WV:1rrcn, Dr. R. L. Carpenter, Prof. K. D. Biology Roeder FACULTY -13041 'W -f-f---a-- -.:-IQ-,ff -4 - . ,, 0 oar keen and alert academic masters. Nlr. J. W. Wulfeck, Dr. E. M. Bennett, Miss l". E. Gray, Prof. L. C. Mead, Miss L. li. Scronsy, Dr. N. Prof L -C Micqd head of , . . , . . . , B. Hall, Jr. psychology ini Dr F R VVulsin, Dr. A. W. Stearns, Dr. H. WV. Dx A. . Saws. ,I l - - - I VVSUMUBZJZHS mm of Dcmonc, Dr. A. D. Ulman L 1- lf, 'F Pl'RAKelleDJP Dr. C. VS. amery, ro . . . y, r. . . I ' ' ' ' 1 Dr. J. P. Tilton, head of ezlucaiirm, Tllton, Mr. A. R. SCllIllldt, lVIr. J. R. Straus brlclgl. -f 305 l- FACULTY s ncleef the skilful tutoring and P'-,,,. Prof. L. F. Manly, head of Prof. G. S. Miller, head of economics government Dr. Eschman Dr. R. L. Nichols, lzmd of geology ,R BIT- Enfigllt, DF- D- Andrews, Prof- H- A- Bridgman, Pmf- Prof. C. P. Houston, Assoc. Prof. Elliot, Mrs. Betty Burch, M- Rfwlllsh Prof. G. S. Miller Prnf. 0. 0. von Mering, Prof. L. F. Manly, Prof. N. R. FACULTY Smith, Prof. C. P. Houston 43061- 'fp--rf-1 ff confident ins imtian eaten student Dr. G. H. Gifford,heacl DP- R- C- GiYlCf, 'mad of of Romance languages ac'5'H'cm'S Assoc. Prof. VV. K. Provine, l!lIlll.I'VlIfl7l of German Prof. G. H. Burch. I1 an fl philosophy Q Mr, J, C, Wells Dr. E. K. Shapira, Capt. R. King, Prof. R. K. Craven, Prof. Prof. K. 0. Rfyrvaagnes NHVLCIICS I Assoc. Prof. YV. K. Provine Mrs. G. C. Balch, Dr. G. H. Gifford, Miss Yvhittredge Prof. M. Newton -I307lL FACULTY 7,535 H W Egg? V - V in I!-qs!-ull In lg 4 1 9 IQ g,.,. , ,,,,,,,, - receives an academic background Mrs. C. B. vanAuke'n, Mr. C. E. L'Ho1nme, Mr. A. G. Burr, Mr. C. M. Holmes, Mr. E. N. Engstrom, Mr. C. F. Brown Mr. R. S. Donnell Prof. P. H. Flint, Prof. N. B. Birk, Prof. M. J. Files, Prof. II. H. Blnncharcl, P1'of. K. O. Myrick, Prof. J. Holmes, Mrs. G. B. Birk l Dr. VV. F. VVyatt, Prof. E. S. Ashton, Prof. J. A. Autor, Prof. A. S. Cole ' Rabbi B. D. Cohon, Dean J. M. Ratcliffe FACULTY 13081 X Q Prof. H. H. Blaxlclmrcl. V ' l llearl of English --1 g' N2 Mr. F. K. Abbott, Blr. R. E. lgliller, Prof. A. H. Imlull .-g.l..,gl.1 r mf and beyond tuition costs. gl 1 jvf Mr. J. Morton, alunzmf Qfficn M r. Bill Slater fi Eno' , 1 l l Mrs. V. Snltmarsh, QIIl1C07ll07llllllTKlCf0I' Mr. Jan Friis , ance Rffr. H. J0llll,I'lSCI1 Nlr. G. Chandler I 43091- rlirerrlor of -mainten- FACULTY f':' be ROTC units prepare ujismen ,Q Col. Hardy in . 'Q' 1 95549 'Q CW yf The AFROT C is a regular academic course which supplements the other courses leading to a baccalaureate degree offered by Tufts College. The four year course is divided into basic air science, normally for Freshmen and Sophomores, and advanced air science for Juniors and Seniors. In the basic course, the student receives instruction in VVorld Political Geography and thirty hours of d1'ill. As a Sophomore, in addition to drill, the student studies general air power. In the last two years, the cadet specializes in his field, which is determined by his major sub- ject. At Tufts, the eight instructors in Air Science are Col. Robert F. Hardy, lllajor Lyman Blake, Capt. Alfred Greer, 1!Lt. Christopher Lenard, lNI!Sgt. Henry Nicols, T!Sgt. Carleton Parsons, M!Sgt. Joseph Flaretey and TfSgt. Vernon Brown. The cadets number 315. They have organized a newspaper and a Command Squadron, the AFRUTC social organization. illajor Blake Capt. Greer Lf. Lenard -we R.G.T.C. 43101 fir future service in the Armed Forces 1 , , LA ' .gm - , .-. . l si.. 3 : x ' Drill Team Cadet Qfficers H ere's where I live Terry and the -Pirates 43111 AIR FORCE R.O.T.C witn wow are tml Capt. Connors CDI' W I liouniree, Jr., i . . . USN 2. LCYDR W. B. Wh-ifalcer, US NR NAVAL R.O.T.C. 'ning and instruction The Tufts Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps was responsible for training ofHcers in VVorld Wlar II and as a result f 't c 0 1 S outstanding record was retained as one of the fifty-two NROTC colleges charged with the l t F ' c u y 0' providing junior officers for the peace- time fleet. A large percentage of the Class of ,51 have seen action in Korea and the Class of 5 59 expects to follow them. The unit has been commanded by Captain Connor who com- pleted years of naval service at his retirement this year. Commander Roundtree is execu- tive officer and S machinery and leadership. Lt. Cmdr. Shep- herd is the Junior instructor in navigation and Lt. O'Neil is the Sophomore instructor in gunnery. Lt. Cmdr. Yvhitachee and L. Coogan instruct the Freshmen in the basic orientation course with Lt. Coogan lecturino' D D all classes on air subjects. hlajor Bowditch enior instructor in naval LCDR C. P. Shepymrfl, Major Bonsrm Bowdiifclz., U S N U Sill C L Q l l l '5- Lt. John 0'Neil, USNR Lt. R. P. Coogan, USN 13121- by peacetime roles 0 f military cliiljf. 'wi 'I , 4-slzp NAVAL R.O.T.C. egos to jereigfe lands supplement Beau Guest teaches the marine course and supervises the regular Friday afternoon drill. The N ROTC men carry as their motto c'Keep the fleet in peace." The midshipmen of the Class of 352 have made three cruises, two of them to foreign waters. The Sophomores visited the Republic of Pananizt and the Canal Zone, Foreign Ski rts! 7 Latest model, two ow: powe1 Around the block, two flights up National Palace of Portugal NAVAL R.O.T.C. -13141 W -f thee reticezl knowledge gained in class. Hands across Ilze sea .feggff .1 ,1,, -.7 Slinging the Bull ' i crossing the equator to be initiated into the ancient order of the deep as shellbacks. The if class split up for the Senior cruise, some going ib' to Norway and Paris, while others visited Holland, Scotland, England, Portugal and Cuba, where they were treated to a round of parties, receptions and military demonstra- tions of welcome. Basilica rj' France or ' ...iw 43151 Cloisters at Batallza Shellback Initiation NAVAL R.O.T.C Acknowledgement This, the 27th volume of the yearbook of Tufts College, is un- doubtedly the largest student undertaking of its type in the history of the college. The centennial issue includes one hundred pages more than any of the previous editions. This larger coverage of material was made possible by the sustaining fund of the Senior Class, the assistance of the college, and an intensive undergraduate sales cam- paign. Facilities, too, were expanded, Jumbo Book Enterprises now possess loudspeaking units and press cameras for future use. A project such as this requires much of its staff in initiative, imagination and perseverance. The lack of adequate working space and the distant publication date which separates the results from work further emphasized these qualifications. Citations for outstanding work on the Centennial Jumbo Book should go to the following people: Len Lombardi for his tireless effort and quiet humor during the school vacations we spent in the publications room. Dave Adelson for his scheduling and arrangement of the Activities Section. Dana Berntson and Bill Ireland who promoted undergraduate sales and managed the finances. Bill Mallinson for his original layouts, artistry, and sugges- tions in the cover design. George lVIillard for his painstaking care in handling the Senior Section. Dwight Nliller for his unusual representation of the Fraternity Section. g Carl Raine and John Forte for an outstanding job on the Sports Section. Photographers, Lloyd Charlton and Don McLea11, and the Tufts College Camera Club. Dick Zinkowski, artist, who created the cover design and the introductory pages of the book. Rickie Craven for gathering the material for Jackson Sports. Nancy Davis and Bibs Pickles for the many long hours spent writing detailed copy and the narrative headlines. Emil Bazzy, Publisher and alumnus, whose enthusiasm in- spired not only the editor but all of the staff with whom he worked. god Mvunf, Editor of the 1952 yearbook 4 316 1 TUFTS COLLEGE President LEONARD CARMICHAEL, Ph. D., SC. D., LL. D. Vice-Presiderzt NILS Y. WESSELL, Ph. D., Sc. Ed. D. Provost JOHN P. TILTON, Ed. D. THE ASSOCIATED SCHOOLS The School of Liberal Arts ' NILS Y. WESSELL, Ph.D., Sc.Ed.D Dean Jackson College for Women EDITH L. BUSH, A.B., Litt.D Dean Engineering School HARRY P. BURDEN, S.M Dean School of Religion W JOHN M. RATCLIFF, Ed.D Dean Graduate School and Special Studies JOHN P. TILTON, Ed.D Dean For information concerning these schools, address the appropriate Dean TUFTS COLLEGE, MEDFORD 55, MASS. Medical School , ' DWIGHT O'HARA B.S., M.D., F.A.C.P., Dean Dental School CYRIL D. MARSHALL-DAY B.D.S., D.M.D., Ph.D., Dean For information concerning these schools, address the appropriate Dean 136 HARRISON AVENUE, BOSTON, MASS. The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy Administered by Tufts College with the cooperation of Harvard University ROBERT B. STEWART, Ph.D., Dean For information concerning this school, address the Dean TUFTS COLLEGE, MEDFORD 55, MASSACHUSETTS 13181 T UETS COLLEGE BOOKSTORE Quality - Service Cooperation CATERING EXCLUSIVELY TO TUFTS PEOPLE TUFTS COLLEGE BOOKSTORE -iswlb I-1 , , 1 not A ,nu-sq peer- BAYARD TUCKERMAN, JR.. ARTHUR J. ANDERSON ROBERT J. DUNKLE. JR. R.OBERT T. FORREST JULIUS F. HALLER ARTHUR J. ANDERSON, JR. HERBERT SEARS TUCKERMAN OBRIO , RUSSELL at Co. I nsumnce of Every Descrytion "A Good Reputation Does Not Just Happen - It Must Be Earned." 108 Water Street Los Angeles, California Boston, Mass. 3275 Wilshire Blvd. 'fcleplxoue Lalayette 3-5700 Dunkirk S-3316 iseolh V f...,.- -. 7. ...-., --...-. , bringing you the complete coordination of all the factors inoolfved in producing the finest Annual possible- tailored to meet your desires and your budget. 56625004 5i6ZVl:C64- dI321y 795 WASHINGTON STREET NORWOOD, MASSACHUSETTS ConLpIiments qf eARRoLL,s DINER 89 NIAIN ST., MEDFORD open from 6 A.M, to 2 A.M. CONGRATULATIONS TO TUFTS COLLEGE FROM "l'Vl1m1, '1't's supplied by . . . H P 8 HILLSIDE HARDWARE - - AND PAINT eo. 1846 QUALITY DAIRY Pnonucrs 1952 f"f'1f'ffSf t'f'1 10' "ff' .3 BOSTON AVE., NIEDFURD IIILLSIDE for 1':1 pill service call hlYstic S-0712 Watkins Home Fashions Last Longer Because We go to extremes in selectin W WE xxcfqwxi ,wil only those things We know to be beautifligl 5 N will and useful, and are critical to the Nth Eb j it f ' degree on construction, you can expect A217 A I J Watkins Brothers home furnishings to last ' ' S' E longer. This means added pleasure to you in In MAPS 9 owning fine things of unquestionably good 4, 7 V taste . . desi ns of lasting goodness based ' X - - T555 on the fines? of the past or the creations A ' of leading contemporary artists . . and the - . b H n ,nll extra comfort and convenience of sound 5 X Q 5 X lasting construction. I UlHlHlHS 0,5 afmam, 113221 O Skl. fgEE?fT?ifi "" f22f2222i2i2:1 2222222212122ifiiiafiiifezi I1ffSi2s2i22f222ff'2Q f I maWmEX?EHffW?EH5EE3fE?HWEEEiE 523512 - .-' ' -ffzsiff 1 ,2ri12E- S-:2:e:5:5z5:s:5:2i 2255::2:z:E'-5252 'f1Ez. ,rziziaiaiaii q 5522225 25552 4-:5iii2E2si5' :52'1 , 65535215 Yffiiiiiliiiiiiiiiaff 'z1z:s:z22233EsfzEaizEsf:' -21f:1is2sZsf::fIa '1r1rE2E5E5E5I' 155525-'31 . 155525EEEEQEQESEEESEEEQZ: QE5EiEjEi2fii1Q1EEiE:E, -:Q:5E.f Ei: '25 5??f?WEiEQJ3aFH?E3EHEHH?HE??HE5 25:31 23 5Egff355rE?g1g25" S:555 3E5EE5EEE:' 3155 " s?2?EEE5E355E15E3E3E:: 555E5E,:QE?E5EfEfEfIf g Qf1'3:?f 55252: 3215515 ww w w ,329 ,yf , f ..,. 2, .v., I. .. . 'fn ' 293 I Q aj, Z 2" if' ,i ' Q ks 6 If 2 S' 'jfzl iiiis' "':'::E: ::F?: Q E5EE???EZESE52fEiEiEEj 55?5: ,:5:::i:,. - Eiif iFEIi?aSWMQHEQxiELQHMww 5351 35. ,,'-.3 H '-1, ,I-55" .:Z3?E:3EE:2:E:1fE1E2Zf :v:IE,' E 25'f"F "E1I. 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S-exe' -1-2:::a:z:a:f:1a1a1:1::::5:f:afI:'1 1 wifi - ERVING SERVAIDESQ i the waifliiir jinefi, fifiple thick, .mfr fexrnifeii niipkin to conipliinenf the jineff fable fetfinfgf Alfa iigrle for ERVING Hi-line napkins fwf boine iinil 10617231 nfe SOLD IN ALL SIZES PAPERS LOOK FOR THIS SEAL "For Serving-It's Ewing" ERVING PAPER MILLS 13231- lug.: lu nga: Compliments Qf the JUMBO DINER THANKS TO THE STUDENTS FOR THEIR PATRONAGE Incorporated September 5, 1877 HILLSIDE - CAMBRIDGE CO-OPERATIVE BANK 356 Boston Ave., Nferlforcl Hillside, Mzxss. ' AIYSUC 6-0680 QUALIIY POOD REASONABLE PRICES George S. Miller, Pres. Donald N. Sleeper, Treas 1N'lYstic G-QDQQ ELi0t 4--17822 -ZZ '1" 3 T j EEST HILLSIDE GLEANSERS T so ' H T1 5? 1 34-lf BOSTON AVENUE 494s BRA'1"1'LE STREE1' jllp My MEDFORD 55, MASS. CAMBRIDGE sa, MASS. SQ - Call and Del'ive'ry Service lfVc Use Dupont Solvents , , ., .. . .. .. Vfomy Wlffl zasmqmf lfg r0m4f.'p54,,E0. ff- C HIGHMD f I bpd? Q SELF 5M OOIHING T - wsr.m75lZ6 :.1,:,1 To ..1,: l N ' I1 XX iz- - Q QA T rl1sl0"iof,nsmacc BOSTON VARNISH COMPANY EVERETT STATION BOSTON 49, MASS. TUFTS GRADUATES wllhe best of them alll' FRANKLIN J. LANE, 1Jl'0ST!18IIt - Class 1917 JANIES B. L. LANE - Class 1949 FRANKLIN J- LANE, JR- - CUSS 1951 In the "handy" bottle...for thirst and pleasure 13241 -- .U-U1! I THE TUFTS ALL COLLEGE RING ruin., ,,,,, ,L E, -YH -.- , 1 l 9 1 Q R L ML-,-L to L L, ,,,,-,-WL -l C0llI,pl'i'lll,6lltS of LOREN MURCHISON 8: CO., INC. College and High School Rings, Medals, and Trophies Represented by JAMES F. CORR 333 Wlashinglzon St., Boston 8, lllziss. Room 705 RI-2-0161 "Opposite Old Smith Church" Undergrad orders taken by announcement in bookstore or at above address ATTENTION ALUMNAE All classes lmving graduated previous to the designing of this new Tufts ring now have the opportunity of placing their order either by nmil or in person at the above address. Samples will be available for display in our Boston Office. Any information desired will be gladly supplied by mail. qm5y . ,Eg-..-. an ,. if nu-1, -Vfwm, , "Congratulations to Tufts Col- C07'1'7'lll"wnt'9 'lf lege on your 100th Anniversary HED,, WINBGURNE from Monarch Finer Foods, f I packers and distributors of Z quality food products for 99 L' G' BAL14 OUR COMPANY years," 230 Boylston St. College K Fraternity Jewelry Boston 16, Mass. Stationery Clrcle 7-7556 Trophies V N A E plmh BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON M DINNER I I Italian and A-lmericcm Food QM? Pizza Our Specialty 65 HOLLAND ST. DAVIS SQ. SOMERVILLE 364 Boston Ave., Medford M0 0-0350 MY 6-5544 1 BEER Famous ' . ' ' , lee Crezrnms J' l 'w Udm lg Frozen , ' ' c rsnzns ff Clhowclel Q20 Foocls f -FFXI r. ALE Our 79th Year of Continuous Catering Service to New Englemcl - , , E, 1 WINE IRVING L. SEILER, ANDREW S. Sl3Il'JluR 110 Nm-way Su-cet B0Sl0ll, Muss- HY'S LUNCH 81 DELICATESSEN . 695Br0:1rlway BullSq. Somerville ' RESTAURANT S0mcrset 6-SH-H5 Im' Wellesley Square lllellesley SANDWICHES MADE UP T0 G0 "Hot Pastromi - Our Specialtyi' DAILY 9 A31-11:-L5 PBI SUNDAY 1 PBI-11:-L5 PM 13261 Warren Kay Vantine Studio, Inc Official Photographer jov' the Centennial Jumbo Book 132 Boylston Street Boston, Massachusetts 13271- gg. ,gs --I-rs Patrons RICHARD F. BERRY A E'39 5910 Bertram Ave. I Bznltiniore, IYICI. VIRGINIA M. BETTS .V34 344 Fairmount Ave. Ivalthain, lNIass. LEONARD A. CHAUVIN A516 14 Fifth Ave. 1Vebster, NIass. LEROY B. CHRISTIAN E'00 10 Hobbs Rd. W est Medford, Mass. ARTHUR P. GOTTWALD A513 4-1 Blossom St. Arlington, Nlass. GEORGE J. GOTTWALD, DNID A519 41 Blossom St. Arlington, Mass. CLEON EDSON HOPKINS A'2'7 Stoneholm Farm Springfield, Vt. ELVA L. HUTCHINS -V33 GRM 19 Perkins Ave. Reading, Mass. ANITA BALZER KINGAN -V20 182 Cook Ave. lVIerideu, Conn. ENSIGN JOHN D. LINDSAY, USNR A'51 729 Balsam Wlay Union, N. J. ' CHARLES R. NIARVIN A'99 16 Nfeclmnic St. M attapoisett, Mass. and Patronesses MELVIN MERKEN Old Lyme School Olrl Lyme, Conn. . . A'50 MARGARET B. PAGE 21 Duer Place VVeelmwken, N. J. . HARRY B. ROSENER 29 Lawn Ave. H Nlidclletown, Conn. IRA A. ROIVLSON, JR., DDS 34 M3.Ig3.1'Ct St. I Plattsburg, N. Y. JOHN H. SCHMUCK 583 Church St. Naugatuek, Conn. PERCY T. SMITH 1118 Glendon Wlay South Pa.szLf,lcna, Calif. H. CHRISTINE SVVENSON, OTR 19 Adams Sig. 1Vilmington, Mass. MARION L. THORNQUIST 2 Hammond Place Wlest Meclford, Mass. COLEMAN TOUSEY, DMD ADELLA HILL TOUSEY 22 Grand View Ave. Somerville, Mass. 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Suggestions in the Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) collection:

Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

1940

Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

Tufts University - Jumbo Yearbook (Medford, MA) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

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