Trinity College School - Record Yearbook (Port Hope, Ontario Canada)

 - Class of 1933

Page 1 of 464

 

Trinity College School - Record Yearbook (Port Hope, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 464 of the 1933 volume:

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Canadian made - - - built to traditional Dack standards - - - available in dis- tinctive models for street, sport and formal wear. Dack custom-grade shoes are priced from 312.00 to S1450 9 I SHOES FOR MEN TOPO O ONTRE L. HAMILTON WINFSOR WINNIPEG C LF DET ADVERTISEMENTS For Sheer Enjoyment no 6 -4 ,, 1 , R ' - if Q lisa' ' 5 f Q '-WEP.. 'x i' ESTIVATE at B O N E C H O I N l 9 3 2 For particulars apply to Kenneth Ketchum, Esq., Trinity College School Director. Camp Mazinaw, Port Hope, Ont T ORTH P BQ N H ADVERTISEMENTS RET' . nn-li THE TRUE VALUE t i s ilic of a Dollar Saved "ii A A 9 4 " "The boy who thinks a dollar is not worth saving becomes the man who thinks a hundred dollars is not worth saving, and he usually ends where he beganathat is, with nothing." A Bank of Montreal savings account into which you deposit regularly will help you realize the true value of a dollar saved. ANK oMlQ8uTRE L W BELL N4 Q Iistzllblislln-ml lS?f5 ELMES HENDERSON 'EQ SON REAL ESTATE QQ INSURANCE Royal Bank Bldg. 10 King St. East, Toronto. QlU1'1JH1'EITiU11 nf Z'LTrinitg nllvgv Svrhnul VISITOR: Ilw In-'Ili lu-Y. llu- lmlwl l1zsl14+pul"l'4 3 GOVERNING BODY Ex-Officio Members 'l'lw Vlnaxlu-4-llul' ul' 'l'Vi11it.v lvlliYQ'l'SiT.X'. y , 'r1" 1 The lwx'.1l11- I1-umm ui l1'1lll1Y I ullw"e' . H ' ll'Ul The l'1'ui'cssm's in Arts, 'l'l'illi1.X' Vullegrv, 'l'Ul'UlltU. ITU. 'I'h+- H1-v. lf. 1ir'z1l1z1111 UI'I'llilI'll. KIA.. IDD, Ilezulllmstvl' oi 1ll1'S4ll4ml. Elected Members vw ,I v . p 1 " Ilu- lu-x.1.-l.N. ln'TlIllll4'.M..X.. D.1.l,.,l,1i1 AIPIIIML 'l'ln- Hun. 3l1'.-l11s1im- ll. Klux llvlmistnun IIINHHII.-lll1ltl'4'lI. A. WAHI ............. . w -I. K. Hullsiml. luml.. MUX. .. ll. l'.-l1'll4'11, l'1S1l. ....... . l,. ll. llzlhlwiu. ICM. .. HUIWIHII 'PNIUIQ lfvl. .. H. li. 51l':l1l1'x', lfsq. ............. . l'lu1- lbw. U. 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Eriniig Llnllvgv Sarhnnl iKvrnri1 VOL.XXXV TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL, PORT HOPE.DEC.l93l, NO.l 'VF , . -Lzhtturml A long term seems to have passed more quickly than usual, prob- ably because there has been very little time to spare. The excep- tionally mild weather has enabled all of us to be out of doors more than usual, and up to the end of November we could congratulate ourselves on having escaped with a minimum of trouble due to illness and injury. But the sudden death of John Gibson cast a shadow over the life of the whole School. A short obituary appears elsewhere. The football season has been very disappointing. The first team felt the loss of Mr. Ogle greatly during the early part of the term. The captain, F. E. Wigle, deserves great credit for the energy and ability with which he coached Bigside without any outside assis- tance, until the arrival of Mr. Britton. It was only in the last match of the season, against our old rivals. Ridley, that we had the satis- faction of seeing the team show their real ability. A debating society has been formed by Mr. Evans and has already held several successful meetings. It has filled a serious gap in the School activities and has our good wishes for its future success. The three societies founded last year have continued this term to provide amusement for some of us in our spare time. When we came back in September we were pleasantly surprised to hear of Mr. Lewis' marriage to Miss Gertrude Petry who has been connected with the School for many years. Two other of our masters, Mr. Evans and Mr. Morse, were married during the summer. We take this opportunity of wishing them well for the future. At the end of last wear, Mr. Ogle, Mr. Gordon, and Mr. Coates left us. Mr. Ogle is a professor at the Royal Military College, Kingston, Mr. Gordon has gone to Australia: and Mr. Coates is a master at Marlborough College in England. VVe welcome to the staff of the School Mr. R. L. du Domaine, Mr. D. K. Parr, and Lieut. Col. K. L. Stevenson who is back again with us after an absence of two terms. Q TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD C5119 Gllgauwl The Chapel Olfertories so far this Term amount to 312652. Of this 837.45 was a special offertory made by the School in response to an appeal made by the Fellowship of the West and a cheque for this amount was sent to the Treasurer, Mr. A. A. Harcourt-Vernon, e -o be used as he thought fit in relieving distress. Cheques for the following amount have been sent from the Of- fertory Fund: M. S. C. C. ,............,.......,...., ........ S 15.00 Widows 81 Orphans Fund .... ..... 1 5.00 Divinity Students Fund ..... 15.00 Port Hope Hospital ........ ..... 1 0.00 REMEMBRANCE DAY On the morning of November 11th. at ten minutes to eleven the zvhole School assembled in the Chapel and then filed out to the mem- yriiil cross. A wreath, presented by Mrs. Orchard on behalf of the Ladies' Guild, was laid at the toot of the cross by the Head Prefect. At eleven o'clock the School stood at attention and kept silence for two minutes. 31111111 Smit Uiiluinu To our very great sorrow John Scott Gibson died on the morning of December 2nd, at the Sick Children's Hospital, Toronto, after an operation necessitated by a sudden attack of osteomyelitis. He entered the Junior School, September, 1930, and came into the Senior School last September. He won his Cricket and Football colours at the Junior School. A boy of sterling character, of much promise, and greatly beloved, he is deeply mourned, and our hearts go out in sympathy with all his relations. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD , illluair in Ihr Srhunl Two School Sing Songs were given early in the term, Mr. Lewis, Col. Stevenson, and Mr. Hiscocks kindly assisting. Five or more :horus songs were learned and sung on each occasion, while the Glee Club sang some sea shanties from the Gallery with good effect. The Orchestra has some new members to replace losses caused by boys leaving last June, and is working at three Carol arrange- ments, two of them by Holst. These should be ready for perfoim- ance with the Choir at the end of term concert on December 16th. life were fortunate in hearing the Hart House Quartet again on Novfmber lSth. VVorks by Haydn, Brahms, and Schubert were played. About thirty boys attended the lecture given by Mr. Sly preparatory to the concert. A School concert was given at which Mr. Ketchum and McClos- key gave an excellent performance of the Purcell "Golden" Sonata, followed by a Schubert Sonatina with Mr. Hiscocks at the piano. We take this opportunity of thanking all those who have contribu- ted to our musical entertainment. The Choir has many new members, from both Senior and Junior Schools, and is preparing for the Carol Service at the end of term. Congregational singing practices each Sunday have resulted in 3 general improvement of the singing by the School of both hymns and psalms. SCHOOL NOTES S. H. Ambrose is Head Prefect. L. Cowperthwaite and F. E. Wigle have been appointed School Prefects. Senior Privileges have been given to: Beck, Broughall, Duncan- son. Mickle, Patch, Ross, Savage, Taylor. F. E. Wigle was elected Captain of Football. H. B. Savage was elected Captain of Bethune House. K. C. Dawe was elected Captain of the Second Team. C. Padley was elected Captain of the Third Team. it TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD W. G. Braden was elected Captain of Brent House Middleside. J. Kerrigan was elected Captain of the Fifth Team. A. D. McGinnis was elected Captain of Brent House Littleside. The Temporary Colour Committee consists of: the Headmaster, Col. Goodday: F. E. Wigle, football representative, T. L. Taylor, hockey representative: W. J. Mickle, cricket representative. During the latter part of the term English rugby was organised by Mr. Robert Orchard and Mr. du Domaine. Although it was en- joyed as a change there is little possibility of it taking the place of Canadian football in the School. Soccer was played by those who did not play English rugby. A very handsome cup was presented to the School by Miss Irvine for an inter-house squash competition next term. A team of five players is to be selected from each house. H. B. Savage is conducting the life-saving classes this year. F. E. Wigle was elected Captain of Hockey. C Padley was elected Captain of Bethune House Hockey. In the New Boys' Race which was run on November 16th., Am- brose iii. came first, Goodfellow came second, and Galloway third. In the New Boys' Boxing Competition those who won their weights were: Wynn, Kirkpatrick, Vaughan iii., Powell, Goodfellow, Ambrose iii., West and Gibson. The New Boys' Gymnasium Competition was won by Chadwick. O'Brian ii. was second and West was third. MR. W. M. OGLE It was with universal and very great regret that we said "Good- Bye" to Mr. Ogle last term when he left to take up an important appointment on the staff of the Royal Military College. He came to us in September 1923 from a post on the staff of the University School in Victoria, B.C. An honour graduate of Glasgow University and a.n athlete of reputation in Scotland, he took charge of the English and French teaching' in the School and also from the very first took an active TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 part in School games. It did not take long for everybody to realize that he was a first rate teacher not only in his special subjects but practically in any subject of an ordinary School curriculum. He combined enthusiasm and patience, breadth of view and a minute attention in detail, all of which contributed to the great success he had in the Class Room. He was unsparing in his efforts to take a share in all our activities: from September 1925 until June, 1930. he was Editor of the School "Record" and during that time he more than maintained the high standard which it held when he took it over. He was a prominent member of the Modern Languages As- sociation of Canada and also graduated at Toronto University in Pedagogy. For two season Mr. Ogle coached our first Football team with great success. During the last year the team did remarkably well and were defeated in only one game. Our very best wishes go with him and his wife and family in their new home at Kingston. GIFTS T0 THE SCHOOL On June 20th. Mr. Geldard, on behalf of the masters and boys in the School in 1930, presented to the School a portrait of Dr. Orchard. in recognition of the energy and enthusiasm with which he has worked for the School during the years following the fire. The painting was the work of Mr. E. Wyly Grier. Mr. Geldard said he only wished that the hanging of the picture in the dining-hall should be delayed as long as possible, because the Headmaster did not want it to be hung there, until after he had left the School. The Headmaster received the gift on behalf of the School and expressed his appreciation of the form it had taken. He said that. when he had first heard of the projected painting, he had hoped that it would be possible for it to be done by Mr. Grier. The sit- tings for Mr. Grier had been a delightful experience. The artist concluded the ceremony by saying a few words of thanks to Dr. Orchard and to the School for their reception of his work. The portrait represents the Headmaster in his robes as Doctor of Divinity, and it is generally considered to be a very good likeness. Mr. Percy Henderson has very generously given to the School his own numbered and framed print of the portrait of the late Mr. Dyce Saunders. This is now hanging on the walls of the vestibule of the Trinity House. li TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Svprrrli Eng This year Speech Day was held on Wednesday, June 24th. In the morning the School attended divine service in St. Mark's parish Church, where the sermon Was preached by the Very Reverend A. Carlisle, Dean of Montreal. His Honour, the Lieutenant-Governor, and Mrs. Ross were at the service. The Prize-giving took place at 2.30 p.m. in the gymnasium. The prizes were presented by the Lieutenant-Governor, and the athletic cups, by Mrs. Ross. Among those who visited the School on Speech Day were:- the Lord Bishop of Toronto, the Reverend Dr. Rigby and the Misses Rigby, the Reverend, the Provost of Trinity College, Toronto, Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Baldwin, Mr. G. B. Strathy, Mr. and Mrs. Britton, Osler. Mr. Gordon Osler, 'Mrs. du Moulin, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. H. Cassels, Mr. and Mrs. P. Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. Bridger. PRIZE LIST Sixth Form T. D. ARCHIBALD Divinity lset Ar: Presented by The Bishop of Toronto. VV. G. COX 3rd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by 1'D'Arcy Martin, Euq. The Jubilee Mathernzitical Exhibition: Matheniatics: The Dr. Jones Prize 'l'. P. MOSS General Proficiency, Christmas 1930: Presented by "E C. Cattmach, Esq. Thr- C'hrnrellor's Prize in M:-mory of Rl. A. VVorrell, Esq. lst f,:0llPl'2ll Pmfir-iem-y leqnzilr, Midsummer 1931: Presented by - L. H. Baldwin, Esq. The lifrorgf- l.eyr--ster Ingles Prize for Classics Vlth Form Siggnifief: Old Boy Donor of Prizes I TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD ll. BI. PONVPZLL The Chance1lor': Prize in Memory of SJ. A. Worrell, Esq. sl General Proficiency tequalb, Midsummer 1931: Presented by UA. Harcourt Vernon, Esq. Frencli H. STIKEMAN The Petry Prize for History and English Literature The Armour Memorial Prize Ontario-Fifth Form W. ARMOUR lst General Proficiency, Midsummer 19313 Presented by ZPG. B. Stipzthy, Esq. VV. H. BROUGHALL General Proficiency, Christmas 1930: Presented by Dr. Rigby W. J. MICKLE Divinity rset Bb: The f:Bishop Brent Memorial Prize A. D. PORTEOUS 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by S. Clarke, Esq. McGill-Fifth Form A. BYERS General Proficiency, Christmas 1930: Presented by WC. A. Bogert, Esq. Greek: Presented by The Rev. Dr. Bethune G. D. GOODPELLOW 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by S. Bletcher, Esq. The Petry Prize for History and English Literature L. G. JOHNSON lst General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by PA. J. Price, Esq. The Petry Prize for History and English Literature Upper Fourth Form B. H. BECK 1st General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by :FG. Crowther, Esq. :f:Signifies Old Boy Donor of Prizes 5 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD G. BONNYCASTLE 3rd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by iiD'Arcy Martin, Esq. J. C. GIBBONS General Proficiency, Christmas 1930: Presented by The Old Boys' Association P. ROUGHTON The Petry Prize tor History and English Literature J. WARDEN 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented in Memory of SD. VV. Saunders, Esq. Lower Fourth Form ST. G. BOYD The Petry Prize for History and English Literature Divinity lset DJ: Presented by f1The Archbishop of Nova Scotia. M. GIBSON General Proficiency, Christmas 1930: Presented by The Old Boys' Association W. G. GREENFIELD Divinity iset Cl: Presented by The Old Boys' Association J. T. M. GUNN lst General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association H. MOORE 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association U plrer Remove Form S. DEAKIN 3rd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by G. B. Allan, Esq. A. GRAYDON Special Prize for French J. V. KERRIGAN 4th General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association 'Signifies Old Boy Donor of Prizes TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD PETER OSLER General Proficiency, Christmas 1930 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by ZFP. D. DuMoulin, Esq. M. K. REID lst General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association Special Prize for Mathematics The Rev. A. Bethune Scholarship W. B. REID General Proficiency 1Middle Removei, Christmas 1930 Divinity lset Al E. CUTLER General Proficiency 1Middle Shelli, Christmas 1930 Middle Remove Form J. ARMSTRONG lst General Proficiency tequali, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association J. BARBER 1st General Proficiency tequall, Midsummer 1931: Presented by Judge H. A. Ward R. HOLMES 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association W. VALLANCE Divinity lset Bn Lower Remove Form D. PATTON General Proficiency, Christmas 1930 General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association Upper Shell Form M. ALLAN General Proficiency, Christmas 1930 lst General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association i:Signifies Old Boy Donor of Prizes 10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD N. BRIDGER 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Azsociation R. VAUGHAN 3rd General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association Middle Shell Form D. WIGLE General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association Divinity fset AJ Lower Shell Form J. GREER Divinity lset Bl F. GIBSON General Proficiency, Midsummer 1931 T. L. REID General Proficiency, Christmas 1930 Special Prizes THE BRGNZE MEDAL .............,..,...........,.,............. .... . P. R. Usborne Head Prefect's Prize: Presented by the O. B. A. ............ P. R. Usborne The f:Rev. F. A. Bethune Scholarship lSenior Schooll to be awarded at Christmas. The Margaret Ketchum Prize ...... ...,,..,........................ J . V. Kerrigan Photographic Competition .,.......,...... ........... S . Deakin Workshop Competition .......................... . ....... W. Vallance Musical Study in the Upper School ..,................................,.. R. M. Powell ll-Ionourable Mention: W. G. Cox: A Graydonl Choir Prize .. ..,.........,......,,.........,.,......,.....,,................,.....,..,.............. Fleming ll-lonoui-alole Mention: W. L. Curphey: H. E. Irwin! A'I'HLl'l'l'll' PRIZES AND TROPHIES Captains Cup: Presented by :ffRev. J. Scott Howard, and bat J. A. Irvine Best Bntsman: E. C. Curry Challenge Cup, and Bat: Presented by 1'-Norman Seagram, Esq .....,.......... R. A. Pacaud Best Bowler: Bat Presented by The Headmaster ....... ...... J . B. Rogers TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD ll Best Fielder: Old Boys' Challenge Cup, and Ball: Presented by :f:D'Arcy Martin, Esq. ....................,..............,........ C. A. Heurtley General Improvement: Bat Presented by the Professional T. D. Archibald Best Littleside Batsman, Challenge Cup: Presented by an Old Boy, and Bat ...............................,.,..........,.. .... P eter Osler GYMNASTICS Bigside: Best Gymnast: Prize presented by E. Price, Esq. ......................,......,.....,.................... R. E. Chown Littleside: Best Gymnast: The 1fiGwyn L. Francis Challenge Cup J. Greer FOOTBALL The Jamie Eaton Cup held by Captain of 3rd XIV ....... ...... C Brown TENNIS The iiWotherspoon Challenge Cup for Open Singles ....,.......... CHALLENGE CUPS FOR ATHLETIC SPORTS The f:EWart Osborne, half mile, open ........... ......,..,...,,..... R . M Powell The SR. S. Cassels, 100 and 220 yards, open ..... ...... J . O Combe The L. L. McMurray, 120 yards hurdles, open ...,.. ........ H . B. Savage The Montreal, quarter mile, Littleside ............... .....,...... I . Waldie The W. Jones, 220 yards, Littleside .............,.............. W. H Cutten The :1:McGee Littleside, gymnastics, boxing, cross country . W. H. Cutten The G. Osler, Littleside, all round athletics ............ W. H Cutten The The Grand, Bigside, all round athletics .... J. A. Irvine and T. L. Taylor -f1Mudge Cup for Highest Aggregate in Sports , ....... J. O. Combe INDI VI DUAL PRIZES The ffCo1. C. J. Ingles Cup for The Best Shot ..................., F. Kilgour The Sergt.-Major's Cup for Best Cadet ..........,......... R. B. Wotherspoon The Bradburn Cup for Best Boxer in School .,.................. T. L. Taylor Oxford Cup-'?Winner: Cup ....,....,.,................... ....... J . C. Combe -iSecond: Mug ..... ......,. R . M. Powell wi'Third: Medal ....,....................,.....,...........,..,... R. A. Pacaud i'Presented by :f:The Thompson Brothers. INTERFLAT QNOVV INTER HOUSEJ CHALLENGE CUPS HELD BY BRENT HOUSE IFORMERLY LOWER FLATJ Bigside Football: Given by :f:Morgan Jellett, Esq. Littleside Football: Given by PA. J. Dempster, Esq. lj TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Bigside Hockey: Given by WP. Campbell, Esq. Middleside Hockey: Given by T. H. McLean, Esq. Littleside Hockey: Given by H. Matheson, Esq. Bigside Cricket: Given by i:Seagram Brothers Middleside Cricket: The f:Ford Stuart Strathy Cup Littleside Cricket: Given by Teviotdale, Esq. The Oxford Cup for Cross Country: Given by Old Boys The fBethune Cup for Best Platoon HELD BY BETHUNE HOUSE lFORMERLY UPPED FLATJ Middleside Football: Given in memory of Rev. C. Cayley The :1iRead Cup for Athletics Shooting Gymnastics NOT AWARDED The Headmaster's Cup for Kicking and Catching Football The Debating Cup: Given by W. P. R. Bridger, Esq. JUNIOR SCHOOL PRIZES-MIDSUMMER, 1931 GENERAL PROFICIENCY First Form First Prize ..... ........................ ......... G . H. K. Strathy Second Prize .... ...,...,............................,..........,.. A . Mc D Ferguson Upper Second Form First Prize ...,, ....................................... ............. C . J. Seagram Second Prize .... ,........,................................ ....... J . G. Kirkpatrick Middle Second Fomi First Prize .. ,. ..,.................................,........... ........ W . H. G. Pavey Lower Second Form First Prize ,,.. .....................,..,.................... ....... J . L. Agnew Second Prize .... .... ,,...,.. . ...........................,. ...... D . K . Dawes I'pprer Third Form First in Flxnniinations ,.,... .......................,.............. ...... W . B. Rogers First in Final Order ............................. ......,.... ........ R . H. Tippet Lower Third Form First Prize .. .,..........,..............,.. ....... P . Hessey-White Drawing Prize ..... ....... H . H. Wright TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD III Special Prizes First Form ................. .,....,...,..,.,.....,...A.,., ...,,.A.. R . A. Fortye Upper Second Form ..... ......,L . A. V. L. Mills Middle Second Form ..................,................,..,,,..,..,.... ...,..,. W '. R. WVright The Martin Memorial Prizes Scripture-First Prize ,.,..,.....i.... ...,...............,...,.,,.... A . Mc D. Ferguson ASecond Prize ,......... ....... G . H. K. Strathy -Third Prize ........,.,... ..,.......... J . S. Gibson Third Form Prize ..,.i. ....,...,.................,.,.......... R . H. Tippet Third Form Drawing Prize ..,.......,........,...,.,..,..,..........,..........,..., W. Mood Music Prizes ...,............,.,....,.......,.,...... G. H. K. Strathy and VV. B. Lowe iHonourable Mention: C. H. Truax, P. G. St. G. O'Brian, H. L. Henderson and C. J. Seagraml Reading Prize and Challenge Cup CPresented by S. Read, Esq. ........ J. W. W. Worthington Prize for Dramatic Interpretation lPresented by Miss G. Petryl .... ............ H . S. Morrisey The Headmastens Cup for Boxing ....... ............. W . H. G. Pavey The Esmonde Clarke Challenge Cup .....,.............. P. G. St. G. O'Brian The Cricket Captain's Bat ........................,............... P. G. St. G. O'Brian Mrs. Cassel's House Cup for Athletic Sports ........ The Bethune House The The The First Second Third Fourth Fifth Hamilton Medal fPresented by Miss Vera Martini ............ A. D. McGinnis and P. G. St. G. O'Brian Bethune Scholarship .........,......................... .............. A . D. McGinnis Entrance Exhibition to Senior School .........,.......... A. D. McGinnis i:Signifies Old Boy Donor of Prizes CRICKET COLOURS Team:-Archibald, Heurtley, Irvine, Lockwood, Mickle, Pa- caud, Rogers, Usborne. Tennis-Dawson, Hall, Neville ma., Padley, Savage ma., Tay- lor, Warden, Whitehead max. Team:-Ambrose max., Chown, Clarke, Corbett, Dawe. Heighington, Holton, King, Pullen, Savage max., Swaisland, Wigle max., Wotherspoon. Team:-Baldwin, Baly max., Cox max., de Pencier, Gunn. McCloskey, Patterson, Powell, Ross, Southam, Trenholme, Wilkie. Team:-Cassels, Cochrane, Curphey, Gibson max., Kerri- gan, Osler ma., Robson, Spragge, Somers, VVhitehead ma., Wigle ma. 1.1. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD CRICKET AVERAGES BATTING Times Highest Innings Not Out Runs Score Average Usborne .,.. 8 0 36 10.62 Heurtley .... 8 1 17 8 Taylor .,.. 8 0 11 4 Pacaud .... 8 2 36 11.5 Irvine .r.. 7 2 38 14.4 Lockwood .... 6 1 16 7.4 Warden .... . 5 0 10 4.2 Padley .... 5 0 27 9 Mickle .... 5 1 9 4.5 Rogers ..., .. 5 1 8 4.5 Archibald ,... 5 3 2 2 BOWVLING Overs M.O. Runs Wickets Average Mickle .... 81 16 18 9 Irvine .... 92 20 25 8.08 Rogers ..., .. 44 9 15 6.06 Lockwood .... 7 -- I-Ieurtley ..,. 8.5 1 4 7 TOTALS Opponents T.C.S. Peterborough 72 for 10 wkts. 47 for 10 wkts. Kappa Alpha 65 for 10 wkts. 87 for 10 wkts. Peterborough 102 for 7 wkts. 48 for 4 wkts. S. A. C. 116 for 10 wkts. 123 for 10 wkts. II. C. C. 76 for 10 wkts. 44 for 2 wkts. Ridley 108 for 10 wkts. 104 for 20 wkts. R, H. Merry's Team 51 for 10 wkts. 82 for 3 wkts. 590 for 67 wkts. 535 for 59 wkts Opponents' Average per wicket: 8.8 runs. 'l'. V. S. Average per wicket: 9.3 runs TILIIQIVLNQJ' COLLIIGII SCHOOL IZIICOQID lf, 1-Xnmual Sparta. 1531 The sports were held during the first week of the term. The heats took place during the course of the week, and the finals were held on Saturday, September 19th. The weather throughout was ideal for athletics. The competition for putting the shot was rein- troduced after a lapse of three years, and proved popular. By far the finest performance was that of Combe, who won five out of the six Bigside events, which he entered. He appeared to win the mile and the hundred yards with equal ease. It was mainly due to his excellent running that Brent House regained the Read Cup from the Bethunes. OPEN EVENTS 100 yds.-1. Combe, 2. Ambrose max., S., 3. Cowperthwaite. 220 yds.-1. Combe, 2 Ambrose max., S., 3. Wynn. 440 yds.-1. Combe, 2. Savage, 3. Ambrose max., S. 120 yds. Hurdles-1. Wynn, 2. Savage, 3. Combe. Half Mile-1. Combe, 2. Holton, 3. Ambrose max., S. Mile-1. Combe, 2. Powell, 3. Ambrose max., S. Throwing the Cricket Ball-1. Robson. L90 yds.l. High Jump-1. Southam, 2. Reid ma., 3. Powell. Q4 ft. 91-3 ins.i. Broad Jump-1. Savage, 2. Wynn, 3. Ried max. C17 ft 1 3-4 ins.l. Putting the Shot-1. Broughall, 2. Wynn, 3. Wigle max.. 133 ft. 311 ins.l. MIDDLESIDE 100 yds.-1. Cutten, 2. Chevalier, 3. Osler ma. P. 220 yds.-1. Galloway, 2. Turpin, 3. Waldie. 440 yds.-Ml. Cutten, 2. Powell, 3. Wigle ma., D. 120 yds. Hurdles-1. Wigle ma., D., 2. Spragge, 3. Cochran. High Jump-1. Powell, 2. Wigle ma., D., 3. Cochrane. L4 ft. 912 ins.i. Broad Jump-1. Wigle ma., D., 2. Peck, 3. Holmes. L16 ft. 1 in.i. LITTLESIDE 100 yds.-1. Cassils ma., M., 2. Russel ma., D., and McGinnis itiedl. 220 yds.--1. Russel max., D., 2. O'Brian ma., P., 3. Cassils ma., M. 440 yds.-1. Russel max., D., 2. Armstrong, 3. O'Brian ma., P. 120 yds. Hurdles- 1. Nelles, 2. Cassils ma., M., and Russel max., D. ltiedl. High Jumpel. Reid mi., W., 2. Cassils ma., M., and McGinnis. C4 ft. 4 ins.l. Broad Jump-Rathbone, 2 Cassils ma., M., 3, Price. 114 ft. 1 in.i. ii, TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD THE CHALLENGE CUPS The Read Cup was won by .................,...................... ....... B rent House Osborne Cup-Half Mile ......4.......,...............4 .... J . 0. Combe L. L. McMurray Cup-120 yds. Hurdles .... ............. V . Wynn Montreal Cup-440 yds., Littleside ........... .... D . Russel max. W. W. Jones Cup-220 yds., Littleside ........ ..... D . Russel max. Elinnthall The 1931 season was very unsatisfactory. The School, with the best team in many years, failed in the crucial Little Big Four games. After beating Pickering 10--3, Trinity 26-5, and the R.M.C. Juniors 14i3, the School were looked upon as having the best chance of winning the championship in years. But, when the big chance came, they did not pull through. Against S.A.C., who were a lighter team, the School line played well, while the half line were guilty of many misplays. Perhaps this accounted for the poor spirits of the team. They had no life, and S.A.C., who showed fight all the way, beat the School rather well, 15a-5. The next week, resolved to do better, the School, again against lighter opposition, were beaten. U.C.C. fought all through the game, while the School only showed real fight in patches. U.C.C. were outplayed but not outfought. The School should have played for single points instead of the major scores. In the last game, the School really came to life for the iirst half and played like demons against Ridley, who had beaten S.A.C. and U.C.C. Although we gained a lucky touch, the School dominated the play and were leading at half time. After half Lime, however, we lost our tight, and Ridley piled up a commanding lead. It was unfortunate for the School that the wind dropped during the last quarter. The main reasons that the School lost the Little Big Four games are that they did not iight and that they were too self-confident. It can be seen now that several changes might have been made that would have strengthened the team. The School were unfortunate in not getting a coach until after the R.M.C. game. However, Mr. Britton did his best with the team, as is shown by the Ridley game. The team could have had no bet- ter coach, and it is unfortunate that he did not come earlier. The team owes a great deal of thanks to Dr. Maynard, who did TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 all that was humanly possible to make the team win the champion- ship. They were fortunate in staying at the Royal York on two occasions through his kindness. Next year the team must carry one great lesson with them- - fight all the way. If nothing else will win the game, iight will. LITTLE BIG FOUR GAMES Oct. 24 S.A.C. 15 T.C.S. 5 at Aurora Ridley 43 U.C.C. 3 at St. Catharines Oct. 31 U.C.C. 9 T.C.S. 5 at Port Hope Ridley 20 S.A.C. 0 at Aurora Nov. 6 Ridley 18 T.C.S. 13 Varsity Stadium Nov. 7 U.C.C. 8 S.A.C. 6 U.C.C. grounds Ply'd. Won Lost For Ag'st. Pts. :1:B.R.C. 3 3 0 81 16 6 U.C.C. 3 2 1 20 54 4 S.A.C. 3 1 2 21 33 2 T.C.S. 3 0 3 23 42 0 iiMRidley wins the Championship. FIRST TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. PICKERING COLLEGE At Pickering, October 3rd, Our first game this year was against Pickering College. Pick- ering having played in Port Hope last year, we journeyed to New- market. Pickering gave us a very good game that was well worth the dusty field and the hot day. In the first period the School, playing under the O.R.F.U. rules, started off with a rush and gained yards several times before Pickering were able to stop them. Wynn and Ross did some fine plunging. Pickering were forced to kick and the School again marched up the field to within scoring distance. From about 30 yards out Ross kicked a touch in gaol for the School. Pickering soon retailiated and, after picking up a fumble, Rayner kicked to the deadline for Pickering. The School, in the second quarter, with the wind behind them started a march down the field, but fumbles and offsides forced them to kick. The Pickering half line fumbled and Duncanson fell on the loose ball, about 15 yards out. With perfect interference, Ross coasted over for an easy touch. It was not converted. 'l.l lflf 'vig W. Broughall L. Cowperthwaite S. Ambrose The Headmaster W. Wynn J. Rogers C. NiCh01s J. Barber J. Grant Robson Q S-I 2 Va cd P' ei QD ,Q E o U 'S TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 159 The School worked the ball down the field again and, after hold- ing Pickering, were in a scoring position, from which Ross kicked another deadline. The School's defence was excellent and Pickering never gained yards, being forced to kick. The School, helped by the strong wind at their backs, gained yards on the exchange of kicks, and Ross soon hoisted another deadline. The half ended with the School forcing Pickering back into a scoring position. T. C. S. 8. Pickering 1. I In the second half the School lost their spirit for a few minutes and Pickering forced the play: they were beginning to recover from their surprise and the School were forced back. With the wind be- hind them, Pickering scored a rouge, when Rayner kicked a long punt. Soon after the play started again the School made a few offsides and were forced back to their 25 yard line. Here Rayner kicked another of his long spirals to the deadline. In the next few minutes of play the School were helped by off- sides and too much interference by Pickering in their hard attempts to crash the defence. If it had not been for these offsides Pickering might have scored. In the third quarter the School picked up once again and soon had Pickering back in their own half of the field. The team was working more smoothly now and with the wind behind Ross was soon able to kick a long ball to the deadline. The School condition was now beginning to tell and Pickering were soon forced back into their own territory. With a good end run engineered bv Taylor the School were in a good position to kick to the deadline again and Ross's trusty foot finished the scoring for the game. From then on the School held the Pickering team back in their own part of the field, and the game ended with the School close to the Pickering goal line. T. C. S. 10. Pickering 3. TRINITY COLLEGE vs. THE SCHOOL At Port Hope, October 15th. This game was played on a slightly damp field that seemed to suit the School's play. Trinity were not up to full strength, and consequently the School had things pretty much their own way. The firstehalf was played under O.R.F.U. rules. In the first few minutes of play the School were forced back into their own territory, but the line held and Trinity were forced to kick. The QU TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD School then began a march up the field with some good running by Combe and some fine plunging by Duncanson, Ross and Wynn. This finally resulted in a touchdown for the School, Wynn going over. From then on the School looked as though they would have the game their own way. Soon after, by means of some hard plunging and running, Ross went over for the School's second touch. After the kick-off the School faltered for a minute or so on their 10 yard. line. 'Srinity got their only points of the game when Welch broke through on an end run and intercepted a pass. The try was not converted. In the second quarter the School again forced the play, some nice runs in the open field being made by Combe, Wigle, and Duncan- son, while Wynn, Ross and Broughall plunged well. The School weze in scoring position twice and Wigle kicked one rouge and Ross the other. Near the end of the quarter the School worked the ball down the field, and Wigle plunged over for a touch. Half time: T. C. S. 17. Trinity 5. In the third quarter the School's condition began to tell. This quarter was more or less a repitition of the second. After a nice long run by Cowperthwaite and a fine plunge by Wynn, Duncanson plunged over for a touch, which Ross converted. In the fourth quarter the School kept the play pretty well down in the Trinity half of the field, and Ross and Wigle were able to kick three points. Trinity tired rapidly, and the School dominated the play hut were unable to cross the Trinity line. Final score: T. C. S. 26. Trinity 5. THE SCHOOL, vs. R.M.C. JUNIORS At Kingston, October l7th. Thin was one of the most enjoyable trips that the team had this fazisnn. R.M.C. were very good hosts and allowed us to have lunch in the mess, :in exceptional privilege for civilians. The School were weakened in this game, Duncanson and Brough- all hr-ing out with injuries. R.M.C. had a heavier line. lt was a nasty clay for rugby. Snow and rain fell all through the g'tm.- :md left the field about an inch deep in mud, with the result that the ball was extremely difficult to handle and fast tricky plays were impossible. The first h'tlt' was pl iyed under Junior Intercollegiate rules. li.M.C. kicked-o:'t'. anti, on the first down, Wynn plunged for about 20 yards. This set the School on their feet and they gained a. great deal of confidence. However, they were forced to kick. Wigle's TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q1 kick was partially blocked, but Combe picked up the ball and, dodging and side-stepping all the R.M.C. tacklers, he ran 45 yards for a touchdown. Ross converted. R.M.C. threatened the School goal line by completing an excellent forward pass, Harris throwing to lianxilton, when they were unable to make yards along the line. This demoralized the School slightly but they fought on and held the Cadets for the rest of the quarter. T.C.S. 6. R.M.C. 0. In the second quarter the School kept up their sound defence and gained yards a few times. chiefly. on bucks by Ross and Wvnn R.M.C. again surprised the School and completed a forward pass, Harris to Phillips. This brought the ball close to the School's line, but the School fought magnificiently and R.M.C. were forced to kick. Combe and Taylor were able to run the ball back only a short dis- tance. The School rapidly worked the ball up the field by bucks and on the exchange of kicks, so that Wigle was able to kick to the deadline. Near the end of the period R.M.C. kicked, and Combe and Taylor fumbled the greasy ball which bounded behind the School line. However, Taylor saved a touch when he kicked the ball to deadline for a safety touch. Half time: T.C.S. 7 R.M.C. 2. In the second half the field was in a deplorable state and the ball not much better. The School did not play as well under the Little Big Four rules and R.M.C. continually broke through the weakened left wing on the kicks. R.M.C. started off with a rush and broke through the School line for yards. The School found its feet and from then on it was a ding dong battle, both lines finding it hard going and fumbles being frequent. The School line was a bit stronger and first Wigle and then Ross broke through to block R.M.C. kicks. Ross started a thrilling race down the field, dribbling the ball. The ball hit the goal post and he picked the ball up and went over for a touch, which he converted. T.C.S. 13. R.M.C. 2. In the fourth quarter a kicking duel developed between Ross and Phillip. The School usually had the conventional two bucks and a kick, the bucking being done by Ross and Wynn. Ross kicked a better ball than Phillip and very soon he was able to hoist a long punt for a rouge. R.M.C. started a final rush, but it was too late and they were only able to score a rouge kicked by Phillip. Wynn and Cowperth- Waite combined for a nice gain for the School to finish the game. Final score: T.C.S. 14. R.M.C. 3. -jj TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD THE SCHOOL vs. ST. ANDREVVS COLLEGE At Aurora, October 2-ith. The School's sad and unfortunate Little Big Four Season opened in a wet day and on a muddy field. A slight wind was blowing up and down the field which gave S.A.C. a slight advantage in the first quarter. The School did not open the game with their accustomed rush and seemed to be dead on their feet. After the kick-off the School's line showed their ability by holding their lighter opponents and forc- ing S.A.C. to kick. Combe and Taylor misjudged the catch and the School found themselves deep in their own territory. They were forced to kick, but Webster and Donnelly were held in their tracks. The School line gained yards several times, but their work was un- done by the fine backfield work of Webster, and the misjudgment of several catches by the School's backfield. S.A.C. made some nice gains by end runs, but the School line held fairly well. S.A.C. 0 T.C.S. 0. In the second quarter the School woke up a bit, but were unable to score. S.A.C. held them fairly closely. It was a repetition of the first quarter. However, after a few minutes had elapsed, S.A.C. secured possession on the School's 45 yard line. Here in a beauti- fully executed end run, McKay passed to Webster, who dodged several School tacklers before running over for a touch. Thompson converted. The School lost their spirit and a listless battle ensued. How- ever, a nice play around the end by Duncanson and Cowperthwaite resulted in Cowperthwaite running about 60 yards before he was tackled. This set the School on their feet again, and, on the next down, Broughall plunged for about 15 yards. But the School were forced to kick. Ross kicked a high short one and the School's chances to score were lost. The School, however, forced the play, and when the half time whistle blew, they were in a scoring position. Half time: S.A.C. 6. T.C.S. 0. At the beginning of the second half Barber replaced Broughall who had been injured. The School again seemed dead on their feet, and S.A.C. forced the play and were within scoring distance. The School line held, however, and Webster kicked a rouge. After some misplays by the School, S.A.C. again worked the ball into scoring position and Thompson kicked a drop. The Schools hopes and spirits were again low, but a nice run by Cowperthwaite set the team on their feet, although offsides and no interference kept them from scoring. . , . S.A.C. 10. 'I.C'.S. fl. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 23 At the opening of this quarter S.A.C. were in possession about the School's 35 yard line. They completed an onside kick and on thc ncfct play Smith went over for a touch from about 5 yards out. It was not converted. The game see-sawed back and forth about midfield for a while. The School's plunging by Ross, Wynn and Duncanson being offset by poor catching in the backfield. In the last few minutes the School started a do or die attempt with a number of onsides. Some were completed. ln the last few minutes the School came to life and showed some good fighting spirit. Ross plunged through for about 35 yards, and, as he was tackled, he passed to Combe who had only one man to pass, but he was tackled on S.A.C.'s 25 yard line. Wigle grabbed a loose ball after an onside about 19 yards out. Wynn plunged for about 7 yards and Ross carried the ball over for a touch on the next play. He failed to convert. The School put on a dying rush, but they had been asleep too long and were unable to score more points in the remaiing few min- utes. S.A.C. 15. T.C.S. 5. Line-up:-F.W., Wigle max., halves, Ryerson, Combe and Cowper- thwaiteg quarter, Taylor, outsides, Ambrose ma. and Grant, middles, Ross and Duncanson, insides, Wynn and Boughall, scrim., Rogers, Nichols, Robson, Subs., Barber, Wigle ma., Holton, Dawe, Vaughan mi., W., McCloskey. U.C.C. vs. THE SCHOOL At Port Hope, October 31st. The greatest surprise of the season came when U.C.C. trirmned the School on their own grounds. U.C.C., having been defeated by Ridley on the previous Saturday, were not considered to have much chance of Winning. The game was played on a slightly muddy field, and there was a breeze blowing from north to south. U.C.C. kicked off, and the School started off as though they meant business and gained yards. They were forced to kick, and U.C.C. in turn looked like business when they gained twenty yards around their right end. The line woke up and U.C.C. had to kick. They drove the ball deep into the School's territory, and Ross was unable to run the ball back very much. The School lost some of their spirit and in the next few minutes U.C.C. were able to score two rouges. This did not seem to bother the School very much as Q4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD they began to rip holes in the U.C.C. line, and many U.C.C. plays were nailed behind the line. p , . T.c.s. 0. U.C.C. 2. ' The School started the second quarter by beginning a kicking game and soon U.C.C. were forced deep into their own territory. However, the School seemed unable to score, most of Ross's punts being short. By dint of some good plunging by Duncanson and VVynn the School moved into scoring position, and Ross kicked a high ball which a U.C.C. half fumbled, and Ryerson fell on it for the School's only points. Ross failed to convert. This gave the School life and some nice line plunges were made chiefly by Duncanson and Wynn. U.C.C.'s plays were often stopped behind their line by WVigle and Robson. Half time: U.C.C. 2. T.C.S. 5. In the third quarter the School started off badly and U.C.C. boxed them in their own half of the field. The School showed no fight, and U.C.C. after gaining their yards a few times scored another rouge. The School commenced to pull together again. A fumble behind the U.C.C. line resulted in the ball being dribbled up the field in a thrilling race. Wigle kicked it first and then again. By this time the U.C.C. players were catching up, but Wynn came up from behind and kicked the ball again. Near the U.C.C. goal lines Wigle fell on the ball. Here the School, after two plunges had resulted in only about 5 yards gain, tried a drop kick, but failed. The play stayed in the U.C.C. half for the remainder of the quarter. U.C.C. 3. T.C.S. 5. The disastrous fourth quarter definitely put an end to the School's chances for even a tie in the Little Big Four. The School, confident and not fighting very hard, began to take things rather easily with disastrous results. For the first part of the quarter the School had things all their own way, some nice gains being made by end runs. Feeble kicking kept the School from scoring. U.C.C. got a break when Cowperthwaite fumbled behind the School line, and they drib- blecl the ball up the field. However, Combe saved the day by falling on the ball about a yard out. In the list few minutes U.C.C. in a dying attempt to score a touch tried a number of kicks with a man onside. With about three niinutes to go, they at last succeeded. Buckhart kicked a high hall mar the deadline, and Combe fumbled the catch. The man onside picked up the ball and dodging a tackler, passed to Bowes, who i-:in over for a touch, which was converted. The School tried a dying rush and worked end runs with great TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q5 effect, Cowperthwaite, Combe and Taylor making some nice gains. but it was too late, and U.C.C., having showed fight throughout the game, finished ahead. Final score: U.C.C. 9. T.C.S. 5. Line-up:--F.W., Wigle max., halves, Combe, Cowperthwaite, Ryerson, quarter, Taylor: outsides, Grant Ma. and Savageg middles, Ross and Duncansong insides, Broughall and Wynn, scrim., Rogers. Robson, Nichols: Subs., Wigle ma., Whitehead max., Barber, Vaugh- an mi., Cassels, McCloskey, Ambrose max., Dawe, Holton. THE SCHOOL vs. RIDLEY At Varsity Stadium, November 6th, In the last game of the Little Big Four the School somewhat redeemed themselves. Until half time the School forced the play and were the better of the two teams. There was a strong wind blowing up and down the damp field which gave Ridley an advantage in the first and third quarters. The School kicked off and Ridley immediately started a kicking game. Before long the School were fighting with their backs to the wall. Powell, Ridley's kicker made some wonderful punts. Soon Ridley were in possession on the School's 25 yard line. On an ex- tension play, Nichols with some fine interference, Went around Rid- ley's left end for a touch. Powell converted. The School forced the play and gained yards a few times. Ross, Wigle and Wynn bucked well. Ridley were held along the line, and sometimes plays were broken up behind the line. Ridley fumbled the ball, and Wigle dribbled the ball up the field. Unfortunately a Ridley player fell on the ball, the School only getting a rouge. The School held Ridley in their own half of the field, but were slowly and surely forced back by Powell's magnificent kicking. Just before quarter time, Powell kicked from Ridley's 20 yard line, and the ball bounded about the School's 25 yard line. Ross and Cow- perthwaite were forced to run back to make the catch: one of them touched the ball, and, when they finally recovered the ball behind the School's line, they were tackled for a safety touch. Ridley 8. T.C.S. 1. In the second quarter thc School turned the tables and soon marched down the field, the wind helping Ross's kicks. The Ridley halves fumbled on their 10 yard line and Wigle recovered. In two attempts by Wynn and Ross the School failed to cross the line, but on the third attempt Ross went over for a touch which he converted. Q6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The School played well and fought all the way, Ross, Duncanson and Wynn plunging well. The School, soon within scoring distance, kicked. and the Ridley half line fumbled, Duncanson fell on the ball for a touch to put the School in the lead. With the wind behind, it was only a matter of time before the School had gained yards on the exchange of kicks, although both lines held fairly well. The School half line did not fumble a ball, while Ridley's backs were not so sure. Soon Ross was able to kick for a single point. With two minutes to go, Wigle received a five minute penalty for high tackling. Half time: Ridley 8. T.C.S. 13. In the third quarter, Ridley took advantage of the wind and soon piled up a great lead. Ridley were unable to gain much on the line and our tacklers stopped the Ridley halves dead in their tracks. The School, being on: short, were unable to make much headway along the line, and Powell's kicking soon put Ridley in a scoring position. Within a short while, Ridley had kicked three rouges. Ross and Cowper- thwaite were catching faultlessly, but were unable to run the ball out. The School had lost their fight now, and many of their plays were broken up behind the line, Ridley breaking through to the right 'ind left of centre. Ridley were in possession about 25 yards out, and Powell kicked 'i placement to put Ridley in the lead. Before the end of the quar- ter. Powell again kicked two rouges. Ridley 16. T.C.S. 13. In the four-th quarter, the School started to fight once more, but their greatest help and Ridley's greatest help-the wind-died away. and the School were unable to kick for points. Thr- School's rally was soon stopped and Ridley gained yards several times. They kept the School back in their 25 yard line, gaining 'advantage on the kicks. Powell was able to kick two more rouges. The School put on a dying spurt and made some effective gains. Wigle was kicking now a little better than Ross. However, Powell ran bark one of the kicks and was stopped by Wigle on the School's 25 yard line. The School gained yards and were about mid-field, when the whistle blew to end a fine game and a most disappointing and un- satisfactory season. Final score: Ridley 18. T.C.S. 13. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD jf Line-up:-Hilves, Combe, Cowperthwaite, Ryerson, quarter, Tay- lor, Wigle: outsides, Grant ma. and Savage: middles, Ross and Duncanson3 insides, Broughall and VVynn3 scrim., Rogers, Rob- son, Barberg Subs., Wigle ma., Whitehead and Vaughan mi., Nichols, Little, Holton, Dawe, Cassels, McCloskey. Ambrose max. SECOND TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. APPLEBY SCHOOL On Thursday, October 15th., the second team travelled to Oakville to play Appleby School's first team. The first half of the game. in which Appleby was vastly superior, was played under C.R.U. rules, while the second half was played under Little Big Four rules, under which the School held their own against the heavy Appleby wing line. In the first quarter, Appleby used the forward pass extensively, and as a direct result of four of these passes, they scored a rouge, a dead-line and two touch-downs which were both converted. Wigle II kicked a single for the School in the closing minutes of the quarter. 11 time score: Appleby 14. School 1. In the second quarter the School took on a new lease of life and held Appleby scoreless, until with about ten second to play, Cassels I was rouged far behind our line. 12 time score: Appleby 15. School 1. Early inLtl1e third quarter Appleby scored a touch-down on a T.C.S. fumble. which they converted. A. few minutes later one of our kicks was partly blocked and McCloskey recovered the ball for our first touch-down. Wigle II. converted it. Appleby added a single to their score in the last few minutes. . 34 time score: Appleby 22. School 7. . In the last quarter Wigle II showed a vast superiority in kicking over the Appleby kicker. But the School only managed to score two points, when Nichols threw one of their men back for a safety- touch. Their halves gave a marvellous display of running kicks out from behind their own line during this quarter. Vaughan III, Nichols, and Wigle II were the best for the School, while Cassels I caught well in the backfield. Final score: Appleby 22. School 9. SCHOOL vs. PICKERING SECOND TEAM On Tuesday, October 20th., Pickering College Second Team came ll fm '-"vfQ7:i' e". fieifiiif lnagggs 2 mia.-1,51 Ha ,'n,4, i 'yi Q., F! ,- . Z,-'T i AL' 'B,s ,.: lg. I 5.l,'1 WI 'l's"'1f1':,:'l l:I:!51'l2liQ W. Whitehead A. Graydon P. Cassels D. Wigle R. Nesbitt T. Trenholtne C1 S E rx: 2 C5 Q2 3 G3 Q M 'C 'a as E- 2 O o 2 L11 as 'U IA UI QB 31.31 :no O J as .31 s-4 S O Di cv I5 fi J E CI cvs .-C! bn I3 C6 IP fc o o U5 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD jj!! here to play thc Second Team. VVhilc under Little Big Four rules during' the first half of the game, the School had the edge, but under C.R.U. rules in the second half Pickering showed their superiority. The School started with a rush, and, early in the first quarter, Wigle ii., receiving the ball from Dawe, skirted the left end and ran about titty yards for a touch. Another three points were scored when Wigle ii. rn ide a drop-kick. 14 time score: Pickering o. School 8. During the second quarter Pickering, kicking from hihind their goal line, knocked the cross bar off the goal posts. In the confusion the School scored at safety-touch. 'Wigle ii. kicked the ball into touch behind the goal line for another point. Pickering scored a touch-down on a long plunge. 12 time Lcore: Pickering 5. School 11, In the third quarter the School unsuccessfully tried a forwird pass. Then Pickering intercepted a pass on an end run and scored a touch-down. They tried several forward passes which were not completed. 529.1 time score: Pickering 10. School 11. Pickering completed two forward passes in last quarter, scoring a touch-down on the second. Dawe made several good runs. Wigle ii. kicked to the dead line, and shortly after the School scored a safety touch. Dawe, Vaughan iii. and Wigle ii. were the best for the School. Final score: Pickering 15. School 14. THIRD TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. SEATON HOUSE SENIORS At. Port Hope, October 17th. In their first match of the year the School beat Upper Canada College Seaton Seniors 42 to 0. From the start it was evident that we had the edge on them, although they proved the faster team. The Iinal score comprised seven touch-downs, of which Heurtly made three, one converted touch, and one dead-line. Pullen, Cutten and Padley all made exceptionally long runs. And, on the whole, all our men played extremely well. SCHOOL vs. PICKERING THIRDS At Port Hope, October 20th. This match was close and exciting throughout. At the end of 0151 rbi? -Q5 9' W LED Hr? 64 .1 LBJ L 1, e?hfw.. I 139 I-L l'l.l'l' llllll HIFI.: vb LE, M, : .E .31 C5 an Q C5 C! Q9 'U G3 P-4 O3 3 ci' U2 EJ ai E0 5 2 E Q E a C D-4 2 a Cd 5 I3 O U2 Q P. Spragge Cutten 3 9. 2 fc ee Q4 C5 E 'CII GQ C cu 2 Z3 CL f-S TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 the iirst half the School was in the lead 9 to 5, having made a touch and a rouge in the first quarter and three more rouges in the second. Pickering also made a touchdown in the first quarter. In the last half the forward pass was used. This put our boys off their game for a while, thus enabling Pickering to score a dead- line and two drops. But the School came back in the last half of the fourth quarter, and Knox was able to fall on a blocked ball be- hind the opponent's goal, scoring a touchdown. This brought the score 14 to 12 in our favour. Before the game was over another rouge was added, making the final score: School, 153 Pickering, 12. SCHOOL VS. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE On Thursday, the 22nd. of October, the third team played the Upper Canada College under-seventeen team at Toronto and were beaten 21e2. Padley, the Captain, was unable to play, having been hurt in the previous game. U.C.C. obtained an early lead by scoring a touchdown and were never in real danger from then on. The School was much lighter than their opponents and was unable to make interference for any of the plays. Hall outkicked the U.C.C. kicker, which saved the School from being defeated by a greater score. SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE. October the 24th., at Lakefield. The game was played on a very wet field, and at times it rained heavily. The team was depleted by injuries, and before the game had been under way long. Knox and Hall were hurt. From beginning to end the game went very much in favour of the Grove. Hall kicked the School's only point in the first quarter. Throughout the game, the School's playing was far below the form shown in other games. The tackling was very poor and the offen- sive weak, and the School was only able to hold the very smart plays of the Grove for a short time in the last quarter. The final score was 61-1 for the Grove. SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD FIRSTS At Port Hope, October 3lst. In the first quarter the School started off the score with a dead- line. Lakefield then drove us up the field and succeded in crossing nj TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD the line for a touchdown, which was converted. In the second quarter Laketield came within a yard of our goal, but our men were able to stop their bucks and hold them down. However, before they were driven back, they scored a dead-line. Soon after this Hall made a beautiful end-run and carried the ball forty yards to Lake- iield's twenty-yzird line. In the next play Padley went through and scored a touch. It was converted by Hall. Lakefleld made one mor: deadline in the course of the quarter and the first half ended with Lakefield one point ahctd. In the third quarter both teams played very hard and neither was able to score. But in the last quarter Lakefield came through on top. Their bucks worked wonderfully. Time after time they made yards. At last they kicked a beautiful placement, followed by a deadline. The School then rallied and gained a few yards, but it was too late. The game ended: Lakefield, 123 School, 7. FOURTH TEAM MATCH SCHOOL vs. U.l'.l'. SEATON SENIORS At Toronto, October 29th. In the first few minutes of play the School scored a dead-line. It was followed a few minutes later by a rouge by Upper Canada. In the course of the quarter we made two rougesg and Upper Can- ada made another rouge and a dead-line, thus bringing the quarter to an end with the score three-all. In the next quarter Upper Canada broke through on an end run and scored a touch. From then on the points began to pile up against the School. After U.C.C. had made a touch and a dead-line, the iirst half ended: School 3: U.C.C. 16. Upper Canada continued their onslaught in the second half. They mad: yards nearly every time and drove us right down the field. Their superiority in weight wore us down. In the third quarter they mztdv three touchdowns, making the score 32 to 3. Our men rallied in the final quarter and played to their utmost, :allowing only two additional points to their opponents. The game ended: 34 for Setton House: 3 for the School. FIFTH TEAM MATCHES SVIIOOI. vs. l..XKl'll"Il'Il.ll SECONDS .Xt Port llouv, Ovtolwr I5th. The inte-:ost ot' the gzinic was centred on the last quarter. Al TU Q on 2. D9 I3 F E? 5 UQ CD r-P O I3 97 TU SD rv- D' cr O U CD 2951.105 'H 2 :U CD 3 QF ou S3 :of-4 EZ M5 FD'-s 'F' H15 9-9 S U2 r+h-l- Q 72' 'QU 52 wa 33 f' rf S" 203 9' ,'3.mC1 UQ"SO Qvfbo :Un cz. 3 FW FUND 3.2 'ofhib QDSH H B 5. m if 9-23 UQ wo H.: n-A 55 af- IIPIISDOS 'H K Aaq ow - SIUUHD uoslom 'M -a DL' Q E 1 -e Il e Q av 3 34 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD three-quarter time the score was 10-4 for Lakefieldg Lakefield having made their points on two touchdowns, and the School theirs on a rouge and a drop-kick. ln the fourth quarter the School rallied. A dead-line by Bell was followed by a drop made by McGinnis: after this another rouge was made. With less than tive minutes to play, the score being 10 to 9 against us, the School made every effort to score the winning points. Everything was running smoothly until Fletcher, of Lake- iield, snatched the ball on a fumble and ran forty yards for a touch- down. After this the Fifth struggled to recover so great ,a loss, birt only succeeded in scoring a rouge at the last whistle. Lakeield won 15 to 10. SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE October I7., at Port Hope. Seaton House Juniors started off well by scoring a touchdown in the first few minutes. However, the School came back strongly and a fumbled ball behind the U.C.C. line resulted in a touchdown for the School. From then onwards the School had much the better of the game, and at the end of the first half the score was 23-11 in favour of the School. In the second half th-ree more touchdovsms and two rouges were added, while U.C.C. went scoreless. Rathbone, Staunton, McGinnis and Bell bucked well, and the team as a whole played well together considering the extremely bad weather conditions. SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD October 28th, at- Lake-field. The gqiine opened disasttrously for the School, when Lakefield blocks-tl a kick and scored a touchdown which was converted. From then on until the fourth quarter the School showed a marked superiority. Keefer made a forty yard run, through the whole Lake- field team, which resulted in a touchdown, and McGinnis kicked two drops, making the score at half time 11-6 for the School. Five rouges and two drop kicks by McGinnis completed the scoring for the School in the second half, while Lakefield added another touch- down. which was also converted, making the final score 22-12 for the School. The team showed a great improvement on their playing in the first game with Lakefield, and this was mainly due to good coaching. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 35 SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE October 30th, at Toronto. This game, like the first with Seaton House Juniors, was played in very bad weather conditions. Play was very even in the first half, but in the closing minutes Seaton House Juniors scored a rouge and a touchdown which was not converted. At the start of the second half the School evened up matters, when Bell crossed the line for a touchdown which was converted. A touchdown and a rouge for each team completed the scoring, and the game ended in a 12-12 tie. Hingston made some long gains in the line and Curphey tackled well, while Algie starred for U.C.C. HOUSE MATCHES BIGSIDE On November lith., Brent and Bethune House Bigside met in their only match of the season. It was a perfect day for rugby, and there was not a great deal to choose between the two teams in the way of playing power. Brent House kicked off, and, on the Bethune's second down, a fumble gave the Brents the ball. A lucky kick hit the goal post and in the ensuing scramble, Wigle i. fell on the ball for a Brent touch- down which was not converted. Soon after, Grant ii. intercepted a long lateral ,pass and rain 60 yards for a touchdown, which tied up the game. Brent House forced the play in the second quarter, and Ross kicked two drops, making the score at half-time: 11-5 for the Brents. Bethune House kicked 01? at.the start of the second half, and Combe almostbroke away, but was finally tackled by a Bethune back. However, the Bethunes played hard and scored two rouges in quick succession, only to have Brent House tighten up and score ten points in return. The game ended on the Bethune one yard line with Brents in possession of the ball. The final score was 13-7 for Brent House. The Brent victory was lnrgely due to the superiority of their half line over that of the Bethunes. Ross and Wigle ma. caught fault- lessly. Wigle ma. outkicked Vaughan mi. nearly every time, and Brent House gained yards on the exchange of kicks. The game was very hard fought throughout, and both teams showed better playing form than has been see all season. :gli TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD MIDDLESIDE FIRST MATCH September 29th. In the iirst few minutes of play the Bethunes scored a rouge fol- lowed by a touchdown by Cox on a blocked kick. The Brents then tightened up and the remainder of the quarter was scoreless except for another rouge for the Bethunes. In the second quarter the Be- thunes scored one rouge, both teams playing equally well. When the whistle blew the Brents were only a few yards from their op- ponents' goal, Osler ii. having just completed a beautiful thirty-yard run. The first half ended with the score 8---0 for the Bethunes. In the last half the two teams played very hard, only one point was scored. In the third quarter Padley made a gain of fifty yards for the Bethunes, after getting an on-side kick. In the last quarter the Bi-ents made their sole point on a rouge. They again came very close to the Bethune goal, but were unable to break through their opponents' strong defence. The final score was: Bethunes 83 Brents 1. SECOND MATCH November 3rd. The game was hampered throughout by a driving rain and a high wind. In the iirst quarter both teams scored dead-lines. Then, three yards from the Brent goal, the Bethunes sent Heurtley through on a buck to score a touchdown. In the following quarter the Be- thunes scored a rouge. Osler ii., a Brent, on a marvelous run, car- ried the ball from his own thirty-yard line to the Bethune twenty- yard. The Brents, spurred on by this, got within ten yards of the Hr-thunc goal, and Cochran succeeded in putting a placement over th- lizir. No further points were made and the score at half time w is T -1 for the Bethunes. In the third quarter both teams played equally hard, but the Brents 1-finie out with two more rouges to their credit. For the most part of tht- final quarter the Brents were kept at their end of the field. Hall. zi Bethune, with the wind in his favour kicked many long punts. The Bethunes scored four more rougesg and, as the Brents fails--l to store again, the game ended, a victory for the Be- thunes ll to T. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD IST LITTLESIDE FIRST MATCH September 29th. At the beginning' of the game the Brents carried the ball to the Bethune five-yard line: but they were driven back to centre-field. In the last two minutes of the quarter, Kerrigan put a drop-kick over the Brent goal. In the second quarter the Bethunes added five points to their score by a touch made by Bell, and another one on a rouge. At half time the Bethunes were leading 9 to 0. Early in the third quarter Godshall took the ball over the Bethune line for a touch. During the remainder of the quarter both teams wavered in centre-field. The score was brought to QA8 in the last quarter when McGinnis made a drop-kick. However, it did not re- main thus for long. O'Brian made a thirty-yard run taking the ball to two yards from the Brent goal. Bell went through on a buck and scored the final touchdown. The game ended: Bethune, 143 Brent, 8. SECOND DIATCH November 5th. Brent House started off with a rush and managed to score two touchdowns, which were not converted, in the first ten minutes, while Bethune House replied with a rouge and a safety touch. Early in the second quarter the Bethunes, on a Brent fumble, made a touch- down which was converted. This proved to be the turning point in the game. At half time the score was 13-e10 for the Bethunesg a drop kick by Kerrigan and a rouge having been added to the score at the end of the first quarter. In the second half Bethune House resorted to kicking and a rouge was scored by each side. The game ended just after Brent House had scored another point, making the final score 14--12 for the Bethunes. Rathbone made some long gains for Brent House, while Bell kicked well for Bethune House and the tackling was good on both sides. The game was very closely contested, and the issue was in doubt right up to the very last min- ute of play. rg, TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD FOOTBALL COLOURS First 'l'enm:-Broughall, Combe, Cowperthwaite, Duncanson, Grant ma., J., Robson. Rogers, Ross, Ryerson, Savage, Taylor, Wigle max., F., Wynn. Extra Colours:-Ambrose max., S., Barber, Nichols. Distinction Caps:-Duncanson, Ross, Ryerson, Wigle max. F., Wynn. Second Team:-Cassels, Dawe, Holton, Hyde, Little, Lockwood, Mc- Closkey, Reid ma., T., Trenholme, Vaughan mi., Waldie, Whitehead max., Wigle ma., D. Extra t'olours:-Nesbitt, Graydon, Clarke. Third 'l'cum:-Braden, Cochran, Cutten, Doolittle ma., R., Hall, I-Ieurtley, Knox, Padley, Powell, Roughton, Spragge. Extra Colours:-Beck, Deakin, Pullen, So.utham. Fourth Team:-Ambrose ma., D., Ambrose mi., P., Bickle, Cox, Cut- ler, Grier, Patch, Reed max., Rice, Ridpath, Seagram, Stone Turpin, Wilson. Ext-ru Colours:-Osler ma., P., Wood. Fifth Tezun:-Armstrong, Bell, Fortye, Godshall, Grant max., R., Hingston, Keefer ma., McGinnis, McLaren, O'Brian ma., P., Rathbone, Reid mi., Staunton. Extra Colours:-Bilkey, Curphey, Kirkpatrick, Molson, Red- path, Russel max., D. 9 THE KICKING AND CATCHING COMPETITION The kicking' and catching competition for the Headmaster's Cup was held this term during October, for the first time since 1928. All members of Bigside Football, who were not injured at the time took pail in this competition. Points Maximum .. 495 Brent House , .. . ,..... .. 297 Bethune House .. . , .,....,,....,. .. 255 The- Pup was won by Brent House. The inrliviilual winner was Ross, who scored 35 points. Lock- wriml :mil 'I'ri-nholrm- were the runners-up with 34132. THE OXFORD CUP The Oxford Vup inter-house cross country race was run Lhii' year on Now-iiih.-r Zmh. Owing to rain the night before the ground TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 39 was very muddy and slippery, making the running difficult. The race proved to be more exciting than was expected, as it was not until the seventh entrant came in that the outcome became evident. Combe and Vallance ii. led round the course, and were followed most of the way by Vallancei. Combe Hnished first, making the run in 22 minutes and 45 seconds. The second and third places were taken by Vallance ii. and Vallance i., respectively. Brent House won by three points, thus retaining the cup which they have held for the last four years. As Combe was the winner last year, he is the second boy in the history of the Cup to win it two years in succession. The summary:- Brent Bethune Combe .......... .......... ,.... 1 V allance maj. ...,....,.. .... 2 Ambrose max. ..... ..... 4 Vallance max. 3 Powell .......... .... ..... 5 G ibbons .,........ .... 6 Wigle max. ..... ..... 7 Knox , .......... ..... - 8 Bonnycastle .... .... 9 Stone ..... ......- 1 0 QE 29 THE IVICGEE CUP The McGee Cup was won this year by O'Brian maj.: out ot a possible 30 points he scored 19. A close second was Price. McGin- nis came third. Summary:-A Running Boxing Gym. Total O'B1-ian ii., P. 5 4 10 19 Price .......... ..,. T 4 5 16 McGinnis ...... 10 3 123 Redpath ..... 1 4 7 12 Goodfellow 10 10 Rathbone ...... 3 4 7 Passey .... ............ 1 1 VALETE Archibald, T.--VI. Form, Prefect, lst. XI.: 2nd. XIV.: Srd. VII.: Oxford Cup. Baldwin, W.ARernove A Form: 4th. XI. Bethune, J.-IV. B Form. 40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Boyd, St. G.eeIV. B Form: Brent Middleside XIV.: Oxford Cup. Brown, C.ee1V. B Form: Bethune Iviiddleside XIV.: lst. VII. tCapt.l 3rd. XI. Brainerd, T.e4VI. Form: 4th. VII. f' Byers. A.-McGill V. Form: Littleside Gym. VIII.: 5th. VII. Carr-Harris, A.-V. Form, 2nd. XIV.: 2nd. VII. Chown, Rf-V. Form: lst. XIV.: lst. Gym. VIII.: 3rd. XI. Cox, W.eVI. Form: Brent Middleside XIV.: lst. Gym. VIII.: 4th XI.: Choir. Dakin, K. e-Remoe B Form. Dawson, D.-VI. Form: Prefect: lst. XIV.: 2nd. XI. cle Pencier, A.-V. Form: lst. XIV.: 4th. XI. de Regil, G.-Remove B. Form. Douglas, F.eeV. Form, lst. XIV.: 2nd. VII. Gibson, M.-IV. B Form: 5th. XI.: 2nd. VIII.: Choir. Goodfellow, G.--McGill V. Form: Bethune Middleside XIV. Greenfield, W.--IV. B Form: Choir. Greer, J. -Shell B Form: Littleside Gym. VIII. Harrington, E.-McGill V. Form: lst. XIV.: lst. VII.: 3rd. XI. Holmes, J.aV. Form: Brent Middleside XIV.: lst. Gym. VIII. Hume. .I.eMcGi1l V. Form. ,X Hunter Cf eV. Form. Irvine, J.. AVI. Form: Prefe-xt: lst. XI. lCa.pt.l: lst. XIV., lst. VII.: lst. Gym. VIII. Irwin, I-I.--IV. A Form: Choir. Johnson, L.eeMcGill V. Form. Kilgour, F. eeIV. A Form. King, T. eVI. Form: 3rd. XI. Law, D. VI. Form. Macnutt, G. XVI. Form. Mann, M. -IV. B. Form: 2nd. XIV. Mc-Crea, A. -VI. Form: Brent Middleside XIV. Moss, P. VI. Form: Head Boy: Bethune Middleside XIV. Neville, D. V. Form: Prefectg 2nd, XIV.: Choir. Neville, G. VI. Form: Bethune Middleside XIV.: Choir: 2nd. XI. Oswald. D. VI. Form. lst. XI.: Oxford Cup. Paterson, H. IV. B Form: 2nd. XIV.: 3rd. VII.g 4th. XI.: lst. Gym VIII I'orte-ous, .-X. V. Fnring 2nd, XIV, Powell, li. YI. lfoim: Head Boy: Ist. XIV.: 3rd. VII. tCapt.l: -ith. XI.: fmxforcl Cup. Reid, M. V. I-'urnig 2nd XIV, Pucaud, R. McGill V. Form: Brent Middleside XIV.: 2nd. VII.' TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .Ll Ross, J. K.4Shell B Form: Brent Littleside XIV.: Choir. Savage, G.-AVI. Form: 2nd. XIV.: 3rd. VII.: 2nd, XI. Shaw, H.eV. Form. Staunton, Af -Remove A Form: Brent Middleside XIV.: 3rd. VII. Stikeman, H.eeeVI. Form. Usborne, P. R.eeAV. Form: Head Prefect, Bronze Medal: lst. XIV. 1Capt.1: lst. XI.: lst. Gym. VIII., 3rd, VII. 4Capt.n: Oxford Cup. Warrell, T.4Shell C Form: Choir. Waugh, J.-Remove .B Form. Wilkie, D.-IV. B Form: Bethune Middleside XIV.: 4th. XI. Wilkie, T.-Shell B Form: Littleside VIII. Williams, R.-IV. B Form. Woods, L.-V. Form. Worrel, J. C.-V. Form: 2nd. XIV. lCapt.l2 3rd. VII. Wotherspoon, R.-VI. Form: lst. XIV.: lst. Gym. VIII.: 3rd. XI.: SALVETE Parent or Guardian H. S. Ambrose, Esq ............ Choir. Name Ambrose, P. J. Cassils, M. H. ........... .... . Chadwick, W. S. Galloway, D. ................. . Goodfellow, C. W Hyde, G. G. ................... . Laileur, A. P. Locke, R. S. ..... . Mitchell, J. S. ..... ....... . Nichols, C. ....... . Peck, H. S. ......... ....... . Powell, W. H. ..... ....... . Russel, H. D. S. West, R. T. ......... ....... . White, W. L. C. Williams, A. M. Wynn, V. J. ..... . .A. C. Cassils, Esq .......... R. E. Chadwick, Esq. ....... . D. E. Galloway, Esq ........... G. C. Goodfellow, Esq ....... Address .Hamilton, Ontario .....Montreal, P. Q. Westmount, P.Q. ....Montreal, P. Q. ....Montrea1, P. Q. G. G. Hyde, Esq ..................... Montreal, P. Q. Dr. H. A. Lafleur '...... ...... M ontreal, P. Q. W. F. Locke. Esq ....... ........ M ontreal, P. Q. M. VV. Mitchell, Esq ............. Sherbrooke, P. Q. M. E. Nichols, Esq ....... ....... W innipeg, Man. Mrs. Peck ............................ M. G. Powell, Esq., Mrs. H. Y. Russel ................ ....Montreal, P. Q. .........Ottawa, Ont. ....Montreal, P. Q. Elmer West, Esq ......... Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. Albert H. White, Esq ......... Mrs. M. E. Williams .......... G. M. Wynn, Esq ...... ........Regina, Sask. ....Montreal, P. Q. ......Montreal, P.Q 42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD fliatrirulatiuu ilieaultzi, 1931 HONO U li MATRICULATION Ontario 1Conipletve1 T. Archibald, W. Cox max., D. Law, G. Macnutt, A. McCrea, P. Moss, G. Neville ma., R. Powell, R, Wotherspoon. Honour Mzitriculution 1Partial1 fi. Ambrose 1611 E. Armour 1613 B. Beck 1213 G. Bonnycastle 1213 XV. Broughall 1212 L. Cowperthwaite 1113 J. Cox 1112 K. Dawe 111: D. Dawson 1211 F. Douglas 1113 E. Ede 1113 J. Gibbons 1313 G. Goodfellow 1213 VV. Greenfield 1213 E. Heighington 1413 C. Heurtley 1913 C. Hunter 1113 J. Irvine 1313 L. Johnson 1213 F. Kilgour 1113 T. King 1313 M. Mann 1113 W. Mickle 1213 R. Nesbitt 1213 D. Oswald 1813 A. Porteous 1513 M. Reid 1213 S. Ryerson 1113 G. Savage 1513 H. Shaw 1111 H. Stikeman 1513 P. Usborne 1113 J. Warden 131: L. Woods 1213 J. Worrell 141. PASS MATRICULATION Ontario 1Con1plet'e1 E. Armour, B. Beck, G. Bonnycastle, W. Broughall, K. Dawe, E. Heighingtou. W. Holton, P. Howard, T. McConnell, M. Reid, P. l-iougliton, J. VVorrell. Mt-Gill 1l'mnpl1-te1 A. Byers, P. Chevalier, G. Goodfellow, A. Grier, J. Hume, L. John- son, T. King, P.. Pacaud, R. Patch, F. wigle. ' ' Ontario 1Partial1 11. A111111-oso 121: J. Band 1313 J. Bethune 1513 St. G. Boyd 1713 C. lirowii lgllff.. Cfhown 1313 H. Clarke 1213 J. Cleveland 1613 L.. 1'ow1113-i'11iwziite 11313 .I. Cox 1412 A. dePencier 1511 C. Doolittle 1713 1-'. Imiiglas 1311 A. Duncanson 1211 E. Ede 1713 H. Ford-Smith 1513 .!. flibbons 1313 M. Gibson 1813 W. Greenfield 1313 M. Gunn 1711 J. Holmes 1513 C. Hunter 1213 E. Irwin 1413 F. Kilgour 1313 H. Little 1511, W. Mic-kle 1113 H. Moore 1613 R. Nesbitt 1213 D. Neville llfll ll. l':1tt-rson 1111 111. Roberts 1413 S. Ryerson 1513 F. Southam 1-11: .1 Stem- 1-11: 'l'. 'l"iylor 1513 P. Usborne 1111 J. Warden 1613 D. Wilkie 1313 L. Woods 111. sIlh.i0'1'tS Pass:-cl from the Remove Form .l. Barber 1113 'I'. Il. Bickle 1611 R. Birchall 1413 W. Braden 1213 A. Burpee 111: P. Cassels 1511 E. Cutler 1613 R. Doolittle 1113 F. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 425 Ede 1213 R. Grant 131, R. Holmes 131, W. Leadbeater 1515 P. Mc- Closkey 121g Peter Osler 1612 J. M. Patton 1213 M. Reed 1615 W. B. Reid 1515 C. Ridpath 1511 P. Spragge 1213 G. Vallance 1115 W. Vallance 1111 G. Vaughan 151. Mc-Gill 1Purtial1 W. Brainerd 131: A. D4 Browne 1713 C. S. Deakin 131g E. Harring- ton 1l13 R. Newman 1811 C. B, Ross 1411 H. Savage C511 D. Thom- son 161: K. VVilson 171. The following Scholarships at Trinity College were gained at the Matriculation examination last June: The WVel1ington Scholarship in Classics, the Bishop Strachan Scholaizihip in English, French, Greek and Lating the Reverend F. A. Bethune Scholarship in General Proficiencyg all these were won by T. P. Moss. The Professor VVilliam Jones Scholarship for Mathematics was awarded to W. G. Cox. VV. G. Cox also won an entrance Scholarship to the California Technical Institute at Pasadena and we have just heard that he has been awarded ihe Drake Scholarship for Freshmen at that College. THE MUSIC CLUB The growth of interest in music in the School is very gratifying, particularly so, as this is only the beginning of the second year of life of the Music Club. This increasing interest augfurs well for the fu- ture of the Club. A small but enthusiastic group gathered together early in the term to appoint officers and discuss plans for the year. The following were elected. Secretary-Ambrose max. Librarian- -Cutler. Committee-Stikeman, Chevalier, Molson, Holmes. On November 29th. the first of the Music Club concerts took place. Mr. Vino Harisay, Mr. Marcus Adeney, and Mr. Sly played a programme of trios by Mendelssohn, Brahms and some more modern composers. On December 5th., Mr. Milton Blackstone, a member of the Hart House Quartette, gave a very delightful viola recital, assisted by Mr. Sly at the piano. We are indebted to Mr. Hiscocks and Mr. Sly for two sets of 44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD records which they have przsentcd to the Club, a Symphony in C major by Mozart, and a String Quartette in F minor by Haydn lthe same one that was played by the Hart House Quartette on their visit hereb. Records of eight Preludes and Fugues by Bach were purchased with Club funds. Unfortunately the victrola has been out of order most of the term but it is now in use again. Owing to the keenness of a number of members, Mr. Sly has consented to give short talks on musical appreciation to certain members of the Club next term. Mr. Sly is making arrangements to have a number of concerts next term by visiting artists. S. H. A. THE GLEE CLUB At the beginning of this term a Club was formed at the instiga- tion of Mr. Sly, with the object of encouraging the singing of chorus and other harmony works. Quite an interest has been taken in this by ll large number of boys, and already a performance has been given, in the form of two sea shanties, which was one of the features of 11 Music Club concert. Although, at the present time, the Club's repertoire is rather limited, a Norwegian song, by Grieg, for male voice, is now being added, which ought to offer, in the near future, excellent entertain- ment. ln spite of the fact that only one practice a week is possible, considerable progress has already been made, and we look forward to :i year of success and musical enjoyment. The officers are: H. B. Savage, captain, and J. G. Warden, sec- retary. THE LITERARY SOCIETY Only three old members of the Society were left at the beginning of the term. Of these Broughall was elected Secretary, Cowper- thwaite, Treasurer, and Ambrose max., a member of the Committee. Fifteen new members have restored the numbers to last year's total, :ind we new have as many members as can be conveniently seated in the Reception lttonrn. So for we have repeated two of last year's most successful plays, "The Skin Game' and "Jo.urney's End"g we have also read Shaw's, "The Devil's Disciple" and "Caesar and Cleopatra" and Oscar Wilde's TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 45 "Importance of Being Earnest". "Journey's End" was as usual received with enthusiasm. Perhaps the most popular of the other plays was "The Importance of Being Earnest". At the beginning of the term, owing to the inexperience of most of our members, the meetings were below the standard of last Lent term. Since then the 'readings have improved considerably, and there appears to be plenty of talent and variety in the Society. Our visitors have been Mrs. Lewis and Colonel Stevenson, whose reading added greatly to the success of the meetings which they at- tended. On the whole, the Society has had a satisfactory term, and judg- ing from the experience of last year, we may look forward to even more enjoyable meetings in the future. THE T.C.S. SCIENCE AND ARTS SOCIETY This year the Society was slow in getting on its feet, and it was only after the half-term week-end that any definite move to map out a program was made. Then a general meeting of the members took place. It was decided that a competition would be held at the end of this term for the best Christmas present made by the boys. Since then the work-shop has been busy all the time, as most of the boys seem to turn to carpentry. A large assortment of new tools has been purchased, and it is hoped that we shall soon have a lathe. As the cost of the tools was considerable, our hopes for a lathe are rather feeble, unless some friend or Old Boy could help us in this respect. The School is greatly indebted to Mrs. Culvervvell for giving us the collection of sea shells and flint arrow heads made by her father, Mr. J. L. Hill. This valuable collection is now placed on shelves, also provided by Mrs. Culverwell, on the walls of the Science and Arts Club Room in the School Buildings. We hope that this col- lection will form the nucleus of our School museum, and that one clay this treasure will be housed in a separate building provided for that purpose. The International Nickel Company of Canada, Ltd., have pre- sented a walnut tray with samples indicative of their refining process at Port Colborne. Several members of the Society have promised to give talks on the work of their different sections, but as yet no program of this sort has been laid out. rtfi TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The Society would be glad to have several more new members. Any boys who are interested please apply to the Treasurer. The officers for the year are: J. G. Warden, Treasurer: and J. I. S. McConnell, Secretary. THE DEBATING SOCIETY A debating society has been formed this term, and three debates will have been held by the end of the term. Our first meeting was a promising one and set a standard which makes us confident that our society will thrive. The motion that there should be no age restriction for .admission to the movies was well supported by Vvilson and I-Ieighington, while Mickle and Patch found ready arguments to limit the freedom of the child. Speeches were on the whole well delivered and there Was no dearth of speakers among the members at the meeting. By a majo-ity of two it was decided that children should be admitted to the movies without regard to age. VVe hope to have much more to say about our debates in the next magazine. The officers of the society are: President, Dr. Orchardg Chair- man. Mr. Evans: Secretary, Xifigle max.. Committee: Savage, Patch and Nichols. Qlll1Il1'ill1Ili1l1I5 Valparaiso Callao About fifteen months ago I set out on a short ocean trip between Valparaiso, in Chile, and Callao, in Peru, a journey of some fifteen hundred miles. Valparaiso is quite the best harbour on the Pacific coast of South America. In all other ports, steamer-s have to berth in an open roaclstead, and communicate with the shore by means of lighters and launches. Here, however, a ship is berthed alongside a wharf, and much trouble is saved. The city itself, when viewed from the ocean, presents a majestic panorma. An ample circle of hills is backed by the snow-capped peaks of the Cordillera. The palaces, villas, and churches are all modern, as older buildings have failed to survive the numerous earthquakes. Indeed, until recently, all buildings were of low structure as a safe-guard against subterranean upheav- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .lf alsg now, however, with the invention of stronger building materials, new scope is offered to the architect, and, consequently, here and there, a small skyscraper may be seen. In the bay itself, and tied up to the wharves are cargo-boats, tramps, and liners of every nationality. Valparaiso is one of the biggest ports in the Pacific. At noon we steamed out of the dock and headed north for An- tofagasta. All that day and the next we remained out of sight of land. I spent my time, like everyone else, making new acquaint- ances and renewing old. About tea-time on the second day out, we passed a big American liner on her way to Valparaiso from New York. The following morning a change of surroundings was to be seen. When I went on deck for a walk before breakfast, we were already lying at anchor off Antofagasta, the second biggest port in Chile. It is about 640 miles north of Valparaiso, and is one of the principal ports in the Bolivian transit trade, having special warehouses for the storage of goods coming to or from that country. The break- Water had been broken down two or three days previous by a gale, and men were busy rebuilding it. We had anchored about a mile off shore, but did not stay long and were soon out to sea again. After lunch we touched at Mejillones, a mineral port some 37 miles north of Antofagasta. By about tea-time we were under way again, our holds full of copper and iron. After tea a friend and I went down to the engine-room with the Chief Engineer. 1: was very in- teresting to see the huge pistons working and to hear the beat of the propellers on the Water, as we followed the shaft up to the stern. Iquique is the principal port in northern Chile and is a great centre for nitrate and iodine. It was at Iquique that our ship stopped the following day. The city was founded in the sixteenth century, and has since been destroyed several times by earthquakes. lt pre- sents a very picturesque appearance. There is an English colony and an English club which I visited, and a race course, golf course, and yacht club. After lunch the ship again got under way and we headed north for Arica, the last port in Chile, or the first in Peru qaccording to Peruviansb. Arica is a pretty town from the sea. There is much more greenness around it than in any towns just to the south or north. Two friends and I went ashore just after breakfast, and, as at Iquique, spent our time in exploring the town. It is built at the foot of the Morro headland, and is fringed with sand hills. The Morro was the scene of a great battle in 1879 between Chilean and Peruvian forces. The town is strongly fortified. 45 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD By three o'clock we were again at sea. Next morning found us anchored off Mollendo. Only passengers disembarking for good were allowed to leave the ship, the surf being too heavy and dangerous. These poor people had to be hoisted in and out of the launches by large cranes with seats on the cables. That afternoon we noticed an immense increase in the number of birds and sea animals, such as the porpoise and dolphin. Peru is renowned for her coastal animal life. That night the captain held a dinner, and the passsengers disembarking at Callao were toasted. All next morning we continued up the coast which was in plain sight. However, about two o'clock, we ran into a dense mist, of which the sea near Callao is never free, although the harbour itself is usually bathed in sunlight. Sure enough, about three o'clock We emerged from the fog-bank to find ourselves surrounded by ships of every size, sort, trade, and nationality, while ahead lay that world famous port-Callao,-gateway to the "City of Kings." -W. B. R1 Nebuchadnezzar I was introduced to him, in the early days of my childhood, through the medium of that haunting nursery rhymner- Nebuchadnezzar, the king of the Jews, Sold his wife for a pair of shoes. When the shoes began to wear, Nebuchadnezzar began to swear. I imagined him to be a fat, sly, old Jew, with cunning little eyes, and 'i long pendulous nose. I saw him standing on his palace door- step, rubbing his oily hands together in obsence delight, as he palmed off his oldest, and ugliest, shrew of a wife upon the humble shoe- vendor in exchange for a noble pair of red shoes, woven with gleaming gilt traccry, and turned up orientally at the toes. I re- joiced excziediiigly, however, that the simple vendor had been too cunning for the old reprobiite, and that the shoes had proved to be shoddy. lt served Nebuchadnezzar right. I wondered how the shoe- vendor got on with the discardsd wife. Perhips he sold her to someone else. After it time I was initiated into the thrilling stories of the book of Daniel, listening to them with round eyes and bated breath, and my conception oi' Nebiu'hadnezz:ir underwent a change. I soon reiliscd that hc- was not :i .lew at all, and so he lost his pendulous misc. Hc if-muined frit in my imaginationg but now he had grown TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .til pompous and vain, and rather fatuous. He was always blowing his own trumpet, :ind doing silly things: trying to make out that he was equal with God. God, of course, would not put up with this for a moment: so Daniel, God's hero and champion, was kept busy pricking the bubble of his inflated vanity, and making him acknow- ledge that he w3sn't a god at all. I loved to identify myself with Daniel, and imagined 'how bravely I would have remonstrated with the fat, pompous old fool, until he came humbly to ask me to inter- cede for him. When I grew up I became interested in ancient history, and my ideas of Nebuchadnezzar passed through a further metamorphosis. I found, to my astonishment, that he was by nc means a kind of foolish old Aunt Sally, but a man of action and intense energy, one of the dominant characters of the ancient worldg and I was moved to admiration of his excellent qualities. I decided that he could hardly be fat: that his activities gave no indication of senilityg and that he certainly was no fool. I read with enthusiasm of his great victory over Pharaoh Necho at Carchemish, a decisive battle of the world, and realised that he was one of the greatest of war-lords. I swung to the other extreme, and gave him a niche in my gallery of world heroes alongside of Alexander, Hannibal, and Napoleon. Not long ago I visited most of the well-known Babylonian mounds, and on the majority of them I found huge masses of bricks with Nebuchadnezzafs inscription stamped on their centres. It is clear that he must have driven a corner in these indispensable adjuncts to civilization, and controlled the market. He doubtless fixed his own price, and amassed an enormous fortune. The amazing success of his financial operations must have turned his brain, so that he became mad, and ate grass like an ox. What a warning to plutocrates! We may yet see Mr. F-d living in a kennel and gnawing at a bone, or Mr. R.--? swinging from the branch of a tree and cracking nuts. Perhaps I was hasty in discrediting the nursery rhyme of my childhood's days. It may have been derived from the work of some historian which has been lost to the world. Hebrew genius is abund- antly evident where there has been a corner in bricks: and how could a Jew miss the opportunity of exchanging a worn-out old wife for a pair of shoes which he considered to be worth many times her value? So Nebuchadnezzar comes back again with his long. pendulous nose, and cunning little eyes, his oily hands, and 'shent per shent' smile. I have therefore evicted him from his niche in my gallery of world heroes. I think that someone else must have won the victory 50 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD of Carchemish for him, while he took the credit for it, and, perhaps, compelled Pharaoh Necho to purchase a huge consignment of his bricks. K.L.S. A Theory of Life There is a law of compensation which appears to extend its in- iiuence throughout the whole universe, and to extend its sway over things physical and spiritual. Every positive has its negative, every force its corresponding resistance, every happening its counterpart. It is as if our universe has been placed by its Creator in a finely adjusted balance: any tendency for one arm to sink is automatically corrected, and the equilibrium is preserved. The organic energy is continually being expended and lost as an active force. To make up this deficiency there obviously must be another energy which is continually growing. But what is this counterbalancing force '? It is highly improbable that Nature would allow anything to re- main that was doing no good. Temperature, atmosphere, the sea- sons, have all been regulated with meticulous care to nelp in the production of life. Physical conditions on our earth are adjusted to a nicety in order to support life, and the careful way in which this sensitive form of enargy has been fostered would seem to convey its importance in the comic scheme. Life would appear therefore to be an 'ill-important force in the Universe. Assuming that life is a creative force to counteract the inroads of decay, its presence could be explained by two theories. There is the conception of life after death. This approaches near to theology, 'ind we cannot know very definitely the parts played by human be- ings after death: but there is another and more tangible theory. Perhaps human life has a definite function, that ot producing ener- gy of a complex nature of which we know littleg man might easily be the regenerative organ for keeping the balance against decay. May not this be the form of energy that complies with the law of compensation and controls the balance against the ever-encroaching powers of destruction. Scientists have visualized a universe, after some vast period of time, as worn out and cold, its energy all expended, and its life ex- tinct. Death seems to have the last word. Several million years have been necessary for life to progress from the amoeba to man himself. The long creative process will not have been in vain if TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD QI the final achievement of human life is to balance the powers of decay. C. NEW BOY 1 A symphonic poem, maybe.J l. Piano pathctico. Stand, stand, stand, In this passage after tea, And I would that my tongue dared utter, What, Prefect, I think of thee. But thoughts like these we m,usn't ment'sh, Because, to modernise the French, We must do "ce que veulent les rois," Seniors, privileged with hench- men: us, poor, insulse serfs, new boys. 2. Fortissimo turbolento. Down the stairs, down the stairs, Slipping and sliding, Storming through corridors, Breathless, without a pause, Eyes full of stark horrors. Dare not risk hiding. Doors bang to right of them, Doors bang to left of them, Crash, slam and clatterg Yale closers ease them not, Someone's unscrewed the lot. What does noise matter? fPraetereunt multitude. Hospes loquiturzi What was that motley mob, Racing, hot on the job: Leaving what they had planned, Hasting, lest they be fanned? Had someone blundered? 52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD QR:-spondet perituszj No! Merely thundered: NEW B-O-Y- - - ! ! ! 3. Chorus, esultunte profet-ico. Happy days will come at last, When we do not have to run so fast, But we'1l make some others fly! iAuthor's note: This one not being in the School anthologies, it was impossible to get the rest of the metreg but it should end:J You just wait until we get our privileges and yell: NEW BOY! ! Notes and Exercises les rois, French, in the T.C.S. pronunciation. --insulse, somewhat archaic, but what a delightful Word. 14-horrors, an abnormal accentuation, but one which will Notes line 7-- 9 25 Exercises 1 2 present no difficulty to those who scan Browning's famous line as: "I gal1o'ped, Dirck gallope'd, we gal1o'ped all three." vfanned, an obscure word, the meaning of which is lost in antiquity. 1Easyi Write a better poem. 11-Iarderr Estimate how many dictionaries were used by. the poet in composing this gem of fantasy. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 Junior Svrliuul Numa As usual during the first half of the Michaelmas Term, we have been very much interested in Footballeour own Rugby games, those of the Senior School teams and the outside games of which we hear over the radio and about which we read in the newspaper. Scores and reports of games appear in another section of the "Record" but we should like to express here our appreciation of the hard work of Mr. Ketchum in his coaching of the Junior School team The ma- terial with which he had to work this year was lighter and less ex- perienced than that of previous years and his task has not been an easy one. We miss "Miss Petry" this year, and we would like to add our good wishes to those of the rest of the School for the happiness of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis. The Junior School sports finals took place on Saturday, Sept. 20th. Mr. James and those of the staff who assisted him are to be thanked for their successful efforts to have the various events sat- isfactorily arranged and happily completed. Rugby Football Colours are awarded to C. J. Seagram, C. H. Truax, D. H. Armstrong, J. E. Cutten and J. L. Agnew. Extra half-holidays have been enjoyed on the following occasions. Sept. 22nd, fin honour of Mr. and Mrs. Lewisl. Sept. 29th. KS. Michael and All Angelsl. Oct. 2nd. fMrs. Boulden's birthdayj. Oct. 15th. Cin honour of Mr. and Mrs. Eric Morsel. Nov. 19th. 1Oxford Cup. Rehearsals have commenced for the production of a Musical Play called the "Charcoal Burner's Son," by L. du Garde Peach and Victor Hely Hutchinson. In our next issue we should be able to give an account of the performance. ATHLETIC SPORTS The results of the events in the Athletic Sports were as follows:- 100 Yards Open - 1, Seagram, C. J.: 2, McBride, G. V.g 3, Truax. 100 Yards Open 12-1, Seagram, C. V.3 2, McBride, G. V., 3, Truax. C. H. '43 3 -p-1 FU eil EEDCL Emi ag . N U U5 ni C5 IA M S 53 g . m I in . s.. U Q . Q 3 2 1 - 5 4 as G9 . 34 oc U . . U 2 5 I . Q W an Q U5 Q1 . 3 oo E5 DQ x . O IE 2 , co U . . fc 5 . as 3 Z' S E E 5 -o . 5 x tr: 1 J C5 :d C. H. Truax J. E. Cutten J. Seagram C. D. H. Armstrong J. L. Agnew TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD S5 100 Yards Under 13-1, McBride, G. V.: 2, Truax, C. H.: 3, Arm- strong, D. I. H. 100 Yards Under 12-1, Tippet, R. H.: 2, Wood, W.: 3, Black, W. A. 100 Yards Under 11--1, Hessey White, P. D. H.: 2, Landry, P. C.: 3, Somerville, C. M. S. 100 Yards Under 10--1, Somerville, C.M . S.: 2, Parr, J. A. K.: 3, Morris, W. D. 220 Yards Open-1, Seagram, C. J.: 2, Truax, C. H.: 3, Starnes, J. K. 440 Yards Openal, Seagram, C. J.: 2, Truax, C. H.: 3, Armstrong, D. I. H. Half-mile Open-1, Seagram, C.J.: 2, Cape, E. V. M.: 3, McBride, G. V. 120 Yards Hurdles Open-1, Seagram, C. J.: 2, Armstrong, D. I. H.: 3, Truax, C. H. Throwing the Cricket Ball-1, Truax, C. H.: Q64 yds. 1 ft. 9 inj: 2. McBride, J. V.: 3, Seagram, C. H. Long Jump, Open-1, Cutten, J. E. Q12 ft. 4 in.J: 2, Seagram, C. J.: 3, Armstrong, D. I. H. Long Jump, Under 12-1, McBride, G. V.: Q11 ft. 9 in.J: 2, Black, W. A.: 3, Wood, W. High Jtunp, Open-1, Pavey, W. G. H. L3 ft. 11 inl: 2, Armstrong, D. I. H.: 3, Cape, E. V. M. High Jump, Under 12-1, Black, W. A.: 2, lfVood, W.: 3, Fleming, A. S. JUNIOR SCHOOL RUGBY, 1931. It cannot be said that Rugby, as a game, has been a success in the Junior School this year. The matches played against other Schools are always enjoyed and the fact that we were unfortunate enough to win only two of six, did not at all take away from the enjoyment of these games. But matches constitute only a very small part of the season, and it was in our daily rugby here at the School that we feel that something was much amiss. Part of the trouble was, of course, due to the fact that it was impossible to field two teams. This meant that rugby tum-outs were of necessity nothing more than mechanical drills, except when we were able to secure, on two or three occasions, some opposition from the Senior School. Drilling as a recreation is as boring to boys, as it is to coaches, and, like all things, an excess of it is detrimental to the gaining of the ultimate goal. Then again, of those boys who were qualified by age and physique 56 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD to play, we were unlucky this year in having only a few who had had earlier experience in the game, and the circumstances under which they had to learn it were far from ideal. Only five colours were awarded. But the real trouble seems to be in the game itself. Even under the best of circumstances, it involves more drill and less play tfor youngsters under fourteen, at least! than most games played on foot. And'should we take up English Rugger, for instance, there would not, at least, be any difficulty in finding a sufficient number of candidates to compose two full teams. The Team deserves to be congratulated for showing considerable improvement in the latter part of the season. Huge scores were piled up against it by the Grove and U.C.C. in the first two games, but, far from being disheartened, the Team determined to do better, and it did: No little credit is due to Seagram who was a steady player and a successful captain. A list of the matches played, with the scores, is given below. First Team Games. 1931. VVed., Oct Tth. v The Grove at Port Hope. Lost Sat., Oct 10th. v U.C.C. at Port Hope. Lost Wed., Oct 21st. v. The Grove at Lakefield. Lost 'Wed., Oct 28th. v S.A.C. at Port Hope. Won Fri., Oct. 30th. v. U.C.C. at Toronto. Lost lVecl., Nov 4th, v S.A.C. at Aurora. Won Picked Team Game Mon.. Nov 2nd, v. Elm House at Port Hope. Won Association Football Game, 1931. Sat., Nov. 14th. v. Crescent School at Port Hope. Won House Games, 1931. XVed.. Nov. llthf ewon by Bethune House. Mon., Nov. 16th.-A-won by Rigby House. Tues .,Nov. 1Tth.Wevvon by Rigby House. 2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31' SALVETA Black, W. A.wSon of W. A. Black, Esq., Halifax, N. S. Fraser, R.A.C.V.-Son of Maurice Fraser, Esq., Barrie, Ont. Goodger, J. E. F.-Son of J. Goodger, Esq., of Port Hope. Howland, V. W.-Son of W. E. Howland, Esq., Toronto. Kirkpatrick, R. C.-Son of Mrs. C. R. Richardson, Montreal. Leather, E. H. C.iSon of H. A. Leather, Esq., Hamilton. Landry, P. C.-Son of W. A. Landry, Esq., Montreal. Martin, E. D. KfASon of Mrs. H. C. Macklein, Toronto. Morrisey, J. P.gSon of Lt. Col. T. S. Morrisey, Toronto. McBride, G. V.5Son of Robt. McBride, Esq., Hamilton. McConnell, W. VV. S.gSon of Lt. Col. W. A. McConnell, Toronto. McFarlane, P. A.-ASon or P. A. McFarlane, Esq., VVestmou11t, P.Q McLennan, J. L.-Son of Guy S. McLennan, Esq., Montreal. Parr, J. A. K.-Son of D. K. Parr, Esq., Port Hope. Passy, F. C.--Son of Lt. Col. P. de L. Passy, Ottawa. Starnes, J. K.5Son of H. K. Starnes, Esq., Montreal. -Son or brother of an "Old Boy". VALETE Dykes, C. P. J. Dumaresq, C. F. Roper, P. K. Barnes, R. H. Russel, A. D. Barton, R. H. .- ADVERTISEMENTS THE TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION Annual Members S3 Life Members S25 11 The annual fee is payzilrlv in mlvzliioc :mil is 4luc on .lIlllllill'.X' lst. cznch y02ll'. Life Membership fccs constituie thc capital fund of the Associzitioii, :xml :arc iiivestml in School Bowls. Life llcmhcrs. lll1'l'1'l-0l't', help to huild up the Associations capital :mil cnjoy thc privilcges of membership af si wry moilcmtc cost to tliemselvcs considering that tho .Ximunl fm- would he 33.00. Honorary Membership r'without feel is granted to lllose- who make- :application tlxcrefm' upon leaiving the School. :mal remains in forcc until the following lll'1'0llllN'l' fllsl. All classes of Members: 1. llwf-ix'c illlN'2llll'l' notices of School Matches :mil othcl' School activities. 2. .Xrc 1-in-ollwl :ls suhscl'ihel's fo The 'l'.4'.S. NIc1'l'Ul'1lH, fl, lh-4-Q-iw 1-opics ot' the Old Boys' Directory. 4. .Xml lu-pt in contact with the School :mel with f-zach othcr- wlncrcver thcy may he. 5. .lssist in promoting thc ohjccfs of thc Asso- Vlillllbll. Communications should be addressed tor- The Headmaster, Tr-inity Vollegre School. Port llope. Oni. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD f,gp QDID Rings' Numa The Right Rev. Frank DuMou1in, former bishop coadjutor of the Diocese of Ohio, has succeeded the Rev. Charles Hinton as rector of the Episcopal Church of St. Johns at Locust Valley, L. I. Chancellor R. V. Harris of the Diocese of Nova Scotia, took a prominent part in the deliberation of the General Synod. He was deputy prolocutor of the Lower House. Alexander Keith Doull, of Westmount, has gone to Japan to take up duties as assistant Canadian Trade Commissioner at Tokio. Rev. V. C. Spencer, V99-'05J, who is a missionary in Okaya, Japan, has returned to Canada on furlough, and writes as follows: "On my way home I travelled across Siberia to see what I could of Soviet conditions. While one misses signs of prosperity yet one is impressed by sings of energy and determination to achieve success with the Five-year Plan. Here and there one saw great saw-mills with stocks of cut lumber, or large towns of new houses around a mine or some other infant industry. The people looked sufficiently fed and warmly clad. One noticed women motormen on many of of the street cars in Moscow." His address is 1118 Barton St. E., Hamilton. Dr. W. W. Francis V88-'95l, is in charge of the Osler Library at McGill University. This is a Library of the history of Medicine and Science, collected by Sir William Osler V66-'67j and bequeathed by him to his Alma Mater. It is a splendid memorial to one of the most distinguished of our Old Boys. Cyril L. Capreol V15-'18p writes to tell us of the untimely death of his friend, T. H. Child, of Davenport, Iowa, who was at the School from 1913 to 1918. Last August Child was picked .up in a critical condition by the side of the Illinois Central railway track and found to have a fractured skull. The circumstances of his death are sur- rounded in mystery: but it is believed that he had been attacked by robbers. C. R. Archibald, Toronto, has made a remarkable record at R. M. C., having been awarded the Sword of Honour, the Governor- General's gold medal, the artillery prize, the Toronto branch trophy, and the prize for general proficiency, as well as most of the prizes in the graduating class. The Rev. E. P. S. Spencer V889 writes to say that his son, Gordon my TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Selby Spencer, came first in Kent School, Kent, Conn., from which he has just graduated. This is a Church School of the Order of the Holy Cross. At the Royal Winter Horse Show, Toronto, on November 24th., Lt. Marshall Cleland, scored the first victory for Canada in the military jumping competition for international officers. MCGILL UNIVERSITY Bob Archibald is a member of the Zeta Psi and still struggling with first year Arts. Donald Byers is also a "Zeta" and is in 3rd Arts. He still finds time, however, to report for the "Daily." Steve Corrigall also reports for the Daily, and is an Alpha Delt in the Players Club. Dudley Dawson is working hard at first year Arts, and lives at the Alpha Delt House. Tam Fyshe put in a brilliant season with the McGill Seniors, and is now in 2nd. year Medicine. "Goof" Goodfellow is starting in first year Arts. "Con" Harrington is in third year Arts and a "Zeta." Although still reporting, he is working hard, and was one of the very few to pass into 3rd, year with all his subjects. Palmer Howard is in his last year of Arts, after which he in- tends to take up Medicine. He is also a Zeta and a member of the Historical Society. Gordon Johnson is working hard in fourth year Arts and has every chance of playing on this year's senior hockey team. Harold Johnson is only a year behind his brother, and like him is a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. Louis Johnson is an Alpha Delt and in first year Arts where he finds the work none too easy. Gordon King is now president of the McGill Students Union, which office he fills ably, and he is rarely to be found at home. He is in Engineering '32. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q51 Tom King, following in his brother's footsteps, is a Kappa Alpha, but has gone into first year Commerce. David Law is in first year Arts, where the work appears to be nothing to him. Sammy MacClean is an Alpha Delt and making good headyway in third year Arts. "Ibby" Nobbs is in 3rd year Arts and still keeps up with his track work. "Dopy" Oswald is an Alpha Delt and in first year Arts where Latin still appears to be his "Jinx." "Polly Pacaud" is in first year Arts and many times wishes him- self back at T.C.S. Paul Pitcher, after a long stay in Switzerland, has gone into 2nd, year Arts and joined the Zeta Psi fraternity. "Stiky" Stikeman is in first year Arts and an Alpha Delt. He has a part in the "fresh-man-play" and is a reporter for the Daily. Archie Stone is in 2nd year Arts and a Zeta. ARCHBISHOP WORRELL We heard with great pleasure of the election on September 24th. of the Most Reverend Clarendon Lamb Worrell, Archbishop of Nova Scotia to the primacy of the Church of England in Canada. Although a resident of the Maritimes for many years, Archbishop Worrell was born at Smiths' Falls in 1853 and was educated at the School. In 1871 he gained the Wellington and Dickson scholarships and entered Trinity University, Toronto, where he won honours in both mathematics and classics. He was ordained deacon in 1881 and priest three years later, at the same time holding curacies in both Gananoque and Brockville. Besides having led a very active clerical life he is an experienced educationalist. He was headmaster of the High School in Brockville in 1884 and later in 1891 was pro- fessor of English literature at the Royal Military College, Kingston. This position he held until 1904 when he was consecrated to the See of Nova Scotia. Ln 1915 he was elected Metropolitan of Canada and first Archbishop of Nova Scotia. 4152 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD BIRTHS Groutemln Toronto, on July 9th., to Mr. and Mrs. Laurence f"Puss"J Grout l'13ee'18l a son, l'Hugo Edmond Sewelll. MARRIAGES Cassels-King' SmitrheAJohn Graham Cassels to Mary Elizabeth King Smith, at St. Andrew's Church, Toronto. 1'rispo-Gillespie--Francis Herbert Crispo to Elizabeth Gillespie, at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Toronto. 1'nmherland-liic-hardson-Ian Hugh Cumberland to Eleanor Elizabeth Richardson, at Toronto, Oct. 10th. Dalton-0'Shea-On 30th. Sept., at Vancouver, Cuthbert Frederick Robert Dalton to Dorothy Rosdew May O'Shea. Evans-Vorreyer-On July 14th., 1931, Edgar Evans to Charlotte Vorreyer, at Braunschweig. .lager-Fraser-Ernest Irwin Jager to Anna May Fraser, July 24th. Labatt-Pierce-Jan. 17th., Hugh Francis Labatt to Margaret Pierce, at London, Ont. L1-wis-Petry-On June 27th., Peter H. Lewis to Gertrude I. Petry, daughter of the late Dr. H. J. H. and Mrs. Petry of Port Hope. Mm-ka-nzif--l+'uirhairn-Maxwell Hibbard Weir Mackenzie to Jean Roger Fairbairn, at Montreal, Sept. 12th. Morse--Robinson-At Belleville, Ont., Sept. 5th., Eric Wilton Morse to Mary Alberta Robinson. ltohf-rtson-Watts-At Christ Church Cathedral, Vancouver, Aug. 19th., William Douglas Robertson to Georgia Watts. Shurp-Mc-Clean-James McAvity Sharp and Iva Beryl McClean, on Sept. 12th., at Stayner, Ont. DEATHS Alle-n-In August, Thomas H. G. Child, at Monroe, La. Davidson-On Oct. 9th,, at Toronto, John Cheyne Davidson, Arch- deacon of Peterborough. Hague-On June llth., :it Montreal Frederick Hague, K. C. McPherson-At Edmonton, Frank H. McPherson. Gibson-At Toronto, on Dec. 2nd., John Scott Gibson. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD G3 EXCHANGES Acta Ridleianna", Bishop Ridley College, Ontario Acta Ludi", Oshawa High School, Oshawa, Ont. Ashburian", Ashbury College, Ottawa. The Albanian", St. Alban's, Brockville. Bishop's College School Magazine", Bishop's College School Lennoxville. Bishop Strachan School Magazine", Bishop Strachan School Toronto. The Black and Red", University School, Victoria, B.C. The Black and Gold", St. John's College, Winnipeg. Blue and White", Rothesay Collegiate School, Rothesay, N.B. The College Times", Upper Ca.nada College, Toronto. The Glenalmond Chronicle", Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire Scotland. The Grove School Magazine", Lakeiield, Ont. The Harrovian", Harrow School, England. High School of Quebec Magazine", High School, Quebec. Lower Canada College Magazine", Lower Canada College, Montreal The Oakwood Oracle", Oakwood Collegiate, Toronto. Ontario Ladies' College "Vox", Whitby, Ont. R.M.C. Review", Royal Military College, Kingston. St. Andrew's College Review", St. Andrew's College, Aurora. Vancouver Tech.", Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver, B. C. VVindsorian", King's College School, Windsor, N.S. I X. M: I' ' 1'gd.5J 1 B ' . ' .I SU 1, -1. 1' I 'fn , ri ph' 'tn 4 W ' 'Hb Q- W' ' ' up 1 v J - ,.l1 'Mah 3 1 . ',l." ' f,,I AFEQA J L . . . ' , J. ,. ,I g - . - .. -., W-Jw:--ff!-r-ffm - ' - -ay, fax! , n 39" 1 gfjfgpg :lui -we-ll Q ri, , ffffgfn :. 15.19-"'KlI. ,"F ' 4 v 1 . X. v r U . 1. L wx , - U' ,W- ' a "'r-' fd: 2-' ' 'ln - - , " ' - 0 pt , .Q ' .ynw :Sql YI .Ji , ,. Q' I .,' Y 1,2 v , lv . H f ,,. nj, "1 fn V ' rr. 5 - . . . - A '1..,'l.rYl:a5l: tiff,-' TW' -"F I: P 1 'I ' 5 v1 S I V Q ,-1' - ' 5 5 I ., .vw "5" - ' :gg , H ' .. I A w f H15 al .+L o N1 n Q I L ,S I , .-. 7 1 4 ' 4 y , K P A 7 -snn,, 'Q fur W. TH l'Y l 'fr . .K V , . ,MN ., , , 1 I-W . 1 . , 1 -d. ' . , + P I x I -inf . , .- n -' 5-'A ' ,. , ,Q JW' r 1. I. . A - 1 .,.1 ii' . , I A 'ol' f q?.L5f':' yr' I., - In I i Q " """J' M" 1,-. 5 - ,N Y ,X 4. I v- - , . I - , ' ll ' r 1' 'V 4' :L . ' gray- . 1 f-b ,f , 1 ' .vga : K- 'O I gf, I - .J ff .K ' ,Q L - r ', if .x-9 g . fb' 1 I " S' n Y 4... ' 9 0 vii' A U l 1: U Yi'-4' V ' f-.- ' w I ':, ' .5 lx 'Lv 5 t A 4 ag r I ' - -' Lava C n V In !.l ' .1 1 A 1 F l r ' 1 i' I I al ' I 'J' A- 'im ii, l, . .qu -3" 57 il v 1 J I 4 , -N ,IK V ." V 'ff 'r' V..-gg." s - , ft? ' 'Wg' X I I Hi -' J A 651+ ' - Q ' 1 ,' ,4 . ll W11 i' ' ', 4-jr ' - 7,1 L Lx ,,,, ' , u I , ,. ruin . t -1 J 11 -j'?Tj"':',' QB" W 59' Eu ,U X Q A ". ' - , . , if ' v ,-' , fvil' Lltlfffb .I n 5 'A X-P 'xg-in-,' 1.430-,,5, by ,' nf'-1 - .N -Y ' V 'n kv! IGJ w-TII1 ix -5. Wlxwlg--' f 'qu vu 'Qi Ifhl W, lv-- L Juni? 'XL' 'Valar' 1' W f I III M 'II u'I -I' I I .x,'l I. f Ilan? "H f .I' It V ' l'I '-' : l. .rl H A'.aI. I - 7113. ' .' ,f4qH"-V ,"' 'I I I in .Al . I ' ' 'I ,. "H Hu, lv -I ' ho E ln, I iw., I. ,xqalgl T' ' :L ,T-P b ' 1. k I . I 1,. I -.5,.'If .1 . nf '-- ',0u'nG'h'1I 'V' 11 A AV' ', .fi 9 .- ,' I, ' I . 'I A,,,,, . 5 I , . Q I , 5 . . I , I I Q I .I .lp Jv- qnxos' A- 4 -QT! .' ,, v A ", 5 ' r:'AA Ven rI1If5'xC. k 1 . I I I JI 1 1 I. LV. . 1 . It I I Iwrl? ly' J. ' I 'QJALinx,'t5.-l- v 7 v .I 'I 'U . I ' ' 'ls ' . ,G ,, I Il I 'QV "nf: 'nh' " I -. -. , I ' . - h---.,......- I . ' Lg I ' - -I - f1,14gf" -1: .fr , I I , ,. 1. I 'I if ' ' li I ' ' . AA I -- 5, I 1 . 1v 1 I 0 I A 4 'J' Is . v ' , g I I ' db -Y:, U, 3 q -1-I I K I, 5 ng a ' aa-. ,, f. ,W .. .. i I , r , 4 I 1 0 ' 1 'I I - L f , lt . ' 7 I' . I I z , Z . 0 . I I- . -V ' r' 'I' I ' s. T... ', I H4 Q 01 . own 4' - .+C Lug q ., -- -4ff.,4 ADVERTISEMENTS COLLEGE OUTFITTERS IN Clothing and Furnishings BOYS', YOUTHS' AND YOUNG MEN'S SIZES Lfl14l7'ED' 1444 ST. CATHERINE STREET WEST MONTREAL DACK'S "Bond Street" Shoes 1 0 Special Scotch Grain 510.50 Dack's "Bond Street" shoes are styled and priced special- ly for young men. They are 100 p.c. Canadian made - - - built to traditional Dack standards - - - available in dis- tinctive models for street, sport and formal Wear. Dack custom-griade shoes are priced from 312.00 to 814.50 I Q f SHOES FOR MEN ORONTO MO TREAL HAMILTON WINDSOR WINNIPEG CALS TROT ADVERTISEMENTS For Sheer Enjoyment JZ .J - f A A Jgusffm 'fr ESTIVATE at B O N E C H O I N I 9 3 2 For particulars apply to Kenneth Ketchum, Esq., Trinity College School Director, Camp Mazinaw, Port Hope, Ont 1.2 'Z' 'Q .ADVERTISEMENTS A-4 Z THE TRUE VALUE , 49 .,E13?T',I.:E -x.ff - fir- -2' x"' 3 F A " ' fp' of a Dollar Saved : A I ' OPT HOPE BRANCH F.W, BELL, MGR. "The boy who thinks a dollar is not worth saving becomes the rn-an who thinks a hundred dollars is not worth saving, and he usually ends where he began-that is, with nothing." A Bank of Montreal savings account into which you deposit regularly will help you realize the true value of a dollar saved. BANK GF MONTREAL Established 1811 ESfillDllSll1'll 1395 ELMES HENDERSGN 'EQ SON REAL ESTATE 'E INSURANCE Royal Bank Bldg. 10 King St. East, Toronto Qlnrpnratinn nf 'rinitg Qlnllrgv Svrhnnl Y Y A VISITOR: II14 Iiighf I I n I I A ' 1 GOVERNING BODY Ex-Officio Members III: IIIIIIIQIIUI ut 'I'1'i11ity I'11ivv1'sit.x'. lx., lr, -rw" 1 II11 In x Hu I mvusl wi I1'm1tx'l ollvsgv. Ihr- I'1'ulvssm's Ill Kris, 'l'l'ini1y I'uIIeg'1'. IIIUYUIIIU. w A In' 4 llu Iux. I. III'iIII1lIl1 Um-lxzlrml, BIA., l7.IJ IIN' S4 IIUUI. Elected Members 1 ' ' I1-Y. 'I'I14- lim-fl Iiislmp Ulf 'I'o1'o11T0. IIQZILIIIIQISIUI' of IIN- III-v 4' I S. IIVIIIIIIIU, MAX.. IM .I,., IAlIl Member. 'I'm'm110 Iln- Ilmn. NIV. -Ius1im- II. Klux IM-mnistuml ........ YVi1111ig:eg IIIN Ilun. -IIl1I114- II. .X. XX.111l ............ . I X. IIullsTull, ICN It I'. .If-lla-11. Iis tl, v I fy. .Il..X. .. I III II2lI1IXYlIl. Ins., I Innl'4I1xll IISIQII' I mg. ...... . Puri llupn- ... 'I'm'm1t0 Nlontrvnl .. 'I'u1'cmTu .. 'I'm'on1en 1 I Ii, SIl':l1I1.x. I-IMI. .II..X., If,f',, ,, .... 'IIUVOIITO lin- I1--x.H. Iiiglnlx,XI,.X.,I,I1.I3. ....... . .... I'm'i IIOIJC I Ilwuuw- ling'-VI Iam. ................... ...... ' I'm'1mto I Ilunflil-124I--nv'-1':'I Il. S, "z1l'lwl'i2'Il1.I'.I3.. l'.KI.Iu. .... 'IIU1'0llt0 X rmzuxu Se-numuunu. Ifwg. ........,............... .. 'I'm'ullTn I II. XIJIAXIIJIVII. Iiwl.. XIII. ,.... .......... . . .. 'I'm'mlt41 Im'-5 II4'II4I4'I'NlrII, lim. ........................... 'I'm'm11o I 1 Ill--ln:Iln1I-vu-'l':uI Sin'.X,I'. Nlzlwluumlu-II. If VI 3. Iiing's1on ,. -. II ' llnn, Nlvzw-411111114-,II.Im1'nmn-fl ......... Ilc'IulI.l. II. V. Elected by the Old Boys Il Xu-N NIJIVIIII. Iuvl.. Xl..X.. Ix.I. ..... In If Il,1'nW-If. I'I.vg,. Ii.I'. .. IIzllniITn11 'I'ul'm11u Tlrinitg Qlnllvgv Svrhnnl ifwrnrh EDITORIAL STAFF. Editor and B.usiness Manager ..... ........ M r. C. R. Hiscocks Assistant General Editor and Sports Editor ...... .,....... F . E. Wigle contributions Editor ...... ........ W - E- AHHOUP Committee ..................... .-..--.-- E - C- Cutler W. P. H. Cassels J. V. Kerrigan R. Patch Junior School Record ....... ......... R ev. C. H. Boulden CONTENTS. Page Editorial .......,....,.,.... ..,..................... . -. - 1 The Chapel .. ............. ..-. - 2 Music in the School , .... .--. - 2 The Orchestra .......,.,.....,...,............,......, ..... 3 School Notes .,..,..,..............,......,..,....,.,,...... ..... 3 A Lecture on the League of Nations ....., ..... 4 Hockey ........,,..,.............................,.........,..,. ...., 5 First Team Matches .... ...., 7 Individual Scores .....,,...... ..... 1 8 Second Team Matches ...... ..... 1 9 Third Team Matches ..... ...,, 2 1 House Matches ........... ...,. 2 5 Squash Racquets .......i. ..... 2 6 Gymnasium Display 29 Life-Saving ................ ..... 2 9 Shooting ....,.....,................. ..... 3 0 The Badminton Club ,..........,..,. .,.,. 3 0 Salvete and Valete .,.,.,.....,....,..,.,. ,.... 3 1 Christmas Examination Order ...... ..... 3 1 Music Club .......,.....,..........,......... ..... 3 3 The Literary Society .,.............. .... 3 3 Drawing Classes ............,,....,,...,... .,.., 3 5 The Science and Arts Society ....., ..., 3 5 The Debating Society ....,...,....... .. .... 37 The Chess Club ..,........... ...... ,... 3 8 Book Reviews ....,,,......,....... .,... 3 8 Contributions ...............,........ .... 4 2 The Junior School Record .........,...,.....................,..............., ..... 5 1 Old Boys' Notes .................................,....,..,.........,.................... 57 Annual General Meeting of the Old Boys' Association ....... .... 5 9 Births, Marriages and Deaths ...,.,.....,...........,,....................... .... 6 3 Exchanges ........... , ..,............. , ........,...,.,...... 6:1 Erinitg Qlnllvgv Svrlinnl, Hurt EDU? ESTABLISHED 1865. Head Master REV. F. GRAHAM ORCHARD, M.A., Emmanuel College, Cam- bridge, D.D., Trinity College, Toronto. Chaplain, Bromsgrove School, England, 1903-1906: Head Master St. Alban's Brockville, 1906-1913. House Masters S. GELDARD, B.A., Esq., Trinity College, Cambridge. LT.-COLONEL C. GOODDAY, Aldenham School, England. Assistant Masters The REV. R. S. TIPPET, B.A., McGill University, Montreal. A. C. MORRIS, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N. S. P. H. LEVVIS, Esq., B.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. E. W. MORSE, Esq., Queen's University, Kingston. C. R. HISCOCKS, Esq., B.A., St. Edmund Hall, Oxford. J. M. de SLUBICKI, Esq., Pembroke College, Cambridge. J. F. GOODGER, Esq., B.Sc., London University, M.R.S.T. E. EVANS, Esq., B.A., University of Wales. D. KERMODE PARR, Esq., B.A., London University. LT.-COL. K. L. STEVENSON, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. Elm .Uuuinr Srlynnl House Master The REV. C. H. BOULDEN, M.A., King's College, Windsor, N. S. Clergy Training School, Cambridge. Assistant Masters W. H. MORSE, Esq. H. G. JAMES, Esq., Leeds University. K. G. B. KETCHUM, Esq., B.A., University of Toronto. C. N. WYNN, Esq., B.A., Keble College, Oxford. Lady Assistant MISS B. s. SYMONDS. Music Master A. SLY, Esq., L.R.A.M. Performers' Diploma, Associate in Music, University of Reading Drawing Master G. T. SCI..-X'I'lAIR, Esq., A.O.C.A., Diploma at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto. Bursar H. M. RATHBUN, Esq., R. M. C., Kingston. Physical Instructor for All Schools SERGEANT-MAJOR S. J. BATT, Royal Fusiliersg late Physical Instructor at R.M.C., Kingston. Irinitg Glnllvgv Svrhnnl illvrnrh 4 hitnrial The School has successfully pissed through a very tedious term Mother nature decided to give .us every possible kind of weather except the long cold spell that we expected. Every hockey team in the School has practically lost a year's improvement, because of the unnatural weather. There are a few people in the School who have not been on skates all term, and many people have not had their full amount of exercise. Considering the poor conditions, the School has been very fortunate in having very little sickness. Because of the lack of ice and snow, every one has turned to some other form of exercise or recreation. The Squash Club has come along by leaps and bounds, and many boys have taken the game up. The huge entry in the School championship shows the interest that has been taken in the game. The Badminton Club has started again and several matches have been played against the town. The De- bating Society which began in a small way last term has blossomed forth into one of the biggest and most interesting societies in the School. On January 22nd., the School had the privilege of hearing Mr. Percy Grainger, who gave a piano recital in the dining hall that was greatly appreciated. On February 27th., Professor Norman MacKenzie of Toronto University gave a lecture on the League of Nations in which he explained the situation in China. The School was very fortunate in hearing someone with such an intimate knowl- edge of recent developments. At the beginning of the term Mr. R. L. du Domaine left us. We welcome to the staff of the School, Mr. G. T. Sclater who has started drawing-classes in both Junior and Senior Schools. We extend our heartiest congratulations to Mr. K. G. B. Ketchum on his engagement to Miss Esther T. de Beauregard. What the future holds no one knows. But each man is the master of his own fate. The rugby team had an unsuccessful season and the hockey team a fairly successful season. It is to be hoped that the Cricket eleven will round off the year by winning the championship. But this can only be accomplished by the hard work of every individual on the team and the backing of the School. The spirit of every individual makes the School what it is. Q TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Uhr Qlhaprl Since the publication of the last Record the offertories have amounted to S151.18. At Christmas we sent cheques for the following Christmas charities: Childrens Aid Society ..... ....,... S 10.00 Salvation Army .......... ..... 1 0.00 Toronto Boys' Home .... ..... 1 0.03 Muskokzi Hospital ................ .,... 1 0.00 Sick Childzen's Hospiital .................................... 10.00 On Advent Sunday Mr. J. F. Goodger gave a very delightful rendering of "Comfort ye, Comfort ye My People" and "Every Val- ley shall be exalted" from Handel's Messiah. On the last Sunday of the Michaelmas Term we had a. very en- joyable Carol Service. illilunir in Ellie Qrhnnl The chief event of the term for the musical interests was the recital by Mr. Percy Grainger on January 22nd. A larger audience thin usual attended, for in addition to the whole School, many visi- tors were present. The programme was very much enjoyed. O11 the afternoon before the concert certain masters and boys were generously entertained by Mr. Grainger in the Junior School, Where he played a Brahms Sonata. Throughout his stay at the School, Mr. Griinger was the guest of Dr. and Mrs. Orchard. He expressed a great interest in the School Orchestra, and offered to send copies of some of his own works which might be found suitable. At the end of the Michaelmas Term the Prefects arranged a unique entertainment which was enjoyed by a large audience. Barn Dances find Bach, Concertina solos, Jazz and Sea Shanties were fol- lowed by rcrreshments. The Choir and Orchestra then led the School in the singing of three carols, two of which had accompani- inents by Gustav Holit. On Palm Sunday the afternoon service is to be held at St. Mark's Church. where the Choir, with Mr. Goodger as soloist, will present mme oi' the Passion music from l-landel's "Messiah", During the term the Choir has also learned Grieg's "Landsighting", which it is hoped to perform with orchestral accompaniment after Easter. TRINITY 'COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Ii THE ORCHESTRA The Orchestra has studied part of a Haydn Symphony and the accompaniment to Grieg's "Landsighting", while the various sections of the Orchestra "have functioned separately as well. The strings have studied Dyson's "Pixie Land" which has also a part for solo flute or clarinet, and the wind and percussion groups have worked at a march by Purcell. The reed instruments have a double lechoi duet by Mozart. The standard of playing is not high, except with a few individual members. In order to achieve the best results, which alone will repay everyone concerned for the time spent, each member must face the responsibiliity for preparing his own share of the Work between rehearsals. In some cases this is being done already, with definite results. The visit of the Toronto Wood-Wind Quintet gave a stimulus to those who heard the performance. Anyone reading these remarks and Wishing to join the scheme will need to buy an instrument and take lessons on the playing of it, and it is often possible to secure remarkably good bargains in these times. At present a flute, oboe and bassoon have been of- fered,for.sale to the Orchestra, and recruits on any one of these would be very welcome. SCHOOL NOTES. C. B. Ross and H. B. Savage have been appointed School prefects. Senior Privileges have been awarded to F. Armour, K. Dawe, A. Grier, W. Holton, and P. Roughton. S. Lockwood was elected Captain of the Second Hockey Team. S. H. Ambrose was elected Captain of the Third Team. A. McGinnis was elected Captain of the Fifth Team. The Hockey Committee consisted of F. E. Wigle, Taylor and Padley. Rehearsals have been started for two plays to be presented next term. g Y A Gym. team is practicing to compete for the Ontario Interscho- lastic Championship in Toronto during the holidays. The boxing competition will begin on March 7th. Oxfords Cup colours were gained by the following:ACon1be. Vallance ma. G., Vallance max. W., Ambrose max S., Powell. J, TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD A LECTURE ON THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS On Februaryy27th. the School was honoured in hearing Mr. Norman Mackenzie deliver a talk on the League of Nations. Mr. Mackenzie is a member of the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto and has recently served in China on a delegation, of which he was one of the Canadian representatives. Mr. Mackenzie's talk was mostly on the Japanese question. He began by a description of his recent trip in order to give us an idea of the present conditions in the East. Briefly, what Mr. Mackenzie said about the issue between Japan and China was as follows. For economic reasons Japan has in recent years virtually acquired Man- chuzia, which is Chinese territory. This has aroused an anti-Japa- nese movement in China, and a boycott has been placed on all Japa- nese goods. To try to force China to drop this boycott, Japan has taken Shanghai and is threatening to destroy it. In doing this, she has broken three peace treaties, and, because of this, outside powers must interfere. The speech then turned to the position of China and Japan with regard to the rest of the world and the League of Nations. The lecturer enumerated the different ways in which Japan has broken the League covenant. She does not appreciate the nature of mod- ern warfare and its consequences. Also with Japan, interest comes befoie principle. The speaker pointed out that the other powers would have to co- operate to bring countries like Japan into the right way, and that we must do this to make the League of Nations a success. He end- ed by saying that ultimately, unless we co-operated to prevent war. there were only two alternatives, communism or chaos. In reply to a question from the Headmaster, Mr. Mackenzie ex- plained how the League was formed, how it worked and what it has achieved. i TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 Qnrkrg The hockey season this year has been fairly successful, consid- ering the lack ofsice. The School has had more games than prac- tices, and with six games won, three tied, and one lost, the team can look back on the past season with satisfaction. During the first part of the term, when there was no ice, Big- side turned out in the Gym. and spent about an hour each day un- der the Sergt.-Major. The work consisted of P.T., basketball, and sometimes finished with a walk. Bigside went to the artificial rink in Oshawa twice during the early part of the term, and the team was moulded together as much as possible on these occasions. There were very few turn-outs in the town rink, the first team played only about five games there, and the Second team one. The First team had very few practices and the Second team less. Although the season. was fairly successful it might have been more so. Taylor, Grant, and Padley showed their playing ability individually, instead of collectively. This forward line did not com- bine and consequently lost many scoring chances. They scored most of their goals on individual efforts. The School "kid" forward line, Grier, Trenholme and Baillie were as good as the other line, and only hard luck, together with inex- perience, kept them from scoring more goals. Their combination ef- forts were the sparkling moments of every game. Near the end of the season their combined work was most brilliant. Only two goals scored by this forward line were individual efforts. The School for many years has not had a team that combined really well: this year has seen a gradual rise from that state. It is to be remembered that the attacking team must make the play for the pass, and not trust to luck that the defending team will get into such a position that passing is possible. The "kid" line amply demonstrated this against R.M.C. Jrs. The School team showed their ability this year to iight an up- hill battle, and the spirit shown by the team, during a term that was very hard on hockey players, deserves to be commended. It is to be hoped that many of the team will be back next year and take to heart the two lessons learned this season,Fto fight every inch of the game and to pass. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD ,A X, 4? a 3 3 Z mi in-4 Z? 39 O E5 Um 55 Q2 -C 53 Q93 5, -E 2,5 EPS H 2 GJ Sling EE -1-. 2:1542 I 30 egg O. ago Om 353 YZ. QFD E 'U U1 CU Uh, Q2 .CFU PE C5 TRINITY COLLEGE'SCHOOL RECORD 7 FIRST TEAM MATCHES THE SCHOOL vs. ZETA PSI. At Bewdley, January 23111. The first game of the season was played on Hol1iday's open-air rink at Bewdley, in several inches of slush and driving rain. This made combination play practically impossible. The first period was very slow, and, although the School had most of the play, they were unable to score. Shipp, in goal for the Zetas, was practically unbeatable. The School's three forward lines worked hard and had many shots on goal, but the slush and the driving rain prevented any scoring. Near the end of the first period the School livened the play up and Grier scored from a scramble in front of the Zeta's goal. Braden went on for Ross, and Newman took Wigle ma.'s place. at the beginning of the second period. About half way through the period the Zetas began to press and, after a scramble in front of the School net, scored a goal, Griffin getting an ankle-high shot past Newman. In the third period the School put on the pressure, but, although they had many scoring chances, Shipp and the slush prevented scoring. That the School had the best of the play is indicated by the fact that they had about twenty-five shots on the Zetas' goal, while the Zetas had only about four. Final score: The School lg Zeta Psi 1. Line-ups: Zetas-Goal, ShiPPS defence, Booth, Griffin, forwards, Robertson. Griffiths, Balton, Gwiney, Cameron. The School-Goal, Wigle ii.g defence, Wigle i., Ross, forwards, Tay- lor, Grant ii., Padley. Subs., Trenholme, Grier, Baillie ii., Kerrigan, Clarke, Lockwood, Comb, Braden, Newman. THE SCHOOL vs. PHI KAPPA PI At Oshawa, February -lth. There being no ice at Port Hope, the game was transferred to Oshawa. The Phi Kaps were only able to put a fairly weak squad 5 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD on the ice owing to injuries, and consequently the School had rather an easy job. In the first few minutes the Phi Kaps rushed the School goal but were warded off, and Grant, Taylor and Padley combined for a nice attack on the Phi Kap citadel. This rush resulted in a goal, Grant scoring on a pass from Padley. A few minutes later the School rushed again, and Taylor scored on a pass from Padley, The School from then on had most of the play, and most of the Phi Kappa rushes were turned aside at the defence. Wigle i. and Padley next scored on individual efforts to finish the period: School, 4, Phi Kappa, 0. In the second period the School's condition began to tell, and the two forward lines skated rings round the Phi Kappas. Padley scored on an assist from Grant, and then Taylor, Grier and Grant scored on pretty individual efforts. Near the end of the period Trenholme scored on a pass from Grier: The School 8, Phi Kappa Pi 0. The third period was a regular field day for the School. Some wide open combination and dazzling speed were unleashed, and the rapidly tiring Phi Kappas were completely outplayed. Wigle and Grant scored on individual efforts. Grant scored twice on passes from Padley and Taylor: Trenholme, on a pass from Grier: Grier on 1 double assist from Wigle and Trenholme, and Baillie, on a double pass from Trenholme and Wigle. The constant back-checking of the School, especially by Padley, kept the Phi Kaps from scoring. Graham and J. Stewart were the most effective of the visitors. Final score: the School 153 Phi Kappa Pi 0. Line-ups: Kzips Goal, Ambroseg defence, J. Steward, E. Stewartg forwards Welch, Mt-Leod, Graham. Subs., Jemmett, Galloway. Y The School Goal. Wigle ii., defence, Wigle, Ross, forwards, Taylor Grant ii., Padley. Subs., Trenholme, Grier, Baillie ii., Wynn Newman. ! v 'l'HlC SFHOOL vs. KAPPA ALPHA At Port Hope, February 6th. The School's nrst game in the town rink was played on very TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 slow ice, which hindered combination and slowed up the play con- siderably. The Kaps brought down a fairly strong team, but the School's superiority around the nets won the game. Before the first period was very far under way, Padley scored on two brilliant individual efforts. This put the School on their feet and from then on they set a terrific pace. Baillie next scored on passes from Wigle i. and Grier. Cunningham put the Kaps into the scoring column when he made a nice individual rush to score on Newman. Taylor finished the scoring in the first period by put- ting in a nice pass from Padley past McDonald. The School's for- ward lines worked fairly well, considering the slowness of the ice. In the second period Wigle i. opened the scoring on an individual rush. The ice began to get worse and the play slowed up. The Kaps rarely got past the School's defence. Grant next scored for the School on a pretty individual effort, when he split the defence. Padley and Taylor again combined to add to the School's score, Padley scoring. These two made several nice combination rushes. The third period was rather dull and F. Rea scored the Kap's second goal. when he circled the defence. The Kaps' condition be- gan to give out, and they relied mostly on individual efforts. The School kept up the pace, and Wigle i. scored on a golf swing from inside the blue line. The School played fairly well as a team. Rea and Cunningham were the outstanding players of the Kappa Alphs. Final score: the School 83 Kappa Alpha 2. - Line-ups: Kappa Alpha-Goal, McDonald, defence, Cunningham, Morden. For- wards, F. Rea, D. Rea, Musgrove. Subs., Noble and Evans. The School-Goal, Newman, defence, Wigle i., Wynng forwards, Taylor, Grant ii., Padley. Subs., Trenholme, Grier, Baillie ii. Braden, Wigle ii. THE SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Port Hope, February 9tl1. The team were determined to avenge their defeat by Lakefield last year. The School defence body-checked rather heavily and slowed the Grove down considerably. The Grove proved themselves real sixty-minute men, as they used no substitutes. Lakefield pressed from the start and kept the School hemmed in their own territory. Macrae opened 'the scoring for Lakefield, wnen 10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD he scored from a small scramble in front of the net. The School seemed to be lost, and, for the greater part of the first period, they were closely checked by the Grove. Near the end of the period Trenholme scored on a very pretty individual rush. This goal put the School on their feet, and, from then on, they pressed Lakefield. Anderson for Lake-field and Wynn for the School received penalties. In the second period the School's defence rocked the Lakefield team with body checks, and the forward lines showed their speed. Padley put the School in the lead with one of his perfect shots from the right boards. Although the Grove continued to press, the School made a nice rush, Taylor making a perfect pass to Grant, who scored. The team's dashing attack and relentless back-check- ing kept Lakefield in their own territory. During the period Wynn and Wigle i. received penalties. The third period scoring was opened by Grant and Padley. Pad- ley made one of his terrific shots from the right boards, and Grant shoved in the rebound. Lakefield tried to keep the School behind their blue line, but the forward lines put on a great effort and Grant and Grier both scored assisted by Taylor and Baillie. Lakefield tried hard, but were tired out and could not cope with the Schoo1's speed. Final score: the School 6, Lakefield 1. Line-ups: LakeiieldaGoal, Disney, defence, Wright and Anderson: forwards, Gunn, Macrae, Carson. Subs., Bagg, Dench, Magill. The School Goal, Wigle ii.g defence, Wigle i., Wynng forwards, Taylor, Grant, Padley. Subs., Trenholme, Grier, Baillie, and Newman. THE SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE At Port Hope, February 16th. The first game against the town team this year was rather a surprise to most of the School. The School just managed to bring off a 3 2 victory in the last few minutes of the game. The Port Hope team had not had much practice, but their individual play made up for this. Francy, Ware and Howden played particularly well and Cancilla in goal made some wonderful saves. In tht first few minutes Wigle i. rushed up and, on reaching the defence, passed to Kerrigan. The latter sent the puck back in front TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD ll of the net to Wigle who slammed the pass home. This gave impetus to the School attack, and they had the majority of the play during the first period, although the town's unexpected strength slightly upset the team. The Port Hope rushes were very effective, and. in some cases, only good saves by the goil-keeper kept them from scoring. Kerrigan put the School well in the lead about half way through the second period, when he shot Padley's rebound past Cancilla. Port Hope were on their toes and very quickly retaliated. Their rushes became very frequent, and they scored, when Rowden split the School defence. The pace was fairly brisk and, although the School were slightly faster, the play was very even. In the third period the School's attack became listless for a while and Francy scored on a pass from Roach, with a shot that Wigle ii. had little chance to save. The School's attack livened up, and their rushes became fast and furious, both teams missing op- portunities to score and both Cancilla and Wigle ii. making some good saves. The School pressed their attack, and, in the dying mo- ments of the game, Wynn rushed up, passed to Taylor at the de- fence, and scored on the return from Taylor. Port Hope tried des- perately to tie the game, but the School's back-checking kept them in the lead. Final score: the School 33 Port Hope 2. Line-ups: Port HopeHGoa1, Cancillag defence, Francy, Ware, forwards, Bur- bett, Sneyed, Roach, Harwood, K. Harwood, Rowden. The School-Goal, Wigle ii.g defence, Wigle, Wynn and Ross, for- wards, Taylor, Kerrigan, Padley. Subs., Trenholme, Grier, Baillie ii., Newman. , THE SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE At Toronto, February 18th. The School's first defeat of the season was sustained against Upper Canada College at the Maple Leaf Gardens. It was the first game of the season in which the School's lack of practice was evi- dent. The team was somewhat bewildered by the huge ice surface and the shape of the rink. The forward lines were at a loss against the almost impregnable defensive system of U.C.C., and the defence had a hard time stopping the U.C.C. rushes. But the score does 12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD not give a true indication of the play: the game was never uninter- esting and the School fought every inch of the wayuntil the final bell. T The first period was not very exciting, as the School had not set- tled clown on the ice, and, although the forwards tried very hard, U.C.C. had the better of the play. The School held U.C.C. off for a while, but about ten minutes of the period had elapsed when U.C.C. broke away and Tatem easily rounded the School defence and scored on Wigle ma. The School had confidence that they could make that up and pres:ed hard, but penalties weakened the team, and U.C.C. went further, ahead, when Tatem scored assisted by Dellis. The forward lines and the defence put on superhuman efforts to score, but the will trained U.C.C. defence just seemed to be in the way at the list moment, and many chances were lost. Near the end of the periold Tatem again scored on a nice pass from Fellinger. The School were becoming used to the ice, and, in the second period they had as much of the play as U.C.C. Taylor, Grant and Padley kept boring in on the U.C.C. citadel, but Wolfe. in goal, played a brilliant game and broke up many good plays and rushes. Taylc-r's boxing-in tactics nearly gave the U.C.C. supporters heart failure. Pzidley's back-checking and brilliant speed broke up many U.C.C. attacks, before they reached the School defence. Grant's stick handl- ing was a dangerous threat at centre ice. Near the end of the period Burkart scored on a nice individual effort for U.C.C. During this period there were several scrambles about the School goal. but these were all passed over successfully. At one time U.C.C. tried "gauging" the School goal, but with very little success. Padley made a nice rush, but, on reaching the goal, passed to Grant who was covered. It was one of the few real chances that the School had to score. In the third period the School went on to do or die, and, every one on the team put every thing that he had into the game. The School defence tightened up and began to body-check fairly heavily, and the forward lines threw caution to the winds and played with reckless abandon. The School's "kid" forward line, Trenholme, Grier and Baillie, kept U.C.C. hemmed behind their blue line and had some hard luck on scoring chances. Penalties, however, weakened the School, and U.C.C. scored twice, Allan, on an assist from George, and Dellis. on an assist from Rogers. The School nearly skated TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 123 themselves into exhaustion attempting to score, but hard luck kept them scoreless. Final score-U.C.C. 63 T.C.S. 0. Line-n ps : U.C.C.-Goal, Wolfeg defence, Burkart, Fellingerg forwards, Allan, George, Rogers. Subs., Dellis, Tatem, Caldwell, Ross, Doug- las. T.C.S.-Goal, Wigle ma.g defence, Wigle max., Wynn, forwards. Grant ma., Taylor, Padley. Subs., Trenholme, Grier, Baillie, Ross, Newman. THE SCHOOL vs. THE TORONTO CRICKET CLUB. At Port Hope, Feb. 20th. This was one of the best games played in Port Hope this sea- son. The Cricket Club brought down a very good team, some of them Varsity Senior O.H.A. players, with the result that the game was very fast and very exciting. Although the School scored the first.-goal, they twice had to come from behind to tie up the game. The School team this year has some fighting spirit that has not been shown for several years. From the very outset of the game the pace was terrific and not really a dull moment ensued throughout the whole game. The Cricket Club showed their class right away and made some danger- ous rushes on the School's citadel, but they were turned aside. The School kept up the pace and before long Padley, Grant and Taylor made a nice rush, Padley scoring after a good pass. The Cricket Club, spurred on by being one goal down, made a tremendous effort and scored two goals, Logie and C. Bell getting the puck past Newman. The School put on the pressure, and the forwards work- ed like Trojans trying to even up the score. During the last few minutes of play, Wigle max. made a nice individual rush up the left boards and scored on Kingsmill with a low shot. The second period was as fast and exciting as the first, neither team having an edge on the play. The School had several pieces of bad luck on scoring chances, but the Cricket Club were kept from any dangerous scoring positions. After a disputed goal, which gave impetus to the team's attack, the School went into the lead. Taylor, going into one of the corners after the puck, made a per- fect pass to Grant, who scored. The School's back-checking and I4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD all-round defensive work, aided by good goal-keeping by Newma.n, left the School in the lead at the end of the period. In the third period, the Cricket Club put on a tremendous spurt, and the School was nearly mowed under. Within a few minutes of the opening of the period, W. Bell rounded the School's right de- fence and scored from close in on Wigle ma. The School grew des- perate and attacked incessantly, but the Cricket Club again broke away and scored on a shot that Wigle ma. had little chance to save. The School, a goal behind, never gave up hope and fought to the finish. Both forward lines worked heroically to even the score up. With but a few minutes to go Wynn rushed up the centre, passed to Taylor at his left on the defence, and scored on the return pass from Taylor. It was one of the best combination efforts of the af- ternoon. The Cricket Club tried hard to score but good back-check- ing kept the School on even terms. A great deal of the afternoon's play by the School was spoiled by too much individual work. Line-ups: The Toronto Cricket Club-Goal, Kingsmillg defence, Logie, Sea- gramg forwards, C. Bell, W. Bell, Heatherington. Subs., Spragge, Clarkson. The Schoole-Goal, Newmang defence, Wigle max., Wynn: forwards, Grier, Trenholme, Baillie ma. Subs., Grant ma., Taylor. Padley, Ross, Wigle ma. THR SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE At Port Hope, February 23rd. This was by far the most exciting game of the year and it showed splendidly the spirit of the team. After being beaten in Toronto fi H, the School determined to win the game, and with a small amount of luck, they should have won. There were quite ia number of penalties which added to the excitement and speed of the game. I-'J actically all the goals were scored when either team was one man s ort. I The Schools defence was a great deal better than on the big ice at the Maple Leaf Gardens, and Newman did not have so many hard shots to handle, although he made some nice saves. The for- ward lines pulled out of their slump to some extent and opened the game up considerably with their passing attacks. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD lj The opening few minutes were rather dull. U.C.C. shooting mostly from outside the blue line, while the School's attacks were broken up at the U.C.C. defence. The game soon warmed up, and it produced one thrill after an- other. When a few penalties had been handed out and one team was playing one man short, things began to get interesting. Both teams unleashed their speed. The U.C.C. attacks were mostly shots from the blue line, while the School continually bored in and gave Wolfe many anxious moments. Grant, at centre for the School, made some nice passes to his wings, but they were not always in position and consequently some scoring chances were lost. The first period ended with no score. The second period brought out the best in both teams and, al- though the School had a slight edge on the play, U.C.C. constantly threatened the School's goal. Newman and Wolfe made some won- derful saves. About the middle of the period, with both teams play- ing a man short, U.C.C. started to crowd the School into their own area, and thc School, while attempting to get loose, shot the puck up the ice. Burkart, rushing up from the U.C.C. defence and from about the centre, let go a drifter which Newman could not see, put- ting U.C.C. one up. The School were determined not to go behind and consequently threw all their weight into the attack which soon produced the de- sired results. Taylor scored from a face-off by the U.C.C. net. The School gained confidence, and they put some sting into their attack that kept U.C.C. hemmed in their half of the rink. During the third period both teams battled furiously for suprem- acy, and U.C.C. attempted to keep the School behind their blue line. There were several scrambles, and, during one of these, the puck was centered out from a corner to Tatem, who was only partially marked, and he shoved the puck past Newman. Penalties began to get more numerous, and, during the last half of the period, it was seldom that both teams were at full strength. The School, how- ever, managed to keep most of their men on the ice, and U.C.C. had a warm ten minutes around their citadel. Finally Taylor and Grant made a nice combination play, Grant going into the corner and laying a perfect pass to Taylor who scored. During the next few minutes, Wynn, Ross, Trenholme, Grier and Baillie made some nice individual rushes, while U.C.C. tried to keep the School in their own area, but hard luck prevented any scoring. Final score-T.C.S. 23 U.C.C. 2. lti TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Line-ups: U.C.C.-Goal, Wolfe, defence, Corbett, Burkartg forwards, Allan, Caldwell, George. Subs., Lamport, Rogers, Tatem, Dellis. The School-Goal, Newman, defence, Wigle max., Wynng forwards, Grant ma., Taylor, Padley. Subs., Grier, Trenholme, Baillie ma., Ross, Wigle ma. THE SCHOOL vs. PICKERING COLLEGE At Toronto, Feb. 25th. This was one of the best trips of the year. Pickering entertain- ed the team to an enjoyable lunch at Hart House. As the game was played at The Ravina Rink, the School were right at home, because the Oshawa rink's ice surface is almost identical. Pickering's bus broke down on the way to the rink, and so the game was late in starting. Pickering consequently played most of the first period with some of their second team men, which handi- capped their play for a while. The opening few minutes of the first period were dull, both teams being rather shaky. The play soon livened up, however, and the School went into the lead. The Grant-Taylor-Padley forward line passed slightly more in this game and, within a few minutes of the start of the period, Grant crashed through to score. The team steadied down after that and, although Pickering had a fair amount of the play, the School were plainly superior. Grant made another sensational rush down the ice, and, after slipping through the de- fence, scored easily. The Baillie-Grier-Trenholme forward line, which has all year shown some sparking combination, showed up to advantage in this gzune, and on at Ilne piece of work engineered by Grier, Baillie scored on a pass from Trenholme. In the srcond period the game tighened up, as Pickering were at full strength. and both teams put more into their attacks. The School missed several opportunities to score, while Pickering were not very dangerous around the School's defence and goal. VVigle ma., however, was called up to stop some hard shots. During the period the School's "kid" forward line, Baillie, Grier and Trenholme. opened up the play considerably, by their constant passing near the Pickering citadel, and it was only hard luck that prevented them from scoring. Near the end of the period, however, Trenholme show- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 ing fine judgment, after receiving a pass from Baillie at the Pick- ering defence, drew the goaler from the net, and then passed to Grier who put the puck in the open net. In the third period Pickering began to get warmed up, and they attacked strongly, but they were ,usually turned aside at the School's defence. The School's'attack lost some of its punch. During a scramble near the School goal Wigle max., was injured and Ross went on. From then until the end of the game, Wigle ma. made a succession of brilliant saves and the two shots that beat him were well nigh impossible to stop. The "kid" forward line attacked strongly, but Pickering ran in a goal. Pickering again broke through the School's defence and, although Wigle ma. made a wondeiful save, a Pickering player following in scored on the rebound. Final score--T.C.S. 43 Pickering 2. Line-up: The SchooleeGoal, Wigle ma., defence, Wigle max., Wynn: for- wards, Trenholme, Grier, Baillie. Subs., Taylor, Grant ma.. Padley, Ross, Newman. THE SCHOOL vs. R.M.C. JRS. At Kingston, March 211-11. As in the Rugby term, when the team went to 'R.M.C. in con- junction with the squash team, it was a, well-enjoyed trip. The cadets put every facility at our disposal, and the team really ap- preciated their efforts. Once again we were allowed to have lunch in the mess with the cadets, and gained a slight insight into the R.M.C. traditions. The School had to play without Grier and Wigle max., but Braden and Kerrigan capably filled the vacancies. The first period started rather quietly, and the team after a wee-k's rest, began slowly. The School's defence was a bit weak and soon, after the opening of the period, after playing around the School's blue line for a few minutes, Lamontagne broke away and scored on Newman. The School woke up and Grant on a solo effort scored for the School to put the teams on even terms. The School's "kid" forward line consisting of Trenholme, Baillie, and Kerrigan went on, and for ten minutes gave one of the smartest passing exhibitions that they have shown this year. Trenholme and Kerrigan led the attacks, and it was only poor shooting at times and hard luck at 13 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD others that kept Baillie and Kerrigan from scoring. Taylor, Grant, and Padley went on, and before long Taylor scored on a pass from Grant, during a melee in front of the R.M.C. goal. Near the end of the period Carson scored for R.M.C. R.M.C. were always dangerous and were really only out-classed when the "kid" forward line was playing. In the second period R.M.C. attacked more strongly and Newman in goal was called upon to stop some rather difficult shots. How- ever, effective back-checking by Padley, and the good work of the Schoo1's defence kept R.M.C. from scoring. Trenholme, Kerrigan and Baillie again showed some scintillating passing and near the end of the period their efforts were rewarded. Trenholme engineered the rush, and the line passed all the way down the ice. On reaching the defence, Baillie on the right, passed to Trenholme at centre, and the latter relayed the pass to Kerrigan who scored. It was the prettiest com- bination effort of the year. R.M.C. pressed strongly, but Wynn and Braden on the defence turned most of the attacks aside. R.M.C. opened the third period with a rush, but the School were not caught napping, and air-tight defensive work kept R.M.C. from scoring. R.M.C. were forced to resort to long shots which Newman, who was playing a good game, easily turned aside. During the latter half of the period Wynn rushed strongly several times and on three occasions had no one but the goalie to beat. However, Armstrong turned aside these shots. Had Wynn passed to his wings, a goal might have resulted. Final scoreeeeSchool 3, R.M.C. Jrs. 2. Line-up: R.M.C. Goal, Armstrong, defence, Ready and MacBrieng forwards, Monnette, Lamontagne, Carson. Subs., Savage, Robertson, McMullin, Piers, Kirk, Ross, Mickles. The School Goal, Newman, defence, Wynn, Braden: forwards, Tren- holme, Baillie ma., Kerrigan. Subs., Taylor, Grant, Padley. ROSS. INDIVIDUAL SCORES For Goals Assists Total Grant ma. . 13 5 18 Padley 6 7 13 Taylor . . T 6 13 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 119 For Goals Assists Total Wigle max. ...... 6 3 9 Trenholme 2 5 7 Grier .......... 5 2 7 Baillie ma. 3 3 6 Kerrigan .... 2 1 3 Wynn 2 0 2 Ross .,.... 0 1 1 Braden .... O 0 0 46 Against Vvigle ma. .... 10 Newman .... 12 22 -li,..l..li-- SECOND TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. SECONDS At Port Hope, Feb. 23rd. The game started off well, with both teams showing good combin- ation. U.C.C. scored nrst, about half-way through the first period, when Storey put the puck in the net on a nice play. The School soon evened up, however, when Kerrigan scored on his own rebound from the boards. In the second period U.C.C. again went into the lead, Dellis scoring on a long shot from centre ice, which eluded Wigle ii. Play was very even for a while, and just near the end of the period Lockwood scored for the School, after rounding the op- posing defence nicely. The third period produced very ragged hoc- key, as both teams seemed to have gone to pieces. U.C.C. were at- tacking strongly at the finish, but the School managed to hold theni out, leaving the final score 2-2. Teams: U.C.C.-Goal, Douglasg defence, McAskill and Fellingerg wings, Loftus 'and Samsong centre, Fairhead. Subs., Dellis, Hood, Kennedy and Storey. T.C.S.-Goal, Wigle ii., defence, Braden and Clarke: wings, Lock- wood and Lindsay: centre, Kerrigan. Subs., Holton, Combe McCloskey and Whitehead i. r bu an .31 m O MCCI P. ead hiteh W W. ckwood Lo e S. Clark H. Ke ri gan to J. 3-4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q1 SCHOOL vs. PICKERING SECONDS At Toronto, Feb. 25th. Owing to a misunderstanding, this game only lasted for two fifteen minute pzriods. There was nothing to choose between the two teams in the first period. About five minutes from the end Kerrigan scored on :1 pass from Lockwood. In the second period Pickering tried hard for the tying goal, but with the help of New- man in the nets, the School managed to keep them fzom scoring. The score 1-0 pretty well indicate: the way the game was played, as there were very few scoring chances, both teams playing very close hockey. Teams : Pickering-Goal, Chandler: defence, Robinson and Langsg wings, Duncan and Palmer: centre, Harvey. Subs., Meredith, Biggin, Davis and Willard. T.C.S.-Goal, Newman, defence, Whitehead i. and Braden: wings, Lockwood and Clarke: centre. Kerrigan. Subs., Holton, Combe and McCloskey. THIRD TEAM MATCHES THE SCHOOL vs. INVICTUS CLUB On the 6th. of February, the School played the Invictus Club, an aggregation composed of first and second team men of Cobourg Collegiate. The lack of practice was very evident on the part of the School. The combination was weak, and the clearing done by the defence was sometimes at fault. Cobourg had a big team, which was strong individually. The game was fairly close, and the School showed great determination. Grant max. scored T.C.S.'s only goal. The score ended at 3-1 for the Invictus Club. THE SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE On Tuesday, the 16th. of February, the third team played a very exciting game with the substitutes of the Grove's first team. In the first period the opponents had by far the better of the play, scoring two goals. The School was a different team in the last two periods. Both teams scored twice in the second period, and in the AM. ' TE RD I TH THE W. Vaughan P. Hall r. E. W. Morse M Ambrose S. Savage H. W. Powell fabsentj. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 222 third the School evened up the score by two long shots. But, a few minutes later, the Grove won the game by a shot from the blue line. Cassels max. was hurt, and Pullen played very well in the nets for the last period. Grant max., Ambrose max., and Patch scored the School's, goals. THE SCHOOL vs. SETON HOUSE SENIORS The game with the Upper Canada Team on February the 18th.. was a fast, clean game. The School played very well in the first period, keeping their opponents near their own goal for most of the half. In the second half Seton House were much better, and the School were not able to hold their lead. Hall was very good on the defence and scored twice by clever rushes. Lindsay netted the other School goal on a rebound. The final score was 3-3. THE SCHOOL vs. SETON HOUSE SENIORS On the 25th. of February, the Thirds played a return game with Seton House at Port Hope. For the first period the piay was fairly even, but, in the second, the School obtained a lead of two goals, and from then on the opponents' defence was left wide open as they played four or five men up on the attack. Consequently, the School forwards broke through many times, and, although many good chances were missed, the School added to their lead several times before the game ended. The hockey was at times very ragged, and penalties were infrequent. It cannot be said that anyone was out- standing. The School defence was steady, and the forwards were faster than the Upper Canada players. The final score was 8-2. LITTLESIDE As was mostly the case in all hockey throughout the School, the Fifth Team did not do very much. Every possible chance, how- ever, was given to the team for a turnout, and, on one occasion, a trip to Bewdley was made. Two games were played with Port Hope teams and the School did well in both. The first, against St. John's Sunday School, resulted in a tie, two all. Keefer scored both the goals and O'Brian and Armstrong TY! ,E V .,....4Ls Hi. . llalapii of' IIIIII IK E 8 li' nga .T r. "ih'.'i.U.'S! 3 '4 ' 91.iL.Zf AM. TE FIFTH E TH bn CI O Armstr D. Redpath R. Lt -Col. C. Goodday McGinnis 1' A . cv 7: O GJ D. Russel CI 9-P r-4 CH A O 2 oi Keefer n R. ria P. O'B bsent . K. Bell ta TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q5 also played well. The Sunday School had a good teim but showed their lack of practice. ln the second game, against the Port Hope Junior Athletic Club. the team showed up much better. They won 2-0, the goals being scored by Keefer and O'Brian. Redpath and Russel played well while Hingston played a good checking game. Bell gave a good display in goal. HOUSE MATCHES MIDDLESIDE The Middleside House match played on the 24th. of Februazy was very close, and penalties weze not infrequent, as is usually the case in house games. Both goals were scored in the second period. Ambrose max. scored the first goal for Brent House, and Hall even- ed up the count a few minutes later. The Brent House defence and the first Bethune forward line were very good. Vaughan and Lindsay starred for their respective houses. The Bethunes did most of the attacking in the list period. The final score was a tie, 1-1. LITTLESIDE Feb. 16th. The game started at a fast pace which lasted throughout the first period. Towards the middle of the period. on a successful rush. Keefer ii. was able to score the first goal for the Bethunes. A few minutes later Rathbone scored with a shot from the midst of a scramble in front of the Bethune net. In the second period McGinnis scored a goal, unassisted. Later O'Brian ii. slipped the puck into the Brent net on an assist from Russel i. In the first few minutes of the final period, O'Brian ii. scored a 2nd. goal and soon after McGinnis went through to score again. From then on, the play was quickened to a furious pace which lasted until the end. Rush after rush was made by both sides, but without scor- ing success. With about five minutes to go, Keefer ii. took a long shot from the side and scored the winning goal. Bethune House won, 4 to 3. 26 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD HOCKEY COLOURS Colours have been awarded as follows:- First Team:-Baillie ma., Grant ma. J., Grier, Newman, Padley, Tay- lor, Trenholme, Wigle ma. D., Wigle max. F., Wynn. Extra Colour:-Ross. Second Team:-Braden, Clarke, Combe, Holton, Kerrigan, Lockwood McCloskey, Whitehead max. W. Third Team:-Ambrose max. S., Grant max. R., Hall, Lindsay Knox, Patch, Pullen, Powell, Savage, Vaughan min. W. Fourth Team:-Cassels max. P., I-Ieighington, Hyde, Osler ma. P., Schofield max. S. Extra Colour:--O'Brien max. S. Fifth Team:--Armstrong, Bell, Keefer ma., McGinnis, McLaren, O'Brian ma. P., Osler max. P., Redpath, Russel max. D. Squash ilizirqurta On account of extremely bad hockey weather this term, much more interest was taken in squash than has been usual. There have seldom been many vacant courts, and consequently the standard of play has been greatly improved. Matches with outside clubs were arranged in which the School did very well, and also a number of tournaments took place in the School. It seems very probable that these matches against other teams will become yearly events, and that :quash will be recognized as a School sport. SCHOOL MATCHES THE sc'HooL vs. KAPPA ALPHA On Saturday, January 30th., a squash team of seven players representing the Kappa Alpha fraternity came here to play the School. The tournament, the first of its kind, turned out to be a great success. The balconies above the squash courts were crowded with spectators, who were rewarded by seeing many fine and ex- citing matches. O'Brien max., in particular, distinguished himself 1 1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD QT by winning all three of his matches, this feat being accomplished by only one other player. The regulations of the tournament were thit every player played three matches consisting of the best two out of three games, the winning team being the one winning the most matches. The School finally managed to win by the close score of 11 matches to 10. Mickle beat Strathy .,... First Round Wigle ii. beat Brown McMullen beat Kerrigan Hurcomb beat Gunn ..... Mickle beat Carter i...... Strathy beat Trenholme Wotherspoon beat Wigle O'Brien i. beat Lash ..... Second Round Wigle ii. beat Wotherspoon Lash beat Wigle i. ......... . Carter beat Trenholme .. Kerrigan beat Lash ........ Hurcomb beat Mickle .... Gunn beat Strathy ...,.... O'Brien i. beat McMullen Third Rouind Carter beat Wigle ii. O'Brien i. beat Brown ........ 2-1 Kerrigan beat Brown .......... 2-0 Hurcomb beat Trenholme ..2-0 McMullen beat Wigle i. ........ 2-1 G.unn beat Wotherspoon ..2-0 THE SCHOOL vs. PHI KAPPA PI On Thursday, February 4th., the School played the Phi Kappa Pi fraternity and gained a victory by 9 matches to 6. The final result was due to the fact that the School was strong as a tegim. The fraternity posses:ed two crack players in Wilson and H. Martin who swept all before them, but, fortunately for the School, their team-mates were not up to their standard. First Round H. Martin beat O'Brien i. Wilson beat Gunn ................ Mickle beat Hunter ............ Kerrigan beat Abraham Dawe beat S. Martin ............ Second Round H. Martin beat Gunn ...... Kerrigan beat Hunter .... O'Brien i. beat S. Martin Wilson beat Mickle ...... Dawe beat Hunter ..., Third Round Gunn beat Abraham ............ 2-1 H, Martin beat, Kerr-igan Wilson beat O'Brien i. .......... 2-0 Mickle beat S. Martin Wigle ii. beat Hunter ...... 2-0 THE SCHOOL vs. MASTERS On Wednesday, February 10th., the School played the Masters and 23 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD beat them 22 games to 14. The points were scored on a basis of three games to a match, the total games deciding the result. Results Mr. Geldard beat Gunn ........ 2-1 Mr. Geldard beat Mickle ...... 2-1 Col. Goodday beat Gunn ...... 2-1 Mickle beat Col Goodday .... 2--1 Mr. Lewis beat O'Brien i ..... 2-1 Wigle ii. beat Mr. Lewis .... 2--1 Mr. Slubicki beat O'Brien i...2-1 Wigle ii. beat Mr. Slubicki..2-1 Kerrigan beat Mr. Hiscocks 3-0 Trenholme beat Mr. Hiscocks 2-1 Kerrigan beat Col. Stevenson Trenholme beat Col. Stevenson 3-O 3-0 THE SCHOOL vs. IVIONTREAL RACQUET CLUB On Saturday, February 13tl'1., the School played a team of four parents from the Montreal Racquet Club, consisting of Mr. Cassils, Mr. Landry, Mr. Russel and Mr. Turpin. Although the School played better than usual and many close matches took place, the experience of the older players finally told, and the School was beaten 8 matches to 4. The opposing team came a long way for the game and their visit was greatly appreciated and enjoyed. It is to be hoped that this will prove to be only the first of a series of contests between the School and the Montreal Racquet Club. Results Mr. Landry beat Gunn ...... 2-1 Mr. Cassils beat Mickle ...... 2--0 Kerrigan beat Mr. Turpin .... 2-0 Wigle ii. beat Mr. Russel .... 2-0 Mr. Landry beat Trenholme Mr. Turpin beat Wigle i. .... 2-1 2-O Mr. Russel beat Dawe ........ 2-1 Mr. Landry beat Kerrigan ..2-0 Mr. Cassils beat Wigle ii. ..2-1 Gunn beat Mr. Turpin .......... 2-0 Mickle beat Mr. Russel ........ 2-1 Mr. Cassils beat Kerrigan ..2-1 THE SCHOOL vs. R.M.C. On the second of March the Squash Team went to Kingston, with the First Hockey Team, to play the Royal Military College. The trip was a very pleasant one, and it was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. We also had the great privilege of dining in the Upper Mesa. The School started slowly, but improved after the first round. Wigle ma., whose hard hitting showed up to great advantage, played TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 29 an excellent game ,for the School, while Watsford was the out- standing player for the Royal Military College. The result was 11fe5 in favour of the School. First Round Second Round VVatsford beat Mickle ,......... 2-1 Watsford beat Gunn .,..,..,.... 2-1 Pepall beat Gunn .......... ..... 2 --0 Mickle beat Pepall .....,.......... 2-1 Wigle ma. beat Cape ............ 2-0 Wigle ma. beat Young ........ 2-0 Dawe beat Young .,.... ....... 2 -1 Dawe beat Cape ......,............. 2-1 Third Round Fourth Round Mickle beat Young ,.......,..... 2-1 Mickle beat Cape .....,,..,........ 2-0 Gunn beat Cape ......,...........,. 2-0 Gunn beat Young ..............,... 2-1 Wigle ma. beat Pepall .......... 2-O Wigle ma. beat Watsford .... 2-1 Watsford beat Dawe ............ 2-0 Pepall beat Dawe ................ 2-0 GYMNASIUM DISPLAY The annual Christmas physical and gymnastic display was held on the 12th. of December. The exhibition was very good considering that most of the work was new to everyone concerned. Both the Remove and physical-training classes used the Neils-Bukh system. of which the marching was the most interesting feature. The audience greatly appreciated the new method, which made a com- plete change from the usual program. The exercises in the horizontal and parallel bar teams were well done, despite the fact that there were quite a number of new boys in both. Also the club-swinging class and the horse team were ex- ceptionally good. The music played by Mr. Sly and the jazz or- chestra did much to make the display a success. LIFE-SAVING Life-saving has held the interest of a great many in the School for the past two terms. Savage and Ross took the classes, and the high standard in the tests is largely due to their very enthusiastic work. In the Michaelmas Term, the following boys obtained the Bronze Medallion:-Bickle, Brainerd, Carling, Cassils maj., Corbett, Gunn. Little, Patton, Ross, Vallance max., Vallance maj. and Wood. In the Lent Term the following passed the requirements for the Proficiency certificate:-Armstrong, Annesley, Ambrose maj., Am- brose min., Browne, Cleveland, Cox, Duncanson, Doolittle, Ede maj.. 30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Fleming, Emmans, Ford-Smith, Goodfellow, Graydon, MacLaren, McConnell, Moore, Osborne, Passey, Patch,'Price, Reid maj., Rough- ton, Russel max., Russel maj., Stone, Vaughan maj., Warden, Wilson and White. At the present time three more classes are being instructed by Savage and Ross. SHOOTING. The inter-House Musketry competition was fired during the week of' December 7th. Brent House regained the c.up with a lead of al- most four points. The averages for the two houses were 37.3 and 33.7 for Brent and Bethune respectively. The School was entered this'year for the -Imperial Challenge Shield. The match was fired in t-he first week of March. The results were very creditable, the School average being 89.412. Alden and Brown made the highest scores of 96 out of 100. In the Annual Course of Musketry 16 boys were qualified, as Marksmen and 24 as First Class shots. Braden made the highest score of 97 out of 100. Two of the three matches in the D.C.R.A. Competition have so far been fired. In the Junior Class, Robson made the best score with 96 in the first match, and McGinnis, with 95 in the second match. In the Senior Division, Braden came first with 96 in the first match and Lockwood was the best in the second match with 93.- The general shooting this year has improved considerably com- pared with that of last year. THE BADMINTON CLUB During the term the Badminton Club was reorganized under Taylor, and two matches were played against the town. The first match was played in the School gym and the School were victorious, the score being 10 to 1 for the School. In the second game, which was played at the Town Club, the School were again the victors by 10 to 5. The following have represented the School in the two matches:-Grant ma., Smye, Vaughan mi., Ryerson, Grier, Wilson, Patch, Cochran, Knox, Taylor, Thomson, Wynn, Wigle ma. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SALVETE Name Parent or Guardian Address Becher, A. Mrs. Archie Becher London, VALETE Beck, B. H.-eSixth: Senior: 3rd. XIV. Eakins, D. V.-Upper Shell. Spragge, P.-Lower Fourth, 3rd, XIV.: 5th. XI. Williams, A. M.5Upper Shell. CHRISTMAS EXAMINATION ORDER VI. V. Mc-Gill 'ffPatch, R. Warden, J. Newman, R. 25'Heurtley, C. Gibbons, J. Wilson, K. Heighington, E. Gunn, M. Deakin, C. S. Beck, B. Cleveland, J. Brainerd, W. Armour, E. Little, H. Thomson, D. Ambrose max., S. Southam, F. licrrigan, J. Grier, A. E. Moore, H. Molson, VV. McConnell, T. Ede max., E. Turpin, G. Wigle max., F. Combe, J. O. Browne, D. Dawe, K. Taylor, T. Grxydon, A. Bonnycastle, G. Nichols, C. O'Brien max., S. Chevalier, P. Stone, J. Ross, C. Broughall, W. Nesbitt, R. Savage, H. Holton, W. Ryerson, S. VVood, J. Roughton, P. Mickle, VV. Trenholme, T. iigequal. Cowperthwaite, L. Stikeman, J. I-'ord-Smith, H. Hyde, G. Cox, J. C. Whitehead max., Wynn, V. Rice, I. Upper IV. Lower IV. Osler ma., Peter. Holmes, R. Cutler, E. Barber, J. Reed max., M. Doolittle, R. Reid mi., VV. B. Grant max., R. Bickle, T. H. Ede ma., F. Vaughan max., G. Corbett, J. Ridpath, G. Patton, D. Hall, P. Ambrose ma., D. Leadbeater, W. Braden, W. Cassels max., P. McCloskey, P. Powell, W. H. Baly max., H. Clarke, H. Padley, C. Duncanson, A. Lockwood, S. Ont VV. 'H 32 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD REMOVE Upper Remove Middle Remove Lower Remove Bridger, N. Allan, M. Vaughan ma., Ambrose mi., Fleming, A. Lafleur, A. McGinnis, D. Brunton, L. Annesley, J. Morrisey, H. Nelles, C. Keefer max. new iv., .J. L R0gerS max J Reid ma., T L Ir-HOX B P.. Bell, K. Waldle I P. wigle ma., D Vaughan H11 W Bankiei-, P. D Grant ma J Emmans, R Osborne J W Carling, L. Pullen J A1den,J- Cutten max W Pincott, S. Godshall, H Robson, E. Langmuir, A W O'Brian ma., P. Vallance max W Cochran, E. Hingston, H W Baillie ma., J. Somers, D. Armstrong, D. Rathbone, G Goodfellow, C. Chadwick, W S Russell ma., D. Swaisland, J Staunton, T. A. G. Vallance ma G Osler max., Pat. Hobson, I. Schofield, S. Burpee, A. Galloway, D. Seagram, D Mitchell, J. S Becher, A. SHELL FORM Upper Shell Middle Shell Fortye, R. A. Vlhite L Iieefer ma., R. McLaren R D Price, A. S. Whitehead ma., R. West R Curphey, W. L. Penny A E Langdale, A. Worthington J M Pettit, R. Ku-kparrick, J. G. Pearson, F. Smye. F. Peck, H. Lindsay, E. L. nnkey, J. D. Cassils ma., M. Hedpath, R. F. Russel max., Dal. Passy, DeL. E. S. Williams max., G. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31-3 MUSIC CLUB The only concert which has taken place this term was one by the Toronto Wood-Wind Quintet on Feb. 20th. These artists treated us to a delightful program. They played two big works, a sextet by Thuille, with Mr. Sly at the piano, and a Beethoven quintet, Op. 71, for wind instruments. Mr. Goodger sang a folk-song for which Percy Grainger had written a wood-wind accompaniment, and the Quintet also played Grainger's "Walking Tune". After the program had been completed, an interesting demonstration of each instru- ment by its player took place. Unfortunately the arrangements for the concerts on March 5th. and March 12th. fell through, but Mr. Sly has consented to give a program on March 12th. It is a pity that more members have not taken advantage of the fine opportunity of using the Club gramophone records in the Dining Hall. The Music Appreciation Circle, however, has met on alter- nate Sunday evenings and has covered a good deal of ground. THE LITERARY SOCIETY At the beginning of the term several new members joined the society, which is now slightly larger than last year. We have not yet completed our program of plays for the year, but since Christ- mas three enjoyable meetings have been held. Although occasion- ally disappointing, the reading on the whole is greatly improved. At the first meeting of the term the society read the "Admirable Crichton", a comedy by Sir James Barrie. Colonel Stevenson was our guest at this meeting. "Juno and the Paycock" by Sean O'Casey, a tragi-comedy of the Irish labouring class in Dublin, afforded the society another even- ing's enjoyment. This play was repeated from last year and proved as popular as before. Uncle Vanya, a play of Russian rural life by Anton Tchekov, was probably the most ambitious undertaking of the year, and some members of the society no doubt found it difficult to grasp. But the reading was very good, largely owing to the help of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, and was a source of great enjoyment to those whom the play interested. The program for the rest of the season comprises a thriller by Javanese Dance by Gilbert Sclatex' TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 255 Patrick Hamilton and another Shaw play. For one of the last two meetings, we hope to have a visitor from Toronto. On Wednesday, March 9th, a party from the society, is going to see "A Midsummer Night's Dream", performed by the Stratford- upon-Avon Festival Company. DRAWING CLASSES Drawing classes have been held in the Junior and the Senior School every Tuesday during the Lent term. Quite a number of the boys are very promising, and some of the better drawings should make a very fine collection by the end of the year. As soon as the weather becomes a little more settled, the Senior School class hopes to get outside and take advantage of the oppor- tunity that is offered there. Mr. Sclater has very kindly allowed us to publish the Linoleum- cut which appears on the opposite page. It has been accepted by the Ontario Society of Artists and is on exhibition during this month at the Toronto gallery. THE SCIENCE AND ARTS SOCIETY The activities of the boys this term have been much the same as in other terms. There will be a contest at the end of the term for the best piece of work turned out of the Work-shop. There will also be a photographical contest at the same timeg if enough entries are available. Two or three boys have been experimenting to find the effects of solutions of mineral salts on the growth of plants. They are using corn in their experiments and now have several corn stalks about three inches in height. One or two boys have been experimenting with lino-cuts. Sev- eral have been made and were quite successful. We are grateful to Mr. Parr, who has given us several snort talks on Photography. The Society was also fortunate in receiving a visit from Prof. VV. T. MacClement of Queen's University. He gave an illustrated 35 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD lecture on "The Canadian Beaver". The following is an account of it written by one of our members:- On Saturday, February 6th., the members of the Science and Arts Society and certain masters and their wives, were fortunate in hearing an illustrated lecture on the Canadian Beaver, delivered by Professor W. T. MacC1ement of Queen's University. It was due to Mr. E. W. Morse that Professor MacClement came, and the Society takes this opportunity of thanking him. After explaining the various parts of the body of the beaver and their several uses, Prof. MacClement spoke about the dams. It appears that the chief purpose of the dam is to keep a sufficient body of water over the edible material, such as the roots of certain water plants, in order that the beavers shall be able to reach the food under the ice in winter. Prof. MacClement pointed out an interesting fact that, while some beaver dams are only six or ten feet in length, one was found that measured 1,100 feet. There were also interesting slides on beaver canals and lodges, describing their construction and the ingenious means of entrance and exit. Prof. MacClernent also explained the term "beaver meadow". This is apparently a field of very fertile soil, situated between two hills with a stream running through the centre. Originally the land was rough and timbered, until a colony of beavers dammed up the small stream and in time lengthened the dam to suit their need. In this way all the trees were cut down in the adjacent vicinity leaving an open plain covered with water. Naturally the dam caught and held all the debris floating on the surface until it became water- logged and sank. Then with the advance of civilization the colony left the district, the dam fell away and the lake was converted to its original state as a stream. In this way there was left a wide fertile meadow, the soil consisting of rotten branches etc.,--making it very rich. This concluded the lecture. We are certain that it was much enjoyed by all present, and everybody went away feeling that they had gained a great deal of knowledge about the life and habits of our national emblemse-the beaver. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 157 THE DEBATING SOCIETY On Sunday, Feb. 28th., the Debating Society had its final debate of the season, except for the Inter-House debate, which will be decided on March 20th. The session was interesting and instructive and several boys made good progress as debaters. Among those who took a prominent part are Armour, Wilson, Wigle, Nichols, Heighington, Savage, Patch, Mickle, Stikeman, Reid iii., Brainerd and Osler ii., while several others made an occasional speech. There was evidence that boys took pains with their contributions. The movie, the influence of newspapers, the conquest of the Atlantic, immigration into Canada, the present system of school examinations, the position of the aeroplane in modern civilization, and the question of prohibition have figured in our motions for debate. Two members of the Staff contributed to the discussion on immigration, and we gave them a hearty welcome. In our debate on School examinations, we were surprised to find the present system upheld, for we had come to believe that its legs were rickety. Upon the chairman lay the responsibility of deciding to which side the balance of debate had been inclined by quality of argument and delivery, and he was forced, though regretfully, to uphold the "status quo." What- of the speakers? Nichols' experience was an advantage to him and to us, and his speeches were at times very good, as, for instance, when he opposed Prohibition. He must, however, avoid giving too personal a point to his remarks in debate. Wilson did some thorough thinking and deserves the thanks of all of us for doing so much. Armour had the eye of a sharpshooter and took delight in bringing down a victim. He has a gift for accumulating interesting facts. Savage was helpful and at times good. Mickle was sometimes up and sometimes down. At least one speech was very good, but Mickle tires of browsing on the heights. VVigle and Patch were earnest and business-like, and have worked well. Heigh- ington spoke frequently and on one occasion reached a high stand- ard. Stikeman was always ready to assist, and his speech on Pro- hibition was praiseworthy. Once, however, we saw him disguising thin argument under a manner of easy assurance. Reid iii. inter- ested us at times by arguments which hinted at power to come. So did Osler maj. who has the qualities necessary to a good debater. Brainerd will do well when he has a little more experience. Greer 35 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD began late in the session, but we discovered that he would have been welcome earlier. The standard of debate was generally good and at times very good. The session was a great success, but it may be well to re- mind speakers that it is better to give connected arguments of their own than it is to seize on an opponent's statement and tear it to shreds. Even in debate it is better to be constructive than destructive. The main thing is to attain, by sheer quality of argu- ment, to a high level of discussion. The following boys, in addition to those already named, spoke at least once in debate: Little, Cutler, Gibbons, Rice, Ambrose maj., Taylor, Bonnycastle, Holmes and Houghton. An account of the Inter-House contest will be given in the next number. THE CHESS CLUB Early in the term it was decided to form a Chess Club and a committee was formed consisting of Ross, Deakin, Gibbons and Osler ma., under the chairmanship of Lt.-Col. Stevenson. Nineteen boys joined the Club, and an American tournament was organised, each member playing every other member, the winner of most games to hold the cup. The cup was won by Deakin, who was undefeated in all his games. On March 5th. a match was played at home versus U.C.C., the following team being chosen to represent T.C.S.: Deakin Ross Osler ma. Gibbons Ambrose, ma. Reid iii. Ede max. U. C. C. won the match by 17 points to 11. -K.L.S. BOOK REVIEWS Usually, at this time of the year, many boys find themselves faced with the task of reading a number of books from the Matricu- lation list, in a very limited amount of time. The following short reviews have been written in the hope that they will prove of help in the choice of reading. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD IS!! "The Master of Ballantraef' by R. L. Stevenson This book centres on an account of a struggle between two brothers, the heir to the title of Durrisdeer, and his younger brother. who, through peculiar circumstances, becomes the holder of the title and substance of his father. Mr. Stevenson in his very en- tertaining style luminates his story with amazing tales of civil war in England, of piracy on the seas, and Indians in the American col- onies. But the interest does not lie wholly in this element of adventure. These thrilling happenings are only incidents in a great tragedy. It is really a most incredible novel. ,l.l.?-- "Two Years before the Mast," by Richard H. Dana A fascinating book written on extracts from the author's journal of his passage as a common seaman on a merchantman. It is an accurate and authentic account of a two years' voyage from Boston around Cape Horn to California and back, portraying clearly the hard and sometimes cruel life of sailors in the early half of the nineteenth century. Mr. Dana has written it in the language of the sea, and one feels, as he reads it, that he were actually with him in the forecastle with the old 'Tars'. "Twenty Years After," by Alexander Dumas. Comparatively few people know that Dumas wrote a sequel to his famous book, "The Three Muskateersn. Yet "Twenty Years After" is just such a sequel, dealing as the name implies, with events of a considerably later period than those in the first book. Here once more we meet many old friends such as D'Artagnan, Athos, Aramis, and Porthos, who perform again their wondrous deeds of valour. Instead of Richelieu there is Mazarin whose villainy sur- passes even that of "The Red Cardinal" himself. The style of "Twenty Years After" follows much upon that of "The Three Mus- kateers" and makes ideal reading. 40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD ' ' Odtaa, " by John Masefield This is the story of a young boy who accidently kills a game- keeper on an estate in England. Lenience is shown him, and he is sent off to South America where he encounters revolution and has many exciting adventures, which help to make the book of interest. Masefleld has written "Odtaa" in his usual breezy style, but he keeps well to the story which is very good. Above all it might be called the character study of a man, whose will is none too strong, when he finds himself faced by unexpected conditions. ' ' Chippinge, " by Stanley Weyman. In "Chippinge" Weyman has departed somewhat from his usual type of story and gives us in its place the tale of a rotten borough and its owners in the days of The Great Reform Bill. The book is full of interesting stories about the graft and the corruption which at that period were ingrained in English political life. Finally, however, he ends up by showing how the true English nature re- asserts itself, when the people rise against the evil and the Great Bill is passed. The closing chapters are centered about a rebellion that rises in Bristol and which provides plenty of excitement. "The Floating Islandf ' by Jules Verne. Here is the story of a Transatlantic voyage in the days before the invention of steam, and of romance in mid-ocean. The appear- ance of a mysterious ghost on the ship and its strange actions help to flavour the already interesting story with an element of excite- ment. Although Jules Verne has used "The Floating Island" to de- scribe the impressions which he had of a voyage across the Atlantic on the famous "Great Eastern" he manages at the same time to provide a very interesting story. "When Knighthood was in Flower," by Major. The author of "When Knighthood was in Flower" has certainly spared no pains to make his story as exciting as possible. From TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 41 cover to cover it is full of the spice of adventure. The hero, an un- known young man attracts the attention of several high personages at the court. He falls in love with a young princessg but the prob- lem of his birth prevents them even thinking of marriage. How- ever, he overcomes all the difficulties and finally attains his prize. aaR0b R0y,'s by Sir Walter Scott. The story of a bold Highlander, Who, with but a few adherents, dares to defy the all-powerful English. Rob Roy's daring escapades, his entrance into Glasgow, and the way in which he manages both to elude and exasperate the English soldiery, are sure to commend themselves to the reader. And, in addition, there are one or two good descriptions of Highland life and scenery which are well worth reading. "Queen Victoria." by Lytton Strachey. This is a book everyone should read. Mr. Strachey has written the life-story of the queen in his intimate, amusing style and has brought us to see the queen as an ordinary human being, with hu- man thoughts and feelings. In reading it We are led almost with- out knowing it, into the innermost realms of the diplomatic and political relations of England at this period. We see what we have read in history in a more romantic light-its real light. Mr. Strachey has given us, as well as a biography, a vivid picture of the romantic Victorian era. -W.B.R. and E.C.C. 42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Qlnntrihutinna Figures in the Firelight Old Jem Sutherland was alive. Lying back in his big arm-chair, old Jem Sutherland thought of this, in particular,-of many things. Here it was on the eve of his one hunclredth birthday, and he was :till in full possession of all his senses. He took genuine pride in this, though in his heart of hearts he was not too pleased with so long a life. People nowadays bothered him so much, and all the nice ones were dead. He felt a vague sense of shame in having out- lived gill his dear-ones. He felt that there was a blot upon his name for hiving lived so long among these awful people. He lay :till farther back in his chair, and with his chin on his breast gazed somnolently into the fire. He was getting pretty feeble now. He hadn't got much longer, he thought. But he still had full possession of his senses. Indeed, sometimes he saw much more clearly than they did. And now, he could often see dead and gone faces in the iirelight. They said, "Just an old man's fancy," but they were blind. There was little Nell with her golden curls and pretty tip-tilted nose. Just a year ago to-morrow she had died,-on his birthday. How they had loved each other! How crushed he had been! He had felt and said that he could never live another year. Now he was still alive! To-morrow they would all come trooping in, and be kind and condescending. They would make jokes about his having outlived all the others. They would say, "Thought you said you would be :lead by now, Papa." Then they would all laugh. How he hated their foolish imbecility! And they called him 'Papa' . . . 'l'apa'. He mouthed the hated word silently to himself. How he loathcd them all! He could not face them to-morrow. For el while he lay motionless sunk in gloom, and tired out by his iicrc-2 lnger. He gazed silently into the fire, now and then rais- ing his eyes to the clock on the mantel, and then slowly letting them he drawn down to the tire again. At that moment they were raised to the clock. In half an hour his tea would be coming in. He didn't want any te 1. Why must they insist that he have tea? He would far rather be alone with his thoughts and his fire. Anyway he had half an hour of peace. He let his eyes sink back to the tire again. It was full of faces now. There was Auntie Laura, and Juno, and Robert and little Alf, and there at the back TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD -13 was uncle Jake and little Nell and the rest of the family . . They were all there . . . Soon he would be there too. . . Very soon, he thought, for now he felt very weak . . . strangely weak. He gazed silently at the figures. They seemed to be beckoning to him. It would be such fun to talk to them all! He had nearly half an hour before tea. He felt vaguely that those other awful people would make a fuss if he went, but they would never know-. He had a whole half hour. Yes, he would go! He would go jus! for a little while. He made a mighty effort to get to them, but theie was some- thing'-some encumbrance-holding him back. The figures in the tirelight were clearer now. They seemed to be urging him on. He would go and stay with them. Yes, he would slip his encumbrance off. He felt that this was rather a daring thing for an old man to do. He had certainly never done it before. He could do it now though. What was that, a footstep in the corridor? He would do it now! His body swayed forward and fell back lifeless. His soul had gone free. Old Jem Sutherland was dead. E.N.I-I.. The Council Rock. We were on a canoe trip, and in the middle of the network of lakes and rivers in Algonquin Park. So far, the trip had been fine fun, although maybe we had travelled just a little bit too quickly, the best was yet to come, and we all did our shares of the work with a wonderful enthusiasm. When we rounded the last bend of the Council River, we found ourselves in the famous Council Lake. which took its name from the huge granite rock at one end, at the base of which the Algonquin Indians had their ceremonies and Coun- cil fires. Of course we just had to stop, and we searched for signs and proofs, but the enormous rock gave us no help, so that a few of us, including myself, went away disappointed and doubtful about the legends that we had been told about it. In a few hours we had left the rock miles behind us. By the time the evening meal came, most of the lads had forgotten about it in the rush for supper, and with the fading daylight. It was my turn to cook in the morning. and I Wearily put the prunes on the slowly-fading' fire, laid out my blanket-roll on the moist ground, snugged in, and prepared for a dreamless sleep. Gazing at the embers of the Iire with half-closed 44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD eyes, I slowly dropped off to sleep, the prune pot, somehow, remind- ed one slightly of the huge Council Rock:- I was sitting with the rest of the young men, and the Council was just about to commence. The old Chief was on his feet, and he was speakingte "And now, my sons, light we the Council fire, not after the man- ner of the white man who makes an heap of logs, but in the man- ner of the red man, who squats over a small fire. As this is a coun- cil of peace, light we the pipe of peace." The braves all puffed the pipe silently, and I envied them their position in the tribe, wondering if my initiation into the tribe was going to be as severe as their's had been. The Chief droned on in a steady tone, "To Maza Inna, lMother Earthr, that she will bless her children with her plenty"3 he pointed the pipe towards the ground. The young men about me were all looking very serious and said the response, "Noon-way," lAmenb, in a low tone. The Chief was finishing the pipe ceremony by addressing the winds, he was praying to them that they would not harm us, but bless us. Then we all stood up while the Chief chanted the tribal prayer:- "Father,4- A needy one stands before thee Fatheryv I that sing am he." There was something majestic in the Way he said "Wakonda," rlfatheri, and for the first time I realized the greatness of the old Chief and was able to understand why the tribe worshipped him the way they did. The council fire was then declared open, and, under the shadow of the huge rock, the contestants came forth and tried their skill in the various competitions. Keenya, my uncle's son, won the hand-wrestling, and the "skin the snake". The braves all appliuded with a quiet "How-How", or condemned a competitor with a loud and disgusted "Waugh-Waugh". Then came the Dog-dance, and after that the Eagle-dance: but the ceremony that I was dreading most, and yet was wishing for, was drawing nearer and nearer. Presently the old Chief arose, and grunted out the name of the young man on my right:- "I am going to find out whether or not you are up to the standard of the men of our tribe. If you are, then we will welcome you into the tribe, as a brave and one of us." TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 45 I was anxious to find out what the test was, I was afraid, and yet felt that I could pass into the tribe of braves. The youth stood .up straight as an arrow, he was steeling himself for what was to come. The Chief took his sharp knife out of his belt, and made a wedge-shaped cut in the breast of the copper-coloured youth. The youth kept his hands still by his side, and closed his eyes. The Chief slowly began to pull the wedge of flesh. The youth was en- during a terrific trial. He was beginning to quiver. He could stand it no longer,-he let out an unearthly scream, which echoed and re- echoed in my ears. Immediately the Chief stood back, and the braves all said,-"Waugh-Waugh, back to the women and children, Waugh-Waugh". I was in a cold sweat. My turn was next. Would I be able to stand it? The Chief was saying something about the was unconsciously repeating over to myself the konda dey dhu, Wakonda natonee," t"Father, fate of cowards. I tribal prayer, "Wa etc."b The Chief I came at once. 1 about to endure,-- that was towering above me, then needed help. The Chief was still was still talking. He mentioned stood there motionless, thinking if Wakonda made the huge rock He could help me when I most talkingg then he finished, and scattered the glowing fire with a deft kick of his foot. He turned towards me. I knew now what I had to do and slowly began to walk foreward. As I walked, I felt the red hot coals sear the soles ofmy feet, and I stiffened to stand the terrible pain. I was going to scream and be through with it, but before I realized it, the trial was all over. I had been tested, ap- proved and accepted. I was now a brave and a member of the great tribe! The Chief was congratulating me quietly: but the "How- I-Iows" of the braves were my great reward. my name, and of what I was Hugh B. Savage. A Dittee ! Some dream of first team colours, and some of privileges, Of gymn. eights and elevens, and such great things as these, But of all the School's great honours, there's none that can compare With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, row for the ' Prefectship each year. Those heroes of antiquity eat food with silver spoons, They sit with senior masters and oft have private rooms. They each have new-boy servants who banish all their smears With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, row for the Fags and second years. 415 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD When e'er we were commanded to turn out on parade, Our prefects marched with batons, but we with rifles played. We threw them out before us, and smiled away our tears With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, row for the Second and third years. And when the term is over, we to our homes repair, Our kinsmen cry, Hurrah boys, here comes the Collegierg Then come the third year lads whose nerves are well on edge With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, row for their Coming privilege! Then let us fill a bumper, and drink a health to those, Who carry books and switches, and wear the learned clothesg May they and their commander live happy with their arts, With a tow, row, row, row, row, row, row for the School Of all our hearts. -W. John C. Stikeman fWith apologies.J The Spectre. A big, black, ghostly barque was she, And shining at her figure-head Was phosphoresence, from the sea VVhich now had claimed its toll of dead. The pilot's boat sped from the shore That ghostly craft to intercept: The only watch he found on board Was one which was by dead men kept. Her decks were scarred and rottingifast, Her rigging showed a lack of care: And by a knife stuck in the mast Was hung a man with golden hair. He went into the cabin dark, The atmosphere was foul with wine: He found the log-book of the barque, And here's what was enscribed therein. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Ten days from shore and all is well! The crew is smart, the weather fair: But on the next a thick fog fell, Which stunk of rot and death I swear. And through this fog for week on week We drifted on to death's dark rim, Until from thirst we could not speak: And seen were many spectres grim. At last into a land of ice From that dread mist we did emerge: It looked to us like Paradise, And then we heard a mournful dirge. And now I know that I am due To quit this earth through God's good grace: To start above my life anew, And know that I have run my race." The pilot stepped into his craft Clasping the book with air devout: And by a sudden chance or draught The big black vessel came about. And now she headed for the sea To sail into the wastes unknown: And soon was hid beneath the lea Until her masts were no more shown. The pilot in an awesome mood, The log-book grasped in one strong hand' Then up in his frail vessel stood, And cast it towards the distant land. And in his mind unto this day, Of that strange night there lies a mark: His thoughts are often far away With that big, black, and ghostly barque. 47 W.M.B TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The Jew of Venice. Antonio, in Venice, Was always a menace To plans which were made by old Shylock, Who said in great dudgeon, "Why should this curmudgeon Be ever a bugbear to my luck ?" Bassanio, a friend, Said to Tony, "No end Of a series of suitors importune An heiress called Portiag lt fills me with nausea, For the beggars are after her fortune. Could I just find some money My fate would be sunny,' For I'd go with fine retinue to her, Steal a march on each suitor Who dared to dispute her, And-well, I'd successfully woo her." ' if Il. .' ,, , l., Then with no small emotion Antonio said, "Ocean Bears all the possessions I'm heir top But why don't you try luck With usurer Shylock? My credit is yours if you care to." "Let's go to the divil And try to be civil And see if he'll be of a nature To lend you enough to Procure the stuff to Give weight to your 1ove's candidature." Bassanio, light-hearted, Made speed and departed To become one of usury's prisoners: Shylock said, "I'l1 consider it A deal, if you bid a rate Consistent with what I call business." TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Then, as though he repented Past hatred or scented Some hope of a profit still greater, "I should like to be frients With you very nice gents," Shylock isaid-and he smiled like a waiter. "If Antonio engages To sign me, as wages, A bond that's not earnest but funny, I'1l do him this favour And not spoil the fiavour By taking a cent of his money." Then, 'suspicion disarming And every fear calming, His innocent plan he announces- "Tony grants me, in jest, That I cut from his breast As much flesh as will weigh sixteen ounces." Tony called all Jews hounds, And his pride knew no bounds To be challenged by son of a Hebrewg "Say on!" said he loudly And thought very proudly, What harm for my ships can the sea brew? But I must not continue In detail to spin you Each fact of our very old story, "If his vessels go under," Said Shylock, " I'll plunder The stuff 'ncath his ribs till I'm gory." Very soon news came leaking That Fate had been wreaking Grim vengeance on Antony's cargoes, And rumours did trickle That Fortune the fickle Had sent his ships worse woes than Argo's. Came the grim day to settle! The Jew, on his mettle, Took a gaoler to Tony's apartment, Saying, "Pay, if you can!" TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD O, unfortunate man! Now he knew what 'to be in the cart' meant. To the gaol he was hustled And Shylock then bustled To take to the uttermost letter Whatever grim forfeit The statute-book saw fit To get from recalcitrant debtor. When the day for delivering The flesh came, stood shivering Poor Tony, the victim of Nemesis, Before all the court, Hearing Shylock exhort- When a lawyer was shown on the premises. If ever young bounder Was skilled to confound a Deliberate lot of old fogies, 'Twas this little fellow In gown black and yellow, Who was master of all legal bogies. He tied Shylock in knots, With his neat little plots And so cheated the Jew of his bacon Nay, to finish his fall, He deprived him of all, And left him forlorn and forsaken. With self-satisfied face At the end of the case, Antonio, no doubt, filled with virtue, Said, "Shy1ock, you miser! Henceforth you'l1 be wiser For you see with what justice we hur But Antonio once spat On the I-Iebrew's new hat, An offence to turn saint to a Nero: So I'm sorry for Shylock Who met with such vile luck, And I'm bound to dub Tony no hero. 1 t you." E. Evans TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 Ihr fduuinr Srljnnl llvrurh Most Lent terms in this part of the world are long affairs, with plenty of hockey, skating and other winter sports. So it is strange to be writing at the end of a Lent term of which there is so little to chronicle. Not that it has been a bad term. On the contrary, the writer lwho remembers several! thinks that it has been one of the best Lent terms he has known. If we lament the fact that we have had little winter and next to nothing of winter's sports, we may rejoice that some of its usual unpleasant accompaniments have been lacking. The health of the School has been excellent and lwe touch woodb we are grateful to be able to say that the sick-room has had very few occupants at any time, that none of them has been seriously ill and that none remained for long. During the earlier part of the term we had no snow, and very little skating. Once the "first turn-out" went in Lingard's bus to Rice Lake, and once the whole School went to the same place and had a very enjoyable afternoons skating. We can remember sea- sons during which we have had all the skating that could be desired -an 'inside' rink and two or three outdoor ones-and our memory records the fact that sometimes during those winters a day's skating missed meant a very disgruntled set of little boys. This year we noticed that the occasional day's skating was a joy which was re- membered for some time to come. Truly, the more we have the more we want! During the latter part of the term the weatherinan has given us some colder spells, and the town rink has been used on several days. General skating when possible and an occasional game of hockey have kept us fit and contentg and We have not missed the larger amount of it as much as we would have expected. One of the great features of this term has been the starting of the Carpentry Club. Mr. Morse has done us a great service and we hope that those who have enjoyed the Club will recognise that they owe a great deal to him both for starting it and for carrying it on. The things made by members of the Club vary a great deal. Useful articles include tables, pencil-boxes, book-racks, and cabinets, but the most popular things at present are model vessels. Freighters, "large" war-vessels and smaller ones are numerous and the interest in their manufacture has been keen. Altogether the Club has been a success and it could not have come at a better time. C. H. Truax was appointed Captain of Hockey. It has been a JUNIOR SCHOOL TEAM S. Russel od TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 difficult season, but he has done his best with the team and it has had a reasonably successful season. More of that anon. Hockey Colours were awazded to:eC. H. Truzix tCLipt.b, D. I. ll. Armstrong, J. E. Cutten, D. K. Dawes, P. A. McFarlane, W. G. H. Pavey, B. S. Russil, C. J. Scigrazn, J. K. Staines. The House Cup for Hockey is won this year by the Bethune House. The only game possible for this cup was played on the 27th. of February in the town rink. McFarlane was the captain of the Bethune teim and a good gime resulted in their winning by a :score of live to two. Congratulations, Bethunes! . VVe are grateful to the Bell Telephone Company for their having provided us with an evening's entertainment on Saturday, February 22nd, The moving pictures shown by them on that evening were much appreciated by the School. So far tMarch 4th.r the Junior School has enjoyed two extra half-holidays this term-one on February the second fthe conver- sion of St. Pauli and the other on Shrove Tuesday. JUNIOR SCHOOL HOCKEY Summary of Season: Games Played-Three Games Lost-Two Games Won-One Points Scored--Fo:-Sixteen Against-Sixteen This year we played only three games-two with the Grove and one with St. Andrew's Preparatory School. Our retum game with St. Andrew's and the games usually played with Elm House had to be cancelled. We are sorry for this: but nothing was to blame but the weather. Junior School vs. The Grove At Lakefield, Friday, February the 5th. Lost 10-5. This, our first game of the season, was a good match and both teams pl-ayed well. Our team was:-goal, Russel, defence, Pavey. and Seagramg forwards, Dawes, McFarlane and Truax. Subs., 54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Starnes, Cutten and Armstrong. The Lakefield boys were some- what better skaters than ours and showed the effects of good coach- ingveespecially in the matter of defence: but we felt all through the game thit it was a somewhat more even match than the score would seem to indicate. Russel was cool throughout the game, but once or twice he was disappointing: and an "open" defence failed frequently to back t'?l him up as they should have done. McFar- lane and Truax were, possibly, our most useful players in this game. Junior School vs. The Grove At Port Hope, Tuesday, February 16th. Lost 5-3. The Lakefield team was somewhat weaker and our boys were ai little more in practice, and a good game resulted. The tempering of the wind to the shorn lamb is a difficult matter in sports and We are grateful to our opponents for their consideration in changing the personnel of their team. Our team was as in the first game. Junior School vs. S.A.C. Preparatory School At Port Hope, Wednesday, February the 24th. Won Sal. This game was somewhat one-sided, as the score indicates. The Aurora weatherman had been even less inclined to provide ice than the Port Hope one, and our visitors had not had a great deal of practice. They played hird and showed no sign of giving ing but- cxcept during the second periodeewe had much the better of the game. Except that Henderzon replaced Russel for part of this game our team was as it had been before. As we look back over the term's hockey, one or two things stand out. The team has not been equal to that of last year: and luck of practice has been partly iesponsible for this. At the same time, it must be admitted that we did not start the season with such promising inaterialg and, even had we had ideal hockey con- ditiong it is not likely that we could have produced anything like so good a team. We think that Armstrong is the most improved player in the Junior School: and this is due to Hstickativeness' rather than to anything else. He is a trier all the time, and his trying has resulted in his becoming as good as some who by nature :should be better than he is. Pavey is young, but promises to be good. Seagram is a hard worker who has been useful throughout the season. Dawes handles his stick well and can skate quickly. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 but at present is seldom inclined to do both of these things at the same time. He has the makings of a very good player, but he has been disappointing at times. McFarlane is at present probably the best player on the team and he has been a useful member of it in all the games: but he has as yet not sufficient physical strength to play hard all the time. Like Dawes he has the natural gifts which go to make up a. hockey player. Truax, who kept goal last year. has played hard all through and has been a help to the team. Cut-A ten has worked hard and well, and Starnes has been useful at times. We ha.ve found it difficult to get a really good goal-keeper. Russel, whose cool-headedness has been his greatest asset, is still young and inexperieincedg and Henderson did not have enough practice to be- come really good. As a rule, the team has worked wellg but there has been rather a lack of "fire" and "life", save in the case of two or three: and the thing that we would have them remember is this-character, grit and doggedness are virtue-s without which all the accomplish- ments of a hockey player avail but little. -A. O. O. Elegy Written in a J .S. Dormitory The rising bell gives forth its tinny sound, The sleepy master wakens with a yawn, And in this room, with many a grunt and groan, The denizens awake to greet the dawn. Now fades the glimmering nightmare from the brain And all the room a solemn stillness bears, Save from the bathroom splashing sounds are heard, And music-boys do scurry forth like hares. Save that from yonder stately redbricked pile, The bell gives forth a solitary clang. And 'cross the campus clearly one can hear Boys rising with many a curse and bump and bang. Beneath those prickly blankets youth doth sleep, And heaves his breast in many a silent snore. Who would each in his narrow bed for ever lie And no more rise, wash, dress when masters roar. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The breezy call of tinny rising bell, The raggingof their fellows 'bout their heads, The sounds of breakfast being prepared below No more lit seems! shall rouse them from their beds. Let not our Masters mock their sleepiness, Their one desire t"Just five more minutes, sir!"J Authority hear not with disdainful smile Th' excuses, long and short, that they murmur. For, Masters, ye were once but twelve years old: Bed, then, to you was nothing else but bliss, So next time, when ye tempted are to soak Four quarters, then remember that?-and this! A.M.F. and J.K.S iwith apologiesl TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD if Qblh Entra' nina Major General H. P. Leader, C.B., V80-'88l, has retired from the Reserve List of Officers of the Imperial Regular Army. R. P. Jellett has been elected President of the Montreal Board of Trade for the present year. Dr. W. I. Taylor, t'87l, passed away at. his home in Port Credit on November 24, 1931. Before the war he served as medical officer in British NVest Africa and afterwards became chief medical officer in Sierra Leone whence he retired in 1922. Argue and Harold Martin were members of the Canadian Squash Team which played against the U.S. Team for the Lapham Cup. Charles N. Kirk is captain of the Toronto University Gym. Team and did very well in the annual match against McGill in the Inter- scholastic Gymnastic Competitions. P. H. Stevenson and C. Delahey were on the M.A.A.A. Senior Rugby Teams which won the Canadian Championship for 1931. Two Old Boys of the School who are attending English universi- ties, J. A. Irvine of Cambridge and L. C. Bonnycastle of Oxford, played very well in the inter-varsity ice-hockey match. Bonnycastle scored five goals and had two assists for Oxford, while Irvine, al- though scoreless, was the outstanding player for Cambridge. Both Irvine and Bonnycastle have been touring the continent with their respective teams and in nearly every case they have both played very good hockey. Bonnycastle has been playing for the All- England squad and has visited many places on the continent. In England his team won the equivalent of the Allan Cup. Irvine early in the season sustained a broken nose in one of the Cambridge prac- tices, but since then he has been playing a steady game for the university. Charles E. Frosst is now living at: Apt. 5, 2165, Lincoln Avenue, Montreal, Que. ADVERTISEMENTS THE TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION Annual Members S3 Life Members S25 The annual fee is payable in advance and is due on .lanuary lst. eavh year. Life Membership fe-es constitute the c-apital fund of the Assoviation, and are invested in School Boncls. Life AIt'llliN'l'S. tin-1'vt'ort-, hc-lp to build up the Associations vapital and enjoy the privileges of membership at a wr-Qv niotlerate 1-ost to themselves eonsielering that the -xllllllill fee woultl he 33.00. Honorary Membership twithout feeb is granted to those who :nuke lllllllllillllbll tlierefoi' upon leaving the St-hool. and rt-mains in fort-e until the following iIl'l'l'llllH'l' fllsl, A11 classes of Members: l. lit-tw-iw 2ltlV2llll'l' motives of School Matehes :xml otln-1' Svliool avtivities. Q - -. Art- t'lll'lbiif'll as snhserihers to the T.fl.S. "li4'1'0l'4l,'. fi. lio'1'f'iX'4- wrpivs of lllf' Old BUYS, DiI'8L'fOI',V. 4. .Xrv kt-pt in 1-ontaet with the Sehool and with 1-nt-ln other wluex-ever they may be. 7. Assist in promoting the 0lbj01'lS of the Asso- 1-lution. Kbmmunications should he addressed tozw- The Headmaster, Trillitlx' l'nlleu'e School. l'wl'I, llope, lllll. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 59 THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION The Annual General Meeting of the T.C.S. Old Boys' Association was held at 5 p.m. on Thursday, February 4th., 1932, on the 9th. floor of the Dominion Bank Building, Toronto. The President, Lt.-Col. J. W. Langmuir, was in the chair and he read the following report for 1931 which was adopted:- Gentlemen:- The membership in the Association for the year 1931 was as follows: Life Members ....... ....... 1 66 Annual Members .......219 Honorary Members ...... ....,.. 2 5 Total 410 I think we may congratulate ourselves on the fact that there is an increase in the Hrst and last classes of membership over the year 1930, but on the other hand, owing to a substantial falling off in the annual membership, our total membership for the year is 76 less than that of the previous year. It might be possible to attribute the de- crease in the annual membership of the Association to present general conditions, but I think that it was more largely due to the fact that only two instead of the usual five flights of circulars were sent out asking Old Boys to join the Association or renew their membership for the year. Besides the Annual Reports of the Association, six advance notices of School activities were sent to the members-two for hockey, two for cricket, and two for rugby. It is true that as each of us received our copies of the T.C.S. Record we read accounts of the activities of the previous term, but more frequent news of School activities in the form of advance notices would help to keep us in much closer touch with the life of the School, and it is hoped that the Committee for the current year which will be elected this afternoon will take steps to remedy this condition. Last Speech Day fourteen prizes were presented by the Associa- tion, and fifteen by individual Old Boys. There are still a number of prizes presented each year which are not given by individuals, and UH TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD any persons who desire to identify themselves with these should com- municate with the Head Master. It is gratifying to note the large number of athletic prizes which are presented by Old Boys and friends of the School. Indeed, it is difficult to think of any athletic activity which is overlooked in this rezpect. Your committee, after giving the matter careful consideration decided that owing to the early date at which Lent commences this year, it would be advisable to postpone the Annual Dinner until after Lent. It was also desired to hold the dinner this year in the Univer- sity Club, and it was found that no suitable night was available be- fore Lent when the whole Club could be turned over to the Associa- tion. The day of the annual dinner will be fixed immediately and notices sent to members well in advance of the occasion. Before concluding my remarks, I cannot overlook making refer- ence to the loyal services rendered by Mr. Harcourt Vernon, the Secretary-Treasurer. I regret, however, that he has definitely inti- mated the necessity of his retirement from this office at the end of this year, and the selection of his successor will need the careful con- sideration of your new committee. I am sure that all members of the Association will agree with me that we are deeply indebted to Mr. Harcourt Vernon for all that he has done in the furtherance of the welfare of the Association. In closing, it is with great regret that I have to record the death of the following: 4 James Ince l1878r, Toronto-Life Member. Rev. Canon Read 118721, Ottawa-Annual Member. P. B. Tucker f1892i, Winnipeg--Annual Member. Frederick Hague, K.C. l1877i, Montreal-Annual Member. and the following recent members of the Association: H. J. Bethune 1l874u, Toronto, Peter Perry f1866i, Guelph, J. L. Mathison 119021. London, England. I should like on behalf of the Association to extend our deepest sympathy tn their families and also to the family of the late John Scott Gibson, who entered the School in 1930 and died in the Sick Childrens Hospital in Toronto, a few short weeks ago. All of which is respectfully submitted. The Secretary-Treasurer then presented the following Financial Statement for 1931 which was adopted: TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 431 Capital Account Receipts Disbursements By balance forward from To General account 1930 T.C.S.bonds 34300 Interest .............,............ 3 14.15 Cash on deposit .. 75 To Balance forward to ---34375.00 1932 T.C.S. Bonds 34300 By 11 Life Members fees 275.00 Cash on deposit ., 350 By deposit interest ........ 14.15 --434650.00 34664.15 34664.15 General Account Receipts Disbursements By annual fees- To T.C.S. Record Subs. 3 382.00 212 for 1931 636 To Annual Meeting 1 for 1932 3 Expenses ...,........,........... 13.67 --3 639.00 To Annual Reports and By 125 Dinner tickets .... 312.50 Postage .............,............ 47.71 By Gifts for Athletic To Annual Dinner .......... 328.95 Prizes 1929 .................. 12.00 To Athletic Prizes 1930 .. 84.80 By Kingston Branch ...... 65.00 To Advance notices of By Bond Interest ............ 258.00 Matches .........,.............,. 57.30 By Int., on General Ac., 38.56 To Speech Day Prizes .... 42.50 By Int., on Capital Ac., 14.15 To Head Perfects Prize 12.50 Tc Membership Circulars 101.83 To Stationery ......,......,.... 21.50 To Postage Sz Telephone 3.65 To Exchange ........,..,........ 7.93 31339.21 31I0-4.34 By Bal. forward from '30 420.15 To Bal. forward to 1932 655.02 31759.36 3559.36 Petry Memorial Fund Account Receipts Disbursements By balance forward To Petry Prizes ............., 3 24.75 from 1930- To Balance forward to T. C. S. Bonds ..3500.00 1932- Cash on Deposit 37.82 T. C. S. Bonds 3500.00 ---3 537.82 Cash on Deposit 46.00 By Bond Interest ............ 30.00 ---3 545,00 By Desposit Interest ...... 2.93 3 570.75 Moved by Dr. R. G. Armour, seconded by S. B. Saunders and carried:- That the following paragraph be added to Article 2 of the Con- stitution:- 62 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD "ici All Masters at the School shall be Honorary Members with all the privileges of ordinary members until such time as they leave the School." It was hoped that this would result in a closer co-operation between the Masters and the Association for the benefit of the School. Moved by Major E. A. Hethrington, seconded by J. B. K. Fisken, and carried:- That the sum of 3500.00 be paid out of the surplus funds in the Association's General account to the Building Committee to be applied on account of the Building Committees office expenses. This action was taken in confirmation of resolutions, carried in 1929 and 1930. Moved by the Rev. J. Scott Howard, seconded by P. E. Henderson and carried:f That a message be sent to Dr. Bethune conveying to him the esteem and regard of the members of the Association. Lt.-Col. Langmuir movedza A vote of thanks to the Dominion Bank for granting the Associa- tion the use of the room in which the meeting took place. The following were nominated and re-elected by acclamation: I-Ion. President:-Dr. Orchard. President:AeLt.-Col. J. W. Langmuir. Vice-Presidents:iRev. C. J. S. Stuart, Dr. R. G. Armour. Representatives on the Governing Body:-D'Arcy Martin, K.C., R. C. H. Cassels, K.C., Dudley Dawson. The following were nominated and elected by acclamation:- Vice-Presidsntz Major E. A. I-Iethrington. Committee to retire December 31st., 1934:e-Dr. J. C. Maynard, .l. G. Spragge. J. McMullen, Dudley Dawson, Jr. Thi? President stated that the Committee had been unable to make satisfactory arrangements for the Annual Dinner before Lent and that it would be held at a time to be decided upon at the next meeting of the Committee. He announced that the Executive Body of the Association would meet more frequently in future and that sub-committees wo.uld be TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD G3 appointed to consider and take action with regard to various matters concerning the Association and the School. A sub-committee on athletics had already been appointed under the chairmanship of S. B. Saunders, the other two members being J. G. Spragge and J. McMullen. p BIRTH Strathy-In Toronto, February 10th., at the Toronto General Hospi- tal, to Mr. and Mrs. G. K. Strathy, a son. MARRIAGE Frosst-Fostver-Charles E. Frosst, Jr., to Mary Edythe Foster, on September 10th., 1931. DEATHS Ince-On November 20th., 1931, James Ince, at his home in Toronto. Taylor-On November 24th., 1931, Dr. W. I. Taylor, at Port Credit. Ontario. EXCHANGES Acta Ridleiannau, Bishop Ridley College, Ontario Acta Ludi", Oshawa High School, Oshawa, Ont. "Ashburian", Ashbury College, Ottawa. "The Albanian", St. Alban's, Brockville. an n na Bishop's College School Magazine", Bishop's College School u Lennoxville. Bishop Strachan School Magazine", Bishop Strachan School. Toronto. ll The Black and Red", University School, Victoria, B.C. The Black and Gold", St. John's College, Winnipeg. Blue and White", Rothesay Collegiate School, Rothesay, N.B. The College Times", Upper Canada College, Toronto. The Glenalmond Chronicle", Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, Scotland. "The Grove School Magazine", Lakefield, Ont. "The Harrovian", Harrow School, England. "High School of Quebec Magazine", High School, Quebec. u an an ts 4,4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Lower Canada College Magazine", Lower Canada College, Montreal The Oakwood Oracle", Oakwood Collegiate, Toronto. Ontario Ladies' College "Vox", VVhitby, Ont. R.M.C. Review", Royal Military College, Kingston. St. Andrew's College Review", St. Andrewis College, Aurora. Vancouver Tech.", Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver, B. C. Windsoriann, King's College School, Windsor, N.S. V V il a. 'IQI I' lx .-! ff: ak , n ' 0 x"1'v- 99' ' .7215 -an Y 0 -5 . .ln ' V av -wg 4" 1 V 2' Q- 3 ' . h- '- , t :Al T' .Q Q .'?' 1 Wf' 4 , I .4 ,, ,uf .6 I - , .4 ef- 4u 1 V , " f r '.' " n 4 Y nf 5 4 .- .., ' .-. , . O I S, 4 I L - 5 ' J U . :-- . . ' , 's ' L A . A . - , - Q- --, , al, , - , V gff' - sf, Y ,' :.'f,, l V fw-1 Y' ".'1,.y:.LL,. -Y '-, tl . ld-24" .H if ' Y ' 5 '-' 'Q ,r .f 1 1 " af , I-'uf , -If-pr' -1 jig . 'Q 5 ' . ! -'fy 4. . p -li fi -. Y I.-L"'.'5f" ' :ws " ," - . - wk Il ' . 5 '- -'A V 6' A .. . o- Y f 5 f, .F +- ,Q- Q ' r - . , A it V .Tr "..' '25 y ,f ' ' U i . . -7- intl... .c:.' l I - 0 ., ii' X .E - : V , L . LN' . 'I . l ,D 4 ' " L Q' ' ' ' A an 'gh 1, A 4 ' - an-,A - --J 1 A A ,1, Qi -4 . ,-L , L 0 'P V44 Q . , - " J' 3-., rf:-' , , - 1' H' - ., I ++1.f : - -n.:b1-f...1.dC1.!.. .fa-af I' . ' '.?""Q-T 4 .so M ' 1' , Y, . . 'A I . Q Q 4 1- '1 - , , v I A ,, ., '- - W. ' .4 ' '. v - . lu H'L -+ - v r 1 .. r.,.V JA C 4 Fo 5 I-I ..- Ir bi 7 .514 Iliff. HN. Jffxk. n I 1' .'-D0 Uvv PM ADVERTISEMENTS TRINITY CO1 .I EGF. In the University of Toronto TRINITY COLLEGE, FEDERATED WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, AND NOW REMOVED TO QUEEN'S PARK, IS ONE OF THE ARTS COLLEGES OF THE UNIVERSITY AND INCLUDES 1. A Faculty of Arts providing instruction for students in classes of limited size in all subjects taught by the Colleges. 2. The full advantages of Federation with the University, instruction by its Professors, qualification for its Scholarships and Degrees, use of its Library, Laboratories and Athletic faculties and membership in Hart House. 3. A Faculty of Divinity in which Trinity exer- cises its University powers of conferring degrees, and prepares candidates for the ministry of the Church. 4. Residences under College regulations for men -"Trinity Housen, and for women students-"St. Hilda 's"g also for members of the academic staff. 5. The Scholarships offered by the College have recently been revised and largely increased. Full particulars will be supplied on request. 6. The Reverend F. A. Bethune Scholarship and the Professor William Jones Scholarship are open only to boys from Trinity College School. For information concerning Scholarships, Exhibi- tions, Bursaries, etc. address: The Registrar, Trinity College, Toronto 5. ADVERTISEMENTS COLLEGE OUTFITTERS IN Clothing and Furnishings BOYS', YOUTHS' AND YOUNG MEN'S SIZES LIMITED 1444 sr. CATHERINE STREET wEsT MONTREAL DACK'S "Bond Street" 51-1055 NOW 58.75 Nr1xx', ut 21 big swing, you can buy Dack's "Bond Street" slump: 11,1 sa-howl, dress and sports wear. Included ilu ' 11+-vx, low prifx-, 58.75, :ire the Scotch grain model, a 1' nw' -+l t'l-llrmmzum golf shoe. FIOYS' SHOES AT 37.50. DACK'S SHOES FOR MEN lbw- lv-4T1j 5Hf3i"v -.y ,', -36 PLO fl G at nd DET Ol ADVERTISEMENTS l l' : y 'f it E .,.. . THE TRUE VALUE of a Dollar Saved PORT HOPE BRANCH F.W. BELL. MGP "The boy who thinks a dollar is not worth saving becomes the man who thinks a hundred dollars is not worth saving, and he usually ends where he began-that is, with nothing." A Bank of Montreal savings account into which you deposit regularly will help you realize the true value of a dollar saved. ANK OF MGNTRE L Established 1817 EST2lllllNllULl 18175 ELMES HENDERSGN '32 SON REAL ESTATE 'EQ INSURANCE Roya.lBa,nk Bldg. 1 10 King St. East, Toronto Qlnrpnratinn nf Irinitg Glnllrgv Svrhnnl VISITOR : The Most Rev. The Ilord A1'cI1ImisI1op of Toronto GOVERNING BODY Ex-Officio Members Ille I'lIilllL'lfllU1' of 'I'1'i11ity Ulliversity. lhv Rev. the l'1'uvost uf 'l'1'i11ity College. I S. Mzxclllm-S, lisq. .............................. Toronto Ihe Rm-V. I". H1'z1I1a111 OI'4'llill'Ll, BLA., D.D-, Heudlnastel' of the Svlloul. Elected Members IIIIA IIHII. Mr. -IIISIIUI' II. Max Ilemlistolnl. I'.I3.l'1 II 0 ., J 1. ., ....Wll1llI1I'Cg IIN Ilmn. -IIIIILIK' II. A. NVZIITI Port Hope I .X. Iluuxtml, limi.. KIA. .... 'I'o1'o11t0 I. I'. -IQIII1-tt, Iisq. ...... Mo11'f1'eal I II. Iizllmlwin. Iisq. ........ . 'lloronfo I Hmwlrnl Uslvv. limi. ......... . 'l'0l'011T0 I Il. Stn-utlly. Iisq.. NI X Ii.i'.. ...... 'I'o1'011to s lI.-- III-xp H. Iiig-lay, NIA., llIl.IJ. ...... .......... l 'ort llope I I:1l'vl1r-4- ISng'vl'l. Izsq ......................... TOPOIIIO I ziumlif-I'-II--an-l':1I Ii. S. f'zll'1wrig'I11.I I I II G . T0r0n1Z0 ll'III2Ill SVJIQVZIIII, Iisq. ........................ 'I'm'011t0 w I II, Klazylnznwl. Iusq.. NI.IJ w I tI'4'X' II4-Ilflo-Vsnll Iuhl . ' ' I Q . 'I'o1'011t0 'I'o1'm1t0 I1.-111.-n:m1-4.I-nm-:IImn X 4. Klum-mlmnmll Ix.l .II Ihr- Ilfm. .III-. SI-:mt I' I' II. I-Szu'n:n'4I N l1I0l'1'l I3 I I I Illlwllvx' Ilzaxxxxmn. Ifsl . ww, . ,. KIIIQISIOII ' 'a 1 V 1 19 , 'I'm'm1'fo X .X. II.I1 mt XI-nwlnn. Img. .......... . 'I'u1'm1fo - v ..' .. 1 Elected by the Old Boys ' 1 II Xiu XI 111111 lvl.. NIA.. Ix.I. .......... . .1 , 4' Ilamilton If V. II. Vzlssvls. Iimg.. If,I'. .. .. 'IIOVOYIIO Zifrinitg Glnllrgv Svrhnnl Qrrnrh EDITORIAL STAFF. Editor and Business Manager ...............................,.. Mr. C. R. Hiscocks Assistant General Editor and Sports Editor ..,.... ....... F . E. Wigle Contributions Editor ......... ....... W . E- ATIIIOUI' Committee ....................... ....... E . C. Cutler J .V. Kerrigan R. Patch W. B. Reid Junior School Record ...... ....... R ev. C. H. Boulden CONTENTS. Page Editorial ................................,...................................... .............................. 1 School Calendar .......................................................................................... 2 The Rev. Charles James Stewart Bethune, M.A., D.C.L., F.R.S.C. 3 The Chapel ...,...............,............................................................................,... 6 Music in the School ................................................. ............................. 7 School Notes .............................. ..... 7 Annual Boxing Competition ..... ..... 8 Gymnasium Competitions ...... ..... 1 0 Squash Racquets ................... ..... 1 0 Swimming ..............,..,....,..... ..... 1 1 Cricket ,.................................. ..... 1 4 First XI. Matches .......... ..... 1 5 Second XI. Matches .... ..,.. 3 0 Third XI. Matches ...... ,,,,, 3 2 Fourth XI. Match ....... ..... 3 5 Littleside Matches ......... ..... 3 5 The House Matches ...... ,,,,, 3 3 Cricket Colours ....... Cricket Averages 43 43 Inspection Day ................. .,,., 4 5 Valete and Salvete ....... ,,',, 4 6 The Library ...................... ,.,,, 4 6 The Dramatic Society .... ,,.,, 4 7 The Music Club ................... ,,,., 4 9 The Literary Society .............. ..... 4 9 Science and Arts Society ...... ..... 5 1 The Debating Society ........... ..... 5 2 Contributions ................................... ..... 5 2 The Junior School Record .................. ..... 6 0 The Meeting of the Ladies' Guild ...,.. ..... 7 0 Old Boys' Notes ,................................ ..... 7 3 Births, Marriages and Deaths ....... ..... 7 5 The Old Boys' Association ...... ...,. 7 6 Exchanges .................................. ..... 7 9 Elrinitg Glnllegv Svrhnnl, Hurt Einar ESTABLISHED 1865. . 5 Head Master REV. F. GRAHAM ORCHARD, M.A., Emmanuel College, Cam- bridgeg D.D., Trinity College, Toronto. Chaplain, Bromsgrove School, England, 1903-1906, Head Master St. Alban's Brockville, 1906-1913. House Masters S. GELDARD, Esq., B.A., Trinity College, Cambridge. LT.-COLONEL C. GOODDAY, Aldenham School, England. Assistant Masters The REV. R. S. TIPPET, B.A., McGill University, Montreal. A. C. MORRIS, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N. S. P. H. LEWIS, Esq., B.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. E. W. MORSE, Esq., Queen's University, Kingston. C. R. HISCOCKS, Esq., B.A., St. Edmund Hall, Oxford. J. M. de SLUBICKI, Esq., Pembroke College, Cambridge. in ' J. F. GOODGER, Esq., B.Sc., London University, M.R.S.T. E. EVANS, B.A., University of Wales. D. KERMODE PARR, Esq., B.A., London University. LT.-COL. K. L. STEVENSON, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. Uhr .iluninr i-'vrhnnl House Master The REV. C. H. BOULDEN, M.A., King's College, VVindsor, N. S Clergy Training School. Cambridge. Assistant Masters XV. IRI. MORSE, Esq. IRI. G. JAMES. Esq., Leeds University. K. G. B. KETCHUM, lflsq., B.A., University of Toronto. Cf. N. XYYNN. Esq., B..-X., Kcble Coll:ge, Oxford. Lady Assistant MISS B. S. SYMONDS. Music Master A. Il. SLY, Esq., L.IL.A.M. Performers' Diplomag Associate in Music, University of Reading Drawing Master G. T. SCLATICR. Esq., A.O.C.A., Diploma at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto. Bursar 1-1. M. HATHBUN, Esq., H. M. C., Kingston. Physical Instructor for All Schools SERGEANT-MAJOR S. J. BATT, Royal Fusiliersg late Physical Instructor at R.M.C., Kingston. Irinitg Qlnllrgr Svrhnnl lirrnrh 7 hitnrial The cricket season has provided another disappointment. The School defeated St. Andrew's, lost to Ridley, and drew with Upper Canada. In none of the matches could it be said that the team showed itself to iull advantage, although Warden played a magnifi- cent innings against Ridley and there was something heroic in the batting against Upper Canada. During the year the School has only won one Little Big Four game. It is true that bad luck has played a considerable party but fortune favours the brave, and the spirit which wins matches is the spirit which sets out to conquer fortune. We have not won a championship for so long that we are getting used to defeat, and acquiescence in failure is a fatal disease. The material we have had for every team this year has been very good. VVhat has been lacking is an attitude of determination towards sports throughout the School. Next year the teams must set out to win every match that they play, and, if everyone Works hard and cheerfully, there is no reason why they should not succeed. Every side will have a nucleus of keen and determined players, whose potentialities are unlimited, if they receive the backing of every individual in the School. During the course of the year competitions have been held for the first time against outside teams in squash and swimming. The result has been a considerable improvement in the standard of these two sports. A good proportion of the boys on the two teams will be returning next year, and the prospects appear bright. The de- velopment of racing swimming should help considerably to fill up the gap which exists in the athletic activities of the School between the end of the hockey season and the beginning of cricket. This term has seen the conclusion of the life-saving classes that Ross and Savage have carried on all the year. For the number of boys that have passed and the enthusiasm that has been aroused they deserve special commendation. During the latter part of the term a House Competition in music 2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD was held for the first time. Considering the short period which the competitors had in which to prepare for the event and the busy- ness of the season, it was very successful. It is to be hoped that another competition will be held next year at an earlier date. On June 3rd. three teams of Old Boys played against the School at cricket. A large number of visitors were present, and the good weather helped to make the day one of the most enjoyable of the year. It has been good to see the many Old Boys that have visited Port Hope during the course of the term. The good Wishes of the School will go with all who are leaving. They have only one message to those who are left, "Carry on, only do better than We did." SCHOOL CALENDAR April 6th. The Term begins. 10th. Second Sunday after Easter. 17th. Third Sunday after Easter. 24th. Fourth Sunday after Easter. 25th. Saint Mark. 28th. Swimming Match between the School and U.T.S. May lst. Saint Philip and Saint James. The 67th. Anniversary of the Opening of the School. 4th. Ascension Day. 7th. Inspection Day. Dramatic Society Performances in the evening. 8th, Sunday after Ascension. 14th. First Team vs. Peterborough C.C. 15th. Whit Sunday. 21st. First Team vs. Toronto C.C. 22nd. Trinity Sunday. Commemoration. 23rcl. Upper School Examinations begin. 24th. Empire Dayf whole holiday. 29th. First Sunday after Trinity. June 3rd. Old Boys' Cricket Games. 4th. First Little Big Four Game, School vs. St. Andrew's College. Sth. Second Sunday after Trinity. 6th. Choir Holiday. Tth. Inter-House Music Competition. 11th. School vs. Ridley. 12th. Third Sunday after Trinity. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD gg 16th. McGill Matric starts. 18th. First Team vs. Upper Canada College. 19th. Fourth Sunday -after Trinity. 20th. Ontario Matriculation starts. 25th. Speech Day. Term Ends. Uhr 33911. Qllparlva QUEIIIIPZ Stewart Bethune HH. A., E. QI. E.. EF. ZR. Sv. Cl., Burn 1533, Eivh 1932. With the death of Dr. Bethune there passes almost the last link with the early history of T. C. S. In a sense he may be called the true creator of the School as we know it. "Father" Johnston was indeed its originator, and the School which he founded at Weston was the nucleus of the later institution. Dr. Badgeley no doubt gave it something of its later form, but to Dr. Bethune it owes most of its traditions and the spirit which has inspired it. The third son of Bishop Bethune, the second Bishop of Toronto he 1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD received his early education at Upper Canada College, where he was a head boy. He then entered Trinity College with a Scholarship, and after a successful University career he took his B.A. degree in 1859 with first class honours in Classics and distinction in Mathe- matics, earning also the Jubilee Scholarship. After a course in Divinity he was ordained Deacon in 1861 and Priest in 1862. He was for a short time Curate to his father, then Rector cf Cobourg, and then went to England where he was Curate at Carlton, Selby, Yorkshire. Returning lo Canada. he was appoint- ed Incumbent of the Credit Mission, a post which he held for four years during which he built two churches. In 1870 Dr. Badgeley resigned the Headmastership of the School which had just been moved from WVeston to Port Hope. Mr. Bethune, lar-geiy persuaded by his lifelong friend, Reverend Wm. Jones, was ixiduced to accept the vacant position and thus began what was the great achievement of his life. The School was then housed in wooden buildings traces of which still remain in some of the present outbuildings. The new Head- master at once set to work to provide something more permanent and the Headrnaster's residence and a substantial brick and stone Main buiiding were erected. The foundation Stone of the new School was laid with great ceremony and can still be seen in the present building. A special feature was the Chapel and everything was done to make it worthy of its purpose---for he meant it to be the centre and inspiration of the life and work of the School. The quiet but steady influence of the new Head was soon felt and made itself evident in the conduct and character of the evergrowing number of boys who were brought under it. Dr. Bethune, for he was given in 1883 the I-Ion. degree of D.C.L. by his old College, was an excellent disciplinarian and wise administrator. He was a master of detail, himself keeping all the booxs of the School both financial and scholastic. Ez-ring, if anything, on the side of economy he built up a large reserve fund while also adding to the School property. In 1890 after twenty years service the pressure of his many duties and responsibilities began to tell upon him and he asked the Govern- ing Body to divide his work. Professor Lloyd of Trinity College was thezefoie appointed Headmaster with charge of the educational side of the School but Dr. Bethune remained as Warden with full control of its financial side. This experiment however did not work very well and after two years Mr. Lloyd resigned and Dr. Bethune resumed all his old duties. In February, 1895, tire broke out in the night and destroyed the Main School Building. Dr. Bethune at once arranged for the housing TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 of the boys among friends in the town, obtained possession of the St. Lawrence Hotel which was then vacant and in a day or two all the School activities were being carried on almost as usual. Undaunted by this disaster he immediately had plans drawn for a new and im- proved building which was erected in a few months. The Tower of the old School was incorporated into the new Building despite the protests of the architect, and many Old Boys wished as he did that it could have been retained when the present buildings were erected. The new School was a great improvement on the old and the new Chapel especially was beautiful in its proportions and possibilities. In 1898 Dr. Bethune suffered a heavy loss by the death of his wife as the result of a carriage accident, and the following year he re- signed the Headmastership. To the end of his long life he retained his loving interest in the School. His advice and counsel was sought by his successor. The boys who had been his pupils held him in honour, affection and esteem while he on his part watched with con- tinual interest their careers and rejoiced in their success. To those of later generations he became a great tradition. Throughout his life Dr. Bethune was la close student of Natural History and early became recognized as a leading authority on insect life. During the arduous duties, which the charge of a large resi- dential School entails, he found relief and relaxation in the care of his evergrowing collection of specimens. He was one of the found- ers of the Canadian Entomological Society and for twenty-five years edited its Journal. He was a constant and valuable contributor of articles to scientific periodicals and the public press. Accordingly his appointment in 1906 by the Government to the Professorship of Entomology in the Ontario Agricultural College was generally ac- cepted as most fitting and deserved. This post he held for fourteen years when he finally retired from active work at the age of 82. His last years were spent in Toronto most lovingly cared for by his daughter, Miss Beatrice Bethune. Almost to the end he was a constant attendant at the services at St. Thomas' Church near which he lived. Though as time passed he was naturally affected by some of the infirmities of old age. such as deafness and dimness of sight, he retained to the full his mental faculties and was always calm and cheerful. At last in his 94th. year his long life of useful service ended and he was called to his rest. Though the buildings which he erected were destroyed by the second fire and new buildings of different design and arrangement have taken their place, the School itself remains as his best monu- ment and so long as it continues will ever be associated with his name. Qi TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Uhr Qlhapvl Since the last number of the Record was published, the offertories have amounted to 323854. Cheques have been sent to: The Relief Fund for Distress in Port Hope ..,......... 351.50 St. Alban's Cathedral Building Fund ................ ..... 4 2.59 Salvation Army Self Deni-al Fund ............................ 10.00 On March 13th., the Bishop held a Confirmation in the School Chapel and the following boys were confirmed: John Lyons Agnew Frederick George McLaren Edmund Vimy Meredith Cape Campbell Revere Osler Alastair McDowell Ferguson Charles Joseph Seagram Hugh Larratt Henderson John Kennett Starnes Vernon Wadsworth Howland Cameron Homer Truax William Bruce Lowe Bruce Stannard Williams Gerald Arthur Markham George Blake Knox Edward Douglas Kirkpatrick Donald Eaton Galloway Martin George Henry Kirkpatrick Paul Alexander McFarlane Strathy The Headmaster and Mr. Boulden were very greatly assisted in preparing their Candidates for Confirmation by the help given them by the Reverend Father C. M. Serson, S.S.J.E., an Old Boy, who spent several days at the School, giving several addresses to the Candidates and Communicants, and preached in the School Chapel on the afternoon of March 13th. The following visitors have also preached in Chapel: April 24th. W. Hamilton Fyfe, Esq., Principal, Queen's University, Kingston. May lst. The Reverend, the Provost, Trinity College, Toronto. May 15th., The Reverend John Lowe, Trinity College, Toronto. May 29th., The Reverend Dr. Kingston, Dean of Residence, Trinity College, Toronto. On the afternoon of March 20th., the last Sunday of Term, the service was held in St. Mark's Church when the choir sang part of the Passion Music from Handel's Messiah. The Service in St. Mark's Church on Palm Sunday was by no means the success which was anticipated. The choir appeared to be at a disadvantage in their unwonted surroundings, and seized with "stage fright". They repeated their performance, however, in the School Chapel on the next day, with complete success. Since Eas- ter they have sung some special items, such as anthems and opening items, with confidence and precision. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T Owing to the quarantine regulations of the Junior School, we were thrown back on unison singing for a matter of five weeks, in- cluding Trinity Sunday. The memorial service excited many fav- ourable comme.nts from visitors, particularly the Way the School has of singing everything possible in the service, and thus lending a spirit of unanimity. After the Service, at the foot of the Cross, the choir and School sang some items which were used at the original dedication in 1922. Among the new hymns added to the repertoire during the term were two of outstanding character, the authors being G. K. Ches- terton and Laurence Housman. Hiuair in Ellie Srhnnl Early in the term we were entertained by a varied programme arranged jointly by Mr. Sly and members of the Orchestra. Savage led some community singing, and also gave a humorous song and a whistling solo. Warden played some jazz with quite a professional style, while Messrs. Lewis and Goodger, with Fleming in disguise, gave us some extracts from "The Beggar's Opera." Solos on no less than eight orchestral instruments were interspersed with piano solos and duets by boys of the Junior School. Ambrose max., sang the solo part of "The School on the Hill," in which everyone present joined. A Sing-Song held more recently was less well a.ttended, probably due to the fine evening and the rival attraction of a baseball gameg but those who were present heard bass trios and duets, a piano duet, Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue, and several songs. The Prefects arranged two entertainments, in which, however, music played a minor part, so that mention here is sufficient. Teams from both Houses are now preparing for a Music House Competition on June 7th. Details of this will appear in the next issue. SCHOOL NOTES Senior privileges have been awarded to J. G. Warden and C. A. Heurtley. C. A. Heurtley was elected Captain of cricket. W. J. Mickle was elected Captain of Brent House. g TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD F. E. Wigle was elected Captain of the Second Team. H. H. Clarke was elected Third Team Captain. P. C. Osler was appointed Captain of the Fifth Team. The Cricket Committee consists of Heurtley, Mickle, and Mr. Lewis. Cups, donated by an Old Boy who wishes to remain anonymous, were presented to Ross and Savage for conducting the Life-Saving classes and to Savage, Bickle, and Cassils ma., the best swimmers of Bigside, Middleside, and Littleside, respectively. Also special cups were awarded to Taylor for winning the Bradburn Cup for three consecutive years and to Warden for his excellent gymnastic work. The Inter-House Platoon Competition was cancelled this year owing to the bad weather on Inspection Day and the week following. The Bethune Cup was not awarded. A badminton tournament was started early this term and thirty- one boys entered for it. Owing to the early start of cricket and the hot weather it remained unfinished with few matches played. It is hoped that next year it will be organized at a time when other sports will not interfere. A tournament has been held by the Tennis Club. Wynn and O'Brien max. reached the finals which could not be played on ac- count of the weather. Passey won the Littleside singles, and Price was the runner up. Two panels have been put up near the squash courts on which the names of prize-winners are recorded: one for the Bullen Cup for open squash-racquets, and the other for the Fred Watts Prize for the Littleside squash-racquets. ANNUAL BOXING COMPETITION The annual tournament took place between the 7th., and 12th. of March. There were only 50 entries from the Senior School, and this is one of the smallest number of entries in several years. But the standard of boxing was good, and many very interesting bouts took place. Especially in the finals where the contestants were very even- ly matched. First Round Finals: First Round Finals: First Round: Semi-Finals: Finals: First Round Semi-Finals, Finals: First Round Semi-Finals: Finals: First Round Semi-Finals: Finals : First Round Semi-Finals: Finals: First Round Semi-Finals: Finals: First Round Finals: Finals: TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD fl FLY-XVEIGHT QOpeny Fleming beat WVest. Curphey beat Fleming. FLY-XVEIGHT 1Novicesj O'Brian ma. beat Keefer ma. O'Brian ma. beat Fortye. BANTAM-XVEIGHT 1OpenJ Stone beat Heighingtong Seagram beat Staunton. Stone beat Knoxg Lindsay beat Seagram. Lindsay beat Stone. BANTAM-VVEIGHT 1NovicesJ Passy beat Brainerd: Ede ma. beat Redpath: Ambrose mi. beat McLaren. Passy beat Bilkeyg Ambrose mi. beat Ede ma. Ambrose mi. beat Passy FEATHER-WEIGHT 40penj Armour beat Wood: Reed max. beat Cox: Taylor beat Ford-Smith. McCloskey beat Armourg Taylor beat Reed max. Taylor beat McCloskey. FEATHER-WEIGHT fNovicesj Ambrose ma. beat Goodfellow. - Ambrose ma. beat Mitchellg Chadwick beat Langmuir. Ambrose ma. beat Chadwick. LIGHT-YVEIGHT fOpenj Gunn beat Doolittle. Roughton beat Baly max.: Cutten beat Gunn. Cutten beat Roughton. VVELTER-WEIGHT 1 Open J Wilson beat Patch. Combe beat Wilsong I-lyde beat Grant ma. Hyde beat Combe. MIDDLE-XVEIGHT COpe.n3 Rogers beat Kirkpatrickg Savage beat Robson. Savage beat Rogers. HEAVY-XVEIGHT QOpenp Ross max. beat Wynn. 10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD BRADBURN CUP The Bradburn Cup for the best boxer in the School has been awarded to T. L. Taylor for his third successive year. GYMNASIUM COMPETITIONS First Eight Second Eight Max. points obtainable ........ 175 Max. points obtainable ...... 150 Warden ................................... 169 24,1 Chadwick .................,.............. 142 SA Wood ............................. ....... 1 64 Reed max. .... ........ 1 40 Dawe ........ ....... 1 61211 Cutten ........ ...... . ..136M,, Somers ..... ....... 1 61 M, Chevalier ........ 131VZ Savage ...... ....... 1 59 IA Pullen .......... ........ 1 27121 Fleming ....... 155 FA McCloskey .... ........ 1 195-'A Taylor ...,.. ....... 1 55 M Holmes .......... ........ 1 17 Molson ...... ....... 1 55 Grant max. ..... ........ 1 04 LQ Littleside Eight fMax. points obtainable 1059. Price ............... .................. 8 515 Keefer maj. ..... ....... 6 414 O'Brian maj. ........ 81 Bell ................. ...... 6 313, Passy ..........,... .... .................... 7 2 321 Ede maj. ..... ......... ....... 5 4 14 Russel max. .............................. 69 9.1 McLaren .................................. 54 The School entered a team this year for the Ontario Interscholastic Gymnasium Competition, which was held for the first time in 1931. VVarden and Dawe, who came first and fourth respectively on the School eight. were unable to compete owing to accidents. The horse used in the competition was entirely different from ours, and the team had but a limited opportunity for practising on it. Taking these facts into consideration, it was quite creditable for the School to come seventh out of fourteen. But a. good many points were also lost on the mats, and it should be easy to remedy any deficiency in this respect another year. The team's best performance was on the high bar, in which event thc School was placed third: Savige was seventh, Taylor eleventh and Fleming fifteenth out of the seventy competitors. The best individu ll total was gained by Savage, who came tW9Hti9lh. S QUASH RACQUETS Forty-eight boys entered the squash tournament held during the latter part of Lent term and finished early in Trinity. Many close matches were played b-1-fore Dawe, Kerrigan. 'Wigle i.. Wigle 11., TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 11 Gunn, Mickle, Trenholme and Whitehead i., were left in the quarter- finals. Quarter-Finals: Kerrigan beat Daweg Wigle ii., beat Wigle i., by default, Gunn beat Mickleg Trenholme beat Whitehead i. Semi-Finals: Wigle ii., beat Kerrigang Gunn be-at Trenholme. Final: Wigle ii. beat Gunn decisively to win the Bullen Cup. This year Miss Irvine kindly presented a squash cup to be com- peted for by the two houses. The competition proved to be a walk- over for Brent House who won by 21 matches to 4. Wigle ii., Gunn, Mickle, Trenholme and Dawe represented Brent House, while Kerrigan, Grier, Smye, Roughton and Wilson played for the Bethunes. Squash enthusiasts on Littleside competed for the Fred Watts Memorial Prize which was among the new events in squash this year. Semi-Finals: Reid iii. beat Osler i., Keefer ii. beat Russel i. Final: Reid iii. beat Keefer ii. to win the Fred Watts Memorial Prize. SQUASH COLOURS Squash colours were awarded to:-Gunn, Kerrigan, Mickle, O'Brien max., Wigle ma. gnllillililillg SCHOOL RACES A swimming competition was held early in the term for the first time since we left Woodstoclz. All the events were keenly contested, and, as was expected, Savage, Bickle, and Cassils ma. came first in their respective classes. Keen interest was aroused in the competition, there being about fifty entries from each house. This necessitated a large number of heats, some of which were very closely contested. In the open events Savage demonstrated to the School an except- ionally fast style and a keen knowledge of racing swimming. He won the forty yards free style, the eighty yards breast stroke and the one hundred yards free style, Cassils ma. beating him in the forty 12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD yards back stroke and Bickle beating him in the two hundred and twenty yards free style. The 220 yards free style race was one of the most exciting races of the program. There were three Brents, Wigle max., Bickle, and Ross, to one Bethune, Savage. Wigle max. set the pace for about six lengths, but was forced to fall back. Then Bickle and Savage forged into the lead, Bickle beating Savage by a head at the finish. Savage's most consistent rivals were Wigle max., Bickle and Ross, as may be seen from the summary. The House relay races provided a great deal of excitement, the open relay being won by Brent House. Bickle, Holton, and Ross left Wigle max. a length lead which Savage cut down to half a length. In the Littleside relay, Bethune House won in fairly easy fashion, although the race was quite close, until Price lost his trunks. There is no doubt, however, that Bethune House would have won, Cassils ma. finishing with a beautiful sprint. Bickle won all the Middleside events in fairly easy fashion and demonstrated a delightfully clean cut back-stroke and crawl. Cassils ma., in winning the Littleside races, was forced to the limit several times, especially by Armstrong in the 40 yards sprint. Ede ma. gave a fine display of swimming and broke into the winning column in the 80 yard breast stroke which he won with ease. OPEN EVENTS 40 yards free style 40 yards back stroke 80 yards breast 1. Savage 1. Cassils ma. 1. Savage 2. Wigle max. 2. Savage 2. Wigle max. 3. Bickle 3. Bickle 3. Vallance IIIBX- 100 yards free style 220 yards free style 1. Savage 1. Bickle 2. Ross 2. Savage 3. Wigle max. 3. Wigle max. MIDDLESIDE EVENTS 40 yds. free 40 yds. back 80 yds. breast 100 yds. free 1. Bickle 1. Bickle 1. Bickle 1. Bickle 2. Brainerd 2. VVhite 2. Wood 2. Brainerd 3. Galloway 3. Brainerd 3. Brainerd 3. Wigle ma. LITTLESIDE EVENTS 40 yds. free 20 yds. back 80 yds. breast 100 yds. free 1. Cassils ma. 1. Cassils ma. 1. Ede ma. 1. Cassils ma. 2. Armstrong 2. VVilliams. 2. McLaren 2. Williams 3. O'Brian ma. 3. Ede ma. 3. Keefer ma. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 133 SVVIMDIING MEET vs. U. T. S. A new chapter in the Schoo1's sporting history was begun, when a swimming team from the University of Toronto Schools visited the School on April 18th. Although defeated, the School has no reason to be ashamed. U.T.S. has a very strong team and has won practically every meet that they have entered. Savage won the only individual victory for the School, coming first in the 40 yards breast stroke, and he came third in the 40 yards sprint. VVigle max., and Ross both gained some points coming third in the 40 yards breast stroke and the 100 yards free style respectively. In the relay races the School lost the 40 yards free style and won the medley. Our team put up a game battle in the former and nearly won the race, owing to a magnificent sprint by Savage, but the lead of the first two swimmers was too great for him to win the race. In the medley Cassils ma. proved himself quite as good as Gerrans at the back stroke. Savage gave Wigle max. a good lead by swim- ming a fast breast stroke, and Wigle finished the race off by holding the lead in the 40 yard sprint. U.T.S. also brought down two boys of Littleside age, Hare and Plumtree, who entertained the School with an exhibition of diving between the races. To conclude the afternoon, Annesley and O'Brian raced these two in a forty yard sprint. O'Brian finally won the race for the School, although Hare for U.T.S. was hardly a nose behind. Annesley and Plumtree fought it out for the third place. U.T.S. demonstrated. fine team work to the School, particularly in the 40 yards and the 100 yards free style, in both of which Renwick and Rogers came first and second respectively. Next year, with more practice and a greater knowledge of racing swimming, the School ought to do much better in the competition. Summary 40 yards free style 40 yards back stroke 40 yards breast stroke 1. Renwick iU.T.S.J 1. Brian QU.T.S.J 1. Savage LT.C.S.J 2. Rogers iU.T.S.b 2. Wallace QU.T.S.l 2. Donovan QU.T.S.b 3. Savage lT.C.S.J 3. Cassils CT.C.S.J 3. Wigle max. CT.C.S.1 100 yards free style 40 yds. free style Q15 and underl 1. Renwick fU.T.S.J 1. O'Brian ma. CT.C.S.i 2. Rogers fU.T.S.J 2. Hare fU.T.S.J I 3. Ross lT.C.S.J 3. Annesley fT.C.S.l 40 Yards Relay. - 1. U.T.S.-7Wallace, Gerrans, Stratton, and Rogers. 2. T.C.S.-Cassils ma., Bickle, Wigle max., and Savage. 14 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 40 Yards Medley Relay. C40 yds. back, 40 yds. breast, 40 yds. freej. 1. T.C.S.-Cassils, Savage, and Wigle. 2. U.T.S.-Gerrans, Donovan, and Wallace. Points scored:-U.T.S. 35-T.C.S. 20. Qlrirkri Cricket started earlier than usual this year because some .nets were put up in the gym., and a certain amount of practice could be had there some weeks before the field was fit. Unfortunately the top net makes it difficult to pitch the ball up to the batsman who, as a consequence, has to play "back" to nearly every ball. On going on to the grass it was some time before anyone learned to play a good forward drive or a forward defensive shot. In the various games played the form shown by the side as a whole and by some individuals was inconsistent-at one time very good-at another very bad. Taking everything into consideration, however, the team was quite as good as any we have had for some years and considerably better than most. One bad fault, and it has been present in other teams, is that much valuable time is lost in practices because some individuals will not make the effort to get right down to the job in front of them. To succeed in any game requires a good deal of rather tedious practice. Unless those bowling in the nets bowl their best, they lose rather than gain by the practice and the batsman is also hin- dered. Several bad mistakes were made in matches that proved very costly. This is characteristic of nearly all games and is usually the factor which determines who shall win. The team in which no one is brilliant but which makes no mistakes will often be-at the team containing many better players who make one or two mis- takes. And here is where Lady Luck is so powerful. One bad shot sends a catch into a fieldman's hands, while another shot equally as bad just escapes its due reward. And the team had more bad luck than good. Very few catches were dropped, yet twice the bats- men went on to make over 50. Warden was well set in the Ridley match when he was hurt. Again, Warden's glasses were not here at the commencement of the U.C.C. game making it necessary for us to field first. There were numerous occasions when individual player-s perform- ed almost brilliantly. The fielding of the team v. St. AndreW's, to- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 gether with excellent bowling by Heurtleyg Warden's batting v. Ridley and a number of overs bowled by Mickleg Lockwood and Vaughan v. U.C.C.. With one or two promising players coming up the prospects for next year look good. In conclusion may we say "Thank you" to all those who have helped us including Mrs. Wright for the "teas", and the many Old Boys who came down to play and to watch. .l.l.-...--.---i- FIRST XI.. MATCHES PETERBOROUGH vs. THE SCHOOL At Port Hope, May 14th. The first game of the year wasplayed against the Peterborough Cricket Club. Peterboroughwas not able to field as strong a team as they had last year, and consequently the School won rather easily. The team put on a good exhibition of tielding and bowling. All four bowlers, Mickle, Whitehead, Rogers, and Heurtley bowled well and Peterborough could do nothing with their balls. Wigle ma. at wickets played Well, 'catching Biddlefand letting no byes or leg byes. Stanger, with 12, was the only Peterborough player to run into double Hgures, and the .side was all out for 31. Cassels max. and Heurtley opened the batting for the School and had put up a good defence for several overs when Cassels was run out on a close call. Heurtley soon followed. Vaughan iii., Warden, Taylor, and Hall then finished the game off in easy style. Vaughan ran up 42 runs before being bowled by an easy ball from Chamber- lain. Warden retired at 28 to give Taylor and Hall a chance, which they took adv-antage of getting 17 and 20 respectively before stumps were drawn. The whole School team batted very well and the game provided just the necessary practice to give confidence to several batsmen as well as some of the Iielders. The School Peterborough Cassels, run out ................. ...... 5 Hamilton, b. Whitehead ............ 6 Heurtley, b. Dyer ........................ 2 Dyer, F., b. Whitehead ............ 1 Vaughan, b. Chamberlain ........ 42 Stewart, b. Mickle ............ ..... 0 Warden, retired .......................... 28 Jefferson, b. Mickle ......,.. ..... 1 Taylor, not out ................ ......... 1 7 Dawe, b. Whitehead ....... ..... 0 Hall, not out .............................. 20 Osler ma., not out ...,.. ........ 5 Lockwood, did not bat Stanger, b. Rogers ......... ......., 1 2 Mickle, did not bat Biddle, c. Wigle ma., b. Wigle ma., did not bat Heurtley ........... ...... ..... 0 T!!! I I 4.5.1. lilili 3 I E! B4 F- I I ll llm G ll .-:le-:-:H e I I I - . ,, glslg gh lllll 'll' IKIB EN ST ELEV IR F E TH S-4 cu F172 O D-I 2 .20 3 D. Vaughan W. Cassels P. P. Hall T. Taylor E. Heighington Warden J. J. Rogers Heurtley C. Mickle 3 '25 o o 3 .Z O o .J Ui TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 The School Peterborough Rogers, did not bat Harvey, c. and b. Heurtley .... 0 Whitehead max., did not bat Montgomery, c. Mickle, b. Extras, byes 3, Wides 2 ..,......... 5 Heurtley .................,..,.......... 3 Chamberlain, b. Mickle ............ 2 Extras, wide ball 1, ,..... ......, 1 Total cfor 3 wkts.b ........ 119 Total .... .....,, 3 1 BOWLING ANALYSIS The School Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Mickle .......... ........ . 7.3 1 9 3 3 Whitehead max. . 8 4 6 3 2 Rogers .......... . 7 2 10 2 5 Heurtley ..... . 3 - 5 2 2.5 P. C. C. Dyer, F. .......... .................... 1 5 2 42 2 21 Jefferson lno balls 21 ...... 16 2 41 - - Hamilton .......... ....,..... . 4 1 11 - - Chamberlain .... . 4 1 20 1 20 TORONTO C. C. vs. THE SCHOOL At Port Hope, May 21st. The weather was rather cold for the game with the Toronto C. C. at Port Hope, but it was one of the most exciting games of the early cricket season, the final score being: the Cricket Club 97, for eight wickets, and the School, 89 all out. The School batted first, and, al- though Hall played very carefully and succeeded in getting 9 runs, the first four wickets were down for 16, Dewar getting two of them. However, the tail end of the team came to the rescue and raised the score to 89. Lockwood, the seventh man in, started to build up the score, playing very carefully and making some nice strokes, eventual- ly being bowled by Lines for 13 runs. Robson, going in after Lock- wood, gave the School some hope and courage by running up 15 runs before being bowled out by Lines. Mickle, Rogers, and Whitehead made a slight "garrison finish," getting 8, 12, and 6 not out, respec- tively. The best bowlers for the Cricket Club were Dewar and Lines. The School started well in the field, getting four of the Cricket Club's strong "bats" out for 31 runs and dismissing Lines, Phipps, Norton, Dewar, and White for a total of 12 runs. However, Levey, the fourth man in, stayed in for the rest of the game and ran up 54 runs before stumps were drawn. Levey gave a wonderful exhibition 15 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD of batting, scoring with almost equal ease off Mickle, Rogers, and Whitehead, and he might have made even more, if he had not hurt his leg. Cleland, an Old Boy, was the tenth man in, and he won the game for the Cricket Club in the last few minutes by knocking four two's in succession, making the score 97 for 8 wickets. Rogers was the best of the School bowlers, -and Lockwood made two nice catches in the field. Had the School bowling been changed sooner, the results might have been different. R The School The Toronto Cricket Club Hall, c. and b. Dewar ...,.......... 9 Dinnick, b. Rogers .................... 0 Heurtley, b. Dewar .................... 3 Rogers, b. Mickle ...... ...... 0 Vaughan, c. Phipps, b. Carlton 1 Carlton, b. Mickle ..... ...... 1 2 Warden, b. Levey ...................... 5 Levey, not out ............................ 54 Taylor, c. Dewar, b. Carlton .... 1 Lines, b. Rogers ........................ 5 Wigle ma., l.b.w., Dewar ........ 4 Phipps, c. Robson, b. Rogers .... 2 Lockwood, b. Lines ...............,.... 13 Norton, c. Lockwood, b. Robson, b. Lines ........................ 15 Whitehead ............................ 0 Mickle, b. White ........................ 8 Dewar, b. Rogers .... ...... 5 Rogers, c. Dinnick, b. Dewar .... 12 VVhite, b. Rogers ............ ...... 0 Whitehead, not out .....,.............. 6 Cleland, not out ................. ...... 1 1 Extras .....,..................................... 12 Wolfenden, did not bat Extras ................,.......................,.. 8 Total .,..., ................. 8 9 Total tfor 3 wicketsl ...... 97 BOWLING ANALYSIS The School Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Mickle ....,, , ......,... .....,... . . 15 4 44 3 14.6 Rogers mo balls 2h ........ 12 2 24 4 6 Whitehead max. ......., .. 3 - 12 1 12 Lockwood .,...,..,. .. .. 1 - 9 - - T. C. C. Carlton lwide bill 1a ..,. 8 2 14 2 7 Dewar , ........ ,..... ..,.., 1 3 2 26 4 6.5 Ltrvf-y ,. 8 2 18 1 18 Lines . . , ....,,,. .. 6 2 11 2 5.5 XVhite ., .. ,,...,,..... 4 - - 7 1 7 Wolfenden mo balls 2a .... 1 -- 1 -- - THIS SFHOOI, vs. THE PETERBOROUGH CRICKET FLUB At Peterborough, May 28th. The return match against the Peterborough C. C. was played on a dull day in fairly cold weather. The grounds were in poor shape TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 after the recent rain and outside the table the grass was rather long. This kept the scoring down considerably. The Peterborough team was greatly strengthened for this game. The School batted first and despite the condition of the field, they ran up 75 runs, although the batting as a whole was poor. Taylor pulled the team out of a bad hole staying in for about an hour and a half and scoring 35, all one's and two's. Taylor batted very steadily, and there is no doubt that on a field where the grass was short, he would have easily made 70 runs. Heurtley, Wigle ma., and Mickle helped to raise the score by scor- ing 6, 5, and 8 not out respectively. The School were all out by 4.30 for 75 runs. Lawrence bowled rather well getting 6 wickets for 33 runs. Warden, Vaughan mi., and Lockwood gave a disappointing exhibition. The School started off rather slowly in the field, although White- held rnade a magnificent catch in the slips off Dyer. Lawrence and Hamilton looked -as if they were going to stay in for a good while but Rogers bowled Hamilton. Lawrence and Smith then made quite a stand, until Lawrence was neatly caught at the wickets by Wigle ma., and Whitehead made a great catch of Smith's cut through slips. The rest of the Peterborough team, however, batted very poorly, the last five wickets yielding only six runs. At the end of the innings Heurtley bowled very well and took 4 wickets in four overs for 5 runs. Rogers and Lockwood were also quite successful. The School Hall, b. Dyer ...........,......... ...... 4 Vaughan mi., b. Dyer .............,. . 0 Warden, l.b.w. Lawrence ........ 4 Taylor, b. Lawrence .................. 35 Heurtley, b. Lawrence ....,......... 6 Lockwood, c. Jackson, b. Dyer 1 Robson, c. Lawrence, b. Hamilton .....................,.....,... 3 XVigle ma., l.b.w. Lawrence .... 5 Mickle, not out .,.......................... 8 Rogers, c. Dyer, b. Lawrence ., 0 Vvhitehead, b. Lawrence ............ U Extras .......................................... 9 Total ..... ...,..... E Peterborough Cricket Club Hamilton, b. Rogers .................. 5 Dyer R., c. WVhitehead, b. Rogers ........,.......,.........., .... 1 Lawrence, c. VVigle, b. Heurtley ................,.............,. 18 Smith, c. Whitehead, b. Mickle 8 Dyer F., c. Vaughan, b. Lock- wood ....,..............,..............,.... 1 Stuart, b. Lockwood .................. 0 Heighington, c. Robson, b. Heurtley ...,..,..,...................... 8 Jackson, c. Mickle, b. Rogers 2 Chamberlain, b. Heurtley ........ 0 Biddle, c. Hall, b. Heurtley ...... 0 Coleman, not out ........................ 0 Extras .................. , 6 Total .... ....... Q3 20 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD BOWLING ANALYSIS The School Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Mickle ......... .... 1 4 5 12 1 12 Rogers .......... ...... .... 1 4 7 18 3 6 Whitehead max. . 4 1 4 -- - Lockwood ......... . 4 3 4 2 2 Heurtley ..... . 4 2 5 4 1.25 P. C. C. Dyer .......... .... 1 5 3 22 3 7.3 Lawrence ....., .... 1 6 1 33 6 5.5 Jackson ....... . 3 - 3 - .. Hamilton . 4 1 8 1 8 SCHOOL vs. OLD BOYS At Port Hope, June 3rd. The School won the toss and agreed to field first. By lunch time seven of the Old Boys were out for 39 runs. After the interval an eighth wicket stand brought the score to eighty. The side was all out by 3.45 for 121. Mr. Rathbun by very heavy hitting made 73. Mickle took four wickets for 20 runs. At 4.00 the School went into bat. Hall and Heighington were quickly out, but Warden and Vaughan batted well to bring the .score to seventy. Warden on making his fifty retired. The runs steadily crept up to a hundred. With five minutes before time the School still needed 14 runs. At the start of the last over, only 6 runs were wanted. Cassels i. ended a. very exciting game by hitting a six. It is to hoped that the Old Boys will bring down a team every year, as their visit is always very welcome. Old Boys The School S. Martin, b. Mickle ..,................. 8 Hall, b. N. Seagram .................. 1 Col. Ingles, b. Heurtley ....,..,.... 6 Heighington, c. J. Seagram, P. Henderson, c. Lockwood, b. N. Seagram .................... 8 b. Heurtley ............,......,,..... 3 Warden, retired .......,.................. 54 R. Pacaud, b. Rogers ....,........... 1 Vaughan, c. Pacaud, b. L. Rathbun, c. Cassels, b. Col. Ingles ...................,....... 18 Mickle I ....... ...............,..,,.... 7 3 Taylor, c. N. Seagram b. N. Seagram, b. Rogers ............ 0 Col. Ingles ,........................... 2 S. DuMou1in, b. Mickle ..........., 3 Heurtley b. Col. Ingles .......,.... 2 .l. Seagram, b. Mickle ...... ....... 0 Lockwood, b. N. Seagram ........ 12 E. Clark, c. Warden b. Mickle, c. S. DuMoulin, b. 14 Heurtley ............................... 7 Col Ingles ............................ H. Cayley, b. Heighington ........ 12 Cassels, not out ........... .......... 1 0 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 21 Old Boys The School D. Dawson, not out. .......... ...... 5 Wigle, not out ............................ 0 H. Blggar, b. Heurtley ...... 1 Rogers, Keefer, did not bat Extras ,................................ ...... 4 Extras ...........................4............... 3 Total .... .............. 1 21 Total Cfor 7 Wkts.J ........ 124 BOWLING ANALYSIS The S0h00l Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Mickle ......... .... 1 4 9 20 4 5.00 Heurtley ..... .... 1 0 2 45 4 11.25 Rogers ........, . 8 1 36 2 18,00 Lockwood ......... . 5 1 12 - - Heighington ..... . 3 1 6 1 6.00 Old Boys Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average N. Seagram ..... .... 1 2 6 23 3 7.60 N. Biggar ........, . 3 - 20 - - P. Henderson ...... . 2 - 16 - - J. Seagram ...., 5 - 17 - - Col. Ingles .... . 9 - 29 4 7.25 L. Rathbun ....... . 6 2 16 - - THE SCHOOL vs. ST. ANDREXVS COLLEGE At Aurora, June 4th. The School's first game in the Little Big Four series resulted in a victory by the narrow margin of 14 runs. The School's excellent iielding and bowling made up to some extent for their poor batting. Heurtley's great bowling effort turned the tide at the crucial moment, while Warden's and Lockwood's batting practically won the game for the School. The School batted first, Lockwood and Heighington taking the opening overs. They made a firm stand by blocking for about half an hour but had only made five runs when Heighlngton was bowled on a nice length ball by Donnelly. Warden and Lockwood then made the stand that practically won the game for the School. They played and ran very cautiously, the majority of runs being ones and twos. Both made some very fine shots and gave no chances, and they looked as though they were good for about fifty runs. Unfortunately Lockwood was bowled by Arm- strong i. when he had only 21 runs and Warden knocked a catch into Cox's hands after he had made 24. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The School looked well away at this time, with Vaughan iii., Taylor, Heurtley and Hall still to bat. However by over-confidence and carelessness, these four wickets fell for one run. Vaughan was bowled by Armstrong in the over after he went in, and Cox caught Taylor on his first ball from Armstrong. Heurtley and Hall stayed for an over or so, but they were soon bowled by Armstrong for ducks. The last batsmen in did practically nothing to help the team, getting 10 runs between them. Mickle and Cassels made a small stand for about half an hour before and after lunch, Cassels being caught by Cox for a duck and Mickle getting five runs before Rea caught him off Donnelly's bowling. Wigle ma. and Rogers made a last minute stand, but Rogers was out on an unfortunate l.b.w. after he had made 2 runs and Wigle ma., 3. St. Andrew's being more or less an unknown quantity, and the School having only 66 runs, the team knew that they had a heavy task on their hands. St. Andrew's started at about 2.20 p.m., with Rea and Findlay i. batting. The School started with 'a snappy display of fielding, Rea being caught by Heighington, off Heurt1ey's bowling, for one run,- one wicket down for seven runs. Findlay and Young made 16 before Heurtley bowled Young a nice ball to hit, which Lockwood caught neatly in the deep field. In the second over aft.er that, Heurtley got Findlay on an l.b.w. With three S.A,C. batsmen out for 16 runs, the School's chances for victory took on a rosier hue, and the team accordingly were more than ever on their toes. The result was that the next six wickets fell for 22 runs, making the total 38, Heurtley taking all the wick- ets, except two, which Mickle and Rogers accounted for. Hall, Mickle and Vaughan made some nice catches, and Wigle ma. was responsible for a good piece of stumping. Slingsby with 7 and Don- nelly with 6 were the high scorers. Green ii., the last man in, and Vowell made a long stand at the end of the game, and it looked as though they were going to stay in and win the match, when Vowell hit the ball to Lockwood in deep field. It was 1 difficult catch and Lockwood had the School sup- porters in suspense, as he juggled the ball. However, he finally made the catch sure, St. Andrew's being all out for 52. In the second innings the School showed their true form. Lock- wood and Heighington ran up 42 runs before Heighington was caught, and Warden and Lockwood stayed in until the latter had run up 50 runs, when stumps were dravxm. Warden got 12 not out. Lockwood gave a wonderful exhibition of batting and running with Heighington and Warden. He made some really nice strokes including a six. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q3 The School St. Andrew's College Heighington, b. Donnelly .......... 0 Findlay, l.b.w. Heurtley ............ 7 Lockwood, b. Armstrong ..l....... 21 Rea, c. Heighington, b. Rogers 1 Warden, c. Cox, b. Armstrong 24 Young, c. Lockwood, b. Vaughan, b. Armstrong ............ 1 Heurtley .......,.. .................... 6 Taylor, c. Cox, b. Armstrong.. 0 Slingsby, c. and b. Mickle ........ 7 Heurtley, b. Armstrong ............ 0 Cox ma., c. Hall, b. Heurtley .... 2 Hall, b. Armstrong .................... 0 Armstrong, c. Mickle, b. Mickle, c. Rea, b. Donnelly ...,.. 5 Heurtley .......,.. ................,. 2 Cassels, c. Cox, b. Donnelly .... 0 Donnelly, c. Vaughan, b. Wigle ma., not out ,................... 3 Heurtley .......... ........... ...... 6 Rogers, l.b.w. Donnelly ............ 2 Smith, b. Heurtley ...................... 0 Extras, b.5, l.b.3, w.1, n.b.1. 10 Vowell, c. Lockwood, b. Heurtley ,......... .................... 9 Forbes, st. Wigle ma., b. Rogers .......... .................,...... 0 Green, not out ......,............ ...... 0 Extras b.7, l.b.4, n.b.1 ...........,.. 12 Total .... . ............... 66 Total ..... ......... E5 BOWLING ANALYSIS The School Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Mickle ......... .... 1 3 7 8 1 8 Rogers ..,... .... 1 5 8 19 2 9.5 Heurtley ..... .... 1 5 8 13 7 1.85 Lockwood ...... . 2 2 - - - St. Andrews Armstrong ino ball 13 .... 23 14 18 6 3 Donnelly fwide balll ........ 13.3 2 32 4 8 Smith i. ................ .......... . 8 4 6 - - Slingsby ..... . 1 1 - - - THE SCHOOL vs. THE TORONTO CRICKET CLUB At Toronto, June 6th, The School played a return game with the Toronto Cricket Club on the Monday after the St. Andrew's match. The game was played on a perfect day with a slight breeze blowing which to some extent kept the heat down. The School batted first and put on a very creditable performance showing that the S.A.C. match was an off day. Heighington and Lockwood batted well, until Lockwood was run out on a very close call. Heighington soon followed him, being caught by Bailey off Q4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Bell's bowling. Warden and Vaughan mi. then made a long stand, Vaughan being bowled by Seagram for 9 runs and Warden being caught by Levey, when he had made 24. Warden had previously hit a long fly off Venables, a slow bowler, for a four, and when he at- tempt to repeat his performance Levey caught him. Taylor got out for one run hitting a catch almost into Bai1ey's hands. Heurtley at last pulled out of his batting slump, getting 21 before being c-aught. He made his stand with Warden and Robson, the latter batting very carefully to make 10 runs before he was out l.b.w. Hall and Mickle went in for ia few minutes before Heurtley decided to declare for 110 runs, leaving the Cricket Club about 2 hours to bat. Seagram, an Old Boy, bowled very well getting 4 wickets for 13 runs. Martin and Dewar started off fairly well for the Cricket Club, hitting the ball very hard without giving any chances. Warden, how- ever, caught Martin, off Mickle, after he had made 16 runs. Dewar and Levey then made quite a stand, and the School began to appear in danger, before Levey was run out for 11. The score then stood at 2 wickets for 63 runs. Dewar and Norton cut the School's margin yet again before Norton was caught at the wickets by Wigle ma. At that time 3 wickets were down for 100 runs, and it was nearly time to draw stumps. Beemer, however, won the game for the Cricket Club by hitting three 4's in succession. Dewar batted very well getting 52 not out. Mickle, Rogers, Heurtley, Whitehead, and Lockwood were put on to bowl, but Mickle was the only one who was successful. The School Heighington, c. Bailey, b. Bell 5 Lockwood, run out .................... 7 Warden, c. Levey, b. Venables 24 Vaughan mi., b. Seagram ........ 9 Taylor, c. Bailey, b. Seagram 1 Heurtley, c. Dewar, b. Seagram ..,...,...................,.. 21 Hobson, l.b.w. Seagram .,..,....... 10 Hall, not out ..,..,...,..,......... ....... 3 Mickle, not out .......,..........,......... 4 VVigle ma., did not bat Rogers, did not bat Whitehead max., did not bat Extras .. .......... ., ...,......... .....26 Total ffor T wkts. decl.i 110 Toronto Cricket Club Martin, c. Warden, b. Mickle ..16 Dewar, not out .......................... 52 Levey, run out ............................ 11 Norton, c. Wigle ma., b. Mickle 16 Beemer, not out ........,............... 13 Venables, did not bat Seagram, did not bat Morden, did not bat Rea, did not bat Bailey, did not bat McQuigge, did not bat Welch, did not bat Extras .......,.............,. ..... 8 Total lfor 3 wickets: ...... 116 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q5 BOWLING ANALYSIS The School Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Mickle ....... 11 2 20 2 10.5 Rogers ............ ..... . .. 11 2 48 -- - Whitehead max. .... 3 - 14 - - Heurtley ............ 2 - 12 - - Lockwood ............ 3 - 13 - - The Cricket Club Dewar ................ .... . .. 10 5 21 - - Levey ..... 11 2 24 - - Bell .,......,... 7 4 5 1 5 Seagram ...... 13 6 13 4 3.25 Martin ....... 4 3 1 - - Venables ...... 3 - 15 1 15 Beemer ..... 1 - 4 - - RIDLEY vs. THE SCHOOL At Toronto, June 11th. One of the most momentous cricket games in the School's history was played against Ridley on Saturday, June 11th. The School with the strongest batting, bowling, and fielding team for many years was beaten 187 to 139. Forty runs seems to' be a large margin but the game in reality was much closer. But for an Lmfortunate accident the result might have been different. After scoring 82, Warden was hit by a full pitch just below the elbow. His arm was rendered practically useless and two balls later he gave an easy catch to Ripley. The School won the toss and decided to field. Ripley and Owen opened for Ridley and commenced scoring almost immediately, most- ly with ones and twos. The School was fielding excellently, and, when Owen and Ripley had been in for about an hour, the former was caught out by Vaughan at cover, off Mickle, after scoring 9 runs. The first wicket was down for 30 runs. Ripley and Clarke then put on a very long stand, the second wicket falling at 87. Both scored consistently with a good sprinkling of boundaries. They looked fairly set and the School's fielding began to slack off. However, Wigle ma. took a catch very neatly at the wickets, and the tide began to turn in favour of the School. McKinstry who has been batting very well for Ridley this year was dismissed for 7, after la very smart catch by Heighington, off Mickle's bowling. Q6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Powell and Ripley carried the score to 122 for four, when Rogers, again off Mickle's bowling, caught Ripley on an easy fly. Buck and Harper were quickly dismissed for ducks, being caught at point by Rogers and at the wickets by Wigle ma., who had been playing deep especially for the catch. Hart and Powell then stayed together until lunch. After the interval they continued to score with regularity, and, although the School's fielding was excellent, they mounted the score to 168 before Powell was out on an appeal for l.b.w. by Mickle. O'Flynn was put out when Lockwood made a sensational running catch off Rogers. The last batsmen did not stay for long. Mitchell was caught by I-Ieighington before he had scored, and Hart was bowled by a nice off-break from Mickle. The Ridley innings closed at 187. Mickle was by far the best of the School bowlers and had the excellent record of 8 wickets for 66 runs. Rogers also bowled well and was unlucky not to be more successful. The School went into bat ready to do or die and to a certain ex- tent carried out their intentions. Lockwood and Heighington again opened the School innings and wore down the Ridley bowlers. They had been in half an hour when Lockwood played too far forward to a "change pace" by Powell and he was stumped by Owen. Warden then joined Heighington and began his long and magniiicent innings. Heighington was stumped by Owen when he had 4 runs, the second wicket falling at 46. Taylor and Vaughan attempted to run up the score and both were set, when they were run out due to over-anxious- ness and poor judgement, for 10 and 8 respectively. This was very hard luck as both seemed likely to make runs. Heurtley -and Warden carried on, and both were batting consistently and strongly, when Heurtley was out as a result of an excellent catch in the slips by Mcliinstry. At this time 5 wickets had fallen for 118 runs. Soon .after Heurtley had come out, Warden was injured. He gnmely tried to carry on with one arm with the result that has al- ready been mentioned. Wigle ma. and Hall were dismissed for ducks. Mic-kle .intl Cassels then made a stand, both blocking but not scor- ing xnzinjx runs. Mickle was bowled by Powell for 5. Cassels and Rogers put on a last minute rally, Cassels getting 11 not out and Rogers being cziught by McKinstry on an easy catch at square leg for 2 runs. The School were out for 133. Powell bowled very well to get 5 wickets for 3-1 runs. It was a hard game to lose and a better balance of good and bad luck by fate might have brought about a different result. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD gf The School Heighington, stpd. Owen, b. Clarke ................................... 4 Lockwood, stpd. Owen, b. Powell ................,................... 4 Warden, c. Ripley, b. Powell ..82 Vaughan mi., run out ................ 10 Taylor, run out .,.........., ...... 8 Heurtley, c. Buck, b. McKinstry ................... ....., 5 Hall, c. Buck, b. Powell ............ 0 Wigle ma., l.b.w. Powell ..,....... 0 Mickle, b. Powell ............,...,....... 5 Cassels max., not out ................ 11 Rogers, c. McKinstry, b. Clarke 2 Extras ...........,.,,............................ 8 Total .... ................. 1 39 Ridley Ripley, c. Rogers, b. Mickle .... 54 Owen, c. Vaughan, b. Mickle .. 9 Clarke, c. Wigle ma., b. Mickle ................................,.. 37 McKinstry, c. Heighington ...... 7 Powell, 1.b.w. Mickle ................ 30 Buck, c. Rogers, b. Mickle ...... 0 Harper, c. Wigle ma., b. Mickle 0 Hart, b. Mickle ............................ 24 O'Flynn, c. Lockwood, b. Rogers ................................... 10 Mitchell, c. Heighington, b. Rogers ................................... 0 Extras ..... Total .... BOWLING ANALYSIS The School Mickle ..,..... .... 2 8.5 Rogers ......... ..,. 2 1 Heurtley .. .. 9 Lockwood ........ . 1 Heighington ..... . 5 Hall ............ 2 Ridley Powell ...... .... 2 3 Cameron ..... .... 1 2 Buck ...... .... 1 2 Clarke ....... .... 1 0 Harper .......,. . 1 McKinstry ...... .... 5 .......187 Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average 7 66 9 34 - 38 - 7 - 21 - 5 8 34 3 25 3 27 1 29 - 2 3 14 UPPER CANADA COLLEGE vs. THE SCHOOL At Port Hope, June, 18th. 8 8.25 2 17 5 6.25 2 14.5 1 14 Upper Canada won the cricket championship of the Little Big Four when they drew with the School. They scored 209 for 9 wickets in four hours, and the School ran up 171 for 7 wickets in two hours. VVhi1e U.C.C. batted, except for the period when Falconer, Del- lis ii., Allan and Mills were in, it was a very dull performance. The School in contrast had every one in high excitement while Lockwood. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Vaughan, Heurtley, Mickle and Wigle ma. were batting. They made a magnificent attempt to pass U.C.C.'s score, but time beat them. The game was half an hour late in starting. The School won the toss and put U.C.C. in to bat. Youngman and Falconer, the opening pair, batted very consistently, and the first wicket fell for 35 when Cassels caught a high catch from Youngman's bat. Allan and Falconer then made a long stand, Allan blocking and Falconer hitting out. Allan started to hit and gave several chances. He was eventually caught, after having scored 22 runs. Falconer came out soon after for 49, when he hit a high catch that Cassels captured. By lunch U.C.C. had made 100 for three wickets. After the interval ten more valuable minutes were wasted before the team went out to field. For a few overs Mickle bowled very well indeed, and within forty minutes things looked much more hopeful for the School with t.he score standing at 116 for 7. Dellis i. was out l.b.w. and Heurtley caught and bowled Walsh. The next two in, Tatem and Wolfe, were dismissed quickly before they had scored, Heurtley getting one wicket and Mickle the other. Then the batsmen became masters of the situation again and Dellis ii., Dickie and Mills all batted confidently, Dickie going out first when Heurtley bowled him with a nice length slow ball. Dellis and Mills made the longest stand of the game, Dellis getting 51 runs and Mills 22. Dellis gave several chances before Warden caught him. Mills and McCulloch finished the U.C.C. innings and stayed in until U.C.C. declared at tea time. U.C.C.'s slow scor- ing made the game rather boring. Towards the end of the innings the School's fielding became rath- er slack. Mickle bowled very well getting 5 wickets for 39 lruns. Heurtley changed the School's batting order in an attempt to fcore runs quickly, and the experiment was successful. Lockwood and Vaughan went in first, and inside half an hour they had made runs when the first wicket fell. Both played inspired cricket. Vaughan at times stepped out of his crease and knocked Young- man's slow balls for boundaries. They both gave a magnificent display .ind the School's hopes brightened. However, Warden and Taylor from whom much was hoped were put out for 2 and 1 respectively. U.C.C.'s bowling improved and Heurtley and Cassels were forced to do a great deal of blocking. However, they made 21 runs between them, before being dismissed. At this time 6 wickets had fallen for 115 runs. Mickle, playing his last game for the School, added to his bowl- ing success a very good display of batting. With Heighington and Wigle ma. he made a long stand, and, if he had had more time, he id Wigle ma. would have perhaps won the game for the School. X TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD ffl Mickle and Heighington raised the score to 152, before Heighington was caught at point by Allan for 9 runs. Mickle and Wigle ii. made a stand until the end of the game, both hitting strongly. Mickle finished with 27 not out and Wigle ma. with 9 not out. The inconclusive ending of the match was very disappointing. It would have been much more satisfactory for both sides had it been possible to play the game to a finish. Upper Canada College Falconer, c. Cassels, b. Mickle 49 Youngman, c. Cassels, b. Heulrtley .......... ..,............... 1 4 Allan, c. Mickle, b. Heurtley ..22 Walsh, c. and b. Heurtley ...... 12 Dellis i., l.b.w., b. Mickle ..,....... 9 Tatem, b. Mickle .,...................... 0 Wolfe. c. and b. Mickle ..........,. 0 Dickie, b. Heurtley .................... 10 Dellis ii., c. Warden, b. Mickle 51 Mills, not out .................,,........... 22 McCulloch, not out ....,............... 5 Extras .............. ....... ...... 1 5 Total ffor 9 wkts. decl.l..209 The School Lockwood, b. Youngrnan .......... 31 Vaughan, b. Dellis, i. ................ 50 Warden, c. Mills, b. Youngman 2 Taylor, st. Wolfe, b. Young- man .......... ............,.........,..... 1 Heurtley, c. Allan, b. Tatem ..12 Cassels, b. Tatem ...................... 9 Mickle, not out .....,.................... 27 Heighington, c. Allan, b. Youngman ........................ .. 9 Osler ii., did not bat Wigle ii., did not bat Rogers, did not bat Extras .......... .....,.............. ......... 2 1 Total Cfor 7 WktS.l .......... 171 BOWLING ANALYSIS The School Mickle .......... 37 Rogers ......... 15 Heurtley ......... 31 Heighington ..,... 3 Lockwood ....... 1 Upper Canada. Youngman ..... .. 14 Tatem .......... 16 Dellis i. .......... 14 McCulloch ...... 1 Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average 19 39 5 7.8 3 37 0 - 6 102 4 25.5 1 7 0 - 2 9 0 - 0 59 4 14.75 6 39 2 19.5 2 46 1 46 O 6 0 -- JQQ TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SECOND TEAM MATCHES UPPER CANADA 21nd XI. vs. The SCHOOL At Port Hope, May 18th. The first second team match resulted in an overwhelming victory for the U.C.C. 2nd. XI.-161 runs for seven wickets, to 47. U.C.C. batted first, and the tirst two wickets fell for 12 runs. However, the .next five batsmen all ran their scores into double figures. McCulloch and Gooderham had the best scores with 48 and 30 not out respectively. Miles, Wolfe, and Allan also batted well. The School's fielding was very poor, and their lack of good bowling was responsible for the large score. The School put on a disgraceful exhibition of batting, Osler ma. with 19 being the only batsman to get into double figures. Ross and Swaisland made a. last minute rally, but they hardly scored any runs. McCulloch bowled particularly well, getting 8 Wickets for 21 runs. The School Osler ma., c. Carpenter b. McCulloch ..................,,........ 19 Heighington, c. Ramsey, b. McCulloch ..................,.......... 2 Padley, b. McCulloch ................ 3 Cowperthwaite, c. Ramsey, b. McCulloch ....................... 0 Wigle max., b. McCulloch ........ 2 Dawe, c. Gooderham, b. U.C.C. 2nd. XI. McCulloch, c. McConnell, b Heighington .................. Dickie, b. P-adley ................. Douglas, b. Padley ............. Mills, l.b.w. Cowperthwaite Wolfe, run uot ..................... Allan, b. Swaisland ............. Gooderham, not out ........ Carpenter, c. Padley, b. McCulloch ..................... ..... 2 Swaisland ...................... Robson, b. McCulloch ......... .... 4 Dickens, James, Ramsey, Ross, c. Allan, b. Dickie ..... .... 8 did not bat. Swaisland, run out ............ .... 7 Extras ................................. McConnell, b. McCulloch .......... 0 Gunn, not out ......,............ .,.. 0 Extras ,................ .... 1 Total ,..... ........,.. 4 8 Total tfor 7 wicketsl .... 161 THE OLD BOYS vs. THE SCHOOL At Port Hope, June 3rd. The Second team won its only victory of the year against the Old Boys on the Kings birthday. The team was greatly strengthened by the addition of Whitehead max. and Kerrigan. The School started off well getting the first four Old Boys out for 4 runs. However, Martin and Osler made a long stand, and Robert- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 son and Mudge helpedto build up quite a good score. The Old Boys were all out for 87 runs. Whitehead bowled particularly well, getting 6 wickets for 27. The School batted very strongly and only tive wickets were down when the Old Boys' score was passed. Osler ma. and Dawe, the open- ing pair, put on a fine exhibition but gave a few chances. Robson and Padley added several runs to the score, Wigle max. and White- head max. linishing off the innings. For the Old Boys, Lyons had the best bowling record with four wickets for 22. The School The Old Boys Osler ma., b. Seagram .,......,... 20 Kingsmill, l.b.w. Whitehead .... 0 Dawe, b. Lyon .......,....,,.... ...14 Blaikie, b. Kerrigan ............ 3 Robson, l.b.w. Lyon ,................. 15 Seagram, b. Whitehead .......,.... 0 Cowperthwaite, b. Lyon ..,....... 4 Lyon, b. Whitehead .................... 0 Padley, c. Martin, b. Strathy .... 20 Osler, S., b. Swaisland .........,.. 2 Wigle max., not out .................. 5 Martin, c. Vvhitehead, b. Pad- Kerrigan, c. Kingsmill, b. Lyon 2 ley .......... .......................,...... 3 2 Whitehead max., not out ........ 3 Mudge, c. Swaisland, b. White- Swaisland, did not bat head .......... .......................... 9 Ross, did not bat Robertson, b. Swaisland ............ 26 McConnell, did not blt Osler, R., b. Whitehead ............ 4 Extras .......... ...................... ....... 7 J . Strathy, c. Ross, b. Padley,. 0 Cleland, c. Padley, b. White- head ....,..... ............................ 1 Strathy, C., not out .................. 0 Extras .......... .............. ...... 1 0 Total ffor 5 wicketsb ........ 90 Total .... ...... 8 7 THE SECOND TEAM vs. U.C.C. 2nd TEAM At Toronto, June 9th, The Second team were again badly beaten in the return match with U.C.C. It was unfortunate that the School chose to bat first, after the long bus ride, when it would have been better to field. No one except Robson batted very well. Robson scored nearly half the School's runs and Wigle max. and Whitehead batted a little better than the majority of the team. Dawe, Padley, Osler ma., and Kerrigan did not do a.s well as was expected of them. U.C.C. batted after lunch and the School started oi with a bang, McCulloch and Allan both going out almost immediately. However, the rest of the U.C.C. team all batted well, particularly Mills, Dickie, and Woods. Ramsey was the best of the U.C.C. bowlers, getting 3 wickets for 2 runs. 132 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The School Osler ma., c. Allan, b. James .. 2 Dawe, c. Powell, b. McCulloch 0 Robson, stpd. Carpenter, b. McCulloch ....................,........ 23 Padley, c. Allan, b. James ....,... 0 Wigle max., c. James, b. McCulloch .................... ..... 9 Kerrigan, c. James, b. McCulloch ,........,................... 0 Swaisland, c. McCulloch ....,....... 1 Whithead max., c. Dickie, b. Ramsey ....,.,.......,................. 10 Ross, hit wkt. Ramsey ............,. 0 Gunn, b. Ramsey ............ ..... 2 McConnell, not out ..... ..... 0 Extras .,.. ................ . .. 0 Total ...... ............ 4 7 U.C.C. 2nd, Xl McCulloch, l.b.w. Whitehead .... 1 Allan, c. Robison, b. Whitehead 0 Dickie, c. Gunn, b. Kerrigan .... 20 James, c. Dawe, b. Kerrigan 10 Powell, c. Dawe, b. Kerrigan .. 2 Woods, c. Robson, b. Kerrigan 24 Mills, c. Gunn, b. Whitehead 44 Croft, b. Whitehead .................... 18 Ramsey, l.b.w. Whitehead ........ 1 Carpenter, c. Kerrigan, b. Robson ............. ...... ............ 9 Wolfe, not out ............ ........ 1 2 Extras ................ ........ 2 3 Total ..... ...... 1 El THIRD XI. MATCHES THE SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Port Hope, May 28th. Lakefield brought down a strong team which won by 16 runs in a one innings game. The visiting team batted first and played a care- ful defensive game which made their score mount up to 61 very slowly. Wright and Strickland batted well, the former scoring 27 runs for his team. Curphey was bowling in fine form for the School and took seven wickets. The School went in and batted rather care- lessly, with the exception of the three who reached double numbers, Deakin, Whitehead and Baly. Lakefield's best bowler was Harris who did a great deal to limit our score to 45. The Grove Strickland, c. Deakin, b. Corbett ........................ ...... 9 Atwood, b. Curphey ......,. ...... 4 Fletcher, b. Curphey ....... ...... 2 Macrae, l.b.w. Curphey ............ 0 Wright, b. Cochran ,.,,,..,,.,......,.. 27 Harris, l.b.w. Curphey ..... ...... 5 Dench, b. Cochran .......... ...... 0 Disney, b. Curphey ..... ...... 4 Magill, not out ......,...... ...... 6 Carson, b. Curphey ..... ..,... 0 Bagg, b. Curphey ...... ...... 0 The School Cochran, l.b.w. Harris ...... ..... 1 Deakin, c. Macrae, b. Strickland ............................. 11 ' 0 Savage, b. Harris ...................... Pullen, c. Bagg, b. Harris ........ 2 Clarke, c. Bagg, b. Harris ...... 1 Corbett, b. Wright ......,............. 0 Baly st. Macrae .......................... 10 McCloskey, run out .,.................. 0 Grant ii., c. Macrae, b. Harris 4 Whitehead ii., b. Strickland .... 10 Curphey, not out ......................... 2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 335 The Grove The School Extras ...........,L....... ,.,... ...... 4 E xtras ,......,.,.......,.,..,.. . ...... 4 Total .... ...... 6 1 Total .,.. ...... 4 5 THE OLD BOYS ss. THE SCHOOL At Port Hope, June 3rd. There were so many Old Boys at the School on June 3rd, that after lunch a third game was arranged. The Third team beat the Old Boys quite handily by 73 to 53. Burns was the best bat for the Old Boys making 25 before he was bowled. The Third team put on their usual display, most of them being put out for ducks. But Whitehead ma. and Clark batted well and almost beat the Old Boys themselves. They got.25 and 12 respectively. THE SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Lakefield, June '7th. The return match at Lakefield could scarcely be called an exhibi- tion of good cricket. The wicket was very irregular, which had the effect of producing many queer balls. Lakefield batted Iirst and piled up a score of 68, Wright making 20 runs. The School Went in and found itself quickly out for 26. The highest score was 8 by Godshall. Magill was bowling well for Lakefield. The School gave Lakeiield a chance to win by an innings, but fortunately put up a better showing in the next innings. The one redeeming feature for our team was the bowling of Cochran and Pullen in the first innings. The Grove The School Strickland, b. Cochran ..... ...... 1 1 Deakin, l.b.w. Magill .................. 0 Atwood, c. Roughton, b. Cochran, c. Bagg, b. Magill .... 1 Cochran ...........,............ ...... 0 Whitehead, b. Harris .....,.......... 2 Dench, b. Cochran ...................... 0 Baly, b. Magill ...........,..,..,.......... 0 Wright, l.b.w. Cochran .............. 20 Roughton, c. Magill, b. Harris 3 Disney, c. Baly, b. Cochran ...... 4 Savage, b. Magill ,........ ............ 2 Macrae, c. Cochran, b. Pullen 12 Pullen, b. Magill .......................... 0 Harris, run out ........................... 10 Clarke, not out ........................ 4 Magill, c. Roughton, b. Pullen 0 Trenholme, c. Strickland, b. Fletcher, b. Pullen ...................... 0 Magill .................,.................. 2 Carson, not out .......................... 4 Godshall, b. Strickland ............ 8 Bagg, c. Baly, b. Whitehead .... 3 Curphey, c. Fletcher, b. Extras ............................. ............ 4 Strickland .................... ...... 1 Extras ............................... ...... 3 Total .... ...... 6 S Total .... ...... 2 6 LITTLESIDE ELEVEN 5: Cd 'cz 'U o o LD L5 E5 Q ..s n-1 fx O a-4 CL an o cd s.. U 1-N O 5-l Q4 C1 O 2 an un O 5-A -Q E 41 U5 H. Morr sey iscorerl. .1-4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD FOURTH XI. MATCH THE SCHOOL vs. ST. SIMON'S RAMBLERS At Port Hope, June 11th. St. Simon's Ramblers Clark, c. Somers, b. Corbett ...... 1 Hogan, c. Grier, b. Corbett .... 0 0 Emerson, b. Smye ...................... Smith, c. and b. Smye .............. 3 MacKay, hit wkts., b. Morrisey 1 Hogan, c. Grier, b. Smye ........ 16 The School Grant ii., 1.b.w., b. Emerson Somers, b. Emerson ............. Combe, not out .,........ . Smye, not out .................... . Grier, did not bat McCloskey, did not bat Edwards, b. Smye .....,................ 11 Southam, did not bat Gilchrist, b. Smye ......... ......, 5 Lindsay, did not bat Folkes, b. Morrisey ....... ....... 0 Cutten, did not bat Barwell, b. Morrisey ..... ....... 0 Turpin, did not bat Flinton, b. Morrisey ..... ....... 0 Morrisey, did not bat Rees, not out ............,. ....... 2 Corbett, did not bat Extras .......... ....... 8 Extras .......... ..................,... . . Total ....... ..........,..........,..,. 4 7 Total Cfor 2 wickets! LITTLESIDE MATCHES THE SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE QSECOND XIJ At Port Hope, May 14th. The School Won the toss and decided to bat. The wicket was rather sticky, yet, thanks partly to the clever fielding of the Grove, and partly to our own bad batting, the School only made 54 LO'Brian 15l. The Grove went in and made 79 fWood 471. In the second innings the School quickly knocked up 52 runs for 2 wkts., but stumps were drawn and the game went to the Grove on the first innings. The School Osler i., c. Gunn i., b. Dench .... 3 10 Keefer ii., run out ..........,........,.. Russel i., c. Dench, b. Strickland .... .... ................ 1 0 Rathbone, c. Gunn ii., b. Strickland ........,. ................ 0 Ede ii., c. Gunn, b. Dench ...,.... 0 O'Brian ii., run out ,..,..,............. 15 Bell, b. Dench .............................. 0 Armstrong, c. Wood, b. Dench.. 3 Reid iii., c. Gunn ii., b. Gunn i.. 9 Redpath, b. Strickland ............ 2 McLaren, not out ......... ...,.... 0 Extras .......... ........... ....... 2 Total ....... ,...... 5 4 The Grove Dench, b. O'Brian ii. Strickland, not out .......,....... Gunn ii., c. Armstrong, b. O'Brian ii. ...... .............. . Wood, St. Bell, b. O'Brian ii Hepburn, b. Russell i. .......... . Burgess, b. Russell i. .......... . Dawe, b. O'Brian ii. .......... Gunn i., b. Ede ii. .............. . McDonald, c. Keefer ii., b. Ede ii. .........,.................. . Findlay, c. and b. Ede ii. Ames, b. Ede ii. ...........,.. . Extras ....,..... ........ . Total .... . IHS TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD THE SCHOOL VS. U.C.C. CUNDER 16 5 At Port Hope, May 18th. The School won the toss and fielded first, putting U.C.C. all out for only 16. lFul1er, 41. We then batted and made 40 runs lEde ii. 83. U.C.C. went in again and made 61 for 9 wickets declared. fFul- ler, 163. The School then drew the game to a close with a score of 39 for 2 wickets lEde ii., 13. Keefer this game in having the Viservices of Curphey and Cochran. The fieldling ii., 123. We were fortunate in two useful Middleside bowlers, was an improvement over that in the House Match the day before. U.C.C. First Imiings McHugh, b. Cochran ..... ..... 3 Fuller, b. Curphey ...... ..... 4 Sawyer, b. Curphey ........,......... 0 Griffith, b. Cochran .................. 1 Youngman, b. Cochran .,.......... 0 McMurrich, l.b.w., b. Cochran 0 Bennet, l.b.w., b. Curphey ...... 1 Martin, b. Cochran .................... 1 Scandreth, b. Curphey ...... ..... 2 Logan, not out .......................... 2 Garcia, l.b.w., b. Curphey ........ 0 Extras ....,,.,.. ...........,.................... 2 Total ...... ........ 1 6 The First Innings Keefer ii., b. Garcia ..,.. ..... 5 Osler i., b. Garcia ........... ..... 0 Cochran, b. McMurrich ,... ..... 2 Ede ii., b. McMurrich ................ 8 Russell i., b. McMurrich .......... 2 Smye, c. Garcia, b. Fuller ...... 6 O'Brian ii., b. Garcia ................ 0 Reid iii., b. Fuller ,...........,....... 7 Rathbone, b. McMurrich ............ 0 Bell, b. Sawyer .........,........ ..... 1 Curphey, not out ............. ..... 0 Extras ..,,....., ......,.., ..... 9 Total ..... ........ 4 0 Second Innings b. Curphey .......... .............. .... 1 c. and b. Keefer ii. .... ...16 b. Curphey .......... .... 3 b. Cochran ..... .... 0 lc. Curphey .................................. 1 b. O'Brian ii. .............................. 15 c. O'Brian ii., b. Keefer ii. ...... 1 not out .......................................... 11 b. Cochran ....... ........... b. Cochran ....... not out .......... School Second Innings retired .......... ................... b. McMurrich .............. c. Bennet, b. Fuller ..... re tired .......... ................ did did did did did did did not not not not not not not bat bat bat bat bat bat bat tfor 2 wicketsj TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD :gf THE SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE ZND. Xl. At Lakcfield-Dlay 31st. The School batted first and made 57 all out tKeefer 16.l which, considering the bumpy wicket, was not a bad score. We then got the Grove all out for 55. iBurgess 153. This was one of our most exciting games, and our win was largely due to the good bowling of Curphey. A second innings was started, each team batting for roughly three-quarters of an hour. In the second innings the -scores were:-T.C.S. 68 for 6 lOsler 20, Russel 1613 the Grove 52 for 8 QDawe 17l. The School Keefer ii., b. Anderson ............ 16 Ede ii., c. Dawe, b. Strickland 3 The Grove Wood, b. Curphey ....... Burgess, b. Keefer ii. . ,... . 0 15 Rathbone, c. Burgess, b. Strickland, b. Curphey ............ 11 Strickland .......... .......... ...... 9 D ench, b. Curphey ........,....... .. f Osler i., b. Anderson ..,............... O Hepburn, run out .............,.. .. . 3 Russel i., l.b.w. Strickland ...... 1 Gunn ii., c. O'Brian ii. b. O'Brian ii., c. Burgess, b. Curphey .......... ...........,.... . 2 Strickland ....,..... ........... .... 2 An derson, b. Curphey ...... 3 Reid iii., b. Strickland .............. 9 Gunn i., b. Keefer ii. 2 Bell, b. Strickland .,.................... 0 Dawe, not out .............,. 11 Armstrong i., b. Strickland .... 4 Curphey, c. and b. Strickland 3 McDonald, b. Keefer ii. Findlay, played on .... 0 6 Redpath, .not out ........................ 1 Extras .......... ........... 2 Extras .............. ................. 9 Total ...... .......... 5 7 Total .... 55 THE SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. "UNDER 16" At Toronto-June 9th. U.C.C. batted first and were put out for 73 runs lBoeck 23: Keefer ii. 8 wkts. for 25 runsi. The School went in but only man- aged to make seventy-two. fReid 275 Youngman 6 wkts. for 17 runs.l To lose by such a small score was disappointing, but both teams played well and there was little between them. A second in- nings Was begun, U.C.C. making 60 for 8 wkts. 1Fuller 161. U.C.C. The School Youngman, c. Smye, b. Cochran, c. Youngman, b. Keefer ii. .................... ....... 1 5 Garcia .................... ...,.......... 9 Sawyer, l.b.w. Keefer ii. ..... .... 0 Keefer ii., b. Garcia .................. 0 Griffith, c. Curphey, b. Ede ii., c. and b. Garcia ........ .15 Keefer ii. .................... ....... 6 Rathbone, c. Garcia, b. Fuller, 1.b.w. Keefer ii. .... ....... 3 Youngman .......... ...... ..,.... 2 Boeck, run out ............... ....... 2 3 Osler i., b. Youngman .... ....... 0 RS TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD U.C.C. McHugh, c. Rathbone, b. Keefer ii. .............................. 0 Bennett, c. Bell, b. Keefer ii. .. 4 Chisholme, c. Cochrane, b. Keefer ii. .............................. 1 Martin, b. Keefer ii. .......... ..... 9 Gregory, l.b.w. Curphey ............ 8 Garcia, not out ..,...,,............ ..... 2 Extras .......... ..................... ...,. 2 Total ....,. .,......... 7 3 The School Russel i., st. Martin .................... 0 Reid iii., b. Youngman ............ 27 O'Brian ii., c. Fuller, b. Garcia 'I Bell, 1.b.w. Youngman .............. 1 Smye, not out .............................. 2 Curphey, c. and b. Youngman 6 Extras .......... ........ . ....................... 3 Total ..... ....... E THE HOUSE MATCHES BIGSIDE FIRST MATCH-May 17th. The first Houst match ended with an easy win for the Brents. The Bethunes were .ictims of hard luck, and, although Lockwood, Hall and Cowperthwaite made good scores, seven Brent House bats- men were sufficient to defeat the Bethunes. The first two Bethune wickets fell quickly. Soon after, Vaughan mi., always a dangerous bat, unfortunately hit his wicket and came out for a duck. The best stand of the innings was made by Lock- wood and Cowperthwaite. Lockwood played carefully to make 21, when he was run out, and Cowperthwaite hit 19 with reckless abandon before being nicely caught by Wigle max. The last few batsmen did not stay for long, and the innings closed at 83. The Brents started badly, two wickets falling for 3 runs. The side then batted confidently to win the match with five wickets in hand. Heighington, Taylor, Warden and Wigle ma. all batted well. Brent House Heighington, c. Vaughan, b. Hall ..,....,.. ,.,,...... .........,...... 1 3 Gsler ma., b. I-Ieurtley .............. 1 Gunn, b. Hall , ..........,...,..,.......... 0 Warden, l.b.w. Padley ...,.......... 10 Taylor, plyd. on Lockwood .... 31 VVigle ma., not out ...,.............. 14 Mickle, not out ,......,..,,..,.... 4 Whitehead, did not bat Vvigle max., did not bat Rogers, did not bat Dawe, did not bat Bethune House Cassels max., c. Osler ma., b. Whitehead .......... ................ 3 Heurtley, b. Mickle .................... 3 Vaughan, hit wkt. Whitehead..10 Hall, b. Whitehead .................... 12 Padley, c. Wigle ii., b. Mickle .. 1 Lockwood, run out .................... 21 Cowperthwaite, c. Wigle max., b. Rogers .......... .................. 1 9 Pullen, c. Wigle, l.b. Whitehead 1 Savage, b. Mickle ...................... 6 Swaisland, not out .................... 0 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 39 Brent House Bethune House Extras .......... ................... ....... 1 2 Smye, run out .....,.......... ...... 1 Extras .......... ..... ...... 1 6 Total tfor 5 wicketsl .....,.. 85 Total .... ...... 8 3 BOWLING ANALYSIS Brent House Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Whitehead max. .... 13 1 41 4 10.25 Mickle .......... .... 15 2 26 3 8.66 Rogers ........,. .... 12 4 11 1 11 Bethune House Heurtley .......... . .... 12 3 21 1 21 Hall .......... . . 9 2 21 2 10.2 Lockwood ..,... . 7 2 10 1 10 Padley ...... ....,,. . 3 - 15 1 15 Smye .......... ........... . 2 - 9 - - Cowperthwaite ...... . 3 - 9 - - THE SECOND DLATCH-May 31st. and June lst. The second Bigside House Match was one of the best games of the year. The Bethunes, after two days' play, finally won, 149 to 133. The game was productive of some excellent batting and fielding. The Bethunes batted first, and, although one Wicket was down for no runs, they quickly built up a score of 119 runs for 6 wickets. Heurtley, Hall, Vaughan iii., and Lockwood batted particularly well. Osler ma. made a sensational catch to dismiss Vaughan. The last four wickets fell adding only 30 runs to the score. Padley, Kerrigan, and Grier made most of the runs. The Brents had a heavy task ahead of them when they went to bat, and, though the first 6 wickets fell for 67 runs, they looked as if they might overtake the Bethunes in the dying moments of the game. Wigle ma. and Taylor made a good stand during the last part of the innings. Taylor with a score of 45 runs was the main- stay of the Brents. Osler ma., Mickle and Wigle max. added a few runs to the Brent stand, but the ninth and tenth wickets both fell when the score had reached 133. .yy TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Brent House Heighington, b. Hall .........,...... 5 Wigle ma., b. Hall .,.,..,............, 12 Warden, c. Cassels, b. Lock- wood ............ ....,................... 2 Taylor, c. and b. Lockwood .... 45 Mickle, 1.b.w. Heurtley ............ 9 Robson, c. Cassels, b. Heurtley 10 Rogers, run out ..,,.....,..,............. 4 Osler ma., b. Lockwood ........., 21 Wigle max., b. Heurtley ..,....... 10 Dawe, not out ............................ 4 Whitehead max., b. Heurtley .. 0 Extras .......... ................................ 2 1 Total ..... ................ 1 E Brent House Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Bethune House Cassels max., run out ..... ........ 0 Heurtley, b. Rogers .................... 11 Hall, b. Robson .......................... 34 Vaughan mi., c. Osler ii., b Taylor .......... ........................ 4 7 Lockwood, run out ...,.................. 14 Cowperthwaite, b. VVhitehead .. 4 Padley, c. and b. Rogers .......... 8 Kerrigan, b. Rogers .................. 9 Swaisland, b. Rogers ..... Grier, b. Rogers ....... Turpin, not out ...... Extras .......... ......... ........10 ........11 Total ...... ......... 1 49 BOWLING ANALYSIS . , A verage Mickle .....,.... . 17 5 36 - - Whitehead ..... 12 6 21 1 21 Rogers .......... 16 4 45 5 9 Heighington ...... 6 2 10 - - Robson .....,.. 3 - 12 1 12 Dawe ...... 2 - 5 - - Taylor .......... ....... . .. 2 - 9 1 9 Bethune House Heurtley .......... 22 8 45 4 11.25 Lockwood .... 16 8 19 3 6.3 Hall ...,..,... 13 5 15 2 7.5 Kerrigan ....,. 13 5 20 --Q - Padley .,...,..,. . 3 1 5 -- - Vaughan mi. .... 1 - 8 - - MIDDLESIDE FIRST MATCH-May 23rd. The first Middleside inter-house match was played on an extra half-holiday on May 23-rd. Bethune House won the toss and decided to field first. Brent House succeeded in making 61 runs on ra bowlerfs wicket. Cochran and Deakin made a stand which resulted in 32 runs. Baly and Turpin were bowling well for the Bethunes. Be- thune House went in and was soon out for a score of 32 in spite of Turpin's steady batting. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 41 Brent House Cochran, b. Turpin .................... 20 Deakin, b. Turpin ............,......... 12 Whitehead ii., l.b.w. Turpin .... 0 Clarke, c. Roughton, b. Baly.. 0 Trenholme, b. Vallance i. .......... 0 Corbett, c. Roughton, b. Vallance 1. .................... ..... 2 Godshall, b. Vallance, i. ............ 10 Southam, b. Baly ...........,.......... 3 Curphey, run out .......,.,............ 2 Lindsay, c. Roughton, b. Turpin 0 Baillie, not out ............................ 0 Extras .......... ................................ 1 2 Total ...... ........... 6 1 Bethune House Somers, b. Corbett .................... 0 Grant ii., b. Corbett .................. 3 McCloskey, c. and b. Corbett .. 1 Baly, c. Baillie, b. Corbett ...... 3 Grier, c. Cochran, b. Curphey..4 Roughton, b. Corbett ................ 2 Vallance, c. and b. Corbett ...... 0 Turpin, c. Southam, b. White- head .......... .......................... 6 Duncanson, b. Curphey ............ 0 Fleming, not out ........,..... ....... 0 Knox, b. Curphey .....,... ....... 0 Extras .......... ............. ....... 1 3 Total ....... ......, 3 2 , SECOND DIATCH-JUN E 4TH. The second and final match resulted in a win for the Brents. Brent House batted first and piled up 122 runs before they were dis- posed of by Pullen and Smye. Ambrose i. and Curphey batted well, the former staying in for over an hour. VVhitehead ii. also helped to build up the score. Bethune House was unable to get more than 42 runs, although Roughton made a fine stand. Brent House Deakin, l.b.W. Smye ....... .... 0 Cochran, b. Pullen .................... 16 Whitehead ii., c. Baly, b. Savage .......... ...................... 2 6 Godshall, c. and b. Pullen ........ 0 Clarke, b. Pullen ...................... 3 Ambrose i., not out .................. 19 Trenholme, c. Smye, b. Pu11en10 Corbett, c. McCloskey, b. Pullen .......... ........................ 0 Southam, c. and b. Fleming .... 15 Curphey, c. Roughton, b. Smye 20 Lindsay, b. Smye ........................ 9 Extras .......... ................................ 4 Total ...... ......... 1 22 Bethune House Baly, c. Trenholme, b. Curphey 1 Savage, b. Curphey .................... 0 Grant ii., b. Curphey ................ 6 Pullen, c. Clarke, b. Curphey .... 0 Roughton, c. Southam, b. Whitehead .......... ................ 1 6 Smye, b. Whitehead .................. 0 Osborne, c. Deakin, b. White- head .............. ........................ 0 McCloskey, c. Corbett, b. Curphey .......... .................... 0 Cutten, not out .......... .,.............. 6 Fleming, c. Corbett, b. Godshall .......... .......... ....... 0 Knox, b. Whitehead ...., ....... 5 Extras .......... ................ ....... 8 Total ...... ....... 4 2 .12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD LITTLESIDE FIRST MJXTCH-May 17th. Bethune House batted first and were quickly put out for 21 runs tKeefer ii., 51. Brents went in and batted steadily to make the high total of 112 lReid iii., 39, Price 25, Osler i., 131. The poor fielding of the Bethunes was largely responsible for this disastrous defeat. Bethune House Brent House Bell, b. Ede ii., ............................ Osler i., b. Armstrong .............. 13 Keefer ii., c. McGinnis, b. Ede ii., c. O'Brian ii., b. Ede ii., .................................. Armstrong .................... 8 O'Brian ii., b. Rathbone ........ Rathbone, b. Armstrong ......... . Russel i., b. Ede ii., ....... Goodfellow, c. McGinnis, b. Rathbone .............................. Worthington, b. Rathbone ........ 4 Reid iii., b. Keefer ii., ................ 39 Redpath, c. Bell, b. Russel i., .... 12 McLaren, c. and b. Keefer ii... 1 McGinnis, St. Bell, b. Williams 1., not out ..,............. Keefer ii., ........................... . 0 Passey, c. P.rice, b. Rathbone Fortye, b. Russel i., .................... 3 Cassils ii., b. Ede ii., ................ Price, hit Wickets ..................... .25 Armstrong, c. and b. Ede ii., .. Brunton, st. Bell, b. Russel i., 3 Morrisey, b. McLaren, b. Annesley, not out ...................... 2 Ede ii., ................................. . 0 Extras ....... ......... 4 ., ....... ....... . 2 Total ..... ............ 2 1 .... ..... ....... . 1 12 SECOND MATCH-June 19th. The Brents batted first and made 73 runs fOs1er 35.1. Bethunes went in and had 53 'runs for 5 wickets when a change occurred. The last five wickets fell in quick succession for less than a dozen runs, the whole side being out for 64. iKeefer 271. As in the last match, the had fielding of the Bethunes was greatly responsible for their losing. Brent House Ede ii., c. Armstrong, b. O'Brian ii. ........., ................ 1 0 Rathbone, c. Cassils ii., b. O'Brian ii. .............,....,,......,, 7 Reid iii., c. and b. O'Brian Osler i., b. O'Brian ii. .,,..,...... .. Redpath, b. Keefer ii. .............. 3 McGinnis, l.b.w. Keefer ii. Price, c. Armstrong, b. O'Brian ii. .......... ,,.,..... . McLaren, c. and b. Keefer Bethune I-louse Keefer ii., c. McGinnis, b. Ede ii. .................................. 27 Russel i., b. Rathbone .,......,..... 0 O'Brian ii., c. McGinnis, b. Rathbone .......... .................. 4 Armstrong, c. and b. Rathbone 13 Bell, c. Redpath, b. Osler i. .... 4 McCoy, c. Fortye, b. Ede ii. .... 2 Cassils ii., stumped .................. 3 Passy, b. Rathbone .................... 5 Morrisey, c. Annesley, b. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Brent House Fortye, b. O'Brian ii. ..... ..... 2 Annesley, b. Keefer ii. ...... ..... 2 Brunton, not out ...........,. ..... 1 Extras .......... .........,..... ..,.. 5 Total ..... ,......,............, 7 3 Bethune House Rathbone .......... ........ ..... Worthington, b. Ede ii. Williams, not out ..,..... Extras .......... .................. Total ...,.. 43 0 0 0 6 ........6-1 CRICKET COLOURS First Team-Cassels i., Heighington, l-Ieurtley, Lockwood, Mickle. Rogers, Taylor, Warden, Wigle ii. Distinction Badges-l-Ieurtley, Lockwood, Mickle, Warden. Second Team-Cowperthwaite, Dawe, Gunn, Hall, Kerrigan, McCon- nell, Oslei' ii., Robson, Padley, Ross, Swaisland, White- head i., Wigle 1. Third Team-Baly i., Clarke, Cochran, Curphey, Deakin, Godshall, Pullen, Roughton, Savage, Trenholme, Whitehead ii. Fifth Team-Armstrong, Bell, Ede ii., Keefer ii., McGinnis, Mc Laren, O'Brian ii., Osler i., Rathbone, Redpath, Reid iii., Russel i. CRICKET AVERAGES BATTING Innings Times not out Runs Highest Score Average Heurtley 8 0 51 21 6.375 Mickle 7 3 71 27 17.85 Warden 9 3 235 82 39.16 Rogers 4 0 16 12 4 Lockwood 8 1 139 50 19.85 Vaughan mi. 8 0 131 50 15.12 Taylor 8 1 65 35 9.28 VVig1e ma. 6 3 21 9 7 Cassels max. 5 2 35 11 11.66 Heighington 6 0 30 9 5 Hall 7 2 37 20 7.4 Whitehead max. 2 1 6 6 6 Robson 3 0 28 15 9.3 it as lllli M' :Dir if? d fi' V019 .ffi-6 A Ill FYI" f' 'f- nglglg gig gl i 'X--jlll . i i CADET CORPS OFFICERS TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 4, BOVVLING Ove-rs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Mickle ...... ...... 1 40 51 219 8.11 Heurtley ..... 74 18 220 10.48 Rogers ......... .,..., 1 03 34 227 15.13 Lockwood ....4.,... 17 8 54 2 27 Whitehead max. .... 18 5 38 4 9 Heighington ........ .. 11 2 34 1 34 INSPECTION DAY The Cadet Corps inspection took place on May 7th. Owing to rain the programme for the day was entirely disarranged. The Gym. display had to be held in the morning instead of in the afternoon. The horizontal-bar, horse. and parallel-bar teams gave a very creditable performance, and the Physical Training class was good, if not quite up to the usual standard. In the afternoon the Cadet Corps paraded in the gym. and was inspected by Brigadier-General G. S. Cartwright, who was accom- panied by Captain M. Isbester. It was an unusual privilege for us to have a Governor of the School acting as inspecting officer. Ln a brief address the General pointed out the advantages derived from cadet training. LIFE SAVING This term Savage and Ross continued their excellent work with the life saving classes, assisted by Bickle and Brainerd. Tests were passed by the following boys:- Teacher's Certiiicate-Bickle, Brainerd and Warden. Award of Merit-Keefer max., Warden, Williams, Wood, White, Val- lance max., Swaisland, Ede, Bell, Doolittle, Moore, Annesley, Roughton, Cox, Price, and Ford-Smith. Bronze Medallion-Wigle max., Cochran, Graydon, Browne, White- head ma., Russel maj., McLaren and Bankier. Proficiency Certificate-Deakin, Reid mi., Kirkpatrick, Newman, Hyde, Kerrigan, Armour, Pettit, Curphey, Worthington, O'Brian maj., Keefer maj., Morrisey and Wigle max. TOTAL AWARDS FOR YEAR 51 Proficiency Certificates 45 Bronze Medals 46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 23 Award of Merits 4 Teacher's Certificates 1 Honorary Instructor's Certificate. 124 Tests taken in year with no failures VALETE Y. S. Ryersong Fifth form, lst. XIV., Senior. J. R. Stone, Fifth form, 4th. XIV., 4th. VII. SALVETE Parent or Guardian Address McCoy, G. E. W. J. McCoy, Esq., Tgrgintg THE LIBRARY The following books have been presented to the School Library:- "The Universal Anthology", in thirty-eight volumes, presented by His Honour Judge Ward. "The Schools and Colleges of Ontario, 1792 to 19l0", presented by Miss Frances Du Moulin. "Greenmantle", "John MacNab", "The Dancing Floor", by John Buchan, "The Scarlet Pimpernel", "The Elusive Pimpernel", by Baroness Orczyg presented by Mrs. Whitehead. The Complete works of Thomas Hardy with the exception of "The Woodlanders", The Poetical Works of Spenser, The Poetical Works of Keats, "A1ice's Adventures in Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll, "The Bab Ballads" by W. S. Gilbert, "The Old Wives' Tales" by Arnold Bennett, "R-archester Towers", "The Warden", "Framley Parsonage". "The Last Chronicle of Barset" by Anthony Trollope, "The Red House Mystery" by A. A. Milne ltwo copiesr, "Typhoon", "The Nigger of the Narcissus" by Joseph Conrad, "The Prisoner of Zenda" by Anthony Hope, "The Moonstone" by Wilkie Collins, "The Innocence of Father Brown" by G. K. Chesterton, "The Church in the World", "Speculum Animate", "Personal Religion and the Life of De- votion" by W. R. Inge, "The Second Empire" by Philip Guedalla, "Berry and Co.", "Jonah and Co.", by Dornford Yates, "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" by V. B. Ibanez, "Short Cruises" by W. W. Jacobs, "Reality" by B. H. Streeter, "Rodney Stone" by Conan Doyle, "The Four Feathers", "No Other Tiger" by A. E. W. Mason, "A Gentleman of France", "Under the Red Robe" by Stanley Wey- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 47 man, "King So1omon's Mines", "Alan Quartermainen by H. Rider Haggard, "Europe in the Nineteenth Century" by E. Lipson, "The New Arabian Nights" by R. L. Stevenson. THE DRAMATIC SOCIETY On the evening of Inspection Day, May 7th, at St. Mark's Parish Hall, the members of the Dramatic Society gave performances of two plays. The first of the-se was "The Little Man," a morality play by John Galsworthy. The title role was played by Stikeman, who with his natural accent and fluctuating voice together with a little make-up represented the character to perfection. However, the most prominent part was taken by Nichols, as the American tourist. He appeared to be completely at home on the stage and gave a finished performance which could hardly have been better. The remainder of the cast also maintained a consistent standard. Molson and Fleming, in an unobtrusive way, gave a very good representation of the English couple. Wigle ii. was most amusing as the distracted mother, and Holton's make-up and broken English proved a great attraction. The minor characters managed to give the right at- mosphere to each scene. During the intermission a short musical programme was given, consisting of piano solos, and a duet by Strathy and Henderson, and a Bach Gavotte for piano and violin by Bonnycastle and McCloskey. "The Man in the Bowler Hat", a one act farce by A. A. Milne was somewhat lighter and quite melodramatic. Broughall was the main- stay of the cast and sent the house roaring with his stupid remarks. Robson, stamping around in a silk hat and opera cloak, played the black-bearded Chief Villain with great gusto. He and his tough. rough-and-ready assistant, Knox, made a hard pair. Taylor was an excellent 'hero' and with his extremely naive 'heroine,' Morrisey, sup- plied the would-be romantic element. Ede i. played the middle-aged wife with supprising accuracy. Both plays were a great success, and we congratulate the pr0- ducers, Mr. Parr and Col. Stevenson, on the exceptional entertain- ment which they provided. THE CASTS "The Little Man" THE LITTLE MAN ...... .... ......................... .... J . S tikeman THE AMERICAN ....... ..... C . Nichols THE ENGLISHMAN .... ...... VN '. MOISOD 'Q CS E .93 49 73 A 0 .cs E-1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 49 THE ENGLISHWOMAN ..... ..... A . Fleming THE GERMAN ............,....... .,A. W l Hgltgn THE DUTCH YOUTH ....... ..... H . Savage THE MOTHER .........,..., .....,.... D . VVigle THE WAITER ...... ....... J . O. Combe POLICEMAN .....,..... .......... F . Wigle RAILWAYMAN ............,,. ,..... .... ' l' . McConnell STATIONMASTER ...,..............,.............................. ...... E . Armour fProducer: Mr. Parrl "The Man in the Bowler Hat" JOHN ....... ..,.....................4.............................. ,.... W . Broughall MARY ..... .,.......,... E . Ede HERO ...................... ....... T . Taylor HEROINE ................. .... H . Morrisey CHIEF VILLAIN .................................., ..... E . Robson BAD MAN ..............,.....,....,...................,... ,.... B . Knox THE MAN IN THE BOWLER HAT ...................... .... C . Nichols lProducer: Col. Stevensonj THE MUSIC CLUB On March 12th., Mr. Sly gave a piano recictal. The programme ranging from Beethoven to Balfour Jardiner. A magnificent Heintz- man piano was sent for the occasion. On Saturday, April 23rd., We had a concert of unusual interest, featuring music of the eighteenth century. Mozart, Bach, Clementi, and Loeillet were represented by copious examples of their Works for piano, and for flute and piano. Our two guest artists on this occasion were Mr. Robert Finch and Mr. Edward Sellen, to Whom the Club is greatly indebted for their kindness in presenting this attractive programme. THE LITERARY SOCIETY Contrary to custom the last meeting of the year was held over until the second Sunday of this term. We were very fortunate in having as our guest, Mr. Robert Finch of the University of Toronto. "Rope," a thriller by Patrick Hamilton, was chosen to be read at this meeting. It was due to Mr. Finch, who is a talented amateur actor himself, that this play was perhaps our most successful effort of the year. Cutler was elected secretary and Stikeman, treasurer, for the year 1931-32. W-H.B- .- -on C6 M S-4 .2 B O DQ 'The Man 1n the -. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 THE SCIENCE AND ARTS SOCIETY On June 3rd. the Society held an exhibit of some of the work done by the members during the term. As it took place on the day of the Old Boys' match, many Old Boys visited, and we hope, en- joyed the show. It was quite a success. Both the Biology room and the Physics room were used. The following is a list of exhibitors and their work. J. C. Annesley-Process of Silvering Mirrors. H. Ford-Smith and R. Vaughan-Explanation of the Radio Tube. R. Emmans and D. Thomson--Glass Etching. E. D. Ede i.-Floating Sieve. C. Nelles-Picture Frames. F. Ede ii.-Electric Furnace. J. M. S. Patton-Silver Plating. P. Bankier-Fire Writing. S. Pincott-Demonstrated the Conductivity of a Salt Solution. H. Little and J. S. Mitchell-Distillation of Alcohol. J. Cleveland and G. Bonnycastle--Magic Pictures. J. T. S. McConnell-Magic Tap. E. D. Ede i.-Water Cultures. S. Pincott-Sea Sled. M. Allen-Clock. C. S. Deakin was in change of the photographs. Mr. Morse and Mr. Parr both contributed to this exhibit. S. Pincott and M. Allen both were awarded prizes for their exhibits. H. Ford-Smith and J. M. S. Patton received prizes at the end of last term. H. Little and H. Ford-Smith were in charge of all exhibits during the show. Officers for the year Were: J. J. Warden, Treasurerg J. T. S. McConnell, Secretaryg C. S. Deakin, in charge of dark room. Twenty-five dollars in prizes have been offered by C. B. Cleve- land, Esq., for the best photograph of the School buildings. The pictures will be judged on their artistic merits, shading, clearness, etc. The contest is being run by the Science and Arts Society and is open to any boy in the School. Full particulars can be obtained from the Secretary. , 52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD THE DEBATING SOCIETY The final meeting of the Debating Society was the Inter-House debate which took place on Sunday, 20th. March. The s "That Capital Punishment Should be Abolished". For this debate we departed from the usualprocedure and chose fi cluding a proposer, a seconder and three supporters. to represent each House. ubject was: ve speakers, in- Nichols, Heighington, Mickle, Wigle and Armour c Brent, While Bethune relied on Wilson, Stikeman, Patch, Savage and Roughton. hampioned We were fortunate in securing as the judges, D. Hugh Chisholm. Esq., K.C., D. F. Houston, Esq., and Col. E. E. Snider. The debate was good but lacked a little of the interest of some earlier meetings. The subject was no doubt partly responsible for this, since it tended to keep speakers too grimly serious. It would be invidious to differentiate between speakers when so many did their best. We looked upon the debate as .a team contest in which the individual was only one of many. The judges' verdict was given in favour of Bethune for the num- ber of points scored. Mr. D. H. Chisholm was, however, of opinion that, had the decision been given on quality of arguments, not on quantity, Brent would have Won. As it was, the decision went to Bethune who deserved congretulation, since they had fewer speakers from whom to choose a team. Dr. Orchard expressed appreciation of the kindness of the gen- tlemen who had accepted the Secretary's invitation to act as judges. Gluutrihutinna Life in a Swiss School In 1929 I attended the Institute La Villa in Lausanne, Switzer- land. The school itselt is situated on the edge of the Lake of Geneva, and directly across the lake are the mountains of Savoy. There are only about fifty or sixty boys there, but they come from nearly every importiint country in Europe. The daily routine is much the same as that to which we are ac- customed in a Canadian boarding school. One gets up in the morning at 7 o'clock and does gym in the court yard for fifteen minutes. The Swiss breakfast consists only of chocolate or coffee and bread and jam. Morning classes last from 9 until 1 o'clock and TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 then lunch is served. Afternoon classes last from 4 until 6 o'clock. Dinner is served at seven o'clock and there is no study afterwards. Lights go out at 10.30 o'clock. The boys take a great interest in sports. From September until November football is played. Games are arranged with other schools, and these take place every Saturday afternoon in the stadium. If you were to ask a Swiss what he thought of American rugby, he would say that it is much too brutal and that only savages play it. In December the whole School moves up to a little village called Grindelwald in the Bernese Oberland. The school has a small hotel at its disposal during the winter months. Most of the boys enjoy this period of the year better than any other, because there is so much to do. Ski-ing is the most popular of all the winter sports, and it does not take long to acquire skill at it. The Swiss peasants are won- derful skiers and Grindelwald possesses some of the finest profes- sionals in Switzerland. Ski races are held about every two weeks. and there are always large entries in them. Bobsleighing is the next most popular sport. Grindelwald has the longest bob-run in Switzerland and although it is not very dan- gerous, a very high speed can be attained on it. The bob-run is between three and four miles in length, and it takes a bobsleigh about four minutes to get to the bottom. The ascent to the top is made by a little electric cog-railway. This railway, which is the highest in Europe, tunnels its way through the Eiger, the Monch, the Jungfrau, and finally arrives at Jungfraujoch where it is possible to ski the whole year around. During the Christmas season many Englishmen spend their holi- days in this district. The Baer Grand Hotel has a very large skating rink, and on certain days it is reserved for the school. If a Canadian comes to the school they will say, "Voici un bon joueur de hockey". They all think that every Canadian boy is a star at hockey. It is very pathetic to watch the French and Spanish boys trying to play the game. They know how to row and to play foot- ball, but they don't know the first thing about hockey or skating. In March the school returns again to Lausanne. The rowing season is very popular with some boys and very .unpopular with others. The training for the crews is very strict. The school has five rowing teams,-the under twelve, under fourteen, under sixteen. under eighteen and the under twenty. There is keen competition to make these teams, and it is considered a great honour to be on one of them. There are four regattas every year and they are held in June at Vevey, Montreux, Lausanne, and in front of Lycee Jaccard. The summer term ends about July 5th. and those boys who wish 54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD to can stay at the School, which movesup to Les Diablerets until the end of August. During the sunfuner months the boys go on hikes, and climb the mountains in the neighbourhood. The school re-opens again for the football season on September 10th. A year or two at a Swiss school gives one an excellent opportunity to learn French and meet boys of other nationalities. Not everyone gets a chance to go to school abroad, but those who do look back upon the experience as one of the best times in their lives. -A.S.G. A Border Incident There was a timid knock at the door. "Come in!" yelled Sir Gwyllmf, and Menelaus, his aged retainer, entered. "Sir Gwyllmf, I bring greeting from the beauteous dam-sel Lotharia, saying that thy rival, the Irish knight, Sir Patrick Lin- goyle, has insulted you in her hearing, also that she will consider you a coward if you do not wreak fitting punishment on him to- night." "Menelaus, let the trumpets be blown. After to-night, Lingoyle Hall will be, with all its inmates, a heap of ashes." Menelaus sighed. He had often heard the "Young Master" speak thus, and always he had been wrong. However, it was useless to point out to hot-tempered Sir Gwyllmf that he feared the worst, so he quickly awakened the retainers, and ordered Sir Gwyllmf's war- horse to be led out from his stall. We pass on to the court-yard, where Sir Gwyllmf is to be seen giving his final commands to his men: "Our object is to burn Lingoyle Hall, everyone will come. See that marshmallows and corn-on-the-cob are brought to refresh us after our ride. We will hide in the woods, near the Hall. At eleven o'clock, on the dot, we'll set fire to the place, and then will feast." "Noble Master," cried Menelaus, "do not go. I know harm will come of it." The knight made no answer, but spurred his horse, and the whole troop followed him into the golden sunset, where, among purple hills and shadowy woods, lay the home of his rival, Sir Patrick Lingoyle of Lingoyle Hall. Meanwhile, far away, this same Lingoyle Hall, ancestral home of countless Irish kings, was the scene of great activity. Sir Pat- rick Lingoyle was in his room, overlooking the great gate, dictating orders to Friar Apodosis, his clerk, and giving commands to his TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 eager servants. He was in high good-humour, for had not the lady of his choice announced that they would be married the day after he had crushed that viper, Sir Gwyllmf? And had he not thought of a great plan, to ride to Castle Pen Gwyllmf, that night, burn it to the ground, and thus prove his eager love for Lotharia? At nine o'clock ldaylight saving timel he led out his men. "No talking-I light the first match lat eleven-We'll hide among the rocks on Pen Gwyllmf. Everybody here? Let's go!" At eleven o'clock, the fearful peasantry were awakened by a sud- den glow, in the vicinity of the site of Castle Pen Gwyllmf. At about the same time, a similar light lit the sky in a north- westerly direction, some ten miles away. Sir Gwyllmf .and his men have met with no difficulty in their bold attempt. They have arrived early, rather sooner than they had expected, so the trifling delay that occurred while Menelaus went back for some matches, disturbed none but Sir Gwyllmf who had forgotten to bring them. The old servant soon arrived, and Lin- goyle Hall was soon ablaze. After a few congratulatory remarks, the men sat down around the blazing Hall and gorged themselves on corn-on-the-cob and marshmallows. When the feasting had finished, Sir Gwyllmf leaped to his feet. "Now boys, time we were off. Let's go home by the South Pass this time, and get there with the drawbridge up before Lingoyle can returng for I saw no signs of anyone around the burning Hall, and if anyone had been inside they would have shouted when the fire got near. He must be out late on some foray or other." Little did Sir Gywllmf guess the awful truth of his words. At that very moment Sir Patrick Lingoyle surveyed the glowing embers of Castle Pen Gwyllmf, with sombre satisfaction, and said: "Come on home, fellows. 1t's getting late. Gwyllmf will soon be home. He's taken all his men on some raid or other, and I'd hate to be around when he sees this. We'll go home by the north branch of the pass. I feel like a ride over the hills to-night." Sir Gwyllmf and his men are nearing home after their long ride. They reach the edge of the forest, before them lies the path up Pen Gwyllmf to the Castle, high on its summit. But what's that strange glowing in the dark? Where is Castle Pen Gwyllmf? At approximately the same moment Sir Patrick and his weary band are standing before the hot embers, once Lingoyle Hall. Both knights said much, but their Words will, we hope, never be repeated. 55 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Sir Gwyllmf, never of a sweet disposition, was almost speechless with rage, even his charger shrank from him. Finally his old servant tried to mollify him. "Come, Sir Gwyllmf, don't take it in such an awful way. It's your own fault, I warned you that something would happ-" Thud! Sir Gwyllmf's terrible temper had reared its fateful head. and poor Menelaus lay senseless on the ground. We have ob-served the happenings at Castle Pen Gwyllmf and Lingoyle Hall. Now let us peer in the window of Castle Pengriffon, the hold of the Welsh knight, Stir Gwynth ap Griffon. He has just come down from his watch tower, under his arm is a telescope. He has been seeking for signs of Sir Gwyllmf or Sir Patrick, whom he expects hourly, while his newly wedded bride, Lotharia, tells him of the happenings on the far side of the border, on the night of their elopement. "-So I sent notes to each of them, my dear, they were busy burning each other's castles while we fled to Wales." Pengriffon Castle is strong, is guaranteed fireproof, and Sir Gwynth has .no fear of Sir Gwyllmf or of Sir Patrick While inside it. He knows that sooner or later they will make friends, for he is re- puted to give the best dinners and to have the best cellar in all the Border. -W.J.M. Pachacamac Should you ever happen to be in Lima and have a day to spare, take your car, or borrow a friend's, and drive out over the desert following the ancient Inca highway to the south east. On the other side of the Lurin Valley, some sixty miles out of town, you will find an old ruined city. That is all that remains of the once glorious town of the Incas-Pachacamac. Years and years ago Pachacamac was one of the greatest cities on the American continents-second only to Curco, the capital of South America. The famous Temple of the Sun was located here and to it came pilgrims from all over South America. Here the proud Incas often held their court and here too Pizarro first met with and defeated an army of those whom he was later to destroy. Nowadays, Pachacamac is soldom visited. Peru is fast becoming a stopping-off place for tourists, but few if any tourists know of the existence of this explorers' paradise. Then too, the Government discourages, without actually prohibiting, any camping of exploring TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 57 in that neighbourhood. They have their reasons, and very good ones too, for it is said that many an Inca prince or princess lies embalmed beneath that soil, surrounded by their most treasured and most valuable belongings. I have often heard stories of murnmies and gold ornaments being dug up among these old ruins, and, indeed, I myself without actually digging for them, have more than once picked up some old Inca spinning-needle or coin. Of all the places that I have been to, Pachacamac is the one where I should like least to be left after dark. Regularly at six o'clock every evening, just as the sun goes down, all the half.wild dogs of the neighbouring villages and haciendas come out to the old ruins and begin to howl. The din is very frightening and one can almost imagine that the spirits of those old Incas have entered the dogs and come back to guard their possessions. -W.B.R. A Happy Doubt Glorious fearsome herald of the night ! When fire-flies shine forth their feeble light, When the worker from his task returns, You come and enthrall the soul that burns In earthly breasts. Then the student from his book looks out Of the window, wonders, muses, doubts That matriculations really are, Inspired as the sun sinks down afar To rise again. -J. Stikernan. Sea, Bird The dusk, marsh air, Tired with a cloudless hour of wild play, Falls heavily upon the cold steele grey Of a resting seag and there As a lifeless dream Awaits imprisoned night To free his cool wet hands And thin relentless feet, to wade the shadowed stream 8 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD With dull and heavy flight To the quiet, umberous line of landfs Far edge-encurtain day With thick, dark rain-and stay Till frantic, angerous light, In sharply winging flight Returns again ---- - - Above the breathless contour of the sea, There is a White gull waiting-endlessly-. Ode to Beer Pale opalescent nectar of the gods, Divine creation of a mortal hand: To think that thou should be consumed by clods, Who high in power and majesty doth stand. Thou brmgest bliss into the human soul, Thou malnest man to strive and fight again: For at the cherished, longed, and sought-for goal, Man knows his stubborn toil was not in vain. A hymn of praise from all creation comes, As frail mankind thy delicacy sipsg From doctors, lawyers, scientists, and bums, Resounds the smacking of contented lips. And now my poem to thy name is done, But there is one request I'd have thee hear: While this poor useless life of mine doth run, Grant that I never gaze upon thy bier. Dawn Dawn is the time that I adore When I may run upon the moor, Where fairy nymphs have left their trace By little ringlets o'er the space. The Robin, waking, nods to me, And so does every little bee, -C.N W.M.B TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD For they all know that it is I And not 3 horrid human spy. The brooks gurgle and sputter so That really it is hard to know If they approve of me or no. In the East the sun is rising, And the fish have stopped their jumping, Every flower has ope'd its eye For now the night has passed by. 3 5 A. I. Rice fill TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Ellie 31uninr Srhnnl lirrnrh What, I wonder, will be the first thoughts which come to our minds in future years when the the words "Trinity Term" are used in our hearing? It is a good many years ago since the writer first came to T.C.S., and he remembers that one of the commonest say- ings among the boys in those days was to the effect that the sum- mer term is the best of all. And certainly there are many things to make it so. Here in the Junior School in the earlier hours of the morning tif anyone is up in the earlier hours to seel we wake to look across the green of the playing fields to the bright sun just appearing over thc top of the Senior School buildings: we see the few energetic ones at the nets, the Memorial Cross standing out against the background of red buildings and green trees and one or two iigures running to the swimming pool for their morning dip. True, our minds are largely taken up with other things-any num- ber of themethere is the calendar to look up and the days to be counted lthough we know quite well without counting how many there are before the holidaysl. There are caterpillars to be fed with green leaves now and to become gorgeous butterflies later on. There are room-mates to be c-haffed and to chaff-words tand even blows sometimesl to be exchanged-there is an exercise in the gym. to be perfected-an article half-made in the carpentry room-a cricket- bat to be oiled-talk of the holidays-clothes, though, to be put on now and a call-over to attend before breakfast-and "There goes the inspection gong." So starts a typical day: and, if we are told that it is not thus that the typical boy sees it, we can only say that there have been times when he did. Of course there have been changes. Time was, for instance, when the Iron Bridge was a more familiar spot than it now is-and we can remember days when the pool at the Iron Bridge was crowded with enthusiastic, shouting boys and altogether an attractive spot. Well, the modern swim- ming tank has taken its place and it has, at least, this advantage-- that it is close at hand and very useful at times when the walk of a mile or so each way would make the "old swimming hole" quite out of the question. But, changes though there have been, the Trinity Term to-clay is not so very different from what it has been for generation after generation of T.C.S. boys and masters: and when it ends it ends still, as it has always done, with those mixed feelings of joy unbounded at the prospect of holidays and all they mean and of one quite inexpressible heart-ache which always goes with the breaking up of a group of humans who have lived in close contact with one another. It is true that this is best under- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q51 stood by those only who have left or are leaving for the last time. But to all, in some degree, there comes some share of it. And who shall say that such feelings--born as they are of mutual regard and affection-are not excellent things. Certainly they exist: and cer- tainly as 1931-32 comes to an end it shares them with all other years that have passed into the traditions of T.C.S. But we shall be accused tif it is an accusationi of sentimentality if we do not get down to business and write about some of the hap- penings of the term. We have had three extra half-holidays this term, one in honour Of the visit of the Rev. V. C. Spencer and Mrs. Spencer, one at the re- quest of General Cartwright and one on Ascension Day. Then, of course, Victoria Day was celebrated as we have celebrated it for some years though the weather this year was far kinder than .usual and conditions were ideal for the picnic on the grounds of Mr. Meadows. We wonder if members of the School ever realize that it is thanks to the kindness of its owner that we are allowed to use a place which others are not generally permitted to use. It is natural that carpentry has not taken quite the same place in the life of the School during the latter part of the term. Much good work has been done, but the great outdoors and its attractions have necessarily had their effect on this side of our life. We have been very fortunate this term in the matter of health. Indeed, except for two cases of mumps there has been nothing at all in the way of sickness up to the date of writing fJune 10th.-we touch woodi. We feel quite justified in saying that our record in this respect is remarkable this year, and we are glad to be able to pay a well-deserved tribute to the work of Miss Morrow to whom it is largely due. Our best wishes go with her for the years to come in the new sphere to which she is going. To Mr. Ketchum and Mr. Wynn too, we say 'Good-bye' with regrets. It would be difficult to find a more cheery, enthusiastic companion than Mr. Ketchum. For four years now he has been with us in the Junior School and we shall miss him greatly when he goes. Mr. Wynn, too, we shall miss: but tn a different way, for to go to the Senior School is not to leave T.C.S. Several events are yet to take place. Among these are a Second team cricket match, the second and third House Matches, a shooting competition and a gymnasium competition. .1,,l Q 5 . ,L 'lf' 5115 FxH"'45'3 'Q pta! 1,'i'? I V, , . A Z: Q M Pi e 1 - if ag 2 'Z' ' M 5+ xi: ' If ,nf--W . A V I g'4. 1 :J ng I! I' 'Dlx 4 . I . thu' .- 1, V - F it Q A Q - -Q ,K I . ix- ' I If Q", 1 l '23 5 5 . ' ff, X Q - ' at f- -f ' ' m X . 1 5 v ..1.. ..- .W Y-,.. x - l Isa. . -s-Q, A, 4 ,24 .I 1 -5 s Yx v .,. f l lliiii 'Q C. J. Seagram C. R. Osler C. H. 'Druax 5 3 S M G so 2,2 C543 mm Pa cv 5 G3 O-4 Q5 2 TRINITY COLLEGE scHooL RECORD JUNIOR SCHOOL CRICKET This has been a good season for our first team, and it 63 has won four out of six games. Upper Canada.Prep. were too much for us, and they are to be congratulated on having so fine a side. Truax has been a good captain, and his batting has been a decided asset. The bowling of Truax and Osler has been successful and the fielding of the team has as a rule been keen. The same eleven boys played in all games and have been awarded colours. Junior School Cricket Colours: C. H. Truax tCapt.J, C. J. Sea- gram, C. R. Osler, W. G. H. Pavey, J. E. Cutten, D. I. H. Armstrong, R. H. Tippet, B. S. Russel, H. L. Henderson, P. A. McFarlane, D. K. Dawes. JUNIOR SCHOOL CRICKET SCHEDULE 1932 First Team Friday, May 13th.-House Match won by Rigby House H Monday, May 23rd.-vs. The Grove cawayl Sat., May 28th.-vs. U.C.C. Prep. ihomel Tuesday, May 31st.-vs. S.A.C. Prep Lawayl Thursday, June 2nd.-vs. The Grove ihome Monday, June 6th.--vs. S.A.C. ihomeb Wednesday, June Sth.-vs. U.C.C. Kawayl Wednesday, June 15th.-House Match. AL Second Team Tuesday, May 31st.-vs. The Grove ihomel won by Sat., June 11th.-vs. St. Simon's Choir won by St. Monday, June 15th.-vs. The Grove tawayl ,i,lm.l.i- T.C.S. U.C.C. T.C.S. T.C.S. T.C.S. U.C.C. T.C.S. Simon's JUNIOR SCHOOL VS. THE GROVE-Lakefield, Delay 23, 1932. T. o. s. won by 37 Runs The School ist. Innings 2nd. Innings b c b c b . c Truax, b. McPherson ................ 0 Seagram, b. Dunn ...................... 2 . Baxter, b. McPherson P.avey, c. Dunn, b. McPherson 4 . Dunn ............................ . Herder, b. McMaster Osler, b. Goldsmith .................... 10 Cutten, b. McPherson ................ 0 Armstrong, c. Herder, b. Dunn 3 Tippet, l.b.w. b. Goldsmith ........ 16 . Perkins, b. Goldsmith . McMaster ................... . Goldsmith ................... run out ............................. 5 1 4 7 0 2 8 .... ...1 154 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD lst. Imlings Russel, c. McPherson, b. McMaster .................... ....... 3 McFarlane, c. Dunn, b. McMaster .................... ........ 2 Henderson, c. and b. McMaster 3 0 Dawes, not out ............................ Extras .,.............. ....... 1 0 Total .......,........................ .... .E 2nd. Innings not out ........ ...... 4 b. Dunn ...................... ...... 4 c. Herder, b. Dunn ..... ...... 0 1.b.w., b. McPherson .... ...... 2 5 Bowling: Dunn 5 for 263 McPherson 5 for 215 Goldsmith 4 for 275 McMaster 5 for 14. The Grove lst. Innings Perkins, b. Truax ............ ....... 2 Baxter, c. and b. Osler ..,......... 10 Dunn, run out ............................ 4 McPherson, c. and b. Osler ...... 4 McMaster, b. Osler ..............,..... 0 Herder, run out ......................,... 1 Pentland, st. McFarlane, b. Osler ......,..,,..... .................... 0 Carter, not out ...........,.............,.. 0 Goldsmith, c. Osler, b. Truax 1 Braid, c. and b. Truax .,.......,.,.. 0 Bayly, c. Osler, b. Truax ........ 0 Extras .............,,..,,. ..........,...,......, 6 Total ..,,........ ..................,... . 28 znd. Innings st. McFarlane, b. Osler ,........... 24 2 b. Truax .................... ........, ...... b. Truax ............................ ...... 2 c. Truax, b. Osler ....... ...... 0 c. and b. Truax ................ ...... 5 c. McFarlane, b. Osler ....... ...... 0 b. Truax ...,...,................. ...,.. 1 b. Truax ..,... ...,... ...... 2 b. Osler ............................. ...... 0 not out ................................. ...... 2 st. McFarlane, b. Osler ............ 0 Bowling: Truax 9 for 303 Osler' 9 for 25. flu the first innings Osler took 4 wickets for 3 runsl. .ll'Nl0li SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. PREP.-Port Hope, Sat., May 28th. Result: U.C.C. Vvon by 57 Runs U.C-C. Prep. lst. Innings Mills, run out .....,..........,... .......... 4 3 Gunn, c. Seagram, b. Osler ...... 7 Suckling, b. Osler .....,................ 2 Macdonnell, c. Russel, b. Osler 10 Martin, c. Seagram, b. Truax .. 2 Campbell, b. Tmax .................... 8 Woods, c. Tippet, b. Osler ........ 11 2nd. Innings c. Seagram, b. Truax ....... ...... 0 run out .............................. ...... 1 7 c. Pavey, b. Truax ........ ...... 1 6 c. Seagram, b. Truax ....... ...... 8 c. and b. Pavey ......... ...... 0 b. Pavey ...................... ...... 2 not out .................. ...... 2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 455 lst. Innings Dewar, c. Cutten, b. Seagram 17 Classey, b. Truax ...................... 2 Wakefield, not out .............. 10 Cote, c. Cutten, b. Seagram .... 0 Extras ........................................... 6 Total ...........................,........ 118 2nd. Innings not out ........................... ..... 1 did not bat did not bat did not bat Extras .................4............. .L. 7 Total .... 16 wicketsl ..........,. 53 Bowling: Truax 6 for 665 Osler 4 for 793 Pavey 2 for 103 Seagrarn 2 for 4. 1Note: In the lst. innings, Seagram took 2 wickets for 0 runs.l The Junior School: First Innin-gs Seagram, c. Cote, b. Woods .... 9 Truax, c. Dewar, b. Woods ..,. 0 Osler, c. and b. Gunn ................ 2 Pavey, b. Macdonell ......... ...... 4 Armstrong, c. Cote, b. Macdonell ................. ...... 0 Cutten, b. Gunn .............. ....... 3 4 Henderson, b. Martin ................ 5 Tippet, c. Classey, b. Gunn .... 1 Russel, c. Suckling, b. Gunn .... 2 McFarlane, c. Campbell, b. Gunn ...................................... 1 Dawes, not out .......,,.......... ...... 2 Extras ................... ..... 1 Total .................... ................ 6 1 Bowling: Gunn 5 for 153 Woods 2 for 133 Macdonnell 2 forM22- Martin 1 for 10. Y JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. S.A.C. PREP. Played at Aurora, May 31st., 1932 Result: T.C.S. VVon by 15 Runs The Junior School Seagram, c. Holton, b. McColl 25 Osler, c. McEachren, b. McColl 0 Truax, b. McColl ........................ 28 Pavey, b. McColl ...................... 11 Cutten, b. McColl ........................ 6 Armstrong, c. McEachren, b. Straith .............................. 3 Tippet, b. Straith ........................ 4 Russell, c. McColl, b. McKerrow ............................ 0 Henderson, b. McKerrow ........ 15 McFarlane, b. McKerrow ........ 9 Dawes, not out ............................ 2 Extras ........................ ......... ...... 2 Total .... ....... 1 05 S.A.C. l McColl, c. Russel, b. Osler ...... 8 McKerrow, c. Dawes, b. Seagram ..........,.................. 20 Thompson, b. Truax .,................ 16 Rowan, c. Osler, b. Truax ........ 5 Holton, b. Osler .......................... 3 Adamson, b. Osler ........... ...... 3 Cox, c. Dawes, b. Osler ............ 0 Armstrong, b. Osler ......... 7 McEachren, run out .................. 5 MacIntosh, c. Seagram, b. Traux ............,...........,......... 13 Straith, not out ................. ...... 4 Extras ................... ...... 5 Total ..... ......... 8 9 56 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE-Port Hope, June 2nd-, 1932 Result: T.C.S. W'on by an- Ilmiings of 48 Runs The Junior School-lst. Innings Osler, b. Dunn ............................ 2 Seagram, b. Dunn ...................... 4 Truax, b. Goldsmith .................. 58 Pavey, c. Herder, b. McMaster 1 Cutten, b. Dunn .......................... 3 Armstrong, c. Goldsmith, b. McMaster .,.......................... 7 Tippet, b. McMaster ....... ........ 9 Russell, b. Braid ......................... 2 Henderson, not out .................... 26 Dawes, c. MacPherson, b. Goldsmith .............................. 1 McFarlane, c. MacPherson, b. Goldsmith ..,.......................... 4 Extras ........................................... 6 Total .................................... 123 Bowling: Dunn 3 for 395 McMaster 3 for 323 Goldsmith 3 for 203 Braid 1 for 9. The Grove lst. Innings Perkins, b. Truax ..,,.... ..... 2 Baxter, run out ......... ..... 2 McLean, b. Osler ........................ 1 McMaster, b. Truax .................. 6 Carter i., c, Armstrong, b. Truax ..................................... 0 Dunn i., c. Truax, b. Osler ........ 8 MacPherson, run out .,.............. 0 Carter ii., c. Tippet, b. Truax 0 Herder, not out ............................ 4 Braid, c. Tippet, b. Osler .......... 2 Goldsmith, b. Truax ....... .,... 0 Extras ............................. ..... 4 Total ...................................... 29 2nd. I-nnings Herder, c. Cutten, b. Truax .... 0 Carter ii., b. Truax ...............,.... 0 McLean, b. Pavey ...... ....... 0 Bnaid, b. Truax .......................... 7 Dunn, b. Truax ............................ 16 McMaster, c. Cutten, b. Tippet 9 Perkins, c. Cutten, b. Truax 6 Baxter, run out .......................... 0 Goldsmith, b. Seagram ............. 0 MacPherson, not out ........ ....... 2 Carter i., b. Seagram ...... ....... 0 Extras ........................... .... 6 Total .,.................................... 46 Bowling: :Truax 10 for 183 Osler 3 for 263 Pavey 1 for 6: Tippet 1 for 133 Seagram 2 for 2. JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. ST. ANDREWS-Port Hope, June Bth., 1932. Result: T.C.S. VVOn by 10 W'ickets and '7 Rufns " The Junior School lst. Innings Osler, c. Pentland, b. McColl 2 Seagram, c. Thompson, b. McColl ..,................................ 7 Truax, b. Pentla.nd .........,.......... 16 2nd. Innings not out ...........................,....... .... 6 c. Thompson, b. Pentland ........ 12 not out ...................................,...... 10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD gif lst. Innings Pavey, run out ........................... 2 Cutten, b. Pentland ...,................ 6 Armstrong, c. and b. Pentland 8 Tippet, b. Pentland ..A..4....,......... 7 Russel, c. and b. Pentla.nd ...,.,.. 0 Henderson, b. McColl Dawes, b. Pentland ..... ...... 2 McFarlane, not out ..... .. 0 Extras .................... .... .,.... 4 Total ...,............ .................... 57 2nd. Innings did not bat did not bat did not bat did not bat did not bat did not bat did not bat did not bat Extras .......,.. ...... 0 Total 28 Bowling: Pentland 7 for 30, McColl 3 for 51. St. Andrew's lst. Innings Pentland, b. Truax .................... 2 McKerrow, c. Dawes, b. Truax 3 McColl, c. Seagram, b. Osler .... 2 Thompson, st. McFarlane, b. Truax ........................ ........... 2 Straith, run out ...............,.......... 0 Cox iii., c. Truax, b. Osler ........ 3 Rowan, not out .................,.......... 5 Adamson, c. Pavey, b. Osler .,.. 0 MacIntosh, st. McFarlane, b. Osler .................................. 0 McEaohren, b. Osler ..,.,........,.. 0 Holton, c. Dawes, b. Truax ...... 0 Extras ..............,, .,......................., 4 Total ...............,.... ................ 2 1 2nd. Innings c. Truax, b. Osler ....... ...... O run out .,....,.................... ...... 5 c. Seagram, b. Truax ....... ...... 0 st. McFarlane, b. Osler ...,........ 2 l.b.w., b. Truax ,.................. ...... 3 c. Cutten, b. Truax ........ ...... 6 b. Truax ..,...............,...... .,....... 2 4 b. Truax ...............,.....,...... ...... 7 st. McFarlane, b. Osler .......,..,. 1 b. Truax ............................,.. ...... 8 not out ...... ...... 1 Extras .... ...... 0 Total ..... Bowling: Truax 9 for 313 Osler 8 for 26. THE JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. U-C.C. PREP.-Toronto, June Sth., 1932 Result: U.C.C. VVon by an Innings and 123 Run-s U.C.C.-First Innings Mills, b. Truax ............................ 35 Gunn, retired .......,.......,............... 70 Suckling, c. Russel, b. Seagram 6 Macdonnell, c. Armstrong, b. Osler ............,.,....................... 3 Dewar, c. Russel, b. Tippet .... 28 Martin, b. Truax ........................ 1 Classey, retired .......................... 32 Woods, c. Truax, b. Seagram ..19 Wakefield, retired ...................... 1 Campbell, did not bat Cote, did not bat Extras Total 16 wickets l ............ 205 Q53 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Bowling: Truax 2 for 46 runs, Osler 1 for 52 runsg Seagram 2 for 32 runs, Tippet 1 for 8 runs. The Julnior School lst. Innings Osler, b. Gunn ................ ..... 1 Seagrarn, b. Gunn ...... ..... 8 Truax, b. Martin ...... ..... 2 Pavey, b. Gunn ...... ..... 3 Cutten, b. Gunn ......... ..... 2 Armstrong, b. Gunn .,.. ..... 0 Tippet, b. Gunn ....... ..... 0 Russell, b. Gunn ............ . ..... 2 Henderson, not out .................... 3 Dawes, c. and b. Gunn ............ 0 McFarlane, c. Campbell, b. Gunn .............,.. .................... 0 Extras ..... ..... 0 Total .................... ................ 2 1 2nd. Innings b. Woods .......................,. ....... 0 c. and b. Woods ........... ....... 1 c. Wakefield, b. Mills ...... ....... 2 9 c. Mills, b. Woods ......... ....... 1 b. Dewar ..,................... ....... 1 4 b. Mills ............................ ....... 4 c. Wakefield, b. Mills ...... ....... 0 not out .............,............... ....... 0 b. Dewar ............................ ....... O c. Suckling, b. Dewar ...... ....... 0 c. Cote, b. Dewar ........ ....... 0 Extras ............,..... ....... 7 Total ............ ........................ 5 6 Bowling: Gunn 9 for 6 runsg Martin 1 for 145 Dewar 4 for 8 runs, Woods 2 for 22 runs, Mills 3 for 13 runs. JUNIOR SCHOOL SECOND TEAM vs. THE GROVE "12" TEAM At Port Hope, Tues., May 31, 1932 Result: Junior School VVon' by an Innings and 2 Runs The Grove lst. Innings Beveridge, c. McLennan, b. Agnew ,.,,.....,......................... 2 Stewart, run out ....... ,.... 1 Dobbey, b. Lowe ....... ..... 9 Dunn, b. Lowe ...,.............,.. ..... 2 Peck, C. and b. Lowe ..,............. 7 Pullen, c. Mood, b. Lowe ........ 0 Pentland, b. Lowe ...................... 0 Macrae, b. Strathy ,.................... 9 Crickmore, st. Phillips, b. Strathy .....,...... ............. 0 Seagram, b. Hessy-White ........ 0 Shepherd, not out ...................... 1 Extras .,...,...... .............,,....... .,... 5 Total ,..., ........36 2nd, Innings C. Passy, b. Lowe ....... ....... 0 c. McBride, b. Agnew ...... ....... 3 b. Lowe ........................... ....... 2 b. Lowe ........................ ....... 6 c. Lowe, b. Strathy ....... ....... 4 b. Agnew .....,...................... ....... 1 c. Phillips, b. Strathy ..,............. 3 c. Ferguson, b. Strathy ............ 6 b. Strathy ....................... .. 2 not out ....... ....... 0 run out ,.,,... .,..... 1 .......38 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 4,9 Bowling: Lowe 8 for 21g Agnew 3 for 233 Strathy 6 for 143 Hessy- VVhite 1 for 0. The Junior School Strathy, b. Dunn ........,..........,..,. 0 Starnes, b. Stewart ....... .... 8 Passy, c. Dobbey, b. Dunn ......,. 6 McLennan, b. Stewart .............. 0 Lowe, b. Dunn ..................A......... 13 McBride, c. Seagram, b. Dunn 6 Phillips, b. Peck ........................ 24 Mood, not out .............................. 0 Ferguson, c. Stewart, b. Dunn 5 Extras ....,......,........ .... 0 Agnew, c. and b. Stewart ........ 8 Hessy-White, c. Pullen, b. - Stewart ................................. 6 Total .................. ......, ......,. 7 6 Bowling: Dunn 5 for 183 Peck 1 for 38, Stewart 4 for 20. THE FIRST HOUSE MATCH The first House Match was played on Monday, May 16th., and resulted in an easy win for the Rigby House, by an innings and twenty-six runs. The Rigby House team batted first and made sixty-one runs lTruax 13, Pavey 111. In their first innings the Bethunes could only get twelve runs, and were forced to follow on. This time they managed to score twenty-three. The second House Match will be played on Wednesday, June 15th. The return game between the second team and the Grove "under 13" team will take place on Monday, June 13th. On Saturday, June 11th., the Senior School Fifth Team played a match with our First. Truax and Cutten batted with confidence for us, but our score of 49 was quite easily passed by the Senior boys before they had lost many minutes. On Saturday, June llth., our Second Team also played a match with the boys of the S. Simon's Choir lTorontoi. Our visitors batted well and made 91 runs, to which we replied with 29. T0 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 'hr illirrting nf Uhr iliahiw' tbnilh The Twenty-eighth Annual Meeting of the Trinity College School Ladies' Guild was held on Tuesday, April 19th., 1932, at 3.30 p.m., at the Women's Art Association Studios, at 23 Prince Arthur Avenue, Toro.nto. Mrs. Cartwright was in the chair. Doctor Orchard opened the meeting with prayer. Mrs. Cartwright spoke with deep regret of the death of the Rev. Dr. Bethune, who was Headmaster of the School for nearly thirty years. A motion of sympathy to Miss Beatrice Bethune and the members of the family was proposed by Mrs. Lawrence Baldwin, seconded by Miss Mary Campbell and carried, when all present stood in silence. After the usual routine of business, Mrs. Cartwright, addressing the meeting, said that the Guild had been in existence for thirty years, though during two years of the war there had been no Annual meetings. Looking over old records, it was gratifying to find that we had with us some of the original members, as well as the daugh- ters, and even granddaughters, of those who formed the Guild in 1902. In those days the Bishop of the Diocese, the Corporation of Trinity College, the governing body of the School, and the Committee of the Old Boys' Association, were present at the Annual meetings of the Guild, and though they did not attend now, were still greatly interested in our activities. As the expenditure for the past year had been so trivial, Mrs. Cartwright and the Committee thought that, having funds in hand, we might supplement some needs of the School, suggesting that the walls of the temporary Chapel require painting, that at least six new surplices were needed for the Choir, and that many representations had been made to her that the windows of the dining hall sho.u1d be screened. .More benches also would be greatly appreciated for the grounds of the Junior School. It was moved, seconded and carried that this work should be put in hand at the convenience of the Headmaster. Mrs. Cartwright said that it was not widely known that there was at present at the School a place of exchange for school books, in charge of Mrs. Shearme the Secretary. With Dr. Orchard's approval it was thought that this exchange might be enlarged to include sport equipment in good condition, to be handed to Sergeant-Major Batt. She asked the ladies to co-operate in this very practical measure. Mrs. Cartwright said there were about three hundred and fifty members in the Guild and hoped that many more would join this year. It was moved by Mrs. Stuart, seconded by Mrs. Cleveland and TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 71 carried, that the Chapel Fund be kept as a separate account, and that the small bala.nce of the Panelling Fund be transferred to the General Ruud. Dr. Orchard opened his brief address by speaking of his affectionate memories of the late Dr. Bethune, and of the understanding and sympathetic help which he had always received from him. He was glad to see such a large and enthusiastic gathering pre-sent, referring to the Guild, the mother and model of all School Guilds in the coun- try. He hoped as many as possible would be present at the memor- ial service in honor of the boys of the School who fell in the Great War, to be held at the School on Trinity Sunday, May 22nd. A vote of thanks was moved by Mrs. Lawrence Baldwin, seconded by Mrs. Beatty, to the President, Mrs. Cartwright, for her tireless efforts in the work of the Guild, and also to Mrs. McLaren, the Hon- orary Treasurer, and Mrs. Archibald, Honorary Secretary. Carried unanimously. The following Officers were then elected by acclamation: Presi- dent, Mrs. Cartwright, Vice-President, Mrs. Britton Oslerg Hon. Treasurer, Mrs. Duncan McLaren, Hon. Secretary, Mrs. Thomas Archibald. The executive Committee is as follows:- Mrs. R. C. H. Cassels Mrs. Norman Seagram Mrs. Bingham Allan Mrs. Dudley Dawson Mrs. Barry Cleveland Miss Vera Martin Mrs Mrs Mrs. Mrs Mrs Mrs Mrs. G. W. Wigle. Carr Harris Frank Cochrane R. C. Matthews Norman Perry J. J. Vaughan W. F. Howland Mrs. Gordon Byers, Corresponding Secretary, Montreal. Mrs. H. S. Ambrose, Corresponding Secretary, Hamilton. Mrs. S. Edgar, President, Port Hope Branch. Mrs. Wotherspoon, Hon. Secretary. Port Hope Branch. The meeting then adjourned, and the members were entertained at Tea by the President and Officers of the Committee. ADVERTISEMENTS THE TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION Annual Members S3 Life Members S25 .i-il-1 The annual fee is payable in advance and is due on January lst. each year. Life Membership fees constitute the capital fund of the Association, and are invested in School Bonds. Life Members, therefore, help to build up the Associations capital and enjoy the privileges of membership at a very moderate cost to themselves considering that the Annual fee would be 33.00. Honorary Membership fwithout feel is granted to those who make application therefor upon leaving the School, and remains in force until the following December Iilst. All classes of Members: 1. Receive advance notices of School Matches and other School activities. 2. Are enrolled as subscribers to the T.C.S. "Record". 3. Receive copies of the Old Boys' Directory. 4. Are kept in contact with the School and with each other wherever they may be. 5. Assist in promoting the objects of the Asso- ciatifm. Communications should be addressed to:- The Headmaster, . Trinity College School. Port Hope, Ont. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T3 H9121 Engle' ntra The Rev. Canon Broughall has resigned from the Rectorship of Grace Church on-thefhill and is now living at 81 College View Ave., Forest Hill, Toronto. Victor C. Spencer has returned to Japan to carry on his mission- ary work accompanied by his bride, the former Kittie Rigby. Bert Gooch and John D. Capreol won the Holland Landing Shield, emblematic of the duck shooting championship for that district. Major Geoffrey S. O'Brian 419071 established a new Canadian aviation record from Toronto to Edmonton. George G. Ross 119061 writes as follows: "Major Geoff O'Brian 419071 delivered a Puss Moth aero- plane to George G. Ross 119061 on June 1st, Ross is cattle and .sheep ranching on Milk River in Alberta. "Geoff. broke all records flying from Toronto to Edmonton, making the 2100 miles in 19 hours." Elias Smart is not actively engaged in banking now but is Audi- tor of The Midland Loan and Savings Co. R. C. Howell is engaged with the New York Realty Co., Buttle. Montana. Gordon Wily is working in Brantford with the Canadian Depart- mental Stores. B. M. Gow has been down in Brazil for three years and expects to return to Canada in May for a three months' holiday. Bill Bolton is stockbroking on the Hoor for J. R. Timmins Co., and is becoming an ardent golfer. "Wamie" Thompson is doing well in the freight traffic depart- ment of the C.P.R. Jack Defries is working hard at architecture in London, Eng- land. His address is 35 Bedford Square, W. C. 1. Geoff. Boone is secretary of the C. S. Boone Dredging Co., after graduating with honours as a civil engineer last year from S.P.S. Dave Cassels is trying to sell bonds for Cochran Murray. Jack Burns has been transferred to the Yonge and Broadway branch of the Bank of Nova Scotia, where he is now acting as both accountant and teller. 1.1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Eric Scott has joined the North-West Mounted Police. Palmer Howard and Gordon Johnson took their B.A. degree at McGill Convocation in May. Montreal Old Boys are thinking about an Old Boys' dinner in Montreal rnext year, similar to the one held annually in Toronto, only better. A. P. Ardagh 11922-1927m, on graduation from R.M.C. last year. received a commission in the Royal Canadian Dragoons. He is stationed at Stanley Barracks, Toronto. G. H. Hees 119271, having graduated from R.M.C. last year, is taking a course at the University of Toronto in Economics. Ian Croll 11921-19271 is with the Manufacturers Life Insurance Co. in Winnipeg. C. R. Archibald 11924-19279 graduated with almost all possible honours from R.M.C. last year and is now continuing his studies at Cambridge University. William J. Gordon, son of Dr. and Mrs. G. D. Gordon of Kempt- ville, Ont., was successful in passing all the final year subjects in medicine at Queen's University, giving him the degree of Doctor of Medicine and Master of Surgery. After writing on the Dominion Council which is held early in June, he intends to enter Ottawa Civic Hospital as House Surgeon on July lst. R. P. Jellett writes: - "Eliza Lilias Grier, widow of Judge Jellett, and matron of the School from 1892-1897 died at Toronto on May 5th., 1932, in the 88th. year of her age. "Her quick sympathy and thorough understanding in dealing with the boys of her day, as well as her bright and active personality endeared her to all those connected with T.C.S. in the closing years of the last century." A. Wray Jones was married to Rosina Marion Taylor, October 21st., 1931. While on their honeymoon they dropped in to see the old School and had a very pleasant afternoon, being entertained at tea by Mr. and Mrs. Boulden, and Mr. Boulden, Jr. Mr. Jones went to McGill University after he left T.C.S., and studied B.Sc. in Arts. From university he started working for Mc- Coll Frontenac Oil Company as a. Chemist and has been with them ever since. He was transferred to Fort William and Port Arthur TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T5 as District Sales Manager April lst., 1932. Mr. Jones played hockey for the championship McColl Frontenac Hockey Team the last two seasons in Montreal. His address in Fort William is as follows: 538 Catherine St., Fort William, Ont. R.M.C. NOTES W. Ralston and J. M. Cape graduated this year. They have both represented the College at squash, and Cape was also on the tennis team. C. L. Ingles, who is in the third year, was well up in his class. T. Fyshe did very well in his second year and was on the first Rugby team. D. G. Price and N. Kirk are in the Third Class. In the final order of the Fourth Class three T.C.S. Old Boys were in the first six, R. M. Powell, T. D. Archibald, and R. B. Wotherspoon. The prizes for General Proficiency and Mathematics were award- ed to R. M. Powell, and T. D. Archibald received the award for Drills and Exercises. R. B. Wotherspoon won his weight in the Novice Boxing Com- petition. T. D. Archibald won both novice and open welter-weight com- petitions. In the latter his opponent was the winner of the Gold Cup, which is awarded to the best boxer of the year. R. M. Powell was on the Junior Rugby team. G. C. Savage was sub. half for the Senior Rugby team, a.nd also a sub. for the Junior Hockey team. R. B. Wotherspoon was in the B. Company gym. six. BIRTHS Campbell-On May 3rd., 1932, at Private Patients' Pavilion Hospi- tal, Toronto, to Sylvia lnee Ebyb, wife of Flight.-Lieut. A. P. Campbell, R.C.A.F., Winnipeg, a daughter. Curry-On May 18th., at the Toronto General Hospital, to Mr. and T6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Mrs. Gerald L. Curry, a son. Lennard-At Mount Hamilton Hospital, on May 4th., to Mr. and Mrs. John E. Lennard, a son, John Graham. MARRIAGES Patterson-Bent-C. Campbell Patterson Jr. C1906-19123 to Mar- garet Stevenson Bent at Emmanuel Church, Boston, November 6th., 1931. Residence, 65 Crafts Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass., Wylde-Harrison-John C. Wylde to Mary Harrison at Lockerbie, Scotland, on August 25th., 1931. Residence, Charles River Village. Dover, Mass., U.S.A. DEATHS Bethune-On April 17th., 1932, The Reverend Charles J. S. Bethune, M.A., D.C.L., F.R.S.C., in Toronto. Jellett-Eliza Lilias Grier on May 5th., 1932, in Toronto. THE OLD BOYS ASSOCIATION A. A. Harcourt Vernon, Secretary-Treasurer of the Old Boys Association, writes:- "On May 15th. a delegation from the Executive Body of the O.B.A. consisting of: Lt. Col. J. W. Langmuir, Major E. A. Hethrington, A. A. Harcourt Vernon, G. S. O'Brien, W. W. Stratton, S. B. Saunders, G. S. Osler, Chas. Burns, and J. G. Spragge, went to Port Hope and held a conference with the Masters in order to receive suggestions from them as to how the Association could be of more service to the School. "All the Masters were present and the Head Master asked Col. Lingznuir to take the chair. Helpful suggestions were offered and the Delegation felt that their visit was well Worth while. "Appended is a list of the Officers and the Committee of the As- sociation with their addresses which I hope you will publish so that old boys who read this may give their suggestions either verbally or in writing so that they may be considered at the next meeting of the Executive Body, of the Old Boys' Association." TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD TT OFFICERS AND THE COMMITTEE T.C.S.O.B.A. Hon. President The Rev. F. Graham Orchard, D.D.-Trinity College School. Port Hope. President Lt.-Col. J. W. Langmuir-Toronto Gen. Trusts Corp.. Bay St.. T0f0nt0' Vice President Major E. A. Hethrington-20 Elm Ave., Toronto 5. The Rev. C. J. S. Stuart-381 Huron St., Toronto. R. G. Armour, Esq., M.D.-Medical Arts Building, Bloor St., Toronto. Rep. of Old Boys on Goveming Body of School D'Arcy Martin, Esq., K.C.-Birks Bldg., King 81 James Sts., Hamilton. R. C. H. Cassels, Esq., K.C.-Blake, Lash, Anglin Sz Cassels. 25 King St. W., Toronto. Dudley Dawson, Esq.-Dominion Bank, Toronto, 2. Committee Retiring Dec. 31, 1932. N. B. Allen, Esq.--82 Old Forest Hill Rd., Toronto. W. W. Stratton-Stewart McNair 81 Co.. Bay St., Toronto. I-I. Latham Burns, Esq.-360 Russell Hill Rd., Toronto. G. Stuart Osler-21 Jordan St. Committee Retiring December, 1933. G. S. O'Brian-265 Roxborough St. E., Toronto. Norman Seagram Jr., Esq.-2 Hawthorne Gardens, Toronto. S. B. Saunders-73 Summerhill Ave., Toronto. Geo. Fulford-Fulford Place, Brockville, Ont. C0l'lllllitt66 Retiring December, 1934. Dr. J. C. Maynard-210 St. Clair W., Toronto. J. C. Spragge-80 Elm Ave., Toronto. J. McMullen-Trinity College, Toronto, 5. Dudley Dawson, Jr.-McGill University, Montreal. A Letter to The Editor To the Editor,-T.C.S. Record. In the course of business and otherwise one naturally meets Old Boys, some of whom belong to the Old Boys' Association and some of whom do not. During these meetings many ideas and arguments come up dealing with different points in the School and Old Boys' T5 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD organizations. Some of Toronto's leading stores have boxes put up outside their buildings asking the public to make suggestions as to any improve- ments etc. to their businesses. Could we not do something like this ourselves-not to put up a box but to have a section in the "Record" called "Letters to the Editor" or simply under the "Old Boys' Notes" in which any arguments or original id.3as could be aired? The other day while talking to an Old Boy tnot a member of the Associationl the subject of Little Big Four Rugby came up. When he was at School he was one of the finest outsides the School has ever known. He felt that he could not be expected to be very pa- triotic when the School games were played either on Friday after- noon or Saturday morning, during either of which times no person in business could see them. The reason for this is, of course, that the players are given an opportunity of attending the Varsity matches on Saturday afternoon and in this way learn moze about the game and gain valuable experi- ence. The games at Port Hope are played in the afternoon which enables people with cars to arrive in time to see most of the game. This, however, does not allow the business men to see the games in Togonto and feel that they are supporting the team. It has been the custom for many years, but whether watching senior rugby or foieiting that to enable O. B.s. to watch Little Big Four games is better is a question which should be the origin of considerable dis- cussion. Among other things there is one point which should be speedily cleaned up. This is the question, "VVhy should prefects be the only ones elected to the committees of the Old Boys' Association? ". The answer is that prefects are not the only ones elected. In fact, some of the most active members of the committee were not prefects. The Nominating Committee, I have been told, endeavours, as far as possible, to pick Old Boys representative of different generations. Any member can make nominations at the Annual Meeting but sel- dom does so. Anyone showing any interest or expressing a desire to be on the Committee would, in all likelihood, be elected at the first opportunity. This letter is intended to start the ball rolling. If Old Boys have g.ievanccs, real or imaginary, thrashing them out through the me- dium of the "Record" would be a good thing. Yours very truly, F. H. Rowe 119281. May 29m., 1932. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 79 EXCHANGES Acta Ridleianna", Bishop Ridley College, Ontario. Acta Ludi", Oshawa High School, Oshawa, Ont. Ashburianu, St. Alban's, Brockville. The Albanian", St. Alban's, Brockville. Bishop's College School Magazine", Bishopfs College School Lennoxville. ' Bishop Strachan School Magazine", Bishop Strachan School Toronto. The Black and Red", University School, Victoria, B.C. The Black and Gold", St. John's College, Winnipeg. Blue and White", Rothesay Collegiate School, Rothesay, N.B. The College Times", Upper Canada College, Toronto. "The Glenalmond Chronicle", Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire Scotland. "The Grove School Magazine", Lakefield, Ont. "The Harroviann, Harrow School, England. "High School of Quebec Magazine", High School, Quebec. "Lower Canada College Magazine", Lower Canada College, Montreal "The Oakwood Oracle", Oakwood Collegiate, Toronto. Ontario Ladies' College, "Vox", Whitby, Ont. M ss an u H an H cc u nn "The Raven", Ravenscourt School, Winnipeg, Man. "R.M.C. Review", Royal Military College, Kingston. "St. Andrew's College Review", St. Andrew's College, Aurora. "Vancouver Tech", Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver, B.C. "Windsorian", King's College School, Windsor, N.S. ,wa-V:-1 Hp , 1 . 1, Hi.,- 'P in .f 'r .X 4s1y. V -1 . 1 Y,-u s 5 :A J v .ith 4 2 A U,-, , AJ' ' '. - N - .file 2' 4 u 5, ' ' - 5, 1, -axis' ' 1 A Q .2 Pj -1 ., 9: 14m x"i,fx -r -O1 VN, i wang. .A-6 'rl I". lv' 1 r' L D . 'QV'-B gi -515-R ' 1 '-- 'ni-Q -.I v .Q r I. j I s . 1' f 2'5" . Rf. H 'ri Q '-'fi ,L -' A I .Il s 6 ' J 'I I Y ,. - ,- 4 1 1 I 4 If ' 'r, 'S L' i'Inl -lv' 0. W '5 "V 'FH . r..-'......,,,a '1U'v ,',' '.. ' w -., '.n.' r . 'I 1' , 4, Q- Q .,l I Ii 'E rf - .NWI Qrjl. ,.:,' H U J' JJ- . , 1 X ' Wx ", I. .. , I N .!' r -. 1 . I - J if-'bu .. -- I-Ii -lY'-v.J..- 1 p . ,vl- : 0 fri Q - u, x,' I .QL ,133 I 1 K a A f' I , . J i' . , - b ' , A v '. I ' 1 .-1 7 "' . , U 0 ,O I 7 .-44 Y . ' ., '- I 1 Z . I yk 4 , 1 11517. ' r , ., 37 J.. .u o YJ 4 -J. I ,"""-f' 5 i -V 1. K ' -I .gif :lp . P. - Q - V - .1- I it -- 2 If I. a' 1 ',5 is-ff'4A ' . '11 -w -I-N f ' I-'ui A F. A ll v1.11 V .j J. nfl 1 + "'1 Q ' ., ' , ' ' ,w, ' ' "' .QJ I -.L ' A- ' v., QI " ' V -if . X 'f . '-, --Q, Q '4 ' ff? - 'j 3:-'-1','.P '4- 41167--' -,v .Lf . P A ,' ,,,f VPN, I 4 . H- -2 -.va L. ' 1 f u' - Y ' ,AA Q I ,TT .- - . , Q . j.'f3'if: -fi' .,-, ' 'I.."7"---? w .'- -F, - - E . Wh K NH, ,','t - J +-kU,. T .,. -' Ar ...-.l '-Av el W ,5. . -v",'. - N. . . 46 4 f'T .L" Lfld I 5 i ,wg 4 . 14 Ln 5' 1 1' " 'F I uri' ' 4' , xi-"'Q3 .-g. . , - , E 'E' -' 'H' 7 J H -"1 A 1" 7 w ". ' ' I' A tn- .1 Qi-A V I ,-. ,l1, iz' Y, I K l,I 'Y -. n'o 0' ."3's I- . I . wtf - , - - 151. - .' 1 Al ' .- . ,lr 0 .hhara . - ,'-l- 4 ,,' '- ' a ' ' .fl ' I' .i ' 0 l I n h .. A 2 Q 4. -- 1 A ' A 7' ' ,... ' if I' 'll ,A t 111, . " ' ,ill , Q-nl ,.i5 I 9515, A 1 "4 1 '- 'L u u. .Q ry, Clk In - . T I 1 ,,"l.f'.: ' 'H "'v' 'F We-W5-:Asa na. A 1622. ,Q '1g. . .,-Q - , ' fi 3, . x. Q Q W. X I - . . O -Q ,. U, K V , L '-- I .s ' L JF" 1 49" " 1 '. 'r Q 'Q U ii, , A if ,fr Y Q -f " f. ,4 +R ' 'f' i 5" i I ' , -I P ' ,9. -. .2-ff f 1 G: J M- '?'r ' ' w. 4 . . l .L ' '. - ' A .s lf! R1 ADVERTISEMENTS TRINITY CO1 ,I RCF, In the University of Toronto TRINITY COLLEGE, FEDERATED WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, AND NOW REMOVED TO QUEEN'S PARK, IS ONE OF THE ARTS COLLEGES OF THE UNIVERSITY AND INCLUDES 1. A Faculty of Arts providing instruction for students in classes of limited size in all subjects taught by the Colleges. 2. The full advantages of Federation with the University, instruction by its Professors, qualification for its Scholarships and Degrees, use of its Library, Laboratories and Athletic faculties and membership in Hart House. . 3. A Faculty of Divinity in which Trinity exer- cises its University powers of conferring degrees, and prepares candidates for the ministry of the Church. 4. Residences under College regulations for men -"Trinity House", and for Women students-"St. Hilda 's"g also for members of the academic staff. 5. The Scholarships offered by the College have recently been revised and largely increased. Full particulars will be supplied on request. 6. The Reverend F. A. Bethune Scholarship and the Professor William Jones Scholarship are open only to boys from Trinity College School. For information concerning Scholarships, Exhibi- tions, Bursaries, etc. address: The Registrar, Trinity College, Toronto 5. ADVERTISEMENTS COLLEGE OUTFITTERS IN Clothing and Furnishings BOYS', YOUTHS' AND YOUNG MEN'S SIZES LIMITED 1444 sr. cATn-seams srneer WEST MONTREAL DACK'S "Bond Street" sl-1055 Now s8.75 Now, at a big saving, you can buy Dack's "Bond Street" shoes for school, dress and sports wear. Included at this new, low price, 58.75, are the Scotch grain model, and the noted "Biaemar" golf shoe. BOYS' SHOES AT 87.50. DACK'S SHOES FOR MEN TORONTO SHOPS 73K S N QSYQNGES 46HL O S E vv NDS WINNIPE CO .-XDVERTISEMENTS It all depends on your GUTLOOK ff "The boy Who thinks a dollar its not worth saving becomes the man who thinks a hundred dollars is not worth saving, and he usually ends where he began-sthat is, with nothing." A Bank of Montreal savings ac- count into which you deposit regularly will help you realize the true value of a dollar saved. ANK or MoNTR:5AL Established 1895 ELMES HENDERSON '32 SON REAL ESTATE '32 INSURANCE Royal Bank Bldg. 10 King St. East, Toronto. Q:Ill1'1LIU1'EIIiU1I nf 'rinitg nllvgv Svrhnul Y X VISITOR: Ilw XIII-I Iivv. thi- .XITIIIDISIIUIP nf 'I' GOVERNING BODY EX-Officio Members Iln- Vllzlllm-IIU1' nl II'lI1lIY l II1VI'I'S1 Y. .,,.. v. J . . 'r1" 1 II11- lIuv.1I14' I l'm'usl III' I1'11111x' I ullvge. III1' I H1'0I 1 A. 41 I N. KIIIVIIIIIIN Img., K.I-'., IIILI7., Trillity lfollegre .... 'Forouto im: I". III'2lIl2lIl1 IVIl'L'I1i1I'LI, MA., UD-, Hez1cImaSte1' of ., AI IIN- SIHIIOHI. Elected Members Ihv Hem. XII-..I11stiw II. M. Ilvuuisfoull, I'.I5.I'I., I,II.IJ., Wi1111ipeg III Ilml IlIlI 1 II X XYIIII I N 1ln v Il I'. -If-III-11, IZNII. .A. 1 ............. I Ort Hope AI011I1'63I I II. IIZIIIIIYIII. Iisq. ....... .. 'I'm'0nto I Hfvwlml 'Isla-V. Iiwfl. ........ .. 'I'01'011t0 1 IS. St:-:1tI1-xp Iisq.. .NI..X., KT., .. .... 'I'01'011to III4 IIe'X'. II. IIIQIIX. MAX., I.I1.I3. ....... ......... I ,OPI IIOPC I I4lI'4'lll'1' A, Iiugw-ri. Iisq. ................. ........ ' Foronfo I 1'1u'mIi1-I--I21-In-r::I II. S. II2ll'IXX'1'IQ'IlI. CII.. I'.N.G. .... Toronto iI'IIl2lIl S4-algraml. Ifsfl. ........................ . . TOFOIIIU I I . Nlzvynnznlwl. lim.. NI.IP. ..,. ...........,... . . 'I'4:1'u11t0 Ic'l'4-ix' II1'll4It'l'Null. Iisq. ........................... 'I'01'0uf0 'I I1 me-uzmt-II4-m-VMI Sim' .X. If KIz11'4Im11-II. If." IS Ip Iiinustell II Ilwn. .XI1'.S1-mutex-II. II. IInl'l1zu'4I ......... Y1mIm'iz1,I3.f7. X .X. llm-1'-mu'1 Y4'I'IIllll. Iisq. ............ . Elected by the Old Boys IJ .Xlwgv Nlsurlin. ICN-4.. .NI..X.. KI. ...... 1 1 1 ' I If I'. II. I.nss1-IA. I '11 IXI Iluullf-5' Iislwsnm. I" AN .. . . . . mg. ..... . . . 'I'm'm11 0 I Iznnilton . . 'l'm'onto 'I'm'mlTn Uriuiig Qlullvgr Svrlinnl. if nrt Einpv, ESTABLISHED 1865. Head Master REV. F. GRAHAM ORCHARD, MA., Emmanuel Collcge, Cambridge, D.D., Trinity College, Toronto. Chaplain, Bromsgrove School, England, 1903-1906, Head Master St. Allxin's Brockville, 1906-1913. House Masters b"'e. S. GELDARD,'Esq., DA., Trinity College, Cam 1'1C.g LT.-COLONEL C. GOODDAY, Aldcnliani School, England. Assistant Masters The REV. H. TIPPET, BA., McGill University, Mmitreal. A. C. MORRIS, Esq., PPA., Kiiig':: College, XVindTor, N. S. P. H. LFIXVIS, Ezlq., BTX., Fembroke College, Cambridge. E. VV. MORSE, Esq., Queens University, Kingston. D. KERMODE PARR, Esq., B.A., London University. LT.-COL. K. L. STEVENSON, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Vtfoolwich. C. N. VVYNN, Esq., B.A., Keble College, Oxford. I hr 3j1IIIilJ1' Earhnnl House Master VV. OGLE, Esq., M.A., Glasgow University. Assistant Masters VV. H. MORSE, Esq. H. G, JAMES, Esq., Leeds University. Lady Assistant Miss B. s. SYMONDS. Music Master A. B. SLY, Esq., L.R.A.M. Performers' Diplomag Associate in Music, University of Reading Drawing Master G. T. SCLATER, Esq., A.O.C.A., Diploma at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto. Physical Instructor for All Schools SERGEANT-MAJOR S. J. BATT, Royal Fusiliersg late Physical Instructor at R.M.C., Kingston. SUMMER 1933 A special T.C.S. tour is being arranged for next summer, sailing on July 7th. by S.S. Duchess of York and spending four weeks in England. in- cluding a week in London, and a week on the continent. For particulars apply to C. N. WYNN, Esq., Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. Iriniig Qlnllrgr Svrhnul Qivrnrh EDITORIAL STAFF. Editor ,..A.,,....,,....,.... ,,........,..,....................,.,..., . Assistant Editor ...... ,....... E. Cutler W. B. Reid Sports Editor .... ........ J . V. Kerrigan Committee ..,... ........ F . Ede F. Smye B. Knox Junior School Record .....r........,..... ........ M r. W. Ogle Adviser and Business Manager ....... ,....... M r. D. Kermode Parr CONTENTS. Page Editorial ......... ..........,,............ .....- 1 The Chapel .................. .- 2 School Notes ..............,........... M 2 The School Calendar ............... -- 3 Fifty Years in Holy Orders ....... .- 5 Music in the School ......... ................ - - 5 Inter-House Music Competition ...... .- 7 The Mu-sic Club ...,...r..............,........ -- 7 Lecture on India .......................,.. .. 3 Speech Day .,....,......... -- 3 Prize List ............,.,........ .-..-- 8 Annual Sports, 1932 ,.........,...... ...... 1 4 Football, 1932 ................,.,........,.. ..... 1 5 First Team Matches ....... ..... 1 7 Second Team Matches ...... ...... 2 5 Third Team Matches ....,. ..... 2 7 Fourth Team Matches ...... ...... 2 9 Fifth Team Matches ..,.. ..... 3 1 House Matches ..,...... ..... 3 2 Colours ......tt,........ ..... 3 4 The McGee Cup ...,...,........................ ..... 3 5 Oxford Cup ...........,..........................,.... ..... 3 5 Inter-House Shooting Competition ..,. ..... 3 5 Contributions ......,...............,.................. ..... 3 7 The Science and Arts Society ........ ..... 5 0 The Debating Society .............,.. ..... 5 0 The Literary Society ............... ..... 5 1 Matriculation Results, 1932 ...... ..... 5 1 Valete ,........,..,............................ ..,.. 5 2 Salvete .......,...,.............,..,......... r.... 5 4 Junior School Record .... ..... 5 7 Old Boys' Notes .,......... ..,.. 6 7 Births and Deaths ......, ..... 7 1 Exchanges ...,...,......,... ., T1 ' Q n , ,, K , ' ,f?KfQ3gj3?f,"-'E+ ...-'51'.K'fiQ' f '-334431: J 'qv' 'flgge-KW" . N V ' ri- -i f-FI K, Z,-FI ' V fi 'W .hw Pi f-Aw-Y xv . 1- r.4gl'-.17 tj 3'-if A j-1 1 K 1. IQ Tw. ,- Vg L55 Aa ,fi I MI, -1,39 ,W-1. .-. ai?r:33if . if Si' 'AX 3 . ff.. v ' W 'Y 6 'roof f, Q A wh. '4"f.5Q" 1 'S ziffwgi x I 5 L Mn iw 'Y 5: al' - , , , , - .1 h :FJ 1 ' - I I if jf if Ly.-., X l . '- 1 " --ff X, 4 xxvf' .Q?.-,-. -...ll .5 "Jump ? 'il A , .yn ' ' fs? 4 . ,ui-f U v ' .Q , -- ' 4:-Air' ff . 1 53 'R I Q on' F Fl DM , '7??,it If af H ,. ' ' -1+ I v' I-M'-, J- ,, .. '.f'.i., 'i,.- 'f' s -.jx .ff , vu' ',"'44-f"g,j1l2'Y,'-'JT he-f-"'1s.' A ' ' " ff- -if.'?L'rLff' V ' 4 .. . , l " ' L--.11 . Archery "Ac'rws-nes on MlCHAEl..MA64 TeRM Q32 'V ' Li-. in Iriniig Glnllvgv Svrhnnl livrnrh VOL. XXXVI TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL. PORT HOPEDEC. l932. NO. 1 iihuinrml With a great many boys leaving last term, we have lost some of our leading personalities, and many of us are missing our old pals. Last term a considerable number of masters left us also: Mr. J. M. de Slubicki, Mr. C. R. Hiscocks, Mr. J. F. Goodger and Mr. E. Evans from the Senior School and the Rev. C. H. Boulden and Mr. K. G. B. Ketchum from the Junior School. They carry with them our best wishes for the future. VVe welcome back Mr. W. Ogle, who after a year at R.M.C. has come back as House Master of the Junior School. There have been several changes this term, in which the old has given way to the new. Organised cheering has been permitted. More frequent trips have been made to the "movies" in Port Hope than in the past. Plans are being made for swimming and basket-ball teams next term. The Football season was not as successful as we had hoped, though we must congratulate the Third and Fifth teams on going through the season undefeated. With many indications of a hard winter, if the prophets are to be believed, greater success in Hockey may make up for this. The continued lack of success in the Little Big Four championship had undoubtedly led to some falling off in school spirit. We should not let this affect us too much. In school spirit, the attitude of every individual is an important factor. If we all, especially certain leaders in the School, assume the attitude of enthusiasm for our School, something even bigger than a championship will have been achieved. Those on Bigside hockey wish to thank the masters for their cars and time, which have made possible the practices in Oshawa. Q TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Uhr Qlhaprl We were very glad to have a visit from the Very Reverend Dean Broughall, on September 25th., and from the Provost of Trinity College, on October Znd., both of whom preached in Chapel. The offertory for this term to date amounts to 86737, and cheques have been sent to: The Fellowship of the West ...........r..l....,.rl..,.,.,,.,,.......,...,.. 5510.00 Bishop Doull towards the education of David Yuen ........ 10.00 Canadian Bible Society ..,........,...r.,...........,...,.r.................... 10.00 British Legion ...,...................,.......,....r4...........,.....,................., 15.00 Our very hearty congratulations to Dr. Rigby on reaching his Jubilee in Holy Orders. REMEMBRANCE DAY The School assembled in the Chapel on the morning of November 11th. at ten minutes to eleven and then filed out to the memoriial cross. A wreath, presented by Mrs. Orchard on behalf of the Ladies' Guild, was laid at the foot of the cross by the Head Prefect. At eleven o'c1ock the School stood at attention for the two minutes silence. SCHOOL NOTES The Headmaster has appointed W. T. Whitehead and R. Newman School Prefects. Senior Privileges have been awarded to P. S. Osler ma., T. Tren- holme, J. Kerrigan, E. Robson, C. Padley, D. Wigle, V. Wynn, P. Cassels, E. Cutler, and J. Cox. V. Wynn was elected Captain of Football. E. Robson was elected Captain of Brent House Football. K. Bell was elected Captain of the Second Team. J. Cox was elected Captain of the Third Team. E. Cutler was elected Captain of the Fourth Team. R. Keefer was appointed Captain of the Fifth Team. V. Wynn has been elected Captain of Hockey. J. Baillie ma. has been elected Captain of Brent House Hockey. A handicap squashtournament has been begun but it is not yet over at the time of writing. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The Colour Committee consists of Wynn, Baillie ma and Wigle Bigside Hockey has started this term and several trips have been made to Oshawa for practice. It is hoped that next term a swimming team will be o1gan17ed A Basketball league has been formed, but not many games have been played. Classes for Proficiency Life-Saving are being held by Cox Coch ran and Fleming. The School has won its first hockey game by defeating the O h awa "Tecumseh's" 4-3. Sept. Oct. Nov. 15th. 16th. 21st. 24th. 26th. 29th. 5th 10th. 15th. 18th. 19th. 22nd. 26th. 28th. 29th. lst. 4th. 8tl'1. 11th. 12th. 13th. 14th. 19th. 21st. 26th. 30th. . SCHOOL CALENDAR New Boys arrived. Term started. St. Matthew. Finals of the inter-house sports. First Bigside Rugby practice. St. Michael and all Angels. First Team vs Port Hope High School. Thanksgiving,-half-holiday. First Team vs St. Luke Ev. First Team vs First Team vs. Trinity College, Toronto Albert College, Belleville Upper Canada College. First Team vs. Port Hope High School. St. Simon and First Team vs. All Saints. First Team vs. Boys left for half-term holiday. Second half of Term started. Armistice Day. Silence round the Cross. Half-holiday. Finals of New Boys' Boxing, and Gym and New Boys' race. Bigside Rugby Flat Match. Shooting started. Bigside hockey started. First Bigside hockey practice, at Oshawa. Oxford Cup trials. Oxford Cup. Lecture on India, by L. H. Baker. St. Andrew. St. Jude. Bishop Ridley College. St. Andrew's College. Canon Rigby at the School Stone-laying Photo: W. H. Trott :zz . :signin The Rev. J . Scott Howard at a School match Photo: Science and Arts Society TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 illiftg ljrara in Mnlg Qbrhrra It is our privilege and pleasure to extend to the Reverend Oswald Rigby, D.D., our heartiest congratulations on his completion of fifty years in the Sacred Ministry. Since as far back as the year 1891 Dr. Rigby has been in the closest touch with the School, first as a member of the Governing Body and then as Headmaster 11903-1913l. It will be seen therefore, that his connection with the School is but a few years less than the whole period of his ministry. After graduating with honours in Theology from Cambridge. where he was a student at St. John's, Dr. Rigby spent several years in England in academic and parochial work. In 1891, however, Trinity University in Toronto secured his ser- vices as Professor of History, and for the next twelve years he acted as Dean of the College. Then he came to us as Headmaster. And for a period of ten years his outstanding abilities were freely spent in the upbuilding of the School. Under his wise guidance the numbers in the School increased. reaching at one time the splendid total of one hundred and fifty. During his headmastership many improvements were made to the fabric of the buildings, inside and out, and the playing fields were increased by twenty acres. The Chapel, which so many Old Boys remember with affection, was beautified with memorial stained glass Windows and other adorn- ments under his regime, with the co-operation of the Trinity College School Ladies' Guild. In his time we held the Championship in Cricket for four years and in Football for three. It is not to be wondered at that we take this opportunity of re- cording our debt of gratitude to Dr. Rigby for the generous portion of his long ministry so freely and generously given to the interests of the School: and further, our gratefulness to Almighty God that He has been pleased to bless the work of His "faithful servant" so bountifully. "Oz", as he was ilippantly but neverthleless affectionately known by irreverent school boys, had the faculty of understanding human nature in youth, which gave him a breadth of outlook gratefully remembered by "swarms" of irresponsible boys who passed through his hands. All his many friends and former pupils will rejoice with us that after a period in hospital, Dr. Rigby has again resumed his ministra- 6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD tions at St. Mark's Church, Port Hope, of which he is the beloved rector. VVith the congratulations which we extend to Dr. Rigby on the completion of half a century in Holy Orders, we also assure him of what he once asked, in the pages of this magazine, as his "only 1ew:ird": the School remembers him with "a kindly and affectionate recollection." It is a unique privilege to offer to one of our oWn Old Boys, the Reverend J. Scott Howard, our sincere congratulations on the com- pletion of fifty years in the service of our Lord. Mr. Scott Howard come to the School in January 1871, where he look a prominent part in all phases of school life, being equally proficient in class and in sport. Always a keen cricketer, Mr. Scott Howard was Captain of the School team in 1876, and 18773 in 1902 he presented to the School the Cricket Captain's Cup to replace one lost in the fire of 1895. Mr. Scott Howard, we are glad to say, still retains his enthusiasm for Cricket, and seldom fails to attend the School matchesg indeed a cricket match without the presence of the G.O.M. of the game would seem like Hamlet without the Prince of Denmark. Mr. Scott Howard entered Trinity University in 1877 and in 1882 was ordained to the Sacred Ministry. He became first rector of St. Matthew's Church in Toronto in 18843 later he became rector of the Parish of Newcastle. We were delighted to see that Mr. Scott Howard occupied the pulpit of St. Matthew's on the fiftieth anniversary of his ordinationg and we desire to assure him that the School rejoices with him in his joy on completing, as a "good and faithful servant", so many years of fruitful, loyal, and unselfish service. illiluair in Uhr Srhuul Several Sing' Songs were held at the beginning of the term. Now that a room in Brent House has been placed at the disposal of the music forces, Mr. Sly gives two recitals each week after even-' ing Chapel. The programmes began with extracts from musical comedies, waltzes, and folk songs and dances, and have now covered such classics as Weber-'s Overtures, Brahm's Hungarian Dances, Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite, Sigurd Jorsalfar, and Moszkovski's Spanislf Dances. The School is to hear a recital by the famous tenor, Hubert Eisdell. An account of this event will be given in our next issue. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T The Orchestra has suffered some losses due to boys leaving at the end of last year, but has some new members, including several among the strings. On Advent Sunday a violin and iiute added some effectiveness to the piano accompaniment of the hymn singing. The success of this experiment seems to justify its repetition. The Junior School and the Senior School Choir are preparing for a Carol Service at the end of term. INTER-HOUSE MUSIC COMPETITION This was held on June 7th, Entries were classed as follows. A 1. Unison Song lten performersi. 2. Vocal Quartet. 3. Piano Solo. 4. Instrument other than the piano. 5. Vocal Solo. 6. Optional Class. tSolos for flute and horn were presentedj. 7. Instrumental ensemble. Mr. Kenneth Ketchum kindly acted as adjudicator. The House Music Captains for Bethune and Brent Houses respectively were Savage and Ambrose max. They are to be complimented on their organizing, and all competitors deserve congratulating on their per- formances. About thirty-five boys took part in the competition. Brent was the winning house. At the close of the evening the orchestra played a Minuet by Haydn. THE MUSIC CLUB A generous donation has added to the Club funds, and some con- certs will be arranged next term. First, a recital by the boy cellist, Bobby Spergel, accompanied by his sister, Mildred. Later on Mr. Marcus Adencey will give a recital. The Club has the opportunity of increasing its acquaintance with the literature of music at the evening recitals in Brent House. It is good to notice the increased use of the gramophone this term, and that several boys have listened to the broadcast concerts from New York on Sunday afternoons. 5 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD LECTURE ON INDIA On November 26th. the School heard a lecture on India delivered by Mr. L. H. Baker. The speaker dealt mostly with the history of Delhi before the British rule, emphasizing the barbarism and cruelty of its short-lived rulers. Mr. Baker illustrated his talk with lantern slides of interesting places and buildings, by which We saw the lavish and extravagant Eastern methods of decoration. The lecture was brought to a close with a brief description of the career of Mr. Gandhi. Mr. Baker, in his iiowing style, presented the subject so as to be of interest to all. Spvrrh Bag Speech Day was held this year on Saturday, June 25th. In the morning the School attended divine service in St. Mark's parish Church. The sermon at this service Was preached by His Grace the Primate of All Canada. The Prize-giving took place in the afternoon in the gymnasium. The Principal speaker was the Reverend Doctor J. P. Sclater of Tor- onto. The prizes were presented by the Primate. PRIZE LIST Sixth Form G. F. BONNYCASTLE The :::G601'g'6 Leycester Ingles Prize for Classics Cequall J. C. GIBBONS The 2f'George Leycester Ingles Prize for Classics fequali E. HEIGHINGTON Divinity: Presented by the Archbishop of Toronto C. A. HEURTLEY General Proficiency fequall Christmas 1931, Presented by C. Cattanach, Esq. R. PATCH General Proficiency tequalj Christmas, 1931 General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by WL. H. Baldwin, Esq. The Chance1lor's Prize in Memory of "'J. A. Worrell, Esq. The Petry Prize for History and English 1f2Signifies Old Boy Donor of Prizes TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD F. WIGLE Special Prize for History Ontario-Fifth Form J. A. GUNN Divinity: The 111Bishop Brent Memorial Prize The Petry Prize for History and English J. G. WARDEN General Proficiency, Christmas, 1931: Presented by Dr. Rigby General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by WG. B. Strathy, Esq. Mathematics iSixth Formb: The Dr. Jones Prize The Governor General's Medal for Mathematics The Jubilee Mathematical Exhibition lVIcGill-Fifth Form R. NEWMAN General Proficiency, Christmas, 1931: Presented by SC. A. Bogert, Esq. W. K. MOLSON Divinity: Presented by The Old Boys' Association K. WILSON General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932 The Petry Prize for History and English French fSixth Formi Upper Fourth Fonn PETER OSLER General Proficiency, Christmas, 1931: Presented by XG. Crowther, Esq. General Proficiency lequall Midsummer, 1932: Presented by i'A. Harcourt Vernon, Esq. i'Sir William Osler Exhibition for Science E. C. CUTLER General Proficiency fequalj Midsummer, 1932: Presented in Memory of 'f'D. W. Saunders, Esq. W. H. POWELL The Petry Prize for History and English T. E. G. VAUGHAN Divinity: Presented by "'The Primate of All Canada "Sir William Osler Exhibition for Science TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Lower Fourth Form R. HOLMES General Proficiency, Christmas, 19315 Presented by The Old Boys' Association General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by S. Clarke, Esq. Greek: Presented in Memory of Dr. Bethune Upper Remove Form M. B. ALLAN Divinity General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1982: Presented by G. B. Allan, Esq. The Rev. WF. A. Bethune Scholarship N. C. BRIDGER General Proficiency, Christmas, 1931: Presented by The Old Boys' Association E. F. L. BRUNTON Greek: Presented by tfD'Arcy Martin, Esq. C. M. NELLES The Petry Prize for History and English R. P. VAUGI-IAN Special Prize for Mathematics Middle Remove Form A. W. LANGMUIR Divinity J. L. REID General Proficiency, Christmas, 1931: Presented by S. Bletcher, Esq. Ist General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by Judge H. A. Ward T. L. REID 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by The Old Boys' Association Lower Remove Form J. B. ROGERS General Proficiency, Christmas, 1931: General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by The Old Boys' Association TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 11 Upper Shell Form R. A. FORTYE General Proficiency, Christmas, 1931: R. G. KEEPER 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932 A. S. PRICE 1st General Pronciency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by The Old Boys' Association Special Prize for Mathematics G. M. WILLIAMS General Proficiency, 1Middle Shelli, Christmas 1931 Middle Shell Form W. L. WHITE Divinity General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1932: Presented by The Old Boys' Association THE BRONZE MEDAL ,.,........................, S. H. Ambrose and F. Wigle Special Prizes Head Prefect's Prize: Presented by O.B.A. .................... S. H, Ambrose The iiRev. F. A. Bethune Scholarship iSenior Schooli to be awarded in September The Margaret Ketchum Prize ..............,,........................ P. St. G. O'Brian Workshop Competition .................... S. W. Pincott: M. B. Allan Cequalj Musical Study in Upper School .....,.......... J. Barber and P. McCloskey CHonourab1e Mention: J. Cleveland and J. Gibbonsj Choir Prize ................................,,.................,.....,............... ....,. N ot Awarded The Armour Memorial Prize .................,......... ....., ...,..... N 0 t Awarded Three Times Winner of Bradburn Cup ...... ........ T . L. Taylor Best Gymnast ,.,...............................,.......... ...... J . G. Warden Bigside Swimming and Life Saving ..... ...... H . B. Savage Swimming and Life Saving ...,.......... ........... C . B. Ross Middleside Swimming ............. ........ T . H. Bickle Littleside Swimming .................................................................... M. Cassils ATHLETIC PRIZES AND TROPHIES Captain's Cup: Presented by tRev. J. Scott Howard, and Bat C. A. Heurtley Best Batsman: E. C. Curry Challange Cup, and Bat: Presented by rNorman Seagram, Esq. ................ J. G. Warden 12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Best Bowler: Bat ....,.....,.....................,...,................................. W. J. Mickle Best Fielder: Old Boys' Challenge Cup, and Ball: Presented by if:D'Arcy Martin, Esq. ............................................ E. Heighington Best Littleside Batsman: Challenge Cup: Presented by an Old Boy, and Bat ........................................................ W. B. Reid General Improvement: Bat presented by the Pro ........ W. L. Curphey GYMNASTICS Bigside: Best Gymnast: Prize presented by E. Price, Esq. ....,................................................... J. C. Warden Littleside: Best Gymnast: The iiGwyn L. Francis Challenge Cup ........,.,..............................................................,............ A. S. Price FOOTBALL The Jamie Eaton Cup held by Captain 3rd XIV .........,.. C. C. Padley TENNIS The 2iWotherspoon Challenge Cup for Open Singles: SQUASH RACQUETS The Bullen Challenge Cup-Open ..................,..................... D. H. Wigle The 'tFred Watts Prize-Littleside ..........,............................. W. B. Reid CHALLENGE CUPS FOR ATHLETIC SPORTS The tEwart Osborne, half mile, open .................................... J. O. Combe The WR. S. Cassels, 100 and 220, open ...,............. ........ J . O. Combe The J. L. McMurray, 120 yards hurdles, open ....... ....... C . V. Wynn The Montreal, quarter mile, Littleside ...........,....... .......... D al. Russel The W. Jones, 220 yards, Littleside .............................. Dal. Russel The i'McGee Gym., boxing, cross country, Littleside .... P. St. G. O'Brian The i'Mudge, Highest Aggregate in Sports ........................ J. O. Combe The G. Osler, all round athletics, Littleside ................ Dal. Russel The Grand, all round athletics, open ........................ ......... J . O. Combe INDIVIDUAL PRIZES The 'iCol. C. J. Ingles Cup for the Most Improved Shot .... J. V. Kerrigan The Sergt.-Major's Cup for Best Cadet ............................ H. B. Savage The Bradburn Cup tor Best Boxer ........., ......... T . L. Taylor Oxford Cup-Winner: TCup ................ ......... J . O. Combe -Second: TMug .........,.......................................... G. Vallance -Third: TMedal ,................................................... W. Vallance TPresented by The :tThompson Brothers The Chess Cup ......,.........................,............................................... S. Deakin INTER HOUSE CHALLENGE CUPS HELD BY BRENT HOUSE CFormerly Lower Flatj Bigside Football: Given by 'Morgan Jellett, Esq. Middleside Cricket: The 'Ford Stuart Strathy Cup Littleside Cricket: Given by F. Teviotdale, Esq. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 The Oxford Cup for Cross Country: Given by Old Boys The "'Read Cup for Athletics The Headmaster's Cup for Kicking and Catching Football Shooting Squash Racquets HELD BY BETHUNE HOUSE IFORMERLY UPPER FLAT? Littleside Football: Given by GA. J. Dempster, Esq. Littleside Hockey: Given by H. Matheson, Esq. Gymnastics The Debating Cup: Given by W. P. R. Bridger, Esq. Middleside Football: Given in Memory of 2f1Rev. E. C. Cayley NOT AWARDED Bigside Hockey: Given by Campbell, Esq. Middleside Hockey: Given by T. H. McLean, Esq. The i'Bethune Cup for Best Platoon Bigside Cricket: Given by i:Seagram Brothers. JUNIOR SCHOOL PRIZES-MIDSUMMER, 1932 GENERAL PROFICIENCY Upper First f"Special"D Form First Prize ....... .................................................,...........,.... G . H. K. Strathy Second Prize ...... ...........................,...................... A . Mc D. Ferguson Lower First Form First Prize ...... .............................,............. ......... E . D. K. Martin Second Prize ..... ............................................ . ,....... H . L. Henderson Upper Second Form First Prize ..,.. ,........................................................ B . S. Williams Second Prize ..... .....,................................................. E . V. M. Cape gSpecia1 Prizes .... .................. F . G. McLaren and D. H. Armstrong Lower Second Form First Prize ...... .............................................. ............... G . H. Nation Second Prize ....... .................................... ......... E . H. C. Leather i:Specia1 Prize ...... ............................................ ........ J . C. McG1ashan Upper Third Form First Prize, Exams. ..........................,........................... P. D. Hessey-White First Prize, Final Order ........................................ ......... G . R. Robertson Lower Third Form. First Prize ........ ........................................... ....... P . C. Landry "'Specia1 Prize ................................................................. ........ W . D. Morris . . Nlartin Memorial Prizes Scripture-First Form .................................................... H. L. Henderson 11 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD --Upper Second Form ..... ........... R . H. Tippet eLower Second Form ....A,.......A.A.A...,...A.......... E. H. C. Leather -Third Form .A................A...........,................,...... G. R. Robertson Music ..,.....,.,......,..,.....,..,..............,... G. H. K. Strathy and C. J. Seagram fHonourable Mention: H. L. Henderson: B. B. Hodgson: E. H. C. Leather and G. R. Robertsonj Drawing .....,................................,.............,..................................... W. B. Lowe Third Form Drawing ..................................... .............. J . P. Morrisey The Reading Prize and Challenge Cup fPresented by E. S. Read, Esq.i ...,.....,.. H. L. Henderson and E. H. C. Leather The Essay Prize ........,..................,..,...... ,................. . .A. Mc D. Ferguson Third Form Repetition Prize fPresented by Miss B. S. Symondsi ..........,..... L. Hasbrouck Special Prize for Mathematics ..,.......,,..,................,........ G. H. K. Strathy Special Prize for English ...,..,.............. ........ A . Mc D. Ferguson The Cricket Captain's Bat .........,............... ................ C . H. Truax The Esmonde Clarke Challenge Cup .....,. ......... C . J. Seagram The Hamilton Bronze Medal ..............,......,.... ........,., ...... C . J. Seagram The Bethune Scholarship .................,........,..................... G. H. K. Strathy The Entrance Scholarship to the Senior School ........ G. H. K. Strathy tThese "Special" Prizes are awarded for consistent work throughout the year. Annual Sparta, 15132 Sports Day was held on September 24th. In the Senior School the Read Cup was won by Bethune House, 2340 pts., to 17503 the Osborne Cup for the half mile was won by Ambrose mag the L. McMurray Cup for the 120 open hurdles was won by Bradeng the Montreal Cup for the 440 yards Littleside was won by Hendersong and the W. VV. Jones Cup ior the 220 Littleside was won by Scott. In the Junior School, Cutten won the Championship. SENIOR SCHOOL RESULTS Open 100 ydsfeel. Padleyg 2. Wynn: 3. Ridpath. 220 ydsal. Wynn: 2. Padleyg 3. Ambrose max. 120 yds. Hurdlese 41. Braden: 2. Seagram max.g 3. Cochran. 440 yds.-1. Wynn: 2. Padleyg 3. Ambrose ma. Half Mile-1. Ambrose ma.g 2. Coxg 3. Ridpath. Mileeal. Cassels max.: 2. Knox: 3. Cox. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 Broad Jump-1. Padley 118 ft. 1 in.rg 2. Peck, 3. Reid ma. High Jump-41. Wigle 14 ft. 11 in.lg 2. Powellg 3. Reid ma. Throwing the Cricket Ballafl. Robson 491 yardslg 2. Reid ma., 3. Corbett. Putting the Shot-1. Wynn 133 ft. 3 in.lg 2. Reid ma.g 3. Robson. Middleside 100 yds.-1. Cassils ma.g 2. Rathboneg 3. Russel max. 220 yds.-1. Cassils mag 2. Russel max., 3. Brunton. 120 yds. Hurdles-1. Rathboneg 2. Redpathg 3. McLaren max. 440 yds.-1. Russel .max.g 2. Armstrong rnax.g 3. Brunton. Broad Jump-1. Armstrong max. Q15 ft. 5 in.bg 2. Rathboneg 3. Cassilg ma. High Jump-1. Reid mi. C4 ft. 4 in.Jg 2. Brunton: 3. Bankier. Littleside 100 yds.-1. Scotty 2. Henderson, 3. Seagram ma. 220 yds.-1. Scottg 2. Hendersong 3. Keefer ma. 120 yds. Hurdles-1. Keefer ma., 2. Seagram ma., 3. Armstrong ma. 440 yds.-1. Hendersong 2. Truaxg 3. Starnes. Broad Jump-1. Scott Q14 ft.Jg 2. Seagram ma.g 3. Armstrong ma. High Jump-1. Cape C4 ft. 2 in.Jg 2. Smith ma.: 3. Henderson. Ilinnthall. 191'-2 For the sake of emphasis we should open this retrospect with a few words on ball-handling, but no one knows better than the team itself to what we owed our two "Little Big Four" defeats. Granted we had little scoring punch against heavier lines, still our team W8.S as good as any defensively. Those two games with U.C.C. and B.R.C. might have had different results, if we had handled the ball even a little better. Every touch scored against us in these games, except two in the Ridley game from onside kicks, resulted from dropped balls, fifteen points in major scores and five singles were registered against us, when We presented our opponents with likely scoring positions. Although our backtield was not perfect, it handled the ball more satisfactorily than the ballcarriers in line plays. The record of the season's games is only slightly better than last yearg of seven games played we won four and lost three. Against Trinity, Mulock Cup Champions, we played our best game, although we lost 11-33 Port Hope H. S. Ltwicel and Albert College were beaten handily and S.A.C. took the short end of a 3-1 score. On : sl: -- mlfr' : wr THE FIRST TEADI 'U cd Q2 .-C1 3 E 3 :E cn E nn rn cd U Ili Ill E ci fi 3 I5 W. Vaughan ogers B.R 6 v, 2 'zz cd EL L5 GJ -9 a-4 G3 ED 6 GJ E O 1: cz GJ 5-4 P E3 s: cd Le .cz CJ O U ki TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 11 the other side of the ledger, we were beaten 11-91 and 22 1 by U.C.C. and B.R.C. respectively. In our opening championship game, the score was only 5 -1 against us three minutes to go, with us in possession 15--20 yards from the U.C.C. goal-line, but an onside kick went astray and the last chance was gone. In the second game, even our friends at Ridley acknowledge that the score did us an injustice. But in both games the School fought desperately to retrieve mistakes and all alike deserve credit for the spirit they showed in defeat. The last game brought us some compensation for our previous misfortunes, we won, but only just! In the last quarter S.A.C. looked very much like pull- ing off a narrow victory, but the game was saved by some clever running back of kicks. This victory should give us a great deal of heart for next season, We were outweighed but we fought hard. Thus we have the Spirit to win, and there is good material coming up, if the youngsters will practise, practise and keep on practising the handling of the ball under pressure. LITTLE BIG FOUR GAMES Oct. 22 U.C.C. 11 T.C.S. 1 Ridley 46 S.A.C. 5 Oct. 19 Ridley 19 T.C.S. 1 U.C.C. 5 S.A.C. 3 Nov. 4 T.C.S. 3 S.A.C. 1 U.C.C. 10 Ridley 3 P1y'd. Won Lost For Ag'st. Pts. U.C.C. 3 3 0 26 7 6 Ridley 3 2 1 68 16 4 T.C.S. 3 1 2 5 34 2 S.A.C. 3 0 3 9 54 0 FIRST TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE HIGH SCHOOL At Port Hope, October 5th. After a two years interval the School again arranged matches with Port Hope High School. The School, in its first game of the season, did not play brilliant rugby, b.ut considering the bad weather and the number of first team casualties, the team did none too badly. 15 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Play was very even in the first quarter with Port Hope taking lull advantage of the School's fumbles. However the School's weight soon told and Wynn went around the left end for the first touch. Cassels kicked a rouge late in the first half. In the second half, after some fine bucking by the School's plung- ers, Rogers crossed the line for another touch for the closing minutes of the game Port Hope scored a point, making the final score 11-1 for the School. SCHOOL vs. TRINITY COLLEGE At Toronto, October 15th. The School lost its first game this year when Trinity College, with a much heavier team, beat them 11-1. The game opened with the School kicking-off. Trinity forced the play at the beginning, but the School soon found its feet and by the good bucking of Wynn, Rogers and Barber got the ball on Trinity's 40-yard line at quarter time. Up to this time .the game had been very eveng Knox, Powell and Waldie being outstanding for the School with their fine tackling. In the second quarter the School continued their offensive and Vaughan used fine judgment in kicking a perfect drop, to put the School out in front 3-0. It was now Trinity's turn to force the play, and nothwithstanding Cassels' good kicking, they gradually moved down the field and scored a single just before half-time. Score at half-time: School 3. Trinity 1. In the second half both teams took the field with twelve men a. side, due to the fact that it had been agreed to play the second half under C.R.U. rules. Trinity continued their forcing play and blocked a kick early in the quarter to score a touchdown. Soon afterwards the School found out what a dangerous offensive weapon the forward pass was, for Trinity completed a long one from centre field and scored another touchdown which was also unconverted. Near the end of the quarter Whitehead and Padley combined smartly, en- abling the latter to break away for thirty yards. The School fought desperately to score in the last quarter amd, mainly through the line bucking of Wynn, who was carrying his tacklcrsasniuch as iivc yards before being stopped, kept Trinity in their own half most of the time. However, Trinity's weight gave them added :itrerigtli and the game ended with the ball Well in the SChool's territory. ' Final score: Trinity College 11. School 3. For the School, VVynn was outstanding with his crushing plunges. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD lil As a whole the team tackled well and Whitehead and Padley showed promise of being a real threat on the half line. The line-up:-- The School-Snap, Robson, scrim. supports, Waldie and Powell: iniides, Rogers and Barber, iniddles, Wynn and Armstrong, outsides, Knox and McCloskey: flying wing, Trenholme, quarter, Vaug-han mag halves, Padley, White'-head max. and Cassels max. Spares, Reid ma., Reed max., Kerrigan, Bell and Cochran. Trinity College-Snap, Marting scrim. supports, Green and Wode- house, insides, Fraser and Gibsong middles, Dinnick and l-Iarrisg out- sides, Wilkinson and Beltong flying wing, Minnettg quarter, Welch, halves, Brennan, Ruddock and Tucker. Spares, Seaborn, Davis. Bushell, Townner and Milyar. SCHOOL vs. ALBERT COLLEGE At Port Hope, October 19th. The School defeated Albert College 52w0 in a game which served as a warm-up for the School at the most. The School kicked off and Sutherland of Albert College ran it back to the half-way mark, going through almost our whole team. T.C.S. started their big drive from their 5 yard line and were never in any difficulty afterwards. Padley got away on a long run and Cassels' kick touched one of their men, giving the School two points after Powell nailed an Albert College half behind the line. Knox fell on a fumbled kick a few minutes later to give the School a lead of 'If-0 at the end of the first quarter. In the second quarter the School ran rough-shod over their oppon- ents and scored 33 points. Vaughan made a touch, which he con- verted, after nice runs by Trenholme and Wynn. Padley got the next touch on an end-run and Vaughan again converted. A drop and a touchdown from Vaughan ii., two rouges, and two touches from Wynn, one of which he converted, completed the scoring for the first half. Half-time: T.C.S, 403 Albert College 0. In the last half Padley and Wynn crashed through the battered Albert College line to romp over for touchdowns. Vaughan kicked a rouge and converted from scrimmage, making a total of 52 points for the School to 0 for Albert College. The line-up:- T.C.S.-Snap, Robson, scrim. supports, Powell and Barber, in- sides, Waldie and Rogers, middles, Wynn and Bell, outsides, Knox and Reid ma., flying wing, Trenholme: quarter, Vaughan ma.: halves, Q0 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Padley, Whitehead max. and Cassels max. Spares, McGinnis, Kerrigan, Braden, Armstrong max., Ridpath. Albert College-Snap, Carrg scrim. supports, Smith and Carsdaleg insides, Butchers and Cochrang middles, Fnaser and Sniderg outsides, Day and Chambers: flying wing, McRae: quarter, Martyn: halves, Cadham, Mitchell and Sutherland. THE SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE At Toronto, October 22nd, In the first Little Big Four match of the year the School lost to Upper Canada College 11-1. In the first half our line was rather weak but in the second it held better against Upper Canada's strong plunging. Upper Canada kicked off and scored a rouge in the first two min- utes after blocking our first kick to gain possession of the ball on the twenty yard line. A few minutes later they led an attack from mid- field, and Powell and Symmes, plunging through our line time after time, brought the ball back to the twenty yard line from where they kicked a deadline. Upper Canada broke through the line and blocked the next kick which placed them on the twenty-five yard line. They then made yards and kicked another deadline. The School, after making yards, kicked the ball into Upper Canada territory where it remained for the rest of the quarter. For the first few minutes of the second quarter the play centered around the fifty yard line. The School then fumbled a kick, thus giving the ball to U.C.C. who kicked from our twenty-five yard line for their fourth point. Upper Canada again blocked the kick. Ad- vancing the ball thirty yards to the ten yard line, they tried a drop, but it went wide of the bars and Padley ran it out to the fifteen yard line. A few minutes later Upper Canada scored another deadline, regaining the ball on a fumbled catch on the twenty yard line. Half time score: Upper Canada 5. The School 0. Early in the third quarter U.C.C. fumbled a catch and the School obtained the ball on the ten yard line. Vaughan tried a drop and got it away, but it hit the bar. Soon after, the School kicked from the thirty-five yard line and scored a rouge. The ball changed hands several times during the rest of the quarter. Cassels out-kicked New- ton, but Upper Canada made up their loss on the gains in the line. The fourth quarter opened with the School in possession of the ball on their own forty yard line. Wynn and Rogers made yards on bucks but the ground gained was lost due to an offside. The School kicked and Upper Canada had their first down on their twenty yard line. New- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Qi ton QU. C. C.l made a beautiful fifty yard run which was followed by a deadline kick. Upper Canada were off-side twice and their kick went outside, consequently the School had the ball on the fifteen yard line. Here the team made every effort to score. Vaughan tried another drop but it was blocked, however Powell recovered it. Then an onside kick was tried, it failed and Gooderham 1U. C. CJ got it and ran back to the forty yard line. Upper Canada. on their last down, kicked, unfortunately the ball hit Padley's foot and bounced into the arms of Wolfe QU. C. CJ who ran ten yards for a touchdown. The Schoo1's hopes again rose when Trenholme picked up the ball after our kick had been blocked and ran it down to U. C. C.'s thirty yard line. However the play was called a forward pass and Upper Canada had first down on the fifty yard line. A few minutes later. with only a fraction of a minute to go, Newton caught a kick and ran sixty yards before he was tackled by Padley just outside the line. Final Score: Upper Canada 11, School 1. The Line-up:- U. C. C.-Scrim., Lash, Douglas, Farlingerg insides Dellis, Gordon, middles, Powell fCapt.l, Symmesg outsides, Elmsley, Gooderhamg halves, J. Newton, Wolfe, Marteng flying wing, G. Newtong quarter. Welch. T. C. S.-Snap, Robson, scrim., Powell, Waldieg insides, Barber, Belly middles, Rogers, Wynn: outsides, Knox, McCloskeyg flying wing. Trenholmeg halves, Whitehead, Padley, Cassels max.g quarter. Vaughan ma. 1'. C. S. vs. PORT HOPE HIGH SCHOOL. At Port Hope, October 26th. As in the previous game with Port Hope the weather was terrible. The whole game was played in a drenching rain and ended practical- ly in darkness. The School did not play very well and only won by 15-7. In the first half Port Hope more than held their own with the School and were leading 2-1, thanks to some nice runs by their half- backs and costly fumbles by the School. In the second half Cassels kicked a point for the School after some nice bucking by the linemen. Soon after a Port Hope onside kick worked and the receiver ran 60 yards for a. touchdown, making the score 7-2 for P. H. The School recovered well, however, and Vaug- an ii. and Rogers both made touchdowns, of which the former was converted. Near the end of the game Cassels kicked two more points leaving the final score 15-7 for the School. jj TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T. C. vs. RIDLEY At Toronto, October 29th. Ridley defeated the School in its second Little Big Four game 19-1 at the Upper Canada grounds. The weather was extremely bad, the game being played in a driving rain which was reinforced by a strong wind in the second half. Ridley started the game by kicking-off. On the second play of the game Cochran made a nice gain on an end-run, and then Cassels kicked to G. Powell of Ridley, who fumbled on his 40-yard line, and the School recovered. Two plunges by Wynn and Vaughan made yards and Casfels kicked over the line to Francis of Ridley who was rouged. Soon after another Ridley fumble gave the School the ball on Ridley's 30-yard line. Cassels kicked what looked like a sure point, but G. Powell ran the ball out. In the next play Wynn made a beautiful tackle. However on the next play Powell made 50 yards, after a running catch, and put T. C. S. on the defensive. Ridley tried an onside kick and made a touchdown which was converted. For the remainder of the quarter both teams made little headway on line plays and resorted to kicking. Neither G. Powell nor Cassels had any advantage and play was kept around centre field. Score at the end of first quarter: Ridley 6. T.C.S. 1. At the start of the second quarter McCloskey and Knox made some nice tackles which halted the Ridley ball carriers for little or no gain. Ridley made another fumble on one of Cassels' kicks and Vaughan ii. secured the ball for the School at mid-field. Cassels kicked a long one and Ridley was offside putting the ball deep in their territory. G. Powell returned the next kick to make a slight gain and then a T.C.S. fumble lost them all the ground they had gained on this quarter. Ridley tried another onside which was again :uccessful and gradually worked their way up to the School's 20 yard line where another onside gave them a touchdown which was also converted. Score at half time: Ridley 12. T.C.S. 1. ' The School kicked off to start the third quarter. The field was now :1 sea of mud and the ball was very slippery. G. Powell made a big gain on an end-run and then kicked to Cochran who made a disastrous fumble on gi difficult catch, the ball going out of the field: thus giving Ridley possession on the Schoo1's 15 yard line. From here Rid- ley kicked another onside which was recovered by Rossiter of Ridley on the cindei track which surrounds the field. The referee counted it as a touchdown but in a conference after the game it was found that by U.C.C. rules the ball was out of play, so that Ridley only scored a rouge. Directly after they kicked another rouge after a TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q3 fumble on the T.C.S. line. At the end of the quarter Wynn broke away for a 45 yard run bringing the ball into Ridley territory. Scoze at the end of 3rd quarter: Ridley 14. T.C.S. 1. The play slowed up considerably in the last quarter due to the condition of the field, and the School often fumbled. Ridley worked up the field and scored another touch on a line play. The game ended soon after. Final score: Ridley 19. 'l'.C.S. 1. For the School Wynn played his usual strong game while Knox, Powell and McCloskey all tackled well. One of the features of the game was the great catching of Cochran in the backfield. T.C.S., of late, has had a bad reputation for backfield catching, and it was certainly pleasing to know that fumbles were not likely in that posi- tion during the game. On the whole the game was evenly fought. Line-ups:M s",T.C.S.-Snap, Robson: scrim. supports, Barber, Powell, insides, Waldie, Armstrong max., middles, Wynn, Rogers, outsides, Knox, Mc- Closkey, Trenholrneg quarter, Vaughan rna.g halves, Whitehead max., Cochran, Cassels. Spares, Newman, Reid ma., Braden, Padley, Bell. Ridley-Snap, MacKinzie i., scrim. supports, Goad, MacLan1ing insides, Bradshaw, Kingsmill, middles, Harris, Frichg outsides, Ros- siter, Noarfg F.W., Buck: quarter, Ripley, halves, Powell, Frances Owen. Spares, Orr, Smeaton, MacKenzie ii., Boterill, Stocking, Harper. 1 SCHOOL vs. ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE At Port Hope, November 4th, The School won their only Little Big Four game by defeating St. Andrew's College 3 to 1. The playing conditions were almost perfect, with only a slight wind blowing diagonally across the field. The School kicked off. After several exchanges of the ball, the School fumbled on an end run which gave S.A.C. possession on our 45 yard line. They kicked to the ten yard line, and a kicking duel developed in which Cassels outkicked Moffat of St. Andrew's to drive the latter back to their own territory, Wynn gained 20 yards on an end run and the quarter ended with the School in possession of the ball on S.A.C.'s 40 yard line. Early in the second quarter the School kicked from the 40 yard line, the ball landed on the five yard line and rolled over the touch line where Moffat of S.A.C. was rouged. The School sent two kicks behind the line but both times Moffat ran them out. However, on their next two attempts a rouge and a deadline were scored. Half time score: School 3. S.A.C. 0 I I 'Ill l'l" I I I s I I 5 'va f III inigw 'i'I I In I 'ill I!a2.!I!I! THE SECOND TEAM Z' cd CD i z.. cv P"'4 m O Ridpath R. New ll H. Peck mi E Godsha, 5 . in 6? m I HQ 2 SE Um 32 Reed T. Reid Ambrose D. 2.1 rc: ms: flnq, gfo UE M m 3 J. Cleveland 5 G Rathbone J. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD jf, In the third quarter the play was mostly in the School's half of the field, a.nd although S.A.C. tried very hard they did not get within our 10 yard line. Moffat and Padley both did some good work in running back kicks. In the last quarter the play livened up considerably. St. Au- drewis kept the ball in the School's territory. Allen tS.A.C.l made a gain of twenty yards, puting the ball on the 35 yard line from where Donnelly got away and made a touch. The play, however, was called back due to illegal interference when two of our second line defense men were drawn out of the play. A few minutes later St. Andrew's scored a rouge, kicking from the 35 yard line. For the remaining I"lVC minutes of the game the play centred about midfield. Final score: School 3. St. Andrew's 1. Trenholme, Powell, McCloskey, and Knox tackled well and Rogers and Wynn did some good plunging. Allen, Graham, Donnelly, and Moffat were S.A.C.'s outstanding players. The Line-ups:- T.C.S.-Snap, Robson, scrim. supports, Powell, Barber, insides Waldie, Armstrong, middles, Rogers, Wynn, outsides, Knox, Mc- Closkey, halves, Cassels max., Whitehead max., Cochran, fiying wing, Trenholme, quarter, Vaughan ma. Spares, Padley, Reid ma., Braden Bell, Newman. S.A.C.-Snap, Armstrong i., scrim. supports, Roden, Cox i., in- sides, Fee, Plaunt, middles, Allen, Graham, outsides, Gladman, Shoch, quarter, Parker, iiying wing, Donnelly, halves, Hughes, Moffat, Per- rin. Spares, Pipe, Hamilton, Mackerrow, Rowell. SECOND TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE FIR-STS At Lakefield, October 18th. The Grove had rather the better of the first quarter, thanks to Macrae's fine kicking, and were able to score a touchdown and a rouge. The School were tackling very well and had the better of the line play. By half-time the Grove had scored another touch and YWO rouges making the score 13-0. At the beginning of the third quarter Wigle ii, fumbled the snap back for a kick and then. recovering, made a marvellous run of 60 yards through the whole Lakefield team, finally passing to Newman who ran the remaining 10 yards for a touchdown. A little later. after a nice run by Cochran, Wigle ii. kicked a rouge to make the score 13-6. Things were running smoothly until Cochran and then VVigle ii. got hurt and were taken out of the game. From this time iwizi' s E a I al ex 4' U Q. S THE THIRD TEAM R. Whitehead F. Gibson R. West J. Cox Staunton T. F3 cn Of J H .2 .-. .-. .... cd CO 6 D. Russel :Ii on A E rn Li TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD jf on the Grove had everything their own way and the game ended with Lakefield victorious by 31a6. For the School, Cochran and Wigle ii. did some excellent broken field running, and the good tackling by the whole teim Wa: e pecial- ly noticeable. SCHOOL vs. APPLEBY At Oakville. 0:-toher 23nd. The Appleby Firsts defeated the T.C.S. seconds 31 to 11. Although the seconds held their own in the first half, Appleby overwhelmed them by much faster play in the second. Appleby kicked off and when first in possession of the ball took it over the line for a touch. It was converted. Appleby fumbled the ball on their own ten yard line and Osler picked it up and ran over for a touch. In the last few minutes of the first quarter the School made yards several times in succession and carried it down to the five yard line from where Armstrong scored a touch in the first play of the second quarter. Appleby then scored a touch on an onside kick and a few minutes later added a single to their score when they Succeeded in scoring a rouge on an unsuccessful drop. However, in the last minute of the quarter they did score a drop making the half time score 15-10 in their favour. In the second half only twelve men were used. Appleby were very fast, but the School managed to keep them pretty Well in check at the start. After trying a drop the Seconds kicked from the twenty yard line for a rouge. In the last quarter, Appleby had possession of the ball most of the time. From the twenty-five yard line they made yards twice and then their quarter went over for a touch. This was followed by a touch when Cochran ran forty yards before crossing the line. It wa.s converted. Jut before time was called Cochran made another beautiful run, this time from his own forty yard line, and scored another touch. THIRD TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. OLD BOYS, Oct. 15. Early in the first quarter Russel i. fell on the ball behind their line, after O'Brian fumbled. Shortly after, Baillie bucked for a touch, making the score 10--0 for the School. In the second quarter Cutten made a short run for a. touch, followed by a nice run by Whitehead on a pass from Ambrose. The first half ended 15-5 for the School. There was no scoring during the second half, the play being very even. QS TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The Old Boys' team consisted of: Spragge 1Capt.J, Cutten, Gibson, Staunton, O'Brian, Baldwin, Boyd, Doolittle, Grant, Trow, Somers, Stone, Roper and Bickle. SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. SEATON HOUSE SENIORS At Port Hope, October 18th. The Third team defeated U.C.C. 11-7. The match was well fought throughout, but the School seemed to have a small advantage. Baillie ii. and Staunton gained ground frequently for the School, while Ambrose ii. and Whitehead did some spectacular running. Cox and Russel i. also played well for the School, while James and Faulkner played well for U.C.C. After a good run by Ambrose ii., Baillie ii. broke through for the first score of the game, the touchdown being unconverted. This touchdown was followed by a rouge making the score 6-0. Shortly after the second half commenced Russel i. broke around the short end to score a touch, which was also unconverted, making the score 11-0. Later U.C.C. made a rouge, followed by a touchdown by James in the last second of play, the touchdown being converted. The final score: School 11. U.C.C. 7. SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. SEATON HOUSE SENIORS At Torolnto, October 22nd. This game was tied 7-7. It was played with twelve men, using the forward pass. The first quarter was scoreless, both teams hold- ing well. In the second quarter Upper Canada kicked a deadline and in the third Falkener scored two drops making the score at three- quarter time 7-0 for U.C.C. In the last quarter Whitehead ii. got away on an end run and scored a touch which he converted. At the close of the game Archbold kicked a deadline bringing the final score to 7 all. Holmes and Staunton bucked well while Whitehead ii. and Am- brose ii. played well in the back tield. Gelli and Falkener were out- standing for Upper Canada. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q9 SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Lakefield, October 29th. Under adverse weather conditions, the Thirds defeated the Lake- field Seconds in their first match 10-6. The School opened the scoring in the first quarter when Holmes scored a touch. Five minutes later Russel i. went around the short end for another touch making the score 10-0 for the School. Early in the second quarter Lakeiield scored, when Hepburn went over for a touch, after a long run by Dench. This was converted by Gunn. When the whistle blew for half time the score was 10-6 in favour of the School. It rained during half time and this slowed up the play considerably. There was no scoring in the second half. All the team played well in this game. SCHOOL vs. LAKEFIELD SECONDS At Port Hope, November 3rd. The Thirds finished off their season with an overwhelming victory. by defeating the Grove 40 to 6. The School opened its scoring with a rouge, followed by touchdowns by Ambrose ii. and Gibson, the latter of which was converted. In the second quarter two more touches were added, Baillie ii. and Whitehead ii. taking the ball over the line. One of these was converted to make the score at half time 23-0 f01' the Thirds. In the last half the forward pass was played. Two touches were made by the Thirds, one of which was converted. The Grove then scored a touch on a fumble. In the last quarter the School scored another touch, making the final score 40 to 6. Ambrose ii. and West played well for the School while the outstanding players for the Grove were Dench and Drake. FOURTH TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. S.A.C. "BEAR CATS" At Port Hope, October 19th. St. Andrew's defeated the Fourths 13-12. The School was lead- ing in the final quarter 12-8, but in the last two minutes St. An- drews scored the winning touch. The School opened the scoring when Reid iv. went around the short end and scored a touch which was converted. In the second quarter S.A.C. scored a deadline and a touch, which was converted, making the half time score 8-6 for the Bear Cats. Early in the second half VVhitehead ii. broke away and 'lFE54!QfE7f I I I Emwqft, "1 S K' s I.. lip T-1. fill r 55 1 k V 1 1 n sy :mg ,sg 'Ill'-Q25 ?' wig? THE FIFTH TEAM TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 scored the School's second touch. It was converted. The score re- mained 12--8 until Mclver of S.A.C. went right through the School line to .score a touch in the last two minutes. The Fourths played very well as a team, but McIver was the outstanding player of the game. SCHOOL vs. S.A.C. "BEAR CATS" At Aurora, October 28th. In their second match against the "Bear Cats" the Fourths were badly beaten 25 to lj St. Andrew's started off with a rush and scored a touch in the first two minutes of play. They failed to convert but three minutes later were back again over our goal line. Again the convert failed and before the quarter was over a rouge raised the score to 11-0. In the second quarter, the School managed to hold them to one touch, making the score 16M0. In the third quarter the Fourths kicked their only point but St. Andrewfs quickly retaliated with a single to make the score 17-1. In the last quarter, with the wind once more behind them S.A.C. raised their score to 25-1 with a drop and another touch. Although our line failed to hold the vic- tors, Ede ma., Reid iv., and O'Brien all played well. For S.A.C. Mac- Iver and Macoll were outstanding. FIFTH TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. SEATON HOUSE JUNIORS At Port Hope, October 18th. The Fifths won their first game of the year by defeating the Sea- ton House Juniors 32-1. The first half was played with 14 men: and the second half with twelve men, and the forward pass was used. Arm- strong ii. and Keefer ii. scored the touchdowns. The School completed two out of three forward passes while Upper Canada only got one out of eight. Passey, Ede ii.. and Truax played well while Fuller was U.C.C.'s best player. SCHOOL vs. COBOURG COLLEGIATE JUNIORS At Port Hope, October 19th. The Fifths won this engagement 39 to 0. One half was played with the forward pass. The Cobourg team was much the lighter and the Fifths had no trouble in smashing up their line. Armstrong ii., Keefer ii., and Truax between them scored seven touches, four of 33 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD which were converted. Cobourg completed two forward passes, while the School did not complete any. Armstrong ii. and Henderson buck- ed well and Murray wa.s outstanding for Cobourg. SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. SEATON HOUSE JUNIORSS At Toronto, October 22nd. The team started off very badly. There were many fumbles and offsides, consequently, Upper Canada was able to score two touches, one of which was converted, a.nd a rouge. In the second half Arm- strong ii., Henderson, Keefer ii., O.sler iii., each got a touch, and Truax kicked a drop and two converts, making the final score 25-12 for us. Truax, Passey, and Armstrong played well for the School. We did not try any forward passes, but Upper Canada completed one out of four. HOUSE MATCHES BIGSIDE Saturday, November 12th. In the Bigside House match the Bethunes overwhelmed the Brents with a score of 18 to 2, thus regaining the cup which Brents have held for 4 years. In the iirst quarter the play was very ragged, there were fumbles on both sides. In the last 5 minutes the Bethunes worked their way down the field to the Brent fifteen yard line, Where Kerrigan got away on an end run, and passed to Russel, who went over the line for a touchdown. Cassels failed to convert, and the quarter ended 5!0 in favour of the Bethunes. In the second quarter the Brents gained possession of the ball on the Bethunes one yard line due to a bad snap. The Bethunes held the Brents for three successive downs. Cassels kicked the ball up the field and the half ended, Bethunes 5, Brents 0. The Brents started off fast in the third quarter but due to a fumble in the back-Held the Bethunes got the ball on the Brent's 20 yard line. After making yards, Kerrigan on a trick play ran ten yards for a touchdown, which was also unconverted. Later in the quarter Cassels kicked to Cochran who was rouged. The score being 11W0 in favour of the Bethunes at three-quarter time. After the first two minutes of play in the fourth quarter, Cassels, after a beautiful catch made a 35 yard run putting the ball on the Brent's one yard line: from where Bell bucked over for a touch which TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 315 was converted by Kerrigan. The game lagged at this point. How- ever, the Brents managed to score a safety touch, after a bad snap. which Cassels missed. Later in the quarter Bell kicked a point for Bethunes, and the game ended with the score being 18-2 for the Bethunes. The 1ine-up:- Bethunes-Halves, Cassels, Russel i., Cox, quarter, Kerrigang snap, Reed i.g middles, Armstrong, Barber: insides, Newman, Bell, outsides, McCloskey, Knox, f. wing, Ridpath. Subs. Baly, Gibson, ,Peck. Brents-Halves, Powell, Cochran, Whitehead, quarter, Godshallg snap, McGinnis: middles, Rogers, Robsong insides, Braden, Waldie3 outsides, Reid ii., Rathboneg f. wing, Trenholme. Subs. Ambrose i., Baillie ii., Osler ii., Redpath. MIDDLESIDE First Match, October 3rd. The Brents took their first step toward winning the Middleside Football Cup by defeating the Bethunes 21-19. In the iirst five min- utes of the game Seagram i. and Baillie ii. -scored touches and in the second quarter Ambrose ii. also scored a touch. Two of the touches were converted. Kirkpatrick plunged through the Brent line and scored a touch which was converted, making the half time score 16-7, in Brent's favour. In the third quarter Passey scored a touch for Bethune House on a fumble. It was converted. However, the Brents quickly retaliated when Whitehead ii. made a touch after a thirty yard run. In the final quarter the Bethunes put up a very strong fight and in the last two minutes Russel i. went over the line for a touch, the final score being 21-19. Second Match, October 26th. This match turned out to be a 3-all tie. The Brents held the lead 3-0 in the last quarter, but Bethune House made a big effort and succeeded in making a safety touch and a rouge to tie the score Q In the first half the ball was fumbled behind the Bethune line where Russel i. was rouged. Corbett kicked a dead line. Just before half time the Bethunes almost scored when the Brents fumbled be- hind their line, however Ambrose ii. ran it out. In the second half the Bethunes started off with a rush, making yards five consecutive times. They failed to score and the Brents worked the ball down the field where Corbett kicked another dead line. In the last quarter 34 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD the Bethunes forced a safety touch, and soon after scored a rouge when Reid iv. was downed behind his line. A minute before time the Bethunes tried a drop but it was blocked. The final score was 3-3, Third Match, November lst. In the first three minutes of play Corbett intercepted a pass, and ran twenty-five yards for a touch. Shortly after Ambrose ii. broke away for the second touch which was converted, making the score 11-A-0 in favour of the Brents. Then the Bethunes kicked two singles ending the first quarter 11-2 for the Brents. All through the game the Brents had the margin, the final score being 29-4 in their fav- our. Ambrose ii. played well for the Brents, scoring three touch- downs, and Miller for the Bethunes. FOOTBALL COLOURS First Team:-Padley, Cassels max., Whitehead max., Vaughan ma., Trenholme, McCloskey, Knox, Rogers, Wynn, Armstrong max., Waldie, Powell, Robson, Barber. Extra Colour:-Cochran. Distinction Caps:-Cassels max., Wynn, Knox, Vaughan ma. Second Team:-Wigle, Godshall, Baly, Kerrigan, Rathbone, Reid ma., Ridpath, Braden, Bell, Newman, McGinnis, Osler ma., Reed max., Peck. Extra Colours:-Ambrose max., Cleveland. Third Team:-Ambrose ma., Baillie ma., Cox, Gibson, Holmes, Red- path, Reid iv., Russel max., Russel ma., Smye. , Extra Colours:-Miller max., Corbett. O' Fourth Team:-Archbold, Bilkey, Cassils ma., Curphey, Cutler, Ede ma., Fortye, Keefer max., Kirkpatrick, McLaren max., O'Brien, Seagram max., Stevenson. Fifth Team:-Armstrong ma., Annesley, Henderson, Howland, Keefer ma. Lowe, McFarlane, Mills, Osler mi., Scott, Truax, Smith ma., Williams ma., Morrisey. Extra Colour:-Mitchell ma. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 35 THE McGEE CUP The McGee Cup Competition this year Was won by Truax Who came iirst in both the Boxing and Gym. competitions and fourth in the New Boys' Race. The results were as follows:M Running Boxing Gym. Total Truax ..,.... ..,.. 3 10 10 23 Scott ........ 7 7 14 Starnes .......... . 10 10 Henderson ...., 7 7 Smith ....... 5 0 Lowe ........ 5 5 Southam ,... 5 5 Martin ,.... 3 3 Mills ......r........ 1 1 McFarlane ....... 1 1 Miller ma. .,... . 1 1 OXFORD CUP On Nov. 21st. Brent House defeated Bethune House by one point in the Oxford Cup race. Knox ofthe Bethunes won handily, complet- ing the course in 25 minutes and 35 seconds, but due to a strong Brent finish, his fine effort was of no avail. For the season, the going was good, being neither icy nor muddy. The teams and the individual standing were as follows:- Brent House Bethune House PoWe11 .............................. ..... 2 Knox ................................... ..... 1 Cutler ..... ..... 4 Cox ............. ..... 3 O'Brien ...... ..... 6 Ridpath ...., ..... 5 Seagram i. ..... 7 Russel i. ..... 9 Bilkey .,...... ..... 8 Newman ..... .....i.. 1 0 E 28 INTER-HOUSE SHOOTING COMPETITION The competition took place during the week of November 28th. Bethune House won with an average of 38.8 against 37.4 for Brent. The highest scores were made by Curphey, Rogers, and Wynn, each of whom made 48 out of 50. The averages show an improvement over the shooting of last year. 1 1 Linoleum Cut M. Cassils Linoleum Cut P. Lowe TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 Gluutrilmtinua Diary of Peter Perry Summer Term, 1870 It is not often we get the chance of picturing for ourselves a School boy's life of over sixty years ago. As in the flash of a movie there is suddenly revealed to us a fragment of existence that might easily have been forgotten. There are people still alive, no doubt, who can describe for us the early days of the School, but their descriptions, coloured by their years of subsequent experience, could never match the actuality of this account. Then, too, there is an exciting sense of eavesdropping, which we get from all good diaries. Peter Perry and his brother George were the sons of J. H. Perry. Esq., of Whitby. Peter joined the School in January, 1866, while it was still at Weston. In 1868 it moved to Port Hope and George Perry joined in January of the next year. When the diary opens Peter is just fifteen and George is twelve. The Rev. C. H. Badgley was headmaster, but he resigned at the end of the term and went to Lennoxville. He was succeeded by Dr. Bethune. The buildings at this period were an old-fashioned frame country house on the site of the Lodge, known as the Ward homestead, and the large brick build- ing down town, at the foot of Ward Street. In this last were the class-rooms and Chapel, while the rest of the life was carried on in the homestead. The diary is written very neatly in la, small note book. Because of the space it would occupy, we cannot show you all of it. The first entry is for Wednesday, April 27th., 1870. "Very warm. Went down to the station to meet Papa. George and I waited from 12 to 6.15 and he did not come. George and I took our meal at Mackies. Had a game of Prisoner's Base after tea. Half holiday." "Thursday, 28th. Very nasty day in the morning but got very nice towards afternoon. Mr. Badgley gave orders that we should all walk down together after this, because some boys Went down before the bell rang. Received 'Whitby Chronicle'. Dinner: meat pie and rice pudding. Went down town with George and got a School cap. George did .not get his. Did not say any Greek." Every day from now on Peter records the dinner, likewise on Sundays the length of the sermon. In the margins are his daily marks. "Saturday, 30th. Fine. Went to drill at 9 o'clock but when we got there instead of drill we played Tag, Pull-away, Leap-frog. I do not know why Mr. Bethune did not drill us. Got out of School 335 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD at 12 o'clock. Some boys went in and sung all the time after tea till study and made the greatest row out. Half holiday. Dinner: beefsteak and queens pudding." - This Mr. Bethune was The Rev. Frederick A. Bethune, younger brother of the future headmaster. "Sunday, May lst. Very hot. Went to church. Sermon 23 1!3. Dinner: roast beef, plum pudding. Did not take any plum pudding. Learnt how to mesmerise in one way. Mr. Bethune was not down to breafast, so I helped the beefsteak and kept the marrow bone for myself, and toast and cocoa." "Tuesday, 3rd, Very warm. We asked for a half holiday but did not get it. Dinner: mutton, apple pie. Got up at 5 o'ciock so that I could study my lessons. Got another bell down at the school to ring when the hour is up. VVe .said that we had not any French to Mr. Badgley and so he took us in Latin Verse instead." "Thursday, 5th. Warm. Dinner: mutton and roly-poly. We had no French to-day as Mr. Badgley did not come down. Received letter from home and also a parcel containing a pair of boots for George, two large cakes, bottle of Arnica, a prayer book and hymn book, and some postage. A shinplaster in Papa's letter for stamps but a I got some from Ma I kept the 25 cts. Perram major came back. Got up at 4.45 a.m. A new boy named Wallace from Peterborough came to-day. He had a brother who went to Weston. Received 'Whitby Chronicle '." "Saturday, 7th. Raining in the morning but fine towards after- noon. We went down to the drill shed but, as last Saturday, we did not drill but played Pull-away and Rogers dressed up as an Indian and went yelling around the shed. The Phisiog dresses that they had for the Phisiogs last year are kept in the drill shed and so that is how Rogers got them. We made Mr. Badgley give us discount on our pocket-money, although they take silver at par. George and 3 other fellows were going to get a licking, but Mr. Badgley let them off ...... " It appears that school caps were a new institution. Two boys, at any rate, refused to wear them and told Mr. Badgley "it spoilt their complexionsf' Soon after, one of them was sent home for his obstinacy. Peter was a keen cricketer and a good deal of the diary is taken up with accounts of matches. There were none with other schools, but they played teams from Port Hope, Cobourg and Grafton. "Tuesday, 10th. 'We had a cricket match between two picked sides. The side that I was on won by 13 or 14. Mr. Badgley gave the 'Evening Star' Cricket Club a set of wickets. The 'Evening Star' Club is a division of the 'Apple Grove' eleven. A new boy named TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 39 Young came to school from the States, abo.ut my height. I believe he is very clever. Because Coxworthy would not sing we bumped him ...... " "Wednesday, 11th. Rainy all day except a little in the afternoon. We had no repetition in the morning. Half holiday. Wrote a note in Georges letter home. Dinner: mutton and apple pies. We made the new boy tCoxworthy1 read as he couldn't sing, but as he would not read just when we told him we gave him a dose of Cod Liver Oil, hot tea, pepper, mustard and salt. It must have tasted awfully nice. Dunsford sang without getting a dose ...... " "Thursday, 12th.' Rainy all day. Dinner: veal and roly-poly. Did not take any pudding. Mr. Badgley's table did not take any be- cause it was so bad. Hubbell max. had a toothache and staid home. I lent him my Arnica .... Went into the Tuck Shop with Hubbell major who treated me to an apple pie, although I did not treat him because I do not spend any money at the Tuck Shop. The old Tuck Shop woman was awfully surprised to see me, as I had only been in once since the 2nd, March." The next day "Worrell, one of the prefects, asked for a half holi- day" and they got it. This was the present Primate of Canada. "We Qthe boysl got a new piece of music: 'I saw Esau kissing Katie'. It is a splendid piece." "Saturday, 14th ..... Went down and got a lock for my locker and got my hair cut. I also bought a glass syringe but the second time I fired out of it, it smashed, and so I lost 35 cents by it. Received letter from home. Went to Mrs. Shortt's to tea. Bethune, De Blaquiere, Ford and myself were asked, but Bethune and De Blaquiere did not go, but Ford and I went. We had splendid fun playing Dan Tucker, Chair Dance, Fortune Telling and Quaker's Meeting. Just got back exactly as the clock was at half past nine. Perram max. came back." "Monday, 16th ..... There was a iight between Price, Jonas Jones and Harthill. Price gave in, or at least said he was blown. Jonas got a dig in the teeth that made his head ache. Harthill got a Goose's Egg on his ear and head. Price got the nail torn from his thumb and otherwise injured. It was very good for Price in the knocking down part, having knocked down Harthill 3 times and Jonas once. Mr. Badgley said that we were to have a half holiday three times a week and to go into school at 9 a.m. So it was a half holiday to-day. Dinner: mutton and apple pies." "Friday, 20th. Very fine. Dinner: vermicelli soup and beef. Mr. Ford heard us French. We had splendid fun with him. Dr. O'Meara heard the Fourth Form their lessons. They kicked up awfully with him. In the afternoon he was not at school and the First Form 40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD who went to Mr. Badgley kicked up awfully, going up to the Tuck Shop and down town in school time and making the greatest old row out, Price and Jonas got caned by Mr. Bethune for kicking up with Perram tthe prefectl. In Algebra I got 'quam optime', 'as good as could be'." "Saturday, 21st ..... In the morni.ng went down with Stennett to see him get a tooth drawn. He took Laughing Gas and made the funniest row when he was taking it. He did not feel it come out a bit, as the gas had influence over him after it was out. In consequence of me going down with him I missed half my Latin. Saw Ned Bur- ton, who said he was coming up to the races, and of course I asked him to stay at our place." Peter went home for the 24th. of May, but was back again the next day. "Went to school but did not say any lessons. Went to church in the morning. Dr. O'Meara preached an extempore sermon of 10 minutes. Some new minister read the prayers. Our new master in place of Mr. Badgley is a very tall man and has awful large feet ..... " This was Mr. Harrington, "a tall, good-looking man," said Dr. Bethune, "with immensely long 'Dundreary' whiskers". He acquired the name of 'Spondee' on account of the 'two long feet' ". "Monday, 30th .... A match with the First Eleven of the Town. They made 52. Their largest single score was 17, made by Joe Hall, who went in first and Was not out all the innings. Our largest SCOFG was 5, made by Cameron, but we got 26 byes. Our total was 39, leaving them 13 ahead of us. Mr. Harrington umpired for us and Burton for them. The scorer was Worrell. Mostly all our boys were dressed in full cricket costume with knickerbockers, some with red or grey stockings which looked splendid on the field. Stotesbury max. caught two splendid catches at point. He fell flat on his face both times. A new boy named Angel came here. It was fun to hear the boys talk about him. One said, 'He will convert me.' Another, 'I think I hear the Angels sing'. Hurt my hand from catching a ball. It came awful swift." "June lst. Very fine. Dinner: roast beef, rhubarb. Had school in the afternoon, but the 2nd. division was only 20 minutes instead of an hour. The greatest rebellion that ever occurred here was to-day. All the boys except 14 stayed home from school in the afternoon be- cause Mr. Bethune gave Tuesday instead of Wednesday, when we did not want it to be instead of Wednesday. Mr. Bethune did not appear to notice them until tea. As soon as the 2nd grace had been said, he told all the boys to stay in the room, and then he called out the names of the boys that were at school and said they might go. Then he called the names of the other boys that were not at school and asked them if they were, and as each answered 'no' he told them TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 41 to go into the study. And then when they were there he gave them a lecture about playing truant, and then called Jonas, Harthill five, Dunsford, Hubbell major into his study and gave them all a caning. Then he called in the 4th. Form and gave them a caning. And last of all he called in Stennett, his own nephew, and told him he must cane him. But Stennett had sworn an oath not to take a caning, so Mr. Bethune said he would take a walk with him. When Stennett came out of his room into the study he was mad and said, 'Byk-, the damn fool wants to convert me. I will see him to hell before he will convert me.' So he did not take a caning, and Mr. Bethune gave him a lecture and said he Would report his case to Mr. Badgley. Mr. Badgley came down here this evening." Peter was a little diffident about some parts of this last extract, so he wrote them in a secret code of his own. But he made the mis- take of concealing surnames as well, which made it quite easy to decipher the whole. "Thursday, 2nd. Fine. Dinner: mutton and custard pies. We had no repetition as Mr. Bethune was not up in time. Mr. Harring- ton asked for a half holiday and Mr. Badgley gave it to us. Received letter from home. Nothing was said to Stennett . . . Meredith and I took Mr. Bethune's toast as soon as the second tea bell had rung, and as I Was putting it on my plate he came in and asked if that was the fine for being late. I said, 'Yes'." "Friday, 3rd. Very fine. Dinner: macaroni soup and beef. I am a darn fool, so Hubbell max. says. Hubbell max got mad with me because I would not look over his Latin. We had a circus in French hour. Some of the boys went for a swim and were late for tea .... Mr. Badgley gave us lief to wear our own hats instead of our school caps. Hubbell max. showed me his father's photograph. Gave my money for the games. Mr. Badgley gave SQ." "Saturday, 4th. Very fine. Dinner: beefsteak, rhubarb pies. Tilly gave me a pie. I divided it between Smith, Cameron and my- self. It was a very good one ..... Price had 23 demis and George 11, who, if Mr. Badgley had been well, would both have got a ca.ning. Price for 12 and George for 6. Some of the boys stayed up and watched last night to see who put the cows in the grounds. Mr. Bethune and Stotesbury max. took the lst. watch from 10-12, and then Smith and Perram max. from 12-2, and then Mr. Bethune and the man from 2-4, and then Harthill from 4-6. Harthill had not a gun, but the others had a double-barrelled gun for one of them and a rifle for the other. They were only going to fire them off to frighten the fellows, and then going to tie them and take them to gaol. But they did not come in, so they had their watch for nothing. Every COW we get we are going to milk after this. We have milked 42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 6 already. Harrison's boil is very bad. Had a splendid bath." Those were the days when baths were scarce, so Peter sometimes lets us know when he has one. A day o-r two later the hat question comes up again. Mr. Badgley "gave out that the boys might wear any hats they liked, but Monday's half holiday would be taken away and all leave to go to town restricted till Saturday, and also called Robertson a stable boy because he wore an awful large hat ..... " "Thursday, 9th .... Robertson went to school in the afternoon but not in the morning. Macklem says that he is going to be sent home for not going to school. Swan went out shooting and shot a good many birds, I believe. Ned Burton gave me the shirt front that I lent him in the holidays. Hardly any of the boys knew their Latin and Mr. Bethune was very 'angry'." "Friday, 10th. As Stennett and George were playing with a pitch- fork, Stennett accidently ran the pitchfork through George's foot just here, ldrawingl, and then pulled it out again. It Went right through his foot and stuck into the sidewalk. George did not cry at first but he did afterwards. Mrs. Marmion took him up to his room and bathed his foot in cold water. In the meanwhile Stennett and I went for the doctor, who, when he had come, dressed it and said George might go out on Tuesday. I would not believe them at first fthe boysl when they told me he had a pitchfork through his foot. We hada splendid treat, after we left the doctor's, at Stevens. Mr. Bethune gave out in study that the bell would be rung for getting up at six, and then we would have school from 6.30-83' "Saturday, 11th. The reason why we had school so early was because we expected to play Lindsay at cricket, but they went away and so we could not play them, and then we had a whole day from 10 a.m. till evening study. George's foot not better. I went down town with Stennett and had an ice cream and cake and a water at Stevens with him. I then telegraphed home, saying, 'George hurt his foot. Don't be alarmed. Let Mamma come down on Monday', but like an ass I did not put 'answer', so I suppose they will only think I am fooling and won't come down. We had terrible lightning and thunder in the evening. I was afraid and told Mr. Bethune that there was a lightning rod on the corner of the house. I promised to give Hubbell my pistol because he wanted it .... " "Monday, 13th. Fine. Dinner: Cold roast beef and corn starch. Whole holiday. Mamma came down to-day and went away again in the evening. She brought down some strawberries and cake. I and Pei-ram ma. went down town and had a treat. I got Mamma to give me a telegraph to take down so that was my excuse. We had our games to-day, which came off very well except one bad accident. Cummings in jumping the long jump dislocated his arm. It was very TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD -1-Zi bad. Mr. Harrington and Kirchoffer pulled it in again, and Harry Wa:-d ran for the doctor, who, When he came up, Set it and put 21 splint on each side. It hurt Cummings awfully. I was Dr. Dewar's fellow physician. That was all the accidents that occurred." Then fol- lows a list of the events and the winners of each. "Some of the prizes were splendid ones. Perram got for the mile race a silver cup, the gift of Mr. Harrington, and Hubbell max, second in the mile race, at splendid gold pencil case. Hubbell also got a match stand, very pretty. Perram max got a dressing case and a splendid riding whip. Cummings got an alarm clock and a razor. Rogers got two flasks and a pencil case and a cane. In the evening the prizes Were dis- tributed and the concert came off. It was very good. Bruce Smith's songs, the 'Life Boat' and England Yet' were the best. He sang both of them splendid. Miss Stotesbury and Mrs. Holland sang, but the funniest songs were by Mr. Harrington, who sang the 'The Twins', '50 Years Ago' and some others. After that they had a dance and went home together. It was a splendid day." "Friday, 17th. Awfully hot. Dinner: soup and beef. I got twined in my Euclid and have to say it tomorrow. Stotesbury asked me to spend the evening at his place tomorrow and not to accept any other invites. It was most awful hot to-day. We could not play cricket till after tea. Cummings arm better. George's foot worse." "Saturday, 18th. I went down and had a treat with Perram ma. Went out to Stotesbury's in the evening, and because some girls were there, Smith and I took French leave." "Friday, 24th. Very fine. Dinner: soup and beef. Did not take any meat as it was bad. Bought two quarts of cherries and one of strawberries with Coxworthy and Bethune. Coxworthy got sick but they did not make me sick." "Saturday, 25th. Very hot. The hottest day We have had. Dinner: beefsteak and corn starch. Half holiday. Bethune and myself got a quart of cherries and then we went down to get another one but the old fellow was awfully mad and said he would not pick them for us. I teased him awfully. Once he said 'What is the use of picking four cents worth,' fthey were 1215 cents a. quart. He meant that his share would be 4 centsl, and I asked him if they Were only 4 cents a quart. That made him awfully mad. I had a splendid shower bath. The doctor ordered one for Rose. It was splendid" These were tough times when shower baths were a luxury. The next day the cherries seem to have taken effect. "I felt a little sick and had to resort to Mrs. Jones pretty often .... " But the next day there were more cherries, and the next, and the next. They were also preparing for examinations. "Thursday, 30th .... Perram max., Rogers, Badgley, Ford and myself were asked to Stotesbury's, and got leave to stay till 12 9'clock. 44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD We did not think We could go at iirst as it was raining so hard, but we got off at last and spent a very pleasant evening. Had a very nice supper. We acted a splendid charade. The word was Spec-ta-tor. We did not get home till half past twelve." July lst. was ri. whole holiday. They played a match against the Grafton Cricket Club, and were beaten by two runs and one innings. "In the afternoon there were Kalothumpians and a iight on Pigeon Hill. I did not see either as I was scoring. It was a free day until 10 o'clock p.m. but Rogers, Perram, Ford, Badgley and myself stayed out till half past eleven. We were at Mrs. Shortt's and had splendid fun. The firexvolks were very good. There was an awful crowd in town. Got some cherries." The "Kalothumpian Parade" Was a fancy dress affair With tableaux on wheels and comic stunts. The "Phisiogs" were the people who organised it and took part in it. "Monday, 4th. Very fine. Dinner: veal and hash and rice pudding. Mr. Bethune was not at breakfast and so I helped the meat, but none of us eat it as there were only about 9,999,999,999,999 big maggots in it. But I had the toast .... " "Tuesday, 5th ..... I treated some of the third form in school to 2 quarts of cherries. The way I did it was this. We were alone in a room downstairs, kicking up the devil, and a little boy passed with 2 quarts of cherries in a basket. So I ran upstairs and got some money from George, and went down and bought the cherries. Stotes- bury ma. took half and put them in a paper and gave them to me, and he and I went and sat down to eat them. Just then Spondee came down and took the cherries that were in the basket, but I hid the ones that were in the paper, and so we got these after he went out ..... " "Friday, 8th. Very fine. Dinner: beefsteak and rice pudding. We were examined in History, Greek and Roman. I passed a middling exam seeing that I never looked at it .... " "Sunday, 10th. Very fine. Dinner: roast beef and pies. Studied some of my Divinity for Monday. We had raspberry pies for dinner. Mr. Bethune preached in church. We had no Divinity. Dr. O'Meara gave out that Frederick Alexander Bethune would be ordained a. priest if no person had anything to say against him being ordained a priest. So all the boys said that they would all write to the Bishop and say that he caned them when they did not deserve it. "Monday, 11th. Rainy. Dinner: mutton, pies. Had an examina- tion in Divinity. I did not do very well. Had no school in afternoon. Received letter from home." "Tuesday, 12th. Very fine. . . . And there it ends. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Football Song VVhen the last quarter's fleeting, Score against us nine to fiveg When it looks like a beating, With no hope howe'er we strive: Don't believe it must be so, That's the time to rouse and go! tChorusl Signals! Up! See the quarter go through for a gain of nine! Now the halves have made yards for a new first down' ' And the bucker goes plunging across the line! ! ! It's the last ounce counts, TRINITY. When the game's end is nearing, And the other side seem's crushedg Six ahead, no one fearing That our line may still be rushed: Don't be sure it can't go wrongg Play it out and finish strong. iChorusl Signals! Up! etc. There's a rule stands as beacon, Whether game or life be meant: In defeat never weaken, If you win, don't be content. Keen to conquer one more height, Ready still for one more fight. iChorusJ Signals! Up! etc. A Canoe Trip through the Kawartha Lakes, Summer 1932 Lines written at Bobcaygeon Wind, rain, and wind, in never ending train. We long to go ahead, but all in vain. An adverse fate compels us to remain. Wind, rain, and wind, the clouds are flying low. The sun may still be there, I do not know. The Moving Finger writes-"Thou shalt not g 0 46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Wind, rain, and wind, a brightening in the sky. I gaze above, and breathe a hopeful sigh. Perhaps it may be clearer by and by. Wind, rain, and wind, down pours the rain anew, And afterwards the wind comes bursting through, Ever against the course we would pursue. Continuation of trip through the forest to Algonquin Park, long portages, provisions running out, lakes apparently fishlessg a handful of oa.tmeal, a little tea, and a couple of bananas, all that remain. The Last of the Bananas O faithful friend! Of weary travellers the humble stay. O lump of squishiness! Thy golden sheen, Which gleamed so lusciously, with fruity mien, Hath given place to blackness and decay. A horrid end! Ah! hapless fruit! A well-filled dunnage bag has been thy home. People have sat on thee, wedged in the dark, 'Twixt hard-edged cans of Libby and of Clark, And finally the "coup de grace" has come, 'Neath someone's boot. I weep for thee, As I behold thee, flattened, bruised, and wang And for myself, since I must eat thee now. Thy skin can scarce contain thee anyhow. I close my eyes, a gulp, and thou art gone, Eternally. K.L.S TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 47 The Sleep Walker Part I-The Dream A death-like stillness pervades the hushed old county court room. Slowly the old Judge rises to his feet and procedes with the summing up of the evidence. "You have heard", he says, "The story of the accused: and you have heard, too, the damning evidence given against him. It is known that the prisoner was sole heir to the fortune of the deceased. We have heard the evidence of the housemaid who says that she heard a quarrel between the old man and his heir. Sir Walter-'s lawyer, Mr. Jones, has told us of his client's late visit to him, and of the intention that he had of cutting this nephew out of his will. Avid we have the cry that a zealous police constable heard still later on that same night, and the body which he found and which has since been definitely identified as that of Sir Walter himself. Finally we know that the accused was absent from his house at the time of the murder, and that he carried with him an old army service revolver, fully loaded. The rest I leave to you, Gentlemen of the Jury, and feel sure that you will see Justice done". He sits down and the Jury gather together their notes and file solemnly out. The courtroom buzzes with speculation. Lunch baskets are opened and litter themselves over the floor as the patient court-goers settle down for a long wait. Half an hour ticks slowly by before the little door at the back of the Jury-box opens to admit the solemn-faced Jury. Reporters tighten fingers on 'phones, and the talk which has been going on dies a sudden death. The atmosphere is tense. The Judge goes slowly through the Jury-ballots. . . he stands up. . . then solemnly stretches forth his hand for the little black skull-cap. Now everybody knows what is coming-yet nobody stirs a muscle. "Arthur Cummings, I hereby pronounce you guilty of wilful murder in the first degree, and sentence you to hang by the neck till you be dead". For one solitary moment the stillness continues. It is ghastly, as though Death himself had entered the room. Then the scream of the prisoner in the dock broaches the awfulness of it, and the room bursts into excited and overwrought chatter. The prisoner has fainted. Dumb reporters spring into rapid speech. The shrill jangle of telephones and clatter of typewriters, together with the banging of pushed-back chairs, blot out the court usher's cry. "Oyez, Oyez ....., " 45 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Part II-The Dream QContinuedJ It is a London morning, dull and grey. The crowd of loiterers and early work-bound roadmen stir uneasily in the road outside Maidstone Jail. It is time. In the inner court-yard, surrounded by a high wall is the scaffold: the little knot of figures draw back. The condemned man's lips tremble violently: suddenly he lurches forward and-held up by the noose which is to jerk away his life-sways limply from side to side. He has fainted, but the execution must continue. Somewhere a gong is sounded. The trap opens. Like a log the body drops from sight. Arthur Cummings has paid for his crime. Part In-Reality The chamber-maid at the house in Park Lane, finding that she got no answer to her oft-repeated knocking, opened the door of her master's bedroom. Arthur Cummings, the owner of the mansion, was lying in the middle of the floor, his hands around his own throat, stone dead! Small wonder that the neighbours were disturbed by a piercing scream as the house-maid swooned away. -W. B. R. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 1 A FOOTBALL STORY List- -en well! A strange hist- -ry I'1l tell. YoungAlbertChess So fat and small When asked, w o u 1 d say "Yes, I will play football." Ithink he is insaneg He'll never learn the game. He's out there every day each F a l 1, Trying in vain to kick the ballg No matter how he talks or boasts, The ball goes nowhere near the posts. But finally he gotabreak oneday: He was asked if he'd like a chance to play. At the mere thought of playing on those grounds When he heard this, he lost quite twenty pounds. Then came at last the fateful, hoped-for a f t e r n o o n But for our hero Chess it could not come too soon. He was out there upon the field an hour b e f o r e, VVith so much well-stuffed padding he could have no more. When whistle shrill began the game, he played halfbackg And any sort of f 0 o t b a 1 l brains he sure did lack. Right in the midst of play they threw to him the ball. And he did not know W h e t h e 1' he should run at all. Near their own touchline he was told to buck. Again he took the ball but had no luckg He hit that t h r u s t i n g line but sad to say It was the last f o o t b a l l he played that day. The ball, ten men, Chess in b e t W e e n, No arm nor leg c o u l d there be seeng His face in mud, he lay as deadg H e l p e d by two men, off he was led. Two bla c k eyes, arm in sling, For d a y s s a i d not a thing Chess no more can do: Methis Waterloo. Nowall day long He plays pingpong. "Puir wee lad" On the grid He did Bad. -R, W 50 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RE-CORD THE SCIENCE AND ARTS SOCIETY The following officers have been elected for the year:-- President, the Headmasterg Vice-President, Mr. Lewis, Secretary, Ede max., Treasurer, Ede ma., Librarian, Stevensong in charge of the dark room, Annesleyg in charge of the workshop, Pincott. A new section has been started this term through the kind assist- ance of Mr. Sly. This is the Archery section. It consists of a group of five boys who have erected a target and made a shooting range. They have become fair shots with bows made by themselves and arrows made by Pincott. During the winter the sport will have to be laid aside, but after Easter it is hoped to form a team .to challenge other schools or clubs. Mr. C. B. Cleveland has very kindly offered twenty-five dollars in prizes for a competition for the best set of six pictures of the School buildings. This competition is open to all boys in the School. As a result of this competition the dark room has been in constant use. In order to save some expenses in buying books individually, boys in the Honour Chemistry Set have joined the Society and use the books in the Library. Added advantages of this method are that these boys can read up their s.ubjects in more than one text, and also get accustomed to using a book and its index to gather information. A collection of Canadian bird's eggs, which was gladly received, was presented to the Society by Ambrose i. At present more interest is being taken in the workshop than in any other branch of the society's activities. THE DEBATING SOCIETY At the beginning of the term Mr. Wynn very kindly took over the Debating Society that Was organized last year. Thus far it has been most successful. During the term the Society has held the following four debates:- "Preparation of War is a guarantee for peace." The motion was proposed by Ede max., who was seconded by Stikeman. The opposi- tion consisted of Stevenson seconded by Reid min. The motion was carried by popular vote. "This House Is in Favour of a Tax on Bachelors." Mr. Parr sup- ported by Miller max. spoke for the motion. Col. Stevenson and Osler ma. formed the opposition. The motion was passed. "This House Believes That Loyalty to Humanity at Large is Pref- erable to Loyalty to One's Country." The motion was proposed by Stikernan, seconded by Vaughan max., and opposed by Nelles, second- ed by Ede ma. The motion wast lost. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51 On the last meeting of the term the Society staged a Mock Trial. This attracted a large audience. Although the case became a little involved, the performance proved to be very amusing. THE LITERARY SOCIET Y The Literary Society has made a very successful beginning this year under its new Vice.-President, Colonel Stevenson. Four plays have been read thus far: "The Importance of Being Earnest," by Oscar Wilde, "The Pigeon," by John Galsworthy, "Journey's End," by R. C. Sheriff, and "The Admirable Crichton," by J. M. Barrie. Before the end of the term it is hoped to read G. B. Shaw's "Arms and the Man", and possibly one other play. illllutrirulatinn iliriiuliff, 1932 HONOUR MATRICULATION Ontario iffompletei S. Ambrose, E. Armour, G. Bonnycastle, W. Broughall, K. D-RWE. J. Gibbons, A. Grier, E. Heighington, T. McConnell, R. Patch, J. Warden. Ontario 1PartialJ J. Barber 111, T. H. Bickle 1433 P. Cassels 1111 J. Cleveland 14l: J. O. Combe 1513 L. Cowperthwaite 111: E. Cutler 1531 E. Ede 1653 H. Ford-Smith 121: R. Grant 111, M. Gunn 1913 P. Hall 117, C. Heurtley 11l: W. Holton 1653 H. Little 171, W. Mickle 1213 H. Moore 1833 R. Nesbitt 131: Peter Osler 1533 M. Reed 1453 W. B. Reid 1211 G. Ridpath 1313 P. Roughton 1813 F. Southam 1413 T. Taylor 125: G. Vaughan 12xg F. Wigle 1713 K. Wilson 1613 P. Chevalier 185. PASS INLATRICULATION Ontario 1Completey T. H. Bickle, J. Cleveland, J. O. Combe, L. Cowperthwaite, E. Cutler, E. Ede, R. Holmes, H. Moore, R. Nesbitt, Peter Osler, M. Reed, W. B. Reid, G. Ridpath, G. Vaughan. McGill 1CompleteJ C. Deakin, J. Kerrigan, R. Newman, K. Wilson. 52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Ontario 1Partial1 M. Allan 1613 D. Ambrose 1313 P. Ambrose 1413 J. Annesley 1513 P. Bankier 1313 J. Barber 1313 A. Becher 1113 W. Braden 1313 N. Bridger 1611 L. Carling 1213 P. Cassels 1413 H. Clarke 1213 E. Cochran 1213 J. Corbett 1813 J. Cox 1113 R. Doolittle 1613 A. Dun- canson 1613 F. Ede 1811 M. Ferguson 1513 A. Fleming 1513 H. Ford- Smith 1213 H. Godshall 1213 R. Grant 1413 J. Grant 1313 P. Hall 1613 E. Keefer 1513 W. Langmuir 1311 W. Leadbeater 1413 H. Little 1113 S. Lockwood 1313 P. McCloskey 1113 A. D. McGinnis 1613 H. Mor- risey 1111 C. Nelles 1513 P. O'Brian 1613 Pat Osler 1313 C. Padley 111: J. Patton 1511 S. Pincott 1213 H. Powell 1913 G. Rathbone 1213 T. L. Reid 1513 J. L. Reid 1413 E. Robson 1113 J. Rogers 1213 Dunbar Russel 1113 S. Schofield 1213 D. Seagram 1113 D. Somers 1214 F. Southam 1211 T. Staunton 1313 P. Strathy 1613 J. Swaisland 1213 T. Taylor 1213 W. Vallance 1213 R. P. Vaughan 1213 I. Waldie 1213 W. S. Chadwick 1113 L. Brunton 121. Mc-Gill 1Partial1 W. Brainerd 1613 D. Browne 1813 A. Graydon 1913 G. Hyde 1413 W. Molson 11113 H. J. S. O'Brien 1713 C. Ross 1613 H. Savage 1813 W. J. C. Stikeman 1513 D. Thomson 1613 G. Turpin 1813 W. Whitehead 1213 J. D. Wood 1613 V. Wynn 1313 I. Rice 131. An analysis of the above results shows that of the Ontario Hon- our Matriculation eighty-five percent of the papers were passed. Of the Ontario Pass Matriculation seventy-two percent of the papers were passed. Of the Junior Matriculation at McGill eighty-eight percent of the papers were passed. In all seven hundred and eighty- five papers were written by boys from the School and of these seventy-eight percent were passed. VALETE Alden, J.-A-Remove B, 5th. XIV.3 '30. Ambrose, S.-VI. Form3 Head Prefect3 Bronze Medal3 lst. XIV.: 3rd. VII.3 Oxford Cup. Armour, E.-A-VI. Form. Becher, A.eRemove B. Bickle, T. H.sUpper IV. Form3 4th, XIV. Bonnycastle, G.-fVI. Form. Brainerd, W.eeMcGill V. Broughall, Wf VI. Formg lst. XIV. Browne, D.-eMcGill V. Burpee. Af Remove B. Carling. L.-eRemove B.3 5th. XIV.3 '30. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 Chevalier, P.- -VI. Form: 2nd. Gym. VIII. Clarke. H.-Upper IV.: 2nd, XIV.: 2nd. VII.: 3rd. XI. Combs, J. OfeV. Form: lst. XIV.: 2nd. VII.: Oxford Cup. Cowpezthwaite, Lf AV. Form: Prefectg lst. XIV.: 2nd. XI. Cutten, Wfv-Remove C.: 3rcl. XIV.: 2nd. Gym. VIII. Dawe, K- AVI. Form: 2r1d. XIV.: Ist. Gym. VIII.: 2nd. XI. Deakin. C. SfeMcGi1l V.: 31'd. XIV.: 3r'd. XI.: Chess Cup. Doolittle, RfaLo'.ver IV.: 3rd. XIV. Duncanvon, A.eAUpper IV.: lst. XIV. Ernmans, Rfeflemove B. Fold-Smith, H.-AV. Form. Galloway, D.ARemove A. Gibbons, IPVI. Form. Goodfellow, Cf-Remove A. Grant, Rf-Lower IV.: 2nd. Gym. VII.: 3rd. VII.: 5th. XIV. Grant, .I.sRemove C.: Ist. XIV.: Ist. VII. Grant, H. -Shell B. Graydon, Afe-McGill V.: 2nd. XIV. Grier, A.W-VI. Form: 4th. XIV.: lst. VII. Gunn, M.-V. Form: 2nd. XI.: Squash. Hall, P.-Upper IV.: 3rd. XIV.: 3rd. VII.: 2nd. XI. Heighington, E.-VI. Form: 4th. XIV.: 4th. VII.: lst. XI. Heurtley. Cf -Head Boy: 3z'd. XIV.: lst. XI. I-Iingston, H. W.-Remove B.: 5th. XIV. Hobson, I.-Remove B. Holton, W.-VI. Form: 2nd. XIV.: 2nd. VII. Hyde, G.saMcGi1l V.: 2nd, XIV.: 4th, VII. Lindsay, E. L.sShel1 A.: 3rd. VII. Little, I-I.-V. Form: 2nd, XIV. Lockwood, S.-Lower IV.: 2nd. XIV.: 2nd. VII.: lst. XI. McConnell, Tr-VI. Form: 2nd. XI. McCoy, G.-Shell B. Mickle, W.-V. Form: lst. XI.: Squash. Molson, W.-McGill V.: 5th. XIV.: lst. Gym. VIII. Moore, H.-V. Form. Nesbitt, R.-V. Form: 2nd, XIV. Nichols, C.-V. Form: lst. XIV. O'Brian, P.--Remove A.: 5th. XIV.: 5th. VII.: 5th. XI.: Littleside Gym. VIII. Osborne, J. W.-Remove C.: 5th. XIV: '30. Patch, R.MHead Boy: 3rd. XIV.: 3rd. VII. Patton, J.-Lower IV. Penny, A.-Shell B. Price, A.-Shell A.: 5th. Gym. VIII. 5.1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Pullen, J.NRemove C., 3rd, XIV., 3rd. VII., 3rd. XI., 2nd. Gym. VIII. Rice, T.MMcGill V.: 4th. XIV. Ross, C.-McGill V., Prefect, lst. XIV., lst. VII., 2nd. XI. Roughton, P.-VI. Form, 3rd. XIV., 3rd. XI. Savage, Hf-McGill V., Prefect, lst. XIV., 3rd. VII, 3rd. XI., lst. Gym. VIlI. Schoneld, S.-Remove A., 4th, XIV. Somers, D.-Remove B. lst. Gym. VIII., 3rd. XIV. Southam, F.-V. Form, 3rd, XIV. Swaisland, J.-Remove B., 2nd. XI. Taylor, T.-V. Form, lst. XIV., lst. VII., lst. XI., lst. Gym. VIII. Thomson, D.-McGill V. ' Turpin, G.-McGill V., 4th. XIV., 5th. VII., '3l. Vallance, G.-Remove B., Oxford Cup. Vallance, W.iRemove B., Oxford Cup. Vaughan, G.--Upper IV. Warden, J.-V. Form, lst. Gym. VIII., lst. XI. Wigle, F.-VI. Form, Prefect, Bronze Medal, lst. XIV., lst. VII., 2nd. XI. Wilson, K.-McGill V., 4th. XIV. Wood, J.-McGill V., lst. Gym. VIII., 4th. XIV. VVorthington, J.-Shell B. SALVETE Name Parent or Guardian Address Ackerman, J. F ....... ...... W . C. Ackerman, Esq ............. Peterboro, Ont. The Rev. H. T. Archbold ........ Toronto. Ont. Archbold, G. ............... ..... . Crump, W. R .,.................... J. Crump, Esq ............................. Toronto, Ont. Kortright, L. H. G .,.......... F. H. Kortright, Esq ....... ......, T oronto, Ont. Miller, G. W. ........... ...... G ray Miller, Esq ..................... Montreal, P. Q. Miller, W. B. ...... Walter Miller, Esq ................. Montreal, P. Q. Mitchell, J. H. ..... ...... J . H. Mitchell, Esq ....... Prince Albert, Sask. Smith, D. S ...... ...... M rs. M. C. Smith ................ Burlington, Ont. Smith, L. ......... ..... L t.-Colonel, A. Smith ............ Winona, Ont. Scott, H. J. ......... ...... L t.-Colonel K. L. Stevenson Port Hope, Ont. Stevenson, D. G ....... ...... W . B. Scott, Esq. ................ Westmount, P. Q. 'lbw' - f W ,g .. J. ul I 3. 12, h .. , 'rl rg -H, V IV J .. F?-. ' . Y' -, A ' 1 . , ' 4 . e ' 4. - Q 94 ' . Q IJ, I 1- ,- 'L ig., ' I I A 5 Y .V - ' n gf? J. V" 4- sf 'E -' .Q ' - Q ' . I . ., V . 1 h - I ' 6 ML' '. .P-.V sl I A , A H ir . N. Lo V . . I.. - . V lf' ,,..Iy . '-,f-"aa'e ,"-.4 . -' ' "' , 1 ' 0 A. ,V s V - af I , 4' ' , ' ' 1 -, . -. ,,, . 3 . .. , ' r I 1 ' .1 X ' 'v " I y ,' . . . Q. b YA .. JL ". J - J. ' i 1 -51 4: F K 3 X . W- , . , ' 'gl . 1 - -4 '-- '. .. 1- , ' ! '. -P . 'J f'1 -,,. Y, , - ., , . .Wx I U. U N A 1 .. 5"-as f f -, .:".'fn 'J - L '- s -- ' - - 1+ ,, ' - - I-4, . . , 4 Y N V. -, -. ' 'V "4-5:-iz'-. 1 ' , ff Y' ' '- 'ss 131 U11 - , .gs 1 r I -Q ' .0 ':- . .15 J - ' v Q Q ' I v ' "', o 4 V -ni ' r v '- ' a1'V V ' W :, u x . ' 4 . 1 53... 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Boulden TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 57 Elini Jluuiur Svrhuul lllvrurh THE REVEREND CHARLES HOWARD BOULDEN It is with very real regret, which is shared by all With whom he came in touch, that we say "Good-bye" to Mr. Boulden as a member of our staff: but his promotion to a wider sphere of work as Head- master of Lake Lodge School, Grimsby, is a well merited tribute to his splendid work at the School. He was the first man to be appointed to the staff when the pre- sent Headmaster took charge in 1913 and he was ordained Deacon in St. Alban's Cathedral at the Advent Ordination of that year. His work was largely with the younger boys and his happy disposition and infectious enthusiasm won him a place in the hearts of all boys and Masters. He was released in 1916 for service in France as Chaplain to the London Battalion, with whom he served until he be- came a Divisional Chaplain, which was another tribute to his splendid work and character. On his return from the war he came back to the School and carried on the work he had been doing before, until the Headmaster put him in charge of the newly formed Middle School which Junior School boys enter when they come to the Senior School. He was admirably fitted for this work and made this important part of our School life and work a separate unit impressing upon it his own personality. He gave of his very best in his leisure time to all the activities of the School and his help was very much valued in Foot- ball and in Hockey. When the new Junior School was built he became its first House- master and it is not too much to say that what the Junior School has been is largely due to his efforts. For eight years he carried on this important work and saw the numbers grow under his guiding hand. He was married in 1928 to Miss Dorothy Fraser of Niagara Falls, Ontario and this happiness which came into his life brought into the School one who has been invaluable to him in his work and a much loved member of the School community. We shall miss him particularly in our Chapel services Where his addresses to the boys have been so very helpful and we are quite sure that they will be remembered by those generations of the School who have been fortunate enough to come under his influence. The School cannot be quite the same without Mr. and Mrs. Boulden but we wish them every blessing and happiness in their new life and work and a very hearty welcome is awaiting them whenever they re- turn here for a visit. gg TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD JUNIOR SCHOOL NOTES ' Michaelmas, 1932, will always be regarded as the term of many changes in the Junior School. First, the loss of Mr. Boulden to the Headmastership of Lake Lodge School, Mr. Kenneth Ketchum to St. Andrews Mr. Wynn to the Senior School and Miss Morrow to Haver- gal, must have made the boys feel strange on their returng and no less strange must have been their feelings on seeing but four tables in use in the dining-room at their first meal. But, after two or three days, everybody had settled down to the work of the moment and our happy family was once more engaging in School activities with all the zest in the world. Our small numbers, however, have made many things possible, the subdivision of the boys into small groups for class-room instruc- tion makes for what is almost individual training, carpentry, draw- ing and music are receiving their full share of attentiong a class of mixed arts, like painting, commercial art, stencilling, making cuts in linoleum and modelling, is receiving instruction from Mr. Robert Orchard twice a week in school hours and at other times on half- holidaysg and on the field and in the gym. and swimming pool, coach- ing and instruction are producing quick results, since individual instances of the need of personal attention are easily singled out for improvement. Taken all in all, it is a splendid opportunity for all of us to approach the amenities of family life and instruction, and, if our bill of health continues excellent, the term should be a very successful one. This year, we prevailed upon the Senior School to include our Sports Finals on the "Big Day", and it is hoped that this arrange- ment will continue. At the moment of writing, we have great hopes of early skating, as the weather is right and the rink all ready for flooding. And are the boys keen? They see visions of having a good team, and, given suitable weather, they are looking forward to a very successful hockey season. MUSIC This term has seen a generous allocation of time table divisions to music. With new equipment in the class room, interest has awakened more than ever, and the singing has improved considerably. The younger boys have a rhythm, or percussion, band. and also practise rhythmic exercises to music in the gymnasium. Some older boys have formed a Junior School String Quartet. A movement by Schubert has been attempted. TRINITY co1.1.Ee.E scHooL RECORD 55, SATURDAY NIGHTS Once again the Kodascope has been called in to entertain us on Saturday nights, and from now on we shall be able to look forward to "movie shows" with some regularity until the return of the long evenings. On Sat., Oct. lst., Col. Stevenson, of the Senior School, entertained us with an interesting lecture on his experiences as a member of an archaeological expedition in Persia. After the lecture, he was detain- ed for more than half an hour by the bulk of the School who wanted to know more about cuneiform writing. The East with all its glamour was the subject of our second lec- ture, when Mr. L. H. Baker gave us an illustrated talk on the Delhi of pre-British occupation. ANNUAL ATHLETIC SPORTS On Saturday, Sept. 24th., We were enabled to run off our Sports Finals in the midst of the Senior School programme. The weather. though dry, was somewhat cold. RESULTS Open Throwing the Cricket Ball-1. Black C54 yds. 1 ft. 5 in.l: 2. Tippetl 3. Russel. Half Mile-1. Russel, 2 Tippetg 3. Black. 100 yds.-1. Cutteng 2. Russelg 3. Kirkpatrick. 220 yds.F1. Cutten, 2. Kirkpatrickg 3. Black. 120 yds. Hurdles-1. Russelg 2. Kirkpatrick: 3. Black. 440 yds.-1. Cutten, 2. Russel, 3. Black. High Jump-1. Cutten L4 ft. 2 in.Jg 2. Blackg 3. Russel. Broad Jump-1. Cutten Q14 ft. 3 in.lg 2 Tippetg 3. Russel. Sack Race-1. Mood: 2. Russel: 3. McConnell. Under 12 100 yds.-1. Hessey-White, 2. Landry, 3. Morrisey. High Jump-1. Hessey-White C2 ft. 1112 in.Jg 2. Landry. Broad Jump-1. Hessey-White 111 ft. 3 in.Jg 2. Stuart, 3. Landry. Under ll 100 yds.-1. Stuart: 2. Somerville: 3. Parr. QU? 'gf' ':w3r" V5 X v Q JUNIOR SCHOOL FOOTBALL TEAIWI .rt U 3 s.. an -Q o Di oi ci .32 O 2 DQ fd E bn .5 e 2 k. Ui fd cz O 4-3 U7 1: ,Q O V1 lj 2 cz cd .Q U1 S C5 O 2 O +6 4-7 Q3 Q4 E' F :ri oi gn CE O-4 'U P1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 151 Under 10 100 yds.--1. Stuart: 2. Parr, 3. Somerville. Championship Points Cutten 253 Russel 193 Black 12, Tippet 93 Kirkpatrick 7. Cutten is to be congratulated on winning the Esmonde Clarke and Mrs. R. C. H. Cassels' cups for the championship. JUNIOR SCHOOL RUGBY FOOTBALL The feature of this season's play has been the certain improve- ment as the weeks went on. Starting with only seven or eight of a suitable size and weight to play rugby, we gradually built up a team which was nothing if not keen. For most it Was their first year in organized football and they responded most heartily to the attention given to the elements of the game. They had no opposition for practice in the Junior School, but day after day they practised tack- ling, catching and interference work till it looked as if they would at last make a team. Accordingly, we arranged four games for the season, home and away with S.A.C. and Lakefield. Although we won only our home games, is it gratifying to note that the team made a great improve- ment in one short month, after losing both away games on Oct. 11th. and 18th., we won the return fixtures by big scores on Oct. 25th. and Nov. lst. Cutten made a very good captain and was ably seconded by Russel in the Work demanded of the team. HOUSE NIATCH It is interesting to note that nearly everybody was engaged in the House game. Owing to the fact that many of the boys were very light, it was considered advisable to play only one game. After three or four days' practice as teams, the Bethunes under Cutten and the Rigbys under Russel, they faced each other on Oct. 28th. in good weather. Cutten, of course, was a tower of strength both in defence and attack, and the Rigby's did very well to open the scoring and then keep within a point or two of victory till the last quarter, when Cutten settled the issue practically on his own. It was a good game from beginning to end with the newcomers making very few infractions of the rules. Final scorezv Bethune House 363 Rigby House 22. HQ TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The Teams Bethunesee Nation, Warner, Leather, Bevan, McGlashan, Stuart, Mood, Parr, Hasbrouck, Cutten, Hessey-White and Tippet. Rigbys-McLennan, Morrisey, Johnston, Morris, Fleming, Landry, Robertson: Fraser, Russel, Black, Kirkpatrick and McConnell. JUNIOR SCHOOL v. THE GROVE Oct. 11th. at Lakefleld. Our first game of the season was a well- fought, though scrappy encounter with many mistakes being made on both sides. Lakefield had the kick-off and for five minutes kept the play in School territory, their best efforts at this stage result- ing in a kick to the dead-line. From the scrimmage School made yards on line plays and gained on the exchange of kicks till the ball was in our possession on Lakefield's 30. Off the next play Cutten, from a pass by Black, went over for a touch, but the convert failed. lst quarter: School 53 Lakefield 1. In the 2nd. quarter the School added a single to the dead-line through Cutten, but Lakefield equalised before half-time by scoring an unconverted touch from open field running. T.C.S. 61 Lakefleld 6. Play continued even, with both backfields putting in some long runs. Lakefield followed up some nice gains With an easy 'COL1Ch. which was unconverted, and five minutes later Cutten again went over for a touch, which Tippet converted with a neat drop. At this point Passey was badly injured about the head, and had to be taken off, but the end of the 3rd period was called before further scoring resulted. T.C.S.12g Lakefield 11. In the initial stages of the last quarter, Russel, our quarter, had also to retire with a knee injury, and Lakeiield added two IOUCIIGS through the good work of Macrae and Dunn. However, School fought hard in the closing minutes to reduce the lead, Cutten at last buck- ing over for a touch. In the last minute Cutten was running hard for what looked like the winning score, when Macrae saved the day for Lakefield with a difficult tackle. It was a fitting close to Macrae's performance throughout the game, as he was here, there and every- where, shining in every department of the game. Final score: Lakefield 213 T.C.S. 17. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD fjgg JUNIOR SCHOOL v. ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE Oct. 18th. at Aurora. Our second away game again resulted in a loss, but the play was far more even than the score indicated and the School did well against a much heavier line. Both teams gave a convincing display and the lack of fumbles was a feature of the play. The School opened the scoring in the first quarter, went around the end for a 50 yard gain that culminated in a touch. St. Andrew's, with their heavy line plunged for yards almost at will and Mclierrow was sent over for a try that evened the count. In the second half St. Andrew's were more in the picture than ever and Adamson scored two touches and Morton a third, while the School could only reply with one. Cutten was closely watched all the second half, with the result that our lighter men could make no headway. For the School, Cutten kicked well and did some good running, while Russel and Mood turned in a nice game. Final score: S.A.C. 283 School 10. Teams : S.A.C.-F.W., Thompson, halves, Adamson, Jarvis and Mac- Intosh, quarter, McKerrowg snap, Reidg scrim. supports, Allenpack, Carrg insides, Archibald and Marlattg middles, Pentland and Morton: outsides, 1-iowan and Armstrong. School-F.W., Fraser, halves, Black, Cutten and Tippetg quarter, Russelg snap, McLennang scrim. supports, Warner and McGlashang insides, Johnston and Leatherg middles, Kirkpatrick and Flemingg outsides, Hessey-White and Mood. Substitutes: Robertson and Has- brouck. JUNIOR SCHOOL v. THE GROVE, LAKEFIELD At Port Hope, Oct. 25th. Again we were fortunate in having an ideal day. I11 the opening minutes School was in a scoring position but failed to score by inches. Play see-sawed and finally Lakefleld attempted a drop from 15 yards, but Cutten caught a Wide ball and ran the length of the field for a. touch. The same player re- peated from an end-run, Tippct converting. First quarter: School 11g Lakeiield 0. Lakefield came back with a will in the second quarter and good work on the line by Beverage and Dunn resulted in a touch by the latter. In reply Cutten circled the end for his third touch which was unconverted. Beverage then did some marvellous plunging to score Lake1ield's second. Just on half time School registered a single from a rouge. git TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Second quarterr-School 173 Lakeiield 11. After half-time play Was very even, both lines holding Well. There was no score in this period. Again in the last quarter play continued even until the last five minutes when Cutten in end runs with Black scored two touches, one of which was converted by Black. Final score: School 283 Lakefield 11. Teams: School--F.W., Fraser, halves, Black, Cutten and Tippetg scrim., Warner, McLennan and McGlashang insides, Johnston, Leatherg middles, Kirkpatrick, Fleming, outsides, Hessey-White, Moodg quarter, Russel. Substitutes, Robertson, Hasbrouck. Lakeiield-Pentland, Robertson, Beverage, McCrae, Peck, Pullen, Baxter, Norse, Dunn i., Dunn ii., Nixon and Bull. JUNIOR SCHOOL v. S.A.C. At Port Hope, Nov. lst.-Cutten kicked off against a strong breeze and S.A.C. had first down on their own 20, but were forced to kick. School made yards on two plunges and Cutten went round the end on the next down, scoring with a 50 yard run. Tippet failed narrowly with the convert. S.A.C. made a spirited reply, making yards several times, but were held to a drop. Just before the quarter closed Cutten got away again to score his second touch and again the convert failed. First quarter: School 10g S.A.C. 3. With the wind the School tried hard to increase their lead but S.A.C. were holding well. Eventually Cutten and Russel piled on two touches in rapid succession, the line making big holes in centre and left-middle. Black converted the first, but failed with the second. Half-time: School 21, S.A.C. 3. On resuming S.A.C. showed improvement with the wind and Adam-- son scored after a beautiful 60 yard run, but the convert went wide. Thereafter the School was seldom in danger, for Cutten nulliiied this touch with a beautiful run from his own dead-line. Black converted. Third quarter: School 273 S.A.C. 8. Again with the wind, School kept the play in S.A.C.'s half, and Cutten added two touches both of which Black converted. In the last minute he also added a single by kicking to the dead-line. Throughout the game Russel tackled very well and played a nice game altogether, while Kirkpatrick, Black and Johnston turned in a good performance. For S.A.C. Adamson and McKerrow were out- standing. Final score: School 403 S.A.C. 8. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 65 Teams: School-Fraser, Black, Cutten and Tippet, Russel, McLennan, Warner and Hasbrouck: Johnston and Leather: Kirkpatrick and Fleming, Hessey-White and Robertson. S.A.C.-Thompson, Adamson, McIntosh and-lw4-eg Mc- Kerrowg Henderson, Reid and Allenpackg Adams and Archibald: Pentland and Marlattg Rowan and Armstrong. COLOURS Junior School Football Colours were awarded to the following:- J. E. Cutten, B. S. Russel, W. A. Black, P. D. H. Hessey-White, R. C. Kirkpatrick, W. Mood, and R. A. C. V. Fraser. ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL Association was played concurrently With Rugby until the State of the ground gave the parent game all our attention. In the early part of the .term two house games were played, and Bethune House emerged victors on both occasions, by 2-0, and 2-1. After our final game of Rugby, the School was divided into "Sevens" and, with Cutten, Black, Russel and Tippet as captains, an interesting seven-a-side tournament was soon under way. The teams werezee Cutten, McLennan, McGlashan, Hasbrouck, Warner, Parr. Russel, Leather, Kirkpatrick, Fleming, Stuart, Fraser, Morrisey. Black, Hessey-White, Mood, McConnell, Johnston, Rougvie, Morris. Tippet, Passey, Landry, Robertson, Nation, Somerville, Bevan. The tournament concluded on November 29th. with the following standing :- Team Ply'd. Won Lost Dr'n. For Ag'st. Pts. Black 6 3 1 2 11 3 8 Cutten 6 3 1 2 12 8 8 Tippet 6 1 2 3 6 8 5 Russel 6 1 4 1 4 14 3 On Wednesday, Nov. 30th., Black's team played off with Cutten's, and after extra time the latter secured the verdict by two clear goals. UU TRHUTY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD BILLIARDS The billiard table has been in great demand throughout the term, and interest was added to this amusement when we conducted a tournament open to the School. The final was staged between Black and McConnell, the former winning by 25 points in a 100 up. VALETE Agnew J. L. Markham G. A. Castle G. V. McBride G. V. Goodger J. E. F. Pavey W. G. H. Hasbrouck L. Phillips D. MCL. Hodgson B. B. Wright W. R. Wright H. H. SALVETE Name Parent or Guardian Address Bevan K. W. A. ...... ....... A . B. Bevan, Esq. ................ Syracuse, N. Y. Rougvyie, C. N. ....... ....... J . Norman Rougvre, Esq ......... Ottawa, Ont. Stuart, J. R. ......... ....... A lbert J. Stuart, Esq ....... Westmount, P. Q. Warner, G. D. E. . .,... ....... G . L. Warner, Esq ................,.... Beacon, N.Y. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 67 QDID ilinga' Numa His Grace the Primate of All Canada V707 was the preacher at the service held in St. Matthew's Church in Ottawa on the occasion of the opening of the Imperial Conference. G. W. Morley V93-'OOD was appointed County Court Judge for the county of Grey at Owen Sound last January. He was formerly Secretary of the Canadian Bankers' Association. Douglas Neville V26-'31b is studying in the Engineering College of Cornell Universityg and Grantier Neville V26-'313 has returned to his studies in the Arts College of the University of Rochester. P. A. C. Ketchum writes to tell us of the following Old Boys who have called on him: Ames Howlett V25-'30r has been at St. John's School, Danvers, Mass. Reginald Howlett V26-'30s played on the Worcester fMass,l Academy Hockey team of 1931-32. Lawrence Harris V263 studied art at the Boston Museum School during 1931-32. Bill Burrill C263 was in business in Boston during 1931-32. Harold Johnson C243 is in business in Liverpool. Arthur McLong V163 who is practising law at Outlook, Sask., recently acted as chairman at a picnic held for and attended by Con- servatives from all parts of the Province, including the Premier of the Province, Dr. Anderson. "Geff" Bonnycastle C28-'32b is a "Zete" at 'University of Manitoba. This makes Dick, Hum, Larry and Geff all Zetes. Jim McMullen V25-'301 has had a great season as half-back on the Varsity intermediate team. This team holds the intercollegiate championship this year. "Taffey" Fyshe V211 has been star linesman for R.M.C. G. S. McK. Elliott f'23A'30J has been prominent on the Ontario Agricultural College team and played a big part in the victories over Loyola and Varsity II. G. Savage C28-'31J, J. Osler C22-'30J, and R. Wotherspoon C25-'31J have been playing well on the R.M.C. junior team. "Tam" Fyshe C'22J, Palmer Howard V231 and Don Byers V26-'30n were subs for McGill I. George Hees V223 Was snap for Varsity I this year. ADVERTISEMENTS THE TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION Annual Members S3 Life Members S25 .i The annual fee is payable in advance and is due on ,I2lllll2ll'.Y lst. each year. Life Membership ft-cs constitute the capital fund of the Association, and are invested in School Bonds. llifc Memliers, tlulrefore, help to build up the Associations capital und enjoy the privileges of menibcrsliip :it at very inoderzitc cost to themselves considering that the Annual fee would be 33.00. Honorary Membership Cwithout feel is grunted to those who make application therefor upon leaving the School. and remains in force until the following Dec-eniber fllst. All classes of Members: l. Ret-eive advance notices of School Matches and other School activities. 2. Are enrolled as subscribers to the 'I'.U.S. "Record". 3. Receive copies of the Old Boys' Directory. 4. Are kept in contact with the School and with each other wherever they may be. Assist in promoting the objects of the Asso- eiation. Commimications should be addressed to:- The Secretary-Treasurer, F. H. Rous lltl 4 harles St, XY. 'l'or'outo 5. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 69 At the Royal Winter Fair Horse Show, Lieutenant Marshall Cle- land Q'26l, riding Roxana, took tirst place in the international officers' competition. In the "touch and out" event, Lieutenant Cleland took second place on Sundart, after two jumps off. Douglas Cleland took first and second places in the junior jumping stakes. The London Times records that G. H. Johnson V241 played well and scored a goal in the Hockey match between Oxford and Germany. Richard C. Howell C'74r holds an important position with the New York Realty Company at Butte, Montana. William E. Osler l'22H'26b is now a reporter on the staff of the Winnipeg Evening Tribune. "Enthusiastic horseman, married 1930, has red-headed baby daughter and is now mourning the loss of a Spaniel," writes Chas. T. Nichols. T. E. Nichols t'l9i'24l is on leave of absence from the reporting staff of the Vancouver Province and at present attending the London School of Economics. C. F. Gwyn V21-'26j is now secretary to the Superintendent of Canadian Pacific Railway in Saskatoon. A. A. Harcourt Vernon V095 was elected President of the Fellow- ship of the West, Diocese of Toronto, at the Annual Meeting held on November 2nd. 1932. Col. H. C. Osborne, C.M.G. V889 is Honorary Director of the National Theatre Movement in Canada started through the influence of H. E. the Governor General. J. H. F. Lithgow 0055, Vice-President and General Manager of the Manufacturers Life Insurance Company, has been elected Pre- sident of the Canadian Life Insurance Officers' Association. "Hans" Grylls U08-'12J, who is Assistant General Superintendent of the East Chicago plant of the Grasselli Chemical Company, writes that he has a wife, a daughter Q65 and a son C31 and continues: "If any Old Boys get to Chicago I would like to hear from them ..... I still have a couple of ambitions: ill to see T.C.S. win another Little Big Four championship: 123 to play in an Old Boys' cricket match." Notes from A. W. Jones 0205, Fort William, Ontario: Sam Young C'20l is at present visiting his family, having return- ed from Calgary. Harry Tuckwell C121 is in the wholesale lumber business. Harold Penhorwood C183 is doing engineering work and is also a manufacturers' agent. 'ffl TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Wray Jones is managing the McColl Frontenac Oil Company's new plant in Fort William. Norman N. DeWind V293 is in Labrador. His mother writes to Lt.-Col. Langmuir: "He went to Labrador for the summer to Work at the Grenfell Mission. He has had a wonderful experience and writes most enthusiastically of the work of the Mission. When Sir Wilfred Gi-enfell was on the coast a few weeks ago, he offered my son a post for a year, so he will not be back for some time. Though this is an interruption of his college work, he felt it was too great an opportunity to miss." The following Old Boys entered Trinity College, Toronto, from the School this September:-E. Armourg E. Heighingtong T. McConnellg W. Broughallg S. Ambroseg J. VVarden1 J. Gibbons: M. Gunng H. Moore, J. Becher. The following boys entered McGill University:AR. Patchg F. Wigleg A. Grier: P. Chevalier: S. Deaking H. Savage. K. Wilson entered Cornell Universityg F. Southam entered Mc- Master Universityg F. Douglas entered Emmanuel College, Cam- bridgeg J. Irvine is at Trinity College, Cambridgeg R. Ritchie is at Lincoln College, Oxford: and G. Johnson is at Merton College, Oxfordg H. Sugarman is at Balliol College, Oxford: R. Douglas is at Christ's College, Cambridge. R. P. Jellett V929 writes that: "- - - as a Governor of the School I spent two and a half days at the School in November and made as thorough an inspection as time would permit of all the premises and departments of the School and of the inside and outside doings of the boysg I was thoroughly pleased With everything that I saw and went away more convinced than ever of the high ideals of the School, the comfort and progress of the boys in form and in physical develop- ment, and confirmed in my belief that T.C.S. offers the boy an in- teresting, full and instructive life with many splendid features which he cannot get at even the best of the public and high schools of the country." TRDUTY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T1 BIRTHS Cassels-In Toronto, on November 20th., to Mr. and Mrs. Graham Cassels, a daughter. Croll-On November 17th., to Dr. and Mrs. L. Duncan Croll of Saskatoon, Sask., a daughter. DEATHS Ly0I1-On November llth., at Montreal, Laurance Lyon. Macqueen-On October 7th., at Toronto, Frederick William Macqueen. Smart-On June 17th., John Elias Smart, at Port Hope. EXCHANGES "Acta Ridleiana", Bishop Ridley College, Ontario. Acta Ludi", Oshawa High School, Oshawa, Ont. "Ashburian", Ashbury College, Ottawa. 'The Albanian", St. Alban's, Brockville. Bishop's College School Magazine", Bishopls College School, Lennoxville. 'Bishop Strachan School Magazine", Bishop Strachan School, Toronto. "The Black and Red", University School, Victoria, B.C. "The Black and Gold", St. John's College, Winnipeg. "Blue and White", Rotliesay Collegiate School, Rothesay, N.B. "The College Times", Upper Canada College, Toronto. "The Glenalmond Chronicle", Trinity College, Glenalmond, Perthshire, Scotland. "The Grove School Magazine", Lakefield, Ont. "The I-Iarrovian", Harrow School, England. "The Trinity University Review", Toronto, Ontario. "High School of Quebec Magazine", High School, Quebec. "Lower Canada College Magazine", Lower Canada College, Montreal. "The Oakwood Chronicle", Oakwood Collegiate, Toronto. "Vox", Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby, Ont. "The Raven", Ravenscourt School, Winnipeg, Man. "R.M.C. Review", Royal Military College, Kingston. "St. Andrew's College Review", St. Andrew's College, Aurora. "The Mitre", University of Bishop's College, Lennoxville, P. Q. "Vancouver Tech", Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver, B.C. "VVindsorian", King's College School, Windsor, N.S. A "ic "" b : . Q 'IV if '- ' -Lg. ' 412' ,?f . I . f' A 4. IW' 5 I. -. hi I I A 4- 4' . . - , V. ' L. "V L . ' ' A., . I -4 E A -n -.C A 5 . .wh 1 D" - o - r ' - , dx- -xv , o u -.-, l 1' I I I 1 , f . . . I for U g L v' o lb I Q A A fl .W :L ' ' .I gi 1 v , , ' - Q .,,r ' .- ,. V G 'J ADVERTISEMENTS TRINITY CGI .I .F.CF. In the University of Toronto TRINITY COLLEGE, FEDERATED WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, AND NOW REMOVED TO QUEEN'S PARK, IS ONE OF THE ARTS COLLEGES OF THE UNIVERSITY AND INCLUDES 1. A Faculty of Arts providing instruction for students in classes of limited size in all subjects taught by the Colleges. 2. The full advantages of Federation with the University, instruction by its Professors, qualification for its Scholarships and Degrees, use of its Library. Laboratories and Athletic faculties and membership in Hart House. 3. A Faculty of Divinity in which Trinity exer- cises its University powers of conferring degrees, and prepares candidates for the ministry of the Church. 4. Residences under College regulations for men --"Trinity House", and for Women students-"St. Hilda 's"g also for members of the academic staff. 5. The Scholarships offered by the College have recently been revised and largely increased. Full particulars will be supplied on request. 6. The Reverend F. A. Bethune Scholarship and the Professor William Jones Scholarship are open only to boys from Trinity College School. For information concerning Scholarships, Exhibi- tions, Bursaries. etc. address: The Registrar, Trinity College, Toronto 5. ADVERTISEMENTS COLLEGE OUTFITTERS IN Clothing and Furnishings BOYS', YOUTHS' AND YOUNG MEN'S SIZES 7 5 Q, , - , lf I 5 r m, 1444 ST. CrA'Tgli:li:?EfESLT-EET WEST DACK'5 "Bond Street" 51-IQES Now 58.75 Noxx', at fr big snvirig, you can buy DaCk's "Bond Street" shoes for sc-howl, dress and sports wear. Included at this now. low price, are the Scotch grain model, and the Iwtff-1 "IZ::1on1u1"t golf shoe. BOYS' SHOES AT 37.50. DACK'S SHOES FOR MEN TCFDOKJTO 'SHVWVS - Lf'-f-Y o 46P E c ADVERTISEMENTS It all depends on your OUTLOOK The boy who thinks a dollar is not worth saving becomes the man who thinks a hundred dollars is not worth saving, and he usually ends where he beganathat is, with nothing." A Bank of Montreal savings ac count into which you deposit regularly will help you realize the true value of a dollar saved BANK oi: MoNT1u5AL Established 1895 ELMES HENDERSON 'E SON REAL ESTATE 'QQ INSURANCE Royal Bank Bldg. 10 King St. East, Toronto. Glnrpnraiinn nf Irinitg Qtnllrgv Svrhnnl VISITOR: The Moet Nov. the iXl'i'illliSil01J of Toronto. GOVERNING BODY EX-Of f icio Members The t,'il2lll1'l'iiUl' of 'l'1'i11i1,v lfiiivcrsity. The Nov. the l'1'ox'ost of 'Ii1.'il1ii.X' College. lf. S. Nlzu-Innes. Hsq.. K.l.'.. MILD., Trinity Uollege .... Toronto The R4-V. I". iil'2lll2llll Orclmrd, MA.. DD-, Heaclinaster of the Stillllli. Elected Members 'l'l11- Hon. Mr. -I usticc H. M. llennistoun, C.B.E.,LL.D.,NVi11l1ilJCg' llis Hon. -lumlgv ll. A. Ward .................... Port Hope li. P. -Iellett, lisq. ............ .. Montreal Ii. II. lialmlwin. Esq. ........ Toronto lf. Gormlon Hsler, Esq. ......... Toronto 43. 13. Strathy. Esq., BLA., K.C., ..... Toronto The Rev. U. Rigby, MA., LILD. ....... ......... P ort Hope CIZIPQIICC A. H0g'L'I't, Esq. .......................... Toronto iil'iLl'2l4iit'l'-Gf'IIl'l'ili G. S. 1'artwright, CB., C.M.G. .... Toronto Norman St'2lQ.L'l'2llll. Esq. ............................ Toronto -I. V. xI21.X'll2ll'fi. Esq., M.D. .... ............... . .. Toronto Percy lla.-mlcrsoxl, Esq. ........................... Toronto liieutf-1laiit-Goin-1'z1l Sir A. C. Macdon-ell, K.C.B. ,,.. Kingston The Hon. Mr. Senator G. H. Barnard ......... Victoria, B. C. A. .X. ii2ll'K'1lIll'i Vernon, Esq. .............. ...... T oronto Elected by the Old Boys R. V. ll. Vassvls. Em., KF. ............... Toronto Dudley Dawson, Esq. ..... ..... T oronto S. Dllllllblliill ............ .... I Tamilfrm Iriniig Qlnllvgr Svrhnnl Qivrnrh EDITORIAL STAFF. Editor ..........,............ ............................................ E . Cutler Assistant Editor ....... ---..-- W - B- Held Sports Editor ........ ....... J . V. Kerrlgan Committee ....,.. -'----- F - E99 F. Smye R. Keefer Junior School Record ....,..........,.. ......- M I2 W- Ogle Adviser and Business Manager ..... ....... M r. D. Kermode Parr CONTENTS. Page Ediroiiai r...rr,...,,.r.,.,.,..4 . ....4...,......,.......... ....... 1 The Chapel ............,.4....... -'-' 2 Music in the School .....r --e- A3 School Notes ...r...,....,.. ---' -J New Colours ...,............. ---- 4 Lecture on Aviation ...........,,. Hockey ..,.r......r.,..,.....,....,.,........,..i First Team Characters ,.,. Bigside .............,............,.,., Middleside ...,.............,.... Third Team Matches ..,.r Littleside .,....,,................ Fifth Team Matches ....... House Matches ........,... Hockey Colours ..,..,,.. Visit to Montreal ........ . Boxing Competition ...... Squash Racquets ......... Shooting ..........,......,...., Life-Saving ..,..,..,................ The Debating Society ..... The Music Club ................. The Literary Society .......... Science and Arts Society ....... Chess Club ......................,..... "Russian Rhapsody" ...... . "The Sucker" .................................,...... .. "Day Dreams" .......,.........,...............,........ "Three Spankers Went A-Breaking" .... . Form List ................................................. Valete ................................... ...... Junior School Record ...,....... Old Boys' Notes .........................,...................... T.C.S. Old Boys' Association ........................,.. Old Boys' Association Dinner in Montreal ...... Dinner in Toronto .........,,............................ Correspondence ................................................ Births, Marriages and Deaths ...... Exchanges ..........,...............,............ -1 -1 0 8 17 17 19 19 21 23 24 27 30 31 31 32 32 33 33 33 34 35 37 38 39 39 41 47 49 51 52 54 55 56 iilriinitg Qlnllrgv Svrhnul. 331111 Bmpr. ESTABLISHED 1865. Head Master REV. F. GRAHAM ORCHARD, M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge, D.D., Trinity College, Toronto. Chaplain, Bromsgrove School, England, 1903-1906: Head Master St. Alban's Brockville, 1906-1913. House Masters S. GELDARD, Esq., B.A., Trinity College, Cambridge. LT.-COLONEL C. GOODDAY, Aidenham School, England. Assistant Masters The REV. R. S. TIPPET, B.A., McGill University, Montreal. A. C. MORRIS, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N. S. P. H. LEWIS, Esq., B.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. E. W. MORSE, Esq., Queen's University, Kingston. D. KERMODE PARR, Esq., B.A., London University. LT.-COL. K. L. STEVENSON, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., NVoolwich. C. N. WYNN, Esq., B.A., Keble College, Oxford. Ellie Zluninr Svrhuul House Master W. OGLE, Esq., M.A., Glasgow University. Assistant Masters W. H. MORSE, Esq. H. G. JAMES, Esq., Leeds University. Lady Assistant MISS B. S. SYMONDS. Music Master A. B. SLY, Esq., L.R.A.M. Performers' Diploma, Associate in Music, University of Reading Drawing Master G. T. SCLATER, Esq., A.O.C.A., Diploma at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto. Physical Instructor for All Schools SERGEANT-MAJOR J. BATT, Royal Fusiliersg late Physical Instructor at R.M.C., Kingston. Irinitg Qlnllrgr Svrhnnl 'ifwrnrh iihitnrial We are very sorry to say that the Headmaster is retiring this June. The announcement of his resignation in January came as a great surprise to all of us. Dr. Orchard, in the past twenty years, has guided the School through some of the most serious crises in its history. He has become endeared to all those who have been under him here. Both the School and Old Boys will deeply regret his leaving. The weather this year permitted a certain amount of hockey to be played on the town rink. For a few weeks there was ice on the School rinks. The iirst team, in spite of restricted practice, had a very successful season. A break in the work was enjoyed by the whole School in the trip to Montreal which came at mid-term. This was the first time the School had given a gym. display in Montreal. The Hockey team played, also for the first time, Bishop's collage School, Lower Canada College, and Ashbury College. The hockey results on the tour were not as good as had been hoped, but the Gym. show, mainly through the Sergeant-Major's efforts, was a huge success. It was, in fact, such a success that Old Boys and friends of the School in Toronto want a similar show there. The School wishes to thank those in Montreal who made the trip possible. Q TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Ellie Gllmprl Since the last issue of the "Record" We have received visits from the following Clergy: February 12th.,-The Reverend A. G. Emmett, Rector of St. Joh.n's Church, Port Hope. March 12th.,eThe Reverend Dr. Hiltz, Secretary, G.B.R.E. March 19th.,WThe Reverend Dr. Mackenzie, Headmaster, "The Grove", Lakefield. The object of Dr. Hiltz's visit was to acquaint the School with the measures being taken to restore the Lost Funds of the Western Canadian Church. This was a very timely visit as it has informed the School of the situation in good time before the appeal which is being made for funds next month, and we have no doubt that the School will make a very worthy response by regular offerings how- ever small on the part of individual members. We are very grateful to Colonel Goodday for the gift of green silk markers for use in the Chapel Bible and Office Books. The Offertories have amounted to 5597.165 included in this amount was the sum of 321.19 collected at the Carol Service on the Sunday before Christmas. Just before Christmas cheques were sent for the following amounts: Children's Aid, Pozt Hope ..,.,. ........ S 10.00 Port Hope Hospital ........,........, ..... 1 0.00 Boys' Home, Toronto ..... ..... 1 0.00 Muskoka Hospital ..,......,,,.. ..... 1 0.00 Sick Children's Hospital ..... ..... 1 0.00 M. S. C. C. ............................ ..... 1 0.00 Widows and Orphans ........... ............ ..... 1 0 .00 illlluair in Uhr Srhnnl The Song Recital by Mr. Hubert Eisdell on January 24th was very much enjoyed. The programme had been chosen with splendid discretion. It included nothing unsuitable for the inexperienced listeners, though much that was interesting to the musical members of the School. The programme ranged from Elizabethan to modern English lyrics, with arias by Bach and Handel, and some Schubert lieder. On March 21st. a very interesting programme was provided by TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .1 Strathy, Barber and Cleveland, pianists: McCloskey, violinist, and Annesley, flautist. The following works were played: a Haydn Symphony as a piano duet, an arrangement for two pianos and violin of Percy Grainger's "Spoon River", and trios for flute. violin and piano by Bach and Gluck. On April 4th. Scott Malcolm and Reginald Godden will give a recital of music for two pianos. The works to be played are: Saint Saens: Variations on a Beethoven theme, Rachmaninov: Serenade. Bach: Organ Toccata i.n F, Delius: Dance Rhapsody, Danse llfiizcabxe and other modern pieces. SCHOOL NOTES. E. Robson and W. Padley have been appointed School Prefer-ts. Senior Privileges have been awarded to J. Rogers, NV. Vaughan M. Reed, and P. McCloskey. v V. Wynn was elected Captain of Hockey. Baillie ma. was elected Captain of Brent House. R. Whitehead ma. was elected Third Team Captain. R. Keefer ma. was appointed Captain of the Fifth Team. D. Wigle was elected Captain of Cricket. W. Vaughan ma. was elected Captain of Bethune House. It is expected that His Excellency the Governor General will visit the School on Inspection Day, May 8th. A play, "Tons of Money" is to be put on next Term and the re- hearsing of parts has been going steadily ahead all Term. Cricket began early in March in the Gym. This indoor cricket is popular and we may safely forecast a good season. The middle of the Term saw some enthusiasm for Basketball but the one game with a team from the High School ended rather disastrously for us. Since then the game has faded into the back- ground. Towards the end of Term a new rule was made allowing boys, subject to certain restrictions, to go dovsm to the Movies on Satur- day nights. We need hardly say that this rule was well received. A Billiard Tournament has been started and is on its way to completion. A Swimming Team is being formed and it is hoped that suf- Iicient interest may be gained for the formation of a VVater Polo Club. The Gym. Eight competitions will be held during the week of April 2nd. I TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD NEW COLOURS A new system of team colours has been adopted. First team colours in Rugby, Hockey, and Cricket remain the same. Half- Colours are given for the First Gym. Eight, the Oxford Cup Team, and Squash. They consist of a half size monogram and a ied, heart-shaped badge on which the team and the year are written in black. Second team colours consist of a large black square "T" together with a badge. Half-Colours and Second Team Colours can be worn on a first team pull-over sweater. Other colours consist of a large red square "T" with the team badge and are worn on a plain White pull-over sweater. Half-Colours will also be given for swimming and basketball when those teams are organized. LECTURE ON AVIATION On February 11th. Major Geoffry O'Brian gave a lecture to the Marco Polo Society on Aviation. Motion pictures were shown of the Montreal Air Pageant and of the Canadian Forest Patrol. Major O'Brian then briefly explained the principles on which an aeroplane works. The rest of the talk was devoted to leading personalities of the aviation world, among them Sir Malcolm Campbell and the late Capt. Bert Hinkler. Major O'Brian stressed the fact that all the many first-class men he has known spent a great deal of time in themselves tuning up their engines and seeing that everything is properly prepared for flight. linrkrg All through the season we have. had to complain that lack of ice has been the main reason for any of our games that have gone the wrong wayg only for two weeks have we had ice everyday, at other times we have had to manage with an odd practice on natural ice and one very necessary turn-out in Oshawa on artificial ice. For the same reason four of our scheduled games had to be cancelled: the good material that we have could not be turned into a first class junior team through this lack of iceg but worse still, it has been im- possible for boys who form the material for future teams to get enough skating and hockey practice to give them very necessary experience. If hockey is to remain a major sport in the School, the time has come to give immediate consideration to provision for TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 winters similar to the last three we have seen, and that means an artificial rink in Port Hope. We have come through the season with really quite a creditable record, St. Andrew's College and The Grove were defeated away, but the second game with the latter had to be cancelled, against Upper Canada College we were victorious on our own ice, but ex- perience told against us in the Maple Leaf Gardens, though on the round we scored 7 goals to their 6. Our tour eastwards was not as successful as hoped, but we came home with only one defeat and that from Bishop'sCollege School, described as one of the best teams in the Province of Quebec. Possibly the long train journey and gym. show of the night before might account for the slowing up in the second period of this game. Against Lower Canada College we showed very poor form possibly due to late hours and an apparent inability to realise that strict training is necessary for hockey. How- ever the team made up for everything by a brilliant display against Ashbury College, winners of all their previous school games. when a fast exciting game resulted in a 2-2 draw. A The team has profited from its experience on big ice, learning that the defence must cover up in front of the goal, that the for- wards rnust be not only active in attack but useful in back checking, and it must be said that in all their games they have played a good clean brand of hockey and though rarely the cause of any trouble on the ice, none of them 'knuckled under' to the other side. No little thanks is due to Finnigan Hills, who has given up his time to coach the team and has accomplished much in the little time we were on the ice. Summary:HePlayed 113 won 51 lost 23 drawn 45 goals for 42: goals against 27. FIRST TEAM CHARACTERS V. VVy1nn, Captain. Age 19. Right Defence. Has been consistently the backbone of the team, a reliable de- fence player, who checked well and used his weight to advantage. His rushes were most noticeable and often resulted in goals, usually in moments when most needed. His great game against L.C C. saved the team from certain disaster. J. Baillie, Vice Captain. Aged 17. Centre. The Teanrs best stick-handler, but lacks a good shot. His checking is consistent, though it would be better with more effort. THE FIRST TEAM E A 3 Q5 E14 Q33 gi B IA CD an C563 LE OE GJ. :Di 'E mx '42 Y. 'gm E CD S231 P-3 Fm CI C6 .99 S-4 L4 CD M 5 P5 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 'I T. Trenholme. Age 17. Left Wing. A fast skater and clever stick-handler. Has a deadly shot but seldom used it. His chief fault was allowing himself to be skated into the corners. VV. Padley. Aged 18. Right Wing. The fastest man on the team: a splendid black-checkerg was un- fortunate throughout the season in not scoring more goals. J. Kerrigan. Age 16. Centre. A slow skaterfbut more than made up for this by his excellent stick-handling. He has a good shot and is a tireless checker. B. Knox. Age 16. Left Wing. A hard worker but lacking polish. Checked well but some- times did not hold his wing. Seemed to have bad luck about the nets and should have scored more goals. WV. Vaughan. Age 17. Right Wing. Started off well but was -ilisappointingly slow towards the end of the season. His shot was effective and his stick-handling good. W. Bmiden. Age 17. Left Defence. Worked very hard and frequently showed great possibilities. Was very weak at rushing and somewhat careless around the net. A fast skater and a fair body checker. He improved steadily throughout the season. D. McGinnis. Age 16. Left Defence. Joined the Team in the middle of the season. A good rusher though somewhat careless in passing. Was very reliable in his defensive work. D. Wigle. Age 16. Goal. His playing was very consistant with few "off" games. He cleared well but at times was careless. He made many spectacular saves on close shots. R. Newman. Age 17. Goal. Inclined to be nervous and over anxiousg was at his best on hard angle shotsg hanHled his stick well. S TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD INDIVIDUAL STANDING G. A. Pts. W'ynn ..,,.. 7 5 12 Baillie ii. 7 4 11 Trenholme .... 7 3 10 Kerrigan ....., 8 0 8 Vaughan ii. 3 3 6 Padley .....,. 5 0 5 Knox ........... 2 2 4 McGinnis ...... ................,...,...... 1 1 2 BIGSIDE SCHOOL vs. BEVVDLEY At Bewdley, January 25th. We arrived at Bewdley to find the ice exceedingly slow and covered with water round the edges. The game got under way and for a time the puck remained round centre ice. Bewdley had some bad luck when Newman made a very lucky save early in the period. Soon after, with one Bewdley man off the ice, Kerrigan scored for T. C. S. from a mix-,up round the goal. Towards the end of the period Vaughan scored on an assist from Knox. Score at end of first period: T.C.S. 23 Bewdley 0. The second period, which was even slower than the first started with a nice play between Knox and Kerrigan, which, however, re- sulted in the latter hitting the post. A minute later Padley center- ed the puck and from a scramble in the goal mouth the puck was slipped in. Within another minute Padley took a long shot from the blue line which found its way between the goa1ie's pads. With T.C.S. playing a four-man attack Wynn made a solo effort to score. Towards the end of the period Knox went off for a, penalty and Bewdley began to press hard for the first time. Score at end of second period: T.C.S. 51 Bewdley 0. From a scramble in the goal mouth Baillie opened the period by scoring. A moment later he shot another in from the blue line, and then passed over to Padley on the following play for three goals in about the same number of minutes. Three or four rushes which seemed about to produce certain goals failed on account of the bad ice and some miraculous saves by the Bewdley goaler. Wynn rush- ed up the ice, shot, and Kerrigan scored on the rebound. The game came to a close with T.C.S. using five forwards. Padley, Baillie and Kerrigan starred for the School. Svhool 9: Bewdley 0. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q SCHOOL xs. THE GROVE At Lakeiield, January 30th. The start of the first period found the Grove pressing, as the School had not accustomed themselves to the ice surface which was a bit smaller than that of Port Hope. However, the ice was fast and good so a fine game resulted. The Grove almost scored several times but Newman was equal to the occasion. Wynn started the School's attack and twice crashed through the defence with only the goaler to beat but both times he was out-witted. Near the end of the period MacRae whipped a low one from the side into the far corner of the cage to put the Grove one up. Baillie, Trenholme and Padley showed some smart combination at the beginning of the second session but just failed to click around the goal mouth. The second line, consisting of Knox, Kerrigan and Vaughan ii. came on and almost scored. On a penalty face-off ten feet in front of the net, Kerrigan slapped the puck home to tie the score. Two minutes later Vaughan came down centre ice shot at the defence, and Kerrigan poked the rebound home to give the School the lead. The Grove tied it up again when Stewart slipped through Wynn and Braden to beat Wigle with a high corner shot. Half-way through the third period Trenholme tore down left wing, rounded the defence, and from a difficult angle shot a hot ozie, which struck the net just inside the post. This ended the scoring of both teams and although the Grove played five men .up the School held them out to win an exciting game 3-2. School 33 The Grove 2. The teams: T.C.S.-Goal, Wigle ii.g defence, Wynn and Braden, centre, Baillie ii.g wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternates, Knox, Kerrigan, Vaughan ii., Newman, Powell. The Grove-Goal, Amesg defence, Wood, Wright, centre, Macrae: wings, Gunn, Stuart. Subs., Dench, Hepburn, Fletcher, Burgen. SCHOOL vs. ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE At Toronto, February lst. This game was played at the Varsity Arena, on ice which was quite fast, considering the mild weather. Neither team had had much practice so that the hockey was not of the very best. Both teams appeared to be fairly evenly matched at the beginning of the game, but when Trenholme rounded the defence and drove a 10 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD low hard shot past Pentland after about ten minutes of play, the School's attack strengthened and S.A.C. were outplayed by a big margin. Perrin evened the score when he picked up a loose puck and beat Wigle. Trenholme again put the School in the lead when he scored on Baillie's rebound. Play was fairly even in the second period but the School Went another goal up when Padley scored on a long shot from right Wing. Half-way through the third period Knox went down centre ice, passed to Vaughan ii., and scored on the rebound. In the final minutes of play Padley made the score 5--1 for the School when he slammed home Trenholme's rebound. School 55 S.A.C. 1. T.C.S.-Goal, Wigle ii., defence, Braden and Wynn, centre, Baillie ii.g wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternates, Kerrigan, Knox, Vaughan ii., Powell and Newman. S.A.C.-Goal, Pentlandg defence, Allen and Plauntg centre, Perrin, wings, Moffat and Donnely. Alternates, Hughes, McKerrow, Graham and McTver. SCHOOL vs. TORONTO CRICKET CLUB At Port Hope, February 4th. This game was the School's second real test of the year. As usual the Cricket Club brought down a strong team which was, how- ever, opposed by an equally strong one. The first period opened with very fast hockey and both goalers were compelled to save smartly to prevent scoring. Kerrigan put the School ahead when he rounded the defence and beat Quinn with a shot that just nicked the inside of the post. The Cricket Club re- taliated soon after when MacLean managed to get in on Wigle to score. Both teams changed lines frequently to keep up the fast pace. In the second period the School again went into the lead when Knox broke fast down centre ice and passed to Vaughan ii. at the defence, who drilled a hot one into the net. The combination of both teams was lessening as the slow ice drove the players to in- dividual efforts. Wynn took a lot of the sting out of Stewart, the matnspring of the visitors' attack, when he crashed him to the ice with a perfect body check. In a mix-up around the net Padley made it 3 l for the School when he batted the rubber home. In the final stanza, play was very even with the Cricket Club pressing slightly. With nve minutes to play, MacLean shot through a maze of legs to score on Newman who had replaced Wigle ii. in TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 11 the nets. The visitors attacked wildly and with ten seconds to play Stewart scored in a scramble to tie the score 3a 3. Ten minutes overtime was played but the bad ice and the ex- haustion of the players produced few scoring opportunities. School 3g T.C.C. 3. The Teams: T.C.S.-Goal, Wigleg defence, Wynn a.nd Bradeng centre, Baillie ii.g wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternates, Kerrigan, Knox, Vaughan ii., Powell and Newman. T.C.C.?Goal, Quinng defence, Logie and McAllumg centre, Hetheringtong wings, MacLean and Geo. MacLean. Alternates, Ball, Baker and Stewart. SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. At Port Hope, February Sth. In the first of 11 two-game series the School defeated U.C.C. by a score of 5g3. In the first period the ice was very bumpy but later it smoothed off. Both teams skated their hardest from the start and the result was a fast and open brand of hockey. Trenholme, Baillie and Padley kept boring in consistently and Fairhead was given no let-up. Wynn broke away at his own defence, stickhandled through the U.C.C. rear- guard, and burned the puck into the top left-hand corner of the net to make it 1-0 for the School. In the second period Wynn again made the the play for the School's second goal, carrying the puck into the goal-mouth where Vaughan ii. slammed it home. Dellis reduced the School's lead to one when he circled behind Wigle and poked the puck in. The first line kept up their good combination and on a face-off to the side of the U.C.C. goal Baillie ii. got the puck back to Trenholme, who gave Fairhead no chance to save. Score at the end of the second period: T.C.S. 3: U.C.C. 1. The third period opened well for the School when Baillie ii. and Trenholnie reproduced their previous goal scoring play and Trenholme was again successful in putting the rubber past the U.C.C. goaler. About a minute later Baillie ii. sniped one in from a difficult angle near the right boards to put the School ahead 5-1. U.C.C. threw caution to the winds and played five men up. This strategy netted them two goals. The game ended with the score 5-3 for the School. School 53 U.C.C. 3. 12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The Teams: T.C.S.-Goal, Wigle, defence, Wynn and Braden, centre Baillie ma.g wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternates, Knox, Vaughan ma., Kerrigan, Powell and Newman. U.C.C.-Goal, Fairheadg defence, Gooderham and Farlingerp centre, Douglas, wings, Dellis and Rogers. Alternates, Loftues, Mills, Ross, Sanson and Wolfe. SCHOOL vs. PORT HOPE. At Port Hope, February 11th. The School started the game minus Trenholme who was ill. Mc- Closkey filled his place. In the first period play was very even with the School having a slight edge. Kerrigan put the School in the lead when he let fly from just outside the defence to beat the Port Hope goalie. Port Hope made some dangerous rushes near the end of the period but Wigle made some good saves to keep them out. Vaughan ma. got right in on the net once only to be out-witted. Knox made the scoze 2e0 when he shot Wynn's rebound into the net, but Port Hope scored soon after to bring the School's lead down to one goal. Wynn made a nice individual rush to split the town's defence and score cleanly. In the third period 6 goals were scored altogether. Port Hope tied the game up when they scored two in quick succession, but the School went back in the lead again, when Baillie ii. scored on a pass from McGinnis and Wynn on a solo effort. In the closing minutes of the game Port Hope scored twice due to some -slack covering up around the goal, and the game ended 5-5. School 55 Port Hope 5. The Teams: T.C.S.-Goal, Wigle ii., defence, Braden and Wynn: centre, Baillie ii., wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternates, Kerrigan, Knox, Vaughan ii., McGinnis and Newman. Port Hope --Goal, Berbertg defence, Harwood and Fransyg centre, Dollieg wings, Roach and Hills. SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. At Toronto, February 15th. This game was played at the Maple Leaf Gardens. The School started out slowly, trying to accustom themselves to the large and sticky ice surface. Baillie ii. opened the scoring when he took Wynn's TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 122 pass to walk right in on Wolfe and beat him with a high corner shot. Soon after Baillie scored again to give the School a 2e e0 lead, This time he broke away, flanked by Trenholme and Padley, split the defence, and Iiipped the puck over the prostrate goaler. Score at the end of the first period: T.C.S. 25 U.C.C, 0. In the second period the School slackened their pace consider- ably, partially due to the very slow ice. Time and again the for- ward lines were caught up the ice, with the result that U.C.C. ram- med home 3 goals to jump into the lead. Score at the end of the second period. T.C.S. 23 U.C.C. 3. The School went all out to win in the final period. Both for- ward lines battled around the U.C.C. blue line but Wolfe, the U.C.C. goaler, was equal to the occasion and the team went down to its first loss of the season. U.C.C. 35 School 2. SCHOOL vs. BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL At Montreal, February 25th. This was the first game ever played between Bishop's College School, Lennoxville, and T.C.S., and as a result, enthusiastic Old Boys of both institutions turned out at the Forum "en masse". Trinity started out fast in the iirst period and had a slight edge in the play. The first line pressed hard a.nd gave Wilson, in the B.C.S. nets, plenty of work. After seven minutes of play Wynn stickhandled his way through the whole team to score a lovely goal for the School. Play was very even during the remainder of the period, both teams testing the goalers with long shots. Score at the end of the first period: T.C.S. 13 B.C.S. 0. The second period was a repetition of the second period in To- ronto against U.C.C. The School went to pieces. Two minutes after the start Doheny went in alone to beat Wigle. Five minutes later Rankin stole the puck at the School's defence and put B.C.S. one up. Shortly after, Bishops again scored and the School found themselves at the short end of a 3--1 score after nine minutes of play. After this sloppy exhibition Trinity tightened up and the end of the period found them pressing B.C.S. again. Score at the end of the second period: B.C.S. 3, T.C.S. 1. With five minutes of the third period gone the School, now desperate, played four men up the ice. Wilson was peppered from all angles and made some sensational saves. B.C.S. were tied up inside their own blue line, and time and again Baillie, Trenholme, Padley and Kerrigan had marvellous chances to score but bad luck 14 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD and bad shooting spoiled them. With forty-five second-s to play B.C.S. broke away with only Wigle to beat, and although he made a miraculous save of one shot, Doheny picked up the rebound and flipped it into the empty net. B.C.S. 43 School 1. T.C.S.--Goal, Wigleg defence, Wynn and Bradeng centre, Baillie ma.: wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternatels, Vaughan ma., Knox, Kerrigan, McGinnis and Newman. B.C.S.-Goal, Wilsong defence, Kenny and H. Dohenyg centre, McKinnong wings, D. Doheny and Rankin. Alternates, Bassett, Stovel, Sheppard and Benison. SCHOOL vs. LOVVER CANADA COLLEGE At Montreal, February 27th. ln the second game played in Montreal at the Forum the School was held to a 2-2 tie by Lower Canada College. The Baillie-Trenholme-Padley line started off with a bang in the first period and, on a pass from Baillie, Padley got right in on the goaler only to hit the post. L.C.C. took the lead half-way through the period when Martin gave Newman no chance on -a. hard drive from close in. Play hovered around centre ice with both teams playing close checking hockey. Score at the end of the first period: L.C.C. lg T.C.S. 0. Two minutes after the start of the second period Wynn duplicat- ed his rush of the Bishopfs game and scored from a difficult angle. Soon after, Brown got away, when the School was a man short, and, going round the defence, beat Newman on a hard angle shot. Once again the School was behind and, although they gave Fraser in the L.C.C. nets many close calls, there was no further scoring in the period. Score at the end of the second period: L.C.C. 23 T.C.S. 1. Determined not to suffer another defeat Trinity went all out in the final period. With seven minutes of play caution was thrown to the winds and four forwards were put on by the School. On a pass from Wynn, Kerrigan got close in on Fraser but was hooked from behind just as he was about to get his shot away. Padley miss- ed another open net and the puck was kept inside the L.C.C. blue line with the L.C.C. goalie performing miracles in the nets. Finally Wynn came to the rescue when he slapped home Trenholmels pass from the side to tie the score, two minutes from the end of the game. School 2g L.C.C. 2. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 Tennis: T.C.S.--Goal, Newman: defence, Wynn and Braden, centre, Baillie: wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternates, Kerrigan, Vaughan ii., Knox, McGinnis and Wigle. L.C.C.-Goal, Fraser, defence, Regall and Long, centre, Thomp- son, wings, Foster and Traversy. Alternates, Martin, Ennory, Brown and Beveridge. SCHOOL vs. ASHBURY COLLEGE At Ottawa, February 28th. This game was played in the morning at the Auditorium on a fine sheet of ice. As in the case of the other two games of the weekend it was the first time that the two schools had met in hockey. Both teams .started off at a terrific pace and it soon became evident that the School had at last returned to its old-time form. The first line was again showing its sparkling combination and speed and played wide-open hockey. Padley got the first real chance in the game, when he coasted in on Beauclerk after BailIie's pass, but shot wide. Ashbury's first line was also turning in a good effort and after about five minutes had gone, Stanfield passed to Syming- ton, who scored on a beautiful shot from right wing. Shortly after this McGinnis broke away at the School's defence, .split the Ashbury rearguard and flipped his own rebound past the prostrate goalie. Score at the end of the first period: T.C.S. lg Ashbury 1. Play was just as fast as ever in the second period and both the School and Ashbury each missed about six perfect chances to score, partly due to the miraculous Work of both goalkeepers. The first and second lines kept up the same good combination play as in the first period and really outplayed Ashbury by a clear margin. There was no score- in this period. Score at the end of the second period: T.C.S. 13 Ashbury 1. After about four minutes of play in the third period Kerrigan put the School in the lead when he slipped through the Ashbury de- fence to drill the puck into the net. However, this lead was short- lived as, in a scramble in front of the net, the puck just dribbled over the line off Wig1e's stick. Both teams played more cautiously after this and the game ended in a dead-lock. School 2 5 Ashbluy 2. Teams: T.C.S.-Goal, Wigleg defence, Wynn and McGinnis, centre, Baillie: wings, Trenholme and Padley. Alternates, Kerrigan, Vaughan ii., A 'i , . 'f . 3. 1 sh .A .I I 1 pf av 5' ,E QE ,aiuqi,ggg5E!QLff -iffy '5 I ,i"f11'f'f'11 24'-i lmediiwigi " it if' g ay, xe?i53Gm5,::u?iI .5 I . 1 IY , ' sf ,Q ze 'UQ l R in hm -M ilzmaniuingl wg: l 4 m L m,'as,,fmQs1 l. I 1 mf L fgslugl s 3 THE THIRD TEADI P. Cassels TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD jj' Knox, Braden and Newman. Ashbury College--Goal, Beauclerkg defence, Vickers and Wilson: centre, Stanfieldg wings, Symington and Allen. Alternates, Mc- Carthy, Fauquer, Roberts, Calder and Hyman. MIDDLESIDE On account of a second rather unorthodox winter, our practices this year were again very much restricted. We did, however, manage to get our customary number of matches played off. Three games won, one tied, and one lost made up the record of the season's play. In the House matches, the Brents won the cup, winning two straight games to overcome the Bethune House lead. Very few of the league games could be played. We were unable to arrange our usual fixtures with Seaton's House, U.C.C., but were glad to have the opportunity of meeting Hillfield School, Hamilton, here for the first time. A vote of thanks is due to Peter Spragge for arranging a return match with the Old Boy-s in Toronto at short notice at the end of the season. Considering the fact that there were hardly more than a dozen practices all season, the Third team, we think, did not play too badly as a team. The principal scorer was the first line centre, White- head ma. Russel max. on the forward line and Cassels max. in goal, also deserve mention for their playing. THIRD TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Port Hope, Feb. 4th. The Tliirds had possession of the puck most of the first period. Whitehead ma. on a rush down the side scored unassisted. In the second period McGinnis scored with a shot from the blue line, and Redpath scored from close quarters. In the last period Whitehead ma. made a beautiful solo rush and scored. The Lakefield team now made every effort, and but for Cassels max. in goal they would have scored several times. How- ever, Attwood scored from a mix-up in front of the net. School 43 The Grove 1. 18 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SCHOOL vs. OLD BOYS At Port Hope, February 11th. The first period was scoreless and the skating very ragged. In the second period the Thirds combined better and Russel max. scored on a corner shot. A few minutes later Peck Went down the side and passed to Smye, who scored from in front of the goal, making the score QA0 at the end of the period. In the third period Smye scored from a mix-up in front of the goal. On the whole the game was quite good, considering that the Old Boys had not played together this year. Their line-up was: goal, Bell, defence, Roper, Trow i., forwards, Staunton, Stone, Spraggeg subs, Boyd, Trow ii., Bickle, O'Brian, Birchall. School 33 Old Boys 0. SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Lakefield: February 15th. ' The first period started off very fast, but the play was ragged throughout. The School opened the scoring early in the second period when Smye put one in. This was followed closely by a goal for the Grove. Towards the end of the period the Grove scored again, making it 2-1 for them. At the beginning of the third period Whitehead equalised, but a few minutes later the Grove was leading once more, and near the close of the period they scored again. The game was very well fought throughout, the Grove having the best of the play. Cassels max. played a good game in goal for the School. School 23 The Grove 4. SCHOOL vs. HILLFIELD At Port Hope, February 18th. The first two periods resulted in a les-0 lead for the visitors. The play was even but very ragged. The School had many chances to score but could not defeat the Hillfield goalkeeper. In the third period the School played better hockey and had most of the play. Shortly after the period opened, Russel max. tied the score. Neither side scored again. School I: Hillfield 1. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 SCHOOL vs. OLD BOYS At Toronto, March Sth. The Thirds won 4-2 in a fast and exciting game. Somers and Stone scored for the Old Boys while Corbett scored twice for the School. Whitehead ma. and O'Brien scored the remaining goals. School 43 Old Boys 2. V LITTLE SIDE As with the other teams, Littleside suffered from lack of ice and therefore lack of practice. Some very fair talent appeared, both from new boys and from those up from the Junior School. Keefer ma. made a Splendid captain and was the outstanding player on the team. Osler mi. improved in goal as the season advanced and should be quite good later on. McFarlane, Truax, Seagram ma. and Armstrong ma. showed .up well amongst those from the J. S., whilst Miller ma. and Scott were the best from outside schools. The House matches were keenly contested and the Bethunes won the cup, largely through the efforts of Keefer. FIFTH TEAM MATCHES SCHOOL xs. THE GROVE At Lakeiield, January 29th. The ice was very good. Lakeiield team was faster and better organised, due to more practice than we had had. At the end of the first period the score was 3-1 against the School. At the end of the second period it was 7-2. The team played much better in the third period and scored three goals to Lakefie1d's two. McFarlane, Scott and Keefer scored the goals for the School. School 55 The Grove 9. SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE. At Port Hope, February 16th. The ice was very good and the School played well, having the edge over the Grove team. Osler mi. played well in the netg he was hurt in the second period but came back on again in the third. , S. fsgl' se' , r. .V ef- f H FA.. imggwl F.: L" Bn . ,,-.,,,.,n t V' ' Qv' . ,II DE Ez- if if 1212133 QIEHEEXELIEI ,. as mv.: Q fl 4, 1. v . if Q , THE FIFTH TEAM TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q1 The game was very open and both teams had plenty of chances to score. Miller ma., Keefer ma., Scott and Seagram ma. were re- sponsible for the School's goals. School 8: The Grove 4. HOUSE MATCHES BIGSIDE First Match, January 18th. Owing to the soft ice the playing throughtout the game was rag- ged. In the first period O'Brien scored forthe Brents on the rebound of a shot from Trenholme. The Brents increased their lead in the second period when Baillie ma. scored on a solo rush. In the last period Kerrigan scored, assisted by Vaughan ma. A few minutes later Wynn tied the score on a beautiful shot. However soon after Trenholme scored on a pass from O'Brien. No further goals were made and Brent House won 3f2. Brent 35 Bethune 2. Second Match, March 13th. In the second house match the Brents defeated the Bethunes by a score of 3-1. Practically the whole ice was covered with a thin film of water which hindered any attempt at combination. In the first period there was no score, but in the second Tren- holme scored twice on passes from Baillie and McGinnis to put the Brents two up. In the third period O'Brien made it three for the Brents when he took Trenho1me's pass and scored. In the dying minutes of the game Kerrigan passed to Wynn who flipped the puck past Wigle making the final score 3-1 for the Brents. The Brents thus retained possession of the Bigside Hockey Cup. Brent 35 Bethune 1. MIDDLESIDE First Match, January 28th. Bethune House NVOD. the first Middleside House match with a score of 3 to 1. The first period was slow and uneventful except for penalties. The second period was played at a much faster pace. The Bethunes almost scored a few seconds after the face-off. White- QQ TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD head ma. scored the Brent's only goal unassisted. The Bethunes evenecl up the score when Cassels max. scored fromamix-up in front of the goal. Before the period was over Smye scored the Bethunes' second goal. The .swift pace kept up throughout the third. Keefer ii. scored the final goal. Bethune House 33 Brent House 1. Second Match, March 6th. Early in the first period Whitehead ii. got a loose puck and opened the scoring for the Brentsg shortly after this, Peck scored for the Bethunes making the score 1-1 at the close of the first period. During the second period the Brents had the best of the play, and as a result of this the period ended with the score 3-1 for the Brents. In the third period the Brents scored three more goals. Brent 63 Bethune 1. Third Match, March 10th. Brent House won the Middleside Hockey Cup by winning the last match 2-0 on March 10th. The play was fairly even, the first two periods, but in the last Whitehead ma. -scored two goals for the Brents. Brent 25 Bethune 0. LITTLESIDE McFarlane opened the scoring from a face-off in front of the Bethune net. The Bethunes soon tied the score and from then on had the upper hand in the play. McFarlane, Scott and Miller ma.. were the mainstays of the Brent tea.m, while Truax and Armstrong ma. played well on the Bethune defence. Both teams had many chances to score. McFarlane scored twice for Brent House and Keefer ma., Dawes and Armstrong -scored for the Bethunes. Bethune 85 Brent 2. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q3 February 3rd. The ice was quite good, except for certain spots. In the first period the Brents had the edge, although neither side scored. Half way through the second period McFarlane scored, which put the Brents in the leld 1-0. The last period was the bestg both teams missed several opportunities, but Keefer tied the score just before time. Osler i., Seagram ina., Miller ma. and McFarlane played well for the Brentsg for the Bethunes Keefer ma. starred, and was in fact the best man on the ice. Brent House lgl Bethune House l. HOCKEY COLOURS The following Hockey Colours have been awarded this yearn! First Team:-D. H. Wigle, R. Newman, V. Wynn, W. Braden, D. A. McGinnis, T. C. Trenholme, J. Baillie, C. C. Padley, G. B. Knox, J. V. Kerrigan, W. Vaughan. Third Team:-P. Cassels. J. Corbett, S. O'Brier1, Peter Osler, F. Redipath, F. Smye, R. Whitehead, W. Whitehead. Fifth Team:-H. Armstrong, R. Keefer, P. McFarlane, B. Miller. C. Osler, H. Scott, C. Seagram, C. Truax. f . i ui' Q4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Hiatt In illiunirral The morning of February 24th. saw the whole School on board a C. N. R. train, bound for Montreal to give a gymnastic display. A pleasant enough journey, everyone busy with books, newspapers, games of bridge, and the inevitable jig-saw puzzles, varied by the stirring musical efforts in the Bethune car and the visits to the lunch counter. The type of luncheon car provided a new experience for most of the party, and incidentally gave someone the opportunity to inform tivo English masters sympathetically that it was the sort of thing just made for immigrants. At Bonaventure station, crowded with parents and friends, there was a swift dispersal. The lateness of the train left no margin of time in the next couple of hoursg but soon after half past seven everyone was dressed and ready on the floor of the spacious Armoury of the Royal Montreal Regiment in Westmount. The programme began at eight o'clock, when the Senior Prefect, on behalf of the School, presented Mrs. R. P. Jellett with a bouquet of roses. Parents and guests had turned out in force, the number of those present being officially put at nearly seven hundred and fifty. The display of gymnastic work went with a swing throughout. The tensest moment came early, when audible gasps greeted Flem- ing's spectacular grand circle on the horizontal bar. This event was followed by the Junior School demonstration class, whose final "under and over" exercise brought delighted laughter by its illusion of an endlessly whirling wheel making great speed to nowhere. The parallel bar team and the J. S. club-swinging squad earned for the Sergeant-Major the most appreciative comments from professional colleagues who were watching everything with keen attention. More laughter mingled with the applause which greeted the tumbling squad, and there was considerable interest in the weaving figures of the Flamborough sword dance, performed by two groups which included some of the youngest J. S. boys. The precision and smartness of the physical training, the rattling speed of the vaulting horse work, and the artistic grouping of the final tableaux were all well received. To judge from the comments of friends and press writers alike, our first gymnastic display in Montreal was decidedly a success. The hockey team played three games during the weekend at Montreal and Ottawa. The rest of the School spent a joyous two days in the city, and the afternoon train on Sunday brought every- TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q5 body back to School. Well, nearly everybody. The following additional comments are taken from the report of the Montreal Gazette. The display was staged, said that paper. "before a large and distinguished gathering of fond parents and friends who applauded everything vigorously, and a number of im- partial and critical observers who agreed that T.C.S. had provided a snow that was well worth seeing. "The work presented during the evening was simply the regular class work carried on three days a week, it was stressed in the pro- gramme, and from the spirit which the boys put into their every act it would appear that they must have a great time at school. In each number on the programme there was evidence of careful train- ing, illustrated in the well-executed movements and almost complete unison seen at all times. "The senior squad, varying in numbers according to the event. distinguished itself on the horizontal bar, parallel bar, va.ulting horse and at tumbling. Probably the best of the four was the parallel bar work, at which a team of 16 performed with grace and agility. Several of the movements on this apparatus were more difficult than might be expected from school boys. Mistakes in all these senior events were few and far between. "The Junior School team, varying in size but not in attention to duty, appeared in a demonstration class, etc. "Eighty boys were seen in the final physical training display in which routine movements were performed together in a way that made the number quite stirring ..... "Among those present were: Brigadier W. W. P. Gibsone, O.C. of Military District No. 4, Dr. C. S. Fosbery, headmaster of Lower Canada College, J. W. McConnell, Col. A. L .S. Mills, Col. and Mrs. Ross Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Fleming, Mr. and Mrs. Alan Law, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Newman, Mr. and Mrs. Paul McFarlane, Col. and Mrs. E. G. M. Cape, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bilkey, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Cassils, Dr. and Mrs. C. K. Russel, Mrs. E. B. Savage, Mr. and Mrs Greville Hampson, Miss Lillian Hampson, Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Nation, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Scott, Mr. and Mrs. W. Landry, Ross Clarkson, Dr. S. E. Whitnall, Canon A. P. Shatford, P. Lindsay Hall, Lt.-Col. J. K. Keefier, Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. Birks, Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Thornhill, Dr. and Mrs. G. E. Armstrong, J. G. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Shearwood, Col. and Mrs. Gerald Birks, Blair Russel, Armand Chevalier, a.nd others." TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD ol "" ,Q ,iff . ' E .mE E ff NIV.:-4 JAQ? Lzmf -ff -L .. .'z."' 2 ' I " -4 'N' 'Ln .. ' V' ' Q .4 ,J 5 r' 5 X ! 9' ' 3' s-.Jud J. .J QL ' .Y .ig Ln l TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD QT BOXING COMPETITION The boxing finals took place on March 3rd. The Bradburn Cup for the best boxer in the School was won by Russel ma. Some of the classes brought a large entry and many good bouts were witnessed. The detailed results follow. Fea-ther-Weight A Ede ma. y Ede ma. j Seagram max. y f Staunton Ambrose max. 1 5 i Staunton I Staunton f Knox Knox I Knox Cutler l Knox Baillie ma. Russel ma Bilkey Bilkey Q Mitchell max. l l Russel ma. Russel ma. Russel ma. Ambrose ma. . Russel ma. Whitehead ma. A Feather-Wveight B fNovioej Kortright l l Ackerman Ackerman , Ackerman IB d f lt Arcnboid y e au ' Seagram ma 1 Seagram ma. Barber TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Bant un-lveight A h Light-VVQ-ight B QNovi0ej Fleming l Ferguson Tie Williams ma Cm-phey Q Williams ma. lfillltillll-xvtqgllt B QN0vicel Martin Martin Mitchell ma. Osler mi. McFarlane McFarlane Strathy Strathy Lowe Howland Truax Truax Heavy-Weight VVynn Wynn f l i Martin Truax Truax Wynn fBy defaultl Robson .L.-, , TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Middle-Weight Osler ma. Newman Newman Newman Whitehead max. W'elter-Weight Braden Bally ' Baly max. L Cox Cox Cleveland , 4 Powell 5 Powell I f Powell Cassels max. Peck Cassels max. Powell 30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Light-Weight A Russel max. Trenholme Trenholme Reed max. Reed max. Reed max. Ridpath Reid ma. McCloskey Reid ma. Reid ma. SQUASH RACQUETS The handicap tournament last term was won by Trenholme. The semi-finals of the tournament for the Bullen Cup were reached by Kerrigan, Wigle, Smye and O'Brien, and in the final O'Brien beat Kerrigan 3-2. In the Littleside tournament for the Fred Watts Prize, Mc- Farlane, Seagram ma., Keefer ma., and Miller ma., have reached the semi-finals. KAPPA ALPHA vs. SCHOOL January 28th. The Kappa Alpha fraternity defeated the School 21 games to 18, in a very closely contested match. Wigle and Hurcombe's match proved the most outstanding of the day. First Round Second Round Hurcomb beat Wigle ....i....... 2-1 Gunn beat Wigle .................... 2--0 Gunn beat Trenholme ............ 2-1 Trenholme beat Wotherfspoon 2--0 Smye beat Wotherspoon ........ 2- McMullen beat Smye ............ 2--0 0 McMullen beat O'Brien .......... 2-0 0 Kerrigan beat Lash ................ 2- Kerrigan beat Moore .............. Baillie beat Moore ....... ........ 2 -0 Hurcomb beat Baillie ............ Third Round Wigle beat Wotherspoon ...... 251 Gunn beat Smye ...................... Hucomb beat Trenholme ...... 2-0 O'Brien beat Moore ................ Gunn beat Smye .......... ,..,.. .... 2 5 0 McMullen beat Kerrigan ...... Lash beat Baillie .................... 2-0 O'Brien beat Lash .................. 2--0 2--0 2--0 2-0 2-0 2-0 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 OLD BOYS vs. SCHOOL March llth. The match proved to be a very interesting one. The Old Boys showed great form and won 8 matches to 4. First Round Second Round H. Martin beat Wigle .......... 3-1 McMullen beat Wigle ............ 3-1 O'BI'iBI1 beat Gunn ................ 3-1 H, Martin beat O'BI'ien t,,,,,.. 3-0 Smye beat S. Osler .......,........ 3-O Gunn beat Smye ,,,,,,,,..,...,,.... 3-2 Kerrigan beat Rysie ...,.,........ 3-1 Mickle beat Kerrigan ,,,,,.,.,,,. 3-2 McMullen beat Osler ma. .... 3-0 Rysie beat Osler .................... 3-2 Mickle beat Baillie ................ 3-0 Baillie beat S. O-sler ...., ........ 3 W1 lNIARTIN'S TEADI vs. THE SCHOOL The match was played on the courts of the Toronto Squash Racquets Club on March 25th. Although the School played well they could not compare with the experienced players of the Toronto club, who won 23-6. Summary : First Round Second Round McMullen beat i1Smye .......... 2-1 McMullen beat 21O'Brien ...,.. 3-0 Martin beat iiWig1e ................ -1 MacKnight beat i1Smye ...... 3-0 4 2f:Kerrigan beat Lucas ..........., 2-0 :l'Kerrigan .beat Robinson ...... 2-1 MacKinght beat iiO'Brien .... 3-0 Lucas beat ifTrenholme 3-A-0 Robinson beat :f1Trenholme ..3-0 :fi--T.C.S. SHOOTING All three matches of the D.C.R.A. competition have been fired. Twelve boys, two more than last year, have won medals which are awarded to those who make 270 or over from a possible 300. The highest score in the senior division was 282, made by West. Annesley was the best shot in the junior competition, making 274. In the Annual Course of Musketry 23 qualified for Mar-ksmen, and 19 for First Class Shots. The School has entered for the Imperial Challenge Trophy, but none of the matches have been fired. LIFE-SAVING Last term seven boys received the Intermediate Life-Saving certincate, and two Second Class Instructor's certificates were given Q22 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD by the Royal Life-Saving Society. Classes have been held this term for the Intermediate and Bronze Medal certificates and will be tested before the end of the term. In both terms the instruction has been carried o.n by Cochran and Cox. THE DEBATING SOCIETY During the term the Debating Society held two meetings. The first was held on March 5th., and there was a debate on the motion, "This House believes that liquor control of the Province of Quebec is preferable to that of the Province of Ontario." The motion was proposed by Stikeman, seconded by Vaughan max. and opposed by Stevenson, supported by Ambrose ma. The affirmative won. On March 19th. the Society held a discussion of modern topics. Mr. Wynn introduced a discussion with "Some aspects of the European situation." Reid mi. read a paper on "The iinancial crises in the United States." This was the first meeting of its type to be held and it proved to be both interesting and popular, everyone present taking part in the discussion. THE MUSIC CLUB Bobby Spergel, twelve year old Cellist, gave a recital, assisted by his sister, Mildred Spergel, on February 4th. The programme began with the Lato concerto, and continued with string music of the eighteenth century, both Italian and French. A modern group followed. A Tambourin by Bobby Spergei was enjoyed as much as anything on the programme. These two young artists astonished us with their skill: but we soon forgot this in very real appreciation of their mature interpretative powers. The club looks forward with pleasure to the visit of Mr. Marcus Adeney. The evening reeitals have continued this term. Music played included compositions of Bach, Delius, Wagner, Brahms, Tschaikovski. The broadcasts by the Boston and New York Orchestras have been attended by a few members. A recent generous donation has enabled the Club to buy gramo- phone records of the following works: Grieg: Sonata in C minorg Clarinet Quintet. Schubert! Octet. Stravinski: Petronshka. Albeniz: Iberia. Wagner: Album TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q33 THE LITERARY SOCIETY This term the Literary Society has read, "Juno and the Paycock," Sean O'Caseyg "The Devil's Disciple", G. B. Shaw, "Hay Fever", Noel Coward, "Rope", Patrick Hamiltong and "Bird in Hand", John Drinkwater. Of these plays, "Rope" and "The Devil's Disciple" were the most successful. SCIENCE AND ARTS SOCIETY At the beginning of this term the interest in radio work which was so prevalent two years ago was renewed. Most of the mem- bers now have their own receivers, all of which give good results. The interest taken in photography is not so pronounced as in former years. During the term the dark-room was thoroughly cleaned and a few minor alterations made. About mid-term a meeting was held and the following leaders appointed for the various sections: Natural History ...., . .......... ....... S tevenson Science ................... ...... R eed max. Workshop ............ ......... P incott Photography ...................,..........................,............... Annesley A leader for the radio section has not yet been appointed. Several of the members of the Honour Chemistry Set have been conducting various experiments out of school under the direction of Mr. Lewis. Valuable assistance has been rendered by Bankier, Pincott, Ede max., and Cleveland in making apparatus for the physics laboratory. It is hoped that much more interest will be taken in the Natural History and Photography sections next term. At the time of writing the Society is applying for membership to the Ontario Federation of Naturalists. , CHESS CLUB An open tournament was held for the Chess Cup, which was won by Stevenson. Osler ma. was runner-up. On March 25th., a team of five, Stevenson, Osler ma., Reid mi., Cutler and Ambrose ma., played the U.C.C. Chess Club in Toronto. and was defeated, nine games to eleven. 3,4 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD RUSSIAN RHAPSODY. Boris brooded. Self-pity consumed him, and he sat in his meagre room and contemplated the past. A week ago he had placed the Ivanovitch millions in "Serbian Sticking-plaster", which Alexis Alexovitch, the moujik, had assured him was a sure thing. But "Serbian Sticking-plaster" had come unstuck and now Boris Ivano- vitch had not a copek to his name. The rattling of the droschkies outside his window roused Boris Ivanovitch from his hypochondriacal stupor. "I shall go and see Sonia," he said, "and then I shall cast myself beneath the twelve-thirty from Nizni-Novgorod". He rose and Went forth into the night. On ia pool-tab'c at the corner saloon, three men were playing crapsky. "Boris Ivanovitch", they called to him as he went by. "Come in and play crapsky with us". "Little brothers", replied Boris, "I have not a copek in the world, but I have two roubles. I will come in and play crapsky". Soon the play grew fast and furious. "Seven come eleven!" cried Boris, spinning the ivories. Time passed rapidly: one hour, two hours flashed by, and still Boris cried, "Seven come eleven," and always he won. At eleven o'clock he had won five thousand roubles. At half past eleven he had won twenty-five thousand: when the lfast chime of twelve o'c1ock died away from the Kremlin, he had com- pletely restored his former fortune. "Little brothers", he announced, relaxing from his exertions, "I must go to see my beloved. Tomorrow I will play you at crap- sky again: but now I must go". But before he went he treated them to half a pint of Vodka apiece. They drank his health with enthusiastic cries: "That Boris Ivanovitch, he knows a thing or two about crapsky!" they shouted. Boris rose and went forth into the .night. "I'll bet I do too," he chuckled, fingering the loaded dice in his pants. But as he strode briskly forward, wrapped in his bearskin, his high spirits slowly faded, and again he began to feel sorry for him- self. Now that he was once more a man of wealth, he envied those magniiicient moments of melancholia he had so recently experienced. As he tootled the door-bell of his beloved's house. a sudden de- termination came upon him. The door opened. "Boris Ivanovitch!" "Sonia Soniavitch!" They slid into each other's arms. Sonia, a beautiful Russian girl, wearing the conventional sackcloth, nestled up to her lover and said in a tender whisper: "Beloved, lend me five roubles. we have TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 33 run out of Vodka." "Alas, little Sonia," exclaimed Boris, "I will not, for a week ago I placed all the Ivanovitch millions in 'Serbian Sticking-plaster-'. A cinch they said it was: but it has gone down and down until now it isn't worth a copek a share. I am desperate: I shall kill my- self. I can't give you anything but love, little sister." I-le looked at her passionately, pleadinglyg but Sonia was in- articulate. Extreme emotion had caused her to swallow her gum. When at last she spoke it was in a hoarse sort of voice. "Boris Ivanovitch," she cried, "You have wronged me cruelly by losing your fortune. Now I will tell you something. I can see you no more, for I no longer love you. I have given my heart to Alexis Alexovitch the moujik! Farewell!" She attempted to slam the door, but Boris deftly inserted his foot. For a moment he was stunned, then his volatile Czech tem- perament ilared into words. "False woman!" he yelled HLIOVV I will tell you that I have just won it all back at crapsky!" He turned and strode away into the night, disregarding such cries as, "Oh, Boris, come back. I did not mean it," which fioated faintly and more faintly to him over the winter air. Boris brooded. Self-pity consumed him. He walked onward slowly, wrapped in an absolute ecstacy of melancholia. Never be- fore had he attained such perfect emotion, such abysmal depression, nor again would he be able to attain it. "I have just time," thought Boris Ivanovitch, with a pleasurable thrill, "to catch the twelve- thirty from Nizni Novgorod." Next morning all that remained of the earthly Ivanovitch was contained in six pieces. The gentle reader may wonder why there were six. Well, it was this way. Boris lay down on the tracks with his arms .at his side. The twelve-thirty passed over his legs and arms. The pieces were as follows: two legs, two arms, one head, one body. Such is Russia. -D.G.S. THE SUCKER. A Short Story The first grey streaks of dawn filtered through the cracks of the door, but the freight train rumbled on oblivious to any change. "Slick" Green tossed in his sleep, and rolling onto abolt, awoke with a start. He sat up, and rubbed his three days growth of beard reiiectively, then seeing the offending bolt threw it across the car with an oath. Sweeping some of the foul straw together, he at- 36 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD tempted to make a pillow and doze off againg but his sleep was over, and he lay on his back thinking. His first distasteful reminiscences of jail after being caught for the theft of the Brokenshire diamonds, were quickly lost to the pleasant memory of how he, the cleverest crook alive, had black- mailed the bad one of the Brokenshire family into joining him, and then helping in his escape from prison. As he crawled to the box-car door he whistled happily, at his cleverness and the good times to come with the money. Opening the door a little more he lay watching for the place to jump ----- Three weeks later, and everything had worked out to plan, thought Green, as he sprawled in the front seat of the big car. There was a marked change from the man who had lain on the wood fioor of the stinking box-car, to the perfectly dressed man who was smoking an expensive cigar in the front seat of Broken- shire's car. He fingered the gun in his pocket and once more went over his recent plans. Simple, he thought, but effective. He saw the sun sinking in a red bliaze, and it looked rich, as he would soon be, instead of meagre, as it had looked from the box-car. They were drawing up to an outpost on the Mexican border, least used by traffic going over from the States. Brokenshire still had the diamonds in the lini.ng of his coat. If the officials tried to stop them, Green would shoot, and then when he and Brokenshire were safely over he would do away with him. If they got over all right, well then so much the betterg but the diamonds would be just enough for himg Brokenshire would have to drop out . . . The Riviera . . . the diamonds-all his! zf: :': :Ee :E: The officials lumbercd up to the car as it drew to a stop at the station. They were just closing up and were joking good-naturedly. "Passports pleeze". Brokenshire and Green reached in their pockets, but Brokenshire instead withdrew a cigarette case and taking a cigarette out lit it. In a drawing, affected voice he began: "We don't nced any passports. This man is Slick Green who just escaped from the Big House, and there is a reward for him". With an ojnth Green drcw his gun and aiming at Brokenshire fired. Clickeeclick- click sand then another click as the handcuffs were on him, and the officers had dragged him from the car. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD a A roar, and the big car jumped from American soil to Mexico. B1'okenshire's voice, still drawling, drifted back to the swearing Green, .and the excited oiicials. "I saw to the gun in the hotel last night .... sucker". DAY DREAMS Throughout the room a silence reigns, A summer silence hot and still And here and there a pupil feigns To work much more than he has will. 'Gainst the window pane a-drumming The foolish Hy himself annoys, In the fields beneath a-humming The busy bee with clover toys. In spite of all the books laid open The minds that should be there are But off among the cattle rope'n Or down amid the Tropics hot. not: They're Outward Bound, across the seas To Eastern lands and jungles deep: To lands of pestilence and fleas, And snakes and bats and things that creep. And now they're fighting Dervish foesg And now regaining treasure lostg Seeking the Pole across the floes, Or struggling 'gfainst some holocaust. The bell has gone, and each awakesg The room that now was dreaming fair, And full of Frobishers and Drakes, Is once again, the classroom bare. B.G.B.R -W.B.R 37 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD THREE SPANKERS WENT A-BREAKING What mighty strength The Prefects use, When with a length Of board they bruise Or smack a man! lDear me! That one's bust. Hand me another, Billl. The White wood flies, The stout planks split, The victim cries, Yet still they hit W And smack a man. ' lWel1, I never. Another one y cracked. Thank youll. With New Boys rough Prefects a.re strongg Although it's tough, O To cure a wrong They'Il smack a man. fUpon my word, if that isn't a third broken. Still some left? Goodl. But: Was hide like steel Of elephants, Or what, conceal- 'd within the pants Of ...,.................... ? 1Wel1, never mind the name. No prizes for guessingj. -X.Y.Z TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD FORM LIST UPPER, SCHOOL VI. V. Mc-Gill Osler, ma. Peter Ede, ma. F. O'Brie.n, S. Cutler, E. Powell, H. Morrisey, H. Reed, max. M. Cox, J. Trenholme, T. Ede, max. E. Barber, J. Vaughan, max Newman, R. Leadbeater, W. Miller, max. G. Ridpath, G. Cassels, max. P. Brunton, L. Kerrigan, J. Corbett, J. Wigle, D. Reid, mi. W. Ambrose, max. D. Russel, ma. D. Cleveland, J. Braden, W. Stikeman, J. Stevenson, D. Biillie, ma. J. Holmes, R, MItChE11, ITIHX J Bell, K. Armstrong max D Whitehead max W Chadwick, W S Pincott, S Wynn, V. Knox, B. Upper IV- Lower IV. Strathy, P. Bankier, P. Allan, M. Langmuir, A. W. Ferguson, MCD. Cochran, E, Reid, IV- J- L- Osler, max. Pat. Fleming. A. A Godshall, H. Nelles, C. M. --'-Rogers, J, Ambrose, ma. P. Robson, E. Annesley, J. Rathbone, G. Reid, ma. T. L. Staunton, T. A. McGinnis, D. Waldie, I. Bridger, N. Vaughan, ma. W. Keefer, ma.x. E. Seagram, max. D. McCloskey, P. Baly, ma.x. H. Padley, C. Smith, D.-Fifth Form. VALETE Wynn, V.-McGill Fifth, Captain of Rugby, Captain of Hockey lst XIV, lst. VII. 40 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD MIDDLE SCHOOL Upper Remove Lower Remove Upper Shell Martin, E. D. K. McLaren, max. R. McFarlane, P. A. Fortye, R. Bilkey, J. D. Osler, mi. C. Scott, H. White, L. Howland, V. Miller, ma. B. Williams, max. G. Lowe, W. B. Keefer, ma. R. Cassils, ma. M. Truax, C. H. Archbold, G. Russel, max. Dal. West, R. Koi-tright, L. H. G. Locke, R. Williams, ma. B. Seagram, ma. C. Waugh, J. Smith, L. Gibson, F. Passy, max. deL. Peck, H. Red ath, F. . Henderson, H. p Lower Shen Pettit, R. Southam, B. Pearson, F. Starnes, J. K. Kirkpatrick, J. G. McLaren, ma. F. Curphey, W. Armstrong, ma. H Mills, A. V. L. Mitchell, ma. J. H Langdale, A. Dawes, D. Smye, F. Ackerman, J. F. VVhitehead, ma. R. Crump, W. X a M 6 f f' 'Y f y FE C TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 41 Ellie Qluniur Svrlinul iKrrnrh The winter of 1932-1933, like that of last year, has been far from kind to us in its dispensatio.n of snow and ice. The town rink was at our command four hours a week, but, with the absence of any sustained spell of fiost, many of our skating hours were cancelled. Again and again we had to fall back on soccer and basketball in the gymnasium. Consequently our hockey suffered badly, not one of the four games played did we win. Yet, even with the little practice obtain- ed before the last game against Lakefield, the team did nobly to lead the clever opposition by 4 goals to one at one stage of the game, only to be nosed out 695 in an exciting finish. So far this year lMar. 27th.,,l we have had three extra half- holidays, Monday, Feb 27th., Ash Wednesday, Mar. 1st., and Wed- nesday Mar 15th. tMrs. Orchard's Birthdayl. The Dramatic Society has been very busy for the greater part of the term on a play to be produced before we go on our Easter holidays. Mr. Robert Orchard has aroused keen interest in this as Well as in painting, drawing and associated arts. At this stage of the term cricket in the gymnasium is in full swing, four or five boys to each net, under the instruction of Mr. H. G. James and Grace, while the Squash Courts have begun to form another attraction for the in-between season. The bill of health was excellent till a mild case of scarlet fever and one suspect were isolated on Mar. 13th. Fortunately there were no more and the School was freed from quarantine on Friday, March 24th. The School visit to Montreal, Feb. 24-26, was a very successful one and many heartening remarks were made on the creditable pei- formance of the Junior School in the midst of the well-deserved praise bestowed on the Senior School for its great display. The Junior School was proud to participate in its small way in such a successful exhibition. HOCKEY The following is the list of Junior School fixtures with iesults Feb. 3rd. vs. The Grove, at Lakefield Lost Feb. 7th. vs. S. A. C., at Aurora Lost Feb. 22nd. vs. S. A. C. at Port Hope Lost Mar 9th. vs. The Grove, at Port Hope Lost fi .t V! f, RSX, J' Q, ? 1 i ff ' I -Fi i , I 2 v ff 'E ' -SW' fl Q -Sis 1 ix SCHOOL TEAINI THE JUNIOR bm cn rn CYS nm. O LTL C1 3 6-9 Z3 U Q H U1 cv E CU P1 C5 Ui S-4 '51 CI cd C C1 cv f-J o b4 K4 '-S TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 43 Colours were awarded to the following: J. E. Cutten. fCapt.J, W. A. Black, M. G. Johnston, F. C. Passy, B. S. Russel, R. H. Tippet. And extra colours to the following: A. S. Fleming and J. L. McLennan THE JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Lakefield, February 3rd. Our first game was played at Lakefield after only two practices. It was not astonishing that The Grove skated ring-s round the School and with better marksmanship might easily have doubled their score. In the early stages it was anybody's game, when the School scored their only goal through Cutten. At the end of the first period 1 el was a fair reflection of the play. Thereafter Lakeiield found their form and at the end of the 2nd. led 3--1. In the last period, they continued to hold the upper hand and scored three more. The Grove 65 School 1. Line-up: The Grove-Buddeng Pentland i. and Baxter, Peck, Robertson and Pullen. Subs: Pentland ii., Dunn ii., Shepherd, McCrea. The SchoolfRus.sel3 Passy and Johnston, Black, Cutten and Tippet. Subs.: McLennan, Fraser, Fleming, Mood. THE JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. S.A.C. PREP. At Aurora, February 7th, At Aurora the School was again defeated, but this time much more narrowly, and in fact had the better of the play throughout after a disastrous start. In the first period, S.A.C. scored three times without any reply from the School. Thereafter, the School came to life and Cutten scored twice. Unfortunately, in this period Passy put the puck into his own net. In the third, each team scoi ed once, S.A.C. finishing in front by 5 goals to 3. S.A.C. 55 School 3. Goal Scorers: S.A.C.-Adamson 3, Armstrong 1. T.C.S.-Cutten 2, Black 1. Line-up: S.A.C.-Pentlandg Martin and Adamson, Arrnlstong, McKerrow and Thompson. 44 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T.C.S.-Russel, Johnston and Passy, Black, Cutten and Tippet. Subs.: McLennan, Mood, Fleming, Robertson, Hessey-White. THE JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. S.A.C. PREP. At Port Hope, February 22nd. In the return game at Port Hope, S.A.C. repeated their victory of two weeks previously. In the first period, the School seemed as if they were going to have the game all their own way, but they were unable to keep up the pace for the next two periods and lost a well-contested game by 6w4. Cutten scored the four T.C.S. goals. For S.A.C., Adamson 3, Armstrong 2 and Thompson 1. S.A.C. Prep. 63 School 4. Line-up: S.A.C.e-Read, Adamson and Martin, Armstrong, McKerrow, Thompson. Subs.: McIntosh and Jarvis. T.C.S.-Fraser, Passy and Johnston, Russel, Cutten and Black. Subs.: Tippet, McLennan, Fleming, Mood, Hessey-White. THE JUNIOR SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE. At Port Hope, March 9th. On fair ice the School put up its best show of the season againSt The Grove, Lakefield, at the Port Hope rink. In the first period the School early forged ahead and led at the end of the period by 3-0, 1Cutten 2 and Black lj. Tippet got two assists on Cutten's efforts. In the second, Lakefield improved greatly and tallied four times through Robertson 133 and Peck, while Black added one for the School. The last period was a ding-dong struggle. Pentland ii. and Robertson scored for Lakefield and Cutten reduced the lead on Tippet's assist. The Grove 63 School 5. Line-up: The Grove-Budden, Pentland i. and Baxter, Peck, Robertson and Pullen. Subs.: Pentland ii., Dunn ii., Shepherd, McCrea. T.C.S.-Russel, Passy and Johnston, Black, Cutten and Tippet. Subs.: McLennan, Robertson, Fraser, Fleming. THE HOUSE MATCHES The Rigbys are to be congratulated on winning the House Hockey Cup. In the first game, the Bethunes, handicapped by the absence of TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .15 Cutten, went down to defeat, 7212. Black scored 5 goals anti Mc- Lennan 2 for Rigbys. Tippet counted for Bethunes, who also received a penalty goal for a stick being thrown. In the second and third games tne result was ide.ntical, a tie 32223. Both were good games and showed the colours performing much better than they had done at any time during the regular "season". In the second, the goal scorers were: Rigbys, Black 33 Bethunes, Cutten 2, Tippet 1. And in the third: Rigbys, Black, Fleming, Passyg Bethunes, Mood 2. Cutten 1. BOXING In the 60 lb. class first round, Somerville beat Stuart and Morris accounted for Parr. The bout between Somerville and Morris, which was the first event on the programme of finals, Saturday, March llth., produced the best boxing of the Junior School. Somerville was clearly superior, but, more than that, he showed every promise of turning out a finished boxer. In the preliminary rounds of the 70-lb. competition, Hessey-White took the decision from Robertson, and Tippet beat Mood. The final between Hessey-White and Tippet was a ragged affair though active. Tippet was returned winner by a narrow margin. In the novices' competition of the same weight Hasbrouck was the winner over Hughes-Hallett, the former having disposed of Bevan in the first round, and the latter Rougvie. In the 80-lb. class, there was only one bout, in which Warner secured the decision over Nation. Again there was only one bout in the 90-lb. competition and that was expected to produce the best exhibition, but it was disap- pointing. Black and Russel were the combatants, but neither gave of his best. Black was the winner by a narrow margin. The heaviest weight, 100 lbs. and over, produced only three competitors, Fleming, Johnston and Kirkpatrick. In the first bout Johnston disposed of Fleming, but Kirkpatrick, bigger and heavier than Johnston, was an easy winner of the final bout. The Headmaster's Cup for the best boxer in the Junior School was awarded by unanimous vote of the judges and referee to Somer- ville. 46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD FORM LIST JUNIOR SCHOOL Upper First Form Lower First Form Upper Second Form passy, F, C, Tippet, R. H. Nation, G. H. Russel, B. S. Leather, E. H. C. Cutten, J. E. Johnston, M. G. McLenna.n, J. L. Fleming, A. S. McG1a.shan, J. C. Mood, W. Hughes-Hallett, D.H.C. Lower Second Form Third Fgrnj Fourth Form Hessey-White, P. D. H. Stuart, J, R, Parr' J' A. K' McConnell, W. W. S. Morris, W. D. Landry, P. C. Rougvie, C. N. Robertson, G. R. Bevan, K. W. A. Hasbrouck, J- d6P- Somerville, C. M. Kirkpatrick, R. C. Biack, W. A. Fraser, R. A. C. Warner, G D. E. Morrisey, J. P. SALVE D. Hughes-Hallett, son of Mr. L. C. Hughes-Hallett, H. B. M. Consul Detroit, Mich. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .H GBR! Enga' Numa Ted Rous V28r the new secretary of the Old Boys' Association spent a couple of days visiting T.C.S. recently. A letter from him will be found at the end of these notes. F. J. Nobbs V271 ran in the McGill relay team against Boston. Three Old Boys were prominent in the Oxford and Cambridge hockey match this year, G H. Johnson V243 for Oxford, R. M. Douglas V271 and J. A. Irvine V233 for Cambridge. All three earned special praise in the English newspaper accounts of the match. Geoff. O'Brien V131 is now Estates Officer for the National Trust Company in Toronto. W. M. V'Buck"b Pearce V103 is now associated with the Imperial Oil Company in Toronto. R. K. Wurtele V251 is working for the Royal Bank in Toronto and is living at 109 Edgewood Road. W. W. V'Gamey"l Stratton V133 is now associated with Jenks Gwynne and Company, members of the New York Stock Exchange, at 320 Bay Street, Toronto. M. Molson V27-'32l Pat Hingston V29-'32J and A. D. Browne V323 are all spending a year in Switzerland at the Institution Sillig, Vevey. Molson and Hingston played in all the football games, Whilst Browne played in four or five. Kirk was one of the University of Toronto gym. five who de- feated McGill this month. Argue Martin, Canadian champion, captured the Ontario squash championship in February. Others taking part in the competitions were Harold Martin, Hubert Martin and Monty Gunn. H. A. Martin V293 was successful in the second year examination at the Law School, Osgoode Hall. C. A. Heurtley V323 is studying accountancy in Birmingham with fair success, and has been playing in goal for the Warwickshire ice-hockey team. He would be very pleased to hear from any Old Boys. Address: 15 Clarendon Road, Birmingham, England. Mr. C. R. Hiscocks, who left the .staff of T.C.S. last year, is spend- ing twelve months in study in Germany. A DVERTISELIENTS THE TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION Annual Members S3 Life Members S25 . The annual fee is IHIYZIIJIQ in :uivnnce and is due on .I2lIlIl2lI'.X' Ist. ozwh yt-ar. Life Membership hos constitute the capital fund of the Assmfizntioh. :xml are invested in Svhool Bonds. Iiife Iiloinhvi-s. TII4'I't'i.Ol't', help to huihl up the Associations UZIIYIIERI :intl vryio-v the privileges of membership at Il vm-nv motlerznti- 1-ost to themselves vonsifloring that the Allllllili fm' Wmlitl iw 33.00. Honorary Membership Kwithout fee? is ggrmitml to those who mukt- xxpplit-ation thc-refor upon leaving the Sm-liool. :mtl VUIIIZIIIIS in furor- until the following I7e-ve!!1he'1'iils1. A11 classes of Members: I. Row-iw mlvziiivv IIOIILQS ot' St-hool Mata-hos ami other Hvhool zlvtivitios. 2. Art- vlllmliwl as si1lism'iIrv1's to the 'l'.t'.S. "RoL'o1'4I". SEZ. lim-oix'e 1-oliios of tht- Hhl Boys' Dil-t-4-to1'.x', 4. A1-v ke-pt in vmitzict with the Svhooi and with to-ncii other wherever they may ht-. 5. Assist in proxnotiligr tht- olijovls ol' the Assu- vlzltimi. Communications should be addressed to:- The Secretary-Treasurer, F. I-I. Rous IIU Vlmrios St. XX. 'l'nl'ullin 5. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 439 G. H. Johnson writes that L. C. Bonnycastle, who went down from Oxford last year and is now in Manitoba, captained the Oxford ice-hockey team and was the idol of the Oxford fans. He also played for England in international matches. H. Howard Writes to supplement the list of Old Boys in the University of Toronto: First Year, besides those previously mention- ed Z. R. B. Lash is registered in University College, R. G. Walton in Medicine, D. E. Jemmett in Trinity. Second Year, in Trinity are C. B. K. Kirk and D. K. deB. Macdonald, in University College, G. H. Hees. Third Year, in Trinity are P. L. Cleveland and C. H. Knight, in Divinity in Trinity is R. T. F. Brain, and in U. C. is J. G. Cleland. Fourth Year, in Trinity are D. Bushell, G. S. Lucas, J. E. T. McMullen, S. L. B. Martin, S. F. M. Wotherspoon, R. L. Evans, in U.C. is F. F. Hogg, in the Faculty of Applied Science is C. E. Bedford-Jones. Post-Graduate, W. K. W. Baldwin M.A., is Class assistant in Botany and studying for a doctorate, H. Howard B.A. is studying for a Master's degree in Classics, G. W. Spragge, B.A., B. Paed., is a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Paedogogy. P. F. B. Lash is registered as an occasional student. C. A. Bogert has been appointed President of the Dominion Bank and Dudley Dawson has become Manager of the same in- stitution. The Right Reverend L. W. B. Broughall was consecrated Bishop of Niagara on the Festival of the Conversion of St. Paul, 25th. January. Bishop Roper presided and Bishop Renison was also present. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT'S REPORT 1932. I have pleasure in submitting to the members of the Association my Report of the activities of the Association and work accomplish- ed by your Committee during the past year. During the year there was an increase in the number of hon- orary members which was partly accounted for by the inclusion of the Masters at the School in this class of membership. The num- ber of annual members decreased during the year by twenty but against this is very gratifying to record that eleven new life mem- berships were taken out during the year. Membership was as follows:- 50 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Annual Members .... ........ 1 99 Life Members .......... ........ 1 77 Honorary Members .... .. 62 438 Copies of the Annual Reports, three issues of the School Record and twelve advance notices of School activities, including matches, were sent to the members. Your Committee met on three occasions during the year, one of these meetings being a conference with the Masters at the School in Port Hope. Several useful suggestions were submitted by the Masters and it is the opinion of the Committee that similar con- ference should be held each year: that the result of such conferences would undoubtedly help to establish ta feeling of co-operation between the School and the members of the Association. At the last Annual Meeting you will recollect that it was pro- posed that several sub-committees be appointed and given certain responsibilities which, in the past, had been assumed by the Secretary- Treasurer with the occasional co-operation of one or two other mem- bers of the Committee. This policy was carried out and the sub- committees appointed fulfilled their duties very satisfactorily, but I must refer particularly to the outstanding effort put forth by the Athletic Committee which was composed of Messrs. S. B. Saunders, J. G. Spragge and J. McMullen, who were successful in arranging for three teams of Old Boys to play cricket against the School, these games taking place before a large number of spectators at Port Hope on June 3rd. Academic and athletic prizes have been presented by the Associa- tion and also by many individuals, to whom we extend our thanks. Mr. Harcourt Vernon was selected by your Committee to attend the Old Boys' Dinner which was held in Montreal and which was negotiated by Mr. R. P. Jellett, General Manager of the Royal Trust Company and one of the senior members of the Governing Body. The Dinner was organized by Mr. C. M. Russell and was attended by about ninety Old Boys and a few of the fathers of present pupils. Mr. Harcourt Vernon reports that Mr, Jellett, who acted as Chair- man, introduced Dr. Orchard as the speaker of the evening and that both the Chairman and the speaker presented the aims of the School in a clear and entertaining manner. The Association's representative at the Dinner also spoke briefly. The Old Boys in Montreal were enthusiastic and hoped that their Dinner would become an annual affair. At this point I feel that particular reference should be made to the efforts being put forth by Mr. Jellett to advance the interests TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOGL RECORD 51 of the School in Montreal and to have the Old Boys there take a definite interest in the problems of the School and assist in maintain- ing the number in attendance. In accordance with the resolution passed at the last Annual Meeting, the sum of 8500.00 was paid over to the Building Committee. You will notice in the Financial Report an expenditure of 3562.31 to cover the cost of mailing booklets entitled "Life at Trinity College School" to thirteen hundred Old Boys. It is hoped that excellent use will be made of these very handsome books by the recipients of them by showing them to their friends and others and also passing them on to those who might become interested in the School. I made reference in my last Report to the resignation of the Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. A. A. Harcourt Vernon. It is with a great deal of pleasure that I am able to report that your Committee was fortunate in arranging with Mr. F. H. Rous to fulfil the important office vacated by Mi. Harcourt Vernon. Mr. Rous has already ap- proached his new work with energy and enthusiasm, and may I bespeak the interest and wholehearted support of all members of the Association for Mr. Rous, which I am confident he does and will continually deserve. In retiring from the office of President of the Association, I should like to convey to the officers of the Association and members of Committees, and also the members of the Association as a whole. my heartfelt thanks for the co-operation which they have extended to me during my term of office. lSignedl J. VV. Langmuir, President, T.C.S.O.B.A. OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION DINNER IN MONTREAL The first dinner of the Association in Montreal was held on December 15th., 1932. R. P. Jellett t'92b presided. In introducing the Headmaster as prinicpal speaker, he referred briefly to a recent visit to the School and expressed much satisfaction with the conditions he saw there. The Headmaster in his speech paid tribute to the housemasters and other masters. He pointed out that he was greatly heartened and encouraged by his associations with so many of the Old Boys. A. A. Harcourt Vernon f'09h, past secretary of the Association and a member of the governing board, extended the best wishes of all those connected with the School in Toronto. He announced that Ted Rous had been appointed as the new secretary of the Association. There were about ninety present. The committee was as fol- 52 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD lows: R. P. Jellett, chairman, C. M. Russel, secretary, N. H. Macaulay, Saunders, P. S. Stevenson and D. N. Byers. Committee At a meeting of the Old Boys' Association held on January 26th., 1933, members of the Committee, to retire in 1935, were duly nom- inated and elected. There are: Lt.-Col. J. Ewart Osborne, H. A. Heaton, J. G. K. Strathy, W. J. Mickle. Also S. H. Ambrose wa-s elected to substitute for J. E. T. McMullen, who has resigned from the committee retiring in 1934. The remainder of the committee: Vice-Presidents, L. L. Mc- Murray, E. J. Ketchum, G. S. Osler, members to retire Dec. 1933, Geo. Fulford, G. S. O'Brien, S. B. Saunders, N. Seagram, Jr., to re- tire 1934g Dr. J. C. Maynard, J. G. Spragge, D. Dawson, Jr. OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION DINNER IN TORONTO The annual dinner was held in the Royal York Hotel on January 27th., 1933. The following were present: Charles Burns, D. K. Cassels, Lee Beatty, Geo. Wadds, Noel Thompson. W. Boulton, Morgan Carry, D. Trow, Lt.-Col. C. J. Ingles, Strachan Ince, Lt.-Col. J. W. Langmuir, Col. Armour, W. Lyon, W. W. Stratton, E. Armour, Dr. R. G. Armour, Brooks Gossage, Dudley Dawson Sr., C. A. Bogert, R. Blackie, Arnold Trow, J. G. Spragge, G. E. Spragge, P. H. Henderson, Norman Seagram Jr., Colin Strathy, Hartley Howard, L. L. McMurray, John Lines, W. Bunting, Geo. Hees, Geo. Scholfield, R. C. H. Cassels K.C., H. Rathbun Hees, John Becher, J. G. Cleland, R. F. Osler, F. G. Osler, Brick Osler, Gordon Wother- spoon, Bill Osler, J. S. D. Thompson, P. Mussen, W. Mickle, J. Strathy, G. K. Fisken, S. B. Saunders, J. Warden, C. Hewson Knight, W. Broughall, Roger Archibald, Monty Gunn, J. McMullen, S. Wother- spoon, G. Mudge, Rev. Canon Loucks, R. Mudge. A. A. Harcourt- Vernon, Major E. A. Hethrington, Norman Seagram Sr., D. G. Hag- arty, R. Falconbridge Cassels. Neil Bethune, J. Gibson, F. M. Pellatt, Dr. J. C. Maynard, Robin Merry, D. Slater, Struan Robertson, H. Corey. F. Hogg, G. B. Strathy, K.C., Rev. G. H. P. Grout, Laurence Grout, Stephen Ambrose, Harrison Moore, E. B. Daykin, J. D. Ketchum, Rev. C. J. S. Stuart, Major H. C. Wotherspoon, G. K. Rack- ham. L. Bethune Smith, T. Carey, Cyril Caperol, Walter Biton, R. L. Evans, Rev. C. H. Boulden, T. Taylor. Dudley Dawson Jr., H. G. Montgomery, Paul Greey, Pete Campbell, Geoff O'Brian, F. H. Rous, W. Spragge, VV. M. Pearce, C. Lumsden, Dr. F. G. Orchard, Mr. C. VVynn. Colonel Langmulr. after reading a letter of greeting from Canon TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SIS Rigby, who recently resigned from St. Mark's, Port Hope, mentioned, as some of the honours which had come to T.C.S. during the year, the appointment of Clarence Bogert V78-'81l as President of the Dominion Bankg Dudley Dawson V89-'93i, general manager of the same bankg and the election of Canon Broughall V88-'94h as Bishop of Niagara. After announcing that the Headmaster had set aside a room in the School for the exclusive use of Old Boys, Col. Langmuir, gave the names of the new officers of the Association as: President, W. W. Stratton: Vice-presidents, L. L. McMurray, S. K. Ketchum and Gordon Osler. In place of D'Arcy Martin, resigned, S. Dumoulin of Hamilton had been appointed a member of the governing board of the School. The Rev. C. H. Boulden proposed the toast of the School. He looked back as an Old Boy with affection to the people and the place where he had spent so long a time. He paid a tribute to Dr. Orchard, who had piloted the School through so many difficulties and whose dynamic energy, determination and sinking of self in the interests of the School had been so outstanding in the four difficult periods, war, peace, the 'ilu epidemic, the fire and the rebuilding.. Only those who had known the School during those times could iealise the confidence that they all had in him. The Rev. Cecil Stewart, Rector of St. Thomas, proposed the health of Dr. Orchard. He offered a tribute from one outside the School. Dr. Orchard was a worthy successor of the line of dis- tinguished headmasters who had preceded him. The outstanding feature of Dr. Orchard's headmastership had been the marvellous engineering of the rebuilding of the School, and the fortitude with which he had faced all difficulties. The new School would not have been built but for Dr. Orchard's zeal and energy. The School would suffer a great loss next June, but would look back with gratitude on the last twenty years. He wished Dr. and Mrs. Orchard all health and happiness and long life in the future. Dr. Orchard, who was received with loud cheers, said that the School was theirs, it did not belong to the Headmaster. It came into his mind as he looked round the room that one and another had made contributions to the School which were valued and never for- gotten. The time had come for him to lay down the responsibilities of what he considered one of the greatest positions in Canada, in which he had done his best. It had been a great pleasure to him that Mr. Boulden had proposed the health of the School. Mr. Boulden had been the first master he had appointed and his help and advice had always been available through thick and thin. It was a tribute to the School that Mr. Boulden had now been chosen as a headmaster. The President of the Association always stood 54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD behind the Headmaster and thanks were due to Col. Langmuir for all he had done during his term of office. The Association had been the incarnation of A. A. Harcourt-Vernon, who was being succeeded on his resignation as secretary by one of his own Old Boys, F. H. Rous. The Headmaster closed by inviting the Old Boys to see the St. Andrew's match the following week and to visit the School when- ever possible. A. A. Harcourt-Vernon, R. P. Jellett, F. H. Rous and W. W. Stratton, the new president of the association, also spoke. CORRESPONDENCE To the Editor T.C.S. Record, Dear Sir, From time to time one hears that it is no use for Old Boys to come down and spend Saturday and Sunday lat the School because they were not. made to feel comfortable or even welcome. Taking advantage of the low rates on the C.P.R. I came down on a Saturday morning. On my arrivial at the School I was not met by the band-imagine my embarrassment had that happened- but found that my best plan was to go and see who was in the Masters' Common Room and consequently to have a drink of cocoa or milk. I found that the masters were very congenial even if I had not met some of them before. ' Lunch was as usual in the Dining Hall and I found the meal excellent lsome people talk about the meals they serve-well all I can say is that they are rnisinformed about the qualityl. ln the afternoon I was free to do as I liked when I liked, Grace taught the boys cricket in the nets put up in the Gym., some boys played squash, some swam and learnt life-saving. At night most Of the chaps were taken to a movie in the town-what luxuries they get nowadays! When I was at School my home was in Port Hope and I was allowed to go home for dinner only every other Sunday! I spent most of the evening in the gym. In 1928 we had about three or four who could do a toddler or a long arm march and be sure of it. That night I saw one after another do a toddler, they did not even bother to get changed but only took off shoes and coat. We thought we were good in the First Eight five years ago-git seems to me now that we were very elementary. I spent the night in the room set aside for Old Boys. It is in the Trinity House ffor the benefit of the uninitiated this is the first house one reaches on coming into the School grounds from the townl, and overlooks Lake Ontario. Those of us who were lucky enough TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .i.n to have our rooms on the south side of the old buildings will be able to see what a great thing Dr. Orchard has done for us in giving the Old Boys rooms on that side. There is a large room directly over the Reception Room, which has been newly painted and when we Old Boys have put some furniture and pictures into it I don't think you could find a more suitable room in the whole Schoolsboth Senior and Junior- eyet they say that T.C.S. does not cater to its Old Boys? Sunday I spent mostly in bed suffering from the effects of try- ing modern methods of learning toddlers, back fiips, etc., ,after five years of more or less inactivity in that line. In closing I would like to say that the whole atmosphere of the School-Masters, Boys, everyone-does really make one feel absolutely at home. Yours etc., ' TED ROUS '28. BIRTHS Somers-February 26th., to Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Somers, a son. Van Straubenzee-March 19th., to Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Van Strau- benzee, a son. MARRIAGES Balfour-Staunton-On January 21st., in the Metropolitan Church, Toronto, St. Clair Balfour, Jr. of Hamilto.n to Helen Gifford, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Staunton. Ketchum-de Beauregard-On December 26th., in the Chapel of St. Andrew's College, Aurora, Kenneth G. B. Ketchum to Esther T., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. de Beauregard. DEATHS Cummings-March 18th., near Toronto, John D. Ctmunings. Fessenden-July 22nd at Bermuda, Reginald Aubrey Fessenden. VVard-January 17th., at Port Hope, Annie Booth, wife of Judge H. A. Ward. 'The Mitre", University of Bishop's College, Lennoxville, P. Q. 'The Black and Red", University School, Victoria, B.C. ',qi TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD EXCHANGES 'The Forum", Barbados, B.W.I. 'The Harrovian", Harrow School, England. 'The Glenalmond Chronicle", Trinity College, Glenalmond. 'The Albanian", St. Alban's, Brockville. Acta Ridleiana", Bishop Ridley School, St. Catherines. Saint Andrew's College Record", St. Andrew's College, Aurora. 'Lower Canada College Magazine", Lower Canada College, Montreal 'The Grove Chronicle", The Grove, Lakefield. 'The Ashburiann, Ashbury College, Ottawa. 'Bishop Strat-lrin School Magazine", Bishop Strachan School Toronto. 'St. Ninian's School Magazine", St. Ninian's School, Dumfries. 'The Blue and White", Rothesay Collegiate School. 'The Raven", Ravenscourt School, Winnipeg. 'Rouge et Noir", Sussex High School, Sussex, N.B. The Tabor Log", Tabor Academy, Marion, Mass. Bishop's College School Magazine", Bishop's College School Lennoxville. The Black and Gold", St. John's College, Winnipeg. The College Times", Upper Canada College, Toronto. R.M.C. Review", Royal Military College, Kingston. Windsoria.n", King's College School, Windsor, N.S. 'The Trinity University Review", Toronto, Ontario. 1 v ADVERTISEMENTS A CANADIAN SCHOOLS TOUR OFTHH BRITISH ISLES and the EUROPEAN CONTINENT r -1 . 'Q-7.51, J. ,, 9 Iqw. Ie. I ."Q.1'f. . , 3 . , -. . -, , ML... 4., ff ' ' ""' ' if , f ,-. M Y ." -I L' . ' JT. ' ",. 1- ' M' at-f??l " 9' "'a"r'fT"' rg 4+ - '.4: X ,4..,S:.c-'- , ., -M 1' ' ' -j A s ..-M Q:-a.::.., ,--rw - - ,. .- my J," ...-..9.,...... 5.-.--n -- 3..:'v-' ,"., Z' X - - Ong, l.. "' 1 'Tx " - f-if 1 H Q A Canadian Pacific "Duchess of York" Sailing' from Mo11T1'c.lI on July Tth. Ol'Q'2Il1IS0lI by l'l1a1'IcS N. xvyllll. lisml.. of Trillity Vollcgc School. Port IIopc. Hut. from whom information may be obtained and with whom reservations should be made. Last Day for 1'9S91'YiIiIO11S May 15th., 1933 In conjunction with CANADIAN PACIFIC STEAMSH I PS Y D 1. I i E S f V l in b I F P. L I O I if E I -Il 4 - . P '- gl:-' P6 Fi . I .iallti-6136258-Gilsrnar.-as.arn:n .,.s.AneSi4an?- QQ-ag 'u.:.-I-,Q -as-ey, sua-' n-nn,4 J 4 ' , 7' A S. 1 I I -'.,.I4 'f x -- H" IJ f O JI'-ff! Qi" U 'X I 'mi V ., v - Q ' , Ffzrwl-1. , ', VLQV Wm, :'Y-,I -3 Y in ,r ' I. nu ,V fr '. 0 I ' Q I 4 .1 rl I V. 1' ' ' tv' A I Q s pl" Y I . ,. . I -' 'J I.. 'i .2 W vu , .4 . .- 1 HJ .4-. f f 1+--'s VJ- x ,,,',-,..' -F, J' " --, ' s"4.I 1-C1 !J'1.g,!..'F ' Q "s",n.n5g- A Q' f 4. .I. - ,I ' .J C hiv 1 v U V ' 'Z --- 1' . .' 9 n .1 J T1 v I .Z plain. v .vb- Q 1:3 'Q 'fl cw f Q f'1AsT-QAHAQEI, cl-1110 44- ,--ah- V-uh-- -1-qduig jug - 5- f - , w.1 ..l . 'xxx' O - 1 -K . ,Y i W' :F ' N . - 'fi l , 4 ,M a x 1 4 41,1-w Al I r Glnrpnratinn nf Elrinitg Qlnllvgv Svrhnnl VISITOR: The Right Rl-V. the Bishop of Toronto. GOVERNING BODY Ex-Officio Members The Clli111L'CllOl' of Trinity lv11lVL'l'Sllf'. The Rev. the Provost of Trinity College. C. S. Blaclnnes, lisq., li.L'.. LL.D., Trinity College .... Toronto The Rev. l". Grahani Ort-liard, MA.. D.D-, Headmaster of the School. Elected Members The Hon. Mr. Justice Ri. M. llennistoun, CBE., LL.D., Winnipeg His Hon. Judge ll. A. Ward .................... Port. Hope R-. P. Jellett. lisq. ............................... Montreal L. H. Baldwin. Esq. .......... .... 'l loronto F. Gordon Usler, Esq. .......... .... 'l 'oronto G. B. Strathy. Esq.. BLA., K.C., .. .... Toronto The Rev. O. Rigby, MA., LlJ.D. ................. Port Hope Clarence A. Bogert. Esq. .......................... Toronto Brigadier-General G. S. Cartwriglit, CB., C.M.G. .... Toronto Norman Seagrani. Esq. ............................ Toronto J. C. Maynard. Esq., MD. ......,......... ........ T oronto Percy Henderson, Esq. ........................... Toronto Lieutenant-General Sir A. C. Macdonell, K.C.B. .... Kingston The Hon. Mr. Senator G. H. Barnard ......... Victoria, B. C. A. A. Harcourt Vernon. Esq. .......... .. ..... Toronto Colonel J. XV. Langinuir .................. .... T oronto Elected by the Old Boys R. C. H. Cassels, Esq.. K.C. ............... .... T oronto Dudley Dawson, Esq. ...... .... T oronto S. S. Duinoulin ....... Hamilton Glrinitg Glnllegr Srhnnl, Hurt Emp: ESTABLISHED 1865. Head Master REV. F. GRAHAM ORCHARD, M.A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge, D.D., Trinity College, Toronto. Chaplain, Bromsgrove School, England, 1903-19065 Head Master St. A1ban's Brockville, 1906-1913. House Masters S. GELDARD, Esq., B.A., Trinity College, Cambridge. LT.-COLONEL C. GOODDAY, Aldenham School, England. Assistant Masters The REV. R. S. TIPPET, B.A., McGill University, Montreal. A. C. MORRIS, Esq., B.A., King's College, Windsor, N. S. P. H. LEWIS, Esq., B.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. E. W. MORSE, Esq., Queen's University, Kingston. D. KERMODE PARR, Esq., B.A., London University. LT.-COL. K. L. STEVENSON, Cheltenham College and R.M.A., Woolwich. C. N. WYNN, Esq., B.A., Keble College, Oxford. E112 Zluninr Svrhnnl House Master W. OGLE, Esq., M.A., Glasgow University. Assistant Masters W. H. MORSE, Esq. H. G. JAMES, Esq., Leeds University. Lady Assistant MISS B. S. SYMONDS. Music Master A. B. SLY, Esq., L.R.A.M. Performers' Diploma, Associate in Music, University of Reading Drawing Master G. T. SCLATER, Esq., A.O.C.A., Diploma at the Ontario College of Art, Toronto. Physical Instructor for All Schools SERGEANT-MAJOR S. J. BATT, Royal Fusiliersg late Physical Instructor at R.M.C., Kingston. Eirinitg Glnllrgv Svrhnnl Qlrrnrh - Q EDITORIAL STAFF. Editor ,....,................ .......................................... E . Cutler Assistant Editor ...... ........ W . B. Reid Sports Editor ..... ........ J . V. Kerrigan Committee ....... .......- F - Ed-6 F. Smye R. Keefer Junior School Record ..................... ........ M r. W. Ogle Adviser and Business Manager ........ ........ M r. D. Kermode Parr CONTENTS. Page Dr. Orchard ..,. ...........V............. ..... 1 Editorial ................... f school Notes .......,.. .... - . 9 Music in the School .,... .---- 9 The New Headmaster ........... 4--.- 1 1 The Chapel ..................................,..................... ..... 1 2 The Fellowship of the West ............................. ...-. 1 3 Visit of the Governor-General of Canada ....... ..... 1 5 The Inter-House Drill Competition .............. ..... 1 6 The Science and Arts Society ..,.................... ..... 1 7 The Library ................,.................. .---- 1 7 Dramatic Society ......... .......... ..... 1 9 The Play Supper ............... ..,.. 2 0 Cricket ...................................... ..... 2 1 First Team Matches . ..... ..... 2 3 Third. Team Matches ..... ...., 3 2 House Matches ............. ..... 3 8 Cricket Colours .......... ,.... 4 0 Batting Averages ..,... ..... 4 0 Bowling Averages .,., ..... 4 1 Gym. Eight Competition ...... ...,. 4 3 Squash Colours ................... ..,.. 4 3 The Toronto Gym. Show ...... ..... 4 5 Tennis ................................... ..... 4 5 Shooting ..,................ .,.. ..,.. 4 6 The Track Team ..... ..... 4 6 Contributions ........ ..... 4 7 Speech Day .....,................... ..... 4 9 Prize List ................................ ..... 5 0 The Junior School Record .......,........ .......... ..... 5 7 Old Boys' Notes .,................,.............................. . ..... 67 The Headmaster's Letter to the O.B.A. ...... ..... 6 7 Births, Marriages and Deaths ................... ..... 7 1 Ladies' Guild .............................................,.. ,,.,, 7 1 Presentation to Dr. and Mrs. Orchard ..... ..... 7 3 Exchanges ...................................................... .,.,, 7 3 The Rev. F. Graham Orchard, M.A., D.D Headmaster, 1913-1933. I after the portrait by E. Wyly Grierl Irinitg Glnllrgv Svrhnnl Kvrnrh llOL.XXXVl TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL, PORT HOPE.JULY, 1933. NO.3 Br. Qbrrharh The last twenty years of the world's history have been remark- able years full of striking events and great changes, and many of these events and changes have of necessity affected the life of Trinity College School. The years of the War, the 'Hu, and the depression have been strenuous years demanding courage and skill of a very special kind from those at the head of our boarding schools. In the case of T.C.S., to the difficulties arising from world-conditions there have been added the special difficulties of the periods of the fire and the reconstruction. Dr. Orchard is a man upon whom try- ing times and difficult situations have always seemed to act as a tonic and the School has been fortunate in that during so many days of storm and stress, she has had as her Head a man of ability, courage, energy and whole-hearted enthusiasm. Dr. Orchard came to Canada in 1906 as Headmaster of St. Alba.n's School, Brockvilleg and in his seven years therehe earned the confidence and admiration of those who were in touch with the School and its activities. It was natural that when in 1913 the Governors of T.C.S. were looking for someone to preside over the destiny of our School they should turn to one whose record for the previous seven years was so good. Under him St. Alban's had done great things, and it was reasonable to hope that T.C.S., too, would prosper and grow under the same able leadership. The Headmaster came to Port Hope in the summer of 1913, and those of us who joined him that September remember with whole- hearted admiration and unstinted praise the way in which he applied liimself to a task which was by no means easy. Tireless himself and always ready to give time and trouble in working for the School, he was careful to see that every minute detail of arrangement was properly attended to-that every man had his work and did it. More than once have members of his staff said that he was an exacting man but that he exacted most from himself. His active step and his keen, alert movements were typical of the ma.n's life, nothing escaped his attention, and nothing however small was neglected. His versatility impressed us much. I remember that one afternoon I went over to the Lodge for some reason now long forgotten. There I came upon the Head sitting at the piano and playing Chopin from memory. That evening I was taking study-the big study, Q TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD with some eighty boys in the old Speech Room. A boy came up to my desk and asked for an explanation of something he could not understand about shorthand. Knowing nothing of it myself I sent him back to his place. Shortly afterwards Mr. Orchard came in and it was not long before I saw him explaining the difficulties in question. An excellent classic and quite capable of teaching well almost any subject on the School time table, he has always been able to supervise the work of every department. His interest in all the .School activities has always been keen, and most of all has he .sought to emphasise the importance of the Chapel and all for which it stands. His sermons were telling and his reading clear and impressive, and one always realised that the himself was supremely in earnest. With his gift of absolute pitch and his knowledge of music, he did a great deal to improve the singing and the rendering of the service. Those early days twith Dr. Petry at the organ, with Moore and Bird, and others who were killed overseas, in the Choir and with the dignity and charm of the Chapel itselfl live in the memory of many of us as great days. It is not that we have allowed time to hallow them and to idealise them. They made their impression then and its very vividness now is an assurance of its effectiveness then: and to us of the staff the main- spring and the power of the School was "Mr. Orchard". With the boys, too, he was a source of admiration and respect. It has al- ways seemed to me that the things upon which he laid most .stress in his preaching and in his teaching were thoroughness and per- severance, things which were even better preached and taught by his life than by his sermons and in his classes. I can hear him now as he spoke in the Chapel, "It is not what you do that matters, but how you do it": and I can recall his painstaking and careful cor- rection of exercises and of handwriting. Do not many boys remem- ber the deliberate and conscientious way in which all irregularities and inconsistencies were pointed out, how conscientious he was and expected others to be about method and detail? Nor in those early days of his administration were the buildings and the equipment forgotten. In the first Christmas holidays of his headmastership the old gas fixtures gave place to electric light and .soon afterwards the old "Gates" came down. tWe who knew the School in those days understood the cry of "Gates" as boys of to-day do not.J I have dwelt upon the early days because they stand out very clearly now as I look back upon them-and because one's first im- pressions are always the most vivid. But I have dwelt upon them intentionally because I believe that they are consistent with the days which followed. The Mr. Orchard of 1913-1916 is the Dr. Orchard of later days. Keen and alert, active and courageous in the days TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Ii of the war, so he remained afterwards. It was the same enthusiasm and energy which enlarged the playing fields, built the Junior School and over-saw the many improvements in the Chapel and the setting up of the Memorial Cross. It was the same courage which brought him through the period of the fire and the colossal task of rebuild- ing. Of course, he was not alone in these things. No account of Dr. Orchard's time at T.C.S. would be complete without some refer- ence to what he himself has called the wonderful work of the Ladies' Guild and to that of many individuals. Governors such as Mr. Dyce Saunders and Mr. Lionel Clarke tto mention only twol, Mrs. Patter- son's help with the Hospital, the help and advice of others too numerous to mention-all these have contributed to the work done. But the dynamic energy and the calm purpose of the Headmaster have been the chief powers behind the buildings and improvements which have been achieved during his regime. A life packed full of work and interest such as has been the Headmaster's during the twenty years he has given to the Sc-hool cannot adequately be described in a short article and much must therefore be left out and more described but briefly. Perhaps, I may be allowed to choose some things which stand out in my mind most clearly. One of these is the attention which he has always brought to -bear upon the hospital equipment, and the care of the boys' health. Every case of sickness has been a subject of keen interest and attention. The information given to parents has been full, detailed and punctual, and the Headmaster's watchful super- vision of this important department has been an education to all who have worked under him. T-he lasting gratitude of many parents has been his as a result of it: and mutual respect and admiration which he and Dr. Forrest have for one another is one of its fruits. Another thing which stands out as one looks back over the last few years is the tireless energy of the days after the fire. With the Senior School at Woodstock and the Junior School and the pro- perty a hundred and fifty miles away, with the plans for the new buildings to be supervised and the adminstration of the School to be carried on, the big task became even biggerg and it was a marvel to us that he could carry it on as he did with the patience and the thoroughness which had become his second nature. Again there were those who shared the burden, but again the embodiment of the unity of the School was the Head, and all its activities were under his watchful eye. Music and art and the enjoyment of beautiful things are pleasures which are apt to be neglected in a busy life. With Dr. Orchard they have had at times to fall into the background: but it TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD they have never been forgotten. Perhaps in a more lesisured life he will be able to enjoy more some of those things which have al- ways been near to his heart. Of these music is one, and it has been his joy to encourage its study and appreciation throughout his time at the School. At different times it has flourished in different ways. Now it has been especially evident in the Chapel services, now in some other field, such as the Orchestra or the Glee Club. But whether in the earlier days of Dr. Petiy and Mr. Stanford or in those of Davidson Ketchum and the St. Matthew Passion and Pinafore, The Headmaster watches a match or in those of Mr. Sly and the Orchestr.a, always there has been the hopeful idealism and the keenness of the Headmaster to encourage and to inspire. He himself has felt and enjoyed the charm of Music and he has always been mindful of its importance and the power it can be in the life of boy and man. And so he and those who worked with him have been instrumental in opening up to not a few boys possibilities of enjoyment and growth and recreation which had otherwise remained outside their ken. How difficult it would be to attempt to write of Dr. Orchard and the School without mention of other people! For the life of none of us is an isolated thing and the attractiveness of most good work that is done lies in the fact that it draws together those who TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 5 do it. And so it is that the account of a man's work must include, expressed or implied, that of other men and women. There are those in more or less exalted position, who have been associated with Dr. Orchard and who :are proud to have been associated with him in the ups and downs of the years from 1913 to 1933. A few of them happen to have been mentioned in this short article, others- many others-have been left out. So too with events and achieve- ments. so with important traits and characteristics of the man of Whom I write. They are not left out because they are unimportant: nor because they are forgotten. If they a.re not in the picture which I have painted, they are in the real picture which I should like to have painted. It would have been a picture of a very human Head- master, who has sunk self-interest and self-seeking in a life of hard work enthusiastically done without fear or favour-among and with others who have been proud to share his achievements and his trials. Mrs. Orchard's share in all that has been done at the School, during the regime of Dr. Orchard has been a large one, and she too has brought enthusiasm and keenness to all she has undertaken. Her particular sphere was, naturally, the Lodge and her excellent taste and skill were brought to bear to beautify it and to make it com- fortable, as well as to entertain in it a steady round of guests, i.n- cluding parents of the boys, other friends of the School and a host of other people. But her interest was not limited to her homey her talents and taste have made themselves felt in the furnishing and planning of the Junior School, of the Hospital and of other units of the buildings, and it would not be fitting that we should allow the gardens and the flower beds to be forgotten, for here, too, her advice and supervision have done much to beautify the surroundings of the School. In fact Mrs. Orchard, like her husband, has identified her- self with all the interests of the School and with the people who make up its family. To one who has made T.C.S. a "second home" for the last twenty years, the leaving of Dr. and Mrs. Orchard is an event fraught with much meaning: it is the going away from the School of people whose life has been so bound up with that of the School that some of us find it very hard to think of the one without the other. We, who 6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD think of ourselves as the Schrool, join in every good Wish for the happiness and prosperity of Dr. and Mrs. Orchard, and in thanks for all that they have been and done for us and for the School. 'PW 11 Kite, U'gf'e Fw K 'pe fa . ,W N , , ,,. ..,.. 1 The Headmaster and Mr. Boulden C.H.B TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T Ehiturial With Dr. Orchard's retirement a great chapter in the history of the School draws to a close. In his twenty years as Headmaster he had built up the School and its traditions. He has brought it safely throught the critical times of war, epidemic, and fire. For the last two decades he has been the very heart and soul of the School, and there have grown up between Dr. Orchard and the School bonds which never can be broken. These ties remain in the memories of those who have been at School under him. Dr. and Mrs. Orchard are going back to England, They carry with them the best wishes of the School for which they have done so much. We are pleased to welcome Mr. P. A. C. Ketchum as our new Headmaster. We are sorry to say that the Rev. Mr. Tippct and Lt.-Col. Good- day, two masters who have meant a great deal to the School, are leaving this term. Mr. Tippet in the last .seventeen years has assisted ably in many activities in addition to his teachingg as head of the Cadet Corps, as physical training instructor before the Sergeant-Major, and in the Library. In guiding our spiritual lives he has become endeared to many of us. Col. Goodday has been with the School ten years. A good or- ganizer, he has supervised many School activities, especially Little- side sports. He has been Master of the Middle School and in the new buildings, Housemaster of Bethune House. We also regret the departure from the Senior School of Mr. E. W. Morse, Mr. C. N. Wynn and Mr. A. B. Sly. We wish to extend to all of them the very best wishes for the future. We were disappointed in not being able to organize basket- ball and swimming teams. But that must be left to the future. However, owing to the keenness of a few, a tennis team and a. track team were organized. Tennis is a game everyone should learn at School. With an organized team the standard of the playing will be considerably raised. S'-2 O rn CI Morse Lt.-Col. K. L. Steve mes E. W. Ja yH. G. da Good Lt.-C01. C. Morse n D. K. Parr W. H. WYE C. N. E71 FQ 42 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 9 Except for Sports Day and the Oxford Cup in the fall, up till now there has been practically no track work at all in the School. However, a good start has been made and we hope that it will con- tinue in the years to come. SCHOOL NOTES On his birthday, June 18th., Dr. Orchard was presented with ll gold watch and chain from the boys of the School "in deep apprecia- tion of all that he has done for us and the School in the last twenty years." The presentation was made by Whitehead max. outside the Chapel after the morning service. D. Wigle and P. S. Osler ma. have been appointed School Prefects. D. Wigle was elected Captain of Cricket. W. Vaughan was elected Captain of Bethune House. P. McCloskey has been elected Captain of Middleside Cricket. C. Truax was elected Captain of Littleside Cricket. C. Seagram ma. was elected Captain of Brent House Littleside. A Life Saving class for the Bronze Medallion has been held this term by Cox. The Littleside Tennis Tournament was won by Seagram ma. who defeated Mills in the finals. The names of the Head Boys of the School and of the winners of the Rev. F. A. Bethune Trinity Scholarship, the Bronze Medal, the Governor-Generalfs Medal, and the Jubilee Exhibition have been put on the panels of the Dining Hall. MUSIC IN THE SCHOOL Owing to quarantine regulations, we were unable to hear the concerts booked for this term. We were disappointed that the con- cert of the Peterboro Madrigal Society had to be postponed. Mr. Marcus Adeney was to have given a 'cello recital to the Music Club, but that too had to be put oi. The evening recitals of the Music Club have continued whenever circumstances permitted. Modern English and French music, Chopin, and Bach featured largely in the programmes. The New Headmaster TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 11 Elie New Erahmnatrr We take this opportunity of offering our welcome to Mr. P. A. C. Ketchum, who has been appointed to succeed Dr. Orchard as Head- master. It is no stranger who is to come to us, but rather an old friend returning. Mr. Ketchum began his connection with Trinity College School when he came here as a boy in 1912. Leaving in 1916 he began his teaching .career as a junior assistant master at Lakefield. In 1917 he entered Trinity College, Toronto, but left in February 1918 to join the Royal Air Force in which he became a pilot on scout machines. Re-entering Trinity College after the war, Mr. Ketchum took his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1923. In this period he excelled also as an athlete. While at Trinity, he was President of the Uni- versity of Toronto Rugby Club, President of the Trinity College Athletic Association and was known as one of the best players of an unusually fine Varsity football team. When he had graduated from Trinity, Mr. Ketchum taught for a year at Upper Canada College, and then, in 1924, returned to T.C.S. as a master. At the end of three years on the staff, he decided to go to Cambridge. During his two years at Emmanuel College, Mr. Ketchum was a member of the Mildmay Essay Club, and of the College rugby team. He read the English Tripos and received his B.A. Cantab in 1929. Since 1929, Mr. Ketchum has been on the staff of St. Markfs School, in Massachusetts, one of the oldest and most distinguished schools in New England. As Mr. Ketchum takes up his new task, he will have the sincerest good wishes of all of us. 12 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Elie Glhaprl On April 8th., the Lord Bishop of Toronto administered the rite of Confirmation to seventeen boys in St. Mark's Church where the special service was held in order to accommodate the large number of visitors. The following boys were coniirmedr Donald Kenneth Dawes James Edward Cutten Lawrence Hugh Galt Kortright Robert Campbell Kirkpatrick Walter Blakeway Miller Edwin Hartley Leather Alan Victor Lennox Mills John Clarke McGlashan John Harley Mitchell John Lawrence McLennan Ernest Llewclyn Gibson Smith George Hugh Nation Basil Gordon Southam Francis Claude Passy David Granville Stevenson Bruce Sutherland Russel William Anderson Black The special offertory of 324.06 is devoted to the Chapel Building Fund by permission of the Bishop. The following visitors have preached in the Chapel: May 7th.-The Reverend C. H. Boulden, Headmaster, Lake Lodge School, Grimsby. May 28th.-The Reverend Sidney Childs, of Trinity College, Toronto. The annual Speech Day service was held in St. Mark's Church with the very kind permission of the new Rector, the Reverend W. Bruce Jennings. The sermon was preached by the Reverend Canon Shatford of Montreal and his wonderful address will live long in the memory of the School. The Bishop closed the service with the bless- ing. On Speech Day the offertory of 834.12 is devoted to the Chapel Building Fund. The offerings collected since the last issue of the Record amount to 519291. On March 12th., the Reverend Dr. Hiltz visited the School and spoke to us about the Restoration Fund and the Headmaster sug- gested that the offerings of the School should. be made at the time of the usual Sunday offertories and anything over a certain amount considered to be the usual offering would be devoted to the Restora- tion Fund. We are glad to say that since then the offerings have been doubled and a cheque for 369.25 is being sent from the Chapel Offertory Fund to the Restoration Fund. On Trinity Sunday we continued our tradition instituted after the War and held a Choral Celebration at half past eleven when the TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD IIS names of our number who gave their lives in the war were read out by the Headmaster and at the conclusion of the service the School went in procession to the Memorial Cross and when in formation there the President of the Ladies' Guild, Mrs. Britton Osler, laid a wreath at the foot of the Cross and the School sang: Lord, Thy wounds our healing giveg To Thy cross we look and live: Jesu, may we ever be Grafted, rooted, built on Thee. The whole school then sang the School hymn, "Blest are the P.ure in Heart". THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE WEST On Sunday, May the 21st., two members of the Fellowship of the West, Mr. A. A. Harcourt Vernon, the former Secretary of the T.C.S. Old Boys' Association, and Mr. Wilfred Bradley, visited the School and gave a lecture on the work and aims of the Fellowship. The Fellowship of the West was started five years ago by a group of young men in Montreal who felt a desire to do a "typical piece of young men's work in Western Canada." By sending out "teams" each composed of a young clergyman and a layman, the Fellowship carries practical as well as spiritual aid to the people in isolated .districts of our great West. Travelling by car, on foot, and on horseback these teams carry the ministrations of the Church of England into many lonely homes. The work of the Fellowship depends entirely on the financial support of its members, and it appeal-s for the direct support of all young men of the Anglican Church. Its asks that we do as much as we can and pray for the work of this wonderful movement. . ,unw- .un-gn. Af' ,S ' 1,, T if 'xii 5232! z if 1 xx 5 Fg"'f,. Bessborough by 'U as f-1 'CS S11 :S 114 C6 s-4 on C1 cu C? S- O S3 s.. cu P O U as .-Ci +A U2 cu 'f-I o C1 cu .'I"-. cv o N Fil 5-4 1-4 Q2 .Cl B C0 C0 GD v-I a .rf 49 oo M e8 2 vi Q E4 4-1 cd TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 15 VISIT OF THE GOVERINOR-GENERAL OF CANADA The Cadet Corps On Inspection Day, May Sth., the School was honoured by a visit of the Governor-General and Lady Bessborough. Their Excellencies arrived at the School at eleven-thirty, having previously spent a short time in town, and were received in front of Trinity House by the Guard of Honour. A bouquet of flowers was presented to Lady Bessborough by Morris, of the Junior School, and the Vice-Regal party was welcomed by the Headmaster. Lord Bessborough then inspected the Guard of Honour, showing considerable interest in the appearance of the Corps. The masters and school governors and their wives were presented, and their Excel- lencies then entered Trinity House to sign the visitors' book, after which they were conducted through the School buildings. Lunch was served in the Dining Hall at one o'clock. There were about a hundred guests present, in addition to the School. In the early afternoon their Excellencies, and as many visitors as could be packed into the available space, witnessed a gym. dis- play. The horse, tumbling, horizontal and parallel bar teams -and the Physical Training class, gave good performances, of which the horizontal bar work was probably the best. After the show, Lord Bessborough briefly addressed the School, taking the theme of his own schools motto. . His Excellency complimented the Sergeant-Major on his success with the teams and the Physical Training class and ended with the well-received "Wish" that the School should have a whole holiday to celebrate his visit. 16 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Their Excellencies left the School by motor-car at four o'clock. Portraits of the Earl and Lady Bessborough, the gift of their Excellencies, have since been placed in Trinity House. Thenofficers of the Guard of Honour were: Captain, Whitehead m.ax.g Lieutenants, Newman and Robson. - as s as ,f N "" ..,. . 5 , 1 'K 1 031,-Q .f 0' T L gif T ., ,s,....., " 2 fr V ., . f f , .. 1-M 11 A j. - ,,,, , an-j,-lg? . , .Pi 1 A Gym. Display for their Excellencies ,- . THE INTER-HOUSE DRILL COMPETITION The Bethune Cup was won by Brent House. The competition was judged by General Anderson and Captain Isbester, the district Inspecting Officer. After the parade, General Anderson presented the D.C.R.A. shooting medals. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 17 THE SCIENCE AND ARTS SOCIETY On the day of the Governor-General's visit we gave a small exhibition of our work, consisting mainly of photographs by Mr. Morse, Nelles and Amiesley. A -special feature was Mr. Sly's ap- paratus for the manufacture of bows and bow-strings. The display was quite a success, although only a limited number of visitors attended. On the last Sunday of the term a short committee meeting was held, at which among other things, it was decided, to effect several improvements in the Dark Room, build lockers in which members might keep objects of value, and lastly to allow all members of the Honour Chemistry -Set free use of the Science Libraries. Some time ago Mr. C. S. Cleveland, the architect of the build- ings, put up a prize for the best photographs of the School buildings. This prize was won by Annesley, Stevenson ranking second and O'Brien third. In conclusion we would like to thank the members and friends of the Society for their aid to the Society during the past year. THE LIBRARY The following books have been added to the Library during the current year, partly by gift and partly from the Library Fund:- "Adventure", by Major-Gen. the Rt. Hon. J. E. B. Seely, "The Royal Road to Romance", by Richard Haliburton, "The Epic of Mount Everest", by Edward Osman, "An Introduction to Dramatic Theory", by Nicoll Allardyce, "Coins and How to Know Them", by G. B. Rawlings 5 "Airmen of the War", by Boyd Cable, "The Fourth Dimension", by H. A. Vachell, "Sunrise Stories", by Riordan and Takayanagi, "Shakespeare in Tale and Verse", by Lois Hufford, "Herne the Hunter", by Harrison Ainsworth, "Christmas Books", by Dickens, "Sonia", by Stephen McKenna, "Ninety-six Hours Leave", by Stephen McKenna, "Not that it Matters", by A. A. Milne, "Laddie", by Gene Stratton Porter, "Jack Miner and the Birds", by Jack Miner, "Blind Corner", by Dornford Yates, "The Rough Road", by William Locke, "The Crouching Beast", by Valentine Williams, "Rupert of Hentzau", by Anthony Hope, "The Middle Watch", by Ian Hay and Stephen King-Hall, "The Return of Bulldog Drummond" by Sapper, ',Blackcock's Feather", by Maurice Walsh, "Rogue I-Ierries", by Hugh Walpole, "Clubfoot the Avenger", by Valentine Money ' of S ' Ton tevenson, S 1. gby, Esq., E. Cutler, Lt.-Co arr, Esq., O. Ri Reed, D. K. P M. U gh eft to ri KL Ferguson, MCD. Wigle, son, A. Fleming, D. CD tev y, D.S SC Morri Archbold, H. G. Allan. M. ughan, Va R. 'O -5 as od 5 E Q1 rn rn G3 O Ill 1Seated1 H. Henderson, J. Stikeman. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 19 Williams, "Scaramouche the King Maker", by Raphael Sabatinig "Twenty Years After". by Dumas: "The Cell Murder Mystery", by Bayne Hobart: "The Four Adventures of Richard Hannay", by John Buchan, "Rivers to Cross", by Roland Pertweeg "Odtaa", by John Masefieldg "The Green Archer", by Edgar Wallace, "Money for Nothing", by P. G. Wodehouseg "The History, Natural Resources, and Native Beauties of Nova Scotia", by R. McLeod, "The Children's Story of the War", in six volumes, by Sir Edward Parrott. DRAMATIC SOCIETY On May Sth., the Dramatic Society gave a performance of "Tons of Money," a three-act comedy by Will Evans and Valentine. Al- though the play is considered difficult for very amateur players, the attempt was a tremendous success. The first act opens with the servants setting the breakfast table, a scene in which we see the coy little parlour-maid, Simpson, tMor- riseyi iiirting with the impeccable butler, Sprules, tplayed to per- fection by Archboldi. Enter the heroine, Louise Allington lF1emingl who has an air of dash about her, and makes herself the keystone of the action by frequently "having an idea", much to the discomfort of her inventor husband, Aubrey, LStevensonl, who seems to have the "artistic temperament" rather badly. Stevenson did well in the first act, but came to the fore in the crises of the second act, in which Aubrey in his first alias gets himself into trouble by "two- timing" with Jean Everard tFergusonl. At this stage Miss Mullett fthe most finished performance of the caste, played by Henderson! had the audience almost in hysterics by her persistent queries. The last act was somewhat slow, but the villain, Henery, fWig1el was a redeeming feature. The real George Maitland, CCassels max.l becomes almost melodramatic in demanding his rights. Finally Aubrey enters as a wandering minstrel, things go "up, up, up", until the play ends with quite a iiourish. We must 11ot forget toemention the staid solicitor, Mr. Chester- man, fStikemeni, of the firm of Chesterman, Chesterman and Chest- erman, or the gardener Giles fReid mil, whose opportune entries will live long in the memory. The School in greatly indebted for this fine evening's entertain- ment to Col. Stevenson, who chose the play, picked and organized my TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD the cast, and directed the rehearsals, and to Parr, who arranged the Stage properties and the extraordinarily good setting. Also we wish especially to thank Mr. Oswald Rigby, whose expert coaching and make-up work contributed so largely to the success of the play. THE CAST "Tons ot Money" SPRULES ...................,...........................,........... ...... G . Archbold SIMPSON ...................................... ......... H . Morrisey MISS BENITA MULLETT .,........,........................... ...... H . Henderso.n LOUISE ALLINGTON .....,....,................................................. A. Fleming AUBREY HENRY MAITLAND ALLINGTON ............ D. Stevenson GILES .....,..,.................................................................. ............. W . Reid JAMES CHESTERMAN ...... ........ J . Stikeman JEAN EVERARD ........... ..... M . Ferguson HENERY ......,.,.,............... .......... D . Wigle GEORGE MAITLAND ..,...................,............. ...... P . Cassels THE PLAY SUPPER On May 27th., the Headmaster and Mrs. Orchard entertained at supper in the Dining Hall those connected with the performance of "Tons of Money." The lengthy and well-chosen menu was printed with appropriate quotations from the play under each item. The meal was a cold one, starting with grapefruit cup and ending with strawberry shortcake. Needless to say, what came between was also excellent. The entertainment began with a treasure hunt, in which Fleming was the lucky finder of a dollar bill which had been hidden in an odd corner of the Dining Hall. Then came two clever skits, com- posed by Mr. Sly entirely with phrases from the play, and a "Tin Horn Concerto," fby Mr. Scott Malcolml rendered by Fleming as the virtuoso, accompanied by Mr. Sly, which was really very funny. Then everyone joined hands in the singing of Auld Lang Syne, and the party broke up after a thoroughly enjoyed evening. - TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q1 Glrirket Practice began in the gym. during the Easter term. Not much could be done at the beginning of the Trinity term, but when a start was made the weather was better than usual and interfered with play on only a few occasions. From the first Wigle showed -signs of doing what he looked like doing last year, namely making runs. With scores of 10, 51 re- tired, 40 retired, 30 retired, 51, 32 and 33 fthe last three being in inter-School gamesl he easily headed the averages and batted con- sistently well. His success is a good example of the reward of the batsman who. goes forward to meet the ball and hits straight. As a Captain he worked hard and considering his lack of experience managed the team quite well. Osler ii., P. S., proved an excellent opening bat .and although possessing a rather atrocious style kept his end up well and on one or two occasions made runs. He set an excellent example in the U.C.C. game by holding a big hit into the "deep field." Vaughan ii. should have made a lot of runs, but failed, largely through turning too much in playing the ball and through impatience. Much careful practice and hard work is necessary before he will make runs. His fielding was consistently sound and on occasion he got valuable wickets with erratic bowling. Cassels has a somewhat ugly style, but showed that it was possible to make runs with it and performed the excellent feat of making twelve runs on two consecutive balls in the U.C.C. game. Padley started the -season well but unfortunately could not keep it up. Robson on the other hand showed marked improvement, and was playing good cricket with a really straight bat by the end of the season. His bowling was erratic, good overs sometimes giving place to a succession of "long hops", which often escaped the punish- ment they merited by the speed at which they travelled. Corbett was our best bowler, being able to make the ball turn both ways and come off the pitch at a difficult angle. Cochran was usually safe for a .small score and with care could be a good bat another year. He must try to overcome the inclination to adopt the ridiculous pose of which he seems fond when playing ack. Rogers and Whitehead were not bowling as well as last year. Smye only rarely got his field .sufficiently well placed to profit from his leg break bowling. Also, his bowling is much too erratic THE FIRST TEAM 95 5. -117155 32 Swv mod sqgjn-4 CJ PSU ay, avg U1-Era .02 MOE aa? 5 . mm? din 5... Cd? GJ . EQ CD .CI Pa .-CI boi-A SSE UZCGO -QP Ro W. P. I'3.I1 Coch ai 2 CQ-ew mm LAS .QQ Ewa A al TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 211 at present to be really useful. His batting improved, but has a long way to go to be good. He must try to grow "yOunger." In -all the matches played except one the team played well and gave a good account of themselves. The game v. Ridley was our first "away" game and the first time we encountered much opposition. These factors together with the high temperature and the nervous tension accompanying la "big" game resulted in such costly mistakes in the field that the total made by Ridley frighte.ned the team, when it came to batting. Without wishing to put the blame on any one individual, undoubtedly the crucial moment was when Cochran drop- ped Clarke on a hard hit to mid-off. This was the first chance he had given and had it been taken not only the extra runs he made, about 80, would have been saved but also the rest of the fielders would probably have been encouraged to do likewise. The fielding in this game was very weak. In the U.C.C. game, on the other hand, a chance was given to Osler and taken near the beginning and from that moment our fielding was excellent. Wigle hit one into mid-wicket's hands and he dropped it and the U.C.C. fielding was as bad as Ours in the Ridley game. These examples are enough to show how important o.ne catch may be. It is a feature of cricket not showed by many other games, that one mistake may lose the match. A fumbled ball at football will handicap the team but may not be fatal to the result. A bats- man once let Off will often carry on for another fifty or more runs without giving any chance and win the game. In conclusion it should be recorded that Mrs. Wright and her helpers served us up some most excellent teas, without which no cricket match is really complete. Thank you. -P.H.L. SCHOOL vs. TORONTO CRICKET CLUB iwmy 20th., 1933. The School went to bat first and declared at 70 runs for 8 wicketsg Padley making top score with 26 runs. Owing to a wet field, the fielding of both teams was ragged. The Cricket Club went in with 71 to make. They won the match by two wickets. Radcliffe batted well for the C. C., scoring 33. School Toronto C. C. Wigle, C. Keeley, b. LlIl.CS ........ 10 Lgney, b, Whitehead 1, ,,,, ,,,,, 1 Osler ii., b. Dewar .................... 2 Din-nigh, b, Whitehead 1, ,,,,,..,,, 7 Vaughan ii., run out ...............- 2 Keeley, b. Whitehead i. ............ 13 Padley, c. Radcliffe, b. Lines .... 26 Rea, C, Wigle, b, Rogers ,,,,.,,.., 3 34 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD School Toronto 0.0. Cassels i., b. Lines .................... 3 Radcliffe, c. Pad1ey,.b. Robson, b. Levey ........................ 1 Vaughan ii. ....................,..... 33 Whitehead ii., c. Rapsey, b. Rapsey, c. and b. Whitehead i. 4 Lines ..................................... 6 Wharton, c. Cochran, b. Rogers 2 Whitehead i., b. Levey ................ 2 Levey, c. and b. Whitehead i. 3 Cochran, not out ........... ....... 6 Baly i., not out ............................ 4 Rogers, not out ............ ....... 7 Lines, did not bat ........................ 0 Smye, did not bat .... ....... 0 Dewar, did not bat ..... ...... 0 Extras .,....................... ....... 5 Extras .....,.................... ...... 4 Total ................ E Total .... ..... . -74 BOWLING ANALYSIS Toronto Cricket Club Overs Runs Wickets Average Loney ...................... ..... 7 19 - - Dewar ...... 4 14 1 14 Lines ..... 10 17 4 4.25 Levey ..... 7 14 2 7 School Whitehead i. ..... 9 28 5 5.6 Whitehead ii. ..... 1 - - - Rogers ............ 8 25 2 12.5 Vaughan ..... .. ............ 1 7 1 7 SCHOOL vs. ALPHA DELTA PHI May 27th. Alpha Delta Phi went in first. Martin, who was opening batter, made a good stand for 20 runs. Awen and Magladeny also batted well for the fraternity. Wigle and Osler ma., were the opening bat- ters for the School, and they made 79 between them, Wigle making 51 not out. Corbett, bowling a medium pace ball, bowled well for the School, getting 5 wickets for 12 runs. Alpha Delta Phi Martin, c. and b. Corbett ........ 20 0 Wylie, b. Whitehead i. ..,.......... . Warden, c. Cochran, b. Corbett 9 Mudge, b. Padley ........ ............... 1 Heintzman, stpd. Wigle, b. Corbett ...,..,.....,......,.,............ 0 Stone 1., run out ..,..................... 6 0 Ambrose, c. Smye, b. Corbett Awen, c. Corbett, b. Smye ...... 21 Stone ii., c. Smye, b. Corbett .. 0 School Wigle, retired .............................. 51 Osler ii., c. and b. Heintzman .... 28 Vaughan ii., b. Wylie ................ Padley, not out .................... Cassels i., c. Wylie, b. Heintzman ................ Corbett, Whitehead ii., Rogers, Cochran, 1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 25 Alpha Delta Phi Magladeny, stpd. Wigle, b. Smye ...................................... 10 Corrigan, not out ................ ..... 0 Extras ...............,......, ..... 7 Total .... .,.................,. 7 4 School Whitehead., Smye, Extras ...... 3 Total ....... ..,.... 1 21 BOWLING ANALYSIS Alpha Delta Phi Overs Runs Wickets Average Wylie .....,............ 9 47 1 47 Heintzman ..... 13 41 2 20.5 Stone i. ...... 4 29 - - School Rogers ............. 7 14 - - Whitehead i. ...... 6 12 1 12 Smye ............. 7.3 15 2 7.5 Corbett ......... 10 12 5 2.4 Padley ................. .................. 6 4 1 4 Whitehead ii. .,.................... 3 10 - - SCHOOL vs. KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY May 30th. The Kappa Alpha fraternity went in first, and made a total score of 53 runs. Rea batted well for a 28. The School went to bat with 54 to make, and Wigle and Osler ii. again left very few runs for the .rest of the team to make. Wigle made 40 not out while Osler ii. made 11 not out. Whitehead i. bowled well for the School, and the good fielding of the team made it hard for the fraternity to SCOPE. Kappa Alpha Robinson, b. Whitehead i. ........ 7 Morden, b. Whitehead i. ............ 0 Rea, c. Rogers, b. Vaughan ii...28 2 Coy, l.b.w. Whitehead i. ........... . O'Flynn, c. Wigle, b. Rogers .... O 3 Walsh, b. Corbett ........................ McQuaigge, c. and b. Corbett .... 0 Gunn, b. Smye ............................ 2 Burton, c. Whitehead i., b. Vaughan ii. .......................... 0 McConnell, run out ...... 1 Algie, not out ............ ..... 0 Extras ....................... ........ 1 0 Total .... ........ 5 3 School Wigle, retired .............................. 40 Osler ii., retired ............................ 11 Vaughan ii., c. and b. Robinson 3 Padley, stpd. Morden, b. Coy .... 0 17 Corbett, b. Coy .....,...................... Robson, c. O'F1ynn, b. Rea ........ 1 Cochran, not out ......................,. 8 Rogers, not out ...... .,.... 1 Cassels i., Whitehead i., Smye, 12 Extras .......... ......... Total ....... ...... Q 25 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD BOWLING ANALYSIS Kappa Alpha Rea ................. Walsh ....... Robinson ,..... Coy ................. McQuaigge ....... School Rogers ........... Whitehead i. Corbett ........... Padley ............. Vaughan ii. ..... . Smye ............... Overs Runs Wickets Average 12 34 1 34 8 15 - - 7 16 1 16 5 16 2 8 1 - - - 5 17 1 17 5 7 3 2.3 5 7 2 3.5 4 9 - - 2 - 2 0 1 3 1 3 ., SCHOOL vs. OLD BOYS June 3rd. The Old Boys batted first, Heighington and Henderson opening. Henderson made 18 runs, but the Old Boys' wickets fell quickly, until Mickle made a good stand making 18. The team made a total of 54. The Schoo1's opening batters made 50, then retired. Padley made 36, the highest score of the day. The next three batters made 26 between them and then stumps were drawn. Robson bowled well for the School, his average being .5. Corbett also bowled well. Old Boys P. E. Henderson, run out ........ 18 E. N. Heighington, l.b.w. Rogers .................................... 0 J. Warden, c. Vaughan, b. Rogers .................................... 5 H. Cayley, c. Corbett,b. Whitehead i. ........................ 0 S. Du Moulin, b. Whitehead i... 0 J. W. Mickle, b. Corbett ............ 18 E. Clarke, 2. Cochran, b. Corbett .................................. 2 J. W. Seagrarn, c. Cassels i., b. Corbett .................................. 1 D. Dawson, b. Robson .............. 0 H. A. Richardson, not out ........ 1 N. Seagram. b. Robson ............ 0 Extras ..,..........,................,............. 9 Total .,.,. ....... 5 4 School Wigle, retired .............................. 30 Osler ii., retired ............................ 20 Vaughan ii., st. Cayley, b. Henderson .....,...................... 1 Padley, not out ............................ 35 Smye, c. Mickle, b. W. Seagram ................................ 6 Whitehead i., b. Heighington .... 3 Robson, not out ............................ 9 Cassels i., ................ did not bat Corbett, .... ....... di d not bat Rogers, ...... ....... d id not bat Cochran, ..... ....... d id not bat Extras ....... ......................... 1 2 .. ..... ii Total .... TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q7 BOWLING ANALYSIS School Overs Runs Wickets Average Rogers ........... . 6 16 2 3 Whitehead i. .... 5 19 2 9-5 Robson ........... 456 1 2 -5 Corbett ........ 5 9 3 3 Old Boys N. Seagram 6 28 - - Mickle ............. 5 17 - - Henderson ...... . 7 36 1 36 VV. Seagram ,..... 5 7 1 7 E. Heighingfon ....... .,............... 4 22 1 22 SCHOOL vs. BISHOP RIDLEY COLLEGE At Toronito, Julne 10th. Ridley won the toss and elected to bat first. The weather was warm and the wicket of concrete, or at least specially prepared with Australian "bulli", which amounts to the same thing. Play opened cautiously, but after five overs the first wicket fell to Whitehead max. with the score at 5. The next two partnerships scored fairly consistently, the wickets falling at 37 and 67 respective- ly. The 'big stand of the innings was for the fourth wicket, Clarke and McKinstry raising the score from 67 to 137. The fielding was not all that it might have been, C1arke's big innings owing a good deal to dropped chances. Lunch was taken with the score at 142 for 4. After lunch there was another profitable partnership, Clarke and Powell bringing the score up to 201 before being separated. After that, wickets fell steadily, but with Clarke still adding runs, and the innings closed with Ridley all out for 243. The School tried -altogether eight bowlers, of whom Robson was the most successful, getting four wickets for 33 runs. The others bowled steadily, but could do little on the hard wicket. The School innings began about half past three. Osler was out in the second over, though the score had already reached 14. Wigle was batting steadily and made runs while Vaughan, Padley, Cochran and Cassels each stayed with him for a time. VVhen the sixth wicket fell it became evident that there was practically no chance of winning and Robson and Smye apparently decided to have a try at Q3 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD making a draw. They stayed together for an hour at the wickets, incidentally adding twenty runs. Ultimately Smye was dismissed and Whitehead's wicket fell quickly leaving Ridley the winners by 243 runs to 120. School Wigle, b. Clarke ......... ..... 5 1 Osler, b. Cameron ......... .. 2 Vaughan, b. Cameron ...... .. 3 Padley, b. Cameron ..... .. 4 Cochran, run out ........ .. 1 Ca.ssels, run cut .,.............. ..... 9 Robson, not out ........,............... 18 Corbett, c. Srneaton, b. Powell ...,.............................. 3 Rogers, c. Cameron, b. Powell 0 Smye, c. Mitchell, b. Ripley .... 6 Whitehead, c. Smeaton, b. Ridley Ripley, b. Whitehead ........ 5 Buck, l.b.w. b. Corbett ............ 15 Orr, c. Rogers, b. Smye ............ 23 Clarke, run out ........................ 118 McKinstry, n. Rogers ...... ..... 3 6 Powell, b. Robson .................... 20 Hart, b. Robson ................ Mitchell, l.b.w. b. Robson Harper, b. Robson ............ Cameron, run out ............ Smeaton, not out ..... Extras ...................... Total ...... BOWLING ANALYSIS Ripley ................................,. 0 Extras ......... ...................... ..... 2 3 Total ..... .................. 1 20 School Rogers ........ ,. 15 Whitehead ..... .. 15.2 Robson ........ 15 Corbett ..... 9 Vaughan ..... 5 Srnye ..... 8 Padley ...... .. 2 Cochran .,,... .. 2 Ridley Powell ..... .. 20 Cameron .... .. 20 Ripley .......... .. 7 McKinstry .,... 6 Clarke ......... .. 10 Buck ......... ...... 3 Overs Maidens Runs Wickets A 4 56 1 5 46 1 4 33 4 2 29 1 0 23 0 2 32 1 0 5 0 0 5 O 12 27 2 9 25 3 2 18 2 2 7 0 6 11 1 0 6 0 SCHOOL vs. ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE At Port Hope, June 14th. 0 0 5 18 .....,243 verage 56 46 8.2 29 32 13.5 8.3 9 11 St. Andrew's won the toss and chose to send us in to bat. The first half a dozen overs passed with Wigle and Osler playing them-' TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD QU selves in carefully, after which they began to score fairly freely. Their partnership of 78 was the best of the first eleven's season. Wigle was the first to be out. Vaughan stayed in long enough to score eighteen and bring the second wicket score to 97. After Osler and Padley were dismissed, Robson and Cochran put on 48 runs together. The other score of interest was Corbett's cheerful 16 not out, which included a well-hit six. About half past three, the School declared the innings closed at the score of 203 for eight wickets. St. Andrew's opened badly, losing Pentland on the second ball, and Green when the score had only reached 17. Then Donovan and Donnelly stayed together for some time, adding about forty runs in their partnership. There after wickets fell frequently, and the game was over by twenty-five to six, St. Andrew's being all out for 84. It was Corbett's day among the bowlers, so far as getting wickets was concerned. He had four for 20 runs. Robson bowled with remarkable steadiness, his record showing nine maiden overs out of twelve sent down, with two wickets for eight runs. Whitehead max. was also effective in taking two wickets for 17, and Vaughan with one for one in four overs. School S.A.C. Wigle, C- Fee, lb- MacKerrow ---- 32 Donovan, c. Rogers, b. Corbett..19 OSIGF, b. Pentland ...................,.... 47 Pentland, b, Robson ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, O Vaughan, b. Donnelly ................ 18 Green, c. Corbett, b. Whitehead 4 Padley, b. Donnelly .................... 0 Donnelly, b, Whitehead ,,,,,,,,,,,, 31 Robson, b. Donnelly .................... 25 Hamilton, o, and b, Robson ,,,... 9 COChI'8-H, C- MSJCKGITOW, b- Rea, b. Corbett ................,......,.... 8 Donnelly ................................ 27 Fee, b, Corbett ,,.,,,,,.,,,,.,.,.,,,,,.,.,. 0 Cassels, c. Hare, b. Armstrong 6 Armstrong, l.b.w. b. Corbett .... 3 Corbett, not out .......................... 16 MacKerrow i., c. Rogers, b. Rogers, b. Pentland .................... 3 Vaughan ................................ 1 Smye, not out ............................ 1 MacKerrow ii., run out ............ 0 Whitehead, ................ did not bat Hare, not out ...................... ....... 0 Extras ...............,............................ 28 Extras ................ ....... 9 Total ffor 8 wkts. decl.J 2.93 Total ...... ..,.... 8 4 BOWLING ANALYSIS School Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Robson ........ ..... 1 2 9 8 2 4 Whitehead ..... ,. 8 3 17 2 8.5 Smye ............ .. 5 0 25 0 - Rogers ..... .. 6 4 4 0 - Corbett ..... .. 9 2 20 4 5 Vaughan .... .. 4 3 1 1 1 30 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD S.A.C. Armstrong ..... .... 1 8 5 46 1 46 Pentland ....... .... 3 0 7 69 2 34.5 Donnelly ....... .... 1 4 4 35 4 8.75 MacKerrow ..... .... 8 2 23 1 23 SCHOOL vs. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE At Toronto, June 17th. As in all the other games this season, Wigle lost the toss and U.C.C. decided to field iirst. The opening pair put on twenty-ive runs before Osler misjudged o.ne and was bowled. He was followed by Vaughan ma., who narrowly escaped being stumped before he had scored, but who went on to score twelve, the second wicket fall- ing at 42. After Padley and Wigle were out, Robson and Cochran again put up one of their very useful fifth-wicket partnership-s, add- ing some forty runs before they were separated. Cassels batted cautiously at first. Keefer seemed nervous, but showed one or two good scoring shots before he was out. Corbett joined Cassels and soon afterwards lunch was taken, with the score at 135 for 7. After lunch Corbett wa soon out, but Smye kept his end up for an hour while Cassels made the most of his opportunities to score. The latter hit two sixes on successive balls, and later three fours in three balls. The two added some Hfty runs in an hour. The innings closed about half past three, the score being 186 all out. The U.C.C. opening batsmen had put on 18 when Tatem was caught at the wicket. Falconer was hurt early in the innings and was obliged to have Fuller to run for him. l-Iis good innings de- serves extra praise on that account, as he continued to score well, making 38. The third wicket fell at 56, and then three more in rapid suc- cession, so that when tea was taken with the score at 60 for six, the prospects were distinctly bright. After tea, however, Wolfe and McCulloch stayed together until after six o'clock. McCulloch steadily scored singles to leave the bowling to Wolfe, who seemed impossible to dislodge. The two put on 77 runs before they were separated, when Wolfe had just reached his fifty. School U.C.C. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 31 Gooderhlam stayed with McCulloch several minutes, during which they added 28 runs. Eight minutes to go and two wickets to fall. James survived three balls and was then caught by Keefer, Corbett bowling. McCulloch returned to the other end and took the bowling of the last over, with the field clustered round him. He watched several balls go by, steered the last through the slips for a single and the match ended in a draw. Wigle, c. Wolfe, b. Tatem ........ 33 2 Osler, b. Tatem ............................ Vaughan, c. Dellis, b. James .... 12 Tatem, c. Wigle, b. Robson .... 7 Falconer, c. Corbett, b. Vaughan ...................,............ 38 Padley, St- Wolfe, b- Ja-IIIGS -.-- 4 Woods, c. Osler, b. Whitehead.. 2 Robson, c. Falconer, b. Tatem..24 Mills, b. Corbett .......................... 5 COCTIF3-H, C- W01f6, b. Dellis .... 20 Douglas, run out .................,...... 2 Cassels, not out ............................ 48 Wolfe, b, Padley ,.,,,.,,,,.,,,,,,...,,.,,, 50 Keefer, C. Douglas, b. Tatem .--. 6 Dellis, c. and b. Corbett ,...,....... 0 Corbett, b. Tatern ...................... McCulloch, not out ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,... 32 3 Smye, c. Fuller, b. McCulloch .... 10 Whitehead, c. Mills, b. Gooderham, b. Corbett .............. 15 James, c. Keefer, b. Corbett ..., 0 McCulloch ............... ....... 0 Fuller, not out ............................ 0 Extras ..... ....... 2 4 Extras .....,...................................... 15 Total .. ............... 186 Total ffor 9 wkts.l ......... ...166 BOWLING ANALYSIS School Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average Robson .... ..... 2 0 6 37 1 37 Whitehead .. 10 2 29 1 29 Corbett .... .. 12 2 29 4 7.25 Vaughan .... .. 7 3 25 1 25 Keefer ...... .. 3 1 2 0 - Smye ..... .. 4 0 20 0 - Padley ..... .. 6 3 7 1 7 U.C.C. Falconer .. .. 2 0 4 0 - Fuller ...... .. 7 1 20 0 - Tatem ..... ..... 2 4 15 18 5 3.6 James ..... .. 13 0 63 2 31.5 Dellis ........... .. 15 4 32 1 32 McCulloch .. 7 1 25 2 12.5 32 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SCHOOL 3rd. XI vs. GROVE lst. XI At Lakefield, May 10th. School Russel i., b. Strickland ...,.......... 1 Bell, c. Fletcher, b. Strickland 7 Trenholme, c. Gunn ii., b. Strickland ..........,................... 5 . . 2 Osler 1., b. Strickland ................ Godshall, b. Strickland .............. 0 Redpath, c. Wright, b. Atwood..17 McCloskey, c. Atwood, b. Wright ...............,.................. 6 Gibson, c. Dench, b. Atwood .... 0 Ede ii., c. and b. Atwood ........ 3 Baillie, not o.ut ...........,................ 12 Reid ii., b. Atwood ............ ..... 0 Byes ..,........................... ....... 4 Total ..... ,.......................... E Grove Strickland, b. Russel i. ............ 49 Hepburn, b. Russel i. ........ .... 0 Dench, c. Trenholme, b. Russel i. ................................ 11 Wright, l.b.w. Trenholme .......... 5 Macrae, l.b.w. Trenholme ........ 4 Atwood, b. Godshall .................. 0 Gunn i., b. Godshall .................... 8 Fletcher, c. Reid ii., b. Russel i...18 Gunn ii., b. Godshall .................. 2 Dawe, hit Wkt. ............................ 7 McMaster, not out ...,.. ..... 6 Byes ............................... ..... 7 Total ......... ......... 1 17 THIRD TEAM vs. THE GROVE At Lakeiield, May 16th. Grove Strickland, b. Russel max. ........ 49 Hepburn, b. Russel .................... 0 Dench ii., c. Trenholme, b. Russel ..............,..................... 11 Wright, l.b.w. Trenholme Macrae, l.b.w. Trenholme ........ 4 Atwood, b. Godshall ................ 0 Gunn i., b. Godshall ........,. ..... 8 Fletcher, c. Reid ma., b. Russel .................................... 18 Gunn 11. b. Godshall .................... 2 Dawe, hit wicket, b. Godshall 7 McMaster, not out .................... 6 Extras ........................... ..... 7 Total ..... ......... 1 T7 School Russel max., b. Strickland ........ 1 Bell, c. Fletcher, b. Strickland 7 Trenholme, c. Gunn ii., b. Strickland .............................. 5 Osler max., b. Strickland .......... 2 Godshall, b. Strickland .............. 0 Redpath, c. Vkfright, b. Atwood..17 McCloskey, c. Atwood, b. Wright .................................. 6 Gibson, c. Dench, b. Atwood. .... 0 Ede ma., c. and b. Atwood ........ 3 Baillie, not out ............................ 12 Reid ma., b. Atwood ....... .... 0 Extras .............................. .... 4 Total ...... ........ 5 7 THIRD TEAM vs. HILLFIELD School First Innings Bell, c. Langs ma., b. Sweeney ................................ 0 Godshall, c. and b. Sweeney .... 2 Redpath, c. Taylor, b. Kerr ...... 7 McCloskey, b. Sweeney ............ 4 Second Innings Bell, c. Robinson, b. Kerr ........ 4 Godshall, b. Kerr ........................ 2 Redpath, b. Kerr ........................ 1 4 Russel max., b. Sweeney ............ McCloskey, played on Sweeney 15 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 33 First Innings Second Innings Russel, c. Bostwick, b. Sweeney 0 Baillie ma., b. Kerr .................... 1 Baillie ma., b. Sweeney ..,......... Osler max., c. Bostwick, b. Cleland .................................. Ede ma., c. Cleland, b. Kerr .. Gobson, not out .......................... Holmes, b. Cleland ,...,............... Ambrose m.i., b. Kerr ...... Extras ......,... ............... Total .... First Innings Robinson, b. Russel max. Langs, b. Godshall .................... Bostwick, c. Redpath, b. Russel .................................... Cleland, run out ..........,............... Sweeney, c. Ede, b. Russel Kerr, b. Godshall ........................ Ross, c. Russel, b. Baillie Roberts, c. and b. Baillie ........ T.ulley, b. Godshall .................... Binkley, not out ................ ...... Taylor, b. Godshall .... Extras ......................... Total .... . ........59 1 Osler, c. Ross, b. Bostwick ...,.... 12 Ede ma., c. Taylor, b. Kerr ........ 3 7 Holmes, b. Kerr .,....,.......... ...... 0 2 Ambrose mi., not out ....... .,.... 4 7 Gobson, not out .......,...... ...... 3 5 Extras ............................ ...... 6 3 2 42 Total .... ...... 5 5 Hillfield Second Innings 3 Cleland, b. Godshall ........... ...... 1 18 Langs, c. McCloskey, b. Godshall .................... ...... 1 6 0 Bostwick, run out ..... ...... 7 0 Robinson, not out ........................ 3 7 Sweeney, not out ........................ 3 12 REST DID NOT BAT 4 Extras .................,.......................... 5 1 2 10 2 10 Total .... ..35 SCHOOL 3rd. XI. vs. HILLFIELD lst. XI. At Hamilton, May 27th. School Hillfield Bell, C- La-HES. b- Sweeney 0 Robinson, b. Russel .................... 3 G0dShal1, C. and b- Sweeney .... 2 Langs, b. Godshau .................... 18 Redpath, C. Tay1Ol', b. Kerr .... 9 Bostwick, c. Redpath, b. Russel 0 McCloskey, b. Sweeney ............ 4 Cleland, run our ..............,........... 0 Russel, C- B0StWiCk, b- Sweeney 0 Sweeney, c. Ede, b. Russel, .... 7 Baillie, b- Sweeney -------.------------ 1 Kerr, b. Godshall ........................ 12 Osler i., c. Bostwick, b. Cleland .................................. Ede ii., c. Cleland, b. Kerr Gibson, not out .......................... Holmes, b. Cleland ....... Ambrose ii., b. Kerr ....... Byes .........................,...... Total .... Ross, c. Russel, b. Baillie ........ 4 7 Roberts, c. and b. Baillie ............ 1 2 Tully, b. Godshall ............... ...... 2 7 Binkley, not out .............. ...... 1 0 5 Taylor, b. Godshall ..... ...... 2 3 Byes .............................. ...... 1 0 2 42 Total .... ...... -55 3.1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SCHOOL vs. THE GROVE At Port Hope, May 30th. The Grove Strickland, c. Baillie, b. Whitehead ................. ..... 1 Dench, hit Wicket, b. VVhitehec.c1 .........,.................. 13 Macrae, c. VVl1itehe.ad, b. Keefer 0 Atwood, b. Curphey .................. 15 Wright, l.b.w. Keefer ................ 0 Fletcher, c. Reid iii., b. Curphey 8 Gunn ii., b. Keefer ...................... 4 Hepburn, b. Keefer .................... 6 McMaster, not out ........... ..... 8 Gunn i., b. Keefer ........................ 4 Wood, c. and b. Keefer ............ 0 Extras ..........................,......... ..... 8 Total ..... .................. 6 3 School Whitehead, c. and b. Wright .... 4 Baly, c. and b. Wright ............ 9 Reid iii., b. Strickland ................ 2 Rathbone, c. and b. Strickland 7 Redpath, b. Atwood .................... 1 McCloskey, b. Atwood ................ 3 Keefer, run out .......................... 5 Russel i., c. Wood, b. Atwood.. 0 Bell, c. Macrae, b. Fletcher .... 3 Curphey, not out ........................ 0 Baillie, b. Fletcher ....... ..... 0 Extras .......................... ...... 6 Total .... ......... 40 BOWLING ANALYSIS School Whitehead ...... Keefer ........... Curphey ...,... The Grove Wright .,,... .. Strickland ....... Atwood ,.....,.. Fletcher ....,.. Overs Runs Wickets Average 15 21 2 10.5 16 24 6 4 5 10 2 5 7 11 2 5.5 8 11 2 5.5 4 9 3 3 3 3 2 1.5 SCHOOL 3rd, XI. vs. OLD BOYS At Port Hope, June 3rd, Old Boys Cleland, c. Ambrose ii., b. Godshall ................................ 10 Stratton, b. Russel i. ................ 17 Smith, b. Godshall ......... ........ 1 4 Gunn, c. McCloskey, b. Russel i. .,................ ..... O Savage, b. Godshall ...... ........ 0 Wigle, b. Godshall ...,...,... ........ 2 6 Maynard, b. Godshall ........ ..... 0 Leonard, c. Reid ii., b. Russel 1. ..................... ..... 9 School Russel i., c. Cochrane, b. Wilson .................................... 45 Bell, c. Cochrane, b. Leonard .. 0 McCloskey, b. Leonard .............. 0 Redpath, b. Leonard .................. 4 Truax, c. Cleland, b. Gunn ........ 1 Reed ii., c. Savage, b. Gunn .... 13 Ambrose ii., b. Gunn ................ 3 Holmes, stpd. Wigle .................. 0 Gibson, b. Wilson ......... ..... 2 Godshall, stpd. Wigle .... ..... 2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Old Boys School Wilson, c. Russel i., b. Bankier, not out ...... .,.... 2 GOdSh3.l1 .............,.................. 9 Byes ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,.,,4, ,,,,,, 9 Langmuir, c. and b. Truax .... 3 Cochrane, not out .................... 4 Byes ...............,................................ 5 Total .... ...... 9 7 Total .... ..,...... 8 1 SCHOOL vs. GROVE At Port Hope, June 6th. The School batted first and made a total score of 112 runs. The high scores for the School were made by Padley, Robson and Cochran, the former making 32, and the latter two making 17 each. After tea the Grove went to bat and made a total score of 27. Smye was the most successful bowler, taking 6 wickets for 6 runs. School Whitehead ii., l.b.w. Strickland 10 Baly i., c. Atwood, b. Strickland 3 Vaughan i., b. Strickland ........ 5 Padley, b. Wright ...................... 32 Robson, l.b.w. Wright .......,........ 17 Cassels, c. Dench, b. Strickland..16 Cochran, not out ...........,............ 17 Corbett, l.b.w. Wright ................ 7 Whitehead i., b. Wright ............ 0 Smye, c. Dawe, b. Strickland.. 0 Wigle, l.b.w. Wright ................ 2 Extras ............................. ...... 3 Total .... ................... 1 12 The Grove Macrae, l.b.w. Robson Strickland, c. Cassels, b Smye Dench, b. Whitehead i Atwood, b. Smye ....... Wright, l.b.w. Vaughan ll Fletcher, c. Smye, b. Vaughan 11. ......,,.. . McM,aster, stpd. Wigle b Smye Gunn i., c. Cassels i., b Smye Hepburn, stpd. Wigle, b Smye Gunn ii., c. Robson, b Smye Dawe, not out ............. Extras ........ Total BOWLING ANALYSIS The Grove Wright ......... Strickland ....... Fletcher ........ Atwood ...... Hepburn . School Robson ...... Corbett ...... Smye ...... Overs Runs W1ckets Average 16 43 16 25 9 1 4 7 6 ...i 4. .M x x 'x 4 N X 'I . 1 f.. 'vt V .,. ,. fag. , VPN fy' , T' K ., ff.. 3? 'S 31 A 'S .v 1 2 + f ' 1 . L if 0 I" .1 5 n. 5 " .- ,AQ , .ls , THE FIFTH TEAM race 4pro.J onG SFS d CD H H. Strathy G. H. K. S011 SU el' MCD. F el' W. B. Mill day Good .-Col. C. Lt Q2 1-Q CH O S-4 C. 3X C. Tru E S Aw cd 0 rn C5 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 37 Whitehead 1. ...... .. ........... Vaughan .......... ...........,..... 4 8 1 8 2 1 2 0.6 ,M-lvllill. "UNDER 16" TEAM vs. U.C.C. "UNDER 16" At Port Hope, May 23rd. U.C.C. Youngman, c. Reid mi., b. Keefer ma.. .......................,. . Mills, 1.b.w. Keefer .................... Boeckh, l.b.w. Russell max. Gunn, c. Truax, b. Keefer ........ McMurrich, b. Russel max. Woods, c. Seagram ma., b. Keefer ma. ......................... . R. Martin, b. Russell ................ F. Martin, c. Armstrong max., b. Keefer .....,................,......... Tobin, b. Keefer ..,...,................... Macdonnell, not out ..... ..... Miller, b. Russell ...... ..... Extras ....................... ......... School Russell, b. McMurrich .........,..,. 11 Keefer ma., b. McMurrich ........ 1 Rathbone, b. McMurrich .......... 8 Reid mi., b. McMurrich ............ 1 Ede ma., c. F. Martin, b. R. Martin ............................ 11 Trua.x, l.b.w. McMurrich .......,.. 2 Osler max., run out .,.................. 0 Redpath, b. McMurrich ..........,. 5 Seagram ma., Stmpd. Young- man ........................................ 2 Armstrong max., not out ........ 10 Osler mi., b. Gunn .................... 0 Extras ......,............,..,............. .,... 4 55 -iii--1-1 U.C.C. "UNDER 16" vs. SCHOOL "UNDER 16" At Toronto, June 2nd, U.C.C. 76 for 9 wickets, School 20. McMurrich lU.C.C.l did the Hat Trick, besides getting 6 Wickets. School Russel max., c. Woods, b. McMurrich ................... .... Rathbone, b. Gunn .................... Ede ma., b. McMurrich ............ Keefer ma., c. Beockh, b. McMurrich ............................ Truax, c. Dewar, b. Gunn ........ Seagram ma., b. Gunn .............. Reid mi., b. McMurrich ........,... Osler max., c. Dewar, b. Gunn Armstrong max., b. McMurrich Osler mi., not out .................... Extras ............................................ U.C.C. Youngrnan, b. Russel max. ........ O Mills, b. Keefer ma.. .................... 0 Boeckh, c. Reid, b. Keefer ma. 6 Gunn, l.b.w. Keefer .................... 0 McMurrich, b. Keefer ................ 0 Tobin, b. Rathbone ........ ........ 1 2 Dewar, c. Keefer, b. Russell max. ........................ 16 F. Martin, c. Osler mi., b. Rathbone .............................. 5 R. Martin, b. Keefer ........ ..... 7 Woods, not out ............................ 22 Macdonnell, did not bat Extras ................................... .... 9 EE 38 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SCHOOL 5th XI vs. LAKEFIELD At Port Hope, June lst. School 132 for 8 wicketsg Lakeiield 98. School Seagram ma., b. Goldsmith .... 40 Lakefield Dawe, c. Truax, b. Osler mi ..... 6 Osler ml., l.b.w. DUIIIIS ............ 9 Burgess, C, Truax, b, McFarlane, c. and b. McPherson 6 Seagram ma, ,,,.,,,,. .,.,.. 1 9 TI'u.3,X, retired ............,,..........,... 53 Dunne, b, Truax ,,,,,, ,,,,,, 1 Dawes, run out .......,.................... 3 Ames, run out .,.....,,,.,, ,..,.. 7 HGHGGFSOH. b- Dunne ---..- .---.., 0 McPherson, b. Truax ................ 22 Ferguson, b. Dunne ....... ....... 0 McDonald, b. Seagram .............. 9 Strathy, b. Frewer .... ....... 0 Frewer, c. Seagram, b. Smith 24 Lowe, not out ............... ....... 1 Goldsmith, b. Truax ..........,......... 1 Smith, not out ...........,...... ....... 3 Drake, c. Miller, b. Smith ......., 4 Miller ma., did not bat Herder, l.b.w. Truax .................. 2 Extras ............................... .. ....... 17 McLean, not out ...... ..... . 0 Extras ...................... ...... 3 132 QQ HOUSE MATCHES BIGSIDE May 16th. Brent House Bethune House Wigle, b. Vaughan ii. ................ 2 Cassels i,, b, Whitehead i. ,,..... . 2 Osler ii., c. Cassels i., b. Vaughan ii., c. Wigle ii., b. Vaughan ii. .......................... 49 Whitehead i. ........................ 10 Robson, l.b.w. Vaughan ii. ........ 1 Padley, b. Whitehead i. ............. . 3 Rogers, b. Kerrigan .................... 20 Cochran, b. Kerrigan .................. 0 Whitehead ii., b. Kerrigan ........ 6 Whitehead i., b. Padley ............ 11 Reid iii., b. Vaughan ii. ............ 11 10 2 1 Corbett, c. Baly, b. Padley ........ Rathbone, b. Vaughan ii. Curphey, not out ........................ Extras .................................. ...... 1 3 Total .... ................. 1 -153 BOWLING Bethune House Padley .........,...... Vaughan ....., Kerrigan ..... Keefer ii., c. Whitehead ii., b. Whitehead 1. ........................ 3 Smye, b. Robson ........................ 7 Kerrigan, b. Whitehead i. ........ 2 Baly i., b. Whitehead ii. ............ 5 West, b. Robson ............... ...... 1 Reed i., b. Robson ........... ...... 0 Knox, b. Whitehead ii., 1 Fleming, not out ............ ...... 2 Extras ............................. ...... 6 Total .... ......... 4 2 ANALYSIS , Overs Runs Wickets Average 16 31 2 15.5 19 33 5 6.6 10 26 3 8.6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD :ffl Smye .........,.. 5 12 - - Keefer ii. ...,.... 1 13 - - Brent House Rogers ............... 7 12 - - Whitehead i. ..... 10 11 5 2.2 Robson ....,....... 5 13 3 4.2 'Whitehead ii. 1 - 2 0 MIDDLESIDE May nth., . Brent Red th b Russel max .......... 6 Godshall, b. Russel .................... 1 Baillie ma., b. Armstrong ........ 6 Trenholme, c. McCloskey, b. Armstrong ............................ 0 Osler max., c. Russel, b. Armstrong .1 ................ ...... 1 Ede ma., c. Newman, vb. Armstrong ...............,............ 3 Russel ma. c. Leadbeater, b. Armstrong ............................ 1 Waldie, b. Armstrong ................ 1 Powell, b. Armstrong ................ 1 Reid ma., c. Stevenson, b. Russel .................................... 2 Bilkey, not out ................... ....., 0 Extras ................... ...... 4 Total .... ............ 2 6 Bethlme Russel max., c. Redpath, b. Trenholme ............................ 3 Bell, b. Godshall ........................,. 5 Keefer max., b. Trenholme ........ 0 McCloskey, run out .................... 13 Armstrong max., b. Trenholme 3 Gibson, b. Trenholme ................ 6 Stevenson, c. Baillie ma., b. Trenholme ............................ 5 Ridpath, b. Godshall .................. 1 Newman, c. Trenholme, b. Osler max. ............................ 3 Cox, stpt. Bilkey, b. Trenholme 0 Leadbeater, not out .................... O Extras ..................................... .,.. 7 Totoal . ..... ....... 4 6 LITTLESIDE May zznd. Bethune Truax, b. Osler mi. .................... O Henderson, run out .................... 0 Armstrong ma., c. and b. Smith 6 Dawes, c. Mitchell ...................... 35 Lowe, b. Strathy ..... ......... 2 1 Mills, b. Osler ................... ...... 1 Morrisey, not out ...................... 8 Annesley, c. Seagram ma.. ........ 0 Kortz-ight, c. Seagram ma. b. Osler ...................................... 0 Brent McFarlane, 1.b.w. Lowe ............ 6 Osler mi., b. Armstrong ............ 4 Seagram ma., b. Truiax ............ 22 Smith, c. Kortright, b. Lowe 8 Strathy, c. and b. Truax ........ 7 Miller ma., b. Lowe ................ 5 Ferguson, b. Truax ............. .... 6 McLaren ma., b. Lowe ..... .... 1 Mitchell, not out ............. .... 2 Howland, b. Truax ...... ....... 0 40 TRINITY COLLEGE scHooL RECORD Bethune Brent Williams ma., b. Osler fmi ......... 2 Martin, c. Truax, b. Lowe ...... 1 McLernon, c. and b. Osler ........ 3 Extras ............................................ 14 Extras .................................... ..... 9 85 76 CRICKET COLOURS The following Cricket Colours have been awarded: First Team:-Cassels max., Cochran, Corbett, Osler ma., Padley, Vaughan ma., Wigle. Extra Colours: Rogers, Smye, Whitehead max. Second Team-Baly max., Curphey, Keefer ma., Rathbone, Reid mi., Whitehead ma. Third Team--Ambrose ma., Bailie ma., Bell, Ede ma., Godshall, Holmes, Gibson, McCloskey, Osler max., Redpath, Russel. Extra Colour: Armstrong max. Nfth Team-Dawes, Ferguson, Lowe, McFarlane, Miller ma., Osler mi., Seagram ma., Smith, Strathy, Truax. BATTING AVERAGES Runs Innings Out Average Wiglc ....... 249 8 5 49.8 Cochran ...... 79 28.6 Osler ma. ..... 112 22.4 Robson ........ 95 19 Padley .............. 113 18.8 Cassels max. ..... 83 16.6 Corbett .............. 46 11.5 Vaughan ma. ..... 70 8.75 Whitehead ma. 16 8 Smye ..,............... 23 5.6 Rogers ..,...........,.. 11 5.5 Baly max. .............. 3 3 Whitehead max. ..... 5 1 Keefer ma. ............ ............... 6 6 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Corbett .......,....... Robson ................... Whitehead max. Smye ............ ......... Vaughan ma. Keefer ma.. .... . Padley ........ Rogers ............. Cochran .............. Whitehead ma. .... . BOVYLING AVERAGES Overs Maidens Runs Wickets Average 67 7512 6212 4015 34 10 18 47 . 6 2 4 0 145 117 166 131 84 33 25 132 7 21 ,LL 1-1 ,,.L--,--,., Grace 6.9 9.7 10.3 10.9 12 16.5 12.5 22 1, -H U fee ,L-in-'!s!s.s,s.a. f . VIII. YM G HE 17 bu GJ 'E E v-5 .Z .2 3 'U G3 .-C1 O 4-3 -4-3 CG U3 6 Ui S-4 O 5 'ES 3 5 Of ci 'U an an Di E-f :S cd P 5 U 2 ubE E2 mln 4-3 U2 5 Z2 an Df- sd :G .-C1 bn 5 Du CD 31 rn O C1-Q IA .2 'cs ai 0-1 O 513 E fi ai ..i i-3 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 13 GYM. EIGHT 'COMPETITIONS First Eight Competition This was held on April 3rd. There were 14 entrants. Extra colours were awarded to three boys who were unable injuries. to compete due to The results were as follows. 1,Maximum 175 pts.b: Fleming -r.-.-- ...... 1 71 li' Bilkey .........e.. ...... 1 59 If Cha-dWiCk ..... ...... 1 65 16 Godshall .......... ......... 1 57 31, VVeSt .............,..... ............ 1 64 M McCloskey ,,,,,,, ,,,,,,.,. 1 37 Reed max. .............,................ 163 W4 Russel max. .......... ...... 1 34 9.1 Extras Colours:-Padley, Reid ma., Vaughan ma. Second Eight Competition The standard of the last five places was a little lower than that of last year's Eight. The results were as follows. fMaximum 150 pts.J: Truax ..................... ...... 1 38 lk Holmes ....... ...... ...... ......... 1 1 5 14 Reid iv. ..................... ...... 1 3614, Ede ma. ....... ..................... 1 1415 Armstrong ma. ..... ...... 1 27 Curphey .................................. . Keefer max. .......... ...... 1 159A Seagram ma. .......... Ceachj .... 113 ,iii- i... Littleside Eight Competition This year's standard was considerably bett last two years. The results. CMaximum 105 pts.J: Scott .......................................... 92 34, Howland ...... Southam ......... ........ 9 2 Seagram ma. Keefer ma. ...... ........ 8 2 Osler mi. .... .. Mitchell ma. .... ........ 8 034 Martin ......... . 1 SQUASH COLOURS Last term the ,Squash Racquets team played er than that of the ........789Q .......76 . ........ 7515 three matches. The following have been awarded Squash colours:-Kerrigan, O'Brien, Smve. Trenholme, Wigle. TEAINI SE HOU NT RE P:B E OXFORD CU TH C! .2 L E0 o S. Esq. Geldard, S. In gra 83. D.S ell W Po H. TRINITY COLLEGE sCHooL RECORD 45 THE TORONTO GYM. SHOW On Friday, May 12th., 60 boys of the School went to Toronto, and that evening put on a demonstration of physical training, parallel- bar and horse-team work. The display occupied roughly half-a.n- hour and was a part of the Eglington Hunt Club Horse Show, taking part in the arena at Eglington. Owing partly, perhaps, to the long journey, and partly to the unaccustomed tan-bark on which they had to work, one or two of the boys had the bad luck to slip in the course of their exercises. However, on the Saturday night the work of the previous evening was repeated with great success, and on the whole we may say that the School played up to all former T.C.S. standards. An enjoyable weekend was .spent by all and we returned to the School by bus on Sunday night. Among the visitors at the Saturday night performance we were honoured by the presence of His Honour, Lieutenant-Governor Bruce. In conclusion we would like, on behalf of the masters and boys, to express our sincerest thanks to all those who did so much towards the success of the trip by their untiring efforts, and the hospitality offered to all out-of-town boys. TENNIS This year, for the first time, the School organized a tennis team. They had two engagements, with Upper Canada College, and succeed- ed in winning both. In the first match, which was held on June 1Oth., at Port Hope, U.C.C. were somewhat handicapped by our grass courts and we won easily in four straight matches. The return match was played the following Saturday in Toronto, and the team played very well to win by the score of three matches to one. The doubles teams were O'Brien and Trenholme, and Baillie ma., and Powell, O'Brien and Trenholme playing in the singles. First Match, June 10th., at Port Hope Singles: Trenholme defeated Phibbs 6-O, 6-05 O'Brien defeated Dickson 6-2, 6-2. 46 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Doubles: Trenholme and O'Brien defeated Welsh and Johnson 6-1, 6-25 Baillie and Powell defeated Fairhead and Phib-bs 6-3, 6-2. Second Match, June 17th., at Toronto Singles: O'Brien defeated Storie 6-2, 6-03 Trenholme defeated Taylor 6-1, 6-0. Doubles: Croft and Dickson defeated Trenholme and O'Brien 9-7, 6-43 Baillie and Powell defeated Johnson and Welsh 6-2, 6-2. SHOOTING Although the Senior team in the D.C.R.A. Competition this year had a much better average than last, the School came 16th. in the Dominion. Their average was 93.8. The Junior team made an average of 87.38, which was lower than last year, but they came 12th. in the Dominion. The best shot for the year is Fleming who scored an aggregate total of 604 out of a possible 650. The School fired in the R.M.C. Competition and came 31st with an average of 91.2. THE TRACK TEAM This term, largely through the efforts of Cox, a track team was formed and entered in the Ontario District meet at Oshawa the 24th. of May. Although the boys were handicapped by limited practice, they ran very well and secured two first places, one second, one third, seven fourths and one fifth place. Ambrose ma. came first in the Intermediate quarter and half mile finals. Armstrong ma. ran second in the junior hurdles and the relay team fAmbrose ma., Cassils ma., Scott, and Waldiel got second place in the Intermediate relay. These qualified for the finals in Toronto. The finals were held in Toronto on June 10th. Here we failed to get any places and the boys showed their lack of experience and the effect of their short training. The Sergeant-Major was very interested in the track work and accompanied the team to Oshawa and Toronto. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .LT Glnutriliuliuua ELEVATION Armour Memorial Prize Translation LFrom the French of Baudelairel Above the green valleys and mountains and meres, The woods and clouds and emerald seas The sun and immensity: further than these, My spirit consorts with the heavenly spheres. Onward and upward in glorious flight And like a strong swimmer who battles the flood Cleaving the measureless heights: till my blood Thrills with a joyous and virile delight! You have made me forget all the sin and disgrace Cleansing my soul at this limitless shrine: You drink as a liquid, untouched and divine The clear fire which fills inexhaustible space. Happy is he, and in spite of the pains And weariness filling this desolate life, VVhose spirit can leave this oppression and strife Gliding to brighter and happier plains. His fancies, like larks, at the dawning of day Up, up to the morning exultingly go. He has learned how to live: Without effort, to know The language of Flowers and inanimate Clay! -D. G. Stevenson. THE STREET OF LIFE The other day I was walking down Yonge Street during the rush hour. The pavement was crowded and I was in a hurry. I felt as everyone must have felt at sometime or other, when they are in an awful hurry and things don't run quite as smoothly as they might. Indeed I quite lost my temper and hurried on, banging into one per- son after another, cursing at them under my breath, and continuing on to the next encounter. Eveybody seemed to be going the opposite way to that in which I was headed. Yet actually I had no reason for excessive hurry beyond that of a wish to be home. It was in 43 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD this mood that I came to King Street just .as the lights turned against me. With an exclamation of impatience I stepped off the paving- only to be pulled back just in time to avoid being mauled by a huge lorry. Turning to look at my protector I found myself face to face with a woman, and as I looked, she smiled. After that I walked on in a different frame of mind. No longer did I rail at my fellow sufferers, instead I did all in my power to avoid collisions, and apologised for such as occurred. I even began to enjoy this game of hurrying through the crowd with a minimum of accidents. Sometimes, too, I stopped to look at some Window display or other. Then I would step out again, and now it seemed as though everybody was walking with me, some fast, some slow. Some stopped at every window, some loitered by the way, others walked briskly looking neither to the right nor to the left. Some walked aimlessly as though just killing time, some with an eager look bound for some ambitious objective. As I walked on it suddenly struck me how like all this was to life. I began to compare the street with the world, the bustle of the street with the bustle of life, the hazards and accidents of Walk- ing in the street with the hazards and accidents of life. And then I thought of my attitude of a While ago and compared it with that of the moment. I realised that Where I had been sullen, bad-temper- ed, and over-hurried, I was now radiant, exhilai-ated, and brisk, and looked, as it were, on life as a game. -W.B.R. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD .19 Svprrrh Eng The School was favoured with brilliant sunshine for Speech Day, held this year on June 23rd. Many parents and guests came up for this occasion, the last official function of the School year and mark- ing this time the end of Dr. Orchard's twenty years as Headmaster. There was the usual early Communion service in the School Chapel. At eleven-thirty the School attended service at St. Mark's Church. The Bishop of Toronto was present and the sermon was preached by Canon Shatford, of Montreal. Canon Shatford took as his text the verse from Ezekiel: "And every one had four faces," and spoke of its meaning for those going out into the world. The face of the lion symbolised courage, the face of the ox, patienceg that of the eagle, visiong and the man's face stood for sympathy. With these the real goal of life might be at- tained, Without any one of them a life was bound to be impaired. After service luncheon was provided in the Dining Hall, and coffee was taken afterwards on the lawn of the Lodge. This year the Distribution of Prizes took place also in the Dining Hall. His Lordship the Bishop of Toronto presided, and, in an ex- tremely happy speech, spoke Lin defiance, as he said, of Dr. Orch.ard's instructionsj of the retiring Headmaster's long and devoted service to the School. His grandfather, the Bishop said, had told him when he was ten years old that the greatest compliment that could be paid to a man was to say that he was a Christian gentleman. The words applied completely to Dr. Orchard, whose influence for good, in the lives of the many school generations that had passed through the School in his time, was incalculable. The Headmaster spoke of the kindness and help he had had from all who had been connected with the School in his time, mentioning particularly the various staffs of the School, the Old Boys' Association, and the Ladies' Guild. Dr. Orchard also expressed his earnest good wishes and high hopes for the future of the School under the new Headmaster, Mr. Ketchum. The Bishop of Toronto then distributed the prizes. Several of the donors of prizes were present, and these were called on to pre- sent their prizes in person. The complete prize list will be found below. Tea served in the Dining Hall brought the day's proceedings to a close. Among those present were:- The Right Reverend the Bishop of Toronto, His Grace Archbishop 5U TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Sweeney, the Reverend the Provost of Trinity College, Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Baldwin, Mr. and Mrs. F. Gordon Osler, Mr. and Mrs. G. B. Strathy, Mr. and Mrs. Percy Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Harcourt Vernon, Mr. P. A. C. Ketchum, Mrs. Ambrose, Mrs. and Mi-ss Archbold, Dr. and Mrs. Armour, Mr. E. Armour, Mr. W. Baldwin, Mrs. Bankier, Mrs. Becher, Mr. John Becher, Mr. and Mrs. Bevan, Mrs. C. W. Bell, the Misses Bilkey, Mr. Black, Mrs. C. H. Boulden, Prof. W. R. P. and Mrs. Bridger, Mr. Braden, Mrs. Burns, Mrs. R. C. H. Cassels, Mr.. Mrs. and Miss Chadwick, Mr. and Mrs. Cleveland, Mrs. and Miss Crampton, the Rev. T. P. Crosthwaite, Mrs. Cutler, Mr. and Mrs. Cutten, Mrs. Douglas, Miss Ellis, the Rev. and Mrs. Emmet, Mr. and Mrs. Fleming, Mr. and Mrs. Fortye, Mrs. Grant. Mr. and Mrs. Grout, Mr. Grout, Mrs. Haultain, Mr. Howland, Mr. H. Howard, the Rev. J. Scott Howard, Mrs. Hughes-Hallett, Mrs. Jemmett, Mr. ffowkes Jemmett, the Rev. W. B. Jennings, Mr.s. Keefer, the Misses Kerr, Mr. E. Ketchum, Mrs. Kortright, Mr. H. Little, Mr. and Mrs. Leather, the Rev. and Mrs. de Lom, Mrs. Macdonald, Dr.. and Mrs. Mackenzie, Mr. McCloskey, Mr. Nevin McConnell, Mr. T. A. McGinnis, Mrs. Mc- Glashan, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan McLaren, Mrs. McLernon, Mrs. Mood, Lt.-Col. and Mrs. Morrisey, Mr. R. Mudge, Mr. Gordon Mudge, Mr. D. Neville, Mr. G. Neville, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Newman, Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien, Mr. and Mrs. Padley, Col. and Mrs. Passy, Col. a.nd Mrs. Norman Perry, Mrs. and Miss Petrie, the Misses Rigby, Mr. O. Rigby, Mrs. Russel, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Smye, Mr. and Mrs. Somerville, Mr. W. W. Southam, Mrs. Starnes, Mr. H. C. F. Stikeman, Mrs. Tuck and Miss Fleming, Mr. R. White, Mrs. Whitehead, Mr. and Mrs. W. R. E. Williams, Mrs. Wotherspoon, Gent.-Cadet R. Wotherspoon, PRIZE LIST Sixth Form PETER OSLER General Proficiency, Christmas, 1932: Presented by 'tE. C. Cattanach, Esq. - Science: Presented by the Old Boys' Association. M. REED The Chancellor's Prize: Presented in memory of U. A. Worrell, Esq. The Jubilee Exhibition for Mathematics W. B. REID Divinity: Presented by the i1Primate of All Canada. The Petry Prize for History and English Presented by the Old Boys' Association TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Fifth Form J. C. COX Divinity: Presented by Archbishop Sweeney H. F. EDE General Proficiency, Christ mas, 1932: Presented by Dr. Rigby H. G. POWELL ncy, Midsummer, 1933: Presented by B. Strathy, Esq. General Proficie McGill Form E. F. L. BRUNTON Divinity: The :iBishop Brent Memorial Prize G. W. MILLER 2nd. General Proficiency Prize: Presented by O.B.A. The Petry History and English Prize: Presented by The Old Boys' Association S. O'BRIEN lst. G ' ' eneral Proficiency. Presented by iC1arence A. Bogert, Esq. French lSixth Forml: Presented by i:A. A. Harcourt-Vernon, Esq T. C. TRENHOLME Mathematics: Presented by S. Clarke, Esq. Upper Fourth Form N. C. BRIDGER The Petry Prize for History and English: Presented by The Old Boys' Association J. B. A. FLEMING Divinity A. D. MCGINNIS 2nd. General Proficiency: Presented by S. Bletcher, Esq. dThe Sir William Osler Science Exhibition G. H. K. STRATHY ency: Presented by lst General Profici His Honour Judge Ward The Governor Generals Medal for Mathematics The Bethune Scholarship Greek Prize: Presented in memory of Dr. Bethune TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Lower Fourth Form P. D. BANKIER 1st General Proficiency: Presented by 'FE G. B. Allan, Esq. Mathematics Prize A. W. LANGMUIR 2nd General Proficiency Upper Remove Form W. L. CURPHEY Special Prize for Latin. R. A. FORTYE The Petry Prize for History and English: Presented by O.B.A. E. D. K. MARTIN lst General Proficiency: Presented by O.B.A. Latin Prize The Bethune Scholarship W. B. MILLER 2nd General Proficiency French Prize H. J. SCOTT 3rd General Proficiency C. SEAGRAM Mathematics Prize. Lower Remove Form R. D. McLAREN General Proficiency, Christmas, 1932: Presented by O.B.A. The Petry Prize for History and English: Presented by O.B.A J. WAUGH General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1933: Presented by O.B.A. Upper Shell Form V. W. HOWLAND 2nd General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1933 W. B. LOWE Divinity 'Signifies Old Boy Donor of Prius TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 P. A. MCFARLANE General Proficiency, Christmas, 1932 Prize for History and English: Presented by Mrs. Renison C. R. OSLER lst General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1933 Mathematics Prize Lower Shell Form J. H. MITCHELL General Proficiency, Midsummer, 1933 Prize for History and English B. G. SOUTHAM General Proficiency, Christmas, 1932. Special Prizes THE BRONZE MEDAL ..................,................... ......... W . Whitehead Head Prefect's Prize: Presented by O.B.A. ..,............. W. Whitehead The Margaret Ketchum Prize ......,................................................. C. Truax Musical Study in Upper School ....... ....... J . Armesley and J. Barber The ifiArmour Memorial Prize ................................................ D. Stevenson ATHLETIC PRIZES AND TROPHIES Cricket Captains Cup and Bat: Presented by 1fiRev. J. Scott Howard, D. VVigle Best Batsma.n: E. C. Curry Challenge Cup, and Bat: Presented by ifNorman Seagram, Esq. ................. ..... D . Wigle Best Bowler: Bat ......,..................................................... ....... J . Corbett Best Fielder: Old Boys' Challenge Cup and Ball W. M. Vaughan Best Littleside Batsman: Challenge Cup, Presented by an Old Boy, and Bat ..................................................,......... C. Truax General Improvement: Bat presented by the Professional .... C. Robson Gymnastics Bigside: Best Gymnast ................................................................ A. Fleming Littleside: Best Gymnast: The tGWyn L. Francis Challenge Cup ............................................................................................ H. Scott Football The tJamie Eaton Cup held by Captain 3rd, XIV ..... ........ J . C. Cox 54 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Tennis Littleside Tournament: Prize presented by WR. P. Jellett, Esq. The The The The The The The The C. Seagram Squash Racquets "'Bul1en Challenge Cup-Open ........ ........ S . O"Brien fFred Watts Prize-Littleside ................................ ...... R . Keefer Challenge Cups for Athletic Sports '6Ewart Osborne: half mile open ................... ................ P . Ambro.se WR. S. Cassels: 100 yards open ......................... ............. C . Padley SJ. L. McMurray: 120 yards hurdles, open .................... W. Braden Montreal: quarter mile, Littleside ............................ H. L. Henderson ":W. W. Jones: 220 yards, Littleside .................................... H. Scott XMcGee: Gymn., boxing, cross country, Littleside ............ C. Truax The i:Mudge: Highest Aggregate in Sports ................................ V. Wynn The XF. G. Osler: all round athletics, Littleside ...... ......... H . Scott The Grand, all round athletics, open ......................... ....... I C. Padley Individual Prizes Cup for the Most Improved Shot ................. ......... R . Vaughan The Sergt.-Major's Cup for Best Cadet ........ .......... A . Fleming The 2Bradburn Cup for Best Boxer .... ...... D unbar Russel Oxford Cup-Winner: Cup ................... ............... B . Knox -Second: Mug ...................................... .......... ....... H . Powell -Third: Medal ................................................................ J. Cox Presented by the ifThompson Brothers. The Chess Cup: Presented by Chancellor i'R. V. Harris .... D. Stevenson INTER HOUSE CHALLENGE CUPS Held By Brent House fFormerly Lower Flatl Bigside Hockey: Given by Campbell, Esq. Middleside Hockey: Given by T. H. McLean, Esq. The i:Bethune Cup for Best Platoon Bigside Cricket: Given by :f:Seagram Bros. The Oxford Cup for Cross Country: Given by Old Boys Gymnastics Middleside Football: Given in Memory of :fiRev. E. C. Cayley Squash Racquets Held BN Bethune House fFormerly Upper Flatl Littleside Football: Given by IFA. J. Dempster, Esq. Bigside Football: Given by 1iMorgan Jellett, Esq. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 55 Middleside Cricket: The i:F'ord Stuart Strathy Cup Littleside Cricket: Given by F. Teviotdale, Esq. The "Read Cup for Athletics Littleside Hockey: Given by H. Matheson, Esq. JUNIOR SCHOOL GENERAL PROFICIENCY First Form First Prize ..4............................................... The i1Hamilton First Prize ....... First Prize ...... Second Prize ....... First Prize ..... Writing Prize ..... C. Passy Bronze Medal .....,.......,.............. ....... B . S. Russel Upper Second Form Lower Second Form de H. Nation P. Hasbrouck C. Landry Third Form W. D. Morris M. Somerville Reading Prize .......................,..,..,. ........ W . D. Morris Fourth Form JrSpecial Prize ....... ................................................, ........ J . A. K. Parr iiMartin Memorial Prizes Scripture-First Form ............................................. ............ R . H. Tippet -Upper Second Form ........................................ E. H. C. Leather -Lower Second Form ......,...................,..........,.. G. R. Robertson Music .....,........................., P. D. H. Hessey-White and E. H. C. Leather Drawing ..... ....... D . H. C. Hughes-Hallett and E. H. C. Leather The Reading Prizes and Challenge Cup fPresented by S. Read, Esq.l TSpec1al Prize ...,...........,...... ...... The Bethune Scholarship .................................... Entrance Scholarships to the Senior School ....... Mrs. Cassels' Cup for Athletic Sports ....... The rEsmonde Clarke Challenge Cup ..... The Housemaster's Cup for Gymnasium ..... G. H. Nation and E. C. H. Leather S. Russel C. Passy C. Passy and B. S. Russel E. Cutten E. Cutten Mood 35 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD The Headmaster's Cup for Boxing ................................ C. M. Somerville The Smye Tennis Trophy .,,.................. .......... F . C. Passy Cup for Tennis Championship .......................... ....,....... F. C. Passy Tennis-Second Prize ................................................................ W. A. Black The Cricket Captain's Bat: Presented by the Headmaster .... J. E. Cutten Sergeant Major's Medal for Shooting ................... ........ K . W. A. Bevan Choir Prize ................................................................................ G. H. Nation TThese "Special" Prizes are awarded for progress during the year. SALVE L. R. McLernon, son of S. A. McLernon Esq., Montreal, P.Q. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 57 Efhr Bluninr Srhnnl llrrnrh It has been the privilege of Mr. Boulden to write our farewell to the Headmaster: the task, in his hands, naturally conveys the feel- ings of the Junior School, which he guided so ably for eight years. Sill, we esteem it an honour to be able to contribute a few grateful words of appreciation of our Headmaster's services in the past and of kindly wishes for his future. As in the past, the Junior School of this year has been privileged to have Dr. and Mrs. Orchard to Sunday dinner frequently and also to have the Headmaster's practical interest in the Divinity classes. Our contact with the Lodge has been further cemented, by the whole- hearted interest of Mr. Robert Orchard in the development of self- expression in the field of art among the boys, all of which have en- abled the School to meet the Headmaster more often then we had reason to expect in his last and busiest year. The purpose of these few lines is complete when we write: "We are very sorry to lose you, but we shall be glad to hear from time to time of your happiness in retirement, which we are sure will be your lot. Good-bye." The past year has been a very happy oneg what scares we had from the visitation of scarlet fever and chicken-pox were false alarms, since the attacks were confined to the initial casesg good health and bright spirits have been the order of the day throughout the summer-term and every waking hour was filled with useful activity. The Carpentry Club has had a very successful year and the members have a right to be proud of their products. Articles of distinct usefulness and clever workmanship have been judged good enough to form part of the dormitory furnishings. Finally, in Dor- mitories G and H the Marionette Club were the busiest little School Club we have ever seeng from the construction of the puppets to the staging of the acts, ano mean demand on the young people who con- stituted the club, excellent results were obtained. Two performances were given before crowded rooms in each case and Mr. Robert Orchard and the boys concerned thoroughly deserved the applause they re- ceived. To those going up to the Senior School we extend the very best wishes for the future. May they come over to see us just as often as their new Housemaster will give them permission! - s.. 2 33 G5 0 Q O E ki F. C. Pass Q S. Russel CD E cvs vw B. C5 E. Cutten H. .51 O 2 -no 'va 3 4.2 CD Q-4 E' E' tri oi uf Y W. Mood eming R. A. C. V. Fraser sq. sey-White A. S. F1 rn as :If E Q I-11 Q 5 cv n-I o 2 J P-S C 3 rn C ,-C1 O "1 U 2 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD SSD JUNIOR SCHOOL CRICKET SEASON 1933 The Junior School played six matches, winning one and losing five. The team were very enthusiastic, but could not overcome the tendency to lift the head and shoulders when playing forward, with the result many were caught out. Russel bowled consistently well and Tippet very well at times: both should become good bowlers. Cutten proved a very willing and capable captain. COLOURS The following have been awarded Junior School Cricket Colours:- J. E. Cutten, B. S. Russel, F. C. Passy, W. A. Black, R. H. Tippet. R. A. C. V. Fraser, P. D. H. Hessy-White and W. Mood. JUNIOR SCI-IOOL CRICKET SCHEDULE 1933 First XI May 27 vs U.C.C. fhomel won by U.C.C. June 2 vs. S.A.C. fawayl won by S.A.C. June 5 vs. The Grove fawayb won by Grove June 7 vs. S.A.C. fh-omel won by T.C.S. June 10 vs. U.C.C. fawayl won by U.C.C. June 13 vs. The Grove I home won by Grove Second XI May 16 vs The Grove fhomel won by Grove June 16 vs. The Grove fawayl won by Grove The 2nd team played two games vs. the Grove and lost both, 82-41, 87-42. The team did not play particularly well but Hughes-Hallett and McLernon showed promise as bowlers. U.C.C. PREP. vs. SCHOOL We opened the season rather poorly by losing to U.C.C. 135-56. Godefroy of U.C.C. distinguished himself as thc best bowler of the day with an average of 3.5 runs per wicket, while Bennet, U.C.C.'s captain was the best batsman. Johnston batted well for School, 50 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD while Cutten took the bowling honours. In the 2nd, innings Passy and Douglas were high scorers with 13 runs each. School , ,, lst. Infnings Russel, c. Fess, b. Douglas ........ 1 Johnston, c. Douglas, b. Godefroy ....................... ...... 1 1 Cutten, l.b.w. Godefroy ..... ...... 4 Passy, st. Carpenter, b. Godefroy ,..................,............ 5 Black, c. Lawder, b. Douglas .. 0 Hessey-White, b. Godefroy ...... 0 Tippet, c. Bennet, b. Godefroy 9 Fraser, c. Bennet, b. Godefroy 0 2 0 0 4 Mood, run out ..,......................... McLennan, not out .................... Fleming, b. Lawder ..... ...... Extras .......................... ...... Total .... ......... 3 6 U.C.C Ist. Innings Stewart, b. Cutten ...................... 0 Dellis, b. Cutten ........,............... 5 Godefroy, c. Russel, b. Cutten 6 Bennet, b. Cutten ..,..................... 12 Fess, run out ,,....,............,........,... 6 Baensto, c. Russel, b. Cutten .. 6 MacLachlin, b. Cutten .............. 8 Douglas, c. Russel, b. Cutten .. 6 Hertzberg, b. Cutten .............,.. 1 Lawder, b. Tippet .............,........ 2 Carpenter, not out ..... ...... 0 Extras ...................... ...... 1 3 Total .... ......... 6 5 2nd. Innings Russel, b. Douglas ........ ..... 3 Johnston, b. Godefroy ...... ..... 0 Cutten, b. Douglas ............ ...,. 2 Passy, c. McLachlin, b. Hertzberg ...............,.............. 13 Black, c. McLachlin, b. Douglas 0 I-Iessey-White, b. Godefroy ...,.... 0 Tippet, c. Douglas, b. Godefroy 0 Fraser, c. McLachlin, b. Lawder 0 Mood, b. Lawder ...................,.... 1 McLennan, b. Hertzberg ............ 1 Fleming, not out ................ ..... 0 0 Extras ...,............................ ...... Total ..... ......... QB PREP. 2nd. Innings ' 5 2 Godefroy, 2. and b. Cutten .... 5 Stewart, b. Tappet ....................,. Dellis, b. Tippet ........................ Bennet, l.b.w. Tippet ................ 1 Fess, c. Johnston, b. Cutten .... 4 Baensto, c. and b. Cutten ........ 12 Machachlin, b. Tippet ......,....... 1 Douglas, not out .....,.................. 13 Hertzberg, c. Johnston, b. Cutten .,..,...................,.......... Lawder, not out ............... ...... Carpenter, did not bat ....... 6 3 0 Extras ............................................ 16 Total ............ C8 wicketsj ...... 68 S..-LC. LOWER SCHOOL vs. SCHOOL In the second game we were defeated 88-87 for 5 Wickets. Mac- Kerrow was the day's best bowler with an average 2.8 while Dawson was by far the best batsman, but Cutten got the largest number of runs per hit withanice sixer. Tippet bowled well for the School with an average of four. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 61 S.A.C. 1st. Innings 2nd. Innings Thompson, b. Cutten ................ 0 Thompson, c. Fraser, b. Tippet 0 Straith, c. Tippet, b. Russel .... 5 Straith, c. Cutten, b. Tippet .... 7 Armstrong, b. Cutten ...........,.... 4 Armstrong, c. Cutten, b. Tippet 0 Adamson, b. Russel .................... 28 MacKerrow, not out ............,....... 1 MacKerrow, b. Tippet ...... ......, 1 1 Adamson, c. Tippet, b. Russel 2 Norton, b. Russel ...................... 4 Morton, b. Russel ................,..... 0 Rowan, b. Tippet ........................ 13 Dowan, ...................,.. did not bat MacIntosh, c. Black, b. Tippet 3 MacIntosh, .... ....... d id not bat Jarvis, b. Tippet ........................ 2 Jarvis, ..,...... ....... d id not bat Sweezy, not out ........................ 0 Sweezy, ....... did not bat Gripton, b. Tippet ..... .... 0 Gripton, ....... did not bat Extras ........................ ..... 4 Extras ..,...... ..................,.... 4 Total ...... ....... 7 4 Total ...... ....... 1 4 School lst. Innings Znd. Innings Russel, b. Straith .............. .... 8 Russel, b. Straith ...........,..... .... 8 Johnston, c. Thomson, b. Johnston, b. MacKerrow .......... 2 Straith ..............,............ . .... 4 Passy, c. Adamson, b. Passy, b. MacKerrow ..,............. 4 MacKerrow .......,.....,.. ,... 0 Cutten, l.b.w. MacKerrow ........ 1 Cutten, c. MacIntosh, b. Black, b. MacKerrow ..........,..... 12 MacKerrow ..................,......, 15 Hessey-White, b. MacKerrow.. 0 Tippet, not out ............................ 8 Fraser, b. MacKerrow ..... ..... 0 Mood. b. MacKerrow ..... ..... 0 McLennan, b. Straith ..... ..... O Fleming, b. Striaith ...... ..... 0 2 Extras ........ ............... ..... Total ...... ........... 33 Black, c. MacIntosh, b. Straith O I-Iessey-White, c. and b. 9 Adamson .,.............,..,.,......... Tippet, c. Adamson, b. Straith 9 Fraser, run out .........,....,.,......... 0 Mood, b. MacKerrow .............,.. 0 McLennan, not out ...,.. ,.., 2 Fleming, b. Rowan ...... ..., 0 Extras ....................... ....... 2 Total ...... ........ 4 7 P.i. LAKEFIELD UNDER- 14's vs. SCHOOL In this game we lost 77-43, although Russel was easily best bowl- er with an average of 3.5. Dobbie and Greenwood stayed in together for 12 overs and got 28 runs between them. The biggest surprise was when Peck, after scoring 43 runs the day before was bowled 2nd. ball. 62 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD School Laketleld Russel, c. Greenwood, b. Dunn, c. Black, b. Tippet ........ 7 Goldsmith ................ ...... 0 Pullen, b. Cutten ........................ 3 Johnston, b. Dunn ....,.. ....... 0 Peck, b. Tippet ................... ...... 0 Passy, b. Dunn ................ ...... 8 Braid, b. Tippet .......................... 3 Cutten, b. Goldsmith ..,... ....... 0 Dobbie, b. Russel ..........,............. 17 Black, b. Dunn ............................ 13 Baxter, c. Mood, b. Cutten ...... 13 Hessey-White, b. Dunn ............ 0 Greenwood, b. Russel ......,......... 11 Tippet, C. Dobbie, b. Goldsmith 1 Carter, not out ............................ 6 Fraser, not out ...........,................ 9 McCrea, c. Black, b. Russel .... 4 Mood, c. Greenwood, b. Dunn.. 0 Goldsmith, c. Black, b. Russel .. 4 McLennan, b. Goldsmith ............ 5 Pentland, b. Black .................... 0 Fleming, c. Baxter, b. Dunn .... 0 Extras ....................... ...... 9 Extras ...,........................................ 7 Total ,... .......... 4 3 Total .... ......... 7 7 S.A.C. LOWER SCHOOL vs. SCHOOL After three unsuccessful tries we at last succeeded in winning a game, the score being 49-47. The game started late on account of rain so that there was only one innings. Straith, one of their best batsmen and bowlers, was hit in the hand by a fast ball from Tippet and unable to finish his batting which was very unfortunate for S.A.C. Luckily he was able to bowl, but could not field very well with only one hand. Hessey-White was the best batsman and Russel bowled well for the School. School S.A.C. Passy. C- M21CI11t0Sh, b- Straith, retired injured ............ 0 MacKerrow ................. ...... 6 Thompsgn, b, Russel ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 5 RUSS61, b- MHCKCITOW -----.. ------ 0 Armstrong, b. Russel ................ 5 Johnston, c. Ad3.II1SOU, b- MacKerrow, c. Fraser, b. Tippet 9 Sffalth ......................... ...... 0 Adamson, C, Passy, b, Russel 4 Cutten, b. Straith ........................ 9 Morton, b, Russel ,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,.,,,,, 2 Black, C. M9.CII1t0Sh, b- Rowan, c. Cutten, b. Russel .... 0 MacKerrow ............,............... 1 MacIntosh, C, Hughes-Ha11et, Hessey-White, b. MacKerr0w H13 b. Tippet .............................. 6 Tippet, run out ........................--.- 0 Jarvis, b. Russel ........................ 9 Fraser, b. Stllaith ...................... 11 Sweezy, C, and ,b, Russel ,,,,,,,, 0 MOOd, I'l.1I1 0111. .............................. 1 Griptgn, not out ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 1 McLennan, not out .,.................. 2 Extras ,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,, ,,..., 6 Hughes-Hallett, b. MacKerrow 0 Extras ............................................ 6 Total .. . .......... 49 Total .... ........ . 47 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 53 SCHOOL vs. U.C.C. PREP. This was our worst defeat, the School losing by an innings and 89 runs. In this game Douglas, of U.C.C., got a bat-trick, while Godefroy, also of U.C.C., got a well earned bat. with 71 runs, he also bowled well. Is the 2nd innings Fraser was high scorer with 18 runs. School lst. Innings Passy, c. and b. Godefroy ........ 5 Russel, b. Douglas ...................... 1 Johnston, b. Douglas ................ 0 Cutten, b. Douglas .................... 3 Black, b. Godefroy .................... 4 Hessey-White, b. Godefroy ........ 0 Tippet, b. Godefroy ....,............... 0 Mood, not out ........,................... 3 Fraser, b. Douglas .....,....... .... 0 Fleming, b. Godefroy ................ 0 Hughes-Hallett, c. Baensto b. Douglas .................,.......... 0 Extras ....,................................ .... 1 Total ...... ......,.,. 1 7 U.C.C. Fess, c. Russel, b. Cutten ........ 10 Baensto, run out .......................... 6 Godefroy, b. Russel .................... 71 Dellis, b. Tippet ............ ....... 5 Hodder, b. Tippet ................,....... 1 Bennet, b. Russel ........................ 19 Douglas, c. Black, b. Russel .... 3 2nd. Innings Passy, b. Lawder ..,...............,..... 0 Russel, c. and b. Hodder ............ 5 Johnston, b. Lawder .................... 0 Cutten, b. Hodder ...................... 7 Black, c. Carpenter, b. Lawder 3 Hessey-White, b. Lawder ........ 1 Tippet, b. Lawder ...................... 0 Fraser, b. Henderson ...... ..,.... 1 8 Mood, c. Hertzberg, b. Henderson .,...,............ .,..... 0 Fleming, b. Hertzberg .......,...... 6 Hughes-Hallett, not out ............ 0 Extras .................................. ....... 3 Total .... ....... 4 3 Prep. Lawder, 1.b.w. Russel ................ 0 Hertzberg, c. Passey, b. Tippet 8 Henderson, not out .................... 10 Carpenter, b. Russel ..... .......... 2 Extras ............................ ....... 1 4 Total ....... .149 THE GROVE vs. SCHOOL We finished the season rather unsuccessfully by losing our last game and getting only 2 points out of a possible 12. In this game we were beaten 83-59. We started off very well but soon slowed down. A thrill hushed the on-lookers when Russel, after 2 overs without a hit broke his duck with a beautiful drive which went for live runs. School Passy, c. Dobbie, b. Dunn ........ 14 Russel, b. Goldsmith ................ 18 Cutten, c. Braid, b. Dunn ........ 0 Johnston, b. Dunn .................... 2 Grove Dunn max., c. Black, b. Tippet..17 Pullen, b. Tippet ........................ 8 Greenwood, b. Tippet ................ 0 Dobbie, b. Russel ........... ....... 6 45.1 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD School Grove BIHCR, C- Dobbie, lb- DUDI1 .---..-- 1 Braid, c. Russel, b. Tippet ........ 15 Hessey-White, b. Goldsmith ,... 2 Baxter, e. Russel, b. Tippet .... 3 Tippet, c. Greenwood, b. Dunn 3 Peck, c. Passy, b. Russel ........ 1 Fraser, c. Dobbie, b. Goldsmith 0 Carter, c. Cutten, b. Russel .... 20 5 3 Mood, not out ............................ McCrea, c. Passy, b. Russel .... Fleming, c. Pullen, b. Peck .... 7 Pentland max., b. Russel .......... 1 Hughes-Hallett, c. Dunn, b. Goldsmith, not out .................... 0 Peck ........................................ 0 Extras ......................... ...... 1 4 Extras ............................................ 7 Total ..... .......... 5 9 Total .... ...... 8 8 GYMNASIUM The competition for the Gym. colours, June 12th., attracted seven entries, all of whom easily gained the required percentage. Mood, Cutten and Tippet were very close in the standing, but Mood was just that much superior to earn the verdict of the judges. The following were awarded colours:- W. Mood, J. E. Cutten, R. S. Tippet, W. A. Black, B. S. Russel, R. A. C. V. Fraser, and P. D. H. Hessey-White. Mood, therefore, won the Housemasteris Cup for Gymnasium, 1933. SHOOTING The results of the work in the range have been very satisfactory, keenness, of course, was ever present, but actual progress was as- tonishing in many cases. The competition for the Sergt.-Major's Medal was very keen and produced excellent scores. Bevan, Kirk- patrick and Hasbrouck tied with 47 in the preliminaries but the final saw Bevan the winner with possible, the only one recorded this year in the whole School. TENNIS The School being smaller then last year, more continued practice was afforded the tennis-lover. The court, though on a new site, proved good enough to attract the keenest interest. The old court was winter-killed and should benefit from a little rest. The com- petition was carried through within the space of a week and the final brought together two very keen and promising players in Passy and Black. Passy proved the steadier and won in two straight sets. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Q55 though Black must be commended for the style he displayed. Passy, accordingly, won the handsome little cup and Black the second prize of four tennis balls and net, all provided from the Club subscriptions. SALVETE C. P. R. Crampton, son of Cecil T. R. Crampton, Esq., El Carmen, Warren, Ontario. D. A. Flock, son of G. Murray Flock, Esq., M.D., Windsor, Ontario. A. R. McLernon, son of S. A. McLernon, Esq., Montreal. FINAL ORDER First Form Lower Second Third Form 1. Passy 1- Mcconneu 1. Morris 2. Tippet 2- Landry 2. Rougvie 3. Russel 3- Hasbrouck 3. Bevan 4. Cutten 5195555503 4. Somerville . Ik Upper Second 6. Warner Crampton 1. Nation 7. Kirkpatrick Fourth Form 2. Leather 8. Black Parr 3. Johnston 9. Morrisey 4. Fleming iHessey-White 5. McLennan f:McLernon 6. Hughes-Hallett 'i'Flock 7. McGlashen 8. Mood 'not ranked Old Boys ' Crickef Dcny,June 3 nqss ,X 1. ' TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 51' ODID 'Kings' Nairn The Old Boys' Presentation to Dr. Orchard The cricket matches on the 3rd. of June provided an excellent occasion for the Old Boys' gift to be presented to the retiring Head- master. After the tea interval in the major match, everybody gathered round the marquee, where W. W. Stratton asked the Head- master's acceptance of the cheque which had been subscribed as a token of the esteem in which the Old Boys held him. Stratton spoke of Dr. Orchard's great work during the war, in the period of the fire and rebuilding, and in fact throughout his twenty years as Headmaster. After Dr. Orchard's feeling response, three cheers were called for and given with a will. The Headmastefs Letter to the O.B.A. lEdilor's note:-The Headmaster has asked me to publish his letter to the President of The Old Boys' Associationj Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ontario. June 4th., 1933. My dear Mr. Stratton: I feel I must write and tell you how much my wife and I ap- preciate what you said at the gathering of Old Boys yesterday. We ADVERTISEMENTS THE TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION Annual Members S3 Life Members S25 li- The annual fee is lD21yZ11110 Ill 21t1VilI14'l' 211111 is 11110 011 -Ia11111a1'y Ist. P21011 year. Life Membership fees co11sTi111'r1v The c'z1pi'fa1 19111111 of T110 Assoc-iz1Tio11, 211111 are 111111811-111 i11 SQIIOO1 Bonds. Life AIP1ll1b9l'S. 11l'l'l'01:Hl'0. 1111111 to 11111111 up the Assoviz1'rio11s C'z1pitz11 211111 ennjoy the 111'1Vi1vg'1-s of ll1GIIl1JGI'S11Il1 211 Z1 very 11101-1t'I'2l1t' 1-ost fo t11e111s1-111-s t'OIlSIf1G1'I1IQ,' 111211 1111- gXll1l11il1 fee 111111111 110 rF3.00. Honorary Membership 1XY1111Hl11 11-1-1 is 21111111111 to 1110810 who ll12l1ilI ilI1Ii111'2l1101l 1l1v1'1-1'o1' 1117011 102lYIllLl' 11111 Sl'1l4'l4l1, 311141 I'1'Illil11lN Ill 1.H1'1'4x 1111111 11111 '1.t1110XY1llQ 111-1-e1111w1' Illsf. A11 classes of Members: 1. 111111-vi1'v 2li1V2llll't' 11o1i1vs 111' gl'1l0U1 M:11v11vs 211141 411111-1' S1'11OU1 z1f'ti1'iTivs. '. Aw- 0111'o110r1 as slllnsc-1'i1w1's To 1110 '1'.f'.S. "Rem-o1'11". 0 -1. R1-vvive vopivs of T110 01:1 Iloys' IJ11'l1l'1OI'.V. 4. Are lu-pt in 1-0111111-T with The 9011001 211111 with 0:1011 01'1l01' 11'11e1'eVe1' T110-1' Illilf' 110. ,., ax. Assist 111 p1'o111o1i11g' 1111- olmjovts 01911111 Asso- 011111011 Communications should be addressed to:- The Secretary-Treasurer, F. H. Rous 1111 1'11:11'10s Si. W. 11101111110 5. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD 69 shall remember it all our lives. You will realise how very deep our feelings are just now, and the very affectionate way in which you referred to us personally gave an intimate touch to a very delight- ful day. The cheque which you handed to us from the Old Boys has given us a great happiness to receive from them and we are indeed very grateful. We would ask you to convey to them our very real thanks. Their generosity will enable us to buy a car and in our wanderings to have a constant reminder of the many personal contacts of friend- ship we have enjoyed while we have been here. Very few Head- masters have had the help I have had especially from the strong and loyal body of which you are the President and I can only wish for my successor that he will have the same support and good fortune I have had. It has occurred to me to ask the Editor of the Record to publish this letter as the easiest Way to convey our thanks to the many Old Boys who were unable to be present yesterday. VVith our kindest regards, Yours sincerely, F. G. Orchard. Old Boys' Cricket l.Vhat a day the 3rd. of June turned out to be. About nine a.m. the -advance guard of an army of Old Boys rolled up to the School. By noon there were so many of them that the Present were let off school to show them round. Lunch was in the Dining Hall, where the new Honours Rolls attracted much attention. There was a very good lunch and some of the Old Boys found it hard to believe that it was just the ordinary daily fare. About two o'clock the real business of the day began. When forty-four Old Boys start in to play cricket with forty-four of the present-day lads, the fun is on. Of course the first team game was entirely serious, in the tradition of the game. But numbers two, three and four became more and more uproarious as the afternoon wore on. Perhaps the most excitement developed in the third match, where the last over found Godshall valiantly trying to hit sixes to 743 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD win, while F. Wigle behind the wickets whipped off the bails four times before finally getting his man. As the Old Boys' only winning eleven, this group were solemnly filmed at the end of their miatch. Notes ' R. A. Pacaud has been playing for the McGill Cricket Club "A" eleven, D. Byers and H. Johnston for the "B" team. Jock Spragge is now selling real estate with Chambers Meredith. K. G. B. Ketchum has been appointed Assistant to the Head- master at St. Andrew's College. Norman O. Seagram and C. M. A. Strathy have been called to the Bar in Toronto. The latter makes the fourth genenation of barristers in the family. Harry Read C271 and Bill Jordan, a recent graduate of Columbia visited the School lately. At R.M.C., G. Q. M. S. C. L. Ingles was fifth in the graduating class and was awarded the Corps of Guides Prize for topographical survey, map reading and field sketching. He has been recommend- ed for a commission in the Royal Canadian Engineers. Charlie Delahey, right wing of the Royals, has announced his retirement from hockey and football. Staff Major C. A. P. Murison, M.C., R.A., has been appointed G.S.O. 2 at R.M.C. The R.M.C. Review records that he "is the only officer on the active list of the British Army to hold both the p.s.c. and the p.a.c. certificates, he has passed .both the Staff College, Cam- berley, and the Advanced Class at the Military College of Science, Woolwich." B. Beck visited the School the other day. He is selling sewing- machines with the Singer Company. C. Nichols is reported to be desk editor with the Canadian Press in Toronto. T. P. Crosthwaite was ordained by the Bishop of Toronto on Trinity Sunday. TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD T1 BIRTHS Crispo-To Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Crispo, at Toronto, in May, a son. Morse-To Mr. and Mrs. Eric W. Morse, at Port Hope Hospital, on June 20th., a son. VVOrsley-To Mr. and Mrs. C. Pennyman Worsley, on May 25th., a daughter. MARRIAGES Kingsmill-VVebster-May 6th., at Westmount, Kathleen Alice Mary, elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. Webster, to Mr. Nicol Kingsmill. eldest son of Lieut.-Col. Walter B. Kingsmill, K.C., D.S.O. and Mrs. Kingsmill, of Toronto. Lash-Clarkson-June 10th., at Toronto, Hazel Eileen, elder daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. Roger Clarkson, to Peter John Baldwin, elder son of Mr. and Mrs. John F. Lash. DEATHS Brooks-April 10th., after a short illness, Charles Edward Brooks. lBorn 1886. T.C.S. 19033. Fletcher-Guy Ashton Fletcher, CT.C.S. 18825. Iahiw' tguilh The twenty-ninth Annual Meeting of the Trinity College School Ladies' Guild was held on Thur-sday, April 20th., in Toronto. Fifty-eight members were present. The President Mrs. G. S. Cartwright was in the Chair. Following the routine business, Mrs. Cartwright spoke of .the general regret occasioned by Dr. Orchard's resignation, of his years of devoted service, and of Mrs. Orchardfs warm and unfailing hospitality. She also referred to the .success of the Guild's party,T1'eld in February in Trinity College. She knew that all joined in thanking Provost and Mrs. Cosgrave, and Mr. Jellett for their great kindness. A resume was given of the work of the past year, with special mention of the screens on the dining-room windows and the benches placed in the grounds. Both these gifts were greatly appreciated by the School. Mrs. Cartwright suggested that some attention be given to the Chapel to enhance its dignity and beauty, and it was decided that ff TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD the Executive deal with this, drawing on the general fund for ex- penses. A motion was also carried, that the "Chapel Fund" amount- ing to 316460, be known in future as the "Chapel Building Fund," to be preserved as a nucleus towards the erection of a new building. In future all donations to the "Chapel Building Fund" should be specincally so designated. To replace the Honour Roll Boards lost in the fire, the Guild decided, following the architect's recommendation, and subject to the approval of the Board of Governors, that the names should be placed in gold and colour on the panelling of the dining hall. The money was voted to execute this work. The Port Hope Branch of the Guild was re-established, with the understanding that no work be undertaken by .them without the sanction of the Executive in Toronto, through with all communications with the Headmaster must go. Hearty votes of thanks were tendered to Mrs. Cartwright the retiring President, and Mrs. McLaren the retiring Treasurer, for their unilagging interest and work. Dr. Orchard expressed his gratitude to the Guild for their friendship and assistance during twenty years and hoped that the same loyal support would be given to his successor. Following the meeting the members were entertained at tea by the executive. The following were elected for the ensuing year:- Officers: President ................................ Mrs. Britton Osler, 67 Binscarth Road lst Vice-President ........ Mrs. G. S. Cartwright, 397 Russel Hill Rd. 2nd Vive-President .......... Mrs. Dudley Dawson, 202 Heath St. W. Hon. Treasurer ...... ....... M rs. Bingham Allan, 6 Wellesley Place Hon. Secretary ...... ....... M rs. Thomas Archibald, 90 Park Road Committee: Mrs. Barry Cleveland Mrs. J. J. Vaughan Miss Vera. Martin Mrs. W. F. Howland Mrs. Carr Harris Mrs. G. W. Wigle Mrs. Frank Cochran Mrs. Cecil Stuart Mrs. R. C. Matthews Mrs. Duncan McLaren Mrs. Norman Perry Mrs. George McLaren Mrs. Gordon Byers, Corresponding Secretary, Montreal. Mrs. H. S. Ambrose, Corresponding Secretary, Hamilton. Mrs. E. Edgar, President Port Hope Branch. Mrs. Wotherspoon, Secretary Port Hope Branch. Membership in the Guild is open to mothers, wives, and sisters. of the boys and old boys: or to anyone interested in the School. ll it it ll "The Blue and White", Rothesay Collegiate School. U C4 I4 Il ll C4 Cl TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL RECORD Til PRESENTATION TO DR. AND MRS. ORCHARD FROM THE LADIES GUILD A very pleasant little ceremony took place on Trinity Sunday in the Reception Room of the School, when Dr. and Mrs. Orchard were presented with a cheque by Mrs. Britton Osler, the President, from the Executive and Members of the Ladies Guild, with an expression of the affectionate gratitude of the Guild and regret at their approach- ing departure. Dr. and Mrs. Orchard said that they were deeply touched, and expressed their thanks most feelingly. EXCHANGES "The Forum", Barbados, B.W.I. "The Harrovian", Harrow School, England. The Glenalmond Chronicle", Trinity College, Glenalmond. 'The Albanian", St. Alban's, Brockville. Acta Ridleiana". Bishop Ridley School, St. Catherines. Saint Andrew's College Record", St. Andrew's College, Aurora. "Lower Canada College Magazine", Lower Canada College, Montreal. The Grove Chronicle", The Grove, Lakefield. The Ashburian", Ashbury College, Ottawa. 'Bishop Strachan School Magazine", Bishop Strachan School Toronto. St. Ninian's School Magazine", St. Ninian's School, Dumfries. U ll 9 The Raven", Ravenscourt School, Winnipeg. Rouge et Noir", Sussex High School, Sussex, N.B. The Tabor Log", Tabor Academy, Marion, Mass. The Mitre", University of Bishop's College, Lennoxville, P. Q. Bishop's College School Magazine", Bishopis College School Lennoxville. The Black and Red", University School, Victoria, B.C. The Black and Gold", St. John's College, Winnipeg. The College Times", Upper Canada College, Toronto. R.M.C. Review", Royal Military College, Kingston. Windsorian", Kingis College School, Windsor, N.S. The Trinity University Review", Toronto, Ontario. U Cl "The Vantech", Technical School, Vancouver, B.C. ADVERTISEMENTS It all depends on your OUTLOOK The boy who thinks a dollar is not Worth saving becomes the man who thinks a hundred dollars is not worth saving, and he usually ends where he began-that is, with nothing." A Bank of Montreal savings ac- count into which you deposit regularly will help you realize the true value of a dollar saved BANK OF MONTREAL Established 1811 Established 1895 ELMES HENDERSON '32 SON REAL ESTATE 82 INSURANCE Royal Bank Bldg. 10 King St. East, Toronto. ADVERTISEMENTS COLLEGE OUTFITTERS IN' Clothing and Furnishings BOYS', YOUTHS' AND YCUN G MEN'S SIZES LIAII TED 1444 ST. CaTg1Sl:1EEiIiEET WEST DACK'S SHOES Now as low as S8-50 Boy's Shoes at S7-50 Distinctive shoes for every occasion are now available in our famous "Bond Street" line at 258.50 fspecial sport shoes at 357503. "Empire" models are 359.50 and our "Custom-Grade" range, from 811.00 up. 9 SHOES FOR MEN 73 K NG ST. W. 46 BL.oo ST, E. ronorrro MONTRE L oTTAwA HAMILTON wmuson wmuwss REGINA LGAR vucouvs AI HVERTISEMENTS TRINITY COLLEGE In the University of Toronto TRINITY COLLEGE, FEDERATED WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, AND NOW REMOVED TO QUEEN'S PARK, IS ONE OF THE ARTS COLLEGES OF THE UNIVERSITY AND I INCLUDES 1. A Faculty of Arts providing instruction for students in classes of limited size in all subjects taught by the Colleges. 2. The full advantages of Federation with the University, instruction by its Professors, qualification for its Scholarships and Degrees, use of its Library, Laboratories and Athletic faculties and membership in Hart House. 3. A Faculty of Divinity in which Trinity exer- cises its University powers of conferring degrees, and prepares candidates for the ministry of the Church. 4. Residences under College regulations for men -f'Trinity House", and for women students-"St, Hilda 's"g also for members of the academic staff. 5. The Scholarships offered by the College have recently been revised and largely increased. Full particulars will be supplied on request. 6. The Reverend F. A. Bethune Scholarship and the Professor William Jones Scholarship are open only to boys from Trinity College School. For information concerning Scholarships, Exhibi- tions, Bursaries, etc. address: The Registrar, Trinity College, Toronto 5. 'lxlf ul' ", 1 J'T. 'A J Ii. , , .,. . V 5 D nrmly Iv.. u.yJ',,1,r, -L. 1' ' 'M' 'YNI1 n , I 5 x UI l ' I .' X, ,. -, ,ft I LU, .' I I ' LJ V Mg' N ' ' n ' AP . "J , s! If rl? v, X r' n S. . . . 'ju , . ,X .Wx , ' v.. ' ' '-I , V . - L 1 v,. 4 f., "1 ' .' n- 1. ,,1 ,v ' 5 X :I P' 4 v 1' X' 'HM 1 Ml w,..gf,w'n V1 .H K I 2,-I, jl"Q4.L.l'LiV,fea' A . 1 , -' , ,,W:f .'f,y .--M , ,, ni ff., , P . . '-.w :, Q,-I 1 ..,.g,e , v I ,MII ,.vv ,,. lyrkuv, - . "Q" N X v vqi ,y V, - , M 14 .ey "1 ' ' " 'Htrgp ' I 5 , ,4- " x..If'x'iLpnX1- xl ,E , r ' ,Hx 'L.v!:u.l',,-RVN AJ' ' 'Ie' -'W"'1Jl7:f 33 . 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Trinity College School - Record Yearbook (Port Hope, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Page 1

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