Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1953

Page 1 of 64

 

Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1953 Edition, Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 64 of the 1953 volume:

. ., - ,f.,N,-.,. M. . . , ., . . 4... .. .Pig : : I A -T,c,LgL,.,:.:.-,,1,l.m,..iv:.:-,. .,.,,, L .,,..1ff--, 4-fjff,-ff: 1'-f-r-:7-'11:f1j:f'--cz:-rf -ry,-f--'-'-rr-:-MA-r:-cf:-g+e-raw: ::"-'ec'-::--rr:-N . - r:':.--wr. .Hn-,. . . , . . . ' v ' XT, '5:Y..,-,...-,. ,... . - R, i , .. M V, A V H 1 F l 1 1 f, I 'I X . Q 5 L 4 1 H f 1 , . - F, I 'x 4 f ,tl J I N 1 3 ' E 2 r r Q ' a , Q P 2 K 5 , , , . . 2 1' 5 3 1 Q 1 n' E QE 1 Z y ? 5 V S! 2 ff 2 5 i 6 If e- ' li .Fez Lg Q 3" lf dj - E21 '51 B4 L. .Ji Fi, 5 5, V sz J s yn, E 5, V V , I pl. , C . x- J. S UNTIL NOW. .,, 1 The keel of the USS TRATHEN was laid on 17 March, 1942 in San Francisco, California. The ship was named after acting volunteer Lieutenant Commanderjames Trathen, USN. LCDR Trathen was born at sea near the coast of Maine on 28 August, 1811 and served with gallantry as an officer of the Federal Navy during the Civil War. The TRATHEN was delivered to the Commandant TWFLFTH Naval District and was commissioned in May of 1943. The ship then departed for Pearl Harbor where she arrived in August and was assigned to Commander Cruisers, Pacific Fleet for training. In the last week of August "DD-4530" joined Task Force 11 and was ordered to Baker Island. Here the ship entered her first action while acting as fighter direction ship off the transport area during the amphibious landings. During World War II the 'USS TRATHEN earned eight battle stars on the Asiatic-Pacific Area Service Ribbon foreparticipating in the following operations: Wake Island Raid ' Marshall Islands Operation Western New Guinea Operation Leyte Operation Luzon Operation Iwo Jima Operation Okinawa-Gunto Operation After nearly three years of fighting the tired, war -weary crew received its last orders with much excitement, for they directed the ship to return to the USA. The 17th of june, 1945, found the TRATI-IEN underway for Pearl Harbor and hence to the States. On the 9th of July the crew enjoyed their first stateside liberty in 32 months in Seattle, Washington. From Seattle, the ship proceeded to San Diego for inactivation and ultimate de- commissioning. The TRATI-IEN was recommissioned on 1 August 1951, and became the flagship for ComDesRon 28. After her Shakedown cruise and a short availability at Mare Island, the ship proceeded to the Atlantic Ocean via the Panama Canal .and joined the Atlantic Fleet. s Following a four month availability in Portsmouth, Virginia, and the ensuing underway training period at Guantanamo Bay Cuba, the TRATI-IEN began a long series of preparations for her Eastern Tour. Finally, on 12 january, 1953, the ship left Norfolk, Virginia, on the first leg of her journey to Korea and the consequent "Round-thee-World" cruise f o , 1 f 2 .-.Wa vf 424' , 11 45-nf -1 L V 7 I' , M ,4 a - f, -...gf :,.,.,,.,, . ,- ' CAPTAIN CLARENCE E. CORTNER, USN COMMANDER, DESTROYER SQUADRON 28 AND DESTROYER DIVISION 281 Captain Clarence E. Cortner, United States Navy, was the Com- mander of Destroyer Squadron Twenty Eight and Destroyer Division 281 during our world cruise. He was born in Cortner, Tennessee, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Cortner. He entered the Naval Academy in 1923 and was commissioned Ensign in 1927, Since reporting to his first ship, Captain Cortner has served extensively in battleships, cruisers and destroyers. He saw duty aboard the cruisers Concord? and Galveston and the battleships Arkansas, Mississippi and Texas. Much of Captain Cortner's sea time hasbeen served in destroyers. He came to his position as COMDESRON 28 inIuly1952, as aveteran of nearlysix years of destroyer experience. Captain Cortner was promoted to his present rank in March, 1945, andshortly thereafter assumed command of Destroyer Division 12. Im- mediately prior to assuming command of Destroyer Squadron 28, he was U.S. Naval Attache' in New Delhi, India. During his tour of duty off Korea, Captain Cortner earned the U- nited Nations Service Ribbon and the Korean Service Ribbon. Pre- viously he had been awarded the Second Nicaraguan Campaign Medal, the China Service Medal, the American Defense Medal, the American Area Campaign Medal, the European African Middle Eastern Area Campaign Medal, the Asiatic Pac ific Area Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, and the Navy OccupationService Medal. i -Q .X . , 15, .- x, 4, 1 , X , . . . w.,+,,.v,X p. V- -f A-, ,xi , ,.- ,Q U wumrx, . ' 3,9 if ff, ,H ,ja ,r:r A .f flprryw- K , .ff -ff Vx fin, 4 .., if '12. .Q J' 'ax Vi., . .Q .vu 9. I .:il:1f'?' ".5g.'3!3..,,:: - W E, 1 . i fix 'WW-L-H. I-zi-I:fz12::is:1'-:-1.- , .. .5 H " " fi-'f .I-'ii i 'Ii V F435 T. '. X ""- fi'Ei'fl"?3'f"fi3f37i3EE2s':5,3?f' 72? .','L li "" f. ,t,r k,.,,:1'5' , j. '-.:4Qf":32-l- " - fig. "" f 'gf' K. V. .krkr V, ,,.V,, ,, ,,,k K V, ..,, I V... "WT -5.-f 3' :zifli-V''2E3?'ff5:'f5'52' . K' 1 'f-f . .Q,,,,. .,,.- Q -f.-, . GQ ' "-s ,fl ' fy., ss fi, . 2 sE 3, 'w " "ir15713f"lf. "':'::3E'5'. .V I X M..3..,.,i, ,,.,, ,.,.,.. , .L .l r Qznnvvl A , , ,,.,,,,,5.,,.,,f3,..i,.,.,.,,,,A V,Vk Z i,-,,V,.Qgg:gj23,,,,, f. , Y ' 1 as R"k"7-'mil 'Q"X'3'".1,1i."v7-3,-2Gs..,y3:v:..3g, 1:1-yy . .v f- ,.,,, gi ,f-, . 11, - I X-9, IagzfI-ff.252-fzie'.,:g:--'--1'gi,. 'F ' . 3 2.L:.:.- ,H w ,. .' "ii -- ' .V '. COMMANDER HARRY BARRETT HAI-IN "The p kipper" Commander Harry Barrett Hahn was born in Brooklyn, New York, on May 30, 1915. The son of Mr. HBITY Hahn and the former Miss Ellen Flattery, Cdr. Hahn attended St, Iohn's Preparatory School and Columbia University. The Commander then entered the U., S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, fr01'1'1 Which he received his commission in 1937. The Commander wears the following decorations: TheAsiatic-PaCifiC Area Campaign Medal, The American Area Campaign Medal, the American Defense Service Medal., The World War II Victory Medal, the Korean Service Ribbon, and the United Nations Service- Ribbon. Prior to assuming his present command on August 1, 1952, Commander Hahn served with the Armed Forces SpeCi3l Weapons Project, the USS MISSISSIPPI, USS MIDWAY, USS COLUMBIA, and the USS NEW ORLEANS. Cdl:- Hahn also attended the U. S. Naval Post G d S work in' Naval Ordnance. ra uate chool and the Post Graduate course at M. I. T. f0I' adwmce i ngm EW ev? 5 it WU WX8 f3'N ,QNX ms e L,j LCDR McKellar was commissioned ENS, USNR in Sept., 1941. Following World War II he transferred to the reg- ular Navy in July, 1946. His previous duty has been mostly in submarines both afloat and on staffs, having served in the USS SAWFISH, USS BAYA, USS LAMPREY, and with ComSubDiv 222, and ComSubLant. He attended the Un- iversity of Washington and is a graduate L oooo oloo -- 0f the University of Utah and the Naval LC DR McKeI lar Intelligence Post Graduate School. LT JG Cobb LT JG Brusf LT Anderson L Three officers who played large parts in preparing the Trathen for Far Eastern duty and in the first stages of the ship 's battle experiences were not with us at the end of the world cruise. LT. Anderson, our Gunnery Officer, LTJG Brust, Engineering Officer, and LTIG Cobb, First Lieutenant were among the many Reserves called from civilian life to officer and man the ships of a Navy which expanded rapidly to meet the threat of the Korean crisis. These three officers served aboard the Trathen through the ship 's period of duty with Task Force 95. Then, their tours of active duty completed, they left the Trathen in Yokosuka in May to retum to the United States to resume their civilian careers. e ,RFE 'Peovte A "tin can" is not the biggest ship in the fleet it's true,-but nevertheless, a smooth working organization is necessary for the day to day operation of a destroyer in our Navy today. Consequently, the TRATHEN performs as an efficient fighting unit only so long as each individual on board contibutes an utmost effort to his job. At the top, of course, is the Commodore, since the TRATHEN is the flagship of Destroyer Squadron 28.- Dur- ing the cruise, the ship accepted cheerfully and accomplished successfully the many extra operational and com- munication tasks to which it fell heir when Commodore Cormer took over various commands in Task Force 95 and 77. Assisting the commodorel is a staff of four officers and ten enlisted men. Actual command of the ship is the job of the Commanding Officer. In the cases of the TRATHEN this was Commander H.B. Hahn, USN. The operation of the ship and the performance, safety and morale of every crew member is ultimately the responsibility of the "skipper" who, no matter what his rank, is called "Captain" in. recognition of his position of command. ' ' " ' d D artment Heads. The "Exec" is responsible for The Captain runs the ship through his Executive Officer an ep the day to day internal functioning of the ship and he deals closely with the personnel aboard. So, on the TRA- TI-IEN the crew saw the name of LCDR McKellar on many special requests and on the Plan of the Day. And it 9 was to his stateroom that many reported for various instructions and directions concerning the running of theship. All th se thin reflect aspects of his job-as Executive Officer. e S5 Under the Captain and Executive Officer are the heads of the various departments - divisions of the ship's force ' t nd Re air Department kept the machinery running that with special jobs to do. The Engineering Departmen a p can-iedthe ship over almost 60,000 miles of sea during the world voyage. The five-inch guns that harrassed the Communists in Korea were in the capable hands of the Gunnery Department, and the movements of the ship and the maintenance of communications fell to the Operations Department personnel. Important items like food, . . . . . D ship's store medical corps, and pay were among the many responsibilities of our Supply Department. This e-- - 1 W partment had to cope with the additional problems caused by long periods at sea and distance from home bases. When the TRATHEN tied up in Norfolk at the end of the cruise she looked as sharp as the day she left despite the continual buffeting of seven months cruising. Her shipshape appearance was due in large part to the effort of the First and Second Divisions of the Deck Department. which, among its other duties, were responsible for main'- taining the smart appearance of the TRATHEN- 1 rnyer n f,,V, , ,,r. ,V fr I , I - W f I f 1, ,V ' ' 2 Q f I ' '- '- y f .... Q37 .M r 2 ,, ,- as , XT 'Numa ' 5 - '- --- , 2.1" ' M g .K 1 3- .' . ' ' fe' ff- . 35"-c'-I-Qs! 4- 42, .1- . 5. . .P wig L lame- no V ,f , milf?-1" iff.-.L"L-, kiwi it e fi - Tp, ,g ,geQ Q,z., twig -.. '- 1" -4 V 4. , . , . W ,m f p4,.,Wt Wj,,y ue ia., , - ' I - ' , M. ,,., V . , ...M . M, t, 4, r f - 1 ...W ---.ten 5 1 - - f 'KH O f., .... X Wt..--, .,,,,,, . A J,-,M,g,,w,y,fM2,,. , N, .jing we-,. 3m,,,M:.4:m,,5,, ,,,,...,.,,,, QA M M X K - tliv,.1f,3....,W-sjfiflgl, s - ,t .. .J u.s.s. TRATHEN DD - 530 fir, 1.--...- X i i Wy' J I t 3 K ? 2 3 . l W Y ,. Q, iiv First Row: LTIG D. T. Lamb LTJG E. R. Harris LT. R. Burt LCDR R.M. McKellar LTJG W. R. Rugg LTJG P.M. Maxwell LTJG LW. Ingram Second row: ENS. R. Sheppard ENS. F.A. Finger ENS. Peo. Hubbard ENS. R. Van Hoek LTJG D.A. Thompson ENS. D.H. Jackson ENS. W.A. Bridges Top Row: Gardner QMC Purcell HMC Coleman YMC Umberger EMC Walker BTC Parker MMC Riley MMC Lyczak GMC Stovall TMC SHlP'S OFFICERS AND C.P.O.'s rf' 17 Q lla v S .5-fr rf V ' it WS. . in f -Ii 'S V , E rr ' lv . . Q, i 5.1, .. , ,W , r r.. .. , , 4 J. , , l.,A, ,1Vl, . . ff . , 4 l , . A . .. . .i . Aa' 1 SW? 4 S 4 First row: Left to right: Robison, BMC, -ENS. Van Hoek, Gesdal, H. E., FT1. Secondfowg Leffnorighr. Ham, G. W., GMSN, Matosich, H. J., GMS. Valentv. A-P-. SN, C2pOCaSa1e, R., FTSN, Jonas, 'G,W,, SN, McG1endon, LR., GM3, Winecart, BM3, Crigger, RJ., SN, Morford, LA., GM3- Third row: Left to right: Gilmore, G.D., SN, Wyche, G-D-. BMSN, HEUFYQ R-J-. SGM2a Pence: W-E-f SN. Jones' EOLW BM3, Viger, P., SA, Cole, 1.R,, GN, Reach, LR., BMSN, White, E., SN. Fourth row: Left to right: Bramlet, B.D., BMSN, Siebenmorgen, RJ-, SN. G008i1'15a FTSN, Rodfeguezv I-a SN. W9-1511: GJ., SN. I Missing: Breeden, BM, Bolton, FT3, Clowers, BMSN, Geedy, SN, Belanger, SN, Dodge, SA,'KidC1, SN, Bushy, SA, Jones, D.W., SN, Wafson, FTSN, Dunningan, BN, Phillips, E.E., SN, Hafuman, GMSN, Mavle. SN, Cook, SN, Kelly. SN, cooke, FT3, camel., GMSN. ' .ll....L f First row: Left to right: Ridley, R.H., BM2, Lyczak, B.A., GMC, ENS. Bridges, ENS. Fingers. Second row: Left to right: Phillips, M. Z., SN, Monday, R.E., SN, Miller, W.G., FTSN, Hendry, K. H., GMSN, Willis, TMSN, Dietterich, R., GMSN, Larned, L.E., SN, Morgan, L.M., GM3, Racioot, O.L, FT3, Priest, G.E.', SN, Whit- low, C.E., Jr., GM3, Pace, LM., SN, Jones, E., SN. Third row: Left to right: Newsome, M.C., BMSN, Wolver, TM3, Evan, P. GM1, Smith W.H., GM1, Davenport, B. E. SN, Wise, R.F., SN, Hull, R.L., FT3,, james, R. R., BMGN, Wise, LC., SN, Crowther, R.G., FT3, Hedges, W.E., FT3, I-Iacper, C.I.., SN, Brovsm, LL, SN, Johnson, SA, Walter, C.E., BM3. g Fourth row: Left to right: Hansen, F,K., SN, Miller, D.W., FTSN, Freeman, M., SA, Franklin, LC., SN, iWe1come, LF., SN, Schrage, E.I.., GM3, Gale, A.R., GMSN, Gorske, GMSN, Revene, O. P., SN, Clark, C.A., SN, Thron, GMSN, Abernathy, R.A., SN, Geedy, BMSN, I-Ialouska, TM3, Ervin, TMSN, Young, D.G., SN, Bradshaw, W. D., BM3. Missing: Williford, TMGW, Morris, FTSW, Rhyne, FT1, Kivett, TMSN, Rennington, GMSN, Kuftack, SW, Anderson, GMSN, Bryant, GMSN, Whitton, GM 3, Googins, FTSW, Paden, SW, Payne, TM3, Young, R. K., TMSN,. 7 .' ' 5 X v:x .,1: E 1' , 3 S, ., N . . . V em ,... , Q -"L 3 V .. i' Q . f H ,, ' . ' 1 i if 1 in . :rx ,. , ' ' H: I f...k,.gx,, . .-. , V V 2' , . ,,, ' 1 N 1 ,r fr 1 QAV P i fi f ' i W 5, .ms,:,,. sa.. I Fgggi, -1,5 - A . . .,.. , A ' - ,,x,, . f fl i':' Z If 3' Top row: Left to right: McElwaine, SN, Turner, RM15 Castle, RM3g Didier, QM35 Duren, QM35 Sergent, SA. Second row: Left to right: MacDonald, SN, Dale, RMSN,Janeski, RMSN, Norgard, RMSN5 Wills, RM3, Henson, YN3, Eke, YNTSN, Faverty, PNSN, Third row: Left to right: Talmon, YN3g Buckland, QMSN, Gardner, QMC, Baltz, QMSN, Coleman, YNC, Liner, QMSN, Wheeler, QMSN, Inforzato, RMSN, Rice, TESN, Sawchik, SN, Missingproreon, QM, Leonard, RM35 Phillips, D.R., RMSN. ,ff Top row: Left to right: Swartz, R.E., FN, Monahan, WJ., FN, Schjeldahl, L., BT1, Larkins, L.C., MMFN, Dickerson, D.R., MM3, Crane, R.G., FN, Smith, C.T., FN, Gunther, R.I., FN, Jensen, I-LD., MM3, Owens, E.L., FN, Gray, L.W., BT3, Clay, F., MM1, Buza, L.B., BT3, Woodruff, A.L., MM3, Staffore, R.E., MM3, Welch, W.C., BTFN, Middle row: Left to right: Quarmley, BT3, Willis, LC., BT1, Vi1la1obos,M.J., BT2, Kalina, j.L., BT2, Muzik, RJ., Johnston, I-LR., BT3, Bahr, O.G., FN, Bishop, L.D., FN, Taylor, FN, Stevens, CJ., FN, Lovik, A.L., MM3, Mit- chell, N.L., FN, Blakestad, N.C., MM3, Davis, G.L., MM2. Bottom row: Left to right: Vice, R.L., FN, Van Vlerah, BT3, Gillum, BT2, Sanfillippo, D.M,, FN, Holt, B. H., FN, Rutan, R.B., MM3, Black, G.W., BT3, Winters, SJ., MMFN, Mowerson, W.H., FN. Officers and CPO's: Left to right: Walker, I. C., BTC, Riley, R. H., MMC, Harris, E.,R., LTJG, Lamb, D.T., LTJG, Parker, LK., MMC. Misisng: Brooks, B.M., BT3, Radford, FN, Greer, FN, Townend, FN, Gibson, FN, Adams, BT3, O'Daniel, FN, King, FN, Teer, BT3, Gilliam, FN, Thompson, W.C., FN, Marshall, I.P., MM1, Muise, FN, Bain, FN, Simeri,FN, Peffers, W.W., MM1, june, FN, Rogers, FN, Salinas, RN, FN, Shriner, D.L., MM3, Daly, E., FN, Wheeler, FA. l i X r Q , K F, fyy' ' .Sh F, I K , YN '0wX-sag-2 4,45 F M , , 2,424 2 Y i F , , 4, I 1 F Q, F ' f. 1 fl, b I F ,.1,: 5 I ye 1b.All , A FF F L-'- P lf' ' Top Row: Left to right: Rhodes, T. G., IC3, Rebber, R. E., EN3, Albanesea F-E-a FN, Th0mP50na I-S-1 EMFNv Toom' er, c,w,, ME2, Reynolds, J.B., FN. Middle Rowaofrrorighrr Browne, Rxr., YN3, Topliffe, T. w., FN, Harper, RJ-, EMFNr Ruddickr I-Ln MR2' Morrghorr, 1.w., EMFN, Popish, L.1.., FM3, McDana1, FM3, Noir-11ro1r1r, K.E., EM3, Presley, P.F., FN. Bottom row: Left to right: Sarama, C. W., EN1, Reamy, C.H., EM1, 36110613 G-B-a FP1, D-H- Jackson' ENS' Ps-W-F Sheiapard, ENS, Umberger, R.L., FMC, Frost, E.L., FM1, Frost, R.H., ME1, Henderson, w.E., ENB. Missing: McLin, MR3, Fuerst, EMFN, Shoemaker, ICFN, Crites, DC3, Taylor, E., EMFN, Naffe, C. E., EN3, S0P91'a EFL., FNFN. ' -B d ' ' F, ': " 1211, , "' ,,,, ,,,,..,, 2 , X i ,gf , :fr 72,4 '74 f ,M - ff-' W - fr 3 5 I2 N, 1, 'Q We r 4 f ,, , A , i 4, 1 rrr, 'ryr f f F f-r'r1F 1 ,, l - r,, F S A F " "AA A Y A F. f W 'F"rr ,rr lbvl A rrr. y F ' a J F f F , F, sF,,,,1i 3 , 2 F Y 5 f F A P is F - rg? F 1 '1 " f F or A ,lr k,'L? F V V 3, U HF Top Row: Left to right: Luindecn, SO3, McG1inchey, RDSN, Floyd, SO3, Culp, RDSN, Avery, RD3, Murray, RD3. Second Row: Left to right: Stevenson, RD3, Prather, ET3, Rine, RDSN, Dennis, RDSN, Springer, RD2, Deros, RDSN, Halter, RDSN, Walsh, SOSN, Robinett, RD3, Stroud, RD3. Third Row: Left to right: Davenport, SO3, Newcome, SO3, Gregory, RD3, Armstrong, SO2, Brockman, RDSN, Sheridan, Streety, RDSN, O'Ma11ey, ETSN, Weiseman, SOSN. ? Missing: Dille, SOSN, Coughlan, ETSN, Ahearn, ET3, McKenzie, SA, Eilers, SA. 4 v 1 ! First row: Left to right: Funderburk, CS1, Pur- cell, HMC, Stovall, TMC, Stewart, TM1. Top row: Sconza, CS2, Thayer, SKSN, Kettleson, DKSN, McKnight, SHSN, Reeder, CS3, Curtis, CS3, Long, SK3, Alexander, SH3. Missing: Billyeu, SK1, Wright, SD1, Hill, SD1, Moore, DK3, I-Ienchal, SK3, Evangelista, TN, Weeden, HM3, Pinckney, TN, Baker, SHSN, Smith, CS3, Labbe, CS3, Martin, SHSN, Single- ton, TN, Mitchell, TN, Teel, CSSN, Harrison, TN, Boudreau, CSSN, Cooper, SH3, Rodgers, SI-ISN, Hall, CS3, Evan, GM1. STAFE Shea, 103, Zagar, QM3, Lanes, TN3, Sack, E. J,, RMC,LTQjgj F.E. Beck. Missing: LCDR.W.S. Mills, LT. D.A. York, LTfjgj G. W. Lanning QCHCQ, ALTfjgj W. A. Danforth, QMCQ, Gillespie, QM1, Coatney, YN1, Fello, TN, Shupin, YNSN, Tacuata, TN, Gleason, RMSN. THE COMMANDER IN CHIEF WELCOMES YOUR RETURN TO THE ATLANTIC FLEET AND CONGRATULATES YOU ON THE EFFECTIVENESS MAINTAINED D FORCES IN KOREA X ADM LYNDE D MCCORMICK SYSTEM TELETYPE HIGH STANDARD OF VERSATILITY AND URING YOUR SERVICE WITH UNITED NATIONS ZIZLHSSQLANTFLT THE COMIIAIIDER III CHIEF us PACIFIC FLEET CUIICRATULATES CCIIIDESROII , HDESRON 28 I 28, uss THATHEN, uss Mccoan, use BLACK, AND uss CHAUNCEY ON INFO TCJCIIDESLANT f co COMPLETION OF THEIR FIRST TOUR OF DUTY III KCHEAII WATERS x WELL DONE x FELIx B STUHP sYsTEIII TELETYPE PRECEDENCE DEFERRED CLASSIFICATION UNC,-ASS FROM CINCPACFLT I ACTION TO! 6 COMDESRON 28 INFO TO: DESDIV 251 ! COIIDESLAI .encem 1 Ronin: 'R-:nc-In NRnnComml Med I, C1-pe V I I V.. ,. , f-..., II MHDRANDUH FOR ALL HANN Subject: Cruise 1. This as we steamed into the Convoy Escort Piers om' cruise ended. I was very proud. 2. Like all significant and important things, there were many phases to the task we had just completed. The seamanship, gunnery, communications, engineering, operations and supply functions made it possible to do our job. However, there was one other that was vitally important and concerning which you all acquitted yourselves extremely well as seamen and gentlemen, namely, the job as Wambassadors of-good will." The opportunity we had to contribute, even thougx it was a very little bit, to spreading American ideas was a. rare reward. In the future, we will get dividends from this. 3. This book will be for all of us a. lasting pictorial log of our cruise around the world. As the years go by I feel sure that it will mean increasingly more to us. For me, personally, it makes it possible not only to express , but also to permanently record, nw overwhelming appreciation for the job you all have done so very well. B A commmna, .s. IIAITI, COMMANDING OFFICER. ON THE EVE OF YOUR HOME COMING I WISH TO EXPRESS MY ADMIRATION AND APPRECIATION OF THE SPLENDID MANIIIER- IN WHICH YOU HAVE ACCOMPLISHED YOUR MISSION IN KOREAN WATERS X RAIN HARTMAN X SYSTEM TEI-Efypg PRECEDIINCE ROJTINE CLASSIFICATION UNCLASS I o FR M COMDESLANT ' I 2 ACTION 'BCI C MDESRON 28 n INFO TO: - USS MCCORD f USS ' I CDMDESFLOT FOUR EXTENDS A HEARTY WELCOME TO COMDESRON 28 AND TO ' J THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE TRATHENI CHAUNCEY BLACK AND MCCORD I UPON THEIR RETURN FROM DUTY IN THE FAR EAST X SYSTEM TELETYPE PREGEDENCE DEFERRED CLASSIFICATION UNC'-ASS I FROM ' COMDESFLOT 4 I ACTION TO: COMDESRON 28 INFO TO: ' DESD I V 281 '10"C""'V0fIE-I 'R0"G"" Vm'c0mm' Med Can: llixec xo,-. max mm. lou Vu lnmcxnlsuppulcemmx CIC Vsw N oon emu H-11 A cm IM Co II I E Tutor py . H Wmq fl-l+ElZ Many times in the days of early January, 1 1953, the duty boatswain's mate passed the word for an "all hands work- ing party" aboard the USS TRATI-IEN. Like the other destroyers of Squadron 28, the TRATHEN was making the count- less last minute preparations for the start of what was to be a memorable "Round-the-World'Pcruise. Out of the con- fusion of the last few days finally came order and on ,January 12th, the ship backed out of her berth atthe Convoy Escort Piers in Norfolk and headed south toward Panama on the first leg of the journey to the Far East. 'l'he crew was soon called upon to get its "sea legs" since the Atlantic was acting up as the TRATHEN. made her way to Panama. However, men and ship took the rough seas in stride and soon the jungle-clad hills of the Panama Canal entrance loomed up in the distance. During the transit of the Canal crew members vied for ringside seats from which to get a birds-eye view of the contrastbetween fascinating jungle landscape and intricate man-made locks that characterize the Panama Canal. That night, with the Canal behind us, the TRATHEN was berthed in the Rodman Naval Base. The liberty section took the opportunity to enjoy Panama City night life while men with the duty were 1 busy fueling the ship and readying for the next phase of the voyage . , n After almost 3, OOO miles steaming, the TRATHEN reached a port familiar to her and many of her crew members -- San Diego. It was in "Dago" in August, 1951, that the TRATHEN was recommissioned after the outbreak of the Korean crisis. Now she was once again in the city enroute to play her part in that war. Two nights there afforded the opportunity for a final "Stateside liberty", but soon the TRATHEN pointed her bow west and started the Pacific crossing. The Pacific must have known it was being invaded by men of the Atlantic Fleet. Almost immediately after de- parting San' Diego, the TRATHEN encountered heavy seas reminiscent of the Atalntic and with every wave that swept across the fantail or sprayed the chow line the question was asked, "Is this the so-called glassy Pacific or are we back in the Atlantic?" - But the navigator was cleared of this suspicion when the view of Diamond Head and the sandy beaches of' Hawaii made it certain that we had reached our next port of call--Pearl Harbor. Here sailors on libertyvisited famous Wa- kiki Beach, the city of Honolulu, or roamed the giant Naval Base. In the moderate climate of this mid-Pacific is- land paradise we enjoyed a temporary respite from the cold weather and angry seas that we had just left behind. But it could only be temporary since the Trathen had to push on to Midway Island, the final fuel and provisioning stop on the long joLu'ney to the Far East. A "gooney bird and geedunk. liberty" was all that time allowed there. Again the much travelled "Trembling T" was underway bound for Japan and the main job of our cruise -- to join the United Nations naval effort against the Communist enemy in Korea. Q 2 s and EIO Mo wood anvaeqo r f 1 , i z o ! I 1 I 1 1 1 1 I K. I , H K 4 I Si , i A r I 4 -2 , A E? x i . Q2 if f 3 J . - - . E":V-"11E'I f ""' - ,,:,. Q V, f 'v V-1 ' ,Q V 1 A gm V , 'rf '51, wfqltc A ' XA V .: f: .': -If I I. "f "fy ffxgf : , f . V, V. , ,..,, V. ,,,, 15, ,1 , V ., . , QV .yu 3, V -f x, V f u f- f -1- -211 ' ' if ff ' Y , ,V Yi V " if gf? 1 KV Q . x Vx ' , ' V '7f7f5.-V' ,zfifiw ' 'Q '52 bm! 'A , 1522 1' v " . V 'nv V if , 3' V 5 t V51V," ..71 fi 'W ' ' 55 Q 'f V f "2 V, Z V, V f Vw , .4 V V. .V ,V ..... . ,. , f - . V , .Vu ee . V V V -' -, 0 - V ' V f, ,fi " 1:4 . , , f , V 'V W V 2' 1" 5 -f A' .,., V V, 52 f " . M - , ,V 3 ,:V,. ,V A .,,' V, , V I rm 5, ,. z . gyglw f ,h,., V, an. ' Q Q, f- . f, , V ., ..VV V. . v,VV .MJ-C ,,.y. -Z '? "W V, , .V., .V ,.,. . .V,.VW:fL-1V.,, V- V V V - VV 4g.Vg:gv,Vg, f ,, , V , ,, '. wJ1'f'V-'V 'Y "4-lf' , 'Abu 7' wax- V 51 V2 "1 ' .:' X Y ' ' f Vykl ' iiielif f 1 1 7 '- f " i 9 , W ,V ' f f 4 V ' A' f QA' ,Q ,Q Q ro V VV VV, QAQAE f is ,f 1 1 ff , f 'ix 4 51 4, m - i l i? 1 f' 'Q 3 ,Q 3 ae ,, w 3 gi K1 if ' 5 5 fx K4 3 " " V! fi 11 f VV 5- gV..,.4:l: ,.-,ff,L. ::V,.g,',2- f I xl Na V7 1 ff 3 17 A , I 094 Q 'V 2" 1,3517 :,:V,E-nf 4315? " 7:1 3:Q35?Vf3: 'L ff 'z ., LVMSQVSIA-y21'V,V,f .V - - " , V - -' f 'V V Q fz.. ' V1z',,g,,.:-V 25.62-p,g1T",,':1.f -,gn f, 'K VM - Vz.sp,, - M-M - - - 1 " L .1 ' I 4- ' f 1253 f 1 'J A Tm, ' ' ' , V KFW? , 1' 5 ev :V 4-3fl3""62!w ' ' if .V :V , V .V V ,Vg,,lV,'f,g:, Vw airy V, ,.. ,V 2M,,, i':VV,1',fW",A:f' .V , A L A .V , :Iliff ' ,oz --f'FfIWf:',Qf:" :f 21 V g:',f.,-in-f"'.iL +1 V 1 . i , '55 :,,l, Q . , '- 1 A f ,. ,M-,4,vyf'x' yfw- 0 M, ' ' .V M f '-SWE: V xii i., 1:2-w , 'I ' '- A l 1 A 'ls fi: V g.g'sg-, ,, 14,1 , "Egg,"jf!-1'f2i f , 'Z f ,1i,e"'2Zfg 't-i1f:, ,f . ,i':2::t1."-,W 312,- I if qs ' ,. -1 f, a::,1' pf I iw.-7, f,2'fi,:721-f ., 1 ?'v'i2f:'gz' fi, ".1f:f:zf 'z - fx! -1, :Z 4,- :S ' z::se.p2' 'f5fif1:,f 'P' J' 1 594, Mig' , , . ,.,., 1, ,C " V-Q: V. f lff 1' M "'?i2,,jv3, , 1.7 'fil7- i:?i'2s::-, ,- ,:,. V V 2 ,426 We made friends . . . . . All soris of friends 0 . , 1 gqmgl 1 .f 9 , ., ig, .,., , x e 4" R159 iii? Y 1' iw QM One ofthe mcmy Bl ck Market Alleys Greatest Llttle Cnty . A 09- 4 0 i f: ami , i f . ,f,. 2 M? .,., ,f , - . , wx-fr,-,,?V 5,5 me 'sf ,- pr, i j 6 '15 2 mea ... EIEIJTK TOTME Q15 TI-IIS CERTIFICATE PRESENTED TO SS Trathen, DD 530 T' 'TTTTT' EOR I-IER CONTRIBUTION TO THE UNITED NATIONS CAUSE AGAINST COIVIMUNIST AGGRESSION IN KOREA BY DESTROYINIS ONE CONIIVIUNIST TRAIN freeze Q, .I IITEEOSIIIJIOE eff-1'- '57 QA ' f f ' .. .II , lljoltmq f Ttcqxfx-, l -- . COMMANDER TASK FORCE 95 I OVER THERE . . . In mid - February the TRATHEN arrived in the Far East and spent a short time in Sasebo, Japan, preparatory to joining Task Force 95, the United Nations Blockade and Escort Force which operates on both coasts of Korea. Ser- ving with this group from February 16 to March 13, the TRATHEN, along with other American destroyers, a Brit- ish destroyer, a Canadian destroyer and a Republic of Korea Navy Ship contributed to the tight United Nations blockade of enemy held East Coast ports. The ship sup- portedminesweeping operations and patrolled against en- emy mine laying efforts. In addition, she provided gun- fire support for United Nations forces ashore and hitene- my supply routes, rail facilities and bridges -all along her assigned coastal sector. At the same time, the TRATHEN carried Captain Cortner to various conferences and ' inspec - tions he made in his capacity as Task Group Commander. When the Commodore was relieved as a Task Group Commander on March 5, the TRATHEN was assigned as the Central Patrol Unit and as such engaged in patrol and firing missions on the coast from Wonsan Harbor north to Cha'-ho. So successful was the U. N. naval blockade that the Reds were forced to rely on their coastal .railroads to transport men and supplies to the front lines. Conse- quently, the TRATHEN concentrated much of her fire power on the enemy rail lines at this time. This effort was crowned with success when, just one day before she was to be relieved the TRATI-l'EN's gun crews sem-ed 3 series of direct hits on an enemy train to win membership in the United Nations "Trainbusters Club. " We were one ofthe few destroyers to gain admission to the Trainbusters up to this time and so the ship returned to Sasebo on March 1 3 with spirits high. I After a maintenance and recreation period, the ship joined Task Force 77 and immediately began her task of screening aircraft carriers of that Fast Carrier Striking Force. Again the TRATHEN took over flagship duties while Captain Cortner acted as Commander of the screening units comprising Task Group 77. 2. When he was-relieved of this command, the TRATHEN proceeded to Yokosuka where her officers and men had a chance to enjoy liberty both in this Japanese port and the larger cities of Yoko- hama and Tokyo. In Yokosuka the TRATHEN men went native, took off their shoes in the best Japanese style, and threwaship's party which was held on two nights so every one could attend.. - The TRATHEN left Yokosuka May 5 to resume duty with Fast Carrier Task Force 77, and served in the flag- ship capacity from May 7 to May 25 while Captain Cort- nercommanded Task Group 77. 2. The TRATHEN continued to operate with Task Force 77 until relieved on June 4. Prior to departing the Force permanently, the TRATHEN was temporarily detached in order to lend screening support to the cruiser USS MAN- CHESTER which was bombarding the hard hit enemy P0143 of Wonsan. Early injune the TlUrTl-IEN returned to Sasebo for the last: time, where preparations were completed prior tO starting the trip to the United States via the Mediterranean- Crossing Over" Gunner's - eye view of TF - 95 ond North Korea MAIL!! 'Q A I f W E ix ! 53543 TMMYGWWMM twin QSW' fi Guard mail delivery by "Whirly Bird" 1' Who se? the blade on that lawnmower? The duck out of water - Sosebo hem 77 UPU 1 Hoi' down here isn'f if? On the way home Whee -' l'm a father! , ,e' ' r 1 -ff,. R Q 'fe 1 f USM Happy Warrior With the "business end" of our world cruise completed, the officers and men of the TRATI-IEN looked forward to the more leisurely but no less exciting, return voyage to the United States. Hong Kong: British Crown COIOUV Off 'Phe China 7 coast, was the first port of call. Sailors on liberty here mingled with a teeming population. which. included thousands of victims of the Red aggression which the TRATHEN had just combated for four months. Slghtseemg tours featured the weird but beautiful Tiger Balm Gardens which many TRATHEN men visited. Other crew members conducted their own tom-S through this busy, fast moving Oriental city. Aboard ship it was just as busy when swarms of merchants crowded the fan tail selling an unbelieveable variety of goods to many willing buyers. As soon as the TRATHEN left Hong Kong mysterious events began to take place. Anonymous threats were voiced over the loudspeaker and garbage was collected with a fiendish joy. The TRATHEN W2-S Hearing the Equator and 311211580145 were preparing to welcome the uninitiated into their fold with the traditional Navy ceremony. June 15 was the day of the rendezvous with the King of the Deep. At the end of a day of garbage chutes, salt water dunkings, haircuts by the Royal Barber, kisses planted on the belly of the Royal Baby and officers waiting on table, King Neptunus Rex could claim 275 men as loyal members of his dominion. Singapore, the fabulous city of the Southern end of the Malay Peninsula, was the next liberty port for the TRATHEN, Knovm as the "Crossroads of the World", Singapore was swarming with Europeans, Malayans and Chinese, all dressed ac- cording to their native customs. Soon the white Navy uniforms were added to his galaxy of color and style as TRATHEN men toured and walked the city and shopped for souvenirs of the Orient. Our too brief stay in Singapore ended, Colombo, Ceylon became the TRATI-lEN'S next distination. Armed with a supply of rupees, liberty parties were soon 'heading for the beach in the numerous native water taxis. Colombo proved to be one fo the most popular sports for souvenir buying as evidenced by the flood of ivory bookends, ebony elephants, pre- cious stones and ,j ewel boxes that came aboard with the returningliberty parties or werepurchased from Bumboats along- side the ship. A group from the TRATHEN took the tour to Kandy, 70 miles from Colombo and a leading a center of the Buddhist religion. They saw the Temple of the Tooth, elephant baths, colorful botanical gardens and tried to fathom the tricks of the snake charmers. W After several days in Colombo, the thirsty TRATHEN got underway for a brief fuel stop at Aden in Saudi Arabia. This hot, barren land was not exactly an attractive liberty port but some of the crew went ashore to retum wearing fezes in- stead of white hats. After the heat of the Middle East we looked forward to the blue waters and refreshing breezes of the Mediterranean. But first the Suez Canal had to be transited. Wtih ships of many nations, the ship anchored out one night waiting for the morning to begin the passage through the Canal. With time out for a salty but refreshing swim call, it was late in the evening before the lights of Port Said at the northern end of the Canal were lost to view and the TRATHEN entered the Mediterranean. y - Athens, Greece, was the first of the long awaited Mediterranean ports of call. Liberty parties saw a modern Athens as well as evidences of the ancient Greek civilization highlighted by the famous ruins of the Acropolis. Well shined black shoes became slightly dusty as tour parties followed guides past the statues and through the temples on the hill which of- fered a magnificent panoramic view of the city below. Ancient history, familiar to TRATHEN men only in the pages of their school books, came to life through the explanations of the guide. Naples, Italy, familiar to some of the crew and being visited for the first time by others, was eagerly anticipated by all hands. Tours to Rome, Pompeii, and Capri made Naples a jumping off spot for maiiy while others contented them- selves with swimming, sightseeing and souvenir hunting in the city itself. Our stay passed rapidly and on July 19 the TRATHEN was once again. underway. When the anchor settled into the silver sands of the beautiful beach of Cannes, France, on July 20, it marked the be- ginning of a four day visit to the world's most famous playground, the French Rivera. Bikini bathing suits appeared a - board ship as well as on the sandy beach of Cannes. Swimming, sun bathing and visits to the picturesque sidewalk cafes P1'0Vided relaxing liberty fm' ma-DY Of the crew. Some, however, momentarily deserted the Seashore to travel to Paris to see treasures of art and history and sample the sparkling night life of the city. But despite the many pleasures of France, everyone was now anticipating the return voyage and the words "home to the States" became the keynote as we weighed anchor July 24 and left cannes for Gibraltar. There was little regret when liberty was limited to a few hours on "The Rock" where the ship took on fuel for the Atlantic crossing. Commumcatlonn 8u1'1Uel'Y2T1d emergency drills plus the job of putting the TRATHEN into tip-top shape for her arrival i:NcErfolk, helpedtopass the time despite a few days of heavy Atlantic sea. On August 6th long awaited words "Prepare f IP or entering Norfolk" appeafed On the Plan of the Day. Reveille PO's had no trouble in rousing the crew that morn- mg- Eafll' In the day men lined the deck for the first glimpse of familiar sights as the ship approached Norfolk. 50011 th ' . ey were rewarded by a v1ew of the Convoy Escort Piers, a large Welcome Home Banner and ,,,, mor im O,-tant .... the . . I . J 9 P Wavmg arms. and then fmlllar faces of WIVCS, ,families sweethearts and friends. After seven months and almost 60,000 miles the USS TRATHEN was home and happy to be there. 0, . ,. 1 ,.,.,,',,, f .11-V. , , Ex Everybody sow something but no- body sow every- thing.. lf's cn lot of city! ffu I 'ff viskmbq I J Q of cw " fx xg wg, 94 4 ob M, Q A KVM fi' -wk l 1 45 4 QM 1 f 5, Say. E AQ 1 'axfffsef KA, Kfx X A so fjgfsvwy Q W nafffm ,W M, , W X 4 kwa buf, w ef 3"?'9 5'4'5'539M 534391735 , M, ww V if ,W fa I Y 4 f 1 25 Qs X 'fefwf 0? wg ' ,435 Ma, ww 'BASIS' 'TQ MI eww: if . N xg N . A N fy, 'QSpMWX we ws, 4 J' 3? A? wkgg Qgszyiqxu VWS 4 Manx 'ww v 5 -N QQ We greg X ,ww M se. A weew X 4 NN my fax N AWXMXQ, W meow y 1 Q f x NSF xx 1 W 9 J QQ L + XXX Sk X XX 1 5115 5 Sv Q gee Q NXXQXWX ENQXS QR X xx xx M3 QQXQWQQN WN NNQM N Q NX X X y W NX x xx N kkgyxgx WX Xxx 1 ig 3wiQ8 ,gr xxx xx xx xxx N Q X X X :QNX Q X Xxixx Xe X N N Y, 4 v- zwdliw .4 xl X w4 X :NX XX R nxwasmaxxm X wx W.. ' A . K ' , e y y e f e ff - we-,. WA.,-wg,, ,f b so 1,:f2'z,, ., -- ' 'z-a ::Xz:':e",fw-f. - V + Y I A '- f A b y ' ' ' m ' " K e f 1 If. ' A ., - A - ' 13 ' '-1: .-ff 4 pm: 3.1 ,.'1v:g:v-fig.1.:1:4:1.1. s155.g.'.1:l-:.'L2-' '-r-is-2- 1:2-we vzezf-:Q -Ie" - . ,. - ' , ,j 1, 1 .,-V, . 5-i,':,:f::e,::4s:, ,-'.:i:'4f:1:f1-2:' vw: - rr-1,1 T-w:f+w T X ., .-1:":2?fE'.'miie' ' ?V 7 ii i" " " ixfw-f.:-12,-121 9 i 'i2i:1',I ffZ' 5:? . ' ' U N . . ' .14 Z: '. ei l - f' A.: fi -,iff ,W ' V- - ' 1-sa.- .-:.,-g:,-2 4? -1, -gf: . 12: . . .. .3 ,.,1:W,:. - -L gg Q5 .-NQAN, 1 be 5-1 g ,r : Q- H f ' 13-ff ,om -21:5,::-vf:,-W -' ri A ' X Rov e .' , N N ,:. -. ' " X . N xi ' .f 9' 'MEF ' '1 '1,4 nz y'3131-' 3' i"T'if-'El'-il- f ?':2':N??TfY1q'-fI1'1 glkf, X N: . , "EQ NF, ' 'N " Q-E-q -, W ' Q f ,lv -1 V7 - " ' "ff""f" " -'K'-'-'- ,- V if ff'-::' if-r o XV-X . -.X - -- E x Fw 1 4 , 4? Q Q 1,1 V ff WWW fy, K W, HM f f 1 gp 11516 1 'fm-f,:1:j1.a,4, ig, 4: W, P , wi Gwyn 41531 ww-' f4vw'f"f'f'Wp "What Friends these mortals be! " X.A.Q:'5'vf, 4 V ' 'Wa Nw :A"A VW, , X w r . K I 1 4, . li V 5-flfiff'i'Q6'7?f1'5?fZ52Q2 , 4 'zxw , wi 4,.,Q,., , -' 4 fl-f, S nj' 4, xg: 'f-11 f 'Y"zM::. ofa.. H2121 15' .24 I7 v ff f 9 1 1 vi Some like lions, Some like tigers, but we like elephants. Anybody got Q peanut? i 1 i 5 2 i G x xy' Q wx, ' :. 2253 gmfzhg., ., fm ,wb QM., , 1 fi E' 5 Y 5, X. 1255219 'iss , ':a1A2i::25-ff'-zq-: .mx ' f ' " ' ,- ., . ,.,. - ff ' ,.,. I H 'ffix-f'K.'s1Tfi1aaf'f'-.:12, Simba, f-Tif'.-"2?,f'21- ' ,L -. -v4::'gf-'L1If-1K1+-21.2-11-1.2-ai-z,s'2Z22.e:,:T,2'i'::f.Q'r'..Tix ""' 1- ' ' N- Q , 3:g'Q,,:-zyqfy g,m,,.-, ' bm ,W,f,.v.-,QQW .41x':f,.,a'-aww'-'gfgfigI'32Q..,1i?xN. .iimwflfe4'f',1l.I"'2'25?'i:ili::4Q2f5lfsi-'fl1i"1::4ipg'-.:,'v.aa1,M,gQ,,g,g:5,-. 4 'f'4mmsmmpmxg., SA" V . , Q-Q4 AW ,.:..1Lgz.,.:,.:.'v f-1 MY . V- Q., - ,mg-Q, 4 ' . , Z -, - M 13 N, . , .M , - om mf Yew , , -Q,-,.,wygm3'gg-'imgp W ,, . . . , ,. .,.,:,.,..,.. g,,lxL 3 IQL. L,:,A,1g,x:x I 1. ,i,,. ,,...,x, 1 ,,,, , . .,..,., A 9,5 'v:: f,Mk ,z,. ., .A.. ,my .,-'f. W,-qqg:::1.',..,. ' 1 ."f'iS?fv ' :I :-?:v.bF 34, .,,. ,E . - 4,-, . 2 -0 ww :f:-fx: -, 1.1-1 11.92 1 1.- 1 myAyfww.,-:Vwww- fy.:ww-V-,Wfly1,1-,,Q.. f- ' . .,.4,.-wi , 1-1: ffl" ft-141' vzlsvzalgi' ,-fig, t N,,we:M,, .,Q.w,w,W,,.m:.,.Q,.,,,, 2,,N.fgmm,1,14,f 2 ,ffl ,, V , V. ,2siIE4s5:2':i::::' X' "Leila: " K' gf2'Q:.1:."'gnggggzg-gif.-5112.51.1,1.egeegz.2'5fgf.g-g:g-g-f'-45532321-:Eifiigz-'gaV, ,511 Z., ' ' -.rv - 1 : M-f' gag.-ima.:-sg?rmglzggz:Egg -5.4-g6fm.:1:g1.1f'g,f'gg'g.Q.q513,,,1,glw,f:a:fr::f:1-:5zgu,2'2.s2.x-:f:-1, 3.',1.-b2E3'ax'z"ff 'rg' . .w - . 2 ' 5'fg'v,5'vg:5w-2if-5,41-1.:sa-1:1Q:.Q5'2,:EE'9wf':fI:.fvIL:'.fre: 'K"k 41Q :M l.l.l bf 'ii 1 n UZ in V . V Q ,- :2.:'Z.1:':-- V .iz 51 Il 5 5- -V 1 -Q 5 1 6-.VV ,-'. 1--. VV '.--f,- .,,., , Q -V.,- Vg-V., -,V1V.1,V,V.VV ,VVVV ,.,. . .,,, V , -,,. V,VV,1. ,,1.-VV.,,,V, ,g4.,, , ,. .,,,.,, V . :1 111.1-1-1? ,11-1191-V.1V:V,.i. V: .1-11V,.V.V.V'-V-:1-V 1-VV..V V.VVV1 ...- .VVVVVVV1 ,.VVVV1 ,.,N, V .,., .1-V ,,., -.,.V.-1 '.,-,.. ' "V V':2VV17f1- 121 1-11,:13'1' .1V..Vj, -Q1 ,Vw ' 1-412' VV ,, .,..,- VV ',., 1, . , ,, -,.i, , ,,,..V -',- ,. V 1 '.V in5523-22545255+3S2I1iIE5ki1?5I5T'o .I' 1' " '.,.....zw-f- '-41111 112.:::V'1i7"'+'if9V 4 V1':: 725' 11 V V V - 21-' - "' 1211155?-71-Y?vV11-V',V,I1f1 fvisg X 537-avi' V, 1e'-- ,gtt- V - 1 V wV ,, ,1VfV'2V,4 ,s1V,1,V-:g1 1:-34 1 A' " ' 'L"' ' -1 . '1 L 1:.,V:1V15.1V'1g,1:VVg1 - ,V 15. 1Vgvgf',Vg,V 1. fm 1 VV- j F0121 -K-11-.1-'Ng'-1-21-V 51:1 ' 1 . :V ii Zfef-i V1V 'Q 'E-Eff-' :iV:Lf3'7 - VV K ' .11':'z?gJ'if1lf'1 ' 591 1 :-12 V, 9.5 1' 1 ,-, 1-1VV .VV-?1l1V'gV.1-:igqg-'Ve25g1.'1g'g-Q,1V1p1V-.- -. Q' .V 7 1-T" V ' 1 t1lVfVV f'1V7"1V 'L" ' 'V VV 47:23 H 1 - Vf-V. -gr 'L" ii VV ,,.,, 1. V, ' .V 1, 5 " V-V ,,,, -. V - ,f V ji ,V V. V-WV.:-iw 'if ff- --2 '-fI1f.1-fm-:1v?2i? ,H 1 -1 1 2 My 21' 'K 7231, .3 I VA ' ff". -1-1-W . 1 . V ' 1 -.1--1-war--211' -21 V- -V -- V.V.:VV:ff,V, . V-,1 -VV1V-W 'zzz:ffV:SV 1 VV'i"V'1z.1V ' - Vff. ,Vz 1 --:1V12--:iv-'-'-'11V.VV - 'wif ,1, ,.1Vi+1V--2 - VV 1-..V1- ff-1 ' ,Q -W1-42-V-e,V1f.12:2f1-l1Vil2sVVss -' V -2 -1- '-fi f l VV-if V-11-21+ -1V "--1112212-2f.2fV 1V .. 41. E. 1 1- .,z?" -f 1-4 f- 1 -V":- :- V1:.s2-V-. , . -if-iff.. mf ii d" -2--.V-M " ii-fV1-212V1-L.i'g-'-'-Vf,1V fi .V V 1 -vA - V. 1 1- V J V V, .,,.., . ., .,,. . ,,., .N ,..A., ,,..,. , . .,,, ,,., V V. .... VV V -,-W 1.VV.1s-ww:-w:-14--V-1 'TV 1 ,Q V1 ,hy V . g..V---P341-'may 9-.fr.,.V.V..,V-.-V. E-:..V.f.1V,.--F1-.fri,1V,.-,.-V..Vmgw-W. --QV, VV V1 .Q MVVV V,vsV:gQg1:Va-V. V V V V VV5V.f- Y , AVVV QQV1.-.V 1- -21 . 553-5'-:1::g'f:z ,V V , Q- V 1 1 VQVV--AV - , ,,1f1x 2-1--"V1i1!f:V.:i:z1zg!g5V 5?-- .egw-1 .1 152 ' '- -' 21' 215.55-VV V V .,,. V' L"f-V' V' ZVV.-1V21iV',i'1,'i' 1- 1 - f:..V fVi-11151 'Z1' 11?-"-V:E-21.22-22 - -"If V25-2.-::". rI-1-Wil. g V V- 2 V VV V 1V - -VY-V 1 'rf--V:1.1 ' f--g- -' -4-.-Vfff-'1s-'--'ffl-EV 11: -V V 1 Vf ' f-V-"' V- -215 V-11 35 ' -.ff ' V 1-YV - -' y- ff'-1---V "'-' V1 ' 1:- 1' ggi? I I -- "- v ' V '- f -1 'Qi' 1' , wi, 7,1--1'- ' V,.-.V21-V111 -'EV-: 2 - 1-55.--zE',52'V5 ,i VVVV 1 2rVE'e1"V.1 V Vgf:.I. ,Q -V 1QfQ,'vFi.f'1gQV -,1.-' - Ii ' I 4-44 1 " f.V512" V-Vf3i"'ff ',"'-f-Qffbf' Z. i1e3'-'i1i'Zf1','l'-' ' ,.1V.fg33V1Vv"V , " . Z, 1- ga 1 1 . EE V A Vl3Hw6'3.:g:V bil:'5A,.E M, VA V VVifV:V7.3,-i : M -:-:1:. 53 13--2 5j,..5Q:-:V-. : :V., V .Z 1 I A A .V 11V-V ...L-:: -ff-V,1w-f VR S'-+ -V-. -2 .,., i1 , ...V VVVV.. , 'V M, ..fV1,,,. ,. 111-sf V-21, .QVVQ-12. -z..11--VV ff1---.,,,.V .V,-VV,f?1:- VV 1--iV':V1V -,Q -'A .Vg -1-' Q if "" ' 4 ' .5-.V 1VV 7 'VTVL?:,fL" VVE'fiV'1Svzf1V,1iEV.1,g 1-Q1--' V V112 1 V V V1 V 112135- 1 '1 , Q- 5 ga " 'Y L 'i-.1j' '11 111' .-V11-7. V I " """' V5 z - '-"ar: ft' 1 V V -V if . V' 'V Vi Q " "'1'T1 V 'ffij VM -.'.1-QVQQXWV .1 V V f"' 1-1 V Vu - -- W V- .. .V.V , . V -,V V f'3i"5f.,2i5 ,t-ig 1 V 7t1f1'1 1i1-WX-"' V-K1-.f,,...' V V .-Vw... 3... ,, , .. 1 V .V A., iz. TI.-.. VV VV--1.131 311, V. ' 1 1 -V V - "Y -'3 il. L VV-,l,5iL- VV .V ' ' fx- V f' , I ' 1 'I7i'LV':2:'1 'TV 1:v, ,.,..-ai-1 VVV V 1tL 2 Y- ' ' . 1. 1 41' V1 -1 " . ---V'31V2-V -'J'-. 1' ,P 71'.uf-y'11-V-1'1-151-111611 .. ,. -is ',-1,251 gig. if ' 5 -3'h'f" " NW'5'f', - V ,- VV1V-VV-w -V, V V,-: ,, g.,,, A5-,' - -.,, J A , -V5.5-V,V.,-01V-,VNV-15 f.5j1-,VH-Vfg, , E .V 51 12--.V'VV,,V.Vff ,-'-1.1 15. 'y 7. :-gV-?-fM'5'V- ! ' TL . -1- ' J,- Q. . A V231.1,f, 1, . , V 1 , g .1V"si:' V--.gQ- Vq:q-.1I- . V ! ' ' " " 21.11-wr.-f..1.1V ' TL.. V-'1 V - f V, V .YQ .9591 fa,,,5.,'Y ,,--,VV VV 3. ,,.V.,.,,V V1Vff-V.,-V423-5-zVv1 3.4,-1-,V.MfgVg.-Z3 ,,j,,Vpgg,3..gk.,-.,mgV..VV,,:1155? VV , - V ,I 0' V - Z ': --X Pg .11 VV " ,' .V1ikLf7312l5Z2ZV5:23-', ,,-2' VE ' -' 552,5 ,V4,2V'QQ11T5-215,1191.221Vj:V:j!-,S52-2Ij'71Ej1-V7V5',V, 1-ff l .-V"A5IfElf2-i" Pf'A"-51 1- .51.1Z14 .-.1',k4.g,"5-V,.,.g. " ' 125 V V:., ,,,V. VVgV.V,-6:1 'fiT""'-:if "'A 1 -' .5V.:-::"' , J. gf., V,,---N44-.-. , ,V ,. ,,.,-,VV. V.,,,-V1.1Vm..V Vw .ZV41-1,1-, -VV --, V . - 1 f VZ 2 'fiw'-V VV . 2 ' M 'f V - 1 -- - '- ' ' .- - ' - --1 :Vf-.1 ,, ig- 2.1. ,,V-4-31'i '1-2 ,,4-1'g- 2,45-.'-..g I 2. -fn... ' - 5- '- '-1414227 -. za ., .V V l ' VVV.'V.'VfV-ii.-'11-g11zV-V.ft.,:.1V"VV-,QE1-:1-i.1l.-,Q1-12522:V:VfL12VV-3,12 1 1iVi-15" ' V V 4 1 if V. 1 V1 . . ,i,1,,.,,, 1 - - -z,,g-V--fgz' ,Q -11, 1 V, vgQ:::, .- '-I A 337142. ,:?f - V1 . ,i , .. ,. . V l nf "" 5 . q' -- 1- ,,1ff1:VeV,,--.p,114:Qi1,w211f2- '1-'--V,zf,,V 21-V111 .f' 1.,.:iw -. -., ,-V- ,if1VV,- g-v - -2.1gQ55.f+g:gV5gg.g-2 s 5: :.11i,b:z.x1-.1zsQ-N -V,,+ Mr '- .V Www- . VV 11 4-. W-TA .V-:fl Vz-::- : ,' ,Vj 1113 -ffl-V'1j'f':-:Vv -.--'41 '1'1 '9,S'?4-V1?f'V-j11,1E1' -5iVE,:dSi1- ?Vf?'9'L?'f5,-Z-1"'-V75l'fQE'.f,-'l.V.,fp ,f '1'kIJ'1'4f'Y,Q7ZE?".1.V. 'WV'-ff. 'W121 --'3f'I-171 41' -L f? I1-5? " :Vf"11-3' '!"--'1!5'FIE:'-'1f"31'l':3f4::'!"'. X ' 1:5 E-11'?15f':iI!1I2-ray-5-mi V.,,:i:2 'ii ,.f-5527-f-2-1 -422-1,-,wg-f , V ' -gwxgki y fi-.:. 12,111.1 'f '1 ,. .,-1. 1-Vw, WV.. V V --, ,-, Q V V., V .- -.gf -V.-1-V-.--. -V. 31. .. ,.Qf- 1.11 1:1-N X '43 VV TV V V ' ' ' ' V, 5, if T "2V5if1V1-4? 3 'f ' 1 V --' 151zV'iii'f--'ff 'sw 1-Vi'--11' 1"1 4 1 , ,L., ' 1f6""' .QL 'iff ' , , , .. -1--1.11-:Vizl-2.1-g-1 , 1 Vf 5 ,. ,MV 571.--1VV-i1..MV,.V V V'2'fQ,V1.wfV 1' 1-1 X1 1 .V I if " "" 1 -.V ,.',' if ' fffw4 :Vf, ,1 ,V" - Vi ML T 1 -V,:V, -'V -tj-254'-"",'""'V" ,.-" V V,"':V,,'-'gWZV.'- ,. f' :, 'I' 1,1 ,IV .- j' "inf ' 1'-55525.-" .1:I3l ?1'F:: f:" 1'f"1 :f7' I :1-:, V 1ffE'1-fgfli-zjgffi., ,Efjff-VE1'::Q53IFVQgVj'i5i2X'.5i,l,'V'-15 :QTEK:-5Q11lf,AEg1Ijj-Q -ig -4 ,' V V, V- V?-2 5 1 . ""' .' ' '- V- V- . 1 V'1- ,, KV V ff. -1 , ' .iw VV1' '-.21-f?' '- -V1-21-al:-aw:-':S?-11-1-V.V:V,V,V1.V.V.1 XV-12.12.s'.V,,,, .,V,1V,-.1,ifgf:,1 V,:1.1,V.g-1-: 21- V v -1 , Q V.-ag,-1 VV - VV .-,-: V V- V V. -1 11 111-ff'14V:fV -V V -1 4...11. 1- V:-V-VzVVV-fz1-V-V- -1-V ww- , V f..V1-1 ,Q - . Vfaeeff-V..-V -VV-V11-Vz.,-5-9-.5.V..W.VV.1:,.ff.,1- . V-V1 .1:1 :QV-1.V1.V.V, V--V1,.:,:-,::1--1,1,1V.-V:-:-Vs--ff-:1---.wa-:V--Sh---A-1.Q1-.11-111-,1k-:. :,f,sb1+--.gsm,-,1--QVVV-VV--.-.-VX. -Q, .3 -.-..g- - 1' V- SQ. -' P? . - . - X Y .gg Q A .. ? , " 1 ' V 1 1 .V 1- V . ., ,--, ,,,. Wz1g.1y4.,.,. Q V VVV ,-X. , ,-3, ,, 4M..,.V.,.4,V -Y, V V V - -1-V3-VV Vi- -:V Y-'1www1-1-If1fSfa..Sww-V ,Vim 1- vxsb-- : VV Vx- A' 1V V-Q11. .. 1- cw ' -f-214' .. .,v1.--fJW.fzf. X ., 1 . 2 V- V . V ,..::V-'. V:V:,Vx.--v:- Sn--1-fffiwiw5?sP.s:3S1N1-111Qif K? "' X 49 'Q 1:1 13 " ' -1.2522-1 af. .. V' W -1f,. 1 -' ,ff- VW ' '--fz ' , 11-fa - -.g1'1V V'VV1V aj? -af iV-:- fg sg? -x:if.i-2. mfs-.gf,,,.,,.V , X X '-.- if '- - -411-V..-1 .-:r s V - ,.VfQf'wi'V0?Wat1 -M f - - W 1- , ::: V' .11w:g6.e- 1. - V: -2V:V:V -.2.-::::-.--.'1Vf--11-::-V-51'zf-ewfa1115-xi.-s-.-1::-:f-:ws-SeeSw:1:-1W'-1-1'-as-.1:f.:-12-212-2-mi-:1:-.N.SM-V '-1---,asv V 1 V-Q Sm V-ff 'XY -- G91 as ' I-' ' gy!! 5. V.,V-,Vg-My-ff?-1.V-,-7' . VW 1.. mgfy 1 -V V Q: AQ .,. - 3 ,. , -Vg- 1--4 , 1:21436V151-.1-1.1-f.1.'1'V1-'-VV52:-.::--VE:-i:e':-.5-f21,.1V-'-11::f.bm-:VVQVQ--1 .1 . , S- - wfg 55+ 'X 1 - - , V V1 gf-.y.-1+ - .1-.V ,, V L. .1 -W 4?-Q v1SV wy'1-- - i.V.w :V -. -.--. 114-.fwf-.. . . .Q-V-152-Z:-212.151,-V112--.- 1-Vg:125:5-Vw.:-:,:V,-VV-V:V:.y.1:11,211Vw--f,-,:-,.:,---zg::,Q.V-X+.:.::f-.i.V:5.:,y.ff11fs fV:11:V- -M .1 .w1 -V-1.-f-v.f-miw.- V ' -- V.-av:-5--V 3, gs s-E -T42 - -f- . . P 1ffh,u ,, -aff 'K ,V-. fV -JV -V .1 -rs 1-QV.. -4- v.. V2 -pg! .4-12 0,--1- 221 -9 6 fs-PM "1-1- - 1- 'V 'A -+18 .:V--.1-sV..:.-111,-zz.:-3 3 ,.1,...fws .-1--w- V,-11'-N-1: W Aww- V. .. 1 ff.. -V , .,mf 2g1:1- +Q2 .f NV Q. -- 11,- --' 3V- -4 , V , , -' , --Y-1 -V V- +-f-.Vw ,V 1V..?fl-:NV, 1 1: Vp wc, -V ,-.5 rw , 5 V1 ,1 ..:-V4--V-fz.V., --pw V-.V:V.1 W V 1,-V.--n V - 1,f 44 as 1 1, -V .VV..f V-M-:f1r.-VVV .'-- A ... .--we:+..1-ffV-:V-s:-,:'f- . .2'V,.:g,a:1V,.- .--11--V--V-N:--,11:::vfif-PV--V-::v:V,.:1 W1 :xA V - --vV,.f-irw -fr-N.. - - - - 1 esgcg WV .-.,V,1V11x--M ww -Awww 1' P' 4-Vwg?f1V.1--1 f-.1,,-Vf-V.f -2-L VV - ...,. .-V1V 1-V,' 5,48w Qf,1f ,+ - :W--1-'15-,r1""1 1:1-5-V ,. - 1' S-QW --2-,Nigga-4 ,fp-My-.V12 -by I A 1 . 1 --f-- ff -. - V. ' . 1 5 f f -V V-2. ,, VV.,-, ,.,-V, YV,..4. V, ,. V WV. M. ,V ..V,. ,. .V . 1. , , ,,N,,.,,.1X-S.. V. ,X 11 ,1 -X,-1,1 1- 1V -V WAZA1-9.-, -1 f '-Zi-S'izVV..f,-.g..,i-:ww'11.:w:?-V: V32 1- -1 -f3f :..:1 "' 111 - 1. aim I .11:-1:V.a,V-:V1'1V,1V. - V V -:W -1,11 . .x.V.1N af..-.,V'V' -1'-w x 1- V1-N :V--.U 3 V ' -2 -1 1 VV 11 ,V f - M y ::.1 V1V1,ff- 1.V -.VV V, 11 -, Qgxwx YM- 1Qm, .q1,,,,, - V-NNXN1 1:--sV ,L Nj Qf- --1 1 . 1, - Q V, 5 5 , . ., ,,ggf,wzq,5v 1 ,figm yfgs 9 VM, Vig vyjff - Wg., -Q , VV . ,5,,,4V,Z4,l2:,'f-, .Q-, ..v,A 1. .1.,:,6q+Q1mx . Q, ,, M , .,V. ,-51,-V A - KVS.,,:mb::3?5w?,,.m5V,w1V.NQ,,,V,35i53. .xNX...,M:9QXX K1 xx.. xxx.. V i Y X, .V, X 1. . .5 xx, V V -1 V- VV .V ' -'--' - - 1511 V91 1 ,E 'fV,-'ff',-1VVV 'i-"-5 - 1 5-11 .2- QT '-:::2'54 " 2. 1' -1 VV'-: 1 '--VVVVf---Vw 12111 kf'2f-me VVV3-?eg..,1-if '6A!+'S5fN:41x3 ' -' 1 1. V- " ' V ff V V 142 2 . 1, V- 1 ,g, -1- ,,.VI' V . ,gf ' , 'e 1 1, 1----1 Q "sv"',-.-..- i.Fw1V-W, 22:5 V11,f - , 1 -4 141 1'-1' -1 V -V ., Vg. ,wa .of 4:,-gq,V ,:f- ,V 1- ' .Vg -.f2gVV-- 1. V ,1-g,nam-V11.,,,,g,.ww.1w-rpg,-1,,1VVN,--V,,,,1 Q1 5.91 V -: G Ng. , -, . 11 V, .,15-gm A-gfgqpjy-1 ,5X,1xxV,-wNy5Q1,,,,g. VV V -1: -QM -V ,1 . -.-1 - 111' -16-15 1' - ' .vi 1V--1.V:1-V214 ':- .1-V . 11VVX'?f?1-f:VQ:4V.g-,--1-1:1.g1.Va.:1.E-'V.-,11:1-1f1wfsaQ-V1V-V1VXV-' -.1 - 1 ,1Ni-' x P 5 1415 Nff-f fWF1VN1wQxK-.'1'aX X ,- - VV . , . V .- -Vf- .- , 1-'11, ,V:,..-1g..p.-Wm- f - V V- ,V.,f.,..V,,-V.f.--,V-V,V,.gf,gZ:V-V,-, -5, 1 4- . I fl 5, 1 , 1. x, . W ax ..gV .. -, , - 155,1-1f.ms,.1xQ-,.1-ses.:,1,1,Q-V.,-V.1V1.1-N - -- . --xg N, 1-.1,x1.k, ,Q 1x.q1.Wk-1W., X XXX fi V,,,,1 , 1 qqfzv V ,X - A 5 1V V . . V -V ., -. ,V . gy - ,, N x-51-. V- fr-,-rg:-rf-3ZSfVaf-w.1 X- 1- 1-psy 11 1 ks-MXXKXXQ my-Y ' 1. -V f-21.-we-'415fyfmzV, . V 1 V, ' V fflff-V1 1f-VV 7 Q V, .V -i4Ix.1g:: ,Vg-f Q- -:-51 l S -1 4 -1--gf-Y--1--W:1f1 xx V- Q- f -1V,,f nv -Vw-Q "' A A . .111 V-'V . 5- V. .V,.V.1.-W 21-2:1'Yaw,,V-. V, .. Qfw v'-v ,Q1 , 1.-15.1. XXNKZ vw. Q- 1 ,jf -V -1-14, . -hp, V '- , :W V,,..,-W 1 V 1 z V1f'.f f- '. V :if-, .-. .1 V. .f-V - M.,-VV . ww QQ,-ff-1xNf -YYWSQYXQ-,Q-,Q QNX-QV-:1:Si1:1V fx-1 - -, '-V 1 -. Af, , -- 0 -4-.--+1 ,1n. ,V 1 ,,g.VV.fV:--f1fg'1 - - 2.-,, ,ff.,g'1M..Z ' ,gy ' . - :. - 1- ' rwtii 5 1 Xkv NSY-1-5-iX ,XFN-g A' X NVQ-rs.-QW g R11 ' 1.1 1 2 - ' ,Q V 1V11 Jw ,JV 1- fa - b'f',.I'f" - 1 nw - -:NF -1 NSR: ri X X Q V ,V.V ,A 1 , VV, 1VV V. .V, Q Wwmwvff V V , V-fpWQfVV 1 . V4 1- -1 -0 V - .5 , - --1V ,., 1 ..1 xg-..V, ,, V -,1-,.1,:1x1.x:,f:,-:.N- V- x, .,-Nga- 5 -. -X N11 Xb- -XXX-1. ,X 1V V -4-35,1 ,,ig,,4,,,.mf-ff-4' ,,J,gf,,W3m,Vf - - , - - -V N1 ,. V. - i . - - 1 ,.g,.,.1, --11 X, .-Xxxwwx - gc 11. - bw-A ' 1 1 1.5y.gz5.-VW-:f:fVf1X1 " f-1 . -' 1- . 14 Qf .1 -11--'QU e '-.- q.-.... , 1 :eww X SX V .XX X, 1N5r11, " 1' -1 f - f 1 1 1-21' - 1--av . . . -'ws VNNNA--NR-WNQXXNN' K- W- The Parthenon on the Acropolis 4-WX: ,. Those Greeks thought of everything! Cathedral of Dophni ,45 L Jax li wifi ,fy V X X X' M , .- A vv2"+.-'fwffvwf " 43 T: R ,, ,,,t.., A ., -if ff 41, , l Q ,Q ' J, -V ff: 1 g 4 . ' -' ' ' - X'A - V- . ff .,..5,.,.,.V.-,. "Af---ew:.i .' da. . , N if N. : - I V F ' . - in A I A . 'J mf " I . V,.''-N-fV.-W'Q-.xv-3---V . .rf-,Q ., - H, X ' W -f M 3 ,iff -fa N ' V? 5 ' -, V 35 - V . J: ' ,. 1 ' , 'T 'V-ZX V' +L , gf 4 vw N ' f .Wm if 8 fl? M 2. fy f is xp MQ X Q-. V 'fV:.w -V -1- J VX , f 58 , , it ? ,2, , V i f? Y ' f , g 2 , - , ' , A f' 4 , , .g Q2 J 5, ., ' fp' . wa ff' 'Wi-. . ' wtf' ,,,, 'V V ,exp-i1.7'-A ., jf ' ' Q , M.. - ' - I," -I 3: fl' ,V,'.- ' - AW! pf V 5 lf- -' Vw - L - -A Nx ,' 1 'L'-""' 4 . -. f . .Vf - V 5222, .Q fl! '.'.. , ". If 1: 'Qx 15,5 - .gf ,K ,gg-Q,--:,.:: f N 1.19, af , ,,..., , -QV x- ,Q I ,, xg, My-Q C .x ,Q , -if , 4, . . 1121:-11-,'-V.:--,v, - gf' V. - ' A , - ' ,V ., V-4+ A M --M., ' ' 5555.1-L:gV...45l.H, I t '-M-:M 14 A VV-I aff :V. ,jf , , ,VVVV ' Wmsi .,'V Y, . 'Q -sf ' X .j3Vf.ge -',, 3 V: 4 ' Q ,, 5, , ,V Wg! V4 ,V V V If .ff ,, pu, ' 5 , f M ,N .,, . n 4 A I gg . .Zi 3,1 l 1 1 1 W1 11 1111 111 41 141 1 P1 14 1!f1fVfW W W 4 1 W, fy 41 ff1,1W4ffwf1g1,5' M11f1f,14f 1 1 , fl 1,11 11 11Q,,4,1,,p, ,fV41!4W,1!f, , 1 1 !.11l,41W 1 f f 4 11,11f!1,11 11 f ,, 411fff7ff1yff24W', xmf12,w'Q fy, 1 ffm 7 10 411 1 111 1 1 11111'101f'f0'f'Wf 1' 1 14111A1,, 111 I e',W111 1 , 1 1 ,, 1 1 ,, 1f1,,4,A11y4 ,w, 1f f X 11 '0'n5,, 111, N11 11 0 , , 11 411, ff ff f,14,, ff ffl fff1f,1f 14114141 11, 141 ,1f 1 If ,,,1, 11 fAf1 111 1 1 11 ,1 1 ,- n-. 2a 1 ,n 1 11 10 X , f 1 1 1 wav.. 1 if 41 44 ..,....1.,, 14? 1 1. Q-..., 41 .5........1 4, 1 fl E 'fi i"'Cf-"sf 44 Y' 'I As-.4-v Y! 141 uf 1.1411111144 VW M-4143" WM 14. Q 11.1.1111 -qv W eww 1 f Amwwm ny 4-1... 1 W vb .f -- f,, . If -- 2 -, f -- 'V , . . . . ,,-,mi f' ' f V -fMMwwf+.w4M,,,,.m 9.55, n 1 E rvqr -'7 .. n, 1 a C 4 I Q 11: 5 1 5 I s I 5? 5 3211 Y l l li? . i Z E 5 'XX' 7 f I 100419 I 1 11 11QV1yg4 ffi9 ,M7QwQ7 ypfizwgydfyfjrff, ,,! fy 41! I J 1 1 1 f ,yfyv i ff' W' Y 4,61 V, YQ 1 M, 1 0 f 1741-Vcfffy gfwf 171411 ff fQ14 ff 1a 41, ff vi 1Jw11fw WL W!! M ff ' 9 f ff ff W1 W1 1 1 1 1 fj14114,,4111f X11 2, lf, f ff' Q 1a A ,1f,f,, f f f 1 117 ,W f "'W'W?m,,,, 1 1 ff! f 1 ,1 11 11 xJ'?'f7 My fzwq-ui , ,191 0' M13 E f,., K: ,DY 4, ,.g,. ,,.,, 4- ., my Jy 1 4 5,274 Wy X M7 ,, gh, his in 1 1111 Z ,ff y Q ff ,Q , fy 6 I , Q 5,.4 Wlf' fm4wf5 r w' 2 Q? Z f l 0? X J ... """' 'f ' 'Z ':' 2 ff ff 116 . ,, ,.,., ,,,,, ,,., .,., ,,,, . ,.,h..,., W,g,f,.-,.w,g,,,1:.f14if?ffg4fV 11 523333.-fl 2If:ii2:I-fi1f1 V K, . 1 af- -.11 7 1-11 ,,h h . ,.m ,. C Z .,,,' 'ggi,jg,-,253-:2'y.,,,"kgig-7 :,g,'Q1,:l,,fi-fy-'if: "', ,, lv .',., , 5 1 , :,f,f:',.1g,1e2-'.1,1- I, ,fSf'Zff29 2- mi:-f'iiE -1 .4:f:22fiEi.f1g1 , zzfiz, 15:55Efye:,.2g3jjgg,,liE-712' '-gQ'e'Q:gl:g12'.j!"ff iigirfifi ,',' :?Jifii'i' 'fk' 1, '2g.:rQl:'i',f" '7"7f' " .45,"'f. Av ' 1 ,,, ,, V, W " if -I f 7, zfiwff., v , ,,,,. ,, Z ,. 1 Mwfw-Q f I, 4,,.- -mv , -,ly .lfzlfiliflfiffl 1 1, ,, f 1 ' 'K . I , , V, ,f ,,,,,. . gL,1:i.51:2fi,:ff'f?z2,fitgfpf yz' ' 12 1. I , f 1 , WM Akm,,,.m,V.,,,.,,.,,f ., ,,, , .,.,,. ,. , ,, 4, ,.,, . .,,,, H, , f- ,.,,, .,-,nf ,.,. f 1 ,jzl ' ' :H ' 2Ze :gai,f':'.1f,gi5,,e1 f 51 ' ir Q ,xx A 'WSP Swimming, Sunning, Sailing -my Qzmmaw,-:, fm.,-5,'.v, ? Q . i fl i ff! pf I YW v?E phi ' f .if , iii gf 1 12 lj? ffif , I K, E SI " : ' F: I. " ii?-1 i iii! 5" N35 Q42 3 Y 75:5 ,312 352 , 3 5? 3. 7: s :5 3? 4 1 2 z ,, iii fg aw 5: ti. 4 ,53,., g: 'gif iz! . ,N-I QI 5' i 5+ fs ii 6m . ,Mya . i , . . -wwe , fil f f Q 9: f. , ,y f w Q1 A s :UEWQM 4 Q Jfroapc-:ci And as we look back at the guys, the gals the games, and even the guns, we can again enjoy our "round- the world cruise, picking out and packing away in our memories the many happy times we have enjoyed to- gether and Forgetting the Few un- happy ones that confronted us. I , UNCLASSIFIED CHARACTERISTICS OF U.S.S. TRATHEN QDD-530I Clqsgg Fletcher Displacement: 2050 tons I2750 tons full loadj Dimensions: 376.5 feet length overall, 39.5 feet beam, I8 feet maximum draft Armament: four 5"f38 caliber, six 3"f50 caliber, five 2I" Torpedoes in Quintuple mount. Machinery: General Electric Geared Turbines, two shafts, Shaft Horsepower - 60000, maximum speed over 35 Knots y Boilers: Four Babcock 81 Wilcox boilers Complement: 350 Iwari , Builder: Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Shipbuilding Division San Francisco, California. VITAL STATISTICS DATA TAKEN FROM 0000 I0 JAN. TO 6 AUG. I953 Hours Underway Fuel Used Underway Fuel Used Not Underway Fuel Used Excluded Status Total Fuel Used . Fresh Water Distilled Feed Water Distilled Total Water Distilled Eng. Miles Steamed 58,328 Mi 3,625 Hrs 2,625,822 Ga I32,264 Ga 5,425 Ga 2,763,4II Ga 706,639 Ga 920,237 Ga I ,626,876 Ga I f 7 f . ,Y . S 'E WY, ,Y ,,YA frrf A,-,A,,,,,,,W,,,.,,11'!3'? 1 4 1 , 1 1 i I I I i


Suggestions in the Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 59

1953, pg 59

Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 8

1953, pg 8

Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 14

1953, pg 14

Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 62

1953, pg 62

Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 7

1953, pg 7

Trathen (DD 530) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 14

1953, pg 14

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.