Three Rivers High School - Reflector Yearbook (Three Rivers, MI)

 - Class of 1932

Page 1 of 60

 

Three Rivers High School - Reflector Yearbook (Three Rivers, MI) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 60 of the 1932 volume:

x x N CSSQQII :Q, A3!i-Rr-9n.W - ? 'Q' Tl-lllE EFLECTO 1932 i VOLUME 23 fo KX Foreword The Reflector Staff of '32, operat- ing cornpulsorily within a reduced budget from previous years, dis- played its initiative by its resolution to deviate from the usual publication of an annual for the entire school. Therefore, the Reflector Staff has compiled the most interesting exper- iences of the Senior Class of '32 with the anticipation that the Seniors will be gratined by this record of their high school career. n Qgjgaa ucN6,3f3L7gcmur t r r 1l Page Ona I - 1Q,:'242g!fCf3'F4,9cR-- veggie gimefrev ' - '0I1+ ws-,SQ Page T-wo it Btgiau e ie,E4i'R,9n..4. e-g- t1lHB'l1IU1'iEll Ellehiraiirm MARGARET ESTHER DUNAWAY was taken from our midst August l, 1930, after an ill- ness of five months. She was born in Three Rivers, August 13, 1914, attending school here to the eleventh grade, when her health failed. Margaret will remain an example of the ideal school-spirited girl to all who knew her. Her talents Were numerous: art, music, studies, and sports. Added to her interest in school activities, she attended regularly the Methodist Episcopal Church, teaching the Cradle Roll class. She was also a mem- ber of the Junior Church and of the Campfire Girls. "Death does not end our friendships true: Vie all are debtors to the dead: There. Wait on everything We do The splendid souls who've gone ahead. To them I hold that We are bound By double pledges to be fine. Who once has had a friend has found The link 'twixt mortal and divine." ff Qyfbt 1l li' r Page Three .nQ76 use 63311 nQ7YeD Ek H? Q mvmszs sffswompdw 32915511 + -wnQbgg,'yfQ3.mu: 116-,QE Page Four -lt' BFRWLQII -eh H or S h n The Seniors at la lll Penseroso Hence, vain deluding Smiles, The brood of Freshies without knowledge bred! How little you bested, Or fill the Seniors' minds with all your Wiles! Dwell with the Sophomore Class, And would-be-wits with dull cartoons possess, As far beneath our dress As sinful man that first invented joy, Or he who would annoy Our studious minds with' sports that come and pass. But Hail, thou Study evermore! Hail, clivinest School Books' lore, Wluose saintly aspect is too high To stoop and look to mortal eye. Come, cherished Wo1'ks, so scarce, so kind, Holy, peaceful and refined, All with a train of musty books, Memory gems and pensive looks. On physics we spend hours of toil To learn what makes the water boil. There, hold our wrapt thought day by clay, Till We become of thy blest clay. These pleasures, Melancholy, give, And we with thee will choose to live. -Kemuard Haas. usa, s s Z, ,.sss I'n,ye Five Alfa Nz?Si9u iii-.v"4Q,3vG,-TQ.,9n nQiWePs2!4 9 Q 2 MR. CHARLES H. CARRICK SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS l University of Michigan Columbia University Bachelor ol' Arts Master ol' Arts MR. WALTER HORST PRINCIPAL OF THE HIGH SCHOOL Olivet College University of Michigan Bachelor of Arts Master of Arts u 1 'ner Page Six if-Jn a1 6TQJle e -JUQJQ Faculty Top row, left to right: Emery Smith, machine shop: George Marks, me- chanical drawing: Chester Pratt, algebra and physics: J. Wion Morey, agricul- ture: Gerald Beggs, chemistry and general science: Guy H. Ringle, Head of Com- mercial Department. Second from top: Miss Winifred Kalchthaler, physical education: Miss Esther Streeter, Junior High English: Miss Vera Hangsterfer, Head of English Department: Miss Marguerite Nelson, typing and shorthand: Miss Caroline Castle, geography. Third from top: Miss Neva Garman, Latin: Miss Lois Crane, foods: Miss Mildred Snyder, art: Miss Mary Williams, U. S. History and French: Miss Mildred Buys, English: Miss Lillian Comar, Dean of girls and mathemat- ics: Mrs. Edith Howell, librarian: Miss Jessie Hoisington, Junior High mathe- matics. ' Bottom row: Mrs. Vera Reed, Superintendent's secretary: Miss Frances Burwell, English: Miss Eleanor Ellsworth, Junior High English: Miss Gertrude Shirley, Junior High English: Miss Dorothy Williams, Junior High mathemat- ics: Miss Avery, clothing: Mrs. Luella France, music: Miss Dorothy Wetherbee, Junior High history. Teachers not in picture are: Ralph Foster, physical education: Leo Hand- ley, industrial department: Raymond Peeke, music and history: Harold Voor- hees, Coach. it carat mm: rfimaemvmc MMFMF H new Page S even BR 1 3196, e e nQ,'275li!C5TQa9u a Senior Class Olfliicers Gordon Behrentz, president: Steven Bonfoey, vice-president: Wayne Hazen, secretary: Llewellyn Ringle, treasurer. Annual Staff '32 Top row, left to right: Jane Pauli, Editor-in-chief: Hester Rienstra, busi- ness manager: Pauline Tobin, activities editor: Kathryn Wells, literary editor. Middle row, left to right: Robert Mack, advertising manager: Catherine Hanley, art editor: Llewellyn Ringle, Boys' athletic editor: Helen Bunn, Girls' athletic editor: Harold Jackson, subscription manager: Josephine Barnes, typist. Bottom row: Lela Withers, joke editor: Eleanor Pierce, assistant sub- scription manager: Eileen Gay, assistant advertising manager: Marjorie Crabbe. chronologist. 2' QQGU '!lG5b- U?'A "" "' " 'U Page Eight -ll iliitgvisu C --. -,M-1Q.5'FQfil,C5FQg9l1 0 Q, . '-' - - 7 ALAN AVERY JOSEPLUNE BARNES Agriculture Commercial "Though moflcst, on his un- 1-Sha is the ,,,,,3,,,.o,. of all zmbarrqssed' brow Nature has courtesy-good with- wrzllen gentleman J out ejrony Judging Team --.------ 1-2-3 Chorus ................. 1-2-4 Track ------'------------- 1 Honor Scholarship ...... 1-2-3 Clfmk Room -----4- - - -4 Annual Staff .............. .4 I Honor Attendance - - -'-- 2 Palmer Certificate .... . . . .3 I GORDON BEI-IRENTZ College Preparatory "Well, if I donft succeed, I ARLENE BERNHARDT have succeeded, and that's n enough." Commerclal Chorus .......... .... 2 -3-4 "Her talents are of the more gasketbnll ..... .... 1 -5-3-2 mlent class." EHHIB .......... .... - - Orchestras ....... .... . .2-3-4 ghffus ' """"' 2'g Class President .... ....., 4 3 mer er 1 ca e ""' "" ' Boys' Glee Club .......... 2-3 "Fire Prince" ............ 3 Interclusev Sports ..... 1-2-3-4 OREN BINGAMAN HAROLD BIRKHOLD l General Commercial i And f""'?QQff,'wlH'f 'B " good "His ziztfgelgziggiealna mm- Vnrsity Club ..,,..... 1-2-3-4 Cross Country D . A . 4 . I . 1-2-3 Ag. Club ............. 1-2-3-4 Interclass Sports ....... 1-2-3 1 Track ...,......... .... 2 -3 O h t 3-4 I "Marrying' Marian" . . .... 2 Bra. QS ra """" "" 3 -4 Honor Attendance . . . .... 2 oxmg """"' ' ' ' ' N N 1 1 W . 4 EDWARD STEVEN BONFOEY BOESCHENSTEIN College Preparatory General "When you get what you "1 find that nonsense at 100-11-i, 1l0'w,Cl31lt times is singularly want lf- 'ff"J""f'W-" Band ................ 1-2-3-4 l Football ................. 1-2 Ql'Cl2leSf21'2--, ------ f-'-- ' -1'3 , Varsity Club ......... 1-2-3-4 skidding, ------------ Q- - -3 Hi-Y Club ,........... 1-2-3-4 H1-Y Club- -W .--4----- 1-2-3-4 Inge,-class Sports ,,,,,,,,, 2.3 Class Vice-President ....... 4 4 H ' HELEN BUNN I EUNICE BUFLOCK College Preparatory Gommercml "She is a ,form of life and "What is the worth of any- light, I thing, but for the lumpiness That seen, becomes ll puff of N 'twill bring." sight." l Chorus ...,........ ,..... 2 -fl Chorus .......... .... 1 -2-3-4 Honor Scholarship ....... 2 Girl Reserves ...... ,.... 3 -4 Honor Attendance ...... 1-2-B Annual StaH ............... 4 Palmer Certificate ......... 8 Interclass Sports ...,... 2-3-4 lg c oo ore ........ .. H' hS h 1St 4 I J, -a efgygavs -1n v,,ga'auf-To oo E E-Tw Page N inc e-e MORRIS CARPENTER College Preparatory "Life is too short for mean anxieties." Manual Arts . ......... 1-2-3-4 I Tennis .................. 3-4 Honor Attendance ........ 1-2 Cloak Room ....,.. .... 4 ALLEN COOK College Preparatory "Hunting he lovecl, but lo-ve he Laughed to scorn." Athletic Manager ........ 3-4 BETTY CREGO Commercial "Patience is a plant that , grows not in all gardens." White Pigeon High School. . Chorus . .............. 1-2-3-4 Blue Triangle Club ....... 3-4 Interclass Sports .......... 1 H.E.C1ub .......... Palmer Certificate EMERSON DELONG Agriculture "The noblest mind the best contentment has." Crops Judging Team . . .1-2-3 Stock Judging Team , .... 2-3 Honor Scholarship ...... 1-2-3 Honor Attendance ........ 2-3 l ANTHONY DUKETTE College Preparatory "From the crown of his head to the sole of his foot, he is all mirth." 3 "Once There Was a l Princess" ......... . . . .4 Creative Arts Guild ........ 4 Chorus Boys' Glee Club ......,..... 2 Toastmaster at the Prom . . .3 "The Fire Prince" ......... . 3 ar GEN xQ.y'QAv?-it'gflW'uJ - uc-UQ!! MILDRED CHRISTNER College Preparatory "The sweet expression of that face, forever changing yet the same." Interclass Sports ...... 1-2-3-4 Baseball ............. 1-2-3-4 Track ................. 1-2-4 Girls' Sports Club ....... 2-3-4 Girls' T. R. ................ 3 Chorus ,...... ...... .... 1 - 2-3 MARJORIE CRABBE College Preparatory "You have a nimble wit: I think 'twas made of Atlanta's heel." "The Swan" ,............ . .4 Chorus ............... 1-2-3-4 Annual Staff ............... 4 D.S.C1ub .... ,...... , "Once There Was a Princess" .......... ..., Ig Creative Arts Guild. . . . . . . JOHN CUNKLE College Preparatory "A Peace above all earthly zlignitles, a still and quiet conscience." Band. ........,....... 1-2-3-4 Hi-Y Club ..... .... 1 -Z-3 Orchestra .... ....., 2 ORA B. DEVILBISS College Preparatory "Her's is the spirit deep and clear, free 'without boldness, 'meek without fear." D. S. Club ............... 3-4 "Once There Was a Princess" ............... 4 "Tho Fire Prince" ........ .3 Orchestra ............ 1-2-8-4 Campfire Girls .... ...... 1 -2 Girls' T. R. . . ..... ........ . 1 Honor Scholarship . ,.... . . .2 Girls' Sports Club ........ 3-4 DELTON ELY Commercial "Give thy thoughts no tongue." l N n - nz f r r II Page Ten DORA FOUST General "E'cn her failings leaned to 'virtue's side." Honor Attendance ......... 2 H. E. Club ............ 1-2-3-4 Girl Reserves ..... ..... 8 -4 Track ......... ..... 1 Baseball .......... . . .1-2 Chorus ............. . . . 1-B Girls' T. R. , .........,..... 2 Palmer Certificate ........ ,3 EILEEN GAY College Preparatory "Intellect, talent and genius like murder. 'will out! " D. S. Club .............. 2-8-4 "Skiddin4z" ....... ..... 3 "The Swan" .......... . . . . .4 "The Fire Prince" ......... 3 Interclnea Sports ...... 1-2-3-4 Annual Staff ....... ........ 4 H. E. Club ...... . . .1 .. .2-8-4 Honor Scholarship ......... 3 KENWARD HAAS College Preparatory "A large part of 'virtue con- sists in good hab1.ts." Manual Arts Club ..... 1-2-3-4 Chorus ..........l....... 3-4 Tennis ....... ....,. ..,.. 4 Honor Attendance .... . . . 1 Cloak'Room .. ...... 4 GRACE HARMAN General "Humblenesn is always grace: always dignity." H. E. Club ......... . ....... 1 Chorus ................ 1-2-4 Palmer Certificate ......... 3 LEO HILLYER College Prepariitory "Opportunity is rare and a wise man willgnever let il. go by him." Band ................. 1-2-3-4 Hi-Y Club ............... 8-4 lnterclass Sports .... .,.. 1 -2 SY? -IQ.,-4s'ggere.9i new weve or r pri' ' ' wiv" Page Eleven -P DONALD GARD College Preparatory "The force of his own 'merit makes his way." Ag. club ............. 1-2-3-4 l Manual Arts Club .......... 3 Boys' Glee Club ........,. 2-3 "Once There Was a Princess" ......... . . . . .4 Track ............. ...... 2 Chorus ....,. ..... 1 -2-3 MARJORIE GUTHRIE Commercial "The flower of meekness grows on a, stem of grace." Chorus ................. .1-2 Girls' Interclass Sports ..... 3 Palmer Certificate CATHERINE HANLEY College Preparatory "She is pretty to walls with., Witty to talk with, And pleasant to think on." Annual Staff ............... 4 D. S. Club ..... ........ 3 -4 Orchestra ............ 1-2-3-4 Campfire Girls ........ . . .1-2 "The Fire Prince" ........ "Sl-ridding". . . . . "Once There Was a Princess" ....... . . . . . . Z-.ol-1: ssl:- "The Swan" ....... ..... WAYN E HAZ EN College Preparatory "Much wisdom often goes with fewer words." Salutatorian ...... .... 4 Band ................. 1-2-3-4 Orchestra ............ 1-2-3-4 C.ass Secretary ............ 4 PAUL HOOVER College Preparatory "The highest graces of music flaw from the feelings of the heart." Band ................. 1-2-3-4 Orchestra ............ 1-2-3-4 Cheer Leader, .... . , .... 1-2-4 "The Fire Prince" ....... . .3 Cross Country ............. 3 Hi-Y Club ............ 1-2-3-4 Ag. Club ........ .....,. . . .4 Chorus ...... ........ 4 i--w..w ee v ll, -Lk L l,,, .. ROBERT HOWARD College Preparatory "Happy am I, from ea-re Pm free : why aren'b they all contented lzlce me." Band ..........,...., 1-2-3-4 Football .,...........,. 2-3-4 Basketball ...... ..... 8 -4 Varsity Club .... .... 2 -3-4 LEONA HUEY College Preparatory "Thou hmm no sorrow in thy song, no winter 'Ln thy year." Girls' 1Sports Club ........ 3-4 Interelass Sports ..,.... 1-3-4 Girl Reserves ........... 2-3-4 H. E. Club .,............ , 1-2 Extempore Speaking ......, 3 ALICE IHRIG General "Beautiful as sweet! Anal young as beautiful !" "Once There Was a Princess" ......... .... 4 T. C. Club .......... ...... 1 Honor Attendance ...... 1-2-3 H. E. Club .......... ...., 1 Campfire Girls ..... .... 1 -2 Palmer Cer tificate MURIEL JACKSON College Preparatory "If you have knowledge let others light their can- dle by it." D.,S. Club ............... 3-4 Creative Arts Guild ....... 4 Chorus ........... ..., 1 -2-3-4 Honor Scholarship ....... 1-2 "The Fire Prince" . .,...,. .3 LELA JOHNSON College Preparatory "Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit." ' Chorus .................. 3-4 af H.E.Club ....... .. ....4 Interclass Sports ..... .... 3 All f MARY ELLEN HUBBARD General "Those about her from her shall learn the perfect 'ways of honor." H. E. Club ............... 3-4 Interclass Sports ....... 2-3-4 GLENN IIUFFSMITH General "One cannot always be a hero but one always can be a man." Band ................. 1-2-B-4 Orchestra ............ 1-2-3-4 Manual Arts Club ..... 1-2-3-4 HAROLD JACKSON Commercial "He was the mildest man- nered man, with such true breeding of a gentleman." Band ................. , 1-2-4 Orchestra .............. 1-2-3 "Skicldlng" ........... . .... 3 "Once There Was a Princess" .... .... ....... 4 H1-Y Club ......... . . . .3-4 AnnualSta.fE ....4 ELIZABETH JOHNSON f Commercial "Her very froums are fairer far, than smales of other nzaulcnas are." H. E. Club ........ , .....,.. 1 Chorus ..,............. 1-2-3 Palmer Certihcate AGNES JOHNSTON Commercial "A gentle disposition brings its own 'rcuxard and many friends." Chorus .......... . ....... 1-2 we 0 - - 'fire no new Page Twelve ll CONSTA NCE KAISER Commercial "Moclcst' in 'not mil rm or- Il U 'lI!l'7ILl57ll, but also u 11'uu.1'rl lo 'vvrtue." Chorus ..................., 1 Ag. Club .,........ ..... 4 Palmer Certi llcute RAYMOND KAUSZLER Collelzc Preparatory "A light lwrzrl, lives long." Band .......,............ 8-4 Orchestra ..,............., 4 ALICE LnMUNYON General "A blush is bountiful, but often incorz'vcw.ia'n.l." Interclzms Sports . , .... , . . ,1 Az. Club ............. 1-2-3-4 H. E. Club ,....... ...... 1 -2 Chorus . ...... .... .... 1 - 2 Palmer Certillcnte ARTHUR LOVEJOY Commercial Hlvllfll sweet rlclinht a quiet life a,6'ords." Interclnss Sports ,........ 1-2 Horror Attendance . . . .. . .3 Boxing ........ .,... .... 1 ROBERT MACK College Preparatory "Even HLOTUIIL 'vanquished hc still could argue." "The Swan" ......,......., 4 Football . ................ 3-4 Track ....... . . . .2-3 l 3 "Skiddinxr"- - -. .... Vnrsity Club, ............ 2-8 Annuul Stall' .,.......... ..4 W Basketball nnd Football Manuxzer ........ , ..... 1-2 llQ,:iE?63kQe9lf - IIQIQ wr-vu err' 3 f Page Thirteen in n- - rr--1?+--3-rrrr116',5g9gN N . WALTER KAISER Agriculture "Judgment is forced upon 'us by cacpe1'1e11ce." Ag. Club ............. 1-2-3-4 Manual Arts Club ........ 1-2 Interclass Sports ,,.. .... 2 -3 MARIAN KING Commercial "All I have seen teaches me to trust the Creator for all I have not seen." Orchestra. ,...... ...... 1 -2-3 Chorus ...,..........., . . 1-4 Palmer 'Certificate . . . . . .3 EDNA LINCOLN Commercial "How Goodness heightens beauty." H. E. Club ............ 2-3-4 T. C. Club ................. 2 Chorus ................ 1-2-3 School Savings Dept. Cashier ........,...... 3-4 Palmer Certificate HARRIET LUSE General "From o. pure heart proceeds the fruit of a, good life." Chorus ................,. 1-2 Orchestra ....,..... ..... 4 Palmer Certilicate GORDON MAHANA College Preparatory "A good all-around student." Band ................ 1-2-3-4 Hi-Y Club .... ..... 1 -2-3 Golf Team . . . ..... 1-3-4 Eagles. A nQ,.f'QgR6T4a9n uelfonk Q W I r W Q CLARIBELLE MAJOR Commercial "Not too serious, not too gay, but a really good girl." Centerville ....,.........., 3 Palmer Certificate GLADYS MARKLE Commercial "A winning way, a friendly smile: in all, a girl who is quite worth while." Ag. Club .... ......... 1 -2-3-4 H. E. Club ........... 1-2-3-4 Chorus ............... 1-2-3-4 Honor Attendance ......... 1 Palmer Certificate LEON'A MEADE Commercial "As a student you shine, as a. friend you are fine." Honor Attendance ......... 1 Honor Scholarship ......... 3 H. E. Club ............. 1-2-3 Chorus ........,......,... 1 School Savings Dept. Cashier ............... 3-4 Palmer Certificate VIVIAN MEREDITH College Preparatory "Prim and thoughtful- always." T. C. Club ................ 2 Girls' Sports Club ....... 2-3 it Campfire Girls ........... 1-2 Honor Attendance ....... 2-'X Interclass Sports ...,.. 1-2-3- f Chorus ............... 1-2-3-4 Girls' T. R ...... ........ 4 EUGENE MILLER General "He was just the quiet kind, One whose nature never varies." yjfgygaa w n 1-'age Fourteen ELIZABETH MALCOLM College Preparatory "She's backward about com- ing forwarzll' Beaver Dam, Wisconsin .... 1 Chorus ................ 1-3-4 Girl Reserves ...........,, 3-4 Interclass Sports .... . . . . .4 ARTHUR MAY College Preparatory "M 11 kingdom for an orchestra." Band ..............., 1-2-3-4 Honor Attendance ....... 1-2 Hi-Y Club .... .......... 3 -4 Orchestra ............ 1-2-3-4 LILLIAN MEADE Commercial "Her personalizgf has won her 'many friends." Honor Attendance . ....... 1 H. E. Club . ............ 1-2-3 Chorus .................. 1-2 Palmer Certificate ANNA MIKOSZ College Preparatory "Always the some-a true friend." H. E. Club ......... . . .1-2-3-4 Girls' Sports Club ....... 3-4 Chorus ............... 1-2-3-4 lnterclass Sports ..,.. 1-2-3-4 JOAN MOHNEY College Preparatory "She is ,fair and full of grace." H. E. Club ...... ..... 1 -2-3 T. G. Club . . . ....... .1-2 Orchestra. ..... ...., 1 -2-3-4 "The Swan". . . ..... ...4 Baseball ......... ...., 1 -2 Ag. Club .......... ..... 2 -3 Campfire Girls . .......... 1-2 Girls' Sports Club ........ 2-3 -o PAUL MOHNEY College Preparatory "The thousand lures of sin around him. had no power to slain the purity within." Schoolcrnft ..........., 1-2-3 Interclass Sports . . . . ..... .4 FRANCES MOYER Commercial "Dark hair, dark eyes-not too dark to be deep and I ull of feeling." H. E. Club ................ 1 .Chorus ................., 1-2 T. C. Club ......... . . . 1-2 Pnlmer Certificate JANE PAULI College Preparatory "Of Grace and Genius, Love and Truth-all which can add rl. charm to Qlouthl' Editor-in-Chief of the Annual ................. 4 D. S. Club ....... ....... 2 -3-4 "The Fire Prince" ......... 3 "Once There Was a Princess" ............... 4 Girls' Sports Club ........ 3-4 "The Swan" ............... 4 Interolass Sports ...., 1-2-8-4 Honor Scholarship ..,.... 2-4 BRUNO PETROWSKI General "A patie-nee which the world can neither give nor tulsa away." Az. Club . ................ .2 Chorus ............... 1-2-3-4 Track ................. . . . .2 Interclnss Sports ........ .2-3 Boys' Glee Club ....,..... 1-2 Manual Arts Club .......... 1 ARDEN PULVER Agriculture "To thy duly now and ever." Stock Judging Team .... 1-2-8 Cloak Room ......... .... 4 Az. club ................. 1-s l ill- llL?ga4?Dme9ll - - 20 IRENE MOSHER College Preparatory "She hath a natural, wise sincerity." D. S. Club ............... 1-2 H. E. Club .... .......... 1 -2 Ag. Club ............. 1-2-3-4 Girl Reserves ........... 1-2-3 Cheer Leader ......,..... 1-2 Girls' Sports Club ..... .2-3-4 Track ............ ...... 3 Girls'T.R....... ....3 MERRITT PERKINS General "Some are, and must bc, greater than the -rest." Honor Attendance ....... 2-B Cloak Room ....... .... 4 NEUMAN NEIGHBORS College Preparatory "Ye taughtnmy lips o, single speech, and a thousand silencesl' Track ........... . . .3-4 Varsity Club , ..........., 3-4 Interclass Sports ....... 1-3-4 Chorus ........ . . . . . . .3-4 Cloak Room ...... .... 4 ELEANOR PIERCE College Preparatory "Let us do the work before us, cheerly, bravely, while we may." Orchestra .............. 2-3-4 "Skidding" .............. . .3 "Once There Was a Princess" ...........,.... 4 Annual Staff ......... .... 4 T. C. Club ......... . . . . 1 Honor Attendance . . . . . . .2 Honor Scholarship ....... 2-4 ROBERT REED College Preparatory "It bejits a young man to be modest." Football ............ ...... 3 Interclass Sports . . . . . . .1-2 E cf ll ' 'Wi' ll Il Page Fifteen QSLQGH- 1 C e a enQ,y'75?gF6F'wJlu avg! HESTER RIENSTRA College Preparatory "The light of midnight starry heavens is in those radi- ant eyes." Class President .......... 1-3 Girls' Sports Club ........ 3-4 "Skiddiug" , ........ .... 3 Annual Staff .,... ..... 4 Campfire Girls ...... . . , .1-2 Chorus ..........,.,.. .... 4 "Once There Was a Princess" ....,.,....... 4 Orchestra ..,,...... .... 1 -2 ARTHUR ROBERTS Industrial Uliumziness belongs to those who are contented." Manual Arts Club ..... 1-2-3-4 Boxing ..........,..,.... 3-4 OPAL RYAN Commercial "Softly speak and sweetly smile." T. C. Club ...........,..... 1 Chorus ............. .... 1 Palmer Certificate RAY SIMMONS Agriculture "O, for an engine to keep back all clocks." Judging Team .,...... . 1-2-3 Interclass Sports ......... 2-3 Cloak Room ...,.. .... 4 HELEN STARZEVSKI Commercial "Joy is not in tliifags, it is in us." H. E. Club ..............,.. 1 Chorus ........... .... 1 -2 Interclass Sports . . . . . , .2 T. C. Club , ....... .v.. 1 Girls' Numeral ..... .... 2 Palmer Certificate LLEWELLYN RINGLE College Preparatory "Every difficulty yields to the enterprising." "The Swan" ...,........... 4 Annual Staff ....,.,.....,.. 4 Basketball ,.... ..... 1 -3-4 Football ......... ...... 4 Vnrsitv Club .,.. ...., 3 Class Treasurer .... ..... 4 VIRGINIA ROLL College and Commercial "A soul as full of worth, as void of pride." H. E. Club .,...,.....,... 1-2 Chorus . ,,.......,.,., . . .1-2 Palmer Cerlziflcate DONALD SHEPHERDSON Commercial "I dare do all that becomes a man, who dares do more as none." Football ................. 3-4 Varsity Club ,,.... ..... 3 -4 Manual Arts Club . . . ,1-2-3-4 Cloak Room .........,...., 4 MARION STANARD College Preparatory "To have the greatest bless- ing, a true friend." GEORGE STAUDER Industrial "On their own merits modest men are dumb." 5ll' W lIl'w""' A D Page Sixteen worth." Baseball ............. 1-2-3-4 , Interclass Sports ..... 1-2-3-4 Annual Staff ...........,.. 4 Chorus ...,. ,.... . .2-3-4 Campfire Girls .... ..... 1 -2 T.C.Club... ...... Girls' Sports Club . ....... 3-4 Girls' T. R .......... . , .3 ROBERT WALTERS Agriculture -lit- ll f f l Q -Y i ' JEANETTE STELL N JOHN THEURER General "Men, I neither hate 'nor love th.e1n, you might cull it tolm-ation." H. E. Club ................ 1 Chorus. .......... ..,. 1 -3-4 9 Az. Club .,,........,....,. 2 Palmer Certificate KATHRYN TIMM General "A gentle rlisymaition. is rv- wardcd by true f1'iC1lL18." Baseball ............... 1-3-4 lnterclass Sports ...., 1-2-3-4 Orchestra ........ ..... 1 -2 PAULINE TOBIN College Preparatory "To know har is to know her "I know is fl sin for me to mt and grin." Grain Judlrimr Team ...., 1-2 Livestock Judging . , ..... 3-4 I nterclnss Sports ....... 2-8-4 ARTHUR WEINBERG College Preparatory "Discration of speech is more W than eloquence." Valedictorian ............. 4 Cross Country ...... ..... 8 G? ??L26h-TM " 'f'i' ' C Page Seventeen College Preparatory "His very foot has 'music in it." Band ............,.,. 1-2-3-4 Orchestra , ............. 2-3-4 H1-Y Club ..........,.... 3-4 Honor Attendance ...,..... 1 MARY TIMM College Preparatory "A perfect woman, nobly plu.-rmcd, to warn. to comfort, and com- mend." Orchestra ....... ..... 1 -2 Chorus .... .... ..,.. 2 - 3-4 "The Swan" .... ...... 4 CLARENCE WAGNER Agriculture "Little I ask, my wants are few." ,Judging Team ANNE WATTS College Preparatory "Who said 'hurry'-Live slowly, it ,feels better." "Skxddmg" ....... . .,,..... 3 "Onee There Was a. Prmcess".............. 4 H. E. Club ..,... ......... 1 -2 Chorus ................ 2-3-4 Extempore Speaking ....... 3 T. C. Club ................. 1 Girls' Sports Club .......... 1 Campfire Girls ..... . . . .1-2 J EANNE WEIR. College Preparatory "Pure thoughts sealed in a. heart of courtesy." Laukenau School for Girls . .3 Orchestra ..,........... . . .2 Campfire Girls .,...... , . .1-2 "The Swan". . . . ....4 ngwx L 7,,,,,, ,, Y Y 4 -it ll e - - -e -ee.e ngbfo-more ----1-.a.1-a- uejfo 443' KATHRYN WELLS College Preparatory "Music is the child of prayer, the companion of religion." Annual Staff. ........ .... 3 -4 D. S. Club ...... ..,..... 2 -3-4 "Skidding" .,,............. "Once There Was a ' Princess" ............... 4 Orchestra ...,.,.,.... 1-2-3-4 Campfire Girls ........... 1-2 "The Fire Prince" ......... 3 Honor Scholarship .... .... 4 DORIS WHITED Commercial "For she was just the quiet kind 'whose 'nature 'newer -varies." H. E. Club ........ 1 Chorus ............ .... 1 -4 Palmer Certificate LELA WITHERS College Preparatory "I do but sing because l must, and pipe but as the linnets sing." Annual Staff ............... 4 D. S. Club ,....... ...... 2 -3-4 KATHRYN WHITBECK College Preparatory "ln her 'vary quietness thcrc is cl1arm." D. S. Club ............... 3-4 Chorus ...........,... 1-2-3-4 Interclass Sports ........ . .1 JEANETTE WING Commercial "Little bits of light and laughter have made this pleasant girl." "The Swan" .....,........, 4 Orchestra ........ D. S. Club ....... Honor Attendance ...... Honor Scholarship Girls' Sports Club .... . Palmer Certificate MYRTLE WOOD General 1-3-4 2-3-4 1-3-4 3 ...3 "Just being happy is good 'worlc and true." "The Fire Prince? ......... 3 Cho,-Us ,.,..,,.,,,.,,,,,, 1.2 Chorus ........... , . .... 1-2 Campfire Girls .... .... 1 -2 T. C. Club .......... .... 1 Interclass Sports . . . . . . .2 PAUL YINGER College Preparatory "In action faithful and in . honor clear." South Haven ........... 1-2-3 Track .... ..... .... . . 4 "The Swan".. ... .4 Macaw 4 or o r - - who mr MSN Pa ge Eighteen, Gmail e . ieJH'Z5lfE'6F'e9n- cc Lima I Class Constitution PREAMBLE E, the 1932 graduates of Three Rivers High School, in order to' form a more perfect class, establish justice, insure the domestic tranquility of the teacher, provide for the common defense of school epidemics, de- mote the general warfare between classes and secure the blessings of freedom to ourselves and underclassmen, have ordained and established this Constitution for the students of Three Rivers High School. ARTICLE I Section l. The Legislative powers shall be vested in the class as a whole and a Congress. ' Section 2. The members of Congress are chosen by the class for a period of one year but can be re-elected. There is no age limit but the oflicer must be a member of the class by whom be is chosen. ' Section 3. Congress shall assemble only when important business necessi- tates and in a speciied place. i ARTICLE II Section l. The Executive power shall be vested in a President and his cabinet. At no time will he receive compensation nor be exempt from any classes. Section 2. I-Ie shall have power to appoint any minor committees or of- ficials and also be considered a member of Congress. . Section 3. I-Ie shall, from time to time, give information to the class and recommend necessary measures: he shall receive the class spade when a Junior and present it when a Senior. ' ARTICLE III i Section 1. The Judicial power shall be vested in one Supreme Court, the principal, and an inferior court, the class advisor. They shall hold their offices for an unlimited time and receive various compensation. Section 2. The judicial power shall extend to all cases involving the con- stitutionality of the dances, class cutting, chalk throwingg in cases involving controversies between interclassmen, a teacher and a classman, or between pupils of the same class. Section 3. Acting as attorney general and in conjunction with the Su- preme Court is the class advisor. All cases have a fair trial and the verdict is final: it cannot be appealed. BILL OP RIGHTS CNot to be infringed upon by underclassmenj The Seniors are the only ones who can claim to be dignified but seem slightly unbalanced: can be the first to march out of assemblyg can go up the stairs the wrong way, can spring Worn out jokesg can laugh at own clever' do- ings: can be called out of classes for annual work: can go to sleep in class: can skip physics lab., can read newspapers in assembly: can be tardy with an admitg can be entertained at a prom by class of '33: can give two plays in '32 and re- ceive diplomas at 1932 Commencement. ' Catherine Hanley. 1 QBEUE 'lG'5L53?iQ5X3-'WVTT T TCT E TWT Page Nineteen fw- Gkisu ' E . ameayfc-Qii,9t,, g neifgyy, Salutatory HE CLASS OF 1932 wishes to extend a whole-hearted welcome to each one of you: to our parents, whose efforts have made our graduation possi- ble: to our teachers whose co-operation and helpful advice have meant so much to us: and to our friends who are assembled here tonight. The interest you have taken in our problems and the help you have given us have made it possible for us to surmount great obstacles. Without these incentives for hard work our schooling would have been much less effective or it might even have been im- possible for us to reach this commencement. We fully realize that in this period of economic disorder our education becomes doubly necessary for future success, and success after a-ll is the goal which we all strive to attain. Success to the average person means the acquisition of wisdom and friends. Contentment and friendships are acquired through the medium of wisdom: therefore it is the most important. We can be certain that if we can but find wisdom, everything else worthwhile will come to us. "Seek ye first the good things of the mind," Bacon admonishes us, "and the rest will either be supplied or its loss will not be felt." In other words, truth will not give us wealth, but it will give us freedom. Man continually seeks after this thing called truth but seldom finds it. Many of those who are within easy reach of it do not recognize the opportunity even when it should be most obvious to them. Education helps us in this quest for the real truth, which has been defined as "the best that you can get with your best endeavor, the best that the best men accept." First, in order to derive the greatest benefit from our schooling it is neces- sary to understand the true purpose and meaning of education. Sir William Osler has stated that "The hardest conviction to get into the mind of a beginner is that the education upon which he is engaged, is not a high school course, but a life course, for which the work of a few years under teachers is but a prepara- tion." This preparation is the thing in which we are most interested at the pres- ent time, since some of us have just completed it, and the remainder have reached an important milestone. It is extremely important. Our success or failure in life depends on the training before the start and on our persistence or our staying powers. In most cases this training is more difficult to complete satisfactorily than the development of staying power. With a few people persistence is a natural characteristic, but with the ma- jority it can be acquired only through diligent labor. On the other hand, practi- cally everyone can become a good student with a little application to the task: many can become exceptional students, but the true scholar is also a student of man. As Emerson says, "In every man there is something wherein I may learn of him, and in that I am his pupil." Hence there are two phases to the development of the intellect: The study of books and the study of men. The ideal student divides his time equally be- tween the two. Books give us facts and ideas which need to be tempered or perhaps revised by experience and contact with our fellowmen. The type of training given to the youth of a nation is one of the greatest of the factors which determines the progress and ideals of that nation. In earlier times, instruction in school was, and even to a great extent today, is a process of pumping facts into the passive minds of students, making of the mind merely Qgfau E E be me Sl ll' nsfggfpjg Page Twenty it ' inf-iC'9FcJ'63'Dtre f e S165-Q x S, 651911 a1fLP42:3gr:6N.,9t1 QIQLYQ tt H25 a reservoir for a fixed body of ideas. But today the idea of training the mind for Q clear and logical thinking is gaining more and more headway. Political and economic disturbances, war and all other disorders which tend to delay progress in the world are largely outgrowths of dogmatic faith, set ideas i and petty prejudices. If everyone were trained to look at both sides of a ques- tion and make decisions only after careful consideration, war and other detri- y mental activities would cease to exist. It is entirely conceivable that through the proper use of education a real Utopia could be evolved. Thus We come to the realization that education is a ponderous force, both in the development of men as individuals and in the evolution of nations. It is a matter which deserves deep consideration and thought by everyone. -Wayne Hazen. i A Hunting They Did Go It was three jolly Seniors, an' a hunting they did go: An' they hunted an' they hullo'cl an' they blew their horns also, Look ye there! They hunted an' they hullo'd an' the first thing they did find l Was a lighted lamp-post in a street, an' that they left behind, Look ye there! One said it was a lamp-post. but another one said "Nayg j It's only Mr. Pratt turned to a photo-'lectric ray." Look ye there! They hunted an' they hullo'd, an' the next thing they did see l Was an owl both wise an' stately, a sitting on a tree. Look ye there! . One said it was a stately owl, another one said "Nayg i It's poor Miss Hangsterfer gone mad: her staff has run away." l Look ye there! i They hunted an' they hullo'd 'til they saw a raging flood j Which turned into a lily when a play-cast acted good. Look ye there! One said 'twas a torrent. but another one said "Nay: It's just Miss Lillian Comar a-directing of a play." I Look ye there! They hunted an' they hullo'd, an' the next thing they did spy Was a flock of quite insane white geese a flying in the sky. Look ye there! One said it was a flock of geese, but another one said "Nayg It's just a bunch of Seniors on a summer holiday!" Look ye there! M uriel J ackson. - Page Twenty-Ona .fe-M u .... nQ,:ffc9ibC57!e9ls BGL? 3 . Valedictory Citizens, fellow students, faculty and members of the school board: Tonight marks the passing of the first milestone in the lives of the class of 1931-32 of the Three Rivers High School: it marks the attainment of the first goal in the education of this group with otherl and higher heights of ac- complishment to come. This goal has not been reached through the efforts of the students alone but with the unstinted co-operation of our teachers and the unselfish sacrifice of our parents whose help will probably never be appreciated at its full worth. Our class has been an average one. It has disregarded rules and been disci- plined: it has not at all times made the most of its opportunities: it has undoubt- edly failed to realize to the fullest extent the advantages it has enjoyed. On the other hand its members have enjoyed a close companionship that will not soon be forgotten. They have entered into the various activities of the school: they have toiled scholastically and strived on the athletic field. Tonight probably assembled for the last time as a whole, tomorrow the members of this group will be scattered. The accomplishments of this group as a unit should be succeeded by the attainments of its individuals. For the mind should not be permitted to grow dull: the body, inactive. The stationary condition is fatal-it leads to indiffer- ence and indifference does not produce success. With every milestone passed the ultimate goal should be placed higher. Hard khocks should not cause dis- couragement, they should increase the incentive to succeed. With the unlimited opportunities offered in the political, economic, com- mercial, scientific, and business fields there should be some worthwhile position in his chosen work for everyone. From this class may come eloquent orators. scientific geniuses, talented men of literature, high-minded statesmen, or organ- izers of huge projects. Success, like many of the things that count most in life, does not come unbidden. To become truly great, one must combine within himself the qualities of faith, a capacity for leadership, tolerance, a spirit of co-operation, self-reliance, individuality, courage, and above all, lofty ideals. As Carl Schurz has beautifully expressed:- "Ideals are like stars, you will not succeed in touching them with your hands, but like the seafaring man on the desert of waters, you must choose them as your guides, and following them, you reach your destiny." Success in the eyes of the world, is attained by few, but there is another part to play in the scheme of things, a part which also merits regard-they part of a helper. Few can succeed without the aid of others. The world has need of both. And now as we leave-none of us without some small regret-the school that has fostered us for six eventful years in our quest for knowledge, each one of us taking his star for his guide, we bid you all a fond farewell. Arthur Weinberg. G? 5' Qlgan 1l l1 4 c r in Page Twenty-Two R190 nQJ2QtmggfR,90 ne,'ffE-bfi! Vingt Ans Apres UDDENLY being seized with the spirit of prophecy, I take my pen in hand to record those things which will be revealed unto me. A darkness comes over my sight, I reel, then all is clear, and I lind myself alone on a high mountain top, from whence I can look into the buildings of the city below. It is morning. I look into the private office of a prosperous concern, and I see a familiar Hgure. Jeanette Wing. She is rapidly dictating to a secretary. On her door are the printed words "General Manager." Then I look into a little country schoolhouse and see Paul Yinger, the poor pedagogue. I am disappoint- ed, I thought he was going to be a cow. From thence I look into an artist's studio. There I see Anthony Dukette and Muriel Jackson, entertaining a group of greasy Bohemians with a puppet show, while from a window I gaze into a studio across the way and behold Catherine Hanley toiling alone at a stocking advertisement. A strange confusion meets my ears and looking into a room above, I ind Ora B. DeVil- Picrce, Paul Hoover. Steven broadcasting over the radio. schoolgirl complexions. Not life, perhaps. Then my sight where I ind several familiar ice Ihrig, who is administer- Mrs. Gerald Bowersox fthe side the hospital I see Kath- tion Army uniform, distrib- to the unemployed. Next to biss, Irene Mosher, Eleanor Bonfoey, and yes, Mr. Peeke, The ladies have retained their so the boys. Too much night wanders to a large hospital. people. Among these are Al- ing a dose of castor oil to former Joan Mohneyj Out- ryn Wells, dressed in Salva- uting doughnuts and coffee the hospital is a church Cfor convenience perhapsj and I look in. There I find Jane Pauli, directing a group of squirming children in the art of organing. It is done wholesale now, you know. Next I gaze into a Carnegie Library, and whom should I behold but Viv- ian Meredith, presiding at the desk, while Pauline Tobin and Hester Rienstra discuss with her the relative merits of various physical education books. As I watch this scene, enters the famous football coach of Notre Dame, Bob Mack, who soon settles the discussion. As I look into the street again, I see 'Arthur Weinberg entering the State Capitol opposite. He is now Governor of the State. Dr. Gordon Behrentz comes riding down the street-on his way to the home of a patient no doubt. Next I look into an Old Maids' Home and find 'Elizabeth Malcolm, Leona Huey and-horrors!-myself, sewing contentedly on patch- work quilts. I hasten' to turn my gaze in another direction and find myself looking into the Sanctum Sanctorum of an experimental chemistry laboratory. And what to my wondering eyes should appear but Merritt Perkins, the second Einstein, aiding Llewellyn Ringle and Robert Reed in their experiment to secure a microscope to make atoms visible, while Secretary of Navy, Wayne Hazen, looks on. Back on the street I find Attorney John Theurer hastening to keep an appointment with the banker, Harold Jackson. Next I visit an apartment- house and Hnd the landlady, Virginia Roll, getting a roll of her own by bam- boozling the boarders. In a home nearby I find Lela Wortinger QWithersj , the happy housewife, making biscuits heavy enough to sink a ship. I see all our other classmates in roles of varied nature, the Meade girls dancing in. a cabaret, some of the girls stenographers, and the strange part is that we are all successful. Marjorie Crabbe. I 'nge Twenty!-Tltrce Page Tll5f"I'lf1l-FOIL7' If-A A ' 1 R f - .' f A x ww K lx L+' xx w w Q X 1 ' l'1-AUP ' , ,J W .' 'Q' 'rw W 'X ,, s , w ill Q HQ B 1 2-ikezif fjlx L. f X ,f l X ,Y V2 Z X X . 1,21 J' '- X. , J. N fl' X . I. . I-gE'jAK bb VI, ' aj +"w f' fy f any X wf fbflf - 2 .,- .Vx iwlkfxy N if i v.-Q 21v,.:'-,L- - ' -lA,5 -,Jaw xx ' .fix xx ,Ax N I 1 ' X , .la tn, I r V gs 5 . X x XA F -f xi we f , X I A x NM1 NLF? "xt X- ff' ffl'-V lf?"-3-x,2il"'7l 9 Sm - X f W frm, 4 L 'Y k Q 'r ' FQ: 7' - - H fx D -,,l.isZ ' .f ' X k ' N ' 'N - fpL"E Q MJ "J 2,f:a'WCC'fzr4m, .- w X J-lpff 7W'+1 i,4 j.i::f I X . Y A Xxvml - ,, N VI x . , j-i 2: A -1-I it V! . 1 1 X . M xffx- 1 v' - ,'. HY sl rv' X , ' f:.4 "f4 ,'ILiJ: x 1 , Sf' ' ' +, 'W f in f: il 'A x':g:s:.:,'59xQiX !jff I In xii gwxx HI 'lag' 3 I-Lf lit I I W' Fx Mblk X, i "I 'b " :I .. w M V ' R If ,f I 1 , fx- .gj 1 1 ski! A., " ,. M 'V "1 'm l A I J 7 fur' alla NRQQQIA g 11 Wlfhe Fire Princes, PRESENTED APRIL 15, 1931 BY THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR, MRS. J. S. FRANCE TPIE music and art students received invaluable experience in this production. The paramount feature, perhaps, is the fact that all the scenery and cos- tumes Were designed and made by the students. The scenery, which was de- signed by Muriel Jackson, typiiied a king's summer palace in Pantouflia. A great deal of study was required of Anthony Dukette to design the unique cos- tumes. Large, mixed choruses and clever dances were frequently in the scenes, making "The Eire Prince" in its entirety, the most spectacular production ever given on this stae. Those from our class who had solo parts were: Lela Withers, Ora B. De- Vilbiss, Jane Pauli, Kathryn Wells, Anthony Dukette and Paul Hoover. , 1 is yflggfaut E le?xf3j3'-,fGM'ar t A E A : Page Twenty-Sim NTtgSi9u -nQ,33?5'gf:i,9rit t t t11 D. St M, C. President .....,...... ....... J ane Pauli Secretary and Treasurer. . . .... Kathryn Wells Librarian .........., ...., F rances Tessin Director .... , . . ...... . . .Mrs. J. S. France N outstanding. worthwhile, school activity-the girls' glee club. "The most interest in the best music"-their aim. It is a self-supporting organ- ization, with the policy "to always be of service" by singing at many public functions and private entertainments. Its ability and earnest endeavor was proved by the award of lirst place in both the district and state contests for class B schools. This year there was' no state contest. However, the club sang for many assembly programs and participated in the National Music Week Festival. Other public appearances were: The Mothers' Day program at the Methodist Episco- pal and the Presbyterian churches: patriotic program at the Baptist church: Par- ent Teachers' convention: Riviera Theatre and the Art Exhibit. The Senior girls in the club are: Jane Pauli, Kathryn Wells, Catherine Hanley, Jeannette Wing, Kathryn Whitbeck, Eileen Gay, Muriel Jackson, Lela Withers, Marjorie Crabbe, and Ora B. DeVilbiss. S lI u ur TT E -new Page Twenty-Seven M 9llf i1e:?Q5hCf3Fi.9n on -iezranya T., R. H, S. Band President ........ . .... .... S teven Bonfoey Sec'y., Treas. . Drum Major .... Ass't. Director Director .........,............ . Robert Thorn Gordon Mahana . . . Arthur May Raymond Peeke THIS self-supporting musical organization of fifty members backs all school Citizens Military Training ter last summer and. our had charge. This fall they took county contest at the St. their other fall appearances Camp Band at Camp Cus- band director, Capt. Peeke, second place in the Tri- Joseph county fair. Among was the significant part taken in the Armistice Day appeared at the Citizens athletics by playing and marching. Our band formed the nucleus for the program. In the spring they Reconstruction Mass Meet- ing, Decoration Day program and the Blossom Festival at Benton Harbor. They are always available for assembly programs and prove their adequateness for the occasions. Senior boys in the band are: Arthur May, XVayne Hazen, Leo I-Iillyer, Harold Jackson, John Cunkle, Robert Howard, Paul Hoover, Steven Bonfoey, John Theurer, and Robert Mack. 5 gym 1 f0ch'ol: A- Il Page Taventy-Eight cms.. 1Q,:fafllffewc9f- an C TD time uSlciclding9l PRESENTED DEC. 10, 1930 DIRECTED BY MISS LUCILE SHAEER THE class of '32 undertook its iirst big enterprise, presenting the three-act comedy, "Skidding" by Auronia Rouveral, to a large, appreciative audience. Robert Mack splendidly portrayed a very diflicult character part. Eleanor Pierce received applause on a lengthy monologue containing bits of philosophy. Hester Rienstra played the part of the mother exceptionally well and seems to have made popular the line "Home! To my mother!" Catherine Hanley and Harold Jackson were ideal in portraying the young people of college age. CAST OF CHARACTERS Aunt Milly . . . .......,,............... .... E leanor Pierce Andy ...... . . .Steven Bonfoey Mrs. Hardy .....,... .... H ester Rienstra Judge Hardy .....,.,... ..... R obert Mack Estelle Hardy Campbell . . . ........ Eileen Gay Marian Hardy ........ . . .Catherine Hanley Wayne Trenton III .... . . .Harold Jackson Myra Hardy Wilcox ,... .... K athryn Wells Mr. Stubbins ......., .... R alph Leisher :S Q9 f' . ifhyala flgig- ll Y ll Page Twenty-Niue Gilt' was f a 1Q,'Q,i,QQ,9li n 4: l l P l l The 1IumorfSemor Prom May 20, 1931 l X A I HO wouldn't be a fish for an evening under the deep blue sea? Two hundred and thirty-seven Juniors, Seniors, Faculty and School Board members responded to the invitations extended by Pauline Tobin in behalf of the Junior class, to spend a few hours in a deep-sea garden amidst many strange lish brought to the scene by Lela Withers and her committee. Hand-tinted, block-printed "mermaid" programs and "fishy" favors aided in making the tables very attractive. Catherine Hanley and her committee were responsible for this feature. "Sea Fare" for the evening consisted of such delicacies as "Chipped Coral Reef," "Seaweed," "Whitecaps," "Sea Biscuit," "Lily Pads," "Frozen Sea Deep," "Mermaids Tears," "Flying Fish," and "Storm Nector from the Sea 4: yfzggzaif en6a-if3f'IfQJ'GD1r 1l Page Thirty BQRCGJYS'-.9lu 'lQ,DQgf:C5F'g9if - n King's Cellar." Nina Riegle and Edna Lincoln were aided in serving the ban- quet by Miss Lois Crane and a group of diligent Sophomores. Music during the banquet was rendered by the Honolulu players from Kalamazoo. "Wave Sounds" Cprogramj procured by Kathryn Wells as follows: "Nep- tune" CAnthony Dukettej: "Tides" fl-Iester Rienstra, President of Junior classj 3 "Schools of Fishes" CPorrest Tobin, President of Senior classj 3 "Deep Sea Music" fMrs. Fosterl 3 "Queer Fish I Have Met" QMr. Horstj 3 and "Drift- wood" CMr. Rix.j While the deep-sea garden was being cleared for dancing, a one-act play, "The Artist" was presented in the auditorium by the Western State Teachers College players. I Cards and dancing followed in the sea garden. Jane Pauli, music chair- man. obtained Warren "Skinny" Byrum's ten piece orchestra for dancing. Undoubtedly, the success of this gala fete is largely due to Miss Carrie Stoeri, class advisor, for her skillful management and leadership, and to her "colleague," Hester Rienstra, general chairman. Mr. Horst Ctelling of his experience in the warj: "Yes, indeed, all the time the battle was raging I was right where the shells were thickest!" Paul Yinger: "What a herog and where was that?" Mr. Horst: "That was a hole in the middle of the ammunition dump." "Kat" W.: "Do you like Chopin?" K. Whitbeck: "No, I get tired walking from store to store." Eddie B.: "I'1l bet you were mad when you caught that skunk." L. Ringle: "You betg I was highly incensed." Advice to Damsels:-Never let a fool kiss you and never let a kiss fool you. If you want to remember things, tie a string around your finger. If you want to forget things, tie a rope around your neck. A scientific expert now comes forward with the claim that fish kill mos- quitoes. But who wants to take a fish to bed with him? Page Thi-rty-0'n.e 6? yiuqyau xn nr insfggg it We 3190, bee-een 1r1e,3Fr5E?fSN..9cK egg mem 66Onee There Was a Princess" l PRESENTED NOV. 18, 1931 DIRECTED BY MISS LILLIAN COMAR A PERFORMANCE parallel to that of professionals was given to a capacity house by the Seniors as their first Senior play. Anna Watts, in the prologue, by her clever interpretation of an Italian princess, assured everyone of a iine performance following. Kathryn Wells played the part of a mischievous child, adding comedy to the otherwise serious play. Marjorie Crabbe was outstanding in a diflicult character portrayal of a maiden aunt. Ora B. DeVilbiss and Paul Yinger played well the parts of elder- ly parents. The plot centered around Catherine Hanley and Anthony Dukette. CAST The Princess .,.., ,.....,. C atherinc Hanley Signor Moroni .... . . . . . .,.. Donald Gard The Old Princess . . . . . rAnna Watts Kate Boyd ,,... . . .Ora B. DeVilbiss Hazel Boyd ...... .,,. K athryn Wells Mrs. Purrington. . . . 4Hester Rienstra Mrs. Seavor ..,... . . .Eleanor Pierce Ruby Boyd ....,. ..... ..,. J a ne Pauli Aunt Meta Trimble . Marjorie Crabbe Joe Boyd .....,.... ..., P aul Yinger Phil Lennox ...... . . .Anthony Dukette Milton D'Arcy .... . . .Harold Jackson Josephine ........ ..... A lice Ihrig 5: Q9 QJZGI' T T itU "t Cid t C "9 Page Thirty-Two Q CaTi9u 4lL:'Qtg:f?290. C nQ7fE 5 , Wlfhe Swan" BY FERENC MOLNAR PRESENTED JUNE 7, 1932 DIRECTOR, LILLIAN A. COMAR THE plot of "The Swan" is so simple that it is hardly more than a back- ground for the clever lines, flashing wit, and delicate pathos. Ferenc Molnar was awarded the cross of the Legion of Honor for the French production. The most striking scene in this play was the lavish banquet scene in the ancient castle. The outstanding characters were: Eileen Gay as Beatrice, the princess: Paul Yinger as the royal tutor: Llewellyn Ringle as the understanding Reverend Father: Jeannette Wing as the heroine: Wayne Hazen as the hero, and Marjorie Crabbe as the comedian. CAST Dr. Agi .... ...... ........ P a ul Yinger George ....... .... C atherine Hanley Arsene .....,.,. ..... J oan Mohney Princess Beatrice . . . ...... Eileen Gay Alexandra ........ . . . . . Jeannette Wing Father Hyacinth . . . .... Llewellyn Ringle Symphorosa ...... . . .Marjorie Crabbe Prince Albert ...... ...... W ayne Hazen Colonel Wunderlich. . , . ..... Gordon Behrentz Count Lutzen ...... ..,. D onald Shepherdson Caesar ......,....... ......... R obert Mack Maid ................ .... O ra B. DeVilbiss Princess Maria Dominica . . . ..........., Jane Pauli ' Countess Erdely ...... ............ M uriel Jackson l Ladies-in-waiting .... . . . Jieanne Weir, Mary Timm Alfred .......... ............. M erritt Perkins Lackeys ........ . . .Robert Reed, Kenward Haas Hussars .... .... P aul Hoover, Leo Hillyer -1 WISH 3 ll no -gf H on m e ron6',:,EgylN Page Thirty-Tlwce Q33- 1 N??i9Ir - JQQQiI'WC:e9IJ, A 11 :- , .,., ,n,,.. ,..- -. Y, ., ' 1 V 2 - A x u..n J ,.,, -.1 V 'XY Ui if +9 A I f 3 fwfr Q43 "M .A ,..,,.i P,-fw 1 Ln..- .- A ' - - "'--:tee-1: , ' il' " ju --f WHA 9550 ,H "',"i,, , .1 ...... I . fx? - , ,...T,-f 'W fu -A ne'aQ,'1Qvpfar-- - Page-Thirty-Four .WLM n - --ne,y"'fEJ'gl5'6F'w.9n r al if ,,,,r- Football '3l 'DURING the football season of '31, Three Rivers won the distinction of having one of the cleanest teams in the Little Five Conference. One of the best games of the season was with the Coldwater team, an outstanding one in the state, the game ending 8 to O. Perhaps the biggest thriller was the game with Dowagiac ending 14 to 13. Coach "Casey" Voorhees worked diligently and patiently with line ma- terial. though rather light. Next year shows great promise as the team loses only livemen, these places being easily filled by the second string men of this year. Under classmen who Won letters are: Lewis, Krueger, Clymer, Cross, Hagenbuch. Briggs, Huffstetter, Papulski, Naylor, Thompson, and Miller. Senior boys awarded letters are: "Captain" Howard, Mack, Shepherdson. and Ringle. U "1" "' Z 3 l Il Page Tltirty-Five At- Eligmat AAA to 4 .r.JQ,DfFZa3ilvR.,9tm iueliiyxk Basketball THE basketball team of this season played hard, clean games against all op- ponents, and is to be congratulated on its sportsmanship. Coach Voorhees sent his hard working team to the regional tournament at Sturgis to play against Dowagiac. Only two men will he lost by graduation, leaving an all-veteran team for next year. The teams were managed by Hugh Van Horn and Allen Cook. The boys acted as hosts for the District Tournament held in our line gym- nasium, entertaining hundreds of out-of-town fans and athletes. The men who received letters are: "Captain" Briggs, Krueger, B. Buck, Clymer, Hagenbuch, and Lewis. The Seniors receiving letters are: Gordon Behrentz and Llewellyn Ringle. gfuqggau 'l l' c ll Page Tlzirty-Six u . Q-i1Q,QlL:qTgl:3'g9E n Track t THIS year's track team has been very successful. Several boys on the team have broken the school record: namely, broadjump, 21 feet 6 inches, taken by Wheeler: and the polevault, ll feet by Yinger. Vlheeler is the high point man this year. In distance, Bob Kemmerling in the 440 yard dash won first in the State meet and promises to be a big asset to the team next year. Also "Captain" Thompson, the half mile man. The team was outfitted in new suits this year, the money being raised by boxing tournaments and popular subscription. ' Three Rivers was quite successful in the Conference meet at Dowagiac and in the State meet. It is likely that Three Rivers will Win the annual track meet at Centerville for the entire county. ' Three stars on the team are Seniors, namely, Robert Mack, Paul Yinger, and Paul Mohney. yan n u W-4-+-R411 Page Thirty-Seven 1 C:Ri90- lQ,'49t5L'lk,9l?-f, .- - MK-D gs: Q- :ig 6 'Q T 5: . . ,sw ,- 1 7 1' ... ' ITL 1 42 . T xi' zaggrztxv v Y 1 1 'a g' Q Y I 1- '... ' xx" ff? f7 .5- Vu' I I A 'JI -' . 'X 7 Q C 6 . - C9 635590 A 'NGK-QQAEQMEIV -pgggrjg Page Tlzirty-Eight 4: ESNCBSLS-Ju +.-1Q,y'QNMgFW'u,9u - v -w nQQ2E Q . Exit' . ,-' P .e'1fa5'f5e!,5'5f3 1 bo ta g 61 E 3542 1 J17 QKSII '!l U" ' intl? 116233 Page Th irty-Nine .4 -tl Sihgiaef - 1es'Q,i,R.9r,L7rc Kc MQW Senior Girls' lrrterelass Basketball ' I 'HE Senior Girls' Interclass basketball season proved to be a success in the interest that was shown. The girls participated in . soccer ball, pin ball, and vol- with the four upper classes. Henry P. Barrows School ley ball were played in the form regular teams because of several other sports, namely: ley ball. Games were played Soccer ball was played on the ground and pin ball and vol- gym. The girls were able to the large number out. TEAM Pauline Tobin . . . ........ ..... F orward Jane Pauli ............ .... F orward Eileen Gay .............. .... .... G u ard Vivian Meredith CCaptainj . . ........... Guard Mildred Christner ........ .... R unning Center Irene Mosher .......... ............... .......... J u mp SUBSTITUTES Anna Mikosz, Helen Bunn, Hester Rienstra, Mary Hubbard, Dora Foust. 94314 P X It P- P nc,-'mgC3j!LQL4'aur T'-' T - cHc+c neggk Page Forty All Sslgmeu 4 gg g ,ne,:'L453,,i,ma9n neffb 3 Girls' Baseball Team THE Three Rivers girls for several years have walked away with the base- ball game held' at Centerville on Fair day, this year defeating the Sturgis team 26 to 11. Sturgis, however, sent a good team against them, but Three Rivers took the lead in the beginning and kept it. The girls also have a fine record in track in which they participate each year on Field Day at Centerville. Track Squad and Baseball Squad. Evelyn Sodeman Helen Bunn Marjorie Ringle Marie Houghtaling Hallie Burgett Mildred Christner Vivian Meredith Frances Tessin Mary Dailey Jane Pauli Evelyn Timm Fern Warner Lodgia Starzevski Mary XVarner Ruby May Margarite Boise Irene Mosher Pauline Tobin Mary Dailey, Senior girl, won first in the Running Broadjump, the Hop- step and Jump, and the Fifty yard dash. Other second and third places were Won by Three Rivers girls. ws.. -a a aiaermassi- laik Page Forty-One ff"-. NEXT HOME user www 'QL ,L .. Page Forty-Two arf SS!?li9u e e .IlQ,.y"f!QEFv6Fia9u. u Chronology SEPTEMBER The beginning of the school year shows the new Senior class delightfully grown-up under its new responsibilities and dignity. How long this unusual sedatcness will last remains to be seen. Some of the boys already appear to be breaking under the strain of no longer being able to throw paper-wads and to chew gum. By the way, that reminds me of the lovely jar of assorted gum that Mr. Carrick showed us the other day, saying that it came from the assembly room seats. They didn't get it all, either, because I found some on one seat that looked like it had been there since the beginning of time. e The speeches Miss Hangsterfer requires us to make in English class are our greatest worry at present. Some of our stouter girls are becoming quite thin under the strain. And think how hard it is on us who have no superfluous weight! I hardly cast a shadow now. The Fair came this month with its usual holiday. Of course, T. R. was well represented in sporting events. Mary Dailey, a Senior, won more laurels for herself and the School. ' OCTOBER Now, we are solidly settled to the old grind and have come through our first six weeks tests of the year battered but alive. With this month came the Senior class election and we girls showed what poor politicians we are by allow- ing the boys to capture all the oflicial positions, NOVEMBER Now that there is THE DEPRESSION hanging over our heads. we don't know whether or not We of any sort. We will do book on the 33500 that the spend. Of course, with the we cannot expect to have haven't had much time to of the Senior play, "Once can put out a class book our best to put out a year school board allows us to boys controlling the class many parties. However, we think about parties because There Was a Princess" which we put on this month. It was quite a big success, and we now have 3- in our class treasur y. DECEMBER The depression has had one good? effect, anyway-Since we cannot afford lyceum programs this year, the teachers are entertaining. during our Friday assemblies by giving us stories of their adventures. And who could ask more or less? December always means Christmas, and the Senior class, as usual, had charge of the Christmas program. which consisted of a lovely playlet telling the story of "The Birth of Christ." Several Seniors are participating in an essay contest which means a trip to Washington, D. C., for the Winner. Oh Yeah? JANUARY We have safely passed the dreaded semester examinations, and are now entering upon our second semester as the leaders of the school. During exam- inations, we Seniors took our intelligence test which used up the little remaining wit we had left from our examinations. VJe hope the results will not be too revealing. Qyfbll r:ss'1GXex'auW E EW- - as new Page Forty-Tlwec -M u 7 .. m Tmgiiian nQ7fE FEBRUARY This month We begin the celebration of the bicentennial of Washington's birthday. I predict Washington programs for months to come, It's no use for us to study any more. The Valedictorian and Salutatorian have been selected. Arthur Weinberg and Wayne Hazen have the honors. It looks as though the boys aren't satisfied with capturing the class orfiicerships, but they must also take the scholastic honors. MARCH At last came that long looked-for event-spring vacation. That is-it's called vacation, but our parents frequently take advantage of the opportunity to get us to help with the spring cleaning. The results of the intelligence test have raised some of us in our estimation, while others of us have been "taken down a peg!" We are depressed this year in more ways than one. We are winning prac- tically no athletic honors, and the music clubs are not participating in the usual contest. APRIL The Shakespearean program-participated in by many of our prominent Seniors-caused a great deal of merriment with the skull throwing and all. One teacher back-stage Cduring a critical moment of one scenej even knocked down an "imported" tree. Mr. Poster's track men collected enough small change during an assembly program to buy new track suits for the team. Therefore, to show its gratitude, the team paraded for us and did a few clever stunts. The winners, Paul Yinger and Evelyn Schultz, have been awarded watches for their prohibition essays. Now they believe in Santa Claus. MAY 6, 1932 The annual Art Exhibit was held this month in the auditorium and there were some very artistic works done by our Seniors. And our two most artistic artists, Muriel Jackson and Anthony Dukette, aided by our class president, Cior- don Behrentz, put on a marvelously clever puppet show, telling the story of Bluebeard and his seventh wife. Mrs. France superintended a line musicale during music week. The Seniors are preparing for their last play, which is entitled "The Swan." Preparations for the Junior-Senior Promenade are being rushed. We Sen- iors aren't coming prepared for anything as the Juniors have been very secretive. However, we shall come prepared to eat. Field Day comes this month which means a chance to catch up on some lost sleep. Baccalaureate will be held Sunday, June 5, and all Seniors will of course be present. The Senior play will be given June 7, and we all hope it will bring us enough to pay for our Senior Year Book Qwhich is going into print right away.j Commencement is June 9, and then our class will be disbanded, and we will at last be forced to look at the serious side of life, "Every cloud has a. sil- ver lining" so they say, and I believe it because we get out of school a week early -due to the depression, I think. It has been a wonderful year, all in all, and it is with great regret that we bid farewell to the school, and to the teachers who have taught us for so long. gfall IGNLQQ,-I9-Kilim m mmm c o Il6",3Q Page Forty-Four Nkfaiiisu 1e,v'QA34al5'liW'e,9u la. g g gg g - - -.IIQPYQM I Jokes B. Howard Creading the ending of a letterj: "- so au revoir, auf wiedersehn, adios, and carbolic acid-" L. Hillyer: "What's the matter with her, can't she speak English?" B. H.: "Those words mean goodbye in different languages." L. H.: "Yeah, but what's the carbolic acid there for?" B. H.: "Oh, that's goodbye in any language." Jane P.: "Did you hear about Jeanne paying live dollars for that little handkerchief she's carrying?" Pauline T.: "Gee, that's a lot to blow in!" "Kat" Wells: "Parcy, if you had two hundred dollars would you give me one hundred of it?" "Parcy" Hanley: "Sure I would." K. VJ.: "And if you had two candy bars would you give me one of them?" P. H.: "Now, Kathryn, you know I have two candy bars." Mr. Pratt, to physics class: "Class: here I've taught you everything I know and still you don't know anything!" M. Perkins Cwistfullyj : "Is there an opening here for an energetic young man?" Business Man: "Yes, and close it as you go out!" E. Lincoln: "Fashions may come and go, but there's always a demand for cosmetics." G. Markle: "Yes, women can't go wan forever." Wayne I-I.: "Did you know that that big Italian lighter has to have a bed over seven feet long?" Arthur W.: "Say, that's a lot of bunk." Miss Crane, instructing her pupils how to serve at dinner: "You must remember always to serve from the left and take the plates from the right. Is that clear?" Anna W.: "What's the matter, superstitious or something?" Bill W.: "I am not thin-skinned, I'm the first to laugh at my own fool- ishnessf' Eileen: "My, what a merry life you must lead!" afeafa-1 iwewi: fl: - is-is Page Forty-Five 5iuQ3,,,f'au e :n u c ll HM N300 g -1eaa'F5QilvWia9rf:.a.: . a vmeifrgrfgxjli Harold J. fdancingj : "I can't keep my mind off of you." Lillian M.: "Well, at least keep your feet off." If Adam came back to earth the only thing he'd recognize would be the jokes. For Anthony Cwho is beginning to thinkj : He lives upon a pedestal,- A pedestal quite high, Or maybe it's a flagpole,- At least, it's near the sky: And there he looks with scornful eyes On other lads half-grown And thinks they're quite the crudest that The world has ever known: But We have hopes for this bright child, This precious jelly bean, And think he will recover when He outgrows seventeen. A parasite is the large, loutish-looking football player who piles on top of the other twenty-one men for effect, after the play is complete. Jeannette W.: "I hear your friend had his left side cut off by a train: is he now?" Hester R.: "Oh, he's all right!" how A theatre is always a sad place because the boxes are in tiers. Margy Crabbe: "After all, my dear, she's only a suicide blonde." Miss Hangsterfer: "Suicide Blonde?" M. C.: "Yes, dyed by her own hand!" The most dangerous part about an auto is the "Nut" that holds the steer- ing wheel. Ora B.: "It's really very easy to classify the talkies. There are only two kinds." Bob M.: "Yeah?" Ora B.: "Yes, if the characters break all the furniture, it's a comedy, If they break the Ten Commandments, it's a drama." Gordon B.: "I can't understand why Jeanne doesn't take an interest in me. Doesn't a girl like a man with a future ahead of him?" Tony: "Sometimes: but my advice would be to try her with a present behind you." Page Forty-Six 5 l 5 e 1Qi1'fE5fig5F19i' - C or nepigg as 6? Baby Pietures Edward Boeschenstein Vivian Meredith Marian King Marjorie Guthrie Lela Johnson Eleanor Pierce Neumon Neighbors Myrtle XVood Catherine Hanley Constance Kaiser Morris Carpenter Betty Crego Harold Birkhold Donald Shepherdson Irene Mosher Bruno Petrowski Allan Cook Robert Mack Josephine Barnes Leo Hillyer Joan Mohney Paul Hoover Arden Pulver Jeanne Weir Kathryn Timm Betty Johnson Helen Starzevski Leona Huey Eunice Bullock John Theurer L WX fi a s ' 2. . -E Donald Gard Katherine Whitbeck Paul Mohney Mary Timm Jeannette Wing Dora Eoust Edna Lincoln Ray Simmons Paul Yinger Kathryn Wells Emerson DeLong Helen Bunn Robert Howard Arlene Bernhardt Harriet Luse Virginia Roll Lela Withers Pauline Tobin Merritt Perkins Alice LeMunyon Alice Ihrig Alan Avery Opal Ryan Anne Mikosz Elizabeth Malcolm Claribelle Major VV alter Horst Jane Pauli Arthur May Bill and Frances Moyer G? Q0 CrQ,,"90 !I?N Il' H ngggg Page Forty-Seven 0190 I1Q,'!f'c31g.6F'e9tA G I C l WIFE 1 'K PHOTOGRAPHY BY H. C, PETZOLD THREE RIVERS, MICHIGAN ENGRAVING BY PONTIAC ENGRAVING AND ELECTROTYPE CO. 812 WEST VAN BUREN STREET CHICAGO. ILLINOIS PRINTING BY THE THREE RIVERS PRESS THREE RIVERS, MICHIGAN ' ning P YY? P.,6f,1Q,p,m.f .QQEEN Page F'ort21-Eight 'n ., - 'f'-9 1 . "- '-' ,I H--1 . gh 1?-. . ., . v . . ,L 'r J f ,A I 3 D


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