Texas Christian University - Horned Frog Yearbook (Fort Worth, TX)

 - Class of 1950

Page 1 of 376

 

Texas Christian University - Horned Frog Yearbook (Fort Worth, TX) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1950 Edition, Texas Christian University - Horned Frog Yearbook (Fort Worth, TX) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1950 Edition, Texas Christian University - Horned Frog Yearbook (Fort Worth, TX) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 376 of the 1950 volume:

I I - 1 I I I In . f l i 7:74 "n.,1.d. in .. .. . 4. 4n...9i,. 1...:, .V .,,wg,,. , 67 MM K5 S , F W. 1 if-1 rim' mlhgi w r p 1 I95II HUIIIIEII FIIIIII I padcfzal I MM. lffaadqn .fqncfz EDITOR BUSINESS MANAGER Nancy Kiki? ASSOC-IATE EDITOR PAUL O. RIDINGS, Faculty Advisor DOROTHY ADLER, CHUCK BROCK, C. W. CARPENTER, BOB DAVIS BOB MAYFIELD, WALTER WILLIAMS Staff Photographers Class and Faculty Photos by ORGAINS STUDIO Favorites by AL PANZERA Queens by RILDA SMITH Depurtmentals by TRI-FOTO STUDIOS Athletics by CAMERA CRAFT STUDIOS and AL PANZERA Engraving by SOUTHWESTERN ENGRAVING COMPANY Printing by STAFFORD-LOWDON Covers by Universal One UITUITS NEITE ,, ---gglwl P. 0, Box 305 I-Kos Y. C. U. Sldtlon l'urlWvn.h.Tuu QHicia1'Studon!Publication I Texas Christian University EDITOR'S MESSAGE I THE STAFF OF THE 1950 HORNED FRG! HAS CG1PLE'I'E!J THEIR I JOB AND ANOTHER EDITION OF THE ANNUAL CAN TAKE ITS PLACE ON SHELVES AT HCHE ....... . . . TO THE STAFF, THE EDITOR SAYS THANK! FOR THE LONG HOURS OF UNSACRIFICING WORK ..... .TO THE ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY, THANK AGAIN FOR COOPERATION, WITHOUT WHICH THIS HISTORY COULD NOT HAVE BEEN WRITTEN. ...... . . .TO THE PRINTERS AND ENGRAVERS, THANXX FOR YOUR JOB WELL DONE.....AND TO THE FACULTY ADVISOR, WHO GUIDED THE WAY .......... THIS HORNED FRCX3 HAS PASSED THROUGH TWO EDITORS HANDS AND MUCH OF WHAT YOU HAVE HERE IS DUE TO THE EFFORTS OF RIE METERS KUTLADY, WHO PLANNED THIS BOOK BACK IN SUMMER 1949.......THANKX TO YOU RIE. WE HAVE TRIED TO PRESENT A NEW STYLE IN CLASS PICTURES THE FAVORITES AND IN , THE ACTIVITY SEXITION. WE HAVE ADDED AN INDEX IF YOU HAVE LOST YOUR WAY. . . . . . HERE IS YOUR 1950 HORNED TRNI. P.S. SPECIAL TRIBUTE IS HEREBY PAID TO THE CLASS OF 1953, WHO LED IN CAMPUS ACTIVITIES FOR THE' YEAR. PASS ON YOUR GOOD WORK. HORNED FROG STAFF Y h Um cLAss EDITOR ....... Reba oc ITOR . Frank Burkefl' COPY ED ' ' I Jim Harley FAVORLTEEI-Egg-OR I l C-onnie Muck Hood WHEEL - ' ' I , Joe Shosld SPORTS EDSTSR ' ""4 , . Beny Criner CLUB EDIT . . - ' ' Ik ,I Irene Rountree INDEX EDETSRS . Grew C"c'dw'c an , Bill Johnson ART EDIT . . - - ' ' ' STAFF MEMBERS B k Charles BuileY ' - . Norman Bgnfirlsl Hgn?:uCk mc Genelle Hart . . E ev .I ' I I l qi' le Jqc: McSwq:2lhick" Olsen . . . Chris Perner Lynn Nlgllie Whifly . . . Nancy Nhwwmnis . . a Shirley WIIIIums . - 1 Noe' ' ' Glenna WIISOH TH R. R It ll NT IB H R. U! E R R I! R E F E l N E fkademiaa at 7 6 ZZ. Pages 18-141 PICTURED: The Academic Dean's Conference, meeting in session with President M. E. Sadler. Left to right: Deans Raymond A. Smith, T. S. McCorkle, Ellis M. Sowell, Jerome A. Moore, C. K. Holsapple, D. R. Lindley, Lucy Harris, and A. T. DeGroot. ,-iazawszaea at 7 E Zz. Pages 142-189 V ' ' PICTURED: Opening Convocation, September 19, 1949, for Fall Semester. This event was the first official University function held in the new Ed Landreth Auditorium. Faculty, students and friends are pictured, with President Sadler presiding. amazed at 7 6 Z6 Pages 190-225 PICTURED: The forty nominees for the annual favorite election. All pictured were presented at the annual presentation ball, December 2, at the Casino. From the forty, students selected the twenty-four pictured in the favorite section. Wieda at 7 6 ZZ. Pages 226-243 PICTURED: The February meeting of the Board of Trustees. Left to right, back row: Clyde Tomlinson, Granville Walker, Ferd Moore, D. G. McFadin, C. A. Wheeler, W. W. Phares, and Lewis Ackers. Center row: M. M. Woods, Dean Moore, Elmer Henson, Sidney Latham, Ralph Shank, Ed Landreth, President Sadler, and Pete Wright. Front row: L. D. Anderson, Steve Cooke, George Kuykendall, Mrs. Sadie Becham, Robert Carr, Dan D. Rogers, and Milton Daniel. Spam at 7 . 75, Pages 244-277 PICTURED: Halftime presentation of the annual TCU-SMU football game, November 25. The Horned Frog Band is in formation of a grave- stone marking the passing of Peruna, Mustang mascot. Addy made presentation of lilies at the spot. 4 cu! 7 . ZZ. Pages 278-331 PICTURED: Typical club signs that catch the eye and blur the vision of passersby in the hallways at the north or south doors of the Administra- tion Building. joiners receive notices of their meetings, from the artists' hard-labored an- nouncements. - ' . - 1. K "W ai M13 x ,Ng , , A 'Hui' ur .kxw ,it 1: si 4 M x M D -Mx V2 :WJ 35: Mm Ex as ss wax, Y xx A , 4: K N k , X WEE K we vang ., fee MX K , I X , :Kgs X , w w ,A . , f 2531 V K Tm f :.: Q9 ,, Q QM Ui , ,, V 5 ' We 4 M, ,X L , A Eg -1-5, 5:5255 I I E - - X K , , KW -M L ' V Lu xx Zi LQ ff- if ff- - gm , Q wg , if T , , gr- Eff A . ,M W ,A K. ,Fri W2 f 1 mg ? K L , K, 'iii Vvxgvkg.-, 1 ' fi w , ,I ,.,,,,11.:1i' I 3. 1 mi , ss , M- nh .. . 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SADLER K those who have been responsible for the preparation of this book We be lieve it is one of the most impressive annuals we have ever had We would like also to express our most sincere appreciation to the varr ous student leaders on our campus for the unusually effective and helpful Wav in which they have done their work this session Several substantial im provements in our life and work have been stimulated by these leaders As our seniors approach gradua tion, we extend to them our very best wishes We hope the work they have done here will prove to be increasingly valuable as they go along through life We want them to feel they are a vital part of Texas Christian University after the1r graduation just as they have been during their student days. If our school is to become what it should, we must have the active interest and co operation of all our Ex Students. Kindest regards and best wishes to everyone. in AY we heartily congratulate Fwe iff S' 5 1950 Horned Frog be dedicated to some one person who has given time, effort and untiring spirit to TCU This dedication is to a popular professor and campus fwure without whose in spiration the editor of this annual might never have come to TCU to edit such a book This edition of the Horned Frog is dedicated to William J Marsh Professor Marsh came to TCU in 1994, and for years has remained a professor of Orvan and Theory and director of Glee Clubs His musical organizations and compositions, in cluding the Texas State Sonv Texas Our Tevas, have brought fame to himself and Texas Christian Univer sit To the popular all time favorite of students and alumni alike, to the friend to all with whom he comes in contact, gentleman, scholar, teacher, and affec tionately known as "Uncle Billy" to his students, may this dedication to Pro fessor Marsh in this small way convey the esteem in which he is held. 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J 2 4. -SPX 5' h If 1' '. - 'fi 'Q lifvfggg--iWW'lR?3?M 'LWl39z2E' ff 22 3'3iff:::if'1::?1"f22 . . 5. --515 '4 uf sxff-2 fl, 6' 4' .QC 2 , ,- ,A wg - ,- ' 2 A ' 1 WY 2 ,. .. .2 2 52 a .2 , 2 , Q, x,.V H W A M Y .A,i H HV... . . ........... . rw E : Marking M76 E721f7'd7Z66 to the T C U Campus is this memorial to the Universirys war dead of World Wars I and II Com pleted in 1949, this entrance replaced the Memorial Arch which stood in the same location from 1973 to 1948 Looking North, one sees the Ad Building and Jarvis Hall. Behind Jarvis are the newer dorms for women, and at the front north end of the campus is the new Fine Arts Building. Looking South, one sees the Ad Building and Clark Hall. There follow Goode, the Gym und Brite in that order. 53' ra 1 1 R Hun. xg? E TOM BHUWH Newest Dormitory for Meri, it has 61 rooms and will house 126 men. Modern in every respect, even to its divi- sion into three self-contained units, it cost 55250,000 and was completed in Septem- ber, 1947. Its name honors Tom Brown, Frog fan and benefactor for many years and trustee from 1941 until his death in 1950. 1 Ten -Am, ' -.. CLHRH Second Dormitory for Meri, its name honors not only Brothers Addison and Randolph Clark, the founders of T. C. U., but also the many other members of their families associated with T. C. U. It has 74 rooms and houses 140 men. GUUDE Oldest Dormitory for Men, iz, Jarvis and the Ad Building were the campus in 1911. Named for Mrs. M. A. Goode, who gave more than any other person for its con- struction, the building has 42 rooms and houses 86 men. Lunmurs nunms 1 Suu WHITS N ewest Dormitory for Women, it is a twin to Foster and was complet- ed in November, 1947. It is named for Dr. E. M. Waits, T. C. U. president, 1916-41, and president-emeritus until his death in December, 1949. IHRVIS Oldert Dormitory for Women, its name carries over from a building on the original Thorp Spring campus honoring J. Jarvis, board chairman, 1890-95. It has 52 rooms and houses 92 women. 1 1,4 FUSTER Fir!! of the New dormitories on the campus, it was "designed to be the best in Texas" and to set the pattern for those to follow. Completed in May, 1942, at a cost of 3500,000, it is named for R. Houston Foster, 15 years a trus- tee and chairman of the board at his death in june, 1941. It has 104 rooms and houses 208 women. Eleven ,:. fy - - aim -gb.: 5 jig lu , H, I PTP-P ia' Ii' ' af H l-like ...wr ' I V, L. .L1:..,g5Q,, ' ..-.:.,:f 'L':1r4g..Qgw...-nn 3 HDIllIllISlRHlIUH BUILDING Heclrl of the Cdmpuf, this building houses virtually all University offices Cincluding those of the president, registrar, business manager, seven of the eleven deans and the publicistj ,and the cafeteria, stu- dent lounge, book store and post office. It also has several class rooms and will soon have a 325,000 stu- dent study lounge, voted at the March, 1950, board meeting. EDUCATION Is EVERYWHERE IN EVIDENCE at T. C. U. There are classes meeting in all of the permanent buildings except the three new dormitories-and in addition the services of ten temporary classroom and laboratory buildings are required. However, since only two of the University's eight schools and colleges have buildings bearing their names, it should perhaps be recorded that the purpose of these pages is merely to picture the permanent buildings presently included in the T. C. U. campus- not to evidence the scope of the educational program at T. C. U. Add-Ran College of Art: and Sciencer, the largest school or college, is active throughout the campus. Its departments hold forth in the Administration Building, in Brite College of the Bible, in the barracks and Sterling House on the East campus, and even in the Gym and three dormitories-physics on the ground floor of the Gym, journalism on the ground floor of Goode, Twelve biology and geology on the ground floor of Clark, and foreign languages on the first floor of Jarvis. The School of Burinerr, second largest, is housed in East campus barracks.- The School of Education, third largest, has headquarters on the ground floor of Brite College of the Bible and holds classes in almost as many locations as does Add-Ran. Harm College of Nzzrring has its offices and advanced class- rooms and laboratories ar Harris Hospital. And the Graduate School and the Evening College locate their classes as nearly as possible in parallel to undergraduate day classes in the same subjects. AN EVER-ENLARGING, IMPROVING AND CHANGING CAMPUS is T' if 1 T W' ' are c e at f " cf V 1 ' . ' -A auf, rf?-I 3 ..1 - 4 -C ix:-, e- 1 sl- . , I V 'thy :AT 1, if I I 24:2 I ,. -i.-....... " T llll MI 'Ml IIII V llllfij naggg 'lun W IHHHEI .vig ..,.. 1 I I I I I .",' ' 5. . pt- Ac' f ' . -Ge,-W.. . coins Bunntn llllillfiilliillll Favorite T. C. U. PiCL'7M'6 Subjed for 25 years has been this beautiful building completed in February, 1925. Its name honors Mary Cours Burnett, whose gift of a three million dollar trust fund to T. C. U. in 1925 made history and rendered a story unique in the annals of education. It will shortly be enlarged to accommodate the University's ever growing library. the result. Even the pictures on these pages, for example, are already out-dated to some extent. Made in the summer and fall of 1949, they do not evidence the new campus "white way" and the many beautification effects which have been added since then. No set of T. C. U. campus pictures could possibly portray ac- curately their subjects by the time they reached publication stage in these times. Physical facilities are being enlarged and changed too rapidly. More improvements have been made on T. C. U.'s campus in the past two years than in the previous 25. T. C. U. is in the midst of a ten million dollar building pro- gram designed to make its physical stature match that of its academic. At least seven new buildings, renovation of the old ones and enlargement of the Library are included in future build- ing program activity. THIS Is THE THIRD CAMPUS of T. C. U. First was at Thorpe Spring, where in 1873 Brothers Addison and Randolph Clark founded the school, then known as Add-Ran College. Second was at Waco, to where the school was moved in 1895 after having become Add-Ran Christian University in 1889. It was in Waco, in 1902, that the present name of Texas Christian University was adopted. On March 22, 1910, the Uni- versity's main building at Waco, which was in effect the campus, was destroyed by fire. There followed the move to Fort Worth in 1910 and to the hub of the present site in 1911. Since that time the campus has grown from 50 to the present 135 acres, from three buildings to those pictured on these pages, and the school's enrollment from 414 to the all-time high of 6,284 recorded in 1949-50. Thirteen FINE HHTS BUILIJIH Providing a "Three-in-One" arrangement, this newest building on the campus features the Ed Landreth Auditorium, three stories of offices, studios and class rooms of the School of Fine Arts, and the Little 1-Theater, with separate entrance frbown at leftj, along the west side, Opened in September, 1949, it cost 31,800,000 and is the largest building of its kind in Texas, if not in the South, and is the only structure in the nation pro- viding under one roof complete facilities for all the arts. The acoustically-perfect auditorium bears the name of the chairman of T. C. U.'s 310,000,000 building program, of which this building is a part -Ed Landreth, a trustee since 1941. Seating ca- pacity is 1625. ' i . 'Fil 1 S 1 Q. 1 1 rl 1 , , ,. ff - --' 'A 1 -' ' A 3 I'-LH' 1 Ji" , , 1 4 V 9 . '-4 if if C il 1 I + , L-. M., ' ' - A fu-'.+ 1 - ,L -as 1 , W' 's - - . 'xg r -- ,-a n -a ny-if : I I i ,- . 11--r-"tif"-?h'1s!':1 ' ' ' - 5 if . ' ' . 1 . i i 1-L' ' ' V' ' - 'til' L :Fe J tag' W ' ' ' " .je 5- -ff 52 .-253371 1 ' f 1 1 :Fifi , - - - i W- - ' ' , -,.'L,ij1',"A'1-3.1: ,gf , " a- - -f1.- ,v up ' , , V, ,' if-2,4 5,L..,L,', ' ..,., .- ,,,,,.. . , ,a., .L . ,......., '-..4.n.ka-ua.: Seating 33,000 in permanent concrete seats completely surrounding a sunken bowl the Stadium builtin 1930 and enlarged twice since then, has often been called "the most beautiful in the Southwest While this compliment is a matter of opinion it is a statistical fact that here are the best parking facilities Cfor 5000 carsj in this area and perhaps in the nation Second Athletic Unit is the Gymg however, most athletic facilities, including track, baseball diamond and practice fields are adjacent to the Stadium. The basketball team plays home conference games at Fort Worth's Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum, the golfers play at Colonial .Country Club, and only the tennis team has its home grounds near the Gym. Built in 1921, the Gym serves primarily as headquarters for physical education classes. A new 3750,000 Field House is listed among the urgent projects in the building program, and when it is completed, this building will be rehabilitated as a gym for women. . t, Af 9. 3 gp ff 221 ,r i W' r' : BRITE CCLLECE First Claiwoom Addition to the campus was, ap- propriately, Brite College of the Bible, which was built in 1914, just three years after T. C. U. had moved to this campus. It is named for L. C. Brite, who provided funds for launching the college and erecting the building and who for 29 years was a trustee. His widow continues to serve as a trustee. l UHIVEHSITU CHCISTIHH CHURCH 3 is-71, - . V ining Wg.,--.,..f.'.-L 71. - - ---- I ,T I' N I K V -'nie'-url, - 1. ' ui. ' 1 " " """ 't i 1, 1 , 4 I f B- A f A C' fi, " . M' if 5, is l Sixleerz Aamir the Street from the north end of the campus is University Christian Church, which-while not an actual part of the University- provides an integral part of Univer- sity life. It is the church home of many of the faculty and students, and it sponsors one of the most ac- tive srudent organizations, the Me- liorists. Built in 1935, this building is currently being enlarged to twice its present size. IIHINIT IMIIEBMIGDIIRJIUIUJM The name of Dr. E. M. Wfaits is one of the most familiar on the T. C. U. campus, for in the twenty- five years he served as president and his nine years as president-emeritus, Dr. Waits was known for his Christian character and as a friend of all with whom he came in contact. It has been said that it is a happy fact that in these times of selfishness and greed, such a man could have lived. He was a lover of sports and sportsmanship, scholars and scholarship. He saw T. C. U. through one of its greatest eras of expansion, and guided its destiny. To "Prexy Waits" T. C. U. owes much, and to T. C. U., Dr. Waits stands as a symbol of the stat- utes on which the institution was founded. T. C. U. is deeply indebted to Mr. Tom Brown for his generosity, as one of the University's great- est benefactors. From 1941 until this year he served as one of the guides of the destinies of the school as a member of the Board of Trustees. A lover of sports and young people, he inspired them because of his faith in them. Standing as an immortal memory of T. C. U.'s friend is the boys' dormitory that bears his name. LYLE MAYNE was one of the most brilliant young scholars on the University faculty. He came to T. C. U. from Yale and the University of California as a professor of Religion and Ethics. He was friend of all, and was most well beloved by his students. Although he was with the University only a short two years, his effective teachings will be long remembered where his students meet and preach. Seventeen HL' I T HH -"NH VII as-N' my 1 ,1 . A., W ,M5,,aL-fx, gy , mm ,W 'ws .1 "VV .J ,Ea 4, ' u 5 f H' Q W M ,,,A 2 , A P' '0ID.N im 5 eg J REBA YOCHAM Editor ADDRAN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES DEAN Dean Jerome Moore, of the College of Arts and Sciences, is one of our more trav- eled deans. Besides going to Europe, he has been to such an interesting place as the Canary Islands. When he was in Europe, he went to the Sorbonne University, in Paris, and the University of Geneva, in Switzer- land. Since one of the subjects he is best quali- fied to teach is Spanish, he prefers Spain for professional purposes, if he were to give his own estimate of the countries he has visited. One of the books Dr. Moore has written was about 17th Century Spanish Ballads. He enjoyed France because he and his wife, who accompanied him, could ap- preciate it together more than they could any of the other countries. Twenty . I Jil, WEA 5, s" :E l AddRan College of Arts and Sciences was the first to be established of eight schools and colleges which are located on the Uni- versity campus. Founded by Addison and Randolph Clark in 1875 at Thorp Spring, the school was originally named AddRan College, in memory of AddRan Clark, a son of Addison Clark. The State of Texas issued a charter to the institution under a revised name, Add- Ran Male and Female College, in April of 1874. The Christian Churches of Texas, hav- ing indorsed the school since its inception, assumed trusteeship in 1889. The name was then changed to AddRan Christian University. After the school had moved to Waco in 1895, it became Texas Christian University in 1902. A fire destroyed the main building Of the University in 1910, and T.C.U. moved to Fort Worth, occupying the present campus in 1911. Other schools and colleges were added later, and AddRan College of Arts and Sciences became the basic unit of Texas Christian University. , xg.. ff' v . rf JEROME A. MOORE Dean Moore, in view of his foreign travel, is a firm believer in American students going to Europe in order to foster interna- tional understanding. Doctor Moore received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and has been associated with the University of Texas, among other schools, before coming to Texas Christian University. . DEPARTMENT HEADS C. F. CHEVERTON, Unclergracluate Religion T. C. CRENSHAW, English BONNIE ENLOW, Home Economics NEVVTON GAINES, Physics W. J. HAMMOND, History H. B. HARDT, Chemistry C. K. HOLSAPPLE, Philosophy H. R. MUNDHENKE, Economics A. L. PORTERFIELD, Sociology T. F. RICHARDSON, Psychology PAUL O. RIDINGS, journalism C. R. SHERER, Mathematics A. O. SPAIN, Government W. M. WINTON, Biology Twenty-one FACULTY ,IESSIII C. ADAMS, Psychology XWARREN AGEIE, journalism E. R. ALEXANDER, Chemisrry DAN L. ANDER SON, Psychology L. D. ANDERSON, Religion RUTH S. ANGELL, English FAE BASS, Home Economics ARTEMSIA B. BRYSON, English C. A. BURCI-I, Religion VIRGINIA CAIN, Home Economics MARY L. CANTRELL, English EULA LEE CARTER, Spanish L. MOFFIT CECIL, English COMER CLAY, Government C. S. CLIFTON, Sociology MARCUS W. COLLIN S, Sociology QLANDON COLQU I TT, Mathematics E. T. CORNELIUS, Religion PAUL DINKINS, English H. J. norms, chemistry MARTINE EMERT, Geography C. J. FIRKINS, Psychology JOHN W. FORSYTH, Biology GEORGE P. FOWLER, Religion, Greek and Hebrew RALPH W. GARRETT, History 0 DANIEL GROFF, Religion BITA MAE HALL, French WHEELER HAWLEY, French LEO HENDRICKS, Geology W. G. HEWATT, Biology F. W. HOGAN, Chemistry IRENE I-IUBER, German S. W. I-IUTTON, Religion DAN JARVIS, Geology NOEL L. KEITH, Religion Tzrenly-Iwo FACULTY C. W. LAGRONIE, Psychology ELVA A. LERRE'I'I', Mathematics FLOYD M. LISLE, Chemistry SANDERS T. LYLES, Biology MABIEI. MAJOR, English RITA MCALISTER, English ROBERT J. McCARTY, Mathematics DOROTHY MICHAEL, English EDITH MORGAN, Mathematics JOSEPH MORGAN, Physics C. E. MURPI-IEY, Biology W. C. NUNN, History E. C. POLK, English MARGUERITI5 POTTER, History CI-IA R LES PROCTOR, Government L. W. RAMSEY, Mathematics MERRILL RIPPY, History PAULINE RIPPY, English ROBERT E. ROBERTSON, Philosophy GLENN C. ROUTT, Religion 0 CLARENCE SALE, Mathematics MARY BETH SCOTT, English MIRTH SI-IERER, History LORRAINE SI-IERLEY, English JASMINE SMOTT, Spanish KARL SYNDER, English TROY STINSON, Aviation RUTI-I TOXIVNE, Religion WARY WADDILL, English MARIAN WHITLEY, Geology MRS. W. M. WINTON, Biology WARREN WOOD, English I-IAZEL 'If WOODWARD, Psychology JOHN L. WORTHAM, Economics MARY ANN XVRIGI-IT, Mathematics SARITA ZAJICEK, Spanish Twenty'-three AWB an 1 if. ! 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Pzfibff, 2 , .. 4,22 . s f lfllli! i wi. if .E "' ??f, I.:::' 75- V , -' J all 'iilfsa I ii' "1'iv'Vl:, ii gsm , ., 1, , I. ,s M.. if ,w i 'A' , ' I S 4 4 ' fs .... .3 2:2 '-..v':"5 : lil' 1' :::::,fgE LV!" -Q' "::gga:E:s:a:a' - t, 2555555555555-- ,ps ' 4 - - . f - M" AQ ililizm 5.1 il ...... fm" . i'l'l'l it 4-iflli' I ii - .is-:im ii.. ......, , V in -g,gQgQMli1irg 7 -sv A Z if Y 29' gill 3 3.4 mf - gi Jiiz I ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS Twenty-four FLOYD ACKLIN. JR. FORT WORTH Major: Geology BILLIE NELL ADKINS LITTLE ROCK. ARKANSAS Major: Religious Education Student Congress 3, Secretary fSummerJ 4: Leri 2: The "Y" 2, 3, 4, President 4: Priscilla 2, 3, 4: Meliorist 2, 5, 4, Treasurer 3 CHESTER C. ALDERMAN FORT WORTH Major: Psychology Psychology Club 4 STEPHEN R. AVERY FORT WORTH Major: Psychology Timothy 3, 4: Meliorist 3 JOHN R. BARKER AUSTIN, TEXAS Major: Journalism Skiff Staff 1, 2, 3, 4: Press Club 3, 4 EDWIN C. BODINE FORT WORTH Major: Geology Natural Science Society 4 SAM W. ACOLA DECATUR, TEXAS Major: Chemistry Chemistry Club l. 2. 3. fl, Treasurer -1 WARREN C. ALBERT FORT VVORTH Major: Psychology Psychology Club 3, -11 Pi Gamma Mu Vice President 4 HAROLD AUTREY JONESISORO, ARKANSAS Major: Psychology and Sociology 3, 4, Student Congress 41 Psychology Club 4: Hoe- Down 4 WYLY EDWIN BALL ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Mathematics and Spanish Parabola Club 2, 3, 44 Hoe-Down 4: Mu Epsilon 5. 4: Los I-lidalgos 4: T. Skating 4 JAMES LAWRENCE BAXTER HENDERSON, TEXAS Major: Psychology Psychology'Club fl: Renegades 3, 4: Alp Omega 3, 4 FRED C. BOENKER FORT WORTH Major: Religion Psychology Club 2, 3 Kappa C. U. ha Phi RALPH GODFRIEY HOLES, JR. CLEBURNE. TEXAS Major: Geology DONALD BOSTICK FORT WORTH Mnjor: Mallmcnmrics and Geology JACK BOYD FORT XVORTH Major: Chemistry Alpha Phi Omega -13 Chemistry Club ll EARL J. BREWER FORT XVORTH Major: Psychology Chemistry Club 3, fl JACK N. BROOKS SHERIDAN, ARKANSAS Ma jor: Psychology LEROY C. BRUNE COLUMRUS, 'l'nxAs Major: Geology ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS HAROLD L. BORLAND PECOS, TEXAS Major: Sociology MINOR W. BOYER FORT WORTH Major: Philosophy Timothy 1, 2. 3. 45 The "Y" 13 Alpha Chi 2, 3, fig Meliorist lg Evening College Student Council 4 OBIE BOYD ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Journalism Skiff Staff 2, 3: Press Club 41 Advertising Club3 CHUCK BROCK FORT WORTH Major: Journalism Horned Frog Staff 43 T. C. U. American Le- gion 1, 23 Flying Frog 43 Pep Cabinet 45 Slciff Staff 3, 43 Press Club 1, 2, 3. 4: Vice Presi- dent Press Club 3: Yacht Club 5, 4 OTIS T. BROOKS FORT WORTH Major: Mathematics Parabola Club 3, 4: Kappa Mu Epsilon 4g Chemistry Club 5, 4: Physical Society 4 FRANK BURKETT FORT WORTH Major: Journalism Horned Frog Staff 41 Skiff Staff 5, 45 Press Club 4 Twenty-five ARTS AND SCIENCE SENIORS ll SHIRLEY BURNS FORT WORTH Major: Pspchology Psychology Club 4g German Club 4 C. W. CARPENTER TI-IROCKMORTON, TEXAS Major: Journalism Hoe-Down 4: Skiff Staff 5, 'fig Press Club 45 Skating Club 3. 4 MARILYN BYERLY BOONE, IOWA Major: English The "Y" 3, fig Skating Club 43 Meliorist 4g Womens Sports Association fi BEN CARROLL ATWOODD, ILLINOIS Major: History Sigma Tau Delta 3, 'ig Alpha Chi 3, -'ig Bryson 4 ' "'-I.-"" BILL CAFFEY COLORADO CITY, TEXAS Major: Geology Natural Science Society 3, 4 THOMAS H. CHAMPION, JR. ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Spanish The "Y" -'ig Los Hidalgos 4: Skating Club ri AVIS DANE CALVERY Font WORTH HARVEY D. CAMPBELL FORT XVORTI-I Major: Home Economics Major: Geology Chi Beta 3: Alpha Chi lg NXfomen's Sports Association I MRS. MARTHA J. CHAPMAN FORT WOl!1'H ROBERT EUGENE CHAPMAN FORT Woitrit Major: Biology Major: Biology BIOLOGY: Dissecting grasshoppers is on the agenda for today's lab session in biology. These two young ladies are being assisted by a student instructor. At the moment, they are examining one of the hopper's parts under the microscope. Located in the basement of Clark Hall, the students meet one three hour laboratory each weekv Two lecture classes are held per week. W. M. Winton is head of this department. Twenty-six T. C. U, American Legion lg CII VIRGINIA Cl-IIEVERTON Rli1lIl'lIl.I., MISSOURI Nllllllfl Religion ARTS AND SCIEN ES SENIOR CASIMIR J. CICHON N. RIVERSIDE, ILLINOIS Major: Biology Marching Iinnd lg Melinrisr 2, 3, -'I Clhemisrry Club 2, Natural Science Society 2 I-IIELIEN DALE CLARK JO FRANCES CLARK IOWA PARK, 'I'I'5XAS GRAHAM, TEXAS Major: Religious Eclucruion Maior: Geology Lexi 23 Priscilla l, 2. 3, fi: Fr01zwt'S li Lexi 23 The "Y" 1, 23 Nazural Science So- Meliorisr I, 2 ciecy 5, Frogencs 1, Business and Professional BILLY II. CLIFTON HASRIILI., 'I'IaxAs Mninr: Geology MAX COGSW ELL SIIIZRMAN, TIzxAs Major: Chemisiry 2: Track -I RALPH H. COI.Il FORT XVORTII Maior: Geology MARVIN J. COOKE FORT XVORTH Major: Geology cmisrry Cluh Skiff Smff XVomen 4 TOMMY COBB FORT VVORTI-I Muior: Macliemarics Purnbolu Club 3, 43 Chemistry Club fi CHARLES O. COLE OLNEY TEXAS Maiur: Journalism 5. fig Press Club 32 ,Inchr Club 3 AARON W. COOK FORT XVORTH Maior: Geology Debate 2, 3, fl: T. C. U. American Legion I, 2 JACK WALTER COOTS FORT WORTH Maior: Geology T. C. U. American Legion 2, 5 Twenty-Jeuen ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS DONNELLA COUCH CARLSBAD, NEW MEXICO Major: Religion The "Y" 1, 21 Priscilla 1, 2. 3. 4: Meliorist 1, 2, 3, 4 DAVID I-I. DAVIS FORT WORTH Major: Government ll- A. L. COX, JR. CLEBURNE, TEXAS Major: Geology LOUIS D. DAVIS, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Geology BILLIE D. CRAIG COLORADO CITY, TEXAS Major: Geology LARRY DENTON BONHAM, TExAs Major: Journalism and English Student Congress 35 Sigma Tau Delta 3. 43 Skiff Staff 3, 4: Alpha Chi 3, 45 Press Club 43 Meliotist 1, 2, 3 m i K . Es . W! -r RENA CUMMINS FORT WORTH Major: Religion Hoe-Down 3, 4: Priscilla 2, 3, 4 FRANK S. DINGWERTI-I FORT WORTH Major: Biology Hoe-Down 1, 2, 3, 4: Nat- ural Science Society 1, ll Twenty-eight i . ..X.Ei: will E I ,I I :Lf i 1 pi CHEMISTRY WORTH C. DALTON FORT WORTH Major: Government Student Congress 23 Debate 2 3, 43 United World Federal- ists 3, 4: Student Court 5 RICHMOND DORSEY FORT WORTH Major: Psychology The smile on this girl's face reveals she has reached a satisfactory conclusion to her chemistry laboratory experiment. This maze of test tubes is located in building. Unlike most sciences, two labs as well as the usual dual lecture periods are required weekly. Four hours credit is given for this science. Chemistry minded uppetclassrnen may act as student instructory in these labs. The department head is Henry B. Hardt. A. BEN DOWDEY COMANCHE, TEXAS Major: Chemistry and Biology Chemistry Club 3. -1: Natural Science Society 5, 4: Mcliorist 3 OSBORN DUKE, JR. FORT WORTH Major: English Sigma Tau Delta 4 DAN ETTER FORT WORTH Major: Mathematics and Chemistry Paraboln Club 3, -fi: Alpha Chi 32 Chemistry Club 2, 5, fig Physical Society 3. li NELDA PAUL FALLIN FORT WORTPI Major: Government Alpha Chi 5, -ig Business and Professional Women 4 WILLIAM E. FREDERICK FORT WORTH Major: Geology MARTHA JEAN GALLOWAY FORT WORTH Major: Sociology The "Y" lg Pi Gamma Mu fi: Business and Professional Women 33 Baptist Student Union 2, 3, Secretary 3 ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIOR M ARIANNE DRUMMOND XVICHITA FALLS, TEXAS Major: English Sigma Tau Delta fig Pi Gamma Mu JEAN EDSALL FORT WORTH Major: Chemistry Chemistry Club 4 JO ALICE EVANS BRONTE, TEXAS Major: Spanish Leti 25 Alpha Chi 3, 45 Phi Sigma Io Los I-Iidalgos lg Frogettes 1 FRANCES FEILD WASHINGTON, D. C. Major: Government Skating Club 4 DAN P. GALBRAITI-I FORT WORTH Major: Psychology Psychology Club 4 JOSEPH W. GARDNER COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLTNA Major: Psychology Timothy 13 U. R. C. 1 5,4 IZ Twenty-Min 8 ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS tr gf E it T . it E 1 PAT GARNER MIDLAND, TEXAs Major: Sociology Bryson 4 BILL GORDON FORT XVORTH Major: Geology MRS. JACK GARRETT FORT WORTH Major: Religion Ministers' Wives 3 PEGGY GORDON FORT Worm Major: Home Economics Chi Beta 5, fig The "Y" Meliorist3 JAMES IRA GATES EL PASO, TEXAS Major: Religion Timothy 4g United Worltl Federalists dj The "Y" 43 Meliorist 4 JACK GOWER CLEBURNE, TEXAS Major: History ROBERT D. GILMORE FORT VVORTH Major: Pre-Med fBiologyl Chemistry Club 4: Natural Science Society 4 MARY GRAVES FORT WOR1'H Major: Psychology Alpha Chi :lg Bryson Band Sweetheart, 1947 3.4 ROBERT L. GLASGOW FORT WORTH Major: Geology LAWRENCE E. GRAYSON TYLER, TEXAS Major: Mathematics Pnrnbola Club 1 Thirty ECONOMICS: Economics is 21 survey course including marketing, labor, management and capital. Dr. Herbert R. Mundhenke, head of the department is instructing this class on the functions of the science of economics. The government and how it operates plus capitalism anal its downward trend are two topics commonly discussed in these classes. To enlighten them on business func- tions, this course is required of all journal- ism majors. Cl'lESTliR Llili GRUBHS FORT XVORTH Major: Physics Alpha Chi -ig Physics Society 3, 4 ROBIQIVI' XV. GUNNIP FORT XVORTII Major: Physics BILL L. 1-lAMIl.'l'ON SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS Major: Pre-Med. ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS GEORGE C. GUPFEY FORT XVORTH Major: Geology PAUL MAX I-IAEFELI, JR. Four WORTH Major: Psychology, Sociology Psychology Club -11 U. R. C. 2, 5: Pi Gamma Mu -ig Skating Club 4, Meliorist 1, 2, 5, -ig Southwest Conference Sportsmanship Associa- tion JIM H A RBIN FORT WORTH Major: Journalism Stutlent Congress 2, 3, fl: Choral Club 2: Nat- Horned Frog Staff 33 Skiff Staff 45 Pfe55 Club ural Science Society 5, -ig Mcliorist 3: Student 3, -ii Skating Club 3. fl? Yilfillf Club 5, 4 Congress President fi JAMES li. IIARRISON FORT XVORTH Major: Geology Natural Science Society -'l SUZANNIE HAYS DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Sociology, Psychology Psychology Club -'ig Leti 2: Skating Club -i JOHN HENRICK PORT W"Oll'I'H Major: Mathematics Parabola Club -ig Kappa Mu Epsilon -'lg Phys- ical Society 4 HELEN HAUSMAN FORT WOR'1'H Major: Geology 13.8 P. W. Club 3. -1 JERRY P. HELTZEL FORT WORTI1 Major: Economics Debate 2, 5, -ig Pi Kappa Delta -1, President fi ROBERT F. HERRING C1-IEYENNI2, WYOMING Major: Government and Spanish Poetry Club 1, 2, 3, -ig United World Federal- ists 3, -lg The "Y" 1, 2, 3, 4: Alpha Chi 5, 4: Phi Sigma Iota 3, 43 Pi Gamma Mu 5, -'ig Meliotlist I, -1: 1. R. C. Vice-President 3 Thirty-one ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS JAMES R. HILL Fom' WORTH Major: Biology Chemistry Club 2, 3, 45 Nat- ural Science Society 3, 4 WEBER RALPH HOLLOWAY FORT WORTH Major: Geology HARLEY F. HINES FORT WORTH Major: Mathematics Parabola Club 3, 4: Kappa Mu Epsilon 43 Physical So- ciety 2, 3g Skating Club 4 CONNIE MACK HOOD BRECKENRIDGE, TEXAS Major: Geography Student Congress 2, 3, 43 Horned Frog Staff 4g Timothy 1, 23 Hoe-Down 33 Renegades 3, 45 Pep Cabinet 4g March- ing Band 1, Bryson 3, 45 Me- liorist 1, 2, 3. 43 Rodeo Asso- ciation 3, 4g Sophomore Presi- dentg Junior Vice-Presidentg Vice - President Student Con- gress 4 JOE E. HODKINS FORT XVORTH Major: Chemistry Student Congress 35 Renegades 3, Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3, 4 JOHN GORDON HOOTEN ATLANTA, GEORGIA Major: Religion and English Timothy 2g Hoe-Down 2, 3, 43 The "Y" 2, 3, 4, Meliorist 2, 3, 4, President Hoe-Down 2 . 11 a use A ug i -it W X -.., JASPER L. HOLLAND FORT WORTH Major: Geology Natural Science Society 1 EMERY HORNADAY HARLINGEN, TEXAS Major: Government Debate 3, 43 Stage Band 1, 33 Choral Club 15 Marching Band 1, 3, 45 Los Hidalgos 4g Skat- ing Club 4g Meliorist 1, 3, 4 4 period. Tlarb-ty-two combined. ENGLISH: DOUGLAS O. HOLLIS FORT WORTH Major: Geology MARY JO HORTON HOUSTON, TEXAS Major: Religion Chi Beta 3, 4, Hoe-Down 2 3, 45 Leti 25 The "Y" 1 Priscilla 1, 25 Frogertes 1 Meliorist 1, 2 Miss Pauline Rippy and these two fresh man girls are enjoying a lighter moment in the English office. In the background are paintings of the Canterbury Tales which they are observing. A former student painted these characters over a six months Dr. Troy C. Crenshaw is head of the English department. Each TCU graduate is required to have at least twelve hours of this subject in his undergraduate years R. C. HOWARD FORT XVORTH Major: Geology NATI-I I-IUDG INS FORT XVORTH Major: Pre-Dental Chemistry Club fl: Natural Science Society -l WILLIAM A. HUDSON D15'rROl'r, MICHIGAN Major: Pre-Medical Cliemimty Club -lg Natural Science Society 5, -'ig I-lerbotology Club -l NORIO IWANIE HIKARI, JAPAN Major: French The "Y" -I CARL M. JOHNSON, JR. FORT MVORTH Major: Sociology NANCY KING GREIENVILLIE, TEXAS Major: Spanish, Religion Student Congress 3, ll, Secretary -lg Lcti 2, Horned Frog Staff 5, il, Assistant Editor -'lg U. R. C. 2, Alpha Chi 3, fl, Vice-President 43 Phi Sigma Iota fi: Press Club 5, -fi, Priscilla I, 2, 3, fl: Los Hidalgos 2, 33, -'lg Frogcttes lg Mc-liorisr I, 2, 5, 4, Secretary 2 ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS LOUIS R. HUDGINS FORT WORTH Major: Geology T. C. U. American Legion I R. ROEMER HUDLER SAN ANGELO, TEXAS Major: Sociology Timothy 1, 2, 3, -1, United World Federalists 2, 5, 4, The "Y" 1, 2, 3, 41 Meliorist 1, 2, 3, 4 WINFORD R. INGRAM FORT WORTH Major: Geology Chemistry Club 5, 43 Natural Science Society fi ROBERT M. JACKSON FORT WORTH Major: Psychology Psychology Club 4: Pi Gamma Mu 4 CHARLES ERVIN KEMP FORT WORTH Major: Mathematics Parabola Club 2, 3, 4, President 53 Alpha Chi 4: Kappa Mu Epsilon 5, 4, President 55 Phys- ical Society 2, 3 ALBERT S. KNOX FORT VVORTH Major: Geology Chemistry Club 3, 4 Thirly-three ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS PORT WORTH Major: Sociology MRS. BILLIE MARIE KUDLATY JEAN KUYKENDALL JAMES DOYLE LANCASTER GERALD L. LANMAN PATRICIA LEONARD LONGVIEW, TEXAS FORT WORTH CLEBURNE, TEXAS ODESSA, TEXAS Major: Religious Education Major: Geology Major: Geology Major: English Student Congress 33 Horned Frog Staff 1, 2, 3, Assistant Editor 3 MARY LAVANDER AUSTIN , TEXAS Major: Sociology Leti 2g Priscilla 45 Frogettes lg Meliorist 1, 45 Choral Club 1, 4 STEVE L. LEWIS Hlco, TEXAS Major: Geology The "Y" 2, 5, 4: Meliorist 2, 5, 45 Women's Sports Asso- ciation 2 GENE R. LINDLEY FORT WORTH Major: Biology Symphony Orchestra 35 Stage Band 45 Marching Band 1, 2: Chemistry Club 5, 4: Natural Science Society 3, 45 Meliorist 1, 2, 3. 4 Thirty-four Hoe-Down 45 The "Y" 45 Bryson fig Skating Club 4 BILL LUCK GKANDVLEW, TEXAS Major: Geology FOREIGN LANGUAGE: Representing the foreign language de- partment is this French laboratory. How- ever, the young lady pictured is a Spanish student who sneakecl in to watch the re- cordings. The boys are tutoring her on the use of earphones and tape recorders. Dr. Wheeler Hawley, head of the French department looks on. Other languages taught in TCU are German, Italian, Latin, Greek, and Portu- guese. Two years of foreign language are required of all Arts and Science majors. JOHN T. LIVENGOOD Rl-IOME, Tux AS Major: Mathematics MRS. MARILYN LYNCH FORT WORTH Major: Journalism Horned Frog Staff 4: Skiff Staff 3, 4, Press Club l, 2, 5, fig Horned Prog Business Man- agerfi GLENN M. MANN WASHlNG'I'ON, D. C. Major: Religion Timothy 2, 3. 4 NORMAN S. MARKS GRAND PRAIRIE, TEXAS Major: Spanish Psychology Club 4, Los Hidalgos 2, 4: Radio Workshop 2: Business Manager Skiff -'lg Atl- vertising Club lip Press Club 4 MARCIA LEA MCAULEY Form' WORTH Major: Geology and Mathematics Parabola Club 2, 5, -lg Flying Frog 33 Kappa Mu Epsilon 2, 3, A13 Natural Science Society 3, 4, Secretary 4 JO ANN McCOY GALvEs'1'0N, TEXAS Major: English COLEMAN L. LOFTON MARIETTA, OKLAHOMA Major: Geology ROBERT .LYNCH AMARILLO, TEXAS Major: Geology BOB MAPES FALFURRIAS, TEXAS Major: Geology MARK MARLOW Pom' WORTPI Major: Economics ELIZABETH J. MCCLURE LIBERTY, NIISSOURI Major: Pre-Law Flying Frog 4 BILL MCCURDY RHOME, TEXAS Major: Mathematics ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS Sigma Tau Delta 4: Chi Beta 4, Los Hidalgos Parabola Club 43 Alpha Chi 45 Kappa Mu 25 Frogc-tres 1: Leti 2 Epsilon 4 Thirty-five ARTS AND SCIE CES SENIORS MARJORIE ANNE MCKEAN FORT WORTH Major: Geology Natural Science Society 4 FRED A. MILLER OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA Major: Psychology and Religion Timothy 2, 3, 43 Alpha Chi Omega 4 WARREN MCMORDIE FORT WORTH Major: Chemistry Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4: Chemistry Club 2, 3, 4 MARY LOU MILLER FORT WORTH Major: Sociology and Psychology Psychology Club 4 MARY LOUISE MCNAMARA FORT WORTH Major: English Sigma Tau Delta 2: Yacht Club l ANNELLE M. MILLER HARLINGEN, TEXAS Major: Religious Education Choral Club 2, 3, 4: The "Y" 1, 2, 3, 4: U. R. C. 2: Pris- cilla 1, 2, 3, 4: Meliorist 1, 2, 3, 4 JACK L. McSWAIN HATTIESBURG, Mississippi Major: Government Stage Band 2, 3, 4: Fine Arts Council 4: Renegades 3, 4: Marching Band 2. 3, fl: Stage Band 2, 3, 45 Radio Work- shop 2g Pep Cabinet Li MICHAEL J. MINARDO FORT WORTH Major: History Pi Gamma Mu 1, 2, 3, 4 Thirty-.fix GEOLOGY: What is it? CHARLES W. MILLER SCI-IENECTADY, NEW Yonii Major: Sociology Timothy 2. 3, ll: United Worltl Federalists 23 The "Y" 2, 3. fig Meliorist 2, 3, fl: Track 2. 3 GEORGIA MIXON PLAINVIEW, TEXAS Major: History Choral Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Leti 2: A Cappella Choir 4: Brushes Club 3: Bryson 3, 4: Frogertes lg Class Favorite 2, 3, fl Gathered around these rock specimens are four geology students. Pulling out their "eyeballers," they proceed to investigate the interior of each rock for significant char- acteristics. Geology courses consist of laboratory and lecture work, summer field trips, and ad- vanced work in drafting and petrology. The department of Geology is combined with Biology, under the chairmanship of Professor W. M. Winton. SHAW MORRIS FORT WOR1'l'I Major! Psychology MARY JANE NICOLDS FORT XVORTII Major: English Sigma Tau Dcltn 3, -lp Skiff Staff 2: fiL'lll'Il1llS Beauty lg Junior Curie 5 DAN A. NOLTE FORT XVORTH Major: Psychology Psychology Club 2. 3. -lg Brushc T. L. OTQONNELL FORT XVORTH Major: Journalism Skiff Stuff 3. Ai: Press Club 2, 3, Club ll ILA MAE OSTIERHOUT FORT WOll1'l'l Major: English Sigma Tau Delux fi THOMAS W. PARKER FORT XVORTH Major: Geology s I, 2 -ig Ynchr JAMES B. MYERS ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS MANDAN, NORTH DAKOTA Major: Economics Chamber Of Congress 43 Los Hidalgos fl JAMES C. NOLAN FORT WORTH Major: Geology Association 5 AYAKO OBANA TOKYO, JAPAN Major: Religion Priscilla 4 JACK O'DONEL FORT XWORTH Major: Chemixrry ROBERT H. PADGETT FORT WORTPI Major: English Sigma Tau Dc-lm 3, -'ig Alpha Chi Sigma Iota 4 WILLIAM K. PEACE FORT WORTH Major: History 3, 43 Phi Thirty-seven ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS - v- VIRGINIA PEARCE PARIS, TEXAS Major: Sociology Hoe-Down 45 The "Y" 43 Women's Sports Association 4 WILLIAM M. PORTER, JR. SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND Major: Religion and English Sigma Tau Delta 43 Timothy 2, 3, 4g United World Fed- eralists 33 Meliorist 2 EUGENE H. PETERS AUSTIN, TEXAS Major: Psychology and Sociology Timothy 2, 33 The "Y" 3, 43 Stuilent Court 4: Alpha Chi 43 Meliorist 2, 3, 4 XVILLIAM T. PRICE DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Geology Hoe-Down 3, 4: Renegades 4 ALARAH PIERCE Posr, TEXAS Major: Religion Choral Club 5, 43 The "Y" 1, 2, 3, 4j Priscilla 1, 2, 3, 43 Meliorist 1, 2, 5, 4 PATRICIA ANN PURTELL Com-'Us CHILISTI, TEXAS Major: Psychology Choral Club 2g Psychology Club 45 Leti 23 A Cappella Choir 4j Skating Club 2: WoInen's Sports Association 2 WM. E. PIERRARD FORT WORTH Major: Economics Psychology Club 2 FLOYD PURVIS TEXAS CITY, TEXAS Major: Psychology T. A. PLUMBLEY, JR. EL PAso, TEXAS Major: Sociology Student Congress 2: Homiletic Guild 13 Timothy 1, 23 A Cappella Choir 33 Alpha Chi 33 C. S. F. Vice-President 1 MARK W. RANDLE, JR. LOCK!-IART, TEXAS Major: History and Religion Timothy 4 GOVERNMENT: Thirty-eight A government field trip is completed. Coming down the steps of the Tarrant County court house are Dr. Comer Clay, Mr. Charles W. Proctor and Dr. August O. Spain. The students accompanying them are government majors. An extensive study is made of the court system and all other political branches of the American government. To accentuate this, an annual field trip is made to Aus- tin to enlighten students on the Texas State Government. FRANK LOYD REELLIE SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS Major: History ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS THOS. L. REED Timothy 3, fig The "Y" 3. -13 Mcliorist 3, 4 TEMPLE, TEXAS JOAN REINEKE DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Journalism Major: Chemistry JAN RIDDLE TUCSON, ARIZONA A Major: Psychology Skiff Staff 3, -1, Press Club 3, 4: Meliorist 3,4 Student Congress 1, 23 Leti 2: The "Y" 1. ROLLIN CARY ROBERTS BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA Major: Religion and Spanish JUNE ROSE FORT XVORTH Major: Sociology Flying Frog 1, 2, Press Club l, 2 OREN B. RUTI-IERFORD FORT WORTH Major: Mathematics Parnhola Club 43 Kappa Mu Epsilon WILLIAM J. SANFORD FORT WORTH Major: Geology 2, 3, fl, U. R. C. 4, Priscilla 1, 2, 3, 4g Frogettes 1, Meliorist 1, 2, 3, 4j Women'S Sports Association 1, 2, 3, 4: Class Secre- tary 5 WILLIAM K. ROBINETIE RAYMOND, MISSISSIPPI Major: Geology United NVorld Federalism 1, 21 Natural Science Society 1, 2 ROBERT L, ROUTH, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Religion Debate 2, Timothy 1, 2, 3, 43 United World Fcdcralists 2, 3, 45 The "Y" 13 U. R. C. 3, Meliorisr 1, 2, 3, fig Radio Vlorkshop 2, 3, 4 OPAL HALLMARK RYAN FORT WORTH Major: Sociology, Psychology Psychology Club 45 Pi Gamma Mu 4 JAMES M. SAVAGE FORT WORTH Major: Pre-Medical Alpha Chi 3: Natural Science Society 4, Vice- President 4 Thirty-nine ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS BETTYE SUE SCOTT WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS Major: Sociology Hoe-Down 4: Pi Gamma Mu fig Skating Club 4 BILL SHELLENBERGER MARIETTA, OKLAHOMA Major: Geology Alpha Chi 33 Natural Science Society 4 ,iss 'B ., FLO SCOTT STANFORD, TEXAS Major: Sociology Leti 2: Pi Gamma Mu 4: Los Hidalgos 4: Radio Workshop 2: A. C. E. Club 4 JEANNE SHELTON FORT WORTH Major: Home Economics Chi Beta 3, 45 Association of Children Education 45 Junior Cutie MARGARET ANN SCOTT FORT WORTH Major: Home Economics Chi Beta l, 2, 3, fi, Secre- tary 2, Vice President 3, Presi- dent lig Alpha Chi 3, 4, Sec- retary 4: Natural Science So- ciety 3, fi JOE SHOSID FORT VVORTI-I Major: Journalism Student Congress 3: Horned Frog Staff 1, 2, 4: Debate fig Skiff Staff 1, 2, 3, 43 Press Club 1, 2, 3, 4 MARION SCO'l"l' FORT WORTIT Major: Psychology Student Congress 1, 2: Psychol- ogy Club 2, 3, 41 T. C. U. American Legion 1, 2, 3, 4: Renegades 3, Los Hidalgos I, 2, Treasurer 1: Cheer Leader l, 2: Basketball Squadmun 1, 2: Press Club I TROY C. SIMPSON FORT WORTH Major: Geology Forty H ISTO RY : Seminar work. BETH SHOFNER FORT VUORTll Major: English Hoe-Down I, 2: Lt-ti 2: Pris cilla l, 2: Los I-lidalgos 2, 3 fl: Frogettes lg Meliodisr 'I, 2 3 4' The "Y" l 2 .ry . IED SKILLEN LUFKIN, TEXAS Major: Geology Deep in a conference of pre-civil war days is Dr. William C. Nunn and four his tory enthusiasts. At present, Dr. Nunn seems to be making a point, judging from the expressions on his audiences face. There are twenty-nine courses offered in the History Department ranging from ac ademic requirement Social Science 512 to ' Dr. William 1. Hammond is head of the department. Five other professors constitute the department staff. JAMES R. SLACK FORT XVORTH Maior: Government WILMA JEAN SMASHEY Li1"rt.l3 ROCK, ARKANSAS Mriior: Home Economics Chi Beta 2, Secretary 2: The "Y" 25 Pris- cilla lg Meliorist 2. President 2 HOMER C. SMITH, JR. BAYTOWN, Tnxfxs Major: Psychology Horned Frog Staff fl: T. C. U. American Legion 3, -'ig Renegades fig Pep Cabinet -'lg Skiff Staff 33 Press Club 35 Cheer Leader -l SHELBY W. SMITH .FORT WORTH Major: Geology Flying Frog 2. 3, fi JIMMIIE D. SPANN FORT WORTH Mniur: English BARBARA STERLING DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Religion Horned Frog Staff 53 Debate 2, 4: Hoe-Down 2, -lg Leti 2, The "Y" fl: U. R. C. 25 Priscilla 2, 5, fl: Skating Club fl: Meliorist 2, 3, -'iz Baylor Representative 3: Sweetheart Court 3: Cotton Bowl Festivities 3: Favorite Nominee 4 ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS JOHNNY SLATE FORT WORTH Maior: Chemistry Chemistry Club 3, 4 DORIS ZINN SMITH FORT WORTH Maior: Sociology JOHN RUSSELL SMITH FORT XVORTI-I Maior: Psychology Psychology Club 3, 43 A Cappella Choir 3: Radio Wforkshop 2 THERON L. SMITH YANTIS, TEXAS Major: Physics Pnrzibola Club 5g Physical Society 4 JOANNE STAFFERTON ALTOONA, IOWA Maior: Psychology Psychology Club 43 Leti 2g The "Y" 1, 2, 3 4, Vice President 53 Christian Service Fellow ship 5, 43 French Club 2, Secretary 2g U. R C. I, 2, 4, President fig Alpha Chi 3, 4 Priscilla 1, 2, 3, 4 Frogettes Ig Meliorist 1, 2 3, ll, Methodist Student Movement 2, 3, 4 Secretary-Treasurer 3 HAROLD O. STEVENS FORT XVORTH Maior: Geology Forty-one ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS BOBBY JACK STIGLER BETTY ANN STINSON STEPHENVILLE, TEXAS WACO, TEXAS Major: Biology Major: Sociology Hoe-Down 1g The "Y" lg Hoe-Down 2: Leti 2: Poetry Marching Band 2g Meliorist 1 Club 3, 45 U. R. C. 2: Pris- JUNE TAYLOR SiLsnEE, TEXAS Major: Sociology cilla 1, 23 Frogettes 1: Me' liorist 13 Women's Sports As- sociation 2 LOWELL E. TAYLOR PORT WORTH Major: Psychology and Sociology RALPH EDWARD STONE JEFFERSON CITY, MISSOURI Major: Religion Choral Club 3: Timothy 3, 43 Meliorist 3 MARJORIE S. TAYLOR YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO Major: Sociology The "Y" 3, flj Pi Gamma Mu 5, 4, Vice-President 3, Presi- denr 4 HENRY H. SWEPE FORT VVORTH Major: Geology CULLEN THMOAS Foivr WORTH Major: Geology I F Forty-two. friends. TERRY TACKETT FORT WORTH Major: Geology Marching Band 3 OWEN EDWARD THOMAS FORT WORTH Major: Mathematics Parabola Club 4 HOME ECONOMICS: One lump or two? In the cozy living room at the Sterling House a tea is in progress. These home economic majors are enjoying the lighter side of home life as they entertain their Located just north of the library, the Sterling House which is the home economics building, has all the facilities of a home The girls get full benefit of each laboratory Miss Bonnie Enlow, department head, is enjoying het share of the tea also. JACK ia. THOMAS FORT XVORTH Major: Chemistry Chemistry Club 4 PAUL T. THOMPSON FORT XVORTH Major: Religion Timothy I, 2, 5, fi: Hoc-Down l, fig United World Fctlernlists 53 The MY" fl, Meliorist l, 2 PEGGY JO TRAMMELL SAN ANGELO, TEXAS Major: Home Economics Chi Beta 55 Lcti 13 Frogettcs 1 CLAY W. WARIX FORT Womrl Major: Psychology Parabolzt Club 2, 3, Psychology Club 3, 4 LLOYD WATSON TLEMPLIQ, TEXAS Major: Sociology Timothy l, 2, 3, fi, Mcliorist 1, 2, 5, vi JAMES O. XVl'llT'l'AKER ROCHESTER, NEW' YORK Major: Psychology Student Congress 45 Psychology Club 3, fl! T. C. U. American Legion 43 United World Federnlists fig The "Y" 3. fig Natural Science Society 4g Los Hiclalgos fig Skating Club l, 2. 3, 4, President 33 Alpha Phi Omega 113 Herb- tology Club flg Mcliorists 1. 2. 3. 4 ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS CHARLES THOMPSON FORT WORTH Major: Journalism Skiff Staff 2, 5, 45 Press Club 45 Baptist Stu- denr Union 2, 3, 4 RHODES THOMPSON, JR. PARIS, KENTUCKY Major: Religion Debate 19 Timothy 1, 2, 5, 43 The "Y" 1, 25 U. R, C. 25 Meliorist 1, 3 CHARLES VAN HOOSIER NVEATHERFORD, TEXAS Major: Geology Flying Frog 5 CURTIS A. WATSON, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Chemistry Chemistry Club 4 EUGEN IA W ELLS FoRT'Won'ri-1 Major: History Flying Frog 1, 45 Leti 25 United World Fed- eralists 35 The "Y" 1, 2, Priscilla 15 Los Hidalgos 2g Frogettes lg Skating Club 1, 25 Meliorist 1, 25 Women's Sports Association 1 LOU WHITE BIRMINGHAM, INIICHIGAN Major: History Women's Sports Association 5: A. C. E. 3. 4 Forty-three ARTS AND SCIENCES SENIORS 5- 1 k ff ll sg H: 5, Ie I Wjihlqf SWG MAGGIE NELL XVHITE BROW'NFlELD, TEXAS Major: Home Economics Chi Beta 3, 4, Vice-President 4: Leti 2 ANN WINTERS PEARSALL, TEXAS Major: Home Economics Chi Beta 2, 5, -1 WILLABETH WILCOX ARLINGTON. TEXAS Maior: English Sigma Tau Delta 4 EVERETT E. WOODS FORT WORTH Maier: Sociology GEORGE H. WILDE GRAHAM, TEXAS Maior: Sociology Hue-Down 1: Renegades 2: Pep Cabinet lg Stuclcnr Court 2. 4 ANDREW WOODWARD ARLINGTON. TEXAS Maior: Geology Forty-four JOSEPH SETH WILLIAMSON FORT WORTH Maior: Biology ROBERT J . WRIGHT NEOSHO, NIISSOURI Major: Economics and Psychology Stage Band I, 2, 5, 4: Hoe- Down 3: Marching Band l, 2, 5: Chamber of Commerce 2 JOURNALISM: Students of journalism at TCU work on campus newspaper, the SKIFF. Courses in- clude practical work reporting, writiri, copy reading, and newspaper makeup. This is a typical Wednesday lab which is probably the longest one in TCU. Starting at l:50, the journalists work until 6 o'clock and sometimes 8 o'clocl-t completing every phase of the coming SKIFF. Warren K. Agee supervises each activity in lab and is acting head of the department of journalism. MARJORIE ADAMS Dallas, Texas ' JOHN W. ALEXANDER Fort Worth JUDY ALEXANDER Baytown, Texas BOB BALL Port Worth MARY ALICIE BALL Atlanta, Texas CLYDE BALLARD Fort Worth BILL B. BARTON Chickaslm, Okla. wwf ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIORS R X 455,-'f R ,ww ' fi f :9f3Hm- . : ,, ,W LALYL, ' my if , ,I , 41 , ,N of ggi A KQEEFE' AAAA 1 .,i, , S . tk f, ,, w2""',,,s: 1 4 A , L, .... H ...W f. l L L Egg A Lf 5 gb 5 W5 fm ff wgt X 3- A lg? RYA A-F QA- M AKZW-,,33.3'.S..'3'T EL A x.... , L.,,,f,N, Hrmxw 2 L 5:2 I pmt? DAN BASI-IAM Fort Worth 4 vffffw st ,, , ...E W EESX ' JG S A MARY LOUISE BELL A Fort Worth 2 P ALICE LOUISE BIENTHALL 'Ei ::':' ' f- , il Cristobal, Canal Zone , LEE v. BERGIER M - il' ' . Fort Worth X 9 , . ' Rx? FRANCIS BLANTON J acksonville, Florida , ff A A " ' V at M3322 I .L 2 nik A 4 X LPM l ,ggi 5 5 i f A ,Q V 5933, 'X iff? r TFA ff, ii Q35 Q .,..., gi 123, , .- Ei Qs? A ig 2 Mai' Sm it 2365 sf' 3' Z 'Z' .Q K' Wg .1 , ,,.:r,-,: ,.,,:. ' - ifififffififififffi A .::: 2-I P, 1 A Rf I , X X 5 It .0 L .W 5 if sf R qi, A , .. H , li Q A M f R? I N. 4 f R., 5 .M R A I l A if I TOMMIE BOUCHARD Austin, Texas ANGIE BOURLAND Itasca, Texas WILLIAM BOURLAND Arlington, Texas FLO BOY ETT Silsbee, Texas CHARLIE J. BROWN g g? Dallas, Texas JAMES xv. BROWNE I . gi: I Fort Worth ., - V TP' JOE LEE BRYAN . E Kansas City, Mo. -1. .:.t : Ax JIMMIE L. BURTON f N 5 Fort Worth ,,1.1,,:., Aff, ' Hg riri. ,.... , ..,, ' ,, CARL ta. CAMP . ""':" Fort Worth M' 1 M .:b,, VIRGINIA ANN CAMPBELL Fmt Worth his ' Qiyf 7'-f if I'-rrtrsl' TOMMY CANON Fort Worth ' T ' Q. MARY ALYCE CARLOCR Fort Worth Forty-five ARTS AND SCIENCES JLHNIORS OLGA JANE CARREJO CMRSJ JACKEE CARROLL JOE M. CARSON San Antonio, Texas Fort Worth Fort Worth JACK F. CLARK BILL I.. COLDREN RICHARD COLLIER Texarkana, Texas Battlesville, Okla. Ennis, Texas RAY C. CUNNINGHAM FRED S. DANIEL ANNETTE DAVENPORT Fort Worth ' Fort Worth Fort Worth gm.- TEENIE CHERNOSKY Temple, Texas ROBERT CONDON Fort Worth DON WEAVER DAVIS McKinney, Texas Forty-rix ummm' fe Wai xr' ? ,zz ,Q 22 1 ' """",' 3 if ' ' L V' ""' 5 "" 2 ai ':': r-"2 . E.,..... Half v..: : .'. . :" J' 1 :':: il sl "" DAVID CHEVERTON CAROLYN CHRISTOPHER Fort Worth Fort Worth DONALD COX San Angelo, Texas LAWRENCE CRANE Detroit, Michigan ELIZABETH DAVIS Mineral Wells, Texas DAVID DENTON Fort Worth MATH EMATICS: These math students are examining this odd mathematical instrument under the watchful eye of Dr. Landon Colquitt. The instrument is a model liptic cone. It is used in the study of liptic intergrals. Math professors and students are discussing it this year, planning to incorporate it into the regular curriculum next year. Charles R. Sherer is head of this department. A math major is requested to minor in chemistry or physics. CHARLES DICKIEY Fort Worth DAVID DICKINSON Midland, Texas BONNIE JUNE DISNEY Borger, Texas JIM DONNELLY Fort Worth ARTS AND SCIENCES JUNIORS SHERRY ANN DRIENNEN Stuttgart, Arkansas JACQUELYN DU BOSE Fort Worth MILDRED DUGAN Fort XVorth BILLY FARRIS Cleburne, Texas JOHN B. FAULKNER Waco, Texas BETHANY F YKE Fort Worth CHARLOTTE ELAINE GARRISON Fort Worth LAWRENCE GIBSON Alligator, Mississippi GORDON L. GRAY Fort Worth ELEANOR GREENE New York, New York ROBERT GRIFFIN Fort Worth SAM HAMILTON Port Worth GENELLE HART Fort Worth W. T. HILL, JR. Fort Worth DORIS HILLGER Fort Stockton, Texas BILLIE HOOKS Carlsbad, New Mexico Lu, XVILLIAM C. HOOSER 5 I-Ionolt1Iu,Tcrritory I-Inwuii if I JOHN C. HOWELL P, F ForrWorrh '?I LOYD P. HUMPHRIES v - Fort XVQILI1 '. ...,. - 4 92 BILLY J. JACKSON Fort Worth Jw ww 3 l III 'EEQI f1t-- - ,.:.:3EEEEEiESs ri F' , Forly-:even ARTS AND SCIENCES JUNIORS E i .2 - i 1, A ,. 14 ':.: ,.,,. ...,., A ' 4 . , f ag :a .-ss a:a:a:a:a:a:a:a:a:a it L' - - it 1. in af f as ' t Aft f , jil J lldls jg 1 :h:Ex .2.gE,..ivg:.,-f gi . W 41' 3332! : 5 1 1' H 1 Egg me ,iii iz? V 3' 3 Nth 4 Z J M It Q ,Q Ls. T lf Q ' -we Ja , . ,.,, . ysmgz r 1:-.::-4.:-,.,. .,.. . . . ,,,: . , QS,' r' ':s:ze2- 32'-:v -- 1:EE55:5:'5::'5E5EEE:E-Ev Q., ac. zf 1i:fjEEsa:g:':::.z:s-ai . areas 12:3 at .- , 'ik It :::::::::: RQ. , .... 3 x . mi 5s:s5s5a5a,... 2Q im ., .... ,, to . Eg Ili: .. "-:5:a:s ::... jj, zu., set-sw: . . -4 . . ,,,. tag, ESU W1 .: is W .., .. : 2213: .L ...... ' -if . xi... Q J. .3 was . -- lima? , :f iii, 25555 54- Ir, " 2"s":""1-2:sa,:.,:,:,:,:, , . L: 5 at :. . 2 LLLXTSEY , ig, :Tiff gg - 5 W .:.: -,,,, W, ::a::::: it gjg nga? 'f2fk2:.55 :V .- ::z5a5z.a.5.g 'Mesa , :f-1.15 .... J .Ez- 575 :usages--f ,, . .1 :a t. , . , , .,,.,,, ,:,:,.1,- New :, V .t ot. . . 2 ...L , fgtsgggs ,, . wrt !,,, - ' 5322 eases. fiwfsg::.:'7 1- ,mt W' f :Elia - ..:::Q2"2 ,.,.,E 1' A 'U X ' iii A S f if ig, TS ,Kill .. 5 V ,sf . li D s , fl. M' Hal 1- fu "' r 5 l gli' gg ai imwzng lg fwgggl 5 W 12 B' "'I- r rir ta 'lit 1 6 I f GERALDINE E. JONES Fort Worth WILLIAM J. KILMAN Fort Worth 4 rm e 5 v i i Z 2 -V .Q Lit X S. 3' L . ff Q my l A fir ' Z2 gf Q -,,. ' N ., t E Q 'Q rw V mx w gi? ri-I .SE R 2 4 2 . girly? E gel r ae Els 5 5 if , 5:5 .... - rs., sp, J gs F wmm. , ...:1.,: J Lil' .tp E1 z-- r 1. Q E m e .,: :,. ..:- - zz' E9 i -- 'Q 2:,:, f I Q T fy :':' J ziz . . :E. L5 2555. :..,iL if 'lif ,,., ' JOE JUREN GERARD E. KAYE W. V. KEITH, JR. EN KENIFF AL KILGOKE Fort Worth Fort Worth Fort Worth Fort Worth Fort Worth LLOYD A. KLAR CHARLES W. KLEINECKE JOHNNY KLUTHE CALVIN W. KNIFFIN DOYLE LANCASTER Fort Worth Fort Worth Mission, Texas Fort Worth Fort Worth JAMES C. LANKFORD DAVID F. LEE LOU ANN LESLEY LULA LEVERETT JIMMY LOVELL Fort XVorth Fort Worth Wichita Falls, Texas Overton, Texas Fort Worth x M., F arty-eight PHILOSOPHY: A person who "tlidn't know Philosophy from his left elbow," would think Robert E. Robertson stayed up in the clouds as he lectured this philosophy class. Actually, he is just as far up as the Fort Worth skyline Cnote this in the backgroundj. One of the first aims of philosophy is to stimulate vigorous thinking. Dr. Cortell K. Holsapple is head of this department. Each philosophy student is asked to bring his reasoning powers to class. ARTS AND SCIENCES UNIORS I wa-aff" s N Yr a WLT' ' ' x K L s W ARTS AND SCIENCES ,IUNIORS eras: 52:5 Q, . ..,q. .,,., p . 3 ig Q: ..,. r, y. gg it ::., ..,:.: - . : ' 2 2 f lg E .. .. yr l tes ez it tl iw? I X S X ii Q, J- 5 55 . fit ' gif xiii 4 l 4 A f mi, I? vga jg? ig EE? gm. , New New ...Rm we Fl lf E MANUEL PAEZ Bogota, Colombia South America B. K. PRESSLEY Fort Worth WAYLAND ROBERTS Fort' Worth ROBERT PAINTER MILDRED PEARSON MILDRED PETERSON DAN A PIRTLE Artesia, N. M. Fort Worth Springfield, Mass. Throckmorton, Texas ANNE PRICE BOB RAGSDALE JOHN GUINN RAMSAY DOYLE RAYMOND Longview, Texas Burkburnenz, Texas Fort Worth Fort Worth TOM E. ROBINSON, JR. ROSE M. ROTH JAMES L. RUGGIERO JOHN SAUNDEN Fort Worth Fort Worth Fort Worth Bonham, Texzw PHYSICS: F1 ty BETTY RUTH PLUMBLEY El' Paso, Texas HELEN L. REEED Gordon, Texas FRED A. SAVAGE Fort Worth Go around the corner of the little gym. Take the door leading to the basement. Step around the collection of pipes, boxes, etc. Round two or three corners, and there will be Dr. Newton Gaines in his office. He is head of the Physics department. With the principle of physics as the com- mon foundation, such subjects as mechanics, electricity, sound, light, nature of matter, radio and electronics, and atomic and nu- clear relationships are studied. ARNOLD SCHECTMAN Fort Worth MILDRED SCHEIRMAN Crockett, Texas MARY LOUISE SCHUCH San Angelo, Texas KATI-IRYN SHACKELFORD Little Rock, Arkansas BETTY CLAY SHANK Fort Worth FLOYD D. SLATON Pampa, Texas L. N. SLAYTON Fort Worth ROBERT E. SLOCUM Fort Worth BARBARA SMITH Rotan, Texas CLAY W. SMITH Fort Wlorth JAMES P. SMITH Fort Worth LEONARDINE SMITH Austin, Texas MIKE SMITH Bonham, Texas EDWIN STANFORD Ccntralin, Illinois MARJORIE STEWART Fort Worth NOBLE H. STOCKSTILL Fort Worth C. RAY STOKES Fort Wortl1 RITA SULLIVAN Palestine, Texas SPURGIZON SUTHERLAND Fort Worth JEANINE TAEGEL Plainview, Texas MARJIE F. TAYLOR Pampa, Texas PEGGY THOMAS Wichita Falls, Texas ROBERT C. THOMAS Fort Wortlm ARLINGTON T. THOMPSON Salamanca, New York ARTS AND SCIENCES JUNIORS ,f , , K .... ll 3 Q1 5 I xi if I of fx :,..- - 1. ::-2- ' ""' in rf 'fl ' X ,.,. .. K fgsi: 1,.r ,g,:::.:',' 'a 7 N " A il X A 3 , ,..' 51. ,f S Z' lltkiffiiiz - Wf??4g f . A I x NS -'P'-iv fu., ffn1,,4,? 2g,,.f. Q J. iw 4 a,".:.-: . 21 hm . wi 1 ii! L. E 2 f if 0 4 2 ..g:5.1g:lj3zg,- ggi K mi ' . 213 If -t wnitg wg? X sf. 5 5.3.33 ig . 35 A is w W, vw: F 115, - flj -my f IIEI:. , .,,.. .I ,i i 'll - ' ' . 3 , '.i2.I?iI:2e:, .- . l '3EE?5'i55 ' f- I as a Egg ffilllffi QF' ,, .ravi W I . mn. .,,. Y .- 'agar 4211. ' Af-in W1 ' . QQ Lpffj " l ,Q H. , V ,HZZ J yr: Nt , 115 gjiliib -- 1. 1, L ,M t 'T 'S R lex .4- . f i ' 6. Fifty-one ARTS AND SCIENCES JUNIORS A ,,,, 3 T., ,M , Ifiizziiii REEEEEEEEEE - 1 .5 EQ . ,W 5 . 5' 955 :ii 53- A ,H 551' A . zsesisgf- .A ga? as gf lg ,L 9:5 Milf' ' W 5. .5 W ,111 ...Z I .1 1 fi gl dll . ' 4 H I lf? I ff st , A .i . .X - ff , .,.,.,. W , I ltlz S 1 ,.. ,.. . fl! ' ::: a A.sA:s . 4 NI: L . . . QEZEZIZ, fm? M flllllll iillillii Qiitffi ...- A " A C' 1, I AQ : - A, A 'li AA ni. ' H, I :.,. ...Vu 2. ,E Il .Ili ,, :,:, , .ss 3 1 . ""' -if ff. A fr I5 ' 'Sw .lil ,.., sail gggy .. "5 ":""' iii?-"III .... , Q AM' ..V' iiiwiialllgi Lg. . 'Ziif " SSS - A SAI 51 A'1'A " ,... i -":' fi' .." 2 .......AAA- 7 '-"' A '-'- - "' ff 'I ::' 'W "'::":' I AEP' '- Z' Ae- v,., . klll "li if ----v----: i llll l .SS"' :'AA ":"' s -" :"' ' Left to right: HARRISON L. TOWNES WOODIE-LOU TROUT JESSE H. TURNER Denton, Texas Lufkin, Texas Fort Worth Left to tight: CHARLES L. WALLER NANCY WARD MARGARET WARNER Fort Worth Left to right: JAMES CODY WHITE Weatherford, Texas Wlichita Falls, Texas JOHN B. WHITE Brownsville, Texas Altoona, Penna. GARNER L. WILDE Graham, Texas DELORES VARGAS Fort Worth PHYLLIS J. WASSON Kansas City, Mo. SUE WILLIAMS Marianna, Florida sa an A 'Q F I H 1 J JM Q BRUCE VINCENT Ellis, Kansas NIRA WEAVER Garland, Texas JACK WREN Weatherford, Texas PSYCHOLOGY: Q . ,N g . 2 F 1 5 2 5 if t A E -3, ibiza JEARL D. WALKER Aledo, Texas BETTY JEAN WERNER Independence, Mo. JAME EDWARD YORK Fort Worth No, this is not an elementary education class, nor is the student lapsing into second childhood. This is a phychological block test, known Fiffy-two to psychologists as the Minnesota Spatial Relations Test. It is one of the vocational aptitude examinations open to all students. Note the girl in the hckground. She is timing the boy being tested. Dr. Thomas F. Richardson is head of the department. These tests are open to all stu- dents. ANN ABBAS Cleburne, Texas JAMES ADAIR Dallas. Texas TED ALLEN Fort Worrh XVESLEY ANDERSON ,, vi, 5 i if fia- N 1 4 ?:.:.: ..h Ti . at NN H, ss ' 4 Cal vm- Texas lilfliliflf I I THORP ANDREWS Fort Worth JOHN AREND Taylor, Texas RALPH ARMSTRONG For: Worth ADELE ASHLEY Llano, Texas PETE BAKER Fon Worth BILL BASS Cleburne, Texas TOMMY BECK Ausrin, Texas JOY BELL Artesia, . . . 6:4 L, ..,.,, V-,,. , , . ful ,,.,.,., . if . Li.. 1, is WJ? i L ,, , , ' - .... l'--f ARTS AND SCIENCES SOPHOMORES fi- " 5 l'AA A f 3 I fel X. i 3 6 ,,, si , ,Q .., ew f A K I' fl' ,A W ali? A , QF 42 si U' I si Z5 -,.s 'Ps N M "l .'.,,.,v,- f 7 ROSCOE BELL Denver, Colo, BETTY BERRY Big Spring. Texas WANDA BIZZELI. Overton, Texas CALVIN BOLES Alamogordo, N. M. ROY BREWTON Mineral Wells, Texas GENE BRICE Sulphur Springs, Texas CHARLENE BROOK Forr Worth BILL BROOKS Temple, Texas NORA BRUCE Fort Worth DAVID BRUNIE Anna, Texas DOROTHY BRYYANT Denison, Texas JOAN BULMER Forr Vlorrh MARILYN BURKE I-Iousron. Texas WILLIAM BURR Fort Worth BARBARA CAMP Pecos, Texas MARY BETTY CAMP Fort Worth Ev-lfvimiz 3 .' eiifiilifi Ni YW ' W i::m,e:i:r nf fm fs: fufwsm . 'fi' assesses ' S 5 g-X gags . . - E52 saw l 1 E, A525 'i 2 sig Z, Wg Q, r Lljfxziig 3 T? E gi s 1 A ,fm w 1, A ..s,,, Y , nn, , - -- 4-ik... ' A ...:.:.:.. i 1 . W swf -N ' I K I :.o ,.,. ' 'F-1 ' 3 H .I , . ,,. 'fl '-,: , ,.,Q I In ., ,ggi ifw- A I I 2 2 2 2 -:-: 2 L?eff '25 ' ::..' ' "' rg 9551 i I """ ""'-v . f l zlafff E zl. z ' 3 73" 2 2 2 .1.r: ."r,,s has 'WS Fifty-three ARTS AND SCIENCES SOPHOMORES mfs - :::... we - mf . . f A: : QII: :-- ..:::ia22s2a 2::1',. Sjif 15 i1'-. .awp i., - 7 :E::iEi:.. -- if - .u ,-.- ":s..s: :-f-- -. ny' V' riff fu .ilisis-If . V :-.:,: f: ft: ,-1-W V. 5: its '-'- .fl A E in ...,... .:.:.: 13.5, 4 4. '::::iasasa-2- ' Q , , 2 ,ii M. " R .. fri alll M 5 i , 2 -we fll an Q K 5 5 Q me 1 5 y .K R, 1 E-WT' " I . ,.,. ,. W lf ll f 1 sf 2 I 4 I ' was Y X if f if fgffiiiky -' 2 . 1' fm- -mx' P .. -W... -:-: ji . in , E I Psi fi 5 , at ., ' . . S,,. g -:A.' ii v::' :.: -',, 'izz Azzz is :::..:: E ,V1. ' SS E ziz ,1..v: .S.AS W "": 1 5 , , :.: ' ' f erte 'fi I ""':: 3 fi .1 lil? H ,, 'Q . U, ,A,- g I "'A' W it s . I zq, A BOB CAMPBELL GRAYFORD CAMPBELL Fort Worth Fort Worth CHRISTINE CHADWICK Chicota, Texas BOBBY Du PREE Palestine, Texas FRANCES CAMPBELL Fort Worth X 'le JOE CAREY Breckenridge, Texas H H ' . .-.-,,.,:,:swwv--M ,. , lgygz, , . ,, ,M ..,. V V H str- - :,:: - .::...:::::: va-.:. ,I flag :' - I l " E fi sy, tim 2fi 'A:gEa Eg' . ,---f::::::::-- K A ' . 'A .... . . H .Qi-ft' :s.:s-asv: :z::::::-: z:::-1f:.:: .W -' E?1,51,'I5-95 ':v:'E:E:E:?.iEEr5 ., t + 4 E 4 , ' ' ..E:E:E:E:::Ei 'gaasasasasasxa ' -' L. 15 . 11' 'lffli :-:-: ' -1'-isis: . it :a:,.,sgag5: 9 -f --E33 i Y f, :aaaaaaals gr:-:. 'Qi ' f """ 4. ,,.,.? ":' ' " L' ' -- - 1 E L i AL' if ziz --iil ' ?Sl Q 1 22? I -.V L L L ':" ,.,...,. ii ' IIL f -22E- ' . I MICKEY CARTEN Fort Worth JEROME CASLER Fort Worth H. R. CASH El Paso, Texas LOUIS COLE LEWIS DAVIS AMELIA DOUGLAS Fort Worth Philadelphia, Penn. Electra, Texas GRETA CHADWICK JANE COYLE MARY KATHREEN DOBBS Sonora, Texas Fort Worth Fort Worth MARK DYER JEFF EDWARDS WM. FENTON Dallas, Texas Van Alstyne, Texas Glendale, N. Y. FRED DUNN MARY IRENE EDGERTON BILL EVANOFF Midland, Texas San Antonio, Texas Breckenridge, Texas UNDERGRADUATE RELIGION: Open to all students on the campus is a period of worship and devotion conducted in Brite Chapel Monday through Friday. The twenty minute program beginning at Fifty-four 12 o'clock is prepared by undergraduate religion majors. Guest speakers are invited to enlighten students on the different phases of religion. Dr. Cecil F. Cheverton is head of the religion department. Any T. C. U. gradu- ate is required to take six hours of a re- ligious survey of the Bible. M , :.::m,-'.,,-i-.-.::- --e:::-r-1' 'r I il f 3' A .... i i ... . .... . ......l. . .... ttt i ' oo.. ..t. JACK L. FIELD Fort Worth HELEN FISHER Houston, Texas J- H. GAINES Fort Worth LELLA GARRETT CAROLE GINGLES Denison . Texas JIMMY GOOCH Mineral Wells, Texas Fort Worth EDITH GREGORY Fort Worth OLIVER C. HARPER ROBERT HARR Fort Wortlt For: Worth CHARLENE HARRISON Fort Worth BILLY I-I EATH Fort Worth WALTER HEHL Austin, Texas MARIANNE HILL Houston, Texas RAYMOND HOLLABAUGH Midlothian, Texas HAROLD H OLLOWAY Fort Worth JACK HOOTE WOOD HOWARD San Angelo, Texas NEIL HULINGS Clifton, Texas Fort Viforth ARTHUR HUNT Fort Worth KATHERINE HUTCHINS Fort Worth CHARLES ING Longview, Texas BILL J AMISON McLeod, Texas MRS. WANDA JOHNSON Fort Wtmrtlm SH ERWOOD JOHNSTON Fort Worth RAYMOND A. JONES Houston, Texas - SHIRLEY SUE KANE Fort Worth FLYNT KENNEDY Chillicothe, Texas ARTS AND SCIENCES SOPHOMORES , ' gv gzilgfi . fizii :-:- :I s-:g.gs 'Z' ' I , i I 2 x A1 W -v ft '-5i:Ei.::4., ' - -2.5 '.-f5:":' 1:1 A J- , gf I 6 ig? if ' s . SI, E gt 2, I A l if igzl ,, I 3 , , E s Y 6 2 3' Q6 Ig! ! ,gr . Wi M in T. My ,gg 1 'In 4 " i ai I U Rig? . WM 'IIASSMY ' -filfifff mort: - sian iswmm. A . "" - f ' .l"i JL!! fit 'iff -- -fi' ttf :V ,, ww, -. , , I if 5552! M522 ug: . 1 .,,. 2 ,. lzllil .,., I -. f " .. - 9 Wi ov K 6 3 N 2 Wye af M ti ' Q i, f ig 43 Y Fifty-five ARTS AND SCIENCES SOPHOMORES aa31Q:,:,:,:,:,:,:g,:E:f11,155 a.g:.:, , , 5 I E E E is I ,. 1s1f4g,., -,- , 1 , ...-.a tt, s'4:'FEvf. . i X . 5 - 1, E 1 ' ll 1 X ,iw 1 .,.. M. ,, ek -Q jj! 1 6, 55 f 5 F gil 1 .., A .. -11:-21... ,f - A ,5 , I lm , 2 Q 21 Y K W N a e a ll .W , ,,,L, 11,7 A --v- -. -vm W - . 1 ' "'i .eSSV, E W, ,...... Ay 1 . l?s'1,,g ,,',ff JAMES KING Fort Worth MARIANNE LOBDELI. Rosedale, Mississippi JANE MARTIN Jacksonville, Florida JEAN KINGSBURY Fort Worth CHARLES LUDWIG Cincinnati, Ohio KENNETH MATHIS Fort Worth DORIS KOPPEN Fort Worth DAVID LYNCH Marshall, Texas DALE MAYBRIER Dallas, Texas 5 mi, ss 1 111 1 iii s ,E 1 -4 , f ,,11i1z my " ""' as:::z::. 11 ig X U . iv 5, l H Hi 5 1 ? WRAYMON LAWLEY ARLENE LISMAN Fort Worth Fort Worth PI-IILLIP LEACH Lufkin, Texas WILLIAM MacDONALD BEBE COUCH MARSHALL Fort Wortlm San Antonio, Texas JUNE MALLATT Cleburne, Texas ALEX McGLINCl-IEY PAT MERGENS Aledo, Texas Fort Worth Fifty-.fix JEAN MCHUGH New Orleans, Louisiana SOCIOLOGY: Dr. Austin L. Porterfield, head of the Sociology department is discussing with an associate the growth and shift of the Fort Wrarth population. This map is being studied by sociology students and will be observed for the next several years to see which way the town is growing and what parts of the city are dying away. Physical, biological, psychological and cultural factors are considered in the study of sociology. BOB MILLER Fort Worth ROBERT E. MILLER Fort Worth EARL MOORE Indianapolis, Indiana NORMAN MOORE Long Islnnd, N. Y. ROBERT MORRIS Bay City, Texas YOUNG JOY MULKEY Fort Worth JAMES MUNCY Fort Worth MARGARET MUNDHENKE Fort Worth RALPH NELSON Marinette, Wisconsin DORA JEAN OCII-IOA Fort Worth GLENN NORMAN Fort Worth MOLLY ANDREE OGG Fort Worth JAMES O'NEAL Loving, Texas JI M OUSLEY Fort Worth GEORGE ORM Fort Worth OLETA OW EN Kahoka, Missouri RAINEY OWEN Abilene, Texas THERON OXLEY Fort Worth BILL PARKEY Fort Worth C. L. PATTERSON Big Spring, Texas LONA SUE PATTERSON Abilene, Texas RICHARD PENTECOST Fort Worth CLAIR PORTER Brownsville, Texas NANCY POSTON Fort Worth WM. B. PROTHRO Mercedes. Texas PEGGY RAGAN Fort Worth RICHARD RAMSEY Fort Worth CAROLENE REDMOND Fort Worth ARTS AND SCIENCES SOPHOMORES 'R wt i 3 i 'affifmf 1 ul . . 'til . --:-:mt 'ga I . ,sly I K ig, N if 'IPA 'X Y ig .lil , . I . ., ,,,.t M 'yllw' ,,., ii' may 2 V.. 75... i , it 1553 S. Qi" gg 12 2 A sf L., E322 if 2 , .., .,.,.,.. .5 ,tm +- , irroo i s 1 iw il? " r 2331, W 515 35' ggi A , if Sl ii, W .:.,.: a I fa ii I 1 nk i L. ESQ rx-W' M Ad m . . WWW t Fil? , .,.,. 1 tt mg., 2 il ? li., 2 i . s Q in gisgkih 5 K ,I J I 1 v RR ..W.W. t- 5 l lg-ies , V : Elwvf Wi :.:.: M-iff f- N S is 'Qi l I SRF A as IME? ti fi gill? xii A ig ht 5 ,. , Z I ,L he I 1 tm pu i in 4 , I ,, , 4 f .Q L, ...,. v,,,... 5 will f or 2 , 1 1 v ii? ' 5 s 5 we Q 5 5 gl is wif 4 it 1 E l ' a 252, i. iii, .... : 4 3 tt.. f Ei ' 2 W Q31 WEE s 3 QE 3' fi ,gf M. f-. r , ' 1 IVV ,Q i . tai 1 R ' ,, V iziz t':::- , , , ,.,.,.,,.,..... to F iffy-reven ARTS AND SCIENCES SOPHOMORES 6+ W' 1 if, WWQQE Fifty-eight CHARLES REECE San Antonio, Texas WILLIAM REEDER Port Arthur, Texas JOYCE R IZYNOLDS San Antonio, Texas JOSE ROMAN Maria, Texas ROBERT ROSS Fort Worth JIM RICI-IERSON Fort Worth MOLLY ROY Fort Worth MICHAEL SALIM Beaumont, Texas THOMAS RYAN Fort Worth JOANNE SCHNEIDER Houston, Texas BILL SCI-IULKEY San Angelo, Texas ORLANDO SEGURA Mnrfo, Texas JOSEPH SEARS Fort Wortli PATRICK SHANNON Fort Worth SARAH SIMONDS Vernon, Texas VERNELL SKULAN Milwaukee, Wisconsin ROBERT F. SLOAN Fort NVorth BOB SINGER Bogota, Colombia III ADOLPHUS P, SMITH Fort Worth HARVEY SMITH Fort Worth MARLIN SMITH Lubbock, Texas BETTY SUE SMITH Center, Texas WADE STEPP Curtisvi BEVERLY STEWART Fort Worth JIMMY L. STORY Alice, Texas llc, Penn. JAMES E. STERLING Daisetta, Texas WILLIAM ORVILLE STRAWN Fort Worth WILLIAM STUART Hattiesburg, Mississippi ARTS AND SCIEN BENNIE TAYLOR Fort Worth TOMMY TAYLOR Fort Worth ,sv - ,J Et .,,.,. ,E UU r . . ., my .:.,.a 5 ,. 5---1 CES SOPHOM RES 4s,3fi.g?' :EE Erf lf E 5 ., ::.:::. g ..,.,. , :sisii li' ,LE 5 1. ,. T i ' V t S I X54 i I f fiw if E tj f , E2- 9 Y i g E Z2 t ' l"'??i 'F 2 I , 2 gif! , it ihfkgg 33 s.,,',' :I Z Q ii X N K 1? laik 1 is 1' . L M JIM C- THOMPSON Fort Worth ROBERT E. THRONE A FortWorrh I of I X' M A I LEON TIDMORIZ I - JACK TRUITT , ,.,,, , Longview, TEXHS ,V NANCY TUNE "" I A - CHARLES W, TYLER ' ' Fort Worth -if-gQf "" E 3 " CROSSON L. TYLER Corpus Christi, Tcxm JOHN WADDLE Sherman, Texas ANNE WALKER For: Worth NICKIE WALLACE Burleson, 'Texas JOE WARD Childress, Texas JAMES H. WARNES Pcnwell, Texas MACK WEBB Goldsmith, Texas MARGARET W ELCH Fort Worth ANNE WHITE Houston, Texas RALPH WHITE Fort Worth JOE CHAN WHITTEN Eldorado, Texas JAMES WILSON Stamford, Texns fm in ' Emil ? , flu, . . 1 L L- it-vf E, Emp '-:EE EEE 92122 1 t lm ity , ,,, 'E EH ig law? 2 ? Six: 3 A if L E E zf-EW' 2 J' ,., s'Elfl?I1?STEl 2:2:2 ,... H .EE ,.,.,, . -. , ,,,. ,,- .w gr, , ,,s,.,. , ': -::-v g:E,gff: A ,,, ,.:Q .,- 4 -Im:-:-::: is E I gqggms 2 E 1 'SEE -Q .E -mummy .... JOAN WILSON Form Worth JUNE WILLIS Fort Worth DICK WOOD Denison, Texas EWART WYLE Tyler, T exns si E .E t , s rf . y t 5 E5 ga fy AEE if t J' Q I aw , fs E: 2 2 E 'H , , 2, 5 E I I I Vi .... ' gn :EI zzzzr 'ww Fifty-nine ARTS AND SCIENCES FRESI-IMEN LLM ig' ' ' ITS? Z 'K i if V ' lilo P VVL 215. Q A . .. - .. , 5+ 1'-df..-:.z-1,-rn-.,1 W ' K 1 Q 22 ' I A,.,.,. . izbz. Q3 S ri w Hi :Sul ' 'll' gig: F' H IJ J Q ,J is ilik Eg gg, A M .,., 5-5,jf,, --: -.-.- 5? .... fig 0 ff its 1 Y S . . iw CS ,L S 'is , 'tg' I 4 n ., 515: r , ' 3 . 5 - A N ,:,,.l.,.,,.,...,,t , ..,.,.,.,. ., . . - ' Q'-:gasses 5 f , err: Qs- ,, .. ,,,, . . ,. 1- m U21 WN, AWA Sf: zz- ' T. S S Q 1: 5 L . ., .:,,::,, -ss l Sixty PATSY ADAMS Fort Wforth DOROTHY ADLER Fort Worth JERE ADMIRE Fort Worth DICK R. ALLEN Hagerman, New Mexico IRVING ALTMAN Benton Harbor, Mich. WILLIAMS AMMONS Wink, Texas CHUCK ANDREWS Fort Worth KEITH ARNOLD Oklaunion, Texas BILL ARROWOOD For: Worth HOY AUSTIN Fort Worth JOHN T. AUSTIN Fort Worth JANET AV ERY Fort Worth CHARLES BAILEY Ballinger, Texas JAMES BARBER Midland, Texas NORMAN BAN TZ Lubbock, Texas BETTY BATCHELOR Houston, Texas BOB BEAUPRE Fort Worth LETITIA BEARD Fort Worth JOHNIE BEASLEY Sc. Vicksburg, Mississippi CAROL BEERS Pensacola, Florida WARREN BELL Partonville, Texas PATRICIA BENEDICT Midland, Texas HOWARD BERGNER Chicago, Illinois BETTY ANN BERTELSEN Houston, Texas ROBERT T. BRADBURY Cleburne, Texas DON BREWER Waycross, Georgia JIMMY BROWDER Cleburne, Texas JOHN P. BRUCE Monahrms, Texas Dnllas, Texas JESSE BRYANT Fort Worrh JUNE BURRAGE Fort Worth C. J. BULLARD . 444 Q, v,---- 1 Tyler- I .,:.:,.,,A I CAROLYN BUSHEY For: Worth 1 BARBARA BUSCI-IMAN BILLY CALDWELL Fort Worxh RAY CALLECOATH Tyler, Texas SARA CARLOCK Dallas Texas JULIA CASTLE Houston, Texas J OE CA M ERON For: Worth EDWARD S. CHESS Sloughzon, Wisconsin ROBERT H. CHRISTIAN We-allierford, Texas LORETTA C1-IUNN Fort Worth BOB CHRISTOPHER Auszin, Texas CAROLYN CLARK Dallas, Texas J EFF CLARK Bay City, Texas CHARLES COBDEN Mineral Wells, Texas "BUBBA" COLEMAN Vernon, Texas LELAND COGGAN MARY COOPER For: Worth Kirkwood, Missouri J. H. COOK Fon Worth NORMAN CORNELIUS For: Worth MARY LOU COTHRAN Dallas, Texas JANE COULTER Olney, Texas ALBERT B. CRABB, JR. Form Worth CHARLES CRAIG Fort Worth MAUREEN CRONIN For: Worth BILLY RUTH CROUT Corpus Christi, Texas SCIENCES FRESHMEN wasp X 5' W wwf wif-xfffiffis ' ilv 11 L L ' I Q J I g I ff 1, ,gg ,,..,...,, t if , ......., ,, M was .. V -.,s:,::-'szlz ,:f-- ,gg vi' 'M 5 ll xii, I ,.., . fn zz.: 'lxz 'I-:..'::"E Y' :::-:-:EW-3f....' 4" ffs-Sw ...,, ' -1 I I smzzzrnr. . 4 G+,-, ,I '- ,, A Sixty-one ARTS AND SCIENCES FRESHMEN 5-wwwase,fwf-ai wg, W - is f,.+l:r:i.w. :,ggj f" '2 ... " .fp,.2 1 Viiliifii , V ix ft ..... . . , .,.,.. . 1 ..,. - if1i""mtt2gw? -t A5251 ' I agwwsf af' : ' f.f"awEfs521 1 . , ' YJ?-W A ..:5f: 6, V , . V 1 g H MQ 'Qp.11'f'f:gf'f' t ,Q 7 ..., - . R-5 : V H A t,22:,,,Q,.if ":5:::::'I ,Mu M JAMM, , W gow EJ' Em? ...,.. .gl in .5 ..,.. - -'-' ,f ll ft.--az.:-3-,zz 5 1.2 ,ww ---- ' sw' --'- , .gg f fs' ' 7, .axes 25 if .H ft Sixty-two BARBARA DAVIDSON Fort Worth MARY EDNA DAVIS Vicksburg, Mississippi JOHN H. DOLLINS Fort Worth DON DOWNING Midland, Texas BETTY DRIVER Fort Worth CARROLL DUNCAN Fort Worth CHARLES DUNCAN Fort Worth ROSEMARY DU ROCHER Rochester, New York FRANK DYLESKI For: Worth BILL EDWARDS Christoval, Texas SUE EDWARDS Fort Worth BETTYE ELLIS Waxahachic, Texas ROY B. ELLIS Fort Worth FAY FAULKNER Breckenridge, Texas EDWARD FIELDING Fort Worth THOMAS W. FIFE Hamilton, Montana MARCUS L. FINLEY Caddo, Texas ANN FLOORE Fort Worth NORMA FLOWERS Pcrryton, Texas ,JAMES T. FLYNT Mineola, Texas JOHN A. FULLER, JR. Port Isabel, Texas JOAN FORE Tulia, Texas RAYNARD FOSTER Fort Worth MIKE GARCIA Fort Worth GLEN GIBBINS Midland, Texas R. H. GLAZNER Vernon, Texas MARILYN GLENN Mineral Wells, Texas ELIZABETH GILLIAND Houston, Texas BETTY JEANNE GREENE Eastland, Texas PATSY GREENWELL Waxahachie, Texas DIANE GREGORY Fort Worth WALTER GRIMES Dallas, Texas CHARLES C. HATHAWAY Fort Worth JIM HATLEY Phillips, Texas JACQUELYN HAMILTON Sulphur Springs, Texas JAMES E. HANKS Wink. Texas RICHARD HANSEN Fort Worth ELIZABETH ANN HARP Matador, Texas MARSHALL E. HARRIS Dt-Land. Florida JOHNNY L. HASKEY Fort Worth CAROLYN HAUGH Houston, Texas REAGAN A. HAYGOOD Fort Worth MYRTLE Jo HEAD Sulphur Springs, Texas C. H. HEDGE Henderson. Texas MERITA HEINZMAN State College, New Mexico LORETTA JEAN HENDERSON San Angelo, Texas BEVERLY HELLMAN Fort Worth BEVERLY HERRIN Vernonia, Oregon ROBERT D. I-IESLEP Houston.'I'cxas JOHN HIGHTOWER Fort Worth MARTHA HIGHTOWER Fort Worth DELBERT P. HOOPER Fort Worth GEORGIA HUNNICUTT Fort Worth DAN HUNT Childress, Texas TOMMY INMAN Fort Worth C. M. JACKSON Waxahachie. Texas ARTS AND SCIENCES FRESHNIEN Wifi DW L , -,Eff SQ' 25711 , ' iii? .... -se, 1 1 42 l ' . --Q sv N ag: ,.5- 3,p.,f Gs' . . V J .. ,,,.?.m . M 1srfSl?5S" gg, . time5555555555:-las' ,- 3 tul "' ' A 'Q li gg I 2 Q5 '1 t I I gem f f 22 ....,.,.,..-. ,.:. . Ffwfiifl .ffl f. 122255 ,, W. Kitt 2" ' zyyzi E .' Ei! 1 at E r as ff ' :mafia ,',5iI'MisEil Q It lg ,.,., . ,..,......... 1 ,.... 'E -QSM? . ss J s , . Q Q TL.i::,, 5:s:s:5:5:5:s:s:a:a:a:s:a:as:5:5:5:5:5 VI..',',,4,,z2' l TATT?EEEEEi5:'?5 E . ,llg -.- SV: QM EE ,Q :.,. , kb .,., F .,...,,,,,, ' 55 ...,.. ' Y -:,esE:E :...:. .... 4 . 15 W.: ...,,. ..,g,' gt E125 , EEZ .,,.,., , EI E - fwtxl '.:-1 ! bt K Q Q x l if M . 5 5 22322 4' l L U ,: -73. t. .N ,,-.Ft : -'--- ,,.,.,.., , H. ... . ..... , .,, ,.U,t,.,. ,.,., . , . . kfwwmn 1. .ag i L45 J EFS? . .55 ,...... , nl l 4 I' ' ff? i H J .... W Eff Sixty-three ARTS AND SCIENCES FRESHMEN is Kg Hilti T A, , 6, LI I i, EEE Ez, z ,.. .::.: : : ::5i5i5i5::::.:-: 6.4.5-t.' '1 it V ZH? . .... r va 2:::: Zi lf! 1 iw gg M ,Wt - .. me if A. M.. . . . f, v , 3, S fr lst lg 'ie il W. " 'W' 5 fs 2 if 'x-N 3 ig? zzzz li t is N A i f f EEE W f ,WH 5 11' :fgic :. Nm :z, 21 f Eg Li' A it l 'ff l 2 2 A ' . A"- 2 " ., 1.', E it ,.,. if ::'g .,.,. E , 3' IEA "kt: V 1 et : 7, .. l- If ,., gil? --::::: s :ers QI. ' t '52 if: 14 wi-iii I I Sax Z v Zvi ,rf sl l its 1 i :i,. .R cess tp . i. 5:5 it, ' ta Mis' ,,, "i" it : .zfriy All- ,,,,, I .,..i: : 'Y :::, ttt I .... A ,,:i ,:,:::iEiEE ., ,,1:.::.l1,., ,,::.,.2 .,.,.,,S.,. . Sixty-four ,uf F , 310. hw, , mf. W4 4 as li 6... ,- ' - ,j?Sfitz5J ::,:,. - v-.. qi.::::,E:,. ,,.,..E ,,,i.A W iff 1 fs- 9 E 2 1 2 - :::::::Y"' J ' "::::::: z 'iff fi .... ---- , i A ::,: R Tu, x iff'-Hin, A ,E i 1 , Mi :::::::::::::::::::-:.: , , , t ft-M1 . 'Z E .. iw., ,E . ..: F Ax as .5-rf' 4: F te E My Ml? 1 E 'Q f is rr W5 gl its ,tts f Hs i f Nw ,HE 1 E. J. W. JACKSON Maypearl, Texas SYLVIA JACOBS Fort Worth LA RUE JAUDON Port Isabel, Texas LYN J EKEL Fort Worth ROBERT C. JOHNSON Dallas, Texas JOAN J OLLEY Port Worth RAY LEON KBMP Paris, Texas A. R. KENNEDY Fort Worth BETTY KILLGORE Port Worth BETTY KIM BALL Fort Worth NEIL LINDLEY Fort Worth JOE W. LIVELY Lnmpasas, Texas ERN I E MARTIN Fort Worth ROBERT C. MAYFIELD Abilene, Texas HELEN MAULTSBY Plano, Texas EVELYN MAYHEW Fort Worth ELOISE MAYO Santa Paula, California KENNETH McCALL Fort Worth MAX M CCALL Fort Worth RUTH McCLESKY Fort Worth LUCIAN MCCLUNG Fort Worth URSULA MCDERMOTT Lufkin, Texas GERALD E. MCELROY Paris, Texas JOHN G. MCKENNA Terre Haute, Indiana KENNETH MCKENZIE Weatherford, Texas LARRY MEEKER Fort Worth JAMIE MENDOZA La Paz Bolivih, South America JOAN MILNER Fort Worth CONNIE MACK MORRISON Coahoma, Texas MARY MORRISON Houston, Texas PHIL MORRISON Fort Worxh BETH MURPHY Dumas, Texas PAUL W. MURPHEY Augusta, Georgia MARTHA NORSWORTHY Jackson, Mississippi LYNN W. NEILL Midland, Texas MOLLIE JEANNE OWEN Raton, New Mexico DON PARKER Port Arrhur, Texas SHIRLEY PATTERSON Sweetwater, Texas JOHN B. PAYN E Webster Groves, Missouri JOHN W. PAYNE Dallas, Texas THOMAS PERME Torenrun, Pennsylvania DON PERRY Ruidoso, New Mexico JULIE ANN PEDERSON Dallas, Texas JANELLE PHILLIPS Fort Worrh GEORGE T. PIERCE Post, Texas CARMEN POWELL Henrietta, Texas CAROL ANN PRUITT Waco, Texas JOHN E. QUICK Albuquerque, New Mexico JOHN G. RALSTON Fort Worth ANN RATTIKIN Fort Worxh CAROLYN RAY Dallas, Texas MELVA JEAN READ Fort Worth BILL REASON ER Fort Worth BETTY RICHTER Houston, Texas IRENE ROUNTREE Boone, Iowa GEORGE T. ROYSE Amarillo, Texas ARTS AND SCIENCES FRESHMEN f-qw.. V ...... N ...- . H32-A 2: ....... , , ,. vga 1 4 -Leaf, . iw , N I if r X :ak .Y I se wg f I is , f an V, a n .. ,,,. 2 is . Q is , 'I l ii K Q ix 1255 M , waz, A , I Xa W Vai ., mm, Q, , 4, L ' -2 :fa ,. , .1" f I W tl S an 95 A' R x gi jx , Q' 4 :fd L Nix gl' 5 E T . .. 'Q - ,. NB! X VNS' - 9 Fwff ' ' . .... Q xx ta:.:i. !': i"s::::-:.:..-.-. . X . . ....... ..- ,...., . , , in X, as , Q N . E e w Q - ..,.' s S ixty-five ARTS AND SCIENCES FRESHMEN IRENE E. SAILOR Pam pa, Texas RICHARD W. SANDERS Fort Worth SUE SCOTT Lancaster, Texas F. M. SI-IADDOX Gulf Camp, Texas SI-IARI SAMPSON For: Worth BOBBIE SI-IELLEY Fort NVorth 1 ANNE SHEPHERD Fort Worth J ACQUELYN SH IZPPARD Dallas, Texas a ,lp iw, 352255 2, il, .sr X --1 .ww 3, mm si? 'f" "-HQ ' rf 5? FI I M 'Y' 9 I we . Il I , ali t,.S.,S,.,.,. It aa " 131, Q S ixty-rix MARILYN SHIPP Shreveport, Louisiana ANNE SMITH Fort Worth BEBE SMITH Fort Worth DOLORES SMITH Stratford, Texas ELSIE SMITH Austin, Texas JOSEPH D. SMITH Fort Worth JOYCE KATHRYN SMITH Brownwood, Texas NANCY SMITH Tyler, Texas WENCIL J- SMITH Rule, Texas DENNY RAY SPECK Menard, Texas PAT SPENCER Centralia, Illinois W-A +551 SARAH SPRINGER Matador, Texas TIER- JOHN L. SPURGERS, JR. Midland, Texas we NICK SPURDIS Beaumont, Texas LYNN E STANLEY Wi' Tyler, Texas R. G. STINSON " Fort Worth CAROL STOLP Fort Worth DONA LEE STOVALL Cleburne, Texas JOHN E. STROMER Fort Worth MARY STRONG Fort Worth ALICE SWEET Fort Worth GROVER SWIFT, JR. Fort Worth JOHN SWITZER Fort Worth DOUG TATUM Fort Wforth R. J. TAYLOR Fort Worth JACK TEMPLE Childress, Texas PAT TERRELL Sweetwater, Texas DOROTHY TRAWEEK Matador, Texas DOLORES TRIPLETT Wcslaw. Tcxns ANN UNDERWOOD Fort Wlorth JANET UPSON Fort Worth ROBERT E. VALLIERE West Springfield, Mass. GEORGETT WALLACE Fort Worth WALLACE WEBB Fort Worth BILLY D. WELDON Fort Worth MARY WELLS North Arlington, Virginia DAN E. WH ELAN Marshall, Texas NANCY WHIPPLE Fort Worth HAL WI-IIST Fort Worth BOB W. WHI'I'E Floydndzt, Texas BILL WIESEHAHN Fort Wlorth MARY ANN WILLIAMS Kaufman, Texas NANCY KATHERINE WILLIAMS Newton, Mississippi KATIE WILLIAMSON Childress, Texas GLENNA WILSON Noconu, Texas MARY ANN WILSON Fort Worth REBA YOCHAM Amarillo, Texas JOANNE YORK San Antonio, Texas ARTS AND SCIENCES FRE HMEN ss --is 5251 I 55,9 .-1115.-,-:::EM Z. W -M52 IAM: ' 5E'- . .- 'W , g 1 A - wgfsrs- ,uit Q' . -'--' - .,.. l . , ..,.. . "M - Y rv V ' V ww M.: f.-... 1-: -M , fs-,:pfm:azf fewest NUT 'W xfmfri , .,... zzz: .:: -.-.r :'- , ..,,. fr. -Eiga: avi? :AEM-.S" ,M . ,.,. .. 2. 5, WWE sf . -. ...,. E A ' .,., - .,., fx fi' ...... ft .. :.:',,2L 3. .,. :TQ ,..,,.,, -pil. ri . 'n il ' .44 A .es gg: "" 5 iii," - Aw 'Z - Q. I 5, ' ' -.-v , gf I a li f A. A gt 4 Q I Af3j5g1f'x .4 - -----? ,wg ,2gg52....U K x .... Y... ., H . 1 ,ci ff'-ifffi ' ,... . ..5:.:.,. , K .. , .... ..,. . F A at f If E? J? ,B fat t fix E t Q lm? 3 95 2 l ffm If I if ,f 1 Age , f' " is gi vs-5 ff wi- gi,,,,gZ.3:L: ii, mr ui,-1. .ggigti J t "A . V -if .sr s... 2 , Sixty-seven SCHOOL OF BUSINESS n DEAN 'Tm something of a dreamer-that's why l'm in education," says Dr. Ellis M. Sowell, dean of the School of Business. He might well add that he isn't the type to sit around without doing any work toward the fulfillment of those dreams, for since he became head of the school in 1944, his every move has been aimed at improving and enlarging its scope and facilities. His hobby--that of exploring human relations -comes of his intense interest in people and is directly in line with and part of the cause for the progress the business school has made. Dr. Sowell is active in civic af- fairs and is superintendent of University Christian Church's Sunday School. Hs is an honorary member of the National Associa- tion of Life Underwriters by virtue of .Sixty-eight T L. , ,, . . iii, E j E 5, THINK Texas Christian University's School of Business began as a School of Commerce in 1884. The faculty consisted of one pro- fessor who taught a course in bookkeeping. From this inauspicious start the school has grown to an enrollment of over 500 business majors. Degrees may be earned in Account- ing, Business Administration, Business Edu- cation, Economics, Finance, Management, Marketing, Personnel Administration and Secretarial Science. In 1938 the present School of Business was formed. The first administrator was Dr. Alvord L. Boeck. Dr. Ellis M. Sowell became the first dean of the school in 1944. The school has developed three major aids to help the student. 1. A freshman orientation program de- signed to help the new student find his field of endeavor. 2. A continuous four-year counseling pro- gram. 5. A job clinic in cooperation with Fort Worth businessmen to secure contacts for service and placement. With the beginning of the fall semester a graduate program for training of junior executives will be added. ELLIS M. SOWELL TCU's having sponsored the first life insurance marketing program in the South- west, in addition to the school's other "firsts." Dean Sowell has done graduate work and taught at Harvard, THE business school in the U. S., and reports that on the whole their students are no better than ours. And he's justifiably proud of two things: his young son and a listing in Wholv Who American Schools and Colleges. FACULTY RUTH ANDERSON, Secretarial Science BILLY BARNES, Accounting XVALTER BLACKLEDGE, Management CHARLES M. BUFORD, Business Administration A. M. HOLCEMBACK, Administrative Assistant to HENRY KEY, Management FERN KING, Secretarial Science R. A. LAMBERTON, Accounting C. A. MILLER, Economics MARY STELLA, Secretarial Science JAMES TEDROW, Business Administration BERTRAM TRILLICH, Marketing DON E. WILLIAMS, Business Administration the Dean Sixty-nine .: M.. 7 ,gf all , ,-f- 5. . aims t , 5 q '54, is " WF!" 165 2 39 in ff r ..... Q Y ' , ,.., F W x ,, f ,ff 6 M e"' 1 new . 1 'ci-ur, . : '.....' X . Z.. .. i ,, ii .,., ,, "1 j 'jfi ,,.,. 'iaiaiaiaiaisit-,'?, ...F Q.. g.. -, M -..,- "" 5 I, , i!i,,',, ' ' C? 'ii5::5fI" f ' Ii? -air.. f ,tc BUSINESS SENIORS HAROLD M. ACHZIGER FORT WORTH Major: Finance T. C. U. Chamber of Corn- merce 3, 43 Alpha Chi 3, 4. LEE ROY BAKER AMARILLO, TEXAS Major: Business and Accounting T C. U. Accountants So- ciety 5. 4: T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 4 RILEY I.. ALDRICH. JR. TEMPLE, TEXAS Major: Business Administration Hoe-Down 2 WINTHROP D. BAKER SOUTHPORT, CONNECTICUT Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 4 'E W fi' mn CALLIE ANN AYRES PARIS, TEXAS Major: Secretarial Science B. 8: P. W. 4 CONNER BALTZELLE FORT XVORTH Major: Business Management T. C. U. Chamber of Com merce 4 SAMUEL PIERCE BAILEY, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration ROY A. BEARD PORT WORTH Major: Business Administration Seventy ance. offered. JESSE L. BAKER FORT WORTH Major: Accounting Student Congress 4: Treasurer 4: T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 2, 5, 4: T. C. U. American Legion 2, 3, 4 HARRY G. BEIERLEIN WESTFIELD, NEW JERSEY Major: Marketing T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 3, 4: Skiff Staff 33 Advertising Club 3, 4 ACCOUNTING: After wearing out three pieces of chalk and filling one blackboard, this accounting student is about to get his problem to bal The department of accounting endeavors to prepare the student to use the subject of accounting as a management tool in small business, as a technique in computing in dustrial costs, and as a means of maintain ing internal control. A practical course of study for fulfilling the educational require j ments for the C. P. A. certificate is also CLAUDE BENNETT TRRRELL, TEXAS Major: Business Administration T. C, U. Chamber of Commerce 2 BILL B01-IANNAN FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 4 J. I.. BRANNON FORT WORTII Major: Accounting R I W. L. BROWN, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 4 SHIRLEY BRUNSON MIDLAND, TEXAS Major: Secretarial Science Student Congress Rig Chi Beta 2: Hoe-Down 2: Leti 2: Bryson 3. -1: Iirogettes I: Meliorist l, 2, 3. HI I I I JOE BUTLER ODESSA, TEXAS Major: Personnel Management T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 3, 4 LINDY BERRY WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 1, 2, 5, 4: "T" Association l, 2, 3, 43 Bryson 1, 2g Class Favorite I, 2, 3, 4 PHILLIPS B. BOLIN FORT WORTH Major: Accounting T. C. U. Accountants Society 4: T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 5, 4 LOYD BROTHERTON FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 3, 4g Trea- urer 4 ROLAND ARTHUR BRUCKS FORT WORTH Major: Marketing HARRY JOHN BRYANT, III FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce fi DORA CALHOUN CRESSON, TEXAS Major: Accounting T. C. U. Accountants Society 4 BUSINESS SENIORS Seventy-one BUSINESS SENIORS EDDIE CHAPIN MILDRED CHAPMAN FORT WORTH HASKELL, TEXAS Major: Business Major: Business Administration Administration Leti 25 The "Y" 13 Frogettes lp Skating Club 45 B. 8: P. W. Club 4: Class Secretary- Treasurer 1 JAKE C. CONE DONALD D. COUCH FORT WORTH FORT XVORTH Major: Accounting Major: Business Education T. C. U. Accountants Society 1 I 5. .kj w ise is . JACK C. CLAYTON BRYSON, TEXAS Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 3, 4: T. C. U. Ameri- can Legion 4 HAROLD P. COX ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Business Management JIM A. COFFMAN FORT WORTH Major: Personnel LEON R. CRAIG FORT XVORTI-I Major: Personnel Management Parabola Club 33 T. C. U. American Legion 4 Debate lg T. C. U. American S 61167101-1100 elf .rf . X .ri i ? 5 . GEORGE M. COLDWELL PORT Wotvrit Major: Business Education Administration JAMES J, CRANNY DETROIT, MICHIGAN Major: Business Administration Legion 13 United World Fed- etalists 1 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: Business .Administration is a flexible pro- gram of business subjects, primarily de- signed to provide the future small business- man with the ability to administer the af- fairs of private enterprise with judgment and imagination. This course of study is particularly useful for the future rancher, farmer, and professional man. This class, under the direction of Henry Key is discussing the four main points of Business Administration. WILMOT F. DAVIS Gafmuvnzw, TEXAS Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce T. T CLAUDE E. DELANEY FORT VVORTH Major: Business Management C. U. Chamber of Commerce 3 WM. H. DENMAN Pom' WORTH Major: Business Administration . C. U. Chamber of Commerce MILLARD C. DYER. JR. FORT XWORT H Major: Accounting CLYDE L. EMMONS .FORT VUORTH Major: Personnel Management DON G. FAULK HOUSTON, TEXAS Major: Business Administration -1 , -1 1 ROBERT A. DAVIS, JR. GAINHSVTLLE, TEXAS Major: Business Administration Horned Frog Staff 4g T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 43 Hoe-Down 4 KENNETH H. DELFELD FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration JOHN A. DILLON, JR. DANVILLE, NEW JERSEY Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 1, 2, 5, 4: Advertising Club DOUGLAS A. ELLIOT FORTNVORTH Major: Business Administration Horned Frog Staff 5: Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 5, 4: Marching Band 1, 2 MARTIN L. ETHRIDGE, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration GEORGE W. FILE FORT WORTH Major: Accounting T. C. U. Accountants Society 5, 4 BUSINESS SENIORS Seventy-three BUSINESS SENIORS DICK "CURLY" FILLINGIM FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 4 JOE B. GOGGANS FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 3, 4 .al tt VUILLIAM E. FORE HAPPY, TEXAS Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 5, 4: Los Hidalgos 3, 4 JAMES H. GOODWIN ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Accounting CLAUDE C. FRANKLIN FORT WORTH Major: Personnel Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce fig Hoe-Down 4 HOWARD J. GRAY XVATERBURY, CONNECTICU Major: Personnel Manageme 5.0 or Ji wif' Seventy-four T HI W. B. FULTZ GRAHAM, TEXAS Major: Business GRADY GREENE FORT WORTH Major: Business ELMER F. GARNAND, JR. FORT WOR1'H Major: Business Management Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- C. R. GREGORY FORT WORTH Major: Accounting T. C. U. Accountants Su- Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- ciety 4 BUSINESS EDUCATION: The training for teaching on the sec- ondary level involves a basic coverage of modern instructional methods as well as the fundamentals, wants, and techniques of modern business. Dr. Ruth Irene Anderson is giving students individual attention. Most of these students are preparing to instruct high school students, many of whom will later enter some phase of business entirely dependent for success upon the training they have acquired in high school. TOM W. HARMON FORT XVORTH Major: Accounting LaVlERNE L. HARTMAN FORT XVORTH Major: Accounting Accountants Society fl WILLIAM I.. HATPON FORT WOR1'I-I Major: Business T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2, 4: Club 43 Yacht Club -i THOMAS E. HODGES Fotrr NVORTH Major: Personnel Management CHARLES HOLT Dt5KAt.tt, TEXAS Major: Marketing GLENN M. HUBBARD DALLAS, TtsxAs Major: Accounting Br ushcs CLIDE RAY HARRIS BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA Major: Accounting T. C. U. Accountants Society 4 CI-IAS. THOMAS HARVEY FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration A. B. HOBBS TEMPLE, TEXAS Major: Business Administration JOE C. HOLMSTROM FORT XVORTH Major: Finance U. Chamber of Commerce 3, 4 ROBERT V. I-IOLT FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration GEORGE HUDSPIETH YADKINVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA Major: Accounting T- C- U- ACCOUHUIDG Society Accountants Society 3, 43 T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 4 BUSINESS SENIORS Seventy-five BUSINESS SENIORS T. M. HUGHES, JR. PROSPER, TEXAS Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 4 HARRY T. JARMON FORT WORTH Major: Accounting Accountants Society 1: T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 1 Alpha Chi 2 a T. mer VIRGIL HUGHES FORT WORTH Major: Accounting Accountants Society 4 WADE L. JONES FORT WORTH Major: Business Management C. U. Chamber of Com- ce 2, 3, 4 CHARLES B. HURLEY PONCA, NEBRASKA Major: Business Administration Accountants Society 13 T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 1: Parabola Club 1 JOHN BARTON JORDAN FORT WORTH Major: Accounting Accountants Society Ig T.C.U. Chamber of Commerce 1 ORVEL R. HUTTO BAYTOWN, TEXAS Major: Personnel PAT JACKSON WAXAHACHIE, TEXAS Major: Secretarial Science Administration B. Bt P. W. Club 1, 2, 3 T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce CHARLES F. KENNEDY FORT WORTH Major: Accounting BETTY ANNE KRIPPEL FORT WORTH Major: Secretarial Science Accountants Society 4 B. 8: P. W. Club 4 .Seventy-513 FINANCE: The work in finance is designed to afford an understanding of the financial processes of the present day economy and to provide an introduction to the problems and meth- ods of financial Operations. A rather thor- ough grounding is offeretl in the principles underlying the financial organization and management of business corporations, the financial responsibilities of corporate of- ficers and the principles and practices of . investment analysis. PAT LANGSTON FORT WORTH Major: Secretarial Science Hoe-Down fi: Alpha Chi 3, 4: B. 84 Club 3. A DARRELL V. LAWLESS FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration Hue-Down 43 Meliorist 3 JOSEPH LEVINE FORT WORTI'I Major: Accounting THOMAS ROY LOWE FORT XVORTH Major: Accounting JOHN A. MAYES FORT WORTH Major: Management DONALD W. MCKAY FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce ROBERT A. LANIER NECHES, TEXAS Major: Finance Class Vice-President 4 JO ANN LEBUS WIC:-HTA FALLS, TEXAS Major: Business Administration Hoc-Down 2 THEODORE FRANKLIN LONG FORT WORTH Major: Business and Pre-Law Student Congress 23 T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2, 5: T. C. U. American Legion 2, 3: Class President 2 EDGAR C. LUCAS FORT WORTH Major: Accounting HUGH HARDY MCCONNELL FORT XVORTH Major: Business Advertising T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 15 Flying Frog 1: Hoe-Down 1, 2: Skiff Staff 1, 2 WILLARD F. MENTON FORT WORTII Major: Accounting Accountants Society 1 BUSINESS SENIORS Seventy-:even BUSINESS SENIORS ROLLIS J. MEREDITH JOHN WILLIAM MASEROLE FORT NVORTH FORT WORTH Major: Accounting Major: Industrial Relations M Monty" MONTGOMERY JOE MONTGOMERY FORT WORTH MERICHIAN, TEXAS Major: Marketing Major: Accounting T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 2 LESLIE E. MINOR, JR. FORT WORTIT Major: Business Management T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 4 CARL D. MOORE Fom' WORTH Major: Accounting T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 3 HARRISON E. MITCHELL Forvr WORTH MARIETTA MIRIKE FORT VVORTH Major: Accounting Major: Secretarial Science T. C. U, Chamber of Com- B. Bc P. W. Club 3, 4 merce 1 JAMES R. MOORMAN FORT WORTH Major: Business CARL MOTHERAL FORT XVORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U, Chamber of Com- merce 2, 3, 4, Vice4President 4: Bryson 3, fi Administration Advertising Club 3, 4, Treas- urer 33 President 4 Seventy eight MANAGEMENT: The management major is offered 'to those students who desire to prepare for positions in the management of business enterprises as supervisors, executives, and in other positions of responsibility. This course covers the fundamentals of manag- ing men, materials, and machines. Special consideration is given to techniques used in the handling of human relations in com- merce, intiustry, and government. As dem- onstrated by this class, visual aid films are available for class use. GLEN R. MUSE PLAINVIEW, TEXAS Major: Business NORMA NELSON MARFA. TEXAS Major: Business Education Hoc-Down fig Lcti 25 The "Y" 1, 45 March- ing Band ig Frogettes 13 Meliorist 1: B. Sc. P. W. Club 2, 3, -1, Secretary 4 ANGFLO NOLE FORT NVORTH Major: Accounting JOSEPH A. OPPIE FORT XVORTH Major: Business Administration LEON PARKMAN FORT WORTH Major: Business Atiministrattion JAMES PHARRIIES FORT WOR'I'Il Major: Business T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce -i PAUL W. NEEDHAM FORT NVORTH Major: Business Administration HARRY JAMES NICHOLS FORT WORTH Major: Accounring Accountants Society 4 RICHARD L. OLSON FORT WORTH Major: Accounting T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce JANE ORMAND PARIS, TEXAS Major: Business Administration JOHN E. PASS, JR. FORT XVORTH Major: Finance T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 3, retziry 53 Press Club 1 ROBERT G. PITMAN, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration 4 4 , Sec- BUSINESS SENIORS i Seventy-nine Student Congress 1: T. C. U. Administration BUSINESS SENIORS CLARENCE PLATT MONAHANS, TEXAS Major: Accounting T. C. U. Accountants So ciery 4 E. L. REAGOR FORT WORTH Major: Management CHARLEEN PLUMLY FORT WORTH Major: Business Education Marching Band 1: Alpha Chi 3, 4, Treasurer 4: B. 8:. P. W. Club 2, 3, 4, President 4 JAMES REPP BAYTOWN, Tex.-xs Major: Business Chamber of Commerce 2, 5, 4: T. C. U. American Legion 4: Renegades 3 JIMMIE PRITCHARD FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U, Chamber of Com- merce 4 BILLY P. RICHARDS FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration FORT WORTH Major: Business Education GEORGE RICHARD RIGHTMIRE FORT WORTH Major: Business JOSEPH A. RABYOR EVELYN JANE READER SAN ANGELO, TEXAS Major: Accounting Accountants Society 3, 4 BERT W . ROBERTS PLAINVIEW, TEXAS Major: Business Administration Stage Band 1, 2, 5: T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2, 3: Board of Directors 2: March- ing Band 2, 5 Eighty MARKETING: producer to consumer is at cerns itself with devising, improving the techniques retailing. versal function of business. T. C. U. Chamber of Com- merce 3, 4: Bryson 4 The transfer of goods and services from major and uni- Marketing con- managirt, and of distribution. The program of the marketing department provides a study of the fundamental prob- lem of marketing for all students in the School of Business and special training for those who look forward to careers in the fields of sales management, advertising, and LESTER H, ROBERTS JARMINGTON, NEW IWEXICO Major: Accounting IRVIN 'I'. SCHELLINGER KELLER, Trzxas Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2, 3, -1 CHARLES SCHNAKIE FORT WORTI-I Major: Accounring Accountanrs Society 3. -'13 T. C. U. Chamber 'I'. of Commerce 3, 4 WALTER G. SI-IARRATT FORT WORTIT Major: Personnel Aclministmtidn T. C. U. Chamber nf Commerce fig T. C. U. American Legion l, 2 BILL SMITH FORT XWORTI-I Major: Business Administrarion T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 3. 4 ROSS B. SMITH BAYTOWN, TEXAS Major: Personnel Management and Psychology T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce -1 T. JAMES D. ROSSON FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration ERNEST C. SCHENK FORT WORTH Major: Accounting ROBERT J. SCHUMACHER FORT WORTH Major: Accounting C. U. Accountants Society 3. MICHAEL SMERICK FRACKVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA Major: Finance C. U, Chamber of Commerce FRANK N. SMITH FORT WORTH Major: Accounting XVALTER B. SMITH FORT WORTH Major: Accounting 4 4 BUSINESS SENIOR ' I : ., . 'fin Eighty-one BUSINESS SENIORS Eighty-two ELVIN H. SPINKS BEAUMONT, TEXAS Major: Management T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 4: Hoe- Down 3 WAYNE A. STEED WEST PALM BEECH, FLORIDA Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2, 3, -fi JOAN STRATTON GRAHAM, TEXAS Major: Secretarial Science Leri 25 The "Y" 1, 23 Alpha Chi 3, 45 Frogertes 1: B. 84 P. W. Club 5, 4 ODELL STRICKLAND FORT WORTH Major: Business Education CLINTON RAY TILLOTSON FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 1. 2g Bry- son 3, 4 LEONARD G. TRIMBLE FORT WORTH Major: Business Adminisrrarion T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 4 JAMES STANCOFF FORT WORTH Major: Business Adminiszrarion HERMAN L. STONE FORT WORTH Major: Accounting JACK STREET FORT WORTH Major: Business Management HAROLD WESLEY THOMAS HEREFORD, TEXAS Major: Business Administration T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2, President 44 T. C. U. American Leg Class Treasurer 4 JOHN W. TOVINSEND FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration BILLIE GRACE TUCKER DALLAS, TExAs Major: Secretarial Science Hoe-Down 3 3. 4 ion 4 HARRY E, B. TUCKIER, JR. PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA Major: Management 'THOMAS I.. VANCE FORT WORTH Major: Business Adminisrrution 'I C U. Chamber of Commerce lg T. American Legion I WINSTON W. VASEY FORT WORTI-I Major: Business Administration XVILLIAM M. XVEBB TRINITY, TEXAS Major: Personnel Management PAUL J- WOLLENWEBER FORT WORTH Major: Accounri ng JAMES HAROLD WOOD FORT WORTH Major: Business Adminisrration C. U. BILL UNDERHILL BIG SPRING, TEXAS Major: Management T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2, 3, 45 T. C. U. American Legion 45 Flying Frog 5, fig Rodeo Association 4 ROBERT C. VANN COLORADO CITY, TEXAS Major: Accounting Accountants Society 31 T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 3. 4: Alpha Chi 3 MILDRED WALLACE SEYMOUR, TEXAS Major: Secretarial Science Lcti 23 Frogettes 13 B. ck P. W, Club 2, 3 ' Vice-President 4 ,4. JACK LI. XVIER BAYTOWN, TEXAS Major: Personnel Administration and Industrial Relations T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 2 HORICE L. WOOD FORT WORTH Major: Accounting CHARLES W. WORTHINGTON FORT WORTH Major: Business Administration BUSINESS SENIOR Eighty-three BUSINESS UNIORS gk - ll," " ......,. 'f -.'. W A t NZ QA Qt, ,,,,, - ::::::::....::: - L K ,-,, M ":i5s::..5'lf:Iff-,:v 1. , . I WILLIAM ABSHIRE Paris, Texas DAN ADAIR Dallas, Texas RICHARD T. ANDERSON VM' ':':" Chir21g0.l11in0is it X 5 ,I SSSSSSS ,, SS SS if I ' i A X X 1 , zzzi X I , :-.:.:,-,:,:::: ., iw ,. . M ,H , ' 'A "": K . . fa. ,.,.,. Z K Ai ' ,, SZ SSSS SESSS SSS. ,tntt A 'cf I 4 1. 1 -2 " z" ilfllll"'i ' JE?-':3'.', Y ft 1 .,.,.: - I M I I 1 S.,. 1 ll I I fi A wi' 'gm Q A ta ll jx ,gilt 521 l, 5, r F , 3 ,dai ' A .- -.-.-, : ,. :"E :': ' 3 'V 14315 H .K V QQ' W Y ' R5'1""" 1 4. Q , f r sl fjir or 4 as I X tl 1 lin. , milw .......lgwVQ,, . 'iii' ,,,, g .Mt 1 .tit M - - ft f. ff - -.::a. ::z.s:s::. ist : Q, :LA tg , " " X if-ii i 2 T fftwg 'll W3 U I.: PREM fn PM , rf I I for td 4 Q A :E Alf QE l A Eighty-four .qi ,1 I Zfli 5 "fx, I tl I' in ALVIN J. BAGNALL Corpus Christi, Texas WOODY BAKER Big Spring, Texas BOB BARNES Fort Worth LAVERNE BENNETT Fort Worth WILLIAM J. BISHOP South Gate, California JAMES R. BLACK Fort Worth RAY BLANTON Fort Worth BILL BOGOLIN Sharon, Pennsylvania EDWARD BRYAN Baytown, Texas PRICE G. BURNETT Brackettville, Texas MAC BURNS Fort Worth C. O. BUTLER Fort Worth C. J. CASEY Fort Worth JAMES GLENN CHILDERS Fort Wortlt MRS. JEAN ALLEN CLAYTON Fort Worth JOHN CURRIE Big Spring, Texas MARTIN DEKKING Legacion De Holanda, Mex LEONARD G. DOSS, JR. Fon: Worth WILLIAM DUNLAP Fort Worth ROY EDGEMON Fort Worth BILLY D. FARLEY Sweetwater, Texas ,y in 2 'SF fi -4 S 5 2 xg v x BUSINESS L' NIORS Eighty-six CLIFFORD R. NUNLEY Forr Worth J. K. "CHIC" Texas City,T OLS EN exas MARGARET PANKEY San Angelo, Texas S. G. PAYTE ForrWortl1 OLLIE C. PAYNE Pecos, Texas JAMES C. PENGELLY Pachuca., Hildalgo, Mexico MARY PERKINS Fort Worth BETTE REYNOLDS Lufkin, Texas MARTIN PHILLIPS Fort Wortl1 DAVID H. SANDERS Cactus, Texas REX E. SHAW Springfield. Texas WILLIAM J. S1-IEA, JR. FortWurrh EVELYN SHELBURNE Rocky Mount, Virgin ia S. I-I. SHINGLER Fort Worth SALLY SKELTON Fort Woth CHARLES SNIDER Gilmer, Texas DAMON DERRELI. SLATER FortWorth MELVIN R. SNOW Fort Worth CARL AUSTIN STANFORD Centralia, Illinois JUSTIN D. STEWART Glen Rose, Texas WAYNE TUMLINSON For: Worth R. B. WALTERSDOF Arlington, Texas ELVIS Rang WARNER er, Texas WANDA WILSON Gainesville, Texas - . . .51 -,C,:h. ' . 'J BUSINESS JUNIOR .fs ' 5- f . I, far l S.,.: , . , 2 19 ' ' " "" ' A i' A A .w A X ' ,,... ,, .. -:-------- SSSS -':' l iii? ' f ""' is YZ QM .. ' ,, "" . ' f . V 419: :C ,H J .,., 5-.zgzgg - ,A .,,,,.. ' . sf . tv , A . .,.. ,, A . """" ' A f - V'2" " " " V' ' A. A. NWEBSTER, JR. HELEN WHITE MADELINE SUE WHITE JAMES WILLIFORD Breckenridge, Texas Fort Worth Fort Worth Memphis, Tennessee JACK WITHERSPOON JAMES M, WOOD RICHARD WRIGHT Duncanvillc, Texas Fort Worth Vernon, Texas SECRETARIAL SCIENCE: To supply the fields of commerce with secretaries, stenographers, and office assist- ants of the highest quality, a program of training in the office skills is offered. Sec- retaries who have completed a four-year college course not only have a broad edu- cational background and intensive training in the office skills, but are sufficiently mature to accept heavy responsibilities and exercise judgment and initiative. I Donald Earl Williams vvatchesithe rechnil que of his rypisrs as they take a speed test. Eighty-seven BUSINESS SOPHOMORES - ' V A . ' , 1 45 4 "" ' :Shall s f -'-- at A "'f' ' Z., " """ .,.. T112 ' .I'2Zf.. i . " E '- "" " .v.-IrZvIvIvZ'1f",' "" ,151 E?5a1.+hl? r'3:vi' .f sl!-:". V ,I 2:2 1 ,.:g.':f .-.- -. ,. ' S ' f""'f"f'f'5'1i ' " ' "xr, ,,jfg...,,. .4-. Eighty-leigh! KATHLEEN ALFORD Center, Texas JEAN ALLCORN Fort Worth SHIRLEY ARCHER Cody, Wyoming ALLAN BROOKSHIRE Lufkin, Texas VERNON BROXVN Fort Worth HERBERT C. CLAYTON Fort Worth JAMES NORMAN COLEMAN Fort Worth WILLIAM A. COMRIE Westfield, New Jersey TAYLOR CROUCH Terrell, Texas NELDA DAVIS Midland, Texas BILL DODSON Amarillo, Texas MELVYN E. DRAKE JAMES L. DUNCAN Fort Worth Fort Worth VIOLET DUKES Center, Texas HAROLD D. ELLIOTT Fort Worth SIDNEY C. FARRAR Fort Worth CLARK FORD Sweetwater, Texas STATISTICS: Deep in thought are these boys in statis- tics lab. The formation of business policies and their effective execution require the as- sembling and analysis of varied quantita- tive data. The basic course in statistics is designed to give all students in the School of Business an appreciation of the function of statistics in the business organization and a familiarity with the tools of statistical analysis. Opportunity for specialization in statistics is also offered. EDWARD GERBACH Fort Worth DOYLE D. GILBERT Fort Worth ROBERT CLAY HALL Fort Worth JIMMY HARGROVE Fort W'orth HERBERT ADAMS HAYES Fort Worth BOB HORAN Fort Worth WANDA HOUSTON Abilene, Texas JIM HUBBELL Houston, Texas BEN O. HUGHES Fort Worth BOB J OH NSTON Fort Worth JOYCE LANSTON Electra, Texas BILLIE LEDDY Fort Worth TOM LEGGETT Fort Worth WILLIAM H. LONG Fort Worth SAMMY LOVELL Fort Worth CHARLES L. LOWRY Mount Vernon, Texas DARRELL LYERLA Fort Worth JAMES ALLEN MARTIN Weatherford. Texas JAMES MARTIN Dallas. Texas DINK MCBEE Wink, Texas CHARLES MCCOY Fort Worth PAULA MCDANIEL Fort Worth RUSSELL B. MCDANIEL Fort Worth ROBERT E. MCKNIGHT Odessa, Texas ROBERT MONTGOMERY Fort Worth JAKE W. MOORE Fort Worth MARTIN S. MOORE Fort Worth WITTEN MOORE Fort Worth BUSINESS SOPHOMORES 'AG' ' emo . 525.21 .- E 1 . sig -- 211 F- -if :Qe :22 - -. WE.. 'W 3 P 5 ,, M , ,pst X J , L f ,yi . W -'itt,:, 'f ix 'Ei 'r-' , .::s'.1:,,....w-,.'a:z.: , g."i':::.51 " . .1 , - Lijlxl, 4 1 "N 1--:f ..e. - 'E ef f -- - 'Yi 2632 I 5 pg Q 5 if 1 3 vt Y 3 I sg is sf ' A ? Q 'xiii S 5 3 Er A. . Ii? QM Q Q 5 w exgggx E2 ri . .... - , . 5 . it . A gg gi PSX A X W.. A' 2 X A . k f N . Ra- -If . . ,,,., If S H 'F 1:5 ' aw , 1 ,gg E 3? it S LL. 3 , Z ,M rv s 2- 5 if W . ,U H ft iz si aW?f? Q 5 15 :ageazaaatag . -535153125-QE. ...,.J,,., ,.., t . .,.,. or Q I K, -'I , Lf L fe . . " 'I' yi ., ,...., I ix... ew- 1 gi , ,x gi A 1-Q a I of f 1 . I-f --It ....Aa:.:.:.:.:: , . I I 5 ,,... If AN, I . 5 : IS. - -V ' A r I' , sz., - ' - . -...- ' -ff 1 :af-M. . , " 4- 1? 2:1 9 , 5- 3 . 5 A- 5 , ' S. E L fijg,.Mm ,.., .,.. g it A .R .,.,.,.,.. . in 'Y 5 E5 S I Nz I i E I V ZR Wamwt .r ,I ,. I.. W A -HW 5 551 ..,.... .... .,., E. ,. .....,.., ....... ,,,.............,,,, , . is 'fr if if -3.1. ,W M, QV W -V . ' wif-..' 4 . E- -5... L. ,. W, ww, ,,.. A .... M 1 M, .t.. , ALT: 7' 3252- iii :,s:5... ..a::.. ,,-1:3 MJF: S 5 Z' ,I :Off X .ii ,- , .xiii 1 ,, 1,-fbi EA z' zwgffii A - I 1 . ,X . 7.1, .t. . It We, V L. , ,. .WW.4wVNs:b,5xz - Hill-IV .. .. zfulu?-1.4. 'E -SA. 5351. 3 In W P, ::a:a:a:s:a:a: Q Q I A- .. V.. -I:-:V -- - .:,,.'-2 .5, :IM C :am , , , , , 4 0355 ofa. -n' 34 'Gigi Q Q : - -.1---.WL .-:mf - fw V , . . ,...... f .. - :,.,., M. -5,53 - - 3 L, : 5.,:g:5:5.:.:.3:::: Q , xwgsro -.,..5:gg: , , kj, ? 95531 ...S , Z . 1 Q Q62 x " EEK f 5 . Ak gt ,Yi , W x :ff is if K-5. f 's 5 . ,Z . , I . gg. rg jg 3 5 'Jus .af . ' :5s,a,:5f5y,,. . .WIWQE .I', 'i5EP? W K '23?TfYTi724 F: " ' EZ - . K' 5' 3" - , iff: A ,. ,f' ,--' -sgsaegsr. 'qi' "f:f.'1g- 1- 1 . 'F JI ' ., xii.: 1? rg :em ' t- ,T ?': , :"::'::' 51,4 .. . - I -g . gi S' AE, ' W , .:.:.:.:.- :53:5,.E,- ,R x l .... , ..:.. ,, .,.,.,. L '-tssfiffl Eighzy-nine BUSINESS SOPHOMORES V .a :g-.: mx: - 1 -M Iii E l 7 ff-E1 ... ,, -. in 4 r:x " ,?sQih?fi .:- st... . , We N Q . 3? L... Y ...R . N ' 33 ,E tg 'v Q egg if Q I . as N N2 A 2 W ,ff .mfg -Q ..,., E., A , ., .... , , , s . l 1 gs 1 1 Trim v 5 . . gi? 2 - . if --'---"' ::..:. ... ..,...-I..-.., S . fs' l . l 1 . x .- l .1 T vl K Y V l Q' 5 :22 iii ' : w xl 2 1 . 'Kr :. g 5. EZ, s , f rs 1 2 X . I , a QS 5,2 Q, 5. W if 5 Ea X Q I 5 .:.::a : ..,,. . : 2 -- sJI,i,,t Mg. .. , .... : 5555: 1. I ,xy . 3.1. gif 1. , .41 . , 1 ,.fzg.5:f..gt.,., xmlgs -me . L... I.:-:V---A i....11r " ' www- ,. . ,,,,, ,. x We QL . ...mi .... 3 .. - 'H ' 47,335 2 .... , ,L -A H in 5 Ei' wa.. 24 ' 1 sm ffisl' -- - --+ ,Q Y . xvwrrx f mv. "'.'.'3z,.,., . , .1 .... , ..,. X as .5 5. 3 s if S E f . 3 s li 5522. ' 2' N fa Z 'R Fx Srl .... 5 Eg , :-21 f": ::.::"" gk 2 l 5. Y 1 is I Q t , , . .,,, 2553. sssgwii L W KM N ineiy C. F. MUSGRAVE Fort Worth WADE NOWLIN Fort Worth WAN DA PEARSON Fort Worth EDWARD J. PFLAZ, JR. San Angelo, Texas BILL PHILLIPS Fort Worth BENNIE POARCI-I Corsicana, Texas JACKIE PORTERFIELD Fort Worth OWEN K. POWELL, JR. Iraun, Texas JAMES O. PREWITI' Kelberg, Texas MARY DEE PRICE Italy, Texas R. C. REED, JR. Fort Worth RALPH SANDERSON Fort Worth JACK H. SEALEY Garland, Texas RENE D. SEARS Hutchins, Texas KENNETH SHURY Weslaco, Texas CLYDE SIKES Child ress, Texas WALTER N. SMITH Vernon, Texas CAMILLE STALEY Vernon, Texas WES STEELE Houston, Texas OTIS ROTAN STEWART Otey, Texas JAYE TAYLOR Fort Worth HAROLD P. TEAGUE, JR. Huntsville, Arkansas ROBERT F. TOMPKINS St. Louis, Missouri WILLIAM B. WALTER Fort Worth DORIS WICK Fort Worth DON WIGLEY Cleburne, Texas HARLEY WILLEY Dallas, Texas JOY WRIGHT San Angelo, Texas U IYESS FRESHMEN W if .mx BUSINESS FRESHMEN E vw Yifglif ' .,'iWQ,,,Ql I . ',1.' frm..-'-i 5 ww - 2525 5: , . 3 ,, M ,E:,, ...,. I-:,:,,., V- .,.. QI T i- TI' ' WX I si aa S SS It .. . ,L . . ,. rg. W '- ff' I sf .1 ,.,, .5 , .. .. X . ..:.,. ..,: L ,s e ex fi I Q53 57' Ji' ,Ek ,jg 'Qi' 0 EM, s X I fs? ,gi M rigs. ,.,, ,. 9 . ..i. ,fu ' -z4- --- . .IE-I-235:52-sf' vig! 1 if ef ,I Na' fl - ' ii. gaelgvagggw "-' - 1 if . " '5" rl,,5i2Ze,Z3E1' ,. ' ' iii? flilif W zzz :i:2 I Iflffx Eageaes X34 ' F? 1 ii! ill ' . A . . 'YE iso, 5. 35: aft ' :: ' ' " Q " , ""' ' 'iff . ....f.:. ,.., ,.:.,.,. - , ...,.....,.. V , ,x,.,., L .. .- 'Ali' ""5EQ:.,,555 . , ,ag I Q Wi -3 .L ' gl? w ,,,,, , 1 ,Q .I . "-is ifv Q is '-Z., A H 55555555 -X T fl ff-A -' - sf-g ,ff??l'f'31:::rfx1'l' Q, I - 1. ' Y 'Ti 4 K wliffiff g ' -. . .. 'r . 'f:"::.gfl??i'ig . A Luigi 'AI 2,f1:?wI'f 15f9 f 3.3, :Ma . ,Muir i 1'-' " --starter ww' vt I f i Q Q 11' sas.. ,, sv .,9.,,,w,zr: vN5v51fll!z ,x r ,V , wx Q 4 f :., 9472.4-W, A A f 3 Ky. it : 1 . . Ninety-two JOHN E. GLENN Freer, Texas REX J. GOODWIN Oklahoma City, Oklahoma CHARLES GRAHAM Webster City, Iowa WALTER GRENDZINSKI Plainville, Connecticut JOANN HALL Wichita Falls, Texas HENRY B. HASH Lancaster, Texas NORMA HAVENHILL Fort Worth EDWIN HAWKINS Fort XVorth DORIS JEAN HENRY Fort Worth KATHERINE HERRICKS Fort Worth ROBERT HOPKINS Dallas, Texas JIM HOWARD Pecos, Texas PATSY KELLY Fort Worth JO ANNE KING Fort Worth CLAYTON KNAPP Panhandle, Texas EDWARD ALAN LEWIS East Prairie, Missouri SCOOTER MACATEE Lovington,New Mexico GRETA MANKINS Columbus, Texas FRANCES MCMAHON Fort Worth TOMMY MERCER Longview, Texafa KENNETH MILLER Sweetwater, Texas NANETTE MILLER Dallas, Texas ZAYNE ANN PAYNE Fort Worth J. F. PUCKETT Fort Worth MARY LOUISE REECE Fort Worth BOBBY ROACH Fort Worth SHEERMAN ROBINSON Fort Worth CHARLES ROGERS Childress, Texas I BERNARD ROSENSTEIN Fort Worth MARY T. RYERSON Izhaca, New York BOB SCI-IAFFRICK Plainville, Conn. RICHARD SHARPLESS Grapevine, Texas MILVIN D. SI-IUPP San Antonio, Texas JOE H. SMITH Por: Worrh ROBERT P. SMITH Belton, Texas HARRY STOUT, JR. Bowie, Texas MARIAN N E SUIT Alvord. Texas DON THOMAS For: Worth EUGENE R. WATTERS Vicksburg, Mississippi DAVID WEAVER Center, Texas MARY WELCH For: Worth AILEEN WELCH For: Worrh GEORGE WHEELER Dallas, Texas NANCY WHITE For: Worth OLLIE WHITLEY Keller, Texas ROBERT F. WILSON Fort Worth CLOYD "SONNY" WINDOM Spearman, Texas BUSINESS FRESHME 351: 1 ' , ' .g.e::5gz -- 3 WAKEEQEAM' 57:5 . , H - Q 1 52 -- ---' . , f' 'ss a 5 .11 4-.15 Y iz wc E , dey .,... ,. 4.1: vw W . A ,f -::::- mf., ,Lu .L ir Y' 2135 N f 1 If fi3EE ggi , I 0 6 iE! ? iii, I im f I . .ff 5 QW V M If 'Laser A gm M35 , , I sim ef.: .af fi' 5 "" IIIIM 1 ...- .,-i ""' ""' ,...V ..,. . R I :-:: Q 5 Mcmxs..-..Y., ' N inety-three SCHGOL OF EDUCATION DEAN Cane-collecting, boutonniere-sporting Raymond A. Smith, Dean of Education, loves to sit and talk. He's got a lot to talk about, too. Anyone who has taught school for 50-odd years as Dean Smith has can vouch for his having not only a wealth of educational knowledge-the kind one gets only through experience-but also numer- ous interesting tales to tell. When he starred teaching at Atlantic Christian College in 1905, he was the only man on the faculty and consequently ended up teaching all the courses that the women instructors simply would not put up with. Before his teaching days, the dean did everything from lumber manufacturing to serving as a second lieu- tenant in the Spanish-American War, and he prefers teaching, thank you. About those N mety- four The School of Education was first rec- ognized as such at T.C.U. in 1924, having three teachers devoted to it exclusively and a dozen other departments giving courses that counted toward certification. Though the teaching profession had been receiving a majority of the graduates from the AddRan College of Arts and Sciences, the first effort to teach the science of peda- gogy was "The Normal College" in 1904. This stressed the reviewing of subjects to be taught in public schools. Education became a department of the AddRan College of Arts and Sciences in 1909. At this time it was announced that the B.A. diploma with a prescribed course in the department of education entitled the holder to a permanent state teaching cer- tificate. The first head of this department was john W. Kinsey. Raymond A. Smith put the department on a permanent basis in 1919. In 1943, his title was changed from Professor to Dean Smith. Degrees in elementary education, second- ary education, and education administration are now offered by the School of Education. RAYMOND A. SMITH canes, he's collected 115 of them through the years, and has lately turned to fountain pens as he's running out of storage space. When he looks around his cigar to remark with wry humor, "Isn't it all a hobby though?" he might well be commenting on his whole approach to life. And to top it off he's a Texan by choice, having been born in Owensville, Indiana, in 1875, and hav- ing left shortly thereafter. FACULTY BUSTER BRANNON, Physical Education MACK CLARK, Physical Education B. A. CROUCH, Director of Teacher Placement Bureau LESLIE P. EVANS, Secondary FAYE JONES, Secondary ALMA MCCLENDON, Kindergarten an L. R. MEYER, Physical Education JACK MARTIN, Secondary TOM PROUSE, Physical Education WALTER ROACH, Physical Education MARGARET ROUSE, Elementary EVA SINGLETON, Elementary MAYBELLE TINKLE, Physical Education SANDY A. WALL, Graduation Personnel KITTY WIN GO, Physical Education M. M. YOUNG Secondary d Primary M44 . all 4 H Eg, . 'i.t f - Nirzely-five EDUCATION SENIORS am waxy!!! :AI mi " SIU K Li A' i s I l N inety-J ix REX ALF ORD FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education "T" Association 2 JOHN ARCHER SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS Major: Physical Education ,Hoe-Down 3: Bryson 2, 3: "T" Association 2, 5: Favorite 4 WILLIAM HENRY BAGBY SULPI-IUR SPRINGS, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education LEROY BARGER AMARILLO, TEXAS Major: Physical Education DONALD BARNES I-I1I.I.sIsoRo, TEXAS Major: Physical Education ANN BAUGH Buowrywoon, TEXAS Major: Education Hoe-Down 4g Press Club 5 ARTHUR EARL APLIN HATTIESIIURG, MISSISSIPPI Major: Education Renegades 3, 4: Los Hidalgos 5 JAMES ATCHISON Fmsco, TEXAS Major: Physical Education The "Y" 1, 3: Meliorist 1, 2, GENE BAKER AMARILLO, TEXAS Major: Education B. J. BARNES HILI.sBoRo, TEXAS Major: Physical Education JOHNNIE JOE BATES IOWA PARK, TEXAS Major: Physical Education Hoe-Down 3, 4 WILLIAM C. BECK FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education "T" Association 2. 3, 4 HELEN BENSON NEW BRUNSWICK. N. J. Major: Physical Education XV. S. A. 1. 3. -1 GEORGE BOAI. SAN ANTONIO, Tuxlts Major: Physical Education Association 2, 3, Ii EDUCATION SENIORS FLORENCE A. BIEBER ESTERLY, PENNSYLVANIA Major: Physical Education Chi Beta 45 XV. S. A. 1, 2, 3, 4- KENDALL RAY BOND Waco, TEXAS Major: Physical Education 1-loc-Down 4: "T" Association 2. 3, fi: Skating Club 4 SECONDARY EDUCATION: Secondary Education fundamentals and theories are carried to McLean junior High School with practice teacher Betsy Frasier. Education 341 is required of all graduates to teach in public schools. It is commonly known as practice teaching-the course all future teachers look forward to with high anticipation. Dr. B. A. Crouch is director of student teaching and placement. HENRY BLACK H ILLSBORO, TEXAS Major: Education HAROLD R. BOST FORT WORTH Major: Secondary Education FRANK R. BLACKSTONE FORT WORTH Major: Education JAMES BOYD SPRINGTOWN, TEXAS Major: Physical Education "T" Association 2, 3, 4 SHANKLE BLOXOM BAYTOWN, TEXAS Major: Physical Education "T" Association 1, 2, 3: Bry- son 1, 2, 3 OREIN BROWNING FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education "T" Association 2, 3, 43 Bry- son 5, 4 Ninety-seven EDUCATION SENIORS 1 I Ninety-eigbr CLARENCE D. BRYANT FORT WORTH Major: Secondary Education KENNETH E. CARLSON BROOKLYN, NEW YORK Major: Secondary Education Press Club 4 WILMA JEAN NENVSOM CLOKE FORT WORTLI Major: Secondary Education JOYCE BYNUM NEW BRAUNFELS, TEXAS Major: Physical Education and English Hoe-Down 3, fig Skating Club 3, 4: Meliorist 5, 4: W. S. A. 5, 4 GEORGE W. CLIFTON DECATUR, TEXAS Major: Physical Education BRUCE P. CRAIG FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education Flying Frog 2: The "Y" Ig Marching Band "T" Association 3. -1: Class Treasurer 5 I: Skating Club 1: W. S. A. I, 2, 3, 4 GENEVA I. CREAMER HAROLD H. LIREWS FORT WORTH FORT WORTEI Major: Education and Nursing Major: Physical Education DOROTHY DANIEL DANIEL P. I-IICKS MISSION, TEXAS FORT WOK'I'H Major: Secondary Education Major: Physical Etlucarion Lori 2: Alpha Chi 3, 43 Los Hidalgos I, 25 Alpha Chi 45 Mcliorist I: Football Manager 3 Secretary 2: Frogertes 13 B. 64 P. W. Club Vice-President 3 ROBERT J. DENT FORT WORTH Major: Secondary Education PATRICIA JEAN DICKINSON ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education Skating Club fl EDUCATION SENIORS Y' K JOE EASTER IRVING, TEXAS Major: Physical Education I-loc-Down 2, 5, fi: Rene- gades 5, ll: Skating Club 3, 4 JOYE GRIFFITH LONGVIIEW, TEXAS Major: Elementary Education Choral Club l, fl: Hoe-Down 2, 5, fi: Lcti 2: Frogettes 1 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION: No, this isn't a sale in the toy depart- ment. Each toy on the table represents a nursery rhyme or story book character. Mrs. Eva Wall Singleton is admiring the little lamb that went to school with Mary. These two students share her as they listen to her explanation of how the animals were made. The education majors constructed these likenesses of the mythical story book characters for an outside project. 4 W. E. ELTON FORT WORTH Major: Education MARIE HAINES Four XVORTH Major: Elementary Education President of Association for Childhood Education CLIFFORD FARMER ALEDO, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education MORELLE HICKS LUFKIN, TEXAS Major: Physical Education 'T" Association 1, 2, 5, 4 BOBBY CHARLES FOX FORT WORTH Major: Secondard Education Skating Club 3, 4 JUNE HOFFMAN FORT XVORTH Major: Elementary Education Chi Beta 13 Association of Childhood Education 4 ALLINE GRIDER FORT WORTH Major: Secondary Education JAMES E. HUNT Fortr WORTH Major: Physical Education "T" Association 1, 2, 3, 45 Bryson 2, 3, 4 enthusiasm elementary N ineiy-nine EDUCATION SENIORS One Hundred T. C. JENI JOHNSON GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO Major: Elementary Education Hoe-Down lg Debate 1 W. E. JUETT AMARILLO, TEXAS Major: Physical Education PAUL E. LABONTE ORANGE, TEXAS Major: Physical Education ROBERT E. LEE FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education T. C. U. American Legion 2, 3, BOBBY MALONE FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education U. American Legion -45 Bryson 2, 3, 4 PEGGY SUE MAY FORT WORTH Major: Elementary Education Hoe-Down 33 Meliorisr 3, 4: W. S ROLAND M. JOHNSON, JR. Onrzssli, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education Psychology Club 4 RUTH A. KARRENBROCK WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS Major: Education Association for Childhood Education fi ELSIE HARRELL LECROY FORT WORTH Major: Elementary Education .A.4, Association for Childhood Education fi The Y.. MARY W. LETTS NOCONA, TEXAS Major: Education 1, 23 U. R. C. 1gPiGamm DOYLE MALON E PLAINVIEW, TEXAS Major: Physical Education U. R. C. 2, 33 "T" Association 2, 3, son 2, 5, fig Favorite I li. A. MCQGAW FORT WOR'1'H Major: Physical Education Hoc-Down fl: The "Y" lig Rodeo tion 4 aMul fig Bry- Associa- OTIS MCKELVEY FORTWOR1'PI Major: Physical Education "T" Association 4 MRS. PAT MILLER MULLINS FORT XVORTH Major: Physical Education I-loc-Down l, 2, 3, 4: Pep Cabinet 4: Bryson fi: Skating Club 1, 2: W. S. A. 1, 2, 5: Class Favorite 3: Cheerleader 3, 4 GIRLS PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Pictured at right is typical girl's physical BILLY TOM MCKOWN HILLSBORO, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education Marching Band 3 DONALD M. MURRAY JOSHUA, TEXAS Major: Education and English Poetry Club 4 EDUCATION SENIORS HOWARD MILES FORT WORTH Major: Secondary Education Natural Science Society 5, 4 GEORGE RAY MUSGRAVE FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education BETTY ANN MINYARD FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education W. S. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 KENNETH NANCE SULPHUR SPRINGS, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education WM. TWAIN MORROW FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education DON NARRELL LORAINB, TEXAS Major: Physical Education "T" Association 1, 2, 3, 4 education class going from Little Gym to the playing field. Physical education for women is taught by Professors Kitty Wingo and Maybelle Tinkle. Touch football, volleyball, basketball, folk-dancing, modern-dancing, and tap- dancing round out the Freshman curricu- lum. Archery, golf, tennis, and swimming are offered to upperclassmen. .4-W One Hundred One EDUCATION SENIORS One Hundred Two MARION OLSEN HOUSTON, TEXAS Major: Physical Education SUE OWEN GRAHAM, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education Psychology Club 43 HoeADown 2: The "Y" Leti 2: The "Y" 1, 2: W. S. A. I, 2: Asso- 2, 3: Meliorist 2, 5: Fencing Club 4 BETTE PEROT TEXARKANA, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education Leri 25 President 2: Frogettes 1: W. S. 1,2,4 ELI WILLIAM PRATER ITASCA, TEXAS Major: Physical Education SUZANNE B. RABYOR FORT WORTH Major: Education BETTY JO RIDDLE FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education The "Y" 5: U. R. C. 3, 4: W. S. A. MARY LOU ROBERTSON FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education W. S. A. 1, 2, 4 A. 1, 2, 3 ciarion for Childhood Education 4 RALPH N. PIPER ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Education JOLLY C. PRIDGEON SAN SABA, TEXAS Major: Physical Education T. C. U. American Legion 4: Renegades 4 CARMEN REINLI ARLINGTON, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education Class Secretary lg Association for Childhood Education fi MARY KATHRYN ROBERTS WICPIITA FALLS, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education Hoe-Down 3, fig The "Y" 3: Skating Club 3, 45 Meliorist 3, 43 Fallis Players 4 WAYNE ROGERS HENDERSON, TEXAS Major: Physical Education "T" Association I, 2, 5 4 Q,- DON ROSS SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS Major: Physical Education Football Varsity l, 2 FRED P. SMITH, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education "T" Association 4 BOYS PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Physical Education is required by all male students, except veterans. Here a typical class exhibits muscle-building exercises on one of the campus playing fields As each season rolls around, the boys enter into the sport characteristic of that time of year. An intramural program is sponsored to stimulate interest in all ac- tivities. Thomas Prouse is director of physi- cal education for men. He is assisted by student instructors. l... 5 BETTY RAE SCHMIDT BRADY, TEXAS Major: General Education Choral Club 1, 2: Fine Arts Council 2: Leti 2: The "Y" 1, 2, 43 Frogettes 13 Meliorist 1, 2, 4: Association for Child- Hood Education 3 HELEN SOVEY Convus CHrusT1, TEXAS Major: Secondary Education EDUCATION SENIORS EUGENE D. SCHMIDT EVANSVILLE, INDIANA Major: Physical Education Student Congress 5, 44 T. C. U. Chamber of Commerce 4: T. C. U. American Legion 2, 5, 4: "T" Association 1, 2, 3, 4: Class President 3, 4 SUSAN STEERS FORT WORTH Major: Elementary Education JANIE SHEPPARD MIDLOTHIAN, TEXAS Major: Physical Education W. S. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 HELEN ELIZABETH SWANK CONROE, TEXAS Major: Religious Education United Wlorld Federalists 3, 4: The "Y" 1, 2: Priscilla 2, 3, 4: Skating Club 3, 4: Mel- iorist 1, 2, 5, 43 Fallis Play- ers 1, 2, 5: Debate 23 Leti 2 NED D. SHOTWELL LUFKIN, TEXAS Major: Physical Education NANCY TALLY JUSTIN, TEXAS Major: Education Flying Frog 2, 3: Leti 2: Skiff Staff 53 Press Club 1, 2, 3: Bryson 2, 5: Frogettes 1: Meliorist lg Rodeo Associa- tion 1, 23 Class Favorite 2 E! t WE? ..., K2 -..S 'Ewa One Hundred Three EDUCATION SENIORS One Hundred Four BETTY THOMPSON FORT WORTH Major: Elementary Education Hoe-Down 2, 3, 4: The "Y" 3, 4: Ministct's NX!ives 2, 5, -'ig Mc-liorist 2, 3 I-IOMER TOMPKINS, JR. CISCO, TEXAS Major: Physical Education "T" Association 1 JEAN TREADWAY DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Elementary Education Association for Childhood Educati MARTHA ANN TULL AMARILLO, TEXAS Major: Education Leti 2: Bryson 3, 4 JOE URBIS WEST, TEXAS Major: Physical Education HUBERT F. WALTERS CENTER POINT, TEXAS Major: Physical Education "T" Association 4 onli WILLIAM H. THRIEET, JR. FORT XWORTI-I Major: Elementary Education Association for Childhood Education fi JANE TREADWAY DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Elementary Education Association for Childhood Education 4 CORRIS TUCKER DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Elementary Education PHIL ULMER FORT WORTH Major: Physical Education BILLY WAYNE WALKER FORT VVORTH Major: Secondary Education SALLY WARE TEMPLE, TEXAS Major: Elementary Education Skating Club 4: Association for Childhood Education 4 WALTER LEE WELCH FORT XVORTI-I Muior: Physical Education JIM WELLS Cl.EntmNr5, TEXAS Major: Physical Education JAMES J. WHEATON FORT XVORTH Maior: Secondary Education ELLEN WILSON LEONARD. TEXAS Mnior: Elementary Education MILTON ANDERSON Terral , Oklahoma I-I. P. ALDERMAN Fort Worth MORRIS BAILEY Vernon, Texas MARTHA BRUCE Graham, Texas RANDY CAMPBELL Fort Worth AL Cl-IMILNICKI Brooklyn, New York LOUIS CRITTENDEN Dallas, Texas GENE CULB ERTSON Fort Worth ANGELO D'AGOSTINO Brooklyn, New York CLARK DODSON Gilmer, Texas JANE EASTER Irving, Texas JOANN ELLIS Del Rio, Texas BETTY SUE DOTY Miami, Oklahoma TOMMYE DOWELL Royce City, Texas BEULAH EDWARDS Miami, Oklahoma BOBBY LEE ELDER Fort Worth MAX EUBANKS Waxahachie, Texas DONALD L, FARRIS Weatherford, Texas EDUCATION SENIOR EDUCATION JUNIORS .M my .W .Q .H ".,g.1i,iI ,, , . ,M-,,'4,f' , ip. ..... 5 V ,izkivf I. " Hi n O Q I :W ' If 2 'Hw,e,s,:,:,:.-,., n aw- fi- " x y.:,1',:5,5::A -N 5 Y fa, .. :.:v .. , ,age , Spy v "'-"' ' :ii ff 1' , I- .,.. f"' ,. A .f , '--- ----- f 233735, I- A I , X I. K tv ' ..,. . ,, iii? ...fi-i:'ZE1f "-- . , -' wi ii 1 1 f"fr5'f l- ., A I -,fi ' .f?' faq 5 ' Wi I if , gil . ft H fig .-.- f W 11, 'lv ,--' ':-sasasaa:.:.,.1af ,. I 7. ' I' ' W: f. , : eff i-Q51 W1 1. - . 3,4 'higjaf 1 ,Egg-a gow: I I I. . Q.-i 5:4 5 im 1, - 5 '- ':::::-ri Q., . - A -, We .,SJI-lggsl " 1'-E ,ya i j' A E 4 V V1 ' . K- ' R ' '-'-' A ff.. . -' . -r" ,, Q 1 i-::.2'.L:a, "2iaia1,g- ,gf :TPI-fi - - -:-:-far.. -We I f V X - be- za.: -an Li-W aww ' f. . I: 1 "" wrt I 3 ui, ' 1:1 i fg if , 1 ' . ' ,,-, '-'- w wf, '11 Lizisiln. 2 , ree. T -f : 225 . 'I ii Pi. 1 VVJI :,- , ,. 'i wwe? .,....,. , ,,. ,,.,.,,. I ,im --,, f tfzfgge-,fy f v a o f Q. w e-z35W,?' "' IQ. ' 11 z-, I -I i :stag '- 56' .K ,Ei : ...:::"' K S wwgva I 'f h f x fit A s:-ig I rf' ff , E ,33E'f??S5eQ ... gm f 51.5.4 I, s I I I , :sw - - ."'fMf"' ' 4 .- .I , , - 5-,i pg:-ygpwgffyr Q, One Hundred Five EDUCATION JUNIO e I I ,user - -- 53:4 .:. ,,... fwfr .... : a:a:a:sEi2:a:. 'rl 1-was ' 2 RS - :iz ,mf -s:::s.:: : 5: .. A -r, V-P s-'::- ms.: ., .Ee .Eg .. wi-. -rg. W - , arm 1 .Y-is . -::::g::,,': ' - .,,.gr., 1,:,,.,.,.,..,,?L,- .4 I - : s:a:s:s:s 'W Q ffursiiw, ur., T l EVE ,gms Er K J ff s will -Q , lgix 'E f 5364 if Ish S I N J ? is glllie I Q it if Er if , Si I 5 , M ........ a:a:a:s:a:s 2:1 ,.:.:.:.:.:... .Q 3, A H X - - - - A -f gr :: N ': E 5 ,... - ,,,. . it sia,.,.,.,.i3fa - -' s. ' H: iw K. r:g. gggg":' ::::::::::: A : i i I i 7, , , ,..,, I Q Q "' ,ll i:::5EiEi:5: :f:I:' ' .. ...., . . . gg" M43 referees: ' ialifif One Hundred Six 1, ' 'J':: 2 :rr ,:.s . J 5 '--: 1 ,1,, I I .,.,:. :':':':' ii- il f-:f' Ari? HW , ri I , .,,,.,. - - ME "" N ----:: 2 :,::: ., ,. I gilt ...,:. 'Ai.,:A: :SI :-:- ., : :' , :::.,, W if i sttii s ' tiuui gi, A, 3 ,Q ' 5 , '?3,,,i A BARBARA FERGUSON Dallas, Texas "SHRIMP" FISHER Colorado City, Texas OLGA RUTH FLUITT Marble Falls, Texas KENNETH D. FRICK For: Worth JOY FROST Hattiesburg, Mississippi EULA MAE GRAHAM For: Worth DOIL GOULDING Electra, Texas KITTIE GRAY Fort Wrnrtlr PATRICIA HAMILTON 1 Plainview, Texas BARBARA HARVISON Fort Worth PATRICIA HILL Tyler, Texas WILLARD E. HOWELL Alvord. Texas CHARLES HUDDLESTON Hubbard, Texas NORMAN HUGHES Fort Worth MELVEL HUNTER Fort Worth JAYME JOHNSON Fort Worth l JAMES KELLETT For: Worth WESLEY 'KINSER Fort Worth CHARLES LARGENT Los Angeles, California OTTO A. LOCKEE For: Worllx LOIS LONG Edwards, Mississippi BILL LOONEY Sulphur Springs, Texas HOMER LUDIKER Fort Worth K. L. MARTIN Mansfield, Texas GENEVA MAXCEY Richland Springs, Texas BARBARA MCCANDLESS Amarillo, Texas BARBARA MCELROY El Paso, Texas NADYNE MEIERDING Dallas, Texas D. FRANCES MCKAY Pon Worth KAY MCLEAN Quannh, Texas MILDRED MOSER Cleburne, Tcxns BILL MOOR MAN Odessa, Texas CONWAY NELSON Fort Worth HELEN NEWTON Brings, Texas WAYLAND W. OATMAN Loving, Texas R. M. ORAHOOD Fort Worth BETTY MARIE PADON For: Worth JERRY ANN PORTWOOD Fon Wforxh CORKEEY ROSE Vega, Tcxns JEAN SMITH Kaufman. Texas BILL SNEDECOR Sr. Louis, Missouri BEVERLY SNEDECOR St. Louis, Missouri NANCY ANN STEELE Burncr,Tcx:1s BILL TANNER Corpus Christi, Texas BETTIE TILLOTSON Jessnminc, Texas LYNN VAUGI-IAN Hubbard, Texas JO BETH VELTEN Brownsville, Texas KENNETH XVALKER Weatherford, Texas EDUCATION UNIOR 53 3 I l sf A J 2 'S' ' A .a '..-- S -A A Q 4 540 VQVQ E5 K I QL.: g:?s-2:2+- , '- max -r 'vmjw gms Qhuaigf -: I il, L . 5 e"L"" L X , rail? 2 .,., I -Y M . ..J,:.- sz: . W l l i One Hundred Seven EDUCATION UNIORS ' -': - , ? at :.. ,..,..., 5 'Il i 4' Q.,,: f T, w ti? i tt sr l EEE? a 4' 1 EDUCATION SOPHOMORES MARGARET WALKER Weatherford, Texas GLENN M. WILCOX. JR. Fort Worth WYNONA WILLIAMS Fort Worth A I - ', REF? 2 ..... , T One Hundred Eight DAN WILDE Graham, Texas BILLY WILLINGHAM Stephenville, Texas PATRICIA WILSON EMMA ABASTAS Frazier, Texas Mineral Wells, Texas BOBBIE JEAN ARNOLD Fort Worth SUE BEST Fort Worth JACK BARTHOLOMEW Fort Worth GILBET BARTOSH Granger, Texas ANN BETTIS Olney, Texas EARLENE BREWSTER Fort Worth BETTY SUE BROWN Fort Worth JACK I.. CALDWELL Fort Worth MAURICE CAMBELL Mr. Vernon, Texas JUDITH DEATON Brady, Texas JEAN CLARK Fort Worth CLARENCE LEO COOK, JR. Fort Worth PEGGY DOMSTAD Cranfills Gap, Texas LUCILE DUSTIN Gainesville, Texas JOHN ETHRIDGE Sundown. Texas MARY ELEANOR FERRELL Tyler, Texas KEITH FLOWERS Perryton, Texas ADRIENNE FOOTE Turncrsville, Texas JOE FREEMAN Fort Worth HARVEY FROMMIE Sinron, Texas JAMES GLENN Mineral Wells, Texas ANN GUEST Forr Worrh ADELLE HAYWARD For: Worth JOE HEARN For: Worth CAROL HENRY Hcarne, Texas BEI'I Y HILL Junction, Texas MARIE I-IINES Lufkin Texas EMMIE HOLLEMAN Lufkin, Texas DON HOPKINS Richland, Texas PHYLLIS HOWARD Electra, Texas DON HUNT Fort Worrh JEAN JERNIGAN Fort Worth WAYLON Ii. KIRK Waxahachie, Texas JAMES KNOX Tafr, Texas MARGARET I.OGAN Fort Worrh BARBARA LOTSPEICH Fort Worrh JOHN MARSHALL Mineral Wells, Texas ED MATH ES Vega, Texas WILLIAM MATTERN, JR. Fairland, Texas "JINX" MCKELVELY Arlington, Texas LOIS MEGGS San Antonio, Texas NITA MITCHELL Austin, Texas VIVIEN MIDDLETON Big Spring, Texas PATSY MILLER For: Worth CATI-IERINE MOORE Richland Springs, Texas TOMMY MOORMAN Longview, Texas GENE MORGAN Stamford, Texas SHIRLEY PAYNE Fort Worth EDUCATION SOPHOMORES Q s . ' e ' fwfr J' X gf if ff' K X? mimi jgf , , if y T' M .gn 4. W IEE I W W grew: A- if '-'- was r 5' Q. WWE ,4 Ni 1 sf' Q 2 I X I 2 I 'R 5: yi I Q4 :1'2::s:s.a::'5:2af, ki'-' '-,-,M ..a:s:s-:Ei ' If ' ..1-:-:.:.,.,..,,., .. ..i,.- ' . 22:1-f nm.. M I K Sli: 3 5 226 X' L, , .I . 3535? ggi? in QF I , , "" i f Q ,X . I ,, , I, ss gg 121' Y 3 , f 4 X gs l 4 3 W fl I ,Q ,. ,ig -,.: ,V P i7 E I 3,24 ,, Z I wa 255544 Ili ' I Y ., I , ,,, A 'Q ,, 1 i I 4-1 x H Y 5' 1482 , A ei I, , H-: .1-I .,,. g. 3 .. ' wif' 'D eira . I , - .,..,, ,VB B 5 .- 53 . ,, w ii i-. . . Q ' 5-. ' 'I 'wif aisiiii' . ' Q my I ' 13' sr 2,, ' Y ' ,1 , -:rw R 7 - ,.5. l ,,, .a , E ah ... 12 ilizi FE L' W V One Hundred Nine EDUCATION SOPHOMORES - 7Q'rf'fJ:maw-+--ww-w,iiiii:lflzlr,5:' ygw I .1 3 ,sis :E 1,1 I-'ZW' . ' Y' . i .x1"9'- W fa f wiv -:-: 5 wiliifw Q25 3 .2 K 1, :, t W . lk ., .. S X 'Tv : ,.,.,v.....,.,., I I 7' , .. . 6 5 , r - ,egg I We if f 42? M155 2 A- xg? asf f 5 W El ,fi If.. SE is I 6 Q E will ffl af. , . ....... . ,-,. ..., . . . . ,. H Erm a .,-- - z,:-5 -::' Ig '--f- ..1, g,... . in , F as 3. ' I 5 :K"""eIQ" ..::::sasasas P' ' Ayriii SQ3 Sify' ,:E..,k...:.:., ....... g g gi I " 1, PIC., E zafgwr is.. . :sEsEsEaiEsEs:a.:.: ' ""' iE5E5:5E:.5:. ,: ::':,'W ' :I :':':" :JS . f - :s:a:a:a:a::.ss:s,v:..' . ....... .f'-was-5 if K Q, , 'E:EEIE . ' I :QM 'Z il , . Icfwwsfg :.:-.:.. 1 T w UE I la I ,Q 6 .,,,,,,...: .., , , I IEEE? 1:1:1: -- I- ---- fsaagx A 5 H I My ,H I Km E M Eiggziizlzlig 3 .',1. '.1" agl EDUCATION FRESHMEN One Hundred Ten BETH PEARSON Ranger, Texas MARILYN PHELPS Fort Worth NORMA ANNE PIRTLE Pampa, Texas CAROL RANKIN Fort Worth JACK RAY McKinney, Texas TED REYNOLDS Aledo, Texas CARLOS J. ROBERTS Mansfield, Texas BETTY ANN ROWLAND Fort Worth JO ANN RUSSELL ForcNVorth PEGGY SLAUGHTER Kenedy, Texas PATRICIA SMART Texas City, Texas DANIEL SNODGRASS Fort Worth ALTON TAYLOR Austin, Texas MARY TI-IOMASON Granbury, Texas JEAN TISDALE Dallas, Texas GEAN TURNER Cleburne, Texas DONALD WARDYNSKE Momence, Illinois JANE LEAI-I WEBSTER Fort Worth CI-IARLENE WI-IITEHEAD Petrus, Texas TOMMY WITT Nocona, Texas HUBERT ZIMMERMAN Mr. Vernon, Texas JIM A MBURG Henderson, Texas KITTY BAGGETT Fort Worth DONALD BELL Kaufman, Texas BARBARA BOHANNON Fort Worth DORIS BUIE Fort Worth RICHARD BYERS Fort Worth JACKIE CASE Cynthia, Kentucky BETTY JEAN DANIEL Mission, Texas MARY LYNN DUBOSE Wicltira Falls, Texas BOOGER EMERSON O'Bricn, Texas JOHN FLINN Fort Worth JOE WAYNE KNAPP Panhandle, Texas ANN LAWLIS Brady, Texas ZANA LEMON Burleson, Texas CLAUDE LITTLE Fort Worth LEONARD LAUDERDALE Somerville, Texas DON MARTIN Iraan, Texas JAMES MASUR Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania CARLTON MCCORMACK Henderson, Texas I-IARLAN MCWILLIAMS Menard, Texas SUE M EINECKE Ozona, Texas JIMMY MILLER Smithfield, Texas NANCY PARKER Hemphill, Texas HU B ERT PARRETT Dallas, Texas MARCELLA PATTISON Fort Wlorth CI-IRIS PERNER Ozona, Texas JACK RAMSAY Henderson, Texas FRANK ROBERSON Midland, Texas STANLEY REINSHAGEN New Braunfels, Texas SANDRA RUSSELL Fort Stockton, Texas DAVE SI-IUMWAY Algona, Iowa JANE SMITH Livingsron, Texas MARY LOU SNEAD Austin, Texas ROBERT SNOW For: Wortlt MARY SPENCER Albany, Texas BETSY STRANGE Wortham, Texas JOI-INSYE TANKERSLIEY Lamesa, Texas MICKEY TEEMS Fort Worth I. A. WARREN Fort Worrh GLORIA WI-IITEI-IEAD Houston, Texas ROD WILLIANIS Garland, Texas BOBBY WILLIAMSON Hagerman, New Mexico SARA ANNE YOUNG Houston, Texas ROBERT ZOTZ Cameron, Texas EDUCATION FRESHMEN II . f5:ff1'z" 'Z , -,: st', ,1 ':' ,, L2 4 72 , ' . V "A 'zvi if f,i'of'f ' a.:.:f,.. ' isis- 1 awk- wf .fm -. A .,.. -if k J H'- :ali sl -ii: ll la , ,.,., I .ff'??2T'iK , , . - '-" F -- typ :f --"' -- '-M , .,,.,.1 V s I Q, 132 ' Y 1. ' "kg, 1- I , . M '-" ' g . , ! , , s ,,,, . . . f - -.5.::::ea:...a':.:-:-2.'1,2.2':' W- -e . wN- sw ,-sill? i . . ,,., I N a"' f , it ' ' :.Z :vw f ,-.. I J . , 3973fii2a'3sikr 0 . I.:.: , :LES -.:2.- ' -,,v . 'g 5 , -ilk 1' , .,.. - 1 --'--- z W. ,. ' at , 1 .J .- I, " K ' ii ..... . 1 . A' ' ,.'. 4 , i s M fi ,Alf 3' Gi A , 'Ts in Q Y Wi , sf .. X, i A ' --f-- , 355 ala? 'M A fi i 1' l 1-s fa I ., t all I iii av Q A v Q 1 Yu 2 I I -- ww W - , .,.1,:,. VXI' ii ,. K N ff . It . --,VV we ......,... .lll t. .-s5,5.-.-.-.- M , K Q af 3 I I 1 ' swf? 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L ' ,..t:::::-a:a:s::' ' f QW- H .-..EE5?S1"II L --f' ..- 'W ' w v H , ,Z ,,,,. , .,,.,. ,,,,,, 'Z , , .....,, as ,,, xi l K " X 15 I A ,Q 1, , sr Q I 49 gt , , t, ' 713. "" XZ fi' O A f if ' L5 1 l I , '::f,t.:-' ' :g:::::iE?2,:1-'52 3 f " ...it One Hundred Eleven SCHOOL OF FINE AR DEAN One of the busiest, most dynamic men on the campus, Dean T. Smith McCorkle has the distinction of having seen his big- gest dream come true in his lifetime--the completion of the new Fine Arts Building last September, for which he has been plugging since l942. The school, whose en- rollment already has surpassed the dean's expectations, seems destined for nationwide prominence under McCorkle's policy of in- terrelating religion with the fine arts. To mmy Clark taught the first instrumental music at T.C.U. a short time before 1880. Mi ss Theodora Cayse established the first "School of Elocution" in the spring of 1896. However, it was not until 1910 that T.C.U. recognized music credits in issuing degrees. A Bachelor of Music degree was first issued in 1924. The School of Fine Arts has three basic objectives. First it seeks to serve the campus at large through courses offered for general electi ve credit or for it major or a minor on the B.A. degree, and by means of pro- grams, plays, and exhibits which enhances the C ultural atmosphere of the campus. Second, the School offers professional training in various aspects of art, drama, music, radio, and speech. Th of th as po throu Dr Dean ird, the faculty and the student talent e school are made available in so far ssible for service in the community and ghout the state. . Thomas Smith McCorkle has been of the School of Fine Arts since 1942. T. SMITH MCCORKLE DEPARTMENT HEADS . w l LEW D. FALLIS FRED B. FOLKS E. L. PROSS S. P. ZIEGLER S peach-Drama Radio S peecb-Drama, Administrator Aft One Hundred Twelve FACULTY KATHERINE BAILEY, Piano MARY LOUISE BAKER, Violoncello CLARENCE J. BEST, Music Education JOHN BRIGHAM, Voice 'E it f i it Y ":'- " if 41, - JOE CINQUEMANI, Trumpet LAURA COUPLAND, Piano JOHN ERICKSON, Art i ' ,:::-" V ARTHUR FAGUY-COTE, Singing W ja? W I LL f Qi, ie , Egger .,..:... 5 :,i i i 5 -,--,V , f me ' X ww fi. X A GP' .fs YZ, ,gli yi mi i NORRIS GREER, Voice RALPH GUENTHER, Flute ANDRE HETZEL, Technical Theater LAVERNE HODGES, Harp VIRGINIA KLEIN, Speech-Drama KARL KRITZ, Opera Work LEONARD LOGAN, Art WILLIAM J. MARSH, Organ, Theory, Chorus 'AJA W eftei DANIEL MCAN1NCH,Ob0e 1 ,V.' i "" . ----: 'f.,,, fl LILITA MCCORKLE, Piiiiio 'iii VIRGINIA MCKINNEY, Music Librarian f f JVZZ KEITH MIXSON, Piano ii iii I I ii: , - I .,ii I ' ",' E ,, ,,,. . X . i' i1ii BROOKS MORRIS, Violin vi ii., H DAVID PRESTON, Ballet JEANETTE TILLETT, Piano WALTER VOLBACH, Drama E. CLYDE WHITLOCK, Theory M. W. WINESANKER, Musicology One H mu! red Thirteen E, D. MEYERS, Art , Fi MRs.ROGERN1aELEY,v0ice im ii 5 , i aiaiai..-X.. .ia 'di - , i li FINE ARTS SENIORS i t s l i i 25 ie A RICHARD M. ARNOLD FORT WORTH Major: Art Brushes Club 2, 5, 4 WENDALL E. BROWN FORT WORTH Major: Arr Brushes Club 5, 4 HOWARD BECKN ELL FORT XWORTH Major: Radio and Drama Alpha Si Omega 23 Al- pha Chi 25 Radio Work- shop 53 Fallis Players 4 GLORIA ANN CALLAWAY MUNCIE, INDIANA Major: Music CPianoD Choral Club 1, 2, 5, 4, Mu Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, Parlia- mentarian 5, 4: Fine Arts Council 23 Leti 25 A Cappella Choir 3: Frogettes lj Fallis Play- ers 4 CHARLES G. BESEDA VAN ALSTYNE, TEXAS Major: Radio-Speech Horned Frog Staff 1, 2, 3, 4g Radio Workshop 1, 2, 5: Fallis Players 2, 3, 4 JENNIE BOWERS LUFKIN, TEXAS Major: Arr Brushes Club 2, 3, fig Lcti 2: Frogettes 15 Mcl- iorist 3 ROY JOE CATES MARTIN O. CLEVELAND CROWELL, TEXAS Major: Drama Choral Club 1, 25 Alpha Psi Omega 2, 3, 43 Sigma Tau Delta 5, 43 Fine Arts Council 2, 3, Cisco, TEXAS Major: Radio-Speech Radio Workshop 1, Fal- lis Players 1 MAY ALICE BRALEY MERTENS, TEXAS Major: Music Choral Club 3, 43 Hoc- Down 45 U. R. C. 5, 4 EDWARD F. COOLEY FORT WORTPI Major: Music Literature Choral Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Phi Mu Alpha Sympho- nia 4g Der Deutsche Verein 4, President 4 .:,..:. K I 3 in . lanlup , E. - ,J A f KENNETH BROWN Fo RT XVORTH Major: Commercial Art WAYNE R. DOUGHERTY FORT WORTH Major: Commercial Art 45 Marching Band 1, Radio Workshop 3, 4: Fallis Players 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, 5 One Hundred Fourteen ART: Without smock and tam the artist is at her easel ready to work. Three two-hour labs are met each week in the Fine Arts Building. Crafts, designing, and commercial art are also in the curriculum of the department. Elementary education majors are instructed in the teaching of art in the grammar schools. Arr history and appreciation courses are required of those planning to receive a BFA degree. JACK DYE FORT XWORTI-I Major: Art BETSY FRASIER Waco, TEXAS Major: Music Education Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 43 Stage Band 4, Mu Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4: Frogettes lg Lexi 2 Cl-IERIE GARDNER FORT VVORTH Major: Music Educarion Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4: Stage Band 4: Marching Band I, 2 CLARA LOUISE GOODSPEED FORT WORTH Major: Piano Choral Club 2, fl: Mu Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, Presidcnr 4, Fine Arts Coun- cil 5. 4 PEGGY JOYCE HARDIE Fond' WORTH Major: Music Education Choral Club 1, 4: Hoe-Down fl: A Cappella Choir 45 Marching Band fi: Flag Swinger 4 MARGUERITE HEATH FORT Woivri-r Major: Music Education RAY ELLIOTT WILLS POINT, TEXAS Mrrjor: Music Choral Club 1, 2, 3, 4, A Cappella Choir fl ALEXANDER FREEDMAN FORT WORTH Major: Arr Skiff Staff 33 Brushes Club 4: Press Club 2 LEWIS D. GILLIS FORTVVORTH Major: Music Education Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 5, 4: Srage Band 1, 2, 5, fig Phi Mu Alpha Symphonia 2, 5, -1, Secretary 2, President 55 Fine Arts Coun- cil 1, 2, 43 T. C. U. American Legion 33 Marching Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Presi- rlcnr fl CHARLIE GUSTAFSON FORT WORTH Major: Commercial Art JAMES E. HARRIS, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Radio-Speech Radio Wlorkshop 5: Fallis Players 2: Class Vice-President 1 RICHARD C. HORST CHAMBERSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA Major: Speech-Drama Alpha. Psi Omega 4: Fine Arts Council 4, President 45 Radio Workshop 3, 4, Presidenr -1: Fallis Players 3, 4 FINE ARTS SENIORS g , Y i I One Hundred Fifteen FINE ARTS SENIORS J FREDDIE HOSKINS FORT WORTH Major: Speech-Drama Alpha Psi Omega 4: Fine Arts Council 5, 4g Hoe-Down 2: Skiff Staff 2: Radio Work- shop 3, 4: Fallis Players 1, 2, 5. 4 EDVIGE J. LAINE FORT WORTH Major: Art Psychology Club 2 ,3, 45 T. C. U. American Legion 2, 3, 45 Brushes Club 1, 2, 5, 4 CHARLES F. HUMPHREY TYLER, TEXAS Major: Commercial Art Horned Frog Staff 3: Psy- chology Club 3g Brushes Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Meliorist 1 VERA LINDER FORT WORTH Major: Music Education Symphony Orchestra 4 BETTY ALICE INGLE FORT WORTH Major: Speech-Drama Alpha Psi Omega 23 Fallis Players 4 FLOYD WISDOM LISLE FORT WORTH Major: Music Literature Horned Frog Staff 4: Sym- phony Orchestra 2: Choral FRANK D. KASKO TRENTON, NEW JERSEY Major: Music Education Symphony Orchestra 4: Stage Band 45 Fine Arts Council 1: Pep Cabinet 15 Stage Band 4: Marching Band 4g Drum Ma- jor 4 MARK R. LIVESAY, JR. FORT WORTH Major: Radio Flying Frog 15 Press Club 1: Radio Workshop 1 JAMES R. KECK LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS Major: Commercial Art Brushes Club 1, 2, 3, 4 AUDRE ABNEY LOKEY LUFKIN, TEXAS Major: Music Choral Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Mu Phi Epsilon 2, 3. 43 Leti 2: Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Fine Arts Council 2, 5, 4: The "Y" 4: A Cappella Choir 5, 49 U. R. C. 3: Alpha Chi 3. 4: Melior- ist 1, 2, 3, 4 A Cappella Choir 4: Frog- ettes 1 MUSIC: Representative of the Department of Music is the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta M. S. Pinafore" presented by the Uni- One Hundred Sixteen , A M - KA versity Choral Club. Under the direction of William 1. Marsh, professor of organ and theory, the club toured West Texas late last spring. Activities of the Choral Club include recitals for numerous groups to encourage interest in music. Dean T. Smith McCorkle is head of the department. GRANT LOONEY FORT WORTH Major: Music Education Symphony Orchestra 2, 51 Stage Band 2, 5: Marching Band 2, 3. 4 JACQUELINE MILLER FORT WORTH Major: Drama Student Congress 1. 2: Choral Club 1: Pep Cabinet 4: Marching Band 3, 4: Bryson 2: Radio Workshop 5: Fallis Players 2, 3, fig Class President 1 RAYMOND C. PRESTRIDGE ALTUS, OKLAHOMA Major: Speech SUSAN ROWLAND FORT WORTH Major: Radio Speech Radio Workshop 2: W. S, A. 2 LORILEI SCHWARTZ FORT WORTH Major: Music Education Choral Club 4: A Cappella Choir 45 Alpha Chi -1: Meliorist 4 CAROLYN S H AW FORT NVORTH Major: Art Chi Beta 32 Hoe-Down 2, 5, 4: Marching Band 4, Flag Swinger: Brushes Club 2, 5, 4: Natural Science Society 1: Skating Club 2: W. S. A. 2 BELLE MCLENDON MILLER ATLANTA, GEORGIA Major: Art Brushes Club 5, 4, Priscilla 5 DORIS MARIE MICKEY MOORMAN FORT WORTH Major: Music Education Choral Club 1, 2, 5, 4: Leti 23 The "Y" I, 2: A Cappella Choir 5, 4: Frogettes 1: Me- liorist 1, 2 JOE READ DALLAS, TEXAS Major: Music Choral Club 5, 4: Phi Mu Alpha Symphonia 2. 5. 4: Timothy 5, 4: The "Y" 5, 4: Marching Band 5, 4 KENNETH F. SCHANEWERK FORT WORTH Major: Music Symphony Orchestra 1, 2. 3, 4, Stage Band 2, 5, 4 SALLIE SECOR MIDLAND, TEXAS Major: Speech Pathology Hoe-Down ii: The "Y" 4: VU. S. A. 4 NINA SHAW FORT WORTH Major: Art Symphony Orchestra lg Hoe-Down 1, 2, 5, 4, Marching Band 1, 2, 5, 43 Majorette 2, 5: Assistant Drum Major 4g Brushes Club 5, 43 Skating Club 2, Basketball Queen 4 FINE ARTS SENIORS One Hundred Seventeen FINE ARTS SENIOR ARTHUR M. SHEETS FORT WORTH Major: Radio Speech T. C. U. American Legion 13 Flying Frog 1: Radio Work- shop 2: Fallis Players 1 MRS. VIRGINIA STROTHER . FORT WORTH Major: Att Alpha Chi 5, 43 Brushes Club 1, 2, 3, 4 WILLIAM B. SHROPSHIRE FORT WORTH Major: Radio Alpha Psi Omega 3, 4: Fine Arts Council 2, 4: Radio Workshop 2, 3, 4: Fallis Players 3. 4 ARTHUR J. TEELE FORT WORTH Major: Commercial Art Fine Arts Council 43 T. C. U. American Legion 1, 2: Brushes Club 3, 4, President 4: Rodeo Association 4 MINOR C. SMITH FORT XVORTH Major: Commercial Art DOROTHY THOMPSON FORT WORTH Major: Art MRS. IMOGENE LESTER STANDEFER BRIDEPORT, TEXAS Major: Art The "Y" 1, 2: Brushes Club 1, 2. 3, 4: Frogettes l H. L. VAUGHN FORT WORTH Major: Speech and Psychology One Hundred Eighteen DRAMA: 'Jill JEAN CLAIRE STINSON CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS Major: Speech-Drama Frogettes lg Leti 25 Bryson 2, 3, 4: Fallis Players 2 KATHERINE FRANK YOUNG FORT WORTH Major: Music Education Student Congress 1, 2, 5: Mu Phi Epsilon 2, 5, 4: Alpha Chi 55 Bryson 2, 3, 4 The unsung heroes of any play produc tion are the stage crew. These boys and girls are setting up for one of the little theatre productions. With the construction of the little theatre in the Fine Arts Build- ing, better facilities for better plays are available. Any student wishing to try out for a part in a production is eligible. Notices are posted prior to all castings. Professor Walther R. Volbach is Director of the University Theater. Professor Andrea Hetzel is technical director. DONNA ADKINSON Fort Worth ROBERT E. AMES Mingus, Texas MARY JO ANDERSON Calvert, Texas JOYCE JOAN BEASLEY Fort Worth MARY RUTH BOONE Wloodsboro, Texas JOHNNY BRADFORD Fort Wortlm BUZ BYAS Fort Worth CAREY JANE CAMERON Austin, Texas TRACY CARY Pnmpa, 'Texas JUNE CAUSLEY Birmingham, Alabama JIM CUNNINGHAM Fort Worth MARILYNE CRILL Form Worth BEVERLY CRINER Fort Worth MELVIN DASHNISR Fort Worth NANCY DAVIS Fort Worth JACQUELINE DENT Fort Worth J. C. DISNEY Borgcr, Texas LARRY FERRARA Hempstead, New York EDWIN HOLLEMAN Fort Worth LETA EUBANK Dallas, Texas MARY ISABEL LUDWICK Fort Worth DOYLE J. GREEN, JR. Cleburne, Texas DON GERNSBACHER Fort Worth RONALD HENDERSON Fort Worth 5?'S1ki'l'f'f Z' "fWr1.f 5ii??545'wT5?ff1r?f "' igggye S?Q,t:, ' f 5G 4, 5 ,Magi .Q . .' :g,,:Q,E:::, .3, ifiiwl I I 251 www' Q f..ftr:'9 :gN5j01s2i5 TT A ' fwi gil' S ii P- "" f'i..,:f:1-' 2 - . .... " T ""' ' FINE ARTS JUNIORS t , zQg'T'S.'.,,..,Q : 5 'tag 1: 13, Zggvwv 'f A f-H-Eifisiw z :. we 5 my X V, , 1 I at Sv WAN" f 5' 'Ss f -Q 9.24 ,if 3 Q.--,., f ,Q i5y 1,,,N W Q 1' .fm ,He ' ,,-em.: '- Da fii 42 N' 5 ati X' " Wi 1 - i Z J' t . , V W . M 6 get , 5 OW lm as P JKT QSM i1 , . M. 5 - fig? J 5 or to 65 H , f , W M Y if izw X, if 4" N S' A H J in 3 IGN f Q I gi ,N 14, NZ V JS Q A as + If WM " -4: i x N Vg L ' - , , f era M:--.-:-1 -sm? J lk r I 4 l ii no ,rea X ' YY 1 liyisl . N ie as tv A I Ig Y .992 , Y fm N' wiv Q-pn 'i SIX? One H zmdrerl Nineteen FINE ARTS JUNIORS l Y " 'A i -- EM.: g m.. 5-im., .,.. 1 ...A ,, V: W 249994 IIIII.I.I" I A9 7.-. S 1 "" "ii "" :- 5 sis. ' I , -isia: I gaze-5' s- 1 F" ' ,S .t 2 . - . . ::::, It , ,...... . -.5- 1 ' . .411 1553 I Qffxi5"'fMMf : ' , t R ff gif t it A , Fe M A B 02 1 g ' 3355? "" ' ' A54 1 tv E ' Tfiiti - A'AA4 ,lftgiygt -A ,.,.,i ,A,A I if", :. ,. .f ,f " ai ' -fi gig, A if .1 xi . , 5 .... ., fi V AF' ' -4- 'L ' "" 5'.,:I'I'...II'I:E:5 fl? I i A 1- .iifiiizrf ggxfizz I l A ' fi-',' on"-- , ....... .EEI2'.:.:.. Q.I.,j::Q:' :gtg BOBBY VERNON HINDS JERRY S. HUGHES ROBERT W, HURST FORT WORTH FARMERSVILLE, TEXAS FORT WORTH LOU A. MARCELLA PAT MCCAMY EULA MARIE MEERS BRONX WEST FARGO, N. D. PAMPA, TEXAS NEW YORK CITY, N. Y. JOHN DIXON OSBURN EDWARD M. PARKER BARBARA PORTER WALTER W. JONES FORT WORTH VIRGINIA MIRACLE PAINIPA, TEXAS ERNEST REPASS DALLAS, TEXAS FORT WORTH FORT WORTH LITTLEEIELD, TEXAS ,......?T.W,..si-IwwmMe44Q?'2K??Z!QA'EixEE 3355 M We WW I ' ,gif , .inf .. 'v ' 'T A A A ww-Izkyhw A " H ' I ' 59,15 U3-M 'xf?ffQf2sf,12Azt::.ii55i,fA ,W ...,, . V -' fly, - A . ..,. , i vwlwv f-W'-ff l DORIS KEYS PADUCAH, TEXAS CLAIRE MAE LESLIE KILGORE, TEXAS MAVIS MITCHELL DALLAS, TEXAS SALVADORE NASCI-IE FORT WORTH NANCY ROBERTS ROTAN, TEXAS LLOYD T. SILVER PARK RIDGE, ILL. RADIO: Testing: I-2-5-4. Everyone is poised. With the "OK" from Fredrick B. Folks in the control room, KTCU will be on the air. One of the finest collegiate studios in the southwest, the new radio station located in the Fine Arts building is sound proof. An organ provides music for many of the programs. The studio has the fortune to own two microphones. One Hundred Twenty BEVERLY SMITH Szrznford, Texas BEVERLY ANN STULTING Big Sprinr. Texas NANCY THOMPSON Fun Worrh ' MARY 'FICE San Marino, California BETTY TOBEY Arkadclphin, Arkansas JANET Tnticxsiass Herndon. Virginia WILLIAM NOLLY VEREEN Greensboro, N. C. DORIS WARD For: Wonh FINE ARTS IUNIORS tl3S..p tim., . . ,. 1 iii: f 1, 558' M -- W I. M- 2 fvm, ' ' "" 5 - ' -Q -'TE f I EJ-iw iV" ' "WW , -:Fi , A :- I .. J' 4 .,::'f3WZ .... fm ..,Eg,.. ,gi qs M fs' 3 , 3 l w . S 2 , W Q, S Xa A wi I R32 .s X I+ we AISI' gr Q sgufwig, ML Lx W fi sd 5 I W 'iglis 2 .... .. . 12,42 5: 222232 JOANNE WI-IITMORE Fort Worth ANN WILLIAMS Delgood, Texas SUE WILLIAMSON Fon Worth ETHEL CORNELIA WILSON Clarksdale, Miss. ODIN WILSON Fort Worth GEORGE W, WRIGHT Fort Worth ELAINE BAKER For: Worth EVELYN M. BAKER ForrWorrh MARY ALICE BARR Cleburne, Texas RALPH BEAN Temple, Texas L. J. BERRY Houston, Texas DALENE BAREN Leakcy, Texas PAT BREEN Fort Worth JO ANN BRENNER San Antonio, Texas -'1-' A gi:-fri..-1:14 . .,.,. , 1: fi . mrfgazzi. 'I 'ff riiis 'fl' .5227 Wi-.ig if I, r 5 5: ir. im! .1 , syfwgggi A Ill' FINE ARTS SOPHOMORES .:a::s::a:5E ,siazigagsgs ' One Hundred Twenty-one FINE ARTS SOPHONI GRES E as 1:.:-:ra I :EEE .,:.x E: ,.:.,........ , , ...,. .,,k. . ,.,,.,,.,.: . f A i 32 . , E M' 'gf 2 X 'Sr t ' I T One H andrea! Twenty-two EDRIS BU LLER Crachett, Texas CATHERINE CALLOWAY Gregory, Texas GERALD COOK Fort Worth BOB CORNELL Ithaca, New York CAROLYN CRAIK Fort Worth M. W. CRIGLER Fort Worth BETTY CRINER New Orleans, Louisiana DARRELL DEBO Burnet, Texas BARBARA DWYER Fort Worth FRANCES ELDER Biloxi, Mississippi BETTYE GILES Breckenridge, Texas TILLIE GILLIS Fort Worth JOANNE GUNN Maturin, Venezuela OVELLA HALL Hot Springs, Arkansas FRANCES I-IALSTEAD Midland, Texas MARY LOIS HENSON Houston, Texas BERT HOLLISTER Magnolia, Arkansas GRACE L. I-IOOPER Fort Worth JEAN HOW ARD Pecos, Texas DEAN ING Lu bbock, Texas BILL JOHNSON Temple, Texas MARY NEITA JOHNSON Fort Worth JAMES L- JONES, JR. Galveston, Texas BARBARA KNOX Cleburne, Texas SUZAN NA LANDERS Menard, Texas BUFORD LATIMER Port Arthur, Texas LLOYDELLE LITTLE Lufkin, Texas JIMMY LIVINGSTON Sun Angelo, Texas CAROL MCCULLOII Galveston, Texas JAMES ROUSE MORRIS Greensboro, North Carolina JACK MULLINS Benton. Arkansas DAVE PRICE, JR. Mem phis, Texas VINCENT QUINTERO Fort Worth CARMA LOU MOORE QPOODLEJ Henrietta, Texas LOYCE ORR Graham, Texas ,IIMMIE MONDIER Fort Worth MARY ANN MUSGROVE Breckenridge, Texas CHERRY LANE PERKINS Alexandria, Louisiana CAROLYN POE Fort Wlorth MAXINE RAGLE Fort Worth MORRIS REI-'ASS Littlefield, Texas JIM ROBERSON Rio Vista, Texas JOE SIMPSON BERNIE ROBERTSON Amarillo, Texas MOLLI E DOT ROBERTSON Dallas. Texas J acksboro, Texas DICK SLON E Ashland, Kentucky JEAN STANSBURY Port Arthur, Texas MARTHA ANN SWAIN Houston, Texas FINE ARTS SOPHOMORES i " fi "" " W ,-'.. : :.: "'.' : I f ss....:.,.,,.,.,,.1., I, R ,,., ""' 'lililirl 525555 E' . ' . 'H 5523: si M kg aj 1 I Q' if i ,sf f . S 1 s W 'A' ff W ffyb - sr- f gs5:s:s:a Aiieizl if .tzijga -:g- , :. " 3351 ,., ..,..,, .. , ,,.., . ,M , ,,,, , , , " .1:agqa55s5:5,.g--:.,.g:g:,,,g',,...,,,s H, 1 f- A: , V ..,..,.,, , f V' , ,,,.,... , ' A .... ..,. I ff is ,,. ,.,,... , . Sa' as Y it I ' I 4 ....,,,v is . X .. 4 1 if? ,f f' t,, 'Tl' -PI-.":a'::.'-',::-:::'- - 1 " it iiiii A ,E .-.. ..... V E33 ,, tt, .Lf -Essay- . . W WI Q 'I' Q , 4 its if wr , ,, ff' 5 ., , . , -f 2, ' f Wa W 1, t 5, I, Q i W Eg L I , I Anais' it I ff I , ., 'if' bi ' ' K gg , , Q r W 1, ra Lin' . f - -g:.e,,.f::s-2"'Es,.-. 'ii' sEs:g,:,5,5- ,g::.5,.g2., slre , , A ibm wwe' Sit ,twmi yi if 32 I gi 1 if- "i"'3":::'i',- I' ff' "xE1F1i . "i'i' . H251 . I Tiflf ': .f if- 'E ,':Si5Qf1,. Rf 1 If I, at , ' .-.- F RW I BILL TATUM gg? Lubbock, Texas BILLY TEEL sun WATSON Fmt Worth 1 V Fort Wortlx U BARBARA WI-IIELAN Marshall, Texas NOEL WILLIAMS Pine Bluff, Arkansas MARIANNE YOAKUM Sweetwater, Texas One H umlred Twevzty-lbree FINE ww ,,: ,.... -rw v : . of-J.,,,,g ,E v a sf-TF? - T fs: " 221, K L Z i 'S 1 - 2 '52 "" 1 ,,:,. -14 ., ,, -. - sf My 1:13 n I-og: f- " Eze - ,:5?,:: .: - 1, J -Q: ,53 9 4' : H :,::s::5:ssga , V' 31, V, g i 1" ,,,. 5551? wi'-Ql x Jifix. , 3 :L .... ,iifilaiefu " ' l' 1725" Q fell A , ag i , , s.,.,, ARTS FRESI-IMEN It' fa.. A.. . if a , l -4 5 Q f fs 5 if Q 4. .315 Nas wif . . fr' 5: - ,f .L , ,Ja .-Wafxrr. '-., 'ff .L .- ,f N ss . :. .-.- E W 'W gif it Y giggles' W f wg H3556 s , .,.. Ziff fl Si zz ,Q '::"" E I ,fx 1 wi I """' -' L . i s ,.. ,, z1' fm I" f- ,.,.. 1 -,., ' 1 .Q SY? ,. Hwy, ,337 . ,, , ., ,MI . I ,X 'I -if T V , I-1 - 2 A e' S te ' fe- ' Q, ,Hey . if " ll - .1 :' '- V 'V .gfznz V t, -r -Zfff ali-1 , H 7 ialiige We fi Nl s we I ff" 1, www, 5 QW ' if 4- ga gi. gf, , I"'2i:3If:f:5-21 fy A we -J, s:,::5:g.,. ...,. sas... ..: .:. . s, , , , ::33:-5-Liz:-5-53:7 "5 V, ..., - km . - .. .1 52 I -:s5s:,g..u ef 44-4 n: A.wfef,,.,,5 ,H , X, 2 ai We is z X ' sw , 1 , f x Q' if at .. , Z gil' .,,. 2 ,.., .. ,, - I 1.A 1 I 31153: e 2 9,4 1 f 5: , . ' 4 we ,. ex. tf,,:,l, wg , we ,:v:.s' fl? X I I., ., :,:. Q Q Q Wifi? IR 'E ' H X 1 Q 0 R M 3 ,G ai' ' 1,. 'v-w r iii ff." . - A' v--l. E, Mies if ff ' 5535 5 . , ,'1,.,., . , f.2 ' NI: 1 1 : ,asf-' Siewe M55 .... if -tif as.. .. Q W ...-:: M ilf f, f ig .,iA , Aff-ft5,,:::,f,,, I 5:53, .f 5 .. - , ay.. X . ss,s,,,- , at ..:.:. -.-.-, ,gf M. ri, QM .. 3 P 7 ,iyairii K MLW is A f gm 3 I I Q S5 is 'T , gd Ulla Z1 1 gy 43 fr H 'T I .495 ? 5 I Nt., 1--.: ,vsvgxefjvvqgwe wfvavaig ef, -Wig 1 ' 5 'mf' 1 x bihjxfiiv One Hundred Twenty-four MARION ARMSTRONG Fort Worth DOROTHY AY ERS Gatesville, Texas JON BEN NETT Childress, Texas GLORIA BENSON BETTY LEE BINGHAM Galveston, Texas DANNY BOGGUS Fort Worth Abilene, Texas BILLIE V. BROWN Wheeler, Texas BILLIE BOU LTINGHOUSE LARUE BROWNING Fort Worth ROBERT CLANCY Miami, Florida GEORGE Fort Worth DAVIS Fort Worth WALTER ECHOLS Fort Worth JESS ANN ESTILL Kermit, Texas WILLIAM LOUISE DEAIGH Port Worth EVANS Fort Worth VELMA GAUNTT Fort Worth LERLA GIBSON Palestine, Texas DON FOWLER Killeen, Texas TOY GIBSON Dallas, Texas JANET HANRAI-IAN Fort Worth PAT GILLELAND Temple, Texas SYLVAN HARRINGTON Plano, Texas LAURA HART Brecken ridge, Texas JOY HENLEY BETTY HUNTER Roxlon, Texas Graham, Texas ROB ERT JACOBSEN Houston, Texas BARBARA KASMEIER E1 Reno, Oklahoma PAT KELSO Laurel, Mississippi JOYCE LEWELLEN Temple, Texas JACQUELYN KEITH Du las, Texas GLEN MARTIN Fort Worth COILA FAE MURPHY Uvalde, Texas BETTY MOORE San Benito, Texas DIANE NELSON Milwaukee, Wis FINE ARTS FRESHMEN . :.f'-'-' "fE'fE2EEE:.EE "3 , 31,5 '-':5::'- . S , ,Q . , , ,, ,, . -3 yrvgv f'Ywtf'Y,fW'ftYW,.1'x: A , 1245, ' ,kg - :jg 1 ::7::-:-:.,Q:s:s:a:2-2-s:2- W, V. - .-ggaa.a, ,,,,:,. f..-A ' ' " Q-.::z::. Q1 ,,v:1.:.,., . A1 4- - fm, 3, 5 4, -:lil-2:2-:, 7 H' S ' " M wi 7 Z I X xx za Q58 + MM , ,,..::, A K, Q wf 4, we Nw ,Qi 11? F N N f g s wi gg gl 5 K M is , :., . 5 .2 is . S 'ff "5?fK?jz,I w,,kv,,?1i:51i we Y 155-A 'Z . ., if -was if .4 W' ' X I 1 Q 1 if A-:E T :,.1 -'QQ One Hundred Twenty fwe . . -.-f--:AWw,y. HARRIS COLLEGE OF NURSING sms The Harris College of Nursing was made possible through a 3l750,000 Trust Fund set up by a well-known Fort Wortli surgeon, Dr. Charles H. Harris. Dr. Harris stated in his gift that the income from the trust fund was to be used to conduct a college of nursing associated with a college or university in Fort Worth. In 1946 the College of Nursing became one of the eight colleges at T.C.U. The Harris College of Nursing is the only College of Nursing in the state, and one of the few in the nation to have an endowment. Students live in Harris Hall, three blocks from the hospital. Offices, classrooms and laboratories of the college are located in Harris Hospital. The hospital serves as a practice field for student nurses for expe- rience in medical, surgical, obstetric, and pediatric nursing. The aim of the Harris College of Nursing is to help carefully selected young women develop into capable, conscientious, pro- fessional nurses to serve competently for the promotion of health. DEAN The fact that the Harris School of Nurs- ing does not meet as a unit on the campus does not lessen its importance to TCU, nor does it in any way lighten the burden of its dean, Miss Lucy Harris, as far as duties go. Keeping up with students receiv- ing their training in a busy hospital con- stitutes a trying task by anyone's standards. But in spite of her many administrative tasks, Miss Harris has found time for a number of hobbies, among which are gardening, concert-going and record collect- ing. She is very fond of piano music and has collected almost all of Beethoven's sym- phonies, which she keeps in the cottage where she lives by herself. FACULTY LUCY HARRIS 1 - -..- ' V- " b mi - . ,tl - L 'P Eg!! , t . f l If 5 ' 'Nj 'l e . ii ' ,. s":i ... ' Mrs. D. L. Anderson Katherine Bratton Mrs. C. S. Clifton Lucille Houston Edith Prather Ruth Sperry One Humlrezl Twenty-.fix NURSING SENIORS ESTHER BATOON Cl.AvmuA, CAGAYAN, PHILIPPINES Mc-liorisl 2, 4 JOHN OSTERHOUT FORT VVORT H JERALDEEN BOYD Forc Worth MARILYN DENNY Dallas, Texas GLENNIS FORRESTER New Boston, Texas M ll.DR ED MOORE For: Worth HU -ELLEN STEELE Fon Worth MARY JO WALTER For: XVorrh MINA PAULINE CECIL RAYMONDVILLE, TEXAS THEDA MAE TIMAEUS TEMPLE, TEXAS "Y" 1: Priscilla 1, 23 Mellor- isr 1, 2, 5, 45 Led 25 U. R C.2 MRS. IRMA MCCALEB FORT WORTH NELL WOLAVER ITALY, TEXAS Meliorist 2, 3, 4 NURSING JUNIORS Orze Hundred Twenty-.veven NURSING SOPHOMORES i Q r . ..t ew i im, ::'k I ,, . , , 1 XX '-:.. . ., . rf. .. ad . ml , ,b,..., L,,l!,5n, ,,,,,, ...,,,,..,..,,..l.l .., .WU s. ....,, Am ,rmdwx af is -s t -H rt .i-1 i.,,, sr- 1. , --g-, HATTIE LOU BELL Cleburne, Texas MACKIE BROWN San Angelo Texas CAROLYN CLEERE ETHEL KILLGORE Dallas Texas HELEN PRICE .a,. ,... . -.M ,A ,aff--. 3 '-'- - -i::: .,. f U ' . 1 E ' is ll Coleman, Texas . '.::-:-sasa.:::2z.5- 1--Ii' az: F 411 -Ji H - 5 -a:a:s:s:a:a -Z M H: "" 7.1 ' . iigga . ' T . - . "" I ' ,ig 7511 ii? '--'-: - Mei 5 IE! ' ltrwfxhvs ,. 5 sss5 One Hundred Twenty-eight Alvarado, Texas MARILYN WITTRUP Eastland, Texas NURSING: With mother close at hand these two student nurses are demonstrating the prop- er way to bathe the baby. A registered nurse stands by to avert any mishap that might occur. Located at Harris Memorial Hospital, the Harris College of Nursing is recogniz- ed by both the state and national board of nursing examiners. First year girls live in TCU dormi- tories, but move to Harris Hall, which is located in the hospital, their second year. Lucy Harris is dean of this school. RUBY LEE AWBUEY Perrolla, Texas BENNIE BRANAN Fort Worrh LOLA BRIDEN Breckenridge, Texas FAYE BROOME For: Worth BILLYE CAUSBIE ' Q ' 1' " XVe:uhcrforr.l, Texas MARTHA co1'H1u2N ,.,,Q, I Q Q , Fort Worth Q5 V IJOLLY DUNN 'mgid -' Fort Worth ,f 'I ' 8 JOAN FOSTER I Z Weatherford, Texas . 1 J SABINA GRAYBELL For: Worth DOROTHY IEVELYN HARRIS For: Worth BARBARA JORDAN Cleburne,Tcx:1s JARENE KEE Fort Worth CLARA LUCY LIGON Menard, Texas SUZANNE MITCHELL Fair Lawn, New Jersey DOROTHY MOORE Fort Worth DIANE PAYNE Fort Worth Donoruv Prmruntt 'L Saint Jo, Texas . I c:LAnA RANSPOT .. Mineral Wells, Texas V "" ' f f l gy BETTY Lou RAYMER ,. A 'lj' JANETTE REAM Longview, Texas SAMMIE JEAN SCOTT Dallas, Texas BETTY SPURLOCK Fort Worth NOREEN WILKINS Weiner, Arkansas MADELINE WILLIAMS Gnlvesron, Texas BETTYE WOOD Fort Worth NURSING FRE SHMEN in 15:35 bk QM QW", 2 r"""'K...4 ' ,,,,., ,I .. fifflzl-', I 5251.s:2sEaEa5s5sEaEaE:.:.g.,' :,"S:' - w S r r KM Y 1 I M eu rw ' 5 3 ra r . I A A f H 5 ..,. .. ,..,.,.,,., ,,. , A . Y, X :H s , 'i A354 5 tx we Wi 1 X I 5 ' AMS: . 5 34 X Is EF ' One Hundred Twenty-nine MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY SENIORS MRS. LOUISE BUNCH CORSICANA, TEXAS BETTY JEAN NEVILLE FORT XVORTH Chemistry Club 2, 5, 4, Secretary and Treasur cr 2, 3: Natural Science Society 2, 3, 4 MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY JUNIORS IOY BANKS Royse City, Texas MARCIA LAHEY Fort Worth l CHRISTINE MARTIN Overton Texas ELIZABETH MASSENGALE Mi ueral Wells, Texas ELVINA SMITH Mertzon, Texas ALICE STERLING Fort Worth .I , PATTI STRICKEL Port Neches, Texas MARLYS TAYLOR San Angelo, Texas One Hundred T birty EVANGELINE VLAMIDES Fort Word1 MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY SOPHOMORES CAROL MARIE BODYCOMB Chatham, New Jersey MARTHA CARDEN Tyler, Texas JOY COLLINS Tolar, Texas MARGARET HAYES Beaumont, Texas CONNIE HUDKINS Hilo, Hawaii BESS MCMA!-ION Fort Worth RUTH PEFFLEY Amarillo, Texas RAY WHITE For: Worth E MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY FRESHMEN MARILYN BUTLER Springrown, Texas LAURA ANN GRAY Ho: Springs, Ark. MARILYN MARTIN Big Spring, Texas BILLIE JO MOORE Hot Springs, Ark. VITA ZODIN For: Worth GRACE PAYNI: Pen-yron, Texas JO ANN RUBY Lufkin, Texas One H andrea! Ilgjrty-we BRITE COLLEGE OF THE BIBLE The Brite College of the Bible is a "theo- logical seminary" and one of the constituent colleges of Texas Christian University. It has its own charter and Board of Trustees, and its own building on the campus of the University. The college was chartered and its building erected in 1914, made possible by the funding of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Brite of Marfa, Texas. It offers a three-year curriculum which requires a Bachelor's degree for entrance, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Divin- ity. Its courses may be used by ministers' wives toward a Master of Arts degree granted by the University. Brite College of the Bible is a member of the American Association of Theological Schools and is accredited by it. DEAN Dr. D. Ray Lindley, who was Dean of Brite College until he went to Atlantic Christian College this term, is a man who will be missed. His efficient administration of the ministerial college has been evidenced during his .. years as dean. He is well grounded in practical dispensing of religious teachings because of varied and colorful pastorates which he has held in Big Spring, San Antonio, New Orleans and Weather- ford. Dr. Lindley's educational record con- tains a rather unique feature in that he has two Bachelor of Divinity degrees-among D. RAY LINDLEY others-from different schools. One is from school, where he was graduated Magna Cum Brite, the other from the Yale divinity Laude. FACULTY 3-'. an i A Ili. Colby D. Hall Harry C. Munro W. L. Reed W. A. Welsh Thurman Morgan Orze H umlrezl Thirty-two IVAN ADAMS Four Oaks, North Carolina B.A., ACC, '47 CHESTER I.. BARNETT jacksonville, Florida B.S., Florida Southern College, '48 EUGENE BRINK Jackson, Michigan B.A., TCU, '47 FRED W. CARLOCK Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '45 ROBERT D. CHAMBLESS Miami, Florida B.B.A., University of Miami, '48 ALEX S. COX III Houston, Texas B.A., TCU, '49 JOHN H. ELKINS Fort Worth B.S., NTSTC, '40 AARON T. BARKER Galveston, Texas B.A., TCU, '47 REUBEN BATOON Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 RAY BRISTOL Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 FRED WENDELL CARR Cameron, Texas A.B., TCU, '46 HAROLD D. CONVERSE Mutual, Oklahoma B.A., TCU, '48 PAUL ARTHUR DODGE Milwaukee, Wisconsin B.A., Eureka College, '48 JOHN ENOCHS, JR. Tyler, Texas B.A., TCU, '49 4 RITE STUDENTS Q. .. ,,. A , N, ,,.. W , L - - 555555555 , ,. .. ...... . ' .: EI Elf:-x2E!E"'EE ,,,,,:.s5 ,.f,-p - my 'L me A 7 .1529 3. ' Q a - - Q.: .......t.::s:s-.'. ., 51 f . X M , V 701' ..,.::E- QQ, , M l .. RYA J -:.,,,,, I ---- ,, q T 'Q Y i , E 1: f mifwz' E A 4 I ii ,X 5 I H y aim ,. I ff 2 M M , M ......... , . ,gy E xx V , MW, . .. . ..,.-..,.,:-,. 5,-wfw. Q ,fmq sv ...M ,,,, . , A o 1 . 5 I 'E:f::-. l 1 s3m,' A A f wi fl TCVIT' ii , ' A . y -' ,--' ., f fel 'Ks ,'x, A V ... - fzrgss ,. .,,-.-., :V I . .,,,.,,,.,.. ' fi, :2::-'- 'Q ,444 .7 2351 'iii' ....,', . .-Q' Vi Ns1.mg:, " 'wg 1- ' zz. Q- 11 tt, ,A W ,M s s ,s,::z: gig, ., . na, M 4 ff Qi.-aww, iw: -. rr- , r is . 1 SYS? M: C ww Q . M we ...J - 'ea ,., f, - T 3, ,:55s5s5s5ea::s5s: f ' ::::::i :.. R xr rf' , F, KMA 5 ,,,, , .,..,.,,, , ,,,, , ' 'gas fy .I H.. ,W I K ...- . Sa F I .Q-, 4-ez .. K xg A I Q si 'il hw H gulf ,lv QQL M Q 5 fi 5 ii 4. .,:,:.:,:-.-,:.-'. g- , ,, 4 fl . ,.., , ' . . . f -- fig il: yy 22? - f 2 f ..... , ..,. f . - i iiilifa , I gifs. One Hundred Thirty-three EBIT STUDENTS t- -..M ,.,. , ., N, ,, ,, C. . .:.:.---:.:.:. - . k K ::::::::::::::: -'-' 5 a5s5gag,., I r lg A .,., ' ' ' ' f ,.A. .:,, . . W ................ E Vit Il-f :ZIZH . i f ::,,.. ,.. j :'- zz ":,:, , ','- ...gf E .iii :,. HF I Zi ii... E , P 4+ .... 4. 2 1- . .,. A fi . f 'iil ti "" "" a gli ei " ' W II -:-: Izul I , ..::f' W f:' ':- .,. ..., ' "f: "" I gg Q A:-:-' Aq, eeee e J A One H uvzdred Thirty-four JACK K. GARRETT Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 MARY GRACE HANNA Fort Worth S.B., University of Oklahoma B.S., University of Oklahoma M.A., TCU, '49 GLEN A. HOLMAN Great Falls, Montana B.Th., Northwest Christian College, B.S., University of Oregon, '48 J. TRACEY HOPPER Corpus Christi, Texas B.A., TCU, '48 CHARLES T, JONES Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '47 DAN MCCOY Chickasha, Oklahoma B.A., TCU, '47 RALPH T. PALMER Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '48 '46 M. M. GROVE Weatherford, Texas B.A., TCU, '56 DALE M. HARTER Burkburnett, Texas B.Th., Northwest Christian College, '46 D. A. HOLT Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 ARTHUR H. HUMPHREY Sedan, Kansas A.B., Manhattan Bible College, '44 WALLACE JONES Greenville, Texas B.A., TCU, '43 ED MUEGGE, JR. Brenham, Texas B.A., TCU, '47 W. CLAUDE PEARCE Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '48 , ,. .,.., .F k:,,,,,,...,,,,,,,, Y ,. if IQ!! " '4,:.,..?y. BRITE STUDENTS Q, w ., il Q X Y in Sc X K! , ,QS H rg, s. wr 5 M , ' A ' ., .H ,... .:.:, .... ,, 'iii ' , .,.. . 1 '.f?',L ., l- I fi TN iid T: i 5-sgfgiilifkw uzl, A 77, -' .,..:, - QL, A sl as-if A W I H W2 :rise , 1 -fr, sf 5 ' I ..., 5- ' ,.i2:2,-" R ' . . , 2 ..,, . " ' ' ."??:s2221e:5:2:"' f ., A ' 1 ' 4. - 1 M' in-z .. HAROLD IE. PHILLIPS JESSE B. PUGH H. J, SHEETS FRED L. TOWNE ROBERT W. WILLIAMS Augusta, Georgia DeRidder, Louisiana Yoakum, Texas Grand Prairie, Texas Roodhouse, Illinois B.A., TCU, '49 B.A., TCU, '48 B.A., University of Texas, '43 B.Th., Northwestern A.B., Illinois College, '44 Christian College, '43 RICHARD S. POOLE HOWARD W. REATHER CLIFFORD TAYLOR, JR. AUSTIN M. WARNER JAMES R. WRIGHT, JR. Fort Worth Camden, Arkansas San Angelo, Texas Fort Worth Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '48 B.A., TCU, '48 B.A., TCU, '46 B.M., American Conservatory B.A., TCU, '48 of Music, '40 A.B., TCU, '47 One Hundred Thirty-five THE GRADUATE SCHOOL DEAN A. T. De Groot came to Texas Christian University as a visiting professor in the summer of 1949. The following semester, he was made Dean of the Graduate School. His first love is travel. With a twinkle in his eye, Dr. De Groot admitted he and his wife went on their honeymoon to France, and he continued by saying that living mod- erately they managed to visit several other countries. While in Amsterdam, Holland, he at- tended a World Council of Churches meet- ing and there met Dr. M. E. Sadler. He also visited Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, England, Canada, and Mexico. While traveling Dean De Groot prac- tices his hobby of writing, mostly such One Hundred Thirty-tix The forerunner of the present day Grad- uate School of TCU was a "Postgraduate Course" instituted in 1881, while the school was still at Thorp Springs. It required the time of one session and was pursued by those who had taken the regular course. No tuition was charged. Under Dr. James W. Lowber, Chancellor, a "University Extension Course" provided graduate credit by reading and correspond- ence flavored with an English pattern of tutoring and examination. In the 189O's, Doctor's degrees were granted through correspondence courses. Late in the 192O's, letters came to the Uni- versity from England and Australia asking for permission to work for these degrees. This correspondence plan was abandoned later, and the new graduate school was or- ganized. To enter the present graduate school, a student must have a Bachelors degree from an accredited college with a two point grade average. The graduate school enrollment now stands at 522. A. T. DEGROOT things as biographies and church history. Another of his hobbies is collecting foreign magazines. ' This summer, he plans a trip to Paris for five weeks of extensive study. ANNIE MAE BARNES Fort Worth B.S., TWC, '48 MARVIN BELL Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 BOB BLACK Fort Worth B.S., TWC, '49 ALBERT B. CASSELL, JR. Fort Worth WINFRED G. FARGUI-IAR Hillsboro, Texas B.S., TCU, '49 EUGENE GREENWOOD Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 AUDREY BELKNAP Fort Worth B.S., TWC, '49 ROY Q. BELLAMY Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 MRS. DOROTHY BROWN Fort Worth B.A., Louisiana College, '45 NORMA CORNELIUS Longview, Texas B.A., ETBC, '48 WALLACE E. GRAHAM Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 W. BASCOM GUFFIN Fort Worth B.M.E., TCU, '46 GRADUATE STUDENTS One Hundred Thirty-.reven GRADUATE STUDENTS One Hundred Thirty-eight BILL HEAD Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 LAYTON B. KEITH Arlington, Texas B.M.E., TCU, '49 JOHN K. LEE Nankiug, China University of Nanking, '41 JAMES W. MCBEE McKinney, Texas B.A., TCU, '49 ROY G. MOORE Cedar, Iowa B.A., TCU, '49 HAROLD L. OINEAL Fort Worth B.S., TCU, '49 VIVIAN HARDER JOHNSON Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '48 CARL KNOX, JR. Arlington, Texas B.S., TCU, '48 CLAUDE MATI-IIS Kilgore, Texas A.B., TCU, '49 CHARLES C. MILLER, JR. Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 THOMAS K. IVIOY New York City, N. Y. B.A., TCU, '49 BILL PADON Fort Worth B.S., TCU, '49 MARY MAXINE JONES PALMER Fort Worth MRS. LUZ D. PAULSON Fort Worth B.S., TCU, '48 MIKE SAENZ Laredo, Texas B.S., TCU, '49 J. ELDEN SPENCER Clarksville, Texas B.A., TCU, '49 CECIL E. WAGGONER Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 W. C. WHITE Fort Worth ANDY JAMES PATTERSON Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '48 PEGGY RICHARDSON Fort Worth B.A. 8: B.S., TSCW, '49 PROSONNA SI-IAI-I Bilaspur C. P., India B.A., Lucknow University, '55 WENDELL R. TOWERY For: Worrh B.S., TCU, '48 M.Ed., TCU, '49 RICHARD E. WALTHER Fort Wort11 B.A., TCU, '49 JOCK E. WILSON Fort Worth B.A., TCU, '49 GRADUATE STUDENTS iam, . , Ml, ..,, . .. , A . 'fir ' . of" 'if ...E-52' ""' 2 'fi' -1-:Q 5 W , sf? ....,.,.,,, E , y- , , , .. ' . m2iw:+W" - -Y W .ra- ' . -:.a2?sae a:s:r:,: fe' .er-2 '- w e :S we irrrpsz . .. . :... rm- .r lm 'I -l.,,,:: , .. ,z I A .... ..... ...... A 5, C U N . -:::." Us mms' , 55:52, 2-I 4 Wi I ,394 wing I 2.4 f QM, Y y + 'f A :.:.-- -, E.. X535 , .if if ,af .rp vi' X One Hundred Thirty-nine THE EVENING COLLEGE The Evening College at T.C.U. offers col- lege study to employed persons who cannot attend day school. Its curriculum is selected to provide required and popular courses in the various liberal arts and sciences at all college levels-freshman through graduate. Most courses are acceptable for credit toward degrees. The Evening College as a definite unit of the University was first organized in Feb- ruary, 1956, by the Board of Trustees. Dr. A. L. Boeck was appointed director of the College. Prior to this time, outside courses were offered by the Schools of Education and Business on their own initiative. Under the leadership of Dr. Boeck, the Evening College expanded rapidlyg business and professional men manifested much in- terest and cooperation, and several large firms paid tuition for their employees to induce them to begin or continue studies in the College. In 1942 Dr. Boeck resigned as clirector, and in 1943 Dr. Cortell Holsapple was made Dean of the Evening College. DEAN Serving a dual role at Texas Christian University is Dr. Cortell K. Holsapple, who is not only dean of the evening college, but a professor of philosophy. He has been asso- ciated with Texas Christian University since 1938. An active civic worker, Dean Holsapple is a member of numerous organizations. On the lighter side is his tennis racket. In the evening, chess and bridge round out his social life, when he isn't practicing how to be a better grandfather. Dean Holsapple has a wide knowledge of Texas Christian University, as his father was on the advisory board for some time, and his sister taught here. One Hundred Forty CORTELL K. HOLSAPPLE During the war, he was head of all the school defense activities including the avia- tion program and the Nurses Cadet Corps. He likes people. He says he likes what he looks upon and he looks everywhere. DOROTHY L. BIELINGSKI For: Worth JIM BURKETI' Fort Worth LOYD A. DOERING Fort Worth DORIS GREGG Fort Worth JEMIMA KRAELL Fort Wortlt DORIS MCKIENZIE Fort Worth MRS. ROBERT NEAL Hepler, Kansas JACK L. NORMAN Fort Worth TIM O'LEARY Fort Wortlm MRS. W. CLAUDE PIERCE Hillsboro, Texas SIDNEY I.. RAMSEY Fort Worth CAROL RHODE Whitelaw, Wisconsin CI-IARLENE RILEY Fort Worth MARGARET SUE WALLACE Fort Worth EDGAR M. WALLEY Fort Wortlx MARIAN WALTON Fort Worth ESTHER WILHELM Fort Worth EVENING COLLEGE COUNCIL One Hundred Forty-one 2 l 1 s'! p I FRANK BURKETT Editor SUMMER STUDENT CONGRESS accomplished more than most full sessions Hall. Those ties you see weren't usually in evidence, it was hot. Besides, usually do. Here members listen to proposed legislation in the Assembly some filibusters might have strangled on them. They had many achance to. WE HAD ll HDT T If Summer School, 1949 version, seemed hotter than most, it was because of the friction generated by fast moving things. Things in general may have started a little slow, with the usual griping going around, such as "You think this is hot? just wait until August!" But by the end of the second week students had just about resigned themselves, and besides, they'd elected a short-term Student Congress. There was nothing short or halfway about the things the congress accomplished, however. The chosen 19 started fast and kept up the pace, highballing through a mass of legislation like a Republican con- gress with the end of a session approach- ing and the Democrats hanging around outside. As always in governmental pro- ceedings, there was plenty of arm-waving and hueing and crying, but maybe that was for the best, for nothing went through unnoticed. The assumption of the manage- ment of the near-bankrupt Student Lounge by the congress, the petty loan fund, the representation furor, every point of Presi- dent Dee Kelly's seven-point program- nothing passed without a lot of verbal ripping and tearing, nothing was one one- way Cunless you count the establishment of one-way driving around the circle behind the Administration Buildingb. One Hzmrlrezl Forty-four HENDERSON AND KELLY AT COLONIAL DANCE IME LAST SUMMER The congress made its biggest hit, however, with the setting-up of what it termed a "vital" social program. It was just that, splitting the boredom and the hear at almost weekly intervals with either a watermelon feast I opposite pagej, for FREE, yet, or else a dance at Colonial Country Club or the Casino. And the summer-sufferers turned out like crickets around a streetlight. So did the Yale Institute people, who did quite a lot of Alcohol-Studying over the three-month period. There were noted authorities from all over, participat- , ing in the Yale clinic, and they joined into the open houses and tennis court dances whenever they weren't dodging students who wanted to serve as guinea pigs in -uh- experiments. The largest senior class in summer school history-the second largest at any time-fairly well dominated the class- activities picture. It didn't have any treasury to speak of, but that wonderful congress took care of its members with a junior-senior banquet and dance at the Casino on August 12. All the wheels turned out in formal attire and it was a nice ball. l The two Colonial dances weren't flops as hops either. The first one attracted so many dancers that they had to set up tables in the broom closets practically. Actual summer school-the attending of classes and preparing of assignments-was more gruelling, but the time sweltered by a lot faster than it does in the long session. Most disturbing thing about the routine was the fact that it began an hour too soon. Those seven o'clock classes were cool and dewey, good for listening and studying but even better for sleeping. Completion of the Fine Arts Building Memorial entrance and all sorts of renovation all over the campus came out of the summer-long construction activity which only slightly impeded students in their quest for knowledge. After all, a couple of air-hammers going full blast outside a classroom window was pretty insignificant, after all. The rush came, as rushes do, right at the last of school. Finals were slugged out and on August 28, the graduating seniors, 364 of them, walked across the stage at Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum, and picked up a diploma apiece. Those who didn't graduate went home for an all-too-short two weeks of rest, with promises of a stupendous "Howdy Week" when they got back. We adm! ka .t f it ,..: A M '7az'at4eaau'm...,ld4d! Suzan 1949 PICTURE AT RIGHT mirror some of 1949 summer school's main ac- tivities. Top, june commencement exercises for graduating seniors, largest class in school's history, are held in Will Rogers Auditorium. Next shots were taken at first of two free watermelon feasts sponsored by congress's social committee. Speed-eating contest is in progress, and Yale Institute visitors seem to be having one of their own in other picture. Bottom, Chubby, date and wheels of junior-Senior dinner- dance. Above, cover of the "Frog Horn," frosh guide book which was completed by congressional committee during August for use during "Howdy Week." One Hzmzlred Forty-five "HOWDY WEEK" COMMITTEEMAN BILL STUART SELLS FRESHMAN CAPS TO LYNN NEILL, CHARLES BAILEY, NANCY WHITE AND JIM HATLEY. 'TWAS 'HIIWIJY WEEK', ARCH ARRIVALS were a frequent sight. These two freshmen, bag and baggage, view Ad Building. One H zmclretl Forty-six TIME T0 SMILE AND SPEAK WELCOME GROUPS met trains. Paxton Moore hello's Iowans Irene Rountree and Charles Graham. tal FIIST, LOUD The first week of school just about lived up to its advance billing. "Howdy Week" began legally at 5:40 a.m., Sun- day, September 11, when the first wel- coming committee met two out-of-state students arriving via train. All during the next two days cars ran from the Hill to transportation terminals, picking up fresh- men. People nearly wore themselves out say- ing "Howdy," and the general effect was one of mixed anticipation and dread- anticipation of the dances, football games and party-times, and dread of the cur- ricular elements of school which seem- ingly cannot be dispensed with. March tunes of college pep songs resounded from the information booth near the Administration Building, the dorms open- ed, old students returned, everyone un- packed and began adjusting for the year 1949-1950. Registration of old and orientation for the new kept the academic calendar full- up from Monday until Friday when classes started. Socially speaking, there was something planned at every available half-hour. HI THERE! told the history of TCU in word and song. Jere Admirc in Navy garb does hornpipe. President Sadler and Dean Moore along with student leaders welcomed the newcomers Monday night, and Dean McCorkle conducted a IOLII of the new Fine Arts Building. Football films were shown in the Assembly Hall, and the Hoedown Club gave square-dance exhibitions in the Little Gym. D. S. F. held a sing-song in Brite Chapel, and re- freshments were served in the girls' dormitories. The "Howdy Week" committee really took care of the freshmen, doing everything but tucking them in at night Cand some of the ever-helpfuls probably wouldn't have minded doing thatj. The fish responded to all this lavish attention by digging down in their jeans or robbing the pennies out of their loafer flaps so they could purchase those lovely caps, green caps which attested to their lowly position in life. "Hi There!" the specially-staged musical stage show which ran two nights during the week, was a smash. It poured forth the history of TCU in words and songs by James A. I-Iowry, B. S. 219. Presented in the Assembly Hall, life from Thorp Spring to the new Fine Arts Building came out a la Olsen and johnson, full of talent and laughs, some intentional and plenty accidental. A "spirit-rededication" service took place Thursday night when students ringed a flaming "T" Crightj to demon- strate vocally their allegiance to TCU at the beginning of the new school year. It was stirring, even if Radio Instruc- tor Fred Folks did have to read the script by a flashlight, lying flat on his face because the mike cord wouldn't stretch. Friday night King Football took over. Following an all- campus barbecue, some 500 students went down to the Santa Fe Station and hollered the team off to the first game of the season. They formed a double cheering line from station entrance to Pullman platform, and a "babe in a box" presented Co-captains Berry and Narrell with a tele- gram which read: "Win if you can, lose if you must, we are with us-TCU Student Body." Saturday afternoon, students stuck by their radios. Those who didn't have them congregated in the Student Lounge and were ear-witnesses as the team climaxed "Howdy Week," simply and completely, by beating Kansas 28-O. And spirits ran high at a victory sock-hop that night in the Big Gym. PEP RALLIES back to the hill once more through well planned and executed yell sessions as this. LONELY FRESHMAN, Rachel Moore, executes "Love With a College Man" to Odin Wilson. SCHOOL SPIRIT, faith and loyalty were pledged at this torch-lighting ceremony. Directly under firey "T," yell leaders direct singing of the Alma Mater Hymn. One Htmclrecl Fofrty-seven PRESIDENT M. E. Sadler welcomes new students and faculty and friends of the University in introductory remarks at Fall Convocation, Monday, September 19. SPEAKER at the event, the Rev. Perry Gresham, former Professor of Philosophy and pastor of the University Christian Church is awarded honorary LI.. D. Degree. One H undred Forty-eight IST 00NVOGATION PACKED THEM IN The annual fall convocation was held for the first time in the new Fine Arts Building auditorium, since then named for Ed Landreth, co-chairman of the TCU Building Campaign. Nearly 1,400 persons filled the new seats to capacity as faculty members in full academic dress were seated on the stage following a procession lead by flagbearers and marshals. The congregation thrilled to the majestic tones of the new 350,000 Moeller organ, as Professor Gordon M. Young played its initial recital. Dr. Sadler welcomed students and friends of the University in his introductory remarks. He listed the progress that TCU had made in the past years, mentioning the scholastic stand- ings of the University. He then applauded members of the welcoming committee on the outstanding success of "Howdy Week." "I doubt if TCU ever had a group of students trying harder to make new students feel welcome," he commented, after having praised the committees chairman. "This is the finest spirit I've seen in my nine year tenure," he said. The Rev. Perry E. Gresham of Detroit addressed the group in a discussion of "Free Minds for a Free World,'l saying "we are the forty-niners of our generation." The former profes- sor of philosophy and pastor of the University Christian Church emphasized that students of today "face the same perils of the unexplored" as did their ancestors who trekked across the treacherous mountains and prairies of the West. Rev. Mr. Gresham listed three great social trends of the American people: growth of the total state, amazing rapidity of social growth and the new power of communications which takes the form of propaganda. He warned that "if an individual wants freedom of free minds he must be worthy of freedom and remain free of his inhibitions." "If we are to exercise freedom, we must be able to think for ourselves," he continued. Referring to the original forty- niners, the Rev. Mr. Gresham declared, "The cowards never started and the weak died on the way." Rev. Gresham received an honorary LL.D. degree from Dr. Sadler. Rev. Granville Walker of the University Christian Church assisted Dr. Sadler in reading of the conferring of the degree. Seventy-five honorary degrees have been conferred by TCU since the special ceremony was inaugurated during the Uni- versity's Fiftieth Anniversary in 1923. Rev. Gresham's was the seventy-fifth such degree. Among early recipients were the Rev. L. D. Anderson, pastor of the First Christian Church, Fort Worth, and chair- man of the TCU Board of Trusteesg Major K. M. Van Zandt, and Col. Lewis Wortliaiii, former publisher of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, the latter two now deceased. The new auditorium was fuller that day than it has been any time since its completion. To those students who will undoubtedly insist that they do not have a picture anywhere in this annual, may we suggest checking the picture at right You must be in there someplace. ' if S - . if I F' ' -YKIIV 'W'- hi I!I,L'Iv'Y 4 J' rf' IMAXAA ff .f., : ,gnu ,thighs ',.v4',if-7 'Q CAPACITY CROWD OF NEARLY 1,400 STUDENTS, FACULTY AND FRIENDS OF THE UNIVERSITY ATTEND FALL CONVOCATION IN NEW AUDITORIUM. One Hwzdrecl Forty-nine I GILBERT BARTOSH OF THE SOPHOMORE CLASS CROWNS BEVERLY HERRIN FRESHMAN PROM QUEEN AT FIRST BIG FALL SOCIAL SEPTEMBER 29TH. One Hundred Fifty BEAUTY REIGNED AT FROSH PROM The first big social event of the school year was the annual Freshman Prom, sponsored by the Sophomore class. Flower salesmen, ticket sellers, and busy telephones at the girls' dorm started the confusion that ends with the play- ing of the last dance. The majestic honor of queen of the 1949 Prom was bestowed on a little Oregon lass, Beverly Herrin. From a floorful of gorgeous gowns and sweet-smelling scents on luscious lovelies, the faculty judges Qrightj spent over half an hour selecting the finalist. With the judges' decision by secret ballot handed him, Gilbert Bartosh, representing the Sophomore class, crowned the queen before some five hundred spectators. The 1948 Queen, Ann Guest, presented the new sovereign with an armful of American Beauty roses. Harvey Anderson and his band played for couples danc- ing in the Big Gym which was decorated in a fall motif. The atmosphere was pervaded by a feeling that each girl was her date's own special queen, a feeling which served to make everyone a little more amorous, to say the least Qbelowb. Multi-colored trees around the dance floor repre- sented schools with which the Frog Footballers engaged in games during the fall. One large tree in the center of the floor represented TCU, standing, like its Prom Queen, majestic over all. FACULTY JUDGES, Dr. W. J. Hammond, Mrs. Sarah Morgan, and Dean Ralph Wetherell, selected her sovereign Majesty from a field of many lovely princesses. ! as I l rg iv,- DANCING COUPLES PROMENADED UNDER THE DECORATIVE MOTIF OF FALL ON THE CAMPUS. MULTI-COLORED TREES REPRESENTED GRID RIVALS. One Hundred Fifty-one FIRST CAMPUS PEP RALLY IN THE ASSEMBLY HALL FEATURED THE INTRODUCTION OF THE 1949 FOOTBALL TEAM AND PRESENTATION OF MASCOT. PEP RIILLIES IXED WITH... With most social activities of the fall season centered around football games, the first home game Pep Rally was anxiously awaited and fully attended. Mr. Barron McCul- loch, President of the Frog Club and Mr. Jack Langdon, President of the Ex-Letterman's Club saluted varsity gridmen at the Oklahoma Aggie Rally. Players were called to the stage and introduced by Professor Paul Ridings. Yell leaders and the student body honored the team with "Frogs Fight." Members of the Pep Cabinet presented Co-captains Berry and Narrell with a box containing the new Mascot, Addy, the All-American Horned Frog, instructing them to "open at game time." Cy Casper, former Frog gridman, told students that appearing before them was "one of the greatest honors of my life." He tearfully told of the football days of yesteryear, and urged the football guys to fight for their student body and their Alma Mater. OPENING GAME of home season introduced '49 edition of the Drum PRESENTATION OF ADDY, the All-American Horned Frog to Dr. Sadler Majorettes. Nina Shaw and Frances Elder pose on gift-wrapped Addy. preceded Pep Rally. Note photograph likeness to Acldy at extreme left. One Hundred Fifty-two VYING FRESHMAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES ARE PHOTOGRAPHED BY TELEVISION CAMERAMAN AT ELECTION RALLY IN BIG GYYMNASIUM. ...ELECTIO Cl-IMPIIIGNING No national conventions, flag-waving, or personal ap- pearance tours preluded it, but it was generally known the first week in October that it was election time. Nineteen posts in the Student Congress needed to be filled and with- out pressure, students announced their candidacy for office. Signs went up, nightly visits to rooms with little hand- bills were made, students passing to classes received blot- ters, chewing gum and other bribes for votes, and that all- disgusting slogan "A vote for Paschal is a vote for Paschal" made its appearance on countless blackboards. The presidential candidates presented their platforms, and their past records for public consumption. Egos and complexes were tossed about like ping-pong balls. It was election time! Campaign addresses and introduction of candidates took place in the Big Gym. Class officers were photographed for television Cabovej and the presidential and vice-presidential candidates made speeches. Election chairman Nancy King served as co-ordinator and introduced candidate Connie Mack Hood, who among other things wished all his friends "a Merry Christmas." The presidential candidates took their business a little more seriously. Bill Hamilton pledged his faithful service to the student body, and pointed out his past records of service to the Congress. Election day arrived. The candidates smoked and paced the floor in the Student Lounge as results were posted. Rumors flew thick around the campus until the final tabulation. When it was all over, the new con- gressmen were sworn into office by Dean Moore in inaugual ceremonies in the Assembly Hall. They then went about the business of guiding student government through the year. M 'Av W" Syst at Qnvvqlfllf Q 'IDU ? 'lllllfl r 8 mt INAUGURATION DUTIES were performed by Dean Moore in the Assembly HEAVY CAMPAIGNING was entered into by some candidates. Students passing to classes viewed witty signsg were urged to vote by personal con- tactg and received blorters, chewing gum, and other bribes, only to enter class with blackboard reading "A vote for Paschal is a vote for Paschal." Hall, October llth. Left to right: Margaret Mundhenke, Thorp Andrews, Greta Chadwick, Melvin Shupp, Delores Smith and Robert Ross, all duly elected Congressmen-at-large of the lower class raise right hands swearing. One Hundred Fifty-three l l ROASTED PIG is presented to Co-Captains Lindy Berry and Don N artell at Santa Fe Station pep rally preceding journey to Razorback territory for annual game. Kick-off of the 1949 Southwest Conference football sea- son was the game between the Frogs and the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville October l. Pre-season pre- dictors had listed everyone from the Owls to the Hogs as possible champions, and of course TCU was included. Spirit was running high around the Hill the entire week prior to the game. The Frogs had won two and tied a thriller with Oklahoma A 8: M, Lindy had been listed 'as the nation's leading passer and "Player of the Week," and that old championship looked close, early in the season as it was. But up in the Ozarks was a fellow named Leon "Muscles" Campbell, and he was leading the nation's ground gainers. So it looked like a battle of the champs, one of these "tumult in the clouds" things. The Pep Cabinet was busy all week getting everyone fired up, and the fervor hit its peak at the station-sendoff at the Santa Fe terminal Friday night. Loads of students left the campus on special buses for the station pow-wow. Some 250 in all were there with signs, purple and white banners, cowbells and at least ten good vocal cords apiece. "Gig the pigs!" "We Want Hog Meat!" and other equally carnivorous-sounding placards rose above the heads of the onlookers. The yell-leaders were yelling and the Horned Frog Band was playing like mad, and right in the middle of it all the screaming wail of an ambulance siren disrupted the yell session. Students watched expectantly as a black hearse pulled up to the baggage platform stage and four white- coated messmen withdrew a stretcher from within it. Those near enough saw one roasted pig, courtesy Leonard Brothers, being carried morgue-like to the platform. It was decorated in the style of the best gourmets, ready for con- sumption and complete with apple in mouth. Co-captains Berry and Narrell accepted the pork Cleftj and received student-sent telegraphic encouragements for the team. ARKANSAS TRIP 0PE ED SWG RACE . BUT REALIZATIUN FELI. A LITTLE SHURT 0F MUST EXPECTATIUNS MARCHING FROGS climb hills of Fayetteville to campus for pre-game A.. . . . mx -,:,:,:,-., .1 , ww it . 5 1 aw - ....- . ,if , ::,:,:,,,:,:.. I f 2 il lffwg 4, K s t . ,ff N' -f --fir Q "lid, . t l 'El 35 Q . ...... Q it SPIRITED FROGS frolic around station with traditional pep signs: "Gig pep rally and swing band exhibition at nearby campus amphi-theater. the Pigs!" "Make Meat of the Hogs" and "Raze Them Razorbacks." One Hundred Fifty-four Then it was time to go, so team, band and a good num- ber of students who considered the game worth more than Saturday classes and expenses said goodbyes Copposite pageb to just anyone who happened to be staying at home and piled aboard the Star-Telegram special and pulled out for the mountains. Sixty band members, five drum major- ettes, five flag twirlets, one mascot and one chaperone made quite an accompaniment for the varsity squad, to say nothing of the kids who ignored the fact that there was no holiday. Some slept on the night ride, more behaved in sleepless train-trip fashion, and early Saturday morning when the porter hollered, "Fay-ette-ville!" all leaned window-ward to behold a reception committee composed of U. of Arkansas students. The Razorback band ripped out a couple of dit- ties, and relations were jubilantly serene-a serenity that turned OLIE to be the calm before a storm. The Frogland aggregation fell into march formation be- hind the Arkansas band and climbed up to the campus. On the way they passed sorority and fraternity houses be- decked with such mayhem-importing signs as "Fry the Frogs!" and "We're Going Berry-Picking!" When they reached the amphitheater, the Frog Band saluted Arkan- sas students who had gathered with TCU fans to form an audience. Then there transpired another pep rally and the stage was set for the gridiron set-to that afternoon. The Arkansas folks made available all sorts of facilities for the TCU band and dormitory rooms were open to the Cowtown visitors. Everyone got down some sort of dinner and went out to the natural bowl stadium. It was 11 hot afternoon, but our boys didn't seem to be. A lot of things went on out on the field that were later kicked around by just about everyone who could run a typewriter, but most of it was water that has since gone under the bridge and good riddance, we say. Anyhow we lost the game. The TCU fans made plenty of noise for their number, but they were most impressed by the Arkansas cheering section. Red and White, the school's colors, winked and blinked from the stands in profuse splendor, and there must 'a' been a million of 'em. The train pulled out at 7:00 that night, and another night was shot. By the time it reached Fort Worth next morning, everyone was beat. YELLING FROGS are lead by cheer leader from baggage platform. CPrize winning Horned Frog photograph by William Holman III.J I PARENTAL FROG HOMER "SPEC" TOMPKINS HAS A TRUE FAMILY SEND-OFF. FRIENDLY FROG is Captain Don Narrell, who thrills one team fan by posing for Star-Telegram news coverage of the trip. What a thrill for a future Frog. One Hundred Fifty-five CONNIE MACK HOOD PRESENTS SHARECROPPER QUEEN AND KING, ANN RATTIKIN AND TED LARGENT, WHO REIGN AT AGGIE WEEK FARMER DANCE. DL' IIGGIE WEEK WENT OVER BIG Although for some it was the same as any other time, October 10-15 was Aggie Week on the Hill. As the bi-annual affair was instilled into minds of freshmen and sophomores who had never witnessed the event, an air of preparedness prevailed. Cow bells were polished, vocal cords were atomized, and school spirit climbed to a new high. Bernie Robertson dusted his guitar and SINGING of the country songs is Bernie Robert- son who serenaded music lovers on Clark steps. One Hundred Fifty-six YELLING students gathered on steps of Admin- istration building at Saturday A. M. pep rally. sang "I'm just a Country Boy" from the steps of Clark Hall in a Tuesday noon serenading. The weekly "mid-night" pep rally sponsored by the Vigilantes was held on Wednesday night on the steps of Foster Hall. The Horned Frog band led campus pepsters on the scene, arousing all early-to-bedders. A group of Hill- billy musicians featured the brand of music that prevailed throughout the week. Girls in pinafore aprons and checked shirts and boys dressed in overalls and straw hats were running amuck Friday as farmer socialites prepared for the Sharecroppefs Ball in the Big Gym. The Pep Cabinet sponsored the country-style dance. Ad- mission was free, and those who went were entertained by Bernie's Hillbilly Five in truly barn atmosphere Cwhat SPEAKING for the first time at a yell session during 1949 grid season is Head Coach Meyer. BM ' ' e fs EXAMPLES OF FROG SPIRIT ARE THESE TWO FRESHMEN LOVELIES, URSULA MacDURMOTT AND JO ANN RUBY YELLING AT AGGIE-TCU BALL GAME. eIse?J. Bales of hay served as decoration and the bleachers were covered with straw. Midway through the dance George Wilde of the Pep Cabinet introduced speakers Barron McCulloch and Jack Langdon, Ki Aldrich, and Coach Dutch Meyer. Coach Meyer commented on the poor attendance of the rally, thanked those present for their support of the team. Following the dance ambitious Frogs attended the Aggie midnight Pep Rally on the steps of the Tarrant County Court House. Strains of the "Aggie War Hymn" floated down the business section during the hour long rally, at which a minimum of fisticuffs ensued. The visitors from College Station paraded down-town at 10 a. m. Saturday morning from the Main Street under- pass to the Court House. Thousands of Aggies and thou- sands of Aggie supporters viewed the military parade. The Aggie sweetheart school, TSCW, sent its representatives to Fort Wortlm to join in the fun. On campus, Frog pep rallyists congregated on the steps of the administration building at 11:00 a. m. An old-time Circus Calliope toured the hill announcing the official rally, with the proverbial "follow me to the" pep rally. A stuffed Aggie was hung in effigy from the trees near the Memorial Arch. At halftime during the football game, which we won, incidentally, the Texas A. N M. sweetheart, Miss Jeannine Holland of Houston, TSCW junior, was presented. This Aggie salute was followed by the presentation of the TCU Horned Frog Band Queen, Beverly Herrin by Drum Major Frank Kasko. An official Aggie and TCU dance was held from 8:30 to midnight in the Crystal Ballroom of the Hotel Texas following the game. The event was sponsored by the Fort Wortli A. Sc M. Club. l il BAND SWEETHEART, Beverly Herrin, is presented at half-time of Aggie game accompanied by traditional roses and kiss from Band Drum Major Frank Kasko. One Hundred Fifty-seven BEAUTIES AND BEASTS REPRESENT THE VARIOUS YEARS or FOOTBALL BATTLES wlTH THE sAYLoR BEARS IN THIS PEP RALLY ONS OCTEIBEIEESTFH. I-INUTHER WEEK . . INCLUDED 'BIIRE FACTS', BAYLIIR Another week whose social life was built around Old Man Football was the one preceding the Baylor game on October 28th. The signs went up around pledging team Support and smirking at the opponent. The Vigilantes raised cain with a mid-week pep rally at the girls' dorm. On Friday evening in the Assembly Hall, the Pep Cabinet presented another Olsen and Johnson type pep rally. The usual Frog yells and same Horned Frog Band numbers were played, with considerable "live talent" floating through the audience in the form of Chic Olsen and Shrimp Fisher doing comedy routines. Billie Boltinghouse appeared as a cigarette girl selling "cigars, cigarettes, almonds," burlesquing through pep talks by members of the cheering squad. The main feature of the night was the skit "Bare Facts." Bernie Robertson characterized a gypsy fortune teller, sitting over crystal ball and telling of the entanglements of the Frog and Bear over the years. Witlm each victory a lovely little lass appeared with the score of that year. For each loss, some male creature in female apparel appeared with the score of that year. As a finale, Marianne Yoakum appeared with the prediction of the 1949 score as TCU 99, Baylor 1. This was the surprise feature of the evening, and even more so 20 hours later. Next day some 1,000 Frog fans boarded buses and cars to Waco to view the game. Cars of purple and white met the high- way early and the Horned Frog Band bus was loaded with signs reading: "Let's Berry Burke," "Let's Drive Ison Wilde," and "We'll Boal 'Em Over at Baylor!" Students arriving in Waco in time saw the Baylor Home- coming Parade in which twenty-six of Baylor's most beautiful coeds rode in and on floats. They were nominees for the Home- coming queen, who was presented at halftime ceremonies of the game. But we'd rather not talk about the game. The Baylor Band was host to the Horned Frog Band with a Bar-B-Que and entertained them with a magic show in the Band Hall. Members of the TCU Student Congress lunched with the Baylor Congress as sportsmanship flowed like wine. SIGNS of Frog spirit followed the band Baylor-bound. SIGNS of pranksters were viewed on SIGNS of intra-school spirit were expressed in this Two: "Let'S Berry Burke"and"I.et'S Drive IsonWilde." campus and business buildings on drag. Baylor Band Bar-B-Q for members of the Frog Band. One Hundred Fifty-eight . . AND THE OFFICIAL UPENING UF FINE ARTS' UNIVERSITY lITTlE THEATER On Monday evening, October 24th Dr. Walther Volbach, Director of the University Theater witnessed "a milestone that I have waited four years to see, and I hope to see many more milestones in our artistic achievements." The first-nighter au- dience viewed the opening of the University Little Theater. Television and radio interviews were held in the foyer of the new theater, like unto nothing but the big-time, legit productions on Broadway. Civic leaders were present at the opening, among them Mr. Web Maddox, President of the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Walter Humphreys, Editor-in-chief of the Fort Worth Press, and Mr. Julian Meeker, President of the Fort Worth Opera Association. Also present were University officials, faculty and students. The play, "You Can't Take it With You," by Kaufmann and Hart, proved to be very timely and, with the possible exception of some miscasting, was one of the artistic achievements on which Dr. Volbach emoted. Audience opinion, the controlling factors in any theater, ran in many directions. One first-nighter, Mrs. Rachel Moore said: "I love that set. I've never seen so much junk in one house in my life!" Mrs. Moore's comment was a compliment to Professor Andrea Hetzel, Technical Director of the Theater, who also de- signed rhe ser. Members of the cast and technical crew executed their jobs to perfection to make this event one of the big moments of a most eventful Fine Arts year. SPECTATORS included such local citizens as Mr. Web Maddox, left, Presi- AC-TORS Bebe Baker and Harry Flowers await cues off stage during per- dent of the Fort Wortli Chamber of Commerce, and Mr. Walter Humph- formance of the Kaufmann and Hart comedy. They display the usual reys, Editor of Fort Worth Press. Proof of real culture on the campus. first-night apprehensions as they wait. Things like that really happen. One Hundred Fifty-nine TREK T0 AUSTIN WAS GREATEST SGADS UF STUDENTS SAW TEXAS UPSET BY AN INSPIRED FRUG NINE MAN LINE That Austin trip was nothing but great. The Administration broke its heart with an official holiday, and things commenced to roll-and early, too. The morning of Novem- ber l2th found students rolling out to a pre-rooster reveille in order to make the special train that left at 6:30 a. m. from the T. 8: P. Station-that is, those students who hadn't gone down the night before. And there were plenty of the latter. Sleepyheads boarded the Katy Special and the long train pulled Austinward. Congress Vice-President and Social Committee Chair- man Connie 4Mack Hood was running around like a decapitated chicken, trying to supply everyone with provisions and hot coffee from the Congress-operated concessionary, as the Cafeteria hadn't One Hundred Sixty opened in time for anyone to get breakfast. Bill Underhill, jolly Pridgeon and Woody Baker managed the concessionary in the baggage car, which proved to be a popular meeting and bruising place for fans. Bernie serenaded Coeds in one car, Horned Frog Band mem- bers played riffs and bops in another. Some slept, others played cards, and as one reporter put it, "there was anything but real pep" en route. But that came later. Upon arrival in the capital city, the fans and band sttaggled over to the Drislcoll Hotel and held a pep rally. Then they branched out, to visit the Capitol Building and other historic spots, or to stroll past row upon row of beautiful houses with Greek letters on the front doors. The Texas campus itself was an eyeful, and the inhabitants of the famed "-40 Acres" outdid themselves in showing TCU students just how hospitable one school could be. There were open houses and one reunion after another as buddies from each school got together. Student governments met and banqueted and Tommy Dor- sey played lovely-real gone, that is-music in Gregory Gym that night. The place was packed, but it was worth the dance- floor battle, and besides, there were a couple hundred other places to go. Oh, and there was a football game that afternoon, too. 'When the final gun sounded and the scoreboard read 14-15 in our favor, there was one profound moment of disbelief. Then the TCU stands exploded in all sorts of yelling and students scurried toward the field, all of them darn near hysterical with glee. "No lights tonight!" became the victory cry, and a motley parade formed behind the jubilant band, which was marching up and down and around the field. They had their hats on backwards Qrightj, and they blew clinkers by the dozen, but they sounded great. A couple of worse-for- wear gentlemen started showing the band where to go, and as a result the procession swung around and marched right through its tear flank. But by that time nobody cared. PICTURES AT LEFT and below are shots of Student Body Trip to Aus- tin for the annual TCU-Texas University Football game. At upper left, Bernie Robertson serenades Coeds en route on special train. At center left crowds rush congress concessionary in baggage car, a popular meeting and bruising place. At lower left, the Horned Frog Band from top-side is viewed playing pre-game pep rally at Hotel Driskoll. Below are several Frog students leaving the State Capitol Building after tour. i... "1 "' ' i mwmnw-f-kmwssssw , E 1 , W w w 1 4 NOSE-PROPELLED ORANGES APPEAR ON THE LOUNGE FLOOR BY SLIMES MARGARET ANN BOLEY, ANN WYATT AND BETTY RICHTER, NOVEMBER 16. INITIATIUN DAY FUR FRUSH On Wednesday, November 16, a day that will live in infamy in their minds, the gals of the Class of '53 suddenly and deliber- ately appeared on campus in non-Harper's Bazaar and non-Vogue attire. It was indubitably Initiation Day. It was that time when young Frogettes behaved as puppets with members of Leti pulling the strings. On Initiation Day "big sisters" selected the wardrobes from Salvation Army, Bundles for Britain, and Goodwill Industries off-casts. These Anatoles of Paris revealed to the world of fashion garbs like unto nothing ever witnessed pre or post "New Look." Administration Building steps and sidewalks were tooth- brushed, giving onlookers a feeling it was "Clean-your-sidewalks and-sreps-with-a-toothbrush Week." Campus personalities re- ceived kisses, serenades, and maid service from these women of another world. Nose-propelled peanuts and oranges began tolling on lounge and post office floors. That evening young frosh girls appeared before officers and members of the Leti in initiation ceremonies. They "scrambled like an egg," "poked like a polka-dot," and "popped like pop- corn" and "flushed like a Well, they put on a show. They had passed their tests and were then transformed into young ladies, capable of their position in campus life. PICTURED at top left, "Slime" Marilyn Martin renders some personal maid service to jim Amburg in the cafeteria, Robert Snow deiectedly looks awayg lower left, Leti officers and members are entertained with stunt by lowly freshmang at bottom, campus wide clean-your-sidewalks with-a-toothbrush event is in full swing as Slimes demonstrate domes- ticrsm. One Hundred Sixty-two UTUMN FELL. Fall activities on the campus included others than those listed in the preceding and following pages. Among those of importance was the annual visit of Horace Heidt, spon- sored by the Frog Club, downtown football booster organi- zation. Heidt and company appeared in Will Rogers Auditorium October 12 and 13. Tryouts were held in the city for young talent to com- pete with some of the county's best that appears with Heidt. jim Rankin, talent scout, held daily auditions at KFJZ. Students played, sang, and danced for Mr. and Mrs. Rankin. One TCU student made his way to the semi-finals and appeared on the show. Lewis Gillis carried the honor of his family and Alma Mater to the stage of Will Rogers in the form of a trombone and competed with other musicians in this vicinity. When Mr. and Mrs. Heidt arrived, they were met by Head Cheer Leader Pat Miller, who took them on a tour of Carswell Air Base, as pictured at right, second from top. During the performance, an audience participation dancing session on stage found Professor Lamberton from the School of Business cutting capers. He is pictured at top right. On Hallowe'en the Student Congress held a Casino dance for All Hallow's Eve believers. Some students ap- peared in costume, as did Horned Frog Photographer C. W. Carpenter and Jo Ann Brenner, pictured third down at tight. Jo Ann borrowed C. W.'s suit, and he her dress. It was a lovely arrangement. The bottom shot, like a well-known nationally adver- tised beverage, knows no season. Here you might even find after class any day of the year, Cowboy presents a prize ticket to campus cars with bad motor manners. Beth Shof- ner can smile at anything. Other events, not pictured, which should be recorded in the archives of 1949-50 were: On September 23, Dr. Sadler became a grandfather, to David Bruce McPherson Il. The child is the son of the former Frances Sadler and David McPherson, both 1949 graduates. Clubs began to function actively. joiners joined, and socials happened. Joan Reineke began her little witty features in the SKIFF. There was quite a to do over the new Auditorium. The issue was a toy with the newly elected congress. The infirmaries consolidated. For the first time in TCU history, a joint infirmary was established in the east end of Waits Hall. Professor Gordon M. Young initiated the new Moller Organ on Sunday, October 2, in the newly named Ed Lan- dreth Auditorium. The Horned Frog Band elected Beverly Herrin as Band Sweetheart. The board of trustees met on October 22 and attended the Mississippi game following the meeting. Favorite candidates were made fun of by Editor Larry Denton in his "professional favorite" article. Larry spoke from experience. One H untlrecl Sicvty-tlrree ALUMNI CAME H0 E CELEBRI-lTED Homecoming was next. It came a little earlier this year, having been selected to coincide with the playing of the Rice instead of the SMU football game. The campus clubs met in council to plan their floats and congress approved an appropriation of 38227.50 for expenses for the Homecoming Committee. Weeks of preparation became reality with the arrival of Friday, November 18. On Wednesday of Homecoming Week, the Vigilantes held one of their successful pep rallies. Members marched with a banner telling of what would be done Cand how bloodilyb to Rice and with torches, lighting their trail from Berry and University Drive to Foster Hall. Hail, hail, the gang was all there. On the steps of Foster, cheerleaders with the able assistance of Freddie made echoes ring far and wide. Then it was Friday. Members of the TCU Chamber of Commerce took special SKIFF editions and typewriters to hotel lobbies, where they registered alumni, marking them with plastic tags. That evening, busses left the campus and driving students met in Burk Burnett Park clad in pajamas and blue jeans. This body of students joined hands and scampered along, snake- dance style, through streets and hotels, ending at the Hotel Texas, with a pep rally salute to the alumni and friends of the school. Then they piled into cars and blared back to school for the annual campus-held bon-fire at the quadrangle. For a week now Viligantes had been building and keeping watch over their pile of lumber scraps and odds and ends, which now was the center of attraction. Crowds gathered from far and wide at the 10 p. m. meeting. Pep cabinet members read telegrams from Frog immortals Sam Baugh, Darrell Palmer, I. B. Hale, and introduced Davie O'Brien, Ki Aldrich and Clyde Flowers, All-Americans who were able to leave the Ex-Letterman's dinner to attend the rally. One Hzmclrecl Sixty-four PICTURED AT LEFT: In the upper picture Nancy Thompson, june Burrage and Nancy Ward examine Homecoming Calendar in main hall. Lower left watchers are members of the Vigilantes who held nightly vigil before campfire guarding bon-fire lumber pile. Below the blazing symbol of school spirit lights the hill area. TWU DAY CALENDAR FEATURED FUN As the Horned Frog Band played the Alma Mater Hymn, Vigilantes and cheer leaders approached the pile and set afire this symbol of Frog spirit. Soon the entire hill was alight and University friends gathered to watch the big fire and the owl on top of it burn. After an hour and a half of rally-fun, those Frogs who could still talk and move went to the Flying Frogs movie and stage show at the TCU Theater. This laugh-packed funfest featured zany acts and riotous comedy. Saturday was far from another day with campus-conscious kids. There were the early morning, last minute things to put on that float, and getting the trailer off to the T. 84 P. reserva- tion. At I0 a. m., rolling northward from the reservation, and on to the court house, came the 1949 edition of the usual Hobbs 'Trailers coated with crepe paper. Among them were, however, several that showed hours of work from the usual few that work. Meliotist for the second year in a row won the first prize. The TCU Chamber of Commerce came in second, and Brushes Club was third. Among other honorable men- tioned attempts were the Junior Class and the Bryson Club. Floats were escorted campusward for view of Alumni at- tending the annual barbecue in the Big Gym. Several hundred Exes gathered in the gym to hear "Rags" Matthews, first TCU athlete to gain national reputation. Following the feed, the Ex-Students' Association re-elected Raymond Buck, presidentg Sam Barlow, vice-presidentg Professor Bita Mae Hall, secre- tary-treasurer. Reigning as the Homecoming Queen was june Burrage, elected by the Varsity squad. june was presented, along with her duchesses Nancy Ward and Nancy Thompson, at half- time ceremonies of the TCU-Rice game. Clarence "Red" Marable, injured player, represented the team and presented June with both carnations and a kiss. Tommy Buchard and Gene Schmidt attended' the duchesses. Following the game, Alumni toured the campus, and visited the new classroom building and Ed Landreth Auditorium. Early evening found the Student Congress host to the Rice student leaders dining at Charles of Orleans. CLUBS SENT REPRESENTATIVES TO DISCUSS PLANS FOR PARADE FLOATS. ONE CLUB HAS TO COME IN FIRST PRIZE WINNER. AGAIN MELIORIST. Post-game dancers found entertainment in the Big Gym at the Carnival Dance. Horace Puckett and his orchestra played for some 150 or 200 couples in the festively decorated barn. While "sitting one out," dancers found concessions-fishing, penny pitchin' and marble shooting. Alumni and students had celebrated Homecoming 1949. CLAD in pajamas and blue jeans, Frog students form SAD sack is Robert Jacobson GLAD TCU Chamber of Commercers serve and devour snake parade through downtown streets and hotel lobbies. in Flying Frogs Stage Revue. boiled rice and roast owl on their floats during parade. One Hundred Sixty-five FESTIVAL DPENED NEW BUILDING MILLIDN AND A HALF DDLLAII FINE AIITS BUILDING DEDICATED Years of planning, solicitation and construction became reality at the formal dedication of the Fine Arts Building on Sunday, December 4. A week of festival events formally opened TCU's newest classroom building and university auditorium. Dr. Sadler presided at this formal convocation and read the dedicatory statement. The A Cappella Choir, trained by Professor Gordon Young, and directed by Pro- fessor Arthur Faguy-Cote, was featured on the program. The day's address was made by Dr. Howard Hanson, direc- tor of the Eastman School of Music. Following the convocation, faculty and out-of-town guests were honored by a buffet supper in the home of Dr. Lew D. Fallis, Opening concert was held in Ed Landreth Auditorium at 8:15 p. m. Sunday evening. Dr. Hanson conducted the University Orchestra in the playing of his "Symphony No. Z," and "Serenade for Strings, Harp and Flute." The University Choral Club, trained by Professor William J. Marsh, joined the chorus in the performance of Dr. Han- son's "Lament of Beowulf." Monday evening, a chamber program was presented fea- turing works of modern American composers Samuel Barber, Anthony Donato and Walter Piston. Tuesday was homecoming day for TCU's own modern American composer, former student and director of the Horned Frog Band, Don Gillis. Dr. Gillis conducted the student and professional musicians in his own works: "Symphony No. 6," commissioned by the University for presentation during the 75th Anniversary Celebration in 19485 "The Alamo", "Portrait of a Frontier Town"g the "Man Who Invented Music," with Professor Fred B. Folks as narrator, and "Symphony No. S." The popular young composer and director of serious music for the National Broadcasting Company in New York made arrangements FACADE or THE NEW FINE ARTS BUILDING wHlcH OPENED DECEMBER 4. fOr Univffsify fliSffibUfi0H Of fCC0fdiU8S of his W0fkS f0f release in 1950. , .3 If .i2,:g,QE.5f57 fjfmi' 'I : ji.. dd' 'nv ,.v.: ' . : '24, Mfr- s 9, . Q e a'. ONE OF THE FINEST PLANTS IN THE COUNTRY IS THIS THEATER. STUDENT AND FACULTY ART WORKS ARE DISPLAYED IN GALLERY. One H untlrecl Sixty-sire SINGERS Georgia Mixon and James Morris voice comedy roles in Festival World Premier of "Acres of Sunshine." Georgia played a lovely, pursuing Morris. FIRST All-DEPARTMENTAL AFFAIR FRIIM SIIHIIIIL UF FINE ARTS RECEIVES PRAISE The eyes and ears of the new cultural center of the Southwest were focused on the Fine Arts Department, Fort Wortlm Ex-Students' Asso- ciation sponsored premier of "Acres of Sunshine" on December 9. Never before had the entire Fine Arts Department been assembled for such a mass venture as the musical comedy by Exes Mrs. Ruth Graham and Mrs. .Mary Ellen Stevens of Kilgore. The music department hand 'ACRES' PREMIER A HIT picked its best talent for the orchestra and chorus. The lead and supporting roles were played by scholarship students of the highest grade. The drama department staged the event, the art department designed and the technical theater crew constructed the scenery. It was a full-scale major operation. Weeks of preparation for the fine chorus and orchestra parts were conducted by Dr. Ralph Guenther. Dr. Walther Volbach until his unfortunate illness gave superior direction. In his absence Professor Virginia Klein polished the perform- ers. Ballet personnel were trained expertly by David Preston. Professor Edwin A. Meyers designed the scenery, and Profes- sor Andrea I-Ietzel and her technical crew built it. Everyone was topsy-turvy in the Fine Arts Building to get "Acres,' opened. The stage crew spent countless hours of "overtime" and let the curtain open with paint drying. All this time there were other performances going on in the building, other rehearsals, and mass confusion. But "Acres of Sunshine" first-nighters were not conscious of anything but the beautiful music of the score, and the clever lyrics and dia- logue of the book. The authors had done themselves proud. They were eager to see their show and get comments from friends and critics. When the lights were dimmed, the orchestra of students and professional musicians filled the auditorium with the strains of the tunes to come. After the applauded overture, the curtain revealed a Rio Grande Valley scene as it appeared in the land development stages. The cast quickly entered, and outstanding characterizations were turned in by experienced Gilbert and Sullivan artists Georgia Mixon and Floyd Lisle. Georgia was not herself for the evening. What more can be said as a compliment to her acting ability! Lisle in return played his usual good self, and thrilled the audience in his antics and businesslike procedure. Joining the two was Norma Morris in the clever "Farmer's Fuguef' Norma appeared as Georgia's mother, and client of Lisle. Her comedy was some of the evening's best. jim Morris' comic lover role added greatly to a good show. The ballet was superb. Professor Preston's training brought a new cultural era to TCU in their exhibition in "Acres" It was a relief to get away from the lovers' songs, when the ballet appeared. Yes, "Acres of Sunshine" had come to Ed Landreth Audi- torium, and the Fine Arts Department was proud of their accomplishments. They should be! I WRITER Ruth Duncan Graham discusses re- WRITER Samuel B. Harrison, author of "Burn- ACTORS presented the premier play two nights hearsal with Ballet Instructor David Preston. ing Embers," which also received world pre- during festival, and a weeks run the following Miss Virginia Klein, director, is sitting at right. mier at Festival, poses with two student actors. week. Scene is from Act three, Scene two. One Hunclrecl Sixty-eight ' I FULL PRE-XMAS SUCIAL CALENDAR Social events of the pre-Christmas week included many a club party on and off campus, decorative dorm parlors and buildings, an all-school open house, and the Congress spon- sored Christmas party. On Thursday, December 15, the Natural Science Club fea- tured a visit from "Dr. Santa Claus." This Santa's most con- spicuous feature was a brilliant purple beard with a border of white. He was portrayed by Dr. Sanders T. Lyle. His costume was a white surgical gown with surgeons cap, and in handing out gifts he was most careful to keep true sterile technique by wearing rubber gloves. The program began with a bar-b-que dinner, the appear- ance of "Dr. Santa Claus," and a movie singsong with both carols and novelty songs. The fourth event of the evening was a humorous and instructive skit entitled "The Sympathetic Nervous System, TCU Style." Participants on this parody included faculty and instructors. A dance routine was exhibited by James Hill, accompanied by Par McCamy. The girls' dormitory groups held their annual "White Gifts" party in their respective parlorsg the Methodist Student Move- ment honored representatives from SMU, who presented a Christmas play, the Meliorist Club held its annual Christmas Caroling partyg the Baptists Student Union held a banquet, Dr. Huber discussed Germanic Winter Festivals for the Ger- man Club, the Ministers' Wives held a party with gifts going to needy children, Bryson held a dinner-dance, the Fallis Players held a progressive dinner, the "Y" entertained in the Little Gymg the Press Club met with sponsor Paul O. and Mrs. Ridingsg and Noel Keith's new children's book, "Rowdy, the Green Horse," went on sale. Christmas was indeed on the hill. Residents of Foster Hall held their annual open house amid the silver trimmed, red lighted tree. Guests were met by dormi- tory representatives and hostesses. Refreshments were served and guests sang around the piano, as pictured at right. The last all-school dance of the semester was held Thursday, December 15, just as Lindy Berry and Don Narrell left for the East-West game in San Francisco. It was in the style of an old- fashioned Christmas party. Congress Vice-President and Social Committee Chairman Connie Mack Hood announced plans early for the event that was to feature the visit of Old Saint Nick. He said, "The spirit of Charity will not be forgotten, there's no charge for admission." Horace Pucker and his orchestra played for dancers, and a floor show consisted of an appearance of the We Three Trio, and the caroling of several young men as pictured at right. Community singing closed the campus portion of the enter- tainment and the orchestra continued the evening of dancing. For the second time within a month, the campus became virtually deserted for a two-week duration, as students began their pilgrimages to the various homes. Administrative offices were closed only five days during the holidays, likewise the book store. The library staff closed their books the entire holiday as well as the girls' and boys' dormi- tories. The Veterans' Administration observed only a two-day holiday on December 26 and january 2. AT RIGHT: above, Martha Ann Tull and Morris Bailey as well as Merell Strickert and Norman Bantz dance near decorative material at Congress sponsored dance in Big Gymnasium on December l5. Middle, Christmas Carolers serenade audience at dance. The group sang "The First Noel" and "Jingle Bells." Community singing followed. At bot- tom, Miss Pat McCamy plays singsong stuff for Dick Wood Qeatingb, Helen Joyce Pepper and Paul Mingus. One Hundred Sixty-nine glvaqvlnsi U P 41" ff lk NN Om: Hundred Seventy 'iv THE YEAR I One Hzmclrecl Seventy-one - 1 KQQWV ii' f " 'L 111155 fiiii 1-' 'Af--,..,...w, 1 'T , . '-.i3:!'..M..:,... ,,,,, W ,,,, K x PLAYING for the Amateur Hockey League are Jim Harben and john Lewis. These TCU students spent winter nights on the ice to work for their team's win- ning of the Texas Amateur Hockey League Championship during February. sponsored last fall by the company in weekly football score contests. Basketball made its appearance on the scene, and Tuesday night crowds traversed Will Rogers Coliseum way for the round- ball thrillers. SPEAKING for the TCU Chamber of Commerce banquet is Dr. Sadler. Dr. Sadler's facial expression was captured by photographers as he finished the proverbial after dinner joke. Tony Pastor played for dancers on February 5 at the Casino. Froggies had their name band and were satisfied. New furniture arrived for the residents of Goode and Clark Halls. The migration of antiques from said dormitories soon made its appearance in the Barracks. One student questioned: . ,,,.., AJQ K GREETING campus football contest winners is Gerald LaRue, representing the Philip Morris Company, who awarded each living group with the highest number of ballots entered in the annual contest with prizes. The first prize, the television set, center, is awarded to Tom Brown Hall. Lindy Berry and Monitor Louis Crittenden receive the set for the dormitory men. The second prize radio-phonograph is received by Clark representatives George Wilde and Tom Price. Goode received the third prize radio-phonograph shown with Monitor Paul Haefli and Mark Dyer. Presentation was made in the lounge. One Hundred Seventy-tlwee FURNITURE arrived for residents of Clark and Goode Halls during winter months. It was Christmas for over a month as the all-steel desks, chairs, dressers and beds arrived, replacing antique odds and ends in the dorms. "What happened to the furniture that was in the barracks?" A jokester replied: "What furniture?" Valentines Day came and passed, with the Rodeo Association holding a Gym Dance for lonely and lovely hearts. as Z MOTOR working can create frustration to the passer-by as well as the mechanic. This headless shade-tree artist peers beyond the radiator that leaves the viewer the illusion that there's something rotten in the state. On February 20 the University Little Theater opened its doors again for the presentation of "Life With Father." This three-act hilarious comedy on the life of the Day family ran over a week for students and townsfolk. INSTRUMENTS focused toward student director of the Horned Frog Band Lewis D. Gillis rebound on the opposite side of Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum at basketball game. Gillis' Stan Kenton-like antics with the baton were a constant entertainment to spectators across the way. The band appeared at home games to add the color and zest to conference play, sorta like football season all over again. On alternate evenings, Gillis was replaced by Frank Kasko. One Hundred Seventy-four S. I viii INTRAMURAL QUEEN ANNE PRICE RECEIVES AWARD FROM MASTER ATHLETE LINDY BERRY FOLLOWING CONTEST AT ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE, MAR. 3. UPEN HUUSE EXHIBITEIJ ACTIVITY VYING for queen honors were many campus co-eds. They are all decked out in their swim JUMPING in miclair is Fencing Instructor Tommy Moy. suits, thanks to the SKIFF objection. Bathing beauty contest was high point of evening. Moy trams contestant prior to matches at opener. One Hzmclrecl Seventy-six milf- "f' -' , Ianni '.4D1 - .- OPENING EVENT OF THE OPEN HOUSE WAS THE SWIMMING MEET AT 7:00. CONTESTANTS VIED IN 40 YARD BACK STROKE. The fifteenth annual Intramural Open House was held in the basketball gymnasiums on Friday, March 5rd, The Physical Edu- cation departmental affair was full packed with exhibits of sports- manship. Opening the evening was the swimming meet at 7:00. Con- testants vied in the 40 yard free style, 40 yard breast stroke, 40 yard back stroke, 60 yard relay, and 100 yard free. Bill Padon was director of this meet. Event number two was the volleyball game between football stars and the basketball squad. Berry, Archer, Rogers, George, Hughes, Farmer and the Mootmans ftwo of themb played against Schmidt, Lee, Fromme, Knox, Reynolds, Brookshire, Ethridge and Swaim. Fencing exhibitions under the direction of fencing instructor Tommy Moy took place in the tumbling room. The Intramural championship in basketball was played at 8:00. The finalists, Tuesday juniors and Wednesday seniors dribbled it out. The juniors became the champions. Members of the Hoe Down Club, accompanied by the Bernie Robertson Musicians exhibited square dancing at 9:00, followed by some antics from the Frog Chorus, with Lindy Berry as an- nouncer. The Intramural Open House queen was chosen from 19 can- didates in the closing event of the showing. Judges chose Ann Price to reign over the event. IN THE ALL-CAMPUS FIGHTS, DICK ANDERSON DRIVES A LEFT TOWARD TOMMY CANNON IN NOVIGE LIGHTWEIGHT DIVISION One Hundred Seventy-seven KISSING visiting movie celebrities are Ranch Week Foreman and Queen. Bernie is with Star Ann Blyth and Sue with War Hero-Actor Audey Murphey at T8cP terminal. GROWING beards is always a forerunner of the Week. Pictured are three contestants, although only one remained bearded: Buck Sloan, Jim Hatley and Chuck Brock. We re , A ELEC'i'it'2?f ffiijijg 2 as CAMPAIGNING for Foreman duties is the unique char- acter, the Ex-Camel Herder Chuck Brock, Life advertised. One Hzmdrecl Seventy-eight RANCH WEEK ANNUAL EVENTS ARE FUN PACKED Ranch Week! Wluat a heck-of-a-time! After weeks of planning on the part of the TCU Chamber of Com- merce, this annual affair began to creep into Froggies like a fever, to explode come Thursday, March 16. Prior to that blessed day, students had elected Sue Meinecke and Bernie Robertson as their Ranch Week Queen and Foreman. There had been much campaign- ing with bath robes and shetland ponies, but these two came out on top. Beards were grown by those who could, and pistols were brought out ready for another try. The calendar was crowded with fun-packed events from the musical to the barn dance. Sheriff Montgom- ery sent a deputy to swear in TCU Range Sheriff Al Bagnall, who in turn swore in his own deputies. Rice, SMU, and TSCW sent representatives to the event, and they were escorted by Chamber members. The jail appeared on campus on Thursday and be- came the center of attraction for un-Westernlikers, campus bandits and wrong-doers. Even the "Vanishing American," Cowboy, spent his time in the "jug," The week ended with the Barn Dance in the Gym- nasium. This Chamber-sponsored dance featured the presentation of contest 'awards at intermission time, and the selection of the most typical campus creatures for the week. -v 3. . g,,,,,B5 1 as pie A V' , 1 'T -, Sf , -in gsgxig .1 Yi? l gs if if 2 . :.:: ,,., .. , - ' X , ' MN., E K i air 3, S M 1:4 e L, WV"-ts: Q1 'M Msg' arf-if s. ffffw 2 ,Q H ii , , Q a - err ,, W -' ., - 'a 'in a ,, ik T' - R , - fri RIDING around the Hill range for the Queen election is "Jinx" McKelvey, with one of her very famous Shetlands. Campaigning takes much of ones time, efforts and energy, WHAT I-l HECK 0F Aftermath of Ranch Week, 1950 style, was not as great as in former years. There was not too much, if any, unnecessary rowdy or ungentlemanlike behavior. There were no faction feuds from either the "athletes" or the "preachers" Ranch Week was enjoyed by all and entered into by all, mostly the class of 1953. Even though it may be a little out of the style of any previous annual, the staff of the 1950 Horned Frog would like to pay trib- ute to the many members of the Chamber of Commerce who proved that Ranch Week can be an enjoyable time, if handled properly. The Chamber let other organizations participate in the prep- arations, and carried them out. They made no mistakes in trying to step on anyone's toes. They spent countless hours in trying to simplify the many tasks of those who did work with the event. Ranch Week 1950 should be remembered a long time. There was the usual conflict with the Student Congress, but even the SWEARING in TCU Sheriff is Sheriff Sully Montgomery at Thursday evening affair. Al Bagnall swore in his deputies. .ff REPRESENTING other conference schools were these lovelies from Rice, SMU, and the A8cM representative from TSCW. A GO0D TIME! Chamber knew the Congress' bark was worse than its bite, and let nothing get into their way to stop this event from coming off on schedule. Carl Motherell, Chamber member, was chairman of the event, and he was ably assisted by the Chamber officers and the mem- bers of this service organization. Remember those little Frog supporter ribbons on sale last fall? The Chambermen spent hours then to make the money to pay for any debts for this year's Ranch Week. For the benefit of newcomers of a few years, Ranch Week has been on probation, due to the war years, which left its mark on student life as well as many, many other things. This year's event should prove to the officials that Ranch Week can be something to be proud of, as well as the new arch, the new Fine Arts Building, and the football and band players' new Shady Oak hats. THROWING COWBOY in the jail proved quite a task for deputies, although it is doubtless others wouldn't assist them. as iwwi' Qi GROUPING around the jail, students spent hours watching for unwesternlike individuals to spend time in the jug. One Hundred Seventy-nine JOKING with his audience, Lindy Berry announces "If I'cl a knowd you was comin', I'd a baked a cake." Berry appeared as a singing cowboy, making debut. SINGING on his knees, a la Al Jolson, Charles Bailey gives forth with "marnmy" stuff, highlighting "Sho Is Blue" trio. One Htmclred Eighty RANCH MUSICAL A SMASH HIT "Ranch Daze," world premier musical comedy opened Thursday, March 16th, and closed the following night. This campus variety show built around the Ranch Week theme was somewhat of a hit. It was a moral victory for the writers, in having accomplished at least a production. It was a success in that it contained only a minimum of talent from the rosters of the School of Fine Arts. It prided itself in not being a production of said school. The musical was sponsored by the Pep Cabinet. It opened with the appearance of the singing narrators, Ran, Chu and Eek-put their names together and you get Ranch Week- Odin Wilson, jere Admire and Bob Christopher. They intro- duced scenes and characters in word and song. joe Shosid played the immortal judge Roy Bean. Claude Mathis por- trayed the drinker at the bar. A quartet consisting of Norman Bantz, David Easterling, jim I-Iatley and Chris Perner stopped the show with "I Sho Is Blue." They were assisted by Charles Bailey, a la Al jolson. Marianne Yoakum played the Bostonian gal bored with Western goingson. She sang the feature production number "Busy A' Bathin'," with shadow screen antics. Melodramatic honors went to the performance of Frank Burkett's "Killing of the Keeper of the Camels." Floyd Pelvis played the title role, Grady johnson the villain. Billy Evans the assistant villain, jackie Keith the lovely, and Bob Cornell the hero. The Shakespearean-Burkett thing was an instant hit with the crowds. Lindy Berry made his TCU stage debut in singing the cow- boy song "just a Rollin' Along." Odin Wilson wrote the book and lyrics and directed the production. jimmy Paschal composed the tunes of the evening. PUSHING up the daisies are Ran, Chu and Eek, singing narrators for show. Left to right: Odin Wilson, Jere Admite and Bob Christopher. SERENADING the Ranch Week Queen, Bob Christopher sings to the Ozona gal, "Gully, Sue! Wl1at'cha gonna do?" PUNNING and masquerading as Dean Moore, Charles Beseda informs Judge Roy Bean of his troubles with blue jeans. DRINKING song of the production is told in aria by graduate student and tetotaler Claude Mathis. C-URSING George Hayes is Sara Simonds, as she sings to audience from the floor. On alternate night she told story to Bobbie McEacheru. DYING during the hilarious tragedy in one act: "The killing of the Keeper of the Camels" is Floyd Pelvis. Over him stands jacquline Keith, as Villain Grady johnson smiles. One Hundred Eig hty-one s SPITTING Championship went without question to last year's Ranch Week Foreman and present Varsity squader Willie Mathis. The crowds are amazed. GLOATING over his first place win in the Pie Eating Contest is cham- pion Bob Cornell. Cornell vied in most of the Saturday contests, CUNTESTS Saturday was all-day holiday for students and faculty, and it might as well have been, or faculty would have gone jail- ward and students ranchward. As it was things were mighty pleasant on the quadrangle and Ernest Allen ranges that day. The morning featured the annual contests. Willie Mathis, last year's Ranch Week foreman won tobacco spitting honors. Bob Cornell came out successful from the field of pie eaters. And the fastest cigarette roller was Charles Craig. Dick Ram- sey won cigar smoking honors. Greta Chadwick and Don PITCHING eggs was a comedy contest which was enjoyed by all but the contestants, judges, eggs. One H urzclrecl Eighty-two ROLLING cigarettes entertained the western-like many on-lockers. It ain't too easy, it says here! SCRATCHING her head is Mrs. Orbeck, appear- ing as a witness to the trial of Dean Shelburne. . ,, - f n. -- , . .4 . i . 9' ,. .-. . V lfmxagfz'-9.4 A I 1' . -' 271 r.Iz'."'f-1'L'J,I I ' '. 1 ' 1-r r yo M. ' H' ' L ' " ' 'Z1 A- sw--Jf 'TI .V-.a .4-Q., '-1 ..- ,,.,-f,,fyf.-.T- 1" .rv-' . .,, ..- '-43-in '-- - - Q., -' 1-.1 up fr' : 1 tJ9'? l'1'1f"-7.9. l:-,3,.f1. , '-.rkff,,' - .M-,, ,, V! -I v"' fee' "Kfi-.-f-"4f'f-1.-"'-:': " " ' lsRT.1L.:':2fS.f'.?QmlJ:!fT:.1.,,m, ftclfi-Af ugctw, .--' T ,, ,.f,,,y. "END OF THE LINE" THIS RANGY BANG-TAIL SEEMS T0 BE SAYING AS IT SENDS JAMES BARBER IN A BONE-RATTLING FALL AT RODEO. Tinsley ran three-legged across the finish line. Bill Reeder came out on top in the egg tossing event. After the jetton Barbecue, which was served to several hun- dred, campus ranchers went out west of the hill to the Ernest Allen Ranch for the annual rodeo. In the bareback bronc event, Art Hoera won highest honors. Top honors in the belled calf roping event went to Burr Hash. In the boys' wild cow milking test, Richard "Punk" Patton topped other contestants. Comedy of the afternoon was in the girl's cow milking, in which Catherine Moore took first place. In the steer riding test Fred Dunn, too, was a firster. The Rodeo Associations event was most successful, having no injuries, and for perhaps the first time in history coming out of the annual event with a little money in the pocket. Following the rodeo, there were rest periods and preparation for the evening dance. At the dance in the big gym, Judy Davis and Norman Bantz were acclaimed as the most typical cow girl and cow boy. f RIDING astride this longhorned beast is an art D and artists don't use paints here. What's the use. BRONCING broncs shot from the shoot, here Buck Sloan makes another try toward a victory. MILKING a wild cow is a chore that no domestic cow girl likes. When it comes to milking try Duz. One Hundred Eighty-three THE DEVIL AND EVERYMAN IN ONE OF THE PLAY'S GREATEST SCENES. EVERYMAN'S SADDEST TALE MEANS NOTHING TO GOOD HUMOUR. One Htmdfreol Eighty-four "EVERYMAN" "Everyman," the great morality play of English literature, came to the TCU Little Theater March 20 for a week's run. It was nothing but great, and by far the most perfect perform- ance of the year, from the Fine Arts Department. Bob Weston, in the title role, portrayed the difficult char- acter in excellent style, turning in a memorable performance. If TCU had a "Hall of Fame" for characterizations, this work fsleiould,-in the mind of the reviewer, go down with the Bob Matheny Gilbert and Sullivan work, Arthur Arney and his G8cS poftrayals, Dorothy Nies in "The Corn ls Green," jerita Folly in the "Drunkard," Dorothy Butcher as Regina in "Little Foxes," George Manitsez in T'Heaven Can Wz1it," jerry Sulli- mad Betty Thornton in "Glass Menagerie," Georgia Mixon in "Acres of Sunshine," and perhaps Freddie Hoskin's portrayal of Grandpa in "You Can't Take It Witli You." Professor Klein and her staff manufactured some beautiful costumes. Professor Andrea Hetzel's crew did wonders with the lighting, which, as pointed out by Editor Denton in the SKIFF, was some of the best in Fort Worth all season. The Volbach directed cast featured also excellent portrayals by Frank Magers, as the Devil and Mary Lou McNamara as kindred. Although they were short speaking parts, the Monks presented one of the most beautiful pictures in the production in their silhouette in the final scene. l EVEN WEALTH DECLINES TO MAKE GRAVE TRIP WITH EVERYMAN. CENTER OF BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS IN THE LOUNGE IS THE FOUNTAIN. HERE STUDENTS KEEP WARES FLYING ACROSS THE COUNTER DAILY. "Life at the Student Lounge!" Here, halfway from the North and South doors to the Administration building, and down one IF THE LOUNGE HAD A MASCOT IT WOULD BE WHITE COLLIE DOG. One Hundred Eighty-six flight of steps can be found the only thriving facsimile of a Student Union on the Hill. Here life can be the busiest or the quietest in this cellarlike abode. Here lovers meet. Here thirst is quenched. Here cards fall. Here a short lunch is devoured. Here boy meets girls. Here abides the Wliite Collie dog. Center of business transaction in the lounge is the fountain, managed by Bill Bishop. Bishop's assistants keep coke, malts, candy, coffee, sandwiches, etc., flying across the counter in re- turn for coins to the Union and deficit funds. They are campus employed students, working for themselves. How democracy hits home! A typical day in the lounge begins at the crack of dawn as the basement janitor sweeps and shines the room for the day's run. Come 9:00 and one of the crew opens the fountain after making ready. About 9:50 the fried-pie man brings in hot fried- pies, and the coffee is ready. Other salesmen appear, and by the 9:40 break in class students are there to purchase the day's goods. The rush continues for fifteen to twenty minutes as a variety of goods cross the counter. Fountainsmen report the variety is amazing. Wlien it's half way between breakfast, the buying is heavier and the tables are then filled up. "Lounge rats," "Queens," "Lizards" and other colloquial named beings drift into the tabled section, reveal a deck of 52's and begin the various games of the day. There is always the need of a fourth, and that fourth nearly always makes his appearance soon. BISHOP AND CREW KEEP ENTERPRISE UPERATING The juke box begins to play the selection of a selec- tor's choice. The studious inhabitants then make for seclusion to the balcony of the Old Auditorium or a park bench. This transformation leaves a new gen- eration of dwellers. These are the talkers. As the music swells so does the chatter at the tables. The whistles are sharper, the confusion greater. The opening of the cafeteria, particularly on TTS, creates a havoc. The early-liner-uppers crowd the door waiting for that click of that lock from within. Once said sound is audible, the hungry beasts mob each other in "crashing the gate." There are some fifteen minutes of their waiting outwardly, adding to whatever additional confusion mingles in the lounge. During the noon hour, the above prevails. As after- noon seeks to the cellar, the drift has gone home- ward or dormward, leaving little of the early morning confusion. Now the lounge is dirty once more, and is swept out again. The office workers pay their daily afternoon pilgrimage honors to the abode, buying as little as possible and making as much fuss as possible. Wlren the evening meal is served in the cafeteria, the lounge once more becomes a pathway to the inner sanctum of Mrs. Orbecks eating establishment. Dur- ing football training, this confusion lasts for over an hour, although during the remainder of the year it is usually confined to an hour's duration. By this time the lounge is swept again. It gets dirty in no time, and stays that way for a long time. Now is the time for all good students with nothing else to do to make their way to the lounge's two television sets. Witlm the set available to be set at three channels, it is not unusual to find Melton Berle on one end of the lounge and "Willia111 Barclay Pre- sents" at the other. The chairs, which up to this point have been in somewhat symmetrical formation turn two ways for viewers. Although high chairs would be more suitable to relieve craning necks, students slump into the chairs and get entertained. About the time the villain ties the lovely to the tracks, or the point of a TV gag is about to come any moment, then the 8:20 bell rings and the Evening College students take their break. That does it, for at least twenty minutes anyway. After the night school patrons leave the fountain, the late watch cleans and closes. Another day has closed at the student lounge. Skipper hails everyone outward, and the white collie dog yawns and crosses the road to get to the other side. WATCHERS during the Evening College class break view one of the TV sets. These patrons make their appearance about the time that the pictured villain climaxes the story or a comedian gives a joke a point. PLAYERS spend hours, and would spend days if the rules allowed. On these tables fall the cards of the future builders of our country. They have been called Lounge "Queens," "Lizards," "Rats" and others. One Hundred Eighty-seven PICTURED IS A TYPICAL WELL-KEPT SUITE OF ROOMS AT FAMOUS BARRAC-KS Z SHAMROCK HOTEL. REST, COMFORT AND PLEASURE ABIDE. LIFE AT THE SHAMROCK HOTEl Life at the Shamrock Hotel is a pleasant one, for here in the form of Barracks Z, residents have set themselves a goal of fun and work. They have transformed the splintered rooms into a suite, and with courtesy and friendliness spend countless hours being "a credit to the Shamrock." INTEREST in each of the "guests" plans and business is shown at the Shamrock. QThose waiting for phone are silent.j One Hzmdred Eighty-eight At almost any hour of the day a voice from the telephone will answer, when you call Ext. 207, "Shamrock Hotel, desk clerk." The clerk will page your party and report any message to him you might leave. Courtesy is a virtue of this cloverland. Shamrockers band together in parades, are constant friends to one another at the hotel, and let it be known they are proud of their abode. COURTESY is another virtue of this cloverland. Nothing but the finest comes from or to the Shamrock. Friends are everywhere. Tai 'P+Io1o QR APAERS A gg?-'Ir KV' T TITTTIT fm 90 4 I I an 5 I W7 XID S A I IWW- egv ,u X R ,.:. 2E,..Q ila f 6? v " Cx I I if I' . X .. C' do 1 , X I I Qqbx, w fgbqfiiqqfl WN 'T iff I S --4qne- O, , INTO ,I SQIIIY, TQ WG- U I pw " ,,, 5 S A VAFWRLISIAI I 1 Q O, I 0 if? I 2' A -Af I -M 1141 ,1 49 PICTURES ON THE FORERUNNING PAGES ARE THE WORK OF THESE BURKETT CARTOONED INDIVIDUALS ANY RESEMBLANCE IS THE USUAL MISTAKE O H d lEJltJ A 1 f,-E vs 4. JY IMI. . .Jx H 'Q-af., ,lf M-A..-f Q ,,,,, W F V, .H-1 JIM HATLEY Editor 5 One Hzmclrccl Ninety-two paeienltallian Ball CASINO, DECEMBER 2nd 446,445 guakdl' Cartoons and Script :rx my ' 111145. ' ECEf S Fmeife eE?im'frZ3 r- CEEE EE E EE E, E E E New Lee 3 . ,Q M K 3 g , . E atfrrfgeiifii fzizfy efme "CQ ihe wE,EQ2 ng'iE14:eeQ Wizeirsz Grim zfcirizt im 533' ?f:f.ffi32gE?Q: E A r - 5 'E GESE 'w ww. w. -. 7 3 2,'!?"?f'f7 vi 11 1: P. 1 ierelmwxs MACK riggllj' 7253 rgfv on 1 mfpfi Q CWS: 'ini fi? ,5fr?i?5 Efi,5'?ff K r 4 44-3555 Lf vii-'fix fiffu giiff' vtiff. ' C - 4 1 C,'l.E.fi'.f AR' In ' Q ., "M, .Z , 'T,- N A eiffffefeaesii ' or r f E fsmfzaif were revive .Q A 3 A . M V 5 A F . l 1 -r-1 ,--vi - Vw. N1 ?g35?fm5g+, Q55QigeilFwQQg?irbg3fg Qz1iq,jEmgQ Q1fls on Leven. .,.. if .1 -57' fziiffff W 5555, V . E KA fig? ' fi PRCFESSOR FREDERICK B. FALKS Master of Ceremonies A , ,qi l 3 lj.: i' f f. 1 'E , K 'ij !v-P Lg' A E? 2 If NY 1 W as my X J , " QE ,, if Y, ff 1 ZS il . -wig 5 3 M fy x iff f -M is gggqzs , vii? wi., Ja: f i 551 my X f 1 7- Qqivfix S 1957 ,Q ii 415 AZVD 'ig t ,A.. , 71 if' ZZ1 XX V A 5f' Q 'z f f ii X :QQEQ rzi . Lf' XCQQBX XT -at S if a To s ,gn AF Q Ca f kilffs X, 11. fl X xiii, . W fi f ff fax mf "":: ff iii? 54 for ' i f gif' iiii' X i lx xg-Ri i' ii Z'-X I A' W r 4 aiasis sss i a L Lf? Q S it ct? The first Freshman couple-or don't you care? The first Freshman couple's a good-looking pair The gal has won some honors, and they're both real slick! Miss Beverly Herrin and jonathan Quick. kit Next couple out in the Frosh parade Consists of a lovely little Lufkin maid And a hot tap dancer who's a ball of fire: Miss Ursula McDurmott and Jere Admire! tit Another Lufkin lassie's in the third fish pair, But her feller is from Keller, what with very little hair, A sparkling little Ruby-first name jo Ann To be escorted by that handsome Ollie Whitley man! it 'A' 'k Now with couple number four about to take their bow, The guy's a basketballer and the gal's a cat's meow. Miss jo Ann York is the lass in this case, She's with Christopher Perner-see the grin on his face? tit The final freshman duo we would like to steer your way, Contains a. pretty little maiden who we hope is here to stay, And a rugged little preacher-man with ants in his pants, Miss Lerla "Tootsie" Gibson and Norman Bantz. One Hzwttlretl Ninety-f'ou1' First on the Soph list come up two- The girl is the sweetheart of T. C. U. The guy loves backing that line by hours, Miss Amelia Douglas and Master Keith Flowers. 'kirir Well the pee-racle's movin', and next in line Are two cheer leaders, and they're both real fine. "Why don't you haul off and love me?"-he does it the best. Guess who? Bernie Robertson and Sunny Guest. 'kit Of the third two people in the Soph-more hi-de-ho, One goes in for journalism, the other radio, And second glances, man alive, they really rate 'em, Hete's Miss Alice Langford and Willy-mmm Tatum! 'A' 'k i' The fourth boy and girl are familiar to each other, Not only ou this dance floor, but they go together, brother, fx The guy is a cheer leader, and his gal has mucho class, We give you Georgia Davis and Billy Dan Bass. iii Rounding out the sophomores we come up with a pair: The boy is being saved this year, and the girlie loves the air. Gilbert Bartosh gets an extra year of eligibility, And thus escorts Miss Ann Bettis with consum- mate agility. One Himdrcd Ninety-f'i'ue X fLk K K X fc' .,,. Qif """"""i:':iii'iif i Pw in A - Q ..... :2:-" Eirz' be .1.' 'QCWT 141 IIN? j t "t il , 2'2e 2:- I if 1 T. . fi tttt ... 69 ,ll1 '5iAE,li Q n i ts. he ' .1 N41 ' f ifia w 1 .... - . ' . 4 ' K :E i .-i- 5 .--, a 1. Aj -'ee..-: : 1'-5 .ks - T xx . i l f 7- f gg K ff ' t , f xg' if I " -I Q2 2 sly.. f X 5 C5 U xg HJ!! , f ii t mo t l "lf' 1 Lfk game 5p1VED gzk-f ra Off a KTCU adventure is this lovely lass, He awaits next season's challenge in the striped grass, And though they never met till yesterday, Let Eubank, Al Vaiani, please step this way. 'k'k'k Now here's a junior rwosome that has met ' before, i She's no dull one and he's no bore. L One of many brothers, from the tacklers he's loose: Dashin' Dan Wilde and Miss Martha Bruce. J in W And next a couple who could be our valentine: She comes from underneath the Mason-Dixon lineg I-Ie's a Waxahacluie center who can do no wrong. Presenting Max Eubank and Miss Lois Long! 'kit Witlm formality and dignity of a sort, Another Wilde brother-the one from the court- Escorts Miss Liz Massengale, brimful of joyg The kiddies are waiting, so c'rnon, Georgia Boy. 'k'k4r One more Junior Couple 'fore the Seniors have their say, The guy is of the Moorman clan, from out Odessa-way, And the gal has been a favorite since she came to the hill, Here's little Lula Leverett and an end named Bill! One Hmrdrcd Ninety-sin: First couple out's about as cute as we've seen, The girl's name's misleading, cause she's really a queen, And the guy's a pass-catchin' lanky snake of a thing, Here's three yards Bailey and Miss Nancy King. iii The next two folks are well-known Crusaders, He's with the paperg she the debaters. And when he wrote that column, he was really just hintin', Miss Barbara Sterling and Professional Denton. 'kit The next two are West Texans and they're both politices, But you can't hold that against them 'cause they've both good Joes. They're the Veep and the Veepess, so we really think we should Introduce Shirley Brunson and Connie Mack Hood. iii A real gone couple is yours next to view, They're both good looking-got nice frames, too. Gorgeous Georgia's Mixon her songs with sports, XVhile Jack has trouble with his Archer supports. iii' We arrive at the finale of the favorite salute, With a modest little fellow and a lovely to boot. We now present Drum Majorette Miss Nina Shaw And Lispin' Lindy Berry with a plastic jaw. One Hu11d'2'ed Ninety-seven BUT: MW if f? QA- 5,5 bk X sf taster-f . are yr W tx T . fe. ?1gp, ..,.. . W nga, gmt, -f lp lg r F2 , 6 i r 40444 .. .. ' 49591 M 7 'liga I . 'Qs f Tp SK . 'I U 5 4 of fjwffssfofv 5 1 TE of I . PRUFESJVOMAL C. 7541! f" ' WLQAP' ir 4 1: -::E:E: uf 22ftI':,, :E-2222 . L ff ore feb 5 Qgxeosgbvgunrra f ff fl 3? l fr if t Zxl x It 'N if Y I Miz? HWPE i J it ff W alia? f, 'Tin it vK1.0 t ll 6 ga . :fg::gQt.rggs,,:,, N fx' XX 'T X! H . E E N . 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BEVERLY HIERRIN URSULA MACDURMOTT JO ANN RUBY JO ANN YORK LERLE GIBSON JOHN QUICK JERE ADMIRE OLLIE XXVI-IITLEY CHRIS PERNER NORMAN BANTZ AMELIA DOUGLAS ANN GUEST ALICE LANGFORD GEORGIA DAVIS ANN BE'I'I'IS KEITH ITLOXVIERS BERNIE ROBERTSON BILL TATUM BILL BASS GILBERT BARTOSH LULA LEVERETI' LETA EUBANK MARTHA BRUCE WILDE LOIS LONG ELIZABETH MASSENGALE BILLY MOORMAN AL VAIANI DAN XXVILDE MAX EUBANK GEORGE WILDE NINA SI-IAXV NANCY KING BARBARA STERLING SHIRLEY BRUNSON GEORGIA MIXON LINDY BERRY MORRIS BAILEY LARRY DENTON CONNIE MACK HOOD JACK ARCHER Two Hundred Twenty-five f. 'Q ? fr Z i CONNIE MACK HOOD Editor Business Manager L. C. "Pete" Wright BUSINESS UFFIIIE The Business Office of the University is cen- ter of activity for the transfer of monies to and from the school. In charge of the office is Mr. L. C. "Pete" Wright, Business Manager of the University and member of the executive committee. Mr. Wright is a TCU graduate and has been with the University over 20 years. After a student has enrolled for classes he pays a visit to the Business Office to make financial arrangements. All records of student's financial situation are kept in the business office by personnel. Room deposits made by dormitory residents are made payable to the office, likewise all fines and fees are paid there. The business office includes the Student Trust Fund Bank, a free bank service for dor- mitory residents and campus organizations. This bank serves as a depository for students away from their home banks. The office handles financial affairs of the University, with Mr. L. A. Dunagan serving as cashier. Mr. Dunagan serves as foreman to the offices' many employees. Assisting Mr. Wright in a secretarial capacity is Miss Lillian McDonald. Miss McDonald is hostess in Mr. Wright's private office, on the first floor of the Administration building. Cushler L A Dunugan OFFICE EMPLOYEES: Mrs. Charlotte Sherrod, Mrs. Marie Fesperman, E, L. White, C. H. Sec,-em,-y Lillian McDonald Knittel, Mrs. W. G. Cook, and Mrs. Sora Roberts. Seated: Mr. J. F. Collins. Two Hundred Twenty-eiglzt REGISTR1-lR'S UFFICE First correspondent with new students is the Registrar S. W. Hutton. Mr. Hutton's office is keeper of all data on the students scholastically, from his high school days throughout graduate school. Upon entering TCU, prospective students write to Mr. Hutton and return to him the necessary material for entrance. To add or drop a course, students must work through the registrar's office, located at the north end of the first floor of the Administra- tion building. All grades and scholastic changes are kept on file of each students attending the University. Part of the Registrars office is the schoolis IBM office, office of the school statistician, Mrs. Mozell McNutt. Mrs. McNutt and her assistants receive and record grades of instructors on permanent index cards. All data on the student is kept in the "mind" of this machine for use on call. This office is also responsible in the assistance of preparing transcripts for mailing. The University Bulletin and all class sched- ules originate from the Registrar's Office. Mr. Hutton personally computes all grade indexes and has an active interest in each stu- dent entering TCU. l 4 I l Q Assistant Registrar C. A. Cumbie OFFICE EMPLOYEES: Joan Russell Mrs Jeanette Wright Nedenna Winslet Seated Mrs Office Supervisor Mrs L W Ramsey Mozell McNutt, Statistician . " W E ,.., RW: DORMITORY PERSONNEL . - if ' ' 3 - :sf ff- fd' V . V R I x rf ... . me , ? .... ffl 5 I ' VL. , or , 4 Dean of Men Ralph Wetherell Dean of Women Elizabeth Shelburne Dean of Students Thomas F. Richardson DORMITORY HOSTESSES DORMITORY MONITORS FOSTER HOSTESSES Mrs. Minnie Lee Harrison, Mrs. Byrd Fahrner, Mrs. Eugene Holmes and Mrs. Estill. TOM BROWN MONITORS Back Raw: Larry Denton, Ed Muegge, Russell Smith. Front Row: Rueben Batoon, Bill Shel- enburger, Louis Crittenden. Two Hundred Thirty WAITS HOSTESSES Mrs. Whittaker, Mrs. Frances H. Blincoe, and Miss Alma McClen- don. CLARK MONITORS Back Row: Noel Williams, George Wilde, Bill Mappes. Front Row: Rex Shaw, Jolly Pridgeon, Bobby Stigler. JARVIS HOSTESSES Mrs. James R. Wright, Sr., and Mrs. Catherine Ball. BARRACKS AND GOODE Face to face: Garner Wilde, Harry Tucker, Ed Stanford, Bill Porter, James Whittaker, Dan Williford, Bill Caffey, Wade Stepp, Jim Story, Buster Locke, Max Cogswell, Soxie Webster and Paul Hoefli. ...N-5 , ,V-ga PRESIDENTS OFFICE Z J. E. Montgomery Noel E. Keith Mrs. Surah Morgan Roy Curtis Ben F. Hearn The office of the president consists of the administra- Noel E. Keith is chairman of the University Press, Sec- tive assistants to Dr. Sadler and to his personal secretary, Mrs. Sarah Morgan. Mrs. Morgan along with her secre- tarial duties serves as hostess to the entire office. retary of the Ex-Student's Association, and a Professor on the campus. Mr. Keith also supervises the University mail- J. E. Montgomery is assistant to Dr. Sadler in the field of promotion, personal contact, and religious emphasis. ment for the University and is assisted by Ben F. Hearn. MARY COUTS BURNETT LIBRARY Mrs. J. E. Mothershead is Librarian of the Mary Cours Burnett Library, located on East campus. Mrs. Mothershead along with her administrative duties has enough time to assist all interested in securing the material necessary. Mrs. Mothershead has a permanent staff and student assistants. Mrs. J. E. Mothershead PUBLICITY OFFICE It is the purpose of the Publicity Office to serve as a liaison in any way possible between the University and the public, particularly the press and radio. The office furthers the University's public relations, pre- pares news releases on campus activity, and until the last semester handled the sports publicity of the school. Paul O. Ridings Gordon C. Lund Two Hundred Thirty-one ing room. Roy E. Curtis is in charge of all Living Endow- Two Hundred Thirty-two INFIRMARY For the first time in the history of TCU, the infirmaries of the campus were consolidated into one unit. This event transpired this past fall, when the east wing first floor of Waits Hall became the infirmary. The infirmary staff is headed by Mrs. Lucille Steers, resident nurse. She is assisted, as pictured at left, by Hu-Ellen Steel, Penny Miller and Nell Wolaver. CAFETERIA The Cafeteria staff and employees are super- vised by Chief Dietitian Mrs. Helen Orbeck. Mrs. Orbeck is assisted in cashier and lunch- room duties by Mrs. Raymond Eller and Mrs. Polly Downey, as pictured at left. The cafeteria serves meals thrice daily to boarding and paying students, faculty and Uni- versity employees. During football, basketball, track and baseball seasons, the cafeteria serves as a training unit for varsity and freshman squads. BUILDINGS The buildings are under the jurisdiction of Mr. L. L. Dees, Superintendent of the Buildings. Mr. Dees is pictured fourth from left, at right. The building crews take care of all upkeep of the buildings of the campus, repairing, con- structing, improving. Offices for the crew are at the south end of the basketball gym. Pictured employees are jack Eller, Henry Strantham, Raymond Eller, and C. B. Redwine. GROUNDS The grounds of the University are attended by the crew of Mr. M. A. Doss, superintendent of the Grounds. Mr. Doss and his crew keep the grounds in readiness throughout the year. The grounds crew played an important part in the recent improvements of the campus. They are in charge of the landscaping, watering, and cleanliness of the grounds. Pictured at left are: J. E. Percy, Mr. Doss, "Cowboy" Munro, and Vestal Lee. SECRETARIES E-' ' Miss Margaret Eubunk Mrs. Ed Cooley M J I D BOOK STORE The University Bookstore, located at the North end of the basement floor is under the management of Mr. E. M. Moore. Mr. Moore and his staff of student employees spend countless hours ordering, shelving, and selling books for the student body. The book- store is also home of school supplies as well as little odds and ends of pennant material. SWITCH BOARD Miss Pauline jones, pictured at right, is chief operator of the school PBX. Miss Jones has been with TCU since the fall of 1948, and has been "number please" girl on both the new dial system, and the former plug-in switchboard. Miss jones has student assistants, and instructs School of Business students in the art of "Hello"-ing. FACULTY CLUBS Officers of the various faculty organizations are pictured at right. Mrs. Gayle Scott is in charge of the faculty social life, and Overseer of the faculty lounge at the south end of Jarvis Hall. Mrs. Angell is President of the Faculty Women's Club and Mrs. Paul Ridings is Presi- dent of the Newcomers .n sToonEN'r O ff!! 5!MJ7PUP,f il N W O i CONGRESS i Merrsnci - Ano MIY HASN T SOMETHING seen none on 'rms' 2 fl fvau T "T N I I -Ak! FOR pl? EAN 'f . . , .iif-5' PLAN .wo T' weLL,wun-ma ,I fjff' ILL E, 1 svoseb TO bo? fs ' . of,-T15 EM TOGEWER 5 "QA ' f A , eemuse os 50 yemggitfgfl ' -of N Aw! ' A 3191 f nmcnvwvif -34 , ou .K f -e I OV --'- - ' 1 I I? A T 'Z Q' 4 .I , X Mme You 29 even Been X W ueareo IN A -ix -I . W 1 ,f ITHE smme? L+ f ' ELL, ' .5 T X 177, Q I ' ,"" . -T 2:1:?"',,1Q'f55' wgl-l-I Og! XA , E V I, ' wif 4 'F 11,-' Q2 f, 1' l"f!'5f""'A -Qfwfrjfz 4' fem NEW , 11, I 'Ni MX eh? Q X M ff T ' ' " if l . A '1-V. ' ' Z f Li H ' NL! 1 ' Z gr 5 .. . u U X N " U fg f 7' K , N l if X JY Y in sf I M ff' ' rl Rh I ft ' 'X I' . 1-A i Q r 1 ' 7 r' X Q f ' 5 f f' f N f N r S " ' f my New ,S-'Luiz , f- -3 if x " llrl Z 5. ,A M 1 fd fa' I ff f ' 'fi T 5 J , ff ,M 1 X I x ,QF 'III 'X f 1 'NN X 'x K X Il -X K X ,Mi Al 4 x X 1 qwfgiki 2 Q 'N 'fl J ' . 'N f..,.-T-Pie V 4 1 N Q 1 Q - gil "1'1-- N 1 - 5 K9 liz CK Qifff ,-X .Ja -- ' x N R I XX X K 1 A I X 1' f 1' 'N G X 'U T ,f X T ff N N LZ? 'Z i 4 ill 4 af f Z aunxerr T if if 9 vi N' we M STUOENT ASSOCIATION CONGRESS CONGRESSMEN Row One: Thorp Andrews, Hal Autry, Tommy Bouchard, Shirley Brunson, Greta Chadwick, Joe Enochs, Lois Long, Margaret Mundhenke. Row Two: Dick Ramsey, Bob Ross, Gene Schmidt, Melvin Shupp, Delores Smith, Barbara Sterling, Jack Truitt, Ann Underwood, and James Whittaker. Two H u'rLcZ'rc0Z Thirty-four wi ' if T .,,, JUSTICES OF THE COURT MEM 2 i, Q 'g f 4, r W M- Y -GMA., 1 Wil si f. Q Worth Dalton Eugene Peters Jan Riddle Ralph Stone C-hief Justice George Wilde AND UUURT CONGRESS OFFICERS President ...,...... Billy Hamilton Vice-President. .Connie Muck Hood Secretary .....,...... Nancy King Treasurer ...,. .... M ike Saenz .,, 1 :. sfx., x 1 if '7 ' "t , ,:-:-'g.:ar 5 gig ' 555 1 Two Hundred Thirty-f'Lfve CLASS OFFICERS SENIORS-President Gene Schmidt, Vice-President Bob Lanier, Secretary Martha Ann Tull, and Treasurer "Fluff" Thomas. ,iv i JUNIORS-President Tommy Bouchard, Vice-President Bob Pointer, and Secretary Lou Ann Leslie. 1 53 v I ini' QR we fx r SOPHOMORES-President Jack Truift, Vice-President Allen Brookshire, Secretary Amelia Douglas, and Treasurer Neil Huling. M635 1 x , ix .,., . 44 ' ,rw 'fp -, 1 .,.... 1 N " ix . ii' ...... , U I ' su. V, . if r ESS FRESHMEN-President Joe Enochs, Vice-President Jimmy Murphey, Secretary Ursula McDurmott, and Treasurer Ray Collicoate. Two Hundred Th,'irty-sia: CHEER LEADERS 1 . Egilsf A . " I LEFT T0 RIGHT: Dopey Smith, Ann Guest, Bernie Robertson, Pat Miller Mullins and Bill Bass with Addy the All-American Horned Frog. LOUNGE ir, - it Bill Bishop Since the Student Lounge became the property of the students through the Stu- dent Congress, in the summer of 1949, Bill Bishop has been its "boss," Bill is in charge of all student employees of the lounge. DI ORS Larry Denton Jimmy Paschal Students elect their editors-in-chief of both the Horned Frog and the SKIFF. Larry Denton heads the student news- paper and jimmy Paschal the annual. Both positions are under the jurisdiction of the Faculty Journalism committee. Two Hznzdred Tlbirty-seven llllllNS BEVERLY HERRIN was chosen from a field of Freshmen beauties as FRESHMAN PROM QUEEN for 1949. This lass from the class of 1953 was presented at the Prom. JUNE BURRAGE was elected HOMECOM- ING QUEEN by the varsity football squad. June was presented at the halftime activi- ties of the TCU-Rice game. Two Hundred Thirty-eight 14' ANNA MARGARET LOGAN was elected by the Varsity squad as BASKETBALL QUEEN. Anna, too, is a Sophomore, having been chosen by the Sophomorish round- ballers. llllllNS ANNE PRICE was chosen from a field of contestants as INTRAMURAL OPEN HOUSE QUEEN during the annual affair. Anne was presented a trophy at the COI1feSf. f -'lei-: -iififs si clgejil ,..:Q Two H undred Thirty-nine 1 ? V P im. ,l H, ,, wrillfi ETREQE- "AA, A mf if T , :ig rg ' : 3 ,A 21:5 ,YQ 2 : , i.7JFm1f. A HT 1950 SWEETHEART, SUZANNA LANDERS, WAS PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL SPRING FORMAL, SPONSORED BY THE CONGRESS, CASINO, MARCH IST. Two Hundred Forty-one X p TEN M051 P ",,2'-.3--I Sf' swf 2 A N74 ' K C X 94 f X ummwif Q CHUCK BROCK is Wx y Qi-2 I NSE- 494 X JIMMY PASCHAL K , NJ V Z? ACTIVE STUDENTS .1 Ed Awww, W f T 2 T ,,,,.. wx 5 M NANC-Y KING Q MD X ""'5 'R X -15 Us v 'a' T gg XT. . . T X 0 Kmlhxxlnna nfflf 1 lfffffl SX A T Sk Q Q S coNNle MACK Hoon I T ,-N 13' BETTY INGLE may Two Hzmdrecl For I E I S Q 2 is 5 2 1 4 z ? v Q E I. C 4 -eil? fikafgfxiki 9 4,922 f""f91 ,- A a 7 V M, lk. Lili' .al I JOE SHOSID Editor Dllill fo qaQ6z'Z7 SWG Teams Ijfndy B2 P ses TC ictor X Wesf 31 .Rom-, 9,3198 3 F t 11 y ix . 31' In EIJ7 ol . ' I P JNest Save-9 Hi B Uwldn an Cef Or W1 y "" MN R Z1 ,Z Offeisgff THE ROCK OF TCU With the May 31, 1950 graduation of Lindy Berry, another Athletic era ends at TCU. Although he was never showered with All-American honors, although he never received more than local and a couple of national awards, although he never starred against Notre Dame, the name of Lindy Berry can definitely be added to Frog greats before him: Sam Baugh, Dave O'Brien, I. B. Hale, Ki Aldrich, etc. As long as their names are spoken, Lindy Berry will be included. f "If Berry isn't an All-American, I've never coached onef' was the statement of Dutch Meyer about his three-year star. As far as the 1950 Horned Frog is concerned, if there ever were All-World and All-Universal footballers, Lindy Berry would be a must on those rosters. Berry's record Cbelowj stands for itself, as it has appeared in many of the nation's leading newsprints. But the real story, the personal side of "Mr. TCU" was told last fall in the SKIFF: Appropriately enough, Lindy, the aerial artist, was given his first name from the flyer Charles C"Lindy"J Lindberg. Berry was born Dec. 27, 1927, just a few months after Lindberg made aerial history by flying the Atlantic solo. On his first visit to TCU, back in February, 1946, he decided that Frogland was the place for him despite the fact he was offered other scholarships. "I like TCU because of its friendli- ness," Berry recalls. That TCU has also liked Berry is evidenced by the fact that he has been elected one of his classes' three favorites for each of his collegiate years, that last year he was named "Mr, TCU," the most popular man on the campus, and that his teammates elected him captain of the 1949 Frogs, an honor accredited to only four other TCU backs in history. In selecting his most exciting play over four years, Lindy does not narrow his selection to only one. A key block which he threw against SMU in the 7-to-7 tie of 1948 to help shake Fullback Pete Stout loose for a long gain, his own 68-yard run against Okla- homa last fall on a trap play, and his touchdown pass to End George Boal in this year's Oklahoma A8cM game are among his most memorable ones. On Thanksgiving Day, 1949, Associated Press Sports Writer Harold V. Ratliff reported to the Southwest in a feature article about Lindy: "Next Saturday afternoon-'long about 5 o'clock-as a hush of football season's end falls over the TCU stadium, The Rock of Texas Christian will hang up his purple jersey forever. "Lindy Berry, one of the most durable men in college gridiron history and probably the busiest of them all, will be saying good- bye to four great seasons. LINDY BERRY'S COLLEGIATE RECORD FOR TEXAS CHRISTIAN PASSING Year- G. Att. Cam. Inc. Inf Gain TD Pri. 1946 ..... ..., 1 0 58 15 21 4 127 0 .542 1947 ..... .... 1 1 72 54 55 5 461 5 .472 1948 ..... .... 1 0 154 61 61 12 706 0 .455 1949. ......... 10 220 106 91 25 1445 11 .482 TOTAL ...... 41 464 214 206 44 2759 14 .461 RUNNING Year-- G. Rum Gain Loft N et Ave. 1946 .... ... 10 112 484 105 579 5.4 1947 .... ... 11 149 520 177 545 2.5 1948 ...... ... 10 190 956 175 785 4.1 1949 ...... ... 10 150 466 208 258 2.0 TOTAL .... .... 4 1 581 2426 665 1765 5.0 RETURNING Year- Punt Return: Gain Ave. Kirk-Ofl Remrm Gain Ave. 1946 ...... ....... 2 4 522 15.4 4 106 26.5 1947 .... ..... 4 -5 512 12.0 5 120 24.0 1948 ...... ... 21 250 11.0 9 254 26.0 1949 ...,.. ... 19 557 17.7 14 250 17.9 TOTAL ........... 107 1404 15.1 52 710 22.2 INTERCEPTED PASSES SCORING YA- N u. Gain A 110. Yr. TD. Ptr. 1946 ...... 1 27 27.0 1946 ..... ...... 5 18 1947 .,.... 2 88 44.0 1947 .... . . 4 24 1948 ...... 0 O . . . 1948 ...... . . 6 56 1949 ...... 5 98 52.7 1949 ....... .... 6 56 TOTAL.. 6 215 55.5 TOTAL. ........ 19 114 1949 HORNED FROG FOOTBALL CAPTAINS: Lindy Berry and Don Nar- rell pictured with the SMU-TCU Student Body Skillet Trophy award. The 1949 Frogs captured the trophy "legally" for the first time in its four- year history, having "won" it last year due to the tie ball game, and being visitors of the SMU Student Body. "In the two score contests in which he has been TCU's per- petual man in motion, Lindy has never known a championship. But he has known the glory of an individual greatness that could not be classified as personal-it made him one of the greatest 'team men' in Texas Christian's football history. "Not once did he ever miss a game due to an injury, nor has he ever left the field except under his own power. His record is fantastic! The only thing Lindy Berry never did was to kick a football. That was Coach Meyer's way of letting the little guy off for good behavior. "You probably won't find Lindy Berry mentioned as an All- American, for some reason he was never thought of in that light. Lindy wasn't a show-off. He was a workhorse-the guy who was always in there fighting for the team. "But he'll be all-American in the heart of Texas Christian." 1950 HORNED FROG FOOTBALL CAPTAINS: Charlie jackson and Clarence "Red" Marable. Marable was the fourth tackle in TCU's history to be named by teammates for the captain slots. Charlie Jack- son is a quarterback, being the fifth TCU back to be named captain in TCU's history of Southwest Conference play. Two Hundred Forty-seven Two Hzmdo--ed Forty-eight AWARD WINNERS MOST VALUABLE PLAYER award for 1949 football season is awarded Don Narrell, co- captain. He is presented this award by its originator, Mr. Dan D. Rogers, chairman of TCU Athletic Cornmirtee, and Cotton Bowl Association, places the award on Narrell's finger. MOST CONSCIENTIOUS PLAYER award for 1949 season went to four-year letterman Morris "Snake" Bailey. This award is so named in honor of its originator, Grassy Hinton. Head Coach Dutch Meyer pre- sented the award to Bailey. UNSUNG HERCDES JACK ARCHER rated as unsung hero for his out- standing work in the Frog backfield for the 1949 season. Jack played in the annual Blue-Gray game, representing TCU last December. ROGER MCAULEY also listed as unsung hero for his outstanding line work in the 1949 season. Roger, like Jack, played in the annual Blue-Gray game in Montgomery, Alabama. x xl' on Two Humlred Forty-nine M7 I fa I .iff I I gl, Ii .. mf.-. I1 I5 X f? X MORRIS BAILEY ,f f ah It I: 'A '1:ainn.'v. 6 5' In . x5 I I I ,N ,,xI'V:I 5, It A I " -A M . ,I 3 ' : . 1' 1' , 'PI-TH' ' BILL MOORMAN Two Hundred Fifty HONOR WINNERS I L fir- ' v, I I V H51 ,I I - . ,G . I.- 4 pf , ' Il iff? I , , X f I M 53 : .2 yn' X III I I I' ' A I I By Ls, Q! I E Y. M. BULL HICKS If, , . I III I 'X ROGER MCAULEY -LN 'N f y I ,I TXII. ' 'ig . Ly "1f XA , fl I :I iffy: if 29" f' B X , . . 1 " , In I 1' I I-ew' ' Mm' , yr i I. , , . 11 ' 11 w Jew, J Ll a. ' N F E , In-.1- JOHN MORTON X A , XI nfl, ., 'II If ,IIHII IIYI X. ' It Im' i.f V if I QI V1 I I ,QQ Y',' fl V IX ,4 , V I DAN WILDE N21 I V If 71 I I - I 'V -"I ,QI EQQIK If ' Lf qv' 'IIQ ,T If I HAROLD KILMAN ml LP-.xgxlhfzssx , sm K QL V41 ' 5 if rev Q I I J I I If 4- I -I -01, V, f. yi L? I I ' 13' D b I I I na I 'is In 1 N 1 H ,IIL 1 RED MARABLE ' ,..' C I blul Q M15 ' 'II' , 1 Q X fy, X 'X ' DWI I ,I we I E 5 W :A 1 I 'ra' u K I I f. ' '--.fps - Q. I" ' VL JISII 2 'I I LI ' 1 I ig fp! at M I I 'I I ""k.I Wh 1 DON NARRELL B ' ff ffm!! A , cw A 1 N1 P It 1--Ia , .' .'- - '11 . J- J J 'I 7' , Hi H Q 51" .I '4'A K' 'iv H. R AX-3, 3 Hi 4. I JACK ARCHER . , .. I. I ...Q ,- J H' Ev? f' ,c ,. NI , f UH ' I., I F :HM ,Q-.W J v II I TF ff 1-JT 'Z QL 1 ' L -. 1 1 " xf-,7 if I f I ' v M., R K ,. ' 1 My ,A, . . kg' 1 ' ,f Y .f "HA ' 'I -sw Q. I, U1 ' XIII af 'v VI: fn? ' , ww GEORGE BOAL ,, , ' - ' ff' ,. , 3 1 1- 'QR jwn l, K. Cl 5 .5- ,i?i7'.ff- . I' A ww I Rah. l L ,- k f I - If I " WS ' 'fr' . 3,1 If 1' 1,4 I eq ' : .. " MILTON FARMER X IIWW4 'N I f ri R XY D .I , ,-X g -la If A 1 'JL -I ' IWC ' ii 5. ' - M Wang! WAYNE Rossks I Z- uh : - xl . 51, I, ight V, . V 'Q .',-, L ,'jv.,'- X .xg 1" Q J. , 1' I. Fw... fe 'sf "1 , 75 f , NXXXI 1 I! 15 . I 1, 7? tix ,, 1 L 5: I sw I ,I 'P ge ,fi REX ALFORD if ER" . ' . 7fABH M 'IHwi R if .1I' . H Q A 11 'll' DICK LOWE imgxrn. ,X .N ,l A Iry vfv f ,-T V... at -N jg ' I w f ,p SL. 1 v, IES-ff 1 fb : I. -Qbii Q 'HL 'w x N' Ri , X I ' W 5 4 I' . ' f S A 5 fi SHANK BLOXOM . X YA , 'Lui RWM V66 NWI f 5 fri: ,A 'R . H ,J E ' ' Nm- F MAX EU BAN KS ,4 ' -u. C I 1: I A If 1 f L W? I 'ffgw as 2' I X .I Mx lx f"' f ,.,O I Ig' H fl .x N W , ,gl , BILLY WILLINGHAM iff X x ' A-.f y 'W fx L 5 1 Ifp i Q , I ,...f Y ' BOB MOORMAN Two Huozclred Fifty-one LINEMEN 4 M t T .-f R ,I , . .' ,A'ft?' I "A' ' ':7i"T- , Q' FFT I I A . , , KX:-.i:'r! f t : :., N x X , , , G G TERO J .. . .,-. . ' ,, 'AIDD ' 5' f . 1 W .. f' . T,-4 N, l m.. 1' 2 X I -I i 14 " f ,, f 'P ' W "A" :Q ' I: ,111 2 1 1 . rw ' - Y wi 'Q kv .wg , I .M f T 'Q .. . 'V '. f VM n. '- NI, A - 1 ,. ' I ' ,- 'Yi2 Q. - 4, ' ' -, 'L '23 -'El 131- .. . f 1 : 1. fn: ..... ,MEI :,,-' " Nia, 31.1-M' 5 H fi .. . wwf?- WILSON GEORGE NORMAN HUGHES HERBERT EOFF . Q' R7 Egfkx -' Tv' . X lv. if rffff ,.. f, if P l J" My WILLIE MATHIS .-vii - ' X. EW W .ik ' '1"' ?r bf - --'- - P 1' .-.-ei"'-"'1ffsfeiafi- .f. , . .,.. -R if ,X - " "4' ' :i-,SL :5:if.5Ef1?f?'-'filkfrf '-, 1' ., .. ff? f . 7'. ' af. -5 ' 5: , R wf' 1" " "-1:2 4-1-.If . . A ,, -5:1--rf-531 1 ALTON TAYLOR HERBERT ZIMMERMAN BMMK, CQ w:-f:.-'.'- ': .. '- 1' 1 , 'fkzff 2 0? 5' PITCCCK "H ' . JZ AHF . '- "i ff fi I tx I AW 1- fi' ff- X 4 ,114 q. QQ9WFS5?i " 2 . -.-' .. ..i- .:: ' ROY BASSINGER ,rwakw ,, . - ,Hymn xl. Q.. J ' 1 .,. f is--M 7' 32.5 f, D if 4 L pw , H If A ' ' gi 'L 5 ,f V JOHNNY DUNN A 5 Vudx N X N- XQ NY ag X xXx i7'f X Nu ? , fe 3 f C Z f 1 , r f " 'V .wz 2 v J' 1 nf 0 ri- I ppb 1 L, K 5 Kg A n. Z f I M 7 ! Z 4, V .WH JIM HUNT Nj -" -V N V, F '- all '. ' . . --l E541 Q ' MNH' W I ' X 'Q ,f ANQS T - V 3 Q 4 In I :Elly 4- ia it N . li 1, J M I rxyrr' , I V at ,, OTIS MCKELVEY BACKS X 1 X f Qfggm wifx f gm M 'f , , 'f XX 'if , 5 A " f'-44,-N akway f ORIEN BROWNING - 1 7 "7f .1 -- . V 1 , ff . mx - 'V ' 1 A. , .Q 'W S ' A15 ,, Qzsiwmg u f X L - givin., 5 K b. g, .. KEITH FLOWERS ' ,325 "fW?c33w1 I . ,- I X Q 1 ' Q .- x If -, an ' Q fi f - " '.1 --Q -- ', r +I" "fi , -,f V. -5: :, -:gf I , . W" 4 ., fu: "nhl ' xl. J ff, .,, 1' HOMER LUDIKER 1. awg ri fw.. .. , . ,Y M EW 1.918 A' J H J. 3 Z- -.v:5fz?Z1 , ' .. ,X .-,. L 4 ' mx' JR., 1 1, " v HOMER THOMPKINS FRANK STRUSKA Two Hundred Fifty-three 'i gf I 5.- I x s I jf y 1 LINDY BERRY, AT FAR LEFT, PREPARES TO BEGIN ONE OF HIS FAMED LONG RUNS AFTER THE FROGGIES LINE CLEARS THE WAY. GIANT KILLING: TCU 14, TEXAS 13 BILLY MOORMAN HOLDS LEWIS LEVINE FOR NO GAIN. Two H7ATLCl7'f2Cl Fifty-foufr AUSTIN, Nov. 12.-They gambled on a top-heavy defense, they regulated their famed air attack to a secondary role. And Texas Christian's unpredictable gridmen here Saturday achieved an incredible 14-15 victory over mighty University of Texas-a result that will take its place high in the long all-time list of stunning upsets recorded by the Purple for Coach Dutch Meyer. Few ever found the Horned Frogs so hopelessly matched, so certain of humiliating flogging, so desperate for the salvaging of something from a season that had seen them suffer all the more criticism because of failures. No one dared to suggest that this could be the spot for an- other characteristic TCU upset. The Frogs came prepared. They put no less than a nine-man wall, which contained four ends, leaving only two men in the secondary for protection against the giant Texans. With the score 14-15 in the fourth quarter, the Frogs suf- fered a horrible vision of seeing their gallant triumph stolen away in the game's last three minutes. Rudy Bauman recovered a Texas kickoff for the Longhorns on their 47. Proctor passed for 13. TCU drew a 15-yard penalty, taking the ball to the 14. After being bogged down on the 16, with only one minute to play, Cambell held and Clay prepared to kick. With split-second precision, Bobby Moorman burst through and blocked the kick, almost as it left Clay's toe. In the scuffle a purple shirt came off with ball and returned it to the 14-yard line, From there Berry ran three plays and the gun sounded. LINDY BERRY IN HIS PLASTIC' MASK BEGINS FIVE-YARD RUN IN SMU THRILLER. LINDY PLAYED HIS COLLEGIATE FINALE WITH THIS GAME.. SKILLET TROPH Y- TCU 21 SMU 13 ' I FORT WORTH, Nov. 26.-Guardian angels who have pro- vided such a magnificently effective celestial convoy for the malevolent Mustangs of SMU through Southwest Conference football for most of the last three seasons, canceled one TCU touchdown here today, but that wasn't enough. The Christians weren't to be denied their first victory in seven years over the Methodists from Dallas. They kept the pressure on and won, 21-13. There was nothing flukey about the victory. TCU moved 87, 51, and 80 yards for her touchdowns, made the most first downs and gained the greatest number of yards. It was a game of champions. Kyle Rote of the Mustangs played in great form, as did Doak Walker, until he was forced out due to a leg injury. A fancy afternoon of fancy plays for the capacity crowd of 33,000 persons ended the 1949 season for the Frogs. For the first time in their history the Frogs won the Student Body Skillet trophy. The trophy was presented the last two years to the visiting team, with ties being the outcome. The ghostly memory of 1947 and 1948 was with the fans. They remembered how the Mustangs, apparently beaten 19-13 and 7-0 in those games, had come from nowhere in the last min- utes to gain 19-19 and 7-7 ties. This time, due to Homer Ludi- ker's accurate toemanship, it was different. Lindy Berry had played with teams winning one, losing one and tying two. Doak Walker, All-American, had done the same. But Lindy had saved his best game for his last, and his win for the last. ALL-AMERICAN DOAK WALKER FILES INTO PHOTOGRAPHERS Two Htmdfred Fifty-five JACK ARCHER, PRONE, REACHES UP T0 GRAB A SHOELACE AND BRING DOWN LEAPING KENNETH ROOF OF OKLAHOMA A8fM IN 33-33 TIE GAME. Two Hundred Fifty-sin: RICE 20-TCU l4 Fort Worth, November l9 RICE TCU 14 .... ,.... F irst Downs ,.... .,.. I 6 104 , . .' .... Yards Rushing .... . , . 261. 160 ......... Yards Passing ,.....,,. 62 7 of 17 ..... Passes Completed ..... 6 of 21 3 ........ Passes Intercepted by .,...... 0 8 for 36.5 ...,.... Punts ,....... 9 for 38.8 5 for 55 ,...,.,. Penalties ...,.,,. 8 for 58 Lindy Berry, wearing a face-covering mask to protect his cracked iowbone, races for o 23-yard gain as the Owls' Frank Allen seeks a tackle. Play ended on Rice 30. ARKANSAS 27-TCU 7 Fayetteville, Oct. l TCU ARKANSAS 14 .,.FirstDowns ..... 8 65 . . . .... Yards Rushing ,.,. . . . 148 89 .......,.. Yards Passing .,........ 46 7 of 24 ..... Passes Completed ..... 4 of 9 1 ........, Passes lntercepted by ......... 4 4 for 166 ,.,...., Punts .,...... 7 for 259 6 for 50 ........ Penalties .,,.,., 11 for 120 John Morton hits Razorback line for six yards and a first down, in the Frogs' heartbreaking Conference opener against the University of Arkansas. BAYLOR 40 - TCU 14 Waco, Oct. 29 TCU BAYLOR 8 .... ....... I iirst Downs ...,...... 15 86 .,..,.. Total Offense Gained .,.... 337 25 ..,... Yards Gained Rushing .,.. 121 61 ....... Yards Gained Passing ,..,. 216 7 of 27 ,.... Passes Completed .... 13 of 25 1 .,.,..... Passes Intercepted ......... 9 S for fifth, .Punts, Avg., Ydge.. .12 for 29W 5 for 46. , Penalties, No., Ydge.. . .5 for 46 John Morton speedily picks up seven yards for a first down. Driving fast and hard the Frog line prepared an end sweep vmch proved to be profitable. Two Hundred Fifty-seven 'rcu 20 .... 218 ... 184 ... THE SEASON'S STANDINGS T. C. U. 28-KANSAS 0 Lawrence, Kansas, Sept. I7 KANSAS .....FirstDowns..... 8 ....Yards Rushing.... 113 ......Yards Passing.......... 90 14 of 29 ..... Passes Completed ....,. 4 of 19 6 ........ Passes Intercepted by ....,... 1 43 ......... Punting Average .... .,.. 3 8 70 ....... Yards Lost, Penalties.. ..... 40 TCU 33-OKLAHOMA AGM 33 TCU Fort Worth, September 25 OKLA. AGM 19 ........... First Downs ........... 16 409 ....... Total Yards Gained ,...... 303 76 ....., Yards Gained Rushing ..... 157 333 ...... Yards Gained Passing ...... 146 24 of 37 .... Passes Completed ...., 9 of 16 0 ......... Passes Intercepted ,..,..... 5 221 , . .Kicks Returned, Total Yards. . , 102 2 for 23 ..... Punts, No., Yds. .... 8 for 163 8 for 35. . .Penalties, No., Ydge.. . .7 for 60 SEASON Team- W. L. T. Pts. Opp. Pct. Rice .... .... 9 1 0 249 84 1.000 Baylor ....... 8 2 0 232 120 .800 T. C. U. ...... 6 3 1 205 185 .650 Texas ........ 6 4 0 290 93 .600 "S. M. U. ..... 5 3 1 195 177 .550 Arkansas ..... 5 5 0 167 175 .500 Texas A8cM. . . 1 8 1 92 267 .150 'Does not include Notre Dame-SMU score. CONFERENCE Team- W. L. T. Pct. Rice ..... . . . 6 0 O 1.000 Baylor ..... . . . 4 2 0 .667 T. C. U. .... . . . 3 3 0 .500 Texas ..... . . . 3 3 0 .500 S. M. U. .... . . . 2 3 1 .417 Arkansas ..... . . . 2 4 0 .333 Texas A8cM .... . . . 0 5 1 .083 TCU I3-INDIANA 6 Bloomington, Ind., Oct. 6 Tcu . INDIANA 11 .......,... First Downs ............ 4 232 ...... Total Offense Gained ...... 134 67 ...... Yards Gained Rushing ....... 7 165 ..1... Yards Gained Passing ...... 127 12 of 23 .... Passes Completed .... 11 of 19 2 ......... Passes Interceptecl ......... 0 94 ...., Kick Returns, Total Yds. .... 107 8 of 37.8 .... Punts, No., Ydge.. . .10 for 34.4 4 for 30. . Penalties, No., Ydge.. . .6 for 30 TCU 28-TEXAS A8fM 6 Fort Worth, Oct. 15 TCU TEXAS ASM 11 .....,..... First Downs ,..,........ 9 299 , . . . .Total Offense Gained ,... . . , 91 120 .,... Yards Gained Rushing ...... 58 179 ...... Yards Gained Passing .,.... 33 13 of 24 ..... Passes Completed ...... 5 of 15 3 ......... Passes Intercepted ....,.... 2 124 ..... Kick Returns, Total Yds. ..... 153 10 for 324. , .Punts, No., Ydge.. . .12 for 456 10 for 90. Penalties, No., Ydge.. . .7 for 65 TCU 33-MISSISSIPPI 27 Fort Worth, Oct. 22 TCU MISSISSIPPI 15 .... ...... F irst Downs ........... 16 429 ....... Total Yards Gained ....,.. 506 151 ...... Total Yards Rushing ..... 398 278 ....... Total Yards Passing .,.... 108 15 of 30, . .Passes Completed ....... 6 of 9 1 ......... Passes Interceptecl ......... 3 83 ..... Kick Returns, Total Yds ...... 92 5 for 250 .... Punts, No., Yds. .... 6 for 260 5 for 55 .... Penalties, No., Yds.. .19 for 122 EW BOTTOM ROW: Left to right, Milton Farmer, James Glenn, Homer Tompkins, Charlie Jackson, Floyd Sanders, Lindy Berry, Bob Fulton, Morelle Hicks, Billy Willingham, Dick Lowe, Gilbert Downey, Wilson George, Al Vaiani, student manager. SECOND ROW: Albert Smith, trainer, Tim Boyd, Harold Kilman, Bennie Poarch, Roy Gassinger, john Morton, Doyle Malone, Gilbert Bartosh, Shankle Bloxom, Dan Wilde, Bill Murphy, Bobby McFarland, Horner Ludiker, Bob McEachern, Jimmy Hunt, Bob Moorman, Carl Knox, coach, Ed Mathes. THIRD ROW: Abe Martin, coach, Byron Brannon, coach, Dutch Meyer, head coach, Morris Bailey, Jack Archer, Douglas Conaway, Charles Lowry, Jimmy Hickey, Herbert Zimmerman, Bill Moorrnan, Orein Browning, Roy Pitcocl-:, jack Sportsman, Bill Hooser, Rex Alford, Wayne Rogers, George Boal, Clyde Flowers, coach, Hub McQuillan and Walter Roach, coaches. FOURTH ROW: Don Narrell, Otis McKelvey, John Medanich, Alton Taylor, Willie Mathis, Bill Elliott, Frank Struska, Max Eubank, Kenneth Scott, joe Urbis, Duane Grissett, Bill Mattern, Jim Yeager. TOP ROW: Clarence Marable, Hubert Ecoff, Roger McAu1ey, Tommy Moorman, John Arend, Tom Cate, Keith Flowers, Norman Hughes, johnny Dunn, Cecil Ingram, Gene Culbertson, Don Hunt. Two Hundred Fifty-eight Mlm 1949 Coaches, kneeling, Walter Roach, Buster Brannon, Hub McQuillan, Carl Knox, and standing, Abe Martin, Dutch Meyer and Clyde Flowers. DUTCH MEYER The head man of football at TCU was also head man of foot- ball for the entire nation in 1949, as president of the National Football Coaches Association. Perhaps as significant as that honor, however, to sports enthu- siasts in the Southwest is the fact that he holds the one-school longevity record in the Southwest Conference. The 1949 season was his 16th as head coach and 26th on the Frog coaching staff. Both are all-time records in the Southwest Conference-no other SWC coach has ever been at a single school as long, either as head coach or as a member of the coaching staff-and probably in the nation. Coach Meyer joined the staff of TCU in 1923 as freshmen mentor, a position he held until 1934 when he became head coach. As a student and coach, Dutch has served actively in Frog sports life for 30 years. Dutch's teams have won two Southwest conference champion- ships, in 1938 fthe year the Frogs won the mythical National Championshipj and 1944. Meyermen have played in post-season bowls: twice in the Cotton, twice in the Sugar, once each in the Orange and Delta bowls. Meyer has coached seven All-Americans: Darrell Lester, Sam Baugh, Dave O'Brien, Ki Aldrich, I. B. Hale, Darrell Palmer, and Clyde Flowers. This year, Dutch signed a new contract for three years, and upon its completion he will have served 30 years as a Frog coach. ABE MARTIN Assistant Coach Martin has been at his Alma Mater in his present position since 1945. He spent the years from his gradua- tion in 1932 to that year in most successful high school coaching positions at Lufkin, El Paso and Paschal at Fort Worm. Abe was on the Frogs first conference championship team in 1929, and was a three-year letterman at TCU. CLYDE FLOWERS Assistant Coach Clyde Flowers is the only Frog to ever have served as captain of the varsity squad two years. He is TCU's most recent All-American, having also been on the Frogs' last conference championship team in 1944. Clyde returned to TCU in 1946 to coach, and resigned this spring to enter private business. A HUB MCQUILLAN Assistant Coach McQuillan came to TCU in 1941 from Texas A8cM. He is chief scout for the Frogs and has been head basket- ball coach at a time While with TCU. He also assists in the coaching of the Freshman footballers. WALTER ROACH Coach Roach is assistant varsity coach, head freshman mentor, and head baseball coach. He was graduated from TCU, having captained the 1936 Cotton Bowl Champions and being a first- team end on the Sugar Bowl champions of 1935. He holds eight varsity letters from TCU and three all-conference awards. CARL KNOX Coach Knox is also a former Frog lettering on the 1946 and 1947 squads. He played quarterback and in his final year was most valuable with his deadly punts. Knox coached at Midland in 1948-49 and returned to TCU as assistant freshman football coach and head freshman baseball coach last fall. Two Hundred Fifty-nine Nov. 24 Two Hzmdred Sixty THE 1949 POLYWOGS PICTURED: Row 1: Stanley Reinshagen, Teddy Baught, Don Parker, jerry Glass, Marshall Robertson, Robert Snow, Don- alcl Bell, Joe Knapp, Tom Evans. Row 2: Bill Hill, Eddie Wilburn, Jim Amburg, Wayne Martin, Charles Roberts, Charles Davis, Kenneth Cochron, Bob Blair, Bob Harclings. Row 5: Carl Knox, Walter Echols, Hubert Parrot, Bill Buck, jack Ramsay, john Harwell, Marvin Fowler, Carlton Mc- Cormick, Ray Moore, Harland McWilliams, C. H. Hidge, Mickey Teams, Coach Roach, Coach McQuillan. Row 4: Don Perry, Charles Wren, Ray Cathey, Jack Tem- ple, Marshall Harris, Bob Zoats, Dave Pitzer, Don Martin, John Driscoll. Sept. 28 Oct. 20- S EASO N -Wogs 13, Baylor Cubs 7. Wogs 21, Aggie Frosh 19. Nov. 3-Wogs 26, Rice Owlets 12 Nov. 11-Wogs 12, Shorthorns 7. -Wogs 20, SMU Colts 27. Won 4, Lost 1, Tie O. Although losing last game of the year, the young Frog Freshmen won the mythical Southwest Confer- ence freshmen team championship. Pictured at left are action shots from the Wogs Thanksgiving Day game with the SMU Colts. The Colts won, 27-20. V LEFT TO RIGHT: MR. WENDELL SUMNER, CAPTAIN GENE SCHMIDT, COACH BRANNON AND DR. HENRY HARDT AT BASKETBALL BANQUET MAR 22 . ..?1.'zS1.. .ig ' . 'Y . A XM N' A we W ax, .a ' W A. COACH BUSTER BRAN NON Coach Brannon this year came into his own with a team of his own doing, having coached them last year as freshmen. These "Brannon Brats" brought the coach the SWC sports editor's "Coach of the Year" award, presented Cabovej at basketball banquet March 22. Coach Brannon is a former Frog himself, having played as a starter on the first Frog quint to win a championship, in 1951, and was all-conference in 1952 and 1955, and captain in 1935. He returned in the spring of 1948 from Rice, where he coached two conference championship teams. just prior to his return to his Alma Mater, however, he spent two years at the University of Florida as backfield coach in football. At TCU he is head basketball coach and assists in football coaching. Two Hundred Siocty-two is f . rs. if " 1 V ' .3 - T , .tu :V L . r- ..f....f -st-,...i.1.1 ,.. - , ...ati CAPTAIN GENE SCHMI DT Captain Schmidt is the only athlete in SWC history to win five varsity letters in one sport. The twenty- three-year-old senior from Evansville, Indiana, has captained the Frogs for the past three seasons. This season he won the first annual Wendell Sumner Award as the most valuable player Cabovej, and rightly so. Several times this past season Schmidt shone above his usual good-game self. The fans have applauded him for actually breaching the necessary gap for a TCU win. During the Frog finale against the University of Arkansas at Will Rogers Feb. 28, one of the great sports moments of all time fell on the great crowd of supporters. With only three or four minutes left to play Gene's last game was cut short by a fifth personal foul. As he left the court, teary-eyed, the crowd ap- plauded as they never had all season. Another Frog great had left the court for all time. f,-.5 ' '54, :mass -"' Q ..,.: ff ,im 1' E 1 M Ag ,- ,, JR Y il' X 3?',.,,,i ' M zz 4 ms.- ,fw X K l ru N 'R Fifi' L GEORGE McLEOD TED REYNOLDS 19719 ll Q 7 I X if A lu' 9:3 Bun CAMPBELL 4 f Q- I . li 'l V TOMMY TAYLOR 45-5 Player- McI.eod 4 . . Fromme . . . Taylor . . . Schmidt . . . Reynolds . . Campbell . Brookshire . Knox .... Erhridge . . . Craig .... Lee ..... Smith .... Elliott .... TOTALS . . . Opposition - 1 A A -1' 'Z . 4 .-':::. 1 7'-0.1 3 Q E I S 1 I, W 1 jf, K+.: QF :ut l I K, A 47, X yr I J xv S ,,. ,.l. E I l , , 1' ' 1 LJ X 5421 BRUCE CRAIG INDIVIDUAL STANDINGS SEASON G. ...20 ...24 ...24 ...24 ...22 ...24 ...15 ..,20 ..19 ...13 3 3 1 ...24 ...24 Fg. Ft. Pf. 95 70 80 256 98 48 73 244 79 44 46 202 70 40 73 180 59 50 54 168 52 14 19 18 17 15 18 13 31 5 9 4 2 2 6 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 476 508 402 1260 489 262 448 1240 CHARLES LEE -fagfj:..fE5,s::s2fz-.:j1.-- 3, ' -5 : ,J:s.g14 "m.M.ag::.,: 1 - . arid 542 . jfs 44 gf an w 4 B f 1? i ' ' if" fill, 1 m ' x .,-...Q-. .. . .'.: s ass: .:.-: 5:-: :-:::-- - .:':' 5 ....... 5 HARVEY FROMME ' 1119! 4 fl il I W. 1 gif -W' 1. gal 'S' Rear , V 11 f A f L sl '-I Q 1 1 4 f 1 Y wif 55 ' JOHN ETHRIDGE ""' U. Ei:IiE:.:.:.:. 2 J! 523335 . ,.. l Hill, JJ 1 ' A JAMES KNOX Two Hundred Sixty-three x2 X v W ' fi? if A , if i . 1 ,Z ,sf FULL SEASON STANDINGS Team- TCU ............ Baylor ..... .... T exas ...... .... Arkansas .,.....,. SMU .....,...... Texas A8cM ...,... Rice ............. Two Hundred Sixty-Six PB. 1260 1187 1179 1139 1214 1271 1238 Opp 1240 1319 1158 1171 1216 1223 1323 Pct. 542 542 542 500 435 417 348 A Ja J 1, . f sz... BASKETBALL 1950 One of the most unpredictable fives in the his- tory of Texas Christian University compiled a 13-11 record over a tough scheduled year. Coach "Buster" Brannon was greeted with mate- rial "still wet behind the ears." This first-year team, at one time during the season jumped from the cellar Cwhere former Frogs had dwelled so longb to a sec- ond place in the conference standings. The Southwest crown seemed to be tossed back and forth. After a full season of this juggling, the Frog cagers ended in sixth place. Handicapped by their lack of experience, the Horned Frogs underwent a tough warming-up schedule before Conference play. TCU got away to a heartening start by annexing wins over Abilene Christian College, 52-35, East Texas State, 63-353 Howard Payne, 61-315 and de- feating Abilene Christian again on their home court, 65-57. Taking the road Buster's Brats were ready to tussle with the leaders of basketball. Their .first open- ing with a Missouri five proved to basketball fans TCU could play winning ball. Missouri was out- fought 37-35. With injuries of big George McLeod, the Frogs were outclassed by bowing to the second game with Missouri 54-45. Bradley took TCU's third 85-49. Then St. Louis University won 80-53. Wichita slapped a loss on the Frogs as they returned to Cowtown. Although losing to the nation's top teams, these Sophs proved they had a fight-to-the- finish team. Overpowering their next three non-conference foes, Wichita, North Texas State, and East Texas State, eyes began to turn toward the Conference play. Rosy visions of a Conference rating began to show prosperous through the heads of hopeful fans. Conference opener at Houston with Rice cost the Frogs their first conference defeat, 80-61. While still on the road, the Aggies tore TCU apart, 49-45. At the first home game, the Purple and White played past SMU 62-50. The next week they out- numbered the Baylor Bears 64-54. At SMU, in Dallas, the Frogs did it again to the Mustangs 51-45. At Austin the Longhorns won 69-56. Rice at Fort Worth met an encouraged five from Frogland, and the Brats piled up a 64-36 score. The next week the Frogs outlasted Texas, 51-38. At Fayetteville the Razorbacks took the Frogs back a notch, 52-43. A8cM came to Fort Worth and took the Frogs 60-58 in the season's greatest heart- breaker. At Waco the Bears returned punches with a 57-42 win over TCU. Arkansas won a tie for the conference champion- ship by outracing the Frogs in the season finale in Fort Worth 45-39. The last thought and proverbial phrase of the season: "just wait 'til next year." SEASON SCORES Abilene Christian College .,,......,,. East Texas State i....... 35 ...,.35 TCU TCU Howard Payne ..,i.... ,.... 3 1 TCU Abilene Christian College. , . ..... 57 TCU Missouri Universit TCU y .... Missouri University ,... ...N35 54 TCU Bradley .............. ..... 8 5 TCU St. Louis University ..,.. ,,... 8 0 TCU East Texas State ................,.,. 44 TCU CO N F E R E N C E Rice TCU 61 Rice ,..... TCU A8cM TCU 45 Texas ...,. TCU SMU TCU 62 Arkansas TCU Baylor TCU 64 A8cM ..,.. TCU SMU ...... TCU 51 Baylor ..... TCU Texas TCU 56 Arkansas TCU Two Hundred Sixty-seven I BASEBALL M aw A Lfl51'w2llAf Ki I 3 :MM -al 5155 i gg M I gk .., Ll 54 1 AIGI5 qgww f' H H - I W AA sl' I 5 MV 1 :il E33 f B15 I 1-, ' MII" -HIQIIIH nw ' A T X, A mm.. I . V. II , T ,slr ,152 ,,', xii HEI: QUIK,- . I, . . -. I .M I. I , 1 ' ' ,lp ' X kr ' : ' gs V- . 1 Xia' -sm: , .me ,,fw'.:, : fa K :T A Q-:IIII 1 MII f ,umm ,In , A If , ' I 5 Li M"f!! ,: : :kk as-'Z i A-,: :If -viii' "1""Q Ffaw Q WS -1 if 'S A." la' 3.3"--6r,"J'7 ' ' I IN SPRING A YOUNG MAN'S FANCY TURNS TO BASEBALL AND THINGS. HERE BILL LOONEY, FROG GATCHER, AWAITS SOMEONE'S FOUL BALL. Two- Hunclrecl Sixty-nine VARSITY SQUAD: Row 1: Pete Donahue, Babe Hart, R. B. Hayes, Harvey King, Wade Srepp, john Swain, John Ethriclge, Bill Elliott, Ed Mathis and Coach Walter Roach. Row 2: Wallace Franks, Bill Looney, John Jones, Nobby Graves, Jim Boyd, Fred Smith, Bill Barnes, Jim Nolan, Melzer Rose and Manager Walter Echols. l l Two Hundred Seventy AT LEFT: Couch Walter Roach and TCU's ace hurler Nobby Graves. N I sl Nl .,,' . .f 1,Z4s'wI I ! Zi - 44. X, . 1 Egfr? f vii 1 E ,R- H: .ik WADE STEPP, Center Field BILL BARNES, Left Field JOHN ETHRIDGE, Second Base TX ' If-Q ,f ' JIM NOLAN, Third Bare JOHNNY JONES, First Baie JIM BOYD, Shortnop JOHNNY SWAIN, Pitcher MAX SALEM, Pitcher HARVEY KING, Shortstop ED MATHES, Pitcher FRED SMITH, Right Field BILL LOONEY, Catcher Two Hundred Seventy-one 'n I MI JQW 24 1 1 Cm 1:1 A .xg .X : 1 133 1 Q wh :reg if . 1 Lx U' 1 H -, fi, Vx . , . 95 -11 . ,cg Q, 1 A Q 5 U 2- if , 1- , Two Hundred Seventy-two SEASON STANDINGS Through April 24, 1950 Team- Won. Lost. Texas A , , . . . 12 4 TCU ....... . . , 10 5 TexasA8cM 11 7 Rice ...... . . . 8 6 Baylor . , , , . 8 6 SMU . . . . . . 7 6 Pct. 750 667 611 571 571 538 CONFERENCE STANDINGS Team- Won. Texas ....... .,.. 6 Texas A8cM .. 5 Baylor ....,. .. 5 TCU . A . . . . . 4 Rice . . . A . 1 SMU . . . . . O Lost. 1 1 3 5 7 4 Pct. 857 750 625 571 125 OOO TRACK 2? 9 AN EXAMPLE OF THE VERSATILITY OF MANY FROG PERFORMERS IS JOHN MORTON, FAMED FOR NOT ONLY HIS GRID ANTICS, BUT IN TRACK. Two Hwrndfred Seventy-tho '60 Two Hundred Seventy-four TRACK AT T. C. U. SEASO N 1950 Schedule March 3, Midwestern and Baylor at Fort Worth, March 11, Border Olympics at Laredo, March 17 and 18, Stock Show at Fort Worth, March 25, Odessa Relays at Odessa, April 1, Texas Relays at Austin, April 5, McMurry College at Abilene, April 13 or 15, S. M. U. at Fort Worthg April 22, Baylor and S. M. U. at Waco, April 29, Baylor and S. M. U. at Fort Worth, May 6, Baylor and S. M. U. at Dallas, and May 12 and 15, Southwest Conference Meet at Austin. TCU TRACKMEN MAX COGSWELL, GARLAND POLK AND JAMES KILLET MAKE A START ON THE FROG TRACK. Two H undred Seventy-five Wamq V11 . GOLF VARSITY SQUAD: Jimmy Hickey, Bill Tatum, Coach Tom Prouse, Captain Doyle Malone, james Hanahan, and "Punk" Two Hundred Seventy-six March 18 March 29 GULF SEASO N 1950 Schedule . r H ' ,firefo- H , .. C Sv M Patton. -Stock Show Tournament at Fort Worth -Texas Tech at Fort Worth. April 3-S. M. U. at Fort Worth. April 11-Arkansas at Fort Worth. April 20-Rice at Houston. May 2-Baylor at Waco. May 5-Texas at Fort Worth. April 21-Texas A8cM at College Station. i if RX TENNIS VARSITY SQUAD: Charles Ludwig, Dixon Osburne, Coach C. A. Burch, jack Levinson, and James Wilson. TENNIS SEASON 1950 Vanity Schedule Thurs., March 23--Central State College at Fort Worth Sat., March 25-University of Colorado at Fort Worth Wed., March 29.-Texas Tech at Fort Worth. Wed., April 5-University of Oklahoma at Fort Worth. Sat., April 8-Texas Western College at Fort Worth. Wed., April 19-Rice Institute at Fort Worth. Fri., April 21-University of Texas at Austin. Tues., April 25-Baylor University at Fort Worth. Sat., April 29-Southern Methodist U. at Dallas. Sat., May 6-Texas A8zM College at Fort Worth. Two Hundred Seventy-seven Km .M ,M .Y ,, . RN.. v M wig ' by L My ,L .-::: . V4 . fw x... ' Wiki?" '. ', .Q ,, QQ L- 7 , , .'gYz.,1 74A-L ML A f if l 9 .,... fx 4 .4 , Q: .mf M ??ag5?i v M U. J w , :fu :Q ,, 5 ig S, ' Q A . N-:Q Q .J" gg.-I, , .:-:2:aga-i,: - 4.1 1 1 , 12? fEEE'WQiaW - Q. 'iw TYEQV' "T5 H525 ,hWlJm5af1, gg iw! 25'YFi, X 'A M 'M,gpQe5 f . fry- , 1 :gigs 1 , wfwu: . ,.V'.fEiikEi4p ,gg ':,-glxg., :ff-.4Lt-1:1E'2:,4x2g:i X Ly any ,2ffff.??fw5Q gg, Y r' : ':' Q w 'vi K s ,.,,,g,1i' 4 fp 1- 2' ,Y L f"'1 A T"i"77 fli ' l5,, .1 W W . . ,,A w-zgWY 'S V .M .gwmwi 'ff- W Z 5 I fist fi'-fi if 91 A V 54 'fiiffi lf? 25522 :ga -z ,.-v I "-- ' A 5 W -- K 5-- , .. ,-U. 4.3 ,M f-fW -ml' Q BETTY CRINER Editor A Cappella Choir 46a The A Cappella Choir was founded by Professor Clarence J. Best in the spring of 1949 for the purpose of promoting A Cappella singing into the curriculum of the School of Fine Arts. Dr. Best served as its conduc- tor the beginning semester. Two Hundred Eighty Gam In the fall of 1949 Professor Gordon Young took duties as conductor and prepared the members for work for the season. Upon his resignation, Dr. Horace Whitehouse took over the direction of the group. They have appeared on programs of the School of Fine Arts and for assemblies of the United Religious Council. ACappella Choir Officers: Lou Marcella P idenrg Edwin H Il Vice-President. l . . V ., A H -lil .,.... .. 1 I ' , l Y ugh' K.: "" E p 1 - It . ---: :Z ,.,. EE,.,. - - i 1--- ,"i' Ilz: C Z , if 5 Ks E 'sail Row 1: Bill Bogolin, Phillips Bolin, Dora Calhoun, James G. Childers, Jack Cone, Leon Row 2: LaVerne L. Hartman, Charles B. Hurley. Harry T. Jarman, John Jordan, Charles Row 3: Chnrleen Plumly, Jane Reader, Charles Schnake, Derrell D. Slater 1 .ZL4 The Texas Christian University Accountants Soci- ety, founded in 1948, is an honorary organization to encourage and foster the ideal of service as the basis of the accounting profession. It promotes the study of accountancy and highest ethical standards. It also acts as a medium between professional men, instructors, stu- Accountants Society Officers: George L. Hudspeth, President, R. J. Schumacher, Vice-President, B. L. Barnes, Sponsor. :rt,:-- .--.,1,:a::2'2'4f 2: f ' ' K ' " ' -1 ZZ ' 2 .,. 5: , ::::-- ,- . ft ,gggg . 5' r' QE:-si , - Q, ,g.. ....... . . . t .,,., ,, .:...:.:,5. gl. . , , ft ' . if .. " , 'I' S .air . .:,., .... . 1 fs gr x ! I S? l i-,f if f ... . .., iff ttyl F L, Q i X l sing ard G. Doss, George File, Clyde Ray Harris F. Kennedy, Joseph Levine, Russell B. McDaniel, XVillartl F. Menton Sac' dents, and others who are interested in the development of the study or profession of accountancy. High morals, scholastic and professional attain- ments in its members, and the profession in general are developed. 1 rg- wld i N if Two Hundred Eighty-one at wi ll id as K.. 53 . " aff? R . 2 r ' Q 1 ' " rim. v Q Y' ' -ff l: H. .... . "H , K. I 44' V ggpsv, " Y ,V X N 1 - . G- 3 5 4 5-455 11- r E. r 4 , f -' ' A,'Q.f.l . .5 4 ' -I ML. s . f At-ff-'l' .. . -U wg, ' . 'Hifi . - '-iff? i,j'Jf,l"1 Wligm A ' y, ASI? ' FI 1 QQ - '- - gl .. Hi ' at vt - " , L -jj l-riviera N . ,.. , e . 4:15, ff, M J 5 -Q 'lla , . ., 4. tgp N - 21 q by .. .5 Row 1: Audrey Lou Abney, Harold Achziger, Floyd Acklin, Wyly Edwin Ball, Clyde Ballard, Joyce Joann Beasley, Howard Becknell, Charles Beseda Row 2: Phillys Bolin, Mary Ruth Boone, Minor Boyls, Frank Burkett, Avis Calvery, Mary Alice Carlock, Olga Carrejo, Jackee Carroll Row 3: Carolyn Christopher, Aaron W. Cook, Edward F, Cooley, Marilyn Criel, Dorothy Daniel, Nancy Davis, Sherry Ann Drennon, Mildred Dugan Row 4: Dan Etter, Nelda Fallin, Barbara Ferguson, Cherrie'Gardner, Don Gemsbacker, Robert D. Gilmore, Chester Lee Grubbs, Barbara Harvison at ezwaza ay ,aaa - Alpha Chi selects its members from the upper one- eighth of the junior class and highest one-tenth of the senior class. Each one must boast over a 2.25 rating as determined by the point system. Founded in 1923, it is strictly a scholastic organiza- tion to recognize students with outstanding scholastic records. Social activities for the year have included a home- coming coffee for ex-members and a breakfast for grad- uate members. Delegates from the club attended special educational performances. Two Hundred Eighty-two 'z AlphiChi Offi cers: Kay Dodson, Presidentg Nancy King, Vice-Presidentg Margaret Ann Scott, Secre- toryp Chorleen Plumley, Trecsurerp Dr. T. C. Cren- shaw, Sponsor. :fi 2.5. 'Em ? A.. 'T .,..... I "xx E ' 1 Row Row Row Row Row Row Row 1. 2. 3 4. 5. 6: 7: Robert F. Herring, Charles Holt, William C. Hooser, Charles Humphreys, Charles B. Hurley, Betty Alice Ingle, Harry T. Jarmon, John Barton Jordan James Keck, Charles Erwin Kemp, Doris Keys, Pat Langston, David F. Lee, Mary W. Letts, Gene R. Lindley, Mark R. Livesay Jimmy Lovell, Jackcy Lushcr. Marcia Lea McAulcy, Pat McCamy, John McKe1van, Mary Lou McNamara, Michael J. Minardo, Paul XV. Needham Norma Nelson, T. J. Nunlcy, John Dixon Osborn, Robert Padgett, Robert Painter, Eugene Peters, Alarah Pierce, Ernest Repass Jan Riddle, Wayland Roberts, Oren B. Rutherford, Bill Shellenberger, Sally Skelton, Barbara Smith, Therol L. Smith, Joanne Stafferton Edwin Stanford, Mariorie Stewart, Berry Ann Stinson, Joan Stratton, Mrs. Virginia Stratton, Marjorie Taylor, Rhodes Thompson, Martha Ann Tull Bruce Vincent, Helen White, W. C. White, Ann Williams, Sue Williamson Two H umlred Eighty-three r 4 2 Q .. ?eg?Tf?e N2 . ' fa ss -- 'W aw e fi, is ,g as iw' 1 as K fri? M X QSNBNS f i ..,, P ld W: Row 1: Jesse L. Baker, Jack C. Clayton, Roberr F. Herring, Janice Laine, James Repp Row 2: Roberr L. Rourh, Eugene D, Schmidt, Marion Scorr, Harold Wesley Thomas Gfacmled G. fafmdan III pad, A Q Q Organized in 1946, the Charles C. Johnson III American Legion Post is open to all veterans on the campus. Its purpose is to render services to veterans and to bring them socially closer to each other. Each year the Post sponsors a creative writing con- test with an award offered to the best essay. Too, the .geytdll outstanding basketball player on the varsity team is presented a trophy by the Post. The TCU Post is the only veterans' organization surviving from World War II. Membership, natur- ally, is restricted to veterans of the U. S. A. Armed Service. 5 ,,, W it . ... r I , , v,-- " ...l,r f M I ." T ','i Two Hzmclred Eighty-four Officers of American Legion: Bill Underhill, Com- mander: Woody Boker, Finance Officerg Homer C. Smith, Historian: B. L. Brown, Sponsor. .-.tl 7 , , qmfyg - 'M Y ikl 'a .gi t l Q : , 1 a W lx .:: Qu E fr ' ' Cliffi 5, . , . ., S' 35'-2 a ', . .-...za 1 xr giswfi sa J Q L Q t a s Q f' i a 'A 1 A, tees V N . ' in ' - V4 -I -.-. : ' - f ' " ' Q- 'N ' ' Jr - 3 'Wi' 1 vp , ,gf Y ' jf ,Z '- J , -- so H N - 3 .:,, Silk 3? x ig l t ' f 1 ii . i ..,. ,,,, ls S l re" 5.5131 ,, ywifj-gc . . L1 L ,-:N A 4 5. 1 25, ,mi l f Nfyf vtw ri. ei: " wif, M f' 2' . , .E T "',:2twg- ..-":"" ?:,.:,:I:5s? , f if ' - , Qavf, X Q is ta f 2 Qs! g : -: - i "fk :': " V - ::,, 1 ':' . , . ..V, , -A - f . .--- - extras, 'L' if "X-zgsllfil. q I - H A :.z.: . .,:...,. ,,. ... . , . . 4-vt, ' i . ,. g ..:. .- . - A , H QQ . "-5 A' yy J:-' - I Ji., fi -fff , l G' - 'fi if . Row l: David H. Brunc, Marilyn Burke, Jacqueline Case, Edward S. Chess, Jane Coyle, Peggy Domstad, Polly Dunn, Barbara Dwyer, Faye Faulkner Row 2: Thomas W. Fife, Norma Flowers, Joyce Garewood, Toy Gibson, Elizabeth Gilliland, Charles Graham, Laura Ann Gray, Sylvan Harrington, Laura Hart Rogv QI Adele Hayward, Wanda Houston, Carol McCullol1, Lona Sue Patterson, Curtis R. Pruitt, Melva Jean Read, Mollie Dot Robertson, Betty Ann Rowland, Wincil J. ml! 1 Row fl: ,lean Stnnsbury, Wfantla Tinkle, L. Crosson Tyler, Janet Upson, Anne Walker, Dolores Welborn, Noreen Wilkins, Nancy Williams, Glenna Wilson nada Anglia Club was revived this year with a different purpose and requirement. It was first organized in , , , , , 1933, but disbanded a few years later- views, and medieval English literature and architecture have been enjoyed by the members. Highlighting the year's activities was a trip to "Theater 50" in Dallas, nected with language and literature that are not taken Where members witnessed fhe Ply' Hamlet' up in regular academic courses. Such activities as color slides of England, book re- Freshman and Sophomore students interested in English are brought together to provide activities con- Anglia Officers: Amelia Douglas, Presidentg Adele Ashley, Vice-Presidentg Jimmy Livingston, Correspondence Secreioryg Bob F. Tompkins, Recording Secretory: William F. MacDonald, Treosurerg Dorolhy Michael, Sponsor. .iii 3 Two H zmdred E'igh,ty-five ' K. .. V p.. 1 " ' -- Egg .: 'rs " " "fr 'gli Q r 5 ....A,, 5 f -"' 'i' tt E Y A gym li "" . s if 1 a r., .,.. -,f 2 ., X' 1 - :Q ,,,, .. . l. ' " to .- .11 'Y' ,0 4 A " ,, ,el 5,-Q8 ., ,v X ' , I 'ir' Q, st , .., ,jg -115,333 , , ' , , 'F 1. . .::,: Q, 1 Q3 Y ks A fr xs X 0 X is AAIZHV :1A: X, AQ A in E .-,, , .,.. E A .A.., I .. Row 1: Harold Bosr, Mary Alice Braley, Jean Clark, Joann Ellis, Eula Mae Graham, June Hoffman, Roland M. Johnson, Jr., Ruth A. Karenbrock Row 2: Young Jay Mulkey, Sue Owen, Carmen Reinli, Betty Rae Schmidt, Betty Thompson, William H. Threet, Jr., Jane Treaclwny, Lou White 1444 ' ' WGMMAMJZJ ' A national organization of teachers, student teach- ers and others interested in child development, the Texas Christian University chapter of the Association for Childhood Education was reorganized in the fall of 1948 after having been inactive for several years. Members direct their interests toward the teaching and training of children, visiting schools throughout the city, attending various lectures and sponsoring speakers who have something of value to contribute to the club. At least one philanthropic project is planned during the year to bring happiness to some group of underprivi- leged children. i.. A , ,.-.4 in 7 I ra ig ..,. -515 .- if? ' 'L fl -iw! 5 H z.:- 1 Met .1 ..,, . ' iQ,1,iiE'flif QM .... .,."i'. . if. . S. Two Hundred Eighty-six Officers of Association for Child Education: Marie Haines, President, Barbara Smith, Vice-Presi- dent: Carolyn Christopher, Secretaryg Eva Wall Single- ton, Sponsor. 6 J., " B8tP ....,.,. V, .., , ,.,.. T Q A 5 Y gs? .. r 7' ' ,slr 3 'i . ' .T,Q,.,,,.p'1' .fs .Ee 4 ,if , ,, , Me wweff . W . . - , .,.,,,.:,.:,:,.,.,., . ,. 1 l I w I wmewww A G H HQ . ' Mtgzraa amen oe " -I if 3 also Q ,G at W A, fs S5 , . gf . .3 Q 4. "ef" ""- , :Z ,, -f--f A , ., .. Ag, Alt, ,N 3 . ,ffff22sf:22" .. ,-me ""' , ' 1 X ' - '1 a- Musa 1+QM, -rt:-: .-.-x ,t ---- .:-:S--if, r , 2:-. -. 4w.---1.w-r- 5 ' ix .,:, its , Z, ..,5i5,: .',.M , r 7 ' -k . "" ' ,, ,,., , 4 5,-,j ..,,-:si 'N' wi? eg? ,,..:5I 2 -'-:f1 'iifx2 i -sy sz .f- ' 1 - - ' i ' ' .. . ..,, . .9 'ff - tm . .3 .V 1 h,2w't eaiaw ' lH'JT ..u?swr.WwwmswQEiWfawwM I' A -. 5 . ., ':.1E:. g. ,.,, ..... " 7 ji- Q x ' , ' ' " ...tv . I i 5 'I-2' "' ' ii ii Ji' X l 1' ' 5352.5 ' N H L-AA f Kp , sg Q wig-, , . X - rf, K -.1 12 ii saisttf, Nil-4-T311 . Jwli . fs.. Row l Row Row Row fl ..... K W .,, .. .. , x p ,V Q. t .. , N' mi . tn, 3 3 n 3 Q T. . . ff W Egg-,-: :"7 "'v i l I .. I , ,,, ' A gi W e braille i 1535-5 . 5 we - S ' . ,t , Kathleen Alford, Jean Allcorn, Callie Ann Ayers, Mary Louise Bell, Laverne Bennett, Shirley Brunson, Dora Calhoun, Jo Frances Clark ' Rena Cummins, Naomi Curtis, Violet Dukes, Nelda Fallin, Helen Hausman, Sara Ann Hyde, Pat Jackson, Betty Anne Krippel 3: Pat Langston, Greta Mnnkins, Joan McSh:1n, Marietta Mirike, Margaret Pankey, Evelyn Shelburne, Sally Skelton, J. Elden Spencer : Joan Stratton, Jaye Taylor, Billie Grace Tucker, Aileen Welch, Mary Welch, Doris Wick eolfegialle Budtinedfi am! Wwnmi Glad Open to women students majoring or minoring in the School of Business, the Business and Professional Women's Club was organized to develop a professional interest in the opportunities open to women in this field. A series of parties and banquets are sponsored each year for the enjoyment of the members. :vu 'l Officers of B. G P. W.: Chorleen Plumly, President, Norma Nelson, Secretary, Dr. Ruth I. Anderson, Sponsor. Two Hundred Eighty-seven er rentms, lviuy nun: U Left to Right: Susan Estes, Jane Coulter, May Beth Bluthman, Floyd Clayton, Ln ry Two Hundred Eighty-eight ewan swim: af ' The Baptist Student Union is known to the T. C. U. campus as B. S. U. This organization is primarily a reli- gious organization, and its purpose is to link the Baptist student with his local Baptist Church. Among its spe- cial features are evening vesper programs held every Monday through Friday in Brite Chapel. Its activities for the past year include a welcoming party for the Freshmen, a fall retreat, a Christmas Ban- quet, an evening picnic in Forest Park, and a spring ICUCHC. "TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY PROUDLY PRESENTS THE HORNED FROG BAND" APPLIES ON THE GRIDIRON AND DURING OTHER ACTIVITIES. I 7. . W Alcvznecf 4409 Eancf The Horned Frog Marching Band is a regularly scheduled class under the curriculum of the School of Fine Arts. The Marching Band attends all functions representing the University in parades, concerts and football games. Musical selections of the Horned Frog Band consist chiefly of modern "swing" works. The Band is known nationally for its swing formation, and is a constant attraction in Fort Wortll and cities and campuses all over the state and nation. Marching Band Officers: Frank Kasco, Drum , Maiorg Beverly Herrin Bond Sweetheart' Nina . ' ' . , "jf" Shaw, Drum Malorelfeg Lawrence Intravcua, Q Band Director. - Student directors receive practical training in con- ducting the organization in performance. Lawrence Intravaia reported to TCU fall, 1949, to replace Leon Breedon, who held Band Director posi- tion for several years. Several of Breedon's arrange- ments are still popular in the organizationis repertoire. The band consists of musicians other than Fine Arts majors. 3 Two Hundrecl Eighty-nine .ggi . 'lm' -i 111AA 1- -: iii . ,., 4 vim? - 'W' " 1 v - - ' ,.,... "--. -"':Q . av ,kk' ::E ,--,-: J ,..I 1 W, V . of ' V .-.-. '1f 1,.g: :., J V .. ' are is A2 L - , if ziziiizi "" 'liffeif fn' 'ii 1"11"V 1 ' Ml W 4 if E 352 A ,- ff- 'li 3523 a , Q , f i , e , f L . ' .,,' i f ., 4 A s If .:, ...,. i , V, 5 , .,.-.-,,--,-- E ei ..:.-I . .'-::,. 'Eg-EE -w:v ,Vl..:, ,-, 3 is- i e :::' 'i-i:f "" " lA 'AAAA :': :.:.' at it e K f 5 X419 ' I. ,iv 3 x' ' 'W "M Y C """' we fs: f X l .:M- e t if . , -J 1 A--A i 4 ar ll Row 1: John F. Ames, Richard M. Arnold, Elaine Baker, Joyce Joann Beasley, JoAnn Ruth Brenner, Wendell E. Brown, Cary Jane Cameron, Alexander Freedman Row 2: Betrye Giles, Laura Hart, James Keck, Par Kelso, Lloydelle Little, Mary Ann Musgrove, Salvador Nasche, Barbara Porter Row 5: Imogene L. Standifer, Jean Sransbury, Merle Strickert, Ann Williams B Artists of the campus meet with the Brushes Club. Together they receive backgrounds, social as well as artistic, and practical work other than that of the class- rooms of the department of Att in the School of Fine Arts. To further the principles of art, and to strive for greater cooperation between the students of art and pet- fection in their chosen fields are the goals of the Brushes Clubbers. Membership is limited to majors and minors in art. Two Hundred Ninety Year's activities include addresses from various au- thorities in the art fields, exhibits of painting, sculp- turing and ceramics of members in the new gallery at the Fine Arts Building. In the annual Homecoming parade in November, the Brushes Club won third prize in the float contest. Members of the organization worked hours with Pro- fessor W. A. Meyers to complete their contribution to the affair. Officers of Brushes: Arthur J. Teele, President: Nancy Davis, Secrefuryg John Erickson, Sponsor. x . .p ,A.. Q v4.kk rv-.N W ,V X., ,W 4, s 5 l , Q ,... . s ff . 'Q - l 'U A' 1 I I A - v H' f ws'1 .1-. .,,. ff" iff' 'J ' I 6 , , tai . in 4 8,1319 gg i We ggi 4 W' l rf ,l r A255 4' arf' Q 22:1 A 5 '-3 -' n iff? S lla l r -W-rm-:as r,, re W Row 1: Jack Archer, Morris Bailey, Bill Bass, Shankle Bloxom, Martha Bruce, Shirley Brunson, Ben Carroll, Mrs. Jackie Carroll Row 2: Nancy Davis, Max Eubank, William E. Fore, Pat Garner, Ann Guest, Patricia Hamilton, Jean Jernigan, Carl Knox Row 3: Ella Ann Matney, Barbara McCandlcss, Patsy Colleen Miller, Georgia Mixon, Carl Motherall, John Dixon Osburn, Michael Padden, Bill Padon Row 4: Bert XV. Roberts, Sally Skelton, Jean Clair Stinson, Jack Sportsman, Nancy Tally, Clinton Ray Tillotson, Martha Ann Tull, Al Vaiani, Dan Wilde B Oldest club organized at TCU after the University moved to Fort Worth is the Bryson Club, founded in 1925 in honor of Professor Walter E. Bryson. The club encouraged the students in the production of all types of literature. Sponsored by Miss Lorraine Sherley, the Brysons now have as their primary purpose the development of character and leadership, scholarship and interest in out- door sports. Members are elected from students out- standing in scholarship or sports. Activities include those of campus-wide interest and events for the members. Bryson Officers: Bobby Malone, Presi- dent: Connie Mac Hood, Vice-Presidentp Mnry Graves, Secretary, Mo- rcll Hicks, Treasurer: Miss Lorraine Shcrley, Sponsor. Two Hundred N 'inety-one it x ,y R 3, fi. ,1,? if-is 'fly ' '-'5,, .g::i' -- ::" iit 55-1 s Mass-. Q., "-- 31 ' ' 9' ' zs,2f125i5?1132 . . .. 4 -' ,SV "'-' 2 f . ' ' if ' li "Eng, :.:1.5" -r ,. 5. we , - f f f " if 2 l li' sift ul? I Q i .Si-'i S T li ,mm ,., ,. .A...... . , .. . ., . . J Row 1: Harold Achziger, Conner Botzelle, Harry Beierlein, Claude Bennett, Joe Butler, Woody Baker, Alvin J. Bagnall, Bill Bohannon Row 2: Lindy Berry, C. O. Butler, Edward Bryan, Jack Clayton, Claude E. Delaney, John A. Dillon, Jr., Leonard G. Doss, F. Wilmont Davis Row 3: W. H. Denman, Robert A. Davis, Jr., William E. Fore, Dick Filligim, W. B. Futz, Don G. Faulk, Joe B. Googans, Grady Greene Row 4: Joe Holmsttom, Jim Hubbell, William L. Hatton, T. M. Hughes, Jr., John B. Jordan, Al Kilgore, Rodney Lee, Tom Leggett 1621.6 Business majors, on the most part spend a little time on Wednesday afternoons meeting with "the Chamber." Junior and senior men majoring in the School of Busi- ness are eligible for membership. The purpose of the organization is for the students of the business school to become better acquainted and gain a working knowledge of the chamber of commerce idea. They strive to locate positions for its members and to serve as a council guiding the social affairs of the school of business. Throughout the football season, members of the chamber spent countless hours in the drug, lounge, classes and other campus points selling the pep rib- bons: "Lasso the Steers," etc. Proceeds from these purple Two Hundred N inety-two 46 printed white ribbons go toward the general budget of the Chamber, and is spent, in return, on the student body in the annual Ranch Week celebration in the spring. During the 1949 Homecoming celebration, chamber members assisted the Homecoming committee in the registration of alumni at hotels and on the campus. Members passed out SKIFF editions and calendars of the events of the Week. During Ranch Week, the chambermen planned, sold tickets and stood as financial backers for organizations participating in the affair. The Chamber of Commerce is indeed one of the most active of all campus organizations. l ll- . .A 'Ali ' :iii if? t ,QQ f Q 'J' 4 RM X if t ' ',,A' is3i2'.':ii':QQgQi3ii:?1.iggi ' "ik '..uf'rs .A use 2 5 X Q Q lin 4 I " 'f-7-"i'1 ' ' ,Agia HS 'ff , r .... I "" iii 5- Q7 BE wkil i . , K Wu X 5 gs.. 5 I f 2 . . ::: .,i . . my ...... Q I It 5, iff 'Ur ' l f Sf: , , W ll: Q. W... ' FQ! Y 's jr 5, .. iii t ,v 'gig I 7 Q lr- r . A WE? Hy. :uit .. I --.15 'i Q.-'3i1'f'l,CQY 51 gl 11: ,I . Lsstj' . 'Wifi ii- , V A , . , .. , Row Row Row Row Chamber of Com- merce Officers: H. W. Thomas, Presidentp Carl Motheral, Vicc-Presi- dent: Wayne A. Steed, Secretary: Lloyd Brolh- erfon, Treasurer: Mr. Billy Burner, Sponsor. Buster Locke, Snm M. Marshall, Joe Montgomery, Lewis Maddox, Leslie E. Minor, Jr., Harrison E. Mitchell, Clifford 4 1 K' l 5 5 W 2 . 52 . ,.... .. gr fm M f' ,iw as 5. , W A lrisiffjtim i ,fl t 'ig 'Q nj ,,,,,,, 1,21 Q, " .1-5-5-5-5-:-2::-.w.'.we .- ' -rt' W.-3, y t ..... w--- 4 , . V, lgwiwmzt. ,,,.,, .. 2 1 ,ir f ,. 1, ,, ...MMM ., 2 5.4 ' t L.. is is I N- 422111111 Q to ,vlan f-QE Nunly, Kenneth Nance J. K. Olsen, James Pharries, James C. Penzelly, James Repp. S. H. Shingler, Charles Schnake, Carl A. Stanford, Bill Smith Jack Scnly, Walter G. Sharratt, Michael Smerick, Ross B. Smith, Elvin H. Spinks, Clinton Ray Tillorson, Bill Underhi Richard Wright, jack Wicr, Harley Willey, Jack Witherspoon ll, Robert C. Vann Two H zmdred Nine ty-three Chemistry Club ':':: ::': I 1-ff 9 Q ,1 V t QA t f N ' i if' if 3 2 S 3' A l Q4 5 as a me ix: Y M yi 5 tv its 4 as ' , , ..,.. H 4..,' --...tm "" ' il 45 ,,. , fr i Wai 2. 9' ' 1 1 sat s . 5 ...... .Qt . 1? it M . . ,,,. , . .... . .. , "L, 41- iv , rm . ' E" 'l.lg,:i ' , f -..j.:rs,:,, I 1 I i , Q' it ' w 3 ? l 2 fr 1 4 ,X f ?""S. .4 FEE,-. -V .wit 4 Q.. Q ............ ,..... 5 . rg ,fffffr - . al l f' i K lr- 1 jgi ,f '15 ' , , 252 , s :. ' A ii-773lfi.SIii , ,,,, ,i....i,. ' f H -,Sz 2 ,V r i. Row l: Otis Brooks, Albert B. Crabb, Jr., A. Ben C. Dowdey, Dan Etter, Marcus I.. Finley, William M. Head, James R. Hill Row 2: Nath Hudgins, William A. Hudson, Flynt Kennedy, David F. Lee, James W. McBee, Alex McGlinchey, Kenneth McKenzie Row 3: Warren McMordie, Robert E. Miller, Lynn W. Neill, Jack O'Donel, Ann Winters 1e.Zf. G , 14m ' efzefmbalgac' For five years, the TCU chapter of the American Chemical Society has been active on the campus. The purpose of the organization is to help the stu- dents of chemistry become familiar with the advance- ments and possibilities in the field of chemistry. Organization meetings consist of working more close- ly together in practical work in the field rather than the necessary theories of the classroom. Two Hundred Ninety-four Dr. Hardt is faculty sponsor of the group, and works in his spare time with these chemistry majors in every effort to meet the standards and goals of the national organization. Membership is restricted to chemistry majors from the school of AddRan College of Arts and Sciences. Officers' pictures are omitted due to the fact they were not made by deadline time. -I 41 ' ,.,,i -A , 5 x i ,gg i i E , U fr: . V I 5522533 6' ze' 0 ' el . V '. ima 'f -ff, .. .- 5 rl . 4 A. ".Q -:-- l if B . f a ' Wifi ' . 2? if ' Fig. , ' 4 ':" V- . fi "r 1 . ' 2 '--2- iff? ' ' . ' ' ' " '-A-2: 3 i ,, Q at . . X up ,Y I fiii: ' .. Egg :IEA I M I A H v-.,, . ,,,, -. Q V -' , , ,jj fa yf ix? Row 1: Wanda Bizzcll, Avis Calvcry, Julia Castle, Betty Ellis, Peggy Gordon, Ann Hays, Marianne Hill Row 2: Katherine Hutchins, Mildred Pearson, Joyce Reynolds, Joanne Schneider, Mary Louise Schuch, Jeanne Shelton, Elsie Smith Row 5: Alice Sweet, Marjorie Taylor, Dorothy Traweek, Katie Williamson 16.Zf. G Home Economics majors and minors form them- selves into the TCU Chapter of Chi Beta. As goals, they have set for themselves to foster high ideals of and appreciation for the home life, to develop personality, poise and initiative and to encourage lead- ership and professional interest in the various fields of home economics. For the 1949-50 school year, the membership of Chi Beta has held social gatherings like their fall Weiner qeaaa roast, and their annual Christmas Party with gifts for the orphans of Fort Worth. During the Homecoming celebration, Chi Beta sent representatives to the intra-club council to plan their float for the Homecoming Parade. The organization's float featured several Home EC majors in cook's cos- tume, passing home-made cakes to the gathered throngs. Social events for the year close with a formal dinner in the spring. Chi Beta OffiC8fS!Morgure! Ann Scott, Presi- denfg Maggie Nell White, Vice-President: Jane Martin, Secretary, Miss Fay Bass, Sponsor. , , hi Two Hundred Ninety-five Choral Club l PIC-TURED ARE MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL CLUB FOLLOWING THEIR PRESENTATION OF PROFESSOR WILLIAM J. MARSH'S CANTATA. Zhu ' wma! Glad All students interested in singing, whether they be majors in the school of Fine Arts or not, are invited to become members of the University Choral Club un- der the direction of "Uncle Billy" Marsh. Students for many, many years have worked with Mr. Marsh in his choral groups, singing popular, classical and light operatic works. The group annually presents a Gilbert and Sullivan Operetta. The venture this year was "Patiencef' Other of the year's activities included participation in the Fine Arts Festival, singing both Dr. Howard Hanson's "Lament of Beowulf" and Marsh's "Praise and Thanksgiving." The group also appeared for the Music Study Club of Fort Worth, and sang choral parts to "The Creation" during Ministers' Week. Two Hundred N inety-six Choral Club Officers: Edwin Hollemun, Presidentp Bob Ross, Vice-Presidentg Aud re Abney Lokey, Secretary: Jimmy Pas- chal, Business Manager: and Mr. William J. Marsh, Direclor of Choral Clubs. PICTURED ARE A PORTION OF THE ENTIRE MEMBERSHIP OF THE C. S. F.g THESE STUDENTS ARE MOSTLY UNDERGRADUATE RELIGION MAJORS. Christian Service Fellowship is the organization of all students preparing for full-time service in the fields of the church. The group seeks to provide a program of general and professional interest and establish and sus- tain a meaningful fellowship. It combines the other religious groups, Timothy- Priscilla Club for undergraduates, the Homiletic Guild for graduates and the Ministers' Wives Club. The group sponsors both the annual Fall and annual Spring Retreats at Mineral Wells. This year they added a speaker to their sponsoring roll, and an annual spring banquet. It was in 1947 that the C.S.F. adopted its new name, at first being known as the Brite College of the Bible Association, or B.C.B. C. S. F. Officers: W Eugene Brink, Presidenfg - Ralph Palmer, Vice-President Jae Reed, Vice-President Betty Thompson, Secretary. if E 1. . , ,,,, .., . , K . . v . ,,,, , V af so i ,., N ..,. - V+- .. . V. at 1 f as ii is larynx sf S Two Hzmdred Ninety-seven wi ,sm 5474 2 - 'W .LX4 ' "ff i f 'ig j :: . " Q T -,:2 I I. it ,R 1 LJ -f1- X "". E .'.. :-' A as I ':" :-: '11"12'-- 4 ' 2 , ,'.AQ ,,,.. f i V : , 1 ' , ' 1- -5 f- A, 'Y -. , ' "" fl' f H! in ,. IHZEF 'E all E I? si Y fi . 4 4 ' 1 , I ii 1 ffvffff' ii V " if if , tm Z 2 Row 1: Thorp Andrews, James 1, Cranny, Jim Cunninghamf Worth Dalton,' Amelia Douglas, Raymond Foster, Emery Hornaday, John Howell' Row 2: Wesley Kinser, Jimmy Livingston, Scooter Macatee, Paula McDaniel, John Dixon Osborn, Robert Painter, Bill Powell, Joe Shirley Row 5: Clay Smith, Walter Smith, Barbara Sterlingf' Martha Ann Swain, L. Crosson Tyler, John Waddell, Nancy Williams, Glenna Wilson 'Members of Pi Kappa Delta .maze squat am! Debate at TCU centers around the office and classes of Dr. E. L. Pross, sponsor of the Varsity Squad. They are an outgrowth of what was called, until 1945, the Frog Forensic Fraternity. This activity represents TCU at speech tournaments with other college squads. This year's activities were climaxed with the TCU chapter being hosts to the Province Convention of the Two Hzmdrecl Ninety-eight pi Kdfflfld fbelfa Pi Kappa Delta honorary forensic fraternity on April 15. Other activities consisted of tournaments with Bay- lor, the Oklahoma Teachers College, and the Pi Kappa Delta tournament. "The April meeting of the provincial Pi Kappa Deltans is an honor for TCU chapter," claims Dr. Pross. "Over 300 debators from over eight states will attend." Debate Officers: Jerry Hefzel,' Debate Munugerp Dr. E. L. Pross,' Sponsor. 'Denotes Members of Pi Kappa Delta r li 9 'ski -is 'T r .,., , " X 1 .- Q eases: Ami-4-aaa 5 ---- fe, -I.-12-' : I , , ,, ,fr ,ilflx ,,,.' 'l - 52.5 any ' ' r 5' -7 'I ,.,lfq,fjfQQ 'if' ' ak'-g " l " , i t . A,A,.A. ,. AAAA 'T - VY' e' T' MXVQ ,z bw 1 - L! e i . 1 , , . A . K , L. .1 , , A ' , ' A 1 '- '- jzvvrul X. . , dui, . X Q Q ' '- rl rr, V' 'T -PJ' 4, - were I l Sf' Row 1: Ivan Adams, Billie Nell Adkins, Marion Armstrong, Norman Bantz, Reuben Batoon Johnnie Beasley Thomas B Beck Roscoe Bell Row 2: Tommie Bouchard, Don Brewer, Gene Brice, Billie V. Brown, LaRue Browning ,Toe Lee Bryan Sara Carlocl. Olga Jane Carrelo Row 3: Jacquelin Case, Leland Coggan, Bubba Coleman, Norman Cornelius, Bob Cornell Mary Lou Cothran Donnella Couch Donald Cox Row 4: Lawrence Crane, Billy Ruth Crout, Amelia Douglas, Don Downing, Walter Echols Leta Eubank Barbara Ferguson Thomas W Fife Helen Fisher . . 8 4 . The Disciple Students Fellowship, formerly Meliorist Club, meets each Sunday at the University Christian Church. Membership is open to all campus persons, regardless of denomination. The organization sponsors activities and leads in Christian service and life on the campus. Weekly de- V ir' -I 5 sr, , I H "f':" It s' f V: - .... ,.,.. . fgf D. S. F. Officers: Edwin Sfunford, President: 'X 'R 'r David Cheverfon, Vice-President: Mildred V 'i Scheirman, Secretary: Peggy Thames, Treasurer. l n- ,, , Y a li, W, l r S , . , . A - . ,V :rf- 45 -sm VZ' Y ....:.,. if . ff' Z Q 1 L 2 if . 1 ., 1. . A 3 . L 3 th 5 pi V l I fs? l M 9 , V ,ix Q., 1, l , W V,L. . .,.. Q . 4 , L,,,,,W . - E.. 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' fi.f.i:.. rr. .1 ,.-:f 2 -V -, ff V, .-,'. - ,V n M 1 9 cf ' 'Zi J .... ,,... , P, . .. gf f i. ff 1' 1 .gr ,,,, 5 , W VA if 4 f gl , fa 17,1 My 3 V .::2s2-.'-2-H241522112215 -"2:isQs2a2z225-g:- f 2 ".fff-1' -I' W . 1 . .. . ..... r ..... . ,,V,. . ,, ,V . Q.z.5?i:..f ii-ml 1 Fwy' Y J 'fly V ' i1Y??' . .:2-V:- .. . r.. ,ki W.-.:.:.:.:L .,,,,,.?-,s,-f- .js wg - A . - - ifrg:5:--:g,:,:,:,:,. ,.... 1. .,.m:,,,5g,v- ,,,,,, . ,.,.,. .... V . ..-.. . - -s . -0 4, MV .V -, , ,- ., , , A ---- ,.,.,.,.,.,, . ,, ,MW -Vg.: ,., ....,V... ,... V, .... .,- ...,.,.::::::::s.,.,. V ,ll x ya ' ' li.if:1ii:Hyz5i " A Yi .. Vg, 53 3 egg . wr V. at 3 we M, 5 .Q ft ws My E - f f,.ff,f fYi?f - ' gf? H V L -e f Q ' f +V, x' .. . .,,.,.,. . .1 xii, gd li .W .V,...f.,. ,qw "" H ' .,.,..,. , "!g'ii..' . of ,gm 1' .N N W 'Y.V ,sg xv 1- fr 5 Row 1: Joy Frost, James Ira Gates, Doyle Green, Walter Grimes, Adele Hayward, Myrtle Jo Head, Joe Thomas Hearn, Walter Hehl Row 2: Merita Heinzman, Loretta Henderson, Robert F. Herring, Robert D. Heslip, John Gordon Hooten, Wanda Houston, Emery Hornadny, Connie Hudkins Row 3: Mirio Iwane, Nancy King, Lou Ann Lesley, Mary Levander, Gene R. Lindley, Neil Lindley, Jimmy Livingston, Lois Long Row 4: Helen Maultsby, Dale Maybrier, Elois Mayo, Gerald Edwin McElroy, Ted McElroy, Annelle Miller, Peggy Miller, Billie Jo Moore Row 5: Mary Morrison, Ed Muegge, Jr., Ciola Fae Murphy, Jean Oates, Loyce Orr, Mollie Jeanne Owen, Oleta Owen, Robert Painter Three H undred ,iv-,i1::i" .. " ' , , Q' L z , ,,,..,. ,, y gs, s Eta ,: Q .... Y H - N .li V Q 9 ' X 1 iw -.-ss, 1 ' ' i ai g l Sf 2 y VW 4 " 2 '- rt J .5 .5 ' , .. , .,.:.:., I , , , m .nn , A ., .L .,. H: i . - I I In 4 M I ,, A 5 ..,. I, mm' that 1, mt .t X X 1 ,, :ii L ,gi xl . Q ' '5 9 ' l ' f P , ..,, 1 "1 ' , ' 3 V g , Q, 3, .f r , 4 1 l, 5 i ff? ' .Va MA 4 ,Nr 4 L I -7 , 1 fr X: W Y. in 93:1-V, r up 1 I Row 1 Row Row Row Row . :lr ' .2315 1 ..,.,. . ,M .-.. mf .,,.-. t 1 .,., i Wt.,.,ew Pl 1-5,-, . .W -'x-4AA ee-e -77355-gig ,,, . tr tr. M, Ak A ..:,:,,.:.:.5.5.5 Q ,ang 33 W li R V l ff Q , 1 l L Q Q0 4 if l 5' NM Q 1 J af Q5 X, W K ,Q rf - :,:. .... . ,, , . ,. ' -' 'l' :..?:ff'aii::'i:::'E'- lat V' 5 Sf as 'E E1 E rvsgz .. - 4. 'Tr 11: 'Sw ,. A s..,. ,Y ' as ind? Q .,,.::.g,,3:1,,,, , 1 sn., W5 1? .SEM sig 1. . 1 " X. I my s 1 : t A s C. L. Patterson, Lona Sue Patterson, John B. Payne, Richard Pentecost, Alarah Pierce, Dona Pittle, Betty Ruth Plumbley, Barbara Porter Carmen Powell, John E. Quick, Howard W. Reather, Frank Loyd Reece, Jan Riddle, Mary Kathryn Roberts, Irene Roundtree, Robert L. Routh George Rowe, Mike Saenz, Irene Sailor, Sue Scott, Betty Clay Shank, Jackie Sheppard, Melvin D. Shupp, Wilma Jean Smashey Jean Smith, Leonardine Smith, Nancy Smith, Pat Spencer, Lynne Stanley, James E. Sterling, Leslie Stratton, Mary Strong Dorothy Trawick, Betty Jean Werner, John B. White, Noreen Wilkins, Nancy Katherine Williams, Shirley Williams, Glenna Wilson, Dick Wood, Ewart Wylie Three Hundred One Fecleralists 1" 1:z:a, g1 -r ffm ,. f -"' 3 2 gf 1 W 2 - WM as , 5- V H2 4 3 . ii? ' " :::if:--.-.--':Q.- z.:-I . Q. T, .r h'E-I i' E e it reg .A ,, ig 2 'ix AN 1 W is Z L lx f if SW i w e X t. ..:: Ei .Q Row 1: Jim Cunningham, Harold Gault, Frances Field, Robert Herring, John Howell, Roemer Hudler, Berry Ingle, Gerald Kaye Row 2: John Lee, Jimmy Livingston, Fred Miller, Mildred Schierrnan, Clay Smith, Barbara Sterling, George Wilde Zlniiecl WMM 4 ' "The United World Federalists is an organization seeking to maintain world peace through effective World government by strengthening the United Na- tions," according to information furnished from the national organization. The TCU chapter of the United World Federalists was founded in 1947. Membership includes all who are interested in the very purpose of the organization. Officers and members are primarily from the Govern- ment and History departments. Three Hundred Two Activities of the year include guest speakers, speaking on all phases of the United Nations and its agencies working for world peace. Films of work being done throughout the world are shown at the monthly meet- ings of this organization. For social events, the organization plans an annual picnic each spring. Dr. August O. Spain, head of the department of government is the faculty advisor of the TCU chapter. .1 United World Federalists Officers: Worth Dalton, President: Thorp An- drews, Vice-President: Robert' L. Routh, Secreturyp A. O. Spain, Sponsor. wr l Ifiifim' 'Ji i H . .gr ' ii fl i4 i 1 1 N 1 Bl . JL If il . f " w +.-- F 1 Y rl' , fu! L 4 1 -tr -I' " . 1"1'I we," ft I ,. i 'gli ' X 1- M ' l Q! C rl l . . 4 'At ""' 1 ,.,gQ:,i , . ' VT 55' :-:-:-:-:.: I L4 . K. A 2 A ., 4 p FPQ: H In ii '21 'I- -.w 1 y i E . ,", r, ! i ,Q Fi I -ef., Flying Frogs r i ki QAM ---V .:.s.: +z. ' f i V ig I A rfiisiezil " we 1.3 Row 1: Wesley Anderson, Lee Berger, Ann Bettis, Chuck Brock, Nora Bruce, C. J. Bullard, Albert B. Cassell, Jr., Adrienne Foote Row 2: Margaret Hayes, Billie Hooks, Jean Kingsbury, Charles W. Kleinecke, Joe Knapp, Mark R. Livesay, Joyce Lewellen, Elizabeth McClure Row 3: Carol McCulloh, Earl Moore. Wayland O. Oatrnan, Clarence Platt, Stanley Rushagen, Nancy Roberts, Bill Schulkey, Arthur M. Sheets Row fi: Patricia Smart, Betty Sue Smith, Bill Snedecor, Jack Temple, Bob Tompkins, Wendell Towery, Bill Underhill, Eugenia Wells QW 44:44 The Flying Frogs, founded in 1947, is open to all Proud Flying Frogs report that the first Civil Air aifmiflded Students- The 8f0UP fePfe5em5 TCU in air Patrol Unit to be established in any University in the meets throughout fhe Country' southwest was organized at TCU this year. Last year the Frogs were host in the National Inter- scholastic Air Meet. This year the group will fly to Pf0fe550f TYOY Sfimsfm is faculfl' 5P0n50f Of the Of' UCLA for the event. ganization. Flying Frogs Officers: L. N. Slayron, President: Clay Smith, Vice-Presidentp Nancy Tally, Secre- tary-Treusurerg Mr. Troy Stimson, Sponsor. 1.1 JSE, r. Z-W 5:25. ' 'lf-'sr-V2 Tho-'ee H uudrecl Three Frogettes ' " ' l' 3 iii - - l 'W' ' gl E77 .V ,,.V . . 2 .,,.. .... A "" - V lg- ll ' " ,.: za., ji .-fi:f-piflflg is-g:: '.. .2:jf- 5 25. 'f"' - . T5 , V 1 """ "Q' T -A-A-A'-" 'AQ :' ': ' 3 3 "" zzz ., ., , ' - v f mt., X. ,. 3- ,W-i-:gg F.: .-...-. : . . WV . 5 L X 5- 6-5... ,.,: , 5 i 1 --.V t f as Q Q A -1' f i S fe it fi Q 5 .2 re a E, V :Ll 5 . .N . . F .,,. 3 ' , . ...... I .,. A . - a- .-.-.- if 5:53 af K Q ..,... 1 'Q ...asa :E fix ' I , N, f i A rrsgrzasfsan A I --- sw -'-tafaiaiafaeaiaf p -' "" In 5 ' i . . I jf X -f'1- A H" 'QW' W 1 ..., ., W,. A :gl , if -s. ,., A Ia- . .,...- ..,5 :f it 1- Q ' , ..,.:.,. .,.,: , "f' i i! ------ -:E 1 is L, -1 5 5 5' Row 1: Kerry Blaine, Billie V. Brown, Barbara Bushman, Sara Carlock, Jacquelin Case, Carolyn Clark, Mary Lou Corrhran, Billy Ruth Crour Row 2: Naomi Cutis, Betty Ellis, Jess Ann Esrill, Faye Faulkner, Joan Fore, Joyce Garewood, Lerla Gibson, Elizabeth Gilliland Row 3: Marilyn Glenn, Patsy Greenwell, Joann Hall, Jacqnelyn Hamilton, Sylvan Harrington, Laura Hart, Merita Heinzman, Loretta Henderson Row 4: Beverly Herrin, Berry Hunter, Barbara Kasmier, Greta Mankins, Marilyn Martin, Helen Maultsby, Eloise Mayo, Sue Meineckc 4 The Frogettes consist of all Freshman dormitory girls. It was organized by dormitory representatives in 1925. The purpose of this organization is to bring all dorm- itory girls closer together, providing social activities for them, and helping to otientate them to life on the University campus. Activities for this 1949-50 year included the spon- soring of a float in the annual Homecoming parade. Three H undated Four The week prior to Homecoming, members of the Frogettes participate in de-capping ceremonies, spon- sored by the Leti, Sophomore girls organization in the dormitories. Freshmen girls are selected by the Leti group as "little sisters" for the Fall Freshman Prom and other social events. During the day of de-capping, Frogettes wear "slime" clothing on the campus. At the initiation ceremonies, Leti officers and members select the year's "best Fresh- man." Frogetfe Officers! Sue Scott, President: Mary Lindo DuBose, Vice- Presidentp Jo Ann Ruby, Secretary. W M7 Frogettes 7 e if . ,Q ,, ' i Row Row "' ' 1 i li "' ff ,WJ ii 5 , .. I? -'lf 1 i ' ' l: Berry Moore, Billie Jo Moore, Berh Murphy, Coila Fae Murphy, Martha Norsworrhy, Mollie Jeanne Owen, Nancy Parker, Julia Ann Pederson 2: Sally Perkins, Carmen Powell, Carol Ann Pruin, Carolyn Ray, Irene Roundnree, Edirh Bradley Sise, Dolores Smith, Elsie Smirh Row 3: Jane Smith, Nancy Smith, Mary Lou Snead, Mary Spencer, Lynne Stanley, Nancy Stine, Dorothy Trawick, Mary Wells Row 4: Suzanne Wheeler, Noreen Wilkins, Glenna Wilson, Ann Wyatt TIL-ree Hundred Fifve Jae 6 , W sn, , Z Row 1: Dorothy Adler, Jere Adrnire, Riley Aldrich, Judy Alexander, Richard Allen, Harold Autrey, Elaine Baker, Charles Bailey Row 2: Joy Banks, Johnny Bates, Ann Baugh, Letitia Beard, Thomas Beck, Ann Bettis, Betty Lee Bingham, Wanda Bizzell Row 5: Roy Blanton, Mary Beth Bleuthman, Carol Bodycomb, Kendall Bond, Joann Brenner, Billie Brown, LaRue Browning, David Brune Row 4: Jesse Bryant, Catherine Callaway, Carey Jane Cameron, Mary Betty Camp, C. W. Carpenter, Dave Cheverton, Charles Cobden, Bob Cornell 525 One of the most active clubs on the campus, the Hoe Down Club was established for the purpose of teaching and encouraging the enjoyment of both square and round-dancing. Members include students from all classifications who are interested in dancing for fun and learning a little more than is taught in the regular curriculum. Several groups from the club participate in dancing contests in the city and put on exhibitions all over the state. Hoe Down sponsored a picnic for members in April. Three Hundred Six 'HQ sllqll Hoe Down Officers: Bernie Robert- :., if, son, Presidentg Joe Easter, Vice-Presi- if dentg Rena Cummins, Secretary: Kitty xx Wingo, Sponsor. ii 1 -'YY' M - f W af- ..-.:. L-EEE. 3? 'wif QE., ,W ii 21:-:-.,: -Q r, 5 ",, . .. ., ,., ,., 5 Ilya .:-:, i ri' . 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Joann Ellis. Lcta Eubank, Bill Evanoff, Barbara Ferguson, Clark Ford, Claude Franklin 3: Velma Gauntt, Lawrence Gibson, Charles Graham, Joye Griffith, Jacquelyn Hamilton, Sylvan Harrington, Henry B. Hash, Margaret Hayes Loretta Henderson, John Hightower, Marianne Hill, Gordon Hooten, Mary Jo Horton, Wanda Houston, Willard Howell, Betty Hunter 5: Tommy Inman, Robert Jacobsen, Robert Johnson, Jeni Johnson, Raymond Jones, James Kellett, Ray Kemp, Doris Keys 6: Clayton Knapp, Susanna Landers, Pat Langston, Darrell Lawless, Claude Little, Lois Long, Louise Mayer, Evelyn Mayhew, Kenneth McCall Row 7: Alex McGlinchey, Robert McKnight, Joan McShan, Larry Meeker, Par Miller, Catherine Moore, Carma Lou Moore, Conway Nelson, Norma Nelson Three Hundrecl Seven , ............. V 3 M- li r, EE Q A 3 ' ' '74 t lll E 1. 5 l a I vf l. E X . .............,,. - 5 . 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Row 3 Row Row Row Row 4. 5. 6: 7: Jean Oates, Rainey Owen, Michael Padden, Margaret Pankey, Lona Sue Patterson, John Payne, Julia Ann Pederson, Don Perry Dana Pirtle, Norma Anne Pirtle, Barbara Porter, Carmen Powell, William Price, Carol Ann Pruitt, Curtis Pruitt, john Ramsey Ann Rattikin, Joyce Reynolds, Mary Kathryn Roberts, Robert Ross, Patrick Shannon, Carolyn Show, Nina Shaw, Robert "Buck" Sloan Dick Slone, Denny Ray Speck, Mary Spencer, Jean Stansbury, Barbara Sterling, Nancy Stine, Alton Taylor, Peggy Thomas Berry Thompson, Paul Thompson, Bettie Tillotson, Betty Tobey, Wendell Towery, Dorothy Trawick, Janet Truckscss, Jack Truitr Billie Grace Tucker, Gean Turner, Bruce Vincent, Anne Walker, Joe Ward, Suzanne NVheller, Nancy Whipple, John White Charlene Whitehead, Noel Williams, Bobby Williamson, Glenna Wilson, Jack Witherspoon, Ann Wyatt, Sara Ann Young, John Switzer, Three Htmdred Eight se H ' .3 1 bf., M1 I El to dnl is Martha Hightower t A S 'E'-3' dk xr 4 .I 9 . ,ip-Q .ff ., ,, ' W, . :l , ,gil J - is A. X .- r 'ai' j s is 4 -r in sv. A 'if ii I iivgi lull, .,.. -as - Q ,Q r 9 fr l X P ge f Y if ll i , Row I: Norman Dantz, Chuck Brock, Frank Burkett, COPY EDITOR, Greta Chadwick, INDEX EDITOR, Berry Criner, CLUB EDITOR, Genelle Hart, Jim Harley, FAVORITE EDITOR, Beverly Herrin Row 2: Connie Muck Hood, WHEEL EDITOR, Bill Johnson, ART EDITOR, Marianne Lobdell, Bob Mayfield, Jack McSwnin, Par Miller Mullins, "Chick" Olsen, Chris Pcrncr Row 3: Irene Rountrcc, INDEX EDITOR, Joe Shosid, SPORTS EDITOR, "Ollie" Whitley, Nancy Williams, Noel Williams, Glenna Wilson, and Reba Yocham, CLASS EDITOR 743 1950 ,domed 4409 In 1898 the first Horned Frog was published for the students of TCU. That book was a long time ago, and yet it records the life and times of the last years of the last century, as this 1950 edition records the life and times of the end of the first half of the present century. It is the purpose of the Horned Frog to keep an accurate account of events, students, faculty and ad- ministration for the purposes of enjoyment, promotion and history. The positions of Editor and Business Manager are selected by popular vote and the Journalism Committee, respectfully. Membership is not confined to any major, but to all interested in working for the aims above. The Editor-in-Chief appoints his staff, subject to the committee. Horned Frog Staff: Jimmy Paschal, Editor: Nancy King, Assislanl' Editor, Marilyn Lynch, Business Managerp Paul O. Ridings, Sponsor. Three H1L11.ll'I'6d N 'ine Ice Skating Club ie. "-' -'-1 - A- , 1, .:-A A,,. ,.,- a I I -a s: is ,,,, J' :.1v P -:-.:f six s. , .ii A'-' is 5 A in 3' , ig Q :rv ii rr ,i 5 ...,. J ,J .J At: f K P 2 M, a 'Jw 2 if I .3 5 i was ,Z ......, .. -.N 1 Ti ig, 1 i 2 R ga Ta' A Jr i W' ffm ll life.: r , i in , .R Si 'C X '-5 ' 2 l X A.AQ-- g .Wi A F t H ' - . ff . gzip i -is "" ..,,. ,..., . , .,,, ,, ,I,Q 1 i ' i J ii ilifffif ' ,. : f ..,, 1" .gn 'i :,:': ' fit- 1 ' . ,,, 1-395,551,331 r ' 15255 gi: , f ET in .qii,:is, -:airy I " gl We i r E5 Q J' W ,, J hi .1 iz W , is X ...,. ,wr N- ni? ....... i mega, - gg-ae ,faaiig,A:,,,z M r 5 . i 1 . gistftf Tis' Y , ,L 21514151.11 A il 3 5 xiii- i, new --f is ,. i ,fi 4 5 'Q , .1 . ,sk , ..,. gy, , , . . .:. ...- --..:.:. I Egg iii i if .:. 'P I VV 5-if i l 2 H l it . .1 2? 2 ' at A M fav V fm W Z 'L 1' ' , 'Q " ai :hw . 5 , Sifizxrii A :gifs Elf A ". 4.f2EfEi"l3 ,:-, ii' Elia Sf. 3 '5 zliiizii ' 5 -112 .fin fi- . .,,.. i Row 1: William Ammons, Wyly Edwin Ball, Marilyn Burke, Marilyn Byerly, Joyce Bynum, Ray Callicoa ' ,... Ei i ' C ?r . ,. Q, l , 5 Q 53 it r 'N.r.e3l:i:5? VI ,Ll fi if r 7 l 1 JN N ,I I X N L Ag, 4 9 Q 5,1 ......... 5 A ,jg ' 9 i , i f use - .. .-.. 1. nfs, 'ia' , Q il ZZ! x Y i th, C. W. Carpenter, Greta Chadwick Row 2: Thomas H, Champion, Bob Cornell, Jane Coulter, Naomi Curtis, Judith Deaton, Patricia Jean Dickinson, Mary Kathrcen Dobbs, Violet Dukes Row 3: Mark Dyer, Joe Easter, Leta Eubank, Frances Field, Joy Frost, Joyce Gatewood, Elizabeth Gilliland, Charles Graham Row fi: James E, Hanks, Jim Hatley, Harley F. Hines, Emery Hornaday, Betty Hunter, Charles Ing, Jayme Johnson, James L. Jones, Jr. ieafces -gear The T. C. U. Ice Skating Club is an all-campus or- The organization was founded in 1948, reaching an ganization for persons liking to ice and figure skate. all time high in membership this year- The SYOUP leaves each and eVefY ThUf5daY ff0m the Professor Donald E. Williams of the School of Busi- Administration Building for Will Rogers' Coliseum ness is the faculty sponsor of the group. during skating season. 1, 1 Three Hundred Ten J l' . ,iii-f, ki' Si 4, ..,.. Ice Skating Officers: Dick Wood, President: Rich- ard Ramsey, Vice-President Wanda Bizzell, Secretary Betty Criner, Treasurerg Mr D. E. Williams, Sponsor. 1 1 al l l ffl 1 -f uh l 4 A l, ' .I Fri' , 3 A I v Ice Skating Club "1 S"44 W ' ww 5 e ew M , i , Dill Y. J Q ., i 'I M H yn ., I wg - M' gi Q 1 ' W 'niE.:-:-:,:-:-:-:-:-:-:.:,: . ,. .1 ' ' 'T " ffiaisrtli'-f1'2 f-.- :-:::: ,,W,.h,,,i 1 . ,i 1 A ,,.,,,, 4' ,f ri ! i my fe if 'lg fel x ff l 25 , M E212 i fi AV ,. l by ' , I -- 1 i vs- """ lf if ,, ff a Q si 112 - - ff iii" v 2, l ' - 'li' IZ . , Row l: Patricia Leonard, jncklyn Lusher, Alex McG1enchey, Frances Merbeth, Vivien Middleton, Billie Jo Moore, Catherine Moore, Mollie Jeanne Owen Row 2: Rainey Owen, Sally Perkins, Barbara Porter, Anne Price, John E. Quick, Sandra Russell, Mary Ryerson, Beverly Smith Row 3: Betty Tobey, Bob F. Tompkins, Dolores Triplett, Janet Trucksess, Gean Turner, Robert E. Valliere, Jo Beth Voltin, Joe Ward Row 4: James H. Warner. David Weaver, Suzanne Wheeler, Bob W. White, Charlene Whitehead, James O. Whittaker, Teddy Joe Wolfenbarger, Sara Ann Young Three Hundred Eleven Los Hidalgos .,4. V ,M HW., M. ll riff ' ' :2::':fY:' if - ,l if S 1, ii.: ...,., ' E N M .. ,,,. . '- ' .1 5 ei W, gigi ' 'txx 2 z 5 fr 353 Q R , f :gli Y Q r Row 1: Wyly Ball, Alice Louise Benrhall, David Brune, Virginia Campbell, Thomas Row 2: Jane Coyle, Elizabeth Davis, Irene Edgerton, Thomas Fife, Jacquelyn Hamil Row 5: Phyliss Howard, Nancy King, Susanna Landers, Lou Ann Lesley, jimmy Row 4 Ty .2044 Members of Los Hidalgos are interested, first, in bringing its members together in social and intellectual intercourse, second, in keeping close touch with college life, and third, in encouraging the speaking of good Spanish by the members. 1 Dora Ochoa, Joe Simpson, Sue Scott, Barbara Smith, Mary Tice, Crosson Three Hundred Twelve F M 5 K glib' ' 1 1 , My 5 5 M ,f , if 1 -1 ' ::,.s"l,,-.,-ri-wr: E35 451 ,,. . l ' ' -flaw , it . , X. ,,,, ' tl .... ,. Q A 1 MSE' i A i ' i x i 1 9 11 ff p Q- , , , -A . .a, , :a:a:a:ass- if ' 'fu i. sa Champion, Virginia Cheverton, Carolyn Christopher, Bob Cornell ton, Beverly Hellman, Bert Hollister, Emery I-Iornaduy Livingston, Jacklyn Lusher, Sarah Frances Moseley, Kenneth McKenzie ler, Dolores Vargos, Arden Wilson O Membership is open to anyone interested in the pur- pose of the organization, but they must have had at least one year of college or two years of high school Spanish. Meetings are held twice monthly from October through May. QYYMQTPT EW , ' is ,, M : u , ttsu s A,,, i-"r'r"" -R i - L I l t , K,-Qs' g , - i ' ' st' M A ' Y n X t lf X L 1 .,p- 4 . W -U V 1 -55' 5' 'H' i ill 31.4 is ii ll i 1 5 Q21 f S ,.,. l " 35 x 1,3 Z Phu as 31 A f . f as " vw af ':::-- .6 :.s.+- wwf . , at Y ,ami I f Q 1 1 x :-V. V i, ,A,.,.A ,S . 5 me gy ,iid K fl 1 Wig? Row I: Allan Brookshire, Betty Sue Brown, Robert Christian, Barbara Davidson, Lawrence Gibson, Jacquelyn Hamilton, George Hays, Gerald Kaye Row 2: Betty Kimball, Pat Langston, Margaret Pankcy, Ruth Pefferly, Chris Pernet, Dana Pirtle, Curtis Pruitt, Joanne Stafferton, Ann Underwood llkllfzacf 'dl' Sllacf Z' fm: nl' The Methodist Students Movement is composed of members of the Methodist Church, present on the campus. The group is active in the stimulation and continu- ance of the Christian ideals on the campus and on to home and business life. Membership is open to all persons interested in the goals and purposes of the organization. Methodist Student Movement Officers: Betty Jo Riddle, Presidenfg X Net, Social events of the year are held often, and an ac- tive campaign for new membership is constantly held. Most student members are members of the Matthews Memorial Methodist Church on Berry Street, nearest Methodist church on the Hill. Meetings are held at the church in a friendly, religious atmosphere. " si .: a--'- .,.. , i 'N . 1 r eeee Q l - Katherine Frank Young, Vice-Presidentg John Wortham, Sponsor. Three H undred Thirteen Seated: Mesdames C. F. Cheverton. O. C. Harper, A. K. Hunt, Mark Randle, R. W. Helserh, Harry Cunningham Middle Row: Mesclames Tom Plumbley, Stephen Avery, R. E. Brown, H. R. Graham, W. C. Wlhitc, James Wright, Paul Thompson, Bob Chambless, Gred Carlock, Alex Cox, Ernest Miller, joe Detamore, Glenn Mann Back Row: Mestlames Eugene Brink, Bill Snedecor, A. M. XVarner, jack Garrett, Claude Pearce, Harold Humphreys, C. L. Barnett, Bob Williams, Allison Holt, Ralph Palmer, Charles Jones Mmzdfm' was Ministers' Wives on the campus was founded in 1938 with the purpose of bringing about closer rela- tionships among the wives of student ministers and to sponsor programs of benefit for them, pointing out duties and responsibilities as wives of ministers. Year's activities for 1949-50 included open house throughout the ministerial apartments during min- fs llts Three Himdretl Fourteen isters' week and a Christmas party with gifts for needy children. An all family picnic is held in May including not only the ministers' families, but those of the Brite and Undergraduate faculties. Although the ministers' wives are not all students of the University, they are indeed a part of the life of Texas Christian University. Ministers' Wives Officers: Mrs. Margaret Pierce, Presidentg Mrs. Jock Garrett, Vice-Presidentp Mrs. Robert Neal, Secretary. . V , 1 fl 311 l :FT fig "MTW 5 r .f . . , -'..l', A al J -"fi ' li 1 ,- 1- 4 V l 1 ' ' + 42 ,sr 1 ,Wg-11 ,f K L . , ., .. s ,. Bsy ssa :Q . . ,,,.,..,.. . . . .,.. :li W1 l og, at yy as lf 5 gs w -ai 5 fr 5 S Row 1: Audrey Lou Abncy, Gloria Ann Calloway, Marilyn Crill, Frances Halsread, Mary Lois Henson Row 2: Mary Neita Johnson, Pai McCamy, Eula Marie Meers, Sue Williamson, Katherine Young gpetifan Zpdifan Gfuzpbc of Mu P ' The Epsilon Epsilon Chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon Sorority of America was installed at TCU on May 21, 1948. The group of music women was known as the Mu Zeta, prior to that rime. The national purpose of the clan is the recognition of scholarship and musicianship and the promotion of friendship within its sisterhood. Mu Phi is a national honorary sorority of professional standing for women in music. The members are elected to membership on the basis of scholarship and musician- ship. They must have a grade index of 2.0 or better. Character and personality are also considered. The group is a small one, and it is an honor to be asked for membership. One of the events of the year for the musical women was being hostess to the visit of Mrs. Margarette Walker of Texas Technological College during the Fine Arts Building dedication. Mrs. Walker is the national president of the Mu Phis. Mu Phi Epsilon Officers: Clara Goodspeed, President: Alice Louise Benfhall, Corresponding Secretary: Betsy Frasier, Recording Secretoryp Mrs. T. S. McCorkle, Sponsor. i 2 I ,,. 51? Y . Three Hundred Fifteen Natural Science :EEE E,,,..: f....ri.,--QW g ,,,, ig? '--- Q tn - -A r i ffl rag 5,26 ,. " j K2 i is if . 'l'ig,-iw' inf, , t. E s Q 1 ' ' 2, Qs 1 if 3 aw ar jf l . as ,,, , ----- H 5 H ,:q..1, . ..,:,,,,,,,,, il ,Z ,,,::::2 -- L 1 1 p 19" g 'N A,::.,.1A,: :,,.,.. ,,,, ,., , if'..21"f,: s . ' '-'. :Hi-::::-:,f Ina Row 1: Virginia Ann Campbell, Ralph H. Cole, Frank Dingwerrh, A. Ben C. Dowdey, Eugene Greenwood, jasper Holland Row 2: Nath Hudgins, William A. Hudson, Wfinford R. Ingram, William J. Kilman, John K, Lee, Gene R. Lindley Row 5: James W. McBee, Marjorie McKean, Howard Miles, Margaret Ann Scott, Barbara Sterling, Garner Wilde IV 5' S' The purpose of the Natural Science society, which was organized on the campus in 1917, is to further interest in-and knowledge of-the natural sciences. The campus chapter of the Natural Sciences Society is open to all students who are majoring or minoring in the sciences, biology, geology, taking pre-medical work or laboratory technology. Natural Science Officers: James R. Hill, Presidentg relury-Treasurer, Dr. Willis G. Hewatf, Sponsor. Lk J Q 1 53.5 Outstanding social event for the 19-49-50 school year was the annual Christmas patty held in the little gym. Dr. Sanders T. Lyle played "Dr. Santa Claus," and faculty members participated in a skit on a scien- tific subject. Jurnes Savage, Vice-President, Murcia Leu McAuley, Sec- "' .... c-aar lfzg., 155555 ,.,. -'-- ..a-2:5-: -Iiii tlfififififif 13 ,13 .... ae' , , , 4 Three Hunclred Sixteen 2 in s 5. . L of 4 lar W rl I 1 get 'S Row 1: Ed Ball, Jackie Carroll, Tommy Cobb, Dr. Landon Colquirt, Robert Gunnip, John Henrick Row 2: Harley Hines, Charles Kemp, Mrs. Paul Lerrett, John Livengood, Bill McCurcly, Ralph Nelson Row 3: Theron Oxley, John Slate, Theron Smith. Jim Thompson Pafmiala The Parabola Club was founded on the campus in 1928. Its purpose is to stimulate interest for mathe- matic majors and to provide interesting topics for dis- the month. cussion. Membership is open to those students who have completed their Freshman math courses and who have an active interest in mathematics. Parabola Officers: Oren Rutherford, President, Otis Brooks, Vice-President, Mrs. Robert L. Wright, Sponsor. .arm-y - A g y-bf' ,' , ' if 'f ii i 5.-5 ' 4 gf . ,W .t , ,- 1 f 'fri ,N ' ' H iriver . K' esp ,J , 2111. tg A jg 'if 1. . ..rEv.5:ii5w 1 E .i g 5- 5- - , fi ' J . '. 1' , at ,-Q1 , .. A, 3 . .. if ' QS' b"' l4f1.ftf341 V , .rm . A15 5 5 -is :'::22 Ez' 3-vw ia .. F S.. fR"i'f' :Z...zi'fi'5lfH2s.., fern. : A3't:az.,.21f'W i, Z1 ...rt lata? ra-j55ef.gV,,., ' Meetings are held monthly on the last Friday of Activities for this school year have included an open house for mathematic exes during the homecoming celebration and the annual Christmas Party. Each spring the membership attends a banquet. Three H uvzdred Seventeen sam, ia, 1 A i ,i ' ' 1 'f " ,.,5fEaf limit, J Row 1: Bill Bass, Chuck Brock, Frank Burkett, Betty Criner, Ann Guest, Connie Mack Hood Row 2: Lois Long, Jack McSwain, J. K. "Chick" Olsen, Bernie Robertson, Homer Smith, George Wilde pep Galina! Next to the Chamber of Commerce, Meliorist, and the Varsity Squads, the Pep Cabinet was next in the amount of activity. The Cabinet is open to membership of any persons interested in planning and supporting the rallies of pep occurring during the season of football and basket- ball. Members by position include the Cheerleaders, the Mascot, President of the Vigilantes, Drum Major of the Horned Frog Band, and a member of the publicity department. Activities of the group include the pep rallies for each home and visiting game during the seasons. The organization was revived this year for the pur- pose of aiding the cheerleaders in planning for the year's events. Pep Cabinet Officers! Patsy Miller, Chairman: Jimmy Paschal, Secretary, Paul 0. Ridings, Sponsor. Three Hundred Eighteen Row l: Tracey Cary. Gerald Cook, Arthur Faguy-Cote, Dr. C. J. Best, Lewis D. Gillis, Ralph Guenther, Ronald Henderson, Edwin Holleman Row 2: Buford Latimer. Lou A, Marcella, W. J. Marsh, Andy Patterson, Ernest Repass, Morris Repass, R. G. Webb, E. Clyde Whidock fbelllaluae u14fp,fuz The Delta Mu Chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia of America was installed on May 21, 19-48. This fraternal organization is an outgrowth of the former Camerat Club. The purpose of this honorary organization is to further the interest in American music on the campus. It is open to those elected to membership from male musicians with an average of "B" or better. Events of the year included serving as host chapter to the bi-annual province convention, on Saturday, December 3rd. Representatives from three states gath- ered prior to the formal opening of the new building to discuss plans of the group, and share opinions in the music field. Both faculty and students comprise the member- ship of Phi Mu. Phi Mu Alpha Officers: Edward Colley, Presidentp Floyd Lisle, National Councilman: Joe Reed, Secrehxryg and Dr. Michael W. Winesanker, Faculty Advisor. Three Hundred Nineteen , l , -.,. A zzz ' 'A2' 222 .., :" ' . - l i i 1 ittt rrri rra ttt a aa ui., .....,.. I Lg H I.. W 3 Era Phi Sigma Iota Z fs?- '- " ' A ,--,' W i s f f? ..:. -1 ."---. ,g :xs li ..:. ' 5 i 5 5: is 2: 2' fi l ..::. , 5 .::.,., 4 -a:a:s:s: "" 1 . 'fffii . . ......g Q ::: i .. ' aa a "1: 1: '.,..:. 'AA' ::l- Alnzubznz ...... .... . . ,. :way-4' ' ,.Vw.,..1,L,,.,,J.H5N 1:53, Mm.: W -A K ,.,...: :VIQ E zulu 3 2 J' t Q.. If 'vt :' I.IIE,I'E2: ,-. ' . ' :Sf ,' 'EEEEE ..., -.,.: . :. --,. 'f E f '- ,K in p at x S I , , F K: ti egg Row l: Wfyly Edwin Ball, Thomas H. Champion, Carolyn Christopher, Jo Alice Evans, Bita Mae Hall, Robert F. Herring Row 2: Nirio lwane, Nancy King, Jacklyn Lusher, Robert Padgett, Martha Ann Tull, Sarah Zajicek were :Ma ezwm Phi Sigma Iota was established in 1927 as a Na- tional Honor Society for Romance Languages. Students in the upper ten per cent of advanced language classes are chosen for this society. Grade points and interest manifested in language study are considered also. New members are initiated in the fall. Three Hundred Twenty of Sigma fella. The TCU chapter is one of forty in American col- leges and universities. Faculty members of the local chapter include Dean Jerome A. Moore, Dr. Wheeler Hawley, Miss Eulalee Carter, and Miss Bita Mae Hall, all professors in the romance languages. Miss Carter is the local chapters faculty advisor. Row l: Harold D. Converse, Marianne Drummond, Gerald Ernest Kaye, Mary W. Letrs, Mark Marlow Row 2: Roy G. Moore, Betty Sue Scott, J. Elden Spencer, Cecil E. Waggoner, Lou White 7eA:afL Gamma Gfuzfzllm Gf pi Q Mu The Texas Gamma Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu is located at TCU. The primary purpose of the honorary fraternity is the discussion of problems and topics of current interest in the field of the Social Sciences. The organization is opened to all students of the Social Sciences who have completed twenty or more than twenty academic hours in the field of Social Science. All persons invited to become members must have an average in grades of B or better. Membership is limited to those of junior rank or better. ' The TCU chapter meets the first Thursday of every month. Dr. Porterfield is faculty advisor for the group. Pi Gama Mu Officers! Warren C. Albert, Vice-Presidentg Betty Clay Shank, Secretary: Dr. A. L. Porterfield, Sponsor. 4 . 'il' CT' ' 1 X l Three Hunndred Twenty-one Press Club A 5 gi! V"W a C ' A,'-'A- i 5: -. E 95 . ' 'E Z"'5I'-L"'.lII5 1 ' A 2 ll 'Pl I Z Q t. an f vi - f.. ,war ' W., ..,..4, , :,v , . ,,, . .Eg . " ' ...ii , - V ' Q fu ' 'Q , 531' x ga 6.25 R an-1 Xa aa? ,. .z .,.. 5.-1 ,gm 5 f " 5 we r ag We sw S gs ? a 1 j X Q rw 5511 ,QQ rr ' giver N1 K sr as A rr fi r 1 5 f f 4 S in 3 32 55 wg R L 257' - 4 az i ff' ..'l:,., 211, 5551 ., I, .r ,nm 1... ,-....: ar, ' , Mfr -:-s so H --": A if ..,.,.,. 4 4 ...., ,, ,... r -' ,, , L- ' 15 xx Z .,,, filgj 'Ab mag' nw' L lx . Q L, wg ,'x' g e 1 ., 5 t W sr " W XS 1 ,wif gl 9 is at j ..- . fa- v,..,.a.... ,,,..... K UZ- ..,....,. ---f, N- W . , ,. , .wa rv., . v , , a T j ra 1 3 2 I lr -. 1' M, 5 . . W U W j 5' fl' 1 w an . EMR , - Qstriirrpa ' - 1 an-:ff 3' .il 3' A s .',,...s, . ,.xW A ,.. 2 j ... ,, j N. P 1 f r , ., ,, . . .. ,AA..1.. ,,,., . . , . A..q . ,,,, M lv f Vx iz 44 -. ' r .rf fgnpg 1 , ,.,..,, .. Y , ! YM, ,ysrwg-.gat ..::::::::::: : My -,A J ,, , a M . ww W7 as .aj . 6 'P Q W sr V ggi r it t t.. my a- 't' r 5 r 6 , my 4 f , 4 A l 53 sl i 'gf H F. or ., ma. ... t . , .... , ..,.. -.. :.:V:1 . ,. r , . , 2. 5. ,Z ws! :EB-E552 :.: ..,. . , . Row 1: Ted Allen, John Barker, Howard joe Bergman, Chuck Brock, William H. Burr, C. W. Carpenter, Mickey Carter, Greta Chadwick Row 2: Jack F. Clark, Betty Criner, Larry Denton, Charles Dickey, David Dickson, Thomas W. Fife, Jim Harben, Beverly Herrin Row 3: Arleigh Wood Howard, Nancy King, Alice Langford, Mark R. Livesay, Charles Ludwig, Marilyn Lynch, Norman Marks, Bebe Marshall Row 4: Evelyn Mayhew, Bob Miller, Jean Oates, T. L. O'Connell, Jimmy Paschal, Lona Sue Patterson, Bill Reasoner, Irene Rountrec Row 5: Molly Roy, Mary Ryerson, Fred Savage, Joe Shosid, Bob Singer, Ray C. Stokes, Nancy Tally, Charles Thompson, Nancy White, Reba Yocham j. zllwrrl M4144 Pam Glad The purpose of the club is to promote the acquaint- Membership is open to freshmen interested in and ance of all students on the campus who plan to make upper classmen majoring in journalism. The organiza nd to sponsor professional tion is named after J. Willard Ridings, late head of journalism their life work, a journalists' visits to the club. X Three Hundred Twenty-two ,. ...M W, fi the journalism department. Press Club Officers: Frank Burkett, President tary-Treasurer: Paul 0. Ridings, Sponsor. ' " f 2 2 -' --Af f ' - 7 IM W :av-. ' , ' arsrsrararsrsra- , ,,, .n 1 was j E V 'i F ,-a.. rf' jf Joan Reinke, Vice-Presidentg Dorothy Adler, Secre- Sigma Tau Delta ,... , NN '51 l 'N -is le t A f' fi 1 , A 1 V ' 'g. A EMF T '1' ' Y .ff 333 i fliffie 1 Row 1: Larry Demon, Kay Dodson, Marianne Drummond, Osburne Duke, Gerard Kaye, Jimmy Lovell Row 2: Joann McElroy, Mary Jane Nichols, lla Mae Osrerhout, Bill Porter, Willaberh Wilcox .il ll . .V W 3 tl l ,g .W :fra f 5 -a'W 2 1' Liam 1.4 4 - x i .qw , W, r 1 .af eaapzaaysrafa vwfzsaza Sigma Tau Delta is another of the campus's many honorary fraternities. This organization is for those English majors and minors having a high scholastic standing in the department. The purpose of the organization is to sponsor and aid the members creative writing. It is affiliated with a national English honorary society. Faculty advisors are Dr. Paul Dinkins and Mrs. Mary Cantrill, both professors of English. Sigmd TUII Delta Officers! Mary Lou McNamara, Presidentg Robert Pugetf, Secretary- Treasurerg Dr. Paul Dinkins, Sponsor. . . .,.,,l, .. .. ,mm- 1?' Q 1 f'fa:::: :.1::: .4-iyiggw. fx v ' 5.11119 ., , W EE? Q.. . ,F ,.,.. f 1, in . , .::.- eggs: "" . n Q. + 35,2 '. xaafz, .2 fy, Tbree Hundred Twenty-three E l i Row 1: C. W. Carpenter, Chuck Brock, Charles Dickey, David Dickson, Jim Harben, James Langford Row 2: Marilyn Lynch, T. L. O'Connell, Joan Reinke, Joe Shosid, Bob Singer, Roy C. Stokes, Charles Thompson 7lze say The SKIFF, founded in 1902, is the University's only newspaper, published weekly on Fridays by journ- alism classes, under the curriculum of the department of journalism. A member of the Associated Collegiate Press and distributor of the Collegiate Digest, the SKIFF won an all-American rating in 1946-47. Throughout the 1949-50 school year the SKIFF has held an active campaign toward better student govern- ment, riddance of vandalism, etc. The newspapers fight for a Student Directory and a Student Union Lounge proved to be profitable as the congress accomplished both these feats. Features of the 1949-50 SKIFF were the weekly cartoons of Cartoonist Frank Burkett, and the editor's column "Cogitatin' With the Editor." Larry Denton was editor for the entire school year. Skiff Officers: Larry Denton, Editor: Norman Marks, Business Manager, Frank Burkett, Chief Editorial Writer: Mr. Warren Agee, Sponsor. Three Hzmdrezi T wenty-four Symphonic Band Wai 'S 'Bcmcf The University Symphonic Band is the concert ver- sion of the Horned Frog Band with added female players and added musical numbers. The organization is directed by Lawrence Intravaia, who also directs the Horned Frog Band. The Symphonic Band appeared during the Fine Arts Festival playing works of modern composers, among them the band's own president, Lewis Gillis. Gillis .XA is .,.. ,. EEIEs:- 5' ' 1. ff .,.,.,. ' -"' . . ' is A Symphonic Band Officers: Lewis Gillis, Prcsidentg Jack McSwain, Vice-Presidentg Mor- ii ris Repass, Secretary-Treasurer: Lawrence ln- fi -.-,, ii travaiu, Director of Bands. F conducted his own work at the performance on De- cember 11th. The band presented another concert on Tuesday, April -4th in the Ed Landreth Auditorium. Feature of this program was the playing of "Concerto for Tim- pam," played by Nolley Verreen, and the concert ar- rangement of Professor Wm. J. Marsh's "Texas Our Texas" by Lewis Gillis. Q ii 1, M V pr b p 4, V , W f , Elf?" ff Qf ,V 5 ' 'ii' Z .,.,.,. . .: ".. '. f"' Three Hundred Twenty-five SJ, Symphony Orchestra Wai ' Sqnrpfzanq 0 a The University Symphony Orchestra, a full sym- phonic organization, carries on an extensive season of programs each year. Under the baton of Dean T. Smith McCorkle, the organization has grown to what the Fine Arts Bulletin calls "recognized as one of the major college organiza- tions of its kind in the country." Only symphonic literature of the highest calibre is played on the various yearly programs. The University Symphony prides itself in having premiered the Don Gillis "Symphony No. 7," in 1948, during the 75th Anniversary celebration. This year, during the fine arts festival, Dr. Gillis returned and conducted an entire program of his works. Union musicians augment the organization when orchestrations demand a larger unit. Once a year students are given a chance to appear in solo spots with the group. Kenneth Schanewerk is concertmaster, filling a post held by Alice Inskeep for many years. Three H undreri Twenty-.fix if . Symphony Orchestra Officers: Andy Putter- son, Presidentg Ernest Repuss, Vice-Presidentp Mary Lois Hensen, Secretory: T. Smith McCor- kle, Conductor. 9 ' .. ,. ..:::: - :v.-.. - X 525555.55 ..,, if ,gg 1, ..., ,- M533 sy 4' -N11 ' ff ff his if ,Q Yu, 'R-'fre mi l r f at i i iz- ., .., Zig., ki ' , jp I ' I . - 5 , " . 'ii -3.5 5. ..,, . , 5 , - - 55555555555 e .5 - .. . 5 '15:5-5- 5- .'Yt.e"g'- ff: f . 'WV' 'hai 3" .5 - pf: "' A ' a, s.. - . s Q5 ' . 5 ' --"f 5 5 D, U N ,ij v , V - EQ S MA - ,ein -A 13:5-?,:55555.. ,I , I- , ,3-5 mi I ff" 4 ' - - ' i 1' 5 ' 1 ' ' 4 l . W i -ggi, , , ,' . ' 5 ., . 1 -- A . f ' . - -3155 2: 5 A ,.-. f N . i , ,,,,,, 'll ' Q .5 ft. ,,,, xiii M, Row l: Johnnie Beasley, Roscoe Bell, Mary Alice Braley, Bettv Sue Brown, Joe Lee Bryan, Adrienne Foote Row 2: Joseph W. Gardner, Mary Elizabeth Geiger, Menta Heinzman, Betty Kimball, Dale Maybrier, Pat McCamy, Mildred Peterson Row 5: Dona Pirtlc, Betty Jo Riddle, Mollie Dot Robertson, Betty Clay Shank, Leslie Stratton, Charles Thompson, Sue Williamson Zmziedk " ' The United Religious Council was founded in 1947 for the purpose of coordinating and expanding the campus programs on religious matters. Membership is restricted to representatives from each organized religious group on the campus. The group meets with Dean of Men Ralph S. Weth- erell, who is also Director of Religious Activities on the campus. The activities for this year included not only pro- viding speakers for the religious convocations of the year, but the sponsoring of the annual Religious Em- phasis Week. This year the Week was called CLEW, or Christian Living Emphasis Week. A troup of speakers were brought to TCU by this group and the Federal Council of Churches for the week of religious thought. This CLEW week is an event that happens once in the campus lifetime of a student. URC Officers! Joanne Stafferton, Presidentg James Gates, Vice-Presidentp Jan Riddle, Secretary: Dean Ralph Wetherell, Sponsor. Three Hundred Twenty-Jeven I A Vigalantes f ' ' , .1 'V 1 V. ,1..,:-:::: 5 :,:,:,:: . .. , , , . . .4f,, . , 1, , ra, QE. EI 1 ,E ., 6 ka fill m , A 1 ' ' ' ,:2,.,E . M 7 " Q .... , , ., , .. 25,335.5 .. ..,.. -:.:a..- f ,,,, " ' A 'A Q bA., . - . 'f f s r are 1 'S P B if K M V . , l 5 ' WE. if xx 4, , I L. lg' 5 f-, Ji 5 5 ie? . , 1 aah-ef il V sf. -- .1 - 'H ff ,i fc.,-N499 i g R l -ar, . .,--l Row lt Arthur Earl Aplin, Alvin J. Bagnal, Charles Bailey, Norman Bantz, James I.. Baxter, Louis Crittenden, Thomas W. Fife, Shrimp Fisher Row 2: jim Harley, Robert Hopkins, Jim Howard, Neil Huling, James L. Jones, James Kelletr, Charles Ted Largent, Michael Pndden Row 5: Jimmy Paschal, Chris Pcrner, Richard Ramsey, Robert 4BuckJ Sloan, Denney Ray Speck, William C. Stuart, Jack Truirr, Ollie Whitley. 'Ur' The Vigilantes, formerly the Renegades, is one of the most active organizations on the campus. Founded in 1948, the group is a Campus booster club to the varsity football and basketball games. This year, assisted by several new members from the class of '53, the Vigilantes worked hand in hand with the Pep Cabinet in sponsoring mid-week pep rallies in between the girls' dormitories. For the regular pep rallies, the group constructed props, painted signs, and served as leaders in the spirit lift on the Hill. Ar homecoming the Vigilantes served as clowns in the Homecoming Parade, and built the annual bon fire at the quadrangle. The organization is open to all persons interested in the aims of the group. It is the purpose of the Vigilantes to serve the school, with emphasis on the football aspect. Three Hundred Twenty-eight i , Vigalantes Officers! Connie Mack Hood, President, "Chic" Olsen, Vice-President, Har- ley Willey, Secretary: Mr. E. C. Polk, Sponsor. l ii -f fl - , QW NW f .,.. , 'W , "' 'W l W l H ' ...V 2 " r " ' :r 2 fr gg Qs X. 5.5 , :PE ,. W s I Q ' in 1 iw X G. SQ - :H ,. :-M W W 'f ft" - 1 Z :iw .,.. Eli-A I 'I ' 11 4 xiii? , ' " f N: , .,.. ' or H ff: .:'1"'i,W , ,s .F W ' rr ""'-: Ig -ss X 1 , , 7 "" A 4,,, .,,,.,, , ' ,S 5 it 'ilill' if x a , - .... . "" 2 .f f mis fit 5' ' WY' " ' ul is 5 .firms gg jf V ,Flirt :w if age i ' i 5 "6 H, lr 5 ,Q . 5 Sei My ig if r , .,,, ,, , y 2 Row 1: Helen Benson, Florence Brieber, Doris Buie, Ira Ann Cadwallader, Berry Jean Daniel, Bonnie Disney, Sherry Drennon, Jane Easter Row 2: Diane Gregory, Zana Lemon, Lou Ann Lesley, Lois Long, Geneva Maxcey, Sue Meinecke, Marian Olsen, Berry Padon Row 3: Virginia Pearce, Berry Perot, ,Ian Riddle, Sue Scott, Sallie Secor, Betsy Strange, Ann Underwood, Vita Zodin wma, span 4 0-it Girls of the W.S.A. endeavor to furnish recreation The W.S.A. was founded in 1924. Each year they and interesting activity for their leisure hours. welcome new Freshmen with an open house in Sep- Their slogan is "a sport for every girl and every Kimber' Sifl in fl 5P0ff with 3 80041 time for ffVefYb0dY-H This year W.S.A. sponsored "T" night is to award Membership is open to any girl on the campus in- members who have earned special recognition during terested in participating in organized sports. the spring sports competition. WSA Officers! Betty Ann Minyard, President: Mary Lou Robertson, Vice-President: Betty Ann Rowland, Secretary: Joan McShan, Treasurer: Catherine Moore, Historian: May Belle Tinkle, Faculty Sponsor. Three Hundred Twenty-nine CK ll frat.. Ljsjffiigi w : X, .ii , A il me .:.: vupsfrfft fr.. ,. i U h A p 2 , V. V - L Vsra e t A V -V . if ,,.:1 V ,. , . 2 'T f E ..-V 1 '1" ' AZ" 'zi' t --1--1 i -7 V.. ' V iz: ""' QW A 'ii N gi., ,QA ,, --:. 42 - .. ' . -V ' 1 ' t V - :,. V ' A r t V- ' . ., V. :.:::: asf :.. 1. . fgiE? ' l 5Sii 55 if l ii f- 23: 51 15535 -2 I -. 2'11-'- . t- " V-V , ' ll? "":':':::" . x f r ' tl F Y ' , .V..V. ..,1 ' r -' , A : : M f '--- ',... V si' 2 , ..,, -X ' t 2 Row 1: Roscoe Bell, Tommie Buchard, Don Brewer, Sara Carlock, Rogers King Coleman, Norman Cornelius, Bob Cornell, Donald Cox Row 2: Elizabeth Davis, Betty Sue Doty, Walter Echols, Peggy Gordon, Joe Thomas Hearne, Walter Hehl, Merita Hunzmnu, Bob Herring Row 5: Gerald E. Kaye, Buford Latimer, May Letts, Mary Lavender, Neil Lindley, Floyd Lisle, Jimmy Livingston, Lois Long Row 4: Ted McElroy, B. Claude Mathis, Dale Maybrier, Eloise Mayo, Ed Mugge, Margaret Mundhenke, Norma Nelson 7k n ll The "Y" on TCU campus is a combination of the YMCA and the YWCA and is affiliated with the na- tional Student Christian Movement. It is interdenomi- national, interracial, and international in its scope. All students interested in the work of the YM or YW are eligible to become members. The organization meets every Tuesday at the Arch. Three times a month discussion groups are held in the homes of the sponsors. These discussions provide an opportunity for all students to seek a Christian inter- pretation for personal, social, economic, religious and political problems. Once a month all the discussion groups meet to- gether for a social or a business session. The "YU is another of the active organizations of the campus, and invites all students into its membership. R a.::sz::ea:ef2En-r-'-z- A ' " " .::':::' ees-5-.'-:-1 4 i sg. Q , pzv iyi , ,S . 55. 9, .. 9 1 1 a, , , ,Q , n- t s 2 h ig v Q g 1 'Q ' X 71 W, J, 4 J t Www -.f t 'xv-fix., -' :-:si ' ':':asas.,. ':- ie.. ff ' :F . l' yjgltl 1:-:cf i g l , f. 4 ,,..- ,, , . ,,:. 1 it W' ' Q Q-,fi MW' iii' ' 5 is V., . pawn E, + 'il f r Q ,N 1 Q a " si i f a Mir- 5 G 3 4 I Three Hundred Thirty -'-- ' "Y"Olficers: Billie Nell Adkins, Presidentg Eugene Peters, Vice-President: Joe Lee Byron, Treasurerg Dr. H. R. Mundkenke, Sponsor. :zi ,,., ,, ..,.,:.,, , S i t 5, 5 A 1 - 1,1-:EB .-.-. 3 . xi. V., :.:,.,.::::-:-- ....-. ,,,,, : .,:, g,,., , . I ..,: , V , ,:., ---- a :- : ' "" 1a:1- . , . my ,. 1-1 'ss , . Q S gi X 3 1 EEE 2 ' Wim- wif ay' M, it -. ' I-F125 - .-,-. , .:.:.:.:.-. . if Wy. --:1:-:::::::: 1 Lk : ,V ".f:f - ..g .-tif f 'Efm.pff-11f2..:x- .. 1, , ., ., : Yr, - A 2 ,Z 7 let ' ffi gi wa grip ir 2 A ? , ' :ff r I ' i v i xt gin an X ik? 'S .. , i Mglvl 4 y Ji 1 ig 5' EQ . X f ,A J :GW ' if Syl il 15 .S ' fav ' 5 . aa, 1 fl A tr , , M , N' ' ' ,,-. f t I ilixj, 4 ig.. A l 3-:Fi fi A fy . 4.:. 5 l xi fig? 4 1 Q :tt M if ff f g at r 5, QA. v wif wi mf ri F EER 1, 1162 2,2 3 5 r E 5 Q il R' .gg MWA 0, CC ll Qyvfst H , ..:,, - 2 f Q QE hi is 0. ' 5 if as f ? x ' K X Q 4 Q 'Qi W z 5 ,Q 1 . , .. , ' , gi 'A Row 1: Loyce Orr, Bob Painter, Alarah Pierce, John Quick, Joe Reed, Jan Riddle, George Rowe, George Royce Row 2: Irene Sailor, Mildred Schierman, Betty Rae Schmidt, Sue Scott, Betty Clay Shank, Floyd Slaton, Wilma Smashey Little, Leonardine Smith Row 3: Nancy Smith, Pat Spencer, Jo Anne Srafferton, Carl Stanford, Edwin Stanford, Lynne Stanley, Barbara Sterling, Marjorie Taylor Row 4: John Waddill, Betty Jean Werner, James O. Whittaker, George Wilde, Noreen Wilkins, Ewart Wyle nw Ng., ,3QT5A,5g?' ..., "" 135 'X .'y"::fl' Q V f j i 31g.'s:e,, A, ' fifrfflii l ' 1' : 1 i lt., ' ' :5 , f b: ' . T bree Hundred Thirty-one ,w4:,fl1i is A M ww1,,,, 11 , HL 5 , ' , ,Q :llwmf ' M - , . 4. S V' ? '?P'm,rf . l ,lm y Q' A 'ww -KFAMQE " fs: ,, ZGYI' 1 4:f.ifQ5f f I 5, I ' :wiv - ' . Q' 5:55555 W ' if my Ay xi , ' : Yi , LV: , ,ff 2 5 9? , :fr 9,2 ' ww-Q Ifgiiiffbfwx ,A ,. Ag f gr n' .9331 . up 4 A A112215-1-. 5 , L wig We -,+ -an , -flmlg 3 gk ,, Q, " fl yi, 'ENQWV W , ' ' 23553 , WV? . Ng 11' SS S 155' 2 'ASH ,z ,J D 2 2' .. - xc ' 2 ,- Q ,Ly .4 bmi, LK A'- ,,f . V 1 E 3, 2 J A WW' az" in 'ze W fsfwb. L . .:.,: , E W K E ec 72 ye 2 5 2 2 I Q 2, L Q 2 Q MARILYN LYNCH Business Manager RIVERSIDE ASSOCIATES 8-2242 0 8-6823 0 8-8150 2809 Rcxce FORT WORTH, TEXAS INSURANCE Porul C. Higginbothcrm 61 Co. Orein Browning BUILDING and REAL ESTATE W. I. Browning Walter Browning, Ir. DESIGNERS. BUILDERS. INSURE. BOND. LOAN cmd APPRAISALS Keep Your Eye on Wally Wdhbmd For the newest, Youngest fashions 7TH AT THROCKMORTON FORT WORTH HHHHIS EIIIIMHN,INE. 0 HEATING 0 VENTILATING 0 REFRIGERATION A. M. Harris, Pres. 1933 East Lancaster 3-1348 .ga-rw , Y I 600 olafe For AMERICAN QUEENS Three Hundred Thirty-five Mexican llnn Carlile Enjoy Mexican meals flavored with a touch of Old Mexico. South-of-the-border surroundings add gusto to your dining. Now two locations for your convenience. lACKSBORO HWY AT 516 COMMERCE WHITE SETTLEMENT RD. M O N N l G ' S The friendly store, in the heart of the down- town shopping district. College students in Fort Worth know they can depend on MONNlG'S for fashion-wise clothes at budget-wise prices. Transit Company Driver, Bill Fielder, wel- comes two regular riders aboard his bus. Typical oi the spirit of service that your Transit Company Drivers show -Bill greets Ray Cash and Mary Lou Miller as they board his bus. Bill and his fellow workers see to it that Ray and Mary Lou and all the other students get where they're going safely and in a minimum of time. Three Hundred Thirty-tix T. C. U. Horned Frog Pharmacy Where Everybody Meets Everybody Three H umlred Thirty-eight Co-eds iind at The Fair one of the few all-junior shops in the Southwest devoted exclusively to the showing and featuring of A1'nerica's most famous and popular names in apparel for juniors. IUNIOR APPAREL AND SPORTSWEAR THE FAlR'S THIRD FLOOR HALTOM'S . . . lewelers since 1893, has had the pleasure ot serving four generations of T.C.U. students with the finest of sterling and plated silverware, diamond rings and jewelry, watches, and T.C.U. class rings and jewelry. Come in soon. Let us serve you. HALTOM'S The House of Diamonds MAIN AT SIXTH FOR MODERN COOKS Bird's-Eye Frozen Foods really fill the bill. Bird's-Eye Foods are already prepared tor cooking, and they come in convenient size packages. If you want really fresh tasting foods without the bother of preparation for cooking-try Bird's-Eye! Largest Dislribularx W of Fresh um! Frozen V. I., EV ' .Q Fruits and Vegetables ' ' X COMPANY in the Southwest 'f. I' a winmnlnl:lrmm tBWwru i l:aL f In '11 usven ron vu: wmsn:-wan-no . DALLAS i LONGVIEW ABILENE FORT WORTH WICHITA FALLS 'A' LUBBOCK NO GIFT IS MORE APPRECIATED THAN A GIFT PACK OF KEITI-l'S FINE FRUITS . . . AVAILABLE THROUGH YOUR INDE- PENDENT "FRESH FROM KEI'I'H'S " DEALER. Bowler! Undef Authority of the Com-Cola Company by Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of Fort Worth 650 SOUTH MAIN FORT WORTH, TEXAS Three Hundred Tb ty Three Hundred Forty Enjoy Life Dine at 0 L I V E R ' S more often 3053 University Drive 49554 For Value! For Qfmlity! It Pfzyf to Shop AT PENN EY' First Quality Merchandise At Lower Prices Looks like Rainey Owen is reaching for another bottle of Vandervoorfs Homoq- enized Milk with cream in every drop. His friend, Toy Gibson, knows that the Vitamin D added to Vandervoort's milk makes tor more of the kind ot beauty students like to see gracinq the campus. F or a smooth-smooth glass ot milk that's delicious and refreshing too, reach for Vandervoorfs every time. "lt's Sure- Good." il VAIID RVGDR S Jfmd Maueqi fbinnm place SOUTHSlDE'S FAVORITE EATING PLACE Service With H ofpitfzlizfy 180.1 sth Ave. 4-8242 Three H and red Yozfll Enjoy Shopping at fe 0 MM Fort Worih's Quality Department Store For olelicious, economically priced mecrls ect RMSTRONG'S Home Cooking I ABOVE: Lou the selection of cr pearl necklace CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO GRADUATES OF 'f 1 9 5 O " "We Are Always for You T.C.U .... 100 per cent" HOUSTON AT SIXTH PHONE 3-4464 Three Hundred Forty-two 'r""" BECAUSE OF ITS MILK and HONEY 0 FLAVOR NGBURN COMPANY, FORT WOR'H ThHfldF h MMM- Three Hundred Forty-four Compliments of 1 ANN o cg . S545 gtg ,:::1f .W X M. JOHNLASHE FORT WORTH DENNIE HARMAN'S . . . HOUSE OF HOSPITALITY . . . For Good Food 215 West Berry Phone 9-7275 Sewing For! Worth For Over 40 Yean 'E 'i 3 l X - 1 f-if . fig: , 1 xx X :X Q " 114 .fkxxn 6' I K4 4.r 'gy 57 x 2 xl X 4 V xx I N x yX 3 3 3 nsumo nnuss PORTRAITS ENLARGEMENTS COPIES MINIATURES ORG IN'S STUDICD D0 You KNoW. We keep your freshman, sophomore, junior and senior pictures on file so that you may re-order one or aIl of them at any time. Our files contain pictures of 1945-'46-'47-'48-'49 and '50 students. Come in today and let us furnish you with a portrait that you will treasure. 80514 HoUsToN 3-2022 Three Humirezl Forty-five Three I-Iundrerl Forty-:ix COLONIAL CAFETERIA Colonial Cafeteria brings you home cooking that is really good. li you have a party, take advantage of Colonial's private dining room, and Without the bother of dinner preparations enjoy "home cooking that is really good." 3062 University Drive 9-5112 Campus Beauties look to Meacham's Where Beautiful Fashions Are a Tradition HOUSTON AT FIFTH FORT WORTH Yon UW!! Henle n Good Time When Yon Plan an Evening at LIHEITS PlHEl OUR MUSIC IS THE BEST FOR DANCINGQ OUR ATMOSPHERE THE BEST FOR ROMANCING We Are Open Every Night Our cover charge is reasonable-50 cents 21 couple on week nights and 3131.00 a couple on Saturday night. LO-1423 5200 Mansfield HWY. OAK FARMS FINE DAIRY PRODUCTS FORT WORTH, TEXAS 300 East Magnolia Phone 3-3421 I like Oak Farms Fine Dairy Products for their health-giving qualities and superior taste. Nothing beats Oak Farms Milk. It's got everything . . . That's the new Chevrolet . . . newest styl- ing, big car comfort, top flight performance. For the best, it's Chevrolet at the Ernest Allen Motor Company, Fort Worth's best for Chevrolet Sales or Service. GENTEOLET 615 Commerce 2-4171 tl AMNWMMN-NMMA vvvv.N.NNNv.,v.NvsN- ,,,N,,,,.,.,.,.,. , .,,,,, vvv,.Nv.Nvvv.. ,,N,,,,A,v. -.,.,..,.Nvv- TCU THEATRE .Nv.,.,.Nx Nvwvv- M NWNWAANMN NWAANWAANV. ,.,,Nvvvv.,,.Nv-JVVWN vm,vv.,vv..v-AAAANVV. 'A' ik 'A' Our doors lead to the best in motion picture entertainment. Students can relax in the friendly atmosphere, typical of all Com- munity Theatres. it 1' 'A' 3055 University Drive-"On the Drag" Three H zmdrezl F ofly-.fevefz Three Hundred Forty-eight One of the finer shops for men . . . exem- plifying the superlative in Americzfs apparel arcs. flee flzlzelk, Cmtom Excellence 107 East Seventh near Main C omplimentr FRANK KENT Your Ford Dealer Sinee 1935 MAIN AT LANCASTER N. MAIN AND 26TH ST. FORT WORTH In Texas more people go into ct grocery store cmd ask for Mrs. Baird's Bread than ask for any other loaf. Here Barbara Croqer and Io Anne Ruby show that Mrs. Baird's Bread is the choice of T. C. U. Co-eds, too, whenever there is an occasion to prepare dormitory snacks, or picnic lunches. ...WITH AN EYE TO THE FUTURE Typifyiriq the qraduatirig class ot 1950, Homer "Dopey" Smith and his Wife, Doris, prepare to meet the future. Your Fort Worth Banks stand ready to help you meet your future with their counsel and advice. Let the experience and guidance they offer make your Way a little easier. ' THE FIRST NATIIINAI BANK ' THE FIIRT WIIRTH NATIIINAL BANK CONTINENTAL NATIIINAI BANK ' UNIIIN BANK ANIZ TRUST CU. ' TRINITY STATE BANK Three H and refl F o Serve Boswell's Velvet Ice Cream for an extra tasty treat. You'll love that velvet-smooth delicious flavor ' Keep Boswell's Velvet Ice Cream in your refriqe- rator . . . It's a pure wholesome food. You'l1 find Boswel1's Velvet Ice Cream at your favorite food store or ice cream counter. Roswell Dstiries Serving the requirements of T. C. U. for 52 Years 0 Iewelry 0 Gifts 0 Luqqaqe 0 Sporting Goods 0 IVIGTIIS Store wagg- I KLA MAIN 5 tinv 'mu vucis xw. fg E ki TRIE if I Three I-Ifnzrlred Fifty Noel Williams and Eugenia Luker Browse Through the Complete Selection oi Brandt Ranch Oak Home Furnishings at . 9 Shim .sf 7TH AT TI-IROCKMORTON DOWNTOWN Fort Worth THE STORE DESIGNED EOR YOUR SHOPPING PLEASURE f C O X. QS f R. E. COX G CO. OF FORT WORTH L. J. 8g DON HUNT'S Offers You Complete and Courteous Service 2-0470 2600 E. Belknap ONE-STOP HUMBLE SERVICE STATION We Give S cSr H Green Stamps OPEN 24 HOURS DAVE BLOXOM'S Also u Complete Line A of Nationally Advertised Sporting Goods l . . . this label in the clothes you wear, means style, quality and value unsurpassed .... For Clean Recreation and Relaxation - - - lt's DAVE BLOXOM'S Campus Club WALTER JETTOINVS FOR BETTER BARBECUE 3-9332 1432 W. Terrell Three Humlrerl Fifty Three Hundred Fifty-two ZIP HAMBURGER SYSTEM To climax a Wonderful evening bring your date to the ZIP for a tasty treat. You will receive fast, friendly service at the Zip Hamburger Stand around the corner on Berry. 2910 West Berry 9'9077 MARY E ELYNS "On the Drag" Clothes that are exclusive but not expensive. Featuring nationally advertised labels for the college and business girl. FAYE GARNER, Owner 3065 University Drive 4-4674 UBE'S JEWELRY We have in stock a complete line of jewelry, fountain pen and-pencil sets, Ronson lighters, and novel and inexpensive gifts of all types. Watch repairs We make are done scientifically. Come in today to get your Watch checked and tuned up. 9-6777 3051 University Dr. ESTE ll-lARlRllSON for remembrances and gifts for all occasions . . . SEND FLOWERS 1622 Plark Place 4-4026 uf A Q T.C.U. SERVICE STATION SSS Drive to T. C. U. Service Station for Reliable K HUMBLE PRODUCTS 'TCH H , ,Q L Or leave your car with us for Lubrication, Repairing, and General Check-Up while you attend classes. All Work Gzmmfzteeri Rogers at Conley 4-0297 Featuring Armstrong Saddles Zisilwttozr emszrr, Authentic Western Wear Phone 3-0200 , 205-A W. 7th St. FORT WORTH, TEXAS R. M. DAVIDSON, Owner . 55 V 5-77 xt. mf- A 3' Texas Christian University is the pride of Fort Worthians everywhere! FORT WORTH CHAMBER OE COMMERCE 114 E. Sth Street Fort Worth, Texas Three Hundred Fifty-tbree STEWART-TITLE GUARANTY OO Correct Abstracts and Title Insurance "It is better to be Sak than sorry" V. C. MCNAMEE, Vice-Preyident 206 Dan Waqqoner Bldq. FOBT WORTH CONGRATULATIONS, GRADUATES We Extend Greetings and Best Wishes to the Faculty and Students of Texas Christian University Distributors oi Industrial Supplies and Equipment WELL MACHINERY 81 SUPPLY CO., INC. 1629 Main Street Fort Worth, Texas Dine and Dance in the Southwest's Most Beautiful Dine and Dance Room THE KEY T0 E lilllltll Hotel Texas has long been the hub of Fort Worth's business lite, and now the glamorous Keystone Boom . . . the Southwests most beautiful dine and dance room . . . makes it also the hub of Fort Worth's social lite. Don't miss the Keystone Room! For reservations, dial 2-3151 . 2: fig lt - 5...-. .. ., 5, ig ,. . ' el Y' ,gr Fort Worth Owned and Operated "Where the West Begins" Three H mulrezl Fifty-four UNIVERSITY OF. Qprfgflfvzfr in cgciwfef wwf Caffe e4 ln 1873 Texas Christian University began its life with thirteen students. It started to grow with Texas, and like Texas, it has continued to grow. Today 6200 students in this center of culture and learning study fine arts, business administration, science, the humanities, prepare for the teach- ing profession, and follow studies leading to the ministry. Composing the University are the AddRan College ot Arts and Sci- ences, Brite College of the Bible, School of Business, School of Educa- tion, the Evening College, School of Fine Arts, the Graduate School, Har- ris College of Nursing, and the Yale lnstitute of Alcohol Studies. Because of its superior Work in all its fields of study, Texas Christian University has been recognized and accredited by all the state and na- tional agencies organized for the purpose. llXHS EHIiI3lIHN 1873 0 1950 HNIVlItTlXl lY President M. E. Sadler Three Hluujrezi Fifty-five I-I. I-I. MORSE REAL ESTATE 815 V2 Throckmorton St. Fort Worth, Texas H. H. MORSE BUSINESS PROPERTY CHAS. H. HAWS TELEPHONE - 2-6176 SALES, LEASES AND MANAGEMENT The Sign of Good Insurance GARTNEIR MXT C H ELL Gt THOMPSON 'k HERMAN GARTNER I. MAC THOMPSON W. L BLOUNT V. P. BAKER W. W. TAYLOR ROGER C. NEELY R. L. FARMER, IR. FRANK L. THOMPSON S' 1889 914 Houston Street at Ninth Fort Worth, Texas Three Humlrezl Fifty-.fix THE TORY OF TEN LITTLE FREE WORKER 'rr-ms: mu: 'rx-In wonxzzns REDOY DOCT RAILROADER MINER STEELWORKER FARMER LAWVER GROCFR SALESCLERK REPORTER 5 3 Q 11 9 at-Q Z' ati? iii! A A kv-5 N025 Ten little free workers in this country line and lair. But it you cherish your freedom-worker have a carel Ten little free workers-Reddy was doing fine Until the socialists got him-then there were nine. Nine little tree workers laughed at Fteddy's tate Along came federal medicine-then there were eight. if-gl Eight little tree workers thought this country heaven b , But the government took over the railroads. then there were seven. Seven little tree workers-'till the miners got in a tix. Uncle said coal's essential and took over leaving six. Six little free workers 'till the day did arrive The steel mills too were tederalized-then there were live. Five little tree workers-but the farmers are tree no more The farms have been collectivized-that leaves only tour. Four little tree workers till the government did decree All must have tree legal advice-then there were three. Three little tree workers-the number is getting few, But with qovernment groceries selling food-then there were two., Two little tree workers-our story's almost done, With clerks at work in tederal stores-that leaves only one. One little free worker-the reporter son-ot-a-gun Mustn't criticize government-so now there are none. Q is ' 17' 'ii' L," -mt., ? Jars sfztz IB Ten little workers-but they are no longer tree They work when and where ordered, and at a fixed rate you see, And it all could have been prevented it they'd only seen tit to agree And work together instead ot saying "it never can happen to mel" This little story points out what CAN HAPPEN to you in Free America and is the story of what HAS HAPPENED in some countries and lS HAPPENING in others as socialization ot industry progresses. TEXAS ELECTRIC SERVICE COMPANY Three Hunrlrerl Fifty-:ellen THOS. S. BYRNE. Inc. Engineen Er General Contractor: FORT WORTH 2, TEXAS C omplimenzs of 111119 111111111 FORT WORTH, DALLAS, SANTA FE 1114 Ienninqs Fort Worth Three Hundred Fifty-eight THE PROGRESS L A U N D R Y PHONE 4-3221 Economical Coffs rf? Carry . . . Superior Dry Cleaning . . . Complete Lczzmciry Service . . . 1627 PARK PLACE FORT WORTH, TEXAS .? Takes Less .. ...Tastes Best! ' ROOFING-Industrial and Residential ' SHEET METAL WORK ' SIDING ' REPAIRS HAMILTON RQOFING Co. 1104 MACON PH. 3-9311 1 l 7 NWWMNWWN Priwzte Parties and Bmzqzretx Playing the Nations Leading Bands-Featuring the Lowest Phone 6-1933 Night Club Food and Beverage Prices ..,.-.... MM, , ...,.-.,....... .v.v. , - ,.,...v.,.,., - sl Three Hfmclr-ed Fifty "Serving Fort Worth ur Your Authorized Dealer for 38 Years" A FIIIIII WIIIIII IIIIITIIII CIIIIIPA Y Sanford G. Webb Elmo S. Webb 1022 LAMAR AT THIRTEENTH Phone 2-6201 C 51 S Sporting Goods Co. Tennis winners, golf champions, all sports experts find the top caliber equipment they need ot C G S Sporting Goods. C G S specializes in the best of sporting goods. 106 East 2nd Street 2-9312 Actual proof of beauty matched, t s ph graph of three campus lovelies in the heating and air-conditioning room at new Fine Arts Building. It ma e n ree o is impressive, eh girls? y b II G k I them, buf il' BEALS Plumbing and Heating, Inc. 0 MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 0 AIR CONDITIONING 0 PLUMBING-HEATING O COMMERCIAL-INDUSTRIAL Thank you, T. C. U., for Selecting Us To Install Your Plumbing, Heating, Air Conditioning and Sprinkler Systems in Your New Fine Arts Building. Three Hundred S ixty d il? amo11.t7?xA bran 'APOLOGIES TO SANTA FE The "SWECO" brand is known throughout the Southwest as the standard for printing plates of the finest quality, an experienced service, and art work that gets over the message. Since l9l2, SOUTHWESTERN of FORT WORTH has blazed the trail for better pictorial impres- sions. Insist on the best, specify SOUTHWESTERN of FORT WORTH as your engraver---you'll be proud of the results achieved by "SWECO"-branded plates. SUUTHWESTERN ENGRAVING COMPANY, HTC. 206Vz West 11th Box 1161 Fort Worth T lnree Hundred Sixly Sfsggstr -Jawa CO. 1114 W. Dcrqqett FORT WORTH, TEXAS EM... This is the way they had to leave- Of course the editor is only fooling . . . the printer was the one who made the errors. All things must come to an end, and so the editor and business manager bid you adieu. There is an old Spanish saying that the publishers should leave town after the book goes to press and so you see them on the way to Siberia. If you are not satisfied with the book, if the wrong name appears under your pic- ture, or even if your picture is left out, you may address your complaints to Baku, Azerbad- zan. This picture shows the way they would like to leave town- Three Hundred Sixty-two .53 53 71 Abbas, Ann .......... .... . . . Abshire, William F. . . . ..... . . . Achzier, Harold M. . . . . .70 282 Acklin, Floyd ....,, .... . 24 Acola, Sam ...... . . . . . Adair, Dan ..... . . . . Adair, James .... . . . . . Adams, Ivan ....... . . 133 Adams, Jessie C. ... .. ... Adams, Marjorie . . . . . . . . . . Adams, Patsy ,,..,,. . ......, . Adkins, Billie Nell . . . ....,.,.. 24 299 Adkinson, Donna . . . ............ . . . . Adler, Dorothy . . ...,....,... 60, 306 Admire, Jerc .... ..., 6 0, 147, 194 224 Agee, Warren ...,.. ............. . 22 A bert, Warren C. . . ...... , ..,. .24 Alderman, Chester . . , . . . . Alderman, H. P. . . . . . . . . Aldrich, Riley ...... .... 7 0 Alexander, E. R. ...... .... . Alexander, John W. . . . . . . . . . Alexander, Judy ..... .,.. 4 5 Alford, Kathleen . . . , . . .88 Alford, Rex ..... Allcorn, Jean . . . Allen, Dick ..... Allen, Richard . . . QIIQ88 Allen, Ted .,... Altman, Irving . . . .55 Amburg, Jim .... . . .110 Ames, John F. ..... ...,. Ames, Robert E. . . . .. . . . . Ammons, William . .. . . . .60 Anastas, Emma . . . . . . Anderson, Anderson Anderson Mrs. D. L.... Dan L. L. D. Anderson Mary Jo . . . . . Anderson, Milton .... ...-- Anderson, Richard T. . . . . . . . . Anderson, Ruth 1. . . . . . . .69 Anderson, Wesley .. .... 53 Andrews, Chuck .... ........ Andrews, Thorpe . . . . . .53. 153 Angell, Ruth S. ......,................. . Ap in, Arthur ,,.,..,..,............ . . .96 Archer, Jack . .96,197, 201 257, 259, 264, 266 Archer, Shirley ....... ............. .... . Arend, John .........,. ...., . . ...... . . .. Armstrong, Marian . . . . . . , 124 Armstrong, Ralph . . . . . . . . Arnold, Bobbie Joan . . . . . . Arnold, Keith ......., ..... Arnold, Richard M. . . . . .114 Arrowood, Bill . ,.... . . . . . Ashley, Adele ...... .... 5 3. Atchison, James . . .... . . Austin, Hoy ..... ..... Austin, John T. .. ..... Aurrey, Harold .. .... 24 Avery, Janet ..... ...... Avery, Stephen ..... ..... Awbrey, Rubly L. . . . . . . . . Ayers, Dorothy ....,. . . . . . . .70, Ayres, Callie Ann .,.... . . . . Henry . . . ,290 I0 Bagbym, William . Baggett, Kenneth 329 ... 113 Bagnall, Al ......... . . .84, 292 Bailey, Charles . . . . . .60, 306 Bailey, Katherine . . . ..... . . . . Bailey, Morris . . . .... 155, 169 Bailey, Sam P. . . ...... . . . Baker, Bebe .... ,....... Baker, Earl Joe .. ....... .. Baker, Elaine .... .... 1 21,290 Baker, Evelyn M. . . . .... . . . . . Baker, Gene ..... .....,.. Baker, Jesse ..... .... 7 0 Baker, Leroy ...... ..... Baker, Mary Louise . . . . . Baker, Pete ....... ...... Baker, Winthrop D. . . ..... . . . Baker, Woody ...... . . .84, 284 Baley, Margaret Anne . . . . . . . . . . . Ball, Bob .............................. Ball, Mary Alice ....,.........,...,...., Ball, Wyly Edwin ..... 24, 282, 310, 312, 520 Ballard, C yde ......................... 45 Balrzell, Conner .... ..............,, . .70 Banks, Jog ........... . .............- 130 Bannett, laude .... ...........,,......., Bantz, Norman .... 60, 169 194, 219, 299, 309 Barber, James ........................ . . . Baren, Dalene .......................... Bar er, Leroy .,.... ..... Barier, Aaron T. . . . . . . . . . Barker, John ....... .--- 2 4 Barned, Donald ,... . .... . Barnes, Annie Mae ... . . . . . . Barnes, B. J. ..,... .... 9 6 Barnes, Billy .... .....- Barnes, Bob ....... .... 8 4 Barnett, Chester L. Barr, Mary Alice Barrett, Tommy . Bartholomew, Jack Barton, Bill B. , ..,.................. . . Bartosh, Gilbert ...... 108, 150, 195, 213, 2 Basham, Dan . . . Bass, Bill .... 25 '111QQi53fi5af2i5.29i Page 53 8-1 292 282 24 84 53 . 299 22 45 60 330 127 322 ,306 324 321 24 155 306 22 45 306 287 96 287 60 306 322 60 162 '290 121 310 108 126 22 22 127 155 84 287 303 60 298 22 328 289 88 53 299 53 108 60 'I 285 96 60 306 C0 'I 24 129 287 124 96 110 328 328 113 291 70 159 91 306 121 96 284 70 113 53 70 292 91 45 45 317 282 292 306 71 328 60 121 96 133 322 96 137 292 69 281 133 121 91 108 45 258 45 318 INDE Bass, Fae .... Batchelor, Betty .. Bates, Johnnie Batoon, Ester R. . . Batoon, Reuben .. Baugh, Ann .... Baxter, James . .. Bean, Ralph .... Beard, Letitia . .... . Beard, Roy ., ....... Beasley, Johme Beasley, Joyce Joann Beary, J. L. ....... . Beaupre, Bob ...... Beck, Tommy .... Beck, William ..... Becknell, Howard . . . Beers, Carol ..... Beierlein, Harry .... Belkna , Aubrey Igonald Bell, Bell, Hattie Lou .... Bell, Joy ....... Bell, Marvin .... Bell, Mary Louise . . . Bell, Roscoe ,.... Bell Warren ..... Bellamy, Roy Q. Benedict, Patricia . . . Bennet, Claude . . . Bennett, Jo ..... Bennett, Laverne . . . Benson, Gloria ...... Benson, Helen ....... Benthall, Alice Louise Berg, Richard . . .... . . . Berger, Lee V. ..... . Bergner, Howard . . . Berry, Betty ..... Berry, L. J. .... . Berry, Lindy ...... Bertleson, Betty Ann Beseda, Charles G. . . . Best, Clarence J. Best, Sue ....... Bettis, Ann ........ Bieber, Florence ..... Bingham, Betty Lee . Bisholjiv, William J. . . . Bizze , Wlanda ...... Black, Bob ....... Black, Henry .... Black, James R. . . .. Blackledge, Walter . . . Blackstone, Frank . . . Blain, Kerry ..... Blanton, Francie .... Blanton, Ray ..,.... Bloxom, Shankle ..... ..ffi66 ....127 .QQ155 Ifffiid fIIQ55'299' 'Ifi45 71Q15Xfts6 225,254,255 'IfIi6a .III55Q295 Bluethman, Mary Beth . . . Boal, George ........ Bodine, Edwin . .... . Bodour, Alice .... Botlycomb, Carol . .. Boenker, Fred ..... Boggus, Danny . . . Bo olin, Bill ....... Bosannon, Barbara . . . Bohannon, Bill ..... Boles, Calvin ..., Boles, Ralph ...., Boley, Margaret .. Bolin, Phyllis ,... . . Bond, Bill ......... Bond, Kendall Ray . . . Boone. Mary Ruth . . . Borland, Harold .... Bost, Harold . .... . Bostick, Donald ..... Bouchard, Tommie . , . . Boultinghouse, Billie .. Bourland, Angie ..... Bourland, William . .. Bowers, Jennie ..... Boyd, Jack .... . . Boyd, James ..... Boyd, Jeraldeen .. Boyd, Obie .... Boyer, Minor .... Boyett, Flo ........ Bradbur , Robert . . . Bradfordi Johnny . . . Braley, May Alice . . . Brannan, Bennie . . . Brannon, Buster ..... Bratton, Katherine . . . . Breen, Pat ............ ffifiil fIII65Q 4.9.7. .22 196 155 .96 .24 166 '299 282 '299 175 156 fA5 327 .84 -97 312 .45 .60 1 ,258 114 365 121 566 f9i 134 .97 .91 151 Q66 .71 291 131 391 299 Illliiil Brenner, Jo Ann Ruth... , Brewer, Don ......... Brewer, Earl ....... Brewster, Earlene . . . Brewton, Roy .... Brice, Gene ..,. Briden, Lola ..... Brieber, Florence Brigham, John . . . Brink, Eugene Bristol, Ray ....... Brock, Charlene Brock, Chuck .... .... Brooks, Bill ..,. Brooks, Jack . . . Brooks, Otis . . . .......60, """'25f565f569f5i6f """"'fIf225Q 1IIi2i'i65' f25 285 296 299 .551 133 322 294 Page 1 295 60 306 127 , 299 306 328 121 306 70 , 327 , 290 91 60 306 96 , 282 60 1 292 137 110 128 53 137 287 330 60 137 60 292 124 287 124 329 316 91 303 322 53 121 199. 266 60 282 113 108 33? 306 84 310 137 97 84 69 97 304 45 306 291 306 97 24 91 306 24 124 281 110 292 53 25 162 282 91 306 282 25 286 25 330 124 45 45 114 25 97 128 25 282 45 60 127 327 129 95 126 121 306 330 25 108 53 299 129 297 133 53 324 53 25 317 Brookshire, Alan H. . . Broone, Faye ..... Brorherron, Loyd .. Browder, Jimmy . . . Brown, B. L. ...... . Brown, Betty Sue . .. Brown, Billie V. . . . . Brown, Charlie J. . . , Brown Mrs. H. C. .. 1 Brown, Mackie .... Brown, Vernon .. Brown, W. L. Wendall . Brown, Browne, W. James Browning, Larue .. Browning, Orien .. Bruce, John ..... Bruce, Martha . . . Bruce, Nora . . . Brucks, R. A. . . Brune, David .... Brune, Leroy .... . Bronson, Shirley . . . Bryan, Edward . . . Bryan, Joe Lee .... Bryant, Clarence . . . Bryant, Dorothy . . . Bryant, Harry ....... Bryant, Jesse ........ Bryson, Artemisia B. .. Buford, Charles M. .. Buie, Doris ...... Bullard, C..J. .... Bullet, Edris ...... Bulmer, Joan ....... Bunch, Mrs. Louise .... Burch, C. A. ........ . Burke, Marilyn ........ Burkett, Frank ..,. 25, 1 Burnett, Price G. ..... . Burns, Mac ..... .... Burns, Shirley . . . Burr, William .... Burrington, Bob . . . Burrage, June ....... Burton, Jimmie L. . . . Buschman, Barbara . . . Butler, C. O. .... . Butler, Joe ...... Butler, Marilyn .. Byas, Buz ..... Byerly, Marilyn . . . Byers, Richard . . . Bynum, Joyce .... Cadwallader, Ira Ann . . Caffey, Bill .... Cain, Virginia . . . . Caldwell, Billy .... Caldwell, Jack L. . . Calhoun, Dora . Callrcoate, Ray ...... Calloway, Acy E. .... . Calloway, Catherine . . . Calloway, Gloria Ann . Calvery, Avis Dane Cameron, Carey Jane . . Cameron, Joe ...... Camp, Barbara .... Camp, Carl B. ..... . Camp. Marv Betty Campbell, Bob ...... Campbell, Frances .... Campbell, Grayford . . . Campbell, Harvey . . . QIii66 ...124 .I1ii2A jIIi55Qi96 ..IIII55Q2S5 IIfiiQ196f262 "1fQIA5f299 iii1i1ii1ffi53f 92 282 309 318 1 1 1 .ss Iii 221 313 304 iiA '299 '264 566 267 .84 327 .61 ii6 .61 265 322 f55 Q61 6i ...84 72 CI "'Q7i .26 ...127 Campbell, Maurice . , . . . 108 Campbell, Randy . ..... . , . . Campbell, Virginia Ann . . . . , 45 Canon mmy . . , , , , . To ....... Cantrell, Mary L. . . . . . Carden, Martha . . . Carey, Joe .... Carlock, Fred W. . . . . Carlock, Mary Alyce ., Carlock, Sara ........ Carlson, Kenneth ..... Carpenter, C. W. .... . Carr, Fred W. .... . Carrejo, Olga Jane . . . Carrico, Helen ....... Carroll. Ben . . . . , Carroll, Jackee CMrs.1. Carson, Joe M. ...... . Carten, Mickey . . . . . Carter, Eula Lee . . . Cary, Tracy ...... Case, Jackie . . . Casey, C. J. .. Cash, H. R. . .. Casler, Jerome .... Cassell, Albert B. . . Castle, Julia ..... Cares, Roy Joe . .. Causbie, Billye F. . . Causley, June ..... Cecil, L. Moffit ....... Cecil, Mina Pauline . . . Chadwick, Christine . . . Chadwick, Greta ..... Chambless, Robert D. . . Champion, Thomas . .. Chapin, Eddie ...... .26. 15A'i53'165f .........61,299 i63f566, .46 ff :i::46,282 .IIii6f2a5 . , 309 """"'26f5i6f 516' 26 98 .91 281 .61 122 114 282 290 .53 271 312 '45 304 322 232 A26 291 .54 127 299 137 .61 310, 312 1 Q 1 1 1 1 1 1 Page 313 129 . 292 60 299 327 306 45 137 128 88 71 290 45 306 97 60 291 303 71 312 25 291 292 330 98 306 22 69 329 303 122 53 130 22 310 324 84 84 26 322 91 164 45 304 292 292 131 127 310 110 310 329 26 22 61 108 287 310 91 306 315 295 306 61 53 45 306 54 54 54 26 272 155 316 45 22 131 54 133 282 330 98 324 133 299 91 291 317 46 322 22 319 304 84 54 54 303 295 114 129 127 22 127 54 322 133 ,320 72 Three Humlred Sixty-three 292 124 Chapman, Martha CMrs. Chapman, Mildred . . . , Chapman, Robert ..... Chernosky, Teenie . . . Chess, Edward .... Cheverton, C. F. . . . . Cheverton, David. ..... Cheverton, Virginia . . . Childers, James Glenn . Chmilnicki, Al .,... , . Christian, Robert H. . , . J .... 324 324 Christ Christ opher, Bob .... opher, Carolyn .. Chunn, Loretta ...... Cichon, Casimir . . . Cinqu emani, Joe .. Clancy, Robert .... Clark, Clark, Clark, Clark, Carolyn ...... Helen Dale . . . Jack F. . . 1 . Jean ..... Clark, Jo Frances , . Clark, Mack ..... Clark, William . . . Clarm, Jeff ........ Clay, Comer ......... Clayton, Herbert C. . . . Clayton, Jack .....,.. Clayton, iMrs.J Jean Cleere, Carolyn ...... Cleveland, Martin O. . Clifton, BH? B. ..... . Clifton, C. . ...,. .. Clifton, Mrs. C. S. . . . Clifton, George ..... Cloke, Wilma Jean .. . Cobb, Tommy ..,... Cobden, Charles . , . Coffman, Jim .... Coggan, Leland . . . Cogswell, Max . . . Coldren, Bill L. .. ,.,,46 1111721 Allen . . . 316 ,307 Coldwell, Geor e . , Cole, Charles .. Cole, Louis ..... Cole, napa ,..,,... . Coleman, Bubba ....,.,. Coleman, James Norman Collier, Richard ...... Collings, Marcus W. . . Collins, Joy ........, Colquitt, Landon .... Comrie, William A. . . . Condon, Robert ..... Cone, Jack .......... Converse, Harold D. .. Cook, Aaron W. ..,. . Cook, Clarence Leo, Jr.. Cook, Gerald ........ Cook, J. H. .... . Cooke, Marvin J. . Cooley, Edward F. Cooper, Mary .... Cooper, Rosemary Coors, Jack Walter Cornelius, E. T. . . Cornelius, Norman . , . Cornell, Bob ...,.... Cothran, Mary Lu . , Cothren, Martha Couch, Donald . Couch, Donnella ., Coulter, Jane .. 122' Coupland, Laura Cox, A. L., Jr.. .. Cox, Alex S. .. Cox, Donald .. Cox, Harold . . . Coyle, Jane ,.... Crabb, Albert .... Craig, Billie D. . . Craig, Bruce ..... Craig, Charles . . . Craig, R. Leon . . . Craik, Carolyn . Crane, Lawrence Cranny, James J. . . Creamer, Geneva .. Crenshaw, T. C. Crews, Harold . . . Crigler, M. W. .. . Crill, Marilyne . . . Criner, Betty ..,. Criner, Beverly .... , Crittenden, Louis ,. Cronin, Maureen .. Crouch, B. A. . Crouch, Taylor .,.,., Crout, Billy Ruth Culbertson, Gene .. Cummins, Rena ..... Cunningham, Jim . Cunningham, Ray C. .. Currie, John , .... .. Curtis, Naomi ..... D'Agnostino, Angelo ...., Dalton, Worth ...... Daniel, Betty Jean . , . Daniel, Dorothy . . . Daniel, Fred S. .. Daniel, Hicks ..... Dashner, Melvin .... Davenport, Annette Davidson, Barbara , . . Davis, David H. .... . Davis, Don Weaver Davis, Elizabeth ..... ....6l, 169, 61,169, ...46, 282, 286, .61 299 .27 .84 .61, 180, 312 .61 .46 108 .27 201 .27 .61 161 Q27 299 .22 '72 155 .27 122 114 11111611157 299 .....61.137,299 ,299.306,310 512 .....61.299 504 1 161 ..1111116 299 1111541295 507 122,307,309,310, 111161 111120 ....91,287 f1146Q Three H umlred S ixly-four .61 46 172 121 282 318 155 299 287 127 304 '20 110 .98 .62 512 v Page 26 72 26 46 285 21 306 312 281 155 313 181 320 61 27 113 124 304 27 322 286 287 95 91 61 22 88 292 84 128 114 27 22 126 98 98 317 306 72 299 27 46 72 27 54 330 S8 46 22 131 317 88 46 281 321 282 108 319 61 27 282 61 91 27 330 330 330 307 129 72 28 310 113 28 133 328 72 312 294 28 98 61 72 122 299 298 98 282 98 122 315 322 127 328 61 95 88 304 155 306 298 46 84 310 155 298 329 282 46 93 127 46 313 28 46 .330 I N D E X-Continued Davis F. Wilmot Davis, George .... Davis Geor ia . . Davis Haro1d Davis, Lewis . . . . . Davis, Louis D. . . , . Davis, Mary Edna ., Davis Nancy ..... Davis Nelda .... Davis Robert . . . . Deaigh, Louise . . . 1 . . Dealaney, Claude .... Deaton, Judith ....... Debenport, Marianne .. Debo. Darrell ........ Dekking, Martin ..... Delfeld, Kenneth .. Denman, William . . . Denney, Marilyn . . . Dennington, Tom . . . Dent, Jacqueline .. Dent, Robert .... . Denton, Davie . . . . . . Denton, Larry ....... Dickey, Charles , ..,,. Dickinson, David ..... Dickinson, Patricia Jean Dietz, K. B., Jr. ,.... . Dillon, John ........ Dingwerrh, Frank . . . Dinkins, Paul ......., Disney, Bonnie June . . Disney, Dobbs, J. C. ....... . Mary Kathryn . Dodge, Paul A. ...,. , Dodson, Bill ...... Dodson, Clark .... Dodson, Kay ,. Dollins, John .... Domstad, Peggy . .. Donnelly, Jim ...... Dorsey, Richmond ..,. Doss, Leonard G., Jr... Doty, Betty Sue . . . ,. Dougherty, Wayne R. . . Douglas, Amelia Dowdey, A. Ben. C.. .. Dowell, Tommye .... Downing, Don ...... e Melv n E Drak , y . .... . Drennen. Sherry Ann . . Driver, Betty ..,..... Drummond, Marianne . Du Bose, Jacquelyn . . . Du Bose, Mary Lynn . . Dugan, Mildred .,... Duke, Osborn, Jr.. , . . Dukes, Violet ..... Duncan, Carroll . . . Duncan, Charles .,.. Duncan, James L. Dunlap, William .. Dunn, Fred .,....,. Dunn, Polly .,....... Du Pree, Bobby ...... Du Rocher, Rosemary . . Dustin, Lucile ..... .. Dwyer, Barbara ..,.. Dye, Jack . . . Dyer, Mark . Dyer, Mildred ., Dyleski, Frank . . . . Easter, Jane . . . Easter, Joe .... Echols, Walter .. Edens, H. J. . Edgemon, Roy ,,.. . . . Edgerton, Mary Irene . . Edsall, Jean ...,.,... Beulah .... Edwards, Edwards, Bill .... Edwards, Jeff .... Edwards, Sue .... Elder, Bobby Lee .... Elder, Frances .... Elkins, John H. Elliot, Douglas . . . Elliott, Harold D. Elliott, Ray ...,.. Ellis, Bettye .... Ellis, Joann . .. Ellis, Roy B. .. Elton, W. E. . Emerson, Booger Emert, Martine . Emmons, Clyde . Enlow, Bonnie . , . Enochs, Joe . . . Enochs, John, Jr. .. Erickson, John . Estill, Jess Ann Ethridge, John . . . Ethridge, Martin .. Etter, Dan .... Eubank, Leta .. Eubank, Max . . Evanoff, Bill .. Evans, Jo Alice Evans, Leslie P. Evans, William Brice . . 11105. Fa uy-Cote, Arthur .... Faiin, Nelda Paul . . . Fallis, Lew D. .... . ......73 1111951224 11112712s2f290 1111111111175 ..11175 ....108 11175 1281197j222f522Q525 ,............47.322 ..,.,........47,322 .. ....,. 98 1' .1111175 ....28,307 .. ..11171507 .. 11111154 ..112Q2 ,.1110s .. ..11S4f2s1 ...,...,...155 .115412a51298Q299 ...........29.294 "1""1'11111G2 ., ..114712s2 .. ......., 62 .. .... 29,321 111 .47 .29 287 1111881 1111129 1111221285 1111541507 E ... .. 105,307 -..-99. 306. ...125,292 .. 1111154 H11122 ..11G2Q294 ...105,286 ..1119L ..1f111i5 ...125,154 ...108,27L ...1111111111'112s2 .29 . . . . 127, 208, 299. 190, 207, 225, 259. 307 266 .54 .29 F I11" ..1129Q2s2 1 . 1 1 f 1 Q 1 1 1 5 1 Page 292 124 225 91 51 28 62 291 88 292 310 91 122 84 73 292 128 91 127 98 46 324 310 91 292 316 22 329 127 310 133 88 155 321 62 285 47 28 292 330 114 307 316 155 299 88 329 307 323 47 304 282 323 310 62 62 88 84 54 285 54 62 108 307 115 310 73 62 329 310 330 22 84 312 29 105 62 54 62 105 152 133 73 88 115 304 307 62 99 111 22 73 21 236 133 290 304 272 73 294 310 291 307 320 95 125 113 287 112 Farguhar, Winfred G. Farmer, Clifford . . . Farrar, Sidney C. . . . . Farris, Billy ...... Farris, Donald L. . . Faulk, Don ,...,.. Faulker, Faye ....... Faulkner, John B. .. , Fc-ild, Frances ..... Fenton, William . . . Ferguson, Barbara . Ferrara, Larry ..... 111162 105, 282, 299 Ferrell.MaryEleanor111..7111111111111 Field, Frances .... Field, Jack L. .... . Fielding, Edward .. Fife, Thomas . . . . File, George ..... Filligim, Dick ,... . Fillingham, Dick ,. Finley, Marcus . . . Firkins, C. J. .. Fisher, Helen . . . Fisher, "Shrimp" . Flinn, John .... Floore, Flowers, Flowers, Flowers, Floyd, Fluirr, Ann . . . . Harry . . , . Keith . . , . .1 Norma . . . Robert R. . . , Olga Ruth . . . Flynt, James ...... Folks, Foote, V Ford, Fore, J Fred B. . . Adrienne . . . Clark ...,. 0311 . .... Fore, William . . Forrester, Glennis .. Forsyth, Foster, Foster, Fowler, Fowler John W. . . Jean .... Raynard . . . Don , .... GeoteP . Fox, Bobby Charles Fraley, Billy D. . .. Franklin, Claude C. Frasier, Betsy ......... Frederick, William E. .. Freedman, Alexander Freeman, Joe ..... Frick, Kenneth D. . . Fromme, Harvey .. Frost, Joy .,.... Fuller, John A.. .. Fultz, W. B. ..., . Fyke, Bethany ,. .. Gaines, J. H. ........ . Gaines, Dr. Newton P. . Galbrai th, Dan P. .... . Gallagher, James C. , . . . Galloway, 'Martha Jean . Garcia, Mike .,,...... Gardner, Cherie ...... Gardner, Joseph W. . . . Garey, Helen ...... Garnan Garner, d, Elmer . . . Pat ......, Garrett, Mrs. Jack .. Garrett, Jack K. .. Garrett, Lella .....,... Garrett, Garrison, Charlotte Elaine Gates, James Ira .... , . . Gatewood, Joyce ....... Gault, Harold L. ..... . Gauntt, Velma ........ Geiger, Mary Elizabeth . . Gernsbacher, Don .... Ralph W. .... . Gerr, Erncstine .,... Gersback, Edward .... Gibbons, Glen . ,.... Gibson, Lawrence . . . Gibson, Lerla ...... Gibson, Toy ......... Gibson, William W. .. Gilbert, Doyle D. . , . Gildon. Kenneth . . . Giles, Bettye ....,.. Gilleland, Pat ....,... Gilliland, Elizabeth . .. Gillis, Gillis, Lewis D. . . . . Tillie ......... Gilmore, Robert D. . . . Gingles, Carole ...,.. Glasgow, Robert L. Glazner, R. H. Glenn, Glenn, Glenn, James . John E. Marilyn Goggans, Joe B. ...,... Gooch, Jimmy .... ,... Goodspeed, Clara Louise Goodwin, James . ..... . Goodwin, Rex J. ..... . Gordon. Gordon, Bill . . . Peggy .. Goulding, Dorl . , Gower, Jack ,..... Graham, Charles . . . Graham, Eula Mae . , , , Graham, Wallace E. , . . Graves, Mary ...... Gray, Gordon L. .. Gray, Howard .. Gray, Kittie .. . Gray, Laura .... Graybil l, Sabina ... 11f162'2a51299f512 00' C5 . 19512251225 ...1l2 ...l08, ..1174 111108. ...105 ... ...... .50 ,,,9l,285 .111111117 ,..125,194 111621235 ....115 111150 1119215071 f75 285 507 522 .73 .62 .55 105 261 .62 120 505 .ss .62 291 162 .74 115 115 271 500 .74 115 .29 150 500 504 125 135 127 507 224 125 122 501 289 150 .62 .74 115 5 5 . 1 1 1 Q Page 137 99 88 47 105 .292 . 304 47 29 54 .310 127 108 310 55 62 . 328 282 292 74 , 294 22 299 .328 111 62 159 266 , 285 91 105 62 , 192 327 307 . 304 292 128 22 129 , 298 125 22 99 84 ,316 29 ,290 108 105 272 .310 62 292 47 55 21 29 91 29 62 282 327 91 74 291 30 134 55 22 47 ,327 . 310 91 ,307 .327 ,282 91 S9 62 313 . 304 285 85 39 S5 .290 125 .310 ,319 122 ,282 55 30 62 109 92 304 . 292 55 316 74 295 510 105 .30 151 92 30 . 330 105 30 .385 , 286 137 1 291 47 74 105 , 285 129 Hooks, Billie ....... Grayson, Lawrence E. . . Green, Betty Jeanne . . . Green, Doye J., Jr... . Greene, Eleanor ...... Greene, Grady ...... Greenwell, Patsy ,.... Greenwood, Eugene . . . Greer, Norris ....... Gregory, C. R. , . . . Gregory, Diane ,. . Gregory, Edith Grier, Alline . Griffin, Robert Griffith, Joyce Grimes, Walter Grindzinski, Walter .. Groff, Daniel .,... Grove, M. M. .,... . Grubbs, Chester Lee ,....... ....... Guenther, Ralph ...........,..... Guest, Ann ......... 109,154.i95,2i2j Guffey, George C. ....,,,...,........ . Guggnn, W. ascom ..............,.... Gunn, Joanne ...,... Gunnip, Robert W. . . Gustafson, Charlie . H Haefeli, Paul Max, Jr. ....... . . Haines, Marie . .......... . . . Hall, Bira May ........ .. . Hall, Dean Colby D. .... Hall, Joann ......... Hall, Ovella .... . , . Hall, Robert Clay Halstead, Frances . , . . Hamilton, Bill L. . . . . Hamilton, Jacquelyn .. Hamilton, Patricia . . . Hamilton, Sam .... Hammond, W. J. . . . . Hanks, James ........ Hanna, Mary Grace Hanrahan, Janet ..... Hansen, Richard . . . Harben, Jim ,....... Hardie, Peggy Joyce . . Hardt, H. . Hargrove, Jimmy .... Harmon, Tom W. Harp, Elizabeth Ann . Harper, Oliver C. . . Harr, Robert ..,... . . Harrington, Sylvan . . . Harris, Clide Ray .... Harris, Dorothy E. . . . . Harris, James '., Jr.. , . Harris, Marshall E. Harrison, Charlene .,.. Harrison, James E. . . , H t Genelle at , .... . Hart, Laura ........ Hatter, Dale M. ..... . lliesfidifsoi , Hartman, La Verne L. . . . Harvey, Charles T. . . . . Harvison, Barbara Hash, Henry B. .... . Haskey, Johnny L. . . . . Hathaway. Charles C. . . Harley, Jim A ..,...... Hatton, William L. Haugh, Carolyn ..... Hausman, Helen . . . Havenhill, Norma .... , Hawkins, Edwin ........ Hawley Dr. Wheller Hayes, 'Herbert Adams I . . Hayes, Margaret .,...... . . Haygood, Reagan A. . . . Hays, Ann ......... Hays, George ..... Hays, Suzanne .... Hayward, Adelle . . . Head, Bill ..,...... Head, Myrtle Jo Hearn, Joe ....... Heath, Billy ...,.... Ht-nth, Marguerite Heaton, W. E., Jr.. . . . Hed e, C. H. .,.. . Hehf, Walter ....... Heinzman, Merita .... Hellman, Beverly Heltzell, Jerry P. ....... . Henderson. Loretta Jean Henderson, Ronald .1i1I1'11'ISS ...65,5oo,3o4 .. lIf Gil Hendricks, Leo ........, Henley, Joy ......... Henrick, John .... Henry, Carol ..... Henry, Doris Jean Henson, Mary Lots Herricks, Katherine . . Herrin, Beverly . .. .... . . , , Herring, Robert F. Heslep, Robert D. Hetze, Andre .... Hetzel, Jerry . . . Hewatt, W. G. . . . Hickey, Jimmy .. Hicks, Morrcllc Hightower, John ..., Hightower, Martha .. Hill, Betty ....... Hill, James R. .. Hill, Marianne . Hill, Patricia . .. Hill, W. T., Jr.. .. ""'63'i5O' 31,283. ,300 Page ......... 30 , .....,.... 63 ....127,300,319 ........... 47 .......74,292 ..,...63 304 ...137,316 ..... 113 ..... 74 ....63,329 . ..., 55 ..... 99 . ..... 47 ....99,307 ....63 300 ..... 92 ..... 22 ....... 134 .....31282 113 291 318 ... 31 ... 137 ......122 .31 317 ... 115 ... 31 .99 286 .22 320 132 226 .. .92 304 122 ..,,...... ... 89 122 315 .31 234 312 313 105 291 ....... .. ... 47 .. .21 151 .. .63 310 .. ... 134 .... ... 125 ..... ... 63 ...31 322 324 .... ... 115 .. ... 21 .. 89 .. 75 . ...... ... 63 ......... ... 55 .......... ... 55 125 285 304 307 ......... .75 281 ....... ... 129 ,..115 ... 63 ... 55 ....... ... 31 ......... 47.309 ...125.285 290.304 ......... ... 134 . ..--- A -75 281 .. ... 75 .. 105 282 . ...... -92 307 ......... ... 63 .......... ... 63 .63 309 310.328 . ........ .75 292 ....... ... 63 .. .31 287 . ... 92 ... 92 . ... 22 ... 89 131 307 .... ... 63 ..... ... 295 ...85 181 313 ....... ... 31 ....109 285 300 ..... 138 294 ....... 63.300 ....l09 300.330 ..... ... 55 .... ... 115 ,......... ... 85 ... 63 . 300 330 327 330 .63,312 ... ... 31 300 304,307 .. ....... 127 319 22 ....... ... 125 .. .31 317 . ... 109 .. ..... ... 92 122.315 ... ... 92 157,194,216 289.304 309 322 284 320 330 .63 300 ...113 .. ... 298 ..221316 .. ... 85 .. .99 291 .. .63 307 ,... ... 63 ...109 ...32 294 316 .... 293 307 .. ... 105 ... 47 I II IJ E DC Hill, Walter ........ H'll D ' I SCI, OHS ........ Hinds, Bobby Vernon. . . . Hines, Harley F. . . . . Hines, Marie ..,.... Hobbs, A. B. ...,., . Hodges, Laverne . . . Hodges, Thomas E. ., Hodfgleins, Joe E. . . Hof man, June ...... Ho an F. W H0i,abak5a5ir'21,. Hollabaugh, Raymond Holland, Jasper L. . . . Holleman, Edwin Holleman, Emmie . . . Hollis, Douglas O. . . . Hollister, Bert ...... Hollister, Bert ...... Holloway, Harold Holloway, Weber Holman, Glenn A. . . . Holmstroam, Joe C. . . I Holsapgle, Dean C. K. Holt, harles ....... Holt, D. A. ....... . Holt, Robert V. . . . . Hood, Connie Mack. . . Johnson, Vivian Harder Johnson, Wanda CMrs.J Johnston, Bob ....... Page ... 138 .. 55 RnphH" Hooper, Hooper, Hooser, H oote, Hooten Delbert P. .. Grace L. . . . . William C. . . Jack ........ , John Gordon Hopkins, Dor ...... Hopkins, Robert .... Hopper, J. Tracey . . . Horan, Bob ........ Hornaday, Emery .... Horst, C. Richard Horton, Mary Jo .... Hoskins, Allen .... Hoskins, Freddie .. Houston, Lucille .. Houston, Wanda .. Howard, Jean . . . Howard, Jim . . . Howard, Phyllis . . . Howard, R. C. . . . . Howard, Wood ..... Howell, John C. . , . . Howell Willard E. Howry, James Allen . . Hubbard, Glenn M. . . Hubbell, Jim ....... Huber, Dr. Irene ..., Huddleston, Charles .. Hudgins, Louis R. Hudgins, Nath ,... Hud ins, Connie .,,. Hudler, R. Roemer .. Hudson, William A. . Hudspeth, George .... Hughes, Ben O. . . . Hughes, Jerry S. .. Hughes, Norman .... Hughes, T. M., Jr. .. Hughes, Virgil ...... Hu ings, Neil ....,.. Hump rey, Arthur H. Humphrey, Charles F. Humphries, Loyd P. . . Hunnicutt, Georgia . . . Hunt, Arthur . ...... Hunt, Dan ....... Hunt, Don ....... Hunt, James E. Hunter, Betty ...,. Hunter, Melvel ..... Hurley, Charles B.. .. Hurst, W. Robert .... Hutchins. Katherine . . Hutto, Orvel R. .... . Hutton, S.W. Hyde, Sara Ann .. Ing, Charles ..... Ing Dean ....... Ingle, Betty Alice Ingram, Winford R. . Inman, Tommy ..... Intravia, Lawrence . . . Iwane, Norio ..... Jacobs, Sylvia ..... Jacobsen, Robert . . . Jackson, Billy J. .. Jackson, C. M. . Jackson, J. W. Jackson, Pat .,...... Jackson, Robert M. .. Jamison, Bill ......, Jarmon, Harry T. Jarvis, Dan ....... Jaudon, La Rue . Jekel, Lyn ....... Jernigan, Jean ...... Johnson, Bill . .... .. Johnson, Carl M., Jr.. Johnson, Jayme . . . . . Johnson, Jeni ....... Johnson, Mary Neita . Johnson, Robert C. .. Johnson, Roland M. . Conhnued Page .. ss ...... 47 ........ 128 ...32,310.317 ......... 109 ........ 75 . ... 113 ..... 75 ...... 32 ....99,286 ..... 22 ........ 69 ...,..... ss ...,.....32,316 ....127,296,319 ......... 109 ........ sz ... 312 ... 122 ... 55 ..... 32 ...... 134 ....75,292 ....21,140 .........vs,zsa ............. 134 ............ . 75 ....32,156,197,203 291,318,309 328 ...........47 303 ......,.... as ...... 122 ......47 283 ........ ss ...32,300 307 ......... 109 ......92 328 ,............. 134 . ...........,... 89 32,298,300,310 312 ................ 115 ............32 307 ........... 55 ............. 116 ,............. 126 ....S9,285,300 307 ........... . 122 .........92 328 ...109 312 ...... 33 ....55 322 ..,.47 298 ...105 307 ..... 144 ...... 75 ....89 292 ...... 22 ........ 105 ......... sa ....aa,z94,s1e .....131 300 .......... as ....33,294 316 . ..... 75 281 ...... 89 ... . 128 ...... 105 .,,.76 292 ..,.,. ve ....55 328 ...... 134 ...116 283 ..... 47 ... 63 .. 55 .. 63 ...,...,... 109 ............. 99 ...125,304,307 310 ............. 105 .....75,281 283 ........ 128 ....55 295 ...... 76 ... .... 22 229 . ..... .,.. 85 287 ...... ....55 310 ... ...,. . 122 ...116,283 ....33,316 ....6s 301 ........ 287 ... ...55.5oo 320 ... .......... . 64 ....125,165 307 ......... 47 ........ 63 ...... 64 ....76 287 ........ as ......... 55 ...76,281 283 ........ 22 ...... 64 ...... 64 ...109 291 ...122 309 ..... 33 ...... 310 ...100 307 ...122 315 ... 64 307 ...100 286 Johnston, Sherwood . , . Jolley, Joan ......... Jones, Charles T, . . . . Jones, Eugene M. . . . . Jones, Geraldine E. . .. Jones, James L., Jr.. . . Jones, Raymond A. .. Jones, Wade T. . . . Jones, Wallace . . . . .. Jones, Walter W. Jonnson, Jamye . . . Jordan, Barbara ..... Jordan, Bobby ....... Jordan, .John Barton .. Juet, William ....... Juren, Joe ....... Kane, Shirley Sue Karrenbrock, Ruth . . . Kasko, Frank D ..... Kasmier, Barbara . . Kaye, Gerard ..... K It, J R ec arnes . Kee, Jarene ...... Keith, Jacqueline .... Keith, Layton B. .. Keith, Noel L. . . .. Keith, W. V., Jr.. . .. Kellert, James ..... Kelly, Patsy ........ Kelso, Pat ........... Kemp, Charles Ervin .... Kem , Ray Leon ..... Kenigf, Ed ......... Kennedy, A. R. ..... , Kennedy, Charles F. . . . Kennedy, Flynt .,... Kerr, Wyatt Moseley . . . Key, Henry ........ Keys, Doris ...... Iflliiifiio .....,.55 Illlisfisifisi IC "' ......,. 112160 .............125 ..............125 ...48,313,321,322 ..........1l6,283 ..iIi65f367 'fIfIIi2S ....33,2a5 ......64 Illfie ..,...55 1IQIiisf2a3 89 55 64 134 85 48 328 307 76 134 128 105 129 85 292 100 48 55 286 304 304 330 290 129 125 138 22 48 328 92 290 317 307 48 64 281 294 85 69 307 Kil ore, Al ....... ........ 4 8 292 Kilfgore, Bettye . . . . . ....... . 64 Killgore, Ethel .... . . . , ..... . . 128 Kilman, William J. . . . ,,,,, , , .48 316 Kimball, Betty ...... .... 6 4, 313 327 King, Fern ............................. 69 King, James ................,.,......... 56 King, Jo Anne .......................... 92 King, Nancy . . . . .33, 282, 300, 309, 312, 320 322 Kinsbury, Jean ...............,.,...... 56 303 Kinser, Wesley ....................... 105 298 Kirk, Vlaylon B. . . ..... 109 Kirtz, Karl ......... . . . 113 Klat, Lloyd A. ....... ..... 4 8 Klein, Virginia ...... ...... 1 13 Kleinecke, Charles W. . . . .... 48 303 Kluthe, Johnny ......, ...... 4 8 Knapp, Clayton ..... . . . . .92 307 Knapp, Joe Wayne . . . . . .111 303 Kniffin, Calvin W. . . . . . . . . . 48 Know, Carl, Jr. ..... ..... 1 38 Knox, AlbertS. ........... 33 Knox, Barbara Ellen .. ................. 122 Knox, Carl ........ .... 1 85, 267, 268, 278 289 Knox, Mames ..... ................. 1 09 Koppen, Doris ...... ................ 5 6 Kripipel, Betty Anne . . . .... 76 287 Kud ary, Billie Marie ..... ..... 3 4 Kuykendall, Jean ........ . . . 34 L LaBonte, Paul ........... . . . 100 LaGrone, Dr. C. W.. .. . . 23 La Grone, Nelda .... . . . 85 Lahey, Marcia . .... . . . 130 Laine, Btlvige J. . . . . . . 116 Laine, Janice ....... . . . 284 Larnberton, R. A. ..... ........... 6 9 Lancaster, Doyle ..... ........ . . . 48 Lancaster, James Dayle . . . . ....... . . . . 34 Landers, Suzanna ....... . , . 122, 241, 307 312 Langever, James ...... ........... 8 5 324 Langford, Alice ..... .... 5 6, 195, 223 322 Langford, James C. . . . ............. . . . 48 Langston, Pat ....... ...77, 283, 287, 307 313 Lanier, Robert ..... ......... . ...... 7 7 Lanman, Gerald L. .. ............. . 34 Lanston. Joyce .... . ......... 89 Largent, Charles ..... .... 1 06,156 328 Latimer, Buford ...... .... 1 22, 319 330 Lauderdale, Leonard , . . ....,.... . 111 Lawless, Darrel V. , . ...... 77 307 Lawley, Wraymon . . . . . . . . 56 Lawlis, Ann ...... . . . 111 Leach, Phillip . . . . . 56 Lebus, Jo Ann . . . .- 77 Le Croy, Elsie . ...... 100 Leddy, Billie . . . ...... . . 89 Lea Dahd F. .. ---- 43,233 294 Lee, John K. .. .....138 316 Lee, Robert E. . . ...... 100 Leq Rodney .... .... 85 292 Leggett, Tom .... 89 292 Lemon, Zana ..... ...111 329 Leonard, Patricia .. ......... 34 311 Lerrett, Elva A. ..... ............. 2 3 Lerrett, Paul, Mrs. . .. ............ . . 317 Lesley, Lou Ann . . . .... 48, 300, 312 329 Leslie, Claire Mae., .........,.... 128 Letts, Mary ..... ...100, 283, 321, 330 Levander, Mary .... ....... 3 4, 300, 330 Leverett, Lula . . . . .... 48, 196 223 Three Hzmdrezl Sixty-fwe 89 295 106 Levine, Joseph ....... Lewellen, Joyce "Dusty" Lewis, Edward Alan . . . Lewis, Steve L. ...,... Ligon, Clara L. ..... . Linder, Vera ....... Lindley, Gene R. . . . Lindley, Neil ...... Lindsay, Jack A. .,... . Lisle, Floyd M. .... 1. Lisle, Floyd Wisdom .. Lisrnan, Arlene ....... Little, Claude ...... Little, Lloydelle .... Lively, Joe W. ..... . Livengood, John T. . . , Livesay, Mark R., Jr.. . . Livingston, Jimmy .... Lobdell, Marianne .... Locke, Buster ...... Lockee, Otto A. ..... . Lofton, Coleman L. . . . Logan, Leonard ...... Logan, Margaret ...... ...34, 283 .64 11111111i16f2a3 122,285,298,300: Lokey, Audre Lou Abney ....,... 116, 282 Long, Lois ...... 106, Long, T. F. ......... . Long, William H. . . . . Looney, Bill ...., Looney, Grant . . . . . Lotspeich, Barbara .. Lovell, Jimmy . . . Lovell, Sammy . . . . . Lowe, Thomas R. . . 1 Lowry, Charles L.. ., Lucas, Edgar C. . . . . Luck, Bill ........ . . . Ludiker, Homer ...... Ludwick, Mary Isabel.. Ludwig, Charles ...,.. Lusher, Jacklyn .... Lyerla, Darrell ..... Lyles, Sanders T. . .. Lynch, Daniel . . . Lynch, Marilyn .. . Lynch, Robert . . . 1 McAninch, Daniel .... McAu1ey, Marcia Lea . . McAuley, Roger ...... McBee, Dink ,..... McBee, James XV. . . . . McCaleb, Irma, Mrs.. . . McCalister, Rita . . . . McCall, Kenneth . ,. McCall, Mac ........ McCamy, Pat ........ McCandless, Barbara .. McCarty, Robert J, . .. McClellan, R. H. . .1 McClendon, Alma . . . McC1esky, Ruth ...... McC1ung, Lucian ,.... McClure, Elizabeth J.. . McConnell, Hugh H.. . . McCorkle, Lilita .... McCorkle, T. S. . .... . McCormack, Carlton . . . McCoy, Charles .... McCoy, Jo Ann . . . McCul1oh, Carol . . McCurdy, Bill ..... McDaniel, Paula ..... McDaniel, Russel B. .. McDermott, Ursula McDonald. D. W., Jr.. . McElroy, Barbara ..,. McElroy, Gerald .... McElroy, Joann .. McElroy, Ted ...... McGlinche2f, Alex .. McGraw, . A. . . . McHugh, Jean ..... McKay, D. Frances .. McKay, Donald W. . .. McKean, Marjorie Anne McKelvain, John ..... McKelvey, "Jinx" .... McKelvy, Otis ..... McKenna, John G, . . . . McKenzie, Kenneth .. McKinney, Virginia . . . McKnight, Robert E. . . McKown, Billy Tom .. McLean, Kay ........ McMahon, Bess .... McMahon, Frances .... McMordie, Warren .... McNaman, Mary Louise. McNamara, Mary Lou. . McNeil, John ........ McShan, Joan ....... McSwain, Jack L.. . . . McNVi11iams, Harlan .. Mabe, H. D. .... . Macatee, Scooter .... Macdonald, William . . Maddox, Lewis ..... Major, Prof. Mabel . . 1 Malavear, Joe ...... Mallatt, June .... Malone, Bobby . . . Malone, Doyle . . . Maloney, Jim . . . 206. 300. 307. 318 11118 111149j2s3.31i .111135Q309f322 AAC .35 ...139 ... 128, 193 111123 , 111611157 ....,...49 ...56, 294 11164 .49.287 ......36 AA ...91 ....100.260 Tb-ree Humlrefl Sixty-six 1 . . Page .77,281 125,303 ... 92 ... 34 ... 129 ... 116 300,316 300,330 ... 85 .23,330 116,319 ... 56 111.307 122,290 ... 64 .35.317 303.322 312.330 .56.309 .85,293 ... 106 ... 35 ... 113 ... 109 296,315 329.330 ... 77 ... 89 ... 106 ... 117 ... 109 283.323 ... 89 ... 77 ... 89 ... 77 ... 34 106,266 ... 127 .56.322 312,320 ... 89 ... 23 ... 56 324.363 ... 35 ... 113 283,316 ... 49 ... 89 294,316 ... 127 ... 23 .64,307 ... 64 315.327 107,291 ... 23 ... 85 .95.230 ... 64 ... 64 .35,303 ... 77 113,316 ... 167 ... 111 ... 89 ... 35 285,303 .35,317 .89,298 .89.281 194,220 ... 85 ... 107 .64,300 ... 323 300,330 307,311 ... 100 ... 56 ... 107 ... 77 .36,316 .49,283 109,178 101,266 ... 64 294,312 ... 113 .89.307 ... 101 ... 107 ... 131 ... 92 .36 294 .36,323 ... 283 ... 49 307,329 309,318 ... 111 ... 56 154,298 .56,285 ... 85 .23.293 ... 49 ... 56 100,291 266,282 ... 49 I N D E X-Continued Mankins, Greta .. Mann, Glenn ,... Mapes, Bob ..... Marbut, Edwin . . . Marcella, Lou A. . , . Margan, Gene ....... Marks, Norman S. .... . Marlow, Mark .,.... Marrero-Rivera, Jaime . .. . Marsh, William J. ...... . Marshall, Bebe Couch Marshall, John ........ Marshall, Sam N. Martin, Christine . . . Martin, Don .,.. Martin, Ernie . . . Martin, Glen ...... Martin, Jack .... . . Martin James ........ Martin, James Allen .... Martin, Jane ......, Martin, K. L. .... . . Martin, Marilyn ..... Marrsukos, Helen ...... Massengale, Elizabeth . . . Massey, Duff H., Jr., . . . Masur, James ....... Mathers, Joe R. . . . . Mathes, Ed ...... Mathis, Claude ..... Mathis, Kenneth .,... Mathis, William R. . . Matney, Ella Ann .,.... Mattern, William, Jr. .. Maultsby, Helen .,... Maxcey, Geneva .,.. . May, Peggy ...... Maybrier, Dale . . . Mayer, Louis ....... . Mayes, John A. .... . Mayes, Malcolm O. ., Mayfield, Robert C. . . . Mayhew, Evelyn .... Mayo, Eloise ..... Mecoy, Don ..... . Meeker, Larry ..... Meers, Eula Marie ........ . Meggs, Lois ............, Meierding, Nadyne ........ Meinecke, Sue ....... 111, Mendoza, Jaime ........ . , Menton, Willard F. ,...... Merbeth, Frances . . . Mercer, Tommy .... Meredith, Rollis ....... Mergens, Pat ,..,.,... . . Messrole, John William Meugge, Ed, Jr. ....... . Meyer, Leo Q"Dutch"J . 1 . Meyers, E. D. ........ . Michael, Dorothy .... Middleton, Vivien . . . Miles, Howard ........ 178. Miller, Miller, Miller Belle McLendon . . Bob .,........ C. A. ......... , Miller, Charles C., Jr.. .. Miller, Charles W. .... , Miller, Fred A. . . .... . . . Miller, Jacqueline "Jackie" .. Miller, Jimmy ........... Miller, Kenneth ......,. Miller, M. Annelle .. Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Miller, Milner, Mary Lou . . . Nanette . . . Patsy . . . Peggy , . . . Robert E. . . . Joan ....... Minardo, Michael J. Mingus, Paul ......... Minor, Leslie E. .... . Minyard, Betty Ann . . Miracle, Virginia . .. Mirike, Marietta ..... Mitchell, Harrison E. .. Mitchell, Mavis ....... Mitchell, Nita . ..... Mitchell, Suzanne . . , . Mitchell. Vida ..... . . Mixon, Georgia ..... . . . , Mixon, Prof. Keith . . . . . Mondier, Jimmie .,., Montgomery, A. M. .1 Montgomery, Joe ,..... Montgomery, Robert .... . 136' Moore, Betty ............ . . . Moore, Billie Jo ............. Moore, Carl D. ............. . Moore, Carina Lou CPoodle1 . .. , Moore, Catherine .......,..... Moore, Dean Jerome . .,... 1 Moore, Dorothy .,... Moore Earl ..,.... Moore: J. Eugene . . . Moore, Jake W. 1 . . . Moore, Martin S. . . . Moore, Mildred . . Moore, Norman .. Moore, Paxton ..... Moore, Rachel, Jr. . . . Moore, Roy G. , . . . Moore, Rubilee .. Moore, Witten ...... Moorman, Bill , .,... Moorman, Doris Marie .....107. fMickey1 Moorman, James R. .. Moorman, Tommy . . . Morgan, Edith .... Morgan, Joseph .. ...92. 287 ..11112Q 1113SQ322 .........35 116f1i3fi16 .........56 "'111Qa5 .111111S6 11111311162 1111i30Qi96 11111391101 11111119 ..1I164Q500 ........i07 15613001327 .........56 11111111164 .....64,307 .64.30o,304 11111111161 ........128 10112401301 11111111177 ....49 11111311306 .......95 "111'23 ...109 ...101 .11157 .11136 109Q29iQ307 .........57 ' 111136 111170 ...101 111178 ....78 16811971200 .....111178 11111111125 131,300,305 11111111123 109,507,311 """111s7 111139 19611091150 Page . 304 35 35 85 319 109 324 321 49 296 322 109 293 130 111 64 125 95 89 304 49 272 85 111 49 109 330 56 49 291 109 304 329 100 330 307 77 85 309 322 330 134 307 315 109 107 329 64 281 311 92 78 56 78 330 156 113 285 311 316 117 322 69 138 36 36 117 111 8 92 300 36 92 31 300 294 K4 3 283 169 293 329 1,28 287 293 128 109 129 85 291. 113 123 78 293 89 305 311 78 307 329 153 129 303 49 89 89 1,28 57 146 147 321 49 89 266 117 78 109 23 23 Morgan, Mrs. Sarah .... Morris, Morris, Morris, Morris, Morris Brooks James ......, James Rouse . . . Robert ...... Shaw ....., ,"' Morrison, Connie Mack .... Morrison, Mary ..... Morrison, Phil ........ Morrow, William .. . Moseley, Sarah Frances. . . Moser, Mildred ..,.... Motheral, Carl ...... Moy, Thomas K. . . . Mu key, Young ..... Mullins, Jack ....... Mullins, Pat Miller .. Muncy, James ...... Mundhenke, H. R. .... . Mundhenke, Margaret . . . Munro, Dr. Harry C.. . . Murphey, C. E. .... . Murphey, Paul W. .. Murphy, Beth ...... Murphy, Coila Fae . . . Murray, Donald .... Muse, Glen R. .,.. . Musgrave, C. F. .... . Musgrove, George ..... Musgrove, Mary Ann . . . Myers, Nance, Narrell, Do.. ..,, 1011 151' 155125512561 James B. .... . 14 Kenneth ..... Nasche, Salvadore .... Needha m, Paul W. ,. Neeley, Mrs. Roger .. Neill, Lynn W. . . .. Nelson, Conway .... Nelson, Diane . . . Nelson, Eugene . . . . Nelson, Norma .. Nelson, Ralph ..... Netka, Bill ......... Neville, Betty Jean .. Newbold, Bill ..,,. Newton, Helen . . . Nichols, Harry .... Nichols, Mary Jane . . Nolan, James C. . Nole, Angelo .... Nolte, Dan A. .... . Norman, Glenn ..... Norsworthy, Martha . . Nowlin, Wade .,.... Nunley, Clifford R. . . Nunley, Thomas J. . . . Nunn. vm c. ..... . C3 Oates, Jean . ..,.... . Oatman, Wayland W. .. Obana, Ochoa, Ayako . .... . . Dora Jean .... O'Connell, T. L. . .. O'Done1, Jack ...... O g, Molly Andrce .. Oien, Olsen, Olsen, 1. K. ...... . Marian ...., Richard L. .. O'Neal, Harold L. . . O'Neal, Jim ....... Oppie, Joseph A. .. Orahood, R. M. . , Orenduff, Patti . . . Orm, George . .. Ormand, Jane Orr, Loyce ........ Osborne, Frances .... Osburn, John Dixon .... Osterho Osterho Ousley, Owen, Owen, Owen, Owen, Oxley, ut, lla Mae .... ut, John J. . . Jim ........ Mollie Jeanne . . . Oleta .,,.... . Rainey ..... Sue ..... Theron . . . P Padtlen, Michael .... Padgett, Robert H. . . . Padon, Betty Marie .. 11178 11110111541 1111157 1111125 . 1 179128312871 1 Q ...49 ..11137 1111851293 .,11123 ..112911s3 ..11G5Q300 . ...... 49 ....37,283 Padon, Bill ....... Paez, Manuel .................... Painter, Robert .....,.... Palmer, Mary Maxine Jones Palmer, Ralph Z. .. Pankey, Margaret , ..... .. Parker, Don ........ Parker, Edward M. .. Parker, Nancy ...... Parker, Thomas W. . . Parkey, Bill ...,... Parkman, Leon . . . , . Parrett, Paschal, Jimmy Hubert ..,.....2, Pass, John E., Jr.. .. Patterson, Andy James . . . Patterson, C. L. . . . . Patterson, Lona Sue . .. Patterson, Shirley .... .50,283.298 ..1s6 idalisilisafiaa 318.319.322.328 ,...57 285.301 . Page .. 151 .. 113 .. 168 .. 123 .. 57 ... 37 ... 65 .65 300 ... 65 ... 101 .49 312 . . . 107 291 292 138 176 .57 286 ... 123 163 309 ... 57 .21 330 153 330 ... 132 ... 23 ... 65 .65,305 300.305 ... 101 ... 79 ... 90 ... 101 123.290 ... 37 101 293 258 266 128 290 .79 283 ... 113 .65.294 107.307 ... 125 ... 126 307 330 .57 317 ... 85 ... 130 ... 49 ... 107 ... 79 .37 322 ... 37 ... 79 ... 37 ... 57 .65 305 ... 90 85 293 .49 283 ... 23 300, 322 107 303 ... 37 .57 312 322 324 .37 294 ... 57 309 328 102 329 .79 318 ... 138 ... 57 ,. 79 ... 107 .. 49 ... 57 ... 79 300 331 ... 49 291 298 .37 323 ... 127 ... 57 305 311 .57 300 .57 311 102 286 .57 317 291 328 320 323 107 329 138 291 ... 50 300 331 ... 139 134 297 287 313 ... 65 ... 128 111 305 ... 37 ... 57 ... 79 111 309, 360 ... 79 ... 139 301 322 65 Pattison, Marcella ..... Paulson. Mrs. Luz D.. .. 102 129 Payne, Diane ....... Payne, Grace ...... Payne, John B. .. Payne, John W. . . Payne, Ollie C. .. Payne, Shirley . .. Payne, Zaync Ann Payte, S. C. .... . Peace, William K. . . Pearce, Virginia . . . Pearce, W. Claude .. Pearson, Beth ...... Pearson, Mildred .. . Pearson, Wanda ..... Pederson, Julie Ann Peffle , Ruth . ..... . Pengelrly, James C. . . . Pentecost. Richard . .. Pepper, Helen Joyce . . . Perkins, Cherry Lane . . . Perkins, Mary ,...... . . Perkins, Sally ....... Perme, Perner, Thomas ....... Chris Perot, Bette . .... . Perry, Don .,..,... Peters, Eugene H. . . . . Peterson. Mildred ..,. Pflanz, Edward J., Jr.. .. Pharries, James Phel s, Philllips Phillips, Phillips, Phillips, Pierce, Pierce 14. l ""' SHP HaroldiE.. Janelle . . . . Martin .. Alarah ..... Geor e T Picrrard, William IE. . Piper, Ralph ...... . Pirtle, Dana ........ Pirrlc, Norma Anne .... Pitman. Robert G., Jr... Platt, Clarence ........ Plumbley, Betty Ruth .. Plumblcy, 'l'. A., Jr. . P1 l Ch 1 n . Um Y. Poarch. arlee Bennie ..... Poe, Carolyn .... Polk, E. C. Polk, Patsy ...... Poole, Porter, Porter, Porter, Richard S. Barbara ....... Clair ...,..,.. William M., Jr Porterfield, A. L. ...., . Porrerfield, Jackie . . . Portwood, Jerry Ann Poston, Nancyh ...... Potter, Marguerite . . . Powell, Bil ....,,, Powell, Carmen ..... Powell, Owen K., Jr.. . . Prater, William .,.. Prather, Dorothy . . . 126 Prather, Edith ....... Pressley, B. K. .,,.... . Preston, David . ..,... . Prestridge, Raymond C. Ptewitt, James O. ..... Price, Anne . ...... . Price, Dave, Jr. .. Price, Helen ...... Price, Mary Dee Price, William T. .. Pridgeon, Jolly. .. Pritchar, Jimmie . Proctor, Charles .. Pross, E. L. ...... . Prothro, William Prouse, Tom ...,,.. P 'tt C rol B... run . a .. Pruitt, Curtis .... Puckett, J. F. . . . . Puente, Henry ..... Pugh, Jesse B. ,..., . Purtell, Patricia Ann . .. Purvis, Floyd ....... Quick, John, E. .... . . . . Quintcro, Vincent . . . . . Rabyor, Joseph . . . Ragan, Peggy .... Ragle, Maxine Ragsdale, Bob ...... Ra ston John E. .. . Ramsay, Jack ,..... Ramsay, John Guinn Ramsey, L.. W. ..... Ramsey, Richard ...... Randle, Mark XV., Jr.. .. Rankin, Carol ....,. Ranspot, Clara ..... Ranyor, Suzanne .... Rattikin, Ann Ray, Carolyn .... Ray, Jack ......... Raymer, Betty L. Raymond, Doyle .... Read, Joe ......... Read, Melba Jean .. Reader, Evelyn . . . fff1f.IIIIf126 1i1'191'212'369' """"QIIf3s IQI3SQ283 1Ii56Q361 .1Is6Q2s1 ffff128, 296 IIff65 f11f56 .I1126f Page .. 11.1 .. 139 129 65 i3s Q56 Q65 131 .86 .57 126 365 313 102 263 .56 179 361 313 .so .50 263 123 361 136 .21 361 139 112 .65 285 Q. 65, 194, 221, 301, 311, R ....57,3l0. ....65 ....65 ....117 ....65 131 301 65 86 109 92 86 37 329 134 110 295 96 305 313 293 301 169 123 86 311 65 328 329 65 330 327 96 293 110 96 135 65 86 331 65 8 3 102 327 110 79 303 301 38 287 90 123 328 126 135 311 57 323 321 96 107 57 23 298 305 96 126 50 113 117 311 123 128 90 38 102 80 23 298 57 95 305 313 92 126 135 38 38 330 123 80 57 123 50 65 111 50 23 328 314 110 129 102 156 305 110 129 50 319 285 80 lldEDEX- Reader, Jane . .. Reagan, E. L. .... . Ream, Janith ....... Reasoner, Bill ..,... Reather, Howard W. .. . Redmond, Carolene . .. Reece, Charles .. .. Reece, Frank L. : . . . Reece, Mary Louise .. Reed, Helen L. . . . , Reed, Joe ....... Reed, R. C., Jr.. . .. Thomas L. . . . Reed, Reed, W. L. Reeder, William Reineke, Joan Reinli, Carmen Reinshagen, Stanley .. Repass, Ernest ...,. Repass, Morris . . . Repp, James ....... Reppeto, Martha Reumolds, Bette . . Reynolds, Joyce .. Reynolds, Rob ..... Reynolds, Ted ...... Richards, Billy ........ Richardson, Claudelle .. Richardson, Peggy . . . Richardson, T. F. . . . Richerson, Jim .. .. Richter, Betty .... R'ddl B r J 1 e, etyo.... Riddle, Jan .......... 39 Ridings, Prof. Paul O. .... . Rightmire, George Richard Rippy, Merrill .......... Rippy, Pauline ......... Roach, Bobby . . . Roach, Walter . . .1 Robbins, Mary ..... Roberson, Frank . . . Roberson, Jim ..... Roberts, Bert W. . . . Roberts, Carlos J. . . . Roberts, Lester H. .... . Roberts, Roberts, Nancy ....... Roberts, Rollin Cary Roberts, Wayland 1 . . Robertson, Bernie ..... Robertson, Mary Lou ..... Robertson, Mollie Dot .... Robertson, Robert E. . .. Robinette, Robinson, Rogers, Charles ....... Rogers, Wayne ...... Roman, Jose ...,. Rose, Corkey ...... Rose, June ......... Rosenstein, Bernard .. Ross, Don ......... Ross, Robert ...... Rosson, James . .. Roth, Rose M. . . Rountree, Irene .... Rouse, Margaret ..... Routh, Robert L., Jr.. .. Routt, Dr. Glenn C.. . . . Rowe, George ....... Rowland, Betty Ann . Rowland, Susan . . . . Roy, Molly ....... Royse, George T.. . . . Ruby, Jo Ann .... Ruggiero, James . . Russell, Jo Ann .... Russell, Sandra ...... Rutherford, Oren B. . . . . Ryan, Olpal Hallmark .. Ryan. T omas ...... . Ryerson, Mary T. . . . . . . . . S Sadler, President M. E., 4, 18 Saenz, Mike ......... Sailor, Irene E. .................... . Sale, Clarence Salim, Michael .... Samlfzson, Shari ..... San ers, David H. .... . Sanders, Richard W. . .. Sanderson, Ralph .... Sanford, William J. . . . . Satterwhire, Elizabeth .. Sauden, John ....... Savage, Savage, James M. .... . Sazama, Peggy Lou ...... Fred A. . . . . Schaffrick, Bob ......... Mary Kathryn . . . William K. . . Sherman ...... Robinson, Tom E., Jr. .... I1Q131j152Q Connnued ....39, ....90, Q65 135 Q39 .297 322 162 111 128 291 Q56 .........102,313 ,283,301,327,g29 21. 309, 8 IIfI123Q151 .....123, .Iif5S 'I65'366'365 ... , , , 'IIIIIQIII39 .fi116 191 ffff39 ffIf93 ,148, 152,167 Schanewerk, F. Kenneth .... Schectman, Arnold ....... Scheirman, Mildred .... Schellinger, Irvin T.. . . . Schenk, Ernest C. Schmidt, Betty Rae .. Schmidt, Gene ..... Schnake, Charles .... Schneider, Joanne ...... Schuch, Mary Louise Schumacher, R. J. Scott, Scott, Scott Scott Scott Scott v 1 1 Bettye Sue . .. Flo ......... Margaret Ann . . Marion ...... Mary Beth .... Sammie Jean . . . ffIf51 ......i63 11111031269 .......81 ..QIIQ46 Q1i16f2s2 1 .80 162 128 162 153 369 281 316 285 .58 .65 218 111 283 311 173 139. 33.66, 126 .39 299 .58 312 295 .40 5 n 3 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 .50, 306, 102, 285 1 1 1 1 1 110 , 311 ,317 39 286, 270. 281, 1 1 Page 281 80 129 322 301 57 58 301 92 50 331 96 39 132 58 324 286 303 283 123 293 126 86 295 126 110 80 126 139 21 58 162 327 331 322 80 23 23 92 95 126 111 123 291 110 81 301 303 39 283 318 329 327 23 39 92 50 92 , 266 58 107 39 93 103 296 81 50 322 95 301 23 331 329 117 322 331 304 50 58 1 322 227 301 301 23 58 66 86 66 96 39 ,168 50 322 , 316 93 117 51 .331 81 81 331 284 293 295 295 281 321 40 , 316 284 23 129 Scott, Sue ...... Schuartz, Lorelei : .. Schuch, Mary Louise . Schulkey, Bill ......... Schumacher, Robert J. . Sealy, Jack H. ....... . Sears, Joseph ....... Sears, Rene D. . . . Secor, Sallie ....... Segura, Orlando ..... Shackelford, Kathryn . . . Shaddox, F. M. .... . Shah, Prasonna ..... Shank, Betty Clay Shannon, Patrick .... Sharpless, Richard . . . Sharratt, XValrer .... Shaw, Carolyn . .. Shaw, Nina ....... Shaw, Rex. E. ..... . Shea, William J., Jr.. . .. Sheets, Arthur M. .... . Sheets, H. J. ........ . Shelburne, Dean Elizabeth .... Shelburne, Evelyn ..... Shellenberger, Bell ..... Shelley, Bobbie ....... Shelton, Jeanne .... Shepherd, Anne ..... Sheppard, Jacquelyn .... Sheppard, Janie . .... Sherer, C. R. ...... . Sherer, Mirth ......... Sherley, Prof. Lorraine.. Shingler, S. H. ....... . Sl11PP. Marilyn ...... Shirley, Joe .... Shofner, Beth . . . . . . Shosid, Joe .......... Shotwell, Ned ........ Shropshire, William B... Shumway, Dave. ....... Shupp, D. Melvin Shury, Kenneth .... S11-ces, Clyde ..... Silver, Llogd T. .. Simonds, arah . . Simpson, Joe ...... Simpson, Troy C. .. Singer, Bob . ..,. .. Singleton, Eva ...... Sise, Edith Bradley .. Skelton, Sally ...... Skillern, Ed ..... Skulan, Vernell ..... Slack, James R. ...... . Slate, Johnny ......... Slater, Damon Derrell .. Slaton, Floyd D. ..... . Slaughter, Peggy ....... Slayton, L. N. ..... . Sloan, Robert F. III .... Slocum, Robert E. Slone, Dick ....... Smart, Patricia ...... Smashey, Wilma Jean . . . Smerick, Michael .... Smith, Adolphus . . . Smith, Anne .... Smith, Barbara . Smith, Bebe . . . . . Smith, Betty Sue . .. Smith, Beverly . . . Smith, Bill ..... Smith, Clay W. . . . . Smith, Dolores ...... Smith, Doris Zinn .. Smith, Elsie ....... Smith, Elvira ...... Smith, Fred ........ Smith, Harvey ........ Smith, Homer C., Jr.. .. Smith, James P. .... . Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Jane ....... Jean ........ Joe H. ....... . John Russell .... Smith, Joseph D. .... . Smith, Jouce Kathryn . . . Smith, Leonardine . . . Smith, Marlin ...... Smith, Mike ....... Smith, Minor C. . . . Smitl1, N. Frank . . . Smith, Nancy .... Smith, Robert P. . . . Smith, Ross B. . . . Smith, Shelby W. . . Smith, Theron L. . . . Smith, W. O., Jr.. .. Smith, Walter B. .. Smith, Walter N. .. Smith, Wencil J. . . . Smoot, Jasmine .... Snede r Beverly . . . co , ' Snedecor, Bill . . . Sneed, Mary Lou Snider, Charles .... Snodgrass, Daniel Snow, Melvin R. Snow, Robert .... Snyder, Karl . . . Sovey, Helen .... Spain, A. O. ..... . Spann, Jimmie D. . . . Speck, Denny Ray . .. Spencer, J. Elden Spencer, Mary . . . Spencer, Pat ..... Sperry, Ruth ...... Spinks, Elvin H. 66, 301, 304, 51Q361Q321 ...117, 152 a6Qi82f369 If1I93 111156 IIfs6f263 .IfQ56 .QIIA1 IQI51f263 fiff51 ....66 111166 ffffii IIII51 .QI66f361 .lilai IfI139 ffff66 329 .58 196 111 327 Q81 156 .86 119 192 .86 .40 Q46 .66 .23 .86 126 322 153 123 322 .95 126 287 .41 .86 .51 I5i 178 116 301 .si 296 156 129 .ai 298 153 295 261 111 107 361 365 181 263 .90 .66 161 111 111 ..66 ,287 .111 .301 Q82 1 1 1 s 1 5 1 3 1 1 Page 331 117 51 303 81 293 58 90 329 58 51 66 139 331 58 93 293 117 289 185 86 303 135 230 287 283 66 295 66 301 103 21 23 291 293 66 298 40 324 103 118 111 301 90 90 128 58 312 40 324 286 305 291 40 58 41 317 281 331 110 303 328 51 123 303 331 293 58 66 312 66 303 311 293 303 305 41 305 130 103 58 318 51 305 301 93 41 66 66 331 58 51 118 81 331 93 293 41 317 126 81 298 285 23 107 309 305 86 110 86 162 23 103 21 41 328 321 305 331 126 293 Three H umlrred Sixty-.reven White 104 Page Sportsman, Jack . . , . . 266 289 Springer, Sarah ..... . . . . 66 Spurdis, Nick . ....... . . . 66 Spurgers, John L., Jr. .... .,......,. . . . 66 Spurlock, Betty ...... . .,......... . . . 129 Stafferton, Joanne ..,..,,.., 41, 283. 313 327 331 Stancoff, James .,.........,... , ....., . . . 82 Standeferm, Imogene Lister 1Mrs.J . ..,... 118 290 Standfor, Edwin . .,......,..... 51, 283 299 331 Stanford, Carl Austin .............., S6 293 331 Stanley, Lynne ...... . .,.. 66, 301. 305 331 Stansbury, Jean ....,. ...,.. 1 23 285 291 Steed, Wayne A. . . ....... .82 292 Steele, Hu-Ellen . . . . .... . . . 128 Steele, Nancy Ann . . . . . 107 Steele, Wes ....... . . 90 Steers, Susan .... .. 103 Stella, Mary . . , , 69 Stepp, Wade . . . ....... . . . 58 Sterling, Alice . . . ......,. . . . 130 Sterling, Barbara . . . .... 41, 298 316 331 Sterling, James E. ........ .58 301 Stevens, Harold O. . . ,...... . . . 41 Stewart, Beverly .... . . . . 58 Stewart, Justin D. . . . . . 86 Stewart, Marjorie . . . . .51 283 Stewart, Otis Rotan . . , . . . 90 Stigler, Bobby Jack . . . . . , . 42 Stine, Nancy ,.... ... . . 126 305 Stinson, Betty Ann . . . . .42, 283 Stinson, Jean Claire .... . . 118, 291 Stinson, R..G. ........ . . . . . 66 Stinson, Troy ..,.... ..,. . 23 303 Stockstill, Noble H. . ..... . . . 51 Stokes, C. Ray ..... ...51 322, 324 Stone, Herman L. . . . .,.. . . . 82 Stone, Ralph Edward . . . . . . . . 42 Stopp, Carol ........ . . 66 Story, Jimmy L. .... . . . 57 Stout, Harry, Jr. . . . . . . . . 93 Stovall, Dona Lee . , . . . . . . . . 66 Strange, Betsy ......... ..... 1 11, 329 Stratton, Joan ......... , ..... 82 283 287 Stratton, Leslie, Jr. ....... .... 1 26 301 327 Stratton, Virginia CMrs.J . . .,.., . . . 283 Strawn, William Orville .... .... ,. . 58 Street, Jack ........... ...,. . . . S2 Srrickel, Patti ......... ....... . . . 130 Strickert, Merle ..... .... 1 26 169, 290 Strickland. Odell ...... ......... 8 2 Stromer, John E. ....... ........ 6 6 Strong. Mary ........... .... 6 6, 301 Strother, Virginia CMrs.J . . . .,... . 118 Stuart, William ........ .... 5 8, 328 Sttilting, Beverly Ann . . . .... . 129 Suit, Marianne ...... . . . 93 Sullivan, Rita ......... ..... 5 1 Sutherland, Spurgeon . . . .... . . 51 Swain, Martha Ann . . . . .123, 298 Swank, Elizabeth . . . ,...,. 103 Sweet, Alice ..,.... ,... 6 7, 295 Swift, Grover, Jr. . . . . . . . . 67 Switzer, John ...... . . . 67 Swope, Henry H. . . . . . . . 42 T Tackett, Terry . . . . . ....... . . . . 42 Taegel, Jeanine ..... .......... . . . 51 Tally, Nancy ................ 103, 291, 303, 322 Tankersley, Johnsye . ,...,............ . . . 111 Tanner, Bill ........................ . . . 107 Tatum, Bill ......... 123, 190, 195, 224 225, 282 Tatum, Doug ....................,,. . . . 67 Taylor, Alton .......,....,.......... . . . 110 Taylor, Bennie ,.....,. . . . 59 Taylor, Clifford, Jr. . . . . . 135 Taylor, Jaye ........ . .90 287 Taylor, June ....., ....... . . . 42 Taylor, Lowell E. . . ..,.,... . . . 42 Taylor, Mariie F. .... .............. 5 1 Taylor, Mar'orie S. . . . . .42, 283 295,331 Taylor, Marlys ..... ........ . . . 130 Taylor, R. J. ....... ....... . , . 67 Taylor, Tommy ....... . . .59 271, 272 Teague, Harold P., Jr.. . . .... . . . 90 Tedlow, James ...... . . . . . 69 Teel, Billy ..... '. .. ,. ... 123 Teele, Arthur J. . . . . 118, 290 Teems, Mickey . . . . . . . 111 Temple, Jack . . . .. .67, 303 Terrell, Pat ........ . . . . . 67 Thomas, Cullen .,..... .... . . . 42 Thomas, Don .,.,.... , . ......... 93 Thomas, Harold Wesley . . . . . .82 284 292 Thomas, Jack E. ,...... ........ 4 3 Thomas, Owen Edward .. ....., 42 Thomas, Peggy ....... . . .51 299 Thomas, Robert C. .... . .. 51 Thomason, Mary ........ ........ 1 10 Thompktns, Homer ....... ........... 1 55 Thompson, Arlington T. . . . .......... . . 51 Thompson, Betty ....... ....... 1 04,286 297 Thompson, Charles ... ....43, 322, 324 327 Thompson, Dorothy .... . ........... 118 Thompson, Jim C. ......... 59 317 Thompson, Nancy .... . . . 129 164 Thompson, Paul T. ...., ..... 4 3 Thompson, Rhodes, Jr. . . . . .43 283 Threet, William . ,.... , . .104 286 Throne, Robert E. . . . . . . . . 59 Tice, Mary ....... .... 1 29 312 Tidmore, Leon . . . . . . . . 59 Tillett, Jeannette . . . ...... 113 Tillotson, Bertie ..... ...... . . 107 Tillotson, Clinton R. . . . . . .82, 291 293 Timaeus, Theda M. ..... ........ 1 27 Ttnkle, Prof. Maybelle .. ..... 95 329 Tinkle, Wanda ....... .... 1 26, 285 Ttsdale, Jean . ....,. ..... 1 10 Three Humired Sixty-eight I N DIEX Tobey, Betty ...... Tompkins, Bob F. Tompkins, Homer . .. Tompkins, Robert F. . Towery, Wendell R. . . Towne, Fred L. Towne, Ruth . ,... Townes, Harrison .... Townsend, John W. . Trammell, Peggy Jo . . Traweek, Dorothy . .. Treadway, Jane ..... Treadway, Jean .. . Trillich, Bertram .... Trimble, Leonard G. . Triplett, Dolores .... Trout, Woodie-Lou . . . Trutkscss, Janet ..... Truitt, Jack ........ Tucker, Billie Grace . . Tucker, Corris .. Tucker, Harry, Jr. Tull, Martha . .. Tumlinson, Wayne . . . Tune, Nancy ..... Turner, Jean ...., Turner, Jesse ....... Tyler, Charles W. Tyler, L. Crosson Ulmer, Phil ..... Underhill, Bill .... Underwood, Ann .. Upson, Janet .... Urbis, Joe ..... Vaiani, Al ......... Valliere, Robert E. Van Hoosier, Charles Vance, Thomas L. Vann, Robert C. .... . Vargas, Delores .. Vasey, Winston .. Vaughan, Lynn Vaughn, H. L. Velten, Jo Beth ..... Nolly Vereen, William Vincent, Bruce ...... Vlamides, Evangeline . Volbach, Dr. Walter . Waddell, John Waddill, Mary ...... Waggoner, Cecil E. .. Waiter, Florence O. . . Walker, Anne ...... Walker, Billy Wayne . Walker, Jearl D. . . . , Walker, Kenneth .. Walker, Margaret . . . Wall, Dr. Sandy A.. . , Wallace, Georgett . . . Wallace, Mildred .. W'allace, Nickie . . . Waller, Charles .. . Walter, Mary Jo .... Walter, William B. . . Walters, Euquen R. .. Walters, Hubert ...,. Walther, Richard E. . Ward, Doris . ...... Ward, Joe ....... Ward, Nancy ....... Wardynske, Donald .. Ware,- Sally ...... Warix, Clay W. . . . . . Warner, Austin M. ., Warner, Elvis ....... Warner, James H. . . . Warner, Margaret . . . Warren, I. A. ..... . Wasson, Phylis ..... Watson, Beverly ..... Watson, Curtis A., Jr. Watson, Lloyd ...... Watson, Sue .,...... Wattersdof, R. B. . Weaver, David . . . Weaver, Francine .. Weaver, Nira . . . Webb, Mack .... XVebb, R. G. .... . Webb, Wallace ..... Webb, William M. .. Webster, A. A., Jr.. .. Webster, Jane Leah .. Webster, Tom ...... Welborn, Dolores , . Welch, Aileen . . . Welch, Margaret .. NX'elch, Mary ..... Welch, Walter ...... Weldon, Billy D. Wells, Eugenia .... Wells, Jim ..,.. Wells, Mary ...... Welsh, W. A. ..... . Werner, Betty Jean .. Werherell, Dean Ralph Wheaton, Jame ...,. Wheeler, George .... Wheeler, Suzanne . . . Connnued ,Q11s7'29S' Iiorif 169. 112259 111183 ...110, .QQIQ5 isa iss 284 .67 196 59. 129 283 f9o 139 301 104 .67 129 .59 .82 291 iid 598 293 312 .67 233 .67 .83, .52 io? 32 298 i39 S9 ...52 59 ...93 2 . ....151 126, ifzs .93 55 1213 .67 .301. , 230, 305 Page 311 301 104 311 303 135 23 52 82 43 305 286 104 69 82 311 52 311 328 287 104 83 320 86 59 311 52 59 312 303 329 285 104 291 311 43 83 293 312 83 107 118 311 129 283 131 113 331 23 321 126 59 104 52 107 108 95 67 83 59 52 128 90 93 104 139 129 311 164 110 104 43 135 86 311 52 111 52 126 43 43 123 86 311 126 52 59 123 67 83 87 110 126 285 287 59 287 105 67 303 105 305 132 331 327 105 93 311 Whelan, Barbara .. ailnelari, Dan .... app e, ancy .. Whist, Hal . ..... . White, Anne .... White, Bob W. .... . White, Helen ........ White, James Cody White, John B. ..... . White, Lou ........... White, Madeline Sue White, Maggie Nell . . . White, Nancy ...... White, Ralph . . . . White, Ray ...,,... WC Whitehead: ciiaiieite' Whitehead, Gloria .. 1143 whmey, ours .,,. 93. 1961 i9Aj 224 278 Whitlock, E. Clyde ...... Whitmore, Joanne ....... Whittaker, James O. .. Whitten, Joe Chan .. Wick, Doris ..... Wier, Jack M. ..... . Wiesehahn, Bill ...... Wigley, Don .....,... .. Wi cox, Glenn M., Jr. Wilcox, Willabeth ...... Wilde, Dan ..,.. 108, 190. 196, 205 Wilde, Garner ...,............., Wilde, George H. ,.... 44, 190, 196 Wilkins, Noreen . . ..... 129, 285 Willey, Harley ..,. . . . Williams, Ann ..,.. Williams, Don E. Williams, Jo ..,......, Williams, Madeline .,.... Williams, Mary Ann ..... Williams, Nancy Katherine Williams, Noel ......... Williams, Robert W. . . . . Williams, Rod ,..... Wlilliarns, Shirley .... Williams Wynona ...... wiiinmsbn, Bobby ...... Williamson, Joseph Seth .. Williamson, Katie ..,... Williamson, Marshall . Williamson. Sue .... Williford, James .. Willingham, Billy Willis, June , ....... Wilson, Arden .......... Wilson, Ellen ........... Wilson, Ethel Cornelia . .. Wilson, Glenna ....... 67 Wilson, Jack E. ........ . Wilson, James . .. ... Wilson, Joan ...., Wilson, Mary Ann . . . Wilson, Odin .... Wilson, Patricia . . . . . Wilson, Robert F. Wilson, Wanda ...... Windom, Cloyd ........ Winesaker, Dr. M. W .... Wingo, Prof. Kitty .... Winters, Winton, Winton, Ann ,.,.... W. M. ..... . Mrs. W. M. Witherspoon, Jack . .. Witt, Tommy ..... Wittrup, Wolaver, Marilyn .... Nell ,........ Wolfenbarger, Tetldy J. . . . Wollenweber, Patil J., Jr... Wood, Bettye ...,....... Wood, Dick .,..,...... Wood, 1-lorice L. ..., . Wood, James Harold . . . Wood, James M. .... . Wood, Roberta ,... , Wood, Warren . . . Woods, Everett E. . . . Woodward, Andrew . . . Woodward, Hazel T. Wortham, John L. ...... . Worthington. Charles Wre n. Wright, W.. Jack ..... ..... George XV. .... . Wright, James R., Jr.. . . . Wright, Joy ......... Wright. Mary Ann ...... Wright, Richard ........ Wright, Robert J. ...... . Wright, CMrs.J Robert L. . Wyatt, Anne ........... Wyle, Ewart ........., . . Y Yoakum, Marianne . . . . . . Yocham, Reba ....... York, James Edward .. York, Joanne .......... Young, Delores ........ Young, Katherine Frank .. Young, M. M. ......., . Young, Sara Anne ....... Z Zaiicck, Sarita .... .. Ziegler, Prof. S. P. . . . . Zimmerman, Hubert .. Zodin, Vita ..... . . . Zotz, Robert ,.,... .67 111129 Qsif 298 his 258' 222 son .90 129 iii 293 Soi i29 ....59.l69 .126 ,.59 fs? Iiis Page .. 123 .. 67 .. 67 ... 67 ... 59 .67 311 .87 283 ... 52 ..52 301 ,286 321 ... 87 .44 295 .83 322 ... 59 ... 131 139 283 110 311 ... 111 309 328 ... 113 ... 129 .311 331 ... 59 .90 287 .83 293 ... 67 ... 90 ... 108 .44,323 ,266,291 .52 316 318 331 305 331 293 328 283 290 .69 310 ... 126 ... 129 ... 67 285 301 123 309 ... 135 ... 111 126 301 ... 108 ... 111 ... 44 .67 295 ... 126 315 327 ... 87 108 266 ... 59 126 312 ... 105 ... 129 305 509 ... 139 ... 59 ... 59 ... 67 147 180 ... 108 ... 93 .. 86 .. 93 ... 113 .95.306 .44 294 ... 21 ... 23 .87 293 ... 110 ... 128 127 232 126 311 ... 83 ... 129 ,301 310 ... 83 ... 83 ... 87 .. 126 .. 23 .. 44 ... 44 ... 23 .23.3l3 ... 83 .. 52 ., 129 .. 135 ... 90 ... 23 .87 293 ... 44 ... 317 305 162 .301 331 ... 123 309 322 ... 52 ... 67 ... 126 313 315 ... 95 111 311 .23 320 ... 112 ... 110 131 329 ... 111


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