Texas A and M University - El Rancho Yearbook (Kingsville, TX)

 - Class of 1972

Page 1 of 334

 

Texas A and M University - El Rancho Yearbook (Kingsville, TX) online yearbook collection, 1972 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 334 of the 1972 volume:

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N 5, X 4 , , If A V 0 5 il 'J 1 QCQCQU ,509 wi.-iq ' s 4 4 q " - fr l .0 1.5 -" .L N-4 "+ 'Nix ' .px sb 'Cf-vw !',, V1 'XA 'Nw 4 A. al 5 X!! fo f"r by l u-J bo Ag n rs... x gf X Q '11 M vw, If wx' iq AQQX 'll!mua'BI"' f df' . ff .3--..,MW, f Ru' at if 'lnqnnain J 4,-1 f .4 Y wgrvw X'f' "K If vi' 'K wx' Y in-dw 'Nl S .3 Fifi ,....-7 -ws '54 Ad MMA -fr" -va ,fy nil .- V .4 .7 ' 'ffm' .4 . K A "Iii 3 'ZFE3 33332 0xV2T"'1 wgehgw ,, 1 'f , ,I V . . 1 71-.1 mga :-fx, .7 K I ,, , any fe 7 Sf' 'ld : , ' x -HQ ft W ' 4 1 s gf J 5 'fr , I5 ,, Q 4 9 1M 4 I ,.""XqM if , ., my , K af, 9' ' 'K if A V . if ,su 2 'aa in ' ' Academics Dr. James C. Jernigan, President. Texas A8.l University Self-Study Program gives over-all evaluation of departments Texas A811 University went through its own examination this year. Over one hundred people were involved in Self- Study committees. Self-Study is a depart- mental and over-all evaluation and ex- amination of the University. Every college is required to evaluate itself and turn in a report every ten years to the Southern Association of Schools and Colleges. These reports are used in deciding whether the university receives renewed accreditation. Self-Study at A811 began in October of 1971. At that time committees were ap- pointed and departments started individ- ual studies. Self-Study will not be com- plete until February of 1973. Self-Study consists of thirteen commit- tees. They include organization and ad- ministration, educational program, finan- cial resources, development of University faculty, library, student development, physical plant, special activities, graduate studies, and research. The last committee is the Planning for the Future Committee. They collect and evaluate every departmental, school, and individual report. From these reports they draw up a synopsis on future develop- ments and proiects for A8rl. Dr. Hildegard Schmalenbeck is the di- rector of Self-Study. She headed the steering committee and helped organize the other committees. During the spring semester she worked full time on Self- 51UdY, giving up her teaching duties in the English Department. X ..z-'-fl President Jernigan's duties require him to leave the office often to attend college functions. Here he cd- dresses students at a noon pep rally. Directors J. C. Martin Jr., president Mrs. Richard M. Kleberg, vice-president Lewis W. Mapl6S, Secfelmy' treasurer William H. Atkinson Everett Braden I Laurence A. McNeil George F. RhodeS Dr. Hesiquio Rodriquez Leo J. Welder nl"" gf Left: Dr. Mario Benitez, Vice-President and Dean of the University. Top: William C. English, Vice-President for Fiscal Affairs. Bottom: Dr. W. Floyd Elliott, Vice- President for Student Affairs. Dr. Mario Benitez appointed new Vice-President, Dean Dr. Mario A. Benitez was appointed as the new Dean and Vice-President of Texas A8tl University in September. His goals include: making A8-I University a first-rate University, starting a program of academic advisement specifically for stu- dents on probation to help them stay in school, to attract stu- dents with high academic achievement and offer them honor pro- grams, to help the administration make every student feel wel- comed at A81l regardless of ethnic background, to encourage all students to feel free to come to the Dean if they have any kind of problems. A graduate from the Universidad de la Habana in 1949, he received his A.M. and M.Ed. degree from Texas Christian Univer- sity, and his Ph.D. from Claremont Graduate School. Throughout his studies, Dr. Benitez maintained a 4.0 grade point average and as a result graduated summa cum laude from all the universities he attended. Dr. Benitez has higher degrees in three fields. Two doctorate degrees, one in literature and one in education, and one higher degree in philosophy. While at the University of Texas, Dr. Benitez coordinated three bilingual education programs. The programs included a B.S., A.M., and Ph.D. degree in bilingual studies. This was the first bilingual program of its type in the United States. Dr. Benitez is also consultant to the Office of Education in Washington, to the Texas Education Agency, and several school districts. sew-nal? 265652 ., 1 Top: Dr. Stanley Anderson, Dean of Agriculture, Dr. Ernest Franke, Dean of Engi- neering, and Dr. John C. Rayburn, Dean of Graduate Studies. Right: Dr. S. Boyd Stewart, Dean of Arts and Sciences. Texas Anil University divided info six schools, Deans direcf if 2' ""Wf'f4vl-11,-mpg U-,Q Topq Dr. John W. Glock, Dean of Teacher Educa- tion. Left: Dr. Dennis B. Ford Jr., Deon of Business Administration. Top: Ildefonso Q. Vidaurri, Student Aid Officer. Right: Johnny L. Johnson, Direc- tor of Student Placement and Coordinator of Extension Teaching. Bottom: Mrs. Carrie Lee Bishop, Dean of Women. Administrators keep academic machinery running smoothly .4?'f" J.-vf W b , 3,3 used V .au qw be-1 ,fu .-wa! ...arf ill' I .,,l I Ml. 1 5 5 5 5 ? tl 33 3 is li :E 3 -vt :',' X Top: David Boothby and John E. Pennington, Business Managers. Left: Dr. William J. Hall, Registrar and Direc tor of Admissions. Center: Manuel Salinas Jr., Assistant to the President. Right: J. E. Turner, Dean of Men. The School of Agriculture marked a year filled with new courses, research proiects, and plans. This year the school had a total head count of 401 under- graduate students and 32 graduates. During the 1971-72 year 36 received de- grees. New faculty members ioining the School were Dr. Gary L. Jelliff, a crop scientist who also taught two courses in Spanish as part of the bilingual program. Dr. Jolliff spent two years in Colombia on assignment with the University of Ne- braska before coming to A8tl. Dr. Robert Wolff returned from a leave-of-absence. This year he was instrumental in design- ing the Materials Handling Center, which grinds and ,prepares food for livestock. At the citrus center in Weslaco Dr. Arlen Klosterboer, whose field is weed control physiology, ioined the staff. Research by faculty members was started in the fields of chemical weed control of golden weed and other peren- nial shrubs and trees, utilization of sor- gham stubble for silage, evaluation of important species of range grasses for South Texas lirrigated and non-irrigatedl, stabilization of Padre Island sand dunes by revegetation, evaluation of odor-sup- School of Agriculture offers new courses, 36 receive Ag degrees IT1C1l'lUI'e. pressant materials for livestock . The School is actively involved in the lete research cen- development of a comp ter on the University farm. This will in- volve the construction and development of a livestock production facility, live- stock slaughtering and processing facility, d construction facil- machinery repair an ity, and the already completed Materials Handling Center. In addition the School is working on the development of irriga- tion wells, water storage facilities, and irrigation systems that will be economical and practical for use in South Texas crop production. A new irrigated ornamental and horti- cultural facility for plants and vegetables is being established on the farm. This is expected to supply a research facility in this field of study and will produce plants, shrubs, and trees for use in cam- pus landscaping. The graduate program matured during the year, particularly in range science and agricultural economics which re- ceived various research funds and fellow- ships. Progress is now being made in the graduate fields of animal science and plant science. 'ff . .e Top: Dr. John W. Howe became the first to receive the "Professor of the Year" award. Sponsored by Alpha Tau Alpha, the selection was made by the votes of all Ag and Ag-Ed students having 30 0, more hours. The award was presented by Allan Ju- mison. Bottom: Dr. Leo Bailey checks the roots ofa plant for students Will C. Bates and Sharon Ply. Students in plant science 211 study propqgqfion techniques and utilize the University greenhouse. .,z . .1 5 .s. x L K A ny.. - . . . 2, A..m s . ., ,X N Xs X N X .- . X . ' .Q S..'iN-EQ. Sy -Ss -' f , :1 X www . ...sei Tap: Marr SNP weeks, Bottom some classes ma 'W i ,.,,-,,v i , 3 l ' 2 lx in - New developments found during year in arf department One of the new developments in the art department was the teaching of "non-visual" art and "self-concept" art to the beginning art education students. With this new concept, the art depart- ment hopes to give the future art teacher an idea of what kind of art he will en- counter when he begins to teach children who directly express their egos. In these two programs, the students worked only with crayola, and their only subiect was themselves. They tried to show feelings they experienced without regard to pro- portion, perspective, and emotional reali- ties. U The Art Department also had a dem- onstration of bronze casting for the first time, and a graduate student ran a metal casting foundry for the first time. Retiring at the end of the 1972 sum- mer session was Ben P. Bailey Jr. Bailey ioined the University faculty in 1936 and served as chairman of the Art Depart- ment from 1958 until 1968. ln the early years he was a one-man art division in the Fine Arts Department, which included art, music, and speech-drama. Bible Chair brings speakers fo ACSQI, new building opens The Campus Christian Fellowship con- tinued Operation Uplift this year. Every Friday students from CCF went to Youth City and Dos Mundos School in Corpus Christi to tutor slow learning students. The CCF also cooperated with the other Bible Chairs to bring films and speakers to campus. CCF director, Karl Brown, taught courses on marriage and morals and the teachings of Jesus. Over TOO students were enrolled. The Church of Christ Bible Chair started a membership drive this semester. They had speakers every week talking on the different periods of Christ's life. The speakers came from churches in this area. Robert Skeleton, director, taught several courses this semester on the New Testament. Tentative plans have been made for new courses on different books of the Bible. There were 85 students en- rolled this semester. The Baptist Student Union served lunches this semester in an effort to get students together. They also worked three Mission points. They visited local areas and worked with disadvantaged children Dean Mathis, BSU director, reported an enrollment of about 100 students this semester He instructed courses covering the prophets, Old Testament, and the Book of the Genesis The biggest prolect of the Catholic Stu dent Association this semester is the new building which was completed in Febru ar The building is open to all students lt includes a snack bar and lounge lt also has classrooms and a large conference room The Catholic Student Association, Catholic fraternity, and married students use the building regularly The center received a new director this year, the Rev Robert J Ullrich The association continued its annual barbecue to collect funds for a mainte nance fund for the building Top: Rev. Robert J. Ullrich, new director of the Catholic Student Center. Bottom: BSU sponsored Buckner Fannin this year. He spoke to students in the Biology-Earth Science building. .. . ...J f Ss Jfiwf v?'f3.ff4f1V,6 sg. frfrffffg-s1gfaF.'f6s -WMM , . 0 . , . . T 0 ' a . . . ' . I 0 - . l l ' . I I u Ax., , fm. : ' , '- wsww5em...,......,.,. N ' 4 355 - 4 "'-- . ' WW: Z I "M . ? ,bb-1 I ' A ,WW WM.. - .4 it . L3 Vff ' :Q ,Z 2 Mi ami? ,. sw, 2,4 , ' V "ww :ffpi 1 --1 -, Q.. , ,.'f,,,'..,. , "I, , .uf..,,,,,, T ,a 'iff '14 If? 'W ---if? ffgfag Ears.. 1 ff! 4 P' 1'5- loch year the see the many ZR. Fannin P ' . .,.z, 'hi -X ' , "J ,X 1, ' , 'N , L-',l?:..X:-it , V -. .gicllbgx ,M N34 X BQ "4 Siva Mx xN' 5 an-I i-2' xc! P. --2 LV X ,N . ..1g11f""?5 Each year the Biology Department holds the Annual Wildlife Show. People from the South Texas Area come to see the many animals, snakes, and birds that are on exhibit. 4111 Biology Department hosts meetingg new fall courses offered One of the busiest departments on the Texas A8tl University campus is the Biol- ogy Department. The department hosted the 1971 meet- ing of the South Texas Association of Bi- ologists on October 21-22. This organi- zation was begun as an association of college instructors. lt has now grown to include biologists working in private in- dustry and government and interested high school biology teachers. The Honors Lecture ,Series Program, held each semester, offers four lectures from various eminent biologists. These lectures are primarily for students in freshman biology courses who have shown a high degree of scholarly attain- ment. The purpose of lectures is to ex- pose students to specialists in different biological fields. The biology department added three new courses this fall, Biology 515, Biol- ogy of Estaurine Organisms, Biology 435, Comparative Animal Physiology, and Biology 439, Introduction to Marine Ecology. Under the direction of Dr. Carl Wood, the Mariculture Research Biological Sta- tion Site 55 situated below Riviera gives the students an opportunity to conduct experiments. The ornithology class under Dr. Allan H. Chaney has made several field trips to the Cd. Victoria, Mexico area to study different species of birds. The zoology class has also undertaken field trips to Bay City to study and collect snakes. Dr. Edwin R. Bogusch travelled in Jan- uary to six southern and midwestern states to give Audubon Society Lectures. The Biology Department has a herbar- ium. Located on top of the Biology-Earth Science Building, it contains approxi- mately 5,000 specimens, mostly from Texas. lt is constantly being expanded with donations from faculty and student collections. lt is utilized by graduate stu- dents in coniunction with their field work, and it is also used as a teaching aid in certain courses in the department. Re-organization for School of Business Adm in istro tion The School of Business Administration has re-organized for the third consecutive year. During the fall of 1971 the school de- partmentalized into four departments. Dr. Dennis B. Ford, dean of the school, said that the change became necessary be- cause of the huge administrative load re- quired to operate the School. There are approximately 1,650 stu- dents enrolled in business courses at A8tl. Operation began for 1971-72 under the leadership of Dr. Robert Nash, eco- nomics and finance, Dr. Darwin Hoffman, general business administration, and Dr. Leslie Muneke, management and market- ing. Another department scheduled for the near future is accounting and elec- tronic data processing. The newly named department heads will be responsible for many duties once assumed by Dean Ford. Department heads will teach three classes and budget their remaining time to adminis- tration. Ford estimates that the administration load for the past four semesters had in- creased by 15 percent and the proiected rate of increase for the next four years will be between seven and ten percent. Thirty-six full-time faculty members and six graduate assistants began duties in August. During 1970-71 the School had 30 full-time faculty members. The School offers students courses of study leading to the B.B.A. degree in ten specializations. The business administra- tion program has been extended to pro- vide for students to earn a provisional certificate in secondary education under the general business or secretarial studies program. Master's degrees offered by the school include the M.B.A., M.S., and M.A. The School continues publication of its Graduate Handbook, a supplementary guide to the University catalog. A new innovation under study is a plan for incoming freshman students to skip mathematics 105 and 108 and be- gin 116 and 117. The bilingual program, now in its sec- ond year, has two faculty members teaching the program's five courses. Ford said that it is now possible for a student to take one-half of his upper level work in Spanish. Yearly programs carried out by the School include offering business exten- sion classes at several area locations and student recruiting visits to iunior colleges. The School has had only two heads during its 47 year history, Dr. J. R. Man- ning and Ford. Ford succeeded Manning as director of the Business Administration Division in 1964, when Manning retired as head. Ford became dean of the divi- sion in 1965 and when the college was granted University status in 1967, he be- came the first dean of the School of Busi- ness Administration. 52?-52? . f J-W' 'St s. -swf- Lx Top: Marv' M' - . banquet, 5I2Ho,EUImg53ccoUm'n9 S9C'elY President, and special guest speaker James Carroll G7 0 I - I students enrolled in various business courses during the year. :ravi 'r 4 .1 5 . buflness Two new courses added to Chemistry Department in fall One new faculty member was added to the Chemistry Department this year, Dr. Albert Olivares, professor of fresh- man and analytical chemistry. Next fall, two new courses will be of- fered to graduate students. They are Special Topics Chemistry and Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Dr. J. A. Beran has completed the first year of a three year 336,000 research proiect. The proiect is entitled the "Ioni- zation Cross Sections at Low Energies." The department purchased a new Wang Electronic Calculator this year which is used by advanced graduates for research. Next fall the department ex- pects to have in operation a new Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer valued at Sl 2,000. Dr. Fred M. Garland attended the Na- tional Meeting of the American Chemistry Society in Boston, and Dr. J. A. Beran attended the National Academy of Sci- ences in Washington, during April. There were 990 students enrolled in the Chemistry Department this year with 42 undergraduate maiors. Education Dept. starts new PFOQFGITI in Bishop Schools n- The Department of Education co ducted an experimental program this year for observers and student teachers in coniunction with the Bishop Public Schools. The faculty also organized an Education Department advisory council d t for the 2,627 students in the stu en teacher program. A certified program in Language and Learning Disabilities will be established in th de artment next year with the first 9 P courses being taught this summer, as well . .... . I as Elementary Specialization in Bilingua Education. Five additional staff members ioined the Education Department during the fall semester. Dr. Ernest Herriman and Ra- mon Tanguma now teach secondary edu- cation and Mrs. Maria Morales teaches elementary education. Tony Garza ioined the school as the new director of the Up- ward Bound Program, and William Bar- ron is the new assistant to the Dean. T 5 is x fs.. s Top- Local iunior high school students came to the University and read before education classes de I' 'ni aingwi I d' language arts. Bottom: Dr. Demos Stinebaugh motivated his students to take part in cass iscuggio ns. Nm .X 'Q 5ch00l niSft"'l nail"K',,, lvl0 'cal we nn nn Sung il W Slllaght new Nl deviflmelllnul nal fllgg Slslfmileeiton ee I ' Vldan Elem, all be olitft lllnls. lilo nfl linear Eledfvzicn tal and 5 ln the Cla pqmnent, Stl opened next two new COUF Economy and This year L graduates w neering, att chairman. One new l Ealing with 1 n'. T U li f .'. i-,r ngs 'ls School of Engineering is divided into fhr The School of Engineering is divided into three maior departments: Electrical Engineering, Engineering. Two new faculty members ioined the Electrical Engineering staff this year, Dr. Chia Sung and James F. Abernathy. T. Joe Boehm will be leaving the Univer- sity next fall to work on his Ph.D. Eight new courses will be added to the department next fall. Introduction to Elec- trical Engineering, Elements of Dynamic Systems, Circuits and Electromagnetic De- vices, Electronics and Instrumentation, and an Electrical Engineering laboratory will be offered to undergraduate stu- dents. Two new graduate courses will be Linear Electronic Circuits, and Pulse Digi- tal and Switching Circuits. The depart- In the Chemical and Natural Gas De- partment, several new courses will be opened next fall. ln the Chemical field, two new courses will be Plant Design and Economy and Air Pollution Control. In the This year 225 undergraduates and I8 graduates were enrolled in General Engi- neering, according to Dr. Marcus Truitt, chairman. One new faculty member ioined the ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ment of Electrical Engineering also in- cludes Computer Science. A new course in Advanced Numerical Methods will be offered in Computer Science next fall. An 58,000 data acquisition unit, called the Nova 1200, was added to the department this year. Homi Gorakhpurwalla is completing a U. S. Department of Agriculture contract research program. Dr. Ernest Franke, Dr. Joseph Calusio, T. Joe Boehm, and Homi Gorakhpurwalla have received faculty re- search grants. Dr. Calusio was also granted a contract research fund from a Corpus Christi industrial firm. There are CHEMICAL-NATURAL GAS Natural Gas field, Gas Well Log Corrula- tion, and Primary Energy Conversion will be offered next year. A class in Environmental Control is still in the development stage. GENERAL ENGINEERING staff, Larry Pleimann who spent three years as a missionary-engineer in the Congo on construction of schools and hospitals. Preparations were made this year for . .U ,, --, ee major departments Chemical and Natural Gas, and General presently six active, funded research pro- grams in the department, as well as nu- merous unfunded proiects involving grad- uate students. Since the opening of the new wing of the Engineering building this spring, the Electrical Engineering Department opened three new labs in the old south wing. The department has 'I74 undergradu- ate maiors and 55 graduate maiors. Dur- ing the course of the year, 24 students will be receiving their Master's of Science degrees, and 30 students will receive the Bachelor of Science degree. There were 200 undergraduate maiors in the Chemical and Natural Gas Depart- ment, and 20 graduate majors. two new courses which will be taught for the first time in the Fall, I972. Soil Me- chanics is one, the other is Water Supply and Waste Water Disposal. s . 'l , t X, I, 1 f 1' X i . ..', Fi . 0 , -fm, . . i n J s . Left: Bruce Ainsworth from Hammond Construction Company in Corpus Christi spoke at the Eta Kappa Nu banquet on "A Career in Engineering." Top: Joe Fritz, John Wincelowicy, and Foren Wilder work on a senior engineering proiect which is an optical fourier transformer apparatus. Each year the English Department holds a book sale on the A8.I mall. Hundreds of novels and text En glish Department odds four to fqculfn courses approved for The faculty of the English Department increased by four this year. Dr. Maxine Delmar teaches Children's literaturep Dr. Howard German instructs l9th Century and Modern British Literaturep Julia Young teaches freshman and sophomore coursesp and Helen Mendenhall teaches English to foreign students. Dr. Hildegard Schmalenbeck did not teach during the spring semester in order to direct the University's Self-Study Pro- gram. Several new courses have been ap- proved for the 1972-73 year. A new 72-73 school yea, will be added to meet the requiremem of the new Bilingual Elementary Educ tion Program. . At the sophomore level a technical writing course will be offered, During the summer of '72 a pilot re. medial tutoring program will be offered to freshmen with English deficiencies. An organizational meeting was held in April to discuss the reactivating ofthe English Club. The club will be used qgqg meeting ground for student and facultf to discuss curricula and counseling ngedgf The sponsor of the club will be Dr. P'--if l I books are sold. comparative linguistics advanced course Q--no--n-nun-cups -,1-I s m --4'C'v -ul . xyjgfkg-.s5vs,V'N: - - is' x H' . Y S' 'N' .' fffsf' chel Haugrud. k, l lllllllflllilllllll dassroom md Two lilen luhq 9C7r ementg Educq. :hnicql lot re fffered s. reld in if the l as u uculty needs. Roy- 5? 2.1.1 . W0 ." 'q Q -U 4'-, ,t 1:1 1" P 4.l 94 4 Dru... .. -. mf at .genr- hnyyf Jllla, 5.513 A, 54 f ,, f .,..-,,1..,..,. AA - -.e:f'.f"w . ,, 9 . ' f 315551, ff Top: Geography students have countless maps at their disposal to use in their classroom and lab research. Bottom: Geology field trips required much walking. Two hikers take o break to rest their sore feet. Geography-Geology Dept. enrollment af maximum capacity Enrollment in the courses offered by the Geography-Geology Department remained at maximum levels as it did last year with approximately l,OOO students enrolled during the Fall, 1971. ln fact, many students had to be turned away from some courses. "We have more students than places to put them. Space for our laboratories is our maior problem," said Dr. Charles Baiza, chairman of the department. The Geography-Geology Department has added three new courses to its program: Stratigraphy and Sedimentation, Field Geology and Geography of Middle America. Also offered for the first time this year were three graduate level courses in geog- raphy. ln addition, the geology curriculum has had revisions in preparation for a maior in this field. John Russell, who teaches courses in geology, is the newest and youngest addition to the faculty. Also teaching in the de- partment for the first time is Adrian Rodriguez, who returned to the University of Wisconsin at the end of the year to finish work on his Ph.D. The Geography-Geology Department also had a visiting instructor for the past summer. He was Robert Garza, a graduate of A8.l University who is presently teaching at San An- tonio College. o faculty members to leave Government Department in fallg grad program revised Two faculty members will be leaving the Government Department next fall. Dr. Charles Judah, professor of American Politics and Thought, will be retiring, and Frederick Natkin will spend nine months at the University of Connecticut during a leave of absence. The Government Department is pres- ently revising the graduate program. Several courses have been added to the department this year including the Gov- ernment Politics of China. Dr. Paul Hoopes has been researching the political actions of the Mexican-Amer- icans. lt is the first such study of its kind in South Texas. Plans are underway to establish q cial science workshop next summer TSI? workshop will act as a refresher I E for high school teachers. 4 mug The department sponsors the Intern'- tional Relations Club in addition tosesf nars and student proiects. V Government is primarily Q service de partment. lt strives to see that each slu- dent is trained in political science and leadership. Courses are open to all stu- dents. There were approximately 22l under. graduate maiors in the departmentlasl year and 19 graduate majors working on their master's. Registration for government classes is never slow since all students are required to have six hoursi th' tild n as e. l A - M e A 1 Y c . i-1.....--- 'I VV .r.... ,g U Q. ...R ' . V g A eglww, X I - 'F 'fy'ff" '5 wi 1' 1 A w. V ' . , X . 1 . ' H2 . ,I ,.. W. .Y tj lon HPE n ldlldm: The types of we f, . !,', 'Y 1' Slil l I Q So, er. The course mternq. i semi- :e de :h stu. 2 and ll stu- mder- it lost ng on s field. :"f f"Y Top: HPE maiors learn the rules of the game when they referee the intramural games for classroom credit. Bottom: The big attraction in the weight lifting room is the Universal Gym which has a wide variety of different D types of weight lifting equipment in one piece of machinery. I .f , -A Q - , W--f ,-'-"i .s f 2 .4 4 . ' 2 .f .. ' . W.. , ' 7" ' if ff f T f . X .. .a ww 'fy' fl ya, I , X I , X gig? -i ' f A 7 , f V .. . i 2 . Z 2 ? 3 -f-f f 5 ,4AfQz,fwf.:fg':ffsaga.-l 5. .U 5. W7 Y!! 4 f 4'!6lf.' - it mf. f,. .4 wif Q ff. 4. f 3 5 , e ' azffif .5 ' 'li' If ff 5 3.-112.5 , fa 2115... , if f 'QW 'ff Qf.Q.rjl5f"'i:Q 45 cliff f iq! fi 414. , A 04, ..f ,,,,. . ,.,,4,,,,, ,,.,,., , T f - enfy f,-1, offers 85 courses to A811 registrants Eighty-five courses ranging from social dancing to varsity football make up the health and physical education curriculum, one of the largest for the University. Four hours of physical education are required for graduation and all freshmen and sophomores are required to take the courses. For maiors in the field the de- partment offers such courses as intramu- ral officiating, teaching dancing, coach- ing of maior sports, athletic training and first aid. The new Physical Education Center has expanded the facilities of the department to allow courses in weight training, hand- ball, diving and gymnastics. The center is equipped with an olympic-sized pool, a Tartan surfaced gym floor and eight handball courts. The faculty added additional instruc- tors for a total of twenty in the depart- ment. The new faculty members are Livia Diaz, Dr. Lea Larson, Ann Pike, and Sherri Stewart. I fj,.:4'E 15 '-s Yr The History Department sponsored a meeting of area social science teachers. During the day-long session, held April 7, A8.l History faculty members were able to meet with the public school teachers over coffee and donuts. The 70 teachers who attended organized the South Texas Social Science Association. History department provides students with helpful reviews Evening reviews for tests are a contribution to education the History partment takes credit for, and this has been of assistance to the many dents who attend the reviews this year, the reviews are conducted graduate assistants and, according to George Coalson, chairman of the ment, they have been very popular The History Department had two tional instructors loin the staff lhlS They were Sandy Hicks and AlfonS0 vantes The department has I6 tors and five graduate assistants on Krngsvulle campus Two additional tors teach at the A8rl branch In A total of 2 432 students enrolled history classes in the fall term The tory Department offers 50 hlstorY and one new course was adde department this year HISTOVY of Since 1644 returned to the after having been discontinued the department added History and History Of the American rn the SouthweSl d to Last lap: HE Clllw taking core ol C ture. 50ll0lllfE partment holds . . H u . t - I Q l I . . .Q vi , . i c gf . u - ., . - vu , . . ,V u 'f ' 11 an - i . I ru A . Top. HE classes provide many different aspects of taking care of a home, including upholstering furni- ture. Bottom: Each year the Home Economics de- partment holds a tea for its graduating seniors. Home Economics gets Federal Grantf new kitchen appliances, sewing machines obtained The Home Economics Department re- ceived a Federal Grant to expand its Food and Nutrition Program. The grant was for S10,800, but since it is based on an enrollment count, it was expected to increase in amount with the higher enroll- ment of HE maiors. Enrollment during the fall, 1971 was approximately 500 stu- dents. This year, the Home Management House and the social living room at the Home Economics Department has been redecorated. The kitchen lab has been newly equipped with modern appliances, some of which were donated by the Cen- tral Power and Light Company and the Houston Natural Gas Corporation, and new sewing machines have also been in- stalled in the sewing lab. A retired teacher, Miss Faye Bible, es- tablished a loan fund for seniors maior- ing in Home Economics this year. The re- volving loan fund is for S2000 and it may be used by any senior meeting the requirements. Dr. Wreathy Aiken, chairman of the department since 1955, retired from the chairmanship. A search for her replace- ment took place during the spring and summer. Dr. Aiken will continue teaching duties. A, ' , '41 . ,,,. IH ,. Sul ' , ..7 fn 5"M'f'h'f'f ' , ' ' x ' t I iggrii iliyc it ' I Top: John Fisher, cadet helper, assists one of the 409 students with her proiect. Many elementary education maiors take this class where they learn materials, tools and processes for teaching crafts on the elementary school level. l. A. boasts modern 4 classrooms, visual aids, 765 majors Industrial Arts now has 165 maiors. Also included in this year's enrollment are 220 non-maiors. This year the IA department has acquired new machinery worth S85,000. According to Dr. AI Gross chairman of the IA department We have the best equipped IA shop in Texas There is nothing south of Chicago that can compare with our modern class rooms which have audio video equip ment The enrollment of IA classes is deter mined according to the amount of tools and space needed to accommodate each student In the Industrial Arts fields for example, engineering drawing has 24 students per class, education technology hot cold metals, woods and plastics, lap: dary and sterling silver and ceramics are limited to 25, arts and crafts and photog raphy have facilities for 30 students I -IT ,-51. I Top: cl image change produre progr I I ll ' ' ll I ' 1 . . 1 I . l f Z! tion tary l xf Top: Clark Council, public relations director of Central Power and Light, spoke to iournalism classes on the image change that CPL started this year. Bottom: Students of the radio and TV newswriting class write and produce programs at KINE-KPUP radio station. Journalism Dept. strives for higher class enrollment "Continued study of department needs," is the plan for the Department of Journalism stated Dr. James H. Herring, chairman of the department. It is the plan of the department to recruit more iournalism maiors from high schools of the area, to recruit more iournalism grad- uate students from the staffs of area mass media and from the faculties of area high schools, and to provide more incentives for outstanding performance in iournalistic activities on campus. This is the second year for iournalism to be a department. The department has requested the addition of an Associated Press wire to be installed in the iournal- ism building. The wire service would be used for class reporting and the Univer- sity News Service. From an enrollment of around 100, about 60 students are iournalism maiors. A total of five faculty members and one graduate assistant form the teaching staff this year. Under the new catalog Agriculture ma- jors will be required to take Journalism 217. This will also be the first time all the divisions of business will accept Journal- ism 217 as a substitute for a semester of sophomore English. Before speech and drama was the only other department that required 217. The only change in courses came with the Beginning News Editingii class. Previ- ously the course was 300 level, and now it has been changed to a 200 level be- cause of the need for students to have the course as soon as possible. There are two scholarships available to iournalism students. They are the E. B. Erard Journalism Scholarship Fund and the Joyce Wilkinson Memorial Scholar- ship. During the summer faculty member Mrs. SheraLyn Alexander went to Sali, Yugoslavia. She was granted a 'fellow- ship to attend the International Communi- cation Seminar abroad. Five weeks of the seminar will include discussions on all forms of communication. The classes will consist of approximately 30 persons from the U.S. and Yugoslavia. Twenty-two speakers from around the world will hold formal seminars and informal discussions as part of the communication meeting. Library totals 275,000 volumes! has possible 500,000 capacity The James C. Jernigan library is a service center for the entire University. The circulation for the 71-72 school year was over 100,000 volumes. The total capacity of the library is about one- half million with the present inventory around 275,000. The value of the books in the library is approximately S2 mil- lion. "This past year S200,000 was spent on new books, bind- ing, and periodicals," explained Paul Goode, head librarian. A collection of oral history tapes have been added to the li- brary's listening center. Dr. Leslie Hunter of the History Depart- ment had compiled the tapes on the history and development of South Texas after recording the reminiscences of people who have lived here for many years. The library has expanded its bilingual section with the addition of numerous volumes of Latin American and Spanish Literature that are printed in Spanish. The library, the largest between San Antonio and the Rio Grande, has an area of 90,000 square feet, and a seating ca- pacity for 1,200 students. lt employs nine librarians, twelve clerks, one executive secretary, and about 80 students. Top: The library provides A811 students with a vast amount of references for classes, research papers, and books for their own knowledge and leisure read- ing. Bottom: Handy reference guides, catalogues, and maps of the library are available to the students to help them find books easier and foster. fits 1 1 F4 'f .sg xiii I 1 X N- I I f , , 1 es for read- y are ,, J fl I QA ll ,.. H U r Z' id Top: Two students work together in an attempt to solve a mathematical problem. Bottom: Dr. John Hardy demonstrates the correct way to approach problem for one of his students. Math enrollment set at 2,809, faculty has inservice training Mathematics faculty members attended weekly seminars this year in an effort to improve their mathematical skills and teach- ing abilities. In the fall semester they met each Monday to study Linear Topographical Sources. During the spring they worked on problems which are published in Mathematical Monthly. Class enrollment during the fall totaled 2,809, with TT4 un- dergraduate and 29 graduate maiors registered. Curriculum changes were made with the initiation of nine courses in a new statistics program. The courses were devised to meet needs expressed by other departments at A81I. Two gradu- ate courses, abstract algebra and real analysis, were added. Several faculty members attended professional meetings this year. Dr. David Cecil presented a paper and chaired a session at the January meeting of the American Mathematical Society in Las Vegas. He also presented a paper at the Texas Academy of Science meeting in March. At the Mathematical Association of America meeting in San Marcos, in April, Dr. John Hardy presented a paper while Chair- man Virgil Kowalik participated in a discussion on problems af- fecting college math departments in Texas. Mike Sahtout and Alvin Kay also attended. Retiring this year is faculty member Ben South. South, who ioined the A8rI faculty in 1947, holds an unbelievable record - he never missed a day of work because of illness, and in all 25 years had to miss only one class. Rene Torres and Luther Troell ioined the faculty for the spring semester. Both were December graduates of the department. Carletta Miller was on leave of absence during the spring semes- ter, completing course work on her Ph.D. in Utah. Addition of program for women cadets, new ROTC feature A new feature of the ROTC Depart- ment is the recently accepted women's cadet program. The A81l ROTC unit is one of four senior Army ROTC selected out of 14 states Fifth Army area t0 Gdmll women to the program. Others in this area are Indiana University at Richmond, Louisiana State University, and A8LM at Baton Rouge. These are among the first ten in the nation selected for the pro- gram. Women who enroll in the Army ROTC Text Program will be eligible to compete for a four-year Army ROTC scholarship during the school year 72-73. The schol- arship will provide S100 for 10 months as well as pay for tuition, textbooks and additional fees. Women will be commissioned as sec- ond lieutenants upon graduation. They will be obligated to serve two years of active duty and four years in a reserve status. Cadets receiving four-year schol- arships must agree to serve four years active duty and two years in reserve sta- tus. The military science program ex- panded with the addition of a senior ROTC program at A8il in Laredo. The Laredo ROTC program was headed by Captain Glenn Mutter, assistant professor of military science' The military science department in- creased its staff at Kingsville by three members in the fall semester, but the Corps class enrollment was twenty less than last year s figure of 208. The drill team and rifle team competed in many meets during the year. The drill team was second in the nation at the Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D C last spring The ROTC also sponsored a iunior drill team competition for the South Texas high schools The big social event of the year was the Military Ball The February ball was held at the County Museum Ballroom, for the Student Union Building was under construction The military science wound up its sea- son by Awards Day held in April Dr James C Jernigan presented the various awards in Jones Auditorium Bm ln' u Top: Displays were constructed for ROTC Open House to explain the different divisions of military science. Bottom: Going through and passing inspection is all part of military life. ,,-J fgp: lose Iungudlle L use riflii 1 acl pldv ' tirely in Si ment. A I .xx 4 ,a ...Q , s P t R- ' l Y 'M lf! l it l i l V 5. it i , - xl Q. an iff , CRCG -.ni x xx N x Top: .lose R. Reyna addresses one of his modern language classes. Bottom: A8-tl students learned to use rifles correctly from an ROTC cadet for a three act play on the Mexican Revolution presented en- tirely in Spanish by the Modern Language Depart- ment. Modern Languages has tremendous growth in majors resulting in addition of faculty The tremendous growth in maiors, from 55 to 90 in undergraduate maiors, plus an increase in class enrollment, has led to an unexpected necessity of adding new faculty members, and an increase in the library holdings for the Modern Lan- guages Department this year. ln the Spanish division, Dr. John J. Sauvageau, Margarita Lopez-Urrutia, and Jose Reyna ioined the staff. In the French division, Neta Smith and Carol Westergren were added. Also, the suc- cess of the live laboratory program initi- ated in the Spanish division last year has - E l X- I V. .A. ii I .il , . X . led to the exploration of having a similar program in the French division next year. ln the spring, the A8il Modern Lan- guage Department hosted the National Spanish Examination, in which 300 high school students participated. The purpose of the examination is to promote and rank language usage at high school level. Dr. R. R. Hinoiosa-Smith, the Modern Languages Department chairman, headed the Nomination Committee of the Alamo Valley Chapter of Leaders of Spanish and Portuguese. Q . I ff w 13 ,L ., , -. p3H4,,3H7V',f I M1 V t , . ., .V 1 I. ,f I 4. , V 1 H ,,VV X Y 6 l 4 v- 3 I . ,J new -Q, v cs-, , . 4 l Music Dept. adds "Counterpoint" to its curriculum The Music department had several things to brag about this year, the first being a new course, Counterpoint, that was added to the spring curriculum for the very first time. Another new course will be added in the fall, Stage Band Workshop. Stress will be on performance, improvisation, composing, and arranging for iazz bands. David Herfort and Dr. J. L. Bella- mah will be in charge. Music maiors now have a choice of math or a modern lan- guage. Before the department had re- quired modern language. A total number of music hours taught increased 1970 in the fall and 13010 in the spring over the previous year. Fifty-five concerts by students, faculty, guests, and ensembles were presented throughout the year to the 140 music maiors and 10 graduate students. Joining the music faculty in the fall were Rosemary Small, for theor a d y n percussion, David Herfort, theory- and in the spring new faculty membefs wer e William Holmes, low brass, and James Sparks, organ and class piano With the death of Roger .Hauenstein during the Christmas break, Ph' M I u Al- pha, muslc fraternity, placed a memorial portrait of him in the music building. ln addition to his teaching duties, Hquen- stein designed pipe organs in the South Texas vicinity. One which was d d' e lcated to him is at the Kingsville First Presbyte- rian Church. it ' Symphonic Band for the An b layer, rehearses with the AGI TOP left: Johmly G?rl:o'AlgjlTgyTr?shSnic Band performed as the climax for the Seventeenth An Festival. Zap, rlghfkenf Guzman repairs one of the head phones in the music library Tapes ' om: . F81-tlllilientjzre available in the librafY for 'he sludenls Use' eq rf-1 S Top: Mark Whitaker can claim to be the youngest person to ever Whitaker works on one of three telescope mounts in the Electricity lab. yr have a comet na yi med for him. Bottom: Physics Deparfmenf gets fwo felescopes for asfronom y lab The Physics Department added an as- tronomy course during the 1971-72 school year. The three-hour course is of- fered to anyone who completes one three-hour pre-requisite physics course. Two telescopes have been added to the department for use in the astronomy lab. A one-hour lab course in mechanics will be offered by the physics department next fall for all engineering maiors. A 57,100 research grant was allotted to Dr. James Tylicki last year from the research Corporation of America. Dr. Tyl- icki has been continuing his study in the area of low temperature spectroscopy. Burgin S. Dunn and Dr. James Tylicki received research grants this year from the University. Two visitors to the department were Dr. Jim Sybert, the chairman of the Phys- ics Department at North Texas State Uni- versity, and Dr. Thornton Page, an as- tronomer on leave of absence at NASA. Dr. Page designed and constructed the ultra-violet spectrometer used during Apollo XVI to measure the earth's cor- ona. There were 21 undergraduate maiors in the department this year and four graduate maiors. tx . s Q.. -- Q t c g Ts. .s', 1 -'-.' LM "', '- is 1- : ' 5 'N , Q. ,C ww' " 40' l 'W 11' c "-3115275 'Q-'lg 'i ..--V.: .. :p-'fb' i ' ' ' f the world and ilselleds , - d 1 ke a demographic survey studying the population o . Sf cl f enrollment ZZ'i1.,3,?i5?'1iZ,5Li 523532, dw mode Q My of of 'he KM CW 10"- up in Psychology- Sociology Dept. "Two factors that may attribute to the large enrollment in our psychology and sociology department is the growing interest in psychol- ogy and sociology throughout the country, and the excellent faculty that we have in our department," explained department chair- man, Dr. George Vaughn. The number of students enrolled in psychol- ogy and sociology total a record setting 2,671 students. There are 1,427 students en- rolled in psychology and 1,244 in sociology. The expanding department added one new sociology course, Social Service Method. This course permits students to go to surrounding areas and work with various social service agencies to gain practical experience working with people. The six-position sociology staff of last year has been expanded to an eight-member team. The psychology staff has also increased its number to eight. The new staff members are Dr. Leonard, Dr. Robert Brown, David Ed- wards and E. L. Sparks, who returned from a leave of absence. Students touring through Manning Hall can also observe one other addition to the de- partment, the Skinner Box. Some of the psy- chology students have placed a sign over a small classroom that reads "Skinner Box." Dr. Vaughn explained that the Skinner Box, as the students like to call it, is cr small room used for experimental psychology. Three students fro ented papers at the Southwest Psychology Association meeting in Oklahoma City. m the department pres- i l 44 was r K-1 l 10p,Mrs, Donn l classes. BOHOH' effects was "Rf effects. A' LA fn. NK -f'4'1 - V .-'-1 A -X -,-Hi' 15.4. . 5 es- Top: Mrs. Donna Tobias, speech and interpretation instructor, goes over some notes for one of her upper level classes. Bottom: Drama students learn the "tricks of the trade" with make-up. One ploy which required special effects was "Romulus the Great." 4 Speech Department receives grant for television equipment With a 525,000 grant from the U. S. Government, the Speech and Drama De- partment acquired closed circuit television equipment this year. The unit will be used to tape lectures all over the campus for re-play. Next fall the radio station KTAI will move to the second floor of the Jones Auditorium and the control room for the television unit will be set up in the present KTAI location. A classroom in the Speech Building will serve as the studio. Dr. Stephen Hofer, with aid from a re- search grant, is developing a Children's Radio Series. The all-Spanish programs, entitled "Grandfather and His Tales," have been submitted to various radio sta- tions across the country for approval. Two faculty members have returned from a one year leave of absence. David Deacon has returned from the University of Texas, and V. A. Smith has come back after working at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. There are 69 students working towards degrees in Speech and Drama. The three maiors offered by the department are speech, drama, and speech and hearing therapy. Faculty boasts 280 fu Ree Aguirre, Education of. word s. Aibfo ni, HiSfOfY Dr. Wilmer W. Aldrich, Chairman of Education SheraLyn Alexan er Judy d ,Journalism Allen, Home Economics Charles H. Alworth, Business Administration Luis Badell, Modern Languages Ben P. Bailey Jr., Ari Dr. Lee L. Bailey, Agriculture Dr. Charles C. Baiza, Chairman of Geography - Geology Dr. Beth Baker, History Dr. Hoyt B. Ballard, Chairman of Government Dr. M. Paul Barlow, Education Terrence J. Barragy, History William B. Barron, Education William J. Bartley, Management and Marketing Fahir M. Basci, General Engineering SGM John A. Beckham, Military Science Dr. Joseph L. Bellamah, Music Kathey Sue Bernard, English Dr. Jefferson M. Bishop, Government Dr. B. Stanley Bittinger, Psychology-Sociology Catherine Blodgett, Catalog Librarian Robert K. Blomstedt, Education Dr. Jerry D. Bogener, Education Dr. Edwin R. Bogusch, Biology Dr. John A. Bonno, Business Administration Robert L. Bradley Jr., Catalog Librarian Betty J. Brewer, Health-Physical Education Dr. Eldon D. Brinley, Chairman of Health-Physical Education Karl W. Brown, Bible Lane Brown, English Dr. Robert L. Brown, Psychology-Sociology Dr. Randall J. Buchanan, Speech-Dramq Fay F. Calhoon, Geography-Geology L, -'I ' n, . 3 I l l W. . : f ll-time members , 2 A hx tvli h 1 'X li A .6 fr Y -2' i L L 4 so fur.. fi - 'lv ". '.l.f ' XC' , '. 5' Q '18 XX , I' 1 + ' x. 'Q s ff, its f' r' is 1 Pm X . . . - H Q ,cf F x ...K .,. l . Elf - f Q 1 .Af . "5 5 6 ? X-N fix ,A x , in .- FP x ti- gp X4 ,I T.. 15 2,33 , Q 5 i H 3 '3,..' , l' , ' va K sb ' - 'f i A , - V'-Ti .1 't Q' 'R - Xl I . , ?1r . 55 . AS A Msg? A ,1"1':.':25-.i X ..-ff 'ya LW-1 V , V . JV.. d is X, 21 E , g'.'ff.qi.,g 1 ' ' . .4 :' Y "P ,K , . 5 . gl, 31: kk J... .V .v- , Mil- , 'l"' .5 - N - swf' ' tx-' -f , 1 .,.' 7 V ., '11 , f , gt' f V""'i ' y I . ,.3.f5ii-1.- 3 5' X-Q rf .. . Q 1 A24 ,,,, , 1.4 4' gs, Q. ' . " " fjfv,.,.V f ' Dx ' x A V . , -:L V' M , '-.i.f,y,-. ,,-' tl 'f if ff A ,Alix . , P , . aa. 4 g -' sm -tam, P :"" V-V'.VLb l A li Dr. Joseph C. Calusio, Electrical Engineering Dr. May E. Campbell, English Eleanor C. Carroll, Education Charles E. Cato, Accounting Alfonso Cervantes, History Dr. Billy J. Chandler, History Dr. Allan H. Chaney, Biology Dr. Jack P. Clark, Speech and Education SSG Robert G. Clark, Military Science Milton G. Clasen, Catalog Librarian Captain Floyd T. Cleveland, Military Science Dr. George O. Coalson, Chairman of History Steven Cohen, English Dr. F. W. Cokendolpher, Education Dr. George A. Cook, English Dr. Stewart E. Cooper, Health-Physical Education Willie Crafts, Health-Physical Education Dr. James A. Craig Jr., Mathematics Dr. Hari N. Dam, Journalism Dr. Robert B. Davidson, Philosophy Dr. Loren E. Davis, Psychology-Sociology Dr. Richard B. Davis, Biology Herman R. DeHoop, History Dr. Maxine Delmare, English Joseph V. Domino, Psychology-Sociology Dr. Frank H. Dotterweich, Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering Dr. Jan Bogdan Drath, Music Dr. D. Lynn Drawe, Agriculture Leon F. Dube, Marketing Danny J. Duncan, Music S. Burgin Dunn, Physics Dr. Paul M. Elliott Jr., Physics Maior John A. Evans, Military Science Kent T. Fields, Accounting Part-time faculty George B. Fink, Biology Dr, J, Browning Finley, Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering Dr. Lewis R. Fisher, Education Dr. Thomas H. Foster, Education Dr. John E. Fucik, Agriculture Dr. R. J. Gallaway, EngliSl1 Dr. Fred M. Garland, Chemistry Tony Garza Jr., Education Dr. Ruth Gauldin, Home Economics Ron Gentry, Health-Physical Education Dr. Howard German, English Sgt. RonaldJ. Giger, Military 5ClenCe Dr. James E. Gillaspy, Biology Dr. L. Camp Gilliam, Education Mrs. Dorothy Ginther, Modern Language Maior Michael Glendening, Military Science Genaro Gonzalez, Mathematics Arlin Dwight Goode, Mathematics Paul K. Goode, Librarian Dr. Clyde M. Grant, English Dr. Darroll Lee Grant, Agriculture A. F. Gross, Chairman of Industrial Arts Dr. Wayne Gunn, English Mrs. Margaret Ann Hancock, Librarian Dr. John W. Hardy Jr., Mathematics Dr. Frederick G. Harvey, Education Mrs. Opal A. Harvey, Librarian Dr. Lee L. Harvill, Geography-Geology Roger A. Hauenstein, Music Dr. Raychel Haugrud, English Mrs. Johnnie Mae Haun, Education and Home Economics Dr.'Herbert R. Haynes, Electrical Engineering DWl9hf Hallett, Business Administration -lefft' W. Hedrick, Industrial Arts Dr. Richard A. Hensz, Agriculture and Director of Texas A8il Citrus Center of 27 adds expertise 1 1 I , 1 ff f 1 f ,X 1 Ai.- .R C -Q'Q- 1, ' A N .1 , A.. -.N .X wc. X K ' -A .:. 4 ...sv .Nl I . 'fs " L. FY -A gs. . , . .fs A 81 X 'N ' fx X X --QS' gk-x vw.. L . ef I I' , IE' V 1 . I X ..,, K f, V if .1 1 C. . A..A . f . ' ' . - 1 Rf? , ' , ,, v. 5. ,. ' 2 ' f r ' :QZJJQ ' SEQ - - 9 J.. L Xi' ' f i ' ff? 'L is-' ' r L J :E Q-L" xr. it l X ll ' . .Q -..."..., , ' ""',. V'1""' g 1 r N A .s..f:"xk . . , . g . . .. . , Q i , , Q, 9, 4 " . -Q .f A, X-M" .- P . XV F il bl' ,Q -it., X : -fy .. is - L-A' - l NNW L .x ii 1 ffm ,-'- . f . X J. . ss.. C Q. . it-. ' F 'ls ll is mm' ll af Q - vi nm.. ..,. ' .nr - .H - - -M .'1:r-- Q af . ii .-.,, . . "M 4 "1 -Q. .V 1' 4 . 'Q 's 1 X ajiggg t v y tw ' Q. '4 .".- ' 'J 1" W9 23 5 'Q 'il -.-f 3 -I Sy Q- if 'b ..A , L ,,., 'l , vi.: ' I l VITQ . A is MS A ,. 'X w M' 5. s 'K' ' 2. V.. ,,:. ,ff--., 1 x.. l , ,JR 62 - 1-gre' "2 X . -. , - Q - - -- fs Fil".-we . ' 5 . . ' '2f11N?i'-,Q -"f.':":1'f'-. -:."' .,. ,,: i. .1 ktbv Q Lx 5iE'f"7x2" L 3 ZQ111 . L -' -s -,,- 2 - img. - W,- .Q si . X S A. vw! X ,X N Q Q-X ' X 44.1.4 ' ' ' M, i -,5. , ' " A ' , A 'r.g?3:'V.,g th , s. .,.:-4.4 -:',.-..:s..e.:m is M-:ext .. ff.fI-L 4'kk ' A A , 1 -I:fjf5?fafi"Ei25. 1'Li":5l1::I,3' ""' fi' 1:13125 1- 'E David A. Herfort, Music Dr. Ernest D. Herriman, Education Dr. James H. Herring, Chairmaniof Journalism Evelyn F. Herrington, Education Dr. Lionel D. Hewett, Physics Sandy B. Hicks, History Dr. Eladia L. Hill, Modern Languages Dr. Powell Hines, Education Dr. R. R. Hinoiosa-Smith, Chairman of Modern Languages Stephen F. Hofer, Speech-Drama Dr. Darvin R. Hoffman, Chairman of General Business Janie A. Holland, Serials Librarian William W. Holmes Jr., Journalism and Director of News Service Dr. Paul R. Hoopes, Government Robert J. Hoover, Marketing Elsie I. Howard, English Dr. John W. Howe, Agriculture Dr. Thomas M. Hughes, Government Robert E. Huitt, Psychology-Sociology Dr. Leslie G. Hunter, History John W. Hussey, Economics Dr. Eugene Jekel, Education Dr. Lloyd N. Johnson, Natural Gas Engineering Caroline Johnston, Education-Music Dr. Gary D. Joliff, Agriculture Beverly Jones, Education Dr. Charles Judah, Government Katherine Kantz, English Alvin J. Kay, Mathematics Herschel G. Kelly, Industrial Arts Kenneth Kelly, Health-Physical Education Milton S. King, Management Robert O. Kirby, Finance Dr. Arlen D. Klosterboer, Agriculture Emerson Korges, Electrical Engineering and Plant Consultant University emplOyS 95 9 Dr. Virgil C. Kowalik, Chairman of Mathematics Dr. Olan E. Kruse, Chairman of Physics Lea Larson, Health-Physical Education Dr. F. C. Lee, General Engineering Dr. Lelan K. LeMaster, Industrial Arts Dr. Robert Leyden, Agriculture Joseph J. Libbon, Psychology-Sociology Francisco D. Lopez, Modern Languages Margarita Lopez-Urrutia, Modern Languages C. W. Mallard, Industrial Arts Ophelia Manning, Home Economics Dr. Ronald E. Marcotte, Chemistry H. Dean Mathis, Bible Frederick J. Matkin, Government Linda M. Matteson, English Dr. Mary R. Mattingly, Chairman of Government Ernest F. Mayer Jr., English John McCown, Psychology-Sociology Clinton G. McDonald, Accounting Donald B. McDonald, Health-Physical Education Kenneth R. McFarling, English James R. Mclntyre, Management Dr. Ronald F. McKenzie, Education Dr. Paul E. McLean, Education-Psychology Gunter S. Mende, History Helen E. Mendenhall, English Carletta Miller, Mathematics Capt. Arthur Minnefield, Military Science C. V. Mooney, Chairman of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering Maria E. Morales, Education Dr. Philip S. Morey, Mathematics Ned C. Morris, Acquisitions Librarian Dr. Attelia Muller, Home Economics Dr. Leslie Munneke, Chairman gf Management and Marketing Dr. Robert T. Nash, Chairman of Economics and Finance raduate assistants 54' .A is i S ' 4 ' L ., V V t 1,1 i Xl .I ...gn . x 3' ,X , A4 r, l .- .S I i 1' 0 fp . T M v c'- N 52a , tel ls A . 'C-C ,1 ' A fn , ,-4 'Z' 1 - . - ig .I V ,K - - X . f -F 1,1-L.. , .K ni' . f 'fi 5. VfAl"' I V it X . J: "f fl 111. v 3 X 7 ' ' 1 i :J Riffs , J' ' " yr, . .I , 'x,1j.: 5' E L L mei f -. ' . V we 4 , Rh . ef? eel Q47 "iii: s it 21" 5- . J-rm-sl kg. Q39 A PLE? , - Pj' .ik xx i , VH L. . sy ,. .,,x 5 . , k ? K 5 s 5 t 1 .QQNN 3 .J 3, 'I Yew "tr ft? :J t i . Wit X , E 4' I K .ix . .4 N x Q - 1' . if 6 X mm . it ,. . n 1 ywff . , X yy M, ,X i if 5 X25 Q ' , ?J'-251 ff' i ' ' W 1, f f fe: , f u I Aff t f.-4 ::,,.n.f:15, .,f, -3 1 J .r Y ,IN 'NX ,E '9 .ii Ah I. eg. Ss if , 5' 'Q N i lb 4-s Q , 1 It I Q- . ':.5?.,, Elm' . in f - V. , '5- . I X ill ' ,777 . 1 S 1 f f . ' i mf .. R . zi 'fr iff .34 t f :it 'Mya 6, , ,,'.,. E -I I jA :Ve.,.,..i- -Mfg? Qi' JV . ,1'+n'7.:. 292.5 i ...-.Q . 'Q eg ,333-M! 4 x ug 'af Eg X . -. ,-..glL,r - F752 3 ,. ,, 1 f"f ' 1 We r wh 2 - ww, X v 19: .if-06, Y gg? ' JW' ZA 434 'L' A t 4, 21,3 7 f 145 ,eff '1fil:'.,12'.'f.'K'.: i' ' Dr. David D. Neher, Agriculture Dr. Darwin B. Nelson, Psychology-Sociology and Director of Student Counseling Services Pauline C. Nelson, Mathematics Dr. Donald M. Nixon, Agriculture SSG William R. Notz, Military Science Fred C. Nuesch, Journalism Elizabeth A. Oliphant, Mathematics Alberto M. Olivares, Chemistry Dr. Kenneth C. Oosterhout, Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering Kenneth G. Page, Geography-Geology Paul C. Palmer, History Dr. J. Talmer Peacock, Chairman of Biology Howard Love Penn, Mathematics Dr. J. Kyle Perrin, Education Ross H. Person, Electronic Data Processing Madeline A. Peyton, Documents Librarian J. D. Phaup, Government Susan B. Phillips, Materials Center Librarian Larry Gene Pleimann, General Engineering A. H. Pritchard, Education Robert E. Quigley, Mathematics Marvin M. Rains, Speech-Drama Dr. John Rascoe, Psychology-Sociology Rex B. Reinking, Agriculture Ferry E. Richards, Finance Capt. George B. Robbins, Military Science Dr. Fernando Rodriguez, Geography-Geology Dr. Ed Ruhnke, Chemistry John L. Russell, Geography-Geology Mahmond M. Sahtout, Mathematics Rafael Sanchez, Modern Languages Harry B. Sanders, English Dr. John Sauvageau, Modern Languages Dr. Orlan Sawey, Chairman of English Dr. Richard Scherpereel, Chairman ofArt Self-study committees G Mae Dell Schiller, Modern Lan9U0Qe5 Dr. Hildegard Schmalenbeck, English Maurice Schmidt, Art Dr. Carlos E. Schoettle, Agriculture Robert C. Scott, Music ura, General Business Felipe J. Seg Dr. Robert M. Sekerak, Psychology-Sociology Robert Skelton, Director of Church of Christ Bible Chair Rosemary Small, Music Buddy Lee Smith, Mathematics Jerry F. Smith, Music Dr. Julia A. Smith, English Lawrence Ray Smith, Speech-Drama Neta Gay Smith, Modern Languages V. A. Smith, Speech-Drama Dr. Arnold K. Solstad, Agriculture Ben J. South, Mathematics Elvin L. Sparks, Psychology-Sociology Dr. F. Michael Speed, Mathematics Joel V. Staff, General Business Jo Ann Stasney, Art Dr. George Steinmeyer, History Sherri L. Stewart, Health-Physical Education Dr. Demas J. Stinebaugh, Education Dr. Virgil F. Stone, Accounting Dr. Edward S. T. Su, Government Dr. Raymond Suhm, Geography-Geology Dr. Chia-Hsiaing Sung, Electrical Engineering Ramon H. Tanguma, Education Alfred E. Tellinghuisen, Music H. Durward Thompson, Agriculture and Landscape Architect Dr. John S. Thompson, Chemistry Jon H. Thompson, An Dr. Lavern W. Timmer, Agriculfure Michael Tinker, English B f fi N . . . f N J JI :Fixx - 5' YK- X X E A X l. 'XX , - ,-., .Lx ty y 9" 'L r l ,7' L. - ,V -li... Q ,r J 'Q VV , k,fA 1 My ' -:- 'W , ?!.,,,,,.,,.L': ' '57 1' Ll if 12. .f Qi4"V2f29. X V. I f' L ' .- ' ff 957 22 2 g jf gf . 1 .'., '.',1iP:f f 1 M- ' ' 2 '- KV! mmm, 4 exif ' H ' ' ' ffiiifisll J Y , , Some faculty members found office space in short supply. Donna R. Tobias, Speech-Drama Dr. Edd Todd, Education :Nf l xi ,X Q E ' X ax. 2- . K . ef' I .., ffl: . Q1 . .flx-if ' .X ak l , Q s - XX Rafi A A"l m. XL . ' -i R A ..T-i"'S 4 wi .. M ff: . xx.. J .L-. B f' -sri il. QW 'Y'-. ef' .. xii.,-liege? - -'RER A A .V X' - h ji... -...U as s-is ' ' i Eff-wiiv. " ""' V Q'T.'1rii ??'i'?'f2sfQ- 'firsg 5542 ' ' 5,2 VLVV ff , V, , FN .. .. 2+ 1 ' V V -:2 ,:+.5:,y 'itil xi ' l 1 L11 I , ,L A KX SAM' , ..-1 ,m..... --.-A stair f' Yfaif fe ff: ff Ar. ' HW , 1 " .-2. w i .15 ' xc . l Q. .K XX AX Z- ' . P-. .J Effie J 1 N X sf yx xx D F Q R . . .. 2- :jfvg R . 2 , A 1, t . Q V. N T' ffsl'.rQ,2if1.sfQfi'gi5i .B MW Q :f at .,:..1i.-ski, 1 X la Dr. Donald E. Todd, Electrical Engineer- ing Leonel Torres, Mathematics Rosie Torres, Sociology James E. Townsend, Finance Dr. M. M. Truitt, Chairman of General Engineering James D. Tryer, Modern Languages Dr. William D. Turner, General Engineer- ing Dr. James Tylicki, Physics Dr. George E. Vaughan, Chairman of Psychology-Sociology Caroline B. Vetters, Psychology-Sociology Joyce Vilseck, Mathematics James L. Von Hatten, English Dr. Thein Wah, General Engineering Dr. Woodrow W. Wallace, Economics Mary Ann Walsh, Speech-Drama Dr. Robert A. Warren, Education Carol Westergren, Modern Languages Dr. John S. Westmoreland, Chemistry Dr. Edwin E. Wheeler, Psychology-Sociol- OQY LTC Donald L. Williams, Military Science Dr. George G. Williges, Biology F. B. Wines, Agriculture Education Dr. Robert L. Wolff, Agriculture Clement K. Young, Mathematics Julia H. Young, English Retiring faculty mem DR. JOHN W. HOWE Dr. John W. Howe took over the reins of ea Emeritus retires this year after 24 years Agriculture in 1948. The Dean I of influencing the agricultural contribution to the economic structure of l dership in the School of South Texas. When he came the agriculture department had iust purchased a trac- ' l or horses. His greatest tor - before that they had plowed with mu es ' th development and expansion of the Univer- pleasure has been seeing e sity farm, the construction of the Kleberg Agriculture Building, and the development of laboratory facilities. ' ' ' ceived a B.S. in agriculture from A native of British Columbia, Howe re the University of Alberta, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from lowa State Col- lege. He spent 15 years as headmaster of the government's agriculture ' ' ' d stem of vocational training school rn- Jamaica, W.l. He inaugurate a sy that opened a completely new field of education to nationals of the Island. Howe later taught at the University of Alberta before ioining the fac- ulty at Texas A8il. There have been changes in students, Howe has noted since he came ' ll 48 "We had an influx of G l 's when l first came. They were a in 19 . , , business. They didn't play around. One thing l notice about the students ' sibil- today, which I think is unfortunate, is a retrcence to accept respon ity. They are willing to let someone else do it. l see this in committee and club work, even. "Students are far ahead in science and, to some extent, math when they come to us now. l don't think they are as well prepared in English, however, as they used to be." Agriculture s Year" award this spring. tudents voted to give Howe the first "Professor of the 7,.4 JQ f.,, g . bers have 777 years experrence Q, fx BEN P BAILEY Retiring at the end of the summer session was the man whoh r 4 longevity record on the Texas A8-I faculty. Ben P. Bailey, Jr. cam University in 1936. His career in Kingsville was interrupted Lt.C World War ll when he served in the Army where he rose to Re'U"nin9 to All, Bailey operated a one-man division in the ment of Fine Arts until T958 when the Art Department was cred he was named chairman. .B0lleY'S versatility shows in the variey o Celved a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Virginia Military lnfvlll dU""9 the e0flY Years of his A8il career he taught surveying 05 art. From UT at Austin he received B.S. and M.S. degrees in: le. ture. He later earned a MFA degree from Claremont Grodua Before Coming to A8il Bailey worked as a draftsmam Pfam" :Cf Gnd teacher of math and military science during varrousP IS career. Once he arrived in Kingsville he became active nv tea fl or gf Hall ' - - . I 'n I i t f degrees he holds ching, which was done in classrooms on the top 0 1960 but asv' dm I until the art building was com leted rn Wlih Grtists in the surrounding area.pHe is a founder of the 5? fi - 7 MAME Af' Leogl-le Und 0 POSl pl'6Sldent of the Texas Fine Arts ASSOCW 7 A Qenile man noted for his kindness and politenesS, Bailey nuslgled i' G favorite of both students and faculty colleagues. He Wase chairman of the Faculty Senate for the 1969-i970 term. ENJ SOUTl B . ' what must Holdrn9 his tob um0n9 Ml fl University hug only missed one - his wile substitvler he has nev South toined the n electrical enginteflnt taught lor six years. and Bendix Corp. br designed the periscr War ll. Over the years 5 the most recent bein At rr retirement 1 lislring rod and reel low luculty member T? 'rr QQ, 'fha'- ,,:r'vi .emi .C " , -,, 'rr ' e When Mrs. Carrie Lee Bishop became the Dean of Women in 1951, I N . 'i BEN J. SOUTH Holding what must be the most incredible record for faithfulness to his job among A811 faculty members is Ben South. In 25 years at the University he has never missed a day of work because of illness, and has only missed one class meeting. Even then he kept it in the family his wife substituted. South ioined the mathematics faculty in 1947. He holds degrees in electrical engineering and mathematics from Notre Dame, where he taught for six years. He was also employed for General Electric Corp. and Bendix Corp. before coming to Kingsville. While with Bendix he designed the periscopes used in bomber turrets built during World War II. Over the years South has served on numerous faculty committees, the most recent being the Student Publications Committee. At a retirement dinner in his honor, South was presented with a fishing rod and reel and subscriptions to mathematics iournals by fel- low faculty members. ld the to the :ly 7' lonel. GPG d and te re 'ell 05 :hiteC' archi .es of -,ly in nninQ lflilflg fexdi been ,ded lx, ., ix. ,A -5? 1 i ,f 3 N.. f. A , ,,f,,. M, f - nur' ,Gu iiii' . V Q DR. CHARLES B . JUDAH Dr. Charles B. Judah has brought a historical perspective to his teaching about American political parties during his five years as a visiting professor in Government. This is a difficult thing to do, his colleagues agree, because of the broad background required. But Judah came to A811 prepared for his teaching duties. His two fields were history and government. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois and also studied at King's College, University of London. His teaching experience included Eastern Illinois State University, New Mexico Highlands University and 20 years at the University of New Mexico. After retirement at UNM, Judah became a visiting pro- fessor at Texas A8.l. Judah has had a prolific scholarly pen. He has published several books and numerous articles. He also worked with the New Mexico State Legislature while teaching in that state. 0-4, CARRIE LEE Bus:-loP her main concern was to see that the two women's dorms, Cousins and Baugh Halls, were operated efficiently. The two dorms were capa- ble of housing 263 women, but they were not full that year. This year as she retires after 21 years as Dean of Women, Mrs. Bishop has had responsibility for nearly 900 women dormitory resi- dents and the equivalent of six dorms lthe new dorm is a double dormj. Mrs. Bishop has been advisor for the Association of Women Stu- dents as it made changes in dorm rules. The most recent of these has been the no curfew rule adopted by all but one dormitory. Over the years she has seen changes in the rules governing dorm closing hours, the practice of signing in and out, and the dress code. The Dean of Women has worked closely with architects and interior decorators during the original designing and construction of women's dorms, and she is solely responsible for the refurbishing of the build- ings and furnishings. For this her background in Home Economics has come in handy. She holds a master's degree from Texas Tech and came to A811 in 1950 as an instructor. She became Dean of Women the following year. Mrs. Bishop has received personal satisfaction from working with campus women's organizations. She worked for the recognition of A8-I by the American Association of University Women so that the coeds would be able to have national honor societies, such as Alpha Lambda Delta. She also was instrumental in bringing national sorori- ties to campus. . W? , 4 ya if 'I 3 ff Vq',i uf' f 79 cadets comprise Kings Rifles df ill teamg win Gulf Coast CompefifiOH Close of the class day for most Texas A81l University students means going back to their rooms to get ready for supper. For a small group of Army ROTC cadets it means sweltering heat or wintery mist, march- ing and inspection. They're the 19 cadets who comprise the precision drill team, the Kings Rifles. The Kings Rifles were fifth nationally out of a field of 34 invited to the National Intercollegiate Championship Competition at Washington for the National Cherry Blossom Festival. ln De- cember the team captured the Gulf Coast Competition in a field of 13 schools at the University of Houston. Spending 12 to 14 hours weekly preparing for their drill meets, the company participates in parades, drill competition and other public performances as representatives of the Uni- versity. An extra-curricular activity for mem- bers of the Corps, the Kings Rifles is a team whose perfection has resulted through tedious work and concentration. The drill style of the Kings Rifles is deceiv- ing as the cadets begin drills standing rigid and fixed. Moments later fast and steady l ed. Rifles are incorpo- movements are exhibit rated into the marches as they are thrown from cadet to cadet while rapid marching continues. This style is new to the drill team as it had once been known for its slow marches. Problems o e the loss of members with each semester change. New members have to be trained to replace the lost cadets. A strain is on all of the members as they have to adiust to new partners. Competition for drill teams is in three cate- gories, according to Mai. Mitchael Glenden- ing, assistant professor of military science. Cadets are first inspected on their dress and equipment. Basic army regulation drills have to be performed as the second phase of inspection. The last form of testing is precision drills lasting 6 to 7 minutes. During these periods, the team performs any original routine incor- porating weapons, color and marching lines. Eduardo Campos of Laredo is commander. Mai. Michael Glendening and lst Sgt. Ronald Giger are advisers. f th drill team center around .M Na 3 Tv ink " H: l 'H' filet! lf' in Elf G. li Q1 I l 1 ,Z ' 'Fx ,-Q"-fi H4 ' x K X ., : Q . N--. V , " , 4 xv. ' hu, .f.. D 2 X its-. W fu 22? 3?5?,53f2 f Z f sYf-12'W'E.5, fm. Q-1 'ss4fffiE?E 15- A 7 72' - 5253 SR " 2 E i w 3 x" ' ,, J .ifkgixb ' QW ,2 . " 'V ." A ' .... Q 1 ,., 331 A4 4 ! V ' K P i H .AV,' .. .,,Q1+-:5'?ilj1'g,Q-.,giQjgQ 'lf29"'i3"' ' ' - .13w4g.g2W- ' ' .A , . , YT . I ykx.. ,,. Q i 53, ...W . . As A k XL. . 1 W- 4-5' .N Q A y V ""-am X"-,., ,, F ,L 1 .mmwf 257 A QI 3-9' 4'4- di Xu -W gl all . QI," U all Geology students have various fielo' trips during year The Geology Club sponsored a field trip to Laredo during the spring break. This trip was for students to visit the Antimony Smelter at Laredo. The smelter is a subsidiary of Na- tional Lead Company. The Antimony Smelter is the only one located in North America. The smelter deals mainly in making metal type. On the way to Laredo the students made various stops to examine rock specimens and observe cross-beds of sandstone. The group also found oyster fossils which were dated back to the Eocene period. After a tour through the smelter the group went to the old coal mines of Santa Dolores. Another trip taken by geology students . was a trip to Blanco State Park during the fall semester. The trip was taken to study fossils, geological structures, and streams. Dr. Lee Harville has accompanied the stu- dents on all of the trips. Another field trip was taken to Big Bend National Park during the spring. The students studied the geology of Big Bend and surrounding areas. The last trip taken by the group was to lnks Lake near Burnet. All geology students and interested students may participate in the trips. z 2 4 JAN 'Ll fn- AUM S c "'i"-'- 1 ' N., iz. DI I .' . Iidliais' l.f..., ,,,....---f .Wig -wwmwmwwx 2525 T , - - k op On 'he 'UP 70 Laredo stops were made to study van0U5 f ina U, Above: At the Antimony Smelters at Laredo students were taken engineers worki ng for the company. l i , I 4 P F ' x r wdmw 1 ww eg ,. brvb- ,, fe' Pl, Q .1 D . 4 ' .' ML-C 2' , I 'mr B W, . .I rp-f gm . , , .7 V, my ,'4'7-, Y 'ff- K pf. rf ,ity Qkliq. 2 -: ,- , X , -4-.M . ,i .,, I 1, .k .xy . , 4- 741 ,353 '. i .,- , , , . . 'Z , ,4, I f, , f .. f , , ,. 1 ,f , V ' M ,.- A, f.,l,fl?f'kfH4 , X1: -new ., , X iN fa , 1 spy.. K k R , 1, . 5,1-,. xr. 11' 1 ,, V, 23.3 4, fum 1' ',,1-., , 2 "nm, ,s,,,-t x . -. fx ,X .,x 1' X ,N 4 XIX 1 .1 '1 1 . .I ,,, il-4 .13 J. 'J 'Vw V XX 5 'llxmx XX: ' wi, i' syn' ' 'ff' ' Www bi ' 41 rg! ,s , K f ., -vw l ......- XX "3 X-.N Kr fr' ,1- s, ,V -,.,J,:,:- i 5 fum A W -wff:f'.1 si 4, tg,-,Lf 4,-,1 Ju H , Q , ., ki. 2 .Q Mfg ,x , Q Z .,LA r wx: Pfiin' I, s. 1,4 . 5 9 -,i R sr is, , , ' .752 'Vi 4 o , sit! , b- ox, ZW , .- ,013 , Q V, . .- , 2 ,, 1 Wa, .-4, 01 f f 'Q , , I r In ,, .rw k, x, 4' K .1 .-1 x . -1 ,.,, , f - 'J 5 '-fK.'!wW rf!-.f'2,' i -, L f , , , A us, .11 NX --str. - -...Mi "Q - f' 1 E "'If-V?" t 45731 2559-,sfo-' r , if f 1!A'.. x - ' -.3-gt-3.-3"-t' L ,1f.'2?.o'15"'gf51 K 1 .. K x ,. ---Av.-4 nv.-.H Qt X .lt-'nbk' A 'N Y 'M . . -S . me . . -ii ' .-.L xxx-a L N-'W 11411 - D' N if L t ,wif- .. -.--umm-arwy - Q W . .X,.X. X. A V - K '.-vffg,:k,g il, . ersrr U rf' On the trip to Laredo geology students stopped 15 miles northwest of Laredo to examine rock speci- mens and cross-bedded sandstone. ,f, riff? 4 A GEORGE WALLACE was the only presidential candi- date to campaign in the area. He appeared at an air- port rally in Corpus Christi. FRANCES FARENTHOLD made a bid for the college vote in her gubernatorial campaign. DR. J. R. MANNING, former Dean of Business Administration, was successful in his race for mayor of Kingsville. .3 1 5 i l 4 fvw , ' -4 - 'V lZa ' Q A'-wil .1 ' IJ, fit". Newly-enfranchised youfh V Q ft 'F l .7 I.. I 4 4 L 1 , Q 1 A ,fl L K' , 1 , lg Q. , tj, . F lt? 1 N 6, if 7' is X S l rl, Gubernatorial candidate DOLPH BRIS- COE appeared at the Aggie Round-Up Rodeo. WAYNE CONNALLY cam- paigned before the Democratic primary for the position of lieutenant governor. Team teaching NSW education project at For the first time the education depart- ment had a team teaching program es- tablished The name of the program was Prolect Quality Education." The proled consisted of teachers, student teachers, and aides all working in a classroom to- gether Dr Robert Cox started the proiect. There were 80 elementary and secondary education students workmg in the Bishop School District, the site of the proiect. Forty of the students were student teach- ers and the other 40 were aides from an Education 304 class The main purpose of the proiect was two fold One purpose was to provide work in a student teaching team situa- tion With teams this enables the student teacher to work individually and in small groups with the students To relate theory to practice is the second purpose of the prolect The University wants to make classes more relevant to everyday teach- mg situations and practice Each classroom had five instructors working with the students The instructors included the regular classroom teacher, two student teachers and two aides. With team teaching the student teach- ers worked in the classroom a full semes- ter instead of half a semester. The stu- dent teachers also worked the full day in the classroom instead of splitting the hours with the regular classroom teacher. The duties of the aides consisted of helping small groups of students who needed special instruction, grading, typ- ing tests, and general classroom work. The purpose of the aides was for them to learn more about public schools and to see if they wanted to continue in the field of education. The Bishop school district is the only district that has been approved for team teaching Other schools have been shown films and slides and express an interest in the proiect. The education department plans for every student enrolled in 304 classes to go through the team teaching by next spring. Faculty members in charge of the stu- dent teachers and aides were Dr. Robert Warren, secondary, and Dr. Jerry Bo- Qeneff elementary It was their duty to supervise student teachers and aides, and provide instruction in teaching techni- ques and methods. The supervisors were also at the school every do and 1hi5 Y gave them closer contact with the student teachers. Bishop school the-student teacher the'opportunity to x Top: The Bishop school student teachers and aides learn to work together as a team in the art class. Bottom: With team teaching students are given more individual attention than in the normal classroom association. l l 'N V' 4' l .L t' Tw schoi to be 'I xl 14' r 11" A t, Top: Making out on exam is iust half the work. Student teachers and aides must also grade the exams and compile the scores. Bottom left: Aides were used at the Bishop schsol to help tutor students who needed extra help. Bottom right: The student teacher, aides and regular classroom instructor had to make plans together for the lessons to e taught that day. -iw--i Q A O l'.1i"kc'3,g l L Munpuwfwi ,- .-Y. f v 2 an f X , ' 1 l 1 o ws x 'ffg' ' 1 , . , K. - . Q , Q 1 V E: 'l . K 9 ' 1, l I' 9 T L I 3 ' vdll0n when , . . 'ved a stal'Id'f'9 o lr0l4 Top: Dr. James C. Jernigan, president of Texas A8-I in Kmgsville smce ll96?gr:'19C:'L will serve IP fhe dlzlowsw was announced that he had been named chancellor of the Texas A.8- lsysfrop, the State Legisl0lU5eKleberglf chancellor and president of the Kingsville campus until an 0PP'oprlallon,or5 members Mrs. Rmhcr identforllli appointment of a new president. Standing beside him are Board of DireC nouncement of the Pliin the fqrll Lewis Maples and Leo Welder. Bottom: The press conference at which tllre were made was helnended. Corpus Christi campus and the elevation of Dr. Jernigan to the chance ors P Science Auditorium. Besid ll U Corpus Cl1l'l5 es members of the press, faculty members and 911053 from 'Ma lrvl"' Wi' W 4 iff' Mew' td. Jernigan is named chancellor over Texas A8.l 's four campuses N -F-A " 4 l V A . , TDP: Dr. D. Whitney Halladay, East Texas State president for six years, is president of the new Cor- PUS Christi campus. Bottom: Dr. Billy F. Cowart, for- merly called director, is now president at Laredo. The Texas A811 University System is the latest system of higher education in the state. lt came into being with the an- nouncement by the A811 Board of Direc- tors' secretary, Lewis Maples, that Dr. James C. Jernigan had been named chancellor. At a press conference in the Earth Sci- ence Auditorium, May 5, it was also an- nounced that Dr. D. Whitney Halladay would become president of the Corpus Christi campus and Dr. Billy F. Cowart will be president of Texas A811 University at Laredo. Jernigan will continue as president of the Kingsville campus until a new presi- dent can be named. Following World War ll, Jernigan was named dean of stu- dent life at A8il. He became academic dean in 1950 when the college boasted an enrollment of 1,876 students. ln 1962 he moved into the presidency, succeeding Dr. Ernest Poteet. At that time A811 had an enrollment of 3,5l6. Halladay assumed the duties of the presidency during the summer after six years in the top position at East Texas State University. The Corpus Christi upper level school has September, 1973 as a target date for enrolling students. The University of Corpus Christi site on Ward Island - without its buildings - has been accepted as a site for the new cam- pus provided that purchase of the build- ings can be financed. Legislation estab- lishing the upper level branch does not permit the spending of state money for any part of the site. The Corpus Christi school was authorized during the spring of 1971 by the 62nd Texas Legislature. Besides his work at East Texas State, Halladay served earlier at Columbia Uni- versity as assistant to the provost and later at the University of Arkansas as dean of students and chairman of the graduate program in student personnel administration fprhigher education. The Laredo school, on the campus of Laredo Junior College, is the only upper level institution in the state currently of- fering the bachelor's degree. lt began classes in September, 1970, enrolled 486 students this year and in May grad- uated 79. Dr. Billy F. Cowart, director since the planning stages of 1969, has now been designated president. First maior off-campus development of A811 came with the establishment of the Citrus Center at Weslaco in 1947. It in- cludes 250 acres of land which is used for carrying out research and instruction under the direction of Dr. Richard A. Hensz. Two graduarions, 1,044 get degrees at Texas Anil A record-breaking 1,044 students re- ceived degrees during two commence- ments at Texas A811 University. The final figure, including 661 who completed degree requirements this week and 383 who finished their work last De- cember, represents an 8 per cent in- crease over the previous high of 965 at- tained last year. Dr. James C. Jernigan, chancellor of the Texas A811 University System and president of A811-Kingsville, conferred a total 918 bachelor's degrees and 126 master's. Exercises were conducted in the Physical Education Center. Besides 104 Texas towns, five other states - California, Georgia, North Car- olina, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island - and 10 other nations lUganda, Colom- bia, India, Iran, Kuwait, Mexico, Paki- stan, Spain, Saudi Arabia and Thailandl were represented. X 5 . X 1 Jin, Al xf I r Vi 'Yr ! Ya! BJ KQV, 0531115115 51 ,5-'?-Ez! 2 fuwgnag. fini' ' 'i if 'T W1 4' , , .QW if 5 lu! as F5 ' J . I ni 2 1 a 9 1 I r..-QQ 1 ,M rx-,Zim 4.f435s,g::J my , f H ffm! , Eg - '.,-:Lge '45 "1"1Q1:lAQ3 'm' ya 'Q 1 nie ffmxffigff ' 1 ,f cw ' - W X Xa X X : 1 N ' . XY- x X wewwx N 4 pmmw, - 1 X' : N 'mix pgfmw ,,,. , " i I WW X xx :N xw.-W V Q X '-4-N 3 L X S ww Q X ' . Q, ,, i 8 Q L. S v . . . , . 1. . -c.-"N: , .- .- - v F' Q '- "' , ffm- Mfg-QQ:-N.: -gfgi - V aww - if Q iw.-.3-.s1-'fflff--1-4. .. vis:--. 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"-'gm-:.-SA - 1--fr-aaa '--ffijlimfyafg-f f.-f5l4g,.1f-41'-qv f ,:.f":f,g-A Q.. 7--ff -1, -2-,MFA ' ,.f:v.a-- ff - ' -., --1-: -.13 - .4 4- 1- - " ' - -.af -- r'Y..1f',-11'-T J ,g wqsgv . A ff., - ,Hg 5 3115. ie - 1 r .aL.aE'.L , , -'x 1 nn Il E' 1' 'WI ' .qjmx 5,5 IIHII- . :iii ll- 1 K - -- -. 1.-' , f-u '-,,-.4-Ml.-f5 ,aff 1.5.4-ral..-.9 , , -. , ,, ,.,,,,.. .gn -A - .,f- -lf.-f.-.1 -ff ,A nf , ' -. f I- 1. .'2'5-1 - - - .. v ..f -4 ,a.l,'5 .. 'f ',-'-,g.v,.l I Sfudenf Life l t El Rancho has first fall delivery, takes TIPA third plgce The 1971 edition of the EI Rancho was delivered iust after fall registration, mak- ing it the first fall delivery in the year- book's publication history. Staff members and volunteer workers from iournalism classes rushed to pass out 2,000 copies the first day in the Library entrance. The central location of the distribution is cred- ited with the large first-day run. Class photographs got off to a slow start when the first day of shooting was rained out by a tropical storm. Photos were made by Stevens Studio, Bangor, Maine, on the second floor lobby of rium due to the construction work and lack of air conditioning in the SUB. The heavy rains, out-of-the-way lo- cation of the photographers and the fact that this was the first year students had Jones Audito to make advanced appointments all con- the smallest number of stu- tributed to dents photographed for the class section in several years. For the second year in a row the EI Rancho won third place in the Texas ln- tercollegiate Press Association's state- wide competition. Judges noted the 1971 edition's "imaginative use of color and good layout" when making their decision known. Editor Kathy Smith and staff member Karen Lemke were at the TIPA ' h convention in McAllen to receive te award. In preparing the 1972 El Rancho the th the age-old problem staff struggled wi of getting the creative iuices flowing. Once the theme had been ,selected work began on the color transparencies. Pho- Jones, senior from tographer Norman San Antonio, did much of the color work Kathy Smith, editor and came up with the double ency illustrating ,he Cycle of nf trunspur. hood and death - and the e scliild. the El Rancho stuff has nevern:icle.Wl1iIi to try to compete with Rice Jlunleed nudes published Q few years niversi1y', beauty of Jones's artistic Pho' 090, the served publication. ogmph de In the spring there was q hem d paign for the 1973 editorshipz Cum. Deryl Holland of Corpl-IS Cltrigii elween cumbent editor Kathy Smith of At the polls students re-electeg 910. smith. lit This year's book was r' Publishing Co. of Dallas.pl'l2hedlirlJZ Taller Futura Book Italic, body Cop ilYPeis Spartan type, Y S gel ln in- Shera Lyn Alexander, qdyiso, WM af" " ff. ,N 1 ...a -r' I 8 . V ,,, . " .5 K- f' . uv! it ' a 9'- -W t.... T 1 7 , 76 H H , . 2 b , ai 4 .-... ,. . .., A S , . ,-, ,. - . ., H V , k I ,T 49, I I ,KM V I I i .1 .. sid W 1' I 2. . . . safe. f,-'. ' F , ' z M Q "- W' . v J . "" ' 'U Q l., L N . ' - A X ... -.- gg ,Lf ' Q ,' , V ., iv Y. .. Deryl Holland, photographer ,',,,, -ll s . , , ,eq f-fif?i'i '57 f it L5 "E L f V-if Dinah Gillaspy, assistant wmwfm' , ' N ff' 1 ."7 f .vw i . , . 'WW ., , ww , hy ,V1 fl ,fl I. f 4,71 13. fly, U 41 ,. 'M I I.. H ,,v, ..4 V4 ,,,, w f ,H V, i ,A V -..X I '71 : I E - . if 5. , I 'av V, V, , f f 1' "lg 1f4n', -1 ,-f. F ?5f'3f, :iv 4' ,f fl A ff' fll4f'fI'11 if Y U ,ff , A -1 Q .,-5: , 'i 1 .fy u 2,541.52 Q1 1 'r 'f ww gf, ' , 'f 1, .did G., u.,,, mv f' ,ly-i.'1f1w 1 X ' 'fn yy uf V, v '-11,15 wg A vii 'f r, ,"P?i'1' ff .J ga: .H ' f- .4 - rf jgfr L2 2 I L It ,A ,., qu .A .N ,V 'WI' 'Hr F .141 g' iz, -J'-f:' -j. f Fi," 17, 5 Q'-1'-Q A .neo 5. , ,, , ll ii Lynda Stover, assistant M-asm' 5, Karen Lemke, assistant 77 KTAI radio station moves to lobby of Jones Auditorium The University radio station will be moving to new quarters for the fall semester, 1972. The radio station, KTAI, will be located on the second floor lobby of Jones Auditorium. The old radio station will be used to house the new closed circuit television equipment that the Speech Department has acquired. KTAI is a 'l0 watt educational station licensed by the Federal Communications Commission. The radio station is completely run by students ex- cept for the position of station manager. There are future plans to increase the wat- tage power of the station up to 250 watts. Programs for the station included music ranging from hard rock, western, classic, and request shows. Two other forms of music were offered once a week for one hour, they were Spanish and Indian music. The hour program for Indian music was conducted by students from India who brought their own records. Other programming included public service announcements for the University and commu- nity. The station goes closed circuit, as well as open air, for students who are enrolled in speech 202 Radio and TV Announcing. The station also had movie reviews and detailed sports coverage of the football and basket- ball games. Two students were sent to NASA to cover the last Apollo moon shot. The students were Clyde McPhearson and Jerry Henderson. While there they got taped interviews from NASA workers on the inside happenings of a space shot. There are around 40 students who work as disc iockeys for the station in the course of a are ten student staff members charge of the station and logs. year. There who are in Any interested student enrolled at Texas A81l University is eligible to work at the station. Top: KTAI staff members were: Alex Garcia, Jackie Schmidt, Meredith Jordan Ggnh Gem-,or were: Robert Cardenas, Jimmy Martinez, James Joyce, Jamie Trevino Terrell Fieemqn Suv lff .Ni Mb Bill Saenz, David Batts. Bottom: Disc iockeys for the campus rodiostotion l 1 . . -st I ' . fir Nqr ,J I lop: Klkl 1 Bottom leli equipment xii 'll R T t f , 'ation 9 R-.xx . .X I L Ll: Nfpjix I A X X- - , - X . if s ' H- ff : W I X-'J l I v.:: ' . , ,kN xx . lj . ee Top: KTAI staff members were: James Joyce, Bill Saenz, Bud Luckett, Roy Martinez, Ken Mathews, Jackie Schmidt, Charle Bottom left: The director of the University Radio station KTAI was Stephen Hofer. Bottom right: One of the disc iockey equipment to a new worker. fum mmf 5 f' Qi -46, I lv 1 ., J, , www ' ., ,1, MMU'"1'LLl2,W.2z1..,..,f.14!Zwff1mM ........f.M..,.,..,w:41,4...4mzxfzmuz:mm4,49,1MM1 s Weathersby, Clyde McPhearson, Ron Byron. s for the station explains how to handle the wwf-""' at E ' We-,,,,,..x .1 79 ,vawmf mzlvg.-lag , mul rawhwnnuwhynm vmm ra-asm vnu,-zulu-Ji :Ax-.xxx .mu In-'L' Q.: r-Liar fx X - imma- 5 l V. 124 YK ' xx ,539 1, 1' 4 W , .. N W Reporters for the 1972 South Texan were Robert Camp, Thurman Hilton, and Chris Corby. 7-"' UM, , X I The new managing editor Diana Varela a ' I D I , nd editor, L' d ' , Association convention in McAllen. ln G Game' cmended lhe Texas lnlefcollegmle P"e55 ll11lP7' "' llllll 'f4,Nt". 1972 South Texan Editor Linda Garcia Norman J ones was Pllologlopllell me f est all body 0' slIlP clll the SPH' me l qstlllllel ved to fhovlll spring ll Hidullo sevtfal as5Um9 l The 5 eye Oll Publicati student 1 cationS South Texan undergoes attack from student body, student congress The South Texan underwent its heavi- est attack in recent years by the student body and Student Congress as its editor- Ship changed hands three times during the spring semester. The first editor was Cecil Parker, who ssumed duties in June 1971 and contin- ued to serve as editor in January al- though he did not enroll in school at spring registration. Managing editor Boris Hidalgo assumed the editor's duties for several months, although he could not assume the title. The Student Congress kept a watchful eye on the situation stressing that the Publications Committee select a qualified student to edit the newspaper. The Publi- cations Committee suggested that Alex C Robert serve as editor, yet his nomination was reiected by the Congress. Elections resolved the editorship problem as the students elected Linda Garcia over Lester Mallory as editor. Miss Garcia was not allowed to as- sume duties as editor immediately be- cause Mallory contested the election on several issues. The contestings were re- iected by the Supreme Court and Miss Garcia assumed duties on April 17th. Innovations to the South Texan were made throughout the year on its format and purpose to the student body. Eight columns were used by replacing the col- umn rule with whitespace. Both vertical and horizontal layouts were experi- mented 'with in the South Texas. The newspaper increased the number of pages during the school year and prod- uced several eight page issues. The South Texan took the role of acti- vating the students with the Miss Sum- mertime Beauty Contest during August and editorials concerning traffic safety, cheerleaders, the need for contraceptives from the Health Service, and liquor-by- the-drink. The South Texan continued to provide a meeting ground for student complaints with its letters-to-the-editor. lt offered all club and organizations services through its club notes and coverage to the faculty with its faculty notes. LET'5g MAKE 299115 fpgsfm A NEWSPAPER UT JUST A " 3 ' . ' ,., 1 ff W, I ,M ,Z"'-fhififff-ff f I . . - , h, rt 5 L t' 'a Gomez, staff writer, Cecil Parker, editor The staff for me Soufh Texan durin fhe fall of 1971 included Boris Hrldalgo, managing editor, Karen Brysc spo s e ici 9 - d'f . LUVVY Mvfray, staff writer, Lynn Brock, business manageff Und Duma Varela' feature e I or Fall registration brings 8,000 to A8.l University Fall registration was earlier than usual this year, occurring dur- ing the last balmy days of August. With all the pink, white, or- ange, green, and blue computer cards, it's a wonder that a record- breaking total of 8,088 students officially enrolled for the l97l fall semester. During September, students found their respective places, not only in the classrooms, but also in the social circles. The SUB spon- sored a Back-to-school Dance, which was followed by regular Thursday night Dateless Dances. For three weeks in September, the national and local fraternities and sororities held their annual rush parties. The Baptist Student Union got an early start with their activities. Their four-day Beachhead Retreat was followed by a BSU lunch- eon and a car wash. The Javelinas held their first two football games out-of-town against Trinity, in San Antonio, and McMurry, in Corpus Christi. Faculty and staff members attended the annual President's Re- ception in the James C. Jernigan Library, and faculty wives were entertained at a luncheon and style show. Many new developments were introduced on campus during September. One of these advancements was the completion of the new wing on the A.L. Kleberg Engineering Building. The university's FM radio station, KTAI at 91.1, began a new broadcasting system called "free form." The music ranged from country-western to rock and underground. Also, for the first time, home football games were broadcast live. A new photographic service, offered to all campus departments and agencies, was also started in September. To highlight the month, an uninvited lady dropped by, interrupt- ing classes during the third week of school. Her name was Tropical Storm Fern. Top left: Students gathered in front of the dorms for social relaxation between studies. Top middle: Long lines stretched around the James C. Jernigan Library dur- ing registration. Bottom left: Following the long wait outside, students were faced with more waiting inside. Top: The first days of class usually involve the buying of texts in the campus bookstore. Bottom: President Jernigan held his annual Recep- tion in September for the faculty and staff members. 1 L I eL""fI XT - gif' ,X f . '17 14 5. ' ' vigrx vb' 5, n g5H'TiS'l ff' ' li' A I ,s, N., PHE' 'SM ' .ff ,ey , L 1, . - - 274 ,. 0 U ' 'I I .x If 'i""B - " 1' fi ' - Q .W .. . .. y . 4 -- ,K 'eta' - Wsfff- ,, .. nl VII 5' I qw N1 Th RQ rgxillk X x X ,-..,,X S f' x Doctor Faustus, Dad's Day, Homecoming, all part of the activities held in October. October began with a struggle between salvation and damnation. The Speech and Drama Department presented their contempo- rary version of Christopher Marlowe's play, "Doctor Faustus" the story of a man who sells his soul to the Devil in order to learn the unknowable. The production was directed by David Deacon, and starred Steve Shipley, of Bishop, in the title role. Dad's Day highlighted the middle of the month. A full schedule of entertainment in- cluded a rodeo at Kleberg Park, tours of the King Ranch and the A811 campus, an ROTC open house, a band concert, a barbeque luncheon, and the East Texas State University football game. Among the honored Dads were Raymond Fernandez, the oldest Dad at 73, and C. L. Rogers, the Dad who traveled the farthest - 5,000 miles from Fairbanks, Alaska. Homecoming weekend completed the busy .,,. ,.,, ,.,, - . .. WA V1 . 1-,-.gi , , l 1 I iiifft' - l .3 ..-if A, ' i 1,5 -ggi. . Aw.. V: W ' , , . ,, Q.. QM N F' as K, hx'-M. W'-mm J sl' f'::s- L. ll and exciting month. Alumni activities this year honored the classes of 1931, '41, '51, and '61, and all former cheerleaders. C. K. Bal- lard, President of the Columbian Nitrogen, Co., was presented the Distinguished Alumnus Award. Jack Cole, a Dallas Lawyer, was elected the new president of the A8tI Alumni Association. Homecoming activities included parties and a barbeque at Mesquite Grove. During half- time at the Angelo State University football game, Cynthia Ramos, a iunior elementary education major from Kingsville, was crowned queen. Eva Anderson and Judy Fowler completed the royal court. Homecom- ing festivities were ioyfully concluded with the Javelina victory of 13-7. Several elections also took place in Octo- ber including class officers, Student Union representatives, and vice-president, Curtis Iv- ery. Left: Guests and students alike enioyed the Home- coming pre-game barbeque sponsored by the ROTC Department. Right: President Jernigan presented Mrs. Martha Gibson the award she won at the ROTC Rifle Shoot during Day's Day. I, l i l O 4 i Q l 2 1 1 5 2 Z A' .f Ewing Clfflwu milfllirdl Tik- tl' 'I U ,l mtl gl 'l i i Vx ix. vucmg 4 T.l..""' i i tl . Q9 Q an i Top: Posters were displayed to announce the con- mmumg snag ' l cert to be held by Victor Borge at A81l. Bill Holmes, mllgow QUMDUKTX ' director of the University News Service, hung the my 1 poster in the Journalism Building. Bottom: Freer df- 7 A High School Band was one of the participants in ig the Eleventh Annual Band Day. Top right: Mony students spent their leisure time in o gome of pool X l A ot the Recreation Room. Bottom right: Don Hogany 'if makes a flying rebound for the Hogs during one of A ' the home games. I, I2 '1 l i s Il 3 ,fig3dZ2M745l,f, 4,1-,. , 1,131 Y V , f F , 0 QP? titttl . 'W .,,, 1 .Q Q 1 if 1. l l e il I V l sf' i ri. . -. i A v t il :IFR V I , W 41 3 fr l X' .4 'll ' ' it t i f , Q ,., f ' it l . 5' C -- I 1 l It i A t K ' ' , 1 N X ff 5 A t f l 2 A ' A g I: fx I .e e -f fi 1 A . , 17 t , Q Im, it Q A E "4 ' . l 1 ,,,fmLg.,3 - " ' S l - . 1 2 2 y l li l t if T . If ,, VQSAS V ? l l 86 A A? .sq 4 's . t -A - 4 1 i its gms H355 .4 X . 'ii S 1.5 . ik 4' N--N. 'we -f ...K - . 'W'--vw . k , Fifi K1 3 'M .A WW? - 'iw . 1 --.f-wyrfw U , , ,. L 3 U 7 fff,.:',Z,,fM1gjjZ5M ,g-Z if A I , , ,K Q., ,.,A ' """ ' ' Wf 7, 1 ' 1, 'W' I. I AA , A fy? 1.1 .f ffjffvzr, Parades, Carnivals, part of activities held in November The Eleventh Annual Band Day, with its parade through downtown Kingsville, was arranged this year by the Epsilon Chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi, and Tau Beta Sigma. The parade of bands, con- sisting of thirteen South Texas high schools, also performed at the Howard Payne football game. The Student Union Governing Board sponsored their annual Fall Carnival in November. Twenty-four- organizations set up various booths, including a dunking stool, pie-throwing booth, cake-walks, and a guinea pig roulette booth. The Speech and Drama Department presented performances of their entry in the Region IV American Theatre Festival, "A Sleep of Prisoners," about four sol- diers locked in a church, and their at- tempt to understand the world and them- selves. Victor Borge, internationally famous entertainer, who talentedly combines con- cert music with compulsive comedy, gave one of his higtily rated performances in Jones Auditorium. The Javelinas played one out-of-town game against Sam Houston in Huntsville. The basketball team traveled to St. Ed- wards University in Austin and St. Mary's University in San Antonio. Their one home game was against Texas Lutheran. Other events of the month included Area Ten's Future Farmers of America Leadership Contest, the Junior ROTC rifle competition, the Student Union Activities Conference, and the informal dedication of the John E. Connor Museum. F The five-day Thanksgiving break high- lighted November. Rhodes joins Board and King 's compete during December Christmas trees and mistletoe charac- Th terized the iolly month of December. e A8il Singers and University Choir pres- ented Christmas Concerts in the Jones Auditorium, and the fraternities and so- ' . . . I 1 rorities held holiday parties with peny of refreshments and surprise-filled stock- ings. Other December events that did not depict the Christmas seaso Texas A8il University Forensic Festival for San Benito High n, included the valley high schools. School captured the over-all first place title. The King's Rifles Drill Team placed sec- l in the Gulf Coast Competi- tion at the University of Houston. The team placed first in the inspection phase, second in the precision drilling, and third in the basic phase. George Fred Rhodes was named to the Board of Directors this month. Mr. Rhodes, a practicing lawyer, is presently a member of the Alumni Association Cen- tury Club, and the Charter President of the Calhoun Local Club of the Associa- tion. He is a former president of the Ex- Student Association. As a former student at A8il, he was president of the student body, a member of Alpha Chi Honor Fra- ternity, and Phi Kappa Delta Forensic Fraternity. Mr. Rhodes earned his Bache- lor of Science degree in 1950. Delta Sigma Phi brought the popular family singing group, the Cowsills, to Kingsville in December. A fund was established this month by the Texas A81l University Faculty Wives Club, to build a fountain in the mall area of the campus. Final exams brought the fall semester to a close and students left for a 21 'day Christmas break. ond over-al Bottom left: Students admire the art exhibition and sale sponsored by the Art Department. Top left: Children were enraptured during the Young People's Concert, "Peter and the Wolf," presented by the Civic Symphony. Top right: Decorating Christmas refreshments is part of the holiday sea- son. Bottom right: Soft music and quiet dancing highlighted the Faculty Christmas Party. January starts with spring reglSfrGfIOl7, d is added to pGCkef 12 24 when students once again slushed A Christmas holidays came to a halt January through registration This semester another computer card was added to the confusion Student Health Card distributed by the Health Center, was needed to meet the require ments of a new bill passed by Texas Legislators To obtain the card a student needed to lete series of dyptheria immunizations This year s spring registration ex l of 7 951 have the comp ceeded the 1971 spring total by 388 students, making a tota t nterest this month with the successful pres The Artist Course Series captured studen s I l reated by A811 students and twenty entation of Film Assault on the eye Ten fl ms c nine experimental films were presented free of charge to all students The films ex lored areas of creation of which few students had formerly been aware The Sun d City College by Richard Smith P Experiment, a multi media film by Joe Martinez an J d e Katana Simmons of the Museum of South Texas Dr received high ment from u g Wayne Gunn headed the symposium as chairman ' leted Alfred L Kleberg Engineering Classes started this month in the recently comp Hall With the Engineering Hall built construction started on a new building for the t' d on expansion of the Student Union Build- Teacher Education Department and con inue 'n ' ' l d d a new walkway in front of Other construction sites underway during January inc u e t ' in the mall area between the Biology-Earth the James C. Jernigan Library and a foun am Science Building and the Campus Bookstore student health car 1, :z'r,d 'l Q ,fr lt. rl L- a the beginning 'll' Top right: With the closing of the Christmas vacation an smog spring semester, January brought cold, brisk weather. Top: A new Sem' ' ' ' ' t r cards to flllou' mean ' - - S registration with waiting in line and more compv 0 -ifi J v',. , Zn. 'C' tn. 1 ,Mr I 'J' ' V. lttt- mmm lqnuqry MM? i x P 'kg qfv, I Y 'X 1 o 1,11 Y 4 I 5 ' I .fc 'f ,V I mm. H X vi fx gl I Q s E J ' NN 5 Wil .j r i of fh' ef abd Top . 1 3' +7 H! Vw 'Vale rounne of Qeififlg up early. Top left: Basketball got into full swing durin Jo WSZWY- Students turned out to support the Hogs at home games. Top right: Jeff enbefg fries for two points as Don Hagany and opponents gaze on. iwifh 0 Christmas break of 25 days students found it difficult to get back in 9 1- V ...,.' flag ,ff .Q I it 5 4 Kg 3 IG Activities abound during February: ROTC Ball, APO funds drive The grandest social event of the year, the U.S. Army . Annual Military Ball, was held February 26, in the new Henrietta ar is the Memorial Center. The highlight of the dance every ye d C lonel and Cadet Lady Ma- announcement of the Cadet La y o ' ' h' Lou Pulliam and ior. The honored ladies this year were Cynt ia Cynthia Ramos. Music of the formal ball was provided by "Ram and the lmpalas." Under the direction of David T. Deacon, the Speech and t." The comedy Drama Department presented "Romulus the Grea satire starred Phil Scott of Jourdanton in the title role. ' ' ' W hin ton Birthday The ROTC Kings Rifles marched in the as g L d The filled A8il's trophy case when they re- ROTC Parade at are o. y turned, having placed first in the basic and precision categories. The Kings Rifles were also honored with the overall championship trophy. ' ' l chartered Texas A8il's Symphonic Band squeezed into severa buses for a six-day, six-concert tour. Concerts were played at ' d Fre- ln leside Sinton, South San Antonio, Burbank, Llano, an 9 1 dericksburg high schools. Their final concert was held at A8il in Jones Auditorium. Another type o concer the popular rhythm and blues band, "War," The entertainers e brou ht to the campus by the Artist Course Committee. wer g By pulling a bathtub up and down the streets behind a pick-up truck, the members of Alpha Phi Omega raised money for the re tossed into the trav- f t was given at A8rl during February by American Heart Association. Donations we eling tub. Curtis lvery, Amarillo senior, was elected president of a new fraternity on campus, Omega Psi Chi. The fraternity is open to all male students with an overall grade point average of 2.0. ,,. .1 l' 15 llkv 1-f,' i llPlefh1hs lllllll leh: pt clnll,,?m'u,l' Wm. I' -L43 if an Vi -I W Q:- ruggqrn 'I -:lfmf-ff-he -at To . . B0ZJ:'H,e1:eFg'T:h?IC bland began their tours during the month, with visits to Central Texas high schools. -.old gyms' To . H: Irs: time gurls Intramurals were offered at A8-I. The basketball games were held at the Comedy some in ':m?1us the Great was presented to the student body in the Little Theatre. The play was a Pulliam' G bon U 1 I1 all of Rome. Above: Don McNair presents the new Honorary Cadet Colonel, Cindy students' k Q 9 0 roses at the ROTC Military Boll. Right: February began with warm weather which the OO advantage of, I Top: The month of March came wrth cold wmdy and ramy days Right Durung the month the annual T Fnghts were held tn the Physucal Health Center The flghts were sponsored by the TAssocnatlon Bottom Student elections were held durmg the latter part of the month The electron had the largest turnout rn the hustory of A81l with nearly 2 OOO students votnng X, fr, vi XMKWM' 14796301 jf --1111 M 'llisnul annum-Mapu... TX March begins with windy, rainy days, ends with holidays How true the maxim, "March comes in like a Lion and goes out like a Lamb!" Cold, windy, and rainy days opened the month, but warm, sunny days appeared in time for the highlight of the month - The election of officers and editors for the 1972-73 season was held March 23 after several days of campaign signs and student deliberation. Final results showed that the Independent Student Party domi- nated the election over the Political Equality Party. Mike Cofer was elected to the vice-presidency. Linda Garcia will be the South Texan editor, and Kathy Smith was re-elected to the El Rancho editor- ship. Arnold Burklow won the maiority of votes to become Head Cheerleader. A run-off was scheduled for April to deter- mine the president of the student body. Members of Drama 405, Children's Theatre, presented "Alice in Wonder- land" for all nine public elementary schools in Kingsville. A8il's band sponsored the Stage Band Festival for high schools throughout Texas. Robert E. Lee High School of Houston was named the all-around champion. Texas A8tl's Debate Team now ranks as one of the state's top ten following the Sixth Annual All-Texas Debate Tour- nament in Austin. Lewis Aldridge of Kingsville and Sheila Hubner of Corpus Christi attained the ranking. The Artist Course Committee was busy again this month. They presented Stan Kenton and his orchestra. The best day of March was the last day, with the start of the 10-day Spring Break. National history was made this month when President Richard M. Nixon paid a peaceful visit to China. Top: Students waited anxiously in College Hall for the results of the election. Left and right: Bill Ham- mons and Kenneth Bird represented organizations in the Ugly Man on Campus contest. The contest is held to raise funds for different service foundations. April begins with run-off Fever. After a April ushered in Spring ten day Easter vacation, classes seemed to lose their challenge. First things come first, however, and a run-off election for Student Congress President was held the second week of April. By a margin of five votes, the PEP elections for pr6S uals, and to breed interaction between all Greeks and independent students on campus. During the cheerleader elections, only 762 students cast their votes. Winning the election were Marvin Douglas, iunior r from Corpus Christi, and education maio Anthony Montello, a business accounting identof the sfudentbodymheerleod A err week of April. Gubernatorial I Dolph Briscoe, was present qtizndllalei day afternoon performance of Ghltlri-t tional Intercollegiate Rodeo AsleNi Soqi, 1 rodeo that was held in Corfu I t the Aggie Round.up. Ch:n2Cllori ROUf1d-up was the announcemelltig , 5 nominee, Juan Cantu, defeated ISP rep- resentative, Joel Solis. Greek Week got underway April 14- 21, with a tree planting ceremony in the mall area. Over 600 sorority and frater- ston. Female cheerleader for 1972-73 will be Nancy Smith, a freshman accounting maior from Rock- ort A tie between Peggy Watkins and maior from Hou low Ag students Also, during the last week ofA. Speech and Dramq Depunmenli gie of the Year whg was eleded 3 Gubernatorial candidate Fran p . Sandra Gracey resulted in a May run-off ented the play, HPIQZG Suite-lr K . . ' 5 P nity members participated in the inter-fra- ternity competitions, parties, and work- shops. The purpose behind Greek Week is to present the Greek System to individ- election. The 43rd annual Aggie Round-up and Western Week were held during the last re Z. enthold, visited the campus ands students in Jones Auditorium ggi position an election issues. 5 FX' -A, X len mdidqi? 'S Smit the N5 soqiqge. lion of lhi l of AS. ll bl ld lPf1l, lle 'il pres rces Fm. Spoke I: bout ls 5: Cl H View x Top: Students spent a frolicking afternoon of friendly competition iust before Spring Vacation at the annual Campus Capers. Left: At the 43rd Aggie Round-up Bill Pugh was named "Aggie of the Year." Above: South Texan and El Rancho staff members attended the TIPA Convention in McAllen where the 1971 yearbook was awarded third place by the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association. May begins with Biology Wildlife Show. ends with finals, 7,044 graduate from Ai' be an with the Biology Club May g . Wildlife Show at the animal compound north of the A81l Livestock Pavilion. Most f the exhibits were caught on field trips o throughout South and Southwest Texas. Biology students were on hand acting as guides through the show. As the semester drew to a close final exams were on the minds of all A8d stu- dents. Exams were scheduled from the llth through the 18th. With the completion of exams came senior graduation. Two commencement exercises were held in the Physical Edu- cation Center. A record-breaking l,O44 students received degrees during the commencement exercises. Announcement of a chancellor for the newly organized Texas A8-I University and presidents of two upper level schools were made during the month. Chancellor is Dr. James C. Jernigan, A81l president since 1962, Dr. Whitney Halladay is to be the . , Christi and Dr. Billy gl'-x:,?r:lllf'lCor,i, A81l at Lared ' dlfeflorqf of president. The 1972 Hom ' A during the montlifoiiilgg game wrisset played against Sam Houggrzngicnlillube e ni- versity Nov. 4. Four students q . I Lawrence P. Smithniplsggrlfs dllfclgl Session" on KGNS-,W in Loredooq Rqp dents were Rosa Ramos SYM' lgeslir Carmen Newman and Mdrinc E52 blorez, U Summer musicals to be preseraegr. You re a Good Man CharlieB Oli which will have five perform 'own' the "King and l." ences' all The area FFA Convention for A was held on the ASLI campus. The :tzz'::..zLfS'den' 'S Charles DeWitt George of Port Lovucu was named lA student of the year, o, now has the designmi Ull a ,:'r"r.:' E'T""F ls I.: -nl ,T With the end of school comes the with one year's accumulation and dorms to go home for the summer- W: SJ WPUS 'OI' gf lulion IS ser ll be l Uni- Vetlof "Rep 6 shi l0te1 ur. Il are mn," t and rea X newly on ol JVOCG . . li. . I I ..--r i . I 'lx-, Q sf '45 l s v .N ,z Q I QW' avid ' . .ww-w-v"""", """" W' W .,,,,,,,..f,wyyx, , , . V 1 .nn-Q, D'i'?5 4 Top: SUB construction workers picketed during the month. Center left: Student Congress advisor Dr. Floyd Elliott presented a gag award to Don Behrens at the Student Congress Banquet. Right: Curtis Ivery presented the "serious" awards at the Student Congress Banquet to honor outstanding members. Bottom: Members of the APO service fraternity painted the "circles" curb. , 2237! W W .. l P' f- l i l . 'z 0 Q Concert choir presents Bach's three-hour "Sf, Matthews Pc The Texas A81l choir performed a spe- cial program this year in collaboration with the Corpus Christi Symphony at Del Mar Auditorium in March. J. S. Bach's "St, Matthew's Passion," a three hour performance, was presented in two parts, the first half was in late afternoon and the second half after a dinner break. The choir began rehearsal on Bach's most im- portant piece at the beginning of the spring semester. The annual tour was taken April l7 through 19. The first afternoon the choir sang in Edinburg and that evening a ioint concert was held for Pharr-San Juan Alamo and McAllen high schools. The next day the choir was at Southmost Col- lege in Brownsville, then on to Harlingen and San Benito. On the way home on the third day the A81l Choir sang a con- cert at Raymondville High School, Choir director Jerry Smith emphasizes a note as he rehearses choir for their performance of "I Passion." Choir members practiced in a circle. x- 'X Yi E ,nll ew's Madrigalians, Spotlights eventually form the Texas Anil Singers 'K . 1 -.kt 4' . AGI Singers: Jose Flores, Bob Gowdy, Paul Romans, Hal Harm, Roel Ramirez, C, B. Turner, Lawrence Burnett, Skip Frazier, Marsha Piwetz, Margaret Thomas, Yolanda Garza, Patty Briggs, Zandy Gillespie, Vicki Strobel, Mary Ann Klassan. r Q. . Tiff. ., if A , ' 'flilfi -l ' V . 'A I 2, S. . ii -A . ' L S ' I if J If I . y lj J. -N" f ' . ,fa r---.--, . es f. .553 Y. . '-5-Qu-.i,:, l- ta i' :fi -1 3 A 3.-Q 1 as W EE S 1 z kgggrxjgw is 1 , eg P J will .I gg, ,. Y The A8.l Singers have come a long way since i952 when they started as a madrigal group. The Madrigalians was a highly se- lect group of T2 singers who sang informally without accompani- ment. They specialized in singing English and Italian madrigals, American folk and novelty songs, and Negro spirituals. In 1956, a small group, the Spotlights sprung from the Madrigalians and eventually the name was changed to the A8rl Singers. This versa- tile group of I6 has widened its program to include all classifica- tions of music. The Singers are in constant demand for civic appearances, public school assemblies and church organizations, averaging 30 appearances per year throughout Texas. During March, the Sing- ers toured the upper Texas Gulf Coast, New Orleans, Lafayette, and Hammond, Louisiana. Performances were also given at Fort Polk, Louisiana, U.S. Army Training Center, and Keesler Air Base, Mississippi. Three other appearances by the group were before the Harlin- gen Chamber of Commerce, the Annual Corpus Christi Chamber of Commerce Banquet, and at the Christmas Concert. The Singers have performed on three occasions outside of the U.S. ln 1960 and 1970 they went to Europe and in 1964 they toured the Pacific area. Top: In spite of a rainy marching season, the ASLI band worked hard to present outstanding halftime shows. One show was dedicated to the Kingsville Naval Air Station. Right: Leadiing the band on to the field was Fernando Ornelas. This was "Fandy's" second year as Drum Moior, which ex- plains in itself his ability to lead a bond. The Texas A81 Fighfin' Jovelina Band This P0 marching 5 Time, they dlg of 0 Sl ning off tl to protect rain did sh0W5 wel sands of one such the Kln95' featuredc r 5 709: Keeping treasurer, No, and Alex Gai lo Come early Hkaindrops keep fallin' . " but band members kept sloshing along This past fall proved to be a rainy eason for the A8rl Band. Many times they found themselves in the mid- dle ofa sudden downpour and went run- off the practice field to find shelter fo protect the many expensive horns. The rain did not stop the band however, shows were still performed for the thou- sands of spectators at the A8tl games. One such performance was dedicated to the Kingsville Naval Air Station. The drill marching S ning featured an airplane taking off. Top: Kee in th b The rain did not cancel the annual Dad's Day concert on the Mall, either, it was moved indoors to Jones Auditorium. Also in the fall the band sponsored the A8rl Band Day and invited area high schools to participate in the parade and half-time show. Immediately after marching season the Symphonic Band began rehearsals for the Annual Spring Tour. This past year's tour took the band to Ingleside, Sinton, South San and Burbank in San Antonio, 1? 1 P 9 e land on the right step this year were ffrontl Dennis Smith, band manager, Patty Hayes, "e05Ufel'i Noe Estrlngel, first vice-president lbackl Ray Grim, second vice-president, David Wilburn, president, :md Alex GT-lfflfl, reporter. Bottom: Leaving the A8tl campus for the Spring tour required many band members 0 come eU"lY In the morning and load the bus. -fag-3., 5"1E?"'u:ffg gilt!! 5.55 U -,v A ENMJL Llano, and Fredericksburg. The tour was ended with a concert in Jones Audito- rium. After tour preparation for the Fine Arts Festival began. "Geometrics" by the guest composer for this year's festival, Dr. Martin Mailman, was played. This year had several outstanding stu- dents to represent A84 with their musi- cianship at the Texas All State Intercolle- giate Band competitions. They were Dave Wilburn, first chair trombone, Steve Terry, second chair trombone, Noe Estrin- gel, first chair euphonium, Mike Robin- son, fifth chair euphonium, Ray Grimm, first chair tuba, Annette Booth, fourth chair clarinet, Leo Garza, third chair alto sax, Richard Roper, fifth chair oboe, and Robert Garza, principal percussionist. The year ended for the A8tl Band with an all day picnic at Mesquite Grove. The band was under the direction of Dr. Jo- seph Bellamah and graduate student, Richard Roper, was the assistant band di- rector. T0 3 t. t : i. 5, ls ll ii ,. D it i it S: 5. 4 gt l l t E gli l 1 ge. il 'T ll ll 76 X A ,:m,pwm:.j- H5 E i 2 E 2 fi l S gl P 04 Winds of Symphony asked to perform of TMEA convention The Winds of the A81l Civic Symphony were honored this year to perform at the l972 Texas Music Educators' Association Convention. The group, who are all mem- bers of the A8tI Civic Symphony, has been in existence for a little less than two years. The members rehearse once a week on standard orchestral literature, and perform independent concerts in ad- dition to the symphony concerts. The Civic Symphony is comprised mainly of A84 students who are enrolled in this ensemble as a course and receive credit. Music maiors are encouraged to participate as well as music faculty. Some townspeople and area people make up the other portion of the symphony. ln December the Civic Symphony per- formed "Peter and the Wolf" at the Fourth Annual Children's Concert. Andy Cook of KINE-KPUP narrated the well- known children's tale. Dr. Merton B. Johnson directs the A8il Civic Symphony. As a professional horn player he has played in the U.S. Army Band, Denver Symphony, Rochester Phil- S32 'clLl":c:Tll99jhSl:hg players are few in number compared to the winds. Middle: Dr. Merton Johnson goes e wi t e local towns eo le who hel make u the s m hon Bottom ln its less than harmonic, and is presently the solo hor- nist with the Corpus Christi Symphony. - P P P p . , I 'h . y p y. . exls ence e wmds of the Aal SYmPl1ony have made tours and were asked to perform at TMEA, T iS5vi.sN .flflfl il I, li 5 s l l s i l The se the fol was Dt Burnett x i - f .1 W OES YW ' , 5' -. -I. 1. The second acl of "Carmen" and "La Serva Padrona" were performed during the fall semester. Top: Carmen was played by Yolanda Garza, and Ed Crump was Don Jose. Boffom: Uberfo in "La Serva Padrona" was played by Lawrence Burneh and Vespone was Manuel Castillo. Ly, V' :ai ---.., -. Opera Workshop provides musical ouflef for singers 105 A Fine Arts Festival honors Dr. Mailman as guest composer The Seventeenth Annual Fine Arts Fes- tival was presented April 24-May 5 with Dr. Martin Mailman of North Texas State University as the guest composerfclini- cian. This year's Festival was centered on "Comprehensive Musicianship," a field in which Dr. Mailman is recognized as a na- tional authority, having been active in seminars for seven years. He has earned three music degrees from the Eastman School of Music, has taught composition at East Carolina College, and has taught composition at North Texas State Univer- sity since 1967. For his compositions Mailman has re- ceived the Edward Beniamen Award, Bir- mingham Festival, and ASCAP awards, and was selected by the Ford Foundation for their Composers in Residence Proiect. During Mailman's visit, he conducted several clinics. On the first day, he worked with the A8il Symphonic Band. The next day he spoke to the music the- ory classes and presented a lecture to faculty and students. ,zo Top: Dr. T. Pierson, music department chairman, discusses one of Bach's pieces with Dr. Mailman this yeur's guest composer. Bottom: Mailman conducted an hour and a half workshop with the band pertainirig to "Com prehensive Musicianship," ii, lllIQlllllillSlQCOlJlllll USOOQHQWS ff Anime- , l . 1 ' -Q .. ,Iva ,s wr vii? Top: H' present ol the F f I . li fi if S' ky... rear's Com- l 'l Top: Harassed parents argue with a reluctant bride in a modern day comedy, "Plaza Suite," which was presented during the Fine Arts Festival. Middle: The senior Art Exhibit was presented during the second week of the Festival. Bottom: Many different aspects were expressed in the works displayed in the gallery. l-1. . .Ai Three departments present 77th Annual Fine Arts Festival The Departments of Speech and Drama, Music, and Art ioin together each year to present the Fine Arts Festival. The Art Department held an exhibition April 24 through 28 in the Art Gallery of works by James Harris and Steven Mon- cus. A reception and discussion was led by the two artists. May l-5 was the ex- hibition of the senior art students. The Music Department held several lectures with the guest composer Dr. Martin Mailman. An opera, "The Good Soldier Schweik," was directed by Robert Scott of the music faculty. Several con- certs were held including the Faculty Re- cital, Honor Student Recital, Student Composition Concert Contest, and the Brass Choir and Percussion Ensemble Concert. ln addition, Dr. Jan Drath, music fac- ulty member, was heard in a piano re- cital, a concert of small ensembles was presented, the concert choir performed with the A8tl Symphonic Band following the next night drawing the Festival to a close. The Drama department took part in the Festival by their presentation of a play, "Plaza Suite," by Neil Simon. The play was held April 24-29 in the Little Theater. During this year's Festival, the Artist Course Series presented three films in the art gallery. They were "The Seventh Seal" by Ingar Bergman, "Ashes, and Diamonds" by Andrei Waida, and "Juliet of the Spirits" by Federico Fellini. 107 ,.- 4 1 wr' 3 - 1: 4 .. .' L 5 . .f ,,, :, ,ggi . 5 1 1 Q, nn, Q ,n,-. " 5 ..,'. ,v' ,Q -, ,, 1Q. ullftl-lr' ,. . '1,1'x Sleep of Prisoners - Rod Grayson lAdaml helplessly watches Cane kill Able as God prevents him from interrupting the fight. The Fanfasfiks - Matt and Luisa lRay Clark and Robin Howardl make plans and wishes for their make-believe world. X f X 0 White Rabbit seen by 8,000 children in Jones Auditorium Top right: Plaza Suite - Borden Eisler Uoe Tre- vinol persuades the reluctant Mimsey Hubley lPolly Fosterl that she should marry him. Right: Alice in Wonderland - More than 8,000 children came to this year's Annual Children's Play in which they saw the White Rabbit in his hurry to get to the Queen's Croquet game on time. Alice lVicky Bondi looks on enchantedly as the White Rabbit Uay Brownl franti- cally looks for his rabbit hole. Bottom: Romulus The Great - Achilles lBarry Hoffl and Pyramus lSteve Wallacel enioy breakfast while waiting for the last Emperor of Rome, Romulus the Great. Romulus has decided that Rome is not worth saving, and that he will let it fall under the invasion of the Goths. 1 " 1' er' .142-ff 5 V, , f 'ff R 7 ,757 M .n 'bg ak W' In '4 'Um Q -xx Victor Borge show packs Jones with night of laughter Top left: Victor Borge performed his satirical iokes and humorous stories to a full house of apprecia- tive spectators. He also displayed some of his pi- ano skillsf but, as always, he never completed a piece without a joke here and there. Bottom left: The well-known Dorian Woodwind Quintet per- formed a concert in the recital hall of the Music Building. Bottom: "Orpheus and the Underworld" was a comic operetta written in the 1870's by Of- fenbach. The operetta was performed in Jones Au- ditorium by the Canadian National Opera Singers. X Q ,t'-' Wi"mf?e Mm Ill l Stan Kenton packs Jones with sounds of stimulating jazz .-To Be Young, Gifted and Black" is the story of author, Lorraine Hansberry, beginning with her early child. hood in the Chicago ghetto. ln two nights, two very different bands packed Jones Auditorium where their vibrant beats could behecrd, Playing the first night was the well known Stan Kenton, who has remained a top iazz band lecderforoverill years. Kenton's band performed as the climax for this year's Stage Band Festival and during the daylln members of the band spoke in workshops on stage bond technique. Performing the second night wasagiwp well known in the hard rock media. They were "El Chicano," who also packed Jones Auditorium. Theirlypeol music - Mexican style rock. - . rvrhv-fqgrv--.. 1-qw? 12? child heard, rer 30 ry the group we Of ri? ' 5, if: rt V+-' 1 'C ',,, 4-.., . fi nj' QM :M I 2 Qf r N X5 X gist f 2 I Z ww if-lr X wQ R , YRXX 2 Two dance groups were on campus in the spring. One was the Modern Dance Group from Texas Woman's University. Bottom: The famed Jose Molina pres- ented Spanish dances with a number of other performers. Arfisf Course has two dance groups 9' D perform in spring QXI N- i i rf, ,, 1 il ,rr ,ir i i 1'- :hr iii ii' iw 1 1 ri li' r r it r, ii rr rl H ir fr V1 ri ri L i I, I I i ir ii I fi ,lr r 1 ri ,i r,. ri r i i i ii ii ir Ir is S I r I E i i i rr, Err rw fit? All 'K A v-K I l W WWW ,,,, 7, , f 1,7 145--f.-:M 3: f-. QM, ,,,., ., L, ,,-,.,, M.- ' ,pie-. -4" - N5 Ulf ,752 ? . ,!, 4' 431 ' . - V: 35477 " 3 I ,ff M253 x tx l l ll A' A , mf e lf Ir" 'yvlf . . , VVY N. ny' .HV , jg, 1, Q 5'-'W A V Right: JOHN CURL is a senior moioring in educa- tion with fields of government and historyy govern- ment and history are the maiors of senior JOE STEWART. Top: ANADELIA GONZALES is a senior maioring in business administration, BUNNIE WEIS- MAN is a senior maioring in education with English and iournalism as specialized fieldsp electronic data processing is the maior of senior CAROL L. WEIS- MANg CELIA JASSO MUNOZ, senior, is a second- ary education maior with fields in English and Spanish. Y can 'A I 1 4 Di: plow: l ROGER tielrlt ll ,Mivn Distinguished Students .ROBERT E. PARKER, a senior, is moioring in general engineering, KAREN FLOYD is a iunior elementary education maiory ROBINSON is a biology graduate student. Bottom: Secondary education is the maior of DAVID M. KEMP, with his ld in history and governmenty JOHN GLOCK is a senior secondary education maiorg accounting is the maior of senior REVIN MlGURAp BEBE CROOKS is a senior psychology-sociology maior. " P1 vo ng: A' -le' I l 1 l 1 4 i l l l t l l l I I 1 l 5 l u E X i 5 1 F 5 X N s 9 E ,Y.,,,.f' fe' l if Q ka :le .it if , .war , fflff' R".- iff wk N, if K Nga' is l 1 Left: Secondary education is the maior of senior MARGARET WAGNER with her fields in H.P.E. and speechy LINDA RAY is a senior elementary education maiori elementary education is also the major of senior ADELINE PHILLIPS. Bottom: Business finance is the moior of senior CARL CODYf secondary educa- tion is the maior of CONNIE SAATHOFF, iunior, with her fields in business and mathp SUZANNE HEINS is a senior English and history maior. Sociology is the maior of senior LINDSAY F. ZAPATA. f 1 S 4' 1' . 71 Top: FLOYD GOODWIN is o senior with maiors in H.P.E. and history. Right: Electrical engineering is the field of senior TOMMY ARGUBRIGHTp CHARLES GRAVIS is a senior physics maiory SUSAN KOE- NIG, senior, is o secondary education maior with fields in biology and math. ,f-- J Z ' if l, ' M, 1 L P T' X - "MW ff I fx ' A 'Q a wi' 'f Q ref , V4 ,. f ' f' it 4,7 L 1 ' I ,Q ,. K 5, gy '.'. 'i f-113 i 1 f cfs!!-L as Y 4, f Y r . , - ,. L. is.. li ' 13 l f 1 gli? vp., 11.415, , 3 , sms Q55 H171 E-'af Xyf rt' Efiffiiii i ' muses LT . li 13'-' Geography and math are the maiors of RUTH BAJZA, a senior, JlM PICQUET is a senior in secondary educu 5 tion with his maior in industrial arts, NATALIE PICQUET is c: senior secondary education major with lieldsin A English and historyg GLENN PICQUET is o senior in natural gas engineering, GARY HlTZFELDERisasenior L' electrical engineer. IZJI, 'f"'F'VY fa-we Ax,-c- ., , 4 IA, V . 1 ,vf 1"- T.. 'S Xl, .'X 1 JW lfll . f V, 5-iff Nvlif, ,Q M ,Z4 1 ,i,jfff' .. W6 W 'A'f ' -.. .ff Q Nj ' . , . ,fu r 3 If ,gf .fflwyifff Wo, f , ' ' , ll-hz, , ' in -f 1 L Q ! A' 1 N, , , 4' f fx ,1. I M D 2 ,.,, ,MI Q yr l W. . - , qv f" i:j:pf7"" gay- E, , t N Q! '--ma. L. cw 5 . ,ff-:il A aw.. 4 iv, ffl ws. ....,....,...c. .l lx 'F- ffr.. L '- a ,Q 1-Nungqeawvw... - -.1 :.L....s.L...4.. . ...Adi - 1 J "' Y-........-..-..A. L ,, , "-W , ' 1, if Top: ROYCE L. FELDER is o iunior agriculture eco- nomics maior. General business is the maior of sen- ior ANNE SMITH. FERNANDO GONZALEZ is a senior physics maior. Bottom: CAROL ANN BESEDA is o graduate student in psychology and guidance counseling. Music education is the field of senior DAVID WILBURN. JANET HANSEN is o iunior math maior. Disfinguished Sfuden fs 9 Distinguished Sfuden fs F7 Y ' -W ' M1257 dw 1 X , I' 59' '94 2 i i' ,pr 8 - - , s. ". ll' . 1 Top: CHRISTOPHER G. DELCAMBRE is a senior business finance maior. Bottom: SUSAN BALLARD isasenioi secondary education maior with fields in English and history, LOU ANN ALTWEIN is a senior secondary educu' tion maior, working in the fields of English and iournalismg JANIS WILSON is a senior elementary education mcior. Standing are JANE DODDS, senior business management maiorg ABEI. LOPEZ, senior general business maiorg and CHRISTOPHER MAISEL, business management major. :qu 'Rm "Yes ., A I I YJ Q. -'Q 1 , an Top: Junior AUSTIN CLARY is maioring in math, SHERRY BURGESON is a senior education maior with her field in Englishg elementary education ma- ior CIDELIA VILLA is a iunior with her field in Span- ishp DUNCAN GRAVIS is a senior physics maior. Bottom: Secondary education is the maior of KAREN HALL, iunior, with her fields in speech and dramap EDITH GEORGE is a secondary education maior with her fields in speech and math. " f W I ,ll 4 , f X I. 1 l " A f M' 72 3 ,lf ,aff if Ml l 3, V, a V' i 44 , u 3 Y N 'XX v.vM,..-.wxww ,f X f f .Jw f f, ,gig -im,- ? A 1i 5 fn- l V X is s fm 1"""i"Qvv VX- Top: Math and English are the maiors of ELVA IRIS RAMIREZ, a senior, FERDINAND SIMON is a iunior who is maioring in general business administrationg JANICE JOHNSON is an elementary education ma- ior with her field in English. Bottom: BETTY ALEX- ANDER is doing her graduate work in guidance and counselingy secondary education is the maior of senior SCOTT SLAUGHTERf JAN WALLACE is a junior majoring in elementary education. Texas A841 RCTC has two barbeqU9Si is much inspected 'W-Km 'An 'fi . , 'ww ' x aux? - 1.Q.?'i5:! , X Gvw ',.-'M, V A .- F ,f jj: 3 ,Y J, . , , 1 iyxller- 1 X. x- f.. ggi , z , ,' s ' lg, ' ' A f"-' '- . V. ,ws-1 , , ,gi X J Q I Q , 1 ' ,i in 9 M . -All l l :X , I ' -,4 , " f A -,lf N , 5' X ' ,, 4. ,f . ,. ., ,1 . els V"- i .., ,, . I .4 6: . --. i l J, , 1 I V . -X I, J J, I A 1 4 5 A ' 'M ' ., J., if 11' " M . .Q ,Tx R sd 4 Lf .' '33, ' .. A 'he' v,-- 1- f 'E ' " V -dr, H ,..lllJL , , f . w".'fr ft 9 l 543.9 . 1 Top left: Sgt. Maior John Beckham watches Ton at the December ROTC commissionings. Top right: President Jernigan swore in cadets Carl Acevedo, William Gee, Maurice Giese, Ton John Lawrance, Nicefore Mendoza, and Raul Prado. Bottom left: Ricardo San: chez, of iunior platoon, went through trainin Richard Florez directing. Bottom right: During March Colonel Tutwiler, Inspector General, inspected the cadets along with student commande y Harder as he signs documents y Harder, Danny Jaloway g preparations for summer camp with r Ricardo Sanchez. A we -A..-HW xc-e 466' .-.-.--- - Y ,,.x f WWWWQH, ' ' , ' 3 ,ft ,pf ghew 7.,,,,f1fz, X sXff.:gf,. " " M Q ' Top: Lieutenant Colonel Donald Williams with ROTC cadets Tom Freund, Dennis Longbotham, Roque Garcia, and Ralph Williams who were awarded two year scholarships. Left: Taking a break from prepa- rations for the ROTC Homecoming Barbeque were President Jernigan, Maior John Evans, Colonel Pe- terson lex-professor of military sciencel, Maior Glendening and Lieutenant Colonel Williams, acting professor of military science. ul "L- . 4 -5 P'-7.-, kb 1 h Con'-P"7 ahsnm . . ' Ol'ver of AIP During the last spring drill for ROTC cadets all companies were inspected. Top. Keszpegts cadet Raip C reporting his unit ready for inspection to Eduardo Pena. Top right: Eduardo Pena , David i as Ke'th Ol' 6 5. Above. I Iver, unit commander, and Dennis Longbotham observe the Procedure inspected Bravo Company during the last inspection of the year. ln Top: the ri it i Inspection of companies held on last meeting day for ROTC Top: Rudy Miller and Joe King as they inspect Charlie Company. Bottom left: Band Company as it is inspected by Carlton Earhart. Bottom right: Richard Florez inspects the rifle of Junior Platoon cadet Jeff Kennedy. 127 ROTC Ladies selected fo repfesenl 'individual ROTC Compo ,' gr, 9 .W V ' r 73.14 I ' ' ,1 .- f ' N . ' ' 6375 fig, l :iff If 1 '9 a fix Y I x Q ' ,f ff x 1 sv. 4-.1 I , 41" Lg' f :Sify -69' qi ofa' 4 R 'v ""'c?' rio pl Ui' 915' W9 Q jr. ifw L na. Tl" Q -Lf' SMR if Nl-l .U gs l F!" Ar" A .. . 91. T.-sFa"-'.4-29-2 . 'ela Corond, ROTC company sweefhearis were Cindy Pulliam, Band Honorary Cadet Colonel, Edna Cavazos, Rifle Teamg Louise Peffy, AlPl'I0 Company' Gmc' Company: Virginia Carrillo, King's Riflesg and Kathy Smith, Charlie Company. j Frank Kl Norma Pulliamg Pam Bis My R1 iles for bi gg, . the i., I 1 at 1 , 1 ' A il 'u - 1 fi l 2 -4 1, lf. .5 4. if F-I t lv: ll' llfl t !.l HF. H g 1 sflgi' ' '-it sig' i r yi fl, r' 4 :li V lgzgji lr 3, 54" t und Sl Nd QMW Front: Kathy Smith, Dana Christenson, Margaret Jacques, Virginia Carrillo, Nancy Morgan. Row 2: Edna Cavazos, Graciella Rathmell, Dalies Fitzpatrick, Phyllis Stafford, Norma Trevino. Row 3: Louise Petty, Rita Moreno, Diane Gonzalez, Olympia Valdez, Lynn Harmon, Debra Coates. Row 4: Cynthia Ramos, Annette Matocha, Cindy Pulliam, Graciela Corona, Jo Ann Moody. Row 5: Karen Lemke, Joyce Skroborcek, Denise Daniel, Belinda Harville, Patricia Basham, Becky Rogers. Row 6: Nancy Smith, Pam Bishop, Katy Gregg, Rosanne Baldwin, Kathryn Baltruzak. Becky Rogers was Bravo Company Sweemean' Color Guard sweetheart was Carol Harris. 9 0 Residence law will go into effect beginning next fall Of the men's dorms this year, May Hall was closed all year due to lack of students, and Baugh Hall closed during the spring semester for plumbing repairs. The boys from Baugh Hall moved into Cousins. The only cafeteria open to the men's dorms was at Poteet. Next year a new residence law will go into effect concerning the students living off campus. All students enrolling for the first time next fall and thereafter, who are unmarried, under 21, and with less than 60 hours of credit, will be required to reside in university dormitories as long as space is available. All students resid- ing in university housing will be expected to remain in said housing throughout the school year if they continue in school. These new laws apply to both women's and men's dorms and are meant to elimi- nate empty dorm complexes. Social activity in the men's dorms was rather limited this year. Cousins and Po- teet Halls held Open House at Dad's Day and Christmas. The New Dorm also held an open house during Dad's Day. At Martin Hall the men sent flowers to any one from their dorm who was in the hospital. The men at Seale Hall got to- gether ot Christmas and the end of school, but without a lounge social activi- ties were very limited. Intramural sports between the dorms included football, basketball, baseball, tug-of-war, and volleyball. In their re- spective divisions, Martin placed second in basketball, New Dorm placed second in tug-of-war, and Seale placed second in volleyball. The athletes of Texas A81l reside at Poteet Hall and the Lodge which is lo- cated at the north end of Javelina Sta- dium. The men at Martin Hall purchased a football this year and are saving money to buy an ice machine next year. After their first television was stolen, the men in the New Dorm bought a new televi- sion. Dorm Mothers for the men's halls are Mrs. Thelma Rushing in Poteet, Mrs. Catherine Gray in the New Dorm, Mrs, Vivian Marshall at Seale Hall, Mrs, Marie Lindsay at Cousins, and Mrs. Jewel Cau- ley in Martin Hall. 7 i '- l nw r . T 7 QF. f 4, ax 3 N ssr . U A 4 5. 12 ww, , W if? V ,Z 7 mfff- gc., rf, I ' V, ., fa.-fp. " 1, - .atz ,fff nv-.L -1 :- QA Zi'-f f 1 A.-. gffgqm 5 , 'K 4-' .ff 4 Mfg 1' 1 gg if y'g1sP,M,: 0 f v ff,f.. TZ- , VH 'Nw ,p.ga,gg3 1,53 ' yi an 53215 My-My -, a'5" "'ffz5:2-w ,f , . -f f, , u,v,,,.., M2547 4' f fy f ,.,,,, Z Three dormitories eX,O6'ff9f7C9 Pfosf Cons of "no curfew" in its first year on campus The big news on women's dormitories this year was no curfew. The dorm con- stitutions in Lewis, Lynch, and Martin Halls were revised to meet the new rule. Dorm assistants thought the "no curfew" rule had its good and bad points. Stu- dents did not come in at the same time and make as much noise as when there was a curfew, and rules on late minutes were relaxed. However, since everyone was not re- quired to be in the dorms at any certain time, the dorm council found it difficult to hold successful meetings. Close relation- ships between students, and between stu- dents and dorm assistants became less common as a result of no curfew. Dorm mothers enjoy the no curfew because it leaves them more free time and elimi- nates a lot of the work that was once associated with late minutes and curfews. With the curfew eliminated, Security Guards watch the dorms from ll:0O p.m. to 7:00 a.m. All persons entering the dorm are required to present their identification cards. The New Dormitory Complex has a curfew, but the girls living there favor the restriction. The girls feel there is more time for studying and getting to know each other. There is also a generous lati- tude of late nights for "sign-ins." On the whole, the boys on the west side of the New Dorm observe the curfew voluntar- ily. Special occasions were observed by all the girls' dorms this year. The biggest event was Open House at Dad's Day, which was held by all the dorms. Re- freshments, coffee, and donuts consti- tuted the main social entertainment Lewis, Lynch, and the New Dorm held open house at Christmas. ln Lewis Hall, the boys were allowed to visit the rooms, in Martin Hall the girls held a Christmas party with refreshments, but did not have an open house. The graduating seniors qt Lewis and Lynch Halls were honored with a cookout and wienie roast. The seven- teen graduating seniors from Martin Hall, considered the sorority-fraternity hall, were treated to dinner at the Round Ta- ble lnn. Regular birthday observances were held at the New Dorm, and Lewis Hall had a big Sister-Little Sister Banquet in October. Some of the constitution revisions this year included new policies for electing dorm council members. At Lewis Hall the qualifications for president and vice-presi- dent dropped from a required iunior standing to a sophomore standing, and all other offices were opened to fresh- men. At Martin Hall the election of offi- cers has been changed so that all those qualified to hold office are selected by the dorm council and listed. The girls vote on those chosen by the retiring council. Other rule revisions included the ex- tended breakfast hours in all dorms by thirty minutes. The New Dorm voted to abolish the daily sign-out practice next fall. The dining hall at Lewis was opened as a study area from 7:00 p.m. to lO:0O p.m. Monday through Friday. Boys were allowed to study in the dining hall if ac- companied by a girl. A few other changes in the girls' dorms included a new color television for Lewis Hall, artificial flower arrangements for Martin Hall, and a rose garden at the New Dorm. No dorm could run smoothly without the everpresent Dorm Mothers. Mrs. Eliz- abeth McCall resides over Lewis Hall, Mrs. Naomi Carroway supervises Lynch Hall, Mrs. Edythe Dailey directs the wom- en's side of Martin Hall, and Mrs. Ellen Wade controls the east side of the New Dormitory complex. 3 f'- wwa. L7 it M., .1 K K, dy ..,, A J' 1 1 7 L E i n 'mile fving efer- fhe H185- ses- ester mry oms. muth- sets. and xsils, s oc. Juri- fried the way if-1 6 F! f ag K sqffw e . PM s ff 1 ' 'A A U gal .v , 1 Q 'ffsf u' rgdxiffw' ,m 4 lull'-fle in he i m V A ww.. - N X X 3 X J Vzggf Homecoming Queen C ynfhio Ramos 'Q . A Q D',s af' I I , 19 Ex-.AF s. ,?:g,.'.,lJ5' 1 , ,Z . "',V I' 755.112 rf, 4 me -"" Lf-Q A! Firsf Princess Second Princess Eva Anderson Judy Fowfer i,,,..ae-nnv"" P. Gp. if A gs? ' 7 sc, r ' 4 as c r . , '- ' X ' f P:3f.f'Z??75:g.7:.3':35'i'N'1':','I "A ,f ,K ,,, K 7 'I 3 cs, 2, s K in '.kV X X, if -Q. , af' 7 4 ! K , I Firsf Runner-Up Fgjg Vicki Haynes Second Runner-Up Debra Coafes f 1 . ,,.,.,y- figtlff fig V' 138 Q XF?-' ..e, .s Miss Summerflme Cheri Hays Irgzuq, .Q .I 11 R - V' 3" .., 'Nw . flibrf .g,.:g-'rf Islas-fx gran? A fin K1 if ig- Mg ' T.Z?- '1 i - . Eezzsf. " P tj: cz 4- 15- Q- ,- 'N' ,e ,.. , v ,L fsg..,'i-, - gf, Q rl ' '. - ,Q ,. , A -, ,., . Mix? 05 . . A xl .5 r' ff' ..,'3s..' -' 4-"', ,xx K .. y K . 5t?'.::-fl C .49 -41 SAK fi' - . 4. is be .w Feature twirlers Dinah Gillaspy lleftl and Pat Bas- ham lrightl dazzled the audience with their fire ba- ton routines during the halftime shows. Dinah per- formed on the student side while Pat was twirling on the press box side. This year's A8il twirlers were lfrontl feature twirlers Pat Basham and Dinah Gillaspy. Line twirlers Vicki Wag- oner, Marilyn Clark, Stephonie Dollery, and Gracie Rocha. A81 Twirlers if 19, 9 4 "Wi "za Z ng 1 0 Dana Nuckols showed up at 8 a.m. every morning to work as a printer in the Duplicating Office. Norman Jones was a photographer for the South Texan, El Rancho and University News Service. n :- .r .gp ST? Q mi , , ., xxx.: .. y,,'N-,s 4. V, ,.,r- -Y"3' ,,,:-.N-. Mx F ' n ' rf ,, av 4 a I .W iq. - ,'.Y..,, 2 i E 3... 'fs 9 in A Y. x x X X , :ks wigg -:g e awk 9 N--N .e e,ee Q was ss ,Q :L .gi .V Working students find 800 jobs in campus offices, services Working students are not an oddity on campuses today, and at A8rl over 800 are employed in part-time iobs at the Univer- sity. While most of them work at the traditional secretary, clerk, research or graduate assistant, there are a few employed in rather unusual positions such as welder, curb painter, dorm as- sistant, dispatcher, student nursery supervisor, lifeguard, printer, computer operator, apartment manager, and photographer. Applicants for all University iobs are required to present evi- dence of good health, character, personality, dependability, and cooperativeness. All students must have a grade point average of at least 2.00 on a minimum of twelve hours of work during the preceding semester or on all University work. Students must be enrolled for twelve hours in the regular sessions and no mini- mum hours are set during the summer sessions. Of the 800 students employed on campus this year, over 50 of them work in the library alone. The highest paid students are graduate research assistants at 33.50 an hour, and the minimum wage of 51.60 an hour is paid to clerks and other secretarial positions. Students may not work for more than twenty hours a week. The University participates in the Federal-Work-Study Program under Title l, Part C of Public Law 88-452, enacted by the 88th Congress. Work-Study provides that a full-time student from a low income family, who is in need of earnings from part-time work and who is in good academic standing, may be assigned to work for not more than fifteen hours each week. Campus Security provides employment for a number of students. Billy Kellner works as a welder, Jonathan Paulk as a curb painter and Kenneth Sapanter as a dispatcher. T March 22 campus elections held for nine top student leaa'ers l Campus elections to determine the nine top student leaders were set for March 22. Thus started the controversy that was not to end with l 1 elections. . The election date was set by Student Association President Bill Shan- - non, winners would take office in May and seven of nine would serve i 3 until May 1973. li Officers to be voted on were President and Vice President of the Student Association, Head Cheerleader, EI Rancho Editor, Editor of the I rx South Texan, and four Representatives-at-large to the Student Union 5 Governing board. ,llil After release of this information the campus political parties set out to ll 'x E ii' make their nominations. The parties backing candidates were Political ' Equality Party, PEP, Independent Student Party, ISP, and students run- l ning without any party affiliations. I ' On the day of elections nearly 2,000 students turned out to vote. This ll , was the largest student body turnout for an election in the history of ' T A8tI. fl The results of the election were that there would be a run-off between l -. Joel Solis and Juan Cantu for president of the student body. Mike il XX l E uf 'H ml Cofer, ISP candidate, won the vice presidency over his opponent Desi g l Martinez, PEP candidate. Arnold Burklow, ISP candidate, won over Juan 3 l Alfaro, PEP candidate, for head cheerleader. The most controversial position in the election was resolved by the l close of the elections. It was the position of the South Texan. The editor- or l ship had been under controversy since the resignation of Cecil Parker at HQ the beginning of the spring semester. Linda Garcia was elected editor lg I l over her two opponents, Lester Mallory and Hardy Bratton. li Kathy Smith, incumbent editor of the El Rancho, was re-elected over T 2 Deryl Holland. The four representatives elected were James Loftin, Stan v ' l ' Haun, Ken Browning, and James Duderstatt. An April run-off election for President of the Student Body resulted with Juan Cantu winning over Joel Solis. The elections were contested for three different reasons. One was on the grounds that signs had been stolen from candidate Hardy Bratton who was running for South Texan Editor. The other complaints were by E I Lester D. Mallory Jr. who stated that a ballot was taken from the poll- I I ing area and that Linda Garcia violated the constitution of PEP by run- ll t ning on their ballot. The A8rl Supreme Court turned all the contestings I V , down and the new officers took their positions. ll l 'lid li li: il i' T 1 il i : L, lf, 1-1? i. l i 5 X li i V Y i - . l, l 1 l 1 i ii ll i it l it 1 i . A ti 'I42 l N., tiv, 'I43 , W5 ,na 2 s 5 5 JE Rig 415 N VM HE AE ml wi fm U Wir' fc l V in 15 1-1 , A wkv4z..w-vm:..: . Am: F1 5 E se E 51 fi Ss .x H B, 2 4 A 5 E -V A r w i 44 I ll.-. , 1 - - ,Tn l l Top: During Aggie Round-up a barbeque was held at Mesquite Grove where the "Aggie of the Year" was named. Aggie Club members had spent the better part ofthe day barbecuing beef. Below: Bill Pugh was named "Aggie of the Year." Right: Nominees for "Aggie of the Year" were Bill Pugh, Denny Moore, Travis Miller, Allan Jamison, and Will Bates. ' 'iii , l tf A 4 'rf ,rl"1 , ,, fn. till .3 Y rf A 1 flal-A rj I l, iw 'offs' LII e P'l 1 If lop: Dr- KI rodeo Pluying. I ffxxfxll . .-Xi ' li f .4 i l . if I I V . Xtll xllll l I1 ittliliwll gifll' it l I ll ii. . .A .X -.W un! . N . ' Q Y, 4 ,rl 1 l 1 , .ft A . 'i 'wif r 1--:.-e 55' ' Sl l of the Allan .lf ,ll 'i r r If I V, ,. 43rd Annual Aggie Round-up, Dr. Howe l retires, Bill Pugh is "Aggie of the Year" A Former agriculture students at Texas A8tI University returned to the campus to ioin pres- ent students and faculty for the 43rd Aggie Round-up. Round-up started off with a retirement ban- quet for Dr. John W. Howe, Dean Emeritus of the School of Agriculture. The banquet was held in the New Dormitory dining room. The 10th annual "Aggie of the Year" award was presented at a barbeque at Mes- quite Grove. The Agriculture Student of the year was chosen by the agriculture student body and faculty. Bill Pugh, a iunior from George West, was the winner of the "Aggie of the year." Other nominees were Will C. Bates, a senior from Beeville, Allan K. Jamison, a senior from Cor- pus Christi, Travis Miller, a senior from Rob- stown, and Denny Moore, a senior from De- vine. Other events were the National Intercolle- giate Rodeo Association competition held Thursday and Friday at the Northway Exposi- tion Center, a reception for alumni at the Hol- iday lnn and a dance at Dick Kleberg Park with Gary Davis and the Rounders playing. , . 1 , ,. W f if 4 'f 4,5 mf-gf g .7 , ,v egg I ,H ' 3 . f ,., 1 , I ,, , fM,ff..,,,W.,,, .J4..,f...f.-..,.f.f.f,MW,4 , ff , X !"f' ' if f fm.. -- 2 ,A 'Y .f,'. ,,L.:.,:, .f-.L , Wflfm- fwwwwwwww f I f j ,, f. , . KE 1 , A W " -f ',,f I-iw,ffmw.ffgf.,.7W,m-,LQ.-1-fefW.2.4f:,iM1 www!-Awwyu..2Wm.,,g,,.,.ff,f, :fjg-f -I 1 -2 'f I .. Mw4y.Wf.W.,.M..fW,w.A-f.-WW4i-wM- -4fWwfffWW,f44fQ,Mf,.M47,MW Eg ' L--.131 , 4 'l'KU'!'JyW 'ugjifv A "5 'f'f0W"??''VfwffwvzffhwwffwuV4-wffffwfwfwff -' .,3- Iffffz-fafwfwywxwwlwffWWWfuf.,,,,,.-fu.,.,.,.,.,,f,., iw.: - - V 'T . i'f'fY7Ti7', ., - 1f"'111v"f'-" V. 'Q "' 5"'CM'QW " "'WWwv4Yi'1Mfif mfamwmnffwwfffwff if . .0 t g ,i , -'-' ' if ' ' ' i, -, v 4, , ,Q A - -' ' .- . Q- .. ' .J ,. 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' B b . M'ddle: During Aggie Round-up Week g0::dDr. John W. Howe, retiring former Dean of the School of Agriculture, received at silnviz tgayiocxclhilgteilclugteofigczf KZb::gUiark'wHh Gary Davis and the Rounders I 00 was held at the Northway Exposition Hall at Kleberg Park. Above: The as nig P Uylng, 145 1 . if E E is 5 5' E 5 '51 -l il ll iz: ia- .ra i , 4 is 'E la ll! 1.1 1? li l -. mdk:- Q 5 r 1 ' F4 .nbkbwl ' ' 1 xv.':S2awlv,m.zf znsimarl wh-mg, 1-, Q iv,w,m':r5f5-X 'Ima-miiydikirmxxwa fe, -v 'i l l l l l l "i l . First annual Engineer's Wee k held at A811 en ineers to honor St. Patrick patron of g The week of March 13-18 was the first annual Engineer's Week at A8il. A num- ber of events were scheduled as the en- gineering students at Texas A8il ioined students at many other engineering schools across the nation in honoring St. Patrick, the adopted patron of all engi- neers. All engineering faculty, students, and their families attended the festivities. The color for the week was green and the newly formed student chapter of ASME lAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineersl sold both green derbys and green top hats that were worn by engi- neering students during Engineer's Week. The week started with a bang on Mon- day night when the Campus Society of Chemical Engineerssponsored a demon- stration on "Hazards of Flammable Li- quids" by J. D. Cantrell of Celanese. On Tuesday night ASME held a meet- ing with guest speaker David Breedlove of CPL, who spoke on "Power Plants." The AIME lAmerican Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineersl student club featured a five-speaker panel from the Petroleum Equipment Sup- pliers Association on Wednesday night, d and they discussed the "Challenge an E lo ment Opportunities for Engineers mp Y . in the Petroleum and Oilfield Equipment lndustries." Students got into the act on Thursday night when the IEEE llnstitute of Electrical and Electronic Engineersl student chapter sponsored presentations by three differ- ent electrical engineering student groups. Refreshments and a social hour followed each meeting. The highlight of the week's activities was the annual Engineering Barbeque, sponsored by the honorary fraternity, Sigma Tau on Saturday, March 18, at Mesquite Grove. The five engineering student organizations competed in organ- ized sports for the first Annual Champi- onship Trophy which was awarded to the student club placing highest in the follow- ing events: slow-pitching, kite flying lboth smallest and largest kitel, and paper air- plane flying lboth longest distance trav- eled and the longest time in the air.l AIME carried home the trophy. 6 I' ve if a. 32,1 A J? Q. 1 , V f 11 . Y ,. ws' by , fi f if 1. 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Q - , 7977 A81 Javelinas Front: Fred Kapser, lVLg David Hopkins, 2VL, Claude McMillon, 3VL, Larry Edwards, 3VL, Floyd Goodwin, 2VL, Bernard Bancroft, IVL, Allen Kaiser, 2VL, Levi Johnson, 2VL, Robert Hubenak, 2VL, Curtiss Neal, 3VL, Eldridge Small, 3VL. Row 2: Paul Ordner, Robert Rodriguez, IVL, Toby Chadick, IVL, Frank Ratka, Johnny Jackson, lVl1 Tom Morton,' IVL, Charles Lee, IVL, Armando Gonzalez, Clarence Alberts, IVL, Don Hardeman, Robert Brooks, Al Shuford. Row 3: Charles Grigg, Mike.CllQYfi9Yf Marion Danna, IVL, Sammy Montgomery, Jim Gandy, Mike Wendel, IVL, Doug Jones, Francis Fries, IVL, Jim Krempin, Richard Chapman, Harold Jackson, Willie Glpson. Row 4: Danny Vasquez, Byron Shaw, Carl Mulkey, Robert Trigg, Richard Gilstrap, Danny Gutierrez,'Robert Skrobarczyk, Sam Aldrich, Mike Mclean, Raymond FGFHGH' dez, David Krebs. Row 5: D. J. Smith, Ronnie Hi inbotham Hen Glenn 2VL- Jerald Ta lor Garland Nelson Dou Herzik, Gr Hanley, Jerry Janik, Mlke Meulh, Ruford Ernest 99 I VY 1 1 Y I 1 9 99 VL. Kg: ., .g-,M x DY . 9. '- ' 'R Wai 5' "' Bw .M 1' 5 sm- --... -.big I lnivqrhdwgs X awry. X 5- W 5 Nl xl. 5 I 'N r 5 -Ls, . ,uh mey :son non I ,1-pf -- '!f.. 'Z if ki ,,g 944 41,5 H 'ia .'?'?"4- Slit., ' 1421, xx ii 1 ami i lim' X Left: Gil Steinke head coach of the Texas A81I Jave- lina football team. Bottom: Team captains for the 1971 A81l Javelina team were front: Claude Mc- Millon, Floyd Goodwin. Back: Allen Kaiser, Eldridge Small, Curtis Neal. ll? lg 'S fa li li A.. ,Q l l 1 l it H: E ii 5 9 . 'IWA Wk 'fu 1Yb.'?Q9!Jl!','LJ-33'i!uIA" .i 1 l l l i i l l l 4 1 l ?-I fi Fwfball '71 Exuberance . . .pain. . . anger . . . are all part of the game, the football game. With students back in the routine of classes there is now one predominating concern. Football season is about to open. Students are asking, "How will we do?" "Will we be as good as last year?" These are questions that can only be answered as the last helmet is put away and the season comes to a close. There are ten games facing the Javeli- nas and a NAIA championship title to defend. How will they do? ls the question that lingers on the minds of the students at A8tl. , ,,,.t , . ,T If f ,.,,y all .,, ,xg MWA, 2 I 5 s bs 2 .l J 7 v 1 . ' fx 1 3, ,:5A X -45' 1,-ju? ' 'Mr 1 5 5 ' f f4 Q , ' Q 'f 4 .", ",,. ' " y,'m,.,, Wi' W -aff? ag 1 , ,, 4. , .A ,,,, 1' X, , , Q I- Vlfy 3 My , ,. .15 - 1. f 1 2- ig. 1 44 'f 1 - -' 7 V. , ' E e ,S 15 S 12 E3 5 R R Z 5? 5. fl 'E 2' 6liHNSL9HiFJ.Wa5C ng: -3 ..a f 15256: 'f.9E':T3'1b "fzJ'J- IRL i5':3','5LiE?-f4L33'XliiI1B,'-24R?i4W:6??ib!ifrWZl',Z'2V WA. 'L fi. 4 x 4 Javelinas start 7971 football season against Trinity in San Antonio The Javelinas started the 1971 season with an NAIA Championship title to de- fend. The first game of the season was in San Antonio against the Trinity Tigers. A crowd of 8,630, the largest to see a Trin- ity home game since 1961, turned out to watch the Javelinas and Tigers battle it out The Javelinas lost to Trinity for the First time in 11 games in the 1971 opener in San Antonio's Alamo Stadium. A8:l threatened first as it moved to the Tiger nine-yard line, only to have the drive stopped by an interception. Trinity took a 7-0 lead with 26 seconds left in the first period. But A8:l tied the score midway in the second quarter when quarterback Desi Naiera found flanker Jerrald Taylor with a 66-yard bomb. Armando Gonzalez kicked the extra point. The Javelinas took a 10-7 lead with 11 seconds left in the half when Gonza- lez kicked a 22-yard field goal. Late in the third quarter, the Javelinas stopped the Tigers on four plays at the A8:l four-yard line. ln an attempt to get out of the hole, the Javelinas gave up a safety, making it 10-9, A8:l, with 23 sec- onds Ieft in the third period. Trinity marched 70 yards for its win- ning touchdown in the fourth period, scoring from the three-yard line with five minutes remaining. A8:l reached the Trin- ity 15-yard line in the closing seconds, but failed to score. A8:l opened its Lone Star Conference campaign with a 37-3 victory over Mc- Murry in Corpus Christi's Buccanneer Sta- dium. The only points in the first half came on a field goal by McMurry, giving the Indians a 3-0 halftime edge. But the Javelinas struck early in the third quarter to begin a scoring barrage. Henry Glenn scored from two yards Quf and Armando Gonzalez converted to make it 7-3 with only a few minufes lapsed in the third quarter. Later in the period, Don Hardeman scored from the one, and Gonzalez converted again to make it 14-3. Still in the third quarter, Glenn set up a touchdown with a 38- yard run, and Harold Jackson carried in from one yard out. Gonzalez kicked to make it 21-3. Levi Johnson intercepted an Indian pass and returned it 37 yards for the first touchdown of the final period, increasing the lead to 27-3. Gonzalez added a 28- yard field goal two minutes later to make it 30-3, and the final touchdown came on a 44-yard pass from Doug Jones to .lerrald Taylor. Gonzalez converted for the final point. The Javelinas opened their home sea- son with a 22-21 victory over Stephen F. Austin before 12,300 fans in Javelina Stadium. After a scoreless first period, SFA took the lead with 6:31 left in the second pe- riod and held a 7-0 halftime lead. A8:l scored first with 4:13 left in the third quarter when Henry Glenn scored from the two-yard line. The extra point failed. The Lumberiacks struck again late in the quarter and increased their margin to 14-6. But the Javelinas tied the score on a six-yard touchdown by Clarence Al- berts and a two-point conversion on a pass from Desi Naiera to Eldridge Small with 14:29 left in the game- SFA fought back to score with lom. utes left and moved ahead 21.141 got its winning touchdown with 6.45 showing after Richard Gilstrap recoveled an SFA fumble at the Lumberiaqk 20. yard line. Marion Danna passed toler- rald Taylor in the end zone for 16 yards and Naiera again passed to Small fo: the two-point conversion that furnished the victory margin. A811 pleased a Dad's Day crowd of 13,300 with a 16-10 victory over E651 Texas State. East Texas struck first witha field goal with 10:43 remaining in the first period and maintained its margin throughout the opening quarter. But A8rl scored with 9:08 left in the second quar- ter when Marion Danna passed to.El- dridge Small for 30 yards. Armando Gonzalez kicked to give A8:l the lead 7- 3. A8:l widened the margin with 4:30lelt in the first' half when Danna passed to Jerrald Taylor for 27 yards. The conver- sion was wide and the Javelinas tooka 13-3 into the dressing room at halftime. The Javelinas concluded their scoring in the third period when Gonzalez kicked a 30-yard field goal. East Texas got its final touchdown will 7:15 left in the game for the final 16-10 count Tl to 9 coml loft' Al ter I fumll Glen mann Th other Dann Smvl kicke Ear nas I field score Sul the hi A8- 3:33 passe conve Ear concll wma for Al lor a versior Milr down lrickea A I annua lavelir gelo t lavelir. An, Frankl lor q vin ll min. - A8tl 6:45 vered 1 20 D Jer- rllrds, ill for fished rd ol East vith a n the rcrgin tA8tI quor- to El- lando ad 7- 10 left ed to unver- :ok a me. :oring ticked 1 with I6-I0 The Javelinas traveled to West Texas Sul Ross in the Lobos' home- coming game, and captured a 38-14 vic- to 609099 tory. n A8-l scored in the opening minutes af- Curtiss Neal recovered a Sul Ross fumble at the Lobo six-yard line. Henry Glenn scored on the first play and Ar- mando Gonzalez converted. The Javelinas drove 71 yards for an- other touchdown seconds later. Marion ter Danna passed 13 yards to Eldridge Small for the touchdown and Gonzalez kicked g0OCl- Early in the second quarter, the Javeli- nas tacked on three points on a 37-yard field goal by Gonzalez, extending the score to l7-0. Sul Ross scored with 12 seconds left in the half to make it 17-7 at halftime. A8il's next points were registered with 3:33 left in the third quarter. Danna passed 14 yards to Small and Gonzalez converted. Early in the fourth quarter, Sul Ross concluded its scoring with a touchdown to make it 24-14. But Allen Kaiser iced it for A8tl on a 59-yard interception return fora touchdown, and Gonzalez's con- version made it 31-14. Mike Wendel scored the final touch- down on a three-yard run and Gonzalez kicked good. A crowd of 14,500 witnessed A8tI's annual homecoming game and saw the Javelinas defeat Angelo State, 13-7. An- gelo had been the only team to beat the Javelinas the previous year. Angelo scored first when Charley Franklin returned an A811 punt 87 yards for a touchdown. This was midway in the first period. A811 marched back and scored before end of the quarter. Marion Danna the scrambled and then hit Jerrald Taylor on an 84'Y0fd pass and run play. Armando Gonzalez converted to make it 7-7. kullte Javelinas turned to Gonzalez's 'Clilfta for the remaining points. The TamPIco, Mexico, senior kicked a 41- Yard goal with 7:30 left in the second mane' Und. that proved enough for the 24'l9Y Javelina defense. But he added a F Yard 90al rn the fourth period for the 'nal l3-7 count. The Javelinas had to fight off a deter- mined Tarleton State team before escap- ing with a 13-7 victory in Stephenville. A8tl scored on its first possession. Mar- ion Danna passed to Eldridge Small for 12 yards and the score, and Armando Gonzalez kicked the extra point. On the first play of the second quar- ter, Levi Johnson returned a Texan punt 73 yards for a touchdown, but a penalty nullified the play. The Javelinas had the 7-0 count at halftime. A8.l marched 73 yards for a touch- down in the third quarter, the points coming on a two-yard run by Clarence Alberts. The conversion failed and it was 13-0, A8tl. Tarleton got its lone touchdown early in the fourth quarter. A8tl again had to turn to place-kicker Armando Gonzalez for the victory mar- gin as the Javelinas defeated Sam Hous- ton, 10-7, in Huntsville. A8tl scored on its first possession, only to have the 11-yard touchdown from Mike Wendel to Jerrold Taylor called back. The first period ended scoreless. Late in the second period, both teams struck for touchdowns. A8tl's came first as Clarence Alberts went over from one yard out. Gonzalez converted. Seconds later, Sam Houston scored and it was 7- 7 at halftime. Gonzalez got his winning field goal with 8:32 left in the third quarter. He carried for 32 yards. Later in the quarter, the Javelinas had their second touchdown called back when Marion Danna threw to Eldridge Small. Howard Payne spoiled a Band Day celebration for Texas A8tl before 15,000 fans in Javelina Stadium by defeating the Javelinas, 20-14. After a scoreless first quarter, A8tl got on the scoreboard early in the second period when Levi Johnson returned a punt 42 yards and a score. Armando Gonzalez kicked the extra point. Howard Payne picked up a safety sec- onds later, and then added a field goal midway in the second period to make it 7-5, A8tl. Howard Payne scored less than two minutes later for a 12-7 lead, and held the margin at halftime. The last game of the season drew to a close with Southwest Texas State Univer- sity defeating the Javelinas during the last few seconds, 29-24. A8tl scored first with a 27 yard field goal kicked by Armando Gonzalez with 8:54 remaining in the first period. A8tl hit again during the last minutes of the quar- ter when Marion Danna ran across from the one yard line to make the score 10- O. The first quarter was concluded with San Marcos making a touchdown with the clock showing nine seconds in the first half making the score 10-7. San Marcos stormed back during the third quarter to take the lead, 14-10. A8.l took over the lead when Henry Glenn swept around left end for four yards to make the score 17-14. A8tl struck again with 9:05 left in the fourth quarter. Again Glenn made the score running in from seven yards out. Ten plays later San Marcos went over the middle to make the score 24-22. With 23 seconds left in the fourth quarter San Marcos made the final score. The final score of the game showed San Marcos victorious, 29-24. 155 V l it A A MTA 04:3 l ,. rl lr ll 4 rl r l gc S F2 ?i 5. 35 r., ' "31f52.:' MQ: Y' 45555. XYEQRPPLEWZSZXQWZWHWWBHN if Wd: .0 I.. 4 ,r.'E:,T"5m. Eight former ASI Javelina sports figures inducted into first Athletic Hall of Fame Highlighting the A8LI Athletic Awards Banquet this year was the induction of eight former Javelina sports figures into the first A8tI Athletic Hall of Fame. The inductees were Don Hightower, Stuart Clarkson, Johnny McNabb, John Mark Dixon, Dr. Robert Martin Hodgkiss, W. L. Harbin, Robert Rich, and A8tl coach Gil Steinke. , Eldridge Small, All-America and recent number one draft choice for the New York Giants, was among four Javelina players to receive individual awards at the banquet Levi Johnson lumor safety was named the most valuable defensive player Ben nard Bancroft linebacker was named most dedicated player These three awards were voted on and chosen by the players themselves. Floyd Goodwin, iun- ior center, was chosen as best blocker. This award was determined by reviewing the season's films and the blocking aver- ages of the players. Curtiss Neal, defensive tackle, was voted to receive the Oliver-Mido award for maintaining the highest gpa during his college career. The event honored the 1971 Javelina football team and all the members of the squad were recognized along with the All American All LSC and All Texas Col lege honorees on the roster Bob Tucker, sports director of KIII TV In Corpus Christi served as master of ceremonies ' Q.. 3 Ls rwgg E 1 '15, TOP Eldridge Small AllA merlca was among four Javelina players to receive individual awards at the AGI Athletic Awards Ban t C :Ea Sag? figures were named to the first A8tl Allhlljtic l-TghebfEf?:lf1:doThl2L lljve ac I Stemke A8tl head coach W L Harbin Johnn ere Y McNabb J h DaxonadRbtRh5 onM0"k b n o er IC eated Mrs Don Hightower accepting for her late hug and Mrs Robert Hodgklss accepting for he I t h b son accepting for her late brother Stuart Clarlllsotfle Us and and Loulse Clark 'inn- 1 ls i The 7 race ., . 5 is-6-tg iiiii 4, The l97l Texas A8-I Cheerleaders were David Ross, Debby Evans, David Sengelmann, Laura Livingston, Margaret Wagner lhead cheerleaderl, Doug Schueneman, Sandie Gracey, and Juan Alfaro. DehbY Eva se '15, David Ross, Juan Alfaro, and David ngel Non. mon lake a break t o talk and watch the a Cheerleaders help support football feam during season The A8ll cheerleaders helped to spark the Javelina football team through an- other season. The success of a football team depends largely on the eight men and women who urge fans to yell during the games for the Hoggies. The task of being a cheerleader does not only require becoming hoarse before the stands, traveling great distances, but it also demands much time and dedica- tion during the week. Posters are put up, pep rallies are held, and practice ses- sions are scheduled to learn new yells. 157 it T5 is N in TE it E T E 5 S a lg F ii, Tl ,Ei tg, 1. 4 lg K 'I N f A i a 3 Q Q EJ 2 FS7fQ!."l.' WHA ' 2225353 :ERx1Ii'AWK??LY Lfffffp.. dis in '3BYWi!'i'f!553"'AivLf!' gf. is T Basketball l 1, Top: Don Hagany, guard, brings the ball in to help set-up a score for the Hoggies. Top right: Penalties against the Howard Payne coach for unsportsmanlike conduct helped the Hoggies win 110-101. Boftom leff: Wayne Johnson recovers a rebound for the Hoggies as Al Nickerson looks on. Boffom right: Wayne Johnson iumps high to try to get control of the ball for ASLI. 1 . ' 4 fgzizfififiizirgifjr I222SE:Rffififfi''SESSEE15,222--1-zlfiffif:2'-"1'-"I,52:.if1"ei'f-f"f'1'-ff-'21f.1'::s:1--N... 1 .... , H , A lv N 3 . Q S i 44 6 ., , x+ 2 F X- 9 AF ' s O Y' El.- 1 -1 'H -4-c is 1 f X K 7 , A lu' ,- .s 5 li A ' ' 1 .. il x l -W 1 -1 1 , , Q 1 6 L' K w i lk .bl '-' , - ,F A l di, 7 P xl , Y . . , ' , 1 . JI' l 'ig s ...N , l. I f -, ll l -fi ,Vi J v x 1 f fi ' I 1 5 N X -XJ ,f l ll w,4,,,Q X W, ' ,fnfw I , ,WLWXM , -ff me , mg , ' . X,-ie' - ' . ' R ' me "hiv 4.4. If 'xv I if A' vf wf Top: Algie Neal races the ball in to set up for another score for the Hoggies. Right: Al Nickerson tries for extra points after a foul was made by the opposing team. Left: Algie Neal iumps high to try for two points. Neal set three single 9 Conference Record. ame individual records. His 21 field goals in one game broke the Lone Star ai.' Wf41z'f,, ,Lf 7 ,Hz -f,..z , z,Z2WAQ6L2Z,op-,1,, 9 1 745: eww r -1,- mn vwnm 'uns.wmmuvu4.'a'5 1. nn .,.-:lv rr. xv-sn w:':f-wx. :ak1x':.'xu7.. 7' I Xi X'1LLr!"-ZA! 'KAY JAIKYIYWKWIIZY 2115? L. . '- HXPQWIA 1. , , ,. f-fu' . H. kj' 6 A8J Basketball Team opens season in scrim The Texas A8-l basketball team en- ioyed one of its best season's in years last winter, compiling a 9-9 Lone Star Conference record and finishing in third place in the final conference standings. The squad was the scoringest in A811 bas- ketball history and numerous other re- cords toppled during the campaign. An indication of the free-scoring sea- son was given in the season opener as the Javelinas defeated Texas Lutheran, 112-85. lt was the most points ever scored by an A8iI team, and several other single-game marks fell. After three losses on the road, the Javelinas returned to the victory column in Georgetown with an 89-87 victory over Southwestern. This started a seven- game winning streak for the squad which tied the school record for most victories in a row. Included in the skein were four LSC victories. The Javelinas opened their con- ference campaign with a 75-66 win over Tarleton, and two nights later defeated East Texas, 87-86. Both victories came on the road. After the holidays, the Javelinas downed Sul Ross, 83-80, and Angelo State, 98-92, to increase their LSC re- cord to 4-0. A811 then split on the road, losing to Howard Payne, 127-81, and bouncing back to take McMurry, 89-87. After dropping five games in a row, the Javelinas got their scoring strength reorganized and whipped Tarleton, 106- 98, and East Texas, 102-84, marking the first time a team had managed to score over 100 points in two consecutive games. In the East Texas game, guard Algie Neal gave one of the best individual per- formances in history for the Javelinas. He hit 21 of 34 field goals and ended with 50 points. This was three points off the LSC single-game scoring record. After losing to Sul Ross and Angelo State on the road, the Javelinas got re- venge against Howard Payne, defeating the Jackets, 110-101, and followed with a 97-92 victory over McMurry, sweeping the season series against the Indians. The season ended with four consecu- tive losses, including a 76-74 squeaker to Southwest Texas State. Seven game records and six season marks were bettered by the Javelinas mage against Tfjnhy and two other season record, Were equalled. The record onslaught was the 5- for the Hoggies in recent lggesl . Years. Th single- ame individ me 9 ual records were by Neal. His 21 of 34 field points against East Texas we,- His 21 field goals broke the Thofsogls. Conference record. ' ul Three single-game team marks we set in the opening game. The Javelinae hit 50 of 106 field goals and scored 113 points against Texas Lutheran. The gfher team mark came in the Javelinas' 110, 101 win over Howard Payne. That repie. sented the most total points scored by both teams in a game, Five team records were set and gn. other tied. The Javelinas hit 950 of 2,097 field goals, erasing the record of 816 of 1,860 set in 1969. The Javelinas scored 2,430 points and averaged 86,7 points a game. The records had been 2,098 points, scored in 1969, and 80.0 average, set in 1970. The Javelinas broke the season re bound record with 1,317 this season. The record tied came with the team's seven- game winning streak. That tied the rc- cord for most games won in a row which was set in 1926 and has been equalled five times since. Sel Qoals and 50 Q- ' a 4 Sbg X i 'wefe lihqg I I2 Dfher I 10. Bpre. li by cn- ? of d of Iinos 86.7 een 0.0 re- The ven- re. 'hich xlled --ia .74 11.4, I '-L, U-.,,. Bn' , . 'inn Nun. f ,4 1 i 1 .ik ls' w ir '1 K Q Z- 4 JfA'Zff2KTMr5'r!w-B .4 Kv24m25:.w! ihlilk ff!-' WHA T5 9.05, 'NECA ku illfaw R16 'N' ,fha ' 9 2526: 39 qt 'lib i33"li'.2B'-SA-32 WI-k72xWi1WHH2Y 9 ISLE' 'R Xi? ,. ,.,m, I, ,PFA , 4 iff .J 6 Basketball '72 Right: Members of the ABA basketball team spend half of their time on the road at out-of-town games. Getting ready to leave were Wayne Johnson, Jeff Wildenberg, Don Hagany, Danny Ciendenin, and Larry Mabry. Bottom: Jeff Wildenberg gets his ankles securely wrapped by AI Shuford, trainer, to prevent iniury during the game. .meg '-'rub 'X Wi.. iil-'81 ,, gf 'f J A , , ., .... l:-.f',..ggf f 'fit Q 4 Top: Members of the A8.l basketball team have a pre-game warm up session. Center left: Wayne Johnson and Richard Stillman meet the team cap- tains of the opposing team at center court. Center right: Coach Don McDonald gives the team advice. Left: After a hard game team members Wayne Johnson, Danny Clendenin and Mike Chiaventone enioy a meal at a local restaurant. I6 'aa wafxzsurfaiiiizff-eb-2 3, , H4 Wm 21523-5 ..,-':'?!?v'f4,VE2N.i7Y w wx.. X- - .-V ,'.fs-.- -..--.fy-.4. -.-v,,. c-.,q+.- .. .ly , , xr.-wa :PEXXQMRUBY 4Vi.'T55w..'4Az- 'ZX . iN".6'5S7A1W25sW 1 l l A8J track team captures championship of Corpus Christi Relays The Texas A811 track and field team captured the championships at the Cor- pus Christi Relays and Javelina Relays, and won several trophies in relay races at other meets as the Javelinas had an- other successful spring season. The Corpus Christi title furnished the highlight of the season. The Javelinas, participating in the meet for the first time, made the point race a runaway, amassing 85 points to second-place Southwest Texas' 40. Angelo State had 39, Sul Ross 38, East Texas 32, and Pan American 21. First places for the Javelinas came by Eldon Tuttle in the iavelin, Tommy Argu- bright in the discus, Robert Gonzalez in the mile run, Richard Doctor in the high iump, Tommy McMillion in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles, Garland Nelson in the 220-yard dash, and by the mile relay team. The squad captured seven first places to win its fourth annual Javelina Relays championship in Javelina Stadium. First place winners were Argubright in the dis- cus, David Weathersby in the 120-yard high hurdles, Gonzalez in the mile run, Tuttle in the iavelin, Butch Hoppe in the long iump, Quirino Caro in the two-mile run, and the 440-yard relay team. Ralph Sutherland, member of the relay team, ran the last leg of a race to come in first for the team. The squad opened its season in the Astrodome, taking only a limited number of participants to the indoor event. The outdoor season opened with the Univer- sity of Houston Invitational in Houston. Point totals weren't kept at either of the meets. The Javelinas finished fourth in the Border Olympics in early March. Tuttle won the iavelin for the only first place for A8.l. Argubright was second in the discus, T. McMillion was third in the inter- mediate hurdles, and the sprint relay team placed third and the mile relay team fourth. The Javelinas traveled to far north Texas for the Stephen F. Austin Invita- tional. The meet was held in Hallsville. The Javelinas finished fifth in the 12- team meet. One A811 individual turned in the best performance of his career and another got his best mark in two years at the Texas Relays in Austin. Argubright threw the discus 165 feet, 1 inch for his career best in the preliminaries of the event. Weathersby got a 14.1 in the 120-yard high hurdle preliminaries, his best of the season. The team was fourth in the 880- yard relay, and the 440-yard relay team was third with a time of 41.7. A811 won two first place trophies in 5 Southwestern Louisiana Relays in lqflll: G. ette. This distance medley team sped 10:27.8 and the sprint medley uni, to 3:27.7. The Javelinas were second in 880-yard and two-mile relay races At the Southwest Texas Invitational San Marcos, Tuttle took top honors in iavelin with a throw of 205 feet bright set a meet record with q throw of 160 feet. The Javelinas team climaxed the seq son with a third place finish in the lone Star Conference meet in Commerce. The Javelinas won four first places, and fin- ished one point behind second Howard Payne and 13 back of champion Angelo State. 'The four gold medals were won by Gonzalez in the 880, Argubright in the discus, Weathersby in the high hurdles, and T. McMillion in the 440-yard inter- mediates. Gonzalez also had a second place performance in the mile and Tutlle was second in the iavelin. The only school record broken came by Mike McMillion in the pole vault. His best was 14 feet, 6 inches, and he vaulted that twice. -place . e 4 : ,.-5. Ill in the -sea- .one The fin- ace oion by the lles, iter- ond ittle :me His he E P 'li 1 154- 1. ,,, :QW V .- 'Q .. V vii ' 1 'a ,ne -z Z Top left: Gold Medalist for the A8iI Track Team this year were Tommy Argu- bright, discus. Top right: David Weathersby won his gold medals in the 120-yard high hurdles. Center left: Eldon Tuttle was a medalist for the team in the iavelin throw. Center right: Tommy McMillion placed for A81l in the 440-yard hurdles. Left: Robert Gonzalez won his awards in the 880-yard run. 167 ' 4 E E i la: ,TE F4 5 41 l l 1 fi S E :ff il 'Q 95 Li it Q , vi . iz WRAYQWEXBY 7 ?Q2S:"YL3' . TYQISB 5. '5Lf1Zv.."?A'1- Ki l l 1 i l i i f 1 .. f, .5- ,tt x . x J' K I A s., ,. at 2 1 X X 7972 Golf Team Members of the golf team were Tommy Jackson. Andy Luddeke, Jimmy Jones, Steve Tankersley, and Larry Aduddell. Golf team opens season in triangular match against UCC, Pan Am The Texas A811 golf team opened its season in February with a triangular match in Corpus Christi against the Uni- versity of Corpus Christi and Pan Ameri- can University, and then hosted a dual match against the University of Corpus Christi on the Kingsville Country Club course. Javelina Tommy Jackson won medalist honors at the Southwest Texas State Invi- tational Tournament in the first tourney play for the Javelinas. He finished five strokes in front of the runner-up individ- ual. The Javelinas finished fifth in the 11- team SWT tournament. The Border Olympics tournament was the second meet for the Javelinas. The squad competed with most of the univer- sity and college teams in Texas at the big meet in Laredo. After the Border Olympics, the Javeli- nas hosted the first Lone Star Conference tournament of the season. Last spring, the conference changed its format for se- lecting individual and team champions. Four tournaments are held each season, and the scores at the end of the four meets are combined to determine the conference champions. ln the Kingsville meet, the Javelinas finished sixth as a team, and Jackson was the low individual with a 225. Chris Hill was two strokes behind with a 227, Karl Fuchs had a 231, Andy Luddeke a 232, and Larry Aduddell a 233. The second LSC tournament was in Nacogdoches with Stephen F. Austin serving as host. Jackson was one of the low individuals, tying for fourth in the meet with a 222. Aduddell was next with a 235. The Javelinas were seventh in the team standings. The third meet was in Abilene. Jackson again was low for the Javelinas with 0 217, eighth among the individuals in the tournament. Other scores for the Javeli- nas were Fuchs 221, Aduddell 230, Jimmy Jones 232 and Steve Tankersley 236. C The final tournament came at the l-5 rce. The Javelinas finished eighth in the meel, and Jackson tied for fifth place with a 211. U g. At the end of the conference compel . - ' h tion, Jackson ended in a tie for elglll place in the final individual standing the This gave him a second team slot Ohms' All-Lone Star Conference squad' llle to be selected. .hed in As a team, the Javelinas llnls ninth place in the league standingS- spring meet in Comme I 1 8 6 I77 :son rh 0 the veli- 230, sley LSC inas iS0fl neti- ghth 195. the firsf lin V5 H we 5 H e E U4 E 63 EE li ! a 9: 4 1 5 E fi fx a- 2 18 ' 'IW 'WWWV FK'lla?JF6biX 11LJ5:"l1uirX?-24-YZ .nr 1-.1 7,XY?Bb M3- !'41":L.'fiV.z. z E 1 N 4 1 I 7972 Tennis Team XM- -sings Ali U, ,.,,, ' 1, Front: Gordon Buckley, Terry Hoover, Gary Rauschuber, Reed Smith. Row 2: Dave Nichols, Don O'ConneIl, Charlie Pollman, George Jones. Tennis team begins '72 season with Anil ln vitational Tournament The Texas A8.I tennis team posted a 6- 6-2 season's record and finished in third place in the Lone Star Conference stand- ings last spring. The team opened against North Texas State, dropping a 6-0 decision, and then entered the Pan American Tournament, which included many of the nation's top- ranked tennis teams and players. The Javelinas hosted their second an- nual invitational tournament in February with six teams entered. Angelo State took top honors and A8iI finished second. In the top match of the tournament, Gary Rauschuber was de- feated by Angelos' David Herrison, last year's conference singles champ. Raus- chuber was A8iI's only finalist as he split sets with Harrison, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4. The doubles finals was an all-Angelo affair with Harrison and Neil McClung winning the title over teammates Tommy McC- ulloch and Barron Rector, 6-3, 6-4. The Hoggies got their first dual victory over St. Mary's on the A8iI courts, win- ning 6-0. A8il's top singles entry, Raus- chuber, beat Federico Sendel, 6-4, 7-5, and in the No. l doubles match, Raus- chuber and Reed Smith won over Sendel and Steve Nienhaus, 6-1, 6-1. Other A8.l victories were by Gordon Buckley, who bested Nienhaus, 6-'l, 6-2, Smith, who defeated Jim Fischer, 6-4, I0-8, and Charlie Pollman, who downed Dennis Brady, 6-0, 6-0. ln doubles, Don O'Connell and Terry Hoover beat Fischer and Brady, 6-2, 6-0. The Javelinas split in three matches to climb into third position in the Lone Star Conference regular season play. After splitting with Sam Houston, 3-3, the Hog- gies split with Stephen F. Austin, 3-3, and lost to Angelo, 6-0. The season was climaxed at the Lone Star Conference tournament in Com- merce. A8iI advanced a doubles team into the semifinals, and two of the A8il singles entries reached the quarterfinals. The performances in the conference meet gave the Hoggies a third place finish in the final LSC standings. The points from the tournament and those earned in reg- ular season play were combined to de- termine the final team standings. East Texas won the championship with 51 points, defensive champion Angelo State was second with 29, A8il had I9 for third, Sam Houston had I5 points,S. F. Austin I3, and Southwest Texas tive. The Hoggies were the second leading scorer in the conference tournament, fin- ishing second to champion ETSU. Raus- chuber and Smith advanced into the sem- ifinals in doubles before losing to East Texas' Harry Fritz and Bob Hochstadter, the eventual champions. In singles, Raus- chuber and Buckley advanced into the quarterfinals before losing to ETSU en' tries. Rauschuber defeated James Pdfks of Sam Houston, 6-3, 6-i, in a second round match after drawing a first round bye. Buckley lost to Hochstadter, lite eventual singles champion from ETSU, In the quarterfinals, and Rau to East Texas' Ken Jantz. schuber bowed Rauschuber, senior from 500 Annex: East Central, ended the season Wil best record l4-3l on the Squad' 5 , qw, .f Wit,-' A g1,Sp W ' . -' ,,,,,' , .4 , ,. 84 A' . . sv, If me t 6, x, I I 5 P .3 1 1 I 0 n K 9 l ...L . I SK- - fa' X , A . iv v 92 , 7, W 'Ziyi ' xv 3 , 7 , 'J vw "' '!,m,,,n '79 . y4f,:.,'S' " ,i' - " . S T 12 M A y - - -11-,Mg 'f ' . gl :. E,-V .V A , -, f 'i -1+ INA' ' :T.fw'5"M""" ' 'N km fp 45, e-.441 gg fi f ,R , A ff, mg A F S ., V gj'1.,,gfQfLI1,i" W . sfvhlhff ,jf Al :A vi 1 U, X J, V 1,k- 'Q-ffyla-,Q -1 xr f -I F1 5ff.A,,."--1 .U . NL., ,SNA 'G l'l'l 1 lllllwl.-11.3, Uk:- '-'hi 5 L vu- r.l-,g- '- ., - ,lv A I . .T"l'u-,... ir... S' "film, 3- . ? 5 f m'WhhZ1u,w,.,,, , ,paw -...... pw V 51 I . iraibwi . 5531 ge WIA R15 KSQUK-9 .f:'?5'F'fM2 55 lf- ,,,. ,,,..,.q- If ..,.,., ,,g ,W .WM A YW: .EYSHWQZLYWLBE-QYZQRZQGHWWHDN M Y?it..'f5..'0A11 .fi 9 r 1 I 1 l 4 I l I I I I 1 4 1 l l I I 1 I l I . I 'fra F , f ' 3 JN 4' T l I It f K I I I fy,-W", 'av' M ll 'I' . I , " I IIIII I I Q It If 5 yt I III I 4 I j I I II I I ' .l I I Il. I I at , 1' I I' lt I I:I I I itll It tr 7972 Soccer Team 2 , I' lille' - 'H'R 2JhOb H 1III Front: Sen Patan, Noe Alvarez, Hessan Sadat, Manuel Chiu, Dharariiai Teia, Pablo ESCObCl', Afl'10lCl0 GUlm0n, JUFIFVT b0lU- OW 1 0 fl 019, Ugo Castro-Mendoza, I Manuel Amparan, Ruben Perez, Armando Chapa, Vinod Patel, Hernan lturbe, Albert Johns, Mike Pautay, Alvaro Vi a o os. I r I I. I s b ' 1 ' II II, occer Team eglns p ay In I I l I . Il , Texas Collegiate Soccer League I l ' This was the first season of play for the A8-l Soccer Team in I I the Texas Collegiate Soccer League. The A81l team is a member of the Southwest division, which II includes defending TCSL champion University of Texas, Texas I, III A81l, Rice University, University of Houston, St. Mary's University, il I Pan American University, and Trinity University. It The Northwest Division is composed of Texas Tech, Midwest- 'I I ern, North Texas State, TCU, LeTourneau of Longview, Texas at I Arlington, SMU, and Stephen F. Austin. I I All league members played bath conference and interdivi- I I sional contests. The championship tourney was played in Novem- l I ber, matching the league leaders. I I'I l Other schools beginning their first year of conference member- ship are SMU, North Texas, LeTourneau, and Pan American. This was the fourth season of play for the A81l team. Last , year, the sport became officially recognized by the University, I 1 and the team boasted five wins to a single loss, with one tie. II One of the soccer team players, Armando Gonzalez, also I played on the football team for the first time. Gonzalez was used as a kicker, using his soccer-style kick to help the football team. The soccer team closed its season with a 2-8 record after ing to St. Mary's University, 3-2. los- t, I Coach Mike Satout gives advice on game strategy. I I I I ' T72 I I x WWCSWICC pawn . 1, vu-wp-X,. ,..... ., .,i.,. K N1 3 kfQgg.5m5sQx . X 07,55 my in N I7 Coaches choose "Athletes of the Year" Tennis A three-year veteran on the tennis team, Gary Rauschuber has held the number I or 2 position since coming to A8eI. Every year he has made it to the conference semi-finals. Coach Ron Hunt analyzes, "He moves well, is quick, likes to play. He enioys himself on the court. He's a good doubles player as well as a singles player, and is unusual in that he can play both forehand and backhand side." "He helps our younger players. He's generous about playing with students who aren't as skillful as he so they can improve their game," Hunt said. Rauschuber's season singles record was 13-IO, his conference singles record was 4-3. Football This year's first-round draft choice of the New York Giants was also Head Coach Gil Steinke's choice. Eldridge Small of Houston has had a career at A8el marked with honor, and is consid- ered one of the top wide receivers in the nation. "The good Lord favored him with inate ability, and Eldridge added good self-dis- cipline," commented Steinke. He's a very coachable person with no hang-ups. l don't know of a coach who ever had to get on to him. He had a good disposition and is very dependable and consistent in his efforts and performance. ln fact, he is one of the most consistent performers we have ever had on the .lavelinas." Small caught 167 passes for 2,547 yards and 20 touchdowns in three sea- sons of offensive action. Defensively, he had five interceptions for 106 yards dur- ing his brief appearances with the unit. He also threw nine passes, completed six for 85 yards and carried five times for 72 yards. Among honors collected were being named to the Associated Press Little All- America team, the American Football Coaches Association All-America team, the All-Lone Star Conference team, and the All-Texas College team. This year he played in the Senior Bowl in Mobile, Ala. He was also invited to play in the North- South Shrine game in Miami, but had to refuse because of semester exams. Busl "li years Dona man j Wilde went Slltell ance l8.6 and I' "H perse good Front: Lucy Haag, Debbie Hugh, Dolores Garcia, Jeanie Miller Row 2 Jean Rains Suzanne Moyer Terry Harris Mary Rosebrock Virginia Miller Martha Dornburg Leigh Rackley. Women 's basketball team opens season against Lamar State Texas A8il Women's Basketball team opened its season against Lamar State. The game was the first roundballer game at the Sam Houston State Invitational Tournament in Huntsville. The Sam Houston Tournament was one of the five meets on the A8iI schedule this season. Other games played were against district opponents Texas South- most, Pan American, Del Mar, Bee County, and the University of Corpus Christi. Betty Brewer is the athletic director of the A8-I squad. The squad has main- tained the district title since it has entered the Texas Commission of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women competition in 1968-69. Only three lettermen returned this year. They were Mary Rosebrock and Virginia Miller, seniors, and Leigh Rack- ley, iunior. Sherri Stewart, the women's basketball coach, is a graduate of Texas Woman's University. The A8-I team scheduled a Presidential Tournament in February at San Marcos, the Houston Recreation Department lnvi- tational held in Houston and the District VI Tournament held in March at Kings- ville. The Texas A8-I Invitational Tourna- ment was also in March in Kingsville. I l N., F ii K ' Sk! X. X h 1 f H - A N, ' Y x - . ig-2: X XX g Q W k .Xi X X Q, ' x kj 'M - ,gpg - 1 . SQ- V . ll P B f -11 M ji fi 'QQ 1 J al? ,wilwlna I .3 X ...3-P' 1 'f 1 5 X.. ID V 'ilii-pl - - 1 i 78 's...-......qjS:! ... X4 eww' Mens Intramurals begin in Januaryg start with six games .JV- The spring season of men's intramurals began in January with six games the first night. There were T35 games scheduled to be played from January through March. Single elimination tournaments in both horseshoe singles and doubles began in February. Each team could enter five players in the singles division and three doubles teams. No individual could be entered in both singles and doubles. The finals in the tennis competition highlighted the men's intramural action in May. The finals were in both the doubles and singles competition. The tennis action saw Fernando Lopez defeating Alex Torres to capture the sin- gle's crown. In doubles, Saul Barrera and Mike Sanchez of the HPE Club won the championship by defeating Douglas and Haddox of the Gravity team. In softball standings, new leaders emerged on the roster. The Century divi- sion saw two teams take over the lead. The Fabachers and Jacks shared honors with 7-1 win-loss records. Bad News and A.G.R. battled it out for a clear cut deci- sion in the Capitol division as they were tied for the lead with 7-0 winning re- cords. In the Central division, the Immortals held the lead with a one game lead over the Bombers. The three mile run in the cross country run was won by Roel Almaraz represent- ing the Fabacher team. Almaraz turned in a time of I8 minutes, 43 seconds as he came in a full 30 seconds ahead of Robert Gonzalez, the second place win- ner in the long run. Seven of the men who started were able to finish the cross country course. The men's swimming and diving meet was also scheduled during May. Each or- ganization could enter two men in each open event and one team per relay. No individual could enter more than four events including the diving. During May there was also a TOO-lap bicycle marathon. Each organization could enter a maximum of three bicycles. Four man teams alternated as riders of each bike. 179 l., I, a ? r s . lt sl! A x i 1: 'Q T5 5: s ,cr .. 1X'3.YAb gs -. ,L 5i?:.f l Spring training Pushing . . .shoving. . . hitting . . . this is all part of spring training that the football squad goes through every year. To the fans football season ends with Thanksgiving. For the player it is a year- round event. With the end of a season comes still more practice, practice, and practice. The team must be in shape for the first encounter of the season. That encounter is scheduled for September 9, 1972, in the Astrodome. For the football team, preparation is the key to success. . ,,,. ,www V . 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Austin East Texas Sul Ross Angelo State Tarleton State Sam Houston Howard Payne Southwest Texas Opponent 16 3 21 10 14 7 7 7 20 29 f f ,ff l gl 7 ff ., I 2 V7 f -4 , , 114, if If ga , I I If ' f ff ii' ' W , f - A811 1 12 64 57 85 89 85 75 87 85 83 98 81 89 76 84 77 90 76 106 102 92 98 1 10 97 74 76 86 94 Basketball Texas Lutheran St. Mary's St. Edward's Pan Am Southwestern St. Edward's Tarleton East Texas St. Mary's Sul Ross Angelo Howard Payne McMurry Corpus Christi Southwest Texas Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Texas Lutheran Tarleton East Texas Sul Ross Angelo Howard Payne McMurry Southwest Texas Corpus Christi Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Opponent 85 85 68 94 87 71 66 86 76 80 92 1 27 87 88 90 1 10 95 84 98 84 94 1 10 101 92 76 104 1 14 1 18 .., V , 'J-...dx V gp ' Q K "iw v.,,,,., W"-w,..,, Q. ' 'i - n. I , 1 , ., ' Ufvffqagf. 1 , -9 A fi' "4" if" if i . , ,a is .,, 'wg A f t V V. V , VV .i 1 , nf gffg,-: 1 4. 5: ,-', rg' VL , , , , T 'G A" ' 1' - -4: . 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W3-qi. ,'..,.'f ...iv Wil' '- ' ,- 1 O Wt V gb R 5 ai 1 ,rm , 5 A -s 55- 4 an . . -' - IQIQIIE Ill III III llll Ilil ll EE g -xx- . , d A I E 7' ' -A A m 2 , . 4 I I A ' ,pf-mx A 4- ,- -v Q - , ll 5 , ,. - E. 3 ' v - .,- 5 1 ' 5 5 5 1 ' iw i ' -- gl. . ., . Lf' - -f'- 3224 974 ' 314-'Fr-"T-?1'Q"39" - , 1 ff-1.51-z - L , - ..': 'U- '-f .a.-'f-z- . i L K 'N f 1 .J bk- , r M W T, W J l..LA 5,LL.i Xxigiff l' Organizations 9 -s x 1. S S rr 2 E 5: 5 B i Q 1 1 s 13255 'EA' '. WSH? -ZR-135 YK'lE-!':?kMNW1'A'2?k17KDKSQf . YQVNJ 17.-'D3'X!u.Z' 5, A.. "rm- U45 H4 l Front: Bobby Evans, Greg Ledet, Antonio Del.eon, Marvin Migura. Row 2: Pam Keith, Kay Sparks, Diantha McMillon, John Wagner. Row 3: Geary Berkman Vemonl Toliver William, Ferdinand Gaenzel. Row 4: William Leur, Ralph Russell lsponsorl, C. E. Cato lsponsorl, C. G. McDonald lsponsorl, Dusty Parker. I um' Accountant Michael Day spoke to the Accounting Society at the regular monthl H 4, y meeting during April. Accounting Society has guest speakers at monthly meetings A guest speaker attended every monthly meeting of the Texas A8tI Ac- counting Society this year. Each speaker explained some phase of accounting to the members of the society, serving to acquaint the student with various oppor- tunities available in the accounting field. Special speakers included Richard Kin- caid, Mary Anna Cunningham, ErneSl Minyard, James Carroll, O. B. Head, Grill Michael Day. In April, the Honor's Banquet was held to honor sophomores who excelled in the elementary courses of accounting, to en- courage them to maior I and to acquaint them with the Accounl' ing Society. Guest speakers at the ban' quet were Bob Lemer an in accounting, d Watson MOY' ers. In MaY, the organization held its nual social banquet at which four SC jd arships were awarded, the TSCPA 0W:nd was given to an outstanding Senlol' d, The SPeakel 5 Judge Rey' new officers were installe at the social banquet WG ' d naldo G. Garza, U. 5- D'5l"d 'lu gi . d nts mus from Brownsville, Texas. STU 9 . ' 07' be maioring in Accounting dl A8'l 'll . 53 der to ioin. Membership thIS Yea' was Afrc Afw year in ledvfe A.A.S. rqndidi Anders comin! cluded nual SI front D james ll 53. i A 86 compared to 30 last yevf- 'Mmvmiz Yociety takers ieetings attended ever re Texas llll ear, rid: riff of qrcovhffli odfllr ww i1h vuri0U50llf Q accoimllll if ded Wrliurl ll' nninghamf T o. B- HW" l Banquet V105 do excell0'l'l"l mooring, ill' ir in llawnhl JHlhtheAtC0il li nkers al them, nd WalS0n ' roi l' ,fhiclt W' Hel ia ti' self' 5CPl if of U i l dire fel' 'rr l 1 the 5P'lI'A ed udie lil '05 iii iff' Afro-American 5OCfefY holds 59m"'70fS, sponsors homecoming queen candidate Af,-0-American Society activities this year included a bi-weekly seminar and a lecture series on "Black Awareness." The A.A.S. sponsored Eva Anderson as their candidate for homecoming queen. Miss Anderson got first runner-up in the home- coming elections. Other activities in- cluded the Afro-American Society's an- nual spring talent show and the Afro- American Culture Show. The Afro-American Society is an or- ganization that seeks to increase aware- ness and togetherness among Black stu- dents on the Texas A8rl campus. The pur- pose of the organization is to promote and sustain Black culture. "Black pride and unity, for a better community" is the motto of the organization. Membership for the organization has more than doubled from 45 members last year to 97 members for the 1972 year. Membership is open to those who support the goals and obiectives of the constitution of the Afro-American Society. One must also be a student at A8rl and pay semester dues for membership. Front: Diane Moore, Laverne Hicks, Audrey Earls, Andrea Freeman. Row 2: Eva Anderson, Kenneth Sapenter, Aaron Williams, Henry Keys, Sandra Crenshaw. Row 3: James Ross, Felix Cook, Walter Moore, Andrew Laws. Q f ilinlt ttf U if N I M W X W 'ff r , S lltl 9 w K 1 al'la fi l 19 I his tw vi 051 187 Two scholarships awarded to outstanding Aggie ClUb memb9fS Two Aggie Club Scholarships were awarded this year to outstanding stu- dents who are also members of good standing in the Aggie Club. Recipients Kenneth Bird and Billy Kellner are both from San Antonio. Members of the Aggie Club sponsored the annual Spring Roundup Barbeque and Dance and the presentation of the Aggie of the Year Award which went to Bill Pugh, George West iunior. Also this year, the Aggie Club held a barbeque at Mesquite Grove for the 4-H and FFA boys who competed in the Area Judging Contest. The Texas A8il Aggie Club is an or- ganization of agriculture and agricultural education maiors united for the purpose of advancing agriculture. E S lf Members of the Aggie Club take part in raising livestock as one of their proiects. This cow was one ofthe many that was iudged by the FFA. Front: Paul Cotter, Richard Standridge, Dalees Fitzpatrick lsweetheartl, Kenneth Bird, Duane Wiemers. Row 2: Danny Canales, Eddie Hagen, Jim Briscoe, Denny Moore Jerome Moy, Glen Willms, Frank Dodson Jr. Row 3: Kenneth Bubert, Billy Kellner, Larry Koester, Percy Carroll, Allen Chopelas, David Neher lsponsorl. Row 4: Bill Pugh' Lynn Kieschmck, Greg Gee, Jose Alamz, Stanley Matson, Timothy Ferguson, Donnie Spring, Sam Womble. Row 5: Byron Hausmann, Frank Carson, Mario Escobar Curtis Hinton, Will Bates, Bart Cousins, Raymond Kosub, Ray Klespies. I it '22 if it s! J mltbel Zipm ll' Wanda lui will lf men Pruk ludiley Mc lodrwfl. lwo 1 lla! Dell S Chl msoreolh Demyllaore, iw I: Bil M, bcolia, 0.18 --1-iw Front: Abel Lopez, Lou Ann Altwein, Sheri Baker, Anne Smith, Maryam Abghary, Jeanie Barnard, Suzanne Heins, Elva Iris Ramirez, Annette Booth, Joyce Simek, Lindsay Zapata, Janene Gay Buck. Row 2: Bunnie Weisman, Hilda Serna, Sharon Champagne, Edna Hohon, Dano Morgan, Gai-Lynn Marshall, Jane Bockholt, Paula DuBose, Wanda Jackson Dyer, Marilyn Goad, Kathleen Mittag, Susan Goode, Sharon Richter. Row 3: John Wagner, Betty Alexander, Catherine Moy, Catharine Murphy, Myrtle Snavely, Beth Boyer, Joyce Florence Schultz, Jones, Gwen Robinson, Bebe Crooks, Ruth Wright, Diann Chapman, Anne Matula, Betty Jo Burkett. Row 4: Evaristo Flores, Karen Prukop, Flroence Schultz, Ruth Baiza, Carroll Weisman, Natalie Picquet, Barbara Wray, Suellen Driskill, Exie Bickham, Bonnie Butler, Estela Johnson. Row 5: Buckley Maior, Frederick Martin, Brad Young, Joe Dayoc, John Harrington, Danny Hale, Parish Patel, Jayesh Patel, Dwight Edens, Efrain Pena, Louis Clark, Johnny Jackson. Two Alpha Chi members attend National Convention af Memphis. Mae Dell Schiller, sponsor, presided over the registration of new members at the annual fall initiation of Alpha Chi. The Texas Omega Chapter of Alpha Chi presented Dr. Jack Stinebaugh, Pro- fessor of Education, who spoke at the open meeting of the chapter on the sub- iect of "Sensitivity Relative to Educa- tional Approaches." Two members of Alpha Chi, Marilyn Boomgaarden and Catherine Augustine, attended the biennial meeting of the na- tional organization at Memphis, Tennes- ' see. Also this year, Alpha Chi held an annual initiation and banquet in Novem- ber. During the spring a professor from A8tl spoke at a meeting open to the pub- I lil ' i i 9 , lic. The purpose of Alpha Chi is the recog- nition of academic distinction of qualify- ing iuniors and seniors of the University. The Alpha Chi motto is, "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." John 8:32. Requirements for membership include a 3.5 grade point average, registration for at least T2 hours during the semester of initiation, iunior or senior classification, and one academic year of attendance at Texas A8il. 9 it - Members were Jerry Delay, Scott Jordan, Robert Scott, Milton Rockwell, Allan Cannon, Frank Hoelzel, Lee Griffin, Hector Saenz, Van Balzer, Freeman Terrell, Jesus Rodriquez, Ben Saltz, Robert Douglas, Keith Collins, John Caldwell. Dad 's Day welcome committee formed by Alpha Phi Omega Alpha Phi Omega carried out many charitable activities this year. Members of the organization formed a welcoming commit- tee on Dad's Day, solicited contributions for the Heart Fund Drive, provided administration and faculty members with desk blotters, and maintained the circle at University Blvd. and Santa Gertrudis. Other activities included aid during the freshman or- ientation, sponsoring the ugly man on campus contest, helping at 'L school elections, and supporting an orphaned Indian child. Special speakers included Dr. Leslie E. Munneke, who at- tended an Alpha Phi Omega smoker to speak about "Leader- ship." The purpose of Alpha Phi Omega is to assemble collegemen in a national service fraternity in the fellowship and principles of ,ff the Boy Scouts of America. The motto of this service organiza- tion is "Be a Leader, Be a Friend, Be of Service." There is a period of pledgeship which must be met prior to becoming a member. The pledgeship includes meeting the re- quirements of leadership, friendship, and service. Pledges are then voted on by the active members on the basis of their per- formance in these three areas. ff The Alpha Phi Omega National Organization was formed at Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania, in l925. Texas A8ll's Nur' chapter was started in 1945 by over 20 students. 9, si, : - -Q- X I F dpfive. Alpha Phi Omega members helped work on campus dUVlf'9 the Head .un ,gl 4' F' -.av g, l 45' 5 I Y s we 2 cg 's A fs, ,hhe,e.s1,, n u Q, -,BX I 'A ui ,. Q,--125 231, .gown 'Q - -f ' l X 6 .T gxkeik ivk -Q . Y, H x . , f---yr 435353, fr x S P A r l 1' Q -U A ,.- f 4 Q nw-ITT "xt , lf, X . ' A W '11 if if ,, ' Nw' .VKH -154 .v"l?7'?4"f Y' 1 'Q ' , 4 .,"r ""zs2'1lf'1f-is wht? . 'Q if ff 5 L 6 a te I U I Man on Campus Contest during the spring. aw"A"-wa' .Q Q. ' wi Z' , rag , ,- . gm, A 4 gr- ,J , ' ,iq f , , . , , I , , , 'gf . Z5 1 Z, 4 V ? , f 2 6 Z! Z 1 v ff ,g 2 if I X Aefwymze f x 15'-22'f'7'fl2j35':2f T47 V775 s . I4 1' f t, ? in f F? if 46224 li , ,1 x 1, T l f, ffwff Qi Q ' Q ,Q ,4fQ,gf,,,,': Etfw' 9 ,Zh 5 l 2 - 15544355 ' , "f f"W ' ' Wq yhzff- C Q , ,f, fy. ,222g, . , V " 5329.2 lf' V ff ' 5 I Wi' ,- - ,V. .- ,. ,,,, .. A. iff ff 2 9 Zac ik ,J .f 'f i , .f , U ,- 522-' f ",' a ' Qlg, . --V 5' ' .I' xi- ,7 M 1 'ff ,gp 4 ?', ',- it -62: b- , 1 ., ,, ,f - 'aa ' 14-".' ' -nz- 2 -' 9' 4 S 1' lla D- 'Agar' , 41: -1 '45 GX, "in, , .qv A . A' - Q' ,Q 'Mt , 7 . 1.4 ,. aww I T 4 lim. ,, ' naseliqli ' APO sponsored the annua g y Proceeds from the contest go to the support of charities undertaken by the ' ' ' ' ere Clifford Stacey, Zeta Tau u Representing the organization this year w gro p. ' Th t - Bill Hammann Chi Omega, Kenneth Al ha' Paul Hamilton, Phi Kappa e a, , P I Bird, Alpha Gamma Rho, and Arnold Burklow, Tau Kappa Epsilon. K v l Alpha Lambda Delta supports academic programs at A811 The Alpha Lambda Delta Society sup- ports all academic programs on campus and in the community. Members also usher at the two graduation exercises in the spring and summer. The purpose of Alpha Lambda Delta is to promote intelligent living and a high standard of learning, and to encourage superior scholastic attainment among freshman women. Freshmen women, currently enrolled for not less than 12 semester hours, who haye at least a 3.5 grade point average, and not less than 12 nor more than 30 semester hours are eligible for member- ship. Fi New initiates of Alpha Lambda Delta take the oath, sign the membership roll, receive their insignia and certificates in a candlelight ceremony. Requirements for membership are to have more than 12 but less than 30 hours, and have a 3.5 grade point average. Front: Linda Estep, Janet Ferrell, Laverne Hicks, Eva Rodriguez, Nelda Lopez, Beth Baker lsponsorl. Row 2: Melba Gutierrez, Sharon Hohon, Kathleen Rees, Zona Reunshagen, Imelda Martinez, Lynda Galvan, Carrie Bishop lsponsorl. Row 3: Gloria Barrera, Carol Ewald, Nancy Brown, Mary Stauffer, Janis Mooney, Phyllis Scheible, .lame Bockholt. Row 4: Lilia Dolores Saenz, Elsie Fontaine, Dorothy Guidry, Donna Smith, Jani Dodds, lsenior advisorl Margie Bast, Jan Wallace liunior advisorl, Bonnie Butler. "l 3 1 ,.-1' f . 1:f,, 1- A , I' e'fff'.'.. .J-iz.. . 'Lpp' aw' 4 ronl:Ni F lsponsorj Alpha I l I 40 gf' iii iigizrf lbullesllml hleen Rees, lr: 1, Phylls Stale f li Front: Nancy Brown, Carl Wood, Steve Shipley, Laura Vela, Jane ldom. Row 2: Robin Howard, Steve Wallace, Kathy Shipley, Ray Clark, Barry Hoff. Row 3: V. A. Smith lsponsorl, David Jensen, Jana Hayes, Randy Bonifay, Phil Scott. Alpha Psi Omega members Robin Howard, Steve Wallace, Jay Brown, Carl Wood, Kathy Shipley, Laura Vela, Phil Scott relax backstage during rehearsals for upcoming performances. CMJ fs., K Alpha Psi supports drama workshops, UIL contest at A521 Alpha Psi Omega participated in nu- merous Speech and Drama Workshops this year, and attended the UIL Contests held on campus. The organization sponsored a raffle and a production of the "Fantasticks" in order to raise money for scholarships. Members of the club organized and ran the concession stands for drama depart- ment productions. Awards and scholarships were pres- ented at the annual Spring Banquet, held at the KC Hall on Military Highway. Scholarships are presented to speech and drama majors in financial need. The purpose of the organization is to advance the cause of drama by sponsor- ing productions and financing scholar- ships. In order to ioin Alpha Psi Omega, one must be interested in, and participate in, drama department activities. One hun- dred points from participation in drama activities is also required. Each point rep- resents eight hours of work. Texas A8rl's cast of Alpha Psi Omega, Kappa Phi, was founded in T947 and has been active ever since. 193 is 511 5 ,. li ii l l li 1 1 li S la 3 Si S 5 f 55 as ?f ii H5665 151564: X257 'J.3?:T3J'6 i3Yx'?H7i'i7,T?J-33'i!wf1X'-2?53iiWiEPM'iifXr'!2F JE.. r4'.'Sg.'j?H."1m i 1 t l i il 'Q l , l A s il at ll ll gl if la l Ii l I I I 4 l i i L 194 A TA holds banquet for new members of the organization Alpha Tau Alpha held a Fall Banquet in the Officers' Club at the Naval Air Station in Kingsville during November to recognize the newly initiated neophytes. The purposes of Alpha Tau Alpha are: to develop a true professional spirit in the teaching of agriculture, to help train teachers of agriculture who shall be rural leaders in their communities, and to fos- ter a fraternal spirit among students in teacher-training for vocational agricul- ture. Alpha Tau Alpha members must be en- rolled in agriculture or agricultural educa- tion courses, have a 2.25 overall grade point average, and 30 hours at Texas A81I to meet requirements for Member- ship in the organization. Front: Bobby Bergstrom, Kenneth Bird, Duane Wiemers, Leroy Arnold, Glenwood Heading Alpha Tau Alpha this year were Ronnie Haug, treasurer, Allan Jamison, vice president, Ban secretary, and Bill Pugh, president. David Neher lsponsorl. Row 3: Byron Hausmann, Will Bates, Bart Cousins, Raymond Kosub, Sam Womble. Willms, Frank Dodson. Row 2: Barry Branham, Bill Pugh, Ronnie Haug, Royce Front D: lwwl Collins, l Two Durii W li lnstilul troleun lull me Sew lllflng Seqio, lint. lhrq 'llME lllill' 11 Gllghq lor Q .The I lium I xx 'YN ! "' .1 ef f' .L ll M Q' A fl! ' .M L , , . f " ,nv 'L ' 2 A "-4 K ffw , ala-1 If 4 ,fa nw :Je V Q f ff' s Fr! I 4 ,, Y" 1 1 ' 2 -, 9 1 ,Q s, M,-4, ' '- I T, , .haw . If 27 f V ' 1 .A 51 A A LV,C!,,4zVf!Z V: .V,. I ' 642-54151, I A 1,4 5, ,.i'?Z24,fyy,w A12 25,f5f,'7 K V' O2 21 . ff . M" 'gl wi ff ,A 1745 1 dw f,,, . I, ' . ,MW f-W 'Qffvff ww ' f .,, f,,.f9w1ffw4, . QQ ' WK4' VJ' K ' .1 1 4, Q, A A ,Q H A3 wh, 9,4 if V E , X X , L 96 .JY Vx ff . . - - - D F,o,,'. Agnes Skfobqrcek, Jean Ann Moody, Sylvia Gamez. Row 2: Lucy Sheriff, Shirley Rich, Sandy Mann, Deborah Simmons, Patricia Deau, Patricia Stehle, lane ve Jan Wallace. Row 3: Virginia Miller, Pamela Mercer, Donna Herod, Ellen Carlson, Maria Guerra, Patricia Sturn, Joyce Simek, Carrie Bishop lsponsorl. ' AWS acts as mediator among WOITVGNS l dorms, brings about "no curfew" A big change in the University this year for which the credit goes to the As- sociation of Women Students was the "no curfew" rule adopted by all but one of the women's dormitories. AWS acts as a mediator between all the women's dorms and organizations making it a cen- tral organization. They vote upon the re- commended changes by the dorms. Rep- resentatives from every dorm and wom- en's organization attend the monthly meetings. There are no money making proiects. Finances come solely from the dues that each woman resident of the dorm PGYS- AWS put a new rose Qafde New Dorm for women and also ri Planted the roses at Martin, l0W'5f an L nch. yin FebruarYf the association senl alll' resentative from each dofm and Clnl Carrie Bishop, Sponsor, fo the slale Wlltl. vention in Commerce, Texas..J0f' lace was sent to a conferenrie ln in A ril. Mlss. Carrie Bishop Gnd Miss Mae Dell Schiller are sponsors for AWS- n dl the Chlcdgo l 1 2 f. - i ,lf 1-'I , 1 l0p:luck Stwndinl lT0fIl: Mm lthlmel, J , ,- :'j 'fi' S siawl' vmenl will multi' ll alst l' senltll dlld lt swrffl Jai l GW in -f f in y '- Y, 'As S ,. al 'gs-S' . 5 si as W., Top: Jack Mathis, seated, won the first place trophy in the BSU car rally. David Jones lsecond picturel placed second in the rally. Jimmy Huey presented the winners with trophies. BSU holds weekly work projects, goes skiing in Santa Fe The Baptist Student Union has been a busy organization this year. BSU has sponsored weekly worship programs, bi- monthly luncheons, weekly work proiects with grade-school children, dorm Bible studies led by students, Monday night vesper services, and Wednesday morning prayer breakfasts. Special proiects included the BSU con- vention in Fort Worth that drew 3,500 students, a January ski-retreat in Santa Fe, special speaker Dr. Buckner Fannin, and an international student retreat at the Highlands Encampment that drew 600 international students from all over Texas. As part of the Inter-Faith Council, the BSU sponsored the showing of 1984 and Phoenix House, a movie dealing with drug abuse. The Inter-Faith Council also sponsored a student-faculty dinner and an after-game "chicken fry." BSU also sponsored parties after three home games and featured such live en- tertainment as the "One Way" singers and "Heritage Singers" from Howard Payne. The Baptist Student Union is a student organization sponsored by the Baptist churches of Texas to provide all students with an opportunity for spiritual, social, and academic growth. This is carried on by a Bible Chair teacher whose iob also includes serving as an advisor to an ex- ecutive council of graduate students who carry on the non-academic phase of the BSU program. The BSU is open to any person and there is no official member- ship. FVOIII: Margaret Malone, Dianna Lyons, Bruce Wind, Bilinda Nichols, Beverly Gibbs, Melissa Sparkman. Row 2: Glenn McPherson, Donna Mainer, Carol Brown, Sylvia 5Cllil11ek, Jimmy M. Huey. Row 3: Susan Hamrick, George M. Redus Jr., Dave Lyons, Timmy Walshe, Jerel Shaw, Dean Mathis ldirectorl. i I QQ gil.. U . 1' tm l 197 m1wmu2::y:1vr,vn-.f.:'a-:m42x'ew-,xs eznlmlx v. 4 -1 2 if fi 1? T? -s if ,e gf E9 sf 51 Ei i . I. WA 45-Y:'V4?!'-Zi-Yi 1. 'ASPN 211-' FFA. "rdJ- T-. FE 198 1 Biology Club's May Wildlife Show has variety of 'critters' The Biology Club held its annual Wild- life Show in May with displays of rep- tiles, amphibians, birds, mammals, and fish from all over Texas. Members of the club also sponsored their annual Faculty- Student Picnic and Wildlife Supper this year. Monthly meetings of the Biology Club featured lectures on graduate school, or- nithology, wildlife biology, herpetology, marine biology, and ecology. The purpose of the Biology Club is to promote interest in the field of biology and any phase of biological science. Members must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and pay one dollar semes- ter dues to meet the requirements of membership. There were 50 members in the Biology Club for the l97l-72 school year. Members of the Biology Club caught animals used in the annual Wildlife Show held during May. Front- Hubert Gonzalez, Kathy Fealy, Betty lsdale, Bennie lsdale, Lupe Quintana, Huge Pipeline lsnakel. Row 2: Vicke Devine, Graciela Ortiz, Bubba Flowers, Susan W' J kF k haser, Collard, Patsy Frankenhauser, Mary Wagner, Brenda Carlile. Row 3: Gail Gavenda, Charles Compton, George Redus, Paul Treptow, Blaine ise, ac ran en u Arnold Cantu, Judy Krevz. Row 4: Richard Siemonsma, Steve Carlile, Sherman Pierce, Rene Ortiz, Bud Gebsen. Z A . ff' ,I W f Q Z VV , -ef, 4 Q, vii f fnfvf, gf 1,3 V siii B , ,f 5 T, , izlil, ffl Q 3 nu 2 .2 ,.,, Y NU Front: Su Hilda Sei Juni 5 M. bbaflwnlw bdfnrlulaf P 22 if . 1 Z' -- JW ,, ' a 1 F : ' ' - . Hg:Z7c:sil:10hr: Heins, Sheri Baker, Annette Booth, Lindsay Zapata, Jane Bockholt. Row 2: Erika Perez, Joyce Jones, Dana Morgan, Carolyn Rees, Catharine Murphy, na. ow : Karen Prukop, Ruth Bagza, Betty Jo Burkett, Beth Boyer, Suellen Driskill, Anne Matula, Susan Ballard, Jani Dodds. Juni Dodds Mgnon ljozrlesenled certificates to the top ten teachers selected by the organization. Receiving his is Dr. son , , associate professor of music. Top Ten Tea given by Cap and Gown members for faculty Cap and Gown Women's Honor Soci- ety sponsored a Top Ten Tea for faculty, and a Faculty Lecture Series this year. Initiation was held each semester, and a banquet was given during the spring se- mester. The purpose of Cap and Gown is to promote loyalty, promote and maintain a high standard of scholarship, to recog- nize and encourage leadership, and to advance the spirit of service and fellow- ship among univfsity women, and to stimulate and de' Jp a finer type of uni- versity woman. Qualifications for membership include scholarship, leadership, and service, 70 semester hours, 30 of which must be at A8il, and a 3.5 grade point average. 199 :- 5' 5 wx 2 E 5 Fi 2 ji as 5 SIGN' HDV YW- "-'i3'15lJ?,'LD3"lin5X'-223VXKJEZMXQWYH f -'H "1d3- Y. J., f F 15 L, T, l Top front: Barbara Hassler, Mary Alice Ramirez, Sonia Longoria, Tony Montello, Luciana Mendez, Patsy Nester, Dahlia Solinas, Vicki Habeeb. Row 2: Kathy Nester Alcira Carbaial, Elizabeth Siercovich, Shirley Longoria, Anna Maria Guerra, Jo Ann Lazarine, Manuel Ruiz. Row 3: Fred Valdez, Dennis Schramek, Ramiro Rubio, Stanley Gonzales, David Garcia, Linda Loibowitz, Miguel Moreno. Row 4: Robert Centilli, Martin Hutchinson, Robert Joslin, Tom Russek, John Fischer, Albert Herrera, Royal Putnam. Bottom: The New Catholic Student Center was opened during the spring. Members of Catholic Student Association are in charge of the lounge Cam. send ggvei tions W' CamP"5 Humble enled 0 wesl Pa ralivfl ll' plosivef and Job OIQU eluded C poration ronio AI modern lone Sl '52, Catholic Student Association changes name of organization The Catholic Student Association voted at their last meeting to change the name of their organization. The new name will be Catholic Students in Action. The reason for the change is that the students are becoming more involved in campus and community work and it is no longer lust a social organization. This is not the first time the organiza- tions name has been changed. It started out in 1957 as the Newman Club, which was named after its founder. In 1968 the name was changed to Catholic Student Association. A new Catholic Student Center opened this spring. Members of the Association are in charge of the lounge at the new center. They serve refreshments and have pool and ping pong tables. Activities this year included the annual barbeque with money raised going to furniture for the new center. Other pro- iects were bake sales and a concession stand at Kleberg Park baseball field. Q state n Antonio during Seventeen students attended convention held in Sa the Spring. This was the first Yea' lol election of officers at the convention. In April, George Zarate attended I tion in San Antonio for I'eP"e5en'alllles' Representatives are in char9e of keepmg other dioceses in the state informed on what the campus happef1if195 CTBC. q conven- are in thai' lee-- nb ' ws- S: A 'x itgm: L Pltlgll lltdii, H lsllulql Teil at lambs several guest speakers and presenta- n at the meetings of the tions were give Campus Society of Chemical Engineers. mble Qil and Refining Company pres- allied a film entitled "Through the North- l wesf Passage" and the Celanese Corpo- ration held a demonstration entitled "Ex- ll ' . e on Interviews Wye," and a lectur End job Opportunities." Organization proiects this year in- cluded a field trip to Corn Products Cor- poration lnternational and to the San An- tonic Area to observe area plants and moclern industrial techniques, such as T Lone Star Brewery and Southwest Re- Campug Society of Chemical Engineers Sends officers fo workshop in Houston search. Club officers also attended a statewide workshop of Chemical Engi- neering students at the University of Houston. The purposes of the Campus Society of Chemical Engineers is to promote the professional development of its members by its programs and by its relations with other engineering organizations, and to contribute to the development of chemi- cal engineering at Texas A8rI through ac- tivities involving the faculty and student members. Any student enrolled in chemical or natural gas engineering is eligible to ioin. 5 ri ollceellllli l Fronl:l'u"Y Albrecht, Vasudev Patel Mohammed lsail Memom .lagdish Patel, Natvvar Patel, Shanker Patel, Ballit Singh Signal, 5232: Z:2?-Vi'j2:'2Nl:,"3ZlniUxkZ1T'Stigeisg Oimellol 5 lgutelfgc- V. Patel, ROY Dinesh Arvind Patel Naresh Shah, Abdul Akbani, Badat Hashim, Ramesh Shah. Row 3:RUPZ PEZ' Nimgicn Desai, Ranchhor Patel, Michele' lnllieii X Kaine, Hariibhai Patel, Dinesh Sha, Nassiii Mohammad. Row 4: Vinod Patel, Carl Herber, Danny Thiongpgjrzxasgey. Edwaivd Davis, Bharatkumm Patel, Karl Coffman, L Pmcflbleffy Hunt, D. C. Bhatt. Row 5: Dr. J. Browning Findley fSP0n50ri Dr- K' C' Ooslerhout lsponsori' , N P1059 Arturo Longoria, Jene Jennings. 201 6 5 Ni ES l KX E ff: S 52 Hi t.. it ki my E 1 l 3' i l 'tiffk ', XPS V,3lj5y,rZ!,.ViYn'iZ.H4-ZIIHVKWQFRNXQMIXMV 'R i "mtl '.?n. gt? 202 University Society of Chemistry Students now in second year on Texas A81 campus The Texas A81l University Society of Chemistry Students is in its second year on the A81I campus. This year the organi- zation had twenty members. The Society of Chemistry Students is open to all students interested in chemis- try and is designed to stimulate and serve the students' interest in the science of chemistry. Front: Mary Alice Diane Patterson Sharon Anne Hohon Becky Arredondo Row 2 De Edward Ruhnke D r 1 , . : . fsponsori, Manuel G. Ga ' , S ' H II ' I Gonzalez, Richard Sanchez, Carlos Zuazua, Roel Arredondo. Row 4: Dennis Linheart, Charles Dean. ma omg U I Fellx Hull' Row Jisylvw 1 I l ',..A,M,,....,..vf-'nugl .. Q? 1 K I ...NM L. Activities for the Society gf t Students included participation in the Carnival. Several guest Speakers ented a series of lectures. Special ers included Dr. R. Seymor from the versity of Houston, Dr. R, Z A8rM University, Dr. H. Shine, Texas Teh University, and Dr. Perry, Robert Welsh Foundation. "'90f0, Texas F'-I X. ,e X 'id' , .0 5" . ' , . N 'gy' fa E' Q it re is Q it l Q I l Z 9' " , 1' Qi ...s-Q...-a-U ,M .... ...Mu Ji Front:M A sim my nl' Klassgn, Kdren Lynn Tudhope, Alma Lee Adams. Row 2: Barbara Elliott, Raul Cisneros lbeaul, Luz Cantu. Row 3: Ada Marie Godley, Patty Briggs, Mary mons, Vongue Ramirez, Delta Omicron furthers interest in music, tutors young musicians in Kingsville area M nqnoemben of the Delta Omicron Inter- formxl Music Fraternity for Women per- I various services in the field of year. Some of these activities fflvsic this Included usherin tens hld. 9 Gt Community Con- qndgutq mg receptions after recitals, ln thonng young musicians. Corn' e lull' DO held a booth at the Fall iv I had mo where they sold articles the girls ode' They mode pinafores for the music classes at Harvey Elementary school, helped with the Christmas pro- gram at Harrel Elementary School, and made S120 raffling off an afghan. Each year they hold a recital in honor of Founder's Day. Their big proiect was doubling their membership with the initia- tion of 12 new pledges. Ada Marie Goldey's vocal talent won her a scholarship to the Seagle Colony Opera Guild at Schroon Lake, New York. The scholarship is for eight weeks beginning June 21. The purpose of the 14 member, honor- ary organization is to further the cause and awareness of women musicians. Requirements for membership include a 2.5 overall grade point average, 3.0 grade point average in all music courses, and outstanding musical potential. 203 if E Q fs 5 yi ,. S ss 5 PE -1: fi if .. N . . . .i ,m!Xx.Z.x-A YW JXSVNJ ,'LLY:NLZk'-5LX"i'X7Q?ER'2sXiQv?NVD7 wi ik ,, if 204 i ' ?,,"'rW F- ,Q :rr is A1 i . , f Episcopal Students boasts membership of 60 in first year Several members of the Episcopal Stu- dent's Association of Texas A8tl Univer- sity attended the Annual Council of the Diocese of West Texas. Ted Boya and Russell Franklin were delegates from the Church of the Epiphany. Ted Boya was the youngest delegate at the council. Twelve other students attended a ban- quet later in the week. The association holds a folk mass at the Church of Epiphany once a semester, weekly Eucharists, monthly dinners in co- operation with the Inter-Faith Council, and several refuats with students from other campuses within the Dioceses of West Texas. The organization made vest- ments and hangings for the church this year. The Episcopal Student's Association provides a means for students who are members of, or interested in, the Angli- can faith, to come together for worship and social activities. All interested students are invited to ioin the organization. The association was recognized by Texas A8tI during the 1971-72 school year. In its first year there were 60 Episcopal members who attended the weekly meetings. - reg ' ic ?'o-WY' Worship services, masses, and meetings are attended by Episcopal and other interested students. Front: Susan Ballard, Vicki Shofner, Kim Hargrove, Annette Booth, Betty Cooke Row 2: Robert Murdock, Leslie Adams, Kenneth Naylor, Charles Motes. Row 3: Hardy Bratton, Father Robert Kinney, Russell Franklin, Ted Boya, David Jones Danny Reed. I .E I5CDPALy STUDENTS? l l , i 43 , .3 ll HZ, l l 5 :Ii lf li, l V li 3 Members fm: L in mul '. .tl Wg sl. fn is F? .G .75 e Ndvddi Inch tml bw. Engineering group Eta Kappa Nu in first year at Acil The Zeta Beta Chapter of Eta Kappa Nu held an Initiation Banquet in April in the new wing of the Engineering building. The 20-member club also participated in the Area High School Career Day trips by accompanying professors making vis- its to the schools. The purpose of Eta Kappa Nu is to bring into closer union those men in Elec- trical Engineering who have achieved ac- ademic excellence. Juniors who have a cumulative scho- lastic rank in the upper quarter of their electrical engineering class and seniors who have cumulative scholastic rank in the upper third of their electrical engi- neering class are eligible for member- ship. Eta Kappa Nu was first organized in 1904 at the University of Illinois. In T916 Eta Kappa Nu had 110 chapters and over 60,000 members. The Zeta Beta Chapter was founded in the spring of 1971 on the A81I campus. Members of Eta Kappa Nu experiment with a piece of electrical equipment. Front: Dr. D. E. Todd, Enrique Rensendez, Evaristo Flores, Tommy Argubright, Jerald Brundrett, Gary Hitzfelder, Ray Mote, John Wincelowicz, Vernon Williams. Row 2: Ernest Hernandez, Virendra Patel, Richard Berett, lsavadharm Teia, Edward Pena, Sidney Stewart, Jose Aris Garcia, Michael Werblen. 205 M. 'SIZE T34- IE'-ii0C9"V.M Iii 1 .-2. v.lQi13S9.f ' 'iii- Q24-KXYQEZZHYKMHW t Efliikwf i R . 538459- fm- "Sjt54. N 206 Front: Nancy Lu Brown, Kathy Martin, Robin Howard, Jana Hayes, Phillip Scott, Margie McCurdy, Moon, Barry Hoff, Dove Jensen. Row 2: Sandra Krenshaw, Joe Trevino, Steve Wallace, Laura Vela, Jane Idom. Row 3: Carl G. Wood, Steve Shipley, Raymond Clark Jr., Randy Bonifay, Jay Brown, Jim Stanley. Footlights supports UIL meet, sponsors campus productions The Footlights Club supports all cam- pus productions and co-sponsored "The Fantastics" this year. Members of the Footlights Club also sponsored an Awards Night Banquet, and organized and worked for the UIL Scholastic Meet. The purpose of the Footlights Club is to further interest in the world of theatre. The club has been on the campus almost 40 years. Requirements for membership include an active interest in drama and a willing- ness to support university productions. Both drama and non-drama majors are able to ioin. Short skits like this one characterizing birds preying on worms stimulate the student's acting abilities as well as the imagination. 2 ,un-uunnilllls .L-1:1 'wi Jo . 'nu s. STX- msc- , in J t ff? Q X 253 x'i 2 v rf? -J Front Ed low 3: l lay Kles l E ef 'C if 1 5 1 W, helm Front: Eddie l-lagen, Richard Standridge, Jerome l. Moy, Jack Linney, Frank Dodson. Row 2: Billy C. Kellner, Greg Gee, Stanley Matson, Charlie Collins, Danny Canales. Row 3: Hllarlo Chapa, James Hodges, Steve Blount, Barry Branham, Denny Moore, Scott Stautzenberger. Row 4: Barry Christensen, Bill Pugh, Will Bates, Bart Cousins, Ray Klespies, Ronnie Haug. l wg,f,g J.i:s , In . ' cl .L ,K :. K., gbbl gms 4. 5 'L 'X-...LKQQI-' T '4'f':."'4f'. 5 551 I 'ff-sf 7 ' L' A vw Lf ., -,, - If , 9 - . 1 We . , .ng as Ps 1 ' - .. .. - . . 1 ' 'T H s'f "2' ' 'TT' . . as g J . J J , 1 A r's si 2- 7 .4 ' ' K ' sir. ,.,tl be T - 1 , --M, ' ' .- V ' Y iii" 'I' ' . A, A 'Lili gf ' wrfl 'l' -Piffx A A "fill Y- "lv il ' ' X 1 1-- ..v 1 I ,A K fx- 1 A W exif, ,A' . . In sf' . 4 My 'MAJ J -We e-'se 1 A if . ' 'gigigg xi Y A iiffx .. ,f is . 1 , 1 :ggi ,..s, is ' 5 , t A fl li L he A y i it M35 .,. . T A K K V his FFA holds annual leadership contest during fall semester During the fall semester this year the Future Farmers of America sponsored the annual Leadership Contest. The FFA an- nual Livestock Judging Contest was held during the spring semester. The primary aim of the Future Farmers of America is the development of agricul- tural leadership, cooperation and citizen- ship. The FFA motto is: Learning to do, doing to learn, earning to live, living to serve. In order to be eligible to join the FFA, a student must be enrolled in agriculture courses or be a former member of a lo- cal chapter of the FFA. FFA officers were Terry Lee, secretary, James Hodges, vice-president, Bill Pugh, president, and Greg Gee, reporter. 207 sQhF?Zk'l4'W7PK4 PH-i4I'7KI7 KJHXKVYWJ . '51 JWH 4 N. MLN' H. 'SHIP fi l1Q'7"'v.7' 'ff' 555555 JNAF3 TR.. NMWWJVWI YJRQ- , '1 MVN! ZW 2522?-I-Yi 'KA is 5 5' I 51. Wd! . 208 Youth City party held for children by Gold Jackets The Gold Jackets helped register and welcome students in the new gym during Homecoming this year. Gold Jacket members worked at the English Depart- ment book sale in November, and made Christmas stockings and had a Christmas party for Youth City. The Gold Jackets is a service organi- zation for the purpose of serving the campus and community. Students with a 2.5 grade point aver- age or over are recommended by the faculty for enrollment. Jani Dodds, Sue New, and Robbie Walker work on one of the Gold Jackets' service proiects. The members made Christmas stockings and gave a party for the children at Youth City. Front: Sue New, Belinda Harville, Linda Mueller, Robbie Walker, Jeanie Barnard, Pat Behal, Joyce Simek. Row 2: Kathey S. Bernard lsponsorl, Susan Collard, Sandy Mann, Susan Goode, Dana Morgan, Terry Sue Cavender, Karen A. Dittlinger, Raychel A. Haugrud lsponsorl. Row 3: Teri Jones, Connie Saathoff, Janice Smith, .lani Dodds, Barbara Allen, Susan Ballard, Joyce Jones, Emma Basaldua. lrorl lea Naiarioflr C I I I S rv X . 0 'H' 6? gg 40 79 0 , ni at rt 1- 99 it is in H up qq 99 Q5 gi , Elf .il si I A,A. - 1 . i lflti Iiedsllnrrrlr isaiCollarl,lri ,1udoeSrM Frontfleo Larsen isponsorj, Mabel H. Bohannon, Domingo Copelo, John Toliver. Row 2: Ramon Pulido, Anita Pulido, Alex Barrera, Arnold Leal, Jose G. Cruz. Row 3: Nasario Cruz, Arturo Gonzales, John A. Perme, Johnny Marroquin, Dr. Stewart E. Cooper lsponsorl. 4, .ff V 4, 2713-1 E A Q, Fi, I. .ll -g Q l ,1q:. xr Z. 'xx - 3 I f , Q 1 V X f uw 4' ,f 1 x V , ,J U fl ui HPE club members offended Houston AAHPER con vention Thirteen members of the Health and Physical Education Club attended the Na- tional AAHPER convention in Houston during March. The convention of the American Asso- ciation of Health and Physical Education and Recreation included a general ses- sion, various study groups, demonstra- tions and workshops. Evening social func- tions were also on the agenda. AAHPER obiectives are to combat those forces in society that alter man's environment or interfere with his opportu- nity for optimum development physically, mentally, socially and esthetically. Students attending the convention, ac- companied by Dr. Stewart Cooper and Dr. Lea Larson, are Alex Barrera, Mabel Bohannon, Cynthia Chandler, Lupe Cruz, Nasario Cruz, Arminda Esquivel, Cynthia Guerrero, Ginger Johnston, Arnold Leal, Virginia Miller, John Perme, and John Tolliver. During the fall semester HPE Club members gath- ered at Mesquite Grove for a barbecue. 209 136455 -w 'T1EfIMT7l0 T144- 751 1SR19f'i',6A R -'fi N :AW ti I'2H.f' lExNltZ5f:'8:f ,- S . 1 . iXX'SI+?,12LYNL24-ZYZVKILPWXCWJMV -wa 5: 'ki' FZ.. 2lO Front: Maria Pena, Connie Talamantez, Alma Hinoiosa, Maria Ramos, Rita de Leon, Irma Bazan, Evita Ynostroza. Row 2: Gloria Garcia, Norma Alvarez, MGYY De l-0 Fuente, Rosa Vela, Celia Ramirez, San Juanita Hernandez, Diana Ramirez, Gloria Mendietta, Bobbie Soto. Row 3: Rey Roias, Toby Vasquez, Juan Abrigo, Benito Garcia, Albert Maldonado, Dale Thompson. Club Hispanoamericano holds annual trip to Mexico City during A841 spring bf9Uk Club Hispanoamericano held several activities this year including their annual trip to Mexico City during the spring break and the "Cinco de Mayo" Cele- bration. Members of the organization also sponsored various fund raising pro- iects, dances, a Mexican Dinner, and an annual banquet. "La Posada" and the annual Turkey Trot were maior organiza- tional proiects. Faculty sponsor of the Hispano Club, Dr. Stanley Bittinger, presented a lecture and slide show entitled "A Trip Through Mexico" during one of the club's meetings. - Any Texas A8tl University studenlllll good standing with the university is ellgl- ble to ioin the organization. The PU'P05e of Club Hispanoamericano is to Pfomole hispanic culture and encourage lhe stuily of Spanish and the culture of Sp0f1'5h Americans. in This year there were 45 members of 25 the Hispano Club, an increase. members. The club is going lnlo 'fs sec' ond decade on the A8rl campUS- Every Year the club SPOUSOVS PIUYS' lectures' and movies. IL, 1. rt 555 fir ilk! lf ll 1 l I 7 lronl:Sl1n Patricia B llrry lla: Jvarez, WF! li rig0, W Mi i ynual ffl 1 ybrecl i sity Wllllk ive n, llle 1 rsil! if M t t is lo llama' t N99 me Sli re of sw 5 m0f"l'ls2E credfe ,of 6, I info 'ls sen ampuljbl 7Y5f ..fy52Q.'L,3'6i"- nfs,-"g,., dw ns--sw' W .--4- ' w , it 4-ff, I' Km -S5 vffx. . .Q .3-5 rw -in Y Q, 4,-5.35 .YM ffff ff, 911' R71 - 11. y s ,V ' W 'MU kj grontrSlgaron Fraizer, Joyce Jones, Patricia Harris, Alma Lozano, Susan Hamrick, Linda Galvan, Mary Ramirez, Rosalind Ybarra, Annell Montgomery, Tricia Yarborough, ctrlcla asham, Wanda Good. Back: Judy Allen lsponsorl, Bobby Soto, Mardell Montgomery, Kathy Mills, Jane Doe, Phyllis Pfeifer, Karen Prukop, Susan Nonmacher, Mary Flack, Cindy Wasson, Dianne Haby, Linda Barnes, Dr. Ruth Galdin lsponsorl. Wu Fqlilushio ns 5l'0W was follere modeled by home economics maiors at a fashion show attended by 70 P9l'50n5- Th wed bt' Cl Chuckwagon barbeque hosted by the Home Ec Association. e fashion Home Ec members attend convention, have cookbook sale A The Texas A8tl Chapter of the Ameri- can Home Economics Association at- tended the State American Home Eco- nomics Association Convention. During the course of the year, the association held a chuckwagon Barbeque, style show, and an installation banquet of new officers. At the Fall Carnival the Home Econom- ics Association members sponsored the "Kountry Kitchen." Also, this year, the organization held demonstrations on freezing food and cake decorating. ln or- der to raise money, the members sold cookbooks. The purpose of this organization is to assist-in fulfilling the purpose of the state and national associations of home eco- nomics and to promote fellowship and a professional spirit among the home eco- nomics chapter members. Any A8tl student who is enrolled in or is interested in home economics is eligible for membership. Honorary membership may be conferred upon any faculty mem- ber, or upon persons not in school, who show unusual interest in the club. 5 121.2 L75 's :fill-5523 45? U . .K:,..1.,i,xh, -. ,WI , H H.. ,.,e::,.,., A .NAS X, 2,3 M... .,, -,tw ie!! '13?S5?t3!!8d'e 28597 'R 53X?5Q?2?aYWE-ZYZYMZWAWW 'GAJ . ?PSf5c v i lt l i 1 i i -, New- rl 3 5 212 f Ne-11---J Front: Kenneth Bubert, H. D. Thompson lsponsorl, Monte Jacoby, Sharon Ply, Will Bates, Bart Cousins, Jane Dow, Raymond Kosub, Dr. Leo Bailey lsponsorl, Greg Gee. Row 2: Jim Briscoe, Lisa Laykasek, Denny Moore, Kenneth Bird, Tommy West, Billy Kellner. ' Members of the Horticulture club worked on the landscaping to the entrance of the James C. Jernigan Library for one of the proiects of the organization. Horticulture Club works for campus """'X''-'ff-""'4'Ta, 1 fx1'LiffiiTi"?'1 . beautification g ' 5 f This year, in its general program of 3.535153 .Q campus beautification, the Horticulture Club took over the landscaping of the . I front entrance of the James C. Jernigan . 'B f Library. Members worked at university V M T 'J beautification under the direction of the ' club's sponsor and founder, Dr. Leo Bai- ley, and the University's landscape archi- it tect, H. D. Thompson. Founded in 1955, the Horticulture Club stresses fellowship among horticulture ' and landscaping students and beautifica- tion of the campus. This year the group's 23 members sponsored a plant sale on Dad's Day, decorated for Dr. J. A. Howe's retirement banquet, and secured 25 hibiscus plants for display at the Dad's Day Plant Sale. Membership to the organization is open to any students who are interested in plants and landscaping. There is one dollar a semester dues. 1 Qi I ' -Al. W. I 4 t 2 .LA lfpwlfffii sCltffI9'I'lll 4 I f ,, Al Q Ill A.. 'fllllll l il' l I rf l ' ' V - .I I .L , - ' 4 , I 7 I' "'! ,.2f, I -iff., I .i t,. '.' i . 4' WL 'Y I I r I TX , .. Among the India Students' activities this year was the celebration of "India Night," consisting of Indian dances and music. Better relationships between countries India Students goal The India Student Association brought many Indian movies to the A8.I campus this year. Every Friday evening was de- voted to Indian music presentation. Dur- ing the fall the India Students celebrated "India Night" where native dances and music were presented. The purpose of the Association is to develop a better relationship between students from India and the American people, and to create suitable circum- stances for the exchange of Indian and American cultures. Anyone interested in the activities of the association can become a member. Front: P. K. Mody, N. R. Dharia, G. B. Shah, J. C. Patel, H. S. Dhruv, J. A. Patel, A. J. Sheth, H. C. Parikh. Row 2: G. G. Patel, C. V. Patel, M. T. Domadwala, H. C. Patel, K. V. Pandya, T. S. Patel, Natwar Patel, Shanker Patel, Ramesh R. Shah. Row 3: J. D. Patel, J. Z. Dalwadt, Hasmuikh, Shah, C. Raydinesh, Naresh Shah, Deven Bhott, Nayan Desai. Row 4: Niranian K. Desai, Suhas S. Gandhi, Prince Pruthvirai, Dhirailal K. Gaiiar, Suresh K. Ghadia, Shashin N. Desai, Navanit N. Modi. Row 5: Vinod X. Patel, Advind R. Patel, Harish M. Patel, M. K. Jhaveri, Rashmi T. Patel, Dinesh N. Shah, Jayesh N. Patel, Bharatkumar R. Patel, Vinod C. Shah, Mayurkant S. Desai. I 5 fi? ga Wifi. 93 T2:PS7iS'!5C .-5435? -11, s .L Q. 73 .1 1 .3 ' 1 1 Y, .J s 6 ,. 'JH- T 2i:XZ'IxE'..21- if 51. iK4,St'.t ?ltf.F5i:'?31- I I Industrial Arts Club sends four members to national convention, holds banquet This year the 31 members of the In dustrial Arts club hosted the Coastal Bend Industrial Arts Festival In the spring they held their annual banquet at the Round Table Inn The National Convention in Dallas was attended by two faculty members and four students. At the Texas State Fair in Austin several faculty members and four students iudged the industrial art works by the tumor highs and high scho I pects from classes such os eathers and machine sho . , P :ted in the showcase of the IAII:JL:xh . ng . This year s Outstanding Industrial A Maior was DeWitt George a senior, rls rom Port Lavaca who was awqr cate for his accomplishments ' I In th ' of Industrial Arts e IIeIII GS Plastic ded Q cemfi' nh Keith Oliver, Charles DeWitt George Jr., R dy Ramos, Gloria Castillo Allen Baass Alan Johnson. Row 2: Steve Humphrey Doroteo Rios John F. h Ed 'S ef, war l M0fSOn, Jr., Jimmy Huey. Row 3: Joel Morales, Jerry W. Hedrick Isponsorl, Frank St. Clair, Jim Picquet, Robert Garcia. 4 Front: Marvin R. Redden, Dhavaiiai Tefa-lsavadharm, Ratan Suiit Sen, Rodrigo Meifueiro, Pete Carrizales, Paul Graf, Emerson Korges isponsori. Row 2: Rodney Fuller, Edward Reisner, Jose Garcia, Evaristo Flores, Nelson Saenz, Sidney Stewart. Row 3: Michael McDougall, Gilberto Moreno, Jerry Brundrett, Jayesh Patel, Albert Herrera Daniel Saucedo. Row 4: Henry Lessner, Michael Vorndam, Viren Patel, Enrique Resendez, Doyle Peake, Michael Weiblen, Gary Hitzfelder, Michael Matteson. Films presented in fall semester to IEEE, Colusio speaks on summer trip fo NASA The Institute of Electrical and Electronic FIIQIHGHS held many educational meet- 'IIQS during the course of the year. In Oc- lober, the University of Texas presented G film entitled "Thermo-Nuclear Re- De ember and December the H purtment of the Navy presented nglneering Solutions to our Envi- Search." In Nov 50me E Emmfnlfll Problems," and Dr. Joseph aIU5'0 Spoke on his summer at NASA. 'WVY Gnd March Dr. Hiatt During Feb Ejesglled G microbiological engineering roll ,em and explained engineering's sponsm med'C'n9, Gnd a program was mio Ofed by Southwestern Bell. Presen- A .Il of semo' PI'0iects was giyen in prize nstitute also sponsored a PUPer contest in the spring, The pur bIe 'Ile student t Pose of the Institute is to ena- 0 start building the bridge from the present studies to the fu- ture positions in industry, government, and the academic world. Any student registered as an under- graduate or graduate student in a com- munity college, technical institute, col- lege, or university is eligible for member- ship. Students must be carrying at least 30? of a full-time academic program in electrical or electronics engineering, ra- dio, and allied branch of engineering, or engineering technology. IEEE is anational and international or- ganization. The organization was founded in 1884 by Gssfwp Of 25 mem' bers including Thomas Edison and Alex- ander Graham Bell. The IEEE has 9f0Wn to a world wide membership of 165,000 over the years and is now the largest en- gineering society in the world. 215 H S 5 'E s wi E ll i E fl S 5 E Z 1 E 3, ii Ei 3 E2 54 3 SZOGWAM KKK-W . '1.X'.WNA2'b'5-'5s'1Lui' Y-. -."?R."fdJ' VE I 1 I 216 Kappa Kappa Psi S.. -... has representatives at Mich. convention -' The Epsilon Delta Chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi was represented at the KKY National Convention in Ann Arbor, Michi- gan, during the last week of August by David Wilburn, Dennis Smith, and David Kurtz. The National Executive Secretary, Rob- ert R. Rubin, spoke at a dinner held in his honor at A81l. The Chapter was also represented at the District Convention at Baylor Univer- sity in March. Proiects sponsored by Kappa Kappa Psi included a car wash, candy sale, tur- key raffle, Band Day, planning halt time shows during the fall semester, and mak- ing plans for the out of town trips the band made. The equally busy spring se- mester included a bike raffle, car wash, third annual Stage Band Festival, and the annual Spring Tour by the A81l Band. 4 P , ., e - - I-. f' - 4 Kappa Kappa Psi is an Honorary Fra- ' ternity for the College Bandsman, operat- ing exclusively in the field of the college and university bands, to promote the col- lege band and to honor outstanding bandsmen through ,membership in KKY. Members must have been in college band at least one semester and must be outstanding bandsmen with outstanding leadership qualities. ik - - Q v .3 wg . ,N X x !. 'Q' ,AK l I I : -T S A 3 -is'i 1ii Members of Kappa Kappa Psi discuss the bands half-time shows, concerts, and tours with Dr. Bellamah each week. Making these plans is one of the main obiectives of the organization. Front: Bobbie Lackey lsweetheartl. Row 2: David Kurtz, Dennis Smith, Noe Estringel. Row 3: Raul Cisneros, Lupe Ruiz, Leo Garza. Row 4: Tommy Zdunkewicz Karl Cowden, Kenneth Shoquist. Row 5: Doug Dowell, Ray Grimm, David Wilburn. I qc: f-'SR ith f X P , , gg? sg? r T 2 J 5 it .ll . 1, ' I Me rdf r Q The Laredo Club sponsored a chalupa sole at the Fall Carnival. l ' Front: Mario R. Lugo, Sylvia Guevara, Consuela Lugo Rivos, Arabelle Martinez, Javier Mata. Row 2: Alice X Garza, Rene Rosales, Oscar Diaz, Ricardo Lopez, Jaime Medina, Cynthia V. Ramos, Jesie M. Jimenez. Row 3: l Juan Jose Gonzalez, Coyetano Tiierino, Elmo Canales, Alvaro F. Lopez, Eloy Vera, Pete Fonseca, Albert J. Y Zdunkmxrf Herrera. Row 4: George O. Coalson lsponsorl, Luis F. Badell, lsponsorl, Pete Soenz, Jesus M. Cruz, Arturo R. VSQU, Pedro Ochoa, Roberto Trevino, Jesus Rangel. Laredo Club holds chalupa sale at A841 Fall Carnivalg raffle The 40 members of the Laredo Club of Texas A811 University held a successful chalupa sale with live entertainment dur- ing the Fall Carnival. Prior to the Thanks- giving holidays, the Laredo Club spon- sored a turkey raffle. Throughout the year, the club held several parties and a barbeque for club members. The organi- zation also co-sponsored the second an- nual "Cinco De Mayo" celebration. The Laredo Club, with the motto "friendliness is our custom," is open to all students who will support the club's obiectives. The purpose of the organiza- tion is to provide a scholarship for an en- tering student at Texas A8rl. The Laredo club is one of the oldest organizations on the A811 campus. Origi- nally the club was only open to students from Laredo. The organization has ex- panded to include any student who is registered at A8rl. For the second year in a row a mem- ber of the Laredo Club was elected Homecoming Queen. The 1971 queen was club member Cynthia Ramos, senior from Kingsville. Other entertainment provided by the club was a presentation of a classic Can- tinflas film. pr 217 iHJQGlhVN2J5Ck'Lfi'VI'RI-T0NF?ltZ'.4'l't"'f 'B 1: 4522144 'R 'B-"Xlw?li!!A . '81 S!lE4K'a,K.!H'2'?!l-'Q' " - " Fi ' Wa' WP?1r'iiSW2RY!kl7 W1 ,ZLYNI-2' A? .' .' 31. Wdi- 'R . THEY '23 218 , . - ' I M rgaret Thomas. ROW Front: Barbara Elliott, Mary Ann Klassen, Diana Treio, Annette Booth. Row 2: Bob Gowdey, David Garza, Dennis Smith, Robert MuzqU'1 0 Reeder, Robert Joslin Silva, Patty Briggs, Raymond Grim, Daniel Vacek. MENC provides members with orientation, music education Music Educators National Conference Student Chapter number 462 is designed to provide its members with the opportu- nity for professional orientation in music education. While membership is open to all stu- dents and includes annual subscriptions to both state and national iournals, music education maiors are especially encour- aged to ioin this organization. To be eli- gible for membership a student must present proof of enrollment at A8tl and pay a fee each semester. Fund raising proiects include guest speakers and performances. They assist in conducting the annual UIL Regional ln- strumental and Vocal I competition, as well as the lime tival, and the GI'e99"Y'Porlla clinic and concert. The club 0 delegates to the TMEA sponsors a local member lo U lso fice. Q n .1 -Q., g ,..--Q 1 an . X I , Q 4 Q i Q D .N 1 5 lk. QU 5, V I S. 1 Wi Y IA fx ze '12 V 4. Q f of 'TAX fx . 'if' 4 mm' fini M. .z 3 4 IES' ' t . ,W if . x. X x xfx vi I 1 .wan i " i 0 i ' . N QSM wi ax ..xJ..s.....--A-' ----ff' --" ,. as 220 l . ' ' . 3: D Christen- Fronh Irma Bazan, Donna Whitley. Row 2: Martha Gibson lsponsorl, Olympia Valadez, Carolyn Oreschmgg, Annabelle Ramos, Belinda HJarvLiesl5Z:arCek0'Egrena Ann sen, Dalees Fitzpatrick, Sharon McDonald, Jane Miller, Janie L. Garza, Yolanda Zapata, Ana Acevedo. Row 4: Dwight Hazeltt lsponsori, OY ' Mudd, Jani Dodds, Barbara Ann Allen, Patty Hayes, Dr. Dennis Ford lsponsorl. Business sorority, Phi Gamma Nu, is The sponsor of College Town Holi on campUS As part of their Town Hall programs, Phi Gamma Nu Sorority sponsored Col- lege Town Hall on campus with James Blain, moderator, who is Director of In- dustrial Relations and is associated with Texas Manufacturers' Association in San Antonio, and panelists Elaine Hobbs, with Central Power and Light Company in Corpus Christi, and Mrs. Mitty Rhodes with Mercantile National Bank in Corpus Christi, in a round table discussion. Phi Gamma Nu also presented Mrs. Dee Shade from Corpus Christi Bank and Trust who spoke during the professional dinner meeting, held in the fall, on bank- ing as a career for women and on busi- ness challenges a woman must meet in order to be accepted in the business world. Activities this year included a Dad's Day Reception, open house during Homecoming, and the Pl? 7055 G"'1eQ"'l Carnival. The Ofganlzahon also reciih nizes the female business Qfcduara lio- the highest grade point average-I ct: for roritY holds various service zfoliommu. campus organizations and te 'f . - ' nl Business or Business Educclloll gmgliieli who maintain a 2.00 Qfadehfmm age are eligible for members 'p'NU is to The Purpose of Ph' Gammcczaiaonof encourage scholarship Gnd CSEO common women students who have T 9 goal of business. ' founded . as . The international sor0rlfY W Unl- f rn FebruarY 17 I W24 at Nofthwihee AlPha sity in Cl1ic0g0, llllnols' N was game a Chapter Of Ph' Gamma Ui 15, 9 us installed on the A8-I Campus Aug 1969. ,s x v.l:90W0'l" mhlml' 115 llle :ampl ross df it fl ,n also ml Qfallle i fer09'j lf W :e Plolelll 4 me will ' s ucativfl mllll, de Pvt' ll rS:g'NU 5, ll Tl 0 cldlloll wai lolllll hwetlem ll l The lllls lima Nl 15, 5 A uglltl l I 10 -Members of Phi Gamma Nu sponsored College Town Hall on campus. Panelists were Elaine Hobbs, senior procedure analyist with Central Power and Light Compa inlliorpus Christi, James Blain, moderator, director of industrial relations in San Antonio, and Mitty Rhodes, with Mercantile National Bank in Corpus Christi. Boffo Members of Phi Gamma Nu participated in the three-legged-race at Campus Capers held during April. m. Z.DHklDX4S2Z!E.1Ki54hYZQEYlKtl"-'19'AU VHA - ?3f'iA3i7563SUZ'. 'BNIB ESM-'af-1 ' f ' , Sli? ' 'LW . X1i'M'?.7',fLJf2'1!iIrY?-Z2-EPZHilti-?:R'xt'li'.iL'f2hY.?I't7f Te 'wil' 222 Front: Charles Allison Omar Garza, William R. Miller, Herbert Peake. Row 2: Philip Morey adviser, Mike Bennett, Darryl Hazlett Eugene Mittag Robert Solis q Matteson. Films, field trips, speeches help form Society of Physics The Texas A8il University Section of the Society of Physics Students sent four students, one sponsor, and one guest to the SPS Convention at Trinity University in October. The 24 members went on field trips to the Celenese Plant at Bishop and to the Zinc Smelting Works in Cor- pus Christi. The club presented three films from NASA, and Dr. L. D. Hewett gave a speech on astronomy. Organizational proiects included a Fall Barbeque at Kingsville's Elk Lodge, and a Spring Banquet at Kings Inn. The club also had a booth at the Fall Carnival and gave a Christmas Party. The purpose of the organization is to stimulate and serve the students' interest in the science of physics. Regular membership is restricted to University students who have not re- ceived a Doctor's degree, but who hold physics as a primary interest. Member- ship is acquired upon payment of the an- nual dues set by the organization. ln December the Physics Club decorated a large tree in Lon C. Hill Building and held their annual Christmas party. I 1 P . n x - 1 Q x . - ' iv' 1 e 'u'-1 ..- 1 f I ,al ff ' ' .Y C... Yiwu X Q A . .f 4' I, K 5 ,lvl ,X A , if ' "ins , ,Rift Ng- .t iraternity's stage band makes many appear- ,ond takes part in various stage band compe- l 4 Phi Mu Alpha displays memorial portrait of Hauenstein, holds benefit variety show Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia held a benefit variety show this year for the Mental Health Foundation. The organization also presented a Roger A. Hauenstein Memo- rial Concert, and a portrait, to be dis- played in the Music Building. Homecoming Dances and Christmas caroling highlighted the annual fall events, and the Phi Mu Alpha Annual Banquet was held in the spring. The purpose of the 38 member frater- nity is to encourage and actively promote the highest standards of creativity, per- formance, education, and research in mu- sic in America. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia was founded in 1898 at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Among Sinfonia's membership may be found some of the outstanding musicians of the day, per- forming in every maior city and teaching in the national universities, colleges, and high schools. Anyone who shows interest for music either by adopting music as his profes- sion or by working to advance the cause of music in America, may loin the organi- zation. Membership requirements are met by anyone enrolled in the institution with no less than a 2.25 grade point average. :Hipolito Garza, Raul Cisneros Jr., Leopoldo Garza, Daniel Valdez, Bertha lpaddlel. Row 2: Jose Rodriguez, David Garza, Ruben Garcia, Matias Garcia. Row 3: lKurtz, Jose Compean, Tommy Zdunkewicz, Rene Guzman, Dan Duncan lsponsorl. Row 4: Hector Hernandez, Roland Zapata, Ben Delgado, Paul Johnson, George ar, Sam Amberson. ff l i ff ' 1 223 F 2 3 2 H E PE 2 5 'S S E 5 i F 5- ECM VJNMKEWNRTY . 'AYPM'-ZY"i'555"l5:J'1' K ' Win. "idl- "il, va 224 Rodeo Club, Kings The Rodeo Club presented three maior rodeo events this year, the Dad's Day Rodeo, an open rodeo co-sponsored by the Kingsville Police Department, and the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Associa- tion competition, which was held in April during the Aggie Round-up. Club members competed in bareback riding, bull riding, steer facing, steer dog- ging, barrel racing, tiedown roping and ribbon roping. Money earned from the rodeos went to scholarships and to spon- soring other competitions. The rodeo co- ville Police Department co-sponsor rode sponsored by the Kingsville Police De- partment was the first open rodeo the club has put on, but they are planning to make it an annual event. E, L, Sparks, sponsor of the club for six years, was elected faculty advisor for the I3-school Southern Region of NIRA. This automatically makes him a member of the NIRA board of directors and re- quires his participation in the national fi- nals rodeo held June 20-25 in Bozeman, Mont. Two club members earned enough points to compete at Bozeman althou ' li the rodeo team fell short of enough points to compete nationally. The req! was fourth in the Southern Region. Albe Bissett competed in steer wrestling qn Lynn Jacoby in goat tieing. Regular membership is open to all fulli time students who are carrying Q min ig mum of 12 hours work. Associate mem. bership is open to former students 0 are granted to persons interested in th club as recognition for their services. Front: Jay Zickefoose, Frank Burbank, Margaret Ferrell, Jerry Favor, Carol Ewald, Tex Terry, John Bednorz. Row 2: Hugh Todd, David M. Shearer, Barbara Hinnant, Trey Elmore, Albert Bissett, Phyllis Scheible, Beverly Collier, Mary Frack. Row 3: Baldemar Garza Jr., George Redding, Charles Weathersby, Larry Urban, Steve Blount, Larry Brand, Lonnie Stewart, Tim Mokry, Eddie Skrobarcek. Texas A8.I, and honorary memberships e. W gy 1, J 1. . . 42, in ,' 'E l nn Aw ui N f X '4 I x S f . V if-fi..' ..c',,. wiki' X-Q V ,. V -' X ,X x " C' 5' . Ir.-.uf .,,,:, x V v bt ,,,v: 1 , if . Q Q B uf r 1 -H . - ,X X lx - J. n N 1. P' I -I .x . Y 2' x :Hai-.A ,lj aK!fp,4-by "M, S If if K, .4 -' V. 52,4 L'z,,,:v....l Q 1 , ,. ff , 4 ,' WM Q ff ff- , V - W ' v f'q"':i' 9 Y ' fi I "'AA' x 'V' ' i " ' MQ? f ' 'f'541N. I -X 1 , "SM Irv. Q . 41- . 2.4, kp I 0 . A ,..,.. 6 4 :fi , ,l . 5 - 3,.3,5l, 1, fa, 1 X ,f-V '2 I A " , ,,,: t way , fa, ' ?, , , ., 45 , 1 I X y was , 52 . , , fix, 'G wr, TLV' QW!! itudiv-fd f 41 S6"JU""'! 162 , 77 I ,f ,i,f ' W1 , , ,, X f . f ,,,f,,,Lf we-WWA, .v wwf 4 I D 'nf". . ,- W- X, . , , g 6' " ,Af ' ,. ,I - A, 2 '--'flu . H, "WW V ' 4 ','f-.T 1- igf" .L . , vi .M I . 5 ' 5 ' if V' ,V " W , 1, A , " 1 rf, 121 f 1, A Kg if-0. M. . V . V Q -.Ly v-.4 T . 4 ff , ,- . f 5 , , ' I! , .. . XA ,Y 'wif '3 5 , f ff 'W--:I E- Y, ' V V' a M. A Y V4 If 1 X M ' ' 'Vw . 8 .4 .1 1 GV , W , f f -1 - . 4 Y X' " " igif ,,' . ....,.,4,,9 , wp... , . . ww :. , MX. ..., , , 'j ,: Q Q f ' inf'-? wvimr . 4-43f1,,'32Y-M 4,573 V' Mfg ,gg-1142-f?,:,1xL' Q31 fwwfxf " fl f '-kfswf. , f .gg if mgfgg-w , A 4. '5z'fH,4x .V V1 f 3 I ,Aw : 1 -, A 5, I ,I I QI.l.f.f A b . V . 4' ffE"?" ,' 'V f' 1 151-V-If, Wy 2, gg va . . ., ,v-,35by3f:g,, - ' f 1 1 , , ,.,, , 1 1 I 1 4 ,:' ' ebkiminli I wh 2 13.5, . 'Neo' i V i 44. .ra 1 we , my 1 , Y E 1 J Y 'L 4 1?-I 1 f1',3f. 'x VHI. j L ' 4 , 2:5 ,wy ,ij if xfl 4 il ill S Q., xx 5 Z' ,, Nt , 1 Q I' i wx x , Xia If JI I b 5 l r 4 E National member of Tau Beta Sigma honored at banquet Tau Beta Sigma, the sister organiza- tion to Kappa Kappa Psi, co-sponsored Band Day and A-the Stage Band Festival during the fall and spring semesters. In November, the TBZ National Executive Secretary was honored at A81I, and dur- ing the last week of March TBZ was rep- resented at the District Convention in Waco. Tau Beta Sigma was chartered on the A8iI campus in February of 1970. Last year the national organization recog- nized its 25th anniversary and four mem- bers of the local chapter went to Ann Ar- bor, Michigan, for the National Conven- tion in August. The purpose of Tau Beta Sigma is to provide service to college bands. Mem- bers must have been in band at least one semester, and should have an inter- est and willingness to work for the bene- fit of the band. Vangie Ramirez, Mary Simmons, Beverly Urian. Row 32 Front: Janie Quilantan, Jerry Favor, Cindy Toland, Vangie Perez Patsy Nester Martha Guerra Dana Morgan Row 2 Sandra Garcia Sylvia Schimek Steve 5 aver Jacque Schmidt, Adelfina Perez, Mike Rivera. Row 3 Jimmy Huey Patricia Smith Erika Perez Betty Jo Burkett Susan Ballard Dwlght Edens Youth City project involves tutoring by SEA members The Student Education Association helps with the tutoring proiect at Youth City, and conducts surveys to learn the feeling of the students in the Education Department. Members of the Association also held a faculty tea and observed American Education Week. During the meetings of the Student Ed- ucation Association, several faculty mem- bers have presented lectures and films on the field of teaching. The Association was represented at the Area IV Conven- tion in Laredo and at the State Conven- tion in San Antonio. Members of the As- sociation also attended the new officer workshop. SEA sponsored several social events dur- ing the course of the year, including an ice cream social. Membership has increased this year by 95, giving the Association a total of 275 members. Anyone interested in the edu- cation field is eligible to ioin the organi- zation. The purpose of the Student Education Association is to acquaint students with the education profession and help them become the better teachers of tomorrow. f ,- ...-f"""'d:- If 1 ' Q 1 en. kv K. X lv- ,x., W.,- -H-exill-.leII4E I . F! 9' r , Y 1 'X . msemsmsff, i Membe held . rs of Siudent Education Association attended the conventions that w "1San Ant ' h T studenwd .OHIO Gnd Laredo. The conventions were sponsored by 1 6 .EXC-5 'iesond rcufwn Association, and were attended by delegations from universi- ate COISQBS throughout the st 3 5 5 3: 5 5 E e 5 5 S E. A N E 3 4 E .. S 4 :- 1 G il Ame ' 1 a-WZYA14 7755371 Y 5k':l'!d' 2 'B' I ?FA."1dJ - 'E-. ,K 's XXVDJJ'-?,'G3:'1!uL1X'-Zr'3'5V4YkHfJ1d+iiW:N?JlY ere X 4 2,000 participate in annual Fall Carnival during November A 24-booth Fall Carnival crowded into the Nierman faculty parking lot in No- vember with over 2,000 participating. 4 Pastries, Mexican Foods, popcorn, and hotdogs were sold among many games l of skill, chance, and funniness. y History of the annual student activity ' dates back to 1955, and participation by y student organizations has grown steadily i through the years. In the past, the carni- vals were held on the SUB and bookstore l lawns. Three years ago, the site was r changed to the faculty parking lot. To avoid duplication of booth offer- l i ings, organizations were given a first- y y come-first-serve choice by registering with i James Prewitt, Student Union Director. A i 57,50 materials fee was charged each yf club, with 52.50 refunded after cleanup y of the parking lot. l' !,,!A, 5 AQ l" . ' , ' Lfwli , 4 y l , 43 li 5 s ll 5 'l Q f I 1 , , l i r l to l l l Z as I i 4 l l E l i ' I , i z l l r ri 3 li l R l 234 ,L gssx- 'I ws, F , 2 ,1 - ,- f.-Q ,Q I kk 3 E 1-J' L f 51 I C ZZ! R. Campus Capers held on E SUB lawn 1 cg, W! IJ N'-.....,. 235 :v. 5 4 S P if Q 53 3 S Nx fl x PE 5 ? Yi 4 ?i gi 5 3 1 k 1. 'JWH QYNLZF-QXKVAWLJMWMHZKV EW' TFA. rm- 'L 55.531 4-I l l l N 1 I V 1 Panhelln iicrelar r..,. .I p CWC L45 1 i , 5. Q 4 f' ' I ' p . r -- Q ' 'w'fl"""5" ,A " pf ,fr ., . W f ,V 4 ' fi," ' , ' .," ' ... J., "' , -' V N "f"'5fx,,' f -of 2 M7 P'61"ff - if , ,, fi iff 'Mf"'9-ftiimif Y" -Vw. .v . - , vw- .. '- 8 1 A , -- -'ff " 2 Z fafffx i'."'.'s 'i , f ,Q -yi QW ,,f. , ff IZW4' f, -, fi .fs f I - ,M a- - , . -sqgf ' - ,p ',..- . gf if 'p "fl ffl, " I Yr WZ ,oc I1 ,qyf . . ' D ,114 ,, K Jkt x -, jp,-. ' J , , ' ' A , Q nfns.-J I .-.I -. ' ' if ' ' L L is ,p p pp 1 ' ,s,.. , g, ,. . , ' 3.5 y,p4..g ,,, fi 1' :'. Q " ww M5 ff . A , WWW' A ' ' V. ' ' " ' " -sv. p-x- 'H' Vs.:--L c .Q 'S , T , p r ' gm - 1, r ff M., y,f1"v.x. iw f - N fs , H puvr ZW! X g 7 , , , Q I6 K, ,f H 7 ,, if ,. A D p may V ,. e I 4, it Q :T 1 ,Ag W N, ,..,. ' .,,,, T is f C l "fx" 'wr H 4-it ' T' 'Wi' A Front: David Holiday, Delta Sigma Pip Jim Patterson, Delta Sigma Pip Gary Steadman, Alpha Tau Omegap Doug Schueneman, Sigma Chip Lester Mallory, Tau KGPPU Epsilonp Mat Donalson, Sigma Chip Tom Hill, Alpha Tau Omega. Row 2: Robert Blackman, Kappa Sigmap Javier Guevara Tau Kappa Epsilon- Jay Bohnef, TCU KUPPG Epsilonp Buzzy Romine, Lambda Chi Alphap Pat Sheedy, Kappa Sigmap Greg Ledet, Sigma Chip Phil Nipperus, Kappa Sigrhap George Glover, ,Lambda Chi Alpha: John Harrison, Delta Tau Deltap Stan Haun, Delta Tau Delta. Social frafernifies governed by IFC on A81 campus The lnterfraternity Council is the QW' erning board of all the men's social fra- ternities on the A8iI campus. . Activities this year included SP0f150"n9 of Greek Week, April I4-27, Gnd the 'SP political party during campus elections. Officers for IFC were Lester M0ll0"Y' presidentp Greg Ledet, vice presidenli Pal lackmdnf Sheedy, secretaryp Robert 5 . rre- treasurerp and Javier Guevard, C0 sponding secretary. 236 QT i Panhellenic Council has nine members from sororifies The Panhellenic Council is formed by a iunior or senior member from all active national sororities on campus. An extra representative is allowed for the sorority which holds the Panhellenic presidency. There are nine members to the Council every year. ' Members of the Panhellenic Council compile the rules governing rushing, pledging, and initiations on campus. The lam Tw lull my, in Chi Milt ll' S me lol' is sP0ls0lll :nfl 'le Isl eledllnl' er Malllm sidtfllf ll Bladlmai all T01 6 A v.,.s,c.,l..s, , . --XJ' Panhellenic officers this year were Janet Aldrich, vice president, Connie Saathoff, president, Debby Eva uqgtary, and Ellen Carlson, treasurer. CI-3' CID x., .1 I organization co-operates with the Univer- sity Administration in the maintenance of high social standards, and attempts to further fine intellectual accomplishment and sound scholarship. The Council strives to maintain, on a high plane, fraternity and inter-fraternity relations within the university. Members of P h P tti Malone Zeta Tau AlPh0' Chelyl Phllllps' Chl Omega? Conme Suulhofi Al llmglllenic Council were Robena Toys' Alpha Della Pi? sandye Kaiilllfxlpga E:iC3:llll:3iaiAlgha Chi Oelmgaf Ellen Carlson, Alpha Delta Pi. ' p Q l Om . - , ' T Ci Us ' 090, Debby Evans, Chi Omega, Janet Aldrich, Zeta au P 237 'f1rIfG.'!YA'sZ'!4'-1Q'2'?.i4'5rf-1934 i1ff.iiiMiK'iVA1 T242 'FIPA' 595' .lrw 4 V592 .1 - 'iii-X'-Z?Ji7QZ7'QJ'lff22?X?!695'7 PHLYNYJQ Srilwiiiis PBA! Iii WEL. ree 4 QP ' D 46 -N...qr'-xv. X 238 '. N I 4 - A , , . x x' xg ' ' 1 x 5 e 3 Q , s 1 1 A' ,-,' Alphr lexus I965. wus fOr DePouv Spec year in home Q and wc Corniva were hr formal, secure Camper Socir ga's in and inir Derby lyre, rl' also po Some Iered 1 Cnmso lerq h 5P0nso- l AXQ Alpha Chi Omega was installed on the Texas A8tI campus during the fall of 1965, The Alpha Chi Omega sorority was founded in Greencastle, Indiana at DePauw University in 1885. Special proiects of the sorority this year included the selling of programs at home games during the football season and working at the Kingsville Lion's Club Carnival. Cake sales and car washes were held to raise money for the spring formal, and a rummage sale was held to secure donations for the Easter Seal Campaign. Social activities of the Alpha Chi Ome- ga's included a Parent's Day Banquet and initiation on Dad's Day, Sigma Chi's Derby Day, and Night of the Golden lyre, the annual spring formal. A Chi O's also participated in Greek Week in April. Some of the activities the sorority en- ltred during Greek Week included the Bike Race, Tau Kappa Epsilon chug- KUPPG Sigma Variety Show, and I Song Fest. Owners of the Crimson Palace invited the sorority to en- lela blCYCle race during their first band Und on Founder's Day, A Chi O's Sponsored a picnic. ship 'mph active Panhellenic Scholar- Y for the fall of 1971 - the temester in a row. olllcels were Caroll Weisman, presi- Mufgle Weber, recording secretary, sing' lreuslffefi and Susan Collard ye Kaiser, Panhellenic repre- year PY JUdY Fowler, second Home- prmcessi Caroll Weisman, Bunnie Gnd Suzanne H ' num , , i erns were ed D'5l'n9Ulshed Students at A8nl. Chi Omega was represented fl Susan Collard Kathe Joyce Mona Weisman Norma Dowdy Daryle Hazlett lbeaul Patsy Hall Cissie Kerr Suzanne Heins Robbie Walker Lynne Brock Vicki Strobel Sandye Kaiser Margaret Joyce Jackie Duke Debbie Barr Dana Monroe Heracles Bunnie Weisman Janet Ferrell Dinah Gillaspy Sandy Chandler Susan Luecken Mary Humphreys Patty Taber Margie Weber Judy Fowler Connie Saathoff Pam Link Caroll Weisman Gail Gavenda Kathy Gillette Teri Jones H AM 5 ?5 all 4 .YZ W MX , WE? l 4 239 I Si.'i?393i5J ZJLZM if tfs I i I 4 l I '1 3 M ll A l l V. l l. .i I l 1 Q l gl 1 . . tl x ll it t I A in l I U 'a I i i lt ll il ln li 5,4 "4 xr l. 2 l l t il 1 . l 240 AAI-I During the past year, Alpha Delta Pi was involved in many activities, including a dunking booth at the fall carnival, sell- ing foil Christmas wrapping paper as a chapter money-raising proiect, monthly birthday parties at Retama Manor, and kidnapping fraternity presidents with a ransom of canned goods which was given to charity. During Sigma Chi's Derby Day the sorority won first place. ADPi's also participated in Delta Tau Delta's Bike Race, Kappa Sigma's Variety Show, Ugly Man Contest, and Campus Capers. ADPi's held their annual Playday, where fraternities competed for prizes and their Black Diamond Ball in April f Alpha Delta Pi's active on cam l Debbie Gum, Miss Derby Dqyi Debb Webb, Alpha Gamma Rho Sweetheqn. Cindy Schuehle, Lambda Chi Alpha Sweetheart, and six girls being Studem Council Representatives and clqgg Officers were Jeanie Barnard, presi. dent, Sandy Mann, vice-president, Debb Webb, secretary, Janice Smith, treasurer- and Ellen Carlson, Panhellenic representql tive. PUS Were officers, .fff X. i l l i l l i l lu-l Milli MTE: Msg? llltldqmffm hm ll? l l l will w l bi l' ll ii ' ' 9' Wfflfllil lf1. x4' , so A - . io. I lofi S ' l Patti Hubert Tricia Graham Sandy Scales Debb Webb Pam Pooley Debbie Cooper Debby Haynes Debi Gum Cindy Nanny Susan Phillips Cindy Schuehle Karen Mann Raydene Curry Buena Dill Jeanie Barnard Marlene Snapka Glenda Worden Jan Smith Carolyn Redinger Sue Akins Janice Smith Sandy Mann Sherye Jackson Linda Anderson Vicki Haynes Roberta Toys Connie Davis Ellen Carlson Paula DuBose C? ,X ,, 1,1 A lr 'n l l l l i i '52 -Wi 34 l .,, J i ff 1 1 fx ff' f :if ,J if ,2 ff 4 1 W 4 Ml f V l , 242 Glenwood Wilms Kenneth Bird Johnnie Carroll Percy Carroll Albert Chalick Gary Baczewski Elma Gregory lHousemotherl Glenn Muennink Rusty Loftin James McQueen Bill Pugh Debb Webb lSweetheartl Larry Koester Greg Gee Frank Dodson Billy Kellner Duane Weimers Ray Klespies Denny Moore Bart Cousins Nolan Brandt Stanley Matson Keith Adams Dr. J. W. Howe Brian Menking Larry Hooker David Cave Allan Jamison ,, ff, "1 'ffvf X W!w1ffwMf,,,., Jw , ww mfygw 0 77 if f!2'fffff2ffC" f ,.,,.W7f44 i57,fj. f f f X f Jnyfffff ,dp-,jf Mffwffgz :ff X f!fff,f f !!fff'fw:f1,,,4f, 1 Qwfiffc Qfgffiqzq 2 pf ' ff V, fy fyfw ,mp "W wwf W!'3Yf1: , mf f, ,Jw 'WWZL5 ,1 iff 2 it llll A ,S i w wi. ,,,.Qf,f,,. . , , 3 ' p,,,'f-'cwiyff-,,,. 1 Nl Alplf were K5 Vice-ple and l.0l Outsl Bill Pve Brandt. Spec dudefl ialionc Kingsvil I 'S H. . XJ i 4 -,, AVP Alpha Gamma Rho officers this year were Keith Adams, president, Rusty Loftun, viwpfesidentg Denny Moore, secretary, and Laffy Koester, treasurer. Qufgtqnding fraternity members were Bill Pugh, Allan Jamison, and Nolan Brandt. I D Special Alpha Gamma Rho prolects in- cluded u petition of colony to become a national fraternity, 0 pledge Pf0leCf for Kingsville Beautification, and building a fence for Mr. Christensen in Riviera. Social activities of the fraternity in- cluded parties and dances after football games, and a dance at Mesquite Grove. Alpha Gamma Rho also held the Pink Rose Banquet in April celebrating Found- er's Day of the fraternity. Alpha Gamma Rho also sponsored a rodeo. The fraternity was founded in l908 in Indiana and established at A8ll in I966. ,-.. -any 243 TK 4, Q fi ' -,f it sa 5: 35 i j-fe L3 Q., Hx R ka ,A Y. aug 63: X t LE, Q! ai vp fc A! ' V asa 355' ' '5ml'5TZ.'i'i2?Q Fi ki 44 A W 1 Z5 is Q 53 , A , . , v 'N'-. l 2. 3 4 5 . Sonny Krause Allen Shields Gear e Harr - 9 . Gerald Rainbolt . Larry Albrecht 6. Malcolm Hamf 7. Luke Womack 8. Steve Barton 9. Lee Russell IO. Johnny Russell ll. l2. l3. ualueu Wayne Klemke Vernon Wuensche 14. Gary Steadman 15. Charlie Chambers I6. 17. l8. l9. Mike McDonald Tommy Mathews Lynn Cornelius L. F. Wilkinson 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. Scott Slaughter Joel Solis Walter Wood Buddy Luckett Mike Klepac Terrell Rainbolt John Fuessel Steve Hill Randy Lawrence Craig Cosgrove Jay Wright Tom Hill Alan Herzik Melvin Cooper Darby Wagner Randy Allen Clifford Stacy Jim Sedwick A 1 . 'T .... A - ..,. 4 -' 1- x r- ink, .. - .nx 1 S ATQ Alpha Tau Omega was well repre- sented this year by Glenn Riff and Steve Hill, Dean's List, Joel Solis, Supreme Court Justice, Tommy Mathews, Repre- sentative-at-Large, Andy Luddeke, A8tl golfer, and Melvin Cooper, President of the Freshman Class. Special proiects of the fraternity in- cluded a Christmas tree sale, bicycle raf- fle, plane trip raffle, participation in a blood drive for Shriners at the annual conclave in Galveston, and a beauty contest during Greek Week. P Alpha Tau Omega social activities in- cluded participation in Alpha Delta Pi's Playday. Little Sisters of the Maltese Cross participated in Sigma Chi Derby Day. The fraternity sponsored an annual Alpha Tau Omega Powder Puff football game, and a Founder's Day banquet and party in Reynosa, Mexico. Officers were Gary Chesnutt, presi- dentg Gerald Rainbolt, vice-president, Tommy Mathews, secretary, Allen Shields, treasurer, and Tom Hill and .lim Sedwick, IFC representatives. 245 r he VH: me 'E Qi .vE"f'K- '-. -W. dv' ' T.. -5 ' if iff - '1 'Us' - -'1-::'- L--W"-Y ' 111941-r ' -R 55.213 SXSW. 'QA .CNE - '. f A V... fedi sell w S B X X' J! X , 1 1 i x W C if Kathy McDonald Kathryn English Linda Ray Patricia Bear Nancy Smith Karen Kemp Kathy Mills Eileen Bellamah . Margaret Wagner Diane Patterson Brenda Binkley Laura Mangold W it it Kylene Dowdy . Vicki Moore Joan Goldthorn Stephanie Dollery Joan Mixon Cheryl Phillips Carol Harris Becky Rogers Cherie Tomlinson Anne Smith Ruth Baiza Gwen Robinson Susan HGY Cindy COX Robbie Alexander Denise Daniel Jane Lyon Ellen McCreiglll Lynn Addms Pam Bish0P Kcfh,-yn Baltruzall Cathy CUlPePPe' Katy GW99 Vicki Shofnef l Chi C lllout rt le Hrs Other 5 ltlflmq land D also gn- Vnqg Pu. Slifil cu frs. 50cin dillefer llfls i lui. Cl lmnch lver io, 4 CQ YT? xv I xgi if l ,.4 .W 5 I N it mfs, ii.. di, ,, 3,2 .5 w ,uw ,an HW COX me Ajgxdriffl ni! Daniel " W ' hl M Mcffell ,, Adarv hy Culpepper V GMU Li Shdfnfl ,Mx , ,i Y ,- la 4-9 A r fd N m .Xl 3 X X x S f -4 XO the First Mefllenpg God m the 70,5 for other 1 0d'5i Church in Kingsville. specml Pmlects included visits to lelu Bondmg Mono' Gnd participation in the 0l50 entered Q QV parade. Chi Omega members musPurcde, anflomcfbin the Jaycee cfhrist- spirit contest Sponsorredelgiond place In the ers' Y The cheerlead- diflellgrcfl Srjclldlirrs Lncllfqed mixers with the Dolls DQY Part G efllmhei on Campus and Dui. Chi O Y 'G er S'9"'c' Chi Derby Br me90s held a Homecoming Unfh lOl' fe quettocl cchers' and Eleusinias Ban- eebrate the founding of the so- rority. Members of Chi Omega also spon- sored the marriage booth at the Fall Car- nival and the annual formal ball, Carna- tion Cotillion. Outstanding student members were Margaret Wagner, head cheerleader, Debby Evans, cheerleader, Stephanie Dol- Iery, twirler, and 13 girls were members of the Student Council, class officers, or Cadet Ladies. Officers were n Gwen Robinson, vice-president, Linda Ray, secretary, Lynn Adams, treasurer, and Debby Evans and Cheryl Phillips, Pan- A ne Smith, president, hellenic representatives. RWE ff? :23S4i5.fQ?f:i ' fi ai 247 E' ' sf nz. -,gs L H., , at - .A ,af 48 ,,, AZI7 The International Fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi is a professional fraternity which fosters the study of business, en? courages scholarship, social activities, and mutual advancement of students through research and practice. The fraternity was founded- in 1907 in the School of Finance, Commerce, and Accounts of New York University. The lo- cal chapter was organized in 1965. This is the first year for Delta Sigma Pi to be recognized as a social fraternity on the A8rl campus. With the recognition by IFC the fraternity formed a little sister or- ganization, Little Delta Sigs, with eleven charter members. i Q :fbi -wgz , . ,..,f..g+, rg A ' -:gf-j M-I?" y IS.. .fag 5 f ' 'ft r' it .g,,..,, 'WW K 2 Special activities this year included a concert by the "Cowsills" at J. K. North- way Exposition Hall during the fall. Other proiects were a "back to school dance" at Elk's Lodge, dances after foot- ball games, participation in ADPi's play- day, Campus Capers, and Sigma Chi Derby Day. The main event of the year was the annual Rose Ball formal. The for- mal was held at the Henrietta King Mu- seum and "Stormy Weather" played. Delta Sig's participated in IFC intramu- rals placing first in tennis, third in spirit contest, and participated in football, track, and golf. Delta Sig's also placed I". .vi second in a Delta Sigma Pi softball tour- nament in Houston. Representatives from the national Of' fice in Oxford, Ohio, paid two visits to the Delta Sigma Pi fraternity during Ille course of one year. Officers this year were Rick Stephens' President: Jim Patterson, vice Pfesldenl' Bill Appelt, secretary, Marvin M'9U'f" treasurer, and IFC representatives Eddle 'K Balsly and Ray W0l19- Outstanding Delta Sigmd Pi members . . - I were Fred Simon, distinguished sfvden and Marvin MIQUVUI distinguished slu- dent. 7 ' :LJ , H-f . ti: ,Q -.-- , sw R! , i., ..:-214: :ini-0 ,J gif?-n:r,i1,f1g.'Q45y:f:,Qf 4.vMj4i31q14,5-,g:jq.r ,SN - I Aw T- 'fly-:I ',,f-Q,-.-gg-M ., cf ,Zigi ,',,,,1ff,4.,44.,4-VLH, etifftei-is :fb i i l v Wfllli ? it i J miaim J 1, will ' AA,' 151 Jtee L9 J ' l lil: '7 51 2'if .' ff? sssi 'J AVV' V Z t reMSrffl'll f 4 f 'il y . . g 1 1 s all f,, . J J J ,vkflf f V J A S 1 I I my f Af , If ,If I , 5 '4 ' ' f ,f f I, , l'K!f ' I 75, W l f MM f X X Q W - ' W' Rudy Alegria David Holiday Buzzy Rumple Jim Patterson Keith Champagne Rick Stephens Jim Wheeler Raymond Wong Jess Torres Walter Easton Norman Smith Ronnie Dollins Fred Simon Richard Wong John Harrington Gary Steeno David Brock Bob Overholt David Heldt Joe Bob Esterak Dennis Kolmeier Bill Applet Eddie Balsly Mal Byrne Karen Lemke, Sweetheart Marvin Migura Charles Hallmark Norman Jones a E 5 F s 5' E an mmfvrln. A.-:mx xfxtuwammr. mu: 'V J IHVl Z,iY!I3E'A3R!0Dt'fi UR- ZAHSYQE X'ihirl'- 2'5- KYVDD 52 Wm- 'En . 2l'1?,f'r"X. I I I Nu 35. Roy Allee Tom Gibson Mike Kring Keith Chadwick Mike Owen Steve Hughes Bubba Stahl Curtis Walker Tommy Broadnax Joe Foster James Badders Billy Cottle Irvin Kleespies Ted Bolzle Mark Trevillian Mike Lefler Rick Goodman Jim Wood Keith Prewitt Steve Hanshaw Scott McMullen Jim Roerig Buddy Whitaker Mike James Renny Walker Nathan Wirth Johnny Copeland Tommy Augubright Richard Williams Bobby Vinson Steve Monk Brian Nolen Robert Elliot Jimmy Lee John Harrison Paul Moy Dick Henderson . Stan Haun . Gary Baltes . Dole Walker E a mmfa'x'z1.w1'vmu :ES EW!-X' 'f H'33!l."A9b5Q -L-Eli 'KRXCJIM-RWHNIHV 'l"i'L'4'V.a1rX' 'L H'-XVDD 'En n'.'S..' Wnfvm- ...1 Richard Gilstrap Hut Smith Gary Ellis Marty West Dusty Parker Steve Morgan Kenneth Chapman Jabby Martin Pat Sheedy Pete Green Jim Sprowl Farris Richardson Harold Sanders Charlie Barnes Joe Nation Bill Hammann Phil Brady Eldon Tuttle Mike Perryman QQ Phil Nipperus Rick New Austin Clary 23. Jim Fischer Danny Kaiser John Nation Ferdinand Gaenzel Chris Bauer John Wheeler Jim Duderstadt Bobby Hall Frank Baumann Mike Garner Robert Blackman Randy Stewert Bobby Wall Brad Abel Marlton Hall Jim Jirasek 5PeClU mf ihrvllghn wld 'l alll' fr hinfflons somale l gorial l0PPa 5' wegk Oil mich wc mid 0' in Lovisil ,nh a dif Active in p00lf md fourl - :Kappa sigma Pfoieds 'his 5Pec'lZded the popular football "run- c Win.. signs for the Javelinas, and through Her every home game. Members nies 0 Pa - 1" ted in all IFC ofthe fraternity P0"'c'po ff t and every member made e or s tionS luntltake the SPfln9 Decnls List' lo ' I activities included the Ohm-'Gil no . Soi Sigma Variety Shaw during Greek KuPPk and G Kappa Sigma Corpus Party wle ll students. Kappa which was Open to 0 k d P t Sigma also Sponsored a Wee en arty 'n Louisiandr and Jock Hop' compe e lvith a disc-l0CkeY from KEYS' ' Acme in IFC, the fraternity placed first .npool third in football and swimmin9, I I and fourth in basketball. Outstanding representatives of Kappa Sigma were Jim Sprawl and Hut Smith, team championship in Lulu Valley Rodeo, Eldon Tuttle, varsity track, Phil Nipperus, Sophomore class president, and Randy . Stewart represented Theta Kappa Chap- ter at Kappa Sigma Grand Conclave in Los Angeles. Officers were Gary Edwards, MC, Robert Blackman, preside.nt, Marty Weber, vice-president, Pete Green, secre- tary, Mike Garner, treasurer, and Danny Stewart and Bobby Wall, IFC representa- tives. Kappa Sigma fraternity was founded in 1869 at the University of Virginia and was first established at A8rl in 1965. oil af , ,Q p n . A .,., - bl ' , Z "-' I. 410-yi if as ' FK.. '.5'.PMQ',C4J-555.1-IY' fc wm- rafi WS. 254 will 'fl , fulfill Wil lf' -'H 21 7 M w 15 S gif ggoeo 153 , l .hL, 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Roxie Villarreal Bobby Bergstrom Bill Seifert Johnny Hahn Jack Van Cleve Buzzy Romine Carl Cody Clyde Schuehle Terry Koehler Robert Ballenger David Sengelmann George Glover David Taylor 14. Darce Kullman 15. Terry Smith 16. Pat Laabs 17. Joe Dietz 18. Mike Cofer 19. Paul Gregg 20. Larry Pierce 21. Gary Strunk -1 -gig, C,.,..,C.m.o lamb' 1909 dl lnlzell 'a l970. Speck alluded lam wh ggl lllllli wendalil nlarilab Charity like Tn le lale sly in ll dal proj md rc-e :chlever AXA Lambda Chi Alpha was founded in 1909 at Boston University and was co- lonized at A811 in 1968, being chartered inl970. gpeqiql proiects held by the fraternity included the third annual Charity Bowl from which they donated 5500 to the lo- cal United Fund and received two com- mendations for having the only lasting charitable annual event in this area. The Charity Bowl has now been renamed the lake Trussell Charity Bowl in honor of the late Jake Trussell's help to the frater- nity in the past three years. Another spe- cial proiect was a retreat to re-examine and re-evaluate the fraternity's goals and achievements. Lambda Chi Alpha social activities in- cluded the White Rose formal in celebra- tion of Founder's Day, and parties before and after each home game. Active in intramural activities, Lambda Chi Alpha placed first in football, second in volleyball, third in ping-pong and pool, and first in basketball. Outstanding members were Carl Cody, self-study committee, Pat Laabs and Wil- liam Howard, Honor Roll, and David Sengelmann, varsity cheerleader. Officers were Carl Cody, president, Buzzy Romine, vice-president, Paul Gregg, secretary, Gus Paul, treasurer, and Buzzy Romine and Daryl Johnson, IFC representatives. . Bert Reinke 2. Mike Carter 31 Jerry West 4. Glenn Weiblen 5. Bill Bronstad 6. Fred Eppright 7. Jerry Bravenec 8. Fred Sandhop 9. Donnie Evans 10. Steve Howell 1 1 12. Jerry Bastian 13. Blake Howard 14. Bill Howard 15. Phil Miller 16. Ronny Davis 17. Reagan Eckert 18. Paul Waters 19. Ace Lebouf 20. Gary Glover . Randy Anderson E5 .e 1 255 Z 6 5 S S E i S .4 3 Z a ,fs 3 lc 7 '-T DLE APAR -ZXYWKYJAEFHMWIRY2 A 'eX'.i"B!X-Erin!-3S"khbX' 'E-. 'I ,."?5A."l,d1- ,JM-,,..:s ., . ,Q . V f.-'-c--f--v-,:- 'ap :- Q- --Q-px Y .z K , .. 11fffi'.rg,. gi1.,4:T .t . ,, . wx S fa ,, 4., A . ew- N-.. . . . X Q, E 4.1 1, ,. . ,wx -my-,,3g'jq1 ,V-, Q fs: f. -:M -1. . s f Q X X A" A X 4.5 -gy -xi: 51? , 55352551 QS'-IEW? 5 2631 .125 X ' ' X X , 5 X X NC N Q - ' I Neg - rx: :Tv P", 1" asv' an .. ..,.. V X lf str.. .k..i.A.g,,,X.. 3 , . -, -, C Q, . - :. X. - va. - .5 - :.4-. 5, 4,5 r an R is U N 9. 555 gspzix' Raiwxazsrz t 5 -', We 'V K . it ' X X -pg.: ff .--, P :Av X 14252 :,:-. iw - M? N ' V sc fi xg, if A Y 'ix Q si Q I x Q S N, N2 .-,, 5 s i W5 1 R X A, X S K Q X X' Q X N i R, gx 'W 2 X r R ie R f W. Q al 9 Albert Skinner Royal Putnam Richard Cortez Chano Gracia Frank Campbell Jimmy Jaramillo George Salinas Joe Ramos David Garcia Joe Obregon Blas Ortiz Ana Gracia Don Halk David Olivas Frank Garcia J. J. Martinez Lauro Cuellar Bubba Rubio Jaime Gonzalez Fred Delgado Mike Kutach 3 IJ at DJJ Danny Saenz Paul Hamilton . Jesus Baez Curt Schmidt Richard Silva Dana Fore Vito Lopez James McGuffin Kathy Nestor Bela Montalvo Laura Flores Sally Barton Dalia Salinas Linda Torres Velma Lopez Anna Guerra Delia Silguero Sylvia Rodriguez Gail Leyendecker Linda Leibowitz Phi K Uniersi l969. P le Unix. Phi K ler, -1 ,. L,-., H .luv .21 Al l' 'K l 3 ' nl: 13 31 'fri fvwtn T. ' if 4 ul!! l ,I 4.4, f t l l T l CDKG UHBLEFYPPS :heta was started at Brown 1969. Phi KH was established at A8tl in lheUniversily?'2IpahTlleto Is sponsored by Phi Kappa Thdl olrc Center. leur included aem S special proieds this Coslume PUYTY in Octo- UCC bafbeque in November. bell and The f - Tolefnlly Sponsored Several :softer 90me" danc e . . . 51 Gnd a campout rn Riviera lust D , year Silber' DU"'f'9 The course of the . GPPG Theta acquired a frater- d mC'-'le a filing cabinet. So ' - . . , and S: activities rncluded a beach party "ll house qn ann , UU' Semester banquets rn De- cember and May. The fraternity was also active in intra- mural sports, participating in football, volleyball, basketball, and softball. Representing Phi Kappa Theta were David Olivas, member of Sigma Tau Honor Fraternity, Ramiro Rubio, Best Ac- tive, Frank Garcia, Most Spirited Brother, and Fred Delgado and Danny Saenz, Best Pledges. Officers of Phi Kappa Theta were David Gracia, president, Frank Gracia, vice-president, Dana Fore, secretary, and George Salinas, treasurer. 257 I , .vnxunwncamx-MN4.:-pgovmwn. il l l l l rl 2 E! 2, 'Timm mu1f 'T UH- RY H5-Y5"!!.uL:-Y WMI' 2-. . 'OH Wd? FIN, . T 1 l i i . 2 i PAZ Rho Alpha Zeta was founded on the A8il campus in the fall of 1969. The so- rority was started with the help of some fraternity men and Mrs. Carrie Bishop, Dean of Women. The sorority was organized to give women of minority groups a chance to participate in sorority life and other activ- ities held on campus. One of the goals of the sorority is to initiate women so that they may be able to maintain the social, academic, and economic status, so that they may be- come a national sorority. Social activities included a birthday party held every three months for the girls born during this time, a get acq- uainted luncheon held during the fall for pledges at El Jardin and the initiation of pledges November 18. Rho Alpha Zeta sponsored a program for National Balck Week entitled "Night of Black Week Poetry, Song, and Dance," during the fall. During the spring the sorority invited a new fraternity, Omega Psi Chi, to a play- day at Kleberg Park. A hotpants contest and dance were held in the Multipurpose Room at the gym with free cokes and hot dogs in the spring. At the end of the spring semester a buffet luncheon was held at the presi- dent's home as an end of school party. Officers for Rho Alpha Zeta were Bob- bie Jean Boone, president, Ada Godley, vice president, Faye La Rue, secretary, Sharon Satterwhite, treasurer, and Sharon Justice, pledge captain. 259 it 5 TS 3 a 3 E E .na xsemfrnu . .fn va' h - x1:4Eam:2'i:fvm. Ame 'P I 83259471 FK.- JlHbliiilfllll',U1Y,2 if N'a'fVY'J."f'W2X'1'.uLN-ffki-f?Z'VK7l I ?YA."rdJ- Tx . 'a 260 ZX Sigma Chi fraternity was first installed in 1855 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and was established at A8tI in 1967. Special proiects for Sigma Chi in- cluded the acquisition of land and funds for a new Sigma Chi Fraternity Lodge. Ken Browning attended Grand Chapter at Scottsdale, Arizona and John Trott John Wagner, and Davis Waddell at- tended a National Training Workshop in Chicago, Illinois. Sigma Chi social activities included the annual Derby Day, Playboy Party, and spring Sweetheart Ball. Fraternity mem- bers participated in Alpha Delta Pi's Playday. Proceeds of Derby Day went to Wal- lace Village, a charity home for mentally I retarded children. Sigma Chi has won the IFC sports tro- phy the last six years and this year the fraternity won first place in football, vol- leyball, and swimming. . Outstanding student members this yedf were Bill Shannon, president of the Stu- dent Congress, Johnny Jackson, letter- man on A81I's football team, Richard Stillman, captain of A8il basketball team: Greg Ledet, IFC vice-presidenti Ken Browning, Supreme Court Justice, and Se' veral members are student congress IGP' resentatives. Officers this year were John Trott, president, Mike O'Shea, vice-Pfesldeml Don Behrens, secretary, Lewis ProwS0f treasurer, and Mat Donalson and MGVI4 Knox, IFC representatives. 5 1 , 3 X P"",, sf 5 orls li Ml lll lUlll lol M5 yldl 'he Sl' Iellff' Richdll ll lilll li lil and if 55 llll Troll isilill ygvllli i MGM l. Mike Meek 2. George Jurica 3. Tommy Carlisle 4. Phil Mayeux 5. Gregory Ledet 6. John Trott 7. James Brannigan 8- David Muir 9. John Habeeb lo- D009 Schueneman ll- Michael O'Shea l2- Conner Bishop l3. Ernie Carey l4. Alex Harris l5- Cfuig Carson l6- John Racco Fasqno l7- John Wagner lloyd ouddas - Donald Behrens 20- William Shannon 2l. Larry Whifworfh Laurel Whifworth 23. Jim Russel Mathews Donalson Darryl Hazleh Lewis Prowse Leroy Cusack Aulus Smith Dale Ellison Bill Pefiiiohn Deryl Phillips Daniel Ellwood Mike Nemec Davis Waddell George Wilkinson Bobby Jackson Kenneth Browning Michael Davis Thomas Boeker Mark Knox William Gregorcyk Raging iii ll 5 5 5 C ra 3 2 E ll ll ,i i 1 If E ri 3 -a fl S pl mu .HBV 'IFE'- ",."?FA."IW- Tc. '+3'A"",'M'l','G-'2'X!nLrY' E73 62 Y ii i? N img I LOW UW llobff 1,015 S. IW' 5. D00 7' 7, Curio: Albff' ,. P, Vhllm 361043 , Illia Lufef . e , M! -UTY .ae 1, Oscar Munoz 2. jack Cowell oberl Escamilla 3,R 4. Chris Delcambre 5. Javier Guevara 5, Don Hohensee 7, Carlos Acevedo B. Albert Abbott 9, vhlliam Dunn 10. Grady Haddox ll. lMlliam P1-wie l2. Lester D. Mallory Jr. l3. Mike Chimarys ll. Warren Burgess l5. Terry Dickens lb. Waller Adcock l7. John Whalley Ivan Lawson Bernard ZumMallen Jesse Galaviz Terry Trevino John Keen Sam Cunningham .lay Bohner Arnold Burklow Robert Huitt lsponsorl Tom Stephens Rene Garza Boris Hidalgo Bill Sullivan Roland Garza Steve Kelly Joe Solis TKE Tau Kappa Epsilon was founded at llli- nois Wesleyan University in 1889 and was established on the A8rl campus in l97l. Special proiects for the fraternity this year were the Public Service Weekend in the Spring and the chug-a-lug contest dur- ing Greek Week. Tau Kappa Epsilon social activities in- cluded the Red Carnation Ball and partici- pation in Founder's Day. The fraternity was represented this year by Lester D. Mallory, and Jesse Galaviz, President's Awards, and Jay Bohner, Stu- dent Council. Officers were Mike Chimarys, presi- dent, Lester Mallory, vice-president, Rob- ert Escamilla, secretary, Chris Delcambre, treasurer, and Lester Mallory, Jay Bohner and Javier Guevara, IFC representatives. X . l 263 v 'IF V0k'f:2GrhIiW1'ALf!kYHUKE7ZW:'L PKI'-'T -. fr P ,s 4 1 P 5 S' 64 .fb ,A T-4 . 'f X l 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ll 12 13 ld 15 16 17 Janet Stanfield Teresa Miller Debbie Davis Jackie Harrel Carol Harlan Becky Rice Darlene Rozelle Karen Keele Beth Hauenstein Marianne Robert June Kelley Cynthia Roquette Sandi Gracey Debbie Cunningham Polly Meadows Debbie White Nancy Brown Teresa Seifz Debb Williams MUVY Jane Langen Jan Wright Laura Livingston 7 Terry Engstrom JoAnne Seitz Ann Gay Jones Janet Aldridge Dana Vittitoe Gail Wilson Sandy Kuresko Karol Lyle Laura Mills Cyndee Remmert Lica East IX R629 l X NxkAxxxSQsggCsg.s s Q ff ' f YFPSHSQSQXX-wmsxsg- s 1 Y 4' -sus.,-ssax . s - M -. . . S, 15 -AXE . . . X . L s , K x X . L. K ., ,,s.gss:gxsSzs: .es .R-iff.. use -gg Q Q- s - x . K asses wi ag: was ss - K . K . 3' xii? '-.xi L .Ex Q 1 .L s .. - 55515 X5D Xiiisiss ' if ' Y 1 IQ .assi is '1 -. - . . . - 5-eggs.: is xjgsrws Y 1. . A , D H f ia YY s.:s . - 11 . its so S ' S .iziiisis F ' K 5 ' with X f - so 5, peas- .uses -less Qs.. s X 1 . X L. Q . . 1 rL5E'R3'?5S 18121 :ki '25 C. K W f 1 if X ' S ' 42-2 fs- i X ly ii se-2221. si .sexi ss . . X . . 9 x -S4:XS1S':TT'oY Xhitfiniisi i 'T it ' is ' 1 X1 ' 1 - - ' t. -skzggs sq -we .X -L ss 1.1. L 2 - .1 x ag Qzgiggf 515aggQs5g.s1s X-sig. X 1 .. - 'Wi l. ssis, M i law 5 Ll 7 ZTA Zeta Tau Alphas began the year with a fall brunch for parents and alumni during Homecoming weekend. Spring activities started with the annual Candlelight Ball in late January. In late spring, awards presentations were made during the White Violet Banquet. Zetas also participated in the Kappa Sigma Variety Show, Sigma Chi's Derby Day, and the fall carnival with a nickel toss. They also entered the College Cam- pus Capers events, and the Ugly Man on Campus. During the Spirit Contest they won first place overall spirit award for the football season. Special proiects for the Zetas consisted of contributions to National Proiect for Re- tarded Children. The fall pledge class helped at an old folks home during the Christmas season. Delegates were also sent to State Day. Individual recognition included Sandi Gracey and Laura Livingston, A8tl cheer- leaders, Cyndee Remmert, Kappa Sigma Sweetheart, Janet Aldrich, A8tl Debate Team, and six girls being members of the Student Council or class officers. Officers for the year were Terry Engs- tom, president, JoAnne Seitz, vice-presi- dent, Laura Livingston, secretary, Jan Wright, treasurer, and Debbie Cunning- ham, Panhellenic representative. ' 'cygmzvmyunvmvxw-fm ' Wausau. 4 I1- zvlu ,1v.-v.w'.:z1urrnmHA l A 32555 BC1l'E!'X'A"' l l l l T l l r ' Iwilib' WWW! H539 ." f .lZ?X'1NKAdiC:?Kkb3X'5H'2U' 'Vdi - 'fn . 'O'.vP75b2" 13. 266 Greek Week begins with Greek Week 1972 officially began April 14 with a tree planting ceremony on the mall. Approximately 600 sorority and fraternity members participated in the week's events. Greek Week plans began taking shape early last December. The agenda included inter-fraternity competition, par- ties, and workshops. "We have had com- plete cooperation from all Greeks," said Jay Bohner, Greek Week chairman. "The main purpose of Greek Week is to show off the Greek system," re- marked Bohner. "lt is designed to breed inter-action between all Greeks. We also hope to increase communication with the independent students on campus." Greek Week was slated to run from fr ee planting ceremony on campus mall April 14-21. A tree planting ceremony took place at the mall followed by the Greek Convocation with President James C. Jernigan as the main speaker. Later that evening the President's Dinner was held, at which Kingsville's Mayor J. R. Manning spoke. Saturday, April 14, was highlighted by Alpha Delta Pi Playday at Mesquite Gove and the Sigma Chi Playboy Party at the Kleberg Museum. Sunday, April 15, included the Delta Tau Delta Bike Race which was open to all students. The Delta Sigma Pi Car Rally followed. Wrapping up the day's events was the Tau Kappa Epsilon Chug- a-lug. Regular IFC, Panhellenic and chapter meetings were scheduled for regular times. Tuesday, April 18, was scheduled to include a Faculty and Staff Coffee in fhe Eckhardt Hall Lounge. A fraternity qnd sorority workshop was planned and held in College Hall. The Kappa Sigma's Greek Olympics took place Wednesday, April 19, qt fhe Brass Monkey. Thursday, April 20, included the Pqn- hellenic Songfest in the All-Purpose Room of the gym. Friday, April 21, wound up the Greek activities. Scheduled were the Lambda Chi Alpha Chariot Race and the Greek Week Party and Beauty Pageant at the Kleberg Museum. s ii,.. . s lf.-f'f'it 5. as T22 . . s if g fi -,Ulf if! if V . if 'J' fin.. Q fs pw .1 In li 11-1 Q-. , . A . ... ,L TSN. r NQUIKU ledllled 'G Hee W1 the Emir! und ' Und held Olympia wr or The d The Pun. P059 Rwn The Greek Ie lambda The Greek mm ul the 'i 3 I 'xl ' 1 F Q -,u - It 1 'qi 'a 57 s 4,4 U'xfL"' I X f 11 115 If wif' I . '.. A 'tue I 3 16: -A . 4- Q PIYS-1 4 ' nam- .1 ' '1i'l.-""f"" , W s,..J5., ,,-..y L .1 ff . t 4 " 35 X .'.- . "4l:'y . Q -A c Q aa.. - .- . Q . ' 1 fi '- x. .L NX we . , ' Q -. . f . xi' " ' X if fe. " 3-,N1 L ' , gh . Y X. . Nw. G 4, t. U,,KxiA. .A ' W' , ' . 't df" i , X W , Q, :.,,4,a,f 'f""" ,W lbw" we , L -f-1 ' f 77 ' 4 I gvulwrx, 47 ,x if W' A V "' , ' 'W ,vw .,-4 " , f ' - , - '?lfi:f?5-129 2,4 Q, V'v9, 1 hr Q ,.,v,,,-, K f'-f f f -,f,,, - , ff' M: ' M. , ,, M - ' Jn, .1 -W '-f, A . , , 0 v " X,.,V .gv f-vx.m1q,w Vlhna.,.,w Q! 267 , an - fzx-uvrwm-.r.4'w'f'm""' m,..vnn"M 7: aiu. 4 ,,m'.'1NS'N' raw 1 .1gCwaw.?,'- ' H muffins 1 1 I I if I I L F k E Pi z 2 mix ll 'I ll II 5 ll ll uf 'ZH' Y- "'kf"' 3, I I Lim! l il.-ln I-Q A '. Q4 i -. . if - --'- llll' 'Ili gill :ml . t Wim 'lil -" 5... 5' i lllll 4 f ""9'v'7'Tvv , f-,,.-'Hg' 1 2 "ff L' ,,,",,-'Q' . ', r,"-it-'ff ' Inc. ,fp fi D wffw-""-'T"TQ"' K Classes iii' f aff, f 1 ' 'JW' ,UKL Wm. 'L , 'A',P1Sbi','4D2'3 ' 269 Cheryl Akers Hebbronville Laura Akins Portland Kenneth Allen, Corpus Christi Linda Alpers, Kingsville Irene Alvarez, Kingsville krfi l gif- .ni ". Q 5 Freshmen adjust to new life at university , A hi I 6 6 Q Jesus Amaya, Brownsville Enie Archibald, San Benito Kay Augustine, Kingsville Susan Baiza, Kingsville Paula Baker, Harlingen Patricia Barnes, Kingsville Sharon Barta, Three Rivers Patricia Basham, San Antonio Margie Bast, Kingsville Beverly Beck, New Braunfels Patti Berkman, Bishop Teresa Blend, San Antonio James Bookout, Santa Rosa Lynne Brock, Kingsville Barbara Bryant, Harlingen Juan Bustillos, Bishop David Byrne, Tilden Linda Byrne, Kingsville i.i Oo -Q Margaret Caballero, Benavides gfflcjf it Cheryl Campbell, Corpus Christi his b , n' , fn xx A fl ' Diana Cano, Kingsville ' T b C Clinton Carter, Corpus Christi B ,A ix g Hugo Castro-Mendoza, Costa Rica , X st,, ,G Diana Cavazos, Alice ' tl Q " ' Edna Cavazos, San Benito f l B t ' 1 K I :lv ex 9 i , B ssi 270 Tw N N Al z-S 5 Q -A ' . , , A-3 my - zl, - f- .:--- A . . , QQ.. ,M , sl-K-wi ll A l , "-' ' C A rg 7, 55.53 iff . . 'h A Q X X N x M X x , A X .ik 3 V ., t - ::- -t-.px '-.X N X X R ex X 2 X xg w - - C 5 Janie Chapa, Benavides Sandra Chapa, Roma Charles Christesson, Rio Grand Barbara Ciavarra, Devine Annie J'Nice Claus, Harlingen Consuelo Contreras, Benavides Carol Cook, San Benito Debra Cooper, Kingsville Marilyn Cooper, Corpus Christi Coiece Cornelius, Alice Susan Cornelius, Houston Martha Crum, Robstown Lena Daily, Corpus Christi Patricia Dean, Yoakum Rita De Leon, Del Rio e City Sherry Donahoo, Alexandria, Va. Norma Dowdy, Kingsville Jan Duby, Premont Debra Duckett, Refugio Jan Dunn, Alice TWO students observe one of the many displays in The F'0f1kC. smith Art Gallery. 5- MWA - "' Qi ,, - e e V515 l i swnxarzsvfms J KEMMWAVA EJ711DWWJEW , i .33 . l A 63' 21 . YM .-Ilmiie. . 1 l 53 55 9 l l 4 l v . ,T t l l l l l l gi: 5? 3' 91+ Ee 2? l PT K ff, Qi 7 . ,H Si gill ill l l l i u l 1 l l l l i , 1 i I l lr .aft l Z l 1 v x i i t 1 F f i I L c E fx l l ll . I n l la 44' 9 ff , if 4 :Qu 9 1 ' 72 'S' , .5 Nh 'id-nn I X' 1 W M 9:3 as. 1, -A322132 ' "'.'.i.n.an'x.e.... In-nunghsf d.nXi4h.4... ' MEF gk 5 QPQXQF. ' Zfr-,F -'J'-L,--V 'QP' ,A x, . 'v -..,., I fx 1.AgN James Durst, Refugio James Dusek, Tilden . Patrice Eicher, Alice 3 ' . Alicia Elizondo, Yoakum 'J Belinda Espinoza, Kingsville , Linda Fealy, Kingsville Earl Fletcher, Kingsville Fred Flores, Agua Dulce Stuart Franke, Uvalde Q. Maria Yvonne Garcia, Roma cl gl , J.. X .N . .4 - I f 'X R- S: -A ' 1 1 -f-"' :CN '51 gef- 2' l hi l 4- 1 cf X Q ' is-f l 1 A 1-Q Jessica Gary, Bishop T" Adalberto Garza, Santa Elena P is if Antonio Garza, Hebbronville -- 1 l" .mf 'F A 3 Diana Garza, Kingsville l- Joel Garza, Rio Grande City 9 i ts 4 -1, I X 1 J t -1,., Q. ',', 9 X A fry X hal it . 1 X " iz. 9 A lll Jose Garza, Rio Grande City Maria Garza, Kingsville Melinda Garza, Port Lavaca Paul Garza, Kingsville Thelma Garza, Kingsville ll 'sg- l i .sag 5" eff 1' W hti. MF ' X xx 41 X X N l sz fs wav- ,f ,I 'Y Q.- i Q X 1 A 6 L LA Q ,, . l: x , R .Vx ' ' 'hs s If H s Rl . 6 Q Bs.. li , ' .91 9 X A Ng fig : fn , - 4 55 f . , iz- V 4' 1 QS. Q14 Q 6 iv' ,K I Jr V ,QS 6.9 L A 'Wg Blanca Lydia Gomez, Del Rio Gary Roy Gound, San Antonio Pamela Griffis, Rockport Karen Diane Griffith, Kenedy Camille Habeeb, Corpus Christi Carol J. Hammons, Corpus Christi Karen Louise Hanson, Hebbronville Kathryn Michele Hargrove, Ft. Worth Carol Harlan, Bishop Terry Elizabeth Harris, Woodsboro Sylvia Hernandez, Robstown Theodore Hernandez,.Kingsville Barbara Ann Hinnant, Freer Arturo Hinoiosa, Kingsville Mary Hinoiosa, Kingsville Freshmen Cheryl Hoelscher, Alice Curtis Holbrook, San Benito Geraldine Hoy, Hebbronville Monica Huff, Riviera Deborah Hughes, Dilley Stephen Hughes, Kingsville Julie Hummert, Harlingen Jimmy Hutto,-Robstown Debra Hyde, Harlingen Sheila Jennings, Portland Debbie Johnson, Corpus Christi A Daniel Jones, Aransas Pass Jean Jostes, Beaumont Kathleen Joyce, San Antonio Cynthia Jungmanf Hebbronville Karen Kattner, Alice Karen Keele, Alice Lynn Kieschnick, Odem Roy Kreusel, San Antonio Kenneth Krug, Kingsville Alma Lara, El Campo Billy Law, San Antonio Jo Ann Lazarine, Beeville Mary Jo Lemish, Lyford Diane Lemmons, Raymondville 273 li E it 2 2 9 5 n nz 5 E lg P' hi. i is 2 i j l .ei hi ia ll si 55 ll ix si, is .,. Qi ll il ii 1 i lgl l l I v 1 l l l 274 Autrey Lewis, Alice Richard Little, Kingsville Carol Lockwood, Bishop Sandra Longoria, San Benito Fernando Lopez, Falfurrias Hilario Lopez, Rio Hondo Jorge Lopez, Rio Grande City Randy Luker, Houston Dianna Lyons, Cisco Sondra Malina, Kingsville Robert Mattingly, Corpus Christi Sandra McAnear, Freer Jennifer McDonald, Ft. Worth Deborah McMeans, Robstown Maria Elma Medina, Kingsville Freshmen Shelley Mengers, Harlingen Pamela Mercer, Corpus Christi Melinda Mills, Rockport Mary Mims, Crockett Orfelinda Molina, Roma Rodolfo Monsevalles, San Benito Anthony Montello, Houston Victor Moreno, Yoakum Nancy Morgan, Premont Jerome Moy, Runge Gloria Munoz, Harlingen Richard Myers, Alice Cynthia Nanny, Riviera Patsy Nester, Hondo Doris Neumann, Big Foot Lois Neumann, Big Foot Bilinda Nichols, Kingsville Penny Nichols, Agua Dulce Deborah Olmstead, Kingsville Nilda Pena, Mission Norma Pena, Realitos Juan Perales, Robstown Jeanette Pettes, Bastrop Ronald Pletcher, Harlingen Janet Sue Plott, Corpus Christi S.- A rg? C9 is Q Even the little ones enioyed a tasty bite of cool, free fruit during the Student Union's fifteenth annual June Watermelon feast. Outside competitive activities and ' Fejxxdent Council dance accompanied the summer i 275 S i Y Y VVHQ i M f I Qwnmfmam nm: 'maxim E1 aavmmmv. l 1 wx! W1-'zz hc nz ' 4, -1 i i '.' M3 :mfzm 51 P I 1 i I A 'QFY J! ,.. Rt 'f i i i 1 +3 i I 276 Last minute thoughts of the game are probably pass- ing through the minds of Steinke and his team while they pause for a few moments during the invocation. Elizabeth Rains, Raymondville Maria Ramirez, Roma Alvaro Ramos, Kingsville George Redus, Devine Becky Rhyner, San Benito Carmen Rodriguez, Harlingen Diana Rodriguez, Santa Rosa Luis Rodriguez, Alice Maria Rodriguez,' Eagle Pass Linda Sadler, La Pryor Elida Saenz, Brackettville Estela Saenz, Benavides Sylvia Saldivar, Alice Maria Sanchez, Harlingen Gary Sanders, Pearsall Irma Sauceda Harlingen Janice Schroeder, Robstown Stephanie Serevicz, New Braunfels Carl Sherman, Kingsville Rosanne Simmons, Kenedy 17. 1 U ew "C" .-ix, Q K flllll ll it is 155 if zxl. 'So '53- S in X i I xi BRL xr - fx' Q sw "'m. as fg- 1 sv .K N' 1 Robert Skrobarczyk, Kingsville Lynda Stover, Kingsville M Ricki Smith, Corpus Christi Jeri Tate, Aransas Pass Raul Tovar, Eagle Pass Paul Treptow Ill, Kingsville Mary Trevino, Pearsall Donald Tymrak, .lourdanton Ofelia Villarreal, Benavides Ralph Villareal, San Antonio Dana Vittitoe, Falfurrias Sharon Wallace, Premont Gayle Watkins, Agua Dulce Robert Wiede, Jourdanton John Williams, Alice f ' Betty'Willms, Goliad Melanie Wilson, San Antonio "' f' Tommy Winzer, Kingsville ' "l - 1 Robin Wohlgemuth, Premont Karin Woodward, Ft. Worth Eileen Zdansky, Raymondville Mary Zoeller, Boerne ldolina Zavala, Kingsville Lynda Zulauf, Alice 1 277 so rf: mv WA4-.ref :rx-.m.en: ' wmwsnxwvrzum H: S ,, 2 f: ii AY. .1 BKQLGELWJQSYYP 1 i 4 W T fi ,,. Fff wfsgg, '- TMJ 1 J 5 2 Sophomores seek to further education Gary Aaron, New Braunfels Omar Abokhader, Libya Alma Adams, San Antonio Daniel Adams, Corpus Christi Sharon Adams, San Antonio Patricia Akers, Hebbronville Juan Alfaro, Corpus Christi David Alston, Kingsville Thelma Alvarez, Kingsville Sixto Arredondo, San Benito Jake Backman, San Antonio Joe Bader, Corpus Christi Joanne Bailey, Jacksonville Maria Barrera, Rio Grande City V James Bogart, Harlingen Bonnie Booker, Schertz Theodore Boya, Harlingen Nolan Brandt, Agua Dulce Ceylun Brown, Premont Gayle Brown, Van Vleck Karen Brysch, San Angelo Fred Buitron, Brownsville Betty Burney, Center Point Ronald Butler, Alice Richard Cadena, Mission John Caldwell, New Braunfels Mary Calzada, Port Lavaca Melinda Canales, Benavides Rebecca Canales, Kingsville Guadalupe Carreon, 'Mercedes J. ,,., ,jg ,A 'CA ' ' y ,S 6- I L ,Lili ll QQ 1' X V3.1 ., is I 'W'-J' 3 H J With a break in the football action, members of Tau Kappa Epsilon rest from their duties. The fraternity helped boost football spirit by ringing the bell during home games. Louisa Cavazos, Raymondville Ruben Cavazos, San Benito Sally Colwell, Hebbronville Mary Cortez, San Antonio Sherryl Crawford, Harlingen Nancy Crum, Robstown Martin Cuellar, Falfurrias Ailton DaMota, Brazil Maria Davila, Corpus Christi Theresa Davis, Harlingen Anna De La Garza, Robstown Angel De La Rosa, Weslaco Jesus De Leon, Corpus Christi Janice Deisler, Kingsville Jeannette Eragoso, Brownsville Della Escobedo, Harlingen Carol Ewald, Marion Donna Ewing, LaMarque Yolanda Figueroa, Robstown Lou Ann Fleming, Harlingen 'rv i VXA 280 A raw Edna Flores, Raymondville Marcos Flores, Roma Dana Fore, San Antonio Rodney Fuller, Jourdanton Melva Galvan, Falfurrias Anna Garcia, Roma Matias Garcia, Laredo Roque Garcia, Rockport Aaron Garza, Kingsville Humberto Garza, Mexico Maria Garza, Alice Martha Garza, Premont Beverly Gibbs, Port Lavaca Dinah Gillaspy, Falfurrias Janice Gipson, Edna Stanley Gonzales, Del Rio Albert Gonzalez, Corpus Christi Maria Gonzalez, Del Rio Rodolfo Gonzalez, Alice Maria Gonzalez, Harlingen gl X57 ff P-. ,. , if 'Z Mrs. Linda Briggs, mother of three children, finds riding a motorcycle is easy and is also a convenient method of travel. Her motorcycle is the second largest that Honda makes. WFT 'bf ,i W-gg' xl l x. Q' Q R ' " we 'H' as . Ai x XM A :F Q y ..-T ,gg A 'i .3 I 1, af ' . , . 1' - X S A 1 'rl Vaal -53-u X 1 1 if U -.'ihvs:na -. X 1 1' . lren, linds i 9 Y X sf' K ,I 3 5 . 9 QD 1 QL, ' I S F J, 1 nr E l l 1 '!f"'?', ' A ik Harvey Gooden, Amarillo Robert Gowdey, Des Moines, Ia Sarah Gowdey, Kingsville ' Timothy Graf, Corpus Christi Helen Griffin, Devine Gloria Gutierrez, Three Rivers Jack Harper, Beeville Mary Hartness, Kingsville Elizabeth Hauenstein, Kingsville Rebecca Hay, Corpus Christi David Henneke, Alice David Hernandez, San Diego Sandra Hernandez, Alice Joel Herrera, Kenedy Sharon Hohon, Bishop Sophomoresz Harol Howard, Aransas Pass Richard Howard, Premont Margaret Jacquez, Harlingen Nancy James, Kingsville Ellen Jesse, Kingsville David Jones, Kingsville Lyndon Jones, San Benito John Keith, Robstown Audrey Kimball, Robstown James Kimball, Robstown Cynthia Kirkpatrick, McAllen ' Laura Klein, Robstown Jane Koennecke, Comfort Michael Kutach, Hobson Arnold Leal, Corpus Christi Beverly Light, Kingsville ' Diane Lincecom, Corpus Christi Annie Littles, Victoria Katherine Lockman, Orange Gro David Loera, Hondo Dennis Longbotham, Del Rio Velma Lopez, Kingsville Vito Lopez, Rio Hondo Carl Lorentzson, Devine Susan Luecken, McAllen is 1 y 1 1 , , 1 1 . 1 1 11 1 11 is 11 ,l 11 11 1 1 1 1 l l 5 1 1 1 1 1 ,1 1 1 '1 1 1 1 1 1 E E ! . 1 1 1 l 1 1 ' 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 5 1 l 1 1 1 l 1 1 iyl i 1 111 1 I i. 11 it 11 V I. 1: 11 11 11 11 1 ?11 11 1 I 11 1 1 282 Jane Lyon, Kingsville Margaret Malone, Mercedes Graciela Martinez, Kingsville Juan Martinez, Brownsville Maria Martinez, Kingsville Norma Martinez, Kingsville Otilia Martinez, Falfurrias Ellen McCreight, Kingsville Sharon McDonald, Harlingen Anna Mendez, Corpus Christi Marianela Mendez, Kingsville Jose Mendoza, Hebbronville Eva Mireles, Falfurrias Connie Molina, Kingsville Maria Molina, San Antonio Arabela Montalvo, Hebbronville Jose Montes, Zapata Miguel Moreno, Dallas Deborah Mueck, Bishop Larry Murray, Refugio Paul Nelson, Shreveport, La. Kurt Neubaver, Kingsville Connie Nielsen, Houston Phillip Nipperus, England Irma Crtiz, Mercedes Sophomores Lilly Osborne, Kingsville Ghanshyambhai Patel, India Lucia Pena, Falfurrias Maria Pena, Robstown Gloria Perez, Corpus Christi Maria Perez, Robstown Richard Perez, Corpus Christi Yolanda Perez, Kingsville Ernest Petru, Corpus Christi Susan Pettus, San Antonio Rodney Poole, Corpus Christi Barbara Pope, Alice Ernest Pruneda, Bishop Joanna Ramert, Harlingen Leonor Ramirez, Hebbronville -fth- L L' f 1.14. 1 I 5 X N 1 Q- e,h 9-f' f fa Q... 6 s L x wx- 1 Q' 6 l liz v- 'Q 'iff' YT? fl A i' ff? pf ff2i9',,, NXN ,pw- Don. Hugany, guard for ihe Hogs, tries for a score q90lnsf Texas Lutheran College during one of the home games. 1 '283 L- V f0"W'5-Y 3 Norma Ramos, Kingsville Teresa Rangel, Rio Hondo Dineshbhai Ray, India Daniel Reed, Riviera Linda Rektorik, Robstown Sharon Rektorik, Robstown Anita Rentfro, Kingsville Larry Rhyne, Kingsville Margry Richardson, Sweeny Maria Rios, Alice Anna Robinson, Kingsville Antonio Rodriguez, Falfurrias Elsa Rodriguez, Laredo Nilda Rodriguez, Brownsville Ginger Rogers, Alice Manuel Ruiz, Batesville Karen Rust, Brenham Alvaro Saenz, Corpus Christi Leonel Saenz, Premont George Salcines, McAllen Mary Sandelovic, Yoakum Curtis Schmidt, Fredericksburg Sylvia Seim, Robstown Elizabeth Siercovich, San Antonio Debra Simmons, Corpus Christi Donna Smith, Pleasanton Gracie Smith, Kingsville Melissa Sparkman, Freer Linda Starcie, Aransas Pass Ralph Stephens, Corpus Christi Mohammad Tarazi, Iran Donald Taylor, Taft . Mary Taylor, Hondo Gary Theiss, Bishop Clarence Thomas, Big Foot Emily Torres, Kingsville Sylvia Torres, Brownsville Adela Treio, Alice Joe Trevino, Kingsville Terry Trombley, Robstown Dorothy Tucker, Kingsville Eldon Tuttle, Poteet Danny Vasquez, Santa Rosa Edna Vela, Falfurrias Evangelina Velez, Eagle Pass Donald Victory, Kingsville Antonio Villalon, Mexico Sergio Villarreal, Laredo Jerome Wall, Corpus Christi Robert Wall, Sabinal Teresa Warner, Runge Mark Webber, San Antonio George Weir, Kingsville Gary Williams, Aguo Dulce Larry Williams, Agua Dulce 286 Juniors seek education in special fields Ronnie Adamson, Del Rio Alfonso Alcala, Del Rio Raul Alegria, Corpus Christi Cheri Allen, Corpus Christi Laura Alvarado, Mexico City Manuel Amparan, Venezuela Scott Aulds, Harlingen Martha Avila, Crystal City Yolanda Baldovinos, Port Isabel Emma Basaldua, Riviera Joyce Benton, Kingsville Kelly Berger, Schulenburg Jack Bissett, Kingsville Sandra Babbitt, Port Isabel Jane Bockholt, Robstown Vicki Bond, Del Rio Dorothea Booth, Comfort Jo Ann Braune, Three Rivers Linda Brown, Eagle Pass Margie Brummett, Refugio Peggy Butler, Portland Ronald Byrd, Corpus Christi Dean Campbell, Houston lrene Canales, Pharr Joe Canales, Laredo Juan Cantu, Hebbronville Ninfa Cantu, Brownsville Enrique Casales, Eagle Pass Clem Casanova, Kingsville Edward Castillo, San Antonio 5 Xfii. If 4 'O I s 'gr f g X ' ' xl X fc l " xx, xss. 7 ,. they q X sv A 5 ,. .4 , .4 o-, 'Vs xfw 'R Y 1-ff Lil' P- , as A- ' Jn. P 214 P E ,f fl E - irc- fX -.fl ii X 5 ll- ltr .. K!-.fit f U ,J f N. fs ' B Maria Castro, Brownsville George Cerrillo, Victoria Keith Champagne, Pettus Sharon Champagne, Pettus William Chapman, Bruni Ella Charles, Bay City James Coon, Tivoli Linda Correa, San Benito Lorrainne Correa, Kingsville Everton Cox, Jamaica, W. I. John Davis, Sabinal Alfredo Delgado, Del Rio Yolanda Doria, Brownsville Marvin Douglas, Corpus Christi Suellen Driskill, San Antonio Shirley Duggan, Corpus Christi Glenda Edens, Kingsville Mario Escobar, Rio Grande City Joe Esterak, Mirando Nelda Farias, Corpus Christi Faculty members enioyed visiting at a reception held in the James C. Jernigan library. 87 gc '1 ei K A fs l . -,,m,egg..,,,w.u,, K- .1',:.'n,,.-' -.Ls--.1 vi'-sw ew, 1 '-wa' sr fi! 4 WSE- 1. EQXQFEZEFERYQMXZN .fliiilf mains ii: l it -4 288 The role of the referee at a university football game is often taken for granted or forgotten. Luis Febles-Martin, Yucatan, Mexico' A Sylvia Flores, Skidmore Abel Fonseca, San Benito Dennis Fothergill, San Antonio Russell Franklin, Victoria Albert Garcia, Taft Frank Garcia, Dilley Gloria Garcia, Pearsall Rodolfo Garcia, Premont Amadeo Garza, Alice Hipolito Garza, Jr., Kingsville Jose Garza, Hebbronville Maria Garza, San Benito Richard Garza, Rio Grande City Richard Gluck, Brownsville John Gomez, Laredo Rocio Gomez, Brownsville lsela Gonzalez, Alice Jacqueline Gonzalez, San Israel Gonzalez, Alice Antonio '11 ii 5fUX 1 5X W Qgx XDA! 'T- i 5: ,..T.,,g. g , gs A L, ...smug 4 I i F. l, fe 5 ,M ,':a-1:::- . ":- W' . S S N P X ,. i 'Z Mary Gonzalez, Del Rio Pedro Gonzalez, Brownsville Arlina Guerra, Rio Grande City Maria Guerrero, Woodsboro' Sylvia Guevara, Laredo Jose Gutierrez, Bishop Jose Gutierrez, Hebbronville ' " 1656 1 W2 vdle ,,,. Q 55 h:g1fA . Octavio Gutierrez, San Diego , ,,,,, ., Ramiro Gutierrez, Alice Q . ,:-gr g . 35: ' - . l C -i" r I -' F Brenda Haby, Rio Medina ,- ., - . "WX 'Q l -z,,'i iff- "- Z, QM Karen Hall, San Benito ' "'-' g Rhonda Hansel, Yoakum s ' --" X K- ' ' . . g '5 I T, Dickie Hart, Freer ,.,,, Q Rene Hernandez, Carrizo Springs Q, "' As Thomas Hill, San Antonio 6, -.qi -' .. . .,,- t -..... ., I , - f ' W Thurma Hilton, Corpus Christi 7 ' "" Q Q ., We V . B 'Q 1 . 'X 5 Rebecca Hott, Westhoff if H l, 1 ' Jimmy Huey, Bay City i -,,' ' - - ...,. C r ,,. I - Clark Hughes, Kingsvllle ' li' ' . . gf X f J, M 14.339 -rx 1- Soma Hull, Brownsville .. - 3 rf if fi . l it QM,-. Ha i .3 . " i A -'-, .. Betsy Hunt, Gonzales It , B i ,. is Louann Huntsman, Corpus Christi ' X ,,,,. . . . . V ,Q ' Jimmy Jaramlllo, Corpus Christi " " -- X L, t X ez: -W ' lfiiil' ' .. . . 4,3 Douglas Jones, Corpus Christi , . ,, f i B' W. Scott Jordan, San Antonio 1 . ' '4 Juniors 1 : S I A Janet Kapavlk, Corpus Christi V Q ' 3 MN 3 61 June Kawamura, San Benito Q V-45.2 - J - - " ' V Q"',?-Ag g Wallace Kelly, KIf'lQSVIll6 1 ,s,,,, y Leon King, Boston, Mass. N iifiz' kg Dian Kubota, Hawaii ai '." 225 ' - , . s -.v U . QL N X 39911, 4 ' J 5 J Dennis Kolmeier, San Antonio , . ,E Q 5 Mary LaCour, Bishop P, James LaRue, Corpus Christi , Q A Karen Lemke, Yorktown 2 .432 .ig -... 1 . g 1 , -s v'-- . . PP sv, t s , it Sam lopez' KIHQSVIIIE , V - 4 z ,X LA ff, - 1 -" K f X ' li' K -,'. ,, " . Buddy Luckett, San Antonio of :e l X Francis Maks, Riverhead, N. Y. fQ1,.?1-M1 A -u C Sandra Mann, San Antonio K uv 21,5 ,V--' 1 sglv . ' g Vqqxv M '.,. '-3?-f s,.s s.. Stephen Martin, Bloomington A ss, Arnoldo Martinez, Hebbronvllle 289 290 Desiderio Martinez, La Feria Diane Martinez, Houston Rosie Martinez, Waxahachie Amanda Mata, Dilley Ginger Matthews, Uvalde James May, Victoria Mark Mazoch, Palacios Mickey McCandless, Corpus Christi Jim McDonald, Mathis Linda McManus, Corpus Christi Hilda Medrano, Brownsville Sharon Mellard, Alice Dexter Menefee, Robstown Jane Miller, San Antonio Ronald Mondragon, Corpus Christi Juniors Jesus Morales, Robstown Rita Moreno, San Benito Catherine Moy, Runge Barbara Mueller, Runge Jeanette Muhlstein, Hallettsville 1 Rebecca Munguia, Harlingen Sherry Nance, Corpus Christi Kenneth Naylor, Refugio Sue New, George West Earl Niles, Corpus Christi Alfredo Ochda, Karnes City Minerva Olguin, Brownsville Carolyn Oreschnigg, Kingsville Maria Ortegon, Austin Maria Ortiz, Falfurrias Billy Parker, Alice Arvind Patel, India Martha Paulk, Kingsville Alicia Pena, Falfurrias Gilbert Perales, San Antonio Quirino Perales, Taft Alelfina Perez, Three Rivers Lydro Perez, Edinburg Ramiro Perez, Eagle Pass Marsha Piwetz, Refugio ,ik V .P l "tri: V ji, FL , "" 1:31 Iv.-1 I J, 1. 11' E :I ..., , ,W ,' ,AA .W , ' 1, gf, i 53, gf p. i i,,, Q ' if f' Xi. Q zz 1 L.,-N 2....J ,. N ' 1, A .v-C RN fx Cl Q 4-iii - . 348, fn Y . as 1-YA: . ' i. ., r . In -, 2, . yr l Ti --'. f ' . H Q., 3- , 1 V, v- , "1 Az- A f A 'J ll, " is ' F-:eq 9' Q' ,wyr AA Ia if ji i as v .E 5 ch .- Xx! 'ui an ' , ' 5 1'-fi., lt Q ' J ififilikfifl I f lf' 'vff' Y it . ' , K . -4, sa X X s is ,,., ,,'. 5.1 w-,SWR Q, muse:-,Q,..m 1...-...K ,K During Alpha Delta Pi Playday fraternity members searched for their bricks in the mud puddle compe- ' tition. I 291 Harold Plath, Pharr Wayne Priesmeyer, El Campo Debbie Pryor, Corpus Christi Mary Quintanilla, Tilden Carol Rackley, Mathis Lorena Rackley, Portland Diana Ramirez, Zapata Gema Ramirez, Hebbronville Janie Ramirez, Beeville Paul Ramirez, Corpus Christi Cynthia Ramos, Kingsville Victor Rangel, Laredo Bert Reinke, Austin Aaron Reyes, Alice Carmen Rivas, Devine Dalia Rodriguez, Falfurrias Mary Lou Rodriguez, Crystal City Jesus Roman, Laredo James Ross, Kingsville Carl Ryan, San Antonio Edna Saenz, Alice Frances Saenz, Robstown Julia Saenz, Hebbronville Anita Salinas, Falfurrias Ana Salinas, Brownsville Maria Sanchez, Brownsville Cruz Sanchez, Carrizo Springs Olivia Sanchez, Eagle Pass Sylvia Schimek, Bay City Juniors The new education building receives a strong foun- ps I' l ,..., .f 4 i""l 2 1 4....0 S i giiag 'X ,st to iz . . " f X -133555 'X X -3 "' was ix sf' aff! X ! , I jf' . wx " . tad 'V seeks xl' ' I P iiia., ' 59 ..L. , ti NAV' was A X 2 . ff X , f i gi 3 .. ' A A s x- X S NA' 3' M . , . . ii 'l'A: fm f 5 is it - ' ' 1 3, .4.5Q:5'f flik-' ' 'L" S' . .1 , gf., , .B , f Y px' 1 , . ' Qt A f f . S . O ' ly.3Z1'.', I 'J is cds. tw. ' .-,- ,.. N4 in i if-' - gg K me .". s ,::.L,L .V Y I I -',, , .um nf "iff: Egfr- s Y . C Jacqueline Schmidt, San Antonio Bernard Schonefeld, Riviera Alvin Schultz, Refugio Ratan Sen, India Jerry Shaw, Corpus Christi Lucila Sherman, Kingsville Joyce Simek, Lyford Peggy Singer, Victoria Janice Smith, Houston Kathryn Smith, Refugio Patricia Smith, Corpus Christi Arnold Snowberger, Kingsville Soria Guillermo, Reynosa, Mexico Garland Speer, Kingsville Sidney Stewart, Kingsville Kay Strandtman, Moulton Ellen Stump, Elsa Harry Taplin, Freer Edward Tauras, Houston Bruce Thurston, Las Vegas, Nev. William Toliver, Converse Connie Torres, Kingsville Anselmo Trevino, Zapata Herlinda Trevino, Falfurrias Manuel Trevino, Kingsville Juniors Adolfo Vasquez, El Paso Alvaro Villolobos, Costa Rica Linda Voigt, Bishop Weldon Wallace, Corpus Christi Mark Walther, San Antonio Marsha Weaver, Kingsville Margaret Weisman, Kingsville Aaron Williams, Houston Janis Wilson, Kingsville Linda Wise, San Benito JoAnn Wolf, Corpus Christi Sam Womble, LaVilla Richard Wong, San Antonio Juan Ybarra, Brownsville Yolanda Zapata, Zapata 29 294 Seniors anticipate graduation ceremonies Ibrahim Abdullatif, Saudi Arabia Mohamed Abokhader, Libya Alfredo Acevedo, Santa Elena Alicia Adame, Taft Keith Adams, Alice Walter Adcock, Corpus Christi Anastacio Aguilar, Laredo Eloise Aguilar, Kingsville Rodolfo Aguilar, Corpus Christi Abdul Akbani, Pakistan Richard Alegria, Corpus Christi Antonio Almaraz, San Diego Jamal Al-Refai, Kuwait Lou Ann Altwein, Taft Olivia Alva, Laredo Yolanda Alvarado, Kingsville Leonardo Alvarez, Corpus Christi Roy Alvarez, Kingsville Farid Al-Weqayan, Kuwait Claudia Arnold, Bishop Rebecca Arredondo, Kingsville Roel Arredondo, Kingsville Karen Ashworth, Refugio Allen Baass, Victoria Michael Baca, Markham Sheri Baker, Kingsville I Luisa Baldonado, Brownsville Rosanne Baldwin, Refugio Harry Balsly, Aransas Pass Bernard Bancroft, Houston ff: K ri X A Y.: 1 rr ., at ' , ill I OU! -EDF sf' 1 f 1 I aff' was - ,, ,,1jj.y,., long lin rury sch iegistrat f X xx X IS... 5. ss.. 5 v Q sz? ww ..-.N Nl Q f x Q2 Q Q J 9' .N Q N f, ., -we .GPR-' we ps ik 'M K .. : : -si X . ,. , l NA' , X . N. XR QS :gg S - : I.. 3 .sfztm . si. Y 0 ,. s m-hl i .vii Long lines, lots of cards, a catalogue, and a tempo- rary schedule that never works are typical of every registration. X T ,Q iN", SSZQESB APS j gr if X V,.- , ,tx - 3:-:AX 1 : N-...,., Linda Barnes, Falfurrias Rolando Barrera, Corpus Christi Tom Barrien-tos, Corpus Christi Terry Baucom, Odem Diana Bazan, Corpus Christi Walter Bear, Bishop Elda Benavides, Corpus Christi Romulo Benavides, Venezuela Betty Benham, Kenedy Bill Bergmann, Goliad Beverly Besancon, Beeville Devendra Bhatt, India Exie Bickham, Corpus Christi Jimmy Billings, Woodsboro Jim Bissett, Kingsville Steve Blount, Corpus Christi Betty Bode, Corpus Christi Jose Bono, Mercedes Bobbie Boone, Victoria Brenda Borchert, Yoakum lDIl.lll lillplllf lilllili lil! AlllMl.llAl la I , 0 J.- I ,xx , f, yyx , 295 96 E. D. Glover, handball instructor, relaxe the gymnasium after a hard day of work. Joan Bounds, Sinton Gary Bowden, Kingsville Sharyn Boyd, San Antonio William Boyd Jr., Kingsville Dell Bradshaw, Corpus Christi Doris Brandon, Agua Dulce William Hardy Bratton, Corpus Christi s outside Denis Breining, Kingsville Gaylene Breshear, Raymondville , J 'if' J V Anna Maria Bressie, Bishop 1 :yy J N W f at xx at A 1 'fit ff., C4 Q3 , rv. - '-o.,K Bradley Bressie, Bishop ' .,.. , ' Steve Bridges, Huntington na I .al 6, 6 David Brock, Kingsville 5' " Y M lg Q Z L 7 Joseph Bruni, Kingsville 1 W 1 is ' Martha Bryant, Harlingen 15i'L H , i A ' X ,X 4 W X f i f K ,nl ,,1, . s 9 ..:, ,Ms A il John Brysch, San Antonio lil' A li Kenneth Bubert, Kingsville ' J Janene Buck, Kingsville Q W a 3' Q98 si Frank Bulloch, Alice Y' ,,: H' 9 l N 3- Bobbie Burch, Corpus Christi W lgglz y y - B , i if W 'Q E A x sf-2 . I fre 3 1 ,. I.. PN 1 Q X X 7 X X sc 'X Q :fair , to x 1 s X -. X s 2 X x fi "k. A ' .. ' X A , ,,t C sg? .- -. ,- 1., J -Eififi '. '5 '. 2 ff, - V '::. 2 - '-' 1 A 's -iff: N fx s,,fS'w1,4 1 , Pi. . JON , ,C , 1:95, , t Ss 4 qi i s 'ls K 1 1 I 1 - ,,. v Q X fl X ,,,,nuva R. . F' f . 'W six Q: V, 4. we "' w .I ., , 71 s ', li? " , in y? 4" ,S1t:"'6:' 2 . ' 4 as . N - . fl Ni s if X M vt' 41. was g X ' ,W ' 'Q .W 2,1 ,gags c 45.5325-:',. .:, - Wm i A F! M S54 f XX' 1 , . , . .sw 1....h,,V I A. f - Q, f , - --. -x x X B s B l' ,.1-: X:-u. fits! V g- , ,f-. Janet Burditt, San Antonio Emmy Buchholz, Brownsville Sherry Burgeson, Orange Grove Betty Burkett, Yoakum Augusto Bustamante, Colombia Maria Bustos, Corpus Christi John Butler, Brownsville Karen Butler, Pearsall Mary Buzan, Corpus Christi Linda Cadwell, Kingsville James Calaway, Alice Emma Calderon, Robstown Clementina Calvillo, Laredo Robert Camp, Kingsville Frank Campbell, Rio Grande City Eduardo Campos, Laredo Joseph Canales, Benavides Luis Canales, Realitos Margarita Canales, Benavides Cylde Canter, Edna Diosel Cantu, Kingsville Jose Cardenas, Brownsville Ellen Carlson, Edcouch Elvia Carranza, Corpus Christi Annabelle Carrillo, Benavides Seniors Percy Carroll, Bay City Nelda Casas, San Diego Martha Causey, Leakey David Cavazos, Kingsville Ezequiel Cavazos, Raymondville Marcus Cave, Kingsville Terry Cavender, Sabinal Dale Champion, Robstown Hilario Chapa, Kenedy Diann Chapman, Corpus Christi John Chapman, Brownsville Allen Chopelas, Mathis Louis Clark, Corpus Christi Gloria Clements, Kingsville Janeen Cobb, Alice 297 298 Carl Cody, San Antonio Kay Conn, Corpus Christi Henry Contreras, Refugio Warren Copeland, Corpus Christi Marianne Cornelius, Kingsville Pete Carrizales, Harlingen Jennifer Cowger, Portland Carlos Cruz, Robstown Jesus Cruz, Laredo Raul Curiel, Mercedes Daniel Dablegott, Bay City Barbara Daniel, Corpus Christi Carla Davidson, Corpus Christi Billie Davis, Pearsall James Deal, Corpus Christi Charles Dean, Dilley Patricia Deck, Corpus Christi Diamantina De La Fuente, Robstown Mary De La Fuente, Robstown Alonzo Delgado, Kingsville Ana Maria Delgado, Del Rio Beniamin Delgado, San Antonio Arnoldo De Los Santos, Zapata Hemant Desai, Kingsville Nayan Desai, India Seniors Niranian Desai, India Kay Dobbins, Pleasanton Teresa Dabelgott, Markham Susan Dodd, Talco Dorothy Dodds, Corpus Christi Curtis Dominque, Corpus Christi Ruth Donges, Bishop Mary Dorminy, Portland Sherry Drees, Berclair Lonnie Drozd, Victoria Paula DuBose, San Antonio B-Elin Ducote, Corpus Christi Ronald Duke, Kingsville Sam Duncan, Alice Karen Dunlap, Corpus Christi K. 3 ff. 4: , . 4 Z - .ka . l 5 ,X f :li 4 x l l X l x K Y 1 4 , K.. sn, , ni , '-1-1 2:-J' I a,- fi, F X Ailtli ' 1 Q r-- 11 9 l ' 1 X t LWB Vt Q5 P? Thomas Dybowski, Kenedy Barbara Earhart, Kingsville Carlton Earhart, Kingsville Edward Ebner, Hallettsville Billy Edens, Victoria Glennis Edge, Mathis Cheryl Edwards, Bishop Ezequiel Elizondo, Kenedy Carolyn Emmert, Premont Betty Encalade, Corpus Christi Larry Eng, San Antonio .luan Escobar, Rio Grande City Noe Estringel, San Diego Mary Eureste, Corpus Christi Bobby Evans, San Antonio Seniors Robert Evans, Corpus Christi Constance Fanning, Corpus Christi Serafin Farias, Delmita B Nick Fernandez, Corpus Christi Timothy Ferguson, Victoria Eddy Fernandez, Corpus Christi Mary Flack, Falfurrias Lee Fletcher, Brownsville Evaristo Flores, Rio Grande City Manuel B. Flores, Robstown Manuel Flores, Rio Hondo ' Marsha Flores, Brownsville Dana Floro, San Bernardino, Ca. James Ford, Corpus Christi Sherry Foree, Kingsville Karen Floyd, Kingsville Loren Fothergill, San Antonio Becky Franklin, Kenedy John Franklin, Kenedy Daniel Frazier, Victoria Skip Frazier, Kingsville Frank Fritz, Robstown Joe Fritz, Kingsville Naomi Fritz, San Antonio Anita Fuentes, Corpus Christi ' i 3 Kathy McDonald showed her spirit at Sigma Chi Derby Day to help the Chi Omegas win the spirit award. f4, L5,47 ,130 w ..,, zfg N ,Q iiffvf fig, V ' ' A I 301 A 302 Algie Neal watches as Al Nickerson struggles for possession of the basketball in the game against St. Edwards University at A8tl. Elena Garza, Alice Martha Garza, Beeville Maria Otila Garza, Brownsville Raynaldo Garza, Poteet Victor Garza, Victoria Charles George, Port Lavaca Edith George, Corpus Christi Suresh Ghadia, India Sam Gibbs, Lampasas Dinah Gillaspy, Odem Lloyd Goldsmith, Portland Delma Gomez, Kingsville Anadelia Gonzales, San Benito Ramiro Gonzales, San Benito Roy Gonzales, Kenedy Esperanza Gonzalez, Corpus Christi George Gonzalez, Corpus Christi Hector Gonzalez, Zapata Irene Gonzalez, Corpus Christi Juan Gonzalez, Laredo 2 V. nm , . if u V X 2 5f,FI' - Q' A , - g I Q . ,A Q 115 'tif . QS 1 'SN .S-4 1 V a 3 v -A I t I YI-if gm.. ff 'ef ,, f If 4 i 'V A all 0'-h 2 ,L . . W-'R s Q l " fir! xii K X .,, .A 1521 . , XX .fx - i -' S WO , 6 4 " ' QA ... x Q X e, X 'iv I B - W if '- X x l 4--i . I 'X' in ij, ,vng wc w , L 3 fil l' l 4?- , A 43-V F., .aif '-C, 1 1 s Q. . V, . AN. , :L Fx vi, : '-Er? -.,,,,..' ,- :':5t'7:-rc-:-'-'or f. 3-' '-i.'::- . ,,,k.. , Iiiiia- , ,V.,V , , kg .+ 1 - ,.iZ?:f"Sif. ' gs. IMLQ 9 4' W' Wk 5 5 M :gg -6 -S . AAq 4 ' ' f . . ,' fi N , .,,,,,,.,,, . v :,, , 4 --- Q TN :Q - .' . ,' f X fi Bs 1 WI. S ' 3 E . Q if 5. 1, A N. 0 W Q 45 1, Qt si 1 'Q' Y " ' "-' ' ii I' f if f s gf' . 5 T wiv Ni ll lfifliifl' - H- - 'i Mario Gonzalez, Alice Norma Gonzalez, Corpus Christi Ruben Gonzalez, Corpus Christi Thelma Gonzalez, Los Saenz Yolanda Gonzalez, Corpus Christi Mary Gott, Corpus Christi Joe Graham, Bloomington Charles Gravis, Alice David Green, Victoria Henry Green, Kingsville Paul Gregg, Cherry Point, N.C. Raymond Grim, Gonzales Peggy Gudka, Corpus Christi Imelda Guerra, Grulla Luis Guerra, Zapata Seniors Irma Guerra, Grulla Martha Guerra, Falfurrias Lucila Guerrero, Brownsville Robert Guerrero, Corpus Christi Armando Gutierrez, Corpus Christi Diana Gutierrez, Corpus Christi Leopoldo Gutierrez, Laredo Horacio Gutierrez, Corpus Christi Perla Gutierrez, Brownsville Arnoldo Guzman-Tamez, Mexico Vicki Habeeb, Corpus Christi Dianne Haby, Rio Medina Bob Haegelin, Corpus Christi George Hagen, Devine Charles Hahn, Westhoff Martin Hall, San Benito Norma Hanus, Skidmore Carolyn Hardin, Natalia Debby Hardin, Kingsville Charlotte Harris, Corpus Christi Patricia Harris, ,San Antonio Barbara Hassler, San Antonio Byron Hausmann, Goliad Mike Havelka, Kingsville Sherry Havelka, Kingsville 303 304 Leslie Hawes, Seadrift Fred Hayden, Adkins Edna Hearn, Kingsville Joe Hearn, Kingsville Nancy Henderson, Corpus Christi Elizabeth Henshall, Beeville Irene Hernandez, Crystal City Donna Herod, Donna Candelario Huerta, Alice Ronald Herzik, Schulenburg Esperanza Hilario, Laredo Lydia Hill, San Antonio Charles Hillis, Brownsville Joe Hinoiosa, Kingsville Gary Hltzfelder, Natalia Charlotte Hodge, Metairie, La. James Hodges, Somerset Linda Hodges, Kingsville Edna Hohon, Bishop Michael Holcomb, Victoria Brooks Holcombe, Victoria Cynthia Holland, Corpus Christi Mary Hoopes, Kingsville Carmen Hough, Corpus Christi Janice Hoverson, Mercedes Seniors Bradford Hubbard, Dallas Sara Huerta, Falfurrias Felix Hull, Brownsville Mary Huser, Beeville David Hutchens, Kingsville Bryan Huth, Houston Cynthia lnmon, Kingsville Ronald lnmon, Kingsville Bennie Isdale, Kingsville Betty Isdale, Kingsville Cheryl Jacoby, Kingsville Monte Jacoby, Kingsville Valentin Jalomo, Taft Pauline Jarmon, San Antonio Linda Jetton, Kingsville Q ' 1 'fe ' "" A 'Sr A f' y If Q., , X .f f W ' x . X W ' L , J 61 L F iv', L,-4 Q Y' X 'fl f-s. s wp-v s.. s x JG fv ...:: 2 ' , ' . i, A it . I -- blk . . , Y af ' J 9 X X -on lx ifgrihewl --g?,f- 1 "W if y - , . - , g..y.,: 5131- :Sify 'Clllx xx x. fl! ' . x , f G r. Y as .Z TS Af, X V an QR . f Ati, 'D R . A" il, !""'-'Y X ' C A 'sf A gg , X x m ags X , 1 X I -Q . 7? A L- K H s. - - . ' I 'E 'X lk 'm Q ,Q X. i f 5 x F -,lexus 1 'lf 'M 1 . , fm VV? ang! . 5 .J - if 2 .ir -fm., I nv 'Z f J rf Q 1 f! ,Z nf-:-:eh .az-' X. , , , ,sg , "' 41 , ' V'. ,ai ffl Z y- '4., A I A , ' 25 . , VQVV 0 , , ,, H., -, Ky 5' -, - -1 C ' W .. . '. 1 -" ril T ? 61,2 V-'ref' X mf JM ul gpsmxs Gloria Jimenez, Corpus Christi Mario Jimenez, Corpus Christi Sally Johns, Kingsville William Johnson, Kingsville Joyce Jones, Center Point Norman Jones, San Antonio Vonda Jones, Kingsville Robert Juarez, Corpus Christi Cheri Judson, Corpus Christi Murray Judson, Corpus Christi Robert Juranek, Odem Suphand Kader, Thailand Gary Kaiser, Kingsville Patrick Kalisek, Bishop Baliit Katial, lndia John Keen, Corpus Christi James Keener, FaIFurrias Pamela Keith, Corpus Christi Juliane Kelton, Corpus Christi David Kemp, Freeport, Ill. The Music Department sponsors a twirling camp every summer for twirlers of all ages. The camp, di- rected by Joseph Bellamah, offers a wide variety of 'routines to both twirlers and drum maiors. 305 l l A ' T Raymond Klespies, Carrizo Springs Gloria Knowles, Corpus Christi Susan Koenig, Kingsville Mary Kolacek, Kingsville Sherry Kouri, Portland Larry Krueger, Robstown Don Kuykendall, Corpus Christi Trudy Lanphier, Corpus Christi Maria Lara, Kerrville George Lawrence, Donna Margi Lawrence, San Juan Ann Leal, Corpus Christi George Leal, Concepcion Yolanda Leal, Kingsville Irma Lerma, Kingsville Seniors William Leur, Victoria Candace Lewis, Premont David Lewis, Port O'Connor Michael Liska, Falls City Harold Lister, Port Aransas David Littlepage, San Antonio Donald Loesch, Bay City Jose Longoria, Encino Shirley Longoria, Corpus Christi Enrique Lopez, Robstown Fidencio Lopez, Agua Dulce Ninfa Lopez, Rio Grande City Ricardo Lopez, San Antonio Juan Loya, Brownsville Wanda Luedecke, Alice Mario Lugo, Laredo Rebecca Luna, Del Rio Blanche Lundquist, Kenedy Sherry Luster, Raymondville Vernon Luza, San Antonio -David Lyons, Cisco Gordon Malengraf, Robstown Lester Mallory, Kingsville Sylvia Mallory, Kingsville Guillermo Mancha, Eagle Pass N MNN.. P l il' .F- Y-fr-gg. rx 5.1 . fir X ' f ,, ' with l V 1 'f- J . 6 xi! Q. Q " ,- ,L-ec-7:cQiv ,- Q -,Q J x SA s Y' my r f I , . . ,, ., 5, 4 M,-1. W4 , . Q 1 .J:.,'. X fzreztlfagz-.'1f.i1ps: 'iff 1 1 If 1 1 , .1 .,.. A ,... , X ',- ij .. pwux 'f- ' fl ,. .f.Q,. ' s it it Q. 4. A if f K i ,i : N ,gf V. .53 f-242.52 ' v " A.4. 1 g ! Jeiff. ' or 'F ' QQ S , 'D 4 1 t A: 51511: E- H- .5 ,lt , --r' is-s : Q s. fr QQ rm 5' X , ww fl . . .,.. - M., vp-5 ..h. 135. 1.3. GY' .1k'5i"i.1 ,. ,.. J .C ,- ,X PR. George Manning, Bay City Marion Manning, Bay City Ruben Marin, Mexico Frank Marroquin, Corpus Christi Johnny Marroquin, Kingsville Gai-Lynn Marshall, Kingsville John Marshall, East Meadow, N. Y. Lester Martin, McAllen Antonio Martinez, Corpus Christi Emma Martinez, Corpus Christi Hilda Martinez, Premont Diana Martinez, Beeville Luis Martinez, Eagle Pass Maria Ernestina Martinez, Kingsville Annette Matocha, Jourdanton ' Stanley Matson, Port Lavaca Anne Matula, Corpus Christi Sharon May, Kenedy Kenneth Mazurek, Bandera Albert McCullough, Corpus Christi Michael McDougall, Kingsville Barbara McGee, Kingsville Michael McGehearty, Corpus Christi Cheryl McGuire, Corpus Christi Jane McKemie, Corpus Christi Seniors Murray McKinley, Pearsall Henry Medina, Beeville Kishor Mehtia, India Michal Mellard, Alice Gwen Melton, Kingsville Frank Mendez, Corpus Christi Jovita Mendez, Robstown Marjorie Meyer, Alice Oralia Meza, Brownsville Rudy Miller, Elgin Virginia Miller, Jourdanton Gary Moffatt, Corpus Christi Olga Molina, Roma Janice Molpus, Portland Howard Monroe, Corpus Christi 307 ll A-f- A f if ffre A -so A f-fc-Ter ff : MI lnI'ligi.....+ r"i ri's'1i' Q :J .tii 'ir 'tii E Q: e Y i f-fI A' l I f E- --- I fr 1 Sterling Moltz, Corpus Christi Alicia Montalvo, Kingsville Sara Montalvo, Hebbronville Roel Montalvo, Kingsville Robert Montalvo, Corpus Christi Marilyn Moody, Robstown Virginia Moos, Hondo Joel Morales, Zapata Audelia Moreno, Odem Elsa Moreno, Laredo Gilberto Moreno, Three Rivers Roberto Moreno, Brownsville Dana Morgan, Premont Virginia Morrow, Corpus Christi Irma Moya, Falfurrias Seniors Samuel Moya, Victoria Linda Mueller, Nordheim Mariano Munivez, Brownsville Celia Munoz, Kingsville Oralia Munoz, Kingsville Robert Murphy, Corpus Christi Ismael Nava, Alice Reymundo Navarro, Cuero Chris Newsom, Corpus Christi Susan Nonmacher, San Antonio Oscar Noyola, Raymondville Dennis Nugent, Ingleside Dorothy Nye, Kingsville Pedro Ochoa, Mission Juventino Olivares, Brownsville David Olivas, EI Paso Antonio Ortiz, Raymondville Michael Pangtay, Mexico Lynn Panning, Houston Bradley Pape, Kingsville Cecil Parker, Longview George Parker, Corpus Christi Lewis Parker, Sabinal Robert Parker, Odem Bhagwanii Patel, India 'Q L QQ. L ' . 5 'M sf M - Q--E ' ' sH1f'ffgQ-. , as i ..-. 1 X -.,4 ps i Q g, A ... - dz.. C N l I -my 5? i Q ,..,.. , XB. S. .L 7 'A + .ff - : X, . Hwy .- gf pg s 'NO , L X. . this Y I 5 . .. J ,eip X XEQA X Q i t 3 A N ww ' X , . ' .1 dl 5""-ez. f-. fm , Y-v' Y azz., QN- Q., r I X t iff. L' I l -.. , 1 S .1 . .fl f L i gf , so . ,g ..:il-.R EX X I, gp Tiff ie.. . 'QQ if . t I 01, f ,. .....,,,,,, F 1 l L .V V X ks X so . , t 4 Q Q' Q N N , X S ., Q. 'PU' x, N X X X "W 1 Q: 213-asset ,-, -,J A V X fmm.,-w-'RJ 2 .. Y, so M, X JA , A f'.. "V '25, pq" m...,..,w1. Jw. A. .. 3 , X .M iw. . ,4 E? x X .VCIJ .MXNQ . T, ..:.,:.M,, 3. ' .'Yr1'fj"'1' nl sham ' ' :-ff, ."f1ff: , , .. - . V X14 s f " . ' if- f . - 1.3:-5 -I he-'K s.. 4 I X -'5 wif- ,,:,- , x K 4 . . r -. 5137! - F ,., P 9 f ,4 -- 5 :g , h-.,.g::5f',-, 5555- vb .V A ,lin , A V ,I 1 k f K ,V ,V , ,Q 'N V-gfi ,--4 i, N V f ,.'- ,. , A "I: .--'. ' ""' -.4A . 4 V.-. lg: R X K f . L , . .Q.- - 4:5 4 as 3531 54' 'ffws . wig X Q a ra. if 1 ,, 5 ,, C t - ,321 s i W ,. 4 ll A E KSVQA kt X L A33 1 IZZ . ,gig X, Bipin I. Patel, India Bipin P. Patel, India C. V. Patel, India Jagdish Patel, India Jayanti Patel, India Jayeshkumar Patel, India Natwar Patel, India Raiendra Patel, lndia Ramanbhai Patel, India Ranchhor Patel, India Shanker Patel, India .Vasudev Patel, India Vinod Patel, India' Viren Patel, Kenya Dorothy Patterson, Port Aransas' James Patterson, Aransas Pass Marilyn Patterson, Corpus Christi Tommie Payne, Kingsville Felix Pena, Kingsville Gloria Pena, Realitos Jorge Pena, San lsidro Baldemar Perez, Kingsville Clementina Perez, Benavides J Corina Perez, Kingsville Erika Perez, Falfurrias Seniors Gloria Perez, Crystal City Jesus Perez, Karnes City Jose Perez, Laredo Mary Perez, Kingsville Janice Perkins, Kingsville John Perme, San Antonio Patsy Pfeiffer, Corpus Christi Dong Pham, South Vietnam Adeline Phillips, Corpus Christi Jim Picquet, Kingsville Natalie Picquet, Kingsville Ernest Pivonka, Jourdanton William Pollock, Kingsville Ronald Poole, San Antonio William Poole, Brownsville 309 310 Coach Don McDonald demonstrates the proper stance and arm stroke used in tennis to one of his Diane Preis, Corpus Christi Christine Prinz, Corpus Christi Julie Pritchard, Kingsville Karen Prukop, Edinburg Pete Pruneda, Corpus Christi Navin Puiara, Kingsville Adrian Ramirez, Zapata Aleiandro Ramirez, Zapata Dora Ramirez, San Benito Evangelina Ramirez, Kingsville Elva Ramirez, Benavides Mary Alice Ramirez, Hargill Gloria Ramirez, Hebbronville Mary Ellen Ramirez, Beeville Annabelle Ramos, Kingsville Imelda Ramos, San Diego Jesus Rangel, Laredo Curtis Rash, Corpus Christi Ronald Rasmusson, Corpus Christi Jacob Rathmell, Zapata 1 X gf i- .-,', ,fb rf. I. .. M X f -vm tb? - , pi' -M-.qv 2 1 -V: ,.-H, Egg e as i Q i ix? x 5 X .0 wt' W, X X X N iw c X N 4 Q If si ,Q fx X ' 1 I 4 '? - "fi: :ax-"5 zagy assess gf FM 'bfi' . I sta si A Y ,W 4 I 3' iiis -is . me Y l X X is s X lf, X , . , X C X 'wwiQ19w11,H ' s 3g,,,3 g 53 'WV' x . .,"lW t 'ss X X 5'.s B i fit xX:ssf2Exsz,11R 9 ' . V X ff-s ffxl 21-if '- ,qgq-, - Marvin Redden, Robstown Sharon Reeves, Portland A Angelita Regino, Alice Dennis Remmert, Bishop Rey Reyes, Goliad Lucy Reza, San Benito Norrine Richards, Kingsville Sharon Richter, Bishop Alma Rios, Falfurrias Doroteo Rios, Kingsville Dora Rivera, Victoria Brenda Roberts, Kingsville Darrell Roberts, El Campo David Roberts, Portland Elaine Roberts, George West Seniors Steve Robertson, Alice Guadalupe Rocha, Corpus Christi Mary Elvia Rodriguez, Corpus Christi Mary Jane Rodriguez, Woodsboro Ginny Rogers, Kingsville Reynaldo Roias, Gregory Margie Rosas, Falfurrias Juan Rosales, Corpus Christi Roberto Rosas, Brownsville Mary Rosebrock, George West Dennis Rowan, Yoakum Barry Rowe, San Antonio Essie Rozzell, Fulton Dora Ruiz, Kingsville Braulio Ruelas, Alice Juan Ruiz, San Benito Abelardo Saavedra, Corpus Christi David L. Saenz, Alice Eva Saenz, Corpus Christi Nelda Saenz, Alice Rosa Saenz, San Diego Steve St. Clair, Kingsville John Salas, Victoria Jerome Samelson, Corpus Christi Richard Sanchez, Del Rio 312 Sagrario Sanchez, Kingsville Ronnie Sanders, Sinton Fred Sandhop, Victoria Charlotte Sandlin, Harlingen Fumiko Sarabia, Corpus Christi William Saunders, Pearsall Bert Schrader, Corpus Christi Charles Schroeder, Beeville James Schueneman, Freer Mark Schuette, Alice Florence Schultz, Kenedy Carole Schumann, Corpus Christi Jenny Schwierzke, Beeville Shawn Segre, Beeville Thomas Seiler, Crystal City Mary Senclair, Kingsville Hilda Serna, Laredo Stephen Shackelford, Corpus Christi Mahendra Shah, India Ramesh Shah, Illinois Raiendra Shah, India Bill Shannon, Kingsville Lowell Sheffield, Corpus Christi Everett Sheriff, Albuquerque, N.M. Lucy Sheriff, Hobbs, N.M. Seniors Linda Shimek, Corpus Christi Scott Slaughter, Del Rio Richard Siemonsma, Falfurrias Carl Simpson, Bastrop Joyce Skrobarcek, Kingsville Bruce Smith, Corpus Christi Charles Smith, Taft Mary Smith, Corpus Christi Martha Smith, Brownsville Richard Smith, Kingsville Terry Smith, Kingsville Susan Snavely, Corpus Christi Maria Elena Soliz, Robstown Frances Spiekerman, Edroy George Staff, Lago Vista X R .1 , E U . I, , iifj, Alai . ll ,. f A, . it i ,E i' I :l'l , Y' may if I 1.4 S-! 5' I3 . . .W A, . 1 is 1 Q .RN T i 2 V . if I' yr A f Y ' l ', . I , JP 5 1 1 l K I CAIJEA ,51 - C ,s:Q?,,.-M... 5' 2 -if '- ,, ,-gin' ' A HQ ass ' 2-X , v ' aw 1- rl -wg., I " '21 Piggy M x A s X -' vm ,,, P- -wx. New-.,,. X f .:, 5 1 N' Q Ax X . Z . f Q ., .. l , W... N , 4 yr-is xv-M 3x""5g , .,.. ..., - J , Am .... A ..,.. P ,ss Raymond Stavinoha, Bay City Ronald Steinmeyer, Skidmore Joan Stephens, Corpus Christi' Eddie Stocking, Crystal City John Stockton, Kenedy Patricia Sturm, Crystal City Bettie Taylor, Kingsville Dhavaiiai Teia-Isavadharm, Thailand William Telford, Kingsville ' Betty Theiss, Santa' Rosa Davey Thornton, Houston Michael Tibbs, Corpus Christi Martha Todd, Portland Cynthia Toland, Refugio Brenda Tompkins, Kingsville Maria Torres, Brownsville Joe Treio, Alice Elma Trevino, Corpus Christi Sandra Trbula, George West Maria Trigo, Rio Grande City 'WN ,pf The 'oy of the students was mirrored in their faces after the Javelinas defeated Sam Houston University. I 313 l K.. 314 Fermin Truiillo, Kingsville Virginia Turner, Beeville Carl Ueiter, Portland Brenda Urban, Bishop Beverly Urian, Falfurrias Robert Utz, San Antonio Daniel Vacek, Rosenberg Olympia Valadez, Alice Diana Varela, Laredo John Vasbinder, San Antonio Oneida Vasquez, Falfurrias Rose Mary Vega, Beeville Velma Vela, Falfurrias Elida Vera, Roma Elva Vergara, Dilley Seniors Abran Villarreal, Robstown Patricia Villareal, Corpus Christi Debbie Waitz, San Antonio Sheri Walker, Corpus Christi Michael Walther, San Antonio Ray Wardwell, San Antonio Randy Warner, Runge James Watson, Cheapside Terry Watts, Luling Linda Weaver, Corpus Christi John Webb, Big Wells Nancy Webb, San Antonio Michael Weiblen, Castroville Caroll Weisman, Kingsville Whylie Welch, San Antonio Craig Whiting, Corpus Christi Loren Wilder, Kingsville Curtis Williams, Corpus Christi Phyllis Williams, Kingsville Stephen Williams, Corp .Js Christi Glenwood Wlllms Gollad John Wincelowicz, Corpus Christi Mary Jean Wolter Bishop Raymond Wong San Antonio gf l 1 x x V up -ea. ,, A mil ' 'li x ' ' p i 4 ll'V?X x 6 .us . .- ,- l 2 ' 1 4 'ig' l . -lie 4s .4""7 'JS - 1 'Q x fi Q9 NR l l ., si gn 5 1.1 s X 5 -' f- 4 A A I J " . - ' . Q "--1 52 7 ' ' J . 'Q or 'V ' na- uf John Wolfe, Taft ' 3 , s jf ' . ii 1-Y f -.' X , I . . 'gr F Q , if X51 f I . 1- ,?9'. 5 K J s 5. -'I' l lv 9 ' 1 Dr Faustus was o dynamic production which por trayed a man who sold his soul to the devil In ex change for wealth and fame Steve Shipley played the role of Faustus NW X mini X !'Nr 127' e'shl-s B I W f '2 ' 2 1" ......... ,"l .,'.'l'l' Q 1 -We1' -1-' ss" F11 51 .dia 'B I Karen Woodall, Robstown Carolyn Wooten, Corpus Christi Maxine Wyche, Klngsvllle Mary Wyscarver, Robstown Antonio Ybarra, Brownsville Norm Yoder, Alice Brad Young Kingsville Rose Mary Zamarripa, Brownsville Elias Zambrano, Kenedy Estella Zambrano, Brownsville Niddia Zamora, Brownsville Maria Zamorano, Corpus Christi Alfonso Zapata, Corpus Christi Eva Zbranek, Rockport Hector Zuniga Laredo 315 Graduates work for advanced degrees 316 Ahmad Akeil, Saudi Arabia Joseph Albrecht, Victoria Merle Albrecht, Harlingen Robert Boone, Sweeny Amphai Buabungsuk, Thailand Voravudhi Bunyaketu, Thailand Diana Canales, Kingsville Paula Chrisman, Devine Ronald Crain, Kingsville Adriana Davila, Mexico Jirapong Dibyamondol, Thailand Frank Dodson, Mathis Angel Gonzalez, Kingsville Barry Hoff, Skidmore Benny Long, Bastrop Mohammed Memon, Kingsville Jackson Moss, Corpus Christi Arvindkumar Patel, India Harshad Patel, India Jayanti D. Patel, India Jayanti M. Patel, lndia Kantilal Patel, South Africa R. J. Patel, India Subodh Patel, India Thakorlal Patel, India Janak Pooiara, India Paul Surinder, India Shirley Pettigrew, Somerset Arnont Promnart, Thailand . x if V 4 , , f 1 A .Y , f. , j , 93 Qt 4. X i x l 1 'I i Q' X Yr, . -ll: ,V -'W xi ri im 'V ...JI v , ww . T , lxx ,Xll ii, xixixv 'Z A 6 lf' , T -.1-P 3345 -.,.V . . i, - -.-sf.. 3' -f"M N' VX NA Consuelo Rivas, Laredo Q P H b .:. Q at ,W Keota Santiwatana, Thailand ,,,. VAPQ -P , :G Gary Simpson, lfingsville ' on in P ' Sumataratana Sitabutra, Chicago, Ill. IP4: ""'A Connie Stavinoha, Bay City A . - L l 7 -..1 .5f.-,fiiishqlfiiixff ,X-'- I 5' Uraiphan Suvanprakorn, Thailand Oma Thompson, Marvell, Arkansas , X Shafi Vora, Pakistan " Ermengarde Walton, Corpus Christi 'QQ J' Q x-' V, . , 7 f W., ,,,, . - 1-6 4' W-4.11 Bailey, Dr. Leo. . . 26, Albro, Dr. Ward, lll . . . 3 Aaron, Gary Mel . . . 378 Abbott, Albert Jr. . . . 263 Abdullatif, Ibrahim A. . . . 294 Abel, John Bradford . . . 252 Abghary, Maryam Sadeghian . . . 189 Abokhader, Mohamed Mansour . . . 195, 294 Abokhader, Omar Mansour . . . 378 Abrigo, Juan Manuel . . . 210 ACCOUNTING SOCIETY. . . 186 Acevedo, Alfredo Jr. . . . 294 Acevedo, Ana Maria . . . 220 Alston, David D. . . . 378 Altwein, 294 Lou Ann . . .120,189, Alva, Olivia . . . 294 Alvarado, Laura Reyes . . . 286 Alvarado, Yolanda F. . . . 294 Alvarez, Irene O. . . . 270 Leonardo Vera . . . 294 Alvarez, Noe . . . 172 Alvarez, Norma Nelda . . . 210 Alvarez, Roy Canales . . . 294 Alvarez, Alvarez, Thelma C. . . . 378 Al-Wequayan, Farid . . . 294 Alworth, Charles H.. . . 50 Amaya, Jesus . . . 270 Amberson, George Samuel . . . Amparan, Manuel A. . . . 172, 286 Andersen, Linda Margaret . . . 241 Anderson, Eva Larose . . . 137, 187 Anderson, Randy . . . 255 Index 223 Acevedo, Carlos Jose Jr. . . . 124, 263 Adame, Alicia G. . . . 294 Adams, Alma Lee . . . 203, 231, 378 Adams, Daniel Edward . . . 378 Adams, Keith Gale . . . 242, 294 Adams Leslie Robert . . . 204 Adamsj Lynn ...246 Adams, Sharon Ann . . . 378 Adamson, Kenneth R. . . . 286 Adcock, Walter Samuel . . . 263, 294 Aduddell, Larry Doug . . . 168 AFRO-AMERICAN SOCIETY . . . 187 AGGIE CLUB ...188 Aguilar, Anastacio . . . 294 Aguilar, Elois Aguilar, Geo eCano. . .294 re g . . . 223 Aguilar, Rodolfo Jr. . . . 294 Aguirre, Ree W....5O AIME . . . 195 Ainsworth, Larry R. . . . 33 Akbani, Abdul Shakoor . . . 201, 294 Akeil, Ahmad A. . . . 316 Akers, Cheryl Ann . . . 270 Akers, Patricia Lynn . . . 378 Akins, Laura Sue . . . 241, 270 Alaniz, Jose Clemente . . . 188 Alberts, Clarence . . . 150 Albrecht, Joseph L. Jr. . . . 316 Albrecht, Larry Miles . . . 195, 201, 245 Appelt, William Osborne . . . 249 Archibald, Joy Arline . . . 270 Argubright, Thomas Jay . . . 118, 167, 205, 227, 251 Arnold, Claudia Denise . . . 294 Arnold, Leroy Anthony Jr. . . . 194 Arredondo, Rebecca Flores . . . 202, 294 Arredondo, Roel . . . 202, 294 Arredondo, Sixto Jr. . . . 378 Ashworth, Karen C. . . . 294 Augustine, Kay Marie . . . 270 Aulds, Scott Bryan . . . 230, 286 Avila, Martha E. . . . 286 AWS . . . 196 Baass, Allen James . . . 214, 294 Baca, Michael Robert . . . 294 Backman, Jake Adrian . . . 378 Baczewski, Gary Louis . . . 242 Badders, James G. . . . 251 Badell, Luis F. . . . 50 Bader, Joe P. Ill . . . 378 Baez, Jesus Jr. . . . 256 Bailey, Ben P. Jr. Bailey, Joanne Kathryn . . . 378 Albrecht, Merle Carolyn . . . 316 50 50, 58, 212 Barrera, Rolando . . . 295 Barrientos, Tomas . . . 295 Barron, William B. . . . 50 Barta, Sharon Jo . . . 270 Bartley, William J. . . . 50 Barton, Sally . . . 256 Barton, Steve Orvill . . . 245 Basaldua, Emma Hinoiosa . . . 208, 286 Bascl, Fahir M. . . . 50, 219 Basham, Patricia Ann . . . 129, 139, 21 1, 270 Bast, Margie Y. . . . 192, 270 Bastian, Robert Jerry . . . 255 Bates, Will C. . . . 26, 144, 188, 194, 207, 212 Batts, David Ray . . . 78 Baucom, Terry Louise . . . 295 Bauer, Chris Carl . . . 252 Baumann, Frank Jr. . . . 252 Bazan, Diana B. . . . 295 Bazan, Irma . . . 210, 220 Bear, Patricia Ann . . . 246 Bear, Walter Edward . . . 295 Beck, Beverly Lynn . . . 270 Beckham, John A. . . . 50, 124 Bednorz, John Thomas . . . 224 Behal, Patricia Ann . . . 208 Behrens, Donald Warren . . . 230, 261 Bellamah, Eileen Marie . . . 246 Bellamah, Dr. Joseph . . . 50, 231 Benavides, Elda Valdez . . . 295 Benavides, Romulo E. . . . 295 Benham, Betty Jean . . . 295 Benitez, Dr. Mario . . . 21 Bennett, Mike J. . . . 222 Benton, Joyce Ann . . . 225, 286 Benton, Linda Ann . . . 225 Berett, Richard . . . 205 Berger, Kelly Charles . . . 286 Bergmann, William Eugene . . . 295 Bergstrom, Robert Riggs . . . 194, 254 Berkman, Geary LYnn . . . 186 Berkman, Patricia R. . . . 270 Bernard, Kathey Sue . . . 50 Besancon, Beverly Jean . . . 295 Beseda, Carol Ann . . . 119 Bessent, Diana . . . 229 Bhatt, Devendrakumar C. . . . 201, 213, 295 Bickham, Exie M. . . . 189, 295 Billings, Jimmy Dale . . . 295 Binkley, Brenda Gail . . . 226, 246 BIOLOGY CLUB . . . 198 Booker, Bonnie Lisa . . . Bookout, James Lowell . . . 270 Boone, Bobbie Franklin . . . 295 258 Boone, Bobbie Jean . . . Boone, Robert Lewis Jr. . . . 316 Booth, Dorothea Annette . . . 149, 189, 204, 218, 286 Borchert, Brenda Gail . . Bounds, Jona P. . . . 296 Bowden, Gary Ronald . . Boya, Theodore L. F. Jr. . 228, 378 Boyd, Sharyn Rey . . . 296 Boyd, William . . . 296 Boyer, Elizabeth Ann . . . 149, 189 225 Boykin, Frank C. . . . Bradbury, Bruce Alan . . . 229 229 Bradley, Robert Lee . . . Bradley, Robert Lee . . . Bradshaw, Dell . . . 296 Brady, Phil Wayne . . . 252 Brand, Kenneth Wayne . . . 225 Brand, Larry Wade . . . 224 Brandon, Doris E. . . . 296 Brandt, Nolan Ray . . . 242, 378 Branham, W. Barry . . . 194, 207 Brannigan, James Leon . . . 261 Bratton, William Hardy . . . 204, 296 Braune, Jo Ann . . . 286 Bravenec, Jerry Wayne . . . 255 Breining, Denis Gerald 229, 296 Breshear, Gaylene . . . 296 Bressie, Anna M. Lewis . . . 296 Bressie, Bradley Allen . . . 296 Brewer, Betty Jean . . . 50 Bridges, Steve Elliot . . . 296 Briggs, Patricia Lynn . . . 101, 203, 218 Brinley, Dr. Eldon D. . . . 50 Briscoe, James Wayne . . . 188, 212 Brock, David Allen . . . 249, 296 Brock, Debbie Lynne . . . 239, 270 Brock, Lynn . . . 81 Brodnax, Thomas Lee . . . 251 Bronstad, William Earl . . . 255 Brooks, Janice Annette . . . 229 Brooks, Robert Gary . . . 150 Brown, Carol Elaine . . . 197 Brown, Ceylun . . . 378 Brown, Gayle Wayne . . . 378 Brown, Jay . . . 110, 206 Brown, Karl W. . . . 50 Brown, Brown, Lane . . . 50 Linda Jean . . . 286 Alcala, Alfonso . . . 286 Aldrich, Janet Kay . . . 237 Aldrich, Sam Henry . . . 150 Aldridge, Janet . . . 264 Aldrich, Dewilmer W. . . . 50 Alegria, Raul Berlanga . . . 286 Ale ria Richard Jr. . . . 294 9 I Alegria, Rud y . . . 249 Alexander, Betty F. . . . 123, 189 Alexander, Robbie A. . . . 246 Alexander, Sheralyn. . . 50, 76 Alfaro, Juan Josaphat . . . 157, 378 Allee Ro Dean Baiza, Dr. Charles C. . . . 50 Baiza, Esther Ruth . . . 118, 149, 189, 246 Baiza, Susan Ilona . . . 270 Baker, Dr. Beth. . . 50, 192 Baker, Paula Kay . . . 270 Baker, Sheri Lee . . . 149, 189, 294 Baldonado, Luisa . . . 294 Baldovinos, Yolanda . . . 286 Baldwin, Rosanne . . . 129, 294 Ballard, Dr. Hoyt B. . . . 50 Ballard, Pamela Susan . . . 120, 149, 204, 208, 232 Bird, Kenneth Ed . . . 95, 188, 191, 194 , 212, 242 Bishop, Carrie . . . 59 Bishop, Kenneth Conner . . . 261 Bishop, Pamela Jean . . . 129, 246 Bissett, Albert Roy . . . 224 Bissett, Jack Doulton ...286 Bissett, James Leroy . . . 295 , y . . . 254 Allen, Barbara Sumner . 220 Allen, Cheri Hager Il . . Allen, Kenneth Ray Il . . . 270 Allen Randall Clay . . . 245 Allen, Judy Little. . . 50, 211 Allison, Charles Buford . Almaraz, Antonio . . . 294 270 Alpers, Linda Sue . . . Al-Refai, Jamal . . . 294 ALPHA CHI . . . 189 ALPHA CHI OMEGA . . ALPHA DELTA Pl . . . 240, 241 ALPHA GAMMA RHO . 243 ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA . . .192 ALPHA PHI OMEGA . . . 190, 191 ALPHA PSI OMEGA . . ALPHA TAU ALPHA . . . 194 ALPHA TAU OMEGA . . . 244, 245 Ballenger, Robert B. Jr. . . . 254 Balsly, Harry Edward . Baltes, Richard Gary . . . 249, 294 . . 251 Baltruzak, Catherine . . . 129, 246 Balzer, William Van . . .190 Bancroft, Bernard Arthur . . . 150, 294 Bannahan, Dean Friend Barcia, Ales . . . 103 Barlow, Dr. Paul . . . ...225 50 Barnard, Jean Claire . . . 189, 208, 241 Barnes, Charles Dale . . .252 Barnes, Linda Sue . . . 211, 295 Barnes, Patricia Gale . Barr, Deborah Ann . . . . 270 . 230, 239 Barragy, Terrence J. . . . 50 Barrera, Alex . . . 209 192 Barrera, Gloria E. . . . Barrera, Maria Imelda . . . 378 Bittinger, Dr. B. Stanley . . . 50, 229 Blackman, Robert Forrest . . . 236, 252 Blend, Teresa Joyce . . . 270 Blodgett, Catherine C. . . . 50 Blomstedt, Robert Kent . . . 50 Blount, Steve Lawrence . . . 207, 224, 295 Bobbitt, Sandra Jane . . . 286 Bockholt, Jane Marie . . . 116, 149, 189, 192, 286 Bode, Betty Ordner . . . 295 Boeker, Thomas Allen . . . '261 Bogart, James Monroe . . . 378 Bogener, Dr. Jerry . . . 50 Bogusch, Dr. Edwin R. . . . 50 Bohannon, Mabel Harris . . . 209 Bohner, Roswell J. Ill . . . 236, 263 Bolzle, William Ted . . . 251 Bond, Vicki Lynn . . . 286 Bonifay, Randall Dennis . . . 192, 206 Bonno, Dr. John A. . . . 50 Bono, Jose Rolando . . . 226, 295 Bond, Vickie . . . 110 Brown, Nancy Carol . . . 192, 264 Brown, Nancy Lu . . . 193, 206 Brown, Dr. Robert L. . . . 48, 50 Browning, Kenneth E. Jr. . . . 230, 261 Brummett, Margie Ann . . . 286 Brundrett, Jerald L. Jr. . . . 205, 215, 227 Bruni, Joseph M. . . . 296 Bryant, Barbara Nell . . . 270 Bryant, Martha Evelyn . . . 226, 296 Brysch, John Mark . . . 296 Brysch, Karen Layman . . . 81, 278 BSU . . . 197 Buabungsuk, Amphai . . . 316 Bubert, Kenneth Darrell . . . 188, 212, 296 Buchanan, Dr. Randall J. . . . 50 Buchholz, Emmy Lucille . . . 226, 297 Buck, Janene Gay . . . 189, 296 Buckley, Gordon Baxter . . . 170 Buitron, Fred Victor . . . 378 Bulloch, Frank Eugene . . . 296 Bunyaketu, Voravudhi Sam . . . 316 Burbank, Francis David Jr. . . . 224 Burch, Bobbie W. . . . 296 Burditt, Janet McQuaid . . . 297 Burgeson, Sherry Shaver . . . 121, 297 Burgess, Warren A. . . . 263 Burkett, Betty Jo . . . 149, 189, 232, 297 Bufklov 263 aufneflt BumeYf Bustdm' Bugllllbi gugtoit Butleff BUllell 297 BUllefl BUll6fl Butler, BUlUn1 Byrd, I Byffler Byrne, Byfnel Byrom. Cabal Coder Cadwi Cahm Calaw Calde Caldv Calha Calus Calvil Calzo Camc Camp Camp Camp 29 Camp Cami Camp CAM EN Cana Cana 31 Canc Canc Can: Canc 2C Cam Cans Cam Cam Can: Cam Cant Cant Cant Cant Can' Can Can Can CAF Carl Can CUT: COIN Car' Car Car 2 Car Car Car Car Car Cal Cai Cal Cal 1 4 Cai Cal Can Cai C01 Ca 75 .270 . 95 250 - -316 . ,llyy . 295 - 296 . .2041 1 149,111 . 221 229 so E52 . .225 I22l 16 742, ala 194, 2111 . .261 . .20l, . .255 19, 296 196 . .296 . 296 10 296 1 01 , 203, 50 . 188, 49, 296 239, 270 . 251 . 255 . 229 150 I 97 . 370 16 192, 264 1, 206 is, 50 , ,230, , 286 , 2051 270 , 226, lm, 270 316 ,188, l , 50 l 226, 1,299 , 170 18 6 29,111 J." 297 5 . 13 I B91 Burklow, Malcome Arnold . . . 191, 263 Burnett, Lawrence E. . . . 101, 105 Burney, Betty Lynnette . . . 378 Bustamante, Augusto . . . 297 Bustillos, Juan L. . . . 270 Bustos, Muria Elva . . . 297 Butler, Bonnie Carol . . . 189, 192 Butler, John Clayton Jr. . . . 230, 297 Butler, Karen Gilliam . . . 297 Butler, Peggy Ann . . . 286 Butler, Ronald Clay . . . 378 Buzan, Mary Ruth . . . 297 Byrd, Ronald W. . . . 286 Byrne, David Walter . . . 270 Byrne, Linda Kay . . . 270 Byrne, Malachy Francis . . . 249 Byrom, Ronald F. . . . 79 Caballero, Margaret Rose . . . 270 Cadena, Richard M. . . . 378 Cadwell, Linda Geryk . . . 297 Cahmpagen, Sharon . . . 189 Calaway, James Ross . . . 297 Calderon, Emma T. . . . 297 Caldwell, John W. IV . . . 190, 378 Calhoun, Fay F. . . . 50 Calusio, Dr. Joseph. . . 51 Calvillo, Clementina . . . 297 Calzada, Mary Virginia . . . 378 Camarillo, Silas . . . 219 Camp, Robert Bernard . . . 80, 297 Campbell, Dean Taylor . . . 286 Campbell, Frank David . . . 256, 297 Campbell, G. Cheryl . . . 270 Campbell, Dr. May E. . . . 51 Campos, Eduardo Javier . . . 297 CAMPUS SOCIETY OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS . . . 201 Canales, Charles Edward . . . 164 Canales, Diana Gloria . . . 228, 316 Canales, Elmo. . .217, 219 Canales, Irene M. . . . 286 Canales, Joe Edward . . . 286 Canales, Joseph Daniel . . . 188, 207, 297 Canales, Luis A. . . . 297 Canales, Luis Gerardo . . . 297 Canales, Margarita H. . . . 297 Canales, Melinda Ann . . . 378 Canales, Rebecca Inez . . . 378 Cannon, Buford Allen . . . 190 Cano, Diana G. . . . 270 Canter, Clyde Allen . . . 297 Cantu, Amador Jr. . . . 229 Canut, Arnold . . . 148 Cantu, Diosel, . . . 297 Cantu, Juan Manuel . . . 230, 286 Cantu, Luz . . . 203 Cantu, Ninfa . . . 286 CAP AND GOWN . . . 199 Carbaial, Alcira M. . . . 200 Cardenas, Jose Luis . . . 297 Cardenas, Roberto Jesus . . . 78 Carey, Ernie James . . . 261 Carlile, Brenda. . . 148 Carlisle, Thomas Lawrence . . . 261 Carlson, Ellen Jo Ann . . . 237, 241, 297 Caro, Quirino . . . 1'64 Carranza, Elvia . . . 297 Carreon, Guadalupe . . . 378 Carrillo, Annabelle Lee . . . 297 Carrillo, Virginia . . . 128, 129 Carrizales, Pedro Jr. . . . 215, 298 Carroll, E. Caroline . . . 51 Carroll, Johnnie Lee . . . 242 Carroll, Percy Eugene . . . 188, 230, 242, 297 Carson, Frank James . . . 188 Carson, Samuel Craig . . . 261 Carter, Clinton M. . . . 270 Carter, Michael Lance . . . 255 Casales, Enrique . . . 286 Casanova, Clem . . . 286 Casas, Nelda B. . . . 297 Castillo, Edward A. . ,. . 286 Castillo, Gloria . . . 241 Castillo, Manuel M. . . . 105 Castro, Maria Del Rosario . . . 287 Castro-Mendoza, Hugo J. . . . 270 CATHOLIC STUDENT ASSOCIATION . . . 200 Cato, Charles E. . . . 51 Causey, Martha Lou . . . 225, 297 Cavazos, David H. . . . 126, 297 Cavazos, Diana Ann . . . 270 Cavazos, Edna . . . 129, 216, 297 Cavazos, Ezequiel Jr. . . . 297 Cavazos, Louisa Maria . . . 279 Cavazox, Ruben Avila . . . 279 Cave, Marcus Lloyd Jr. . . . 297 Cave, Michael D. . . . 242 Cavender, Terry S. . . . 208, 297 Cebi, Necla . . . 219 Centilli, Frank Robert Jr. . . . 200 Cerrillo, George . . . 287 Cervantes, Alfonso . . . 51 Chadick, Toby Jay . . . 150 Chadwick, Keith J. . . . 251 Chalick, Albert . . . 242 Chambers, Charles Fred . . . 245 Champagne, Keith Paul . . . 249, 287 Champagne, Sharon B. . . . 287 Champion, Dale Brian . . . 297 Chandler, Dr. Billy J. . . . 51 Chandler, Sandra L. . . . 239 Chaney, Dr. Allan H. . . . 51 Chapa, Armando Alanis . . . 172 Chapa, Hilario Ill , . . 207, 297 Chapa, Jane Nora . . . 271 Chapa, Sandra M. . . . 271 Chapman, Diann . . . 189, 297 Chapman, John Willoughby . . . 297 Chapman, Kenneth Wilson . . . 252 Chapman, Richard John . . . 150 Chapman, William Joseph . . . 287 Charles, Ella Jane . . . 287 CHEMISTRY CLUB . . . 202 Cheyney, Joseph Michael . . . 150 CHI OMEGA . . . 246, 247 Chiaventone, Mike J. . . . 163 Chimarys, Michael . . . 263 Chiu, Manuel Trimmer . . . 172 Chopelas, Allen Albert . . . 188, 297 Chrisman, Paula Sue . . . 316 Christensen, Barry Lee . . . 207 Christensen, Dana Faye . . . 129, 220 Christesson, Charles A. Jr. . . . 271 Ciavarra, Barbara B. . . . 271 Cisneros, Raul B. . . . 203, 216, 223 Clark, Dr. Jack P. . . . 51 Clark, Louis Marie . . . 189, 297 Clark, Raymond Jr. . . . 109, 193, 206 Clark, Robert G. 5.S.G. . . . 51 Clarke, Marilyn Sue . . . 139 Clary, Austin Allen . . . 121, 252 Clasen, Milton G. . . . 51 Claus, Annie Jnice . . . 271 Clements, Gloria Hinoiosa . . . 297 Clendenin, Danny Allen . . . 162, 163 Cleveland, Floyd T. lCaptainl . . . 51 Coalson, Dr. George O. . . . 51, 217 Coates, Debra Nell . . . 129, 138 Cobb, Janeen Collins . . . 297 Cody, Carl Myers . . . 1 17, 254, 298 Cofer, Michael Dixon . . . 230, 254 Coffman, Karl . . . 201 Cohen, Steven . . . 51 Cokendolpher, Dr. F. W. . . . 51 Collard, Susan Dawn . . . 148, 208, 237, 239 Collier, Beverly Ann . . . 224 Collins, Charles E. . . . 207 Collins, Charles M. . . . 207 Collins, Gary Jose . . . 195 Collins, Jeffry Bruce . . . 229 Collins, Keith N. . . . 190 Colwell, Sally Jack . . . 279 Compean, Jose David . . . 223 Conn, Elizabeth Kay . . . 298' Contreras, Consuelo . . . 271 Contreras, Henry Jr. 298 Cook, Carol Ann . . . 271 Cook, Felix Derwyn . . . 187 Cook, Dr. George A. . . . 51 Cooke, Betty Cadwell . . . 204 Coon, James Lynn . . . 287 Cooper, Debra Rebecca . . . 241, 271 Cooper, Marilyn . . . 271 Cooper, Melvin . . . 230, 245 Cooper, Dr. Stewart E. . . . 51, 209 Copeland, Johnny Dalton . . . 251 Copeland, Warren Ricky . . . 298 Copelo, Domingo . . . 209 Corby, Chris Steven . . . 80 Cornelius, C. Coiece . . . 271 Cornelius, Lynn Taylor . . . 245 Cornelius, Marianne . . . 298 Cornelius, Susan Marie . . . 271 Corona, Graciela . . . 128, 129 Correa, Ida Lorrainne G. . . . 287 Correa, Linda Lou . . . 287 Cortez, Mary U. . . . 279 Cortez, Ricardo Alcala . . . 256 Cosgrove, Craig Edward . . . 245 Cotter, Paul Franklin . . . 188 Cottle, William Joe 251 Cousins, Barton W. . . . 1885 194, 207, 212, 242 Cowden, Karl Douglas . . . 216 Cowell, Jack Wayne . . . 230, 263 Cowger, Jennifer J. . . . 298 Cox, Cynthia . . . 246 Cox, Everton Lloyd . . . 287 Crafts, Willie. . . 51 Craig, Dr. James A. Jr. . . . 51 Crawford, Sherryl Sue . . . 279 Crenshaw, Sandra J. . . . 187 Crompton, Charles . . . 148 Crooks, Bebe Kay . . . 115, 189 Crum, Martha Jean L . . 271 Crum, Nancy Gail . . . 279 Crump, Edwin Travis . . . 105 Cruz, Carlos Pena . . . 298 Cruz, Jesus Manuel . . . 217, 219, 298 Cruz, Jose Guadalupe . . . 209 Cruz, Nasario Jr. . . . 209 Cuellar, Lauro Mario . . . 256 Cuellar, Martin . . . 279 Culpepper, Cathy Lynn . . . 246 Cumba, Mary Ann Carter . . . 116 Cunningham, Debora Ann . . . 264 Cunningham, Samuel A. . . . 263 Curiel, Raul Jr. 298 Curl, John E. . . . 114 Curry, Raydene . . . 241 Cusack, William Leroy Jr. . . . 261 -411.11- Dabelgott, Daniel Alan . . . 195, 298 Dabelgott, Teresa Ann . . . 298 Dailey, Lena Ruth . . . 271 Dalwadi, Jayantilal Z. . . . 213 Dam, Dr. Hari N. . . . 51 DaMota, Ailton . . . 279 Daniel, Barbara Lois . . . 298 Daniel, Denise . . . 129, 226, 230, 246 Danna, Marion Joseph . . . 150 Dannels, William Ray . . . 195 Davidson, Carla Kay . . . 298 Davidson, Dr. Robert B. . . . 51 Davila, Adriana . . . 228, 316 Davila, Maria De Lourdes . . . 279 Davis, Billie . . . 298 Davis, Connie Sue . . . 241 Davis, Deborah Lynn . . . 264 Davis, Edward Thomas Jr. . . . 201 Davis, John S. . . . 287 Davis, Dr, Loren E. . . . 51 Davis, Michael Bruce . . . 261 Davis, Ronny Paul . . . 255 Davis, Dr. Richard B. . . . 51 Davis, Theresa Ann . . . 279 Dayoc, Joseph Ill . . . 189 DeHoop, Herman R. . . . 51 De La Fuente, Diamantina . . . De La Garza, Anna P. . . . 279 De La Rosa, Angel . . . 279 De Leon, Antonio . . . 186 De Leon, Jesus . . . 279 De Leon, Rita . . . 210, 271 Delmare, Dr. Maxine . . . 51 De Los Santos, Arnoldo L. . . . 298 DELTA SIGMA Pl . . . 248, 249 DELTA TAU DELTA . . . 250, 251 Deal, James Monte . . . 298 Dean, Charles Hope . . . 202, 298 Dean, Patricia Gayle . . . 271 Deck, Patricia Louise . . . 298 Deisler, Janice Eileen . . . 279 Delcambre, Chris Geary . . . 120, 263 Delgado, Alfredo R. . . . 256, 287 Delgado, Alonzo Jr. . . . 298 Delgado, Ana Maria . . . 298 Delgado, Beniamin . . . 223, 298 DELTA OMICRON . . . 203 Desai, Hemant Natv . . . 298 Desai, Mayurkant S. . . . 213 Desai Nayankumar, Mangubha . . . 213, 298 Desai, Niranian Kantilal . . . 201, 213, 298 Desai, Shashinchandra N. . . . 213 Devine, Victoria Ann . . . 148 Dharia, Nikhil . . . 213 Dhruv, Hasitkumar S. . . . 213 Diaz, Oscar . . . 217 Dibyamondol, Jirapong . . . 316 Dickens, Terry . . . 263 Dietz, Walter Joseph Jr. 254 Dill, Buena Faye . . . 241 Dillard, George Oliver . . . 219 Dittlinger, Karen Ann . . . 208 Dobbins, Kay E. . . . 298 Doctor, Richard . . . 167 Dodd, Susan D. . . . 298 Doods, Dorothy Jane . . . 120, 149, 192, 199, 208, 220, 298 Dodson, Frank Arnold Jr. 188, 194, 207, 242, 316 Dollery, Stephanie Ann . . . 139, 246 Domadwalla, M. T. . . . 213 Domeri, Ray . . . 201 Domingue, Curtis John . . . 298 Domino, Joseph V. . . . 51 Donahoo, Sheryll D. . . . 271 Donalson, David Mathews . . . 230, 236, 261 Donges, Ruth Ann . . . 298 Doria, Yolanda . . . 287 Dorminy, Mary Ann . . . 298 Dornburg, Martha Antonette . . . 176 Dotterweich, Dr. Frank H. . . . 51 Douglas, Marvin Kenneth . . . 287 Douglas, Robert Wayne . . . 190 Dowdy, Nita Kylene . . . 246 Dowdy, Norma Jean . . . 239, 271 Dowell, Douglas Leroy . . . 216, 231 Drath, Dr. Jan Bogdan . . . 51 Drawe, Dr. D. Lynn . . . 51 Dress, Sherry Diane . . . 298 Driskill, Suellen . . . 149, 189, 287 Drozd, Lonnie C. . . . 298 Dube, Leon . . . 51 Du Bose, Paula . . . 298 Du Bose, Paula . . . 189, 241 Duby, Jan Suzette . . . 271 Duckett, Debra Jane . . . 271 Ducote, B. Elin Richardson . . . 298 Duderstadt, James L. . . . 252 Duggan, Shirley Nell . . . 287 Duke, Jacquelyn . . . 239 Duke, Ronald Douglas . . . 219, 298 Duncan, Danny J. . . . 51, 223 Duncan, Paul Thomas . . . 229 Duncan, Sam Lee . . . 298 Dunlap, Karen Corea . . . 298 Dunn, E. Jan . . . 271 Dunn, 5. Burgin . . . 51 Dunn, William Mason Jr. . . . 263 Durst, James Roy . . . 272 Dusek, James Lee . . . 272 Dybowski, Thomas E. . . . 299 Dyer, Wanda Jackson . . . 189 319 320 4-11.4.1 Earhart, Barbara Scott . . . 299 Earthart, Carlton Nelson Jr. . . . 127, 299 Earls, Audrey Lucille . . . 187 East, Lica Elena . . . 264 Easton, Walter C. . . . 249 Estringel, Noe . . . 216 Ebner, Edward Leo . . . 299 Eckert, Reagan Al . . . 255 Edens, Billy Dwight Jr. . . . 189, 232, 299 Edens, Glenda Wilson . . . 287 Edge, Glennis Kay . . . 299 Edwards, Cheryl Gibson . . . 299 Edwards, Larry . . . 150 Eicher, Patrice E. . . . 272 Elzondo, Alicia . . . 272 Elizondo, Ezequiel . . . 299 Elliott, Barbara Sue . . . 203, 218, 231 Elliott, Dr. Floyd . . . 21 Elliott, Dr. Paul . . . 51 Elliott, Robert Burl Jr. . . . 251 Ellis, Gary Garland . . . 252 Ellison, Dale P. . . . 261 Ellwood, Daniel Thomas . . . 261 Elmore, Trey . . . 224 Emmert, Carolyh Louise . . . 299 Encalade, Betty Polk . . . 299 Eng, Larry Jean . . . 299 English, Kathryn E. . . . 246 English, William C. . . . 21 Engstrom, Terry Lou . . . 264 EPISCOPAL STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION . . . 204 Eppright, Fred G. Jr. . . . 255 Eragoso, Jeannette . . . 279 Escamilla, Robert G. . . . 263 Escobar, Juan Manuel . . . 299 Escobar, Mario Alberto . . . 188, 287 Escobar, Pablo Aleiandro . . . 172 Escobedo, Della Mae . . . 279 Espinosa, A. J. . . . 227 Espinoza, Belinda L. . . . 272 Estep, Linda Ann . . . 192 Esterak, Joe Robert . . . 249, 287 Estringel, Noe . . . 103, 299 ETA KAPPA NU . . . 205 Eureste, Maria F. . . . 299 Evans, Bobby Max Jr. . . . 186, 299 Evans, Bobby Morris . . . 186, 299 Evans, Deborah Ann . . . 157, 237 Evans, Donnie Ray . . . 255 Evans, John A. lMajorj . . . 51, 125 Evans, Robert Bailey . . . 299 Ewald, Carol Ann . . . 192, 224, 9 27 Ewing, Donna Jean . . . 279 -i--ii Fanning, Constance Marie . . . 299 Farias, Nelda Moreno . . . 287 Farias, Serafin . . . 299 Fasano, John Rocco . . . 230, 261 Favor, Jerry Davis . . . 232, 224 Fealy, Katherine Lynn . . . 116, 148 Fealy, Linda Marie . . . 272 Febles, Martin Luis A. . . . 288 Felder, Royce Lee . . . 119, 194 Ferguson, Timothy Craig . . . 188, 299 Fernandez, Eddy Fidel . . . 299 Fernandez, Nicolas . . . 299 Fernandez, Raymond Charles . . . 150 Ferrell, Janet . . . 192, 239 Ferrell, Margaret Lourana . . . 224 FFA . . . 207 Fields, Kent T. . . . 51 Figueroa, Yolanda V. . . . 279 Fink, George B. . . . 52 Finley, Dr. J. Browning . . . 52, 201 Fischer, James H. . . . 252 Fischer, John Francis . . . 200 Fishar, Dr. Lewis R. . . . 52 Fitzpatrick, Dalees . . . 129, 188, 220 Flack, Mary Elizabeth . . . 211, 224, 299 Fleming, Lou Ann . . . 279 Fletcher, Alvis Lee . . . 299 Fletcher, Earl Wayne Jr. . . . 272 Flores, Edna Belinda . . . 280 Flores, Evaristo Jr. . . . 189, 205, 215, 299 Flores, Fred Ramon . . . 272 Flores, Jose . . . 101 Flores, Jose Angel . . . 101 Flores, Jose Eliazar . . . 101 Flores, Jose G. . . . 101 Flores, Laura ldalia . . . 256 Flores, Manuel . . . 219, 299 Flores, Manuel Brionez . . . 299 Flores, Marcos . . . 280 Flores, Marsha Lou . . . 299 Flores, Richard . . . 124 Flores, Sylvia Anabel . . . 288 Flores, Sylvia Andrea . . . 288 Florez, Richard Edward . . . 127 Floro, Dana Michelle . . . 299 Flowers, Daryl Coe . . . 148 Floyd, Floyd, Karen June. . .115 Karen Rowe . . . 299 Fonseca, Abel Pedro . . . 217, 288 Fontaine, Elsie Jane . . . 192 FOOTLIGHTS CLUB . . . 206 Ford, Dr. Dennis B. Jr. . . . 220 Ford, James E. . . . 299 Fore, Dana Andrew . . . 256, 280 Foree, Sherry Beth . . . 299 Foster, Joseph Cleveland . . . 251 Foster, Polly Belinda . . . 110 Foster, Dr. Thomas H. . . . 52 Fothergill, Dennis Lee . . . 288 Fothergill, Loren Wayne . . . 299 Fowler, Judy Christine . . . 137, 239 Franke, Stuart Odell . . . 272 Frankenhauser, Jack . . . 148 Frankenhauser, Patsy C. . . . 148 Franklin, Becky Bates . . . 299 Franklin, John Donald . . . 299 Franklin, Russell David . . . 204, 288 Frazier, Daniel Wayne . . . 299 Frazier, Sharon Kay . . . 211 Frazier, Skip . . . 101, 299 Freeman, Andrea Faye . . . 187 Freeman, Terrell . . . 98 Freund, Tom Clausen . . . 125 Fries, Francis Anthony . . . 150 Fritz, Frank Joseph . . . 299 Fritz, Joe Fred . . . 33, 299 Fritz Naomi Camille. . . 299 Fucik, Dr. John E. . . . 52 Fuentes, Anita W. . . . 299 Fuessel, John William . . . 245 Fuller, Rodney Keith . . . 215, 280 Fuzzell, Norman Allan . . . 300 1-i1-1: Gaddis, Lloyd William . . . 261 Gaenzel, Ferdinand . 300 Gaines, Margaret C. 225 Gaiiar, Dhirailal K. . . . 201, 213 Galaviz, Jesus Cerda . . . 263 Galloway, Dr. R. J. . . . 52 Galvan, Concepcion S. . . . 300 . . 186, 252, Galvan, Lynda Rose . . . 192, 211 Galvan, Melva lris . . . 280 Gandhi, Suhas Sunderlal . . . 213 Gandy, Jim . . . 150 Garcia, Albert Prado Jr. . . . 288 Garcia, Alex . . . 78 Garcia, Anna Maria . . . 256 Garcia, Angelita V. . . . 300 Garcia, Anita Reyes . . . 300 Garcia, Anna Lynda . . . 280 Garcia, Arturo B. . . . 300 Garcia, Benito Jr. . . . 210 Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, 300 Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia, Garcia Garcia 3 . is L. -' ij: ' lp 1. XU- ' ,V , Bernardo Perez . . . 300 Chano . . . 256 Clemente . . . 300 David Aris . . . 218, 227 David Joe . . . 256 David Martin . . . 300 David P. . . . 223 Delores A. . . . 176 Eliza Morales . . . 300 Francisco . . . 256, 288 Gloria Aguilar . . . 288 Gloria Alice . . . 288 Gloria Jean . . . 210 Jose . . . 215 Jose Aris . . . 164, 205, Linda Canales . . . 80 Manuel Gerardo . . . 202 Maria Yvonne . . . 272 Matias A. Jr. . . . 223 Melinda Estella . . . 300 Nelda . . . 300 Omar. . . 300 Robert Julian . . . 300 Robert R.. . . 214 Rodolfo Jr. . . . 288 Romeo . . . 122 Romeo Reyna . . . 228 Roque Jr. . . . 125, 280 , Ruben . . . 223 Garcia, Sandra Alicia . . . 232 Gardiner, Kathryn M. . . . 300 Garland, Dr. Fred M. . . . 52 Garner, Michael Loy . . . 252 Gary, Jessica Maurine . . . 272 Garza, Garza, Garza, Garza I Garza, Garza Garza Garza Garza Garza Garza Garza, I I I I Aaron John . . . 280 Adalberto Jr. . . . 272 Adolph C. . . . 300 Alice . . . 217 Amadeo Torres . . . 288 Ann Doris . . . 231 Antonio L. . . . 272 Baldemar Jr. . . . 224 Daniel T. . . . 300 Diana G. . . . 272 Elena R. . . . 302 Hipolito Huerta . . . 223 5 Glenn, H' lxl Gilletl' D Gilliam' J Gllf11ore'i Gilsggpf 2 L Gipwflfc GiP90n'. Glendefllf 52,12 l Ginllwfr Glock, lol i Glgveff G GIOYCFI G 25? RR GIUC I l GOUdr Ml G0adI w G0dleYl I Gow it Ggldfmlll Goldtlwf' Golllldlr l Gomez, l G0me1I I G0me1I ' Gomez, l GOlTlelI I Gonzales Gonzales Gonzalef Gonzalef Gonzalef Gonzale: Gonzalo: Gonzalei 200, I Gonzale Gonzale Gonzole . Gonzale I Gonzole , Gonzale l Gonzale Gonzale Gonzale Gonzale Gonzale K Gonzale 288 Gonzale Garza, Humberto Carlos . . . 280 gonzo? Garza, Janie Lopez . . . 220 Gonzo!! Garza, Joe Rafael . . . 300 Gonzo' Garza, Joel Ruben . . . 272 ' Gonml' Garza, Jose Angel . . . 288 Gonml' Garza, Jose D. . . . 288 onml' Garza, Jose Rene . . . 272 Gonml' Garza, Leopoldo Jr. . . . 216, 223 Gonml' Garza, Maria Alicia . . . 288 Gonml' Garza, Maria Guadalupe . . . 272 Gonml' Garza, Maria Sylvia . . . 280, 302 Gonml' Garza, Martha Ann . . . 280, 302 Gonml Garza, Melinda Jean . . . 272 Gonml Garza, Mucio B. . . . 219 Gonml Garza, Omar . . . 222 Gonml Garza, Paul Pena . . . 272 Gonml Garza, Raynaldo D. . . . 226, 302 Gofllfll Garza, Rene . . . 263 303 Garza, Ricardo Ruben . . . 288 Gonml Garza, Roland . . . 263 Gonlfll Garza, Thelma . . . 272 Gonlfll Garza, Tony Jr. . . . 52 303 Garza, Victor Rangel . . . 219, 302 G00de Garza, Yolanda . . . 101, 105 Goode Gauldin, of. Rum. . .52, 211 Goode Gavenda, Frances Gail . . . 148, Goode 239 Gown Gebsen, Clarence Ullman . . . 148 251 Gee, Greg J.. . . tae, 207, 212, Goodi 242 150 Gee, William Dolan. . .124 Goh.: Gentry, Ron . . . 52 Gollnd George, Charles De Witt Jr. . . . Gwdi 214 281 George, Edith Nell . . . 121, 302 Gowd, German, Dr. Howard . . . 52 231 Ghadia, Suresh K. . . . 201, 302 Gmc, Gibbs, Beverly Kay . . . 197, 280 Grqfii Gibbs, Sam Ray . . . 302 Grqfy Gibson, Martha J. . . . 220 Grqhu Gibson, Thomas Patrick . . . 251 Grqhq Giese, Maurice Wayne . . . 124 241 Giger, Ronald J. fist Sgt.l . . . 52 Gm 1 Gillaspy, Dinah Lynn . . . 101, 139, Gros' 239, 280, 302 grow Gillaspy, Dr. James E. . . . 52 30, Thelma Maria . . . 303 "' 'ella-1' Gillette, Kathryn Ann . . . 230, 239 Gilliam, Dr. L. Camp . . . 52 Gilmore, Jerel Carter . . . 225 Gilstrap, Richard Lloyd . . . 150, 252 Ginther, Dorothy . . . 52 Gipson, Janice . . . 280 Gipson, Willie Joe . . . 150 Glendening, Michael lMaiorl . . . 52, 125 Glenn, Henry Lee . . . 150 Glock, John William Jr. . . . 115 Glover, Gary Wayne . . . 255 Glover, George William . . . 236, 254 Gluck, Richard J. . . . 288 Good, Marilyn Jane . . . 189 Good, Wanda . . . 211 Godley, Ada Marie . . . 203, 258 GOLD JACKETS . . . 208 Goldsmith, Lloyd Milton . . . 302 Goldthorn, Joan Celeste . . . 246 Golihar, Garth . . . 78 Gomez, Blanca Lydia . . . 273 Gomez, Delma Antonette . . . 302 Gomez, Juan Jr. . . . 288 Gomez, Leticia . . . 81 Gomez, Rocio Beatriz . . . 288 Gonzales, Amador Jose . . . 150 Gonzales, Anadelia . . . 114, 302 Gonzales, Angel . . . 316 Gonzales, Arturo R. Jr. . . . 209 Gonzales, Ramiro Mungia . . . 302 Gonzales, Roberto Gomez . . . 175 Gonzales, Roy D. . . . 302 Gonzales, Stanley Zacarias . . . 200, 280 Gonzales, Albert G. . . . 280 Gonzalez, Diana . . . 129 Gonzalez, Diana M. 129 Gonzalez, Esperanza G. 302 Gonzalez, Fernando . . . 119 Gonzales, Genaro . . . 52 Gonzalez, George Fermin . . . 302 Gonzalez, Hector H. . . . 302 Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Hubert S. . . . 148 Irene . . . 302 Gonzalez, Isela . . . 288 Gonzalez, Israel Trevino . . . 288 Gonzalez, Jacqueline Faye . . . 288 Gonzalez, Jaime R. . . . 256 Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Jorge Oscar . . . 228 Juan Antonia . . . 302 Gonzalez, Juan Jose . . . 217 Gonzalez, Maria E. . . . 280, 303 Gonzalez, Maria Irma . . . 303 Gonzalez, Maria R. . . . 280, 303 Gonzalez, Mary A. . . . 289 Gonzalez, Norma . . . 303 Gonzalez, Norma Irma . . . 303 Gonzalez, Pedro Jr. . . . 289 Gonzalez, Roberto. . . 167 Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Roberto B. . . . 167 Roberto Jr. . . . 167 Rodolfo Jr. . . . 280 Rolando N.. . . 116 Gonzalez, Ruben Alonzo . . . 226, 303 Gonzalez, Sylvia . . . 202 Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Yolanda Aleman . . . 303 Goode, Arlin Dwight. . . 52 Goode, Paul K. . . . 52 Goode, Susan Elaine . . . 189, 208 Gooden, Harvey Kent . . . 281 Goodman, Richard Lance III . . . 251 Goodwin, Floyd Turner . . . 118, 150, 151 Golf, Mary Florence . . . 303 G0Uf1d,Gcry Roy. . .273 Gowdev. Ruben Allen . . . 218, 281 Goilieb Sarah Harwood . . . 101, Gracey,S d G -I Graf Pour-1 ra GI . . . 157, 264 G i ' E.. . .215 Graf, Timothy James . . . 281 fdlwm. Joe Mack. . .303 Grggfimi Patricia Anne . . . 229, gfanf, Dr. Clyde M.. . .52 'UNL Dr. Darroll Lee . . . 52 Gfgglgi Charles, Michael . . . 118, Gravis, Duncan Doyle . . , 121 Grayson, W. Rodney Jr. . . . 109 303 Green, David Kell . . . Green, Henry Thomas Jr. . . . 303 Green, Johnny P. . . , 252 Gregg, Katherine Ann . . . 129, 246 Gregg, Paul Charles . . . 254, 303 Gregorcyk, William Alfred . . . 261 281 Griffin, Helen Ruth . . . Griffin, Lee Wilson . . . 190 Griffis, Pamela M. 273 Griggith, Karen Diane . . . 273 Grigg, Charles T. . . . 150 Grim, Raymond Bruce . . . 103, 216, 218, 303 Gross, A. F. . . . 52 Gudka, Peggy Irene . . . Guerra, Anna Maria . . . 200, 256 289 Guerra, Arlina Ana . . . Guerra, Imelda Gloria . . . 303 303 Guerra, Irma Rosa . . . Guerra, Luis Gonzalo Jr. . . . 303 Guerra, Martha Lydia . . . 232, 303 Guerra, Roberto . . . 195 Guerrero, Lucila . . . 228, 303 Guerrero, Maria Irene . . . 289 Guerrero, Roberto M. . . . 303 Guesta, Julie . . . 228 Guevara, Javier Carlos . . . 236, 263 Guevara M. S lvia . 217, 289 192 , y . . Guidry, . Dorothy B. . . . Gum, Debra Ann . . . 241 Gunn, Dr. Drewey Wayne . . . 52 Gutierrez, Armando Garza . . . 303 150 Gutierrez, Daniel H. . . . Gutierrez, Diana Marie . . . 303 Gutirrez, Gloria . . . 281 Guttierrez, Horacio E. . . . 303 Gutierrez, Jose Dario . . Gutierrez, Jose Jesse . . . 289 303 Gutierrez, Leopoldo . . . Gutierrez, Melba . . . 192 Gutierrez, Octavio Luis . . . 289 Gutierrez, Ramiro . . . 292, 303 303 Guzman, Arnuldo . . . Guzman, Rene Alberto . . . 223 Habeeb, Camille Frances . . . 273 Habeeb, John Spencer . . . 261 Habeeb, Vicki . . . 200, 303, 289 Haby, Brenda Clarie . . . Hab Dianne Marie . . 211, 303 263 Y, ' Haddox, Grady Ray . . . Haegelin, Robert Edward Jr. . . . 303 Hagany, Donald John . . . 86, 91, 158, 162 Hagen, George Edmund . 207, 303 Hahn, Charles Alfred . . Hahn, Charles Thomas . . Hahn, Johnnie Lee . .N . 254 Ha'i Jassim Ghuloom I, . . .172 Hale, Danny Edward . . . 189 256 Halk, Donald Harry . . . Hall, Karen Elaine . . . 121, 289 252 Hall, Marlton Guy . . . Hall, Martin Nathan . . . I Y . . . Hall, Robert Wayne . . . Hallmark, Charles R. . . . Hamff, Malcolm Cornell . 303 Hall Pats Ruth 239 252 249 Hamilton, Paul Martin . . . 191, 256 Hammann, William J. . . . 191, 252 273 Hammons, Carol J. . . . Hammons, Robert F. . . . Hamrick, Susan P. . . . 197, 25? Hancock, Margaret Ann . Hanley, Gregory A. . . . Hansel, Rhonda Sue - - - Hansen, Janet Lynn . .l . Hanshaw, Stephen Louis . Hanson, Karen Louise . . 503 Hanus, Norma Jean . . . Hardeman, Donald Ray . . . 150 Harder, Tony. . . 124 Hardin, Carolyn Ann . . . 303 Hardin, Deborah Garner . . . 303 Hardy, Dr. John W. Jr. 52 Hargrove, Kathryn M. . . . 204, 273 Harlan, Carol . . . 264 Harlan, Marian Carol . . . 273 Harm, Hal . . . 101 Harmon, Barbara Lynn . . . 129 Harper, Jack Wayne ll . . . 281 Harr, George Carroll . . . 245 Harrel, Jackie . . . 264 Harrington, John V. III . . . 189, 249 Harris, Alex Hicks . . . 261 Harris, Carol L. . . . 246 Harris, Harris, Harris, 273 Charlotte Ann . . . 303 Patricia Sue . . . 211, 303 Terry Elizabeth . . . 176, Harrison, John . . . 236, 251 Hart, Dickie Lee . . . 289 Harvery, Dr. Frederick G. . . . 52 Harvey, Opal A. . . . 52 Hardvill, Dr. Lee L. . . . 52 Harville, Cecilia Belinda . . . 129, 208, 220 200, Hassler, Barbara Mary . . . 303 Hauenstein, Elizabeth A. . . . 264, 281 Hauenstein, Roger A. . . . 52 Haug, Lucile Annette . . . 176 Haug, Ronald Wayne . . . 194, 207 Haugrud, Dr. Raychel . . . 52 Haun, Edwin Stan . . . 236, 251 Haun, Johnnie Mae . . . 52 Hausmann, Byron Ray . . . 188, 194, 303 Havelka, Michael Louis . . . 303 Havelka, Sherry Schmidt . . . 303 Hawes, Leslie Ryon . . . 304 Hay, Rebecca L. . . . 281 Hay, Susan Leslie . . . 246 Hayden, Fred Clifton Jr. . . . 219, 226, 304 Hayes, Jana Sue . . . 193, 206 Hayes, Patricia Elaine . . . 103, 220, 231 Hayes, Patricia Ruth . . . 103, 220, 231 Haynes, Debby Alice . . . 241 Haynes, Dr. Herbert R. . . . 52 Haynes, Vicki Ellen . . . 138, 241 Hays, Cheri . . . 138 Hazlett, Darryl Dwight . . . 222, 239, 261 Hazlett, Dwight. . . 52 Hearn, Edna Mae B. . . . 304 Hearn, Joe Lee . . . 304 Hedrick, Jerry W. . . . 40, 52 Heins, Suzanne . . . 117, 189, 194, 230, 239 Heldt, David Michael . . . 249 Henderson, Nancy Carol . . . 304 Henderson, Richard Lewis . . . 251 Henneke, David Porter . . . 281 Henshall, Elizabeth D. . . . 304 Hensz, Dr. Richard A. . . . 52 Herber, Carl Robert . . . 201, 227 Herfort, David A. . . . 53 Hernandez, David . . . 281 Hernandez, Ernest J. . . . 205 Hernandez, Hector R. . . . 223 Hernandez Hernandez, Rene Oieda . . . Hernandez, San Juanita . . . 210 Hernandez, Sandra Kay . . . 281 Hernandez, Sylvia . . . 273 Hernandez, Theodore . . . 273 Herod, Donna Louise . . . 304 Herrera, Albert T. . . . 164, 200, 215 Herrera, Ablerto Jose . . . 217 Herrera, Joel Angel . . - 231 Herriman, Dr. Ernest D. . . . 53 Herring, Dr. James H. . . . 53 Herrington, Evelyn F. . . . 53 Herzik, Alan Louis . . . 245 Herzik, Joseph Douglas . . . Herzik, Ronald Leon . . . Hewett, Dr. Lionel D. . . . Hicks, Laverne . . . 187, 192 Hicks, Sandy B. . . . 53 220, , Irene Ortiz . . . 304 289 150 304 53 Hidalgo, Boris Alberto . . . 81, 263 Higginbotham, Ronald Lee . . . 150 Hilario, Esperanza Gloria . . . 304 Hill, Dr. Cladia L. . . . 53, 228 Hill, Lydia Beatrice . . . 304 Hill, Stephen John . . . 245 Hill, Thomas William . . . 236, 245, 289 Hillis, Charles R. . . . 304 Hilton, Thurma Lene . . . 80, 289 Hines, Dr. Powell . . . 53 Hinnant, Barbara Ann . . . 224, 273 Hinoiosa, Alma D. . . . 210 Hinoiosa, Arturo Garza . . . 273 Hinoiosa, Joe Louie . . . 304 Hinoiosa, Mary Helen . . . 273 Hinoiosa, Dr. R. R. Smith . . . 53 Hinton, Curtis Bert . . . 188 HISPANOAMERICANO CLUB . . . 210 Hitzfelder, GarylMax . . . 205, 215, 227, 304 Hodge, Charlotte V. . . . 304 Hodges, James Richard . . . 207, 304 Hodges, Linda Gibbs . . . 304 Hoelscher, Cheryl Kaye . . . 273 Hoelzel, Frank Edward III . . . 190 Hoelzel, Mary Sue . . . 229 Hofer, Stephen F. . . . 53 Hoff, Barry Craig . . . 109, 110, 193, 206, 316 Hoffman, Dr. Darvin R. . . . 53 Hohensee, Edwin Don 263 Hohon, Edna Mariorie . . . 189, 304 Hohon, Sharon Anne . . . 192, 202, 281 Holbrook, Curtis Emil . . . 273 Holcomb, Michael Wilson . . . 304 Holcombe, Brooks J. . . . 304 Holiday, David Lawrence . . . 236, 249 Holland, Cynthia Jane . . . 304 Holland, Janie A. . . . 53 HOME ECONOMICS ASSOCIATION . . . 211 Holmes, William W. Jr. . . . 53 Hooker, Larry Edward . . . 242 Hoopes, Mary Elizabeth . . . 304 Hoopes, Dr. Paul R. . . . 53 Hoover, Terry Lee . . . 170 Hopkins, David Merrell . . . 150 HORTICULTURE CLUB . . . 212 Hartness, Mary . . . 281 Hott, Rebecca Ann . . . 289 Hough, Carmen Saenz . . . 304 Hoover, Robert J. . . . 53 Hoverson, Janice Cecille . . . 304 Howard, E. l.. . . 53 Howard, Harold Blake . . . 255, 281 Howard, Richard Lee . . . 281 Howard, Robin Cooper . . . 109, 193, 206 Howe, Dr. John W . . . 26, 53, 58, 145 Howell, Steven Dale . . . 255 Hoy, Geraldine Ann . . . 273 HPE CLUB . . . 209 Hubbard, Bradford Scot . . . 219, 229, 304 Hubenak, Robert Wayne . . . 150 Hubert, Patricia Suzzane . . . 241 Huerta, Candelario F. Jr. . . . 304 Huerta, Sara . . . 304 Huey, Jimmy Mac . . . 197, 232, 289 Huff, Monica Anne . . . 273 Huff, Ruford Allen . . . 150 Hugh, Debbie . . . 176 Hughes, Clark Dennis . . . 289 Hughes, Deborah Ann . . . 273 Hughes, Stephen Ross . . . 251, 273 Hughes, Dr. Thomas M. . . . 53 Huitt, Robert E. . . . 53 Hull, Felix, . . . 202, 304 Hull, Sonia Saldivar . . . 202, 289 Hummert, Julia Kay . . . 273 Humphrey, Stephen Allen . . . 214 Humphreys, Mary Eleanor . . . 239 Hunt, Elizabeth A. . . . 289 Hunt, Terry Lee . . . 201 Hunter, Dr. Leslie Gene . . . 53 Jennings, Gordon Jene . . . 201 22 Huntsman, Louann . . . 289 Huser, Mary Alice . . . 304 Hussey, John W. . . . 53 Hutchens, David A. Jr. . . . 304 Hutchinson, Martin Louis . . . 200 Huth, Bryan Lee . . . 304 Hutto, James E. . . . 273 Hyde, Debra Denise . . . 273 ldom, Mary Jane . . . 193, 206 INDIA STUDENT ASSOCIATION . . . 213 INDUSTRIAL ARTS CLUB . . . 214 I E E E . . . 215 I R C . . . 236 Inmon,l Cynthia Ann . . . 304 Inmon, Ronald Glenn . . . 304 lsavadharm, Dhavaiiii Tefa . . . 215 Isdale, Bennie Carol . . . 148, 304 Isdale, Betty Carolyn 148, 304 Iturbe, Hernan . . . 172 lvery, Curtis Lee . . . 230 -L1-i-1 Jackson, Harold Burnet . . . 150 Jackson, John Porter . . . 150, 189 Jackson, Robert Milton . . . 261 Jackson, Sherye Lou . . . 241 Jackson, Thomas Ronald . . . 175 Jackson, Tommy Lee . . . 168 Jacob, Rathmell . . . 219 Jacoby, Cheryl Lohmann . . . 304 Jacoby, Lynn . . . 225 Jacoby, Monte J. . . . 225, 304 Jacquez, Margaret . . . 129, 281 Jalomo, Valentin S. . . . 304 Jaloway, Danny Christopher . . . 124 James, Michael Edward . . . 251 James, Nancy Glenn . . . 281 Jamison, Allan Keith . . . 26, 144, 242 Janik, Alvin Jerry . . . 150 Jaramillo, Jimmy . . . 256, 289 Jarmon, Pauline M. . . . 304 Jekel, Dr. Eugene . . . 53 Jennings, Sheila J. . . . 273 Jensen, David Allen . . . 109, 193, 206 efnl GFI Dr James C J 'g , . ..I..20, 70, 83, 85, 124, 125 Jesse, Ellen Marie . . . 281 Jetton, Linda Kaye . . . 304 Jhaveri, Mayank K. . . . 213 Jimenez, Gloria . . . 305 Jimenez, Jesus M. . . . 217 Jimenez, Mario Saul . . . 305 Jirasek, James Milton . . . 252 Johns, Sally Ann . . . 305 Johnson, Alan . . . 214 Johnson, Bruce Alan . . . 229 Johnson, Debra Charlene . . . 273 Johnson, Estela Trevino . . . 189 Johnson, Janice Glock . . . 123, 230 Johnson, Levi . . . 150 Johnson, Dr. Lloyd N. . . . 53, 195 Johnson, Dr. Merton B. . . . 104 Johnson Paul Houser. . . 223 Johnson, Wayne Junius . . . 158, 162, 163 Johnson, William Alan . . . 305 Johnston, Caroline . . . 53 Jolley, Linda Jean . . . 225 Jollifb Dr. Gary D. . . . 53 Jones, Ann Gay . . . 264 Jones, Daniel Calvin . . . 273 Jones, David Huske . . . 197 Jones, David Huske lll I . . . 204 Jones, David Neil . . . 281 Juranek, Robert James . . . 305 Jurica, George Henry . . . 261 Justice, Sharon Ann . . . 258 i-1 1-1- Kader, Suphand . . . 305 Kaiser, Allen Curtis . . . 150, 151 252 Kaiser, Danny Kaye . . . Kaiser, Gary W. . . . 305 Kaiser, Sandra Ann . . . 237, 239 lisek Patrick Mark Kapavik, Janet Webb . . Ka , . . .305 Kantz, Katherine . . . 53 289 216 KAPPA KAPPA PSI . . . KAPPA SIGMA 252, 253 Kaspar, Fred . . . 150 Katial, Baliit Singh . . . 201, 305 Kattner, Karen Sue . . . 273 Kawamura, June Alice . . . 289 Kay, Alvin J. . . . 53 Keele, Karen Elizabeth 264, 273 263 Keen, John Gabriel . . . ener James Earl Ke , . . . Keith, John Stephen . . . 305 281 Klemcke, Wayne Allen . . . 245 Kle ac Michael Alex P , . . . 245 Klespies, Raymond F. Jr. . . . 188, 207, 225, 242, 306 Klosterboer, Dr. Arlen D. . . . 53 Knowles, Gloria Ann . . . 306 261 Knox, Mark William . . . Koehler, Bill Terry . . . 254 Koenig, Susan L. 118, 306 Koennecke, Jane Ella . . . 281 Koester, Larry Wayne . . 242 l Kolmeier, Dennis Wayne . . . 249, 289 Korges, Emerson . . . 53, 215 Kosub, Raymond Albert . . . 188, 194, 212 Kouri, Sherry Lee . . . 306 Kowalik, Dr. Virgil C. . . Krause, Norwood, Earl . 245 150 Krebs, David Ralph . . . Krempin, James Maurice Krenshaw, Sandra . . . 206 273 Kreusel, Roy Glenn . . . Kreuz, Judith Louise . . . 148 251 Kring, Michael H. . . . Krueger, Larry Gene . . . 306 273 Krug, Kenneth E. . . . Kruse, Dr. Alan E. . . . Kubala, Michael Ray . . . 201, 227 Kellh, Pamela l-Ynn - - - 186. 305 Kubota, Diane Marie . . . 289 Kelley, HBFSCLWCL G- - - - 53 Kullman, Darce Erwin . . . 254 KelleY, June Meflde - - - 264 Kureska, Sandra Kathryn . . . 264 Kelley, Kenffelh - - - 53 Kurtz, David Eliia . . . 216, 223 Kellnef. Billy Charles - - - 141. 207, Kutach, V. Michael . . . 256, 281 212, 242 263 Kuykendall, Don Robert . . . 306 Kelly, Stephen Craig . . Kelly, Wallace Eugene . ..289 Jones, Douglas Dwaine . . . 150, 289 Jones, Beverly . . . 53 Jones, George Clement Jr. . . . 170 Jones, Joyce Edna . . . 149, 189, 208, 211, 305 Jones, Lyndon Cass . . . 281 Jones, Norman Robert . . . 80, 140, 230, 249, 305 Jones, Teresal Claire . . . 208, 239 Jones, Vonda Lee . . . 305 Jordan, Meredith M. . . . 78 Jordan, William Scott . . . 190, 289 Jostes, Jean Elizabeth . . . 273 Joyce, James Richard . . . 78, 79 Joyce, Kathleen Ruth . . . 239, 273 Joyce, Margaret Ann . . . 239 Juarez, Robert O. . . . 305 Judah, Dr. Charles . . . 53, 59 Judson, Billie Cheryl S. . . . 305 Judson, Murray Warren . . . 305 Jungman, Cynthia Ann . . . 273 Kelton, Juliane Bubik . . . 305 Kemp, David Michael . . . 115, 305 Kemp, Karen Kaye . . . 246 Kennedy, Jeffery John . . . 127 Kerr, Mary Therese . . . 239 Keys, Henry James Jr. . . . 187 Kieschnick, Lynn Edgar . . . 188, 273 Kimball Audrey J 281 La Cour, Mary Grace . La Rue, James Michael . . . 289 Kimball, James William . . . 281 Laabs, Patrick M. . . . 201, 254 King, Joseph Brady . . . 127, 225 Lackey, Bobby Louise . . . 216, 231 King, Leon Randolph . . . 289 LAMBDA CHI ALPHA . . . 254, 255 King, Milton S. . . . 53 Langen, Mary Jane . . Kirby, Robert O. . . . 53 Lanphier, Trudy Annette . . . 306 Kirk, Cynthia L. . . . 225 Lara, Alma Gloria . . . 273 Kirkpatrick, Cynthia Sue . . . 281 Lara, Maria Concepcion . . . 306 LAREDO CLUB . . . 217 Klassen, Mary Ann . . . 101, 203, Larrumbide, Richard Manuel . . . 218 Kleespies, Irvin William . . . 251 219 Klein, Laura Jean . . . 281 Kathy Smith and Karen Lemke working in the Journalism Building on the 1972 El Rancho. Larsen, Robert Carl . . Y.. .,-...-....,e.....A..,.e,,,. ABI cheei Larson, L La Rue, F Law, Billy Lawrence Lawrence 306 Lawrence Laws, An Lawson, Laykasel lczarine, Le Bout, Leal, Ang Leal, An Leal, Ge Lecl, Iris Ledet, G 230, 1 l-94. Che Lee, Dr. l-99, Jim! le Mash Lefler, C Leibowit 256 Leigh, VI lemish, Lemke, l 289 ltmmcn lermql 1 lermq, I liking, leur, W 306 Lewi,, I lbvligl Q lQVIis' I Ley: PC' Leyd,,, Leymd: Libbonl URN. a Lillie' Q lI"l'0ff. P1 l!""'v. lltlv. I lftltf. I MZ lllsf. L""'1Uxi A811 cheerleaders Debby Evans and Margaret Wagner take a break to watch the action. Larson, Lea . . . 54, 209 La Rue, Faye . . . 258 Law, Billy Don . . . 273 Lawrence, George Michael . . . 306 Lawrence, Margaret Doedyns . . . 306 Lawrence, Ronald Michael . . . 245 Laws, Andrew Lee Jr. . . . 187 Lawson, Ivan Lee . . . 263 Laykasek, Lisa Grace . . . 212 Lazarine, Jo Ann . . . 273 Le Bout, John Lawrence . . . 255 Leal, Angela Leticia . . . 306 Leal, Arnold P. . . . 209, 281 Leal, George H. . . . 306 Leal, Iris Yolanda . . . 306 ledet. Gregory Mason . . . 186, 230, 236, 261 Lee, Charles William . . . 150 Lee, Dr. Frank F. C. . . . 54, 227 lee. Jimmy Telano . . . 251 Le Master, Dr. Lelan K. . . . 54 l-Gfler. Charles Michael . . . 251 Leigggvitz, Linda lrene . . . 200, Leigh, William Drew . . . 225 temlih, Mary Jo . . . 273 'mke,Kare L . . .129 249 l'1 yflh I I Lemmons, Diane . . . 273 lefmu, Irma cufaei. . .306 l'e'mU,Roberto H.. . .219 tessnerttienry J. 111 . . . 215 elazglllllllam Hamilton . . . 186, lewis' AUl'eY Jean . . . 274 LQWQS, Candace Lee . . . 306 eW'5, David Earl . . . 306 l-GY, Patrick Dennis . . . 227 Leyden, Dr. Robert . . . 54 l-?Yendecker, Mqry Gail 256 lll'l""'fJ0Seph J.. . .54 I llglll' BeVe"lY Ann . . . 281 !"'e,Dave w.. . .229 Eziecum, Diane Annette . . . 281 L. kan, Dennis Charles . . . 202 L!"fPf1mela Dorothy. . .239 Linney, Jack Clark lll . . . 207 l'l"'fMichae1A.. . .soo l5Ster,Hm1a P. 111. . .306 tllll9, Richard . . . 274 LLMQPCGG, David Brian . . . 306 Lives' Annie Laura . . . 281 "Won, Laura c.. . .157, 264 Lockman, Katherine R. . . . 281 Lockwood, Carol G. . . . 274 Loe, Sidney Glenn . . . 225 Loera, David Alvarez . . . 281 Loesch, Donald Ray . . . 306 Loftin, James R. . . . 242 Long, Benny Frank . . . 316 Longbotham, Dennis . . . 125, 126, 281 Longoria, Jose Arturo . . . 201 Longoria, Sandra T. . . . 274 Longoria, Shirley E. . . . 200, 306 Longoria, Sonia Hilda . . . 200 Lopez, Abel . . . 120, 189, 230 Lopez, Alvaro F. Jr. . . . 217 Lopez, Enrique S. . . . 306 Lopez, Fernando M. . . . 274 Lopez, Fidencio G. . . . 306 Lopez, Francisco P. . . . 54 Lopez, Hilario Jr. . . . 274 Lopez, Jorge Luis . . . 274 Lopez, Margarita Urrutia . . . 54 Lopez, Nelda Maria . . . 192 Lopez, Ninfa Gonzalez . . . 306 Lopez, Ricardo . . . 217 Lopez, Samuel C. . . . 289 Lopez, Velma Ramos . . . 256, 281 Lopez, Vito . . . 256, 281 Lorentzson, Carl Martin . . . 281 Loya, Juan A. . . . 306 Lozano, Alma Deborah . . . 211 Luckett, Worth M. Jr. . . . 79, 245, 289 Luddeke, John Andrew . . . 168 Luecken, Susan Nita . . . 239, 281 Luedecke, Wanda Jeane . . . 306 Lugo, Mario Rene . . . 217, 219, 306 Luker, Randall Wayne . . . 274 Luna, Simon Mauro . . . 306 Lundquist, Blanche Marie . . . 306 Luster, Sherry Wray . . . 306 Luza, Vernon Joseph . . . 186, 306 Lyle, Karol Jo . . . 264 Lyon, Jane Marie . . . 246, 282 Lyons, David Russell . . . 197, 309 Lyons, Diana B. . . . 197, 274 -.1-1 -.1-1 Mainer, Donna Sue . . . 197 Maisel, Christopher Mark . . . 120 Maior Buckley Heath . . . 189 Maks, Francis Peter Jr. . . . 230, 289 Maldonado, Alberto Jr. . . . 210 Malengraf, Gordon . . . 306 Malina, Sondra K. . . . 274 Mallard, C. W. . . . 54 Mallory, Lester De Witt Jr. . . . 230, 236, 263, 306 Mallory, Sylvia Fulton . . . 230, 306 Malone, Margaret Ann . . . 197, 282 Malone, Patti Ann 237 Mancha, Guillermo . . . 306 Mangold, Laura Lee . . . 246 Mann, Karen Louise . . . 241 Mann, Sandra Kay . . . 208, 230, 241, 289 Manning, George Edward . . . 307 Manning, Marion Delores . . . 307 Manning, Ophelia . . . 54 Marcotte, Dr. Ronald E. . . . 54 Marin, Ruben Aleiandro N. . . . 307 Marroquin, Frank . . . 307 Marroquin, Johnny Jr. . . . 209, 307 Marshall, Gai Lynn R. . . . 189, 307 Marshall, John Thomas . . . 307 Martin, Frederick Karl . . . 189 Martin, Kathleen Kay . . . Martin, Sammy Lee . . . 206 Martin, Lester Earl Jr. . . . 307 252 289 Martin, Stephen Ramsey . . . Martinez, Martinez, Martinez, Martinez Martinez 290 Martinez, Martinez, Martinez Martinez Martinez Martinez Martinez Martinez Martinez Martinez Martinez, I I I I I I Andres. . . 164 Arabella . . . 217 Arnoldo Xavier . . . 289 Desiderio R. Jr. . . . 290 Diane Magdalene . . . Emma Dolores . . . 307 Graciela Garcia . . . 282 Hilda . . . 228, 307 Imelda . . . 192 Juan Jose . . . 256, 282 Luis Fernando . . . 307 Maria Alma . . . 282 Maria Ernestina . . . 307 Norma Ann . . . 282 Otila L. . . . 282 Robert Martinez, Rosa Maria . . . 290 Matula, Anne . . . 189 Massey, James Robert . . . 201, 1 227 Massey, Susanne . . . 225 Mata, Amanda Eguia . . . 290 , Mata, James . . . 217 Mathews, Kin . . . 79 Mathews, Tommy Arthur . . . 245 Mathis, H. Dean . . . 54, 197 Mathis, Jack Gray . . . 197 Matkin, Frederick J. . . . 54 Matocha, Annette Marie . . . 129, 1 225, 307 Matson, Stanley Marshall . . . 188, l 207, 242, 307 Matteson, Linda M. . . . 54 Matteson, Michael Barr . . . 215, 222 L Matthews, Ginger Scoggin . . . 290 Mattingly, Dr. Mary R. . . . 54 Mattingly, Robert Bruce . . . 274 Matula, Anne Jarvis . . . 149, 307 Matula, George Ervin . . . 225 May, James Arnold . . . 290 May, Paul K. . . . 251 May, Sharon Ann . . . 307 l Mayer, Ernest F. Jr. . . . 54 Mayeux, Philip Sterling . . . 261 Mazoch, Mark David . . . 195, 290 Mazurek, Kenneth Raymond . . . 307 McAnear, Sandra Kay . . . 274 McCandless, Mickey Ted . . . 290 McCown, John . . . 54 McCreight, Ellen M. . . . 246, 282 McCullough, Albert T. . . . 307 McCurdy, Margery Ruth . . . 206 McDonald, Clinton G. . . . 54, 186 McDonald, Donald B. . . . 54, 163 McDonald, James W. . . . 290 McDonald, Jennifer Joan . . . 274 McDonald, Kathryn Denise . . . 246, 301 McDonald, Michael N. . . . 215, 245 McDonald, Sharon Ellen . . . 220, 282 McDougall, Michael H. . . . 227, 307 McFarling, Kenneth R. . . . 54 McGee, Barbara Sue . . . 307 McGehearty, Michael J. . . . 307 McGuffin, James Howard . . . 256 McGuire Che lCalaway. . . 307 1 VY Mclntyre, James R. . . . 54 1 McKemie, Jane Leslie . . . 307 McKenzie, Dr. Ronald F. . . . 54 McKinley, Murray, Don Jr. . . . 307 McLean, Michael Stanley . . . 150 McLean, Dr. Paul. C.l . . . 54 McManus, Linda Mae . . . 290 McMeans, Deborah Jane . . . 274 McMillan, Michael Davis . . . 167 McMillion, Michael Ray . . . 164 McMillion, Tommy Louis . . . 164, 165, 167 McMillon, Claude Oakley . . . 150, 151 McMillan, Diantha . . . 186 McMullen, Scott E. . . . 251 McNair, Donald Caddel . . . 93 McPherson, Clyde C. . . . 79 McPherson, Glenn Ray . . . 197 McQueen, James Carlton Jr. . . . 242 McVey, Zane David . . . 164 Meadows, Polly Elizabeth . . . 264 Medina, Henry . . . 307 Medina, Jaime . . . 217 Medina, Maria Elma . . . 274 Medrano, Hilda H. . . . 290 Meek, Michael G. . . . 261 Mehta, Kishor S. . . . 307 Meifueiro, Radingo . . . 215 Mellard, Sharon Jean . . . 290 Melton, Gwendolyn Diane . . . 307 Memon, Mohammed Ismail . . . 201, 316 M E N C . . . 218 Mende, Gunter S. . . . 54 Mendenhall, Helen E. . . . 54 Mendez, Anna Lucille . . . 282 Mendez, Frank William . . . 307 Mendez, Jovita . . . 307 Mendez, Luciana . . . 200 323 24 iii--T B lawn. The egg-toss was one of the events entered by students at the annual Campus Capers held on the SU Mendez, Marianela . . . 282 Mendietta, Gloria L. . . . 210 Mendoza, Hugo . . . 172 Mendoza, Jose Antonia . . . 282 Mendoza, Niceforo Saldana . . . 124 Menefee, Dexter Lee . . . 290 Mengers, Shelley Celeste . . . 274 Menking, Brian Neal . . . 242 Mercer, Pamela Sue .. 274 Meuth, Michael Allen . . . 150 Meyer, Mariorie Helen . . . 307 Meza, Oralia . . . 307 Migura, Marvin James . . . 30, 115, 186, 249 Miller, Carletta . . . 54 Miller, Edward Philip . . . 255 Miller, Jane Marie . . . 220, 290 Miller, Jeanine Cheri . . . 176 Miller, Maxine June . . . 229 Miller, Rudy Warren . . . 127, 307 Miller, Teresa . . . 264 Miller, Travis Dale . . . 144 Miller, Virginia Kay . . . 176, 307 Miller, Wayne Herschel . . . 219 Miller, William Robert .. 222 Mills, Kathy Ann . . . 211, 246 Mills, Laura Ellen . . . 264 Mills, Melinda Sue .. 274 Mims, Mary Beth . . . 274 Minnefield, Arthur ICaptainj . . . 54 Mireles, Eva V. . . . 282 Mitchell, Pamela Joaquine . . . 230 Mittag, Eugene Alvin . . . 222 Mittag, Kathleen Cage . . . 189 Mixon, Joan Patrice . . . 246 Mladenka, Paul Dale . . . 229 Modi, Navanit, Narandas . . . 201, 213 Mody, Prakash, Kantilal . . . 213 Moffatt, Gary E. . . . 307 Mokry, Tim Joe . . . 224 Molina, Connie . . . 282 Molina, Maria Magdalena . . . 282 Molina, Olga Odette . . . 307 Molina, Orfelinda . . . 274 Molpus, Janice E. . . . 307 Maltz, Sterling, James . . . 308 Mondragan, Ronald Philip . . . 290 Monk, Steven Douglas . . . 251 Monroe, Dana Sue . . .' 239 Monroe, Howard Marshall . . . 307 Monsevalles, Rodolfo S. . . . 274 Montalvo, Alicia . . . 308 Montalvo, Arabela . . . 282 Montalvo, Bela . . . 256 Montalvo, Robert . . . 308 Montalvo, Rael Francisco . . . 308 Montalvo, Sara Laura . . . 308 Montello, Anthony . . . 200, 274 Montes, Jose Macedonia Jr. . . . 282 Montgomery, Annell . . . 211 Montgomery, Mardell . . . 211 Montgomery, Samuel R. . . . 150 Moody, Jo Ann .. 129 Moody, Marilyn Kay . . . 308 Moon, Carolyn Gwen . . . 206 Mooney, C. V. . . . 54, 195 Mooney, Janis Shiller . . . 192 Moore, Denny L. . . . 144, 188, 207, 212, 242 Moore, Diane Bernadette . . . 187 Moore, Melvin John . . . 230 Moore, Vickie L. .. 226, 246 Moore, Walter King . . . 187 Moos, Virginia Ann . . . 308 Morales, Jesus . . . 290 Morales, Joel 214, 308 Morales, Maria E. . . . 54 Moreno, Audelia Franco . . . 308 Moreno, Elsa P. . . . 308 Moreno, Gilberto Carlos . . . 215, 308 Moreno, Maria Rita . . . 290 Morneo, Miguel . . . 200, 282 Moreno, Roberto . . . 308 Moreno, Victor James . . . 274 re Dr Phili 5 Mo y, . p .. . . 54 Morgan, Dana Leigh . . . 149, 189, 208, 232, 308 Morgan, Nancy Kay . . . 129, 274 Morgan, Stephen Frank . . . 252 Morris, Ned C. . . . 54 Morrow, Virginia . . . 308 Morton, Thomas Carlyle . . . 150 Moss, Jackson C. . . . 316 Mate, Ray Louis Jr. . . . 205 Mates, Charles J. . . . 204 Moy, Catherine L. . . . 189, 290 Moy, Jerome I. Jr. . . . 188, 207, 274 Moya, Irma Mar . . . 308 Moya, Samuel Arguiio . . . 308 Moyer, Suzanne . . . 176 Mudd, Loretta Ann . . . 220 Mueck, Deborah Gail . . . 282 Mueller, Barbara Ellen . . . 290 Mueller, Linda Kay 208, 308 Muennink, Glenn F. . . . 242 Muhlstein, Jeanette Grace . . . 290 Muir, David Wayne . . . 230, 261 Mulkey, Carl W. . . . 150 Muller, Dr. Attelia L. . . . 43 Munguia, Rebecca Ann . . . 290 Munivez, Mariano Enrique . . . 308 Munneke, Dr. Leslie E. . . . 54 Munoz, Celia Jassa . . . 114, 228, 308 Munoz, Gloria Ann . . . 274 Munoz, Oralia . . . 308 Munoz, Oscar J. . . . 263 Murdock, Roberto E. . . . 204 Murphy, Catharine Ella . . . 149, 189 Murphy, Robert J. . . . 308 Murray, Larry Wayne . . . 282 Murray, Lang . . . 81 Muzquiz, Robert F. . . . 218 Myers, Richard Wayne . . . 274 Nance, Sherry Lynn . . . 290 Nanny, Cynthia G. . . . 241, 274 Nash, Dr. Robert T. . . . 54 Nation, Joe Hart . . . 252 Nation, John Waldrum Jr. . . . 252 Nava, Ismael . . . 308 Navarro, Reymundo G. . . . 195, 308 Naylor, Kenneth Glen . . . 204, 290 Neal, Algie R. . . . 159 Neal, Curtiss Wayne . . . 150, 151 Neher, David . . . 188 Neher, Dr. David D, . . . 55, 194 Nelson, Dr. Darwin B. . . . 55 Nelson, Garland . . . 150, 167 Nelson, Paul Edward . . . 282 Nelson, Pauline C. . . . 55 Nemec, Michael Francis . . . 261 Nester, Kathryn Ann . . . 200, 256 Nester, Patsy Marie . . . 200, 232, 274 Neubauer, Kurt Erich Jr. . . . 282 Neumann, Doris Marie . . . 274 Neumann, Lois Ruth . . . 274 New, Richard Neal . . . 252 New, Sue . . . 116, 208, 290 Newsome, Chris . . . 308 Nichols, Bilinda E. . . . 197 274 Nichols, Lawrence David . . . 170 Nichols, Penny Sue . . . 274 Nickerson, Alphonso . . . 158, 159 Nielsen, Connie Rae . . . 282 Niles, Earl Eugene . . . 290 Nipperus, Phillip Steve . . . 236, 252, 282 Nixon, Dr. Donald M. . . . 55 Nolen, Brian Lee . . . 251 Nye, Dorothy Geataganas . . . 308 O'Brien, Maureen . . . 109 O'Cannell, Daniel . . . 170 O'Shea, Michael John . . . 261 Obaze, John O. . . . 172 Obregon, Jose Luis . . . 256 Ochaa, Alfredo . . . 290 Ochaa, Pedro Jr. . . . 217, 308 Olguin, Minerva . . . 290 Oliphant, Elizabeth A. . . . 55 Olivares, Alberto M. . . . 55 Olivares, Juventina R. Jr. . . . 308 Olivas, David . . . 256 Olivas, David Contreras . . . 227, 308 Oliver, Keith Douglas . . . 126, 214 Olmstead, Deborah E. . . . 274 Oosterhout, Dr. Kenneth C. . . . 55, 201, 227 Ordner, Paul William . . . 150 Oreschnigg, Carolyn Louise . . . 220, 290 ORGANIZATION OF GENERAL ENGINEERS . . . 219 Ornelas, Fernando . . . 102 Ortegon, Maria Jesus . . . 290 Ortiz, Antonio Jr. . . . 308 Ortiz, Blas Avalas . . . 256 Ortiz, Graciela . . . 148 Ortiz, Irma . . . 282 Ortiz, Maria Teresa . . . 290 Ortiz, Rene . . . 148 Osborne, Lilly Laverne . . . 282 Overholt, Robert Martin . . . 249 Owen, Michael Lee . . . 251 Page, Joel Dean . . . 219 Nonmacher, Susan E. . . . 211, 308 Page, Kennefh G, , , , 55 Nordmeyer, Rudy L. Jr. . . . 229 Norris, Neal . . . 229 Notz, SSG. William R. . . . 55 Noyola, Oscar Jose Il . . . 308 Nuckols, Dana Caldwell . . . 140 Nuesch, Fred C. . . . 55 Nugent, Dennis Gerald . . . 308 Palmer, Paul C. . . . 55 Pandya, Kiran Vipin . . . 213 Pangtay, Michael . . . 308 PANHELLENC COUNCIL . . . 237 Panning, Lynn Catherine . . . 308 Pape, Bradley K. . . . 308 Parikh, Hariprasad C. . . . 213 Parke Parke Parke Parke Parke 21 1 Pasch Pasch Patan Patel, Patel. Patel, Patel, 21 . Patel. Patel. Patel, 2 1 Patel. 21 Patel, Patel, Patel. Patel Patel 30 Patel Patel Patel 31 Patel Patel 21 Patel Patel 3C Patel Patel Patel Davic Parker Brlly Gerald Parker k PId1kZIr Lewrs Fenley 252 308 Parker Robert Edward 219 227 308 Paschal DannY RGY Paschal Thomas Fred Patan Sen Patel Arvrnd R Patel Arvmdkumar R 201 Patel Bhagwanlr Dayalrl Patel Bharatkumar B ecr 81 308 George John 136 303 Patel Brplnchandra I Patel Brprnchandra P Patel Chrmanbhar V 213 309 Patel Ghanshyambhar G 213 282 Patel HarendrakumarJ Patel Har1shbha1M 189 213 Patel Harllbhar D Patel Harshadbhar P Patel Jagdlshchandra P Patel Jayantlbhar A Patel Jayantrlal Dayabhar Patel Jayant1IalM 309 316 Patel Jayeshkumar N 213 215 309 Patel Kantubhar R Patel Natwarbha1B 20 213 Patel Rarendra Manrbhar Patel Ramabhal Ambaram Patel Ramanbhar N Patel RanchI'1orG 201 309 Patel Rashm1kantJ 2 Patel Shankerbha1P 213 309 Patel Subodhkumar R 6 Patel Thakorbha1G Patel Thakorbha1S Patel VasudevT 201 309 Patel Vrnod Ashabhar 201 213 309 Patel Vlrendra C 205 215 Patterson Dorothy T Patterson James M 236 249 Patterson Marrlyn Ruth Patterson Sherry Duane Paul Surrnder Paulk Jonathan Ross Paulk Martha Nell Pautay Muke Payne Tommre Rhodes 309 Peacock Dr J Talmer Peake Doyle Cecrl 215 227 Peake Herbert Arthur Pewretz Marsha Pena Alrcra O Pena Edward L 126 205 Pena Pena Pena Pena Pena Pena Pena Pena Pena Davrd Senglemann and Laura Lrvlngston lead fans 7 Efrarn Felrx D Glona G Jorge Alberto Luc1a Mana Elena Mana Erc1I1a Nrlda 4 Norma 7 rn o yell to support the Javelmas I- ...29o I I 55 ,C1---I f ' '---13 H'....29O ' I I I, , ....2o1I I H ....274 III223' I ...115, I' IIIISI I I ...29o 569, ' '...117, I , IM , I....3I1:e I ...309 I I .:I.229 I I . 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' I ' '...310 I ...31 I '...261 5 1 31 0 I ...sro ' ...213 I ...292 - I ' ....31 'I ' ....2o9 'I ...209 216 I ...211 I ...2oI 25 - I .....55 - I '...232 - I ...ma - -I ....292 I ...292 I ' ...176, 292 Penn Howard L Perales Grlbert Cruz Perales Juan Jr Perales Qulrrno Gonzales Perez Adelfrna 232 290 Perez Baldemar Perez Clementrna Perez Corlna M Perez Errka Ernestlne 232 309 Perez Evangelrne Perez Glorra 230 282 309 Perez Jesus P Perez Jose Alfonso Perez Lydro Tony Perez Mana Isabel Perez Mary Esther Perez Ramrro III Perez Rrchard Oscar Perez Ruben Mauro Perez Ruben Medrano Perez Yolanda Perkrns Janrce Oglesby Perme John Anthony 209 309 Perrin Dr J Kyle Perryman Mrchael Verne Person Ross H Petru Ernest Louls Petter Jeanette Mary 74 Pettrgrew Shrrley Jean 6 Pettrlohn Wrllram Ross Pettus Susan Petty Carlene H 129 216 Petty Carolme L 129 216 Peyton MadellneA Pferfer Phyllrs Marne Pfeiffer Patrrcla Myrtle Pham Dong Xuan Phaup T D PHI GAMMA NU 220 221 PHI KAPPA THETA 256 257 PHI MU ALPHA Phrllrps Adelrne Marne Phrllrps Cheryl Ann 237 246 Phullrps Deryl Glen Phrllrps Susan Beth Phrllrps Susan B PHYSICS SOCIETY Prcquet Glenn Alon 118 95 Prcquet James Ph1l1p 118 214 Plcquet Natalre Brumfueld 189 309 Pucquet W1lI1am Ross Prerce Larry Prerce Sherman James Prvonka Ernest Raymond Prwetz Marsha Lynn Plath Harold Lee Plelmann Larry G Pletcher Ronald Gene Plott Sue Ply Sharon Lee 26 212 Pollman Charles Kenneth O Pollock Wrllram Whalen Poolara Janak Ramlrbhar Polle Cynthra Jane Poole Rodney Alan Poole Ronald Dale Poole Wrllram Prerre 263 309 Pooley Pamela Elarne Pope Barbara Lynn Prado Raul Clos Prers Duane M Prewltt Kerth Alan Prrce Ernest Ray 109 150 Prresmeyer Wayne Anthony Prrnz Chrlstrne MC L 0 Pritchard A H Prrtchard Julre Marne Promnart Arnont 6 Prowse Grey Lewls Prukop Karen Rose 149 189 Pruneda Ernesto 164 282 Pruneda Pete Pruthvrrag Prlnce Pryor Deborah Raye Pugh Wrllram Carl 144 188 194 207 242 Pulara Navrnchandra R 0 Pulrdo Anlta L Pulrdo Ramon Pullram Cynthia Lou 93 129 Purrop Karen Putnam Royal Edward 0 6 Qurgley Robert E .lr Qurlantan Janne Qurntana Guadalupe Qurntanrlla Mary G Rackley Carol Lee Rackley Lorena Lergh Rambolt Gerald Eugene Rambolt Terrell John 245 Rams Elrzabeth Jean 176 276 Rams Marne M 55 Ramert, Joanna June 282 Ramrrez, Alelandro R 310 Ramrrez, Celra 210 Romrrez, Drana 210 Ramrrez, Drana M 292 32 6 Ramirez, Dara Lee .. 310 Ramirez, Elva Iris Garcia . . . 123, 189,310 Ramirez, Evangelina Cantu . . . 310 Ramirez, Gema L. . . . 292 Ramirez, Gloria E. . . . 310 Ramirez, Janie Ramirez, Leonor . . . 282 Ramirez, Maria E. . . . 276 Ramirez, Mary Alice . . . 200, 310 Ramirez, Mary Ellen . . . 310 Ramirez, Mary Lupe . . . 211 Ramirez, Raul N. . . . 292 Ramirez, Rael . . . 101 Ramirez, Vangie . . . 203, 231 Ramos, Annabelle . . . 220, 310 Ramos, Cynthia Veronica . . . 129, 136, 217, 292 Ramos, Imelda Irene . . . 310 Ramos, Jase Oscar . . . 256 Ramos, Maria Luisa . . . 210 Ramos, Norma Ella . . . 248 Ramos, Rodolfo . . . 214 Rangel, Jesus Jr. . . . 217, 219, 310 Rangel, Teresa P. . . . 284 Rangel, Victor M. . . . 292 Rascal, Dr. John . . . 55 Rash, Curtis Wayne . . . 310 Rasmusson, Ronald R. . . . 310 Rathmell, Graciela . . . 129 Rathmell, Jacob G. Jr. . . . 310 Ratka, Frank Darrell . . . 150 Rauschuber, Gary John . . . 170, 174 Ray, Dineshbhai C. . . . 284 Ray, Linda Marie . . . 117, 230, 246 Raydinesh . . . 213 Redden, Marvin Ray . . . 215, 311 Redding, George Daniel . . . 224 Redinger, Carolyn M. . . . 241 Redus, George M. Jr. . . . 148, 197, 276 Reed, Daniel Odell . . . 204, 284 Reeder, Terry Garland . . . 218 Rees, Carolyn Anna . . X. 149 Rees, Kathleen Louise . . . 192 Reeves, Sharon Lynn . . . 311 Regina, Angelita G. . . . 311 Reinke, Bert Lloyd . . . 255, 292 Reinking, Rex B. . . . 55 Reinshagen, Zana Lynn . . . 192 Reisner, Edward Joseph Jr. . . . 195,215 Rektorik, Linda Gaye . . . 284 Rektarik, Sharon Ann . . . 284 Remmert, Cynthia Suzanne . . . 264 Remmert, Dennis Jerrell . Rentfro, Anita Cavazos . . . 284 Resendez, Enrique Jr. . . 215, 227 Re es Aaron y , . . . 292 Reyes, Mary Alice . . . Reyes, Ray A. . . . 311 Reyna, Jose . . . 115 Reza, Lucy RHO ALPHA ZETA . Rhyne, Larry Wayne . . Rhyner, Becky Sue . . . ...311 ..311 .205, 226 . . 258, 289 . 284 276 264 Rice, Rebecca Lynne . . Richards, Ferry E. . . . 55 Richards, Norrine . . . 311 Richardson, Farris A. . . . 252 Richardson, Margry Yvonne . . . 284 Richter, Sharon Kay . . . 189, 311 Rios, Alma ...311 Rios, Doroteo H. . . . 214, 311 Rios, Maria Elia . . . 284 Rivas, Carmen Aida . . . Rivas, Consuelo . . . 217, 317 Rivera, Dora Marie . . . 311 Rivera, Mike M. . . . 230, 232 Robbins, ICaptainj George B. . . 55 Robert, Marianne . . . Roberts, Brenda Pugh . . Roberts, Darrell Dean . . . 195, 311 Roberts, David Robert . . Roberts, Elaine . . . 311 Robertson, Stephen Keith Robinson, Anna Kathleen Robinson, Gwen . . . 189, 246 Robinson, Roger Lee . . . 115 Rocha, Graciela Solis . . Rocha, Guadalupe Loranzo . . . 311 Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, 292 264 .311 .311 ...311 ...284 .139 .190 Rockwell, Milton Evral . RODEO CLUB . . . 224, 225 Antonio. . . 284 284 Antonio. . . Carmen C. . . 276 Dalia Perez . . . 292 Diana Maria . . 276 Elsa Marie . . 284 Eva Deifilia . . . 192 Dr. Fernando . . . 55 Jesus G. . . 190 Luis Javier . . . 276 Maria A. . . 276 Mary Elvia . . 31 1 Mary Jane . . 311 Mary Lou . . . 292 Rodriguez Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Rodriguez, Nilda . . . 284 Robert M. . . . 150 Robert Trevino Robert X. . . . Sylvia . . . 256 Roerig, James Edward . . . 251 Rogers, Ginger Dale . . . 284, 311 Rogers, Rebecca Lynn . . . 129, 246 Roias, Reynolda C. . . . 210, 228, 311 Roman, Jesus Silvino . . . 292 Romans, Paul Judson . . . 101 Romike, Harold Ray . . . 229 Romine, Malcolm Reeves . -. . 236, 254 Rosales, Javier Rene . . . 217 Rosales, Juan Fernando Jr. . . . 311 Rosas, Margarita . . . 311 Rosas, Roberto Marcos . . . 311 Rosebrock, Mary . . . 176, 311 Ross, Gordon David . . . 157 Ross, James Jr. . . . 187 Ross, James Moffatt . . . Rouquette, Cynthia Ann . . . 264 Rowan, Dennis Ray . . . 311 Rowe E. Barry . . .311 Rozzell, Essie Darlene . . . 264, 31 1 Rubio, Ramiro Rolando . . . 200, 256 Ruelas, Braulio G. . . . 311 Ruhnke, Dr. Ed. . . 55, 202 Ruiz, Dara Guadalupe . . Ruiz, Guadalupe Jr. . . . 216 Ruiz, Juan Francisco . . . 31 1 Ruiz, Manuel Jr. . . . 164, 200, 284 Rumpel, Buzzy . . . 249 Russek, Thomas Joseph . . . 200 Russell, James Wesley . . Russell, John L. . . . 55 Russell, John Robert . . . Russell, Lyman Lee . . . 245 Russell, Ralph C. . . . 186 Rust, Karen Sue . . . 284 Rust, Rebecca Wyvonne . Ryan, Carl Thomas . . . . . 225 292 Saathaff, Connie Lou . . . 117, 208, 237, 239 Savedra, Abelardo . . . 311 Sadat, Mansouri Hesameddin . . 150 127 Saenz, Alvaro Danny . . . 284 Saenz, David Eugene . . . 256 Saenz, David L. . . . 311 Saenz, Edna Garza . . . 292 Saenz, Elida . . . 276 Saenz, Esperanza Saenz, Estela G. . . . Saenz, Eva Nelda . . . Saenz, Frances . . . 292 Saenz, Julia . . . 292 Saenz, Leonel Arnoldo . Saenz, Lilia Dolores . . Saenz, Nelda Iris . . . 276 311 .192 311 Saenz, Nelson . . . 215 Saenz, Pedro I. Jr. . . . Saenz, Rosa L. Perez . . Saenz, William Paul . . . 78, 79 Sahloul, Mahmond M. . . . 55 Salas, John Jr. . . . 311 Salcines, George . . . 284 Saldivar, Sylvia . . . 276 Salinas, Ana Cecilia . . Salinas, Anita G. . . . . 292 292 Salinas, Dahlia Diana . . . 200, 256 Salinas, George E. . . . Saltz, Ben Cecil . . . 245 190 L Samelson, Jerome Donald . . . 311 Sanchez, Cruz Olvera Jr. . . . 292 Sanchez, Maria Antonia . . . 276 Sanchez 292 Sanchez , Maria Concepcion . . . , Olivia . . . 292 , Richard B. . . . 124, 202, Sanchez, Rafael . . . 55 Sanchez 31 1 Sanchez, Sagrario C. . . Sandelovic, Mary Lyn . . . 285 Sanders, Sanders, Sanders, Sanders, Sanders Gary Bruce . . Glenda S. . . . 55 Harold G. . . . 252 1 55 Harry B. . . . Ronnie Adron . Sandhop, Fred Charles lll . . . 255, 312 Sandlin, Charlotte Yvonne . . . 312 Sanez, Hector . . . 190 Santiwatana, Keota . . . 317 Sapenter, Kenneth Alton 187 Sarabia, Fumiko . . . 312 Sauceda, Irma Gloria . . . 276 .J Sauceda, Daniel . . . 215 Saunders, William Arnold . . . 312 SGH So' Sco Schi Schl Sch Schi 2 Sch. Sch. 5 Schw 2 Schm 2 Sch, Sch Sch' Schl Sch' Sch' 3 Sch: Schw Sch' Sch' 1 Sch' Schw Schw Schw Sch' Sco' Sco Sco' S E Sed Seg Seg Seit Seili Seir Seit Seit Sek Sen Sen Sen 2 Sen r l 1 I r l I 1 I l l i l l 1 l l e S l w It .1 1 Sauvageau, Dr. John . . . 55 213 Sawey, Dr' Orlan ' ' ' 55 Shah, Girish Baburao . . Scales, 501101111 Am' - - - 241 Shah, Hasmukhlal A... . Scheffler, Charles -l"- - - - 219 Shah, Mahendrakumar Ratila . . . Scheible, Phyllis L. . . . 192, 224 312 Scherpereel, Dr. Richard . . . 55 Shah, Mehesh R, , , 1 201 5Cl11ll9Y, Mae - - - 197, 228, 232, Shah, Nareshkumar J. . . . 213 292 Shah, Raiendra N. . . . 312 Schiller, Mac Dell. . . 56, 189 Shah, Ramesh R, , , , 201, 213, Schmalenbeck, Dr. Hildegard . . 312 56 Shah, Vinod Champaklal . . . 213 Schmidt, Curtis WUYUG - - - 256, Shannon, William Joseph . . . 230, 285 261 - Schmidt, Jacqueline M. . . . 78, 79, Shaver, Jerry sfeyen , , 232, 293 Shaw, Byron Lott . . . 150 Schmidt, Maurice . . . 56 Shaw, ,lei-el , , , 197 Schoettle, Dr. Carlos E. . . . 56 Shaw, je,-ry Glenn , 1 , 293 Schonefeld. Bemafd G- - - - 293 Shearer, David Michael . . . 224 Schrader. Bert Dale - - - 312 sheedy, Patrick c. . . . 236, 252 5Cl1I'Gmek, Dennis Carl - - - 200 Sheffield, Lowell Bradley . . . 312 Schroeder, Charles William . . . Sheriff, Everel-1 Paul , , , 312 312 Sheriff, Lucille Adcock . 312 Schroeder, Janice Elaine . . . 276 Sherman, Carl E, 111 , , , 276 Schuehle, C1ndY Sue - - - 241 Sherman, Lucila Ramirez Schvehle, ClYde Geofge - - - 254 Sheth, Ashokkumar J. . . . 213 Schuenemcn. James Douglas - - - Shields, Milton Allen in . . . 245 157, 236. 261, 312 Shimek, Linda Louise . . Schuette, Mark Dennis . . . 312 Shipley, Kalhleen Martin Schultz, Alvin F. Jr. . . . 293 Shipley, Stephen Glenn . . . 108, Schultz, Florence Kay . . . 189, 312 193, 206 5C11UfTl0nn, Curole V1"911"10 - - - 312 Shofner, Victoria Ann . . . 204, 246 5C11W1eflke, Jef1f1Y Sue - - - 312 Shoquist, Kenneth Michael . . . 216 543011, R0lPl'1 Pl"1ll1P - - - 193, 206 Shuford, Albert Wesley . . . 150 515011, R0b9ff C- - - - 56 Shumate, Jon Mark . . . 229 Scott, RObeI'1 Lee . . . 27, 190 Sideboflgm, Lqrry Gene 5 E A - - - 232, 233 I Siemonsma, Richard Charles . . . Sedwick, Arthur J. Jr. . . . 245 122, 148, 312 Seger, 5l10Wf1, Elizabeth - - - 312 Siercovich, Elizabeth May . . . 200, Segura, Felipe J. . . . 56 235 Seifert, William Frank . . . 254 SIGMA CHI , , , 260, 261 Seiler, Thomas Ray . . . 312 SIGMA DELTA Pl, , , 228 Seim, Sylvia Anne . . . 285 SIGMA TAU , , , 227 Seitz, Jo Anne Eileen . . . 264 Silgaera, Delia , , , 256 Seitz, Theresa Margaret . . . 264 Silva, Richard , , , 256 Sekerak, Dr. Robert M. . . . 56 Silva, Robert Joslin , , , 5911, 1101011 511111 - - - 215, 293 Simek, Joyce Ann . . . 189, 208, Senclair, Mary E. . . . 312 293 Senselmvnn, David Ll0Yd - - - 157, Simmons, Debra Lynne . . . 285 254 Simmons, Mary Jane . . . 203, 231 5efeV1C1, 51ePl"9n1e Ann - ' ' 276 Simmons, Rosanne Ellen . . . 226, Serna, Hilda . . . 149, 189, 312 276 5 E R V E - - - 226 Simon, Ferdinand Carl Jr. . . . 123 Shackelford, Stephen W. . . . 312 Simpson, Carl Wade , , Shah, Dinesh Nandlal . . . 201, Sir-hpsan, Gary Don , . . Singer, Peggy Jean . . . 293 Sitabutra, Sumataratona . . . 317 Spelton, Robert. . . 56 Skinner, Albert Lee . Skrobarcek, Eddie Leon . . . 195, 224 . 256 Skrobarcek, Joyce Marie . . . 129, 220, 312 Skrobarczyk, Robert M. . . . 150, 277 Slaughter, James Scott . . . 123, 245, 312 Samll, Eldridge . . . 150, 151, 174 175 Small, Rosemary . . . 56 Smith, Anne . . . 189 Smith, Aulus Bruce . . . 261 Smith, Bruce Kent . . . 312 Smith, Buddy Lee . . . 56 Smith, Smith, 21 8 1 Charles Wesley . . . 312 Dennis Morris . . . 103, 216, Smith, Donald Joe . Smith, Donna Lee . Smith, Gracie Lynn . Smith, Jan Aileen . . . Smith, Janice Lee . . . 241, 293 Smith, Jerry F. . . . 56, 100 Smith, Dr. Julia A. . 150 192, 285 . 285 241 208, 230, ..56 Smith, Kathryn Sue . . . 76, 128, 129, 293 Smith, Lawrence R. . . . 56 Smith, Martha Jane . . . 312 Smith, Nancy Marie . . . 129, 246 Smith, Neta Gay . . . 56 Smith, Olivia Anne . . 119, 246 Smith, Patricia Ann . . . 293 Smith, Ricki Lynn . . 277 Smith, Roger Hutto . . . 252 Smith, Terry David . . 254, 312 Smith, Thomas Reed . . . 170 Smith, V. A. . . . 56, 193 Snapka, Marlene Elaine . . . 241 Snavely, Myrtle H. . Snavely, Susan Elizabeth . . . 312 Snowberger, Arnold lll . . . 293 .189 Solis, Joe Angel Jr. . . . 263 Solis, Joel Rene . . . 230, 245 Solis, Robert Robles . . . 222 Soliz, Maria Elena . . . 312 Smith, Dr. Arnold K. . . . 56 Soria, Guillermo . . . 293 Soto, Balbina . . . 210, 211 South, Ben J. . . . 56, 59 Sowada, Patricia Lynn . . . 225 Sparkman, E. Melissa . . . 197, 285 Sparks, Elvin L. . . . 56 Sparks, Jacqueline Kay . . . 186 Sparks, Linda Ford . . . 231 Sparks, Linda Gail . . . 231 Speed, Dr. F. Michael . . . 56 Speer, Garland Wayman . . . 293 SPELEOLOGICAL SOCIETY . . . 229 Spiekerman, Frances Arlene . . . 312 Spring, Donnie . . . 188 Spring, William Donald . . . 225 Sprowl, James Craig . .1 . 252 St. Clair, Frank Dale . . . 214 St. Clair, Steven Ervin . . . 311 Stacy, Clifford Eli lll . . . 191, 245 Staff, George McDonald . . . 312 Staff, Joel V. . . . 56 Stafford, Phyllis Marie . . . 129 Stahl, Charles Richard . . . 251 Standridge, Richard Allen . . . 188, 207 Stanfield, Janet Rhea . . . 264 Stanley, James W. . . . 206 Starcic, Linda Ann . . . 285 Stasney, Jo Ann . . . 56 Stauffer, Mary Louise . . . 192 Stautzenberger, Scott W. . . . 207 Stavinoha, Connie Brooks . . . 317 Stavinoha, Raymond Joe . . . 313 Steadman, Gary Marc . . . 236, 245 Steeno, Gary Richard . . . 249 Steinke, Gilbert E. . . . 151 Steinmeyer, Dr. George . . . 56 Steinmeyer, Ronald C. . . . 219, 313 Stephens, Joan Carol . . . 313 Stephens, Ralph Wayne . . . 285 Stephens, Rickey Verlin . . . 249 Stephens, Thomas James . . . 263 Stevens, Charles R. . . . 126 Stewart, Joe Raymond . . . 114 Stewart, Lonnie Charles . . . 224 Stewart, Randall James . . . 252 Stewart, Sherri L. . . . 56 Stewart, Sidney Francis . . . 205, 215, 293 Stillman, Richard . . . 163 Stinebaugh, Dr. Dennis J. . . . 56 Stocking, Edward L. . . . 313 Stockton, John Kenneth . . . 313 Stone, Dr. Virgil F. . . . 56 Stover, Lynda Laing . . . 277 Strandtman, Glenda Kay . . . 293 Strobel, Vicki Lynn . . . 101, 239 Dinah Gillaspy takes a break from working on the El Rancho, which came out in the fall. Strunk, Gary.. . 254 STUDENT COUNCIL . . Stump, Ellen Jean . . . Stupp, Mark . . . 27 Sturm, Patricia Carol . . Su, Dr. Edward S. T. . . Suhm, Dr. Raymond . . Sullivan, William Joseph Sung, Dr. Chia-Hsiaing Sutherland, Ralph Louis Suvanprakorn, Uraiphan 7 Taber, Patricia Lynn . . Talamantes, Connie J. . 2 Tanguma, Ramon H. . . Tankersley, Stephen P. Toplin, Harry Albert Jr. Tarazi, Zadeh Mohammad Tate, Jeri L. . . . 277 TAU BETA SIGMA . . . TUA KAPPA EPSILON . 263 Tauras, Taylor, Edward Joseph Jr Bettie Jean . . . Taylor, David Alan . . Taylor, Donald Lee . . Taylor, Jerrald Wayne . Taylor, Mary Catherine Tays, Roberta Ann . . . 241 237 Tela, lsavadharm Dhavallai Adolfo Efren . . . 293 Todd, Martha Karen . Vora, Shafi. . . 201, 317 Williams, Curtis Marshal . . . 314 28 172, 205, 227, 313 Telford, William Henry . . . 313 Tellinghuisen, Alfred E. . . . 56 Terrell, Freeman M. Ill . . . 190 Terry, Texas Hopkins . . . 224 Theiss, Betty Jane . . . 313 Theiss, Gary Lee . . . 285 Thomas, Clarence lvan . . ., 285 Thomas, Margaret E. . . . 101, 218 Thompson, Danny Leon . . . 201 Thompson, Franklin Dale . . . 210 Thompson, H. Durword . . . 56 Thompson, John Kenton . . . 195 Thompson, Dr. John S. . . . 56, 212 Thompson, Jon H. . . . 56 Thompson, Oma Peter . . . 317 Thomson, Kirby Ray . . . 229 Thornton, Davey Spencer . . . 313 Thurston, Bruce Allen . . . 293 Urban, Milton Larry . . . 224 Urian, Beverly Jean . . . 314, Utz, Robert Leslie . . . 219, 314 Uurph, Catherine . . . 149 Vacek, Daniel Wayne . . . 314 Valadez, Olympia . . . 220, 314 Valdez, Alfredo Isaac . . . 200 321 218, Valdez, Daniel Jr. . . . 223 129 Valdez, Olympia . . . Tibbs, Michael Joseph . . . 229, 313 Tijerina, Cayetano . . . 217 Timmer, Dr. Lavern W. . . . 56 Tinker, Michael . . . 56 Tobias, Donna P. . . . 49 Todd, Dr. Donald E. . . . 57, 205 Van Cleve, Jack lll . . . 254 Varela, Diana Oralia . . . 80, 81, 314 Vasbinder, John H. . . . 314 Vasquez, Todd, Hugh Charles . . . 224 Vasquez, Alolfo Hernandez . . 293 Vasquez, Danny . . . 150, 285 Vasquez, Oneida Celinda . . . 314 313 Toland, Cynthia Ann . . . 226, 232, 313 Toliver, John Edward . . . 209 Toliver, William H. . . . 293 Tomas, Patrick Wayne . . . 225 Tomlinson, Cherie Lynn . . . 246 Tompkins, Brenda Lynn . . . 313 Tores, Jess . . . 249 Torres, Connie , . . 293 Torres, Emelia B. . . . 285 Torres, Leonel . . . 57 Torres, Maria Concepcion . . . 313 Torres, Rossie . . . 57, 226 Torres, Sylvia Linda . . . 256, 285 Tovar, Raul . . . 277 Townsend, James E. . . . 57 Trbula, Sandra Kay . . . 313 Vasquez, Toribo . . . 210 Vass, Paul Leroy . . . 229 Vau han David Ellis 164 g , . . . Vaugham, Dr. George E. . . . Vega, Arturo Roberto . . . 217 Vega, Rose Mary . . . 314 Vela, Edna Iris . . . 285 Vela, Laura Rita . . . 193, 206 Vela, Rosa . . . 210 Vela, Velma . . . 314 Velez, Evangelina . . . 285 Vera, Elida . . . 314 Vera, Eloy . . . 217, 219 Vergara, Elva P. . . . 314 Vetters, Caroline . . . 57, 226 57 Treio, Adela . . . 285 Treio, Diana . . . 218 Treio, Joe Frank . . . 219, 227, 313 Treptow, Paul William lll . . . 148, 277 Trevillian, Mark Alan . . . 251 Trevino, Anselmo Jr. . . . 293 Trevino, Elma G. . . . 313 Trevino, Herlinda . . . 293 Trevino, James . . . 78 110 Trevino, Joe D. . . . Trevino, Joe Raymond Trevino, Jose . . . 206 ...285 Trevino, Manuel Albert . . . 293 Trevino, Mary Hilda . . . 277 Trevino, Norma J. . . . 129 Trevino, Roberto . . . 217 Trevino, Terry Joseph . . . 263 Trigg, Robert. . . 150 Trigo, Maria Garza . . . 313 Trombley, Terry J. . . . 285 Trott, John Charles . . . 261 Truitt, Dr. M. M. . . . 57 Truiillo, Fermin . . . 314 Tryer, James D. . . . 57 ' Tucker, Dorothy Jean . . . 285 Tudhope, Karen Lynn . . . 203, 231 Turnbull, Wayne Marshall . . . 122 Turner, Claude B. . . . 101 Turner, Virginia Jean . . . 314 Turner, Dr. William D. . . . 57 Tuttle, Eldon Doyle Jr. . . . 164, 167, 252, 285 Tylicki, Dr. James . . . 57 . Tymrak, Donald J. . . . 277 Ueither, Carl . . . 314 Urban, Brenda Gail . . . 314 Victory, Donald Glenn . . . 285 Villa, Cidelia . . . 121 Villalobos, Alvaro F. . . . 172, 293 285 Villalon, Antonio . . . Villareal, Ralph Martinez . . . 277 Villarreal, Abraham . . Villarreal, Ofelia T. . . . 277 Villereal, Patricia . . . 314 Villarreal, Sergio R. . . Vilseck, Joyce . . . 57 Vinson, Bobby Reece . Vittitoe, Dana Elaine . . . 264, 277 Voigt, Linda Sue . . . 231, 293 Von Hatten, James L. . Vorndam, Michael Edward . . . 215 Waddell, Davis Ray . . . 261 Waddell, Richard Henry . . . 230 Waggoner, Vicki Lynn Wagner, Darby Gene . . . 245 Wagner, John Wayne 261 Wallace, Steven Wilson . . . 110, 193, 206 Wallace, Weldon Lee . . . 293 Wallace, Dr. Woodrow W. . . . 57 Walsh, Mary Ann . . . 57 Walshe, Michael Timothy . . . 197 Walther, Mark . . . 293 Walther, Michael Wayne . . . 314 Walton, Ermengarde Irene . . . 317 Wardwell, Ray Harry . . . 314 Warner, Randy Lynn . . . 314 Warner, Teresa Lynn . . . 285 Warren, Dr. Robert A. . . . 57 Wasson, Cynthia . . . 211 Waters, Paul Douglas . . . 255 Watkins, Gayle Denise . . . 277 Watson, James William . . . 314 Watson, Rita Jo . . . 258 Watts, Terry Glen . . . 314 Wayner, Margaret . . . 157 Weathersby, Charles F. . . . 79, 224 Weathersby, David Lee . . . 164, 165, 167 Weaver, Linda Nell . . . 314 Weaver, Marsha Elizabeth . . . 293 Webb, Deborah Jean . . . 241, 242 Webb, John Berry . . . 314 Webb, Nancy Carol . . . 314 Webber, Mark Ellis . . . 285 Weber, Margiery Ruth . . . 239 Weiblen, Glenn Patrick . . . 255 Weiblen, Michael Don . . . 205, 215, 314 Weimers, Duane . . . 242 Weir, George W. . . . 285 Weisman, Bunnie . . . 189 Weisman, Caroll Louise . . . 114, 189, 239, 314 Weisman, Margaret Elaine . . . 12, 93, .1 14, 230, 239 Weisman, Ramona Lee . . . 239 Welch, Whylie Wayne . . . 314 Wendel, G. Michael . . . 150 West, Jerry Wayne . . . 255 West, Paul Martin . . . 252 West, Thomas George . . . 212 Westergren, Carol . . . 57 Westmoreland, Dr. John S. . . . 57 Wever, Velasco Pedro E. . . . 195 Whatley, John Robert . . . 263 Wheeler, Dr. Edwin E. . . . Wheeler, James Henry Jr. . . . 249 Wheeler, John Fletcher . . . 252 Whitaker, Buddy . . . 251 Whitaker, Mark . . . 47 White, Debbie Kay . . . 264 Whiting, Craig Dudley . . . 314 Whitley, Donna Lee . . . 220 Whitworth, Larry Joe . . . 261 Whitworth, Laurel Woodrow . . . 261 Wiede, Robert Martin . . . 277 Wiemers, Duane Wilkes . . . 188, 194 Wilburn, David Robert . . . 103, 1 19, 216 Wildenberg, Jeffery W. . . . 91, 162, 175 Wilder, Loren Graves . . . 33, 314 Wiley, Robert James . . . 225 Wilkinson, George Ray . . . 261 Wilkinson, Lowell F. lll . . . 245 William, Toliver. . . 186 Williams, Aaron Charles . . . 187, 293 wilson, can . . . 264 Wilson, Janis Louise . . . 120, 293 Wilson, Melanie Lynn . . . 277 Wincelowicz, John Paul Jr. . . . 33 205, 314 Wind, Bruce Carroll .' Wines, F. B. . . . 57 .197 Winzer, Tommy C. . . . 277 Wirth, Nathan Kent . Wise, Blaine William . Wise, Linda . . . 293 . 251 .148 Wohlgemuth, Robin Ann . . . 277 293 Wolf, Jo Ann F. . . . Wolfe, Debbie Hutto . . .285 Wolfe, John Elvis . . . 314 Wolfi Dr. Robert L. . .57 Wolter, Mary Jean . . . 314 Womack, Luke . . . 245 Womble, Sam Marion . . .188, 194, 293 Wong, Raymond L. . . . 249, 314 Wong, Richard Lee . . . 249, 293 Wood, Carl Gene . . . 193, 206 Wood, James Alexander Jr. . 251 Wood, Walter Ellis . . . 245 Woodall, Karen Willoughby . 315 Woodward, Karin Chase . . . 277 Woolsey, Patricia M. . ..22 Wooten, Carolyn Taylor . . . 315 Worden, Glenda Rae . . .241 Wray, Barbara Spenrath . . . 189 Wright, Jan . . . 264 Wright, Jay Len . . . 245 Wright, Ruth Gaddis . .189 Wuensche, Vernon Allen . . . 245 Wyche, Maxine Porter . . . 315 Wyscarver, Mary Louise . . . 315 Yarborough, Patricia Beth . . Ybarra, Juan, Manuel . . . Ybarra, Rosalind B. . . . 211 Ynostroza, Evita . . . 210 Yoder, Norman Edward . '. . Young, Brad . . . 189, 315 Young, Clement K. . . . 57 Young, Darrel Allen . . . 228 Young, Julia H. . . . 57 293 Wagner, Margaret Elaine . . . 117, 246 Wagner, Mary Elizabeth . . . 148 Wah, Dr. Thein . . . 57 Waitz, Deborah Ann . . . 225, 314 Walker , Cheryl L.. . .314 Walker, Curtis Kenneth . . Walker, Dale Roger Jr. . . Walker Walker Wall, J . 251 , Robbie Jane . . . 208, 239 , Renny. . . 251 erome Pollard . . . 285 Wall, Robert James . . . 252, 285 Wallace, Deborah Jan 192, 226 Wallace, Sharon Dale . . . 277 Williams, Deborah Jean Williams, LTC. Donald L. . . . 57, 125 Williams, Gary Wayne . Williams, James Vernon Williams, John Robert . Williams, Larry Duane . Williams, Phyllis Wilson Williams Ralph Lewis . Williamsi Richard Earl . . 264 . .285 . 205 277 285 . 314 125 251 Williams, Stephen K. . . . 314 Williges, Dr. George G. . . . 57 Willms, Betty Jean . . . 277 Willms, Glenwood James . 188, 242, 314 . . 194, Zamarripa, Rosemary . . . 315 315 Zambrano, Elias . . . Zambrano, Estella . . 315 Zamora, Niddia Maria . . . 315 Zamorano, Maria E. Loya . . . 315 Zapata, Alfonso . . . Zapata, Lindsay Frances . . . 117 149, 189 Zapata, Roland . . . 223 Zapata, Yolanda . . . 220,293 277 Zavala, Idolina . . . Zbranek, Eva Mae . . . 315 Zdansky, Eileen . . . 277 Zdunkewicz, Thomas Michael . . 216, 223 ZETA TAU ALPHA . . 264, 265 Zickefoose, Paul Jay . . 224 Zoeller, Mary Denise . . . 277 Zuazua, Carlos Raul . . 202 Zulauf, Lynda Gayle . . . 277 Zum, Mallen, Bernard Wayne . . 263 Zuniga, Hector Xavier . ..315 315 --lm s.iMi 5-f'4fr. i'f :TH 'mill 'ffm L-H15 Gai'---Zzj mm. A""m'l WM "f'Yf0w..' M,,,75' WIWA. Roemff Seem, ...264 len..,245 lgmonmnh, , Pm.-la. Y. ,Pdffidaltfhuf n,Mm0d...5f uid! .... IH fw?0..,2lU nmfdfnrdwf V. . 189.315 men1K.,.57H ,lAn,n,..2x: H...57 - 4 mfr---If i,,,,.3l5 'a"?fe+f 2 Z: I ,JISV 11ff""" ,.223, 277 1--' we JIS n.. W WW w.-'wif wwf-'ff wwf pw xw""'3V: I sx , :X NX. 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Texas A and M University - El Rancho Yearbook (Kingsville, TX) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

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