Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA)

 - Class of 1954

Page 1 of 278

 

Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1954 Edition, Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 278 of the 1954 volume:

1 fowl ' ' ) ' . ' I THE COVER. The cover design,- drawn by Harriet Schwartz of the Tyler School of Fine Arts, is an abstraction of a maze repre- senting life. It offers many possible paths and many starting points, as does life, and presents a picture that is sometimes clear, some- times confused. Our years at Temple University were but a segment of this maze of life. They were years of increasing complexity, perception and unity as ivc matured and completed a step in the process of learning to live. THE 1154 TEH PUBLISHED BY THE SENIOR CUSS OF TEMPLE UNIVERSITY PHILADELPHIA, PA. RUTH KELLER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF JOAN ECKSTEIN EXECUTIVE EDITH HARRIET SCHWARTZ ART EDITOR CEORCE DETWILER mm mm RAYMOND WHITTAKER FACOLTV ADVISER LEARNING Gathering around piano in Mitten Hall West Alcove. TO LIVE Conwell Hall As we prepare to leave Temple University after sev- eral years of study, work and play, we realize that our most valuable experiences came not just in ordinary learning, but in learning to live. While we studied and read to become chemists, busi- ness executives, teachers, and artists, we were also learn- ing to become citizens of town, state, country and world. As we learned to be better technicians and specialists, we also learned to get along with our neighbors and as- sociates. We learned the importance of finding our place in life and of performing with joy and satisfaction the service that we were fitted for. We learned that the world needs men and women of broad vision to lay pans and dream dreams as well as specialists to carry out the plans. We learned that the world needs those who look at man as man, not as black or white, Christian or Jew. We learned the importance of human principles and ideals. We learned to appreciate art, literature history and science in their broadest sense. And we learned that making a successful living is only a part of living successfully. In short, we learned that there is more to learning than simply reading books, attending classes and being trained for an occupation. Whether in the classroom or on the athletic field, in worship or in observing beauty, in working with organizations or in attending social af- fairs in all of these we were not just learning, we were preparing for life, we were learning to live. In the pages of this book we will show some of the ways in which Temple University has helped us learn to live. Four Studies are the main reason for the exist- ence of Temple University and are one of the most important influences in preparing us for life. It is through the University classroom and laboratory, through reading and studying that boys and girls begin to think as men and women. We learn the meaning of ob- jectivity and the scientific attitude. We have at hand the works and thoughts of the great philosophers, writers and scientists of all time as we seek a broad understanding of our civilization. Vital to our progress in the academic world is the faculty whose job it is to guide us in our efforts to achieve a degree of in- tellectual maturity. Also important is Sulli- van Library where we may go for study and research and where we may find books to stimulate us further. Absorbed interest in the chemistry laboratory. Sullivan Library THROUGH STUDIES Five ATHLETICS Action in a football game. As part of our well-rounded develop- ment in preparation for life, Temple Uni- versity presents a diversified athletic pro- gram. For those of us who are content to watch and cheer while others play there are the high-ranking basketball team, foot- ball team and soccer team, national cham- pion for the year. For those who prefer to take active part in sports there are many varsity and intramural teams. Women, too, have a complete program of varsity and recreational activities un- der the direction of the Women ' s Athletic Association. Our playing fields and practice areas are wide-flung, but for those who want to enjoy the athletic program, the oppor- tunity is here. Silcox goes up to score against St. John ' s. Eight Social life at Temple University is but another of the ways in which the University helps us in learning to live. Center of social life is Mitten Hall with its Auditorium for dances, mixers and dinners, with its Great Court and Alcoves for every- day talking and socializing and its Cafeteria and Grille for meals and snacks. Among the functions presented each year are the class dances, Homecoming, Carnival, mixer dances, the White Supper and Candle- light Concert, Brotherhood Dinner, convoca- tions and a host of affairs sponsored by the schools of the University. Because of the size of the student body and the difficulties in establishing friendly relations between so many people, much of the job of providing social enrichment falls to organizations, departments, and sororities and fraternities. These smaller groups within the University are often best able to help us in developing social skills for later ife. Hillbilly band at Alpha Sigma Alpha ' s rush party. Elementary Education tea. SOCIAL LIFE Nine ACTIVITIES Among our most valuable experiences in learning to meet later life are those we share outside of class and lecture room in participating in activities. Temple University offers us an almost limitless variety of clubs to join and things to do. Department clubs, dra- matic organizations, political clubs, language and science groups, publica- tions, honoraries and professionals, ath- letic teams, sororities and fraternities, and student government groups are some of the types of activities available. Not all of us took advantage of the opportunities in this area, but for those who did the time was well spent in en- riching and broadening our personal experience. Tylerplayers ' Harriet Schwartz in Pygmalion. All minds at work in the Temple News city room. Ten Baptist Temple As an urban university in the heart of the city of Phila- delphia, Temple University has no grassy hillsides and no gleaming lakes. The campus consists mainly of side- walks and row houses with several giant halls in their midst. And the students are largely commuters, many of whom work part or full time. This environment, this urban situation, affects all that Temple University is and does. Its spirit has a touch of the throbbing pu se of the city with its crowds of people. There is the intellectualism that thrives in a city where cultural advantages abound, and the feeling of brother- hood that grows as understanding grows. With these goes a spirit of liberalism, and the realization that change will occur and must be guided. The city offers material things in its relationship with the University. It offers jobs at close hand for those IP need. It offers entertainment, stores and transportation. And offers a laboratory of life for the social scientist and the artist. In our year s at the University we have come to over- look its faults and disadvantages and have sought out the good. We have taken the advice of Russell Conwell and have looked for our " acres of diamonds " where we are. We have found that in its surroundings, as in its pro- gram of studies, religion, aesthetics, athletics, social ife and activities, Temple University has helped us not only in learning, but also in earning to live. Sullivan Library Mitten Hall SURROUNDINGS Eleven Dental-Pharmacy School building. SU RROU Philadelphia Art Museum Thomas Theological Hall Twelv Oak Lane Country Day School Cedarbrook center N Dl NGS Artist ' s drawing of the new building for Temple University Hospital. Stella Elkins Tyler Schoo of Fine Arts Thirteen DR. ROBERT LIVINGSTON JOHNSON, A.B., LLD., L.H.D. Fourteen Greetings from the President The class of 1954 is being graduated in the year of Temple University ' s rebirth. A new law school has been dedicated. Ground has been broken for a new medical center. A fund-raising campaign has started which is going to rear for the undergraduate schools a new plant on the site of the old. It is a resurrection. This capacity to grow old in service, then emerge phoenix-like, young, new and beautiful, is the kind of immortality that is given to institutions worthy of survival. For man, such fate is not possible. The physical frame cannot be renewed. Yet the spirit of man, which is his essence, can be revived unceasingly by its contact with the magic of learning and ideas. College has initiated you into this mystic process. Let this secret of learning to live never elude you. President Fifteen ADMINISTRATION DR. MILLARD E GLADFELTER, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., D.Sc., in Ed., LLD. Provost and Vice-President DR. MILLARD E. GLADFELTER Provost and Vice-President WILLIAM W. TOMLINSON Vice-President DR. GEORGE A. WELSH Vice-President DR. WILLIAM N.. PARKINSON Vice-President MARTIN MERSON Vice-President DR. HARRY A. COCHRAN Treasurer DR. EARL R. YEOMANS Secretary A. CALVIN FRANTZ Assistant Treasurer HARRY H. PITTS Comptroller RUSSELL CONWELL COONEY Asst. Secretary and General Counsel GENERAL ADMINISTRATION AND STUDENT WELFARE WALTER HAUSDORFER JOHN M. RHOADS CHARLES E. METZGER JOHN G. BERRIER DR. BRUCE S. ROXBY JOSHUA C. CODY JOHN BARR RAYMOND V. PHILLIPS University Librarian University Registrar Administrative Assistant to the President Assistant Registrar Director of Health Service Director of Athletics Industrial Placement Officer Director of Teacher Placement W. P. WETZEL Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds HARRY H. WESTENBURGER Purchasing Agent DR. JONAS W. BUCHER Director of Duplicating Services RAYMOND C. WHISKER Adviser to Undergraduate Publications ELVIRA K. WOERLE Directress of Housing LOUISE ORAM Activities Counselor RAYMOND L BURKLEY Executive Director, General Alumni Association CURTIS F. BICKER Manager, Student Store Sixteen TRUSTEES P,blic)l ni d Hou! , Counsel " Assoei ' 1 ' 01 BISHOP FRED P. CORSON, A,B,, M.A., B.D., D.D., L.H.D., Lift D., LLD. Chairman of the Board THE GOVERNOR OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA THE MAYOR THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA MAJOR GENERAL MILTON G. BAKER BROOKS BROMLEY RUSSELL CONWELL COONEY, B.S., LL.B. JOHN A. DIEMAND THEODORE A. DISTLER, M.A., LL.D. CHARLES G. ERNY THOMAS L. EVANS FRANK J. FELL COLONEL SAMUEL W. FLEMING, JR., A.B., M.E. ARTHUR S. FLEMMING. LL.D. WALTER D. FULLER FRANCIS B. HAAS, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D. WALTER C. HANCOCK MRS. RICHARD E. HANSON LOUIS P. HOYER, B.S., Ed.M., LL.D., Sc.D. G. MORTON ILLMAN, M.D. ROBERT LIVINGSTON JOHNSON, A.B., LL.D., L.H.D. MRS. LIVINGSTON E. JONES CHARLES KLEIN, LL.B., LL.D. RALPH G. LUFF ALEXANDER MACKIE, D.D. R. ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY, A.B. JAMES A. NOLAN HOWARD C. PETERSEN ARTHUR E. PEW, JR. H. W. PRENTIS, JR., A.B., A.M., LL.D. HENRY N. RODENBAUGH, B.S. in M.E., M.E. WILLIAM A. SCHNADER, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. WILLIAM R. SPOFFORD, LL.B. MRS. JOHN A. STEVENSON, B.S. JAMES M. SYMES EDWARD BANCROFT TWOMBLY, B.A., LL.B. MRS. GEORGE F. TYLER, L.H.D. GEORGE A. WELSH, LL.B., LL.D. Seventeen DEDICATION MR. WILLIAM W. TOMLINSON To William W. Tomlinson, Vice-President of Temple University, who of all the members of the Administration has been closest to us, we dedicate the 1954 Templar. For his willingness to lend a sympathetic ear to our problems, for his work in presenting our University to the people of Philadel- phia and suburbs through public speaking, taking part in public affairs and guiding the University of the Air television program, for his active interest in the expansion program and his work in raising funds for it, and for his interested participation in student affairs for these we thank Mr. Tomlnison and dedicate to him our book. Eighteen CONTENTS Outstanding Seniors 22 Liberal Arts 29 Business 41 Teachers 57 Community 75 Fine Arts 83 Pharmacy Theology Sports . Greeks . . . Honoraries and Professionals . Governing Bodies .177 Organizations 18 Features Nineteen THE DEANS s MR. JOHN A. BROWN AND MISS GERTRUDE D. PEABODY At a University as large as Temple it would be easy for the individual student to feel lost in the crowd if it were not for the services of Miss Gertrude D. Peabody, Dean of Women, and Mr. John A. Brown, Dean of Men. For students experiencing difficulty in selecting vocational objectives, in learning to study effectively, in solving personality problems, health or financial problems or any of the multitude of problems that may come up in the course of a college education, Dean Peabody and Dean Brown offer warm interest, understanding and expert guidance. Most of the time of the deans is thus spent in giving counsel to students who request it and feel the need of it. But as members of many important University groups the deans are kept busy much of the time with meetings, appointments and spe3ches. Through all their work the deans maintain an active interest in campus organizations and are always ready to offer sound advice to student leaders who seek them out. Twenty SENIORS We, the graduating seniors of 1954, hai ' c completed the required amount of study for a degree, are best able to appreciate the contribution of Temple University in preparing us for Hie. Twenty-one OUTSTANDING Known mostly for his work in religious or- ganizations, especially as vice-president of Newman Club and president of URC, Tony Stromeyer has also been active in Theta Kappa Phi, IF sports and Crusaders. Tony was a member of IF Council for two semesters. " Mr. Fraternity " might well be the nick- name for Dave DeTurk. As president of Sigma Pi and IF Council and co-chairman of Greek Weekend, Dave ' s influence in fraternity affairs was always strong and vital. This leadership ability again came to the fore when Dave was named president of the Committee of Six. NANCE GINGRICH Nance Gingrich, a vivacious redhead, was Alpha Sigma Alpha ' s gift to the Women ' s Athletic Association, of which she was presi- dent. Active in both Chimes and Magnet, Nance was seen leading cheers at every foot- ball game. As for sports, you name it, and she was in it. Vice-president of Theta Sigma Upsilon, Dee Shakoski ' s undergraduate career was climaxed by the winning of the coveted TU Award for excellence in sports. Besides sports, Dee de- voted her time to Beta Gamma Sigma, Chimes, Magnet, Marketing Club, SAM and Pi Gamma Mu. DAVID DETURK DOLORES SHAKOSKI Twenty-two SENIORS SUE DAVIDOFF The winner of this year ' s Sword Award was energetic Sue Davidoff, who made her mark at the University in campus politics. Possessed of a liberal, clear-thinking mind, this future sociologist was a long-time member of Stu- dent Senate and the Thomas Jefferson Club. Campus politician in the highest sense of the word, was Ed Russell, president of Young Republicans Club. A member of the Student Speakers Bureau, a debater and a Crusader, Ed also made news in the National Students Association, ICG and Phi Alpha Theta. The male winner of the Sword Award, Marty Gross, did his utmost to stir up school spirit at the University during his four years. He was a cheerleader and a Crusader, and most important, president of Student Senate. Marty also participated in IM sports and was a member of the Pre-Law Club. A stellar member of the University ' s Debate Society, Dick Bernstein made a perfect presi- dent for the Intercollegiate Conference on Government and the Council on Student Gov- ernment. Dick was president also of the Sword Society, so we might refer to him as the " creme de la creme. " EDWARD RUSSELL RICHARD BERNSTEIN Twenty-three ERNEST DUNBAR From heeler through the ranks of the NEWS staff went Ernie Dunbar, right up to the top spot of editor. A journalism major, Ernie also won top honors in Sigma Delta Chi he was elected president. As a member of the Com- mittee of Six, Ernie picked up a lot of material for his lucid, perceptive editorials. Barbara Polss Leventer, topnotch student and winner of the outstanding non-Greek woman award, was editor of the TEMPLAR as a junior and moved on to editorial posts on the NEWS. Vice-president of Magnet and Theta Sigma Phi, she was also a member of Chimes and Beta Gamma Sigma. Her ac- complishment of the year: marrying Dick Leventer. ' Madame Editor " for the fall semester of 1953 was Dorothy Grabusic, a little girl who carried her big responsibilities with ease and relish. Dot rescued the almost defunct Theta Sigma Phi and as president turned it into an active and important organization. A journalism major, Ruth Keller was city editor of the NEWS one semester and as a senior became editor of the TEMPLAR. Ruth was a member of Magnet, Beta Gamma Sigma, Theta Sigma Phi and president of Chimes. And last but not least she was in Alpha Sigma Alpha. RUTH KELLER Twenty-four JOSEPH PETROCIK Active in both politics and journalism, Joan Friedman did well both as president of Thomas Jefferson Club and city editor of the Temple NEWS. Joan was also features editor and president of Theta Sigma Phi. She was a member of Beta Gamma Sigma. Sparkplug of station WRTI was Charlie Shaffran who was first chief announcer and then station manager. Charlie emerged from his plush radio station long enough to be selected as a member of the Sword Society and director of the Circle K Club, and then it was back to the airwaves. Joe Petrocik won fame at the University as author of the News column " Along Greek Row " but he worked hard as a reporter and as assistant features editor of the paper too. Secretary of both Sword Society and Sigma Delta Chi, Joe was elected scribe of his fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi. Largely responsible for the smooth running of the women ' s dormitories was Dee Hagy, president of Wiatt Hall Council and Women ' s Senate. Besides her many duties in the dorms, Dee was a member of the Women ' s Glee Club and Magnet and was a participant in Activities Workshop. CHARLES SHAFFRAN Twenty-five Named outstanding sorority woman, Joan Martin was president of Theta Sigma Upsilon and did an outstanding job arranging social affairs in the Office of Student Personnel. Active in IM sports, Joan was a four-semester member of the Newman Club and president of Mitten Hall Student League. Smiling and efficient Ginnie Bahmueller was counted on to do the lion ' s share of the work in many organizations. She was president of Magnet and her sorority, Alpha Sigma Alpha, secretary of Beta Gamma Sigma and the Council on Student Government, and vice- president of the Women ' s Glee Club. She had time left over to devote to the Secretarial Club, the Concert Choir and IM sports. Uncountable hours of service was Bill Wills contribution to the University. He worked on the Carnival, Homecoming, White Supper, Frosh Camp, Brotherhood Week and Senior Giving, and belonged to Sigma Pi and ICG. We ' re not sure, but we think that Bill holds the record for being president of organiza- tions. He headed Crusaders, Pre-Law Club, Young Republican Club and Liberal Arts Club. WILLIAM WILLS Twenty-six Whether she was playing the leading feminine role in Othello or the part of a saucy maid in You Touched Me, Barbara Lamer Rappaport plunged into her acting as- signments and did a superb job. President of Templayers and secretary of Theta Alpha Phi, Barbie also belonged to Magnet, Thomas Jefferson Club, WRTI, Student Speakers Bureau and the English Honorary Society. Rick Weiser, a Frenchman from Egypt, came to the University in his junior year, and immediately made his presence felt, especially in the area of student government. An out- standing member of Student Senate, Rick was also president of the French Honorary Society, and a member of IRC and Pi Gamma Mu. One of the greatest boosters of Temple spirit was Ernie Alferez, Crusader and Fresh- man Camp staffer. Ernie ' s voice was one of the Men ' s Glee Club ' s biggest assets for his four years at Temple. Also a four-semester member of the Newman Club, Ernie worked on the Owl magazine and was a member of the Young Republican Club. ROLAND WEISER Twenty-seven JOSEPH ZDROJEWSKI ROSALIE LICATA For a fellow whose last name is unpro- nounceable by most of us, Joe Z. from Pharmacy has made quite a name for himself at the University. Joe was the very capable student director of Freshman Camp, president of APhA, a member of Kappa Psi and captain of the fraternity basketball team. Into her two years at Community College Shirley Cragle crammed a wealth of activity. She was editor of the Owletter and repre- sentative for the TEMPLAR. Shirley was also secretary to the Freshman Commission and Student Council, was a Freshman Camp staffer and sang in the Community Chorus. One of Pharmacy School ' s shining lights was Rosalie Licata, who served as Student Council secretary and dormitory vice-president. She was also a member of Women ' s Senate, Lambda Kappa Sigma and secretary of APhA. On the lighter side, Rosalie was a cheerleader, worked on the Pharmacy shows and was a member of Freshman Camp staff. Active in almost every activity of the Tyler School of Fine Arts was Wilbur Thompson. Most notable were his four semesters of work in Tylerplayers and on the Dean ' s Ball Com- mittee. He was editor of Gargoyles, a mem- ber of Tyler Council, the Forum and the Fencing Team, and was representative for the TEMPLAR. Twenty-eight LIBERAL ARTS Twenty-nine DEPARTMENT HEADS WILLIAM T. CALDWELL Dean A.B., 1915. Princeton University; A.M., 1917; Ph.D., 1923; Yale University JOSEPH A. MEREDITH Foreign Languages A.B., 1916, Lehigh University; A.M., 1917; Ph.D., 1928, University of Penn- sylvania ERNEST P. EARNEST English B.S.. 1923, Lafayette College; A.M., 1927; Ph.D., 1936, Princeton University TOWNER B. ROOT Geology and Geography S.B., 1921; S.M., 1922; Ph.D., 1935, University of Chicago Thirty WILLIAM ROGERS, JR. Chemistry B.S., 1921; M.A., 1922; Ph.D., 1924, Princeton University NEGLEY K. TEETERS Sociology and Anthropology B.A., 1920, Oberlin College; M.A., 1925; Ph.D., 1931, Ohio State University GORDON F. HOSTETTLER Speech and Dramatic Arts A.B. and B.S., 1940, Kent State Uni- versity; M.A., 1942; Ph.D., 1947, State University of Iowa WALTER LAWTON Mathematics A.B., 1929, Temple University; A.M., 1930; Ph.D., 1934, University of Pennsylvania ARTHUR N. COOK History B.S., 1919, Colgate University; A.M., 1921; Ph.D. 1927, University of Pennsylvania J. LLOYD BOHN Physics B.S., 1924, Pennsylvania State College; Ph.D., 1928, California Institute of Technology MAURICE F. KEEN Biology A.B., 1931, Princeton University; A.M., 1933, Temple University Thirty. one yr a HERBERT ABRAMS 1327 W. York Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 4; IM Basketball 2, Hillel 2. SHELDON L ALBERT 6330 Large Street Philadelphia, Pa. POLITICAL SCIENCE Temple News 3. MOHAMMAD ALI 16 Hazan Singh Building Frere Road Karachi, Pakistan SOCIOLOGY BARBARA H. ALTERMAN 6703 N. Nth Street Philadelphia, Pa. SPANISH French Honor. Society 3, 4; Hillel I; Club Amistad I, 2, 3; OWL I. LOUIS J. AVILA 2742 S. Iseminger Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHYSICS ROBERT J. ARMSTRONG 1 664 S. 54th Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHILOSOPHY IM Basketball 2; TCP 2, 3, 4; Westminster Fellowship 2, 3. CLINTON F. BANKS Route One Elkton, Va. POLITICAL SCIENCE NAACP I, 2, 3, 4; Conwell Club 2, 3, 4. ROBERT ARONOVITZ 1545 Robbins Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Phi Alpha I, Sergeant of Arms Pledge Master 2, 3, 4; IF Football 2, 4: Bowling 4; Pre- Law Club 2; Hillel 3, 4 SAM 2. ROBERT K. BARON 1332 Medford Road Wynnewood, Pa. RADIO Var. Swimming I, 2, 4; Basket- ball Mgr. 3; Hillel I, 2; ICG 2, 3; WRTI News Dir. 3, Prod Mgr. 4. College of ANN G. BARONE 42 E. Madison Avenue Clifton Heights, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Italian Club 3, 4. IRWIN BECKER 2701 W. Lehigh Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY Var. Tennis 2, 3; Chemistry Soc. Sec. 3, Treas. 4. RICHARD I. BERNSTEIN 9 E. Maple Street West Hazleton, Pa. ECONOMICS Delta Sigma Rho 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Sword Soc. Pres. 4; ICG I, 2, Par!. 3, Pres. 4; Debate I, 3, 4, V. Pres. 2; Crusaders 2, 3, 4; IRC 2; Young Republican Club 2, 4, V. Pres. 3. GLENN A. BOLOSKY 2547 N. Stanley Street Philadelphia, Pa. DRAMATIC ARTS Theta Alpha Phi, Pres. 3, 4; Templayers I, 2, 3, 4; WRTI I, 2, 3, 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4. HAROLD BRECHER 609 S. Fourth Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY MARTIN BISK 314 S. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4. ROBERT A. BERNOFF 4940 Chancellor Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY Var. Swimming 2; Chemistry Soc. Pres. 3, 4; Crusaders 4 Circle K Club 3, 4. ALAN BLANK 5444 Locust Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY IM Sports I, Soc. 2, 3, 4. 2; Chemistry ANTOINETTE C. BONFILIO 1419 Ellsworth Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Biology Honor. Soc. 2, 3, 4; Italian Club 2, 3, V. Pres. 4; German Club,4. RAE C. BROWN 1711 N. Ruby Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 3, 4; Temple News I, 2; TEMPLAR I, 2, Sr. Ed. 3, 4; Lib. Arts Club I, 2; Hillel I. 2, 3, 4. FREDERICK C. BRANCH 2518 N. 22nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHYSICS Kappa Alpha Psi 2, 3, 4. SONYA B. BROWN 641 N. 40th Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Thirty-two IM SYLVIA BUDNICK 10 E. Adams Avenue Pleasantville, N. J. PSYCHOLOGY Basketball I, 2; Women ' s Senate 2. JACK CANNAL 2364 78th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HISTORY LOIS A. BYRNE 15 Bennett- Road Springfield, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 3, Sec. 4; Concert Choir 3, 4; Music Ed. Chorus 3, 4; Women ' s Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Havertown Comm. I; Theater Workshop I, 2; Owl Mag. I, 2; TEMPLAR I, 2, 3; IRC I, 2. PHILIP S. CAPLAN 5 N. Fredricksburg Avenue Ventnor, N. J. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 4. RICHARD J. CAMPBELL 4208 Penn Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY LOUIS E. CHARTOCK 2078 E. Cumberland Street Philadelphia, Pa. SCIENCE HELEN J. CHERTKOF 6522 Cutler Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 4; Debate Council I, 2; IRC 3, 4; TJ Club 4. LORETTA P. CERCHIARO 53 W. Rhume Street Nesquehoning, Pa. FRENCH Delta Sigma Epsilon 2, 3, 4: IM Volleyball I, 2, 3, 4; IM Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; Dorm. Council 3, Treas. 4; URC 3, 4; j Newman Club 1,2,3, 4. FRED B. COFFMAN 620 Saude Avenue Essington, Pa. PHYSICS Liberal A rts SUE M. DAVIDOFF 1517 68th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SOCIOLOGY -rench Honor. 3, 4; Pi Gamma vlu 3, 4; Cedarbrook Student I omm. I ; Fresh. Comm. Pres. ; TJ Club I, 2, 3, 4; Student senate 2; Soph. Council 2; nternational Student Service 4. JOHN J. DIAMOND 407 Radcliffe Street Bristol, Pa. ENGLISH HARVEY DAVISON 133 Hansbury Avenue Newark, N. J. PSYCHOLOGY IM Basketball 3, 4; Hillel 2, 3, 4. JOHN C. DOLAN 732 Carver Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Newman Club 1 , 2, 3, 4. DAVID A. DETURK 363 Lakeview Avenue Drexel Hill, Pa. ENGLISH Sword Soc. 3, 4; Circle K 3, 4; English Hon. Soc. 3, V. Pres. 4; Sigma Pi 1,2, Sec. 3, Pres. 4; IF Football, Volleyball I, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 2, 3; IF Council 3, Pres. 4; Havertown Student Comm. I ; Student Senate I, 2; Lib. Arts Club Treas. 2; Homecoming Comm. 4. NEIL ETTINGER 6027 Shisler Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Biology Lab. Assist. 3, 4. GARDNER A. EVANS 1427 Mt. Pleasant Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HISTORY hi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Pi Jamma Mu 3, 4; Owl Award JOAN P. FELDMAN 8007 Temple Road Philadelphia, Pa. DRAMATIC ARTS Theta Alpha Phi 3, 4; Tem- players 2, 3, 4; WRTI 2, 3, 4; TJ Club 3, 4. PERRY C. FENNELL 118 N. Peach Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Kappa Alpha Psi 2, 3, 4. PAUL J. FINK 1604 Middleton Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Tau Epsilon Phi I, 2, 3, Chan- cellor 4. MARTIN W. FORD 4703 B Street Philadelphia, Pa. SCIENCE v I m.l 1 B Thirty-three CYNTHIA FREEDMAN 121 Merrybroolc Drive Oakmont, Havertown, Pa. MATHEMATICS English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Havertown Student Comm. I ; Owlette I; Math. Soc. 3, Pres. 4. FAYE J. GIRSH 2304 79th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 4; French Honor. Soc. 2, 3, 4; ICG I, 2, 3; Student Senate, Rec. Sec. 3; NSA 3; SDA 3, 4; Havertown Student Comm. I; IRC 1,2; Hillel I, 2. GERALD GOLDBERG 1730 Mohican Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY WILMA S. FRIEDMAN 215 Upland Road Merion, Pa. PRE-MEDICAL French Honor. Soc. 2, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Pi 3. Treas. 4; Chem. Soc. 3, 4; Hillel I, 2. SAMUEL L. GLANTZ 5143 Whitaker Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. POLITICAL SCIENCE TEMPLAR Bus. Mgr. 3, 4; ICG 3, 4; TJ Club 3; Debate Coun- cil 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4. STANLEY G. GOLDBERG 4951 Parkside Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ENGLISH Pre-Dental Soc. I, 2; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. GORDON GAEMAN 2421 S. Beulah Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHYSICS EDWIN M. GOLDBERG 1629 W. Huntingdon Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHYSICS ALAN GOLDFINE 5419 Chester Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Pi Lambda Phi I, 2, Corn. Sec. 3, Exec. Bd. 4; IF Basketball 2, 3; IF Softball 3. College o f JOYCE V. GOLDY 3302 N. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. HISTORY Pi Gamma Mu 4; Volleyball 2; Women ' s Glee Club I; Wes- leyans I; Lib. Arts Club 2. GERALD R. GOSS 4514 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY IRWIN P. HALPERN 383 Edmonds Avenue Drexel Hill, Pa. HISTORY Delta Sigma Rho 3, 4; Debate Council I, 2, 3, Historian 4; Havertown Theatre Workshop Pres. I ; Templayers 2, 3, 4; Speakers Union 3, 4. HECTOR N. HERNANDEZ I I Betances Street Aguadilla, Puerto Rico BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Crusaders 3, 4; OWL 3, 4; Chem. Soc. 4. PAULINE GOLOVE 527 W. Roosevelt Boulevard Philadelphia, Pa. HISTORY Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4; IRC 2, 3, 4. JACK M. GREENBAUM 1155 E. Phil-Ellena Street Philadelphia, Pa. POLITICAL SCIENCE Cedarbrook Basketball Capt. I; Diamond Key Soc. Co- ordinator 3. ROBERT J. HARMON 101 N. Wyoming Avenue Ventnor, N. J. SPEECH LEONARD GORDON 2213 N. Hobart Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. NANCY J. GROSS 6808 N. Tenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 4; Phi Delta Ta WRTI I, 2, 3; Hillel Cabi u 2, 3; jinet 2. NORMAN HAUSER 6640 N. 16th Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; Chemis- try Soc. 2; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. ALLEN B. HERRING 2436 S. Seventh Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4. LEWIS W. HIRSH 6613 N. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Var. Swimming 2, 3, 4; Chess I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. Thirty-tour ELSIE M. HOLLIS 6359 McCallum Street Philadelphia, Pa. SOCIOLOGY Var. Swimming I, 2, 3, 4; Rhythmic Swimming 2, 3, 4; Softball Mgr. I, 3; Lacrosse 3; Club Amistad 2. CHARLES C. JEFFERSON, JR. 704 S. 55th Street Philadelphia, Pa. GEOLOGY Delta Phi Alpha 3, 4; Geology Soc. V. Pres. 3, 4; Circle K Club 3, 4. LAURA G. KEITH 320 Midway Avenue Lexington Park, Md. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 4. LAWRENCE P. JACOBS 315 Barrett Street Wilmington, Del. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 4; Pi Lambda Phi 3, 4; IF Baseball, Track 3, 4. STEPHEN H. KAPLAN 8 Sawyer Avenue Vineland, N. J. PSYCHOLOGY Swimming 2. GERALDINE T. KESSLER 4418 Sansom Street Philadelphia, Pa. SPEECH THERAPY Vest Pocket Theatre 2. JEROME H. JAFFE 2146 E. Chelton Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Psi Chi 3, 4; Chemistry Soc. 2, 3, 4; Diamond Band 1,3,4. FREDRIC KAZAN 7082 Forrest Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PHILOSOPHY Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; IZFA 3, 4; OWL 2, 3, 4; Philosophy Club 2, 3, 4. HERBERT H. KEYSER 6416 Dorcas Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. Liberal A rts ALBERT KOFSKY 5717 Malvern Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY ARTHUR L. KOROTKIN 226 Robat Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY IM Basketball 2; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. REBECCA E. LADENHEIM 210 Pelham Road Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY JOEL S. LAFAIR 1718 Stenton Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PHYSICS WILFRED LEWIS, JR. 191 1-B N. 47th Street Pennsauken, N. J. ECONOMICS JOSEPH L. LUCIA 7202 Tulip Street Philadelphia, Pa. ECONOMICS WILLIAM M. LONSDALE 5333 Wakefield Street Philadelphia, Pa. MATHEMATICS Concert Choir I, 2, Treas. 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club 2, 4, V. Pres. 3; T-Owl Quartet 4; Math. Soc. 3, 4. FREDERICK A. MALINOSKI 322 N. Maple Street Mount Carmel, Pa. PHYSICS Orchestra I. ALVIN A. KUSHNER 1586 Greenwood Avenue Camden, N. J. ENGLISH French Honor. Soc. 3, 4; De- bate I, 2, 3; Senate I, 2; Templayers I. GEORGE U. LEWIS 823 N. 49th Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHILOSOPHY Phi Alpha Theta 3; Alpha Phi Alpha 3; Circle K Club 2. V. P. 3, 4. LEO J. LUCA Winslow Road Winslow, N. J. BIOLOGY Alpha Phi Delta I, Tribune 2, 3, Historian 3, 4; IF Baseball, Football I, 2; IF Council 2, Treas. 3, 4; Crusaders 3, 4; Liberal Arts Club 3, Treas. 4; Senior Giving Committee 4. NORMA A. MANCINI 908 Lancaster Avenue Bryn Mawr, Pa. MATHEMATICS Delta Sigma Epsilon 2, 3, 4; WAA Basketball I; Newman Club 2, 4, Sec. 3: Liberal Arts Club 2; Glee Club I; Math. Soc. 4; Havertown Owlette I. Thirty-five JAMES G. B. MASON 203 Harrison Avenue Glenside, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4. JOSEPH R. MILLIGAN 720 N. Ninth Street Camden, N. J. PSYCHOLOGY Sigma Pi 3, 4. OSCAR W. NELSON, JR. 822 Gordon Street Allentown, Pa. BIOLOGY Sigma Pi 1,2, Corr. Sec. 3, 4; IF Football I, 2, 3; IF Bowling, Swimming, Softball I, 2, 3, 4. JOHN L. MILLER 408 Westview Road Elkins Park, Pa. SOCIOLOGY Tau Kappa Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4; Sociology Club 3, 4. ROBERT L. NAY 1123 Kenwood Avenue Camden, N. J. PRE-LAW Conwell Club 2, 3, Treas. 4; Concert Choir 3, Historian 4; Pre-Law Club I, 2, 3, 4. JULIUS NEWMAN 1633 N. 33rd Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; Spanish Club 2, 3. MURRAY C. MILLER Broadway Avenue Primes, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, Pres. 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD C. NEAVEL 6422 Argyle Street Philadelphia, Pa. GEOLOGY Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Geol- ogy Club 2, 3, 4. LAWRENCE E. NEWMAN RD 3 Sunbury, Pa. CHEMISTRY Chemistry Society 2, 3, 4. College of ALVIN NOVACK 2101 Tyson Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; Pi Lambda Phi 2, 3, 4; IF Basket- ball, Baseball 2, 3, 4; Student Senate 3. ANTHONY F. QUATTRONE 2549 S. Jessup Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, V. Pres. 4; Alpha Phi Delta 3, 4; IF Basketball, Baseball 3, 4; New- man Club I, 2, 3, 4; Liberal Arts Club 3, 4. NOAM PITLIK 4918 Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. DRAMATIC ARTS Theta Alpha Phi 3, 4; WRTI 2, 3, 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4; Tern- players 2, 3, V. Pres. 4. RAYMOND A. RACHMAN 4551 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY Chem. Soc. 2, 3, 4. JOHN D. O ' DELL 19 Walnut Street Wellsboro, Pa. MATHEMATICS Diamond Honor Soc. Sec. 3, V. Pres. 4; Sigma Pi I, 2, 3, Sec. 4; IF Football, Basketball, Softball I, 2, 3, 4; I M Swim- ming, Volleyball 2, 4; Diamond Band I, 2, 3, 4. HENRY F. PERILLO 704 Catherine Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY Chemistry Soc. 2, 3, 4. PAUL PARDYS 2500 N. Stanley Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. CECILIA E. PEYTON 128 E. Washington Lane Philadelphia, Pa. ECONOMICS LOUIS J. PORRETTI 1519 S. Mole Street Philadelphia, Pa. HISTORY BARBARA L. RAPPAPORT 1949 72nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. DRAMATIC ARTS English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Mag- net Honor. Soc. 4; Theta Alpha Phi 3, Sec. 4; Tern- players 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Cedarbrook Theater Workshop Pres. I; WRTI I, 2, 3, 4; TJ Club 3, 4; Student Speakers Bureau 3, 4; Freshman Camp 4; Philosophy Club 3, 4. HARVEY RABIN III N. 13th Street Millville, N. J. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4 . SAMUEL RAPPAPORT 1051 69th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ENGLISH Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; IZFA I, 2, 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4. Thirty-six KURT REIBEL 2837 W. Cumberland Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHYSICS GEORGE A. REICHARD 99 Susquehanna Avenue CHEMISTRY Lock Hav Chem. Soc. 2, 3 an. Pa 4. WILLIAM H. REILAND. JR. 2121 Belvedere Avenue Havertown, Pa. CHEMISTRY DAVID J. RHOADS 1015 N. Main Street Old Forge, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Men ' s Glee Club 2, 3, Treas. 4; Concert Choir 2, 3, 4. CLEMENT RICHARDSON 3706 Pulaski Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SOCIOLOGY Alpha Phi Alpha 3, 4. ARNOLD RITTER 4728 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 4; IM Basketball. FREDERICK W. ROGERS 31 Stewart Avenue Trenton, N. J. CHEMISTRY Diamond Honor Soc. 3, Treas. 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, Sec. 3, 4; Diamond Band I, Mgr. 2, 3, 4; Chem. Soc. 3, 4. JANICE M. ROGERS 21 I S. Sixth Street Easton, Pa. SOCIAL SCIENCE Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4. JOSEPH B. ROSENBERG 2137 Knorr Street Philadelphia, Pa. RADIO WRTI 2, Music Dir. 3 Program Dir. 4. FM L i h r u I A rts LEONARD ROSENBLATT 426 Wolf Street Philadelphia, Pa. DRAMATIC ARTS Theta Alpha Phi V. Pres. 3, 4; Templayers 2, 3, Treas. 4. EVA M. ROSTEK 58 Hancock Street Riverside, N. J. FRENCH Chimes 2, 3, 4; Magnet 3, 4; Delta Phi Alpha 3, 4; English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; French Honor. Soc. I, 2, Sec. 3, Pres. 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; TEMPLAR 2, 3: Lutheran Stu- dents 2, 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 3, 4. ALVIN SALTZMAN 2452 N. Napa Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 4; Philosophy Ciub 4. JACK SCHWARTZ 1943 N. Sixth Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Philosophy Club 2; Liberal Re- ligious Fellowship 2. RONALD S. ROSENTHAL 5737 Ogontz Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY EDWARD E. RUSSELL 154 E. Walnut Street Kingston, Pa. POLITICAL SCIENCE Sword Soc. 4; Delta Sigma Rho 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Debate Council I, Pres. 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; ICG I, Pres. 2, V. Pres. 3, 4; Student Speakers Bur. 2, 3, 4; Crusaders 2, 3, 4; Circle K Club Sec. 3, 4; URC 2; Newman Club I, 2; IRC I, 2; Pre-Law Club I, 2; Young Republican Club 2, Pres. 3, 4. MICHAEL A. SCHIAVONE 7170 Cottage Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Cedarbrook Student Comm. Treas. Pres. I; Newman Club 4; Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4. WILLIAM B. SEMBROT 201 Fourth Street Blalcely, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, Chaplain 4; IF Basketball, Football 2, 4. SAUL ROSSIEN 527 Monmouth Street Trenton, N. J. HISTORY TJ Club 3, 4; Templayers 4; Hillel 2, 3; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4. DONALD R. RUTLEDGE 7233 Dungan Road Philadelphia, Pa. MATHEMATICS ELEANOR A. SCHWAB 2208 N. Seventh Street Philadelphia, Pa. POLITICAL SCIENCE ROBERT SENESE 410 St. Louis Avenue Egg Harbor, N. J. BIOLOGY Thirty-seven CHARLES SHAFFRAN 505 W. Abbottsford Road Philadelphia, Pa. RADIO Sword Soc. 4; IM Baske tball 2. 3: Circle K Club, Dir. 4: WRTI I, 2, Announcer 3, Station Mgr. 4; Templayers 4. ALLAN B. SIMON 370 Sherman Avenue New Haven, Conn. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 4; Pi Lambda Phi I, Soc. Chrmn. 2, Sec. 3, 4; IM Football I; IF Football, Basketball, Volleyball I, 2, 3, 4. BEATRICE M. STATES 524 Orvilla Road Lansdale, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, Sec. 4. DAVID A. SHIMP 106 W. Diamond Street Clifton Heights, Pa. CHEMISTRY Chemistry Soc. 4. LAWRENCE D. SIMKINS 2817 S. Fairhill Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Psi Chi 3, 4. L. ROSAMUNDE SKLAROFF 5040 Overbrook Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SPANISH XYW 2, Treas. 3, V. Pres. 4. PAUL B. SOLNICK 1309 Levicl Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; Chemistry Soc. 3, 4. HOWARD J. STEIN 5213 N. Nth Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4. ANTHONY J. STRACCIOLINI 2354 Pierce Street Philadelphia, Pa. MATHEMATICS Alpha Phi Delta I, 2, 3, 4; IF Sports Council; IF Baseball, Basketball, Volleyball, Ping- Pong I, 2, 3, 4; Italian Club 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Math. Soc. 4. ,,:..,:; College of DANUTA E. SWIECICKI 1467 Bradley Avenue Camden, N. J. GERMAN Delta Phi Alpha 2, 4, Pres. 3; German Club Pres. 4; New- man Club I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD P. TORP 770 Galey Boulevard Extension Beaver, Pa. CHEMISTRY Chemistry Soc. 2, 3, 4. BETTY R. TECKER 541 1 Arlington Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY I Alpha Sigma TEMPLAR 2. Pi Sec. ALAN TRACHTENBERG 1138 E. Susquehanna Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ENGLISH English Honor. Soc. 2, 3, 4; Student Senate 3, V. Pres. 4. HACE TISHLER 1018 Unruh Street Philadelphia, Pa. HISTORY Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; Debate Council I, 2, 3, 4; Delta Sigma Rho 3, 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4. RICHARD UHRIN Providence Road Media, Pa. CHEMISTRY Sigma Pi 2, 3, 4; IF Sports 2, 3, 4; Diamond Rifles I, 2; Chemistry Society 2, 3, 4. ADRIENNE J. VALENTINE 225 E. Upsal Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY English Honor. Soc. 4; Delta Sigma Theta 2, 3, 4; Cedar- chest I; NAACP 2, 3, 4; Ger- man Club 4; Italian Club 3, Soc. Chrmn. 4; Lutheran Stu- dent Assoc. 3, 4. MARTIN VISNOV 2443 77th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY IRVING H. WAGMAN 315 High Street Burlington, N. J. BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY AND MATHEMATICS HERBERT WAGNER 350 Summer Street Clifton, N. J. CHEMISTRY Diamond Honor. Soc. 2, 4, Pres. 3; Pi Lambda Phi 3, 4; Diamond Band I, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Society 2, 3, 4. LEILA P. WATERS 3201 W. Diamond Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY Var. Bowling 2; Cedarbrook Commission I ; Cedarchest I ; Chemistry Soc. 3, 4; Bridge Club I, 2. Thirty-eight R. ROLAND WEISER 79 Malilea Naili Avenue Cairo, Egypt POLITICAL SCIENCE Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; French Honor. Soc. 2, Pres. 3, 4; IRC 3, 4; Student Senate 3, 4. KENNETH E. WILLIAMS 6328 Brous Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ENGLISH Phi Alpha Theta 3, 4; English Honor. Soc. 4; TCP I, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Theology Fellowship 3, 4, Treas. 2. LOIS M. WOLF 1313 Cherry Street Pottstown, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4. PAUL J. WEISS 5956 N. 21st Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHEMISTRY Hillel 3, 4; Chemistry Soc. 3, 4. WILLIAM W. WILLS RD I Duncansville, Pa. POLITICAL SCIENCE Sigma Pi 3, 4; IF Football, Basketball, Softball 4; Cru- saders 2, 3, Pres. 4; Pre-Law Club 2, 3, Pres. 4; Young Re- publican Club 2, 3, Pres. 4; Liberal Arts Club 2, 3, Pres. 4; Mitten Student League 3, 4; ICS 3, 4; Senate Public Rel. Dir. 4; Class Council 4; Internet. Service Comm. 4; Sr. Giving Fund Comm. 3, 4: Frosh Camp Staff 4. JAMES L. WOLFGANG 5300 Saul Street Philadelphia, Pa. GEOLOGY RICHARD WILGUS 80 W. Baltimore Avenue Lansdowne, Pa. ENGLISH HARRY LLOYD LEONARD WOLLACK 5959 Alma Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY Li ib em I A rts PASQUALE J. ZARRO 1118 Titan Street Philadelphia, Pa. PSYCHOLOGY GERALD I. ZATUCHNI 1627 N. Seventh Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; French Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Diamond Key Soc. 2. EUGENE J. ALTEN 123 S. 55th Street Philadelphia, Pa. ECONOMICS Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Finance Soc. 3, 4; Liberal Arts Club I, 2, 3, 4. PHYLLIS D. ZAYON 5725 Addison Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHYSICS Thirty-nine fEMPLE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL . . . helping hand for the community. Forty BUSINESS Forty-one DEPARTMENT HEADS HARRY A. COCHRAN Dean B.S., 1916, University of Pittsburgh; M.S., 1924; Ed.D., 1930, Temple University; LL.D., 1936, LaSalle College; LL.D., 1951, Ursmus College J. DOUGLAS PERRY Journalism and Communications A.B., 1926, Butler University; A.M., 1932, University of Chicago WILLIAM A. SCHRAG Assistant Dean B.S. in Com., 1929, Temple University; M.B.A., 193!. Harvard University; D.C.S., 1947, New York University FRANK PADDOCK Political Science A.B., 1916, Indiana State Teachers ' College, Indiana; Ph.D., 1925, University of Wisconsin RUSSELL H. MACK Economics B.A., 1920, Baker University; M.A., 1924, Columbia Uni- versity; Ph.D., 1933, University of Pennsylvania IRWIN S. HOFFER Statistics B.A., 1917, Harvard University; M.A., 1922, Columbia Uni- versity; M.B.A., 1927, Harvard University; LL.D., 1952, Elizabethtown College MYRON S. HEIDINGSFIELD Marketing B.S., 1937, College of the City of New York; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., 1943, New York University W. ROY BUCKWALTER Management B.S. in Econ., 1929; M.A., 1932; Ph.D., 1940, University of Pennsylvania STERLING K. ATKINSON Accounting B.S., in Com., 1926, Temple University; M.A., 1929, University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 1934, Columbia University; C.P.A. (Pa.) J. HAZEN HARDY Real Estate, Insurance and Business Law Real Estate, Insurance and Business Law A.B., 1925, Columbia University; LL.B., 1928, Harvard University STANLEY F. CHAMBERLIN Finance B.S. in Econ., 1922; M.A., 1925, University of Pennsylvania; Ph. D., 1935, New York University Forty-three LEWIS H. ABEL 1522 Pacific Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. ACCOUNTING ICG 2, 3, Pres. 4: Debate 2; Cedarbrook Players I ; Speak- ers Bureau 2; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. SHIRLEY M. ABRAMS 1301 Hampden Boulevard Reading, Pa. COMMUNICATIONS Theta Sigma Phi 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; WRTI I, 2, 3, 4. WILFRED M. ABEL 6120 Delancey Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING EDWARD H. ABRAMS 238 Roumfort Road Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Marketing Club 2. VERNON G. ALTEMOSE, JR. Main Street Ta.tamy, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, Treas. 3, 4. ERNEST R. ALFEREZ 73 S. First Avenue Coatesville, Pa. PRE-LAW Sword Soc. 3, 4; Crusaders 2, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club I, 2, 3, 4; Club Amistad I, 2; New- man Club I, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Camp Staff 4; Pre-Law Club 2, 3, 4- Young Republican Club 3, 4; Owl Mag. I. INEZ L. ANDERSON 223 S. Fraley Street Kane, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. Sec. 3, 4; Phi Gamma Nu 3, Pres. 4; Var. Bowling Mgr. 3, 4; WAA Volleyball I; Women ' s Senate 3, 4; Wiatt Hall Coun- cil Treas. 2, 3. MARVIN ALLANOFF 6248 N. 15th Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Pi Lambda Phi I, 2, 3, Social Chmn. 4; IF Football, Softball I, 2, 3, 4; IF Basketball 3, 4; IF Handball 2; IF Council Sec. 2; SAM 3; Senate 3, 4; Finance Soc. 4. WILLIAM N. ANDRUS 1180 E. Sharpnack Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Spanish Club 3, 4. School of MARIANNE E. ANGERMANN 1236 Tyson Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alpha Sigma Alpha 2, 3, 4; Phi Gamma Nu Sec. 2, V. Pres. 3, 4; WAA Swimming 2, 3; Tennis 3, 4; Secretarial Club I, 2, Pres. 3, 4; Marketing Club I, 2; Lutheran Student Assoc. 2, 3. VIRGINIA H. BAHMUELLER 329 Oak Road Glenside, Pa. SECRETARIAL Chimes 2, Treas. 3, 4; Magnet Pres. 3, 4; Beta Gamma Sigma Sec. 3, 4; Alpha Sigma Alpha I, 2, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; IM Basketball 2, 3, 4; Rhythmic Swimming 3; Music Ed. Chorus 3; Concert Choir 4; Mitten Student Board 3, Sec. 4; Sec- retarial Club I, 2, 3, 4; Wo- men ' s Glee Club I, 2, Sec. 3, V. Pres. 4; Freshman Camp Staff 4. ELI H. BAUM 4749 N. 12th Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW Pre-Law Club 2, 3, 4; Philoso- phy Club 3, 4. LEATRICE J. BERMAN 727 East Upsal Street Philadelphia, Pa. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL Secretarial Club I, 2. HARRY H. APPELBAUM 1 14 S. 49th Street Philadelphia, Pa. FINANCE Finance Soc. Pres. 3, 4. IRVIN BAGELMAN 4244 Viola Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Marketing Club I, 2, 3, Advertising Club 2, 3, WRTI 2, 3. 4; 4; RONALD P. BALDWIN 5321 Oakland Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. Pres. 3; Scabbard and Blade 4; De- bate Club I. JAMES D. BEATTY 8008 Temple Road Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Beta Gamma Sigma 3, Pres. 4. STANLEY M. BARON 104 Righters Ferry Road Bala Cynwyd, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ICG 3, 4. JOSEPH J. BENTZ 4820 Large Street Philadelphia. Pa. MANAGEMENT HOWARD J. BERNSTEIN 10 N. Maine Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. Treas. 3, 4; Pi Lambda Phi I, 2, Treas. 3, 4; Cedarbrook Play- ers I: IF Council 2, Sec. 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. LARRY BERNSTEIN 4319 Roosevelt Boulevard Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Forty-four MARTIN BERTMAN 1544 Bradley Avenue Camden, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ROBERT L. BODINE 445 Summit Avenue Westville, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SANDI L. BORNSTEIN 5309 Euclid Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW Student Senate I, 2, 3, Class Council I, 2, 3, 4. THOMAS BIZONES 121 Copley Road Upper Darby, Pa. REAL ESTATE Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; IM Football I; IF Football 3, 4; IF Softball 2, 3, 4. WALTER BOON, JR. 404 E. Ridley Avenue Ridley Park, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, Marshal 4; IF Football, Basketball, Soft- ball, Track, Swimming, Volley- ball, Bowling 2, 3, 4; Market- ing Club 2, 3, Treas. 4; SAM 3, 4; Finance Soc. 4; Adver- rising Club 3, V. Pres. 4. BENJAMIN W. BOVA 2209 S. Nth Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Sigma Delta Chi 2, Corr. Sec. 3. JESSIE L. BLOSTEIN 216 South Street Athens, Pa. JOURNALISM Templayers 3, 4; Temple News 2, 3, 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4; Hillel I, 2; Philosophy Club 3, 4; University Theatre I, 2. MARVIN BORDETSKY 1710 Widener Place Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Alpha Delta Sigma 2, 3, 4; Advertising Club I, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club I, 2, 3, 4. MARVIN E. ERASER 3718 Fremont Avenue Camden, N. J. MANAGEMENT Var. Baseball 2, 3, 4. Bus in ess PETER J. BRAUN 115 E. Moreland Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Var. Tennis 2, 3, 4; SAM 4; Finance Soc. 4. MICHAEL BRODIE 6446 Morris Park Road Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW LOUIS A. CAMISHION 310 Fairview Street Riverside, N. J. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD J. CAMPBELL 1634 W. Cheltenham Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW JOSEPH CARP 2133 S. Fifth Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4. LEONARD CHACKMAN 7301 Ventnor Avenue Ventnor, N. J. ACCOUNTING M Basketball 3, 4; Cheer- leaders 2, 3, Capt. 4; Cru- saders 2, 3, 4; Class Council 3, 4; Circle K 3, 4; Hillel 2, 4. DAVID J. CHESSLER 6007 N. 13th Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DONALD H. CHARLESTON 6001 Augusta Street Philadelphia, Pa. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION ANTHONY S. CASSANO 628 N. Church Street Hazleton, Pa. ACCOUNTING Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, Sec. 3; IF Football, Basketball, Bowl- ing, Softball I, 2, 3. THOMAS P. CHECCHIA 927 Longshore Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Var. Basketball 2, 3, 4. IRENE L. CLARK 5745 Jefferson Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Theta Sigma Phi 3, 4; Temple News 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; TJ Club 2, 3; Templayers Workshop 2. JOHN J. CLIFFORD 3331 N. Hope Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4. Forty-five it . ci Ul FRED COHEN 6052 Pine Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW GERALD J. COHEN 5524 Woodland Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW ROY J. COHEN 5646 Pine Street Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT Diamond Rifles I, 2, 3. ALFRED COLEMAN 138 N. 56th Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Finance Soc. 3, 4. NOEL E. CURRY 21 St. David ' s Road Colwiclc, Merchantville, N. J. SECRETARIAL Alpha Sigma Alpha 2, Trees. 3, 4; Phi Gamma Nu 3, Social Chairman 4; IM Basketball 2; Secretarial Club 3, 4; Lutheran Students Assoc. 3; Young Re- publican Club 3; Club Amistad I, 2; SAM 4; Temple News 2, 3, Copy Editor 4; Finance Society 4. WILLIAM A. COLUMBUS 253 Euclid Avenue Manasquan, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Phi Alpha I, 2; Pledgemaster 3, 4: If Football, Basketball, Swim- ming, Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Diamond Rifles I, 2, 3, 4; NDTA 3, 4. WILLIAM J. DANIELS 2149 N. 21st Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM FRED COVE 61 16 Locust Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW Debate Club 3. JOEL K. DAVIS 3332 Vista Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; IF Ping-Pong, Basketball, Track, Bowling, Swimming 2, 3, 4; Student Senate 2, 3; Diamond Rifles I, 2, 3. School of GEORGE E. DETWILER 207 S. Devon Street Wayne, Pa. ACCOUNTING Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, Sec. 4; IM Football, Basketball, Soft- ball I; IF Football, Basketball, Softball 2, 3, 4; IF Track 4: IF Council 3, 4; Mitten Stu- dent Board 3: TEMPLAR Bus. Mgr. 4. WILLIAM L. DOHAN 808 Wickfield Road Wynnewood, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, Sec. 3, Guard 4; IF Bowling, Softball 2, 3, 4. JACKSON R. DUNLAP, JR. RD 1 Lewes, Del. PRE-LAW Sigma Pi 3, Herald 4; IF Basketball, Football, Softball, Swimming, Volleyball, Track 3, 4; Finance Soc. V. Pres. 3, 4; Pre-Law Club 3, 4. DEBORAH G. EHRLICH 5650 Gainor Road Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Debate Council I, 2, Sec. 3, 4; Student Senate I, 2; Class Council I, 2; TEMPLAR I; Owl I; Hillel I, 2; Secretarial Club I, 2; Modern Dance Workshop 3. Forty-six RONALD N. DIAMOND 5428 Wyndale Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4; Tau Epsilon Phi 3, 4; Hillel 3, 4. GEORGE W. DRAIN 920 Turner Avenue Drexel Hill, Pa. MARKETING Diamond Honor. Soc. 3, 4; SAM 2, 3, V. Pres. 4; Market- ing Club I, 2, 4, V. Pres. 3. BERNICE E. DUPUIS 1639 Magnolia Avenue North Willow Grove, Pa. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL Phi Gamma Nu I, 2; Secre- tarial Club I, 2. ALFRED I. EINHEBER 419 W. Ellet Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IM Baseball I; Marketing Club 2; Hillel 2. DAVID DION 1113 Melrose Avenue Melrose Park, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ERNEST DUNBAR 2125 Titan Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Sword Soc. 3, 4; Alpha Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; Sigma Delta Chi 2, 3, Pres. 4; Temple News 2, City Editor 3, Man- aging Editor 4, Editor-in-Chief 4; Owl 2; NAACP 2, 3, Pres. 4.; CHARLES E. DWYER 7959 Fillmore Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, Sr. Vice- Pres. 4; IF Football 3; IF Bas- ketball 3, 4: IF Softball 3, 4; Marketing Club 3. GEORGE R. ELLIS, JR. 312 Parsons Avenue Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COHEN IED COVE lociit St,,,) W-lAW it!. LOIS FAIR 4617 N. Tenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECRETARIAL French Honor. Soc. I, 2; Hillel I. ROY F. FOREMAN 5352 Morse Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Marketing Club 3, 4. SANDRA C. FELDMAN Parkway House Philadelphia, Pa. RETAILING Marketing Club 3, 4. IK. DAVIS IVnti Street MpM,. HE-LAW WILLIAM FORMAN 6736 Sratz Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IM Baseball 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. SIDNEY FRANKEL 5244 Montour Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW jflter. Baseball 3, 4. Dimming !, ] : we !, ]; Direr 3. B. JOAN FRIEDMAN 2045 Walnut Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Theta Sigma Phi 3, Pres. 4; Temple News 2, Asst. City Edi- tor 3, Features Editor 4; City Editor 4; WRTI 3; TJ Club 2, 3, Pres. 4. Bus in ess EDWARD J. FILEMYR Davisville Road Davisville, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; IF Sports 3, 4; Crusaders 2, 3, 4. PAUL B. FOX 3907 Ventnor Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Diamond Key Society I, 2; Finance Society 4; SAM 4; Var. Wrestling 2, 3; IM Basket- ball I, 3, 4; IM Baseball I; IM Football I. MARVIN R. FRITZ 1340 Columbia Avenue Reading, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION V!D DION delroie Avenue OK Pli Pi. ADMINMT ' OS FRANK J. GALL 236-A Haddon Hills Haddonfield, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delta Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, Marketing Club 1, 2, 3, SAM 4. JESSE J. GELSOMINI 219 Elm Street Camden, N. J. REAL ESTATE 4; Scabbard and Blade 4; Delta 4; Sigma Pi 2, Sec. 3. Pres. 4; IF Football, Basketball, Base- ball, Bowling 2, 3, 4; Mitten Student Board 3, 4; NDTA 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; SAM 4. S litai Stall lidtlpfe Pa. (SHIM.! . - : ; A:-: " J, 4; Signa Pr. 4; Ie-S jt, Editor !, to ,,4,E(!itow-0 LES 1 DWEP, Abut Sim! : football W} j. |f Sc ' tbi ; C-=i- ALLAN S. GIBBONS, JR. 216 Quigley Avenue Willow Grove, Pa. JOURNALISM igma Delta Chi 3, 4. ALBERT GILBERT 723 Vine Street Camden, N. J. ACCOUNTING DONALD R. GERMAN 1318 S. 51st Street Philadelphia, Pa. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Young Re- publican Club 2, 3, 4. GEORGE GILLMAN 5620 Pine Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AARON L. GLATT 6905 N. 19th Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING vlarketing Club 3, 4. JOSEPH GODFREY 2801 N. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM LEON GOLDBERG 309 E. Rockland Street Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE RICHARD S. GOLDBERG 6590 Rudderow Avenue Merchantville, N. J. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE RONALD GOLDSMAN 1744 65th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT Phi Alpha 2, 3, 4; IF Baseba Basketball, Footbal 2, 3, 4. ck I, GEORGE R. GOLDSTONE 6250 Larchwood Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; IM Basketball 3; Var. Rifle Team I, 2; Cedarbrook Student Comm. I; Class Council 3; Student Senate 3. Forty-seven STANLEY N. GORDON 5222 W. Berks Street Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT DAVID S. GREISLER 4912 Bingham Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DOROTHY M. GRABUSIC 3402 Disston Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Theta Sigma Phi 3, Pres. 4; Temple News I, Asst. City Editor 2, Features Editor 3, Editor 4; Marketing Club 2, 3; Advertising Club 3; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; TJ Club 3, 4; Senior Giving Comm. 4; Coun- cil on Student Gov., Comm. of Six, 4. ALAN W. GROSS 5937 Horrocks Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MELVIN GREENBERG 6224 N. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Marketing Club 2, 3, 4. ROBERT GROSSMAN 5647 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Sword Soc. 4; Honor. Account- ing Soc. 3, 4; IM Softball I; TJ Club 4, Treas. 3; Student Senate 3, 4; Class Council 3. FRED E. HAGMAYER 1220 N. Sixth Street Reading, Pa. MANAGEMENT Delta Sigma Pi 2, 3, V. Pres. 4. MARTIN GROSS 417 W. 66th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW IM Basketball 2; Student Sen- ate I, 2, 3, Pres. 4; Cheer- leaders 2, 3, 4; Crusaders 2, 3, 4; Pre-Law Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel 2, 3, 4; Fresh. Camp Staff 4; Class Council 2, 3, 4. HOWARD M. HALL 1926 N. Venango Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM TCF I, 2, 3, 4. School of JERRY N. HALPERN 5312 N. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Finance Soc. 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; SAM 3, 4. MELVIN A. HARRIS 1702 W. Ruscomb Street Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT ROBERT G. HAMMOND Haddonfield Berlin Roads Marlton, N. J. ACCOUNTING CHARLES E. HARRIS 7845 Bayard Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4. LEONARD C. HECHT 6701 Rutland Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Scabbard and Blade 4; NDTA Pres. 3, 4; Diamond Rifles 4; Debate Team I. ROBERT HOFFMAN 1414 W. Champlost Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING VILMA HARTMAN 8106 Buist Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL Phi Gamma Nu Sec. I, 2; Tennis Club 2: Lutheran Stu- dent Association I, 2; Secre- tarial Club I, 2. JACK HELLER 145 E. Rockland Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW WILLIAM E. HARTMAN 1022 Levick Street ACCOUNTING MARY V. HOLSHOUSER Park View Apartments Collingswood, N. J. SECRETARIAL Phi Gamma Nu I, 2; Secre- tarial Club I, 2. FREDERICK W. HESS 4156 Stirling Street Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT Theta Kappa Phi I, 2, 3, 4; Var. Basketball 2, 3, 4; IF Sports I, 2, 3, 4: Freshman Basketball I; Student Senate 3, 4. GLORIA S. HONICKMAN 1340 Kerper Street Philadelphia, Pa. COMMUNICATIONS Theta Sigma Phi 3, 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 4; WRTI 2, 3, 4; Temple News I ; Advertisin Club 2: Hillel I. Forty-eight " W MARVIN J. JESHIVA 190 E. Mosholu Partway Bronx, N. Y. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Diamond Honor Soc. 3, 4; Pi Lambda Phi I, Treas. 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; IF Football, Baseball, Handball I, 2, 3, 4; Diamond Band I, 2, 3, 4; Stu- dent Senate Exec. Committee 2, 3; Cedarbrook Student Commission Pres. I ; Frosh Camp Staff 2; Crusaders 3. JOHN V. JENGO 177 Laid Law Avenue Jersey City, N. J. ' i WdSe, [ PRE-LAW P ' s. H-s Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Var. :Cr,sid K ;: ? Gym Team 3, 4; NDTA 2, 3, : :: ; ; - . Pres. 4; SAM 2, 3, 4; Pre-Law ) are i , Club 3, 4. ' : 1, 3, 4. BERYL JASPER 5119 Whitaker Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING SHELDON C. JELIN 4945 Sansom Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Phi Alpha I, 2, Sec. 3, V. Pres. 4; IF Sports 2, 3, 4; SAM 3, 4. UN 6ROSS MARDIE M. JUSKALIAN 3427 N. Howard Street Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE , HAIL U. MYRON E. KANIS 742 Madison Avenue Scranton, Pa. ACCOUNTING THOMAS E. KATEN 7612 Lexington Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. COMMUNICATIONS Young Republican Club 3, V. Pres. 4; Philosophy Club 2, 3, Pres. 4; Debate Council 2, 3; Pre-Law Club 2, 3, 4. JOHN J. KANE 1361 E. Lycoming Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4; Theta Kappa Phi 2, 3, Pres. 4; Var. Basketball 2, 3, 4; New- man Club 3, 4. MARTIN I. KATZ 502 Landis Avenue Vineland, N. J. ACCOUNTING Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4; IF Council 3, 4; Finance Soc. 3, 4. Business IB E. HAW bird SttM! M t HAKIMAN Livid Street ippi :! ' ' . .- HOWARD P. KAUFFMAN 1004 66th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ' Marketing Club I, 2, 3, 4; .SAM 2, 3, 4; Finance Soc. 3, !4; Temple News 3; Pre-Law Club 3, 4. RUTH E. KELLER 1083 Easton Road Roslyn, Pa. JOURNALISM ; Magnet 3, 4; Chimes 2, 4, .Pres. 3; Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Eng- ' lish Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Alpha ' Sigma Alpha I, 2, Editor 3, 4; Theta Sigma Phi 4, V. Pres. 3; :iM Basketball 2, 3, 4; Var. Hockey, Basketball I ; Var. Tennis 2; TEMPLAR 2, Exec. :Editor 3. Editor-in-Chief 4; ( Temple News I, 2, Copy Edi- Itor, City Editor 3; Mu Mu Mu 3. 4. HAROLD B. KORNFELD 1014 Vine Street Scranton, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 3 hi Alpha I, 2, 4, Treas. 3; F Basketball, Bowling I, 2, 3, I; IF Baseball, Football, Vol- eyball, Handball 2, 3, 4. SEYMOUR KURLAND 5800 Larchwood Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION leta Gamma Sigma 3, 4. ROBERT KAUFFMAN 2005 Glenview Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING 1M Football 3, 4; Cedarbrook Chorus I. ROBERT KELESHIAN 2852 D Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delta Sigma Pi 4; NDTA 4. BENSON B. KESSLER 6932 Torresdale Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SAM 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 3; Finance Soc. 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. STANLEY R. KRAKOVER 2434 N. 59th Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW IRC 2, 3, Club 3. Treas. 4; Pre-Lav DOUGLAS KLEINMAN 3827 Boardwalk Atlantic City, N. J. PRE-LAW Tau Epsilon Phi I, House Man- ager 2, 3, 4: IF Bowling 2, IF Basketball 2; Pre-Law Club 3, 4; IF Council I, 2. RICHARD D. KREGER 4469 N. Gratz Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING ZUG 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, ISADORE KWART 2538 N. 32nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Marketing Club 3, 4; Thomas Jefferson Club 3, 4. SAUL W. LAKIER 1432 S. Paxon Street Philadelphia, Pa. FINANCE Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Finance Soc. 3, 4; NDTA 3, V. Pres. 4; SAM 3, 4; Hillel I. 2, 3, 4. Forty-nine PETER W. LAMB Grand Avenue West Trenton, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MALCOLM B. LEITMAN 6540 N. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. RETAILING Phi Alpha I, 2, 3, 4; Market- ing Club 4; Hillel I, 2. DEANNE H. LEBIDINE 4145 Lancaster Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. COMMUNICATIONS Theta Sigma Phi 3, 4; Temple News 2, 3; Fresh. Comm. I; Vest Pocket Theatre 2; WFIL Radio Workshop 4; WRTI 2, 3, 4. ALAN LEVIN 622 Mayfair Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IM Sports 2; Marketing Club 2; Hillel 2. DAVID E. LEIBOVITZ 816 W. Columbia Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Hillel 2, 3, 4. BERNARD D. LEVIN 28 S. Massachusetts Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IM Sports I; Riding Club 3. 4; Pre-Law Club 2; SAM 3, 4. SAMUEL S. LEVIN 237 S. 49th Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Owlette Staff I; Winged Wheel 2, 3, 4. JACK LEVINE 6531 N. Grati Street Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4; IF Softball, Bowling, Basketball, Table Tennis 2, 3, 4. NEIL LEWIS 6840 Horrocks Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION School of WALTER LISZEWSKI, JR. 91 Strath Haven Drive Broomall, Pa. REAL ESTATE Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; IF Basketball, Softball 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club 3, 4; Finance Club 3, 4. JOSEPH R. LOPEZ 201 W. Phillips Street Coaldale, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Theta Kappa Phi 2, 3, Treas- urer 4; Baseball 3, 4; IF Sports 2, 3, 4; SAM 4. MARVIN H. LOURIE 70 St. Paul Street Brookline, Mass. ACCOUNTING Pi Lambda Phi Treas. 3, 4; NDTA 4. HARRY R. LLOYD 153 S. Center Street Merchantville, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Scabbard and Blade Treas. 3, 4; Delta Sigma Pi Historian 4; IF Track 3. HARRY LORE 1323 South Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW WRTI 2, 3. DONALD W. LOEB 2920 N. Camac Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW MARVIN LUNDY 962 N. Marshall Street PRE-LAW Phi Sigma Delta 1, 2. HUBERT E. LOTT Chase Avenue Hallstead, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; IF Sports 2, 3, 4; Diamond Rifles 3, 4; SAM 3, 4; NDTA 3, 4; IF Council I, 2, 3. HARVEY S. LUTERMAN 7922 Green Lane Wyncote, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Pi Lambda Phi 2, 3, 4; IF Football, Baseball, Basketball 2, 3, 4. CHARLES D. LYONS 5230 Church Road Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, Pres. 4; Var. Baseball Mgr. I, 2; Diamond Key I, Pres. 2; Football Mgr. I, 2. rifty GRACE M. LYONS 5129 Roosevelt Boulevard Philadelphia, Pa. SECRETARIAL HUGH D. MANIFOLD RD I Dallastown, Pa. PRE-LAW Sigma Pi 3, 4; IF Football, Swimming, Basketball 3; Finance Soc. Corr. Sec. 3. PAUL C. MARISCAVAGE 2748 N. Newkirk Street Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT STEPHEN E. MARKER! 3548 Sheffield Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Beta Gamma Sigma 4. !; SAM] JOHN J. McCAFFERTY 3808 Berry Avenue Drexel Hill, Pa. JOURNALISM 1 TEMPLAR Sports Editor 4. CATHERINE McELROY 1515 North Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Theta Sigma Phi 3, 4; Temple News 3. JAMES J. McNICHOL 1729 N. 59th Street Philadelphia, Pa. TRANSPORTATION ! ' Theta Kappa Phi I, 2, 3, 4. ANTHONY MEGLIO 1310 S. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW WRTI 2, 3, 4. ALICE M. MILLER 426 W. Grange Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Theta Sigma Phi 3, 4. iBTiton kilt Al! ilkfiBJ, Fi. EDWARD L. MOODY 2507 N. 18th Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING i AWINiiW " ' - ' NAACP 1, 2, 3, 4. IBM Sg i Epsb! i : i :=-:- : " , : 4, ' C- . n, a (y S. LlflcMW FRANK R. ONORATO 1216 E. Market Street U 6r Li " ' New Albany, Ind. Wyete, Pa. ACCOUNTING J,Pki I!.. " H 0. HOil ,. if For Sec. " ROBERT C. PARKINSON 318 Stiles Street Elizabeth, N. J. MANAGEMENT CONRAD J. MILLER 1501 W. Lehigh Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Theta Kappa Phi 2, 3, 4; Var. Basketball 2, 3, 4; Var. Base- ball 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; SAM 3, 4. WARREN H. MURPHY. JR. 7350 Rugby Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Freshman Basketball I; Var. Basketball 2, 3, 4; SAM 3, Sec. 4; Finance Soc. 3, 4. CHARLES E. OPP1DO 1841 N. Park Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Delta Sigma Pi 2, Treas. 3, 4; SAM 2, 3, Treas. 4; Men ' s Slee Club 2, 3, Librarian 4; IF Council 3, Sec., V. Pres. 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4. FREDERICK S. PATTI 7522 New Second Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Honor. Accounting Soc. Treas. 3, V. Pres. 4; Cross Country Team I, 2; Track and Field Squad I, 2; Circle K Club Treas. 4. RONALD M. MAYROVITZ 1533 N. Marshall Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Tau Epsilon Phi 3, 4; Market- ing Club 3, 4; Advertising Club 3, 4. JOSEPH P. McGEE 6545 Limekiln Pike Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Freshman Basketball I; Fresh- man Football I ; Varsity Foot- ball 2, 3, 4; IM Basketball 2, 3, 4. SOLOMON MEMBERS 1428 S. 19th Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Temple News I, 2, 3, Make-up Editor 2, 3, City Editor 4; Managing Editor 4; Hillel I, 2, V. Pres. 3 T 4. Bus i n s s JAMES B. MINTER 204 E. Sixth Street Lansdale, Pa. MANAGEMENT Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; Diamond Rifle Drill Team Commander 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4. RICHARD M. OBERHOLTZER 67 E. Bringhurst Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Beta Gamma Sigma 4. HERMAN OSTROVSKY 5213 N. Ninth Street Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE Debate 2; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4. BENJAMIN PAUL 2523 Pacific Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Var. Gym Team I, 2, 3, 4; Crusaders I, 2, 3, 4; Cheer- leaders I, 2, 3; Marketing Club 2, 3. Fifty-ono PHILIP B. PERKIN 1431 Stevens Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Swimming 2, 3, 4; Golf 3. CORNELIUS A. PHILLIPS 47 W. Fifth Street Bridgeport, Pa. JOURNALISM BARBARA POLSS Ogontz Manor Apts. Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; French Honor. Soc. I, 2, 3, 4; English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Mag- net 3, V. Pres. 4; Chimes 2, 3, 4; Theta Sigma Phi Sec. 3, V. Pres. 4; Cedarchest I; Fresh- man Camp Staff 3, 4; News 2, Professional Ed. 4; TEMPLAR I, Faculty Ed. 2, Ed-in-Chief 3, Editorial Advisor 4; Presi- dents Council 3: TJ Club 3, 4; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4. MAYER M. PERRY 3004 Pacific Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. ACCOUNTING Cheerleader 2, 3, 4; Crusaders 2, Vice-President 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Faculty Dining Service 3, 4; Freshman Camp 3; Steering Committee 4. ROBERT A. PIEPER, JR. 6323 Marsden Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM JOSEPH J. PETROCIK 429 West Center Street Mahanoy City, Pa. JOURNALISM Sword Secretary 4; Delta Sigma Pi 2; Scribe 3, 4; Sigma Delta Chi 3, Secretary 4; Mitten Student Board 3, Director 4; Temple News 2, 3, Assistant Features Editor 4; Freshman Camp Staff 4; New- man Club I, 2, 3. DONALD PITCHMAN 6626 N. Uber Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING JEROME POMERANTZ 4721 Lafayette Avenue Merchantville, N. J. ACCOUNTING JOHN D. PRINGLE 4682 N. Sydenham Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sigma Pi I, 2, Treas. 3, V. Pres. 4; IF Football, Basketball, Softball I, 2, 3, 4; IF Bowling 2, 3, 4; ROTC I, 2, 3, 4; Diamond Band Color Guard 2, 3, 4. Sc hoo I of ROSALIND M. PRINTZ 608 W. Godfrey Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL Hillel I. JOEL N. RALPH 1714 Mohican Street Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE GEORGE H. RECK 315 S. Broad Street Trenton, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ' Finance Soc. 3, 4; Pre-Law Soc. 3, 4; SAM 3, 4. HERBERT RICKLIN CIOIO Presidential Apts. Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CHARLES G. R1TTENHOUSE 256 S. 2 1 st Street Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT JEROME I. ROBIN 4850 N. Hutchinson Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Hillei I, 2, 3, 4; 3, 4; NDTA 2, Beta 4. Finance Soc. 3, 4; Sigma JOSEPH ROSE 1231 Stirling Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4; IF Basketball, Baseball 2, 3, 4; SAM 4. NAYDA ROSENBLATT 5327 Diamond Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECRETARIAL LOUIS D. ROSENBERG 444 Taylor Avenue Scranton, Pa. MARKETING Phi Alpha I, 2, Pledge Master 3, Secretary 4; IF Council 2, 3; IF Baseball I, 2, 3, 4: Football I, 2, 3, 4; Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; IF Volleyball 2, 3, 4: IF Ping Pong 2, 3, 4; IM Basket- ball I, 2, Football I: Market- ing Club 2, 3, 4; Hillei 2, 3, 4. BERNARD A. ROTH 5827 Woodcrest Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING ALLEN B. ROSENBERGER 515 Maple Avenue North Hills, Pa. ACCOUNTING WARREN ROUTHENSTEIN 5606 Woodcrest Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE Fifty-two NORMAN RUBIN 2126 Melvin Street Philadelphia, Pa. INSURANCE Baseball 3, 4. HOWARD V. RUDOLPH 1828 68th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4. JOHN J. RUSH 713 Schiller Avenue Trenton, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SAM 3, 4; Canterbury Club mM 2, 3, 4. IM RONALD SACKS 5746 Pine Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Basketball, Football, Bowl- ing I; Marketing Club 3, 4. LOUIS SAMUEL 2124 N. Melvin Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4. JOHN J. SADER, JR. 516 N. Tenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club I, 2, 4, V. Pres. 3; Advertising Club 2, 3, Pres. 4; Diamond Rifles 2, 3; NDTA 3, 4. JOEL SAMUELSOHN 1501 Orland Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Alpha Beta Sigma 2; Market- ing Club 3; Advertising Club 2. CHARLES L. SAGERMAN 129-10 Liberty Avenue Richmond Hills, Queens, N. Y. ACCOUNTING CHESTER H. SANGER 15 Carol Avenue Brookline, Mass. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Pi Lambda Phi 3, 4; Student Council V. Pres. I ; Student Senate I ; Cedarchest I ; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4- NDTA 3, 4. Bus In ess fSEIUKK NANCY M. SANTANGELO . IroiJStr.it 757 Sandy Street Norris+own, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION oc. J, ; Pre-i: ' Delta Sigma Epsilon 4; New- SAMU man Club 4. JACOB L. SCHACHTER 4908 N. 12th Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-LAW Hillel 2, 3, 4; IZFA 2, 3, 4; Pre-Law Club 2, 3, 4. GERALDINE SCHENKMAN 8507 Williams Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. RETAILING Phi Delta Tau I, 2; Marketing Clu b 2, 3, Corr. Sec. 4; Hillel I, 2, 3; Advertising Club 4. JAMES L. SCHWARTZ 21 Waverly Road Wyncote, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Beta 7amma Sigma 4; Sword Soc. 4; Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; SAM 2, 3, Pres. 4; Finance Soc. 3, 4; Circle K 3, 4. MARJORIE E. SAVAGE !068 ' 2 Wyoming Avenue Exeter, Pa. RETAILING Wiatt Hall Dorm 2, Pres. 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, Sec. 4; Women ' s Senate 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 4. IRVING J. SCHECHTER 1830 N. Marshall Street - Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Club Amistad 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Finance Society 2, 3. RICHARD C. SCHMIDT 2476 N.W. 42nd Street Oklahoma City, Okla. MANAGEMENT Psi Chi 3, 4; Delta Sigma Pi 3, 4; SAM 2, 3, 4; Finance Soc. 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 4. RICHARD N. SCHWARTZ 15 City Terrace North Newburgh, N. Y. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Diamond Honor Soc. 3, 4; Scabbard and Blade I, 2, 3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4; SAM I, 2, 3, 4; ROTC Drill Team I, 2, 3, 4. EUGENE M. SAVELL 424 Dickinson Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 4. MARTIN SCHECHTER 5402 Arlington Street Philadelphia, Pa. INSURANCE DONALD G. SCHWARTZ 225 Parkside Avenue Brooklyn, N. Y. MARKETING Phi Alpha I, 2, Pres. 3, 4; IF Football 2, 3, 4; Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; Baseball I, 2, 3, 4; Handball 2, 3, 4; Bowling 2; Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Swimming 2; IM Football I; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Marketing Club 2, 3, 4; IF Council 3, 4. HARRY C. SCOTT 219 Lantwyn Lane Narberth, Pa. ACCOUNTING Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4; Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; IM Bowling I; IM Basketball I; IM Softball I. Fifty-three II mi RAYMOND J. SEARS 2241 Larue Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ARTHUR J. SEGAL 13 W. Merrick Road Freeport, N. Y. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4. JANICE S. SHAPIRO 5236 Lebanon Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL HERBERT L. SHARP 1225 N. 13th Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Marketing Club 3, 4. HOWARD W. SILVER 6216 Carpenter Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION STEVEN B. SILVERMAN 914 Magee Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4. DOLORES M. SHAKOSKI Box 114 Homer City, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Chimes Chap. 3, 4; Magnet 4; Beta Gamma Sigma 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu 3, 4; Theta Sigma Upsilon 2, V. Pres. 3, 4; Var. Bowling I, 2, Capt. 3, 4; IM Bowling I, 2: Var. Tennis 4; IRC 4, Sec. 2, Pres. 3; SAM 4, Sec. 3: Freshman Camp Staff 4; Student Activities Workshop Steering Comm. 4; Model U.N. Assembly Dele- gate 3; Marketing Club 2. JOHN SIDORSKY 137 Olive Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING SAM 2, 3, Treas. 4. ABRAHAM J. SIMON 1539 S. Fourth Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING NDTA 3, 4. Sch oof of JOHN R. SLENN 5430 Windsor Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. FINANCE Finance Soc. 3, 4. JOHN L. SMITH 2212 Hillcrest Road Drexel Park, Pa. ACCOUNTING Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, Jr. Marshall 3, V. Pres. 4; IM Basketball, Bowling, Softball I, 2; IF Football, Basketball, Bowling, Softball 3, 4; Haver- town Theater Workshop I . CHRISTOPHER A. SOTOS 3199 Federal Street Camden, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delta Sigma Pi 3, Historian 4; SAM 4; NDTA 4. SABRA V. SLOSBERG 732 E. Phil-Ellena Street Philadelphia, Pa. RETAILING Marketing Club 2, Corr. Sec. 3, V. Pres. 4: Hillel I, 2, 3; Advertising Club 4. SEYMOUR J. SMITH 425 W. Ellet Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4. THOMAS N. SMILEY 106 Locust Street Merchantville, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MARK SOIFER 618 W. Third Street Chester, Pa. JOURNALISM Var. Baseball 3, 4. GEORGE A. SPENCER 325 Dawson Street Philadelphia, Pa. JOURNALISM Sigma Delta Chi 2, Treas. 3, 4; Diamond Band I; Owl Band Temple News 3, Assist. i ; i empiu Copy Ed. 4. BERNICE STARR 24 N. Fredericksburg Avenue Margate, N. J. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL ALFRED STEIN 50 N. D Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING THOMAS L. SPICER PO Box 6343 Philadelphia, Pa. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Kappa Alpha Psi 2; NAACP 2, 3, Pres. 4; TJ Club 4; SAM 4; ICG 4; Crusaders 4. ZALMER STEINBERG 2320 Federal Street Camden, N. J. ACCOUNTING Beta Gamma Sigma 4. Fifty-four . , : ' ' Y- i .-.:- :.. . ; " ! " .: : ' ANTHONY J. STROMEYER 129 W. Sylvania Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Theta Kappa Phi I, 2, Hist. 3, Sec. 4; IF Football, Softball, Swimming Ping-Pong I, 2, 3, 4; IF Volleyball, Basketball, Track 3, 4; IF Handball 4: Newman Club I, 2, Treas. 3, V. Pres. 4; URC 2. 3, Pres. 4; Crusaders 2, Treas. 3, 4; IF Council 3, 4. EUGENE J. TODD 5849 N. Fourth Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING PAUL A. TAMNY 1360 Westbury Drive Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING ANITA TANKER 108 N. Huntington Avenue Margate City, N. J. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL EUGENE M. TOLL 8302 Temple Road Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE MINTING Ireii. 4. 1AM J. SIMON , W Streit VINCENT A. TORLINI 103 St. David ' s Place Atlantic City, N. J. JOURNALISM GEORGE E. TOROIAN 227 W. Ontario Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING AS N. SMILET locust Stteel lintville, N. J. LEONARD E. TOPLIN 1500 Bradley Avenue Camden, N. J. MARKETING Templayers I, 2, 3, 4; Philoso- phy Club 4; International Stu- dents Service Comm. 3, 4; Marketing Club 3, 4; TJ Club 4; ICG 4; IRC 4; NAACP 4. RICHARD N. TOWNSEND 115 Hill Avenue Langhorne, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE Sword Soc. 3, 4; Delta Sigma Pi 2, Social Chrmn. 3; Chan- cellor 4; Alpha Phi Omega I, Sec. 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; IF Sports Council 3, 4; IF Football. Bowling, Basketball, Track, Softball 2, 3, 4; Mitten Student Board 3, Treas. 4; Men ' s Glee Club 3, 4: Dia- mond Rifles 2, 3; Freshman Camp Staff 3, 4. Business M SOIFER . Third Shit Jwler, Pi. : : JEROME J. VERLIN 812 S. Cecil Street Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE Basketball 3, 4; Finance DOMINIC A. VINCIGUERRA 1142 Durfor Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Club 3, 4. GLORIA VIOLIS 232 E. Lancaster Avenue Wayne, Pa. SECRETARIAL -Phi Gamma Nu 2; Radio Workshop 2. JASL.SPICEI CHARLES W. WALSH, JR. Laurel Springs, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; SAM 3, 4; Advertising Club 2, 3, 4. Welffc Pi MORTON B. WAPNER 4550 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Cedarbrook Basketball I. COUNT! CHARLOTTE WEINRACH 5706 Wyndale Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. TWO-YEAR SECRETARIAL Hillel I, 2. JOHN J. WARD 3304 B Street Philadelphia, Pa. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Student Comm. I; Young Re- publican Club 3; Pre-Law Club Sec. 3, Pres. 4; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4. LAWRENCE WEISMAN I 104 E. Haines Street Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Scabbard and Blade 4; Var. Fencing 4: Diamond Key Soc. 4; NDTA 3, 4; Winged Wheel Ed. 4. GABRIEL R. VINOKUR 918 West Wyoming Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ACCOUNTING Tau Epsilon Phi 3, 4; Hillel 2, 3, 4. CLIFF C. WAMACKS 812 Collen brook Avenue Drexel Hill, Pa. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IM Football I; Baseball I; Basketball I; ICG I, Treas. 2, Asst. Regional Dir. 3, 4; TJ Club 2, 3, Treas. 4; Debate I, 2; IRC 2; Temple News 3; Newman Club I; Student Speakers Bureau 3: Havertown Theater, Student Comm. I. LOIS A. WATSON 23 Salem Street Elmer, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Wesleyans 2, 4; Marketing Club 4; Advertising Club 4. DAVID A. WESTWOOD 6142 N. Fourth Street Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE Fifty-five E. JOSEPH WHEELER, JR. 1408 Lindley Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MANAGEMENT Delta Sigma Pi 4. GEORGE J. WILSON 1817 N. Park Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ECONOMICS TRANSPORTATION Delta Sigma Pi I, 2, 3, 4; IF Football I, 2, 3; IF Baseball I, 2; Swimming I; IF Bowling I, 2; Van. Rifle Team 2, 3. G. HERBERT WIRTH, JR. 1301 Overbrook Drive Colwick, Merchantville, N. J. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delta Sigma Pi 1,2, 3, Sec. 4; IF Football I, 2; Diamond Band I, 2, 3, 4; Diamond Rifles 2; IF Council Sec. 2; SAM 4; Young Republican Club 3; Finance Soc. 4. EDWIN M. WILDER 1724 Conlyn Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Alpha Delta Sigma 4; Market- ing Club 3, 4; Advertising Club 3; WRTI 4. C. HERBERT WINEHOLT, JR. 5219 Springlake Way Baltimore, Md. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, His- torian 3, 4; Advertising Club 3, 4; SAM 3. 4. IVOR N. WITT 4513 Conshohocken Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Senate I, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Association I, 2, 3, 4. ROBERT N. WILLIAMS 6313 Ogontz Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. COMMUNICATIONS Alpha Phi Omega 3, 4; Sigma Delta Chi 3, 4; Temple News 2, 3, 4; WRTI 3, 4; Freshman Camp ' Staff 4; Cedarchest I; Bloodmobile Student Chmn. 4; Delta Sigma Pi 4. PAUL L. WINTER Cease Drive Shavertown, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delta Sigma Pi 2, 4, Treas. 3; IF Football, Softball, Basketball 2, 3, 4; Finance Soc. 4. BERNARD WOLF I 136 E. Cliveden Street Philadelphia, Pa. MARKETING Phi Alpha I, 4, Sec. 2, Pres. 3 Alpha Delta Sigma Pres. 4; IF Football, Baseball I, 2 Marketing Club 2, 3, Pres. 4 Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; IF Counci I, 2; Beta Gamma Sigma 4. Bus i n s s ROBERT W. WOLF 5 N. Main Street Ambler, Pa. ACCOUNTING CHRISTOPHER YOUNG, JR. 4428 McKinley Street Philadelphia, Pa. COMMUNICATIONS Rifle Team 2, 3, 4; WRTI 2, 3, 4; Diamond Band 2, 3, 4; ROTC Drill Team 2, 3, 4. JUNE M. WYSOCKA 204 Eighth Avenue Haddon Heights, N. J. COMMUNICATIONS Theta Upsilon Sec. 2, 3, 4; UCM 3; Advertising Club Treasurer 3, 4; Canterbury Club 3, 4; WRTI 4. HARRY YOUNG, JR. 320 University Boulevard Glassboro, N. J. ACCOUNTING HARVEY A. YANKS Kevon Park Apts. Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE HERBERT C. YOUNG Butler Avenue Chalfont, Pa. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION HARRY N. ZANKMAN 6235 Castor Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. REAL ESTATE INSURANCE ALFRED ZERNIK 4554 Bleigh Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. FINANCE NDTA 3, Sec. 4; Finance Soc. 3. 4. Fifty-six J TEACHERS Fifty-seven JOSEPH S. BUTTERWECK Acting Dean B.S. in Ed., 1922; M.A., 1924, University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., 1926, Columbia University THOMAS E. CLAYTON Acting Head of Secondary Education B.S. in Ed., 1939; E.M., 1947, Temple University; Ed.D., 1949, University of Southern California DOROTHY HOYLE Acting Head of Elementary Education B.S. in Ed., 1932, Temple University; M.A., 1936, Teachers ' College, Columbia University Fifty-eight DAVID L STONE Acting Head of Music Education B.Mus., 1941, Syracuse University; M.A., 1942; Ph.D., 1952, Harvard University WILLIAM M. POLISHOOK Assistant Dean and Business Education B.S. in Ed., 1931, Salem (Mass.) State Teachers ' College; Ed.M., 1935, Harvard University; Ed.D., 1945, New York University WILLIAM L. HUSHES Health and Physical Education B.A., 1919, Nebraska Wesleyan University; M.A., 1924; Ph.D., 1932, Columbia University; D.Sc. in Ed., 1949, Boston University GRACE C. HUDDY Acting Head of Home Economics B.S. in Ed., 1938, Framingham State Teachers ' College; M.A., 1944, Columbia University Fifty-nine AUDREY FELDMAN ADLER 1301 E. Johnson Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-5OCIAL WORK LETITIA L ANDERSEN 205 Chestnut Street Brooklawn, N. J. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION WAA Volleyball I; Van. Hockey 3, Modern Dance Con- cert 3; Water Show 2, 3, 4. LEO J. AWAD, JR. 4628 Hartel Street Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Key Club 4. MARJORIE G. ALEXANDER 1432 N. 55th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SOCIOLOGY Alpha Kappa Alpha 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; NAACP I, 2, 3, Sec. 4; TEMPLAR 3: OWL I, 2, 3, 4. CHRISTOPHER APPLEGATE 1930 W. Passyunk Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 4; IM As- sistant 3, 4; Lifeguard 3, 4; Swimming Assist. Mgr. 3; Assist. Trainer 3; Phys. Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4. FRANK PRENTISS BALDWIN 7242 Walker Street Philadelphia 35, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES IM Basketball 3, 4; Diamond Rifles 2; Winged Wheel 4; NDTA 4. PARIS LLOYD ALLISON 7. E. Maple Avenue Morrisville, Pa. HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION Sword Society 4; Phi Epsilon Kappa 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; IM Basketball 3, Student Direc- tor 4; Phys. Ed Club 2, V. Pres. 3; Pres. 4; Traveling Troupe 2, 3, 4; Water Show 3, 4. FLORACE L. ARNOLD 107 Crescent Drive Sebring, Fla. MUSIC SUPERVISION Magnet Sec. 4; Women ' s Sen- ate V. Pres. 3, 4; Music Ed. Club 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Concert Choir 3, 4. ELEANOR J. BANKERT 5341 Locust Street Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Chorus 3, 4; TCP I, 2, Orchestra 3, 4: I, 2. Teachers ETHEL L. BANKS 5900 W. Thompson Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Delta Sigma Theta 3, 4; NAACP 2, 3, 4. RHODA A. BLOCK 5623 Beaumont Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Hillel 4; ECEE Club 3, 4. FLORENCE M. BECK Route Four Bethlehem, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Wiatt Hall V. Pres. 3, 4; Wo- men ' s Glee Club 2, 3; Lutheran Student Assoc. I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. MARY E. BOCCADORO 206 S. Fifth Street Easton, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION MARK BERNSTEIN 1733 N. 32nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Chess Team 2, 3, 4. RUTH M. BONES Sheppton, Pa. HOME ECONOMICS Chimes 3, 4; Var. Swimming, Tennis 2, 3, 4; Home EC. Club I, 2, 3, 4. SYLVAIN BONI 228 E. Sheldon Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION French Honor. Soc. 2, 3, 4: Var. Soccer 2, 3, 4; Chess Team 3. JOAN B. BORKON 5401 Berks Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel I. HELEN JANE BONIKOWSKI 5101 Ditman Street Philadelphia 24, Pa. BUSINESS EDUCATION Phi Gamma Nu 2, 3, 4; Var- sity Archery 2, 3, 4: IM Bas- ketball 2, 3, 4: Business Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4. EVELYN BORTNICK 2137 S. Fourth Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION GERALDINE BOONE 2362 N. Lambert Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Modern Dance Concert Group 3, 4. ESTELLE M. BOTWINICK 524 Adams Avenue Woodbine, N. J. SECONDARY EDUCATION Phi Delta Tau 2, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; Hillel I, 3; Bus. Ed. Club 2, Corr. Sec. 3, V. Pres. 4; Marketing Club I, 2; Pan- heltenic Assoc. 4. Sirfy 3r f ALLISON A .,e nil, p, MARGARET E. BRADY 653 Line Street Camden, N. J. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MARY F. BRANON 612 Highland Terrace Pitman, N. J. MUSIC EDUCATION Women ' s Glee Club 2, Chorus 3, 4. iwnt Dm, " Flj. := UWKH Lousl Street 1 4; Cms ], . DIRCK L. BRENDLINGER 7821 Barnes Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Sigma Phi Epsilon 2, 3, 4; Var. Soccer, Track, Cross- Country 2, 3, 4; IM Football, Softball I; IF Track, Football, Softball, Handball, Volleyball, Bowling 2, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club I, 2; ICG I, 2. ALICE M. BURNHAM 39 Sharon Street Geneva, N. Y. PRE-THEOLOGY Conwell Club I, 3, 4, Sec.- Treas. 3; UCM 2, 3, 4; Con- cert Choir 2, 3, 4. DOROTHY A. BROWN 1 802 E. Third Street Bethlehem, Pa. MUSIC EDUCATION Delta Sigma Theta 3, 4; NAACP 2, Glee Club I 4; Women ' s DOROTHEA BRECKENRIDGE 721 N. Second Street Steelton, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Delta Pi 2, 3, Corr. Sec. 4; WAA Rhythmic Swimming 3, 4; Bowling 2, 3, 4; Basketball I, 2. SOLOMON M. BROWNSTEIN 1922 N. 32nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Concert Dance Group 2, 3, 4; Hillel 3, 4; Theatre 2, 3. ROBERT W. CALDER 930 I Ith Avenue Prospect Park, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; IM Basketball 3, 4; Diamond Band I, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra I, 2, 3, 4; Music Ed. Club 2. ISABELLE M. CANTOR 6140 Washington Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION WAA Swimming I, 2; WAA Modern Dance 3; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. Co lleg e K BNSTEIN N.!2! Street lielpk Pi. :: EDUCATION .2,3,4. WARREN L. CARLSON 3230 McMichael Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION IH M. IONES kpplon, Pi WE ECONOHC 4 ' Vir. Wrrirriit ], 4; Hcne E- C: AlOINE lOONt N.Lib = ; iWdprw Pi Once 0X1 E Ass . ' ELIZABETH J. CHAPMAN 2328 N. Camac Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Delta Sigma Theta 3, 4; Con- wt ' l Club 3, 4; NAACP I, 2, 4, Sec. 3; ACE 3, 4; Owl Mag. Staff I; Modern Dance Work- shop 3. WILLIAM COCO 4208 N. Franklin Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 3, 4; Var. Soccer I, 2; Var. Gymnastics I, 2, 3, 4; Traveling Troupe 3, 4: Phys. Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4: Water Show 2, 3, 4. JOHN J. CZARNECKI 4715 E. Stiles Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 4; Phi Epsi- !lon Kappa I, 2, Treas. 3. V. Pres. 4; IM Basketball 3, 4: [Student Health Council I, 2; Class V. Pres. I, 2; Phys. Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4. VIRGINIA W. CARTER 4833 N. Fairhill Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Kappa Delta Epsilon 3, V. Pres. 4; Westminster Fellowship I, Sec. 2, 3: ECEE Club I. 2, 3, 4. ARCHIE E. CHINN 3646 N. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-THEOLOGY Canterbury Club I, 2, 3, 4; Pre-Theological Fellowship I, 2, 3, 4. MARTIN S. COHEN 3043 W. Page Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club 4. 2, 3, 4: ACE 3, MARIANNE F. CASEY 4636 Penn Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Theta Sigma Upsilon I, Asst. V. Pres. 2, 3, Second V. Pres. 3, 4: WAA Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, Sec. 3, 4; Mitten Student Board 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. JOHN A. CLARK 620 S. I 6th Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4: ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; ACE 3, Pres. 4. LORETTA A. COLETTI 3418 N. 19th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Theta Sigma Upsilon I, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 4. ADELE M. DANGELO 2924 S. Sydenham Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Theta Sigma Upsilon 2, 3, 4; Mitten Student Board 3, 4: Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; SESA I, Sec. 2; SESA Exec. Comm. 2. LOUIS A. D ' ANGELO 439 Commonwealth Avenue Trenton, N. J. MUSIC SUPERVISION Orchestra I, 2, 3; Class Pres. 2, 3, 4. Sixty-one ANTHONY D ' ANNUNZIO 1936 S. 21st Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION IF Bowling 3, 4. HOWARD DAVIS 5036 N. Eighth Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4. STANLEY C. DIAMOND 6900 Oakland Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. ELIZABETH A. DICKERT 7208 Penarth Avenue Upper Darby, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Alpha Sigma Alpha 2, 3, Registrar 4; WAA Lacrosse 2, 3; IM Basketball 3; ECEE Club 2, 3, 4. WILLIAM J. DOORLY 2903 W. Susquehanna Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION JOHN A. DOLAN, JR. 6352 Revere Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Base- ball I, 2. PHILIP C. DONAHUE 4838 Frankford Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Phi Alpha Theta 2, Pres. 3, 4; SESA 4. JOHN H. DRURY 512 E. Johnson Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 2, 3, 4; Var. Gym Team I, 2, 3, 4. JACOB S. DUNLAP 122 W. Plumstead Avenue Lansdowne, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION Nursing Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4. Teachers MYRA O. DURLOFSKY 5056 Gainor Road Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Hill el I. CAROL J. EISENBERG 6606 N. Gratz Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Student Senate 2, 3; Hillel I, 2, 3; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. IRVIN J. FARBER 2623 N. Hollywood Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 4, 5; Hillel I, 2, 4, 5; Treas. 3; IZFA I, 2, 4, Pres. 3, 5; Cedarchest Features Editor I. MARVIN E. FEIGENBERG 412 S. 62nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, Pres. 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Debate Council I; Hillel 3, 4; IRC I. Sixty-two BURNS W. EATON 3303 N. Park Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Music Ed. Club I, 2. 3, 4; Diamond Band I, 2, 3; Wesleyans I, 2; Concert Choir 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club I, 2; Music Ed. Chorus 1 , 2, 3. RICHARD D. ELDER 1835 W. Erie Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Chess Club 2, 3, 4. MARVIN FARBSTEIN 923 N. 42nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Cru- saders 2, 3, Hist. 4; Men ' s Glee Club 2; Concert Choir 3: SESA I, 2, 3, 4. SAUL FEINBERG 6020 Tabor Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Pi Mu 3, 4; Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Concert Choir V. Pres. 3; Men ' s Glee Club I, 2, 3, V. Pres. 4; Music Ed. Club I, 2, 3, V. Pres. 4. JOHN G. EDENHOFNER 150 N. Second Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION RALPH C. ESTERLY 3543 Stouton Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION ICG I. EUGENE L FEGELY 947 Nth Avenue Prospect Park, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Sigma Phi Epsilon I, 2, 3, 4; Var. Track I, 2; IF Sports I, 2, 3, 4; Concert Choir 1,2, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club I, 2, 3, 4; TEMPLAR 2, 3; Temple News I, 2, 3. JOAN R. FEINSILVER 149-03 Eighth Avenue Whitestone, N. Y. DENTAL HYGIENE DOROTHY L PELS 728 Nathan Hale Avenue Colonial Lakelands, Trenton, N. J. PRE-SOCIAL WORK Alpha Sigma Alpha 2, Assist. Treas. 3, 4; WAA Tennis, Fenc- ing, Lacrosse, Volleyball 2, 3, 4; Rhythmic Swimming Mgr. I; IM Basketball 2, 3, 4; Temple News I, 2, Assist. Makeup Ed. 3, 4; Owl Mag. I; TEMPLAR I, 2, Managing Ed. 3, Organizations Ed. 4; SESA I, 2, 3, 4. LEONARD S. FISHBEIN 231 Fairmount Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ELIZABETH I. FOCHT 1143 Pratt Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Theta Sigma Upsilon 2, Editor 3, 4; IM Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; :ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. ETHEL FINK 1450 Grange Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. JUDITH S. FINKEL 2035 Cheltenham Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. ANN M. FISHER 1004 Willow Street Norristown, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Delta Sigma Theta 3, Pres. 4; Phi Delta Pi 3, 4; Var. Hockey, Basketball I, 2, 3, Capt. 4; Var. Softball I, 2; IM Fencing 3: IM Swimming Lacrosse 3, 4; WAA Board I, 2, 3, Publicity Dir. 4, Rec. Sec. 4: Class Treas. 3; Phys. Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4. JOHN L. FOULKES 516 W. Broad Street Gibbstown, N. J. PHILOSOPHY JOAN E. FLEISHER 6441 N. Park Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hille I, 2, 3, 4. WILLIAM Y. FRABIZIO I I I Ferry Street Stockton, N. J. MUSIC SUPERVISION IM Basketball 2, 3, 4; Orches- tra I; Class Pres. 3. College BERNARD M. FREEDMAN 4565 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH Or PHYSICAL EDUCATION Kappa Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4; Var. Swimming Mgr. 2, 3. BERNICE L. FREIND 5537 Lansdowne Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION )ebate Council I; IRC I; :CEE Council I, 2, Treas. 3, ' res. 4; ICG 2, 4, Sec. 3; Iridge Club 3, 4. MARIE L. FURCZYK 305 Maple Avenue Wyncote, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION heta Sigma Upsilon 2, 3, 4; lewman Club I, 2; ECEE Club 2, 3, 4. JEAN M. GARVIN 1015 Summit Street Darby, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION : .CEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. JANET A. FREEMAN 2124 Latona Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Delta Sigma Theta I, 2, V. Pres. 3; Modern Dance 2; NAACP I, 2: Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3; Glee Club I, 2; OWL 2, 3; ACE 4. HEDVA FRIED I S. Nashville Avenue Ventnor, N. J. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hille I, 2, 3, 4. HARRIET FREIBERG 6513 N. 16th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION English Honor Soc. 3, 4. BERNICE FRIEMAN 3147 W. Euclid Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Delta Epsilon Pres. 4; SESA I, 2, 3, 4. CARMEN J. GALZERANO 835 Almond Street Vineland, N. J. MUSIC EDUCATION Orchestra 1,2, 3, 4. ELEANORE GELTZER 5439 Arlington Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION XYW I, 2, Sec. 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Owl Magazine I, 2. GERALDINE GAPINSKI 500 Cottman Street Cheltenham, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Theta Sigma Upsilon 3, 4; IM Basketball 2, 3, 4; Club Amistad I, 2; SESA I, 2, 3, 4. CONSTANCE GETIS 7940 Forrest Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Delta Psi Kappa 2, Pres. 3, 4; Var. Swimming I, 4, JV Capt. 2, 3; Rhythmic Swimming I, 2, 3, 4; Var. Hockey 4; Mod- ern Dance I; Modern Dance Concert 3; Water Show I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. Sixty-three CHARLOTTE J. SEVER 5151 N. Ninth Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION English Honor. Soc. 3, Treas. 4; XYW 2, 3, Corr. Sec. 4; Senate 4; TJ Club 3, 4; Amistad 2, 3, 4; Cedarbrook Student Comm. I ; Theater Workshop I. ILENE S. GINSBURG 4754 N. Ninth Street Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC EDUCATION RITA J. GIAMPORCARO 2503 S. Tenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Wo- men ' s Glee Club I, 2; ACE I, 2, 3, Pres. 4. JAMES A. GLENNON Bayville. N. J. SECONDARY EDUCATION Modern Dance Group 2, 3, 4. NANCY L. GINGRICH RFD 3 Reading, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Chimes 2, 3, 4 ; Magnet 3 Treas. 4; Alpha Sigma Alphs 2, 3, 4: Phi Delta Pi 3, 4; Var Hockey I, 2, 3; Fencing I, 2 Var. Swimming, Softball 2, 3 4; Rhythmic Swimming 2, 3, 4 Lacrosse 3. 4; Modern Dance Concert Group I, 2, 3; Phys. Ed. Club I, Sec. 2, 3, 4; Wiat) Hall Council V. Pres. 2: Presi- dents Council ' 2; Temple News I. RUTH M. GLICK 428 W. Ellet Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Debate Council 2, 3. LEONARD F. GOLDBERG 2 S. Baltimore Avenue Ventnor, N. J. SECONDARY EDUCATION LENORE K. GOLDE 4523 Spruce Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. EDITH L ilSS.ro.rtkS ' ra ; Ti ' ,. V ' I-: ' . jEAtUHE ' l ' . , Upii ' M L !l , wnai flub ' JUDITH E. GOLDMAN 5820 Pentridge Street ffl Marlel S Philadelphia, Pa. PliUilpk ELEMENTARY EDUCATION . ! :.-l0TWf W 2 1 3 Sigma " heta ECEE Club 1,2, 3, 4. Teachers MARJORIE J. GOODMAN 305 Rand Street Camden, N. J. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Ctub I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 2, 3, 4. HELEN L. GORDON 148 W. Lehigh Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Templayers I, 2. REGINA N. GRAY 1037 Dorset Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; I, 2, 3, 4. Hillel PEGGY A. GREEN 7901 Heather Road Elltins Park, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hille! I, 2, 3, 4. MARY E. GOSNAY 77 Chester Avenue Clifton Heights, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Delta Pi 2, 3, 4; Var. Hockey, Basketball 2, 3, 4; La- crosse 2, 3, 4; WAA Board Corr. Sec. 4. MARILYN K. GREENBERG 5811 Beaumont Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Carnival Comm. 2; Ecegram if M. Hire VMWStri HoBdik P MX- BUM ipra Siga A ' pi it-eiii SUeol As wet ' s GlttC : K a. Cot i Hit i ' NOIMAN J. HOI ffl ' . " .-;- A H w n ' m ERNEST F. GROTHE 6131 N. I Ith Street SECONDARY EDUCATION Scabbard and Blade 3, 4; Rifle Team I, 2; ROTC Drili Team 3, 4. IRMA H. GRUBER 900 Sanger Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION WAA Bowling I; Hillel ECEE Club I, 4. HARRISON A. GRUENLER 1514 Powder Mill Lane Wynnewood, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION 2; SELMA GURST 106 N. La Clede Place Atlantic City, N. J. BUSINESS EDUCATION Delta Kappa Epsilon 3, Rec. Sec. 4; Bus. Ed. Club 2, 3, Corr. Sec 4. Sixty-four VIRGINIA J. HAAK 1021 Park Avenue Collingswood, N. J. HOME ECONOMICS Theta Sigma Upsilon 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, Sec. 3, 4; Home EC. Club I, 2, 3, 4. JOHN HADLEY 1550 Adams Street Gary, Ind. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Var. Football I, 2, 3, 4; Var. Track I, 2, 3, 4; I M Basketball I, 2, 3, 4. SAMOELHOI flMUBaSk HUI ,| aMY Ettc HIOA. EDITH L. HAGY 215 S. Fourth Street Oxford, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Magnet 4; English Honor. Soc. j " i 4 1 , ' . i A . kl A A D I; " . A : -ii |5 i: ; V j,3, 4; WAA Bowling 2: Wiatt ; Hall Council 2, Pres. 3; Wo- I men ' s Senate 3, Pres. 4: Wo- 1 men ' s Glee Club 1,2. 3; Presi- dents ' Council 3, 4. BENNIE L. HALBERT 2215 N. Garrett Avenue Dallas, Texas HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Delta Psi Kappa 3, 4. CHARLES B. HARMAN 506 Bridge Street Beverly, N. J. MUSIC SUPERVISION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, V. Pres. raw [Dm--. Mcil 2, j. E- SOLDMAN Ptr% Street b U 3 JEAN T. HEPBURN 224 E. Comly Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Chimes 3, Pres. 4; Theta Sigma Upsilon I, 2, Treas. 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, Sec. 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. DOLORES A. HILL 4929 Market Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Delta Sigma Theta 2, 3, 4; .lee Club 2. CHARLES J. HICKS 542 Shadeland Avenue Drexel Hill, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Concert Choir 2, 3; Men ' s Glee Club 2, 3, 4. H E. SOSNAY filter Avenue ta Heijkti, Pi, PHYSICAL SDIC " I Pi 1, !, lisfetW !,!, ' : I 3, 4; WAA h ' N K. HOME luonoit Aveoie C:--. !:;::- DOROTHY L. HILL 1324 N. Alden Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Alpha Kappa Alpha 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 3, 4. ALFREDA E. HIDALGO 1805 W. Berks Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Alpha Kappa Alpha 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance Workshop 2, Concert 3; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; NAACP I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD F. HINKLE 6801 Yocum Street Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION College BETTY M. HIPPENSTEEL West Park Street Honesdale, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION Alpha Sigma Alpha 3, 4; Lutheran Student Assoc. 3, 4; Women ' s Glee Club 3; Nurs- ng Ed. Club 3, 4; Women ' s Senate 3, 4. NORMAN J. HOFFMAN 208 Monument Avenue National Park, N. J. MUSIC SUPERVISION ' iamond Band 2, 3, 4; Orches- LORA B. HOFFMAN 265 S. 22nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. MARTIN HOFFMAN 5519 Addison Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Var. Swimming 2, 3. ONA.SWL!! PwderUllw ynnewood, Pi. OHN HADtf jOAJi !lTe t Gary, 1 GEORGE HOLOWACH 1030 Stokes Avenue Collingswood, N. J. SECONDARY EDUCATION SESA I, 2, 3, 4. CARL M. HOPFINGER I 139 N. 41st Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Var. Basketball I, 2, 3, 4. ra 2, 3, 4. SAMUEL HORN 2964 N. Ella Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION ORCHID A. HUMPHREY 1937 N. 23rd Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 3elta Sigma Theta 2, Treas. 3, Women ' s Glee Club 3, 4; EE 1,2, 3. 4. RODELLE S. HORWITZ 2122 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Kappa Delta Epsilon 4; Mod- ern Dance Workshop 4; Hillel 2, Corr. Sec. 3, Pres. 4; ECEE Club 2, 3. 4. MINNA J. HYATT 637 W. Norris Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION JAMES C. HOWAT 158 E. Sterner Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 2, 3, Rec. Sec. 4; Var. Swimming 2, Capt. 3, 4; Var. Soccer 4; Water Show I, 2, 3, 4; Phys. Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4. LEON HYMOVITZ 2534 N. Spangler Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Sixty-five ALVIN JACOBS 5700 Nassau Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION CLIFFORD H. JORDAN 232 S. 22nd Street Philadelphia, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION Nursing Ed. Club I, 2. BARBARA S. KAMINSKY 925 Yeadon Avenue Yeadon, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. BERNICE KAUFMAN 1628 N. 76th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Kappa Delta Epsilon 3, 4; Hillel I, 4; Templayers I, 2, 3: Debate Club 2. ANNA T. KELLY 1740 Sansom St reet Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Delta Psi Kappa 2, Treas. 3, 4; Var. Hockey, Softball Mgr. 1, 2, 3, 4; Var. Basketball 2, 3, 4; IM Basketball I, Bowling I, 2; Badminton I. 2, 3, 4; Water Show 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance Concert 3; Phys. Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4. KATHERINE A. KEEN 729 Bullock Avenue Yeadon, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Magnet 4; Alpha Sigma Alpha I, 2, 3, Chaplain 4; Kappa Delta Epsilon 4; IM Bowling 3, 4; WAA Tennis 2; Owlette I; Havertown Theater Workshop I; Havertown Student Comm. I; Temple News 2, 3; Student Senate 2, 3; Women ' s Glee Club 2, Treas. 3, 4; West- minster Fellowship 2, Sec. 3: TEMPLAR Senior Editor 4. AROUSS KEMKEMIAN 12 Silaholar Street Heliopolis, Cairo, Egypt HOME ECONOMICS Home Economics Club 3, 4. LOIS KELLAR 5307 Euclid Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION XYW 2, Pres. 3, 4; Mitten Student Board 4; Hillel 3, 4; Carnival Chmn. 4; ECEE Club 2, 3, 4; International Student Service Comm. 4; NSA 4; Senior Giving Comm. 4. ROBERT C. KERR 6520 N. 21st Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION OWL 2, 3, 4; ICG 3, 4; NAACP 2, 3, 4. T e ackers HAROLD KESSLER 191 W. Norris Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION NANCY L. KOHN 61 13 Carpenter Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Phi Alpha Theta Treas. 3; Tem- players 3; Young Republican Club 3. ETTA L. KRAUSS 5450 Wissahickon Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. MIRIAM KINCUS 1325 Yerkes Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION IM Bowling I; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; XYW 2, Treas. 3, Pres. 4: Mitten Student Board Sec. 3. JAMES J. KOREN 1949 N. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION MADELIN H. KNOLL 7723 Beech Lane Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; TCF I, 2, 3, 4; Conwell Club I, 2, 3, 4. JEROME M. KURTZBERG 1915 Spencer Street SECONDARY EDUCATION Chess Team I, 2, Capt. 3, 4. JOANNE KRAUSE 6124 Beach Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHORAL CONDUCTING Modern Dance 3; Concert Choir I, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club I. 2, 3, 4; University Chorus I, 2, 3, 4; TCF I, 2; WRTI I, 2; NAACP 3, 4; OWL 3, 4. NAOMI R. KURTZ 121 Plant Avenue Wayne, Pa. BUSINESS EDUCATION BERNARDINE T. LAFONT 402 S. 16th Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Theta Sigma Upsilon 2, 3, 4; Hockey I, 2; Swimming I, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4. Sixty-six WALTER LAMAR, JR. 2454 W. Nicholas Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Alpha Psi 4. DORIS LAMBERT 2214 N. Melvin Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. LORRAINE J. LEE 8662 Thouron Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION Nursing Ed. Club 3, 4. IRMA LEHMAN 4332 Pine Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION JOSEPH M. LESAK 500 Mohawk Avenue Norwood, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION LIBBY A. LESCHES 7859 Michener Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION French Honor. Soc. I, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleaders 2, 3, 4. 9 Cow. | LEILA A. LEVICK 7267 N. 21st Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Kappa Delta Epsilon 3, 4; Modern Dance 3; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Cedarchest I; Senior Giving Comm. 4; International Stu- dent Service Comm. 4. ESTELLE R. LEVIN 5618 N. Marvine Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club 2, 3. 4; XYW 2, Sec. 3, 4; Carnival Comm. 2, 3, 4; Brotherhood Dinner Comm. 4. CLAUDETTE LEVITT 5325 Wayne Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION ROSALIND S. LIEBERMAN 5128 C Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2. 3, 4. HERBERT E. LIPKIN 735 S. 21st Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION , . . , . TJ Club 2 ' JOHN J. LOGUE 606 W. Chew Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Var. Soccer 2, 3, 4. HEINZ H. LUEBKEMANN 62 Wall Street Trenton, N. J. SECONDARY EDUCATION SESA 4; Men ' s Dormitory Treas. 4. EDWARD C. LOEFFLER 4507 McKinley Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Canterbury Club I, 3, 4, V. Pres. 2; Pre-Theology Fellow- ship I, 2, 4, V. Pres. 3. ESTHERBELLE LONDON 2602 Island Road Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Phi Delta Tau 2, 3, 4; Bowling Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. HELEN E. MacMASTER Cattell Road New Sharon, N. J. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION WAA Board 3, 4; Var. Bowling 2, 3, 4, Capt. I; Var. Archery 2, 3, 4; IM Bowling, Basketball, Volleyball, Archery I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. WALTER LEHRER 2521 N. 34th Street Philadelphia, Pa. BIOLOGY MYRA LESTER 2426 S. 13th Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS EDUCATION Honor. Accounting Soc. 3, 4; Phi Sigma Sigma I, 2, House Bursar 3, Sec. 4; Bus. Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. MARCIA Y. LEVIN 5864 Malvern Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. College RAYMOND LINDEN 6706 N. Sixth Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Debate Team 2, 3, 4; NAACP I, 2, 3, 4; ICG 2, 3, 4; Semantics Club 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, 4. NINA L. LOEV 2005 N. Broad Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Hillel I, 2, 3, 4. BEATRICE F. LUDOVICI 2437 W. Huntingdon Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION French Honor. Soc. 2, 3, 4; Beta Sigma Epsilon 3; Kappa Delta Epsilon 4; WAA Volley- ball I; Tennis I, 2; Newman Club 2, 3; NSA Convention 2. SHIRLEY H. MAIZEL 6227 N. 16th Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club 1,2, 3, 4; Fresh- man Camp Staff 2; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; TEMPLAR I; Student Activities Officer 2; Scene Shop I, 2. Sixty-seven ' RUTH E. MANDELBAUM 5103 Whitaker Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Phi Sigma Sigma I: Hillel 3. 4; ECEE Club 2, 3, 4. MARGARET L. MANIFOLD RD I Dallastown, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION Concert Choir 3, 4: Nursing Ed. Club 4. JOHN E. MARGOS 3819 N. Delhi Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-THEOLOGY Can ' erbury Club I, 2, 3, 4. GILDA MARGUT 249 S. Sixth Street Lebanon, Pa. HOME ECONOMICS DANIEL MAXYMUIK 920 N. Lawrence Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION IF Basketball 3, 4. ROBERT w. MCCARTHY I 14 Waver ly Street Jersey City, N. J. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 2, 3, 4; Var. Gymnastics I, 2, 3, 4; Travel- ing Troupe 2, 3, 4. JOANNE L. MANN 1015 Emerald Avenue Collingswood, N. J. HEALTH HHiblCAL LOCATION Delta Psi Kappa 2, Sec. 3, 4: Var. Basketball I; WAA Basketball 2; Volleyball I; Modern Dance Concert 3; Water Show 2, 3, 4. JOAN E. MARTIN 472 Thatcher Roed Springfield, Pa. SECONDARY LDUCAT.ON Theta Sigma Upsilon Alum. Chmn. 2, Pres. 3, 4; Kappa Delta Sigma 3, 4: IM Basket- ball 3, 4; Bowling 3; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Panhellenic Assoc. 4, Pres. 3: Panel of Americans 4; SESA Publicity Chm. 2, Sec. 3; Council of Presidents 3; Mitten Student League 3, Pres. 4. WILLIAM J. McGUINN 3140 Natrona Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION SESA 2. Teach ers ADRIENNE McNAUGHTON 2512 S. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Var. Swimming, Tennis I, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance I, 2, 3; Hocltey I, 4; Class Sec. 3, 4; Delta Psi Kappa 2, 3: Theta Sigma Upsilon 2, 3. MELV1N METELITS 5645 Litchfield Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Havertown Unit Pres. I; De- bate Team I; ECEE Club I, 2, 3 Pres. 4: Circle K Club 2; Mu Mu Mu 3, 4: NAACP I. 2: 3, 4; Sword Soc. 4. LUCILLE Y. MINTZ 5308 Diamond Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. DORIS H. McPHERSON 2021 N. Carlisle Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Alpha Kappa Alpha 2, 3. ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. ANTHONY G. MECOLI 215 Franklin Street Glassboro, N. J. MUSIC SUPERVISION Kappa Phi Kappa 4; Class Pres. 2. HELEN L. MEYERS RD I Chambersburg, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION Nursing Ed. Club V. Pres. 3, 4. AUDREY M. MILLER 464 Comly Street Philadelphia, Pa. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION WAA Tennis, Roller Skati Basketball 3, 4; UCM 2, 3, ng, RHODA L. MORRIS 351 Upland Way Drexel Hill, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. DONALD C. MITCHELL 1029 W. York Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Kappa Alpha Psi V. Pres. I, 2, Pres. 3, 4; Var. Track I, 2, 3, 4: Cross Country 1,2, 3, Capt. 4; Diamond Key Mgrs. Soc. Treas. 3, 4; Swimming Mgr. 2. 3 " Track Mgr. I, 2: Cross Cou " - try Mgr. I, 2: Temple New; 3, 4. CAROLE A. MOSKOWITZ I 100 65th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION OWL I, 2; Hillel I; TJ Cub 2, 3. LUCILLE M. MORETTO 3948 Temp ' e Street Calumet, Mich. NURSING EDUCATION Nursing Ed. Club 3, 4. JAMES R. MOSS 2445 N. 20th Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Var. Fencing 3, 4; Track I: Cross Country I; IM Basket- ball 2, 3. Sixty-eight INA S. NICHOLAS 5931 Thompson Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. JOAN S. OLSHIN 1809 N. 33rd Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; NA .CP 2, 3. LOIS D. OSTROLENK 5209 Chester Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Music Ed. Chorus I, 2, ?, Mil MORRIS OZER 1539 Maylard Street Philadelphia, Pa. SOCIAL C-rOUP WORK il 2. 3, 4; SESA 2, 3, 4. ALBERT S. PERILLO 100 S. Main Street Darby, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION G:LDA j. PALAHCIA 1527 W. Passyunlc Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Thela Sigma Upsilon 2, 3; Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Mil- ten Student Board 3: ACE 4. JAMES W. PERRY 1304 N. 26!h Slreet Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Van. Track 2, 3, 4; IM Table Tennis 3, 4. JOHN C. PARELLA 345 Monroe Street Bristol, Pa. CHORAL CONDUCTING Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Music Education Chorus 2, 3, 4; Con- cert. Choir 2. 3, President 4. SIDNEY R. PETERS lOih Jefferson Streets Wilmington, Del. BUSINESS EDUCATION Honor. Accounting Soc. 2, 3, 4; Circle K Club Pres. 3, 4; Bus. Ed. Club I, 2, Pres. 3, 4. College DANIEL PEVNER 1883 Conlyn Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION ' Phi Epsilon Kappa 3, 4. ESTHER S. POGACH 1322 Point Breeze Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; IZFA I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. ENNIO B. PONCIA 2949 N. 26th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION SESA I. ALMA R. POSNER 7600 Ogonti Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club 1.2, 3, 4. LYNA P. PRAGER 5718 Woodbine Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HOME ECONOMICS ROY R. RANDALL 8205 Ardmore Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ROBERT M. ROBERTS 1831 Beverly Road Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Men ' s Glee Club 3, 4; West- minister Fellowship Club 2, 3, 4; Kappa Phi Kappa 4. DORIS J. RIHL 2355 E. Susquehanna Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Alpha Sigma Alpha 1,2, 3. 4; ACE 4; Lutheran Student Assoc. I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD R. ROBINSON 3044 N. Eighth Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION English Honor. Soc. Sec. 3, Pres. 4; Sword Soc. 4; Kappa Phi Kappa Sec. 3, 4; Circle K Club 4; SESA I, 2, 3, 4; SESA Exec. Bd. 2, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club 4. FREDERICK R. RABINOWITZ 5737 Cedar Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 4; Var. Gym- nastics Mgr. 3, 4; Phys. Ed. Club 3, 4; Cheerleaders d . ANNA L. ROBERTS 1209 N. Tavlor Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Delta SiTna T ' a 3. 4: Wo- men ' s Gleq Club 3: ECEE Club I, 2, 3. BEATRICE K. RODGERS 4615 Hartel Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Delta Sigma Epsilnn V. Pres. 2, 3, Pres. 4: Panhellenic Assoc. Sec. 3, 4; Concert Choir I, 2, 3; Music Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4; Concert Dance 2. Sixty-nine BRUNO L RONDINELLI 1708 McKean Street Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; Or- chestra I, 2, 4. Pres. 3; Class Dept. Pres. 3; Men ' s Glee Club 3, 4. RICHARD ROSENBERG 6036 Carpenter Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Audio-Visual Department Aid 2. 3, 4; Kappa Phi Kappa 4; SESA I, 2, 3, 4. J. ROBERT RORISON 3347 Princeton Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4: ICG 3, 4; Lutheran Student Assoc. 1, 2, 3; SESA Exec. Comm. I, 2, 3, 4: Kappa Ph! Kappa 4; SESA I, 2, 3, 4. LEONA ROSENWALD 5432 Euclid Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1,2, 3, 4. SYLVIA C. ROSEN 5212 Berks Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2. JOAN ROVINE 5959 Upland Way Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel I, 3. VIRGINIA L. ROZELL 935 Fisle Street Scranton, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION BEVERLY T. RUBIN 1335 E. Barringer Street Philadelpia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Freshman Commission Corr. Sec. I; Hillel I, 2; IRC 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. BETH ANN RUSH 1854 E. Third Street Williamsport, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Delta Sigma Epsilon Sec. 2. 3, 4; Concert Choir I, 2, 3; Wo- men ' s Senate 2, 3, 4; Music Ed. Club I, 2, 3, 4. Teachers DORIS SALMANSOHN 6334 Morton Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Hillel I. KATHLEEN I. SCHOELLKOPF 6353 Buist Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Women ' s Glee Club I, 2, Pres. 3, 4; ECEE Club Rep. 2, 3; UCM 3, 4, Sec. 3; West- minster Fellowship 2, 3, 4. JUNE E. SCHWEIKART 5346 Chew Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Delta Psi Kappa Hist. 3, 4; Van. Swimming 3, 4; WAA Fencing 3; Van. Hockey 4; Class Treas. I ; Modern Dance I, 2, 3: Water Show 2, 3, 4. BETTY LOU SHOEMAKER 4447 N. Ninth Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Kappa Delta Epsilon 3, 4: Westminster Fellowship I, 2. Seventy JOHN P. SANTOS, JR. 1247 S. 18th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION OWL I, 2, V. Pres. 3, 4; French Honor. Soc. 4; Concert Dance 2: NAACP I, 2, Treas. 3, 4; Spanish Club 4. EUGENE W. SCHOLL 2215 Germantown Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 3, Pres. 4; Var. Track 2, 3, 4: Van. Gym- nastics 2, 3, 4; NDTA 3, 4; Rep. Council 3, 4. REVELLE SHAMBELAN 7003 Cedar Park Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION MARILYN C. SCHERLIS 7959 Woolston Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Chimes 3, 4; Phi Sigma Sigma I, 2, V. Pres. 3, 4; Hillel I, 2; Senate I, 2: Temple News I, 2, 3, 4; TEMPLAR I; Club Amistad 2; ECEE Club I, 2 3, 4. ANDREW G. SCHULTZ 5749 N. Seventh Street Philadelphia, Pa. PRE-THEOLOGY English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Fencing 3, 4; Wesleyans 3, 4; UCM Pres. 4. Va SONDRA SHERMAN Merion Gardens Apartment Merion, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. HARRY J. SMITH, JR. 7419 Andrews Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 2, 3, 4; Var. Soccer 2, 3, 4. HARRY S. STROTHERS 232 Greenfield Avenue Ardmore, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Alpha Phi Alpha I, 2, 3, 4. LEWIS M. SWARTZ 1028 Harrison Street Philadelphia, Pa. ENGLISH English Honor. Soc. 3, 4; Sec. Ed. Newspaper 2, 3; Hillel 3, 4. ROBERT J. SYKES 4030 Aldine Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION 1, 2, !, . f,::, I Kappa Phi Kappa 1, 3, Treas. jj 4; Canterbury Club I, 2, 3, 4. MIRIAM TAYLOR 1418 S. 58th Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club 4. JANET SWERLICK 5748 Nassau Road Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION French Honor. Soc. I, 2, 3, 4; Italian Club 3, 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Cedarchest I ; Freshman Commission I. BETTY JANE SZIEDE 1420 Lindley Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Theta Upsilon 2, Treas. 3; Newman Club I, 2, Pres. 3, 4; URC 2, Sec. 3, V. Pres. 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4: Modern Dance Workshop 2; Presidents Council 3; Freshman Camp Staff 3, 4; Panel of Americans 4. THELMA TERDIMAN 6555 N. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. MARTINA B. SWICKLIK 275 Miner Avenue Wanamie, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION EDWARD TATOIAN 3355 N. Howard Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 3, 4; Var. Soccer 2, 3, 4. ANNA M. TRAUTMAN 507 E. Grand Avenue Tower City, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Student Assoc. I, 2, 3, 4. College HARLAN J. TRITSCH MARGARET F. TURNER 2625 N. 23rd Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION SESA I, 2, 3; Newman Club I, 2. EARL TYSON 43 I S. 56th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION TCP I, 2, 3, 4. KATHLEEN M. URBANOVITS 7162 Georgian Road Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; New- man Club I, 2, 3, 4; Pan- hellenic Assoc. 2, Treas. 3, V. Pres. 4; Theta Upsilon I, V. Pres. 2, Pres. 3, 4. HENRY VIRGILIO 124 W. Fifth Street Lansdale, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Theta Kappa Phi 3, 4; Kappa Phi Kappa 3, Sec. 4; IF Volley- ball 2, 3, 4. JOAN M. WALSH 6245 Woodstock Street Philadelphia, Pa. HOME ECONOMICS Glee Club I; Home EC. Club I, Hist. 2, 3, Pres. 4. FRANK T. VANNELLA 428 Quince Street Vineland, N. J. MUSIC SUPERVISION IM Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; New- man Club I, 2, 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club 3, 4. JESSIE G. WAICE 61 14 N. Marshall Street Philadelphia, Pa. NURSING EDUCATION Nursing Ed. Club Treas. 3, 4. CARL A. WALZ 4010 Shelmire Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Alpha Phi Omega 2, 3, 4; Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Lutheran Stu- dent Assoc. I, 2. GEORGE M. VICTOR 226-07 139th Avenue New York, N. Y. BUSINESS EDUCATION Pi Lambda Phi 2, 3, 4; IF Football, Basketball, Softball 2, 3, 4; Diamond Rifles 3, 4. THOMAS W. WALLACE 1535 S. Vodges Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Nat. Defense Transport. Assoc. 3, 4; Men ' s Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Diamond Rifle Drill Team 3, 4. MANARA J. WEBSTER Woodbine, N. J. HOME ECONOMICS Conwell Club I; Women ' s Glee Club I, 2, V. Pres. 3, 4; Concert Choir 2, 3: Home EC. Club I, 2, 3, 4. Seventy-one ' - W V ' k mr . ALICE M. WEIL 3812 Powelton Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Alpha Sigma Pi 3, 4; WAA Hockey 2. 3, 4; Volleyball I, 2; Lacrosse 2. 4; Var. Casket- ball I, 2, 3, 4: Conwoil Club I, 2; TCP 2, 3, 4; UCM 3, 4; Westminster Fellowship I. GERALD WEINSTEIN 116 N. Hartford Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. SZCONDARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa 3, 4; SESA 3, 4; NAACP 4. JUNE E. WIDDIS 3203 Unruh Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION The:a Upsilon 2, V. Pres. 3, 4: IM Bowling I; Var. Bowling 2; Lu.horan Student Assoc. 3, 4; Women ' s Glee Club 2, 4: Concert Choir 4: ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Panhellcnic Assoc. 3. MARCIA I. WEINBERG I 109 Unruh Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCA i XYW 3, 4: Bridge Club 3, 4; ECEE Club 2. 3, 4. ROBERTA K. WCISS .Y.N 5876 Mrilvern Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDL-:AT:ON ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Mitien S ' udcnt League Chm. 3: XYW 2. 3, 4. FRANK WIECZOREK 4711 E. Thompson Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Phi Epsilon Kappa 2, 3, 4; Var. Football 2; Diamond Rifles 3, 4; Health Council I. NORMAN A. WEINBERG 5105 Whitaker Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Kappa Phi Kappa I, 2, 3, 4: Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2. 3, 4; IRC 2, 3, 4. WALTER WICKERT I I I Maplewood Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCAT.CN ELAINE S. WILLIAMS 2641 E. Ontario Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. Teach ers MARY WILSON 5118 Malcolm Street Philadelphia, Pa. MUSIC SUPERVISION Orchestra I, 2, Sec.-Treas. 3, Pres. 4 Lutheran Student Assoc. I, 2, Treas. 3, 4. HARRIET C. WOHL 5734 Oxford Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2. 3. 4. ARTHUR D. ZBINDEN 813 W. Lehigh Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Men ' s Glee Club 3, 4: Lutheran Student Assoc. 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. LEONA L ZERBY 73 Bald Cypress Lane Levittown, Pa. HOME ECONOMICS MARY JANE WINCHESTER 3208 Longshore Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION IM Bowling I, Assist. Mgr. 2: Var. Bowling I, 2, 3, 4; Var. Archery 2; Conwell Club I, 2, Pres. 3, 4. JANET M. YAMRON 5405 Atlantic Avenue Ventnor, N. J. CHORAL CONDUCTING Concert Choir I, 2, 4, Sec. 3: Music Ed. Chorus I, 2, 3, 4; Class Sec. I; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; MENC I, 2, 3, 4. SELMA ZEILER 1719 N. Ruby Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECONDARY EDUCATION Phi Delta Tau 2, 3, 4; SESA I, 2, Social Chm. 3, 4. HELEN WINTERLE 374 DuPont Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Theta Sigma Upsilon 2, 3, 4; WAA Tennis 4; Lutheran Stu- dent Assoc. 3, 4; Women ' s Glee Club 2, 4. GLORIA L. YEAGER 2139 N. Melvin Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club 1.2, 3, 4. NANCY ZEITZ 3717 Fairmount Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Ecegram I: ACE 2; Hillel I; NAACP I, 2. JODY ZUBROW 4737 Sansom Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Cedarbrook Comm. I; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4; Senate 2; Cheerleaders 2; XYW 3. Treas. 4; Bridge Club 3, 4; Freshman Camp I. GERTRUDE ZUCKER 4130 Parlcside Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ECEE Club I, 2, 3, 4. Seventy-two MARCIA ZUKIN 4928 N. Tenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ' lodern Dance Group 2; Hillel 2. MARIAN GOLDSTEIN ROBERT J. FLYNN 13 E. Upsal Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCATION Sword Soc. 3, V. Pres. 4; Phi Epsiion Kappa 3, 4, Treas. 2; Var. Gymnastics 2, 3, 4; IF Track, Swimming 2, 3, 4; Class Pres. I, 2; Phys. Ed. Club I, 2, V. Pres. 3. Pres. 4; Wafer Show I, 3, 4; Modern Dance Concert I, 2, 3; Freshman Camp Staff 3; Circle K Club 3, 4. STANLEY SLUTZKY 1956 N. Hollywood Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS EDUCATION BARBARA E. REFSIN 1516 S. 58th Street Philadelphia, Pa. BUSINESS EDUCATION Math. Soc. 2, Delta Epsiion 4; 2, 3, 4. 3, 4; Kappa Bus. Ed. Club MARTIN A. LABB 945 S. Second Street Philadelphia Pa. HEALTH PHYSICAL EDUCA1 lOf Phi Epsiion Kappa 2, 3, 4; Class V. Pres. 2, Pres. 3, 4. EVE BANKS 4674 Franlcford Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. RETAILING French Honor. Soc. 4; Market- ing Club 4, Sec. 2, V. Pres. 3. College Seventy-three COLLEGE HALL ... on the city ' s busiest thoroughfare Seventy-four COMMUNITY Seventy-five FACULTY . ttI. Dean HARRY C. ROUNTREE B.S., 1925, Pennsylvania State College ROBERT L D. DAVIDSON Assistant Dean A.B., 1931, Dickinson College; Ed.M., 1937; Ed.D., 1946, Temple University JAMES J. CRAWFORD Assistant Dean of the Technical Institute B.S. in E.E., 1928; M.A., 1933, University of Pittsburgh EDWARD B. SHILS Social Science B.S. in Economics, 1936; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., 1940, University of Pennsylvania JOHN W. TREGO Administrative Assistant B.S., M.A. EMILY M. FLETCHER COOPER Student Counselor, Psychology B.S. in Psychology, 1932, Columbia University; A.M., 1937, New York University WILLIAM J. PAGE Social Science B.S. in Ed., 1946; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., 1952, Temple University WILLIAM F. SASSAMAN Business B.S. in Ed., 1949; Ed.M., 1952, Temple University JOHN V. BOSCH Business B.S. in Ed., 1937; M.S. in Ed., 1939; Ed.D., 1952, University of Pennsylvania HORACE PALMER BECK English A.B., 1943; A.M., 1947; Ph.D., 1952, University of Pennsylvania WILLIS S. KRAEBER Business Millersville State Teachers ' College, Gettysburg College, Temple University HOWARD YAWN Photography B.A. Pennsylvania State College DONALD G. PETERSON Social Science and Sciences B.S., M.A. University of Minnesota CARL J. ABRAMOVITCH 106 Railroad Court Taylor, Pa. TELEVISION LEONARD ALTMAN FRANCIS W. ANDREWS Route One Slatington, Pa. ELECTRONICS HENRY B. ARTSON RFD 1 Rehoboth, Del. BASIC BUSINESS MAA Table Tennis I, 2. DONALD A. BACHMAN 7 S. Decatur Street Strasburg, Pa. MORTUARY SCIENCE RALPH R. BAUTZ 7323 E. Walnut Lane Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING, REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING ROBERT A. BELL SIMON BERKOWITZ 4535 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. BASIC BUSINESS EDMUND F. BERRY Fort Washington Avenue Ambler, Pa. MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN C omm unity WILLIAM F. BILLOW SAMUEL G. BONSALL 629 Seneca Avenue Norwood, Pa. MACHINE DESIGN JOHN P. BRADICAN JOEL R. BUBNEKOVICH 2736 N. Congress Road Camden, N. J. MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN JOHN T. CERANKOWSKI CLIFFORD CLARK SABINA BUDANO 7036 Jackson Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECRETARIAL STUDIES WAA I, 2: Freshman Comm Pres. I, 2; Student Council I, 2; Dramatics I. JOSEPH E. CIARDELLI III! E. Cheltenham Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING AND ESTIMATING Alpha Phi Delta I, Pres. 2, 3; IF Swimming, Football, Soft- ball 1, 2, 3; Council of Presi- dents 2, 3. JAMES E. COX BARRY J. BURTON 5927 Belden Street Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION LOUISE A. CIPOLETTI Broad and Kern Streets Riverton, N. J. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL Student Council I, 2; Newman Club I, 2; Freshman Comm. I. SHIRLEY J. CRAGLE 8 S. 15th Street Camp Hill, Pa. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL WAA I, 2; Student Council Sec. I, 2; Symphony I; Owlet- ter I, 2; Freshman Comm. Sec. I, 2; Freshman Camp Staff 2; TEMPLAR 2; Chorus I. Seventy-eight il WALTER G. CREED 1202 Atwood Road Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION H8AUIZ f U, Upfe, Pi. RAISA FRIEDMAN 1707 W. Butler Street Philadelphia, Pa. SECRETARIAL STUDIES Owletter I, WAA I, 2; Chorus I. STELLA C. FACCHINEI Dudley, Pa. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL Student Council I, 2; Fresh- man Comm. I; Dramatics I, 2; Newman Club I, 2; WAA I, 2; Chorus 2. SANDRA S. GALLER 6647 Malvern Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SECRETARIAL STUDIES WAA I, 2; Freshman Comm. 2; Chorus I. BURTON J. FINKLE 34 Park Street Brookline, Mass. BASIC BUSINESS Diamond Honor Soc. 4; Pi Lambda Phi I, 2, 3, Scribe 4; IF Football, Basketball, Volley- ball I, 2, 3, 4; Diamond Band I, 2, 3, 4; Student Senate 3, 4; Student Council Pres. 3, 4. ARA SANJOYAN slington Ave CHARLES GARGANI IUIUPJON Men Street Welnii, Pi. nrioi, N. iECREI - ROSE G. GILETTO 1140 Watkins Street Philadelphia, Pa. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL Owletter I, 2; Freshman Comm. I ; Student Council 2; Chorus I; Dramatics I. ROBERT P. GOLDY 1 100 Ray Avenue Ocean City, N. J. BASIC BUSINESS MAA Bowling I, 2; Chorus I, 2; Owletter I, 2. STEPHEN GULA Co liege WILLIAM J. HAGYE HIROSHI HASMIMOTO HERBERT F. HAUG 409 Acker Street Philadelphia, Pa. BASIC BUSINESS MAA Bowling I, 2. DONALD J. HAUSLER 182 W. Tiber Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING, REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING MAY J. I POCK Box 98 Beaufort, N. C. PHOTOGRAPHY WALTER JAMISON FRANK N. JENSEN, 3rd 235 Mill Road Havertown, Pa. PHOTOGRAPHY GEORGE J. JISKRA 4707 Pine Street Philadelphia, Pa. MORTUARY SCIENCE MAA Baseball I, 2. BARRY JONES SNIEGA M. JURSKIS 1313 W. Jerome Street Philadelphia, Pa. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN AND ESTIMATING RHODA KAMERLING 1711 Conlyn Street Philadelphia, Pa. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL Owletter I, 2; Freshman Comm. I; Student Council 2; Chorus I; Dramatics I. Seventy-nine JAMES J. KENNEDY 235 N. 12th Street Allentown, Pa. CHARLES KIRKNER WILLIAM E. LEE 3721 N. Bouvier Street Philadelphia, Pa. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN AND ESTIMATING DAVID LEVA EDWARD S. LIEBERT RICHARD LOMAX HERBERT F. MACK 2941 Lawrence Street Philadelphia, Pa. PHOTOGRAPHY WILLIS C. MacNAMARA, JR. Box 74 Snow Shoe, Pa. PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL L. MAHONEY S524 N. Fairhill Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING 0WNC.PUH US Kinnm I hl Cywyl DDK) AND BR HAMY W C own m unity JEROME J. MAIMAN 4731 N. Seventh Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING, REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING THOMAS McGOWAN FRANCIS A. McMENAMIN 5929 Jannette Street Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION GEORGE T. MEHRER 820 Market Street Camden, N. J. BASIC BUSINESS RICHARD MOLL EDGAR A. MONTEALEGRE Box 1000 San Jose, Costa Rica BASIC BUSINESS CHARLES R. MOYER 1151 Luierne Street Scranton, Pa. TELEVISION JOAN M. MYERS 4401 Monument Avenue Richmond, Va. SECRETARIAL STUDIES BURNS NIPPLE WAA I, 2; Chorus I man Comm. I. Fresh- WILLIAM E. OVERHOLTZER 588 Main Street Pennsburg, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS ALFRED P. PAGE ZOLTAN L. POCZAK 2032 Livingston Street Bethlehem, Pa. TELEVISION RADIO AND ELECTRONICS UttBW.WW IS)! Irrwcd Hmdon, P TEMON HI! Cottigi S Pttdilpliii, MSTBARr sen : hi,!. " ' ' I. " -- set Eighty ' : - : IRVING POMERANTZ 708 S. 60th Street Philadelphia, Pa. RADIO AND TELEVISION WILLIAM W. POST 229 Sylvania Avenue Glenside, Pa. BASIC BUSINESS MAA Bowling I, 2; Freshman Comm. I ; Student Council Treas. I, 2. EDWIN C. PURINTON 715 Kenmore Road Bala Cynwyd. Pa. RADIO AND TELEVISION JAMES P. QUILTER 5787 Nassau Road Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING, REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING UMAHONn ' HARRY RAND STEPHEN REBILAS S A. MIHU CHARLES W. ROBINSON, JR. JimtttStel 1503 Brierwood Road Havertown, Pa. TELEVISION College THOMAS M. ROEDER 308 Columbia Avenue Palmerton, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS A. MONTEALEGI ROBERT B. ROWLAND 6912 Cottage Street Philadelphia, Pa. MORTUARY SCIENCE Sigma Eta I, 2. ROBERT A. RUTH I 125 Rundle Street Scranton, Pa. TELEVISION ALBERT A. PUNTEL 341 Church Lane Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS RICHARD W. RAMBO 547 New Street Spring City, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS JAMES A. REED Main Street Gratz, Pa. MORTUARY SCIENCE RONALD ROSE 4760 N. Rorer Street Philadelphia, Pa. MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN DELFINO A. RUZZO 2214 Rittenhouse Square Philadelphia, Pa. BASIC BUSINESS lUKNS NIPPLE LILLIAN SASLOW 2465 77th Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL Dwletter I, 2; Freshman Domm. I; Student Council 2; Chorus I. HERWOOD G. SCHEIFELE SANDRA SCHACHTER - P , ROBERT C. SCHILLING 671 I Charles Street Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS Band I, 2. JACQUELIN A. SCHAFER RFD 1 Haddonfield, N. J. BASIC BUSINESS WAA I, 2; Owletter Co- Editor I, 2; Chorus I; Student Council 2; Freshman Comm. I. JOSEPH S. SCOTT 524 E. Center Avenue Newtown, Pa. MORTUARY SCIENCE Eighty-one ill SANFORD B. SEGAL 728 Marley Road Philadelphia, Pa. LIGHT BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CHARLES S. SEIDLE 4762 Loring Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING, REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING ARSLAN H. SERAYDARIAN 1618 S. 58th Street Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS ROBERT SIGRIST DONALD M. SILVERMAN 2439 S. Third Street Philadelphia, Pa. BASIC BUSINESS MAA Bowling I, 2. CHARLES S. SMITH 250 W. Olney Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING, REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING ROBERT D. SNYDER 411 S. 44th Street Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION JOHN M. SPENCER 130 Long Lane Upper Darby, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS JOHN F. STARYNSKI 4223 Terrace Street Philadelphia, Pa. MACHINE DESIGN Community THOMAS W. STEWART, JR. I 10 N. Cove Road Merchantville, N. J. RADIO AND TELEVISION JOHN E. STOEBENAU 4347 E. Thompson Street Philadelphia, Pa. ELECTRONICS MAA Sports I, 2. RICHARD SWAIN GINA A. TATTA 1931 S. Mole Street Philadelphia, Pa. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL WAA I, 2; Freshman Comm. I, 2; Dramatics I, 2; Student Council I. O ' NEAL TURNER 715 N. Sloan Street Philadelphia, Pa. MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN Softball; Football I; MAA I, 2. MARY T. VIOLA 1436 McKean Street Philadelphia, Pa. MEDICAL SECRETARIAL WAA I, 2; Freshman Comm. V. Pres., Art Editor I; Student Council 2; Dramatics I; Owietter I, 2. BENJAMIN J. TERRY 20 S. Tenth Street Kulpmont, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS F. THOMAS TRAGANZA 6406 Germantown Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. TELEVISION, RADIO AND ELECTRONICS ROBERT TURNER ROBERT S. TURZANSKI 3943 N. Percy Street Philadelphia, Pa. HEATING REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING ROBERT T. WEIK 15 Summer Lane Levittown, Pa. HEATING, REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING STELLA E. WINITSKY 1 10 Raynham Road Merion, Pa. BASIC BUSINESS WAA I, 2; Owietter I; Hillel I, 2. THOMAS WOLOHOWICZ Eigh ty-two FINE ARTS Eighty-three FACULTY BORIS BLAI Dean and Sculpture D.F.A., studied at Imperial Academy of Fine Arts, Kiev and Leningrad, and Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris. Assistant to Rodin. ALEXANDER ABELS Painting and Science of Painting Studied at Academy of Fine Arts, Berlin and Munich. Formerly instructor at Art Student ' s League, New York, and Tech- nical Adviser, Treasury Department, Section of Painting and Sculpture. MA Wi VA: li ii Hy. : : ::::!::. ' TO Ibjtte. RAPHAEL SABATINI Sculpture Studied at Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and with Antoine Bourdell and Fernand Leger. Painter, sculptor, and printmaker. HERMAN S. GUNDERSHEIMER History of Art Ph.D., University of Leipzig. Studied at Universities of Munich, Wuerzburg, Berlin. Formerly Director, Rothschild Museum, Frankfurt-on-Main. Eighty-tour ALEX DUFF COMBS Ceramics and pottery B.F.A.: B.S. in Ed.; M.F.A., Temple Uni- versity. Exhibits paintings, ceramics, sculpture and prints. VINCENT P. ROD6ERS Jewelry and Metalwork Studied at California School of Fine Arts, Seattle Art School, and with Henry L. Jenkinson and Douglas Gilchrist. MARTIN ZIPIN Industrial Design B.F.A.: B.S. in Ed.; M.F.A., Temple Uni- versity. Exhibits paintings, prints, and photographs. Director of Tyler School Arena Theatre. ARTHUR FLORY Etching and Printmaking Graduate, Philadelphia Museum School of Art. Exhibits prints, oils, watercolors, and ceramics in national shows. FURMAN J. FINCK Painting and Watercolor Studied at Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Winner of the Cresson Scholarship (1924), Carnegie Prize, National Academy of Design (1934) and others. ALDEN WICKS Painting A.B., Princeton University; M.F.A., Temple University; Studied at Sorbonne, Paris, and Art Students ' League. For- merly instructor in art at Princeton Uni- versity and Hunter College RUDOLF STAFFEL Ceramics Graduate, Art Institute of Chicago. Studied under Jose Arpa and Xavier Gonzalez. Extensive research in early Mexican and American Indian crafts Eighty-five HOWARD C. BARTNER Bay Avenue Toms River. N. J. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Fencing I; Gargoyles I, 2, 3, 4; Film Forum I, 2; Templayers 4; Tyler Player Set Designer I, 2, 3; Student Folkways 2, 3; Dean ' s Ball Committee I, 2. JOSEPH A. CIASULLO 2007 W. Stella Street Philadelphia, Pa. FINE ARTS Theta Kappa Phi 3, 4; Tau Kappa Beta 4; Var. Football 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3: Wrestling I, 3, 4; IF Swimming 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4: Volleyball 4; Bowling 3, 4; I M Basketball 3; Fencing 3; Winged Wheel Art Ed. 4. SAMUEL L CURTIS 107 W. Sharpnack Street Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING WALTER B. BARTNER Bay Avenue Toms River, N. J. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Fencing I; Tyler Players Set Designer I, 2, 3; Templayers 4; Gargoyles 4; Student Folk- ways 3, 4; Forum I, 2; Dean ' s Ball Committee I, 2. MALGERT H. COHEN 8030 Thouron Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING DORIS L. BIRD 2029 Snyder Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Dean ' s Ball Committee 3; Gar goyles 4. MARJORIE H. COLES Harding Highway Woodstown, N. J. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Hockey I; Orchestra I, 2, 3, 4. MARVIN S. DRIZIN 6537 N. 18th Street Philadelphia, Pa. GRAPHIC ARTS AND SCULPTURE IM Basketball I, 2, 3, 4; Tyler Players I, 2, 3, 4, 5; Faculty Exhibition 2, 4; Gargoyles Adv. Mgr. 2, 3; Dean ' s Ball Comm. I; Tyler Chorus I, 2, 3. MARY I. ESPY 7737-B Lucretia Mott Way Elkins Park, Pa. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Tyler Dormitory Pres. I ; Choir I, 2; Dean ' s Ball I, 2, Co- Chmn. 3. School of DAVID W. EVANS Lower State Road Doylestown, Pa. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IM Basketball 2; Chorus I, 2; Gargoyles Prod. Mgr. 4. RUTH C. FRANK 2259 Bryn Mawr Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SCULPTURE LOUISE A. GALLAGHER 21 19 Brandywine Street Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING RICHARD L. HARRISON 140 Hewett Road Wyncote, Pa. FINE ARTS Var. Fencing 4; Tyler Fencing I, 2, 4; Tylerplayers I, 2; Tyler Dance Group I, 2. PATRICIA T. INGRAM 231 Winona Street Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING AND CERAMICS Dance Club I; Choir I, 2. ALLEN R. KOSS 223 Spruce Street Philadelphia, Pa. FINE ARTS LAWRENCE M. HEYMAN 1748 Taylor Street Washington, D.C. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Var. Fencing 3, 4; IM Basket- ball I, 2; Student Senate 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3; Owl I; Gargoyles Co-Prod. Mgr. 4; Tylerplayers I, 2. RUTH M. JACKS 274 River Road Red Bank, N. J. PAINTING AND CERAMICS Fencing I, 2, 3, 4; Tyler Dorm Treas. I; Student Council 3; Tylerplayers I, 2; Gargoyles I, 2, Adv. Mgr. 3; Dean ' s Ball Committee I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD C. LAFEAN Fourth and High Streets Melrose Park, Pa. PAINTING Var. Fencing 2, 3, Co-Capt. 4; Tyler Fencing Coach 4, 5; Tennis 3; IM Basketball 3, 4; Student Council 2; Forum Committee 4, 5; Tylerplayers I. 2, 3, 4. 5; Chorus I, 2, 3, 4, 5. SUE C. HUTCHINGS Bananera Guatamala SCULPTURE PAINTING AND JEWELRY Fencing I, 2: Tylerplayers I; Chorus I, 2: Dean ' s Ball Com- mittee I, 2, 3; Student Coun- cil Sec. I; Gargoyles 4. CORNELIUS KOSH 626 Gerhard Street Philadelphia, Pa. EDUCATION Var. Fencing 3; Gargoyles I, 2, Asst. Ed. 3; Owl Art Editor 3. ADOLPHUS LEWIS, JR. 4029 Brown Street Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IM Basketball 2; Dean ' s Ball Committee I, 2. Eighty-six A. NEWTON MALERMAN 2206 Bryn Mawr Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SCULPTURE Sword 4, V. Pres. 3; Fencing 3; Student Senate 2, 3, Pres. 4; Student Council I, 2, Pres. 3; Freshman Camp Staff 2, 3, 4; Gargoyles I, 2, Ed. 3; Tyler Folk Dancers I, 2, 3, 4: Tyler- players 2, 3, 4, 5; Tyler Forum I, 2: Sketch Sheet 3; Dean ' s Ball I, 2, 3. HARRIS MEISEL 600 W. Woodland Avenue Springfield, Pa. PAINTING Sword Soc. 4; Var. Fencing 2, 3, 4; Tyler Fencing 2, 3; IM Basketball I, 2, 3: Chorus I, 2. 3, 4; Student Council I, 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Hillel I, 2, 3, 4; Gargoyles 4: Square Dance Group I, 2. JAMES A. O ' REILLY 1355 Perkiomen Avenue Reading, Pa. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Dean ' s Ball Committee 1,2, 3, 4; Tylerplayers 1 , 2, 3, 4; Gar- goyles 4; Square Dance I, 2, i 3; Chorus I, 2, 3; Sketch Sheet 3. RINA S. MALERMAN 2206 Bryn Mawr Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE Chorus I, 2, 3; Theatre Work- shop I, 2, 3, 4, 5; Gargoyles 2, 3, 4; Forum Committee 2, 3; Student Folkways I, 2, 3, Pres. 4; Student Senate 4; Tyler Dance Group 2, 3; Dean ' s Ball Committee I, 2, 3; Sketch Sheet 3. EDWIN NAGEL 6333 Bingham Street Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING IM Basketball I, 2, 3, 4, 5. HERBERT MANDEL 257 S. 20th Street Philadelphia, Pa. SCULPTURE MICHAEL A. RAPACH 207 First Street Barberton, Ohio PAINTING IM Basketball I, 2, 3; Choir I, 2; Tylerplayers 2, 3, 4. LOUISA G. ODENWELDER 47 S. Fourth Street Easton, Pa. SCULPTURE Dean ' s Ball Committee 2, 3, 4; Square Dance 2, 3; Tyler- players 2, 3, 4; Fencing 3. INGA R. RICE Park Drive Manor Philadelphia, Pa. CERAMICS Fencing 2, 3, Capt. 4; Dean ' s Bail Committee I, 2, 4, Co- Chrmn. 3; Chorus 1, 2, 3; Gar- goyles Art Ed. 4; Tylerplayers 4; Student Council 3, 4; Stu- dent Social Diirector 4; Sketch Sheet 3. Fine Arts MARLYN J. RUBENSTEIN 3004 Germantown Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. SCULPTURE Choir 2; Modern Dance Group I ; Recorder Group I. MARY L SANTILLI 271 W. Chocolate Avenue Hershey, Pa. SCULPTURE Gargoyles I, 3, 4; Choir I, 2; Tyler Hall Council I. GLORIA J. SHURIG 1210 Spring Garden Street Philadelphia, Pa. SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS Var. Fencing 2, 4, Capt. 3. ELAINE M. SMAILER Fifth and Asbury Avenues National Park, N. J. PAINTING AND CERAMICS ro 3: e5=) ' E; |.];0IMK BARBARA A. WALTNER 503 Cortlandt Avenue Mamaroneck, N. Y. PAINTING Tyler Workshop Players 5; Gargoyles 5; Chorus 5. WILBUR S. THOMPSON 313 E. Burd Street Shippensburg, Pa. PAINTING Fencing 3, Co-Capt. J.V. 4; Student Council 3; Forum Comm. I, 2, 3, 4; Tylerplayers I, 2, 3, 4; Gargoyles Editor 4; Dean ' s Ball Committee I, 2, 4, Co-Chrmn. 3; TEMPLAR Rep- resentative 4- Sketch Sheet 3. THOMAS J. WASHINGTON 5446 Arch Street Philadelphia, Pa. SCULPTURE CAROLE E. TICK 1655 E. 28th Street Brooklyn, N. Y. SCULPTURE JV Fencing 2, 3, 4; Dean ' s Bal Committee I, 2, 3, 4. JOAN D. WEBSTER 231 Winona Street Philadelphia, Pa. PAINTING Choir I, 2; URC I; Christian Science Org. I, 2, 3, Pres. 4, 5. ENID M. WEISZ 2074-A N. John Russell Circle Elkins Park, Pa. FINE ARTS Choir I, 2, 3; Dean ' s Ball Com- mittee I, 2, Chrmn. 3; Tyler- players 2; Student Council 3, 4, 5; Student Social Director 4, 5. BESSIE R. YOUNG 7819 Botanic Avenue Ph iladelphia, Pa. SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS Eighty-seven PRESIDENT ' S HALL . . . recent addition at Tyler. TYLER SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS ENTRANCE Eighty-eight PHARMACY Eighty-nine JOSEPH A. MARUNO Organic Chemistry JOSEPH B. SPROWLS Dean Ph.C. and B.S., 1936; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1941, University of Colorado EDWARD FACKENTHAL Physics JOHN A. LYNCH Senior Class Advisor Pharmaceutical Economics " KICK I ft) FRANK H. EBY Botany and pharmacognosy ARTHUR K. LEBERKNIGHT Bacteriology SAMUEL ELKIN Inorganic Chemistry THOMAS M. LOGAN Public Health Ninety ARTHUR E. JAMES ROBERT L. MEYERS FRANCES MARR MAURICE L LEITCH Inorganic Chemistry Botany and pharmacognosy Pharmacy Biology ALFRED N.. MARTIN, JR. Pharmacy FREDERICK DEMARTINIS, JR. Physiology SIDNEY H. ABRAMSON Pharmacy EVERT J. LARSON Physiology ALFRED E, LIVINGSTON Pharmacology DAVID E. MANN, JR. Physiology FRITZ O. LAQUER Biochemistry S. WALTER FOULKROD, JR. Pharmaceutical Law HERBERT M. COBE Bacteriology JEROLD NEWBURGER Physics A. J. VAZAKAS Chemistry PETER J. ANDREWS Pharmacy LOUIS RAVIN Chemistry Ninety-one JACOB ABRAMS 344 S. Lehigh Avenue Frackville, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 4, His- torian 3; IF Basketball 2, 3, 4; IF Football 3, 4; Pharmacy Show 2, 3; APhA 3, 4. BERNARD L BABBITT 1972 W. Sparks Street Philadelphia, Pa. Tau Epsilon Phi 2, 3, 4; Pharmacy Show I. 2, 3, 4. ROBERTA E. ALLOWAY 2618 Parade Street Erie, Pa. Lambda Kappa Sigma I, 2, 4. V. Pres. 3; APhA I, 2, 3, 4; Curtis Hall Council I, Social Chmn. 2, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; Women ' s Senate 3, 4; Fresh- man Camp Staff 4; Cheer- leaders 2, 3: Pharmacy Show I, 2, 3. SIDNEY L. BARLOW 4736 Rising Sun Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 3, 4; IF Basketball, Football, Soft- ball 2, 3, 4; APhA 1,2, 3, 4. EUGENE Y. ASTOR 1310 Levick Street Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi I, 2, 3, 4. JOHN B. BATDORF 410 E. Market Street Williamstown, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 4, Rec. Sec. 3; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD T. BERNSTINE 2375 Hillside Avenue Williamsport, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4; APhA I. 2, 3, 4. HARVEY L BILKER 1826 Ridge Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi I, 2, 3, 4; Pharmacy Show Writer, Director 3; Stu- dent Council 3; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. WILLIAM H. BRINER 7919 Park Avenue Elkins Park, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, Pres. 4; IF Basketball, Softball 2, 3, 4: Student Council 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. harm acy EDWIN BRUSH 4154 Leidy Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 3, 4; IF Basketball, Football, Softball 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. JOSEPH X. CARNEY 242 S. Main Street Archbald, Pa. Phi Delta Chi 3, 4; APhA 2, 3, 4; Newman Club I, 2. EDMUND T. CARROLL Abbottstown, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4; Clas Sec. 3. BERYL J. CHABY 1409 Riverview Avenue Wilmington, Del. CLIFFORD W. S. CHONG 7596-A Papio Street Honolulu, T.H. Phi Delta Chi 2, Sec. 3, 4. JOHN B. CHRISTMAN 104 Fitch Road Hatboro, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4. EMERSON H. CLEWELL 5 E. Poplar Street West Nanticoke, Pa. Phi Delta Chi 3, 4. SILVIO D. COCCIA I I I I W. Seventh Street Chester, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, Inne Guard 4; Class Treas. 4. ORAZIO R. COLLELUORI 21 14 S. Iseminger Street Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4. CHARLES A. COLLINS RDtfl Newtown, Pa. APhA 3. BERNARD COHEN I 101 N. 41st Street Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 1 , 2, 3. 4; IF Football, Softball, Basket- ball I, 2, 3, 4; APhA 4. JOSEPH A. CORCORAN 4902 Knorr Street Philadelphia, Pa. APhA I, 2, 3, 4. Ninety-two JOHN A. CRAIG IS E. Carey Street Plains, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, Hist. 2, 3, Newman Club I, 2, 3, TEMPLAR Rep. 4; APhA I, 3, 4. CHARLES W. CUSTER, III Bethlehem Pike Whitemarsh, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, Master-at- Arms 3, Corr. Sec. 4; Phar- macy Show I, 2, 3; APhA 3. 4. MICHAEL Dl MARCANGELO 312 Clinton Street Camden, N. J. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4; Class Treas. I, 2, V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Newman Club I; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. THORPE W. ELLIS 34 E. Main Street South Pottstown, Pa. DONALD G. DOUGHERTY 429 N. 23rd Street Allentown, Pa. Phi Delta Chi 3, 4; APhA 4. Phi Delta Chi 3 ball 3, 4. 4; IF Basket- PAUL O. FEHNEL 924 Mount Vernon Street Lansdale, Pa. IF Council V. Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, Chaplain 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. ARTHUR L. DAVIS 5070 Whitalter Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi I, 2, 3, Sec. 4; IM Football, Baseball I, 2, 3, 4; IF Football, Baseball 1,2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4; IF Council 3, 4. HEDY EINIG 114 W. 86th Street New York, N. Y. Lambda Kappa Sigma I, 2, 3, 4; APhA 4; Student Council I, 2, Sec. 3; IF Council Sec. 3. 4; Women ' s Senate 3. EDWARD FINE 1053 Langham Avenue Camden, N. J. Pharm acy SAMUEL FINE 6816 Upland Street Philadelphia, Pa. IF Football 2, 3, 4; Softball 3, 4; Basketball 2; Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. SAUL C. GOLDMAN 1624 E. Washington Lane Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi I, 2, 3, Treas. 4; Var. Basketball I; IM Basket- ball I; Var. Track 2, 3, 4. BOBBY D. GARRETT Walnut Avenue Cornwells Heights, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4. NEILSON GENDELMAN 67I7N. 16th Street Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi I, 2, 3, 4; I M Foot- ball 4; Basketball I, 2, 3; ball I, 2, Soft- 3, 4; Pharmacy Show FRANK W. GOODHART Manheim Gardens Philadelphia, Pa. Kappa Psi I, 2, 3, Regent 4; Var. Basketball I, 2; IF Basket- ball 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. JOHN S. GRISWOLD 33 Brenwal Avenue Trenton, N. J. DELBERT M. HUMENIK 113 Oak Street Nanticoke, Pa. Kappa Psi I, 2, 3, 4; Basket- ball Mgr. I, 2, 3, 4; IF Basket- ball 3, Softball 4; Pharmacy Show 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. ROY F. GUTSHALL 1836 State Street Harrisburg, Pa. Kappa Psi I, 2, 3, Sec. 4; IF Football 4; Softball 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4; Pharmacy Show Stage Mgr. 2, 3. ISADORE M. JACOBS 4 N. Nashville Avenue Ventnor, N. J. APhA 2, 3, 4. SIDNEY A. GR EENBLATT 5633 Ogontz Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi I, 2, 3, Pres. 4; IM Basketball, Football, Softball I, 2, 3, 4; IF Basketball, Football, Softball I, 2, 3, 4; Pharmacy Show I, 2, 3; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. JAYNE L. HAINES Boulder Valley Farm Ouakertown, Pa. Lambda Kappa Sigma I, 2, Pres. 3, 4; Class Sec. I, 2; Pharmacy Show 3; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. ARTHUR L. KOCH 139 Adams Street Freeland, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4; Class Treas. 1,2, 3. f H 3 f H 5 ' Ninety-three BERNARD E. KOFF 6023 N. Camac Street Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Phi Omega 2; Wrestling I; Pharmacy Show 2, 3; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. BOHDAN KOPYTKO 847 N. Seventh Street Philadelphia, Pa. MURRAY C. KROUSE 4341 Main Street Philadelphia, Pa. DAVID KUDISH 7 Providence Road Chester, Pa. ROBERT R. LARMER 42 Russell Street Woodbury, N. J. APhA 3, 4. JOSEPH E. LEGENZA 527 Cypress Street Throop, Pa. Phi Delta Chi 2, 3, 4. GERALD E. KRAMER 4805 N. Ninth Street Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 3, Bellarum 4; IM Football, Basketball, Baseball 2, 3. 4; IF Football, Basketball, Baseball 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. NORMAN S. LANE 243 S. 41st Street Philadelphia, Pa. Temple News 1 ; Chess Club 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3. ROSALIE A. LICATA 2 Watkins Street Swoyerville, Pa. Lambda Kappa Sigma I, 4, Social Chmn. 2, 3; IM Basket- ball I, 2; Dorm Council V. Pres. 2, 3; Women ' s Senate 3, 4; Student Council Sec. 3, 4: APhA I, 2, Sec. 3, 4: Phar- macy Show I, 3; Cheerleaders 2, 3, 4; Freshman Camp Staff 3, 4. School of DONALD R. MACESLIN, JR. 1317 S. Queen Street York, Pa. Kappa Psi 3, 4; IF Sports 3, 4: Basketball I, 2. SIDNEY MALAMUT 7114 Lynford Road Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega I, 2, 3, 4: IF Basketball, Football, Base- ball I, 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. JAMES W. MATTHEWS, III Box 135 Custer City, Pa. Kappa Psi 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4; Pharmacy Show 2, 3, 4. WILLIAM E. McCORKLE, JR. 3421 N. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Delta Chi 2, 3, Treas. 4: IF Council 3; APhA 2, 4. GERALD McNAUGHTON, JR. 212 E. Cochran Street Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Delta Chi 2, 3, 4. BENNETT MORGANSTEIN 1415. 49th Street Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega I, 2, 4, Social Chmn. 3; IF Basketball, Football, Baseball I, 2, 3, 4: APhA I, 2, 3, 4. JULES S. ORLOFF 629 W. Courtland Street Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi 2, 3, 4; Pharmacy Show 2, 3, 4. JOSEPH M. MURRAY 100 S. York Street Mechanicsburg, Pa. JOHN J. MLODZINSKI 27 Coon Street Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Kappa Psi I, 2, 3, 4; Var. Basketball I, 2, Capt. 3, 4; APhA 3, 4; Pharmacy Show I, 2, 3, 4. JULES S. NETTER 5548 Chester Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Delta Chi Pres. 4. 3, 4; Class V. EDWARD J. PERRI 733 E. Price Street Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Delta Chi 2, 3, 4. RONALD J. PETUSKY Park Crest Barnesville, Pa. Kappa Psi I, 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. Ninety-four BASIL PISCH 57 E. Kirmar Avenue Nanticoke, Pa. Kappa PsI I, 2, 3, 4; Van. Basketball 1 , 2, 4, Co-Capt. 3; APhA I, 2, 3, 4; IF Council 3, 4; Pharmacy Show 2, 3. HERBERT POMERANTZ 4536 N. Warnock Street Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, Sub-Dir. 3, Directorum 4; IF Baseball, Basketball 2, 3, 4. GERALD H. POLAKOFF 6507 N. Uber Street Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. VINCENT P. POLLACK 34 S. Tenth Street Mahanoy City, Pa. Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; APhA V. Pres. 4. EDWARD L. RICHIE 34 Reservoir Road West Chester, Pa. KENNETH F. POTTER 101 N. 13th Street Harrisburg, Pa. Kappa Psi 1,2, 3, Chaplain 4; Basketball I, 2, 3; APhA I, 2, 3, Treas. 4; pharmacy Show Stage Mgr. 2, 3. ALLEN P. ROSENBERG 6536 Ogontz Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 3, Chaplain 4; IF Sports 3, 4; Student Senate 4; Circle K Club 3, Treas. 4; IF Council Treas. 4; Pharmacy Show 3; NSA 4; Senior Prom Comm. 4. PAUL F. REISS McClure, Pa. BENNIE B. ROZANSKI 60 Hudson Road Plains, Pa. I li H r m acy ELBERT SCHOONOVER, JR. 503 Brooklyn Boulevard Sea Girt, N. J. 4;APkAI,!i Kappa Psi I, 2, 3, 4; Var. Slew 2, U Basketball I, 3, 4; IF Basket- ball, IM Basketball 2; IF Soft- ball I, 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD L. SIREN 3310 N. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3. V. Pres. 4; Class Sec. 4; Pharmacy Show 3. LARRY P. SEIFER 731 1 Brookhaven Road Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega I, 2, 3, Social Chmn. 4; IF Basketball, Football, Baseball I, 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4; Social Com- mittee 3, 4. WENDEL W. SMITH 230 Norway Avenue Trenton, N. J. ALBERT J. SHEVOCK 787 W. Main Street Plymouth, Pa. Kappa Psi I, 2, 3, 4; APhA STANLEY N. STARBECKE R 12 S. Andover Avenue Margate City, N. J. Zeta Beta Tau 2, 3, 4; APhA 2, 3, 4. CAROLL S. SUTRYN 1109 Webster Street Shamokin, Pa. GILBERT B. TABBY 1 1 16 W. Wyoming Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Rho Pi Phi I, 2, 3, 4; IF Coun- cil 3, 4. ALBERT TINI 205 Yale Avenue Morton, Pa. Class V. Pres. I; Class Pres. 2. HERBERT O. TOMAN 33 Avon Avenue Westville, N. J. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. NORA VARTANIAN 7050 Marshall Road Upper Darby, Pa. Lambda Kappa Sigma I, 4, Hist. 2, 3; Pharmacy Show I, 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 4; Student Council 2. SEBASTIAN J. VASTA 661 I Cornelius Street Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4; Phar- macy Show 2, 3. Ninety-five JOSEPH J. WASHELESKI 523 Railroad Street Forest City. Pa. Phi Delta Chi I, 2, 3, 4. EMANUEL WINOKUR 6860 N. Forrest Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 3, 4; IF Football, Softball, Basketball 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. MARVIN M. WEBER 719 S. Alder, Street Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega 2, 3. 4; IF Baseball, Football 2, 3, 4. JOSEPH V. ZAPPASODI 2218 S. 16th Street Philadelphia, Pa. Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; APhA I, 2, 3, 4. HERMAN WEISMAN 331 N. West End Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. JOSEPH R. ZDROJEWSKI 225 S. Harrison Street Wilmington, Del. Kappa Psi 2, 3, 4; Var. Basket- ball 2, 3; IF Basketball, Soft- ball 2, 3, 4; IF Football 4; APhA I, 2, Treas. 3, Pres. 4: Freshman Camp Staff 2, 3, Student Dir. 4; Circle K Club 3, 4. ERVIN G. ZUCKER 6062 E. Roosevelt Boulevard Philadelphia, Pa. Alpha Zeta Omega I, Ex- chequer ?, 3, Athletic Chmn. 4; IF Football, Basketball, Baseball I, 2, 3, 4; Social Committee 3. Pharmacy Ninety-six THEOLOGY Ninety-seven FACULTY J. S. LADD THOMAS Dean A.B., D.D., D.F.A. O. SPURGEON ENGLISH Psychiatry M.D. GEORGE HANDY WAILES Professor Emeritus A.B.. A.M., D.D. EDWIN LEWIS Systematic Theology A.B., B.D., Th.D., D.D. ROSS HARRISON STOVER Public Speaking A.B.. B.D., D.D., LLD., S.T.D. Ninety-eight F. ERNEST STOEFFLER Church History B.S., B.D., S.T.M., S.T.D. JOHN D. HERR Systematic Theology B. of Arch., B.D., Th.M., Th.D. CORNELIUS M. DEBOE Christian Philosophy and Ethics A.B., Th.B., A.M., Ph.D. HARRY DAVID HUMMER Practical Theology A.B., B.D., Th.M., Th.D. A.B. GEORGE B. KRANTZ Episcopalian Polity CHARLES P. ROBSHAW Old Testament A.B., Th.B., Th.M., S.T.D. CLINTON M. CHERRY Hebrew, Greek, and the New Ttestament A.B., B.D., Th.M., Th.D. ANDREW W. BLACKWOOD Professor of Biblical Homiletics A.B., D.D. STUART M. FINCH Lecturer in Psychiatry M.S., M.D. ARCHIBALD G.ADAMS Professor of World Missions A.B., B.D., S.T.M., Th.D. Ph.D. RICHARD KRONER Philosophy Ninety-nine WILLIAM A. CASSIDY 429 Ellerslie Avenue Ambler, Pa. RICHARD CROWE 45-36 1 71st Place Flushing, L. I., N. Y. ARLEY B. GOLDEN 23 W. Main Street Christiana, Del. DANIEL G. HIGGINS, JR. Still Pond, Md. EDWARD G. HUNTER 2506 Brown Street Philadelphia, Pa. LEONARD M. JONES 219 W. Spring Avenue Ardmore, Pa. Student Council, Senior Rep.; NAACP. ALEXANDER M. CHARLES 1600 Dewey Avenue Bartlesville, Olcla. WESLEY GROWTH ER 245 N. Ninth Street Reading, Pa. JOHN S. HEIM 103 Jefferson Street East Greenville, Pa. School of ROBERT W. HUGHES Salem Pike Clarlcsboro, N. J. ROBERT J. INMAN 139 E. Second Avenue North Wildwood, N. J. STACY D. MYERS, JR. Waterloo Avenue Berwyn, Pa. One Hundred ROBERT M. NEELY 1333 E. Susquehanna Avenue Philadelphia, Pa. WAYNE A. PATTON 1229 N. Fort Thomas Avenue Fort Thomas, Ky. IM Basketball, Volleyball. WILLARD L ROBINSON, JR. Charlestown, Md. CHARLES E. ROMINGER Presbyterian Manse Rectory Forked River, N. J. EDWARD J. SEIBERT Delsea Drive Franklinville, N. J. Street Meetings 2, 3. RONALD R. SEIBERT RFD 3 Ellcton, Md. Seminary Meetings. Quartet; Street Theology WILLARD P. SIRMAN, JR. Church and Evergreen Street Thorofare, N. J. Street Meeting 2, 3; Quartet. JOHN E. SKINNER 529 Manor Road Wynnewood, Pa. WILLIAM B. THIELKING 105 S. Belmont Avenue Atlantic City, N. J. Street Meeting 2, 3; Student Council Pres. 3. PHILIP H. TOWNLEY 314 Layering Mill Road Bala Cynwyd, Pa. CHARLES WILCOCK, JR. 7 Swedesboro Avenue Bridgeport, N. J. One Hundred One RUSSELL H. CONWELL . . . founder of the University. THOMAS HALL . . . home of the School of Theology. One Hundred Two SPORTS i- Sports f lay an often vita! part in the ivcll-roiinded development of students at Temple University in furthering physical well-bei ng and fostering a sense of sports- manship to be carried over into later life. One Hundred Three Senior Tackle TOM WALTERS Cwch IBM Ace Halfback KEN STOUT SUMMARY Temple Opponent 34 Albright Syracuse 42 27 Bowling Green 27 Bucknell 21 33 Scranton 7 7 Bainbridge Naval Station 7 6 Yale 32 Fordham 28 Boston U. . 20 134 157 Top Lineman LARRY CARDONICK " PflK. Senior End BOB DANIELS r ' " 1 Coach Al Kawal ' y Co-captains Joe McGee and Carmen Piccone with Coach Kawal Football Team Wins Four Like March, the Temple gridiron squad came in like a lion and went out like a lamb. Paced by halfback Ken Stout, who led the Owl scorers with 24 points and won the Maxwell Club award for his stellar play against Bucknell, coach Al Kawal ' s men finished the season with a record of four wins, four losses and a tie. Three Owl linemen, tackle Tom Walters, end Bob Daniels and guard Larry Cardonick, received honorable mention on the United Press All-East grid team. At the year ' s close Cardonick and Stout were picked as outstanding lineman and backfield man respectively. Throughout most of the season the starting lineup consisted of Lee French at center, Jim Cloney and Larry Cardonick at guards, Duke Ponis and Tom Walters as tackles, Bob Daniels and Joe McGee at end, Carmen Piccone or Gus Braccia at quarterback, Mike Purri and Ken Stout as halfbacks, and Jack Charters at fullback. Temple opened by crushing Albright, 34-0, but suc- cumbed to similar treatment when Syracuse won 42-0. Undismayed by this loss, the Owls bounced back into the win column by whitewashing Bowling Green, 27-0. Jack Charters, Bob Daniels and co-captains Joe McGee and Carmen Piccone provided the scoring punch. Then came a jaunt to Lewisburg where the Templars won their first road game in two years by beating Bucknell 27-21. Highlight of the day was an 88-yard touchdown sprint by Ken Stout. By licking the Bisons, the Owls regained possession of the " Old Shoe Trophy " for the first time in three years. Playing Scranton for the first time in 22 years, Temple routed the Royals, 33-7, as Stout raced for three touch- downs. The biggest " moral victory " of the season came next when the Owls tied the heavily-favored Bainbridge FIRST ROW (from bottom): P. Dobransky, M. Purri, R. Munro, G. Braccia, J. Ciasullo, J. Rightus, W. Sheaffer, R. Robinson. SECOND ROW: T. Walters, D. Plugge, R. Daniels, Co-Captains J. McOee and C. Piccone, J. Hadley, K. Stout, B. Hannum, J. Cloney. THIRD ROW: Head coach Al Kawal, D. Ponis. H. Fisher, P. Anapol, T. Robinson, R. Stolte, C. Mikovich, L. French, H. Stevenson, L. Rutkoski, Line Coach Pete Stevens. FOURTH ROW: N. Droboniku, L Cardonick, J. Kapp, L. Mauriello, C. LaRocca, S. Kolinsky, C. Anderson, J. Fauci, Backfield Coach Mac Strow. One Hundred Five Big Bflinbridge line traps fullback Jack Charters. Scatback Tex Robinson. Naval Center team, 7-7. Carmen Piccone scored for the Templars on a quarterback sneak. Temple might have upset the star-studded service team had not Dick Stolte ' s usually accurate toe gone amiss on a late field goal try. The next three games were a different story. The Owls journeyed to Yale and were subdued by the Eli, 32-6. Mike Purri scored the Seniors. KNEELING: Joe McGee, Bob Daniels, Lee French, Ciasullo. STANDING: Carmen Piccone and Johnny Hadley. Walters, Dick Stolte, and Joe Syracuse 42, Temple 0. The Owls would like to forget this one. Boston unleashes its aerial attack. One Hundred Six Senior Lee French centers. Owls only touchdown. Then they played Fordham at the Polo Grounds. The Rams rushing attack proved too much for them as they lost 28-0. A 20-0 loss to Boston U. closed out the season, and marked the final game for seniors Carmen Piccone, Lee French, John Hadley, Bob Daniels, Joe McGee, Dick Stolte and Tom Walters. Ken Stout (with ball) streaked 85 yards against Bucknell. ' S. ' " . ' Twas a cold, cold day at Yale. Sheaffer off tackle. Quarterback Gus Braccia fires. One Hundred Seven Coach Pete Leaness Coach Leaness with four Owls named to the All-Eastern team: E. Tatoian, J. Dunn, A. Didrilcsen and L. Oliver. Also chosen but not shown was R. Casey. Soccer Team Undefeated, Following a one year lapse, Coach Pete Leaness ' s soccer squad won back the NCAA crown and were voted the " outstanding college team in the country " by the Intercollegiate Soccer Football Association. Inside Jack Dunn and halfback Len Oliver won All-American honors for their stellar play. Unbeaten and untied, the Ow booters scored 60 points, held the opposition to only eight, and racked up a total of 10 straight wins. University officials rejected a post-season bid to play in the mythical national soccer bowl championship against the University of San Francisco, explaining that the trip would have been too costly. In their first match the Owls blanked the Alumni, 4-0, and then opened the regular season with a 4-1 victory over Bucknell. Thanks to frequent assists by wingmen Ed Tatoian and Bob Casey, All-American Jack Dunn tabbed all four points. The Cherry and White, playing the entire game without a substitution, then shaded a strong Haverford team, 2-1. Dunn and center forward Frank Fanucci scored for the Owls. Temple then had a field day against Delaware, swamping the Hens, 12-1. Al Didricksen, inside, led the scoring derby with four goals, followed by Fanucci and Dunn with three each, and Tatoian and Sylvan Boni, inside, with one apiece. Almost as humiliating was the 10-0 pasting which the Owl booters then gave to Drexel, as Fanucci banged in four markers. Rutgers came next and with Didricksen, Dunn, Tatoian and Boni doing the scoring, Temple came out on the long end of the 7-1 score. Then came the " big game " with Army, until then unbeaten and untied. In less than four minutes, Tatoian had booted three goals against the West Pointers. He and Didricksen later added another for good measure. Final score: Owls 5, Army 2. Another arch rival, Penn State, then bowed to Temple, 2-0, in an excitingly close game. This win clinched the NCAA eastern title but proved a costly win for the Owls, as halfback Norm Cohen suffered a broken leg. Four Te Dunn made ' The John Log ' ; m The 1953-54 squad: BACK ROW: Coach Leaness, D. Sass, manager, A. Didriben, S. Boni, J. Dunn, W. Coco, F. Schneider, I. Canter, R. Lamey, D. Brill, C. Lewis, H. Smith, M. Hoffman, trainer. KNEELING: J. Logue, R. Casey, E. Tatoian, F. Fanucci, L. Oliver, R. Damerjian, M. Westover, D. Brendlinger and W. Steerman. One Hundred Eight Wins NCAA Crown Four Temple booters scored in the team ' s 9-2 win next over Gettysburg. Dunn made four bullseyes, Tatoian and Fanucci two and Oliver one. The Owls then closed out the season by routing LaSalle, 9-0. It marked the final game for seniors Harry Smith, Ed Tatoian, Bob Casey, Floyd Schneider, John Logue, Sylvan Boni, Bill Coco and Dirck Brendlinger. Outstanding for his defensive work throughout the season was fullback Bob Lamey. SUMMARY Temple Opponent 4 Bucknell I 2 Haverford I 10 Drexel 12 Delaware I 7 Rutgers I 5 Army 2 2 Penn State 9 Gettysburg 2 9 LaSalle .. 60 8 Tatoian leaps for the ball while Didriksen waits ior a pass. Fanucci takes Army player for an unexpected ride. All-American Jack Dunn. Coach Leaness talks over strategy with H. Smith, F. Schneider, R. Casey, E. Tatoian, W. Coco, S. Boni and J. Logue. One Hundred Nine Ail-American Len Oliver. LaSalle player finds it difficult to guard both Boni (with ball) and Brendlinger. Didriksen takes a pass. INDIVIDUAL SCORING Dunn 20 Tatoian 13 Fanucci 12 Didriksen 10 Boni 2 Oliver 1 Smith 1 Casey 1 Fanucci gets off a kick. Look Ma, no hands. One Hundred Ten Tap-off in Philadelphia Pharmacy game. Captain John Mlodzinski. Druggist Dribblers Have Fine Season Paced by Captain John Mlodzinski, Temple Pharmacy ' s basketball team com- pleted one of the most successful seasons in its court history. The Owl sharpshooters dumped 13 of their 17 opponents and won I I of the last 12 starts. In Eastern Intercollegiate Pharmacy League play, the dribbling druggists finished in second place behind seemingly invincible Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. By bucketing an average of 17 points a game, Mlodzinski was among the leading Delaware Valley area scorers throughout the season. Behind him in the team race for individual scoring honors was Dick Stern, whose game average was 12.4. Other outstanding members of coach John Ballots ' squad were Bert Schoonover, Basil Pisch, Si Denenberg, Glen Boerstler and Ken Paull. SUMMARY Temple Opponent 66 Ursinus 84 56 Philadelphia Textile 73 College of South Jersey 63 72 Glassboro State Teachers 44 61 Philadelphia Pharmacy 65 Philadelphia Textile 84 College of Osteopathy 58 St. John ' s Pharmacy 61 College of South Jersey 58 Philadelphia Pharmacy 73 National Aggies 55 St. John ' s Pharmacy 44 Columbia Pharmacy 48 Glassboro State Teachers 61 Brooklyn College of Pharmacy 53 National Aggies 68 Columbia Pharmacy 53 Brooklyn Pharmacy 61 Coach John Ballots. 47 64 77 61 65 71 66 76 83 59 69 75 82 FIRST ROW: J. Marlino (Athletic Director), V. Morse (Manager), B. Pisch, J. Mlodzinski, B. Schoonover, D. Humenik (Manager), K. Potter, G. Sebastanelli (Manager), J. Zdroiewski. SECOND ROW: J. Buschemi, K. Paull, D. Stern, J. Hassman, G. Boerstler, S. Dennenberg, Coach John Ballots, L. Ravin. Coach Harry Litwack Cagers Have Tough Schedule Win 15 Lose 12 A veteran Temple basketball team failed to live up to its advance press notices this season, dropped several important games by close margins, and wound up with a so-so 15-12 win, loss record. Pitted against several of the top teams in the nation, coach Harry Litwack ' s cagers might have won a tourney bid had they not fallen apart near the end of the season. However, there were some memorable nights. Temple fans will long remember the 57-56 upset which the Owls pulled on NCAA champions La Salle. Scoring 24 points, the Explorers ' All-American Tom Sola was too much for the Cherry and White in the first Temple-La Salle game, which the latter won, 77-53. At the second meeting, however, the Owls bottled up Gola, controlled the back- boards and, this time, Harry Silcox was the most accurate man on the court with 27 points. There were several heartbreaking losses for Temple. For instance, the 57-56 loss to St. Joseph ' s and th.e 64-62 game against lona, which the Owls almost pulled out of the fire. Temple got revenge against St. Joseph ' s in their second meeting. Captain John Kane bucketed 2 I points, and the Owls won in a romp, 73-58. Two Temple games resulted in new scoring records. Kentucky ' s All-American Cliff Hagan broke three scoring marks as the invincible Wildcats trounced the Owls, 86-59. Temple ' s leading point maker Harry Silcox set a new South Hall record by racking up 33 markers against Drexel. The previous mark of 31 was set by Bill Mlkvy in 1951. Until that game, Drexel had been unbeaten, but Temple left little doubt as to which was the better team by coasting to a 100-62 victory. One of the most exciting games was against Santa Clara, which Temple won, 67-57, thanks to a late surge and several crucial field goals by sophomores Hal Lear and Harold Reinfeld. Connie Miller proved a capable ball handler, while Sam Sylvester specialized in grabbing rebounds. For their all-around play, Harry Silcox and Al (Lefty) Didriksen were named to the All-Philadelphia team. Captain John Kane. The 1953-54 OwU basketball squad. Seated: C. Mohr, S. Sylvester, J. Kane, H. Silcox, L. Smith. Standing: coach H. Litwack, C. Miller, H. Lear, A. Didriksen, F. Dobisch, and manager. One Hundred Twelve notices O f remember well for w, 77-53. to kai court 1 Hie 57-54 iptain Join l-American itneOwls, record by ,;i5i smple won, s Hal Lear Sylvester scores. i] Didriben Temple 59 Navy 65. FIRST TEAM: C. Miller, H. Lear, S. Sylvester, A. Didriksen, H. Silcox and J. Kane. Temple 58 SUMMARY Opponent Albright 50 59 Kentucky 86 73 Seton Hall 59 60 Lehigh 48 58 Lebanon Valley 62 72 Gettysburg 69 54 Albright 46 63 57 ... 77 72 Lebanon Valley 67 Santa Clara .... 53 La Salle 79 59 64 66 65 56 62 62 100 73 62 57 67 St. John ' s . 76 Muhlenberg 59 Georgetown 72 Holy Cross 52 Penn State Pa. Military College 42 Navy 65 Lehigh 61 Manhattan 62 Delaware 57 St. Joseph ' s 57 lona 64 Princeton 68 Drexel 62 St. Joseph ' s 58 St. Francis 71 La Salle 56 72 65 61 85 ... 67 Gangway for Didriksen. Teamwork paid off. " Lefty " Didrlksen takes to the air. Harry Silcox. Captain John Kane scoring. Hal Lear hooks Connie Miller breaking loose. Didriksen intercepts Santa Clara pass. Watchful eyes and a jump ball. Kane rounds the bend. LaSalle player thwarts Owl scoring try. Silcox ties up opponent, as Didriksen and Kane rush in to help One Hundred Fifteen Coach Charles Demetriades. Wrestlers Win Four Despite a lack of manpower, coach Charlie Demetri- ades ' wrestlers were a vast improvement over last year ' s squad which failed to win a match. The Owl grapplers won four of nine matches, and tied one. Freshman Art McCall won the Middle Atlantic AAU 115-pound title, sophomore Bill Simmons went through the season undefeated and senior Bob McCreary ended his brilliant wrestling career at Temple in a blaze of glory. McCreary, who c ompiled a three season varsity record of 22 wins, four losses and one tie, was selected to compete in the National Championships at Norman, Oklahoma. A 123-pounder, he placed second in the Eastern Intercollegi- ates earlier this year. Simmons won a Wilkes College tournament, without having a point scored against him. His teammate and brother, Dick, lost only one match. Other Temple standouts were Jack Scanlon, Hubert Cherrie, John DiFioro and Joe Ciasullo. SUMMARY Temple 23 Muhlenberg 10 Syracuse 15 Lafayette 12 Rutgers 22 Gettysburg Buclcnell West Chester Franklin Marshall NYU . 19 3 9 26 Opponent 13 21 15 16 10 10 27 23 10 Art McCall. Dick Simmons fights off Lafayette ' s Dick Eisenbeis. The world was upside down for Hubert Cherry an ' d this Franklin and Marshall wrestler. Captain Bob McCreary. Varsity squad: R. McCreary , R. Simmons, D. Simmons, J. Scanlon, H. Cherrie, J. DiFiori, J. Ciasullo and coach Demetriades. One Hundred Sixteen I! 21 li II 10 -10 !! -a 11 Gymnasts Win Two As Scholl Sets Record Several outstanding individual performances highlighted an otherwise disappointing campaign for the 1954 Temple gymnasts, who finished with two wins, three losses and a tie. The brightest spot of all was Gene Scholl, who shattered a record while winning the rope climb at the Eastern Inter-collegiate Gymnastic League ' s Individual Championships which were held at the University in March. Scholl set a new South Hall Gym mark by scurrying up the 20-foot rope in 0:03.5 seconds. The Owls ' captain John Jengo, Bob McCarthy and Bill Rocco also turned in fine performances in the tourney. In Olympic compe- tition, McCarthy tied for first place in the still rings division by amassing 226 points. Jengo and Rocco finished second in the horizontal bar and tumbling specialties, respectively. After defeating Jersey City Recreation Center in the opener, 52-40, coach Max Younger ' s gymnasts squeezed by Syracuse, 48.5 to 47.5. Scholl won first p ace in the rope climb and Coco captured top honors for the sidehorse. The Owls then lost to a tough Army team, 50-46, before holding Lawncrest Recreation Center, which was composed of former Olympians, national champions and other outstanding athletes, to a 48-48 tie. Scholl and Jengo won first places against Penn State, but the Nittany Lions won out 61-35. Scholl set a new Temple record for the rope cimb at 3.7 seconds, a record which he broke later in the Individual Championship Tourney. Other Owls who turned in fine performances were Ben Paul, Bob Demerjian, John Drury, Bob Zelinsky, Jack Bretcher, Bob Morton and Dick Brown. A 54-42 loss to Navy closed out the season. Captain John Jengo and coach Max Younger. Gene Scholl climbs .the rope. 1954 Gym Team. Front Row: J. Drury, E. Scholl, B. Paul, captain J. Jengo, R. McCarthy, J. Bretcher, W. Coco. Back Row: coach Max Younger, manager F. Rabinowiti, W. Rocco, A. Cocco, R. Brown, R. Damerjian, R. Flynn, R. Zelinsky, asst. manager R. Able, and trainer S. Rosenthal. Bob McCarthy One Hundred Seventeen IE Jack Bretcher, diving specialist. Coach Don Conrad with co-captains Bob Bernoff and Jim Howat. Swimming Team Wins Three Bolstered by the return of eight senior lettermen and paced by up-and-coming sophomore Al Fekete, coach Don Conrad ' s 1954 swimming team compiled a record of three wins and seven losses. Fekete, a freestyle sprint artist, amassed 76 points to lead the Owl mermen in scoring. Close behind him were co-captains Bob Bernoff, a freestyle distance expert, and Jim Howat, diver and freestyle competitor, in that order. Competing against nine other Philadelphia area colleges in a post-season tourney at Villanova College, the Owls finished third behind city champion La Salle and the University of Pennsylvania. Fekete recorded Temple ' s lone triumph in the 50-yard freestyle. In league play, the Cherry and White swimmers won their opening match against Swarthmore, 59-26. They lost their next five matches before outpointing Drexel, 54-30, and swamping Pennsyl- vania Military College, 60-24. Swimming for Temple for the last time, besides Howat and Bernoff, were seniors Jack Bretcher, Sam Neff, Len Popowich, Ed Tarsa, Bob Baron and Phil Perkins. Bretcher shared the diving chores with Howat, while Popowich specialized in the breaststroke. Undergraduate letter winners, along with Fekete, were Lou McFadden and Emil Liebman. Temple SUMMARY Opponent 59 22 19 33 37 34 54 Swarthmore 26 Delaware 62 Princeton 65 La Salle 51 Lafayette 48 New York U Drexel 60 Pa. Military College 37 Gettysburg 38 Rutgers 50 30 24 45 44 Tense moment in Temple-La Salle meet. FIRST ROW: S. Neff, A. Fekete, R. Bernoff, J. Howat, L. McFadden, E. Tarsa. SECOND ROW: J. Bretcher, L. Popowich, R. Baron, E. Liebman, P. Perkins, Coach Don Conrad. One Hundred Eighteen Opponent 26 12 .65 FRONT ROW: R. Torp, D. Shimp, B. Smilowitz, L. Heyman, S. Battle. BACK ROW: F. Pierce, coach, H. Meisel, B. Morrison, J. McBride, J. Fratto, D. Murdock, and B. Fannor, mgr. Captain Harris Meisel and coach Fred Pierce Fencing Team Wins Three, Loses Two Temple Opponent 15 Lafayette 12 12 John Hopkins 15 12 Lehigh 15 17 Haverford 10 19 Muhlenberg 8 Coach Fred Pierce ' s first year at the helm proved successful as Temple ' s fencers whipped three of their five opponents. In post season play in the Middle Atlantic Conference, NCAA championships, Temple finished fourth, won the team foil trophies and also took a gold medal in the foil. In local pre-season competition in the Amateur Fencers League, Temple won eight medals. Following this were victories over Lafayette, Haverford and Muhlen- berg. Leading the team were Captain Harris Meisel and John Fratto, who won the NCAA team foil trophy. Fratto, a sophomore, also won a gold medal. New letter winners, in addition to Fratto, were William Morrison, Bernard Smilowitz and Sol Battle, and seniors Dick Torp and David Shimp. Seniors Larry Heyman and captain Meisel were the veteran letter winners. Inexperienced Rifle Team Does Well Despite a shortage of materia , coach Sgt. Joseph P. McMahon ' s rifle team had won nine and lost eight before a final match, scheduled for May 8 against St. Joseph ' s. The team, made up almost entirely of sophomore ROTC students, was led by Captain George Wilson, who was the only senior on the squad. A pair of sopho- mores, Leonard Schwartz and Andrew Demetropolous, were the team ' s top point getters with 372 and 370 markers, respectively. The Owl marksmen downed LaSalle thrice and the Penn ROTC twice. They also defeated Lafayette, Valley Forge Military Academy, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Villanova, the latter by a forfeit. Temple dropped matches to Lehigh and Drexel twice, and also lost to Princeton, Western Maryland, PMC and Villanova. Rifle Team: M. Goldberg, B. Gross, G. Wilson, captain, L. Schwartz, A. Demes and D. Sherman. Coach Sgt. Joseph McMahon gives pointers to marksmen Bernard Gross, George Wilson and Leonard Schwartz. Coach Ben Ogden. Track Team ' s Chances Are Anybody ' s Guess About the only thing that could be predicted as Temple ' s 1954 out- door track team limbered up in Spring practice sessions was the fact that the Owl cindermen would compete in five dual and three triangular meets this season. On paper the prospects looked good, because a host of veterans had returned from last year ' s squad. Returning were Captain Jim Gulick, the team ' s leading scorer last year, who pole vaults well and who set a new University record for the javelin in 1953 with a heave of 200 feet. Coach Ben Ogden could also count on Santee Ruffin, who has already sped over the 120-yard high hurdles and 220-yard low hurdles in 0:15.1 and 0:24 seconds, respectively. Expected to score consistently also were Mike Purri and Paul Goldberg, in the shotput and discus, Saul Goldman, in the high jump, and Bob Cummings in the sprints. The team ' s success, however, seemed as though it would depend on the Owl ' s ability to score frequent second and third places in meets, as well as first. Coach Ogden was counting heavily on sprinters Manny Cabrera, Jim Kapp, Jesse Bell, Sam Brodsky and Bob Damerjian, half-milers Jack Hoffman, John Marshall and Ed Sutherland, and field men Jack Hoffman, Bill Tisouris and Charles Bushar. Before running in the Penn Relays, the Owls opened their season in an away meet with Swarthmore. With only two seniors, Cabrera and Kapp, on the squad, the North Broadstreeters ' 1955 track team looks very promising indeed. Distance runner John Marshall leads pack. Captain Jim Gulick sails over the bar. Bob Damerjian shows good form in broad jump. One Hundred Twenty Sometimes the Owls lost Hurdler Santee Ruffin in action. Sometimes Temple won . . . And sometimes the race was very close. Harriers Suffer from Lack of Material Plagued with a shortage of personnel, coach Ben Ogden ' s cross country team staggered through an un- successful season and wound up without a win. The Owl harriers lost to St. Joseph ' s, West Chester and La Salle. Another meet, with Albright, was postponed because of a heavy snow. Carrying Temple ' s co ors over the gruelling five-mile run were Al Scerbo, Jack Hoffman, Walter Barrett, Jerry Johnson and John Marshall. This was the entire team in a sport which requires a minimum of five runners. When Marshall became sidelined with illness at the West Chester meet, the Owls almost lost by a forfeit. Thanks to volunteer Jack Scanlon, of Temple ' s wrestling team, the meet was run as scheduled. Temple and West Chester harriers at start of five-mile run. Cross Country team. STANDING: J. Scanlon, J. Hoffman, coach Ben Ogden, A. Scerbo and D. Mitchell. KNEELING: J. Marshall and W. Barrett. NOT IN PHOTO: J. Johnson. One Hundred Twenty-one COACH ERNIE CASALE Veteran Baseball Team Returns After a highly successful 1953 season, Temple ' s baseball squad looked forward to even better things this season. Bolstered by a flock of veterans and a group of promising rookies, coach Ernie Casale ' s nine seemed a sure bet to improve on the I 1-6-1 record of 1953, during Casale ' s first year at the helm. Standouts among the returnees were first baseman Dick Connolly, the team captain, and pitcher Bill Shilling. Connolly, the Owls ' slugger who received the team ' s most valuable p ayer award last year, was back for his third straight season. Shilling, a good fast bailer with a tricky curve, has been the team ' s top hurler for the past two seasons. Expected to start in the infield with Connolly were veterans Bob McCreary, second baseman, Francis " Rail " Sylvester, shortstop, and Connie Miller at third base. Marty Grims, Len Oliver and Floyd Schneider promised to give added strength to the infield. Behind the mask was the peppery and hard hitting veteran Bill Hall. New- comers Gary Mozenter, Duke Ponis and Howard Glickman were also available for catching chores. Besides the offerings of Shilling, they were expected to handle pitchers Larry Grivna, John Lario and Chet Bromke. Coach Casale was counting on veteran outfielders Mark Soifer and Sid Frankel to supply much of the hitting power. April 3 Rutgers 6 Princeton 9 Albright 10 Lehigh 13 Muhlenberg 17 Navy 19 Georgetown 24 Gettysburg 26 Swarthmore 28 Haverford May 4 Lafayette 5 LaSalle 7 Bucknell 10 St. Joseph ' s 12 LaSalle 13 Franklin and Marsha 15 Penn State 19 Delaware 25 St. Joseph ' s 26 Drexel UerBIIScU Sylvester connects. Seniors Bill Schilling, Floyd Schneider, Bob McCreary, Dick Connolly and Marie Soifer talk things over. Captain Connolly and Coach Casale. One Hundred Twenty-two i on t[,e ] 6 team 6 team ' s season. Creary, it tnird trengtn blefor handle Wei Warming up at practice session are pitchers (left to right) N. Rosen, B. Schilling, C. Bromlce, L Grivna, C. DiSanto, M. Fields and J. Lario. Pitcher Bill Schilling lv 1 Catchers Bil l Hall and Gary Mozenter. Strike three and he ' s out. One Hundred Twenty-three Close but safe. Men ' s Tennis Coach Irv Singer had only two returning lettermen on his tennis team this year. Coach Singer hoped to improve on last year ' s dismal l-l I record, but only about 15 candi- dates reported for practice. Seniors Pete Braun and Nate ' Skip ' Weinstein were the only lettermen returning. Other seniors on the squad were soccer star Ed Tatoian and man- ager Marv Allanoff. Newcomers were Bob Leber, Bernard Kartoz, Kurt Sromze and Irv Shore. Shore is the top prospect for next year ' s team. Although ineligible to play in the regular matches this season, since he is a transfer student from Miami University, he displayed excellent form in several exhibition matches. The Owl netmen were scheduled for 16 regular matches this season. Tennis Team: M. Allanoff, N. Weinstein, P. Braun, E. Shore, E. Tatoian, B. Kartoz. Nate Weinstein and Coach Irv Singer. Pete Braun scoops up a low one. Nate Weinstein backhands the ball. Golf Golf Team: Coach Mac Strow, C. Chong, T. Hyman, Captain Austin Felis, E. Abrams, H. Kauffman. Clifford Chong tries an iron while Aus Felis and Hank Kauffman watch. Lack of manpower threatened Temple ' s chances as coach Mac Strow ' s golfers prepared to open an I I match schedule. The burden of the attack was expected to fall on the shoulders of captain Austin Felis, a junior, who consistently shoots in the 70 ' s. The only other veteran returning from last year was Ed Abrams. Newcomers to the squad were Gerry Ochrieter, Jack Schreffler, Clifford Chong and Toby Hyman. The Owls lost their opening match to Haverford, 9-0, but bounced back to defeat St. Joseph ' s, 5-4, before losing to Delaware, 7-2. Captain Austin Felis and Coach Mac Strow. I. Harlot Action in Sigma Pi Sigma Phi Epsilon game. Latter won Inter- fraternity basketball title. Theta Kappa Phi took I-F grid honors while Phi Alpha finished second. ids Hit bill. :bces id was Austin lelOs, ear i krieter, ferford, and IF League Activities A change in policy in the University ' s intramural sports program highlighted the IM and Inter-fraternity activities this season. The change involved an effort on the part of Dr. John H. Jenny, intramural sports director, and the Department of Health and Physical Education to stimulate more participation among men and women students and the faculty. Numerous co-educational sports, from badminton to volley ball, were scheduled in an effort to stir more interest in sports among both sexes. Weekly co-educational swimming and bowling sessions were also held for interested faculty members and students. No one was admitted to swim except in pairs of one faculty member and one student. Either student or faculty member could do the inviting. Faculty mem- bers who supervised IM activities included Dr. Jenny, Dr. Joseph Carroll, Donald Conrad and John Logan. George Detwiler was president of this year ' s Inter-fraternity Council, while Francis Sylvester served as secretary-treasurer. Tau Epsilon Phi took double honors by winning the table tennis and bowling championships. Sigma Phi Epsilon and Sigma Pi were runners-up in those sports, respectively. Theta Kappa Phi won the IF football title, with Phi Alpha finishing second. In basketball, Sigma Phi Epsilon came out on top ahead of Theta Kappa Phi. Sigma Pi and Pi Lambda Phi showed good form at their bowling match here, but Tau Epsilon Phi won the IF title. Intramural basketball league champs, Tali Athletic Club, display their Individual trophies. TOP ROW: K. Stout, T. Robinson, J. Charters, F. Schneider and G. Braccia. BOTTOM ROW: F. Sylvester, M. Purri and J. Cloney. One Hundred Twenty-five FIRST TEAM: Coach Anne Volp, L. Haas, C. Clinton. J. Edenborn, K. Ganther. S. McKay, R. Derstine, M. Kline, G. Evans, R. Fabry, U. Belli and M. Gosnay. Named to the All-College first team for their outstanding play were: L. Haas, R. Fabry, J. Edenborn and M. Gosnay. Temple Opponent 3 Beaver I 4 Swarthmore 3 Bryn Mawr 4 West Chester 3 Ursinus I 4 Drexel 2 2 Penn .. ... 2 SECOND TEAM: P. Munsell, B. J. Burnett. J. Crolius, A. Fisher, M. Northey, B. Hess, A. Kline, M. Snyder, J. Lucente, J. Johnson, L. Goverberg, A. Sharalcawa and B. Reimann (kneeling). Hockey Team Wins Five Winding up her fifth year as coach of the field hockey squad, Mrs. Anne Volp has established a record which will be hard to beat. During her reign, the Owlettes have won 24 games, tied five and lost only two. Only one setback marred another perfect season for her this year. Ursinus won, 1-0. But led by captain Mary Sosnay the Cherry and White team won five games, humbling Beaver, Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr, West Chester and Drexel. A tie with Penn closed out the successful season. It also marked the final game for manager Anna Kelly. Rita Fabry, Joan Edenborn, Lillian Mass and captain Mary Gosnay were named to the All-College first team. Owlettes (dark uniforms) on the offense against Beaver. Hieiroititanilii. indM.6ij.a. Oppomt I Coach Mrs. Anne Volp discusses strategy with captain Ann Fisher. Temple Opponent 52 Beaver 61 56 Albright 10 35 East Stroudsburg 24 55 Penn 36 44 Ursinus 37 68 Rosemont 30 58 Immaculate 55 45 Swarthmore 32 lawr,West successful taa Kelly. irySosnay Jean Rodger shoots while Marlene Northey (25) guards the backboards. Coach Anne Volp and her starting team. KNEELING: A. Kelly, E. Dietz, M. Gosney, N. Kelly, R. Derstine, A. Fisher, M. Northey, J. Edenborn, B. Thunler, J. Lucente, D. Walton. STANDING: Coach Volp, G. Evans, A. Kline, B. Ball, A. Weil, J. Mann, J. Rodgers, B. Reimann, B. Brink, K. Ganther, M. Kline, C. Clinton, L Haas V. Belli, J. Johnson, P. Munsell, A. Shirakawa, and L. Andreson, Mgr. irl Cagers Have 7-1 Log An opening game loss to a tough Beaver College team marred an otherwise perfect season for Coach Mrs. Anne Volp ' s basketball charges, who duplicated the 7- 1 log they posted a year ago. Sparked by captain Ann Fisher, the Owlette dribblers routed Albright, Penn, Rosemont and Swarthmore and won by closer margins against East Stroudsburg and Ursinus. Highlight of the season, however, was the North Broad Streeters ' 58-55 win over Immaculate, which until then had been undefeated. Temple was " up " for that game, because Immaculata handed the Owls their lone defeat last year. Pacing the team in scoring with I 20 points was Jean Rodger. Close behind her were Marlene Northey and Marge Kline with 1I7 and 1 03 tallies, respectively. Graduation will take Captain Ann Fisher, Mary Gosnay, Alice Weil, Joanne Mann, Anna Kelly and manager Tish Anderson. Immaculata player grabs rebound as Jean Rodger, Marge Kline and Marlene Northey (in dark uniforms) close in. One Hundred Twenty-seven Coach Mrs. Prudence Fleming gives a few tips to Captain Adrienne McNaughton. Shirley McKay doing a neat jacknife. Temple mermaids: D. Sarmitz, A. McNaughton, C. Getis, P. Schwenk, R. Fabry, J. Bonn, E. Hollis, R. Bones, B. Hess, C. Wacker, S. McKay, Mrs. Fleming (coach), and L Leboviti (mgr.j. Mermaids Win Four, Lose Three Temple ' s girls ' swimming team chalked up a 4-3 record for the 1953-54 season. Coach Mrs. Prudence Fleming ' s mermaids lost only to Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr and Chest- nut Hill. The Owlettes posted victories over Beaver, Drexel, Ursin us and Penn. They also placed fifth in the Eastern Intercollegiate championships. Spearheading the Cherry and White scorers through- out the season were Carol Wacker in the freestyle and Betty Hess in the backstroke and breaststroke. Other im- portant point makers were captain Adrienne McNaughton and Shirley McKay, who specialized in diving. The loss of only four varsity members, the Misses Mc- Naughton, Getis, Bones and Hollis, indicates the potential strength of next year ' s team. Caught in the air at a practice session are Betty Hess, Judy Bonn, Rita Fabray and Carol Wacker. Pretty and talented were seniors A. McNaughton, C. Getis, R. Bones and E. Hollis. One Hundred Twenty-eight Bowlers Have Ups and Downs Temple 1897 Drexel 1949 Penn .. 1902 Drexel 1831 Penn .. 1895 NYU . For the first time in three years, Coach Marie Grail ' s bowling team failed to capture the eastern intercollegiate championships. Hampered by the loss of last year ' s captain and high scorer, " Dee " Shakoski, who was graduated in February, the Owlette keglers failed to win a match during the regular season. However, Temple did well in the national Tele- graphies in December and in February, which they won. Co-captains of this year ' s squad were Helen McMasters and Mary Jane Winchester. Bowling team. STANDING: M. J. Winchester (Co-captain), C. Schmidt, L. Anderson, P. Hill, H. MacMaster (Co-captain), R. Smock. SEATED: Miss Marie Grail (Coach). Opponent 1971 2046 1984 1845 2082 Captain Helen MacMaster rolls away, and seniors, H. MacMaster, Miss Grail, L. Anderson, and M. J. Winchester. I IONI and E. Pitchers Ruth Derstine and Nancy Kelly. Veteran Softball Team Returns A seasoned Softball squad, under the direction of coach Marie Grail, returned to action and gave signs of a promising 1954 campaign. The lone senior on the team was manager Anna Kelly. However, many veterans were back on the diamond. Spring training found Ruth Derstine and Nancy Kelly handling most of the pitching, with Rita Fabry and Barbara Thumler sharing the catching. Others expected to start in the opening game against Beaver were Carol Wacker, first base; Elaine Deitz, second; Marlene Northy, shortstop, and Jean Johnson, third base. Lillian Haas, Marian Snyder, Shirley McKay and Judy Schuman were among those vieing for outfield positions. The Owlettes ware hoping to match or better their record of last year when they won four and lost one. Coach Marie Grail talks things over with co-captains Lill Haas and Carol Wacker. Softball team. KNEELING: B. Hess, J. Johnson, C. Clinton, M. Northy, N. Kelly, B. Thumler, D. Walton. STANDING: Miss Marie Grail (Coach), L. Haas, C. Wacker, S. McKay, R. Derstine, E. Dieti, J. Schuman, M. Snyder, A. Kelly (Manager). Tennis squad: A. McNaughton, Z. Toff, A. Fisher, N. Levit, E. Blackman, J. Berg, J. Schweikart, B. Ball, Irv Linder (Coach). Top singles Ann Fisher and Zelda Toff. Seniors Helen MacMaster and Helen Bonikowski get into position. Manager Gay Ganther and Coach Flossie Green check scores. Coach Irv Linden and Captain Adrienne McNaughton. Women ' s Tennis Prospects of a successful season for coach Irv Linder ' s tennis team looked good as 28 girls, including several veterans, reported for spring practice. The brightest prospect among the newcomers appeared to be Zelda Toff, a freshman. Among the veterans returning to the squad were captain Adrienne McNaughton, Ruth Bones and Sybil Davidowitz. Other potential letter winners were Sladys Evans, Marian Snyder, Anne Fisher, Joan Gelman and Anne Friedman. Manager of this year ' s team was June Schweikart. After some speculation as to whether Temple would be able to field an archery team this year, coach Miss Florence Green and her bow and arrow misses opened the season against Penn. So few stu- dents tried out for archery, that this was the first year, to Miss Green ' s recollection, that the Owlettes were unable to field a junior varsity squad. Returning from last year ' s team which won five out of six matches were only two girls: Helen Mac- Masters and Helen Bonikowski. New target shooters included Kay Ganther and Mary Brown. Besides Penn, Temple was also scheduled to play Rosemont, East Stroudsburg, Swarthmore and Drexel. Archery Archery squad: Helen MacMaster, Judy Featherman, Helen Bonikowski, and Kay Ganther. WAA Activities Mrs. Fleming, WAA adviser Hundreds of Temple women students participated in the sports of their own choosing to make this, the 28th year of the Women ' s Athletic Association, a roaring success. Some of the coeds played on varsity teams, such as hockey, basketball and swim- ming. Others preferred the intramural activities, which included horseback riding, lacrosse, fencing, modern dance, senior ife saving, social dance, badminton and rhythmic swimming. There were sports of all kinds for every girl and, as usual, Mrs. Prudence Fleming was always there when the girls needed advice. Mrs. Fleming has been adviser to the WAA for the past five years. In an effort to keep attendance high, many of the WAA ' s activities were co- educational, such as tennis, dancing and horseback riding. An allotment in the WAA budget provided for this. Every woman student in the University automatically becomes a member of the WAA when she pays her student activities and actively participates in one or more of the association ' s activities. The purpose of the organization is to foster good sportsmanship and to promote the welfare of women students at the University through intramural, varsity, recrea- tional and co-recreational activities. This year ' s officers were Margaret Kline, president; Betty Hess, vice-president; Gladys Evans, treasurer, and Rita Fabry, recording secretary. Barbara Reimann was the corresponding secretary, while Mildred Duckett and Judy Bachman handled the publicity. The WAA had a " first " this year when it gave a volleyball and swimming play day for senior pupils at high schools in the Philadelphia area. 1 Temple Performing chores at WAA office seems pleasant for Mrs. Volp, Betty Hess, Barbara Reimann, Rita Fabry and Gladys Evans. nd arrow few shi- the first Owlettes won five ilen Mac- 1 shooters d to play ore and Betty Jane Luechtner leads Modern Dance group. Sometimes there were as many males as females at the WAA lounge. Here Jact Brechter, Gene Scholl, Bill Coco and Ed Tatoian entertain June Schweiltart. One Hundred Thirty-one An understanding of the University ' s athletic program would seem incomplete without some mention of the policy makers who make it tick. The Director of Intercollegiate Athletics is Josh Cody, who is now in his second year after many successful seasons as coach of Temple basketball teams. He is responsible to the University ' s 2 1 -man Athletic Council which makes recommenda- tions to President Robert Johnson. Council members are appointed annually by the President of the University. Seven must be faculty members, including a minimum of three persons selected from a panel of the University Senate. The remaining members are selected from the Board of Trustees, the Administration and the Alumni. The following four-point recommendation was agreed upon by the Athletic Council at a meeting last year: 1. That we advocate as wide participation in intercollegiate athletics by the student body as is feasible with the resources and facilities available. 2. That the athletic student receive no different facilities with respect to ad- mission, scholastic standing and scholarships. 3. That every effort be made to arrange schedules with colleges whose aims and practices are similar to our own. 4. That we do not oppose participation in post season tournaments under proper auspices, but the schedules should not be arranged with such participation in mind or as a necessary goal. One Hundred Thir+y- ' wo GREEKS Sororities and fraternities at Temple Unizvrsity offer an ideal training ground for students to learn the rudiments of social living. Teaching members to get along rvith other people is a vital contri- bution of the Greeks to the development of social skills and the preparation for later life. One Hundred Thirty-three Alpha Sigma Alpha OFFICERS President Virginia Bahmueller Vice-President Charlotte Klemp Rec. Secretary Mary Burns Corr. Secretary. Nance Gingrich Treasurer Noel Curry Alpha Sigma Alpha social sorority is one of the largest and most active social soror- ities at the University. Since its establish- ment on campus in 1922, the sorority has risen to a position of leadership in local activities. Winners of last year ' s outstanding soror- ity trophy, the group highlighted its social season with a Christmas party and formal, a Valentine ' s Day formal, a Spring dance, Mother ' s Day and Founder ' s Day teas, and parties for most of the fraternities. The Alpha Sig ' s gave three awards to seniors at the annual Senior Dinner in May: the scholarship award for highest scholastic average; the Frost Fidelity Award for ser- vice to the sorority, and the Wilma W. Sharp Award for service to the University. With Miss Helen Corey as adviser, Alpha Sigma Alpha has as its aim the physical, social, intellectual and spiritual development of its members. " Aspire, Seek, Attain " is the group ' s motto. FIRST ROW: M. Angermann, V. Bahmueller, P. Buclcwalter. SECOND ROW: N. Curry, W. Curry, E. Dickert. THIRD ROW: D. Pels, D. Forster, J. Fraps. FOURTH ROW: N. Gingrich, B. Hippensteel, K. Keen. FIFTH ROW: R. Keller, B. Levinstein, P. Lillie. SIXTH ROW: F. Manno, D. McNaul, K. Mellwig. SEVENTH ROW: L. Persia, E. Portser, D. Rihl. EIGHTH ROW: C. Sader. B. Vavro, J. Webster. One Hundred Thirty-four Sigma Phi Epsilon OFFICERS President Benjamin Hannum Vice-President John Smith Corr. Secretary George Detwiler Rec.. Secretary Alex Ricci Treasurer .... ..Vernon Altemose Sigma Phi Epsilon social fraternity, fourth largest fraternity in the nation with 123 chapters, is also one of the largest at the University. First fraternity to move from Park Avenue to Broad Street, Sig Ep moved to its new address for the start of this school year. Members took part in the Homecom- ing parade and Greek Weekend, and held an orphans Christmas party, a barn dance, their annual Sweethearts Ball, and regular house parties. Advised by Mr. Edward Cassell and Dr. John H. Jenny, the group last year re- ceived three scholastic awards. They were awarded the Deans Award for highest scholastic average, another for most scho- lastic improvement, and the Ulysses G. Dubach Award for highest scholastic average. Purpose of Sigma Phi Epsilon is brother- hood. FIRST ROW: V. Altemose, R. Angros, W. Boon. SECOND ROW: D. Brendlinger, A. Cassano, M. Chiodo. THIRD ROW: J. Davis G. Detwiler, W. Dohan. FOURTH ROW: W. Liszewslci, H. Lott, M. Miller. FIFTH ROW: A. Ricci, F. Rogers, J. Sader. SIXTH ROW: F. Schmaulc, H. Scott, W. Sembrot. SEVENTH ROW: J. Smith, C. Wallace, C. Walsh. EIGHTH ROW: J. Walsh, H. Wineholt. One Hundred Thirty-five Phi Alpha OFFICERS President Jack Hoffman Vice- President Ross Kershey Secretary Richard Wolf Treasurer Robert Baseman Founded for the purpose of aiding and advancing the interests of its members socially, fraternally and scholastically, Phi Alpha fraternity made strides in another field this year when they won the Inter- Fraternity Sports Trophy, plus awards in football, Softball, handball, and volleyball. Phi Alpha also gave out a good number of awards this year: The Piwosky scholarship cup to Bernard Wolf, the Pete Leaness award to Ross Kershey, and the Hiram D. Shore award to Jack Hoffman. Phi Alpha started out at the University as the Koffee Klub in 1927. In May, 1929, it was inducted into national Phi Alpha. The fraternity, advised by Dr. Oscar Dooley, participates in IF sports, Spring Weekend, Parents Day, Old Timer ' s Night, Alumni Reunion Nights, weekend parties and open houses. Phi Alpha ' s motto is " friendship everlasting, " and its flower is the red rose. FIRST ROW: R. Aronovitz, W. Columbus, R. Goldsman, D. Greisler. SECOND ROW: J. Hoffman, S. Jelin, B. Kaplan, H. Kornfeld. THIRD ROW: M. Leitman, L Rosenberg, D. Schwartz, B. Wolf. Fil: U One Hundred Thirty-six OFFICERS President Jesse Gelsomini Senior Vice-President Fred Hagmayer Vice-President Paul Lofrerno Secretary Herbert Wirth Treasurer .... William Heins Delta Sigma Pi Delta Sigma Pi is the social fraternity for men in the School of Business. Its aim is to foster the study of business in uni- versities, to promote closer cooperation between the business world and students, and to raise the standard of commercial ethics and culture. The fraternity this year awarded the Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key to the senior man with the highest scholastic average in the School of Business. Delta Sigma Pi national was founded at the New York University School of Commerce in 1907, and the Omega chapter was established at the Uni- versity in 1923. Dr. Stanley Chamberlain, chairman of the Department of Finance, is adviser. Two publications keep the members well- informed. One is the " Deltasig, " national publica- tion, and the other the " Omegazine, " chapter newsletter put out twice a semester. FIRST ROW: C. Dwyer, E. Filemyr, J. Selsomini, F. Hagmayer, R. C. Sotos. THIRD ROW: R. Townsend, J. Wheeler, P. Winter, H. Wirth. Keleshian. SECOND ROW: H. Lloyd, J. Minter, J. Petrocile, R. Schmidt, Is B Bl One Hundred Thirty-seven FIRST ROW: L. Camaioni, J. Celebre, L. Cerchiaro, D. Dessino. SECOND ROW: N. Mancini, B. Rodgers, B. Rush, A. Seidel. THIRD ROW: T. Spina. M. Stahl. R. Ungaro. HI Si Delta Sigma Epsilon OFFICERS President Beatrice Rodgers Vice-President Loretta Cerchiaro Rec. Secretary Beth Ann Rush Corr. Secretary Theresa Spina Treasurer.... Arlene Seidel An " Old Heidelberg " party opened the September rush season at the Delta Sigma Epsilon sorority and was followed by a formal dinner in Mitten Hall. The girls entertained their national Secretary-Treasurer at a formal dinner, and the football team was feted with an " Anchor Bainbridge " party. At Christmas time, the Delta Sigs had their annual Pollyanna party, attended the White Supper, and sent gifts to their patient at the Health Service Hospital at Carville, La. The girls work hard to retain the high position of social, service, educational, and scholastic standards they have set for themselves. This year they won the national music award for their sorority. Delta Sigma Epsilon was founded nationally in 1914, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and locally in 1921. Delta Sig became a member of the National Panhellenic Conference in 1947. tei fan W, One Hundred Thirty-eight FIRST ROW: D. DeTurk, J. Dunlap, H. Manifold, J. Milligan. SECOND ROW: O. NELSON, J. O ' Dell, J. Pringle, R. Uhrin, W. Wills Sigma Pi Sigma Pi social fraternity is the oldest national fra- ternity at the University. Its main goal is to establish a brotherhood of and for college men. Members kept busy this year with the IF Ball, Greek Weekend, Homecoming, Orchid Ball, Christmas party for orphans and a Christmas caroling party, Founder ' s Day Dinner, and the usual parties and social affairs of every year. New award given this year by Sigma Pi was the Sam- uel Russell Memorial Pledge Award for the outstanding pledge of all fraternities. Other awards given were the Kappa Award, the Monroe Cup and the Scholarship Award. The Kappa Award is a key for the brother who has done most for the fraternity; the Monroe Cup is awarded to the Greek man who has done most for the University, and the Scholarship Award is for the brother with the highest scholastic average. OFFICERS Sage David DeTurk 1st Counsellor Manuel Carbonell 2nd Counsellor John Pringle 3rd Counsellor Donald Cox 4th Counsellor John Snyder Herald Jackson Dunlap Corr. Secretary John O ' Dell One Hundred Thirty-nine Pi Lambda Phi OFFICERS Rex Marvin Jeshiva Archon Fred Levin Corr. Scribe Harvey Karlin Rec. Scribe Burton Finlcle Keeper of Exchequer Marvin Lourie Founded at Yale University in 1895, Pi Lambda Phi fraternity seeks to combine the ideals of good scholarship with service to the college community. Undergraduates who attain a C average and serve as an active pledge for eight weeks are qualified for membership in the local chapter, founded in 1927. Every year, the fraternity presents the Alfred Kouner Memorial Award to the University ' s outstanding athlete. This year the award went to Tex Robinson, who was selected by the athletic coaches. Two members, Bill Sorkin and Lee Greenspan received awards this year as the most valuable players in Interfraternity handball and ping pong respectively. The fraternity also placed second with their Homecoming house decorations. Fraternity colors are purple and gold. Its flower is the woodbine. FIRST ROW: M. Allanoff, H. Bernstein, M. Erony. SECOND ROW: B. Finlcle, G. Gillman, A. Goldfine. THIRD ROW: W. Green, L. Jacobs, M. Jeshiva. FOURTH ROW: M. Lourie, H. Luterman, A. Novack. FIFTH ROW: C. Sanger, A. Simon, G. Victor. SIXTH ROW: H. Wagner. One Hundred Forty Tau Epsilon Phi OFFICERS Chancellor Paul Fink Vice-Cha ncellor H erbert Wartenberg Scribe Bert Greenspan Bursar Joseph Rose To promote good fellowship, understand- ing, and high scholastic standards, and to promulgate the ideals of the Jewish faith through brotherhood are the basic aims of Tau Epsilon Phi. Zeta Lambda Phi, established as an independent local fraternity at Temple, in 1927, associated itself, in 1951, with the national organization of Tau Epsilon Phi, founded at Columbia University, in 1910. The fraternity ' s creed is " to live in the light of friendship; to walk in the path of chivalry; serve for the ove of service; and practice each day friendship, chivalry, service. " This year, the local chapter won the national award for chapter improvement and a second prize for its Homecoming float. TEP served as host chapter for the regional Jubilee, and presented two awards one to Vaughn Monroe as the " Best College Entertainer of the Year, " and the other to Pete Leaness as " Temple Coach of the Year. " TEP ' s adviser is Dr. Nathaniel Jacken- doff, assistant professor of economics. FIRST ROW: R. Diamond, J. Dubyn, G. Feldman. SECOND ROW: P. Fink, B. Greenspan, C. Harris. THIRD ROW: M. Jaffe, M. Katz, D. Kleinman. FOURTH ROW: J. Levine, A. Mayrovitz, J. Rose. FIFTH ROW: H. Rudolph, A. Segal, A. Silberman. One Hundred Forty-one OFFICERS Archon Marlene Finkel Vice-Archon Frances Seidman Corr. Secretary Myra Lester Scribe Roz Stutman Bursar.. Ruth Horowitz Phi Sigma Sigma FIRST ROW: M. Finkel, M. Finkelstein, Z. Goldstein. SECOND ROW: A. Klinefeld, M. Lester, R. Stutman. " Aim high " is the motto of Phi Sigma Sigma sorority, and the girls of that sorority have proved that the motto means something to them. This year, the sorority was the proud winner of the Temple Scholarship Cup and the Divisional Cooperation and Achievement Cup. The sorority gave awards to its most active pledge and its most active member, plus a scholarship cup to the member with the highest average in the sorority. The national sorority was founded in 1913 at Hunter College, while the local Xi chapter was formed in 1926. Included in Phi Sigma Sigma ' s activities this year were the Charity Ball, Spring and Winter Formals, dinners, participation in the Carnival, Homecoming and Greek Weekends, open houses, rush parties and pajama parties. Advisors are Midge Levinson and Lila Levin. One Hundred Forty-two Phi Delta Tau OFFICERS President Estelle Botwiniclc Vice-President Harriette Newman Secretary Ruth Apatoff Treasurer .Carol Pinn FIRST ROW: R. Apatoff, E. Botwinick, R. Hochman, C. Lewis. SECOND ROW: E. Lewis, E. London, R. Maries, H. Newman, S. Zuler. Phi Delta Tau started out at the University in 1941 as a local sorority and is now under the sponsorship of Alpha Epsilon Phi. The high ideals of the sorority are to foster friendship and scholarship, and to develop character, person- ality, and leadership among its members. Having as their motto " Our key to friendship is sincerity, " the girls of Phi Delta Tau enter into all University activities, including Homecoming and Greek Weekend, and have besides, many socia activities of their own. Phi Delta Tau has business meetings every Monday night, social affairs once a month, and the highlight of their season the annual Winter Ball in December. The sorority ' s flower is the gardenia, and its colors are green and white. Miss Enid Jacobson is adviser to Phi Delta Tau, which takes into membership any woman who has completed one semester with at least a C average. One Hundred Forty-three OFFICERS President Joan Martin Vice-President Dolores Shakoslci Vice-President Marianne Casey Corr. Secretary Gladys Anderson Rec. Secretary Loretta Coletti Treasurer Jean Hepburn Theta Sigma Upsilon FIRST ROW: G. Anderson, E. Baird, C. Buehrer, A, Caponetti, M. Casey, L. Coletti, A. D ' Angelo. SECOND ROW: K. Davies, E. Focht, M. Furczyk, P. Gage, G. Gapinski, B. German, J. Haak. THIRD ROW: L Harlan, J. Hepburn, J. Janssen, V. Knoos, B. Lafont, G. Lepore, J. Martin. FOURTH ROW: F. Mino, C. Mosby, I. Nicely, C. Panaccio, B. Schoenly, D. Shakoski, N. Signore. FIFTH ROW: L. Tarsitano, H. Winterle. One of the largest and most active sororities at the University is Theta Sigma Upsilon, on campus since 1924. Winners of last year ' s Greek Sing, the sorority also won the Most Original award at Carnival and third prize for float, and honorable mention for house dec- orations, at this year ' s Homecoming. Designed to foster close friendship among members, Theta Sigma Upsilon enjoyed a full social season. They sponsored a Christmas Carol party and a tree trim- ming party, a dinner for the house mother, Mrs. Gruber, a money-making spaghetti supper and a formal dance in the spring. They celebrated Christmas and Thanksgiving by giving a local needy family dinner and supplies for the holiday. " The higher good " is the group ' s motto, and the torch is the symbol. Mrs. Edith Klain is adviser. One Hundred Forty-four Alpha Sigma Tau OFFICERS President Marie Furia Secretary Yvonne Matoushek Treasurer Maryann Vojtko Chaplain Swynn Kelly " Friendship, Sincerity and Honesty " this is the motto of Alpha Sigma Tau social sorority. With a small, compact membership this group carried through a full program of activity this year. Opening with a Founders ' Day Dinner in November, the sorority sponsored an Al umnae Theater Party, a winter dance, a card party in February and a spring dance. Residents of the new Panhellenic House, Alpha Sigma Tau was established at the University in 1925. The Sorority was founded nationally in 1899. Acting adviser is Miss Ethel Weimar. FIRST ROW: E. Dunbar, G. Lewis, J. Liles. SECOND ROW: C. Richard- son, H. Strothers, D. Williford. ill , FIRST ROW: M. Furia, G. Kelley. SECOND ROW: Y. Matoushek, M. Vojtko. Alpha Phi Alpha " Kindly deeds, scholarship and love for all mankind " are guiding principles for the men of Phi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. The fraternity has grown from the seven students at Cornell who were its founders in 1906 to its present membership of 14,000. Drawing its members from colleges and universities in the Philadelphia area Psi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha each year sponsors a Sweetheart Dance and a Relay Prom and gives part of the proceeds from these affairs to charity. One Hundred Forty-five OFFICERS President John Kane Vice-President Joseph Pinto Secretary John Rightus Treasurer Joseph Lopez Theta Kappa Phi FIRST ROW: F. Hess, J. Kane, J. Lopei, J. McMichael. SECOND ROW: C. Miller, J. Skeltino, T. Stromeyer, H. Virgilio. Theta Kappa Phi is the social fraternity for Catholic students. It aims at bringing students into a brotherly relationship, promoting the spirit of good fellowship, encouraging the attain- ment of high scholastic standing and offering to each member the training and environment that makes the University man. In 1932 the local fraternity Chi Lambda Phi became lota chapter of Theta Kappa Phi. After closing during the war, it reopened in 1946 under the leadership of Ralph Foster and has since bought a house and redecorated. The fraternity this year gave an award to the brother who has done most for the fraternity. Advisers to the group are Dr. William McKeever and Mr. Collins Healy. Famed for its Sunday afternoon jam sessions, Theta Kap gave a Christmas party for neighbor- hood children and held its annual Brothers Dinner. One Hundred Forty-six Kappa Alpha Psi OFFICERS President Perry Fennell Vice-President Edward Meeks Secretary Bradley Smith Treasurer Kenneth Minyard FIRST ROW: F. Branch, P. Fennell. SECOND ROW: D. Mitchell, S. Ruffin. Since its founding at the University in 1920, Lambda chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi has become an active social fraternity on campus. Winners of honorable mention in Carnival for the last two years, the fraternity in the last year held their John Milton Lee banquet, Christmas party, annual Temple Dance, Founders ' Day program, Diamond Ball formal, and annual Kappa picnic. They also sponsored a zoo trip for under-privileged children and sponsored an interclub council for high school students. Broad purpose of Kappa Alpha Psi is achieve- ment in all fields of endeavor. To qua ify for membership men must be of good moral charac- ter and studying for a degree. With combined business and social meetings every month the fraternity has as its goal " Achievement. " The sweet pea is its flower. One Hundred Forty-seven FIRST ROW: M. Alexander, B. Baugh, L Craddoclc, G. Davis, A. Hidalgo. SECOND ROW: D. Hill, D. McPherson, C. Sirm. K. Spotwood, A. Washington. Alpha Kappa Alpha OFFICERS President M ar jorie Alexa nder Vice-President Naomi Hughes Rec. Secretary Carene Sims Corr. Secretary Lorraine Craddock Treasurer Audrey Washington Alpha Kappa Alpha social sorority aims at promoting and encouraging high standards of scholarship and morals and to study and solve problems of all women. Winners of second prize in Delta Sigma Theta ' s Jab- berwock, the girls of Alpha Kappa this year sponsored a Chocolate Sip, Founder ' s Day meeting and formal ball in February, a spring dance, and a Cotton Ball for the benefit of their scholarship fund. " By merit and culture " is the group ' s motto, and quali- fications for membership are a 2.5 scholastic average, high moral standards, ability to work with others and leadership. The sorority was founded nationally at Howard Uni- versity in 1908, and the local chapter was born in 1945. The group once again presented its Bachelor of the Year award in April. One Hundred Forty-eight FIRST ROW: D. Brown, J. Chapman, A. Fisher, J. Freeman. SECOND ROW: D. Hill, O. Humphrey, A. Roberts, A. Valentine. Delta Sigma Theta Delta Sigma Theta socia sorority aims at high scholar- ship, high moral standards, interest in the welfare of others and a common bond between college women. " Intelligence is the touch of wisdom " is the motto of this sorority which took part in the national job oppor- tunities project to help young women get desired em- ployment, the national library project to provide rural areas in the South with literature, and the Jabberwock, a cultural affair. Founded in 1913 at Lincoln University, there are now more than 200 chapters and 2000 members in the na- tional organization. Mrs. Gertrude Barnes is adviser to the local chapter. Sorority flower is the violet, and two meetings are held every month. OFFICERS President Ann Fisher Vice- President Florence Howell Corr. Secretary Beatrice Peterson Rec. Secretary Gwendolyn Micheaux Treasurer Orchid Humphrey One Hundred Forty-nine OFFICERS President Joseph Ciardelli Vice-President Robert Senese Treasurer Anthony Stracciolini Tribune Hugh La Monica Historian Leo Luca Chaplain Francis Sylvester Alpha Phi Delta FIRST ROW: J. Ciardelli, J. Luca. SECOND ROW: A. Quattrone, A. Straeciolini, R. Senese. Alpha Phi Delta fraternity aims at developing and maintaining friendships, democratic ideals, and the common bond. Along with the rest of the Greeks on campus, the fraternity participated this year in Home- coming, Carnival, Greek Weekend and the Interfraternity Ball. To these, they added a Spring Formal, an Autumn Festival and regular weekend socials to round out their social activities. Founded nationally at Syracuse University in 1914, the fraternity began locally in 1930. With Mr. Erie Ehly as adviser the group re- quires a C average for applicants to member- ship. Alpha Phi Delta presents two awards to mem- bers, one for scholarship and the other for athletics. An award is also given to the alumnus who has done most to assist undergraduate and alumni harmony. The fraternity motto is Brotherhood, Love and Justice. One Hundred Fifty Theta Upsilon OFFICERS President Kathleen Urbanovits Vice-President June Widdis Secretary Rosina Mauro Treasurer. . Joan Wellner FIRST ROW: R. Mauro, K. Urbanovits. SECOND ROW: J. Wagner, J. Widdis, J. Wysocka. The first social sorority founded at the Uni- versity, Theta Upsilon aims at developing a strong esprit de corps, making the chapter a vital force on the University campus, producing women of poise, personality and power to be noted for their character, culture and charm, as well as their democratic attitude toward the rest of the world. " Let there be light " is the motto of this group that participated in Greek Weekend, Homecom- ing, and Carnival along with the other Greeks on campus. In addition, the Theta U ' s had a special Founder ' s Day celebration in January. Advisers to the sorority are Miss Mary Smith and Miss Ellen Trusdale. It was founded at the University in 1915 as a local called Alpha Theta Pi and in 1933 became affiliated with Theta Upsilon as Delta Alpha chapter of the national. One Hundred Fif+y-one H P IN MEMORIAM The class of 1954 extends sincerest sympathy to the family and friends of Samuel Russell, who died following injuries in an inter-fraternity football game. Sam, a pledge of Sigma Pi, was injured in a touch football game with Sigma Phi Epsilon. Because he suffered from leukemia, a fact known only to his family and himself, the injuries proved fatal. One Hundred Fifty-two HONORARIES and PROFESSIONALS Honorarics and Professionals at Temple University are additional groups that have a part in the process of teaching students to lire. By providing the oppor- tunity for working and socializing zvith people of similar interests and by honor- ing students of merit, these groups add their share in preparing us for life. One Hundred Fifty-three OFFICERS President Virginia Bahmueller Vice-President Barbara Polss Secretary Florace Lockwood Treasurer Nance Gingrich Magnet Membership in Magnet honor society for senior women is one of the highest honors given to women students at the University. Only 15 women are selected for membership each year, and each must qualify with a 2.5 schol- astic average and qualities of outstanding leader- ship and personality. Magnet gave two awards this year, the Freshman Honor Pin and the Service Recognition Award. The Honor Pin went to the sophomore woman with the highest scholastic average in her freshman year. The Service Award went to the Women ' s Athletic Association for outstanding service to the Univer- sity and to the immediate community. Among the group ' s activities for the year were the co-sponsoring of the Homecoming Dance, sell- ing of Christmas wrappings and sponsoring of an informal party for international students. Advised by Miss Adele Frisbie, the purpose of the group is to recognize and promote scholarship and leadership and to encourage a spirit of coop- eration among University organizations. FIRST ROW: F. Arnold, V. Bahmueller, N. Gingrich, E. Hagy, K. Keen. SECOND ROW: R. Keller. B. Polss, B. Rappaport, E. Rostelc, D. Shakoski. IIRST now: i SECOND ROW, One Hundred Fifty-four Sword OFFICERS President Richard Bernstein Vice-President Robert Flynn Secretary Joseph Petrocik Treasurer Robert Grossman I Sword Society is an honorary for the recognition of outstanding senior men. With a membership limited to 25 but usually much smaller than that, Sword qualifications are leadership in University activities, desirable person- ality traits and a minimum scholastic average of C. Sword once again presented its Alumni Award to the outstanding alumnus for contributions of serv- ice to the University. The society ' s name comes from the story of Johnny Ring, who gave his life during the Civil War to save the sword of Russell Conwell, founder of the University. This inspired Conwell throughout his ife to live two lives: one for himself and one for Johnny Ring. Members of Sword are also expected to live two lives: one for themselves and one for the University. Its ideals are duty, faith and loyalty. FIRST ROW: E. Alferez, P. Allison, R. Bernstein, D. DeTurk, E. Dunbar. SECOND ROW: R. Flynn, R. Grossman, S. Peters, J. Petrocilc, R. Robin- son. THIRD ROW: E. Russe!!, J. Schwartz, C. Shaffran, R. Townsend. One Hundred Fifty-five OFFICERS President Charles F. Schalch Vice-President Richard N. Schwartz Secretary Ernest Grothe Treasurer Donald R. German Scabbard and Blade FIRST ROW: R. Baldwin, R. Boltner, E. Filemyr, Major R. Fish, J. Gelsomini, D. German. SECOND ROW: E. Grothe L. Hecht, J. Jengo, P. Kelly, S. Lakier, Lt. Col. F. Long. THIRD ROW: Major T. Morehead, J. Minter, J. Pringle, C. Schalch, W. Schilling, R. Schwartz. FOURTH ROW: Major J. Walker, M. Waltz, L. Weisman, G. Wilson. W ROW- D He Scabbard and Blade is the national honorary for men in the Reserve Officer Training Corps. The group tries to raise the standard of military education in American colleges and universities, to unite in closer relationship the military departments of these insti- tutions, to encourage and foster the essential quali- ties of efficient officers and to promote friendship and good fellowship among the cadet officers. With members chosen solely on merit this group held three business meetings and one dinner meeting a month. It also sponsored the Military Ball, held a combined dinner with the chapters from the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel, and planned several ROTC parties. The organization once again this year gave Scab- bard and Blade Awards to outstanding freshman and sophomore cadets, based on leadership, academic standing and aptitude for military service. Major Thomas Morehead is adviser to the group. One Hundred Fifty-six Kappa Phi Kappa President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer. OFFICERS Marvin Feigenberg Charles B. Harmon Henry Virgilio Robert Sykes kill FIRST ROW: R. Calder, J. Clark, J. Dolan, B. Eaton, R. Elder, I. Farber, SECOND ROW: M. Farbstein, M. Feigenberg, S. Feinberg, C. Harmon, J. Lesak, R. Linden. THIRD ROW: A. Mecoli, J. Parella, F. Rabinowitz, R. Roberts, R. Robinson, R. Rorison. FOURTH ROW: R. Sykes, H. Virgilio, C. Wall, A. Weinberg. Kappa Phi Kappa honorary fraternity for men in education aims at promoting the cause of education by encouraging men of sound moral character and recognized ability to study the principles and problems of education. To become a member a man must have a B average and a minimum of six education credits, or the recom- mendation of the chairman of his department. The fraternity presented two awards this year. The President ' s Key was given to the outgoing president for service to the chapter, and the Honor Key was given to another member for service. At once-a-month meetings members heard guest speakers, educational films, and forums. The group is advised by Dr. Charles Fischer. Founded nationally at Dartmouth College in 1922, Kappa Phi Kappa was established in 1927 at the Uni- versity as Alpha Alpha chapter. One Hundred Fifty-seven Beta Gamma Sigma OFFICERS President James Beatty Vice-President Delores Shakoski Secretary-Treasurer Martha K. Wiegand Assistant Secretary Virginia Bahmueller Beta Gamma Sigma is the national honorary fraternity for the highest-ranking men and women students in the School of Business. Members are elected on the basis of high scholarship and promise of future marked business ability. Membership is limited to the upper ten per cent or less of the senior c ass and the upper three per cent or less of the junior class. The group honors scholarship each year by inscribing on a bronze plaque in Con- well Hall the name of the business fresh- man with the highest scholastic average. An inscribed loving cup is awarded to the sophomore in the School of Business with the highest average for the sophomore year. Known as the Phi Beta Kappa of busi- ness, Beta Gamma Sigma was established at the University in 1935 and nationally at Madison, Wis., in 1907. FIRST ROW: V. Bahmueller, R. Baldwin. J. Beatty. SECOND ROW: J. Carp, J. Friedman, F. Gall. THIRD ROW: R. Keller, S. Kurland, H. Lott. FOURTH ROW: R. Oberholtzer, F. Patti, B. Polss. FIFTH ROW: E. Savell, J. Schwartz, H. Scott. SIXTH ROW: D. Shakoski, R. Townsend. One Hundred Fifty-eight Honorary Accounting Society OFFICERS President: Charles Lyons Vice-President Frederick Patti Secretary I nez Anderson Treasurer Howard Bernstein Taking its members from the ranks of the future CPA ' s is the Honorary Accounting Society, advised by Mr. William J. McKeever and Dr. Sterling K. Atkinson. A local organization, the society aims at promoting a professional attitude among accounting students, recognizing achieve- ment in the field and informing students of current problems in accounting. Each semester, the group sponsored a trip to local businesses to acquaint mem- bers with various office and accounting systems in use. The society held a banquet with guest speakers in both spring and fall. Alumni as well as faculty and members, at- tended the spring dinner. To be eligible for the society, students must have a B scholastic average and two years of accounting. FIRST ROW: V. Altemorse, I. Anderson, R. Baldwin. SECOND ROW: H. Bernstein, J. Carp, J. Clifford. THIRD ROW: G. Dragonetti, R. Grossman, J. Kane. FOURTH ROW: C. Lyons, F. Pat+i, L Samuel. FIFTH ROW: E. Savell, H. Scott, S. Peters. SIXTH ROW: H. Switkay. One Hundred Fifty-nine Chimes OFFICERS President Jean Hepburn Vice-President Barbara Levinstein Secretary Nance Singrich Treasurer Ginny Bahmueller " To lead with knowledge, to follow with intelli- gence, and to seek the worthwhile in life " is the motto of Chimes honor society for junior women. To qualify for membership, women must be high sophomores or juniors, have a 3.0 minimum average and participate in activities. The general purpose of the society is to honor junior women for outstanding leadership, scholar- ship and service to the University. Under the advisership of Mrs. Grace B. Huddy, Chimes sold Christmas seals for the tuberculosis drive this year and cooperated with Magnet in giving a party for international students. Chimes was founded as a local at the University in 1932, and in 1947, joined with three other col- leges to form the national honor society. FIRST ROW: V. Bahmueller, R. Bones, J. Edgar, N. Gingrich. SECOND Rabin, E. Rostek, M. Scherlis, D. Shalcoski. ROW: J. Hepburn, R. Keller, B. Levinstein, B. Polss. THIRD ROW: J. One Hundred Sixty OFFICERS President Paris Allison Vice-President John Czarnecki Corr. Secretary James Fox Rec. Secretary James Howat Treasurer Harry Stevenson Phi Epsilon Kappa Phi Epsilon Kappa is the on y national profes- sional fraternity for men in health and physica education, and recreation. Founded at the Ameri- can Gymnastic Union, Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1913, it has 41 collegiate and nine alumni chapters and will soon become international. To elevate the standards, ideals, and ethics of those engaged in teaching in this field is the organ- ization ' s main purpose. To qualify as members, men must be physical education majors, meet the pro- fessional maturity and character standards, and have an average of at least 2.5. Two members of the society were elected to Sword Society this year, and the fraternity pre- sented a distinguished service award and a scholar- ship key award to outstanding students. The organization ' s motto is " Friendship Hath Power " ; its colors, black and gold; its symbol, the winged foot. The group ' s adviser is Erie Ehly. FIRST ROW: P. Allison, C. Applegate, W. Coco, J. Czarnecki. SECOND ROW: J. Drury, R. Flynn, J. Howat, R. McCarthy. THIRD ROW: E. Scholl, H. Smith, E. Tatoian. One Hundred Sixty-one I FIRST ROW: B. Bova, E. Dunbar, R. Ford, S. Lehrer. SECOND ROW: J. Petrocilt, G. Spencer, R. Williams, R. Wright. Sigma Delta Chi is the professional fraternity for men in journalism which aims at providing a meeting ground for students majoring in journalism so that they may hear men in the field and discuss problems and oppor- tunities related to journalism. During the year the group heard several speakers in the newspaper and radio fields, co-sponsored the Christ- mas party for the Communications Department with Theta Sigma Phi and served as aids in the Temple Press Tournament for high school journalists. SDX was founded at the University in 1930 and na- tionally in 1909. Professor J. Douglas Perry of the De- partment of Journalism is adviser. Sigma Delta Chi OFFICERS President Ernest Dunbar Vice-President Allan Gibbons Secretary Joseph Petrocilc Treasurer George Spencer One Hundred Sixty-two FIRST ROW: S. Abrams, I. Clark, J. Friedman, D. Grabusic, G. Honickman. SECOND ROW: R. Keller, D. Lebedine, C. McElroy, A. Miller, B. Polss. Theta Sigma Phi OFFICERS President Joan Friedman Vice-President Barbara Polss Secretary Catherine McElroy Treasurer.... ...Alice Miller The only professional fraternity for women in journalism is Theta Sigma Phi, which is advised by Miss A. Jacqueline Steck of the Department of Journalism. The group this year highlighted its program with a pledge tea in the fall, a Christmas party for the whole journalism department, and the annual Matrix Table dinner in May. Members also worked on production of the Templar as a term project and served as moderators at the NSA Intercollegiate Press Conference. Purpose of Theta Sigma Phi is to honor distinguished women in letters and journalism, to unite and inspire these women, to set up standards in journalism and letters and to improve working conditions in these fields. The group presented its annual award to the sopho- more woman who had done most for University publica- tions at the Matrix Table. One Hundred Sixty-three Alpha Sigma Pi OFFICERS President Murray Miller Vice- President Anthony Quattrone Secretary. Beatrice States Treasurer Wilma Friedman Philosophy blue and oxyhemoglobin red are the appropriate colors of Alpha Sigma Pi, biology honorary. Open to devotees of the microscope and amoeba, this group requires a 2.8 average in bio ogy courses and junior standing of its members. Under the advisership of Dr. Asa A. Schaeffer, Alpha Sigma Pi aims at stimulat- ing the interests of its members in the fundamental biological sciences. In addition to regular guest speakers in the fields of science, the members spon- sored a spring picnic, an annual banquet also in the spring, field trips, a fall picnic and a Christmas dance. A local organization with a state charter, Alpha Sigma Pi was founded at the Uni- versity in 1945 and was incorporated in 1951. Symbol of the group is the conventional- ized cell in metaphase. FIRST ROW: M. Bisk, P. Fink, W. Friedman, N. Mauser. SECOND ROW: H. Hernandez, A. Herring, L. Jacobs, L. Keith. THIRD ROW: B. Mason, M. Miller, J. Newman, A. Novack. FOURTH ROW: P. Pardys, A. Quattrone, H. Rabin, M. Schiavone. FIFTH ROW: W. Sembrot, R. Senese, A. Simon, P. Solnick. SIXTH ROW: B. States, H. Stein, R. Tecker, L. Wolf. SEVENTH ROW: G. Zatuchni. One Hundred Sixty-four English Honor Society OFFICERS President Richard Robinson Vice-President David De Turk Secretary Mary Lou Silverstein Treasurer. .. .Charlotte Gever The English Honor Society ' s prime pur- pose is to foster a wider appreciation of the English language and English literature. To achieve this, the members read their own literary efforts at their informal monthly meetings. The Society sponsors lectures, hears play readings and listens to poets read their own works. To become a member, a student must have had at least 12 semester hours of English and a B average in English courses. This year, Dr. Robert Llewellyn substituted as adviser to the group, in the absence of their regu ar adviser, Dr. George S. Stokes. Every year, the Society gives awards to the man and woman in the graduating class who have achieved the -highest over- all average in English. FIRST ROW: D. DeTurlc, C. Freedman, H. Freiberg. SECOND ROW: C. Gever, E. Hagy, B. Kaufman. THIRD ROW: R. Keller, B. Polss, B. Rappaport. FOURTH ROW: R. Robinson, E. Rostek, A. Schulti. FIFTH ROW: L. Swarti, A. Valentine, J. Webster. SIXTH ROW: K. Williams. One Hundred Sixty-five OFFICERS President Secretary Treasurer Historian and Chaplain. Connie Getis Joanne Mann Anna Kelly June Schweikart Delta Psi Kappa FIRST ROW: C. Getis, D. Given, L Halbert. SECOND ROW: A. Kelly, J. Mann, J. Schweikart. This year, the Delta Psi Kappa sorority and the Philadelphia Alumnae chapter were hostesses for their national convention in New York City. The girls prepared a scrapbook for display at the convention. To be eligible for membership, a woman must be an administrator, teacher, or prospective teacher of high standing in the field of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. These women must have attained standards above average in these and the academic studies, and they must give evidence of potential leadership in the profession. The Psi Kaps bienially award a research fel- lowship worth $250 to a woman engaging in research in the field of health and physical edu- cation. It is available to any graduate student in the country. The fraternity also maintains an Educational Loan Fund of more than $2,000 for use by any worthy member for educational purposes. One Hundred Sixty-six Phi Delta Pi OFFICERS President Margaret Kline Vice-President Mary Gosnay Rec. Secretary Dottie Breclcenridge Corr. Secretary Glenn Morrow Treasurer Gladys Evans FIRST ROW: G. Evans, A. Fisher. SECOND ROW: N. Gingrich, M. Gosnay, M. Kline. To provide a factor of unity and mutuality between teachers and students of physical edu- cation is the fundamental aim of Phi Delta Pi, professional fraternity for women in physical education. The national organization was founded in 1917, at the Normal College of the North American Gymnastic Union in Indianapolis, Indiana. Beta, the local chapter started here in 1929. To qua ify for membership, women must meet the minimum scholastic requirements set by the school, be enrolled as a major or minor student in health and physica education, and or recre- ation, and meet the personal, social, and profes- sional qualifications set by the local chapter. The society ' s colors are purple and gold; their symbol the violet and green oak leaf. One Hundred Sixty-seven FIRST ROW: S. Boni. E. Cholakian, J. Eckstein, W. Friedman, F. Girsh. SECOND ROW: B. Ludovici, B. Polss, E. Rostek, J. Swerlick. French Honor Society OFFICERS President Eva Rostek Vice-President Arthur Wolsoncroft Cor.. Secretary Jacqueline Landis Rec. Secretary Robert Levy Treasurer. Arthur Freedman The French Honor Society was the first language club on campus. Since its founding in 1908, the club has managed to keep active in University affairs. This year the members participated in the annual Carnival, spon- sored an evening of French and English folk songs sung by Dorothy Talbot, showed movies and slides taken in France, and presented a Christmas program featuring a scene from Claudel, " L ' Annonce fait a Marie. " The Society tries to present to students who have shown ability and interest in French an opportunity to come into contact with French people and French cul- ture. Membership is limited to students with a C- - cumulative average and a B average in French. The end of this year will see its affiliation with the National French Honorary Society. One Hundred Sixty-eight FIRST ROW: R. Calder, G. Drain, B. Eaton, B. Finlcle. SECOND ROW: M. Jeshiva, J. O ' Dell, F. Rogers, W. Schilling. THIRD ROW: R. Schwartz, H. Wagner, G. Zaluchni. Diamond Honor Society Diamond Honor Society, the governing body of the Diamond Band, is composed of outstanding members of the band who have given at least two years of service. The group assisted Director Howard Chivian with the administration of the band and helped solve problems that arose. Diamond Honor Society each year presents the Robert Miller Award at the Homecoming pep rally to the bands- man who has done most for the band and is not yet a member of the honor society. Founded in 1947, this group met one Wednesday night each month and ended the year with a spring banquet. OFFICERS President William Schilling Vice-President John O ' Dell Treasurer Frederick Rogers One Hundred Sixty-nine Phi Gamma Nu OFFICERS President Inez Anderson Vice-President Marianne Angermann Secretary Vilma Hartman Treasurer Etna Edwards Scribe. Joan Wolfe Die Ed His FIRST ROW: I. Anderson, M. Angermann, V. Bahmueller, H. Bonikowski, N. Curry. SECOND ROW: B. Dupuis, E. Edwards, V. Hartman, M. Holshouser, J. Wolfe to, it DUN Bwbn J. 64. Phi Gamma Nu is the professional sorority for women in the School of Business and Public Administration. Founded at the University in the I930 ' s, the sorority aims at furthering the interests of women in the fields of business, providing an opportunity for fellowship among women of similar interests and stimulating scholarship in the business subjects. Women in the School of Business are eligible for membership, provided they have a C average and interest in business. The group this year had regular meetings, both social and business, and sponsored several informal dances. One Hundred Seventy AM ' ds foil, OFFICERS Directorum Herb Pomerantz Subdirectorum Kenneth Chane Sig nare Gerald Dinerman Excheque Fred Herman Historian Theodore Fischer Bellarum Gerald Kramer Alpha Zeta Omega FIRST ROW: J. Abrams, G. Angert, S. Barlow, D. Black, E. Brush, B. Buck, K. Chane, S. Chankin, B. Cohen. SECOND ROW: H. Cohen, S. Dennenberg, M. Dessner, D. DeWolf, G. Dinerman, J. Dovberg, A. Eisenberg, N. Eisenberg, S. Fine. THIRD ROW: T. Fischer, P. Futerman, J. Gellman, F. Gold, M. Goldentyer, L Goldstein, A. Guralniclc, F. Herman, C. Kjatskin. FOURTH ROW: J. Koretsky, G. Kramer, S. Malamut, B. Morganstein, L. Newman, K. Paull, H. Pomeranti, A. Rednick, A. Rosenberg. FIFTH ROW: L. Rosenfeld, D. Schaeffer, S. Schiffman, C. Segal, R. Segal, L. Seifer, B. Shapiro, S. Shapiro, R. Tatorsky. SIXTH ROW: M. Weber, S. Weiss, E. Winokur R. Ziff, E. Zucker. " A misfortune to one is a concern to all " is the motto of Alpha Zeta Omega professional pharma- ceutical fraternity. Drawing its members from the ranks of pharmacy men of sound mind and body, of good character, and in possession of the five human senses, this fraternity was founded at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, in 1919. Under advisers Robert Meyers and Sidney Abrahm- son, AZO opened its social season this year with a party at School Lane House. The gala closing celebra- tion was in June. The chapter was also one of the hosts at the annual convention at Atlantic City. The fraternity once again presented the Remington Manual award to the member of the fraternity with the highest scholastic average for the junior and senior years. One Hundred Seventy-one Rho Pi Phi OFFICERS Chancellor Sidney Greenblatt Vice-Chancello r Gerald Cleaver Secretary. .... Harry Berlcowitz Treasurer.. ..Saul Goldman Rho Pi Phi, professional pharmaceutical fraternity, aims at promoting fraternalism, advancing the profession of pharmacy, raising professional standards and aiding interprofessional relationships. In line with these aims, the fraternity each year presents the Leo G. Penn Award, a gold inscribed dispensatory, to the out- standing senior with the highest scholastic standing in junior and senior dispensing laboratory. With meetings twice a month, this inter- national fraternity is advised by Mr. Samuel Elkin. Founded in 1919, at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, the organization now boasts of 16 student chapters and nine alumni chapters. Three magazines keep members informed of happenings: Rope and News, national; Galen Gabs, chapter, and The Galenite, local alumni publication. FIRST ROW: E. Astor, H. Berlcowiti, H. Bilker. SECOND ROW: J. Cleaver, B. Cohen, A. Davis. THIRD ROW: A. Friedman, N. Gendleman, S. Goldman. FOURTH ROW: S. Greenbla+t. J. Miller, J. Orloff. FIFTH ROW: G. Polaloff, P. Schwartz, P. Stein- berg. SIXTH ROW: G. Tabby, E. Ziviti. One Hundred Seventy-two Lambda Kappa Sigma OFFICERS President Jayne Lebow Vice-President Cynthia Barton Corr. Secretary Marian Christman Rec. Secretary Eleonore Chernoff Treasurer.... .Frieda Szolack Lambda Kappa Sigma is the largest and oldest pharmaceutical sorority in the world, with chapters in approved colleges of pharmacy throughout the nation. The University chapter became affiliated with the national organization in 1948, when ihe organization became a national pro- fessional sorority. The aim of the group is to unite profes- sional women in pharmacy in a single organization and better their relationships. " To be, rather than to seem " is their motto. Lambda Kappa Sigma ' s activities include a Founders Day, hygeia day, a Christmas excursion for orphans, and a picnic for freshman. Prospective members must be pharmacy students and have passed all their first semester subjects. Miss Frances H. Marr is adviser to the group. FIRST ROW: R. Alloway, C. Barton, M. Bezrod. SECOND ROW: E. Chernoff, M. Christman, F. Edelson. THIRD ROW: H. Einig S. Garber, J. Haines. FOURTH ROW: J. Henry, R. John, M. Kidorf. FIFTH ROW: A. Langadinos, B. Lerner, R. Licata. SIXTH ROW: M. Loftus, H. Marcus, E. Nanasko. SEVENTH ROW: B. Petruzzo, L. Rieger, I. Saponis. EIGHTH ROW: F. Szolack, N. Vartanian. One Hundred Seventy-three OFFICERS Regent Frank W. Goodhart Vice-Regent Anthony J. Finamore Secretary Roy F. Gutshall Treasurer Charles J. Gartland Kappa Psi FIRST ROW: J. Biemsderfer, G. Boerstler, R. Briglia, J. Cannon, S. Cole, B. Compton, R. Dearden, J. Dodge, R. Eclebold, A. Finamore. SECOND ROW: C. Gartland, D. Glenn, F. Goodhart, K. Goodhart R. Gutshall, D. Humenik, R. Kelly, W. Koons, J. Longenecker, R. Lukasik. THIRD ROW: D. Maceslin, J. Matthews, J. Mikusa, J. Mlodzinski, T. Moleski, R. Maull, J. Maurini, V. Morse, W. Nooney, R. Otten. FOURTH ROW: W. Peifer, R. Petusky, B. Pisch, V. Pollack, K. Potter, M. Sabol, E. Schoonover, E. Sebastianelli, A. Shevock, J. Sladek. FIFTH ROW: T. Sokolaski, D. Stauffer, D. Sundberg, R. Swope, V. Tarabbio, J. Troglio, M. Voda, J. Wenger, S. Wesbury, L. Williams. SIXTH ROW: H. Woodeshick, J. Yakowenko, J. Zappasodi, J. Zdrojewski, D. Repotski, A. Rodgers. . J en,i,P.( CS,J.( One of the largest and most active of the profes- sional pharmaceutical fraternities is Kappa Psi, estab- lished at the University in 1930. Winners of the Pharmacy interfraternity basketball championship this year, the fraternity aims at devel- oping a high standard of moral, social and professional contact. Highlighting Kappa Psi ' s social year were the Homecoming celebration for alumni, a faculty-frater- nity dinner, a party in honor of the fraternity ' s sorority sisters of Lambda Kappa Sigma and a spring formal and dinner dance. As thei r charitable contribution, the members pre- sented a gift to a deserving orphanage. With colors of scarlet and cadet gray, the group was founded nationally at New Haven, Conn., in 1879. Dr. Frank H. Eby is adviser to the local chapter. One Hundred Seventy-four Phi Delta Chi OFFICERS President William H. Briner Vice-President Richard L Siren Corr. Secretary Charles W. Custer Rec. Secretary Clifford Chong Treasurer William E. McCorlcle, Jr. ' i O K. Pet D. Suidker), FIRST ROW: J. Batdorf, C. Benedetti, R. Bernstine, M. Bianchini, W. Briner, J. Buscemi, P. Oldwell, D. Campbell, J. Carney. SECOND ROW: E. Carroll, C. Chong, J. Christman, E. Clewell, S. Coccia, O. Colleluori, F. Craig, J. Craig, C. Custer. THIRD ROW: R. Daniel, M. DiMarcangelo, D. Dougherty, T. Ellis, P. Fennel, B. Garrett, J. Gatti, T. Glinsley, R. Haglund. FOURTH ROW: D. Hooper, A. Koch, J. Lagenia, W. McCorkle, P. Mclaughlin, G. McNaughton, E. Heckstroth, W. Mingle, J. Murray. FIFTH ROW: A. Palumbo, E. Perri, J. Petroviti, F. Pisano, J. Pozia, R. Ricci, E. Richie, M. Savelloni, E. Schneider. SIXTH ROW: V. Severino, R. Siren, J. Sisk, H. Toman, F. Vari, S. Vasta, J. Washeleski, A. Wynosky. Founded at the University of Michigan, in 1883, Phi Delta Chi fraternity seeks to advance the science of pharmacy and chemistry, and to promote a fra- ternal spirit among its members. The local chapter, under the guidance of Dr. Edward Fackenthal, was chartered in 1951 and already has 63 members. The fraternity ' s flower is the red carnation; it ' s motto, " Alterum Alterius Auxilio Eget. " Members must have good moral character and be in good class standing. Phi Delta Chi sponsors a Homecoming open house, an alumni banquet, the National Pharmacy Week Dis- play, a Spring formal, and publishes a chapter newspaper. One Hundred Seventy-five MITTEN HALL ALCOVE . . . best spot for relaxation. One Hundred Seventy-six GOVERNING BODIES Governing Bodies at Temple University provide an outlet for student leaders in different areas to exercise their abilities, and they allow these qualities of leader- ship to be used for the good of the entire student body. One Hundred Seventy-seven Senate OFFICERS President Martin Gross Vice-President Alan Trachtenberg Student Senate, chief governing body of the University student body, spent the last year in a state of turmoil. Because it was felt that the group was not representative and was not carrying out satisfactorily the functions that it was designed for, Senate was disbanded at the end of the first semester. A committee of student leaders, includ- ing presidents of the leading organizations at the University, was formed to devise a new student government and to act as interim governing body until the new one could begin. A committee of six was formed to lay much of the ground work for the new government. Among the programs of the old Senate were sponsoring the Student Book Ex- change, the scholarship fund for needy students, reciprocal football ticket pro- gram and mixers in Mitten Hall. Dean of Men John A. Brown was Senate adviser and also one of the administration members working on the reorganization of Senate plans. FIRST ROW: S. Bernstein, M. Chiodo, C. Eisenberg. SECOND ROW: B. Finkle, C. Gever, M. Gross. THIRD ROW: R. Grossman, K. Helfond, F. Hess. FOURTH ROW: L. Heyman, J. Leventhal, C. Morris. FIFTH ROW: C. Mosby, R. Rummler, A. Trachtenburg. SIXTH ROW: R. Weiser, W. Wills. One Hundred Seventy-eight Women ' s Senate OFFICERS President Edith Hagy Vice-President Florace Arnold Secretary- Treasurer Gilda Margut The governing body set up by the Uni- versity for women students is Women ' s Senate. The organization ' s duties revolve around the necessity for providing and en- forcing rules for resident women on campus. The Women ' s Senate was founded ten years ago for the purposes mentioned and has been active in women ' s governmental affairs since then. Since there are no specific qua ifications for membership, any woman residing in any of the sorority houses or dormitories is eligible for a post on the governing body. There is one representative for every 20 women resident students. Main duties of the group are setting hours for resident women and deciding on regulations for visitors. The organization also supervises business and social activities for its member students. FIRST ROW: I. Anderson, F. Arnold, Z. Goldstein. SECOND ROW: D. Greenberg, E. Hagy, B. Hippensteel. THIRD ROW: J. Janssen, G. Margut, R. Marks. FOURTH ROW: A. N ovick. M. Savage, P. Schwenk. FIFTH ROW: B. Vavro, D. Wagner. Ono Hundred Saventy-nine Inter-Fraternity Council OFFICERS President David DeTurk Vice-President Charles Oppido Secretary Howard Bernstein Treasurer Leo Luca FIRST ROW: R. Angros, H. Bernstein. SECOND ROW: D. DeTurk, J. Kane, L. Luca. Interfraternity Council is the governing body for University social fraternities and is composed of two representatives elected from each fra- ternity on campus. The council, which meets twice monthly for business, was organized to promote and co- ordinate fraternity activities at the University. This year the council has continued its policy of making the University fraternity-minded and has worked closely with the National Inter- fraternity Conference to assure the best possible management of the fraternity system. Two of the top social functions of the year were sponsored or co-sponsored by IF Council. It sponsored the Interfraternity Ball at the Penn- Sh erwood Hotel and co-sponsored Greek Week- end, including Greek Sing, Dinner and Ball. The council also regulates and governs rush- ing of new members. Adviser is Mr. Sylvester Aichele of the Political Science Department. One Hundred Eighty OFFICERS President Charlotte Lewis Vice-President June Widdis Corr. Secretary Virginia Bahmueller Rec., Secretary Bea Rogers Treasurer .. .Marlene Finkel Panhellenic Council FIRST ROW: V. Bahmueller, M. Furia, C. Lewis. SECOND ROW: J. Martin, H. Newman, B. Rodgers, K. Urbanovits. To assist the University in all phases of Univer- sity life, to make and keep rushing rules for all sororities, and to encourage and sponsor inter- sorority relationships is the guiding purpose of the Panhellenic Council. Founded nationally in Chicago, in 1902, the local adviser is Miss M. Katherine Hinchey. The organization sponsors a formal tea and a coke hour as part of the two annual rush periods. The Council also plays an active role in planning Greek Weekend and Homecoming activities, and presents an award each year to an outstanding Greek woman and non-Greek woman in addition to the Panhellenic Achievement and Scholarship awards. This year there is a Panhellenic House at 1826 N. Broad Street, where six sororities have rooms and carry on their activities. One Hundred Eighty-one FIRST ROW: J. Edenborn, R. Fabry, A. Fisher. SECOND ROW: N. Gingrich, M. Gosnay, E. Hess. The Women ' s Athletic Association supervises the com- plete schedule of athletics and recreation for women students at the University. The WAA Board, which is the group ' s governing body, is a small group of women students elected by the mem- bers. All women students who participate in a WAA activity are automatically members of the organization. Among the activities sponsored by WAA are varsity hockey, basketball, swimming, rhythmic swimming, tennis, Softball, archery and bowling; intramural basketball and bowling; and modern dance, la crosse, volleyball, golf, horseback-riding, and tennis. Advised by Mrs. Prudence Fleming, the group was the recipient this year of Magnet ' s Service Award for out- standing service to the University and community. Dean Laura H. Carnell and Miss Anita Preston founded the WAA in 1925 with the idea of promoting good sportsmanship and health through a recreational program. It is a member of the Athletic Federation of College Women. Women ' s Athletic Association OFFICERS President Nance Gingrich Vice-President Rita Fabry Recording Secretary Ann Fisher Corresponding Secretary Mary Gosnay One Hundred Eighty-two IF Athletic Council OFFICERS President Ross Kershey Secretary-Treasurer Jack Levine KNEELING: J. Levine, R. Kershey. STANDING: G. Detwiler, F. Sylvester, W. Klugh, H. Lloyd, S. Lieberman. The Interfraternity Athletic Council aims to further the advancement of fraternity sports and to for m a closer affiliation among fraternity men. Two sports delegates are elected from each member fraternity of the Council. Among the many sports participated in are, football, Softball, basketball, bowling, handball, swimming, table tennis, track and volleyball. The Council was founded in 1948 by Jack Burns, head of intramural sports. The group meets every Monday under the guidance of Dr. John Jenny. Athletic Council OFFICER Chairman Dr. John Jenny SEATED: S. Aichele, L. Mauriello, Dean John Brown, P. Allison, G. Detwiler. STANDING: Dr. B. Roxby, Dr. John Jenny (Director). The Intramural Athletic Council is the governing and directing body of the University intramural sports pro- gram for men. Limited in the past, the organization has tried under the direction of adviser Dr. John Jenny to undergo a more active and inclusive program. The idea of the program is to interest as many men at the University as possible in taking part in some form of athletics for the sake of good fun and physical fitness. One Hundred Eighty-three Senior Class Council OFFICERS Chairman ...Charlotte Gever SEATED: A. Trachtenberg, M. Gross. STANDING: M. Allanoff, W. Wills, L Heyman, C. Eisenberg, B. Finlle, L. Chackman. The Senior Class Council is composed of the senior members of Student Senate. I he group plans and directs the activities of the senior class. The only important function handled by this council is the Senior Prom. Senior Council is advised by the Office of Student Personnel. iEAlH): Dr. Hi W. Miclaclin, H socii .; C Junior Class Council SEATED: R. Rummler, C. Mosby, C. Morris, K. Helfond. STANDING: M. Chiodo, J. Leventhal, B. Cohen. The Junior Class Council, under the supervision of Mis: Louise Oram, directs all the activities of the junior class. The annual junior prom in April is its biggest job. Members of the Council are juniors who have been elected to Student Senate in the annual December election. Those who serve a year on Senate automatically become members of the Senior Class Council upon mov- ing up. Junior Class Council meets every two weeks. One Hundred Eighty-four Sni- Theology Council v OFFICERS President William Thielking SEATED: Dr. Harry Hummer (Adviser), W. Thielking, L. Jones. STANDING: D. Seeland, R. Hughes, W. Maclaclan, W. Crowther, C. Alexander. NOT IN PICTURE: T. Hoffman, W. Butler, H. Bashore. The Theology Council plans and carries out all the social and spiritual activities beyond the regular fields of study for theology students. The group sponsored monthly luncheons, special speak- ers, street meetings, and hospital visitations. Council members are also responsible for publishing The Sem- inary Crier, a bi-monthly publication. Highlight of the social year was the annual Christmas party, attended by students and faculty alike. Class Council Sophomore OFFICERS Chairman Robert Dumas SEATED: C. Gillespie, R. Dumas, M. Greenfield. STANDING: I. Liss, R. Fomelont, A. Ziebelman. The governing body of the sophomore class is the Sophomore Class Council. Chiefly, its duties are con- cerned with sophomore class functions and activities, but members of the council must consider these in relation- ship to the rest of the school. This is easily accomplished since all members of the council belong to the Studenl Senate. Most eagerly-awaited activity planned by the Council was the annual Soph Cotillion, held during the first semester in Mitten Hall Auditorium. One Hundred Eighty-five Pharmacy Council OFFICERS President William Briner Vice-President Stuart Wesbury Secretary Rosalie Licata Treasurer. Eleonore Chernoff SEATED: S. Wesbury, E. Chernoff, W. Briner, R. Licata. STANDING: I. Soponis, H. Butler, R. Snyder, R. Coxe. Pharmacy Student Council, founded in 1929, is com- posed of eight members, two from each class. The members are elected by the Pharmacy students in an annual all-school election. The purposes of the organization are to consolidate and regulate school social activities, to conduct student elections and to give the student body representation in school planning. All-Pharmacy school dance, Christmas convocation and the all-Pharmacy picnic are some of the activities spon- sored by the Council. Members of the organization must maintain at least a C average. Dr. Frank H. Eby is adviser to the group, the group. Pharmacy IF Council OFFICERS President Paul Fehnel Corr. Secretary Stuart Wesbury Rec. Secretary Hedy Einig Treasurer Allen Rosenberg SEATED: G. Tabby, P. Fehnel, H. Einig, A. Rosenberg. STANDING: L. Newman, S. Greenblatt, Edelson, E. Meckstroth, B. Pisch, S. Wesbury. F. The Pharmacy Interfraternity Council is composed of representatives from the school ' s four fraternities and one sorority. The council regulates the pledging system by setting up rules relating to rushing dates and student ' s qualifi- cations. The organization also participates in freshman orientation and the interfraternity sports program. Officers of the council are rotated. Members must maintain at least a C scholastic average. One Hundred Eighty-sis Tyler Council Wesbury e Licats Oiernoff OFFICERS President Theodore Mailman Vice-President Barbara Chase Secretary- Treasurer Charles Schneeweiss I. Rice, H. Garton, R. Kelson, H. Meisel, T. Mailman, B. Chase, N. Zimble, R. Gargaro, W. Thompson, M. Keesey, J. Shoettler, J. Drew, C. Schneeweis. ; - sst a ip, The official governing body of the Tyler Schoo of Fine Arts is the Tyler Council. Each class elects its individual representatives in an all-school election, and the officers of the council are then elected by the entire student body. The council sponsors a complete program of activities, including most of the social functions. Among the affairs sponsored by the council this year were the freshman dance, the Christmas ball, and annual dean ' s ball. The organization holds weekly business meetings. Community Council OFFICERS President Burt Finkle Secretary Shirley Cragle Treasurer.... ..William Post SEATED: S. Fuchini, J. Schafer S. Budano, B. Finkle, M. Viola, G. Tatta, S. Cragle. STANDING: Mr. Gaither, Mr. Peterson, Mrs. Cooper, Dr. Schills, Dr. Page. must Community Council is the student governing body of Community College. In addition to governing, the group aids the student body in its relations with the fac- ulty and sponsors the newspaper. Advised by Dr. William Page, Mrs. E. F. Cooper, and Dr. R. L. D. Davidson, the council sponsored a winter dance and a Christmas punch hour. To be eligible for membership, Community College students must have good scholastic standing and must be able to serve for one year. Meetings are held once a week. One Hundred Eighty-seven MITTEN HALL GREAT COURT One Hundred Eighty-eight ORGANIZATIONS Organisations at Temple University are as varied as they are numerous and offer to all with the time and desire to participate a ivealth of satisfaction. They are but another of the broadening experi- ences of college that make us better able to cope unth life ahead. One Hundred Eighty-nine Diamond Band Good musicianship and snappy for- mations make the University ' s Diamond Band one of the top college bands in the country. Under new director How- ard Chivian, the band kept up the pace set in years before on the ath- letic field, in parades and on the con- cert stage. Special feature of the Diamond Band was the unusual drill formations and col- orful lighting effects at night football games. These brilliant displays enter- tained the spectators between halves. Among the honors coming the way of the Diamond Band this year was the invitation to play at President Eisen- hower ' s birthday celebration at Her- shey in October. Mr. Howard Chivian, director of bands Mr. Morry Heliner, personnel director and arranger. Band in its famed " diamond T " formation. Majorettes line up! The Diamond Band prepares for action at Temple Stadium. Clemen Peck directs work in the scene shop. Temple University Theater Temple University Theater is responsible for the dramatic presentations given at frequent intervals to the student body. Students without much experience in dramatics may begin their work with Vest Pocket Players directed by Arthur O. Ketels. They do a one-act play each week under student direction. These plays are done script-in-hand style and without sets. The next step is to University Theater productions directed by Prof. Paul E. Randall. Students acting or doing technica work under the direction of Clemen Peck in these full productions earn points necessary to become a Templayer. Each Templayer must have worked on several shows before he is eligible to be a member. Irv Halpern and Len Rosenblatt in " You Touched Me. ' Scene from " Othello. " Joan Weisbard wields hammer in scene shop. Action in " You Touched Me. ' Fall editor Dorothy Grabusic. SOL MEMBERG City Editor NOEL CURRY Copy Editor FRANK AVATO Sports Editor FALL STAFF DOROTHY GRABUSIC Editor ERNEST DUNBAR Managing Editor JOAN FRIEDMAN Features Editor BARBARA POLSS Science Professional Editor RUTH RUMMLER Makeup Editor Assistant City Editors: Charlotte Lubin, Jessie Blostein Assistant Features Editors: Bob Ford, Joseph Petrocik Assistant Copy Editor: Robert Wright Cartoonist: Dick Robbins Assistant Make-up Editor: Dot Pels Assistant Sports Editor: William Hall Photographers: Robert Ford, Robert Schoonover REPORTERS: Ron Berkheimer, Diane Schwartz, Robert Carlson, Rose DeWolf, Enid Gordon, Cy Lehrer, Olga Wingfield, Ruthe Horowiiz. Sports Reporters: Al Gibbons, Ray Gill, Shirley McKay, Bob Kimmelblatt Adviser Bus. Mgr.: Ray Whittaker Comp. Room Foreman: Alvin Rupel A hectic Monday afternoon in the news room. Three top editors talk over a policy problem. Ruth Rummler and Dot Pels lay out the front page. One Hundred Ninety-two JOAN FRIEDMAN City Editor ROBERT FORD Features Editor FRANK AVATO BILL HALL Co-Sports Editors SPRING STAFF ERNEST DUNBAR Editor SOL MEMBERS Managing Editor BARBARA POLSS Makeup Editor RUTH RUMMLER Science Professional Editor DOT PELS NOEL CURRY Copy Editors Photographer: Bob Schoonover Librarian: Barbara Twiford Assistant City Editor: Cy Lehrer Assistant Features Editor: Diane Schwartz Assistant Copy Editor: Rose DeWolf Assistant Makeup Editors: Bob Wright, Charlotte Lubin Assistant Sports Editor: Ray Gill Cartoonist: Dick Robbins REPORTERS: Enid Gordon, Ron Berkheimer, Ruthe Horowitz, Frances Ross, Steve Hirschman, Joan Fleck, Marcia Tickner, Jack Slater, Vene Cipriotti, Marie Plaska, Stearns Batley, Pat Schwartz. Sports Reporters: Al Gibbons, Shirley McKay, Charles Hessack, Al Tozier, Jerry Luber, Jay Levit, Marv Sitkoff. Adviser Bus. Mgr.: Ray Whittaker Comp. Room Foreman: Alvin Rupel Temple University News Rewrite this lead! Slug it speech! Shorten this head- line! These are a few of the directions that bewildered the uninitiated who may have stumbled by mistake into the offices of the Temple University News. The official University student newspaper, the News came out three times a week, come rain or come shine. Faced with daily crises, the staff kept up a calm exterior and confined its chaotic appearance to the first and second floors of 1930 Park Avenue. Editorial campaigns played the usual part in the paper ' s fight for better student government and against discrimination in organizations and fraternities. While much of the work was routine, there were enough bright spots to keep the staff on its toes and to banish monot- ony. One thing staff members tried to remember was the News motto " Accuracy, accuracy, accuracy: get it right. " Spring editor Ernest Dunbar. Ray Gill, Frank Avato and Bill Hall worry with the sports pages. - % ?f Bob Wright and Barbara Polss make up the pages. Noel Curry (center) supervises copy desk. One Hundred Ninety-three Templar From June to June work on the Templar, Uni- versity Yearbook, goes on with ever a new deadline to replace the one last met. Starting in September detailed work begins in earnest with seniors and organizations to be photographed, senior cards to be typed and copyread, letters and bills to be sent, pages to be layed out and copy to be written, features to be planned and pictures to be cropped. Through it all weave the problems of finding people to work, keeping within the budget and convincing staff members that they would have something to show for their work. With the final page safely in the hands of the printer, the whole staff is ready to let out a loud " Hurrah! " And the editor yells loudest of all. Editor-in-Chief Ruth Keller. Floriana Manno lays out a page. Jack McCafferty looks for sports shots. Editorial Adviser Barbara Polss. June Fraps and Rae Brown look through old yearbooks. Senior editor Kay Keen. One Hundred Ninety-lour RUTH KELLER Editor-in-Chief HARRIET SCHWARTZ Art Editor JAC K McCAFFERTY Sports Editor JUNE FRAPS Faculty Editor JOHN CRAIG Pharmacy Representative WILBUR THOMPSON Tyler Representative BARBARA POLSS Editorial Adviser Kay Keen Rae Brown Ed Weinberg Dot Fels JOAN ECKSTEIN Executive Editor FLORIANA MANNO Features Editor JUDY EDGAR Copy Editor TED DETWILER Business Manager SHIRLEY CRAGLE Community Representative RAY WHITTAKER Faculty Adviser Sam Glantz Tom Curran Edith Alexander Joan Eckstein trims a photo. Business manager Ted Detwiler makes a call. Art Editor Harriet Schwartz. Sam Glantz works at the files. Dot Fels types write-ups. One Hundred Ninety-five WRTI WRTI, University radio station, is run by students on much the same lines as commercial stations. Equipped and staffed like professional stations, WRTI serves as a workshop for students interested in writing, announcing, directing, planning, programming, and production for radio or television. An addition last year was WRTI-FM, which broadcast throughout the city with shows of general interest under the supervision of Mr. John B. Roberts. The AM show broadcasts from early morning until late at night to bring a wide variety of shows to the Broad and Montgomery campus. Ranging from music and sports to discussions and quizzes, the station aims at pleasing as many listeners as possible. Charles Shaffran, AM station manager. Steve Yednoclt, assistant to FM manager, goes on the air. Music director Gloria Teblum and her assistant Ivan Shaner file records th e music room. Chief announcer Dan Wood. Al Shelow, promotion director, looks through clippings. One Hundred Ninety-six Bob Carlson, assistant AM station manager, and traffic manager Betsy Waldman look over the schedule. Assistant FM manager Steve Cohen checks tape recording with Warren Weiner. FM traffic manager Ruth Gruber gives directions to Art Sulzburgh. Paul Jeffers, news chief, and Jerry Burg take copy off the wire. ,. i c a L v Gary Gumpert, assistant special events director, gives signal from the master Program director Jack Snyder and Bob Kimmelblatt at the sound truck. control room. One Hundred Ninety-seven Lt. Col. Long talks to Cadet Maj. John Pringle. Cadet Col. William Schilling points out training schedule to Cadet Lt. Cols. Richard Schwartz and Robert Boltner. ROTC The University ' s Reserve Officer Training Corps unit is almost a school in itself. In addition to the courses designed to make army officers of the men, the unit offers social functions and activities. Within the local ROTC unit is a national honorary fraternity, Scabbard and Blade; a drill team, Diamond Rifles; a newspaper, the Winged Wheel; a rifle team, and the National Defense Transportation Association. Under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Lloyd K. Long and Cadet Colonel William Schilling, the ROTC sponsors several parties, dinners and dances. Highlight of the year socially is the Military Ball, one of the most colorful functions on the University calendar. But above all, the corps aims at developing a spirit of unity and pride in the service that will make outstanding officers of the men. CWO Lindstrom works at the files. Major Morehead, Cadet Lt. Col. Schwartz, Sgt. Daugherty and Cadet Capt. LaKier inspect Diamond Rifle equipment. Sgt. Daugherty checks the work of the secretary, Mrs. Demuth One Hundred Ninety-eight Maj. Fish shows Cadet Maj. John Jengo how the cargo training aid works. Cadet Capt. LaKier, Cadet Maj. Pringle and Cadet Lt. Fredman inspect the bulletin board. All hands busy in the instructors conference room. Cadet Col. Bill Schilling looks on as Sgt. Sherman tries Cadet Sgt. Bernard Gross for siie. George Spencer, editor of Winged Wheel, supervises Cadet officers Jesse Gelsomini, Erwin Fredman, and William Columbus. One Hundred Ninety-nine Concert Choir OFFICERS President John Parella Vice-President Saul Feinberg Secretary Jane Altma n Treasurer James Griffith President Vice-Pro Secretary FIRST ROW: J. Elliott, E. White, A. Burnham, J. Berkowitz, J. Wagner, J. Reinhardt, B. Prosser, M. Krilcorian, E. Scheeti, J. Yamron, C. Enti, E. Dawkins, V. Bahmueller, M. Stahl. SECOND ROW: G. Davis, G. Plone, J. Terwilliger, J. Widdis, J. Webster, J. Altman, L Byrne, J. Chappell. J. Krause, S. Kemmerer, L. Manifold, C. Ondeck, A. Helsel, J. Beach. THIRD ROW: R. Edwards, E. Anderson. R. Jarris, R. Gottshalk, P. Gutlawn, C. Hildebrand, B. Brown, G. Kirk, R. Peters, K. Willcutts. FOURTH ROW: W. Snyder, R. Nay, J. Zilkow, C. Hallquist, J. Griffith, E. Mitchell, J. Mitchell, W. Johnson, G. Bacon, R. Peisner, D. Rhoads. The Concert Choir, directed by Mrs. Elaine Brown, is one of the most active and most widely-known groups at the University. After a tour of Europe which included past and present members of the choir, the group added to its renown by performing Beethoven ' s " Ninth Symphony, " Prokoviev ' s " Alexander Nevsky " and Rachmaninoff ' s " Bell Sym- phony, " in Philadelphia and New York with the Philadel- phia Orchestra. The choir made its annual tour of eastern cities be- tween semesters and presented its annual spring concert and music convocation in May. Choir members in Sep- tember attended a camp financed by themselves. - Syffl Music Education Club OFFICERS President Leo Awad Vice-President Burns Eaton Secretary Bernard Epstein Treasurer Roy Eikerenkvetter FIRST ROW: S. Stinger, E. Gittlemacher, P. Belfiglio, B. Epstein, G. Beach, R. Eikerenkoetter. SECOND ROW: R. Bush, R. Ewart, H. Yutiler, A. Ricci, R. Conti, T. Kloos. THIRD ROW: J. Griffith, M. Goldstein, R. Nelson, W. Ramsey, E. Meyer, A. Bettelli, M. Matz, R. Cummings, R. Razze. FOURTH ROW: C. Refuge, E. Carter, M. Bloom, D. Berkowitz, B. Gellman, E. Sheetz, M. Herold, C. Entz, S. Kemmerer. FIFTH ROW: D. Barentin, L. Sperling, J. Wagner, J. Elliott, D. Blank, M. Krikorian, D. Burkins, A. Dieterle, A. Nebo, M. Stahl, L. Irvin, D. Pliskin. SIXTH ROW: A. Tarbutton, R. Overton, E. White, G. Davis, D. Maloczek, B. Cieslinski, J. Paperman, S. Kessler, L. Zinger. SEVENTH ROW: R. Young, K. Davies, J. Wyatt, R. Rabinowitz, V. Engel, J. Wurster, J. Reinhardt. The purpose of the Music Education Club is the ful- filling of the social and professional needs of the students. The club strives to strengthen the social unity of the department and serves as a body for the discussion and presentation of professional activities. All students of the Music Ed. Dept. automatically become members of the Music Education Club. This musical organization takes part in the Christmas Concert, the annual Music Convocation, and the Spring Concert. Two Hundred w low. B SECOND low., lite Hi Cam durir Men ' s Glee Club Griffith OFFICERS President Charles Hicks Vice-President Harry Yutzler Secretary Clarence Hallquist FIRST ROW: Mr. James Cullen (Director), T. Kloos (Accompanist), H. Morris, R. Gottshalk, P. Shotel, R. Nelson, W. Starsinic, R. Conti, R. Innuarato, J. Weiner, D. Rhodes, E. Alferei. SECOND ROW: R. Silmore, W. Snyder, R. Fried, W. Vodges, A. Callahan, S. Horowitz, J. Rowland, S. Root. V. Ziccardi. THIRD ROW: J. Griffith, E. Mitchell, J. Townsend, M. Marks, R. Robinson, H. Yutzler, C. Hicks, W. Lonsdale, C. Myers. :ert The Men ' s Glee Club, directed by Mr. James Cullen, offers musical and social opportunities to men interested in singing. The group joined for the first time this fall with the other University choirs in performing Beethoven ' s Ninth Symphony with the Philadelphia Orchestra in the Acad- emy of Music and Carnegie Hall. Eugene Ormandy conducted. In addition, the Glee Club sang at the class dances and at the White Supper, and were weekend guests of the Dennis Hotel, Atlantic City, in return for a concert. The annual spring concert and spring banquet provided the year ' s grand finale. Women ' s Glee Club OFFICERS President Marilyn Stahl Vice-President Virginia Bahmueller Secretary Anita Novick Treasurer. Katherine Keen FIRST ROW: R. Glazer, L Dilg, M. McCromack, E. Portser, N. Richmond (Conductor) and son. SECOND ROW: V. Bahmueller, J. Beach, M. Stahl, J. Cohen, M. Furia, J. Goldbaum. THIRD ROW: L Irwin, N. Beucler, R. Calzada, I. Isaac, S. Williams, A. Bonner, D. Burkins, J. Brooks. The Women ' s Glee Club is a group of students who like to and are able to sing. Directed by Mrs. Violet Richman, the club meets twice a week for practice and fellowship. Highlights of the Glee Club ' s musical season were the Candlelight Concert, presented after the White Supper during the Christmas season, and the annual Spring con- cert. The group also sang at Valley Forge Hospital and at churches and meetings throughout the city and sub- urbs. The Glee Club once again presented service pins to members who have attended regularly, served faithfully, and been members for four semesters. Two Hundred One Cheerleaders Captain Leonard Chackman KNEELING: N. Gingrich, L. Lesches, C. Schmidt. R. Fabry. STANDING: M. Gross, A. Packer, Len Chackman (Captain), F. Rabinowitz, M. Perry. Entrusted with the task of whipping up school spirit and enthusiasm for games and pep rallies are the cheerlead- ers. Led by captain Leonard Chackman, the cheerleading squad this year consisted of four men and three girls with three alternates. Max Younger organized the group in 1927 and is still its adviser and coach. He also plays a leading part in selecting the members of the squad. SEATED: E. Hunsinger, D. Cox, W. Wills, W. Knipe, R. Wright. STANDING: L Luca, H. Shotel, D. Bakove. E. Weinberg, L James, S. Kovnat. T. Curran. Crusaders OFFICERS President William Wills Vice-President Milton Perry Rec. Secretary Robert Gilmore Corr. Secretary William Knipe Treasurer.. .. Donald Cox Leading the drive for more school spirit are the Uni- versity " pep boys, " the Crusaders. With the aim of raising spirit and serving the school, the Crusaders keep busy from fall to spring with their multitude of activities. They sponsored all the pep rallies including a bonfire at Temple Stadium, sold Beat Bainbridge buttons for Homecoming, sponsored the Penny Preakness for the Salvation Army, co-sponsored Brotherhood Dinner and Carnival and sponsored the car-caravan to the Yale Foot- ball game. Membership is limited to men of good scholastic stand- ing, plenty of school spirit, and willingness to work. Two Hundred Two I Wiatt Hall OFFICERS President M arjorie Savage Vice- President Florence Beck Secretary Barbara Reynolds Treasurer Barbara Snyder , A. Pitler, ; FIRST ROW: B. Tomushalc, P. Lerman, L. Weinstock, F. Alter, D. Preis, M. Reyes-Rivera, J. Wysocka, J. Moore, M. Savage, F. Beck, B. Hess. SECOND ROW: L. Anderson, A. Spang, C. Raldirls, W. Baron, S. Diamond, C. Raffuge, D. Given, J. Rogers. THIRD ROW: M. Newhart, L. Keaton, R. Slazer, M. Zigrand, D. Burkins, E. Hagy, Miss Clark (House Mother), B. Snyder, B. Reynolds, C. Speciale, L. Graziani, M. Snyder, J. Bachman, R. Derstine. iam Wills Ion Perry iGilmore Wiatt Hall provides a " home away from home " for many of the University ' s non-commuting women students. Among the social activities for the girls were an informal picnic, a Hallowe ' en party, a dormitory formal and in- stallation tea, a faculty tea, a Christmas party, and a senior dinner. The girls also took part in Homecoming and Carnival by entering a house decoration, a float and a booth. The officers of Wiatt Hall plan the social activities for the year. House meetings are called for special occa- sions and regular business is conducted at House Council. House director is Miss Eleanor Clark. Curtis Hall OFFICERS President Roberta Alloway Vice- President Alf reda Szolack Secretary Cynthia Barton Treasurer.... ..Loretta Cerchiaro Coi ifor Ih and Foot- (and- SEATED: L. Cerchiaro, R. Alloway, Miss Sparkman (House Mother). STANDING: A. Szolack, M. Zagoria, F. Edelson, D. Schwartz, C. Barton. The Curtis Hall Council is the representative body of the women ' s dormitory that serves as governing body for the students living there. Along with its governing functions, the council spon- sors and pans the social affairs. These include the dormitory open house, the Christmas party, the winter formal and installation dinner. Curtis Hall also takes part in Homecoming and Carnival. The girls in this dormitory last year won the WAA intramural basketball championship. House director is Mrs. Frances W. Cobbs. Two Hundred Three Earl FIRST ROW: E. Russell, H. Tishler, D. Erlich, I. Halpern. SECOND ROW: Dr. Gordon Hostettler (Adviser), R. Kabe, A. Schwartz, Mr. R. Burgess (Adviser). THIRD ROW: S. Glantz, R. Owrti, Dr. Robert Haakenson (Adviser). FOURTH ROW: E. Sean, R. Schwartz, F. Lipman, F. Rothchild. FIFTH ROW: R. Bernstein. M. Chanin, S. Soltroff, R. Ziegler, A. Ring. SIXTH ROW: T. Katen, C. Wright, E. Moore. Young Republican Club OFFICERS President William Wills Vice-President Thomas Katen Secretary Judy Adams Treasurer Thomas Curran " The constitution guarantees to each state a republican form of government " is the motto of the Young Republican Club, founded on campus, in 1951. Under the guidance of Dr. Lawrence O. Ealy, of the history department, the Club strives to promote Republi- canism on campus through meetings and discussion groups every two weeks. At the regular discussion meetings, YRC sponsors addresses by prominent local Republican leaders. At the end of the school year, there is a dinner meeting featuring a speaker of state-wide recognition. Speakers Union OFFICERS President Ed Russell Vice-President Ted Lane Secretary Debbie Erlich Treasurer Hace Tishler Historian Irv Halpern Debating, discussion and related activities are encour- aged at the University by the Speakers ' Union, local affiliate of Delta Sigma Rho, national forensic fraternity. Members engage in inter-collegiate debates, provide student speakers for various groups, and present a weekly discussion broad- cast over WRTI. Speakers ' Union sponsored the Seventh Annual Novice Tournament at the University in December. During the year they sent debaters to Muhlenberg College, New York University, Allegheny College, Pennsylvania State University, Mary Washington College, Georgetown University, Brooklyn College, and Indiana University. Under the guidance of Dr. Gordon F. Hostettler, Dr. Robert H. Haakenson, and Mr. Parke Burgess, Speakers ' Union was undefeated in last year ' s Eastern Forensic Asso- ciation Tournament, and tied for third place in the State Forensic Tournament. This year, Speakers ' Union was more popular than ever with 20 members enrolled. FUST HOW: F. SEATED: T. Katen. Dr. Lawrence Ealy (Adviser), W. Wills. FIRST ROW Miiriii, Dr. [ STANDING: R. Dumas, E. Weinberg, D. Cox. SECOND ROW: F. Richie. W. Uw, A. Since Kissel. Two Hundred Four icour- Ilijte libers alters road- lovice eyear U ' ersity, ' OoUyn er, Dr. eaiers : Asso- i State smore Early Childhood and Elementary Education Club OFFICERS Co-Presidents Corr. Secretary Rec. Secretary Treasurer. Melvin Metelits Bernice Friend Carol Kanig Shirley Felderstein Millie Gordon The Early Childhood and Elementary Education Depart- ment Club gave a scholarship to Melvin Metelits, a tea, dinner, semi-formal dance, severa coffee hours, discussion groups, and dramatic presentations this year. The club was founded in 1930 to foster social, educa- tional, and intellectual development of its members. It now boasts over 500 members, and this year the club won first honorable mention in the Homecoming Parade. Any member of the Early Childhood and Elementary Education Department may join the club. Along with social functions, they do social service work and charity work. At their annual tea, parents, faculty, and representa- tives from the school systems in the metropolitan Phila- delphia area are entertained. FIRST ROW: G. Wilson, B. Friend, A. Alberstadt. SECOND ROW: C. Kanig, S. Felderstein, Jane Morrell (Adviser), L. Relsman. THIRD ROW: L. Labovitz, J. Schroder, M. Copperman. ft. RBI 101 : F. Wli FIRST ROW: F. Sinn, B. Smilowiti, D. Sass. SECOND ROW: N. Mancini, Dr. Lawton, C. Freedman, F. Everhart. THIRD ROW: J. Lafair, A. Stracciolini, M. Bernstein. Mathematics Society OFFICERS President Cynthia Freedman Vice-President Bernard Benjetsky Secretary Norma Mancini Treasurer Jerry Lafair The wizards in math and physics, provided they are juniors and seniors, make up the ranks of the Mathe- matics Society. The purpose of the group is, appropri- ately enough, to promote interest in mathematics and physics. The group ' s program this year included guest speakers at the bi-monthly meetings during the first semester. The second semester was devoted to preparation and ad- ministration of the Temple Mathematics Tournamenr. High schools from the Middle-Atlantic states competed in this tournament and the top schools received awards. Organized in 1927, the Mathematics Society is ad- vised by Dr. Albert Schild. Two Hundred Five Marketing Club Si OFFICERS President Bernard Wolf Co-Vice-Presidents Sa bra Slosberg George Drain Rec. Secretary Marjorie Savage Corr. Secretary Geri Schenkman Treasurer Walter Boon Preside Vice-Pn Hoipto SodalC FIRST ROW: S. Feldman, W. Boon, B. Wolf, M. Savage, Dr. Myron Heidingsfield (Adviser), S. Slosberg, G. Schenkman. SECOND ROW: G. Drain, L Rosenberg, N. Wright, B. Vavro, M. Greenberg, E. Banks, H. Sharf, E. Wilder. THIRD ROW: M. Leitman, L Toplin, R. Mayrovitz, R. Sacks, D. Schwartz, D. Vinciguerra, J. Fuir. FOURTH ROW: R. Hoffman, A. Glatt, N. Weinstein. The Marketing Club, designed to interest students in the fields of marketing and distribution, is open to all students at the University. Founded in 1945 by Dr. Myron S. Heidingsfield, who is faculty adviser, the organization is now a student chap- ter of the American Marketing Association. Throughout the year, the club heard seven men and women in the fields discuss their fun ctions and careers in order to increase the familiarity of the members with the field. ing: and Advertising Club President ....John Sader FIRST ROW: G. Weiner (Guest Speaker), R. Dinkins, Serrill Gibson (Adviser), W. Friel. SECONC ROW: J. Surlock, W. Boon, A. Miller, J. Wysocka. THIRD ROW: P. Larkin, R. Singel, J. Sader H. Schwartz. The Advertising Club, for students interested in adver- tising, is designed to present outstanding advertising men and their ideas, practices and work to students in order to acquaint them with the field. Social and business meetings were held monthly with guest speakers at several. The group also took several field trips through agencies and printing plants. Adviser to the club is Mr. Serrill Gibson of the Marketing Department. Two Hundred Six UDort ' : year field, Md, Jb Secretarial Club Skiker, )e Drain Savage leniman OFFICERS President Marianne Angermann Vice-President Dorothy Sta vrou Hospital Chairman Virginia Holshouser Social Chairmen Rosita Calzada Sylvia Oeser FIRST ROW: Miss Adele Frisbie (Adviser), M. Holshouser, S. Oeser, M. Angermann, D. Stavrou, R. Calzada, D. Shoemaker, Miss Martha Wiegand (Adviser). SECOND ROW: E. Berman, S. Cramer, B. Dupuis, V. Hartman, S. Blatt, P. Nimoityn, F. Share, B. Wurst. THIRD ROW: W. Curry, N. Curry, V. Bahmueller, M. Beucler, J. Smith, G. White, J. Wurst, D. Hub, G. Violis. Professiona and social activities for members of the Secretarial Department are provided by the Secretarial Club, which annually sponsors freshman orientation meet- ings, a Christmas party, square dance, spring luncheon, and professional meetings. Two- and four-year students vie among themselves for the club ' s yearly award to the student in each division with the highest point-hour ratio. The group works under the guidance of Miss M. Adele Frisbie, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. Finance Society OFFICERS President Harry Appelbaum tr,e FIRST ROW: H. Wirth, H. Kauffman, A. Zernick, B. Kessler. SECOND ROW: N. Curry, J. Levanthal, W. Kissel, J. Dunlap, Dr. Henry Richards (Adviser), Dr. Stanley Chamberlain, H. Appelbaum, E. Weinberg, W. Curry. THIRD ROW: G. Peck, P. Fox, R. Stauch, M. Allanoff, G. Freedman, M. Wood, D. Dortch, G. Cohen, M. Block. The Finance Society was set up at the University last year for students interested in finance and its related fields. Advised by Dr. Henry M. M. Richards and Dr. Stanley Chamberlain of the Finance Department, the organization held regular meetings to discuss topics and problems of finance. The group joined with the Society for the Advance- ment of Management in bringing several outstanding speakers to dinner meetings of the combined societies. All students interested in finance are eligible to become members. Two Hundred Seven Home Economics Club OFFICERS President Joan Walsh Vice-President Gilda Margut Secretary Marilyn Bell Treasurer Selma Glickman Historian Lorraine Capaini FIRST ROW: L Tarsitano, J. Rabin, M. Furia, P. Brightman. SECOND ROW: M. Bell, Adviser Miss Wampler, J. Welsh, G. Margut. THIRD ROW: P. Barksdale, J. Goldbaum, R. Bones, I. Best, C. Chatman, C. Johnson. FOURTH ROW: L Golwyn, P. Geraghty, J. Fetherman, M. Lomazoff. The Home Economics Club, founded in 1929 as a departmental club, is affiliated with College Clubs of Pennsylvania and the American Home Economics Association. The club is under the direction of Mrs. Gloria Wampler and is open to students in the home economics depart- ment. Socials, coffee hours and bazaars are some of the activities sponsored by the club. Around holiday time, the girls send baskets to the poor, and occasionally they hold cake sales to raise money for a scholarship fund. FUST ROW: S. A. PUr, I. H D. Sw H, Yrt of, ( tern low: FIRST ROW: M. Swicklik, B. Hippensteel. SECOND ROW: J. Siren, J. Dunlap, H. Myers, J. Waice. THIRD ROW: B. Reynolds, L. Manifold, R. Shear, H. Hauth, G. Roulston, L. Lee. Nursing Education Club OFFICERS President Jacob Dunlap Vice-President Helen Meyers Secretary Joan Siren Treasurer. ... .Jessie Waice The Laura H. Carnell Nursing Education Club is for students, alumnae and faculty members of the School of Nursing. The club was founded for the purposes of collecting historical data relating to nursing, discussing professional opportunities and development, providing a chance for members to meet people prominent in nursing and bring- ing students closer together for social activities. Meetings are monthly. Two Hundred Eight Presided Corr. Sec I, and four Alpha Phi Omega OFFICERS President Richard Townsend Senior Vice-President Barry Hoffman Rec. Secretary Robert Williams Corr.. Secretary Richard Neavel Treasurer ...Leonard Dubin ' ' - ' ifX ' ' A; I. IW I. fet, art- Ddap Meyers n Siren Waice FIRST ROW: S. Levy, R. Williams, R. Townsend, B. Berlcowitz, R. Peritz. SECOND ROW: H. Kahn, A. Packer, B. Hoffman, H. Keren, K. Wiegand. THIRD ROW: J. Townsend, E. Filemyr, R. Neavel, D. Sass, H. Yutzler. Want your laundry kit mailed? Need an usher? Alpha Phi Omega, University service fraternity, will take care of it for you. Composed of active and former Boy Scouts, the fra- ternity ' s purpose is to assemble college men in the fel- lowship of the Scout oath and law, and to develop friend- ship and promote service to humanity. The boys also work as Homecoming parade helpers, medical examina- tion aids, collect for the United Fund, and sponsor the Bloodmobile on campus. APO national was founded at Lafayette College, Easton. Temple ' s Zeta lota chapter was initiated into national on May 18, 1948. XYW OFFICERS President Lois Kellar Vice-President Rosamunde Slclaroff Rec. Secretary Eleanor Seltzer Corr. Secretary Charlotte Gever Treasurer Mariam Kincus FIRST ROW: E. Levin, K. Helfond, J. Pokras, C. Morris, M. Weinberg, G. Kanig SECOND ROW: M. Kincus, E. Seltzer, Adviser Anne Nugent, L. Kellar, C. Sever, S. Birch, R. Brouse. Ten young women who wanted to serve the University and were not members of any social sorority on campus founded X Y W in 1947. The organization strives to foster a spirit of friendship among non-Greek girls on campus while doing a service for the University. Girls who are low sophomores and are not sorority members are eligible for membership. This year, XYW was a sponsor for the farewell dinner for Chaplain Rice, helped with the student alumni fund council, and the Brotherhood dinner, and ushered at Graduation. Along with Crusaders, they co-sponsored the University Carnival. Adviser to the group is Miss Anne Graham Nugent. Two Hundred Nine National Assn. for Advancement of Colored People OFFICERS President Thomas Spicer Vice-President Georgia MacMurry Secretary Dorothy Cohan Treasurer. ... Terotha Ritter FIRST ROW: L. Moore, D. Redd, E. Jones, T. Spicer, O. Rivers. SECOND ROW: J. Collins, E. Bessian, R. Dumas, V. de Graffen-Reid. J. Santos, L. Toplin, L. Poe. THIRD ROW: A. Valentine, D. Cohan, R. Thomas, E. Casselle, D. Maloney, E. Dunbar, L. Yates, E. Isaac, D. Brown. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is the group of campus leaders who strive to eliminate racial and religious designations from fra- ternity and sorority charters and registration blanks. NAACP is also known for its jazz concerts, featuring student musicians and guest artists. They also sponsor civil rights forums and a mixer each semester at which time students of various racial and re igious backgrounds can get acquainted with each other. The group adviser is Dr. Irwin Griggs, professor of English. University Christian Movement OFFICERS President Andrew Schultz Secretary Bev Prosser Treasurer William Fischer President Vice-Preii ' Secretarie Treasurer tie regi The University Christian Movement holds a service in the Chapel of the Four Chaplains. The University Christian Movement, founded at the University in 1952, is designed to promote " a fellow- ship of Christian students and faculty for worship, study and action " in the University community. Under the advisership of Mr. Harvey Cox, the group this year has sponsored weekly chapel services, study groups on the Christian faith, and the White Supper. UCM has also taken part in Intercollegiate Student Chris- tian conferences, the academic freedom program, the Religious Emphasis Week and Brotherhood Week and has promoted faculty-student discussions. Two Hundred Ten Soj tion - men Tl Sol ill; lent Newman Club IJ! Spies feMiny V Cohan ta Hitter OFFICERS President Betty Jane Sziede Vice-President Tony Stromeyer Secretaries Marianne Casey Jean Hepburn Treasurer... Dick Van Sciver FIRST ROW: R. Van Sciver, J. McKeown, S. Martyska, N. Reilly, Rev. David B. Thompson, Rev. John J. McHale, M. Casey, B. Sziede, G. White, M. Zigrand, P. Duffy. SECOND ROW: M. Beucler. D. Swieciclci, L. Cipoletti, J. Ward, C. Macdonald, B. Cielinslci, D. Malsieck, D. Bursak, R. Ungaro, M. Schiavone. THIRD ROW: F. Karl, F. Everhart, P. Munsell, E. Walsack, M. Feti, D. Kurash. C. Kusyk, P. Boyle. FOURTH ROW: J. Gelsomini, P. Lillie, M. Manno, B. Tomushak, R. Caliada. N. Kennedy, E. Greenwitz, K. Mellwig, P. Planas, T. Presby. Newman Club is a national organization for Catholic students with the purpose of enr iching its members spir- itually, intellectually and socially. Under the advisership of Miss A. Jacqueline Steck, the organization this year sponsored a square dance, a regional harvest dance, a Christmas party for orphans, a series of lectures, a communion breakfast and a St. Patrick ' s Day party among other things. Founded locally in 1921, the national was established at the University of Pennsylvania in 1898. Motto of the group is " Cor ad cor loquitur. " Hillel OFFICERS President Rodelle Horwitz Vice-President Sol M emberg Corr. Secretary Carol Kanig Rec. Secretary Maxine Tannenbaum Treasurer Jay Levin iper. iris- the FIRST ROW: C. Bloss, C. Kanig. SECOND ROW: D. Bakove, S. Memberg, R. Horwitz, S. Resnikov, Rabbi Alex Goldman. The University Hillel Foundation, a religious organiza- tion for Jewish students, is affiliated with the B ' nai B ' rith Hillel Foundations at American Universities, and is a member of the Allied Jewish Appeal. The Foundation, under the direction of Rabbi Alex Goldman, is located in the Ellis Memorial House. Religious holiday celebrations, social affairs and sports fill the school year calendar of the organization. Books, honor keys and other awards are given annually to the students who have participated most in the work of the group. Two Hundred Eleven FIRST ROW: N. Zimble, J. Frasetto, J. Drew. SECOND ROW: T. Mailman, R. Lafean, W. Thompson. American Pharmaceutical Association OFFICERS President Joseph Zdrojewski Vice-President Vincent Pollack Secretary Rosalie Licata Treasurer Kenneth Potter Tyler Forum OFFICERS President Joan Frasetto Vice-President. Richard Lafean Tyler Forum aims at integrating fine art with other media of cultural expression by bringing to the school educational and recreational programs. These programs included this year films, lectures, mus- ical groups, modern dance groups, and demonstrations in some of the art media. The forum itself is a group of five students elected annually to prepare and plan the programs for the rest of the student body. While the events are all student- sponsored and planned, the faculty lends full support. Faculty adviser to the group is Mr. Alden Wicks. SEATED: J. Zdrojewslci, R. Licata, K. Potter. STANDING: S. Wesbury, L. Williams, V. Pollaclt. Graduate and undergraduate Pharmacy students get acquainted with the aims and practices of the American Pharmaceutical Association through membership in the Student APA. The national student branch of APA was organized in Philadelphia, in 1852. Temple ' s chapter ' was chartered in February, 1939, and, and is currently advised by Dr. A. John Vazakas. Members meet twice yearly with the Philadelphia Col- lege of Pharmacy and Science chapter. A Christmas dance, a trip to Washington, D. C., and attendance at the Student Branch Convention of Districts One and Two were the major projects of the year. Two Hundred Twelve Tylerplayers OFFICERS President Buddy Drizin Vice-President Wilbur Thompson Secretary James O ' Reilly Tylerplayers is the dramatic group of the Tyler School of Fine Arts and offers another direction in which stu- dents of the school may express themselves. Because of limited enrollment of Tyler, the group can- not stage major productions, but the performances they give are of fine quality. Top billing of this year went to Tylerplayer ' s produc- tion of " Pygmalion " by Bernard Shaw. Martin Zipin is director and adviser to the group. Gargoyles OFFICERS Editor Wilbur Thompson Assistant Harriet Schwartz Art Editor Inga Rice Production Managers David Evans Larry Heyman FIRST ROW: D. Evans, I. Rice, H. Schwartz, L. Heyman. SECOND ROW: W. Thompson, D. Rice, J. O ' Reilly. Gargoyles is a magazine printed and published by stu- dents of the Tyler School of Fine Arts. Intended to give students an outlet for literary and artistic expression and to publicize the school, it gives students experience in editorial work and management and planning of a magazine. To be eligible for the staff, students must work on three issues of the publication. Gargoyles came out twice this year. Two Hundred Thirteen Tyler Chorus OFFICERS President Joa n Frasetto Secretary Na ncy Zimble Treasurer .Lowell Nesbitt One of the organizations most participated in at Tyler School of Fine Arts is the chorus for those who enjoy getting together once a week for singing. Under the direction of Mr. Williams the chorus per- forms at social functions, including the Dean ' s Ball. But its main purpose is to provide another outlet of artistic expression, this time in the field of music. Tyler Fencing OFFICERS Varsity Captain Inga Rice J.V. Captains Carol Tick Theodore Hallman Wilbur Thompson FIRST ROW: R. Lafean, A. Uuhara, C. Tick, I. Rice, N. Zimble, A. Solomon, 6. Shurig. SECOND ROW: L. Heyman, H. Meisel, W. Thompson, T. Hallman. One of the more popular groups at the Tyler School of Fine Arts is the Fencing Club, which is open to both men and women students. The fencers meet outside opposition in addition to matching each other for sport and recreation. Members receive fencing pointers and advice from Coach Erie Ehly. Two Hundred Fourteen Community MAA OFFICERS President George Kapeglian Vice President. ... Gene Turko The Men ' s Athletic Association of Community College is composed of students interested in sports and wishing to spread a similar interest to other students at the school. Sponsors of the intramural basketball and Softball pro- gram, the group each year gives an award to th e student voted as " contributing the most to sports at Community College. " An award is also given to members of each team sport. Owletter OFFICERS Co-Editors Jackie Schafer Shirley Cragle FIRST ROW: J. Meyers, S. Cragle, Dr. Page (Adviser), J. Schafer, M. Viola. SECOND ROW: L. Sasslow, R. Giletto, R. Kamerling. Official newspaper of Community College is the Ow- letter, which was organized in I960 and is published bi-monthly by Community students. While students of Community College receive the Temple News, the Owletter spotlights news of particular interest to the students at the Cedarbrook campus. Advised by Dr. William Page, the Owletter is consid- ered not only a source of information but also an im- portant part of the extra-curricular program of Com- munity College. Two Hundred Fifteen Social Committee OFFICERS Chairman Sabina Budano M. Viola, S. Budano, S. Cragle, R. Giletto, G. Tatta. The Social Committee of Community College takes complete charge of the social activities of the students of the college. Working under the direction of the Administrative Of- fice, the Social Committee sponsors, plans and carries through social affairs for Community College students. Temple Christian Fellowship Temple Christian Fellowship is an interdenominational organization open to all who believe in Christ and who feel the need of a spiritual fellowship. Its threefold purpose is, " to propagate the gospel of Jesus Christ, to promote an interest in foreign missions, and to promote good will and good relations with all FIRST ROW: S. Root, E. Alexander, L. Dilg, M. Hampe. SECOND ROW: R. Armstrong, L. Bevan, K. Williams, G. Ensworth. THIRD ROW: G. DeChant, E. Winn, J. Gilmore, D. Frost. FOURTH ROW: J. Zillsow, B. Ripka, J. Williams, G. Anderson. FIFTH ROW: J. Draper, G. Krilc, R. Joseph, E. Miller. Among this year ' s activities were a freshman luncheon, an international students luncheon, a Halloween party, and a lecture series. In addition to bi-monthly business meetings, the group held weekly luncheon and devotional meetings. Two Hundred Sixteen BJI University Religious Council OFFICERS President Anthony Stromeyer The University Religious Council has as its chief aim the coordination of varied activities of the individual religious clubs on campus. Council ' s members include delegates who are elected FIRST ROW: T. Stromeyer. D. Balcove. SECOND ROW: B. Albert, J. Barnett, C. Kanig, B. Vavro, E. Alferez. THIRD ROW: S. Resni- kov, B. Tabb, Rabbi Alex Goldman (Adviser), K. Mellwig, B. Prosser. from all the religious clubs. Their main function is to supervise the membership drives of all the religious organizations. Brotherhood Week and Brotherhood Dinner were the annual projects sponsored by the Council. Society for Advancement of Management OFFICERS President James Schwartz Vice-President George Drain Secretary Warren Murphy Treasurer Charles Oppido FIRST ROW: K. Mellwig, M. Rothman, E. Portser, W. Curry, SECOND ROW: D. Dortch, D. Shoemaker, S. Oeser, N. Curry. THIRD ROW: N. Arnick, I. Hynitiky, E. Filemyr, E. Weinberg, A. Bitman. FOURTH ROW: B. Tait, L. Gall, L. Gougnin, J. Sidorsky. Members of the Society for the Advancement of Man- agement, one of the busiest organizations on campus, work hard to learn and promote the practices of scientific management. Sponsored by the Philadelphia Chapter of SAM, in March, 1953 the group was presented by its sponsor with an award recognizing it as the outstanding SAM chapter in this area. All upper class business majors with more than a C average are eligible for membership. This year SAM members took plant trips to R. M. Hollingshead Co., the Budd Co., and Bell Telephone Co. In addition, several prominent businessmen spoke before the group. Co-advisors of SAM are Dr. Harold Haas and Mr. Samuel Wilson. Two Hundred Seventeen Liberal Arts Club OFFICERS President William Wills Vice-President John O ' Dell Secretary William Knipe Treasurer ..Leo Luca FIRST ROW: Dr. Robert Haakenson (Adviser), W. Wills, Dean William Caldwell, J. Shenton. SECOND ROW: L Luca, R. Peritz, A. Quattrone, J. Haak, D. Bakove, M. Green, J. Goldberger, I. Liss, John O ' Dell. THIRD ROW: D. Cox. Jerome O ' Dell, R. Wright. The purpose of the Liberal Arts Club is to establish an improved social and cultural relationship among men and women in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and to create better student-faculty understanding. Regular meetings are held monthly, and the club ' s activity calendar includes an annual Christmas party, the traditional tea for Liberal Arts faculty members, two social gatherings for students and faculty, and a mixer dance for students of the College. All Liberal Arts students are eligible for membership in the organization. Dr. Robert Haakenson of the Speech Department is adviser. Chairma 3 " sen L dire Pre-Law Club OFFICERS President William Wills Vice-President Stanley Bergman Secretary-Treasurer Robert Force FIRST ROW: J. Hampton, F. Cove, H. Baum, J. Fauci. SECOND ROW: Dr. Frank Paddock ,,,.. (Adviser), W. Wills, Dean Benjamin Boyer, S. Bergman. THIRD ROW: R. Abel, H. Zelkowiti, T. Katen, J. Dunlap, R. Sandell, M. Gross, R. Nay. The Pre-Law Club is a local organization for students interested in making a career of law. Under the sponsorship of the Political Science Depart- ment the group aims at establishing contacts with the legal profession, improving facilities for advice and counsel in the legal field, and encouraging friendship among those interested in law. Meetings are held twice a month with guest speakers from the legal field and panel discussions. Dr. Frank Paddock, head of the Political Science Department, is adviser. Service keys were awarded this year to executive board members. Ci Inter Two Hundred Eighteen n O ' Dell two niier Fillip Senior Giving Committee If ill!! if 19 1 I OFFICER Chairman Ben Paul FIRST ROW: A. Stromeyer, E. Alferez, J. Gelsomini. SECOND ROW: J. Pringle, W. Wills. L Luca, B. Paul, J. Wysocka, L. Cerchiaro. THIRD ROW: R. Lloyd. R. Townsend, M. Gross. The Senior Giving Committee is a group of seniors who organized, directed and solicited funds for the annual drive for contributions to the University from seniors. This drive is known as Annual Giving. Under the student direction of Ben Paul and the alumni direction of Mr. William Hallahan, the drive received almost double the response in contributions than that of last year. Undertaken during the fall of the year, the drive for the first time went over the 50 per cent mark. Awards were given to the organizations having all their senior members contributing. ! Circle K Club OFFICERS President Sidney Peters Vice-President George Lewis Secretary John Snyder Treasurer. ... Fred Patti Piddi SEATED: F. Patti, Dr. McGaul, Dean John Brown, S. Peters, G. Lewis. L. Chackman. STANDING: " u H Zeto " ' " - P- Cox, C. Jefferson, D. Englert. C. Shaffran, J. Zdrojewski, J. Schwartz, J. Peace, Dr Millard Franl nt, is cutive Gladfelter. Circle K Club, founded for college men by Kiwanis International, completed its first year on the Temple campus with a fine record of service to the University and the community. Circle K members assisted with plans for the Brother- hood Dinner, conducted the Toys for Tots Drive on cam- pus, and handled the district Community Chest cam- paign. The local is one of 52 chapters established throughout the United States. Two men from each department of the University are chosen biennially for membership in CKC. Dr. Millard Gladfelter is adviser to the group. Two Hundred Nineteen Secondary Education Students Assn. OFFICERS President Vincent Ziccardi Vice-President David Greenberg Secretary Ruth Horowitz Treasurer ...Rita Pessolano The Secondary Education Students Association is the student governing body of secondary education students. Undergraduate students in the department automatically become members of the group. General aim of the association is to make better teachers and to promote better understanding of the profession. Included in this year ' s activities were a spring FIRST ROW: B. Dumas, C. Baldwin, W. Neff, W. Hozelett. SECOND ROW: B. Starsini, J. Hummford, M. Robinson. THIRD ROW: E. Corbin, J. Brosso, R. Robinson. FOURTH ROW: R. Hochman, B. Donaldson, J. Coleman, R. Rosenberg. banquet, a series of departmental coffe hours, lectures and informal discussions. Much of the activity of the group is carried on through clubs and committees connected with special interests such as the math and science club and the cultural affairs committee. Business Education Club OFFICERS President Sidney Peters Vice-President Estelle Botwinick Secretary Selma Surst FIRST ROW: B. Rath, S. Marchionni, Miss Marion Coleman (Adviser), S. Shrager. M. Vojtkom. SECOND ROW: E. Botwinick, V. Miller, H. Bonikowslci, J. Wolfe, H. Stein, Z. Goldstein. THIRD ROW: H. Marron, Dr. William Polishook (Adviser), C. Granatoor, F. Toll, S. Gurst, R. Kafrissen, B. Refsin. The Business Education Club for members of the Department of Business Education aims at developing professional interest, attitude and leadership in the field and serving the University. Established in 1926, the group this year sponsored panel discussions, a party for freshmen in October and the annual department dinner in January. Members publish a magazine, " The Busi-Ed. " Dr. W. M. Polishook is head of the department and Mrs. Frances B. Bowers is adviser to the club. Two Hundred Twenty National Defense Transportation Assn. OFFICERS President John V. Jengo Co-Vice-Presidents Charles F. Schalch Saul LaKier Corr. Secretary Lawrence Shaiman Rec. Secretary Alfred E. Zernik Treasurer Jerome I. Robinovitz FIRST ROW: Major Morehead, D. German, J. Jengo, J. Scott, Major Fish. SECOND ROW: J. I Gelsomini, E. Scholl, S. Himmel, A. Fine, W. Columbus. THIRD ROW: H. Stevenson, J. Hoschek, I: W. Kissel, F. Wood, D. Vinciguerra. tores irests The National Defense Transportation Assocaition is an organization of ROTC cadets and transportation stu- dents who are interested in military transportation. The group was organized to make available to the country, in case of war, a transportation system suited to the emergency, to collect and disseminate mi itary transportation information and to make trained personnel available. It is also intended to provide fellowship for the students. Founded at the University in 1952, the organization this year held frequent dinner meetings with speakers. The members took field trips to Port Richmond and Indian- town Gap. Concluding the year ' s activities was Temple Night Advisers are Major Rue D. Fish and Dr. William Mc- Kenna. ation Physical Education Club Iney Peters , Botwinicl elnu Sin OFFICERS President Paris Allison Vice-President Harry Stevenson Secretary Shirley McKay Treasurer Rita Fabry FIRST ROW: P. Allison, R. Fabry, M. Ladd. SECOND ROW: F. Feschuck, J. Fox. " Strong mind in a strong body " is the motto of the Health, Physical Education and Recreation Club. The membership is comprised of all the students in this de- partment. The purpose of the group is to provide opportunities to promote student professional growth and welfare through their own participation in professional and social activities. Co-advisers for the Club are Dr. John Jenny and Dr. Elizabeth McHose. Monthly meetings were held at which socia and pro- fessional activities were planned. Frequently guest speak- ers were heard. Two Hundred Twenty-one R .. Two Hundred Twenty-two FEATURES From September through May a con- tinual parade of events and activities pro- vides fun and inspiration for Temple University students and opens yet another door in the search for understand- ing of life. Two Hundred Twenty-three lA eeKena of Freshmen learn Temple songs. a t C- amt SEPTEMBER Chappie Rice leads group singing. Senior staffers rehearse program. For the first time in its five-year history, Freshman Camp convened after one week of classes had gone by. The Camp Hilltop site at Downingtown, Pa., was alive with Temple cheers and songs from Friday afternoon to Sunday afternoon. Led by Chaplain H. LaMarr Rice and student director Joe Zdrojewski, Freshman Camp was hailed as the best yet by staff members and faculty, and the Class of 1957 heartily agreed. It was a weekend of athletics and fun, which provided a perfect setting for frosh to meet their deans, and the administration. Volleyball is enjoyed by freshmen and staff alike. Steering committee takes a rare moment of rest. Two Hundred Twenty-four eai6tration u ion Photographer gets a student ' s " number. 1 Confusion and more confusion! Endless lines, each one longer than the last. Arriving at the front after an hour of standing to hear the news, " That class is filled. " Trying to avoid 8 A.M. classes and trying to get the profs who are " Good Joes. " Greet- ing old friends and rehashing last term ' s courses. Handing over huge sums of money to the registrar, pausing for breath- then down to have your picture taken, pictures which never did you justice. At last! Done! Finished! A state of happy disorganization. Yes! it was registration at Temple U. Freshmen mob registration tables. Students make appointments for physical examinations. Pens run dry as cards get filled out. The final blow in registration. Two Hundred Twenty-five f Bandsmen enjoy dinner at Hershey. Edward Roberts and Director Howard Chivian. or The Diamond Band added to its laurels this year when it was chosen to play for President Eisenhower at his birthday party in Hershey. For Ike the band presented its " marching band beam " drills, in which the musicians form their pat- terns in a darkened stadium with lights on caps and uniforms and with instruments outlined in neon lights. Again this fall the Diamond Band provided lively and colorful entertainment between halves of football games with its snappy marching and routines. Unloading equipment for Ike ' s party. Majorettes end halftime show. Two Hundred Twenty-six rrere and ere Freshman Dave Edelstein makes himself at home in Room 5, Mitten Hall temporary dorm. Harvey Cox greets new arrivals to freshman permanent dorm. General Norman D. Cota presents Civil Defense Award for Temple Unviersity to Mr. Wallace Wetiel, superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. Mitten Hall hostesses, Mrs. Whidden and Mrs. Ross. Students get information on organizations during Activities Rush Week. Two Hundred Twenty-seven Weekend of Ljaiety., rJ OCTOBER Secondary Education decoration. HOMECOM1 ' Banner welcomes alumni to Mitten Hall. Diamond Band parades down Broad Street. Homecoming this year was as gay and carefree as ever in up- holding its reputation as the outstanding weekend of the fall semester. Starting with open houses all along Greek Row, returning alumni and students were treated to a festive weekend. The Sat- urday morning parade up Broad Street, led by Homecoming Queen Claire Coleman and the ' Diamond Band, featured floats and bands of every description. The football game, preceded by a spirited pep rally, kept enthusiasm at a peak as the Owls held Bainbridge to a tie. Climax- ing the weekend was a student-alumni dance in Mitten Hall with ; the final chance to meet old friends and make new at the annual Homecoming. Winning float of Buery Hall dental hygenists. Float of Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity. Two Hundred Twenty-eight ti and omecomin. -it Homecoming Queen, Claire Coleman. Bainbridge sailors entertain at halftime. Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority. Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity. Speakers ' table at Alumni Homecoming Dinner Alumni and students enjoy Homecoming Dance. Two Hundred Twenty-nine rr Even shining shoes can be a pleasure. Tau Epsilon Phi pledges do their part for Muscular Dystrophy. Among the most active and best organized groups on campus are the sororities and fraternities of the Uni- versity. Primarily interested in the social side of life, the so- rorities and fraternities accept responsibilities as well. Fraternities have frequent parties and socials for mem- bers and in addition take part in " Help Week " in which pledges are given duties to help around the University. Sororities, too, emphasize social affairs but have their serious moments. Panhellenic Council this year took charge of the Red Cross fund drive in this area. Greek Weekend, Homecoming, IF Ball, parties, rush- ing and dinners are all part of sorority and fraternity life along with " Help Week, " parties and gifts for the needy and philanthropic drives. A good time was had by all at the Sigma Pi smoker. A trip to the backwoods was provided for rushees at Alpha Sigma Alpha ' s Hillbilly Party. Memories of the " Big Top " were brought back by Theta Upsilon at their Circus Party for rushees. Jack Skloff presents Tau Delta Phi Award to Harry Smith, Jr., outstanding back at Soccer Dinner. Two Hundred Thirty the oLJ n " Be it ever so humble, there ' s no place like home. " This could very well be the motto of the girls living in the dorms. For while there is much to complain about, the dorms are still a home away from home. For those who call Curtis Hall or Wiatt Hall home, dorm life can be lots of fun. Dates and pillow fights and gab fests and on rare occasions studying fill the days and nights of the dorm girls and make them just a little sorry to leave after their four years. Even though outnumbered, this coed finds pillow fighting fun. The living room is a swell place to relax and pass the time. The phones are an important focal point in dorm life and also provide a place for chatting. The girls show that dorm life can also be comfortable. Two Hundred Thirty-one NOVEMBER Joe Petrocik introduces guests to Dean Cochran. Dean Brown greets students and parents. Dr. Butterweclc and Edith Hagy greet guests. Parents and students mingle at refreshment table. ll leet the sident A I decet p Dr. Robert L. Johnson, President of the University, once again invited freshman students and their parents to come meet the deans and mem- bers of the Administration this fall. With upperclassmen serving as hosts and hostesses, guests and faculty mingled in an atmosphere of sociability. The Diamond Band per- formed and refreshments were served. Dr. Johnson made the welcoming address to freshmen. Two Hundred Thirty-two Coach Al Kawal talks to group at Syracuse pep rally. School Spirit Mitten Hall Great Court was alive with activity on several Thursdays dur- ing the football season. The reason: the Crusader-sponsored Pep Rallies to boost school spirit for a coming football game. Under Len Chackman, Business 54, the rallies featured the Diamond Band, the cheerleaders, and the coaches and players on the football team. At a rally held on the morning of Homecoming, a wreath was placed on the bust of Russell H. Conwell, University founder. Cheerl eaders ' captain, Len Chackman. Band ensemble entertains at Scranton pep rally. Cheerleaders in action at pep rally. Two Hundred Thirty-three Dr. Gundersheinier ' s history of art class. 6 for I at a er Tyler School of Fine Arts, located away from the main campus and outside the city limits, has a campus and activities all its own. Besides taking part in the University ' s programs, Tyler has its own publication, dance groups, dramatic group, ath- letics, student council and cultural groups all aimed at furthering the artistic and social interests of the students. Informal dancing for the artists. Sue and Lou Vernon are butterflies at the Masquerade Ball. Mrs. Blai and Ann Uuhara. A scene from Tylerplayers ' Pygmalion. Two Hundred Thirty-four Museum painting under the direction of Mr. Abels. I Paint-grinding in class. Student works on welded sculpture. Instructor Ted Hallman weaving. Professor Sabatini ' s wood and stone carving class. Working outdoors on a fresco. Two Hundred Thirty-five Sophomore class group in " Slow Boat to China. " The Aquabelles in action. Sophomore mermaids pose. tke lA orfa tli tlie Wate Sit ow " A Dream Cruise Around the World " was the theme of the sixth annual water show presented this year on November 12 and 13 in Conwell Hall pool. The aqua show featured solo, adagio, and ballet numbers by members of each class in the department of Health, Physical Edu- cation and Recreation, sponsor of the show. The Aquabelles, too, a group of WAA women from all schools in the University, gave an exhibition in water ballet and rhythmic swimming. Songs were supplied by the singing quartet of Phi Epsilon Kappa, national physi- cal education fraternity. Adrienne McNaughton and Jack Bretcher present adagio number. rspigMI Entire cast assembles for " God Bless America " finale. Two Hundred Thirty-six J4ere ana Uk ere f on ibers Edu- ' ster I by iysi- Mayor Joseph Clark addresses group in Mitten Hall. Receiving line at Elementary Education Tea. Dr. Jenny speaks to guests at Chappie Rice ' s farewell dinner. Teachers ' ensemble renders a farewell number to Chappie at his dinner. Chappie Rice conducts Fireside Sing before he leaves Temple. Two Hundred Thirty-seven DECEMBER Students chat with chaperones. Mid-floor decoration provides atmosphere. opn.6 esLJctnce at ( o ion A medieval wonderland was the setting of the Sophomore Cotillion held this year on December 4 in Mitten Hall Auditorium. Carrying out the theme of " Court Capers, " the Sophomore Council of Student Senate decorated the walls of the stage in red, white and gray as the background for a large shield. The theme was further carried out on the walls and pillars of the auditorium. A medieval king and queen formed the centerpiece. Music for the dance was pro- vided by Bill Davies and his orchestra. Couples relax between dances. Students ejnoy the sweet dance music. Worship in the Chapel of the Four Chapels. eiqiou.6 a are Religious activities at the University are as varied as they are numerous. Under the guidance of the groups ' ad- visers the programs this year kept pace with the demand. The Protestant organizations, Hillel and Newman Club kept a full schedule of events for their members. United Chri stian Movement sponsored weekly chapel meetings for all denominations and beliefs. University Religious Coun- ci sponsored a Religious Convocation and Brotherhood Dinner. For all faiths there was the opportunity to worship and join in fellowship with persons of similar and different beliefs. Harvey Cox. Protestant adviser to students, in his office. Hillel girls discuss plans at coffee hour. University Religious Council members work together on dinner. Women ' s Glee Club enters Great Court for Candlelight Concert. A Dr. Seegers, President of Muhlenberq College, is main speaker of the evening. Spirit of Frances Steiner entertains at Candlelight Concert. Ushering in the Christmas season at the University were the annual White Supper and Candlelight Concert. The traditional turkey dinner, sponsored by the University Christian Movement, was ad- dressed by Dr. Conrad Seegers, President of Muhlenburg College and former dean of Teachers College here. Men ' s Glee Club and the T-Owls quartet entertained during the dinner. Following the White Supper the Women ' s Glee Club presented its annual Candlelight Concert in the Great Court. Robed in white with red stoles, the group sang an appropri- ate collection of hymns, carols and folk songs. White Supper in progress in Mitten Hall Auditorium. Two Hundred Forty Men ' s Glee Club performs. White Supper ana ( anatellakt (Concert T-Owl quartet renders a number. Speakers ' table at the White Supper. Small ensemble of Women ' s Glee Club is -featured in the concert. Two Hundred Forty-one rfere and A bit of Hawaii brought here by the junior phys eds at their Christmas luncheon. Dr. Skelton speaks during " This I Believe " series. Part of the group who attended the Business Alumni Dinner. The Council on Student Government listens to a report at the open hearings. Clerks and secretaries are busy in the Registrar ' s office infold flttfl ere Mr. Metzger speaks to the News staff during a press conference. A member of the Temple University Hospital Auxiliary presents a checlc for the hospital. Christmas atmosphere in Mitten Hall Great Court. An informal air prevails at the Fireside Forum. Issues are discussed at a student government meeting. JANUARY Watch out for the explosion! The machines do the work. Interested attention is given " Pop " Randall by theater students. All through the year-round whirl of activity, dances, meetings, football games and parties, one thing that kept creeping in and demanding attention was classes. There was always another paper to write, another book to report on, another test to study for right down to the final day of exams. There were lectures, laboratories, practice teaching and settlement house work as well as work to be done at home. Through it all classes remained as the central and tying in point of all the influences connected with education. Concentration in the chemistry lab. Two Hundred Forty-four Social Dance class, Temple ' s answer to Arthur Murray. I Future reporters type up " hot " leads. Ctc Future CPA ' s at work. Home Economics Lab, proving ground for future homemakers. Dr. Kramer lectures while history studes wish for a shorthand course. Model Pharmacy. n aa the ill la-Kina at I h armacu a Located in one of the finest of the University ' s buildings, the School of Pharmacy carries on its classes and social affairs quite a few blocks away from the main campus. Much of the social life at Pharmacy centers around the professional fra- ternities and sorority which carry on active programs. High spots in the year ' s calendar are the Pharmacy Dance and the annual Pharmacy Show. With their own basketball team and student council the students of the School of Pharmacy keep occu- pied with classes and fun much the same as the rest of the University. Study in the library. Seniors in dispensary lab. Books for eager students. Two Hundred Forty-six Instructors at work in the manufacturing lab Scene from last year ' s Pharmacy Show In the office. Working in the balance room for quantitative analysis lab. Two Hundred Forty-seven Deserted grille sure sign of concentration elsewhere. The dreaded hour arrives students suffer in Mitten Hall Auditorium. I lian.tma.re of C-acA Twice a year the week-and-a-half of finals, dreaded by brainy and dumb alike, rolls around. It is a time of frantic reading, studying and reviewing, a time when the library is jammed and the grille is deserted. Mitten Hall Great Court is invaded by crammers. Books are opened for the first time, and fraternities get out their files of old exams. Bleary-eyed and weary students scrawl their thoughts in blue books or fill in blocks of form A ' s. At the end of the week-and-a- half students and professors alike heave a unanimous sigh of relief and once again the world looks rosy-hued and bright. The library is as good a place as any to cram. The last lap. Marking the Form A ' s by machine. Ciptiys it tlie S Went! reip Two Hundred Forty-eight J 3k ere Displays at the Secondary Education Alumni Exhibit in Mitten Hall. Temple ' s efforts to aid the community are seen in the opening of South Hall Pool with Joe Verdeur as guest. Students respond to the call of the Bloodmobile. Long waits in line result in empty wallets at the Student Store Relaxation after finals with chess and ping pong. Two Hundred Forty-nine Grounder 6 U inner FEBRUARY Eric Sevareid, chief Washington correspondent for CBS radio, was the principal speaker at the Founders Day Dinner in Mitten Hall Auditorium. The dinner, sponsored by the General Alumni Association commemorated the I Nth anniversary of the birth of Russell H. Conwell, University founder. Other highlights of the Dinner were the presentation of the Alumni Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Louis P. Hoyer, superintendent of Philadelphia ' s Public Schools. The Russell H. Conwell Award was presented to Dr. Millard E. Gladfelter, University provost and vice presi- dent. Musical selections were provided by the University Concert Choir. University President, Robert L. Johnson gave the open- ing address to the alumni members. Speaker of the evening, Mr. Eric Sevareid, addresses guests. William R. Spofford presents Alumni Distinguished Service Award to Dr. Louis P. Hoyer, Superintendent of Philadelphia public schools. President Johnson speaks to the group. Concert Choir entertains after the dinner. Guests dine in Mitten Hall Auditorium. Two Hundred Fifty nUrt f f Moving-Up Day Convocation featured presentation of awards and installation of officers. Guest speaker was Albert C. Wedemeyer, one of the nation ' s foremost military startegists. Dean Gertrude D. Peabody installed the new officers of campus organizations and Alumni Association President Harold Stone presented awards to outstanding seniors. The Sword Award was presented to Sue Davidoff and Martin Gross. Wilma Friedman and Gardnar Evans re- ceived the Owl Award while the University Plaque was awarded to Delores Shakoski and William Schilling. Charlotte Gever, chairman of the senior class, was in- ducted into the Alumni Association by Stone. New student leaders take oath of office. General Albert C. Wedemeyer addresses group in Baptist Temple. Guests enjoy luncheon with President Johnson following ceremonies. Winners of Owl Award, Wilma Friedman and Gardnar Evans; T.U. Award, Delores Shakoski and William Schilling, and Sword Award, Sue Davidoff and Martin Gross, and Charlotte Gever, chairman of senior class council. Two Hundred Fifty-one (Jorotnernooa. lA eeK rrlantianted o u inner Miss Marjorie Penney receives Human Service Award at dinner. Chaplain Goldberg, main speaker at the dinner, chats with President Johnson. Miss Penney addresses dinner guests. Highlighting the Brotherhood Dinner was the presenta- tion of the University Religious Council Human Service Award to Miss Marjorie Penney, founder of the Phila- delphia Fellowship House. The major address of the eve- ning was delivered by Captain Joshua L. Goldberg, chief of the Jewish chaplains in the Armed Forces and member of the American rabbinate. Harvey Cox, Protestant adviser to students, led group singing after dinner, and the Fellowship Choir directed by Mrs. Elaine Brown performed. General view of diners in Mitten Hall auditorium. Mrs. Elaine Brown directs Fellowship House Chorus after the dinner. rrere and ere Voting at second semester registration on student government and discrimination. Three students pause during the mad whirl of registration. Soccer awards are presented to Harry Smith and Ed Tatoian by Jack Skloff and Al Laverson while Josh Cody and Pete Leaness look on. Freshmen enter the " big top " at the Frosh Hop. Conrad Seegers, president of Muhlenberg College, speaks at mid-year Commencement. Two Hundred Fifty-.three The graduating class in Baptist Temple. MARCH run. rrollc and Fun and festivity were keynotes of this year ' s annual Carnival as 36 clubs and organizations turned Mitten Hall Audi- torium into a wonderland of booths based on television shows. Games of every sort, chances, basket- ball, hot dogs, and soda, dancing and fortune telling were among the enter- tainments cooked up to make money for the World University Service and the Student Scholarship Fund. XYW and Crusaders organized and sponsored Carnival. Top prize winners were French Honor Society, Sigma Pi and Wiatt Hall while runner-up spots went to Kappa Alpha Psi, Alpha Sigma Alpha and the Chem- istry Society. Crowned " Queen for a Day " at Carnival was Delta Sigma Epsilon ' s Mary DiLeo. " Shooting Basketball, " Theta Kappa Phi ' s booth, really drew the crowds. A touch of the wild west was provided by Alpha Sigma Alpha ' s " Lone Ranger. " Attempts to " Beat the Clock " at Sigma Pi ' s prize-winning booth ended in much hilarity. " Fish, fish and more fish, " describes Kappa Phi Kappa ' s boolh where live goldfish were given away as prizes. Two Hundred Fifty-four the J U (Carnival Balloons, rolling pins, and quite an elaborate man helped to carry out WAA ' s theme of " Kitchen Kapers. " DRAGNET Alpha Phi Omega presents " Dragnet. 1 Wiatt Hall ' s " Ramar of the Jungle " booth copped first prize as most attractive. Figures from around the world formed the background for the booth of the University Religious Council ' s " Welcome Travelers " booth. Hunger pangs were satisfied at Sigma Phi Epsilon ' s booth, " Pots, Pans and Personalities. " Top honors in Greek Sing went to Theta Sigma Upsilon and Sigma Pi. Joan Janssen, president of Theta Sigma Upsilon, receives sorority achievement award for her group. Dean John Brown, presents the service award to Tau Epsilon Phi. oLJine. aDance, Greeks and their dates had their fill of fun and frivolity as they cavorted through the open houses, parties, dinners, Sing and Ball that made Greek Weekend one of the year ' s gayest. Open festivities was the annual Greek Sing in Mitten Hall Great Court. Repeat winners of the songfest were Sigma Pi fraternity and Theta Sigma Upsilon sorority with Sigma Phi Epsilon and Alpha Sigma Alpha in the runner-up spots. Following close behind the Sing was Greek Din- ner featuring presentation of awards and a talk by Don Rose, Bulletin columnist. Top scholastic awards went to Sigma Phi Epsilon and Phi Delta Tau, while Panhellenic Council ' s Sorority Achieve- ment went to Theta Sigma Upsilon. Robert Bloss, Sigma Phi Epsilon, receives Sigma Pi ' s Samuel R. Russell Memorial Award as the outstanding fraternity pledge. Two Hundred Fifty-six The outstanding fraternity man award was presented to David DeTurk by Mr. Sylvester Aichele. Dean Gertrude Peabody presents outstanding non-greek woman award to Barbara Polss Leventer. Ljala Weekend Dean Brown presented both his awards, the Serv- ice Award, and House Improvement Award, to Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity. Individual awards went to Barbara Polss Leventer as outstanding non-Greek woman, Joan Martin as outstanding Greek woman, Robert Bloss as outstanding pledge of the year, and Dave DeTurk as outstanding fraternity man. Tony Stromeyer received the Monroe Award for contributions to the University, and Theta Kappa Phi won the all-sports trophy. Climaxing the weekend ' s festivities was Satur- day night ' s Greek Ball, featuring Elliot Lawrence and his orchestra. After the tumult and shouting died, it was generally agreed that " a good time was had by all. " I Don Rose, columnist for The Evening Bulletin, speaks at Greek Dinner. Greeks bunny hop. Energetic couples try jitterbugging. Two Hundred Fifty-ieven Work, Ptau and Stuc u Wltli A fast game of ping-pong. A rarity: someone studying. Dr. Snyder in the book store Far from the crush of the main campus are the students of Community College with a campus of their own at Cedarbrook. Set up in September, 1948, as an undegraduate division of the University, Community College along with Technical Institute is designed to provide a post-high school education for those desiring a broader cultural and educational back- ground. Students receive an associate degree on completing two and three year courses. Community students have a complete program of activi- ties including dances, a newspaper, chorus, sports, socia affairs, and student council to make their stay at the University an active and enjoyable one. Hostess Mrs. Dinger in the lounge Two Hundred Fifty-eight John Carl and Conrad Mizdail bone up Secretaries are busy in the dean ' s office. Two Hundred Fifty-nine Othello ' s soldiers get drunk in an inn. Brabantio accuses Othello of stealing his daughter, Desdemona. CAST Ohello Noam Pitlik lago Desdemona Barbara Rappaport Roderigo Brabantio Glenn Bolosky Emilia Cassio Charles Hicks Lodovico Bianca Joan Feldman Montano . Leonard Rosenblatt Saul Rossien Sally Roth Karl Friedman .. Michael Ricciardi Desdemona is waited on by her servant, Emilia. L iniver it u The production of " Othello " this year was the big- gest project undertaken by University Theater since their musical comedy three years ago. One of the largest casts in recent years breathed life into Shakespeare ' s sad, beautiful story. There was no scrimping in the production. The show was rich and colorful with beautiful costumes. The set was simpe, yet provided enough levels and pillars to allow interesting and different staging for each scene. The show included exciting swordplay and well-integrated musical bridges. This was the first Shakespearian play to be done at Temple under the direction of Prof. Paul E. Randall. Scene design and technical direction was by Clemen Peck. Othello strangles his wife, Desdemona, in a jealous rage. Othello ' s lieutenant, Cassio, duels as lago looks on. Two Hundred Sixty Potential writers leave classes in the journalism building. an d ere " There ' s always room for one more " or so it seems in the elevators in Conwell Hall. A laboratory technician experiments in the Research Institute. Students arrive at Mitten Hall for a gala evening affair. Mickey ' s on Watts Street provides a convenient place to stop for a snack. Book Store in Conwell Hall. APRIL Cadet Colonel Bill Schilling " crowns " honorary colonel, Marjorie Savage. . f2 ff ilitaru M- atl The army went formal on April 24 when Scabbard and Blade, honorary military fra- ternity, held its annual Military Ball. The ceiling of Mitten Hall Auditorium was decorated with parachutes accented by colored spotlights for the occasion. Music was provided by the Ken Moore Karavan Band. Marjorie Savage, ROTC sweetheart, re- ceived an award as Honorary Cadet Colonel from Scabbard and Blade. Further highlighting the evening was the presenta- tion of the sword of " Command and Leadership " to Cadet Colonel William Schilling, followed by the Grand March in honor of the Cadet Colonel and the graduating seniors. The regimental command and dates line up: Pauline Lerman, Bill Columbus, Simone Green- burg, Richard Schwartz, Virginia Bahmueller, Bill Schilling, Jean Schmidt, Charles Schalch, Frank Baldwin and Eleanor Domlcoslci. Lovely evening gowns and smart uniforms fill the dance floor. The grand march. Two Hundred Sixty-two Mrs. Elaine Brown, Concert Choir director. (Concert C-A or t (c aue6 Sal, The snted by m. Music Karavan heart, re- , Cadet . Furfe presents- and and and the One of the outstanding college choral groups in the country is the University Con- cert Choir under the direction of Mrs. Elaine Brown. With a fame based largely on recordings and television and radio appearances with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Concert Choir makes several tours each year of eastern cities. The combined University choirs ' per- formance of Beethoven ' s " Ninth Symphony " in the Academy of Music, Philadelphia, and Carnegie Hall, New Yoik City, drew raves from the critics. Thoy performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy. Last summer a selected group of Concert Choir members, former and present, were sent to Europe on a tour. They sang in London, Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, Frankfort, Munich, Mannheim, Salzburgh, and behind the iron curtain in Vienna, receiving plaudits as they went. Mrs. Brown leads the Concert Choir. Choir members relax during rehearsal. Practice at the Academy of Music. Concert Choir performs at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia and Carnegie Hall in New York. Two Hundred Sixty-three ? J -L Sullivan cJLiot iwan cyt-ioraru . . . Urs. Nordke Servi Dr. I catei dent! chart alsoi In mainf Mia Smpi Dr. Roxby, Health Service Director Mrs. Nordberg, nurse, and Mrs. Perrollo, secretary, in office. Mecca for University students with aches, pains, sniffles and broken bones is the University Health Service, located at 1920 N. Park Ave. Headed by Dr. Bruce Roxby, the Health Service specializes in catering to the ills of resident students, but all stu- dents are admitted for clinic treatment without charge. Faculty members and University employees also have access to Health Service facilities. In addition to clinic services, the Health Service maintains a well-equipped infirmary to which resi- dent students may be admitted. Se ervce Varied rckeA ana Miss Gumper, nurse, gives Jerry Cohen a foot bath. Dr. Roxby and nurses check on patient Mary Ellen Thompson. Two Hundred Sixty-five - rrere ana Buildings and Grounds office. Students pause to chat outside Pete ' s, a favorite haunt. i ? Noon hour rush on Watts Street. Dr. Murray Hauptschein in the organic lab of the Research Institute. The grille in Mitten Hall is a popular place during lunch time. ere Students at work in the chem lab. Construction work on the pavement in front of Mitten Hall. Sullivan Library provides a good place to study. " %, " % [ " Wonderful dance " was Ihe opinion of this year ' s Junior Prom. MAY A moment of study on the landing. Diniity slJ Relaxation in the lounge. au tuclent rottow in th or Ju.r When Dr. Russell H. Conwell began teaching his first students, young men interested in becoming ministers but unable to afford expensive educations, he laid the foundations for Temple University ' s School of Theology. With classes and activities centered around Thomas Theological Hall, Theology School students are a closely- knit group with a program of activities all their own. Under the leadership of the student council the students enjoy a program of fun, fellowship and inspiration outside of the regular curricular offerings. All eyes to the podium. Council prexy Bill Thielking. Two Hundred Sixty-eight Greek, too, can be amusing. MI Mi,, I Divinity students on their way to street meeting. Hallway discussion. mr Class dismissed. Miss Margaret Weeber, Theology secretary. Don Phillips and Bill Thielking inspect show-case Bible. Two Hundred Sixty-nine FEMPLF ALMA MATER - - - +f- Onward with Temple, banners all unfurled. Wide flung our standards, to the winds they ' re hurled. Following our Founder to immortal fame, Making true his vision of a deathless name. Hail! Alma Mater, honor, praise to thee; We pledge our lives, our hearts in loyalty. Wisdom, truth and virtue built our Temple great; Perseverance conquers, higher to create. ArcKnowteclae with . . . the professional help of Nason Clark of the Clark Printing House, Inc. and Marvin Merin of Merin Studios. . . . the cooperation and skill of photographers Martin Zipin and Robert Schoonover. . . . the interest and advice of Raymond Whittaker, faculty adviser. . . . and the faithful work of the following editors and staff members: Joan Eckstein Harriet Schwartz Floriana Manno Jack McCafferty Judy Edgar June Fraps Ted Detwiler John Craig Shirley Cragle C aitor RUTH KELLER Barbara Polss Kay Keen Rae Brown Ed Weinberg Dot Pels Sam Glantz Tom Curran Edith Alexander Wilbur Thompson Two Hundred Seventy-one Two Hundred Seventy-two


Suggestions in the Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) collection:

Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

Temple University - Templar Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.