Temple University School of Dentistry - Odontolog Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA)

 - Class of 1977

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Temple University School of Dentistry - Odontolog Yearbook (Philadelphia, PA) online yearbook collection, 1977 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 208 of the 1977 volume:

Temple University School Of Dentistry Comprehensive Bulletin 1973-1977 Temple University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all in every aspect of its operations. The University has pledged not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex. age, religion, national origin or physical handicap. This policy extends to all educational programs and activities. The rules and regulations as stated in this bulletin are announcements only and in no way serve as a contract between the student and Temple University. The majority of information herein has been accurately extracted, with discretion, from the Bulletin of Temple University School of Dentistry. (Wo) wUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUBS TUDS TUDS TUBS Tit LBS TUBS TUBS TUBS J LBS TUBS TUBS TUBS TUBS TUBS TUBS TUBS TUBS TrUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS T TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TDedication In the past four years there have been several men who have watched with patience and compassion as we have struggled to attain our skills. They have shown that learning dentistry can be a pleasant experience for everyone involved. We have seen these men appeal to something that goes far in producing results and quality in our work. They appeal to our intelligence and the pride we take in the things we have learned. There are few people in the school who possess all the attributes associated with being a truly great teacher. You are the ones we rely on to maintain a certain sense of professional excellence and to have, at the same time, an understanding of the students’ problems. It is with great pleasure that we announce you as recipients of the 2nd Annual Temple University School of Dentistry Humanitarian Award. Winners will each receive $2,000 to be presented in their name to the Dental School of their choice. They will also receive the keys to a new 1977 Cadillac Seville. These awards have once again been donated by the Class of 1977 Beer Fund. DR. EGIDIO F. TORRETI Assistant Professor. Operative Dentistry Philadelphia, Pennsylvania St. Joseph’s College Pennsylvania State University Temple University Dental School '42 4DR. HAROLD JAMES LANTZ Professor and Chairman. Prosthetic Department Topton, Pennsylvania Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science Temple University Dental School Temple University School of Education Michigan University Dental School DR. LARRY J. GELLER Instructor, Oral Medicine Brooklyn, New York Brooklyn College B.S. ’68 Temple University Dental School ’72 5DR. JOSEPH R. MARCHESANI Assistant Professor. Oral Pediatrics Haddonfield, New Jersey LaSalle College B.A. ’57 University of Maryland Dental School ’61 DR. PHIL WIEGAND Assistant Professor, Endodontics Taylorville, Illinois St. Louis University University of Illinois Loyola University Dental School Temple University Dental School 6DR. FRANK WILLIAMS Associate Professor, Radiology St. Louis, Missouri St. Louis University Dental School ’51 University of Rochester M.S. ’68 DR. PETER COSTE Associate Professor, Fixed Partial Prosthetics Swarthmore, Pennsylvania Temple University Dental School ’41 l£EDR. PAUL ALAN FARBER Associate Professor, Pathology Brooklyn, New York University of Michigan AB ’60 University of Michigan DDS ’62 University of Rochester PhD ’67 DR. ARTHUR S. MILLER Professor and Chairman, Pathology Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Montana State University BS ’57 Washington University DDS ’59 Indiana University MSD ’63 8GENERAL INFORMATION ODON'ICiU e' WStALJWfjl IKDZAIH iTrwO' oCALENDAR FOR YOUR BASIC YEAR 1973-1977 FIRST SEMESTER Freshman Orientation ............ Promotions Committee meets ...... Classes begin ................... Construction begins ............. Heat turned off ................. Thanksgiving recess begins ...... Promotions Committee meets....... Dr. Patag loses jade tie tac .... Semester ends ................... Construction ends ............... Promotions Committee meets....... SECOND SEMESTER Classes begin ................... Construction begins again ....... Promotions Committee meets ...... Class size reduced .............. Angie Costa’s birthday-school closed Second semester examinations begin Promotions Committee meets ...... Biochemistry grades posted ...... Promotions Committee meets....... Heat turned on .................. Commencement .................... Coffee machine cleaned .......... Thursday and Friday, September 2,3 .....Tuesday, September 7, 9 a.m. ___Wednesday, September 8, 8 a.m. ... .Wednesday, September 8, 8 a.m. .........Monday, October 23, 7 a.m. ___Wednesday, November 23, 5 p.m. .....Monday, November 29, 9 a.m. .....Tuesday, November 30, 2 p.m. .....Thursday, December 23, 5 p.m. .....Thursday, December 23, 5 p.m. .........Monday, January 3, 9 a.m. ....Monday, January 3, 8 a.m. ....Monday, January 3, 8 a.m. ....Tuesday, January 4, 9 a.m. Friday, February 11, High Noon ....Friday, March 16, 8-9 a.m. ........Monday, May 1, 8 a.m. ....Wednesday, May 3, 9 a.m. ......Thursday, May 4, 4 p.m. ......Tuesday, May 16, 9 a.m. ... .Wednesday, May 17, 8 p.m. .Thursday, May 26, 1977?78?79 ........Friday, May 27, 2 p.m. 10TEMPLE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY The Philadelphia Dental College, which became the Temple University School of Dentistry in 1907, was organized after the charter was secured on April 18,1863, through the efforts of Dr. John Hugh McQuillen and his professional associates. Upon organization of the faculty, Dr. McQuillen became Dean, and the first session of the school began in the fall. At that time there were but three other dental schools in the United States; now there are 3,245 including correspondence and night school. Besides keeping abreast of the constant advances in dentistry and drawing to itself students from every civilized country, this school made a noteworthy departure in first incorporating into its curriculum the study of oral surgery. The credit for this innovation is attributed to Professor James E. Garretson, a noted and skillful surgeon, who for many years was the Dean of the Faculty. Professor Garretson was also responsible for the organization and establishment of the first hospital, formerly known as the Garretson Hospital, now a part of the Temple University Hospital, devoted to the surgical treatment of diseases and lesions of the mouth, teeth, and associated parts. In 1907, by mutual agreement, the Philadelphia Dental College was taken over by Temple University, the latter institution acquiring possession of the ground, buildings, equipment, and good will of the former and taking entire charge of its management. The Temple University School of Dentistry is a member of the American Association of Dental Schools, and conforms to all of the requirements of this organization and of the Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Association. Its diploma is recognized by the American Association of Dental Examiners, the National Board of Dental Examiners, and the American Association for the Prevention of Dentistry. THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL HYGIENE Temple University operates a School of Dental Hygiene in conjunction with the School of Dentistry. The course, which covers two college years, is the only fully accredited instructional program in the dental school building. Students having satisfactorily completed the two year curriculum may continue in the College of Education and earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Education. iiTHE DENTAL SCHOOL BUILDING In the fall of 1947, classes began in Temple University’s Dental School building at 3223 North Broad Street approximately one block south of the Medical School and the Hospital. The building is a beautiful structure of reinforced concrete with four floors totaling 197,000 square feet. The facilities, design, and arrangement of these quarters were carefully planned in order to provide the most modern and effective dental education plant possible. The modernistic front of white limestone and marble faces North Broad Street where separate entrances to the administrative offices and clinic are located. The building extends in the rear to Park Avenue where there are more entrances. Access to the upper floors is provided by numerous well lighted stairwells, strategically located for utmost convenience. The second floor is devoted to the various clinics and their needs, including the Soble Laboratory and the Magen Laboratory. Additionally, some shops and the office of the Department of Physical Plant are on this floor. The lecture halls, the biological and technical laboratories and associated research facilities, the graduate and seminar facilities, and an X-ray laboratory are on the third floor. The fourth floor is used partially for the vendeteria and the Department of Biochemistry, while the remainder of the floor is occupied by the learning center classrooms and the dental store. Also on this floor are the recently completed plush offices of the Dean and his staff, which overlook the courtyard. This arrangement of offices affords direct observation of the daily activities of the school. iinTTiin TEMPLE UNIVERSITY 12fhp Dental SchoolTHE HISTORICAL MUSEUM Temple University School of Dentistry, the second oldest in existence, has accumulated a unique collection of historically valuable items. The Museum continually acquires manuscripts, books, catalogues, prints, paintings and dental objects of historical importance. Books written by graduates and faculty members and early periodicals containing their writings graphically portray the history of the school and the profession. Antique instruments and equipment are preserved and displayed in the museum. Many of these objects were invented by members of early faculties of the Philadelphia Dental College. A number of these same faculty members carry around their antiquated instruments and willingly demonstrate their use to unwilling students. The purpose of the museum is not only to collect, document, and preserve objects representing the history of dentistry, but to stimulate, interest, and inspire the viewer with a feeling for that history. THE AUDITORIUM The Auditorium, with a seating capacity of 800 persons, is located in the exact center of the ground floor. Its floor slopes downward toward the stage in order to provide the most efficient vision possible. Direct and indirect auditorium type lighting is used, and the room is aired by a forced ventilation system. Facilities for the projection of all types of motion pictures, sound and color films, and still slides are included in addition to television monitors for broadcasting live or taped programs. A complete sound system of microphones and amplification units are included and upholstered chairs with fold down writing boards have been installed.THE CLINICS The clinics, composed of a total of 260 operating units, are primarily located on the second floor. A separate entrance for patients admits them directly to a receptionist who guides them to the proper department. The restorative and general treatment clinics of the department of Operative Dentistry, Endodontics, and Periodontics, and the offices of the heads of these departments occupy the entire west side of the floor. Along the south corridor is the Office of the Director of Clinics, the clinics and offices of the Department of Oral Diagnosis with 12 individual examining cubicles and a medical laboratory; the Department of Radiodontics, the Department of Oral Surgery; and the waiting room, offices, and demonstration rooms of the Department of Oral Pediatrics. The main clinic was renovated completely in 1967, is air conditioned, and contains 88 modern cubicles with the latest mobile dental units and chairs. Along the north corridor are the department of Complete and Partial Denture Prosthesis, and Fixed Partial Denture Prosthesis, the Louis Herman Clinic, the offices of the chairmen of these departments, and the Soble Laboratory for technical clinical operations. 15THE HERMAN CLINIC The Dr. Louis Herman Clinic affords the dental student an opportunity to practice dentistry in an atmosphere closely resembling that of a private practice. Included in this clinic are nine operatories, six x-ray units, one laboratory, two consultation rooms and two offices. A unique feature of the Herman Clinic is that eight of the nine operatories are furnished with different types of dental equipment, thus allowing students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with equipment they may want to use in private practice. THE SOBLE LABORATORY The laboratory is adjacent to the general restorative clinic and communicates with it. Two large student laboratories and three technicians laboratories, each eqiupped for specialized technical operations, the office of its director, storage and supply rooms are conveniently arranged to make this laboratory a complete and efficient auxiliary unit of the general clinic. THE LECTURE HALLS The four lecture halls are situated on the north side of the third floor. One of the four is the amphitheater type while the remaining three are regular classrooms. All of the rooms have cushioned chairs, are excellently lighted, and fully air-conditioned providing total comfort for the student. Three of the rooms are equipped with closed circuit television. 16PRE-CLINICAL SCIENCE LABS Pre clinical Science laboratories are located along the west side of the third floor. Each laboratory is furnished with the special eqiup-ment; including inadequate lighting, cast iron stools, clogged sinks, unreliable equipment, and overcrowded conditions, necessary for the complete instruction in the field of dentistry. BASIC SCIENCE The basic science departments, with the exception of Anatomy, are located along the south side of the third floor. Each teaching laboratory is furnished with new equipment especially designed to meet the needs of thorough training in each subject involved. In addition, specialized equipment has been installed in each laboratory to afford the student a chance to kill as much of his valuable time as possible. VISUAL EDUCATION The closed and open circuit television facilities of this department, enables an absent instructor to control time, space, perception, size, and perspective in instruction with student conceptual development as the primary objective. Video taped demonstrations, procedures, etc. are available for individual or group student viewing. This includes the Dean’s Hour, taped every Friday afternoon before a live audience with music provided by Billy Binns and his orchestra. This program is broadcast by satellite to 9 departments and 34 countries with a total viewing audience of 78 million. This program is a past winner of the highly coveted Tony Award. 17HEALTH SERVICE The University Health Service seeks to promote a high standard of physical and mental health among students. It does not attempt to replace the services of a personal physician or psychiatrist, but to supplement them in relation to academic programs and campus life. A Health Service Office for students in the School of Dentistry is located in the Dental Building. Its staff includes a registered nurse and a Part-time physician. Upon completion of the freshman preclinical courses, students are permitted to perform simple coronary bypass and kidney transplant procedures in the Health Service Surgery Room. As the student improves his skills he will eventually be permitted to scale teeth and perform minimal dental procedures up to and including finished cavity preparation. THE VENDETERIA The vendeteria, with a seating capacity of 350 persons, is located on the fourth floor of the building. Offering a full line of hot and cold drinks, soups, sandwiches, fresh fruits, and pastries, the vendeteria is open five days a week to students, faculty, and patients. iTHE ELEVATOR The executive elevator is located at the rear of the building. With a weight capacity of 85,000 pounds it travels directly from the ground floor to the fourth floor at 9.6 feet per second. It enables the staff to travel directly to the newly decorated offices on the fourth floor quickly bypassing the deteriorating conditions on the second and third floors. The student escalators allow the student an opportunity to travel safely and easily from floor to floor. The escalators are well lighted, freshly painted, and cleaned daily by a competent staff member. i PARKING There is a twenty-three car parking lot adjacent to the building where department chairmen, steamfitters, and sheet metal workers can park their cars without fear of vandalism. The lot is guarded by highly trained professionals who use the latest in surveillance techniques. The University provides on street parking anywhere in North Philadelphia, however they assume no responsibility for stolen tires, stolen batteries, or stolen cars, nor do they assume the costs of parking tickets or towing charges. Due to lack of parking facilities patients are forced to find alternate means of transportation. 19THE STUDENT LOUNGE The student lounge is a scattered complex of rooms throughout the building which enables the student to relax and get away from the intense pressure of the dental curriculum. Saunas and showers are provided in each of the lounge areas, allowing the student to be refreshed and maintain a clean, well groomed appearance. Racquetball courts, a weight room, and the dental bar and grill are other highlights of what has become a model of luxury and modern convenience for dental schools around the world. Recreation programs, which are incorporated into the schedule, are held daily under the supervision of our own athletic director. The healthy attitude of the administration in establishing these programs has gone a long way in creating a feeling of well being and cooperation in the students.THE FACULTY LOUNGE The faculty lounge is presently undergoing construction and renovation. When completed the lounge will have dining facilities for 400 faculty members and their guests. A billiard room and television lounge are also in the planning stage. Athletic contests are staged weekly in the recreation room for the benefit of the faculty and staff. Also lunchtime seminars are given for the further enhancement of knowledge among the instructors. It is hopeful that upon the completion of phase II of this construction, each faculty member will be presented with a key to the lounge enabling him to enjoy the prestige and benefits it represents.TJDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS rUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS TUDS 240 ft ft ft 0 c 0 ft V ftft e» p AuXuakjI __ . ft ft ln UfuCD r CI;iTj CO 3 6Al.0wm.fc f 6AJ« t 6AJMAK 7 6ECKEA.C OCLbKY A BCRS TSt»«A f 000 enruiviM ft JfT eotoisM.o 6owci 7 ft Kt IWIUK »» ft ft V' a r CMCRON 6 0 tA«li07Tl OalWTUlA, CLARK. M CONRtLLY COOttR J 00 corw: 3 ft XKilO DCCRl 5 7 0 DtfclKOMMC 0 - Dot CAN 0 CUJOrr rt PSAiiiNI N fo»c o r L£;-Ai»: f«. CARCUC 0 0 ;ca torr. | $0 fcOKtt.7 fcO OC». COACH 0 COYwACT 6AKTF r 0 uuMit 00 ( V f-; w' iwu.o, h ha«"Ai r wwplo r t 0$ _ .V Kfirc.K MOkfcAMlI Mci66 G. 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Overland Park, Kansas University of Kansas B.A. Chemistry and Biology Psi Omega Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society American Student Dental Association Gold Foil Study Club JOHN D. ALLEMANG, JR. D.D.S. Horsham, Pennsylvania Dickinson College B.S. Biology Xi Psi Phi Fraternity-Social Chairman, Treasurer American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association 26JOHN JOSEPH BAUMAN D.D.S. Lewis town, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University. B.S. Science Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Student Dental Association PHILIP JAMES BAUM D.D.S. Wantagh, New York University of Virginia, B.A. Biology Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children 27CHARLTON DEAN BECKER D.D.S. Reading, Pennsylvania Albright College B.S. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association ARTHUR R. BELSKY D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Sociology Alpha Omega Fraternity, Oral Surgery Honor Society, U.S. Army Reserve, Stomatognathic Honor Society, American Society of Dentistry for Children, American Student Dental Association, Intradental Baseball. Iron Man Society 28ROBERT W. BERSTECHER D.D.S. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Waynesburg College B.S. Alpha Omega Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association CHARLES VV. BESTERMAN D.D.S. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Grove City College B.S. Mechanical Engineering Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society American Student Dental Association American Society of Dentistry for Children 29JAMES RICHARD BOWERS D.D.S. Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University, B.S. Biology Psi Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association JOROY E. BRAHEN D.D.S. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Drexel University, B.S. Alpha Omega Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association EARL JOHN BUEHNER D.D.S. Minersville, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University, B.S. Biology President. Psi Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association PAUL J. BUTLER D.D.S. “Butts” Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.S. Medical Technology Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity - Treasurer American Society of Dentistry for Children U.S. Army Reserve American Student Dental Association GARY LYNN CAMERON D.D.S. Fayetteville, North Carolina University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill B.S. Biology American Student Dental Association American Society of Dentistry for Children 32THOMAS J. CAPRIOTTI D.D.S. Gallitzin, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association Iron Man Society ROBERT DOUGLAS CARNEY D.D.S. State College, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.A. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity St. George Oral Cancer Society-Sec. Treasurer Stomatognathic Honor Society American Student Dental Society JJKENNETH ALLAN CHINTELLA D.D.S. Sharon, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Sociology Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Student Dental Association HARRY A. CLARK, JR. D.D.S. Lancaster, Pennsylvania College of the Holy Cross B.A. Biology American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association 34LEO FRANCIS CONWAY D.D.S. Conshohocken, Pennsylvania Drexel University B.S. Chemistry University of Delaware M.S. American Student Dental Association American Society of Dentistry for Children American Society of Preventive Dentistry JAMES A. CONNELLY D.D.S. Sharon, Pennsylvania Indiana University of Pennsylvania B.S. Biology Psi Omega Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association 35JEFFREY PAUL COOPER D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Gold Foil Study Club Stomatognathic Honor Society Alpha Omega Fraternity St. George Oral Cancer Society American Society of Dentistry for Children JEFFREY WYNN CORLL D.D.S. Zelienople. Pennsylvania Slippery Rock State College B.A. American Student Dental AssociationJOHN PATRICK COYNE D.D.S. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania St. Vincent College B.S. Biology Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Student Dental Association RICHARD DANZIG D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Psychology-Alpha Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association American Society of Dentistry for Children 37JOSEPH FRANCIS DEERING D.D.S. Doylestown, Pennsylvania La Salle College B.A. Psi Omega Fraternity-Secretary “Broadway Joe" Stomatognathic Honor Society-Sec. Treasurer JOHN V. DI GIROLAMO D.D.S. Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.S. Biology Alpha Omega Fraternity-Secretary Stomatognathic Honor Society-President Class Vice President Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children President of The Norm Lippman Fan Club J8JOSEPH DlMANSKl D.D.S. Passaic, New Jersey Rutgers BA. M.B.A. i Psi Phi Fraternity Periodontai Honor Society American Strident Dentai Association DAVID A. DUNCAN D.D.S. Boyer town, Pennsylvania Widener College Alpha Omega Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society President of Gold Foil Study Club American Student Dental AssociationMARGARET A. ELLIOTT D.D.S. Jenkintown. Pennsylvania Skidmore College B.A. University of St. Andrews Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association Temple Alumni Day Table Clinic Competition - First Place May 1975 Table Clinic Competition - American Dental Association - Chicago, October 1975; SCADA Student Clinician Member N. MICHAEL FAZZINI, JR. D.D.S. Berwyn, Pennsylvania St. Joseph’s College B.S. Biology American Student Dental Association Oral Surgery Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society Treasurer Psi Omega Fraternity U.S. Naval Reserve 40DAVID M. FOX D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania State University of New York at Albany American Society of Dentistry for Children St. George Oral Cancer Society American Society of Preventive Dentistry American Student Dental Association 41JOEL STEVEN GARBLIK D.D.S. Cherry Hill, New Jersey Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science American Student Dental Association, American Society of Dentistry for Children, Oral Surgery Honor Society, Stomatognathic Honor Society, Professionalism Committee. Temple University Athletic Council. Odontolog, Psi Omega Fraternity Rush Chairman 1976-77, Periodontal Honor Society, Intramural football, softball JESSE FRIEDLANDER D.D.S. Elmont, New York State University of New York at Albany B.A. Mathematics Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society 42STEVEN GERZOFF D.D.S. Metuchen, New Jersey Rutgers University B.A. sociology Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association ROGER WAYNE GIBBON D.D.S. Virginia Beach, Virginia Old Dominion University B.S. Medical College of Virginia Psi Omega Fraternity-Vice President American Student Dental AssociationMYRON BARRY GOLDBERG D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Alpha Omega Fraternity - President 1975; Oral Surgery Honor Society; Treasurer Periodontal Honor Society; St. George Oral Cancer Society; American Society of Dentistry for Children; American Society for Preventive Dentistry; Iron Man Society; Temple Dental Swimming Team JOSEPH GREGORY GOMEZ D.D.S. Holyoke. Massachusetts University of Massachusetts B.S. Zoology Psi Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association American Society of Dentistry for Children 44 LAWRENCE J. GORDON D.D.S. Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University Psi Omega Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association OSCAR L. GOREN D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Drexel University B.S. Math M.S. Environmental Science Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity Student Council American Society of Preventive Dentistry 45JOHN T. GOTWALT D.D.S. Akron, Pennsylvania Gettysburg College B.A. American Student Dental Association TODD RICHARD GRAEF D.D.S. West Caldwell, New Jersey Bucknell University B.S. Biology American Student Dental Association -46SAMUEL D. GREENLEE U.D.S. Vandergnft, Pennsylvania Bucknell University B.S. Biology Curriculum Committee; ASDA Representative Vo Student Council; Delegate, ASDA Annual Session; Delegate, PDA Annual Session; President, ASDA Temple Chapter, Consultant on Licensute Vo V e ASDA; United States Navy Reserve; Sv. George Oral Cancer Society; American Society ol Dentistry For Children; Oral Surgery Honor SocietyMICHAEL GULLO D.D.S. Westmont, New Jersey Fairleigh Dickinson University B.S. Alpha Omega Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer SocietyJAMES RUSSELL HAROLD D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Indiana University B.A. Zoology Psi Omega Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association VINCENT HAROLD HEAPS D.D.S. Columbia, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.S. Biology Stomatognathic Honor Society Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Student Dental Association 49MARK STEVEN HOCHBERG D.D.S. Syosset, New York Temple University B.A. Alpha Omega Fraternity, American Student Dental Association Representative, Odontolog, American Society of Dentistry for Children. Periodontal Honor Society, St. George Oral Cancer Society, Iron Man Society, Notetaking Service V.P. MORTON HERTZ D.D.S. Brooklyn, New York Brooklyn College B.A. American Society of Preventive Dentistry American Society of Dentistry for Children Periodontal Honor Society-Vice President Oral Surgery Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society SOSIPAUL ROGER PHILLIP HUGHES D.D.S. New Florence, Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown B.S. Biology American Society of Dentistry for Children American Society of Preventive Dentistry American Student Dental Association DALE MICHAEL HUPALO D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Psychology American Society of Dentistry for Children American Society of Preventive Dentistry American Student Dental Association Iron Man Society 52STEPHAN INKER D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Geology Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society Iron Man Society American Student Dental Association 53 MICHAEL G. IRELAND D.D.S. Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania Villanova University, B.A., B.S. Psi Omega Fraternity-Social Chairman Intramural football, basketball, softball American Student Dental Association LEONARD JACKSON JR. D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Lincoln University B.A. Psi Omega Fraternity St. George Oral Cancer Society Oral Surgery Honor Society-Lions International 54JUDITH ANN JENNINGS D.D.S. Hoffman Estates, Illinois Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children St. George Oral Cancer Society American Student Dental Association EDITH K. JONES D.D.S. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania University of Delaware B.A. Biology American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association 55JOSEPH JURGEVICH D.D.S. R.I). 3 Box 39 Stoystown, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children Iron Man Society STEVEN LOUIS KANEFSKY D.D.S. Short Hills, New Jersey Fairleigh Dickinson University B.S. Biology-Alpha Omega Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association 56RICHARD MICHAEL KELOWITZ D.D.S. Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania East Stroudsburg State College B.A. Biology Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Student Dental Association MICHAEL FINKER KILLEBREW D.D.S. Tucson. Arizona University of Arizona B.S. American Student Dental Association Boy Scouts of America 57 DENNIS SAMUEL KING D.D.S. Belleville, Pennsylvania Eastern Mennonite College B.S. Colorado State University M.S. American Student Dental Association Stomatognathic Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children St. George Oral Cancer Society ACS Summer Traineeship WARD KING D.D.S. “Sky” East Brady, Pennsylvania Westminster College B.S. Psi Omega Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children 58THOMAS M. KOHLER D.D.S. Rochester. New York Vilianova University Stomatognathic Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society Gold Foil Study Club LEWIS LAMPIRIS D.D.S. Queens Village, New- York Hunter College of the City University of N.Y. B.A. American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association S9KWOK CHUNG LAU D.D.S. Hong Kong University of Wisconsin B.S. State University of New York M.A. American Student Dental Association American Society of Dentistry for Children BRUCE R. LEINEN D.D.S. Trevose, Pennsylvania Rutgers University R.S. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Student Dental Association Odontolog Staff 60LINDA SCHERZER LEWIS D.D.S. Union, New Jersey University of Pennsylvania B.A., B.S. Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity-Junior and Senior Class Secretary-Treasurer American Society of Dentistry for Children St. George Oral Cancer Society Oral Surgery Honor Society 61NORMAN MATTHEW LIPPMAN D.D.S. Mt. Carmel, Pennsylvania Franklin and Marshall College A.B. Chemistry; Univeristy of North Carolina M.S. Organic Chem.; President Alpha Omega Fraternity; American Society of Dentistry for Children; American Society of Preventive Dentistry; American Student Dental Association; Oral Surgery Honor Society; Periodontal Honor Society; St. George Oral Cancer Society; Mouth Prop Honor Society MICHAEL LOLL D.D.S. Lucinda, Pennsylvania St. Vincent College B.S. Biology Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society 62THOMAS J. MCAVOY D.D.S. Troy, Michigan University of Michigan B.S. Biology St. George Oral Cancer Society Oral Surgery Honor Society Xi Psi Phi Fraternity ANTHONY M. LUCIANO D.D.S. Teaneck, New Jersey Fairleigh Dickinson University B.S. Biology Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Student Dental Association 6Jm ROBERT HARRY McCOY D.D.S. Boothwyn, Pennsylvania Widener College B.S. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Society of Preventive Dentistry St. George Oral Cancer Society tim McFarland d.d.s Bala-C'ynwyd. Pennsylvania Kansas State University B.S. Oral Surgery Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society Xi Psi Phi Fraternity wDALE K. MCLAUGHLIN D.D.S. Port Allegany. Pennsylvania Indiana University of Pennsylvania B.A. Sigma Epsion Delta Fraternity St. George Oral Cancer Society American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association MACK L. MCKEE D.D.S. Los Angeles, California California State University at Long Beach B.A. Sophomore Class Sec-Treas., Junior, Senior Class Pres., Executive Committee 75-76, 76-77; Student Council 75-76, 76-77; Chairman-Constitution Revision Committee; Sigma Epsion Delta Fraternity; Student Representative for ADA National Survey on Curriculum; Delegate 1975 Regional Meeting AADS-N.J.: Delegate 1976 Nat'l Meeting AADS-Miami Beach, Fla. 65THOMAS J. MOTE A R D.D.S. Southampton, Pennsylvania LaSalle College B.A. American Society of Dentistry for Children St. George Oral Cancer Society American Student Dental AssociationPAUL JOHN MARCUCCI JR. D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science Psi Oinega Fraternity Committee on Professionalism American Society of Dentistry for Children Stomatognathic Honor Society Oral Surgery Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society KAREN E. MARCUS D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. American Student Dental Association American Society of Dentistry for Children Oral Surgery Honor Society Stomatognathic Honor Society ASDA Representative Student Clinician Alumni Day American Association of Women Dentists Iron Person Society 67IRA MENDELSOHN D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Stale University B.A. Alpha Omega Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children Stomatognathic Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society DAVID CHARLES METROKA D.D.S. Fairless Hills. Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Psi Omega Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children St. George Oral Cancer Society Table Clinic Winner 1976 Participant in Alumni Day 1975 American Student Dental Association Iron Man Society 68ELLIOTT MILGRAM D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Slate University B.S. Villanova M.S. Alpha Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association ROBERT S. MILLER D.D.S. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Psychology Alpha Omega Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society Iron Man Society American Student Dental Association 69DOUGLAS E. MILSAP D.D.S. Ft. Myers, Florida Emory University B.A. Chemistry Psi Omega Fraternity-Rush Chairman Stomatognathic Honor Society Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children Periodontal Honor Society American Student Dental Association MICHAEL A. MOSKOWITZ D.D.S. Bayside. New York S.U.N.Y. at Stonybrook B. Eng. Alpha Omega Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children Oral Surgery Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society American Student Dental Association Odontolog Staff 70■V GIRARD NISTA D.D.S. West Newton, Pennsylvania St. Vincent College Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children Xi Psi Phi Fraternity American Society of Preventive Dentistry MARK LYLE MUCKEY D.D.S. Concord, California University of California at Santa Barbara B.A. Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children Psi Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association 71GARY THOMAS OFRICHTER D.D.S. Bethlehem. Pennsylvania Dickinson College B.S. Psi Omega Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association FRANCIS O’MALLEY D.D.S. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Iron Man Society 72JOHN RUSSELL PULLMAN D.D.S. Brooklyn. New York University of Michigan B.A. Alpha Omega Fraternity Student Council Representative Periodontal Honor Society Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association St. George Oral Cancer Society Odontolog Staff LOUIS K. RAFETTO D.D.S. Norristown. Pennsylvania University of Delaware B.S. President Oral Surgery Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society Odontolog Staff American Student Dental Association 71FRANK JOHN RECUPERO D.D.S. Kittanning, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.S. Psi Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association TOO A S LEWIS RLG. N D.D.S. Quatryv'tWe. V ennsyto ania lYxcVdnson CoUege R.$ . Vs Ome a VTaleimty American Student Dental Association 7ALANCE ELLIOT ROBINSON D.D.S. University of Pennsylvania B.A. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society American Student Dental Association 75EDWARD J. ROMAN D.D.S. Canonsburg, Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh B.S. Biology Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association Assistant Editor Odontolog EDWARD L. ROSEN D.D.S. Los Angeles, California University of California at Los Angeles B.A. Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity Stomatognathic Honor Society American Student Dental Association 76 MAURY JAY ROSENBLUM D.D.S. Brooklyn, New York Ohio State University B.A. Political Science Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association RICHARD L. RUSH D.D.S. Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.A. Alpha Omega Fraternity Odontolog American Student Dental Association 77MARC SANDLER D.D.S. YVynnewood, Pennsylvania Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity Periodontal Honor Society Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association WILLIAM JOSEPH SCHILLING D.D.S. Latrobe, Pennsylvania Washington and Jefferson College B.A. Biology Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Oral Surgery Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society American Student Dental Association Representative 78 «=» IRA LOUIS SCHWARTZ D.D.S. Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh B.S. Biology Alpha Omega Fraternity Periodontal Honor Society American Student Dental Association JAMES G. SCHMOYER D.D.S. Reading Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.A. Psi Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association Editor Odontolog 79SHELDON M. SEIDMAN D.D.S. Brooklyn, New York State University of New York at Stony Brook Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity American Student Dental Association 80NEAL SHIPON D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.A. Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity-President American Student Dental Association ALAN M. SMOLEN D.D.S. Glenside, Pennsylvania Temple University A.B. American Society of Dentistry for Children Oral Surgery Honor Society Alpha Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association Iron Man Society 81DANIEL JAMES SULLIVAN D.D.S. Scranton, Pennsylvania College of the Holy Cross B.A. Chemistry Gold Foil Study Club Stomatognathic Honor Society American Student Dental Association i 82RUSSELL PAUL SWETTER D.D.S. Forest City, Pennsylvania University of Scranton B.S. Biology Oral Surgery Honor Society Stomatognathic Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children BRUCE A. TOLLIN D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University Temple University B.S. St. George Oral Cancer Society Oral Surgery Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity 83f DAVID R. TRETER D.D.S. Erie, Pennsylvania Thiel College B.S. Wright State University M.S. Chemistry Freshman and Sophmore Class President American Student Dental Association 84DONALD JAMES TREXEL D.D.S. Wilmington, Delaware University of Delaware B.A. Biology American Student Dental Association, American Society of Dentistry for Children, Oral Surgery Honor Society, Stomatognathic Honor Society, Periodontal Honor Society, Odontolog photographer, Xi Psi Phi Fraternity, U.S. Navy Scholarship. STEVEN ROBERT URY D.D.S. North Bellmore, New York Clarkson College of Technology B.S. Alpha Omega Fraternity, Notetaking Service-President, Odontolog, American Society of Dentistry for Children, Periodontal Honor Society, St. George Oral Cancer Society. 8$JEFFREY W. VECERE D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Kansas State University, Temple University B.A. Psi Omega Fraternity-Vice President Gold Foil Study Club Oral Surgery Honor Society Iron Man Society JEFFREY M. WEINER D.D.S. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Temple University B.A. Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association Iron Man Society 86GARY V. WETZEL D.D.S. Dillsburg, Pennsylvania West Chester State College B.A. Chemistry Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Gold Foil Study Club Stomatognathic Honor Society Periodontal Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children BARRY H. WEXEER D.D.S. Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.S. Biology Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity American Society of Dentistry for Children Stomatognathic Honor Society American Student Dental Association United States Army 87DAVID ALLEN WILLIAMS D.D.S. “Tiger” Erie, Pennsylvania Thiel College B.A. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Freshman Class Vice President Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association 88EDWARD LEIGH WOEHLING D.D.S. Waverly, Pennsylvania Bucknell University B.S. Biology Student Council Representative Periodontal Honor Society Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children St. George Oral Cancer Society Odontolog Stomatognathic Honor Society ALFRED J. WOLANIN, JR. D.D.S. Erie, Pennsylvania Villanova University B.S. Biology Delta Sigma Delta-President Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society of Dentistry for Children American Student Dental Association St. George Oral Cancer Society Periodontal Honor Society 89 JOHN GRUVER WOLF D.D.S. Manheim, Pennsylvania Temple University B.S. Pharmacy Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity American Society of Preventive Dentistry American Society of Dentistry for Children Periodontal Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society Oral Surgery Honor Society American Student Dental Association FRED LEE WRIGHT, JR. D.D.S. Wilmington, Delaware University of Delaware B.A. Biology Gold Foil Study Club American Student Dental Association 90J. DONOVAN WRIGHT D.D.S. Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania King’s College B.S. Biology Psi Omega Fraternity Gold Foil Study Club Oral Surgery Honor Society Stomatognathic Honor Society RONALD WYGONIK D.D.S. Apollo, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University B.S. Xi Psi Phi Fraternity St. George Oral Cancer Society American Student Dental Association 91 GEORGE JAMES YARZABEK D.D.S. Warren, Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh B.S. Biology Psi Omega Fraternity American Student Dental Association ROBERT RAMSAY ZIMMERMAN D.D.S. Waynesboro, Pennsylvania Grove City College B.S. Chemistry Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity American Student Dental Association 92JOHN EDWARD ZJJRASKY D.D.S. New Castle, Pennsylvania Youngstown State University B.S. Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity American Student Dental Association JAMES T. KIRK CAPT. USS Enterprise Star Fleet Academy Landru Benevolent Society Dilithium Crystal Study Club Talos IV Commanders Convention 93Abby, Aline. Jim and Greta Doreen and Dave Dennis, Judy, and Bradley Ron and Harriet Gary and Ann Jeff and Lee Bob, Linda, Amy. and familyDave. Nan. and Dame Gary and Susan Karen and Ed Nancy and Jeff Oscar and GailJeff and Denise Linda and Mike Rich and Susan Sam and Janet Irwin and LindaGeorge and Connie Joe and Beth Tom and Patti Audie and Dale Earl and Diane Harry, Mary, and Jason Elliot, Shellee. and The Cal Ira and KarenEd And Genn Jim And Stephanie Todd And Mary John And Nancy Sallie W.TUITION AND ADMISSION 99Admission Applicants for admission to Temple University School of Dentistry must present to the Office of the Dean: 1) credentials which satisfy the requirements for admission to the College of Liberal Arts of Temple University; 2) credentials for a minimum of three full years (90 semester hours or 135 quarter hours) of pre-dental collegiate work; 3) a minimum average of “C” in all pre-dental studies, and in the required science courses; 4) satisfactory scores on Dental Admission Tests. In addition, all accepted students must submit a report of a complete physical examination prior to registration, and duplicates of their final college transcripts. The credentials for entrance to the College of Liberal Arts must include evidence of graduation from an accredited high school. 21 units of acceptable work are required for admission. Fifteen units are prescribed as follows: English ..................................................................2 units College Preparatory Mathematics ..........................................2 units Soap Carving .............................................................3 units Vaseline Science .........................................................3 units Foreign Language .........................................................1 unit Welding ..................................................................2 units Golf and Tennis ..........................................................3 units Dodging Insurance Salesmen ...............................................2 units Of the remaining six, at least threemust be selected from the following fields: foreign language, mathematics, science, social science, and animal husbandry. The remaining three units may be in any subjects which meet the requirements for secondary school graduation; however the student is strongly urged to include further courses in borrowing money and filling out computer forms. Under no circumstances will a student who is conditioned, deficient, or who has failed in any of his entrance subjects be considered for admission, unless prior arrangements have been made with the Dean. The Admissions Committee reserves the right to select applicants on the bases of admissions tests, scholarship, recommendations, interviews, and the ability to write checks in the correct amount. The Dean shall have the right to reject any application for admission. 100Tuition Acceptance Within thirty days following the date of the Dean’s letter accepting a student for matriculation, each applicant must send to the Dean’s office a letter indicating his intention to matriculate in this school at the date indicated, and must accompany this letter with the acceptance deposit of $200.00 payable to Dean Dous, This deposit is never returnable, but upon satisfactory completion of the requirements of registration, the amount of $200.00 will be deducted from the tuitin fee upon surrendering his freedom to the comptroller’s office for the first semester the student is in attendance. — Pennsylvania Non-Pennsylvania r 6GS Residents Residents Matriculation fee Tuition ............ Note Taking Service Class Dues ......... City Wage Tax ______ Faculty Retreat Fund Yearbook ........... $15,000 $15,000 . 2,400 4,800 . . . 500 500 ..1,500 1,500 .. 10% 15% . . . 200 200 cheap Tuition is payable at the beginning of each semester. Students who fail to meet this requirement will be charged with absences from all classes until their accounts have been settled or satisfactory arrangements made. A fine of $5.00 per week will be imposed for tuition remaining unpaid one week after the opening of each semester. A penalty of $10.00 will be assessed for all checks issued to the University and not paid on presentation to the bank. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to set aside funds to be used for the physical development of the University. The University reserves the right to change the tuition and fees without notice. Any change may become effective at the beginning of the succeeding academic semester. 101TEXTBOOKS AND INSTRUMENTS All students must purchase at the beginning of each school year a complete set of new required textbooks and instruments. The instrument kit must be purchased and paid in full at the time of registration each year. Under no circumstances will a student be allowed to sell any equipment while he is enrolled in this school, and he must be able to show evidence of owning and possessing a complete cumulative set at the beginning of each year. The approximate yearly costs for textbooks and instruments are indicated below: Books And Supplies Instumcnts Freshman year ........................$350.00 Sophomore year ....................... 250.00 Junior year ............................75.00 Senior year ............................25.00 $2500.00 1200.00 Charge It Charge It The freshman student is given the opportunity of pur--chasing one of several student cabinet designs. Through years of research and refinement the University settled upon four basic models. It is from one of these that the student chooses. Economy Model $2000.00 Student Special $2300.00 Double Winged Deluxe $2500.00 Mortician Imperial Deluxe $3000.00 102 •All prices do not include federal, state, local, or excise taxes. Destination charges and dealer prep are also extra. White-walls available on Imperial Deluxe Model only.CURRICULUM ADMINISTRATION Dr. Kendrick Brookreson Dr. Dale Roeck Dr. John Bomba Mr. Art Young Mr. Ed Sullivan Mr. Joe Nahas Mrs. Margaret Dous Mr. Richard Hinson 104STAFF Odie McMichael Sgl. Robinson Robert Leath Arcie Hyman 105CURRICULUM Shirley Pyke The curriculum is structured to prepare the students for the general practice of dentistry; or as a foundation for graduate study in a specialty area, basic science, or research. The flexibility in the schedule allows ample time for numerous elective courses offered by the institution. Several student honor societies, study clubs, and the American Student Dental Association provide opportunities to broaden one’s knowledge of dentistry beyond the level of the regular curriculum. The student will find it a challenge to allow time to take part in these functions. The student is given the option of attending summer sessions between each school year. These sessions are held to provide him with the opportunity to broaden his dental horizons, enjoy the Philadelphia scenery, meet new muggers, and give him a chance to graduate in four and one-half years. COMMUNITY DENTISTRY Law For Dentists Students are required to attend the first five lectures; however; attendance is optional for the instructor. Capital punishment for uncooperative patients is discussed in depth and pardons are given to all the unindicted-co-conspirators in the plot to boycott the Dean’s noon-hour briefings. Dr. Georgianne McVay Dr. Richard Mumma 106 Dr. Louis Dubin Dr. Howard Neuman Dr. Merrick L. Furst Ph.D Dr. Gerald Orner Psychology I One Semester of instruction is presented to the students which addresses itself to self perception as a necessary first step toward developing a level of skill in interpersonal relationships that will enhance their performance in and enjoyment of dentistry as a profession. Psychology II One semester of instruction is presented to the students which is designed to prepare the students to more effectively relate to his patients. This course builds on the self-perception course presented in the first year by considering in some depth specific problems that migth be encountered in the doctor-patient relationship and the doctor’s role in the community. Psychology III This course is taught by the fabled Dr. Merrick L. Furst Ph.D who definitely needs his lights turned on. Epidemiology And Biometry The greatest percentage that is the mean average of the median mode as related to the Gaussian distribution with respect to Chi Square. Analysis provides insight into PMI, DMF, PI, AFL, FDR, and the NBA on CBS. Practice Administration Students learn the fundamentals of practice management with special emphasis on tax evasion, methods of turning dying into a profitable venture, and advanced forging of attendance sheets. 107PRECLINICAL Dr. Stanley Jordan, Chairman Dental Materials This course curriculum introduces the student to that area that Temple guarantees its graduates competence - dental laboratory technique. A by product of this course is that it allows the student an avenue for part time after-school dental lab employment, or a full time career opportunity as the case may be, and unfortunately has been. It is here that “thick and creamy” becomes as familiar to the student as the common rat dentition. The student is also oriented and prepared for faculty professional behavior over the next four years as his entrance into dentistry is eased upon him by a fun loving little ball of dynamite. The staff caters to the student by maintaining almost exact exam questions from year to year. However, the department chairman does reserve the right to alter the answers in the true academic spirit maintained throughout the course. Let it be known that there will be an increase in the jewelry requirements for the upcoming classes. NEUROANATOMY Neuroanatomy is presented both regionally and systemically, mainly by lectures which are exquisitely designed to place students in a deep coma to compensate for sleep lost the night before studying protocol. This course affords the students a chance to see an instructor pick a brain that is not his own. The curare effect is demonstrated at weekly sessions. Dr. Ralph Domanico Dr. Larry Love Dr. Benjamin Patag Dr. Charles Santangelo 108HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY Dr. Marion McCrea, Chairman Dr. David Aker Dr. Louis Caso i A combined presentation of general and oral histology with emphasis on fundamental tissues and their functions. This course has long been a student favorite for examination procedures. They teach the student the value of memorizing precorrected protocol and living near the dental school in order to be on time for 7:00 examinations. The course operates entirely through laboratory study; no formal lectures are given. The instructor is a Ham and the only thing updated from year to year is the textbook. Attention to original research is generally circumvented to avoid undue confusion. ANATOMY This course is specifically oriented toward the dental student’s needs: 90% of the curriculum deals with extensive dissection and little discussion of the thorax, abdomen, and femoral regions; 10% is reserved entirely for the head, neck, and related oral structures. Daily seminars are conducted in the basement coffee lounge on a variety of topics such as passing female anatomical structures and Tasty cake tissue texture. This course is open ended in function: those students desiring a great deal of dissecting experience will usually find ample opportunity to work in the labs. Fortunately, the limited availability of corpses also provides an equally satisfying situation for those students who d' not desire such experience. 109Dr. Frank Hohenleitner Dr. John Martin PHYSIOLOGY In a department oriented to professional research, the student obtains knowledge on pertinent topics such as accoustic decoupling devices, underwater breathing through a 15 inch tube, system interrelationships, and how to make a hormone by 007. A major feature of this course is its total break from the daily routine of dental school. Departmental policy dictates that no subject matter of dental relevance will be included in the curriculum. The closest the student will get to dentally related information is in the canine lab. Each year the department conducts a debate of which even Demosthenes would be proud; with the students and dogs on one side and the faculty on the other. The department takes special pride in challenging the student with tests of their competence in such various fields as physics, computer technology, vertebrate physiology and water chemistry. The chairman of the department is renowned for his expertise in the field of autonomic stimulation of the visceral organs and using this knowledge to nauseate the students. Dr. Francis Kendall nokcalloP treboR .rD, namriahC Dr. George Schacterle Dr. Robert Friedman Dr. Theodore Rosett BIOCHEMISTRY The laboratory course is research oriented and is conducted in a manner whereby each student selects one of a number of dentally significant problems on which to work for a major part of the semester. Active participation in the research exercise requires the utilization of the biochemical principles being taught. It affords the student the opportunity to directly relate this phase of studies to his future clinical career. The lecture course is presented in a clear, straightforward manner, continually referring to dentally relevant topics such as biochemical genetics, enzyme chemistry, and the Krebs Cycle. A top-flight staff under the direction of Dr. Bob “Bolo” Pollack and Dr. Theodore (Huh?) Rosett provide stimulating lectures that keep the student awake, enabling him to complete last week’s crossword puzzle. PHARMACOLOGY Dr. David Mann, Chairman Pharmacology and Therapeutics span the study and application of drugs in a dental practice. These courses are valuable inasmuch as they methodically teach the students which drugs he could take in order to cope with dental school. Many practical applications such as atrophine therapy and the use of belladonna alkaloids are presented and will be discussed as an aid to future clinical administration. The courses are given during the sophomore and junior years and consists of sixty-four hours of lecture, each ending with a special prayer to the ancient Egyptian Sun God “Ra”. inDr. Frank Sammartino, Chairman RADIODONTICS The course in radiology is a self-teaching exercise. The staff tries to insure that no lectures will be given until the student has mastered radiographic techniques through trial and error. Only after the students have made all the mistakes will lectures be scheduled. It is during these lectures the student is reminded of all the pitfalls and errors and how to avoid them. Some major mistakes that are brought to light include talking to the department secretary, letting Dr. Toplan review your cases, trusting the automatic developer with your films, and drinking the fixing solution. Any technical matters are willingly cleared up by Janet without whom the school could not survive. Dr. Richard Gregory Dr. Stanley Toplan Dr. Frank Williams 112Dr. Dean White Dr. Arthur Miller, Chairman PATHOLOGY True or False-circle only the true. 1. Pathology is a course dealing in Path. 2. Sleep is a major problem in lectures. 3. Dr. Leifer died in 1972. 4. Tissue is something made by Kleenex. 5. The relationship between the oral cavity and the body as a whole is not important. 6. Art Miller looks like Bruce Leinen. 7. Bruce Leinen looks like Art Miller. 8. S H L weighs more than Robbins. 9. Is Dean White really the Dean. 10. Sow-Yeh-Chen bugged the Legionnaires. Dr. Paul Farber Dr. Sow-Yeh-Chen Dr. Robert Baum Dr. Norman Willett, Chairman MICROBIOLOGY Instruction is given by means of lectures and laboratory work in the sophomore year. The department nurtures and coddles the future clinician into a sense of security which ends with an examination that is an equitable indication of what the student has learned. In the laboratory the students are required to buy season passes to hear song and dance routines and impressions of their favorite stars, given weekly by a fellow classmate. As the year progresses the class will be amazed at all the pretty colors of all the nice little bugs and will be astonished at the ability of methylene blue to stain their clothes. Biggy Rat and Mr. Potatohead are always available to argue over examinations and are willing to answer questions put forth by the student body as long as they are not too hard. 113ORAL DIAGNOSIS AND ORAL MEDICINE Includes the techniques and rationale, of comprehensive examination, the recognition of oral and systemic diseases, the significance of systemic disease in dental practice, and the planning of treatment to restore oral health. The most outstanding asset of this department is the faculty itself. The Chairman is one of the most learned men in his area of expertise. Through his image of isolation and harrassment he is able to abide with Temple’s philosophy of outstanding faculty of non-educators. Junior and senior students examine all patients at the patient’s first visit to the dental clinic. Those patients requiring emergency treatment are examined, diagnosed, and treated by the student to relieve the emergency situation. To break up the tedium of peering down the throats of bewildered patients, Dr. Midnight can be seen performing his entertaining weekly tirades against these unsuspecting juniors and seniors. The public is invited to watch him foam at the mouth and to howl in laughter at his fruitless attempts at intimidation. (Visitation hours are 8:30-12:00 daily, except Wednesday.) The remaining faculty members, presided over by the staff butler, are also notable individuals. They include a self-anointed, nonboard eligible oral surgeon, the very last of the Mohicans, and the Spark Plug of the department who imitates a dentist. The annual staff trip to Tahiti is partially funded by a Junior Class Raffle of 138 blood pressure cuffs with the winning number receiving all of them. Dr. Theodore Simpson, Chairman Dr. Norman Freeman Dr. Keith Anderson 114Dr. L L. Halpern Dr. Joel Weiss Dr. Larry Geller Dr. Umbenhauser Dr. Maurice Nelson Dr. Louis Cahan WARNING: The Surgeon General has determined that the Department of Oral Medicine may be hazardous to your health. nsOPERATIVE Dr. Angelo Costa, Chairman This course teaches the student to recognize the most common of all dental diseases; one affecting the student himself. The etiology is paranoia and there is the classic triad of symptoms: (I) the student learns to maintain a state of concentration in the face of diversion, i.e. a television monitor tape is played incessantly during laboratory hours, (2) the student begins to involuntary practice the art and science of “minor tooth movement” as applied to rubber dam application, Ferrier class III preparation, and proximal contact improvement, and (3) the student feels an abnormal affection for the most valuable instrument in his arsenal — the screwdriver. In addition, the market value of ivorine teeth is a matter of constant financial concern. The operative clinical requirements for the junior and senior years are a mainstay of the University, for there has been no alterations in these standards for 40 years. Each student is required to perform the basic operations mastered in the preclinical course without the aid of a screwdriver. These include 15 gold foil restorations (beginning with panning for the gold), 10 resins, 8 inlays (three being 360 degree onlays), and 25 amalgams. In addition the student must do 5 restorations utilizing self-tapping pins as the only restorative material. A minimum of 18 pins per tooth is required for credit. Dr. Egidio Torreti Dr. Medick Capirano Dr. Augustus Russo 0 116Dr. Bertram Siegal Dr. Stanley Lisowski Dr. Tim Conway Dr. Fred Pavlikowski Dr. Robert Cornish Dr. Robert Hardy Dr. Michael Chapman m Dr. Vincent Buggy Dr. Thomas Forgeng 117Dr. David Litwack, Chairman PERIODONTOLOGY Periodontology is the science that deals with the supporting structures of the teeth in health and disease. The student’s first introduction to the “gums” is presented in a way of a very meaningful, gratifying, and warm experience by Carol Hildebrand. It is the heat of the slide projector blowing in a crowded carrel, serving to create an ideal situation in which the student actually enjoys learning that he has had gingivitis since the age of eight. With this wealth of knowledge the newly enlightened student is eased into the clinical environment as a sophomore, with his first case of severe periodontitis. Within the allotted three visits for treatment the student is expected to perform deep scaling and curettage, to change lifetime patient habits, and to devise treatment plans for advanced periodontal surgical techniques. Lectures are derived exclusively from Glickman’s Periodontal Therapy and Popular Mechanics. These lectures are provided to supplement the student’s knowledge and the lecturer’s income. The faculty is the largest in the school and has a great turnover rate because of the large amount of deaths in the department each summer due to frostbite and exposure from the air conditioning vents. Another exclusive feature of the department is a self-taught course in the understanding of French periodontal problems manifested in the teachings of the world-renowned periodontal biologist Dr. Jean Poul-lain and his handpiece, “The Calypso”. Dr. Jean Poullain Dr. Leslie Salkin 118Dr. Jay Denbo Dr. Allan Schlossberg Dr. Brian Wall 119ENDODONTICS Dr. George Biron During the sophomore year, a lecture course is presented on the philosophy, principles, and slight of hand of endodontic therapy. Emphasis is placed on two areas of departmental concern: (1) the sales of their respective textbooks and (2) the wallet of the patient. Once the student has shown a proficiency in these areas he progresses to the laboratory where he is taught the Anti-Sargenti method of endodontics and the mastery of the Morton salt sterilization technique. This convenient procedure was devised to minimize infection of extracted teeth and subsequent acrylic abscesses. As documented in the clinic manual not a single case of acrylic abscess has been seen in preclinic due to this technique. Students practice to improve their skills in rotating reamers and files within the canal. Those that are most proficient are sent to graduate school to learn advanced reaming and filing. As a specialist in endodontics, the graduate will be trained and licensed to charge higher fees for the same service. The department follows the University’s strict code in applicant selection giving no preference to ethnic background, sex, or religion. Dr. Paul Lafkowitz Dr. Rufus Minor Dr. Ed Rainey 120Dr. L. Seiden Dr. Philip Wiegand Dr. Donald Morse Dr. Marvin Gross Dr. Edward Eisenberg Dr. Jose Heredia Dr. Irving Sinai 121REMOVABLE PROSTHODONTICS “Less than 50% of all denture wearers are satisfied with their appliances.” Temple University is pleased to say that it has been able to uphold this proud tradition. For his first introduction to the growing field of prosthetic dentistry the student is exposed to a course where he has the honor and pleasure of paying for a set of plastic, unyielding manikins upon which he is expected to produce a perfect set of plates. When the student has completed these plates, they are collected and graded by a precision, mechanical device, eliminating any and all subjectivity. The device, created and patented by Temple University, consists of a lifelike model of an instructor which, with the use of an apelike grasp, articulates the models and utters a letter grade that is permanently recorded on the student’s transcript. In the junior and senior year the student soon finds that for every instructor on board there is a different way to make a set of teeth. As the young clinician roams among the faculty he hears the same refrain: “I don’t believe you are following what I am trying to say.” (This from one of the top five prosthodontists in the World.) or “I don’t know why he told you to do it the way you have it here. Go get your compound occlusion rims.” This method of instruction in prosthetics was pioneered by the fabled Dr. “Walk Away Renee” Varrin and his now famous three fingered ripcord denture. One can find no fault with other features of the course, such as: instruction on setting-up 90° teeth; placing a final lustre shine on impression trays; information on current models for tray handle design; and how to make a mechanical post-dam, whatever that is. Dr. Harold Lantz, Chairman Dr. Joseph Faltermayer Dr. Kenneth Miller Dr. Joseph Wazney Dr. Wayne Morris Htifffff. 12 2Dr. David Rising Dr. Jerry Summers Dr. Joseph Shore Dr. Barry Abrams Dr. Richterman Dr. Thomas Davis Dr. Edward Brown Dr. Albert Rosett Dr. Antonis Dr. Renee Varrin 123FIXED PROSTHODONTICS The name of the department is derived from the requirements that are fixed in such a way that only a selected few graduate on time. Another popular concept is that the term “Fixed” comes from the boys in the lab who will solder fractured margins, tend to perforations, and touch up irregular porcelain. In fixed prosthodontics the student is indoctrinated with the fact that the post and core and the porcelain veneer crown is the only known restoration in the dental profession. The preclinic lab shows the student how to wax it, cast it, solder it, veneer it, chamfer it, shoulder it, feather it, fudge it, and then have it stolen. It is with diamonds, silk stockings, screwdrivers, and an unlimited cash flow that the student enters the self-paced nonpressure world of Crown and Bridge. The didactic part of the course is presented as a series of meaningful lectures. As an added bonus, and consistent with the department policy toward liberal education, a series of three lectures on the Hanky, Panky, and Mann philosophy of life and dentistry is presented. An illustrious part-time faculty is always available to help the students with their clinical problems. The ever-present faculty has made it possible to produce high volume dentistry without compromising quality. For example, one student was actually seen cutting a tooth and taking an acceptable impression in just under four hours. Research is an integral part of any institution of higher learning, and Temple has always been a leader in this area. A grant from the Smith National Coffee Foundation has allowed the Crown and Bridge faculty to pursue the question of which coffee really does taste best. Dr. Bernard Olbrys Dr. Ernest Mingledorff, Chairman Dr. Louis Zislis L 124Dr. John Biederman Dr. Anthony Rinaldi Dr. John Motsko Dr. Theodore Kaczmar Dr. Thomas Balshi Dr. Richard Hochman Dr. Robert Goldberg Dr. Paul Archaki Dr. Gronceski Dr. Paul Waicus 125ORAL PEDIATRICS In an attempt to acquaint the student with child behavior this course is presented in a juvenile manner. The department provides an opportunity for the student to cover all aspects of children’s dentistry. Included in the curriculum are instructions in the use of leather restraints, how to use hysteria to your advantage, and learning pressure points that render a child unconscious in five seconds. A course in space maintenance is presented during the sophomore year. Along with learning how to fabricate appliances, the student is taught how to maintain his space in next semester’s junior class. During the junior year a series of informative and interesting lectures allow the student to broaden his knowledge in children’s dentistry. The unequalled attendance records and the alertness of the student body attest to the depth of the lectures. Exams are derived from Old McDonald’s Kiddie Kookbook of Pedodontics. Junior students are assigned to Saint Christopher’s Hospital for Children and to Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children on a voluntary basis. Any senior student not volunteering during the junior year will be assigned to donate his time. Dr. William Binns, Chairman Dr. Robert Carrel Dr. Eugene McGuire Dr. Ron Fenido o 126 Dr. Augustine Chialastri Dr. Joseph McCormack 127ORAL SURGERY Dr. Alex Mohnac, Chairman During the sophomore year students receive lectures on the fundamentals of minor oral surgical procedures including exodontics and the pulling of teeth. The clinical portion trains the student to be an expert in suture removal and Lavoris usage. The day begins with a short and sweet interrogation by the staff officers in the seminar room, during which the student is thrown into a quagmire of indecision. The student then prepares himself for the clinic by dressing with shin guards and other protective devices, while taping sterile gauze to his index fingers so as not to infect the controls to the dental chair. Also, the student is advised that any transfer of contamination to the sterile field necessitates the sterilization of the patient’s mouth in the ovens. The didactic portion of the course prepares the student to diagnose a coagulation disorder when the patient has a history of padding furniture every where he goes or bleeds profusely when chewing stale bread. There upon he is able to quote the going price for factor replacement therapy. A battery of six lectures are presented by a consultant for Barnum and Bailey, who provides for their sideshows by way of his mistakes. These lectures are known by many as “God’s gifts to the mandible.” In an attempt to maintain the steady state of confusion, examinations are designed to enable the student to recognize misspelled words w'hile being shuffled from room to room pondering the extraneous material contained on their pages. Dr. Paul Lang Dr. Robert Schraishuhn Dr. Daniel Daley Dr. Allen Fielding 128Dr. James Bond, Chairman ORTHODONTICS The student is taught the fundamentals of writing a letter of referral. He is acquainted with enough basic jargon to enable him to know that tooth movement is an extremely complex field that should never be attempted by the general dentist. The question “Why should all cases of Bad Bite be sent out?” is asked at the final exam. All students who answer this question will receive an “A” in this course. Dr. Allen Brown Dr. Joel Fromer The Nutritionists NUTRITION As an adjunct to the Oral Pediatric and Biochemistry curriculum a course on the instruction and implication of eating food is given so that these departments can get more money from the government. Through the use of hidden microphones and cameras the student is committed to three mini one hour sessions in which he must convince his subject that sugar is the source of all evil. Makeup artists and costume designers are available to the student before taping sessions to insure that they are cast in a favorable light. The Academy of Nutrition gives an annual award to the senior student who lays it on the thickest to their child patients. 129OROFACIAL REHABILITATION The department of Orofacial Rehabilitation performs exotic surgical procedures that cannot be done by the undergraduate. The student can rest assured that any mistakes he makes in the clinic can easily be patched up here. This department gained fame in the late 1960’s when they rebuilt the faces of many of Joe Frazier’s sparring partners. Here we can see several of their many successes. 130 OROFACIAL REHABILITATION IN APPRECIATION Margaret Adam Tom Aspell Ramona Rivera Mary Havelin Anna Czarkowaki. Myrtle Smith, Marie WrightWe Are Grateful To Thee Gilda Segal FRONT ROW: J. Blakely. M. McMahon. F. St Marline. M Barenbaum. W. Edwards; BACK ROW: L. Schaeffer. 1. Steventon, W. Williams, J. Gentile, W. Hegamin, F. Mizgorski, R. Lobichuaky, R. Silberman, R. Oehrtmann Meredith Richardson Eleanor Mclaughlin Dolores HobsonFor All Thou Hast Given Betty Loev Donna Simonetti Mike Fedoriska BACK ROW: Adrienne Needleman, Sharon Zimmelman, Mabel Anderson, Doris Morris; FRONT ROW: Ellen Rosen, Carrie Wigington. Joyce Hewiah Micki Miller, Gelsie Cipriani, Carol Hunsperger, Joann SmithMay Thee Continue In Thy Noble Cause Merris Stephenson, Debbie Smaw Marianne Olenik Linda Compton, Pat Gladden Elizabeth Kraft Dorrie Dudo. Carol Beldecos, June Beale Barbara ResnickOf Aiding Our Poor, Wretched Souls Ethel Perkins Terry Thompson Barbara McFarland Maureen Dugan Joyce Piccone, Janice Wolf. Susan Kreipe Library StaffWE THANK THEE! Dolores Hobson Lonnie .Jones, Irene Tribble, Mary Gilliard Almira Law, Susan Adam, Ann Cameron Theresa Wyszynski Giseal FrickSTUDENT LIFE 137'ROUTVA Tm ’t (Vrru.«,? -vZ. CN2 M,C «J.vHT AT A k coVBoy rilttfv' x ---■ UU €i 1 1 1 00T TrrC ‘bpACt cc y - 1 ;r- GfT A SHK»vT2 •v, 1' H K6_1 p i wiTi» Get' totftft Pawuajn, AtiifeijV jJ MA r|NftUt eveCfe C $C '?t ft MU,w AK'Yfic y £cp.y tl MOOuiATiO b 'mi TH£ e : 0 p co v - Get . SbT CCCA f : CTMiN t P At Va! mi stT. oc ThA'T'S A k -M . W$ Duo£ r ge'Ds 0 e R6AMIW A O cFiuO', C? t n£ f lam 0(?ee»o Y — -A. A 7 a L.TTL6 ) aPicau UMSHIA f mm bPAtc- COioSey cAAi1 f J t APc TH£k 3u»OP or : ,5KOKey TMf r CNC T.-tP fu '.T f AjU f (I -•jmJ'I ■wfiJn v 1 ,S£w m. CON weuATcftV uVY; ‘sxrtiv • OtP'N'TcLv Ij AAJ Sr'CC7 J t-wcu, cajcm m j r, x- 5 V HKiO t fj J xT" U f c Q. SVA6 60CP JWPO . T srof v’ i.u ,?c V—-o -rupev-M tc ? Se r TVU5» V? ANi $. WMfpiATf, P l orr-'yl ONl£i?, p -r? -_ f C't-U «Ai?iC 1% k ArMtA «? ' y I Accfiu' ffc t THiMK THIS 0M?$, kft| ,HiN'«P 9AISI£ |«NDr (! A , =£ R Agffe v apc'Jj 4 9 UMCK ?iZ -o o.p.j r SCMg lA'CAt IfJfO PkJ 1 A ef O'" AA 5?A y COM'W AT MA- u£T Me Crivc VA -boMd »0'3S. X J -vc.- -'c - AJ rtAppyUAWP. S LAV A fuAf AND'CPT THr] , pk (- TO t Ot HK£ - fc£frt smamc a tc- v-i- Tp si fpie , V AnO C £C .U { Pi(r (0 -b ) £ Ai THAT-1. vV I 4Tl£»U irtT ----Vic«emJOSEPH’S CAFE 3348 GERMANTOWN AVE BA 8-9523 Congratulates The Class Of 77 And Roman’s Gluttons Winners Of The 1st Annual Pig Contest A Great Place To Scarf 1 ORruobourrs Ase, Dofj'T FAT THE UfesAVEZS ! u - WL- , ■$?' S 1' - i '•WVfA} lf flKttJ- - (v4 liL fio tolitib'i thMl CoM £a4 Ji t£. jl J P W Kt " Od.'t l_, .-.‘• «v ■ V v hP - ke. ?SPORTS Temple Dental Fishing Champs 144 Alphu Omega Denial Football Champs Pullman pulls oneRoman bags last living Schilling Gullo kicks one out 14$ TUDS is 1 in my book Dr .1 leads TUDS to titleNo Harold, I can’t sign off your work, but maybe Joe Faltcrmayer will. Mrs. Adam, I’d like a high chair for next Tuesday afternoon, please ou see. put n little paper under here and Roy put your snake awav or I won't turn around. ... and don't ever try to bite me again! you have instant occlusion. 146 My name is not Linda Lovelewis.Seen at the beach with a friend No Dr. Miller, you don't need your loupes to see this set. Rich, where do you get those kind of pictures. Seeing is believing. A little off the sides, none off the top. please. I.m sorry to tell you Dr. Varrin, but we were Italians have it this long! unable to complete your exorcism 147-lit The Second Annual Awards The Ala Tragus Award An indelible ink pen to Shig Shinhira for completing his tattoo requirements with utmost proficiency. The Lead Pipe Award To the steamfitters and sheet metal men for quietly going about their construction. The Pressure Transdoucher Award To "Pens” Kendall for having his right hand sutured to the side of his head. The Big “I ” Award To the Senior Class for thinking they would graduate on time. The Philadelphia Space Cadet Award A nitrous tank to Ira Schwartz for reaching the outer limits in dentistry. The Dentist of the Weak Award One corned beef hoa-gie and a dirty handkerchief to Norm Lippman for performing dentistry without looking. The High School Sweetheart Award A key to rrom 369 for Gerry Nista at lunch hour.The Spheralloy Award To Robert Hardy for converting 923 potential gold foils into amalgams. The Common Sense Award To Stanley Toplan-one lead apron for protecting himself where it counts. The Practice Management Award To Howard Neumann for innovative design and space utilization in a dental office. The ‘7 Can't Hack It ” Award To Dr. Mitchell of Operative whose last words at Temple were, ‘‘I can’t take any more, now they are teaching me class I amalgams.” The Gary Gilmore Award To Bruce Leinen for successfully exposing himself to 100,000 roentgens without once saying ‘‘lick me.” The Keith Anderson Award Four polyurethane wheels to Nate Robinson for passing his skate boards. The 7 Can Make It On My Own " Award A final “A” average and ten faculty members assigned to Ann Jennings for life. The Ron Petrosky Award To Sheldon Seidman for Graduating before half of the class of 1976. 149Alpha Omega Fraternity Psi Omega Fraternity 150Xi Psi Phi Fraternity Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity 151Sigma Epsilon Delta Fraternity Gold Foil Study Club 152Stomatognathic Honor Society St. George Oral Cancer Society 153Oral Surgery Honor Society American Society Of Dentistry For Children 1S4Periodontal Honor Society American Society For Preventive Dentistry 155Oral Medicine Honor Society OdontologSenior Class Officers Iron Man SocietyOMICRON KAPPA UPSILON Omicron Kappa Upsilon was organized in 1914 at Northwestern University. Its goal was to develop a spirit of scholarship and professional conduct and to recognize those who have distinguished themselves in these two endeavors while undergraduate dental students. The name and design on the key are founded on the initial letter of four Greek words: Satiria, Adantos, Kei, and Hygenia, which mean conservation of teeth and health. This, of course, is the goal of dentistry. We congratulate the seniors of the Class of 1977 who have received this honor. Stephen Inker Thomas Kohler Karen Marcus Joseph Peering 158Michael Moskowitz Louis Rafetto Edward Rosen Russell Swetter John Trabuchi Daniel Sullivan Gary Wetzel Edward Woehling John Wolf Sheldon Seidman Jeffrey Vecere J. Donovan Wright 159Student Council Reincarnation Honor Society Temple Dental Student 1977 Temple Dental Student 1900 160DENTAL HYGIENE CLASS OF 1977 OUR FAMILY Hey you guys .... Thru the good times and hard times, Can we stay together? We can care for ourselves, We can care for each other. Let’s give it our damnest, We’re young, but we’re strong, We can ride the winds high, Soar the sky, Surge the sea, Hey will you guys smile with me? I think we can make it, Let’s give it a try, With hands held together, We’ll keep our heads high. Hey you guys . . . Suzanne Dubin162 Michele Gail Boory Cherry Hill. New Jerseyi Amy J. Brendlinger Wiesbaden, Germany ■ Robert F. Cistola Old Forge, Pennsylvania Cathy Ann Contino Dallastown, Pennsylvania IfelKathleen Ann Creamer Downingtown, Pennsylvania 164 Suzanne L. Dubin Elkins Park. Pennsylvania Catharine L. DaDamio Reading, Pennsylvania165 Janet Everett Philadelphia, Pennsylvania W IDonna Marie Fulmer Tamaqua, Pennsylvania Carolynn A. Giordano Broomall, Pennsylvania ► Mary Anne Giordano Sea Isle City. New Jersey 166Becky Gotwald Carlisle, Pennsylvania Jan Shaner Greenlee Sandra Jeanne Henderson Bethlehem. Pennsylvania West Chester. Pennsylvania 167168 Pam I. Kaplan Bothesda, MarylandLinda J. Konrad Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Linda Ruth Lappen Salisbury. Maryland 169 Wendy B. Larsen Upper Black Eddy. Pennsylvania I Heidi Christina Lengacher Kinzers, Pennsylvania 170Donna R. Loev Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Jean McCarthy Philadelphia. Pennsylvania Jean Marie Lovett Conestoga. Pennsylvania 171172 Maureen O’Reilly Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania Christa M. Paese Totowa, New JerseyEmily F. Perina Morristown. New Jersey 173 Pattie Redding Hanover, Pennsylvania Barbara J. Reiss Philadelphia. Pennsylvania174 Elisabeth Shnhcn Norristown, Pennsylvania17S Mary R. Turnbach Chester, Pennsylvania176 Ava Susan Yalisove Wilmington. Delaware Janice Beth Wermelingcr Babylon. New York177Instructors And Staff Betsey A. Alden, R.D.H., B.S., M. Ed. Barbara K. Komives, R.D.H., B.S.. M.S. Director, School of Dental Hygiene Assistant Director Sara Henne, R.D.H., B.S. Betty Granger. R.D.H., B.S. Robin Grnnson, R.D.H., B.S. Rosa Middugh, Secretary 178Sherri Y. Dunbar. R.D.H.. B.S.. M. Ed. Joan Scranton, R.D.H., B.S., M. Ed. Joan Leimbach, R.D.H.. B.S. Judith Belonia. Secretary 179My quota is what????!!!! Flashback! Hey. I passed! Aha”. 1 saw you dilute lhal iraceV. P.OA. Prisoner of MdeiLet's see now. what else do I need? They said ther's a lot of fish in the sea. Sterile Cuckoo? Hey Wendy, how long’s your hair’ What do ya mean y mouth looks suspicious1’ One. Two. Three. Floss!You tell Mrs. Komivea, I’ll whistle if I want! I'm sorry, that number has been changed to an unpublished number. Boob In Mouth position! I’m freezing my buns off! 102 on Histo?! You're killing the curve! 182 You guys! See how much better Skinners solution works than Quiet Touch?Get off my case • I'm not clinical assistant! You’ll never zap me I have a lead jock! Distal of first, second, and third molars, you can’t be serious about me checking out this patient?! I didn’t know Gleem wasn’t accepted by the A.D.A.! See what one week of Dunbar can do to you?!?Oh no. I’m out of dental floss! I think I'm gonna cry! Alright, whose been doodling on this treatment plan? Are you trying to tell me, I have to give a mandibular block? Where have all the young girls gone? To Joe’s!! If that’s calculus I'll hang up my hat! 184 Hey Mom, look, your partial!Welcome to my nightmare. THE END! So is construction! Miss Henne, I'm not a schnook! D . „ Boards are tomorrow' 18SClass Officers Left to Right: N. Vergari, Sec.; M. Giordano, Treas.; D. Zielinski, V.Pres.; E. Perina, Pres. Sigma Phi Alpha 186 Standing: C. Paese. J. Greenlee Seated: H. Ettinger, K. Livezey, K. DaDamioHAPPY BIRTHDAY’S OF THE CLASS OF 'll t Patricia Adams Cheryl Birkbeck Michele Boory Amy Brendlinger Robert Cistola Cathy Contino Kathleen Creamer Catharine DaDamio Suzanne Dubin Michele Edris Hope Ettinger Janet Everett Donna Fulmer Carolynn Giordano Mary Anne Giordano Becky Gotwald Jan Greenlee Sandra Henderson Mary Ellen Henry Wendy Irwin Pam Kaplan Linda Konrad Linda Lap pen Wendy Larsen Heidi Lengacher Lisa Lerza Kim Livezey Donna Loev Jean Lovett Jean McCarthy Kathleen McCormick Maureen O’Reilly Christa Paese Emily Perina Pattie Redding Barbara Reiss Susan Seldin Donna Sergely Elisabeth Shohen Jan Sippel Marge Tevis Mary Turnbach Nina Vergari Janice Wermelinger Ava Yalisove JoAnne Yunghahn Diane Zielinski June 19, 1956 January 13, 1958 May 14. 1957 February 26, 1958 June 17, 1949 September 4, 1957 September 20, 1957 September 4, 1947 April 10, 1957 June 8, 1956 February 5, 1957 August 16, 1953 May 23, 1957 September 3, 1954 October 23, 1955 March 21, 1957 December 14, 1951 July 29. 1956 December 4, 1957 February 11, 1948 June 6, 1955 June 13, 1957 June 18, 1957 June 22, 1957 November 10, 1956 July 22. 1956 January 23, 1956 August 10, 1956 April 17, 1955 April 12, 1955 June 26, 1956 December 31, 1955 October 27, 1957 June 10, 1952 September 19, 1957 August 9, 1956 March 28, 1952 September 28, 1956 June 13, 1957 January 29, 1955 June 15, 1955 May 6. 1957 January 16, 1954 March 10, 1955 January 26, 1955 July 3, 1956 September 30, 1956 187 0$ 113 0 (§ M PX-900 100 KV simplified system Features the difference in panoramic x-ray systems. A diagnostic must in orthodontics, oral surgery, prostodontics, implantology, for fast, correct diagnosis, more comprehensive general dentistry. No blank space in the center. When space, cost, efficiency and reliability are a consideration, think of americana For additional information write: americana x-ray corp. 568 Grand Wenue. Englewood N J 07631 201 944 0010 1MCongratulations on achieveing your D.D.S. The Alumni Association of the Temple University School of Dentistry is pleased to welcome you into our ranks. You have now made the transition from the role of a recipient to that of a giver. Your active support of the Association will provide the impetus and energy to sustain the excellence of our leadership in the alumni family of the University. THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE TEMPLE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY Congratulations Temple Dental Class of 1977 TEMPLE GRILL CAFETERIA Professional Planning Services, Inc. 233 IANC ASTER AVENUE • ARDMORt.PA 79003 275 Ml 9-7633 lampert • Marks Associates Esiate Planning — Tax Shelters — Investments Life and Health Insurance BROAD AND RISING SUN AVE. BA 6-6090 Specializing In Breakfast And Lunch For Hungry Students Open Monday Through Saturday 6:30 — 5:00 TANLEY LADERMAN, C.l U. ROBERT ABRAMS 189TWO in ONE !. . AulC — • plcX - " 0 ' M $ Sail Tt» o p to. Ko.d to .« ••tot , • ■ DENTAL RESEARCH DATA CONffJMIS.. $«ff Threading Stainless Steel Pins are 230% mor In Dentin than Cemented or Friction Locked Pins, tar. Mimm. and Minikin sues. Available only through your deafer . WHALtOtHJInternational 236 fifth avenue ne yorfc n of » CO HMMU % 0€ 'i C«xp 190PREMIER TRADEMARKS MEANS QUALITY SINCE 1913 1. “Premier" - For all products 2. “Premierlite” • Operative Instruments 3. "Kluorident" • Liquid or Gel - Acidulated Phosphate Fluoride 4. "R-C Prep" - A Chemo Mechanical Preparation of the Root Canal 5. “Durelon" - the Adhesive Cement 6. “Carbidized" • Scalers - Excavators - Chisels 7. “Hemodent" - Hemostatic Solution - Gingival Retraction Cord 8. “Red Dot" - Diamond Instruments 9. "Scutan" - for Temporary Crowns and Bridges 10. “Ela” - Carbide and Steel Burs 11. “Striptite" • Matrix Retainer 12. “Cavit" • Ready Mixed Cavity Seal 13. “Beutelrock” • Plastic Handled Endodontic Instruments 14. “Topicale” • Topical Anesthetic 15. “Strip-Aids" - for Self Adhering Bands 16. “Stanide" - Stannous Fluoride 17. “Retra-Rings" - for Gingival Retraction 18. “Wedges and Wedge Positioner" 19. “Never-Clog” -Delrin Analgam Guns 20. “Temple Composite Instruments" - for Placement of Composite Materials 21. “Impregum" - Polyether Rubber Impression Material 22. “Cavilax" - Cleaning. 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Our constant search for new developments and improvements helps to fulfill the advancing requirements of modern dentistry. We realize dental instruments are in constant use, making their quality and perfection of prime importance. We know only first class instruments can assure fine results. We are well known, for more than thirty years, and deserve the confidence of the dental -medical professions who understand the practical form and the standard of quality of our instruments. KARL SCHUMACHER DENTAL INSTRUMENT CO., INC. P.O. BOX 11628 PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19116 Office: 2727 Philmont Ave. Huntingdon Valley 19006 (215) 464-1556 FREE Beautiful gold-embossed certificates for your office. The Dental Assistant’s Creed. The Dental Assistant's Pledge. Dentsply International is proud to sponsor the publication of these two beautiful certificates which are suitable for framing and hanging in your office They have both been widely distributed to the ADAA membership through National Headquarters. 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Faster, more productive, safer, and more economical, too. 14% Greater Access. Overall length from top of ULTRA Handpiece to tip of ULTRA Diamond less than 19 millimeters. 3 millimeters shorter than the smallest standard-size handpiece and regular-length cutting instruments. What an advantage when preparing a Class V buccally on a 1st or 2d molar! Or for any other cavity or pedo preparation where access is difficult. Starflite ULm operative handpiece Starflite ULTRA Handpiece with Starlite ULTRA Diamonds. Above (left to right): UD3P, UAT35. UAT36. U34P, U330-4P, UD37P. U556-5P. U769-7P. U700-7P. and U260-8P. UAT39L in handpiece. Starflite ULRK operative diamonds ULTRA Handpiece with ULTRA Diamond UAT39L at right is 3 millimeters shorter overall than standard-size Starflite FUTURA with standard length AT39L. Ample Stall-Free Power and Torque in the ULTRA combination: more than in many full-size handpieces. Speed, too: over 425,000 RPM at 30 PSI air pressure. And variable speed, as well. When operating close to pulp and you wish to proceed with caution. ULTRA slows down to less than half-speed without stalling. Safety Assurance with ULTRA combination. You operate with a shorter friction-grip cutting instrument designed to fit the compact ULTRA handpiece head exactly. Result is smoother cutting, less vibration, less pulpal trauma. Save Two Ways. The ULTRA combination helps you do more in less chairtime by providing quick and ready access to the rear areas of adult and children's mouths. And. because ULTRA Diamonds are guaranteed to outcut and outlast twice their price in carbides, you lower your operating costs while increasing your operative excellence. Starflite ULTRA Handpieces available to fit all 2-. 3-, and 4-hole tubing connectors. 194 another "years ahead" Dental product from Star Dental Mfg. Co. Inc. • Conshohocken. Pa. 19428 • (215) 825-3010 Porcelain To Gold Crown And Bridge Full Dentures Congratulations Partial Dentures RITMAN DENTAL LABORATORY DR. ALAN M. SMOLEN 255 S. 17th Street Philadelphia, Pa. 19103 Telephone: PE 5-9430 From That Prejudiced Group “The Smolen Bunch” Congratulations To JEAN M. LOVETT CLASS OF ’77, DENTAL HYGIENE. CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATING CLASS ’77 AND STAFF FOR A JOB WELL DONE. Conestoga Chemicals And Plastics, Inc. 1278 Loop Road Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17604 Mr. And Mrs. Joseph G. Gomez, Sr. SINCE 1917 Shop the Easy Way in our NEW ILLUSTRATED 28 PAGE CATALOG NO. 50 Dental Instruments Showing Half a Century of Developments in Dentoforms and Other Practice Aids. Write today for your NEW Catalog No. 50 COLUMBIA DENTOFORM CORPORATION 49 East 21st St., New York, N.Y. 10010 For lustrous, washable finish on stone or plaster models, use Columbia Model Gloss... $3.25 per quart. MISDOM-FRANK CORPORATION Visit our booth No. J50 at the A.D.A. Meeting in Houston 195GRADUATE SCHOOL? GOVERNMENT SERVICE? ASSOCIATESHIP? YOUR OWN PRACTICE? Whether you’ve got choices to make or you've made your choices ... Healthco can help you find a location; design, equip and finance your office; show you how to buy merchandise economically; train your staff in modern, efficient office routines. Healthco is ready when you are; Healthco will most likely be where you are. Our 72 ... and growing ... dental supply and equipment locations are nationwide and throughout Canada. Even more important, our well-staffed organization is unrivalled in expertise that is always at your service. All this and competitive prices, too! You’ve got a lot of choices for your future .. one of the wisest you can make now and throughout that future is to get there and to grow there with Healthco ... the choice of a lifetime. When you’ve made the right choice, contact your Healthco rep at your present location, or the branch manager where you’re relocating. 10 Practice Management Monographs: Write for yours today! C What's the Best Location tor Your New Dental Practice7 Malpractice Warning Signs Sateguards tor a Successful Dental Partnership l. How to Maximize Your Assistant's Assistance Ways to Lower Overhead Waste How to Collect What Patients Owe You Solutions to Your Most Difficult Fee Problems Your Strategic Plan to Build the Perfect Dental Facility How to Hire Superior Dental Help i Considerations in Setting Up a Dental Practice Check off the brochures you’d like and mail to Healthco, 25 Stuart St., Boston. Mass. 02116, and we’ll send you the brochures you’d like, written exclusively by Healthco’s professional staff. -Healthco Dental Supply Philadelphia Dental Supply. 2130 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA 19103, (215)568-7450 Healthco Dental Supply. South Long View Drive, Turnpike Industrial Park. Middletown. PA 17057, (717) 939-0483 Deeley Dental Supply. 6308 Blair Hill Lane. Baltimore, MD21209, (301) 828-0300Congratulations Class Of 1977 MERIN STUDIOS Official Yearbook Portraits GRANT AVE. AND ASHTON RD., PHIL. PA. OR 3-5777 FREEDOM. To practice quality dentistry without concern about equipment, supplies or nOo w UEJED Heinsheimer Dental Supplies, Inc. • 10 West Coulter EJD Heinsheimer Dental Supplies, Inc. • 10 West Coulter Street Philadelphia, Pa 1914 • (215) VI9-9000 CONGRATULATIONS to JEFFREY MARC WEINER, D.D.S. With Deep Pride And All Our Love Mom And Dad And Family CONGRATULATIONS and GOOD LUCK MARY ANNE GIORDANO from DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH E. GIORDANO 197We take pride in the job we do, so you can take pride inthejobyoudo. At Jelenko. we understand how you feel as you enter dental practice. Because it's the same feeling we have every day. The urge to excel... the demand for quality. We take pride in the job we do. so you can take pride in the job you do. Now. there are two ways to put Jelenko’s expertise to work for you: First, call our toll-free number. (800) 431-1785, to get in touch with a Jelenko expert. For technical assistance. For gold price quotations. For ordering. For scrap pickup (we'll even give you free containers and labels). Second, take advantage of the educational courses at Jelenko's Regional Service Centers. Most are free; for a few. there is a modest fee. We're working hard to keep Jelenko the leader in consistent, high-quality alloys for crown and bridge restorations and partial dentures. And we're proud to be serving your profession... we hope we'll be serving you soon. PEfNWUJ SJELENKO OENTAt HEALTH PRODUCTSPATRONS MR. MRS. WEBSTER BECKER MR. MRS. ROBERT A. BIRKBECK COLONEL MRS. DARWIN L. BRENDLINGER MR. MRS. LEONARD DANZIG MR. MRS. JOSEPH G. GOMEZ. SR. MR. MRS. JAMES K. GOTWALD RUTH LAPPEN HANSON W. RICHARD HAROLD MR. MRS. ROBERT E. HENRY MR. MRS. PETER JURGEVICH MR. MRS. CARL D. KING MRS. JUDY KING AND BRADLEY MR. MRS. TRENNIS KING MR. MRS. DONALD W. LOVETT MR. MRS. VINCENT J. MCAVOY MR. MRS. KENNETH S. MCLAUGHLIN MR. MRS. SAMUEL OFRICHTER ERNEST AND LUCY PAESE DR. AND MRS. ANSON PERINA MR. MRS. LOUIS RAFETTO MRS. BARBARA REGAN MRS. BETTIE L. RICKARDS MR. MRS. JAMES L. RUSH MR. MRS. BENJAMIN M. SHANER MR. MRS. JOHN A. SIPPEL. JR. MR. MRS. JAMES J. TREXEL MRS. JEAN A. WILLIAMS MR. MRS. H. LEIGH WOEHLING DR. MRS. IRVING YALISOVE MR. MRS. JOHN ZURASKY. SR. 199Editor-in-chief Assistant Editor Hygiene Editor Business Manager Photographers General Information Senior Sections Curriculum Art Work Contributors James Schmoyer Edward Roman Heidi Lengacher Sam Greenlee Bruce Leinen Wendy Irwin Donald Trexel Mark Hochberg Steve Ury Joel Garblik Amy Brendlinger Mike Moskowitz John Pullman Edward Woehling Lou Rafetto Lee Levinson Thomas Regan John DiGirolamo Rich Rush The 1977 edition of The Odontolog has been published with the best interests of many in mind. First for the many candidates awaiting admission, so to better equip them with first-hand knowledge on this institution. Second, for all underclassmen, for it is up to them to perpetuate this educational system. Finally, for the graduating seniors as a reminder of what it was like these last four years at Temple Dental, just in case one may decide to go through it again. All in Jest The Editor Thank You


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