Taft School - Taft Annual Yearbook (Watertown, CT)

 - Class of 1913

Page 1 of 187

 

Taft School - Taft Annual Yearbook (Watertown, CT) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 187 of the 1913 volume:

HE TELTU ALMON C. JUDD, Proprietor WATERBURY, CONN. " The Most Attractive Hotel in New England l' -QS - . A if --22112 1 .. fs V' As.-QW . l ,oi l 1 iifmf, f-" ' 0 -ZEYM liiff rg , ww -'-Q-X 745 ,,5'f'g' of iam- - 1 Q .. 33155 - gait-, ' 44.424 V- ft, wif ,ffff f 1 mira , . ,af 5, :lf1f-ivf'e-- f if sr Sit: gm. ff- is ---1,4 r:.,1f -Q: 4 -, ffS5Te,l:: rpg' Ming:'a"31mf1w,'.xiffjliigii--."g', 4rf2:5's.Q" '--- ,. 1:i,4fs,-llama-lf - at 3 Q .ef 1 , , 7 ' ' l 0:-' rg-1 iggff- 1 L yy -. Lf- :z ' .. , .t.. -, '? li 1 A ,, 4 ,JL ..,-, 'wiv' " 511' 2:3 , H , .Q YJQQI- 'V ,LJ 4 flag- , . J, 1:1 :aff Iggy..-gz1.,.,,.l.'12j,5fv, is A4 if , v, J ,,,yff:3...9,3gy.4b,551,-. ,. gf3x,.,,,, 4 ON THE IDEAL TOUR A magnificent Fire-Proof Hotel, with every comfort and luxury Delightfully situated. European Plan. Grill Room with unexcelled cuisine. Five miles from Taft School by trolley, or excellent road for automobiles SUMMER RESORT, HOTEL ASPINALL, LENOX, MASS. Kindly Mention The Taft Annual fi5Q5QUyifffQ,?,Q I PACH BROTH ERS Qollege Photographers NEW YORK 5'S'fQK fif2U5 lfZkT ESTABLISHED l8I8 entlemeni urnisahtxig IIUU5, BROADWAY COR.TWENTY-SECOND Szf. NEW YORK. Young Nlen's Suits of latest styles and newest patterns Overcoats in hand loom Tweeds, Cheviots, Kenmares, Shetlands, Complete Outtittings for Travel at home or abroad Imported Haberdashery and Shoes Trunks, Bags, Valises, Fitted Cases, Shawls, Robes Hats and Caps from England and the Continent Novelties in Soft Hats Huntsmen's Hatsg Polo Helmets " ad for illustrated catalogue 4 Kindly Mention The Taft in ,Z ,.. 1.. 11a-m'.,-..i'i'- -, .5 .,?".."'.:ir'4t :':'2f--'TnT""" 'Y Q ""i'.zf 'aa - fi' 1 ' T . ' '1W Farewell to the Old Building A song of parting and of love I have to tell, A song of many years of ceaseless strife, A song of purpose true of him we know so well, A song of bursting bonds for broader life. f Oh! reverend, aged house of white, Blessed by true friends, through pass of time, That for long years has been the site W'here gathered youths from every clime g Where friends first met to last for life, Vlfhere minds were taught by Word and pen, And by the force of honor rife Mere boys were shown how to be men, For shelter now thy days are o'er, ' At last the shell must broken be And from the nest the bird must soar To reach a higher, better tree. Thy work has not been done in vain, From you things greater shall arise, And ever shalt the new remain But for thy honor 'neath the skies. And now thy task is done-thy day of service o'er. Our love, thy merit, words could never tell, But in this parting-time, now from our hearts we pour Our thanks and praise in just a sad "Fare-Well." ,ig 1' XX?- L 'f ':4 .,- xx, 'LT5-5731 f ix If, 'V J r',,,I,',1 .Nfl 11,7 qi,'uU4,l,lI11ff5,f x I V1 12 M ? I - mm m Www JHNIEHEURRY -J ' .L A A Eisassi f Bassa s - - 1 foe: T N , 5 g aasaef- 5 T .-AT "" "" 1 E H , - 1 fvllf., ,.Z':'ff1g. . ,i+i'E1'5,3'Q 'E 1.- -f , X1 S ifl f 1 llllllll 555 553 " mmnnm mmumr.-mg UIUUWUUU mg m rnsmmmlfm - f 1 5 3 " 1 f VOLUME XX - 4. X 5-17' A ' - A , Q f X . f ig-.+ BOARD OF EDITORS mmm EE E EE CLIVE C. DAY, 1 13, C'klZi7'7llll7Z,' H UDSON 2255522 ummm n 9 snrmrl m ggggggg B UR R, 313, 1 QI 3, Hwzam 13' 11lwzbfr,- A RTHUR gggggg u m H. BUNKER, IQ 13, YVALTER B. LAXVRENCE, m mm ff? IQI3, LEIGHTON H. COLEMAN, 1914, FRANK- 7 73 L52 LIN VV. YVOLF, 1915, Efiiz'or.v,- XIVILLIAM XV. J, -437155 CRAPO, IQ 14, HALLECK LEFFERTS, 1914, An' E4 y Editor.v.,- GRAHAM M. BRUSH, IQI4, Bzf.vif1e.v.v 51' Illaazagezg- ROBERT H. BOXVLES, 1914, Amisf- if an! Bzzsizzess lllafzager. n umzmm mimmn 16555535 5553553 mmmmun 1' mmllll 1 :QQ 'fi'- Ej ' The Taft School, VVatertown, Conn. 2?4Mq'1,1 , K Y, HH' fn 1913 , .,,, ,. 54 1. 16452 5 lik f ' , rv T w 7 F .-,T 1 1 . I' m as 'Fi J C3 f"1-N rm ' Q iff' E mgmmg ummm 7 , ' XX mmsanm mnmmm m mmmmmmm mm--ll- X mmm---- f ,r 1-5 mmmmnmm E111 53111111111 1511111111 1111111111111 A 1111111 111' 1111111-111' 111111111 1111h 11i11h 11111111 A 1111111 111 11111111-11 1112111 in 1111111 A 1111111 111 1111111111 111511211 is 11111 EI 11111-1 G91 11111111 1111' 1111111111 111111111111 111 111111. Evil 111111 1111111 111111 1151211111 1111911 giur E111 121111111 IIPEIKT-11.911 lllllfh 211111 I111111. U11 111111-1111151 1111111 H1111 51112 111111 1111111.1g 1111111 13112 11111111 111 h11hir1112 111111 11111111. 4-LVHWMW HE TOUCH of sadness, as we, the Class of 1913, realize that this is the last Annual to be X issued under the present roof, gradually merges into a feeling of joy, when we see the great 25 opportunities that are about to be laid before the incoming classesg and we only wish that we had been fortunate enough to have the advantages of the new surroundings. But now all we can say is that in the hands of the Class of I9I4 we place the school spirit, and to them and the whole school we wish all success and happiness in the future. It is hoped that any little "digs" contained herein, which are meant in fun alone, will be received in the spirit in which they were written. ln closing, the Annual thanlcs all those, not on the board, who have aided in any way the publishing of this volume. 'Sf QWQ NL-F C FACULTY GROUP THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 HORACE D. TAFT, Head Master H:XRLEX' F. ROBERTS 1 Yale, 1883, M.A. XYestern Reserve, 1884, BLA. CIVIL GOVERNBIENT LATIN OLIN C. JOLINE C. H. WARD H2-1'V31'C1, 1389, BJX. Pomona, 1898. HA., Yale, 1899, M.A. GREEK ENGLISH IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL Y SYDNEY B. MORTQN ANDREW D. MCINTOSH Yale, 1900, B.A., 1904, M.A: Yale, 1903, B.A. LATIN HISTORY PAUL M. WELTON NIEXKVTON B. HOBART Yale Medical School, IQOI-,OZ XVSSfC1'l1 Reserve, 1878, B.A., M.A ATHLETIC DIRECTOR GERMAN 9 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 GARFIELD M. XWELD JOHN T, DALLAS Mif-ld1ffbUYY. 1904, B-JY Yale, I9o4, B.A., Union Theo, Sem., IQOS MATHEMATICS CHAPLAIN AND RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTOR 1. B. S. BACON CHARLES B. XNYELD Yale, 1911, B.A. Middlebury, I9o5, B.A. LATIN ENGLISH IQI2 THE TAFT ANNUAL I3 GEORGE R. VVILSON HENRY M, NVELLS Mxddlebury, 1904, B.A. Harvard, 1905, B.A. INIATHEMATICS FRENCH THE TAFT ANNUAL WR Whx 4 Tunes-I ff 4 ' 'Nunn is NW A 2 L M as WI as 'mi lam? G THE SCHOOL I6 THE TAPT ANNUAL 1913 scnoot LIST Ol' ANTHONY ANJXBLE. .. ...... I2 Elm Street, Morristown, N. I. EDVVARD ANDREWS .... . . .I206 University Street, Seattle, XVash. HAROLD ASHWORTH .............................. Wfatertown, Conn. ELIAS CORNELIUS ATKINS. . .1219 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Ind. W'ILLIAM EVELYN BABCOCK ...,....... Dana Place, Englewood, N. I. SHERMAN BALDWIN ....... .... 5 5 XVest 85th Street, New York, N. Y. EDMUND ARTIAIUR BALL. .... .......................... B Iuncie, Ind. AUSTIN DUNPIAM BARNEY ....................... Farmington, Conn. RUSSELL STERGIS BARTLETT ..... 814 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. ROYAL NIOULTON BASSETT ............................ Milford, Conn. BARETS O. BENJAMIN ....... 639 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. BCIAURICE BENJAMIN ........ .639 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. CHARLES VAN ANTNVERP BENNER ................... Englewood, N. 1. EDWARD PAYSON BORDEN, 2D ........... The Clinton, Philadelphia, Pa. EDWARD WALTER BOURNE ....... 73 Mansfield Street, New Haven, Conn. JAMES RUSSELL BOURNE ......... 73 Mansfield Street, New Haven, Conn. WILLIAM NETTLETON BOURNE. . .73 Mansfield Street, New Haven, Conn. ROBERT HIARDING BOWLES ............... P. O. Box 474, Oakland, Cal. GRAHAM NIANVEL BRUSH ......... 76 Maple Avenue, G1'C6l'lXVlCl1, Conn. ARTHUR HUGI-I BUNRER ......... 421 North Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. HUDSON BURR ..........,. 81.1. North Prairie Street, Bloomington, Ill. WILLIAM PATRICK BYRNE ..... 859 Wfatertown Road, YVaterbury, Conn. ANDREW PICKENS CALHOUN ............ Euclid Heights, Cleveland, O. OLIVER LYANS CLARKE ...... 5013 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La. WALTER LYANS CLARKE ..... 5oI3 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La. 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL I7 VVILLIAM CLARKE COIT ........... Lake Shore Boulevard, Cleveland, O. LEIGHTON LIAMMOND COLEMAN. .116 East 58th Street, New York, N. Y. BECKWITI-I COOK ................ 44 Sycamore Road, Hartford, Conn. HENRX' SAGE FENIMORE COOPER ..... 96 Wfestern Avenue, Albany, N. Y. VVALLACE GRAHAM CORNVIN. . .247 St. Ronan Street, New Haven, Conn. THOMAS HOOICER COWLES ......... 1130 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Ill. VVILLIAM VVALLACE CRAP0 ........ 180 Seminole Avenue, Detroit, Mich. CLARKE XVILLIAM CROCKER .... 2301 Laguna Street, San Francisco, Cal. JOHN BTOFFAT CUNNINGIIAM. .2889 Pacific Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. FAYETTE SAMUEL CURTIS, JR. . . .f. .Millwo0d, Wfestchester County, N. Y. VVILLI.-XM l.VlClfINLEY DAVIS ........,................ Tacoma, Vtfash. CLIVE CAMERON DAY ........... 109 Vtfoodlawn Avenue, Summit, N. J. FRANCIS PERKINS DAY .... ...... 7 40 Carlton Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. :HOWARD BRUSH DEAN ....... 264 Vtfest 73d Street, New York, N. Y. THORNE DONNELLEY ........ 1309 VVest 73d Street, New York, N. Y. AUSTIN DUNIIAM ............... 1030 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn. JOHIN VVILBUR DWIGHT, JR. ...................,...... Dryden, N. Y. GEORGE LANE EDWARDS, JR. . .512 South Wfebster Avenue, Kirkwood, Mo. SAMUEL EELLS .......... Overlook Road, Euclid Heights, Cleveland, O. JOHN FRANKLIN ENGER ...... Marion Avenue, Avondale, Cincinnati, O. JOHN VILLIERS FARWELL ....... 18 Wfest 86th Street, New York, N. Y. ROBERT LEWIS FISHER ....... 403 St. Ronan Street, New Haven, Conn. EDWARD XVILLIAMS GARFIELD .... Lake Shore Boulevard, Cleveland, O. NEWELL GARFIELD ........... ...... A . .Vtfest Mentor, Lake County, O. RUDOLPH GAREIELD ........ ........... . .. .West Mentor, O. GEORGE CURTISS GILLETTE .... . . .9 Eld Street, New Haven, Conn. FRANK STEVENS GOFF ...... .. .771 Rock Street, Fall River, Mass. PAUL HYDE GRAVES .............. 625 Stevens Street, Spokane, VVaSh. NATHANIEL TAYLOR GUERNSEY ........ 227 37th Street, Des Moines, Ia. CARL HAMANN. . .. ............. 118 Viban Street, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. EDMUND HENRY HAMANN ...... II8 Viban Street, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. ATCHESON ADAIR LL-XRDEN 183d St. Sz Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. ROSS HZARDEN ...... I83d Street 81 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. FREDOLIN GROSS HERBERT. .1829 VVest Wfalnut Street, Murphysboro, Ill. BEERRIT HEMINWAY, 2D .......................... VVatertown, Conn. BARTOXV LEWIS HEMINWAY .... .... W atertown, Conn. I8 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 NELSON CHARLES HTENGER .... .................. X 7Vatertown, Conn. GEORGE BURTON HOLLISTER ........ WVoodlaWn Crescent, Cincinnati, O. ELYAH KENT HUBBARD ...... .... 3 Q7 High Street, Middletown, Conn. HAZARD ROBINSON HYDE .......................... Englewood, N. J. WALTER PHELPS JACOBS .......................... Watertown, -Conn. ERWIN STRICKLAND JENNINGS. .63 Brooklawn Place, Bridgeport, Conn. ROBERT LIVINGSTON JOHNSON ...... Huntington Place, Norwich, Conn. WALLACE WILBUR JOHNSON. . .I44 Harrison Street, East Orange, N. J. STODDARD PINTARD JOHNSTON. . .146 East 38th Street, New York, N. Y. CARTER FESSENDEN JONES .... 434 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. HAROLD RITTENIIOUSE IQIEEN ........... Dublin Road, Greenwich, Conn. SOLON CHESTER IQELLEY, JR. ........ 854 Main Street, Stamford, Conn. DANIEL SHERRIL IQENT ...... 415 Humphrey Place, New Haven, ,COnn. SAMUEL WALDRON LAMBERT, JR., I3o East 35th Street, New York, N. Y. WALTER BALDWIN LANVRENCE .... 44 Vtfoodlawn Avenue, Summit, N. J. HALLECIC LEFFERTS ........... 254 XfVest 74th Street, New York, N. Y. EDWARD JAMES LOBDELL, JR. ...................... Greenwich, Conn. CHARLES PINCKNEY LUCKEY .... 584 Orange Street, New Haven, Conn. CHARLES ELIHU LYMAN, JR. ..................... Middlefield, Conn. JOHN LYMAN .....,........ .................. . Middlefield, Conn. ELMORE MCNEIL lWCKEE. . . JOHN HOWARD ZMSALLON .... HENRY NEIL MALLON. . . PATRICK NIALLON ....... . . . . . . . . .Locust Drive, Summit, N. J. 234 McGregor Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 234 McGregor Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 234 McGregor Avenue, Cincinnati, O. EDWIN WALDO BIARVIN ......... 36 VVoodlawn Street, Hartford, Conn. GEORGE DWIGHT MATTIIIESSEN Adriance Avenue, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. JOHN FRIDELL NIETCALFE ...... 55 Central Park 'West, New York, N. Y. HUMPIIREY MORRIS ........... 53 Edge Hill Road, New Haven, Conn. ASA BURTON NELSON ............................... Derby Line, Vt. JAMES LEROY NICICEL, JR. ............ Menlo Park, San Francisco, Cal. WILLIAM IQENNETH NOBLE, JR. .. .420 VVayne Street, Fort Wfayne, Ind. FREDERICK ELLIOT PELONSKY ....... I5 Mayfair Street, Roxbury, JOHN DEWITT PELTZ ....... ....... 3 23 State Street, Albany, Mass. N. Y. CHARLES PITKIN PEPPARD ........ 3711 Gilliam Road, Kansas City, MO. EUGENE AWARD POTTER, ......... 20 X-Vest 53d Street, New York, N. Y. WEBSTER CLAY POWELL ...... 235 WVest IO3d Street, New York, N. Y. 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQ PIERREPONT ISHAM PRENTICE ......................... Nyack, N. Y. AUSTIN ROE PRESTON ...... 155 Park Place, East Aurora, N. Y. HUGTI BERGESS REED ....... . . . FRANCIS CLARKE REYBURN ....... . . . . . . . ,45 Forest Street, Hartford, . . .1161 Prospect Avenue, Hartford, .94 Hudson Terrace, Yonkers, LUCIUS FRANKLIN ROBINSON, JR. .... 45 Forest Street, Hartford, BARCLAY ROBINSON ........ CALDWELL COIT ROBINSON. . JAMES HAMILTON ROBINSON ..... EDWARD VAN VOLKENBUIQG SANDS, 101 East 39th Street, New York, 1111 Park Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. .4529 Lindell Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. Conn. Conn. N. Y. Conn. N. Y. ROBERT HAYSHAM SAYRE, 3D. . .685 Delaware Avenue, S. Bethlehem, Pa. PAUL BEAcH SESSIONS ............. 25 Bellevue Avenue, Bristol, Conn. EDWARD DARLING SMEDLEY .... ................ B ronxville, N. Y. GREGORY WATERMAN SPURR. .. ................. Sparkill, N. Y. FREDERICK CLARKE STERLING .......... 141 East 26th Street, Erie, Pa. JOSEPH SARSFIELD SWEENY ........ 323 Eighth Avenue, Spokane, VVash. CHARLES PI-IELPS TAFT, 2D .... ......... 3 I Pike Street, Cincinnati, O. CARR MEYSENBURG THOMAS ...... 200 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. JOHN RANDOLPH THOMPSON, 3D .... 4415 Grand Boulevard, Chicago, Ill. RICHARD COWLES THOMPSON .... 583 Orange Street, New Haven, ALLAN TRAIN TRUMBULL ............. P. O. Box 133, Litchfield, HERMON LEONARD UNDERHILL .......... Owego, Tioga County, JOHN GRIEIPEN UNDERHILL .............. Owego, Tioga County, WILLIAM BEEKMAN UNDERHILL, 120 East 40th Street, New York, DAVID LANMAN VAN BUREN .... 55 West 71st Street, New York, CURTISS ARTHUR VARIEL ..... 164 West Main Street, VVaterbury, GEORGE CORYDON WAGNER, JR. .... 324 North E Street, Tacoma, BENJAMIN STUART VVALCOTT 1743 22d Street, N. W., Washington, ARVIN JESSE WVELCH ........... 209 Orchard Street, New Haven, WILLIAM DWIGPIT WHITNEY ....................... Cornwall, FRANKLIN XVARREN VVOLF ............. Hotel Puritan, Boston, VVALTER REID VVOLF .................. Hotel Puritan, Boston, Conn. Conn. N. Y. N. Y. N. Y. N. Y. Conn. Wash. C. Conn. Conn. Mass. Mass. D. HENRY HOWARD HOUSTON VVOODWVARD. .Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. KENNETI-I PTAZEN WOOLSON ......................... Springfield, Vt. COURTNEY RICHARD YOUNG. .1740 18th Street, N. VV., Washington, D. C. ARTHUR LATHROP ZERBEY .......................... 'Wilkesbarre, Pa. 'i IQI3 T1-IE TAFT ANNUAL 21 XX ebL',!Rl7Tel-llb"L on sf, 1 Lcxfl ' I THE SCHOOL islnow about to begin what may be called a I third era in its history. It has passed through the smallness and struggles of the Pelham Manor era, it has closed the era of greater beginnings at W'atertown and now soon the third will begin, the era of what ?-it is the future, and we cannot tell. Taft School was founded in the fall of 1890, in the village of Pel- ham Manor, VVestchester County, New York, by Horace Dutton Taft, fl graduate of Yale College in the Class of 1883, and for some years a tutor of that institution. . As might be expected, the first years of the school had aa very small enrollment, there being but seventeen boys and three masters at the beginning, who were quartered in several neighboring cottages. Organ- ized athletic teams, in so small a school, were of course, practically impossible, but yet attempts were 1nade both on the gridiron and on the diamond, and it was in these first efforts that the Taft spirit became a vital part of every fellow. The third year after its founding, the school was removed to Water- town, Connecticut, a quiet, country village located in the southernmost ridges of the Berkshires. It was admirably adapted by nature to the purpose, and the building chosen, the old VVarren house, was in many respects almost ideal for a use of this kind. From that time on athletics began to be thoroughly organized, and the school teams grew in number and prowess. Teams from other schools were met and since victory has come far more often than defeat, a feeling of pride for the school was instilled, which, it can but be hoped, IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 23 will always serve as an inspiration for school honor. Moreover, the attention of the school has not altogether been turned toward athletics, but much effort and ability has been put into musical, dramatic, literary and various other kinds of activities, all of which have become more numerous and more efficient, particularly in recent years. In the fall of 1908 the first part of the Annex was completed, and in two years it was triple its original size. The new gymnasium was ready for occupancy in january, 1911, and in February, 1912 it was announced that the subscription for the last bond had arrived, thus com- pleting the incorporation of the school. During the last year the walls of the new building have risen foot by foot, and it is expected that next fall will see the whole school under one roof. Yet, amidst all the joy and excitement of moving into the new surroundings, the closing of the second era in the history comes not without a certain touch of sadness. The two buildings, under whose roofs the present reputation of the school was formed, will always be a strong proof of the fact that personality, above all else, makes a real school. It only remains to be seen what the future will bring with its additional asset of perfect equipment, added to the school spirit. 5,59 .N , :-w-:-- ,:, V: f 1 f 'f 1':'1 X I THE -TAFT - EEHUUL. V1 FLUUR. GLYMNASKUM SHED ...v . Q M.. i"f"S manruwn B1 w.w.cv1Avo 'Pt Q D671 U --I GYM Rim., SERVANT5 Apmnrrus Gm M E f.m.1. Fmns OLDER A 1 -' E.'R.'CLA5S RooM. pays' I num: ROOP1 , "' "" I norman I: Room 5- UPP E R 'PART g ig or ,E g NTCHEN TERRACE ,L 4 .n U, , BO 'HER WH Sum I Qmn! !! 's 5 F' 5 LOBBY Eg Q 5 cn. cm. cn. ig 3 : :'.'.1' 0 . ... ., . P ' 1 E F l W VI f v VK L , - -J - -f .6 Q5 47: Mun l Y H Hrs-r:ns', n 1 E r-mafum ci-R. CIR- rcmxncz 3: 5 loc-4 Nl HJ. cannon Chix ' 5, 'Rm-n 'DI N I N GL CR- 'R o Q P1 mmm. cm. Wim!! C.T?. mm TAHYRY 1 ...l-.. T X ,Dm 'NG Lqvxni MALL U ' Hoon 'Room -w.-vvm o P - in-on THE-WT' THUULU Qbunvnnt BHEENENT. su vnu-4' neu 1. -M . 'HIUL """' A: A cuss uwvaemn o ,Room 5 la., QP I: - 3 ' MAJ. g .un-nu - com. 15-A B"""R cozu. X F' 'Ro"" i -.Q !QEATnlm H - "' nznnwmf, 0 ' E Y SYORAGE ,., t.l.,Ass roof-1 CLASS RUON 0 E 3 0 -no-Q gf mul. -n.,1. 16" 3 2 X n I. ' 'DRYING 4 -- - Rnoq .i.lT J s. VF sa.-PPL1 won' NEWS- 5ALr.s n 'vkppf 'Room vm-ER B in 'can oem FOAM z Z- q 0 N o LECTURE F ft 'RooM 'rrlunut STaRAas U Lwvum STORAQK NOVD I UPPER GVNHNPIUIN. DR. DR. ' 1041 Llc DJI. f un. DR. D-R H -ms 1.1 "1" DR. , ui QR. sy., x:-.12 -I sn. nn, fm DR' 'O' U25 103 bran xas AM, ,, Linen Eff: 11, DIL , R-. , ji .- 11.1 1, - f- Sigur 'Riff DQ, lil in 5: L""" n.R. nn. un. un. na. nn. nv. , n N .:,::-4.35 - CJEUJB mu 1.1. 1,1 ,lm , I., 11.1 u , my .. Ll I . . , ,-- zflffffs mm. S-K 4352 'E sn. anew- L""Mrg5l- 5 MPH 521 " - 1--A-1 5 MJ' Fu-f-1 fu. x. mu I, L- ' ' v ' I "F- . lfuov x LN, AYUPY Us ii 5 ' DR un. ,,, TFXFT SUEUUL 1" t' Assr.r-151.1 'D.R. mu. D-R' -A mann mf Z W.. C.R.' Chu Rnm. DVR' lg? 1.33 DQR.-13.3.-JJ..u.Tc..,. , - 1 , ,, bl, 3 s.R.1B.,.-s1n,c.R.,.... 5 " 3,54 E uf 135 " :- SH, - Shu-ln W.. IIII! L : gg mr-511 ' ' W" 'i I M un u 5 D Bul 1 , Z' 'R""' 'N R-U. g 5 B-4 'I - tn 4 Ron-1 'xf' 8.2. G'lMNAsunq 'Roar 13.12, eo: 1... 'J-I 5-K 301 DR. 33,-R, DIR. 31m 5.2. :or 3111 903 Dug - .DRI DIR. M'-39, 'DR' awk' un 'floor 304' v. l' ' V X lg ma BAN Jura. am. nv. 5.2. D-IR 19.11. 75.12. 1:12. ':v.'w.. 1112. if' an Qilq 201 ao? seq :no w M if T" 'IN' :nf 1,16 su- ' 1 SW" sfonme T1-W s.re. -n.1z. C23 5 2.11. ex 9.12. rv 35 S-Yfgmifgl 3-Y- 'sws aw an vm A aw aa-1 :ai 5 334 'sn ,Gm-lv - . w..-Az ' - ,. ' 6TUDY STUDY X lg 'UR- D- SL' 314 a a Ti ER' DQ. 115 311. iq THF' T SEHU UL UR -Q ., 7073- 126 nssanuu Mau.. H' D? A , . ,I . 3A FLU UR PLHN. DR- 111 ' no SME. S DQR. 2-BMV' Dvvxale-I?o1-m ATM 16' , - rv 2.5, T Sv-FL -'13 015 Sunglzwenm, M,-Jima SNA! F -. ff :Shox-ters. 'lids ' F I-I moves Suvuutl A-1 1 garage -5151 bis-nd? 'Bal ' '5hK'K'5 Realm 5411 QYMNASIUM 1zooF 5-R 5.12. 3-R. , , . 501- seq, sos. HHH I-Dm, LABQRAYQRY 4'3- '25 xmz. 5.12. 'DR' 0 Solh 505. 'Nq- ff ui DTR. 54 gfoazffgf.-,nfl 6 - fzmdziqwm ,us TOIIILET 1 fx f X L lzzzn E 33- un' SR- 17.12. DR. Summa 13.11. nn. sv. STUDY L WN' qos 904' 407 ln:-T. wqq -no 'HI H11 I 1 ' . 1 L V - ,. wa 1 , nn. 51-ora as ' R' 313' smanqe "mf 5-W. D 12 15.12. SN-oruu mt. 4.31 V59 43, S., ,, 'HA '41 '-I11 Kwai -I X D.R. 'Roof' R007 'HQ' TJ.Tl. limo U. '- 0 DR. " THFT SCHOOL ' I! - ml. WQXA L,k. 2 UW: FLUURM 50m ULCFLUUR aj TUWEK. DSR. ' H0313 'Double 'Rn-msn. SIR. fl Boxfslng in Tuohi. 3h.1 Skuwurs. H., wa. V1 Y' LIY STUDY 415 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 31 4: EHECA AR mai SUNDAY 1 M nounm lfuesbu wgpues1mn111nu3sDRYfFRsbRY SHTURDRK fmst erm legiws On We-K. Sq:-T. lf. . Xmas acailm Tice. if To dim- 7- Easter Xlacat-M11 Hur- sq 'fo NP' 31- I bchoul closes Un l'TlW.'f ur "at . 'mal Sept. I Metcalfe arrives. IS School opens with forty-three new boys and two new masters. IQ Football practice starts. Senior class elections: Sayre, Presidentg Benner, Vice-Presi- dentg Dunham, Secretary and Treasurer. 20 Mr. Charles Horse makes 'his first appearance. First T. A. A. meeting-VV. 'Wolf elected Assistant Football Manager. 23 Nigger Clarke decides to play football. 25 First T. S. C. S. meeting-Burr elected Secretary. 28 Meriden game cancelled. Secretary of T. S. C. S. resigns football managership, and Thompson is elected. 29 Mr. Bacon's football clothes arrive. 30 Mr. Bacon decides that tennis is an excellent sport after all. Upper middle class elections-Lefferts, Presidentg XV. Wfolf, Vice-Presidentg Metcalfe, Secretary and Treasurer. Oct. 'I Burr, Cowles. and Davis appointed Rah! Rah! boys. 5 Kent 14, Taft 12. 32 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 Oct. 7 Nov. T. A. A. meeting-Cowles elected Hockey Manager and Pres- ton Assistant Basketball Manager. Metcalfe elected Baseball Captain-'ATO him that hath, shall be given." ' Taft 76, Mackenzie O5 Bunker finds friends among his enemies. Dunham resigns from presidency of T. S. C. S. Taft elected. Curtis and F. 'Wolf bring out the Oracle. Davis gives Benner fthe motorcycle fiendj a ride in his new "Mercie mel' 60. Football-Taft 40, Gunnery O. XVestover is in the grand- stand, and some of the heroes have tea. Andrews asks Mr. XVard for permission to borrow some of McKee's new hair tonic. Mr. Wfard says, "There is nothing in it." Taft 33, Cheshire o-Trumbull is entertained at the Elton by Miss Pelonsky and friend. Lefferts and Bowles elected to Annual board. Taft 26, Riverview 13, Byrne invites female 'Waterbury to witness game. ' Football trip-Pomfret 16, Taft o. QI-low have the mighty fallenlb Taft 2d 52, Wlestminster 2d O. Burr saves the Infirmary. 'Warren cup presented. Lefferts makes prize speech. New football song. Burr has his troubles. Second football trip-Taft 7, St. Paul's 6. Andrews loses a hair, only 960 left now. Bunker has record day: Forgets to call to Bill during 5 o'clock study period. Taft 43, W'estniinster 7. Gee, we hate to do it. Tteaj for some of the players after the game. The Honor System is born, but the denierit system has been Bourne for a long time. Last football game-Taft 2d 26, Pawling 2d o. Scandal in Mr. Bunker's room. I IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 33 Nov. Dee. Ian. Feb. Only Q59 now Csee November IID. Somebody goes skating. Bet it wasn't Lob. Class for hunchbacks starts. Mr. Weltoii unanimously elected leader. Football dance. The alumni return, and some of the fussers get angry. Thompson leaves for Christmas vacation. The rest of the school decide to go home., One hundred and thirty-two members of Taft School vow never to get on bounds again. Farwell breaks his vow Qsee Istj. Some of the elite go to,lVestover. "Cab, lady ?" First basketball game-Taft 60, Crosby High 33. Burr, Benner and Davis elected as Class Day Committee. Eight hundred and one leftg get some more hair tonic, Gus. Qsee Nov. 25.5 Basketball-Taft 23, Hartford High 22. Mr. G. Wfeld entertains hopefuls Cfor particulars see C. Robinsonj. The eight immortals meet. Basketball-Taft 65, Hopkins Grammar 4. Class games start. Seniors give little upper-middlers the horse laugh. T Scandalous-a fight in the Christian Society meeting. Basketball-Stamford 25, Taft 22. The "Hell-Dodgers" again. ' . Basketball walk-Lefferts loses some of his apparel and comes in the back way. Hockey players skate on ice instead of mud, they win-Taft 4,.All-CO111lCCtlCL1t 1. Basketball-Taft 32, Yale Freshmen 24. Baby Vlfells born and refuses to adopt French as her mother tongue. Hockey-Taft 4, Vlfatertown o. Bunker, F. Vlfolf, Coleman and Lawrence become some of the "Annual" boarders of the Taft School. Hockey-Taft 17, Yale Scrub o. Basketball-Taft 23, Cheshire 12. 34 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 Feb. I3 lcicles make it too cold for Andrews in Greek class. I4 Underhill gets a valentine. I5 Hockey-Taft 5, Pawling o. Basketball-Taft 15, Pawling 20. Oh you Hampton quartette Saturday night! I7 Bunker and Davis acquire sudden dignity. 18 Hockey-Taft 5, Wfatertown 1. IQ Basketball-Taft 24, C. L. I. ro. 21 The XVashington's Birthday dance. NV. Wolf "wakes" up. 22 Bunker loses his dignity. CSee I7tl1.D Taft 46, Alumni IQ 24 Hockey team defeats New Haven 5-2. 26 Hockey team defeats Harstrom I3-I. 27 Dunham gets a birthday cake Cthey couldnit get all the candles on itj. March 1 Basketball-Taft 48, St. Paul's 14. 2 Mclieelelectecl Captain of Hockey team for 1914. 3 "Ponce de Leon" takes the Hockey team to Gunnery and they win 4-o. He returns a "great man." 5 The f'VVhy-Hre-us" picture taken and others. 6 Handball team humiliated by the lightning rapidity of the Faculty. 9 Cooper feeds the school. 1 1 School picture taken. I4 The Panama research expedition leaves. IQ A relief party is sent after them. April 2 School reopens. 4 The Panama expedition returns, but floods detain Cincin- natiites. 5 I. Thompson saw his first wedding and got 48 demerits. 9 Baseball-Taft 16, Wlatertown 2. I2 Thompson gets off two demerits. I3 Confirmation by Bishop Lloyd. I4 Gun Club becomes coed and Curtis almost resigns. I7 Bunker is given his annual bath. CT-Ie didn't enjoy it.j I8 Yale Freshmen 15, Taft 3. 21 Nlfoodchopping at Quassapaug-Taft vs. Wfestover. A noise is heard at Bethlehem. IQI3 THB TAFT ANNUAL 35 Apr-ii May June Baseball-Taft 6, C. L. I 3. Reduced to 48. Andrews at last tries a new hair tonic. The play was "Going Some." St. Paulls 9, Taft 5. Professor Taft addresses school. K'Cowboy" goes on a tobacco jag. Donnelley and Bowles try out for the fire department. Baseball-Taft 4, Harstrom 4. The hirsute gentleman leaves. Trumbull gets 'em. , Baseball trip-Taft 4, Choate 2. Class meet-Upper-middlers win, records are broken by Cooper and RN. Clarke. Cowles gets a privilege! Mr. G. Wfeld tries to amuse Hazel and Robert by dressing up as an Indian. O. Clarke gets lem, too. CSee May 1.1 Track team wins in dual meet with Hartford High-score 59-45- Baseball team defeats Kent 3-I. Baseball team wins from New Haven High I5-5. Tennis team loses to Hartford High 4-2. Alumni Day! "Grads" win baseball game IO-8. "How it has all changed!" r Baseball team 15, Cheshire 2. Senior Class picture-Andrews comes out of the inhrmary. Byrne gets two helpings of strawberry shortcake. Taft 7, Gunnery 2. Annual goes to press. Flutter! Flutter! The fates unroll the scroll. afjffm 13:-up - - raging -'f ax 51: j w f'- 'war' -ug' 'INGgltiilxwuifffiwff' '-E 'e?'1:.? gggagkgwgr.,.igQQga5..,6fr..,. 2 ' K! are '-1- ' J.J .... 11x 3, .X .. 3 4 2 -R, . ,4,, z X .X Q X X. X1 U 'E' 'Y i. 2 I TI-IE ANNEX IQI3 T1-:E TAFT ANNUAL 1 iii iff: IH' ! J HH . 5'-. 1:'1-iz.-' ' " L' .-.... THE TAPT ANNUAL IQI3 Former tlfficcrs of thc Taft Athlctic Association 1893-1894 1894-1895 1 89 5-1 896 1896-1897 1897-1898 1898-1899 1899-1900 1900-1901 1901-1902 1 902-1 903 1903- 1904- 1904 1905 1905-1906 1906-1907 1907-1908 1908-1909 1909-1910 1910-1911 1911-1912 IQI2-IQI3 PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT A. C. Harrison, .First Term C. VV. Andrews, Second Term C. VV. Andrews, Third Term C. A. Brayton H. S. Hotchkiss R. H. Townshend G. Lear, 2d A. Lamb R. D. Patterson G. H. Baldwin D. B. Trumbull T. I. Driggs I. M. Townsend, Jr. Geo. L. Emmons Chas. F. Mills Henry Hull L. M. W'iggin Alfred Cowles. 3d O. B. La Cour I. T. Blossom Farwell Knapp O. L. Guernsey A. Dunham 5 C. Gordon ' TO. H. Guthrie S. Bell C. Lloyd QP. H. Guthrie C' Gratz Dent C. S. Goodrich H. Taft G. M. Brown H. F. Sperry H. XV. Dun, Ir. L. B. Mattieon H. P. Bingham SECRETARY AND TREASURER E. H. Tefft E. H.. Tefft E. H. Tefft l XV. T. Townshend Lea Hunt Lea Hunt Lea Hunt I. D. Perkins D. C. Bunn I. E. Doran XV. S. Taft M. G. Merwin R. E. Scragg Willson Eyre T. Lilley R. H. Benner C. Deming I. B. Stapler C. B. XValler O. B. La Cour E. F. Phelan il. T. Blossom 5P. D. Fullerton if D. M. Claghorn Y C. M. Baxter John Garheld O. H. I. Crocker, jr. P. R. H. Sayre, 3d C. L. Guernsey Calhoun. lr. V. A. Benner IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 39 Taft Athletic Association EVERY STUDENT A MEMBER V ,, OFFICERS President .,.... ................ ...... A . DUNHAM Vice-President .... .... R . B. SAYRE, 313. Secretaffy-T1'easm'e1' ...- C. V- A- BENNER 40 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 Former Captalns and Managers, 1891-1913 FOOTBALL CAPTAINS 1891 XNM. TATLOCK 1898 PAUL XIVELTON IQO5 E. I. SANGER 1892 J. H. WELCH 1899 PAUL XIVELTON 1906 T. LILLEY 1893 A, C. HARRISON IQOO CHAS. SHERWOOD, IR. 1907 I. B. STAPLER 1894 C. A. BRAYTON 1901 CHAS. SHERWOOD, IR 1908 E P. PHELAN 1895- R. TOWNSHEND IQO2 NVALTER HART 1909 O. B. LA COUR 1896 J. B. LEAR 1903 GUY C. CLEVELAND 1910 O. L. GUERNSEY I897iC. LLOYD 1904 L. B. MA'111S0N 1911 O. L. GUERNSEY G. LEAR IQI2 A. DUNHAM MANAGERS 1891 WM. TATLOCK 1899 C. S. GOODRICH 1906 H. HULL 1892 T. S. MCLANE 1900 G. H. BALDW1N 1907 L. M. W1cG1N 1893 A. D. GILLETTE IQOI VV. S. TAFT 1908 ALFRED COVVLES, 3D 1894 H. VV. CHAMBERS 1902 PERCY VV. HOLTER 1909 J. T. BLOSSOM 1895 H. S. HO1cHK1SS 1903 J. M. TOXVNSEND IQIO T. A. CONNORS 1896 D. XfVELcH IQO4 GEO. L. EM111ONS IQII P. CALHOUN, JR. 1897 LOR1Nc FARNAM 1905 H. P. B1NcHA11 IQIZ-S H. BURR 1898 A. R. LAIVIB f 1. THOMPSON BASEBALL CAPTAINS ISQZ XV. BRAYTON 1898 I. E. M1XNN 1906 R. C. DEM1Nc 1893 5 L. EMERSON 1899 PAUL XVELTON 1907 R. C. DEM1Nc YG. PERKINS 1900 PAUL XVELTON IQO8 C. S. NIUNSON 18941 T. S. MAFFITT IQOI C. SHERXVOOD, IR. 1909 G. E. STEVENS, JR. C. A. BRAYTON IQO2 GUY C. CLEVELAND IQIO I. T. BLOSSOM 1895 A. H. FARNHAM 1903 GUY C. CLEVELAND IQII F. E. ANDREXVS 1896 XV. H. GUTHRIE 1904 GUY C. CLEVELAND 1912 O. L. GUERNSEY 1897 R. TOXVNSHEND 1905 GEO. .L. EAIMONS 1913 J. P. METCALEE MANAGERS 1892 E. L. BROWNIELL 1899 I. D. PER1c1NS, JR. 1906 CHAS. P. MILLS 1893 I. H. WVELOH IQOO R. D. PATTERSON IQO7 H. L. FOLSO11 1894 A. D. GILLETTE 1901 HOWARD TAFT 1908 C. B. XV.-XLLER 1895 XV. T, TOVVNSHEND IQO2 GEORGE M. BROWN 1909 I. XX7. B1AILLIARD 1896 H. S. HO1cH1:1SS 1903 MARCUS G. MERW1N 1910 R. XV. WOLF 1897 PAUL BARNET 1904 CHARLES D. MILLS IQII I. N. GARE1ELD 1898 H. B. STODDARD 1905 XV. H. HUNTA, IR, IQI2 H. H. T11'111ANN. IR. 1913 R. B. SAYRE, 3D IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 41 HOCKEY CAPTAINS 1901 ROGER E. ALLING 1905 SHERMAN H. PERRY 1909 ALFRED COWLES, 3D 1902 WVALBRIDGE S. TAFT 1906 S. H. PERRY 1910 T. A. CONNERS 1903 MARCUS G. MERXX'IN 1907 R. C. DERIING 1911 F. E. ANDREWS 1904 R. SANFORD 1908 JULIUS B. SMITH IQI2 C. V. A. BENNER . IQI3 C. V. A. BENENR MANAGERS 1901 JOHN E. DORAN 1905 GEORGE L. EMMDNS A1909 T. A. CONNERS 1902 IOHN D. C0MER 1906 H. P. B1NGHAM 1910 D. M. CLAGHORN 1903 JAMES M.T0WNSEND 1907 HENRY HULL IQII B. M. IEN1c1NS 1904 R. E. SCRAGG 1908 CARL H. HANNA 1912 I. R. SHELDON IQI3 T. H. CONVLES TRACK CAPTAINS 1905 HUG0 ARNSTEIN 1908 CHARLES B. VVALLER IQII F. KNAPP 1906 STUYVESANT PEABODY 1909 VV. A. ROGERS IQI2 PAUL LOUGHRIDGE IQO7 STUYVESANT PEABODY IQIO C. M. BAXTER 1913 H. S. F. COOPER MANAGERS IQO5 GEORGE L. EMM0NS IQO8 D. C. WVARNER 1911 A. DUNHAM 1906 CHARLES D. MILLS 1909 E. F. PHELAN IQI2 A. DUNHAIVI 1907 D. C. XVARNER IQIO K. M0NTEA0LE IQI3 VV. M. DAVIS BASKET BALL CAPTAINS 1909 I. T. BLOSSOM IQIO C. M. BAXTER 1912 P. CALHOUN, IR. 1911 P. CALHOUN, IR. 1913 H. LEFFERTS MANAGERS IQO9 I. W. FRENCH 1910 N. L. MCLAREN IQI2 H. I. CR0c1cER, IR. IQII I. N. GARE1ELD 1913 H. L. UNDERHILL TENNIS CAPTAINS 1908 F. MCN. RANSOM IQIO D. M. CLAGHORN 1912 H. LEFFERTS 1909 A. H. MAN, IR. IQII 'W. R. ALLEN 1913 H. LEFFERTS MANAGERS 1908 A. H. BEARD 1910 WV. R. PARMELY IQI2 I. D. HOX'T 1909 A. L. BARBOUR IQII D. R. COLEMAN IQI3 C. P. TAFT, 2D 42 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 LJ'-JTC OFFICERS ' President ......... .............. . . . B. ROBINSON Vice-P1'csz'deut ...... ......... H . B. REED Serratary-T1'easw'er . .. ............ .... S . VV. LAMBERT, JR. MEMBERS Runs BLUES Babcock Jennings Lambert Gillette Fisher Spurr johnson, XY Hubbard Bourne, E. Mallon, P. Reed Luckey Crocker Thomas Variell Marvin Dwight Van Buren Kent 'Woolson Hamann, E. Ashworth Wfhitney Heminway, B. Prentice Peppard Young Dean Robinson, B. jones Bassett Matthiessen Guernsey Anable Record of All Football Games TAFT VS. ISQZ 1893 IBQ4 1895 1896 1897 1S98i1899 1900 1901 IQO2 1903 IQO4 1905 1906 1907 IQO8 1909 19,110 1911 1912 Alumni ,,,,,,,.,. .... .... .... 4 - o 18-10 .... Io-0 .. , 0-13 AnS0nia H. S ..... .... 1 4-0. .... .... 3 0-0 .... . . 1. ..., , , ,, Betts Academy ..... .. .... 22-O 6-2,4 .... 21-5 .... Black Hall ........ .... .... .... 1 4 - o 32-o 21-0 .... ..., ...1 ,... .... .... .... . . . Boardman H. S ..... .... .... I .... .... .... .... , . . . ..,, 0 - 6 .... .... .... .... ,.., .... .... .... .... .... . . . . Bridgepiirt H. S .... . .... ,. . , .... ..., .... .... .... 1 1 - 0 .... 2 8-0 I1-I2 3-0 23-0 57 .0 5-0 .... .... .... . . .. . . . . Cheshire ..............,.... .... . . 26-0 6-0 10-0 20-0 . . . . . . 17-0 23-0 .... .... .... .... .... 2 c, - 0 -15-o 23-0129-0 30-3 ll-5 22-0 32-0 Choate ...................... . . . .... .... .... .... .... . . .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ..,. .... .... .... .... 1 9 - 0 . . . , Conn. Agricultural Co1lege.,. .... ,, .... .... .... . . . .... 0-11 .... .... ..., .... W .... ,,,, .,., .... .... . . , , . , , , Gunnery ............. ........ .... 4 8 -0 42-0 . . . .. .,.. 18-0 6-5 6-5 11-11 40-o 24-0 0-0 10-0 O-18 11-5 , , , , 40-0 Hackley ..................... .... .... .,.. .... .... ..,. .... .... .... .... ' .... .... .... 3 5 - 0 ,,,, , . , . Hartford H. S. .... .... .... .... .... . . . . . 0-17 5-6 .... .... .... 0 - to c-5 6-10 .... . ,, I-lillhouseH.S .... .... 1:-1611-0 .... . ,... .... . .. ,,,, ..., , Hil1sideA.C .... ,... 2 2-0 4-O .... .... .... . . , .... .... .... .... .... .... . . . . Holbrook ......... .. ..., . . . ,,.. .... .... .... ..., .... .... . 1 1 - 5 .... 6 - 6 c-18 6-5 6-16 .. . , Hopkins G.S ..... .. 4-2 58-0 .... ,... 2 Q70 .... .... . . 1c,-5 .... 18-0 .... .... .... . . , Hotchkiss. ..... .... o '22 6-38 O-26 a-24 ..., 0-22 0-21 o-64 , .... .... .... .... .... .... .,.. . , , , Kent ........... . . .... .... .,.. .... ..., .... .... . . . .... .... .... .... .... 1 6 - 0 1 2 - 1 4 Mackenzie ..... .. .... .... .... . . . .. . .... .... .... .... . . 0 -0 8-o 5-0 76-O llfleriden High ..... ....I .... .... . . . .... .... ,,,, 5 - 5 Il-0126-Z 36-6 ... . NaugatuckH.S .... ,... . .... .... 2 2-0 9... ,,,, .... .... . . ,, New HavenH.S ........ ..., .... . . . .. 6-18 5-6 0-0 21-0 5-0 . ,, N. Y. A. C. Juniors .... 4-8 .... . .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... . . . . Pawling ............... .. .. .... .. .... .... .... .... .... 0 - Q 0 -180-16.... POI1'AfY6iZ .............. .... . . . 6-2 .... ...- .... ---- ---- --.. I C - 3 .... c - 17 Po1tChester H.S .... . .... .. .... .... 4 o-0 .... .... , . .... ,... . Ridge ............... .... .... .... .... .... 1 1 - 0 2 5-J . . . .... .... .... .... .... . . . . Riverview .......... .. 5-0 6-o 17-6 17-o .... .... , .. 5-17 6-10 c-0 L-5 24-2 26-13 St. Paul's Church ..... .,. .... .... 1 8-o C-6 ' .... .... .... .... . . . .... . ... . . .. St. Paul's School ..... .. . .... O-2X C-XI i 14-10 0-5 . .. L-0 7-6 Thomaston ............... .... . .. 0-0 0-I9 ..,. i .... .... .... .... . . . . TorringtonH.S ............... .... . . .. .... .... - -- .... 67-o .. TrinityScho0l .......... .... ..... . 1 6-.4 .... .... .. .... .... , , University School, Bridgeport ..... .... .... .... 3 8 - 0 .. . .. UpsonSen1inarv ...,.,........ .... o-0 .. .. Waterbury H. .S ..,............ 22-0 .... 0-0 .... .... 6 -6 . . ... i .... 5-0 . Vllaterbury Y.M.C.A .... .. 0-12 .... .... .... .... .... . . . i .. Watertown .:. ...... ..... . .. .... 22-0 18-o .... . . .... . . Watertown Firemen .,... .... . ..36-0 .... . .... .... .... .... . . . .... . Wesleyan IQI5 ......... .. . .... . .. ..., .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ..... 3 5 - 0 . . . . Westminster ......... ,.., . ., .... .... 5 -5 6-16 0-29 I8-O 12-0 5-8 c-12 11-0 ..,. i35-0 43-7 Wilson 81 Kellogg ..... 6-4 .. .... .... . . .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ,... .... ,,., L ,,,, , , , , Yale 1896 .......... .... ..., 0 - 6 .... c.-14 .... .... .. .... . .... .... .... .... . . . Q o-J Yale 1901 ...... - . . .... . . . 6-0 11-0 .... Q5-o .... .... .... . . .. .. 5-6 Yale l'Scrub" .,.... .... . . ,. .. o-8 .... . .. . 5-0 .... 5-0 j 0-28 0-0 6-0 ... . .. ... . 0-0 I 0-10 Scored by Taft .... . 26 48 24 70 218 138 61 QQ 54 34 72 103 73 210 142 53 62 66 103 I187 235 SC01'ed against Taft .... 16 18 2 44 38 76 32 5 33 50 114 117 67 IO 21 61 57 55 35 8 7 57 Record of All Baseball Games TAFT vs. 1893 1894 ISQS 1896 1897 18981 1899 IQCO IQOI IQD2 I 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 IQOQ IQIOI 1911 1912 Alumni .............. Betts Academy ........ Black Hall ............. Boardman M. T. H. S.. Booth. ................ . Bridgeport H. S ....... Cheshire .......... Choate ............ Colony Club .,..... Conn. Lit. Inst ...... Cutler ........ ....... Danbury tLeaguei ..... Gunnery ...... ....... Harstriim ...... . . . Hartford High ...... Hillhouse H. S ..... Hillside A. C ..... Holbrook ....... Hopkins G. S ..... Hotchkiss. ..... . Ki11g's School ..... Litchfield ......... Mackenzie .......... Meriden 1-I. S ........ Middletown H. S .... Morris Cove ........ Mount Pleasant .... Naugatuck I-I. S .... New Haven H. S .... New Rochelle ......, New Rochelle M. A .. Oakville A. C ....... Pawling ......... Pomfret ...... Ridge ......... Ridgefield .... Riverview ...... Sacred Heart ..... S. S. S. '09 .............. Springlielcl H. S ....... Stamford I-I.S ..,...... "Strollers" !Ansoni:0. St. Elmo Club ......... st. Paul's CGarden cnyif I Q. Sulield ..................... Torrington I-I. S ,........... .. ...I 3-7 I 1 j8-10 I 1-19 3-25 lI4-2 7-2 7' I I - xc-23 4-z 9-4 .... 6-22 'Gig Qgliz .. 0-18 1 . I-12 3 13-16 .... 1 .... z I4 5 i 15" TriangleA.C .... 15-5113-18 8-4 41-0 12-5 2-5 21-3 .... i 2- I5-2 8-1 'Hi "fo 51653 .... 1 .III Eli 14-9 8-6 iell .. .... IO'I II.. 9-11 12-4 .... N Q3.. 3 18 . . . zo-4 15131316 "If 'Alai 6-2 7-6 11-16 1511.3 Ali' 17-14 18-9 546 ALA 2-5 .gm I-ZX 1 .. 710 C-6 7-6 1-10 28-0 13-4 14-10 'Sli 3-6 15-14 0-4 Elii 'SLA I 3-4 7-6 9-15 2-8 o 5-z 4-3 9-3 7-1 2-4 IO'-4 13-19 7- 9-5 rs-4 5-4 -s 21-7 is 14-8 4-I4 4-7 6-5 7-5 IC-'5 4-3 2"I 2 13-.Q 6-9 2-18 0-5 5-3 glii 2-4 6-9 I-7 7-5 122112212222 c.-3 .... 11-3 1 .1 7'-4 f..fAli5'1ii6 I.. 'II jig '9l1ifIII'zilg ....16-3.... QLLIIIIIIII .1-1 .. 2-I 3-3 3-2 0-K 3-0 8-5 4-2 'Ali .Lg 513 4-S 1-6 53-16 13-2 O-7 .... 6-4 0-4 6-4 .... 18-4 .... 3-Il IL'-8.... O-3 C'X 5-2 . . 9-7 5-1 11-9 o-2 3-7.... 6-4 1 1 3 7-11 .... -9 Trilbys fYaley .......,....,...... .. 15-7 Trinity Freshmen. ..... University School, Bridgeport ..... . 39-2 ffl. IIII II 5.113 Waterbury High School ......... 2-19 7-3 .. .... .... . . . 18-7 . . .... .... . . 3-z . Waterbury Y, M. C. A ........ .... .... .... 57 - 4 . . 16-3 .... 2-3 9-5 .... . .. .... .. .. . . . Watertown .....,..,....... .. .... ..., . .... .... .... 2 Q - 14 .... .... .... . . ... .... Westminster ............ .. 21-5 15-5 3-4 14-3 Q-I 2-4 6-S .... 5-2 8- Vlfesleyan Freshmen ..... . .... . .... 6-14 .... .... .... .... . 5 -7 WesleyanD.K.E ...... .. .... .. .. . . .... . ....I3'I.... . Woodbury ............ .. 8-7 .. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... . . . . . . . Yale College ...... . .... . .... 1-5 .... .... .... 2 - 9 4-18 .... .. 6-6 . Yale Freshmen .... .... . 6-3 4-6 5-2 I-13 . . 7'3 .... 4-10 .... .... . Yale juniors ....... .... .... .... .... .... .... 3 - 3 . . .. YaleLa.1vSchool... ,... .... . .. 6-5 .... .. Yale 1896 .......... . . 4-11 . . . .... .... .... . . . . Yale 1898 ........ .... . . i11-5 5-4 .... . .. Yale 1899 .... . . . .. 8-6 1 1-.1 .... . . . . . Yale 1901 .... . .... .... 1 4-2 .... . Yale 1905 ...... .... .... .... . .... .... 6 - 6 . Yale IQO4 S .... .... . 13-25 14-7 . . .... . . . Yale IQO3 .... .... 4 -7 . . .... .... Yale 1912 ...... .... . .... . .... . . .... .. ..,. 1-8 Yale 11915 ....... . . .... . .... .... .... c-13 Yale "Scrub" . rc-17 .... . 9-5 i .... 6-5 .... 3-1 11-12 -7 YaleU.G.G. ..... .. .... 12-10 . ..,. . . . Yale Wanderers .... .... . .. .... .... .. .... .... .... . .I. 13-3 Scored by Taft ....... . 79 25 73 86 138 4Q 125 82 48 110 177 S6 166 I 8: 60 i 53 SI 51 61 56 Scored aga1nstTaft .... . 114 37 51 117 3.1. 53 41 53 61 164 Q4 Q3 98 oo ICI 45 36 31 48 78 Scores of All Basketball Games TAM' VS. 1909 IQIO 1911 1912 1913 TAFT vs. Iotg I IQID 1911 1912 IQI3 Alumni ........................ .... .... .... .... 4 6 - 1 9 Pawling ...... .... . . . . 28-14 15-20 Bridgeport High School ....... .... .... 7 7 -15 .... Poly. Prep .... .... .... 3 1 -12 .... ChCSlllfC . .................,... 5 18-43 ..,. 45-25 45-27 23-12 Ridgeheld .... .... .... 4 9 -19 66-23 I 21-18 Sanford ...... 35-13 37-6 .. . . . . , Choate ..... .. .... g35-14 .... .... . . Stamford .... .... .... . . . 22-25 26-34 St. Paul'S ...........,...... .... .... 1 7 -zo 19-18 48-14 Collegiate ............. .... .... . .1 5-17 .... Trinity ...........,,..,...... .... .... 2 3 -18 .... Conn. Literary Inst ....... .. ...1 .... . 43-19 24-ro VVaterbury Y. M. C. A. II .... 22-18 . .... .. . . . Crosby High School ..... .. 24-31 2c,-311 .... .... 6 11-28 Vlfesleyan IQI2 ............... 19-38 . .. .... .. . . Dean Academy ......... .... .... .... 1 c, - ZQ .... Vlfesleyan Freshmen ...... .... . . g 33-31 28-26 . Greenwich ............ .... .... 2 5 -zo .... .... 3 2-21 Gunnery ........ .... 1 9-17 19-14 Wesleyan 1914 ........ .... . .... 2 8-22 Hartford High .......,.... .... .... .... 2 3 - 22 Westminster ..... . . 22'I6 . .... . . . . . . . Heathcote Hall .........,.... .... 3 6-11 .... .... .... X ' ale Freshmen ..... .... . .. 14-32 .. . 32-24 Hopkins Grammar School ..... .... .... 6 5 -4 536-6 V K. O. K. A. II. .. ... .......... 16-zo 55-5 .... ..., X 'ale "Scrub" , . .... 21.-19 37-11 .. . . S-zo izo-11 MnCkeHZie .......... .... 2 6-39 .11-7 T l Outlaws Okralej '-... . . . 23'-3 39-4 otal .... , . 15c-21:41 274-194 402-2111 447-240 424-201 Record of All Hockey Games TAFT VS. IQDI IQO2 1903 1904 IQOS 1906 1907 IQOS 1909 IQIO 1911 1912 1913 All COnneCtiCutS ..... .... 2 -o 9-1 1-.1 6-9 4-6 4-1 Alumni ............. .... . .. .... .... .... .... 3 - 2 . . .. Black Hall., .,.... . 9-0 .... .... .... .... . . . Bridgeport H. S .... . .... 1-3 .... . Cheshire .......... . . .... ,... 8 -0 6-1 Clippers ........ .. o-o 4-o .... Fifteen Club .,,. . .... .... .... .... 7 - 5 Greenwich .... .... 3 -0 .... .... . .. .... .. ., Gunnery ..... .... . .. 1440 .... .... . .. 4-o Harstrtim .,,.... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 3 - a 2 - 3 1 3-1 Hartford H. S ...... .... 1 -1 o-1 5-Q 4-a 8-o 4-2 .... 15-3 .... Hillhouse H. S ......... 2-o .... .... .... .... .... .... . . . . . . Hopkins Grammar ..... 1-1 1-o 2-0 . .... .... .. .. Hotchkiss ............ 2-6 .... . .... .. .... Litchfield ............ .... ' .... . 4-J 9-o . . . . . . . . . Middletown High .... ... ... .... .... .... .... .... 8 - o . ... ... Morristown ......... .... .... .... .... .... 4 - 5 .... .... .... New Haven H. S ..... . . . 2-1 2-o 2-1 7-2 IL-1 .... 9-0 5-o 5-2 Pawling ............ .... .... .... .... .... .... .... . . . .... . . . . 7 -o Pomfret ............ c-3 o-8 .... .... ,... 3 - 1 .... .. 2-4 . . . . Riverview .....,...... .... .... .... 6 - 1 .... .... .... .... .... Springfield H. S, .,..... .... 4-o zo-o 18-o .. 2-1 Trinity Freshmen ..... 6-o .... .... .... Trinity ............... .... .... 6 -1 .... .... . .. Waterbury H. S. .. .... .... 1 5-a .... .... .... . . .. Watertowvn ....... 2-o 2-1 12-1 5-o 3-1 6-1 5-1 4-o 5- Wesleyan Cubs .... .... . .. .,.. .... .... 2 - 1 .... . Westminster ...... .... 1 1-1 ,. .. Yale 1go1 ........ 3-1 .... .. .... .... . Yale 1904 ........ 4-1 .... .... .... .... .... . . . . .. Yale IQOQ ......... .... .... .... .... 6 - 1 .... .... .... .... Yale Freshmen ..... .... .... 2 1 2-6 8-.4 c-1 1-3 1-7 5-1 .... Yale Scrubs ...... , , 15-1 o-3 6-1 .... .... .... .... .... .... 1 7 - o Y8.le19o7 ........ .... 2 -4 .... .... .... .... . . . ,.... Yale 1912 .... . .. .......,........ ........ .... .... .... .... . . 4 - 1 13-2 Yale 1913 ..................................... .... .... .... .... .... 2 - 1 7 " 3 Scored by Taft ....... 35 6 9 6 84 41 45 20 23 24 36 62 SQ Scored against Taft .... 3 IO 4 18 3 9 6 7 q 27 5 22 5 IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL f ax 4 Hll 48 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 AUST1N DUNHA11 JOHN R. THOMPSON CAPTAIN MANAGER The Football Team Left End ..... ........... E . V. SANDS, 19143 N. BTALLON IQI3 Left Tackle .... ........................ - -X. H. BUNKER 1913 Left GTVZCIVCZ ..... .... - X. T. TRUMBULL, 19133 G. L. EDWARDS, 1914 Center ........ ......................... 1 LX. DUNII.-XM 1913 Right Guard .... ....... S . C. IXTELLEY 1913 Right Tackle ..... ............ .... R . H. S.xY1zE, IQI3 Right End ...... ........................... C . P. TAF1, 2D,, 1913 Qua1'te1'bacle .... .... C . V. A. BENNER, IQI32 T. H. COWLES, 1913 Left Halfbczcle .... ....................... I . F. NTETC.-XLFE, 1914 Pullback ........ .... N . G1xR1f1121.D, 1914: G. M. BRUSH, 1914 Right Halfbacle. .. .... T. DONNELLEY, IQISQ E. C. AT1q1NS, 1915 Li W FOOTBALL TEAM go 7 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 The Football Season Review HIE team of IQI2 thoudh it commenced the season by a defeat school has ey C1 tuined out vvltll only tive letter nien as a : .......: I ,... E 4 7 9- from Kent, has the reputation of being one of the best the .-A"'.'-A foundation, the team was hammered into shape from an inex- perienced but resolute squad, and rolled up large scores on Mackenzie, Gunnery, Cheshire, and Riverview. Pomfret with a better and veteran team inflicted the only other defeat, while the team in the best-played game of the year proved itself superior to St. Paul's. The climax of the season was capped by the crushing defeat of Xvestminster, when Taft netted a score, unparalleled in the past, of seven touchdowns. RESULTS OF GAMES Taft .. .. I2 Kent ....... .. I4 Taft . . . . 76 Mackenzie .... , . 0 Taft . . .... 40 Gunnery .. . . . . O Taft . . . . 32 Cheshire . . . . . O Taft . . . . 26 Riverview . . . . I3 Taft .. . . O Pomfret .. . .. I6 Taft .... .. 7 St. Paul's .. .. 6 Taft . . ,... 43 Wfestminster . . . . 7 TOTALS Taft 236 .... ...,........... O pponents 57 FOOTBALL SQUAD 52 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 The Second Football Team, 1912 The Second Team, heretofore something only for the First to grind to pieces, proved itself worthy of no little praise. Not only was this eleven the First Team's most valuable asset, but it also gained itself honor by adding' to the season's list two more overwhelming defeats. Left Etta' .... Left Tackle .... Left Guard. .. Cen ter ........ Right Guard .... Right Tackle. . Right End. .. Qua1'terback .... Left Halfback Fullback ..... Right Halfback Taft Second . Taft Second . Captain, ELMORE M. BTCTQEE ........... . ............ NELSON, R. JOHNSON .......McKE13 . . XV. CLARKE ... .1-7. VVOLF . . . . .BARTLETT HA. HARDEN, FARXVELL .............SwEENEY . . . .CALHOUN . . . ........... COIT Bowuas, JACOB RoB1NsoN,L.RoB1NsoN RESULTS OF GAMES . . . . . . . 52 Tlfestminstei' Second . . . . . O .. 26 Pawling Second . Football Averages THE FIRST TEAM .. O ASC, 17 YGQTS 6 11101111155 T1'Ffg'71f,. 155 poundsg height, 5 feet II inches. THE SECOND TEAM Age, 16 years 8 months, 'ze'c1',Q'Izt, 1.15 poundsg Izcjight, 5 feet 9 inches. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 53 Individual Football Review APTAIN DUN HAM showed great improvement over his last year's work, and especially on the defense. Not only may he be classed as one of Taft's greatest centers, but he may also be put on the list of Taftis greatest players. Atkins has the makings of a very valuable man. On account of his age, however, it was not thought advisable to use him much last fall, but a lot is expected of him in future seasons. Benner was laid up a large part of the season, but he recovered -in time for two final games, in which he played with his usual consistency. He has the remarkable record of having played three years on the team without missing a tackle in an 'open held. i Brush, although he lacked weight, was fast and made good as Gar- field's substitute. Another year, however, he will probably be tried at quarter. Bunker was taken from the back field and placed at tackle. Here he proved satisfactory, being a lively and hard worker, he punted part of the time for the team, while he succeeded in blocking a number of the opponent's kicks during the season. I f Cowles, acting as substitute for Benner, played in a majority of the games, and filled the position with great accuracyg at Pomfret he showed up at his best, playing steadily to the end. Donnelley was very heavy and fast. He was good at individual running but was too apt not to take the holes, thus causing losses at times. Edwards, though inexperienced, was able to hold his place at guard by steady work, and will be heard from next year in the line. Garfield played a splendid game throughout the year, blocking on the offense and backing up theline on the defense. Wfhenever called upon for a short gain he invariably answered with a good plunge. 54 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 Kelley, taking Underhill's place at guard, did Very well, though light, and particularly in the Westininster game. Mallon was very light, but he was a hard tackler and diagnosed each play without mistake. Wfith a little more weight he would probably make a star. Metcalfe, though unable to play the previous year on account of illness, regained his form of three years ago, and especially in the final game starred as a line plunger. His skin-tackle buck was the most con- sistent ground-gaining play of the year. I Sands, in spite of the fact that he was liable to be drawn in, became efficient in checking the play and boxing his tackle. Sayre, at tackle, gained steadily in value to the team, and did his best work in the X!VCStI11lllS'ESl' game, though he was against a heavy man. His greatest importance lay in his ability to block in an open field. Taft, at end, through his hard work made himself a valuable man, though not fast, he became efhcient, especially on the defense. Trumbull, a substitute guard on account of lightness, could not be used the whole game, but was a hard man to stop while he played. Underhill was kept out of the game most of the year through sick- ness. His loss was severely felt, and most of all in the Pomfret game. Summary of Season Taft Oppozzents Ground gained on rushes... 3077 yards 1o59 yards Runbacks on kicks ......... . S06 " 419 " First downs made ............... . Q2 58 Forward passes attempted ......... . 28 47 Ground gained on forward passes .... . Q5 yards 148 yards Distance punted ................. .. 1oo2 " 1538 " Average distance punted .... . 35 ' 35 " Distance lost on penalties .... . rio " Q5 ' THE TAFT ANNUAL XCCJDDW :UW EW FF CJLJC- ff A94 5 if M F , 1 56 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 HALLECIQ LEFFERTS HERMAN L. 1UNDERHILL CAPTAIN BIANAGER The Basketball Team Lzft.F0rumrd ...,. ............... .... I1 NL BRUSH, Righz' Forward ..... .... H . LEFFERTS, Center ......... .... B I. GARFIELD, Left Guard ..... .... R . H. SAYRE, Right Guard .... .......... .... C . P. TAFT, Substzftute H. N. MALLON, IQI3 1914 1914 IQI4 1913 1913 l .I BASKETBALL TEAM 58 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 The Basketball Season Review :E ,5.h:.,:1s,1':qf1:j3g LTHOUGH this year two games were lost-one more than last season,-little difference can be found between the two teams. At the outset of the season the team had two serious drawbacks, green material and green coaches, and much effort was used towards overcoming them. Up to the Stamford game the team had not developed to its best, but by the time of the Yale Freshman game the team had been welded into an effective machine, and it was in this game more than any other that the team showed its true worth. 'The games that were won, were deservedly won, and every point meant hard work and grit, as there was no past reputation to live upon. The injury to Captain Lefferts in the Stamford game upset the players to a large extent and this was largely responsible for the loss of the Pawling game. RESULTS OF GAMES Taft . . ........ 60 Crosby High ...... . . 28 Taft .. . 23 Hartford High ..... .. 22 Taft . . . . . 65 Hopkins Grammar . . . . . 4 Taft . . . 22 Stamford High .... . . 25 Taft . . . 32 Yale Freshmen . . . . . . . 24 Taft 43 St. Paul's ...... .. I4 Taft . 23 Cheshire . . . . I2 Taft . . . I5 Pawling . . . . . 20 Taft .24 C. L. T. ..1o Taft . . . 46 Alumni . . . . . IQ Taft . . . 66 Ridgefield . . . . . 23 TOTALS Taft 424 .... ............... O pponents 201 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 59 Second Basketball Team W. L. CLARKE, 1914, Captain Left Fovfwatrd ................ 1 ............ I. H. MALLQN, 1915 Right F01'wa7'd .... ..... O . L. CLARKE, 1916 Center ......... ........ S WEENY, 1915 Left Guard .... .... N . C. I-IENGER, 1916 Right Guard ..... .... ...,. X N . L. CLARKE, 1914 Substitutes P. SESSIONS, 1913 M. B13NjAM1N, 1914 60 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 Individual Basketball Review -'---- EFFERTS was without question the best basketball player on Q the team and in addition to this he wx as 'Ln excellent captain iffris . . . . and Hoorleader. Wfhen he was out of the game, he was missed not only because he could pass and shoot accurately, but because he kept the team keyed up to its highest pitch. Next yearis team is indeed most fortunate to be able to look forward to such a cap- tain. Brush was equally good at forward and guard, and his development throughout the season was constant and rapid. In spite of the fact that at times he was prone to lapse, he was on the whole a fast and skillful player and of value to the team. Garheld filled his position at center very creditably. It is a hard place to play, as the man must be both the guard and forward and must pivot in passing and perform most exacting work on the toss up. All this he accomplished, being handicapped by an only ordinary ability in shooting. Sayre was played at guard this year instead of center, and there he proved to be much better. Although wild at times in passing and catching, he acquitted himself with skill and often was a terror to his opponents, who had great respect for his prowess. Taft at the other guard had had little experience in basketball, but he improved with rapidity towards the close of the season. His shoot- ing as a rule was only fair at best, but in several games he scored with sensational shots from the center of the Hoof. Mallon was a very valuable substitute, and was also a remarkable player for his size. Good in shooting and passing, he more than made up for his lightness by his energy and speed. Q3 THE TAFT ANNUAL HU :Y Q W f N X xg? X N " Q wi bg 'L Y ,1 ll! l,5'LJ'CV 'g 1 E 62 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 1. 'lf K U J 158.451 CHARLES V. A. BENNER THOMAS H. Cowuas Left Wiaz-g Cen tea' ..,. R i ght IfVf71g' Rover ..... P 0 int ..... Cover-Point. . . Goal ....... The Hockey Team XV. P. JACOB, . . . .T. DONNELLEY, .C V. A. BENNER, . . . .I. V. FARWELL, .. .......... 5. EELLS, . . . . .I. F. IXCIETCALFE, ....E. MC. MCKEE, Szzbsfitutes E. XV. ANDREWS, 1913 T. H. Cowuss, 1913 1914 1915 1913 IQI4 1913 IQ14 1914 HOCICEY TEAM 64 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 HOCKCYISCZISOH Review --', 5 N spite of the fact that there was practically no ice before February first, the hockey team won itself a place of honor in the annals of the school history. Through faithful train- ""' ing and regular exercise the squad was kept in good form, so that when the ice did come, every man was in excellent condition and ready for hard work. In the unusually short season the team was made so proficient that not only did it not lose a game, but it was scored upon only five timesg and its'comparative superiority over its opponents may be seen from the scores below. HOCKEY SCORES Taft . . . ....... 4 All Connecticuts . . . . . 1 Taft . . . . 4 Wfatertown ...... . . O Taft ... .. I7 Yale- Scrubs .... .. o Taft . , . . . 7 Pawling ..,....,.... . . . . 0 Taft . . . . 5 lllatertown ............. . . I Taft . . . . 5 New Haven High School .... . 2 Taft . . . . . I3 Harstrom ............ . . . . I Taft . . ..... . . 4 Gunnery ............. . . O TOTAL Taft SQ .... ........... .... O I Jponents 5 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 65 Goal ....... Point ..... Cover-Point Rover ..... Center .... Right Wi111fg' Left Wi1eg. 1 Second Hockey Team LUCIUS F. RO1:1NsON, JR., 1914, Captain F. S. CURTIS, A. DUNHAM, M. HEMINWAXV, L. F. ROB1NSON, VV. CORWIN, A. B. NELSON, L. H. COLEMAN, 1914 1913 1914 1914 1913 1913 1914 THE HOCKEY SQUAD 66 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 Individual Hockey Review -553: 15-,Lg ENNER, captain for two years and right wing, completed his school hockey career with his best season. Always cool, he was an incredibly swift dodger and he shot with the same 3:5 "" 357""'5':l accuracy from any angle, moreover, for one his size he was unusually hard to put off his feet. The brilliant success of the team is entirely due to him, as practically all the coaching was done under his direction. He nearly overcame the habit of carrying the puck in front of his own goal, and was always ready to pass to his team-mates to let them have a shot. Donnelley, at center, had a great asset in his speed, and many goals were scored as a result of his quick shots from a rebounding puck. Wfith a little more steadiness and coolness he should make an excellent center for next year. Eells was played at point this year and was found to be the right man for the position. He overcame the fault of losing his head and realized his possibilities, a thing which before was rendered impossible. Farwell, at rover, played a great deal better game than he did last season, and next year he will prove of value to the team, especially if he overcomes his tendency to run wild. U jacob, at left wing, was too apt to get offside, while he was not aggressive enough when the puck was behind the opponents' goal, His stick work, however, was greatly improved and he acquired the ability of shooting more quickly, McKee, at goal, proved to be a pleasant surprise to the team. It was thought that the loss of Butterworth would be seriously felt, but McKee filled his place with equal skill. He was keen in judgment and quick in movement, consequently only four goals were scored on him during the season. Metcalfe, at cover-point, showed a marked improvement over his last year's game, being much faster and shooting with better aim. He was efficient in blocking and carrying the puck down the rink. Andrews and Cowles, as substitutes, were both very reliable, failing to make the team as regulars by a very small margin. They were both fast and active and their substit-ution at any time in the game did not weaken the play in the least. I ,o. im ESQ lim 68 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 I. F. METCALFE ROBERT H. SAYRE CAPTAIN NIANAGER Pitchers ..... N. GARF11zLD, 1914g T. H. COWLES, 1913: S. EELILS, Catchers ............. First Base . Second Base Third Base . Short Stop . Left Field . Center Field Substitute . .C. P. TAF1, 213, 19133 T. DONNELLEX', .. ....................... I. F. METC.-xL1f12, F.S'1E111.1NG, .. ..... H. N. BKTALLON, E. M. BTCTQEE, A. L. ZERBEY, J. S. SVVEENY, Right Field .... ..... T . DONNELLEX', . . . . Q . .E VV. ANDREWS, 1913 1915 IQI4 1916 1913 1914 1913 1915 IQI5 1913 IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL BASEBALL TEANI 70 THE aralar ANNUAL T915 Baseball Season Review A-f, 5 N view of the fact that the most important games of the year have not been played as we go to press, it is very difficult to estimate the true worth of the nine. Although baseball has .4 always been a weak spot in the record of school athletics, this year's team can by no means be classed among the poorest. In fact, it was one of the best batting teams the school has ever put on the diamond. and though a little deficient in fielding, it gained its victories through its steady and machine-like playing, rather than through any individual starring. At the beginning of the season the Yale Fresh- man and St. Paul's games were lost, largely through lack of develop- ment. However, hard work and steady practice brought the team into such shape that it won the rest of the games up to the date of publi- cation, with the exception of a tie with Harstrom and a defeat by the Alumni, and indications bid fair that the team will not have been unsuccessful. RESULTS OF GAMES Taft . . . ...... I7 Wfatertown . . . . . 2 Taft . . . . . 3 Yale Freshmen . . . . . I7 Taft .. 5 St.Paul's...... . 9 Taft .. .. 6 C. L. T. .. . 3 Taft . .. .. 4 Choate . .. 2 Taft . . . . . 4 Harstrom . . . . 4 Taft . . . . 3 Kent ............ . . I Taft . . . . . I5 New Haven High . . . 4 Taft . . . . . S Alumni ........ . . . IO Taft ....................... 7 Gunnery . .................. 2 Games with Riverview, Pomfret, Paxvling and Wfestminster not played at time of publication. 2913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 71 Fz'tel1e1'5 . . . Catclzor . . First Base . Second Base Tlz'1'1'rl Bose Slzo1'tStofJ . Loft Field . Center Field Riigltt Field Taft 2d ... Taft 2d . .. Taft 2d ... Second Baseball Team ....C. R. YOUNG, IQTSQ N. ILIENGER, .....W. Co1'1, XN. P. Lxcou, L. F. ROIQINSON, IR., ' .O. L. CL.xRK13, .j. H. MALLON, E. C. ATICINS, N. HENGEIQ, 1916g C. R. YOUNG, F. P. DAY, RESULTS OF SECOND TEAM GAMES 4 SCy11lOU1'I'Iigh School . , . . 2 VVoodbu1'y High School . 4 Choate 2d 1916 1916 1914 IQI4 1916 1915 1915 1915 1916 6 ..I 6 772 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 Individual Baseball Review , APTAIN METCALFE did remarkably well in his capacity as '.'e. Q leader of the team, both in working hard himself and in keep- ing the team strictly to business. After playing at second ""i" "': f or two years, he was moved to first, where he proved of much more value, though he didn't cover quite enough ground. Taft, as catcher, improved steadily throughout the season 3 and though weak in his throws, he caught the majority of base-runners. He was good in stopping wild pitches, and strengthened the team with his batting. N. Garfield, as pitcher, became more skilled as the season progressed. He showed head-work in sizing up batters, and his main fault was allowing men on base to take too big a lead. Sterling, at second base, having overcome his last yearis nervousness, was especially good in taking the throws to second, while his batting improved. McKee, at short stop, was erratic: at times he played a brilliant game, while at others he would fall down on some of the easiest plays. He was one of the surest hitters on the team. Mallon, at third base, showed great improvement in every phase of the game. At all times he was cool and steady, and exceptionally good at handling bunts. Zerhey, at left field, won his position through his ability to bunt and to wait out the pitchers: he was also very fast on bases. Sweeny, at center field. was a good fielder and a fair thrower. However, he was apt to be nervous, missing some of his easy chances at times. Donnelley, at right field, though weak as a fielder, was a heavy hitter and a fast man on bases. Andrews through uncertain playing lost out on a regular field posi- tion, but with a little more steadiness he would have made the best outfielder on the team. Benner stood a chance for an outfield position, which he lost through illness. Cowles and Eells, both made good substitute pitchers and most years would have made the team, this season. however, they were so unfortu- nate as to have to contest against Garfield. 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL L Q ffl: fS'm,5i JJL CQXN4, 74 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 H. S. F. COOPER XVILLI.-XM M. DAVIS CAPTPRIN NIANAGER Track Team Low lmrdles, 4,140-j'Cll'd dash .... ............ E . C. JXTKINS Pole vault ................................. E. XY. .ARNDRENVS Pole zfazzlt ..........N .......................... G . M. BRUSH Hallzllzm'-tIz1'01c', slzof-put, lziglz-jzmzp, broad-jzzuzp . .A. H, RUNKER Pole-zfault, broad-jzzilzp, lzz'gh-jzzmjv .............. VV. L. CLARKE 220-yard dash, 4.10-yafd dash, 880-yard run ...... H. S. F. COOPER 100-yard dash, 220-j'ClI'd dash .............. .... T . DONNELLEX' 880-yard rmz, broad-jzmzjw ................, . . .G. L. EDWARDS IO0'jfCZ7'd dash, 220-yard dash, low lzzzrdlvs . . ...... I. F. ENGER IOO-yard dash, high hurdles, lou' lzzzrdles ........ Y. FARWELL, Hamzzzer-throw, slzot-put .................... H. L. 'UNDERI-TILL 1915 1913 1914 1913 1914 IQI3 1915 1914 1914 1914 1913 TRACK 'FEA M 76 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 Track Season Review .--. Qfzr,-5,-:Qi IWVING to the fact that the ANNUAL goes to press before the TWilliams meet, nothing very definite can be said concern- ing the success of.the team. However, a very gratifying " ' "" ' showing was made in the dual meet with Hartford, the team winning 59 to 45: and in the Class meet, the school records for, the 440-yard dash and the pole vault were broken. Though perhaps not as well rounded as last season's team this year's had several very strong spots in the pole vault and sprints, and more promising material. Indoor track exercises were started early in the winter and much hard work was accomplished before spring, under the guidance of Captain Cooper. Throughout the entire year he was the moving spiritg and not only did he develop himself in the quarter and half-mile runs, to which he had been moved from the short sprints, but he also kept the whole team up to its highest pitch. Farwell is the best hurdler that has ever been in school. He strengthened the team in these events and also assisted in the 1oo-yard dash. Donnelley, having equalled the IOO-y9.1'Cl record, proved himself to be a star sprinter and was very fast in the 220-yard dash. linger, who worked in the 220-yard flat and hurdle events, was a valuable complement to the team. ' VV. Clarke, having broken the pole vault record, made this the strongest of the field events, while in the broad jump he made the sec- ond best leap in the history of the school. Andrews and Brush both aided in strengthening the pole vault by working towards eleven feet. The hammer throw has always been a favorite event, in which this year unsteadiness was the greatest drawback. H. Underhill worked steadily and was generally sure of over 140 feet, with Bunker a little less. The latter also has put the shot over 40 feet. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 100-Yard Dash . .. K 220-Yard Dash ....... 440-Yard Dash . .. .. 880-Yard Run . . . Mile Run ....... 120-Yard Hurdles .. 220-Yard Hurdles .. Broad lump . . . Discus ........ Hammer Throw .. High Jump . .. Pole Vault .... Shot Put .... C. School Records TEACK EVENTS V COXVLES, T. D. DONNELLEY ....... wh . K. C. COYVLES .. H. S. F. COOPER . . . S. CHATFIIELD . . . . . H. L. F01..soM . . . . I. V. FARWELL .. . H. P. BINGHAM .. FIELD EVENTS R.PAL3E . Q. L. GUERNSEY . . . P. LOUGHRIDGE .. . I. N. GARFIELD .... .. W. L. CLARKE .. S. I. PEABODY ... 77 sec 23 sec. .... 521A sec 2 min., 5 sec 4 min., 47 sec . . . . 162 sec 27M sec .. 20 ft., 8 in . 107 ft., 4 in 154 ft., QW in .. 5ft., 82 in IO ft., my in .. 41 ft., 4 in -51" 7'-1'S'115:ZET'N5"-I-1.wZP 1.4.-J .-M.. M... IQI2 THE 1APT ANNUAL 7, Vffiy Kg? fill C 0 :S fi f M 57 if-Kb 4 Q 'ifg V .Mx X .ff--3 ggi: I ! , l , 1 ' 2 iii!-ig! My awww ,M 80 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1o13 CHARLES P. TAFT, en HALLECK L12FFERTs ' BIANAGER CAPTAIN Tennis Team MEMBERS F. P. DAY, 1916 H. LEFFERTs G. C. XVAGNER, IR., IQI3 E. D. SMEDLEY, 1917 A 'RESULTS OF MATGHES Taft .... .......... 4 New Haven High . . . . . . . I Taft ................,....... 2 Hartford High ............... 4 Matches with Gunnery, Yale Freshmen, Pomfret and Morristown not played at time of publication. Y TENNIS TEAM I . w IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL sg E cf G. A. XV H T. T. A. G. S. I. N. OF THE Oli I .. .,., 3 . .. J I S 41.11, A wcfxnzns Q 3 2 Q U . . .1,1,.m.q3ju. : u.,:- VV. ANDREWS, 1913. V. A. BENNER, IQI3 M. BRUSH, 1914... H. BUNKER, 1913.. . L. CLARK12, 1914 .... S. F. COOPER, 1913. H. Cowuzs, 1913... DONNELLEY, 1915... DUNHM1, 1913.. . . .. L. EDw.xRDs, IQIL4. . EELLS, 1913. ......... . V. FARXVIZLL, 1914 ..... ..... GAR1f115LD, 1914. ..... .... . Baseball, Track, Hockey ..Football, Baseball, Hockey .. . . . . . . .Football, Basketball . , . .Footbal1, Baseball .....................Track ......................Track ..Football, Baseball, Hockey Football, Baseball, Hockey ..................Football . . . .Football, Track .. ........ Baseball, Hockey ..............Track, Hockey Football, Baseball, Basketball W. P. Lxcous, 1914 ....... ....................... H ockey S. C. KELLEY, IR., 1913 ..... ...................... I Tootball H. LEFFERTS, 1914 ........ ...................... B asketball H. N. MALLON, IQI3 .... ..... F ootball, Baseball. Basketball E. I. E. M. MCKEE, 1914 ..... F. METCALFE, IQI4.. V. Sams, 1914 ....... R. H. SAYRE, HI, IQI3 F. C. STERUNG, 1916... I. S. SWEENY. 1915 ..... A. T. TRU111sULL, 1913. A of H. . L. Z121z1s1zx', 1913 .... L. UNDEIQHILLA, 1913 ..... NOTE :-This list is not complete, as the Aazzmal went to press before the Baseball and Track seasons. ............Baseball, Hockey Football, Baseball, Hockey ....................Football . . . . . . .Football, Basketball Baseball Baseball Football l, Track Baseball ....Footbal the close 84 THE TAFT ANNUAL 'IQI3 CHJY 511, Football DRIICC COIIIIIHUCC Arthur Hi. ?Ia'1111Iwr, 1513, Q'LI1a1ir111z111 55. N211 i1'Ha1Iln11A, 1513 1ier111n11 E. 'JH11hrrhi1I, 1513 iilmnrr HH. iiIIr?Knr, 1514 COI11111C11CCI1lCI1t COIT11l1ittCC 15111151111 Burr, 1513, Glh11i1'111z111 - 13111111111 11111. Ennis, 1513 GIBIYIPE IH. A. E51-1111rr, 1513 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 77i':' X 'WE' E Husxcan Cwns tml. 86 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQIQ Leadvz' . Ma1zagz'r . SHBALDXVIN, 1914 E. C. ATKINS, 1915 XV. L. CLARKE, 1914 G. M. BRUSH, 1914 Glcc Club FIRST TENORS I-I. L. UNDERHILT R. PRESTONT E. W. MARVIN, 1917 P. B. SESSIONS, 1913 SECOND TENORS I. H. ROBINSON, 1913 H. L. UNDER111LL, 1913 FIRST BASSES I. H. MALLON, 1915 SECOND BASSES A. R. PRESTON, 1914 I. S. SWEENY, 1915 L. F. ROBINSON, 1914 N. GARFIELDI, 1914 IQI3 THE TAET ANNUAL S7 ' Mandolin Club A 1 Leader ..........,.................. E. W. ANDREWS Manager ............................ ......... H . BURR FIRST 'MANDOLINS E. W. ANDREWS, 1913 R. H. BOWLES, 1914 G. M. BRUSH, 1914 J. R. THOMPSON JR., 1913 C. W. CRoc1cER, 1917 1 E. MCN. MCKEE, 1914 A. B. NELSON, 1913 SECOND MANDOLINS C. B. COOK, 1914 G. B. HOLLISTER, IQI3 S. C. KELLEY, 1913 I. L. NICKEL, IR., 1914 I. DEXIV. PELTZ, 1914 MANDOLAS O. L. CLARKE, 1915 N. GARFIELD, 1914 OCTAVE MANDOLA C. C. ROBINSON, 1914 BASS LUTE C. P. TAET, 211, 1913 GUITARS W. L. CLARKE, 1914 S. EELLS, 1913 R. L. FISHER, 1915 I. S. SWEENY, 1915 88 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 C Banjo Club Leader .................. ..... X V. L. CLARKE Manager ...........,............ ..... G . M. BRUSH BANIEAURINES O. L. CLARKE, 1915 W. L. CLARKE, 1914 E. GARFIELD, 1917 H. H. WOODWARD, 1915 SECOND BANIOS J. R. THOMPSON, JR., 1913 G. C. XVAGNER, IQIQ FIRST MANDOLINS E. XV. ANDREXVS, 1913 N. GARFIELD, 1914 SECOND MANDOLINS C. B. Coo1c, 1914 A. B. NELSON, 1913 GUITARS G. M. BRUSH, 1914 S. EELLS, IQI3 R. L. FISHER, 1915 C. P. TAFT, 211, 1913 LQIS THE TAFT ANNUAL Taft Dramatic Association A OFFICERS President ....... ..... 1 .............. C . P. TAFT, H, 1913 l7ice-P1'eside1zt- .... ..... T . H. COWLES, 1913 Manager ....... ............ .... A . H. BUNKER, IQI3 MEMBERS W. N. BOURNE, 1913 WY P. BYRNE, 1913 H. S. F. COOPER, 1913 XV. G. CORW1N, 1913 F. S. CURTIS, IR., IQI4 C. C. DAY, 1913 VV. B. LAWRENCE, 1913 J. H. MALLON, 1915 E. M. MCKEE, 1914 I. DEW. PELTZ, 1914 I. H. ROB1NsON, 1913 L. F. ROBINSON, JR., 1914 F. C. S'rERL1NG, 1916 I. R. THOMPSON, JR., 1913 A. T. TRUMBULL, 1913 89 Q0 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 The Play -, HE Dramatic Association is to be congratulated on the remarkable success of its performance, the production of "Going Some." a farce in four acts by Paul Armstrong I and Rex Beach. The fact that the piece was unusually well adapted for amateur acting, and that skilled coaching was given bv H. T. Wfarren, e.1'-'o6, Yale XIO, both made possible the achieving Mexico, on a ranch, "being the chronicle of a certain lot of college men and girls, with the tragic strain of phonograph and cowboys." All the parts, well selected, were admirably hlled, and the action Went off without a hitch, making complete the success of the play. CAST OF "GOING SOME" j. XNALLINGFORD SPEED .. . ........ C. R Taft 1913 HLARRYJ' GLASS ......... 1. H. Robinson 1913 CULVER COVINGTON ..... C. C. Day, 1913 BERKELEY FRESNO . . . J. R. Thompson 1913 JACK CHAPIN ......... .. . M. McKee IQI4 HSTILL B1LLl' STOVER ............... ..... F . S. Curtis, IQI4 AURELIO MARIE CARARA, a .Mexican .... ..... X V. N. Bourne 1913 MISTER CLOUDY, a 'ABreed" ...... A. T. Trumbull, 1913 VVILLIE, a bad man ............... H. S. F. Cooper 1913 GABBY GALLAG1-1ER ......... ...B. S. Wfalcott, 1913 SKINNER ................... ..... F . C. Sterling 1916 JEANE CI-IAPIN, jack's Sister .... .. KV. G. Corwin, 1913 ROBERTA KEAP .............. .... L . F. Robinson 1914 LIELEN BLAKE --VW P. Byrne, 1913 MAMADETTA HI. H. Mallon, 1915 CHINK ......................................... 1. D. Peltz, 1914 COWBOYS, T. H. Cowles, IQISQ A. B. Nelson, lQI3, H. L. Underhill, 19135 NW. R. Wfolf, 1914 IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL QI I SYNOPSIS ACT I. Flying Heart Ranch, New Mexico. ACT II. Bunkhouse, Flying Heart Ranch. ACT III. Same as Act II. IACT IY. Scene 1, same as Act IIg Scene 2, Centipede Ranch, New Mexico. Time, Present. Place, New Mexico. Stage Manager .............. ................. X Y. R. XYQLF, 1914 Property Man .......... ..... X FV. M. DAVIS, IQI3 Assistant Property Blau .. ...... S. BALDWIN 1914 Electrician ............ A. P. C,xL1110UN IQLL Prompter .... ..... I- I. N. IVIALLON IQI3 List of Dramatic Productions 1 900 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 Lend Me Five Shillingsf, Serious Situations in Burleigh's Roomf' A Regular Fixfs Box and Cox." D' Ye Know Me Now P" The Two Buzzards." "April Fools." He Lies Like' Truth." The Deuce Is in Him." The Goose with the Golden Eggsfmi Lend Me Five Shillingsf' A Picked-up Supper." My Lord in Livery." Area Belle." 1908 Mr. Bobf' 1909 The Private Secretary." 1910 The Amazonsf' 1911 Dandy Dick." 1912 The Importance of Being Earnest." 1913 "Going Some? Cast but never staged. TH E CA ST IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL HON YOUR MARK !" "ALL OUT, Boys !" THE TAFT ANNUAL gg 1'??f' ' V. i f 4 M 'Xw,'?,f'i5 H l f - PU 3.Ll CAN GHS IQII5 THE TAFT ANNUAL 95 The Taft Annual VOLUME XX C1Z0'l'l"HZl17'L ..... . ............................... CLIVE C. DAY Honorary Member ......................... HUDSON BURR, 3D Edzlzfors ..... ART1-1UR H. BUNKER, 19135 WALTER B. LAWRENCE, LE1o11T0N H. COLEMAN, 1914, FRANKLIN XV. VVOLE, Art Editors .... XVILLIAM VV. CRAPO, 1914, HALLECK LEFFERTS Business Manager ........................ GRAHAM M. BRUSH Assistant Business Manager ................ ROBERT H. BOWLES I may judge r 1913 1913 19135 1915. T914 1914 1914 HE TAFT ANNUAL was Hrst published in 1894, four after the founding of the school, and having met with success from the start, has been received as one 0 scl1o01's permanent organizations. The nrst issue was bound in paper and consisted of but thirty-nine pages. The reader its growth from the size of the present volume. This book is not intended to be a 'literary masterpiece, but it is published as a record book of the scho0l's activities. In addition to this it fulfills the ,place of a Senior Class book and is generally regarded as such. The chairmen and managers of the past nineteen volumes have been as follows: ClZClfl'IZZCUI Business Manager 1894 C. XM ANDREWS H. M. BRANCH 1895 R. HOOKER H. S. HOTCIIICISS 1896 H. S. HOTCHKISS 1897 DEAN VVELCH 1898 LEA HUNT 1899 I. D. PERKINS, IR. C. E. VVINTON 1900 R. D. PATTERSON GE0. H. BALDWIN 1901 GE0. H. BALDWIN R. E. ALLING 1902 I. D. COMER P. VV. HOLTEIQ 1903 T. I. DRIGGS P. XM. HOLTER 1904 I. M. TOWNSEND,-IR. H. KN. DUNN, JR. 1905 GEO. L.E11M0Ns NV. H. HUNT, IR. 1906 C. F. MILLS STUYVESANT PEABODY 1907 STUYVESANT PEABODY C. D. VVINSLOW 1908 A. H. BEARD S. P. PLATT I 1909 ALFRED COWLES, 3D E. F. PIIALAN 1910 J. T. BLOSSOM N. L. MCLAREN 1911 VV1LL1AM C. MOOIRE I. N. GARFIELD IQI2 TTAROLD H. TITTMANN HENRY I. CROCKER, J years great f the THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 " f" " ' , ' ' fir'tfr,fL k I Il J 1 -: THE ANNLTfXL BOARD 1913 THE TAPT ANNUAL Q7 THC P2lDyl'llS VOLUME XX Clzanman .......... ................. E LMORE M. MCIQEE, 1914 1914 Business Manager .......... ............... . WALTER R. WOLF, Assignment Editor ....................... CHARLES P. TAET, ZD, 1913 Associate Editors, VV. P. BYRNE, 2D, IQI3Q C. C. DAY, 19135 T11oMPS0N, JR., 1913, H. L. UNDERHILL, 1913, 1. LYMAN, I. H. MALLON, 19153 VV. D. VV111TNEv, 1915. Assistant Business Manager ................ MERRIT HEM1NWAY, 1914 J. R. 1914: . - HE PAPYRUS was founded in 1894 by the "White Caps," who with one exception comprised the first Board. Up to 1909 it was issued bi-weekly, but is now published every Tues- day during the school term. This year it was enlarged to eight-pages, with an occasional ten-page number, having the appearance of the Yale N ews. In policy it is strictly a newspaper and will receive only items that would appear in such a publi- cation. Most of the material is culled from school happenings, but interviews, communications, and articles foreign to the school are also included. The Chairmen and Managers for the past eighteen volumes are listed below: Somewhat Chaifnn en Mana gers 1894-1895 A. D. GILLETTE H. W. CHAMBERS 1895-1896 H. S. HOTCHICISS 1896-1897 J. W. PERRY O. W. WHITE 1897-1898 LEA HUNT L. FARNHAM 1898-1899 A. R. LAMB J. D. PERK1NS, JR. 1899-1900 C. S. GOODRICH B. M. WARREN 1900-1901 I. E. DORAN VV. S. TAFT 1901-1902 D. B. TRUMBULL W. S. TAFT 1902-1903 C. D. MILLS E. K. GILLETTE IQO3-IQO4 I. M. TOWNSEND, I C. D. MTLLS 1904-1905 GE0. L. EMMONS D. I. ELY 1905-1906 D. J. ELY S. PEABODY 1906-1907 E. H. TOWNSEND L. M. WIGGIN 1907-1908 E. STEVENS G. E. STEVENS 1908-1909 G. E. STEVENS A. COVVLES, 3D 1909-1910 J. N. GARFIELD O L. GUERNSEY 1910-1911 A. T. BRICE, IR. F. :KNAPP 1911-1912 I. A. GARFIELD H. H. TITTMANN, IR. THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 s fc' Q, q iii!- X W -53 . . .-1,.-" W' S 1 -'-Q A 5 5. 1 ' THE PAPYRUS BOARD 1913' THE TAFT ANNUAL Q9 The Oracle OFFICERS Cliairnian ........ ........,.. F AYETTP S. CUR11S, JR., 1914 Excliaiige Editor ......................... HENRX' S. F. COOPER, 1913 Editors .......... W. B. LXWRENCE, IQISQ G. C. VVAGNER, JR., IQI3j VVM. WY CRAPO, IQI4Q F. XV. VVOLF, 1915 Business Manager ...................... SOLON C. KELLEY, JR., 1913 Assistant Business Manager .... .... R OBERT L. JOHNSON, 1914 'HE ORACLE, being' the last of the school publications to be fotmeled, was started in 1905 from very small beginnirigs. It 1S issued eight .times during the School year and compnses I " " literary CO11'E1'1DLIt101lS by the Students only. From the Start it grew rapidly both in quality and quantity and in the past two years it has taken rank among the best of sel1ool literary efforts. The chairmen and inanagers for the previous volumes have been as follows : . 19o5-1906 1906-1907 1907-1908 1908-1909 19o9-1910 IQIO-IQII 1911-1912 Chairmen R. FERGUSON . HULL A. CONNORS A. CONNORS . A. REQUA C. PE131 RIPLEY Mlzlzageifs VV. A. BEARDSLEY O. P. CAMP Oy P. CAMP D. P. FULLERTON D. P. FULLERTON P. H. LOUG1-1R1DGE O. MCKEP, JR. I. D. HOYT 100 THE TAI-TT ANNUAL IQI3 J rf' "1 Wink THE ORACLE BOARD IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 101 DEBAWTING CLUB. ATX Xl X55, 1 Luk fx ,W U k Gus Md IO2 THE TAET ANNUAL IQI3 The Debating Club - -4V, - '-----4-- HE DEBATING CLUB was formed in the spring of 1912 and from the smallest beginnings it has grown and improved Q Q with astonishing rapidity The Club is divided into two sides, the Wal! and the Court, and development in one year from crude attempts at speeches to well-delivered debates and animated discussions has been so marked and gratifying that there can be no doubt that this Club will take its place among' the permanent organizations of the school. OFFICERS First Term P-1'eside1z.t .... Vice-Presideazt Secretary ...... ................. .... Second Term Preszdevzt ...... ......,.......... . . . . Vfice-Presidenzf . . . .......... . . . . Secretary .... ............... Thi-rd Term P1'ES'id67Zf ....... .............. .............. M. McKEE A. H. BUNKER H. N. LTALLON H. N. NTALLON . S. F. COOPER T. TRUMBULL P. TAFT, 2D l7fzce-Preszdeatt ................................... A. T. TRUMBULL Sec1'eta1'y ............................................. C. C. DAY ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE C. C. DAY H. N. MALLON C. P. TAF1, 2D HONORARY MEMBERS H. BURR, IQI3 E. M. MCKDD, IQI4 MEMBERS Court I-Val! H. S. F. COOPER, 1913 M. BENJAAHN, IQI4 C. C. DAY, IQI3 A. H. BUNKER, IQI3 G. L. EDWARDS, JR., 1914 VV. P. BYRNE, 1913 G. B. HOLLISTER, 1913 F. S. CURTIS, 1914 VV. B. LAWRENCE, 1913 P. H. GRAv1zs, 1916 I. P. M13Tc.,xLFE, 1914 R. L. JOHNSON, 1914 C. P. PEPPARD, 1915 S. C. KELLEY, IR., 1913 UI. S. SWEENEY, 1915 UT. H. BTALLON, 1913 C. P. TAFT, 2D, IQI3 H. N. MALLON, 1913 I. R. T11oM12soN, 3D E. V. S.1xNDs, IQI4 W. D. VV1-11rN1zY, 1915 C. ,M. THOMAS, 1915 F. XV. VVOLF, 1915 A. T. TRUMBULL, IQ13 IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL IO THE DEBATING CLUB IO4 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 V W 1 NJ C575 0096. QAYEZL 19111 1 1 is V 1 Q 11 L 1 W IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 5 IO Prize Speaking UPPER CLASS ORATORY WON BY FAYETTE S. CURTIS, JR., 1914 Subject: Recall of Judges MIDDLE CLASS DECLAMATION ' WON BY P113RRE1fON1 I. PRENTICE, IQI5 Subject: George Gassel's Defence LOWER CLASS DECLAMATION 'WON BY .ARVIN J. XVELC11, 1916 Subject: Wflaipping the Navy WINNERS OF TRIAL SPEECHE5 L. F. ROBINSON, JR., 1914 F. S. CURTIS, JR., IQI11. M. BENJAMIN, 1914 A. H. BUNKER, 1913 C. E. LYMAN, JR., IQI3 A. T. TR1v111aULL, 1913 H N. BTALLON, IQI3 E. M. McKEE, 1914 S. C. KELLEY, JR., 1913 H. BURR, IQI3 B. A. C. C. E F. JONES, 1917 S. XWALCOTT, 1913 J. XVELC11, 1916 J. XV.-DW1G1-11, JR., 1916 P. I. PRENTICE, 1915 C. R. YOUNG, 1915 NV. D. XKVHITNIEY, 1915 F. KN. VVOLF, 1915 P. LUc1q1zY, 1917 A. BALL, 1915 V DEBATING CLUB PRIZE Presented to that member' Of the Debating' Club showing the greatest improvement during the year. WON BY JO11N H. BIALLON, 1915. 106 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI2 'QM 9 X , ,T - 5 ' Y ll: H1147 X . , Lg ffm 1 'Heckler MAT, Gianni Club' XMIM' "N N 1 1 Fl u 'Q -. 1 If I . QI 536.1 NC X Ji" Lrwff 1913 A THE TAFT ANNUAL 107 The Gun Club OFFICERS Presidelzt ....... .................... E LIAS C. A'1K1NS, 1915 Vice-Presidevzzf ........,. ..... I OI-IN R. THOMPSON, 313, 1913 Secretary and Treasurer .... ..,.... VX IALTER L. CLARKE, IQI4 Manager .............. ...................... A . D. BARNEY, IQI4 i MEMBERS R. H. BOWLES, IQI4 , A. A. HARDEN, 1916 G. M. BRUSH, 1914 N. C. HENGER, 1916 O. L. CLARKE, IQI6 S. C. KELLEX', JR., 1913 H. S. F. COOPER, 1913 S. P. JOHNSTON, 1913 W. W. CRAPO, 1914 S. VV. LAMBERT, JR., IQI5 F. S. CURTIS, IR., IQI4 C. E. LYMAN, JR., 1913 T. DONNELLEY, 1915 ' C. P. PEPPARD, 1916 I. V. FARWELL, 1914 C. C. ROB1NSON, 1915 P. H. GRAVES, 1916 G. C. XVAGNER, IR., 1913 U GUN TEAM E. C. ATIQINS, 1915 VV. 'W. CR.-XPO, IQI4 VV. L. CLARKE, 1914 G. M. BRUSH, IQI4 P. H. GRAVES, 1916 HONORARY MEMBERS MR. CHARLES SHERWOOD MISS JACOB PRIZES PreSident'S Cup ........... ........ .... 1 U on by W. L. Clarke Pair of moccasihs ........... .. ...... ...won by E. C. Atkins Shell case fhandicap Shootj .................... won by W. L. Clarke Cup, presented by Mr. Barney, for highest year'S average Cnot yet awardedj. FACULTY COMMITTEE MR. MCINTOSIT MR. VVARD MR. WELTON IOS THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 THE GUN CLUB 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 109 ., '--A' 5-1 '-4A'2 E wish to seize this opportunity to express our thanks to the ' .,'- Alumni for the many and varied things they have done for lflg. the school. During the past few years especially, we have a ,Ej f "A. 9 g become indebted to them for the prizes they have offered to L' be contested for in nearly every branch of school activities, and these we would acknowledge with a most sincere appreciation. Yet perhaps their greatest gift is not as tangible as these. It is the spirit that they have shown in college and after-life, and it is this realization that is a true inspiration for us in all our endeavors, which we could ill afford to lose, and which we cannot repay them sufficiently for except by showing them through the advancement of the school our most heartfelt thanks. Below is printed a short article, written by the Secretary of the Alumni Association, which ought to prove to be of interest. To The Alumni 5 The Alumni Associationklts Growth HE TAFT SCHOOL is only a child twenty-three years of age. F The Taft Alumni Association is a still younger offspring, N , ' I being able to boast a mere ten years of existence. Up to five I YD years ago the Taft Alumni Association amounted to little more than a Reunion Committee-to-day it is a real organization with something accomplished, yet with more in the works, as it Were. The officials, "Mad, Buckingham, 795, "Ted', Mason, ,Q7j "Charlie" VValler, ,o8, and L. M. Wigg'in, '08, have conceived the idea of making the Association a genuine, vital force in the life and growth of the Taft School Incorporated. One of the most concrete actualities as a result of this policy is Volume I of the Taft Biogmplzy Book, published last year by the Secretary. It is planned to make this a regular publica- tion, appearing every five years. Volume H is due in 1917. Another example of the Alumni Association's influence is the gift which the Association will make to the new school next year4-but more of that anon. . 9 Much has been done-more remains. VV ith the same officers reelected for another year, there is an excellent opportunity for further development. CSignedj L. M. WIGGIN, Secretary. IIO THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 Taft School 'Christian Society N OFFICERS President ...... .... C . P. TAFT, 213, 1913 Vice-President .... R. H. SAYRE, 313, IQI3 Secretary .... .......... H . BURR, 1913 Tl'C'CISIl7'6'l' .... ..,. C . V. A. BENNER, 1913, 4-if-II MEMBERS Andrews, Atkins, Baldwin, Ball, Barney, Bartlett, W1 Bourne, Brush, Bunker, Byrne, Calhoun, XV. Clarke, Coit, Cooper, Corwin, Cowles, Crapo, Davis, C. Day, Donnelley, Dunham, Edwards, Eells, Enger, Farwell, N. Garield, C. Hamann, A. Harden, H. Heminway, Hollister, R. johnson, Johnston, Kelley, Lawrence, Lefferts, E. Lyman, I. Lyman, McKee, J. Mallon, N. Mallon, Metcalfe, Nelson, Nickel, Pres- ton, 1. Robinson, L. Robinson, Sands, Sessions, Sweeney, I. Thompson, Trumbull, H. Underhill, I. Underhill, 'Wagner, Wfalcott, F. VVolf, XV. VVolf, Zerbey. IQI3 'THE TAI-TT ANNUAL III TAFI SCHOOL CHRISTIAN Socnzry OFFICERS 112 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 S 'Y NN xxxxmxxx I . 3 S K N 1 V Qt 970 egggi, E155 R 2 fm .5 out lgeah iliinniinr Austin Eunham ' Sveninr Qllnnitnrzf Qlharlrn H. A. Benner william 11111. Baum Arilmr 15. Eunkrr iilnhrrt 15. Svagrr. BB lguhanu Burr Glharlrs QB. Elaft, EE Hpper ilmiilhlr iJ1Huniinr5 iiallvrk Ieffrriz Malin ll. Wulf IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL II MONITORS II4 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 5, 41 1 113 5 bqig 0 an x 5 v Q N 'fi' lfehlnhx .I O Y I I ' wwf' 547505 fa' A N' 'lg my L Q55 .-.5--'1'-. nit" ' .1-'i""""" 'x. -. NN-X l-CII .,"fQv Q f W ' V frs ., ' . ' ll " . "Q, 17.19 ,,, ififmf' ' ,4 745' . I 's.E ghwsbfl Q OFFICERS President ...... ........... .... R 0 BERT H. S.-XYRE, 3D l7'ice-President ........ .. .CHARLES V. A. BENNER Secretary and Treasurer ...... AUSTIN DUNHALAI IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL II ,gf Y ' fllllllllllt, , - -M 111 ,f -. , Y Q.-nf -. ., ai.. 1 G H 5n'v,sif , A rm 221 fx,-,.,,-' 'wg df f e??t" A "Q ,, - ia.: k Q - , I , H Y ' 455' - , It - x 3 5 y' 4 1 1- L f f ' f X 4, , . lllll W fa 6111111 1 , I .A 'A - . 4-3' .-f " Qu, I 1. Q, .', 23,1 W sg' V .1-.-' ' " ,WV in-f ...N ,... '.M4g,iiLn ,rnh , , ,, 116 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 Senior Statistics Done most for the school-Sayre 11, Dunham 8, Taft 8, Burr 2. Most popular--Benner 23, Sayre 3, Dunham 2. ' Best athlete-Benner 22, Mallon 6, Bunker 2. Greatest fusser-Benner 18, Trumbull 3, Underhill 3, Byrne 2. Greatest would-be fusser-Byrne 17, Kelley 12. Busiest-Burr 13, Taft 8, Thompson 6. Laziest-Underhill 11, Johnston 6, Robinson 3, Sayre 3, Dunham 2, Hol- lister 2. Best dresser-Burr 13, Bunker 9, Benner 4, Thompson 2. VVill do best at college-Taft 17, Benner 4, Burr 4, Sayre 3, Dunham 2. Noisiest-Thompson 14, Eells 9, Bunker 4, Sayre 2. 'Wittiest-Robinson 2o, Trumbull 5, Lawrence 2. Takes life most seriously-Day 9, Burr 8, Andrews 4, Taft 3, Benner 2, Davis 2, Mallon 2. Takes life least seriously-Dunham 8, Robinson 5, Underhill 4, Hollister 3, Eells 2, Lyman 2. Handsomest-Davis 12, Cowles 6, Sayre 5, Bunker 2, Wfagner 2, Vtfal- cott 2. Brightest-Taft 27, Johnston 2. Joy of Faculty-Taft 18, Bourne 6, Burr 2. Bane of Faculty--Dunham 9, Thompson 6, Sayre 4, Bunker 3, Byrne 3, Hollister 3. Best natured-Underhill 8, Dunham 4, Sayre 4, Cooper 3, Benner 2, Burr 2. Class grind4Bourne 15, Nelson 9, Zerbey 2, Best bluffer-Hollister 8, Bunker 4, Dunham 3, Cowles 2, Johnston 2, Thompson 2, Trumbull 2, Underhill 2. Poorest bluffer-Byrne 1o, Underhill 6, Cooper 5, Kelley 4. 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 117 Most modest-Cooper 8, Zerbey 7, Corwin 6, Mallon 4, Burr 3. Woinan hater-VVagner 15, Corwin 5, Bartlett 4, VValcott 3, Zerbey 2. Class punster-Bartlett 6, Robinson 5, Lyman 4, Dunham 4, Hollister 3, Lawrence 3, Kelley 2, Trumbull 2. Largest vocabulary CXX-- Fillj-Bunker 17, Thompson 8, Taft 2. Most practical-Burr 8, Mallon 5, Davis 4, Taft 4, Day 2, Sayre 2, Vtfalcott 2. - . Most impractical-Byrne 6, Eells 5, Andrews 3, Hollister 3, Underhill 3, Day 2, Dunham 2, Thompson 2. Most versatile-Taft 9, Mallon 8, Davis 3, Bunker 2, Bells 2. Most literary-Lawrence 8, Bourne 4, Wagner 4, Taft 3, Bunker 2, Day 2, Nelson 2. I Biggest rough-houser-Cooper II, Bunker Io, Trumbull 7, Thompson 2. Goody-goody-Bourne 27, Taft 2. Class chimney-Dunham 30. CWho did Dunham Vote for?j IIS THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 EDVVARD WTLLIAM SON ANDRENVS 'iGus" "Gussie" "Baldy" "Ted" "Bobbie" SEATTLE, WVVASH, Age, IQ years, 8 months. Height, 5 feet, 7 inches. Weight, 150 pounds. Four years in school. Yale. Second Hockey team, 1912. Captain, 1912. Hockey team, 1913. Baseball team, 1912, 1913. Track team, 1912, 1913. School record in pole-vault, 1912. Mandolin Club, 1911, 1912, 1913. Leader, 1913. Banjo Club, 1912, 1913. If it were not for the fact that he takes such good care of his complexion, for l1e is well stocked with the latest cosmetics, one would think that he would lose all his hair fsingularj. As it is, l1e keeps time for the "Trang-Twang" Club so violently that l1is stubble falls out in such a way that he will soon be in a class with certain members of the Faculty. But, 'shushl He asked us not to mention this subject, as he has had a falling out with it. Comes from the lVild and Woolly W' est, and owns a book of photo- graphs. Moreover, he can be often found trying to ind out how much geometry Taft knows. Dances like an express train-and also on one. .fNever mind, 'lBobbie!"j Zazafmef IJ. ya 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL IIQ RUSSEL STURGIS BARTLETT b "Bart" "Raspberry" NEW YORK, N. Y. Age, I6 years, 9 months. Height, 6 feet. Weiglit, 155 pounds. Three years in school. Yale. Second Football team, 1911, 1912. Second prize in Latin sight translation, 1912. This rosy-cheeked personage, ,with the martial stride and Hyperion curls, might at First glance give one the impression that he's quite a man. However, he has flatly contradicted this, When, after receiving a mark of 100 per cent. in his Latin exam, he modestly avowed, 'Tm only sixteen, too." Still he has a way of eating and sleeping that the most sceptical cannot help but secretly envy. Has been found eight Sundays in succession enjoying a morning rest in bed, while the rest ofthe school was in church. And still he has "pep" enough to run around the square three times without stopping-at least he said he didn't stop. 12o THE TAET ANNUAL 1913 55 ' 3 F l S2 . Q e N E l ' 4 ' 1 K iN 1 J L f . . -fi 'ua ' . "J -1. " , T Q. 1 1 5 f CHARLES VAN ANTWVERP BENNER "Bun" "Bunnie" HB" ENGLEWOOD, N. I. Age, 20 years, IO months. Height, 5 feet, 8 inches. XVeight, I4O pounds. Four years in school. Sheffield Scientific School. Football team, 1910, 1911, IQI2. Hockey team, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913. Captain, 1912, 1913. Baseball team, 1910, 1911, 1913. Monitor, 1913. Treasurer of T. S. C. S., 1913. Secretary of T. A. A., 1913. Class Day Committee, 1913, Cupid surely had a big hand in making "Bunnie" and gave him a big quiver full of arrows which he uses rather promiscuously, Spends a great deal of his time in going for or waiting for the mail-and female. In spite of the fact that he has had serious heart trouble, he is rather athletic fputting it mildlyj. Some claim, when they see him on the ice, that he is a direct descendant of Pegasus. and we agree. Possesses an affable nature and rooms with a pair of bowlegs. Keeps a general assembly room on the third floor, and comes from Englewood. XVe salaam to you, l'Bunnie." ta 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 121 VVILLIAM NETTLETON BOURNE 9 "lrVilliel' "Bill" New HAVEN, CONN. Age, I7 years, 2 months. Height, 5 feet, IOil1'1Cl'16S, VVeight, 130 pounds. Five years in school. Yale. Dramatic Association, 1912, 1913. Catiline Essay Prize, 1912. After many hours of searching in vain for "Willie," one of the pursuers in desperation seized a telephone. "Has anyone seen VV. Bourne F" he politely asked Central. No answer. Again the question was asked. This time a faint snoring came back over the Wire-evidently some one was sleeping. "I-Iello! Hello !" Suddenly there came a sound as of four chairs falling over at once and-4'Quid vis? Tumultus me magnopere turbatf' C This indignantlyj It was enough. Leaving the phone, we hastened to the room where "Central" hid, and succeeded in entering the barricaded door. There, concealed byia tremendous pile of books, was the object of our search. VVe began to speak, when he said: "It is my inexorable desire that you deliquesce speedily." And We lied. QXJLW. 91. 122 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 ARTHUR HUGH BUNKER KI:Bunk77 CCB-GL' 'YONKERS, N. Y. Age, I7 years, IO months. Height, 6 feet, 1 inch. lVeight, 190 pounds. Three years in school. Sheflield Scientihc School. Football team, 1910, 1911, 1912. Track team, 1912, 1913. Monitor, 1913. Chairman of Football Dance Committee, IQI2. Debating Club, 1912, IQI3. Vice President, 1912. Manager of Dramatic Association, 1912, 1913. Annual Board, 1913. Fence Orator, IQI3. ' Crape was hung on the doors when 'fBunk" left Yonkers, but the school had a holiday when he arrived. May be seen at any time doing anything from catching on the Senior team to running the high hurdles better than anyone else. Takes great delight in breaking windows and shouting at HBill." Has callers every evening from 8 to 10, and goes for the mail, making frequent trips beyond the Post Ofhce. Carries fire-arms at the table and draws geometric figures in blue chalk. One day he played "nigger-baby" and ate off the mantelpiece afterwards. Never does work before dinner, nor after the irst study-hour, yet he is a busy person. 2,1 vfaa, IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL T23 '.,f.5f HUDSON BURR "Budson" "Burr" ' BLOOMINGTON, ILL. Age, I7 years, IO months. Height, 5 feet, IO inches. Weiglit, 150 pounds. Three years in school. Shefheld Scientific School. Second Basketball team, 1911, 1912. Captain, 1912. Manager of Football team, 1912 Cresignedb. Assistant Manager, 1911. Monitor, 1913. Secretary, T. S. C. S., IQI3, Amina! Board, 1912, 1913. Chairman, 1913 fresignedj. Assistant Manager, 1912. Mandolin Club, 1912. Manager, IQI3. Debating Club, 1912. Secretary, 1912. Chairman of Class Day Committee, 1913. Allah! We are Maize! for none but brave men would dare to do such a thing as to Write down anything about the character of this dignified personage. Before going any farther we must establish the fact that he is no relation to Aaron-strange as it may seem. However, he has been known to have some of his namesake's pugilistic spirit as shown in his rivalry with Mr. Yales's boys at a certain dance. He has a passion for birds and keeps a cuckoo-clock in his room. He solicits your trade and Will guide you through Panama under his personal supervisiong and will also retail all your old clothes at a reasonable cost. eiffwa I24 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 XNILLIAM BYRNE, H lfJ'L1dg.e77 HPat!3 HBH173 XIVATERBURY, CONN. Age, 16 years, 4 months. Height, 5 feet, 6 inches. VVeight, 135 pounds. Four years in scl1ool. Shefheld Scientihc School. Papyrus Board, IQI2, 1913. Dramatic Association, 1911, IQI2, 1913. Debating Club, 1912, 1913. He is a true descendant of Archimedes. Early in physics he learned that effort is not work. Since then he has assumed that effort is not worth while. Soon after, he took three weeks, vacation, returning to ask if sunbeams were absolutely necessary to run a dynamo. At tive minutes of ten every night he drops his "Saturday Evening Post," and starts his Physics, French, Englisli, Geometry and-but here he stops, a new thought possesses him, he opens his door and cries, "If sarcasm were good marks, I wouldn't have to studyfl "Judge" claims tl1at every- body "kids" him about his trips tolto Sh! Sr- Margarevss so We'll be merciful and add nothing more. ev? DQ, 1913 THE TAET ANNUAL 125 HENRY SAGE FENIMORE CQOPER f'Eenny" "Fen" "COOp', ALBANY, N. Y. Age, 18 years, 3 months. Height, 5 feet, 9 inches. Vfeight, 140 pounds. Three years in school. Yale. Track team, 1912, 1913. Captain, 1913. Oracle Board, 1912, 1913. Exchange Editor, 1913. Debating Club, IQI2, 1913. Vice President, 1913. Gun Club, IQI3. Dramatic Association, 1913. , It can readily be seen why he is called "Penny," since he was found in the fens somewhere in the vicinity of Cooperstown. He is the only one in captivity, as his fellow snakes escaped the clutches of civ- ilization, though he has tried often to induce them to take a school education, much to their disgust. Loves to look out the window in Latin class, and in Civil Government he has been awakened from a sound sleep. Takes great delight in being as uncomfortable as possible by disrobing with his window open in zero weather. Can chin himself on the picture moulding, hide in a bureau drawer, and slide down stairs by his finger- nails. It has also been stated that he was seen down South hunting. afgfiy 126 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 VVALLACE GRAHAM CORXVIN "VVally" "Wallace" New HAVEN, CONN. Age, I7 years, 3 months. Height, 5 feet, 4 inches. XfVeight, 100 pounds. One year in school. Sheffield Scientific School. Second Hockey team, 1913. Dramatic Association, 1913. In spite of the fact that he has only spent a year with us, "XVallace" has succeeded in making the whole school laugh, and he didn't do it by any prearranged plan. The said incident occurred when he was disguised as a charmingly prim young lady Cand he merely sat downj. Nevertheless, to look at the way he devours his lessons one would never suspect him of such a truly wicked nature. VVe wish we could see more of him-he deserves watching. Ldalfaaa giddafa IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL I27 THOMAS HOOKER COVVLES KcTO111,, "Hook" "Ti1n', CHICAGO, ILL. Age, 18 years. Height, 5 feet, 8 inches. Weiglut, 135 pounds. Five years in school. Yale. Second Football team, 1911. Football team, 1912, Second Hockey team, 1912. Hockey team, 1913. Manager, 1913. Baseball team, 1912, 1913. Dramatic Association, 1909, 1913. Vice President, 1913. "Aw the Gus" is heard from a window, quickly :followed by a "Bmp- young man" and we know "Hookl' is far away from our reach. He has a habit of disappearing when that voice is heard, but still we don't have to see him to know what to say-he is one of those "whose actions speak for him," and as we look back and see three "T's,' in one year for him, not weighing over 200 pounds, we bow our heads. Makes a monthly trip to New Haven every week, he says it's his teeth, but he has never told us her name. Wfears a silk neck on his hockey sweater and owns one pair of white trousers. Added to this, he is a student, being one of three who have stuck for ive years in the Class of ,I3. f-,,.-v 128 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 il an 5 . . 1 " ' 1 Alu- ,f " - 'r 4',,,.fl?l-..-17,, XVILLIAM MCKINLEY DAVIS I "Bill" "Dave" "Davie" ,W Tixcoinx, W ASH. Age, 18 years, II months. Height, 5 feet, 9 inches. XVeight, 145 pounds. Three years in scl1ool. Pennsylvania. Second Football team, 1911. Manager Track team, 1913. Assistant Manager, 1912. Monitor, 1913. Class Day Committee, 1913. Senior House Committee, 1913. Oh, yes indeed, he's a westerner. Could tell that by a glance at the above pictures, couldn't you? Handsome, too! VVell, just ask the Class of IQI4. Wfithout any insinuations we think he's bow-legged. He denies it, and spent two hours on a picture puzzle from Pojvezzlaer Zldfeclzav-zics trying to prove the opposite. But tl1e fact remains. And, "Golly Ned," he's musical. Can tell you how to play a mandolin through both study-hours and get an average of 70 for the year. W'ill take you auto-riding with his mechanic, Bennerg and travels between New York and Litchfield between two and three A. M. ajft 744114 QW, IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 129 . .,.. 1-1" ' ' if ' -:W ..L5,1:1:1?fi'-"125,1.. ' 7'4::11"'3'i:j'f ' Q, , 4 1-g.fz'z2w.,1:.-:,.:.,:5a1.'f-.:12..,'ff:,..:-. 1 . - .W J -' s w " -1:..,:.e::.1::-a1- :mate-faf Mx' - ' 1.1121-.i:1.:s-:.1i.fz.1 ,..u1f.sww' :ffafie-4 1:ss:1.:-'-11:.':.:z:z..-rw-Av .1 .1...fe-111112:52.111-aaiazaw: . Q5:?iE'E'E3::p f1-"WI ""--ff 15: 7.1 1 " , ---la:-'p .,.3,g:p: ' ' " 1533-:Vg-,g:y':'. Z. .3 If if ' ' - wiaceiiai -' ': 65:1 'z " " I., ' 95' , 1 751719 V, , ,. ,Q 4.5 . V ,.., .V . I A. V , EE i4.Q.:.1 1 ' - ', . J - . 1' , 7-Z-" C292'-'-'47,-Z.,'-,L-J'.'J1j,'I-,-1'7'C"g'g'g-,lk fr?-.-Lvj.LY..,,1j,, ' ' ,I-5.47 A-.+G ,ar '.g,,,.1 --.1.1.m.f 1--:.q,,, .. "2-1:14 F 1-: frfvfisi., Simi?"ii'57:755?:"'iri'1?2i"11-1 '- -. :few-5:1:2:i'I' 1,...fp--vfzgf. ,g.,.::f',H',.y5:p'.A 51,4 ,ap11-5:1-.-35515325-:1-,,,',:g-zf:zI:-iff :V.,pf:::"':1'-41221-"ff -rw:-f 11.415 '. :. , V: .1':"7 1fa111z1ey " ' CLIVE CAMERON DAY HClive" SUMMIT, N. I. Age, 18 years. Height, 5 feet, IO inches 'Weiffht 1 . G , 45 pounds. Three years in school. Yale., - Papyms Board, IQI2, 1913. Animal Board, IQI2, 1913. Chairman, 1913. Dramatic Association, 1913. Debating Club, 1912, 1913. Secretary, 1913. Since "Clive" is our chairman we feel that in this case silence is golden. Though he was unable to participate in athletics, let it suthce when we say he aspires to tennis and perspires on the "versus Facultyv handball team, thatl h ' ' ie as a serious nature and is uncomnionly stubborn. I3O THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 AUSTIN DUNI-'QAM "Sam" K'Durham" HARTFORD, CONN. Age, 20 years, 6 months. Height, 6 feet, IZ inches. Wfeight, 173 pounds. Five years- in school. Yale. Football team, 1910, 1911, IQI2. Captain, 1912. Second, 1909. Second Hockey team, 1911, 1912, IQI3. Manager of Track team, 1911, 1912. Monitor, 1912, 1913. Head Monitor, 1913. Treasurer of T. S. C. S., 1910, Secretary, 1911. President, 1912. President of T. A. A., 1913. Class Secretary, 1912, 1913. Football Dance Committee, 1911. Has been a member of the last live graduating classes, but this year by the determination with which he chews his pipe-stem we can see that he is going to put the cz in his diploma. Plays football best with a grandstand full of Hskirtsl' behind l1im, and wears a green hat. Owns 50 per cent. of the shares in the royal suite and has hours from two to three "at home" Cwith Mr. Wfilsonj. Can always tell you how many days before vacation, and is Hfeeling lowl' unless he is telling one of his stories. Continually wishes there was a separate mail system between Vlfatertown and Middlebury, and he says he has the hardest schedule in school. He is now practicing his signature. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL I3I SAMUEL EELLS lf Sami! CLEVELA ND, O1-110 Age, I7 years, IO months. Height, 5 feet, IO inches. Vtfeight, 150 pounds. Four years in school. VVilliams. , Second Hockey team, 1911, 1912. Hockey team, 1913, Second Baseball team, 1911, 1912. Baseball team, 1913. Glee Club, 1912. Mandolin Club, 1910, 1911, IQI2, 1913. Banjo Club, 1912, 1913. Bzzlbul Committee, 1913. Is never happy unless playing some musical instrument and is con- sequently always in a good humor. Can play anything from a mouth- organ to a violin Qnotice We say "to"j. His hearers stopped him there. Yet he claims he knows one chord and we agree-a discord. And sing! well, nothing but classics. Such songs as "Millions of Girls" and "Robert E. Lee" are really distasteful to him. If you don't believe that, go listen to him. Beside his musical ability, they say he's athletic. Anyone, doubting this, should be present at the Senior House when he has just received his mail. "Look out, 'Judgef he's comingln T32 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 .rfailii 'fl 'M Q f L' f ' 1 I f -. .. . . . MIM, I I-v I .. f ,,, 3 , I 1 7 A .. , 4 - . E Ag J X gaahf. mama, , 4 f A fr . u. - . y ' ' 44153 - i rc.- -' A -:saw e-'5-2 1 as ' 1 . - ,Q--fs.: . . ., xv. .- -. -Q .- ' ia l' T . - I A ' 12.51 5 Wu' . ' 'N .1 .2- , , 'G' Q 't 4 . - 4.11. c.. , - -...f 1 , I ..f. mag 1 GEORGE BURTON HOLLISTER ' 'fGeorge" CINCINNATI, OHIO Age, 18 years, II months. Height, 5 feet, 8 inches. llleight, 135 pounds. Four years in school. Yale. Mandolin Club, IQI3. Debating Club, 1912, 1913. Prize Composition, 1911. Hark! A merry whistle can be heard ascending the stairway, and presently a voice is heard shouting in accents clear, "Handball team report at 3 o'clock.' There is a hurrying of feet and we divine the team was waiting' anxiously for its ardent leader. 'KC-eorge' has, it is true, one main trait of character Che told us he had a characterj, and that is tenacity of purpose. He was once even known to make the rounds of twenty-eight hat stores in New York in search of a "dip" which would Ht itself to his particular style of beauty. His favorite attitude, as we see him, is receiving a master from half way under a bed, though at times he has not bothered even to move. Xlfe may add he has made some of his best "jokes" upon hearing read off Ha visit plus fivef' and as, with prancing step, he betakes himself hence from a certain classroom, where he recites in the following manner: 'KA-er-er-.U Gs. ' IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 133 , , -if if! M' , , f llff ' ze ' , 1-1 l Ui -.A.' ., 'f 1, 4' W A 1 J . li iimfifff ffwg if 41: 3 251, lf' STODDARD PINTARD JOHNSTON - "Stoddard" NEW YORK, N. Y, Age, I7 years, 3 months. Height, 6 feet, I inch. Weiglit, 165 pounds. Two years in school. Yale. Library Monitor, IQI3. Gun Club, IQI3. -A Gifted with sufficient brain-power, so that work has been a mere detail, 'fStoddard" has loafed gloriously through two years of school and has at last reached a place where his life must be biographed. To go into detail: "Stoddard" has two occupations-tennis and reading. As we have never played him in the former, naught can be said as to his game, while it seems sufficient in the case of the latter when we say his favorite authors are R. XV. Chambers and G. B. McCutcheon. "Say, have you seen that new story in the Cosmopolrifavz by the author of KHis Blushing Bride? H Smtlwt Www I34 THE TAET ANNUAL 1913 1 . -4'55f"f'2N ft! as ini' 9 -ff , QI I .,.:'s ...,-. , , Q. ufwv: ., . 4 - A - -' f',.v:'f1.r ' Q ' 'r' 011'-. X' 1: s"'P"i-1' -1522 X' 'A Q li" 5' ' 4. " 5561-F I -We I ':.-2,1-:sfashc 5 51. 1 'Wm ' ' 'EST' 5 71- A ' , 1 - .zisgfff 51.551 .' '-: . :,, 3 fl 1' QP' SOLON CHESTER KELLEY, JR. Hliellu USO!! STAMFORD, CONN. Age, 18 years, 8 months. Height, 5 feet, II inches. Wleight, 160 pounds. Four years in school. Brown. Second Football team, 1911. Football team, 1912. Oracle Board, 1911, 1912, IQI3. Assistant Manager, 1912. Manager, 1913. Debating Club, 1912, 1913. Mandolin Club, 1913. Gun Club, 1913. This man of Irish descent and intelligence is one of the greatest fussers of the class, with the possible exception of the "Judge," and has the Blarney Stone beaten to a frazzle when it comes to winning the ladies. Also manages the Oracle, which accounts for his sporty collars and silk shirts. One day when the Board was taking a trolley ride to get an inspiration, he was found expostulating with them about paying a thirty cent fare out of the Oracle money. No wonder he gets away with it. He often complains that he can't "see it too well," so we advise him to buy a pair of glasses. Never mind, "So,' you're right there. ref.,-CM Glaze.. duaaasp.. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 135 VVALTER BALDVV IN LAVVRENCE V "lfValt" '4Walter" SUMMIT, N. J. Age, I7 years, IO months. Height, 5 feet, IOM inches. lfVeight, 135 pounds. Two years in school CII and '13j. Yale. Animal Board, 1913. Dramatic Association, IOII. Oracle Board, 1913. Debating Club, 1913. Senior' House Committee, 1913. Ivy Ode, 1913. "lfValter" the "lit'ry" man 'of the classg and if he isnlt voted class punster, it won't be his fault-he's been working hard for that title day and night at our expense. But respect is due to anyone who can make the Board of this paper and the'O1facZe, besides. Moreover, he has the distinction of being the only Senior that has really had his neck broken, Owns a set of O. Henry, but finds it difhcult to keep track of his volumes. If you Want to meet this interesting character, you'll find him up on the fourth floor arguing with Mr. Joline. 2760041 vgawrivvarx 7136 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 CHARLES ELIHU LYMAN HEI!! CiEHie7! M IDDLEFIELD, CONN. . Age, 18 years, II months. Height, 5 feet, II inches. XVeight, 150 pounds. Four years in school. Sheffield Scientihc School. Gun Club, 1913. This finished product of the school is about the only one of his class who has decided on his life work. After standing three years of the city life of New Haven, he is going to beat a hasty retreat to his farm. Yes, he boasts he can already surpass Luther Burbank in grafting apple seeds onto peach blossoms so that enough niulberry leaves can be obtained to feed his silk worms. Is particularly good at handball, as he imagines he is handling hot potatoes, when playing. Shoots daily on the Gun Club and is one of Tho1npson's official keepers. Both can give you full particulars about each other. ZZMZMKZAQ rf 'fr 913 THE TAET ANRUAL I37 P' L- l p , , 1 , . ' W FS ya - 'C 1 v 5" 25. -,, 3- , -'f -- 1 I -'41 ,.,.',e.,,f1.i., . 1, pf' . -' .,Q-.-wi. " If . Q yzfi L' e 9, 1'-:gif , , 4 . 5 7 131 ' f4iEgv3'lg?-iv 4 .f ,. -1-' 43,1 9 44- 'Y -' 51253044 qs'-I , ,.1 -:iw f 'V f- .- - :wif l'1Q 1 1 f if teas 1212" ,L f 2, 1 , U-gwu zf' '- ::'f :'ia i' ' ' ' V - Q.,f31?f',f .. .3,,.11 . 11135 gg . . ,,, ' if - g,- -5g,:f"j11q .-1-bil , "-w , fm- 1 , ,,.:2r.v -"'-,,-1' . i f f 1,7 1 .,,.,f.W .. f- 143.,:g,.,:51g:522,311-393,53 ,,.-,,,gg-3.3115 1 ,- Age, 18 years, HENRY NEIL MALLON Y UNCH!! CINCINNATI, OHIO 5 months. Height, 5 feet, 8 inches. Wfeight, 140 pounds. Two years in school. Ohio State. Football team, 1912. Basketball team, 1913. Baseball team, 1912, 1913. Debat- ing Club, IQI2, IQI3. Secretary, 1912. President, IQI3. Library Monitor, 1913. Football Dance Committee. 1912. Debating Prize, 1912. Valeclictory, 1913. Small, silent, steady! No, We're not seeing how many words we can think of that begin with s, but those three words describe the above little fellow to a dot. Though he has been in school two years and, incidentally in the front ranks of everything-even studies,-he has never been even reported to have become ruffled at the greatest provocation. Wfhen not Worrying about his valedictory, he takes great pleasure and recreation in telling the members of the Debating Club they're Wrong- it makes no difference what side they take. Has an affection for relations and brought his cousin to the football dance. Sometimes the little things do count in this world, after all. ' ZMLZWMZ6-2, 13,8 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 ASA BURTON NELSON "Nel,' "Nellie" ' DERBY LINE, VT. Age, 16 years, 9 months. Height, 5 feet, 8 inches. Wleight, 145 pounds. Four years in school. Yale. Second Football team, 1912. Second Hockey team, 1912, 1913. Mandolin Club, 1912, 1913. Banjo Club, 1913. Sextette, 1913. Library Monitor, 1913. 'Wearily we climbed the stairs to our hero's room. He was out. Could they tell us where he was? Ol1, yesg in Mrs. Gardiner's room. Thank you. fBusiness of crossing corridor and entering afore-men- tioned apartments.l Yes, there he is. See him, lying upon the sofa, propped up by pillows, reading Laura jean Libbey, to the accompani- ment of a Victrola, and munching chocolate bonbons. Isn't it a beautiful scene? And it's no pipe-dream, either. just interview Asa and we'll wager a free copy that you have the same result. L ma Ma. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 139 55 If f" ,, H ,?,1 ..KVf. Th ., I Site. l. 1.if.ff,,QQlgjl- V. p pl '," Q, 1 1' is ad- I' My I Ii" 1- ' 1' , -.?l'l'2:' 'Tiff' f E5 fl' 'TZFFQ 'wil . . -I-5 .jefgw... 1 JAMES H. ROBINSQN t'Iim" "Iimn'1iei' YONKERS, N. Y. Age, IQ years, 9 months. Height, 5 feet, 6, inches. Weight, 137 pounds. One year in school. Sheffield Scientific School. Glee Club, IQI3. Dramatic Association, IQI3. Bulbul Committee, 1913. After sampling various schoolactivities "jimmy" finally chose the drama. Here his forte surely lies, for who can forget the tender pathos of "Glass" as he said: "You suffragette, if you kiss me, I'll whollop you." His supply of humor is unending, and nearly every name and custom in the school has suffered at the hands of his "wit," He is, however, of a quiet disposition Cshall We say, that of a gentleman of leisure FD and enjoys nothing better than to sit before the fire, feet up, pipe in mouth, lost in absorbing O. Henry. Also he rejoices in a barber- shop tenor, which he uses upon all possible occasions, including church. I I4O THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 RQBERT HEYSHAM SAYRE, TTT HPUSSII lipussyyll KKBOb!7 SoU1H BETHLEHEM, PENN. Age, 20 years, 1 month. Height, 6 feet, 1 inch. Yfeight. 169 pounds Six years in school. Shetneld Scientihc School. Third Football team, IQO8. Second, 1909. Football team, IQIO, 1911 1912 Second Basketball team, 1910, 1911. Captain. IQII, Basketball team, IQI2, IQI3 Second Baseball team, 1910, IQII. Captain, 1911. Manager Baseball team, 1913 Assistant Manager, 1912. President of Class, 1912, IQI3. Monitor, 1912 IQI3 Vice President of T. S. C. S., 1913. Vice President of T. 1-X. A. 'fPussy" has been with us almost long enough to remember when Mr. Blaine was in politics and Dunham clid11't smoke. He hails from Pennsylvania and has many qualities of its widely advertised Dutchmen, one of which Mr. Taft has repeatedly told him about. Takes great delight, when not having a shredded wheat party at IO.3O P. M., in quelling Thompson and quoting Kipling, also in table repartee-for details see Andrews. Owns a head of kinky hair which he dislikes but keeps for the sake of the girls g and shares the Annex with Dunham. ' IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 141 w fa., gpg , x ""' 'vi 2:11214 is -- ' PAUL BEACH SESSIONS "Sess" BR1s1oL, CONN. Age, I7 years, 4 months. Height, 5 feet, II inches. VVeight, 147 pounds. One year in school. Yale. ' Second Basketball team, 1913. Glee Club, IQI3. Quartette, 1913, This Bristolite decided to stop 'off at VVatertown for a year on his way to New Haven. H-as red hair, wears glasses, and sings, but outside of that he's a pretty good sort of fellow. Spends his time doing Kelley's Latin, when not eating. Wlent out for the Senior team, but decided to save his arm till he got to New Haven. Generally tends to his own business though nearl an f night one can hear him shout out of his 1 b Y 3 Cv window, "W7ho threw that ?" , ?,M.n T42 THE TAET ANNUAL IQI3 ee 5 ' f V - . A CHARLES PHELPS TAFT, Il 'lChas', "Charlie" "Tait" NEW HAVEN, CONN. Age, I5 years, 9 months. Height, 5 feet, II inches. W'eight, 175 pounds. Five years in school. Second Football team, 1911. Football team, IQI2. Basketball team, 1913. Baseball team, 1913. Manager, Tennis, IQI3. Papyrusv Board, IQII, 1912, IQI3. Assignment Editor, 1913. Dramatic Association, 1909, 1910, 1911. 1912, IQI3. President, 1913. Mandolin Club, 1911, 1912, 1913. Sextette, 1912, 1913. Banjo Club, 1912, 1913. Monitor, 1913. President of T. S. C. S., IQI3. Debating Club, 1912, 1913. President, 1913. Scholarship, Prize, 1909. IQIO. IQII, 1913. Second Prize, 1912. Latin Prose Prize, 1912. Latin Sight Translation Prize, 1912. The editor, weary from long enumeration of "Chas's" honors, refilled his pen and tried to think: and the only result was, "How does he do it ?" This is no wonder, for when the grease is thick in most of the rooms in study-hour, he may be invariably found perusing the col- umns of The 51111. Has a cheerful habit of being absent-minded every once in a while Cthey say all men of genius have this failingj, and would have gone to breakfast without his shoes 0116 morning, had not some kind person told him to "come to life." Nevertheless, though he can forget more to the square inch than anyone in school, he some way or other shows a11 almost inconceivable record of deeds in the end. His name is always connected with Q5 per cent, and still he is tl1e only member of the class who is not going to graduate. Cl1c.,4.QQ.-P. -Tazfyiim 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 143 Ui- 57. r . JOHN 1cANDoLF 1HoMPsoN, 111 ffrhompff ' CHICAGO, ILL. Age, 18 years, 9 months. Height, 5 feet, 95 inches. Vlfeight, 125 pounds. Four years in school. Yale. Manager Football Team, 1912. Papyrus Board, 1911, 1912, 1913. Mandolin Club, 1912, 1913. Banjo Club, IQI2, 1913. Debating Club, 1912, 1913. Gun Club, 1913. Vice President, 1913. Dramatic Association, 1913. john is a little man -with the big voice. If nothing were said of him here, you would not be long in .making his acquaintance, as he has a way, peculiar unto himself, of making himself both seen and heard. Has kept time and score for all games since we can't remember when. Is always on business, and you must make appointments with him before- hand. Owns eleven blazers and a sled. Claims that he's as big as Taft: actual measurements disprove this, but taking other things into consid- eration-well, how about it, John? Believes in taking twice as long vacation as the rest of the school, and 'tif you want to see the best city in America, come to Chicago." 144 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 ALLAN TRAIN TRUMBLTLL uflwonywl L11c11r1131,1m, CONN. Age, 18 years, 9 months. Height, 5 feet, IO inches. 'Weight, 145 pounds. Three years in school. Sheffield Scientiiic School. Football team, 1912. Debating Club, IQIZ, IQI3. Secretary, IQI3. Vice President, 1913. Dramatic Association, 1912. 1913. Chairman of Bzzlbul Com- mittee, 1913. Class History, IQI3. A pipe and a laugh and we have a very good picture of this Litch- held-well, o11ce we would have said "farmer," but since he has visited New York several times during the past year we can hardly call him that. As one would gather from our first statement, he is not an over-diligent workerg nevertheless he accomplishes a tremendous amount between two and three. Moreover, in mathematics he has had the honor of having given l1is name to something: a "Trumbull" error Qdon't makenonej. Can smoke anything from corn-silk to hemp. Spends most of his time convincing his room-mate of something that he doesn't believe. Ylle would say more but fear that we would run on to a big tale. 1913 THE TAFT ANNUAL 145 ,l, HERMON LEONARD UNDERHILL "Hern1ie" "Undie" "Heian" Q Owizco, N. Y. Age, 20 years, 2 rnonths. Height, 5 feet, IO inches, Weight, 193 pounds. Four years in school. Yale. Second Football team, IQIO. Football team, IQII, IQ12. Track team, IQI2, 1913. Second Baseball team, 1911. Manager Basketball team, 1913. Assistant Manager. 1912. Papyrus Board, IQII, 1912, IQI3f Mandolin Club, IQIO, IQII, 1912. Glee Club, IQIO, 1911, 1912, 1913. Leader, 1913. Football Dance Committee, 1912. After interviewing some of those on this lean nyn1ph's corridor, we have learned part-we assure you but a small part- of l1is life. He is affable, to say the least, and believes thoroughly that everything that is yours is his also. But even here his optimism and good nature sometimes prevail, for if the mud is not too deep, he lets you have your arctics on Sunday. Having' lost "the hidden soul of harmony," he can be heard seeking it at almost any time-and we hope he finds it soon. vVVvl'1CI1 leading cheers, he tells us to "wash his handsf, but we think he is almost capable of doing that himself. In fact, he is an "all round" man. 146 THE TAET ANNUAL IQI3 -GEORGE CORYDON XVAGNER "Wa0",' "Dutch" b TACOMA, W Asn. Age, I7 years, 8 months. Height, 5 feet, IO inches. Weight, 130 pounds. Two years in school. Sheffield Scientiflc School. Tennis, 1912, 1913. Oracle Board, 1913. Banjo club. 1913. Gun Club, 1913. This bustling product of the Golden Wfest is a tennis player of great renown. It is whispered among the best circles that McLoughlin gave him instructions, bidding him to uphold the honor of the Pacific Coast, before he left on his pilgrimage to the East. At any rate, he's got a pretty big cup in his room which his room-mate will tell you in awed tones was won in a tennis tournament fwe think there were two entriesj. He believes that his great success lies in keeping himself in strict physical condition, and with this in View he usually takes a spring trip to Bermuda, being under the care of certain members of the Faculty. He has learned by infinite patience to play the banjo-also through the patience of those on his corridor. , IQI3 . THE TAFT ANNUAL 147 r BENJAMIN STUART VVALCOTT ffsfewf' VVASHINGTON, D. C. Age, 16 years, II months. Height, 5 feet, IO inches. Weight, 145 pounds. y One year in school. WVilliams. Dramatic Association, 1913. This representative from Vlfashington is the original India-rubber martyr. Keep well away from him if you have any of that article about your anatomy. It is reported that when he was forced to use crutches, having injured his ankle, he absolutely refused to use any rubber tips on them, exclaiming, "Think of those poor souls Working-" but here he was grabbed by "Shorty," who made him read an article in the Outlook. Ran half-mile in the class meet but no official time was taken, owing to the fact that the timer was only provided with an eight-day clock. Besides this he is remarkable for having taken live years of "Taft School Latinn in one. W afiiwf ' 148 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 ,af x -, .-i:5f7',. .i-l., ' g " -f ' .- , -. '21, -,Ar ' 1 - -fun,-ei: V., ,- ..,g, f "' f' S-..f'5f4p"'-25: X - . :P + . . A 1 .,.qg,,A3? ..,.f:'?v- I , , .71- '- vig, ,Arg .A A .JA 1g,.,,..v :-'-ifflif " " 1 s--fl lrfvfisf-51' H ' 21 M - ,n:?g','f.A.9.1j F. s- X ,- ju :.' 4:4- r--'f .,..,,.. f- wr' ,. z,g:: r 1.33, -J! -- -L' Z 5'-f-' F11 i?PggLfifff:z' , U, .:v...,-t sv., V- LZ. IH., f-:if 4' - if-+2 lsff:-1344 'f M- -' 'f gf':A'2? ffa'-,gigigv A, ., 4 ' '-Qfi' . ' '-ini: 1 - f'. Q? F' ,, .,. ,- ,,..f.,...,4gf.,f,g.,ff.,,.,.,,f,. 2,11 3" 1' Wi! ' qizg-ze- f:f1,'.f+i1 ARTHUR LATHROP ZERBEY cczerbrr YVILICESBARRE, PA. Age, I7 years, 5 months. Height, 5 feet, 6 inches. Vlfeight, 135 pounds. One year in school. Yale. Baseball team, 1913. The modest Senior !-not that the rest aren't modest, butl. Fur- thermore he has been known to stump Mr. McIntosh Cand we hope you donlt want any more proof that he's there with the brainsj. But wait! Maybe by reading so far you havenlt pictured our "Shrub" in the proper light. Wfho would guess that he is an athlete? Yes, he played baseball, all right, and the way those bases flew by him as he ran would make Thorpe himself envious. His broad grin has so cheered us all that one cannot but regret that he has been here but one year. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL I f? tl Tritt mt ll -0 if me VHN lslllllitli Q J , Qld Rip Van NVinkle de Tait, sir, Awoke on a bright summers day, To find to his fast-growing horror I-Ie'd slept twenty years quite away. The reason I have all this knowledge, Vtfhich Ilm quickly imparting, you see, Is this, the simplest of answers, R. IW. de Tait, sir, is me. So now to the point of my story- Too much of this might be a boreg And pardon, please,' errors in grammar' This poet has ne'er writ before. O Muse, 'tis tit I invoke youg On my knees to implore your good aidg Ye editor seeks a class forecast And that person needs must be obeyed. So Muse, with your kinclest permission, Iill jot down a line or two here, And when people finish perusing It, I should worry, I fear. As I was descending the mountain, A shot rang' out loud in the air QJTKAJTC 49 go THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 And I ran into old "Penny" Cooper NVho had just finished killing a bear. Once again I was off for the village, But stopped for a drink at a farmg Lo! out rushes Elihu Lyman So pleased to give me the glad arm. As I'm nearing the bounds of my township, A signboard stands greeting my eye "Use Andrew's wonderful tonic- Vtfith it the hair cannot die !" I smile and recall how poor "Gussie" Used to wheedle an egg from the cook, And buy all of Murph's latest tonics To save his dear hair-But here, look! "I'Iermy" Underhill comes up the sidewalk And a tear can be seen in his eye. l'Oh 'Rip,' won't you lend me a raincoat? I'll return it, I swear, bye and bye." just then a crowd of young students Rush forth from a school-building smallg "W'i1lie" Bourne comes a-following after The principal of Corwin Hall. As I walk on, the houses are closer,- The streets take on more of an air. "I'll wager a dollar," I murmur, "john Thompsonls been booming things here." Nor am I all wrong in my guessing: Before my eyes Cdoings of Fate!Q Is an othce whose sign in the window Reads: Iohn Thompson, Choice Real Estate. Next door our old friend Austin Dunham Sells pipes, cigarettes, and cigars, Wfith a present with each dollar purchase Of a pound of tobacco in jars. IQI3 TI-IE TAPT ANNUAL ISI On the corner I purchase a paper, W'hose boss was none else but Clive Day, And look for an ad of amusements To help drive my dull care away. Aha! at the Orpheum The'ter, Given up to renned vaudeville, Among a long list of bum actors "Sam" Iiells' name is there on the bill. Another act on the same programme QI11 brackets they call it "a bear"j Is one by "Bun" Benner and "Tommy," Entitled a "dance on the stairf' Asudden desire for a soda Turns my steps to a nearby drug-store, Russell Bartlett is there at the counter, Consuming a 'fdopei' as of yore. The clerk's face is very familiar, I puzzle to think who it is: "Stoddard Johnston!" I cry, full of wonder, 'When he asks me: "Plain water or 'hz ?' ' The front door then slams with a racket, A cheery voice rings in my ear. "It's George!" I exclaim in amazement, "I Wonder what heisldoing here. Perhaps he no longer keeps training, Our hand-ball captain at school, The king of them all in the bluff game And ditto in slinging the droolf, 'f'Why Rip, I'm so glad to see you, Pray tell what you're doing around? For years We have placed you as resting 'Vkfhere the rivers of booze do abound' U I tell him the tale of 1'1'1y sleeping And how I have once more bestirred IS2 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 To visit my Taft ,I3 classmates. His answer is: '6VVell, you're a bird !" But nevertheless then he tells me In his same old humorous way Wfhat all the old fellows are doing And how they are earning their pay. Byrne, as we all had expected, Is a judge in the Federal Court, ls married, has two little 'fBillies," And puts down the booze by the quart, Hudson Burr is presenting a series Of lectures on Panama old, Wfhile a great surprise follows right after' "Tony', Trumbull's a bachelor bold, The last man T'd pick for that honor. CI'm down on all matrimony For particulars see Mr. Irving And then you can well pity ine.j Arthur Bunker's a big husky porter, QA gasp here escapes from my lipsj But the dignity he always carried Coinpels him to scoff at all tips. f'Bill" Davis, he says, is the pres'dent Gf a school corresponding by mail And boasting to cure men of bowlegs. Provided they shell out the "kale." He tells me that Nelson has started A libr'y of fiction and suchg Wlhen I ask, "Is it free to the public?" My friend loudly hollers, "Not much!" Among all the best-sellers in it Arthur Zerbey's new book may be seen Called E.1'fFI'l01lCUS -zviflz. the Blank Verses, Or Hl'llfS for the Poet lVlz0's Green. IQI3 TI-IE TAFT ANNUAL I5 "Alas!" I exclaim in a moment, HOf 'Pussy, you'Ve said not a bit, Of fPussy,' our former class-pres'dent, A corking good fellow to witf' "I-Ie's planning a visit to Europe," My guide begins to explain, But I shout out in boisterous laughter, "I-Ie's up to his old tricks again!,' "And what has come of 'Dutch' Wfagner P" I ask in a bright hopeful tone. "Velocipedes still are his hobby And reaping the oats he has sown. 'Chas' Taft is now starring in opera- I always said he could sing- But heard him last night with S. Kelley, Wfho said, 'I can't grant him a thingf H "In baseball we're well represented,', Continued my friend very soon, T 'Z 'Stew' Wfalcottfs a Major League umpire, And with ease he is able to croon 'Yer out, you Robinson loafer,' For ,limmy's made good at the game, And has robbed J. McGraw of his salary And made for himself quite a nanief' MOI Sessions to me you've not spoken," I said, in an effort to gain All the news from my noisy companion. "Pray what business does he maintain ?l' "IfVhy Sessions has made his profession That of playing the organ and such, I-Ie started that back in our schooldays And likes the sport ever so muchf' "Then 'El1C1'CiS Mallon-I'd almost forgot h So high has he risen 'bove me- im , I THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 He's a Congressman from my old district, And a statesman that's going to be Someone worth while ere he leaves us, You mark my words, take them all in, For Neil, with the tact of a Franklin, Is a man on Whose word you can pin." That's all of them now, patient reader, But I think that you all will agree That forecasting is not my vocation And "back to the mountains" for me. Very Well, I'll be off in a minute, QI must stop though and have my beard shavedj And leave you to say at your leisure How well T ,I3 has behaved. saggy 156 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 fl fl5K STORY. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL I An Alphabetical School Day Acrostical as this may seem to be, Because the letters reach from A to Z, Carefully 'tis written, if not well, Done between the soundings of the bell. Early as the sun dare show his head, Frightened by the sun, while still in bed, Grappling with a collar, 'gainst the odds of fate, Hurrying to school, just to find you're'late, Insisting that the bell was rung a half minute early,- jamming, pushing, fighting, shoving, everybody surly g . Knowing word by word the morning bill o' fare: Little cream as usual, which always goes to Sayre, Muffins, enemies of heat, and omelets icy cold, No one dares deny it, for the tale is very old. Of course the day of work is there before us still: Prayers and supplications our souls and hearts do fill, Quotations overwhelm us, rules are all forgot, Rushing over pages, that we learned have not. Sessions held from two to three Qthey mark our ignoran Terror fills our very souls Coh, what a circumstancej. Unfortunately we do find, our marks are very low, Very often is the case, we wonder "VVhy 'tis so ?" Wait till mathematics come, the fear of Wfilliam Byrne, "X plus Y plus Z"-he says, "is all you have to learnf C a Yet even then, we're very fond of this' old school, so dear, Zeal inspires every heart, and knowledge conquers fear. 158 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1913 We Should Worry! Burr should worry, get sick, and undermine his system. P. Sessions should worry, buy some peroxide, and die. Crapo should worry, get a job, and draw a salary. The gun team, go on a tear, and get shot: Bunker should worry for seven days and grow weak. F. N. Barton should worry, buy a Gillette, and raze his prices. The "Judge" should worry. fall into the stove and Byrne. Dunham should worry, be a plumber, and have plenty of pipes. Fisher should worry, purchase a hammer, and gain a few pounds. Sayre should worry, buy a whetstoue and grind. Wfe should all worry, start running. and pass our exams. IQI3 TI-IE TAFT ANNUAL 159 Quotations New School-'fAnd still be doingt never done." T. S. C. S. reformation-"No season now for calm familiar talk." Civil Government Class-"T he more we study, we more discover our ignorance." Mr. Wa1'd fin Senior English dailyl-HO night and day, but this is wondrous strange V' Thompson-"'Ilhough vanquished he could argue still." Trumbull-"I could a tale unfold." Burr-"O Cuckoo! Shall I call thee bird. Or but 21 wandering Voice P" Cooper-"The hell within him." - Kelley-"VVhy all this rush and fuss and great anxiety to live ?" I-Iollister-"I shall never beware of my own wit until I break my shins upon itf, ' Dunham-"I-Ie was not merely a chip off the old block, but the old block itselff' E Bunker-f'All the great men are dying, and I'm not well myselff, Corwin-f'Life is short and so am If, Donnelley-"A schoolboy's tale, the wonder of the hourf, I. Robinson-"All work, even cotton spinning, is noble: work is alone noblef, . Wfatertown-"Far from the madding crowd, ignoble strife." Davis-"Thou hast the sweetest face I ever looked upon." C. Taft-" But men are men: the best sometimes forget? Mr. Wfheeler-"I am a man that from the first has been inclined to thrift." Glee Club-"I-Iow this discord doth afllict my soul V' Byrne-"Every why has a whereforef' I6O THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 Taft Echoes junior-"Please, Mr. Dunham, may I sleep with Bob to-night? Mr. Taft gave me permission and Mr. McIntosh said it was all right." Dunham Cdubiouslyj-"Oh, I suppose so." Student CMonday morningj-HSay, Metty, why are you all dressed up? Look at your trousers-therels not a crease in them !" Mr. 'Ward Qin English Classj-'KHOW can you distinguish the Lady in Camus from an ordinary person ?,' Burr Cinnocentlyj--"VVhy, she was virtuous' Mr. Ioline-"VVell, George, translate." George-"Er-ah-er-er-.U Mr. joline-"XVell, George, you may cease translating." Senior Cmusingj-"VVell, I'll Wish Ld laughed at his jokes when Lm tutoring in geometry this summerf' Master fat dinnerj-Hjohn, please don't read newspapers at the table." Thompson-"Oh, that's all right, this is the 'Papf l' Member of Annual Board-"George, you're very witty, aren't you?" George-i'Sure.'l Member-"lVhy don't you write for the Amzzzal? George-"Huh! lVhat's that got to do with wit ?" Calhoun Qin historyj-"Carthage's territory extended from the Pil- lars of Hercules to the Rock of Gibraltar." Coit Ceyeing a glass of water UU at dinnerj-"Thanks, this is delicious. VVho mixed it ?', First student-"Miz Roberts gives us all kinds of figures of speech in Latin Classfl Second student-"So does Mr. Hobart in German Classg we have anacoluthon, aposiopesis and Pelonskyf' IQI3 TI-TE TAFT ANNUAL 161 Information Bureau All ready knowledge of anything and everything in the Tait School. If you want to know why they should have a "GTT,' ' Ask Garfield. If you want to know how you can go to New York every Sun- day without points, y See Calhoun. If you want to know .anything about Bermuda Chickens, Question Wfagner. If you want to know how to put away twelve shredded wheat at one sitting, Take breakfast with Bunker. If you want to know the joys of the denierit system, Get C. Robinson to elucidate. If you want to know Leffertls middle naine, Inquire from Davis. If you want to know how to shoot three men with two bullets and not repent afterwards, Look up Curtis. lf you want to know how to avoid seasickness, Drop into Dunhanfs rooni. If you want to know how to graft an Elton Dinner ott a Sun- day-School, e Petition Burr and Wfolf. CBut we hope you won't want to.j lf you want to know how it feels to be married, , Hunt up Mike. If you Want to know anything else, Visit Donnelly. 162 THE TAFT ANNUAL IQI3 Extracts from English Papers He listens to the morning' lwealcing.-Scz,y1'e. For instance, a man sees a woman and goes home thinking about her,-a thing' which was not the custom in the days of C3.l1'O.-447'Zd7'6ZC'S. A rush candle means a candle quickly brought.-? The Puritans came in small ships ready to enclure ha1'clsl1ips.-T1'1mz- 171111. Then Ben Ionson's learned rocks are spoken of as an amusing' enter- tainment for one wishing an attractive pageailt.-Uzzdvrlzill. Une of the many enemies of popular government, which injures Morality and Religion, is Public Credit.-Ecllfs. Sent to Sing' Sing on a charge of second-hand 1UL11'ClCl'.-PO'ZL'CN. He opened the g'irl's strong'-box with the can-opener attachment, and then reacl all the llrissels.-B-w'11v. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 163 ATTENTION ONE AND ALL! The Annual Takes Great Pleasure in Placing the Following Publications Before the School JUST ON THE MARKET The Call of the Carpenter ................... Charge It ........................ Dancing and Dancers of To-day .... A Dome of Many Colors ........V The Eldest Son ................ The Harvester ..... The Iron 'Woman .................. lust Boy ................... Q .......... The Man W'ho Understood Wlomen .... Marriage .... ........... . ........... . A Miscellany of Men ..,.... . The Red Cross Girl ........... The Scout Master of Troop 5 ..... Social Life in Old New Orleans .......... The Soul of a Tenor ...................... I The Unknown Quantity fa masterly storyj .. NEXV EDITIGNS The Foreigner ....... .................... ..... The Head Coach ...... The Man Higher Up .... Dr. Luke of Labrador . .. .. . . . The Private Secretary . . . . . . . Set in Silver ........ The Talker ....,... ... .... ..' ....... ..... The Wlizard of Oz ....,........................ And a Colossal Undertaking ...... Byrne ...E1'ery1l1c11i ... Metcalfe Coit .,..N, llJUll0l1 .. E. Lyman . PV. Bowne Variel ... Kelley ... Dzzlzlzallz ..... Faculty Miss Lowry ,,C1z1'fix . . PV. Clarke .... Presfozz MV. G. l'l'eld Mr. Gardvzez' Nr. llfelfoll . N. Gfirjield PV. Ufolf Mrs. Gardzzef' .... Sterling .... R. f0ll71'SOIl Mr. Roberts The Ward Edition of Shakespeare fPocket Slzeb With Notes by W. Bourne All's Vilell That Ends Wlell ..... ......... . . Diploma As You Like It ,........... .....,...,... P Iolllsler Comedy of Errors ......... Dramatic Axsocialiozl King' Iolm ............,... ......,... 1 Ur. Dallas Love's Labors Lost ........ ....... S weeziy Midsummer Nighfs Dream Much Ado About Nothing ... .... The Merchant of Venice .... The Tempest .........., .... A VVinter's Tale .. . .... ..Cu111zi1zgl1am, f. TIZOJIIPSOVZ- M11 lfVBlf0ll .. Mr. Ufells Marlaing Book 164 THE TAIFT ANNUAL' IQI3 WOULD THE SUN CHASE SHINING 'EF 13gm.Tz'sl-1111112 was Mussels ? ' S vv EENE Y CQULD NOT DFINCE? Plissrow DID- NOT PLHYTHE Pnrzmo? MaWee:rou LET Flwvowe Our OPS-row CLRSS? DHN .Sumvnm M!rN'r Ou'rOF BU51Nr:55? L.'EoBaNsoN CouLDN'T5FvY l'GoT FINYTHINGTQ CUNHINGHHM BRHUSHED I-lfs H HIE ? KELLEY 51-opPEuTfw1Nc.To FU55 THEGIRLS? Dvnmnm Dm NOT GET Hxslwlggascnnum? IBENNER MFIRKED FINYQNE ONT4-:E FLURTHFQQOR? LHUNDRYSENT-Bncx H-PHIR Or Sobxs-F: Vlnrcu? DONNELLY Coon: NQTTHRQWTHEBULL? Jwcos :Dua Nor HHVE HNY BIGDOPE ? T'bz'WnnDFoRoo1'TB.XM1Nn THE CLOCK ? -me FlNNunL CHME OUTONTINE ? METCHLF KNEW H15 FRENCH? Loiansu. Mussel: Fi l'IfaHL? THIS WHS HCCEPT ED BYTHE FlNNUnJ 6? ic. IQI3 THE TAFT ANNUAL 1 EVEN IF wi DIDNT Fur THE rm nv Pon if WE FPUT IT QV STYUNS I-IRR HEY T' ISGMQQF AT vu-r -rue H' A 5 STVR IN as MNSTER JW Q Q 456, Lawn j Pinis The end has conieg our days of school are oler, And as this book we close, the last wide door Through which we pass to yet more vital things Ts opened, and the sight of Future brings Before us by its harsh proximity The truth that stern responsibility Must soon upon our shoulders heavy lie. And, as we on Life's threshold pause to eye The world in which our work niust soon be laid, And hesitate, and Wonder if afraid lVe'll shirlc the duties men ought never fear. A courage springs from what we've learned while here, The school's true spirit puts our minds at rest- A111bltlO11!S creed, "do more than 'wellf do 'best' 'l And now from this, the place of help, we part. From rnen, true friends, dear to each heart. TV e niust go forth with no strength but our own To try the world's rough paths alone. But when kind Fate doth lead us back again Wtelll conie to thank-'tis here we learned were men. LJLQIC Complimenis of john R. Thompson Co d 1'XI Tll'fX1 5- N - LEVI N w1m3RTowN GARAGE Repairing and Storage Main Street Branch ONE MINUTE FROM SCHOOL Opposite School DOOLITTLE Sc PUTNANI Carpenters and Builders Cabinet W01'li, Interior Finish General Mill Worli Telephon 116 5 1dlNI lllfX 1 P. N . L U N D merchant Cailor Repairing, Cleansing, Pressing r Nearly and Promptly Done WATERTOWN - - CONN. Best Results are always obtained by the specialist. Our specialties are pictures, frames ana photo- graphic finishing. Let us serve you in these lines. Careful attention given to mail orders. THE CURTIS ART CO. 25 West Main St. Waterbury - - Conn. The Watertown Lumber Co. s Lumber DOORS, SASH, BLINDS, GLASS, SEWER PIPE AND MASONS' SUPPLIES t X 1 7 Kindly Menti The Taf 1 nnua HOUSE ESTABLISHED 1881 JACOBS 8: JACOBS 1 ailnrn REPRESENTED BY MR. I. M. JACOBS 1086 CHAPEL STREET NEW HAVEN. CONN. 3 IdlNI TlTfX1 I d1yNIt II Ti 'I "3 I 'V Sb 111' onmsi Q? :ai I xr ' . V ' Q 0, QD EY M - S El -nznS1ay in place -Grace 1hc fhce 11 Stanley H. Grater Manufacturing and Refracting Uptician 4th Floor, 65 Bank Street' Waterbury, Conn. Office Hours: 9to12a.ndIto5 Wednesday and Saturday E The Woodruff Grocery Co. Staple and Fancy GROCERI ES Wines and Imported Cigars 40 North Main Street WATERBURY - - CONN THE FILLEY FQ CRANE CO. FURNITURE "TAF'I'S" EVERYTHING NEEDED WE HAVE - t X I 9 ALEXANDER DALLAS INCORPORATED Zin , T "RESERVED H115 Z FOR A FRIEND" 119 GRAND STREET WATERBURY - CONN. NIAKE YOUR ALLOWANCE LAST LONGER Save Nloney on Sporting Goods COLVIPLETE UP-T0-IJATE LINE OF Sweaters Hulltillg Boots and Coats Skis Base Ball Goods Skates Foot Ball Goods Nlackixlaw Coats Tennis Goods Boating and Calnping Supplies OUR LATEST CATALOGUE WILL BE SENT FREE ON REQUEST ontgomery Ward 8: Co. Chicago Avenue Bridge, Chicago IO Kindly Mention The Taft Annual The China Shop China and Glass Novelties in great variety. Flemish, German and Japanese Pot- tery for wall and cabinet decorations. A Hue line of Chafmg Dishes from 33 up. Express paid on all orders. 26 North Main Street Waterbury - - Conn. THE TRACY BROTHERS COMPANY Carpenter and Mason Contracfors MASON SUPPLIES, LU MBER Mill and Cabinet Work Store Fixtures GENERAL JOBBING General Contractors for the new Taft School HURON PORTLAND CEMENT C0. ALPENA, MICH. lulrlurlakxlxlrl lLx!.'l-rl ulifhhlflrlrkrlftrl I 'ulilnrl 'WK-rinfliltl Huron Cement S llllt Kil lllll lil! lllll ililll il ififill llllli llxlli-lli11lfll'lKKKll:. sion A1203 F6203 Cao Mgo S03 22.475 6.115 2.79513 65.615 1.625 1.405 Kindly Mention The Taft Annual Phone 175 MAIN STREET lVIcCLEERY'S Livery, Feed ana' .Boanihg Sfable Baggage transferred to and from the school Carriages meet every train lVIcCLEERY'S HOTEL First-class accommodations for Chauffeurs and Cars Clothes for school and college -that are reliable at popu- lar prices have been macle a particular feature of our business. GRUENER BROTHERS Importers and Tailors 94,4 CHAPEL STREET New Haven - - Conn. RESERVED FOR FRAN K B RCS. FIFTH AVENUE BGCJT Sl-ICP I2 Kindly NI t fl 'l ft A THE MERCHANTS TRUST C0. 1 42 GRAND STREET Waterbury - - - Connecticut Regular Banking and Trust Busi- ness Transacted This Trust Company pays 275 interest on checking accounts and 455 compound interest on savings ZCCOLTIITS. r Our Bonds of Thrift, Perseverance and Independence on which pay- ments are made monthly for three years are worth knowing about. Call at the bank and ask to see them. T355 DAVIS cn, HAWLEY JEWELERS, Inc. 68 BANK STREET Diamonds Fine Engraved Stationery Watches Favors Prizes Emblems ff" ' , 7 ft ' it - Q 's E i . . 1: ' 1 v f .fbi ' , - 5 : ' '75 I , ,I ,--' x f N 1 , , 'muah' ,Mic :ff 'ta . 15" ":r:4'f'Cf :? "'-'f 1, . ' - r 456 4,-' ,h ref THE ELI BOOT HOP Ennivra in 1 aft Svrhnnl 1004 CHAPEL STREET NEW HAVEN, CONN. Opposite Osborn Hall Kindly Hlention The Taft Annual Patrozzized and Recommended DY TA F T Graduates 5 'LHEI O FFAILO .,.., . :f -- dd N W- , E 5014 CHAPEL ST. Nzw HAvaN,CoNN. Makers of SMART COLLEGE CLOTHES Plzofogra bs " Of the Boys For the Boys By the Bronsons " qya BRONSON STUDIO 27 EAST MAIN ST. Waterbury - Conn. X 'Pl-Lone, 1649 K dl NI t 11 Tft X al JAMES W. BRINE CO Official Athletic Ouuqtters TAFT SCHOOL FOOT BALL BASE BALL BASKET BALL TRACK AND HOCKEY SUPPLIES 1436 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS I'IODSON'S CAFE Cafe and Restaurant 20 EXCHANGE PLACE Ladies' and GentIe1nen's Dining Room 16 EXCHANGE PLACE F . WALTER LAWRENCE, Inc 322 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK -If Gems, Precious Stones and Pearls Pearl Neckla C65 JJ' I d d I amples of the art of th I d th 'l mith HARRY EDWARD HARD Svinhin ann Art Shun EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS AND SCHOOL GROUPS A SPECIALTY 56 BANK STREET WATERBURY, CONN I6 I C115 NI r ll Tfcx I To ifze Boys at the Taft School qllVlr. Fitzgerald wishes to thank all the hoys for the many liindnesses extended to his representative during the past school year. r JOHN F. FITZGERALD HABERDASHER NEW HAVEN, CONN. Gi? Colonial Trust Company Capital, s400,0oo Surplus, S270,000 Waterbury - Conn. A. G. WEST Optonletrist Mfg. Upiician WATERBURY, CONN. 95 BANK ST. Room 2, lllullings Building WN f f' EVER - v1i,:.:g:-.al rg-l,L.,e.-..: r-.-.Y- 7A:,..A--.'. . . A . -.u. . . ...i.. .-. ' 144 'Ef 'S' " A -' ' ' -- .. . -L :L "Bl arf, "-w? 6,-L f ' f -1- 1- if e.- ..',., . a . . gf"-'fra-.fr 9 lf 4: 1, . - . ' .. .A,,, l -.s,,,r,.,,,:,,,... ..,. ,Q I 'Nb iff' st D SEM tnffzfisrlr' .ff .1-.was 1 ' 4 ' H :-11 ' -Ar ,- :' 'i-,-V-Ee' , .--.- f :V girl-.-,5.:,, 7'--r ,- .,:,. . , .var5.,,f.,, ' 91: 4225555 'fi arf 'Hi -L 'V 'Ir' doing,-u -P .i?Q15gF'3 ,jg Zvys 55.1 ar ' 's 3 J F vffgf- , "':T4:.p2g fz1.'4.iv i gt, I I . i. , I ,,.. ..,...,.., . ,,.'?,, . , l -'. v I, H :rf wh!-'i 'iv' -.-.- -- ' - me ' ' -PM-,1it7.3F?Yz2.'ibi:1:-ie-31, Q-.:5:f-:.q- H. ' . ' -ef - 1- .,- g.,,,,.,.e,f.,-4..f.,,,.,7.-,,,A,,y 3, , , D O you realize the importance of being well dressed? Do you realize the well dressed man is the one who receives recog- nition in business and society P If you wish to be considered well dressed, you should make this store your headquarters for fur- nishings. We carry an exceptionally fine line and also save you something on the cost. THE TOGGERY SHOP EXCHANGE PLACE M. J. MORAN, Prop. Kindly Mention The Taft Annual If Many-Manpower. Urganization .l,The preciorninating principle oi present clay inclustry is U The Division of Lalnor H niacie effective through organization. Long heiore this principle was recognizecl in commerce it was the secret oi the generalship which won the great hattles of the worlcl. From the Roman Phalanx to the Atlantic Squadron this has been the secret of power. GL This is the principle upon which H The Lalqesiale Pressuhas heen lauiltg sliill and organization have heen cornhinecl to procluce quality and service. The systematic cornhination of ideas, the effectiveness of originality have Won for us the clistinction of lneing The Foremost High Graale Prinling Plan! in America. fl, H The Lakeside Press," lhis N Many-Man Powered M institution whose husiness is Qgaliiy Priniing, is at your service irorn preparation to clis- trihution. OUR FACILITIES Ari Deparirncnl-Expert Designers, Illustrators, Mechaiiical Artists, Commercial Photographers. Engraving Planl- 14' acre- Half- tones, Zinc Etchiugs, 2-3-4 color Process Plates,Wood Engraving. Composing Room - acre - Hanci Compositors, Monotype, Linotype, Type Casters, all new type. Eleclrolype Foundry-,Lf acre-Flat or Curved Plates. Press Room - Ijif acres- Cylinder, Joh, Rotary and Automatic Otliset Presses lor Planogravure. Bincieries-Pamphlet, Catalogues, Perioclicals, Cloth and Leather Bound Boolis. QL Do you not helieve, that with your intel- ligent coeoperation and our unequalleii iacili- ties, our organization ol one thousancl experts, our forty years experience 35 fnakefs ol attractive and artistic printing-we can pro- duce your printed advertising lnetter, more economically in point of lime, convenience and more profilably lo you 9 IL 'K No mailer where you are- our long ciislance service will reach you. U E119 lizrlavaihia litres THE R. R. DONNELLEY E3 SONS CO. CHICAGO, U. S. A. Kindly Mention The Taft Annual when buying a Mandolin, Banjo or Guitar, do not forget that l deal in the very best lines of these instruments at prices that are most reasonable. Cll Also everything pertaining to the same. ClIThorougl'1 instruction on banjo, mandolin, guitar and kindred instruments. J. J. DERVVIN 109 BANK STREET VVATERBURY, CONN. 'Pl-IONE, l849f2 A THE LITTLE SHOP OF QUALITY There is in Watertown zt THIS SPACE " Little Shop of Quality " that offers you the advan- RESERVED FOR tage of over 28 years expe- rience as 21 WVz1tchmaker, Jeweler and Optician. No W E need to go out of town to . ' get your wants attended to in this line. We carry in stock, The Lyhnel..amp, the best study AND lamp made. FRANK E. HEALEY VOCAL WATCHMAKER, OPTOIVIETRIST INSTRUCTQR Main Street Watertown, Conn. ' Telephone 45-3 SPECTACLES AND EYE GLASSES The Thompson Co. Shirtmakers, Mengs Furnishings Hats and Caps Agents for Blark Cross Gloves and Leather Goods 880 CHAPEL STREET, NEW HAVEN, CONN. T ll Nl t 'll Taft Annul 1899 SUl.LlVAN'S PHARMACY 1919 For fourteen years we have striven to please the good people of XVatertown. Our long experience has taught us to carry only the best in each particular line. Our motto is Ql!!ZfZ.Z9f'I?L11Cl Seffzizke. IVe desire to remind you-jot it down now-that you should bear this store in mind for the new school year. LET US SUPPLY YOU WITH V Koclaks Waterman Pens Premo Cameras Ingersoll Watches Taft Banners Victrolas Spalding Athletic Goods Gillette Razors Torrey Razors and Strops and many other things too numerous to mention Our Prescription Department is complete in every detail. Almost anything you Want you can " Get it at Sullivan's." DRUGS THE REXALL STORE KODAKS D. G. SULLIVAN, Registered Pharmacist Kindly Mention The Taft .Xnnual I


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