Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA)

 - Class of 1949

Page 1 of 176

 

Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1949 Edition, Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1949 volume:

HALCYON Son! What ' s alt this the administiation ' s been yritine me about you? ,« »v SWARTHMORE COLLEGE " FREUD would have tomething to wy about that. " ' :7y K» , Bl SWARTHMORE COLLEGE SWARTHMORE PENNSYLVANIA ' : ,. V . . •tSM , ' 1 rfe .. .. " iS l f l j rTi To all of those who are Swarthmore Col- lege, this book is respectfully dedicated. It is so dedicated with unspoken praise and with a word of caution. To the Alumnae ... we shall soon be you, and there is no difference between us. To the Administration that the least of the reasons we come to Swarthmore is to sleep in your dorms, eat in your dinng rooms and live by your regulations . . . that rules and regulations are made to help people live together, not to hinder them . . . and that a frank admission is to be preferred to soft words. To the Faculty . . . that your part of the college lies far beyond your class rooms . . . that we come here unlearned, but we do so in order that we may learn . . . that freedom of education means equal opportunity, and judgment solely upon merit. To the Students that you are here for the development of the mind, and of the inner self, rather than of the ego . . . that no group has the right to take it upon itself — unbid- den — to say how others shall live and act . . . that the engineer with his road and the scien- tist with his experiment, each have a respon- sibility as to their destination or use, and he cannot claim an occupational deferment from the world around him . . . that apathy is one of the greatest enemies . . . and that time is not standing still while we prepare for the future, and our lives now are no less im- portant than what is to come. . A PHILOSOPHY 01 ' EDUCATIOX " She ' s a rum ' un is Education, " to paraphrase Mr. Squeers in Nicholas Nickleby, " . . . more easier concei ed than described. " Certainly no one des- cription would fit the philosophies and programs this country offers its students, and no one statement ivill do justice to the educational ideals of Swarthmore College, or reflect the differences of opinion of those whose business it is to formulate and execute the program. Three propositions, howe er. summarize certain features in Lne practice and ideals of the college. 1) A liberal education involves the development and discipline of the mind. A disciplined mind is one that knows how to analyze complex data and to rise methods suitable to the material. To do so, it must possess at least some of the common intellectual skills necessary to the understanding of man and his environment, including the appraisal of values inherent in human action. Intellectual discipline is, in the last analysis, self-discipline, and the college can but provide the setting and the tools. Each individual must depend upon his native qualities plus the use made of time and opportunity. Freedom from many conventional academic restrictions puts the responsibility on the indi idual. The honors program, above all, is designed to foster this intellectual discipline and achievement. Introduced twenty-five years ago by President Aydelotte to compensate for what he called the academic lock-step of mass education, it is needed even more today. Some students want combinations not a ailable and elect to remain in course. Some do not want to make the effort that honors work requires. Some are not yet capable of it. Honors work is not the only method of intellectual sahation, but its success at Swarthmore and the subsequent wide imitation elsewhere emphasize the first ideal of genuine education. 2) A liberal education provides a common background. The range of human knowledge and the diversity of individual interests are so great that some degree of specialization is necessary and desirable. Equally necessary and desirable is a certain amount of common information and intellectual background. If men are- to deal intelligently with their problems as members of society, they need to understand each other ' s language. The scientist cannot be a good citizen if he is ignorant of economics and politics. The political economist cannot understand the natural scientist if he knows nothing of the rigor if the scientific method. Both ought to be familiar with the classis expressions in philosophy and literature of tlie way men have conceived human life. Thus, a liberal education ought to deal with certain broad concerns of men in their relations with each other, concerns which underlie their indi idual enjoyment of life and their common efforts to develop a civilized societ). For this purpose some subjects are more important than others. This recog- nition is embodied in the new curriculum vith its various required courses in the first two years. There is room for debate whether the particular subjects now prescribed are the best or whether the content of the requiresd courses best serves the common end. The ideal, howe ' er, is receiving increasingly -svide recognition in contemporar education. S)A liberal education includes the development and disclipine of the emotions. Those who look uison the college or university as a kind of intellectual factory only, are wrong. The development of the mind and of the emotions do not alwa)s go handin hand. The ideal is the growth of the t vo together, and any college which fails to recognize both the ideal and the close i-iterconn°ction of the two in the actual learning process is failing in its responsibility. This is why the spirit and attitude embodied in a college are as important as its intellectual standards and methods. The Quaker tradition of Swarthmore plays an important role in providing a framework of values and attitudes which cannot be taught in classes, but which permeate the institution in the quiet way typical of the Society of Friends. Student activities contribute to the total education. They are not sideshows, but, when used wisely,should form an integral part of the academic program. In proper proportion, they are a vital part of a liberal edu- cation concei cd as the de elopment of men and women whose intelligence is directed bv character and ivhose philosophy of life is sharpened bv discii lined and informed minds. JOHN W. NASON TABLE OF CONTENTS DEDICATION 2 PRESIDENT NASON 4 ADMINISTRATION 8 FACULTY 13 STUDENTS 31 ACTIVITIES 88 FRATERNITIES 106 DORMITORIES 112 MEN ' S SPORTS 118 WOMEN ' S SPORTS 135 THE CHOSEN PEOPLE 143 SWARTHMOREANA 148 ADVERTISING DIRECTORY 168 CRUM LEDGE GATES AND FACULTY ROW DEAN EVERETT L. HUNT Ever since his arrival in Swarthmore in 1925, Dean Hunt has been a self-styled " student ' s attorney " ; he believes it is the Dean ' s job not to make and enforce rules, but to see that the rules established by the students and faculty bring about the happiest and most successful level for all concerned and to represent the interests of the individual student to whom the mechanical rules do not apply. Dean Hunt is the affable advisor to all men on any matter— his concern is always for the indi- vidual as well as the group. He also interviews visiting prospective students, and handles most of the veterans ' applications. An extremely busy administrator, he is also a much-valued professor, teaching classes and seminars in literary criticism and his beloved Milton. And with Mrs. Hunt, the Dean is much in demand as chaperone for social functions— re- member them at a recent T. P. blowing soap bubbles? Yet in spite of being one of the busiest men on campus, this jovial Westerner somehow manages to find time to listen to his Bach recordings or to rvui through his movies of the West. Dean Hunt, with his warm-hearted friendliness and understanding, has become one of Swarth- moi e ' s most prized possessions. DEAN SUSAN P. COBBS Not only does Miss Cobbs handle the duties of a Dean of Women— the interviewing of applicants, the advising of students on problems of any nature— with great skill and charm, but she is also a member of the Classics Department. That southern accent proclaims her as a former resident of Alabama, and also provides, with her amused consent, any of the college mimics with an entertaining subject. And she herself is remembered for her part in the recent skit of the Club Roccatorso. In residence at Benjamin West House, Miss Cobbs gives teas for freshman girls, furnishing herself with a chance to know them all person- ally, and for the girls to meet each other and feel at home. VICE PRESIDENT JAMES PERKINS No stranger to the HALCYON is Mr. Perkins; Sports editor for the ' 36, he was reported to be a " scholar, conscientious and tirorough ... a ready conversationalist . . . and the possessor of a decisive firm type of personality. " He was a member of the well-sung Economics Honors group of that year. Before returning to Swarth- more in ' 40, he served on the Princeton faculty, and in the OPA and FEA. As chairman of the campaign, his worries run into the millions, and yet he managed to assume the additional duties created by President Nason ' s leave of absence this fall. COMPTROLLER CHARLES G. THATCHER Calm, even, quiet, efficient, Mr. Thatcher pays the bills. Under his direction and control, Swarthmore functions: buildings grounds, business offices, house director, dining room— all are part of his ultimate responsibility. The making of the budget, payment of salaries, and departmental expenditures also fall under his jinisdiction. But his connection with Swarthmore is more than of checks and ledgers. He was graduated in the Class of ' 12, and married into that of ' 13. Prof, to the slide-rule pushers, Mr. Thatcher was head of the Engineering department for ten years. " Whenevr you are all mixed up and feelin ' sick o ' men Just go to Old Charles Scarrett and he ' ll fix you up again You ' d think him just a slow old cus with no chance at all for fame, Biu he ' s mighty fine to have around, he ' s always just the same. " -HALCYON 1912 ASSOCIATE DEAN ALICE L. MORAN Aiding Miss Cobbs is our Associate Dean of Women, Miss Alice Moran, a charmins; and effcient person. Her chief responsibility is handling the larger share of work involved in the selection of women students. She shares with Miss Cobbs the interviewing of applicants who come down to Swarthmore. She also travels to New England and the mid-West, interviewing prospective students, which must be done be- tween the end of February and the middle of April, making the spring a rather hectic time. As vocational advisor for women. Miss Moran conducts privavte interviews with seniors on the question of jobs after graduation, and, under her guidance, the vocational committee has sponsored lectures by faculty members of differ- ent departments on job prospects for majors in various fields. Before coming to Swarthmore, Miss Moran was secretary of the tutorial system at Radcliffe and of the Harvard Graduate School office. Although she has been here less than three years, she has made for herself ari enviable place in the heart of the College. ASSISTANT DEAN J. DEMARIS AFFLECK When Demmie Affleck was graduated last year she had a big job ahead of her— that of Assistant Dean of Women at Swarthmore. Demmie had shown herself particularly capable for this type of work during her undergraduate years. She was awarded the Oak Leaf Medal as being the most outstanding for loyalty, scholar ship and service in her class. She was also a member of Mortar Board and president of W. S. G. A. As Assistant Dean, Demmie has control of the conduct books and special permissions, is advisor to the Social Committee,W .S. G. A. and the Student Council, and has charge of the baby- sitting agency. However, her position is pri- marily that of advisor to any or all students who need the help of someone familiar with student problems. In this respect, she is housemother of Parrish and freshman coinisellor. Demmie made a quick transfer from student to faculty, and she is convinced that the factdty position is much the better of the two— as she phrases it, " no homework " . 10 ASSOCIATE DEAN JOHN M. MOORE In the field of veterans ' affairs, Mr. Moore has the double task ot acting as a representative ot the college to the Veterans ' Administration, and as faculty advisor to the veterans themselves. Mr. Moore came to Swarthmore from Ham- ilton College four years ago to teach philosophy and religion. After being here for two years, he was offered the job of Associate Dean. As Mr. Carrell says, it is John Moore ' s ability for organ- ization which has caused things to fall naturally into their places with almost a minimum of effort. As an additional responsibility, Mr. Moore is also the Executive Director ot the National Coimcil of Religious Education, which aids young men who wish to do graduate work in religion, and helps them to get jobs after they have been graduated. Next year he will also take on the responsibilities of the Registrar ' s Office. In interviewing, advising, and teaching, Mr. Moore ' s mature judgement and ready sympathy have been appreciated by all students. ASSISTANT DEAN JEPTHA J. CARRELL " Jep " Carrell came to Swarthmore in the fall of 1946, after his discharge from the Marine Corps. He had previously studied at Swarthmore with the V-12 unit, and had finished his studies at F. and M., and at Penn Graduate School. His work at Swarthmore is purely administrative. Since it is difficult to interview each applicant for Swarthmore due to distances involved, Mr. Carrell has been organizing alumni committees in various parts of the country who will do some of the intei-viewing for the College. An- other purpose of this Alumni Center Organi- zation is to help create more alumni interest in the school. Also, it is hoped that the alumni will seek out more applicants themselves, thus providing a better choice for the College. " Jep " is extremely well-liked around campus. Summer afternoons will find him out in the Wharton quad warming up his pitching arm with the boys. Young himself, " Jep " is well able to appreciate and answer the questions of Swarthmore ' s many veterans, as well as to help cure the men ' s everyday headaches. 11 FRAN SHERO l» A ENOS CHEMISTRY CARPENTER HUMMEL MORRILL FONER JENKINS ■hll •1 When I was a boy in Jopplin, Missouri " SWAN CLASSICS HISTORY FIELD LAFORE SPAULDING TOLLES guess tba We " ■e .ill " t -Jr " ' ' ' tie ht. WENCELIUS " To the enterprising student . . MATHEMATICS and ASTROiOMY PHILOSOPHY FIRTH SHRECKER ' nothinii else bi RITCHIE FLEMISTBR MEINKOTH X hon I sas working with Hartman . . . " Education is a serious business Now.- blow! " SCHOFIELD, BATTIN, EAGAN, BROADHURST. DEVRIES, HEY- ROTH, HAAS, FINCH, CLIFFORD JOHN FULLER ADAMSON ne ■el call him b his middle name . . . sets dangerously excited, once in a while about social matters . . . tremendous life as combat infantry man . . . economics . . . relaxation on week- ends with music and art . . . considers the sack the greatest human invention . . . future plans: graduate school and grandfatherhood . . . johnny BARBARA LEIGH AESCHLIMAN short strolls and after-limch siestas . . . sidjbies and sea . . . cecil, the red wagon . . . " where ' s my martin key? " . . . always late, except when it matters . . . beloved for her spongy shoulder, but she has her own fantastic problems, too . . . everything that happens to her turns into an ad- venture . . . " das leben ist ein trap " . . . every- one knows barri WALTER EDWIN AHRENS between martin and anywhere else on campus . . . especially the observatory ... on the gym floor during square dances . . . " up in the po- conos last siunmer we " . . . knows where he ' s going . . . it ' s usually abbreviated m.d. . . . a war) ' foe in any btdl session . . . un- usually warnr and thoughtful friend . . . with no enemies . . . big ed MURRAY GRIEVE ALBERTSON " just dropped in to say howdy " . . . mashed potato kid . . . martini-lover . . . " no lemon for me, please " . . . beaver . . . dancer extraor- dinaire . . . mercinial . . . blissful drinker . . . consulting engineer . . . those blushful jokes ... a face full of grin . . . worrier . . . cub- bearcat . . . buck hill will never forget him . . . chained to a slide rule . . . dartmouth memories . . . cocktails in the morning . . . jet-propelled ELIZABETH ANN ALDERFER quiet, friendly, and unruffled . . . capable presi- dent of palmer, but not above climbing in ia the fire escape in an emergency . . . bid ble gum addict . . . can be foimd behind horn- rimmed spectacles and a stack of books fding her nails . . . " i ' m clueless ' " . . . perpetualh ' plan- ning to " cut clown on my smoking " . . . barber- shop harmon) in the shower at 2:02 in the mor- ning . . . dry wit that startles . . . ann 32 ROBERT NELSON ALF ANDRE the true cosmospoiitan . . Itc ingenue and rec- ord holder . . english honors . . . intelligent, despite his baleful prophecies . . . niexican sum- mers and trench futuies . . . bob ROLF OTTO AMANN air of precision hides inner warmth ... a char- acter right out of dahl ' s boston . . . dartmouth background, sought by tech and harvard, but chose svvarthmore . . . expounds infinite knowl- edge of public transportation . . . from diligent manager to kwink executive . . . " but, bill, the braves ha e a sensational st|uad this year! " . . . o-o-o-o-tto WILLIAM DAUGHETY AMIS constant war on intolerance from politics to race . . . active member of pea, race relations, debat- ing club, student federalists . . . writes and talks for sn classical music . . . interested in sociol- ogy, philosophic discussions, and women . . . the walking paradox: an energetic southern lib- eral . . . good talker with worthwhile ideas . . . good listener with a quick laugh . . . " yes, but mv point is " . . . the key word is action . . . bill JANET LOWE ANDERSON the only swarthmorean who is never cynical . . . perfect tonic for depression ... an incredible specimen of irrepressible exuberance . . . found in martin at all hours . . . radiates enthusiasm for zo . . . addicted to collecting milk bottles and dining room food . . . loves the great out- doors, amateur photography, basketball, and things oriental . . . absolute!) unique JEAN MARION ASHMEAD long live the king and the british empire! . . . born in india and still has her baby pillow . . . " naturally! can ' t sleep without it " ... in hon- ors spelled with a " u " . . . active deeyou sister and french house president . . . look for the yarn then find jean with the very blue eyes and ed 33 WINSTON SHERMAN BAILEY always a pipe and a necktie . . . da) student . . . great self-confidence and poise . . . oldish twenty- seven . . . assistant manager and jayvee member of swimming team . . . first love, after his wife that is, is music— listening, and learning how to ■ iite it . . . gi es the impression that he ' s one ol the boys in the back room . . . reserved, but friendly when you know him . . . " carry on " . . . win GEORGE ALLEN BARNWELL worldly-wise from experience . . . born in dutch east indies . . . and around the world three times . . . triple nationality . . . once in a while he attends a class, invariably to drag down another " a " to add to his collection . . . reads poll sci and ec books in his " spare time " . . . futine ])lans: " ill stay in school as long as my family will support me " . . . existentialist . . . never worried or upset . . . always in the methodical pursuit of attractive women . . . cynical sophisti- cate JOSEPH HENRY BATTIN love me, lo e m pipe . . . that calm detached debonair . . . deceitfully naive blue eyes and irish grin . . . the philosophy of the rubiyat skylines the engineer ' s practicality . . . dream ; ' orld has blondes, Cadillacs, martinis . . . future plans: beachcomber, but would perhaps prefer the riviera . . . definitely not a leg-man . . . majors in amicability . . . rhumba season in rio . . . kappa sig thespian . . . joe WILLIAM JAMES BATTIN, JR. penchant for the esthetic, despite slide-rule pre- occupations ... is known to have read two books ... if you need a date, he will extract one from liis residual supply of interesting women . . . cynical humor with a touch of the rabelaisian, the latter leering behind a veneer of savoir-faire and onlv manifesting itself on Saturday nights . . . bill ■ BARBARA ANNE BEEBE pre-med ividow with a rock . . . skipper of the swimming team . . . first string lacrosse— went out green " just for the exercise " . . . anecdotes, tea, and laughter . . . phi beta kappa prize for the outstanding soph . . . now in ec honors . . . blond dynamo . . . barb 34 ROBERT BURKE BENHAM not exactly shy . . . but just unassuming and minding his own business ... a vakiable lab partner ... an m.e. major . . . gets around to phi sig meetings . . . outing and rifle club shin- digs . . . likes classical music, flyiug. skiing, and sailing . . . and manages to a oid entangling alliances . smile . . . bob right in there with that benhain DANIEL NEWSON BESHERS lance corporal in the Washington cadets . . . suspicious of city slickers and hat-check girls . . . uses the french whenever possible . . . " no, i do not consider that an objet d ' art " . . . planted in the midwest, primed at swarthmore . . . physics honors, with interests in all social phenomena . . . halcyon . . . lacrosse ... a good man on any side . . . danny JAMES KENDALL BLAKE mec . . . vets ' committee . . . freshman athlete . . . married in his sophomore year . . . now com- mutes from norristown to english seminars . . . deeyou . . . has a repressed ambition to be a comedian ... a peculiarly intent way of walking • • • j ' m ROBERT CHARLES BLEKE the man with the horn . . . music scripts for sn . . . band . . . orchestra . . . even the hamburg show ensemble . . . piano serenades in managers ' parlor . . . how he manages to be seen so often in the libe is contrary to all laws of probability . . . but he ' s a hard worker . . . and balances it with a lot of fun . . . bob RICHARD ROY BLOUGH certain boisterousness beneath his pleasant naivete . . . chem major to the accompaniment of mozart and haydn . . . math club . . . garnet club Softball . . . pre-war chorus member till the khaki called . . . one of those rare specimens who works all day and goes early to bed . . . dick 35 CHARLES BRADFIELD BODINE could find his way to commons without his glasses ... a wizard at doing the wrong thing with playing cards . . . staunch and omnipresent member of kwink . . . has many cultural inter- ests, but still manages to attend classes . . . prob- ably knows some clean stories, too . . . finicky about food: it has to be edible . . . smiles with almost the same speed as he picks up a check . . . authority on anything )ou ask him about . . . brad EDMUND ADDISON BOWLES accomplished and thorough, yet full of imagina- tion . . . chorus manager . . . chairman of Itc makeup crew . . . typanist of college orchestra . . . claims to disapprove of people who stay up late at night, but he ' s no early retirer himself . . . conxentional bostonian . . . arrow shirts with trench cuffs synon)inous with his name . . . a swarthmore rarity— -a music major . . . future includes wedding bells and kathy . . . ed JOHN WELLS BRACE physics major in honors . . . still loyal to Cornell . . . cheerful . . . works hard . . . loves to carry the bass drum (throwback to his days as band manager at Cornell) . . . sees a certain someone in brooklyn every now and then . . . never enough time for work . . . marriage and a ph.d. in distant [utme . . . transferred here as a junior, but is ahead) known and liked by many ROBERT JAMES BRENTANO medieval scholar . . . honors isn ' t enough . . . hoosier lad, but without the innocence . . . blond, blue-eyed third-f mobster . . . ceirter of a gay and interested circle . . . seemingly very quiet and inoffensive . . . makes marginal notes in Japanese, learned in the army . . . " all my friends are " ... father of the dodo picnic . . . diabolistic sense of humor . . . " but she ' s in lo e with someone else " . . . brent JOANN BROADHURST always tra eling at top speed . . . but ready to stop to be friendly . . . " do not disturb " signs, but loves to have them ignored . . . infectious good humor . . . easy to talk with . . . there ' s no paper like the u ' oodbury times . . . history major . . . consumes facts and dates . . . bright spot in the libe • • • jo 36 THEODORE RALPH BROMWELL " he ' s from central " ... in re sonthoffi . . . pen- nock-i-o . . . " gotta go to the libe for a book " . . . president, treasurer, and secretary of the print club . . . " bach has to be played loud " . . . 7 a.m.- 11 p.m. orientation . . . perfectly planned . . . " be with you in five minutes " . . . diminutive semi-genius ... so good that even histfiry honors have not pointed the voca- tional way . . . law, teaching, or maybe a psych- iati ist ' s couch ... no matter what, ted ' ll be good at it ROBERT OTIS BROWN somnolent mein camouflaging acute sense of humor . . . " sorry, thermo test tomoirow " . . . arch-enemy of " creepism " . . . soccer with a vengeance . . . consumes incredible quantities of licorice . . . aggressive republican . . . brownie PRISCILLA BUCK the gal from cal . . . first winter here: " look at the sn-ooo-w! " . . . endless amount of funny stories . . . wise advice ... a chainiing smile and an infectious laugh . . . knf)ws music from beethoven to mercer . . . makes her own clothes with incredible speed and skill . . . prill KATHERINE BURT hails from hinsdale . . . pigtails and brogues when it rains . . . the form divine and oh! that walk ... a musical lepertoire of ballads, folk- songs, and mozart ' s fortieth . . . constantly new interests with enthusiasm for each . . . sketch club, math club, lecorder playing . . . " i ' m just a passive liberal " . . . math major . . . katy EDWIN MONROE BUSH, JR. always busy . . . nimierous jobs, all done to per- fection . . . cracker room, phinx sports editor and business manager . . . budget, conduct, and social committees . . . class officer . . . kappa sig and varsity football . . . an ec major— he ' s sine to be an ingenious and highly successful businessman . . . efficiency is the key word . . . ed 37 DORIS JEANETTE CAMPBELL good sense of humor and that anglecake smile . . . Itc officer . . . sensational in you emit take it ivitli you . . . those eyelashes . . . palmreader extraordinaire . . . loyal friend, meticulous, de- pendable . . . loves collies . . . monologues echo- ing through the dome at weird hours . . . has that wonderful Philadelphia drawl . . . doris on horseback WALTER LEO CAREL matinee idol from ' way back . . . happily, he ' s married . . . flew those big navy boats . . . that ' s where he got the jacket . . . studying psych, with tangents into english and phil just for the " honors " . . . chef for s.p.i.c. . . . has been known to cuss extraordinarily . . . one of the vertebra of the Itc . . . the brain in five billion dollars . . . a capable writer and astute critic for all that . . . wait GEORGE WILLIAM CAROW math major . . . geniune intellectual curiosity . . . will argue about anxthing with anybody at any time . . . " that ' s not logical " . . . varied inter- ests include listening to " fine " music . . . paint- ing with oils . . . sincerity and understanding . . . warm friendships . . . phi delt . . . future plans for a marriage and a home in Vermont DAVID MARK CHALMERS history honors ' devil ' s advocate . . . " there must be a supreme coiut decision somewhere that ex- plains that— " . . . sweet talk endless, with ma- licious undercurrents . . . qualified statements . . . puzzled reverence . . . living is to take it lightly, convictions can withstand . . . essentially loves the bizarre . . . strange music . . . turnings of a phrase . . . yet acquiesces to convention . . . cutting . . . commons and intuitional bridge . . . astute commentary . . . halcyon editor , . . " I ' m liardlv an altruist, but— " . . . dave JOHN HORNER CHAPMAN infantry sergeant— military bearing . . . big huge smile— always laughing . . . party boy . . . lost without that green spiral notebook . . . cog of social committee . . . budget connnittee . . . prexy of ifc . . . student council . . . " i ' m hot for it " . . . advocate of gracious living . . . imiversally well liked but not a backslapper . . . phi delta theta for aye . . . and for janie . . . and for jack 38 GEORGE LI-SENG CHEN balance of brilliance and personality . . . per- sistent until he understands . . . delta sigma rho attests his mastery of forensics . . . delights in interpreting history . . . active in ire and the student cinriculum committee . . . constant poise . . . fluent conversationalist . . . most graceful dancer . . . ringing laugh . . . mixture of realism and idealism . . . intends to teach and enjoy this academic life . . . george has much to give when he returns home to china JOHN HOLT CLANEY handsome " stoneface " conceals a sharp wit . . . understands people . . . known for his mile-long line and a way with the women ... to be found in cutting or with his head in a stall . . . history major at last! . . . jack EDWARD MANSFIELD CLARK transfer from vassar (!)... man of the world, navy air corps, and campus . . . ex-engineer in economics . . . just like the other phi psi ' s . . . and he ' s dropped his pin, too . . . like a good little brother . . . small, dark, and handsome . . . wrestling, mec, industrial relations . . . interest in foreign affairs . . . firm belief that work is not the spice of life . . . smooth dancer and socially inclined . . . ed ANN THACHER CLARKE the honors system was made for this thinker . . . enthusiasm plus for philosophy, history and people . . . even the unique experience of a year ' s friends service work in berlin could not dampen her ardor for college life . . . haunts the libe, but derives untold glee from chorus, cham- ber music, cutting, and bridge . . . " thanks awfully " . . . thach ALICE BROADUS CLIFFORD completely sincere . . . appreciative of people, books, music . . . little-boy look in jeans . . . hates bridge . . . humming gilbert and sullivan under her breath . . . worries about the world ... an elusive charm . . . likes josh white lecords, a. a. milne, and thomas mann . . . sudden spurts of energy ... a lass with a thoughtful air . . . infectious laughter . . . cliffie 39 HARRIET R. COHEN keen ideas behind those brown eyes . . . honors —psych and phil ... a growing imaginative mind ... an artistic doodler . . . " shall i look sweet or sophisticated? " ... a pretty gal with the " good word " . . . fond of pickles, olives, and roomie . . . sympathetic . . . diligent . . . impetuous . . . happy . . . " i ' m sitting on top of the world " ... an unsurpassable babe MARGARET JEAN COMFORT " gotta get to bed early tonight; i ' ve been up all day " . . . irrepressible high spirits . . . exciting and excitable . . . she ' ll second any motion . . . a dash of mexican pepper . . . but there ' s a serious side, echoed in her lovely voice . . . the baby of the seven . . . peg-o ' -my-heart FORREST STARR COMPTON one of the most active and outstanding per- sonalities on campus . . . good perspective on life . . . steadying and soimd influence . . . mec . . . sports editor of the news bureau . . . jayvee baseball . . .phi psi vice-prexy . . . Itc above all . . . poll sci major, but maybe some day broad- way . . . much-valued friend to many . . . woody JOYCE ELIZABETH CONOVER the nebulous and dreamy about her produce an elusive and cjuite charm . . . artistic jack-of-all- trades with an emphasis on writing and oil-paint- ing . . . reader of the esoteric . . . mobile, expres- sive eyes . . . student federalists . . . vocational committee . . . but this above all— zo major . . . relishes bringing abstract philosophical problem down to a practical level CHARLES MAXMILLIAN CONVER history major with a first lo e for english . . . acclimated and readjusted to civilian life at roberts . . . " all the world ' s a stage " biu life upon it is essentially a comedy . . . carefidly concealed serious stream that won ' t stay hidden . . . success . . . husband . . . father . . . typical con eiism in what the future owes him: radio writing for him, a football future for the next generation . . . chuck 40 ARDEN FISH CORDRAY math major (in a casual way) . . . never loses her temper, but she isn ' t insufferably seraphic —or haven ' t you ever noticed that satanic gleam in her eye? ... all sorts of hidden talents . . . tootles a mean flute . . . riding in bessie with arden at the archaic wheel has whitened many a swarthmore head . . . " has anyone seen my hirsband? " RICHARD E. CORDRAY math, women, and " shaggy dogs " . . . inexhaust- ible supply of those s.d. stories . . . " now obvi- ously " ... math club . . . came back from the army to find arden . . . now another one of those married vets . . . " circumstances make cases " . . . the kind of person who passes the exam without taking the course . . . dick LLOYD RUTHERFORD CRAIGHILL, JR. native yankee fiom nanchang . . . varsity track and jayvee soccer with the strength of a coolie and energy of a missionary . . . sea prexy . . . one-man tenor section in the chorus . . . vaga- bonding thiough new england with sketchbook ... no cloud-bound idealist . . . from the mystically sublime to the comicalh ridiculous . . . krag JANET CRUM gal from kalamazoo— with accent to prove it . . . " did you say ' crummy ' ? " . . . bridge player plus . . ' . golf team ... a determined walk . . . terrific grades with no trouble at all . . . " don ' t you think? " . . . faces any situation squarely— feet on the ground . . . psych major and loves it . . . our strawberry blond . . . jan RICHARD CRYER lives at home and likes it . . . rugged . . . jovial . . . winning smile . . . football captain ' 48 . . . varsity basketball . . . scientific bridge . . . phi psi billiard champ . . . always game for a party . . . tp ' s with ginny . . . plushies with the boys . . . popular . . . unassuming . . . supreme opti- mist . . . takes life in his stride and finds it swell . . . dick 41 PETER DALAND dynamic and forceful . . . immovable opinions concerning life in general and swarthmore athletics in particular . . . thinks students should have more time to devote to sports . . . captains the garnet dog-paddlers . . . jayvee track . . . amazingly sympathetic . . . eager book worm . . . army signal corps flagged him a french fiancee . . . pete JOSEPH CARLYLE D ' ANNUNZIO, JR. a world of diversified ability . . . from v-12 e.e. at Columbia, he came to s ' niore for an education . . . psych major . . . varsity soccer and basket- ball . . . Itc . . . concentrated social life to bal- ance his academic eiTorts . . . and he does every- thing well . . . gently egocentric, carefully groomed, easy dispositioned . . . joe and life have fashioned a happy working agreement out of each other ' s contributions . . . jose JOAN LYNNE DAVIS spontaneous generosity that captivates ... as ready for an intellectual conversation as for a thinsday night jam session . . . honors ability . . . and for such a little girl ... " a horn blows at midnight " . . . numberless giggles— the other side of that unfathomable, far-away look in her en- chanting brown eyes . . . lynne, the dreamer of the seven WILLIAM ARTHUR DAWSON blond scott of cjueens county . . . makings of a zoologist with a liberal arts curriculum . . . joke teller par excellence, of truly inimitable style . . . the piercing remark that isn ' t expected . . . the knack for felicitous phrasing . . . active avc and Itc . . . recreational bridge, skating, and horseback riding . . . enthusiastic skier of the " modified sitzplatz " school . . . too original to be predicted . . . loyal . . . responsible . . . rela- tively solvent ... a self-made legend . . . wild bill dawson mtel SAMUEL HAMILTON DAY, JR. igent . . . conscientious . . . retiring but affable to those who know him . . . good-natiued . . . independent . . . man of the world . . . academically as a social science honors student . . . physically as a romantic voyager to trinidad, soiuh africa, and India . . . unbelievable capacity for consimiing caffein tablets . . . printers ' ink on his hands every friday night . . . brass bands jjla when he gets to breakfast . . . wears well . . . sam 42 HERBERT HERMAN DECKER poll sci major, sack minor . . . tends to coast amiably through life . . . jazz fiend: " dig that beat " . . . open alert mind leads to frequent reversals of opinion . . . ire, ssa, sea, sn, sda, chorus and stu feds . . . " why, that ' s absurd; of course i ' m right " . has that oldtime religion . . . smooth dancer and conversationalist " well, it ' s in this week ' s lime " . . . she will have to be a blond . . . herb ZLATA ELIZABETH DEMEREC one of the sunniest personalities you know . . . the warmest laugh on campus . . . observant of the big things around her, but never forgets the important little ones that make up life . . . zoology major with varied interests— like irv, f ' r instance . . . seems to " belong " , whether in the lab, at the piano, or sailing off long island . . . always willing to lend a hand in college enter- prises EDWIN WALTER DENNISON tall good-humored astronomer . . . originator of eddisms— the sort of jokes at which to groan whole-heartedly . . . usually to be foiuid in his " office " in the observatory . . . one of the sn technicians smart enough to remain on the good side of the administration . . . second generation swarthmore man . . . gets sudden inexplicable himgers for subbies . . . enjoys explaining a math problem to a freshman . . . especially if she ' s a good looking girl . . . really likes to live in mary lyons and walk to college— on a bicycle . . . special for the girls— if you want to do somethina; different on a date . . . ed JOHN E. DENTON put the " a " in athlete . . . serious-minded and sincere . . . gives his all to any job . . . well-known and well-liked . . . enters friendships cautiously, but maintains thenr tenaciously . . . hard worker: waiter at the neuk, left-end par excellence, good grades, and maralyn . . . quiet, modest and re- tiring, biu with definite ideas . . . deep sense of loyalty to notions of fair play . . . great guy . . . jack DANIEL PAUL DETWILER mercersburg grad . . . friends, from the physics department to hams in australia . . . quiet and unassuming . . . between the transmitter and woody finds time for concentrated study . . . square dance enthusiast . . . handy with slide rule and pencil ... or soldering iron and pliers . . . bothered by qrm and engineers . . . never out of bed before 7:57 a.m. . . . reaches his goals quickly, quietly, and well . . . prefers to be lazy . . . dan ' l 43 JANE DEVRIES unique filing systems . . . memos to herself: " jane, you must work " . . . lover of movies and food ... or is it food and movies? ... a deter- mined pre-metl with a promising future . . . blue jeans and checked shirt . . . terrific with a base- ball bat or on the diving board . . . wonderful weekends everywhere . . . stability and coirimon sense . . . sees the world straight ... a breath of fresh air WALTER S. R. DICKINSON, JR. most famous for his brilliant and satirical wit and his wholly unique pitching motion . . . sees the inconsistencies and incongruities in people, as well as in political and intellectual life . . . moral purpose often discerned behind this rail- lery . . . full-fledged humanist . . . sentimental, honest, and highly practical . . . one of those rarities, a constructive critic ... a purist when it comes to judging neckties . . . dick JOHN THEURER DIEBOLD most perfect gentleman on campus . . . sombre, nonchalant, an emotional rock of gibralter . . . but has his spurts ... an unsuccessful policy of austerity toward women . . . sophisticated inter- ests: gilbert and sullivan, broadway shows . . . expert on european royalty, despite an earnest endeavor to be a liberal economist . . . wonderful knack of making you feel terribly important . . . wonderful friend, even when you need him ... if it ' s about horses, big John knows all GLORIA ELIZABETH DISNEY sultry brunette from dc . . . strictly a city girl . . . loves football games, track meets, poetry, and cats ... in her next life she wants to be a kitten . . . artistic tastes and temperament . . . " it all depends on the individual " . . . always sleepy . . . always soft spoken ... if it ' s a joke, you have to explain it . . . beth JAMES MORGAN DOLLIVER executive type with good looks thrown in . . . goes places and does things . . . president of debate society and phi delt . . . handles tlie money for sn . . . public speaker extraordinaire . . . clelta sigma rho . . . honois in more ways than one . . . majors in poli sci and barbara . . . " turn out those lights " . . . makes music with the orchestra . . . won the war with the coast guard . . . iowa nationalist . . . always well-dressed . . . himior when it ' s needed and common sense all the time . . . " odd ' s hid " . . . jim 44 HERBERT SHALOM DORDICK an engineer by error ... a musician b inclina- tion ... a pianist and composer of no small talent . . . varsity tennis standout with an envi- able record . . . looks forward to finding week- ends . . . part interest in cracker rocjm ... an optimist, ' til he fell on his noggin . . . now he ' s just happy . . . herb JACQUES ROBERT DUBIEN chemistry is his passion . . . but there ' s plenty of interest left over . . . orthodox frenchman where girls are concerned . . . immaculately dressed ... a perpetual souice of wisecracks and good humor . . . conscientious student who achieves a beautiful balance between work and play . . . nearly perfect . . . " for convenience ' s sake " SELMA JANE EBLE jitterbug par excellence . . . swimming record breaker . . . three-letter varsity gal . . . loves life . . . always out-giving . . . ever ready for a party . . . subbies and needlepoint . . . doin ' what comes naturally . . . big weekends— darn those Saturday classes . . . a-one sense of humor . . . devilish . . . dizzy but lovable CORINNE JENNIFER EDWARDS the cheerful soul— you just can ' t pick a fight with her . . . clock ten minutes fast so she won ' t be more than ten minutes late . . . independence plus . . . history major . . . sn ' s letter-writing and stamp-licking staff . . . very attached to a pair of bright orange slacks . . . flair for the unusual . . . the personality that warms . . . and brad . . . answers to winnie WILLIAM BUTH ELDREDGE big-city boy with an eye for local color . . . multitude of damon runyon acquaintances . . . never-ending stream of anecdotes about Chicago mobsters, local politicos, and the cubs ... ire . . . garnet club star . . . poli sci honors . . . fierce regard for the common man since his life as a deckhand . . . future mayor of Chicago . . . bill 45 JOAN ELLWOOD possesses a deep sympathy tor the common man and the courage of her convictions . . . worked with unions in philly and nyc through the indus- trial relations committee . . . works for world federalists, too . . . thoughtful and well-informed on many subjects . . . but not one to cram her opinions down others ' throats . . . retiring per- sonality with great capacity for friendship and loyalty that is effortless but sincere RICHARD WHITTAKER EVERETT a pre-arni) stretch as god ' s roommate (in roberts hall) and jesus ' brother (in faintly portrait) . . . independence . . . checkered shirt . . . co-editing the phinx . . . manages to squeeze in an ec seminar here and there among trips to the druggie . . . not averse to a spot of commons bridge or ping-pong ... all managed with an air of casual efficiency and savoir-faire ... a man of the people . . . dick MICHAEL JOHN FABRIKANT bar-tender extraordinaire . . . panama under the auspices of the u. s. army . . . unable to hold onto nroney . . . reserved seat in the friends ' libe . . . sly disregard for restrictive college regida- tions ... life a succession of papers . . . but work rareh interferes when there ' s pleasure to be had . . . life ' s a lot of fim seen from inside a plaid siiirt . . . claims both nyc and clinton corners as residence . . . " my name, sir, is spelled with a ' k ' " ... mike MARY BUNTING FALLIN friendly . . . everyone who knows her likes her . . . gwimper . . . argyle socks bound for carnegie tech . . . perfect roommate . . . always cheerfid . . . always has a cold nose in the winter . . . passion for kittens . . . dependable . . . knows the words to every popular song ever written . . . puckish smile JOYCE FAVORITE those plaid shoelaces . . . bright-eyed . . . can talk to anyone with ease . . . " my word! " . . . playing or cheering, just so long as it ' s sports . . . commimity conscious . . . knows everybody . . . " don ' t ou read the bidletin boards? " . . . candy for comfort . . . sleepless wonder . . . bursting with little bits of news . . . " you just have to come up and see my pictures! " . . . her " buddies " • ■ ■ jo 46 HANS ERNST JOHN FEIGL biazilian socialite with antipathy to razors and ties . . . loud bark, but little bite ... a balanced compound of night lite on broadway and goethe in trotter . . . has austrian pastry shipped direct to his room . . . shouts of " oyyy-ler " in the cpiad at night . . . mass of contradictions . . . with a tremendous understanding of science and the arts . . . big John MARY JEAN FINCH irrepressible love of the ridiculous . . . rare sympathy and understanding . . . eyelashes ex- traordinaire . . . likes to theorize . . . frankly, when does she study? . . . can ' t say she didn ' t try to make all her friends history majors like her- self . . . pervasive sense of fun . . . inner poise to meet every situation . . . " coffee— black " . . . finchie JOHN WYMAN FISKE electrical engineer in honors . . . finds time for many varied activities . . . kwink, camera club, sn . . . continually in a rush . . . very energetic . . . engineer with an intellect . . . new england background . . . more recently horn new york city ... a good sense of humor but a very .serious mind . . . republican with a social conscience . . . knows what he wants and how to get it . . . probably headed for engineering management . . . self-assured ROBERT FORSTER back from the army a coiriplete individualist . . . still hankers after the bohemiair existence . . . summer taxi driver . . . return to naples . . . denounces hypocrisy and the double stand- ard . . . " those lip service liberals " . . . thorough student in history honors with an intellectual bent . . . voltaire and rousseau . . . purposeful tread . . . gregarious but disdains wheeldom . . . " mary " section please . . . bob ROBERT BIRDSALL FREAR sn ' s technical ace ... a tech for the navy . . . economics for a peacetime practice ... an oldie left over from 1942 . . . but still the same old careless guy . . . crossword puzzles— but the way he cusses ' ein, they inust be his pet peeve . . . so far he ' s maritally unburdened, but he still gets letters from africa ... he never carries money; q.e.d.: " who gets the paper tonight? " . . . one of the independents around campus, though ardent avc man . . . bob 47 ROBERT FRANK FREMONT, JR. the old man of the sea ... six years with the merchant marine . . . chief ' s papers ... a mate ' s rating . . . day student . . . m.e. . . . careful . . . precise . . . conscientious . . . easy-going . . . efficient . . . practical bent . . . part time emplo)ment of his a ocation . . . hard work wins out . . . bob RUTH FRIEDENTHAL political spark plug . . . social consciousness . . . tremendous enthusiasm for everything . . . ssa, ire, pea exec, and phoenix . . . fashion plate with a penchant for fabulous blouses . . . petite isionary . . . dynamic ability to carry her ideals into action . . . eloquently profoimd expositions of phi! at two a.m. . . . " it was terrific " HERBERT HALSEY FROST vet of the navy air crew . . . always in a good mood . . . piano style all his own . . . varsity lacrosse . . . jayvee football . . . even his ancestors were deeyous . . . carrying on the tradition with enthusiastic lo alty . . . the kind of guy who knows everyone . . . and e eryone who knows him likes him . . . froat CHARLOTTE LOUISE GARCEAU shrewd insight coupled with ingenuous simplic- ity . . . enthusiastically conscientious math major, with leanings toward research in astronomy . . . fluent german . . . clarinet in orchestra, alto in chorus . . . worries, but takes time off for waa and basketball, brooklyn and princeton . . . uni- versally beloved . . . char BUCKLEY R. GARRETT pet peeve is his car— but it gets him here from lansdowne . . . army man . . . pre-war baseball and football . . . varsity basketball . . . marital status: " single, but hopeful " ... a phi psi who ' s still an engineer . . . doesn ' t object to dropping his slide rule for a chat with the bovs . . . buck 48 WARREN T. A. GEARY short, dark, and dapper . . . pet peeve is land- lords who don ' t take babies . . . spent his frosh year at rutgers . . . future history prof . . . erstwhile acti e member of the sn workshop . . . spare time now taken up by wife and hono- hdu-born son . . . daily travels from the wilds of roxboro . . . geery JAMES HOPKINS GIFFORD industrious civil engineer . . . treasurer of the slide rule club . . . ex-seabee . . . lacrosse . . . tennis racket and skis under his pillow . . . always time to check the latest paper or magazine . . . deep interest in problems of the day ... no ordinary personality . . . consistently good- natured . . . pipe fanatic . . . keen sense of humor . . . deeyou wit . . . promising futine . . . giff HOWARD SOTHORON GILLIAMS lost all his beautiful blond hair in the ' 45 haver- ford raid ... it grew back in the navy . . . spring weekends sailing his boat in jersey . . . spends more time in the sack than any other two men living . . . ci il engineer and phi sig . . . where there ' s suds, there ' s hope JOHN FRANCIS GOERTNER fine combination of good sport and good student ... as physics major occasionally loses contact with the here-and-now . . . may need a sub- stantial jolt to restore consciousness— otherwise quite normal . . . inimitable grin . . . outing club . . . phi delt . . . ability coupled with a good dis- position . . . MORTON JEROME GOLLUB a pre-med with a four-college background . . . frequent patronizer of the bridge games in commons ... a generous dispenser of the omni- present stock of apples in his room . . . actually enjoys the hike to and from mary lyons . . . possessor of a highly analytical and introspective mind ... a connoisseur of classical music with an intense dislike of the modernists . . . officiates at cutting every other Wednesday . . . chases down innumerable people to interview for the phinx . . . enjoys and revels in swarthmore ' s liberal atmosphere . . . glub 49 DONALD JAY GORDON lives in long island and the mountains . . . says sut-al tor subtle . . . " that ' s real smooth " . . . takes his realism with a sprinkling of Star- dust . . . brunettes with bangs . . . homework always expendable . . . headed ' 47 harrisburg delegation . . . pet pee e— cold winter nights ... on laughing terms with the world . . . specializes in the siesta . . . just call for flash or don FREDERICK GREEN, JR. refugee from penn . . . marine corps fighter pilot on guadalcanal . . . passion for airplanes . . . radio ham— call wSewf . . . another one of reaser ' s men . . . married life in grace park— with a wife whom he definitely won ' t allow to wear slacks . . . proud papa of four-year-old ricky . . . fred RICHARD S. GREEN never in a hurry . . . alwa)s time for kwink . . . jayvee baseball . . . the rest of the time holed up in martin labs . . . good reason— zo honors . . . bluntly tells coy girls just what he thinks of them— and his comments are not exactly flat- tering . . . but his fatal weakness, oddly enough, is women . . . stud ing— " that ' s for kids! " . . . but he ' s just a big wav)-haired kid anyway . . . dick THEODORE GREENSPUN day student with an impressi e attitude . . . voluble intellectual . . . liberal socialite . . . liter- ary creative writing . . . dodo . . . times notoriety for culture for the masses; art for the lower classes . . . social psyche . . . talkative . . . tries for the impression . . . " the aesthetic view " . . . ted RICHARD MARVIN GREENSTEIN pre-war vintage swarthmorean . . . and as solid a fixture in the garnet line then as now . . . athletically-minded and inclined as the day is long . . . brain power to spare, too, when applied ... if you didn ' t know, there are other interests besides jerry . . . ex-aaf fly-boy with an enviable record in the pacific . . . the ideal doctor . . . " try a-z-o " ... all around is putting it mildly . . . you ' ve missed something if you ' ve never enjoyed his friendship . . . greenie 50 JANE MASSON GROSS the lady engineer in honors . . . reads organic for diversion . . . " ugh, this calculus " . . . math and music . . . orchestra . . . discusses all subjects from english to electronics . . . " thy modesty ' s a candle to thy merit " . . . perseverant . . . two- year hiker from preps . . . shy blue eyes . . . janie SARA MARGARET GWYNN everything is relative and temporary . . . ignore it and it will go away . . . enthusiasms ranging from astrology to winnie the pooh . . . active and varied social life . . . unequaled and never dampened sense of humor . . . best of rainy day companions . . . peggy JEANNETTE LOUISE HAAS math major with a sense of humor . . . gets excited about movies, people, places . . . that rarity: the perfect bridge partner . . . the long trip home to marietta well worth it . . . can ' t stay away from magazines . . . writes delightful letters . . . and notes to people . . . loves to see people happy and helps to make them so . . . jenny HOWARD FRANK HARRIS one of the few old-timers left from the class of ' 45 . . . only his roomy hears his most frequent sayings— definitely not for public consiunption . . . conscientious student . . . bottle of scotch from the dodo . . . the rack is indeed an essential part of college— at least, eight hours a day . . . favors the genteel masculine pleasines— like throwing light bulbs . . . oh, pinless one . . . lost his phi sig jewelry on one of his frequent trips to Saratoga springs— judy goes to skidmore . . . stinkv ERIC GUSTAV HEINEMANN aptitude for asking the " wrong " kind of ques- tion . . . the kind with no answer . . . drives to the core of every issue . . . impatience with irre- levancies . . . the frightfid beetling of his brows is symptomatic . . . lacks only beard and pipe to look like the typical professor . . . and he threat- ens to acquire both 51 CHARLES ALLAN HERNDON ])oliteness personified . . . reserved and quiet ■ith strangers, but interesting and likeable among friends . . . someda ' hopes to have a house in the maine woods vith an electric fence around it . . . often confused . . . likes music and tlie spirit . . . tuba in the orchestra . . . member of the chorus tchcn time allows ... a coke fiend who never returns bottles . . . charlie CHARLES JOHN HESNER e.e. courses with commons labs in bridge and ping-pong . . . gallant . . . admitted hedonist . . . frank ... a little dogmatic . . . plays deter- mined court to dame fortune . . . grand-slam chuck ALICE HEYROTH just mention Cincinnati! . . . sincere concern for world and social problems . . . lovely soft curls . . . twinkling eyes reflect a bit of the ironical in her humor . . . perpetual motion with the knit- ting needles . . . earnest, thoughtfid manner . . . happiest with a cup of coffee and good conver- sation . . . plans for an interesting future . . . allie WARREN PATRICK HIGGINS belated arrival ia seton hall and a long path . . . well tra eled soldier . . . more good yarns than most . . . one of the best all-around athletes ever to hit s varthmore . . . outstanding on grid- iion, court, and diamond . . . idealistic ec major A ith practical ideas . . . phi psi and book and key ... on the way to harvard business school . . . antirollo . . . sure success . . . lefty ROBERT WARREN HILLEGASS a mickey rooney grin, but there the resemblance ends . . . orderly, neat, efficient . . . anti-souvenir; hates to save anything ... an english major with a serious approach to the books . . . cjuoter of odd remarks . . . emerges from the depths of the deeyou lodge to hit the dining room door at precisely 7:591 9 each morning . . . former " in- mate " of the coast guard academy— and glad to be out . . . record-collector . . . baseballer . . . that gal at penn state . . . bob 52 RUDOLF ERNEST HIRSCH ec major . . . tlien iiiaxbe into high finance . . . bats about wagner . . . actor and engineer at wsrn . . . Itc property committee . . . home- made spaghetti dinners . . . studies best at 2:00 a.m. ... " I consider myself the last proponent of free enterprise on these rolling green acres " . . . rudy WILLIAM JAMES HIRSCH the kid from brooklyn . . . stick a cigar in the moiuh, and there ' s the biggest little guy italy and the 15th air force had ever seen . . . pour in a few glasses of chianti, and there ' s a truly charter member of the s.p.i.c. . . . add a dash of student council, student affairs committee, sn, ire, and Itc . . . recipe for a " hellofagoodguy " . . . the head THOMAS VICTOR HODGES, JR. disillusioned by the army about engineering and economics . . . returned determined to sample every experience from drugs to dancing . . . hamburg show sparkler . . . deeyou . . . expert at getting from 30th street to swarthmore on a 49th street ticket . . . perennial freshman be- havior from neuburg and field . . . under guise of psych major, studies human beings in hopes of becoming one himself . . . thurber-escjue dis- tortion of perceptions . . . tom JOHN HERBERT HOSKINS handsome but reserved . . . distinguished mien . . . elusive, but with an engaging grin . . . neat, steady, and efficient . . . new hampshire is " home " and " heaven " . . . skiing, and expert square-dancing . . . tennis manager and enthusi- ast .. . worried soc head . . . wsrn . . . phi delt . . . poll sci . . . conservative rare among bull majors . . . diplomat . . . " read this nam pamph- let for the answer " . . . johnny NORMAN LLOYD HOULBERG gracious gentleman of the old school . . . gen- erous and well-liked . . . moderate in speech and habits . . . prone to self-examination . . . " why am i here, anyway " . . . major in Spanish with a serious intent . . . destined for work in south america . . . inspired strummer of second-hand guitar . . . wields the long-handled spoon . . . slaves over accounts for phi delt . . . norm 53 LESTER CALLOWAY HUNT, JR. brown-eyed westerner from cheyenne . . . per- sonality kid . . . brilliant witticisms in Spanish class . . . voice of experience on tortillas and mexican senoritas . . . sigma nu at the university of Wyoming . . . give the man a horse he can ride . . . talked his way into delta sigma rho . . . a ersion to efficiency . . . bud ALFRED CURTIS HUNTING physics honors, but only as a datum point . . . philosophy (humanism) . . . the drama . . . kahlil gabran . . . fast . . . poll sci . . . cutting collection and chorus ... a light will be burning in c section any hoin- of the night . . . bouncing, snappy stride . . . one of the " brothers " of the summer of ' 45 . . . violent polemicist against social institutions, double standard, and social pampering . . . " by very definition! " . . . al MAN KYN HYUN in korean, " man " means " latest treasure " . . . he ' s an ambitious poll sci major ... a transfer from tire seoul national university . . . after the war, he worked for the provisional government in korea, in the capacity of director of the political research section . . . man is well-dressed, jovial, and extremely polite . . . and has made quite a number of friends in his stay here ... a brilliant student, his modesty and erudition are tremendous ... he is a hard worker, and a conscientious " seeker of the truth " WILLIAM BATES JAMESON likes everybody and vice versa . . . inveterate tease . . . dependable phi delt . . . maestro of the ping-pong paddle . . . asce prexy . . . beaming smile available and in use nearly all the time . . . c.e. with commons minor . . . studies at least twice a month to draw down consistent a ' s . . . discusses bridge and bridges with equal erudi- tion . . . recently discovered that s ' more is co- educational . . . highest and final authority on how to do engineering problems . . . " at the bethlehem steel company they— " . . . bill ATHALIA CRAWFORD JAMISON a walking comedy . . . laughs at anything . . . playful . . . " boy, girl " . . . loves to tease . . . endless pep and enthusiam . . . cheerleader . . . " come on, will you, let ' s fight " . . . majoring in sports . . . letter girl of hockey, badminton, and tennis . . . serious moments, too . . . practical . . . outing club . . . race relations . . . face paintei ' for Itc . . . spunky exterior . . . bobbie 54 WILMER ATKINSON JENKINS. II intellectual athlete . . . restless sacker . . . almost always on the books . . . sarcastic sense ot hiunor . . . soph class prexy . . . phi delt social chairman . . . i.f. council . . . social committee . . . " i can ' t do it, i ' ni in honors " . . . cliche hater . . . tremendous part) boy . . . politically unconscious . . . " wanna buy a stamp album? " . . . wheaton weekends . . . June . . . bill JOHN STEWART JOHNSON only full-time practising esthete at swarthmore . . . busy with cutting, cooper foundation, editing the dodo, and occasional english seminars . . . burdened with a sense of humor and an intuitive manner of speech and dress . . . spends vacations imbibing alternately in manhattan and jackson heights . . . recently re-canted— took up bridge in commons and di-di anywhere east of the alle- ghenies . . . stew RICHARD Ambrose johnston backbone of kappa sig . . . softball pitcher no- body could hit . . . frustrated big leaguer . . . fashion plate . . . keeps marion and lin ' s in business . . . watch him turn on the charm . . . remember his run against muhlenberg? . . . big economist someday . . . " three no trump " . . . definitely a good man . . . johnny HELENA MARIE JOURDAN dry wit . . . rare abilty to laugh at herself . . . third finger, left hand . . . letters from art . . . " that ' s stoopid! " . . . Connecticut drawl, believe it or not . . . always has lots to do, always gets it done . . . strong loyalties . . . rational approach to life but there ' s always the funny side . . . mischievous smile . . . butch HERBERT KAISER spasmodic student with conscientious intentions . . . history honors and a cup of tea . . . every- body ' s opinion both his meat and poison . . . penchant for avc . . . Itc with a hqsty heart . . . always intellectual . . . eager politician with- out being repulsive . . . social animal, sp say the girls . . . secretly frustrated to be domesticated . . . herb 55 ARTHUR LINCOLN KAPLAN left for the aimy as a math major and returned to be an e.e. . . . three years as one of uncle sain ' s weather men . . . chairman of Itc construc- tion crew . . . phi sig pledge . . . garrahan ' s resistor expert . . . weekly trips to philly to see if sally won ' t provide the remedy for his bach- elorhood . . . art LOIS LAEL KELLY bright smile . . . generous and sweet . . . always leady to help ... Itc secretary . . . jayvee hockey and archery . . . junior class secretary . . . poli sci and phil in honors . . . westtown . . . picture album of summers in maine . . . she can rave about it for hours . . . pint-size package of pep JOHN IRVING KENNEDY from stony point . . . sails on hudson . . . seems to spend time studying . . . philosopher and psychologist with mathematical flairs, in honors . . . 7:50 riser . . . loses to mrs. selmes about one- in-twenty . . . solid careful thinker . . . quick to laugh . . . going to law school, and places . . . jack JOYCE BALDWIN KIDDER poli sci major, in honors . . . intelligent, pene- trating mind . . . good taste in books, music, and painting . . . debussy and el greco among her favorites . . . loves pageantry— desire to see the Vatican and a coronation . . . not mechanically minded . . . long bike rides . . . home to yeadon for weekends . . . quietly friendly . . . enthusias- tic ANN WINSOR KILLOUGH " chief mechanic " . . . passion foi taking things apart— but they really work when she puts them togethei ' again . . . sets her clock at night . . . sleeps through the radio in the morning . . . sarcastic sense of humor . . . " that ' s what we like to hear! " . . . ec major— statistical, not do- mestic . . . with a future iti business ... no theory in a vacuum for this gal . . . " next time i have some spare time— " 56 MORTON COWLING KIMBALL " rochester is not a one-industry town— but ko- dak, kodak, kodak " . . . mixes better " dog ' s noses " and knows more emily post than anyone else on campus . . . extremely fond of bright bow ties, cocktails before dinner, and neatness . . . " were you born in a barn?— moo! " . . . solid citizen, but he ' s got a " past " stored in a little grey cell in key west (navy, you know) . . . sings untranslated wagner as he careens down the halls of wharton at five a.m. . . . perhaps best described as a rather gaudy victorian . . . " mo without an e " RICHARD WILLIAM KIRSCHNER transfer from coliuiibia . . . day student but well- known . . . fifth year of varsity tennis . . . ever- ready to swap quips with the best of ' em . . . generally found in his " office " in the libe base- ment . . . embryonic student of pipe lore . . . ardent believer in the right of the merchant marine to a g.i. bill . . . few will forget his campaign for the honor system . . . dick ROY FREDERICK KNUDSEN the gieat white father of engineering knowledge and slide-rule efficiency, needing guidance only dm ing those early morning somnolent hours . . . modest of glamor . . . was an aaf captain . . . phi delt songster . . . camera virtuo.so . . . had last birthday several years ago . . . kanute EVA FRIEDA KOCH tall, dark, dignified and intelligent . . . but watch for that twinkle in her eye . . . well travel- led, well read, well informed ... a flare for red clothes . . . linguistics honors . . . " eva, i just can ' t take my cutting period tonight " . . . har- rassed but it gets done— and done, oh, so well . . . fun to talk with, fun to be with JOHN BRAMPTON KOELLE salient characteristics— keen, incisive, anecdotal, sometimes caustic but invariably subtle wit and repartee . . . connoisseur of better vintages and foods . . . delights in charles addams, victor red seal, and heartily endorses sentiments of ogden nash . . . " d " section ' s shower-room story teller, also sparks all night cram sessions with 16-cylin- der genius . . . only at swarthmore to integrate his pe7sonalities . . . deep-sunk roots preclude changes in this patroon-style bon vivant 57 ARNOLD IRVING KRELL e.e. from ohio state via the astp . . . gives the fuses quite a workout . . . two chief activities: trying to find mccrumm re physics problems, and entertaining the wife marjorie . . . can make the philly local in one minute flat with the help of kaplan ' s car . . . loves to push buttons and pull switches . . . arn ELIZABETH ALBRIGHT KSCHINKA english, history, and phil honors fit her human- itarianism . . . philosophical pipe-puffer of gentle humor, wisdom, and a sense of the ridiculous . . . conscientious and efficient, whether collect- ing clothes for fsc or fimctioning as president of pitt . . . loves her Pennsylvania mountains, driv- ing, and animals . . . spritely curly hair and sparkling brown eyes frame an enthusiastic spirit . . . lisby ELEANOR MAIE LACY red-headed fourth-easter from china . . . out- ward poise belies spark of humor in her eyes . . . psycii majoi in honois— has already acquired an imderstanding of human nature not to be found just in text books . . . hockey and basketball . . . ire . . . vocational committee . . . race rela- tions . . . still has time to be a Cleveland Indians fan . . . " first to bed— last to rise " . . . that ' s ellie EDGAR KENDALL LANDIS the " landis legend " from geneva and paris to the Canadian woods . . . swarthmore ' s gift to com- plete liberation . . . progressive schools did it . . . navy fly-boy . . . four seminars per semester . . . plushies or phil ' s for beer and bull . . . serious side and deep convictions, too . . . knowl- edge of history and fiench make him honors material . . . ken GLORIA LANE varied record collection with a special place for dorothy shay . . . always ready for adventure, but don ' t ask her to climb the water tower! . . . maintains an ideal balance between studies, the extra-cm ricular, and fun . . . the tailored type . . . coffee at the druggie— no cream . . . jayvee swimmer, gwimp, student affairs, and inevitable office-holder— in short a mighty busy gal, but always time for a " coffin nail " and a chat . . . spontaneit) . . . " good gooby " . . . phi delt pin . . . cush . . . glo-bell 58 ELLIOT RICHARD LANG " may i borrow ...? " ... frustrated engineer . . . ex-navy fly boy . . . swarthmore v-5 unit . . . staunch democrat . thinks new look is not . . . " we were robbed! " a well-stacked reason . . even the nav) ' couldn ' t destroy sounds off at will . . . " it " . . . from brooklyn . . goes home often for passion for sailing that BETTY JO LARSH lots of style . . . room in parrish with all the comforts of home— visitors always welcome . . . wonderful listener for any joke . . . sense of the ridiculous in life . . . warm understanding balanced b) active mind and fine sense of humor . . . record collection yea long . . . lloyd ' s sword and shield . . . HOWARD THOMAS LAYCOCK a runner from wa)- back . . . german major . . . " think i ' ll cut this morning— let me sleep " . . . an off-campus lite . . . next stop— divinity school . . . musical, too . . . pet peeve: people who make " funny " remarks about short haircuts . . . " this morning we learn the backstroke " . . . easy-going and affable . . . answers to steve or howie BARBARA EDITH LEA unquenchable enthusiasm for eveiything . . . started a good neighbor policy all her own . . . " life is so complicated " . . . but what comjDlica- tions! . . . " oh, my shattered nerves " . . . that rare and wonderful quality of faith in human nature . . . bright hair matching a bright per- sonality . . . the redhead of the seven . . . bubbl- ing bobbe JOAN LeVINO expressionly piquant eyes . . .fine arts major— " no, i just study pictures " . . . passion for le- arranging furniture . . . fridays behind the new yorker . . . Sundays behind tiynes crossword puzzles . . . former sn jill-of-all-trades . . . perennial varsity archer . . . always argyleing . . . " you! you haven ' t done your write-up yet! " . . . snowballs aimed at her center window . . . ever-ready and effervescent laughter . . . vinnie 59 LLOYD WILLIAM LEWIS a liberal from larchmont . . . interests are betty, sports, and politics— in that order . . . bedroom eyes (slie claims) . . . swings a mean tennis racket . . . makes like al jolson with april showers . . . constantly buying orchids— for phi delt . . . creator of sage thoughts . . . serious, industrious worker with a touch of jose . . . " gotta get in shape " . . . that satisfied, settled look . . . early riser, first for breakfast . . . future executive in denver TZE-KUANG LI leo li, or better, lao li, is swarthmore ' s confucius . . . quiet, modest exterior hides brilliant mind and tun-lo ing heart . . . engineer by profession . . . philosopher by avocation . . . avid reader . . . knows Chinese classics almost by heart and has read much translated western literature ... a geography and history fiend . . . plays seven musical instruments . . . more self-effacement and sincerity plus such profound knowledge in one friend is hard to find JOHN HALSEY LIRIO will of his own with a genuine consideration for the feelings of others . . . diagram your jokes for him . . . history major with inquiring mind in many fields . . . every Sunday finds him some- here between bass and tenor on abide -with me . . . incipient raphael, shown in the margins of his poll sci notes . . . loyal in friendship . . . " carry on " . . . jack SUSAN MEHRER LURIE kindly, interested, and understanding . . . that cute giggle . . . startling red hair and apple cheeks . . . psych major in honors . . . studying in the window . . . always worrying about some- thing ... if it ' s not argvles, it ' s cables . . . Itc, race relations . . . parrish fire corporal . . . sensi- tive to the finer things of life: music, painting, and Shakespeare . . . susie PAUL CHRISTOPH MANGELSDORF, JR. happiest when surroimded by odd pieces of graph paper . . . known, among other things, for his black-rimmed spectables . . . disciple of bix beiderbecke . . . majored in chem, poll sci, bot- any, and phxsics . . . power of oblivious concen- tration . . . not envied for his taste in clothes . . . never without a complete change of fiuni- tine . . . onlv one zombie to this customer . . . mangel 60 WILLIAM HENRY MATCHETT a tremendous library, increasing daily, and he ' s read most of them, too . . . writes— poetry, short stories, a novel . . . three years in civilian public service . . . friendly, expansive, orderly, search- ing ... a keen sense of the important things in life, and a deep interest in what life means to himself and others . . . staunch supporter of student friends meeting . . . deep convictions which are always being put into action . . . actively interested in the study of the records of the life of jesus . . . lunches at the nookie . . . an ardent bird spotter . . . bill DOROTHY LOUISE McCLOSKEY quips in an elfish manner . . . wide assortment of jokes— reinforced aftei every weekend home . . . " thank god for small favors " . . . " what ' ll i do now? " . . . submarines— on doctor ' s orders . . . dancing feet, amazing memory for song lyrics, an incurable whistler— in fact something about lier personality that says " music " . . . " biu he ' s so cute! " . . . impish . . . clever . . . fun . . . the party ' s not complete without dorie ROBERT LESLIE McCOY, JR. party boy . . . that blond wa hair . . . phi delt house mother . . . main extia-curricidar activity: beavering . . . pet pee e: bridge . . . ec honors . . . very loquacious . . . " now in baltimore )ou ' ll find all the finer things in life " . . . always calm, friendly, sincere . . . extreme extrovert . . . mac JOHN DENT McCUTCHEON, III picture of innocence . . . but still the vrestling captain . . . mec . . . ex-prex of world federalists . . . phi sig . . . great respect for the sack . . . respected . . . rare friend . . . known and liked by everyone . . missouri ' s " ozark ike " LAURA LUCCI McKNIGHT if not to be found at french house, try the women ' s gym . . . ardent student federalist . . . Virginia complex . . . future includes chuck . . . violet eyes and oh, those eyebrows . . . savoir faire . . . never speak to her before she ' s brushed her teeth . . . head-aches with the collection com- mittee . . . " george, which way did the fox go? " . . . loyal to bandminton jayvees ... if there ' s ever a woman president, it ' ll be mcknight 61 ANNE DILLARD McLAREN navy junior from dc and arkansas . . ' . " traveled in every state but maine " . . . like a bottle of ginger ale . . . dry but scintillating . . . menagerie of mistreated quotations . . . chronic sesquipe- dalian . . . enthusiastic bass-drummer . . . gwimper . . . hall prexy . . . women ' s sports for halycon . . . dining room fixture behind an apron . . . .one of those determined femme chem majors . . . dilly WILLIAM JAMES McMILLAN no, the other one is orville . . . scholarly gentle- man . . . southern drawl and hospitality . . . poli sci in honors . . . full-to-bursting notebooks . . . leaves the libe only for food and sleep . . . poli- tics and baseball . . . determinism . . . greatest good for the greatest number . . . bull sessions . . . private war on hyjDrocrites and intolerants . . . bill SARA-PAGE MERRITT enthusiasm that o erflows . . . collects recipes with good-looking illustrations . . . v orks fast and efficiently . . . always the lighter side . . . wide circle of faithful friends . . . turns out a prolific amount of letters . . . her memoirs would amaze . . . vmruffled poise . . . hamburg chorus girl . . . may queen attendant . . . s-p MARJORIE LOUISE MERWIN adventuresome . . . cheerful to the nth degree . . . " it ' s tremendous " . . . another one of those roof fiends . . . willing to help anyone anytime . . . still waiting for a seven no-trump hand . . . lacrosse, swimming and gwimp . . . student fed- eralists and race relations . . . collection of beer mugs . . . another female chem major, never without a lab . . . some people are exuberant, margie ' s jet-propelled ORRICK METCALFE, JR. swarthmore ' s fresh breath from aboiU as deep south as you can go— mississippi . . . the product of philosophy . . . active kwink member, to be found at football games selling programs and hotdogs, or as basketball manager ... in the spring, the track team . . . phi delt . . . and a hardworking pre-med . . . high spirits . . . naturally denatured . . . " i must have silence while I ' m doing my german " . . . o 62 ELLEN HOPE MEYER an energetic tiab o£ allure that flits from group to group . . . partakes of a good steak or an in- tellectual bout with equal zest . . . proves you can blend tasteful dresses, mystic poets, and social fact into an organic whole . . . the uncom- mon awareness that college is a cjuest for knowl- edge in relation to self, although the intensity of her quest embarrasses the more phlegmatic . . . myth-breaking intuition and the self-effacing chortle . . . unlike most halycon victims, she has already gone far JEAN ARDIS MICHENER bubbling blonde . . . loves children— social serv- ice work in Chester . . . violin virtuoso . . . may- queen coint and march of dimes queen . . . alice of you can ' t take it witli you . . . hockey, basketball, lacrosse letters . . . and jayvee tennis . . . cheerleader, especially for the soccer team . . . pin, ring, and nick . . . mich CLAYTON LEONARD MILLER hot for cigars . . . hotter for pipes . . . always two jumps ahead of the stick . . . beer with the boys . . . pride of the bearcats ... a million words a minute— once he gets going . . . beaver . . . v-12 memories . . . inajors in laaosse, minors in c.e. . . . indefatigable kappa sig . . . can ' t study with- out a radio . . . upstate boy . . . " let ' s get the outa here and go to Chester " . . . clayt FRANK ARNOLD MILLER good listener . . . always knows you before you know him . . . purposeful and dependable . . . a respectable seeker after truth . . . pg history at penn . . . garnet guard in ' 46 . . . hoards everything hoardable . . . staggers his sleeping hours aroimd the clock . . . can get chummy over bulletin comics and a cup of michael ' s coffee BLAIR ALEXANDER MOFFETT two-toned personality . . . ex-marine . . . french and Spanish vocabulary . . . foreign trade and l atin america . . . Spanish club ... ' 46 phinx editorial staff . . . active phi psi . . . varsity foot- ball and jayvee lacrosse . . . " the thing is— " . . . portrait paintings that are really good . . . campus sketches for the halcyon . . . lunch at the neuk and coffee at the druggie . . . moff 63 MORGAN FRANCIS MOORE a pre-med with wider interests . . . spends most spare hours with classical music . . . " anything composed after nineteen-hundred is woilhless! " . . . known for expert photograph) and camera club lectures ... a loping tennis player with a lasting claim to fame: " i can foot-fault three ways at one time " . . . phi delt . . . cheerful smile, serious interior . . . morg WILLIAM McKAY MOORE the southern gentleman . . . Virginia ' s gift to swarthmore . . . blondish-brownish butch . . . blocking back on ' 43 eleven . . . several semesters as a s ' more sailor ... shuttles between commons and hicks . . . conscientious engineer . . . phi sigma kappa fair . . . " scarface " to the brothers . . . bill FREDERICK RICHARD MOREY bashful, ever-present grin . . . quiet and attentive listener, a dependable promise . . . profound " hmmm " . . . facetious " you don ' t say " . . . martin, trotter ph)sics lab, phi delt lodge . . . arsity track— shot-putting . . . the tuba in band and orchestra ... a night owl. relaxes to classics and symphonies on his home-made radio set, a nav)-learnecl art . . . never in a hurry . . . de- termined and persistent student when interested, nonchalant and easily distracted when not . . . pre-med tag, but glows at the ord bio-physics . . . count on fred JANE NEWTON MORFOOT quizzical expression and the wide-eyed look . . . simpatica . . . understanding plus a sense of humor ... a book, a coke, a cigarette . . . mar- ital status is " someday! " . . . social committee . . . can hit the bull ' s eye now and then with bow and arrow . . . jack . . . and janie STEPHEN MUCHA the man with the voice . . . knows where he ' s going and what he wants— and will get it . . . perennially with a cue stick in hand . . . usually smiling . . . warm, friendly, engaging personality . . . phi delt . . . m.e. . . . pride in his photo- graphic work— and rightly so . . . nothing ruffles his calm, cool composure . . . steve 64 CARL GERHARD MUELLER a mech engineer with a hiture in business . . . transfer from coast guard academy . . . loves college life . . . but why study . . . likes friday nights and open fires . . . phi sig . . . scrappy athlete . . . jayvee soccer . . . always a smile . . . always willing to help . . . sincere and thoughtful . . . sambo BARBARA HOLLY MULLER " schmule " to her intimates . . . natural brown curls . . . chocolate eyes . . . popular parrish presi- dent . . . neatness complex . . . able seaman . . . close harmony in the smoker ... a light-hearted classics major . . . mischievous but sincere . . . immense powers of exaggeration . . . proud wearer of phi psi pin . . . peter . . . barb JAMES ARTHUR MUMPER keeper of the deeyou minutes . . . harmonizes best in the showers . . . poll sci major with a strong liking for the frencli . . . sunday nights harrassing the cub reporters . . . his line of jokes needs a definite overhauling . . . " it knocks me out " . . . the more roommates the better . . . man of many colleges . . . covered the eto thoroughly with the rainbow di ' ision . . . those raid-afternoon siestas . . . definite journalistic bent . . . iim JOHN LOGAN NEED never fazed . . . loyal and ardent deeyou . . . physics honors, does his grinding in trotter . . . staunch tackle for the bearcats . . . inherited an undying interest in the navy . . . returne d to California after living iii the east . . . sometimes unconventional but alwavs sincere BARBARA ANN NELSON bie hello with real sincerity . . . what or who doesn ' t interest her? . . . definitely western . . . so much fun to tease . . . exuberance . . . " hey, fellas, guess what? " . . . never washes that curly hair till fifteen minutes before her date . . . languages, music and boats . . . indispensable to any barbershop quartet . . . the perfect room- mate . . . sunshine 65 THOMAS GILBERT NICHOLS a trombone, a pipe, a small sloop . . . sarcastic wit, that sly chuckle . . . loud and stentorian tones . . . arthur murray on any dance floor . . . dexterous manipulation of the isoclines and the hyperbolic fimctions . . . sartorial expert . . . favors the blue and white . . . " these women who wear dungarees to dinner! " . . . Sunday after- noons in n-section . . . gib EDWIN GEORGE NICHOLSON the muscular but cjuiet type . . . big foot of the )a)vee soccer squad . . .ypsl— note the red and black plaid shirt . . . sea . . . cps during the war . . .sly sense of humor— need we sa) more than that he ' s one of peek ' s buddies . . . history major with teaching tendencies . . . ed MARY GUSHING NILES " refugee " from Washington and senate job . . . embryo politician or joianalist, doesn ' t care which . . . ec major in honors . . . receives her best motivation for papers from 12 to 4 (a.m.) . . . Softball and tennis . . . night bicycle rides and walks in the rain . . . sometimes seen in a skirt . . . record collection the pride and inspira- tion of palmer . . . world federalist . . liberal ( viih a small " 1 " ) . . . photography . . . one of those rare indi iduals who can point out the really himiorous side of plato ... a wonderful person to get to know . . . cush ROBERT ZANE NORMAN one of the swarthmore brains . . . finds time for nearly everything from avc to outing club . . . easy to get acquainted with but hard to know . . . source of innumerable valuable ideas . . . ardent square dancer . . . sincere interest in science from astronomy to psych . . . believes in double standard . . . manages very well with male supremacy . . . animated thermometer and ex- pert meteorologist . . . knows what he thinks ... bob KATASHI OITA chem majoi with " a ' s " in poll sci . . . bowdoin ' s original bo v-tie box . . . survived tough jersey- to-bowdoin mission with pete in the " green one " . . . knows the what, who, when, and where of all sports events . . . charter member of s.p.i.c— can de ' our an entiie red hot pepper . . . studious and likeable . . . attached to macarthur ' s intelli- gence outfit overseas . . . vintage of pre-war swarthmore . . . loves to " sack it in " . . . prefers California beaches to those of maine 66 MARALYN ROSE ORBISON 1948 godey lady . . . giggles contagious and en- dearing . . . her quiet coinage speaks for itself . . . conscientious but so much fun . . . golf par excellence . . . " my god miss mitchell " . . . base- ball enthusiast and for a good reason . . . blue eyes, black hair— the pretty half of a very hand- some couple . . . ancl far from the least of the seven . . . orb WILLIAM HULL OSLER rapid repai tee . . . graceful tennis . . . poised and cosmopolitan . . . those parties . . . future ex- ecutive . . . idea man ... a real live fuller brush salesman . . . george school and the nav) . . . the bachelor life with interludes . . . cleeyou rush chairman . . . thrives on argument and orator) . . . princeton weekends ... a date file for the brothers ... a promising future . . . humanist . . . bill GARLAND BRUCE OVERTON, III the flushing enigma . . . relic of " old " swarth- more . . . individualist . . . everybody ' s friend and neighbor . . . speaks softly and carries a pungent wit . . . mec . . . jayvee batting records . . . hanibing show . . . escaped the stigma of " wheel " . . . keen observer of human nature . . . at the head of any early chow line . . . bruce DONALD GLUCK OYLER " happy don " — can find the humor in everything but his fifth course . . . defies the good life with plenty of parties, golf, and sack time . . . works while wharton sleeps . . . sleeps while wharton works . . . popular with everyone but the library . . . " get me a date " . . . unconciously became a swarthmore tradition . . . " hey oyyy-ler! " ROBERT HENRY PARKS gum-chewing romeo . . . bright yellow scarf and blue overcoat . . . lollipops in the libe . . . day hop from haverford (!)... Spanish club . . . but he didn ' t get that tan in mexico . . . self- admitted cigarette bum . . . can be found at the neuk with moff . . . ec major, ref room minor— but it pays off . . . bob 67 DEAN PEABODY psych major in honors . . . " it all has no mean- ing " . . . there ' s got to be honor among thieves . . . perhaps . . . athletic activities range from mountain tops to swimming pools . . . masking a himianitarian heart imder his studied insin- cerity ... a tather-contessor to inferior neurotics ... a reallv brilliant mind . . . wanderer from the happy valley . . . brother of the open road . . . das ist das lieben CHRISTIAN HARALD PEDERSEN interests as broad as his smile . . . good for a million laughs . . . loves of his life: " the green one " and athletics . . . four letter man . . . " all american " . . . frosh prexy when a sophomore . . . bookie when a junior . . . hamburg shows . . . eternal be our loves, o brother . . . student council . . . dozens of committees . . . " come, ve go togedder " . . . carrots and frozen celery . . . pete EDWARD BETTS PERKINS fl -boy who couldn ' t take his unifornr off ... ec major surrounded by engineers . . . french house studying with jean . . . lacrosse and soccer . . . summer brakeman on the prsl ... an educated toe . . . dean of deeyou . . . soph vice-prexy . . . secretary-treasurer of ifc . . . treasiner of mec . . . that fiendish gleam . . . perk EUGENE RONALD PINTO continual jokes . . . extrovert . . . " rare as a bear " . . . hot pianist . . . pleasure and peeve: women . . . those good looking outside dates . . . per- petual cute smile and wavy brown hair . . . " tremendous " . . . varsity wrestling . . . jayvee baseball and golf . . . zoo major with a toothy future . . . n.y.u. dental college . . . gene JOHN PIPER day student . . . started ' way back in ' 42, and still ■going strong . . . two years on lacrosse varsity . . . one of the ' 42 bearcats . . . and fidl-time pusher of a slide ride . . . demon driver . . . pipe 68 ROBERT KENNETH PLATT " that ' s for the birds " . . . pre-dent from haver- ford . . . values that sack time . . . those two years in india . . . taking movies his hobby, lacrosse his sport . . . jayvee football . . . student federalists . . . avc . . . phi sig . . . growing appreciation of music . . . one of our few well-dressed men . . . closet stocked with a six months food supply . . . bob THOMAS FRANZ ALFRED PLAUT words stimibling over each other . . . worlds of information crammed into a few brief moments ... to combine the theory with reasonable pur- pose . . . " let ' s look at this rationally " . . . avc . . . pea . . . industrial relations . . . the long yellow lists . . . gesticulating in commons . . . handsprings in palmer lounge ... be frank, use not hypocrisy ... to achieve an end " let ' s ecclec- ticize " . . . torn DAVID SAUL POLLEN will go out of his way to be helpfid . . . cham- pion kibitzer . . . industrial relations . . . race relations . . . annually heads complaint commit- tee to discuss troy laundry losses . . . quips and sly remarks . . . " i want what i want when i want it " . . . consistent worrier but gets high grades . . . freckles easily in the sim . . . dave ' JOHN MARSHALL PRATT english honors . . . lives in west Chester— pet peeve is that branch of the p.r.r. . . . overwhelm- ingly sincere . . . takes the serious view . . . firm belief in the soul . . . deep thinker . . . the good, the true, the beautiful . . . pre-army kwink and Itc . . . frank, open face . . . " now take the aggre- gate cow— " . . . deplores subtlety . . . jack RUTH LOUISE PRETZAT lubane and cosmopolitan . . . competent in any situation . . . never appears baffled . . . excellent horsewoman and archer . . . devastating wit gen- erally controlled to the point of civil good humor . . . crisp look belies a warm peisonality . . . fondness for french lit (especially menus) . . . sings hymns and quotes latin before breakfast . . . long-legged ancl lithe . . . pretzel 69 WILLIAM MATTHEW PYE, JR. returnee from a hitch in the army engineers . . . pre-war drum major . . . jayvee basketball and soccer . . . kwink . . . office holder for the crescent and the star . . . pioneer on the midnight trail . . . always ready for beer, bull session, or poker . . . that cigar . . . the balance of serenity among some of his more tumultuous and light-minded friends ... a " man of distinction " — but smile when YOU sav that . . . bud LOUIS NATHAN RASHIN " the mad russian " . . . irrepressible humor . . . " svolotch! " . . . extrovert with a seven-day work schedule . . . pre-med in phil honors . . . handles four languages fluently . . . serious side . . . well- disfjuisecl idealist . . . sensitive of the feelings of others . . . spontaneous generosity . . . worked his way over from shanghai via merchant marine and a student visa . . . fascinating mixture of the east and west and a completely unforgettable personality . . . lou DAVID COLEMAN REDDING the man behind the pipe . . . definitely individ- ualistic . . . mozart and beethoven . . . music di- rector of sn . . . aesthetic contemporary . . . phinx ' s most critical byline . . . supper-clubber ... a derby, a cane, a cutting key . . . esoteric . . . compi.etement quelquechose . . . dave FREMONT GOEFFERT REDFIELD the informed call him " ripcord " , or " creepfield " . . . affable . . . always smiling (after 10 a.m.) . . . favorite hero: timon of athens . . . idealistic cynic . . . " maybe men are more productive? " . . . future plans: sinecure and opulent women . . . crewcut that never grows out . . . for the present: perseverance and perspicacity . . . monty SUSAN REINOEHL FLINDELL serene composure offset by disarming chords of hilarity . . . quick to comprehend, she ' s the mis- tress of every situation ... a yankee from buenos aires . . . gave inter-american circles a whirl; now her plans include touring the world with her talented fred from the backseat of a con- cert grand . . . the allared member of the seven .... black-eyed susan 70 ALAN LEE REINSTEIN famous tor his abundant stock of ring-lore and tiis zeal for boxing . . . jayvee soccer . . . but a conscientious student underneath it all . . . poli sci honors . . . inevitable response to any sug- gestons of carousal— " can ' t— got a paper " . . . future— toss-up between law school and running a home for effete boxers . . . clunky LAURA GWENDOLYN REPPERT charming smile, ready sympathy . . . but you never hear about her troubles . . . uncpienchable enthusiasm for everything ... a laugh so waim it could brighten e en the stacks . . . " it was humil- iating! " . . . shattered kappa sig tradition and hitched her wagon to the crescent and the star . . . carrying on the reppert tradition . . . but i really do have five sisters . . . and the seven . . . lovely laura CAROLINE NEVIN REYNOLDS keep an ear open for chopin, and you ' ll find this gal beating it out in the managers ' parlor . . . says she ' d rather relax in cutting than study . . . enthusiast at the stables . . . energy-plus charac- terizes everything she does . . . makes more out of not enough time than anyone else on campus . . . rennie EDWARD RIVLIN puts poli sci to work on student coimcil . . . " it ' s time to go to bed; be my guest? " . . . trigger- .foot on the soccer field . . . letter sweaters for all occasions . . . takes to the hills in summertime . . . " that ' s the funny part about it " . . . eats friday and sunday night meals with gusto, no sense of taste . . . map-covered walls . . . he ' ll dig for oil wells like his daddy used to do ... a million laughs . . . reevo KAY IRIS ROPP bohemian from the Chicago art world . . . and swarthmore ' s most adamant defender of the " new look " . . . forty page papers . . . spaa and a social conscience . . . " i will if i say i will " . . . tennis . . . coffee and hamburgers . . . flashing needles . . . " look, puss " . . . french house bull sessions . . . kakie 71 ROBERT JULES ROSSHEIM via penn stale and villanova . . . keenly inquisi- tive mind . . . amazing amount of facts on any topic . . . subtle sense of humor . . . superb con- versationalist . . . anything started becomes a job well done . . . jayvee basketball . . . garnet tennis captain . . . camera club . . . weekends with Jeanne, his philly filly . . . ford convertible popular with his buddies . . . full of vim and vigor . . . ross GORDON HINSEY ROWE, JR. southern gentleman with yankee sophistication . . . those people who won ' t believe he ' s from mississippi! . . . " you ' ll have to excuse me, i ' m a philosopher " — and a most honors-able one at that ... if he doesn ' t know the answer, he just . laughs . . . able student council prexy ... a year on the avc exec board . . . erstwhile army medic . . . his favorite pastimes: sleeping ten hours a day and running through crum . . . plans to teach— but bound to be successful at anything and everything . . . gordie JOSEPH DELA RUTLEDGE long-coupled radio fiend . . . should be an elec- trical engineer except that he has an aversion to engineering . . . not interested in sports but try wrestling with him some time . . . ardent outing clubber and square dancer . . . one of the cabin " construction crew " . . . teetotaler, doesn ' t go in for wine, women, or cigarettes . . . recognized by his soldering iron and 6 feet 6 with the un- combed mop on top . . . gets done whatever he decides he wants to do . . . and that includes deviltry . . . joe ROBERT SADACCA pre-med with side interests— fine arts, bridge, and ■ atom-ray water pistols . . . chivalry is not yet dead . . . that maroon sweater in commons head- ing for the ping-pong table ... la donna e mo- bile—hunting song . . . follow the babe . . . phi delt . . . hellv . . . bob YOSHIRA SANBONMATSU satire and tea at the druggie . . . physicist with suppressed desire to write ... a step above most in individualism . . . peers tolerantly at a hu- morous world through a shock of black hair . . . social versatilit) from smooth dancing to pol- ished dealing of bridge hands . . . California in- fluence shows up in levis and huaraches . . . en- ner ated track star . . . vosh 72 WALTER WOODWARD SANVILLE party, party, part) . . . man of nian talents, he takes the line of least resistance . . . " tonight ' s my seminar, and i haven ' t started yet, but why worry? " . . . expert camoufiage for a serious core and real ability . . . phxsics honors and la ger- man, roos-ian style . . . where to eat?— for life begins with the antipasto . . . Canadian woods . . . navy . . . classical music . . . " why should i discriminate; i ' m as good as he is " . . . " seriously now— " . . . the sanvilles are a swarthmore insti- tution . . . and so is woody THOMAS ROBINSON SAUNDERS biddle-dee-boo kid . . . mad for parties ... al- ways on the ts plane . . . " dela vare ' s bound to win this week " . . . hell raiser . . . superior operator . . . chalkin " boy . . . years overseas didn ' t change him a bit . . . " gimme 21 points and i ' ll take army " . . . laughing boy . . . rabid sports fan . . . " if i ever get through e.e. " . . . jay ee tennis . . . ed ' s buddy . . . terror of buck hill . . . he ' s really been around . . . " just let her grow up a little " . . . " wait for murray " . . . tom MARY ELIZABETH SCHELL mysterious beauty with an exotic undertone . . . sophisticated wit . . . unconsciously possesses the poise and charm she admires in others . . . dozens of argyles across the miles to dr. dick . . . and a ringing in her ears ... of not far dis- tant wedding bells . . . the sage of the seven . . . marv lee RICHARD KLEIN SCHOEPPERLE operator . . . golfer extraordinaire . . . honors grey flannels and saddles . . . party in the lodge . . . weekend in new york party man . . . ever loyal phi psi . sack " hide the 2;ood car . . . roots austm . . . austni roots . stories . . . always ready for a laugh . . . liberal . . . studious . . . deep . . . amusing . . . great guy . . . shep DAVID PURDY SCHOFIELD noted for his acting; notorious for his singing . . . raves about blonds and Cadillacs . . . married a brunette and drives an olds . . . equally adept with stearman, slide rule, and shot glass . . . piloted fighters for uncle sam ... a real brain . . . keen enjoyment of life . . . " well, if it ain ' t ' husky ' " o KATHLEEN MORRIS SCOTT a pre-med wiih wide interests . . . music, books, the world . . . quiet manner, dimpled smile, beautiful complexion ... all this and an athlete, too . . . enchanting rag curlers . . . picnics, hikes, camping . . . hates convention . . . gal with a purpose . . . flashes of puckish humor . . . en- thusiasm for " doing things " . . . happiest in jeans and jacket . . . keenie WILLIAM M. SELDEN monty wooley . . . known to his more intimate friencis as " the hulk " . . . versatility, thy name is selden . . . ex-top sergeant, turned poll sci major with agricultinal aspirations ... at home at all times on gridiron . . . phinx orifice . . . cracker room, especially . . . despite his puns, reputed to have an earnest interest in some things . . . academic and otherwise , . . bill EDWARD BURNS SHAW ardent reader ' s digest booster . . . excellent horse- man . . . enticed by honors system from native honolulu . . . intense devotion to duty . . . english major in course . . . fleetwood imperials . . . cynical pessimist with irridescent adjectives and a cutting wit . . . frets over petty details . . . phil minor but rational argument throws him into confusion . . . suave, gentlemanly, bloated with pride . . . rarely guilty of lapses of good taste . . . prejudice-ridden, tedious conversation- alist . . . dishonest, depraved . . . nobody likes him . . . burns JOEL LAWRENCE SINER one of the atoms of the f-3 nucleus ... a zo- ologist from kew gardens . . . but honors-able all the way . . . long and tall . . . that rough exterior hides a heart of granite . . . " what standard are you on? " . . . imprejudiced ... a smile for one and all . . . sits with cooper founda- tion and the ire for various reasons . . . jo-el WARREN CLARKE SKIPP " what do you think our chances are? " ... a man to watch in any field of endeavor . . . con- scientiously helpful . . . perservering . . . avc exec committee . . . chorus manager . . . collection committee ... a seveie music critic as well as an accomplished pianist . . . relaxes with a pipe and fellowship at plushies . . . warm smile that takes all comers . . . deep, original thought on politics, music, and women . . . realistic imagination . . . skip 74 RICHARD ARTHUR SPIERLING quiet but aftable . . . sincere and dependable . . . spirited phi sig . . . member of the ifc . . . poli sci major with historian tendencies . . . drummer in the band . . . never misses a classical concert . . . neat dresser . . . always a joke to tell . . . always ready lor the druggie or the bridge table . . . always ready for a good time . . . click DOUGLAS ROBERT SPITZ hails from rochester, new york . . . history majf)r . . . aside from assignments, reads the spiril avidly . . . late riser, heavy smoker . . . relaxes at the druggie or the field house— and in nyc once a semester . . . manager of lacrosse . . . doug CHARLES NORMAN STABLER, JR. enlightened captalist . . . rabble louser . . . idea man . . . active and efficient . . . student federalist chairman . . . executive type . . . master of any situation . . . indescribable sense of humor . . . banned in boston . . . subtle . . . writes his own stuff . . . " neatsie " . . . that engaging sneer . . . garrulous party boy . . . sack smoker . . . deeyou . . . laura . . . chuck GRIFFIN MILLER STABLER the blonde sophisticate . . . huge smile . . . the young executive . . . kwinker . . . mec sec ' y . . . " dats de truf " . . . party boy extraordinary . . . " just buy me a c[uart of beer " . . . passion for sailing ... a different major every week . . . spent five years passing off his language require- ment . . . " somebody eat this breakfast for me " . . . lois . . . sword and shield . . . a.riff VIRGINIA WILLIAMS STERN a girl with a quick sense of humor and a friendly smile . . . believes in getting a broad education, but it must be practical . . . leads her roommates a merry chase . . . interested in people . . . likes dogs, swimming, and music . . . north wing ' s capable hall prexy . . . math major . . . keeps her head and her temper, even at three a.m. fire drills . . . Chicago and ken this summer . . . ginny 75 RUTH ANN STEWART the perfect lady ... as perfect on the tennis court ... a gentle charm . . . loved and deplored for her pixns . . . bit of a romantic in her taste in literature . . . that tailored look . . . famous last-minute papers ... a way with words . . . the best of freshmen counsellors . . . loaded with talent . . . ann FRANKLIN PIERCE STOW, JR. another of those big stow boys— kappa sig, of course . . . and one of uncle sam ' s infantrymen ... at home on the football field and the con- cert stage . . . varsity tackle . . . choral singing . . . possesses one of those rare smooth tempera- ments . . . after swarthmore probably art ... a person you like to know . . . bud CHALMERS CLARK STROUP product of bedford, pa . . . remnants of a pennsy accent . . . staunch member of kappa sig . . . golf enthusiast ... a good man in tiine of need . . . or at any other time, for that matter ... a natin- ally good-natured person, always helpful, always friendly . . . greets you with a big smle . . . earnest . . . genuine interest in the books . . . meticulous dresser . . . chal RUTH REBECCA STRUIK strong boston and m.i.t. background . . . math major in honors . . . interested in ire and cam- paigns for civil liberties . . . spends her summers in a unitarian work camp . . . inveterate letter- writer . . . midnight confabs in re problems of the world . . . barnaby devotee . . . stroodle ROBERT HUGH TAYLOR, JR. the denvei kid . . . climbs the rocky mountains in the sinnmer . . . math wizard on a pepsi-cola scholarship in the winter . . . the higher num- bers in honois and math club . . . mad about maps . . . when not square dancing or outing- clubbing, he ' s taking pictures ... or just being naturally friendly . . . hugh 76 WILLIAM MOTTU TAYLOR transfer Irom duke . . . mint jnleps and mag- nolia trees . . . " i ' d like to see anybody who does less than i do, only i don ' t mean studying " . . . phi sig . . . english major . . . lacrosse player and football enthusiast, and we know why . . . haimony personified ... he should have been here long ago . . . bib GEORGE AUSTIN TEST common sense to an uncommon degree . . . enjoys his laugh . . . here is a man, with that correct blend of dignity, maturity, humor and understanding which endears him to all who know him ... in the army he saw overseas duty in sicily and france for three years ... a natural athlete ... if encouraged can display consider- able ability " treading the boards " . . . summer- time botanical considtant to the scott foimda- tion . . . narrator extraordinaire of the modern dance program . . . Pennsylvania dutchman from york, the home of fine " schmerkase " and bar- bells . . . his wife, doris, secretary to miss moran . . . lieaded for career in teaching ALAN BUTLER THOMAS, JR. learns his ec theory in class . . . for practical lessons: the efficient and successful proprietor of the commons store . . . his arms constantly fidl of empty coke bottles, but behind that there ' s a cheery grin and a " hi! " for all . . . but there ' s still time for the bearcats and jayvee lacrosse . . . the nav) dragged him away for awhile— and we ' re all glad he ' s back . . . con- servative phi delt . . . wife helen and son dougie . . gus MARGARET ANN THOMSON up with the sun . . . shining eyes; waiting tables . . . supersonic speed from one zo lab to another . . . n.y.u. med school . . . ten hours sleep . . . still plenty of time for all those friends . . . " v ' hat ' s your maladjustment? " . . . knows Chinese, too . . . committees, chorus, and conduct prexy . . . there ' s no " p " in that name . . . unless it ' s for pepper . . . meg SAMUEL JUDAH TODES frequently in parrish, hunting that lost book . . . slow gait and pensive expression . . . would like to talk if you ' ll stop for a moment . . . appreciative of people and the things they have to say ... a sense of humor and a sinprising capacity for high hilarity . . . pursues philosophy in and out of seminars . . . inquiry into other fields, particulaily literature . . . occasional poetry . . . sam 17 PAUL BARTON TRESCOTT a man of many talents is he . . . returned to college after a year ' s hitch in the army . . . bebop, bridge, and the phinx occupy the better part of his time . . . ruth and history seminars take up the rest . . . his sarcastic exterior covers the heart of a newspaperman and, as such, he wages a never-ending war against reactionaries and scoffers who dub him " history major " . . . often mutters " interesting manifestations " — hangover from the motley crew of m.l. no. 1 . . . bart RICHARD M. TURNER wise man, to have transferred from drexel . . . now a dayhop mech engineer ... a three-year tech in the air corps . . . lives in norwood with wife elizabeth CATHERINE TRUMAN UNDERHILL never too busy to listen and sympathize . . . hospitable . . . meticulous model of style . . . witty . . . those spaghetti dinners . . . wrinkles her nose when she laughs . . . sincere . . . tliose blue-rimmed hailequins . . . s]3anish major . . . the domestic type ... a true lady . . . kay GERTRUDE ELIZABETH UREY always has that " happy " look . . . math major in honors, with interest in the sciences, history, a member of the orchestra for gay sense of humor, and a mis- . . . Wednesday night bull ses- . . . enjoys people, ice skating, passion against nicknames— just call her elizabeth . . . knows how to get the most out of college— and does and music three years . . . chievous streak sions in trotter and reading . . HEINZ VALTIN combines proficiency in athletics, talent in the theater, and keen intellectual ability in the class- room . . . varsity soccer . . . binning ambition to break the garnet ' s pole-vaidt record . . . Itc char- acter actor . . . zo major— pre-med . . . human- itarian spirit— that bedside manner . . . phi psi treasurer . . . class prexy . . . conscientious and sincere . . . his friendship is valued by all . . . afraid of only one thing— losing his hair 78 THOMAS PETER VILUSHIS pride of hazleton . . . e.c. major who knows where he ' s going . . . takes his phys problems in stride . . . big grin . . . nocturnal humor . . . pollen ' s nemesis . . . " ready to go, just taking a shower " . . . " you ' re so right " . . . ex v-12 . . . ■arsity football and lacrosse . . . just so you don ' t fight . . . big tom RICHARD WARE WALKLING how-dee-eee-eeu-do! . . . ex-na y radar tech . . . now competent and hardworking e.e. . . . oh, those long lab reports . . . plans to delve into field of electronics . . . " that ' s the breaks, I guess " . . . clarinet irtuoso . . . shot gun repartee . . . mec . . . dependability . . . fraternity treasurer . . . phi sigma kappa pliair . . . dick KAI-CHUNG MAURICE WAN alternately known to the denizens of d-3 as: kai- chung. the hong-kong hep cat . . . tex, the cow- bo ' from west china . . . maurice and lao wan . . . different facets of character to suit each name: varying from the raucous, guitar-strum- ming tex, with liis lusty cattle calls, to leo wan, with his quiet, penetrating philosophical discus- sions . . . pre-med of high calibre . . . high grades and high dreams . . . car-crazy sophisticate . . . tennis champ . . . reformer , . . philosopher ._ . . swell friend STEVENS HOWARD WEISS brooklynese . . . " steve, you ' re the greatest guy on this earth " . . . poli sci major . . . labor law is a long step to the left for a former future corporation lawyer . . . grim determination . . . regimented confusion . . . fashion plate . . . cocktail set . . . smooth talker . , . success . . . " from lana tinner to steve with all my love " . . . creep) ' LISBETH ROSE WERTHEIMER blue raincoat . . . that laugh . . . straight black hair . . . indian-like walk . . . occasional loud bursts of singing . . . lionors student of psych and phil problems ... an understanding and in- terest in art and lit . . . likes whitman . . . kathe kollwitz pictures on her walls . . . purposefiU, but occasional states of confusion . . . hates change in her friends . . . lise 79 BETTY LEE WHITE boston accent . . . tennis and red sox enthusiast . . . waa and Itc . . . completely domesticated . . . the little girl type . . . versatile math major . . . labs, labs and more labs . . . ever snapping her gum . . . scientific bridge . . . miles and a phi psi pin . . . blue eyes always sparkling . . . lee MARGARET SPENCER WHITE always good-natured . . . quiet charm . . . pleas- ing manner . . . understanding . . . conservative . . . effervescent wit . . . easy smile . . . meticulous dresser . . . from a long line of swarthmoreans . . . varsity golf— broke a hundred once . . . sum- mers at skytop . . . al jolson fan . . . typical woman driver . . . " they must have rocks in their heads " . . . peg ELIZABETH NORRIS WILBUR " i wish i had straight hair " . . . afraid someone will find out how intellectual she really is . . . broken ribs at exam time . . . " i must stay up all night and finish those socks " ... a gift for making people feel at ease . . . organization is not one of her irtues ... in search of Ihe pla- tonic relationship . . . music and laughter . . . liz RUTH MARIE WILCOX blue-eyed blonde with dimples . . . disguised mature common sense . . . bubbling laughter . . . western friendliness brought from Colorado springs . . . happiest making a birthday cake- but the boys never seem to object . . . believe it or not, an outdoor gal . . . bridge trainer for the roommate . . . bright colors . . . ruthie WILLIAM HENRY WILL green e)es and crinkly blond hair . . . ready smile . . . diligent duster . . . hails from philly . . . peddles pork protesting subbies . . . founder, emperor, and sublime word of the society for the preser ation of Italian culture . . . absorbs academic knowledge through his pillow . . . vet of medical corps . . . weel 80 EDITH GOLDING WILLIAMS experienced sailor and skier . . . lo es the out- doors—especially those new hampshire moiui- tains . . . interested in the mechanics of every- thing . . . " i ' ve just got to get down to work! " . . . count her in on most any escapade . . . there ' s a bit of the devil along with that good common sense . . . tell her your problems and they ' re hers, too . . . enjoys a good joke even when it ' s on her- self . . . edie JOAN UPPINGTON WILLIAMS sympathetic eyes and an angelic face, topped with locks hiding reef highlights . . . looks as though she ' s carrying the world ' s problems on her shoulders . . . but those prankish glances destroy the illusion . . . forever applying psy- chology, biu hasn ' t been able to explain her sleep-talking yet . . . those flights to fourth east will be her downfall . . . happiest when about to get outside of a hot fudge sundae . . . always ready to take in a movie . . . ecstatically happy when behind a paint brush in Chester . . . " holy cow " . . . wimsy LEO GEORGE WOERNER, JR. dependable . . . friendly . . . sincere . . . the big e.e. . . . " just for laughs " . . . social chairman at phi delt . . . wrestling . . . the editorial " we " . . . motivated by the deadline . . . incorruptible collection attendance-taker . . . loves the out- doors . . . considted about everything . . . that blue hat and that motorcycle ANDREA WOLF simply adores hoises . . . people are perfectly wonderful . . . mexico was divine . . . enjoys her maladjustment immensely . . . walks with one eye to business . . . she ' s just so busy . . . racial prejudice is an essential problem . . . life is terrifically vital . . . andy JULIA MAY WOLF hails from salt lake city . . . impulsive energy . . . diverse interests . . . always following up a new idea . . . conversations on the library steps . . . the life of any bull session . . . pessimist about grades— no one knows why . . . " procrasti- nation is the thief of time " . . . generous nature . . . busy gwimper . . . never a dull moment . . . judy 81 KATHRYN LORETTA WOLFE kind, generous, interested . . . lanciful flights within realistic bounds . . . a carousel on top of the u ' oild . . . " i must write to robin " . . . the constant friend . . . well-intentioned housekeeper —lor ed, of course . . . how nice can one person get— and then some . . . kathy JUDITH CHARMIAN WOLFSON psych major in honors . . . loves it . . . english and history, too . . . auburn hair and natiual curls . . . mar elous weekends in new york . . . " but I can study just as well there as here! " . . . accomplished violinist, contribiuing sensitive music to orchestra, dr. dresden ' s, and fortunate friends . . . erstwhile dodo business manager . . . international relations figiues as well ... it adds up to jud) SARAH CADWALLADER WOOD otherwise known as puss . . . the comedian— fol- lowed by a gasping giggle . . . brainy for her french major, scatterbrained in the dorm . . . kay for a roomy . . . french hotise for a place to keep her toothlDrush . . . and frank for the phi delt pin . . . sally THEODORE PAUL WRIGHT, JR. Washington, northwest . . . never misses a social event . . . " the sound of that beat " . . . swears by krech . . . montana escape . . . stubborn advo- cate of the " solid facts " in seminar ... an his- torian who thinks . . . organization plus . . . " bought your halcyon? " . . . masters the student directory . . . potential bureaucrat . . . women english majors are dangerous . . . " greetings " . . . ted DODDRIDGE ROWAN YOUNG hails from California and never lets you forget it . . . that freshly groomed look . . . supercilious eyebrows . . . uses his literary flair to express abstract thoughts . . . " one time when i was at chadwick " . . . transcontinental romances aided by airmail stamps . . . has his moods . . . tendency to speak in ottonian dialect . . . " meet my lancllady " . . . acts on impulse . . . complex personality . . . " for he is an englishman— and it ' s greatly to his credit " . . . dodd 82 HERSCH LEIB ZITT no compromise . . . zitt is the nietzschean . . . life is struggle, other people are mostly matter, zitt is all energy . . .history major— it ' s no hard cold science but a place lor passion as well as knowledge . . . intense . . . interested . . . sincere . . . racontem- superb . . . ex-eto-er and " his " war . . . vriting a paper?— want an idea or a bibli- ograph)? . . . " may my right hand lose its cun- ning betore i forget thee, o zion " 83 ' ■ ' ♦♦I a %i •- " n ' t3.i .« ■ ilk c ■»• ' % !• ' »■ ' 11 I !•« ' k " , (♦♦i n 1950 DOEHLERT Trcaaurer 1951 86 i ' I f, « . ' X " ' • v .V CkidvduiA. Phoenix ° Halcyon 92 Dodo • • 93 Math Club 94 Debate Society 94 Race Relations 95 Student Christian 95 WSRN 96 Engineers 97 Li« e Theatre , 98 50C 100 Music 101 VWF 102 Collection 103 Social Committee 104 Dissemination of Knowledge By Paul Schreoker What is commonly called the dis- acminatlon of knowledEe consUta, in fact, essentially In the spreading of patterns of behavior, and not, or only 10 a minor extent, in ever more people genuinely understand- ing—that la. realizing £ ally derived speclflcatli Swarthmore, Red Hotbed, Purged By Hon. O ' Rourke methodlc- ina of high- retlcal sys- tem ' s and traditions conveyed to them In the form of technical pat- terna. It may well be that the es- aential function of the proceaa ap- .pearlng as the spreading of knowl- edg= Is not the increase ot the rela- tive or absolute- number of people whose image of reality compiles with the norms of science, but the increasing Impact of science on the generation of patterns In all the neighbor fields, especially on the higher levels ot generality. The growing influence in certain epochs Commissars Train Student Clubs for Revolution O ' Rourke Enters Congress, Becomes Red- Investigator AWAKE! Back-To-Bed Movement Will Save The H WP ' jactical Future in ,.. r -r ■ - Psych Stressed King Cole Trio „ . „ — Si ngs Swan Songg jjjfrFa ' h ' ' TRIUMPH IN CRUM ROPE-PULL Swarthmore Delegation Contributes Campaign Gets Second Wind To Lively NSA Regional Convention With Goal of I ' s Milliot ; [S By XHok DtcUnsoo write In defense of the prone osltion; It ' s worth defending from he onslaugTfla of the vlgorom. nfttressed SOPHOMORES DOUSE FROSH; State Constitution Is Adopted; Future Plans Made By Larry Welakruntz What had been anticipated by many as a rather lifeless organi- zation meeting of the PefTnsylvanla Region of the NSA.. held at Pcnn Stme ColleRe on December 19, 20, and 21. and attended by 150 dele- gates representing 46 Pennsylvania colleKes, turned out to be an excit- ing and extremely Important ses- sion. N ' ol only was the refilonol Smith Analyzes Coop History The Cooperative Movement was given a thorough analysis by Dr. Caleb Smith of the Economics De- partment on December 16 In Bond. Aydelotte Leaves Institute Post T. T. • ™ Collection Speecii Be-i_ Race Relations Clmic gins Fund Drive iGestaltist Looks suidu, r„.„.,.nl Hollywood II .i.rt ih.s Thur.duy Oemmic Affleck -lie Jii.t diiv . wli.Ch 5 -, . fjii or w, i.y the Hecomes new ' ' " T ' " ' « " , ' ' »? ' n ' „ Assistant Dean O ' Rourke Trails Reds with the Help of Shero Vernon O ' Rourke, newly elected to-the House of Representatives, has been appointed to the House Com- mittee on Un-American Activities. In an exclusive interview granted to Phocnis and the Chester Times. I hold as one of my tec - ily begins at home. -efore I a 1 going to direct my ttrsi. efforts tijwards my own district, I want Delaware County to have the I best gol-durned un-American activl- I ihe in try.- w •»■ • — which Lana 1 urner to or the Speak in Collection [T " , ' J, ' — — lattons. B eh Wednesday and Thuridky inicrnatli sTontnc n earneit group of itu- delegatio dintr. haaded by Bill Matchett and Smith. Tonea, known as the Record Garver, afled and approved JIM WHIPPLE he went :e;;; ' :nd -bur ' th " ' rst - -r f- ' y«y« » " » IS were laid for programs ' «» • name remained. In Ihe fields of race re- udent government, and Swarthmore College. will serve a: Th.- the headquarters ot a " race re-Fumi E lations clinic- recently established,,! Coll, hv the Pennsylvania Region of Ihe .., . ,u N.SA. at Its conference at Peno .„ „„, State College on December 19. 20, " " " and 21. The purpose of the clinic " ■ ' " ' " ■ ' as stated In the report of the Panef ' " " " " on E omestic AfTftJrs, will be " to In- ' ' ' ' ' " vestlgate, compile, and dlssemlnate ' ' " ' information concerning racial and religious discrimination in the col- leges of the Pennsylvania region, and to recommend programs of action which can alleviate such -ii.- 11- 51.000. Thi.- ORotJrke then announced that ho -vould begin his investigations with Swarthmore College, a small educa- tional instutition long suspected as i eing a Communist front organiza- lion. -My own knowledge of that nstiiution will be supplemented by that of my newly-appointdd spetis.t ' investor. L R. Shero, who has ovw , ' CI_ I » If :• J period of years wormed his w«y i-Dnoemaker S HOUdayinto the colUges inner Workinga, " -at, " ■- rjsk of his life and reputation. I know what the place is like. " onal affairs I m. consisting of Ralph Lee Larry Welskrantz. Newt and Ruth Friedenthal Study Group, got together In one ot (substituting for Polly Plnsker who the lodge to rtu dy the reeordi of bec ame alck just prior the life of Jeaua. New Dodo ' s Wings Clipped; Swarthmore Purity Saved By LauTK Johnson and Paul Golnn Shortly before Christmas the- Dodo was cent to the printer afterj the atatr had spent houra df hagg- ling over the selection of material from a surprisingly large group of contributions of more that usual Extravaganza by ZaII, Bowen Presented This and tomorrow evening, No- vember 2] and 22, Swarthmore students and alumni will once again Hock to Clothier Memorial to see the traditional fun-making, let-your- hair-down, student-written, student- ridden production of the Hamburg Show. Sponsored by Kwink, the always pecmlered on the ' ore the Swai thmore-Hav- Cord Meyer Addresses AVC: p., ci„«,„ r -.r, , , r • -vai timore vjoing Federal UN or Certain War yyrjih " Kix " No Complete AB Defense ?t " UWF Seeks Means to MakeStudent PldnO RcCltal Future Wars Impossible |yg j g Larger AudiencB I aSOII Suspends PllOeilix;Mana ment riots Break BaiisKiiisey Out of Coiitext«3l%art.eV " " ' n MaShi PCA Chapter Is Formed By Swarthmore Liberals January Graduates Preview Life Outside Ivory Tower Most Graduates Plan .. _ Graduate School WorkOTlIZ berVSS After Graduation ii - — Mer Country ' Miss Albertson Removal of Suspension Follows Week Of Discussion and Arbitration By JANET FRIEND Iphia Play Contest Bells Ring Again The Into vague the Swarthmore sends ' Orld thts month i about their nest mov Wher the Pliocnix asked ( nftht.be Are Swarthmore Women Inhibited? .Hollywood couple Ds ino Pnr of seniors they said. " My God! Is r aCKHiy rOF it tha . soon? " Graduate school Is ahead in fall for several. Bob Creed, English major, says he ' ll be at Harvard Vot I DoTCn tO SpCaf next fall, John Brumbaugh may get there for law or graduate work UGDaie ftudlenc of iome 1»0 people. I ' " " ■ Including several Swarthmoro -, , J £ • students attended a meeting called DOOk ana Aey by the Eaatem Pennsylvania Ch«p- - — ter of the Progres«lvc Cltlzenj of „ r ., _ , I America Saturday, November Irt. Un l-Yiday, February 13th, President John Nason an- — " " Jiujependence square, Phiiadei- nounced his decision to suspend tlie PHOENIX from publi- cation. The immediate cause of the action was an editorial which appeared in the PHOENIX of January 16th. com- menting lipon tlie book by Alfred Kinsey and his associates, . " Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, " signed by the editor. ' The editoriaj. said Mr. Nason, " culminated several semesters , of irresponsibility by the PHOENIX staff. " The actual suspension lasted only a week, though PHOE- NIX publication was delayed for a longer time; conferences ttetween administration offlctaJs. Student Council, and the co-editors of ThU editorial u written to explain why we think it better not to write about a lubject which demand« edi- neetlng called to protest the jod Investigation by the T« T ;ki ' Dr lfw. r ' Committees had previously m J-jlDe JSeiiry ohll ited by the dty of Phlla- . on the grounds that dam- n» M.wio nMa night be done to Indep« - By Marria OId« f obtained a fed- At 10:45 AM. Monday. Decern- prohibiting the city ber 1. the m e chimes began to ring mning the rally, again. Kinsey Cflmpus commEriT thing ; we never thoui;ht we ' d hear : perot hailing new arrivals at - worth, ' " come on up and look In my closet, i -e got the new look. a new wrinkle In s-warihrnore etiquette: frosh bill BlbertsM) t s«8 mllli pllcher and calU a waltres , " madam, madam. " then there ' s the frosh girl at thi }opy. likp that whe n they graduate " first dance; " do swarthmore men in Drive for uwF: iSA Breaks With lUS Other Plans Maae _ _ , g t ' °™ ' • " " «■ ' • Over Stand on Czech Coup our fir.t retpon«, to reading the Kiiu.y Report wa. I C . , _, lo write a blijtcring editorial, quoting- devattatms ita- iNegotiating Team _ • - To Boycott Prague C Cl ' l ' tC Summer ConferenceOl JfJ Wl %9 • • • • Myths of Wharton Quad Made Public Pagan Cultists Worshipping Oyler Busch Quartet Plays ' Chamber Music Program End Dash Lone Female Infiltrates: R. Valtin and Pederson Achieve Soccer Honors It hat been the policy of the Phoenix in the pajt to criticize Collection in all way , shape , and form . For ft change, we are soing to adrocate a constructive change in Pegard to Collection. Why not have it at 10 A.M. instead of 1 1 7 The race to the dining hall i a di grac«, an tnaul to speakers, performers, or whoever has been feature on the program. Furthermore, the extended chow line not infrequently work a hardship on the student with a one o ' clock clc» or lab, not to mention the strain on " -v-w . the d ing room personnel. Engineers Streamline n _ Cla «e now meeting at ten on Tue.day, Thunday,! By Bob B«a« POrtment ard Saturday could be witched to eleven for that day ift r yrars of ninnnin t , , «Uy without much hardship to the students, since theyttt s ' Lnirch ' irmln .n f S ' - ' would still get to the dining room before noon. leering department, la bcglnnlnj We al o maintain that thi move would at least d . ' " " ambition of combinini, lack of ttudent intere t in Collection program , f " trsi nd?. ' ' ' ,?™ ' ' ' ' " ' ■ - ' -r .-J u- k It. -.-.t - ..f . V. indication or this trend le 600.000-pound testing machlni Student Council Thrilled Engineers Plan Research ' Security of School -.Have HageBone-Crusher TS ' tl Coaches Choose All-star Outfit I JURGEN HEBERLE — h« was too interested. Two Swarthmore varsity soc ' players, rullback Chris Perter I and Inaide left Rolf Valtin, capiu bertha on the 1947 All-Amorli soccer team choaen by the Natio Collegiate Coaches Association their annual meeting In New Yc January 3 A third player. D ' Annunzio, took honorable tlon for his woik a» goal tcndi Drexel Is Easy Wrestling Victim ; Collegft Starts Year With 392 Women, ' ' %11 Men Enrolled this Modernizing Curriculum In Liberal Arts Urged ■was completed last sprlnd Ing the aumraer work was be- on a Navy reaearob oontracl ih conaiata of the investigation he types of fracturea occurring i-arioua typea of ateela and the clpal subject ia the effect of Rude Reception Repels . Futile Frosh Fp.mmes Solomon Asch, From The New School, Joins Swarthmore Psychology Department Joe Swarthmore College beglnj school year with 1069 students en- " " ' ; rolled. Th.s Includes 392 npmen and 677 men Among the men are 227 day students, among the women only 20. About 51 oft the total men ' a enrollment are veterans, a Carr Consuited on Chemical War Stolper To Join Cartel OSBORNE. CLARKE, REDIFER. SHAFER, EVERETT, SELDEN WYNNE. SMYTHE, McGRAYNE The existance of the HALCYON is nothing short of a minor miracle, and none but its staff can fully know liow difficult they are to produce. With one notable exception, all of the staff— top to bottom— were new to the HALCYON, and the workings of a yearbook had to be discovered rather than planned. The greatest difficulties resulted not so much from inexperience as they did from budgetary balances, unkept promises and student apathy. Many promised much and failed to deli ' er; more just cotddn ' t seem to remember. There will be some who until they inspect this book, will not be aware that they had to be left out because they couldn ' t quite re- member to tinn in a picture or show up at a meeting. On the other hand, there were those not belonging to the staff who gave valuable assistance and cooperation. The HALCYON is the product of hard work and of all of these other factoids. THE HALCYON STAFF ... t WRIGHT, RAVDIN E ANS. WYNNE, LEVINO. KENNED ' . CHALMERS ?SKl Mnnu7 M i Ri PRIZE ESSAY The Day of a Sti-artkmoTe Couple: i ' eing a Pica for the Recognition oj the Proposition that Sex h Here to Slay, Thereby Dririnij il Indoors. J PECULIAR paradox prevails here at Swarthniore. On the » y one hand we have the ostensible ofPcial ignorance of the sex urge. This is a bad thing. On the other hand we have the canipiis literally decorated with couples in various stages ot intricate physical entanglement. This is also a bad thing. Yot. oddly enough, I have a neat little theory that the " ofllcia! ignorance " causes the " public demonstrations. " Indeed, on a warm spring day the ubiquitous dogs are hard put to out-do the student body. T hough I must reluctantly admit that the dogs arc far more eSicaciou. ' , although none the less blase. Now. I personally have no bones to pick with these public lovers, except perhaps lo note (from the point of view of the artist) that they are hopelessly amateurish. About the only lime they ever bother me ' is when I choose to amble about campus in dctatched meditation, " contemplating the ultimate, " trip over a pair of intertwined IQ ' s. fall, and deal myself bodily harm. Otherwise, they could give vent to their animal spirits in Gimbel ' s window and I wouldn ' t give a damn. But I am passionately attached to Swarthmore, and I hear that this sort of thing just " doesn ' t look good. " And furthermore, any levej- hcadcd sophomore will concede that the situation is getting out of hand a;hcn a young thing walks into the Dean ' s offce and demands " athletic credits " for her nocturnal activities on the football field. Viewed in this light, it is a downright threat to the future of hockey and horseback riding at Swarthmore. Not to MENTION the shock it gives the RICH parents of prospective female students. Lot us then trace the day of a Swarthmore couple and hope that in the process we shall find a way to alleviate this deplorable state of affairs. In ihe dim, misty light of the early morning, a youthful chap ap- thc seat. As one they advance upon the bastions of reason and truth for forty-five minutes, tear then to bits and emerge, hand-in-hand, from the wreckage with a mutual basic concept. At noon they stand hand-in-hand in the chow line, ignorant of the confusion about them, alone in their oneness. Throughout lunch they gaze fondly at Poem How like each proud and foremost wave Thai runs alone upon the hostile shore, fopiTlg as to leatc the common grave Of all waters and seek out a more wrestle on the grass. 1 which defy description. Unique and virgin place; that grows roll upon the grass, pot on platforms, bright sun dispels. •ation, ]} nation ' y often grows. L. DR, Johnson. maintain for as much c couples even mainlair I ' arrish during the nint Unsure and rcMless by its chaffing froth; That, vnahful, sighs to stop, then slowly goes. Still hesitant, in covert whiap s off To thread its mild uay back— do tee at viev Of a strange spectacle first bum With kindled, eager sense of new And luring sights that bid to spurn All semblance to the old; then come Ey habit and by questioning to trace Its fitness to a more familiar form! Thus things in light and dark stand back tofac And though the shapes at dusk may struggle free. They cannot long remain in flight. There are many v f„,. p„„m, of our farmtr dag, ro,,,,,! the Siirne then .„ . .„ „,. ralk with llie Tinner ' s ' ' Hiroshima Open blossom, from silver bird Made no sign of spring. Of Human Dignity Of course I love you, darling. H all the tears I ' ve shed lor you were stretched end to end, They ' d make a crystal path to China, And then some. Those are only tears. But damned il I Will make myself a path for you to walk on To China or to Hell, And tremble with liquid ecstacy because Your shoe has touched me! A Word to The Papooseless Js Useless Just like a hunter who comes home quite mooseless. Or a train in the freight-yard which sits there cabnoseless. Perhaps like a drunk who finds he is boozeless. Or a ship in the drydocks rusty and cruiselcis. Or maybe a hangman who discovers he ' s nooseless: A girl will discover that meii think she ' s useless Until she can learn that it ' s wise to refuse— less. Brannock Burns ' Finest tain the Clutch— a thing wuitu, »,.. fact, is no mean feat. Others man; arms, eacli about the other, rcveral appears quite painful and most dec is unfathomable. After a C|uiek smoke on the pc what a scene! A mad hand-in-han separation. Their fingertips touch lightly and then apart! All this, it mtphl be added, taking place amidst a kaleidoscopic pan- orama ot roaring motor scooters, cigar-smoking zoologists, rushing bicycles, and dashing students, to which the two seem completely oblivious. Forced apart, they soon meet again tor that sweetest of pleasures: a class together. He .sits on her right, enabling them to maintain the Clutch clandestinely beneath DODO EVER since the days when Bran- nock Burns was a wee ' un lagging after his da ' s kilt tails, he had determined to produce the finest batch oi whiskey in all o ' Scotland. That he did so is a testament to ScolUsh deter- mination, but, it would seem, his success went unrewarded. Just as the eighty- nine year old Scot bent to lest the finished product, his loot slipped on the heather (some say) and he fell into the bubbling vat. Witnesses, however, are on record as having sworn that Burns went under with a smacking oi. lips and a twinkle in his eyes. That, in brief, is the legend which perpetuates the memory of a Scot who really threw him- self into his work. The lame of that last batch of Brannock Burns ' toured the world. Every port touched by Her Majesty ' s Navy heard of this whiskey. Explorers and mission- aries, too, carried the word back into in all o ' Scotland. And some have attributed lo Britain ' s refusal to export a sample to Kaiser Wilhelm ' s birthday party lirst rank in the long complex, list of causes of World War I. So it was, then, that in the Spring of ' 42, a group ol jeeping GI ' s — none ol them could have been over twenty — hstened with rapture and amazement to a hospitable family recount the glory that had been Scotland ' s. After Brannock Bums had been fished out of the vat, and after everything possible had been wrung out of his clothes, it was found that what was left was hardly enough lo fill a guart bottle. Following the first tasting by Bums ' helpers, it was unanimously agreed that each of the party should be allotted five sguare inches q[ the soil surrounding the vat. The liHle plots were then taken home and either squeezed like a lemon or sucked like a peppermint shck, so f , Slight Verse Lucy Haykb. DODO GAROARa SOSmaN (3( ENTAN0 Little Stories in Psychology: yist LAur A JOHNSON PAUL GUINN STEW RT JOHNSON ALBERT AND THE RABBIT When, for example, a child who already shows startle and other so-called fear responses to loud sounds is presented with a loud sound and a rahbil, he becomes conditioned in a very few trials so that the presence of the rabbit alone will elicit startle, crying or related behavior " lionng, Langjcld and Weld. pg. 300. " Good morning, children, " said the professor, beaming on the shining rows of vacuous faces, " would you like to hear a story about conditioned responses to iay? " " Oh, yes! " chorused a girl on the front row. ■ ' Well, then, I will tell you all about Albert and the Ilabbit. " Albert was a typical red-blooded, healthy American boy, just like oiost of you. " {Three Kappa Sags beamed and squirmed self-con- sciously.) " His mother was a widow-an educated, enlightened and even emancipated young woman who was extremely enthused about modern ideas and more speeiEcally about the young men who dealt m those ideas. During the time in which our experiment takes place isor, a lovable old fuddy-duddy in quaintly archaic expressions), logist. Dr. Abulia K. Tcstos- est. " )r. Testosterone spent a great ortunatcly Albert, true to the nt, inquisitive and vocative. olerance. the young scientist ' the subject for what was to be sychology. Albert ' s flattered f afferent neurons, and ofTcred .nd anybody here who doesD ' t Id alchemist. she was being ' sparked ' , " (the profe; " " JJl Sludebakcn are inicrullble Malted Barley or Sour Grapes A Wth of Scotch Ain ' t so motch. Maryly Nute. REDDING BROOK. The Remarks of Mary Tudor Early in the Morning, 17 November 1558 Look how the arras ripples. The fountains fall and roses bloom in light. And there ' s some whisper in this hour. Maid, Maid, who cry, who call. And why do they condemn me as I die? I made a mighty candle of my realm To place upon the aitar of the Sun, And fonts I made of tens, too often red. But belter than the color of brush reeds. I made this land a prayer. Forgive me Philip, God. And you, the land, if I too harsh Did scour you of your Ridleys And your sin. Forgive my litanies If I did chant too loud. And still you cry, behind the arras. In the yard, and down the cobbled street, And why? I hear the murmur now. Mourning me with laughter, Mary , And the Cardinal, with laughter and " Lei them die ' The chant, the chant of " Calais " in the streets. Of " Calais, " a moiety, a blotch of grubby earth, Calais. So thus the arras mourns, for Calais. Saved you your England ' s soul and lost her Calais? Die then unmoumed. The litany is over, begin the Mass. " Judge me, O Lord, " For I have lost Calais. BAR SPIDER Winner, Fifth of Scotch Contest DAN was wiping the bar with a lo the other, was perspiring. A young damp rag when the man came man came through the door. He looked in. Dan limped over to him, something like Eddie, only younger, bul " What ' U you have? " he asked. there was no swagger in his walk. He " Give me a bottle of Bud, Dan. " sal down next to Eddie and when Dan Someone put a nickel in the juke box, came over he ordered a beer. He took and the bartender shuffled away. He out a package of cigarettes and some rehjmed with an open bottle of beer and change and placed them in front of him set il before the man with a glass. Dan ' s on the bar. Cully, at the other end of trained eye spotted an empty glass at the bar, watched Eddie and the younger the other end of the long bar. , " What ' s yours. Cully? " he asked the tall, gaunt man. " Isn ' t that Eddie McGrath over there? " asked Cully. " Yeah, " grumbled Dan. " Why doesn ' t the boss keep him out man. Eddie toyed with his glass as the young man drank two beers, " Kinda dull drinking alone, isn ' t it? " ventured Eddie. The young man looked up sharply at Eddie, then tapped a cigarel on the coun- WE CAN DftlVE ' iT ' lIVLiuUKs: ; I ' lowf ine answer rises out ol the depths of Cloisters, comes booming out of Crura, rings out of the Managers ' Parlor, roars up from Fraternity Row; PUT CURTAINS ON THE CL.VSS LODGES! ! ! : Bob Christie, THE SWARTHMORE DEBATE SOCIETY A more widespread interest coupled witli a full schedule has given this year ' s edition of the Swarthmore Debate Society one of its very best seasons. The exceptionally large number of members participating in intercollegiate debate competition was responsible for the growth of Swarthmore ' s reputation as an important center of the forensic art. The crowning achievement was the capture of the Pennsylvania state champ- ionship this spring. Increased tournament debating and a more active program of individ- ual debates has made the Debate Society an active campus force. Indicative of the growing importance of debating at Swarthmore is the fact that the Ben Franklin Debate Tournament is scheduled here this spring. Always with room for more members, the Society exists to serve those who are anxious to either engage in inter- collegiate debating or to learn how to speak in public more effectively. The present manager of the organization is Jim Dolliver, with Mr. Beik as advisor. MATH CLUB Throughout the past year, the Mathematics Club under the presidency of Carl Levinson has presented to its members, its usual full schedule of speakers. The programs were so arranged that half of the talks were given by professors and outside guests, and half by the students. Among those who spoke were Doctors Brinkman, Garahan and Schonberg, Irv. Dayton, Lou Howard and Bill Lichten, and the subjects ranged from " Conditionally convergent series, " to " Kinematics, " and " Differential Analyses. " Besides sponsering the problem contest which is open to all students, the Math Club put for- ward several contestants in the Putman Matlie- matical Nationwide contest. KAWSON, GARCEAU, BURNHOLTZ. LEVINSON The Race Relations commiuee is dedicated to the practical policy of campus and comminiity education and action in order to overcome racial pre- judice, intolerance and discrimination. As a student organization, the committee is primarily concerned with discrimi- nation as it manifests itself in the field of education, but thru comimity projects and connections in Swarthmore it has been able to prevent its own isolation. For the student body, the committee has presented a number of speakers who have discussed discrinrination from all aspects, from psychological explanations to techniques in breaking down racial barriers. With regard to the college itself, the Race Relations group has been interested in investigating the possibili- ties of a more representative student body. In the community, the committee has investigated a number of problems which lead to the necessity of organizing some form of a community racial council. The Swarthmore committee was the parent organizer of the intercollegiate organization, and Andy Wolf is the Chairman. The committee is also co- operating with the NSA as regards the setting up of an inter-racial clinic. STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION The Swarthmore Student Christian Association is an interdenominational organization open to all students who are interested in learning more about re- ligion, and especially Christianity as a way of life. In addition to the regular Sunday evening meetings which were addressed by faculty members as well as representatives of both the Friends Ser- vice Committee and church groups, the SCA has sponsered a clothing drive, con- tributed to the World Student Service Fund, and cooperated in a work project. The SCA is a participating member of the national Student Christian Move- ment and the World Student Christian Federation. Officers for this year were: Lloyd Craighill, president; Maryly Nute, secretary; and Dick Spruyt, treasurer. RACE RELATIONS COMMITTEE First Row: Foster, Hershberger, Jenson, McDaniels, Miller, Spenser, Weber. Second Rory: Redding, Robertson, Rounds, Hackett, Conway, Brightman, Hopkirk. Standing: Peele, Kimball, Kurtz, Epstein, Rashin, Lloyd, Young, Arsht, Ward, Conant, Whittlesey, Hansen, Eisler. WSRN This year, WSRN followed what was perhaps the most extensive progiam of enlargement and reorganization in its history until the usual budget troubles forced a slowdown to its activity. The station began the season with impressive publicity campaign, which paid dividends in the form of a vastly increased staff. Then, thru the purchase of new equipment, WSRN was able to triple its power of transmission. During the first semester, Andy Weil was the Station Director, and the other section heads were: Mike Eisler, Production; Al Ward, Chief Engineer; Ted Conant, Technical Director with Wolf Epstein as Assistant; Dave Redding, Music, and David Peele in charge of publicity. Ken Kurtz, with the aid of Al Hunt, revamped the Sports Depart- ment, and the Radio Workshop after the depart- ure of Otto Menzel continued its dramatic offerings under the diiection of Larry Hansen. Beginning with the Dickinson football game, nearly every major game, home and away, was broadcast, with their sponsership by local merchants proving to be one of the station ' s major source of income. To this was added the Epstein, Ward, Eisler, Kurtz. proceeds from the sale of WSRN recordings of campus events such as the Hamburg Show and the Bach Oratorio, as well as that from individ- ual records and " talking letters. " For the Second semester, Mike Eisler became Station Director and Jim Hackett, Chief An- nouncer. The station began to broadcast weekly programs, originating from WSRN, over WPWA in Chester, and also to relay EM programs to the campus during the daytime. The general policy of WSRN for the second semester was to make on the spot bi-oadcasts of all campus speakers and events of importance. 96 ENGINEER ' S CLUB OFFICERS: ROEMER. HURD. y CORNOG. GORJANC LTC Experiment and success marked the 1947-48 season of Swarthmore ' s Little Theater Club. Under the direction of Mrs. Barbara Pearson Lange, the LTC concentrated on producing drama not often presented and original productions native to Swarthmore. The guiding policy of the year was based on the premise that the duty of a college theater should be to supplement rath er than to imitate the professional stage. The final production of the pre ' ious season saw the inception of the new policy, with Winifred Muir directing Chekov ' sT ;c Bear for a Collection pro- duction. Capably done, this effort demonstrated admirably well the fruitful possibilities of the much-neglected one-act fomi. Opening the current season, LTC produced two original one-act plays by Lorenz Hansen: Laughlin ' s Son and Departure. The value of this type of pro- duction proved threefold. From the point of view of the individual actor, the plays afforded ample range for interpretation uninfluenced by previous perfonn- ances. The stage crews were enabled to exercise a wide range of ingenuity and imagination; and the playwright gained considerably in invaluable experience. As a result of the success of Hansen ' s works, the Club this spring is cooperating with Book and Key in sponsoring a contest for original one-act plays. The major production of the f irst semester was Philip Barry ' s Hotel Universe, a metaphysically philosophical drama seldom produced. Played without inter- mission, a dream-like performance rewarded a very appreciative audience and a hardworking cast. Spring brought Thomas Dekker ' s Shoemakers Holiday swirling happily back from the 17th century. Characterized by originality in design, costume, setting, and production as a whole, this fitting climax to an overwhelmingly successful season has joined the halls of happy legend. 99 OUTING CLUB This year was made memorable for the Outing Chib by the coming of the " Gadget " , a cross between a panel truck and a station wagon. The Gadget, of great capacity and not so great reliability, spends a good part of its time in the repair shop. However, despite such handicaps, the SOC carries on. Specifically, carrying on includes a square dance every Wed- nesday night, an event every weekend, two or more intercollegiate events each year, assorted movies and slides, and the Folk Festival. The Wednesday night square dance group usually has about twenty people, enough for more than two squares. There are cpiite frequent differences of opinion in the group about whethter New England dancing is as good as Western dancing, so both are included, well mixed with various kinds of fofk dances, lie weekend trips include ice skating, roller skating, and bike trips; pack trips, usually on the Applachian Trail; canoe trips from Mays Landing; and the ever popular Cabin Weekends. The cabin, on Mr. Pitt ' s farm near the Mason-Dixon Line, is a place for hiking, chopping wood, square dancing, eating ... in other words, for having fun. The two regular annual intercollegiate events are run by the Intercollegiate Outing Club Association, he first of these is the spring conference of lOCA ' s thirty member colleges, in which Swarthmore has participated for the last fifteen years. The conference brings representatives of these colleges together to discuss problems in running outings and outing clubs, and to sing and square dance. However, the major intercollegiate event of the year is College Week. During College Week, the Adirondack region of upper New York State is over-run by outing clubbers, alums, and a few mountain goats, all of whom go abaut with reckless abandon climbing mountains, hiking, swimming, square dancing, singing, growing assortments of blisters, beards and bruises, and generally having a wonderful time. In the final analysis, that is the why of the Outing Club: to enable people to ha e a good time to- gether, out of doors. 100 JO[ias rA ron Top ron ' : Hopfcirk. Kurtz, Brodie, Stabler, Tomsho. Second row: Shoup, Montgomery, Garver, Hershberger. First vow: Starrels, Gilbert, Miller, Baker, Schem, Abbott, Dunstan. UNITED WORLD FEDERALISTS With the return this fall of Colgate Prentice, former national President, the Swarthmore chapter of the " W orld Federalists began a program of information and education for a world federation. Under Chuck Stabler, first semester President, the Federalists concentrated on organization and expansion of its membership rolls. With the second semester election of Bill Ravdin, machinen was set up for a community-wide " World Government Day, " featuring mass petitions in support of a unified world government. Boasting one of the largest active memberships on campus, the World Fed- eralist organization has grown from a group of five to the present total o£ 55, an indication of the growing consciousness of Swarthmore students of the major problems facing the world. SWARTHMORE ORGANIZES Dining the academic year, 1947-48, Swarthmore had its interests organized and catetred to by a multitude of organizations. In the field of the natural sciences, Science Integrated drew large crowds to its distinguished program of speakers, and a Physics club promised to put in an appearance for the benefit of those interested in the physical sciences. The International Relations Club heard speakers on the complexities of foreign affairs, while the Industrial Relations Club sought information on the field of domestic controversy. The AVC, the only veterans organization on campus, also sponsored a series of talks, and opened a non-profit, second hand book store as one of its campus and commimity projects. The SDA was the campus branch of the national Americans for Democratic Action, and the college branch of the PCA was relegated to a back row seat while most of its members were working outside of the organization in active support of the presidential candidacy of Henry Wallace. During the year, Swarthmore voted to join the National Students ' Assembly (NSA), and in the spring, the Swarthmore chest drive emphasized the appeal of the World Student Service Fund for the means for educational rehabilitation abroad. 102 A TERN FOR THE ' WORKING TOGETHER TO CREATE THE OPPORTUNITY PEELE ¥ILL BE HANDED m CdUeCTION PERKINS VI UL SPeAK TOO... THe.f M CrHr V£,ls Ba A FRANK OiSC JS5(OH SOCIAL COMMITTEE The Social Committee is organized (on the basis ot appointments) to provide suitable recreation and entertainment appealing to the greatest variety ol; personalities and interests within the Swarthmore student body. Problems of finance and capable workers as always beset the Committee, but the year proved successful, particidarly in the project of widening the scope of activities available. New types included a theater party, a student-faculty bridge party, a roller skating part) and a student piano concert. Through the work of Doris Gavett and Pat Lackey, se eral tea dances held in Commons after football games brought a large response, while unusually popidar were the pre-holiday events in December: Christmas vespers in Clothier, old-fashioned carolling on the campus, and the Candy Cane Formal, the theme of which was iniiquely carried out in both the decorations arranged by Dot Brodie and the refreshments in charge of Helen Green. The biggest occasions were of course the traditional WSGA weekends, climaxed by the formals, and the grand finale of the first semester, the Club Roccatorso, boasting a script by Dick Dickinson and Art Levin on " Dangerous Dan McGrew " , starring Dean Cobbs, Mr. Pierson, and Mr. LaFore. All the entertainment engendered a considerable amount of enthusiasm; those deserving credit are: Co-chaiiman: Jean Bill Spangler Treasurer: Jack Chapman Decorations: Dot Brodie Refreshments: Helen Green Publicity: Lynn Hill Cumnrins and Chaperones, hnitations. and Pro- rams: Lama Reppert Miscellaneous: Tom Bressler, Roy Dickinson, Doris Gavett, Pat Lackey, Sam Mason, Chris Meyers, Yvonne Motley, Mary Lee Schell 104 NOT ARRANGED BY SOCrAI. COMMITTEE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL The Interfraternity Council is the coordinating unit of fraternity life on campus, and as such its functions are important not only to the fraternities them- selves, but to the college as a whole. Consideration and solution of those problems arising in fraternity life, and making available the services of an organ- ized group for various projects, are the fundamental raison d ' etre of the council. The organization is composed of two representatives from eaach of the fra- ternities and the Garnet Club, with the new addition of a faculty advisor, Carl Dellmuth. All relationships between the fraternities, among their members and with the Student Council, are handled by the IFC. This year the agenda included simplification of the rushing rules, and a definite schedule of rushing smokers was set up, thus eliminating conflicting dates and enabling the prospecti ' e pledges to base their decision on a wider selection. Initiated but left for future discussion was a program to limit rushing to one period per year. The relations of the fraternities with the college community were improved on both the athletic and administrative levels. The interfraternity basketball league during the winter, and softball league in the spring, met with a larger response in participants as well as spectators. Through the Council, the fraternities are working on strengthening bonds with their alumni in order to utilize the benefit of their past experience and activities, and council representatives also are responsible, in conjunction with Book and Key, to give prospective freshmen a view of Swarthmore College life. Kappa Sigma Dick Hurd Bill Clark Phi Delta Theta Bill Jenkins Fred Morey FALL ' 47 Delta Upsilon Bob Hillegass Tony Wolfe, IFC sec ' y.-treas. Phi Kappa Psi John Austin Dick Esrey Phi Sigma Kappa Bob Simpson Dick Spierling Andy Weil, IFC president Garnet Club Andy Frank 106 KAPPA SIGMA William Albertson Joseph Battin William Battin David Brown Charles Bush Edwin Bush Robert Christie William Cornog Walter Cosinuke John Denton Thomas Eagan David Galloway Joseph Gary Rex Gary Henry Gorjanc Erling Haabestad Donald Cooper Robert Gray Samuel Griscom Geoffrey Hazard Robert Joseph Jonathan Hanke Charles Hesner William Hirst Richard Hurd Richard Johnston Peter Kaiser Richard Kaire Raymond Kudlick Frank Ludemann Alburn Metz Clayton Miller Thomas Montgomery John Piper Burdette Poland William Pye Fremont Redfield David Schofield Jacob Slick Chalmers Stroup Jackson Taylor Richard Unger Donald Walters Lee Wentling Russell White Charles Wilson David Witheford PLEDGES Richard Kozicki Harry Oppenlander Thomas Vilushis William Weston PHI DELTA THETA Geir) Achterman Ed Ahrens Murray Albertson John Bozic George Carow Dick Chambers Jack Chapman Dick Cushing Dick Davis Henry Dekker Jim Dolliver Bruce Douglas Gene Farley Brad Fisk Bob Forster John Goertner Frank Hege John Henchel John Hoskins Norm Houlben Bill Jameson Bill Jenkins Dick Jenny Tom Killip Mo Kimball Norm Kime Roy Knudsen Lloyd Lewis Sam Mason Bob McCoy Jack McCrory Orrick Metcalfe Morgan Moore Fred Morey Gib Nichols Steve Mucha Frank Nicholson Frank Oja Herb Pahl Ed Ra-i son Will Roth Bob Sadacca Woody San ille Tom Saunders Carter Smith Chuck Smith Dave Sparks Griff Stabler Gus Thomas Morrie Trimmer Tom Truitt Al Van Deusen George Van Deusen Bill Weaver Leo Woerner Ted ' right " 7 Harvey Anderson Robert Alfandre Norman Baker Robert Benham Edward Burroughs Eugene Christin Robert Colyer Allen Enders Villiam Ford Howard Gilliams Howard Harris John Lawrence Peter Lorch John McCutcheon William Moore Carl Muller George M)rick Robert Piatt John Rounds Robert Simpson Richard Spierling John Tanguay William Taylor Henry Temple William Tietz Alfred Trescott Richard Walkling William Webster Andrew Weil PHI SIGMA KAPPA Ethan Deinhard David Hunt William Kane Arthur Kaplan Robert Kerdasha Alan Matthias Robert McBride PLEDGES Alan Meltzer Richard Mills Gerald Moeller Robert Myers Richard Raymond Charles Thompson William Van Stone DELTA UPSILON David Armington William Biadshaw Thomas Bressler Richard Brown William Brown James Cox Clifford Bryant John Cromwell Roy Dickinson Franklin Elliott David Field James Fligg Edward Frost Herbert Frost Howard Fussell James Hackett Robert Hillegass Thomas Hodges John Hoffmeister Alan Hovey Alan Hunt William Hunter James Kirkhoff Philip Kniskern Robert Latimer Walter Leser Alfred Levering Walter Lukens Thomas McCabe William Francis Gerald Rosen Robert Parsons Frank Miller James Miunper John Need Edward Neuberg AVilliam Osier Edward Perkins Donald Piccard Da id Remsey Jonas Rosenthal William Saul William Schweikle Richard Schwertner Clinton Shafer James Sheedy Stephen Sickle Steven Spencer William Spock Charles Stabler Edward Stabler Jan Stabler Robert Thomas Robert Vernon Da id W esson Robert Whitman Anthony Wolfe PLEDGES Kenneth Ruhl Robert Shaffner Robebrt Amussen Morrie Bassett Bill Battin John Bement Bob Bissell Curly Bo wen Miles Brown Ed Clarke Woody Compton Dick Cryer Haines Dickinson Dick Esrey Frank Felton Bob Forrey Van Gathany Jim Hayes Wairen Higgins Peter Knaur Stuart Lane John Longstreet Pelser Lynah Ed Mahler Ed Mifflin Gordon Mochel Blair Moffett Don Ovler Ted Paxson Jim Reilly Robert Roemer Dick Schoepperle Buck Shane Gavin Spofford Whitne) ' Stearns Heinz Valtin Rolf Valtin Larry Yearsley Douwe Yn tenia PHI KAPPA PSI AFFILIATES Joe D ' Annunzio Phil Brickner Ned Blown Joe Gaskill Charles Jeanne Charles Randall PLEDGES Charles Reilly Paul Van der ' eur Morey " VV etherald Dodd Young Don Stoudt HOFINCIDBNT , ' WINDOWS OF WORTH " 116 ' LANDS END " 117 MEN ' S SPORTS Top rov.-. Whitman, Metcalfe, Harris, Williams, Bodine, Fiske, Baily. Bottom row: Brown, Neuburg, Green, Amann. KWINK Since its formation in 1916, the Society of Kwink has been one of the more active and in- fluential campus organizations. As its members are selected from the managerial staffs of the men ' s athletic teams, its primary fiuiction is naturalh that of supervising the managerial system and supplying irew men for that vital position. Through the years, however, other activities have beeir recognized as the traditional responsibility of the Society. Among these are the presentation of the Hambing Show each fall, the management of food and program concess- ions at the footijall games, the planning of the men ' s varsity sports dinners, and the duty of assisting Gwimp with the basketball food con- cession. Last tall, the Society assmned the sponsorship of the Cheerleaders, and a system similar to the managerial set-up was instituted. In genera], the Society works with the men ' s athletic department, and helps, whenever and wherever possible, to make the sports program more successful. Since last .September, the Society has been at full strength for the first time in six years, and through the co-operation of all its members, has been able to fruitfully complete for the school year its many services to Swarthniore and its students. 118 Top row: Stofko, Elverson, Griscom, Mochel, Dickinson, Walters, Raymond, Stow, Bush, Amussen, Hurd, Bissell, Kirkhoff, Sanville. Second row: Wcntling, Spofford, Miilev, Hege, Brown, Albertson, Johnston, Esrey, Gaskill, Achtermann, Wolfe. First row: Cryer, Moffett, Work, Clark, Greenstein, Gorjanc, Austin, Forrey, Longstreet, Bowditch, Smith. FOOTBALL I ' lie 1947 Iboiball .season was a niodeiale success wiih loui wins and lour losses. One of the losses was to a team that greatly outclas.sed Swarthmore, a iorgiveable occinance, but the defeat by Haverford, the traditional rival, was a severe blow to the team and students, and lo ;ill good friends of .Swarthmore as well. When the season began, Lew EUerson had fifteen returning lettermen around whom to build the team, and there were several good men from last year ' s junior varsity as well as three talented freshmen. Although this year ' s team was one of the heaviest combinations ever to take the field foi ' the Garnet, practically all of the opposition was even heavier yet. The season started with three losses, an omin- ous beginning. The opener was with Franklin and Marshall, who proceeded to pound out a 21-6 victory. The Diplomats appeared as a much better coordinate and more practiced team than Swarthmore, who was still decidedly rough on the finer points of football. The following game with Muhlenburg resulted in an unfortunate 67-7 score, tlie only consolation being that the Garnet ' s touchdown was the first to be scored against the Mules by any of its opponents. The score at Wesleyan was 40-7, but the numerical totals are not truly indicative of the game, for man small but important bad breaks, which included the recall of f vo touchdowns, damp- HIGGINS ened the ardor of the Little Quakers. The Cardinals stored five of their six touchdowns on long runs, which indicates a rather even battle between the opposing linemen. The Ursinus game, played on homecoming da) ' , i ' as the first victory of the season, Avith Dick Cryer scoring the only touchdo-(vn of the after- noon, and Dave Work adding the extra point. This was a game that the team was determined not to lose, and they vorked well together on both offense and defense. The Bears continually were in trouble, and intercepted passes put an early lid on most of their offensive efforts. The second win was over Dickinson on their field; the score, 14-7. Dick Esrey ' s speed was an out- stand factor in this game as he scored both touchdowns, Dave Work, of course, adding the extra points. The Garnet defense was very tight and the offense dominated the field. The John Hopkins game was, by far, the most satisfactory performance of the whole season. It was the second year in a row that Hopkins, the favorite, had been beaten by the smaller op- ponent. All three touchdo vns were made by Dick Esrey as the result of long runs. Hopkins scored first, and Esrey returned the kickoff for Swarthmore ' s initial six points, following a simi- liar course of action with the second half CLARK. DICKINSON 120 BOWDITCH kickoff, he added the third tally with a fourth j eriod end run. Beautiful down-field blocking was a vital factor in all of the scoring, and a foin- man line on defense worked well against the Hopkins air and ground attack. Drexel, which did not win a game all year, gave the Garnet little trouble. The team func- tioned smoothly, and after two first period touch- downs by Cryer, relaxed to the extent of giving up two touchdowns to Drexel. However, Cryer went over again to sow up the game, Swarthmore 19 to 14. The combination of rain and mud conspired against the efficiency of both teams. When fa ' ored Swarthmore lost to Haverford, 13-0, it was an occasion for the Garnet to hang its head in shame. Haverford went all out for this game, and had worked out an effective method of stopping the Little Quaker ' s offensive. Long kicks well placed towards the side lines, and fine punt returns by the Haverford safety man kept the Garnet on its own side of the field, while Haverford constantly threatened. Co-cap- - tain Botetler scored twice, aided the first time by penalties; while the Haverford line kept the Garnet ' s running attack under control through- out the game. The Wright Trophy, awarded annually to the outstanding man from each team, was given to Botetl er and to Captain Hank Gorjanc in recognition of his outstanding play at guard. Several outstanding performances during the season were turned in by Ray Posel, Jim Bow- ditch, and Lefty Higgins in the backfield; Gorjanc, Dave Work, Dick Greenstein, Bill Albertson, and Haines Dickinson in the line. An injury early in the season cut short what pro- mised to be an exceptionally capable career at a tackle slot by Bud Stowe. The ends, rotating frequently and maintaining a standard of aggressive defense and sparkling offense, in- cluded Jim Kirkhofl . Gordon Mochel, Tom Vilushis, and Rich Raymond. A strong supply of reserves were a dependable source of security throughout the season. 121 Nichols, Palmer, Spauldings, Sparks, Lawrence, Condit, Coach Miller, Dayton, Lichten, Frank, Battin, Stevenson, Bestor, Cheyney, Amann. CROSS COUNTRY The 1947 Cross Country icain toni[jik ' cl a record of three victories and one defeat, imder the skillful coaching of fames Miller and the leadership of Captain Irving Dayton. ' Ihc season opened with the lone defeat, a -14-17 sci back at the liands of a strong West Chester team. The Garnet, however, showed the jjromise and balance which sidjsecjtiently led to an iipsei victory over Lafayette, 29-2G on the latter ' s very treacherous course, and lo an overwhelming tritmiph over Gettysbing and Lehigh. The climax of the season was the defeat of Ha cilord in an extremely close match which vas ihe most exciting contest of the year, and which gained a leg on ihe Hood trophy lor the second con- secutive time. Team spiiit and the all-oiit efforts of everyone o!i a well-balanced sc]iiad, were the kev to the success of the 1947 season. 122 Top row: Spangler, Clarke, Shaffner, Ruhl, Dunning, Bodine, Coach Kennedy. Second row: Rosen, Woerner, Garver, McCutcheon, Craver, Houlberg. First row: Ramsey, Segal, Fusaro, Jack, Roy. Burroughs. WRESTLING Under ihe ex.cellcnt coaching ol Ben Rennech, the 1947-48 wrestling team had a record ol three wins and three losses. The captain loi- the season was Joini McCutcheon, who wrestled 17:)ll). the first semester and 1()5 the second. Ed Burroughs lield down the 121 lb cla.ss and at 128, Ed Clark- who was injured early in the season— John Bozic and Andy Segal all saw action. Ben Fusaro, captain-elect lor next year wrestled in the 136 lb class, while both Bob Shaffner and Ralph Roy represented Swarthmore in the 145. Jordy Jack and Leo Woerner fought at 155, but this position was later taken over by Ken Ruhl when he dropped fiom the 165 lb position he had held earlier. Dave Ramsey took over the 175 lb slot when the switch was made, and to round out the team. Newt Garver, a novice, capably handled the unlimited class. During the season, victories were scored over Drexel, Ursinus, and P. M. C, by scores of 32-5, 22-10, and 29-3. Delaware, John Hopkins, and Haverford won against the garnet by scores of 1,5-13, 23-3, and 18-17. Throughout the season, the team handled itself capably with outstanding performances being turned in by Burroughs, Fusaro, Jack and McCutheon, and considerable promise promise and skill being shown by the freshmen members, Ruhl and Shaffner. 1 j ■ttk 3 r wKamK w B Ki T l K Ht - 1 Ti Lorch, H. Valtin, Shane, Neuburg, Henchel, Bassett, Pedersen, Yearsley, Mahler, Nicholson, McCrory, Doehlert, Brown, Al Yasir, Evans, Kniskern, Nunez, D ' Annunzio, Horace (front:) Valtin, R., Captain, Dunn Coach. SOCCER YEARSLEY, NICHOLSON The 1947 varsity record of se en ins, one tie, and one loss is tire second best record in Swarth- more College ' s soccer history, sinpassed only by the perfect season of 1929. Coach Dunn had a difficult job. for the Garnet vas the defending champion of the Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Conference. . s assets, Dunnie had fourteen retinning lettermen, and three excellent promotions from last year ' s unbeaten freshman team. On the other hand, the liabilities vere many: a tough schedule ivith only two home games, frequently bad weather, and Pennsyl- ania and .A.rmy, two af the toughest opponents, within the first three games. The fast moving Garnet opened the season by downing the University of Pennsylvania by a three to two score. Xext, at Rutgers the team had to take some hea y charging, but returned from New Brunswick a three to one winner. At 124 West Point, Heinz Valtin scored in the first quarter, and not until later in the game did the Cadets manage to tie it up. Throughout the last quarter the Garnet attack was a constant threat, calling from the cadets their utmost efforts to prevent another Swarthmore scoring again. When Army refused to play overtime, the match remained a one to one draw. Stevens Institute of Technology came to Swarthmore and lost by three to one, and on Ursinus ' rolling fields, the home team was shut out three to nothing. At Princeton, Captain Rolf Valtin had a field day, scoring every one of the goals of the four to nothing triumph. Lehigh came to Swarthnrore and took home a two to one victory over a Garnet completely disoriented by an injiay to one of its best men. On a rainy day at Annopolis, in a game resembling a swim- ming meet. Navy was drowned by four to two, following the injury of their goalie when he dived into Rolf Valtin ' s shoe. Last, but never least, Haverford was beaten by one to nothing. This score was repeated with Swarthmore on the loosing end, when the Garnet played home against Rutgers in an extra- season game for the district championship. In spite of losing its title, the Garnet could be pioud, for it had established a percentage of .877, scored twenty-three goals against nine by their opponents, and placed Rolf Valtin and Chris Pedersen as All-Americans. Six members of the team: Pedersen and Valtin, Buch Shane, Frank Nicholson, Joe D ' Annunzio and Larry Yearsley entered preliminary trials for the Olympic team. Pedersen, Valtin and D ' Annunzio survived the first elimination, and Pedersen and Valtin, the second, both with excellent chances of landing berths on the final team. In his last year at Swarthmore, Rolf Valtin broke two college records: his own of most goals scored per season, from seven in 1946 to a new high of twelve in 1947, and the highest riinnber of goals scored by a player in a single game. Be- sides those mentioned above, Heinz Valtin, Ned Neuburg, Dave Doehlert, Morrie Bassett, Phil Evans, John Henchel, Ali Al Yasir, and Jack McCrory all played first class games. Heinz Bondy and Dick Longaker were injured early in the season and never had a chance to prove themselves. A number of other men were injiued during the .season, but the Garnet ' s excellent reserve strength came through and gave promise of other good seasons to come. Captain-elect Chris Pedersen should lead another title threatening team next year. ALI AL YASIR a g Top tow: Williams, Keighton, Thompson. Frost, Graves. Mason, Brickner, Rawson, Bailey. First row: Cox, Strauss, Sickle, Peabody, Daland, Coach McAdoo. SWIMMING .Smashing six oiil ot eight college letoids on the way, the most successtul swimming team in Swai thmore history swept to seven straight after initial losses to Penn and Temple. Brooklyn College was overwhelmed 46-29 after which Franklin and Marshall was beaten 38-37 as Vernon in his linal intercollegiate appearance helped to break the college lecord for the medley relay. Drexel fell next and then a tense struggle with Delaware culminated in ictory by a singe point gained in the final relay. Loyola was added to the Garnet victims, and the season headed for its climax with a 43-32 decision over Lehigh. Finally, undefeated West- chester fell after a protracted struggle before record breaking performances by Graves, Daland, Cox and Rawson. Unable to match the individual stars on the Westchester and Lehigh teams in the Middle . tlantic Conference meet, the Swarthmore men never-the-less remained in the running initil the final event. Daland, team captain, and Rawson final!) broke the 220 and 100 yard freestyle records at this meet after threatening all year. Several times during the vear. Graves broke his own mark lor the backstroke, and Vernon and Piccard broke the breaststrokc record alter- nately, until Vernon graduated, whereupon Piccard finally set the record which is now official. 126 12 i Top ron: Wentz. Esrey. Reilly, Evans, Higgins, D ' Annunzio. First ron: Yearsley, Cryer, Unger, Garrett, Valtin. BASKETBALL Last gear ' s leam, champion ol ihe Southern District ol the Middle Atlantic Conlerence, was intact this season with exception ol Fuzzy Faus- naugh, who was lost thru graduation. With Captain Dick linger, Bucky Garrett, Jim Reilly, Lelty Higgins and Dick Cryer, Coach Bill Stetson had a reliable and practiced five with which to begin the season ' s operations. Right from the start the team showed plenty ol spark as they breezed past Textile and Pharmacy, 55-28, and -l9- ' ' . , respecti ely. Tempered a bit by a 49-25 dcleat at the hands ol a superior Penn team, a (ighting Garnet five came Irom behind to lick Franklin and Marshall 46-4. in a game which saw Swarthmore ' s Jim Reilly rack up fifteen points. . t this point, the Garnet lell upon evil days, re- cci ing a (iO-.Sl defeat b) Falayelte and a heart- breaking 41-39 loss to Army afier a late rally failed to overcome the Cadet ' s lead. Beginning to gather uj) steam when I efty Fliggins ' l)asket in the final seconds resulted in a 38-36 win over Delaware, the Swarthmore team rolled to three straight victories over P. M. C, Drexel, and Johns Hopkins. Although hard pressed by P. M. C. in a game that needed an overtime period to settle the issue 45-39, Drexel and Hopkins went down easily 67-42 and 55-52. Dick Cryer ' s twenty-two points most of which were obtained b) beautiful one-handed push shots, were highly instrumental in the victory over Drexel, while Reilly, Higgins, and Gary had a combined total of thirty eight against Hopkms. A hard fighting Ursinus team gave the Garnet its first conference defeat, 49-38 at Collegeville. Bouncing back from this catastrophy, the Garnet outscored Haverford, 66-41, in a fast and fiashy " performance. Fine defensive games turned in by Garrett and Unger kept the Haverford team ' s offensi e from functioning as well as it had against many opponents. At P. M. C., the Quakers sufiered their worst defeat of the season, 80-46. Confused by the small court and bewildered by the dogging tactics of the opposition, the Swarthmore men scored their usual number of points for the evening, but were completely unable to stop Martz, and Margaxage, and other P. M. C. sharpshooters. In a non- conference game the second team paced by I ick Esrey ' s 13 points lost a close one to Mora ian, 50- 54. With three quick victories. Delaware 69-52, Drexel 48-42, and Ha erford 59-45, Swarthmore oracticallv had the Southern Division title in the baa, onlv to lose to Ursinus at home. 54-43. As a result of the loss to Ursinus. the Garnet JUNIOR VARSITY Top ron: Stoudt. Francis. Parsons, Wilson. Spenser, Sipler. Bottom ran: Spock, Hazard, Weston, Brown, Oppenlander, Gaskill. 128 was thrown in a three-way tie first place with Ursinus and P. M. C. TraveUng to Norristown tor the first garnet ot the play off, Swarthmore was again tlirottled by its old nemesis, Ursinus. The Bears jumped to the lead from the outset of the game and were never threatened. Although Pete Kaiser, Joe D ' Annunzio, Phil Evans, and Larry Yearsley shoived plenty of fire in the second half, it wasn ' t enough to prevent a 49-37 defeat. Not to be overshadowed by the varsity, Coach Howard Sipler ' s Jayvees established an enviable reputation for themselves. Although their per- formance was never so spectacular as Coach Stetson ' s men, " the " junior " team showed plenty of ability in upsetting a tremendously favored and previously undefeated Delaware team 44-43. Though their record of ten wins and six losses does not seem particularly impressive, it is notable that of the six aames lost, four were b a maroin UNGER J. V. 39— PENN STATE 42 REILLY of two points or less, and the season ended triumphantly with four straight victories. As a fitting climax to the 1948 basketball season, Jim Reilly was selected as a member of the All- Philadelphia team. Outstanding on the team, both offensively and defensively, he scored 266 points during the season. Captain Dick Unger, Lefty Higgins, Pete Kaiser, Rolf Valtin, Larry Yearsley, Phil Evans, all seniors, climaxed brilliant careers. Sam Gary, out for the first half o f the season and a mainstay in the latter half, was elected Captain for the next season. LACROSSE Top row. Coach Blake, P. Kaiser, Dickinson, Henchel. Smith, Goudsmit, Meta, Glucksman, Coach Piper. Second row: C. Kaiser, Ludeman, Frost, Albertson, Cosinuke, Enders, Eger, Hurd. Third ron: Douglas, Kirkhoff, Weymuller, Bowditch, Dunning, Kuller, Piper. 130 In the beginning it was tlie Field House. That ' s how the Lacrosse team genesis would start; lor early in the year they were down there bouncing tlie ball off the wall, off the screen, off Faulkner ' s head, off everything— life wasn ' t sale for ordinary pedestrians. Then it was out in the mush of early Spring, slinging the ball and the mud around with equal abandon. Finally, the field got hard and the squad got in shape and ready to begin their season. ' Twas a glorious start, too, for they took Washington and Lee by a 12-6 margin. Then the Tigers from Princeton walloped the Blakemen 15-5. Showing good spirit, the Garnet bounced back to an 18-4 triumph over Lehigh. Then there was Virginia: beaten by 16-3; but Swarthmore also got beaten by Ole Virginny ' s sticks. Loyola, Drexel, Stevens, Penn, and Westchester were over- come by scores of 14-2, 9-2, 13-4, 11-5, and 10-1, respectively. The victory over Loyola was es- pecially sweet, compensating for last season ' s defeat. W. 5R Then came Navy— came, saw, and conquered in the words of another writer— when it was all over and the bodies carried from the field, the score stood at 18-2 in the Middies ' favor. The windup of the season was a thriller with Penn State. Swarthmore was on top of an 11-9 score at the end of that one, which went into an over- time period. Now for the men who were responsible for this highly successful season. On the attack and in the midfield were Abner Albertson, Walter Cosinuke, Bob Kuller, John Piper, Stafford Metz, and Cap- tain Jim Bowditch. The last three deserve special mention: Metz for being high scorer with 25 goals. Piper runner-up with 21, and Bowditch for his fine field-generalship. On defense were Haines Dickinson, John Henschel, Pete Kaiser, and goalie Ed Dunning. Backing up the starting ten weire Si Goudsmit, Gordon Douglas, Malcolm Smith, and Herb Frost, all fine lacrosse men. Special honorary mention must be made of the Jayvees, who in their own right woir foiu " out of five. As good as the season was, prospects for 1948 seemed better. 131 Top row: Carrell, Chambers, Higgins, Mahler, Oppen- lander, Esrey, Richardson, Macchi, Dickinson. First row: Gillam, Evans, Denton, DeBurlo, Black, Valtin, Willis. BASEBALL The 1947 varsity baseball squad showed more strength than a record of six wins and eight losses would indicate. Two ot the losses, to Penn and to Lafayette, were by one run. Several members of the team turned in outstanding individual performances, despite the over all record. Captain Bill Black scouted second base with almost faultless skill, and was third among leaders of the batting average scale. Warren Higgins, captain- elect for 1948, was key man on defense and in the hitting department: scoring sixteen runs, batting in the same number, and averaging .431. Dick Esrey as centerfielder and pitcher proved a very capable player, hitting .400 and leading the team in stolen bases. Elliot Richardson had a better fielding average than the combined averages of the opposition ' s catchers. Rolf Valtin and Ed Mahler in the infield; Jack Denton, Jack Willis, and Phil Evans on the mound; Rusty DsBurlo, Cliff Gillam, and Arky Chambers all tinned in impressive performances. GOLF Top row: Feltan, Lawrence, Armington, Yearsley, Risko, Coach Eckerd. First row: Stein, MacLaren, Longstreet, Reller. The golfing sextet enjoyed a successful season in 1947, winning six out of nine matches. The year got off on a sour note with two matches going to Princeton, 9-0, and Penn, 8i 4-i , respect- ively. Traveling to West Point, the Garnet won, 5-4, on the eighteenth green. The team took off from there to sweep easily through its next two matches: beating Franklin and Marshall, and LaSalle by scores of 6-3 and 9-0. Drexel, the next opponent, was in many ways the " big " team of the yeaar. The match was close and very tense, evetr all the way, until Swarthmore dropped in the last hole, 5-4. Traditional rival Haverford, on its own course, fell easily, 7-2. The high point of this match and of the year was the 72 shot by Howard Stein. The two last matches with Lafayette and Lehigh were taken by Coach Eckerd ' s men, 5-4 and 8i C-i 4- TENNIS The t vo outstanding e enis ol a very successful 1947 tennis season were the win over Army, 5-3, and the loss to Haverford, 8-1. In the HaNerford match, Morrie Bodenger anquished his stiff opponent alter going to three sets and racked up the single game win of the entire meet. Shane and Rossheim also went to three sets in extremely close battles. Kirschner put up prolonged fights in his second set, ' though he eventually dropped it, 11-13, and lost his match. This was the first loss to Haverford in teniris since 1938. At West Point, Bodenger met his only defeat Top row: Coach Faulkner, Rossheim, Kirschner, Schmidt, Frankel, Hoskins. First row: Shane, Dordick, Quint, Bodenger. of the year at the hands of Army ' s number one player, but the team as a whole chalked up a decisi e vin o er the Army team, the first since 1930. he season was the second best in Swarthmore ' s tennis history: fourteen wins out of fifteen matches. Johns Hopkins, Moravian, Lafayette, LaSalle, Franklin and Marshall, Muhlenburg, Ursinus, and Delaware were all defeated by per- fect scores, 9-0. Other victims were Pennsylvania, 5-4, Westchester, 8-1, Temple, 8-0, Drexel, 8-1, and Lehigh, 7-2. ) ■ ; Ji I ' T-f- Top row: Amann, Montcalm, Jack. Brickner, Nicholson, Coach Barron. Raymond, Bradshaw, Harris, Tietz. Metcalfe, Fiske. Second row: Rawson. Moore. Fausnaugh. Work, Vernon, Gary, Clark, Williams, Frank. First row: Posel. Mochel. Daland. Valtin, Van Dusen, McBride, Stuckenrath. TRACK Coaches Bert Barron and Lew Elverson guided the 1947 track team through a rather successful season. Two ' ery close defefats were handed the Garnet by teams visited in the first meets of the year: John Hopkins emerging the victor, 66-60, in the opener, and Lehigh edging out Swarthmore by the narow margin of 6234-61. Temple, hosts for the second meet, finished a sony third. Both of these contests were decided by the outcome of the last event on the card. Returning to more fainiliar surroundings, Alimmi Field, the cinder men showed plenty of power in winning, 71-55, froin Delaware. In the next two meets, both at honre, all-arotmd strength was displayed. Haverford was crushed, 82-44, in a contest whose outcome was never in doubt. In another triangular meet, the Garnet scored 891 9 points, with Drexel and Ursinus trailing, 36 and 281 2. To climax the campaign, Swarthmore came from behind in the last event, the broad jimrp. to snatch a victory from St. Joseph ' s in the Neigh- boiiiooel Meet by the margin of 53 5 6-4614. Four other colleges were far behind. During the Middle Atlantic Meet held at Rutgers, in which the Garnet placed fourth, John Moore established a new College record for the 120 High Hurdles. His time of 15.5 bettered the record of 35 years standing. Throughout the season, Captain Bob Vernon paced the team with his all-aioimd skill, while Moore, Dave Villiams, and Frank Nicholson also provided consistently good performances. N " i CHOI. SON WOMEN ' S SPORTS WOMEN ' S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The WAA has a station wagon— but that ' s not all. Its membership includes every woman student in the college. The WAA Council is elected by the girls at large, and consists of two freshmen, three sophomores, and two juniors, plus a representative each fiom Gwimp and the Outing Club. WAA has control of women ' s athletics, mostly through the financial depart- ment. It is known to the students primarily through the large variety of extra- curricular sports it has offered. The Council, led by Helen Hill, has sponsored this year co-ed fencing, badminton, archery and riding. They also planned a riding show in the spring. For the girls, they have arranged inter-class tennis, archery and hockey tournaments, and started an informal bowling group which met every Thursday night. WAA also holds the annual hockey banquet when athletic awards are made. This year they purchased a new station wagon, and to save wear on this, they bought a second hand truck which is available to other student organizations. In order to familiarize the students with their activities, a copy of the minutes of each WAA meetingis posted on the bulletin board by the east door of Parrish, and a trophy case is being built in the entrance to the Hall Gymnasium, which will display the class plaques and individual awards. Since a large number of the students are not required to participate in athletics, the WAA is of particular importance because of the recreational activities it offers to this group. 135 GWIMP Ann Alderfer Janet Anderson Barbara Beebe Lynne Da ' is Winnie Ed ' ards Mary Fallin Joyce Favorite Peg Gynne Gloiia Lane Bobbie Lea Ann McLaren Marge Merwin Maralyn Orbison Laura Reppert Mary Lee Schell Meg Thomson Ruth Wilcox Judy Wolf HOCKEY Jean Abbott Sema Eble Margy Hench Lynn Hill Bobbie Jameson Alice McNees Ellen Myer Myra Pfau Carol Stein Edie Thatcher Sue Williams Connie Verrei Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. 15 Nov. 18 16 21 24 29 1 6 10 Swarthmore - Swarthmore 3 - Swarthmore 1 - Swarthmore 1 - Tournament at Swarthmore - Swarthmore 4 - Swarthmore 1 ■ Swarthmore - - Penn 3 - Chestnut Hill - Bryn Ma vr 1 - Drexel 1 Bryn Mawr 1 — 1 - Beaver 2 - Rosemont - Temple 4 - Ursinus 5 i ' IS ' VV i ; Y STANDING: ROOSEVELT, HENCH, PARRY. ABBOTT, THORPE J v i» K, TENNIS For the 1947 season, the women ' s tennis team turned in another one of the outstanding records for which it has been responsible in recent years. Losing only one match, the team chalked up six victories, four of them shut-outs and the other two overwhelmingly Swarthmore victories. The results of the individual matches were: April 28 Swarthmore 5, Chestnut Hill May 1 Swarthmore 4, William Mary 1 9 Swarthmore 5. Rosemont 13 Swarthmore 2. Penn 3 21 Swarthmore 5. Drexel 23 Swarthmore 5. Temple 28 Swarthmore 4, Bryn Mawr 1 while the jimior varsity w(jn over Upper Darby and Penn. The varsity nrembers were: Evans, Roosevelt, Abbott, Hench, Thorp, Jamison, Clendenin and White. The captain of the team was Gloria Evans, who with Amy Roosevelt was awarded a gold " S " for four years of varsity participation, and the manager was Peg Mac Laren. Gloria Evans was also second in the Intercollegiate Tennis Toinnament, held at Bryn Mawr. The junior varsity was composed of: Strawbridge, Zander, H. Hill, Stewart, Michener, Litchard, Merson, Wilcox. 139 RATH, JOCH, SCHLICHTING, MERRILL. NILES, DEVRIES. McCLELLAN, HILL SWIMMING In a season that probably broke the record for record-breaking, the women ' s s vimniing team emerged vmdefeated from all of its nine dual meets, tied for second place in the Eastern Inter- collegiate Meet and took third in the Eastern Regionals of the National Telegraphic. Garnet ictinis were Penn (32-25), Beaver (37-20), Chest- nut Hill (38-19), Drexel 43-14), Temple (31 1 ,- 25 1 ), Bryn Mawr (32-25), Brooklyn (54-14), Hunt er (37-20), and Ursinus (40-17). Only twice was the team hard pressed, and on both occasions —against Temple, and Bryn Mawr— the free-style relay team responded by breaking college records to win both race and meet. Overwhelming speed and the versatility of individual team members were vital factors in the Quakerette victory-gathering, but of at least equal importance was the steady improvement of all squad members imder the expert coaching of Dinny Rath. Strongest spot on the varsity was the backstroke where freshman Martha Penfield fin- ished the season undefeated, taking Eastern Intercollegeiate and Eastern Regional titles and setting nimierous records. Junior Selma Eble and sophomore Pat Niles also came thru with per- formances that placed them among the top backstrokers in the area, in addition their free- style talents for the shorter distances enabled Selma alone to contribute five victories. Fresh- man Laura McClellan, improving after a slow start, twice lowered the college record for the 100 yard freestyle, and doubled as a back- stroker as well. Eloise Schlichting, 1947 captain and only senior squad member, and sophomore Gertrude Joch garnered breaststroke points for the varsity while two hitherto inexperienced divers, junior Jane DeVries and freshman Janet Merrill came thru with five firsts and four seconds in that department. The medley relay team of I ' enfield, Beebe, and Eble and Niles was undefeated as was the free- style relay team, of which Schlichting, Merrill, McClellan, Beebe, Niles and Eble were the most frequent members. Team captain Barbara Beebe was outstanding in her showings both as breast- stroker and as member of the different relay teams. The trademark of the 1948 edition of the Swarthmore mermaids was its many record- breaking performances: fourteen school, four pool and four intercollegiate. School records breaststroke: 20 yds, 12.4 sec; 40 yds, 28 sec; 50 yds, 35.7 sec; 100 yds, 1:21.5 by Beebe backstroke: 20 yds, 12.6 sec; 40 yds, 27.1 sec; 50 yds, 35 sec. by Pen field freestyle: 100 yds, 1:08.6 by McClellan medley relay: 60 yds, 35.1 sec; 75 yds, 46.5 sec. by Penfield, Beebe, Eble. 120 yds, 1:21.3 by Penfield, Beebe, Niles. freestyle relay: f60 yds. 1:36.2; 200 yds, 2:04.9 by McClellan, Beebe, Niles, Eble. individuaJ inedley:60 yds, 43.19 sec. by Beebe Pool records: 20 yd. breaststroke: 12.4 sec by Beebe 20 yd. backstroke: 12.6 by Penfield 60 yd. Medley relay: 35.1 sec. by Penfield, Beebe, Eble 120 yd. medley relay: 1:21.3 by Penfield, Beebe, Niles Eastern Intercollegiate meet records: 50 yd. backstroke: 35.3 sec. by Penfield 200 yd. freestyle relay: 2:04.9 by McClellan, Beebe, Niles, Eble Eastern Regional record 100 yd. breaststroke, short course: 1:21.5 by Beebe National Intercollegiate record ■ £ yd. breaststroke, short course: 28 sec. by Beebe GIRLS WILL BE GIRLS THEY ' RE OFF! WATER BALLET 141 LACROSSE Standing: Pfau, Leeds, Verrci, Jones. Cordray, Williams, Urey, Beebc, Brodie, Merritt, Wilbur, Yntema, Merwin, Hosteller, Stein, Scott. Kneeling: Michener, Hay, Albertson, Thacher, Kohler, Smith, Staman. First row: Handwerk, Bach, Verrei, Stein, Mitsudo. Second row: Favorite, Sartorius, Pfau, Hyslop, Lurie. Third row: Matthews, Jones, McNees, Meyer, Turlington, Williams, Moll. BASKETBALL 142 STUDENT COUNCIL 1947 Helen Blankenagel Jean Cummins Dick Gushing Bill Hirsch Enid Hobart Cliainnan: Peter Kaiser Polly Pinsker Ed. Rivlin Rolf Valtin Gordon Roive Dick Gushing Roy Dickinson Al Hunt John McCutcheon Polly Pinsker 1948 Heinz Valtin Warren Skipp Chuck Stabler Larry Weiskrantz Alternatina Cliairman: Coke Prentice, Ed. Bush 143 Standing: Dayton, Stneal- lie. Betsch, Hay, Bassett, Stern, Cummins, Muller, Jourdan, Lurie, Alderfer, Devries. Second row: Clough, Blankenagei, Phelps, Sut- ton, Hobart, Hoisington, Bryan. Fallin. First rorf: Failla, Broadhurst, Ksch- inka WSGA 1947 1948 Helen Blankenagei President Barbara Muller Bunny Phelps Conducl and V-Pres. Meg Thompson Enid Hobart Personnel Activities Vocational SomennUe Sec ' y.-Treas. Betty Bassett Carolyn Bryan Les Leeds Yuri Morikawa Ann Steivart Ginny Stern Barbara Beebe Jo Broadhurst Martha Penfield 1947 John Siegle Griff Stabler MEG Chairman Secretary- Treasurer 194S Chris Pedersen Ed. Perkins Fromer, Stabler, Lorch, Overton, Perkins, Siegle, McCutcheon, Solomon, Ford, Clark. BOOK AND KEY Morris Bassett Carrol Bowen Philip Evans Warren Higgins Peter Kaiser Christian Pedersen 1947 James Sheedy Rolf Valtin Lawrence Weiskrantz Andre v Weil Paul Zall 1948 Edwin Bush [ohn Chapman Edward Perkins Colgate Prentice Gordon Rowe AVarren Skipp Heinz Valtin PHI BETA KAPPA Elizabeth Anderson Robert Bartle Howard Bowman Adelaide Brokaw Vaughan Chambers Willa Freeman Rosalind Lorwin Richard Lvman Howard Sachar Frederick Snyder Jane Torrey Volfgang Treuenfels Elisabeth Weisz Michael Wertheimer Isabel Witte SIGMA TAU C. Russell DsBurlo [esse Denton George Geiger. C:iifl Keho Donald Kelley Elliot Richardson Robert Whitman SIGMA XI Richard Blough Adelaide Brokaw Vaughan Chambers Voodland Hastings Herbert Hilhnan Robert Kuller Stetan Machlup Frederick Snyder V ' olfgang Treuenfels Ebenezer Williams 146 SWARTHMORE COLLEGE CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES JUNE, 1947 In the Division oj the Hurrianrlicj COMMENCEMENT JUNE 16, 1947 Jean Demaris Affleck EuzABBTH Anderson Jane-Powell Ballard LEO Arthur Borah, II Horace Wiilard Breece Margaret Harrison Canedy Elizabeth Craig Crawford Auce LucaE Deatherace (Honon) WiNNiFRED Cortland Emerson Janet Gay {High Honors ) James Byron Gildersleeve {Honors Eleanor Stabler Gillam Susan Smfth Harrer Janet Hotson (High Honors) Marjorie Norton Howard Betty Alden James (High Honors) William John Carter Gloria Eleanor Clement Robert Ladd Decker John WilllamDouglass Byron Stauffer Ebersole Ward Dennis Edwards (Honors) Gloria Edith Evans John Raymond Farrell Robert Fleming Gemmill Clifford Riggs Gillam, Jr Lucretla Jordan Gottlieb Alan Norman Hall David Hapgood Graham Olin Harrison (Honors) Robert Cough Hayden Victor H. Herbert, Jr. David Lewis Hewitt Jane Topping Hoar Hanna Kenuore THE ORDER OF EXERCISES Reading of Scripture Review of the Academic Year PRESIDENT NASON Joan WHrrE Jenkins Fred Kettner John (Jack) Kleiner Denise Malice Fi NA Monroe Margaret Munn Elizabeth Tunell Pope MARiL-i-N Joan Rosen Elizabeth D. Schauffler Catherine Jane SMtTH Jane Sorber (Honors) Mary Louise Steytler Elisabeth Weisz (Highest Honors) Michael Matthew Wertheimbr {High Honors) Benjamin Franklin Wolverton, Jr. Socicil Sciences William Noble Kinnard, Jr. (Honors) David Frederick Kirn Rosalind Lqrwin (High Honors) Richard Wall Lyman (High Honors) Susan Otto (High Honors) Carroll Fahnestock Poole Henry Reineke Richards Howard Morley Sachar (High Honors) Walter NLsrshall Schmidt BnATRiCE Dale Shou ' p (Honors) William Charles Sieck William Arthur Temple Barbara Ellen Thorp Ransom Hudson Turner, Jr. i Clyde Arnold Willis Jackson deCamp Willis loiiN Peter Wright Merle Albert Yockey, Jr. Commencement Address THE HONORABLE HAROLD EDWARD STASSEN CONFERRING OF DEGREES 147 148 COTTAGE CHEESE FRESH EGGS M ILLER-FLOUNDERC SAFE MILK O Distributors of Golden Guernsey — America ' s Table Milk CHester 3-6129 HOMOGENIZED BUTTERMILK ' XO MEAT , F|b |lSiOrv § i Ng» PALTRY 402-404 N. Second Street PHILADELPHIA MILDEN WHITE INCORPORATED 70 Years in Business 60 People At Your Service POULTRY, GAME, BUTTER, EGGS AND ALL SEA FOODS MAY FAIR FROSTED FOODS 1212 Filbert Street Philadelphia 7, Pa. Abfetts ICE CREAM FELIX SPATOLA SONS FRUITS and VEGETABLES Since 1880 BEST QUALITY AND SERVICE READING TERMINAL MARKET MEDFORD ' S FRANKFURTERS and LUNCHEON MEATS for FLAVOR QUALITY HOME DRESSED BEEF - VEAL and LAMB MEDFORD ' S CHESTER, PA. 149 WHERE TO SHOP its MAnrii ' j vorcE " RCA— Victor Columbia Capitol Decca Disc and Decca FFRR Phonograph Records PHILCO — RCA VICTOR — EMERSON Radio, Radio-Phonographs and Television at The Music Box 409 DARTMOUTH AVE. SWARTHMORE HOLLYHOCK GIFT SHOP 4 Park Avenue Swarthmore Distinctive Pottery and Glassware Greeting Cards for Every Occasion Bridge Prizes Hand Made and Costume Jewelry LENDING LIBRARY OF THE NEWEST BOOKS Sivarthinore s Most Unusual Shop alice barber gifts OLD BANK BUILDING (next to the Post Office) HOY ' S 5 and 10c STORE Swarthmore, Pa. LAMP SHADES - G.E. GLOBES - WASTE BASKETS - ELECTRIC EXTENSION CORDS - STATIONERY - GREETING CARDS - TOOTH PASTE AND BRUSHES - SHAVING CREAM AND BLADES and thousands of every other everyday needs 150 College Haberdashers BETTER CLOTHES FOR EDS AND CO-EDS AT REASONABLE PRICES BUCHNER ' S SWARTHMORE CELIA SHOE SHOP 102 Park Avenue FINEST IN SHOE REPAIR Serving Students Since 1904 PHONE SWARTHMORE 2350 EDWARD L. NO YES CO. Swarthniore, Pa. Real Estate and Insurance 23 S. CHESTER ROAD Swarthniore 0114 151 152 ESTABLISHED 1881 INCORPORATED 1925 CRETH SULLIVAN, Inc. GENERAL INSURANCE Associated MARSHALL P. SULLIVAN ' 97 FRANCIS W. D ' OLIER ' 07 106-08 S. FOURTH STREET PHILADELPHIA 153 This . . . and a drink in Crum for the Freshman Class . . . Thru the courtesy of the Class of 1950. SWARTHMORE 0450 TO GIVE HER THE BEST CALL OR SEE BALTIMORE PIKE SPRINGFIELD, PA. Roofing Sheet Metal Work Rock Wool Insulation City and Suburban Free Estimates . . . Budget Plan T. S. JOHNSON SONS CO. 622-626 CHERRY STREET Philadelphia 6, Pa. WA 2-1366 GITHENS, REXSAMER CO. 242 and 244 North Delaware Avenue Philadelphia 6, Pa. 154 Cyrus Wni. Rice Co., Inc. CONSULTING WATER CHEMISTS AND ENGINEERS INDIVIDUAL ANALYSIS - SURVEYS SUPERVISED CONTROL - RESEARCH 15-17 Noble Avenue PITTSBURGH 5, PA. BILL BATTEY SPORTING GOODS Fishing Tackle - Guns and Ammunition Skiis - Boots - loe Skates, Etc. 18 SOUTH ORANGE STREET Phone 6-1823 MEDIA, PA. TROY LAUNDRY CO. 5th and Yarnall Streets Chester, Pa. Lombard 3-9390 McARDLE COONEY, Inc. Pipes, Valves and Fittings Fabricated Power and PLUMBING and HEATING SUPPLIES Process Piping .519 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. FABLE COMPANY, Inc. Sheet Steel . . . Sheet Copper Stainless Steel 504-12 North Third Street Philadelphia, Pa. KEEP SUPPLIED WITH SCHOOL TICKETS GOOD ON BUSES AND AAIL CARS UNTIL USED 5c a Ride, including Special Free Transfers. Obtain Identifi- cation Cords at School Office. RED ARROW LINES Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co. WHERE SWARTHMORE EATS Bruehl ' s Old Forge Drive-in HAMBURGERS — STEAKS PLATTERS MILK SHAKES Baltimore Pike and Woodland Avenue Springfield Complinienls of WALT HAMBURGERS and HOT DOGS BALTIMORE PIKE AND WOODLAND - AVENUE FOR OVER 40 YEARS STRATH HAVEN INN SWARTHMORE, PA. has maintained a welcoming OPEN DOOR for ALL SWARTHMOREANS Overnight or Permanent Luncheon Dinner Banquets Telephone: SWarthmore 06-80 CHARLIE ' S — HOT DOGS — WOODLAND AVENUE AND BALTIMORE PIKE MICHAELS College Pharmacy EVERYTHING IN DRUGS DELUXE FOUNTAIN SERVICE OPEN ' TIL 11 P.M. SCOTT PAPER COMPANY ' Chester, Pa. liiil - ' l 1 1.. ilL i Vik Jw iC , iV j H rp iimn rtellSi ' nm ' ._. 1 . Hys ' ifll wmSmm 1 1 H C lo. 1 fi sd BI S B •■ mii jk - - " «i HRm JI| HE|| Ai ! H Ii HBI H BB " " ! « « it;) ■ ■ ■ v " ' Bi siS ' 1 The College r MMj " s VBHiS £ Bookstore BkI i OI • ' • ' Good Books of All Kinds JJPIP iW ■ Stationery ' Sf °iSi| MflMMKiSS HH tf ' ' ' Pennants and Other Novelties H We Encourage Browsing X 158 EDITOR: David Chaimkrs LITERARY EDITOR: Joan LeVino JUNIOR EDITORS: Diane Evans, Anne Larcher MENS SPORTS Dan Beshers SUBSCRIPTION Ted AViight ADVERTISING Bill Ravelin Ruth Fieidenthal Diana Ginzbuig Bets Hershberger Nancy Kenne) . mi Ki Hough Barbara Lea Dilly McLaren Woody San ille Dot Wynne Paul Zall PHOTOGRAPHY Tom Truii I John Anderson Selma Eble Carl Ihirig Ed Severinghonse Katashi Oita AVoody Thomas Bill Veaver Steve Zellerbach ART CREDITS Tom Hodoes. Liicv Hoisinston. Blair Moffett cover sketch bv Art North 159 IVIarghall P. Sullivan, President Russell Bleakley, Vice President Francis W, D ' Olier, Treasurer Francis J. Temple, Secretary INalhaniel T. Officer, Asst. Treasurer Archibald Carrick, Jr., Asst, Sec ' y. CRETH SULLIVAN, Inc. ESTABLISHED 1881 GENERAL INSURANCE Representing The Franklin Fire Insurance Company Insurance Company of North America Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Company Queen Insurance Company of America Surety Fire Insurance Company Great American Insurance Company Providence Washington Insurance Company Hanover Fire Insurance Company 106-08 S. FOURTH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. 160 WOMEN ' S GYM A. RAYMOND RAFF INCORPORATED CARPENTERS AND CONTRACTORS 1631-16331635 THOMPSON STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. HUMMER and GREEN Fifth and Fulton Streets Chester, Pa. " EVERYTHING FOR BUILDING ANYTHING " Our " Home Builders Service " will help you Modernize or Build a new home. Our " Home Insulation Division " will save you money while making your home more comfortable. Our " Kitchen Service " offers metal or wood cabinets for complete kitchens and laun- dry rooms. Westinghouse and other na- tionally known appliances. PHONE CHESTER 3-9171 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNTING SECRETARIAL 1-2-3 Year Courses SINCE 1865 young men and women DESTINED for LEADERSHIP In business affairs have confidently prepared for their careers at PEIRCE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Pine St. West of Broad, Philadelphia 7, Pa. Call, write or ' phone PE 5-2100 for cotalog . i. .. .. 162 M. WEINSTEIN SON TAILORS — CLEANERS 100 Park Avenue Swarthmore, Pa. Call and Deliver Swarthniore 1727 Venturi FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES PHILADELPHIA, PA. 163 H. D. REESE, Inc. Meats Poultry Butter Frosted Birdseye Foods 1208 ARCH STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. Ham and Eggs CLASS OF ' 48 ' By heaven, it is as proper to our age To cast beyond ourselves in our opinions, As it is common for the younger sort To lack discretion. " HAMLET Act ii, sc. 1 -■vi i " , -.-■ vV .r:- ii-j SMfc t-aw .j j , ' s • • I SAILING... Call CAMPUS on Your next Yearbook. Learn WHY this Organization is the Largest Producer of Fine School and College Annuals. CAMPUS PUBLISHING 1420 WALNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA 37 WALL ST., NEW YORK ART SERVICE • ENGRAVING • LETTERPRESS AND OFFSET PRINTING CLASS OF 1949 w. 9 ADVERTISING DIRECTORY Abljotts Ice Cream 149 Alice Barber Gifts 150 Bill Battey Sporting Goods 155 Bruehl ' s Old Forge Drive-in 157 Buchners Campus Publishing Co 166 Cams Flowers 154 Celia Shoe Shop 151 Charlie ' s 157 Class of 48 165 Class of 49 167 Class of 50 •• 154 College Book Store 158 Creth Sullivan 153 160 Fable Co 155 Githens, Rexsamer Co 154 B. J. Hoy 150 Hummer Green 162 Hollyhock Gift Shop 150 T. S. Johnson, Sons Co 154 McArdle Cooney, Inc 155 Medfords 149 Michael ' s College Pharmacy 157 Milden White 149 Miller Flounders 149 Music Box 150 Edward L. Noyes Co 151 Pierce School 162 A. Raymond Rath 162 H. D. Reese, Inc 165 Cyrus Rice Co 155 Scott Paper Co 158 Spatola Sons 149 Strath Haven Inn 157 Troy Laundry • 155 Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co 155 Venturi 163 Walt 157 Weinstein Cleaners 163 George L. Wells, Inc 149 A substantial portion of this — your book — is made possible by the revenue received from advertisements. Help yourself by helping them. Patronize our advertisers. 168 Son! What ' s alt this the administi-ation ' s been writine me about you? i iV " FREUD would have Mnething to My about that. " a .


Suggestions in the Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) collection:

Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

1946

Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

1948

Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

Swarthmore College - Halcyon Yearbook (Swarthmore, PA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.