Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA)

 - Class of 1943

Page 1 of 86

 

Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 86 of the 1943 volume:

r TF ..:5i fl • ' ■ 1- i SENIOR CLASS Stoneiiam High School Stoiieliani, Massachusetts presents THE 1943 YEARBOOK FO;R1i WORM The Winchester hike ... A. A. dances . . . the Dramatic Club play . . . the girls’ basketball tourna- ment . . . the rush to the lunch room . . . air raid drills . . . the senior prom! Perhaps in the difficult days to come this Yearbook will help you to recall these things and many others typical of Stoneham High School in 194.‘k If these memories inspire you to fight harder in order that future classes may enjoy school days in a world at [ eace, then it will l)e a Yearbook worthy of its name. Kiktlani) McCaleb Kditon-in-vhief To the gallant, unselfish clefeiulers of freedom, just yesterday onr classmates and today our friends in arms, we hopefully and proudly dedicate this Year- book. May the unfailing determination of j)urpose and remarkable resourcefulness they have shown in their years at Stoneham High School, make their serv- ice under the flag of this great democracy. The United States of America, as ])raiseworthy and deserving of credit as their activities at our school. cStons fiam zaduation xszaiisi (2[a±± oj- Z7oax 2 cJ-faHH, tons iarn, c::A la±±ac u±EH± xLcla £.(jEnbi , uns. £.Lglitz£.ntli PROGRAMME Entrance of Graduates — “War March of the Priests” (from Athalia) Mendelssohn High School Orchestra (The audience will remain seated as the graduates enter the hall) Class Marshals Marilyn B. Crafts, Class of 1944 Ralph B. Truesdale, Class of 1944 Graduation Hymn (the audience uniting) Hemy-Walton 1 2 Faith of our fathers, living still Faith of our fathers, we will strive In spite of dungeon, fire and sword. To win all nations unto thee; O how our hearts beat high with joy And through the truth that comes Whene’er we hear that glorious word ! from God Mankind shall then indeed be free. 3 Faith of our fathers, we will love Both friend and foe in all our strife. And preach thee, too, as love knows how By kindly words and virtuous life. Refrain Faith of our fathers, holy faith We will be true to thee till death. Prayer Rev. Mark B. Strickland First Congregational Church, Stoneham Speech of Welcome Francis H. Howard, Class President Address — “That Freedom Shall Live” Richard E. Storey, Class of 1943 Selection — “Operatic Excerpts” Stoneham High School Orchestra Mr. Rolland Tapley, Conductor Mr. Maurice Hoffman, Organist Wagner PROGRAMME - Presentation of MacDonald Medals To Shirley }. Blood and Kirtland E. McCaleb Mr. Earle T. Thibodeau Teacher in Stoneham High School since 1918 The MacDonald Medals, in memory of James Wallace MacDonald, Principal of Stoneham High School from 1876-1892, are presented for scholarship, character and good influence in the school. “Amaryllis” arr. by Ghys “Lullaby” Simes High School Glee Club Miss Helen M. Sawyer, Music Supervisor Announcement of Other Honors and Awards Award Donor Washington-Franklin History Prize Massachusetts Society, S. A. R. stoneham Woman’s Club Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute- f? c American Legion Auxiliary ' . American Legion " S Stoneham Grange — for Boys History Medal for Girls Mathematics and Science Medal Carrie S. Ireland Citizenship Award Citizenship Medal James W. Hibbs Music Prize Eliza Carruthers Lister Award in Art Stoneham Grange College Scholarships Parent-Teacher Association Special Scholarship Blue and White Club Scholarship Award Stoneham Teachers’ Club Mr. Charles E. Varney Superintendent of Schools, Stoneham Presentation of Class Gift Jane Borthwick, Class Vice President Award of Diplomas Mr. Everett C. Hunt Chairman, Stoneham School Committee (The parents of boys absent with military leave are invited to receive their sons’ diplomas) “Star Spangled Banner” Entire Assembly “Recessional March” Selected Organ - GRADUATES HARRY ALLAN ALWARD, JR. DONALD L. ANDERSON RAYMOND WENDELL ANDERSON FRANK L. ANGELOSANTO GLORIA BAXTER ROBERT WILLIAM BIGGIO RICHARD BLINN SHIRLEY JEAN BLOOD JANE BOKTHWICK ARTHUR 0. BRIDGMAN WESLEY LOUIS BROWN MURIEL P. BUCKLE MILDRED ANNE CAHILL DORIS COCHRANE GEORGE F. COGAN BARBARA LOUISE COLE WILLIAM R. CONLEY JOSEPH F. CONNORS SALVATORE COSTA SHIRLEY A. COX JOAN CONSTANCE CRAIGIE SHELDON M. CRAM VIRGINIA LARRAINE CROSS DOROTHY J. DALTON TONY L. D’ANNOLPO GLORIA DAVIDSON M. MARION DAVIS BARBARA A. DEMPSEY GERTRUDE VIRGINIA DEMPSEY WILLIAM A. DOHERTY HAROLD DOWNES JAMES ELLS JOHN PATRICK ENGLISH RICHARD L. EVANS ALBERT EDWARD FINNEGAN, JR. BARBARA R. FLUKES JOSEPH P. FRASER BARBARA ROWE GARSIDE LOUISE THELMA GIRARD ROBERT P. GLOOR MURIEL RUTH GOUDEY ROZELLE IRENE GRAHAM GERALDINE RUTH GUTTADAURO ELIZABETH CLAPLEN HEINLEIN PHYLLIS CLAIRE HERMAN CHARLES DOUGLAS HICKS RUBY JANE HODSON RUSSELL GEORGE HOLDEN ANNA HOVNANIAN RICHARD HOVNANIAN FRANCIS H. HOWARD HAROLD HUBBY JEANNE M. HULME HERBERT W. HUNT ANNE JOHNSON MARTIN P. JORDAN MARY E. KELLY JOHN KENNEY C. EMERY KNIGHT JOHN KNIGHT JULIA KOPREK MARJORIE LOUISE LAMB DOROTHY P. LAWSON ELEANOR C. LEARY JOSEPH A. LONGMORE ROBERT JAMES MacKAY BARBARA A. MANLEY BEVERLY RUTH MAHN KIRTLAND EDWARD McCALEB JAMES M. McLaughlin EMILY R. McRAE WILLIAM JOSEPH MEEQAN WILLIAM LAWRENCE MELLETT ‘ESTHER MEUSE PATRICIA A. MILLER ‘SUSAN MINASIAN ALFONSO JAMES MINGHELLA ‘MARIANNE MORSE ‘SHIRLEY MOORE NANCY GOWEN MORRILL ESTHER B. MORRISON GORDON ANDREW MUNRO AGNES LOUISE MURPHY‘ FRANK RICHARD MURPHY EDWARD NAZARIAN LUCY MARY NAZARIAN HOSE E. ORSILLO ARTHUR E. OUTRAM, JR. DOROTHY G. PARSONS LUCILLE PEZZOLE ‘EMILY MARINER PRICE EDWARD II. PROODIAN, JR. GERTRUDE GENEVIEVE QUARTER MARJORIE PRISCILLA REED FLORENCE M. REILLY ERNEST HOWARTH RIPLEY ‘MARGUERITE EDITH ROBERTS RUTH ROBINSON PRISCILLA R. ROCKWELL MARY ELIZABETH ROUNDS MARY SAMOUR STANLEY JAMES SEWARD GLORIA SHEEHAN CHARLES B. SHERIDAN ‘EDITH J. SMITH FRANKLIN MacKAY SMITH ‘RICHARD EDWARD STOREY‘ ‘VIRGINIA LEE STRONG HELEN RITA TAYLOR CHARLOTTE GRACE THOMPSON ELLEN TRODELLA LOUIS VACCA LEON R. WARREN HERBERT NELSON ' WASHBURN KATHERINE E. WATKINS ALBION D. WEEKS LEONARD ROBERT WORTHEN ELOISE MILDRED WYATT Class Colors — Blue and Silver Honor Group In military service H ANNUAL Mcent Mel The Civic Arts Chorus of Stoneham (Formerly the Home Front Chorus) TOWN HALL May Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Nineteen Hundred and Forty-Seven Eight o ' clock ACT ONE A Formal Concert on Deck CHORUS — When Day Is Done Katcher arr. Koshetz Salangadou Scott JACK DIAMOND, Soloist THE BRANNEN TRIO — Trio in F Major Gade Allegro Animato March of the Tin Soldiers Gabriel Pieme Waltz: Voice of Spring Stramss JUDITH MacNEIL, Violin; MABEL BRANNEN, Cello WESTON BRANNEN, Piano TENOR SOLO — The Wanderer’s Song Rasbach JACK DIAMOND CHORUS — The Village Blacksmith Noyes MARILYN HOWARD, Soloist PIANO SOLO — Danse Debussy Ritual Fire Dance De Falla ALLEN GILES SOPRANO SOLO — Sea Moods Tyson MIRIAM ARKWELL CHORUS — Song of the Sea Stebbins INTERMISSION FOR REFRESHMENTS (A town ordinance prohibits smoking in the auditorium) ACT TWO A Traveling Troupe PINAFORE (Abridged) Gilbert and Sullivan arr. by Johnson and Vom Dyke Scene — The deck of H. M. S. Pinafore at anchor off Portsmouth Time — Noon of a summer day, early 19th century CHARACTE3tS Bill Bobstay (Boatswain Mate) Jack Farquharson Ralph Rackstraw (Able Seaman) Jack Diamond Dick Deadeye (Able Seaman) Brenton Vaughan Captain Corcoran (Commanding H. M. S. Pinafore) .. Wallace MacKay Josephine (The Captain’s Daughter) Marilyn Howard The Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph Porter, K. C. B Irving Sibley (First Lord of Admiralty) Little Buttercup Eleanor Johnston (Mrs. Cripps, a Portsmouth Bumboat Woman) INTERMISSION FOR REFRESHMENTS ACT THREE THE NEPTUNERS of New Bedford Chapter of the Society for the Preser- vation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America Sailing, Sailing gweet Roses of Mom Linger Longer Lou EVERETT WOOD, Tenor JOHN BRIDEN, Baritone CHARLES RICKETTS, Lead ALFRED MAINO, Bass BARITONE SOLO — The Mighty Deep Jude DAVID TRENHOLM THE SPANISH TRIO — Beautiful Dreamer Foster, arr. Carter Anniversary Song Jolson-Cha plin, arr. Carter ROBERT CARTER, Accompanist JEAN SCHUMANN, ELEANOR JOHNSTON DOROTHY CORUM DUET — The Singing Lesson Squire MR. AND MRS. ARKWELL TENOR SOLO — Strange Music Wright and Forrest WALLACE MacKAY NOVELTY INSTRUMENTALIST GEORGE GILLETTE THE NEPTUNERS — The Life Boat Men Are We Old Aunt Dinah CHORUS — Romany Herbert MIRIAM ARKWELL, Soloist BUSINESS STAFF Tickets Publicity Table Decorations .. Curtains and Lights Refreshments Ushering Eleanor Johnston Jack Farquharson Miriam Arkwell Charles Morrell Stoneham Rotary Club Stoneham Rotary Club REFRESHMENTS On Sale at First Intermission Sandwiches Chopped Ham 15c Egg Salad 15c Chopped Chicken 25c Coca Cola 10c On Sale at Second Intermission . Ice Cream 10c THE TABLE COVERS Will Be Placed On Sale Listen For Announcements The proceeds of this year’s concert will be donated to charity in cO ' operation with the Stoneham Rotary Club. OFFICERS Of the Civic Arts Chorus of Stoneham President Vice President Secretary Treasurer David L. Trenholm Ruth Parks Doris Bellamy Clarence Lent 9ER wie They serve with honor Miss Dorothy Alger Mr. Karl Elerin Miss Marion Franchere Mr. Roger Lamson Mr. William Miller Miss Fannie Spinney Raymond Anderson Wesley Brown Joseph Connors William Doherty James Ells Joseph Fraser Harold Hubby Marlin Jordan John Kenney John Knight ■» 1C ■ . ' m. €: ■ ■ ■ We pay tribute to our principal, Mr. Howard W. Watson, for his kind understanding and unusual wisdom. Often has he spurred us to greater goals hy a softly spoken word or by a friendly smile. Unceasingly has he given time and effort to build our confidence and to keep forever jileasant and worthwhile our recollections of Stoneharn High School. As we leave our classes, we shall carry with us the memory of a courteous adviser, a faithful friend. First Row: Mr. Miller, Mrs. Baker, Miss Johnson, Mr. Thibodeau, Mr. Nadeau, Mr. Watson. Mr. Richard- son , Miss Res ' ish, Miss Dunning-, Mr. Bushway. Second- Row: Mrs. Lawson, Mrs. Lobdell, Miss Jenkins, Miss Stevens, Miss Armstrong, Miss Finn, Miss Fitzgerald, Miss Marsh. Third Row: Mr. Buono, Mr. Davis, Mr. Herrick, ST FF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Kiilland McCaleb. LITERARY: Virginia Strong, Priscilla Rockwell, Robert Biggio, Shirley Moore, Shirley Blood. ART: Muriel Goudey. PHOTOGRAPHY: Richard Storey, Stanley Seward. BUSINESS: Salvatore Costa, James McLaughlin, Richard Evans, Herbert Washburn. ADVISER: Miss Ruth Finn. Pkesident; Vice I’kesident: Secketakv: Tkeasurek: Francis Howard Jane Borlhwick Eleanor Leary Emery Knight ALLAN AIAVAKI) Fiery red hair is only pait of what makes A1 so well-liked. His ever present sense of humor and agreeable disposition makes up the rest. We shall always remember him as outstanding in both hockey and football. Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Play, 2; Vice President ot Dramatic Club 3; Ushei- at Giad- uation. DONALD L. ANDKKSON This big blonde boy of C2 has sti ' uggled all year trying to prove that some trig problems just can ' t be done. Maybe he has something there. Basketball. 2; Soccer, 1; Blue and White, 1. KICHAKD BLINN Dick can be seen any Saturday driving his beach wagon on his famous egg route. His love for flashy clothes and his gay smile have made him one of the best liked fellows in the class. Football, 2; Blue and White, 2, 3; Usher at Graduation. KOIiKKT BIGGIO Pep and a jolly disposition make up for Bob ' s small stature. We won- der ho v so much fun can be wrap- ped up in one person! Hockey, 2 3; Football, 2; Yeai- book Staff. KAVMOND W. ANDKKSON Strictly “hep” and “on the beam” Ray is one of the most versatile, up-and-coming males of fthe class. The first of Cl to enter the service, we know that if Uncle Sam likes him as well as we do, he’ll be an admiral in no time. Traffic Squad, 1, 3; Hockey, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Play, 1; Class Treasur- er,!; Chairman of Social Commit- tee, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; Mar- shal at Graduation, 2; U. S. Navy. FRANK L. ANGKLO “Angie” has found many friends in football and basketball. He is a member of an air-minded family and looks forwaid himself to fly- ing the airways. Traffic, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3: Blue and White, 1. 2, 3; A. A. Treasurer: Winter Carnival, 2, 3. GI OKIA BAXTKR Few really get to know Gloria, but all like her. Vivacious and ver- satile, she is active in sports and social affairs. The twinkle in her eyes also denotes the sense of hu- mor that makes “Boo” certain to get along. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2: Blue and White; 1, 2, 3; Vice Piesident of Dramatic Club, 2; Marshal at Graduation, SHIRLFV J. BLOOD Butch is the sort of giil with .hom one always feels at ease. i-Ier poise, affability, and serenity, have made her one of our outstand- ing and popular classmates Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1; Field Hockey, 1, 2; Glee Club, 2; Blue and White, 2, 3; Yeaibook Staff: MacDonald Medal; Four Year Honor Group. JANE BORTIIWICK The high reputation of Stoneham High School depends on steady, reliable people like Janie. She is well liked by all who know her because of her pleasing personal- ity and friendliness. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1; Blue and White 1, 2, 3; Vice President of Blue and White; Cheei ' Leader, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Play, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; Usher at Graduation; Class Vice President; Class Statistician. ARTHUR C. BRIDGMAN Just as Bud stole the show in our class play, so he has been stealing it throughout his school years with his ever ready wit, fine spirit, and sportsmanship. Basketball, 1, 2, 3: Football, 3; Soccei ' , 1, 2, 3; ' Tennis, 1; Base- ball, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White 1, 2, 3; Manager of Cheerleadeis, 3; Dra- matic Club 1, 2, 3; Play, 3; Winter Carnival. 1. 2. 3; Vice President of Blue and White, 1, 2; President of . . 3; Captain of Basketball, 2; Captain of Baseball, 2; Class Sta- tistician. WKSLliV L. BROWN Wes is the fellow who knows his math, histoiy, English, and science. In other woi’ds, he’s the brains of He has proved himself a good fighter as well as a scholar. Include a little shyness and you have Wes- ley Brown of the U. S. Navy. Baseball, 1, 2; Blue and White, 2, 3; Winter Cainival, 2, 3; U. S. Navy. MURIEL F. BUCKI.E Muiiel has displayed hei’ talents many times in singing and playing the western songs of which she is a lover. She is one of our gay- est cheei leaders. One of Muilel’s di ' eams will be realized when she finds hei ' new home in Texas. Traffic Squad, 3; Blue and White, 3; Cheei ' leadei’s, 3; Four Year Honor Group. BARBARA COLE Barb is the girl who is seen but not heard. She is a real scholar- as well as a good friend. Barb has already started on her business careeer. Honor- Roll, 1, 2, 3; Four Year Honor Group. WILLIAM R. CONLEY Bill has never- made himself too conspicious; yet he has been very much a part of the class. Especial- ly commendable have been his co- operation and team work on the hockey squad. Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 1; Golf, 2, 3; Blue and White Club, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2. MILDRTIU CAHILL For- a gir-1 who has been with us only two year-s, Milly has won many friends. Although shy at flr-st, she soon becomes the life of any party. Her- bright smile and remarks have br-ightened r-nany a dull monrent. Blue and White Club, 2, 3; Dra- matic Club, 2; Usher- at Gr aduation. DORIS COCHRANE Dor-is’s club activities have made us r-ealize how well she accepts re- sponsibility and what a true friend she is. Glee Club, 2, 3; Blue and White Club, 2; Bowling Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Captain of Bowling. GEORGE F. COGAN Hockey has made George an orrt- standing classmate. Besides, who wouldn ' t admire a fellow who knows his history as well as Geor ge does. Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2. JOSEPH F. CONNORS A carefree good natur-e and a fine personality have made Joe popular among his fellow students. Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White Club, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; Captain of Baseball, 3. SALVATORE COSTA Sal Costa comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb. He really is a gentle creature, but would have us think he lives on a diet of razor- blades, milk bottles, and nails. Sal’s main interests lie in dates, dramatics, and playing dumb; but we all know he has plerrty of per- sonality. Blue and White Club, 2, 3; Dra- matic Club, 1, 2, 3; Treasurer of Dramatic Club, 3; Yearbook Staff; Class Prophecy. SHIRLEY A. COX Shit-ley is the brisk little girl on the basketball team with an odd sense of humor- that bubles out now and then to the amusement of her classmates. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3. JOAN C. CKAIOIK Personality plus — that ' s our Joanie. After spending a month last summer at Patterson Field, Ohio, she became a confirmed ad- mirer of the Air Corps. Her ever read y smile has endeared her to all her Classmates. Basketball. 1, 2; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Usher at Graduation. SlIKPUON M. CKAM Hei ' e is Stoneham’s " Lefty” Grove. Shel is known by every member of the class as the six- footer who throws a mean curve- ball. Football, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3. GLORIA DAVIDSON This girl who came to us this year from Shrewsbury brought with her, determination, trustworthi- ness and sweetness. Her ambition is to be a nurse. Glee Club, 3. MARION DAVIS Outstanding because of her danc- ing and acrobatics, Marion makes us wonder if she wears magic shoes. We know someday when she becomes famous, we shall be proud to say, “We knew her’ when — !” Traffic Squad, 3; Blue and White 2, 3; Cheerleader, 3; Winter Carni- val 2; A. A. Show, 2, 3. VIRGINIA CROSS This girl is " a bit of all right.” Though outwardly shy, underneath she has all the qiralities that make for’ friendship. Field Hockey, 1; Glee Club, 2, 3: Blue and White, 2, 3; Winter’ Carnival, 2, 3. DOROTIIV J. DALTON Dot is one of the cute girls in the class. No wonder’ George takes such a fancy! Blue and White. 2, 3: BasketbaT, 1, 2; Field Hockey, 1, 2; Glee Club, t. 2. TONY L. DANNOLFO Mr. Five by Five — Tony! He will always be remembered for’ his ability on the gridiron. The class will miss Tony’s mischievous smile and all his pranks in the class- room. Hockey, 1; Football, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carni- val, 1, 2, 3; Dranratic Club, 2. BARBARA A. DEMPSKV Tra la, la, la. Here comes Barb, our’ opei’a singing actress. This young lady has her’ heart, mind, and soul set itpon entering the theatre! Barb wants to be Barbara Dempsey, so we won’t call her our Helen Hayes. When Barb’s ambi- tions are fulfilled, we hope that the same jolly, amiable, and distinc- tive Barbara Dempsey that we know will still be on top of the world. Honor Roll, 1; Basketball, 1, 2; Field Hockey, 1, 2; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Prize Speaking Contest, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; President, 3; Play, 2; Spring Concer’t, 1; Usher’ at Grad- uation. VIRGINIA DKMPSEV A very pleasant addition to our class is this blonde miss. School wouldn’t be the same without you. Din. We’ll miss your’ giggles! Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Winter’ Carnival, 2, 3; Captain of Girls’ Basketball. WILLIAM A. DOHERTY Bill is noted for his ability as a hockey player’. His assists arrd goals aided Stoneham in many victor’ies. Judging from his good natured ways, we’ll vouch that he’s a fine fellow to have around. Hockey, 1. 2, 3; Football, 2; Base- ball, 1, 2; Blue and White Club, 2, 3; Winter’ Carnival 1, 2, 3; U. S. Navy. IIAKOLI) DOWNES We’re proud of our hockey team, and pi ' ouder of our goalie and cap- tain. Despite that innocent look we suspect that he is at the bottom of much mischief. Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4; Captain of Hockey, 4; Soccei ' , 1, 2, 3, 4; Cap- tain of Soccer, 4; Tennis, 1; Golf, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3. JAMES ELLS Jimmy never wasted his talents in idleness while in the classroom. We know that the U. S. Army picked the right fellow for the job to be done. Blue and V. ' hite, 3; Winter Car- nival, 3; U. S. Army. BAKBAKA K. FLUKES Always leady with a quick re- tort, Barb makes every gatheiing just a little bit livelier. She is al- ways gay and happy and never seems to have a caie in the world. Basketball, 2; Field Hockey, 3; Glee Club, 1; Blue and White, 2. JOSEPH P. FRASER Joe is a sinceie, hard worker. He chose to leave us early for the Army Air Corps. We hope he con- tradicts tradition, and gets a few zei ' os in the future. Traffic Squad, 3; Blue and White, 3; U. S. Army. JOHN P. ENGLISH Nothing of him that doth fade But doth suffei’ a sea change Into something rich and strange. — Shakespeare Honor Roll, 1, 2; Soccer, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Play, 1, 2; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Prize Speak- ing Contest, 2; Spring Concert, 1; Winter Carnival, 2. RICHARD EVANS We have all known someone like Dick who is always there when one needs a fiiend. He is as genuine as a fingerprint. Football, 3; Soccer, 2; Baseball, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; Yearbook Staff. ALBERT FINNEGAN, JR. Easy come, easy go, never a wor- ry in the world - that’s typically Basil. The mere mention of exams sends him into a cold sweat and ruins his entire day. Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Orches- tra, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 3; Play, 3; Usher at Graduation. BARBARA R. GARSIDE Barb’s good nature and conta- gious laugh have won a way into the hearts of all of us. Her pretty blown eyes reflect her eagerness to be of service. Honor Roll, 1; Basketball, 1; Field Hockey, 1, 2; Glee Club, 1, 2; Blue and White Club, 1, 2, 3; Win- ter Carnival, 2, 3; Diamatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Four Year Honor Group. ROBERT GLOOR Bob is one who can always be depended upon to give the correct answer. His intelligence, poise, and geniality mark him as a pleasing person. Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. MURIEL R. GOUDEV Gabby — laughing brown eyes, wavy hair topping a remarkably artistic intellect. This young lady has a knack for holding up her end of the conversation. Gabby acts and writes unusually well, but her talent in drawing has furthered her desire to become an artist. Gabby will surely find her “place in the fun.” Ba sketball, 1; Field Hockey, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Play 3; Winter Car- nival 2, 3; Art Editor of Yearbook. HKLKN M. GKAIIAM CIIAKLKS I). HICKS Although Helen’s interests are out-of-town, she still has many friends in school. Helen has con- tributed many laughs for the en- joyment of the classroom. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1 , 2 . KOZEIlr E r. GRAII.AM Poised j scril €s Sa+ley ko a “T“. She ha TH ie yjillty tol c ipe with aiTA ' ' siAuatiip iJ and jj s ses talent jrr musTC and dramaitcs. We haven ' t forgotten the class play -A - Basketball, 1,, 2. 3; Gle«- Club, 1, " ' 3: Blu and White, 1, 2, 3; Prize Speaking Contest, 1, 2; Dramatic GKib, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club Play, 3; Spring ConceVt, 2, 3; Vice Pres- ident of A. A. Bud always comes through with a big smile and a joke. We ' ll all miss the class Mischa Auer! Hockey Manager, 3; Baseball Manager, 1; Blue and White, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3. HUBV J. HODSON Ruby, the pet of the class, never has a dull moment. One can always be sure of seeing her mischievous grin whenever opportunities for fun arise. Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Bowling Club, 3. GEIiALIHNK R. GUTTADAUKO Gen ie’s ardent cheers have helped our team on to many victories, and what would we have done without her at our basketball tournaments? If she is as successful as she is popular, she will reach the top with ease. Basketball, 1. 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Cheer- leader, 2, 3; Co-Captain Cheering Squad, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; A. A. Show, 1, 2, 3; Riding Club, 1; Class Prophecy. BKTTV HKINLEIN Betty is the reserved young lady who took our nickels and dimes at the lunchroom. Dependable should be her middle name. She is demure, quiet, and always smiling. Traffic Squad, 2; Field Hockey, 1; Basketball, 1, 2; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3; Spring Concert, 2. 3. FHVEIAS C. HERMAN Phil took our class by storm in the tenth grade. She has added a lot of fun these past three years. Glee Club, 1; Blue and White, 3; Usher at Giaduation. RUSSELL G. HOLDEN Russell is well known as a steady dependable lad. This is shown by bis woik as manager of the basket- ball team. Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival. 1, 2, 3; Managei’ of Bas- ketball; Traffic Squad, 1; Baseball, 2 . ANNA HOVNANIAN Although Anna has not partici- pated in many school activities, she has made her presence in the class- room felt by a quiet dignity and courteous manner. Glee Club, 3; Blue and White, 1. RICH.ARI) HOVNANIAN Who’s the virtuoso of 12B? Dick Hovnanian, of course! This quiet lover of music will be remembered by everyone in the class. Orchestra, 1, 2, 3. FRANCIS H. HOWARD Fran is a live wire, an athlete, and twice our class president. He has a sense of humor and also brains. An excellent combination, Sonny ! Traffic Squad. 2; Hockey, 1, 2; Football, 2, 3; Golf, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Head Usher at Grad- uation; Class President, 2, 3; Grad- uation Committee. HAROLD HUBBY Hub is the fellow who has been seen flying around the town in his old rattletrap of a car. He has made many a girl’s heart skip a beat. Basketball, 1; Football, 1, 2, 3; Clue and V hite, 2, 3; Usher at Graduation; U. S. Army. ANNE JOHNSON Anne is a retiring girl, but her poise adds dignity to the class- room. We hope that she will enjoy nursing. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Bowling Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Spring Concert, 2. MARTIN P. JORDAN Red hair, a cheeiy smile, a hearty laugh — Martyl His ability to give orders and give them pleasantly made him an ideal football cap- tain. Typical American describes this lad now in the U. S. Navy. Honor Roll, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; Blue and White Club, 2, 3; President of Blue and White, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; U ;her at Graduation; Co-Captain of Foot- ball, 3; U. S. Navy. JEANNE M. HULME Jeanne is the happy-go-lucky girl of the business course. She’s hap- piest when playing basketball or entertaining friends with her piano playing. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Captain of Basketball, 1; Field Hockey, 1, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1. 2, 3; Winter Carnival 1, 2, 3; Cheerleadei’, 2; Dramatic Club, 1, 2. 3. HERBERT VV . HUNT Mike can be seen in his spare time at the local Spa sipping cokes and telling his " moion” jokes. Wherever theie is a crowd gathered you may be sure Herb is in the middle of it. It will not be easy to forget Mike. But then — who wants to? Hockey, 1; Basketball, 1, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2 ,3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club Play, 3; Usher at Giaduation. RICHARD T. JENKINS Although Dick joined the Navy too early to receive his diploma, we feel he is still one of the class. We remember his smile, his jokes, and the eighteen points scored in the Concord basketball game. Soccer, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White Club, 1, 2, 3; Ten- nis, 1; A. A. Show, 1, 2; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Ushci ' at Gradua ion; U. S. Navy. MARY E. KELLY Sparkling eyes and blushes des- cr ' bo Marv. She is a plucky, hard working little miss. Basketball, 1, 2; Field Hockey, I, 2; Cleo Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and V?h’ c, 1, 2: Spring Concert, 2; Win- ter Carnival, 1, 2. JO”N KENNEY Act ' ons speak louder than words v’ith John. His service at the Mass- achusetts General Hospital and t ' ow with Uncle Sam is proof of this. Blue • " ’nd ' Wh’te. 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; U. S. Coast Guard. C. EMERY KNIGHT Emery is the business man of the class as well as an athlete. He has been promine;it in school activi- fes and has always been ready to do his part. Ilor.or Roll, 2; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; L ' .a.scbcll, 2; Blue and W’hite, 1, 2; Class Treasurer, 2, 3; Winter Car- nival, 2; Graduation Committee. JOHN KNIGHT Although he had a little tough luck at the beginning of the foot- ball season, this fellow still had plenty of fighting spirit left for hockey. Remember Johnny ' s favor- ite war cry, “Haggerty!” We know that with his personality he must now be making new friends in the U. S. Army. Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 2, 3: Winter Carnival, 2, 3; Usher at Graduation; Co-Captain of Foot- ball; U. S. Aimy. JUIJA KOPKKK Although Julie has not partici- pated in many school activities, she has made heiself very deal’ to her friends with hei ' unassuming ways. JOSKFH A. LONGMOKK A tall fellow with a quiet good humor has captured our hearts through the years in high school. Joe will undoubtedly make a good business man. Blue and White, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3. UOBKRT J. MAC KAY Quiet in class, yes, but outside—? Bob is sports-minded and one of our best hockey men. We’re proud of the good playing he’s done, and we think he’s a nice fellow to have around on any occasion. Traffic Squad, 2; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival. 2, 3; Usher at Graduation; Class Will. M.AIMOKIK LAMB Margie is the girl with the per- petual smile and a great fondness for roller skating. Her ready laugh has added enjoyment to our years at S. H. S. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1; Glee Club, 2. 3; Blue and White, 2 . DOROTHY I . LAWSON One word describes this girl with the light brown hair — thoughtful- ness! Dolly’s gracious mannei’ and pleasant ways have won her many friends. Field Hockey, 1, 2; Glee Club, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3. KLKANOR C. LKARY " A pei’son really has to know Eleanor to appreciate her wonder- ful sense of humor and charm. She’s very fond of sports and was the captain of our successful field hockey team. To have Eleeanor for a friend is certainly an honor. Honor Roll, 1; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Spring Concert, 1; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; Class Secretary, 2, 3; Co-Captain of Field Hockey, 3; Gradtiation Com- mittee. BEYERLY MAUN Bev is a good scout who looks at things from the sunny side. She never seems to be gloomy and we think there should be more like her. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3! Winter Carnival, 3; Usher at Grad- uation. BARBARA A. MANLEY Barbara is the alert little red- head of the business class. She has been a stai- in both field hockey and basketball. We’re sure she’ll shine Just as brightly in the business world. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2; Spring Concert, 2 3; Winter Carnival 1, KIRTLAND E. McCALEB Kirt, the editor-in-chief of the Yearbook, is one of the leading scholars of our class. Everything seems perfectly simple to this ge- nius. He has glided through school with as much ease and grace as he displays on the ice. Kirt is the Harvard man of the class of 1943. Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Hockey. 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 2, 3; Tennis, 1; Golf, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival 1, 2, 3; Usher at Gradu- ation; Yearbook Staff; MacDonald Medal; Four Year Honor Group. JAMES M. MoLAlTGlIEIN Mac is best known for his stellar woi ' k on the ice last winter. Eveiy ad in this book is evidenc e of the sales ability which will bi’ing him ineevitable success. Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2; Yearbook Staff. EMILY R. McRAE In our class Mac stands for conscien,.iou ness, goodheartedness, and fun. Mac is so sweet and naive that at times she surprises hei ' self. Under those lovely golden locks lies a brain that really clicks. Honor Roll, 3; Traffic Squad, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2; Blue and Vv ' hite, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic 1, 2, 3; Spring Concert, 1; Winter Carnival, 2; Class Vice President, 1 ; Grad- uation Committee. SUSAN MINASIAN Sue is the dark-haired beauty of the class. She’s always ther ' e with her quick wit and ready answers. Coming to us fiom New Yoik in her junior year, she has won many friends. Honor Roll, 2, 3; Tiaffic Squad, 3; Glee Club, 2, 3; Four Year Honor Group. ALFONSO MINGIIELLA A light heart and a gay manner are typical of Al. His wavy black hair and captivating smile are the piide of the senior class. Best of luck to a gland fellow and sports- man. Traffic Squad, 1, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; Football, 1; Soccer, 1; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 3; Foot- ball Manager; Graduation Commit- tee. WILLIAM J. MEEGAN Here is the clown of our class. When Bill is around, we can be sure that thei ' e will be action. Managei ' of Hockey, 3; Baseball Manager, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3. WILLIAM L. MELI.ETT Bill is one of the scholars of C2. His ability to do physics pi ' oblems and to ski with the best of them will keep this fellow on top. Soccer-, 2, 3; Blue and White, 2, 3; Orchestra, 2, 3; Winter Car-ni- val, 2, 3. PATRICIA A. MILLER Patsy is the happy-go-lucky mem- ber of Cl. Her winning smile and good nature have made her- ever popular. Honor- Roll, 1, 2; Basketball, 1; F’ield Hockey, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Play, 3; Winter- Car-nival, 2; Cheer-leader-, 3; Prize Speaking, 1, 3. SHIRLEY MOORE Mugs is an incomparable student and especially merits our praise since through her- talents many a less gifted classmate has found his courses easier. Although somewhat temper-amental, Mug’s humor car- ries her- through. Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1 2, 3; Winter- Carnival, 3; Year-book Staff; Class Historian; Four Year Honor- Group. NANCY G. MORRILL Nan always has a twinkle in her- eyes and a good word for- every- one. Her- setrse of humor- is wonder- ful, and her- cur ly head can usually be found in the middle of some mis- chief. Basketball. 1, 2; Field Hockey, 1, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3. ESTHER B. MORRISON Esther- is known for- her- hear-ty larrghter. She was an excellent for- ward on the basketball team, and she also found time to Ire a cheer- leader- for the football team. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Cheerleader 1; Dra- matic Club, 1, 2, 3; Spr-ing Con- cert, 2; Wirrter- Car-nival, 1, 2, 3; Captain of Girls’ Basketball. MARIANNE MORSE Marianne is unique we all agree. Interested most in phy sics, poetry, and music, she refrains from dis- playing her unusual abilities. Her delightful qualities make her our class Peter Pan. Honor Roll. 1, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1; Glee Club, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Orches- tra, 1, 2, 3: Dramatic Club, 3; Sp ing Concert, 2; Winter Carnival, 2; Four Year Honor Group. GORDON MUNRO Gordon is a retiiing person. His sincere efforts, which we have noticed in school, will aid him in his chosen field. LUCY M. NAZARIAN A pleasant disposition, sincerity, and a fund of naive answers char- acterize Lucy. ROSE E. ORSILI.O Ozzie is small and peppy. Her humor and friendliness have made her a pleasant classmate. Traffic Squad, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 3; Spring Concert, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3. AGNES L. MURPHY Agnes is the beautiful blonde of the senior class. When students speak of some funny incident, you can be sure that Agnes has had something to do with it. Blue and White, 2, 3; Winter Car- nival, 2, 3. FRANK R. MURPHY Frank’s gay smile reminds us that he likes mischief and can’t sit still for five minutes. He is one of the best liked fellows of 12G. Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3. EOtYARD N’AZ.ARIAN Ed has proved by his scrappy spirit in hockey that it isn ' t the size that makes the man. He has been a vital part of our class. We’ll miss you, Ed. Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Soccei ' , 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 1; Blue and White, 2, 3; Winter Cainival, 2, 3. ARTHUR E. OUTRAM, JR. Who is the rather quiet lad in 12G, the one who is always willing to help some member of the class write his forgotten homework? Yes, that’s right! Good old Art! His kindness and courtesy maik him as a real gentleman. Blue and White, Carnival, 1. 1, 2; Winter DOROTHY G. PARSONS Dot and laughter go together. Though small she is a swift and speedy playei ' in both field hockey and basketball. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Winter Cainival, 1, 2. LUCILLE PEZZOLE Cille is the peppy little dark- eyed gill with speed on the basket- ball floor. Her vivacious ways have added the whole class to her long list of friends. Basketball 1, 2, 3; Field Hockev, 1, 2; Glee Club, 2, 3; Usher at Grad- uation. KUNKST II. KirLEV EMILY M. PRICE Emily, the excellent manager of the girls’ field hockey team, has been a willing worker on all oc- casions. Basketball, 1, 2; Field Hockey, 1, 3; Blue and White Club, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 3; Manager of Field Hockey, 3; Honor Roll, 3; Four Year Honor Group. OdoUj EDWARD II. PROODIAN, JR. When we see anyone carefully copying music in home room, we immediately realize it’s Eddie. Stoneham High Schol will miss this fine violinist. Orchestra, 3; Spring Concert, 3; Graduation Committee. Rip is a studious classmate who has contributed much to every class. May his efforts be rewarded with good foitune in life. Blue and White, 2. MARGUERITE E. ROBERTS Popular Peggy is always on the go. Orchestra, cheerleading, clubs, and sports keep her always busy. Her smile is as reassuring as sun- up and her personality impresses eveiyone. Honoi ' Roll, 2, 3; Traffic Squad, 3; Basketball, 3; Blue and White, 2, 3; Cheerleader, 3; Prize Speaking Con- test, 2, 3; Orchestra, 2, 3; Drama- tic Club, 2, 3; Play, 2; Spring Con- cert, 2; Ushei’ at Graduation; Sec- retary of Blue and White, Secre- taiy of Dramatic Club; Secretary of A. A.; Graduation Committee; Four Year Honor Group. GERTRUDE G. QUAI.TER Pep and personality are Gertie ' s keynotes. She is sweet as sugar but full of spice. Come what may. Gei ' tie will never be at a loss for fiiends. Honor Roll, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2; Field Hockey, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Win- ter Carnival, 2, 3; Usher at Grad- uation; Class Will. M. PRISCILLA REED We will never forget Pi ' iscilla, the girl with the beautiful hair. In- clined to be a dreamer, she looks for the silver lining in every cloud. She always has a smile for every- one and a cheerful remark for every occasion. May all your dreams comee true, Pussy. Traffic Squad, 1; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3. FLORENCE M. REILIA Red hair and a snappy reply characterize Rusty. She has a way about her that is ii ' resistible. Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 3; Spring Concert, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2. RUTH ROBINSON Ruthie with hei- sweet smile and piquant humoi- has made school days enjoyable. Her ambition to be a nurse is well chosen. Basketball, 1. 2; Field Hockey, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Cainival, 1, 2. PRISCILLA R. ROCKWELL Chris is quite a girl! Our spell- ing champion, Chris is full to the brim of words almost long enough to be serial stoiies. Her jokes are as dry as last year’s maple leaves. This young lady can hold her own in an aigument until it is lopsided. Basketball, 1; Field Hockey, 1; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 2, 3; Prize Speaking, 2, 3; Drama- tic Club, 3; Play, 3; Spring Concert, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3; Year- book Staff; Honor Roll, 3. MARY E. ROUNDS Anything to do with a flute makes Mary sit us and take notice, for she is a faithful and necessary member of our orchestra. At times she appears quiet; but if one catches her in a talkative mood, he really can’t get a word in edge- wise. Basketball, 3; Blue and White, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3. MARY SAMOUR FRANKHX M. SMITH Mary is a quiet, efficient person. It is a pleasure to have her as a friend. We are sure she will make an excellent addition to any busi- ness office. Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White, 3; Spring Concert, 2. ST. NLEV J. SEAWARD Here’s a fellow with a place in every heart and a finger in every pie. But please, Stan, stay away from the stage. Football. 1, 2, 3; Soccer, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Play, 2; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3; Yearbook Staff. Although a retiring and unas- suming pel son, Franklin has the sincercst wishes of the class for his success. RICHARD STOREY Dick has a pleasing way about him that makes us like him. Aero- nautics seem to be his fli ' st love just now, and we hope some day to ride in a plane he has designed. Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 2; Football, 3; Traffic Squad, 3; Soc- cer-, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Yearbook Staff: Manager of Basketball, 2; Class Orator; Four- Year Honor- Group. Gl.ORIA SHEEHAN Gloria is our rhythm girl who can always be heard singing a popular song. She enjoys playing liasketball and has been one of Stoneham High’s cheerleaders. Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Cheerleader-, 2; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Winter- Carnival, 2. CHARLES SHERIDAN Charlie is our- contribution to the Navy Yard. If he keeps up the morale of his fellow workers as he has kept up ours, ships will soor r be lartnched in rapid successsion. Blue and White, 1, 2; Winter Carnival, 1, 2. EDITH J. SMITH Fratrk and sincere, Edith has won many friends by just being her-self. Her- lively and timely argu- ments have prevented many a class period from becoming dull. With her- character, we are certain Too- tie can cope with the future. Field Hockey, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3; Orchestra, 2, 3; Winter- Carnival, 2; Blue and White, 2; Forrr- Year- Honor Group. VIRGINIA L. STRONG Studious and dependable is Vir- ginia. She can always be counted upon to do more than her- share of hard work, and we like her for- it. These qualities spell success. Honor- Roll, 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad, 3: Basketball. 1: Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Yearbook Staff, Graduation Committee; Four- Year Honor- Group. HELEN R. TAYI,OR A certain salty humor-, which dis- tinguishes Helen from the rest of us, pops out to our- great amuse- ment in unexpected places. Basketball, 1, 2; Field Hockey, 1; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and White 1 , 2 . CHARLOTTE G. THOMPSON Tommy is an all-round good sport. Who else carr crack a joke with as straight a face as this hu- man “bearr” can? Chardie’s ath- letic prowess has brought much honor- to S.H.S.; and wherever- she may go, her everr disposition and patierree will be appreciated. Basketball, 1. 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Blue and Wb.:te, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 3! Spring Concert, 2, 3; Winter Carrrival, 2, 3; Captain of Field Hockey. KLLKN TKODKLLA ALBION I). WKKKS Although Ellen appears to be very demure, her friends know her to be quite the opposite. She should make a charming secretary. Basketball. 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 1. 2; Glee Club, 1, 2; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1; Ushei- at Graduation. LOUIS VACUA “Swift” should explain this year’s basketball captain. Although swift as a streak on the basketball floor, Lou has been very quiet in the classroom. This hasn’t hindered his popularity any because every- one likes an easy-going fellow. Basketball. 1, 2, 3, 4; Captain, 4; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2; Football, 1, 2, 3. An apple a day keeps the doc- tor away. This apple-eating fellow is so capable that he received an “A” in a subject he didn’t take! Hockey, 1; Soccei-, 1; Baseball, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 1, 2, 3. LKONAKI) R. VVOKTIIEN A winning personality, a ready smile, and the ability to do and do right describe Len. We predict for him a brilliant future. Soccer, 1; Baseball, 1; Blue and White, 1, 2, 3; Dtamatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Graduation Committee. l.EON R. WARREN Blonde hair, blue eyes, and a cheery smile add up to the Sterling Hayden of our class. Football, 1; Blue and W’hite, 1, 2, 3. HERBERT N. WASHBURN Herb is a lad who has what it takes. He looks hard work straight in the face and always stares it down. Although rather serene on the surface, everyone has occasion- ally seen sparks fly from Herb’s eyes. Honoi’ Roll, 1; Traffic Squad, 1; Blue and White, 2, 3; Yearbook Staff. KATHERINE E. WATKINS Blonde and petite is oui ' well- dressed Kay. Besides being a good athlete, she is an exceptionally good dancei ' . Keep time with the music, Kay, and you will always be in step. Basketball. 1, 2, 3; Field Hockey, 2, 3; Glee Club, 2; Blue and White, 2, 3; Winter Carnival, 2, 3; Ushei ' at Graduuation. EI OISE M. WYATT “Sweet Eloise” — go the words of the song, and they describe her very well. She is pert and pretty and popular ' . To be a nurse has al- ways been her ambition, and she has already started to fulfill it. Glee Club, 1. 2, 3; Blue and White 1, 2, 3; Spring Concert, 2, 3; Winter Cai ' trival, 1; Ushei ' at Graduation. LOUISE T. GIRARD Louise’s fluency makes us realize that we really have an extraordin- arily intelligent girl in our midst. Glee Club, 2. ESTHER MEUSE Esther ' has a jolly disposition that is h ard to equal. She is an e.xcellent student, and has contrib- uted much to her ' class. Those who know her ' certainly value her friendship. Honor Roll, 2, 3; Graduation Committee; Four- Year Honor Group. ESTHER SMITH Esther- hasn’t much to say, birt her quiet way has made her ' re- spected by her- friends. Clee Glrib, 1. MacDONALl) MEDAI.S tor Scholarship, Character and (load Influence in the School Shirley J. Blood Kirtland E. McCaleb CEASS HISTORIAN Shirley Moore GKADL ATION ADDRESS .... Richard Storey Preliminary Honor Croup (B average or higi Shirley J. Blood Muriel E. Buckle Barl)ara L. Cole Barbara R. Gai ide Kirtland E. McGaleb Esther M euse Susan Minasian er for four years) Shirley Moore Marianne Morse Emily M. Price Marguerite E. Roberts Eldith J. Smith Richard E. Storey Virginia L. Strong GLASS PROPHECY CLASS WILL Salvatore Costa and Geraldine Guttadauro Robert MacKay and Gertrude Quaker The following awards and prizes will he announced at graduation exereises: llisotry Medals Mathematics and Science Medal Grange Art Prize Grange 1 usic Prize American Legion Metlal Carrie S. Ireland Citizenshi]) Award Parent-Teacher Scholarships Teachers’ Club Scholarship Blue and White Scholarship GR DUATION COMMITTEE P rancis Howard Emery Knight Eleanor Leary Emily McRea Esther Meuse Alfonso Minghella Edward Proodian Marguerite Roberts Virginia Strong Leonard Worthen :oi¥iE Francis Howard lunight it hecomes niy |)leasurt‘ to welcome all of you, friemls of llte a;raduales, to our exercises. 1 welcome you uol only iii behalf of the class- mates present, hut also in behalf of those honored classmates now in the sendee of our country. Though we miss these friends who are already in the Army, Navy, Marines and Air (iorps, and wish they were here, we feel that they are with us in si)irit for this important day. War has made us more conscious than ever of sacrifice and has given us a better evaluation of all things. What day could be more ap[)ropriate than this one, therefore, on which to thank our parents publicly for the many sacrifices they have made during these past years to make this grad- uation day |)ossihle for us? Always we have felt the need of their sym- pathy, understanding, and wisdom; now we acknowledge it and j ay tribute to it. Throughout our school years, others too have sacrificed time and effort to prejjare us for the future. Let us give proper praise to our faculty for their untiring efforts, and to the school committee for their wise pro- vision for our welfare. .fust as we are conscious of the pleasant days now behind us, so are we conscious of the responsibilities ahead. Some of us will be furthering our education in institutions of higher learnings; others will be entering the service almost immediately. No other class has been faced with such an unpredictable future. In any case we shall go forth into our new places hoping to put an emi to this i)eriod of strife. We have a two fold duty to accomplish: first, to fight for the restoration of peace in the world; second, to make the post-war world one of which we shall b(‘ proud. This will call for vision and unceasing fortitude. May we, with the ludp of (iod, be ready for the years before us in all things and at all limes. Richard Storey THAT FREEDOM .MAY SURVIVE Wlifii George W ashinglon, Thomas Jeffer- son, ami Abraham Eincoln died, they left to their relatives and to all Americans an in- heritance, not of money, not of industry, hut of the right to freedom. History has reca)rded the early growth of that inheritance. One of the earliest de- mands lor freedom made hy English-speak- ing people was the Magna Charta. In this, these fuiulamental rights of free men, were expressed; the right to freedom of religion, the right to trial hy jury, and the right to he taxed only as the needs of the Government re([nired, and then only with the consent of the people. Eor about four hundred years, the Kings of England respectetl this document until cer- tain of them desired an established church. Although the majority of the peojile willingly ascril)etl to this faith, a small band of them were persecuted for their diflerent views on religion. Some of them left England, first for Holland, then for America. Before they landed in 1620, the Pilgrims drew uj) in the “Mayflower Gompact” what was |)robably the first statement of rights in America. In it, the right of assembly, the right to free sjieech, and the right to make and to execute their own laws were guaranteed. Strangely enough, the very thing they desired most was not included, the right to worshi]) as they pleased. Not all those interested in freedom left England with the Pilgrims. Others made their demands in the form of a revolution which resulted in a renewal of the terms of the Magna Charta, in a set of laws known as the “Bill of Rights.” J he rivalry among the countries of Eng- land, France, and S])ain for control and [lower in America led to coiujuest and settle- ment. The opportunity for free enterprise this country offeretl, as op|)osed to the o{)- pression of the English, bred in the colonists a desire for independence. This grew until in June, 1776, it was decitled that “we are and of right ought to he free and independent states. It was only one month later that Thomas Jefferson at the request of the Second Gon- tinental Gongress, drew u[ the “Declaration of lnde[)endence.” It stated that: “All men are created equal; that they are endowed by tbeir Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of hap|)iness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men deriving their just powers from the con- sent of the governed; that when any form of government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the right of the peojile to alter or abolish it ... . Prudence, iiuleed, will dic- tate that governments long established should not be abolished for light and transient causes.” After a hard fight our forefathers won their independence, and a new government was launched. In 1787, the Fiiited States Consti- tution was drawn u[), but the states refused to ratify it until a series of amendments known as the “Bill of Rights” was added. These guaranteed the jiersonal freedoms all men re- quire: the freedom of speech, press, assembly and religion. So in 1787, the Constitution officially became tbe law of the land. In 1861, the union was torn and all it stood for threatened by a great civil war. After one of the worst battles, that of Gettysburg, termed by most historians as the turning point of the war, Lincoln reiterated the fact that " all men are created equal.” Forceful indeed are his words " that we here dedicate our lives that this nation of the people, by the people and for the |)eople shall not perish from the earth.” Lincoln’s view of justice and equal- ity extended not only to America, but to all the people of the world. At the close of the Civil War the Northern interpretation of Am- erican principles triunq)hed, the Southern states lost their right to secede, but gained the protection of a united nation, and the Negroes were released from bondage. In 1898, the |)eople of America discovered that it would be necessary to interfere with Furopean affairs to protect their interests and the freedom of the world. We fought the Spanish- American war to free Cuba, our first southeastern neighbor, of her oppressor. So, you see, we began near home to impress upon the world our desire to make freedom for all peof)le a reality. Our next interference with European af- fairs came in the Great War, the war to end all wars, the war to make the world safe for democracy, the war to insure freedom for all people. The Allies won this war after four years of bitter fighting. L ruler Wilson’s fourteen jioints, we had a good op|)ortunity to preserve world peace. However, there was lacking a “will to peace” among the larger countries, and the League of Nations had not the [lower to force aggressors to submit to lawful settlement of disputes. L ndoubtedly, had the Lnited States been willing to cooperate, the League might have grown in power to be much more (dleclive. As it was, all the larger jiowm ' s considered their own interests first, and cooperation was con- sistent only among the smaller nations. This is the history of our inheritance of freedom and our fight to [ireserve it f rom the Magna Charta to our Declaration of Inde- [lendence and through the first World War. xNow, while we are engaged in the Second World War, is the time to plan for a just and lasting peace. It is too soon to make a final blueprint for a world organization because we cannot tell the extent of power with which nations will emerge from the war. However, it is not too soon to consider the fundamental princijiles to which we will have to hold if there is to be a cessation of armed conflict over a period of years to allow a concept of world cooperation to develop. What concessions and compro- mises must be accepted cannot be determined as yet. Although we must, as realists, realize we cannot [jossibly achieve all our ideals at once, the clear statement of the principles for which we are fighting will give direction to our diplomacy. Some of our war aims, as given by Pres- ident Roosevelt and Winston Churchill in the Atlantic Charter are that people will be given the o[)[)ortunity of choosing the type of gov- ernment they want; all nations will be given the right to free trade and freedom of the seas. To these aims were added by Roosevelt in his Four Freedoms address to Congress that the four freedoms we will grant to all j)eoj)le are freedom of press and speech, and free- dom from want and fear. To do our best to fulfill these aims, there are certain facts we must recognize. The first of these is that we cannot have both j)eace and revenge. The de- f( ' aU‘(l counlnh ' s sliould l)e j)Utnshed, Inil the way to punish tlnun is by making lliemhelp to rebuiltl that which they have destroyed and therehy help the coiujuered nations to get hack on their feet. I he next lact to he recognized is that we must foster in the ])eoj)le of the world a " will to peace” so that we will not fail again as we did in 1918. To do this, war must he stripj)ed of all glory. The horrors of this one should leave no illusions in the minds of anyone, old or young. The causes of war should he care- fully analyzeil, and the psychological and economic factors acknowledged and met. do guard against a peace treaty written in revenge, we must allow for a cooling-ofl per- iod of from ten to twenty years after the close of the war. During this time men whose know- letlge, training, and sympathies fit them for their special tasks, should he in constant con- ference, working out the jirohlems that arise among nations. We must realize that there can he no su- perior race, color, or creed. We must also he hrought to recognize that the welfare of every individual person and nation depends upon the welfare of all the world. A threat to the freedom of one country is a threat to the free- dom of all. d ) firmly estahlish peace, we must u[)root all traces of prejudice toward races and nations hy recognizing the best ipialities of all cultures and creeds. All na- tions differ in language and customs, hut we must [dan a coojierative peace despite these diflerences. The world would he a dull jilace if all the |)eople in it were of one mind. Much of the color and joy of living conies from the folkways of the (lillerent conntrii ' S. ' I ' lie self- interest of nations must he balanced hy pride in the contrihntion each can make to the ulti- mate welfare of all. Holding government positions, local or national, must he considered an honor and a noble service to a country. From each nation should he selectetl youth of high intelligence, of excellent character and of sound judgment to be trained for diplomatic service. They should he educated at |)ulilic expense at home and abroad until they are well grounded in the history, language and culture of the coun- try to which they will he sent. Hy an unbiased treatment of the history of all nations, we must aim to heal the wounds international strife has caused. After the last war, rei)iesentatives of the Weimar Rej)uhlic of (Germany suggested to the League of Na- tions that an International Commission he formed for the editing of textbooks of nations to promote fairness, syni{)athy, and under- standing; hut desire for revenge blinded lead- ers to the wisdom of the suggestion. Man has been so impressed hy his achieve- ments in the sciences that he has come to wor- ship his own creation. The chaos we suffer is the fulfillment of the pagan faith of the world. We need to hold fast to the truth of the Psalmist, “The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof,” that we may fulfill well our sacred trust in using its national re- sources. That freedom may survive, we, the grad- uating class of 1943, do, in the words of Jef- ferson, " with a firm reliance on the protec- tion of Di ine Providence, mutnally pledge to each other t)ur lives, our fortunes, and onr sacred honor.” HM!9TOR Y ■June 18, 1943, and we’re alumni! How strange it will be to be cut oil Irom all the laniiliar activities of schot)l lite with which we have been so busy for four long years. How hard it is to think ol leaving the many Iriends we have made and the niches we have cut for ourselves in our own little worlds. J his graduation marks an end to the carefree years we have spent, working, playing and pre|)aring ourselves for higher goals. To some of us it means the beginning of a coni- |)letely new life in the business world, and to others the entering of fields of higher educa- tion. That, however, is future history; so let us look at the |)ast and see what we rememl)er. 1939 - 1940 Didn’t we feel grown u[) in the innth grade? Do you remember how we felt at our irst dances — so sweet and shy, with the ju ' et- ty little girls on one side of the gym and the hashful boys on the other? But the shyness suddenly and miraculously was overcome when the refreshments were served. These dances marked the beginning of our social careers. In “What a Life,” the dramatic club play, we saw ourselves as others see us and laughed hy Shirley Moore illustrated hy Muriel (knidey at what we discovered. Our class was highly honored when Miss King selected among the stars for her A. A. show, “New Town Hall Tonight,” some of our leading thesi)ians: Beverly Malm, Ksther Morrison, Shirley Ringland, and the Dempsey sisters, who ] or- trayed the “Old Maids.” The fact that this was put on in the new auditorium was a thrill in itself. 1940-1941 In our sojdiomore year, we joined with vigor many high school activities. Our foot- ball team had bad breaks that year, the worst being the blizzard just before our Thanksgiv- ing Day game. But the players, with [)lenty (»f school spirit, pitched in and worked until late at night shoveling snow from the field. Using the snowbanks as bleachers, the fans in lusty cheers really showed their a])preciation for our boys. “Smiling Thru” a very well-known drama, was j)resented that year to the a|)preciation of all who saw it. It was a beautiful |)lay and was put on with such an enthusiastic s]iirit that it was a great success. To our great re- gret that it was her last. Miss King |)resented the A. A. show at the Town Hall. I’m sure none t)l ns will ever lorf ;et the l)eantilnl bal- let that was executed — and 1 really mean ex- ecuted — hy our dazzling; " Foothall Follies. " That show was the funniest 1 had ever seen; many of you will agree with me. W ith the hel[) of " Doc ' s " Blue and W ' hite Ulul), the whole high school made history hy reviving the winter carnival. The spoil pro- gram was complete to the last prize and the weather was perfect. ho climax the excite- ment of the day, we had a carni al hall at which, with the proper ceremoin, the King and ( )ueen were crowned. About the last of April and May, strange sonmls began to float in and about the old As- sembly Hall, and in sjiite of closed doors and lessons to do, we could not ignore such glor- ious warblings. So, with Mr. Davis inter- preting, we spent many enjoyable jieriods of music appreciation. 194f - 1942 i ow ' we wau ' c juniors and how ' important we felt! We w ' ere upper classmen and we reveled in the glory of it. WAren’t we proud t)f our orchestra that year when, capably di- rected by our popular Mr. Tapley, it gave its first big concert at the Town Hall? It was gratifving to hear a high school orchestra play so well. Fverybodv said it was the best amateur concert he had ever heard, and w ' e heartily agreed. " Captain Applejack,’ a swashbuckling pirate story witli a bloruly plot, was the Dra- matic Club ' s presentation at that lime. Many members of our class took part in it and had a wonderful time. Our whole football season w ' as made bright by the victorious Thanksgiving Day game at Beading. Although we were the underdog, the Rearling team could not hold its own and W ' e won hv one touchdown. The thrills and hig’n spirits lasted throughout the triumphant night and we j)araded through the streets, serenading the coaches and amusing motor- ists in the square with a real snake dance. Again we made a success of winter carni- val and after everyone had recovered from the strenuous races of the carnival itself, the coronation hall took place in the Town Hall. W4lh an impressive and colorful ceremony, our (iarnival King and Queen were crowned, after which the Koyal Dancers entertained the imperial couple w ' ilh a graceful rendition of the " Skaters’ Waltz.” Bill Conley, who ”i really looked the pari of jester with colors, hells and all, was amazing. d he girls’ Basketball ' l ournament ! We just couldn’t forget that! We surely felt proud of ourselves when we won from both sopho- mores ami seniors, d hat was an almost un- heanl-of happening ami we were as excited as we could he. ddie old town rang with cel- ebration all night. After many weeks of teaching, Mr. Miller decided that his work had beeti to no avail when the silence of one laboratory [)eriod was broken by an innocently stated question, ‘‘Mr. Mill er, where can 1 get a beakerful of air?” Maybe the Shadow would know. When the class elections were over, we found that Francis Howard had succeeded Bill Conley as president. Francis, one of our most popular boys, deserved the honor and also the congratulations he received. Our junior year w ' as coming to an end and how excited we were at the prospect of be- coming seniors in a lew days, dhis time we took part in the graduation of the Class of 1942. Remember how lovely Gloria Baxter looked and how very poised Ray Anderson W ' as as they served as our marshals? When the di[)lornas were awarded, we became sen- iors and entered the last year of our high school lile. 1942 - 194.3 Weren’t we busy at the first of this year? Dances were held almost every Friday which were well patronized by the rnernljers of our class. On the top of the list of athletic activities was the Winchester hike. Like a well-organ- ized parade, we marched over to the field, with spirits and hojies as high as the stars. Our team played a marvelous game, and had it not been for a lucky — or rather unlucky — touchdown by the other side, we would have been on top of the world. Of course, the disappointment was acute, but we took it with grace and resolved to “do or die” next year. He had another shoveling-fest for our win- ter carnival. Although everything was cov- eretl with wet snow, the rink was sufficiently cleared by the S. H. S. students so that we could play hockey on it. And we did, beat- ing the mighty B.(k Freshmen 7-0. We wt ' re again disapfiointed because we could not have a carnival ball and many were the pre- cious dreams of being carnival ( )ueen duit faded from iew. Bui our hockey learn j)layed a good season. Caj)lained hy Harold Downs, we won ihird place in the league, and so were a cretlil to “Doc” Ciordon. “The Connecticut ankee in King Arthur’s Court was presented hy the Dramatic Club, starring Muriel Goudey, Priscilla Rockwell, Patricia Miller, Rozelle (iraham, Jane Borth- wick, Herbert Hunt and Arthur Bridgman, excellently su[)ported by many juniors and soj)liomores. It was acclaimed by all as an almost professional performance. J his year ' s basketball tournament was practically an exact counterpart of last year’s as far as games are concerned. There was a freshness in the original costumes and rout- ines of the junior and seiuor classes that made (piile an inij)ression upon the audience. The games were thrilling from start to finish and because the junior teams played so well, we should not begrudge them the victory. After all, didn ' t we beat the seniors last year? There were cpiite a number of boys and girls who received letters at our spring as- sembly. Everyone knew that now he was helping the war effort in keeping himself well 1)V physical education. Our sports are now a vital |)art of the school program. W ' e hoistetl the service flag this year as many of our older lioys have left for service or early semesters of college. The spirit of our class is well represented by these boys and we re proud of them! When the class honors were announced, we found that Shirley Blood and Kirtland McCaleb had been awarded the MacDonald medals and that Richard Storey was to give the class address. Those honored were pro])- erly congratulated and everyone was pleased. Then came the senior ])rom bringing to a high point our social life, followed by the actual climax, the class banquet, cementing together in one final union our class fellow- ship. At last the night of nights came, and with j)ride in our achievements, but with wonder in our hearts because of the uncertain future, we received our diplomas, and resolutely faced our new exj)eriences. AI.MA MATER Hail to thee, dear Stoneham, Our voices now we raise, So let us join together And all thy virtues praise. Our hearts are in thy keeping; Thine honor weTl uidiold, Po hel|) each one the other 1 ill fate our lives enfold. So sing of Alma Mater, A toast to Blue and White, A j)ledge to thee, dear Stoneham, Always to fight for right. Kathleen and John English REMEMBERING We say goodbye, remembering All the beautiful things Eike ivy glistening in the sun. Voices raised in joy and anger. The fiery energy of youth. And joy of competition. Sparkling eyes. The endless shuBle of directed feet. And echoing laughter, d he shivering squeak of chalk. And hooks, timeworn. Interrupted music from a broken pencil. Raindrops pleading to come in, fhe slow, dull click of lime And dreamy fact ' s — waiting. Shirley J. Blood STONEHAM LIBERATOR WE FREE THE MASSES FROM IGNORANCE Vol. MEML. No. 134 JUNE, 1 950 Price 5 Mills Editoi ' s-Publishers Sal Costa Jerry Guttadauro Members of the Disassociated Press STONEHAM SCENE OF GALA CELEBRATION GRAND OPENING Last evenino at Stoneham Square, Stonehamites witnessed the orancl opening of Miss Esther Morrison’s Deluxe Assembly Line Restaurant. This feature, the latest in Gastronomic accom- modation, includes an assembly line conveyor belt straight from the huge modern kitchen. There the head cook. Frank “Spaghet- ti” Smith, directs his kitchen crew consisting of Dick Hovnanian, Jeanne Hulme, Marianne Morse and Esther Meuse in assem- bling Sky Scraper Dinners which the elite fervently await at the other end of the belt in the plush lined dining room. For entertainment at the restaurant Miss Marion Davis is appearing in her Broadway hit, “Dancing With the Stars.” Supporting Miss Davis is her famous line of beauties: Patsy Miller, Glo Sheehan, Esther Smith, Marj. Lamb, Ellen Tro- della. Din Dempsey, Chris Rock- well, Virginia Cross, Betty Heinlein and Helen Taylor. The snappy comedian is Robert Gloor. HELIUM STATION CLOSED Stoneham’s helium station has been finally closed. Chaidie Thomp- son, foi ' iner manager, and hei’ staff, Anna Hovnanian, Lucy Nazarian, Rose Orsillo, Emily Price, and Pri- cilla Reed, have all gone to work for Leon Warren and Don Andeison in the Two and Four Cent Department Store, REUNION Reports are leaking out that there will be a reunion of the class of 1943 on July 2. Among the waiblers will be Rusty Reilly, Ruth Robinson, Mary Samour, Mary Rounds, Virgin- ia Strong, Shirley Cox, Gloiia David- son, and Barb Manley. CHILDREN’S CENTER The Board of Selectmen voted last night to accept the gift to the town of an ultra-modern children ' s center. The distinguished donors of the fund for the building are: the great artist Miss Barbaia Garside, famous Amer- ican impersonator. Miss Muriel Goudey; and the world renowned historian. Miss Shirley Moore, SENIOR PLAY This year the senior play will be “Slave Drivers,” not in anyway re- fering to the faculty. The well-known math teacher will be portrayed by A1 Weeks; the senior English teach- er by Barb Flukes; girls’ physical training instructor by Kay Watkins; boys ' physical training instructor by Tony Dannolfo; French teacher by Bev, Mahn; and senior history teacher by Dick Story, NEW YORK, June 1— Kirt McCaleb noted expert on medalurgy, has just hired a new stenographer by the name of Eleanor Leary, She insists that medalurgy is misspelled, but you know McCaleb. BEAUTY SHOP Do you need a Permanent? Are you losing your hair? Don’t sit there go to MINGHELLA and COLE’S BEAUTY SHOP 2.5.354 MAIN STREET Have you a girl friend? Send her Flowers from BIGGIO and CONLEY’S Florists We specialize in early dandelions Located in the Heai’t of Stoneham Square CONTEST WINNERS Bob MacKay, industrialist, agricul- turist, and architect of such famous buildings as the Playboy’s Emporium and the Duplex Chicken Coop has announced the lesults of the beauty (Continued on Page 2) June, 1950 STONEHAM UBERATOR Page 2 CURRENT BOOKS Allan Alward, the great Philan- thropist and educator, has just written a best seller, “Franklin Roosevelt as I Knew Him in His Seventh Term.” Dorothy Parsons the young and vivacious writer has just completed her latest book entitled “Little Miss Dynamite.” Othei- new books at the library are these: “How To Be A Successful Farmer” by Ernest Ripley. “The Art of Speeding” by Russell Holden. “How To Make Fiiends and Keep Them” by Hal Downes. “The U. S. Navy” by Louise Girard. Seen at the Joidan and Hunt Swanky Country Club, the Red Fox, weie such famous people as Dick Evans, renowned financier; Heib Washburn, editor of the “Saturday Evening Post”; and Goidon Mun- roe, author of the famous novel " Who Did It?” These three gentle- men were accompanied by their caddies, Stan Seward, Chailes Hicks and Bill Meegan. Fran Howard, the new pro, and his assistant. Bud Hubby, were seen showing the club hostess, Phil Herman, and the sing- ing head waiter, Ed. Nazarian, how to hold a golf club. EAST WOBURN, June 1 — Pete McLaughlin is still running the Tex- aco Banana Boat Fleet up to the First National in East Woburn with his captain, the original banana boy, Wes Brown, CONTEST WINNERS (Continued from Page 1) contest he has just sponsored: Miss America, Geitie Quaker; Miss Tan- gerine, Emily MacRae; Miss Pride and Prejudice, Edith Smith, The judges were Bill Mellet, Ed Proo- dian, Joe I.,ongmore, and James Ells, SOCIAL WHIRL A party for post-deb Miss Gloria “Boo” Baxter of High Hill was held at the home of Miss Millie Cahill of Prospect Court last night. Among those present were Nancy Morrill who has just recovered from a con- cussion received when she fell from “Willie Boy” in the Scituate Steeple Chase last week; Jane Boithwick, home from her tour with the Rus- sian Ballet; and Barbara Dempsey; Broadway’s new and vei ' y talented dramatic actress currently starring in “My Sister Virginia.” Miss Demp- sey ' s next play will be entitled “A Last I’ve Found Plouffy.” UNDER THE SPOTLIGHT Ray Anderson and his famous all boogie band is soon to appear at the Playboy Empoiium, famous Stone- ham night spot. A headliner will be Frank Angelo, famous for his sing- ing sax. The Four Modernaires will be Charles Sheridan, John Kenny, Joe Fraser and Lennie Worthen, Agnes, the beautiful blonde bom- ber of the class of 1943 accompanied by her secretary, Julie Koprek, has returned to Stoneham for rest after several peisonal appearance tours demanded by her public. Miss Agnes Murphy won the title of Miss Pow- ers in 1945 and was immediately signed by Warner Brothers, Sally Graham was mistress of cer- emonies on Thursday at the home coming paity for her best friend, Peggy Roberts, who has just re- turned from Europe, The receptioii was held at the Town Hall, SPOT POND, June 1— Officers Art Outram and Frank Murphy of the Stoneham Police arrested two per- sons for disturbing the peace last night. The officers claimed that the young people weie distracting the attention to the other people who were trying to see the outcome of the submarine races. The young men weie identified as Shel “Errol” Cram and Dick “Rick” Blinn. WOMEN’S CLUB At the monthly meeting of the Stoneham Women’s Club, President Anne Johnson intioduced the two speakers on the program: Lt. Doro- thy Lawson whose subject was “My Experiences in World War II”; and Miss Shirley Blood, whose subject was “Nursing Duiing the Recon- struction Period.” Tea was served by Miss Mary Kelly and her com- mittee. ! STONEHAM PLAVHOUSE | I I i Sunday - Monday - Tuesday I ’ 1 BASIL FINNEGAN and j t BUD BRIDGMAN t I — in — I j “Mother, May 1 Go j I ito the Academy?”! 1 I - ? I — also — t I t Joan Craigie and Lucille I ? Rezzole, Sue Minasian | and Muriel Buckle in “SECRETS OF A ? SECRETARY” i • • Wednesday -- Thursday | EMEIiY KNIGHT and I LOU VACCA I “ — in — j “Desperadoes” j — also — i Bill Doherty and Joe t Connors in I “BRUINS vs. t EAST WOBURN” r ' • Friday -- Saturday t DOT DALTON and i • GEORGE COG AN i ♦ T t — in — I i “Ah-Sweet Love” I I Co-Hit I i Eloise Wyatt, Ruby Hodson | i and Doris Cochrane T I — in — • j “W E THREE” I ahr EcuU Will au U ratamrnt of Sbr (EUtaa iif liI43 He it rememl)ered that we, tlie class of 191H of Stoneliam High School in the town of Stoneliam, County of Middlesex, and the State of Massachusetts, being of sound mind and mem- ory, do make, puhlish and declare this our LAS ' f WILL AND rKSTAMLN ' l, hereby revoking all lormer wills made by us. Alter payment of our just debts and expenses of graduation, we dispose of our estate as follows: 1. d ) teachers ami students who have left to enter the Armed Forces, we leave a wish that they may be as successlul in thidr new undertakings as they were in their old. 11. To all future chemistry classes, we give and heijueath an automatic bottle washer. III. do any and all procrastinators who may at some time, just by chance he in need of a hook report in a hurry, we leave a set of senior Knglish hook re[)orts, A+ grade, approved and assorted. IV. To Mr. ' riiihodeau, to help enforce law and order in the years to come, we leave a policeman’s badge and hilly club to aid him in keejung the corridors clear of all loiterers. . d ' o all succeeding jitterbugs, we leave a set of wooleJi sweaters to insure the success of all future high school 4 9 3 fkj, , — 4 C pri s4 5 cJ O .. i J der«X A Pd Os ' Lb;’ c toriE.fiam c:Salioot xaduation Sxs.xaL6.siiL S[aiL± oj- 1Q 3 UoLun cJ-fa[[, ton£.fiam, c:A [a±±acliU6.£.tti. £.(j£ning, ans. zi fiissnifi PROGRAMME Entrance of Graduates — “War March of the Priests” (from Athalia) Mendelssohn High School Orchestra (The audience will remain seated as the graduates enter the hall) Class Marshals Marilyn B. Crafts, Class of 1944 Ralph B. Truesdale, Class of 1944 Graduation Hymn (the audience uniting) Hemy-Walton 1 2 Faith of our fathers, living still Faith of our fathers, we will strive In spite of dungeon, fire and sword. To win all nations unto thee; O how our hearts beat high with joy And through the truth that comes Whene’er we hear that glorious word! from God Mankind shall then indeed be free. 3 Faith of our fathers, we will love Both friend and foe in all our strife. And preach thee, too, as love knows how By kindly words and virtuous life. Refrain Faith of our fathers, holy faith We will he true to thee till death. Prayer Rev. Mark B. Strickland First Congregational Church, Stoneham Speech of Welcome Francis H. Howard, Class President Address — “That Freedom Shall Live” Richard E. Storey, Class of 1943 Selection — “Operatic Excerpts” Stoneham High School Orchestra Mr. Rolland Tapley, Conductor Mr. Maurice Hoffman, Organist Wagner PROGRAMME Presentation of MacDonald Medals To Shirley J. Blood and Kirtland E. McCaleb Mr. Earle T. Thibodeau Teacher in Stoneham High School since 1918 The MacDonald Medals, in memory of James Wallace MacDonald, Principal of Stoneham High School from 1876-1892, are presented for scholarship, character and good influence in the school. ‘‘Amaryllis ” arr. by Ghys “Lullaby” Simes High School Glee Club Miss Helen M. Sawyer, Music Supervisor Announcement of Other Honors and Awards Award Washington-Franklin History Prize for Boys History Medal for Girls Mathematics and Science Medal Carrie S. Ireland Citizenship Award Citizenship Medal James W. Hibbs Music Prize Eliza Carruthers Lister Award in Art College Scholarships Special Scholarship Scholarship Award Donor Massachusetts Society, S. A. R. Stoneham Woman’s Club Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute American Legion Auxiliary American Legion Stoneham Grange Stoneham Grange Parent-Teacher Association Blue and White Club Stoneham Teachers’ Club Mr. Charles E. Varney Superintendent of Schools, Stoneham Presentation of Class Gift Jane Borthwick, Class Vice President Award of Diplomas Mr. Everett C. Hunt Chairman, Stoneham School Committee (The parents of boys absent with military leave are invited to receive their sons’ diplomas) “Star Spangled Banner” Entire Assembly “Recessional March” Organ Selected - GRADUATES - HARRY ARLAN ALWARD, JR. DONALD L. ANDERSON RAYMOND WENDELL ANDERSON FRANK L. ANGELOSANTO GLORIA BAXTER ROBERT WILLIAM BIGGIO RICHARD BLINN SHIRLEY JEAN BLOOD JANE BORTHWICK ARTHUR C. BRIDGMAN WESLEA ' LOUIS BROWN MURIEL F. BUCKl.E MILDRED ANNE CAHILL DORIS COCHRANE GEORGE F. COGAN BARBARA LOUISE COLE WILLIAM R. CONLEY JOSEPH F. CONNORS SALVATORE COSTA SHIRLEY " A. COX JOAN CONSTANCE CRAIGIE SHELDON M. CRAM VIRGINIA LARRAINE CROSS DOROTHY J. DALTON TONY L. D’ANNOLFO GLORIA DAVIDSON M. MARION DAYHS BARBARA A. DEMPSEY GERTRUDE VIRGINIA DEMPSEY WILLIAM A. DOHERTY " HAROLD DOWNES JAMES ELLS JOHN PATRICK ENGLISH RICHARD L. EVANS ALBERT EDWARD FINNEGAN, JR. BARBARA R. FLUKES JOSEPH P. FRASER BARBARA ROWE GARSIDE LOUISE THELMA GIRARD ROBERT F. GLOOR MURIEL RUTH GOUDEY ROZELLE IRENE GRAHAM GERALDINE RUTH GUTTADAURO ELIZABETH CLAFLEN HEINLEIN PHYLLIS CLAIRE HERMAN CHARLES DOUGLAS HICKS RUBY JANE HODSON RUSSELL GEORGE HOLDEN ANNA HOVNANIAN RICHARD HOVNANIAN FRANCIS H. HOWARD HAROLD HUBBY JEANNE M. HULME HERBERT W. HUNT ANNE JOHNSON MARTIN P. JORDAN MARY E. KELLY JOHN KENNEY C. EMERY KNIGHT JOHN KNIGHT pa JULIA KOPREK MARJORIE LOUISE LAMB DOROTHY P. LAWSON ELEANOR C. LEARY " JOSEPH A. LONGMORE ROBERT JAMES Mac.KAY BARBARA A. MANLEY BEVERLY RUTH MAHN KIRTLAND EDWARD McCALEB JAMES M. McLaughlin EMILY R. McRAE WILLIAM JOSEPH MEEGAN WILl.IAM LAWRENCE MELLETT ESTHER MEUSE PATRICIA A. MILLER SUSAN MINASIAN ALFONSO JAMES MINGHELLA ♦MARIANNE MORSE ♦SHIRLEY MOORE NANCY GOWEN MORRILL ESTHER B. MORRISON GORDON ANDREW MUNRO AGNES LOUISE MURPHY " PRANK RICHARD MURPHY EDWARD NAZABIAN LUCY MARY " NAZARIAN ROSE E. ORSILLO ARTHUR E. OUTRAM, JR. DOROTHY G. PARSONS LUCILLE PEZZOLE ♦EMILY MARINER PRICE EDWARD H. PROODIAN, JR. GERTRUDE GENEVIEVE QUARTER MARJORIE PRISCILLA REED FLORENCE M. REILLY ERNEST HOWARTH RIPLEY ♦MARGUERITE EDITH ROBERTS RUTH ROBINSON PRISCILLA R. ROCKWELL MARY ELIZABETH ROUNDS MARY SAMOUR STANLEY JAMES SEWARD GLORIA SHEEHAN CHARLES B. SHERIDAN ♦EDITH J. SMITH FRANKLIN MacKAY SMITH ♦RICHARD EDWARD STOREY " ♦VIRGINIA LEE STRONG HELEN RITA TAYLOR CHARLOTTE GRACE THOMPSON ELLEN TRODELLA LOUIS Y " ACCA LEON R. WARREN HERBERT NELSON WASHBURN KATHERINE E. WATKINS ALBION D. WEEKS LEONARD ROBERT WORTHEN ELOISE MILDRED WYATT Class Colors — Blue and Silver Honor Group In military service Q he Spaulding J nnual One u cl Play Contest Spaulding Auditorium lUednesdaq Puening June 11, 1941 al 8:15 o’clock THE JUNIOR CLASS PRESENTS— " The Udlidnt " by TTohvorthy TTall and Roliert liddlomass CAST OF CHARAl ' TERS Warden Holt H. Driscoll Reid Path er T i y Norman Vereoe James Wilson Josephine Paris 4 ;:0 ' i?i ; . C;.... :iilr........;. : IMarie Keogh Dan, a jailer ; ..... ..T. ..;.. ' . ' ...J George Gladding An attendant Deane Straiten SCENE: The Warden’s office in the State’s Prison, Weathers- field, Conn. Prompter — Dorothy Palaoro THE SOPHOMORE C’LASS PRESENTS— “Ted’- by M illiam G. B. Carson CAST OP CHARACTERS I Iiss Emma Norris Barbara Keogh William Bnrd John IMoss IMrs. Pierc( !0C d ly ' .S j]3C ?r:V.‘i ' l ?.?: ' .lrf.. Kathryn Patterson Mrs. Henley Joan Rice Norma Pierce Betty Jean IMitchell SCENE : The Pierce living room. Prompter — Edith Smith TTIE FRESinrAX CT.ASS PRESFiXTR— “Circumstdnces Alter Cases " l)y Ruth Giorloff CAS1’ OF (IIAR AFTERS Eve Hamilton Maria Ozizella ' Betty Everett , Colette Pepin Stephen Everett Xeal Houston Don Hamilton- ' Stanley Crrandfield ] rawfrie .■:! IMildred X orrie SCEXE : The Hamilton living- room. Ih’ompter — Dorothy Fowlie IMUSIC : SPAULDIXF ORCHESTRA Director — Agnes O. Garland IMarcho aux Flambeaux Clark Overture — The Golden IMagnet Bonnet IMinuetto from E-tlat Symphony Mozart Violin Solo — IMeditation from Thais Alassenet Roland Pacetti JT DGE . IMrs. Kenneth H. Ross, Director, IMontpelier Theater Guild General Stage IManager — Orphens Bellucci ’41 Assistants — Harry Perrigo ’42, Rene Bernaseoni ’4d. PTederiek Honey ’44 Property Manager — Winifred Xorris ’43 Director— Clyde G. Fussell Furniture through the courtesy of IM. J. M hiteomb, E. Barre All plays are produced l y special arrangement with Mbalter H. Baker Conijiany, Boston, IMass. winter dames for llie duration of the heatless Saturday nights. V 1. To tlie flckh ' femmes of ’44, w ' e will this advice: Heed Mr. Higgins’ mathematical wisdom to insure success in your chosen career. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, We hereunto set our hand and seal, and declare this to he our Last Will and Testament, this tenth day of May in the year of our Lord, one thousand, nine hundred and forty-three. (signed) Gertrude (Jiialter Robert MaeKay for the class of 1943 Signed, published and declared by the Class of 1943 in the presence of us, who, at the request of the Class of 1943, in their presence and in the presence of one another, hereunto subscribe our names as witnesses thereto, on this, the eighteenth day of June, one thousand, nine hundred and forty-three. WITNESSES 1. Howard IG. W a tson 2. Ruth (R Finn .3. Gertrude M. Johnson Most I’opuliu Hoy Most Popular (jirl Most l.ikely to Succeed, Hoy Most Likely to Succeed, (did Most dVmperaineulal Most Bashful Most Perscnality Most Versatile Most Studious Most Admiralile Most Talented Most Spirited Most Independent Best Looking Boy Best Looking (did Best Boy Athlete Best Girl Athlete Best Boy Dancer Best (dill Dancer Biggest Time Killer Biggest Line Class Actress Class Good Egg Class Heart Breaker Class Comedian Class Sweetheart Class Flirt Class Scientist Shyest Favorite Teacher Favorite Band Favorite Song Favorite Sport Favorite Subject Favorite Comic Strij) Favorite Hero Most Kememhered Event Book of the Tear Martv Jordan Jane Borthwick Kiriland McCaleh Shirlev Blood Esther Morrison Dick Hovnanian Bud Bridgman Marguerite Roberts Dick Storey Emily McRae Marion Davis Dick Blinn Boo Baxter Bud Hubby Millie Cahill John Knight Eleanor Leary Bill Doherty Gerry Guttadauro A Finnegan Jimmy McLaughlin Barbara Demiisey Gabby Goudey Francis Howard Herb Hunt Phyllis Herman Gloria Sheehan L.eonard Worthen Nancy Morrill Mr. Miller Harry James As dime Coes By Football Gym Li’l Abner . . l iger Burns Winchester Came and Hike Rati on Book FIELD HOCKEY First Row; N. Morrill, B. Manley, C. Thompson, E. Leary, E. McRae, D. Parsons M. Crafts. Second Row: S. Co.x, M. Da- ley, B. Mahn, E. Price, E. Smith, S. Moore, Mrs. Law- son. CHEER LEADERS First Row: J. Hale, P. Mil- ler, G. Guttadauro. J. Borth- wick, E. Morrison, M. Rob- erts. Second Row: E. Hansell, M. Buckle, M. Fullford. BASKETBALL First Row: E. McRae, S. Cox, E. Smith, E. Leary, E. Morrison, J. Borthwick, G. Sheehan, S. Rin land, J. Hulme. Second Row; D. Parsons, B. Manley, S. Moore, C. Thomp- son, P. Reed, A. Johnson, R. Graham, M. Roberts, L. Pezzole, Mrs. Lawson. U H€»€:KEY We had an exciting field hockey season this year and an excellent team, in which all three senior high classes were well represented. To our credit are two victories, Heading and Wakefield, .3-0 and 5-0 resjiectively : one tie game, Winchester 2-2; and one loss to our traditional rival, Melrose, .3-1. The Melrose game was by far the most exciting for two reasons: it was our hardest game, and it came at the end of the season. Here’s cheering for next year’s team and a most siicci ' ssful season. CfHEER EE OEKS These versatile voung ladies are really something to he proud of — and b( lieve us, we are proud of them! They have done wonderful work this year cheering our teams when we were winning or losing. Their constant encouragement was always welcome and helpful to all the players. We think they are tops, for they are pretty, vivacious, and spirited. Basketball this year was fast and strenuous. The blue and white teams played their games with skill, speed, and an enjoyable spirit of comrade- sliij). The followers of this exciting s|)ort j)layed themselves to rags each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoon with no audience except their fellow players. The heart-warming manner in which the fighting teams truthfully praised each other gave our games a pleasantly gay spirit. The climax of the season was, of course, the great tournament, ' fhis year, the capacity of the hall being limited, attendance fell a bit from last year’s; but the spirit was the same. ' Ihe games were hard and fast. The cheering was practically continuous. The .Iimiors won this year as last. Ifveryone was hapfiy and almost all celebrated tin night at the Spa or Twins in a very festive mood. FOOTBALI First Row: P. MinRhella, W. Lawson, ' I . Dannolfo, E. A gelt), J. Knifi ' ht, M. Jordiiii, E. Knifiht, J. Connors, J. McLaug-liIin, E. MiiiKhella. Second Row: ,L Rotiindo, R. Mercer, S. Seward, E. An- K ' elo, II. Hubby, L. Vacca, A. Alward, E. Asci, E. Howard, S. Cram, R. Murphy. ' I bird Row: J. Marrone, H. Little, K. MacKenzie, R. p]v- ans, R. Storey, L. Dill, T. Sadafora, D. Bickneil, J. Rolli, N. Simpkins, J. Grif- fiths. Foui ' th Row: Mr. Gordon, A. Einnef an, R. LeMoine, E. Martin, J. Winton, C. Lay- man, R. Truesdab, B. Clark, R. Hayden, R. IjivinK ' ston, Mr. Miller. HOCKEY First Row: J. Connors, R. MacKay, K. McCaleb, J. McLauo-hlin, R. Bif p:io, H. I )ownes. Second Row: J. Knifrht, W. Lawson, Mr. Gordon, R. Surrette, W. Doherty, G. CoKan . BASKETBALL Fhrst Row: R. Truesdale, D. Murphy, H. Lynch, L. Vacca, A. Bridgman, R. Mercer, A. MiiiKhella. Second Row: ,1. Marrone, P. Minghella, E. Martin. E. An- gelo, J. Borthwick, G. Proo- dian, Mr. Buono. ' rhird Row: W. Dannolfo. E. ■ n} ' elo, J. Winton. Despite a eom])aratively light haekflehl, Coach “Bill” Miller, assisted hy “Doe” Cordon, steereil his Stonehani lads through a favorable football season with four victories, two losses, and two ties. Highlight of the year came in the contest with Winchester High. On this occasion the student body trekked en masse to the game and had much praise heaped on them by Boston newspapers for their patriotism and spirit, dlie Blue and White, pre-game underdog, out[)lay(‘d and outfought the highly touted Winchester eleven, losing in hut the last thirty seconds of play, 12-10. While the loss dampened the team’s spirit momentarily, several local experts lauded the boys lavishly and maintained that this thriller had been the l)est of school- boy football for several years. “Doc” Gordon’s boys, with but a few experienced members from the pre- vious seast)u finished third in the swift-skating Greater Boston Interschol- astic Hockey League. The Stoneham sextet lacked luck as shown by scores in Medford, .3-4, and Arlington, 1-2, contests; but with spirit they thrilled many a spectator and won more games than any other team in the circuit. As usual, they maintained their annual su|)eriority over Newton, Belmont, and Cambridge Latin. In addition to their ollicial season the locals were included in a jilayoff series between the Greater Boston and Bay State Leagues; but lost to undefeated Framingham, occupant of second jilace in the latter circuit, by a score of 2-0. All in all, the Stoneham boys carried their banner high throughout the season. Ibis season Mr. Buono inherited and capably coa ched the basketball team. Vvbthout the services of their star goal-getter, “Dick’ ' Jenkins, who was claimed by the F .S. Navy, the Stoneham basketeers sported a record of two victories and eight losses. Although on the losing end of several contests, each was the type in which tin ' winning points could have gone to eitlu ' r team. As in football, Wincln ' ster High gave the (juintet their toughest batth ' . Only in the dying second of the game did tin ' S.H.S. “pull the game out of tin ' fir( ' ” by a scoia ' of 21-20. So despite the nundn ' r of loss( ' s, the hooj)- sters gave tln ' ir every last bit of fight to the sport. BLUE AND WHITE CLUB First Row: A. Finnef ’an, R. MacKay, J. McLaughlin, ' I ' . Dannolfo, A. Bridgman, H. Hunt, R. Truesdale, N. Glynn, K. MacKenzie, E. Angelo. Second Row: E. Hansell, E. Price, B. Heinlein, R. Gra- ham, J. Borthwick, M. Rob- erts, G. Guttadauro, P, Mil- ler, E. Morrison, N. Mor- rill, E. McRae, P. Reed, M. Dodge, C. Shaw. ' Ihird Row: H. Stoumbelis, V. Dempsey, B. Mahn, M. Goudey, G. Qualter, V. Cross B. McGrath, A. Murphy, M. Morse, B. Garside, S. Moore, M. Fullford, P. Rockwell, D. Parsons. Fourth Row: V. Strong, G. Sheehan, A. .Johnson, D. Bicknell, E. Knight, S. Sew- ard, K. McCaleb, R. Blinn, J. Borthwick, J. Northrup, .1. Rollins, C. Thompson, J. Hulme. BASEBALL First Row: L. Dill, R. Trues- dale, J. Connors, A. Bridg- man, A. Minghella, F. Mar- tin, W. Thomas, P. Minghel- la. Second Row: Mr. Gordon, N. Glynn, J. Winton, A. Dona- ghey, G. Trueman, J. Coffin, R. Wright, J. Testa, II. Lynch, ,1. Rolli, H. Poutre. ni u ym mi IB W ' ■■ M T E E L E K I ' mier the able guidance of “Doc” (fordon, the Blue and White Clul) car- ried on this year despite many ol)stacles. None of us will ever forget the great school spirit that was hehind the nienioral)le hike to Winchester and the glorious march home again with tears in our eyes, prouder of our football hoys than if we h.ad won the game. We are equally proud t)f our Winter Carnival s])orts |)rogram. The undaunted spirit of the Blue and White was again shown when everyone donned snow togs and shoveled for two days to clear the hockey rink of snow. Although we could not hold our Carnival Ball, the way our hockey hoys ])layed and defeated the Boston College freshmen made u]) for the disai)])ointment. Everyone turned out to see the victory; and the Carnival was inoclaimed completely successful when we reachetl our goal and made enough money to continue the one hundred dollar scholarship awarded to a worthy senior each year by the Blue and White Club. omsEBmLL Hit hard by the losses of such talented and experienced seniors as Marty Jordan, Wes Brown, John Knight and Shel Cram, the Stoneham High School baseball nine included only three seniors — Art Bridgman, A1 Minghella, and Joe Connors. Several major positions were open to inex])erienced juniors and sophomores. rt Donaghey, Bud Dill, Frank Martin, and Har ry Lynch seemetl to be capable fielders, while Ralph Truesdale had the job of fdling John Knight’s first base position. A clever little ])itcher was John Coffin; and a smart catcher, Pat Minghella, was close second to Joe Connors. DRAMATIC CLUB First Row: R. Storey, I. Clement, R. MacLean, R. Sorenson. Second Row: II. Stoumhelis, R. Graham, M. Roberts, J. Boi’thwick, S. Seward, M. Goudey, V. Dempsey, R. Rockwell, T. Stoumhelis. Third Row: P. Morrell, W. Ristts, P. Miller, H. Hunt, J. Rollins, L. Worthen, K. Morrison, A. Bridgman, J. Hale. ORCHESTRA Left to right: G. Sanford, J. Penta, M. Roberts, J. Taylor J. Gallagher, M. Morse, E. Proodian, J. Mercelle, R. Mercelle, E. Smith, P. Pear- son, M. Rounds, C. Thomp- son, Mr. Tapley, R. Tren- holm, A. Cook, A. Anderson, J. Melkonian, D. Hovnanian, F. Austin, R. Thompson, D. Cook, R. Melkonian, 11. Mel- konian. TRAFFIC SQUAD First Row: M. Buckle, D. Olson, P. Reed, V. Strong, B. Bockus, R. Orsillo, S. Minasian, G.. Chase, M. Rob- ei ' ts. Second Row: Mr. Thibodeau, R. Storey, A. Minghella, J. Fraser, h’. . ngelo, ,1. Con- nors, N. Peacor, L. Martin, J. Marrone. A 3 K €:i-UO “All the world’s a stage,” and we of the Dramatic Cduh are learning to play onr parts upon it. Our j)roduction of “d’he Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” this year won much acclaim with Brud Bridgman in the leading role, and Rozelle (iraham as the scheming Morgan LeFay. Muriel Goudey, Priscilla Rockwell, I’alricia Morrell, Richard Hayden, Patricia Mill er, Jane Borthwick, Robert MacLean and Robert dowse were good players too in this gay drama. Our new adviser is Mr. Willard R. Higgins. We wish Barbara Dempsey, our [)resident, every success in her future dramatic career. This year our high school orchestra has enjoyed again the leadership of our conductor, Mr. Rolland Ta|)ley, a member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Last fall the orchestra had two public performances: the first, at the Stoneham League of I’eace Action meeting; and the second, at the J ' eachers’ Club. The Sj)ring Concert showed the good work the orchestra members had been doing during the winter months. We are indebted to Mr. J ' apley for the love of good music he has inspired. FRHEM09 OF I ■■ ■ The Advertisers believed us when we told them they would benefit by your interest in them. Go to them now! O.UA fZeuutAcL as Oflicial Photo raplier for the Class ol 1943 is in knowing; that the Slone- ham llif ;h School has received the finest in Photo»;ra|)hic Service. Aft Oxy- Qame we would enjoy working with the graduating class and yearbook staff as much as we have this year. )le xjt y xiA let us assist you. THE Warren Kay Vantine Studio, Inc. 160 Boylston Street Boston, Mass. TO THE SENIORS TTie fellow who tries to do something and fails, is infinitely better off than the one who tried to do nothing and succeeds. The greatest mistake we can make in life is to be continuously fearing we will make one. BUT — Work with the Construction Gang and not with the Wrecking Crew. W. W. FISKE COMPANY Compliments of T. J. MURPHY DR. RALPH BAXTER DENTIST Chase Building LOUIS MILLER .Modern Fine (Quality Footwear lor the entire family — at reasonable prices . ' 14(5 Main Street Stoneham Compliments of MELLEY GRAIN CO. MILK and CREAM FARM PRODUCTS Compliments of DOCKAM ' S STONEHAM AND BOSTON EXPRESS HARRY R. DOCKAM, Prop. GROCERIES PROVISIONS John Fortini ELM STREET MARKET Tel. 1204 — 1205— 1206 90 Elm Street Stoneham DR. F. HARRIS DENTIST Franklin Street Compliments of W. T. GRANT CO. KNOWN FOR VALUES Telephone 0130-W . ' 118 Main Street FOR LUNCHEON AND ICE CREAM visit THE STONEHAM SPA You Get Quality Plus Service kb Stoiu liaiirs Hacking Us, All Righir IT HAT’S COOKING? For one thing, their mothers step])ing it oil like the Three Musketeers — toting their own parcels, of all things! Just to save rubber for ’em. Ami would you imagine Lulu Belle taking highest honors in a First Aid Class? Or Mrs. Berwyn teaching a Nutrition Class? And everyone going in for Victory Gar- dens to make sure they’ll get their three squares a day when they start their tour of Furope? Too had about fuel’s being so light — hilt leave it to that gang hack home. Why, you wouldn’t know ’em! They’re terrific! J he editor ought to splash ink clear across the front jiage with LOCAL FOLKS MAKF GOOD! A’ MIST NOT FAIT THEM NOIV! Stoneham INDEPENDENT MfDDI.ESEX DRUG CO. Mr. Mrs. E. K. Boyd, Reg. Pliar. ' lele])hone 0.342 Free Delivery — U here Friends Meet Friends — Cenlral Square W. J. FALLON MARBLE RIDGE DAIRY Milk and Cream Farm Products Telephone 0154 30.3 Park Street Stoneham, Mass. MODERN BEAUTY SHOPPE Telephone Stoneham 0115 21 Franklin Street Stoneham, Mass. WILLS HARDWARE STORE LINOLEUM — PAINTS HOME FURNISHINGS — GIFTS GARDEN IMPLEMENTS 21 Central Street Telephone Sto. 0642 ELITE QUALITY SHOP .1. Starkman, Prop. 2,86 Main Street Wakefield, Mass. Sloiiehatn, Mass. Compliments of SEVERANCE TRUCKING AND COAL CO. C. W. HOUGHTON HEATING — PLUMBING 422 Main Street Telephone Stoneham 0139 Stoneham BELL HARDWARE CO. The Complete Hardware and Paint Store where you can get what you need For The Home •TRADE AT BELL’S” 413 Main Street Stoneham Compliments of THE STONEHAM PRESS One of New England’s Outstanding Weeklies Compliments of BEE’S RESTAURANT CONGRATULATIONS ! S. H. S. 1943 Again we take spaee in The Authentic to extend greetings and best wishes to the graduates of Stonehain High School. It has been our pleasure to watch their j)rogress over the years. The succes- ful men and women scattered in various parts of the country, who received their early education here, make us ])roud of Stoneham schools. Today, her graduates are scattered in all parts of the world. Ton are entering upon a life filled with ])erplexing j)roblems. You will be called upon to make sacrifices in the service of your country. We are sure you will meet the challenge, whatever it may be, in a manner that will bring credit to your home, your school, aiul the Town of Stoneham. W ' herever vou go, whenever you see " Patch” products in the " corner drug store,” you mav be reminded of the old home town. The E. L. Patch Company Boston. M ass a c h us e tts LINDSAY’S SHOE STORE Compliments of SHOES FOR ALL THE FAMILY — W here You M ait for the Hus — 400 Mtiin Street Wakefield, Mass. Compliments of RAY BUCK FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED GAY THE FLORIST Telephone 0217 4.5 Spring Street Stoneham, Mass. STONEHAM FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK Compliments of SUNLITE BOWLING ALLEYS Compliments of A. DEFERARI SONS Established 1885 Compliments of MALDEN DR. LEAVITT BUSINESS SCHOOL STOP AND BUY FRUIT Secretarial Office Machines Clerical Accounting Civil Service 5 Months’ Intensive 407 Main Street Telephone 004(5 MARBLE STREET STORE Full Line of S. S. Pierce (ioods Candy — Tobacco — .Meats — Provisions Telephone Sto. 1041-M INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION DAY OR EVENING COURSES FREE PLACEMENT EDUCATIONAL BUDGET IF DESIRED Dowling Bldg., Malden Square Mai. 025(5 CONGRATULATIONS To The Graduation Class of 1943 FROM JAe- YtloAiZi iP.attda£ STONEHAM, MASS. CANDY AT WHOLESALE FOR SCHOOLS, SCOUTS and SOCIAL CI,UBS BOURDON STUDIO COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHS JOHN SKINNER SON PORTRAITS — PICTURE FRAMES P38 Windsor Avenue Watertown Telephone Cry. 1454-M Telephone Middlesex 2778-M Albion Street W akelield “ ) } ' Direct From The Maker’ ELDRED BARBO, Inc. maniifaeturers of DEPENDABLE FURNITURE Telephone 1201 287 Main Street Stoneham, Massachusetts A. J. BOWERS CO. OPTICIANS 489 Main Street Telephone Stoneham 0755 For an Appointment It Will Save Y ' ou Time PARKER THE FLORIST — FINE FLOWERS — Telephone Cry. 0745 395 Main Street Wakefield FRED MARTIN SON LOCAL INTER- STATE MOVERS RES. OFFICE 1396W 1092 65 Franklin Street Stoneham AND WE LIKE UNDER-GRADS Pardon us for pointing, but we seem to be it when it comes to outfitting the smart young men of New England. We ' ve had many years of experience in satisfying 1 1 ' eir demands (and believe us they know w ' at they want). Parents approve too or Kennedy prices are always geared to the times. KENNEDY’S FAMOUS UNDER-GRAD SHOP H. E. BELLOWS Compliments OPIOMETRIST of Theatre Building- Stoneham WAKEFIELD PRINCESS Telephone 0253-R THEATERS MERRILL ' S BEAUTY SALON Featuring- Individual Hair Styling- — Artistic Permanent Waving- Breck Treatment 5 Central Street Sto. 0810 STONEHAM MOTOR CO. Franklin and Spencer Streets Tel. 0490 Compliments of STONEHAM FRUIT COMPANY Stoneham Square U P H O L S T E HI N G F. W. DOWNES SON Expert Woi-kmen Reasonable Prices Work Guaranteed 3 Pine Street Telephone Sto. 09( 5-W Compliments of MAYNARD H. MOORE. JR. WM. A. MCPHILLIPS COLD MEATS and GROCERIES CANDY — ICE CREAM — TOBACCO 80 Pine Street READ AND WHITE DRESS CLOTHES TO RENT LADIES’ and MEN’S NAVAL OFFICERS’ UNIFORMS FOR SALE 111 Summer Street Boston McCarthy simon, inc. MANUFACTURING SPECIALISTS 7-9 West 36th Street, New York Just off Fifth Avenue Specialists in CHOIR VESTMENTS PULPIT GOWNS CAPS, GOWNS, HOODS for All Deg-rees Outfitters to over 2500 Schools, Colleges, and Churches SECRETARIES NEEDED - I Uncle Sam needs thousands of Secretaries now — so does big business But the Best Jobs Go to the Best Prepared! • Army and Navy men spend many months training for the work they must do. Be sure you are well prepared for your job on the home front! Tien you choose Fisher School you are sure of secretarial training that brings out the best in you — that prepares you for a vital, well-paid j)osition now, and a career with a future. Accelerated courses if you wash. More than 2100 calls for Fisher graduates last year alone! Why not start July 5? Call or write for catalog. Two convenient locations: BOSTON, 118 Beacon Street • SOMERVILLE, 374 Broadway THE FISHER SCHOOLS JAMES A. MCDONOUGH GROCERIES — PROVISIONS Compliments of Telephones 0297 — 0299 STONEHAM THEATRE Deferrari Block Central Square ALWAYS A GOOD SHOW Compliments of Compliments of RICHARDSON ' S BENT SQUARE SPA VARIETY STORE 121 Franklin Street Stoneham GIFTWARES STATIONERY FRANK G. ELIOT INSURANCE of Every Description SCHAEFER’S NEWS GREETING CARDS NEWSPAPERS LINENS CHARLES AND FRANCES ESEKIN STONEHAM DYE HOUSE i’he Only Women’s and Men’s Custom Tailor and Furrier in Town Cleansing — Repairing — Rug Cleaning “Daily-Service-to-Your-Home” Between Tel. office and Stoneham Press 368 Main Street Telephone 1020 Compliments FRANKLIN STREET GARAGE Albert F. Lane Pontiac Authorized Sales-Service Bus Service of 41 Franklin Street Stoneham Compliments of JOHN BADUVAKIS 491-A Main Street Stoneham T. A. PETTENGILL Stoneham THIS BOOK PRINTED BY jTleAAitnac ’pAintinq, Q wvjoanu. COM MERCIA I. I’RLyrERS 4 South Broadway Lawrencfi, Massachusetts JOHNSON REAL ESTATE SERVICE STATION INSURANCE TEXACO PRODUCTS MORTGAGES 451 MAIN STREET STONEHAM E. CARLETON BEMIS, Realtor 375 Main Street Sto. 0529 Stoneham 0950-1238R MIKE THE BARBER Compliments 390 Marble Street of DR. TAURO STONEHAM PHARMACY Best Wishes to Boys Entering the Service and to Others of the Graduating Class CENTRAL AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE BEN MARSACK SHOE KEPAIRING Telephone 0988-M 2 Winter Street 302 Main Street WHITNEY’S PHARMACY DR. COY Chase Building Stoneham, Mass. DR. A. JONES Compliments of Franklin Street DR. BRESENHAM VACCA’S VARIETY STORE R. L. STILES CO. Corner Pond and Summer Streets MANUFACTURING CONFECTIONERS Compliments of NU-WAY CLEANERS Compliments 40714 Main Street of COFFEE SHOP A FRIEND 301 Main Street Stoneham Massachusetts


Suggestions in the Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) collection:

Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

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Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

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Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Page 1

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Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

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Stoneham High School - Wildlife Yearbook (Stoneham, MA) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.