Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA)

 - Class of 1955

Page 1 of 198

 

Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1955 Edition, Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 198 of the 1955 volume:

i 0 " V - " r (? «. ft. 0,0015 fv r ' iv ' - ' ( ! . U t dxtitr This Book Belongs o 4XVV 19 55 El Recuerdo Garreft Kinser, Editor Stockton College Stockton. California Table of Contents Introduction Administration - Faculty Student Government Graduates Curriculum Activities Clubs Sports Advertising Index Page 2 In The Beainning p At S oi nd y morrmljlihe ; ' second week of September, 1954, guys and gals ended theic j u j three months freedom to enrolk - - W C JiaJL f - :L4A. ' lUr ! (XMc ' tta i , semester. To the dismay of teachers an ycounlef students registered in the spacious, new Library building. The final tally was 3,556, the largest number of students ever to enroll at the college. Standing in line for what seemed hours, the students patiently waited for the cards which OK ' d their placement in a desired class. J : .??k , Students registered from as far away as Syria and Nor- way, but the primary function of the school was to serve the individuals within the Stock- ton " educational watershed. " Page 3 w mESfm Registration was quite hectic, but last minute counseling in the person- nel center helped late students to get to classes on the first day of school. After acquiring a complete schedule, new registrants were left to their own devices, and most of them wandered around the campus trying to orient themselves with their new classrooms. They strolled down the covered walk- ways and peered into the various classrooms that they would soon be occupying. Some walked by the Barn area and discovered the snack bar, student store, and one of the locker rooms. Some guys and gals went out to the athletic fields and passed by the gyms. They were astounded by the immensity of the campus. SC covers forty-two acres with the new Library at the northeast boundary point, the new classroom building at the south- east corner, and the sports fields all along the west line. This innocuous looking door was misleading, for this door lead to the den of the IBM " monsters " . . . the " things " to which students, teachers, and administrators alike paid homage. Teachers cried " Where are my IBM class cards? " Counselors demanded " Where are my IBM lists of counselees? " Students moaned " Look at that IBM report card, " But the IBM machines whirred, clicked, and garrumphed on as if to ignore human exist- ence. Page 5 Automation. The " monster " at the right was the daddy of them all at SC. Its " brain " was ex- posed at the lower left, a com- plicated system of wires that told the machine what operation to perform. The most sinister of machines was this, because it printed the report cards. Page 6 Automation. The lovable little " monster " at the left sorted IBM cards faster than students could think up excuses for being late or absent. Automation. With its protec- tive cover plates removed and its nerves, arteries, veins, and other vital pieces exposed, one can study the elaborate work- ings of a mechanical " monster. " At risk of life and limb, a photographer approached the " monster " for a close- up. Its double " mouth " was absorbing two sets of IBM cards while an endless sheet of paper recorded the data trans- mitted to the printing bars from the apparently meaningless jumble of little square holes found on the cards. , The 1955 El Recuerdo stands as a monument to all the St. George ' s who challenged the " beasts " and won their battles. The yearbook staff stands in- debted to the International Business Machines firm for creating such cute little " monsters " and for permitting such rough handling of their products. Stockton College has closed its doors for another year and the machines will have crawled deep into their lair where they will hibernate for the summer. As the machines awake from their slumber one morning next September, a new crop of St. George ' s will charge the IBM " monsters. " Page 7 Jjl Il4i 4!4i4 414 444 444414144 44 4 4 4 REC05J2. ill 99 6 6 611 6 6 777 188:888 99999 999 9199 93999:939 44||4 D-:PT W M..DE«iPTMENT im INST CODE INSTRUCTOR ' S C " MBER ODE cou se 3? 31 39 40I41U2 43 t4 4i o 47 43 49 id SIIS2 S3 M SJ X S7 l-i »»_; ' —j s: l z- °i -J cj oars LOW IC| COu»St I 5 5 5 5 1 5 5 SYST 16666666666 77777 77 7777 88888|888£| 9|9 9 9 99 9|9 9 9 3|9i9 8S9SIISI E2 S3 Mies 66 aN:i HOURS pji 555 3999999 67 Si 69 70 71 7; 73 in ' ;tr ' i;t Zl ' li 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 e I ( I ( 1 • • c . d c » . 1. 1 ilHt 1 • I rfi 111 1 1 1 • g • I e B 1 1 « g : ( I « i I • 1 1 g 1 1 I I I I I I I I n t ill 1 I ' I 1 Mil ll lit! I II lit I I I t Ml 11 I M I I I ill ■ 111 I I I l lll l 1 mi ll I ' ■ A-;; , ■ ' .If. . ' ( _»f. ' llIlJlllJj|lJl)ill|lMli;llIll!;iI!lllI|Jll!MlJ12 , ' 1 . :„lr ' ' |s ili)H)i!))liiJi|j:ijii)i)iiiiiii!i!iiini3ii)lin ,.| - f TZ.. ' . ' .,K,:.l i • l|jJ««44M 4«|»,4yiJI l444_l.ijl4_4 m 4 l4|| " ' f | f r . t ' . " , ; ■Jt I I 1)1111111)3)11) iM. ) It lis i s s s s I s i s s s i ' s s sis s i s s sjs iWi s s ; ktlllilllllttCetittlStltEtdllili ' lll pill I III M 1 I I I 7 ) 7 III ; 71 1 1 I 7 I 7!) 7 17 7 7 piiiiili,iini|iiii|ii,iiliiiii|iii|ii SS«9lt«m Sm t !)s|M9S9S|9I43I9)S} 9 31 S SS9 S 9 - -,1 C l i: ' jde: f b w o a 1 hi ! STOCKTON CCLL!Gt r= i 4n CO r-» ( ? CO r ir? 03 r ir to r-. CO r— IT) CO __ «o r— ir CO r tra CO r- U-3 fO r tn CO r ir CO p Illuutd ' M ' ul ! u :miu h n i 666|G6B56e6SE6E 9|J8 8818 88 818 I I I llL I l-l I L I I L L t CO r 999 Hi 999 |S5. 30OD S.bDijna a3ertJ I b3iS3n3S-- ' A3 1 3G05 NOii I 1 1 III 1 i|||i nil M U II U U Up( C: ;C U U 19 B u OOOJOOOJOO 00000 1 J? — «NJ CO T CO CO o s — CM CO r lO CO r cs •— CM CO r H CO I- s — CM CO ' - H CO r-» c= ? — Csj CO ■ r iO " ■ I c» s? — CM CO •« ■ CO r ' » — CM CO T- T — CNI CO •=t ? — CM ro • |;= S - •— CM M C O ■q -i ■ M CO -5n - ' I . " is GHVJ SSV13 •2 2222221 3 3 3iS33 2222 2 2 222s i 3 3 3 ab 3 3 3 3 i 212 21 « A ' n l»- 2 3 3!3!3h 3 3!3 3 33 ' Si ,;;:; « ™. _ " : : IJ?? ■■ ziz-., ' tt t : - r : 6! i. ?SS! A ' :: 4 4 4 4 ' U I 4i4 4 4 4 4 4 4 41ii4.4-i 4i4 4JJi .J ! A ' •jrj. SSilsdtSSSSSIslslSlStSSSS l S S 5 S 5 5 II s|| 5 ST ' 9C9 65 8 ;i5 K « K « r. 15 C; ' 6 Et t» J 5f tt ' c» .•»!l»p» 6C K tt 9i rt ft ie|6666S6 !8e|888 88 ALL LLLLL !9999939| S9S|9SS! iSNI id;-a CCC|C 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 19 09 6S K JS « S5 K 0000000 D 66 6|6 6SB6 6 6|6|B6e6G6 8 6 3 89 ' 88| LLL at 9 9119 9 9 IIS III I I I 19 09 9t oolooo IS G tflHl 3 ' .Ort ee ; 3; 9; »; a ;; i; o; bi 8i ii si 9i »i ti ;i IIJII6666E66666666G6666E6 UOHl obI S3ni ■03M J am II T3W mi ' ' - ' A ' W aw [■»■ Af . " O . " - d 3 " is V C N D rf [■ariH.i NOW r 1 r " . P- ' - ' i |0 3» 6EE66 8|888 tLLLL :SSiS9 »►♦ CEEEE t E 1 I I l|M It .» r r ■» £ E C £ £ E E E E E|E llll»i:i ll Z I I 1| 1 l|tll 11 )»« 9 ' 1 " C 9C rt wlil iliCr 9 III il OJli K- ' A H :ee|E£E|eee 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 »1 Ci ;. 1. 91 6 I I 9 lOPP " 100000 eecEE 1111 9 c ; 00000 1. S CO H -1 o en •c c Kj - K c=1 j ' S oa • J or en ■c c » isa — SO ' L CO oo " J m tn •c . c Ka — So riS; CO oo " CT en -t H isa — K = aco oo - a? tn H CO o — S = " S CO oo —J 03 cn B c IS.4 — 2 uaco 92 ci3 oo oo oo 05 or 03 tn cn cn .bto c » ISJ — s = — a cs — S c= — liS CO " SCO oo CO -J cn cn n 1 1 1 m — so S CO m ■ o cn mn — E er iScD : Sco — oo or tn cn ' S o S CO oo ■ J 03 cn -SO " S to 3 2 CO ,- ::i CO ;: ;::; to t: CO CO oo oo oo oa oo oo 09 cn cn cn cn cn cn o ■:; c rn s - m f- o z ' o o m 0000000 6t 69 70 71 72 73 74 Illllll - " .D? CO oo -i o cn — S .nSCO f " ::: to oo oo 03 cn O CD J) m m I I! S " r S CO CO ay cn cn — s = S CO oo -J o cn B — so 393110D NOiMOOiS I O ' J — H- ■- ■;-• 4 I ij . A I A« o (C ee •hJ a n 9 tJ ; ' jf- :. ' " ; l; ' ' . ; J. } mm G li OiO D,0 0:0 G e OiO;GiO OiO OiO II ) . I ' I I ■ ,j i. ' 4«i4S 5u 5! ' : J I 1,1:1 111 I 1 1 ih 1 M dk I 1 JU Aditi|fni|s i t?5 S« 57 W M ►« :! F? g3 8 iS5,86i67 Cv3 09 70 71 72 7. j i 76 77 - ' li ;■ eO H 11 IJ 1 1 1l ih. ' iii u ] liih n|i n loll 3!3!3 3 3 3 3 3 3i3 3 313 313 i 3 3 3! " - " " " " rr r.b,h i 4!4i4 4 4444414 cyfiCi! 5 5S5i5555 5 5|5!5 5 855 5 55 515 5 6 5 58 8S6dgBG 555 G 8 S i I - ■ 1 1 11111111 Vlihllll 11 1 7:7 7 71? 1 11 i : iO • Julio L. Bo rf ol azzo President of Stockton College One of the busiest men in Stockton is Julio L. Bortolazzo (Ed.D., Harvard, 1949). Dr. Bortolazzo is not only the President of Stockton College, but serves as Assist- ant Superintendent for Secondary Educa- tion for the entire school district as well. This man ' s range of activities is not limited to things academic. He was selected president for the United Crusade in Stock- ton and has been active in other civic enterprises. He is a tennis player just short of championship calibre and an avid fan of many other sports. On top of all this, he still finds time for home life with his attractive wife and his three gumptious boys. Under Dr. Bortolazzo ' s leadership, Stock- ton College has added a new Library and a new Classroom Building with a Science Building and a Theatre Arts - Music Build- ing already approved. His tremendous personal drive and organizational ability were an important factor in passage of a $7,750,000 bond drive last fall. Further, he was a key man in helping SC students obtain more than $50,000 in scholarships last year. Stockton will always be a better place to live because of Dr. Julio " Busy B " Bortolazzo. Administrator . . . Educator . . . Friend . . ,». J ! Burke W. Bradley Vice President and Executive Dean Louis Windmlller Dean of Admissions and Registration The leaders in Stockton public education are: Dr. Julio L. Bortolazzo (Assistant Superintendent for Secondary Education), Dr. Nolan D. Pulliam (Superintendent of Schools), Donald R. Sheldon (Deputy Superintendent of Schools), and Thomas R. McCandless (Assistant Superintendent of Schools and Business Manager). Stockton school board members and the top administrative officials constantly solved difficult prob- lems of providing the city with good education in the face of rapidly rising enrollments and a steady need for additional school buildings. Stockton school board members are: sitting, Mrs. Henry M. Brand- stad, Mrs. Ennis C. Woodruff, John Zuckerman; standing, Alex J. McRae, Richard Parsons. Page I Philip Garllngton Dean of Instruction and Administration c i a.. f Max Barber Assistant Dean (Counselors) Deans Allen Waldo Dean of Students Margaret Taverner Assistant Dean (Women) Page 12 David Greene Dean of Adult Education Division Chairmen f ..iMffi V t IIXV.1;. I John Arnold Chairman of Sciences and Mathematics . W i:- Irving Goleman Chairman of Arts and Letters Gladys Benerd Assistant Chairman of Physical Education Pete Lenz Coordinator of Athletics Lorraine Knoles Chairman of Social Sciences Mike Garrigan Chairman of Physical Education C5 -y Charles Guss Chairman of Communications Ralph Herring Chairman of Industrial Education r William Niven Chairman of Business Education Page 13 Faculty Frank Brown Herman Breding Veva Brown Page 14 A - w y Ward Clubine Helen Danner Annamary Devlin Eleanor Cole Leslie Davis Edwin Ding Bernlce Collins August Day Bruce Duke Ar+hur Corra George DeMange Marilla Dunning James Gorrell William Gott John Fanucch Grace Frye William Fitts Naomi Fuqua VInelta Eppley John Foppiano Charles Geddes Leo Estrada John Fredericlcsen Jabez Gibson Donald Evans George Freeman Ralph Goebel Boyd Mickley Thomas Milligan g f fjf i William Parton Chrysta Richards Elizabefh Schuler Sanford Pearce Robert Riddle Harry Schufz Carl Peregoy William Rundle Ann Schwab Frank T. Smith Ruth Smith James Smyth d James Musto V V JLr r ' , n ' i U w J. Carroll O ' Neill % I iflLi Joseph Naiman Flora Olsson Verna Page Walter Rathhaus 4 A Maxim Popovlch Ruth Saw Adele Sharpe Mllo Price Donald Schaeffer Marjorie Sheridan Violet Solomon Ernest SpafFord Cv . SI larry Iremaine Jean Tully Evelyn Stuart Alex Turkatte J. Henry Welton John WIttsche argarette Voltmer li Lucas Underwood James Wilson Page 18 Ernest Woodman Bert Young - 4 Helen Growe Research Assistant Warren Smith Attendance Counselor Albert Sharpe Testing Kathleen Seagraves Placement Director Secretaries Tom Barton Students ' Representative Amber Ellis Nurse k J Howard Pearcc Director of Front Row: Theresa Moreno, Lois Lowrey, Rubye Walker, Margaret Krebs, Constance Penn, Mary Lou Johnsen, Betty Shimasaki, Mildred Socha, Flora Rizzi. Row 2: Eleanor Uebele, Margie Boccoli, Marjorie Moore, Carolyn Meyer, Jeanne Gust, Edna Lea Boyles, Virginia Boalt, Irene Rohde, Agnes Duncan. Row 3: Betty Haskell, Marie Schacht, Lucille Martin, Margaret Nemee, Leonore Estalle, Elizabeth Koch, Jean Geddes, Shirley Delucchi, Nell Wisler. Not pictured are Lloyd Wilson, Jim Cave, Millie White, Leone Schv artz, Pearl Bashor, Dorothy Clark, Olive Gullison, Alvina Keller, Gwyn Clark, and Mildred Easier. Cusfodians June Stone Snack Bar Saleslady Front Row: Lois Porter, Frena Barlow, Carrie Mae Harris. Row 2: Elsie Quast, Beverly Nictiols, Barbara Sparrenberger, manager. Special Police Officers Caryl Scott, left, and Louis Goody. Front Row: Charles McGinnis, Albert Ritter, Andrew Warfleld, Wilbur Alexander. Albert Lee, Truman McGIII, Isadore Andrews, Virgil Bregante, Sam Barbagelata, head custodian. Row 2: Willie Riley, William Lovelace, Sam Anderson, L. C. Brice, Ken Wright, head gardener; Horace Mahon, Don Gwaltney, Harold Frades, Daniel Olson, Green Saffold. Evans Hall and Octavia Jackson are not pictured. Page 19 MON. TUES ■ ED. THUR. If ri. Ill 1 29 99 TUES WEO. THUR FRI. 666 7|7 9 99 99999999 93999 M V ViXJl M 39 «J4||« « Vl i ' i « M COu NSELOR |66 777 888 999 66 77 18 91 COuRSt 16666666666 Tnmmn 88888|8888| 999399|9999 7|7 9i9 «.50 5IJ52 M M 55 5t 57 51 59 60 61 6: O 64165 66 L 3_-_t£J DAYS AND HOURS hjHllS 6666666 7777777 88|88{ 9999999 67 66 69 70 71 7? 73 NSTRnCTGR r£!-i- Sv£ -- iEst- jt II! ' . ' jn " ' " " •) ' ' ' ' ' f ' ' ' ' • •■■ • » • oTIiTTIJ tli 1 1 « • in I tW) cTi iTilJi I jioTo II 1 i{iiiiiilii Y ii|iiji|iiin7ii ii° ' i ' iiri]n nri ' n ' ' iini?.i]i " ' " liilniln ' fififiKfii; m -a ■jr. rt t- ;OOGOO|OOO0Oti.uM 6 5 i IK ?5 •: 13 H 1 n n n n H I STOCKTQM COLLEGE « CO f c LO cr r-» c lO o • ■ ■i o r 4r3 CO r-. u. CO r Cl o: S ° o s t _) ' - z 1- -:, M f " ' 7 H- S IT iH , o Z UJ Z) UJ tn o o _ 1— i ; 1 1 1,1 ■ ' ct CD m ' i £71 i " r « » " - CM C 3 — CM CO - «— CNI CO •— CM CO - M-= S »— C ' J CO • ic:? R - •M CO « OR — ' CO CN »- a »— ■i CO •« p; •— CM CO ' r CO e — CM CO -« ■ CD 2? •— CM CO ' o 0D — rsj m CO :i - CM CO ■ r s — M CO B — — CM CO r • -— CM CO ■•a- o — CM •«»- o r; — H CO - »■ z — CM c r 2 CNI CO r 91 -- CM B r 1 e — C « »— QdVO SS " 10 22222282222 21222 21222 2 2 212 6|333 33:3 33i3 33i3 33333 3 3 3i3n3!3;3 c-r 212 2 2 ]i3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4[li|.4 4 J4 4 4 .4 4 AJTEN B5: -:• w... . ; •C i. ft 5 6|-, 6 66166666 6616 66 666 66 6 II L 99| tv etc III I I I ISKIf 000 8B| ' It 999 anni 3 ssni now 66 unHi S3ni NOW X 1; K u K u ;; u Of El 11 n 9t ti i ci :i n 11 t 1 t 3 I Ijl 1 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 I anHi ■a3« S3ni NOW unHi S3n NOW X b -(Bn. bflHi •a3« ■NOW ' NOW NOW I no ' , ■ 0 J 3 d 3 JlM V C N 3 rf V dnHi NOW ctecccc 2222222 11 I l|l I in 9» 5» t» tt r» 00000 D| 22221222 , " l|l ' |l 0 « If cf t cf rt ct a (ijOf ■ 00 000 MOOD ?W T»T»TTTtTT7T7 EEE ' 2 22 ISJNO 3S =± ►ft ►►»»» !»» «EC|EEE|EEE :222|222222 I 1 I I 1 I 1 I I 1 »i ti ;i 11 01 E • lOOP ' tnOOOOO ■V; i Ife TT 11-5 Mi 144 Jrl A 1 I IS a -=-» 1-5-E -.■a i A llf 66666 l|8BS tLLLl 99999 SS|S5 »»► EEEEE 222|2 I 1 I 1| qS CO 92 CO 00 00 OS Of 0 en en CJ1 — ' s { ) r " Eli xg CD 00 - 03 CJ1 1 1 5 ° to ■■3 ca S CO 00 —J CD tn — a = Eco m - eT en 4 1 ' i — S e= iSco SSco o»_ o en en S CO 00 — i o en -SCO i Sco x3 CO OB 00 o en CJ1 c m Z H -( m 3) -4 2 — 8 CD — S «= 0- CO i;;rj CO is CO 00 OD OD o 03 o en en 5 |— ' 0 — :i CO oa •— i o en m m S es 5! CO oo -j o en — ' a gSaco Pi- CO 00 00 —J —J en 0 H n 3) ■i 7; m - I — a S CO 00 0 CJ1 — a 8«r. eo —J o « » 1 — so 309-inOD NOiXDOiS " n i MWH iiMMMM, CL cci 55 0 z I S H i 31 i C G 00000 • ; Vj i - A « n n 0|0 0;0 § 0|0:OiO 3 ojo 4S 5w 55 = ' j M W 55 S« 57 S? 58 Si 2 £3 84 S5jS6{S7 68 W 70 7! 72 VI ' Mj i ?8 n ilnin n n nil iijjii 1 1 liiiii i 2 2 2|2 2|2 2 2 2 2 ' 3!3 3|3i3 3 3 mm jjs n j o c.yr T cuRf?e:nt ye II II 91 tl »t CI II II Qt I a 1 lit » c t I 666666666666 166666 lo M t i C C IC c !SS55i555555 SSSooSSSSS 51515155 5 55555 168 66 66 eSBS m o r; S Student Arthur GodI Student Body President Elected Officers Kathryn Wilson Secretary Page 22 Robert Harlan Commissioner of Rallies Art Godi received the gavel as president of the Stockton College Student Association last year after spending four years in student government activities, holding the office of Vice-President during the previous year. As DeMolay Master Councilor, an office which he held during half of his term as president, and an active member of Key Club, Italian Club, Student Faculty Com- mittee, Alpha Gamma Sigma, and Rotary, he kept himself busy, although he always found time for an occasional game of ping-pong or round of boxing. He was always present at the athletic contents and other school activities. hlls plans for the future are somewhat uncertain but fail along the lines of political science and law. He plans to attend either Stanford University or University of California. The " wheels ' were camera- caught debating over ar article in The Collegian " Hand over da cabbage! " Two " thugs " are working over Joe DeCrlstofaro, a Stockton College student and profes- sional boxer, trying to convince him that he should buy a student body card. ■ ' • ' rfi .,. Jack McDonald Ik m ' Beverly Goold Social Chair Council ■hB Patrick Hobin Representative to the Board of Athletic Contrc Joan Malloy Commissioner of Publications Forest Harrison Commissioner of Publicity Robert Gibson Commissioner of Elections Diane Custer Representative from Women ' s Athletics John Adamson Student Body Vice-President ( Charles Bloch Commissioner of Drives James Morrison Commissioner of Student Affairs Appointed Officers Page 23 Eleventh Grade Council K Z •v- Thomas Dixon Eleventh Grade President Tom Dixon presided over the eleventh grade class council as president and is assisted by, I to r. Jaci Williams, treasurer; Debbie Gole- man, vice-president, and Pat Spooner, secre- tary. Twelfth Grade Council Tom Quinn Twelfth Grade President Tom Quinn held the office of senior clasi president. Other leaders Included, I to r, Bob Evanhoe, vice-president; Jean Hartnnann, secretary; and Mary McDougal, treasurer. Inter-Club Council ifal ) Front Row: Bertha Demming, Judy Wollenhaupt, Debbie Goleman, Pat Athans, Dorothea Surryhne, Marcia Bell, Yvonne Meyer, Shirley Duncan. Row 2: Ken Smith, Charles Ledger, James Smith, Max Huber. Pete Stang, Calvin Calloway, Bob Gibson, Dale Scott, David Tapia, Danny Martinez, Dave Sears. Row 3: Richard Logemann, Vern Souza, Bob Sullivan, Eddie Fernandes, Hank Eilers, Del McComb, Abel Escalante, Joe Garcia, Vladlmar Vuinovic. Joe Schenk, John Adamson. Inter-Club Council is the governing body of all of the Stockton College clubs and organizations. It is headed by John Adamson, vice-president of the student body. Page 24 Thirteenth Grade Officers Fourteenth Grade Officers V 4 Bob O ' Lear Thirleenth Grade President Leading the thirteentin grade is President Bob O ' Lear, second " from left. Filling the remaining offices are: I to r, Dick DeLong, treasurer; Calvin Calloway, vice-president; Marcia Johnson, secretary. Joe Garcia Fourteenth Grade President Joe Garcia, second from left, wields the gavel for the fourteenth grade. Other offi- cers are: I to r, Frances Brell, treasurer; Hank Filers, vice-president; Shirley Williams, secretary. Inter-Club Council (Spring) oin -- — « ' iLl Front Row: Yvonne Meyer, JacI Wiillanns, Mildred Lopez. Diane Custer, Colleen Gallagher, Jean Pereira. Arlene Kasa, Shirley Duncan, Judy Wollenhaupt. Row 2: Howard Kotez, Dan Martinez, David Tapia. Tony Cuevas, Ed Fernandes, Wayne McCombs, Bob Evanhoe, Vern Souza, Bob Gemar. Row 3: Bob Gibson, Bob Craig, Ron Olvera, Alfred Yada, Roger Benedlto, Howard Takaoka, RInehart Heinitz, Bob Sullivan, V. W. Vuinovic, Hank Eilers, John Adamson. ■ age 25 The Student Court was the campus judi- cial body headed by Jim Morrison, Com- missioner of Student Affairs, and ruled un- der the iron hand of Dick O ' Day, judge. Student Court Front Row: Sue Sheppard, Dick O ' Day. Tom Harmon. Row 2: Geraldine Garden, Allen Waldo, adviser; Jim Morrison. i Student Faculty Committee This committee was organized to discuss and solve conflicting problems of the students and faculty, and was headed by Art Godi who served as chairman. Front Row: Naomi Fuqua. John Adamson, Art Godi. Bob Gibson, Bernico Collins. Row 2: Judy Teter, Bev Goold, Margaret Taverner, Debbie Goleman, Julie Wager, Jim Morrison. Row 3: Pat Burns. William Niven, Don Schaeffer, Allen Waldo. Merle Akeson. Chuck Bloch. Page 26 Board of Publications Front Row: Beverly Lawton, Joan Malloy, Kathy Wilson, Betty Lawseth, Pat Athans. Row 2: James Hicks, adviser: Bob Gagnon, Garry Kinser, Ed Lewis, adviser. Mike Kuhiman and Jerry French are not pictured. Under the leadership of Rally Commissioner Bob hHarlan and Adviser Paul Winters, the rally committee served as a planning staff and stage-hand crew for the majority of rallies. Rally Committee The Board of Publications was the advisory body of the college publications and consisted of indi- viduals holding top positions on both the El .Recuerdo and the Collegian staffs. %, ,-s Front Row: Rose Marie Mayer, Jean Hartmann. Sue Chlsamore. Pat Jensen. Row 2: Alberta Fedler. Pat Brooks, Al Fields, LaVonne Crismon. Del McConnb, Dave Sears, Tansy Herplch, Row 3: Ellen Lawseth, Deanna York. Darlene Mills, Barbara Wilson, Gall Smith, Willa Jean Stevahn, Colleen Cross, Barbara Shellcross, Hart Weaver. David Tapia, Bob Harlan. Row 4: Pat Athans, Margot Seymour, Mary Reynosa, Sharon Hightower, Judy Teter, Carol Cruz, Barbara Treece, Ruby Heikklnen, Elvin Myers. Del Simmons. Paul Winters, adviser. Page 27 j yr ' . MON. TUES ,E0. THUR Ifri. 99 MOri. TUES WEO. THUR FRI 99999 9 99 9 UMu K 3? n n«i :ii «__--J- COUNSELOR lu J 55l 666 7|7 5|| |66 777 8 8;8 8 8 9 9 999 9999 9 5 5 66 7 7 18 91 5 5 5 515 5 5 5 5 16666666666 77 7 77 7 77777 88888|8888| 99999919999 54 55 SC SI ! • M E DAYS AMD 5|5 6 ' 6 I 7|7 8 ' 8 I 9i9 lOUBS ' jlllS 51555555 5T1 555 E 6 6 6 6 6 61 " c c e i 7777 777 8818888 9999999 6) U S9 10 71 12 73 INSTRUCTOR riWMIiiiHiita .V.-t-- :i -■ • - " t t z I 7 • I ■ i ii • ( • • I • c 1 c ' « ( » ! i ' « 1 1 • I ijiii mill yiiii Mill ill 1 1 III I i 1 1 1 glTilTi •» • c 1 1 a 1 1 1 1 lit t c i • 1 1 1 1, i at i i I I I I 111 M I I I I I I ill IMil I 1 I lllll I 111 I I , I , , I ' ' [ ASe Lv ' - ' -C ••__ ' ! ' Jim 21IIljlll!(!l|lj;jIlll|jllIlillIIIIll!l|IliJ)!Il , _ ...Jt;. ,J,f7 I I ) 1 1 1 1 il 1 1 1 ijijiii 1 1 J I) 1 1 1 1 su u 1 1 1 1 1 )|i iiJl 1 1 1 ;,p - - 1 TZi ' ' .iK • .t.l| j l i«J «ll. Mj[wJ«lJ «UU ' JLL ,« «. « l ' «ll« " ' , ' fj, I ' . ' .f. ' , " r. .He i! F I s Is lis i i 1 s 1 Is s rs s s|sirsT:l s i sljsTI i I lit t ( i i i 1 1 ( i ( i ( i ( s • ( t ( i i I ni I ■ " ,_:— " ; i I " ,. .] ---l—i I|llll|17)71117l77)li7)l717;i7imillll| • | ,,. i | ,|. j " ]» -■-, ' ;■■■ I I pniii|i|iiiii|niiii|Mi|iiiiMH|n| 1 1) I « 1 1 1 1 liBil I I I ! ! I ) I! ) I ) I I • I ) I ! ril ) 1 1 1 )| 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 • " ■rl r 00 ' -c. IT. rt a: ' -•0 00 Q u w u ( OjI 1.-1 i.J . .-T 2 3 4 SiS $ K 15 :, " 13 H 1 n nin 11 11 n n 1222122222212222 2 STOCKTON COLLEGE | cj ' »— o 3 — 06 5 (r .iJ 2 i ' LJ (T fa m to r- trs CO r irt CO r m (O r i« CO r ir CO r wm CO r-» n CO p . lO CO p ir CO r » ir CO »-• •■ %r CO r-- ir to r r CO r . lO CO p« m CO r— inr. -. I jor. I ■ it ulft ' ii ukl a :( u u 6 6(|66E ' 66EES I8| at 98818 18 t III 999 999 SSJill lllLL 99999 aaoD sjioiDi-.c : u3enA iNsniaJ ja3l 9 «ji3A iN3afc l)3lS3« 3G0j t jad3i Q ttC3 ! P! — C..4 CO Ic 3 — 222 333 !■-= K — tf ro -t ' «J R — " i-M CO •■ « — «.. K — CM e X rM u a — CM a — m ea •— c ea s — CM ? «— «N e- ' 5 «— rsi ro t » - CNI CO • ' f _ J CO 1 " _ OM r ■ r » z _ CSI c •«r :: CX ■ CM CX4 CD - — CO CO CO U, - eN4 CM CM in try r iO en : en - c on " 5 i • aav ' j ssvHD 25 1 c3 33 333!3 33i333 22221 3323!333 3 3 22 22 2|2i2J2j2 22 22 i4 44 4 4 .1 ! l - ifcjr :S? " Hii rf L_i H C ' ih: : = :::• 44 - I- 4 4 4 4 4 ' 1 41 4i4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4i4i4i i4 4 14 4 4 " " El:;M i " Wee- ' . ' ' ■: ' -K :N. T Afe " iO J I WCr-J. ! -r I ir- f Ti c bV Ft (V r frt rf ;t it 66 6:6 6 6(6 6 618 » Bt K iC 9f 5E It n 66666666 3 8 918 81 99|999 ttt III I 1 1 IS K U 000 ss r ■03M •lOrt a K V H U U l K 61 Bi U 91 il »( CI 21 11 01 S t ||||6666666 66 6 666666666 6| 031 S3ni ■NOW Ion iN ■anHi ■03« S3ni " NOW aoHi a3M S3n 5301 b NOW [ bflHi ■Q3W J ; a 3 JN V C N D " fv i- ariHi cceceec iiiiiii 1 M l|l I n it 9» fr tt rt r 000000 lllltlll 1 I l|l l|l rl»K »C ir ' E « K it OOOOOQO fT|F|f| t ' [rtT7rrrrrf|FfyrrrrtT|?T Ee|EEE|EEC iiUziiiii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 EEC IVZ I I ' l a. iiiof 30 t " TT T 2± . ■ rf - -i-r ' " - " :: fie i r ::i ' ' ' tl II 11 ot f I t I m: tr s 66666 8|888 99999 S9|SS tMt EEE EE tl|- Sco oo - o en ■■ CO l o — ss iS OS oe ■ 4 o tn H CO ivj — 3 Jli to M en tn ■c c t — s " o n yi _ — s c ■§■ OO -J o CJ1 ' ' - ■ — s o 2 " a oo J CT en ._. ri 2 = S " oo •—J o en n 1 CD 3 o Cto or J 09 cn — a o 2 to B -«J 03 en ' 3) Imp _ s C3 iS to oo J en en tr s ato oo J o en ' 1 ;T — s 2 to oo J o» en " S to oo - o — s o IB -«J en en 2 i;{ z o - s CD :t)o to r-i— to oo oo en 5 ? 5 s -H s .- ' • to oo J CT» en " s 2 — » n r— o l s oo --J o en o 3 . -1 » o ■u to oo -J 03 en m m ■■s r-aco oo « i a» en — a gJSto oo J o en o : — s R- ; CO oo J CT ■i 2 33 m - — 3 r,pS to •-J cr en — 3 pS CO oo -J C7 en ■1 — 3 r-f,S r oo —J a CJl H — S 3031100 N0i O0iS CL ' C ' o OB -4 e Ut - « o en ;-« CD . n " ■-to , a W1 o «o M IS Ol UI H H ■I = io [ 0 s i S c ■ ' ■,- -r, v--: » ' i-T—C :21 ..: i ! :- ' .)(if-. T ' J ' ' ; ' M • ' . ' ii — r I ■,:s. « 5 ; C;V5Jr I OjO SjO OjO OiO:0iO OjO S " " n nil nlnin n 1 n iii ijijh 1 1 1 iiili nin i 1 ?2 2 22 22,2 2212 2122 22 2 i3 3 3 333 ! U 4 4 4 4 414 4 4! : I 3 333331333 I ._ li lTiT L S. m m SFMFSThR I Cuf RE:rslT YEA " rv a i5 555i5 55 5 5 5j5i5 I I j I 515 5 5 55 5 5 51155 S 5 6 8886 6888sis8 6 ipM o O o —I O a iif; ljs E Gerald Aamoth Roy Adams Jim Allman Neai Amick Lawrence Aokl Marvin Aokl Maria Barrett Frances Barton Jesse Bafres Gary Bieber Charles Bloch Shirley Bosio Joe Bradley Frances Brell Ecqullla Bridges Carol Brooks Linton Brown Scott Brundage Charleen Burshlem Gene Campbell Richard Brown Bobbl Burke John Byer Dena Canepa Ted Canote Jack Cheney Adele Canfele Robert Corbett Don Carlos Ann Copeland Janet Castlgllone James Dean Wayne Castle Sally Oela RIva Emma Dowell Fourteenth Grade Graduates Pat Di Giorno Sam Garcia Thomas Gates Robert Gibson James Green Edythe Haanstra Thomas Hamilton hS W Car! Hansen Lavona Hanson Robert Hargis Henry Harrell Reinhart Helniti Robert Hilder Diana Hinshaw Merv Hoffnnan Charles Howell William Klein Bill Kobus Lou!s LaRossa Donald LeBeouf Dorothy MacDonald Robert Krage Frank Lee Page 32 Harry Malley Richard Hurd Richard Johnston Layso Kuwamofo Alex Linker Thomas Mah Harold Hurst Helynn Kappos Ada Langenbach Stanley Little Mary Johnson Lula King Lee LePlant Janet Lobenberg Diane Manthey Kenneth Kuykendalt Clifford Patfon Robert RImlngfon Roy Rodriguez Robert Mcintosh George Moton LeeAnne PezzI Jefferlene Pierro Rose Navalta Dick O ' Day M ary Stella Polslnelli Diane Price Felix Orozco Jessie Pigg Robert Prouty Alfred Oyog Leonard Pitts Dixie Raney James Reynosa Ernest Roberts Robert Rodriguez Francis Romano Bert Russ Grace Sato Don Smith Marie S+agnaro Laura Swinney Harriet Rothstein Florence Rouser Mike Sangulnetti Glen Shellcross Marcia Simmons Marjorie Simmons James Smith Jon Smith Doris Spencer James Stewart Dorothea Surryhne Page 34 Norma Suarez John TeSelle Delia Torchia Shirley Williams Marjory Wood Claude Wilson James Uyemura Simon Zambra Hussam Zamrik Magarito Zarate George Zissis Tvrelfth Grade Graduates Shirley Albright George Allison Alice Alvillar Arne Aasen Jane Abbott f. . t Sylvester Agullar Muriel All Freddie Almendarez Donna Anderson John Ahearn Easter Allen Carlos Alonzo Manuel Anderson Barbara Abney Benny Acoba I . Jun Akaba Lester Allen Barbara Alvarez Sen Alcaba Margaret Allen Rachel Alvarez Judy Andrev Laurence Angelo - I.. Wanda Adams f I ■i iV ,,. ' .. « » Leo Agbulos Lynette Agnew Charles Anderson Anna Arrabit Joyce Alberca Richard Alvarez Marlene Alvas Jennie Aranjuez x I- r . r Pat Athans Jack Avey Patsy Baiter Buzzy Barbieri Page 36 Douglas Atkinson Betty Badalamenti Lynette Bancroft „- l5 Sk. RocheNe Bashor Evelyn Beerbower Don Bennett Charles Bertucelli Joseph Atilano Carol Avery Betty Ballenger Lura Barnard IW-rf r Blllie Austin Carol Bdcigalupi Jean Balzer Andrew Baroni " W , 1 ' i Fred Beaver ' rr tt " David Bennallack itm 4v Penny Bartholomew Arthur Bd s Marcia Bell Robin Betz Elaine Basham Barbara Batton Shirley Benedict Robert Bianchi Jacklyn Bertolatti Bob Barton Sal Batres Carol Bcllln Ray Berkenbile Darlene Blumberg Dennis Bowman ' -t . Floyd Brown Barbara Bucklus Charles Burkner dMfc -ffjr.- Gaylord Brlgnal! Robert Brown ■ . Patricia Burrola Ronnie Black Dian Bonfilio Deloise Block Sylvia Bradbury Tom Blackmun Ronald Boone 0--- James Bratcher Philip Brome Ronald Brown Harold Brandt Phyllis Brome Ruth Brown Sam Burton George Buterac Hugh Bradford James Braghetta Margie Brooks Dick Broyles Charlotte Bradley Jack Brennfleck Deann Brown Wayne Brunson Jim Byers Ricardo Caballero , 1 Jerri Burdick ■ K- -1 f S-, L. ' Kf r Benny Cabebe David Cameron Dianne Campbell Kathleen Campbell Corrine Carman Eleanor Carrol Rowan Carlson Sonia Carlson Janice Casteline Ti j1 Joel Clair Hubert Claxfon d Pf Ralph Caudlllo Sam Chan Mae Jane Chow Marjorte Carnahan Pat Chan Reuben Chandler Caria Chrisman Page 38 ■ WBr Carolyn Chiapale iji TT 1 -r - 1 T IV I ■ y Margaref Cheney Walfer Christiansen Darlene Clark Warren Clark ' fer Sonia Clayton Vahl Clemensen Barbara Canepa Mary Castillo Pauline Chan Susan Chisamore Victor Cleere Robert elites Pete Catlett Ronald Chan Gloria Chiti Sharon Coate ' (r wJ j . ,.! ' ' 4h,. : Barbara Copeland John Coffey Shermallne Cooper ■if f Donald Cooper George Cosgrove Molley Coffey Marie Collins Milce Cons+ancio Leonard Corren Leah Corfelaizi Dolores Cor+ez Consrance Courtwrlght Estella Cox Bobby Craig Alma Crawford James Crownover Jim Cutts Beatrice Davis Charlotte Davis Consuelo Crawford Carol Cruz Karen Dahl Nell Crites Marilyn Curnow Jean Dalgleish Bernlece Cross Carole Curtis Carolyn Dane Colleen Cross Diane Custer Anita Daub f ■ h Gordon Davis i x i I : Keith Davis i I L Marie Davis Sharline Davis Naomi Dean Betty Dennis David Doyle - r 1 I z I - ) wlmmm Leora Denny Philip Dillon Lacy Dickerson Frank Drendail Carlin Drais Bob Dustin Linda Dyke Jacit Dentoni Judy Dodgen Pat Der John Dolph Gerry Day Bertha Deming arah Delgado € y i I - ' l r jf :i -- . r Loralee Denhar dt Jim Devincenii ti Shirley Duncan Bonnie Eberhardt L .ri i Roger DeRieux Beverly Douglas Carl Drennan Carol Eaton Douglas Eberhardt Leroy Ehlers Gabriel Elmldolan Linda Edson Robert Eggiman Mary Elizarraraz Bud Ellsworth Loraine Erpilla Pauline Estrada Allyne Evans Wayland Ezelle William Elsholz Bonnie Evinger Mina Faires Darlene Erion Barbara Ewing Donald Farrell Lupe Flores William Ford Beatrice Fontes .J Richard Ferrero Joyce Fobbs Don Ferrari Eda Fine Arlind Fontes Judith Foster Frank Fox Phillip Friis Glen Fouquette " Gerald French Sally Gale Richard Franch Geraldyne Freed Gene Gadbury Bob Fruchtenicht Jiro Futamachi Carl Garcia Rifa Galgianl Glenda Gannon Milce Gillcf Jan Gellafly Theresa Garcia Eugene Ghan .. Conchita Garcia Elda Garner Harold Gilchrist Bob Ghio Betty Gilmore Mcrvyn Girsh Marie Gianelll Melvin Gin Marge Ginbcy Mary Garcia Allan George Gill Gilfillan Eugene GinI Leslie Gini Ltnda Glasgow i I » Norma Glasson Benny Gonzales tip? 1 ■ i Gail Gomes Bertha Gonzales Kelih Gosnell , .r- It George GranuccI Dorothy h agenhofer Bob Greneveld Jerry Gritz Louise Guinn red Maase Page 43 Jack Harray Myrna Hambly Nlla Hanson Robert Harlan X Bruce Hampton Betty Harden Julio Haro Pat Hand Jerry Hardig Deanna Harper Dale Hansen Janice Harlan Allen Harr - i Gall Hartmann i» ' :; «»: Mary Hicki nbotham w • ' Jean Hartaiann Joan Hayashi Ruby HciUlnen Barbara HotI Lewis Henderson Shirley Hern Martha Hidalgo Dorothy Harris William Harris Tone Hallitt Len Heick Gloria Heinie J. D. Hempstead Leroy Herrera Rosario Herrera Ann HIgashI Oscar Johnson Dean Jones ;a- I (i icaix. Charles Jones Lois Jones Marian Jordan Glenna Jones Ronnie Jones Patricia Jordan Judy Kellogg Warren Kibby Robert Klein V Mike Kuhlman Sandra La Fontaine - - ' HEi ' g III Dorothy Jones Loneta Jones Evelyn Keller Paddy Kelly f f Gloria Jordan Jim Keifer Mildred Kline Jo Ann Kuchenrlter Maxine King Buddy Klingensmith Kathryn Kunkle Helen Key Virgil Kramer Le Anne Kroh Vesten Laird Marilyn Landucci Gerald Kinkead Virginia Knox Fred Kurth Page 46 . - , Robert La Plant i 1 f r Elaine Lane f Eilen Lawseth Ronald Laughlin Anne Lawson Kenneth Lane Ann Lavorato Corinne Lawson k TT { Ray Lane Joann Lawler Richard Lee 4 V ' Paul Lapltan Beverly Lawfon Charles Ledger Betty Lawseth John Lee Jerry Longacre Charles Lorenson - L • I - ' ' P Roberta Lee Norman Lew Betty Ann Lopez Bob Leopold Marlene Long Mildred Lopez Page 47 I i John Mdcomber Robert Mar Alfred Martm Beverly Mason Kosel Matsushita Paula Madsen Roger Marlani Dean Martin Eddy Mah Mary Marks Lucretia Martin Martha Mallery Faye Marsh Mary Martin Bill Mali David Marshall Janet Martlnell Elmer Mar Darlene Marsland Kazuo Masai T W H Lester Matsune Colleen Mayeda Edward Mayer Royce Mayo Earl McCann Carolyn Mather Rose Marie Mayer Joe McCann I J- Larry McCIary Mary McDougall Wayne McCombs Dolores McGill Roland McCormacIc Glena McGIII : w f 1 ' f % h. «V-7C i Gary McCown Tom Means Barbara Michelson Fred Misasi Billy McNeer Angle Meredith Patsy McGuIre Jean Mercado Joyce Meyers J 1 vf ' Lois Mendosa Elvin Meyers Luther Miller ■4tr ' ' -v- . ' -..fl-i ' fl|P|BMM| Bob Mingram jj_ Sam Moeckly .Am m . Greg Meadows Willard Meredith Y ' vonne Meyer , ' y h gB Don Miniaci t ' tf I B Glenn Money Dwight McCarroll Jack McDonald Connie McGraw ■ ' r mi.} «5 Sheila McCarthy Bob Miller Gene Moccaflche r Dennis Meyer Gary Milano Clara Mizuno Tony Monges William Morales Lamont Morgan " 1 I A « Jdmcs Morrljon Richard Mosqueda Helen Mosqucdo Dala Naatz Arthur Mow Page 50 Joan NaVawataio 1 Rodnvy Motto Yo hiaki Murano " ' Barbara Nessler James Newman James Nicholson Buddy Nielsen William Nietmann Barbara Newton Kenneth Nishilcawa Bob Ogan James O ' Lougdlin Dennis Norgard Inez Norman Joann Odgers Roberta Odgers F I Meivin Ndvone 1 . LyneHe Newman Laurel Olson . A — , Chevy Orozco Arfhur Ow«ni John Owens John PdhI Ray Paje I DoMdyne Oiborn ■I- Dick Otborn Betty Peyton Maty Ann Psiuto Jeen Pereire Lolite Pedro Fred Pelmer Edith Perks Micheel Peyne i ' - ' h Robert Pedersen Sylvle Pehl Sylvia Peireno Merlene Perlet 1 (k BeHy Powell David Price P Walter Peyton Eddie Piazza V William Powers Delphina Prieto i r 1 Julia Perez Darrelt Perry Robert Peterson Eleanor Peloids Janice PigozzI _ Ethlyn Pollard Cora Pineda Marilyn Pirkola Daphine Potter Bob Pitzer Don Potter George Pr«to Bill Prltckard Mile Preston Gertrude Phillips Judy Prevatali Rex Proper ■k m w s Alice Quart«i Robert Quick Avii Reid Marilyn Reed LoreHa Renfro CliHord Reynold! M«ry R «ry Keynote rr " fi ' i. Roneld Rhodet Glorie Reiendei ■o yX P « RettUff Tom Quinn, Jr. Arlene Remer Bud Rendolpli 1 - - " Jt ' , n " V k ■ ' " ■■ ' . Jerrell Rhynei ii T Ml t; ' - f 1 Reuben Robles Estella Rodriguez JT Sandra Rogers Audrey Rojas . j Tom Romero y RicKard Root % David Rule Page 56 . Margaret Rote ' X Sharlott Sandarton Eva Sandoval Jean Rowley Nancy Samoni Noah Saflold Loratia Sanchai Carole Salo Don Sandart 1 S- Tommy Schlepp Albert Sangulnetti Ben Savage ' i Robert Sdvio TT s i - Joe Schenk » r Lewis Schmid James Scadden Eileen Schlepp Corrine SchuUe Larry Scrlven Williarn Schoenduby Lee Schultz Dave Sears LoreHa Seegers Dale ScoH Gene Seifert i ' r John Schali Carl Schweitier David ScoHen Page 57 Page 58 Delbert Simmons k Ronald Smith Donna Spradiing ■«. :- .j " Robert Sohnrey , " W Vernon Souxa ' Nora SUHord $h«tl SttkUy n — _ Robtrf Sullloan Emtrton Sutfon Judy T«lbo« i: ' ' DT J Gene Talley Ml- i ' mitiM June Tanata David Tapid Donald Tapid Vivian Tassano ) Carolyn Teague Maud Teverbaugh Barbara Thompson Norma Tipton IT James Tominaga Beverly Tracy Barbara Treece Lee Ann Vanderford Sandra Van Vranken Larry Tupper Ann Ulleberg Ralph Tribble Steve Veda Doncid VaUi John Vincent NotI Waldan Phyllit Walteri Wayne Virdan Donald Welding Lucille Warren Tvonne Walker ae Wathlngfon Ann Wilcoi Vonda Wilkt 1 Larry Weiqum Belty White » ' n Adrt«n Vera jt ;i ♦ Oonna Viviano Cdry Walker Rogtr Warrick Ben Waddle George Walker Louis Washington mmwirmi Kmif itm mat i ' n i.-. Edna Wllliamt . i _ Chriitel Welqkerf Jean While Silt Weete Joyce White Mary We er Barbara Weare Ray Wiebe Marie Wiinams Kathryn Wilson Judy WoHf Judy WoHenhaupt Barbara Woodruff Susan Work Karuko Yagi Barbara Yep Frances Zdarsliy Arthur Zorniger Paul Wltteman i Chance Wong - f ' 7 Mutsuko Yamamoto Joseph Yee Roberf Yasul Thelma YeH Estella Zakel Ann Yonishige Sumiko Yostilmura ' r V I Shirley Wright Jeanefte Wong Alfred Yada i- f n Linda Zumwalt Stockton Vocational Nurses Mary E. Arnold Jovita CantU Barbara BardtUy Barbara Ettrada Ruth Blackwall Ramona Ettrada El ;. Boldick H«lli« Fliher 1_J II. ' . M«Ua Gratham ( raca t. nand LOis jonat riowaro uvwit ,i,;.V ' A J ffi« Br«»tt r Eliia GonuUt Robert Luclcy Dclphin Abit J «n Archer Laurtnc A. Alien Dell M « Armitronc Dorothy Lu»e« Vivian Schooler Gledyi Viqnolo 7 . Barber Whit Nurting Superviior Hattene Miles W.lletta Simpson Doris W lk r Merre M«rlin Betty Smith Kyoko Murano Jeannette Sulliyan Stockton College Adult Education pro- gram had another first in occupational training. On January 29, I 955 the first group of vocational nurses were gradu- ated, having been trained completely in the local school system. The vocational nurses ' primary duties are bedside nursing and care of the chronically ill. Their training is aimed to fit local demands. The instruction in school is supplemented by work carried on at San Joaquin General htospital and Saint Joseph ' s hHospital under the guidance of clinical instruc- tors provided by Mrs. Barbara White, supervisor of the program. ' ■ .%, ' ■ ' • .4 » l ' » tN JANUARY 1955 GRADUATES Georgia McHugh Nursing Instructor Queen Brodie Pauline Bullard LaVerne Germann Stella Gonzales AUGUST 1955 GRADUATES ' ■ vfv, 9 O A ' - . , - ' ' f f V i " ' i »-. , ' ' ) ' •■ ■ ' • Nedra Wadlow EsHello White TUCS ■ " ■ thurI Irni. [ TUfS wco. 6K6|b666|6EE6S666GS66SSS6 7|7J7 7 7;7 7|7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7|7l7 7 7 7 III I.I 1l8 S 8 8|8 8 8 8 8 8|8 8 g S|8I B 8|8 99999999 999 99 9 999939|99 9 999|9 9 999 9 99 u i » a II n «■ • 11 II 4 ' t .1 n J 99 6 6 Si tttcce. 7 7 7 8 8 8 999 ' ■ V ' , ' ; vt u (I i; U M » H U I C«y »«io» iiiiiiiiiiiikk " IMm. I III I iiiiiiMiiiM ' iitiiiiiMtiin • ' •■•••■•■a ' •MM •• ■ ' -■ -■••• •••--. ■■.•«■• ■■» b« ■«••■• w •• ■ •• 1 1 1 II 1 1 ill 1 1 • 1 1 • I iii ill 1 1 1 1 ill 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 ijx i.i.t I ■ nt I .i Lti iiiitlltiiiiii;ii iiiliiit:)iiliiulli Jilt;{ I J ' ' |r nil ml II iiji|» I II II II II I mil II 1 1 II II ill II I I ' A...J|i ' |«,«lll«i l«t4l«l I|4l|l4||l ||4l4ltl444l4l||l | I I ' V ' , ' JK ■. I I — ■ — t)ilillnim|iiiti mliti i» ilii _ t •lt|llil|l IMII4llllllllitlllll(«ll . " . |l ;i|iiiiMi iiiMiiiMiMiiiiiinirm ' I % Imiiiiiimliiiiliiiiliiiiiiiihii imiiimiMII«ms l i m in i iit«i mt|m i m imii iii « n i .1 « L_._.„._ 00 ' x: rt ? 3 j £ iOGOOOlDOOOrj 11 i n n;n 1 ! i r- 2 2112 11 .1 i o!3 3 3 33!3 33 I I I ' ; 4 4 4! ' ' i I 1 )1 -.-I. iril ' ■■ I 5b ■■=M -o-i i y |0 SI ' J K ' «j IT CM 04 CN4 •— C» I « »» 1 - 3 1= 9 i ' I? •»! ' • I .— fs «— C « i? - r i l?-n- ni, n ■ T c .. P «0 ii ■ __ _r»» - ir _ ' " H7 ' J G7V " l5 cs - i.tiii,c.t J.m4.4.Jt .i i» 13 3 3i 33 33:3 33 3 31 3 313 4 4 44 -1 4i4i4 4 L!i:;?i5 ' ■ - :: j:|[ VW 4 4 4 4 4 4 JJi 4. 4-i 414 _4 s I l- 1 c I 8® ' V ' eO- " " T V- - " •■■ p- i — ' I i 2 2 2:2 2 3 33 3I3 3 ■ I I I i:-i. ! y. ticiUty ( ' » ' .; tr ' »» tV:»1tf K K (Ti ' tt K nla uU uiuui k « k ' u ti ; ' Ktt nit ii ti »i ci ' L u oi ' V I ' i fit » i ( ' i S.8 E e,6 6 6 e 6 e 6|6 B 6 6 6 6 t 6 6 S S llll CG6666666S666SS6e66S|6 66E6 liSissa etc III » t » » » » »l» ttetttct s!|;s tcicctcc 2:222 2;!Z2{22|{2 2 ♦TV Tt » ► » »»»»»! |M t»»»|»t ft ccc 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t|i III I i|i iiijii ' t It K» ».» ft (»|) ' I ijai K ' ! ' ■( t K tx ' kd U » )|ooooooD30||!|Oi) oju ojo : 11 u • " 6 s ; :, 8; t C|CCC|CCC 2z;|;:2222 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CI II tl I i; 91 » • ( I ; J r fi - 1 t E t E E ; J?J|Z ' ' • ' ' Mc 00000- ■ 2 CD - CJl en -D - )00 9 MCI 1 1 »C CD oo _ :;; ri 1 m — BO C to ■■ •—J CT en 1 1 ' S O0 en — 8 CO — SO to oe - J 9 cn -• a o5 CO oo oo —J C7» C 1 en 5 ° Z O — so — SO — a o . .— CO oo —J O) cn fZ o u m — 2 ' ri CO i w CO OD OB 9 CJ1 cn CO 2 -f m f- E i ,0:: to OO " mt o cn OO OO —J cn m 3s n - ■ — 3 o ' S CO oo 9 cn C«1 — " r-. ' ie r oo « J a cn 1 ■i -go 303mOD NOiXDOlS I J ' j iSjar. ; j .1 ' - ■- ' ' ■{■ 4i I i ' Jf- ; i ' j ' " . ; 6 1 J A ' ,...J:.. y . ..).. I L- G L ' iO J (i oe D (; 0,0:010 QiO 0iO i. A- 4gi43 5y 51: ' , ' .jl ( 55 J 57 y W vS :« r? 83 S iS .K jG? M 09 JO ;i 72 ' . ' . l } ' j JS j ' S " a 80 li rn 1 1 n ? £ 33 44 iiiM n I n I 22 22i22 2|22l2 22 22l . ■ j I I 3 3 33i333|33;3i33 3|: 4 4 44:4 4 4mjj4 " .ii.liLJ.[!.J..lJ..lII 3SRLVlATiO J COO Sii It 1 n K e Y c rvr Cu»?E:r-;T ylar a jz.p.m |68SEG8G6SE6ElEG6SS ' I|II8 99S99 ■03» 3» ' S555i5 5555 5|5i5i5i55 5 55 5|5 5i 555 S86 ■■ ( ■- i;-. c; Included in the course offering of the drama depar+nnent were classes in which the principles of play production were put into practice. Arts and One of the many eicellant humanltiet courses was •• ■ " • :, ; . ,,cially uciale beauty at eiprested in the musicoi ertt. Page 68 The division of Arts and Letters has been under the capable leadership of Irving Goleman for the past seventeen years. He was also directly associated with the College of the Pacific in the English and religious education departnnents. He is considered an outstanding philosopher and teacher. Among the departments of this division were drama, art, music, language and humanities. A wide variety of courses were offered in each of these areas. Weaving, metal jewelry, and ceramics Instruc- tion as well as a complete fine arts program were found at SC. Letters Learning to play an instrument was one of the enjoyable classes offered by the music department. The music students participated in many assemblies, notably the Christmas assembly. Sprechen Sie Italienisch? Tne fundamentals of Spanish, Italian, French, German, and Latin plus advanced work in several of these were offered. Information about the cultural background of the countries involved was an integral part of the class work. Page 69 Social Sciences The great mysteries of the mind and the universe were studied and discussed in philosophy classes by college division students. The social sciences constitute some of the new- est fields to receive scientific treatment in their study. Stockton College recognized their impor- tance to modern living as judged by the quantity and variety of courses offered. hHistory. driver training, international understanding, social problems, psychology, philosophy, economics, marriage, and the family, community service, sociology, etc., were some of the class listings in this division. Miss Lorraine Knoles has headed the division for the past ten years. Miss Knoles was the victim of an unfortunate accident early in the second semester; she fell on the library steps one Satur- day and broke her leg. She was able to return to her duties after a month ' s absence. Human behavior, such as thinking, perception, learning, emotions, motlvati personality, etc. were given scientlTc analysis in a variety of psychology cours . Page 70 Orientation to college life was part of the curriculum for college division students in order to help them get the most out of their studies and to better understand themselves. Basic economic principles, such as the law of diminishing returns, are often applied to many everyday problems as well as to business and economic situations. Understanding why historical events followed the path they did is often as important a part of history study as trying to spot the mistakes others made that they might be avoided in the future. Page 71 Science and Mathematics Introduction to the mysteries of the worlds of chemistry and of physics represented an Im- portant contribution to SC students ' education. Photogra- phy courses, including motion picture production, were add- ed to the curriculum this year. Dr. John Arnold headed a large and active Science and Mathe- matics division. All home eco- nomics training at the college was Incorporated in the Science de- partment. Biology, another of th« many science courses, was designed to acauaint the general student with the practical aspects of his everyday world. Pnnr Mathematics, the most precise science, was studied at a variety of levels at Stockton College, from applied arith- metic and consumer ' s mathematics to calculus and statistics. High school, college level transfer, and college level terminal courses comprised the offering. A high school class worked at understanding geometry. College level beginning algebra was a stepping stone to higher scientific training. The aeronautics department of the Science division offered courses in navigation, meterology, aerodynamics and aircraft, and courses leading to private or commercial pilot ' s licenses. Additional credit was obtainable for completion of licenses. Page 73 Trade and Industry In the automobile shop, students were taught all phases of auto repair in- cluding such difficult work as auto- matic transmissions. Playing a vital role in the education of future San Joaquin farmers, the agricultural courses offered a wide variety of training directly related to conditions in this region. Carpenter trainees laid subflooring. Ralph Herring has been division chair- man of Industrial education for the past seven years. Again this year under his supervision, the carpentry, mill cab- inet, electrical, plumbing, painting, and sheet metal shops combined their skills to build a five-room house. School projects of this nature readied the stu- dents for futures as skilled craftsmen. Paqo 74 A modern dance sequence. Physical Education Physical education was a much wider field than football, basketball, baseball, and track. Modern dance, hygiene, archery, golf, tennis, swimming, social dancing, tumbling, recreational leadership, badminton, and more comprised the division offering under the direction of amiable Mike Garrigan. Miss Gladys Benerd assisted Mr. Garrigan, acting as head of women ' s activities. Pete Lenz was coordinator of athletics for the college. Hygiene was a prerequisite for graduation at both high school and college levels. First aid instruction was a regular part of the course along with personal hygiene and human relationships. P.E. activities continued beyond regular school hours in a wide variety of intramural sports. Page 75 Business Education I ri F K 2j • T fl Conning to the teaching pro- fession with eight years of business experience. William Niven has been a competent chairman of the division for the past three years. Business education courses are based on the needs of the students who plan to make their living in the business field. An all-important phase of learning in a good business program were shorthand dictation classes offered at SC. Training and practice in the operation of business machines of all kinds was included in the business curriculum. Pago 76 Business math classes solved everyday, real-life problems dealing with income, investment, earnings, and budgets met in business and private life. The booki eeping section of the business department was planned to give maximum benefits to non-business as well business majors. Typing classes at SC were always packed, proving that this skill is recognized as not only a business necessity, but a valuable asset in everyday living. Page 77 Communications Charles Guss has directed the Communications division since 1949. English, speech, and jour- nalism courses In wide variety rounded out the curriculum In this important area. Western literature and creative writing courses proved very popular with many students. Some journalism courses trained students to work on the school paper and yearbook, while other classes actually produced these publications. SC English classes ..tressed basic skills I with special I twelfth grade courses ' designed for college-bound students. Speech was one of the most useful subjects offered at both hlgn school and junior college levels. In these da J..- .. were e- overcome mi- r n.-irurnl staqofriqht and d - ICO .ip. P »qe 78 Mustang Debate Fronf Row: Tom Boqgs. Chuck Bloch. Paul Winters, debate coach; Leo Sardella. Charles Ludwig, Marilyn Ea Row 2: Max Cargay. Duane Mayfield. Mervyn Hoffnnan. Max Huber, rley, Iris Dave Carter, Teselle. S£) In March the above five iourneyed to McMinnville, Oregon, where they competed In the Linfleld Inter- collegiate Tournament of Champions and defeated thirty-one colleges and universities from eight west- ern states to win the sweepstakes award. They are;, - ' front row, Marilyn Earley, and Iris Carter. Row Chuck Bloch, Max Huber, and Dave TeSelle, iJ . ; ' Colt Debate Fronf Row: Tom Smith. Sonda Smith, Don Coopor. Row 2: Darryl Wong. 6 Thompson, John Fanucchi, debate coach. Row 2. Harry Sharp. Tom Smith. J[ f tvt " " y Ed Lewis Advittr The staff of the paper drew up a creed which states: the main purposes of the Collegian ore (I) to present news of Interest and importance to its readers, adequately and accurately, and (2) to operate as a laboratory for learning the newspaper profession. The " All-American " rating earned last year in national judging was evidence that the creed was being fulfilled. The Fall editor, Bill Coolc, was praised In an article as being " the best editor the paper ever had. " Bill gradu- ated mid-term and the paper was turned over to new heads who continued to publish more papers than ever before In the school ' s history. Coll e g I a n Front Row: Jorry French J»cli Har ' oy. Row 2: Wob«r Ctnapa C-. N Ffa,.. . ,. Photographers Business Staff I m Sifting: Diana Campboll. Bsvarly Lowton, managor. Standing: Cliff Raynoldt. Robarta Lea. Caria Jonat. It taties a lot TO ■ ' i.iic ,1 [virc. Page 80 Bill Cook Editor (F.ll) Kathy Wilson Managing Editor (Fall and Spring) 1 ' ■- ' Mike Kuhlmann Editor (Spring) cc Ail-American ' ' Newspaper Editorial Staff News Staff i COIUGIAM H H Front Row: Dick Zoleai and Jim Forbes, editorial writers. Row 2: Lindley Thomas, sports editor; Geraldine Garden, feature editor; Bob OLear. news editor. Front Row: Ronald Hildebrand. Lindley Thomas, Ronald Kibby, Bob Parkin, Bob Peterson, Jerry Simpson. Ish Castellano. Row 2: Joan Malloy, Lorelta Anderson, assistant feature editor; Rena Bayer, Joyce Goetz, Evelyn Hamos. Bobby Weinstock, Sylvia Smith, Roberta Lee, exchange editor. Not pictured are Jean Carlson, Diane Campbell, Cliff Reynolds, and Don Gwaltney. Page 81 El Recuerdo Business Staff Gaorqg Roberti, Joan Malloy, manager; Bevarly Lawton. Caria Jones Jim Hicks Advitar Tempers flared more than once as the editor cracked the whip, but there were plenty of happy moments too. Evenings, Saturdays, and Sundays were just good times to work unhampered by class schedules and other interruptions. Yearbook sales soared to a new high, 1275, under the direction of George Roberts. The 192 pages record the activities of the largest enrollment in Stockton College ' s history, 3,556, an increase of some 500 students over the year before. Mr. Hicks, the adviser, survived the ordeal without an ulcer. Miss Doris Hoenisch was art consultant. " Cheese " Paste up . . . Write up. Poge 82 (!Vu%. »v.J Garrett Kinser and El Recuerdo were synonymous. The only task he didn ' t actually perfornn was to snap a photo, although he supervised the takinq of many of them. Artistically inclinecl, he designed the cover and section pages, and planned the page layouts; he pasted hundreds of photographs and wrote copy. The book is his. Stockton College Yearbook Production Staff Photographers SiHIng: Betty Lawseth. manager; Darlene Mills, Jaci Williams, Kathy Jacobs. Standing: Helen Ross, Gretchen Holt. Carl Overton. Jerry Hopper. Not pictured are Pat Brooks, Nance Allen, Palt, Dyer, Soma Davis. Office Managers Richard Yoshlkawa Graduate Portrait Photographer Carol Cruz, loft, and Pat Jensen. Page 83 TUES I " TMOR |fri. wco. Tho« FRI 3 R ntl :i}393|}3393 3 ' 9;} 9 ■93393939 S6bjb6 7|7 777 188818 66|6666S6E666 ' 6 ' 6S6666E6 Thin m 1 m 1 m 11 n n Is 88 8I8|88 8S|8 888|8888 ■ 9 9 3 nil 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 99 9 9 9 |9 9 9 9 9 9 I 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 u i r. M ] ' M H t ' U • J ! ' - ' M ' J 4 M U«l U U U » 14 IT U M H :! i; ' i 0- :1 [titli«tiMMiiiii r ' «!iiinl 1 " ' __11Jfi _ --. 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 rt 1 1 1 i 1 1 Vl I • I ! ■ ' • ( I • 1 1 • I t I I I I lill I M t I I ill lit I t M ill I I I I M 1 I I t 1 I I JXllU. ' .UU ' jIill 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1(1 1 I ) 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1)1 1 1 1 1 |i 1 1 1 1 il 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 il II I ijitkti 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ) ' i nil 1 1 ini| " ' " " " " " nnnju.«JU " «« ' « ' ' «ll« $ i 1 : t • » I : Il • III O ' llLI - " l clA- H I |-r_ -«n )l ll |lllill ' tl ' llllllVtlVltt ijk I ' ] lltl|llll| ilt«li lt ii«litlijltlWli " 1_ ' I ' , p|iiii|MiiiMiiiMi|irjiiiiMi|iimii .. " ' .. I t . |iiiiiliiiiii|iiii|i«ii|iiiitiiilii lllllllt»tfllllll ltl|«l1iffllllllllll1llltit1Mt e ' c c c e t e i „.„„ : •j! 1- T.J dent r.o n ( 1 ' . ' I 1 . ' -.1 - ■3t 0 " 0 0l[0 0 DOOl wu al 2 3 b; £ ' ; 3 it: I •; J?. H 1 n nin n n n H —ST ' t t I . i = a — c — |o le — t — |o CM ,« 31 ;5 § •AJ •- 5 o H 1 u t s 2 s iir. Z w 3 w V- — l u o fi laikk. kk ' t.« -i;::— |lli;illtltlll lldlllllllil r I, J «r LO r B «o r to «o r «n «A -. »n o r i CO r tn CO F tn 40 F I iinitiiiiii V5 «ii_«l lliiJ fl ' l«l all • axl ' 1 ?» " " .■. ' - « 8 I CI8VJ SSVT3 TT 2 2 2-2 2 2 2 2 28 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 i 2 2 2 2 2 212 212 2 2 2 2 i I I i I I 6 33 33 3:3 3 313 3 3i 3 3 3 3;3 3 3 3 bI 3 . 3 3|3i3i33 3 3 3 3 I I ' ! I i :i ' ;.444 44U a : JW S :: -.•.™ 5 5 6!-, 4 4 4 4 4 -Ui 4j4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4i4.i4iai4 4 14 4 4 J V.-. TJ I 1 J A .-■ n Wee- " T 1: ■ J. KiC. .•W- 1 " sfiLK. i MJN. r I ( T U C. - |i I Illllblll ■ I " ttcLccl«ccctci ((( (((( (l 1 1 I ( (1 n una r ! K it h ( ' r i ••»»•(« :tU»p« k a « u k n ;i h J I ' 9 9 9|9 9;9 9tS9 I s;;s [CC|C 1 1 1 11 S ItK « Kin K 10000 ssi|;1|st 00 »»» etc I I 1 K KCi 000 ttOMl E 6 e 6 6|| e!G 6 6;6 6 S 6 e 6 6ISi6 G 8 B 6 S S t|6 B 88 81 8|S|!8I8 ' 8I 1 L LlVLillLlltl unrii oil NON ' . iSJO-ii ■ U »: If V U M U U II Kit Ilia II tl t (I ti It •( I • t lit I ' I IIIIB B 6 B B B e B 6,B 6 B 6 S S B B 6 6 B IB E B B t N0« IKJ untu anMi tecttct iiiiiii (C ' CtCCC lllll tllLl 91199 SS|SS ■rr»|rffrr»T» » t » » » ' i m » » » » » | !» » » » Nun ui ' n Nor I J Zd 3JNVC ' N3rfv a jM N0« tVi I 1 I l|t I » .» »t t» II -I •» 000000 llllltlUllV.l I I 1 1 lll lllll 11 ■ .![» « r ir H a K ctja u,Qf ||||| n 1 [I o!o : . I : ' CC|CCC|CCCCt(tt i: • T : i i: e : : 5 . Ki 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 l H tl f. II 11 I I t t ooo ' nooooo lllll t » I t oooool I : ' itiQf.. " iS CO OO CT tn ■i Co -5=1 " S CO OS _J en 0 en x c » ro — • V O { I • _ — It (3 o=.o OO OO O) O) tn J -0 — S e= 2 S CO OO J 0« en rt 1 ' 1 ■H?; C3 Cco or • o en — S «r C CO H • o en ' 1 — t = OS o en _ jn en -«-5 _ S CD OO • J Ol en — ' - ■ Sco s3 «o OO CD 2 cr en 5 S 5 C m 5 ' z o 2 — 8 C3 — so — 3 ea I ' l- CO OO —J CT CJI ? 3 H O o - rf w CO oa OO —4 09 09 « en en en 11 s 2 H f- s ' " .5 «o OO — CT en — a " ' ::r CO OO OO - J CT en f IT! X CD rn - : I — so . S CO Vfr CO OO en en — so — so ' ■f-B « OO •- j» en -so 393nOD NOiXDOiS S-to •• - w — «0 " 0 " ■to B —J a U hYff sio ' - » -. 1 t .. .. J... ■« " r " ■ 4 — » L ' ■ ' l 1 . . . . » .It ' l- l 1.) ....X. . ••-1. ' ■ ' J ■ »■ »- " r 4- 0::v :i ' .. .xjfrr. -• " A; j «) ' z . j ' ' . ;i 1 i. 1 1 tt ;3 I I I i 9 oiG 2,0 G:e s o;o:oio o o o o o a oio o Sio s o ' ., 4 . : -, ' 3 i-- 4« 48 5w 5; ' ..- • Ji ' 55 SfS 57 W W 6« 2 g3 g lSJ .S jSJ 65 OS 78 ] 12 7? 7 ! i JS ; ' S ;■ iiO M i n nh njnin 1 11 1 1 1 JjjlylUJJJ..ilJlllll A B S R L V ! A T i i C i!) t IT V 22 22 2 22|222j2 2|22 2 2 2 ' 33 33 333133 3i3 31313 3 3 ! i M . Si .1 I. ;-..(, . . (. . I , lit . C t I •• 96 6 6 6 6 ( 6 8 6 6 S 6 1$ S S 8 ( i5555i55$555|5i5 I I I • ■ ' i Homecoming A perpetual trophy was awarded to the Stockton College Intramural Theatrical Society ' s float, " Legionnaire ' s Mirage, " which took first place. A highpoint of the Homecoming rally was an inspiring speech by Mr. Amos Alonzo Stagg. Coach Harry Kane, left, and Coach Don Hall also addressed the packed grandstands of Baxter Stadium. Members of Newman Club selected Italy as their theme and dis- played an Italian Festival, which won second place in the parade. Winding up the Homecoming ac- tivities, a costume dance entitled " Foreign Frolic " was held Saturday evening. Juanita Milton, dressed as an African missionary, and Jack Hunter dressed as an Arabian h. ' , were both awarded a throe d i- mi ■• ' ■ order for the two pr . i costumes. Page 86 A mixture of happiness and surprise was portrayed on the faces of, left to right, Jean Berry, Nance Allan, Sue Seaman, and Carole Hankins, the four finalists of the Queen contest, when the winner was announced. Numerous clubs and organizations entered floats in the pa- rade, which was un der the chairmanship of Brent Heisinger. pui lq Sue Seaman, a college liu-iiirnan, was selected as the 1954 Stockton College Homecoming Queen. She was chosen from among 1 7 entries, all of whom were judged on poise, personality, and beauty. Parade floats symbolized the theme of Homecoming, Foreign Countries. Homecoming, held October 16, will prob- ably be remembered by S. C. alumni as the Roundup or Jubilee. This was the first Stock- ton College Homecoming, and featured a football game, a parade, a queen contest, a rally, and was brought to a close with a costume dance at the Civic Auditorium. Page 87 Winnie Mustang Song Leaders Pert song leaders. Alberta Fedler. bottom, and Tansy Herplch took a part in S C athletic victories as they danced and pranced for cheering sports fans to the nnusic of Stockton College ' s fight songs. Winnie and Musty, recognized Stockton College personalities, were always seen by football fans clowning during halftlme activities. The nnascots were in reality Barbara Shellcross and Elvin Myers. Mustang Yell Leaders The big fvel Full of vim, vigor, and vitality, Pat Brooks. li, and . Bloch, were well known fiqw at all Mustang athletic events. Colt Yell Leaders Colt yell leaders, Margot Seymour, Pat Athans Mary Reynosa, Anita Greene, and David Sears added a spark to the Stockton College rooting section which caused the stands to tremble with school spirit displayed by exuberant fans. ? Colt Song Leaders Musty and Winnie The Stockton College songieaders, Pat Jensen, front, and Jean Hartmann, Rose Marie Mayer, and Susan Chisamore, have led cheering fans innumerable times to the music of " Washington and Lee Swing, " " Notre Dame Fight Song, " and the " Alma Mater. " The frolicing Colts, Musty and Winnie, alias Bob Harlan and Barbara Shellcross, treated the rooters to hilarious halftimes. This was one of their many stunts. Page 89 Pep Rallies spirited students, song and yell leaders, and the band often nnet in the Barn area for pep rallies, which were held frequently dur- ing football season. The featured rally of the year was the Stockton - LodI ex- change rally, an event which is held during the week of the " fiery " football contest be- tween the two rival schools. Hold everything! A nnocit football game between Stockton College and Lodi High School was dramatized by members of Women ' s Sports Association at the Stockton - Lodi exchange rally. Demonstrating their school spirit. Chuck Bloch, Pat Brooks. LaVonne Crismon, and Del McComb. Mustang Yell Leaders, inspired enthusiastic sports fans during an outdoor pep rally. Page 90 Class Rallies The four classes competed for a perpetual trophy which was not awarded until the end of the semester. A theatrical agency was used as the theme for the 14th grade rally. To the left, a group of depressed gals is pictured crooning, " I ' m Going to Wash That Man Right Out of My hiair. " Below, the male mem- bers of the class proclaimed, " There is Nothing Like a Dame! " -• Beverly Tuso and Don Cima posed before a group of chorus girls, who were the featured attraction of the I 3th grade class assembly. A contrast was drawn between the danc- ing styles and automobiles of the 20 ' s and 50 ' s. After watching the old-timers run through a Charleston, modern " bop- sters " from the I 2th grade class showed them how it ' s done nowadays. Eleventh graders performed during the same assembly with the seniors. After-ganne dances followed the majority of football and bailcetball games, and the pictures to the right display the variety of styles of dancing which could be seen at the events. Dancers were camera-caught enjoying one of the more lively dances, familiar to the high school - college set. Most after-game dances were held in the Stockton College gyr Dances " Sleigh Ride " was the theme for this year ' s annual Christ- mas semi-formal dance, which was held in the Civic Audi- torium. Page 93 tftn A total of 457 journalists, representing 32 schools in Northern California gathered at Stockton College November 5 for a high school and junior college jour- nalism conference, which was under the direction of James Hicks and Edmund Lewis, El Recuerdo and Col- legian advisers respective! . Stockton College Journalism Conference i E ' J 3 _ J 1 KI J i L:: 1 John Duke, journalism instructor at Fresno State College, was one of the featured speakers. With the theme of the con- ference, " accentuate the positive " In mind, members of the fourth estate collect- ed numerous ideas which were taken back to their own publications for use. ViitTiny |uurnalisls are pictured working at o iieiu trial, a section of the conference where awards were given to the outstanding writers in feature writing, editorial writing, sports writing, and straight news writing. 4 The West reading room of the new S C library was headquarters for • conference. Doleqatos wore taken on a tour through the Stock- ton Collego Print Shop, one of the few school print shops in the itata and were shown inspecting the folding machine. Pago 94 Curious students were pictured inspecting a display set up. by the Electrics Club. Club Day Clubs sold such novelties as corn on the cob, carrots, apples, and garters. Others set up ' displays or gave away such things as ' Hi ' cards or balloons. Club Day, a Stockton Col- lege tradition which is not primarily a money making project, is a day set aside for campus clubs to lure new members and to make known their existence. Because of rain, the Club Day booths were for the first time placed under the trellised walk-ways instead of the Barn area as usual, which proved to be a very successful arrangement. Music burst torth from the Radio Club ' s dis- play and drifted over the campus to inject the spirit of Club Day into the student body. Male students showed an extreme interest in the display set up by the Knuckle Busters, the Auto Mechanics Club. Page 95 Pert and pretty were Florence Reed, right, and Gail Hartman, who captured the titles of Attendants to the " Queen of Clubs. " A picture of loveliness! Julie Wager was chosen to reign over the Colt - Flame football game and after- game dance as " Queen of Clubs. " Queen of Clubs Leading the car parade down Pacific Avenue was Florence Reed and Joan DeCarli. I to r seated in the lead car. A kiss of congratulations was bestowed upon " Queen of Clubs " Julie Wager by Bob Harlan, Rally Commissioner. The fact that there was one of the largest turnouts In the his- tory of Stockton College v as In Itself evidence that the queen contest, sponsored by Headllners Club, was a suc- cess. A new Innovation was Introduced to the campus. In that the princesses were se- lected by campus clubs and represented the clubs In the contest. ' oicorii afo pitlurod b«(oro tho crown. ng. Ihoy arc, 1 to r. Joan DoCarIi and Dino Cortopaili. Albef ' a Fodlor and Dal McComb. Barbara h. Jaan Paroira end Jim Morriton, Judy Gran and CKafIa Bartucalli. Francai Bartln and Martin Paqa, Joann Moor and Don Smith. " !■ , ' . " ■ I ird. Bevarly Tui -jc - • " ■■-■». Connia McGraw and Gary Cahill. Mary Lou Hall «nd John Vincont. Julia Waqar Carolyn Ranfro and Ed Rantro, Gail Gomel and G«or9« Barron, . „ ,. ». .- ,, - U ,.r,n .inH C 1 kni ' h Goinoll Page 96 Italian Club Play Vocalists Marilyn Benjamin and Clara Hendrix were accompanied by Arthur and Elmer Moretto. Adding spice and comedy to the production, Bob Perry (left), Joe DeCristofaro (standing left), and Guy Micell (seated middle), along with Linda Drake and Frank Guidi (seated right) portrayed gay Napoll booth owners. With toes pointed, Italian Club dancers, I to r, Mary Stella Polsinelli, Dena Canepa, Rochelle Onweiler, Beverly Tuso, Marcla Johnson, Rita Franco, Ruth Glmlen, Marie Stagnaro, and Jackie Koster seem to be enjoying their escapade. A double love plot was enacted iiy Bob Dal Porto, Diane Custer, Kathy Bisagno, and Art Godi. Don Clma, who wrote and directed the play, and Marcla Johnson are seen during one of their outstanding dance routines. comedy to the production. Oena Cdnepa and Marie Stagnaro stopped for a glass of " wine " from booth owners Bob Perry, Guy Miceli, and Linda Dyle. " Carnevale Napolltano " was this year ' s annual Italian Club play which was a gay, colorful production. Don Cima wrote and directed the play which illustrated fair time in Naples and was full of numerous Italian folk songs and dances. Page 97 am Club Coca Cabana .% " Nrtuqhty Ninefies Revue " was the title of this novel theatrical production. The ring- s • was transfornned to a gay nineties saloon, complete with swinging doors, a ' .r and cuspidors. The Stockton College Intramural Theatrical Society presented the second annual Club Coca Cabana In No- vember. The campus night-club featured waiters, bar maids, a dance band, and two floor shows. Larry Angelo and Glena McGill. with the Key- notes occupying the band stand In the back- ground, entertained the night-club patrons. Accordionist Oeanna Harper Is pictured in the floor show spotlight. f 1 Prancing Can-Can girls, Cecilia Fernandez. Mary Lou Hall, and Barbara Treece. were a major attraction of the night spot. Club Coca ' s Can-Can cuties were a ssisted by Larry Angelo at the f e piano. N ' ont : ' i.iibr " " . wirr ' i by a staff of Don Riley, Kotez. Pago 98 " Claudia " " Have a bite of pickle, David? " enticed Claudia, as David dis- gustedly checked her unsyste- matic bookkeeping system. Maxim Popovlch SC Drama Instructor Claudia and her mother exchange good nights before retiring When Claudia entertained dinner guests from New York, Fritz, the Naughton ' s handyman, donned a white jacket to serve the dinner in an elegant manner. " Claudia " a three act comedy drama written by Rose Franken, was presented by the SC drama department in early March. Larry Angelo and Mitzi Davis co-starred in the production as David and Claudia Naughton. Other members of the cast of the lighthearted drama were Glena McGill, Claudia ' s mother, Mrs. Brown; Ray Fountain, Fritz, the Naughton ' s handyman; Colleen Cross, the Naughton ' s maid, Bertha; Stan Denton, Jerry Seymour, a suave Englishman who was the Naughton ' s country neighbor; Cecilia Fernandez, Julia Naughton, Claudia ' s slster- in-law; and Carole Love, who portrayed Darushka, a Russian opera singer. David returned home to find his wife in the arms of Jerry Seymour, a novelist, who rented a country home nearby. I .. A ' V-. Cs. Claudia was a naive child-bride with an acute case of mother attachment. David, after displaying much patience and understanding, finally discovered that his wife had untangled herself from her mother ' s apron strings, and was ready lo face the responsibilities of a wife. Newman Club won first place to add to their growing collection of awards. Using the " old movies on TV " theT-e and the entire stage re: ' 1 a " Pilco " home tele- V ■ ne club presented their sliit realistically, commercials and all. Variety Shov PILCO Jolly old Saint Niclt. Dick O ' Day. filled the heads of the members of the 14th grade class with visions of sugar plums as he related a Christmas story in their sicit. Veterans ' Club members gaze at the lifeless body of Dick O ' Day sprawlen ' acvross the floor as emcee Tom Boggs throws a questioning glance towarj the audience. The Stoclcton College Variety Show was an annual affair and many campus clubs and organizations participated. The event was sponsored by Colt Band and awards were given for the best skits. Tom Boggs traditionally emceed the show, as he was the Master of Ceremonies of the first and second SC Variety Shows and. after a term in the service, returned last year. Page 100 The winning skit in the high school division, presented by the French and German Club, was a comic operetta entitled ' The Gray Tower. ' A Chorus of fair maidens demand the autograph of Adjusto le Carburator, the hero, alias Dick Osbourne. Meanwhile the heroine, Saratoga, who was portrayed by Marlene Bartlett, pined away in her tower await- ing her rescuer. A trio, consisting of Frank Panoncialman on the string bass, Mike Montana at the piano, and singer Don Douglas, rendered several popular songs in their own particular style. These three fellows have also played for after-game dances with great success. The Audio-Visual Operators Club was also one of the participating clubs. " Sad Wed- ding, " the title of their skit, was a comedy-tragedy concerning a backwoods wedding. Page 101 Fun Fest " Tradewlnds. " theme of the 1955 Fun Fest. gently swept over the campus In March, Injecting a mood of gaiety and light -heartedness Into the entire student body and faculty. The traditional event was staged at the Civic Auditorium which was transformed Into a tropical won- derland. Cardboard jungle animals and snakes gazed dov n upon the dancers and a wrecked ship shared the stage with Art Nielsen and his orchestra. Pert Gail Hartmann ar foreign student Ed Zamr were pictured after receiving the news that they were King and Queen o 1955 Fun Fest, chosen from thirty-eight royalty hopefulfl. Each received an engraveql: identification braceML In line with Fun Fest tradition, a theme mural adorned the end of the Barn. Bob Gibson and his father, Howard Gibson, hung the mural as usual. Decorations chairman Garry Kinser peeks out from under the ladder. The Fun Fest rally was generally acclaimed one of the best ever staged at SC. The scenes at right and below convinced many to attend because all attendance records were broken. Chuck Blocn and Brent ' • ' f- ' inqcr were CO-chalrmen. Clad In festive at+Ire, two " natives " clown in front of the fortune telling booth. Page 103 a A f .%. . ' in n i |i| i Front Row: Le Tonner. Darrell Handel, Jim Santans, Malcolm Stone. James F ' ancoit. David Bromwell. George Stretart, Nelion Zane. Ronald SchmiH. Alle- G« er. Bearge King. Pete Gibion. Row 2: Mary Anne Chrlstoferson, Sheila Gi len. Janice Rodman. Bonnie Spurgeon, Flora Horton. Carl Hamon. Ina G ' a ' a- Janet Fairbanlt. David TeSelle, Laura Covey. Ann Miller, Lynn Stevens, Janic i Johnson. Row 3: John Wright. Don Keller. Alan Reyburn. Jim h Frank Panoncialman. Ed Farley. Patrrcl Flentge. Mai Olivas. Muriel Bradley. D nald Baldwin. Barrie Wells. Arthur Corra, director. Row 4: Jim Hool. Burbank. Trevor Kohler. Joan Kiehn, Arlen Kigitale, Eva Lu Tarr, Alice Mey t. Katherine Kiehn, Barbara Dow. Cliff Patton. Phillip Gaier, Charlotte ; Francet Littleton. Row 5: Jim Durflinger, Marl Blinoff, William Taylor, Will am Saunders, Henry Avila. Ray Lippert. Annette Granger, Donald C . - Catherine MacKeniie, Virginia y»nn. Faye Barnes. SC-COP Band Above is the band assembled on the football f eld and ready to go into one of its nr any halftime routines. Without a doubt the group added spirit to every game. Outstanding In its many per- formances at Mustang foot- ball and basketball games and other school functions was the SC - COP marching band. Students didn ' t find it hard to remember the unique halftime shows put on by this group during football season. The band, which is under the di- rection of Art Corra, also played at COP games and is considered one of the great- est marching bands in Cali- fornia. Page 104 Colt Band The Stockton College Colt Band, under the direction of Arthur hHolton. competed in the state music festival held at San Francisco State College and returned home with a superior rating for the second consecutive year. Excellent half-time performances were a specialty of the Colt Band, pictured above in a routine representing a bull fight, using themes from ' Carmen ' for Colt- El Camino football game. Drum Majors and Drum Majorettes: Judy Dodgen, Bob Stanley, Leilani Herplch, Ronnie BJack, Mary Doll. Band Members: Front Row: Pete Lucchesi, Bob McCall Manuel Fernandez. Don Gonzales. Don Tapia. Eddie Avila. Carlos Alonzo, Les Gini, Charles Marshall, Nancy Hanlts, Carol Avery, Marlene Kundert. Judy Alexander. Loretta Stanneic, Marge Belknap. Carol Crapple. Maud Teverbaugh. Row 2: Jean Reyburn, Donna Carlson. Marilyn Burgess, Carolyn Breakttetd, Mary Drummond, Bill Mongolo, Melvin Cook, Jared Richardson, Marlene Miller, Pat Moresco, Pat Baker. Barbara Canepa, Elda Garner, Row 3: David Marshall, Milo Kvidera. Roberta Odgers, John Newell. Glenn Money, Bill Sattler, Thelma Tarklngton, Luther Miller, Charles Newman. Roy Chambliss, Andrew Thompson, Carl Kennard, Terry Scott, Bill Haley, Ray Howley, Larry LeFevre, Tommy Campbell. David Wood. Bill Crandall, Arthur Holton. director; Frank Becknell. Steve Weesner, Othel Easter, Patricia Carido. Adrian Sims. Rex Proper, Buddy Washington, Raymond Hall, Bobby Crieg. Gary Carver, Gene Moccafiche, Leroy Johannaber, David White. Shirley Wright, Helen Huffman, Lynn Rimer, Charles Lorenson, Dan Ramirez, Bob Graneveld. First Orchestra Front Row: Irene Marfinez. Julie Wager, Kathy Bisagno. Bertha Anderson, Sue Francis, Arleno Ramer, Barbara Buckius. Row 2: Bob Jamieson. Mike Thomas (ompty seat; he took this picture), Joan White, Barbara Denny. Marilyn Burgess, Ted Reyes, Jack Cole. Milo Kvidera. Mike Saxton. Alex Wessitsh. Ruth Hawkins, Margot Kampe. Row 3: Evelyn Perl. Rachel Alvarez, Henry Avila, Judy Alexander. Glenn Money, Lou Karim, Peggy Joy, Danny Portlllo, Alan Snow, John Coffey. Eddie Avila, Pauline Holdren, Pat Dennis, Claudia Ormsbee, Janice Bowman. Page 105 Troubadours This select group of singers were the offi- cial carolers of Stock- ton and nnade many guest appearances at local clubs, especially at Christmastime. Front Row: Rl)s Garcia. Genevieve Cebaliza, Landra Mooberry, Barbara Waare. Deloys Wheeler. Glenna Mowry. Carol Ballin. Row 2: Marlene Long, Margaret Allen. Jean Dalglaish. Carlita iiaacs. Lila Cool. Dian Bonfilio. Row 3: Richard Rithwain. Don Farrell. Del Simmoni. Jaclie Reevei. Row 4: John Arnold, Emerson Sutton. Arthur Bati. Don Bennett. Dave Doyle, Jamei Tomlinton, Rochelle Bathor at the piano. Mixed Chorus Mixed Chorus, under the direction of Frank Thornton Smith, was the featured attraction of the annual Christmas party. At Easter, Troubadours and a selected group from Mixed Chorus presented " The Crucifixion " at a downtown church. Richard Rithwain. Darlane Rodman, Ba-, Pnqti 106 I Oratorio Chorus Students Interested In learning to sing classic, romantic, and contemporary oratorios enjoyed Mr. J. Russell Bodley ' s Oratorio Chorus. The students spent the fall semester preparing a full production of Handel ' s " Messiah. " In the spring the class was scheduled to produce Ralph Vaughn Williams ' " Sancta Civltas. ' Stockton College students participating in the " Messiah, " pictured above, were Joyce Albright, Henry Avila, Adele Cantele. Lois Cogorno, James Dean, Bill Dodge, Don Douglas. Florence Erojo, Janet Falrbanlcs, Allen Geyer, Arlyce Johnson, Don Keller, Trevor Kohler, Robin Locke, Katherine " MacKenzie, Sandra Melbs, Faye Osbourne, Polly Osbourne, Frank Panonclalman, Sue Seaman, Lloyd Schopp. Marlene Sutherland, and Sandra Wright. Opera Class The gigantic task of producting an uncut version of the opera, " Boris Goudonoff, " was undertaken quite successfully by Dr. Lucas Underwood ' s Opera Class. This performance received acclaim in a nationally recognized magazine. " Boris Goudonoff " was the first west coast performance by a college and the second student presentation of this opera In the United States. Page 107 I TUCS ■ " THUHI |fRi. ' MO ' J TUTS WCD. THUR f Bl 5 5 ■ 5 II 5 5 5 5 5 5 1 5 S S S S SSISjSlS S S S S SfS $||S S 5 1 t6 6|b866|6 6666 66 6 6666SS666S64ttttfct 7|7 7 7 7|7 7 n m 111 n fini n m illSStIS t II88|S18S|S888|8 88 e ■l 9U 4 « 9 a a a ' Q ' q 099011041)1)919933331993 9|9,9|9 99339 lUA ' ' 4 .»»• »• MO ■« V I H ■ It II I. • . I II IKIIilllKI. Iiiiiiitti«i iiti« iiiiiti:iiiii ii ii 1,1 1 1 1 1 til I I I I I ill t|i I I 1 1 ill t I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 i,i,t 1 1 1 liUl M:l II, riiiiliiiiiiri iniliii riiii ir, ii) Jii | 1 , ' ,f ' I jC ininliiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiliiii .1 t ' 1 1.. .| L«ji«i««i«i«it4«iiiit«ii«i««ii«ii««(«ii4i||ai I I I ' " t ■ I I I ftlltlllllllMllllllDlllMtlltllloi I I iilitiiliiiiiiitiiiiiiiiitiitii ' tii .l|lMtMMMIMfM)iFrMIItiriirill |iiiii|iaiiii|iiM|iaii|iiiiiiM|ii I I ••iiiiiiiil I ' iiii iii|iiiiii|iiiitiitiiiiiii «iii I jr. f ■■■JC ' ENT f. . i :Q GOO DID 000 1 I V w U yj b £ ' 5 5 ' -1 I I |M -- -I- I--I sroc«TON coLL ' if o « — ca r — •-Jo o «a r— !■» ' • ' • 1 ua ii ' l(iiG?i))ilt ) «0 « ( t " " " (X •« «A ' »i } s Hl l ' I ' -I 2 w 3 u. M II III 11 1 1 1 1(1 (ill (((11 l- 9 - So £ CZ " • ' I L ; ;-._ ' H " • " ■ mil •»•••»• !» — ] : I III B ; • ' » • .? _ I ■ — -i _ ; f " : ■ Hfi . " » . r- 1 1 s {It i!f ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 o IE — [ ■ »r ca r»- «n (A r iTS fcO lo Z »3« no. nfirnr 1 1 1 1 ■ • m ii««lMCiB H«ai • IliUMMIIIl rN m o : - r«4 ro V o a i «« Oi « « o X • CM «o C9 3 rsi r 9 — rs f » ' - CD — M i- il ' — cs m • C o m - E - " ' ' ds " • ' - ■ ' ■ r I 0H — CM - ' -- ' M " I ! 1 • . i_.L_ C — CM «-NI -i! :i ic9 Z — CN •- i ? - r «-» |fl3 m — €%• ro ' CD • — f ' ' ( « 4 r - ' J.I ex ro ,y2 1 n !:n n 1 n n I I I I 1222 22222212222 2 222 QMVJ SbVTJ Of; :■■} I 1 I I ' I • .5 I S2 27 2 2,2;2!2!2 2;2 2 2g i i 3 3 33!33 3i333i3333i3 33 3 3i3.J 3 3 ' 3i3h 3 3 ' 3 3 3 3 f V. 4 4 4 4 4: ' ' 4i ' M 4 4 4 ' . i. s : 5 4g4j4 4444444 4_4i4.4 i 4 4[4 4 4_4 ' ' . ■. ' • f lljKS! C ' w I I n;r I I: • r ti .) ' TU ' r Vl|iWMW «« — T — .v. ' . ' . E 6 6 6j| 6j6 $ 6,6 e 6 e 6 6 6|6|6 6 6 6 6 6 6 616 6 ||M C E|C till I I I I It K n K 0000 ;!:||; »»» t ct I I I K K II 155 r ' .Ort H lUOHl S3ni ,4.|U|a w u K u t c v (I ii|ii II (I »i (1 1, .. ui ( « , • ' V • I ( 111 1 6 6 6 6 6 6 S 6 6 S 6 6 6 i 6 6 S 6 6 E |6 6 S 6 i.,i- J 1 , 1 — I III ltd Hnni OJM tH 3 tiniu 13M f3ni U ni b Mm MOM I caw iW ' I ' 6 i ( 19199 i ctcct tt ' t :; 2222 2 2 Ct ' 1 1 c c c 22221222 anoz ' .■ jjNvc ' Kijrf? I ► » T» ► ► » »»»»»| |»» »» |» 1» » » » M I l|l 111 1 l|M|l CC t 2 212 1 19» « I ' f c c; K nio. K-cr =i;i olLO olo_o q ooj liil.o. ' i o i oji ojo . " .o 1 I T : irirt: " Lli j: .». t t |t tt |Ct t 1: = ? s ir? 1:: K r ■ 6 5 : : J ::« _ 1: » T : 5 «i t c t c c! : 222|222222.222|2 I I I M I 11 t 1:1 I t I (t »t ti ; 1. 41 t ( I t ( t P " 1 0;0 i. ■ QU kHJQF. A .SCO 2 to 00 00 00 - tn cn cn ite Ca» K -,£=] 2 •? - " , I ) - . — — s «= .SCO C «» 00 —J cn cn 3 ' ( UD — BO C CO B " • o» cn. 1 1 - " 1 C C3 00 o cr cn cn — sol j « (A OD - o cn .£ CO 1 to cS to 00 00 - cn cn r» I ) c rn Z Z — So ,- CO 00 —J 0 c « 2s ' 0 ■X. - 1 ■r; CO r : to 2 CO .5 o 00 OD 00 cn cn cn cn r- 2 OD cn cn ' ' to 00 ■ " J «r» S 2 m - — 30 , S D H -» 4 o cn — SO Vv; CO 00 -.i 0 cn 3) s B — a rj CO eo • j cn cn J H -so 303l " ' OD N0iX30l S 4 .].. 4i ' - « I ' 1 " , -(A 1 »■ T I ' .a «S - t» l—J i « - -• fc -« : " ;0f-;: ' % " . ; : ' J ' ' i G 1; OiO i; e D fi S iO;OiO OiO (iiS s «., 4 ; . .,3 jl .i-- 4g!4S 5u 5! ' ..-• ' •J ! i : 5 5f6 57 y W r-S V ' ? 3 S IS .M iGJ G ) 09 JO ] Ti ::• i ' rj J6 i; " ! ■« " o oQ n i n n h n n i M 11 1 i.iiIijlLj!J.j.i.J...l .111.11 JJill I i I -BSRLVlATiO ' vJ j:O0l KEY 22 22 2 22i222j22i22 2 2 2l , I 3 3 33333:33 313313 13 33 i i I 44 4444414 44i44 4 4ii4 k-ey. II 11 II ti ri CI II H | I • 1 III ( f I EEEEESESE6EEI66E66 l|MI |12 11 ' 191999 I . id-l 01 unHL •03» — ' 1 ' ' ; s; s " - «; ffl i -i 1 c I c ! c .1? .7 yf 88 %: J N? J , . j310 ■ j i6S8SS66SB5|B ' 5 v oBv " ' o vjv vJsS-w ' V w J I 56 58 886b|s5GS8S ( ry f , p, ' ' ' ' r r r iff TJ Front Row: Norma Suaraz. Jackla Ouboii, Frances Brail, Bobbi Burla, Dorolhaa Surryhna, Hsrriat Rothttain, Mariana Matrovich, Maria Barratt. Anna Garcia. Row 2: Adala Cantala. Margarat Rota. Pat Crumb, Elsa Hotmsan, Sua Raney. Alberta Fadlar. Nance Allan, Glanna Moory. Sally Delia Riva. Katharine Lum. Row 3: Carl Hanian. Hani Eilert, Marvin Ellanberg, Jacl Saion, Elmer Moretio, Juanila Milton, Dayea Swineford, Pat Brooki, Marcia Johnjon, Frances Barton, Del McComb. Row 4: Frank Lee, Jette Batres, Albert Fields, Calvin Calloway, Jose Fuentes, Carlos Ferrer, Royce Monks, Pete Stang. Arthur Moretto, Juan Ulep, Gene Barton. Alpha Gamma Sigma -J Members of the Stockton College chapter of Alpha Gamma Sigma were hosts for the first Northern California Conference of the statewide organization, which was held at SC during the fall. The honorary was made up of college division students. Front Row: Mits Gladys Benard. adviior: Frances Barton. Gerd Elsa Holmian. Dorothea Surryhna. Bavarly Goold. Lr„-, ' Rr. 7 ♦■ ■ • " ,. ■ „ ... " . ., . . , , ,. . Do. Row 4. Norma ' Row S t • Frank Ic. Row t: CUyton Banliay, R, Ailen ey«r, John Adamson, Art Godi Page 110 ArUn Ka Katharina Lutn, Ro. 3; •I Bob G« " i«f. a, Gafy R " cl». Front Row: Deonne Leong, Jean Reyburn. Barbara Chan, Janice Yoneshige, Yukiye Hattcri, Nobulo Tanaka, Cynthia Ah Tye. Docla Lucas, Nina Clayton, Beverly Polk, Dorothy Wong. Row 2: Martha Mallery, Diane Hoskins, Rochelle Bashor. Anne Yoneshige, Jo Ann Moore, Ann Qulnn, Yvonne Meyer. Mary Sheridan. Bertha Anderson, Geraldine Garden, Rena Bayer, Diana Lillie, Debbie Goleman, Dorothea Daclan, Be ' ' ' ' i i . . rs ■ ■ n Wollenhaupt, Jackie Jacobs, " -.._.._ California Scholarship Federation Students admitted to the CSF honor society must have at least a 2.5 (3.0 is perfect) grade point average, the equi- valent of a B plus grade. This group acted as official school host and pro- vided guide service around the campus. Front Row: Barbara Barkhorn, Sharon Blanchard, Rochelle Bashor, Barbara Chan. Patty Cook, Margaret Rose, Karuko Yagi, Shirley Duncan, Rochelle Onweiler Julio Wager, Jo Ann Itaya, Ann Yoneshige. Row 2: Pat Sloneker, Jim Morrison, Margot Lilly, Gail Hartmann, Mary Roynosa, Diane Custor, Kathie Jacobs. Joanette Wong, Andrea Tagupa, Delia Smith, Marilyn Burgess, Jackie Hooo, Carol Rideout, Mary Sheridan, Dave Rule. Row 3: Pat Burns, Dobbio Goleman, Maud Teverbaugh, Paula Madsen, Estelle Cox, Gayle Goetz, Lynn Rimer, Martha Mallery, Judy Wollenhaupt, Jean Hisaka, Joan Nakawatase, Jo Ann Moore, Dick Osborne. Row 4: Jack McDonald, Gordon Zuckerman, Dorothy Wong, Pat Eddlestono, Peggy Joy. Arlene Valterza. Janet McGinley, Jaci Williams, Sonia Carlson, Jean Pereira, Mary Lemon, Jean Reyburn, Bob Evanhoe, Alen Wossitsh. Row 5: Crane Zumwalt, Tom Dixon, Richard Hubbard. Ronald Wong. Bob Quick, Richard Laursen, David Wood, Bert Johnson, Betty Lowry, Miss Veva Brown, advisor; Eleanor Spencer. Dorothy Daclan. Frances Lamonica. Betty Glnboy. Page I I I Front Row: Janot Caitigllone, Margie Simmoni. Alberta Fedler, Frances Barton, Maria Barrett. Dorothea Surryhne. president. Row 2: Anne McCauley, Bobbi Burle, Marlene Metrovich. Harriet Rothstein, Darlene Woods, Edythe Haanstra. Norma Suarez. Row 3: Marilyn Ridalev. Mary Stella Poliinelli, Marian Eberhardt, Frances Brell, Helen Oanner, adviser; Sally Oela Riva. Colleen Gallagher, Marjory Wood. Fourteenth Year Women ' s Honorary Society The cream of the crop! The Fourteenth Year Women ' s Honorary Society was an organization for women who retained a high scholastic average in their sophomore year of college work. Headliners Club Membership in Headliners Club was reserved for the outstanding students of Journalism, and was composed of staff members of the Collegian and El Recuerdo. Page 112 Front Row; Beverly Lawton. Joan M ' , Wiltcn, Bx ' ty Liiotelh, Pat Alhani. Row 2: ' at, Ron K bby, Jerry French, Garry Kinter. r i ' vieer. Key Club Key Club was a service organization sponsored by the Kiwanis Club. They hosted the California- Nevada-hHawaii Club Con- ference last fall held on the SC campus, the highlight of their year ' s activities. Front Row: Philip Bingham, Kazuo Masai, Robert Yasul, Darrell Wong, Warren Kibby, Jim Newberry. Row 2: Charles Johnson, Yoshiaici Murano, Chance Wong. Dale Scott, Ken Lane, Bob Beardsley. Row 3: Ray Wong, Clifford Harnnon, Art GodI, Mile Kuhlmann, John Adamson, Ed ZamricI:, Tom Barton, adviser. Row 4: Bob Sullivan, Ken Nishikawa, Perry Graves, Carl Drennan, Bob Perry. Round Table Club Round Table Club mem- bers discussed current social problems. Front Row: Ann ?uinn. Julie Wager, Bertha Darning, MaK Barber, adviser; Tom Di«on, Pat Hobin, Janot McGlnloy, Margot Lilly. Row 3: JoAnn Moore, Jean Reyburn. Jaci Williams, Gaylo Goetz. Vonnio Mabbett, Barbara Barron, Arleen Valtoria. Row 3: Tim Quinn. Jack McDonald. Earl Moreno, Bob Evanhoe. Jerry Gritz. Richard Laursen, Paul Poulsen, Ken Valentine. Page I 1 3 SCITS Club Fron» Row: Jaan Rowlay. Evelyn Hamas, Beverly McCleln. Ruby Helkllnen. Willa Jean Stavahn. Barb ara Wilson, Colleen Cross. Row 2: Pat Stringer, Sue Schlegel, Donna Anderson. Barbara Treece, Shirley Silveira, Cecilia Fernandez, Barbara Alvarez. Lorena Waller, Sharon Olson, OIlie Stover. Row J: t aiim Popovich, adviser; Gregg Harris. Wayne Virden, Larry Angelo, Jim Riley, Howard Kotez, Elvin Myers, Emmett Kaarns, Bob Harlan. The Stockton College Intramural Theatrical Society, consisting of SC thespians, was extremely active during the past year. Their activities were highlighted by the second annual presentation of " Club Coca Cabana " staged in November. Camera Club Campus shutter bugs gained knowledge in photography through membership In the SC Camera Club, a new club this year. Front Row: Mike Thomas, P Jaci W " (IT--. Row 2: Jerry F " f hflflgi Lnfj i. Pog« 114 Chess Club Check Mate! This is a fa- miliar phrase to Chess en- thusiasts. This organization, which provides relaxation for its members, was just formed this year. Front Row: Jim Finucane. Dean Coleman, Philip Bingham, Darrell Wong. Row 2: Don Evans, adviser; Ronald Singson, Alls Childress, Marvin Ellenberg, Pat Burns. Front Row: John Vincent, Larry Welgum. Mile Kuhlman; Chuck Bloch, Brent Heisinger, Al Fields, Jesse Batres, Bob Gibson. Hank Filers. Row 2: Don Schaeffer, adviser: Diane Hoslcins, Norma Aamoth, Rosemary Grazlani. Barbara Wilson, Connie McGraw, Kathy Wilson, Janice Baclgalupi, Pat Shum, Gail Dlven, Oiiie Stover, Charles Newman, Jim Kiefer. Membership in Guys and Dolls was reserved for those who enjoy dancing. GAD ' s was extremely active during the past year, as it hosted two after game dances and also held club dances every other week. Ski Club Last winter when the snow was piled high to the delight of siti enthusiasts. Dodge Ridge, a winter resort high in the Sierras, was several times host to the Stockton College Ski Club. Front Row: Micttiko Watsnabo. Wills Jean Stevahn. Joan Ma!loy, Estslle Lommel. Barbara Wilkinion. Row 2: Bill Weber. Doug Eberhardt. Dennis Honeychurch. Clifford Humphrey. «orge Roberts. Row 3: Bert Johnion, Bob Jamieion. Jay Melloy. Jinx Hicki, adviser Delta Mu Eta Newly formed this year. Delta Mu Eta is a club composed of women interested in home economics, and was under the sponsorship of Miss Beatrice Gray. rf Left to Right. Doro ' hir MocDonald. Arlone Kasa. Lou.se Li..n9iton, Mary H.bbard. »n i M.ss Beatrice Gray, adoser. Pag« I 1 6 Front Row: Enna White. Pat Burke, Marlene Metrovich, Harriet Rothstein. Maria Barrett, Mary Dowell. Row 2: Hank Eilers, Royce Monks, Robert Craig, Keith Keppel, Bill Buettner, Kathleen Hinds, Carol Brooks, Verna Johnston, adviser; Pete Stang. This organization was formed for students interested in science, specifically the biological sciences. Guest speakers were selected fronn medicine, dentistry, and laboratory clinics. Bi-Sci Club Audio -Visual Operators Club AVOC was a club organized to train operators to run the schools ' projectors and other audio-visual equipment. Front Row: Michiko Wafanabe, Mildred Kline, Margaret Rose. Frances Poulsen, Carolyn Renfro. Pat Treadway, Sue Tillery. Row 2: George Roberts. Frank Snyder, Ray Moll, David Tapia. David Hun,phrey. Page 1 1 7 FroJi Row: Chsrlai Ludwiq, Jesse Reridan. Pete Stang. Dorothea Surryhne, Enna White, • ■ Carol Burcham. Row 2: John Speari, adviser; Sydney Threet, Jim Porbes. ombs. Ed Mayer. Joe Tattes. Royce Monls. Clementine Gray. Bob Gemar. Row 3: ' " th Keppel. Harvey Travis. Robert Mcintosh. Roland Heiklinen. Lynn Stevens, Carl Overton. Walter Halland. Robert Craig, Duane Mayfield, Curt Mettler. Mai Huber. German Club This club was composed of upper division German students and was primarily social In nature. German and French Club The German and French Club was made up of high school students in the German and French classes. This club devoted itself to sending packages overseas to France. Ger- many. Austria, and Korea. Page 118 Front Row: Gilbert Mate. Bob Evanhoe. Salvador Moreno. M.ke Montana. Carl Miller. Ley Campbell. Marcia Sider. Betty Combs. Ton! Pilon. Beverly Newton. Ann Qumn, Roberta Guerard. Willa Jean Stevahn. Beverly Schumocl, Sonia McKee. Claudia Ormsbee. Mary Sheridan. Row 2: John Kawada. Bob Olubo. Oavid Rule. Charles Ledger, Did Osborne. Maud Teverbaugh. Lou Karim. Wendy Stahlay. Kathy Ferguson. Pat Oer. Jeanelte Wong. JoAnn Moore. Jeri Henderson. Judy Booth Sylvia Bradbury. Wanda Reel. Row 3: Richard Laursan. Charles Johnson. Jim Finucane Mary Revnota Diane Hoskins, Cn- ' .,,,,--., . , -, ,t Hobin, Go ' 1. . • , Wong. Rcr . . ,., , „ _, .- , ,_. I .- , . » i-. ' .! . .■ Chfney. Burl Ferrari, i cr. Bob Gordon. Sue St " afla Andersen Row S: Ka:uo Meiai. ' . .nil Ronald Marlham. C ' ? -it. M U Thomgt. Judy Wollenhaupt. Lee Ann Vanderford. Pal Burns. Berlhe Doming. Yvonne Meyer, Wayland Etell. Bob Kirby. Jim Morrison. Miss Ellen DeRuchie. edviter. Row 4: Jecl McDonald. David Sears. Walton Bodley. Bruce Hymen. Front Row: Pat Crumb, Martha Mallery, Harriet Rothstein, Arlen Gray, Marlene Metrovlch, Bobbie Burle, Miss Ruth Smith, adviser. Row 2: Judy Hagstrom, Royce Mensinger, Bob Dessaussois, Bill Buettner, Patricia Hershberger, Harry Maxey. Le Cercle Francois Le Cercle Francals, the French Circle, con- ducted meeti ngs in French, viewed movies, sang, and presented a play in the language. Los Iberos Los Iberos was the campus Spanish club, and consisted mainly of students of the Spanish classes. Front Row: Joyce Goetz. Sue Francis, Sandra Hansen, Arleen Valterza. Amelia Roman, Sue Schlogol. Row 2: Miss Adeline Selna, adviser; Gayle Goetz, Mary Roman, Jaci Williams. Andrea Tagupa, Mary Hickenbotham, Muriel Ali, Sharon Blanchard, Barbara Dieclco. Row 3: Shirley Duncan, Jane Layson. Shirley Albright. Thelma Yelt, Eleanor Pezoldt, Deanne Brown, Carol Rideout, Betty Lowry. Pat Eddleslon. Row 4: Jerry Griti. Larry Scadden, Michael Freeman Alexander Wessitch, Bert Johnson. Page 119 Front Row: Baatric Fontei. Evelyn Grost. Edna Williams. Lacy Diclterson. Mariana Parle . Lou Anna Lawion. Row 2: Joy..!; v .• ' ■» 3 " jmnla Aranjuai. Gloria Afanjuai. Genevieve Oalro. Jessie Mae Plqg, Mlts Amber EUls. adviser. Row 3: Nan Phlpps. Virginia Alaison. Sutanne Solium, Diana He»e$. Florence Chan. Marie Chaffee. Geraldlne Smith. Row 4: Margie Gmbey. Ramona Garcia. Ton! Pllon. Cheryl Flack. Joanna Wilson. Waldene Ferrari. Marjorie Morris. Row 5: Laverne Vierra, Muriel All. Mildred Lopez. Monica White, Barbara Canepa, Eileen Schlepp. Glenna Jones. Row 6: Loretta Anderson, Merle Turley, Lynette Bancroft, Lucrelia Martin. Nancy Ewing. Joyce Vlvlano, Donna Semper. Row 7: Calia Montei. Marie Collins. Bob Mar. ' Dialma Yett, Pauline Holdren. Barbara Ewing. Future Nurses Members ot Future Nurses Club often heard speakers from different NewmQII Club phases of medicine. Newman Club, made up of Catholic students, was one of the more active clubs on campus. They walked away with two first place titles and one second place for an outstanding skit in the Variety Show, the club with the largest number of student body card holders, and their float In the Homecoming Parade. The Newman snow trip to Yosemlte was one of the club ' s annual affairs. Front Row: Dave DlMcn. Don Lebeouf. Joe Garcia, John Pahl, David Rule, Leo Gardella. Sal Batres. Charles Ledger. Row 2: Anita Adams. Frances Lucas Dosie Juanitas. Roberta Reynosa, Anne McCauley. Mary Hlbbard. Janice Castellne. Jean Parelra. Estelle Lommel. Ade ' e Cantele. Evelyn Fr:s Row 3: Mary Stuart, Miss Veva Brown, adviser, Janet Castiglione. Mary Reynosa. Deanna Daclan. Sonia Vuinovlc. Susan Chlsamore. Ellen Lawse ' Juleda Favllla. Rita Giordano, Rev. John J. Glasky. chaplain. Row 4: Frankle Santinoni. Allan Fetters, Ann Ulleberg. Bob Kavanauqh. Carolyn Mather, Carl Dreno»t Mary Stella PolslneHi. Margie Simmons. Jesse Batres, Colleen Gallagher. Tom Gates. Paqo 120 Colt Pep Club The Colt Pep Club was organized to promote school spirit at athletic contests, and was head- ed by Dave Sears, Colt yell leader. Front Row: Sue Chlsamore, Pat Jensen. Row 2: Rose Marie Mayer. Jean Hartmann. Row 3: Jane Layson. Darlene Mills, Carol Cruz. Deanna YorJ!, Row 4: Judy Wollenhaupt, Vonnie Mabbet, Gall Hartnnann. Row 5: Alis Childress, Dave Sears, David Tapia, Margot Seynnour. Row 6: Hart Weaver. Veterans ' Club Front Row: Bill Pope, Joe Torres, Tom Mayo, Pat Wilson, Jim Stewart, Alfred Oyog, Gerald Hopper. Row 2: Everett Holmes, Stan Winson, Charles Fletcher, Carlos Ferrer, Ralph Deming. Row 3: Lester Spring. V. W. Vuinovic, Dick O ' Day, Bill DeRouen, Cliff Geddes, adviser. Under the leadership of Carlos Ferrer, the vets tackled many campus problems, working for the bet- terment of the col- lege. Page 121 Stockton Vocational Auto Club I— IWM— 1 1 - i v I The Stockton Vocational Auto Club was an organization formed to accommodate students inter- ested in the subject. Front Row: Kannath Bard, Simon Zamara. Joa Atllano, Claranca Munnarlyn. Gontalo Vlllapando, Tom Juano, Stava Chacon. Row 2: Richard Brown, Euqane Ghan, Mika Gillat, David Scotten, Richard Caballaro, Clyda Walthars, Satora Murakami, Joa Guzman, Charlas Jonas, advisar. Row 3: Bob Lavarne. John Marbia, Bill Weasa. Bill Spaegia, Gena Talle, Rai Moquit. Body and Fender Club The Body and Fender Club was under the leadership of Ed Fernandez, president, and was an active organization during the entire year. Front Row: Ton ' cr Allan. Eddia harnandei, Bann, Nobi Tamura. ' - ' oora, Don Durttam. Row 2: Ronald Fenlay, ft r ii im v.yr, i ;, r-nn. Rod Viaira. Jack Pipar, S " AKrad Nava. Row 3: Stanlay Slaat, B ' ll Lauqhiin, Floyd Wikon Ronald Ln " f " - " H r M ln. l ' I i... f. A ,n»a. adviinr Haw 4 , ■, Ma ' n A or Laa, k Etcaianta. Richard - Ju •do jan P ,,-,0 177 Future Farmers of America MM ' dtw ' ' - • : ' iij-p - . i r Hp - ' » i i K-h -Hr This organization of future farmers was extremely ac- tive and innumerable prizes attested to their industry and success. Front Row: Mickey Von Bank, Jack Coffer. Wayne Wilson, Franklin Edson, Brock Smith, Don Durham, Jay Reynolds, Weidon Hood. Row 2: Bob Ogan, Ted Huckabee, Ed Lucchesl, Aldo Deloso. Arlind Fontes, Pete Lucchesi, Bill Winn, Mike Burrow, Philip Frils. Row 3: Dave Hutchinson. Jim Hankins. Albert McCarty. Charles Burkner. Fred Hasse, Ed Piazza, Bruce Hampton, Richard Logemann, Melvin Jensen, John Stark. Machine Shop ' designing and building of modern, convenient desks for the art classes was one of the major projects of the machine shop during the past year. They wlUD also designed and constructed wood vises for the new Daniel Webster school. Front Row; Jesse Welch, Robert Izquierdo, William Elsholz. Henry Munoz. Earl McCann. Eldon Tithorlngton, Bill Dofflemeyer. Robert Sablo. Tom Milligan, adviser. Row 2: Larry Doaton, Ronald Casagrando. Reno RIghetti. Richard Franch, Robert Eggiman, Bud Ellsworth, Charles Ortega. Page 123 Graphic Arts Club Front Row: Jamat Kari Ian, Ron KIrichenman. Ray Vaiquez. John Knoblock. Bob Self. Harold GilcKrit . Bob Rugnao. Laroy WelU. Lanny Weill. Oean Ritchie. Row 2: Oscar Howell. Pela Catlett. Eari Trotter, Hertrtan Foreman. Douglai Croy. Jim Tomlinion. Chevy Orozco. Dick Davenport. Jerry Null. Jerry Burdicl. Douglas Louie. Row 3: Don Velez. Ptiil Brome. Larry Garibaldi. Lamont Morgan, Lee Schultz, Bert Miner, Richard Roof. Les Wagner. Vern Souza. Members of the Graphic Arts Club printed The Collegian weekly and also printed the papers of the three high schools in Stockton. Electrics Club front Row Page 124 f«rnan«i - Jody. H - ► n„_ K_-vi Ccar.. (j ,, Steward. J ■ B ' d. Andrew Vxlat. (dd e Mah Row 2: Mel Wood. J ' : G n. Mr. Young, adviser. Row 3: Ron Boone. Allan Go The Electrics Club was primarily students enrolled in the shop course. They have been responsible for the major part of the electrical work on campus. FroM Row: John Metrovich. Fred Kurth. Thomas Robustelli, Jim Frantham, Roger Mariani. Row 2: George Granucci, Ronald Vollmer, Rulugio Piceno, Ray Leitner, Joseph McCann, Douglas Ratto. Row 3: Leo Estrada, adviser; William Powell, John Jones, Rosario Herrera, Buzzy Barbieri, Nick Garcia, Ronald Olvera, Warren Kibby. Mill Cabinet Club Mill Cabinet students were mainly those who were inter- ested in the field as a career. OToole ' s Drafting Club Drafting enthusiasts made up the membership in O ' Toole ' s Drafting Club, which is under the spon- sorship of Herbert Welch, drafting Instructor. Front Row: John Lewis, Francos Swan, Norma Aamoth, Jerry Hopper. Rinehart Helnitz. Howard Talaoka, Carol Baciqalupi. Margaret Allen. Row 2: Richard Van Natter, Tom Holmes, Leonard Davis, Herb Welch, adviser. Page 125 Paint Splashers The Paint Splashers played a major role In the completion of the house built on campus last year by the Trade and Indus try depart- ment. Front Row: Prentice Rushing. Keith Walters. Bob Bennett. Bob Wardlane. Row 2: Bert Beer. Donald Linker. Ray Pai . Freddy Almendarez. Leonard Hill. Row 3: Roger Benedito. Phillip Fowler. Julian Aguilar. Charles Bertuccelli Samuel Oelgado, Tom Howard. Radio -Electronics Club - " r Radio- Electronics Club was composed mostly of students of the T I class. Front Row: t- O. Brown, odvuer: Oan Kilartrnoi, Don Co i. Bob McKay, Norman Putnam. J. L. Wiiiette, adviMr; Archie Thorriii Row 2: liaiai A »x Piy Wallt. Ivo Paiva. Gene Jensen. Raymond Mali. Franl Mosqueda. Irwin Hatfield. David Tap ' s Row 3: ' Jim Vrialmq. Paul Druager. Ken Klemo. Harold Sandari, Jackie Eaton, Gerald Aamoth, Oliver N»«t -,mo Row 4 • nsor. Richard McClenahan. Sylvester Aguilar, Victor Nishimoto, Tomi Gondo, Hire Noguchi. Sam Burton. Jam j r -; Pago 126 Tinbenders Club Members of Tinbenders were students taking a course in sheet metal. Most of the members of this club were planning a vocation which requires working with sheet metal. Front Row: Arnle Aasen, Oscar Johnson, Walter Rowley. Wayne Beach, Donald Ding. Row 2: Bill Grandadaz. Bob Sohnrey. Harold Brandt, Wayne Shotwell, Ronnie Jones, Sene Gadbury. Row 3: Jim Gorrell, adviser; Richard Burrola, Joe Reyes, Glen Vesey, Kenneth Smith. Jess Ferrer. Woodpeckers Club The SC Woodpeckers, unlike their name-sakes, were constructive as- sets to the Stockton College campus. Front Row: Harold Fisher. Fred Watson. Richard Paul. Dick Baclgalupi. Bill Sloan, Richard Schleder. Row 2: Leo Aqbulos. Filbert Coronado, Harold Doll, Wayne Hardin, Dickie Freed, Don Trotter, Bob Leonis. Row 3: Chester Margason, adviser; Albert Britter, Richard Alvarez, Charles Maimone, Jerry Tucker, Inez Rios, Alfred Yada, Joe Schenk, John Wittsche, adviser. Page 127 ■■ » . MON TUCS I " THun |fri. i MO Tuts «co TKM FRI TT 5 S lis lis S 5 S S 5 1 5 S S 5 S 5 5 S 5 1 5 S S 5 S S 5 S IS S S S6 6|S t66|S666(66SS666E66E666 7|7 77777 77777)7777 7 7 7i7 777777 llSSt 8|88S8 I8|l88 S|l88 8|t gS8 IIII999999999 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 | 9 9 9 9 9 9 | 9 9 9 9!9 9;9 9 9 9 9 9 9 M l M U M 11 a U MlM alt) M M n ' 1 AND MO ins »lill IN- T . IMMIIIIIIIIIill till! iiitiinM««itiii ' niiiirMiiit)i 1 1 iM I yli ill 1 1 1 1 ill 1 1 M I I.I 1 1 It I II I ill II mill i|Ui 1 1(1 1 I 1 1 1 ri I lit 1 1 t.i{i 1 1 1 1 il) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1| 1 1 tl 1 1 1 1 iliiiiiiiiiliiiuit»i iniiii iiiiiiii ' iii|iiiiliii ,,| I •«|1 .4 I444I4I 4.4,4 4 4 4.4 444444 4 t 4f4«444444444||« ' " ' • .1 " I ■ « ri,.;ML..,j|; :.« JR, iiiimiiiiiiiil •1— .1- .— . III ill 1 1 1 1 III 1 1 II ittili 1 1 1 1 ki ifi 1 1 I ill 1 1 1| 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 • • it« I iL 1 1 |||IIIIIMM IMIMMIMIMtlllllll ' lM |lllll|lllill|llll|llil|llllllil|li ■lMI|||||»t|||||||l|lf|ltlllf|llll»l|ll1||||f||1|| •v.i ' yjj ' anf ' v-.».T M, ' yy. ? ' vy2: " . ' If- ■: iH t c t c c c • 5 ■i C- r ' iO 00 010 0000 I 7 3 i; £ $ 3 jr. i : 13 H 1 n nin n n 1 n i 2l Of s — ie a — ,« a «= n — l«= « — a s " c ° a o M !Z iCE « ' I o ' 2 ; uj 3 - «• r «D 0 2 ' s r- (■«Ai ' i ' | c S — ?:— lllllltIKi ll|llt!llMl m to r «o " pi ' ■J tn CO r « ' i m CO r- " »r (O r« r iO p . «r» «o F » t 1 «o p » •• 1(( III It I ' m 1 1 iiiniii i t { rail • aXlA ifttoa I X 31 « 4 r a-» CO r— 51 CM B i fcO «o r - 7 «M r ■ ir B r-- 9 r " «i ■ ■ r» o n a ex € ir» «o r 1 II 1 lllll 1 1 1 1 111 I M 1 1 1 1 W ' G K — C 4 CO ) W l= " » — " " " »l l 1 3 a — «V 4 O «» -•■ ' «1J K « 4 € -•■I t ' I « »- x C9 K - cw G ;; . ' N (O CNI n — ;; — CM e3 f — r — rs • - %! " 1 — ex - L ' • ' I (X i:nz L Of I ] IS 2 2 212 2 12 22 22222 T I I . 222212222 212:2 S!33333;333i 3 K i 3 3 3 3:3 3 3 3 3 ' ..-1 2 2 22221 i i 3 3 3 3!3!3i3 3 3!3 3 3 4 4 4 iia :4 4 4 4 4!f 4i 4 414 4Mi4i4 4444444 4_4i4i4]ji_[4_4 i to : : A :i :j 5 .V V. ' . B! J ' 1 ! I MON. T I . ■;ii .i«.i ' . J I » . ■ 1 ' - J ' " 1 HO ' » ■ - -o:) B66 118 111 6S665S666 66|6|6eB6666B 8|9898B U 99|99 tu i tit 9 91:999 I»» t|t 1 1 1 sen; ttt 2:2 ISS m ■Q3» on 6 6 Kkt U l{ K U H U U 1; K «l II 11 11 CI »i tWi 11 11 I I 1 11 ( t t I III 1 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 |6 8 6 6 6 HrtMi 03M 6311 unxi n3« 5301 t M ► » ♦ » » I cccccttic llllliz l ivn nun min nun 1 uriHi ■03M l|IIS |uu 99999 SSISS I I I I I I I I l|l I I M n K It K it».i i( » it ' I UN It I ' •( c k ctia ttiQf tttt t ttt ii|ii|i ► mwt » ft ► trrrrf? rrnrnrnrt ► » » » tt;C 1 11 17 ». ' . i I s I ;il ' 1 : : • I ■ = III . Hi ' - iiiniJ ' ii CC|CCC|tCC ccccc :2:Z|Z2 222 2;!:2|; i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 fi »i {I r ti 11 ( • 1 I ; OOP ' 1 00 too ling I . . . , ' 0 2 ou ivaor.-; 1 .. .... . ji j . , ■: f ! - , 1 — CL £ 0 CM .:? ' H H i ; ; 5 -i « c ■. t. 5.1 ' f.::.v,: Ji:« ' .-i.xiH ; ; ►v ij r ; ■■) Z ' 7 i -.1 A« J £: f_ , ..J, -[ i G S OiO 8 D O G;e G S 8 SjOiOiG OiS SjO 4, 4 . A : Vj i 4«|48 5u 5! V: W! ' 55 S« 57 W W -M Si f? £3 g jg .K SJ { d (-S JO ; ' ! 72 V? " I i J6 ! 8 " a oO n i n njn ijnin 1 1 11 1 lii iji ' ili n h iiih nh n ' ■BSRLVlATiO J j::OD{i: KEY 22 222 22j222|22|2222 2 " 33 333333 33133131333 44 4 44 4414 44144:4 4 ey. ' ■ " I i •■ " r I :3 TkitTC ' MT rrw II U »l fl II II •! I i I lit t I I { GBBSBIBSSBBSlBBBBB • IBIB |ltl t 11999 SSIS! Id J HnHi h f- 5 5S5i55 55 5 5!5i5 i 6 6 88 866eSB6:SSS I I ? w -A ! ' - o M Don Hall H «d Coach iftX Bill Parton B«ckfi»ld Coach Keever Jankovich Lin Coach Mustang Football With Don Hall moving up to head coaching rank and the addition of newcomers Keever Jankovich and Bill Parton to the staff, the Tangs had high hopes for a successful season. Despite outstand- ing performances by Don Miller, Junior Reynosa, Ben Parks, and Gene Campbell, the team ended up in fifth place. Throughout the season, the ' Tangs showed flashes of superior playing abi- lity, but often were unable to hold their rivals for the entire sixty minute period of play. The team dropped their first conference contest, but ended up in a tie the next three times. This situation led the " Collegian " to apply the say- ing " Always a bridesmaid, but never a bride. " The Tangs, however, ran all over the San Mateo eleven, showing real power and coordination while running up a 34-7 score. ' " . ' Jtw Y ' StJ u c r V 4V, ■ ' •• - . ' i .oi.o, f. ' ..i. " r, l Q cr.i, Aloi L.nkor, Al Ko!di, ' Jijn Jwio. Dt » Poffy. Jack Jordan, Galon Shaut. Ji- ' Row 2: Mary Saart. manaaar: Alai Laof. George Orello, LaRoy Benitei. Ben Pariti Gane Campbell, t ' :■ ' ' •■ %„ J. j;,y, c. Dean M- oland, Tom W Charlai ' ■ - . ., ..■■ -. .. - „ .V. - ... ..,. Don Hall, and liv ' ' .. ... .■.. . uu n i. Row 4. i. .. i-,,...- ,j,.„. ,..,. Don Millar, Jack Harrall, Ooug Wiati, Garaid Kotala, Jarry Nimi, Frank Smith, Naal Amick, Art Sartini, Dick Allan, Julio Sampton. Dalofl Schmidt. Paao no Gene Campbell successfully eluded the Comp+on man for another first down. Sea son R e cor sc Opponents 6 Bakersfield 44 14 Compton 14 13 CCSF 13 14 Modesto 14 34 San Mateo 7 13 West Contra Costa 34 7 Santa Rosa 34 7 Sacramento 13 13 College of the Sequoic )s 32 Junior Reynosa ene Campbell Ish Castellano Romer Derr Page 131 Reynosa assisted two Compton players in a .-nodern dance sequence. Shiro Sasaki Ben Parks Page 132 Nick Garc • " 1 Art SarfinI ■. ? . Dick Perry Don Miller •i BW ' ' ' ' |Wfc ' ' «BflpB Cliff Greenwood Ish Castellano nailed his man. Charles Ortega Jerry Nims Dan Delfatti Page 133 Richard Zolezzi Doug Weitz Julio Samion. No. 84. goes down. 1 John Schmidt Floyd Zoffu ua ' i Pago 134 St«ve Campora i: I Colt F o o t b I I SC ' s Colt varsity ended a successful season In the powerful Sac -Joaquin conference with a 6 win - 3 loss rec- ord that landed them In 5th place. The team was dubbed the " hlurrl- canes " early in the season as Coach Harry Kane worked his boys into a smooth running machine. Team play was sparked by brilliant playing on the part of such Colts as Adrean Vera, named to play In the annual Shrine North - South game, Bob Mlngram, Don Miniaci, Fred Almendarez, and Captain George Cosgrove. " The most famous name In football, " Amos Alonzo Stagg, was ever pres- ent at football practice sessions as an advisory coach. hHe was inadver- tently bowled over one day and suf- fered injuries from which he has now fully recovered. Bill Gott Assistant Coach Amos Alonzo Stagg Advisory Coach Harry Kane Head Coach Coach Harry Kane was new to SC in 1954, coming from Taft High School where he had a top-rate football team. He was formerly an outstanding line backer for College of the Paci- fic, but was Injured in an exhi- bition game which ended his chances of a brilliant profession- al football career. Coach Bill Gott also was new to SC, mov- ing up from Edison High in Stockton. 9 ' ■ ..•k . Jir Front Row: Soil Yamamolo, Hanic Moreno, Freddie Almendarez, Danny Esquerra, John Mad, Gordon Zuclerman, Ines Rios, Bob Mingram, Pete Catlett, Pete Serrano. Eddy Torres. Row 2: Chevy Oroico, Adrean Vera, Don McDonald. Jerry Fo«. Les Wagner. Jerry Kent, Noah Saffold. George Cosgrove. Don Miniaci, Ben Savage, Earl Moreno. Row 3: Jim Conovor and Harry Kane, coaches; Wayne Johnson. Phil Smith, Leadell Traylor, Ken Steele, Lew Schmidt, Ron Smith. Roger Warrick, Phil Brome. Larry Lacey, Dave Price. Dutch Trlebwasser, trainer; and Bill Gott. coach. Page 135 Pete Catlett Roger Warrick ' 1 iVs Earl Moreno Bob Mingram clutched the pigslcin for a TD. Bob Mingram Sea ' ,on Record sc Oppontnti 13 BalcersHeld 8 6 Modesto 38 Downey 6 19 Turlock 20 7 McClatchy 26 24 Sacramento 12 33 Woodland 25 El Camino Lodi 28 Froddie Almenderei Page 136 Don Miniac! I George C- i Inez Rlos Jerry Fox Adrean Vera Only Colt player selected to play in the an- nual North - South Shrine game in July 1955. 4L Jerry Kent jhn Mack t Soji Yamamoto Eddy Torre 4 ' Lew Schmid A Lodi Flame prepared to be doused by Colt ' s Don McDonald, No. 36, Adrean Vera, No. 62, and Pete Catlett, No. 7. However, the Colts ran out of water and were scorched by a score of 28 - 0. Page 137 _1 n . . , ■ , t . -, ,. -is Les Wagner Wayne Johnson iHt Leadeil Traylor Gordon Zucicerman Ben Savage Pete Serrano Larry LoCfly Paqe 138 Freddie Almendarez, one of the Colt ' s leading ground-gainers, was dropped from behind by a McClatchy player. Dark shirted No. 71 in background was Noah Saffold. o tm Don McDonald ■ BC ' E Lm H s M H p %vV«|Pf w V m -.. 1 wM bt.« i V fcn H La " • C P p i«i HP IM i i li Don Miniaci, No. 20, Jerry Kent, No. 61, John Mack, No. 42, Hank Moreno, No. 38, and Pete Catlett (left foreground) threw a noose around a McClatchy ball carrier. " • ' ' ' - A ' • i ' -l . ? Danny Esquerra Kenneth Steele - rV Hank Moreno Noah Saffold Page 139 Front Row: Len Oiwald. Charlei Williams. Jack Chenoy. Monto Maniz. Bryco Coffoo. Row 2: Pete Fellows. Bob Hergis. Georga Moton, Ron M.ller. Jay Baumgartnor. Row 3: Coach Boyle. Noil Nostrand. Ray Silvas. Bob Ghlglieri. Lou Ferrario, Chris Greene, Earnie Sutton, manager. Mustang Basketball The 54-55 season turned out to be one full of surprises for the SC Mustangs. Jack Cheney, all-conference guard last year, was Coach Boyle ' s only returning letterman. After a sparkling season of play featuring many brilliant upsets by the ' Tangs, the team was nosed out of the Big Eight Con- ference championship by the West Contra Costa Comets. The team was led by such outstanding cagers as Cheney, Len Oswald, Ray Silvas, George Moton, and Lou Ferrario, each of whom topped the 200 point mark. The season ' s performance can be classified only as " outstand- ing " and is one that should make each player proud. Frank Boyls Coach Pag0 140 Bryce Coffee tsss; y ' KKKM Jack Cheney George Mofon Ray Silvas Jack Cheney, No. I 3, the Mustang ' s " fire-ball " guard, leaped up to sink another 2 points, as Len Oswald, number 24, looked on with evident satisfaction. Len Oswald 41 George Moton, No. 21, and Jacit Cheney stood gaping as Ray Sllvas hovers over hii man. Gary Ricks Monte Maniz Jay Baumgartner Season e c o r sc Opponsntt 63 Oakland 38 72 Santa Rosa 67 71 Modesto 52 59 San Mateo 62 66 CCSF 60 77 Sacrannento 71 61 West Contra Costa 50 73 Oakland 48 83 Santa Rosa 62 73 Modesto 52 67 San Mateo 62 59 CCSF 55 76 Sacramento 62 63 West Contra Costa 78 ' age 142 Batch Williams Happy ' Tang players talked over the plays that helped beat Sacramento JC. Lou Ferrario " Lanky Lou " Ferrario, No. II, looped in a difficult shot from behind the backboard as George Moton, No. 21, and Ray Silvas, No. 15, looked on. Neil Nostrand W : Bob Ghiglierl Page 143 Carl Peregoy Co«ch Colt Basketball The Colt hoopmen put forth a tremendous amount of energy this past season. Coach Peregoy greeted but one returning varsity man. Sylvester Aguilar. In league play, the team finished with a seven win - six loss record in fourth place through the consistent efforts of such cagers as Bob Pedersen, Roger Warricic, and Wilson Johnson. The season, though not as successful as hoped for, ended happily when the Colts doused the Lodi Flames in the final game of the season. Front Row: John Morrli, Bill Crandall, Psto Call H, Brant Grimm. Bob Mingrsm. Row 2: Manual Hamandaz. manaqar; Sylvattar Aquilar. Bud Watkinqton. Phil Smith. Ron Brown. Don Sarai. Frad Suarat. manaqor. Row 3: Coach Pareqoy. Bob Pedanan, Bundy Graan, Gill Giinilan, Roqar Warrick, Tom Maani. Dala Watkar. Wilton Johnion. T h t h sc Opponanti SC Opponanti 44 Sacramento 38 31 Grant 38 7 Lodi 52 48 Turlocit 53 50 McClafchy 52 51 Woodland 42 46 Modesto 55 50 Turlocit 54 64 El Camino 36 53 Modesto 40 47 Downey 31 52 Do ney 40 62 Lodi 54 Page 144 r Tom Means .i Gill Gllfillan Bill Crandall Bob Pedersen Bob Pedersen, the Colt ' s " standout " center, nabbed the rebound as Brent Grimm, No. 40, came to assist. c% Wilson Johnson Brent Grimm Page 145 Pete Catlett John Morris r (II I jmi i n Ray Claveran Brt»n Qft, mm firei one from the iide. No. I I n Tom Means. Page 146 Bob Mingram Sylvester Aguilar a Bud Washington Ji, Roger Warrick m e Roger Warrick, No. 10, sailed high into the air as he laid the ball against the backboard for two against Lodl. Ron Brown Page 147 Colt B e e s Front Row: Doug RftHo. Don Kibby, Bill Young, Al Del Prato. Bob Rugnao. Row 2: Bob Thomai, coach: Al Crandall. Di«is Frazer. Das Lambart, Chuck Novotny. Stava Weainar. Banny Gonzales is not pictured. Coach Bob Thomas ' Bee Team turned in an outstanding (performance this year. In spite of being the shortest team in the league, the squad placed second In the league, even beating top-place Grant 46-40 in a non - league game near the end of the season. Dee Lambert was unanimously selected as the most valuable player on the team. e a s o n e c o r so Opponents 49 Sacramento 40 38 Lodi 33 57 McClatchy 47 38 Modesto 39 54 El Camino 32 56 Downey 32 29 Grant 34 28 TuHock 36 39 Woodland 48 42 Turiocic 30 57 Modesto 46 60 Downey 41 41 Lodi 63 age 148 Practically uvt-r i ' v iiy (,J ,ti -r ' ' » tni .1 ' .T Dixie Frazer. No. 14, Al (5el Pre to. No. 16, and Bill Young, No. 7, struggled for the rebound. Faculty - Block S Basketball Game The fickle finger of fate singled out Don Miniaci. Coach Harry Kane, owner of the finger, found out that football rules worked better in this game than anything else. Referee Julio Bortolazzo hands ball to Howard Jackson with instructions to take five or six free throws. Block S letter-winning athletes met in annual March powwow decked out in battle togs, their sole aim to avenge last year ' s defeat. The faculty, out to prove their superiority once more, induced Dr. Julio Bortolazzo to be head referee and Mike Garrigan to double check on things. 47 to 45. Faculty, of course. Two more for the faculty as lengthy Howard Pearce flips one in. Page 149 One of SC ' s outstanding mermen, Brent Heisinger. No. 27. churned for the bell. Starting the season with a green squad, Coach Anttlla ' s team ended the season with a 6 win - 2 loss record for league play to finish in second place. Brent Heisinger was selected as the most valuable player and Jim Allman the most improved player. Mustang Water Polo Bob Norrls, No. 34, prepared to make a shot in a game against the Olympic Club Reserves. SC poured in fourteen goals to Reserve ' s four. Front Row: Bob Hall. Bob Prilchard. Gono Bsrion. Bob O ' Laar. Jim Allmsn. Willi WabtUr. Walt Pattarton. Row 2: Rinoharl Heiniti. Brant Haiiinqar. Forail Harnton, Bill Antlila, coach; Bob Norrii. Bob Buditon, Dick OaLonq. Don Smith. Page 150 Cross Country Front Row: Abe Karlm, Leonard Hill, Arne Aasen, Eddie Hinshaw, Gary Sullivan. Coaching the Cross Country team this past season proved to be a rewarding one for Don Evans. Evans, by the way, did all the coaching on his own time. Winning their three meets gave proof of the effort expended by the squad. in the large Sac -Joaquin League Conference meet held at El Camino hHigh School in Sac- ramento, the team placed fourth. An excellent showing was made by Abe Karim and Garry Sullivan. The stop watch told the story. Dr. SchotI, here we come! Page 151 Front Row: Willla WabtUr. Jack Saion. I. . - - V ■ - Walt PaMonc Hainitx. Row 2: Brent t . Bob McLoughlin. Gary Cahill, Norman Borth. Jim Allman. Row 3: Bob O Laar. Forest Harrison, Don Smith, Dick DeLong, Gaorge Hughes. Coach Anttila. Mustang Shimming Coach Bill Anttila welcomed most of last year ' s outstanding Colt swimmers to his Tang team. Despite the loss of his top breastroker, Anttila worked his mermen into the Northern California championship for the ninth time in ten seasons. Walt Patterson and Brent Heisinger provided much of the season ' s excitement by winning several of their races by " touch-outs. " Also contributing to the highly successful season were Don " Smitty " Smith, the squad ' s outstanding swimmer, and such ' Tangs as Norm Borth and Bob McLoughlin. William AnHila Coach Lynn Waller, the team s exceptional diver, was camera-caught doing a running forward one - and - a • half. racing dive. Swimmer at left was from El Camino. Page 152 Front Row: Mickey Gasser, Zack Totten, Keith Davis, Charles Lay, Burke Ferrari, PaulJacobson, Bob Duran, Dennis Ahearn. Row 2: Doug Eberhardt, Gordon Zuckerman, Dave Crandall, Bob Bennitt, Bud Ellsworth, Scott Stevenson. Row 3: Larry Emerson. Bill Cudney. Bob Beardslee, Roger Benedito, Kelvin Kjeldsen, Jerry Layton, Tony Roclia Phil Dillon Coach Bill Anttila. Co lt Sv imming The 1955 Colt splashers swam over most of their competition for a good season. The team was a fairly green one due to gradua- tion of many top swimmers last year, but the outstanding ability of Keith Davis and Bob Bennitt kept the team on the winning side of the ledger most of the time. -— ' — ' . — J — Bob Benniti-, left, and Keith Davis flash into their backstroke after their turn in the Lodi meet. Off to a good start! Page 153 Mustang Baseball The strong pitching trio of Neil Nostrand, John Schmidt, and George Moton enabled the Mustang horsehiders to win a ma- jority of their games. Coach Don Hall had his " ole " reliables. Jack Cheney. Don Freed. Charlie Gritts. Don Stevens. Schmidt and Moton back from the ' 54 Colts; he had standouts Alex Leos. Neil Nostrand. Ron Miller. " Itch " Norton, and Phil Smith. This well-knit, smooth playing unit provided the fans with many fast, hard fought, hard won games, and lived up to Coach Hall ' s expectations. Don Hall Co«ck , v-j« 9«. ■ • ■ yji um Front Row: Jack Choncy. Don SUvant, Sam Bahic. Don Fread, Alai Laos, Don Torra, Bob Parry. Curt Mattlar. Charlla Grittt. Row 2: Larry O Railly. Nail Notlrand. Rauban Bocci, Phil Smith, Ron Millar, " Itch " Horton, Marty Stavani, Don Chambart, Stava Campora. John Schmidt, Gaorqa Moton, Coach Hall, Pag« 154 I ' MJb. Don Freed demonstrated the best technique to use in beating a runner to third base. Season Record sc opponents 10 Porterville J C 4 10 Porterville J C 2 II Grant J C 12 College of Sequoias 1 1 8 CCSF 4 4 CCSF 5 7 San Mateo J C 3 6 San Mateo J C 14 12 Fresno J C 6 10 Porterville J C 1 1 14 College of Se quoias 8 4 Reedley J C 3 8 Sierra J C 3 7 West Contra Costa 6 5 West Contra Costa 1 1 What goes up m and the Porterville before ust come down — man came down Sam Behic could make first base. Page 155 Strike one! Donnie Freed swung hard but didn ' t connect. Larry O ' Reilly slid into second for a stolen base. .81 Clenched fists and gritted teeth didn ' t help Sam Behic make home plate soon enough. Pnqa IB6 Colt Baseball Front Row: Rowan Carlson. Mike Preston, Jesse Reygosa, Louis Lovotti, Rudy Moreno, Al Crandall. Pete Catlett. Row 2: Ron Laughlin, Jim Devincenzi, Bob Mingram, Art Holland. Don McDonald. Mike Gillet. Earl Moreno. Row 3: Bill Laughlin. Eddie Davidson. Dean Martin. Bob Leopold, Buddy Washington, Coach Peregoy. Carl Peregoy •-•aK s call em as I see em. The Stockton College Colts started out the season by winning all of the practice games, but losing their first few league games. It was Coach Carl Peregoy ' s trying job to get the Colt ' s out of second and into high gear. Bob Leopold, Al Crandall, Dean Martin, and Ron Laughlin were only a few of the players who helped pull the team through many a tough game and into a well-played season. Page 157 Bet it was a homer! " May I tie your shoe? " It looted as though the Manteca man was asking Colt Louis Lovotti this question as Lovotti slid into first. Yer out! Page 158 Don Minlaci gleefully rounded first base after banging out his first hit of the season in league play. Ron Laughlin moved his foot to tag the sack one step ahead of the Tracy runner. Jim Devincenzi is the pitcher in the background. Bob Mlngram, No. I , and Pete Catlett, to his left, welcomed home run hitter Ron Laughlin as he completed his tour of the bases. Page 159 Front Row. _:.u:-.i: _-;■-.. (. " i r.. . :. -- - Z, -.- ;: ,. . L r.r; L,- ..••• . :. Row 2; .-i;. Pellegrini, Al fialdt, Bart Gauger. Row 3: Howard Jaclson. JacV Perry. Harv Freedly. Mustang Track Frank Boyle Coach The 1955 Mustang Track team, under the able coaching of Frank Boyle, proved to be a well-balanced squad. Although hampered all season by Ineli- gibility, the thinclads were a pretty hard team to beat. Charlie Curtis and Gene Campbell were two of the consistent scorers, while Howard Jack ' on. Batch Williams. Bart Gauger, Cliff Green- wood and Vern Sclotthauer were among the ' Tangs who turned in fine perform- ances. Paga 160 Roll them hips! Cliff Groonwood wasn t quite high enough. Season Record 5C Opponenfs 49 Modesto 75 84 San Mateo 40 82 West Contra Costa 42 581 2 Santa Rosa 631 2 44 C C S F 80 39 Sacramento 85 Batch Williams was up and over in the hurdles event. Gene Campbell seemed to walk on thin air. Upsy- daisy! The ' Tangs all-around boy, Howard Jackson, cleared the bar. atfT-: " ' f ' iTfrv ' aiiUMft ' iJfiiv Page 161 Leadell Traylor snapped the tape in the 220 for another first, while Wilson Johnson and Pete Serrano settled for fourth and fifth spots. The grin on his face proved that Wilson Johnson was well pleased with his jump. Ken Noyer paused on the way down, after vaulting over the bar with plenty of room to spare. Coif T r a c V Season Record SC Opponent SC Oppontnti 381 3 El Camino 651 3 70 Torlocic 34 68 Downey 36 40% Lodi 631 3 761 2 Modesto 27i j Pago 162 » »»»A;i Front Row: Gary Venable. Richard Mosqueda, Freddie Almendarez, Louis Koe, Richard Moreno, Carl Kennard, Paul Poulsen, Tom Romero, Jim Newberry, George Thompson, Don Kibby, Tony Gumbaro, Ken Noyer. Row 2: Bob Tanalta, Waymond Hall, Dwight MacCarroll, Jim " Legs " Tominaga, Dee Lambert, Paul Lapltan, LeRoy Ehlers, Russ James, Ron Hildebrand, Gary Sullivan, Frank Oblen, James Wilburn, Fred Suarez, manager. Row 3: Coach Gott, Jun Akaba, Joe Hendrix, Alfred Baguio, Danny Esguerra, Adrean Vera, George Cosgrove. Ed Hinshaw, Bert Johnson, Willis Taylor, Wilson Johnson, Don Velez. Roger DeRieux, Gary Hill, Leonard Hill, Abe Karim, Lauren Pettis, Eddy Torres. Coach Bill Gott ' s first season with the Colt cindermen proved to be a fruitful one. The large turnout was ample proof of the spirit of team members. Relying on such hustlers as " Legs " Tominaga, Jun Akaba, Leadell Traylor, and Waymond Hall, the Colts racked up a good number of points for a season ' s job well done. Bill Gott Coach Jun Akaba displayed his tremendous will to win. Waymond Hall, right, and Carl Kennard dom- inated the hurdles in a meet with Turlock. Page 163 i? Gary Riclts concentrated on a good serve Chuck Bloch displayed his " fine form " with Corky Fergusson on the doubles court. Mustang Tennis Though lacking experienced players, Coach Bill Par+on ' s squad played a creditable season. Sparking the ' 55 Tang tennis team was Dick Whitesides. Backing up Whitesides were Corky Fergusson, Chuck Bloch and Del Simmons. R-- Bill Parton Co4cS Kan . Bill Burrow . I. Dal Simmoni. Re- .• .1. Jarry Msiton. Gordon F«rquu«n, 0 uck Bloch, Sam L «. Page 164 Colt Tennis f Here it comes! Tom Means blasted the ball There It goes! Jack McDonald returned the ball. With Bill Parton taking up the coaching reins, the SC Colts enjoyed a very successful season. Winning most of their games, the Colts " Racqueters " proved to be a hard team to beat. The only losses suffered were to Lodi and Downey. Bob Rose and Luis Perez were the leading netters. The rest of the team proved to be able. Fronf Row: Louis Peroz, Bob Rose. Gabriel Elmidolan; Row 2: Tom Means, Larry Weigum, Ron Brown, Jack McDonald, Cliff Hahn. Page 165 Mustang Golf Front Row: Burqaii Windsor Bob Oliva, 0«l Janien. Bob Moffat. Row 2: Coach Pels Leni, DavO Dillon. Andy Adamt Ivan Uaacson, Date Jonton Jo« Keytar. The past season for the Tang golfers proved to be an exceptionally brilliant one. In eight league games, the squad was undefeated. Led by Bob Oliva, Dave Dillon, and Burgess Windsor, the team was ranked one of the top two teams in the state. Burgess Windsor, one of SC s stand-out golfers, was named " Athlete of the Year " for the city of Stocltton by the Stockton Jesters Club. Burgess, last year, won second place in the National Amputees Golf Tourney in Michigan; he plans to enter the Tourney again this year. Lee LaPlant loosens up while several of his teammates look on. Pago 166 The proper technique of chipping was demonstrated by two of Coach Lenz ' s top-notch golfers. Colt Golf - vt.1 iwnw In 1955, as in past years, Pete Lenz coached the Colt golf team. The Colt " linksters " had some good material, but they were up against very tough competition. Two of Coach Lenz ' s highest- rating squad men were Tim Quinn and Ron Smith. Left o Right: Dean Jones, Ron Foster, Tim QuInn, Craig Corren, Bill McNeer, Pat Hobln, Les Gini, and Coach Pete Lenz, kneeling. Page 167 Jim " Junior " Reynosa Football Jack Cheney B«tUtb«ll Outstanding Athletes George Moton B t b«ll Mustangs Wi m ' Charlei Curtlj Tr.cl Brenf Helsinger W«l«rpolo Don " Smitty Smith Swimmin9 Bob Oliva (not pictured) 6eH age 168 Richard Whitesidos T«nfl!t Adrean Vera Football Colts Keith Davis Swimming v i Brent Grimm Basketball Bob Leopold Baseball Dee Lambert B Basketball Abraham Karim Cross Country Jun Akaba Track Tom Quinn, Jr. Golf Bob Rose Tennis Page 169 Cabinet n A fi n n. rt rj r A Lth to Riqht: Milt Irens Harrlt. advitsr, Kathia Jacobs, Calhlin Draway, Lea Ann Vandarford, Linda Edton, Barbara Tablar, Diana Cuttar, Darlana Lincoln, Barbara Thompson. Pat Burrola, Eslalla Co , Mist Marcila Millar, advisar. Women ' s Sports Association The Women ' s Sports Association of Stock- ton College is an organized girls ' club which promoted good sportsmanship, leadership, and friendship. Headed by President Diane Custer, the girls participated in eleven " sports days " at various high schools and junior colleges in Northern California. In the Spring, the two groups combined to become one. Miss Marcila Millar, laft, and Miss Irana Harris, advisars. Sports managers for W.S,A. were Mary Ellen Casfillo. Lacy DIclierson. Sylvia Peirano, and Margaret Cheney. Not pictured was Florence Reed hocltey manage Pago 170 Volleyball Champions The two championship volleyball teams, pictured below, were shown in action against each other In the playoff game, won by the three o ' clock group. r ( p fi0 a Front Row: Barbara Wilson, Delphine Prieto, Martha Hidalgo, Rachael Alvarez, Phyllis Villamor, Kathie Jacobs. Row 2: Monica White. Jean Reyburn, Irene Martinez. Estella Cox, Edna Williams, Margo Collures. Tennis Doubles Champs Mary Turley, left, and Irene Martinez. Field Hockey Champions Front Row: Diane Williams, Virginia Garbiso, Diane Custer, Linda Edson, Pat Burrola, Alice Correa. Rachael Alvarez. Row 2: Consuelo Crawford, Barbara Tabler. Dorothy Harris, Darlene Moland, Barbara Ewing, Loe Ann Vanderford. Beatrice Davis. Estelle Coi. Mary Baraias, Florence Reed, Martha Hidalgo. Page 171 Front Ro " : Cv ' A..- , Ruby Coffey. Mary Helen Barajaj. Loij Jones. Caria Chrlsman. Diane Oenhart. Barbara Alvarez. Moora. Row 2: Judy Booth, Barbara Kay, Lacy Diclerton. Virginia Aleison. Monica White, e Onweiler. Tawana Stringer, Arline Higday. Row 3: Katherine Iwamoto, Nancy Neugebauer, Ch ,Q bh.r:3 ' 3, Kj:uyo Nalaols, Pat Carido, Maiine Angelo, Sharon Willianni. Snorah Lee Moore. Row 4: Mary St. Clair. Dariene Moland. Cherrone Du Bois. Norma McNeer. Margo Cooluret. Rose Marie Parent!, Augustine Williams. Dorothy Harris. Essie Lena Wright. Miss Miller, adviser. Row 5: Anita Irey, Carlita Isaacs, Maiine Harvell. Ann Quinn, Mary Mourisli, Rae Maclas. Alice Correa. Virginia Garblso. Martha Hidalgo. Barbara Ewing. Two o ' clock W.S.A. W. S. A. Mermaids Look out! The championship team charged toward the goal cage. Page 172 Maxine Harvell, No. 44, lunged al the ball as Kathle Jacobs readied herself for a shot. Teammate Lee Ann Vanderford moved In and Virginia Garbiso and Alice Correa, No. 54, wait for the rebound. L Champion Velia Barrera after a display of her archery skill. ' 4 3 o ' clock W.S.A. Front Row; Dorothy Harris, Sally Gale. Sylvia Pelrano. Gloria Williams, Diane Williams, Edna Williams, Annie Terry, Mary Ann Bonucelli, Jeanne Wilson, Sandra Fletcher. Row 2: Consuelo Crawford, Blanch Thompson, Ellse Livingstone, Rachael Alvarez, Patricia Burrola, Delphlne Prleto. Barbara Wilson, Pat Harrison, Wendy Stahley, Lillian Alsop. Row 3: Barbara Thompson, Diane Custer, Kathle Jacobs, Margaret Cheney, Mary Grazlanl, Shirley Benedict, Darlene Lincoln, Vollla Barrera, Angel Martel, Eveline Gross. Row 4: Beatrice Davis, Carolyn Dana, Estello Cox. Lee Ann Vanderford, Barbara Tabler, Betty Lowry, Yvonne Meyer, Linda Edson, Marilyn Reed, Phyllis Vlllamor, Mary Ellen Castillo. Row 5: Mar Williams. Bov Roberts, Irene Martinez, Mary Turley, Cathlln Drewey, Rosemarie Melburg, Carol Brooks, Florence Reed, Mildred Reed, Joann Bradley, Laura Jackson. Row 6: Ruth Bollinger. Debbie Goleman, Coryl Myers, Dona Carlson, Linda Nostrand, Jeri Henderson, Betty Ginbey, Lois Mendonsa, Margie Ginbey, Sharlee Stahley, Joann Lawler, Doll Williams. Page 173 t . §► » «_ 1 55|5||555555|5S55 5 i ' ilSiSTs 5 5 J 5 StS 5 |S i S | UON. TUCS I " TMUN Irm. MO ' l TUCS T»MI f Rl TT SSt|6t6(|SSSS(6SSS6ES(6 6S66 7|7 777 77 777)7777777 7 7,7 77777 ii8i8iiiiiiiiiiiiiJi ' iiiliiii j!1 i-= ■| jU a a o ' a ' s eooaaaoog ljjjjjgljjj g ' j g j 9 9 9 9 9 I III • I u ■ tlllltllKltxri- tiliMitlilltiKrtltlllllllllltiailliltMfMII 1 1 1 1 1 1 ill 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 i|i ill 1 1 II i|m 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 ill 1 1 111 1 1 1 l iiM i I i:i I ti rMiiliiiiiir iiiiliiiri{ iiiii jiijMiiil , ' ' . " .f ' I L iiiiiiltiiiiiitiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiii)ii9i)liii ;,p t .! ,IL. J ••4i«iii« ««.« i.i 4 1 4 « «(« t 44« « - 4 ii« ' " , V V ir T 9 IK l. -- _ • — kililliiiiMliiiiikVt ' ifiliiiwiiliii I • nil iiiliiiKiiiiii III iiiiitaii ' tti I i|u M M M r I It M I M I r) M I M I rn ri 1 1 I I iiiiiiii«iiiiiiiiii( iiiiMi«iiiaii STQCmtqn COl. L f OF o Hlllllllll ' it iti|fiiiiiaiii»t»iiiiiiitiiitii itJ k- » J - i " - -t s r r i |fcc o » U O I 1- -4 • : 1 1 ui ■ • • a. m 1 1 iNp _ f a n; - ■ " z — " u o = - 1 1 i ( i 1 1 1 « iiiiiiiii ' - IIIIIIIII » r " — • »«mA l4Mkii l4 • all l« I Hill :r i , 1 1 r 1 1 HI CM ro rsi CO ; _ ' :. ' ■.; • A ' . ■ N « M »: i 1 -1 ».. T ' JC ' ENT NO J 00 x; 0[0 Q t w U i 2 3 i; 6 » 5 3 if. M " ;.■; H ' . n nin n n n r l-l c r»» -j-l J C3 :5 — ■jlTl ? TT-rrti — ! — r " T-T— rn m l iJ « CO LJ " £ =» ' 4 ' i « -♦1 f j ? »- • • •- u. C7 • • - ■Si ' ' ., n ■ • tr cs Otiv ' j ssvno T - o 2i 2 2 212 2 2 2 2 2i 2 2 2 2 2:2 2 2 2 i 2 2 2 2 i 2j2|2 6:3 3 3 3 3:3 3 3i 3 3 3i 3 i 2 2i2 2 2 3 3 3;333 3 3i 3 n 3!3i3 3 3 3!3 3 3 •1:8 = • ' ir,5 i = = 1 « :i ' 48 4,4 444444 4 4 414.4 .4 4 14 4 4 A f f E N D A Nir L rTico-iD 5U- V. ' .- Wte- I: ' . ' •. N. 5 5 -iSRc. ■i ' ■ ' ;■ 1 TUr • " I V f-K r ! MON. : 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 ■JpA ' PS K " .-J. ; ..... O O y» — -0 r ' 2m ri 1 ' 1 ;T i l l - n Z • S Z " " 2 £ - m O -r - O 5 » O (D _( f m m 3 X — » 303TnOD N0i iD0i ' ; I ( . .J: ::l T i ' ' . ' ii 1 ' 1 ■::iA s ,- w (0 a» -rf 9 " » I i K - ' ; 1— — ' ».C io -- -. -. v-3 B I m C o 5: J s;) C::v.: i:«v ooir: ) i (J t ; T - I I I I I J CiO OiO S G|0:OiO OiO G 4S 5u 5? = j «!« 55 S« 57 « % » f 2 83 S Ss ggjg? 6 OS 70 71 72 V. M|?i ?S 77 I n nil n 11 n ill ihiiji n n liih 1 1 « J L L L A 000 iS 79 iiO 1 1 1111111 3 333331333 I ._ INITiSl S. M S SFM fSTf ft ra CVr .Cuf R T YEAR a TCRi II II II U H CI II II « I I I ill I t { 1 6 B(6t 1(68616166 66 t !5 5 5 5 i 5 5 5 5 5 5 SSoSwoSSSS 5:5 i 1 515 5 5 555551 66 68 86 seises 555 S8S o o — » o o If; A Claire Herring finds, as you will too, that cool and refreshingly new cotton separates can always be found at The Sterling. Remember, Sterling is the mark of quality. Happyholme Dairy Products " You can whip our cream, but you can ' t beat our milk, " says Mayor Dean DoCarIi, owner ot Happy- holme Dairy producti, as he hands a quart of Golden Guerns ey milk to noopman Bob Pedersen. iqe I 76 You ' ll meet the " young at heart " like Jean Berry and Lynn Stevens at The Forum where contemporary living is expressed in gracious, modern designs. The artistically in- clined person may also choose from a wide variety of supplies on dis- play. Picture Story of your Wedding YOSHIKAWA STUDIO II NORTH ELDORADO STREET STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA TELEPHONE: HOward 3-7941 « i . f member of: Photographers Association of America Professional Photographers Association of California Professional Photographers Guild of San Joaquin County Professional School Photographers Association Page 177 M Freitas Music Company Whether if s Mambo cr bop, Mozart or Brahms, Freltat Music Company offers all speeds In the record dep art- ment to SC students. For music appreciation or parti- cipation, make your selec- tions here. tkc jj urvov 2 + 2=4 AND MORE THE BROWN HOUSE and TABAK OF CALIFORNIA show this fashion arithmetic course a thing or two with Joan Malloy and Diane Hoskins wearing two completely interchange- able outfits for the four. Each piece blends perfectly with other parts of your wardhobe for the more. Priced surprisingly low. YOST BROS -1 Page 178 YcsT Brox. Jan Geilatly and Dennis Bowman are only two of many satisfied customers who know they look their best in the latest styling In men ' s wear from Tott Bros. El Dorado Bowl Bob O ' Lear says, " Bowling is right down my alley when its at the El Dorado Bowl. Plan to spend your " spare " mo- ments there for the finest in recreation and relaxation. jN in tai L Ij " Oh! Look! " exclaims Rose Marie Parenti to Jay Malloy. " I told you I saw this lovely room arrangement in a national magazine " . . . and you will see quality furniture, too, when you shop at Burnham Bros. Nehi Bottling Co. Ron Kibby and Rich Roberts are ready to uncap bottles of sparkling Royal Crown Cola. For variety, winter or summer, Nehi Bottling Company offers this and many oth- er refreshing drinks. Page 179 r vo i Ivjc ({c " Q.Q.(Ap X) • ' Pat Hobin is getting smiles of ap- proval from Jean Pereira and Jack McDonald on his selection of a r r;M snorts outfit from Bravo McKeegan. P u i n n ' s Counters and iholves at Quinn ' t are filled v»ith the latest and best in book, stationery and office sup- plies. Their stock is designed es- pecially for you and your needs. Howard H. Gibson Realty Salesman Bob Gibson and prospec- tive buyer LaVona Moore look over ome of the quality listings at Howard H. Gibson Realty. Wheth- er buying or iellinq property, drop in at 129 North California Street for all types of residential, suburb- an and ranch properties. Page 180 Leah Cortelazzi has chosen a whife background printed striped taffeta with a tiny rosebud motif. The three-quarter sleeves are cuffed with rhinestone buttons. The dress has a shirt front with convertible collar, and the skirt is very full with Its own net petticoat. ii2: :r ' : :i ' ..i Main and San Joaquin Streets LaVonne Chrismon has chosen a two-piece separate. The skirt has the new long torso of solid color channbray with a hip- to- hemline skirt of flowered chintz with match- ing belt. The blouse has the new high, straight neckline, and match- ing color in the torso of the skirt. Page 181 " DU 4. " DxCOC KH NIghf or day you II find ttie tops in eating treah at Dick ' i Drive Inn. You will alwavs get your order promptly whetner it be a lunch, dinner or ttiat midnight snack with your favorite date after the dance. Page 182 Campus Lane Just stepping Out to please that very particular guy in her life li Julie Wager In one of those eiqulilte creation ' , found eiclusively at Campus Lene. drDtLlty TtSSen Gail Bockmon has just chosen a chocolate Ice cream roll . . . one of many delicious pas- tries to be found at Weob ' i Bakery. V ' pto wn J Gail Hartmann found her dress at the ' uptown ' store, while sister Jean discovered her Jonathan Logan ' on the avenue. ' Both are set for a cool summer. ■! l, » Hannan Police Patrol SERVING AT SCHOOL DANCES AND GAMES 144 N. San Joaquin St. Day or Night: HO 6-9636 Art Nielsen and His Orchestra ENJOY DANCING AT ITS BEST 919 West Elm Street Phone HOward 2-0235 Advertising Photos by Willard Kurt Cummings Page 183 Newby ' s Drive Inn Umm . . . They ' re really delicious. Newby ' s barbecued sandwiches and Newby ' s Royal ice cream. Lofs of parking space, and service with a snnile go with the high quality food that ' s always ready for you. TiffVid ' Iif£e SPORT SHOP £W»7 »«« « f i ' ty SfxytT ' WMOLCSALC There s no hesitation on the part of Don Snnith, he has found exactly the right footwear in Ward Tyler ' s fine shoe departnnent: a variety of sporting goods for all ages is their specialty. uhL STOtKTON DRY GOODS WAIh aI NUHtll For that extra special occasion, Beverly Roberts and Linda Nostrand highly reconri- mend the stylish creations that arv fea- tured at Duniap ' s Stockton Dry Goodt. " ngo IS-I END ZONE Coffee flme is casual relaxation time for Marlene Comaskey, George Gilbert, Jim Gillet, and Anne McCauley. It ' s the camp- us eating and meeting spot: the End Zone . . . the friend zone of SC. COP Campus Barber Shop The COP Campus Barber Shop is where Don Gwaltney is having his hair cut. The convenient location of the establishment is to the bene- ft of the busy student. College Bookstore Marlene Sutherland selects her choice in books from the com- plete line of college supplies as suggested by Mr. Morris, own- er of the College Bookstore. " On campus for you " is their answer to your every college need. Page 185 Ted Herman and His Orchestra SEE ME AT MIRACLE MUSIC ANYTIME! 2363 Pacific Avenue Phone HOward 3-1536 Jacqueline Hooe ' s costume en- semble consists of a smartly styled printed coat with a complimentary matching solid dress. Wear as a " dress-up " or enjoy the casual jumper alone. The Fabric is Fresh-Tex by Cranston. Blacic White. Blue White. The Mills Press Lithographers Printers Stocktons leading Printing House Page 186 KNOBBY SHOP Pat Jensen, as gay as Spring itself, opens the door to smart styles at reasonable prices, of- fered to you exclusively at the Knobby Shop on the Avenue. M c C r a y ' s POLLY-DEBS and RAND -•■ Shoes LADIES ' and MEN ' S 2349 Pacific Avenue HOward 5-5571 203 Lincoln Shopping Center GRanite 7-2530 VliorrenllSpiis Craig and Leonard Corren agree that an advance-designed Zenith television set fronn M. Corren Sons will always capture attention in your home. Page 187 Drawing furnished courtesy Mayo. Johnson and DeWolf, James I. Barnes GENERAL 940 Spring Street A N ROOFING CO. Guaranteed Roofing of All Kinds 1521 NORTH SARGENT AVENUE STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA Architects, A. I. A., Exchange Building, Stockton, California Construction Co. CONTRACTORS F Redwood City, Callforni MICHAEL FLYNN MFG. CO. Lupton Metal Windows and Doors 1441 WEST FREMONT STREET STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA Carol Cruz is a reflection of elegance in a delicate party frock from Cerri ' s, on the Avenue, your answer to the prettiest in summer cottons. Reiman ' s Camera Shop D.O i jgnon jpprcves of Bud Reiman ' s choice of a Rollei- cord from the excellent pho- tographic supplies available at Relman ' i Camera Shop at b28 East K ' V ;, P-ige 190 Index Activities Section 84-107 Administration 10-13 Advertising Section 174-190 Alpha Gamma Sigma (AGS) - - - - | |0 Audio-Visual Operators ' Club (AVOC) - 117 Baseball 154-159 Basketball 140-148 Bl-Sci Club 117 Board of Publications 27 Board of Education - II Body and Fender Club -...-. |22 Bortolazzo, Dr. Julio L. 10 Bradley, Dr. Burke W. i| Cafeteria Staff 19 California Scholarship Federation (CSF) - Ml Camera Club .-. ||4 Cheerleaders 88-89 Chess Club - . . . . 115 Class Officers 24-25 Club Day 95 Club Section 108-127 Collegian 80-81 Colt Band - - . |05 Colt Orchestra 105 Cross Country 151 Curriculum Section 66-83 Custodians and Gardeners 19 Dances 92-93 Deans 12 Debate 79 Delta Mu Eta 116 Division Chairmen 13 Dramatic Productions 97-99 Electrics Club 124 El Recuerdo 82-83 Faculty 14-18 Faculty- Block S Basketball Game - - - , 149 French - German Club MB Football 130-139 Fourteenth Year Women ' s Honorary - - 112 Fun Fest 102-103 Future Farmers of America (FFA) - . . 123 Future Nurses of America 120 German Club 118 Godi, Arthur 22 Golf 1 66 - 1 67 Graduates Twelfth Year 35-63 Fourteenth Year 30-34 Nurses 64-65 Graphic Arts Club 124 Guys and Dolls ' Club 115 Headliners Club ||2 Homecoming 86-87 Inter-Club Council 24-25 Introduction 3-7 Journalism Conference 94 Key Club ||3 Le Cercle Francais 119 Los Iberos | I9 Machine Shop Club 123 Mill Cabinet Club 125 Mixed Chorus 107 Newman Club 120 Opera |07 Oratorio Chorus |07 O ' Toole ' s Club 125 Outstanding Athletes 168-169 Paint Splashers ' Club -----.. |26 Pep Club 121 Policemen |9 Queen of Clubs 96 Radio Club 126 Rallies 90-91 Rally Committee 27 Round Table Club 113 SC-COP Band 104 Secretaries |9 Ski Club 116 Sports Section 128-173 SC Intramural Theatrical Society (SCITS) I 14 Stockton Vocational Auto Club - - . 122 Student Affairs 26 Student Council 22-23 Student Court 26 Student Government Section - - - - 20-27 Swimming . . . 152. 153 Tennis 164-165 Tin Benders ' Club 127 Track 160-163 Troubadours 106 Variety Show 100-101 Veterans ' Club 121 Water Polo 150 Women ' s Sports Association (WSA) - - 170-173 Woodpeckers ' Club 127 Page 191 r i m I i I i Pearly Gates . . . here we come! All good little IBM cards hope to go to heaven. The cards have passed on into another world since the students they represent are now scattered for the search and conquest of other, more real " monsters " . . . living, laboring, and loving. Page 192 ' . r v v ' ■ " •?; f fcfr J ft '


Suggestions in the Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) collection:

Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

1957

Stockton College - El Recuerdo Yearbook (Stockton, CA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 182

1955, pg 182

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.