Stern College for Women - Kochaviah Yearbook (New York, NY)

 - Class of 1956

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Stern College for Women - Kochaviah Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 52 of the 1956 volume:

,r " i 3n Retrospect 1955-1956 ip THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE FRESHMAN CLASS OF S tern y otleae J or l l or, Ljeshiva Ulniversitu 253 LEXINGTON AVENUE NEW YORK 16, N. Y. JLie 1956 TABLE OF CONTENTS Freshman Class Officers 3 " In Retrospect " Editorial Staff 3 Message from Dr. Belkin 4 Message from Mr. Stern 5 Message from President of Freshman Class 6 DEAR DIARY (News) 7 Diary of a Thespianette 16 LITERARY FRED — Selma Stillman 18 THE SABBATH — Rhoda Glyn 19 AMERICA — Lea Iczkovits 20 THE BARREL-ORGAN — Tamar Fromer 21 THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK: A REVIEW — Iolet Shapiro 24 FORSAKEN HOUSE — Selma Stillman 25 LIFE ' S DEMAND — Selma Stillman 26 GREETINGS 27 HFBREW LITERARY , 44 FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS President Effie Fink Vice-President Rhoda Glyn Secretary-Treasurer Genia Prager EDITORIAL STAFF Editor — Iolet Shapiro Co-editor Martelle Berenson Literary Editor Selma Stillman News Editor Effie Fink Hebrew Editor Rachael Apher Business Managers Dorothy Gewirtz Esther Vitsick Make-up and Copy Editoi Frances Pakter Circulation Editor Roberta Daina Photography Editor Michele Michelstein Co-Art Editors Rosa Lee Jacobson Sondra Levy Production Aide Rhoda Glyn We would like to thank the Administration, the Student Body, and especially our faculty advisers: Dr. Dan Vogel, Dr. Menachem Mendel Brayer. and Mrs. Elizabeth Isaacs for their splendid cooperation in helping us make this endeavor a success. The Editors. tr TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS OF STERN COLLEGE: As Stern College completes its second year, I wish to congratulate all of you for the vital role you are playing in making the school a success. I want to express my appreciation for your faith in the aims and objectives of the college. As pioneers in a great venture, you are helping to translate into reality an academic enterprise which is opening new frontiers in the education of Jewish womanhood in America. Stern College stands for a great ideal. It is a private college of arts and sciences which endeavors to create a congenial home atmosphere with a particularly Jewish environment. As a new college, it can incorporate the latest trends and developments taking place in leading colleges for women throughout the country. It thus is able to formulate a balanced curriculum with particular emphasis on the humanities. Most important of all, ours is the only college under Jewish auspices where the sacred heritage of Judaism and contemporary culture are integrated into the American way of life, so as to supplement and complement each other. Here, Torah learning and Jewish history and philosophy walk hand in hand with knowledge of the arts and sciences. What we are accomplishing is obtaining a valued and honored position for the college in the community. I look upon each semester as an unlimited opportunity for achievement and take pride in what we have attained thus far. With all best wishes for a very happy summer, I am, Cordially yours, SAMUEL BELKIN President TO THE STUDENTS OF STERN COLLEGE: My congratulations on the publication of your magazine. Its issuance marks an- other proud chapter in the history of the college. Although, for the moment, the school ' s record is brief in retrospect, it is long in achievement. As the first liberal arts college for women in the United States under Jewish auspices, the founding of Stern College constituted an experiment in the history of higher learning. Now, with completion of its second year, it has secured a firm place for itself in the community. The accomplishments of the student body have won it a deserved place of importance on the educational scene. This is understood by the fact that enrollment for the coming term will be augmented by representatives of more than fifteen different states and three foreign countries. But, most significant of all is the role you are playing in the preservation of our heritage, in the advancement and strengthening of Judaism. As a pioneering group, you are setting a magnificent example, fortifying our Faith and opening new vistas for future students. Again, my congratulations. Best wishes for a very happy summer. Sincerely, MAX STERN FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE FRESHMAN CLASS Our freshman year has come to an end, leaving us one year older and the bene- ficiaries of enriching experiences. Friendships which will last a lifetime have been cemented. New doors leading to higher intellectual planes have been opened to us. As one of the major efforts of the year, this magazine represents the sincere hard- working efforts of the editors and the staff. The Hebrew section is a new addition which should establish a firm tradition for future publications. We sincerely hope that our supporters will be pleased with this endeavor. Through the wide circulation of " In Retrospect " we hope to attain a place among other college publications of this type. I would like to thank my fellow officers who gave unquestioningly of their time and energy to ensure the success of class functions. They were most cooperative at all times and pleasant to work with. I sincerely hope that incoming freshmen will derive as many spiritual and mental benefits as we have gleaned during our never-to-be forgotten Freshman year at Stern College. EFFIE FINK SEPTEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary: As we circled the block bustling with traffic in midtown Manhattan looking for Madison Avenue and 37th Street, my heart was in my throat. Passing the department stores and corner groceries that would soon be favorite haunts, I wondered what the coming year would hold in store for me. " Would I make friends, what kind of a girl would my room-mate be, would I benefit from college life? " These and a thousand other questions crowded my mind as the car pulled up at 237 Madison Avenue before the maroon awning bearing the name Hotel Duane! This was to be my home away from home for a year, and as I »alked into the lobby with a suitcase in each hand, my heart pounded like a drum when I saw all the strange faces. Going up in the elevator I said to the girl standing next to me: " Are you going to Stern College? " She was — and when I stepped out of the elevator, I had a room-mate. After my new room-mate and I had deposited our luggage in a room, we walked the few blocks to Stern College — our school. We were two frightened freshmen and it wasn ' t hard to recognize our fellow classmates. All the sophisticated, composed looking girls were certain to be sophomores. After supper in the beautiful cafeteria, we returned to the dorm to unpack and begin the wonderful process of making new friends. That was yesterday — and today was registration day at Stern College for Women. In the morning the lobby was full of nervous freshmen. We all walked to school in a contingent — each bolstering the other. After eating breakfast, those who had not yet been placed in a Hebrew group were instructed to report to the office for an interview. We all sat on the long benches in front of the office, after scrambling for a seat near the end of the line. The first girl to brave the unknown terror came out alive and healthy, although this didn ' t relieve the tension of the others too much. Finally it was over — and then it came. Cards — pink cards, yellow cards, blue cards, green cards, — cards, cards, and more cards — and they all had to be filled in. By the end of the afternoon we all had writer ' s cramp and empty pens. By this time we were completely willing to sink into the seats in the auditorium. We enviously admired the poised look of the Student Council officers who welcomed us to Stern College and introduced two of the faculty members, Mrs. Elizabeth Isaacs, and Mr. Dan Vogel. Returning to the dormitory after supper was already like returning home. OCTOBER, 1955 Dear Diar) ' , The time has now come to make a crucial decision with regard to my " college life " and particularly pertaining to my citizenship as a member of the freshman class. The notice for elections has been posted on the bulletin board; the offices open were President and Vice-President, ( who were to serve also as delegates to Student Council ) and the Secretary-Treasurer. Many girls spurred on by entrance to a new school and a desire to serve it, enthusiastically signed their names as candidates. As election day approached, the cafeteria, during lunch hour, filled with gay chatter and heated discussions as to the preferred candidate. The campaign was in progress. Finally the big day came! Ballots had been printed. All discussion was over. From the mixture of accents and new faces it was time for personalities to emerge. The girls are all excellent and the decision is not easy. As the votes were cast, the candidates were to be seen tensely pacing the floor and chewing their nails as they awaited the final outcome. They did not have long to wait! By mid-afternoon the results were known. Debby Kolitch of N. Y. C. became President. Effie Fink of Scranton, Pa. — Vice-President. " Ginger " Prager of New Britain, Conn. — Secretary-Treasurer. NOVEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, Freshman orientation today was very interesting and informative. Dr. Meyer Schnall, a noted gynecologist from Forest Hills, Long Island, addressed the class, speaking from an Orthodox point of view. He explained to us many vital aspects of Jewish married life .... Dear Diary, Rabbi Morris Max, the eminent Jewish authority, was the guest speaker at today ' s meeting of Freshman orientation. He spoke on the topic of " The Jewish Concept of Marriage " . Our questions were competently answered by Rabbi Max during the lively question and answer period that followed .... NOVEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, The first issue of our newspaper, Kocbaviah, came out today, and the freshmen are well represented on the staff. Rhoda Glyn, Marga Weinberg, Dottie Gewirtz, Elayne Morris, and Hannah Kalter are news reporters. The freshmen on the feature staff are Esther Holstein, Iolet Shapiro, and Geri Strulowitz. The typing staff consists of Ginger Prager and Roberta Daina. DECEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, It was very peculiar to see boys walking around the school tonight. The occasion was our Chanukah Chagiga, the first affair of its kind ever held at Stern. After a short period of socializing, the program began with the singing of the National Anthem. The walls of the auditorium, unaccustomed to the reverberations of deep masculine voices, echoed the sounds. Martelle Berenson led the gathering in the singing of Chanu- kah and Israeli songs. The rest of the program consisted of a professional magician, and Aaron Dobin. Aaron, a student at Yeshiva University, sang and played on the guitar several Israeli and American folk songs. After the entertainment, everyone adjourned to the cafeteria for refreshments and a social hour. Stern College ' s first social attempt was a success! 10 DECEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, Tonight I acted as a hostess for the delegates to the convention of the Women ' s Branch of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. The women were given a guided tour of the building and were able to question their guides about the workings of Stern College. They were duly impressed with our newly remodeled build- ing of which we are so proud. Dottie Gewirtz spoke at the convention and her en- thusiasm for the school has elicited their approval of our students. JANUARY, 1956 Dear Diary, Today starts my last week-end before finals. What excitement! I made up a schedule for finals, when to study, and when to review. Only two things did I forget . . . only 24 hours to a day and allowing time for sleep(?) If I keep this schedule I should make out very well, but . . . I have three days before Monday — when I have two finals. But the only time that I ' m home on Friday, I have to help in the house. Shabbos, after lunch, I finally get down to study. I study my Siddui and Rambam. Shabbos night — why did I have to accept that date — I could study German now! Sunday morning, I take along my German books and notebook to study on the way to teaching. I don ' t get too much done and it ' s already nine o ' clock. Today of all days, when I ' m so nervous and upset about finals and studying — the ptincipal walks in for inspection! As a punishment for the little . . I make them sit still, without doing anything for ten minutes. At least I have ten minutes to study. I come home and study, then I eat and study some more. No wonder that during final week I gain weight. Stay up until one o ' clock and study for one of Wednesday ' s tests. I came to school and, well i t ' s after the first test — one down and six to go. The days ate getting quite monotonous, all we see are red-eyed girls walking around memorizing dozens of facts which they will forget the minute after the test. (It often happens that they forget them a minute before the test too.) As each final is finished the notes are carefully put away and saved for the blessed day of the last final when all the notes will be ceremoniously prepared for the big bonfire. This went on a whole week. I studied while I ate and ate while I studied (which was a strain on my figure), on the train, and then walking to school. Before a certain final, given by a certain teacher (who just recently got enga — oops, almost slipped) the entire class was tired and we all studied together. Then we started to dance a Hora. How we did it, I can ' t imagine, after a week of exhaustion. But that ' s how it is . . . 11 FEBRUARY, 1956 Dear Diary, The students of Stern College were very privileged to hear an address today given by the distinguished author, lecturer, and religious leader, Rabbi Dr. Leo Jung. The basis of his speech was the important role of Orthodox Jewish women in the American scene. This theme was incorporated with the timeliness of Purim. All the girls are now looking forward to attending Dr. Jung ' s course in Jewish Ethics, which will be given at Stern beginning next year. The assembly had an added attraction in the person of Martelle Berenson, whose singing of " Ve ' Ulai " and " Love is Where You Find It " thrilled us all. FEBRUARY, 1956 Dear Diary, It is now mid-year and Debby Kolitch, our very capable President, was forced to resign. Effie Fink succeeded her as President. The office of Vice-President was open and elections were held once again. All the candidates were excellent but the weight of the decision was alleviated somewhat by the fact that a half a year enabled us to become better acquainted with our classmates. Rhoda Glyn of Baltimore, Md. was elected Vice-President of the Freshman Class. Our leaders through this first difficult year were wonderful. We owe them a great deal of thanks. 12 FEBRUARY, 1956 Dear Diary, The Charity Drive is now in full swing. Yeshiva University, including Stern College, is co-operating in an attempt to raise money for Israel. The sum total will be used mainly for defense and educational purposes. The chairman for collection among the freshmen is Dorothy Gewirtz, who proudly announces that Stern is leading all other branches of Yeshiva University in contributions per student. MARCH, 1956 Dear Diary, I guess they don ' t teach boys to read up at Yeshiva. The sign outside the library said, " Checking — 15c " , yet every one asked " How much is it to check? " This was our Shushan Purim Chagiga. The freshman chairman of this affair, Elayne Morris, graciously welcomed the guests. The entertainment was provided by Jack Glickman, a magician, and Shimmy Gewirtz, a singer. Following on the program was a series of Israeli dances performed by the Israeli Dance Club, under the leadership of Mrs. Marvin Hershkowitz. Refreshments were served in the cafeteria which was appropriately decorated with Purim masks. A weary group combined efforts to restore the cafeteria to its natural order as the building slowly emptied of its 250 guests. A sense of satis- faction was felt for a job well done. APRIL, 1956 Dear Diary, The entire student body gathered in the auditorium to celebrate Israeli Indepen- dence Day. Martelle Berenson led the group in singing several Hebrew songs. Mr. Vogel spoke briefly, advocating that we deliberate upon the precariousness of Israel ' s situation as well as the joyous spirit of the occasion. Dr. Noah Rosenbloom conducted responsive reading of several Psalms and then delivered an inspiring talk, calling upon American Jewry to abandon their lethargic attitude towards the miracle of Israel and to lend full support to its rebuilding. The singing of Hatikvah was a meaningful con- clusion to the program. 13 APRIL, 1956 Dear Diary. Today I attended the Lag B ' Omer outing of Stern College. The weatherman co- operated and gave us a beautiful, sunny day. After much ado, we boarded the buses that were provided by the Student Council, and were on our way to Pelham Bay Park. The ride was made pleasant by the singing of both Hebrew and English songs. The buses got lost on the way, and we had not the slightest idea of how to get to the park.. Finally, at four o ' clock, we arrived. The meeting place was to be the baseball diamond. Only one detail was not mentioned — which baseball diamond? Well, we walked and walked, finally asking a park official to help us. The weather changed suddenly and it became very cold. We sat down to eat our sandwiches. The boys enjoyed a game of baseball, and the few girls who joined that game hit the ball and ran, not knowing to where. But it was fun! At 6 p.m. a cold, tired, but happy group of fifty decided to mount the waiting buses and call it a day. »f J MAY, 1956 Dear Diary, Two of my fellow freshmen were elected officers of the dormitory for next year. Ginger Prager was unanimously elected secretary post which she also holds this year. and Dottie Gewirtz, treasurer, MAY, 1956 Dear Diary, Plans for a club hour for next term were discussed at the Student Council meeting today. Those clubs which were active this year, such as the Debating Club, supervised by Rabbi Sol Spiro, the Chalil Club led by Barbara Gross, and the Psychology-Sociology Club, all requested a specific time for meetings. If there are any requests for additional groups, and enough girls are interested, the Student Council will form these clubs. 14 MAY, 1956 Dear Diary, I listened in on a choir rehearsal today. Dr. Ruth Kisch, the director, is preparing the girls for two presentations. They will sing for a program to be given for the incoming freshman class, the present students, and their parents on May 13th. The choir will also perform at the installation of the Student Council officers on May 29- MAY, 1956 Dear Diary, Today ' s meeting of the Jewish Ethics Club made me realize again the importance of such a group. Rabbi Howard Levine, one of our instructors, delivered a talk en- titled, " What Is Modern Orthodoxy? " in which he discussed several current religious controversies. This group, until several weeks ago, was conducted by Dr. Jean Jofen, instructor in languages at Stern College. She discussed with us the laws concerning Purity of the Family. We were also taught the laws of koshering a chicken in an explicit manner, as Dr. Jofen demonstrated on a real chicken. MAY, 1956 Dear Diary, After a few days of campaigning and speech making, the Student Council elections were held. Effie Fink, a freshman, was elected Secretary for the coming school year. MAY, 1956 Dear Diary, As I realize now that the end of my first year in college is rapidly approaching, it seems like only yesterday that school was beginning. While remembering how frightened I was. coming into a strange school, knowing no one, I think of all the wonderful friends I have made since last September. I sincerely hope that these friendships will last for the remainder of my college years and long after that. I feel that I have gained much more than just book knowledge — I have become a more mature and understanding person who will be able to contribute to the strength- ening of Orthodox Judaism. 15 DIARY OF A THESPIANETTE SEPTEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, I jusc signed up for the Dramatics Club. I ' ve always had a yen to " express myself " on the stage — and here ' s my opportunity at last. NOVEMBER, 1955 Hey! What ' s going on? I didn ' t know Sarah Bernhardt went into tantrums before every performance she gave. Oh, I see. Rabbi Shulman (he ' s our coach) says this ' U really bring out our voices. But I ' m a modest and delicate soul, so I don ' t really think I ' ll try it now. What am I talking about? That ' s easy. Take any kind of recitation, break it up into syllables, and shout it that way while throwing your arms, trunk, and those other appendages into a different contortion with each syllable. Sounds weird? Aw. c ' mon, it ' s all for the sake of art and the theatre! Rabbi Shulman is demonstrating ... he flings his left arm to the ceiling . . . oops! There goes his watch sailing across the room . . . and as it clonks against ye old blackboard, we realize we ' ve been fortunate to witness power as a tangible object . . . well, anyway Q.E.D. JANUARY, 1956 Sh-h! Do not tell anyone, but I theenk perhaps maybe efsher the Dramatics Society of Stern College for Women — ahem! is preparing to consider offering a sample of its illustrious theatrical ability. MARCH, 1956 Let ' s do a musical! Somebody around here ' s supposed to sing! Don ' t be silly — give the audience credit for some imagination. Rabbi Shulman and I have gone over to Schirmer ' s to listen to the score of Trial by Jury. Gilbert and Sullivan were never in better voice — oh, pardon my error — anyway this operetta is tres suitable for our purpose and we ' ve got just the cast. MAY, 1956 Rabbi Shulman has certainly given a great deal of his time and effort and infinite patience in his direction of our performance. Martelle Berenson is, as usual, in beautiful voice as the lovely, wronged Angelina. Rachael Apher as the judge is sen- sationally funny with her inimitable style of song and jig. Other freshmen in the cast are Effie Fink, Iolet Shapiro, Ginger Prager, Chani Intrater, Fran Pakter, Ethel Kagan, Marga Weinberg, and Esther Holstein. As an unbiased outsider, Yours Truly declines to make a statement about her part as the Defendant, seeing as how circumstantial evidence may tend to irreparably incriminate said party of the first part. Meanwhile, back at the operetta ... it seems that one of our spies in the audience has just informed us that they were rolling in the aisles. Sound corny? Aw, don ' t be a killjoy ... let us live a little. History has just been made at Stern College — ■ the first Dramatics Club presentation — and as our jet-propelled curtain closes the stage from view, I give a weary yawn — what a workout, but what fun! Sleep tight, little Diary, Ie shono ha boah ba Metropolitan. 16 FRED SELMA STILLMAN, LONG BEACH, NEW YORK Daphne first saw him down by the corner drugstore. His hair was dark brown in color and his eyes had a soft, lovable look. Questioning the soda-jerk, Daphne learned that Fred often visited that very drugstore. just at that moment Fred came inside and Daphne noticed the brisk way he carried himself and the friendly greetings he got from the drugstore staff. She wondered whom he lived with and the soda-jerk informed her he didn ' t know. Somehow afraid to ask any more questions, she left the store, looking back at Fred just once. Instinctively she liked him and knew that she would return to that soda fountain often. As she had hoped, when she became part of the drugstore scene, Fred finally noticed her. One day he sat next to her while she drank a malted milk and she dared to watch him closely for several seconds. When she turned the stool around so as to get off, she accidentally kicked his leg. When he jumped back in a sutprised manner and looked at her in a slight cringe of pain, she cried, " I ' m sorry. " A special awareness in the look he returned her made her happy that this little accident had occurred. That day he walked home with her. Well, he actually didn ' t walk home with ,her — he just sort of trailed her in the background. Daphne felt a glow in her heart and a blush on her cheeks, but she didn ' t turn around to acknowledge his presence; she knew she must handle this right — especially with one she had begun to feel so deeply about. About two doors from her house he stopped walking and just seemed to be watching. Daphne watched him out of the corners of her eyes. " I guess he just wants to learn where I live and maybe, oh maybe, he ' ll come over one day. " These were her thoughts at that moment, but she did not tell her mother or father about Fred. He was her own secret and besides she didn ' t know if her parents would smile on a drugstore-meeting-follow-home friendship. So Daphne decided to stay away from the drugstore for one day at least, with the hope that Fred would come over to see what had happened when such a steady customer absented herself from her daily haunt. But Fred did not come, not at all. It made Daphne a little sad, but she couldn ' t act disappointed or her mother would notice and she didn ' t want to tell about Fred, not just yet anyway. 18 The next day she and her parents went to visit her uncle who lived in the country, and they spent Saturday and Sunday there. She felt a little sad when the weekend had finished, because that marked the end of summer for her. School would begin and she knew she might never get to see Fred again. Of course she could drop into the drugstore on the way back from school, but then perhaps he would leave town now that a new season had started — ■ and besides, he did know where she lived. It would be wonderful if he did stay in town and if he accompanied her to and from school every day. She would proudly stroll by and show off her handsome and wonderful friend. Monday morning she thought about her walk to school. Her two friends Jo Ann and Betty would come along giggling and skipping up to her door and tell her to hurry or they might be late to school. It would be so much nicer if Fred could walk with her. Somehow she wanted and needed that kind of companionship now. Her mother told her to stop daydreaming and to finish her breakfast. The girls arrived right on time . . . they always came on time, it seemed. Somehow the first day of school didn ' t seem quite so exciting as she had expected. She slipped into her jacket and picked up her books . . . then she saw him approaching the house. Oh joy! She could walk with him after all. Her mother wondered at the strange look on her daughter ' s face. " What are you staring at, Daphne? " " It ' s Fred . . . Oh Mother, it ' s Fred. Isn ' t he handsome! Isn ' t he wonderful! " Her two friends stopped short as the fleeting figure dashed up to Daphne and greeted her quite joyfully. " Mother — Jo Ann — Betty . . . This is Fred! " Fred happily acknowledged the greeting. " So this is why you ' ve been acting so strangely lately! " Daphne ' s mother exclaimed. " Yes, Mother, " Daphne answered. " At last I ' ve found the one I want. The mother smiled and thought profoundly about the girls prancing gaily off to school together, and a third — her Daphne — entrancingly engrossed in her wonderful Fred, who furiously wagged his tail and barked in glee. THE SABBATH RHODA L. GLYN, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND The seventh day! The glorious Sabbath Queen Tiptoeing softly on the threshold of my home Bearing her gift from the Almighty above Our Sabbath most holy, a sign of His love. There ' s a present of rest and of thankfulness too. Of joy and remembrance of what ' s happened to you. All week under strain with the drudge of each day The thought of the Sabbath washes troubles away. Each Sabbath day the glory of G-d Sheds its light upon my house As the candles flicker, their flames so bright. Give us reason to bless this precious sight. Relaxed and composed from the tasks of the week. Renewed by the quiet and peace that we seek, The poor, the rich, the young, the old, Can share its glory, more worthy than gold. Happy are we who were chosen by G-d. To enjoy such a holy and precious day. V! AMERICA LEA ICZKOVITS, TEL AVIV, ISRAEL I had heard many admiring remarks about America as a country of beauty, of largeness, commercial development, etc. But about the high level of education and art I did not hear anything. When I finally arrived, I was impressed mainly by these aspects. I did not pay much attention to the beautiful places of this big city, because it appeared to be natural after hearing so many enthusiastic descriptions from people who had visited here. It surprised me much more that New York itself is such a big center of education and art. To be honest, I wasn ' t so happy to come here at first as everybody emphasized to me when they heard that I wanted to attend college here: " If you want to enjoy your life; go to New York, but if you want to study seriously, go to England. " As soon as I arrived here, I realized how much people can be mistaken. Wherever I turned, I saw adults as well as children anxious to study and progress. First, a very interesting thing caught my eye here, particularly because I never before saw anything similar to it, although I passed through many civilized countries. I never saw people who wanted to learn, read, and visit museums and all sorts of educational assemblies as here in New York. In the subways, in buses, people read even in standing position. After watching the material that those people devour like hungry wolves, I found out that many other beliefs of the people were wrong. The greatest percentage of citizens read good readings, and not those cheap stories that were attributed to them. As for musical development I learned that the U. S. A. is not filled only with cheap music. Even in Radio City Music Hall one can hear fine musical pieces played bv an outstanding orchestra. Even television helped me to learn much about the common American citizen ' s educational interest in various fields such as poetry, history, literature, music, paintings, etc. Quickly I destroyed the whole line of challenges about Americans. Another example would be the statement that people who were born here don ' t speak any other language except their own mother tongue. To disprove this, I found out after investigating thoroughly, that one who finished high school has to learn a foreign language at least for two years. Therefore, most people, at least the same percent as in other countries, know one or more foreign languages. When I attended school I was convinced completely that my attitude toward America was wrong. I imagined girls would have no educational interest and, instead, I met intelligent students, well-educated in various fields, who were willing to learn and succeed in their way. Two things I learned from this. First, never again will I take any one ' s word in advance. Second, to form an opinion it is not enough to hear and see from a distance, but one ought to investigate thoroughly and then to form an opinion and criticize. To apologize for my early thoughts I can only say that one can consider herself fortunate to come to the United States, get a balanced education and, have fun, especially at Stern College! The original flavor of the Israeli style has been retained in the writing of both Miss Iczkovits and Miss Fromer (on the following page). COLLECTORS SELMA STILLMAN The world is full of collectors — These things may interest some others, Of clippings and cameras and cars, But I have intangible hies Of miniature ships and old paper clips Of happiness sparks from witty remarks — And historical surgical scars. I ' m a collector of smiles . 20 THE BARREL-ORGAN TAMAR FROMER, TEL AVIV, ISRAEL On the Rue de Richelieu every day, one can meet a middle-aged gentleman, walking toward the Champs Elysees. In summer he dressed in a wonderful gray suit, from the best tailor, shoes shining like mirrors, and a worn out top-hat. The gentle- man ' s face had a ruddy complexion, grizzled side whiskers, and grayish gentle eyes. He walked bent over, keeping his hands in his pockets. In fine weather, he carried under his armpit a cane; on a cloudy day he bore a silk umbrella. He was alwavs deep in thought, and walked slowly. While walking, he gave the right of way to everybody, with a smiling face. When he noticed a beautiful woman, he put on his eye-glasses in order to admire her. Doing it phlegmatically, he always became disappointed. This gentleman was Monsieur Tomas. Monsieur Tomas had strolled for the past thirty years along the Rue de Richelieu, and sometimes he thought, How many things have changed here. As a young lawyer, he rushed as the wind; he was merry, talkative, straightforward, and had a crop of hair and a big mustache. While young, he was deeply attracted to art, but most of his time he devoted to women, which had been his biggest passion. He was very fortunate with them, but he could not find time to marry, being constantly busy with Fifi, Loulou, Mimi, and other beauties. Getting his Ph.D. as a lawyer, Monsieur Tomas rid himself o f his youthful fever, and his attitude to life became more serious, to the extent that he even considered marrying. He had a fortune, many possessions, and a reputation of an art lover. He even rented an apartment of six rooms, furniture made in the style of Louis XV, decorated the rooms magnificently and he looked for a wife. But it was hard for him to choose the right woman. This one was too young, the other he knew too long, the third was just perfect except that she lacked temperament, the fourth one who waited for Mon- sieur Tomas married someone else . . . Yet Monsieur Tomas did not mind, as he felt there remained a lot of other women in the world. He began to take more and more care of his apartment, changed the furniture, bought paintings, replaced the mirrors. His apartment became famous. Unintentionally, he created in his flat an art gallery, which was visited by his friends and acquaintances. Being a wonderful host, and known as a lover of art and music, he organized in his home concert-evenings, and the elite of the Parisian society gathered in his salon. Monsieur Tomas was at the peak of his social career and he dreamed only of a wife. Once at one of his famous parties a young " Aphrodite, " admiring the salon, exclaimed, " What wonderful paintings! The wife of Monsieur Tomas will be very happy. " " If happiness for a wife are paintings, " answered a friend of the host merrily. The salon vibrated with life. Monsieur Tomas smiled bitterly, and since then, whenever anyone mentioned marriage to him, he carelessly waved his hand, saying, " Ahem, no! " In this period of his life he shaved his mustache, and grew side burns. He talked respectfully of women, and even of their weaknesses he had much toleration. Not expecting much of life, he abandoned his practice and now he concentrated all his thoughts upon and devoted his tender feelings to art, which became the essence of his life. But as any mortal is not free from idiosyncracies, so Monsieur Tomas had his share. He had a strange hate for the barrel-organ and the organ grinders. When Monsieur Tomas occasionally heard a barrel-organ on the street, he quickened his pace, and lost his temper. He, a level-headed, gentle and quiet man, was driven insane upon the sound of the barrel-organ. He did not keep this weak point secret and explained: " Music is the most tender emotion of the spirit and has eternal beauty. In the barrel-organ this subtle art changes into a vulgar technical machine, wirh ordinary sounds. These sounds madden me. I am living only one life and I shall not waste it for hearing his hideous music. " Somebody malicious, knowing of this reluctance of the lawyer, played a very unpleasant joke, by sending two organ grinders to play under his window. Monsieur 21 Tomas became enraged and invited the one for a duel. The house in which Monsieur Tomas lived changed ownership frequently. Naturally every new owner increased the tax. and the first one who received the raise in rent was Monsieur Tomas. The lawyer paid the taxes under one clear condition — that a barrel-organ would not be played in his backyard. Disregarding this contract, Monsieur Tomas called every new door- keeper and conversed with him: " Listen my dear, what is your name. ' ' " " John, sir. " " Listen, my dear John, I shall give you one hundred extra francs every month. Do you know why? " " In order that you should not allow any barrel-organ to play in the back-yard. " Such conversations took place with every new superintendent. Four rooms of his six had windows on the street, and two in which the windows opened to the backyard. Every day he sat in his study before his desk and read. Opposite his windows, in the backyard, was a little apartment whose inhabitants changed constantly. Now, there lived two women and a little girl. They earned their livelihood as seamstresses. The younger one was the mother of the girl. The windows of Monsieur Tomas and the new inhabitants had been open all day, so when Monsieur Tomas sar in his chair, he could see excellently what was occurring in his neighbor ' s house. The rooms were furnished poorly; on the chairs and tables everywhere lay pieces of material prepared for sewing. In the morning she cleaned the flat, at noon they had a poor lunch, and none of them left the sewing machine until the evening.. The girl was sitting usually beside the window. She was a child with dark hair and a beautiful pale face, but always sad. Sometimes the girl dressed and undressed her dolly, but she did it very slowly and with a certain amount of difficulty. Sometimes she sat quietly as if she listened to something. Monsieur Tomas had never seen this child singing, or jumping, or running across the room; he did not even notice the slightest smile on the pale lips of the motionless face. " Strange child " , he said to himself, and he started to watch the girl more carefully. Once he noticed that the mother gave her a bundle of flowers. The girl ' s expression changed a little bit, she smelled the flowers, touched them tenderly and kissed them. Finally, she put them in a glass of water, and said: " Mother, how sad it is here. " Monsieur Tomas was shocked. How could it be sad in this house, when he constantly was in high sp irits. Once standing at the window in his study, a strange scene appeared before his eyes. Hastily he put on his eye-glasses and he saw this poor little girl standing in her window, and with her eyes wide open, she looked directly to the sun. On her ever motionless face, feelings expressed themselves, something like joy and sorrow. " She does not see! " whispered the lawyer, and his eyes began to burn — a reaction that the girl should have felt — and he wondered how a person could bear the heat of the sun, which is like a flame of fire. Indeed, the little girl was blind. At the age of six, she had had the measles, and as a result she lost her sight. In the beginning, she and her mother thought it temporary, but as the days passed and no improvement ap- peared, the girl got used to the dark night of her life. Systematically, her memory of seen expression began to be cloudy. Day and night meant for her the same; she lost the dimensions of reality, and entered only into her known world of voices and touch. The face and hands acquired an extreme sensitivity. Distant phenomena reacted upon her only through the sense of hearing. She sensed the slightest rustle, she recognized every voice, every step, the dog barking, the cat meowing, the echo of the street; she loved it and lived in it. But, since she lived in the house of Monsieur Tomas her life was much poorer and monotonous, no happy voices of playing children, no loud talking door-keepers, no backyard-traders with old things, and no heavenly sounds of 2? barrel-organs were heard. She sar quietly in the room; she was not allowed to play in the backyard, and she could not hear birds chirping. Her only pleasure was being touched by the sun. Her wide open eyes expressed a well of sadness. The girl grew thinner and thinner, and her face expressed deep yearning and longing. It happened that Monsieur Tomas took the defense of a very famous murder case, as a hobby naturally, and a new era began in his life. Every morning he submerged himself in the depth of the case, and an absolute quietness ruled his house. One afternoon, while Monsieur Tomas meditated, an extremely strange accident happened. In the backyard, under his windows, a barrel-organ was playing. The impression was mighty. Monsieur Tomas was dumbfounded, he did not know what to think or to do. His face became white as snow, his body began to tremble. For a moment he thought it was an hallucination. But the vulgar, vivacious, like circus rope dancers ' sounds of the barrel- organ revived him. This very moment his tender and tolerant heart gave birth to primitive instincts. He wanted to shout, beat, kill, to destroy this barrel-grinder. Like a tiger, he jumped to the window, he opened his mouth to shout, then suddenly he heard from across a child ' s voice. The little blind girl danced, singing happily. Her always pale face became reddish colored, her lips became full and smiling, from her poor eyes a rain of tears streamed. In this quiet house, she did not experience such a storm of feeling. What wonderful phenomena were the false tones of the barrel-organ. How magnificent the roar of the trumpet, the same which nearly brought Monsieur Tomas to an apoplexy. Especially, since the organ-grinder saw the girl ' s happiness, he began to stamp with his heels and whistle joyfully. In this moment, the faithful servant of the lawyer broke into the latter ' s study dragging the new door-keeper. " I just told him, " the servant explained, " to throw out the organ-grinder, sir. I told him we have a contract. " The organ-grinder was playing already the third tune, loudly and falsely. The blind girl was drunk with happiness. Monsieur Tomas, removing his eyes from the girl, turned phlegmatically to the new doorkeeper: " Listen, my dear sir, what is your name? " " Andre, sir. " " Listen, my Andre. I shall pay you one hundred francs, every month, do you know why? " " No, sir. " " You should never let any barrel-organ in the back yard. " hastened to explain the servant. " No, " said Monsieur Tomas, smiling sadly. " On the contrary, you should let the barrel-organ play, twice a day. " 23 THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK A Book Review 10LET SHAPIRO, MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN Through the pages of the diary she kept for two years, Anne Frank emerges as a warm, vibrant, and living adolescent girl. The diary, a gift from her parents, was begun soon after Anne ' s thirteenth birthday. Before the " disappearance " of the Frank family Anne had been a carefree schoolgirl. Despite the war she was thoroughly spoiled by her family and seemingly lacked nothing. She was the pet of her teachers and the object of many a schoolboy ' s affection. Her friends were almost countless; yet Anne felt the lack of a true friend in whom she could confide and " bring out all kinds of things that lie buried deep in my heart. " She intended for her diary to contain not " a series of bald facts, " but to be her friend, whom she named Kitty. The Frank family had emigrated to Holland from Germany when Anne was four years old. Six years later, however, the Germans occupied Holland. Surmising the extent to which the Nazis would carry out their goal of exterminating the Jews, the Franks had made extensive preparations to go into hiding. Their plans for disappearing were unexpectedly speeded up, however, when the Gestapo issued a call-up notice for Anne ' s sixteen-year-old-sister, Margot. Their hiding place was a concealed apartment in the back of Mr. Frank ' s place of business. For over two years the Franks, the Van Daans, and Mr. Dussel lived in these rooms without once leaving. At first, living in the " Secret Annex " seemed to Anne like " being on vacation in a very peculiar boardinghouse, " but very soon the novelty wore off. Fresh air became a longed-for luxury and fear of detection was a constant menace. Frequent burglaries of the adjoining warehouse, unexpected ringings of the bell, and frighteningly close air raids gave life in the Secret Annex a nightmarish quality which the reader feels as if he himself were experiencing it. The greatest hardship for Anne was not being able to attend school. Her studies were Anne ' s main pursuit during the years of seclusion. History especially was a favorite subject and she had a strange fascination for tracing the family trees of European royal families. She longed for the day when she would be free to explore the public libraries again and read her fill of Greek and Roman mythology. Writing also meant much to Anne, whose ambition was one day to become an author or journalist. No matter how lonely, frustrated, or unhappy Anne became, there was never reason for being bored in the Secret Annex. Anne, Margot, and Peter Van Daan even learned shorthand through a correspondence course. The occupants of the Secret Annex were never completely isolated from the outside world despite the fact that for two years they could not leave their apartment. Their Gentile friends, who alone knew of their retreat and who kept the fugitives provided with all necessary supplies, were frequent visitors to the secret dwelling. The radio, their prized possession, kept them in contact with London, New York, Tel Aviv, and Berlin — but the latter station was tuned in only for classical music. The diary contains lively descriptions of the daily sessions around the radio and the arguments subsequent to each news broadcast. Anne ' s diary is interspersed with conversations, humorous situations., skillful carica- tures and philosophic reflections amazingly perceptive for a young, inexperienced girl who asked herself: " How can you write about philosophy? " Through its pages can be traced Anne ' s growing-up from the carefree schoolgirl to a mature person who fully realized both her shortcomings and her potentialities. The almost constant bick- ering and quarreling among the Franks, Van Daans, and Dussel tormented Anne in her sensitivity. To these altercations, coming in the midst of this upheaval in her young life, Anne ' s reaction was impertinence. Misunderstood by her parents, unable to confide in her sister, rebuffed by the Van Daans and Mr. Dussel, she was constantly scolded and reminded of her faults. To conceal her loneliness and disguise her distress, Anne put up a front, giving an impression of conceit, disrespect, and impudence. As the months passed, she became further estranged from her parents and realized the futility 24 of hoping for their confidence. She knew that growing up would be her own accom- plishment. Her inner conflicts, struggles, and eventual victories made of Anne a mature person whose maturity was not always outwardly manifested by her behavior. However, after more than a year of mutual dislike, Anne and Peter gradually entered into a new relationship, and Anne for the first time experienced love that was returned. Peter was the only person able to penetrate her outer shell and reach the " real " Anne. Never- theless, Anne was disappointed in his complete dependence on her and was unable to confide completely, even in Peter. " Kitty " was never to be dethroned. Another diary resulting from the Second World War was The Wall, kept by Noach Levinson during the German occupation of the Warsaw ghetto. The striking dissimilarity between the two is that Anne Frank ' s diary was kept by a real person, while Noach Levinson is a fictional creation. This realism necessarily imparts much more impact to the reading of Anne Frank ' s diary. When she began her diary, Anne did not expect it to have any other purpose than to " be a great support and com- fort , " while Noach Levinson attempted to write his observations with historical objectivity. Levinson, like Anne, was part of a group, and like Anne, was not sparing in his depiction of his " family. " Heroes, heroines, cowards — all were present within The Wall. Mr. Dussell and Mrs. Van Daan especially were mercilessly caricatured by Anne, who saw both the foibles and virtues of the inhabitants of the Secret Annex. Whereas Noach Levinson escaped from the ghetto to find freedom, Anne Frank was taken from the Secret Annex to find death. Amidst the grimness and terror of the circumstances under which she was living, Anne came to realize that comfort and solace could be found in G-d ' s natural beauties, and discovered that this was all necessary for happiness. Anne did not think of all the misery in the world, but thanked G-d for the beauty and good that still existed. She never lost faith in the ultimate triumph of right and the restoration of peace. Yet Anne Frank, who wanted so much to live, died in a concentration camp, ironically only two months before the liberation of Holland. Anne had had a goal: " to work in the world for mankind, " and she wrote in her diary: " If G-d lets me live, ... I shall not remain insignificant. " G-d did not let her live, yet she did not remain insignificant. Anne Frank wanted " to go on living even after . . . death. " Through her diary she does live. To the reader Anne Frank speaks still — of courage in the face of death, of humor in the face of terror, of faith in the face of disparagement. FORSAKEN HOUSE SELMA STIILMAN There stands a house empty, lifeless, void of joy; Its owner once lived in it and played as a little boy. Its garden blushed with roses and a great pear tree stood Where now there is but withered grass and rotting, wormy wood. Here ' s the spot where a babe once walked, slipped, then fell — Stood again, walked, ran, climbed trees, grew well. Went away, left the house that sheltered his young years, That stares through black, blind glassy eyes, dry of tears. There is no heart inside these walls to grieve from loneliness. Old house, rusty, dirty, think not of your ugliness! Those who dwelled within your walls were to you as food Which sustained them — then they left you just a house of wood. A hundred years you ' ve watched these mortals pass before your door. Stand until the bombs descend — until there is no more. 25 LIFE ' S DEMAND SELMA STILLMAN The child was small, with big brown eyes That stared in wonder at the sight Of starry skies and snowy walks. And autumn winds and planes in flight. The kind old man enjoyed his youthful Grandchild ' s wide-eyed look, As with the little hand in his They walked beside the brook. The questions from that small mouth flowed Like ripples in the stream. The sparkling voice of youth and awe Caused the old eyes to gleam. " Oh, Grandpa, why does that tree Stand tall and straight and strong; While here is one that ' s weak and bent; What makes it so — what ' s wrong? " " Mv child, there ' s nothing wrong with age — It ' s natural for all — For you and me and even for That tree that ' s strong and tall. I am like those branches that Are withered from the snow, But I have had a full, rich life, And though my back bends low, It ' s proud and straight inside my heart ( If you can understand) Because I ' ve given to the world — And that is Life ' s demand. " " Why Grandpa, what did you give ■ — Did you once plant a tree? " " Yes, so I did - — and now its gift To Life walks here with me. " 26 GREETINGS We do not endorse or sanction the Kashruth of any products or restaurants advertised in this publication. 27 BEST WISHES FROM Jhe student Council OF S tern ( olle leae 1955-1956 ANNE ROSENBAUM, President SURA SCHREIBER, Vice-President EVA OSTERREICHER, Secretary JOANNE PELTZ, Treasurer COMPLIMENTS OF MALDEN MILLS MALDEN, MASSACHUSETTS GREETINGS FROM MR. AND MRS. MOSES WOLFE AND FAMILY 3054 NORTH 54th STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS OF Joshua S. Koenigsberg 15 WHITEHALL STREET NEW YORK 4, N. Y. NATHAN LEVINE Colonial Togs 71 WEST 35th STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. BEST WISHES FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS Mr. and Mrs. Sol Teplinsky 3777 NORTH 58th BOULEVARD MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS OF Milwaukee Scrap Metal Company 1236 WEST PIERCE STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS OF Mr. and Mrs. Sol Blankstein 4617 NORTH WILSHIRE ROAD MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN Bargain Corner 225 WEST BAY STREET SAVANNAH, GEORGIA COMPLIMENTS OF PACKARD PHARMACY, INC. MR. AND MRS. JACK FINK 133 EAST 34th STREET SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA NEW YORK, N. Y. COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF PRIME PACKING COMPANY KALMA MUSHKIN MR. MRS. SAMUEL KAMESAR SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA 2049 NORTH 14th STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN OUR BEST WISHES FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS MR. AND MRS. MORDECAI WAXMAN 510 WEST VINE STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN BEST WISHES DR. AND MRS. ALFRED BADER MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS OF BASS BROS. INC. 3161 NORHT 31st STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN GREETINGS TO IOLET DAWN SHAPIRO MRS. ROSE VINARSKY SHELDON SINGER 1554 NORTH 33rd STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN GREETINGS TO OUR DEAR FRIEND, IOLET SHAPIRO MR. AND MRS. M. REICH and FAMILY MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS OF MR. AND MRS. SAM KAHN 3201 NORTH 46th STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS OF MR. AND MRS. JULIUS KATZ 3618 NORTH 54th BOULEVARD MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN GREETINGS FROM RABBI AND MRS. DAVID S. SHAPIRO AND DENA 2566 NORTH 12th STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN CENTRAL SQUARE PHARMACY LOUIS BERENSON, PH.G. REG. PHARM. CENTRAL SQUARE AND MAIN STREET BRIDGEWATER, MASSACHUSETTS FROM AN AUNT AND UNCLE OF EFFIE FINK Who are proud to be related to such a wonderful young lady MR. AND MRS. DAVID FINK SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA MR. AND MRS. MEYER FINK SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA MR. AND MRS. H. BODEK NEW YORK, N. Y ISRAEL MEAT COMPANY Strictly Glatt Kosher Orders Delivered TISSER AND MLYNARSKI 1317- 55th STREET BROOKLYN, N. Y. UL 1-7342 GREETINGS ANONYMOUS CONGRATULATIONS TO EFFIE FINK RABBI and MRS. E. WOLF WILKES BARRE, PA. HERMAN KOENIGSBERG 38 PARK ROW NEW YORK CITY VERNON CARD SHOP 1. GREENSPAN 232 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK 16, N. Y. VALLEY FOOD SHOP 218 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK CITY MURRAY HILL LAUNDRY AND CLEANERS 258-262 LEXINGTON AVENUE NEW YORK CITY COMPLIMENTS OF THE BUTLERS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA HARRY LEVY ' S SHOES 408 SARATOGA AVENUE BROOKLYN 33, N. Y. COMPLIMENTS OF MR. AND MRS. PHILLIP NEWMAN AND FAMILY BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS GREETINGS RABBI AND MRS. SAMUEL 1. KORFF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS best Wishes to our daughter EFFIE MR. AND MRS. MEYER E. FINK AND FAMILY SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA GREETINGS FROM JEWISH PRESS HOROWITZ PUBLISHING MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN COMPLIMENTS OF MR. AND MRS. LOUIS J. NOVICK AND FAMILY MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN BEST WISHES FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS MR. AND MRS. HERMAN LAUFER MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN SEPTEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary: As we circled the block bustling with traffic in midtown Manhattan looking for Madison Avenue and 37th Street, my heart was in my throat. Passing the department stores and corner groceries that would soon be favorite haunts, I wondered what the coming year would hold in store for me. " Would I make friends, what kind of a girl would my room-mate be, would I benefit from college life? " These and a thousand other questions crowded my mind as the car pulled up at 237 Madison Avenue before the maroon awning bearing the name Hotel Duane! This was to be my home away from home for a year, and as I talked into the lobby with a suitcase in each hand, my heart pounded like a drum when I saw all the strange faces. Going up in the elevator I said to the girl standing next to me: " Are you going to Stern College? " She was — and when I stepped out of the elevator, I had a room-mate. After my new room-mate and I had deposited our luggage in a room, we walked the few blocks to Stern College — our school. We were two frightened freshmen and it wasn ' t hard to recognize our fellow classmates. All the sophisticated, composed looking girls were certain to be sophomores. After supper in the beautiful cafeteria, we returned to the dorm to unpack and begin the wonderful process of making new friends. That was yesterday — and today was registration day at Stern College for Women. In the morning the lobby was full of nervous freshmen. We all walked to school in a contingent — each bolstering the other. After eating breakfast, those who had not yet been placed in a Hebrew group were instructed to report to the office for an interview. We all sat on the long benches in front of the office, after scrambling for a seat near the end of the line. The first girl to brave the unknown terror came out alive and healthy, although this didn ' t relieve the tension of the others too much. Finally it was over — and then it came. Cards — pink cards, yellow cards, blue cards, green cards, — cards, cards, and more cards — and they all had to be filled in. By the end of the afternoon we all had writer ' s cramp and empty pens. By this time we were completely willing to sink into the seats in the auditorium. We enviously admired the poised look of the Student Council officers who welcomed us to Stern College and introduced two of the faculty members, Mrs. Elizabeth Isaacs, and Mr. Dan Vogel. Returning to the dormitory after supper was already like returning home. OCTOBER, 1955 Dear Diary, The time has now come to make a crucial decision with regard to my " college life " and particularly pertaining to my citizenship as a member of the freshman class. The notice for elections has been posted on the bulletin board; the offices open were President and Vice-President, ( who were to serve also as delegates to Student Council ) and the Secretary-Treasurer. Many girls spurred on by entrance to a new school and a desire to serve it, enthusiastically signed their names as candidates. As election day approached, the cafeteria, during lunch hour, filled with gay chatter and heated discussions as to the preferred candidate. The campaign was in progress. Finally the big day came! Ballots had been printed. All discussion was over. From the mixture of accents and new faces it was time for personalities to emerge. The girls are all excellent and the decision is not easy. As the votes were cast, the candidates were to be seen tensely pacing the floor and chewing their nails as they awaited the final outcome. They did not have long to wait! By mid-afternoon the results were known. Debby Kolitch of N. Y. C. became President. Effie Fink of Scranton, Pa. — Vice-President. " Ginger " Prager of New Britain, Conn. — Secretary-Treasurer. NOVEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, Freshman orientation today was very interesting and informative. Dr. Meyer Schnall, a noted gynecologist from Forest Hills, Long Island, addressed the class, speaking from an Orthodox point of view. He explained to us many vital aspects of Jewish married life ... . Dear Diary, Rabbi Morris Max, the eminent Jewish authority, was the guest speaker at today ' s meering of Freshman orientation. He spoke on the topic of " The Jewish Concept of Marriage " . Our questions were competently answered by Rabbi Max during the lively question and answer period that followed .... NOVEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, The first issue of our newspaper, Kochaviah, came out today, and the freshmen are well represented on the staff. Rhoda Glyn, Marga Weinberg, Dottie Gewirtz, Elayne Morris, and Hannah Kalter are news reporters. The freshmen on the feature staff are Esther Holstein, Iolet Shapiro, and Geri Strulowitz. The typing staff consists of Ginger Prager and Roberta Daina. DECEMBER, 1955 Dear Diary, It was very peculiar to see boys walking around the school tonight. The occasion was our Chanukah Chagiga, the first affair of its kind ever held at Stern. After a short period of socializing, the program began with the singing of the National Anthem. The walls of the auditorium, unaccustomed to the reverberations of deep masculine voices, echoed the sounds. Martelle Berenson led the gathering in the singing of Chanu- kah and Israeli songs. The rest of the program consisted of a professional magician, and Aaron Dobin. Aaron, a student at Yeshiva University, sang and played on the guitar several Israeli and American folk songs. After the entertainment, everyone adjourned to the cafeteria for refreshments and a social hour. Stern College ' s first social attempt was a success! 10 MR. AND MRS. MAX ORENSTEIN MR. AND MRS. E. LAUFER 1739 NORTH 3rd STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN A FRIEND GOODMAN-BENSMAN FUNERAL HOME MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR SPIEGEL COMPLIMENTS OF DR. AND MRS. WYMAN BERENSON FRIENDS OF IOLET SHAPIRO " H. SMITH ' S " ANNETTE - PHYLLIS GRANDMOTHER RESNICK MR. AND MRS. MAX B. ANTON AND FAMILY MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. ISADORE AFRAM MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. PETER GROSSMAN MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN GOODHUE PHARMACY 197 MADISON AVENUE H. L. MARCUS Tel. MU 3-2658 MR. AND MRS. HARRY PERSONICK SISTERHOOD KEHILATH JACOB i-OVENTHAL REALTY CORP. AAATTAPAN, MASSACHUSETTS 137 EAST PARK AVFNUE LONG BEACH, N. Y. MR. AND MRS. JACOB M. MORRIS AND FAMILY GOLDSTEIN ' S MEAT MARKET PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Strictly Kosher 813 MADISON AVENUE BRIDGEPORT, CONN. ISRAEL Strictly Kosher Meat Poultry Market LONG BEACH, L. 1. . ' .?.. AND MRS. LOUiS T. MILLER AND FAMILY BALTIMORE, MARYLAND DR. AND MRS. B. BAHN 30STON, MASSACHUSETTS MR. AND MRS. MAURICE LERNER AND FAMILY MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN JULIUS PICK MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. BENJAMIN KOENIGSBERG BEST WISHES TO E. F. NEW YORK CITY FROM HER GRANDPARENTS SUNSHINE FOOD MARKET L. ABRAMOWITZ SONS " Southern New England ' s Largest MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH DEUTSCH Kosher Super Market " BROOKLYN, N. Y. BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT PARK EAST PHARMACY MR. AND MRS. JOS. EISENBERG 33 EAST PARK AVENUE SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA LONG BEACH, NEW YORK DIANE LIDO FISH MARKET Greeting Cards and Gifts LONG BEACH, N. Y. Student Discount BROOKLYN, N. Y. MR. AND MRS. MAX ORENSTEIN FRIENDS OF IOLET SHAPIRO " H. SMITH ' S " ANNETTE - PHYLLIS GRANDMOTHER RESNICK MR. AND MRS. E. LAUFER 1739 NORTH 3rd STREET MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. MAX B. ANTON AND FAMILY MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN A FRIEND MR. AND MRS. ISADORE AFRAM MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN GOODMAN-BENSMAN FUNERAL HOME MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. PETER GROSSMAN MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR SPIEGEL GOODHUE PHARMACY 197 MADISON AVENUE H. L. MARCUS Tel. MU 3-2658 COMPLIMENTS OF DR. AND MRS. WYMAN BERENSON MR. AND MRS. HARRY PERSONICK SISTERHOOD KEHILATH JACOB MATTAPAN, MASSACHUSETTS LOVENTHAL REALTY CORP. 137 EAST PARK AVENUE LONG BEACH, N. Y. MR. AND MRS. JACOB M. MORRIS AND FAMILY PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA GOLDSTEIN ' S MEAT MARKET Strictly Kosher 813 MADISON AVENUE BRIDGEPORT, CONN. ISRAEL Strictly Kosher Meat Poultry Market LONG BEACH, L. 1. MR. AND MRS. LOUfS T. MILLER AND FAMILY BALTIMORE, MARYLAND DR. AND MRS. B. BAHN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS MR. AND M3S. MAURICE LERNER AND FAMILY MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN JULIUS PICK MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN MR. AND MRS. BENJAMIN KOENIGSBERG NEW YORK CITY BEST WISHES TO E. F. FROM HER GRANDPARENTS SUNSHINE FOOD MARKET L. ABRAMOWITZ SONS " Southern New England ' s Largest Kosher Super Market " BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH DEUTSCH BROOKLYN, N. Y. PARK EAST PHARMACY 33 EAST PARK AVENUE LONG BEACH, NEW YORK MR. AND MRS. JOS. EISENBERG SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA DIANE Greeting Cards and Gifts Student Discount BROOKLYN, N. Y. LIDO FISH MARKET LONG BEACH, N. Y. f 4€t ls0W; [U iuru L , - A G«. :c, drafter Aht 1 «5A« qo H %v f « £ 4 «4 £ .□■oripi nnatyc ,( 72 ,ntn 7nan c-7iy2 r.D7a c n iKtya nnn7isn nns .dtk c-:- vtd n y.n s ' on la K «inc 1272 c n t nn ?vBoy n j; no tranc -r dih sr-r ni7ir lto nntyno .no is ri Kin dk ins c|n; ns2is K7 .o n nntync vn i7K2 ,my nrn ' 7 nsn la sty sin 2-T, " paoy,, .nity " ? caiirs-in pa c n rvn " ic 1 n.-nn napao . " niannsn " n niaaa , :ns7 ntyin s n ' ?i rmny kvsd? 72is„ u?a c " n MJ-rsn- .d 27 np soa mnyn p«i D " 7iyn en c:i ■o ,nnpa n,.y s) lain ' is .3triD2 m» nray? en 72pna cyiD27 .rvo ijcds c ' t cmn: inp: .rpcww n?n; nnat?n pn sxna sin irsr iaxy ns ir.nn ssmo; ;-anB 2 .n?2 7y 22nnm " m2n„2 nan n n n r ,cnn« cva- nuya ,c-. -2 72pna v.: ray ■ ' ::: n2iy Kin» iP " n yv 1« " - ™s p nn ' n mnyn ,djs« .n7pa ?y nmi r i«n 7tt sman " Dyn ns map? 7121 imuya payrm 2a .-.sis B7pa lanania .msnsn " inn 102 enc extras ' ? myira naa s 7K itr nrna 7!y mpnm vnyn ca s n .nrn 1 ? naisn ns D«nDff ,n " n 102 c as ?s ,naan .mx i ys 1 ? ,nT n7 ms? maontn nan.ai ,nyi;n naps swan piv irs r p7pn2 a TAVIST! TWQ nr,2 ' ns nsn — trm-iM rrnan nsc2 c acsn ty men nai " ? ?nntr; yntpn .•OVTK ,2 0 D72 — tflTtSS ,-nra mesa 171s t M — :mi»n Hibjjt " sa miro csns ,mn2 apt?) (maiy -|nxy n2B»in ns no7 — : rrnan ?nts st37 si ' s 7721 7 2 n2tr,n " o k — tn-nna -n - s nisT? n2ms s " p27 nmy ' didbti , nyc , „ n " n nna2n n dc ,yi2C lmnyn ma 1 ? a nn 2 in k i P2 : 2inr n yi n7in 7y npns n7m Tiy2 mrp 2-in ,DmaD ensn nytr,, " .yi2ir ■ ' S 7y anann nsrn na n2n — :nman 72tr ntyp22 .ni22n nta pinn2 S22 npn ht ' dIt nn2i nna2B o msD2 nts ty .]2 ,, a , ' 2 nmc np27 n ' 712 aais .minn— :m » n .nrn np l 7no2 ?ync — :nnian .2112 ip 2 niranc taa K — :nT» nn ?2iQ wane lais ns s — :nm»n !np7nD2 — tm nn npim na2 iy — n " an na sa nT ' a ' rn ?nai2an n2iirnnD ns !msD2 laty— fltaw nn n ! np nc2 pty ,( 7 n a 1 -[a s — jnma 12 72 n2no n n K717— :nTfi fl .n 1 in n p ,0 212 38 ruiDBO atyv ntn dim lyi nxis umiDD n« Ttrym D anTa nii37n oonsn ityy insn .■pma ,, D3 31 itny nawn U7 iKnn par; 7B wn D tin nsi nays? nmin i ' KYw ' 1 " n n« 7K1B " " n ?y nana sin .131013 pxn ?2s nmnn g3:sd3 o yn .otjiiwin .n " 3nnn anuria □iTB ' y iiBDn njc3 mynM ' 3 " ' itt fa neon njnj niyiiM -on rnn 1 s,s.n ypin n« nsnan " n73 no33n„ nMitan n 733 cmn n " n ?ty r.ta3 miK„ .njnnsn n«on n7nnna n« mKnon ns ' 07 nTX " 1 km " ]177 nTvyn DHiiTn 7B nrvni jiKapn " c-c-w 1 7icn„-i ,nMnron naiYK 1113 " n j ' u ' n ni7y„n id " 1 ? unpin:? •j- y-i; ns i3isi7n iyaj nai? ,1313371? .nannn 7Kit?t nnn 7s nnt nnn imn r- ?i n nK 7B3D juny ;,? ,]vain nK yi?3D{?3 .niK nm nam myain miaics .m xa? nxi3 □tpiix .mnm myn jn numi d vs ,n3K7D t7yai ,cnniD ,DiTDm KQino lmso 73D1 . . . dibd kitki nnnM nt? nsMi mron jToxn .nmnn in d;i ,imsiDi2 n7iy nnnn in it 1 7y .7Kity pK3 onsHnn D«nn nTXt7 umiBD mtrpnj inTX " 1 .nnnn tsi?ip nii3i pili P3 ,r7pl13 ns .iKin nannn nmyn nnson nnnyn i v ;n 7B n inn i7iin ,nt?iam nxupn " n itsnp nx ntnnn ,nuwn nnyn ;t37t? D nann nx n: ,-nsa n333i Tyn nanoa Diyint?nn nK nxin n? ,nxip3 .d3iyn gt 7yi mtxii 7oy 7ti ,gim Q D .pxn yna n7K 73 ,n7iK3- Kni nnKi nn?a s 73n ,innn nayn laicn 373 iy:: 133 .nnayn irrpxts ct nai i»2| " n iisd ysin ,n3t? 45 1337 tn73 -pyx ibid hkd " iay„n innaD.i ' 1 iti ' 73 nmsDnn n3ia ' nM msDn .y n 1 n?n maon o ,cnn d d n i_ i3yn cTDnm □ i p , Tin mso ns i tn " ni3i3y„n -m nson nty .nayty own .]i33y hdv 7kidb nM naion c ' i ;u3y DDnan3 nnns D " 3ts 1 133 .-inra D njn n nayn onsion ins 3 1888 n3B 3 3K3 nyt?n3 1713 ision C3n T»B7D Hint nM 1 " »3K .nt t733 it nj;33 n3 in Kip n7tn .miDD ?y3i .-pLyyn I3itan7 3n33 tm3 nn? pt m Dt-ita -m 303 ,yti ' n p pn mya i-y ,Qt3ty yaty nns .n isys nt7p " n n„ t-nyn pnyn n3tr;3 ]i33y .nt3itsn nyi3n3 7yis nnm ,-,t3K ]r 133 nxi« n?y 1909 n3 ' 3 . " ]vs t33in„ 7t3» nyin - iv i ? na yj Dttnata 73s ,ni3Di33 ip s 3 1913 n3B 3 Tiasm nawKnn C7iyn non7n nsna 3tt 1924 n3B 3 ..131? 13 ICt? 1NC17 Hint 3tnc3 H3y7 Ktn mtnM inpwn t,k ,ntnt3 x t?t« sin ottn •PlKil T333 lliy71 nJlM 13D3 nt3t? n7D 731 ,1D71 T]2 " 2 3B t lt?K3 DtDtil nS KM 131T 3wn7 17 nn7 ,;t7i33 ny iniM3 man Di3B s " ? n n .it n.s , " 7KiB t pK„ Qt3 n ,nnn7sn ni3t? ;n n7Ki ,ni34?7 7i3t i3tK ins 13- ik ...?i3yn 7y lnne Do inti ,nttn nait?3t? itni3na nns nsi it3ty 11331 itatp nM kms? . . . .ino tk yiT 1 " ' o 39 ...--.,. — rs " - z„ - - — ana D7iy2 : " :;■ -is- - :s ,n , i--: rfiaro s-r - - -•,12,. — aonsa anatn ,137 t.;:2 . " uixns wys D7iyn -pa __ c „.»- „ n= -,•-«--■ --•;- -- »•«»• «:; -•; rsr n?B 2 , -i2- i " " jS . " n S " Jtl ' V -rz na«n nrs nns» ,?snB " a B " n3?n 1B3 nsiwn n:rs ns? 22 irnirpn .S2 i; jams ' na y nnxaa nmaa na»sn -2 ,nnxan nanna ' a s r; .r»2 nins ,na s ,2s " iir»3 r a " S7 mnyn sti na»sn irpa lrrnaya -• ' . " •:-- -2i-;2 nr,2s- 17 n:n ' " ta n sn l fiai lwftiyaa - ' " •2-- ns s7 " •- .n 2n mpy s n narsm wan 7a pansn s.n rron .nsa ,-i2 " 12 " r2 .win -i " ' rpaa Tan tmis snna nanxnsi rpnayn mioaa -.•• ' s-r Tina rva - - moan ns p " nxa ,nany s na ,-pyn ri - " asi .Bl 1 722 V7M 212 ' ? V3i?3rp pnnsn —22 ksb3 .--;••;-■ -- — sn nffsn r; n7y:m na- n on msnn n?y3 2- " r,22 ;m22 2«: :22 pinm •»» ' ' - " n»K„— :(3 ,_ s;) vs ' aa r,io -; 2r _ r -pa-aa nasi " . " " " a 73 yi s ' 71 sia inn aa .nan 1 s; 7?an .- -r- " 2- ,rprri?ya .--■- paisi naian na sn muj ns - " .• ,?ian nv a ya nnxa spim .z " " na sn —2 pty nnxa nann ,ns? 722 -• " -•.s -z ' tdd nnaa " s n .nssa 2 i?n cnTs nasan 7a mxan 2 v p zr ' ;2 --Sit; " " sr nwannn ns n " nms7 nn; nrinwai ,21a 73a cn7 n:mn7 .(7 " Tn) " n3 " oa n ;2 n7apna " inv cnmx najan nixa nrn; ,. .nn .z _ - 2 ' 2 nstn z - - - na sn " V2 ,- , ' n sin " s Tysn inn -:.n mx mm,, mis 2—2-2 i22 2:2; " rnna pn p " n " 2 , 2 ,pnn " " a? ni ' ipa u ' 22 ' „ : 22 - " s s n , 2 " 7 pUTins ' " " iu ' sin ?sn . " nt a 1.7 2 ' 22 ' 2 7- ' p 2-2 ' " 22 V " " ' - n 1- " T " ■( ' - ) - ' (P P) ' 7 " n ' n»» ,: 7 " 11TJ7 •r-r 2-nn jT " nn« n3H32 t 7« Wannw -2 737 ruiyi ?3n nwy7 ' rav r;aa .73pa sin las £2 — ' ' 72 D Timoan — D mn v nz c ' jv s ' in c , , xn ' , i nrn ;sn " sr. ,nr;2 , n2 - Tin n n ' 22 nsiaTi may nosin na sn 2:2s .ens " ? jissn 3ia 722 naaynai n7j?3 -• -•; s ' nz v S2n D7ij?2 2; !2 n2 ■JS8 7H-, ■ 73n7 annran nysm 383n n ' j ' insr; j2 ' cu- an -2 ' a2 cn ' iT,-i x , " -2S-S2 2 2 ' ;n2-- n ' 7isan nnsyn rrnsan ?sn2 pS3 msu n-n?p3aK2 nermnc dki ;nsn rfiuw ,D« oyn onsion .nerrnn .-r-n- n-s-r-r-s- mnsDn 7C ,n« " " " l iri ' it: ' ' : - n - ' - : ' n ; ' -;: 2:2s nans ' " nsnnn mnaon 22 2 ns a npa en nyizr, a«nn niDnya _ r .-.-■-;- nsys ] " - ; nsyn nsian nT ' S 1 ' .n a ' sih Dnvnma nopn nawn t -y nsuw D- annn " pr. paan mi3y7 2spn nrw sm _......_ , D , C nrn?TO . n;nio -.- n - : isi7nn T-n 7ysa 2 s-,n nz pnan •si " 2 -rr 73T 72 nsipns ,2vn Tyi 22 " 2n- nsispn ,?aym ninyn ht»: - rr-: •,- " :- :-:: ns -:: - ' 2 mis linai .rc n- n yn _ n s -. _....... s - r;zn nsi pm ansian paw ,w»n 40 z-y JS3KC " iccracn iHsnrem 18W : " : : .-— - ... .- -.._- .-...- ...... __.. - --» — £ n 1 ; - • •- 7STKT " ■;i- ' i nrsn pi rml q jB Kft Bs ra ran u rrv rr i -ror ' ja m»« oy yw jo 1 ? ;«o;n cas ' ?! nosy •p ,c l 7 , w , " T ' i ? saco .rena ,rman Tain .nnay pi t3t b m: in: mini ns na77 -ptaxn a nsa nirp nM ;t?py n n 73K .nyv S7C naa intPM nntfnn ,bk7 ns7 r jot v.ayai ,?n;i .unatra i3i km c; n im s7 " px p„ naan c:a7 awn s7 p7i ,nnay3 Ktaann7 d b 1317 top s? ' w latyn D atym pns ynj mn pnwn n?M 73s .C7iy7 «7n — pwn nsy naiD7 p ins pKts nsn nry K 3« p nan s sin ia?a id; tkbi ujitrto c7b h menn c a tnn7 is KXB7 iTpantr rwwfri minn 737 n?B nMnt? na vcst .mnn« msa 3 iB3 n ararn tkboi c v :mo:: tidIto B an 73 D D ' 37K Di13 KXB1 ,DW DnSD .13DT3 niyiT im sto mxim piKa nay pny p«B nsn km o " Oiyi3B n ns k xm p?i ?KTt!» D ' uwyn n«i " nspyn„i , " n7xan„ nann i7yais " ms„m " oxn,, d bim pi rmtPNts .nacM mnnanm nn« ,nnaya man nmn ' 1 p nneca :inm na aoa □; natrn ntatyann np DHwn anc ly 3m nnv 1 in -p ntry: d»b .ri3 icantm ?sntj " psa .o?iyn " »p n in " 1 ? notpann p to nawn nniM inmay tk mxnna toy .?nan into Kin niM " riyty y,na .ntoi nto 73 ?y monnm c p 3H3i 3n3 .nantyn ntoaa 133 P " S7i 73s s? cays7 .C]in ' 73 .1717 " , naitwnn m K ,3n3i ans ran K7S . ,, n7 " ' nt?to cai nantsM n7naa nna T an may ,mm mns ,nwn mes .itoy -pro nxp wiy n7y3 7y , ,7D33 n " 3 ,n3ir 7 ' 73 nn« eye .np37 inrp iss ,n3un7 ptytna .mini j3 -iry7N I ' i ' iJB ' Dioa n£3tt ' 3 n7i:n msisna nmn n nai nnayn nstr .naty n:tr n:nan na i77snn pnv ,mip p 7? nsti ' n: n;c ' 3 738 . Tipn nso ns na n»7i TTiyc n ona rn ya " ' , i?u i85t nn7i n:B " n u:ic 7 ns nvnn? rpn iTn nT»7a raw .ntpnn natr: n7 7 ' nnnc ins 73s ]sa7ns nty s ns n:i? ,iinstr nTin | " »3ya paynn? 17 isip ns7m rsai ,nay 0 7 lay .ton dc 7y wmi ]3 myi7s — tBpn ityvs ia7 ,?«w n 733 p pi n ntt ' 3 .omna nio?m mm ;n7 msp„ isd i3n7 7nn • ' ity ncj: ia? .n?sn m3?n ly yam " iny ,px , :7iS Ty3 np " i73 cpv ' I na ia -cann 7 7 yantra .ima?3 piosrn nnisi i-a7na ipa hm 133 ,m»y T»ya iTd:b37 dj3j ts .7sntyi nso 17n ctrm n 773 nta»n cc? porm .nsisnn nasn ns n77=a3 ia7i tns7 enso i ai:-ina no:ns sxa sinn pt3 n7Sw ' n nnn ts j-pdti? n nsisa 7s-ic cyty ta nm nntan7 omn n niM7i 7snc ps ,ixns7 3W7 maia ;stt 7 nnn ts C7is .cayn 733 oy ins ?im7iB3 oyn 1311 nsc tivki KH3i Dn7t5 o nstr Dm»T7 rnnntr irmsK .nnay s%n nsTn risen nms nrnn7 insi n3 nan -nana .onp a a na " 13-171 was -7iya3 7innm n?73an ns 3Ty ysn " nncn,, pesin nosaa .nnsy ptt»7 n nni jt»x ns 7y vnien ns nasair nns .ttmpn nans 7y«rmpn vmyn? naann csn onaiD ,ms7 sr nw nasi 17 laoDntr nmn vn oai a nn nmn -p .nsa naM 31a piyn rmyn ?y Dns ' 337 tan7 naa» o cn a m:7 D ans ,on y yacn i 42 to 1 cn n a o nsn7 nnra cn- ' sncn nuiann en n ' 7S py pi cima . snti " pw» 17s nor;? mjuin mni ,nnajin niiT 7ts ?n:in pmnm msmn nns ,nwn D7iyn nonto nns ,n7pn wjnn .b dd d «u cna isn cto .D " Dnn to csn7 oniiTn to inntr lints ' isnti " D «i:„n crya -o itrnn nnnaa .an ]qt ins S7 nrn axon n,s -ps rnis dib js nnp7 i7nn monn qs .dhihm ns nnnts S7 ,nn:mn ns tftn d jh 7ts pinna axa qs .lynu s? Drrrwpyi nDJ7 iD7jw n?sa rm ns Vpn conn ennnn .ntyssn isa nnnon7 ntonen jna nnsi nns to ..nnno ny .nmnM ns inns d diih .nn7 n sen cxsjnt? c-nmn 7ts tsnann eye ns " DtsTi pmnn nsipn nns rjsi nnmn ns airy? iats n S7 di-pcd amir .Dmuinm D onn 7ts imnn pta n nnnn mnn? nnn arvrtiD 1 ? nnmn lot nnyai i y yswrfi ntrss nnpae n7i7 sin non nnmn ntnt27B oxya j-rtsnisn inspty.ni myn ns men nso nxp s " t nea.n td„ 7y naty? uns Dt o dhihm toe oxya rrri axon iTij-n mn dto aty-anty myai .tyoi nya dixids rn n?s anin 1 7ty nan ce en? nrns cipn pst? isn ?s ton enc 7t:u ntysa ns ,cnny pi nscotr .?nan -po mnm B7bvi?i ns tonsym criyn nonto nns 7snty ps1 c ntysnn a ' iyn pa in innsti !3 ia ns may nt sa .o-wk 7ty n na nx-op oy nnn nn in ns uary .n trn mnsa nns7 n i d tq ns niD its nn c iyn to can n inn iaj ens yatsi2 . ntr rns 1 ? csia 3 qoa tsyo rpoN 1 ? en faisnts ' cnosa nsn K ce;s iyni s? n ei cnin 1 6,000,000 nn aene j ' ns naM en .nno mae " ? .misii mto nn usn«n nrn ' ? pntsa n in B sinn n nno -n s n« nyiDtyn n sn miDTm nncn n- ya ns n 1 ? uyantya .nsn« i: y snpi cp aiyDi:n p nn« .myon c iyn to nn y iston: , " mpnn„ i to irot mtoa roeioo nany nns ,K " oan nan m pn: nan i«n„ nyi ' n pa tonan nn n« urnxna ij7o 7n nspn nmxy neis nenn " .7«nts i ps ' 7 aiB 7 mN7 n, ' u ' im p«spn i3«xi ,3 insn imna nT hm .nnn ' ,?n trcen inpa a ntD ns mns7 wryn «7 ni:w«nn c a a .U7ia utyann noiyj nenn n a Dim .CDDinti ' D atr inny " noja,, naja nan? ryn nnseai .nan dw 7y nan ' 7i i.is nia menn nn« toi nit sn p« sin 7Hnei p«tf 1:7 niaon umomntrn7 .nn::ina c nn asno nssina nsa mnon unumnn .nsni ne« ns ipa? .iasc ' D to 17a anDsn rn n nnn njja nto nmpa i?issi ns sxio to 7yca db» irra nnnnn — nssinm .iasy n« ccsnri n n-in 1 ? mn n ns irpnan ejki .nnotrnn iB ,smm 17 0 nns nns to .a ' 7iy nDsa-, — v iam nns to ns lnnan n nn;ama nin ness is nnrrri ipin 7y m»B 7 .rpjfinffn n7CDD7 nnmn ton tansn wian ns i:ob 171: nns naea may? .mnnn n npa urns n3B7 i7sa eoirn ps .n nn7 unmynn as? tos? .qidb ' lonoa nsyn ms a a esn .n esn unn ,pni2ai ti ' sin nt?3in ,7snei nrnna ntrjnnn sin ncyji npmn djds .nn7iaa oyn neann fisipsis ns? snt ' ,aias 7n 43 44 PRIDE PRINTERS 3S E. FIRST STREET, NEW YORK CITi OR. 4-46SB


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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.