Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1980

Page 1 of 88

 

Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1980 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 88 of the 1980 volume:

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Hs - 5 1 .gg in .-5 ri '1 2 L Ki IF 1 HAD ONE WISH GRANTED ME My WISH WOULD BE TO SA IL THE SEA T0 WALK ON DECK AND BREA THE SALT R A I'D BOARD A SHIP BOUND ANYWHERE FR?,ii?M TIMBUCKTOO TO SUBIC BAY M HEART WOULD BE ABOARD TO STAY LE OTHER MEN THE LAND STILL TOIL LEA VE THEIR SWEAT UPON THE SOIL M FUTURE LIES UPON THE SEA M' RESTLESS SOUL AT LAST SET FREE ,- ., . .V , ' ' ., A-iwN,..,, I .. MAA Q Q . I CORPORAL TONY STEIM USMC Tony Stein was born in Dayton, Ohio on 50 September 1921, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Steve Stein. lle attended grammar school in Dayton and went on to be a student at Kaiser High School. Witli the outbreak of World War ll. Tony Stein felt his patriotic duty and enlisted in the Marine Corps. Corporal Stein became an expert marksman and on several occasions saved the lives of his companions. On Bouganville. for instance, he knocked his commanding officer to the ground while simulta- neously firing a burst into a nearby treetop in which ajapanese sniper was concealed. Before the end of the campaign, he had single handedly eliminated four other snipers. The events of 19 February 19115. the day of the initial assault on Iwo jima. climaxed the wartime career of Corporal Stein. Stein's Battalion had managed to isolate the hill. taking the narrow isthmus at the foot of Suribachi. but then became entrapped in a blazingjapanese Crossfire which pinned down the entire unit. Using his improvised aircraft weapon, Corporal Stein and his company commander, Captain Grove Wilkins "stepped out ,across Iwo jima as if they owned the place - and their amazing 'courage kept things going." ' si .,LessQ.than two weeks later he volunteered to help clear a ridge ofjapanese snipers so that his company could capture an airstrip at theihorth end ofthe island. On 1 March 1945 he fell mortally while charging enemy machine gun emplacements. was presented posthumously to Mrs. Tony Stein by W'..Penn9yer jr., on 19 February 1946. STEIN HERALDRY The insignia has been designed to embody 5 which depict the source of the ship's name. The four major elements: ymbols Across the top of the shield are five white' stars on a field of light blue fthe Honorl symbolic of the Medal of Honor perudasit. The embattled scarlet and gold bend, in the colors of the Marine Corps, are given to show strength and honor and alludes to Corporal Tony Stein, USMC, in whose honor the ship is named. The ancient mariner's "boarding - pike" is symbolic of the seas and the navy men who carried the fight to the enemy with inherent strength. The boarding - pike is gold on a field of silver. Corporal Tony Stein was born and raised in Dayton, Ohio. The state flower of Ohio is the Red Carnation, imposed on the right side of the crest within a field of white. The motto of the STEIN is "INDOMITABLE." It was taken from the citation accompanying Corporal Steins Medal of Honor: "Stouthearted and indomitable, Corporal Stein, by his aggressive initiative, sound judgment and unwavering de- votion to duty in the face of terrific odds, contributed materially to the fulfillment of his mission and his out- standing valor throughout the bitter hours of conflict enhanced and sustained the highest traditions ofthe Zinit- ed States Naval Service." ribbon color of the ,flvigdal of 'DOM I TABV6 STE! UNITED STA TES SHIP STEIN l06Sy is ll Klum class lrltgglft niiiiietl in honor of C orporal 'loin Stein, iNl.irine llero and Medal of llonor winner in World War ll. 'lilie lili- l05l class vessel is configured for optirinirn .inti-sub- marine performgince. lioxvexer, it is also c.ip.ible or car- rying ull! other destroyer tasks, such .is naval gunfire support. anti-air warfare and replenisliment operations. Since S'l'lflN's priniiiri' mission is .mtl-subinarine warfare, her main armament is configured to provide the optimum in ASW search. detection and kill, S'l'lilN is equipped with an ANXSQS-JOCX bow-mounted sonar which is capable of multi-mode operations, the ANXSQS-SS Independent Variable Depth Sonar lIVDSl and the LAMPS manned helicopter system. included its MAD and sonobuoy capabilities. ASW armaments include the ASROC long range. rocket-fired torpedoesg above water torpedo tubes, which can fire either MK44 or MK-16 torpedosg and LAMPS dropped torpedoes. In addition. for self protection and anti-air warfare, STISIN is equipped with a 5754 dual purpose. rapid-fire gun, and the basic point defense missile sys- tem. The keel of USS STEIN was laid on ljune 1970 at Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company. Se- attle, Washington. She was launched 19 December 1970, and was commissioned on Sjanuary 1972 at the Puget IFF- 1 0652 Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington. In April 1973. STIiIN steamed south for a four week, 1-1,000 mile shakedown cruise in Central and South America. and participated in the Portland Oregon Rose Festival later that same year. STEIN departed her homeport of San Diego for her first WestPac deployment in April 1973, returning to San Diego on 1 November 1973. September 1974 marked the start of STEIN'S second WestPac deploy- ment. After nearly seven months, and over 38,000 miles later STEIN returned to San Diego on 7 April 1975. In November 1976, STEIN returned to San Diego after an extensive eleven month overhaul in Portland, Oregon. With her return, STEIN commenced a rigorous schedule of tests and local operations, preparing for her third Western Pacific deployment during the first half of 1978. STEIN set out on her third WestPac deployment on 10 january 1978 and participated in operations in the SEA of OKHOTSK, after a 9 year absence of U.S. Naval vessels from that area. After port visits to Hawaii, Republic of the Philippines, japan, Ceylon, Mauritius, Mombasa, Bandar Abbas, Karachi, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, STEIN returned to San Diego on 16 july 1978. The ship then commenced training evolutions for her upcoming deployment in the summer of 1979. 9' COMMANDING OFFICER COMMANDER RONALD F. WALTERS Commander Ronald F Walters is a 1965 graduate of the United St N l d , . . - , , L ' 1 ates lava Aca emy. He reported to USS CROMWELL fDIf 10143 in that year and assumed duties as Main Propulsion Assistant. Damage Control Assistant, and Engineer officer in that order. In IWS he entered the Naval Destroyer Officer School ' d . ' d ' ' I an upon gra uation was ordered to DSS XVILTSIE fDD 7161 in which he served as the Engineer and Weapons officer. In IMS he was awarded th - N i ' A h' e axy c ievement Medal with Combat "V" for duty in the V ' , s ' 1 . ' ietnam 'Iheater of Operations. In 1968, Commander Walters entered the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. graduating with a Masters of Science Degree in Physics in 1970. After graduation from the Defense Language Institute in 1971. he was ordered to Vietnam as the Psychological Warfare Senior Advisw. F " 1 ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' tr or service in this capacity he was awarded the joint Service Commendation Medal and the Navy Commendation Medal. Upon return from Vietnam in 1972. Commander Walters assumed duty as the Executive Officer of USS LANG IFF 1060l. He attended the Naval War College from 1974 to 1975 and subsequently was assigned to Field Command, Defense Nuclear Agency in Albuquerque, New Mexico. For service as the Chiefofthe-loint Nuclear Accident Coordination Center, he was awarded a silver star in lieu of a second award of the joint Service Commendation Medal. Commander Walters is married to the former Pamela Ann Marie Fraser. He has three daughters: Anne Marie, Melissa and Susan. -- at -- 4 -1--A '---- - -"' '::g .0 4"4,,,- V. ..,.-,-ffm W-ferr.:-Hffwrfr-fg1"f . a a , Lia -1 in ' - V 1 - ' ...C -me-2 wi- 'arfwmfz-View .'Q'f fe '.-1'-' tif.-751.f,j4:::f'..,gf ' -. '.gp,:- .1-: ' .V A -' ft. g H 14:2 sg H-9-Lf 4' fl ' ' N? Ji 'r'T?E'ia'bf?5Ei?W'2 ii'--11-Q'--Srila'PQ.xs::"fsf, ftffa-FIC- nS':,':, e" fa-..sw-'..'1 -' A' vw ' P 'Ui I :i..t5'1..g:,:2a' a.f,c-fri,-.Lai '+'e.?fif.m12,aaa V' 1'-at W - " ,',' Q f IH, rl' 4.4- 'IIA "' La.. I 1 I 1 I i I I I I I i I i I 9 i l I 2, i I, M lt f ga ,is 1 v I I 1 ala:- ..,. .....ae..t,. ffm A - is ff? 4. at-. -. 9:15 .-fi ,-?'5ie'E f ft :"1W.f s 1 fd' 'Y 1 u v v isis sf v . ,Wm N 'f".'5v.J ' If .Jehu S.. - - te :, e. is. , , . ,sn mxozrng LCDR KEITH M. ARNDT Lieutenant Commander Arndt was bom in Seattle, Washington and attended schools in Richland, Washington. He is a graduate of Washington State University and was commissioned an Ensign upon completion of Naval Officer Candidate School in june 1965. Lieutenant Commander Arndt's initial assignment was the amphibious ship USS A TORTLTGA ILSD-261. in which he served as Communications Officer. His next tour of duty was as officer-in-charge of a PCF ISwift Boatj operation out of Qui Nhon, Vietnam fromdlune 1967 to june 1968. Lieutenant Commander Amdt then served on the staff of Commander, ELEVENTH Naval District in San Diego prior to .itztnding N.ii.iI Destroyer School, Newport, Rhode Island in 1970. Upon graduation troiii Nax .il Destroyer School. he serxed as Operations Officer aboard the tiescroier ISS ll.-XNSON i DD 82131. Following an assignment as Commanding Ulfrter. Nami Rt strt e Ceiitct, Vaileio. Cialiforiiigi he was ordered to Headquarters. Nav. Retruitirig Area l.lGll'l' in San Francisco. lieutenant Commander Arndt igratltiatet: with higlit-st distinction from the Natal War College. Newport. Rhode lslant: un vluli. N71 and Eiteii stried .is Flay.: Secretary and Aid to Commander Cruiser- Dt str. ner Liroup ONIQ Ile reported .ilioard I'SS SIIEIN in April 1978. After torripletziiyg iiistour.ih--.irdti1t- SIIIIN lie was ordered to recruiting duty in Ohio, in .rtitiart or Nr-0 LCDR FRANCIS WILLIAMSON I.ieuten.inr Commander Francis T. Williamson is a 1966 graduate of the Universi- ty of Wisconsin, Ile reported to IYSS NAVASOTA IAO 1061 in that year and assumed duties as Ships Hosun, Second Division Officer and Gunnery Officer. In 1944 he received orders to the River Patrol force, Republic of Vietnam. Following graduation from Language and Counter-lnsurgency School he served as Comhat Intelligence Officer for the River Patrol Force at Binh Thuy RVN. In 1969 Lieutenant Commander Williamson reported to the pre-commissioning detail of 1'SS ILE. YARNIELL IDLG 171 in Bath, Maine. He commissioned USS HF, YARNELL as First Lieutenant and served one year onboard prior to entering the Naval Destroyer School. Upon graduation in 1970 he was ordered to the pre- commissioninyg detail of ITSS AYLWIN IDE 10811 as prospective Weapons Officer, commissioning her in that hillet in September of that year. In 1973, Lieutenant Commander Williamson entered the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey graduating with a Master of Science degree in physics in 1976. He entered the Armed Forces Staff College that year, graduating in 1977, and was subsequently assigned to the USS HORNE ICG 301 as Weapons Officer. In 1979, Lieutenant Commander Williamson received orders as Executive Officer, USS STEIN IFF 10657. . , 5 S! 1? , 4 1 ,. ,i ' PERA TI ONS DEPA Lt. Christian Ness et-1 1 r ft ' ' .ai , 14, .wx-3 , ' 6,75 " ne w 5 ' ' . 4? t 1,-.Yf?Ee1:2' " - f' -.gi t 1 W 'K' Lt. Larry Mitchell ' a-isa K 'Q Lt. Rick R ubel Operations Department is the eyes, ears and brain of the The men who compose this department are proficient in such areas as radar navigation, communications, intelligence gathering, health care, and numerous other jobs which are absolutely essential for the efficient "operation" of the ship. The various components of the Operations Department include the radio- men, signalmen, quartermasters, personnelmen, yeomen, electronics technicians, electronics warfare specialists, hospital corpsmen, and last but not least the operations specialists. Led under the auspicious eye of LT. Chris Ness the Operations department continued to show itself to be one of the "Fleet's Best" during the most operationally gruelling deployments in recent years. ,f l"!' emu? by .w5"Ci--f , a "" fm- "TI-fji- ,f ' l 71, 4 fi "DXF lmiigjili li I fi ,AI Y Eff.. F Q - fha-1ox'vw'4 QQ- V I-id QS? tTX'f" -A-'T-"ui lgti gp . ,Ip S fW.,,---.- sg. , N A :::'- 4.-.. xx Q n -' . . Pa ., . WEAPONS DEPARTMEN Weapons Department is the long right arm of STEIN, the means by which the ship may interdict and project its power in a wartime environment. The sailors who man the weapons systems are also responsible for transportation and st f h d ' ' ' ' orage o t e or nance and fine tuning their equipment. With the thorough knowledge these men have when it comes to their equipment, we can be confident a second shot won't be necessary. Since one of STEIN's primary mission areas is "ASW" Anti-Submarine Y Warfare, we are well equipped to detect localize and eliminate an sub-surface , , y threat which we may encounter. Armed with an ANXSQS-26CX sonar, AN XSQS-35 independent variable depth sonar, helicopter dropped sonobouys d 7 torpe oes, and Asroc, we are able to operate effectively in an ASW environ- ment. For protection in the fast paced world of "AAW", Anti-Air Warfare, the Stein is equipped with a 5"f54 d I defense missile system. Led by LT. Rubel's guiding hand, the STEIN is surely a force to be dealt with W in a modern multi-threat environment. t ua purpose rapid fire gun, and the basic point Lgfg joseph Sta ger- Ulla-i Lt. Kevin M ercer' .V UL., V 'h . Lt. R oss Anderson NOT SHOWN p Lt. Commander Richard Gibbons S UPPL Y DEPAR TMENT Supply Department feeds the ship. , s Q . The other departments have seemingly insatiable hunger for material. Supply uid! "black oil, bullets and beans" that the ship needs to keep going. ' p I Whether it's underway in the Indian Ocean, or tied to the pier in San Diego, supply personnel use their ingenuity, and a lot of paperwork, to get us what we need. No matter what it is, if we need it, they can get it! Supply Department provides personal services to the crew, as well. They serve three meals and midrats to the whole ship's company every day fthe next best thing to Mom's home cooking?J. They do our laundry, cut our hair, and sell those necessities like soda pops and candy bars. They hand out the green stuff that keeps us going from payday to payday. They do it all without much thanks from the rest of us. So, just once, here's to the men who keep our stomachs full and our pockets jingling - here's to the men of STEIN's Supply Department! I ENGINEERING DEPAR TMEN T Engineering Department is the legs of the ship. The engineers on STEIN are tasked with many different jobs. First and foremost, of course, is to provide the propulsion power to move the ship through the water - without the Snipes, we'd never get underway! All this takes a tremendous effort to coordinate, and ensure the safe, efficient movement of the ship. But less well known, perhaps, is the support the Engineering Department provides to other departments. From steam for the laundry and shipboard heating, lightingg fresh water for the galley and showersg welding and brazing assistance, special power requirements for Operations and Weapons departments' electronic gadgetry and weaponryg even to flushing water for the heads - they provide it all. Again, the fact is this: without the snipes, we couldnt fight the ship! The cruise has been highlighted by many engineering achievements. Foremost in all our minds was the 114 days continuous steaming. To have been lit off for that period of time without any major casualties is extraordinary, stemming solely from the efforts of the snipes. Additionally, no one can forget our days in Diego Garcia, where our propeller was changed out while we moored alongside USS DIXIE KAD 14l at anchorg and both boilers had watersides and firesides cleaned. Hard work, team effort, professional competence, and PRIDE -- all these describe STEIN's snipes. We present to you the Fleet's Finest! P 5 w.-ei.. ,.,. 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Dunawaw III s Rwutmc or limcrgcncx' -scu or mpc CH' Trgirlc for lfvcry' .lub J Calahan, Grover Dorsey, Curtis Dorsh, William Garcia, jerry Gonzales, Andrew Herrera, Gary Harris, Harry Vallery, joseph Vertrees, Kurt West, Vincent Williams, Michael Young, Tracey OC Division 2 .4 1 'Z I' 033 +V 1 r .,-..-Q.. .W-.. 'fi 4 1 4 , 1 3 1 A ' aim ' I 1 4 . x 1 H --.9 1 gh I g 1- .,,, W' 5 QS? 5" 39 N- Q - 1 - A"J 1 wt, ' .... WA-1 -L5 ' 5 2 5 ,i V ! 1 1-me wink t K iff, 5 r- ' , 35:15 y ' 3 - :ri . f - 1 'V f ,,,.. . .. 3 am , , iff 4352 , A .. ' .yr 'ff E-it ii' fer .' Q-q " .I f 2:1 3- , , hfzgu, gig.-if . V. . . - 1 'f ??iif?3Ey 1' Bassett, Hal Bernier, Alan Culver. Edward Goldstein, Raymond Heizler, Arthur Hudson, Randal Korte, Timothy LeBlanc, Randy Price, Charles Stirn, Rodney Spencer, Clifford Tibbits, Mark 11 , 5 4 N . 4 f- Mg, ' . , -,- f S!" 1 . S . g X , ,K 'iw 'S 2 J . I S. rg , , i ..- I '4 x ff, .6525 A x. ' . nu . 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Mark Miller, Larry Norwood, Richard Ortiz, Victor Phillips, Paul Rhodes, Elbert Rowand, Raymond lst Divrkion yl NV u-rm :fx 5 'I Washington, Warren mffsrfrvbfn Wwdsf Benner: r N L Q'-if 'M ' ,, R43 'E' 'ri Ni- 'Ning A.: 1 A s1 5 1- A 5 A 3 . gh A 1 Amlcrswii, RMS liiislwxipli. ljllllll Cgixgi. Cirwgn' Craig. S.iii'.::fl DUlwUlS. liflllill liclllci SCU CU lliirr, Cilcim llm. Ilimil My-rfcr. Kcmm-tlm Mitchell. harry Pctcrscn, Steven RiCl4crt. Cari' Rogers. Wayne Rubcl. William Spikcr. juhri Stagcr. jmcpli OFFICERS 'I' I Ufgrg -L K- Stoll, jerry Websrer, Carl Zzvoy, Mark Ness, Christian In ports mth as Mombasa and Perth, the officers ofthe wan-lroom pooled their resources to rent an "admin", a hotel suite where they could find a reprieve from the incessant grind of underway watches, enjoy sports, and explore the sights and night life. ln Momblsl, the Nyali Beach Hotel had white sands and hordes of German tourists. ln Kenya, Scott Spiker, Cliff Moore, and Phil Bosltovicli went on at photo safari. and lithan DuBois learned the all-encompassing phrase fjgmho,-limbo", which became a hyword. A party ol intrepid hikers conquered MT. Fuji, including Scott Spiker, Ethan DuBois, Wayne Rogers,jerry Stoll, Sam Craig, and Cliff Moore. ln Perth the officers attended a "Califomin Wine And Cheese Party" Cthey supplied the wine and cheeselg the W.A. women registered "IO" on the Ricltert Scale. Rick Rubel went body surfing in llawaii and almost didnt come hack. Other highlights included a reception for the CO and XO given hy the Governor of the military district in llargeisa. Somalia fthe governor didn't give the Captain any goatsl, and the return reception on Stein's flight deck for Somalian authorities and diplomats, including the military attaches ol the Peoples Republic ol China, the Sudan, and ltaly. Four STFIN wives were on the pier to meet us upon our return to Subic Bay-Pam Fraser- Walters, Mrs. Rubel, Mrs. Stager and Mrs. Petersen. Mark Zavoy enjoyed the beaches and small towns ofjapan, and they all thrilled to the shimmering night life of Diego Garcia. There were STEIN dots from Kamakura to Perth, from Mombasa to Waikiki, to help them remember us like we will always remember them. ,, ... if if ,ff I' it I, d -mae-ii '-:vii yan.. in-in we , v W Q gl .L 34 HIEFS h ln MMCS FERGUSON UPI mfg STQRER QMI NIL lil V1.5 U51 HARRIS if!!! 5 - HMC RENN 'Ili -fe? Pu' " RMC GILLISSPIIS PNC MUSIfS MSC Sl'Vll,I ANU SKCS PANGALINAN BTC. Nll,HUl.S ?" 3' LIL . ll f - ' 'i Q ' -9 1 4 0 , FIU! HAR A N 'Q 1 .bf gm., Ml. Z- 1- Q fm 56 'L g , -Q 5 5 1 1 41 1 E L f f iw f " 1 1 isps I P l: rf 52 . ,V av .QQ ' 1.-fg y 1.22 f ,. ,',. Weights Measures 12 lb 2 lb IV2 Cl' 1 tbsp 4 oz 6 tbsp 2 oz V1 cup 6 lb 6 oz 5 qt 2 lb 7 oz 2Vz qt 8 lb 4 oz 1 gal Method 1 Cook beef with onions and garlic in its own fat until beef loses its pink eolor strrrtng to break apart Dram or Add salt chili powder tomatoes, corn, a In mixer bowl blend cornmeal. chili powder, and salt Add water mtx on medium speed until smooth and threlcened Spread W4 qt hot cornmeal mixture over bottom and sides of each greased pan to form a thin erust Pour 3 qt meat mixture over crust in each pan. 3 meal mixture ovcr meat mixture in caeh pan for topping Spread remaining IA qt corn Bake 45 minutes remove from oven. S rrnkle 3 cups cheese over each pan. lnbtedrents Weights Beef boneless 54113 2Mlb 6oz Measures 1 gal Vs cups UA cups 9 tbsp 2 tbsp llt, water, and seasonings Max light! but th l D0 MGT thick weighting 3 oz each y omg' Y tam and grill other side 7 minutes, nd olives stir to mix vsell and bring, to a or er a r nn , not 4lb8oz 1 cu 96 culbs 4 5 tbsp 9 tbsp ' 1 gal 1 gal 6lb8oz a 20 lb 4 gal Water, boiling Peas, Frozen Method 2lb8oz 2 gal 1-2Vz lb pkg 1. Dredge meat in seasoned flourg shake off excess. Place an equal quantity of meat in each roasting an 2. Cook in oven about 30 minutes or until browned on all sides. 5. Add 2 qts water to each pan. Cover. C k 1-V h 4 oo 2 ours longer or until tender . Add onions, carrots, and potatoes to waterg cook about 20 min. 5, Add peas to vegetables, continue cooking 15 minutes. Add ve etables and cooking liquid equally to meat in each pan. Stir, Heat to serving temperature 6. g YIELDS: 100 Portions Pineapple Chicken Ingredients Chicken, broiler-fryer cut-up Monosodium glutamate Soy sauce Salt Sugar, Granulated Flour, wheat, hard Pineapple, canned crushed Method Weights 50 lb 5 Oz 4 oz 2 lb 4 oz 6 lb 12 oz Measures 2 tbsp 2 cup V2 cup V2 cup 2 qt 5 qt 1. Wash chicken thoroughly under running water. Drain well. 2. Sprinkle cut side of chicken with monosodium glutamate. 5. Combine 1 cup soy sauce, salt and sugarg spread on chicken pieces. 4. Dip chicken in flour. 5 . Fry l0 minutes. 6. Place chicken, skin side up, in pans. 7. Combine sauce and pineapple, spread about IV: qt over top of chicken in each pan Cover pans It Bake 155 intra of until chicken is tender. Yustnsr we Fatima IR DEPT ' ' .gg 5 1 tm gl .. 3 gn-'L ' up fr, in Fl' uc- 5 aff .vu U s., I O 'il-2 0 . 9 -.. Il 0 5' ... ' Q -. '- f,1.-:i-.a wq- . -, ' ..,. :ba zz J. T'r'fg,!'-'K , - .:.:',, . , q , map, . 5 rp g' 745: . ' Q. 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' x A l H .-t flu Hunt ruu'm.frn2wf. fum Xlwilw .lulmy -.an1'1rm,1- HULU ' v m A 1, ' Q 2 , X, ' A N , sg., 1' ,is ' .,--1 .qv "T 1, U TK: 2 ' f ww. ,,,,,4 11 151' 2 , Restncts Sales f Grain to Soviets SAUDIS PULL OUT OF OLYMPICS AS AFGHAN PROTEST r 432' U.S. Will Seek Bases on Arabian Sea l 1 ia l I '12 Allies in Europe 71' OK Sanctions V - '9 Against Iran em v arg,-9 1 4127 0 4f World Court Tells Iran to Free Qf?p:f4' All U.S. Hostages Immediately Q. ers for the Hostages Sanctions SOMALIA All lrmlls must guru- mlm! our lvricl' stop in SOMALIA w x m rr vlwc ruulrl Will lrml sf: Hlgllll' rnrv.-resting rh' 'A fm- mylar away VC'l1cn wc arm rlrfr rwm,-rrrrru-:rr 5-rmrrlwl rlrr S'l'l'lN wrrlm nur VL-rx' crwn pm" lu If lr x-.lm lm xx rx w su, lmlul rlmr wc rlirlrrl sec .mv ufqrllc nam' flu wlrf-lf-r1rm'rl1.rr wr'wrrcrlrcrc.'l'l1crcwg1snl5wan L-xCluS1x'c wmv r.rmfl:f flu tm: .nrt in r1:.1l-.rrrg GUATMS HEAD SUU 'mc was had ly "ln-us Mr .-x curl: nw. laws. as-Ar,,. r K --Q if l l 'T'w'w.-F l rliffjgig. 4 .,. i YCTYN rlmr LHllyUI'lL' could ask lor. Alter all V , 11155 tw Llu fur dfl har 5 - A , . , rrglrt em rlrc writer from. lfxccllcnt rr mllul lv. flu- lmuls. Scum- ut' the crew 'M rr mum .l rf, wrrm-ww flu- Sl.lUtQllIL'l' ul .1 xf1rtginyrmt.and tlun if 3 J ' , -,, V -- - - -11:-iir'w1-If-fg.'::g. r, -- -.STEM-W -- -V - - --H '--+---f-----f-'--- . ,, A GONZO STATIO ,: E-.Q ,V .4 A, 1 at ,ff 'ii '...,3..:,4 , .V ,, , ., ls.. -. 1- , -. A -L - 444. lv ' A ii. . 'L' 'xl' y - D .- . s - ,...,, 3--.., .Y b i i lm- - """'f ' 'MY-.rwtv '-""1:...R-..-- :"?',Q:-Q ., if., U' - ' '94 .S ff QUMS -2' vfl' ' ' L 5.4 .,:., ..,, v.. A tease- if MG. 1 R t r 'S Qs- ., 4. 'ff 1 I 4 " . ,.1ien., Q i fi -ff' O 5 f a PO0R IVAN C 'T Fl D NICE lll'l'I'Y A Soviet ship shadowing units in the Indian Ocean wanted to know the where- abouts of the carrier USS Kitty Hawk and flashed a signal to the USS Midway: "Where is Kitty Hawk?" The carrier answered: "lt's a small town in North Carolina." Qi .W '-up A Qu. 'I U 1 x 'Y f, ,, l, l Christmas and all through the STEIN, were posted, the brightwork was shined. all tucked away safe in their racks, of P. I. and frosty six-packs. were hung by the boilers with care, hopes that Saint Nicholas soon would be there. When, from up on the flight deck, there arose such a Clatter, That I sprang from my stateroom to see what was the matter. I flew through the light locker, undogged the hatch, Flung open the door and fastened the catch. Then, as I looked aft, in the moonlight appeared, An H-46 drawn by tiny reindeer! As the sparkling helo touched down on the deck, The pilot leaped out, and he looked quite a wreck. In his fur-trimmed red suit, he stepped light as a feather, But he sure wasn't dressed for this Indian Ocean weather. His white beard was matted, grease smudged cheek and brow, In his wool and black leather, he perspired like a sow. But his eyes, they were twinkling, as he ran to the mack -Then, that jolly old fat man, he leaped down the stack! And I thought to myself, as I struck down below, "Quick, to the fireroom, this should be quite a show!" And all the boiler techs looked on in wonder, When Santa hit the deck plates with a noise like the thunder. "Me hearties! Me mateys!" old Saint Nick exclaimed, "Be dashed and be damned! Ye've done it again! Full many a league have I flown from the Pole, To join ye on Gonzo-now ain't it a hole?" He smiled like dawn breaking over the Arabian Sea, And produced a fat gunny sack with obvious glee. "I've brought ye some goodies-enough for the Force- This here U.S. Navy works Old Nick like a horse!" He pulled out some Playboys, a stuffed and baked pig, A Case ofjack Daniels and a keg of "San Mig", Some X-rated movies, 300 judy dolls, A Honda One Thousand, and fifty footballs, A ton of love letters that smelled like perfume, A rack of new shotguns, a hot air balloon, A shiny new Harley, all covered in chrome, But, best of all-300 tickets for home! Then, touching his red shiny nose with a grin, He said, "I hope never to come here again!" Roaring with laughter, he grabbed hold of his belly, Leaped twice in the air so it shook like plum jelly, Spun on his heel then, and jumped up the stack, And shouted, "Go home, mates, and never come back!" We saw him step briskly back into his craft, As the whole crew came running to the weatherdecks aft. "Up Donner and Blitzen!" he cried out aloud, "On Prancer and Thrasher!" and made for the clouds. "To MIDWAYV' he cried, and then, passing from sight, -"MERRY CHRISTMAS to STEIN!- and to all, a good night!" -Steve Foiles A f L. 7Zv RELEASE 745 140,935 ? I 1412 il, ARDS fl Amilis ig L in T 1 'H 1:1115 A - QQ, ,, . YL A j 1 A T 'D 'W .rv T ., v .lf U ' 'M is 'e . . r , c Ama., Q J 'NN-.--' NQ....JJ' V 6 ,y 1... Q J ,M ww 4, -+1 '54 f' 4,35 '3 " - -f -.:.r ' J: M iw f LL 8 ' X , V Z R A D N p , S N..f+- SA'-v X """",-li--ffx' ' ' ' "1 X -Ml "X My Ax J' , SQSQ if EB r X X 1 1 F XK.Q.-:LQL-f"" M19 GQELW EUQMEQ 14, ,....-....,...,.,..x M... ,. f 'P L.- , f'5qV71AQ'Ffizy. ' ' Qin. , , s Q . gg 'i ,L " -t ,. " v -V - I 1 "' W 1' 1' A. Q i 3 'lun-MEN 1'-' "'h ' mg sw I G . , -4-fx ,,-fl-4 J H Q, 1- "Ill-?:' ' -1,495 rf- W .di ' ax,-. - v ,i , DIEGO GARCIA IRON! NIXITNI 'VU SI-'XIX AI SUN 'IU IM b5 1H'X NUM! 'IU RUN!! 'HH' YHIX Yllil I . A rx ... I Av" ' li! I '- ,..,t S mf 4' ' u fi -M F " ' QA Y -v V .4 A 'L ' ' rf HMA. ,..o"" -., fb 'Hqqfg 'f-L.. Q Qi?" 4 , ,gm ' ,, M., , 'h"m, 'YP 'll' ,AM tj! V X SlVGB'l1i0l'ifl'lS away home A contemplated cruise Mi-les of beach I'd freely roam The land was there to use Now it s gone, they took it all away or Where are the people I knew yesterday V W Why all the boredomg it's a holiday p just let the waters take me home Looking at our ports of call Was pleasing to the eye Wish we could have seen them all Instead of assin 1 by Now thely're ggne, they were the place to be W, Not out on Gonzo circling endlessly Where is the Stein, will she return from sea Oh, let the waters take me home V Our group of men was full of pride They helped each other through Those times when troubles wouldn't subside When one day seemed like two Now it's done, they've slipped behind us friend japan, Mombasa, Perth and Pearl do end Hope San Diego is around the bend Please let the waters take me home ft ' f 6 Dave Motcheck it - 1 .1 'ff 1 35. .,. 3, ' , P ax? .A i v , g,.,,.'4 i Q ., ,M Ji. 1 AY: 157 , T: 47 A, . WAYIINPORT: 76.77235 VISITFD YOKOSUKA, JA 0 J . SUBIC BAY, RP I FREEMANTLE, WA MOMBASA, KA PBERBERA, SOMALIA DIEGO GARCIA, BIOT MAIN SHAFT ROTATIDNS: so,v5o.ooo NUMBER OP DAYS STEAMING PLANT: 183 DAYS PERCENTAGE OE TIME STEAMING1 917.4 FUEL CQNSUMED. s,ooo,ooo GALLONS+ FRESH WATER CQNSIIMEDI IV: MILLION + FLT QTRS SET: ass c2.5fDAY IINDERWAYI NUMBER OE LOG IIELOSI 261 NUMBER OF VERTREP HELO'S: 151 NUMBER OF ROTATIONS STEIN HELO BLADES: 4,197,600 ROTATIONS BEEF: 11.6 TONS PORK: 4.1 TONS CHICKEN: 2.6 TONS BACON: 1.1 TONS FISH: 2.2 TONS POTATOES: 4.3 TONS EGGS: 88.320 MILK: 4.928 GALLONS ICE CREAM: 1.575 GALLONS BUTTER: 1.4 TONS BREAD: 3.7 TONS COFFEE: 1.725 LBS. SUGAR: 3.4 TONS FLOUR: 4.6 TONS MSGS RUN OFF: 454,605 SHIPS SIGHTED: 2.951 UNREPS: 65 CROSSED EQUATOR: 4 TIMES PAINT: 728 GALLONS PAINT BRUSHES: 608 TOILET PAPER: 203.279 SHEETS OR 197.5 MILES OVER .100 ID CARDS TYPED UP BIGGEST SCREW JOB: PROPELLOR 25.000 LBS, 380,000 "As you are relieved and head home, I know you do so with much pride in your work in the Arabian Sea. You can be sure that your pride is shared here where the impressive potential and high daily state of readiness of the ships, squadrons and personnel of the Kitty Hawk and Midway battle groups have not been overlooked. You have shouldered the lead of U.S. military capability in the Mideast and your efforts are greatly admired and appreciated by all of us here at home. You and your families have waited long and persevered in the face of our nation's need to demonstrate a show of visible strength and determination in a troubled area. You have done so with excellence and skill, with stamina and dedication. Your voyage home is well earned and your return much awaited. Well done." -ADM Thomas B. Hayward, Chief of Naval Operations subsequent message from ADM Hayward added, "As a measure of that appreciation on behalf of your grateful countrymen, I am pleased to advise you that the award of the Navy Expeditionary Medal has been approved by the Secretary of the Navy for units of your task group and other units participating in these operationsfj Youtipersonalrsacrifices are appreciated by your fellow Americans, and your completion -of ignment with such great success is in keeping with the highest tradition Service. Well done and Godspeed as you return to your horineports with loved ones. It has been an honor and pleasure for me to -SRDM. departs-the Indian Gceanf 4 --Rep. Bob Wilson, CA ' The Congressional Record, 20 FEB 19SOY N AVY EXPEDITIO AR Y GLOSSARY ABOARD - In or on a ship ADRIFT - Ill Loose from moorings and out of control. Applies to anything which is lost or left lying about Cll Certain sailors AYE AYE - a command or ordtr "I understand and will obey" BEAR A assistance Q BOOT - a non-sal BULKI "wall"l CHOW - COMBA ission is Com at DECK - H a ship i o layers lnever called a "floor"l DEEP SIX ENSIGN - C11 The dP'b missioned officer Cnever called a "ifaiw,aufQQi!! FIELD DAY - Ill A day in preparation for an inspection Q21 Any evolution c eg., a chewing-out KNOCK OFF - To cease doing work" ON THE BEACH , mplgyed, LIBERTY CALL - Permission to go 0 E PARTY - A group ha or purpose, as working party, linehan- dling party, l PGLLYWOG - A lowly person who ,SHELLBACK - A worthy person who has ie survived the punishment given 1 ' by King Neptune's Court for the offense of being a pollywog. To change the location from which the national flag is flown underway or coming to moorings. never calledj a mop. C23 Slang for sailor, because theyguw f K F L , v 5- 2 34 Q 5 , . V V 1 i l I , . U. , , A V bu W., W: m,xq'yfy,,..rX 5 4 Q.- ,Y " M ,f SALEM GHANA I QL lv-Q WTIAN 1' KN? ,.. Q----wp Y X'-. .,,,,,,,V X-XMMM Q H -Z. V A' ftfqlcfav "'i3i4W . ' E s X 5 X 1 Q I fi A ' 6 o 1 x-- ' ACIFIC -QM ocffmf SDUIW ffl CIFIC'


Suggestions in the Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1978 Edition, Page 1

1978

Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1983 Edition, Page 1

1983

Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1987 Edition, Page 1

1987

Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1990 Edition, Page 1

1990

Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1991 Edition, Page 1

1991

Stein (FF 1065) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1980 Edition, Page 85

1980, pg 85

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