University of Montana Western - Chinook Yearbook (Dillon, MT)

 - Class of 1928

Page 1 of 220

 

University of Montana Western - Chinook Yearbook (Dillon, MT) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 220 of the 1928 volume:

 v  She 1928 Chinook CDontana State formal College CHINOOK £ ife Forenoon and afternoon and night,—Forenoon, And afternoon, and night,—Forenoon, and—what! The empty song repeats itself. No More? Yea, that is life: make this forenoon sublime, This afternoon a psalm, this night a prayer, And Time is conquered, and thy crown is won. —Edward c.R. Sill —  CHINOOK. Contents Ex Libris Campus Scenes 1928 Chinook Faculty Frontispiece Seniors Title Page Juniors Foreword Traditions Contents Page Activities Dedication Society Chancellor’s Message Calendar President’s Message Jokes and Snaps Dean’s Message Autographs College Song Advertisements{ CHINOOK Co Oivian E. ‘Robe our faithful, enthusiastic, helpful class adviser, we, the Senior Class, do hereby dedicate in grateful appreciation the 192S Chinook CHINOOK Ghe Chancellor s CDessage One of America’s greatest teachers wrote this short specification of “The Ideal Teacher”—"He is one who is ready to be forgotten.” An analysis of this specification is commended both to my young and old associates in education. To me, the specification—"readiness to be forgotten,” does not seem, at first blush, to harmonize with that important educational mandate—“In your educational work strive to win the approval of those who are discriminating and high-minded.” Why strive to win approval if you are ready to be forgotten? The reward seems inadequate, and the relationship between the specification and the mandate is vague and seemingly non-existent. However, a careful examination of the specification "ready to be forgotten,”—and the mandate—"strive to win high approval” makes clear that a causal relationship really exists. "Readiness to be forgotten” is an attitude of mind which is developed only by sacrifice of self for truth and the welfare of others; and sacrificial living wins, sooner or later, the approval of all the noblemen whose high standards we endeavor to achieve. This greeting is not a preachment. It is a challenge to all who enter the high profession of teaching. Endeavor mightily to become "Ideal Teachers.” They alone can improve and save our civilization. H. G. Wells declares that the continuity of civilization will be determined by the race now on between education and catastrophe. CPelvin A. ‘BrannonCHINOOK Ghe President s CDessage The Chinook brings its annual message. It speaks eloquently for the worthy class of 1928. It knows their language now, and it will use its 1928 vocabulary and spirit in after years, when members of the class consider themselves grownup, wise,—even old. May the spirit of 1928 come back every time a Chinook is opened. May the hardy, cheerful courage which has made the book a success go with every member of the class always. Sheldon E. ©avis CHINOOK 'Ghe Dean’s (Dessage And let your best be for your friend. If he must know the ebb of your tide, let him know its flood also. For what is your friend that you should seek him with hours to kill? Seek him always with hours to live. For it is his to fill your need, but not your emptiness. And in the sweetness of friendship let there be laughter, and sharing of pleasures. For in the dew of little things the heart finds its morning and is refreshed.—Gibran. Angeline SmithCHINOOK Che College Thy towers stretching upward Guide us on our way; Thy green lawns rolling outward Hold us throughout the day. Each memory brings a thrill Of golden days upon the hill. In Montana’s fairest valley. Where our hearts must always rally. Normal College, here’s to you, For to you we’ll all be true. Though we’re far away at work or play We shall keep our colors flying still for you. So onward through the years let’s go, And no one dares to tell us no, For we’re bringing to fame, that dear old name— Normal College, here’s to you.f A CHINOOK Our Dormitory ‘J-iome ft M 1928 %CHINOOK Swimming ‘PoolCHINOOK Campus tOalk£ibraruCoztj Campus Corner CHINOOK ROBERT CLARK M.A. Professor of Psychology and Education J. FORD McBAIN M.A. Professor of Science LEE R. LIGHT M.S. Vice-President Professor of Education LUCY H. CARSON M.A. Professor of English 21 —MARGARET CRAIG CURRAN B S Director of Teachers’ Service Division Professor of Education CHARLES HENRY M.A. Director of Training RANSOM A. MACK IE M.A. Assistant Professor of History and Education ROBERT E. ALBRIGHT M.A. Assistant Professor of History and Social Science —22—RUSH JORDAN B.S. Assistant Professor of History and Social Science JESSIE L. DUBOC M.A. Assistant Professor of Education Supervisor of Training Grades Four to Eight _ -23— JOHN B. CLULEY B.S. Instructor in Mathematics ELIZABETH M. SHOTWELL B.A. Supervisor of Primary TrainingCHINOOK. LILLIAN It. FREE Librarian Instructor in Library Economy KARL L. FAIRBANKS B.A. Instructor in Manual Training 0. ELDORA RAGON B.S. Instructor in Drawing ALICE E. RUSSELL B.A. Instructor in English —24 — 9 GENEVI EVE A L HE HTSON I3.A. Instructor in English LOUIS M. SCHLEIER M.A. Principal Upper Grade Buihiing Training MARGARET HUNTINGTON M.A. Instructor in English FLORENCE M. LEWIS B.S. Instructor in Home Economics -25—CHINOOK • J LAWRENCE A. DOUGHERTY B.S. Assistant Professor of Science VIVIAN M. ROHE B. Music Instructor in Music A. T. PETERSON B.A. Instructor in Agriculture RALPH McFADDEN Instructor in Piano Graduate of Dana Musical Institute Pupil of Sigismund StojowskiCHINOOK 6£l 7? ELMO JAQUETTE-SCOTT Instructor in Voice Student of Chicago and Cincinnati Conservatories MAItY K. SANDS M.A. Instructor in Dramatics MARGARET M. ULRY B.S. Instructor in Physical Education HELEN MAE SMITH B.A. Instructor in Physical Education —27—LOUISE B. FREEMAN B.S. Registrar 0. KAY MOE B.A. Instructor in Physical Education and History I CHINOOK. J KATHERINE J. MacGREGOR R..V School Nurse —28—CHINOOK Seniors Anxious to bring back that feeling of being organized, the Seniors of 1928 elected their officers in the early part of September. Knowing the responsibility of sponsoring the Chinook, the class immediately elected its associate members for the Chinook staff. All tasks and duties were assumed with enthusiasm. Stunts, assembly programs, and athletic teams made obvious the talent and skill of the class. Throughout the entire year the Seniors took active part in all school affairs. Officers MISS ROBE ...................Class Adviser MR. ALBRIGHT .....Chinook Business Adviser MISS ALBERTSON .....Chinook Literary Adviser Tall Quarter SAM CAPPIOUS . . RUTH BERGQl'IST WILMA KIMBALL ARTHUR BRINE .....President Vice-President Secretary ....Treasurer ICinter Quarter QUINLAN ........ nnK-mv n-v £ £ EDNA HAWBAKER ...............Treasurer Spring Quarter HELEN C. BALLARD................ President SAM CAPPIOUS Vice-President MARGARET WORKING .......... ....... Seer darv MARY lee TOWER .....................Casur£E=f CHINOOK. fcE m= MARTHA DeGROAT ALLEN Livingston. Montana Gargoyles "Mama's Affair" "Quality Street" "The Patsy” Chinook Staff W. A. A. META BARTELS Miles City. Montana "A Woman of Character" Varsity Hockey Senior Basketball V. A. A. MARGARET L. ANDERSON Belfry, Montana Kappa Zeta Xu Editor-In-Chief of Chinook V. W. C. A. Treasurer Intercollegiate Debate, ’27. ’2S Montanomal Chanticleer Club Junior Class President, ’27 Junior Class V.-Presldont, 26 LENA BELEY Big Timber. Montana University of Montana, 1928-27 MARTHA E. ARMITAGE Cameron, Montana MARION BENEDICT Great Falls, Montana Gargoyle Recorder, '2S Y. W. C. A. President, ’28 W. A. A. HELEN C. BALLARD Dillon. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu Gargoyles Orchestra, ’28, ’27 RUTH BERGQUIST Helena. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu W. A. A. President Vice-President Senior Class. '27 Chinook Staff Varsity Swimming. '26 Varsity Volleyball. ’26-’27 Tennis. ’27 Life Guard, ’27-’2S Basketball. '2S Y. W. C. A. CONSUELO BANNISTER Miles City. Montana ALICE BETHKE Aberdeen, South Dakota —30—f --------Y CHINOOK BARBARA EDNA BLANNIN Butte, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Montanomal Staff Chanticleer Club W. A. A. FRANCES N. BRUYN Butte. Montana W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. GOLDIE BLOOMER Chinook, Montana MELBA BURKE Rivulet. Montana FANNY BRADY Wilsall, Montana Kappa Zeta Xu W. A. A. Treasurer. Swimming, ’26 Baseball. '27 Basketball. '26-'27 Hockey, ’27 FRANCES C. BURKS Deer Dodge, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu President Senior Class Treasurer. '27 House Council V. V. C. A. Cabinet Glee Club. '27-’28 Operetta. '27 "Once In a Blue Moon" Montanomal Staff. '27 HELEN I. BRANDSTROM Butte, Montana Glee Club "Once in a Blue Moon" "Barbarossa of Barbary" Montanomal Staff Chanticleer Club Y. W. C. A. SAM CAPPIOUS Dillon, Montana Junior "Class President. '26 Senior Class President. 27 Editor Montanomal. ’27- 2S President Chanticleer Club. '2S Associate Editor Montanomal. ’26 ARTHUR BRINE Malta. Montana Lambda Chi Sigma Senior Class Treasurer. "27 Montanomal, '27 Tennis, '27 MILDRED MARIE CARLSON Cameron, Montana —.11—CHINOOK. OLGA V. CARLSON Princeton. Minnesota Orchestra MARY CAROLYN CLARKE Groat Falls. Montana LOIS CARPENTER lyde Park, Montana FRIEDA CLAUSEN Boutdup. Montana CLADYS BURTON CARTER Butte, Montana COLDIE COLE Missoula. Montana I'niversity of Montana Vice-President Chanticleer Club House Council, '2$ Montar.omal Staff. '2$ Y. V. C. A. ELENE C. CASSIDY Butte. Montana University of Montana. '25-'26 Y. W. C. A. DOROTHY COLLINS Great Falls. Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Y. V. C. A. Vice-President House Council. '27 Sect etary-Treasurer Chanticleer Club Student Activity Fund Committee, '27 Gargoyles Glee Club. '27-'2S ANNETTE K. CHELLIS Miles City. Montana Carnival Queen. 192$ NELLIE CRONIN Butte. Montana -32—CHINOOK ROSE K. CUTLER Corvallis. Montana VELLA FARMER Dillon. Montana LETA DORAN Sioux Pass. Montana ELEANOR FELLOWS Miles City, Montana Montanoinal Staff Chanticleer Club Senior Volley Ball VIVIAN EASTRIDGE Stevonsvllle. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu Secretary House Council Chinook Staff W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. Secretary CLAISSE MARY FEENAN Columbia Falls, Montana GERALDINE ELLIOTT Wibaux. Montana House Council. 26-'2s Glee Club KENNETH H. FOWELL Cascade, Montana State University, 25-’26 "M" Club, ’2S Football. 28 Basketball. '28 VIOLA EVERSON Reserve, Montana LUCILLE FUNK Sheridan, Montana Montana State College. 26- 27CHINOOK LLOYD C. GASS Hysham. Montana Operetta. '28 Orchestra, ’26-’2S "M" Club Basketball. '2S Football. ’27 Chanticleer Club. ’2$ Moutanoinal DOROTHEA J. GRILL Miles City, Montana Montanomal Staff Chanticleer Club Senior Basketball. '28 Varsity Volley Ball. '27 W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. GRETCHEN GAYHART Kalispell. Montana Junior Class President. '27 Gargoyles Glee Club Tennis. '27 Baseball. '27 W. A. A. BLANCHE GUILLOT Helena, Montana Secretary-Treasurer Booster Club Glee Club. '27 "Barbarossa of Barbary" Chinook Staff Swimming:. '27 W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. MARY ANN GEORGE Ismay, Montana "Rich Man. Poor Man” Y. W. C. A.. '28 FRANCES GULA Roundup. Montana GRACE GOODMAN Plentywood. Montana Kappa J5eta Nu Operetta Glee Club "Rich Man. Poor Man" W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. BIRGETTA HAGAN Anaconda, Montana BEATRICE GRAVEN Redstone, Montana W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. HARRIET HALVERSON Whitehall. Montana —34—HAZEL IRENE HAMRY Hutto, Montana Montanomal Staff Chanticleer Club Y. W. C. A. EDNA LUCILLE HAWBAKER Westby, Montana Kappa .eta Nu Senior Class Treasurer. '28 HELEN A. HARKIN Belfry. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu Debate, '27-’2S Student Activity Fund Committee. '27 Chinook Staff W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. RUTH HELMING Wisdom. Montana HELEN M. HARKINS Butte. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu House Council Gargoyles W. A. A. LILLIAN HEPP Poison, Montana Montanomal Staff. '2S Chanticleer Club. '28 MARY M. HARRINGTON Butte. Montana DORIS J. HICKMAN Big Timber. Montana RUTH HOSTETTER Valler, Montana Orchestra W. A. A. ALYCE HINES Billings. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu Glee Club Hockey W. A. A. —35—rf CHINOOK _________ JULIA HOBLITT Corvallis. Montana JULIA JACKSON Pony. Montana WINNIEFRED HOFFMAN Belgrade. Montana Varsity Basketball. '2S Junior Basketball, '27 Junior Baseball. '27 Senior Volley Ball, '27 W. A. A. ELEANOR JAQUETTE Kalispell. Montana W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. EDLA HOLBROOK Forsyth. Montana Chinook Staff .Montanomal Staff, '28 JUNE JOHNSON Conrad, Montana House Council. '2G-'27 LEOTA HUGHES Dillon, Montana Montanomal Staff, '2S MARGARET JOHNSON Perma. Montana EDITH HUSTED Jackson. Montana GWYNETH JONES Wise Klver, Montana W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. —36—CHINOOK MAE JONES Great Falls. Montana Y. W. C. A. WILMA KIMBALL Hyshatn. Montana Kappa .eta Xu Treasurer Senior Class Secretary. 28 House Council. ’27 Glee Club. 27 W. A. A. LENORE KAMPF Terry. Montana Orchestra. '27-’2$ MARY KING Rosebud. Montana MARION KEANE Butte. Montana W. A. A. ANNA KRAUSE Fairfield. Montana DOROTHY KELLEY Hardin, Montana astrid kripen Cascade, Montana Glee Club. ’26 FERN KENNEDY PblllpsburK. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu EMMA LaPORTE Red Lodge. Montana Gargoyles House Council —37CHINOOK MARIE LARSEN Dillon, Montana ELIZABETH LOWNEY Hamilton, Montana Senior Basketball W. A. A. LORNE LAUDER Stevensville. Montana Lambda Chi Sigma Gargoyle Treasurer Class Treasurer, ’26 Basketball. '2S Track. ’2S ANNE LOWRY Livingston, Montana MARJORIE LAUGHLIN Miles City, Montana Montana State College Gargoyles Chinook Staff Y. W. C. A. LOUISE LUDING Wliitefish, Montana Baseball. ’27 W. A. A. Y. V. C. A. FRANCES LEE iKxlson. Montana Kal»l a Zeta Xu Basketball. ’2S W. A. A. Hockey, ’27 Y. W. C. A. DOROTHY MAI ER Butte, Montana SELMA LEE Axtell, Montana EMOGENE MALLETTE Shelby, Montana -38- CHINOOK. LUCY MARLOW Harlem. Montana LaFRANCES McCOY Bainville. Montana House Council Junior Baseball W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. MILDRED MARLOW Harlem, Montana IRENE McFADDEN Butte, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu VIOLA MARTIN Buffalo. Montana Frances McLaughlin Hillings, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Gargoyles V. A. A. MAYME MARZETTA Great Palls. Montana Kappa Zeta Nu NY. A. A. GENEVIEVE MCLAUGHLIN Anaconda. Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Student Activity Fund Committee. '27 VERNACE McBROOM Big Arm. Montana V. V. C. A. SADIE McMANIGAL Wolf Point, Montana Orchestra —30—CHINOOK ETHEL McMILLAN Sidney. Montana Varsity Volleyball. 25 26 Varsity Baseball. ’25-'26 Junior Basketball. ’25-’26 W. A. A. ROSALIE MUMMEY Coburg, Montana JUDY MOORE Hamilton, Montana W. A. A. ELIZABETH NELSON Great Falls. Montana HUGH MOSIER Whitehall, Montana Montana State College Chinook Staff M” Club Football. '27 MARIE NELSON Butte, Montana Montana State College Gargoyles "Quality Street” "The Weather Vane Elopes” "Evening Dress Indispensable” Y. W. C. A. FRANK MOYER Collagen. Montana ANNA NIGON Havre. Montana MARY MULLINS Butte, Montana Glee Club. ’27-'2S Operetta Basketball. '2$ W. A. A. MARY NODSON Lewistown. Montana W. A. A. 1928 —40— ISABELLA O’CONNOR Butte, Montana Mouse Council President V. A. A. Secretary Junior Basketball Junior Swimming Team Volley Ball. ’27-’28 BERTHA QUINLAN Deer Lodge, Montana Kappa Zota Nu Treasurer Vice-President Gargoyles Senior Class President. ’2S Student Activity Fund Committee. '27-'2$ Montanomal. '2 -'27 "The Patsy” BERNICE OWEN Phllipsburg, Montana Gargoyles MIRIAM RAHDERS Helena. Montana Montana State College Intermountain Cnion College Y. W. C. A. ROSE PETERSON Nashua. Montana ELIZABETH REYNOLDS Stevensville. Montana NELLE PORTER Stevensville. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu Vice-President Senior Class Glee Club Operetta Y. W. C. A. MARGARET RILEY Butte. Montana RHETTA PRICE Avon. Montana FLORENCE RING Helena, Montana Gargoyles Glee Club Hockey Swimming V. A. A. —41CHINOOK GARRY ROBERTSON Red Lodge, Montana Lambda Chi Sigma Junior Class Treasurer. '27 “M” Clul) Chinook. '27 Basketball. ,27-’2S OTTO SASSMAN Dillon. Montana FRANCES ROBOCKER Kali spoil. Montana University of Montana HELEN SCALLON Anaconda, Montana Kappa Zeta Xu Booster Club President Chinook Staff V. A. A. Y. W. C. A. ARLEEN SABY Cascade. Montana MRS. DELLA SCHUM Dillon. Montana MARTHA SALLEE Great Falls. Montana Kappa Zi ta Nu President Forum. 24 House Council Snap Kditor. 24 Gargoyles “On the Firing Line.” 24 Operetta. 24- 28 "The Happy Pair." '24 “Hearts." 2f. "The Patsy." '27 “The Knd of the Trail." 28 DORRIT SCOTT Dillon. Montana. Associate Editor Montanomal Social Vice-President Women’s League. '2fi Chinook Staff Chanticleers Y. W. C. A. ELIZABETH SANDERSON Cascade, Montana Kappa Zota Nu Volley Ball. 27 Basketball, 2S Y. W. C. A. W. A. A. MARGARET SCOTT Wibaux. Montana Kappa Zeta Nu House Council —42— CHINOOK WALLACE SCOTT Wibaux. Montana University of Montana Lambda Chi Sigma “M" Club "Barbarossa of Barbary” Basketball, -is Track, '27 Football. ’26-27 MARY SHEPARD Stevensvllle, Montana GLADYS SEDERHOLM Whitotail. Montana OLLIEMAY SHY Ashland, Montana Varsity Basketball Varsity Baseball W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. HELEN SEIDEMANN Saltese, Montana NORMA SIMONS Butte, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Assistant editor Montanomal Gargoyles "Quality Street” LOU SHAY Butte, Montana Volley Ball DORIS SMITH Great. Falls. Montana CATHERINE SHEEHY Bridger. Montana Chanticleers VV. A. A. GOLDIE SMITH Bainville. Montana Kappa Zeta Xu —43CHINOOK DOROTHY SNYDER Great Falls. Montana Montanoma). ’2S "Ja7.7. and Minuet” ELEANOR SULLIVAN Butte. Montana NANNIE SORRELLS Butte, Montana MARY SULLIVAN Olive. Montana LOVINNIE SPERRY Townsend. Montana . MARGENE SUNDERLAND Helena, Montana Intercollegiate Dehate. '2S LUCY STARK Wibaux. Montana HELEN SWANSON Victor, Montana House Council, ’27 Orchestra. '27 Gargoyles Chinook Staff W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. MAYBELLE STRUNK Cascade. Montana CHESTER TAYLOR Bozeman, Montana Lambda Chi Sigma "M” Club Track, ’2fi-’27 Football. ’27 Basketball. ’26- 27-’28 —44—CHINOOK MARY THOMAS Butt©, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu vioe-rrestdem Gargoyles "Weather Vane" Chinook Staff Volley Ball. '27-'2S W. A. A. EDITH TWEEDY Butte, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Gargoyle President W. A. A. Vice-President Associate ICditor Chinook Vice-President Chanticleers. Winter ’28 House Council Cheer Lender. '27-’2S Basketball. '27-'2.S Varsity Baseball. ’27 Varsity Hockey. ’27 Varsity Volley Ball. '27 Montanomal GENEVIEVE THOMPSON Scobey, Montana PATRICIA VEGAS Great Falls, Montana W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. MARY LEE TOWER Dillon, Montana Gargoyles Chinook Staff DOROTHY VOERGE Livingston. Montana House Council. '27-’2!$ Glee Club Chinook Staff Senior Hockey Team W. A. A. Y. W. C. A. MARIAN TUCKER Missoula. Montana LOIS WAGNER Fromberg, Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Y. W. C. A. Cabinet House Council. '26- 27-’28 Operetta Chinook Staff W. A. A. DOROTHY TWAY Great Falls, Montana Secretary Senior Class. '27 Kappa Zeta Nu W. A. A. MARIAN WAGY Corvallis, Montana Kappa Zeta NuCHINOOK ft MYRTLE WARNER Plains. Montana BETTY WILLIAMS Cascade. Montana Kappa Zola Nu Basketball. 25 W. A. A. SYLVIA WARREN Lewlstown. Montana Montanomal Staff Chanticleers W. A. A. BLANCHE WOODS Butte, Montana Intercollegiate Debate, ’2S Montanomal Chanticleers INOLA WATSON Butte, Montana Intercollegiate Debate, '27-'2s Chinook Staff Montanomal Chanticleers Y. W. C. A. ELIZABETH WOODS Wilsall. Montana NOLA WELCH Lambert. Montana Hockey. '27 Volley Ball. '27 W. A. A. LONA LEE WOOLVERTON Livingston, Montana Gargoyles Glee Club. '27-'2S Operetta, '27-'2S W. A. A.. ’27-'2S Y. W. C. A.. '27-'2S CATHERINE WHITE Butte, Montana MARGARET WORKING Wilsall. Montana Kappa Zeta Nu Hockey. '27 V. A. A.BERTHA AINLEY Chester, Montana University of Montana ADELE MARCINKOWSKI Culbertson, Montana Gargoyles Operetta Glee Club Orchestra W. A. A. NELLE BLAIR Dillon, Montana Kappa Zcta Nvi RUBY A. MILLER Great Kails. Montana MRS. BESSIE M. DICK Dillon, Montana SELEY MOORE Hamilton, Montana Operetta, ’27 Football. ’27 EDITH GREINER Lothnir. Montana Montanomal. '27 DAVID MURRAY Bearereek. Montana Vice-President "M" Club Chinook Staff Track, ’27 Football. ’27 Basketball, ’2S MARGARET KINNIBURGH Green River. Wyoming MRS. FRANCES STAMN Dillon. MontanaCHINOOK EMMA STARNS High wood. Montana MARY SHEEHY BrUlger, Montana V. A. A. EDITH WEBBER Big Timber. Montana BESSIE LEE WYLIE Hamilton. Montana —4S—c CHINOOK Seniors •December, 1927 Fanny Brady Arthur E. Brine Frieda Marie Clausen Lotty Mae Devereaux Mary Nell Doyle Dorothy Eggenherger Vella Mae Farmer Ruth Fonts Gretchen L. Gayhart Ruth H. Helming Alyce M. Hines Eleanor Jaquette Mildred M. Johnson Dorothy Velva Kelley Josephine Larimer Anna Marie Larsen Katherine Walsh May Judy Elizabeth Moore Frank P. Moyer Florence J. Ring Della Sell urn vv Grace Shaw ScMary Eleanor Shepard orma Ann Simons jovfnnfe D. Sperry Svelyn Denslow Steel Evelyn T. Strieker Marian Wilson Tucker Marion Esther Wagy CDarch, 192$ Goldie K. Bloomer Frances C. Burks Olga V. Carlson Dorothy Jane Collins Sylvia Doris Devitt Leta B. Doran Vivian Fulton Helen M. Harkins Edna L. Hawbaker Dorothy W. Hoffman Margaret Johnson Gwyneth Jones May Elizabeth Jones Vernace M. Me Broom La Frances McCoy Mary V. Mclsaac Dorothy Maier Anna C. Kigon Mary A. Nodson Bertha Quinlan E. von Tobel Rife Wallace H. Scott Alice M. Seman Lou Shay Catherine Sheehy Doris Louise Smith Nannie W. Sorrells Margene Sunderland John C. Taylor A. Jerome Wall June, 192S Bertha Ainley Martha Allen Margaret Anderson Martha E. Armitage Helen C. Ballard Meta M. Bartels Lena Beley Marion M. Benedict Ruth 1). Bergqulst Barbara E. Blannin Helen Brandstrom Francis N. Bruyn Geraldine Burke Samuel L. Cappious Gladys B. Carter Elene C. Cassidy Mildred May Cave Mary C. Clarke Goldie A. Cole Bessie M. Dick Vivian C. East ridge Geraldine Elliott Viola H. Everson Clarisse M. Fecnan Mary E. Fellows Marjorie Flaherty Lloyd C. Gass Mary Anne George Grace A. Goodman Beatrice A. Graven Edith A. Greiner Dorothea J. Grill Blanche H. Guillot Frances Mary Gula Birgetta Hagan Harriet Halverson Hazel Irene Hamry Helen Ann Harkin Mary M. Harrington Lillian N. ilepp Doris J. Hickman Grace E. Holbrook Ruth Hostetter Leota V. Hughes Edith Mae Husted Julia K. Jackson June R. Johnson Lenore Kampf Marian Keane lone Kelsey Fern L. Kennedy Wilma P. Kimball Marg. Kinniburgh Emma M. Laporte Lome R. Lauder Margery Laughlln Frances M. Lee Winona Lewis Elizabeth Lowney Anne M. Lowry Louise C. Ludlng Genevieve McLaughlin Mary F. McLaughlin Ethel C. McMillen Emogene Mai let to E. Jane Malone Lucy M. Marlow Mildred M. Marlow Bernice B. Marriott Mayme E. Marzetta Edna Bertha Medsker Ruby A. Miller Emily A. Mil ward Mary Frances Mullins Bernice Nelson Marie Montana Nelson Isabella E. O’Connor Bernice Owen Rose Evelyn Peterson Miriam H. Rahders Catherine E. Reynolds Garry E. Robertson Martha May Sallee Elizabeth Sanderson Helen Seal Ion Margaret E. Scott Gladys E. Sederholm Helen Ida Seidemann Mary M. Sheehy Olliemay H. Shy Sister M. Eustasia Sister M. Ruth Goldie Hallie Smith Gertrude I. Spuhler Frances Stamm Emma H. Starnes Maybelle Strunk Eleanor M. Sullivan Mary Agnes Thomas Mary I ee Tower Dorothy Louisa Tway Edith E. Tweedy Patricia Mae Vegas Dorothy L. Voerge Lois Armene Wagner Myrtle Warner Leslie Inola Watson Edith Belle Webber Nola A. Welch Emily I. Wellcome Catherine E. White Elizabeth C. Williams Blanche Anne Woods Lona L. Woolverton Margaret J. Working August, 192$ Margaret Alexander Jessie C. Bannister Dorothy E. Berglund Alice H. Bethke Silva Brluer Melba Frances Burk Mildred M. Carlson W. W. Chance Rose Kathryn Cutler Kddabeth Fisher Lucille K. Funk Katherine M. Grenier Katherine B. Higgins Helen May Johnson Astrid Edith Kripen Sadie A McManigal Seley William Moore Rosella H. Mummey David W. Murray Mrs. Elizabeth Nelson Nolle Lucille Porter Rhetta Anne Price Arleen W. Saby Dorrit Lenore Scott Dorothy Louise Snyder Lucy M. Stark Mary Sullivan Helen Swanson Genevieve N. Thompson Cylvia I Warren Elizabeth Woods 1928 —49——50—i Juniors During the month of September, 1927, the Junior class was organized. The initiative of the Juniors was displayed throughout the year. They brought forth much of the talent of the school as was shown in their Assembly program, Hallowe’en stunt, and the Pantages act in the Carnival. With the ability it has shown, the class of ’29 will be successful in continuing its work next year. Officers MR. JORDAN Class Adviser Tall Quarter CHARLES DAVIS ............................President KATHLEEN SULLIVAN ........................Secretary CARL BALDWIN .............................Treasurer tDin ter Quarter CHARLES DAVIS ......................President VIRGINIA LAUGHLIN .............Vice-President GWENDOLYN MITCHELL .................Secretary CARL BALDWIN .......................Treasurer  CHINOOK M. Abbott M. Akerson C. Baldwin M. Bates A. Bloom L. Brown B. Cochrane R. Brunctt E. Cole L. Chamberlain H. Cole M. Clemow M. Cole A. Cline N. Cole J. Donaldson J. Dover L. Coleman M. Curdy E. Daily C. Davis H. DavisCHINOOK C. Downing B. Eaton G. Evans E. Fisher H. Flatness mh B. Fousek D. Hanson F. Franklin E. Higgins G. Gass L. Hinman C. Glenn E. House A. Hagan H. Jacques M. Klerstead D. Jemison A. Johnson E. Johnson M. Johnson R. Kappel i 1928 -53- A. Kipp H. Kipp D. Koskinen L. Kroeger E. La Hood V. Laughlin E. Lovell G. Lester E. Matson F. Lightfoot K. Mead A. Lillie L. Mellen R. Linderman M. Mensing M. Ohnstad G. Mitchell M. Montgomery K. Moore M. Moyle L. McCoy —54 —M, Orr E. Riemer L. Stephens H. Thompson P. Parslow G. Ross K. Sullivan D. Verry A. Perry E. Sherman G. Tecs V. von dcr Vor A. Poirier M. Smith B. Thibadcau G. Waller L. Randall I. Stephens H. Thomas E. Walls I. Welch —55—I CHINOOK. Abbott, Mary E. Ahlquist, Opal C. Akerson, Mabel A. Allen. Jessie Aim, Margaret Anderson, Mrs. Helen Ayres, Alice Bailey, Eva E. Baldwin, Carl W. Barrett, Lillian Bast a, Helen C. Bates, Mary E. Baxter. Edith Beck, Mildred 0. Bell, Jeannette Bickford. Gertrude Binsfelt, Laura Blackwood. Frances Blair, Cyme Bloom, Alfreds Bouton, Dorothy M. Bowen, Frances Bray, Alma Brinkman, Doris Bristow. Lucy Britton. Dorothy Brogan, Mary M. Brown. Lavyrne Brunett, Rose Burns. Katherine Buss. Mary A. Calkins. Inez M. Campbell. Evelyn Carlson, Mildred K. Carney. Ruth Cartwright, Gretchen Caswell. Amy Chamberlain, Lois Clemow, May E. Cllnard, Jewell C. Cline. Alice Clopton, Stella Cloyd, Mae Cluzen, Ida 0. Cochrane, Bessie Cole. Ella L. Cole, Hugh)un Cole, Morris A. Cole, Norris E. Coleman, Mrs. Lois Copelane. Florence Copp. Mabel Juniors Crowly, Ben C. Crystal, Eleanor L. Cullen, Grace Cuningham. Lillian Curdy, Margaret Curnutt, Amber Daily. Emma L. Davis, Charles Davis. Helen L. Deeney, Catherine C. Depew, Alice Dettwiler, Ruth Dier, Sylva Dimlch, Mary Dippy, Rosalene Donaldson, John E. Dover. John Downing. Clara Dunn, Ruthford Dunn, William Duntley. Hazel Easton, Vinnle E. Eaton. Mary B. Emerson. Le Roy M. Erickson. Anna M. Eskridge. Margaret Evans, Gwendolyn Fabrick. Jane Farrell, Burnice Feeney, Frances Fischer. Alma Fisher, Eddabeth Flaherty. Isabel E. Flatness. Hazel Flynn. Catherine Forgy, Frances Forsgrcn. Wallace Fountaine. Venda Fousek. Blanche Francesia, Vera Frank, Alberta Franklin. Florence Fuller, Myrtle Gass. Gerald Geary. Eloise Giles. Eleanor Glenn, Caroline Grundy. Ix rraine Callings. Violet Hagan. Austa Haling, Claudia Hallenburg. Charlotte Hamann, Ruby Hamilton, Gladys M. Hamilton, Nellie Hansen. Alice Hansen, Mercedes Hanson. Dorothy Harden, Ruby H. Harlan, Mildred Harrington, Agnes Harrington, Frank Harrington, Veronica Hazelmire. Thelma Havcrlandt, Charles Hedman, Lillie E. Henneberrey, Ambrose Hersman, Olla J. Hiebert, Louise Higgins. Ellen Hill. Aili J. Hinman, Laurence Holliday, Thelma Hollingsworth. Geo. H. Holmquist. Ethel House. Elizabeth Hundley, Pansy Jacques, Helen Jemison, Dorothy Jenkins, Opal Johnson, Alma Johnson. Beryl E. Johnson. Edna L. Johnson, Jennie E. Johnson. Mildred Johnson, Mildred Pearl Johnson. Walter I. Jones, Anna M. Jones, Edna Kappel, Ruth Kennedy, Blanche Kerr. Floy Kerr, Marie Kerr, Survantus Kierstead, Maryon Kilburn. Helen M. King. Rosemary Kipp. Ann K. Kipp. Helena M. Klaboe, Harriett Kligora, Elva Knight, Louise Knudsen. Sverre -56—CHINOOK Koontz, Berthana Koskinen, Della Kostka, William Kraftenberg. Ebba Kroeger, Esther L. LaCasse, Evelyn LaHood, Evelyn Lang. Kay It. Larson, Jeannette Laughlin, Virginia Laux, Margaret Lee, Alvina Lester, Guy Lightfoot, Frank E. Lillie. Alice M. Lincoln, Irene Linderman. Ituth Lloyd, Dorothy Lobdell, Harriett Lode, Jennie Ix rensen, Elizabeth Lovell, Esther Luckett, Mary N. Luoma, Hilja McCa rthy, J ose p h i n e McCoy, Leone McGee, Margaret McGiffen, Helen McGreevey. Teresa McKay, Margaret McKinlay, Esther B. McKinney, Merlwyn MacDonald. Mary Manlove, Blanche E. Mantz, Rose Manuell, Madge Marcyes, Gwendolyn Marshall, Grace Marston, Madge Marti, Pearl Massle, Laurlne K. Mast, Alden Matkin, Gwendolyn Matson, Ethel Matson, Myrtle Mead. Catherine Mellen, Lucille Mensing, Mary Metcalf, Grace K. Micbelotti, Mary Mitchell. Gwendolyn Mogus, Helen Juniors Mohar, Julia Monroe, Viola Montgomery, Marjorie Moore, Katherine F. Moyle, Merry Murray, Jennette Myers, Sarah A. Nedrow, Florence Nelson, Leonard B. Nelson. Sophronia Nelson, Stella M. Nelson, Virginia A. Nichols, Kenneth North, Laura Odden, Birgit Ohnstad, Mae E. Orr, Marcia L. Otis, Florence V’. Overfelt, Ethel Pars low, Phoebe It. Perrine, Virginia Perry, Albert Pierson. Frankie Pilon, Alta R. Pitt. Louise Poirier, Aileen Porter, Veva Prinzing, Lena Provo. Mary Quast, Elsa Randall, Leda Reddick. Gladys Reeder, Lee Riemer, Ellen Robichaud, Mary C. Romain, Magdalena Rome, Harriett Roobol, Darrel Ross, Genevieve Rouse, Dorothy Ruckdasehel, Olga It. Ruggles, Beatrice Rydberg. Anna Lisa Sat her, Edna Scalabrin. Alice Scherlie, Esther Scherlie. Ruth Schwab. Anna Scott, Lydia Scully, Gladys E. Seder, Olga L. Sehvay, Eleanor Shaw. Elizabeth Sherman, Emily Simmons, Maggie Skornogoski, Alvina Smith, Elizabeth It. Smith. Geraldine Smith, Minnie M. Sommers, Russell Speck, Mary Sprunger, Mary K. Staples, Dorothy Stephens, Isabel Stephens, Lois Sterry, Norman Stone, Beverly Stubbe, Elma W. Stubbe, Jennie Sullivan, Catherine Sullivan. Kathleen Swanson, Ed la Swanson. Norma Syverson. Nellie Teats, Ella Tees, Geraldine Thexton, Albert Thibadeau, Bertha Thomas, Hazel Thompson, Hulda Thompson. Lillian Tierney, Florence Tjaaland, Alma Trollnger, Olive Vander Ark, Gertrude Verry, Dorothy von der Vor, Violet Walden. Virginia Wall. Elizabeth Waller, Gertrude Walls, G. Electa Walstad. Anna Watts. Earl O. Weed, Gladys Welch. A. Imogene Wendel, Helen Weston. Agnes Wickham, Margaret Williams. Dolores Williamson, Belvina Wyatt, Clara Wyatt, Thomas Ziegler, Minnie 1928 —57—CHINOOK ' 1928 —58——59—CHINOOK Ghe College Sing The College Sing is another one of the many impressive activities of commencement week. Both classes group together on the College steps to sing the most popular Assembly songs and sometimes the songs featured in and popularized by the operetta. For the last time during the year the students sing the song which will linger longest in the memories of all: Norma College, Here's to You ! Ghe ‘Pow tCW During the last week of the spring quarter the warriors of the Junior and Senior tribes don their feathers and war paint in preparation for a final conflict. Like all combats, this is a struggle for supremacy. The Juniors send one of their tribesmen to declare war on the Seniors, whom they believe to have grown too obi to perform the duties of their respective positions. The old group contend that the length of time they have lived here entitles them to full possession of the territory. After a lengthy discourse upon the subject of right and Justice, the Seniors are convinced that the Juniors, by reason of their age, are better fitted to carry on the work of the institution. Through this ceremony the rights and privileges of the upper classmen are surrendered to the younger members of the school, who promise to faithfully uphold the good name and ideals of the College during the coming year. In true Indian style the tribes mingle together to smoke the pipe of peace and ( fc dance around the campfire. The Pow Wow is the ceremonial dedication of upper class power by the Seniors to those who are next in line for graduation at M. S. N. C. Ghe "Go” September 21. the annual ‘•Go,, day, was a red-letter day at M. S. X. C. Faculty and weather man co-operated in giving us a glorious holiday. Hiking clothes were donned early in the day, and the road to Dillmont Park was thronged with students on their way to the traditional picnic grounds. An impromptu baseball diamond was laid out in front of the pavilion, and a most exciting game in which many participated was played. Otto Sassman as fielder caught many a fly but no baseballs. The football game attracted devotees of that sport, also. Music for an informal dance at the pavilion was furnished by several of the students. Mr. Cluley and his daughter. Betty Jean, chaperoned the party. Meanwhile preparations for the great event of the day—LUNCH—were being made. Those who labored carrying wood and water were materially assisted and cheered in their efforts by the kind and continual instructions of the faculty. After MUCH HELP from the students, Mr. Jordan and Mr. Albright succeeded in building a fire and making coffee. No urging was necessary when the culinary forces at last sent out the call “Come and get it, or we'll throw it out!" Never was such a long and vociferous bread-line! Heaping plates were given out by Dean Smith and her corps of helpers. The students at M. S. N. C. were not suffering from loss of appetite, if one were to judge from the number who came back in true dormitory style for “seconds.’’ Since "do” day is the traditional get-acquainted mixer of the year at Montana State Normal College, it is held shortly after the beginning of each fall quarter. On that day faculty and seniors discard their usual sober mien and devote themselves to welcoming the new students to the College. HI ' 1928 -60-f CHINOOK £?he ‘Hallowe’en ‘Party The annual Hallowe’en party was given this year on October 2D. Novel stunts by campus organizations furnished the varied program at the College auditorium. The program follows: K. Z. . STUNT—Jinssu’s in de Cold, ('old Ground. Mary Thomas. Vivian Eastridge, Betty Williams. Margaret Anderson. Bertha Quinlan. W. A. A. STUNT—Barn Dance. Gretchen Gayhart.....Mouth Organ Alyce Hines ................Calls LaFrances McCoy, Wilma Kimball. Eleanor Jaquette, Lois Coleman, Elizabeth Sanderson, Helen Swanson, Frances Lee, Lois Wagner. Mary Me Isaac, Patricia Vegas, Louise Luding. JUNIOR CLASS Romeo and Juliet. Virginia Laughlln .........Reader Norman Starry Romeo Otto Sassinan .............Juliet Thomas Wyatt ..............Brutus Rosemary King.....Sister of Brutus Isabel Stephens, Mary Provo, Marjorie Montgomery, Laveryne Brown. Florence Nedrow, Meta Bartels, Dorothea Grill, Alfreda Bloom. SENIOR CLASS-Side by Side. Helen M. Harkins, Mayme Marzetta, Marian Keane, Dorothy Tway, Martha Sallee, Emogene Mallette. (•LEE CLUB A Japanese Love Song. Gretchen Gayhart .........Chinaman Blanche Guillot.....Japanese Girl Thelma Holliday ............... ............Poor Butterfly (Solo) Members of the Glee Club. GARGOYLES — Two Black Crows at Normal. Florence Ring and Lome Lauder. Y. Y. C. A. The Ghostly Jamboree. Dorrit Scott ................Head Spook Jane Fabrick, Marian Benedict, Dorothy Collins, Elene Cassidy .......................Ghosts Plddabeth Fisher, Patricia Vegas, Dorothy Lloyd. Alice Lillie ........................ Witches Dorothy Kelley, Blanche Guillot, Helen Scallon, Dorothy Voerge, Dorothea Grill. Frances Lee ............................ Sneaks Edith Tweedy as master of ceremonies announced the different stunts. At the conclusion of the program at the auditorium everyone went by way of the laundry room door to the “Rec” hall where the annual Hallowe'en dance was in progress. The way led through the Chamber of Horrors where ghosts walked, wild women shrieked, and pitfalls beset the path of the unwary. "CD” ‘Daij “M” Day is the birthday of the great white “M," which is the symbol of the Montana University. On this day—sometime during the month of May—the "M” receives another coat of paint, and all its dimensions are increased by one foot. An onlooker (if there be any such) upon this scene of industry, has the opportunity to observe a direct and useful application of the habit of standing in line, acquired on registration days. A line of students arranges itself between the corner of the ‘M" and a pile of rocks. Instead of being carried one by one the rocks are passed down this line. Thus as the “M” grows older, it also grows larger. When all the additional rocks are placed, the Seniors apply the new coat of white wash with brooms,—the kind which the good people of Dillon cultivate in their back yards. During the course of this process Dean Smith and the dormitory kitchen force have been preparing lunch in the valley below for the hungry ,.' 00.', When the group has eaten, then rested for a time and perhaps indulged in a few games of baseball, the eastward march begins. Everyone returns home thoroughly satisfied and in most cases thoroughly sunburned. —61—I}he CDaij Pete The May Fete is a spring festival given on the campus in honor of the May Queen. The Queen and her attendants are elected by the student body. They are chosen on the basis of their popularity and their worthy achievements at the Normal. Roseanne Smith of Boulder had the distinction of being May Queen in the spring of 1927. The participants are the pupils of the training school and a number of College students who are enrolled in certain physical education classes. Through dancing and dramatization they interpret a story to their audience. For the past two years this activity has been directed by Miss Helen Mae Smith. (3he Candle-Cight ‘Procession Have you memories of a swift-falling twilight in early summer, when the dark mantle of night blots out the familiar shrubbery of the College campus? The well-known towers of the main building are silhouetted against the darkened sky; lights twinkle along the well-loved walks; the dormitory windows show bright in the warm, scented summer evening. All nature is hushed. Even the sleepy robins, so noisy in the early twilight hours, are still at last. Into this expectant calm comes the sound of voices, clear and sweet: "Oh, college chums, dear college chums, the years may come, the years may go; But still my heart in memory clings to those college days of long ago." The Seniors, in cap and gown, march slowly down the darkened walks, each one carrying a lighted candle. As the long line meets the line of Juniors at the entrance to the campus, the candles are handed to a Junior. “Through youth, through prime, and when the days of harvest time to us shall come; Through all we'll bear those memories dear of those college days of long ago.” The lines pass. Twinkling points of light mark the path taken by the Juniors, as they bear the lighted candles across the campus. The song dies down. —62—CHINOOK ‘House Council Officers ISABELLE O’CONNOR ......................President FANNY BRADY ................Vice-President “New” JUNE JOHNSON .............Vice-President “Middle” EMMA LaPORTE ...............Vice-President "Old” The Residence Halls have an executive body called the House Council. This body was organized in order that each floor in the three dormitories might be represented. Two girls from each floor are elected as representatives. The Council meets to plan the social calendar and to discuss the special problems met by the girls who live in the Residence Halls. The most prominent affair on the social calendar this year was the colonial ball given February 11, the most striking feature being the minuet danced by sixteen couples. The House Council is the one and only governing body in the Residence Halls, and it has tried to fulfill its duties by providing social activities for the men and women of the College. Student Activity Pund Committee Three years ago the student activity fund came into existence. It is made up of the two-dollar fee paid by each student every quarter. A committee of the faculty, senior and junior classes apportions this money among the student activities, the Montanomal, and the lyceum course. President Davis appoints three faculty members, and three representatives are elected from each class. Mr. McBain was chairman of the committee this year. The other faculty committee members were Dean Smith and Miss Russell. The Senior representatives were Garry Robertson, Bertha Quinlan, and Martha Allen; and the Junior representatives were Rosemary King, Helen Lou Davis, and Carl Baldwin. 1928 -63- oung LOomen’s Christian Association Officers MARIAN BENEDICT DOROTHY COLLINS VIVIAN EAST1UDGE M AR(! A RET ANDERSON LOIS WAGNER FRANCES BURKS ... GENEVIEVE ROSS .. HELEN LOU DAVIS ... ..................President Vice-President ..................Secretary .................Treasurer ....Senior Cabinet Member ... Senior Cabinet Member ... Junior Cabinet Member ....Junior Cabinet Member Tile Y. W. ( A., an organization whose aim is to create a good fellowship among the women of the Normal College, has been very active this year. The social activities of the Y. W. C. A. consisted of a treasure hunt, stunt night, a Pantages act for the Carnival, and a Hallowe'en stunt. Running to and fro at the football games were Y. W. girls selling hot-dogs as fast as they were made. At the meetings several of the faculty members gave talks to the girls. They also had the pleasure of having Miss Stella Scurlock, national secretary, visit them. CDembers Mary At t»ott Margaret Anderson Elizabeth Armltage Meta Bartels Mary Bates Barbara Blannln Frances Bruyn Lola Carpenter Mao ClemOW Alice Cline Bessie Cochrane Ella Cole Goldio Cole Dorothy Collins ltose Cutler Margaret Curdy Emma Daily Helen Ix u Davis Dorothy Da mm rose Clara Downing Hazel Duntley Gwen Evans Grace Goodman Beatrlee Graven Isorraino Grundy Blancho Guillot Marjorie Flaherty Frances Forgy I,a Frances McCoy Berdina McKinley Merlwvn McKinney Merry Moyle Jennetto Murray Bernice Pankey Phoebe Parslow Genevieve Boss Dorrtt Scot-; Emily Sherman Olga Seder Olliemay Shy Helen Swanson Bertha Thlbadonu Genevieve Thompson Hulda Thompson Lois Wagner a —64—CHINOOK ‘Kappa 2-eta Tlu Officers PRANCES BURKS ...........................President MARY THOMAS ........................Vice-President VIVIAN EASTIUDGE ........................Secretary BERTHA QUINLAN ..........................Treasurer The Kappa Zeta Xu sorority was organized twenty-three years ago for the purpose of promoting social activities and sisterhood among the students of the Montana State Normal College. Since Its organization it has taken part In all school activities of a social nature. Each quarter new members are pledged. A candidate must have completed two successful quarters of work at M. S. N. C. before she can be pledged. This year over fifty members were pledged to this society. In the winter quarter a new constitution for the organization was written. The social part of the society consisted of breakfasts for the members, marshmallow roasts, firesides, and formal dances in the fall and spring quarters to conclude the initiation of the pledges. Margaret Anderson Helen C. Ballard Ruth Bergquist Nell© Blair Barbara Blannin Fanny Brady Frances Burks Dorothy ('oilins Sylvia Devitt Lottie Devereaux Nell Doyle Vivian East ridge draco Goodman Helen A. Markin (Dembers Helen M. Harkins Edna Hawbaker Alyce Hines Fern Kennedy Wilma Kimball Helen Krantz Marie Larson Frances Lee May me Marzetta Frances McLaughlin Helen McLean Genevieve McLaughlin Irene McFadden Nelle Porter Bertha Quinlan Martha Sallee Elizabeth Sanderson Helen Seal Ion Margaret Scott Norma Simons Goldie Smith Mary Thomas Dorothy Tway Edith Tweedy Lois Wagner Marian Wagy Betty Williams Margaret Working t928 x —66— 3CHINOOK COomen's Athletic Association Officers RUTH BKRGQUIST President EDITH TWEEDY ...........Vice-President ISABELLA (PAT) O’CONNOR . ..........Secretary FANNY BRADY Treasurer H-cader of Sports MARY THOMAS ...........................Hiking One of the youngest organizations on the campus, but one of the most active, is the W. A. A. It became nationalized last year, the only organization on the campus so honored. This year the W. A. A. took a very active part in promoting good sportsmanship in athletics. A new constitution was written by a committee appointed by the president. In order to become a member of the organization a student must have completed one successful quarter at M. S. N. C. She must have earned ninety points by hiking and ten other points by some athletic activity, or by making a first team for which one hundred points are given, or a second team for which fifty points are given. A felt monogram is awarded when a student receives five hundred points, two hundred of which have been made by teams. A chenille “M” is given when she has earned eight hundred points, four hundred of which are made by teams. Nearly seventy-five new members were initiated this year. The social activities of the W. A. A. were the Mixer, the W. A. A. Get-together. the initiation, and the banquet. CDembers Seniors Margaret Alexander Martha Allen Meta Bartels Marian Benedict Ruth Bergquist Barbara Blannln Fanny Brady Silva Brlncr Frances Bruyn Melba Burk Ixris Coleman Ixntlo Dovereaux Vivian Eastridgo Grace Goodman Gretchen Gayhart Beatrice Graven Dorothea Grill Blanche Gulllot Helen M. Harkins Helen A. Ilarkln Alyco Hines Winifred Hoffman Ruth Hostetter Eleanor Japuette Mildred Johnson Gwyneth Jones Marian Keane lone Kelsey Wilma Kimball Mario Larsen Frances Leo Elisabeth Ixnvncy Louise Luding Mayme Marietta Adele Marclnkowskl I ,a Frances McCoy Mary Mclsaac Ethel MeMlllen Judy Mooro Mary Mullins Mary Nodson Isabella O'Connor Floreneo Ring Elizabeth Sanderson Helen Scallon Catherine Sheehy Mary Sheehy Olllemay Shy Helen Swanson Mary Thomas Dorothy Tway Edith Tweedy Patricia Vegas I orothy Voerge Ix is Wagner Sylvia Warren Nola Welch Elizabeth Williams Margaret Working Juniors Alice Cline Ia Ik Chamberlain E. I,. Daily Berdcno Eaton Frances Forgy Agnes Harrington Veronica Harrington Elizabeth House Alma Johnson Helen Kilburn Evelyn LaCasse Alvina Leo Alice Lillie Elizabeth Lorenson Leone McCoy Meriw.vn McKinney Mary Menslng Jennette Murray Sarah Myers Aileen Poirier Harriet Rome Emily Sherman Isabel Stephens Hulda Thompson Gertrude Waller Imogene Welch -68- CHINOOK Ghe Chanticleer Club 7? Who’s crowing all the most up to date news? Why, the Chanticleers. of course! Have you heard of the newest organization on the campus? In order to fulfill the long-felt need of a club for the purpose of promoting interest in journalism, the Montanomal staff organized the Chanticleer Club. The first meeting was held on Monday, January 9. The club plans to have many social functions as well as programs of a literary nature. Miss Albertson is faculty adviser. The officers are: lOintcr Quarter SAM CAPPIOUS .............................President EDITH TWEEDY ........................Vice-President DOROTHY COLLINS ................Secretary-Treasurer Spring Quarter SYLVIA WARREN .......................... President GOLDIB COLE ........................Vice-President DORRIT SCOTT ..................Secretary-Treasurer Mary Abbott Irving Ady Margaret Anderson Barbara Hlannin Helen Brandstrom Sam Cappious Goldie Cole Charter (Dembers Dorothy Collins Eleanor Fellows Lloyd Gass Hazel Hamry Lillian Hepp Edla Holbrook Leota Hughes Martha Opp Dorrit Scott Catherine Sheehy Edith Tweedy Gertrude Waller Sylvia Warren (Dembers Dorothy Jemison Mildred Johnson Anna Krause Marjorie Laughlin Initiated ‘During Spring Quarter Leone McCoy Victoria Mihelich Bernice Owen Dorothy Snyder Helen Wendel Dorothea Grill Blanche Woods Inola Watson—71—CHINOOK. Ghe Gargoyles Officers MISS SANDS ............................. Sponsor EDITH TWEEDY ..........................President BERTHA QUINLAN Vice-President ESTHER LOVELL .........................Secretary LOKNE LAUDER ......................... Treasurer MARY LEE TOWER .........................Recorder The Gargoyles, the dramatic society of Montana State Normal College, was organized in 1922 for the purpose of furthering dramatic activities in the school. Any student who is interested in dramatic work may be elected to membership, if he has proved his ability in one or more of the three departments of the club, business, stage, or acting. A new feature of the club this year is the honor society, The Order of the Jewelled Mask. Only those members who have completed a certain amount of work, after election to membership of the Gargoyles. are eligible for election to this honorary order. Besides the public performances given throughout the year by the Gargoyles, dramatic activity has been stimulated by the informal presentation of numerous “laboratory plays” at regular club meetings. From the proceeds of plays given for the public, it has been possible to add to the stage equipment a row of X-ray border lights, dimmers, a set of screens, and many smaller properties. The club has a room which it is furnishing with furniture that may bo used on the stage. The try-out committee is elected by the club for the purpose of preparing and giving try-outs for membership. The chairmen of the business department were LeRoy Emerson and Helen Lou Davis; stage department, Florence Ring and Charles Davis; and acting, Martha Allen. Martha Allen Elene Armstrong Helen Ballard Marian Benedict William Chance Dorothy Collins Charles Davis Helen Lou Davis John Donaldson LeRoy Emerson Grctchen Gayhart Gerald Gass Lloyd Gass (Dembers Helen M. Harkins Emma La Porte Marjorie Laughlln Virginia Laughlin Lome Lauder Guy Lester Esther Lovell Adele Marclnkowski Frances McLaughlin Leonard Nelson Marie Nelson Bernice Owen Phoebe Parslow Mary Provo Bertha Quinlan Esmond Riberdy Florence Ring Martha Sallee Norma Simons Helen Swanson Mary Thomas Edith Tweedy Mary Lee Tower Gertrude Waller Lon a Lee Woolverton 1928 —72—CHINOOK 1928 —73—Z5he ‘Patsij Tlie Patsy, a three-act comedy by Barry Conners, was presented on the evening of December 9. This play was a double love story; the competition of two sisters, the actions of one countenanced by her mother, and those of the other by her father, carried out the idea of rivalry. The characters, who were all Gargoyle members, were very successful in carrying out their parts. Cast Mrs. Harrington, Martha Allen; Mr. Harrington. Esmond Iliberdy; Patricia Harrington. Martha Sallee; Grace Harrington Bertha Quinlan; Billy Caldwell. Charles Davis; Tony Anderson, LcRoy Emerson. Directed by Miss Sands The Lady Loses ller Hoop, a rhythmic playlet, was presented by the Gargoyles for the Booster Club Carnival. Conventional scenery made by club members carried out the idea of the play. Cast Heroine, Esther Lovell; Hero, Lloyd Gass; Villain, Lome Lauder; Children. Directed by Miss Sands Rich Mail, Poor Man, a one-act comedy by Bertha Y. Burrill, was presented on February 10. Cast Emma, Nelle Porter; Kitty, Kathleen Sullivan; Visiting Nurse, Mary Ann George; Mrs. Smythe, Helen M. Harkins; Peter. Earl Watts; Tommy Browning. Morris Cole; Largo Johnson. Lome Lauder; Mrs. Oleson. Alice Lillie; Mrs. Haggerty, Grace Goodman; Mrs. MacPhairson, Mary Robichaud; Yetta Goldstein. Frances Feeney; Mrs. Bonelli, Gertrude Waller; Student Director. Virginia Laughlin. —74—-75-( CHINOOK The Weatlier Vane Elopes, a one-act fantasy, by Alice C. I). Riley, was presented on February 10. Cast Jackie (the weather-vane) ...............Mary Thomas Dighty (tl»e fountain) .............Frances McLaughlin Flora (the mistress) ....................Marie Nelson Andrew (the gardener) ...................Norman Sterry Student Director ........................Bertha Quinlan The End of the Trail, a realistic one-act play, by bertson, was presented February 10. Finest Howard Cul- Cast Marthy ......... John ....... Bill ........... Student Director ...Martha Sallee .William Chance John Donaldson ...Martha Allen —76—1928 CHINOOK die ‘Purple Dream The Purple Dream, a fantasy of one act by Donald L. Breed, was presented for the American Federation of Women's Clubs on October 27. Cast Mary Ellen ............................Norma Simons Mrs. Carver-Blythe ....................Martha Allen Ysobel ................................Helen Seal Ion Dream Sir George ......................Charles Davis Real Sir George .......................Lome Lauder Butler ...............................John Donaldson Directed by Miss Sands A tDoman of Character A Woman of Character is a one-act comedy which was given by the club for assembly during the fall quarter. Cast Mrs. Adams Old Lady (her mother) Mrs. Perkins .......... Mrs. Albright ......... Mrs. Lee .............. The Bride ............. Mrs. Cline ............ Mrs. Harrington-Cross Mrs. Lange ............ Student Director ...... .. Helen M. Harkins ....Virginia Laughlln ........Meta Bartels ......Emma La Porte ........Florence Otis .....Gertrude Waller Marjorie Montgomery Frankie Mae Pierson ........Esther Lovell Norma Simons —77—•‘Plays of the Summer of 1927 Square Penes is a charming fantasy which was presented out of doors the night of the Candle-Light Procession, last June. Cast Mary Williams and Norma Simons Directed by Miss Sands Ann Ann. a three-act comedy by Lechmore Worrall, was presented by the Senior class August 27. This was the first three-act comedy to be presented during a summer term, and it proved very successful. Cast Mrs. Hargraves .....................Gretehen Gayhart Edward Hargraves (her son)........Charles McDermand Billy (William Lloyd)....................Bay Kimball The Very Reverend Samuel Hargraves...William Verwolf Ann Aiming (an American newspaper reporter)....... ......................................LeOna Whilt Evangeline Liscomb .......................Alyce Hines Directed by Miss Sands CHINOOK She "CD” Club Officers WALLACE SCOTT DAVID MURRAY LeROY EMERSON ...........President .....Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer The “M" Club was first organized in the fall quarter of 1925 when M. S. N. C. began to take an active part in intercollegiate athletics. Its membership is composed of men who have earned their letters in one of the major sports. Coach Moe has supervised the athletics this year. The aim of the club is to promote athletics. The interest of the students in athletics proved that the club's aim was fulfilled. There were several dances given by the "M" Club throughout the year. They were well attended. The “M” Club presented a Pantags act, difficult to surpass, at the Rooster Club Carnival. Through the careful management of the athletic program, which was under the supervision of Guy I ester and Wallace Scott, the club was financially a success. Sweaters were awarded to the football and basketball players. The year of 1928 was a marked success for the "M” Club. With most of its present members returning next year, the advancement of athletics is certain. (Dembcrs C. Baldwin C. Davis L. Emerson K. Fowell (1. Cass L. Cass A. Henneberry C. Hollingsworth K. Lang G. Lester F. Light foot H. Mosier I). Murray L. Nelson E. Riberdy G. Robertson W. Scott C. Taylor E. Watts CHINOOK. Chinook In the year 1903 the first school annual, the Chinook, appeared. It is sponsored by the Senior class. Everyone considers the Chinook his most valuable possession because it takes in all the memories of the happy days spent at M. S. X. C. The Chinook staff was elected in the spring quarter of 1927. The associate members were elected during the fall quarter. The art editor contest was won by Phoebe Parslow, whose work was considered excellent. The meetings of the staff were held every other Monday night during the fall and winter quarters. Several Chinook drives were held each quarter, to which the students responded readily. Staff CDembers Mr Albright Business Adviser Miss Albertson .......................................................Literary Adviser Margaret Anderson .............................................Editor-in-Chief Edith Tweedy .................................................Associate Editor Helen Catherine Ballard ...............................Business Manager Helen Lou Davis ............................Associate Business Manager Inola Watson Literary Editor Helen A. Markin ...............................Associate Literary Editor Vivian East ridge ..............................................Picture Editor Lois Wagner ...................................Associate Picture Editor Helen Scallon ............................................Organizations Editor Martha Allen ............................ Associate Organizations Editor Hugh Mosier ...................................................Athletic Editor Ruth Bergquist ................................Associate Athletic Editor Mary Lee Tower ................................................Calendar Editor David Murray ..................................Associate Calendar Editor Dorrit Scott ......................................................Joke Editor Mary Thomas .......................................Associate Joke Editor Blanche Guillot .................................................. Snap Editor Dorothy Voerge ....................................Associate Snap Editor Phoebe Parslow Art Editor Helen Swanson .....................................Associate Art Editor Virginia Laughlin ................................Junior Representative Edla Holbrook .................................................Activity Editor Marjorie Laughlin .............................Associate Activity Editor —80—CHINOOK Che CDontanomal January G, 1923. the first issue of the Montanomal, the student paper of the Normal College, was published. Since then several changes and improvements have been made. The staff of 1927-1928 has contributed its share to the development of the paper. The Montanomal is under the supervision of Miss Albertson, faculty adviser and instructor in journalism. It is a paper of which the College may well be proud. A two credit course in journalism, which is now given, has resulted in a better written paper. Besides the weekly issues of the paper, a Carnival number was put out by the Montanomal staff and the Chanticleers. CDontanomal Staff 1927-28 MISS ALBERTSON ................. SAM ( AIM'IOrs ............. SYLVIA WARREN. GERTRUDE WALLER Faculty Adviser ...Editor-in-Chief m Associate Editors LeROY EMERSON. MARY ABBOTT. LEOTA HUGHES Advertising Managers Assistant Editors and ‘Reporters Irving Ady Margaret Anderson Barbara Blannin Helen Brandstrom Goldie Colo 1 )orotby Eggenberger Eleanor Fellows Lloyd Gass Dorothea Grill Hazel Hamry Lillian Hepp Dorothy Jemison Mildred Johnson Anna Krause Marjorie Laughlin Iyoone McCoy Victoria Mihelich Martha Opp Bernice Owen Dorothy Snyder Dorrit Scott Edith Tweedy Inola Watson Helen Wendel Blanche Woods Edla Holbrook, Exchange Editor 5State Normal l ix W ith i Is Stroud UEI’ORTS 1 kKMOKONI T Ln..m:i s lining l ro Srninrs I'rr. groin a ration (Itnpiylm ll I | Ifc-n CHINOOK CHINOOK ‘Debate The debaters of 1927-192S upheld the record established by their predecessors for the past two years. Two decision debates were held, both of them ending in victory for the Normal College. The third and last debate was an open forum debate with the sophomore team of the Montana State College at Bozeman. The affirmative team debated twice here, and the negative team debated once in Billings. The question for debate this year, a topic which is being earnestly discussed throughout the United States at this time, was, Resolved: That, the United States should cease its policy of protecting, by armed force, capital invested in foreign lands except after formal declaration of war. The first debate of the season, and the first one ever held .between the lOastern Montana Normal School and the Montana State Normal College, resulted in a 2-1 decision in favor of the Dillon debaters. The Normal College was represented by its negative team consisting of Helen A. Harkin of Belfry and Inola Watson of Butte. Margene Sunderland of Helena, Blanche Woods of Butte, and Margaret Anderson of Belfry, upholders of the affirmative, won a 3-0 decision over the State School of Mines team. The final debate in which the affirmative team, consisting of Lillian Barrett of Great Falls, Blanche Woods of Butte, and Margaret Anderson of Belfry, met the sophomores of the State College of Bozeman. was a no-decision debate. Much credit is due Mr. Albright who has so successfully coached the debaters for the past three years. —84—CHINOOK ‘Booster Club Officers HELEN SCALLON ............................President BLANCHE GUILLOT ................Secretary-Treasurer The Booster Club, a Senior organization, was organized October 13. The purpose of this organization is to boost all school activities and be financially responsible for the Chinook. The club began work immediately. The President of the club acted as Carnival manager. Every Senior, with the co-operation of the Juniors, took part and made the Carnival a success. 1928 —85—CHINOOK Che ‘Thermal College Index The Normal College Index, which is published by the journalism class once each month, is sent to Montana teachers. It is the professional publication of the Normal College and is under the direction of Miss Albertson. As it is the purpose of the Index to help teachers in their work, each issue is specialized; social science, rural school, primary, intermediate, upper grade, English, and high school numbers have been issued this year. Index articles are written by the journalism staff, the faculty, and alumni. Normal students receive a copy each month. Index Staff 1927-2S MISS ALBERTSON ...... Faculty Adviser I)R. DAVIS ...........Business Manager Journalism Class Irving Ady Margaret Anderson Barbara Blannin Helen Brandstrom Sam Cappious Goldie Cole Dorothy Eggenberger Eleanor Fellows Lloyd Gass Dorothea Grill Hazel Hamry Lillian Hepp Leota Hughes Dorothy Jemison Mildred Johnson Anna Krause Marjorie Laughlin Leone McCoy Victoria Mihellch Martha Opp Bernice Owen Dorothy Snyder Dorrit Scott Edith Tweedy Gertrude Waller Sylvia Warren Inola Watson Blanche Woods CHINOOK Glee Club Back row: Dorothy Voerge, Dorothy Collins, Grace Goodman, Rosemary King, Mary Mullins, Francos Burks. Virginia Walden. Front row: Nolle Porter, Thelma Holliday. Koslna lyoo. Helen Brand- strom. Sophronia Nelson. Dorothy Britton. Geraldine Elliott, Wilma Kimhall. Blanche Fousek at the piano. CDembers First Soprano Thelma Holliday Nelle Porter Dorothy Voerge Dorothy Collins Second Soprano First Alto Gretchen Gayhart Mary Mullins Sophronia Nelson Adele Marctnkowski Virginia Walden ltosina Lee Helen Brandstrom Rosemary King Grace Goodman Accompanist Blanche Fousek Second Alto Wilma Kimball Geraldine Elliott Frances Burks Florence Ring Dorothy Britton —87— CHINOOK First row: Wilma Kimball, Violet von der Vor. Helen Brandstrom. Blanche Fousek. I orothy Voerg©. Dorothy Britton. Geraldine Elliott. Virginia Walden. Blanche Gutllot. Second row: Sophronla Nelson, Grace Goodman. Mary Mullins. Frances Burks, Rosemary King. The Women's Glee Club presented Its annual mid-winter concert December 5. and went on a tour which included: Sheridan .......December 6, 1927 Butte ..........December 14, 1927 Virginia City December 7. 1927 Helena ........December 16, 1927 Whitehall ......December 8, 1927 Great Falls December 16, 1927 Dorothy Britton and Virginia Walden, new members of the Glee Club during the winter quarter, filled the vacancies left by the graduation of Qretchen Gay hart and Florence Ring. Instrumental Trio which accompanied this club °n tour Ix-ft to right: Violet von der Vor. violin; Martha OPP. vlo, S Blanche Fousek. piano. -88—1928 "Rendezvous A CDusical Sketch Arranged by CO'xss ‘Robe Shepherd ......................Dorothy Collins Shepherdess ........................Rosina Lee Old-fashioned Lady ..............Nelle Porter Old-fashioned Gentleman ........Thelma Holliday Staff Director ..................................Miss Robe Stage Manager ...........................Gerald Gass CHINOOK —S9—Operetta Once in a ‘Blue CDoon A Musical Comedy in Three Acts, With Prologue Story by Gordon Ihhetson Music by Noble Cain Dramatized by Randolph Carter ‘Presented by the Glee Clubs of the Montana State Normal College. at the Normal College Auditorium. Friday, March 23, 1928, 8:30 Director .......................Vivian M. Robe Business Manager ...............J. Ford McBain Student ‘Business Staff Stage Manager ............................................Charles Davis Electrician ................................................Edith Tweedy Art Director ..............................................Phoebe Parslow Property Manager ...........................................Hazel Thomas Dance Director ...........................................Blanche Guillot Cast of Characters Moon Lady, Lady of the Blue Moon............ Hop Sing HI, the houseman................... Suzanne, the French maid.................... Mrs. Montgomery, the hostess................ Lea trice, her younger daughter............. Sylvia, her older daughter.................. Mrs. Lila Lavender, a friend still in mourning Billy Maxwell, a friend of Sylvia's......... Sir Percival Chet wood, a pseudo-Englishman... M. Rene LeMon, a Frenchman.................. Mr. Babbit Morton, a home-town booster...... Betty Morton, his daughter.................. George Taylor, alias Bob Harrington......... Mooney, a detective ........................ ...........Marie Fall ........Mary Mullins ...Helen Brandstrom ......Grace Goodman Lona Lee Wool vert on ....Thelma Holliday ......Dorothy Britton .....Kenneth Fowell .....John Donaldson .....Garry Robertson ..........Lloyd Gass .........Nelle Porter .........Gerald Gass .....Sverre Knudsen —90 -Operetta—Continued Attendants of Moon Lady—Lois Wagner, Mayme Marzetta, Marie Nelson, Dorothy Tway. Modern Dancers—Nelle Porter, Lona Leo Woolvorton, Blanche Gulllot, Dorothy Voerge, Martha Sallee. Spanish Dancers—Blanche Guillot, Kay Lang. Reporters—Leonard Nelson, Earl Watts, Seley Moore. Guests at House Party—Sopranos, Martha Sallee, Dorothy Voerge. Marie Fall, Ruth Linderman, Hazel Thomas, Rosemary King, Laveryne Brown; Altos, Wilma Kimball, Geraldine Elliott. Virginia Walden. Leone McCoy, Gwendolyn Matkin; Tenors, Seley Moore, Albert Perry, Sverre Knudsen, Laurence Hinman; Bassos. Earl Watts, David Murray, George Hollingsworth, Norris Cole, Leonard Nelson. (Dembers of Orchestra First Violins: Violet von der Vor, Martha Opp, Ruth Hostetler, Marguerite David. Second Violins: Phoebe Parslow, Sadie McManigal, Lenore Kampf. Cello: Joe Sprinkle Trombone: Pindling Wolf Carnival Stunt Ghe Glee Club Stunt Carnival flight IDon Tirst ‘Prize by Cote of the Audience —91—CHINOOK. Alumni Association In June, 1927, the local alumni of the Montana State Normal College held its annual picnic on the Olmsted lawn. Eighteen regular members, eight visiting graduates who were home for the summer, and four members of the class of 1927 were present. It has been the custom for the last three years to have no alumni banquet but to add the one dollar banquet fee to the alumni loan fund. Fees totaling fifteen dollars were turned in on that day. (Dembers of the ‘Dillon Unit Mrs. M. A. Walker Mrs. T. D. Olmsted Mrs. P. I). Willis Mrs. A. L. Anderson Mrs. Jay Holtz Mrs. I). V. Erwin Mrs. Findlay Watson Mrs. L. S. Hartwig Mrs. Verle M. Lasich Mrs. S. E. Davis Mrs. Lee Tower Mrs. John Orr Mrs. Maynard Lovell Miss Oenevieve Albertson Miss Josephine Erwin Miss Mary In ties Miss Alice Russell Mrs. Frank Paul Mrs. It. I). Curry Miss Mary Baker Mrs. Edna Schenk Moe Mrs. Carl Taylor Mrs. J. C. Faller 3CHINOOK 1927 'Football Season Montana State Normal College opened its fourth annual intercollegiate football season with only three of the 1926 men back in the line-up; Wallace Scott. “Dub” Emerson, and Ambrose Hennebcrry. Coach O. K. Moe called an early meeting of prospective football men, and the season’s practice was soon under way. A new line was built, a back field selected and trained, for a very hard season's schedule lay ahead of the Bulldogs. Twenty men reported, and Coach Moe began the practice of the fundamentals. The line centered about Esmond Riberdy of University “Frosh” fame and the back field around Captain-elect “Chuck" Davis, a member of Butte’s 1924 championship team. Riberdy was flanked by a few experienced men. but for the most part the line was in need of the fundamentals. Leonard Nelson and Carl Baldwin each gained a regular position on the wings. Lightfoot of Whitehall and Murray of Bear Creek established themselves as guards. Watts, G. Gass and L. Gass, Dunn, and Kerr worked as tackles. In the back field with Davis at fullback. Emerson at quarter, Fowcll, Mosier. Scott, and Henneberrv at halves, the combination was complete. Other men on the team deserving much credit were Knudson, Hollingsworth. Robertson, Lang. Moore, Moyer and Wyatt. Guy lister served for the season as Bulldog manager. The epidemic of smallpox which visited the Normal campus early in the season kept five valuable men out of practice for three weeks and left the team working under a handicap which greatly hindered its getting into the season’s form. Lightfoot sustained a fractured shoulder in a scrimmage against the Dillon high school, and his absence was greatly felt in the last game of the season against Intermountain Union College. Playing a hard schedule, suffering from the "Jinx" of injury and the breaks of the game, the Bulldogs fought their way through a ( } —93—season without a single victory. Yet, we must give them due credit for the manner in which they played the game. Here and .here the games were illuminated by flashes of brilliant team-plav and sacrifice upon the part of the men. The outlook for a better 1928 team under Coach Moe tends to be a reality as many of the strongest men will again be with the Bulldogs in the coming season. Fourteen men won the “M.” IJutte School of Mines.............................. 20 Normal ............................................ 0 October 1. 1927. The first Bulldog defeat came at the hands of the “Ore-diggers" from the Butte School of Mines. This game drew the largest crowd of the season on the home field. The Normal eleven was forced to play a defensive game throughout, and here the line was tested under fire. In comparison the line played well against the heavier and more experienced Miners. Doheney led the victors. Here the "Jinx” first asserted itself against the Teachers. Davis, Bulldog fullback, sus- 3CHINOOK tained a wrenched neck, and “Dub" Emerson, quarterback, was taken from the same, injured. Weak points in defense, offense, and tlie execution of plays were apparent, but these were corrected before the game with Weber College, which followed. Weber College, Utah .............................. 19 Normal ............................................ October 22, 1927. The Normal eleven entered the Weber game with a much improved line. Weber failed to gain a great deal of yardage through it and was forced to resort to end runs and deceptive plays. Weber’s first score came when Mosier, left half, tumbled when taekled on a wide end run. The play was not covered well, and a Weber back scooped up the ball for a fifteen yard run and a touchdown. Weber scored its second touchdown on a fake play on the out-of-bounds rule. The play failed to work a second time. The third tally came by straight football through the Bulldog line in a moment of weakness; the victors were successful in a try-for-goal once out of the three times 95—attempted. For three quarters the Weber line withstood the attack of the Teachers, but in the final period it weakened, and at the close of the game the Normal eleven was on a march toward the Weber goal. The single score for the Bulldogs came when Fowell, replacing Mosier at left half, recovered an advanced fumbled punt and raced twenty yards for a touchdown. The "Jinx’ again; and Emerson, after a brave fight, was removed on account of injuries. Mount Saint Charles ............................. 153 Normal ............................................ 0 October 28, 1027. The trip to Helena was made by automobile, and the Bulldogs were completely overwhelmed by what is conceded as Montana’s best 1927 college team which was much heavier and faster than the Normal eleven, and throughout the game tore the Bulldog line to pieces and smothered plays in the back field before they were well under way. However, the men met the situation like true sports and prepared for the big game with Rexburg. —06—c CHINOOK ___1'._( ■ Kicks College ................................... 18 Normal •; November 5, 11 27. What should have been a victory was reversed into defeat when the Bulldogs failed to realize their power in the air against Kicks. The teams were evenly matched, with the Normal excelling in passes. Kicks scored first on a fumbled punt on the five yard line. According to the new rules it should have been their ball at the point of recovery. Kicks scored their second touchdown by an end run from punt formation. Captain Lindquist completed the total in the third quarter, none of the extra points being converted. The third quarter was scoreless, and both teams resorted to punting for protection. “Chuck” Davis in the final quarter gave as pretty an exhibition as has ever been seen on the local field when he took the ball almost the length of the field by the forward pass route and then tore through the Ricks line for a touchdown. Davis, Riberdy, and Scott starred for the Bulldogs. Intermountain Union College ..................... 12 Normal 6 November 12, 1927. On account of bad weather and roads the Bulldogs had to travel by rail to Helena to play their game with Intermountain. The game was played on an ice-bound field which proved the undoing for the scoring machine of the Bulldogs. In this game the line had suffered the loss of Lightfoot at guard position, and Kerr at tackle. Watts was suffering with a badly bruised shoulder and was taken from the game in the first half. The first score came when an Intermountain hack returned a punt and placed the ball within scoring distance. Snow crashed through center hut missed the try-for-goal. The second touchdown was gained by means of the forward pass after an Intermountain march of twenty-five yards. The Bulldogs’ only marker came after an offensive drive which placed the pigskin on Intermountain’s twenty yard line, and Davis passed to Emerson who had neatly evaded the Intermountain hacks. Throughout this period the Normal eleven outplayed the opponents in both offense and defense. Emerson again suffered injuries and was forced out of the play. In the closing minutes of play Davis intercepted a long pass and raced off for what seemed to be the lucky break. But the ice-bound field crushed the hopes of the team mates as “Chuck” slipped, in reversing the field, and slid out of bounds. 1928 —97—( CHINOOK 1928 ‘Basketball Season Normal ...... Kicks College January 6, 1928. In the first game of the 192S basketball season the Bulldogs went down to defeat before the fast Kicks College five. The Normal squad played hard but was unable to cope with the more experienced team from Idaho. The game started fast from the tip-off. and Kicks counted on the first play. Murray came back with a foul shot, and a few seconds later sank a neat basket from the corner. This placed the Bulldogs in the lead for a time, but the Kicks team found their stride and worked like a machine for the rest of the half. The half ended 32-3 in favor of Kicks. The Bulldogs came back in the second half to hold the visitors to 13 points while counting 5 for themselves. The Normal's defense proved a problem for the Idaho men. The fight with which the Bulldogs came back in the second half of a losing game was for the loyal boosters some consolation. Normal Mines January 14. 192S. An improved Normal five played the Miners a 30-24 tilt. The game was fast and rough and as a result many fouls were made, and two men were removed from the game. The giant Matlock at guard position was a pillar of strength in the Mines’ defense, and Kelly, the fast little forward, was high point man for his team with ten points. Lang starred for the Normal with ten points. Powell and G. Gass gave a clever exhibition of guarding for the Bulldogs while Murray and Taylor showed up well on the floor work. -98-I CHINOOK % 0 If Montana State College....... 81 Normal ..................... 23 January 18, 1928. The Montana State College "Bobcats” gave the fans of Dillon as fine an exhibition of basketball technique as has ever been seen on the home floor when they played the Bulldogs here on January 18. ‘‘Ott” Romney started his first team, and at the end of the first half they had counted 56 against the Normal’s 12. In the second half the second team rolled up 25 more.points. Both teams showed excellent team work. The Bulldogs were kept to long shots by the guarding of their famous visitors. Lang was by far the star of the Bulldog team. Powell worked well at guard, and Taylor, Murray, and Robertson played real basketball for the Normal. The students of Montana State College and the people of Montana are proud of the great Bobcat team which has dominated basketball for the past two years. We arc proud of them, proud of their sportsmanship, their style, and the manner in which they play the game. They have brought glory to Montana sports and given the Universities, Colleges, and Schools of Montana something of which to be proud. Southern Branch University of Idaho................ 26 Normal .... 26 January 26, 1928. The first game, played with the University of Idaho, Southern Branch, was dropped by a one-point margin. The game was exceedingly close throughout, and the winner was In doubt until the final gun. Lang was high point man for the Normal with eight points to his credit. Taylor was second high point man with six. f 6 101 Weber College ............ 34 Normal 26 January 27, 1928. In the game with Weber College, Utah, the Bulldogs put up a good battle and lost only through the greater height and superior playing of the Weber center. The Normal obtained an early lead and kept it until the end of the first quarter. In the second period the Weber team ran up a lead of eight points. During the latter part of the game the teams battled 1928 —99—CHINOOK t 0 n on even terms, each team scoring eleven points. Lang and Taylor divided honors in this game: both scored eight points. The Bulldogs were especially impressed with the sportsmanlike treatment they received from the Weber team while in Ogden. Ricks College .............. 44 Normal ................... 16 January 28, 192S. b Weakened hv their long and strenuous trip, the Bulldogs were routed by the fast Ricks 3 College team at Rexburg, Idaho. •' The Normalites put up a good fight hut were simply unable to cope with the more experienced and larger team from Rexburg. The loss of Taylor and Davis from the game by injuries was another factor in the defeat. Taylor came through in this game with six points, and Robertson with five. Southern Branch University of Idaho................ 26 Normal ............................................ 23 February 2. 1928. The Bulldogs started their return game with the Tigers from Idaho a hit over-confident, and with revenge in their hearts for the one-point defeat of a week before. The game was very slow. Not until Lang and Murray started a rally in the last few minutes of the first half did the Normal players find their stride and start to play real basketball. This spurt of team work and shooting placed the Bulldogs in the lead for the half. In the second half the vis- itors came from behind and equalled the score, then took the lead. The rally, which started the Normalites on what seemed a victory in the first half, failed to he repeated In the last period. The Tigers believed in the old adage, “Possession is nine-tenths of the law,” for they played a stalling type of game most of the time. In the last few seconds. the Tigers crushed the hopes of the fans by dropping in a basket or two, through clever team work, and clncheu the score In the game Taylor was shifted to forward and Murray -100- CHINOOK to center. Powell played a good consistent game at guard, and Lang played the usual shifty, clever game at forward but with much tough luck. Mines ............................................ 40 Normal College ................................... IS February 1«. 1928. The Bulldogs of Montana Slate Normal College lost their return game with the Butte School of Mines to the tune of 10-18. The game was played at Butte. The Miners started fast in the first few minutes for an 8-1 lead and then hit a surprising slump while the Bulldogs climbed to the short end of a 9-7 score. The Miners led by 13-7 at the end of the first half. In the second half the Miners scored 16 points before the visitors could score a point. Four more baskets, for a 28-point lead at 37-8, gave the Miners' reserves a chance to get into action. From then on the Bulldogs had the edge, and the play was rough. Tim Dennehy set the pace for the Miners with eighteen points, and Kelly followed with eleven points. Lang held scoring honors for the Normal team with ten points to his credit. Montana State Normal ............................. 45 Kastern Montana Normal ........................... 10 February 23, 1928. The Montana State Normal Bulldogs closed their season with a victory when they defeated the Kastern Montana Normal quint with a score of 45-10. The Jinx that had pursued the Bulldogs throughout the year failed to visit the Normal gym. and the Bulldogs had their day. The game was fast throughout, and the score by no means indicates the fight put up by the visitors. During the first period the Bulldogs were unable to hit the basket. At last Lang found his shooting eye. and assisted by Murray and Robertson, succeeded in rolling up a score of 23-6 at the half. Lang was distinctly the star of the evening. He rolled in baskets from every angle of the floor to give himself a total of twenty-six points at the final whistle. Foot starred for Billings with six points. —101—CHINOOK 1927 Crack Season What proved to be M. S. N. C.’s greatest track season began when Coach Bruce Hollister issued his call for track men early in the spring of 1927. With only two experienced men on the squad he built up a track team worthy of the name. Taylor, veteran of 1926, and the Normal’s high point man, was the nucleus upon which the team was built. In the Mines’ meet he ran up 24 points. Miller proved to be the best distance runner produced by the school. Thompson and Scott were point-getters in the dashes, each capturing 12 points. The climax of the 1927 track season ■was the dual meet with the Butte School of Mines. May 20 and 21. The meet was held in Dillon on a rain-soaked field, but the Bulldogs came through and held the Miners down to one first place. Wells winning the half-mile. Some good records were made in spite of the stormy weather and slow track. Snow and rain fell during the entire meet. Wells was star for the Butte squad and Taylor and Miller for the Teachers. Following are the events, the Mines men being indicated: 220-yard dash—Miller, first; Scott, second. Time—:26.3. 880-yard run—Wells (Mines), first; Eggebrecht, second. Time—2:22. Javelin throw—Taylor, first; Wells (Mines), second. Distance—117 ft. 6 in. Mile run—Brown, first; Wells (Mines), second. Time—5:38. High hurdles—Taylor, first; Robertson, second. Time—: 19.4. Relay—Won by Normal team, consisting of Scott, Eggebrecht, Thompson, and Miller. Time—4:20. High jump—Taylor, first; Roy (Mines), second. Height—5 ft. 6 in. 100-yard dash—Scott, first; Thompson, second. Time—:10%. Broad jump—McDermond, first; Brown, second. Distance—IS ft. 6 in. Low hurdles—Taylor, first; McDermond, second. Time—:32. Discus throw—Ribcrdy, first; Taylor, second. Distance—103 ft. 10 in. 440-vard dash—Miller, first; Denehy (Mines), second. Time—:60. In the cross country run held the next day, 40 points were made by the Normal and 15 by the Mines. The Normal took the first four places. Miller was first, his time being 15 minutes and 56 seconds, which was one minute slower than his previous record. Twenty men started and the first ten to finish placed as follows: Miller, Normal, first; Eggebrecht. Normal, second; Brown. Normal, third; Murray. Normal, fourth; Boyce. Mines, fifth; Wells, Mines, sixth; Kimball. Normal, seventh; Healy. Mines, eighth; Taylor, Normal, ninth; Mayo. Mines, tenth. Montana State Normal College made 87 points to the Mines’ 22 in this dual meet. -102—Swimming The swimming meet has been changed from the fall quarter to the spring quarter in order to make it possible for Juniors who do not know how to swim when they enter the Normal to try out for the team, it is hoped that with this change the Juniors will participate to such an extent that the College may have a swimming tournament that will he as successful as the one held the fall quarter of 1920. (Doderate Sports A Moderate Sports class was introduced in the winter quarter, and the games played were horse shoes, handball, shuffle-hoard, Philadelphia kick, ball, and German hat ball. An elimination tournament was held in horse shoes, handball, and shuffle-hoard, and the winners and runners-up received twenty-five W. A. A. points. Color teams were chosen in Philadelphia kick ball and German bat ball. Each one who played in either game received twenty-five points for W. A. A. tennis One of the popular spring sports at Montana State Normal College is tennis, a game which is usually new to many students. Regardless of their inexperience, many good players are developed for tennis teams. A class elimination tournament was held last spring with Ruth Hergquist winning for the Juniors and Hope Carter for the Seniors. The Junior-Senior singles final was an evenly matched game. The first set 6-3 was an easy victory for the Junior player, and the second was a hard fought deuce set which ended 9-7, also in favor of the Junior. Thus Ruth Hergquist won the tennis championship for herself and her class. Uolley ‘Ball Volley ball occupied its usual prominent place In women’s athletics. Before the inter-class tournament, an inter-dormitory tournament was held. This gave every girl who desired to play a chance to take part. “Middle” won the tournament. In the inter-class tournament the Seniors won two of the three games in the series from the Juniors who, as usual, put up a hard fight for the championship. The first game, which the Seniors won 2-0, was by far the easiest of the series. The loss of the first game seemed to put more fight into the Junior team, and they defeated the Seniors in the second game 2-1. The final game proved to he the most difficult, for the Seniors had to fight continually to defeat the enthusiastic Junior team 2-1. Both teams fought hard, and the crowd was kept in suspense until the final whistle which declared the Senior team champions in 1927 volley ball. Lineup Senior •Ruth Bergquist Eleanor Fellows Winniefred Hoffman Isabella O’Ckmnor •Edith Tweedy Mary Thomas Elizabeth Sanderson •Nola Welch •Dorothea Grill, Mgr. Junior Lois Coleman Beatrice Graven Ruby Hardin •Alvina Lee Mary Mensing Harriet Rome Edna Sather •Sylvia Warren •Agnes Harrington, Manager Those starred made the varsity team. —104—{{CHINOOK h ______ ‘Baseball Among the women at the Normal College in 1927 were many enthusiastic baseball players. Practices were held in the gymnasium until there was favorable weather. Near the middle of the season a baseball team was chosen which played the training school team. For several years the Normal team had been defeated, but this year they had luck and downed the training school girls in two successive games. During the Junior-Senior tournament the Juniors fought hard but were unable to defeat the sturdy Senior team which won the championship by taking two games from the Juniors. Cineup Senior Team •Fisa Soderstrom. (Manager) ♦Marie Larson •Olliemay Shy •Fanny Brady Julia Connell •Leah Westerman Gladys Ledbetter •Aileen Murphy •Catherine Harrington Gretchen Gay hart Junior Team •Edith Tweedy, (Manager) LaFrances McCoy Elizabeth Colbenson Violet Morse Mildred Johnson Ruby Nelson Winniefred Hoffman •Ruth Bergquist Louise Luding Those starred made the varsity team. CHINOOK IDomen s ‘Basketball Basketball is the most exciting sport of the whole year because the Normal College has so many expert players. This year an inter-dormitory tournament with six teams represented was held with the team from third floor “New" victorious. Class teams were chosen near the end of the winter quarter, and the first inter-class game was played as a preliminary to the boys’ game with the Eastern Montana Normal School. The teams were evenly matched, and it was anyone's game until the final whistle blew, declaring the Seniors winners 18-17. The second game was a walkaway for the Juniors, 24-111. The third game proved to be a repetition of the first game and ended 15-16. During the extra three-minute period of play the Juniors sank their winning basket, taking the game 17-15 and so winning the basket ba 11 Cham pionsh i p. The Junior second team defeated the Senior second team in two games, thereby winning the second team championship. Tirst Ueam Cine- Seniors up Juniors •Olliemay (Happy) Shy (Captain) Frances Lee (Manager) Ruth Bergquist •Edith Tweedy Dorothea Grill ♦Winniefred Hoffman Lois Chamberlain (Captain) •Mildred Johnson (Manager) •Irene Lincoln Mary Mensing Isabel Stephens •Elizabeth Lorcnson Substitutes Meta Bartels Alvina Lee Elizabeth Lowney Jennette Murray Mary Mullins Meriwyn McKinney Those starred made the varsity team. Second Seniors Grace Goodman (Captain) LaFrances McCoy Dorothy Voerge Nola Welch Elizabeth Sanderson Maybelle Strunk Margaret Johnson Elizabeth Williams Ueam £ine-up Juniors Harriet Rome (Captain) Virginia Nelson Gretchen Cartwright Veronica Harrington Helen Kilburn Imogene Welch Laura North Evelyn LaCasse ‘J-locketj Hockey made its first appearance at M. S. X. C. in 1927. Since it was a new sport for all, the Juniors had the same opportunity to develop a winning team as the Seniors. The hockey equipment was purchased by the W. A. A. The Seniors defeated the Juniors in the first match 5-0. The fast forward line of the Seniors kept the ball in the Junior territory most of the time, and only the quick work of the Junior full backs kept their opponents from running up the score. The second game was played Thanksgiving morning in a snow storm on a slippery field which made playing difficult. The game was even during the first half which ended 2-2, but the Seniors came back in the second half and caged five more points, making the final score 7-2 in favor of the Seniors, who were thus made champions in the inter-class hockey tournament. —107—CHINOOK ‘Hocketj £tneup Seniors •Meta Bartels (Mgr.) Martha Allen •Fanny Brady (Capt.) •Ruth Bergquist Vivian Eastridge Alyco Hines Gwyneth Jones lone Kelsey •Frances Leo Viola Martin Juniors Meriwyn McKinney (Manager) •r ois Coleman (Capt.) •Lois Chamberlain Alice Cline Margaret Alexander Florence Copeland •Frances Forgy •Veronica Harrington •Evelyn Lacasse Leone McCoysociety  CHINOOK T}he Carnival Queen As the evening of the Booster Club Carnival drew near, excitement over the election of the carnival queen became intense. The nominees were’ Frances Burks. Helen Scallon. Mary Harrington and Annette Chellis. The competition was so close that the results of the election were not known until the curtain rose, and Annette Chellis. attended by Frances Burks, Helen Scallon. and Mary Harrington, ascended the throne and was crowned queen of the Booster Club Carnival of 1928. The crowning of the queen was a fitting climax to the varied and beautiful acts of the carnival. The throne with a background of flowered scenery enhanced the pretty dresses of the queen and her attendants. The queen was charming as she ascended the throne amid the applause of a delighted audience.Uhe Carnival A carnival appears to be the name of an entertainment that takes one's money and leaves him nothing, but the Booster Club Carnival was distinctive in that it was not that kind. It was a most successful carnival. both in the way of entertainment and finance. Each organization in the school was represented in an act for the vaudeville. The acting equaled the best performances at a high class theater. It was the spirit and co-operation of each organization that made the Carnival such a decided success. The special features were a Showboat act, portrayal of the classroom of 1980, The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi, the Passion Show, a scene under the sea, the athletics of 1900 and 1928, A Lady Loses Her Hoop, Under the Moon, and the evolution of dancing. The Chanticleer Club added much to the Carnival by their extra Montanomal. At the close of the program the Queen was crowned. By vote of the audience the Glee Club received the prize for the best act of the evening.Colonial ‘Ball The first Colonial dance ever given at the Montana State Normal College was held the night of February 11. The recreation hall was appropriately decorated with flags. The dance was invitational, and many guests enjoyed the excellent music, which was furnished by the Baxter-Tonrey orchestra, and the novelty of a Colonial ball. The outstanding feature of the dance was the Minuet, danced by eight couples, wearing powdered wigs and charming colonial costumes. It seemed as if the hands of time had been turned back a century or more as one gazed upon the graceful dancers. Those taking part were: Geraldine Morgan Geraldine Smith Elizabeth Lowney Marie Nelson Ruth Linderman Olliemay Shy Lois Wagner Marjorie Montgomery Magdalena Romain Florence Franklin Virginia Laughlin Katherine Flynn Agnes Harrington Veronica Harrington Isabel Stephens Isabella O’Connor —111—CHINOOK Ghe Gargoyle ‘Banquet The Gargoyle banquet given in the fall quarter conveyed to all those present the spirit of the Gargoyles. This spirit was expressed throughout the program by the theme of the toasts. The names of plays being produced on Broadway were used as titles. “The Silver Cord,” which binds the Gargoyles into a bond of fellowship both in the present and in the past, was the introductory toast by the toastmistress, Miss Carson. Edith Tweedy welcomed the new pledges with a toast, “Behold This Dreamer.” It was a very appropriate title for the president who had visions of the future success of the club. “The Road to Rome” meant a great deal to the pledges as Esther Lovell in a toast acknowledged for them their intentions of accomplishing great deeds for the Gargoyles. From dreams to “Bare Facts” was a decided transition. Nettie Porter, a charter member of the Gargoyles, reviewed, much to the pleasure of each member, the early struggles of the dramatic society. Wherever there is gaiety there is jesting. Charles Davis enlightened those assembled as to the value of “Ink” in making a mark in life. The “Nineteenth Hole,” something to strive for, a toast by Mr. Clark, was an inspiration to every member. A touch of regret entered in, though mirth seemed to captivate all. “Interference,” a toast of farewell given by Norma Simons, brought the realization of the loss of some leading Gargoyles. “And So to Bed,” spoken by Miss Sands, brought to a close the drama of life portrayed at this Gargoyle banquet. -112- CHINOOK Co-Bd ‘Prom “Side by Side” each lovely lady and sleek-haired escort entered the recreation hall. From somewhere far off beyond the crowd came the strains of music as the couples formed in line for the grand march. Then “On with the Dance”— the first one to Dean Smith, then “To our Partners.” During the favor dances little black canes tied with red ribbons were handed to the “gentlemen” and tiny red parasols to the ladies. After the favor dance everyone tried, with varying degrees of success, to dance the good old-fashioned rye waltz. Mellow lights, good music, delicious punch, gaiety, favors, novel dances—all these helped make this year’s Co-ed Prom a huge success, and, when twelve o’clock came, the feelings of all were expressed in the name of the last dance —“Tired But Happy.’’ TC. 2 . Tl. Dance The Kappa Zeta Nu pledge dance was held in the Guild Hall on November 23. This dance was given in honor of the twenty-four pledges of the fall quarter. The girls received French dolls as favors. Punch was served during the evening, and excellent music was furnished by the Baxter-Tonrey orchestra. A formal dance was also given in honor of the pledges of the spring quarter. This was given in the recreation hall. These dances were among the most enjoyable of the social functions of the year.CCHINOOK. _________ 10. A. A. CDixer The W. A. A. started the year right by showing the new Juniors a good time at the Mixer. The aim of the party was to arouse interest in the W. A. A. as well as to have a regular good time. Emblems, numerals, and “M's” were won by the members to distinguish them from the other students. Pep songs and speeches in the dining room were used as a means of instructing the Juniors in the requirements for membership. Games were so lively, dances so peppy, and the lunch in the dining room so enjoyable that many a Junior left the party firmly resolving to become a member of the W. A. A. £;he ‘Kid ‘Party The Y. VV. C. A. is composed of very dignified members, but all this dignity was lost when they put on “kid” clothes October 14 for the annual kid part}". All sorts of games which bring back fond memories, such as farmer-in-the-dell and skip tag. were played. Many vocal cords were tried out by the crying contest. Impromptu speeches were given on “The First Time I Was Spanked.” The evening was made complete by ice-cream and lollypops. Annual ‘Reception According to custom the annual reception was held early in the fall quarter this year so that everyone might “get acquainted.” All of the new students were presented to the faculty members. After the formal reception, the guests enjoyed a program and dancing, in the recreation hall. inCHINOOK Calendar 1927-1928 Pall Quarter September 12. Registration; another big rush on. 13. Work begins and we “size up” our teachers. “Frat” breaks the ice and holds a meeting. 14. New students greatly frightened by loud shrieks from the auditorium. Discovered— Glee Club try-outs. 15. Gargoyles make plans for the year. 16. College reception; we all get acquainted. 17. Faculty nurses sore arms from too much hand-shaking. 19. The Chinook whistles into existence. 20. “Come and get your pajamas on. Tell the Dean you won’t be long!” Rings through the halls of the dormitory as the party given by old dorm girls for the new girls assembles in the “Rec” hall. 20-21. Gargoyle try-outs. 21. “Go” at Dillmont Park; we all go. 23. W. A. A. Mixer; good time for all. 26. Last but not least the K. Z. N.’s hold first meeting. 27. Senior and Junior political campaigns; Seniors need time to meditate before election. 30. Pep rally! Rah! Rah! Atwater Kent Vocal Contest. October 1. Rallv brings crowd; Normal loses to the “Miners” 20-0. 2. Chinook art contest begins; talent! You would be surprised! —115—CHINOOK 10. Student teachers enjoy vacation; Frank Moyer is the goat. 13. More darn fun! Ballot box stuffed and everything; Bulldog chosen as the mascot. Y. W. C. A.’s revert to past and become realistic examples at Kid Party. 18. Gargoyle make-up demonstration; no, they did not have a quarrel! 21-22. “Lilies of the Field” presented by the Moroni Olsen Players. 22. Bulldogs vs. Weber; Normal jinx again triumphs. 23. W. A. A. initiation begins; aren’t you glad it isn’t 1900 again? 25. Gargoyles give the “Purple Dream” for Assembly; if only our dreams would come true! 29. Ghosts walk, witches dance, perilous pathway to “Rec” hall daunts the faint-hearted; a ripping good time for everyone at the Hallowe’en party. 31. Vacation is over for student teachers; lesson plans are again the chief topic of conversation. —116— CHINOOK November 3-4-5. Chinook drive; “Come and buy! Come and buy!” They did. 4. Volley ball games. Middle wins from New, 2-0. Old wins from Town, 2-0. 5. The Dean entertains at the first house dance of the year. 6. Another defeat for our Bulldogs; Normal vs. Ricks; score 18-6. 10. Junior-Senior hockey game; 5-0; Rah! for the Seniors! 12. Bulldogs vs. intermountain; 12-6; too bad! 15. Who is this Patsy person we hear the Gargoyles talking so much about? 18. Dillon is depopulated as everyone with the price goes to Butte for the football classic between the Bobcats and the Grizzlies. Let’s see! What was the scandal about Miss Sands and Martha? 18-19. Fenwick Newell and assisting artists present a pleasing program. 23. K. Z. N. Pledge dance. 24. Seniors again victorious in hockey; 7-2. 25. Gargoyle initiation banquet at the Country Inn. 28. Middle dorm wins volley ball tourney. 30. What do you know? “M” Club and W. A. A. pass letter resolution. Commencement. lOinter Quarter December 2. Glee Club Concert; witnessed by many. 5. We all sign up for another quarter of work. 6. Glee Club leaves for Sheridan, Virginia City and Whitehall, where they present their program. 1928  CHINOOK 9. The Patsy; another one of the Gargoyle productions. Good—the usual thing! Glee Club returns with many experiences to relate. 10. “M” Club tournament. 12. Glee Club again leaves on trip to central Montana cities. 13. We all enjoy the Christmas program at Assembly. 16. Goodbye M. S. N. C., and Merry Christmas! January 3. We are all back again, tired but happy. 6. W. A. A. initiation; fun for spectators, but for pledges—?? Ricks defeats Bulldogs in first contest of the season—45-8. 7. Invitational dance at “Rec” hall. 9. Chanticleer Club is organized by the journalism class. 11. Everyone is so busy and so mysterious; what can it mean? Oh, the Booster Club Carnival, of course! 13. Unlucky Friday for Bulldogs; 30-24 in favor of Miners. Big surprise; pajama party at the “Rec” hall. 18. Bulldogs downed by Bobcats in an 81-23 clash. 21. Booster Club Carnival! Fun, fun, fun for everyone! 28. Co-ed Prom; where did all the “men” come from? 26-27-28. Bulldogs travel to Idaho and Utah, but jinx is in pursuit, and they come home defeated.CHINOOK February 2. Southern Branch University of Idaho defeats Bulldogs 26-23; so close, but yet so far! 3. “M” Club dance; did we enjoy it? I’ll say so. 4. Interesting talk entitled Seventeen Years of Thrills in South America given by Dr. G. Whitfield Ray. 10. Gargoyles present three one-act plays: Rich Man, Poor Man; The Weathervane Elopes; and The End of the Trail. W. A. A. tournament begins with “Old” and “Middle” playing. 11. Colonial Dance. We’d like another affair. 16. Again the Bulldogs are defeated by the Mines, 40-18. Third floor “New” wins the W. A. A. tournament; hurrah! 17. John B. Ratto, impersonator, presents a very instructive as well as pleasing program. 21. Jazz and Minuet and Pierre Patelin presented by dramatic production class. Bulldogs defeat the Eastern Montana Normal School, 23-6; rah, rah, rah, TEAM! 23-24-25. Mining District Basketball Tournament held at College gym; vacation proclaimed for Friday afternoon. 2. M. S. N. C. debating team wins 2-1 from the Eastern Montana Normal School. 3. Mines and M. S. N. C. debate; M. S. N. C. is again victorious. 4. Senior dinner. March 1928 —119—CHINOOK 7. Graduation; congratulations, Seniors! 8-9. Quarterly exams—how pleasant! 10. Rig sigh of relief; another quarter ended! Spring Quarter March 12. Registration. 16. Debate between M. S. N. C. and State College. 23. “Once in a Blue Moon”—the operetta. 25. Operetta cast enjoys a breakfast. 28. Strickland Gilliland entertains students. April 5. Piano recital by the students of Mr. Mc-Fadden. K. Z. N. meeting. 7. Another informal dance at the “Rec” hall. 9. Full house! “Candida” is presented by the Moroni Olsen Players. 18. Men’s handball tournament. 25. Chanticleer Club gives banquet for new pledges. 27. Track meet; Normal vs. Beaverhead County High School. 28. Miss Smith gives informal dance. May 1. Children’s plays given at assembly; we all enjoyed them. 5. Stunt Movie Frolic (all girls; one of those suffragette affairs). 9. “M” day; necks blistered; very tired, but happy.CHINOOK 12. “M” Club dance; leading dance of the spring quarter—x ref. K. Z. N. 15. Music department has charge of assembly; spring has a rival. 17. Recital; a rare performance. 19. Matinee dance for high school girls; they treat their rivals considerately. Water Carnival; the plunge room resounds with shouts of shy mermaids. 22. May Fete; new queen and bleachers stand the rush. 25. W. A. A. banquet; nuff said. 26. K. Z. N. dance; rivals the “M” Club affair. 27. Baccalaureate Sermon and Senior dinner; time is getting short. 28. Senior Play; “Alice-sit-by-the-f ire”; another success to the succession. 28. Gargoyle housewarming after the play; they talk it over. 29. Gargoyle banquet; one of those filling affairs. 30. Tea for Seniors’ visitors and faculty; just a friendly gathering. Senior sing; we join in right heartily. Pow Wow; big medicine; Juniors agree to carry on. Candle light procession; very beautiful and inspiring; Juniors are greatly impressed. 31. Commencement; students at M. S. N. C. finish another successful and happy year. —121 —Che Senior ‘Play “Alice-Sit-by-the-Fire,” the Senior play, a three-act comedy by J. M. Barrie, was given on Monday evening. May 28, at the Normal College auditorium at 8:30. There was one performance only, because of the many activities of commencement week, although in the past it had been customary to give the Senior play on two successive nights. The play is laid in England, while the plot centers around the two girls, Amy and Ginevra, who have just seen their first plays and are deeply impressed by the “eternal triangle” of life. Cast of Characters Alice, the mother ......................................Mary Mullins Amy, the seventeen year old daughter.................Vivian East ridge Ginevra, her chum................................Lona Lee Woolverton The nurse ...........................................Mary Lee Tower The maid ................................................Frances Lee Colonel Gray, the father......................................William Chance Steve, an attractive young man............ ..........Kenneth Fowell Cosmo, the young son.................................Walter Brundage Richardson, Steve's servant.....................................Edith Tweedy —122—I CHINOOK. Miss Sands (in Speech class): “You are to pretend you are angry.” Alden Mast: “Get out of here, you cur (Kerr)!” Did Mrs. Lorensen scold Bessie for arriving home late with the milkman? No, she scolded the milkman for arriving late with the milk. E. Sanderson: “What a pity Joan uses so much powder and perfume since she married money. She used to be much nicer.” M. Strunk: “Yes, I knew her when she hadn’t a scent.” M. Bates: “Does your friend Helen drive that car all over now?” K. Sullivan: “You guessed it—sidewalk and all.” C. Flynn: “It doesn’t pay to be crooked.” E. LaCasse: “For instance?” C. Flynn: “Look at what happened to all the cork- screws and hairpins!” Peg Alexander: “You must be fond of automobiles.” Bill Tash: “What makes you think so?” Peg: “I heard you have a truck farm.” —123—I CHINOOK % Mother: “I don’t like to hear that my little boy is at the bottom of his class.” Bobby: ‘‘It isn’t my fault. The fellow that’s at the bottom is home sick.” D. L.: “Won’t you say something sweet?’ V. L.: “Applesauce!” Haverlandt: “Do you talk in your sleep?” Sterry: “No, my room-mate says I’m perfectly exas- perating—I only smile.” Dear Editor: What should I do when I am run down? Anxious. Dear Anxious: Take the license number. Father: “How is it that you have failed in every subject at school?” Bill Chance: “I had an absent-minded professor, and he forgot to pass me.’’ Mayme (telegraphing home): “In four weeks I have reduced my weight to half. How long shall I stay?” Dad (wiring back): “Another four weeks.” 124-CHINOOK Burnice Farrell: “But, darling, don’t you want to marry a man who is economical?” Rhetta Price: “Oh, I suppose so, but it’s awful being engaged to one.” Mr. Moe: “Can you give me an example of wasted energy ?” Morris Cole: “Yes, sir, telling a hair-raising story to a bald-headed man.” Vivian Eastridge: “Did you hear about Ruth’s teeth falling out while she was playing tennis?” Marian Benedict: “No, did she lose the set?” Inola Watson: “Tommy, if you had fifty cents, and you loaned your father thirty cents and your brother twenty cents, how many cents would you have?” Tommy: “I wouldn’t have any sense.” H. C.: “He can’t fight!” G. L.: “Can’t! Say, when he swings and misses, the other guy gets pneumonia!” Schoolma’am: “Emulate George Washington.” Dusky Lad (from'rear of room): heah de whole time.” “No’m, I’se beenCHINOOK A teacher was giving his class a lecture on charity. “Willie,” he said, “if I saw a boy beating a donkey, and stopped him from doing so, what virtue would I be showing?” Willie (promptly): “Brotherly love!” “Robert, you are incorrigible. I shall have to ask your father to come to see me.” “Better not do that, teacher; Pop’s a doctor and charges three dollars a visit.” Helen McLean: “That man irritates me!” Lena Beley: “Why?” Helen: “He knows so much that isn’t so—and he can prove all his statements.” M. Riley: “Isn’t that girl thin, though?” F. Gula: “Thin! She could take a bath in a fountain pen. Father: “Nelle, what time did that young man leave last night? I didn’t hear him say good night.” Nelle Porter: “No, father. He doesn’t say it.” D. Murray: “Do you like Kipling?” E. Mallette: “How do you dance it?” w— 1928 —126—f CHINOOK. Crimes the Law Sanctions Killing time. Hanging pictures. Stealing bases. Shooting the chutes. Choking off a speaker. Running over a new song. Smothering a laugh. Setting fire to a heart. Knifing a performance. Murdering the English language. Dean Smith: “Why are you fooling so long with that clock, Marjorie?” M. Laughlin: “I’m just cleaning its hands.” Dean Smith: “Well, just wipe them. You needn’t manicure them.” Rubes L. Wagner: “I don’t see Otto with that pretty country girl any more.” M. Anderson: “No, he took her to an art gallery, and said the pictures looked like the work of Reubens.” Leap Year E. Cassidy: “Do you think a woman should ever pro- pose?” Gappy: “Not until she is reasonably sure a man won’t.” —127—CHINOOK A. Lee: “He stole a kiss from me!” Ella Cole: “That was only petty larceny.’ A. Lee: “No, it was grand!” Pat O’Connor: “I was in a most embarrassing position this morning.” Ruth Bergquist: “How’s that?” Pat: “I had to rescue a man from drowning when he was trying to teach me how to swim.” Frankie Lee: “So you are one of a pair of twins. Are you the right one or the left one?” Morris Cole: “That all depends on you, dear.” M. Clemow: “Dub can certainly make wise cracks!” D. Grill: “Yes, he reads all the Fords in town.” B. Guillot: “Listen, 1 want ‘The Life of Julius Caesar’.” K. Sullivan: “Yes, and when you get it—you’ll sit in the library and study the ‘Character of “Swede” Nelson’.” Dean Smith (breaking in on a big feed): “What does this mean?” Lenore Kampf: “We’re cramming for a Foods test tomorrow!” Mary Lee Tower: “Do you play ‘To the Rising Sun’?” Helen Ballard: “I play to Bill; he isn’t called that!”CCHI NOOK ________ Mosier: “Hollingsworth is taking up boxing in earnest now; they call him the cross-word puzzle boxer.” Lester: “How’s that?” Mosier: “He comes in the ring vertical and goes out horizontal.” Mr. Dull: “Donaldson learned to play the piano in no time.” J. Wall: “Yeah—I heard him playing it that way the other day.” Lady watching a baseball game: “Isn’t the pitcher an expert? He always hits their bats, no matter where they hold them.” Under Escort Mr. McBain: “Were you personally conducted on your tour?” Mr. Dougherty: “Yes, my wife went along.” Thrift Note Frank Lightfoot’s Policy: “Early to bed, early to rise, Keeps your room-mate from wearing your ties.” Yum Yum First Eskimo: “How did you like your Christmas tree?” Second Eskimo: “It was swell. Those were the best candles I ever ate.” $ —129—ALL IN A NORMAL LIFE" CHINOOK —132—-133—CHINOOK 7? Vl Ta. it! V CflU », t 4»' ¥ ft vv. « VM ■s,"‘r W « W v' VV . s»x Vi? 4 t«r; % ]fln i K • trr A ■ «q n 1928 —134——136—-137—138—-140—-141-I —142——143—CHINOOK Autograph f 1928 Ti —148—I —150—4 CHINOOK ‘Patronize Our Advertisers The merchants who have generously supported this publication have made this Chinook possible. The class of 1928 expresses its appreciation to the advertisers. Our Advertisers The following have, in a very real manner, helped to make this 1928 Chinook the book that it is. Their loyal support is certainly appreciated: D1LLOX Anderson Market ................................................ ISC Andrus Hotel ................................................... 192 Baldwin’s Millinery ............................................ 174 Barry Hopkins Garage ......................................... 158 Beaverhead Abstract Co.......................................... 192 Beaverhead Cleaning Works ...................................... 156 Beaverhead Lumber Company ...................................... 162 Beaverhead Motors .......................•...................... 188 Best. Dr. II. F. 173 Bimrose, I)r. F. H.............................................. 173 Bond Grocery ................................................... 188 Burfiend Drug ................................................. 175 Camel Inn ...................................................... 187 Cash Meat Market ............................................... 163 City Baking Company ............................................ 186 City Drug Company .............................................. 175 City Shoe Store ................................................ 163 College Grill .................................................. 187 Curry, Dr. R. D............................................... 173 Dart Hardware Company .......................................... 15S Dickey’s Cash Store ............................................ 180 Dillon Bottling Works 163 Dillon Clinic ... .............................................. 168 Dillon Examiner ................................................ 186 Dillon Furniture Store ......................................... 189 Dillon Implement Company ....................................... 1S6 Dillon Steam Laundry ........................................... 175 Electric Shop .................................................. 180 Dillon Steam Laundry ............................................. 175 Electric Shop .................................................... 180 —151— CHINOOK. Eliel Bros............................... Elliot’s Cash Store ..................... Fairchild Studio ........................ First National Bank ..................... Free, Dr. E. G........................... Gosman Drug Store ....................... Graeter Grocery ......................... Hartwig Theater ......................... Hazelbaker. Frank A...................... Huber Bros............................... Hughes and McCaleb ...................... Interstate Building and Loan Association. Japanese American Studio ................ Lovell's Barber Shop .................... Luebben, Thomas E........................ MeFadden Confectionery .................. McFarland, I)r. A. H..................... Men’s Store ............................. Montana Auto Company .................... Montana Mercantile Company .............. Montana State Normal College ............ Niblack. Chas. II........................ Normal Lunch Basket ..................... Penney. The .1. C. Company .............. Red Star Garage ......................... Romersa, Dr.............................. Square Deal Grocery ..................... Stamm, Albert ........................... Standard Lumber Company ................. State Bank of Dillon .................... Sugar Bowl Cafe ......................... Tattersall Variety Store ................ Taylor. Dr. Carl B....................... Terry’s ................................. Thomas Book Store ....................... Tribune Book Store ...................... Union Electric Company .................. Western Wholesale Company ............... White Cafe .............. y f------ ' 1928 159 188 172 161 174 164 192 162 189 158 158 170 165 187 168 165 174 187 164 191 155 156 171 168 170 174 159 160 160 169 180 157 160 171 171 163 189 180 156 —152—CHINOOK )} __________........... BUTTE Brophy’s .................................................... 1S5 liutte Business College ...................................... 15" Butte Electric Railway ...................................... 182 Butte Optical Company ....................................... I"9 Cliaquamegon Cafe ........................................... 1;,° Columbia Floral Company ................................. 185 Dreibelbis Music Store ....................................... 184 First National Bank .......................................... 178 Gamer’s Confectionery ........................................ 184 Gamer Shoe Store ............................................. I"3 Henningsen Co................................................ I 2 Iloenick’s Fur Company ...................................... 190 Hubert Shoe Company .......................................... 190 Jones Storage Company ....................................... 184 Leggat Hotel 18® Lockwood Hotel ............................................... 181 Ma ran’s ..................................................... 185 Metals Bank and Trust Company ............................... 176 Middleton Studio ............................................. 176 New York Cafe ................................................ 181 Paumie Dyers and Cleaners .................................... 184 Paxton-Rockefeller Drug Company .............................. 1"8 Photo Shop ................................•.................. 191 Sheets-Powell, Jewelers ...................................... 179 Shiner's Furniture Store .................................... 181 Shirley Clothing Store ....................................... 185 Simons, I.. Jeweler .......................................... 179 Symons Bobber Shop ........................................... 179 Symons Dry Goods Company ..................................... 18" Truzzolino Chili Parlor ...................................... 17" Ward Thompson Paper Company .................................. 186 Weinberg’s ................................................... 17" Wein’s Clothing Store ........................................ 166 Young. Fred P. 191 ST. PAUL, MINN. Buckbee-Mears Engraving Company .............................. 154 HELENA The Helena Independent .................................. 182BUCKBEE-MEARS COMPANY Designers and Engravers of SCHOOL ANNUALS We specialize in cuts for SCHOOL PUBLICATIONS "Our College Travel Department announces special Collegiate Tours to Europe, visiting England, Belgium. Holland. The Rhine. France —${$. .00 complete. Also tours to Honolulu, Alaska, South America, Mediterranean Cruises. around the world cruises. Accommodations on the best steamers afloat and stopping at excellent hotels." ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA —154 —State Hormal College of the University of CDontana High School graduates may well look upon teaching as a favorable field for a life career. Working conditions and salaries are improving. The demand for trained teachers has not been supplied in recent years; by no possibility can an adequate supply of teachers be trained in the near future. No one prepared to teach is without remunerative employment. Professionally trained teachers need not seek positions; they receive offers. Sure employment in a highly respected occupation with compensation in proportion to the training is the teacher’s prospect. The State Normal College of the University of Montana offers superior facilities for professional training. Its graduates are eagerly sought. If after the completion of the two year course a graduate wishes to teach, a position is waiting. If it is desired to continue in school, full credit for Normal College work is given in the University of Montana institutions or in universities not located in this state. In the usual four years of a college course a Normal diploma and a University degree may both be secured, no loss resulting from transfer of credits. For bulletins or information address The Registrar, Dillon, Montana. —155—DILLON’S GREATEST Ready-to-Wear Store takes this opportunity to thank the people of Southern Montana and the students of the Montana State Normal College for their patronage which has made our past year a great success. It is our aim to bring to you the best of merchandise, give to you the best of service, and always try to please. We extend to you a cordial invitation to visit our store when in Dillon. Chas. H. Niblack Highest Quality Lowest Price Prances Feeney: "What were Webster’s last words?" Alice Scalabrin: "Zymosis, zymotic, zymurgy.” Beaverhead White Cleaning Cafe Works Known for Service __ Special Hates for Students Cleaning—Pressing All Work Guaranteed Open Day and Night E. P. SILL, Proprietor ROY FORRESTER, Prop. Dillon, Montana —156—I CHINOOK Training—the Key that Unlocks the Door of Success ! A THAI NED MIND IS TIIE BEST INSURANCE FOK FINANCIAL INDEPENDENCE A most cordial Invitation to enter our school is extended to all forward-looking young men and young women. The business world Is greatly in need of trained helpers — those whose basic educational preparation is broad enough to enable them to rise in the scale of service. DAY AND NIGHT SCHOOL IN SESSION THE ENTIRE YEAR REMEMBER THE BUTTE BUSINESS COLLEGE IS ONE OF THE LEADING COMMERCIAL TRAINING SCHOOLS OF THE ENTIRE NORTHWEST BUSINESS EDUCATION ADDS VALUE TO ALL OTHER EDUCATION Established 1890. Write for Catalogue. Owsley Block. Butte. Mont. Badly Bruised Boxer: "I can't ’ardly sec 'ini now. Second: “Never mind— it im from memory.” Mary Mullins: “Were those kids ever here before?” Annette Chellis: “No, they never escaped before.” Mr. Henry: “Mr. Kostka. answer this question.” Mr. Kostka: “A—A—ahem!—a—” Mary Mullins (aside): “Custer's last stand.” John Donaldson: “Did you hear about th© wooden wedding?” Adele Marclnkowski: “I’ll bite!" Donaldson: “Two Doles were married." Gift Novelties Attractive and Inexpensive Gifts for Graduation TattersalFs Variety Store —157— CHINOOK Dillon's Gifts that Last Sporting We invite your patronage for Fountain Pens, Ever- Goods Store sharps, M. S. N. C. Jewelry and Gift Goods. A complete line of all Standard Athletic Supplies We Test Eyes We Carry the Goods Hughes Huber Bros. Dillon, Mont. McCaleb Jewelers and Opticians Basket hall Trip fa Bulla i'oi One Night Only G. Goodman: “Won't you write to me while you are gone, dear?” K. Lang: "Yes, two or three letters at least!" Dart Hardware Implement Co. Dillon Montana STI DKBAKKK AM) STAR AUTOMOBILES Barry Hopkins GARAGE Dillon. Montana Edla Holbrook: “So. I didn’t see a soul coming over." Mr. Albright: "Don’t you know you can’t see a soul?” Lome Lauder: “She calls her sweeties ‘Jack Dempsey’!” Hugh Mosier: “Why?” Lauder: “Because, they never come back." Kay Lang (his sentiment suddenly cut short by an unexpected slip over the side of the hill): “For Heaven’s sake, Grace, give me your hand!” Grace Goodman (in total ignorance of his predicament): "Not 'til you’ve asked Pa. Kay.” 1928 —158— « CHINOOK, Complete Apparel for Every Occasion STYLES THAT ARE UP TO THE MINUTE Priced to Fit Your Pocketbook Largest Store, Most Complete Stocks in Southwestern Montana ELIEL’S Economy Through Quality Dillon Phone 91 Mont. —159—CHINOOK School Days Is your boys eyesigh t normal? Is your boy’s eyesight normal? Glasses mean increased efficiency and the saving of future vision. Have his eyes examined today. Dr. Carl B. Taylor Optometrist Standard Laim her and Coal Company Lumber and all kinds of Building Material, Lime, Cement and Plaster Dillon, Montana .New Menace to Health Aunt Prudence: “Keep away from the loud-speaker, Denny. The an- nouncer sounds as if he had a cold.” To You- You will be exquisitely pleased with our fine complete selection of Wrist Watches and Jewelry. Albert Stamm Jeweler Waterman-Parker, Conklin Pens If anyone wishes to know the easiest way to get kicked out of college, he might inquire of Kenneth Fowell who explained it quite definitely one day on the street to Mrs. Moe and Mrs. Davis, but he did not know it was Mrs. Davis. Gwen Evans: “I like a man with a past; he is always interesting.” Merry Moyle: “I like a man with a future; he is more interesting.” Bessie Cochrane: “I like a man with a present; the more expensive the present is. the more interest 1 take in it.” Mr. Cluley: “Do you have any trouble with ‘shall and ‘will’?” Mr. Albright: "No. My wife says 'You shall.’ and I say ‘I will’!” 1928 —160—CHINOOK The First National Bank We carefully guard the interests of our customers in every possible way. All business transactions in this bank are regarded as strictly confidential. Established 1884 Capital and Surplus $400,000.00 161—. CHINOOK COME TO THE Hartwig Theatre FOR THE BEST PHOTOPLAYS Matinee Saturday and Sunday You Can See a Complete Show Starting at 9:45 P. M. rntrl See America First Mr. Schleier: “How was the scenery on your trip?" Mr. Fairbanks: “It ran largely to tooth-paste and smoking tobacco.’ IF IT IS— Building Material Lumber and Coal —SEE— Beaverhead Lumber Co. Dillon, Montana—Better Material Cheaper—Dillon, Montana ----- ' 1928 x —162—CHINOOK TRIBUNE Visit Dillon’s Most Up-to-Date Market Book Store Headquarters for all kinds of Lunch Goods and Vegetables Students — A he ays Welecome Cash Meat 22 S. Montana St. Dillon, Montana Market Next to Post Office Mias Rohe: “What is a nocturne? If you were writing a nocturne, what sort of a piece would it be when you finished?” Julia Jackson: “It would be a funny kind of a piece if I wrote it.” Three Important Elements in Our Women’s Shoes— Style. Ease and Your Money’s Worth City Shoe Store H. SCHOENBORN. Prop. Order Your Dance Punch from Dillon Bottling Works OILMEN, MONTANA Gwen Mitchell: “Now I wonder whatever’s become of the girl who used to drop her eyes, raise her face timidly, and murmur, ‘You’ll have to ask Papa'?” Emily Sherman: “Oh, she’s got a daughter who shouts, ‘Shove her into high—the old man's gaining on us'!” Carl Baldwin: "Ho, Holly, how comest thou by thy faculty for Juggling?” George Hollingsworth: “Ho, thy- self. hast there not always been a jugular vein in my family?” Jerry Gass: "Did you fill your date last night?" Anthony Connelley: "I hope so. She ate everything in sight.” 1928 —163—■CHINOOK. Montana Auto The Best Supply Co. in drug store service and merchandise Dillon, Montana One of Montana’s Largest and Best Equipped Garages GEO. M. GOSMAN Chevrolet, Buick and Druggist Cadillac Automobiles The Rexall Store Miss Robe: “What is a rhapsody?” Lois Wagner: “In it you feel kind of light and airy. Little Girl (looking into music shop at bass viol and violin): "Oo, look, mother, the big fiddle’s got a baby!” Viola Martin: “About what is the population of this place?” Marcia Orr; “About the post-office.” Bill Dunn: “I’m glad I wasn’t born in Venice.” Ruff Dunn: “Why?” Bill Dunn: “Because I don’t know any Italian.” Sweet Young Thing: “Really good-looking boys are so scarce these days; I think I ought to make mine do another year.” Compliments of a Friend iCHINOOK McFadden’s Dillon’s Most Popular Ice Cream Parlor Candies—Ice Cream—Pastries—Hot Tamales—Lunches Mildred Carlson: “What's the matter, Floy?" Floy: “Some meat got into the empty place in my tooth.' Photographing OF ALL KINDS PORTRAIT, COMMERCIAL AND PANORAMIC (We photograph anything anywhere) Kring your Kodak film to us for the best finishing and quickest service Japanese - A merican Studio 1928 -165— CHiNOOK LEGGAT HOTEL FIREPROOF European Plan, Reasonable Rates, Clean, Comfortable, Safe Exceptionally Good Service ALEX. LEGGAT. Mgr. Butte Mont. we i rsrs . 33-33 37 Cast Pork St M O NT rXAf UT MEftt sTOrQ Mrs. Blue Heron was Riving a party. Mrs. Stork was supposed to sing but was forced to decline. Mrs. Stork: “I've got a frog in my throat.” WARD THOMPSON Paper Co. —“A Right Paper for Every Purpose” School Papers a Specialty The Chinook printed on Black and White Enamel 820-830 Utah Ave. Butte, Montana Happy Shy: “Where did Dot Grill get her new sweater?" Edith Tweedy: male, as usual." "Through the The Hostess: “You can’t imagine how had my husband’s eyesight is getting. Only yesterday he mistook me for the nursemaid.” A Guest: “And she’s such a pretty girl, too.” Morris Cole: “No, I can’t marry you, Meta, but come around, and I’ll introduce you to my twin.” -tl 1928 iti CHINOOK. A word of more than ordinary7 significance to the student is ECONOMY At this friendly community store lessons in genuine economy are expounded every clay of the year—your every dress need and desire has been anticipated with the earnest hope and endeavor to be of service to you. Montana’s largest and finest selected stocks of reasonable merchandise await you at Symons where Quality and Economy are inseparably associated. Symons Dry Goods Company 1928 —167— Butte, Montana Butte, Montanac CHINOOK. Our Selling Policy Is This: We hold no so-called sales of any kind nor dc we name comparative prices of any kind. Goods are always sold at the lowest possible prices consistent with prevailing market conditions, and when the price of some article is marked down to its replacement value, the former price is never mentioned. We aim to give the same fair, square treatment to you every day. Guy Lester: "I had a wonderful time at your party last night.” Barbara Blannin: "Why, I had no party last night!" Guy Lester: "That so? Well, be- lieve me. I was at somebody’s party last night." Margaret Jordan: "I think there is company downstairs.” Her Friend: "Why?" Margaret Jordan: "I just heard mama laugh at one of papa's Jokes.” Mr. Dougherty (in Botany class): "What is night?" Ruth Bergquist: “Night ' is the time when the plants don't get any sunlight.” Compliments °f Thos.E.Luebben Dillon, Montana Dillon Clinic Dr. M. A. Walker Dr. F. M. Poindexter Telephone Block Phone 21 1928 -168— I CHINOOK “There is a tide in the affairs of men which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.”—Shakespeare. The tide of opportunity is at the flood for young men and women now starting in the business life. Start by forming business-like habits. Intelligent saving leads to thrift and eventually leads to prosperity. A Savings Account should be started in a bank and into it should be put a definite portion of each month’s returns. It will work for you by drawing interest. Consult your banker in regard to savings and investment. He will be pleased to advise with you. This bank has served the public successfully for twenty-eight years. Its services are offered to you. The State Bank Trust Co. of Dillon A. L. STONE. President W. A. GRAETER. Cashier —169-I Interstate Building Loan Association Dillon, Montana OUR PLAN— This Association issues Investors’ Installment Shares at a guaranteed cost of $50.00, payable at 50 cen‘s per share per month for a period of 100 months. WE MARK MONTHLY INSTALLMENT LOANS ON IMPROVED (TTY PROPERTIES Kenneth Fowell: “I'm going to kiss you and kiss you and kiss y0ll Marian Benedict: “That would only be three times.” SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO AGENCY FOR Dodge Brothers Cars Machine Shop with Lathe, Press, Welding Plant— Large Stock of Tires, Motor Accessories, Parts, Battery Rental—Batteries in Stock—Batteries Charged. Red Star Garage W. E. LLOYD, Owner Taxi Service Phone 31402l 7? CHINOOK The Thomas Book Store Where Students Get Their Supplies Picture Framing Spalding Athletic Goods Miss Freeman: “May I borrow your compass?” Unfortunate Student: “Surely. Wliat are you going to do with it?” Miss Freeman: look neat." ‘I’m sending your grades home, and I want them to Dub: “I wish some college clothes.” Frog: “Athletic, humorous, or studious?" Irving Ady: “What are the races that have dominated England since the invasion of the Romans?” Small Boy: “The Derby and the Grand National, sir .” Tan Burks: “What’s the matter?" Dave Murray: “I washed a dirty piece of ice in hot water, and now I can't find it.” The Normal LUNCH BASKET mks. .ikssk orm School Supplies and Candies Lunch Goods and Ice Cream Across from the Campus ICE CREAM SOFT BRINKS CAN OIKS TERRY’S 1928 53? —171—CCHINOOK ______ “Faces fade, and the people we once knew, some of them, are gone forever. Children grow up and go away. The old house is torn down. The pots die or disappear. The time to take the picture is when you see t. The historic value of things, fixed in the form of a picture, is beyond price." —Elbert Hubbard. £?he Irairchild Studio CORLISS FAIRCHILD, Prop. Everything in the Photographic Line ‘Dillon, (Dontana » —172—f CHINOOK Dr. Best Dr.F.H.Bimrose Dentist Dentist Phones: Office, 363—Res., 334-W Phones: Office Hours, 9-12—1:30-5 Office 64, Res. 189-J Office over Suite 14 and 15 Telephone Waldorf Company Block, Dillon, Montana m All work and no play makes Jack, and lots of it. Guy Lester: “If I’m studying when you come in. wake me up.’ Dr. R. D. Curry Dentist Rooms Telephone Bldg. Phones: Office 335—Res. 54-W Author (at first performance of his play which is being booed by the house): “Good Heavens! I shall have to boo, to, or they'll find out that I wrote it!” Hen Crowley: "If you’ve spotted the man who stole our truck, why don't you get it back?" Ambrose Henneberry: “I'm wait- ing for him to put on a new set of tires.” Hugh Cole: “I used to be on my girl's mind all the time,—but—” Sverre Knudsen: "Hut what?” Hugh Cole: "Hut she changed her mind.” 1928 —173—CHINOOK Dr. A.. II. McFarland DR. W. J. Os tea pa thic Physician ROMERSA No. 12 Telephone Block Dentist Telephone 245 — Over Hughes McCaleb Dillon, Montana Phone 65-W Judge: “Why did you slick a knife in this man?’’ Prisoner: “Well, I heard the police coming, and I had to hide it somewhere.” Bill Chance: “Jerry Gass and Dot Grill are certainly dancing close together.” Wallace Forsgren: “Yeh. they’re having a heart-to-heart talk.” Helen A. Harkins (at training school): "What is this a picture of?” Small Tot: “That’s the Goddess of Liberty. You can always tell her ’cause she’s got an ice-cream cone in her hand.” Mother: “That’s a lazy son we’ve got! I told him to heat the magic carpet, and he’s bumping it back and forth into the minaret." E. G. Free B.Sc„ M.D. Physician and Surgeon Poindexter Block Baldwin Millinery Shop Cadet Hosiery with "Van Dyke” Heel and Toe “To Beautify the Ankle” —174— iCHI NOOK ji Dillon Steam Laundry At the End of Every Telephone 135-W City Drug Company For Cameras and Camera Supplies, Grafonolas and Latest Dance Records Make Our Store Your Store Helen McClean: “Name the largest known diamond.’ Frances Gula: “The Ace.” John Dover: "I don’t like heavy underwear; a suit of it made me get pneumonia once.” Lawrence Hinman: “Howzat?” John Dover: "I forgot to put it on.” Mr. Mackie: “What is the mean- ing of urbane?” Inola Watson: “It pertains to the country.” Sam Capplous; “Yes, the Moroni Olsen Players will Ik here in ’Lilies of the Valley’.” Burfiend Drug Co. 2 Doors North of Post Office - 1928 VCHINOOK. Your Education Is Not Complete Until You Learn How to Save Money We Offer Every Inducement Metals Bank Trust Go. OFFICERS CHARLES J. KELLY Chairman of the Board JAMES E. WOODWARD President JAMES T. FINLEN Vice-President R. W. PLACE Cashier J. L. TEAL Asst. Cashier J. J. BURKE Asst. Cashier Butte Established 1882 Montana DIRECTORS: JOHN D. RYAN CORNELIUS F. KELLEY THOMAS A. MARLOW CHARLES J. KELLY J. BRUCE KREMER HARRY L. GALLWEY L. O. EVANS JOHN E. CORETTE JAMES T. FINLEN J. R. HOBBINS Interest on Savings Accounts Member Federal Reserve System A class-room is like an old car—the crank in front and a bunch of nuts in the rear. Miss Kagon: "Does everyone write like that in your town? I can barely read It.” Miss Sprunger: "Dr. Davis made out our cards.” Albert Perry: "What’s this stuff?” Waiter: “Chili, sir.” Albert Perry: “Chilly the dick- ens! It nearly burned my tongue off!” Floy Kerr: “You’re turning Cath- olic. aren’t you?” Marie Kerr: “I’m not. I’m a Methodist!” Floy Kerr: "Hut you go to Mast every now and then!” Middleton Studio Photographs Tell the Story 206 W. Park St., Butte —176 CHINOOK £ Take Notice of this Advertisement It will help you to get acquainted with the best eating house in the City of Butte. We Specialize in Mexican Dishes and Fine Merchant Lunches Pay Us a Visit—You Will Be Pleased With Our Food and Service Open from 8:00 A. M. until 12:30 A. M. Truzzolino Chile Parlor 120 W. Park Butte, Montana WOMEN’S APPAREL “You Get the Nicest Things” at Weinberg’s Large Assortment—Exclusive Styles Weinberg’s FASHION SHOP 58 West Park St. Butte, Mont. Hi: "I sent a dollar to a firm for a cure for my horse that slobbers.” SI: “What did you get?” HI: “A slip of paper on which was written: ‘Teach him to spit’.” 1CHINOOK Established 1877 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUTTE. MONTANA Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits One Million Dollars ANDREW J. DAVIS. President J. E. STEPHEN SON. Vice-President GEORGE U. HILL, Cashier A. J. DAVIS. Jr., Asst. Cashier J. F. LOWNEY, Asst. Cashier "So you know Lindbergh personally?” "Oh, yes!” "Have you ever met him?” "Well, not exactly, but I was in St Louis once.' Dorrit Scott: “Can’t say I like it—you and I have the same name." Wallace Scott: “That’s all right, just as long as we don’t have the same face!" Ambrose Henneberry: “I heard of a man who was sentenced to ten years in the pen for stealing a kiss.” Marian Keane: "Oh. Pinky, kiss me as though you were going to be sentenced for life!” Mrs. Free (in library economy class): "I am giving you the book by a Mr. Paine; it is not the same Paine I gave you yesterday." Paxson Rockefeller Co. Druggists Kodaks, Perfumes, Fountain Pens. Complete line of Elizabeth Arden’s Toilet Goods Developing and Printing 24 W. Park (il E. Park Butte, Montana Rexall Store Mail Orders Filled 1928 —178—CHINOOK Sheets-Powell Jewelers 57 West Broadway Butte, Mont. “The Sign of Good Footwear” 17 No. Main, Butte, Mont. Butte Optical Co. BI TTK’S ORIGINAL OPTOMETRISTS Dr. J. L. Hannifin Dr. Wm. J. Sullivan Dr. T. I). Moran ARTIFICIAL EYES Father: "When George Washing- ton was your age. he was a surveyor.” Dub Emerson: "And when he was your age. he was president." Meriwyn McKinney: “Do you know the fourth commandment?” Alvina Lee: "‘Humor thy father and thy mother.’ isn’t it?” Alice Lillie: "Are you letting your hair grow?” Dorothy Lloyd: "It will anyway, so I might as well. Be Convinced—Not Persuaded “DICK” The Pioneer Permanent Waver Symons Hoiihcr Shop Phone 6000 For Appointments Tom Wyatt (writing home1: “How do you spell financially. Seley?” Seley Moore: "F-i-n-a-n-c-i-a-l-l-y —and there are two r’s in embarrassed.” Chet Taylor: "Are you running in the queen contest up here?” Margaret Riley: “No, I haven't got the right kind of shoes on." Our Stock Is of the Best Our Prices Are the Lowest Everything in the Jewelry Line Terms if Desired I. Simon (Simon’s for Diamonds) 21 N. Main St. Butte, Mont. « CHINOOK DICKE TS CASH STORE Quality Groceries for Less Klein Block East Glendale St. Phone 341 One Dozen South Idaho Julia Hoblitt: “Have you any green lip-stick?" Clerk: “Why do you want that?" Julia: “Well, a railroad man is calling on me tonight." Electrical Western Appliances Wholesale For the Home Grocery Co. The Electric Shop Wholesalers and Importers Buries Taylor of Staple and Fancy Gro- — ceries. Distributors of the Celebrated Del Monte Dillon, Mont. Canned Goods —180—C CHINOOK ________ orth a million.” t?’ Dot Tway: “She has more cases than a doctor.” Mary: "Well, I got another joke for the (’hinook. I wonder if I told it to you?” Dorrlt: “Is it funny?” Mary: “Sure it is.” Dorrit: “You haven’t told it to me then.” Alice Cline: “That girl tells the craziest stories." Bertha Thibadeau: "Why, she just has an unbalanced line.” Melba: “Say. what are your views on marriage?” Nichols: "I really think it’s too dangerous.” ks you!” ot the back entrance to a cafeteria. Quick Service New York Cafe Steaks and Chops All Kinds of Sandwiches Lunches Butte, Mont. EAT AT The Lockwood For Real Home Cooking 35 West Broadway Butte, Montana SHINER’S Butte Montana’s Greatest Furniture Store Select your furniture here —buy it through your Local Dealer Emma La Porte: "Hurrah, I’m w Frankie McCoy: “A million whai Emma LaPorte: "A million sucli Nay, nay, Eleanor, a bacteria is Kay Sullivan: “Has that girl an- other case?” —1S1—CHINOOK. CLARK PARK BUTTE The Finest Baseball and Football Field in Montana Columbia Gardens Butte’s Great Pleasure Resort and Picnic Grounds Butte Electric Railway Co Marion Benedict: "I wouldn’t like 10 be up there in that plane.’ Dorothy Voerge: “I wouldn’t like to be up there out of it!” “Toots" Flaherty: “You know that old vase you said had been handed down from generation to generation?” Mrs. Stephan (anxiously): “Yes." “Toots”: “Well, this generation has dropped it!” Carl Baldwin: “Anyone could tell by looking at you that your parents came from Ireland.” A. Murphy: "My parents did not come from Ireland.” Carl Baldwin: "Don’t try to kid me; your face shows that your parents came from Ireland.” A. Murphy: “They did not; they are in Ireland yet!” “Kip”: "Do you Rive me the gate?” "Chuck" Davis: you’ll take a fence.” suppose she’ll "If she does. MONTANA’S FAVORITE Blanchard Brand Delicious Ice Crea??i Sold exclusively in Dillon at the following places: Terry Browning’s Elliott's Cash Store Fred G. Lyon The Sugar Bowl Cafe T. E. Gray These dealers will supply you with bulk ice cream, pint and quart bricks; Dixie Cups and Eskimo Pies, for every day meals and parties. If you get BLANCHARD ICE CREAM you will be delightfully surprised. Henningsen Company 1928 —1S2——183—CHINOOK WHEN IN BUTTE Established 1887 Paumie Parisian Dye EAT AT House, Inc. Gamer s French Dyeing and Cleaning We Insure Our Customers’ (ioods No. 60 West Galena St. Confectionery Corner Dakota Phone 516 BUTTE. MONT. Trade at DREIBELBIS Mail Orders Filled Largest and Best Equipped Music Store in Montana Promptly 77 West Park St., Butte ‘Is your father very old?” •Just a little; his head Is just beginning to push through his hair.’ Jane: “What kind of gum are you chewing?” Jerry: "I never asked him—” Wyatt: “Now that we’re married, dear, we can stay with your folks for a while.” Marian: “Oh, we couldn’t do that.” Wyatt: “Why not?” Marian: “They're still staying with theirs!” Doctor: "H’m. I can't under- stand what causes your rapid pulse.” Ailing Burglar (feebly): “I ex- pect it’s the sight of that there gold watch, doctor.” Jones Storage Transfer Co. Fireproof Storage, Cartage Expert Packing, Shipping Phone 978 Warehouse Wyoming and Iron Sts., Phone 407 Butte, Montana 1928 —184-Shirley Clothes Shop Suits and Overcoats for Men and Young Men at Big Savings “FROM FACTORY TO YOU” SHIRLEY CLOTHES SHOP 14 North Main St. Brophy’s Gold Bar Canned Fruits and Vegetables Phone 1040 Butte, Montana “What Is strategy?” “Strategy Is when you are out of ammunition but fool the enemy by continuing to fire.” Doctor: “Has the patient been delirious, nurse?” Nurse: “Yes, doctor. When you went, he said, ‘Has that idiot gone?’ —and those were the last sensible words he said.” Pinky: “When you told Bill to stop kissing you. did he stop?" Nolle: “Oh, yes—every time.” Nelson: “If I stood on my head, all the blood would flow to it. now would it not?” Knudsen: “Yes." Nelson: “Then how is it that when I'm standing on my feet it doesn't rush down to them?” Knudsen: “Because your feet aren't empty.” So the absent-minded professor opened up his bed and jumped out the window. “Say It With Flowers” from Columbia Floral Company 47 W. Broadway Butte, Montana Phone 1923 A. C. Wilhelm N. F. Leonard We Telegraph Flowers Everywhere -185—McCracken Bros. The Men’s Store Society Brand and Clothcraft Clothes; Florsheim Shoes; Lanpher Hats and Caps; Wilson Bros.’ Furnishings. Everything in hoys’ apparel and ladies' Holeproof Hosiery. Try Our Tailor Shop The Camel Inn Dining Room Just Like Home 419 S. Dakota College Grill Mrs. ||. K. Olsen, Prop. Students' Lunches School Supplies Candies 6Zi Wife: “Do you know that you haven’t been home for four nights?” Absent-minded Professor: "Ye Gods! Where have I been going?” Martha Sallee: “Is this dance formal, or can I wear my own clothes?” Mrs. McBain: “Dear, would you like some waffles for supper?" Mr. McBain: “No! They look too much like fried crossword puzzles.” It is no longer a breach of grammar when a man gazes skyward and remarks "It looks like We.” Algy: “If you are a thought- reader, why do you read my hand instead of my mind?” Madame: "It’s so much easier; I can see at once that you have a hand.” George W. Lovell Hair Cutting Toilet Supplies 29 Bannack St.. Dillon. Montana Carl Baldwin: “Now I want to show you how to change gears.” Ruth Bergquist: “Oh. Carl, let’s not change them—they are just right as they are.” Jimmy Gass: "Could you learn to love me?" Lona Lee: “Well, I learned to speak Polish!" —187—CHINOOK Bond Grocery Elliot Cash Company Store Dealers in High-Class Student headquarters for Groceries all School Supplies, Lunch Goods, Ice Cream, Soft Ground Feed of All Kinds Drinks, Large Variety Candy Bars Toast and Coffee Nook The Place of Good Fellowship Across from the 12 E. Helena St., Phone 99 Campus Work never killed anyone, but Caesar died with ambition. George Hollingsworth: "The height of my ambition is to box matches. "Mary, dear, I shall never forget it. Your kindness to me through this trying illness will live in my memory forever. Why did you do it?” "Well, David, it would hardly do to be widowed with seven children at Christmas time.” United States, Seiberling, Goodyear Tires All Sizes Wallace Scott was invited to a golden wedding, and was told that each guest would be expected to bring a golden present. Scott took a goldfish! "Do you believe in the survival of the fittest?” “Naw, I don't believe in the survival of anybody. I’m an undertaker.” Beaverhead Motors Company Ford Sales and Service c 1928 -188-f CHINOOK g; 7? Dillon Furniture Company All Kinds of Furniture Kelvinators Baldwin Pianos Vacuum Cleaners and Easy Washers GROCERIES SQUARE DEAL CASH STORE Telephone 303 There are those who keep a secret—and those who keep it going! She sez: "I have no sympathy for a man who gets drunk every night!” He sez: “A man who gets drunk every night doesn’t need any sym- pathy!” Frank A. Hazelbaker Insurance—Real Estate Southern Montana Abstract Title Co. Abstracts 15 S. Idaho St. Phone 57 Dillon, Mont. Union Electric Company Heat Light Power Let Electricity I)o Your Cooking Ask About the Automatic Electric Range —1S9—CHINOOK AL. HULTMAN, Mgr. Phone 61 When in Butte Stop at The Old Chequamegon Cafe (Shay-W om-E-Gon) 27 N. Main St. Butte Hoenck's Fur Shop Repairing—Relining Remodeling Satisfaction Guaranteed Phone 803 for Storage 125 N. Main St. Butte Marie Nelson: "Is he dumb?” Frances McLaughlin: “lie’s so dumb he thinks that the St. Louis Cardinals are appointed by the Pope.” Professor McBain: "Why is it that Finland has a larger wooded area than other countries?" Mary Provo: “It may be covered with matches that won’t strike.” Fdduheth Fisher: "I hear that a biologist is producing flowers by electricity. Is that possible?” Elizabeth Woods: "Sure, aren’t flowers often grown from bulbs?" Elizabeth House: "So you im- agine you know as much as the professor. do you? How is that?” Martha Allen: "Well, he himself has said that it is quite impossible to teach me anything.” One: “How come the flowers?” Two: “They're for Joe. He fell asleep during an aeronautics exam.” Helen Scallon: "Say, will you come with me to the ironing-room?" Blanche Guillot: “Why?” Helen Scallon: "Oh, dear, I have a pressing engagement." MATRIX Shoes fcr Women fleautv is deftly fashioned into the Matrix Shoe that fits the bottom of the foot. And it needs no hrcaking-in — is comfortable from the very first step. HUBERT’S Shoes and Hosiery 51 West Park St. Butte, Montana 1928 —190CHINOOK Kodaks, Fountain Pens, Auto Pencils Fred P. Young Send Your Films to “At, Congratulates the Graduating Class of ’28 and Wishes Them Success in the Commencement of a the Expert” New Career We Assure You Good and Lasting Work Specialists Butte’s Busy Jeweler Main and Broadway Butte, Mont. 21 W. Park St. "Ive just found a rare nickel— advise me to do?" wo buffaloes on it. What would you “I’d lay it aside and look at it again when 1 was sober.” Father: “Isn't that young man rather fast?” Frances Bruyn: "Yes; but I don't think he'll get away.” Laveryne Brown: ‘‘What steps would you take if you saw a dangerous lion on the campus?" Carry Robertson: "Long ones!” "Hey, d’ya know Ida?" “Ida who?” “I dunuo." Caller (to Mr. Murray): "Is your boy industrious?” Mr. Murray (Dave’s father): “Not very. You see. I’m working his way through college.” The Montana Mercantile Co. The Home of QAULITY GROCERIES Fancy Lunch Goods a Specialty With UsCHINOOK Land Office Filings Proofs Oldest Set of Abstract Books in County Reliable Service in Land Matters BEAYERHEAD ABSTRACT CO Pearl I. Smith Title Building Dillon, Montana. Mr. Dougherty: beans, -peas, etc.?' Billy Kimball: Mr. Dougherty: ‘Why don't people in the United States use more dried ’Cause, there’s more here.” ‘Beans or people?” While in Dillon Stop at The HotelAndrus GRAETER Grocery Co. HARRY ANDRUS, Mgr. Retail Groceries Dillon’s Only Modern Hotel — European Plan Kitchen Hardware Rates: $1.50 to $2.50 Cafe and Dining Room in Connection with Hotel Dillon, Montana rT i ' 1928 "vv r ■wTO'Nlr ' y A


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University of Montana Western - Chinook Yearbook (Dillon, MT) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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University of Montana Western - Chinook Yearbook (Dillon, MT) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

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University of Montana Western - Chinook Yearbook (Dillon, MT) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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