St Johns College - Yearbook (Annapolis, MD)

 - Class of 1895

Page 16 of 42

 

St Johns College - Yearbook (Annapolis, MD) online yearbook collection, 1895 Edition, Page 16
Page 16



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217 sr. JOHN'S GOLLEGLAN. tivity of mind? This question is- soon answered. The mere considera-. . U POLITIQS' j tion of ,such a question is sufficient to make him revolt at the idea. The times are too advanced, inature too precious, to be lost on an untutored intellect, and immediately throwing aside those feelings which can have bitter fruit, he .preceives that there is indeed yet a goal to be reached worthy of his care and diligence. v The most 'prominent figure of speech in '4Locksley Halli' is the metaphor which is especially expressive in the lines, j "Foret'ook up the glass of Time, and turned it in his glowing hands, h Every moment, lightly shaken, ran itself in golden sands. We also see word-painting in the word "glowing,i' which, strained' from its ordinary rise, expresses the radiant bliss of true love. 1 Again, we notice how impressive the unfaithful-. ness of his betrothed is made byifirst telling of the happy season of court- ship, and then, in an exclamatory sentence, abruptly announcing her infidelity and his shattered hopes. Q Taking the poem as a whole, we may see points of similarity between it and "ln hl6l'l101'l5Ll'1l.,, Both eX- press change of thought or purpose by means of question and answer, both begin sorrowfully, and little by little light seems to dawn upon " the afliieted oneg and in both itis clearly indicated that sorrow should not be permitted to gain mastery over our better feelings, but that "Men should rise on stepping stones Of their dead selves, to higher things. C. T. F., '97, THE connnes MAN IN? CFrom a Socialistic Standpoinhj f I-We publish this solely for its merit.-7ED'.j 'The charge has frequently been made that the course of instruction in Economics and Social Science 'pur-' sued in our institutions of learning, has 'been ,mainly instrumental' in making the college bred man acreaf turejof monoply and blinding himpto the :deal welfare of his country 'and the toiling masses of his countrymen.. This charge is based upon valid rea- sons. If we carefully examine the views of men graduated for. years past at our colleges we will almost in- variably iind that they are firm ad- 'herents to the pernicious system of legislation which has been so' fruitful of millionaires and mortgages, and ground the struggling workingman to poverty and despair. J T . lt -would be impossible to form an adequate conception of the injury that has been worked by the dissemg ,ination of the doctrines originally taught in the class room. Many a -young man has had his natural no- tions of right and justice sadly dwarfed, his judgment stultiiied, by the 'vague and fallacious theories ad- vanced by that wildest of all theor- ists, the -professor of Economic Science. They have taken their places 'inthe world of affairs imbued with these 'flearnedv notions concerning finance and taxationg they have enter- ed the national halls of legislation and enacted laws in conformity with

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