Sarnia Collegiate Institute and Technical School - Collegiate Yearbook (Sarnia, Ontario Canada)

 - Class of 1946

Page 8 of 172

 

Sarnia Collegiate Institute and Technical School - Collegiate Yearbook (Sarnia, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 8 of 172
Page 8 of 172



Sarnia Collegiate Institute and Technical School - Collegiate Yearbook (Sarnia, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 7
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Sarnia Collegiate Institute and Technical School - Collegiate Yearbook (Sarnia, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 9
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Page 8 text:

THE COLLEGIATE 99 scnooi, oRcut2sTm ' Standing tlcft to right?-Miss Ramsden. Hill liruncr, H. Barnes, ll Yan .-Xlsyne, D. Guthrie, P. XYray, D. Eyre, T. Kenny, R, Gcere, Mr. Brush tionductorl. ' liront Row tlcft to right!-R. Allen, XY. Marshall. li. MacDonald: j. lftiwlev, lf. Young. Gray. a i W PERCUSSION IN THE Music 'WORLD HE MUSIC we hear today has a colourful past. XYhethcr you pat- ronize classical music, modern jazz, or both, makes no difference. Both forms go back to ooo A-XD. when an ambitious ltalian, intrigued by musical sounds, laboriously devised the music static and modern system of notation. Up until Guido d'.-Xrezzo came along there was no accurate method of transferring musical sounds to the written page. But long before d'Arezzo's time, even before the time of civilized man, savages in primeval forests had learned to utilize a crude form of music. That, of course, was percussion. By stretching the skins of animals across the open ends of hollow logs, it was possible to achieve a single tone musical effect. XYhen more than a single drum of this sort was used, there resulted a series of different tonesg and thus was the first music devised. Primitive people used the drum as a sort of communication. Probably one day when Mr. Cavemanf was far from home he must have accidentally knocked his club against a hollow log and was surprised when his spouse told him she had heard it from far off in their cave. From then on he hit the hol- log logs on purpose to notify Mom that he had been successful in a Dinosaur hunt and that Pop was bringing home the bacon ,for should I say Dinosaurb. At any rate, the drum was one of man's first inventions, and he used it to expect his moods, as a means of communication, and to entertain himself. Now, hundreds of years later, it is still being used in much the same way. Great composers have recognized the value of the drum in a sustaining mood. Berlioz, for example, scored parts for sixteen kettle drums and ten drummers in his "Requiem." . ' Man has used the drum in peace and war, in happiness and sorrow. The roll of drums has been used to pay tribute to a nation's heroes, and to dmm Russian Cossacks, riding at the French, beating on drums slung on either side

Page 7 text:

98 THE COLLEGIATE THE FGRGODTTIEN MAN HN MUSEC N THESE Clays when there are so many soloists on the radio, in concerts, and in motion pictures, most of us are so carried away by the ability of the individual artist. that we fail to notil:e the beautiful background being played by the orchestra. To the average listener this is the case, for after all, our whole attention is being appealed for by the soloist, vt bile the orchestra sits in the background and is there for the sole purpose of supporting the performer. However, this background is carefully prepared so that it will give the soloist the most support possible without detracting the listener from the rendition of he solo. Nl'ho then, is responsible for this accompaniment? It seems that many people are unaware of the number of men who spend years of work and study in developing an ability in this profession. These men are known as arrangers or orchestrators. They take the bare melody of a tune andi create from it the beautiful score which you hear. Only a person with an extensive knowledge of music and an abundance of originality can make a success of arranging. lt is especially difficult to get started in this line of work, because of the scarcity of good teachers and texts. First, one must acquire a thorough knowledge of harmony and coun- terpoint and familiarize himself with the instruments for which he is going to write. .Xfter he is enlightened upon these fundamentals, the aspiring or- chestrator puts himself to work, gaining experience by the trial and error method. .-Xt lirst he may have to follow examples of other men's work and, if he is fortunate, the student might be able to have his attempts criticized by someone who is already adept at this work. Even with this help, the man who wishes to be successful in this profession must keep working at it until he attains accuracy, originality, and speed. The arranger is constantly confronted with new problems. One phase of arranging is the work done in preparing background or "mood" music for moving pictures. I have often remarked how perfectly the music fits into the scenes of the picture, how there is just the right type of music in the right place. ln order to reach this state of perfection, the arranger has -the film shown to him. He notes the exact times at which important, events 'take place, the emotions displayed in them, and their duration. Then he is given .1 minimum of time in which to complete a suitable score, and must meet this deadline so that the picture can be shown at a planned premiere. However, this is not the best-known job of the orchestrator. His biggest job is in writing arrangements for conductors and soloists. In this work he tries to satisfy his clients and yet write the type of music which he himself enjoys most. Often arrangers become so tired of trying to satisfy the tastes of or- chestra leaders and soloists, that they organize their own orchestras so that they can have their own style of nicusie played in the way which they desire. The arranger always remains in the background. His work is not done on a brightly-lighted concert stage or in a gaily-decorated ballroom. He re- ceives few compliments from the listeners, and usually his name is not even known to them. So, the next time you are impressed by the music of a good musical organization or soloist, remember that the arranger contributes to this success, without making an appearance in the performance. -Bill XVilkinson, IZB. "Really," said Maxine Palmer to a fresh fellow, "You take your arm from around my waist or keep it still-l'm no ukulele.



Page 9 text:

I00 THE CoL1.EciATE of their horses helped to turn Napoleon back from Moscow. Down'through the centuriesf the drum, fiand related percussion instrumentsj has been im- proved until today it is common practise, in symphonies amd jazz combinations alike, for complex parts to be written for mem-bers of thel drum family, just as they are. A drummer must be versatile. His sense of rythm must be In the held of jazz music, especially, has percussion suddenly become a highly important, indispensable adjunct of a musical organization. Every great dance band in the world- uses drumsg and in virtually eveny instanjce, the most ofteni publicized is the drummer, and, therefore, the most often fea- tured memlber of each group. Drummers like Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich, and Dave Tough are not only excellent soloists but equally talented as "section menf' or ensemble drum- mers. lf they iveren't they'd be unkown rather than internationally noted as they are. A drummer must be versatile. His seense of rhythm must be perfect. lle must be proficient on the bass drum, struck by foot peclalg wood blocks: various cymbals: the snare drum, upon which he uses both sticks and wire brushes: cow bellsg whistlesg sock cymbals, also manipulated by foot pedal as well as by stick:1 and brushesg and any one of a dozen other implements including temple blocks, chimes, and in some cases, vibraharps. In all the world there is but one nation without drums, that nation is japan. All other nations have them and in most native areas it is the stan- dard musical instrument. And so the world of music rolls on with the per- cussion instruments providing the beat and rhythm. lil. V fN on Friend: XYhat will you do when you grow up to be a big woman like your mother? Small Daughter: Diet! wk Pk lk as llope: The doctor told a friend of mine that she mustn't neck. 'l'erais: Gosh, was she sick? Hope: No, she was the ClOClIO1'lS wife. af as as af Mitchell: lYhat shall we do this afternoon? Price: 1'll spin a coin. If it's heads we go to the show. If it's tails we go to Port Huron. lf it lands on edge we go to school. Robert Thompson on the way to school and nearly late, prayed, "Dear God, don't let me be late. Please don't let me be late. Then he happened to stumble and said: "you don'tl have to shove." Dk Pk is all "I ean't marry you,', said the justice of the peace. "A girl of seventeen must have her father's consent." "Consent I" yelled the would-be groom: "say, who do you think this old guy with the shotgun is-Daniel Boone?l'

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